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Sample records for adults starting antiretroviral

  1. When to Start Antiretroviral Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... away. What conditions increase the urgency to start ART? The following conditions increase the urgency to start ... risk of HIV transmission. Once a person starts ART, why is medication adherence important? ART is a ...

  2. Rising Obesity Prevalence and Weight Gain Among Adults Starting Antiretroviral Therapy in the United States and Canada

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, Cathy A.; Lau, Bryan; Shepherd, Bryan E.; Justice, Amy C.; Tate, Janet P.; Buchacz, Kate; Napravnik, Sonia; Mayor, Angel M.; Horberg, Michael A.; Blashill, Aaron J.; Willig, Amanda; Wester, C. William; Silverberg, Michael J.; Gill, John; Thorne, Jennifer E.; Klein, Marina; Eron, Joseph J.; Kitahata, Mari M.; Sterling, Timothy R.; Moore, Richard D.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The proportion of overweight and obese adults in the United States and Canada has increased over the past decade, but temporal trends in body mass index (BMI) and weight gain on antiretroviral therapy (ART) among HIV-infected adults have not been well characterized. We conducted a cohort study comparing HIV-infected adults in the North America AIDS Cohort Collaboration on Research and Design (NA-ACCORD) to United States National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) controls matched by sex, race, and age over the period 1998 to 2010. Multivariable linear regression assessed the relationship between BMI and year of ART initiation, adjusting for sex, race, age, and baseline CD4+ count. Temporal trends in weight on ART were assessed using a generalized least-squares model further adjusted for HIV-1 RNA and first ART regimen class. A total of 14,084 patients from 17 cohorts contributed data; 83% were male, 57% were nonwhite, and the median age was 40 years. Median BMI at ART initiation increased from 23.8 to 24.8 kg/m2 between 1998 and 2010 in NA-ACCORD, but the percentage of those obese (BMI ≥30 kg/m2) at ART initiation increased from 9% to 18%. After 3 years of ART, 22% of individuals with a normal BMI (18.5–24.9 kg/m2) at baseline had become overweight (BMI 25.0–29.9 kg/m2), and 18% of those overweight at baseline had become obese. HIV-infected white women had a higher BMI after 3 years of ART as compared to age-matched white women in NHANES (p = 0.02), while no difference in BMI after 3 years of ART was observed for HIV-infected men or non-white women compared to controls. The high prevalence of obesity we observed among ART-exposed HIV-infected adults in North America may contribute to health complications in the future. PMID:26352511

  3. First-line antiretroviral therapy durability in a 10-year cohort of naïve adults started on treatment in Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Castelnuovo, Barbara; Kiragga, Agnes; Mubiru, Frank; Kambugu, Andrew; Kamya, Moses; Reynolds, Steven J

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The majority of studies from resource-limited settings only report short-term virological outcomes of patients on antiretroviral treatment (ART). We aim to describe the long-term durability of first-line ART and identify factors associated with long-term virological outcomes. Methods At the Infectious Diseases Institute in Kampala, Uganda, 559 adult patients starting ART in 2004 were enrolled into a research cohort and monitored with viral load (VL) testing every six months for 10 years. We report the proportion and cumulative probability of 1) achieving virologic suppression (at least one VL <400 copies/ml); 2) experiencing virologic failure in patients who achieved suppression (two consecutive VLs >1000 copies/ml or one VL >5000, for those without a subsequent one); 3) treatment failure (not attaining virologic suppression or experiencing virologic failure). We used Cox regression methods to determine the characteristics associated with treatment failure. We included gender, baseline age, WHO stage, body mass index, CD4 count, propensity score for initial ART regimen, VL, time-dependent CD4 count and adherence. Results Of the 559 patients enrolled, 472 (84.8%) had at least one VL (67 died, 13 were lost to follow-up, 4 transferred, 2 had no VL available); 73.6% started on d4T/3TC/nevirapine and 26.4% on AZT/3TC/efavirenz. Patients in the two groups had similar characteristics, except for the higher proportion of patients in WHO Stage 3/4 and higher VL in the efavirenz-based group. Four hundred thirty-nine (93%) patients achieved virologic suppression with a cumulative probability of 0.94 (confidence interval (CI): 0.92–0.96); 74/439 (16.9%) experienced virologic failure with a cumulative probability of 0.18 (CI: 0.15–0.22). In the multivariate analysis, initial d4T/3TC/nevirapine regimen (hazard ratio (HR): 3.02; CI: 3.02 (1.66–5.44, p<0.001)) and baseline VL ≥5 log10 copies/ml (HR: 2.29; CI: 1.29–4.04) were associated with treatment

  4. Predicting virological decay in patients starting combination antiretroviral therapy

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Model trajectories of viral load measurements from time of starting combination antiretroviral therapy (cART), and use the model to predict whether patients will achieve suppressed viral load (≤200 copies/ml) within 6-months of starting cART. Design: Prospective cohort study including HIV-positive adults (UK Collaborative HIV Cohort Study). Methods: Eligible patients were antiretroviral naive and started cART after 1997. Random effects models were used to estimate viral load trends. Patients were randomly selected to form a validation dataset with those remaining used to fit the model. We evaluated predictions of suppression using indices of diagnostic test performance. Results: Of 9562 eligible patients 6435 were used to fit the model and 3127 for validation. Mean log10 viral load trajectories declined rapidly during the first 2 weeks post-cART, moderately between 2 weeks and 3 months, and more slowly thereafter. Higher pretreatment viral load predicted steeper declines, whereas older age, white ethnicity, and boosted protease inhibitor/non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors based cART-regimen predicted a steeper decline from 3 months onwards. Specificity of predictions and the diagnostic odds ratio substantially improved when predictions were based on viral load measurements up to the 4-month visit compared with the 2 or 3-month visits. Diagnostic performance improved when suppression was defined by two consecutive suppressed viral loads compared with one. Conclusions: Viral load measurements can be used to predict if a patient will be suppressed by 6-month post-cART. Graphical presentations of this information could help clinicians decide the optimum time to switch treatment regimen during the first months of cART. PMID:27124894

  5. Central Nervous System Strongyloidiasis and Cryptococcosis in an HIV-Infected Patient Starting Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez, Mónica; Flores, Paúl; Ahumada, Víctor; Vázquez-Vázquez, Lorena; Alvarado-de la Barrera, Claudia; Reyes-Terán, Gustavo

    2012-01-01

    We report a case of Strongyloides stercoralis hyperinfection syndrome with central nervous system involvement, in a patient with late human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection starting antiretroviral therapy, in whom Strongyloides stercoralis larvae and Cryptococcus neoformans were isolated antemortem from cerebrospinal fluid. Our patient was not from an endemic region for the parasite, so strongyloidiasis was not originally suspected. For this reason, we conclude that Strongyloides stercoralis infection should be suspected in HIV-infected patients starting antiretroviral therapy in order to avoid potential fatal outcomes. PMID:22924046

  6. When to Start Antiretroviral Therapy in Resource-limited Settings

    PubMed Central

    Walensky, Rochelle P.; Wolf, Lindsey L.; Wood, Robin; Fofana, Mariam O.; Freedberg, Kenneth A.; Martinson, Neil A.; Paltiel, A. David; Anglaret, Xavier; Weinstein, Milton C.; Losina, Elena

    2011-01-01

    Background Results of international clinical trials assessing when to initiate antiretroviral therapy (ART) will not be available for several years. Objective To inform HIV treatment decisions over the short- and long-term regarding the optimal CD4 threshold at which to initiate ART in South Africa, while awaiting “when to start” trial results. Design Cost-effectiveness analysis using a computer simulation model of HIV disease. Data Sources Published data from randomized trials and observational cohorts in South Africa. Target Population HIV-infected patients in South Africa. Time Horizon Five-year and lifetime. Perspective Modified societal. Interventions No treatment, initiate ART at CD4<250/μl, and initiate ART at CD4<350/μl. Outcome Measures Morbidity, mortality, life expectancy, medical costs, and cost-effectiveness. Results of Base-Case Analysis If 10-100% of HIV-infected patients are diagnosed and linked to care, initiating ART at CD4<350/μl would reduce severe opportunistic diseases by 22,000-221,000 and deaths by 25,000-253,000 during the next 5 years, compared to initiating ART at CD4<250/μl; cost increases would range from $142 million (10%) to $1.4 billion (100%). Either ART strategy increased long-term survival by at least 7.9 years, with a mean per person life expectancy of 3.8 years for no ART and 12.5 years for ART at <350/μl. Compared to initiating ART at <250/μl, initiating ART at <350/μl had an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of $1,200/year of life saved. Results of Sensitivity Analysis Initiating ART at CD4<350/μl remained cost-effective over the next 5 years even if the probability that the trial would demonstrate superiority to earlier therapy is as low as 17%. Limitations This model does not consider the possible benefits of ART initiation at CD4>350/μl nor reduced HIV transmission. Conclusions Earlier ART initiation in South Africa will likely reduce morbidity and mortality, improve long-term survival, and be very cost

  7. HIV, antiretroviral treatment, hypertension, and stroke in Malawian adults

    PubMed Central

    Corbett, Elizabeth L.; Connor, Myles D.; Mzinganjira, Henry; Kampondeni, Sam; Choko, Augustine; Hopkins, Mark; Emsley, Hedley C.A.; Bryer, Alan; Faragher, Brian; Heyderman, Robert S.; Allain, Theresa J.; Solomon, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To investigate HIV, its treatment, and hypertension as stroke risk factors in Malawian adults. Methods: We performed a case-control study of 222 adults with acute stroke, confirmed by MRI in 86%, and 503 population controls, frequency-matched for age, sex, and place of residence, using Global Positioning System for random selection. Multivariate logistic regression models were used for case-control comparisons. Results: HIV infection (population attributable fraction [PAF] 15%) and hypertension (PAF 46%) were strongly linked to stroke. HIV was the predominant risk factor for young stroke (≤45 years), with a prevalence of 67% and an adjusted odds ratio (aOR) (95% confidence interval) of 5.57 (2.43–12.8) (PAF 42%). There was an increased risk of a stroke in patients with untreated HIV infection (aOR 4.48 [2.44–8.24], p < 0.001), but the highest risk was in the first 6 months after starting antiretroviral therapy (ART) (aOR 15.6 [4.21–46.6], p < 0.001); this group had a lower median CD4+ T-lymphocyte count (92 vs 375 cells/mm3, p = 0.004). In older participants (HIV prevalence 17%), HIV was associated with stroke, but with a lower PAF than hypertension (5% vs 68%). There was no interaction between HIV and hypertension on stroke risk. Conclusions: In a population with high HIV prevalence, where stroke incidence is increasing, we have shown that HIV is an important risk factor. Early ART use in immunosuppressed patients poses an additional and potentially treatable stroke risk. Immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome may be contributing to the disease mechanisms. PMID:26683649

  8. Acne vulgaris and acne rosacea as part of immune reconstitution disease in HIV-1 infected patients starting antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Scott, Christopher; Staughton, Richard C D; Bunker, Christopher J; Asboe, David

    2008-07-01

    Immune reconstitution disease (IRD) has been widely reported following the commencement of antiretrovirals. We report a case series from a cohort of HIV-1-infected patients of whom four developed acne vulgaris and one developed acne rosacea after the initiation of antiretroviral therapy. Acne vulgaris, as part of IRD, has been reported only once in the literature, whereas acne rosacea has not, to our knowledge, previously been described. This serves as a reminder not to overlook dermatological manifestations of disease in patients with HIV infection after starting antiretrovirals.

  9. Cause-Specific Mortality in HIV-Positive Patients Who Survived Ten Years after Starting Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    May, Margaret T.; Vehreschild, Janne; Obel, Niels; Gill, Michael John; Crane, Heidi; Boesecke, Christoph; Samji, Hasina; Grabar, Sophie; Cazanave, Charles; Cavassini, Matthias; Shepherd, Leah; d’Arminio Monforte, Antonella; Smit, Colette; Saag, Michael; Lampe, Fiona; Hernando, Vicky; Montero, Marta; Zangerle, Robert; Justice, Amy C.; Sterling, Timothy; Miro, Jose; Ingle, Suzanne; Sterne, Jonathan A. C.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To estimate mortality rates and prognostic factors in HIV-positive patients who started combination antiretroviral therapy between 1996–1999 and survived for more than ten years. Methods We used data from 18 European and North American HIV cohort studies contributing to the Antiretroviral Therapy Cohort Collaboration. We followed up patients from ten years after start of combination antiretroviral therapy. We estimated overall and cause-specific mortality rate ratios for age, sex, transmission through injection drug use, AIDS, CD4 count and HIV-1 RNA. Results During 50,593 person years 656/13,011 (5%) patients died. Older age, male sex, injecting drug use transmission, AIDS, and low CD4 count and detectable viral replication ten years after starting combination antiretroviral therapy were associated with higher subsequent mortality. CD4 count at ART start did not predict mortality in models adjusted for patient characteristics ten years after start of antiretroviral therapy. The most frequent causes of death (among 340 classified) were non-AIDS cancer, AIDS, cardiovascular, and liver-related disease. Older age was strongly associated with cardiovascular mortality, injecting drug use transmission with non-AIDS infection and liver-related mortality, and low CD4 and detectable viral replication ten years after starting antiretroviral therapy with AIDS mortality. Five-year mortality risk was <5% in 60% of all patients, and in 30% of those aged over 60 years. Conclusions Viral replication, lower CD4 count, prior AIDS, and transmission via injecting drug use continue to predict higher all-cause and AIDS-related mortality in patients treated with combination antiretroviral therapy for over a decade. Deaths from AIDS and non-AIDS infection are less frequent than deaths from other non-AIDS causes. PMID:27525413

  10. Antiretroviral Drugs for Treatment and Prevention of HIV Infection in Adults

    PubMed Central

    Günthard, Huldrych F.; Saag, Michael S.; Benson, Constance A.; del Rio, Carlos; Eron, Joseph J.; Gallant, Joel E.; Hoy, Jennifer F.; Mugavero, Michael J.; Sax, Paul E.; Thompson, Melanie A.; Gandhi, Rajesh T.; Landovitz, Raphael J.; Smith, Davey M.; Jacobsen, Donna M.; Volberding, Paul A.

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE New data and therapeutic options warrant updated recommendations for the use of antiretroviral drugs (ARVs) to treat or to prevent HIV infection in adults. OBJECTIVE To provide updated recommendations for the use of antiretroviral therapy in adults (aged ≥18 years) with established HIV infection, including when to start treatment, initial regimens, and changing regimens, along with recommendations for using ARVs for preventing HIV among those at risk, including preexposure and postexposure prophylaxis. EVIDENCE REVIEW A panel of experts in HIV research and patient care convened by the International Antiviral Society-USA reviewed data published in peer-reviewed journals, presented by regulatory agencies, or presented as conference abstracts at peer-reviewed scientific conferences since the 2014 report, for new data or evidence that would change previous recommendations or their ratings. Comprehensive literature searches were conducted in the PubMed and EMBASE databases through April 2016. Recommendations were by consensus, and each recommendation was rated by strength and quality of the evidence. FINDINGS Newer data support the widely accepted recommendation that antiretroviral therapy should be started in all individuals with HIV infection with detectable viremia regardless of CD4 cell count. Recommended optimal initial regimens for most patients are 2 nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) plus an integrase strand transfer inhibitor (InSTI). Other effective regimens include nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors or boosted protease inhibitors with 2 NRTIs. Recommendations for special populations and in the settings of opportunistic infections and concomitant conditions are provided. Reasons for switching therapy include convenience, tolerability, simplification, anticipation of potential new drug interactions, pregnancy or plans for pregnancy, elimination of food restrictions, virologic failure, or drug toxicities. Laboratory

  11. Effects of nutritional supplementation for HIV patients starting antiretroviral treatment: randomised controlled trial in Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Abdissa, Alemseged; Kæstel, Pernille; Tesfaye, Markos; Yilma, Daniel; Girma, Tsinuel; Wells, Jonathan C K; Ritz, Christian; Mølgaard, Christian; Michaelsen, Kim F; Zerfu, Dilnesaw; Brage, Søren; Andersen, Åse B; Friis, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To determine the effects of lipid based nutritional supplements with either whey or soy protein in patients with HIV during the first three months of antiretroviral treatment (ART) and to explore effects of timing by comparing supplementation at the start of ART and after three months delay. Design Randomised controlled trial. Setting Three public ART facilities in Jimma, Oromia region, Ethiopia. Participants Adults with HIV eligible for ART with body mass index (BMI) >16. Intervention Daily supplementation with 200 g (4600 kJ) of supplement containing whey or soy during either the first three or the subsequent three months of ART. Outcome measures Primary: lean body mass assessed with deuterium dilution, grip strength measured with dynamometers, and physical activity measured with accelerometer and heart rate monitors. Secondary: viral load and CD4 counts. Auxiliary: weight and CD3 and CD8 counts. Results Of 318 patients enrolled, 210 (66%) were women, mean age was 33 (SD 9), and mean BMI was 19.5 (SD 2.4). At three months, participants receiving the supplements containing whey or soy had increased their lean body mass by 0.85 kg (95% confidence interval 0.16 kg to 1.53 kg) and 0.97 kg (0.29 kg to 1.64 kg), respectively, more than controls. This was accompanied by an increased gain of grip strength of 0.68 kg (−0.11 kg to 1.46 kg) for the whey supplement group and 0.93 kg (0.16 kg to 1.70 kg) for the soy supplement group. There were no effects on physical activity. Total weight gain increased by 2.05 kg (1.12 kg to 2.99 kg) and 2.06 kg (1.14 kg to 2.97 kg) for the whey and soy groups, respectively. In addition, in the whey supplement group overall CD3 counts improved by 150 cells/µL (24 to 275 cells/µL), of which 112 cells/µL (15 to 209 cells/µL) were CD8 and 25 cells/µL (−2 to 53 cells/µL) were CD4. Effects of the soy containing supplement on immune recovery were not significant. The effects of the two supplements, however, were not

  12. Obesity Trends and Body Mass Index Changes After Starting Antiretroviral Treatment: The Swiss HIV Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Hasse, Barbara; Iff, Martin; Ledergerber, Bruno; Calmy, Alexandra; Schmid, Patrick; Hauser, Christoph; Cavassini, Matthias; Bernasconi, Enos; Marzolini, Catia; Tarr, Philip E.; Aubert, V.; Barth, J.; Battegay, M.; Bernasconi, E.; Böni, J.; Bucher, H.C.; Burton-Jeangros, C.; Calmy, A.; Cavassini, M.; Egger, M.; Elzi, L.; Fehr, J.; Fellay, J.; Furrer, H.; Fux, C.A.; Gorgievski, M.; Günthard, H.; Haerry, D.; Hasse, B.; Hirsch, H.H.; Hösli, I.; Kahlert, C.; Kaiser, L.; Keiser, O.; Klimkait, T.; Kouyos, R.; Kovari, H.; Ledergerber, B.; Martinetti, G.; Martinez de Tejada, B.; Metzner, K.; Müller, N.; Nadal, D.; Pantaleo, G.; Rauch, A.; Regenass, S.; Rickenbach, M.; Rudin, C.; Schöni-Affolter, F.; Schmid, P.; Schultze, D.; Schüpbach, J.; Speck, R.; Staehelin, C.; Tarr, P.; Telenti, A.; Trkola, A.; Vernazza, P.; Weber, R.; Yerly, S.

    2014-01-01

    Background  The factors that contribute to increasing obesity rates in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive persons and to body mass index (BMI) increase that typically occurs after starting antiretroviral therapy (ART) are incompletely characterized. Methods  We describe BMI trends in the entire Swiss HIV Cohort Study (SHCS) population and investigate the effects of demographics, HIV-related factors, and ART on BMI change in participants with data available before and 4 years after first starting ART. Results  In the SHCS, overweight/obesity prevalence increased from 13% in 1990 (n = 1641) to 38% in 2012 (n = 8150). In the participants starting ART (n = 1601), mean BMI increase was 0.92 kg/m2 per year (95% confidence interval, .83–1.0) during year 0–1 and 0.31 kg/m2 per year (0.29–0.34) during years 1–4. In multivariable analyses, annualized BMI change during year 0–1 was associated with older age (0.15 [0.06–0.24] kg/m2) and CD4 nadir <199 cells/µL compared to nadir >350 (P < .001). Annualized BMI change during years 1–4 was associated with CD4 nadir <100 cells/µL compared to nadir >350 (P = .001) and black compared to white ethnicity (0.28 [0.16–0.37] kg/m2). Individual ART combinations differed little in their contribution to BMI change. Conclusions  Increasing obesity rates in the SHCS over time occurred at the same time as aging of the SHCS population, demographic changes, earlier ART start, and increasingly widespread ART coverage. Body mass index increase after ART start was typically biphasic, the BMI increase in year 0–1 being as large as the increase in years 1–4 combined. The effect of ART regimen on BMI change was limited. PMID:25734114

  13. Rash and hepatitis within days of starting a new antiretroviral regimen: nevirapine hypersensitivity, secondary syphilis or both?

    PubMed

    Saxon, Cara J; Helbert, Matthew R; Komolafe, Adeniyi J; Higgins, Stephen P

    2014-03-01

    We report a case in which an HIV-positive man developed general malaise, skin rash and biochemical hepatitis within days of starting a nevirapine-based antiretroviral treatment regimen. At the same time, his syphilis serology proved positive. We discuss the diagnostic dilemma: was this a nevirapine hypersensitivity reaction, secondary syphilis or both?

  14. Outcomes of infants starting antiretroviral therapy in Southern Africa, 2004-2012

    PubMed Central

    Porter, Mireille; Davies, Mary-Ann; Mapani, Muntanga K.; Rabie, Helena; Phiri, Sam; Nuttall, James; Fairlie, Lee; Technau, Karl-Günter; Stinson, Kathryn; Wood, Robin; Wellington, Maureen; Haas, Andreas D.; Giddy, Janet; Tanser, Frank; Eley, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Background There is limited published data on the outcomes of infants starting antiretroviral therapy (ART) in routine care in Southern Africa. This study aimed to examine the baseline characteristics and outcomes of infants initiating ART. Methods We analysed prospectively collected cohort data from routine ART initiation in infants from 11 cohorts contributing to the International Epidemiologic Database to Evaluate AIDS in Southern Africa. We included ART naïve HIV-infected infants <12 months of age initiating ≥ three antiretroviral drugs between 2004 and 2012. Kaplan-Meier estimates were calculated for mortality, loss to follow-up (LTFU), transfer out and virological suppression. We used Cox Proportional Hazards models stratified by cohort to determine baseline characteristics associated with outcomes mortality and virological suppression. Results The median (interquartile range) age at ART initiation of 4945 infants was 5.9 months (3.7-8.7) with follow-up of 11.2 months (2.8-20.0). At ART initiation 77% had WHO clinical stage 3 or 4 disease and 87% were severely immunosuppressed. Three-year mortality probability was 16% and LTFU 29%. Severe immunosuppression, WHO stage 3 or 4, anaemia, being severely underweight and initiation of treatment before 2010 were associated with higher mortality. At 12 months after ART initiation 17% of infants were severely immunosuppressed and the probability of attaining virological suppression was 56%. Conclusion Most infants initiating ART in Southern Africa had severe disease with high probability of LTFU and mortality on ART. Although the majority of infants remaining in care showed immune recovery and virological suppression, these responses were suboptimal. PMID:26167620

  15. Immunodeficiency at the start of combination antiretroviral therapy in low-, middle- and high-income countries

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To describe the CD4 cell count at the start of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) in low-income (LIC), lower middle-income (LMIC), upper middle-income (UMIC) and high-income (HIC) countries. Methods Patients aged ≥16 years starting cART in a clinic participating in a multi-cohort collaboration spanning six continents (International epidemiological Databases to Evaluate AIDS and ART Cohort Collaboration) were eligible. Multi-level linear regression models were adjusted for age, gender and calendar year; missing CD4 counts were imputed. Findings 379,865 patients from nine LIC, four LMIC, four UMIC and six HIC were included. In LIC the median CD4 cell count at cART initiation increased by 83% from 80 to 145 cells/μl between 2002 and 2009. Corresponding increases in LMIC, UMIC and HIC were from 87 to 155 cells/μl (76% increase), 88 to 135 cells/μl (53%) and 209 to 274 cells/μl (31%). In 2009, compared to LIC, median counts were 13 cells/μl (95% CI -56 to +30) lower in LMIC, 22 cells/μl (-62 to +18) lower in UMIC and 112 /μl (+75 to +149) higher in HIC. They were 23 cells/μl (95% CI +18 to +28) higher in women than men. Median counts were 88 cells/μl (95% CI +35 to +141) higher in countries with an estimated national cART coverage >80%, compared to countries with <40% coverage. Conclusions Median CD4 cell counts at start of cART increased 2000-2009 but remained below 200 cells/μl in LIC and MIC and below 300 cells/μl in HIC. Earlier start of cART will require substantial efforts and resources globally. PMID:24419071

  16. Immunologic Risk Factors for Early Mortality After Starting Antiretroviral Therapy in HIV-Infected Zambian Children

    PubMed Central

    Rainwater-Lovett, Kaitlin; Nkamba, Hope C.; Mubiana-Mbewe, Mwangelwa; Moore, Carolyn Bolton

    2013-01-01

    Abstract To explore immunologic risk factors for death within 90 days of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) initiation, CD4+ and CD8+ T cell subsets were measured by flow cytometry and characterized by logistic regression in 149 Zambian children between 9 months and 10 years of age enrolled in a prospective, observational study of the impact of HAART on measles immunity. Of 21 children who died during follow-up, 17 (81%) had known dates of death and 16 (76%) died within 90 days of initiating HAART. Young age and low weight-for-age z-scores were associated with increased risks of mortality within 90 days of starting HAART, whereas CD4+ T cell percentage was not associated with mortality. After adjusting for these factors, each 10% increase in CD8+ effector T cells increased the odds of overall mortality [OR=1.43 (95% CI: 1.08, 1.90)] and was marginally associated with early mortality [OR=1.29 (95% CI: 0.97, 1.72)]. Conversely, each 10% increase in CD4+ central memory T cells decreased the odds of overall [OR=0.06 (95% CI: 0.01, 0.59)] and early mortality [OR=0.09 (95% CI: 0.01, 0.97)]. Logistic regression prediction models demonstrated areas under the receiver-operator characteristic curves of ≥85% for early and overall mortality, with bootstrapped sensitivities of 82–85% upon validation, supporting the predictive accuracy of the models. CD4+ and CD8+ T cell subsets may be more accurate predictors of early mortality than CD4+ T cell percentages and could be used to identify children who would benefit from more frequent clinical monitoring after initiating HAART. PMID:23025633

  17. Incidence of Severe Neutropenia in HIV-Infected People Starting Antiretroviral Therapy in West Africa

    PubMed Central

    Leroi, Charline; Balestre, Eric; Messou, Eugene; Minga, Albert; Sawadogo, Adrien; Drabo, Joseph; Maiga, Moussa; Zannou, Marcel; Seydi, Moussa; Dabis, Francois; Jaquet, Antoine

    2017-01-01

    Background In sub-Saharan Africa, antiretroviral therapy (ART) including drugs with potential toxicity such as Zidovudine (ZDV) are routinely prescribed. This study aimed at estimating the incidence of severe neutropenia and associated factors after ART initiation in five West African countries. Methods A retrospective cohort analysis was conducted within the international epidemiologic database to evaluate AIDS (IeDEA) collaboration in West Africa. All HIV-infected adults, initiating ART between 2002 and 2014, with a baseline and at least one follow-up absolute neutrophil count (ANC) measurement were eligible. Incidence of severe neutropenia (ANC <750 cells/mm3) was estimated with 95% confidence interval (CI) according to age, gender, HIV clinic, hemoglobin, CD4 count, clinical stage, and ART duration. A Cox proportional hazard model was used to identify factors associated with severe neutropenia, expressed with their adjusted hazard ratios (aHR). Results Between 2002 and 2014, 9,426 HIV-infected adults were enrolled. The crude incidence rate of a first severe neutropenia was 9.1 per 100 person-years (95% CI: 8.6–9.8). Factors associated with severe neutropenia were exposure to ZDV <6 months (aHR = 2.2; 95% CI: 1.8–2.6), ≥6–12 months (aHR = 2.1; 95% CI: 1.6–2.8) and ≥12 months (aHR = 1.6; 95% CI: 1.2–2.2) [Ref. no ZDV exposure], CD4 count <350 cells/mm3 (aHR = 1.3; 95% CI: 1.1–1.5) and advanced clinical stage at ART initiation (aHR = 1.2; 95% CI: 1.0–1.4). Conclusion The incidence of severe neutropenia after ART initiation in West Africa is high and associated with ZDV exposure and advanced HIV disease. In this context, efforts are needed to scale-up access to less toxic first-line ART drugs and to promote early ART initiation. PMID:28122041

  18. START or SMART? Timing of Antiretroviral Therapy Initiation and Cardiovascular Risk for People With Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Siedner, Mark J.

    2016-01-01

    The Initiation of Antiretroviral Therapy in Early Asymptomatic HIV Infection (START) study has reinforced the benefits of early initiation of antiretroviral therapy (ART). However, a notable secondary finding from that study was that immediate initiation of ART did not prevent cardiovascular disease (CVD) events (0.17 vs 0.20 events/1000 person-years, P = .65). This result appears to contradict a body of evidence, most notably from the Strategies for Management of Antiretroviral Therapy (SMART) study, which reported a 70% increased hazard of cardiovascular events for those deferring or interrupting treatment. Thus, an important unresolved question is whether the timing of ART impacts CVD risk. In this review, published data on relationships between timing of ART and CVD risk are reviewed. The data support a role for ART in mitigating CVD risk at lower CD4 counts, but data also suggests that, among those initiating therapy early, ART alone appears to suboptimally mitigate CVD risk. Additional interventions to address CVD risk among human immunodeficiency virus-infected populations are likely to be needed. PMID:26989755

  19. Lipoprotein Changes in HIV-Infected Antiretroviral-Naïve Individuals after Starting Antiretroviral Therapy: ACTG Study A5152s Stein: Lipoprotein Changes on Antiretroviral Therapy.

    PubMed

    Stein, James H; Komarow, Lauren; Cotter, Bruno R; Currier, Judith S; Dubé, Michael P; Fichtenbaum, Carl J; Gerschenson, Mariana; Mitchell, Carol K C; Murphy, Robert L; Squires, Kathleen; Parker, Robert A; Torriani, Francesca J

    2008-12-01

    BACKGROUND: Dyslipidemia is a frequent complication of antiretroviral therapy (ART) for patients with human immunodeficiency virus infection (HIV). The effects of ART on lipoproteins are less well-understood, and have not been investigated in a prospective study where assignment to ART is randomized. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effects of three class-sparing ART regimens on lipids and lipoproteins. METHODS: This was a substudy of a prospective, multicenter study treatment-naïve HIV-infected individuals randomly assigned to receive a regimen of nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) + the non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor efavirenz, NRTIs + the protease inhibitor lopinavir/ritonavir, or a NRTI-sparing regimen of efavirenz + lopinavir/ritonavir. Lipoproteins were measured by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. RESULTS: Among the 82 participants, total and small low-density lipoprotein concentrations increased (median, interquartile range) by 152 (-49 - +407, p<0.01) and 130 (-98 - +417, p<0.01) nmol/L, respectively, especially in the arms containing lopinavir/ritonavir (p(KW)<0.04). Very low-density lipoproteins also increased (p<0.01), with a larger increase in the arms that contained lopinavir/ritonavir (p=0.022). High-density lipoproteins increased by 6.0 nmol/L (2.8 - 10.4, p<0.01), but differences between arms were not significant (p(KW)=0.069). Changes were not related to changes in markers of insulin/glucose metabolism. CONCLUSIONS: Total and small low-density lipoprotein concentrations increased, especially in the arms containing lopinavir/ritonavir, as did increases in total very low-density lipoproteins. Adverse changes were especially prominent in the arm with efavirenz + lopinavir/ritonavir.

  20. Unmasking histoplasmosis immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome in a patient recently started on antiretroviral therapy

    PubMed Central

    Nabeta, Henry W; Okia, Richard; Rhein, Joshua; Lukande, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Histoplasmosis is the most common endemic mycoses among HIV-infected people. Patients with suppressed cell immunity mainly due to HIV are at increased risk of disseminated disease. Dermatological manifestations of immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS) and cutaneous manifestations of histoplasmosis similar to an IRIS event have been previously described. We report the case of a 43-year-old male who presented with cutaneous disseminated histoplasmosis due to Histoplasma capsulatum var. capsulatum 4 months after the onset of the antiretroviral therapy and some improvement in the immune reconstitution. After 2 weeks of amphotericin B and itraconazole therapy, the scheduled treatment involved fluconazole maintenance therapy, which resulted in an improvement of his skin lesions. PMID:28210571

  1. Unhealthy Alcohol Use is Associated with Monocyte Activation Prior to Starting Anti-Retroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Carrico, Adam W.; Hunt, Peter W.; Emenyonu, Nneka I.; Muyindike, Winnie; Ngabirano, Christine; Cheng, Debbie M.; Winter, Michael R.; Samet, Jeffrey H.; Hahn, Judith A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Alcohol use may accelerate HIV disease progression, but the plausible biological mechanisms have not been clearly elucidated. Methods HIV-positive persons who were not on anti-retroviral therapy (ART) completed the baseline assessment for a longitudinal study examining the association of alcohol use with HIV disease markers. Oversampling drinkers, baseline samples were tested for markers of monocyte activation (sCD14), inflammation (IL-6), and coagulation (D-dimer). We defined “unhealthy alcohol use” as testing positive using the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test – Consumption (AUDIT-C; ≥ 3 for women and ≥ 4 for men) in the past 3 months or testing positive using a biomarker of heavy drinking, phophatidylethanol (PEth; ≥ 50 ng/ml). Multiple linear regression was used to examine the associations of unhealthy alcohol use with sCD14, Log10 IL-6, and D-dimer. Results Compared to those who were abstinent from alcohol, unhealthy drinkers had significantly higher sCD14 levels (mean = 1,676 vs. 1,387 ng/ml; mean difference (95% CI) = 289 (83, 495), p < 0.01). In analyses adjusted for demographic factors, current cigarette smoking, and HIV disease markers, unhealthy drinkers continued to display significantly higher sCD14 levels compared to those who were abstinent from alcohol (adjusted mean = 1,670 vs. 1,406 ng/ml; adjusted mean difference (95% CI) = 264 (47, 480), p = 0.02). Unhealthy alcohol use was not significantly associated with IL-6 or D-dimer levels. Conclusions unhealthy alcohol use was independently associated with a marker of monocyte activation (i.e., higher sCD14) that predicts mortality in treated HIV infection. Longitudinal research should examine if unhealthy alcohol use predicts changes in sCD14 prior to and following ART initiation. PMID:26509359

  2. Early Antiretroviral Therapy at High CD4 Counts Does Not Improve Arterial Elasticity: A Substudy of the Strategic Timing of AntiRetroviral Treatment (START) Trial

    PubMed Central

    Hullsiek, Katherine Huppler; Engen, Nicole Wyman; Nelson, Ray; Chetchotisakd, Ploenchan; Gerstoft, Jan; Jessen, Heiko; Losso, Marcelo; Markowitz, Norman; Munderi, Paula; Papadopoulos, Antonios; Shuter, Jonathan; Rappoport, Claire; Pearson, Mary T.; Finley, Elizabeth; Babiker, Abdel; Emery, Sean; Duprez, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Background. Both human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and antiretroviral therapy (ART) may increase cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. Vascular function assessments can be used to study CVD pathogenesis. We compared the effect of immediate versus deferred ART initiation at CD4 counts >500 cells/mm3 on small arterial elasticity (SAE) and large artery elasticity (LAE). Methods. Radial artery blood pressure waveforms were recorded noninvasively. Small arterial elasticity and LAE were derived from analysis of the diastolic pulse waveform. Randomized treatment groups were compared with linear models at each visit and longitudinal mixed models. Results. Study visits involved 332 participants in 8 countries: mean (standard deviation [SD]) age 35 (10), 70% male, 66% nonwhite, 30% smokers, and median CD4 count 625 cells/mm3 and 10-year Framingham risk score for CVD 1.7%. Mean (SD) SAE and LAE values at baseline were 7.3 (2.9) mL/mmHg × 100 and 16.6 (4.1) mL/mmHg × 10, respectively. Median time on ART was 47 and 12 months in the immediate and deferred ART groups, respectively. The treatment groups did not demonstrate significant within-person changes in SAE or LAE during the follow-up period, and there was no difference in mean change from baseline between treatment groups. The lack of significant differences persisted after adjustment, when restricted to early or late changes, after censoring participants in deferred group who started ART, and among subgroups defined by CVD and HIV risk factors. Conclusions. Among a diverse global population of HIV-positive persons with high CD4 counts, these randomized data suggest that ART treatment does not have a substantial influence on vascular function among younger HIV-positive individuals with preserved immunity. PMID:27942541

  3. Considerations in the rationale, design and methods of the Strategic Timing of AntiRetroviral Treatment (START) study

    PubMed Central

    Babiker, Abdel G; Emery, Sean; Fätkenheuer, Gerd; Gordin, Fred M; Grund, Birgit; Lundgren, Jens D; Neaton, James D; Pett, Sarah L; Phillips, Andrew; Touloumi, Giota; Vjecha, Michael J

    2012-01-01

    Background Untreated human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is characterized by progressive depletion of CD4+ T lymphocyte (CD4) count leading to the development of opportunistic diseases (acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS)), and more recent data suggest that HIV is also associated with an increased risk of serious non-AIDS (SNA) diseases including cardiovascular, renal, and liver diseases and non-AIDS-defining cancers. Although combination antiretroviral treatment (ART) has resulted in a substantial decrease in morbidity and mortality in persons with HIV infection, viral eradication is not feasible with currently available drugs. The optimal time to start ART for asymptomatic HIV infection is controversial and remains one of the key unanswered questions in the clinical management of HIV-infected individuals. Purpose In this article, we outline the rationale and methods of the Strategic Timing of AntiRetroviral Treatment (START) study, an ongoing multicenter international trial designed to assess the risks and benefits of initiating ART earlier than is currently practiced. We also describe some of the challenges encountered in the design and implementation of the study and how these challenges were addressed. Methods A total of 4000 study participants who are HIV type 1 (HIV-1) infected, ART naïve with CD4 count > 500 cells/μL are to be randomly allocated in a 1:1 ratio to start ART immediately (early ART) or defer treatment until CD4 count is <350 cells/ μL (deferred ART) and followed for a minimum of 3 years. The primary outcome is time to AIDS, SNA, or death. The study had a pilot phase to establish feasibility of accrual, which was set as the enrollment of at least 900 participants in the first year. Results Challenges encountered in the design and implementation of the study included the limited amount of data on the risk of a major component of the primary endpoint (SNA) in the study population, changes in treatment guidelines when the pilot

  4. Clinical impact and cost-effectiveness of antiretroviral therapy in India: starting criteria and second-line therapy

    PubMed Central

    Freedberg, Kenneth A.; Kumarasamy, Nagalingeswaran; Losina, Elena; Cecelia, Anitha J.; Scott, Callie A.; Divi, Nomita; Flanigan, Timothy P.; Lu, Zhigang; Weinstein, Milton C.; Wang, Bingxia; Ganesh, Aylur K.; Bender, Melissa A.; Mayer, Kenneth H.; Walensky, Rochelle P.

    2008-01-01

    Background India has more than 5.7 million people infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). In 2004, the Indian government began providing antiretroviral therapy (ART), and there are now an estimated 56 500 people receiving ART. Objective To project the life expectancy, cost, and cost-effectiveness associated with different strategies for using ART in India, to inform treatment programs. Methods We utilized an HIV disease simulation model, incorporating data on natural history, treatment efficacy, and costs of care from India. Input parameters for the simulated cohort included mean age 32.6 years and mean CD4 count 318 cells/μl (SD 291 cells/μl). We examined different criteria for starting and stopping ART with a first-line regimen of stavudine/lamivudine/nevirapine, and the impact of a second-line protease-inhibitor-based regimen. Cost-effectiveness in US dollars per year of life saved (US$/YLS) was compared incrementally among alternative starting, sequencing, and stopping criteria. Results Discounted (undiscounted) mean survival ranged from 34.5 (37.5) months with no ART to 64.7 (73.6) months with one line of therapy initiated at CD4 < 350 cells/μl, to 88.9 (106.5) months with two lines of therapy initiated at CD4 < 350 cells/μl. Lifetime medical costs ranged from US$530 (no ART) to US$5430 (two ART regimens) per person. With one line of therapy, the incremental cost-effectiveness ratios ranged from US$430/YLS to US$550/YLS as the CD4 starting criterion was increased from CD4 < 250 cells/μl to < 350 cells/μl. Use of two lines of therapy had an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of US$1880/YLS compared with the use of first-line therapy alone. Results were sensitive to the costs of second-line therapy and criteria for stopping therapy. Conclusions In India, antiretroviral therapy will lead to major survival benefits and is cost-effective by World Health Organization criteria. The availability of second-line regimens will further increase survival

  5. Challenges, successes and patterns of enrolment in the INSIGHT Strategic Timing of AntiRetroviral Treatment (START) trial

    PubMed Central

    Rappoport, C; Engen, NW; Carey, C; Hudson, F; Denning, E; Sharma, S; Florence, E; Vjecha, MJ

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this report is to describe the challenges, successes and patterns of enrolment in the Strategic Timing of AntiRetroviral Treatment (START) study. Methods START is a collaboration of many partners with central coordination provided by the protocol team, the statistical and data management centre (SDMC), the International Network for Strategic Initiatives in Global HIV Trials (INSIGHT) network leadership, international coordinating centres and site coordinating centres. The SDMC prepared reports on study accrual, baseline characteristics and site performance that allowed monitoring of enrolment and data quality and helped to ensure the successful enrolment of this large international trial. We describe the pattern of enrolment and challenges faced during the enrolment period of the trial. Results An initial pilot phase began in April 2009 and established feasibility of accrual at 101 sites. In August 2010, funding approval for an expanded definitive phase led to the successful accrual of 4688 participants from 215 sites in 35 countries by December 2013. Challenges to accrual included regulatory delays (e.g. national/local ethics approval and drug importation approval) and logistical obstacles (e.g. execution of contracts with pharmaceutical companies, setting up of a central drug repository and translation of participant materials). The personal engagement of investigators, strong central study coordination, and frequent and transparent communication with site investigators, community members and participants were key contributing factors to this success. Conclusions Accrual into START was completed in a timely fashion despite multiple challenges. This success was attributable to the efforts of site investigators committed to maintaining study equipoise, transparent and responsive study coordination, and community involvement in problem‐solving. PMID:25711319

  6. Anemia is associated with monocyte activation in HIV-infected adults on antiretroviral therapy

    PubMed Central

    Lipshultz, Hannah M; Hileman, Corrilynn O; Ahuja, Sanjay; Funderburg, Nicholas T; McComsey, Grace A

    2015-01-01

    Background Anemia has been linked with mortality in HIV infection. The mechanism of anemia in the era of contemporary antiretroviral therapy is not understood. The aim of this study was to describe the association between anemia and markers of immune activation and inflammation in a cohort of HIV-infected adults on stable antiretroviral therapy. Methods We performed a cross-sectional study of HIV-infected adults on antiretroviral therapy with HIV-1 RNA < 1000 copies/ml. Soluble and cellular markers of inflammation and immune activation were measured. Relationships between hemoglobin levels, anemia (hemoglobin <13 g/dL for men and <12 g/dL for women) and mild anemia (hemoglobin <14 g/dL for men and <13 g/dL for women) and these markers were explored using multivariable linear regression. Results Among the 147 participants, median age was 46 years, 78% were men, 68% were African American and 29% were Caucasian. Median BMI was 26.7 kg/m2, nadir and current CD4+ T cell counts were 179 and 613 cells/mm3, respectively, and 78% had HIV-1 RNA <50 copies/ml (range 20–600 copies/ml). Median (IQR) hemoglobin was 14.3 (13.1–15.1) g/dl; 14% were anemic and 33% had at least mild anemia. In multivariable analyses, mild anemia was independently associated with female sex, older age, shorter duration of ART, lower WBC count, higher platelet count, higher sCD14 and a greater number of CD14dimCD16+ cells or “patrolling” monocytes, which remained significant after further adjusting for race and BMI. Conclusions Having hemoglobin <14 g/dL for men and <13 g/dL for women was independently associated with monocyte activation (sCD14 and CD14dimCD16+ cells) in HIV-infected adults on stable antiretroviral therapy. PMID:25668820

  7. Mortality in Patients with HIV-1 Infection Starting Antiretroviral Therapy in South Africa, Europe, or North America: A Collaborative Analysis of Prospective Studies

    PubMed Central

    Boulle, Andrew; Schomaker, Michael; May, Margaret T.; Hogg, Robert S.; Shepherd, Bryan E.; Monge, Susana; Keiser, Olivia; Lampe, Fiona C.; Giddy, Janet; Ndirangu, James; Garone, Daniela; Fox, Matthew; Ingle, Suzanne M.; Reiss, Peter; Dabis, Francois; Costagliola, Dominique; Castagna, Antonella; Ehren, Kathrin; Campbell, Colin; Gill, M. John; Saag, Michael; Justice, Amy C.; Guest, Jodie; Crane, Heidi M.; Egger, Matthias; Sterne, Jonathan A. C.

    2014-01-01

    Background High early mortality in patients with HIV-1 starting antiretroviral therapy (ART) in sub-Saharan Africa, compared to Europe and North America, is well documented. Longer-term comparisons between settings have been limited by poor ascertainment of mortality in high burden African settings. This study aimed to compare mortality up to four years on ART between South Africa, Europe, and North America. Methods and Findings Data from four South African cohorts in which patients lost to follow-up (LTF) could be linked to the national population register to determine vital status were combined with data from Europe and North America. Cumulative mortality, crude and adjusted (for characteristics at ART initiation) mortality rate ratios (relative to South Africa), and predicted mortality rates were described by region at 0–3, 3–6, 6–12, 12–24, and 24–48 months on ART for the period 2001–2010. Of the adults included (30,467 [South Africa], 29,727 [Europe], and 7,160 [North America]), 20,306 (67%), 9,961 (34%), and 824 (12%) were women. Patients began treatment with markedly more advanced disease in South Africa (median CD4 count 102, 213, and 172 cells/µl in South Africa, Europe, and North America, respectively). High early mortality after starting ART in South Africa occurred mainly in patients starting ART with CD4 count <50 cells/µl. Cumulative mortality at 4 years was 16.6%, 4.7%, and 15.3% in South Africa, Europe, and North America, respectively. Mortality was initially much lower in Europe and North America than South Africa, but the differences were reduced or reversed (North America) at longer durations on ART (adjusted rate ratios 0.46, 95% CI 0.37–0.58, and 1.62, 95% CI 1.27–2.05 between 24 and 48 months on ART comparing Europe and North America to South Africa). While bias due to under-ascertainment of mortality was minimised through death registry linkage, residual bias could still be present due to differing approaches to and

  8. Outcomes of antiretroviral therapy among younger versus older adolescents and adults in an urban clinic, Zimbabwe

    PubMed Central

    Takarinda, K. C.; Owiti, P.; Mutasa-Apollo, T.; Mugurungi, O.; Buruwe, L.; Reid, A. J.

    2016-01-01

    Setting: A non-governmental organisation-supported clinic offering health services including antiretroviral therapy (ART). Objective: To compare ART retention between younger (age 10–14 years) vs. older (age 15–19 years) adolescents and younger (age 20–29 years) vs. older (age ⩾30 years) adults and determine adolescent- and adult-specific attrition-associated factors among those initiated on ART between 2010 and 2011. Design: Retrospective cohort study. Results: Of 110 (7%) adolescents and 1484 (93%) adults included in the study, no differences in retention were observed between younger vs. older adolescents at 6, 12 and 24 months. More younger adolescents were initiated with body mass index <16 kg/m2 compared with older adolescents (64% vs. 47%; P = 0.04). There were more females (74% vs. 52%, P < 0.001) and fewer patients initiating ART with CD4 count ⩽350 cells/mm3 (77% vs. 81%, P = 0.007) among younger vs. older adults. Younger adults demonstrated more attrition than older adults at all time-points. No attrition risk factors were observed among adolescents. Attrition-associated factors among adults included being younger, having a lower CD4 count and advanced human immunodeficiency virus disease at initiation, and initiation on a stavudine-based regimen. Conclusion: Younger adults demonstrated greater attrition and may require more attention. We were unable to demonstrate differences in attrition among younger vs. older adolescents. Loss to follow-up was the main reason for attrition across all age groups. Overall, earlier presentation for ART care appears important for improved ART retention among adults. PMID:27358802

  9. Psychosocial factors affecting medication adherence among HIV-1 infected adults receiving combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) in Botswana.

    PubMed

    Do, Natalie T; Phiri, Kelesitse; Bussmann, Hermann; Gaolathe, Tendani; Marlink, Richard G; Wester, C William

    2010-06-01

    As increasing numbers of persons are placed on potentially life-saving combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) in sub-Saharan Africa, it is imperative to identify the psychosocial and social factors that may influence antiretroviral (ARV) medication adherence. Using an 87 question survey, the following data were collected from patients on cART in Botswana: demographics, performance (Karnofsky) score, perceived stigma and level of HIV disclosure, attitudes and beliefs concerning HIV/AIDS, substance and/or drug use, depression, and pharmacy and healthcare provider-related factors. Overall adherence rates were determined by patient self-report, institutional adherence, and a culturally modified Morisky scale. Three hundred adult patients were recruited between April and May 2005. The overall cART adherence rate was 81.3% based on 4 day and 1 month patient recall and on clinic attendance for ARV medication refills during the previous 3 months. Adults receiving cART for 1-6 months were the least adherent (77%) followed by those receiving cART for greater than 12 months (79%). Alcohol use, depression, and nondisclosure of positive HIV status to their partner were predictive of poor adherence rates (p value <0.02). A significant proportion (81.3%) of cART-treated adults were adherent to their prescribed treatment, with rates superior to those reported in resource-rich settings. Adherence rates were poorest among those just starting cART, most likely due to the presence of ARV-related toxicity. Adherence was lower among those who have been treated for longer periods of time (greater than 1 year), suggesting complacency, which may become a significant problem, especially among these long-term cART-treated patients who return to improved physical and mental functioning and may be less motivated to adhere to their ARV medications. Healthcare providers should encourage HIV disclosure to "at-risk" partners and provide ongoing counseling and education to help patients

  10. Pneumococcal vaccination among HIV-infected adult patients in the era of combination antiretroviral therapy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kuan-Yeh; Tsai, Mao-Song; Kuo, Kuang-Che; Tsai, Jen-Chih; Sun, Hsin-Yun; Cheng, Aristine C; Chang, Sui-Yuan; Lee, Chen-Hsiang; Hung, Chien-Ching

    2014-01-01

    HIV-infected patients remain at higher risk for pneumococcal disease than the general population despite immune reconstitution and suppression of HIV replication with combination antiretroviral therapy. Vaccination with 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PPV23) composed of T-cell-independent antigens has been recommended to reduce the risk of pneumococcal disease in HIV-infected adults. However, given the heterogeneity of study design, execution and subjects enrolled, studies examining serological responses to PPV23 yielded conflicting results and observational studies of clinical effectiveness only provided moderate evidence to support the routine use of PPV23 in HIV-infected adults. Pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV), with conjugation of the capsular polysaccharide to a protein carrier, is more immunogenic than PPV23 and has been demonstrated to protect against pneumococcal disease in HIV-infected children and recurrent invasive pneumococcal disease in HIV-infected adolescents and adults. Guidelines have recently been revised to recommend that HIV-infected patients aged 19 y or older receive one dose of 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13) followed by a booster vaccination with PPV23. In this paper, we review the studies using different vaccination strategies to improve immunogenicity among HIV-infected adult patients. PMID:25483681

  11. Adherence to antiretroviral therapy among HIV-infected adults in the United States.

    PubMed

    Beer, Linda; Skarbinski, Jacek

    2014-12-01

    National estimates of antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence and adherence support services utilization are needed to inform efforts to improve the health of HIV-infected persons in the United States. In a nationally representative sample of HIV-infected adults receiving medical care, 86% self-reported taking all ART doses in the past 72 hours. Overall, 20% reported using adherence support services and 2% reported an unmet need for services. If all nonadherent persons not receiving adherence support and all persons with a self-perceived unmet need for adherence support accessed services, resources to support ∼42,673 additional persons would be needed. Factors associated with lower adherence included younger age, female gender, depression, stimulant use, binge alcohol use, greater than once-daily dosing, longer time since HIV diagnosis, and patient beliefs. Predictors of adherence are multifactorial so multiple targeted strategies to improve adherence are warranted. Providing adherence support services to all those in need may require additional resources.

  12. Risk of Cancer among Commercially Insured HIV-Infected Adults on Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Dhakal, Ishwori; Casper, Corey; Noy, Ariela; Palefsky, Joel M.; Haigentz, Missak; Krown, Susan E.; Ambinder, Richard F.; Mitsuyasu, Ronald T.

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to explore the cancer incidence rates among HIV-infected persons with commercial insurance who were on antiretroviral therapy and compare them with those rates in the general population. Paid health insurance claims for 63,221 individuals 18 years or older, with at least one claim with a diagnostic code for HIV and at least one filled prescription for an antiretroviral medication between January 1, 2006, and September 30, 2012, were obtained from the LifeLink® Health Plan Claims Database. The expected number of cancer cases in the general population for each gender-age group (<30, 30–39, 40–49, 50–59, and >60 years) was estimated using incidence rates from the Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) program. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) were estimated using their 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Compared to the general population, incidence rates for HIV-infected adults were elevated (SIR, 95% CI) for Kaposi sarcoma (46.08; 38.74–48.94), non-Hodgkin lymphoma (4.22; 3.63–4.45), Hodgkin lymphoma (9.83; 7.45–10.84), and anal cancer (30.54; 25.62–32.46) and lower for colorectal cancer (0.69; 0.52–0.76), lung cancer (0.70; 0.54, 0.77), and prostate cancer (0.54; 0.45–0.58). Commercially insured, treated HIV-infected adults had elevated rates for infection-related cancers, but not for common non-AIDS defining cancers. PMID:27882054

  13. Suboptimal antiretroviral therapy adherence among HIV-infected adults in Guangzhou, China

    PubMed Central

    Muessig, Kathryn E.; McLaughlin, Megan M.; Nie, Jing Min; Cai, Weiping; Zheng, Heping; Yang, Ligang; Tucker, Joseph D.

    2014-01-01

    Despite China“s free antiretroviral treatment (ART) program, there are high rates of treatment failure, large sociodemographic disparities in care outcomes and emerging medication resistance. Understanding patient medication adherence behaviors and challenges could inform adherence interventions to maximize the individual and prevention benefits of ART. This study assessed recent non-adherence and treatment interruption among 813 HIV-infected adult outpatients in Guangzhou, China. Participants completed a behavioral survey, underwent chart review, and were tested for syphilis, gonorrhea, and chlamydia. Factors associated with suboptimal adherence were identified using univariate and multivariate logistic regression. Among 721 HIV-infected adults receiving ART, 18.9% reported recent non-adherence (any missed ART in the past 4 weeks) and 6.8% reported treatment interruption (four or more weeks of missed ART in the past year). Lower education, living alone, alcohol use and being on ART one to three years were associated with recent non-adherence. Male gender, lower education and being on ART one to three years were associated with treatment interruption. ART medication adherence interventions are needed in China that include individualized, long-term adherence plans sensitive to patients“ educational and economic situations. These interventions should also consider possible gender disparities in treatment outcomes and address the use of alcohol during ART. Successful ART medication adherence interventions in China can inform other international settings that face similar adherence challenges and disparities. PMID:24666239

  14. Suboptimal antiretroviral therapy adherence among HIV-infected adults in Guangzhou, China.

    PubMed

    Muessig, Kathryn E; McLaughlin, Megan M; Nie, Jing Min; Cai, Weiping; Zheng, Heping; Yang, Ligang; Tucker, Joseph D

    2014-01-01

    Despite China's free antiretroviral therapy (ART) program, there are high rates of treatment failure, large sociodemographic disparities in care outcomes and emerging medication resistance. Understanding patient medication adherence behaviors and challenges could inform adherence interventions to maximize the individual and prevention benefits of ART. This study assessed recent nonadherence and treatment interruption among 813 HIV-infected adult outpatients in Guangzhou, China. Participants completed a behavioral survey, underwent chart review, and were tested for syphilis, gonorrhea, and chlamydia. Factors associated with suboptimal adherence were identified using univariate and multivariate logistic regression. Among 721 HIV-infected adults receiving ART, 18.9% reported recent nonadherence (any missed ART in the past four weeks) and 6.8% reported treatment interruption (four or more weeks of missed ART in the past year). Lower education, living alone, alcohol use, and being on ART one to three years were associated with recent nonadherence. Male gender, lower education, and being on ART one to three years were associated with treatment interruption. ART medication adherence interventions are needed in China that include individualized, long-term adherence plans sensitive to patients' educational and economic situations. These interventions should also consider possible gender disparities in treatment outcomes and address the use of alcohol during ART. Successful ART medication adherence interventions in China can inform other international settings that face similar adherence challenges and disparities.

  15. Metabolic disorders and cardiovascular risk in treatment-naive HIV-infected patients of sub-saharan origin starting antiretrovirals: impact of westernized lifestyle.

    PubMed

    Eholié, Serge Paul; Lacombe, Karine; Krain, Alysa; Diallo, Zelica; Ouiminga, Mariama; Campa, Pauline; Bouchaud, Olivier; Bissagnene, Emmanuel; Girard, Pierre-Marie

    2015-04-01

    In a cohort of HIV-infected patients of sub-Saharan origin we describe the incidence of metabolic syndrome, insulin resistance, and lipodystrophy after 3 years of combined antiretroviral therapy, and model the 10-year risk of cardiovascular diseases, while taking into account environmental factors. This is a multinational, prospective cohort study conducted in HIV outpatient clinics from four tertiary care centers set in France and Côte d'Ivoire. The participants were HIV-infected, treatment-naive patients eligible to start antiretroviral treatment and were of sub-Saharan African origin. The main outcome measures were the incidence of metabolic syndrome, insulin resistance, and lipodystrophy, and the assessment of the 10-year risk of cardiovascular diseases using Framingham risk prediction, D.A.D. Cardiovascular Disease Risk, and WHO/ISH prediction charts. Of 245 patients followed for up to 3 years, the incidence of metabolic syndrome, insulin resistance, and lipodystrophy was 5.5, 8.5, and 6.8 per 100 person-years of follow-up (cumulative incidence: 14.4%, 19.2%, and 18.1%, respectively). Living in France as well as female gender and being overweight were risk factors for metabolic disorders as whole and only first generation protease inhibitors were marginally associated with metabolic syndrome. Cardiovascular risk as modeled through the three equations was high in all patients with the synergistic and deleterious effect of living in France compared to Côte d'Ivoire. This cohort study shows how the synergy between HIV, antiretroviral (ARV) exposure, and westernization of life style in a cohort of HIV-infected patients of sub-Saharan origin leads to a progressive increase in the risk of lipodystrophy, as well as metabolic syndrome and insulin resistance, all associated with increased cardiovascular risk.

  16. Is long-term virological response related to CCR5 Δ32 deletion in HIV-1-infected patients started on highly active antiretroviral therapy?

    PubMed Central

    Laurichesse, Jean-Jacques; Taieb, Audrey; Capoulade-Metay, Corinne; Katlama, Christine; Villes, Virginie; Drobacheff-Thiebaud, Marie-Christine; Raffi, François; Chêne, Genevieve; Theodorou, Ioannis; Leport, Catherine

    2010-01-01

    Objective To examine whether CCR5 Δ32 deletion is associated with long-term response to combination antiretroviral treatment (cART) in HIV-1 infected patients. Methods The genetic sub-study of ANRS CO8 APROCO-COPILOTE cohort included 609 patients who started a protease inhibitor-containing cART in 1997–99. Patients were considered to have a sustained virological response if all plasma HIV-RNA measurements between month 4 and years 3–5 were <500 copies/ml, allowing for a single blip. Virological response was compared between patients heterozygous for CCR5 Δ32 (Δ32/wt) and wild-type patients (wt/wt) from month 4 to year 3 and month 4 to year 5. Logistic regression analysis was used to adjust for baseline demographical data, HIV-RNA, CD4 cell counts, antiretroviral naive status, time spent on antiretroviral therapy at year 3 and 5 and adherence to treatment (month 4 to year 3 and 5). Results Sustained virological response was better in Δ32/wt than in wt/wt patients: 66% versus 52% up to year 3 (p=0.02), nearly significant after adjustment to potential cofounders (p=0.07). Δ32/wt patients had a better virological response, up to year 5, 48% versus 35% (p=0.01), and remained significantly better, after adjustment, associated with a better virological response up to 5 years post initiation of cART (p=0.04). There was no association with CD4 response. Conclusion Δ32/wt deletion is associated with a beneficial virological response to cART on the long-term. Whether this association can be a direct effect of Δ32/wt deletion remains questionable and needs confirmation in other observational studies. PMID:20050936

  17. Correlates of Antiretroviral Therapy Adherence among HIV-Infected Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    McCoy, Katryna; Waldrop-Valverde, Drenna; Balderson, Benjamin H.; Mahoney, Christine; Catz, Sheryl

    2016-01-01

    Background Despite the success of antiretroviral therapy (ART), HIV-infected older African Americans experience higher mortality rates compared to their white counterparts. This disparity may be partly attributable to the differences in ART adherence by different racial and gender groups. The purpose of this study was to describe demographic, psychosocial, and HIV disease-related factors that influence ART adherence and to determine whether race and gender impact ART adherence among HIV-infected adults aged 50 years and older. Methods This descriptive study involved a secondary analysis of baseline data from 426 participants in “PRIME,” a telephone-based ART adherence and quality-of-life intervention trial. Logistic regression was used to examine the association between independent variables and ART adherence. Results Higher annual income and increased self-efficacy were associated with being ≥95% ART adherent. Race and gender were not associated with ART adherence. Conclusion These findings indicated that improvements in self-efficacy for taking ART may be an effective strategy to improve adherence regardless of race or gender. PMID:27071744

  18. Antiretroviral Treatment Adherence: Knowledge and Experiences among Adolescents and Young Adults in Soweto, South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Tshabalala, Celokuhle; Laher, Fatima

    2017-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) management of adolescents and young adults (AYAs) is particularly pertinent to sub-Saharan Africa, where the pediatric HIV burden is marked. Antiretroviral treatment (ART) adherence is a major challenge for AYAs. This qualitative study explored knowledge and experiences of adherence amongst AYAs attending treatment at the Perinatal HIV Research Unit (PHRU), Soweto, South Africa. Four focus group discussions (FGDs) and eight in-depth interviews (IDIs) were conducted with HIV-infected 15–25-year-old ART recipients. Transcripts were coded thematically. Participants (n = 26) were aged median 18.5 years, 59.1% female and 69.2% virally suppressed <400 cp/ml. Three main themes emerged during FGDs and IDIs: (i) correct knowledge about how to be adherent, benefits, and nonadherence consequences, (ii) social, personal, and medication-related barriers to adherence, and (iii) reminder, concealment, and motivational strategies to optimize adherence. Interventions to improve AYA adherence could focus on practical strategies, including status disclosure and medication concealment.

  19. Monitoring and Switching of First-line Antiretroviral Therapy in sub-Saharan Africa: Collaborative Analysis of Adult Treatment Cohorts

    PubMed Central

    Haas, Andreas D.; Keiser, Olivia; Balestre, Eric; Brown, Steve; Bissagnene, Emmanuel; Chimbetete, Cleophas; Dabis, François; Davies, Mary-Ann; Hoffmann, Christopher J.; Oyaro, Patrick; Parkes-Ratanshi, Rosalind; Reynolds, Steven J.; Sikazwe, Izukanji; Wools-Kaloustian, Kara; Zannou, Djimon Marcel; Wandeler, Gilles; Egger, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Background HIV-1 viral load (VL) testing is recommended to monitor antiretroviral therapy (ART) but not universally available. We examined monitoring of first-line and switching to second-line ART in sub-Saharan Africa, 2004–2013. Methods Adult HIV-1 infected patients starting combination ART in 16 countries were included. Switching was defined as a change from a non-nucleoside reverse-transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI)-based regimen to a protease inhibitor (PI)-based regimen, with a change of ≥1 NRTI. Virological and immunological failures were defined per World Health Organization criteria. We calculated cumulative probabilities of switching and hazard ratios with 95% confidence intervals (CI) comparing routine VL monitoring, targeted VL monitoring, CD4 cell monitoring and clinical monitoring, adjusted for programme and individual characteristics. Findings Of 297,825 eligible patients, 10,352 patients (3·5%) switched during 782,412 person-years of follow-up. Compared to CD4 monitoring hazard ratios for switching were 3·15 (95% CI 2·92–3·40) for routine VL, 1·21 (1·13–1·30) for targeted VL and 0·49 (0·43–0·56) for clinical monitoring. Overall 58.0% of patients with confirmed virological and 19·3% of patients with confirmed immunological failure switched within 2 years. Among patients who switched the percentage with evidence of treatment failure based on a single CD4 or VL measurement ranged from 32·1% with clinical to 84.3% with targeted VL monitoring. Median CD4 counts at switching were 215 cells/µl under routine VL monitoring but lower with other monitoring (114–133 cells/µl). Interpretation Overall few patients switched to second-line ART and switching occurred late in the absence of routine viral load monitoring. Switching was more common and occurred earlier with targeted or routine viral load testing. PMID:26423252

  20. Jump Start: The Federal Role in Adult Literacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BCEL Newsletter for the Business Community, 1989

    1989-01-01

    A study examined the Federal Government's role in adult literacy. A far-reaching plan of action for the Federal Government was proposed that was based on an understanding of national literacy need and the structure and politics of Federal Government. The focus of the current national literacy movement was found to be seriously flawed in…

  1. Quality of Life Among Individuals with HIV Starting Antiretroviral Therapy in Diverse Resource-Limited Areas of the World

    PubMed Central

    Hendriksen, Ellen S.; Smeaton, Laura; Celentano, David D.; Hosseinipour, Mina C.; Barnett, Ronald; Guanira, Juan; Flanigan, Timothy; Kumarasamy, N.; Klingman, Karin; Campbell, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    As Antiretroviral Therapy (ART) is scaled up in low- and middle-income countries, it is important to understand Quality of Life (QOL) correlates including disease severity and person characteristics and to determine the extent of between-country differences among those with HIV. QOL and medical data were collected from 1,563 of the 1,571 participants at entry into a randomized clinical trial of ART conducted in the U.S. (n = 203) and 8 resource-limited countries (n = 1,360) in the Caribbean, South America, Asia, and Africa. Participants were interviewed prior to initiation of ART using a modified version of the ACTG SF-21, a health-related QOL measure including 8 subscales: general health perception, physical functioning, role functioning, social functioning, cognitive functioning, pain, mental health, and energy/fatigue. Other measures included demographics, CD4+ lymphocyte count, plasma HIV-1 RNA viral load. Higher quality of life in each of the 8 QOL subscales was associated with higher CD4+ lymphocyte category. General health perception, physical functioning, role functioning, and energy/fatigue varied by plasma HIV-1 RNA viral load categories. Each QOL subscale included significant variation by country. Only the social functioning subscale varied by sex, with men having greater impairments than women, and only the physical functioning subscale varied by age category. This was the first large-scale international ART trial to conduct a standardized assessment of QOL in diverse international settings, thus demonstrating that implementation of the behavioral assessment was feasible. QOL indicators at study entry varied with disease severity, demographics, and country. The relationship of these measures to treatment outcomes can and should be examined in clinical trials of ART in resource-limited settings using similar methodologies. PMID:21499794

  2. Immune Reconstitution During the First Year of Antiretroviral Therapy of HIV-1-Infected Adults in Rural Burkina Faso

    PubMed Central

    Tiba, Fabrice; Nauwelaers, Frans; Traoré, Siaka; Coulibaly, Boubacar; Ouedraogo, Thierry; Compaoré, Adama; Kräusslich, Hans-Georg; Böhler, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    There are no data on the outcome of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) in HIV-infected adults in rural Burkina Faso. We therefore assessed CD4+ T-cell counts and HIV-1 plasma viral load (VL), the proportion of naive T-cells (co-expressing CCR7 and CD45RA) and T-cell activation (expression of CD95 or CD38) in 61 previously untreated adult patients from Nouna, Burkina Faso, at baseline and 2 weeks, 1, 3, 6, 9 and 12 months after starting therapy. Median CD4+ T-cell counts increased from 174 (10th-90th percentile: 33-314) cells/µl at baseline to 300 (114- 505) cells/µl after 3 months and 360 (169-562) cells/µl after 12 months of HAART. Median VL decreased from 5.8 (4.6- 6.6) log10 copies/ml at baseline to 1.6 (1.6-2.3) log10 copies/ml after 12 months. Early CD4+ T-cell recovery was accompanied by a reduction of the expression levels of CD95 and CD38 on T-cells. Out of 42 patients with complete virological follow-up under HAART, 19 (45%) achieved concordant good immunological (gain of ≥100 CD4+ T-cells/µl above baseline) and virological (undetectable VL) responses after 12 months of treatment (intention-to-treat analysis). Neither a decreased expression of the T-cell activation markers CD38 and CD95, nor an increase in the percentage of naive T-cells reliably predicted good virological treatment responses in patients with good CD4+ T-cell reconstitution. Repeated measurement of CD4+ T-cell counts during HAART remains the most important parameter for immunologic monitoring. Substitution of repeated VL testing by determination of T-cell activation levels (e.g., CD38 expression on CD8+ T-cells) should be applied with caution. PMID:22435082

  3. Determinants of non-adherence to antiretroviral therapy in adult hospitalized patients, Northwest Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Tsega, Bayew; Srikanth, Bhagavathula Akshaya; Shewamene, Zewdneh

    2015-01-01

    Aim The aim of this study was to assess the rate of antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence and to identify any determinants among adult patients. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted on 351 ART patients in the ART clinic of the University of Gondar referral hospital. Data were collected by a pretested interviewer-administered structured questionnaire from May to June 2014. Multivariate logistic regression was used to determine factors significantly associated with adherence. Results Of 351 study subjects, women were more predominant than men (64.4% versus 35.6%). Three hundred and forty (96.9%) patients agreed and strongly agreed that the use of ART is essential in their life, and approximately 327 (93.2%) disclosed their sero-status to family. Seventy-nine (22.5%) participants were active substance users. The level of adherence was 284 (80.9%). Three hundred forty-one (97.2%) respondents had good or fair adherence. Among the reasons for missing doses were forgetfulness (29 [43.3%]), missing appointments (14 [20.9%]), running out of medicine (9 [13.4%]), depression, anger, or hopelessness (4 [6.0%]), side effects of the medicine used (2 [3.0%]), and nonbelief in the ART (2 [3.0%]). The variables found significantly associated with non-adherence were age (P-value 0.017), employment (P-value 0.02), HIV disclosure (P-value 0.04), and comfortability to take ART in the presence of others (P-value 0.02). Conclusion From this study, it was determined that forgetfulness (43.3%) was the most common reason for missing doses. Also, employment and acceptance in using ART in the presence of others are significant issues observed for non-adherence. Hence, the ART counselor needs to place more emphasis on the provision and use of memory aids. PMID:25784793

  4. Effect of antiretroviral therapy on malaria incidence in HIV-infected Ugandan adults

    PubMed Central

    Kasirye, Ronnie P.; Grosskurth, Heiner; Munderi, Paula; Levin, Jonathan; Anywaine, Zacchaeus; Nunn, Andrew; Kamali, Anatoli; Baisley, Kathy

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Using the data of a trial on cotrimoxazole (CTX) cessation, we investigated the effect of different antiretroviral therapy (ART) regimens on the incidence of clinical malaria. Methods: During the cotrimoxazole cessation trial (ISRCTN44723643), HIV-infected Ugandan adults with CD4+ at least 250 cells/μl were randomized to receive either CTX prophylaxis or placebo and were followed for a median of 2.5 years. Blood slides for malaria microscopy were examined at scheduled visits and at unscheduled visits when the participant felt unwell. CD4+ cell counts were done 6-monthly. Malaria was defined as fever with a positive blood slide. ART regimens were categorized as nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI) only, non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI)-containing or protease inhibitor containing. Malaria incidence was calculated using random effects Poisson regression to account for clustering of events. Results: Malaria incidence in the three ART regimen groups was 9.9 (3.6-27.4), 9.3 (8.3-10.4), and 3.5 (1.6-7.6) per 100 person-years, respectively. Incidence on protease inhibitors was lower than that on the other regimens with the results just reaching significance (adjusted rate ratio 0.4, 95% confidence interval = 0.2–1.0, comparing with NNRTI regimens). Stratification by CTX/placebo use gave similar results, without evidence of an interaction between the effects of CTX/placebo use and ART regimen. There was no evidence of an interaction between ART regimen and CD4+ cell count. Conclusion: There was some evidence that protease inhibitor-containing ART regimens may be associated with a lower clinical malaria incidence compared with other regimens. This effect was not modified by CTX use or CD4+ cell count. The antimalarial properties of protease inhibitors may have clinical and public health importance. PMID:28121670

  5. Mortality According to CD4 Count at Start of Combination Antiretroviral Therapy Among HIV-infected Patients Followed for up to 15 Years After Start of Treatment: Collaborative Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    May, Margaret T.; Vehreschild, Jorg-Janne; Trickey, Adam; Obel, Niels; Reiss, Peter; Bonnet, Fabrice; Mary-Krause, Murielle; Samji, Hasina; Cavassini, Matthias; Gill, Michael John; Shepherd, Leah C.; Crane, Heidi M.; d'Arminio Monforte, Antonella; Burkholder, Greer A.; Johnson, Margaret M.; Sobrino-Vegas, Paz; Domingo, Pere; Zangerle, Robert; Justice, Amy C.; Sterling, Timothy R.; Miró, José M.; Sterne, Jonathan A. C.

    2016-01-01

    Background. CD4 count at start of combination antiretroviral therapy (ART) is strongly associated with short-term survival, but its association with longer-term survival is less well characterized. Methods. We estimated mortality rates (MRs) by time since start of ART (<0.5, 0.5–0.9, 1–2.9, 3–4.9, 5–9.9, and ≥10 years) among patients from 18 European and North American cohorts who started ART during 1996–2001. Piecewise exponential models stratified by cohort were used to estimate crude and adjusted (for sex, age, transmission risk, period of starting ART [1996–1997, 1998–1999, 2000–2001], and AIDS and human immunodeficiency virus type 1 RNA at baseline) mortality rate ratios (MRRs) by CD4 count at start of ART (0–49, 50–99, 100–199, 200–349, 350–499, ≥500 cells/µL) overall and separately according to time since start of ART. Results. A total of 6344 of 37 496 patients died during 359 219 years of follow-up. The MR per 1000 person-years was 32.8 (95% confidence interval [CI], 30.2–35.5) during the first 6 months, declining to 16.0 (95% CI, 15.4–16.8) during 5–9.9 years and 14.2 (95% CI, 13.3–15.1) after 10 years’ duration of ART. During the first year of ART, there was a strong inverse association of CD4 count at start of ART with mortality. This diminished over the next 4 years. The adjusted MRR per CD4 group was 0.97 (95% CI, .94–1.00; P = .054) and 1.02 (95% CI, .98–1.07; P = .32) among patients followed for 5–9.9 and ≥10 years, respectively. Conclusions. After surviving 5 years of ART, the mortality of patients who started ART with low baseline CD4 count converged with mortality of patients with intermediate and high baseline CD4 counts. PMID:27025828

  6. Is early antiretroviral therapy initiation useful in HIV(+) adults without co-infections?

    PubMed

    Chauriye, Verónica; Monsalve, Ximena

    2015-12-02

    HIV infection is a worldwide epidemic. Antiretroviral therapy has dramatically changed the outcome of the disease but there is still controversy about the best time to initiate it, especially in patients with CD4 counts over 350 cells/µL. Searching in Epistemonikos database, which is maintained by screening 30 databases, we identified two systematic reviews including four pertinent randomized controlled trials overall. We concluded early initiation of antiretroviral therapy probably reduces mortality, risk of opportunistic infections and tuberculosis, but increases the risk of important adverse effects.

  7. The Perfect Pairing: The Adult Learner and the Boutique Winery in the Start-Up Phase

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heath-Simpson, Delta F.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this phenomenological study was to understand and describe the lived experiences of adult learners who are owners and managers of small winery businesses operating in the start-up phase of the organizational life cycle. The study explored and identified the meaning of adult learning in the entrepreneurial context and its affect on…

  8. Crofelemer for the symptomatic relief of non-infectious diarrhea in adult patients with HIV/AIDS on anti-retroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Castro, Jose G; Chin-Beckford, Nafeesa

    2015-01-01

    Chronic diarrhea remains a common condition that affects people infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) despite the widespread use of potent antiretroviral therapy. It is important that providers control this condition, as the persistence of diarrhea affects the quality of life of patients and may contribute to decreased adherence to antiretroviral therapy. Strategies to control diarrhea in patients with HIV infection include switching to a new antiretroviral regimen and/or the use of specific medications to control the diarrhea. This review aims to provide a concise evaluation of a newly approved medication (crofelemer) that has a novel mechanism of action and has received approval for the symptomatic relief of non-infectious diarrhea in adult patients with HIV on anti-retroviral therapy.

  9. Socioeconomic factors explain suboptimal adherence to antiretroviral therapy among HIV-infected Australian adults with viral suppression

    PubMed Central

    Siefried, Krista J.; Mao, Limin; Kerr, Stephen; Cysique, Lucette A.; Gates, Thomas M.; McAllister, John; Maynard, Anthony; de Wit, John; Carr, Andrew

    2017-01-01

    Background Missing more than one tablet of contemporary antiretroviral therapy (ART) per month increases the risk of virological failure. Recent studies evaluating a comprehensive range of potential risk factors for suboptimal adherence are not available for high-income settings. Methods Adults on ART with undetectable viral load (UDVL) were recruited into a national, multi-centre cohort, completing a comprehensive survey assessing demographics, socio-economic indicators, physical health, well-being, life stressors, social supports, HIV disclosure, HIV-related stigma and discrimination, healthcare access, ART regimen, adherence, side effects, costs and treatment beliefs. Baseline data were assessed, and suboptimal adherence was defined as self-reported missing ≥1 ART dose/month over the previous 3-months; associated factors were identified using bivariate and multivariate binary logistic regression. Results We assessed 522 participants (494 [94.5%] men, mean age = 50.8 years, median duration UDVL = 3.3 years [IQR = 1.2–6.8]) at 17 sexual health, hospital, and general practice clinics across Australia. Seventy-eight participants (14.9%) reported missing ≥1 dose/month over the previous three months, which was independently associated with: being Australian-born (AOR [adjusted odds ratio] = 2.4 [95%CI = 1.2–4.9], p = 0.014), not being in a relationship (AOR = 3.3 [95%CI = 1.5–7.3], p = 0.004), reaching the “Medicare safety net” (capping annual medical/pharmaceutical costs) (AOR = 2.2 [95%CI = 1.1–4.5], p = 0.024), living in subsidised housing (AOR = 2.5 [95%CI = 1.0–6.2], p = 0.045), receiving home-care services (AOR = 4.4 [95%CI = 1.0–18.8], p = 0.046), HIV community/outreach services linkage (AOR = 2.4 [95%CI = 1.1–5.4], p = 0.033), and starting ART following self-request (AOR = 3.0 [95%CI = 1.3–7.0], p = 0.012). Conclusions In this population, 15% reported recent suboptimal ART adherence at levels associated in prospective studies with

  10. Gender differences in diet and nutrition among adults initiating antiretroviral therapy in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Abioye, Ajibola I; Isanaka, Sheila; Liu, Enju; Mwiru, Ramadhani S; Noor, Ramadhani A; Spiegelman, Donna; Mugusi, Ferdinand; Fawzi, Wafaie

    2015-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected males have poor treatment outcomes after initiation of antiretroviral therapy (ART) compared to HIV-infected women. Dietary factors might mediate the association between sex and disease progression. However, the gender difference in diet among HIV-infected individuals in sub-Saharan Africa is largely unknown. The objective of this study was to examine differences in dietary intake among HIV-infected men and women. We conducted a cross-sectional analysis of dietary questionnaire data from 2038 adults initiating ART in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania to assess whether nutrient adequacy differed by sex. We dichotomized participants' nutrient intakes by whether recommended dietary allowances (RDAs) were met and estimated the relative risk (RR) of meeting RDAs in males using binomial regression models. We also estimated the mean difference in intake of foods and food groups by gender. We found poorer dietary practices among men compared to women. Males were less likely to meet the RDAs for micronutrients critical for slowing disease progression among HIV patients: niacin (RR = 0.39, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.27 to 0.55), riboflavin (RR = 0.81, 95% CI: 0.73 to 0.91), vitamin C (RR = 0.94, 95% CI: 0.89 to 1.00), and zinc (RR = 0.06, 95% CI: 0.01 to 0.24). Intake of thiamine, pantothenate, vitamins B6, B12, and E did not vary by gender. Males were less likely to eat cereals (mean difference [servings per day] = -0.21, 95% CI: -0.44 to 0.001) and vegetables (mean difference = -0.47, 95% CI: -0.86 to -0.07) in their diet, but more likely to have meat (mean difference = 0.14, 95% CI: 0.06 to 0.21). We conclude that male HIV patients have poorer dietary practices than females, and this may contribute to faster progression of the disease in males.

  11. Nevirapine-related adverse events among children switched from efavirenz to nevirapine as compared to children who were started on nevirapine-based antiretroviral therapy directly.

    PubMed

    Sanjeeva, G N; Sukanya, V; Pavithra, H B; Dodderi, S K; Rewari, B B; Govindaraj, M; Shivananda, S; Premalatha, R

    2015-01-01

    In this retrospective study, incidence of nevirapine (NVP) toxicity in children who were switched from efavirenz (EFV) to NVP (treatment experienced [TE] group) was compared with that of children who had started NVP-based antiretroviral therapy directly (treatment naïve [TN] group). This study also identified risk factors associated with development of NVP toxicity in children. The incidence and risk of developing NVP toxicities were significantly higher in TE when compared to TN group. Median duration of onset of NVP toxicity from the initiation was 2.14 and 3.84 weeks in TE and TN children, respectively. Mean CD4 count was found to be significantly higher in children who developed toxicity (577 ± 81 cells/µL) as compared to the children who did not develop toxicity (403 ± 29 cells/µL). Similarly, children in TE group who developed NVP toxicity had higher mean CD4 cell count than children in TN with NVP toxicity. The risk factors for the development of NVP toxicity include female gender with CD4 count >250 cells/μL and TE children especially girls with CD4% >15% and boys with CD4 count >400 cells/μL. To conclude, the higher incidence of NVP toxicity among TE group warrants a cautious approach while switching the NVP- from EFV-based therapy.

  12. Depressive and Anxiety Symptoms Predict Sustained Quality of Life Deficits in HIV-Positive Ugandan Adults Despite Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Ezeamama, Amara E; Woolfork, Makhabele N; Guwatudde, David; Bagenda, Danstan; Manabe, Yukari C; Fawzi, Wafaie W; Smith Fawzi, Mary C

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The impact of psychosocial status at onset of antiretroviral therapy on changes in quality of life (QOL) and subjectively rated health (SRH) among adults on highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) in resource-limited settings is poorly understood. Therefore, we evaluate the association between stigma, anxiety, depression, and social support and change in QOL and SRH in HIV-infected Ugandan adults during an 18-month period. Psychosocial indicators were assessed at enrollment using structured questionnaires. QOL and SRH measures were assessed at months 0, 6, 12, and 18 using the Medical Outcomes Survey-HIV. Linear mixed models determined risk estimated differences in QOL and SRH in relation to quartiles of each psychosocial status indicator. Repeated measures generalized estimating equations modeling was implemented to assess differences in likelihood of improved versus nonimproved SRH during follow-up. QOL scores and SRH improved significantly for all participants over 18 months (P < 0.0001). The gain in QOL increased dose-dependently as baseline depressive symptoms (time∗depression P < 0.001) and anxiety levels (time∗anxiety P < 0.001) declined. Lower social support was associated with worse QOL at baseline (P = 0.0005) but QOL improvement during follow-up was not dependent on baseline level of social support (time∗social support P = 0.8943) or number of stigmatizing experiences (time∗stigma P = 0.8662). Psychosocial determinants did not predict changes in SRH in this study. High levels of depression and anxiety symptoms at HAART initiation predicts lower gains in QOL for HIV-positive patients for as long as 18 months. Long-term QOL improvements in HIV-infected adults may be enhanced by implementation of psychosocial interventions to reduce depression and anxiety in HIV-infected adults. PMID:26945347

  13. Replication of Human Herpesviruses Is Associated with Higher HIV DNA Levels during Antiretroviral Therapy Started at Early Phases of HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Christy M.; Var, Susanna R.; Oliveira, Michelli F.; Lada, Steven M.; Vargas, Milenka V.; Little, Susan J.; Richman, Douglas D.; Strain, Matthew C.; Pérez-Santiago, Josué; Smith, Davey M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Asymptomatic replication of human herpesviruses (HHV) is frequent in HIV-infected men and is associated with increased T-cell activation and HIV disease progression. We hypothesized that the presence of replication of cytomegalovirus (CMV) and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) (the most frequently detected HHV) might influence HIV DNA decay during antiretroviral therapy (ART). We investigated 607 peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) samples from 107 CMV-seropositive, HIV-infected men who have sex with men, who started ART within a median of 3 months from their estimated date of infection (EDI) and were monitored for a median of 19 months thereafter. Levels of HIV, CMV, and EBV DNA and cellular HIV RNA were measured by droplet digital PCR (ddPCR) for each time point. Using a general linear mixed-effect regression model, we evaluated associations between the presence of detectable CMV DNA and EBV DNA levels and HIV DNA decay and cellular HIV RNA levels, while adjusting for peak HIV RNA, nadir CD4+ count, CD4/CD8 ratio, CMV IgG levels, time from EDI to ART initiation, time from ART initiation to virologic suppression, detectable CMV DNA pre-ART, and age. The presence of intermittent CMV DNA in PBMC during ART was significantly associated with slower decay of HIV DNA (P = 0.011) but not with increased cellular HIV RNA transcription or more detectable 2-long terminal repeat circles. Higher levels of EBV DNA were also associated with higher levels of HIV DNA (P < 0.001) and increased unspliced cellular HIV RNA transcription (P = 0.010). These observations suggest that replication of HHV may help maintain a larger HIV DNA reservoir, but the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. IMPORTANCE Over three-fourths of HIV-infected men have at least one actively replicating human herpesvirus (HHV) in their mucosal secretions at any one time. Cytomegalovirus (CMV) and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) are the most common, and although it is often asymptomatic, such CMV and EBV

  14. Long-Term Antiretroviral Treatment Adherence in HIV-Infected Adolescents and Adults in Uganda: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Inzaule, Seth C.; Hamers, Raph L.; Kityo, Cissy; Rinke de Wit, Tobias F.; Roura, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Background Long-term success of HIV antiretroviral therapy requires near-perfect adherence, maintained throughout one’s lifetime. However, perceptions towards ART and patterns of adherence may change during the life course. We assessed challenges to long-term adherence in adolescents and adults in three regional HIV treatment centers in Uganda. Methods We conducted 24 in-depth interviews and 2 focus group discussions with a total of 33 health-care providers and expert clients (HIV patients on long-term ART who assist with adherence support of fellow patients). Interview topics included experiences with patients on long-term treatment with either declining adherence or persistent poor adherence. Transcribed texts were coded and analyzed based on the social-ecological framework highlighting differences and commonalities between adolescents and adults. Results The overarching themes in adolescents were unstructured treatment holidays, delays in disclosure of HIV status by caretakers, stigma, which was mainly experienced in boarding schools, and diminishing or lack of clinical support. In particular, there was minimal support for early and gradual disclosure for caretakers to the infected children, diminishing clinical support for young adults during transition to adult-based care and declining peer-to-peer support group activities. The predominating theme in adults was challenges with treatment access among temporary economic migrants. Common themes to adults and adolescents were challenges with disclosure in intimate relationships, treatment related factors including side effects, supply of single tablets in place of fixed-dose combined drugs, supply of drug brands with unfavorable taste and missed opportunities for counseling due to shortage of staff. Conclusion Adherence counseling and support should be adapted differently for adolescents and adults and to the emerging life course challenges in long-term treated patients. Programs should also address constraints

  15. Tracking Adult Learning Routes. A Pilot Investigation into Adult Learners' Starting Points and Progression to Further Education and Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGivney, Veronica

    A sample of approximately 50 educational organizations in England and Wales were invited to supply statistics or other information regarding where adults start their return to learning. Approximately two-thirds responded and also commented on the feasibility of collecting such data. Responses indicated a lack of "hard" quantitative…

  16. Increasing HIV-1 pretreatment drug resistance among antiretroviral-naïve adults initiating treatment between 2006 and 2014 in Nairobi, Kenya.

    PubMed

    Chung, Michael H; Silverman, Rachel; Beck, Ingrid A; Yatich, Nelly; Dross, Sandra; McKernan-Mullin, Jennifer; Bii, Stephen; Tapia, Kenneth; Stern, Joshua; Chohan, Bhavna; Sakr, Samah R; Kiarie, James N; Frenkel, Lisa M

    2016-06-19

    Antiretroviral-naïve adults initiating antiretroviral therapy in Nairobi, Kenya were tested for HIV-1 drug resistance at codons K103N, Y181C, G190A, M184V, and K65R using an oligonucleotide ligation assay. Prevalence of pretreatment drug resistance increased from 3.89% in 2006 to 10.93% in 2014 (P < 0.001), and 95% of those with resistance had at least one nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor mutation. Resistance to tenofovir (K65R) was found in 2014 but not in 2006.

  17. Do Sedentary Older Adults Benefit from Community-Based Exercise? Results from the Active Start Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yan, Tingjian; Wilber, Kathleen H.; Aguirre, Rosa; Trejo, Laura

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: This study assessed the effectiveness of Active Start, a community-based behavior change and fitness program, designed to promote physical activity among sedentary community-dwelling older adults. Design and Methods: A quasi-experimental design was used. Data were analyzed using a within-group pretest-post-test design to calculate changes…

  18. [Pneumocystis jiroveci pneumonia characteristics in adults with AIDS with or without antiretroviral therapy].

    PubMed

    Bahamondes M, Laura; Villar Z, M José; Orellana C, Carolina; González R, Jimena; Montenegro U, Cristian

    2006-09-01

    Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) has changed the epidemiology of Pneumocystis jiroveci pneumonia (PCP) in AIDS patients. Global incidence of PCP has decreased and now it is prevalent in AIDS patients who do not receive HAART or are unsuccessfully treated with persistent immune depression. Moreover, the immunologic response to HAART has caused a PCP form which is included in the immune restoration inflammatory syndrome (IRIS). As of late 2004, 75.5% of patients cared for at Dr. Lucio Córdova Infectious Diseases Hospital were receiving HAART. This study compares PCP clinical characteristics in patients under the effect of HAART (n: 6) with those without antiretroviral therapy (n: 12). Among those with HAART, 83.3% (5/6) were without immunologic responses and 16.7% with virologic response. The median CD4 counts were low in both groups: 20 cells/mm(3) without HAART and 51 cells/mm(3) with HAART. There were no differences in most of PCP characteristics, and no IRIS cases were observed. HAART-receiving group had less severe disease and lower frequency of both, complications and steroidal therapy prescription (P 0.023).

  19. Kinematics of the typical beach flags start for young adult sprinters.

    PubMed

    Lockie, Robert G; Vickery, William M; Janse de Jonge, Xanne A K

    2012-01-01

    This study profiled beach flags start kinematics for experienced young adult sprinters. Five males and three females (age = 20.8 ± 2.1 years; height = 1.70 ± 0.06 meters [m]; mass = 63.9 ± 6.0 kilograms) completed four sprints using their competition start technique. A high-speed camera, positioned laterally, filmed the start. Data included: start time; hand clearance time; posterior movement from the start line; feet spacing during the start; elbow, hip, knee, trunk lean, and trajectory angles at take-off; and first step length. Timing gates recorded 0-2, 0-5, and 0-20 m time. Spearman's correlations identified variables relating (p ≤ 0.05) to faster start and sprint times. The beach flags start involved sprinters moving 0.18 ± 0.05 m posterior to the start line by flexing both legs underneath the body before turning. Following the turn, the feet were positioned 0.47 ± 0.07 apart. This distance negatively correlated with start (ρ = -0.647), 0-2 (ρ = -0.683), and 0-5 m (ρ = -0.766) time. Beach flags start kinematics at take-off resembled research analyzing track starts and acceleration. The elbow extension angle (137.62 ± 13.45°) of the opposite arm to the drive leg correlated with 0-2 (ρ = -0.762), 0-5 (ρ = -0.810), and 0-20 m (ρ = -0.810) time. Greater arm extension likely assisted with stability during the start, leading to enhanced sprint performance. The drive leg knee extension angle (146.36 ± 2.26°) correlated with start time (ρ = -0.677), indicating a contribution to a faster start completion. A longer first step following the start related to faster 0-5 m time (ρ = -0.690). Sprinters quicker over 0-2 and 0-5 m were also quicker over 20 m (ρ = 0.881-0.952). Beach flags sprinters must ensure their start is completed quickly, such that they can attain a high speed throughout the race. Key pointsThere are specific movement patterns adopted by beach flags sprinters during the start. Sprinters will move posterior to the start time prior to

  20. Description and Demonstration of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy to Enhance Antiretroviral Therapy Adherence and Treat Depression in HIV-Infected Adults.

    PubMed

    Newcomb, Michael E; Bedoya, C Andres; Blashill, Aaron J; Lerner, Jonathan A; O'Cleirigh, Conall; Pinkston, Megan M; Safren, Steven A

    2015-11-01

    There are an estimated 1.1 million individuals living with HIV/AIDS in the United States. In addition to the various medical comorbidities of HIV infection, depression is one of the most frequently co-occurring psychiatric conditions among HIV-infected individuals. Furthermore, depression has been found to be associated with nonadherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART), as well as HIV disease progression. Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) has repeatedly been found to effectively treat depression in adult populations, and CBT for adherence and depression (CBT-AD) is an effective treatment for improving depressive symptoms and medication adherence in the context of various chronic health conditions, including diabetes and HIV-infection. This paper provides a description of the CBT-AD approach to treat depression and ART adherence in HIV-infected adults, which we have developed and tested in our clinic, and for which detailed therapist and client guides exist. To augment the description of treatment, the present article provides video component demonstrations of several core modules that highlight important aspects of this treatment, including Life-Steps for medication adherence, orientation to CBT-AD and psychoeducation, and suggestions for adaptation of core CBT modules for HIV-infected adults. Discussion of video demonstrations highlights differences in patient presentations and course of treatment between HIV-infected adults receiving CBT-AD and HIV-uninfected adults receiving traditional CBT for depression. This description and the accompanying demonstrations are intended as a practical guide to assist therapists wishing to conduct such a treatment in the outpatient setting.

  1. Description and Demonstration of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy to Enhance Antiretroviral Therapy Adherence and Treat Depression in HIV-Infected Adults

    PubMed Central

    Newcomb, Michael E.; Bedoya, C. Andres; Blashill, Aaron J.; Lerner, Jonathan A.; O’Cleirigh, Conall; Pinkston, Megan M.; Safren, Steven A.

    2015-01-01

    There are an estimated 1.1 million individuals living with HIV/AIDS in the United States. In addition to the various medical comorbidities of HIV infection, depression is one of the most frequently co-occurring psychiatric conditions among HIV-infected individuals. Furthermore, depression has been found to be associated with nonadherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART), as well as HIV disease progression. Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) has repeatedly been found to effectively treat depression in adult populations, and CBT for adherence and depression (CBT-AD) is an effective treatment for improving depressive symptoms and medication adherence in the context of various chronic health conditions, including diabetes and HIV-infection. This paper provides a description of the CBT-AD approach to treat depression and ART adherence in HIV-infected adults, which we have developed and tested in our clinic, and for which detailed therapist and client guides exist. To augment the description of treatment, the present article provides video component demonstrations of several core modules that highlight important aspects of this treatment, including Life-Steps for medication adherence, orientation to CBT-AD and psychoeducation, and suggestions for adaptation of core CBT modules for HIV-infected adults. Discussion of video demonstrations highlights differences in patient presentations and course of treatment between HIV-infected adults receiving CBT-AD and HIV-uninfected adults receiving traditional CBT for depression. This description and the accompanying demonstrations are intended as a practical guide to assist therapists wishing to conduct such a treatment in the outpatient setting. PMID:26688659

  2. Determinants of survival in adult HIV patients on antiretroviral therapy in Eastern Uttar Pradesh: A prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Chakravarty, Jaya; Tiwary, Narendra K.; Prasad, Shashi Ranjan; Shukla, Saurabh; Tiwari, Anurag; Mishra, Rabindra Nath; Sundar, Shyam

    2014-01-01

    Background & objectives: The National AIDS Control Organization (NACO) of India has been providing free ARV (antiretroviral) drugs since 2004. By 2012, 486,173 patients had received treatment through the antiretroviral therapy (ART) centres. The objective of this observational study was to assess the factors determining survival of patients on ART under routine programme conditions in an ART centre in north India five years after its inception. Methods: Treatment naive HIV positive patients who were enrolled in the ART centre between May 2009 and May 2010 and started on ART as per the Revised NACO guidelines 2009, were included in the study and outcome was assessed after two years of follow up. Results: A total of 1689 patients were included in the analysis, of whom 272 (16.10%) expired, 205 (12.13%) were lost to follow up (LFU), 526 (31.14%) were transferred out to other facilities and 686 (40.63%) were alive at the end of two years. Majority (92%) of the deaths occurred in the first six months of therapy. Age >30 yr, male gender, poor functional status, haemoglobin level <11 g/dl, body weight <45 kg and CD4 count <100/μl at baseline had significantly higher relative hazard of death. Most LFU also occurred in the first six months and these patients had significantly low CD4 count, weight, haemoglobin level and higher number of patients in Stages III and IV as compared to those who survived. Interpretation & conclusions: The study findings revealed poor survival in the first six months of therapy especially in those with severe immunosuppression. This emphasizes the need for early enrolment into the programme. The high LFU occurring early after initiation of therapy suggests the urgent need to build an efficient patient retrieval system in the programme. PMID:25488442

  3. HIV infection and arterial stiffness among older-adults taking antiretroviral therapy in rural Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Siedner, Mark J.; Kim, June-Ho; Nakku, Ruth Sentongo; Hemphill, Linda; Triant, Virginia A.; Haberer, Jessica E.; Martin, Jeffrey N.; Boum, Yap; Kwon, Douglas S.; Tsai, Alexander C.; Hunt, Peter W.; Okello, Samson; Bangsberg, David R.

    2015-01-01

    HIV infection is associated with arterial stiffness, but no studies have assessed this relationship in sub-Saharan Africa. We enrolled 205 participants over 40 years old in Uganda: 105 on antiretroviral therapy for a median of 7 years, and a random sample of 100 age and gender-matched HIV-uninfected controls from the clinic catchment area. The prevalence of arterial stiffness (ABI>1.2) was 33%, 18%, 19% and 2% in HIV+ men, HIV- men, HIV+ women, and HIV- women. In multivariable models adjusted for cardiovascular risk factors, HIV+ individuals had over double the prevalence of arterial stiffness (APR 2.86, 95%CI 1.41–5.79, P=0.003). PMID:26636926

  4. Antiretroviral therapy enrollment characteristics and outcomes among HIV-infected adolescents and young adults compared with older adults--seven African countries, 2004-2013.

    PubMed

    Auld, Andrew F; Agolory, Simon G; Shiraishi, Ray W; Wabwire-Mangen, Fred; Kwesigabo, Gideon; Mulenga, Modest; Hachizovu, Sebastian; Asadu, Emeka; Tuho, Moise Zanga; Ettiegne-Traore, Virginie; Mbofana, Francisco; Okello, Velephi; Azih, Charles; Denison, Julie A; Tsui, Sharon; Koole, Olivier; Kamiru, Harrison; Nuwagaba-Biribonwoha, Harriet; Alfredo, Charity; Jobarteh, Kebba; Odafe, Solomon; Onotu, Dennis; Ekra, Kunomboa A; Kouakou, Joseph S; Ehrenkranz, Peter; Bicego, George; Torpey, Kwasi; Mukadi, Ya Diul; van Praag, Eric; Menten, Joris; Mastro, Timothy; Dukes Hamilton, Carol; Swaminathan, Mahesh; Dokubo, E Kainne; Baughman, Andrew L; Spira, Thomas; Colebunders, Robert; Bangsberg, David; Marlink, Richard; Zee, Aaron; Kaplan, Jonathan; Ellerbrock, Tedd V

    2014-11-28

    Although scale-up of antiretroviral therapy (ART) since 2005 has contributed to declines of about 30% in the global annual number of human immunodeficiency (HIV)-related deaths and declines in global HIV incidence, estimated annual HIV-related deaths among adolescents have increased by about 50% and estimated adolescent HIV incidence has been relatively stable. In 2012, an estimated 2,500 (40%) of all 6,300 daily new HIV infections occurred among persons aged 15-24 years. Difficulty enrolling adolescents and young adults in ART and high rates of loss to follow-up (LTFU) after ART initiation might be contributing to mortality and HIV incidence in this age group, but data are limited. To evaluate age-related ART retention challenges, data from retrospective cohort studies conducted in seven African countries among 16,421 patients, aged ≥15 years at enrollment, who initiated ART during 2004-2012 were analyzed. ART enrollment and outcome data were compared among three groups defined by age at enrollment: adolescents and young adults (aged 15-24 years), middle-aged adults (aged 25-49 years), and older adults (aged ≥50 years). Enrollees aged 15-24 years were predominantly female (81%-92%), commonly pregnant (3%-32% of females), unmarried (54%-73%), and, in four countries with employment data, unemployed (53%-86%). In comparison, older adults were more likely to be male (p<0.001), employed (p<0.001), and married, (p<0.05 in five countries). Compared with older adults, adolescents and young adults had higher LTFU rates in all seven countries, reaching statistical significance in three countries in crude and multivariable analyses. Evidence-based interventions to reduce LTFU for adolescent and young adult ART enrollees could help reduce mortality and HIV incidence in this age group.

  5. Community-Based Accompaniment with Supervised Antiretrovirals for HIV-Positive Adults in Peru: A Cluster-Randomized Trial.

    PubMed

    McLaughlin, Megan M; Franke, Molly F; Muñoz, Maribel; Nelson, Adrianne K; Saldaña, Olga; Cruz, Janeth Santa; Wong, Milagros; Zhang, Zibiao; Lecca, Leonid; Ticona, Eduardo; Arevalo, Jorge; Sanchez, Eduardo; Sebastián, Jose Luis; Shin, Sonya

    2017-01-10

    We conducted a cluster-randomized trial to estimate effects of directly observed combination antiretroviral therapy (DOT-cART) on retention with viral suppression among HIV-positive adults in Peru. We randomly allocated facilities to receive the 12-month intervention plus the standard of care, including adherence support provided through accompaniment. In the intervention arm, health workers supervised doses, twice daily, and accompanied patients to appointments. Among 356 patients, intention-to-treat analyses showed no statistically significant benefit of DOT, relative to no-DOT, at 12 or 24 months (adjusted probability of primary outcome: 0.81 vs. 0.73 and 0.76 vs. 0.68, respectively). A statistically significant benefit of DOT was found in per-protocol and as-treated analyses at 12 months (0.83 for DOT vs. 0.73 for no DOT, p value: 0.02 per-protocol, 0.01 as-treated), but not 24 months. Rates of retention with viral suppression were high in both arms. Among adults receiving robust adherence support, the added effect of time-limited DOT, if any, is small-to-moderate.

  6. Retention in care, resource utilization, and costs for adults receiving antiretroviral therapy in Zambia: a retrospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Of the estimated 800,000 adults living with HIV in Zambia in 2011, roughly half were receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART). As treatment scale up continues, information on the care provided to patients after initiating ART can help guide decision-making. We estimated retention in care, the quantity of resources utilized, and costs for a retrospective cohort of adults initiating ART under routine clinical conditions in Zambia. Methods Data on resource utilization (antiretroviral [ARV] and non-ARV drugs, laboratory tests, outpatient clinic visits, and fixed resources) and retention in care were extracted from medical records for 846 patients who initiated ART at ≥15 years of age at six treatment sites between July 2007 and October 2008. Unit costs were estimated from the provider’s perspective using site- and country-level data and are reported in 2011 USD. Results Patients initiated ART at a median CD4 cell count of 145 cells/μL. Fifty-nine percent of patients initiated on a tenofovir-containing regimen, ranging from 15% to 86% depending on site. One year after ART initiation, 75% of patients were retained in care. The average cost per patient retained in care one year after ART initiation was $243 (95% CI, $194-$293), ranging from $184 (95% CI, $172-$195) to $304 (95% CI, $290-$319) depending on site. Patients retained in care one year after ART initiation received, on average, 11.4 months’ worth of ARV drugs, 1.5 CD4 tests, 1.3 blood chemistry tests, 1.4 full blood count tests, and 6.5 clinic visits with a doctor or clinical officer. At all sites, ARV drugs were the largest cost component, ranging from 38% to 84% of total costs, depending on site. Conclusions Patients initiate ART late in the course of disease progression and a large proportion drop out of care after initiation. The quantity of resources utilized and costs vary widely by site, and patients utilize a different mix of resources under routine clinical conditions than if they were

  7. Incidence of serious morbidity in HIV-infected adults on antiretroviral therapy in a West African care centre, 2003-2008

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In resource-limited settings, scaling-up antiretroviral treatment (ART) has required the involvement of decentralized health facilities with limited equipment. We estimated the incidence of serious morbidity among HIV-infected adults receiving ART in one of these HIV routine care center in sub-Saharan Africa. Methods We conducted a prospective study at the Centre Medical de Suivi des Donneurs de Sang (CMSDS), which is affiliated with the National Centre for Blood Transfusion in Abidjan, Côte d’Ivoire. Adult patients infected with HIV-1 or HIV-1/HIV-2 who initiated ART between January 2003 and December 2008 were eligible for the study. Standardized clinical data were collected at each visit. Serious morbidity was defined as a new episode of malaria, WHO stage 3–4 event, ANRS grade 3–4 adverse event, or any event leading to death or to hospitalization. Results 1008 adults, 67% women, with a median age of 35 years, and a median pre-ART CD4 count of 186/mm3 started ART and were followed for a median of 17.3 months. The overall incidences of loss to follow-up, death, and attrition were 6.2/100 person-years (PY) [95% CI 5.1-7.2], 2.3/100 PY [95% CI 1.6-2.9], and 8.1/100 PY [95% CI 7.0-9.4], respectively. The incidence of first serious event was 11.5/100 PY overall, 15.9/100 PY within the first year and 8.3/100 PY thereafter. The most frequently documented specific diagnoses were malaria, tuberculosis, bacterial septicemia and bacterial pneumonia. Conclusion Among HIV-infected adults followed in routine conditions in a West African primary care clinic, we recorded a high incidence of serious morbidity during the first year on ART. Providing care centers with diagnostic tools and standardizing data collection are necessary steps to improve the quality of care in primary care facilities in sub-Saharan Africa. PMID:24373303

  8. Effect of Intercurrent Infections and Vaccinations on Immune and Inflammatory Biomarkers Among Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Adults on Suppressive Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Darrell H. S.; Szadkowski, Leah; Raboud, Janet; Yi, Tae Joon; Shannon, Brett; Kaul, Rupert; Liles, W. Conrad; Walmsley, Sharon

    2015-01-01

    We used generalized estimating equations to quantify the impact of recent vaccination or intercurrent infections on immune and inflammatory biomarkers among 144 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected adults with HIV RNA < 50 copies/mL on antiretroviral therapy. These events were associated with a 2.244 µg/mL increase in high sensitivity C-reactive protein and should be routinely assessed in future studies. PMID:26380337

  9. Tuberculosis incidence rate and risk factors among HIV-infected adults with access to antiretroviral therapy in Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    LIU, Enju; MAKUBI, Abel; DRAIN, Paul; SPIEGELMAN, Donna; SANDO, David; LI, Nan; CHALAMILLA, Guerino; SUDFELD, Christopher R.; HERTZMARK, Ellen; FAWZI, Wafaie W.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine the incidence rate and risk factors of tuberculosis (TB) among HIV-infected adults accessing antiretroviral therapy (ART) in Tanzania. Design A prospective observational study among HIV-infected adults attending 47 HIV clinics in Dar es Salaam. Methods We estimated TB incidence rates among HIV-infected patients prior to and after ART initiation. We used Cox proportional hazard regressions to determine the predictors of incident TB among HIV-infected adults enrolled in the HIV care and treatment program. Results We assessed 67,686 patients for a median follow-up period of 24 (interquartile range: 8–49) months; 7,602 patients were diagnosed with active TB. The TB incidence rate was 7.9 (95% Confidence Interval (CI), 7.6–8.2)/100 person-years prior to ART initiation, and 4.4(95%CI, 4.2–4.4)/100 person-years for patients receiving ART. In multivariate analyses, patients on ART in the first 3 months had a 57% higher risk of TB (Hazard Ratio:1.57, 95%CI:1.47–1.68) compared to those not on ART, but the risk significantly decreased with increasing duration of ART. Risk factors for incident TB included being male, having low body mass index or middle upper arm circumference, lower CD4 cell count, and advanced WHO disease stage. There was seasonal variation for incident TB, with higher risk observed following the rainy seasons (May, June, and November). Conclusion In TB endemic regions, HIV-infected patients initiating ART, particularly males and those with poor nutritional status, should be closely monitored for active TB in the months following ART initiation. In addition to increasing the access to ART, interventions should be considered to improve nutritional status among HIV-infected patients. PMID:26091295

  10. Effects of highly active antiretroviral therapy on the survival of HIV-infected adult patients in urban slums of Kenya.

    PubMed

    Muhula, Samuel Opondo; Peter, Memiah; Sibhatu, Biadgilign; Meshack, Ndirangu; Lennie, Kyomuhangi

    2015-01-01

    Recent improvements in access to Anti-Retroviral Therapy (ART) have radically reduced hospitalizations and deaths associated with HIV infection in both developed countries and sub-Saharan Africa. Not much is known about survival of patients on ART in slums. The objective of this study was to identify factors associated with mortality among adult patients on ART in resource poor, urban, sub-Saharan African setting. A prospective open cohort study was conducted with adult patients on ART at a clinic in Kibera slums, Nairobi, Kenya. The patients' enrollment to care was between March 2005 and November 2011. Descriptive statistics were computed and Kaplan-Meier (KM) methods used to estimate survival time while Cox's proportional hazards (CPH) model fitted to determine mortality predictors. A total of 2,011 adult patients were studied, 69% being female. Female gender (p=0.0016), zidovudine-based regimen patients (p<0.0001), CD4 count>351 patients (p<0.0001), WHO stage I patients (p<0.0001) and "Working" functional status patients recorded better survival probability on ART. In CPH analysis, the hazard of dying was higher in patients on Stavudine-based regimen(hazard ratio (HR)=.8; 95% CI, 1.5-2.2; p<0.0001),CD4 count<50 cells/µl (HR=1.6; 95% CI, 1.5-1.7;p<0.0001), WHO Stage IV at ART initiation (HR=1.3; 95% CI, 1.1-1.6; p=0.016) and bedridden patients (HR=2.7; 95% CI, 1.7-4.4;p<0.0001). There was increased mortality among the males, those with advanced Immunosuppression, late WHO stage and bedridden patients. The findings further justify the need to switch patients on Stavudine-based regimen as per the WHO recommendations.

  11. Initiation of antiretroviral therapy in HIV-infected adults with skin complaints in northern Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    Mavura, Daudi R.; Masenga, E. John; Minja, Eli; Grossmann, Henning; Crump, John A.; Bartlett, John A.

    2015-01-01

    Abnormal skin findings are identified in over 90% of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected persons globally. A prospective cohort study of HIV-infected patients with skin complaints commencing antiretroviral therapy (ART) in northern Tanzania was undertaken. Consecutive HIV-infected subjects presenting with skin complaints, who met criteria for ART initiation, were recruited at a Tanzanian Regional Dermatology Training Center. A single dermatologist evaluated all subjects; baseline skin biopsies were performed, and CD4+ cell counts and plasma HIV RNA levels were measured. All subjects received a fixed-dose combination of stavudine, lamivudine, and nevirapine. A total of 100 subjects were enrolled; 86 subjects completed six months of follow-up. Median baseline CD4+ cell counts and plasma HIV RNA levels were 120 cells/μl and 5.2 log10 copies/ml. The most common dermatologic condition was papular pruritic eruption (47%). The median baseline score on the Burn Scale was 38%. After six months, 10 subjects had achieved the complete resolution of skin abnormalities. In those without complete resolution, the median Burn Scale score improved to 7%. Five patients developed new eruptions by month 3, which in two cases were attributed to drug reactions. In the 86 subjects remaining on ART after six months, the median CD4+ cell count had increased to 474 cells/μl, and plasma HIV RNA levels were <400 copies/ml in 85 (99%) subjects. Patients with HIV infection with skin complaints experienced marked clinical improvements following ART initiation. PMID:25256912

  12. [National consensus document by GESIDA/National Aids Plan on antiretroviral treatment in adults infected by the human immunodeficiency virus (January 2011 update)].

    PubMed

    2011-03-01

    The update of these adult antiretroviral treatment (cART) recommendations has been carried out by consensus of a panel consisting of members of the Grupo de Estudio de Sida (Gesida, AIDS Study Group) and the Plan Nacional sobre el Sida (PNS, Spanish AIDS Plan) who have reviewed the antiretroviral efficacy and safety advances in clinical trials, cohort and pharmacokinetic studies published in medical journals (PubMed and Embase), or presented in medical scientific meetings. Three levels of evidence were defined according to the data source: randomized studies (level A), cohort or case-control studies (level B), and expert opinion (level C). The decision to recommend, consider or not to recommend antiretroviral treatment (ART) was established by consensus in each situation. The current treatment of choice for HIV infection is the combination of three drugs. Combined ART is recommended in patients with symptomatic HIV infection, and guidelines on this treatment in patients with an opportunistic type C infection are included. In asymptomatic patients, initiation of ART is recommended on the basis of CD4 lymphocyte counts, plasma viral load and patient co-morbidities, as follows: a) therapy should be started in patients with CD4 counts <350 cells/μL; b) Therapy should be recommended when CD4 counts are between 350 and 500 cells/μL, except when CD4 are stabilized, there is low plasma viral load, or the patient not willing; c) Therapy could be deferred when CD4 counts are above 500 cells/ μL, but should be considered in cases of cirrhosis, chronic hepatitis C, hepatitis B fulfilling treatment criteria, high cardiovascular risk, HIV nephropathy, viral load > 100,000 copies/ mL, proportion of CD4 cells < 14%, in people aged >55 years, and in cases of discordant serological sexual couples in order to reduce transmission. cART should include 2 reverse transcriptase inhibitor nucleoside analogues (AN) and a non-analogue reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NN) or 2 AN and a

  13. Short Communication: Limited HIV Pretreatment Drug Resistance Among Adults Attending Free Antiretroviral Therapy Clinic of Pune, India.

    PubMed

    Karade, Santosh; Patil, Ajit A; Ghate, Manisha; Kulkarni, Smita S; Kurle, Swarali N; Risbud, Arun R; Rewari, Bharat B; Gangakhedkar, Raman R

    2016-04-01

    In India, the roll out of the free antiretroviral therapy (ART) program completed a decade of its initiation in 2014. The success of first-line ART is influenced by prevalence of HIV pretreatment drug resistance (PDR) in the population. In this cross-sectional study, we sought to determine the prevalence of PDR among adults attending the state-sponsored free ART clinic in Pune in western India. Fifty-two individuals eligible for ART as per national guidelines with median CD4 cell count of 253 cells/mm(3) (inter quartile range: 149-326) were recruited between January 2014 and April 2015. Population-based sequencing of partial pol gene sequences from plasma specimen revealed predominant HIV-1 subtype C infection (96.15%) and presence of single-drug resistance mutations against non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor in two sequences. The study supports the need for periodic surveillance, when offering PDR testing at individual level is not feasible.

  14. Use, perceptions, and acceptability of a ready-to-use supplementary food among adult HIV patients initiating antiretroviral treatment: a qualitative study in Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Olsen, Mette Frahm; Tesfaye, Markos; Kaestel, Pernille; Friis, Henrik; Holm, Lotte

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Ready-to-use supplementary foods (RUSF) are used increasingly in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) programs, but little is known about how it is used and viewed by patients. We used qualitative methods to explore the use, perceptions, and acceptability of RUSF among adult HIV patients in Jimma, Ethiopia. Methods The study obtained data from direct observations and 24 in-depth interviews with HIV patients receiving RUSF. Results Participants were generally very motivated to take RUSF and viewed it as beneficial. RUSF was described as a means to fill a nutritional gap, to “rebuild the body,” and protect it from harmful effects of antiretroviral treatment (ART). Many experienced nausea and vomiting when starting the supplement. This caused some to stop supplementation, but the majority adapted to RUSF. The supplement was eaten separately from meal situations and only had a little influence on household food practices. RUSF was described as food with “medicinal qualities,” which meant that many social and religious conventions related to food did not apply to it. The main concerns about RUSF related to the risk of HIV disclosure and its social consequences. Conclusion HIV patients view RUSF in a context of competing livelihood needs. RUSF intake was motivated by a strong wish to get well, while the risk of HIV disclosure caused concerns. Despite the motivation for improving health, the preservation of social networks was prioritized, and nondisclosure was often a necessary strategy. Food sharing and religious fasting practices were not barriers to the acceptability of RUSF. This study highlights the importance of ensuring that supplementation strategies, like other HIV services, are compatible with the sociocultural context of patients. PMID:23766634

  15. Cigarette smoking is associated with high HIV viral load among adults presenting for antiretroviral therapy in Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Pollack, Todd M; Duong, Hao T; Pham, Thuy T; Do, Cuong D; Colby, Donn

    2017-01-01

    High HIV viral load (VL >100,000 cp/ml) is associated with increased HIV transmission risk, faster progression to AIDS, and reduced response to some antiretroviral regimens. To better understand factors associated with high VL, we examined characteristics of patients presenting for treatment in Hanoi, Vietnam. We examined baseline data from the Viral Load Monitoring in Vietnam Study, a randomized controlled trial of routine VL monitoring in a population starting antiretroviral therapy (ART) at a clinic in Hanoi. Patients with prior treatment failure or ART resistance were excluded. Characteristics examined included demographics, clinical and laboratory data, and substance use. Logistic regression was used to calculate crude and adjusted odds ratios (aOR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI). Out of 636 patients, 62.7% were male, 72.9% were ≥30 years old, and 28.3% had a history of drug injection. Median CD4 was 132 cells/mm3, and 34.9% were clinical stage IV. Active cigarette smoking was reported by 36.3% with 14.0% smoking >10 cigarettes per day. Alcohol consumption was reported by 20.1% with 6.1% having ≥5 drinks per event. Overall 53.0% had a VL >100,000 cp/ml. Male gender, low body weight, low CD4 count, prior TB, and cigarette smoking were associated with high VL. Those who smoked 1-10 cigarettes per day were more likely to have high VL (aOR = 1.99, 95% CI = 1.15-3.45), while the smaller number of patients who smoked >10 cigarettes per day had a non-significant trend toward higher VL (aOR = 1.41, 95% CI = 0.75-2.66). Alcohol consumption was not significantly associated with high VL. Tobacco use is increasingly recognized as a contributor to premature morbidity and mortality among HIV-infected patients. In our study, cigarette smoking in the last 30 days was associated with a 1.5 to 2-fold higher odds of having an HIV VL >100,000 cp/ml among patients presenting for ART. These findings provide further evidence of the negative effects of tobacco use among

  16. Cigarette smoking is associated with high HIV viral load among adults presenting for antiretroviral therapy in Vietnam

    PubMed Central

    Pollack, Todd M.; Duong, Hao T.; Pham, Thuy T.; Do, Cuong D.; Colby, Donn

    2017-01-01

    High HIV viral load (VL >100,000 cp/ml) is associated with increased HIV transmission risk, faster progression to AIDS, and reduced response to some antiretroviral regimens. To better understand factors associated with high VL, we examined characteristics of patients presenting for treatment in Hanoi, Vietnam. We examined baseline data from the Viral Load Monitoring in Vietnam Study, a randomized controlled trial of routine VL monitoring in a population starting antiretroviral therapy (ART) at a clinic in Hanoi. Patients with prior treatment failure or ART resistance were excluded. Characteristics examined included demographics, clinical and laboratory data, and substance use. Logistic regression was used to calculate crude and adjusted odds ratios (aOR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI). Out of 636 patients, 62.7% were male, 72.9% were ≥30 years old, and 28.3% had a history of drug injection. Median CD4 was 132 cells/mm3, and 34.9% were clinical stage IV. Active cigarette smoking was reported by 36.3% with 14.0% smoking >10 cigarettes per day. Alcohol consumption was reported by 20.1% with 6.1% having ≥5 drinks per event. Overall 53.0% had a VL >100,000 cp/ml. Male gender, low body weight, low CD4 count, prior TB, and cigarette smoking were associated with high VL. Those who smoked 1–10 cigarettes per day were more likely to have high VL (aOR = 1.99, 95% CI = 1.15–3.45), while the smaller number of patients who smoked >10 cigarettes per day had a non-significant trend toward higher VL (aOR = 1.41, 95% CI = 0.75–2.66). Alcohol consumption was not significantly associated with high VL. Tobacco use is increasingly recognized as a contributor to premature morbidity and mortality among HIV-infected patients. In our study, cigarette smoking in the last 30 days was associated with a 1.5 to 2-fold higher odds of having an HIV VL >100,000 cp/ml among patients presenting for ART. These findings provide further evidence of the negative effects of tobacco use

  17. Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus and response to antiretroviral therapy: A prospective study of HIV-infected adults

    PubMed Central

    Maskew, Mhairi; MacPhail, A Patrick; Whitby, Denise; Egger, Matthias; Fox, Matthew P.

    2013-01-01

    Background The possible impact of co-infection with Kaposi’s sarcoma associated herpes virus on the response to antiretroviral therapy (ART) is unknown. Prospective studies are rare, particularly in Africa. Methods We enrolled a prospective cohort of HIV-infected adults initiating ART in Johannesburg, South Africa. Subjects were defined as seropositive to KSHV if reactive to either KSHV lytic K8.1 or latent Orf73 antigen or both. Subjects were followed from ART initiation until 18-months on treatment. HIV viral load and CD4 counts were tested 6 monthly. Linear generalized estimating and log-binomial regression models were used to estimate the effect of KSHV infection on immunologic recovery and response as well as HIV viral load suppression within 18-months after ART initiation. Results 385 subjects initiating ART from November 2008-March 2009 were eligible including 184 (48%) KSHV+. The KSHV+ group was similar to the KSHV− in terms of age, gender, initiating CD4 count, body mass index, tuberculosis and haemoglobin levels. The KSHV+ group gained a similar number of cells at 6- (difference of 10 cells/mm3, 95% CI: −11–31), 12- (3 cells/mm3, 95% CI: −19–25) and 18-months (24 cells/mm3, 95% CI: −13–61) compared to the KSHV− group. Adjusted relative risk of failure to suppress viral load to <400 copies/mL (1.03; 95% CI: 0.90–1.17) were similar for KSHV+ and KSHV− by 6-months on treatment. Conclusions In a population with a high KSHV prevalence, HIV-positive adults co-infected with KSHV achieved similar immunologic and virologic responses to ART early after treatment initiation compared to those KSHV−. PMID:23614996

  18. “I was thinking too much”: experiences of HIV-positive adults with common mental disorders and poor adherence to antiretroviral therapy in Zimbabwe

    PubMed Central

    Kidia, Khameer; Machando, Debra; Bere, Tarisai; Macpherson, Kirsty; Nyamayaro, Primrose; Potter, Lucy; Makadzange, Tariro; Munjoma, Ronald; Marufu, Marshall; Araya, Ricardo; Safren, Steven; O'Cleirgh, Conall; Chibanda, Dixon; Abas, Melanie

    2015-01-01

    Objective To document the lived experiences of people with both poor mental health and suboptimal adherence to antiretroviral therapy in high HIV prevalence settings. Methods In-depth qualitative interviews were conducted with 47 (female =31) HIV-positive adults who scored above the cut-point on a locally-validated scale for common mental disorders. Purposive sampling was used to recruit participants with evidence of poor adherence. Six additional key informant interviews (female = 6) were conducted with healthcare workers. Data were collected and analysed inductively by an interdisciplinary coding team. Results The major challenges faced by participants were stressors (poverty, stigma, marital problems) and symptoms of common mental disorders (“thinking too much”, changes to appetite and sleep, “burdened heart”, and low energy levels). Thinking too much, which appears closely related to rumination, was the symptom with the greatest negative impact on adherence to antiretroviral therapy among HIV-positive adults with common mental disorders. In turn, thinking too much was commonly triggered by the stressors faced by people living with HIV/AIDS, especially poverty. Finally, participants desired private counselling, access to income generating activities, and family engagement in mental health care. Conclusions Better understanding of the local expression of mental disorders and of underlying stressors can inform the development of culturally sensitive interventions to reduce common mental disorders and poor adherence to antiretroviral therapy. PMID:25754063

  19. Outcomes of antiretroviral therapy among younger versus older adolescents and adults in an urban clinic, Zimbabwe.

    PubMed

    Matyanga, C M J; Takarinda, K C; Owiti, P; Mutasa-Apollo, T; Mugurungi, O; Buruwe, L; Reid, A J

    2016-06-21

    Contexte : Un centre de santé soutenu par une organisation non gouvernementale offrant des services de santé, notamment les services de traitement antirétroviral (TAR).Objectif : Comparer la rétention du TAR entre des adolescents plus jeunes (10–14 ans) et plus âgés (15–19 ans) et des adultes plus jeunes (20–29 ans) et plus âgés (⩾30 ans) et déterminer les facteurs associés à l'attrition et spécifiques des adolescents et des adultes parmi ceux qui ont mis en route du TAR en 2010–2011.Schéma : Etude rétrospective de cohorte.Résultats : L'étude a inclus 110 (7%) adolescents et 1484 (93%) adultes. Aucune différence en termes de rétention n'a été observée entre les adolescents plus jeunes et plus âgés à 6, 12 et 24 mois. Davantage des plus jeunes adolescents ont été initiés au traitement avec un index de masse corporelle <16 kg/m(2) comparé aux adolescents plus âgés (64% contre 47% ; P = 0,04). Il y avait plus de femmes (74% contre 52% ; P < 0,001) et moins de patients démarrant le TAR avec un comptage de CD4 ⩽ 350 cellules/mm(3) (77% contre 81% ; P = 0,007) parmi les adultes plus jeunes comparés aux plus âgés. Les adultes plus jeunes ont eu davantage d'attrition à tout moment que les plus âgés. Aucun facteur de risque d'attrition n'a été observé parmi les adolescents. Chez les adultes, les facteurs associés à l'attrition ont inclus l'âge plus jeune, un comptage de CD4 plus faible et une infection au virus de l'immunodéficience humaine plus avancée lors de la mise en route du traitement et son initiation dans le cadre d'un protocole basé sur la stavudine.Conclusion : Les adultes plus jeunes ont eu davantage d'attrition et devraient susciter davantage d'attention. Nous n'avons pas pu démontrer de différences d'attrition entre les adolescents plus jeunes et plus âgés. La perte de vue a été la cause principale d'attrition dans tous les groupes d'âge. Dans l'ensemble, un démarrage plus précoce du TAR parait

  20. Prices paid for adult and paediatric antiretroviral treatment by low- and middle-income countries in 2012: high, low or just right?

    PubMed

    Perriëns, Joseph H; Habiyambere, Vincent; Dongmo-Nguimfack, Boniface; Hirnschall, Gottfried

    2014-01-01

    A viable market for antiretroviral drugs in low- and middle-income countries is key to the continued scale-up of antiretroviral treatment. We describe the price paid by low- and middle-income countries for 10 first- and 7 second-line adult and paediatric treatment regimens from 2003 to 2012, and compare the price of their finished formulations with the price of their active pharmaceutical ingredients in 2005, 2007, 2010 and 2012. Between 2003 and 2012 the median price of adult first-line treatment regimens per treatment-year decreased from USD499 to USD122, and that of second-line regimens from USD2,934 to USD497. In 2005 adult formulations were sold for a price 170% higher than the cost of their active pharmaceutical ingredients. This margin had decreased to 28% in 2012. Between 2004 and 2013, the price of paediatric treatment per treatment-year decreased from USD585 to USD147 for first-line and from USD763 to USD288 for second-line treatment. In 2005, paediatric treatment regimens were sold at a price 231% higher than the cost of their active pharmaceutical ingredients. This margin remained high and was 195% in 2012. The prices paid for antiretroviral drugs by low- and middle-income countries decreased between 2003 and 2012. Although the margins on their sale decreased, there is likely still space for price reduction, especially for the more recent World Health Organization recommended adult first-line regimens and for paediatric treatment.

  1. Incidence and predictors of tuberculosis among HIV-infected adults after initiation of antiretroviral therapy in Nigeria, 2004-2012

    PubMed Central

    Dokubo, E. Kainne; Shiraishi, Ray W.; Agolory, Simon G.; Auld, Andrew F.; Onotu, Dennis; Odafe, Solomon; Dalhatu, Ibrahim; Abiri, Oseni; Debem, Henry C.; Bashorun, Adebobola; Ellerbrock, Tedd

    2017-01-01

    Background Nigeria had the most AIDS-related deaths worldwide in 2014 (170,000), and 46% were associated with tuberculosis (TB). Although treatment of people living with HIV (PLHIV) with antiretroviral therapy (ART) reduces TB-associated morbidity and mortality, incident TB can occur while on ART. We estimated incidence and characterized factors associated with TB after ART initiation in Nigeria. Methods We analyzed retrospective cohort data from a nationally representative sample of adult patients on ART. Data were abstracted from 3,496 patient records, and analyses were weighted and controlled for a complex survey design. We performed domain analyses on patients without documented TB disease and used a Cox proportional hazard model to assess factors associated with TB incidence after ART. Results At ART initiation, 3,350 patients (95.8%) were not receiving TB treatment. TB incidence after ART initiation was 0.57 per 100 person-years, and significantly higher for patients with CD4<50/μL (adjusted hazard ratio [AHR]: 4.2, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.4–12.7) compared with CD4≥200/μL. Patients with suspected but untreated TB at ART initiation and those with a history of prior TB were more likely to develop incident TB (AHR: 12.2, 95% CI: 4.5–33.5 and AHR: 17.6, 95% CI: 3.5–87.9, respectively). Conclusion Incidence of TB among PLHIV after ART initiation was low, and predicted by advanced HIV, prior TB, and suspected but untreated TB. Study results suggest a need for improved TB screening and diagnosis, particularly among high-risk PLHIV initiating ART, and reinforce the benefit of early ART and other TB prevention efforts. PMID:28282390

  2. Utility of Cryptococcal Antigen Screening and Evolution of Asymptomatic Cryptococcal Antigenemia among HIV-Infected Women Starting Antiretroviral Therapy in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Kwan, Candice K; Leelawiwat, Wanna; Intalapaporn, Poj; Anekthananon, Thanomsak; Raengsakulrach, Boonyos; Peters, Philip J; McNicholl, Janet M; Park, Benjamin J; McConnell, Michelle S; Weidle, Paul J

    2014-01-01

    Cryptococcal meningitis (CM) remains a significant HIV-associated opportunistic infection in Southeast Asia and Africa, with a high burden of disease and a high mortality rate despite the availability of antiretroviral therapy (ART). We retrospectively examined the utility of cryptococcal antigen screening to identify risk for CM among 211 Thai women initiating ART. Antigenemia prevalence was 11% (n = 9) among 84 women with a CD4 count <100 cells/mm(3). Screening identified all women who later developed CM. Cryptococcal antigen titers decreased over time with ART. Our study confirmed findings from previous studies in Thailand and South Africa and provided novel observational data regarding the course of cryptococcal antigenemia in patients initiating ART and the poor efficacy of low-dose fluconazole prophylaxis in preventing CM among patients with antigenemia.

  3. Supervision, monitoring and evaluation of nationwide scale-up of antiretroviral therapy in Malawi.

    PubMed Central

    Libamba, Edwin; Makombe, Simon; Mhango, Eustice; de Ascurra Teck, Olga; Limbambala, Eddie; Schouten, Erik J.; Harries, Anthony D.

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe the supervision, monitoring and evaluation strategies used to assess the delivery of antiretroviral therapy during nationwide scale-up of treatment in Malawi. METHODS: In the first quarter of 2005, the HIV Unit of the Ministry of Health and its partners (the Lighthouse Clinic; Médecins Sans Frontières-Belgium, Thyolo district; and WHO's Country Office) undertook structured supervision and monitoring of all public sector health facilities in Malawi delivering antiretroviral therapy. FINDINGS: Data monitoring showed that by the end of 2004, there were 13,183 patients (5274 (40%) male, 12 527 (95%) adults) who had ever started antiretroviral therapy. Of patients who had ever started, 82% (10 761/13,183) were alive and taking antiretrovirals; 8% (1026/13,183) were dead; 8% (1039/13,183) had been lost to follow up; <1% (106/13,183) had stopped treatment; and 2% (251/13,183) had transferred to another facility. Of those alive and on antiretrovirals, 98% (7098/7258) were ambulatory; 85% (6174/7258) were fit to work; 10% (456/4687) had significant side effects; and, based on pill counts, 96% (6824/7114) had taken their treatment correctly. Mistakes in the registration and monitoring of patients were identified and corrected. Drug stocks were checked, and one potential drug stock-out was averted. As a result of the supervisory visits, by the end of March 2005 recruitment of patients to facilities scheduled to start delivering antiretroviral therapy had increased. CONCLUSION: This report demonstrates the importance of early supervision for sites that are starting to deliver antiretroviral therapy, and it shows the value of combining data collection with supervision. Making regular supervisory and monitoring visits to delivery sites are essential for tracking the national scale-up of delivery of antiretrovirals. PMID:16628306

  4. Predictors of loss to follow-up in antiretroviral treatment for adult patients in the Oromia region, Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Megerso, Abebe; Garoma, Sileshi; Eticha, Tolosa; Workineh, Tilaye; Daba, Shallo; Tarekegn, Mihretu; Habtamu, Zelalem

    2016-01-01

    Purpose It is known that antiretroviral treatment (ART) reduces mortality from acquired immunodeficiency syndrome related causes. Patient’s lost to follow-up (LTFU) in this treatment poses a paramount problem to the public and health care services. Information on predictors of loss to follow-up is scarce in this study area and similar settings. Therefore, this study aimed at identifying correlates of loss to follow-up in ART among adult patients in the Oromia region of Ethiopia. Methods A case–control study was conducted between February 2015 and April 2015 using medical records. The stratified sampling technique was used to select health facilities. The number of patient records to be included in the study was proportionally allocated to each stratum based on their patient proportion in the regional data. Specific health facilities from which to include the records were randomly selected from a list of the health facilities per stratum. All adult patient records registered as LTFU (416) in the selected health facilities during the 12-month period prior to the data collection date, and 832 patients with good adherence to ART were included. Data were double-entered into Epi Info 7 and analyzed using SPSS 20. Descriptive statistics and binary logistic regression were used to report the results. Qualitative data were thematically analyzed using open code computer software. Results Age 15–24 years (adjusted odds ratio [AOR], 19.82 95% CI: 6.80, 57.73); day laborers (AOR, 5.36; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 3.23, 8.89), rural residents (AOR, 2.35; 95% CI: 1.45, 3.89), World Health Organization clinical stage IV (AOR, 2.29; 95% CI: 1.45, 3.62), baseline CD4 <350 cells/mL (AOR, 2.06; 95% CI: 1.36, 3.13), suboptimal adherence to ART (AOR, 7.42; 95% CI: 1.87, 29.41), were factors which increased the risk of loss to follow-up in ART. Conclusion Multiple risk factors, both socioeconomic and clinical, were associated with loss to follow-up. Attention is required to

  5. Overcoming Barriers to HIV Treatment Adherence: A Brief Cognitive Behavioral Intervention for HIV-Positive Adults on Antiretroviral Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Olem, David; Sharp, Kelly M.; Taylor, Jonelle M.; Johnson, Mallory O.

    2014-01-01

    Maximizing HIV treatment adherence is critical in efforts to optimize health outcomes and to prevent further HIV transmission. The Balance Project intervention uses cognitive behavioral approaches to improve antiretroviral medication adherence through promoting adaptive coping with medication side effect and distress related to HIV. This 5-session intervention has been documented to prevent nonadherence among persons living with HIV who experience high levels of distress associated with their antiretroviral medication side effects. We describe the theoretical underpinnings of the intervention, provide details of the training and session protocols with a case example, and discuss implications for future applications of the intervention in both research and clinical settings. PMID:24855332

  6. Structural Determinants of Antiretroviral Therapy Use, HIV Care Attendance, and Viral Suppression among Adolescents and Young Adults Living with HIV

    PubMed Central

    Kahana, Shoshana Y.; Jenkins, Richard A.; Bruce, Douglas; Fernandez, Maria I.; Hightow-Weidman, Lisa B.; Bauermeister, Jose A.

    2016-01-01

    Background The authors examined associations between structural characteristics and HIV disease management among a geographically diverse sample of behaviorally and perinatally HIV-infected adolescents and young adults in the United States. Methods The sample included 1891 adolescents and young adults living with HIV (27.8% perinatally infected; 72.2% behaviorally infected) who were linked to care through 20 Adolescent Medicine Trials Network for HIV/AIDS Interventions Units. All completed audio computer–assisted self-interview surveys. Chart abstraction or blood draw provided viral load data. Geographic-level variables were extracted from the United States Census Bureau (e.g., socioeconomic disadvantage, percent of Black and Latino households, percent rural) and Esri Crime (e.g., global crime index) databases as Zip Code Tabulation Areas. AIDSVu data (e.g., prevalence of HIV among youth) were extracted at the county-level. Using HLM v.7, the authors conducted means-as-outcomes random effects multi-level models to examine the association between structural-level and individual-level factors and (1) being on antiretroviral therapy (ART) currently; (2) being on ART for at least 6 months; (3) missed HIV care appointments (not having missed any vs. having missed one or more appointments) over the past 12 months; and (4) viral suppression (defined by the corresponding assay cutoff for the lower limit of viral load at each participating site which denoted nondetectability vs. detectability). Results Frequencies for the 4 primary outcomes were as follows: current ART use (n = 1120, 59.23%); ART use for ≥6 months (n = 861, 45.53%); at least one missed HIV care appointment (n = 936, 49.50); and viral suppression (n = 577, 30.51%). After adjusting for individual-level factors, youth living in more disadvantaged areas (defined by a composite score derived from 2010 Census indicators including percent poverty, percent receiving public assistance, percent of female, single

  7. Prevalence, Correlates and Under-Diagnosis of Clinical Depression among Adults on Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy in a Tertiary Health Institution in Northeastern Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Jidda, Mohammed Said; Wakil, Musa Abba; Rabbebe, Isa Bukar; Omeiza, Asuku Beida; Yusuph, Haruna; Ogunlesi, Adegboyega; Suleiman, Umar Garba

    2014-01-01

    Clinical depression is a highly debilitating illness, which is often under-diagnosed and negatively impacts on the quality of life of its sufferers. When it co-exists with other medical conditions, its effect is even more incapacitating. Undiagnosed depression in the context of HIV infection leads to accelerated decline in CD4+ cell counts with concomitant increase in the viral load and poor adherence to the antiretroviral medications which lead to viral mutation and the evolution of resistant strains. This study examined the prevalence of depression, its correlates and the frequency of the diagnosis of the condition among HIV+ subjects on highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) by the internists and general physicians at the University of Maiduguri Teaching Hospital in Northeastern Nigeria. Three hundred and fifty representative samples of HIV+ adults on HAART were drawn from the Antiretroviral Therapy Clinic of the Institution. Diagnosis of depression was made using the International Classification of Diseases-10 criteria based on Composite International Diagnostic Interview generated data. Socio-demographic and clinical variables were also analyzed for their correlation with depression in the subjects. About 20% of the respondents were diagnosed with clinical depression and no diagnosis of the condition was hitherto entertained in all the respondents. The independent determinants of depression in the participants were: female gender [odds ratio (OR)=3.87 (95% confidence interval, CI: 2.089-7.183)], past history of psychiatric illness [OR=43.81 (95% CI: 9.731-197.30)] and family history of psychiatric illness in first-degree relatives of the subjects [OR=14.364 (95% CI=5.327-38.729)]. Depression is a relatively common psychiatric condition among adults on HAART, there is therefore the need for routine screening of this condition among HIV+ subjects in order to optimize patient care and improve clinical outcomes.

  8. Changes in Body Fat Distribution on Dual-Energy X-Ray Absorptiometry in Black South Africans Starting First-Line Antiretroviral Therapy.

    PubMed

    Abrahams, Zulfa; Levitt, Naomi; Lesosky, Maia; Maartens, Gary; Dave, Joel

    2016-10-01

    Long-term use of antiretroviral therapy (ART) increases the risk of developing lipodystrophy. Few studies from Africa have used longitudinal data to assess the development of lipoatrophy and lipohypertrophy. We use clinical anthropometry and dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) to describe changes in body fat distribution over a 24-month period in individuals initiated on ART. A convenience sample of black South Africans (55 men and 132 women) were recruited and followed for 24 months after commencing ART. Body fat distribution was assessed using anthropometric measurements and DEXA scans at baseline and then at 3, 6, 12, 18, and 24 months after commencing ART. DEXA was also used to estimate abdominal visceral adipose tissue (VAT) and subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT). Women gained more overall weight and more regional fat in all areas analyzed on DEXA scans. Women, not men, experienced a significant increasing trend in trunk fat and a significant decreasing trend in limb fat, when expressed as a percentage of total body fat. In men, the risk of developing lipoatrophy was more than two times greater than that of women, after adjusting for age, baseline body mass index, and ART regimen. Lipohypertrophy occurred similarly in men and women. VAT and SAT increased significantly in men and women, with women gaining considerably more than men. These findings are of great concern as an increased waist circumference is associated with increased mortality in HIV-infected populations. Further investigation is required to understand the mechanisms underlying the sex differences in changes in body fat distribution and its effects on cardiovascular risk.

  9. Etravirine combined with antiretrovirals other than darunavir/ritonavir for HIV-1-infected, treatment-experienced adults: Week 48 results of a phase IV trial

    PubMed Central

    Arathoon, Eduardo; Bhorat, Asad; Silaghi, Rodica; Crauwels, Herta; Lavreys, Ludo; Tambuyzer, Lotke; Van Baelen, Ben; Vanveggel, Simon; Opsomer, Magda

    2017-01-01

    Objective: VIOLIN (TMC125IFD3002; NCT01422330) evaluated the safety, tolerability, and pharmacokinetics of etravirine with antiretrovirals other than darunavir/ritonavir in HIV-1-infected patients. Methods: In a 48-week, phase IV, single-arm, multicenter study, patients on prior antiretroviral therapy (⩾8 weeks) who needed to change regimen for virologic failure (viral load ⩾ 500 copies/mL) or simplification/adverse events (viral load < 50 copies/mL) received etravirine 200 mg bid with ⩾1 other active antiretroviral, excluding darunavir/ritonavir or only nucleoside/tide reverse transcriptase inhibitors. Results: Of 211 treated patients, 73% (n = 155) had baseline viral load ⩾ 50 copies/mL and 27% (n = 56) had baseline viral load < 50 copies/mL. Protease inhibitors were the most common background antiretrovirals (83%). Diarrhea was the most frequent adverse event (17%). Serious adverse events (no rash) occurred in 5% of patients; none were etravirine related. Overall, median etravirine AUC12h was 5390 ng h/mL and C0h was 353 ng/mL (N = 199). Week 48 virologic response rates (viral load < 50 copies/mL; Food and Drug Administration Snapshot algorithm) were 48% (74/155) (baseline viral load ⩾ 50 copies/mL) and 75% (42/56) (baseline viral load < 50 copies/mL). Virologic failure rates were 42% and 13%, respectively. The most frequently emerging etravirine resistance-associated mutations in virologic failures were Y181C, E138A, and M230L. Virologic response rates for patients with baseline viral load ⩾ 50 copies/mL were 38% (30/79) (non-adherent) versus 64% (44/69) (adherent subset). Conclusion: Etravirine 200 mg bid in combination with antiretrovirals other than darunavir/ritonavir was well tolerated in the studied treatment-experienced HIV-1-infected population. The overall etravirine safety and tolerability profile and pharmacokinetics (specifically in those patients who were adherent

  10. Depressive and Anxiety Symptoms Predict Sustained Quality of Life Deficits in HIV-Positive Ugandan Adults Despite Antiretroviral Therapy: A Prospective Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Ezeamama, Amara E; Woolfork, Makhabele N; Guwatudde, David; Bagenda, Danstan; Manabe, Yukari C; Fawzi, Wafaie W; Smith Fawzi, Mary C

    2016-03-01

    The impact of psychosocial status at onset of antiretroviral therapy on changes in quality of life (QOL) and subjectively rated health (SRH) among adults on highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) in resource-limited settings is poorly understood. Therefore, we evaluate the association between stigma, anxiety, depression, and social support and change in QOL and SRH in HIV-infected Ugandan adults during an 18-month period. Psychosocial indicators were assessed at enrollment using structured questionnaires. QOL and SRH measures were assessed at months 0, 6, 12, and 18 using the Medical Outcomes Survey-HIV. Linear mixed models determined risk estimated differences in QOL and SRH in relation to quartiles of each psychosocial status indicator. Repeated measures generalized estimating equations modeling was implemented to assess differences in likelihood of improved versus nonimproved SRH during follow-up.QOL scores and SRH improved significantly for all participants over 18 months (P < 0.0001). The gain in QOL increased dose-dependently as baseline depressive symptoms (time*depression P < 0.001) and anxiety levels (time*anxiety P < 0.001) declined. Lower social support was associated with worse QOL at baseline (P = 0.0005) but QOL improvement during follow-up was not dependent on baseline level of social support (time*social support P = 0.8943) or number of stigmatizing experiences (time*stigma P = 0.8662). Psychosocial determinants did not predict changes in SRH in this study. High levels of depression and anxiety symptoms at HAART initiation predicts lower gains in QOL for HIV-positive patients for as long as 18 months. Long-term QOL improvements in HIV-infected adults may be enhanced by implementation of psychosocial interventions to reduce depression and anxiety in HIV-infected adults.

  11. Efficacy of Initial Antiretroviral Therapy for HIV-1 Infection in Adults: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of 114 Studies with up to 144 Weeks' Follow-Up

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Frederick J.; Amin, Janaki; Carr, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Background A comprehensive assessment of initial HIV-1 treatment success may inform study design and treatment guidelines. Methods Group-based, systematic review and meta-analysis of initial antiretroviral therapy studies, in adults, of ≥48 weeks duration, reported through December 31, 2012. Size-weighted, intention-to-treat efficacy was calculated. Parameters of study design/eligibility, participant and treatment characteristics were abstracted. Multivariable, random effects, linear regression models with backwards, stepwise selection were then used to identify variables associated with efficacy. Outcome Measures Antiviral efficacy (undetectable plasma viral load) and premature cessation of therapy. Results 114 studies were included (216 treatment groups; 40,124 participants; mean CD4 count 248 cells/µL [SD 81]; mean HIV-1 plasma viral load log10 4.9 [SD 0.2]). Mean efficacy across all groups was 60% (SD 16) over a mean 82 weeks' follow-up (SD 38). Efficacy declined over time: 66% (SD 16) at 48 weeks, 60% (SD 16) at 96 weeks, 52% (SD 18) at 144 weeks. The most common reason for treatment cessation was participant decision (11%, SD 6.6). Efficacy was higher with ‘Preferred’ than ‘Alternative’ regimens (as defined by 2013 United States antiretroviral guidelines): 75% vs. 65%, respectively, difference 10%; 95%CI 7.6 to 15.4; p<0.001. In 98 groups (45%) reporting efficacy stratified by pre-treatment viral load (< or ≥100,000 copies/mL), efficacy was greater for the lower stratum (70% vs. 62%, respectively, difference 8.4%; 95%CI 6.0 to 10.9; p<0.001). This difference persisted within ‘Preferred’ regimens. Greatest efficacy was associated with use of tenofovir-emtricitabine (vs. other nucleoside analogue backbones) and integrase strand transfer inhibitors (vs. other third drug classes). Conclusion Initial antiretroviral treatments for HIV-1 to date appear to have suboptimal long-term efficacy, but are more effective when commenced at plasma viral loads

  12. Child Safety: A Healthy Start. Teacher's Guide. Health Promotion for Adult Literacy Students: An Empowering Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hudson River Center for Program Development, Glenmont, NY.

    This guide is intended to help adult literacy teachers in New York present a learning module in which an empowering approach is used to provide adult students with information about child-rearing and prevention techniques to keep their children safe. The first half of the guide consists of reading materials concerning the following: home and road…

  13. Effect of Raltegravir-containing Intensification on HIV Burden and T Cell Activation in Multiple Gut Sites of HIV+ Adults on Suppressive Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Yukl, Steven A.; Shergill, Amandeep; McQuaid, Kenneth; Gianella, Sara; Lampiris, Harry; Hare, C. Bradley; Pandori, Mark; Sinclair, Elizabeth; Günthard, Huldrych F.; Fischer, Marek; Wong, Joseph K.; Havlir, Diane V.

    2010-01-01

    Objective To determine whether raltegravir-containing antiretroviral therapy (ART) intensification reduces HIV levels in the gut. Design Open-label study in HIV+ adults on ART with plasma HIV RNA<40 copies/ml. Methods Seven HIV+ adults received 12 weeks of ART intensification with raltegravir alone or in combination with efavirenz or darunavir. Gut cells were obtained by upper and lower endoscopy with biopsies from duodenum, ileum, colon, and rectum at baseline and 12 weeks. Study outcomes included plasma HIV RNA, HIV DNA and RNA from PBMC and 4 gut sites, T cell subsets, and activation markers. Results Intensification produced no consistent decrease in HIV RNA in the plasma, PBMC, duodenum, colon, or rectum. However, 5 of 7 participants had a decrease in unspliced HIV RNA per 106 CD4+ T cells in the ileum. There was a trend towards decreased T cell activation in all sites, which was greatest for CD8+ T cells in the ileum and PBMC, and a trend towards increased CD4+ T cells in the ileum. Conclusion Most HIV RNA and DNA in the blood and gut is not the result of ongoing replication that can be impacted by short-term intensification with raltegravir. However, the ileum may support ongoing productive infection in some patients on ART, even if the contribution to plasma RNA is not discernible. PMID:20827162

  14. The Impact of Comorbid Clinical Depression on The Health-Related Quality of Life of Adults on Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy in Maiduguri, Northeastern Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Wakawa, Ibrahim Abdu; Said, Jidda Mohammed; Abba, Wakil Musa; Shehu, Saleh; Rabbebe, Isa Bukar; Beida, Omeiza

    2014-01-01

    Background: Globally, depression compromises the quality of life (QOL) of people suffering from it. We assessed the impact of comorbid depression on the health-related quality of life (HRQOL) of adults on highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) in northeastern Nigeria in this study. Materials and Methods: Three hundred and three adults on HAART were recruited for this study from the ART clinic of the University of Maiduguri Teaching Hospital in northeastern Nigeria. The depressive disorder module of the Composite international diagnostic interview (CIDI version 3.0) and the WHO quality of life instrument (WHOQOL-BREF) were used for the evaluation of depression and quality of life respectively. Results: The prevalence of depression in this study was 19.8%. The depressed respondents rated their HRQOL poorer than their nondepressed counterparts on the physical, psychological, social relationships and environmental domains as well as the global outcome, as shown by these statistically significant findings (T = 9.739, P = <0.001), (T = 8.972, P = <0.001), (T = 6.533, P = <0.001), (T = 8.913, P = <0.001), and (T = 10.018, P = <0.001), respectively. Female gender, CD4 counts <200/mm3 and diagnosis of depression were significant predictors poor QOL. Conclusion: Depression has a negative impact on the QOL of the respondents. We therefore recommend incorporation of the routine screening of this important psychiatric comorbidity into the care of this vulnerable group in order to optimize patient care. PMID:25336775

  15. Disease patterns and causes of death of hospitalized HIV-positive adults in West Africa: a multicountry survey in the antiretroviral treatment era

    PubMed Central

    Lewden, Charlotte; Drabo, Youssoufou J; Zannou, Djimon M; Maiga, Moussa Y; Minta, Daouda K; Sow, Papa S; Akakpo, Jocelyn; Dabis, François; Eholié, Serge P

    2014-01-01

    Objective We aimed to describe the morbidity and mortality patterns in HIV-positive adults hospitalized in West Africa. Method We conducted a six-month prospective multicentre survey within the IeDEA West Africa collaboration in six adult medical wards of teaching hospitals in Abidjan, Ouagadougou, Cotonou, Dakar and Bamako. From April to October 2010, all newly hospitalized HIV-positive patients were eligible. Baseline and follow-up information until hospital discharge was recorded using standardized forms. Diagnoses were reviewed by a local event validation committee using reference definitions. Factors associated with in-hospital mortality were studied with a logistic regression model. Results Among 823 hospitalized HIV-positive adults (median age 40 years, 58% women), 24% discovered their HIV infection during the hospitalization, median CD4 count was 75/mm3 (IQR: 25–177) and 48% had previously received antiretroviral treatment (ART). The underlying causes of hospitalization were AIDS-defining conditions (54%), other infections (32%), other diseases (8%) and non-specific illness (6%). The most frequent diseases diagnosed were: tuberculosis (29%), pneumonia (15%), malaria (10%) and cerebral toxoplasmosis (10%). Overall, 315 (38%) patients died during hospitalization and the underlying cause of death was AIDS (63%), non-AIDS-defining infections (26%), other diseases (7%) and non-specific illness or unknown cause (4%). Among them, the most frequent fatal diseases were: tuberculosis (36%), cerebral toxoplasmosis (10%), cryptococcosis (9%) and sepsis (7%). Older age, clinical WHO stage 3 and 4, low CD4 count, and AIDS-defining infectious diagnoses were associated with hospital fatality. Conclusions AIDS-defining conditions, primarily tuberculosis, and bacterial infections were the most frequent causes of hospitalization in HIV-positive adults in West Africa and resulted in high in-hospital fatality. Sustained efforts are needed to integrate care of these disease

  16. "Starting from Ground Zero:" Constraints and Experiences of Adult Women Returning to College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deutsch, Nancy L.; Schmertz, Barbara

    2011-01-01

    Women adult students face particular constraints when pursuing degrees. This paper uses focus group data to explore the educational pathways, barriers, and supports of women students. Women's educations are shaped by personal and structural gendered forces, including family, economic, and workplace issues. Women report conflict over short-term…

  17. Oakland Readers. A Book of Life Stories Told by Students in the Second Start Adult Literacy Program. Levels One-Four.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamb, Jessica, Ed.

    This set of Oakland Readers consists of four books of oral histories edited on four reading levels. Each book contains life stories told by students in the Second Start Adult Literacy Program. The books are intended for use by tutors and adult students/new readers in adult literacy programs. Life stories of eight students appear in each book. In…

  18. Epstein-Barr virus DNA loads in adult human immunodeficiency virus type 1-infected patients receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ling, Paul D.; Vilchez, Regis A.; Keitel, Wendy A.; Poston, David G.; Peng, Rong Sheng; White, Zoe S.; Visnegarwala, Fehmida; Lewis, Dorothy E.; Butel, Janet S.

    2003-01-01

    Patients with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection are at high risk of developing Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-associated lymphoma. However, little is known of the EBV DNA loads in patients receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). Using a real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction assay, we demonstrated that significantly more HIV-1-infected patients receiving HAART than HIV-1-uninfected volunteers had detectable EBV DNA in blood (57 [81%] of 70 vs. 11 [16%] of 68 patients; P=.001) and saliva (55 [79%] of 68 vs. 37 [54%] of 68 patients; P=.002). The mean EBV loads in blood and saliva samples were also higher in HIV-1-infected patients than in HIV-1-uninfected volunteers (P=.001). The frequency of EBV detection in blood was associated with lower CD4+ cell counts (P=.03) among HIV-1-infected individuals, although no differences were observed in the EBV DNA loads in blood or saliva samples in the HIV-1-infected group. Additional studies are needed to determine whether EBV-specific CD4+ and CD8+ cells play a role in the pathogenesis of EBV in HIV-1-infected patients receiving HAART.

  19. Correlates of Combination Antiretroviral Adherence Among Recently Diagnosed Older HIV-Infected Adults Between 50 and 64 years

    PubMed Central

    Abara, Winston E.; Adekeye, Oluwatoyosi A.; Xu, Junjun; Heiman, Harry J.; Rust, George

    2016-01-01

    Optimal adherence to combination antiretroviral therapy is essential to the health of older people living with HIV (PLWH), however, the literature on adherence and aging is limited. Using Medicaid data from 29 states (N = 5177), we explored correlates of optimal adherence among older PLWH. The prevalence of optimal adherence was low (32 %) in this study. Males were more adherent than females (APR = 1.11, 95 % CI 1.02–1.21, P = 0.0127); persons with three or more co-morbidities (APR = 0.67, 95 % CI 0.60–0.74, P < 0.001), two co-morbidities (APR = 0.86, 95 % CI 0.75–0.98, P = 0.0319) and one co-morbidity (APR = 0.82, 95 % CI 0.73–0.92, P = 0.0008) were less adherent than those without any co-morbidity; and residents of rural areas (APR = 0.90, 95 % CI 0.63–0.98, P = 0.0385) and small metropolitan areas (APR = 0.82, 95 % CI 0.72–0.94, P = 0.0032) were less adherent than residents of large metropolitan areas. There were no racial differences in optimal adherence. Targeted interventions that provide adherence support, case management, and peer navigation services may be of benefit in achieving optimal adherence in this population. PMID:26885812

  20. Incidence and Predictors of Antiretroviral Treatment Modification in HIV-Infected Adults: A Brazilian Historical Cohort from 2001 to 2010

    PubMed Central

    Pinto Mendicino, Cássia Cristina; Reis, Edna Afonso; Carmo, Ricardo Andrade; Menezes de Pádua, Cristiane

    2017-01-01

    This study estimated the incidence of and time to first antiretroviral therapy (ART) modification. This longitudinal analysis comprised a sample of 236 patients from three HIV/AIDS referral centers in Belo Horizonte, Brazil—part of a major historical cohort. Inclusion criteria were as follows: having been treatment-naive patient ≥18 years old who initiated ART between 2001 and 2005 in these three referral centers. The main endpoint was time to first ART modification. Patients were followed up for five years, covering the period 2001–2010, during which time Pearson's chi-square test was performed to compare ART modification between groups. Kaplan-Meier inverse survival curves were employed to describe the probability of ART modification and Cox proportional hazard regression was used to estimate the adjusted hazard ratio (aHR) of ART modification. Among 247 patients from the major cohort, 236 were eligible. Median follow-up time was 37.2 months and the contribution in person-months was 7,615.4 months. A total of 108 (45.8%) patients had their ART regimen modified at least once (incidence rate: 1.42 per 100 person-months). Adverse drug reactions were the main reason for ART modification. Women (aHR = 1.62; p = 0.022) and patients on protease inhibitor- (PI-) based regimens (aHR = 2.70; p < 0.001) were at higher risk of ART modification. PMID:28348602

  1. When to start paediatric testing of the adult HIV cure research agenda?

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Seema K

    2017-01-01

    Ethical guidelines recommend that experimental interventions should be tested in adults first before they are tested and approved in children. Some challenge this paradigm, however, and recommend initiating paediatric testing after preliminary safety testing in adults in certain cases. For instance, commentators have argued for accelerated testing of HIV vaccines in children. Additionally, HIV cure research on the use of very early therapy (VET) in infants, prompted in part by the Mississippi baby case, is one example of a strategy that is currently being tested in infants before it has been well tested in adults. Because infants’ immune systems are still developing, the timing of HIV transmission is easier to identify in infants than in adults, and infants who receive VET might never develop the viral reservoirs that make HIV so difficult to eradicate, infants may be uniquely situated to achieve HIV cure or sustained viral remission. Several commentators have now argued for earlier initiation of HIV cure interventions other than (or in addition to) VET in children. HIV cure research is therefore a good case for re-examining the important question of when to initiate paediatric research. I will argue that, despite the potential for HIV cure research to benefit children and the scientific value of involving children in this research, the HIV cure agenda should not accelerate the involvement of children for the following reasons: HIV cure research is highly speculative, risky, aimed at combination approaches and does not compare favourably with the available alternatives. I conclude by drawing general implications for the initiation of paediatric testing, including that interventions that have to be used in combination with others and cures for chronic diseases may not be valuable enough to justify early paediatric testing. PMID:27259546

  2. A meta-analysis of adherence to antiretroviral therapy and virologic responses in HIV-infected children, adolescents, and young adults.

    PubMed

    Kahana, Shoshana Y; Rohan, Jennifer; Allison, Susannah; Frazier, Thomas W; Drotar, Dennis

    2013-01-01

    The relationship between adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) and virologic outcomes in HIV+ children, adolescents, and young adults has been notably understudied, with much of the extant research focused on specific sub-literatures, such as resource-limited regions, specific clinical outcomes and time frames. The authors sought to better characterize the relationship between adherence to ART and virologic functioning along various sample and methodological factors. The authors conducted a meta-analysis of thirty-seven studies and utilized a random effects model to generate weighted mean effect sizes. In addition, the authors conducted meta-ANOVAs to examine potential factors influencing the relationship between adherence and three categories of clinical outcomes, specifically Viral Load (VL) <100, VL < 400, and continuously measured VL. The analyses included 5,344 HIV+ children, adolescents, and young adults. The relationship between adherence behaviors and virologic outcomes varied across different methods of measurement and analysis. The relationship between adherence and continuously measured VL was significantly larger than for dichotomously-coded VL < 400 at Qb (20.69(1), p < .0005). Caregiver self-report indices elicited very small to small magnitude effects across both VL < 100 and VL < 400 outcomes and combined informant reporting (youth/adolescent and parent) produced significantly larger effects than caregiver report alone with adherence and VL < 400 outcomes at Qb (9.28(1), p < .005). More recently published trials reported smaller relationships between adherence and categorical clinical outcomes, such that year of publication significantly negatively correlated with VL < 100 (r = -.71(14), p < .005) and VL < 400 (r = -.43(26), p < .02). The data suggest that the magnitude of the relationship between ART adherence and virologic outcomes among heterogeneous samples of HIV+ children, adolescents and young adults varies across virologic outcomes and

  3. Using Health Surveillance Systems Data to Assess the Impact of AIDS and Antiretroviral Treatment on Adult Morbidity and Mortality in Botswana

    PubMed Central

    Stoneburner, Rand; Korenromp, Eline; Lazenby, Mark; Tassie, Jean-Michel; Letebele, Judith; Motlapele, Diemo; Granich, Reuben; Boerma, Ties; Low-Beer, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Botswana's AIDS response included free antiretroviral treatment (ART) since 2002, achieving 80% coverage of persons with CD4<350 cells/µl by 2009–10. We explored impact on mortality and HIV prevalence, analyzing surveillance and civil registration data. Methods Hospital natural cause admissions and deaths from the Health Statistics Unit (HSU) over 1990–2009, all-cause deaths from Midnight Bed Census (MNC) over 1990–2011, institutional and non-institutional deaths recorded in the Registry of Birth and Deaths (RBD) over 2003–2010, and antenatal sentinel surveillance (ANC) over 1992–2011 were compared to numbers of persons receiving ART. Mortality was adjusted for differential coverage and completeness of institutional and non-institutional deaths, and compared to WHO and UNAIDS Spectrum projections. Results HSU deaths per 1000 admissions declined 49% in adults 15–64 years over 2003–2009. RBD mortality declined 44% (807 to 452/100,000 population in adults 15–64 years) over 2003–2010, similarly in males and females. Generally, death rates were higher in males; declines were greater and earlier in younger adults, and in females. In contrast, death rates in adults 65+, particularly females increased over 2003–2006. MNC all-age post-neonatal mortality declined 46% and 63% in primary and secondary level hospitals, over 2003–2011. We estimated RBD captured 80% of adult deaths over 2006–2011. Comparing empirical, completeness-adjusted deaths to Spectrum estimates, declines over 2003–2009 were similar overall (47% vs. 54%); however, Spectrum projected larger and earlier declines particularly in women. Following stabilization and modest decreases over 1998–2002, HIV prevalence in pregnant women 15–24 and 25–29-years declined by >50% and >30% through 2011, while continuing to increase in older women. Conclusions Adult mortality in Botswana fell markedly as ART coverage increased. HIV prevalence declines may reflect ART

  4. Ratio of Monocytes to Lymphocytes in Peripheral Blood Identifies Adults at Risk of Incident Tuberculosis Among HIV-Infected Adults Initiating Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Naranbhai, Vivek; Hill, Adrian V. S.; Abdool Karim, Salim S.; Naidoo, Kogieleum; Abdool Karim, Quarraisha; Warimwe, George M.; McShane, Helen; Fletcher, Helen

    2014-01-01

    Background. Eight decades ago, the ratio of monocytes to lymphocytes (hereafter, the “ML ratio”) was noted to affect outcomes of mycobacterial infection in rabbits. Recent transcriptomic studies support a role for relative proportions of myeloid and lymphoid transcripts in tuberculosis outcomes. The ML ratio in peripheral blood is known to be governed by hematopoietic stem cells with distinct biases. Methods. The predictive value of the baseline ML ratio was modeled in 2 prospective cohorts of HIV-infected adults starting cART in South Africa (primary cohort, 1862 participants; replication cohort, 345 participants). Incident tuberculosis was diagnosed with clinical, radiographic, and microbiologic methods per contemporary guidelines. Kaplan-Meier survival analyses and Cox proportional hazards modeling were conducted. Results. The incidence rate of tuberculosis differed significantly by baseline ML ratio: 32.61 (95% confidence interval [CI], 15.38–61.54), 16.36 (95% CI, 12.39–21.23), and 51.80 (95% CI, 23.10–101.71) per 1000 patient-years for ML ratios of less than the 5th percentile, between the 5th and 95th percentiles, and greater than the 95th percentile, respectively (P = .007). Neither monocyte counts nor lymphocyte counts alone were associated with tuberculosis. After adjustment for sex, World Health Organization human immunodeficiency virus disease stage, CD4+ T-cell counts, and previous history of tuberculosis, hazards of disease were significantly higher for patients with ML ratios of less than the 5th percentile or greater than the 95th percentile (adjusted hazard ratio, 2.47; 95% CI, 1.39–4.40; P = .002). Conclusions. The ML ratio may be a useful, readily available tool to stratify the risk of tuberculosis and suggests involvement of hematopoietic stem cell bias in tuberculosis pathogenesis. PMID:24041796

  5. Health-related quality of life of HIV-infected adults receiving combination antiretroviral therapy in Addis Ababa.

    PubMed

    Mekuria, Legese A; Sprangers, Mirjam A G; Prins, Jan M; Yalew, Alemayehu W; Nieuwkerk, Pythia T

    2015-01-01

    Health-related quality of life (HRQoL) is an important outcome measure among HIV-infected patients receiving combination antiretroviral therapy (cART), but has not been studied extensively in resource-limited settings. Insight in the predictors or correlates of poor HRQoL may be helpful to identify patients most in need of additional support and to design appropriate interventions. A cross-sectional study was conducted between September 2012 and April 2013 in 10 healthcare facilities in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. Patients who were at least 6 months on cART were randomly selected and individual patient data were retrieved from medical records. HRQoL was measured by the WHOQoL-HIVBREF, depressive-symptoms by the Kessler-6 scale, and stigma by the Kalichman internalized AIDS-related stigma scale. Multivariate linear regression analysis was carried-out to examine associations between HRQoL and the other variables. A total of 664 patients (response-rate 95%) participated in the study. A higher level of depressive-symptoms was most strongly and consistently associated with a lower HRQoL, both in terms of the magnitude of the relationship and in the number of HRQoL domains associated with it. Also, a higher level of HIV-stigma was associated with a lower HRQoL except for the physical domain, while obtaining sufficient nutritious food and job opportunity were associated with a better HRQoL except for the spiritual and social domains, respectively. Demographics, clinical, and treatment characteristics yielded few significant associations with HRQoL. Our study findings suggest that interventions to improve HRQoL should focus on reducing depressive-symptoms and HIV-stigma, and on enhancing food security and job opportunity.

  6. Delayed switch of antiretroviral therapy after virologic failure associated with elevated mortality among HIV-infected adults in Africa

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Maya L.; Tran, Linh; Geng, Elvin H.; Reynolds, Steven J.; Kambugu, Andrew; Wood, Robin; Bangsberg, David R.; Yiannoutsos, Constantin T.; Deeks, Steven G.; Martin, Jeffrey N.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Routine monitoring of plasma HIV RNA among HIV-infected patients on antiretroviral therapy (ART) is unavailable in many resource-limited settings. Alternative monitoring approaches correlate poorly with virologic failure and can substantially delay switch to second-line therapy. We evaluated the impact of delayed switch on mortality among patients with virologic failure in Africa. Design A cohort. Methods We examined patients with confirmed virologic failure on first-line non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI)-based regimens from four cohorts with serial HIV RNA monitoring in Uganda and South Africa. Marginal structural models aimed to estimate the effect of delayed switch on mortality in a hypothetical trial in which switch time was randomly assigned. Inverse probability weights adjusted for measured confounders including time-updated CD4+ T-cell count and HIV RNA. Results Among 823 patients with confirmed virologic failure, the cumulative incidence of switch 180 days after failure was 30% [95% confidence interval (CI) 27–33]. The majority of patients (74%) had not failed immunologically as defined by WHO criteria by the time of virologic failure. Adjusted mortality was higher for individuals who remained on first-line therapy than for those who had switched [odds ratio (OR) 2.1, 95% CI 1.1 –4.2]. Among those without immunologic failure, the relative harm of failure to switch was similar (OR 2.4; 95% CI 0.99–5.8) to that of the entire cohort, although of borderline statistical significance. Conclusion Among HIV-infected patients with confirmed virologic failure on first-line ART, remaining on first-line therapy led to an increase in mortality relative to switching. Our results suggest that detection and response to confirmed virologic failure could decrease mortality. PMID:24977440

  7. Effects of 96 Weeks of Rosuvastatin on Bone, Muscle, and Fat in HIV-Infected Adults on Effective Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Ying; Debanne, Sara M.; McComsey, Grace A.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Heightened inflammation and immune activation are associated with lower bone mineral density (BMD) and lean body mass (LBM) among HIV-infected persons. We hypothesized that a reduction in inflammation with rosuvastatin would be associated with improvements in BMD and LBM. HIV-infected participants on stable antiretroviral therapy without statin indication and with heightened immune activation (≥19% CD8+CD38+HLA-DR+ T cells) or inflammation (hsCRP ≥2 mg/liter) were randomized to rosuvastatin 10 mg daily or placebo for 96 weeks. Among 72 participants randomized to rosuvastatin and 75 to placebo, there were no significant differences in the relative changes in BMD (p > 0.29) or in fat (p ≥ 0.19). A trend toward increased LBM (p = 0.059) was seen in the rosuvastatin arm without differences in creatinine kinase or self-reported physical activity (p ≥ 0.10). In a multivariable regression model, rosuvastatin was associated with a significant positive effect on LBM after adjusting for age, sex, race, smoking status, and detectable HIV-1 viral load. Higher baseline sCD163 correlated with increases in LBM from weeks 0 to 96 (p = 0.023); greater changes in total and leg lean mass were seen among statin users with higher compared to lower baseline IP-10 levels (LBM 1.8 vs. −0.3%; p = 0.028 and leg lean mass 2.9 vs. −1.7%; p = 0.012). Rosuvastatin is associated with an absence of toxicity on BMD and a potential benefit on LBM over 96 weeks of therapy. The preservation of LBM in the rosuvastatin arm over the 2 years of the study is of major clinical relevance in delaying loss of muscle mass with aging. PMID:26477698

  8. Crofelemer: a review of its use in the management of non-infectious diarrhoea in adult patients with HIV/AIDS on antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Frampton, James E

    2013-07-01

    Crofelemer (Fulyzaq) is a botanical drug substance (oligomeric proanthocyanidin) extracted from the stem bark latex of the Croton lechleri tree. Crofelemer undergoes minimal systemic absorption following oral administration; it acts locally within the gastrointestinal (GI) tract by inhibiting the two principal chloride ion channels in the luminal membrane of enterocytes. Crofelemer is the first (and so far only) agent to be approved by the US FDA specifically for the symptomatic relief of non-infectious (i.e. secretory) diarrhoea in adult patients with HIV/AIDS on antiretroviral therapy (ART). This approval was based on findings from the ADVENT study, a large (n = 376 randomized patients), multicentre, phase III trial in which the recommended dosage of oral crofelemer (125 mg twice daily) significantly reduced secretory diarrhoea in HIV-positive individuals on ART compared with placebo, as assessed over a 4-week period. Crofelemer was generally well tolerated in ADVENT (which included a 5-month placebo-free extension phase) and a 48-week, open-label, phase III safety study; infections and GI disorders were the most frequently reported treatment-emergent adverse events (TEAEs) in patients receiving the drug. Of note, the overall incidence of TEAEs was similar in the crofelemer and placebo groups during the 4-week placebo-controlled phase of ADVENT. Treatment with crofelemer had no appreciable effect on immune parameters, such as HIV viral load and CD4+ cell counts.

  9. Relationship of Medication Management Test-Revised (MMT-R) performance to neuropsychological functioning and antiretroviral adherence in adults with HIV.

    PubMed

    Patton, Doyle E; Woods, Steven Paul; Franklin, Donald; Cattie, Jordan E; Heaton, Robert K; Collier, Ann C; Marra, Christina; Clifford, David; Gelman, Benjamin; McArthur, Justin; Morgello, Susan; Simpson, David; McCutchan, J Allen; Grant, Igor

    2012-11-01

    While performance-based tests of everyday functioning offer promise in facilitating diagnosis and classification of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND), there remains a dearth of well-validated instruments. In the present study, clinical correlates of performance on one such measure (i.e., Medication Management Test-Revised; MMT-R) were examined in 448 HIV+ adults who were prescribed antiretroviral therapy. Significant bivariate relationships were found between MMT-R scores and demographics (e.g., education), hepatitis C co-infection, estimated premorbid IQ, neuropsychological functioning, and practical work abilities. MMT-R scores were not related to HIV disease severity, psychiatric factors, or self-reported adherence among participants with a broad range of current health status. However, lower MMT-R scores were strongly and uniquely associated with poorer adherence among participants with CD4 T cell counts <200. In multivariate analyses, MMT-R scores were predicted by practical work abilities, estimated premorbid functioning, attention/working memory, learning, and education. Findings provide overall mixed support for the construct validity of the MMT-R and are discussed in the context of their clinical and research implications for evaluation of HAND.

  10. Awareness about antiretroviral treatment, intentions to use condoms, and decisions to have an HIV test among rural Northern Lowland Thai and ethnic minority young adults.

    PubMed

    Srithanaviboonchai, Kriengkrai; Celentano, David D; Visaruratana, Surasing; Kawichai, Surinda; Wichajarn, Monjun; Genberg, Becky; Chariyalertsak, Chonlisa; Kulich, Michal; Chariyalertsak, Suwat

    2010-04-01

    Young adults aged 18 to 32 years were randomly selected from a household probability sample participating in Project Accept in the remote areas of Chiang Mai province in northern Thailand in 2005. Among 2989 respondents, 44.4% had never heard of antiretroviral treatment (ART). Lack of awareness of ART was independently associated with having had no formal education compared with some formal education and being an ethnic minority compared with being Thai. In all, 57% of the respondents who had ever heard of ART stated that if ART were easily available in their communities it would affect their intentions to be tested for HIV, whereas only 36% stated that this would affect their intentions to use condoms. Younger participants were less likely to intend to get an HIV test as compared with older individuals, and ethnic minorities were less likely to report that they would get an HIV test compared with Thai lowlanders. Single individuals and people who lived separately from their spouses were more likely to have the intention to use condoms if ART were available.

  11. Use of and Adherence to Antiretroviral Therapy in a Large U.S. Sample of HIV-infected Adults in Care, 2007-2008

    PubMed Central

    Beer, Linda; Heffelfinger, James; Frazier, Emma; Mattson, Christine; Roter, Brad; Barash, Elizabeth; Buskin, Susan; Rime, Todd; Valverde, Eduardo

    2012-01-01

    Background: Antiretroviral therapy (ART) is the cornerstone of HIV clinical care and is increasingly recognized as a key component of HIV prevention. However, the benefits of ART can be realized only if HIV-infected persons maintain high levels of adherence. Methods: We present interview data (collected from June 2007 through September 2008) from a national HIV surveillance system in the United States—the Medical Monitoring Project (MMP)—to describe persons taking ART. We used multivariate logistic regression to assess behavioral, sociodemographic, and medication regimen factors associated with three measures that capture different dimensions of nonadherence to ART: dose, schedule, and instruction. Results: The use of ART among HIV-infected adults in care was high (85%), but adherence to ART was suboptimal and varied across the three measures of nonadherence. Of MMP participants currently taking ART, the following reported nonadherence during the past 48 hours: 13% to dose, 27% to schedule, and 30% to instruction. The determinants of the three measures also varied, although younger age and binge drinking were associated with all aspects of nonadherence. Conclusion: Our results support the measurement of multiple dimensions of medication-taking behavior in order to avoid overestimating adherence to ART. PMID:23056163

  12. Pill Burden Influences the Association Between Time-Based Prospective Memory and Antiretroviral Therapy Adherence in Younger But Not Older HIV-Infected Adults.

    PubMed

    Sheppard, David P; Weber, Erica; Casaletto, Kaitlin B; Avci, Gunes; Woods, Steven Paul

    2016-01-01

    Prospective memory (PM) is associated with antiretroviral (ARV) adherence in HIV, but little is known about how pill burden and age might affect this association. One hundred seventeen older (≥50 years) and 82 younger (<50 years) HIV-infected adults were administered a measure of PM in the laboratory and subsequently were monitored for ARV adherence for 30 days using the Medication Event Monitoring System. In the older group, better time-based PM performance was associated with higher likelihood of adherence, irrespective of pill burden. Within the younger sample, time-based PM was positively related to adherence only in participants with lower pill burdens. Younger HIV-infected individuals with higher pill burdens may overcome the normal effects of time-based PM on adherence through compensatory medication-taking strategies, whereas suboptimal use of these strategies by younger HIV-infected individuals with lower pill burdens may heighten their risk of ARV nonadherence secondary to deficits in time-based PM.

  13. [Consensus document of Gesida and Spanish Secretariat for the National Plan on AIDS (SPNS) regarding combined antiretroviral treatment in adults infected by the human immunodeficiency virus (January 2012)].

    PubMed

    2012-06-01

    This consensus document has been prepared by a panel consisting of members of the AIDS Study Group (Gesida) and the Spanish Secretariat for the National Plan on AIDS (SPNS) after reviewing the efficacy and safety results of clinical trials, cohort and pharmacokinetic studies published in medical journals, or presented in medical scientific meetings. Gesida has prepared an objective and structured method to prioritise combined antiretroviral treatment (cART) in naïve patients. Recommendations strength (A, B, C) and the evidence which supports them (I, II, III) are based on a modification of the Infectious Diseases Society of America criteria. The current antiretroviral treatment (ART) of choice for chronic HIV infection is the combination of three drugs. ART is recommended in patients with symptomatic HIV infection, in pregnancy, in serodiscordant couples with high transmission risk, hepatitis B fulfilling treatment criteria, and HIV nephropathy. Guidelines on ART treatment in patients with concurrent diagnosis of HIV infection and an opportunistic type C infection are included. In asymptomatic patients ART is recommended on the basis of CD4 lymphocyte counts, plasma viral load and patient co-morbidities, as follows: 1) therapy should be started in patients with CD4 counts <350 cells/μL; 2) when CD4 counts are between 350 and 500 cells/μL, therapy will be recommended and only delayed if patient is reluctant to take it, the CD4 are stabilised, and the plasma viral load is low; 3) therapy could be deferred when CD4 counts are above 500 cells/μL, but should be considered in cases of cirrhosis, chronic hepatitis C, high cardiovascular risk, plasma viral load >10(5) copies/mL, proportion of CD4 cells <14%, and in people aged >55 years. ART should include 2 reverse transcriptase inhibitors nucleoside analogues and a third drug (non-analogue reverse transcriptase inhibitor, ritonavir boosted protease inhibitor or integrase inhibitor). The panel has consensually

  14. Start Young!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rubin, Penni

    2002-01-01

    Discusses the importance of early interest in science and how effective it is on career choice in adult stages of life. Recommends starting mathematics and science activities in preschool and kindergarten. Describes how to create a career-oriented learning center in the classroom with examples of kitchen chemistry, nutrition/botany, zoology,…

  15. Mortality and immunological recovery among older adults on antiretroviral therapy at a large urban HIV clinic in Kampala, Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Semeere, Aggrey Semwendero; Lwanga, Isaac; Sempa, Joseph; Parikh, Sujal; Nakasujja, Noeline; Cumming, Robert; Kambugu, Andrew; Mayanja-Kizza, Harriet

    2014-01-01

    Background We describe older (> 50 years) HIV-infected adults after ART initiation, evaluating immunological recovery by age category, considering individual trajectories based on the pre-treatment CD4. We also describe mortality on ART and its risk factors by age category including the contribution of poor immunological recovery at a large urban clinic in Kampala, Uganda. Methods We performed a cohort analysis of adult (>18 years) HIV-infected patients who initiated ART between January 1, 2004 and January 3, 2012. Immunological response was evaluated using mixed-effects linear regression. We described mortality using Kaplan Meier survival methods analyzing for risk factors of mortality using multivariate Weibull survival regression stratified by age category. Results Among 9,806 individuals who initiated ART, mean age was 37 years (S.D 8.8), average follow-up 5.7 years (S.D 1.7) and median baseline CD4 was 115 cells/mm3 (IQR; 42-184). Adults <50 years had on average a higher CD4 increase of 45 cells/mm3 (95% CI; 17, 72, p=0.001) compared to counterparts aged ≥ 60 years. Mortality was highest among older adults compared to younger counterparts. Only CD4 count <100 cells/mm3 after 1 year on ART and a CD4 count less than baseline were associated with a statistically significant higher rate of death among older adults. Conclusion Older adults had a slower immunological response which was associated with mortality, but this mortality was not typically associated with opportunistic infections. Future steps would require more evaluation of possible causes of death among these older individuals if survival on ART is to be further improved. PMID:25171733

  16. Partner Disclosure and Early CD4 Response among HIV-Infected Adults Initiating Antiretroviral Treatment in Nairobi Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Trinh, T. Tony; Yatich, Nelly; Ngomoa, Richard; McGrath, Christine J.; Richardson, Barbra A.; Sakr, Samah R.; Langat, Agnes; John-Stewart, Grace C.; Chung, Michael H.

    2016-01-01

    Background Disclosure of HIV serostatus can have significant benefits for people living with HIV/AIDS. However, there is limited data on whether partner disclosure influences ART treatment response. Methods We conducted a retrospective cohort study of newly diagnosed, ART-naïve HIV-infected adults (>18 years) who enrolled at the Coptic Hope Center in Nairobi, Kenya between January 1st 2009 and July 1st 2011 and initiated ART within 3 months. Analysis was restricted to adults who reported to have either disclosed or not disclosed their HIV status to their partner. Analysis of CD4 response at 6 and 12 months post-ART was stratified by age group. Results Among 615 adults newly initiating ART with partner disclosure data and 12 month follow-up, mean age was 38 years and 52% were male; 76% reported that they had disclosed their HIV-status to their partner. Those who disclosed were significantly younger and more likely to be married/cohabitating than non-disclosers. At baseline, median CD4 counts were similar between disclosure groups. Among younger adults (< 38 years) those who disclosed had higher CD4 recovery than those who did not at 6 months post- ART (mean difference = 31, 95% CI 3 to 58 p = 0.03) but not at 12 months (mean difference = 17, 95% CI -19 to 52, p = 0.4). Among older adults (≥ 38years) there was no observed difference in CD4 recovery at 6 or 12 months between disclosure groups. Conclusion Among younger adults, disclosure of HIV status to partners may be associated with CD4 recovery following ART. PMID:27711164

  17. Are social support and HIV coping strategies associated with lower depression in adults on antiretroviral treatment? Evidence from rural KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Yeji, Francis; Klipstein-Grobusch, Kerstin; Newell, Marie-Louise; Hirschhorn, Lisa R; Hosegood, Victoria; Bärnighausen, Till

    2014-01-01

    We assess depression rates and investigate whether depression among HIV-infected adults receiving antiretroviral treatment (ART) is associated with social support and HIV coping strategies in rural South Africa (SA). The study took place in a decentralised public-sector ART programme in a poor, rural area of KwaZulu-Natal, SA, with high-HIV prevalence and high-ART coverage. The 12-item General Health Questionnaire (GHQ12), validated in this setting, was used to assess depression in 272 adults recently initiated on ART. Estimates of depression prevalence ranged from 33% to 38%, depending on the method used to score the GHQ12. Instrumental social support (providing tangible factors for support, such as financial assistance, material goods or services), but not emotional social support (expressing feelings, such as empathy, love, trust or acceptance, to support a person), was significantly associated with lower likelihood of depression [adjusted odds ratio (aOR) = 0.65, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.52-0.81, P < 0.001], when controlling for sex, age, marital status, education, household wealth and CD4 cell count. In addition, using "avoidance of people" as a strategy to cope with HIV was associated with an almost three times higher odds of depression (aOR = 2.79, CI: 1.34-5.82, P = 0.006), whereas none of the other five coping strategies we assessed was significantly associated with depression. In addition to antidepressant drug treatment, interventions enhancing instrumental social support and behavioural therapy replacing withdrawal behaviours with active HIV coping strategies may be effective in reducing the burden of depression among patients on ART.

  18. Tuberculosis Incidence and Risk Factors Among Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)-Infected Adults Receiving Antiretroviral Therapy in a Large HIV Program in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Chang, Charlotte A; Meloni, Seema Thakore; Eisen, Geoffrey; Chaplin, Beth; Akande, Patrick; Okonkwo, Prosper; Rawizza, Holly E; Tchetgen Tchetgen, Eric; Kanki, Phyllis J

    2015-12-01

    Background.  Despite the benefits of antiretroviral therapy (ART), tuberculosis (TB) is the leading cause of mortality among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected persons in Africa. Nigeria bears the highest TB burden in Africa and second highest HIV burden globally. This long-term multicenter study aimed to determine the incidence rate and predictors of TB in adults in the Harvard/AIDS Prevention Initiative in Nigeria (APIN) and President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) Nigeria ART program. Methods.  This retrospective evaluation used data collected from 2004 to 2012 through the Harvard/APIN PEPFAR program. Risk factors for incident TB were determined using multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression with time-dependent covariates. Results.  Of 50 320 adults enrolled from 2005 to 2010, 11 092 (22%) had laboratory-confirmed active TB disease at ART initiation, and 2021 (4%) developed active TB after commencing ART. During 78 228 total person-years (PY) of follow-up, the TB incidence rate was 25.8 cases per 1000 PY (95% confidence interval [CI], 24.7-27.0) overall, and it decreased significantly both with duration on ART and calendar year. Risk factors at ART initiation for incident TB included the following: earlier ART enrollment year, tenofovir-containing initial ART regimen, and World Health Organization clinical stage above 1. Time-updated risk factors included the following: low body mass index, low CD4(+) cell count, unsuppressed viral load, anemia, and ART adherence below 80%. Conclusions.  The rate of incident TB decreased with longer duration on ART and over the program years. The strongest TB risk factors were time-updated clinical markers, reinforcing the importance of consistent clinical and laboratory monitoring of ART patients in prompt diagnosis and treatment of TB and other coinfections.

  19. Virological response and resistance profiles after 24 months of first-line antiretroviral treatment in adults living in Bangui, Central African Republic.

    PubMed

    Péré, Hélène; Charpentier, Charlotte; Mbelesso, Pascal; Dandy, Marius; Matta, Mathieu; Moussa, Sandrine; De Dieu Longo, Jean; Grésenguet, Gérard; Abraham, Bruno; Bélec, Laurent

    2012-04-01

    The rate of virological failure was assessed in 386 adult patients attending the Centre National Hospitalier Universitaire of Bangui, the capital city of the Central African Republic (CAR), receiving their first-line antiretroviral (ARV) drug regimen for 24 months, according to the World Health Organization (WHO) recommendations. In addition, genotypic resistance testing was carried out in 45 of 145 randomly selected patients whose plasma HIV-1 RNA load was detectable. Overall, 28.5% of ARV-treated patients were in virological failure (e.g., HIV-1 RNA >3.7 log(10) copies/ml). Twenty-four percent of patients in virological failure showed wild-type viruses, likely indicating poor adherence. Even after excluding the M184V mutation, all 76% of patients in virological failure displayed viruses harboring at least one major drug resistance mutation to nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTI), non-NRTI, or protease inhibitors. Whereas the second-line regimen proposed by the 2010 WHO recommendations, including zidovudine, tenofovir, lopinavir, and atazanavir, could be effective in more than 90% of patients in virological failure with resistant viruses, the remaining patients showed genotypic profiles highly predictive of resistance to the usual WHO second-line regimen, including complex genotypic profiles diagnosed only by genotypic resistance tests in some patients. In conclusion, our observations highlight the high frequency of therapeutic failure in ARV-treated adults in this study, as well as the urgent and absolute need for improving viral load assessment in the CAR to prevent and/or, from now on, to monitor therapeutic failure.

  20. Antiretroviral Therapy Adherence Enhancing Interventions for Adolescents and Young Adults 13–24 Years of Age: A Review of the Evidence Base

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Youth living with HIV are highly under-represented in the evidence base for adherence interventions, despite their diverse and unique needs and barriers. Objective: This systematic review aimed to identify antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence interventions specifically targeting adolescents and young adults (defined as ages 13–24) with the goal of characterizing the evidence base. Methods: Articles were identified using the PubMed database and cover work published through September 14, 2015. Inclusion criteria: (1) average age 13 to 24, (2) HIV positive, (3) on or beginning ART, (4) intervention targeted ART adherence in full or in part, (5) reported adherence, viral load, and/or CD4 count outcomes. Strength of evidence was defined as level 1 [randomized controlled trial (RCT) with significance testing on outcomes], 2 (within group studies with statistical testing on outcomes), 3 (RCTs with descriptive results), or 4 (within group studies with descriptive results). Results: Of 151 articles, 10 met inclusion criteria. Published between 2003 and 2014, these studies evaluated diverse intervention approaches. Most were conducted in the US and were small pilots that have yet to be replicated despite promising results. Only 3 studies met criteria for highest level strength of evidence; 2 supported a phone-based counseling approach with adherence monitors and 1 for weekly individual and family counseling. Conclusions: Despite nearly 20 years passing since the wide-scale availability of ART, and clear recognition that adolescents and youth adults fair worse on the cascade of HIV care, the evidence base remains sparse and underdeveloped. Promising approaches need replication and more rigorous studies are desperately needed. PMID:26959190

  1. 100 Things Every Adult College Student Ought To Know: A Self-Orientation Guide with Definitions, Customs, Procedures, and Advice To Assist Adults in Adjusting to the Start of College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardin, Carlette Jackson

    The information for this book was obtained by asking hundreds of adults students, and instructors with experience teaching adult learners, what they felt were the most important things adult students needed to know. Chapter 1, "Getting Started," provides information about what a student needs to know before enrolling in college. It is designed to…

  2. High perceived social standing is associated with better health in HIV-infected Ugandan adults on highly active antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Ezeamama, A E; Guwatudde, D; Wang, M; Bagenda, D; Brown, K; Kyeyune, R; Smith, Emily; Wamani, H; Manabe, Y C; Fawzi, W W

    2016-06-01

    Perceived social standing (PSS) was evaluated as a determinant of differences in health outcomes among Ugandan HIV-infected adults from Kampala using cross-sectional study design. PSS was defined using the MacArthur scale of subjective social status translated and adapted for the study setting. Socio-demographic and psychosocial correlates of PSS ranking at enrollment were determined using linear regression models. High versus low PSS was defined based on the median PSS score and evaluated as a determinant of body mass index, hemoglobin, quality of life (QOL) and frailty-related phenotype via linear regression. A log-binomial regression model estimated the relative-risk of good, very good or excellent versus fair or poor self-rated health (SRH) in relation to PSS. Older age, increasing social support and material wealth were correlated with high PSS ranking, whereas female sex, experience of multiple stigmas and multiple depressive symptoms were correlated with low PSS ranking. High PSS participants were on average 1.1 kg/m(2) heavier, had 4.7 % lower frailty scores and 3.6 % higher QOL scores compared to low PSS patients (all p < 0.05); they were also more likely to self-classify as high SRH (RR 1.4, 95 % confidence interval 1.1, 1.7) but had comparable hemoglobin levels (p = 0.634). Low PSS correlated with poor physical and psychosocial wellbeing in HIV-positive Ugandan adults. The assessment of PSS as part of clinical management, combined with efforts to reduce stigma and improve social support, may identify and possibly reduce PSS-associated health inequality in Ugandan adults with HIV.

  3. “The sky is the limit”: adhering to antiretroviral therapy and HIV self-management from the perspectives of adolescents living with HIV and their adult caregivers

    PubMed Central

    Denison, Julie A; Banda, Harry; Dennis, Alexis C; Packer, Catherine; Nyambe, Namakau; Stalter, Randy M; Mwansa, Jonathan K; Katayamoyo, Patrick; McCarraher, Donna R

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Worldwide, HIV-related mortality among adolescents living with HIV (ALHIV) increased by 50% from 2005 to 2012 and is attributed in part to a lack of support for adolescent retention to care and adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART). This vulnerability reinforces the need to better understand incomplete ART adherence among ALHIV, particularly in sub-Saharan Africa, where the majority of the world's 2.1 million ALHIV reside. Methods From December 2011 to February 2012, we conducted in-depth interviews with 32 ALHIV (aged 15 to 18) and 23 of their adult caregivers in the Copperbelt Province of Zambia. Interviews were transcribed and translated. An iterative qualitative process was used to code and analyze the data and main themes were summarized regarding the barriers to and facilitators of ART adherence. Results More than a quarter of ALHIV reported missing a day or more of ART (ranging from one day to six months). Barriers to ART adherence included fear of disclosure and anticipated stigma. Few youth were willing to take their drugs outside of the home, which led to missed doses of ART. Similarly, families tended to manage HIV within the home only. As a result, although caregivers and families were often the greatest source of emotional and instrumental support, they coped with HIV in isolation of other potential support from their communities, schools or churches. Factors that supported ART adherence included attending clinic-sponsored youth groups, wanting to maintain one's health and using phone and clock alarms. Involvement of adult caregivers in HIV management varied greatly and was often based on the age and health status of the youth. Some caregivers struggled with letting the adolescents assume responsibility for their medication, and ALHIV had few self-management skills and tools to help them regularly take ART. Conclusions These data highlight the importance of families and home environments in supporting adherence to ART among ALHIV

  4. Antiretroviral Treatment 2010: Progress and Controversies

    PubMed Central

    Gulick, Roy M.

    2011-01-01

    Effective antiretroviral therapy (ART) changes the clinical course of HIV infection. There are 25 antiretroviral drugs approved for the treatment of HIV infection, and current antiretroviral drug regimens are highly effective, convenient, and relatively nontoxic. ART regimens should be chosen in consideration of a patient’s particular clinical situation. Successful treatment is associated with durable suppression of HIV viremia over years, and consequently, ART reduces the risk of clinical progression. In fact, current models estimate that an HIV-infected individual appropriately treated with antiretroviral drugs has a life expectancy that approaches that of the general HIV-uninfected population, although some patient groups such as injection drug users do less well. Despite these advances, continued questions about ART persist: What is the optimal time to start ART? What is the best regimen to start? When is the optimal time to change ART? What is the best regimen to change to? In addition, newer antiretroviral agents are in development, both in existing classes and in new classes such as the CD4 receptor attachment inhibitors and the maturation inhibitors. Further research will help optimize current antiretroviral treatments and strategies. PMID:21045599

  5. The use of cell phone reminder calls for assisting HIV-infected adolescents and young adults to adhere to highly active antiretroviral therapy: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Puccio, Joseph A; Belzer, Marvin; Olson, Johanna; Martinez, Miguel; Salata, Cathy; Tucker, Diane; Tanaka, Diane

    2006-06-01

    Long-term medication regimen adherence is challenging in all populations, but in the HIV-infected adolescent population the frequency of poverty, homelessness, substance abuse, and mental illness make highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) adherence even more challenging. In 2003, we developed a pilot program for HIV-infected adolescents and young adults between the ages of 16 and 24 who were either going to begin a HAART regimen for the first time or begin a new HAART regimen. Participants received a free cell phone with a local service plan for approximately 6 months. Participants received phone call reminders for 12 weeks. Call frequency was tapered at 4-week intervals. Patients were assessed at 4-week intervals to determine the perceived intrusiveness or helpfulness of receiving calls, and missed medication doses. Eight consecutive patients were recruited for the study, and five were able to complete it through the 24 weeks. Most participants found the calls to be helpful and the level of intrusion into their daily lives acceptable. Using cell phone reminders to assist patients does not require an extensive amount of daily staff time. Tapering calls rapidly over 3 months, followed by discontinuation of calls provided inadequate support for subjects, especially those with significant psychosocial issues such as substance abuse. Use of cell phone reminders to assist adolescents adhere with HIV medications was practical and acceptable to pilot study participants. Viral suppression waned for all but two patients after termination of cell phone reminders and suggests that a 12-week intervention was not adequate for most subjects. Larger prospective studies of cell phone observation of therapy will be needed to determine if this intervention can improve long-term adherence and health outcomes.

  6. Retention of Adult Patients on Antiretroviral Therapy in Low- and Middle-Income Countries: Systematic Review and Meta-analysis 2008–2013

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Matthew P; MPA, Sydney Rosen

    2015-01-01

    Background We previously published systematic reviews of retention in care after antiretroviral therapy initiation among general adult populations in sub-Saharan Africa. We estimated 36-month retention at 73% for publications from 2007–2010. This report extends the review to cover 2008–2013 and expands it to all low- and middle-income countries. Methods We searched PubMed, Embase, Cochrane Register, and ISI Web of Science from January 1, 2008 to December 31, 2013 and abstracts from AIDS and IAS from 2008–2013. We estimated retention across cohorts using simple averages and interpolated missing times through the last time reported. We estimated all-cause attrition (death, loss to follow-up) for patients receiving first-line ART in routine settings in low- and middle-income countries. Results We found 123 papers and abstracts reporting retention for 154 patient cohorts and 1,554,773 patients in 42 countries. Overall, 43% of all patients not retained were known to have died. Unweighted averages of reported retention was 78%, 71% and 69% at 12, 24, and 36 months after treatment initiation, respectively. We estimated 36-month retention at 65% in Africa, 80% in Asia, and 64% in Latin America and the Caribbean. From lifetable analysis, we estimated retention at 12, 24, 36, 48 and 60 months at 83%, 74%, 68%, 64% and 60%, respectively. Conclusions Retention at 36 months on treatment averages 65–70%. There are several important gaps in the evidence-base, which could be filled by further research, especially in terms of geographic coverage and duration of follow-up. PMID:25942461

  7. Systematic review of statistically-derived models of immunological response in HIV-infected adults on antiretroviral therapy in Sub-Saharan Africa

    PubMed Central

    Sempa, Joseph B.; Ujeneza, Eva L.; Nieuwoudt, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Introduction In Sub-Saharan African (SSA) resource limited settings, Cluster of Differentiation 4 (CD4) counts continue to be used for clinical decision making in antiretroviral therapy (ART). Here, HIV-infected people often remain with CD4 counts <350 cells/μL even after 5 years of viral load suppression. Ongoing immunological monitoring is necessary. Due to varying statistical modeling methods comparing immune response to ART across different cohorts is difficult. We systematically review such models and detail the similarities, differences and problems. Methods ‘Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Review and Meta-Analyses’ guidelines were used. Only studies of immune-response after ART initiation from SSA in adults were included. Data was extracted from each study and tabulated. Outcomes were categorized into 3 groups: ‘slope’, ‘survival’, and ‘asymptote’ models. Wordclouds were drawn wherein the frequency of variables occurring in the reviewed models is indicated by their size and color. Results 69 covariates were identified in the final models of 35 studies. Effect sizes of covariates were not directly quantitatively comparable in view of the combination of differing variables and scale transformation methods across models. Wordclouds enabled the identification of qualitative and semi-quantitative covariate sets for each outcome category. Comparison across categories identified sex, baseline age, baseline log viral load, baseline CD4, ART initiation regimen and ART duration as a minimal consensus set. Conclusion Most models were different with respect to covariates included, variable transformations and scales, model assumptions, modelling strategies and reporting methods, even for the same outcomes. To enable comparison across cohorts, statistical models would benefit from the application of more uniform modelling techniques. Historic efforts have produced results that are anecdotal to individual cohorts only. This study was able to

  8. Predictors of treatment failure on second-line antiretroviral therapy among adults in northwest Ethiopia: a multicentre retrospective follow-up study

    PubMed Central

    Tsegaye, Adino Tesfahun; Wubshet, Mamo; Awoke, Tadesse; Addis Alene, Kefyalew

    2016-01-01

    Background The number of patients using second-line antiretroviral therapy (ART) has increased over time. In Ethiopia, 1.5% of HIV infected patients on ART are using a second-line regimen and little is known about its effect in this setting. Objective To estimate the rate and predictors of treatment failure on second-line ART among adults living with HIV in northwest Ethiopia. Setting An institution-based retrospective follow-up study was conducted at three tertiary hospitals in northwest Ethiopia from March to May 2015. Participants 356 adult patients participated and 198 (55.6%) were males. Individuals who were on second-line ART for at least 6 months of treatment were included and the data were collected by reviewing their records. Primary outcome measure The primary outcome was treatment failure defined as immunological failure, clinical failure, death, or lost to follow-up. To assess our outcome, we used the definitions of the WHO 2010 guideline. Result The mean±SD age of participants at switch was 36±8.9 years. The incidence rate of failure was 61.7/1000 person years. The probability of failure at the end of 12 and 24 months were 5.6% and 13.6%, respectively. Out of 67 total failures, 42 (62.7%) occurred in the first 2 years. The significant predictors of failure were found to be: WHO clinical stage IV at switch (adjusted HR (AHR) 2.1, 95% CI 1.1 to 4.1); CD4 count <100 cells/mm3 at switch (AHR 2.0, 95% CI 1.2 to 3.5); and weight change (AHR 0.92, 95% CI 0.88 to 0.95). Conclusions The rate of treatment failure was highest during the first 2 years of treatment. WHO clinical stage, CD4 count at switch, and change in weight were found to be predictors of treatment failure. PMID:27932339

  9. Empiric Tuberculosis Therapy versus Isoniazid in Advanced HIV-infected Adult Outpatients Initiating Antiretroviral Therapy: a Multi-Country Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Hosseinipour, Mina C.; Bisson, Gregory P.; Miyahara, Sachiko; Sun, Xin; Moses, Agnes; Riviere, Cynthia; Kirui, F.K.; Badal-Faesen, Sharla; Lagat, David; Nyirenda, Mulinda; Naidoo, K; Hakim, James; Mugyenyi, Peter; Henostroza, German; Leger, P.D; Lama, Javier.R; Mohapi, Lerato; Alave, Jorge; Mave, V; Veloso, Valdilea.G; Pillay, Sandy; Kumarasamy, N.; Bao, Jing; Hogg, Evelyn; Jones, Lynne; Zolopa, Andrew; Kumwenda, Johnstone; Gupta, Amita

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Mortality within the first 6 months after initiating antiretroviral therapy (ART) is common in resource-limited settings and is often due to tuberculosis (TB) among patients with advanced HIV disease. Isoniazid preventive therapy (IPT) is recommended in HIV-infected adults, but sub-clinical TB can be difficult to diagnose. We hypothesized that empiric TB treatment would reduce early mortality compared to IPT in high-burden settings. Methods We conducted a multi-country randomized clinical trial comparing empiric TB therapy (Empiric) vs. isoniazid preventive therapy (IPT) in HIV-infected outpatients initiating ART with CD4 counts <50 cells/mm3. Individuals were screened for TB using a symptom screen, locally available diagnostics, and the GeneXpert MTB/RIF assay when available. The primary endpoint was survival (death or unknown status) at 24 weeks post randomization. Kaplan Meier estimates of the endpoint rates across arms were compared by the z-test. Registered at ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT01380080). Findings From October 31, 2011 until June 9, 2014, we randomized 850 participants (424 in Empiric arm and 426 in IPT arm); the median CD4 count at baseline was 18 cells/mm3 (IQR: 9, 32). At week 24, each arm had 22 primary endpoints, for rates of 5.2% in each arm (95% CI: 3.5% to 7.8% for Empiric and 3.4% to 7.8% for IPT; absolute risk difference of -0.06% (95% CI: −3.05% to 2.94%). Grade 3 or 4 signs or symptoms occurred in 50 (12%) in the Empiric arm and 46 (11%) in the IPT arm. Grade 3 or 4 laboratory abnormalities occurred in 99 (23%) in the Empiric arm and 97 (23%) in the IPT arm. Incident TB was more common in the Empiric arm (31 vs. 18 events, p=0.01). Interpretation Empiric TB therapy did not reduce mortality at 24 weeks in outpatient adults initiating ART with advanced HIV disease. The low mortality rate of the trial supports implementation of systematic TB screening and IPT in outpatients with advanced HIV disease. PMID:27025337

  10. HIV-1 virologic failure and acquired drug resistance among first-line antiretroviral experienced adults at a rural HIV clinic in coastal Kenya: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background An increasing number of people on antiretroviral therapy (ART) in sub-Saharan Africa has led to declines in HIV related morbidity and mortality. However, virologic failure (VF) and acquired drug resistance (ADR) may negatively affect these gains. This study describes the prevalence and correlates of HIV-1 VF and ADR among first-line ART experienced adults at a rural HIV clinic in Coastal Kenya. Methods HIV-infected adults on first-line ART for ≥6 months were cross-sectionally recruited between November 2008 and March 2011. The primary outcome was VF, defined as a one-off plasma viral load of ≥400 copies/ml. The secondary outcome was ADR, defined as the presence of resistance associated mutations. Logistic regression and Fishers exact test were used to describe correlates of VF and ADR respectively. Results Of the 232 eligible participants on ART over a median duration of 13.9 months, 57 (24.6% [95% CI: 19.2 – 30.6]) had VF. Fifty-five viraemic samples were successfully amplified and sequenced. Of these, 29 (52.7% [95% CI: 38.8 – 66.3]) had at least one ADR, with 25 samples having dual-class resistance mutations. The most prevalent ADR mutations were the M184V (n = 24), K103N/S (n = 14) and Y181C/Y/I/V (n = 8). Twenty-six of the 55 successfully amplified viraemic samples (47.3%) did not have any detectable resistance mutation. Younger age (15–34 vs. ≥35 years: adjusted odd ratios [95% CI], p-value: 0.3 [0.1–0.6], p = 0.002) and unsatisfactory adherence (<95% vs. ≥95%: 3.0 [1.5–6.5], p = 0.003) were strong correlates of VF. Younger age, unsatisfactory adherence and high viral load were also strong correlates of ADR. Conclusions High levels of VF and ADR were observed in younger patients and those with unsatisfactory adherence. Youth-friendly ART initiatives and strengthened adherence support should be prioritized in this Coastal Kenyan setting. To prevent unnecessary/premature switches, targeted HIV drug resistance

  11. Twice-daily versus once-daily antiretroviral therapy and coformulation strategies in HIV-infected adults: benefits, risks, or burden?

    PubMed Central

    Nachega, Jean B; Rosenkranz, Bernd; Pham, Paul A

    2011-01-01

    The recent development of once-daily antiretroviral agents and fixed-dose combination formulations has been an important development in antiretroviral regimen simplification. Recent studies indicate that once-daily antiretroviral regimens improve adherence, especially in antiretroviral-naïve patients and in difficult-to-treat populations, such as the homeless or marginally housed. However, there are potential risks with the higher peak and lower trough plasma drug concentrations that may result from certain once-daily formulations. Due to the multifactorial and complex nature of adherence behavior, clinicians’ efforts to improve patient adherence should not be limited to prescribing once-daily regimens, but should also consider social support, side effect management, and adherence support tools, such as pillbox organizers and other targeted interventions. Additional research will clarify the benefits of once-daily and fixed-dose combination regimens on clinical and virologic outcomes. Comprehensive cost-benefit analysis of regimen simplification could help facilitate evidence-based decisions regarding antiretroviral regimen choices. PMID:22259241

  12. Sub-optimal adherence to combination anti-retroviral therapy and its associated factors according to self-report, clinician-recorded and pharmacy-refill assessment methods among HIV-infected adults in Addis Ababa.

    PubMed

    Mekuria, Legese A; Prins, Jan M; Yalew, Alemayehu W; Sprangers, Mirjam A G; Nieuwkerk, Pythia T

    2017-04-01

    Adherence to combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) is generally high in most resource-limited settings. However, sub-optimal adherence occurs in a sizable proportion of patients, and is independently predictive of detectable viremia. We investigated sub-optimal adherence according to self-report, clinician-recorded, and pharmacy-refill assessment methods, and their associated factors among HIV-infected adults receiving cART in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. Eight-hundred seventy patients who initiated cART between May 2009 and April 2012 were randomly selected, and 664 patients who were alive, had remained in clinical care and were receiving cART for at least six-months were included. Sub-optimal adherence was defined as patients' response of less than "all-of the time" to the self-report adherence question, or any clinician-recorded poor adherence during the six most recent clinic visits, or a pharmacy-refill of <95% medication possession ratio (MPR). Logistic regression models were fitted to identify factors associated with sub-optimal adherence. The average adherence level to cART, expressed as MPR, was nearly 97%. However, sub-optimal adherence occurred in 12%, 4%, and 27% of patients according to self-report, clinician-recorded, and pharmacy-refill measures, respectively. More satisfaction with social support was significantly associated with less sub-optimal adherence according to self-report and clinician-record. Younger age, lower educational level, and lower CD4 cell count at cART initiation were significantly associated with sub-optimal refill-based adherence. Findings from our large multi-center study suggest that sub-optimal adherence was present in up to a quarter of the patients, despite a high degree of average adherence to cART. Interventions aimed at preventing sub-optimal adherence should focus on improving social support, on younger patients, on patients with lower educational level, and on those who started cART at a lower CD4 cell count.

  13. Effects of Antiretroviral Therapy on the Survival of Human Immunodeficiency Virus-positive Adult Patients in Andhra Pradesh, India: A Retrospective Cohort Study, 2007-2013

    PubMed Central

    Chaturvedi, Himanshu; Jayaseelan, Lakshmanan; Harvey, Pauline; Seguy, Nicole; Chavan, Laxmikant; Raj, Pinnamaneni; Pandey, Arvind

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The survival outcomes of antiretroviral treatment (ART) programs have not been systematically evaluated at the state level in India. This retrospective study assessed the survival rates and factors associated with survival among adult human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients in Andhra Pradesh, India. Methods The present study used data from 139 679 HIV patients aged ≥15 years on ART who were registered from 2007 to 2011 and were followed up through December 2013. The primary end point was death of the patient. Mortality densities (per 1000 person-years) were calculated. Kaplan-Meier and Cox-regression models were used to estimate survival and explore the factors associated with survival. Results The overall median follow-up time was 16.0 months (2.0 months for the deceased and 14.0 months for those lost to follow-up). Approximately 13.2% of those newly initiated on ART died during follow-up. Of those deaths, 56% occurred in the first three months. The crude mortality rate was 80.9 per 1000 person-years at risk. The CD4 count (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR],4.88; 95% confidence interval [CI], 4.36 to 5.46 for <100 cells/mm3 vs. >350 cells/mm3), functional status (aHR, 3.05; 95% CI, 2.82 to 3.30 for bedridden vs. normal), and body weight (aHR, 3.69; 95% CI, 3.42 to 3.97 for <45 kg vs. >60 kg) were strongly associated with the survival of HIV patients. Conclusions The study findings revealed that high mortality was observed within the first three months of ART initiation. Patients with poor baseline clinical characteristics had a higher risk of mortality. Expanded testing and counseling should be encouraged, with the goal of ensuring early enrollment into the program followed by the initiation of ART in HIV-infected patients. PMID:27951632

  14. Short Communication: Population-Based Surveillance of HIV-1 Drug Resistance in Cameroonian Adults Initiating Antiretroviral Therapy According to the World Health Organization Guidelines.

    PubMed

    Fokam, Joseph; Takou, Désiré; Santoro, Maria Mercedes; Akonie, Haniel Ze; Kouanfack, Charles; Ceccherini-Silberstein, Francesca; Colizzi, Vittorio; Perno, Carlo-Federico; Ndjolo, Alexis

    2016-04-01

    With ongoing earlier enrollment on and rapid scale-up of antiretroviral therapy (ART) in Cameroon, there are increasing risks of transmitted HIV drug resistance (HIVDR) at population levels. We, therefore, evaluated the threshold of HIVDR in a population initiating ART, to inform on the effectiveness of first-line regimens, considering HIV-1 diversity, plasma viral load (PVL), and CD4-based disease progression. A total of 53 adults [median (interquartile range, IQR) CD4: 162 cell/mm(3) (48-284); median (IQR) PVL: 5.34 log10 RNA (4.17-6.42) copies/ml] initiating ART in 2014 at the Yaoundé Central Hospital were enrolled for HIV-1 protease-reverse transcriptase sequencing. Drug resistance mutations (DRMs) were interpreted using the 2009 World Health Organization (WHO) list versus the Stanford HIVdb algorithm version 7.0. Level of DRMs was low (3.77%) versus moderate (7.55%), respectively, following the WHO list (T69D, K103N) versus Stanford HIVdb (T69D, A98G, K103N, K238T), respectively. Prevailing clade was CRF02_AG (71.70%). Based on Stanford HIVdb, a slightly higher proportion of patients with DRMs were found among ones infected with CRF02_AG than in those non-CRF02_AG infected (7.89% vs. 6.67%, p = 1.000), with lower PVL (7.69% <5.5 vs. 0% ≥5.5 log10 RNA copies/ml, p = .488) and with higher CD4 counts (9.52% CD4 ≥200 vs. 3.33% CD4 <200 cells/mm(3), p = .749). Thresholds of DRMs suggest that standard first-line regimens currently used in Cameroon may remain effective at population levels, despite scale-up of ART in the country, pending adherence, and closed virological monitoring. With an intent-to-diagnose approach, the discrepant levels of DRMs support using Stanford HIVdb to evaluate initial ART, while revising the WHO list for surveillance.

  15. Risk Factors for Mortality among Adult HIV/AIDS Patients Following Antiretroviral Therapy in Southwestern Ethiopia: An Assessment through Survival Models

    PubMed Central

    Seyoum, Dinberu; Degryse, Jean-Marie; Kifle, Yehenew Getachew; Taye, Ayele; Tadesse, Mulualem; Birlie, Belay; Banbeta, Akalu; Rosas-Aguirre, Angel; Duchateau, Luc; Speybroeck, Niko

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Efforts have been made to reduce HIV/AIDS-related mortality by delivering antiretroviral therapy (ART) treatment. However, HIV patients in resource-poor settings are still dying, even if they are on ART treatment. This study aimed to explore the factors associated with HIV/AIDS-related mortality in Southwestern Ethiopia. Method: A non-concurrent retrospective cohort study which collected data from the clinical records of adult HIV/AIDS patients, who initiated ART treatment and were followed between January 2006 and December 2010, was conducted, to explore the factors associated with HIV/AIDS-related mortality at Jimma University Specialized Hospital (JUSH). Survival times (i.e., the time from the onset of ART treatment to the death or censoring) and different characteristics of patients were retrospectively examined. A best-fit model was chosen for the survival data, after the comparison between native semi-parametric Cox regression and parametric survival models (i.e., exponential, Weibull, and log-logistic). Result: A total of 456 HIV patients were included in the study, mostly females (312, 68.4%), with a median age of 30 years (inter-quartile range (IQR): 23–37 years). Estimated follow-up until December 2010 accounted for 1245 person-years at risk (PYAR) and resulted in 66 (14.5%) deaths and 390 censored individuals, representing a median survival time of 34.0 months ( IQR: 22.8–42.0 months). The overall mortality rate was 5.3/100 PYAR: 6.5/100 PYAR for males and 4.8/100 PYAR for females. The Weibull survival model was the best model for fitting the data (lowest AIC). The main factors associated with mortality were: baseline age (>35 years old, AHR = 3.8, 95% CI: 1.6–9.1), baseline weight (AHR = 0.93, 95% CI: 0.90–0.97), baseline WHO stage IV (AHR = 6.2, 95% CI: 2.2–14.2), and low adherence to ART treatment (AHR = 4.2, 95% CI: 2.5–7.1). Conclusion: An effective reduction in HIV/AIDS mortality could be achieved through timely ART

  16. Factors associated with timely initiation of antiretroviral therapy in two HIV clinics in Lilongwe, Malawi.

    PubMed

    Johnson, D C; Feldacker, C; Tweya, H; Phiri, S; Hosseinipour, M C

    2013-01-01

    The World Health Organization (WHO) estimates that only 30% of eligible, HIV-infected individuals start antiretroviral therapy (ART). This study seeks to explore the geographic and individual factors associated with starting ART on time. This retrospective study includes 15,734 HIV-positive adults initiating ART at two HIV clinics in Lilongwe, Malawi. The outcome was starting ART within two weeks of meeting ART eligibility as defined by the Malawi ART guidelines. Euclidean distance from patient neighbourhood to their clinic was calculated using Google Earth. Logistic regression models assessed factors influencing starting ART on time. Of 15,734 adults initiating ART, 8178 were from Lighthouse (LH) and 7556 were from Martin Preuss Center (MPC). Combined, 68.7% started treatment on time. Patients who were eligible for ART based on a CD4 cell count <250 cells/mm(3) versus WHO stage were less likely to begin ART on time at both LH (odds ratio [OR] 0.16; 95% CI 0.13-0.19) and MPC (OR 0.24; 95% CI 0.21-0.28). Likelihood of starting on time decreased with each kilometer further from clinic location among LH patients (OR 0.97; 95% CI 0.94-0.99); distance was not significant at MPC. In conclusion, predictors differed by clinic. Distance to clinic and type of eligibility for ART significantly influence starting ART on time.

  17. The Majority of the Pre-Antiretroviral Population Who Were Lost to Follow-Up Stopped Their Care in Freetown, Sierra Leone: A 12-Month Prospective Cohort Study Starting with HIV Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, J. Daniel; Schlough, Gabriel Warren; Conteh, Sulaiman; Barrie, M. Bailor; Kargbo, Brima; Giordano, Thomas P.

    2016-01-01

    Background The heterogeneity of the pre-antiretroviral (pre-ART) population calls for more granular depictions of the cascade of HIV care. Methods We studied a prospective cohort of persons newly diagnosed with HIV infection from a single center in Freetown, Sierra Leone, over a 12-month period and then traced those persons who were lost to follow-up (LTFU) during pre-ART care (before ART initiation). ART eligibility was based on a CD4 cell count result of ≤ 350 mm/cells and/or WHO clinical stage 3 or 4. Persons who attended an appointment in the final three months were considered to be retained in care. Adherence to ART was measured using pharmacy refill dates. “Effective HIV care” was defined as completion of the cascade of care at 12-months regardless of whether patients are on ART. Tracing outcomes were obtained for those who were LTFU during pre-ART care. Results 408 persons newly diagnosed with HIV infection were screened, 338 were enrolled, and 255 persons were staged for ART. ART-ineligible persons had higher retention rates than ART-eligible persons (59.6% vs 41.8%, p = 0.03). 77 (22.8%) of 338 persons received effective HIV care. Most attrition (61.9%) occurred with persons during pre-ART care. 123 of 138 persons (89.1%) who were LTFU prior to ART initiation were found, and 91 of those 123 (74.0%) were alive. Of the 74 persons who were alive and described their engagement in care, 40 (54.1%) stopped care. Nearly half (42.5%) of those 40 stopped after assessment of ART-eligibility but before ART initiation. The main limitation of this study was the lack of tracing outcomes for those lost during ART care. Conclusions The majority of the pre-ART LTFU population stopped their care, particularly after ART-eligibility but before ART initiation. Interventions to hasten ART initiation and retain this at-risk group may have significant downstream impact on effective HIV care. PMID:26901765

  18. Continued Slow Decay of the Residual Plasma Viremia Level in HIV-1–Infected Adults Receiving Long-term Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Riddler, Sharon A.; Aga, Evgenia; Bosch, Ronald J.; Bastow, Barbara; Bedison, Margaret; Vagratian, David; Vaida, Florin; Eron, Joseph J.; Gandhi, Rajesh T.; Mellors, John W.

    2016-01-01

    We measured plasma human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) RNA levels by means of single-copy assay in 334 participants receiving virologically suppressive antiretroviral therapy (ART). A residual viremia load of ≥1 copy/mL after 4 years of ART was predicted by a higher pre-ART HIV-1 RNA level, higher CD8+ T-cell count during treatment, and a lower ratio of CD4+ T cells to CD8+ T cells during treatment but not by initial ART regimen. In a longitudinal subset of 64 individuals, continued decay of the plasma HIV-1 RNA level was observed, with an average annual decrease of 6% and an estimated half-life of 11.5 years. In contrast to prior reports, the persistent viremia level continues to slowly decline during years 4–12 of suppressive ART. Clinical Trials Registration: NCT00001137. PMID:26333941

  19. Executive summary of the GeSIDA/National AIDS Plan consensus document on antiretroviral therapy in adults infected by the human immunodeficiency virus (updated January 2014).

    PubMed

    Berenguer, Juan; Polo, Rosa; Lozano, Fernando; López Aldeguer, José; Antela, Antonio; Arribas, José Ramón; Asensi, Víctor; Blanco, José Ramón; Clotet, Bonaventura; Domingo, Pere; Galindo, María José; Gatell, José María; González-García, Juan; Iribarren, José Antonio; Locutura, Jaime; López, Juan Carlos; Mallolas, Josep; Martínez, Esteban; Miralles, Celia; Miró, José M; Moreno, Santiago; Palacios, Rosario; Pérez Elías, María Jesús; Pineda, Juan Antonio; Podzamczer, Daniel; Portilla, Joaquín; Pulido, Federico; Ribera, Esteban; Riera, Melchor; Rubio, Rafael; Santos, Jesús; Sanz, Jesús; Tuset, Montserrat; Vidal, Francesc; Rivero, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    In this update, antiretroviral therapy (ART) is recommended for all patients infected by type 1 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1). The strength and grade of the recommendation varies with clinical circumstances, number of CD4 cells, comorbid conditions and prevention of transmission of HIV. The objective of ART is to achieve an undetectable plasma viral load. Initial ART should always comprise a combination of 3 drugs, including 2 nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors and a third drug from a different family (non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor, protease inhibitor, or integrase inhibitor). This update presents the causes and criteria for switching ART in patients with undetectable plasma viral load and in cases of virological failure. An update is also provided for the specific criteria for ART in special situations (acute infection, HIV-2 infection, and pregnancy) and with comorbid conditions (tuberculosis or other opportunistic infections, kidney disease, liver disease, and cancer).

  20. Safety, pharmacokinetics, and antiretroviral activity of multiple doses of ibalizumab (formerly TNX-355), an anti-CD4 monoclonal antibody, in human immunodeficiency virus type 1-infected adults.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Jeffrey M; Kuritzkes, Daniel R; Godofsky, Eliot; DeJesus, Edwin; Larson, Jeffrey A; Weinheimer, Steven P; Lewis, Stanley T

    2009-02-01

    Ibalizumab (formerly TNX-355) is a humanized monoclonal antibody that binds CD4, the primary receptor for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), and inhibits the viral entry process. A phase lb multidose study of the safety, pharmacokinetics, and antiviral activity of ibalizumab was conducted with 22 HIV-1-infected patients. Nineteen patients were randomized to receive either 10 mg/kg of body weight weekly (arm A) or a 10-mg/kg loading dose followed by 6 mg/kg every 2 weeks (arm B) intravenously for 9 weeks. Three patients were assigned to receive 25 mg/kg every 2 weeks for five doses (arm C). During the study, the patients remained off other antiretrovirals or continued a stable failing regimen. Treatment with ibalizumab resulted in substantial reductions in HIV-1 RNA levels (0.5 to 1.7 log(10)) in 20 of 22 subjects. In most patients, HIV-1 RNA fell to nadir levels after 1 to 2 weeks of treatment and then returned to baseline despite continued treatment. Baseline viral isolates were susceptible to ibalizumab in vitro, regardless of coreceptor tropism. Emerging resistance to ibalizumab was manifested by reduced maximal percent inhibition in a single-cycle HIV infectivity assay. Resistant isolates remained CD4 dependent and were susceptible to enfuvirtide in vitro. Complete coating of CD4(+) T-cell receptors was correlated with serum ibalizumab concentrations. There was no evidence of CD4(+) T-cell depletion in ibalizumab-treated patients. Ibalizumab was not immunogenic, and no serious drug-related adverse effects occurred. In conclusion, ibalizumab administered either weekly or biweekly was safe and well tolerated and demonstrated antiviral activity. Further studies with ibalizumab in combination with standard antiretroviral treatments are warranted.

  1. Greater change in bone turnover markers for efavirenz/emtricitabine/tenofovir disoproxil fumarate versus dolutegravir + abacavir/lamivudine in antiretroviral therapy-naive adults over 144 weeks

    PubMed Central

    Tebas, Pablo; Kumar, Princy; Hicks, Charles; Granier, Catherine; Wynne, Brian; Min, Sherene; Pappa, Keith

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Antiretroviral therapy initiation has been linked to bone mineral density and bone biomarker changes. We assessed long-term bone turnover biomarker effects over 144 weeks in patients initiating dolutegravir (DTG) + abacavir/lamivudine (ABC/3TC) versus efavirenz/emtricitabine/tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (EFV/FTC/TDF). Methods: Patients randomized in SINGLE received DTG (50 mg once daily) + ABC/3TC or fixed-dose combination EFV/FTC/TDF. We evaluated vitamin D serum levels and bone turnover markers (BTMs), including type 1 collagen cross-linked C-telopeptide (CTx), osteocalcin, bone-specific alkaline phosphatase (BSAP), and procollagen type 1 N-terminal propeptide (P1NP), at baseline and weeks 48, 96, and 144. Results: Among the 833 enrolled patients (68% white, 85% men), baseline median age was 35 years (range 18–85), median CD4+ was 338 cells/μl, and median BMI was 24 kg/m2. Fifty-three percent of patients smoked, and 6% reported baseline vitamin D use, with no meaningful differences between groups. Relative to baseline, CTx, osteocalcin, BSAP, and P1NP increased; vitamin D decreased in both groups at weeks 48, 96, and 144. Changes from baseline typically peaked at weeks 48 or 96 and for the four analytes, excluding vitamin D, with the EFV/FTC/TDF group having significantly greater changes from baseline at all time points. Conclusion: DTG + ABC/3TC in antiretroviral therapy-naive patients resulted in significantly lower increases in BTMs (CTx, osteocalcin, BSAP, P1NP) compared with EFV/FTC/TDF over 144 weeks. The observed changes are consistent with results from other smaller, randomized trials. These differences in BTMs likely correlate with changes in bone mineral density over time. PMID:26355674

  2. [The antiretroviral agent Fullevir].

    PubMed

    Nosik, D N; Lialina, I K; Kalnina, L B; Lobach, O A; Chataeva, M S; Rasnetsov, L D

    2009-01-01

    The antiretroviral properties of Fullevir (sodium salt of fullerenepolyhydropolyaminocaproic acid) manufactured by IntelFarm Co.) were studied in the human cell culture infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). The agent was ascertained to be able to protect the cell from the cytopathic action of HIV. The 90% effective concentration (EF90) was 5 microg/ml. The 50% average toxic concentration was 400 microg/ml. Testing of different (preventive and therapeutic) Fullevir dosage regimens has shown that the drug is effective when used both an hour before and an hour after infection and when administered simultaneously with cell infection. The longer contact time for the agent with the cells increased the degree of antiviral defense. Co-administration of Fullevir and the HIV reverse transcriptase inhibitor Retrovir (azidothymidine) showed a synergistic antiretroviral effect. Thus, Fullevir may be regarded as a new promising antiretroviral drug for the treatment of HIV infection.

  3. Feasibility and Acceptability of a Smartphone App for Daily Reports of Substance Use and Antiretroviral Therapy Adherence among HIV-Infected Adults

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    While substance use is one of the most consistent predictors of poor adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART), few studies among people living with HIV (PLH) have utilized mobile phone-based assessment of these health behaviors. PLH were recruited from primary care clinics to report ART and substance use using a smartphone application (app) for 14 consecutive days. The app's feasibility as a data collection tool was evaluated quantitatively via surveys and qualitatively via in-depth interviews to assess daily report completion, compliance, and study satisfaction. Overall, 26 participants (M = 49.5 years, 76% male) completed 95.3% of time-based daily reports. Participants reported high satisfaction with the app and expressed future interest in using smartphones to report daily behaviors. High completion rates and participant acceptability suggest that smartphones are a feasible, acceptable method for collecting substance use and ART data among PLH. Potential areas of concern such as sufficient training and assistance for those with limited smartphone experience should be considered for future app-based research studies among PLH. PMID:27610243

  4. Feasibility and Acceptability of a Smartphone App for Daily Reports of Substance Use and Antiretroviral Therapy Adherence among HIV-Infected Adults.

    PubMed

    Przybyla, Sarahmona M; Eliseo-Arras, Rebecca K; Krawiec, Gabriela; Gower, Emily; Dermen, Kurt

    2016-01-01

    While substance use is one of the most consistent predictors of poor adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART), few studies among people living with HIV (PLH) have utilized mobile phone-based assessment of these health behaviors. PLH were recruited from primary care clinics to report ART and substance use using a smartphone application (app) for 14 consecutive days. The app's feasibility as a data collection tool was evaluated quantitatively via surveys and qualitatively via in-depth interviews to assess daily report completion, compliance, and study satisfaction. Overall, 26 participants (M = 49.5 years, 76% male) completed 95.3% of time-based daily reports. Participants reported high satisfaction with the app and expressed future interest in using smartphones to report daily behaviors. High completion rates and participant acceptability suggest that smartphones are a feasible, acceptable method for collecting substance use and ART data among PLH. Potential areas of concern such as sufficient training and assistance for those with limited smartphone experience should be considered for future app-based research studies among PLH.

  5. Executive summary of the GESIDA/National AIDS Plan Consensus Document on antiretroviral therapy in adults infected by the human immunodeficiency virus (updated January 2015).

    PubMed

    Berenguer, Juan; Polo, Rosa; Aldeguer, José López; Lozano, Fernando; Aguirrebengoa, Koldo; Arribas, José Ramón; Blanco, José Ramón; Boix, Vicente; Casado, José Luis; Clotet, Bonaventura; Crespo, Manuel; Domingo, Pere; Estrada, Vicente; García, Federico; Gatell, José María; González-García, Juan; Gutiérrez, Félix; Iribarren, José Antonio; Knobel, Hernando; Llibre, Josep María; Locutura, Jaime; López, Juan Carlos; Miró, José M; Moreno, Santiago; Podzamczer, Daniel; Portilla, Joaquín; Pulido, Federico; Ribera, Esteban; Riera, Melchor; Rubio, Rafael; Santos, Jesús; Sanz-Moreno, José; Sanz, Jesús; Téllez, María Jesús; Tuset, Montserrat; Rivero, Antonio

    2015-10-01

    In this update, antiretroviral therapy (ART) is recommended for all patients infected by type 1 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1). The strength and grade of the recommendation vary depending on the CD4+ T-lymphocyte count, the presence of opportunistic infections or comorbid conditions, age, and the efforts to prevent the transmission of HIV. The objective of ART is to achieve an undetectable plasma viral load (PVL). Initial ART should comprise three drugs, namely, two nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTI) and one drug from another family. Three of the recommended regimens, all of which have an integrase strand transfer inhibitor (INSTI) as the third drug, are considered a preferred regimen; a further seven regimens, which are based on an INSTI, an non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI), or a protease inhibitor boosted with ritonavir (PI/r), are considered alternatives. The reasons and criteria for switching ART are presented both for patients with an undetectable PVL and for patients who experience virological failure, in which case the rescue regimen should include three (or at least two) drugs that are fully active against HIV. The specific criteria for ART in special situations (acute infection, HIV-2 infection, pregnancy) and comorbid conditions (tuberculosis and other opportunistic infections, kidney disease, liver disease, and cancer) are updated.

  6. Executive summary of the GESIDA/National AIDS Plan Consensus Document on Antiretroviral Therapy in Adults Infected by the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (Updated January 2016).

    PubMed

    2016-01-01

    In this update, antiretroviral therapy (ART) is recommended for all patients infected by type 1 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1). The objective of ART is to achieve an undetectable plasma viral load (PVL). Initial ART should comprise 3 drugs, namely, 2 nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTI), and 1 drug from another family. Four of the recommended regimens, all of which have an integrase strand transfer inhibitor (INSTI) as the third drug, are considered a preferred regimen; a further 6 regimens, which are based on an INSTI, a non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI), or a protease inhibitor boosted with cobicistat or ritonavir (PI/COBI, PI/r), are considered alternatives. The reasons and criteria for switching ART are presented both for patients with an undetectable PVL and for patients who experience virological failure, in which case the rescue regimen should include 3 (or at least 2) drugs that are fully active against HIV. The specific criteria for ART in special situations (acute infection, HIV-2 infection, pregnancy) and comorbid conditions (tuberculosis and other opportunistic infections, kidney disease, liver disease, and cancer) are updated.

  7. "If you want me to treat you like an adult, start acting like one!" Comparing the criteria that emerging adults and their parents have for adulthood.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Larry J; Padilla-Walker, Laura M; Carroll, Jason S; Madsen, Stephanie D; Barry, Carolyn McNamara; Badger, Sarah

    2007-12-01

    The purpose of this study was (a) to identify the criteria parents of emerging adults consider necessary and important for their children to achieve adulthood, (b) to compare parents' criteria for adulthood with the criteria espoused by emerging adults, and (c) to examine how these criteria might differ on the basis of gender of the parent and gender of the child. Participants included 392 unmarried college students, ages 18-25, and at least 1 of their parents (271 fathers, 319 mothers). Results revealed that (a) as did their children, most parents did not yet view their children as adults, (b) there was disagreement between children and their parents in the emphasis they placed on various criteria for adulthood, (c) mothers and fathers did not always agree on the importance of various criteria, and (d) the gender of both the parent and the child played a role in the criteria parents deemed important for adulthood. Taken together, the findings suggest that parents and children view the transition to adulthood differently, which might have implications for the parent-child relationship during this period of development.

  8. Executive summary of the Consensus Document of GeSIDA and Spanish Secretariat for the National Plan on AIDS on combined antiretroviral treatment in adults infected by the human immunodeficiency virus (January 2013).

    PubMed

    2013-11-01

    In the present update of the guidelines, a starting combination antiretroviral treatment (cART) is recommended in symptomatic patients, in pregnant women, in serodiscordant couples with a high risk of transmission, in patients co-infected with hepatitis B virus requiring treatment, and in patients with HIV-related nephropathy. Guidelines on cART are included in the event of a concurrent diagnosis of HIV infection with an AIDS-defining event. In asymptomatic naïve patients, cART is recommended if the CD4(+) lymphocyte count is <500cells/μL; if the CD4(+) lymphocyte count is >500cells/μL, cART can be delayed, although it may be considered in patients with liver cirrhosis, chronic infection due to hepatitis C virus, high cardiovascular risk, plasma viral load (PVL) >10(5)copies/mL, CD4(+) lymphocyte percentage <14%, cognitive impairment, and age >55 years. cART in naïve patients requires a combination of 3 drugs, and its aim is to achieve undetectable PVL. Treatment adherence plays a key role in sustaining a favorable response. cART can, and should be, changed if virological failure occurs, in order to return to undetectable PVL. Approaches to cART in acute HIV infection, in women, in pregnancy, in tuberculosis, and post-exposure prophylaxis are also examined.

  9. Non-Classical Monocytes and Monocyte Chemoattractant Protein-1 (MCP-1) Correlate with Coronary Artery Calcium Progression in Chronically HIV-1 Infected Adults on Stable Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Zungsontiporn, Nath; Tello, Raquel R.; Zhang, Guangxiang; Mitchell, Brooks I.; Budoff, Matthew; Kallianpur, Kalpana J.; Nakamoto, Beau K.; Keating, Sheila M.; Norris, Philip J.; Ndhlovu, Lishomwa C.; Souza, Scott A.; Shikuma, Cecilia M.; Chow, Dominic C.

    2016-01-01

    Background Persistent inflammation and immune activation has been hypothesized to contribute to increased prevalence of subclinical atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk in patients with chronic HIV infection. In this study, we examined the correlation of peripheral monocyte subsets and soluble biomarkers of inflammation to coronary artery calcium (CAC) progression, as measured by cardiac computed tomography scan. Methods We conducted a longitudinal analysis utilizing baseline data of 78 participants with HIV infection on stable antiretroviral therapy (ART) in the Hawaii Aging with HIV-Cardiovascular study who had available baseline monocyte subset analysis as well as CAC measurement at baseline and at 2-year follow up. Monocyte phenotypes were assessed from cryopreserved blood by flow cytometry and plasma was assayed for soluble biomarkers using antibody-coated beads in a high sensitivity Milliplex Luminex platform. Change in CAC over 2 years was analyzed as the primary outcome variable. Results Of all monocyte subsets and biomarkers tested, higher non-classical monocyte percentage (ρ = 0.259, p = 0.022), interleukin (IL)-6 (ρ = 0.311, p = 0.012), and monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1 (ρ = 0.524, p = <0.001) were significantly correlated to higher 2-year CAC progression in unadjusted Spearman’s correlation. Non-classical monocyte percentage (ρ = 0.247, p = 0.039), and MCP-1 (ρ = 0.487, p = <0.001), remained significantly correlated to 2-year CAC progression, while IL-6 was not (ρ = 0.209, p = 0.120) after adjustment for age, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, total/HDL cholesterol ratio, smoking history, and BMI. Conclusion The percentage of non-classical monocytes and plasma MCP-1 levels were independently associated with CAC progression and may be related to the progression of atherosclerosis and increased CVD risk associated with chronic HIV infection on stable ART. PMID:26867220

  10. Changing Trends in Complications and Mortality Rates Among US Youth and Young Adults With HIV Infection in the Era of Combination Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Mirani, Gayatri; Williams, Paige L.; Chernoff, Miriam; Abzug, Mark J.; Levin, Myron J.; Seage, George R.; Oleske, James M.; Purswani, Murli U.; Hazra, Rohan; Traite, Shirley; Zimmer, Bonnie; Van Dyke, Russell B.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) has resulted in a dramatic decrease in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)–related opportunistic infections and deaths in US youth, but both continue to occur. Methods. We estimated the incidence of complications and deaths in IMPAACT P1074, a long-term US-based prospective multicenter cohort study conducted from April 2008 to June 2014. Incidence rates of selected diagnoses and trends over time were compared with those from a previous observational cohort study, P219C (2004–2007). Causes of death and relevant demographic and clinical features were reviewed. Results. Among 1201 HIV-infected youth in P1074 (87% perinatally infected; mean [standard deviation] age at last chart review, 20.9 [5.4] years), psychiatric and neurodevelopmental disorders, asthma, pneumonia, and genital tract infections were among the most common comorbid conditions. Compared with findings in P219C, conditions with significantly increased incidence included substance or alcohol abuse, latent tuberculosis, diabetes mellitus, atypical mycobacterial infections, vitamin D deficiency or metabolic bone disorders, anxiety disorders, and fractures; the incidence of pneumonia decreased significantly. Twenty-eight deaths occurred, yielding a standardized mortality rate 31.5 times that of the US population. Those who died were older, less likely to be receiving cART, and had lower CD4 cell counts and higher viral loads. Most deaths (86%) were due to HIV-related medical conditions. Conclusions. Opportunistic infections and deaths are less common among HIV-infected youth in the US in the cART era, but the mortality rate remains elevated. Deaths were associated with poor HIV control and older age. Emerging complications, such as psychiatric, inflammatory, metabolic, and genital tract diseases, need to be addressed. PMID:26270680

  11. Antiretroviral treatment sequencing strategies to overcome HIV type 1 drug resistance in adolescents and adults in low-middle-income countries.

    PubMed

    De Luca, Andrea; Hamers, Raphael L; Schapiro, Jonathan M

    2013-06-15

    Antiretroviral treatment (ART) is expanding to human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-infected persons in low-middle income countries, thanks to a public health approach. With 3 available drug classes, 2 ART sequencing lines are programmatically foreseen. The emergence and transmission of viral drug resistance represents a challenge to the efficacy of ART. Knowledge of HIV-1 drug resistance selection associated with specific drugs and regimens and the consequent activity of residual drug options are essential in programming ART sequencing options aimed at preserving ART efficacy for as long as possible. This article determines optimal ART sequencing options for overcoming HIV-1 drug resistance in resource-limited settings, using currently available drugs and treatment monitoring opportunities. From the perspective of drug resistance and on the basis of limited virologic monitoring data, optimal sequencing seems to involve use of a tenofovir-containing nonnucleoside reverse-transcriptase inhibitor-based first-line regimen, followed by a zidovudine-containing, protease inhibitor (PI)-based second-line regimen. Other options and their consequences are explored by considering within-class and between-class sequencing opportunities, including boosted PI monotherapies and future options with integrase inhibitors. Nucleoside reverse-transcriptase inhibitor resistance pathways in HIV-1 subtype C suggest an additional reason for accelerating stavudine phase out. Viral load monitoring avoids the accumulation of resistance mutations that significantly reduce the activity of next-line options. Rational use of resources, including broader access to viral load monitoring, will help ensure 3 lines of fully active treatment options, thereby increasing the duration of ART success.

  12. Effect of Early Antiretroviral Therapy on Sexual Behaviors and HIV-1 Transmission Risk Among Adults With Diverse Heterosexual Partnership Statuses in Côte d'Ivoire

    PubMed Central

    Jean, Kévin; Gabillard, Delphine; Moh, Raoul; Danel, Christine; Fassassi, Raïmi; Desgrées-du-Loû, Annabel; Eholié, Serge; Lert, France; Anglaret, Xavier; Dray-Spira, Rosemary

    2014-01-01

    Background. The effect of early initiation of antiretroviral therapy (ART; ie, at CD4+ T-cell counts >350 cells/mm3) on sexual behaviors and human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV) transmission risk has not been documented in populations other than HIV-serodiscordant couples in stable relationships. Methods. On the basis of data from a behavioral study nested in a randomized, controlled trial (Temprano-ANRS12136) of early ART, we compared proportions of risky sex (ie, unprotected sex with a partner of negative/unknown HIV status) reported 12 months after inclusion between participants randomly assigned to initiate ART immediately (hereafter, “early ART”) or according to ongoing World Health Organization criteria. Group-specific HIV transmission rates were estimated on the basis of sexual behaviors and viral load–specific per-act HIV transmission probabilities. The ratio of transmission rates was computed to estimate the protective effect of early ART. Results. Among 957 participants (baseline median CD4+ T-cell count, 478 cells/mm3), 46.0% reported sexual activity in the past month; of these 46.0%, sexual activity for 41.5% involved noncohabiting partners. The proportion of subjects who engaged in risky sex was 10.0% in the early ART group, compared with 12.8% in the standard ART group (P = .17). After accounting for sexual behaviors and viral load, we estimated that the protective effect of early ART was 90% (95% confidence interval, 81%–95%). Conclusion. Twelve months after inclusion, patients in the early and standard ART groups reported similar sexual behaviors. Early ART decreased the estimated risk of HIV transmission by 90%, suggesting a major prevention benefit among seronegative sex partners in stable or casual relationships with seropositive individuals. PMID:23990567

  13. The START Study to evaluate the effectiveness of a combination intervention package to enhance antiretroviral therapy uptake and retention during TB treatment among TB/HIV patients in Lesotho: rationale and design of a mixed-methods, cluster-randomized trial

    PubMed Central

    Howard, Andrea A.; Hirsch-Moverman, Yael; Frederix, Koen; Daftary, Amrita; Saito, Suzue; Gross, Tal; Wu, Yingfeng; Maama, Llang Bridget

    2016-01-01

    Background Initiating antiretroviral therapy (ART) early during tuberculosis (TB) treatment increases survival; however, implementation is suboptimal. Implementation science studies are needed to identify interventions to address this evidence-to-program gap. Objective The Start TB Patients on ART and Retain on Treatment (START) Study is a mixed-methods, cluster-randomized trial aimed at evaluating the effectiveness, cost-effectiveness, and acceptability of a combination intervention package (CIP) to improve early ART initiation, retention, and TB treatment success among TB/HIV patients in Berea District, Lesotho. Design Twelve health facilities were randomized to receive the CIP or standard of care after stratification by facility type (hospital or health center). The CIP includes nurse training and mentorship, using a clinical algorithm; transport reimbursement and health education by village health workers (VHW) for patients and treatment supporters; and adherence support using text messaging and VHW. Routine data were abstracted for all newly registered TB/HIV patients; anticipated sample size was 1,200 individuals. A measurement cohort of TB/HIV patients initiating ART was recruited; the target enrollment was 384 individuals, each to be followed for the duration of TB treatment (6–9 months). Inclusion criteria were HIV-infected; on TB treatment; initiated ART within 2 months of TB treatment initiation; age ≥18; English- or Sesotho-speaking; and capable of informed consent. The exclusion criterion was multidrug-resistant TB. Three groups of key informants were recruited from intervention clinics: early ART initiators; non/late ART initiators; and health care workers. Primary outcomes include ART initiation, retention, and TB treatment success. Secondary outcomes include time to ART initiation, adherence, change in CD4+ count, sputum smear conversion, cost-effectiveness, and acceptability. Follow-up and data abstraction are complete. Discussion The START

  14. Discontinuation from Antiretroviral Therapy: A Continuing Challenge among Adults in HIV Care in Ethiopia: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Gesesew, Hailay Abrha; Hajito, Kifle Woldemichael; Feyissa, Garumma Tolu; Mwanri, Lillian

    2017-01-01

    Background Discontinuation of antiretroviral therapy (ART) reduces the immunological benefit of treatment and increases complications related to human immune-deficiency virus (HIV). However, the risk factors for ART discontinuation are poorly understood in developing countries particularly in Ethiopia. This review aimed to assess the best available evidence regarding risk factors for ART discontinuation in Ethiopia. Methods Quantitative studies conducted in Ethiopia between 2002 and 2015 that evaluated factors associated with ART discontinuation were sought across six major databases. Only English language articles were included. This review considered studies that included the following outcome: ART treatment discontinuation, i.e. ‘lost to follow up’, ‘defaulting’ and ‘stopping medication’. Meta- analysis was performed with Mantel Haenszel method using Revman-5 software. Summary statistics were expressed as pooled odds ratio with 95% confidence intervals at a p-value of <0.05. Results Nine (9) studies met the criteria of the search. Five (5) were retrospective studies, 3 were case control studies, and 1 was a prospective cohort study. The total sample size in the included studies was 62,156. Being rural dweller (OR = 2.1, 95%CI: 1.5–2.7, I2 = 60%), being illiterate (OR = 1.5, 95%CI: 1.1–2.1), being not married (OR = 1.4, 95%CI: 1.1–1.8), being alcohol drinker (OR = 2.9, 95%CI: 1.9–4.4, I2 = 39%), being tobacco smoker (OR = 2.6, 95%CI: 1.6–4.3, I2 = 74%), having mental illness (OR = 2.7, 95%CI: 1.6–4.6, I2 = 0%) and being bed ridden functional status (OR = 2.3, 95%CI: 1.5–3.4, I2 = 37%) were risk factors for ART discontinuation. Whereas, having HIV positive partner (OR = 0.4, 95%CI: 0.3–0.6, I2 = 69%) and being co-infected with Tb/HIV (OR = 0.6, 95%CI: 0.4–0.9, I2 = 0%) were protective factors. Conclusion Demographic, behavioral and clinical factors influenced ART treatment discontinuation. Hence, we recommend strengthening

  15. Projected Uptake of New Antiretroviral (ARV) Medicines in Adults in Low- and Middle-Income Countries: A Forecast Analysis 2015-2025

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Aastha; Juneja, Sandeep; Vitoria, Marco; Habiyambere, Vincent; Nguimfack, Boniface Dongmo; Doherty, Meg; Low-Beer, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    With anti-retroviral treatment (ART) scale-up set to continue over the next few years it is of key importance that manufacturers and planners in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) hardest hit by the HIV/AIDS pandemic are able to anticipate and respond to future changes to treatment regimens, generics pipeline and demand, in order to secure continued access to all ARV medicines required. We did a forecast analysis, using secondary WHO and UNAIDS data sources, to estimate the number of people living with HIV (PLHIV) and the market share and demand for a range of new and existing ARV drugs in LMICs up to 2025. UNAIDS estimates 24.7 million person-years of ART in 2020 and 28.5 million person-years of ART in 2025 (24.3 million on first-line treatment, 3.5 million on second-line treatment, and 0.6 million on third-line treatment). Our analysis showed that TAF and DTG will be major players in the ART regimen by 2025, with 8 million and 15 million patients using these ARVs respectively. However, as safety and efficacy of dolutegravir (DTG) and tenofovir alafenamide (TAF) during pregnancy and among TB/HIV co-infected patients using rifampicin is still under debate, and ART scale-up is predicted to increase considerably, there also remains a clear need for continuous supplies of existing ARVs including TDF and EFV, which 16 million and 10 million patients—respectively—are predicted to be using in 2025. It will be important to ensure that the existing capacities of generics manufacturers, which are geared towards ARVs of higher doses (such as TDF 300mg and EFV 600mg), will not be adversely impacted due to the introduction of lower dose ARVs such as TAF 25mg and DTG 50mg. With increased access to viral load testing, more patients would be using protease inhibitors containing regimens in second-line, with 1 million patients on LPV/r and 2.3 million on ATV/r by 2025. However, it will remain important to continue monitoring the evolution of ARV market in LMICs to

  16. Can pricing deter adolescents and young adults from starting to drink: An analysis of the effect of alcohol taxation on drinking initiation among Thai adolescents and young adults.

    PubMed

    Sornpaisarn, Bundit; Shield, Kevin D; Cohen, Joanna E; Schwartz, Robert; Rehm, Jürgen

    2015-12-01

    The objective of this study is to assess the relationship between alcohol taxation changes and drinking initiation among adolescents and young adults (collectively "youth") in Thailand (a middle-income country). Using a survey panel, this study undertook an age-period-cohort analysis using four large-scale national cross-sectional surveys of alcohol consumption performed in Thailand in 2001, 2004, 2007 and 2011 (n=87,176 Thai youth, 15-24 years of age) to test the hypothesis that changes in the inflation-adjusted alcohol taxation rates are associated with drinking initiation. Regression analyses were used to examine the association between inflation-adjusted taxation increases and the prevalence of lifetime drinkers. After adjusting for potential confounders, clear cohort and age effects were observed. Furthermore, a 10% increase of the inflation-adjusted taxation rate of the total alcohol market was significantly associated with a 4.3% reduction in the prevalence of lifetime drinking among Thai youth. In conclusion, tax rate changes in Thailand from 2001 to 2011 were associated with drinking initiation among youth. Accordingly, increases in taxation may prevent drinking initiation among youth in countries with a high prevalence of abstainers and may reduce the harms caused by alcohol.

  17. The Start of Head Start

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neugebauer, Roger

    2010-01-01

    The creation of the Head Start program occurred at break-neck speed with many dramatic turns and many colorful players. No one tells the story better than Edward Zigler in "Head Start: The Inside Story of America's Most Successful Educational Experiment"--a detailed and personal, behind the scenes look at the program's inception. From this…

  18. High rate of lymphoma among a UK cohort of adolescents with vertically acquired HIV-1 infection transitioning to adult care in the era of antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Eades, Chris P; Herbert, Sophie A; Edwards, Simon G; Waters, Laura J; Peake, Tabitha; Miller, Robert F; Jungmann, Eva

    2016-01-02

    Among an inner London UK cohort of 147 adolescents transitioning from paediatric into adult care between 2007 and 2015, a new diagnosis of lymphoma was made in five patients; incidence rate = 0.425/100 person-years (95% confidence interval = 0.424-0.426). Previously described risk factors, including low nadir CD4 cell count and ongoing HIV-1 viraemia, appeared to be important. These data suggest that careful surveillance and a low threshold for investigating relevant symptoms continue to be essential for such patients.

  19. Pulmonary function in an international sample of HIV-positive, treatment-naïve adults with CD4 counts >500 cells/μL: a substudy of the INSIGHT Strategic Timing of AntiRetroviral Treatment trial

    PubMed Central

    KUNISAKI, Ken M.; NIEWOEHNER, Dennis E.; COLLINS, Gary; NIXON, Daniel E.; TEDALDI, Ellen; AKOLO, Christopher; KITYO, Cissy; KLINKER, Hartwig; LA ROSA, Alberto; CONNETT, John E.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To describe the prevalence and correlates of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in a multicentre international cohort of persons living with HIV (PLWH). Methods We performed a cross-sectional analysis of adult PLWH, naïve to HIV treatment, with baseline CD4 cell count >500 cells/μL enrolled in the Pulmonary Substudy of the Strategic Timing of AntiRetroviral Treatment trial. We collected standardised, quality-controlled spirometry. COPD was defined as forced expiratory volume in one second/forced vital capacity (FEV1/FVC) ratio less than the lower limit of normal. Results Among 1026 participants from 80 sites and 20 countries, median (IQR) age was 36 (30, 44) years, 29% were female, and time since HIV diagnosis was 1.2 (0.4, 3.5) years. Baseline CD4 cell count was 648 (583, 767) cells/μL, viral load was 4.2 (3.5, 4.7) log10 copies/mL, and 10% had viral load ≤400 copies/mL despite lack of HIV treatment. Current/former/never smokers comprised 28%/11%/61% of the cohort, respectively. COPD was present in 6.8% of participants, and varied by age, smoking status, and region. 48% of those with COPD reported lifelong nonsmoking. In multivariable regression, age and pack-years of smoking had the strongest associations with FEV1/FVC ratio (p<0.0001). There were significant differences between the effect of region on FEV1/FVC ratio (p=0.010). Conclusions Our data suggest that among PLWH, naïve to HIV treatment and with CD4 cell count >500 cells/μL, smoking and age are important factors related to COPD. Smoking cessation should remain a high global priority for clinical care and research in PLWH. PMID:25711330

  20. Risky sexual practice and associated factors among HIV positive adults attending anti-retroviral treatment clinic at Gondar University Referral Hospital, Northwest Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Risky sexual practice among people living with HIV/AIDS is a public health concern because of the risk of transmission of the virus to sero-discordant partner/s. There is also the risk of re-infection with new, drug resistant viral strains between sero-concordant partners. However, there is lack of information on risky sexual practices among HIV positive adults. Therefore, this study aimed to assess risky sexual practice and associated factors among adult HIV positive clients at Gondar University Referral Hospital, Northwest Ethiopia, 2015. Methods An institution based cross sectional study was conducted at Gondar University Referral Hospital from May to June 2015. A pretested structured questionnaire was used to collect the data. Using systematic random sampling technique, a total of 513 respondents were participated in this study. The data were entered into EPI info version 3.5.3 and transferred to SPSS version 20 for analysis. Descriptive, bivariate and multivariate analyses were done. A P-value <0.05 was considered to determine the statistical significance of the association between factors (independent variables) and risky sexual practice. The Odds ratio was also used to determine the presence and the degree of association between the dependent and independent variables. Results A total of 513 respondents were participated in this study. The prevalence of risky sexual practices in the past three months was 38% (95% CI: 33.3%, 42.3%). Being in the age range of 18–29 years (AOR = 2.63, 95% CI: 1.55, 4.47) and 30–39 years (AOR = 2.29, 95% CI: 1.48, 3.53), being single (AOR = 6.32, 95%CI: 2.43, 16.44),being married (AOR = 6.06, 95% CI: 2.81, 13.07), having no child (AOR = 2.58, 95% CI: 1.17, 5.72), and a CD4 count of greater than 500/mm3 were factors significantly associated with risky sexual practices. Conclusions A considerable number of HIV positive clients had risky sexual practices. It is strongly recommended that the Regional Health Bureau

  1. Starting Points

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wicks, Karen

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses the findings of a micro research project which explores students' perceptions of learning mathematics when embarking on undergraduate studies in education. The theme for this study is the consideration of a possible link between adults' perceptions of learning mathematics and the effect this may have on their…

  2. The next generation of the World Health Organization's global antiretroviral guidance

    PubMed Central

    Hirnschall, Gottfried; Harries, Anthony D; Easterbrook, Philippa J; Doherty, Meg C; Ball, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    The 2013 World Health Organization’s (WHO) Consolidated guidelines on the use of antiretroviral drugs for treating and preventing HIV infection provide more than 50 new recommendations across the continuum of HIV care, including recommendations on HIV testing, using antiretroviral drugs for prevention, linking individuals to HIV care and treatment services, initiating and maintaining antiretroviral therapy (ART) and monitoring treatment. Guidance is provided across all age groups and populations of adults, pregnant and breastfeeding women, adolescents and key populations. The guidelines are based on a public health approach to expanding the use of ARV drugs for HIV treatment and prevention, with a particular focus on resource-limited settings. The most important new clinical recommendations include: treating adults, adolescents and older children earlier – starting ART in all individuals with a CD4 cell count of 500 cells/mm3 or less (but giving priority to those with advanced clinical disease or a CD4 cell count less than 350 cells/mm3); starting ART at any CD4 cell count in certain populations, including those with active TB (existing recommendation), Hepatitis B infection and severe chronic liver disease, HIV-positive partners in serodiscordant couples (existing recommendation), pregnant and breastfeeding women, and children younger than 5 years of age; a preferred first-line ART regimen of Tenofovir+3TC or FTC+ Efavirenz as a once-daily fixed-dose combination for adults, pregnant women, and children aged 3 years and older; and the use of viral load testing as the preferred approach to monitoring the response to ART and to diagnose treatment failure. Guidance is also provided on enhancing the efficiency and effectiveness of HIV services, including strategies to improve retention in care, and adherence to ART; task-shifting to address human resource gaps; decentralizing delivery of ART to primary health care, and integrating ART services within maternal and

  3. The F4/AS01B HIV-1 Vaccine Candidate Is Safe and Immunogenic, But Does Not Show Viral Efficacy in Antiretroviral Therapy-Naive, HIV-1-Infected Adults

    PubMed Central

    Dinges, Warren; Girard, Pierre-Marie; Podzamczer, Daniel; Brockmeyer, Norbert H.; García, Felipe.; Harrer, Thomas; Lelievre, Jean-Daniel; Frank, Ian; Colin De Verdière, Nathalie; Yeni, Guy-Patrick; Ortega Gonzalez, Enrique; Rubio, Rafael; Clotet Sala, Bonaventura; DeJesus, Edwin; Pérez-Elias, Maria Jesus; Launay, Odile; Pialoux, Gilles; Slim, Jihad; Weiss, Laurence; Bouchaud, Olivier; Felizarta, Franco; Meurer, Anja; Raffi, François; Esser, Stefan; Katlama, Christine; Koletar, Susan L.; Mounzer, Karam; Swindells, Susan; Baxter, John D.; Schneider, Stefan; Chas, Julie; Molina, Jean-Michel; Koutsoukos, Marguerite; Collard, Alix; Bourguignon, Patricia; Roman, François

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The impact of the investigational human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) F4/AS01B vaccine on HIV-1 viral load (VL) was evaluated in antiretroviral therapy (ART)-naive HIV-1 infected adults. This phase IIb, observer-blind study (NCT01218113), included ART-naive HIV-1 infected adults aged 18 to 55 years. Participants were randomized to receive 2 (F4/AS01B_2 group, N = 64) or 3 (F4/AS01B_3 group, N = 62) doses of F4/AS01B or placebo (control group, N = 64) at weeks 0, 4, and 28. Efficacy (HIV-1 VL, CD4+ T-cell count, ART initiation, and HIV-related clinical events), safety, and immunogenicity (antibody and T-cell responses) were evaluated during 48 weeks. At week 48, based on a mixed model, no statistically significant difference in HIV-1 VL change from baseline was demonstrated between F4/AS01B_2 and control group (0.073 log10 copies/mL [97.5% confidence interval (CI): −0.088; 0.235]), or F4/AS01B_3 and control group (−0.096 log10 copies/mL [97.5% CI: −0.257; 0.065]). No differences between groups were observed in HIV-1 VL change, CD4+ T-cell count, ART initiation, or HIV-related clinical events at intermediate timepoints. Among F4/AS01B recipients, the most frequent solicited symptoms were pain at injection site (252/300 doses), fatigue (137/300 doses), myalgia (105/300 doses), and headache (90/300 doses). Twelve serious adverse events were reported in 6 participants; 1 was considered vaccine-related (F4/AS01B_2 group: angioedema). F4/AS01B induced polyfunctional F4-specific CD4+ T-cells, but had no significant impact on F4-specific CD8+ T-cell and anti-F4 antibody levels. F4/AS01B had a clinically acceptable safety profile, induced F4-specific CD4+ T-cell responses, but did not reduce HIV-1 VL, impact CD4+ T-cells count, delay ART initiation, or prevent HIV-1 related clinical events. PMID:26871794

  4. Mortality, AIDS-morbidity and loss to follow-up by current CD4 cell count among HIV-1 infected adults receiving antiretroviral therapy in Africa and Asia: data from the ANRS 12222 collaboration

    PubMed Central

    Gabillard, Delphine; Lewden, Charlotte; Ndoye, Ibra; Moh, Raoul; Ségéral, Olivier; Tonwe-Gold, Besigin; Etard, Jean-François; Pagnaroat, Men; Fournier-Nicolle, Isabelle; Eholié, Serge; Konate, Issouf; Minga, Albert; Mpoudi-Ngolé, Eitel; Koulla-Shiro, Sinata; Zannou, Djimon Marcel; Anglaret, Xavier; Laurent, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Background In resource-limited countries, estimating CD4-specific incidence rates of mortality and morbidity among patients receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART) may help assess the effectiveness of care and treatment programmes, identify program weaknesses and inform decisions. Methods We pooled data from 13 research cohorts in five sub-Saharan African (Benin, Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Cote d'Ivoire and Senegal) and two Asian (Cambodia and Laos) countries. HIV-infected adults (≥18 years) who received ART in 1998-2008 and had at least one CD4 count available were eligible. Changes in CD4 counts over time were estimated by a linear mixed regression. CD4-specific incidence rates were estimated as the number of first events occurring in a given CD4 stratum divided by the time spent within the stratum. Results Overall 3,917 adults (62% women) on ART were followed-up during 10,154 person-years. In the ≤50, 51-100, 101-200, 201-350, 351-500, 501-650 and >650/mm3 CD4 cells strata, death rates were: 20.6, 11.8, 6.7, 3.3, 1.8, 0.9 and 0.3 per 100 person-years; AIDS rates were: 50.5, 32.9, 11.5, 4.8, 2.8, 2.2 and 2.2 per 100 person-years; and loss to follow-up rates were: 4.9, 6.1, 3.5, 3.1, 2.9, 1.7 and 1.2 per 100 person-years, respectively. Mortality and morbidity were higher during the first year following ART initiation. Conclusion In these resource-limited settings, death and AIDS rates remained substantial after ART initiation, even in individuals with high CD4 cell counts. Ensuring earlier ART initiation and optimizing case finding and treatment for AIDS-defining diseases should be seen as priorities. PMID:23274931

  5. Comparative durability of nevirapine versus efavirenz in first-line regimens during the first year of initiating antiretroviral therapy among Swaziland HIV-infected adults.

    PubMed

    Takuva, Simbarashe; Evans, Denise; Zuma, Khangelani; Okello, Velephi; Louwagie, Goedele

    2013-01-01

    Nevirapine (NVP) and Efavirenz (EFV) have generally comparable clinical and virologic efficacy. However, data comparing NVP durability to EFV are imprecise. We analyzed cohort data to compare durability of NVP to EFV among patients initiating ART in Mbabane, Swaziland. The primary outcome was poor regimen durability defined as any modification of NVP or EFV to the ART regimen. Multivariate Cox proportional hazards models were employed to estimate the risk of poor regimen durability (all-cause) for the two regimens and also separately to estimate risk of drug-related toxicity. We analyzed records for 769 patients initiating ART in Mbabane, Swaziland from March 2006 to December 2007. 30 patients (3.9%) changed their NVP or EFV-based regimen during follow up. Cumulative incidence for poor regimen durability was 5.3% and 2.7% for NVP and EFV, respectively. Cumulative incidence for drug-related toxicity was 1.9% and 2.7% for NVP and EFV, respectively. Burden of TB was high and 14 (46.7%) modifications were due to patients substituting NVP due to beginning TB treatment. Though the estimates were imprecise, use of NVP - based regimens seemed to be associated with higher risk of modifications compared to use of EFV - based regimens (HR 2.03 95%CI 0.58 - 7.05) and NVP - based regimens had a small advantage over EFV - based regimens with regard to toxicity - related modifications (HR 0.87 95%CI 0.26 - 2.90). Due to the high burden of TB and a significant proportion of patients changing their ART regimen after starting TB treatment, use of EFV as the preferred NNRTI over NVP in high TB endemic settings may result in improved first-line regimen tolerance. Further studies comparing the cost-effectiveness of delivering these two NNRTIs in light of their different limitations are required.

  6. Clinical Pharmacokinetics of Antiretroviral Drugs in Older Persons

    PubMed Central

    Schoen, John C.; Erlandson, Kristine Mace

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Combination antiretroviral therapy has enabled HIV infected persons to reach older ages in high numbers. Hepatic and renal changes that normally occur with advancing age occur earlier and with higher incidence in HIV-infected individuals. A limited number of prospective controlled studies have demonstrated small reductions (17% to 41%) in lopinavir, atazanavir, and lamivudine clearance in older versus younger adults. A much larger number of retrospective studies in adults (age range ~20 to 60 years), including all antiretroviral drugs, have evaluated age as a covariate for pharmacokinetics. Most studies did not detect substantial associations between drug exposures and age. Areas Covered This review summarizes antiretroviral drug pharmacokinetics in older persons. The authors review articles from PubMed (search terms: elderly, antiretroviral, pharmacokinetics) in addition to the bibliographies of those selected. Expert Opinion The evidence to date does not support major pharmacokinetic changes in adults between ~20 and 60 years of age. However, additional prospective, well-controlled studies are needed in more persons > 60 years, including those with frailty and comorbidities, with assessment of unbound drug clearance, and incorporation of adherence, pharmacogenetics, and concomitant medications. Until then, guidelines for drug-drug interactions and dosing in renal and hepatic impairment should be followed in older HIV infected individuals. PMID:23514375

  7. Press Start

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harteveld, Casper

    This level sets the stage for the design philosophy called “Triadic Game Design” (TGD). This design philosophy can be summarized with the following sentence: it takes two to tango, but it takes three to design a meaningful game or a game with a purpose. Before the philosophy is further explained, this level will first delve into what is meant by a meaningful game or a game with a purpose. Many terms and definitions have seen the light and in this book I will specifically orient at digital games that aim to have an effect beyond the context of the game itself. Subsequently, a historical overview is given of the usage of games with a serious purpose which starts from the moment we human beings started to walk on our feet till our contemporary society. It turns out that we have been using games for all kinds of non-entertainment purposes for already quite a long time. With this introductory material in the back of our minds, I will explain the concept of TGD by means of a puzzle. After that, the protagonist of this book, the game Levee Patroller, is introduced. Based on the development of this game, the idea of TGD, which stresses to balance three different worlds, the worlds of Reality, Meaning, and Play, came into being. Interested? Then I suggest to quickly “press start!”

  8. Potential drug interactions in patients given antiretroviral therapy

    PubMed Central

    dos Santos, Wendel Mombaque; Secoli, Silvia Regina; Padoin, Stela Maris de Mello

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: to investigate potential drug-drug interactions (PDDI) in patients with HIV infection on antiretroviral therapy. Methods: a cross-sectional study was conducted on 161 adults with HIV infection. Clinical, socio demographic, and antiretroviral treatment data were collected. To analyze the potential drug interactions, we used the software Micromedex(r). Statistical analysis was performed by binary logistic regression, with a p-value of ≤0.05 considered statistically significant. Results: of the participants, 52.2% were exposed to potential drug-drug interactions. In total, there were 218 potential drug-drug interactions, of which 79.8% occurred between drugs used for antiretroviral therapy. There was an association between the use of five or more medications and potential drug-drug interactions (p = 0.000) and between the time period of antiretroviral therapy being over six years and potential drug-drug interactions (p < 0.00). The clinical impact was prevalent sedation and cardiotoxicity. Conclusions: the PDDI identified in this study of moderate and higher severity are events that not only affect the therapeutic response leading to toxicity in the central nervous and cardiovascular systems, but also can interfere in tests used for detection of HIV resistance to antiretroviral drugs. PMID:27878224

  9. Long-term outcome of patients after a single interruption of antiretroviral therapy: a cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background To describe the long term outcome of patients who interrupted highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) once, identify the variables associated with earlier need to re-start HAART, and the response when therapy was resumed. A retrospective observational cohort of 66 adult patients with HIV-1 infection who interrupted HAART with a CD4+cell count ≥350 cells/μL and undetectable viral load (VL) was performed. The pre-established CD4+ cell count for restarting therapy was 300cells/μL. Cox regression was used to analyse the variables associated with earlier HAART reinitiation. Results The median follow-up was 209 weeks (range, 64–395). Rates of HIV-related or possible HIV-related events were 0.37 (one case of acute retroviral syndrome) and 1.49 per 100 patient-years, respectively. Two patients died after re-starting therapy and having reached undetectable VL. Three patients suffered a sexually transmitted disease while off therapy. Fifty patients (76%) resumed therapy after a median of 97 weeks (range, 17–267). Age, a nadir of CD4+ <250 cells/μL, and a mean VL during interruption of >10,000 copies/ml were independent predictors for earlier re-start. The intention-to-treat success rate of the first HAART resumed regimen was 85.4%. There were no differences by regimen used, nor between regimens that were the same as or different from the one that had been interrupted. Conclusions Our data suggest highly active antiretroviral therapy may be interrupted in selected patients because in these patients, when the HAART is restarted, the viral and clinical response may be achieved. PMID:23095460

  10. Antiretroviral Therapy for HIV Infection: When to Initiate Therapy, Which Regimen to Use, and How to Monitor Patients on Therapy.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Steven C

    Antiretroviral therapy is recommended for all patients with HIV infection. The benefit of immediate antiretroviral therapy was confirmed by results from the START (Strategic Timing of Antiretroviral Treatment) trial, which showed a 57% reduction in risk for the composite end point of AIDS-related events, serious non-AIDS-related events, or death from any cause with immediate treatment in antiretroviral therapy-naive participants with CD4+ cell counts above 500/µL. Other changes in HIV care include the widespread adoption of integrase strand transfer inhibitor-based regimens. Considerations regarding when to initiate antiretroviral therapy, which initial regimens to use, and appropriate monitoring of individuals taking antiretroviral therapy are discussed. This article summarizes an IAS-USA continuing education webinar presented by Steven C. Johnson, MD, in July 2015.

  11. Characteristics of HIV-2 and HIV-1/HIV-2 Dually Seropositive Adults in West Africa Presenting for Care and Antiretroviral Therapy: The IeDEA-West Africa HIV-2 Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Ekouevi, Didier K.; Balestre, Eric; Coffie, Patrick A.; Minta, Daouda; Messou, Eugene; Sawadogo, Adrien; Minga, Albert; Sow, Papa Salif; Bissagnene, Emmanuel; Eholie, Serge P.; Gottlieb, Geoffrey S.; Dabis, François; Zannou, Djimon Marcel; Ahouada, Carin; Akakpo, Jocelyn; Ahomadegbé, Christelle; Bashi, Jules; Gougounon-Houéto, Alice; Azon-Kouanou, Angèle; Houngbé, Fabien; Koumakpaï, Sikiratou; Alihonou, Florence; d’Almeida, Marcelline; Hodonou, Irvine; Hounhoui, Ghislaine; Sagbo, Gracien; Tossa-Bagnan, Leïla; Adjide, Herman; Drabo, Joseph; Bognounou, René; Dienderé, Arnaud; Traore, Eliezer; Zoungrana, Lassane; Zerbo, Béatrice; Sawadogo, Adrien Bruno; Zoungrana, Jacques; Héma, Arsène; Soré, Ibrahim; Bado, Guillaume; Tapsoba, Achille; Yé, Diarra; Kouéta, Fla; Ouedraogo, Sylvie; Ouédraogo, Rasmata; Hiembo, William; Gansonré, Mady; Messou, Eugène; Gnokoro, Joachim Charles; Koné, Mamadou; Kouakou, Guillaume Martial; Bosse, Clarisse Amani; Brou, Kouakou; Assi, Achi Isidore; Chenal, Henri; Hawerlander, Denise; Soppi, Franck; Minga, Albert; Abo, Yao; Bomisso, Germain; Eholié, Serge Paul; Amego, Mensah Deborah Noelly; Andavi, Viviane; Diallo, Zelica; Ello, Frédéric; Tanon, Aristophane Koffi; Koule, Serge Olivier; Anzan, Koffi Charles; Guehi, Calixte; Aka, Edmond Addi; Issouf, Koffi Ladji; Kouakou, Jean-Claude; N’Gbeche, Marie-Sylvie; Touré, Pety; Avit-Edi, Divine; Kouakou, Kouadio; Moh, Magloire; Yao, Valérie Andoblé; Folquet, Madeleine Amorissani; Dainguy, Marie-Evelyne; Kouakou, Cyrille; Méa-Assande, Véronique Tanoh; Oka-Berete, Gladys; Zobo, Nathalie; Acquah, Patrick; Kokora, Marie-Berthe; Eboua, Tanoh François; Timité-Konan, Marguerite; Ahoussou, Lucrèce Diecket; Assouan, Julie Kebé; Sami, Mabéa Flora; Kouadio, Clémence; Renner, Lorna; Goka, Bamenla; Welbeck, Jennifer; Sackey, Adziri; Owiafe, Seth Ntiri; Wejse, Christian; Silva, Zacarias José Da; Paulo, Joao; Rodrigues, Amabelia; da Silva, David; Medina, Candida; Oliviera-Souto, Ines; Østergaard, Lars; Laursen, Alex; Sodemann, Morten; Aaby, Peter; Fomsgaard, Anders; Erikstrup, Christian; Eugen-Olsen, Jesper; Maïga, Moussa Y; Diakité, Fatoumata Fofana; Kalle, Abdoulaye; Katile, Drissa; Traore, Hamar Alassane; Minta, Daouda; Cissé, Tidiani; Dembelé, Mamadou; Doumbia, Mohammed; Fomba, Mahamadou; Kaya, Assétou Soukho; Traoré, Abdoulaye M; Traoré, Hamady; Toure, Amadou Abathina; Dicko, Fatoumata; Sylla, Mariam; Berthé, Alima; Traoré, Hadizatou Coulibaly; Koïta, Anta; Koné, Niaboula; N'Diaye, Clémentine; Coulibaly, Safiatou Touré; Traoré, Mamadou; Traoré, Naïchata; Charurat, Man; Ajayi, Samuel; Dapiap, Stephen; Otu; Igbinoba, Festus; Benson, Okwara; Adebamowo, Clément; James, Jesse; Obaseki; Osakede, Philip; Olasode, John; Sow, Papa Salif; Diop, Bernard; Manga, Noël Magloire; Tine, Judicael Malick; Signate Sy, Haby; Ba, Abou; Diagne, Aida; Dior, Hélène; Faye, Malick; Gueye, Ramatoulaye Diagne; Mbaye, Aminata Diack; Patassi, Akessiwe; Kotosso, Awèrou; Kariyare, Benjamin Goilibe; Gbadamassi, Gafarou; Komi, Agbo; Mensah-Zukong, Kankoé Edem; Pakpame, Pinuwe; Lawson-Evi, Annette Koko; Atakouma, Yawo; Takassi, Elom; Djeha, Améyo; Ephoévi-gah, Ayoko; Djibril, Sherifa El-Hadj; Dabis, François; Bissagnene, Emmanuel; Arrivé, Elise; Coffie, Patrick; Ekouevi, Didier; Jaquet, Antoine; Leroy, Valériane; Lewden, Charlotte; Sasco, Annie; Azani, Jean-Claude; Allou, Gérard; Balestre, Eric; Bohossou, Franck; Karcher, Sophie; Gonsan, Jules Mahan; Carrou, Jérôme Le; Lenaud, Séverin; Nchot, Célestin; Malateste, Karen; Yao, Amon Roseamonde; Siloué, Bertine; Clouet, Gwenaelle; Djetouan, Hugues; Doring, Alexandra; Kouakou, Adrienne; Rabourdin, Elodie; Rivenc, Jean; Anglaret, Xavier; Ba, Boubacar; Essanin, Jean Bosco; Ciaranello, Andrea; Datté, Sébastien; Desmonde, Sophie; Diby, Jean-Serge Elvis; Gottlieb, Geoffrey S.; Horo, Apollinaire Gninlgninrin; Kangah, Serge N'zoré; Malvy, Denis; Meless, David; Mounkaila-Harouna, Aida; Ndondoki, Camille; Shiboski, Caroline; Thiébaut, Rodolphe; PAC-CI; Abidjan

    2013-01-01

    Background HIV-2 is endemic in West Africa. There is a lack of evidence-based guidelines on the diagnosis, management and antiretroviral therapy (ART) for HIV-2 or HIV-1/HIV-2 dual infections. Because of these issues, we designed a West African collaborative cohort for HIV-2 infection within the framework of the International epidemiological Databases to Evaluate AIDS (IeDEA). Methods We collected data on all HIV-2 and HIV-1/HIV-2 dually seropositive patients (both ARV-naive and starting ART) and followed-up in clinical centres in the IeDEA-WA network including a total of 13 clinics in five countries: Benin, Burkina-Faso Côte d’Ivoire, Mali, and Senegal, in the West Africa region. Results Data was merged for 1,754 patients (56% female), including 1,021 HIV-2 infected patients (551 on ART) and 733 dually seropositive for both HIV-1 and HIV 2 (463 on ART). At ART initiation, the median age of HIV-2 patients was 45.3 years, IQR: (38.3–51.7) and 42.4 years, IQR (37.0–47.3) for dually seropositive patients (p = 0.048). Overall, 16.7% of HIV-2 patients on ART had an advanced clinical stage (WHO IV or CDC-C). The median CD4 count at the ART initiation is 166 cells/mm3, IQR (83–247) among HIV-2 infected patients and 146 cells/mm3, IQR (55–249) among dually seropositive patients. Overall, in ART-treated patients, the CD4 count increased 126 cells/mm3 after 24 months on ART for HIV-2 patients and 169 cells/mm3 for dually seropositive patients. Of 551 HIV-2 patients on ART, 5.8% died and 10.2% were lost to follow-up during the median time on ART of 2.4 years, IQR (0.7–4.3). Conclusions This large multi-country study of HIV-2 and HIV-1/HIV-2 dual infection in West Africa suggests that routine clinical care is less than optimal and that management and treatment of HIV-2 could be further informed by ongoing studies and randomized clinical trials in this population. PMID:23824279

  12. A lot of mental illness starts in adolescence. Therefore should we shift some of the spending from adult to adolescent mental health services?

    PubMed

    Neal, David

    2015-09-01

    In May 2015 the UK elected a new government. In election campaigns, health is one of the most important areas of debate and over the preceding 12 months, the state of child and adolescent mental health services (CAMHS) had held a particularly high profile in the media and in political debate. Many had suggested that the rate of mental illness starting in adolescence is increasing and that service provision is not of sufficient quality or scale to meet this need. A brief review of the sources for these statistics reveals that whilst this may be true, there is a dearth of accurate and up to date data on the scale of the need for CAMHS or the extent to which it is being met. Nonetheless, members of all parties claimed to support improvements in mental health service provision for children and adolescents through increases in funding. A key question for policy makers has therefore become, from where any additional funding might be derived. One suggestion has been that funding be transferred from spending on adult mental health services. The exact practical nature of such a policy is yet to be explored in detail by government or stakeholders. The primary purpose of the present discussion is therefore to consider the possible ethical implications of such a policy in principle. The discussion forms part of a wider and evolving political and professional discourse on society's and government's attitude towards mental illness, towards the balance of individual and societal needs and towards the balance between preventative and supportive interventions to improve health.

  13. Starting motor

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, T.; Hamano, I

    1989-05-23

    This patent describes a starting motor having a housing, planetary reduction gears including an internal gear in the housing. The improvement consists of an elastic member having a first annular portion mounted in engagement with a fixed annular member of the housing and a plurality of protruding axially extending elastic portions providing a corrugated surface pressed into engagement with an end portion of the internal gear, the elastic member being sandwiched between the internal gear and the housing member, the protruding axially extending elastic portions providing resilient means which flex and incline circumferentially under turning force from the internal gear and exert reactive thrust on the internal gear elastically so that the frictional force at the abutting surfaces of the protruding portions holds the internal gear in resilient engagement with the elastic member and the resilient means acts as a buffer to absorb rotary impact force developing in the planetary reduction gears.

  14. Clinical and virologic outcomes after changes in first antiretroviral regimen at 7 sites in the Caribbean, Central and South America Network (CCASAnet)

    PubMed Central

    Wolff, Marcelo; Shepherd, Bryan E.; Cortés, Claudia; Rebeiro, Peter; Cesar, Carina; Cardoso, Sandra Wagner; Pape, Jean W.; Padgett, Denis; Sierra-Madero, Juan; Echevarria, Juan; McGowan, Catherine C.

    2015-01-01

    Background HIV-infected persons in lower income countries may experience high rates of antiretroviral therapy (ART) change, particularly due to toxicity or other non-failure reasons. Few reports address patient outcomes after these modifications. Methods HIV-infected adults from 7 Caribbean, Central and South America network (CCASAnet) clinical cohorts who modified > or = 1 drug from first ART regimen (ART-1) for any reason thereby starting a second regimen (ART-2) were included. Results 5,565 ART-naïve HAART initiators started ART-2 after a median of 9.8 months on ART-1; 39% changed to ART-2 due to toxicity and 11% due to failure. Median follow-up after starting ART-2 was 2.9 years; 45% subsequently modified ART-2. Cumulative incidences of death at 1, 3, and 5 years after starting ART-2 were 5.1%, 8.4% and 10.5%, respectively. In adjusted analyses, death was associated with older age, clinical AIDS, lower CD4 at ART-2 start, earlier calendar year, and starting ART-2 because of toxicity (adjusted hazard ratio[aHR]=1.5 vs. failure, 95% confidence interval[CI]=1.0–2.1). Cumulative incidences of VF after 1, 3, and 5 years were 9%, 19%, and 25%. In adjusted analyses, VF was associated with younger age, earlier calendar year, lower CD4 at start of ART-2, and starting ART-2 because of failure (aHR=2.1 vs. toxicity, 95% CI=1.5–2.8). Conclusions Among patients modifying first ART regimen, risks of subsequent modifications, mortality, and virologic failure were high. Access to improved antiretrovirals in the region is needed to improve initial treatment success. PMID:26761273

  15. Antiretroviral therapy: Shifting sands

    PubMed Central

    Sashindran, V.K.; Chauhan, Rajeev

    2016-01-01

    HIV/AIDS has been an extremely difficult pandemic to control. However, with the advent of antiretroviral therapy (ART), HIV has now been transformed into a chronic illness in patients who have continued treatment access and excellent long-term adherence. Existing indications for ART initiation in asymptomatic patients were based on CD4 levels; however, recent evidence has broken the shackles of CD4 levels. Early initiation of ART in HIV patients irrespective of CD4 counts can have profound positive impact on morbidity and mortality. Early initiation of ART has been found not only beneficial for patients but also to community as it reduces the risk of transmission. There have been few financial concerns about providing ART to all HIV-positive people but various studies have proven that early initiation of ART not only proves to be cost-effective but also contributes to economic and social growth of community. A novel multidisciplinary approach with early initiation and availability of ART at its heart can turn the tide in our favor in future. Effective preexposure prophylaxis and postexposure prophylaxis can also lower transmission risk of HIV in community. New understanding of HIV pathogenesis is opening new vistas to cure and prevention. Various promising candidate vaccines and drugs are undergoing aggressive clinical trials, raising optimism for an ever-elusive cure for HIV. This review describes various facets of tectonic shift in management of HIV. PMID:26900224

  16. Cardiovascular risks of antiretroviral therapies.

    PubMed

    Mondy, Kristin; Tebas, Pablo

    2007-01-01

    The use of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) has resulted in sustained reductions in mortality from HIV infection. In recent years, HAART has also been associated with metabolic complications that may increase patients' cardiovascular disease risk. Recent studies have begun to support a more complex interaction between HAART, HIV infection itself, and other traditional social and immunologic factors that may predispose patients to premature cardiovascular disease. Substantial progress has been made in the development of newer antiretroviral therapies that have a better metabolic profile with respect to dyslipidemia, hyperglycemia, and lipodystrophy. Optimal selection of metabolically neutral antiretroviral therapies, together with aggressive management of other modifiable coronary risk factors, may improve cardiovascular disease risk in the long term.

  17. Longitudinal Changes in Emerging Adults' Attachment Preferences for Their Mother, Father, Friends, and Romantic Partner: Focusing on the Start and End of Romantic Relationships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Umemura, Tomo; Lacinová, Lenka; Macek, Petr; Kunnen, E. Saskia

    2017-01-01

    Only a few studies have longitudinally explored to whom emerging adults prefer to turn to seek closeness, comfort, and security (called "attachment preferences"), and previous studies on attachment preferences in emerging adults have focused only on the beginning of romantic relationships but not on the end of relationships. Czech…

  18. Long-Term Outcomes on Antiretroviral Therapy in a Large Scale-Up Program in Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Meloni, Seema T.; Chang, Charlotte A.; Eisen, Geoffrey; Jolayemi, Toyin; Banigbe, Bolanle; Okonkwo, Prosper I.; Kanki, Phyllis J.

    2016-01-01

    Background While there has been a rapid global scale-up of antiretroviral therapy programs over the past decade, there are limited data on long-term outcomes from large cohorts in resource-constrained settings. Our objective in this evaluation was to measure multiple outcomes during first-line antiretroviral therapy in a large treatment program in Nigeria. Methods We conducted a retrospective multi-site program evaluation of adult patients (age ≥15 years) initiating antiretroviral therapy between June 2004 and February 2012 in Nigeria. The baseline characteristics of patients were described and longitudinal analyses using primary endpoints of immunologic recovery, virologic rebound, treatment failure and long-term adherence patterns were conducted. Results Of 70,002 patients, 65.2% were female and median age was 35 (IQR: 29–41) years; 54.7% were started on a zidovudine-containing and 40% on a tenofovir-containing first-line regimen. Median CD4+ cell counts for the cohort started at 149 cells/mm3 (IQR: 78–220) and increased over duration of ART. Of the 70,002 patients, 1.8% were reported as having died, 30.1% were lost to follow-up, and 0.1% withdrew from treatment. Overall, of those patients retained and with viral load data, 85.4% achieved viral suppression, with 69.3% achieving suppression by month 6. Of 30,792 patients evaluated for virologic failure, 24.4% met criteria for failure and of 45,130 evaluated for immunologic failure, 34.0% met criteria for immunologic failure, with immunologic criteria poorly predicting virologic failure. In adjusted analyses, older age, ART regimen, lower CD4+ cell count, higher viral load, and inadequate adherence were all predictors of virologic failure. Predictors of immunologic failure differed slightly, with age no longer predictive, but female sex as protective; additionally, higher baseline CD4+ cell count was also predictive of failure. Evaluation of long-term adherence patterns revealed that the majority of patients

  19. Clinical Outcome of HIV-Infected Patients with Sustained Virologic Response to Antiretroviral Therapy: Long-Term Follow-Up of a Multicenter Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Gutierrez, Félix; Padilla, Sergio; Masiá, Mar; Iribarren, José A.; Moreno, Santiago; Viciana, Pompeyo; Muñoz, Leopoldo; Sirvent, José L. Gómez; Vidal, Francesc; López-Aldeguer, José; Blanco, José R.; Leal, Manuel; Rodríguez-Arenas, María Angeles; Hoyos, Santiago Perez

    2006-01-01

    Background Limited information exists on long-term prognosis of patients with sustained virologic response to antiretroviral therapy. We aimed to assess predictors of unfavorable clinical outcome in patients who maintain viral suppression with HAART. Methods Using data collected from ten clinic-based cohorts in Spain, we selected all antiretroviral-naive adults who initiated HAART and maintained plasma HIV-1 RNA levels <500 copies/mL throughout follow-up. Factors associated with disease progression were determined by Cox proportional-hazards models. Results Of 2,613 patients who started HAART, 757 fulfilled the inclusion criteria. 61% of them initiated a protease inhibitor-based HAART regimen, 29.7% a nonnucleoside reverse-transcriptase inhibitor-based regimen, and 7.8% a triple-nucleoside regimen. During 2,556 person-years of follow-up, 22 (2.9%) patients died (mortality rate 0.86 per 100 person-years), and 40 (5.3%) died or developed a new AIDS-defining event. The most common causes of death were neoplasias and liver failure. Mortality was independently associated with a CD4-T cell response <50 cells/L after 12 months of HAART (adjusted hazard ratio [AHR], 4.26 [95% confidence interval {CI}, 1.68–10.83]; P = .002), and age at initiation of HAART (AHR, 1.06 per year; 95% CI, 1.02–1.09; P = .001). Initial antiretroviral regimen chosen was not associated with different risk of clinical progression. Conclusions Patients with sustained virologic response on HAART have a low mortality rate over time. Long-term outcome of these patients is driven by immunologic response at the end of the first year of therapy and age at the time of HAART initiation, but not by the initial antiretroviral regimen selected. PMID:17183720

  20. Importance of Baseline Prognostic Factors With Increasing Time Since Initiation of Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The extent to which the prognosis for AIDS and death of patients initiating highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) continues to be affected by their characteristics at the time of initiation (baseline) is unclear. Methods We analyzed data on 20,379 treatment-naive HIV-1–infected adults who started HAART in 1 of 12 cohort studies in Europe and North America (61,798 person-years of follow-up, 1844 AIDS events, and 1005 deaths). Results Although baseline CD4 cell count became less prognostic with time, individuals with a baseline CD4 count <25 cells/µL had persistently higher progression rates than individuals with a baseline CD4 count >350 cells/µL (hazard ratio for AIDS = 2.3, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.0 to 2.3; mortality hazard ratio = 2.5, 95% CI: 1.2 to 5.5, 4 to 6 years after starting HAART). Rates of AIDS were persistently higher in individuals who had experienced an AIDS event before starting HAART. Individuals with presumed transmission by means of injection drug use experienced substantially higher rates of AIDS and death than other individuals throughout follow-up (AIDS hazard ratio = 1.6, 95% CI: 0.8 to 3.0; mortality hazard ratio = 3.5, 95% CI: 2.2 to 5.5, 4 to 6 years after starting HAART). Conclusions Compared with other patient groups, injection drug users and patients with advanced immunodeficiency at baseline experience substantially increased rates of AIDS and death up to 6 years after starting HAART. PMID:18043315

  1. [Successful treatment of HIV-associated chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy by early initiation of highly active anti-retroviral therapy].

    PubMed

    Kume, Kodai; Ikeda, Kazuyo; Kamada, Masaki; Touge, Tetsuo; Deguchi, Kazushi; Masaki, Tsutomu

    2013-01-01

    A 47-year-old man with HIV infection presented with lower leg dominant dysesthesia, muscle weakness and sensory ataxia of 3 month's duration. Nerve conduction studies (NCS) showed demyelination change in the median and tibial nerves and sensory nerve action potential (SNAP) in the sural nerve was not evoked. Somatosensory evoked potential (SEP) showed the delayed N9 latency. Diagnose of HIV-associated chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) was made. Although the CD4 lymphocyte counts were relatively preserved (466/μl), highly active anti-retroviral therapy (HAART) was started according to a new guideline for the use of antiretroviral agents in HIV-1-infected adults and adolescents recommending early initiation of treatment. After six months, HIV1-RNA was not detected and the CD4 lymphocyte counts showed a recovering trend (585/μl). His symptoms had disappeared, except for dysesthesia in the tip of a toe. Repeated NCS demonstrated full recovery from the demyelination and appearance of SNAP in the sural nerve. The improvement of his symptoms and NCS findings has been maintained for two years. Although effectiveness of immunotherapies such as oral prednisone, high-dose immunoglobulins and plasmapheresis have been reported in HIV-associated CIDP, early initiation of HAART may be also important for favorable prognosis in HIV-associated CIDP.

  2. Do They Know Who We Are?: A Starting Point for Enhancing the Visibility of Adult Education Programs within Schools of Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olson, Joann S.

    2016-01-01

    Within the contemporary landscape of higher education, adult education programs are generally housed, academically and organizationally, within Colleges and Schools of Education. Given the breadth of programs offered, it is perhaps not surprising when faculty are unaware of what those in adjacent programs are doing, but this segregation may make…

  3. START (STrAtegies for RelaTives) coping strategy for family carers of adults with dementia: qualitative study of participants’ views about the intervention

    PubMed Central

    Sommerlad, Andrew; Manela, Monica; Cooper, Claudia; Rapaport, Penny; Livingston, Gill

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To analyse the experience of individual family carers of people with dementia who received a manual-based coping strategy programme (STrAtegies for RelaTives, START), demonstrated in a randomised-controlled trial to reduce affective symptoms. Design A qualitative study using self-completed questionnaires exploring the experience of the START intervention. Two researchers transcribed, coded and analysed completed questionnaires thematically. Setting Three mental health and one neurology dementia clinic in South East England. Participants Participants were primary family carers of a patient diagnosed with dementia who provided support at least weekly to their relative. We invited those in the treatment group remaining in the START study at 2 years postrandomisation (n=132) to participate. 75 people, comprising a maximum variation sample, responded. Primary and secondary outcome measures (1) Important aspects of the therapy. (2) Continued use of the intervention after the end of the therapy. (3) Unhelpful aspects of the therapy and suggestions for improvement. (4) Appropriate time for intervention delivery. Results Carers identified several different components as important: relaxation techniques, education about dementia, strategies to help manage the behaviour of the person with dementia, contact with the therapist and changing unhelpful thoughts. Two-thirds of the participants reported that they continue to use the intervention's techniques at 2-year follow up. Few participants suggested changes to the intervention content, but some wanted more sessions and others wanted the involvement of more family members. Most were happy with receiving the intervention shortly after diagnosis, although some relatives of people with moderate dementia thought it should have been delivered at an earlier stage. Conclusions Participants’ varied responses about which aspects of START were helpful suggest that a multicomponent intervention is suited to the differing

  4. Relationships of Childhood Adverse Experiences With Mental Health and Quality of Life at Treatment Start for Adult Refugees Traumatized by Pre-Flight Experiences of War and Human Rights Violations

    PubMed Central

    Opaas, Marianne; Varvin, Sverre

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Adverse and potentially traumatic experiences (PTEs) in childhood were examined among 54 adult refugee patients with pre-flight PTEs of war and human rights violations (HRVs) and related to mental health and quality of life at treatment start. Extent of childhood PTEs was more strongly related to mental health and quality of life than the extent of war and HRV experiences. Childhood PTEs were significantly related to arousal and avoidance symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and to quality of life, whereas pre-flight war and HRV experiences were significantly related to reexperiencing symptoms of PTSD only. Within childhood adversities, experiences of family violence and external violence, but not of loss and illness, were significantly related to increased mental health symptoms and reduced quality of life. These results point to the importance of taking childhood adverse experiences into account in research and treatment planning for adult refugees with war and HRVs trauma. PMID:26103604

  5. Relationships of Childhood Adverse Experiences With Mental Health and Quality of Life at Treatment Start for Adult Refugees Traumatized by Pre-Flight Experiences of War and Human Rights Violations.

    PubMed

    Opaas, Marianne; Varvin, Sverre

    2015-09-01

    Adverse and potentially traumatic experiences (PTEs) in childhood were examined among 54 adult refugee patients with pre-flight PTEs of war and human rights violations (HRVs) and related to mental health and quality of life at treatment start. Extent of childhood PTEs was more strongly related to mental health and quality of life than the extent of war and HRV experiences. Childhood PTEs were significantly related to arousal and avoidance symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and to quality of life, whereas pre-flight war and HRV experiences were significantly related to reexperiencing symptoms of PTSD only. Within childhood adversities, experiences of family violence and external violence, but not of loss and illness, were significantly related to increased mental health symptoms and reduced quality of life. These results point to the importance of taking childhood adverse experiences into account in research and treatment planning for adult refugees with war and HRVs trauma.

  6. Assessing social preparedness for antiretroviral therapy in a generalized AIDS epidemic: a diffusion of innovations approach.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Shannon K; Kelly, Kevin J; Potgieter, François E; Moon, Martha W

    2009-02-01

    Researchers conducted focus groups in the Eastern Cape Province of South Africa concerning AIDS and treatment options. Constituent groups included adults aged 25-45, HIV/AIDS caregivers, HIV-positive adults, nurses, rural elders, teenagers, and traditional healers. This pilot work aimed to gather early evidence on perceptions about the government's rollout of antiretroviral treatment (ART), identify potential barriers to success, and inform a subsequent pilot survey. Diffusion of innovations theory was used to interpret the data and helped identify potential obstacles to the ART rollout. AIDS stigma and a weakened healthcare system were negatively impacting the program. There was a lack of accurate knowledge about HIV/AIDS and antiretroviral treatment, with wide disparities among groups. Many people were not convinced that antiretroviral treatment is superior to other treatments, and a few people were afraid it was poisonous. There was no evidence that people were aware of the long-term difficulties of adherence to the regimen.

  7. An information system to manage the rollout of the antiretroviral treatment programme in the Free State.

    PubMed

    Kotzé, J E; McDonald, T

    2010-06-01

    The Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome epidemic, caused by the Human Immunodeficiency Virus, is a global crisis which threatens development gains, economies, and societies. Within sub-Saharan Africa, where the epidemic began the earliest and the HIV prevalence is the highest, African countries have death rates not seen before. In South Africa the epidemic has a devastating impact which creates profound suffering on individuals and their families, and the impact on the socio-economic level is of great concern. The eradication of HIV/AIDS represents one of humanity's greatest challenges, which requires co-operation and comprehensive collaboration between many different role players. In this endeavour clinical information plays a major role. To combat the effect of the disease, the Free State Department of Health started with the provisioning of antiretroviral therapy in the public health sector. The objective of this paper was to address the challenges they faced in order to develop and implement an information system to manage the rollout of antiretroviral treatment effectively. They started with a paper-based system to collect vital information. It was followed by a palm computer project that was initiated to electronically capture the data collected by the paper-based system. This system was then replaced by a comprehensive Hospital and Clinic Information System which was acquired and customised for the antiretroviral data collection process. Research partners developed a standalone antiretroviral data warehouse for collecting information associated with the monitoring and evaluation of the Free State antiretroviral and HIV/ AIDS treatment programme. The data warehouse successfully produced several management information reports to the antiretroviral management team. A need was identified to design a comprehensive antiretroviral data warehouse that will integrate data from several operational sources which are all associated with HIV/AIDS.

  8. Brain tumor - primary - adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... Vestibular schwannoma (acoustic neuroma) - adults; Meningioma - adults; Cancer - brain tumor (adults) ... Primary brain tumors include any tumor that starts in the brain. Primary brain tumors can start from brain cells, ...

  9. Safety, Pharmacokinetics, and Antiretroviral Activity of Multiple Doses of Ibalizumab (formerly TNX-355), an Anti-CD4 Monoclonal Antibody, in Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1-Infected Adults

    PubMed Central

    Jacobson, Jeffrey M.; Kuritzkes, Daniel R.; Godofsky, Eliot; DeJesus, Edwin; Larson, Jeffrey A.; Weinheimer, Steven P.; Lewis, Stanley T.

    2009-01-01

    Ibalizumab (formerly TNX-355) is a humanized monoclonal antibody that binds CD4, the primary receptor for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), and inhibits the viral entry process. A phase lb multidose study of the safety, pharmacokinetics, and antiviral activity of ibalizumab was conducted with 22 HIV-1-infected patients. Nineteen patients were randomized to receive either 10 mg/kg of body weight weekly (arm A) or a 10-mg/kg loading dose followed by 6 mg/kg every 2 weeks (arm B) intravenously for 9 weeks. Three patients were assigned to receive 25 mg/kg every 2 weeks for five doses (arm C). During the study, the patients remained off other antiretrovirals or continued a stable failing regimen. Treatment with ibalizumab resulted in substantial reductions in HIV-1 RNA levels (0.5 to 1.7 log10) in 20 of 22 subjects. In most patients, HIV-1 RNA fell to nadir levels after 1 to 2 weeks of treatment and then returned to baseline despite continued treatment. Baseline viral isolates were susceptible to ibalizumab in vitro, regardless of coreceptor tropism. Emerging resistance to ibalizumab was manifested by reduced maximal percent inhibition in a single-cycle HIV infectivity assay. Resistant isolates remained CD4 dependent and were susceptible to enfuvirtide in vitro. Complete coating of CD4+ T-cell receptors was correlated with serum ibalizumab concentrations. There was no evidence of CD4+ T-cell depletion in ibalizumab-treated patients. Ibalizumab was not immunogenic, and no serious drug-related adverse effects occurred. In conclusion, ibalizumab administered either weekly or biweekly was safe and well tolerated and demonstrated antiviral activity. Further studies with ibalizumab in combination with standard antiretroviral treatments are warranted. PMID:19015347

  10. Perception of Antiretroviral Generic Medicines: One-Day Survey of HIV-Infected Patients and Their Physicians in France

    PubMed Central

    Jacomet, Christine; Allavena, Clotilde; Peyrol, Fleur; Pereira, Bruno; Joubert, Laurence Morand; Bagheri, Haleh; Cotte, Laurent; Garaffo, Rodolphe; Gerbaud, Laurent; Dellamonica, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Background In the interest of cost effectiveness, switching antiretroviral brand name medications to generics is recommended in France since 2013. The study objective was to evaluate the perception of generics per se and antiretroviral generics in HIV-infected patients and their hospital physicians Methods and Findings 556 out of 703 (79%) adult HIV+ outpatients and 116 physicians in 33 clinics were included in a multicentric cross-sectional survey performed in September 2013. Patients completed a self-questionnaire on their perception and acceptability of generics. Physicians completed a questionnaire on their acceptability of switching antiretroviral to generic. Socio-demographic data, medical history and HIV history were collected. Among the 556 patients with a median HIV duration of 13 years, 77% were France native, 59% in active employment, 100% covered by social insurance, 95% on antiretroviral therapy. Seventy-six percent of the patients accepted generics and 55% trusted them overall. Antiretroviral generics were accepted by 44% of them but only by 17% if the pill burden was going to increase. The factor significantly associated with acceptability of antiretroviral generics was acceptance of generics per se (p<0.001). Among the 116 physicians following a median of 100 HIV-patients/year, 75% would prescribe generics, dropping to 26% if the combo had to be broken. Factors significantly associated with willingness to prescribe antiretroviral generics were the absence of concern regarding the chemical entity (OR = 0.33), being aware that the patient would accept generics for other pathologies (OR = 2.04) and would accept antiretroviral generics (OR = 1.94). No factor related to sociodemographic conditions, HIV status or comorbidities was associated with the acceptability of antiretroviral generics. Conclusions Acceptability of antiretroviral generics in this French population was mostly dictated by the patient’s and physician’s knowledge and use of generics

  11. [Shaping the future of vocational rehabilitation of adults: eight fields of action as starting points for a cross-actor innovation process].

    PubMed

    Riedel, H-P; Ellger-Rüttgardt, S; Karbe, H; Niehaus, M; Rauch, A; Schian, H-M; Schmidt, C; Schott, T; Schröder, H; Spijkers, W; Wittwer, U

    2009-12-01

    Established by the Federal Ministry of Labour and Social Affairs (BMAS) in October 2007, the Scientific Expert Group RehaFutur had been commissioned to elaborate cornerstones for the medium- and long-term development of vocational rehabilitation of adults with disabilities (re-integration). Initial questions inter alia were as follows: Which function should vocational rehabilitation have in a service- and knowledge-oriented working world that will increasingly be affected by demographic change? How can disabled persons' right to occupational participation by way of vocational rehabilitation, a right stipulated both under the German constitution and in German law, be realized as needed also in the future? Various fields of action have been derived on the basis, for one, of an investigation of the factors, social law, social and education policy as well as European, influencing vocational rehabilitation and, for the other, of an evaluation of current labour market and demographic developments. Dealt with in the fields of action outlined are the aspects: equitable opportunities of access, developmental and needs orientation, closeness to the real occupational and working world, as well as the role of self-determination and self-responsibility. The fields of action are to be understood as framework concept for shaping a cross-actor innovation process. Sustainable vocational rehabilitation is characterized in particular by the fact that it is specifically targeted at promoting disabled persons' self-determination and self-responsibility actively using these in the process and that it strengthens an independent lifestyle, ensures social participation by inclusive structures; also, it facilitates continued participation in working life by ongoing education involving holistic development of professional and personal competencies oriented towards the individual's resources and potentials, safeguarding it by systematic networking with companies. The concept presented for

  12. Antiretroviral prophylaxis of perinatal HIV-1 transmission and the potential impact of antiretroviral resistance.

    PubMed

    Nolan, Monica; Fowler, Mary Glenn; Mofenson, Lynne M

    2002-06-01

    Since 1994, trials of zidovudine, zidovudine and lamivudine, and nevirapine have demonstrated that these antiretroviral drugs can substantially reduce the risk of perinatal HIV-1 transmission. With reductions in drug price, identification of simple, effective antiretroviral regimens to prevent perinatal HIV-1 transmission, and an increasing international commitment to support health care infrastructure, antiretrovirals for both perinatal HIV-1 prevention and HIV-1 treatment will likely become more widely available to HIV-1-infected persons in resource-limited countries. In the United States, widespread antiretroviral usage has been associated with increased antiretroviral drug resistance. This raises concern that drug resistance may reduce the effectiveness of perinatal antiretroviral prophylaxis as well as therapeutic intervention strategies. The purpose of this article is to review what is known about resistance and risk of perinatal HIV transmission, assess the interaction between antiretroviral resistance and the prevention of perinatal HIV-1 transmission, and discuss implications for current global prevention and treatment strategies.

  13. [Ergotism due to simultaneous use of ergot alkaloids and high activity antiretroviral therapy].

    PubMed

    Cifuentes M, Daniel; Blanco L, Sergio; Ramírez F, Camila

    2016-06-01

    High activity antiretroviral therapy may exacerbate the activity of ergot alkaloids due to an inhibition of cytochrome P450. We report a 57 years old female with AIDS treated with lamivudine, zidovudine, atazanavir, ritonavir and cotrimoxazole presenting with ischemic signs in the four limbs. There was acrocyanosis and weak radial and ulnar pulses. A family member referred that the patient used ergot alkaloids for headaches. An ergotism due to the simultaneous use of ergot alkaloids and antiretroviral therapy was suspected. The latter was discontinued and intravenous nitroglycerin, nifedipine and pentoxifyline were started with good results.

  14. The Impact of Different CD4 Cell-Count Monitoring and Switching Strategies on Mortality in HIV-Infected African Adults on Antiretroviral Therapy: An Application of Dynamic Marginal Structural Models

    PubMed Central

    Ford, Deborah; Robins, James M.; Petersen, Maya L.; Gibb, Diana M.; Gilks, Charles F.; Mugyenyi, Peter; Grosskurth, Heiner; Hakim, James; Katabira, Elly; Babiker, Abdel G.; Walker, A. Sarah

    2015-01-01

    In Africa, antiretroviral therapy (ART) is delivered with limited laboratory monitoring, often none. In 2003–2004, investigators in the Development of Antiretroviral Therapy in Africa (DART) Trial randomized persons initiating ART in Uganda and Zimbabwe to either laboratory and clinical monitoring (LCM) or clinically driven monitoring (CDM). CD4 cell counts were measured every 12 weeks in both groups but were only returned to treating clinicians for management in the LCM group. Follow-up continued through 2008. In observational analyses, dynamic marginal structural models on pooled randomized groups were used to estimate survival under different monitoring-frequency and clinical/immunological switching strategies. Assumptions included no direct effect of randomized group on mortality or confounders and no unmeasured confounders which influenced treatment switch and mortality or treatment switch and time-dependent covariates. After 48 weeks of first-line ART, 2,946 individuals contributed 11,351 person-years of follow-up, 625 switches, and 179 deaths. The estimated survival probability after a further 240 weeks for post-48-week switch at the first CD4 cell count less than 100 cells/mm3 or non-Candida World Health Organization stage 4 event (with CD4 count <250) was 0.96 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.94, 0.97) with 12-weekly CD4 testing, 0.96 (95% CI: 0.95, 0.97) with 24-weekly CD4 testing, 0.95 (95% CI: 0.93, 0.96) with a single CD4 test at 48 weeks (baseline), and 0.92 (95% CI: 0.91, 0.94) with no CD4 testing. Comparing randomized groups by 48-week CD4 count, the mortality risk associated with CDM versus LCM was greater in persons with CD4 counts of <100 (hazard ratio = 2.4, 95% CI: 1.3, 4.3) than in those with CD4 counts of ≥100 (hazard ratio = 1.1, 95% CI: 0.8, 1.7; interaction P = 0.04). These findings support a benefit from identifying patients immunologically failing first-line ART at 48 weeks. PMID:26316598

  15. Determinants of access to experimental antiretroviral drugs in an Italian cohort of patients with HIV: a multilevel analysis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Identification of the determinants of access to investigational drugs is important to promote equity and scientific validity in clinical research. We aimed to analyze factors associated with the use of experimental antiretrovirals in Italy. Methods We studied participants in the Italian Cohort of Antiretroviral-Naive Patients (ICoNA). All patients 18 years or older who had started cART (≥ 3 drugs including at least two NRTI) after their enrolment and during 1997-2007 were included in this analysis. We performed a random effect logistic regression analysis to take into account clustering observations within clinical units. The outcome variable was the use of an experimental antiretroviral, defined as an antiretroviral started before commercial availability, in any episode of therapy initiation/change. Use of an experimental antiretroviral obtained through a clinical trial or an expanded access program (EAP) was also analyzed separately. Results A total of 9,441 episodes of therapy initiation/change were analyzed in 3,752 patients. 392 episodes (360 patients) involved an experimental antiretroviral. In multivariable analysis, factors associated with the overall use of experimental antiretrovirals were: number of experienced drugs (≥ 8 drugs versus "naive": adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 3.71) or failed antiretrovirals(3-4 drugs and ≥ 5 drugs versus 0-2 drugs: AOR = 1.42 and 2.38 respectively); calendar year (AOR = 0.80 per year) and plasma HIV-RNA copies/ml at therapy change (≥ 4 log versus < 2 log: AOR = 1.55). The probability of taking an experimental antiretroviral through a trial was significantly lower for patients suffering from liver co-morbidity(AOR = 0.65) and for those who experienced 3-4 drugs (vs naive) (AOR = 0.55), while it increased for multi-treated patients(AOR = 2.60). The probability to start an experimental antiretroviral trough an EAP progressively increased with the increasing number of experienced and of failed drugs and also

  16. The WHO public-health approach to antiretroviral treatment against HIV in resource-limited settings.

    PubMed

    Gilks, Charles F; Crowley, Siobhan; Ekpini, René; Gove, Sandy; Perriens, Jos; Souteyrand, Yves; Sutherland, Don; Vitoria, Marco; Guerma, Teguest; De Cock, Kevin

    2006-08-05

    WHO has proposed a public-health approach to antiretroviral therapy (ART) to enable scaling-up access to treatment for HIV-positive people in developing countries, recognising that the western model of specialist physician management and advanced laboratory monitoring is not feasible in resource-poor settings. In this approach, standardised simplified treatment protocols and decentralised service delivery enable treatment to be delivered to large numbers of HIV-positive adults and children through the public and private sector. Simplified tools and approaches to clinical decision-making, centred on the "four Ss"--when to: start drug treatment; substitute for toxicity; switch after treatment failure; and stop--enable lower level health-care workers to deliver care. Simple limited formularies have driven large-scale production of fixed-dose combinations for first-line treatment for adults and lowered prices, but to ensure access to ART in the poorest countries, the care and drugs should be given free at point of service delivery. Population-based surveillance for acquired and transmitted resistance is needed to address concerns that switching regimens on the basis of clinical criteria for failure alone could lead to widespread emergence of drug-resistant virus strains. The integrated management of adult or childhood illness (IMAI/IMCI) facilitates decentralised implementation that is integrated within existing health systems. Simplified operational guidelines, tools, and training materials enable clinical teams in primary-care and second-level facilities to deliver HIV prevention, HIV care, and ART, and to use a standardised patient-tracking system.

  17. Antiretroviral concentrations in small hair samples as a feasible marker of adherence in rural Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Hickey, Matthew D; Salmen, Charles R; Tessler, Robert A; Omollo, Dan; Bacchetti, Peter; Magerenge, Richard; Mattah, Brian; Salmen, Marcus R; Zoughbie, Daniel; Fiorella, Kathryn J; Geng, Elvin; Njoroge, Betty; Jin, Chengshi; Huang, Yong; Bukusi, Elizabeth A; Cohen, Craig R; Gandhi, Monica

    2014-01-01

    Antiretroviral hair levels objectively quantify drug exposure over time and predict virologic responses. We assessed the acceptability and feasibility of collecting small hair samples in a rural Kenyan cohort. 95% of participants (354/373) donated hair. Although median self-reported adherence was 100% (IQR 96–100%), a wide range of hair concentrations likely indicates overestimation of self-reported adherence and the advantages of a pharmacologic adherence measure. Higher nevirapine (NVP) hair concentrations observed in women and older adults require further study to unravel behavioral versus pharmacokinetic contributors. In resource-limited settings, hair antiretroviral levels may serve as a low-cost quantitative biomarker of adherence. PMID:24694932

  18. The nurse practitioner's role in managing dyslipidemia and other cardiovascular risk factors in HIV-infected patients: impact of antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Willard, Suzanne

    2006-01-01

    The beneficial effects of antiretroviral therapy (ART) for the treatment of HIV disease have been accompanied by metabolic changes associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. These changes, which include dyslipidemia, change in body fat distribution, and insulin resistance, resemble the symptoms of metabolic syndrome. Protease inhibitors, nucleoside analogue reverse transcriptase inhibitors, and nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors have all been associated with dyslipidemia to varying degrees. In addition, patients on ART show an increased risk of myocardial infarction and other cardiovascular events. According to the recommendations of the National Cholesterol Education Program and the Adult AIDS Clinical Trial Group, health care providers should assess cardiovascular risk before starting ART and then continue to monitor lipid levels. Treatment of ART-associated dyslipidemia should follow the following sequence: therapeutic lifestyle changes, lipid-lowering drug therapy, and finally, modifying ART if necessary. By providing education, support, and follow-up care, nurse practitioners can help to implement these steps.

  19. Antiretroviral Therapy Adherence and Use of an Electronic Shared Medical Record Among People Living with HIV.

    PubMed

    Saberi, Parya; Catz, Sheryl L; Leyden, Wendy A; Stewart, Christine; Ralston, James D; Horberg, Michael A; Grothaus, Louis; Silverberg, Michael J

    2015-06-01

    Electronic shared medical records (SMR) are emerging healthcare technologies that allow patients to engage in their healthcare by communicating with providers, refilling prescriptions, scheduling appointments, and viewing portions of medical records. We conducted a pre-post cohort study of HIV-positive adults who used and did not use SMR in two integrated healthcare systems. We compared the difference in antiretroviral refill adherence between SMR users and age- and sex-frequency matched non-users from the 12-month period prior to SMR useto the 12-month period starting 6 months after initiation of SMR use. High adherence was maintained among SMR users (change = -0.11 %) but declined among non-users (change = -2.05 %; p = 0.003). Among SMR users, there was a steady improvement in adherence as monthly frequency of SMR use increased (p = 0.009). SMR use, particularly more frequent use, is associated with maintaining high adherence and non-use is associated with declines in adherence over time among patients with access to these online services.

  20. Insurability of HIV-positive people treated with antiretroviral therapy in Europe: collaborative analysis of HIV cohort studies

    PubMed Central

    Kaulich-Bartz, Josee; Dam, Wayne; May, Margaret T.; Lederberger, Bruno; Widmer, Urs; Phillips, Andrew N.; Grabar, Sophie; Mocroft, Amanda; Vilaro, Josep; van Sighem, Ard; Moreno, Santiago; Dabis, François; Monforte, Antonella D’Arminio; Teira, Ramon; Ingle, Suzanne M.; Sterne, Jonathan A.C.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To increase equitable access to life insurance for HIV-positive individuals by identifying subgroups with lower relative mortality. Design: Collaborative analysis of cohort studies. Methods: We estimated relative mortality from 6 months after starting antiretroviral therapy (ART), compared with the insured population in each country, among adult patients from European cohorts participating in the ART Cohort Collaboration (ART-CC) who were not infected via injection drug use, had not tested positive for hepatitis C, and started triple ART between 1996–2008. We used Poisson models for mortality, with the expected number of deaths according to age, sex and country specified as offset. Results: There were 1236 deaths recorded among 34 680 patients followed for 174 906 person-years. Relative mortality was lower in patients with higher CD4 cell count and lower HIV-1 RNA 6 months after starting ART, without prior AIDS, who were older, and who started ART after 2000. Compared with insured HIV-negative lives, estimated relative mortality of patients aged 20–39 from France, Italy, United Kingdom, Spain and Switzerland, who started ART after 2000 had 6-month CD4 cell count at least 350 cells/μl and HIV-1 RNA less than104 copies/ml and without prior AIDS was 459%. The proportion of exposure time with relative mortality below 300, 400, 500 and 600% was 28, 43, 61 and 64%, respectively, suggesting that more than 50% of patients (those with lower relative mortality) could be insurable. Conclusion: The continuing long-term effectiveness of ART implies that life insurance with sufficiently long duration to cover a mortgage is feasible for many HIV-positive people successfully treated with ART for more than 6 months. PMID:23449349

  1. Failure to Restore the Vγ2-Jγ1.2 Repertoire in HIV-infected Men Receiving Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy (HAART)

    PubMed Central

    Hebbeler, Andrew M.; Propp, Nadia; Cairo, Cristiana; Li, Haishan; Cummings, Jean Saville; Jacobson, Lisa P.; Margolick, Joseph B.; Pauza, C. David

    2008-01-01

    Gammadelta (γδ) T cells expressing the Vγ2-Jγ1.2Vδ2 (Vγ9-JPVδ2, alternate nomenclature) T cell receptor (TCR) constitute the major peripheral blood population of γδ T cells in adult humans and are specifically depleted during human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) disease. Vγ2-Jγ1.2Vδ2 T cells provide a convenient model for assessing the impact of antiretroviral therapy on cell populations that are not susceptible to direct infection because they do not express CD4 and depletion occurs by indirect mechanisms. We obtained longitudinal PBMC samples from 16 HIV-infected individuals who were enrolled in the Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study (MACS) and starting highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). Vγ2-Jγ1.2Vδ2 T cells were depleted in these individuals as a result of HIV infection. Despite evidence for clinical benefits of HAART, the Vγ2-Jγ1.2Vδ2 T cell repertoire did not recover after HAART initiation irrespective of treatment duration. These studies highlight important defects among cell subsets lost due to indirect effects of HIV. PMID:18606571

  2. [Antiretroviral therapy: useful from prevention to HIV treatment].

    PubMed

    Tshikung, Olivier Nawej; Calmy, Alexandra

    2016-01-13

    In 2015, the publication of important studies allowed the development of new guidelines, notably by WHO and the European AIDS ClinicalSociety (EACS), for HIV preventive treatment (pre-exposure prophylaxis), as well as for the start of antiretroviral treatment. The START and TEMPRANO studies have extended the treatment to all HIV-infected patients, irrespective of the level of immunosuppression and therefore the CD4 count. In addition, innovative screening methods, such as self-tests, are now available in all French pharmacies since 15 September 2015. The latest developments in 2015 concerning the prevention, screening, and treatment of HIV are discussed in this article and will certainly have an impact on the care of patients in Switzerland.

  3. Adherence to antiretrovirals in people coinfected with the human immunodeficiency virus and tuberculosis1

    PubMed Central

    Lemos, Larissa de Araújo; Fiuza, Maria Luciana Teles; Reis, Renata Karina; Ferrer, André Carvalho; Gir, Elucir; Galvão, Marli Teresinha Gimeniz

    2016-01-01

    Objective: assess the adherence levels to antiretroviral therapy in people coinfected with HIV/tuberculosis and correlate these levels with the sociodemographic and clinical variables of the study population. Method: cross-sectional study involving 74 male and female adults coinfected with HIV/tuberculosis. For the data collection, a sociodemographic and clinical assessment form and the Antiretroviral Treatment Adherence Assessment Questionnaire were used. For the data analysis, the software STATA version 11 was used, through descriptive statistics, Fisher's chi-square exact test and the probability test. Results: men were predominant (79.7%), between 30 and 39 years of age (35.1%), low income (75.7%) and pulmonary tuberculosis (71.6%). Adherence to antiretroviral therapy was inappropriate in 78.1% of the men; 61.0% of single people; 47.0% unemployed and 76.5% among people gaining less than one minimum wage. A significant difference was observed between compliance and length of use of antiretrovirals (p=0.018), sexual orientation (p=0.024) and number of children (p=0.029). Conclusion: the coinfected patients presented inappropriate adherence to the antiretrovirals, a fact that negatively affects the health conditions of the people living with HIV/tuberculosis coinfection. A statistically significant correlation was found between the levels of adherence and some sociodemographic and clinical characteristics. PMID:27192416

  4. Use of Third Line Antiretroviral Therapy in Latin America

    PubMed Central

    Cesar, Carina; Shepherd, Bryan E.; Jenkins, Cathy A.; Ghidinelli, Massimo; Castro, Jose Luis; Veloso, Valdiléa Gonçalves; Cortes, Claudia P.; Padgett, Denis; Crabtree-Ramirez, Brenda; Gotuzzo, Eduardo; Fink, Valeria; Duran, Adriana; Sued, Omar; McGowan, Catherine C.; Cahn, Pedro

    2014-01-01

    Background Access to highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) is expanding in Latin America. Many patients require second and third line therapy due to toxicity, tolerability, failure, or a combination of factors. The need for third line HAART, essential for program planning, is not known. Methods Antiretroviral-naïve patients ≥18 years who started first HAART after January 1, 2000 in Caribbean, Central and South America Network (CCASAnet) sites in Argentina, Brazil, Honduras, Mexico, and Peru were included. Clinical trials participants were excluded. Third line HAART was defined as use of darunavir, tipranavir, etravirine, enfuvirtide, maraviroc or raltegravir. Need for third line HAART was defined as virologic failure while on second line HAART. Results Of 5853 HAART initiators followed for a median of 3.5 years, 310 (5.3%) failed a second line regimen and 44 (0.8%) received a third line regimen. Cumulative incidence of failing a 2nd or starting a 3rd line regimen was 2.7% and 6.0% three and five years after HAART initiation, respectively. Predictors at HAART initiation for failing a second or starting a third line included female sex (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.54, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.18–2.00, p = 0.001), younger age (HR = 2.76 for 20 vs. 40 years, 95% CI 1.86–4.10, p<0.001), and prior AIDS (HR = 2.17, 95% CI 1.62–2.90, p<0.001). Conclusions Third line regimens may be needed for at least 6% of patients in Latin America within 5 years of starting HAART, a substantial proportion given the large numbers of patients on HAART in the region. Improved accessibility to third line regimens is warranted. PMID:25221931

  5. Mortality after failure of antiretroviral therapy in sub-Saharan Africa

    PubMed Central

    Keiser, Olivia; Tweya, Hannock; Braitstein, Paula; Dabis, François; Mac Phail, Patrick; Boulle, Andrew; Nash, Denis; Wood, Robin; Lüthi, Ruedi; Brinkhof, Martin WG; Schechter, Mauro; Egger, Matthias

    2010-01-01

    Summary Objective To assess the outcome of patients who experienced treatment failure with anti-retrovirals in sub-Saharan Africa. Methods Analysis of 11 ART programmes in sub-Saharan Africa. World Health Organization (WHO) criteria were used to define treatment failure. All ART-naïve patients aged >16 years who started with a non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI)-based regimen and had at least six months of follow-up were eligible. For each patient who switched to a second-line regimen, 10 matched patients who remained on a non-failing first-line regimen were selected. Time was measured from the time of switching, from the corresponding time in matched patients, or from the time of treatment failure in patients who remained on a failing regimen. Mortality was analyzed using Kaplan-Meier curves and random-effects Cox models. Results Of 16,591 adult patients starting ART, 382 patients (2.3%) switched to a second-line regimen. Another 323 patients (1.9%) did not switch despite developing immunological or virological failure. Cumulative mortality at one year was 4.2% (95% CI 2.2-7.8%) in patients who switched to a second-line regimen and 11.7% (7.3%-18.5%) in patients who remained on a failing first-line regimen, compared to 2.2% (1.6-3.0%) in patients on a non-failing first-line regimen (p<0.0001). Differences in mortality were not explained by nadir CD4 cell count, age or differential loss to follow-up. Conclusions Many patients who meet criteria for treatment failure do not switch to a second-line regimen and die. There is an urgent need to clarify the reasons why in sub-Saharan Africa many patients remain on failing first-line ART. PMID:20003034

  6. Adherence to On-Time ART Drug Pick-Up and Its Association with CD4 Changes and Clinical Outcomes Amongst HIV Infected Adults on First-Line Antiretroviral Therapy in Nigerian Hospitals.

    PubMed

    Anoje, Chukwuemeka; Agu, Kenneth Anene; Oladele, Edward A; Badru, Titilope; Adedokun, Oluwasanmi; Oqua, Dorothy; Khamofu, Hadiza; Adebayo, Olufunso; Torpey, Kwasi; Chabikuli, Otto Nzapfurundi

    2017-02-01

    Medication adherence is a major determinant of antiretroviral treatment (ART) success. Promptness in medication refill pick-ups may give an indication of medication adherence. This study determined medication refill adherence among HIV positive patients on ART and its association with treatment outcomes in HIV treatment centers in Nigeria. This retrospective multi-center cohort study involved a review of ART refill records for 3534 HIV-positive patients aged 18-60 years who initiated first-line ART between January 2008 and December 2009 and were on therapy for ≥18 months after ART initiation. Drug refill records of these patients for 10 consecutive refill visits after ART initiation were analyzed. The first ten consecutive refill appointment-keeping rates after ART initiation ranged from 64.3 % to 76.1 % which decreased with successive visits. Altogether, 743 (21.1 %) patients were deemed adherent, meaning they picked up their drugs within 7 days of the drug refill appointment date on at least nine out of ten refill visits. The adherent group of patients had a mean CD4 cells increase of 206 ± 6.1 cells/dl after 12 months of ART compared to 186 ± 7.1 cells/dl reported among the nonadherent group (p = 0.0145). The proportion of patients in the adherent category who showed no OIs after 12 months on ART (81 %) was significantly higher when compared to the proportion in the non-adherent category (23.5 %), (p = 0.008). The multivariate analysis showed that the odds of being adherent was 2-3 times more in patients who had a baseline CD4 count of less than 200 cells/dl compared to those with a baseline CD4 of >350 cells/dl. (AOR 2.43, 95 % CI 1.62-3.66). In addition, for patients with baseline CD4 cell count of 201-350 cells/dl, the odds of being adherent was found to be 1.9 compared to those with baseline CD4 of greater than 350 cells/dl (AOR 1.93, 95 % CI 1.27-2.94). Pharmacy refill data can serve as an adherence measure. Adherence to on-time drug

  7. Drug interactions between hormonal contraceptives and antiretrovirals

    PubMed Central

    Nanda, Kavita; Stuart, Gretchen S.; Robinson, Jennifer; Gray, Andrew L.; Tepper, Naomi K.; Gaffield, Mary E.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To summarize published evidence on drug interactions between hormonal contraceptives and antiretrovirals. Design: Systematic review of the published literature. Methods: We searched PubMed, POPLINE, and EMBASE for peer-reviewed publications of studies (in any language) from inception to 21 September 2015. We included studies of women using hormonal contraceptives and antiretrovirals concurrently. Outcomes of interest were effectiveness of either therapy, toxicity, or pharmacokinetics. We used standard abstraction forms to summarize and assess strengths and weaknesses. Results: Fifty reports from 46 studies were included. Most antiretrovirals whether used for therapy or prevention, have limited interactions with hormonal contraceptive methods, with the exception of efavirenz. Although depot medroxyprogesterone acetate is not affected, limited data on implants and combined oral contraceptive pills suggest that efavirenz-containing combination antiretroviral therapy may compromise contraceptive effectiveness of these methods. However, implants remain very effective despite such drug interactions. Antiretroviral plasma concentrations and effectiveness are generally not affected by hormonal contraceptives. Conclusion: Women taking antiretrovirals, for treatment or prevention, should not be denied access to the full range of hormonal contraceptive options, but should be counseled on the expected rates of unplanned pregnancy associated with all contraceptive methods, in order to make their own informed choices. PMID:28060009

  8. The Head Start Debates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zigler, Edward, Ed.; Styfco, Sally J., Ed.

    2004-01-01

    The future of Head Start depends on how well people learn from and apply the lessons from its past. That's why everyone involved in early education needs this timely, forward-thinking book from the leader of Head Start. The first book to capture the Head Start debates in all their complexity and diversity, this landmark volume brings together the…

  9. Head Start Automation Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maryland Univ., College Park. Univ. Coll.

    The task for the National Data Management Project is to share technological capabilities with the Head Start Community in order to implement improved services for children and families involved in Head Start. Many Head Start programs have incorporated technology into their programs, including word processing, database management systems,…

  10. Medication Possession Ratio Predicts Antiretroviral Regimens Persistence in Peru

    PubMed Central

    Westfall, Andrew O.; Paz, Jorge; Moran, Fiorella; Carbajal-Gonzalez, Danny; Callacondo, David; Avalos, Odalie; Rodriguez, Martin; Gotuzzo, Eduardo; Echevarria, Juan; Willig, James H.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives In developing nations, the use of operational parameters (OPs) in the prediction of clinical care represents a missed opportunity to enhance the care process. We modeled the impact of multiple measurements of antiretroviral treatment (ART) adherence on antiretroviral treatment outcomes in Peru. Design And Methods Retrospective cohort study including ART naïve, non-pregnant, adults initiating therapy at Hospital Nacional Cayetano Heredia, Lima-Peru (2006-2010). Three OPs were defined: 1) Medication possession ratio (MPR): days with antiretrovirals dispensed/days on first-line therapy; 2) Laboratory monitory constancy (LMC): proportion of 6 months intervals with ≥1 viral load or CD4 reported; 3) Clinic visit constancy (CVC): proportion of 6 months intervals with ≥1 clinic visit. Three multi-variable Cox proportional hazard (PH) models (one per OP) were fit for (1) time of first-line ART persistence and (2) time to second-line virologic failure. All models were adjusted for socio-demographic, clinical and laboratory variables. Results 856 patients were included in first-line persistence analyses, median age was 35.6 years [29.4-42.9] and most were male (624; 73%). In multivariable PH models, MPR (per 10% increase HR=0.66; 95%CI=0.61-0.71) and LMC (per 10% increase 0.83; 0.71-0.96) were associated with prolonged time on first-line therapies. Among 79 individuals included in time to second-line virologic failure analyses, MPR was the only OP independently associated with prolonged time to second-line virologic failure (per 10% increase 0.88; 0.77-0.99). Conclusions The capture and utilization of program level parameters such as MPR can provide valuable insight into patient-level treatment outcomes. PMID:24098475

  11. Protocol for a Randomized Controlled Trial Evaluating Mobile Text Messaging to Promote Retention and Adherence to Antiretroviral Therapy for People Living With HIV in Burkina Faso

    PubMed Central

    Ouedraogo, Denis; Artavia-Mora, Luis; Bedi, Arjun; Thiombiano, Boundia Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    Background Retention in care and adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) among people living with human immunodeficiency virus (PLHIV) is a critical challenge in many African countries including Burkina Faso. Delivering text messaging (short message service, SMS) interventions through mobile phones may help facilitate health service delivery and improve patient health. Despite this potential, no evaluations have been delivered for national scale settings to demonstrate the impact of mobile health (mHealth) for PLHIV. Objectives This study aims to test the impact of SMS text messaging reminders for PLHIV in Burkina Faso, who are under ART. The evaluation identifies whether patients who receive SMS text messages are more likely to (1) retain in care (measured as a dichotomous variable), (2) adhere to antiretroviral regimens (measured as the number of doses missed in the past 7 days), and (3) experience slower disease progression (measured with T-lymphocytes cells). The second objective is to assess its effects on the frequency of health center visits, physical and psychosocial health, nutrition and whether the type of message (text vs image) and frequency (weekly vs semiweekly) have differential impacts including the possibility of message fatigue over time. Methods This 24-month, wide-scale intervention implements a randomized controlled trial (RCT) to evaluate the impact of four variants of a mHealth intervention versus a control group. Our sample comprises adult patients (>15 years of age) undergoing antiretroviral therapy with access to mobile phone services. Multivariate regression analysis will be used to analyze the effect of the intervention on the study population. Data collection is done at baseline and three follow-up waves 6, 12, and 24 months after the intervention starts. Results The targeted 3800 patients were recruited between February 2015 and May 2015. But political uncertainty delayed the launch of the intervention until October 2015. Data

  12. Population-level associations between antiretroviral therapy scale-up and all-cause mortality in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Larson, Elysia; Bendavid, Eran; Tuoane-Nkhasi, Maletela; Mbengashe, Thobile; Goldman, Thurma; Wilson, Melinda; Klausner, Jeffrey D

    2014-08-01

    Our aim was to describe the association between increasing access to antiretroviral therapy and all-cause mortality in South Africa from 2005 to 2009. We undertook a longitudinal, population-level study, using antiretroviral monitoring data reported by PEPFAR implementing partners and province-level and national all-cause mortality records from Statistics South Africa (provider of official South African government statistics) to analyse the association between antiretroviral therapy and mortality. Using mixed effects models with a random intercept for province, we estimated the contemporaneous and lagging association between antiretroviral therapy and all-cause mortality in South Africa. We also conducted subgroup analyses and estimated the number of deaths averted. For each 100 HIV-infected individuals on antiretroviral therapy reported by PEPFAR implementing partners in South African treatment programmes, there was an associated 2.9 fewer deaths that year (95% CI: 1.5, 4.2) and 6.3 fewer deaths the following year (95% CI: 4.6, 8.0). The associated decrease in mortality the year after treatment reporting was seen in both adults and children, and men and women. Treatment provided from 2005 to 2008 was associated with 28,305 deaths averted from 2006 to 2009. The scale-up of antiretroviral therapy in South Africa was associated with a significant reduction in national all-cause mortality.

  13. Intellectual property rights, market competition and access to affordable antiretrovirals.

    PubMed

    Pascual, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    The number of patients receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART) has increased from around half a million in 2003 to almost 10 million in only 10 years, and will continue to increase in the coming years. Over 16 million more are eligible to start ART according to the last World Health Organization (WHO) guidelines. The demand is also switching from the less expensive antiretrovirals (ARVs) that allowed such scale-up to newer more expensive ones with fewer side effects or those that can be used by people who have developed resistance to first-line treatment. However, patents on these new drugs can delay robust generic competition and, consequently, price reduction made possible by economies of scale. Various ways to address this issue have been envisaged or implemented, including the use of the flexibilities available under the Agreement on Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights (TRIPS), systematic widespread voluntary licensing, of which the Medicines Patent Pool (MPP) is an example, and the application of different prices in different countries, called tiered pricing. This paper helps explain the impact of patents on market competition for ARVs and analyses various approaches available today to minimize this impact.

  14. The latest in antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Temesgen, Zelalem

    2006-10-01

    The XVI International AIDS Conference (AIDS 2006), organized by the International AIDS Society (IAS), took place August 12-18 in Toronto, Canada. It was attended by over 26,000 participants from more than 170 countries and featured more than 4,500 abstracts as well as an array of community and cultural activities. The theme of the meeting was "Time to deliver", emphasizing the continued need and urgency in bringing effective HIV prevention and treatment strategies to those living with and affected by HIV/AIDS. The meeting's agenda was broad and included policy and programmatic topics as well as scientific research. This report focuses on reports presented at the conference that directly deal with antiretroviral therapy. This is primarily because of the nature of the venue where it is intended to be published (Drug News & Perspectives) as well as the expertise of the author. It is not a lack of recognition of the other equally important topics and discussions that took place at AIDS 2006. The author is solely responsible for the selection of topics and presentations to be included in this report.

  15. [Adult].

    PubMed

    Milke-García, María Del Pilar

    2016-09-01

    Adulthood starts after youth and is characterized by the completion of growth and the achievement of organic and psychological maturity. Obesity and other preventable diseases related to lifestyle are common at this age. A complete, balanced and sufficient diet, together with exercise are important in order to prevent and treat these diseases. Several studies have brought about the mechanisms by which the incorporation of milk and dairy products to diet is beneficial in order to prevent and treat these diseases. Milk also contributes to the improvement of dental, bone and intestinal health, theoretically helps in body weight control, has a definite role on the muscular and bone mass maintenance and is an option for hydration during exercise, this being as important as diet for overweight, obesity, diabetes, dislipidemias and hypertension control.

  16. Comparative evaluation of US Food and Drug Administration and pharmacologically guided approaches to determine the maximum recommended starting dose for first-in-human clinical trials in adult healthy men.

    PubMed

    Imam, Md Tarique; Venkateshan, S P; Tandon, Monika; Saha, Nilanjan; Pillai, K K

    2011-12-01

    The authors compared US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and 9 pharmacologically guided approaches (PGAs; simple allometry, maximum life span potential [MLP], brain weight, rule of exponent [ROE], two 2-sp methods and 3 one-sp methods) to determine the maximum recommended starting dose (MRSD) for first-in-human clinical trials in adult healthy men using 10 drugs. The ROE method as suggested by Mahmood and Balian1 gave the best prediction accuracy for a pharmacokinetic (PK) parameter. Values derived from clearance were consistently better than volume of distribution (Vd)-based methods and had lower root mean square error (RMSE) values. A pictorial method evaluation chart was developed based on fold errors for simultaneous evaluation of various methods. The one-sp method (rat) and the US FDA methods gave the highest prediction accuracy and low RMSE values, and the 2-sp methods gave the least prediction accuracy with high RMSE values. The ROE method gave more consistent predictions for PK parameters than other allometric methods. Despite this, the MRSD predictions were not better than US FDA methods, probably indicating that across-species variation in clearance may be higher than variation in no observed adverse effect level (NOAEL) and that PGA methods may not be consistently better than the NOAEL based methods.

  17. Non-Antiretroviral Microbicides for HIV Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Yanille; Dezzutti, Charlene S.

    2016-01-01

    Non-antiretroviral microbicide candidates were previously explored as a female-controlled method of preventing sexual transmission of HIV. These products contained non-HIV specific active compounds that were ultimately found to disrupt the vaginal epithelium, cause increased immune activation in the female genital tract, disturb vaginal flora, and/or cause other irritation that precluded their use as vaginal microbicides. Due to the failure of these first-generation candidates, there was a shift in focus to developing HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis and microbicides containing small-molecule antiretrovirals. Even with the limited success of the antiretroviral-based microbicides in clinical evaluations and no commercially available products, there has been significant progress in microbicide research. The lessons learned from previous trials have given rise to more rigorous preclinical evaluation that aims to be better at predicting microbicide efficacy and safety and to novel formulation and delivery technologies. These advances have resulted in renewed interest in developing non-antiretroviral-based microbicides, such as broadly neutralizing antibodies (for example, VRC01) and anti-viral proteins (for example, Griffithsin), as options for persons not wanting to use antiretroviral drugs, and for their potential to prevent multiple sexually transmitted infections. PMID:27438574

  18. CROI 2015: Advances in Antiretroviral Therapy.

    PubMed

    Olender, Susan A; Taylor, Barbara S; Wong, Marcia; Wilkin, Timothy J

    2015-01-01

    The 2015 Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections included new and exciting advances in the realm of antiretroviral therapy. The Temprano trial demonstrated benefits from early antiretroviral therapy and isoniazid preventive therapy. Important data on investigational antiretroviral drugs were presented, including tenofovir alafenamide fumarate and BMS-955176, an HIV-1 maturation inhibitor. Novel data on the HIV care continuum from resource-rich and -limited settings highlighted persistent sex- and race-related disparities in care engagement, and the crucial need to bring HIV testing and care into the community to improve engagement across the care continuum. Life expectancy data from resource-limited settings reveal dramatic improvements across sub-Saharan Africa, although people with HIV still live 5 years to 10 years less than those without HIV, and new cost-effectiveness research revealed that the price of antiretroviral therapy itself remains a key driver of cost and cost-effectiveness calculations. Results from the PROMISE trial showed reduced rates of mother-to-child transmission among women who received antiretroviral therapy with 3 drugs compared with women who received zidovudine monotherapy, supporting current World Health Organization guidelines.

  19. Depression at Treatment Initiation Predicts HIV Antiretroviral Adherence in Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Glenn J.; Slaughter, Mary; Ghosh-Dastidar, Bonnie

    2014-01-01

    We examined the relationship between depression (symptom type, diagnostic severity and change over time) and adherence to HIV antiretroviral therapy (ART) with data from three longitudinal studies (N= 1021) of patients starting ART in Uganda. The Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9) was used to assess depressive symptoms (total score; somatic and cognitive subscales), and to categorize severity level. At baseline, 9% had major depression and 30% had minor depression; 82% were adherent (reported no missed ART doses in past 7 days) at Month 6 and 85% at Month 12. Controlling for demographic and medical covariates, multivariate random-effects logistic regression models revealed that change in depression was not related to adherence; however, baseline total depression symptoms, and cognitive symptoms in particular, as well as major and minor depression, were significant predictors of adherence. These findings highlight the need for early identification and aggressive treatment of depression to optimize ART adherence. PMID:28084190

  20. Hidden costs of antiretroviral treatment: the public health efficiency of drug packaging.

    PubMed

    Andreu-Crespo, Àngels; Llibre, Josep M; Cardona-Peitx, Glòria; Sala-Piñol, Ferran; Clotet, Bonaventura; Bonafont-Pujol, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    While the overall percentage of unused antiretroviral medicines returned to the hospital pharmacy is low, their cost is quite high. Adverse events, treatment failure, pharmacokinetic interactions, pregnancy, or treatment simplification are common reasons for unplanned treatment changes. Socially inefficient antiretroviral packages prevent the reuse of drugs returned to the hospital pharmacy. We defined antiretroviral package categories based on the excellence of drug packaging and analyzed the number of pills and costs of drugs returned during a period of 1 year in a hospital-based HIV unit attending to 2,413 treated individuals. A total of 6,090 pills (34% of all returned antiretrovirals) - with a cost of 47,139.91 € - would be totally lost, mainly due to being packed up in the lowest efficiency packages. Newer treatments are packaged in low-excellence categories of packages, thus favoring the maintenance of these hidden costs in the near future. Therefore, costs of this low-efficiency drug packaging, where medication packages are started but not completed, in high-cost medications are substantial and should be properly addressed. Any improvement in the packaging by the manufacturer, and favoring the choice of drugs supplied through efficient packages (when efficacy, toxicity, and convenience are similar), should minimize the treatment expenditures paid by national health budgets.

  1. Head Start. Fact Sheet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Administration for Children, Youth, and Families (DHHS), Washington, DC.

    Head Start is a national program that provides comprehensive developmental services for preschool children (ages 3 to 5) from low-income families and social services for their families. Approximately 1,400 community-based nonprofit organizations and school systems develop programs to meet specific needs. Head Start began in 1965 in the Office of…

  2. Start at the End ...

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldsworthy, Anne

    2005-01-01

    Start at the end; that's the way to improve children's plans for investigations. Strange as it may seem, there are times when beginning at the beginning of an investigation is not the best way to start things off. To give children the opportunity to ask questions and plan what to do, sometimes it is best to get them first to consider others' data…

  3. Starting School in August

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chmelynski, Carol

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses the controversial decision of the school board from the Broward County, Florida to start the school year on August 9. School boards across the country that are grappling with the idea of starting school earlier in the year are increasingly running up against strong opposition from parents. In many districts,…

  4. START II and beyond

    SciTech Connect

    Mendelsohn, J.

    1996-10-01

    The second Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty (START II), signed by President George Bush and Russian President Boris yeltsin in January 1993, was ratified by the US Senate in January 1996 by and overwhelming vote of 87-4. The treaty, which will slash the strategic arsenals of the United States and Russia to 3,000-3,500 warheads each, is now before the two houses of the Russian Parliament (the Duma and the Federation Council) awaiting ratification amidst confusion and criticism. The Yeltsin administration supports START II and spoke in favor of Russian ratification after the Senate acted on the treaty. The Russian foreign minister and the Russian military believed that START II should be ratified as soon as possible. During the recent presidential campaign and his subsequent illness, President Yeltsin has been virtually silent on the subject of START II and nuclear force reductions. Without a push from the Yeltsin administration, the tone among Duma members, has been sharply critical of START II. Voices across the Russian political spectrum have questioned the treaty and linked it to constraints on highly capable theater missile defense (TMD) systems and the continued viability of the ABM Treaty. And urged that START II ratification be held hostage until NATO abandons its plans to expand eastward. Although the START I and START II accords have generated the momentum, opportunity and expectation-both domestic and international-for additional nuclear arms reductions, the current impasse over ratification in the Duma has cast a shadow over the future of START II and raised questions about the chances for any follow-on (START III) agreement.

  5. Antiretroviral (HIV-1) activity of azulene derivatives.

    PubMed

    Peet, Julia; Selyutina, Anastasia; Bredihhin, Aleksei

    2016-04-15

    The antiretroviral activity of azulene derivatives was detected for the first time. A series of eighteen diversely substituted azulenes was synthesized and tested in vitro using HIV-1 based virus-like particles (VLPs) and infectious HIV-1 virus in U2OS and TZM-bl cell lines. Among the compounds tested, the 2-hydroxyazulenes demonstrated the most significant activity by inhibiting HIV-1 replication with IC50 of 2-10 and 8-20 μM for the VLPs and the infectious virus, respectively. These results indicate that azulene derivatives may be potentially useful candidates for the development of antiretroviral agents.

  6. Antiretroviral Treatment and Sexual Risk Behavior in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Risher, Kathryn; Rehle, Thomas; Simbayi, Leickness; Shisana, Olive; Celentano, David D

    2016-04-01

    The sexual behavior of individuals living with HIV determines the onward transmission of HIV. With the understanding that antiretroviral therapy (ART) prevents transmission of HIV, the sexual behaviors of the individuals not on ART with unsuppressed viral loads becomes of the greatest importance in elucidating transmission. We assessed the association between being on ART and sexual risk behavior among those living with HIV in a nationally representative population-based cross-sectional survey of households in South Africa that was conducted in 2012. Of 2237 adults (aged 15-49) who tested HIV-seropositive, 667 (29.8 %) had detectable antiretroviral drugs in their blood specimens. Among males, 77.7 % of those on ART reported having had sex in the past year contrasted with 88.4 % of those not on ART (p = 0.001); among females, 72.2 % of those on ART reported having had sex in the past year while 80.3 % of those not on ART did (p < 0.001). For males and females, the odds of reporting consistent condom use and condom use at last sex were statistically significantly higher for individuals on ART compared to those not on ART (males: consistent condom use aOR 2.8, 95 % CI 1.6-4.9, condom use at last sex aOR 2.6, 95 % CI 1.5-4.6; females: consistent condom use aOR 2.3, 95 % CI 1.7-3.1, condom use at last sex aOR 2.3, 95 % CI 1.7-3.1), while there were no statistically significant differences in odds of reporting multiple sexual partners in the past year. In this nationally representative population-based survey of South African adults, we found evidence of less risky sexual risk behavior among people living with HIV on ART compared to those not on ART.

  7. Self-reported adherence to antiretroviral therapy in HIV+ population from Bata, Equatorial Guinea.

    PubMed

    Salmanton-García, Jon; Herrador, Zaida; Ruiz-Seco, Pilar; Nzang-Esono, Jesús; Bendomo, Veronica; Bashmakovic, Emma; Nseng-Nchama, Gloria; Benito, Agustín; Aparicio, Pilar

    2016-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and the acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) represent a serious public health problem in Equatorial Guinea, with a prevalence of 6.2% among adults. the high-activity antiretroviral treatment (HAART) coverage data is 10 points below the overall estimate for Sub-Saharan Africa, and only 61% patients continue with HAART 12 months after it started. This study aims to assess HAART adherence and related factors in Litoral Province of Equatorial Guinea. In this cross-sectional study, socio-demographic and clinical data were collected at Regional Hospital of Bata, during June-July 2014. Adherence to treatment was assessed by using the Spanish version of CEAT-VIH. Bivariate and linear regression analyses were employed to assess HAART adherence-related factors. We interviewed 50 men (35.5%) and 91 women (64.5%), with a mean age of 47.7 ± 8.9 and 36.2 ± 11.2, respectively (p < .001). Overall, 55% patients had low or insufficient adherence. CEAT-VIH score varied by ethnic group (p = .005). There was a positive correlation between CEAT-VIH score and current CD4 T-cells count (p = .013). The Cronbach's α value was 0.52. To our knowledge, this is the first study to assess HAART adherence in Equatorial Guinea. Internal reliability for CEAT-VIH was low, nonetheless the positive correlation between the CEAT-VIH score and the immunological status of patients add value to our findings. Our results serve as baseline for future research and will also assist stakeholders in planning and undertaking contextual and evidence-based policy initiatives.

  8. Long-Term Antiretroviral Treatment Outcomes in Seven Countries in the Caribbean

    PubMed Central

    KOENIG, Serena P; RODRIGUEZ, Luis A; BARTHOLOMEW, Courtenay; EDWARDS, Alison; CARMICHAEL, Tracie E; BARROW, Geoff; CABIÉ, André; HUNTER, Robert; VASQUEZ-MORA, Giselle; QUAVA-JONES, Avion; ADOMAKOH, Nicholas; FIGUEROA, J Peter; LIAUTAUD, Bernard; TORRES, Magaly; PAPE, Jean W

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To report long-term HIV treatment outcomes in 7 Caribbean countries. Design Observational cohort study. Methods We report outcomes for all antiretroviral therapy (ART) naïve adult patients enrolled on ART from program inception until study closing for cohorts in Barbados, the Dominican Republic, Haiti, Jamaica, Martinique, Trinidad, and Puerto Rico. Incidence and predictors of mortality were analyzed by time-to-event approaches. Results 8,203 patients started ART from 1998 to 2008. Median follow-up time was 31 months (interquartile range: 14 to 50 months). Mortality was 13% overall: 6% in Martinique, 8% in Jamaica, 11% in Trinidad, 13% in Haiti, 15% in the Dominican Republic, 15% in Barbados, and 24% in Puerto Rico. Mortality was associated with male gender (HR 1.58; 95% CI: 1.33 – 1.87), body weight (HR 0.85 per 10 pounds; 95% CI: 0.82 – 0.89), hemoglobin (HR 0.84 per g/dl; 95% CI: 0.80 – 0.88), CD4 cell count (0.90 per 50 CD4 cells; 95% CI: 0.86 – 0.93), concurrent TB (HR 1.58; 95% CI: 1.25 – 2.01) and age (HR 1.19 per 10 years; 95% CI: 1.11 – 1.28). After controlling for these variables, mortality in Martinique, Jamaica, Trinidad and Haiti was not significantly different. A total of 75% of patients remained alive and in-care at the end of the study period. Conclusions Long-term mortality rates vary widely across the Caribbean. Much of the difference can be explained by disease severity at ART initiation, nutritional status, and concurrent TB. Earlier ART initiation will be critical to improve outcomes. PMID:22240464

  9. Psychiatric Advance Directives: Getting Started

    MedlinePlus

    ... More... Home Getting Started National Resource Center on Psychiatric Advance Directives - Getting Started Getting Started Psychiatric advance directives (PADs) are relatively new legal instruments ...

  10. Progress in antiretroviral drug delivery using nanotechnology

    PubMed Central

    Mallipeddi, Rama; Rohan, Lisa Cencia

    2010-01-01

    There are currently a number of antiretroviral drugs that have been approved by the Food and Drug Administration for use in the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). More recently, antiretrovirals are being evaluated in the clinic for prevention of HIV infection. Due to the challenging nature of treatment and prevention of this disease, the use of nanocarriers to achieve more efficient delivery of antiretroviral drugs has been studied. Various forms of nanocarriers, such as nanoparticles (polymeric, inorganic, and solid lipid), liposomes, polymeric micelles, dendrimers, cyclodextrins, and cell-based nanoformulations have been studied for delivery of drugs intended for HIV prevention or therapy. The aim of this review is to provide a summary of the application of nanocarrier systems to the delivery of anti-HIV drugs, specifically antiretrovirals. For anti-HIV drugs to be effective, adequate distribution to specific sites in the body must be achieved, and effective drug concentrations must be maintained at those sites for the required period of time. Nanocarriers provide a means to overcome cellular and anatomical barriers to drug delivery. Their application in the area of HIV prevention and therapy may lead to the development of more effective drug products for combating this pandemic disease. PMID:20957115

  11. [Antiretroviral therapy in HIV-infected children and adolescents: lessons learned in 30 years of the epidemic].

    PubMed

    Bazin, Gabriela Ricordi; Gaspar, Mariza Curto Saavedra; Silva, Nicole Carvalho Xavier Micheloni da; Mendes, Carolina da Costa; Oliveira, Cora Pichler de; Bastos, Leonardo Soares; Cardoso, Claudete Aparecida Araújo

    2014-04-01

    This study aims to evaluate antiretroviral therapy in children and adolescents with AIDS. We selected 247 abstracts published from 1983 to 2013, collected from the PubMed and LILACS databases. Sixty-nine articles were selected. Attention to research in the pediatric age bracket in 30 years of the epidemic is explained by the age group's immunological characteristics, since AIDS progresses faster in children than in adults. Recent studies focus on the initiation of highly active antiretroviral therapy before the onset of symptoms. Early introduction of combination antiretroviral therapy has been implemented effectively and safely in populations with limited resources, leading to significantly improved survival. The current challenge is to manage a chronic disease with acute complications. New studies should focus on population specificities and identify the individual needs of pediatric patients.

  12. Artemether-Lumefantrine Exposure in HIV-Infected Nigerian Subjects on Nevirapine-Containing Antiretroviral Therapy.

    PubMed

    Parikh, Sunil; Fehintola, Fatai; Huang, Liusheng; Olson, Alexander; Adedeji, Waheed A; Darin, Kristin M; Morse, Gene D; Murphy, Robert L; Taiwo, Babafemi O; Akinyinka, Olusegun O; Adewole, Isaac F; Aweeka, Francesca T; Scarsi, Kimberly K

    2015-12-01

    Coadministration of nevirapine-based antiretroviral therapy (ART) and artemether-lumefantrine is reported to result in variable changes in lumefantrine exposure. We conducted an intensive pharmacokinetic study with 11 HIV-infected adults who were receiving artemether-lumefantrine plus nevirapine-based ART, and we compared the results with those for 16 HIV-negative adult historical controls. Exposure to artemether and lumefantrine was significantly lower and dihydroartemisinin exposure was unchanged in subjects receiving nevirapine-based ART, compared with controls. Nevirapine exposure was unchanged before and after artemether-lumefantrine administration.

  13. The Evolving Genotypic Profile of HIV-1 Mutations Related to Antiretroviral Treatment in the North Region of Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Lopes, Carmen Andréa F.; Soares, Marcelo A.; Falci, Diego R.; Sprinz, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    HIV related mutations can be associated with decreased susceptibility to antiretrovirals and treatment failures. There is scarce information about HIV mutations in persons failing HIV treatment in North of Brazil. Our aim was to evaluate evolution of HIV subtypes and mutations patterns related to antiretroviral therapy in this region. We investigated HIV resistance profile in adults failing antiretroviral regimen in Northern Brazil from January, 2004, through December, 2013. Genotype data was evaluated through Stanford University algorithm. There were 377 genotypes from different individuals to evaluate. Resistance mutations were similar to worldwide reports and related to antiretroviral exposure. Most prevalent mutations in the reverse transcriptase gene were M184V (80.1%) and K130N (40.6%). Thymidine associated mutations were more frequent in multiexperienced patients. Most common protease mutations were M46I, V82A, I54V, L90M, I84V, M46L, and L76V. Subtype B was the most prevalent (90.7%). There were differences between subtypes B and non-B mutations. We documented for the first time subtypes and patterns of HIV associated mutations in Northern Brazil. A1 subtype was identified for the first time in this area. Depending on drug regimen and how experienced the patient is, an empirical switch of a failing antiretroviral treatment could be a reasonable option. PMID:26543866

  14. The importance of the patient-clinician relationship in adherence to antiretroviral medication.

    PubMed

    Molassiotis, Alex; Morris, Kate; Trueman, Ian

    2007-12-01

    The aim of the study was to assess dimensions of the patient-clinician relationship in relation to adherence with antiretroviral medication in a sample of HIV patients. This was a correlational evaluation, using a cross-sectional design. Thirty-eight HIV patients in two UK HIV units provided complete data. Analysis suggested that the elements of the patient-clinician relationship contributing to adherence with medication were the patient perception of being valued and respected by the clinician, the patients' ability to initiate discussions about the treatment, empowerment and level of trust placed in the nurse. The latter, and the time since starting antiretroviral treatment, were the only two variables that could predict adherence in a regression model, explaining 41% of the variance in adherence. Building trusted relationships with the patients and investing in educational and communication techniques to improve the therapeutic relationship could strongly contribute to HIV patients to maintaining high adherence rates.

  15. Paying for antiretroviral adherence: is it unethical when the patient is an adolescent?

    PubMed

    Healy, Justin; Hope, Rebecca; Bhabha, Jacqueline; Eyal, Nir

    2017-03-01

    With the expansion of antiretroviral treatment programmes, many children and adolescents with HIV in sub-Saharan Africa could expect to live healthy lives. Yet adolescents have the highest levels of poor antiretroviral adherence and of loss to follow-up compared with other age groups. This can lead to increased morbidity and mortality, to the development of drug-resistant strains, and to high societal costs. While financial incentives have been extensively used to promote medication adherence among adults, their use among adolescents remains rare. And while there is a large body of ethical literature exploring financial incentives among adults, little philosophical thought has gone into their use among adolescents. This paper explores three oft-mentioned ethical worries about financial incentives for health behaviours and it asks whether these concerns are more serious in the context of incentives for improving adolescent adherence. The three worries are that such incentives would unduly coerce adolescents' decision-making, would compromise distributive justice and would crowd out intrinsic motivations and non-monetary values. Our tentative conclusion is that more empirical investigation of these concerns is necessary, and that at this point they are not compelling enough to rule out trials in which adolescents are incentivised for antiretroviral adherence.

  16. TARCOG Home Start Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Top of Alabama Regional Council of Governments, Huntsville. Human Resources Program.

    This report describes the Top of Alabama Regional Council of Governments (TARCOG) Home Start Program. Five aspects of the program are presented. (1) The nutrition component is aimed at helping parents make the best use of food resources through good planning, buying, and cooking. (2) The health program involves provision of medical and dental…

  17. Starting in School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albertine, Susan

    2012-01-01

    Through its signature initiative, Liberal Education and America's Promise (LEAP), the Association of American Colleges and Universities (AAC&U) is promoting a vision for learning that begins in school: Starting in School . . . Rigorous and rich curriculum focused on the essential learning outcomes; comprehensive, individualized, and…

  18. Is Head Start Dying?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherman, Ann; And Others

    1971-01-01

    Analysis of problems faced by Head Start and its present status includes a review of its transfer from O.E.O. to H.E.W., its extensions, the Westinghouse Report, and other studies and articles. Decline in public interest and support is noted. (KW)

  19. Blogs: Getting Started

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dyrud, Marilyn A.; Worley, Rebecca B.; Schultz, Benjamin

    2005-01-01

    Blogs are communication tools, they serve as vehicles to transmit messages. Before deciding to blog, one needs to devise a strategy on how this medium will fit in with his or her communication needs. This will also help later in deciding which features one will need to include in his or her blog. This article discusses ways on how to start and…

  20. Smart Start Evaluation Plan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryant, Donna; Burchinal, Margaret; Buysse, Virginia; Kotch, Jonathan; Maxwell, Kelly; Neenan, Peter; Noblit, George; Orthner, Dennis; Peisner-Feinberg, Ellen; Telfair, Joseph

    Smart Start is North Carolina's partnership between state government and local leaders, service providers, and families to better serve children under 6 years of age and their families. This report describes the comprehensive plan to evaluate the state and local goals and objectives of the program, focusing on the components addressing the…

  1. Home Start Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roggman, Lori; And Others

    This curriculum guide contains monthly work plans and weekly activity units for a Home Start Program. Emphasis is placed on the importance of the home, the family unit, and the education and development of young children by their own parents. Yearly goals include concern for the following: physical and dental health, nutrition, mental health and…

  2. Home Start Evaluation Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    High/Scope Educational Research Foundation, Ypsilanti, MI.

    Case studies of eight Home Start programs are given as the third section of an evaluation study. Communities involved are Binghamton, New York; Franklin, North Carolina; Cleveland, Ohio; Harrogate, Tennessee; Houston, Texas; Weslaco, Texas; Millville, Utah; Parkersburg, West Virginia. Although each study varies in format, each describes in detail…

  3. Cohort profile: Antiretroviral Therapy Cohort Collaboration (ART-CC).

    PubMed

    May, Margaret T; Ingle, Suzanne M; Costagliola, Dominique; Justice, Amy C; de Wolf, Frank; Cavassini, Matthias; D'Arminio Monforte, Antonella; Casabona, Jordi; Hogg, Robert S; Mocroft, Amanda; Lampe, Fiona C; Dabis, François; Fätkenheuer, Gerd; Sterling, Timothy R; del Amo, Julia; Gill, M John; Crane, Heidi M; Saag, Michael S; Guest, Jodie; Brodt, Hans-Reinhard; Sterne, Jonathan A C

    2014-06-01

    The advent of effective combination antiretroviral therapy (ART) in 1996 resulted in fewer patients experiencing clinical events, so that some prognostic analyses of individual cohort studies of human immunodeficiency virus-infected individuals had low statistical power. Because of this, the Antiretroviral Therapy Cohort Collaboration (ART-CC) of HIV cohort studies in Europe and North America was established in 2000, with the aim of studying the prognosis for clinical events in acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) and the mortality of adult patients treated for HIV-1 infection. In 2002, the ART-CC collected data on more than 12,000 patients in 13 cohorts who had begun combination ART between 1995 and 2001. Subsequent updates took place in 2004, 2006, 2008, and 2010. The ART-CC data base now includes data on more than 70,000 patients participating in 19 cohorts who began treatment before the end of 2009. Data are collected on patient demographics (e.g. sex, age, assumed transmission group, race/ethnicity, geographical origin), HIV biomarkers (e.g. CD4 cell count, plasma viral load of HIV-1), ART regimen, dates and types of AIDS events, and dates and causes of death. In recent years, additional data on co-infections such as hepatitis C; risk factors such as smoking, alcohol and drug use; non-HIV biomarkers such as haemoglobin and liver enzymes; and adherence to ART have been collected whenever available. The data remain the property of the contributing cohorts, whose representatives manage the ART-CC via the steering committee of the Collaboration. External collaboration is welcomed. Details of contacts are given on the ART-CC website (www.art-cohort-collaboration.org).

  4. Antiretroviral Therapy as Prevention of … Pneumococcal Infections?

    PubMed Central

    Leporrier, Jérémie; Delbos, Valérie; Unal, Guillemette; Honoré, Patricia; Etienne, Manuel; Bouchaud, Olivier; Caron, François

    2016-01-01

    Background. Despite antiretroviral therapy, it is generally believed that the risk for pneumococcal infections (PnIs) is high among patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). However, most studies in this field have been conducted before 2010, and the proportion of virologically suppressed patients has drastically increased in these latter years thanks to larger indications and more effective antiretroviral regimens. This study aimed to re-evaluate the current risk of PnI among adult patients infected with HIV. Methods. The incidence of PnI was evaluated between 1996 and 2014 in 2 French regional hospitals. The 80 most recent cases of PnI (2000–2014) were retrospectively compared with 160 controls (HIV patients without PnI) to analyze the residual risk factors of PnI. Results. Among a mean annual follow-up cohort of 1616 patients, 116 PnIs were observed over 18 years. The risk factors of PnI among patients infected with HIV were an uncontrolled HIV infection or “classic” risk factors of PnI shared by the general population such as addiction, renal or respiratory insufficiency, or hepatitis B or C coinfection. Pneumococcal vaccination coverage was low and poorly targeted, because only 5% of the cases had been previously vaccinated. The incidence of invasive PnIs among HIV patients with a nonvirologically suppressed infection or comorbidities was 12 times higher than that reported in the general population at the country level (107 vs 9/100000 patients), whereas the incidence among virologically suppressed HIV patients without comorbidities was lower (7.6/100000 patients). Conclusions. Human immunodeficiency virus infection no longer per se seems to be a significant risk factor for PnI, suggesting a step-down from a systematic to an “at-risk patient” targeted pneumococcal vaccination strategy. PMID:28018929

  5. Cohort Profile: Antiretroviral Therapy Cohort Collaboration (ART-CC)

    PubMed Central

    May, Margaret T; Ingle, Suzanne M; Costagliola, Dominique; Justice, Amy C; de Wolf, Frank; Cavassini, Matthias; D’Arminio Monforte, Antonella; Casabona, Jordi; Hogg, Robert S; Mocroft, Amanda; Lampe, Fiona C; Dabis, François; Fätkenheuer, Gerd; Sterling, Timothy R; del Amo, Julia; Gill, M John; Crane, Heidi M; Saag, Michael S; Guest, Jodie; Brodt, Hans-Reinhard; Sterne, Jonathan AC

    2014-01-01

    The advent of effective combination antiretroviral therapy (ART) in 1996 resulted in fewer patients experiencing clinical events, so that some prognostic analyses of individual cohort studies of human immunodeficiency virus-infected individuals had low statistical power. Because of this, the Antiretroviral Therapy Cohort Collaboration (ART-CC) of HIV cohort studies in Europe and North America was established in 2000, with the aim of studying the prognosis for clinical events in acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) and the mortality of adult patients treated for HIV-1 infection. In 2002, the ART-CC collected data on more than 12,000 patients in 13 cohorts who had begun combination ART between 1995 and 2001. Subsequent updates took place in 2004, 2006, 2008, and 2010. The ART-CC data base now includes data on more than 70 000 patients participating in 19 cohorts who began treatment before the end of 2009. Data are collected on patient demographics (e.g. sex, age, assumed transmission group, race/ethnicity, geographical origin), HIV biomarkers (e.g. CD4 cell count, plasma viral load of HIV-1), ART regimen, dates and types of AIDS events, and dates and causes of death. In recent years, additional data on co-infections such as hepatitis C; risk factors such as smoking, alcohol and drug use; non-HIV biomarkers such as haemoglobin and liver enzymes; and adherence to ART have been collected whenever available. The data remain the property of the contributing cohorts, whose representatives manage the ART-CC via the steering committee of the Collaboration. External collaboration is welcomed. Details of contacts are given on the ART-CC website (www.art-cohort-collaboration.org). PMID:23599235

  6. Mediators of antiretroviral adherence: a multisite international study.

    PubMed

    Corless, I B; Guarino, A J; Nicholas, P K; Tyer-Viola, L; Kirksey, K; Brion, J; Dawson Rose, C; Eller, L S; Rivero-Mendez, M; Kemppainen, J; Nokes, K; Sefcik, E; Voss, J; Wantland, D; Johnson, M O; Phillips, J C; Webel, A; Iipinge, S; Portillo, C; Chen, W-T; Maryland, M; Hamilton, M J; Reid, P; Hickey, D; Holzemer, W L; Sullivan, K M

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of stressful life events (SLE) on medication adherence (3 days, 30 days) as mediated by sense of coherence (SOC), self-compassion (SCS), and engagement with the healthcare provider (eHCP) and whether this differed by international site. Data were obtained from a cross-sectional sample of 2082 HIV positive adults between September 2009 and January 2011 from sites in Canada, China, Namibia, Puerto Rico, Thailand, and US. Statistical tests to explore the effects of stressful life events on antiretroviral medication adherence included descriptive statistics, multivariate analysis of variance, analysis of variance with Bonferroni post-hoc analysis, and path analysis. An examination by international site of the relationships between SLE, SCS, SOC, and eHCP with adherence (3 days and 30 days) indicated these combined variables were related to adherence whether 3 days or 30 days to different degrees at the various sites. SLE, SCS, SOC, and eHCP were significant predictors of adherence past 3 days for the United States (p = < 0.001), Canada (p = 0.006), and Namibia (p = 0.019). The combined independent variables were significant predictors of adherence past 30 days only in the United States and Canada. Engagement with the provider was a significant correlate for antiretroviral adherence in most, but not all, of these countries. Thus, the importance of eHCP cannot be overstated. Nonetheless, our findings need to be accompanied by the caveat that research on variables of interest, while enriched by a sample obtained from international sites, may not have the same relationships in each country.

  7. Changes in the renal function after tenofovir-containing antiretroviral therapy initiation in a Senegalese cohort (ANRS 1215).

    PubMed

    De Beaudrap, Pierre; Diallo, Mouhamadou Baila; Landman, Roland; Guèye, Ndeye Fatou; Ndiaye, Ibrahima; Diouf, Assane; Kane, Coumba Toure; Etard, Jean-Francois; Girard, Pierre-Marie; Sow, Papa Salif; Delaporte, Eric

    2010-11-01

    To describe and compare the changes in renal function between HIV-1 infected adult patients receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART) with and without tenofovir (TDF). The population consisted of 40 patients starting a TDF-containing regimen and 388 patients starting regimen not containing TDF, and followed during 42 months. The estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) was calculated using the Cockroft-Gault and MDRD equations and modeled separately for the first 12 months and the subsequent period. Between baseline and 12 months, the eGFR decreased significantly in patients receiving TDF (-10.40 ml/min), whereas it increased in the other +4.33 ml/min). A significant variability in the eGFR trajectories of patients receiving TDF was observed; 12 (30%) of them experienced a persistent decrease, 5 (12%) had an initial transient increase, and 23 (58%) a steady slow increase in eGFR. The characteristics at baseline of the patients with persistent decrease were not different from the other patients but their immune reconstitution was impaired. After 12 months, patients receiving TDF experienced a higher rate of transition from mild renal impairment (60-90 ml/min/1.73 m(2)) to moderate renal impairment (30-60 ml/min/1.73 m(2)) when compared with patients not receiving TDF. A significant though moderate decline in the renal function was observed in one-third of the patients receiving TDF compared to patients not receiving TDF. Moreover, this impairment was persistent after the first year of treatment.

  8. Prevalence and Outcomes of Hepatitis B Coinfection and Associated Liver Disease Among Antiretroviral Therapy-Naive Individuals in a Rural Tanzanian Human Immunodeficiency Virus Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Ramírez-Mena, Adrià; Glass, Tracy R.; Winter, Annja; Kimera, Namvua; Ntamatungiro, Alex; Hatz, Christoph; Tanner, Marcel; Battegay, Manuel; Furrer, Hansjakob; Wandeler, Gilles; Letang, Emilio

    2016-01-01

    Background. We evaluated the prevalence of chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection and liver fibrosis/cirrhosis in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals enrolled in a rural Tanzanian prospective cohort and assessed hepatic fibrosis progression 12–24 months after antiretroviral treatment (ART) initiation. Methods. All ART-naive HIV-infected adults ≥15-year-old enrolled in the Kilombero and Ulanga Antiretroviral Cohort who started ART between 2005 and 2015 were included. Pre-ART factors associated with significant liver fibrosis (aspartate aminotransferase-to-platelet ratio index [APRI] >1.5) and cirrhosis (APRI > 2.0) were identified using logistic regression. Results. Of 3097 individuals screened, 227 (7.3%; 95% CI, 6.4–8.2) were hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) positive. Before ART initiation, 9.1% individuals had significant liver fibrosis and 5.3% had cirrhosis. Human immunodeficiency virus/HBV-coinfected individuals were more likely to have an APRI score indicating significant fibrosis (14.2% vs 8.7%, P = .03) and cirrhosis (9.2% vs 4.9%, P = .03) than HBV-uninfected patients. CD4 cell count <200 cell/μL and alcohol consumption were independently associated with pre-ART APRI score, indicating significant fibrosis and cirrhosis in multivariable analyses. Among individuals with elevated APRI measurements pre- and 12–24 months post-ART initiation, 53 of 57 (93.0%) of HIV-monoinfected and 4 of 5 (80.0%) of HIV/HBV-coinfected had a regression to APRI < 1.5. Conclusions. Hepatic fibrosis and cirrhosis were common in our cohort, especially among HIV/HBV-coinfected individuals. The APRI improved in most patients. Pre-ART HBsAg screening and early onset of tenofovir-based ART for HIV/HBV-coinfection should be prioritized in sub-Saharan Africa. PMID:27704017

  9. Antiviral and antiretroviral use in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Money, Deborah M

    2003-12-01

    The history of antiviral and antiretroviral therapy is recent compared with many other medical therapies, including traditional antibiotics in pregnancy. There are few long-term data on which to base decisions of management in pregnancy. Accessing up-to-date information is critical to optimizing the safety of care for mothers and their infants. Exposure to medications in pregnancy can be toxic to a fetus in a gestational age-dependent manner. Determination of safe medications for pregnancy must take into consideration the need for certain medications and the possibility of inadvertent exposure in early pregnancy because of unplanned pregnancies. This article reviews the most commonly used antiviral and antiretroviral agents and places emphasis on the issues regarding use in pregnancy.

  10. The Promise of Antiretrovirals for HIV Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Flash, Charlene; Krakower, Douglas; Mayer, Kenneth H.

    2013-01-01

    With an estimated 2.6 million new HIV infections diagnosed annually, the world needs new prevention strategies to partner with condom use, harm reduction approaches for injection drug users, and male circumcision. Antiretrovirals can reduce the risk of mother-to-child HIV transmission and limit HIV acquisition after occupational exposure. Macaque models and clinical trials demonstrate efficacy of oral or topical antiretrovirals used prior to HIV exposure to prevent HIV transmission, ie pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP). Early initiation of effective HIV treatment in serodiscordant couples results in a 96% decrease in HIV transmission. HIV testing to determine serostatus and identify undiagnosed persons is foundational to these approaches. The relative efficacy of different approaches, adherence, cost and long-term safety will affect uptake and impact of these strategies. Ongoing research will help characterize the role for oral and topical formulations and help quantify potential benefits in sub-populations at risk for HIV acquisition. PMID:22351302

  11. Individualization of antiretroviral therapy - Pharmacogenomic aspect

    PubMed Central

    Dalal, Bhavik; Shankarkumar, Aruna; Ghosh, K.

    2015-01-01

    Combination therapy with three drug regimens for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection significantly suppresses the viral replication. However, this therapeutic impact is restricted by adverse drug events and response in terms of short and long term efficacy. There are multiple factors involved in different responses to antiretrovirals (ARVs) such as age, body weight, disease status, diet and heredity. Pharmacogenomics deals with individual genetic make-up and its role in drug efficacy and toxicity. In depth genetic research has provided evidence to predict the risk of developing certain toxicities for which personalized screening and surveillance protocols may be developed to prevent side effects. Here we describe the use of pharmacogenomics for optimal use of HAART (highly active antiretroviral therapy). PMID:26831415

  12. Altered Oligodendrocyte Maturation and Myelin Maintenance: The Role of Anti-Retrovirals in HIV-Associated Neurocognitive Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Brigid K.; Monnerie, Hubert; Mannell, Maggie V.; Gannon, Patrick J.; Espinoza, Cagla Akay; Erickson, Michelle A.; Bruce-Keller, Annadora J.; Gelman, Benjamin B.; Briand, Lisa A.; Pierce, R. Christopher; Jordan-Sciutto, Kelly L.; Grinspan, Judith B.

    2015-01-01

    Despite effective viral suppression through combined antiretroviral therapy (cART), approximately half of HIV-positive individuals suffer from HIV-Associated Neurocognitive Disorders (HAND). Studies of antiretroviral treated patients have revealed persistent white matter pathologies including diffuse myelin pallor, diminished white matter tracts, and decreased myelin protein mRNAs. Loss of myelin can contribute to neurocognitive dysfunction as the myelin membrane generated by oligodendrocytes is essential for rapid signal transduction and axonal maintenance. We hypothesized that myelin changes in HAND are partly due to effects of antiretroviral drugs on oligodendrocyte survival and/or maturation. We showed that primary mouse oligodendrocyte precursor cell cultures treated with therapeutic concentrations of HIV protease inhibitors Ritonavir or Lopinavir displayed dose-dependent decreases in oligodendrocyte maturation; however, this effect was rapidly reversed following drug removal. Conversely, nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor Zidovudine had no effect. Furthermore, in vivo Ritonavir administration to adult mice reduced frontal cortex myelin protein levels. Finally, prefrontal cortex tissue from HIV-positive individuals with HAND on cART showed a significant decrease in myelin basic protein compared with untreated HIV-positive individuals with HAND or HIV-negative controls. These findings demonstrate that antiretrovirals can impact myelin integrity, and have implications for myelination in juvenile HIV patients, and myelin maintenance in adults on lifelong therapy. PMID:26469251

  13. The Impact of Non-Antiretroviral Polypharmacy on the Continuity of Antiretroviral Therapy (ART) Among HIV Patients.

    PubMed

    Krentz, Hartmut B; Gill, M John

    2016-01-01

    Improved survival achieved by many patients with HIV/AIDS has complicated their medical care as increasing numbers of co-morbidities leads to polypharmacy, increased pill burdens, and greater risks of drug-drug interactions potentially compromising antiretroviral treatment (ART). We examined the impact of non-antiretroviral polypharmacy on ART for all adults followed at the Southern Alberta Clinic, Calgary, Canada. Polypharmacy was defined as ≥5 daily medications. We compared the impact of polypharmacy on continuous (i.e., remaining on same ART for ≥6 months) vs. non-continuous (i.e., discontinuing or switching ART) ART dosing frequency, number of ART pills, number of non-ART medications, and age. Of 1190 (89.5%) patients on ART, 95% were on three-drug regimens, 63.9% on QD ART, and 62% ≥3 ART pills daily; 32.2% were experiencing polypharmacy. Polypharmacy was associated with lower CD4, AIDS, >180 months living with HIV, higher numbers of ART pills, and older age (all p < 0.01); 32.1% stopped or switched ART. Polypharmacy increased the risk for non-continuous ART (36.8% vs. 30.0%; p < 0.01). Non-continuous ART increased with daily ART pill count but not increased age. Non-adherence and adverse effects accounted for the majority of non-continuous ART. We found a strong association between polypharmacy and non-continuous ART, potentially leading to effective ART being compromised. Collaborative approaches are needed to anticipate the negative impacts of polypharmacy.

  14. The discovery and development of antiretroviral agents.

    PubMed

    Lange, Joep M A; Ananworanich, Jintanat

    2014-01-01

    Since the discovery of HIV as the causative agent of AIDS in 1983/1984, remarkable progress has been made in finding antiretroviral drugs (ARVs) that are effective against it. A major breakthrough occurred in 1996 when it was found that triple drug therapy (HAART) could durably suppress viral replication to minimal levels. It was then widely felt, however, that HAART was too expensive and complex for low- and middle-income countries, and so, with the exception of a few of these countries, such as Brazil, a massive scale-up did not begin until the WHO launched its '3 by 5' initiative and sizeable funding mechanisms, such as the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, TB and Malaria and the US President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR), came into existence. A pivotal enabler of the scale-up was a steady lowering of drug prices through entry of generic antiretrovirals, competition between generic manufacturers and the making of volume commitments. The WHO Prequalification of Medicines Programme and the Expedited Review Provision of the US Food and Drug Administration have been important for the assurance of quality standards. Antiretroviral drug development by research-based pharmaceutical companies continues, with several important innovative products, such as long-acting agents, in the pipeline.

  15. The Indigenous Red Ribbon Storytelling Study: What does it mean for Indigenous peoples living with HIV and a substance use disorder to access antiretroviral therapy in Saskatchewan?

    PubMed

    Nowgesic, Earl; Meili, Ryan; Stack, Sandra; Myers, Ted

    2015-01-01

    Indigenous peoples living with HIV are less likely than non-Indigenous peoples living with HIV to access antiretroviral therapy; however, there is not enough contextual information surrounding this issue. The Indigenous Red Ribbon Storytelling Study was conducted in part to examine how Indigenous peoples living with HIV construct and understand their experiences accessing antiretroviral therapy. Our study design was critical Indigenous qualitative research, using the Behavioral Model of Health Services Use and community-based participatory research approaches. The study was conducted in partnership with Indigenous and non-Indigenous organizations. Study participants were adults from two Canadian cities. The study methods included 20 individual and two Indigenous sharing circle interviews, six participant observation sessions, a short survey and thematic analysis. Accessing antiretroviral therapy within the context of living with a substance use disorder was an overarching theme. Indigenous peoples living with HIV felt they had to choose between living with their active substance use disorder and accessing antiretroviral therapy. They felt misunderstood as a person living with a substance use disorder and often felt coerced into using antiretroviral therapy. Despite these challenges, they persevered as Indigenous peoples living with HIV and a substance use disorder. Further research on antiretroviral therapy access among Indigenous peoples living with HIV and a substance use disorder, particularly from the perspective of health service providers, is needed.

  16. Initiating Antiretroviral Therapy for HIV at a Patient’s First Clinic Visit: The RapIT Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Rosen, Sydney; Maskew, Mhairi; Fox, Matthew P.; Nyoni, Cynthia; Mongwenyana, Constance; Sanne, Ian; Sauls, Celeste; Long, Lawrence

    2016-01-01

    Background High rates of patient attrition from care between HIV testing and antiretroviral therapy (ART) initiation have been documented in sub-Saharan Africa, contributing to persistently low CD4 cell counts at treatment initiation. One reason for this is that starting ART in many countries is a lengthy and burdensome process, imposing long waits and multiple clinic visits on patients. We estimated the effect on uptake of ART and viral suppression of an accelerated initiation algorithm that allowed treatment-eligible patients to be dispensed their first supply of antiretroviral medications on the day of their first HIV-related clinic visit. Methods and Findings RapIT (Rapid Initiation of Treatment) was an unblinded randomized controlled trial of single-visit ART initiation in two public sector clinics in South Africa, a primary health clinic (PHC) and a hospital-based HIV clinic. Adult (≥18 y old), non-pregnant patients receiving a positive HIV test or first treatment-eligible CD4 count were randomized to standard or rapid initiation. Patients in the rapid-initiation arm of the study (“rapid arm”) received a point-of-care (POC) CD4 count if needed; those who were ART-eligible received a POC tuberculosis (TB) test if symptomatic, POC blood tests, physical exam, education, counseling, and antiretroviral (ARV) dispensing. Patients in the standard-initiation arm of the study (“standard arm”) followed standard clinic procedures (three to five additional clinic visits over 2–4 wk prior to ARV dispensing). Follow up was by record review only. The primary outcome was viral suppression, defined as initiated, retained in care, and suppressed (≤400 copies/ml) within 10 mo of study enrollment. Secondary outcomes included initiation of ART ≤90 d of study enrollment, retention in care, time to ART initiation, patient-level predictors of primary outcomes, prevalence of TB symptoms, and the feasibility and acceptability of the intervention. A survival analysis

  17. Difficulties encountered with the use of antiretroviral drugs in India.

    PubMed

    Saple, Dattatray G; Vaidya, Satish B; Vadrevu, Ravi; Pandey, Ved P; Ramnani, Jeetender P

    2002-08-01

    The improved availability and drastically reduced cost of antiretroviral therapy, largely due to generic manufacturing, has enabled an increased number of HIV-positive Indians to undergo antiretroviral therapy. But unless these drugs are used judiciously, treatment failures will cause the emergence of drug-resistant HIV strains. This is a grave danger not only to India but to the entire world. So far, antiretrovirals have had only a limited impact in India. HIV-infected patients require multidimensional care and the success of antiretroviral therapy depends on numerous economic, social, cultural, political, technical and infrastructural factors.

  18. “Risk factors associated with virologic failure in HIV-infected patients receiving antiretroviral therapy at a public hospital in Peru”

    PubMed Central

    Jorge, Alave R; Jorge, Paz B; Elsa, Gonzalez L; Miguel, Campos S; Rodriguez, Martin; Willig, James; Juan, Echevarría Z

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To describe clinical and biological characteristics of subjects with virologic failure who participated in the sexually transmitted diseases HIV/AIDS National Program from a Peruvian public hospital. MATERIALS AND METHODS An exploratory descriptive study was performed with data from subjects older than 18 who started high activity antiretroviral therapy (HAART) between May 2004 and December 2009 and who had a viral load control after 24 weeks of HAART. Virologic failure was defined as a viral load value above 1000 copies/mL on follow up after 24 weeks on HAART. RESULTS Of 1 478 records of patients on HAART analized, the median age was 35 years [IQR, 29-41] and 69.6% were male. Also, virologic failure occurred in 24% and 3.7% died. Of subjects with virologic failure, 9.5% died. On multivariate analysis, age, history of antiretroviral use before starting HAART, change of antiretroviral therapy due to toxicity, opportunistic infections during HAART, level of CD4 + lymphocytes below 100 cells/ml at start of HAART, adherence and clinical stage were independently associated with virologic failure. In the group of patient with no history of antiretroviral use before starting HAART, age, opportunistic infections during HAART were associated with virologic failure. CONCLUSION This study identified factors associated with virologic failure. Further studies are needed to evaluate whether the use of these factors can help to identify prospectively patients at high risk of failure, and to design interventions aimed to reduce this risk. PMID:23450408

  19. Acceptability of Early Antiretroviral Therapy Among South African Women.

    PubMed

    Garrett, Nigel; Norman, Emily; Leask, Kerry; Naicker, Nivashnee; Asari, Villeshni; Majola, Nelisile; Karim, Quarraisha Abdool; Karim, Salim S Abdool

    2017-02-21

    WHO guidelines recommend immediate initiation of antiretroviral therapy (ART) for all individuals at HIV diagnosis regardless of CD4 count, but concerns remain about potential low uptake or poor adherence among healthy patients with high CD4 counts, especially in resource-limited settings. This study assessed the acceptability of earlier treatment among HIV-positive South African women, median age at enrollment 25 (IQR 22-30), in a 10 year prospective cohort study by (i) describing temporal CD4 count trends at initiation in relation to WHO guidance, (ii) virological suppression rates post-ART initiation at different CD4 count thresholds, and (iii) administration of a standardized questionnaire. 158/232 (68.1%) participants initiated ART between 2006 and 2015. Mean CD4 count at initiation was 217 cells/µl (range 135-372) before 2010, and increased to 531 cells/µl (range 272-1095) by 2015 (p < 0.001). Median viral load at ART initiation decreased over this period from 5.2 (IQR 4.6-5.6) to 4.1 (IQR 3.4-4.6) log copies/ml (p = 0.004). Virological suppression rates at 3, 6, 12 and 18 months were consistently above 85% with no statistically significant differences for participants starting ART at different CD4 count thresholds. A questionnaire assessing uptake of early ART amongst ART-naïve women, median age 28 (IQR 24-33), revealed that 40/51 (78.4%) were willing to start ART at CD4 ≥500. Of those unwilling, 6/11 (54.5%) started ART within 6 months of questionnaire administration. Temporal increases in CD4 counts, comparable virological suppression rates, and positive patient perceptions confirm high acceptability of earlier ART initiation for the majority of patients.

  20. Timing of antiretroviral therapy and TB treatment outcomes in patients with TB-HIV in Myanmar

    PubMed Central

    Shewade, H. D.; Kyaw, N. T. T.; Oo, M. M.; Aung, T. K.; Aung, S. T.; Oo, H. N.; Win, T.; Harries, A. D.

    2016-01-01

    Setting: Integrated HIV Care programme, Mandalay, Myanmar. Objectives: To determine time to starting antiretroviral treatment (ART) in relation to anti-tuberculosis treatment (ATT) and its association with TB treatment outcomes in patients co-infected with tuberculosis (TB) and the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) enrolled from 2011 to 2014. Design: Retrospective cohort study. Results: Of 1708 TB-HIV patients, 1565 (92%) started ATT first and 143 (8%) started ART first. Treatment outcomes were missing for 226 patients and were thus not included. In those starting ATT first, the median time to starting ART was 8.6 weeks. ART was initiated after 8 weeks in 830 (53%) patients. Unsuccessful outcome was found in 7%, with anaemia being an independent predictor. In patients starting ART first, the median time to starting ATT was 21.6 weeks. ATT was initiated within 3 months in 56 (39%) patients. Unsuccessful outcome was found in 12%, and in 20% of those starting ATT within 3 months. Patients with CD4 count <100/mm3 had a four times higher risk of an unsuccessful outcome. Conclusions: Timing of ART in relation to ATT was not an independent risk factor for unsuccessful outcome. Extensive screening for TB with rapid and sensitive diagnostic tests in HIV-infected persons and close monitoring of anaemia and immunosuppression are recommended to further improve TB treatment outcomes among patients with TB-HIV. PMID:27358804

  1. Adherence to HIV/AIDS antiretroviral therapy among drug users: A qualitative study in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Hosseini, Zahra; Eftkhar, Hasan; Nedjat, Saharnaz; Ebadi, Abbas; Abbasian, Ladan; Zamani, Fereshte; Aghamollaei, Teamur; Shojaeizade, Davood

    2016-01-01

    Background: The introduction of antiretroviral therapy has caused a remarkable decrease in the occurrence of diseases and mortality among HIV-positive patients, while this success has not been achieved among injection addicts due to a low adherence to antiretroviral medicine. This study aims at clarifying the important factors affecting adherence to treatment in addicts suffering from HIV. Materials and Methods: In this qualitative research, data were gathered through in-depth interviews and field notes, and were interpreted through content analysis in the form of constant comparison. The participants were 16 drug addicts living with HIV/AIDS. Most of them had records of imprisonment and were receiving Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy (HAART) drug treatments in the AIDS center of Imam Khomeini Hospital complex, affiliated to Tehran University of Medical Sciences. Sampling was started in a purposive method and was continued until data were saturated. Results: Four main categories including psychological reactions, contradictory beliefs, perceived support, and individual and environmental barriers were extracted from the data, each having some sub-categories. Conclusions: The obtained results indicated that adherence to the treatment of HIV is not constant and mono-dimensional, but is a function of different factors. Hence, an individual having feeble adherence in a specific time and under specific circumstances may show desirable adherence under a different circumstance. Thus, treatment of addicts living with HIV/AIDS requires physical, psychological, and social attention along with drug treatments. PMID:26985220

  2. Health outcomes among HIV-positive Latinos initiating antiretroviral therapy in North America versus Central and South America

    PubMed Central

    Cesar, Carina; Koethe, John R; Giganti, Mark J; Rebeiro, Peter; Althoff, Keri N; Napravnik, Sonia; Mayor, Angel; Grinsztejn, Beatriz; Wolff, Marcelo; Padgett, Denis; Sierra-Madero, Juan; Gotuzzo, Eduardo; Sterling, Timothy R; Willig, James; Levison, Julie; Kitahata, Mari; Rodriguez-Barradas, Maria C; Moore, Richard D; McGowan, Catherine; Shepherd, Bryan E; Cahn, Pedro

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Latinos living with HIV in the Americas share a common ethnic and cultural heritage. In North America, Latinos have a relatively high rate of new HIV infections but lower rates of engagement at all stages of the care continuum, whereas in Latin America antiretroviral therapy (ART) services continue to expand to meet treatment needs. In this analysis, we compare HIV treatment outcomes between Latinos receiving ART in North America versus Latin America. Methods HIV-positive adults initiating ART at Caribbean, Central and South America Network for HIV (CCASAnet) sites were compared to Latino patients (based on country of origin or ethnic identity) starting treatment at North American AIDS Cohort Collaboration on Research and Design (NA-ACCORD) sites in the United States and Canada between 2000 and 2011. Cox proportional hazards models compared mortality, treatment interruption, antiretroviral regimen change, virologic failure and loss to follow-up between cohorts. Results The study included 8400 CCASAnet and 2786 NA-ACCORD patients initiating ART. CCASAnet patients were younger (median 35 vs. 37 years), more likely to be female (27% vs. 20%) and had lower nadir CD4 count (median 148 vs. 195 cells/µL, p<0.001 for all). In multivariable analyses, CCASAnet patients had a higher risk of mortality after ART initiation (adjusted hazard ratio (AHR) 1.61; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.32 to 1.96), particularly during the first year, but a lower hazard of treatment interruption (AHR: 0.46; 95% CI: 0.42 to 0.50), change to second-line ART (AHR: 0.56; 95% CI: 0.51 to 0.62) and virologic failure (AHR: 0.52; 95% CI: 0.48 to 0.57). Conclusions HIV-positive Latinos initiating ART in Latin America have greater continuity of treatment but are at higher risk of death than Latinos in North America. Factors underlying these differences, such as HIV testing, linkage and access to care, warrant further investigation. PMID:26996992

  3. Enceladus: Starting Hydrothermal Activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matson, D. L.; Castillo-Rogez, J. C.; Johnson, T. V.; Lunine, J. I.; Davies, A. G.

    2011-01-01

    We describe a process for starting the hydrothermal activity in Enceladus' South Polar Region. The process takes advantage of fissures that reach the water table, about 1 kilometer below the surface. Filling these fissures with fresh ocean water initiates a flow of water up from an ocean that can be self-sustaining. In this hypothesis the heat to sustain the thermal anomalies and the plumes comes from a slightly warm ocean at depth. The heat is brought to the surface by water that circulates up, through the crust and then returns to the ocean.

  4. Properties of "started" earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babeshko, V. A.; Evdokimova, O. V.; Babeshko, O. M.

    2016-04-01

    The properties of earthquakes called "started" in [1] are studied. The problems associated with the method of revealing them, the expected behavior of the event, and the determination of its place, time, and intensity are discussed. Certain characteristic properties of real earthquakes are compared with the modeled ones. It is emphasized that there are no data on earthquakes of a similar type in scientific publications. The method of using high-efficiency calculations is proposed by imbedding the investigations in topological spaces having a wider spectrum of properties than the functional ones.

  5. Role of assessment components and recent adverse outcomes in risk estimation and prediction: Use of the Short Term Assessment of Risk and Treatability (START) in an adult secure inpatient mental health service.

    PubMed

    O'Shea, Laura E; Dickens, Geoffrey L

    2016-06-30

    The Short Term Assessment of Risk and Treatability is a structured judgement tool used to inform risk estimation for multiple adverse outcomes. In research, risk estimates outperform the tool's strength and vulnerability scales for violence prediction. Little is known about what its'component parts contribute to the assignment of risk estimates and how those estimates fare in prediction of non-violent adverse outcomes compared with the structured components. START assessment and outcomes data from a secure mental health service (N=84) was collected. Binomial and multinomial regression analyses determined the contribution of selected elements of the START structured domain and recent adverse risk events to risk estimates and outcomes prediction for violence, self-harm/suicidality, victimisation, and self-neglect. START vulnerabilities and lifetime history of violence, predicted the violence risk estimate; self-harm and victimisation estimates were predicted only by corresponding recent adverse events. Recent adverse events uniquely predicted all corresponding outcomes, with the exception of self-neglect which was predicted by the strength scale. Only for victimisation did the risk estimate outperform prediction based on the START components and recent adverse events. In the absence of recent corresponding risk behaviour, restrictions imposed on the basis of START-informed risk estimates could be unwarranted and may be unethical.

  6. Modeling antiretroviral drug responses for HIV-1 infected patients using differential equation models.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yanni; Miao, Hongyu; Tang, Sanyi; Wu, Hulin

    2013-06-30

    We review mathematical modeling and related statistical issues of HIV dynamics primarily in response to antiretroviral drug therapy in this article. We start from a basic model of virus infection and then review a number of more advanced models with consideration of pharmacokinetic factors, adherence and drug resistance. Specifically, we illustrate how mathematical models can be developed and parameterized to understand the effects of long-term treatment and different treatment strategies on disease progression. In addition, we discuss a variety of parameter estimation methods for differential equation models that are applicable to either within- or between-host viral dynamics.

  7. Modeling Antiretroviral Drug Responses for HIV-1 infected Patients Using Differential Equation Models

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Yanni; Miao, Hongyu; Tang, Sanyi; Wu, Hulin

    2014-01-01

    Summary We review mathematical modeling and related statistical issues of HIV dynamics primarily in response to antiretroviral drug therapy in this article. We start from a basic model of virus infection and then review a number of more advanced models with considering, e.g., pharmacokinetic factors, adherence and drug resistance. Specifically, we illustrate how mathematical models can be developed and parameterized to understand effects of long-term treatment and different treatment strategies on disease progression. In addition, we discuss a variety of parameter estimation methods for differential equation models that are applicable to either within- or between-host viral dynamics. PMID:23603208

  8. Antiretroviral treatment, management challenges and outcomes in perinatally HIV-infected adolescents.

    PubMed

    Agwu, Allison L; Fairlie, Lee

    2013-06-18

    Three decades into the HIV/AIDS epidemic there is a growing cohort of perinatally HIV-infected adolescents globally. Their survival into adolescence and beyond represent one of the major successes in the battle against the disease that has claimed the lives of millions of children. This population is diverse and there are unique issues related to antiretroviral treatment and management. Drawing from the literature and experience, this paper discusses several broad areas related to antiretroviral management, including: 1) diverse presentation of HIV, (2) use of combination antiretroviral therapy including in the setting of co-morbidities and rapid growth and development, (3) challenges of cART, including nonadherence, resistance, and management of the highly treatment-experienced adolescent patient, (4) additional unique concerns and management issues related to PHIV-infected adolescents, including the consequences of longterm inflammation, risk of transmission, and transitions to adult care. In each section, the experience in both resource-rich and limited settings are discussed with the aim of highlighting the differences and importantly the similarities, to share lessons learnt and provide insight into the multi-faceted approaches that may be needed to address the challenges faced by this unique and resilient population.

  9. Missouri: Early Head Start Initiative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Law and Social Policy, Inc. (CLASP), 2012

    2012-01-01

    Missouri's Early Head Start/Child Care Partnership Project expands access to Early Head Start (EHS) services for children birth to age 3 by developing partnerships between federal Head Start, EHS contractors, and child care providers. Head Start and EHS contractors that participate in the initiative provide services through community child care…

  10. Minnesota: Early Head Start Initiatiive

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Law and Social Policy, Inc. (CLASP), 2012

    2012-01-01

    Minnesota provides supplemental state funding to existing federal Head Start and Early Head Start (EHS) grantees to increase their capacity to serve additional infants, toddlers, and pregnant women. The initiative was started in 1997 when the state legislature earmarked $1 million of the general state Head Start supplemental funds for children…

  11. Establishing a workplace antiretroviral therapy programme in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Charalambous, S; Grant, A D; Day, J H; Pemba, L; Chaisson, R E; Kruger, P; Martin, D; Wood, R; Brink, B; Churchyard, G J

    2007-01-01

    Ways to expand access to antiretroviral treatment (ART) in low income settings are being sought. We describe an HIV care programme including ART in an industrial setting in South Africa. The programme uses guidelines derived from local and international best practice. The training component aims to build capacity among health care staff. Nurses and doctors are supported by experienced HIV clinicians through telephone consultation and site visits. Patients undergo a three-stage counselling procedure prior to starting ART. Drug regimens and monitoring are standardised and prophylaxis against opportunistic infections (isoniazid and cotrimoxazole) is offered routinely. Laboratory and pharmacy services, using named-patient dispensing, are centralized. The programme is designed to ensure that data on clinical and economic outcomes will be available for programme evaluation. Between November 2002-December 2004, ART delivery has been established at 70 ART workplace ART sites. The sites range from 200 to 12000 employees, and from small occupational health clinics and general practitioner rooms to larger hospital clinics. During this period, 2456 patients began ART. Of those on treatment for at least three months, 1728 (78%) have been retained on the programme and only 38 (1.7%) patients have failed the first-line ART regimen. This model for delivery of ART is feasible and successful in an industrial setting. The model may be generalizable to other employment health services in settings of high HIV prevalence, and as a model for implementing ART in other types of health-care settings.

  12. Colorado Even Start Progress Report, 2001-2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Beckie

    Even Start programs integrate early childhood education, adult literacy or basic education, parenting education and support, and parent and child time together to help break the cycle of poverty and illiteracy. This progress report describes the Even Start program in Colorado and presents evaluation findings from the 2001-2002 implementation year,…

  13. Colorado Even Start Progress Report, 1999-2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Beckie

    Even Start programs integrate early childhood education, adult literacy or basic education, parenting education and support, and parent and child time to help break the cycle of poverty and illiteracy. This report describes the Even Start program in Colorado, and includes evaluation questions and methods. The report presents evaluation findings…

  14. Starting physiology: bioelectrogenesis.

    PubMed

    Baptista, Vander

    2015-12-01

    From a Cartesian perspective of rational analysis, the electric potential difference across the cell membrane is one of the fundamental concepts for the study of physiology. Unfortunately, undergraduate students often struggle to understand the genesis of this energy gradient, which makes the teaching activity a hard task for the instructor. The topic of bioelectrogenesis encompasses multidisciplinary concepts, involves several mechanisms, and is a dynamic process, i.e., it never turns off during the lifetime of the cell. Therefore, to improve the transmission and acquisition of knowledge in this field, I present an alternative didactic model. The design of the model assumes that it is possible to build, in a series of sequential steps, an assembly of proteins within the membrane of an isolated cell in a simulated electrophysiology experiment. Initially, no proteins are inserted in the membrane and the cell is at a baseline energy state; the extracellular and intracellular fluids are at thermodynamic equilibrium. Students are guided through a sequence of four steps that add key membrane transport proteins to the model cell. The model is simple at the start and becomes progressively more complex, finally producing transmembrane chemical and electrical gradients. I believe that this didactic approach helps instructors with a more efficient tool for the teaching of the mechanisms of resting membrane potential while helping students avoid common difficulties that may be encountered when learning this topic.

  15. Preventing and managing antiretroviral drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Kuritzkes, Daniel R

    2004-05-01

    Development of resistance to antiretroviral drugs (ARVs) is a major impediment to optimum treatment of HIV-1 infection. Although resistance testing can help to select subsequent regimens when virologic failure occurs, cross-resistance, which affects all classes of ARVs, may make it more difficult to achieve optimum control of HIV. We have known for some time that our first choice of antiretroviral therapy offers the best chance to control HIV replication and that initial therapy should be selected with an eye on future options. Potency is the first line of defense against the development of resistance. Other factors that affect resistance development include: tolerability, potential for optimum adherence, and genetic and pharmacologic barriers to development of resistance. If resistance emerges, only a single drug may be affected initially, and a rapid change in ARVs may preserve the efficacy of other components. One cautionary note is that we can no longer assume that a patient's HIV is fully susceptible to all ARVs even in the initial regimen. Transmission of drug-resistant HIV means that the genetic composition may be that of an "experienced" virus with reduced susceptibility to ARVs. Resistance testing at the time of transmission is most likely to reveal this resistance, but over time the dominant genetic pattern may revert to wild-type, and be missed by resistance testing. Because "archived" resistant HIV may emerge quickly once treatment is initiated, we need to keep this in mind when selecting initial therapy.

  16. Guidelines for antiretroviral therapy for HIV infection

    PubMed Central

    Rachlis, A R; Zarowny, D P

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To develop guidelines for health care providers and their HIV-positive patients on the clinical use of antiretroviral agents for HIV infection. OPTIONS: Recommendations published in 1996 by an international panel. OUTCOMES: Improvement in clinical outcomes or in surrogate markers of disease activity. EVIDENCE AND VALUES: The Canadian HIV Trials Network held a workshop on Oct. 19-20, 1996, to develop Canadian guidelines that incorporate information from recent basic and clinical research. RECOMMENDATIONS: Recommendations for the use of antiretroviral drugs in HIV infection are provided for initial therapy, continuing therapy, primary infection, vertical transmission, pediatric therapy and postexposure prophylaxis. VALIDATION: The guidelines are based on consensus of the participants attending the workshop: Canadian investigators, clinicians and invited representatives from the community, government and the pharmaceutical industry. They are subject to review and updating as new information on clinical benefits is published. SPONSORS: The workshop was organized by the National Centre of the Canadian HIV Trials Network. Unrestricted educational grants were provided by 8 pharmaceutical companies. Additional support was provided from the National AIDS Strategy of Health Canada. PMID:9627563

  17. Antiretroviral drugs: Critical issues and recent advances

    PubMed Central

    Desai, Mira; Iyer, Geetha; Dikshit, R. K.

    2012-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is now recognized as a chronic illness. Although the success of highly active antiretroviral therapy is beyond question, several issues still persist. Since the drugs cannot eradicate the virus, cure is not yet possible, and patients have to maintain a lifelong adherence with the risk of toxic effects, drug-drug interactions and drug resistance. A clear understanding of the viral replication and its interaction with host cell factors has led to the development of a large number of effective antiretroviral drugs (ARVs). New drugs in the existing class such as apricitabine, elvucitabine and etravirine have shown promising results against HIV isolates resistant to first line drugs. These drugs have offered a new choice for patients with drug resistant disease. However, the impact of their long term use on safety is yet to be assessed. Novel drugs with unique mechanism of action such as CD4 receptor attachment inhibitors, maturation inhibitors, pharmacokinetic enhancers, capsid assembly inhibitors and lens epithelium derived growth factor inhibitors are still under development. Currently, ARVs, especially tenofovir and emtricitabine, are also being evaluated for prevention of sexual transmission of HIV-1. The initial results of an HIV prevention trial network are encouraging and have recommended the use of ARVs for pre-exposure prophylaxis. Thus, ARVs form the key component of HIV prevention and treatment strategy. This article discusses the challenges associated with HIV-1 treatment and updates several major advances in the development of ARVs. PMID:22701234

  18. Comparative efficacy versus effectiveness of initial antiretroviral therapy in clinical trials versus routine care

    PubMed Central

    Routman, Justin S.; Willig, James H.; Westfall, Andrew O.; Abroms, Sarah R.; Varshney, Mohit; Adusumilli, Sunil; Allison, Jeroan J.; Savage, Karen G.; Saag, Michael S.; Mugavero, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    Summary The generalizability of clinical trial findings (efficacy) to routine care (effectiveness) may be limited. The present study found similar first year virologic and CD4 outcomes among antiretroviral-naïve patients treated through routine care vs. those participating in clinical trials. Background The generalizability of clinical trial findings (efficacy) to routine care (effectiveness) may be limited due to study eligibility criteria and volunteer bias. While well chronicled in many conditions, the efficacy vs. effectiveness of antiretroviral therapy (ART) remains understudied. Methods A retrospective study of the UAB 1917 Clinic Cohort evaluated naïve patients starting ART between 1/1/00–12/31/06. Patients received ART through clinical trials or routine care. Multivariable logistic and linear regression models were fit to evaluate factors associated with virologic failure (VF=VL>50 copies/mL) and change from baseline CD4 count 6 and 12 months after ART initiation. Sensitivity analyses evaluated the impact of missing data on outcomes. Results Among 570 patients starting ART during the study period, 121 (21%) enrolled in clinical trials vs. 449 (79%) receiving ART via routine care. ART receipt through routine care was not associated with VF at either 6 (OR=1.00;95%CI=0.54–1.86) or 12 (OR=1.56;95%CI=0.80–3.05) months in primary analyses. No significant differences in CD4 count responses at 6 and 12 months were observed. Conclusions Though marked differences in efficacy vs. effectiveness have been observed in the therapeutic outcomes of other conditions, our analyses found no evidence of such divergence among our patients initiating antiretroviral therapy for HIV. PMID:20067423

  19. From Head Start to Sure Start: Reflections on Policy Transfer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Welshman, John

    2010-01-01

    This article uses the history of debates over the US Head Start programme (1965), Early Head Start (1994) and the UK Sure Start initiative (1998), as a window on to policy transfer. In all the three, the aim was that early intervention could offer a means of boosting children's educational attainment and of countering the wider effects of poverty…

  20. Biomarkers From Late Pregnancy to 6 Weeks Postpartum in HIV-Infected Women Who Continue Versus Discontinue Antiretroviral Therapy After Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, Risa M.; Leister, Erin; Kacanek, Deborah; Shapiro, David E.; Read, Jennifer S.; Bryson, Yvonne; Currier, Judith S.

    2013-01-01

    Background Women who use antiretroviral therapy (ART) solely for the prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV discontinue postpartum. We hypothesized that women discontinuing ART by 6 weeks postpartum (“discontinuers”) would have elevated postpartum inflammatory biomarker levels relative to women remaining on ART postpartum (“continuers”). Methods Data from HIV-infected pregnant women enrolled in the International Maternal Pediatric Adolescent AIDS Clinical Trials Group P1025 with CD4 counts >350 cells per cubic millimeter before initiating ART or first pregnancy CD4 counts >400 cells per cubic millimeter after starting ART and with available stored plasma samples at >20 weeks of gestation, delivery, and 6 weeks postpartum were analyzed. Plasma samples were tested for highly sensitive C-reactive protein, D-dimer, and interleukin-6. We used longitudinal linear spline regression to model biomarkers over time. Results Data from 128 women (65 continuers and 63 discontinuers) were analyzed. All biomarkers increased from late pregnancy to delivery, then decreased postpartum (slopes different from 0, P < 0.001). Continuers had a steeper decrease in log D-dimer between delivery and 6 weeks postpartum than discontinuers (P = 0.002). Conclusions In contrast to results from treatment interruption studies in adults, both ART continuers and ART discontinuers had significant decreases in the levels of D-dimer, highly sensitive C-reactive protein, or interleukin-6 postpartum. Continuation was associated with a more rapid decline in D-dimer levels compared with discontinuation. PMID:23714738

  1. Self-Reported Side Effects and Adherence to Antiretroviral Therapy in HIV-Infected Pregnant Women under Option B+: A Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Cois, Annibale; Remien, Robert H.; Mellins, Claude A.; McIntyre, James A.; Petro, Greg; Abrams, Elaine J.; Myer, Landon

    2016-01-01

    Background Antiretroviral therapy (ART) regimens containing efavirenz (EFV) are recommended as part of universal ART for pregnant and breastfeeding women. EFV may have appreciable side effects (SE), and ART adherence in pregnancy is a major concern, but little is known about ART SE and associations with adherence in pregnancy. Methods We investigated the distribution of patient-reported SE (based on Division of AIDS categories) and the association of SE with missed ART doses in a cohort of 517 women starting EFV+3TC/FTC+TDF during pregnancy. In analysis, SE were considered in terms of their overall frequency, by systems category, and by latent classes. Results Overall 97% of women reported experiencing at least one SE after ART initiation, with 48% experiencing more than five SE. Gastrointestinal, central nervous system, systemic and skin SE were reported by 81%, 85%, 79% and 31% of women, respectively, with considerable overlap across groups. At least one missed dose was reported by 32% of women. In multivariable models, ART non-adherence was associated with systemic SE compared to other systems categories, and measures of the overall burden of SE experienced were most strongly associated with missed ART doses. Conclusion These data demonstrate very high levels of SE in pregnant women initiating EFV-based ART and a strong association between SE burden and ART adherence. ART regimens with reduced SE profiles may enhance adherence, and as countries expand universal ART for all adult patients, counseling must include preparation for ART SE. PMID:27760126

  2. A Pilot Study of Raltegravir Plus Combination Antiretroviral Therapy in Early Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection: Challenges and Lessons Learned

    PubMed Central

    Collier, Ann C.; Chun, Tae-Wook; Maenza, Janine; Coombs, Robert W.; Tapia, Kenneth; Chang, Ming; Stevens, Claire E.; Justement, J. Shawn; Murray, Danielle; Stekler, Joanne D.; Mullins, James I; Holte, Sarah E.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Availability of integrase strand transfer inhibitors created interest in determining whether their use would decrease persistently infected cell numbers. This study hypothesized that adding raltegravir (RAL) to standard antiretroviral therapy (ART) would decrease human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected CD4+ T cells more than standard combination ART. This was a pilot, randomized study comparing open-label standard triple ART to standard triple ART plus RAL over 96 weeks in ART-naive adults with early HIV infection. The primary objective was to compare quantity and trajectory of HIV DNA. Eighty-two persons were referred. A diverse set of reasons precluded the enrollment of all but 10. Those who enrolled and completed the study had an estimated median duration of HIV infection of 74 days at ART start. The groups had similar baseline characteristics. The RAL group had more rapid first phase plasma HIV RNA decay (0.67 log10 copies/mL/day) than with combination ART (0.34 log10copies/mL/day), p = 0.037. Second phase HIV RNA decay, residual viremia, cell-associated RNA, HIV DNA, CD4+ T-cells with replication-competent virus, and 2LTR circle levels did not differ between groups. Among those with entry plasma HIV RNA levels above the median, 2LTR circles were significantly lower over time than in those with lower entry HIV RNA levels (p = 0.02). Our results suggest homogeneity of responses in cell-associated RNA, HIV DNA, CD4+ T-cells with replication-competent virus, and 2LTR circles with early HIV in both ART groups. The kinetics of 2LTR DNA did not reflect the kinetics of plasma HIV RNA decline following ART initiation. PMID:26862469

  3. A Study of Compliance to Antiretroviral Therapy among HIV Infected Patients at a Tertiary Care Hospital in North Karnataka

    PubMed Central

    Hasabi, Ishwar Siddappa; Kachapur, Chandrashekar; Kaulgud, Ram Suresh

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Compliance to Antiretroviral Therapy (ART) is a primary determinant of treatment success of HIV-AIDS. Many studies have shown inadequate compliance to ART in the Indian population. Aim To assess the compliance to ART among HIV infected patients, to explore the factors affecting compliance and impact of compliance on CD4 count. Materials and Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted with 200 adult patients attending ART center, KIMS, Hubli. The patients were randomly selected and compliance to ART over preceding 3 months was assessed. Reasons for non- compliance were assessed among those with inadequate compliance. Results Mean age of the study population was 40.07±9.99 years. The sex ratio was 1.02:1 (M:F). Majority of patients were in WHO stage 1 with treatment, with CD4 count above 500/μl. Pulmonary tuberculosis was the most common opportunistic infection. Most of the patients were on long term ART, more than 5 years {81 (40.5%)}. Most of the patients were on ZLN regimen {97 (48.5%)}. Compliance over the preceding 3 months was 94.84± 14.93% for ART and 88.97±23.75% for opportunistic infection prophylaxis. There was no significant difference in compliance in relation to age group, sex, educational status, residence, religion, habits, HIV status of spouse or child, the regimen of ART and frequency of dosing. The compliance was better among those on long term treatment, i.e., those on treatment for more than 5 years compared to those who started ART in last 1 year (p=0.06). The most common reasons given by patients for non-compliance were going away from home, busy with other work and simply forgot. Better compliance was associated with higher CD4 count. Conclusion Compliance to ART was inadequate in the studied population, which is a major obstacle to success of ART. PMID:27437267

  4. Metabolic syndrome before and after initiation of antiretroviral therapy in treatment-naïve HIV-infected individuals

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, S; Schouten, JT; Atkinson, B; Brown, T; Wohl, D; McComsey, GA; Glesby, MJ; Shikuma, C; Haubrich, R; Tebas, P; Campbell, TB; Jacobson, DL

    2012-01-01

    Background Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a cluster of risk factors for cardiovascular disease and diabetes, many of which are associated with HIV and antiretroviral therapy (ART). We examined prevalence and incidence of MetS, and risk factors for MetS in ART-naïve HIV-infected individuals starting ART. Methods MetS, defined by the Adult Treatment Panel III criteria, was assessed at and after ART initiation in HIV-infected individuals who enrolled in selected AIDS Clinical Trials Group (ACTG) trials and were followed long-term after these trials as part of the ACTG Longitudinal Linked Randomized Trials cohort. Cox proportional hazards models were used to examine risk factors of incident MetS. Adjusted hazard ratios (aHR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) are reported. Results At ART initiation, the prevalence of MetS was 20%. After ART initiation, the incidence of MetS was 8.5 per 100 person-years. After adjusting for demographics and body mass index, the risk of MetS was decreased for CD4+ T-cell counts>50 cells/mm3 (aHR = 0.62, 95% CI=0.43 to 0.90 for CD4>500), and the risk was increased for HIV-1 RNA >400 copies/mL (aHR=1.55 (95% CI=1.25 to 1.92) and use of a protease-inhibitor (PI) based regimen (relative to no PI use, aHR=1.25 (95% CI=1.04 to 1.51) for any PI use). Conclusion In HIV-infected individuals on ART, virologic suppression and maintenance of high CD4+ T-cell counts may be potentially modifiable factors that can reduce the risk of MetS. The effect of MetS on the risk of cardiovascular disease and diabetes needs to be evaluated. PMID:22828718

  5. Incidence of virological failure and major regimen change of initial combination antiretroviral therapy in the Latin America and the Caribbean: an observational cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Cesar, Carina; Jenkins, Cathy A.; Shepherd, Bryan E.; Padgett, Denis; Mejía, Fernando; Ribeiro, Sayonara Rocha; Cortes, Claudia P.; Pape, Jean W.; Madero, Juan Sierra; Fink, Valeria; Sued, Omar; McGowan, Catherine; Cahn, Pedro

    2015-01-01

    Background Access to combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) is expanding in Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC). There is little information in this region regarding incidence of and factors associated with regimen failure and regimen change. Methods Antiretroviral-naïve adults starting cART from 2000-2014 at sites in seven countries throughout LAC were included. Cumulative incidence of virologic failure and major regimen change were estimated with death considered a competing event. Findings 14,027 cART initiators (60% male, median age 37 years, median CD4 156 cells/mm3, median HIV-RNA 5·0 log10 copies/mL, and 28% with clinical AIDS) were followed for a median of 3·9 years. 1,719 patients presented virologic failure and 1,955 had a major regimen change. Excluding GHESKIO-Haiti (which did not regularly measure HIV-RNA), cumulative incidence of virologic failure was 7·8%, 19·2%, and 25·8% at one, three, and five years after cART initiation, respectively; cumulative incidence of major regimen change was 5·9%, 12·7%, and 18·2%. Incidence of major regimen change at GHESKIO-Haiti at five years was 10·7%. Virologic failure was associated with younger age (adjusted hazard ratio[aHR]=2·03 for 20 vs. 40 years; 95% confidence interval[CI] 1·68-2·44), infection through injection-drug use (IDU) (aHR=1·60; 95%CI 1·02-2·52), initiation in earlier calendar years (aHR=1·28 for 2002 vs. 2006; 95%CI 1·13-1·46), and starting with a boosted protease inhibitor (aHR=1·17 vs. non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor; 95%CI 1·00-1·64). Interpretation Incidence of virologic failure was generally lower than in North America/Europe. Our results suggest the need to design strategies to reduce failure and major regimen change among younger patients and those with a history of IDU. Funding US National Institutes of Health: U01 AI069923. PMID:26520929

  6. Flu Season Starting to Peak

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_162917.html Flu Season Starting to Peak More severe strain of ... 6, 2017 FRIDAY, Jan. 6, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Flu season is in full swing and it's starting ...

  7. Yes, Head Start Improves Reading!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larsen, Janet J.

    This study evaluated the effect of a Head Start program on children's intelligence and reading achievement test scores over a three year period. Each of 25 Head Start children was paired with a non-Head Start child of the same reace, sex, age, socioeconomic status, date of school entrance, kindergarten experience, promotion record, and type of…

  8. The Role of the Family Service Center Demonstrations in the Future of Head Start.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anziano, Michael C.

    This paper describes the implementation of a Head Start Family Service Center (FSC) program and discusses the impact of such centers on Head Start preschool education. It reviews the role of current Head Start FSCs on the provision of support services to Head Start families, especially in the areas of adult literacy, substance abuse education and…

  9. Adding value to antiretroviral proficiency testing

    PubMed Central

    DiFrancesco, Robin; Taylor, Charlene R.; Rosenkranz, Susan L.; Tooley, Kelly M.; Pande, Poonam G.; Siminski, Suzanne M.; Jenny, Richard W.; Morse, Gene D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Clinical trial specimens tested for antiretroviral (ARV) concentrations often require compliance with Clinical Laboratory Improvement Act and/or the Food and Drug Administration bioanalytical guidance. Experimental The Clinical Pharmacology Quality Assurance Program (CPQA) designed 8 proficiency testing (PT) rounds over 4 years to assess precision, specificity and stability. Results Ten laboratories provided blinded proficiency data to support continued acceptable precision of ARV methods. Specificity samples identified little bias for individual methods; hemolyzed (87%) and lipemic (86%) results were ≤10% of their control results. Stability was established for ARVs in plasma at −70°C for 2.5–3.6 years. Conclusion PT provided by the CPQA assured continued acceptability of individual laboratory assay performances for precision and specificity, and obtained ARV stability during long term storage. PMID:25413704

  10. [Pilot study of antiretroviral therapy in Djibouti].

    PubMed

    Ahmed, A A; Latoundji, S

    2007-01-01

    A cross-sectional survey was conducted among 112 HIV positive patients who had received antiretroviral therapy for >3 months to assess the efficacy of treatment (viral load <400 copies/mL). The median age at enrolment was 36 years, 90% of patients were at the AIDS stage and median CD4 rate was 118/mm3. Patients received a combined treatment of 2 NRTI +1 NNRTI (51%), 3 NRTI (45%) and 2 NRTI+1 PI (4%). Virological efficacy was seen in 74% of the patients, irrespective of the prescribed protocol and the initial clinical and immunological profile. Mean improvements measured were 20% on the Karnofsky index (KI), 2.1 kg/m2 in body mass index and 82 cells/mm in CD4. The prevalence of side effects was 84%. The predictors for treatment success were quality of care and KI > 70%.

  11. Antiretrovirals inhibit arginase in human microglia.

    PubMed

    Lisi, Lucia; Laudati, Emilia; Miscioscia, Teresa F; Dello Russo, Cinzia; Topai, Alessandra; Navarra, Pierluigi

    2016-01-01

    Preliminary evidence in an animal model, that is, primary cultures of rat microglia cells, suggested that some antiretroviral drugs (ARVs), namely darunavir, atazanavir, efavirenz, and nevirapine, increase NO production through a mechanism involving the inhibition of arginase (ARG) activity. This study was conceived to investigate the effects of ARVs on ARG activity in a human experimental model. We compared CHME-5 human microglial immortalized cells under basal conditions with cells exposed to either IL-4, a mix of inflammatory cytokines, or both stimuli given together. We also tested the effects of ARVs on CHME-5 cell lysates after exposure to the above stimuli. Moreover, the interaction between the ARVs and ARG was investigated via computational chemistry. We found that ARVs consistently inhibit ARG activity both in intact and lysed cells. In docking studies, darunavir and atazanavir showed similar scores compared with both l-arginine and the ARG antagonist nor-NOHA. Efavirenz and nevirapine, which are less potent in inhibiting ARG in the biochemical assay, also had lower scores. In conclusion, the present findings in a human model support the notion that ARG pathway can present a new, additional molecular target for different ARVs in HIV treatments. We found that antiretroviral drugs (ARVs) consistently inhibit arginase (ARG)-I activity both in intact and lysed cells. In docking studies, darunavir (DRV) and atazanavir (ATV) showed similar scores compared to both l-arginine and the ARG antagonist, Nω-hydroxy-nor-arginine (nor-NOHA). Efavirenz (EFV) and nevirapine (NVP), which are less potent in inhibiting ARG in the biochemical assay, also had lower scores. In conclusion, the present findings in a human model support the notion that ARG pathway can be envisioned as an additional and new molecular target of different ARVs in HIV treatments.

  12. What to Start: Selecting a First HIV Regimen

    MedlinePlus

    ... medicines to treat HIV infection is called antiretroviral therapy (ART). People on ART take a combination of HIV ... treat HIV infection. HIV treatment (also called antiretroviral therapy or ART) begins with choosing an HIV regimen. People on ...

  13. Men and antiretroviral therapy in Africa: our blind spot.

    PubMed

    Cornell, Morna; McIntyre, James; Myer, Landon

    2011-07-01

    Most antiretroviral therapy (ART)-related policies remain blind to men's treatment needs. Global and national programmes need to address this blindness urgently, to ensure equitable access to ART in Africa.

  14. Is it time to revise antiretrovirals dosing? a pharmacokinetic viewpoint.

    PubMed

    Cattaneo, Dario; Baldelli, Sara; Castoldi, Simone; Charbe, Nitin; Cozzi, Valeria; Fucile, Serena; Clementi, Emilio

    2014-10-23

    We document our experience with therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) of antiretroviral agents (1807 determinations) carried out as day-by-day clinical practice for the optimization of drug dosing in HIV-infected patients. A significant proportion of patients had lopinavir, atazanavir and nevirapine trough concentrations exceeding the upper therapeutic threshold. Further studies are needed to identify good candidates/drugs for TDM, eventually allowing the selection of patients who may benefit from TDM-driven adjustments in antiretrovirals dosage.

  15. Early versus Delayed Antiretroviral Therapy for HIV and Tuberculosis Co-Infected Patients: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Shipeng; Chen, Lizhang; Wu, Wenqiong; Fu, Zhongxi; Zhang, Heng; Li, Zhanzhan; Fu, Chenchao; Mou, Jingsong; Xue, Jing; Hu, Yingyun

    2015-01-01

    Objective To compare important clinical outcomes between early and delayed initiation of antiretroviral therapy (ART) in adults who had a co-infection of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and tuberculosis (TB). Methods We performed a systematic search for relevant publications on PubMed, EMBASE, and the International Clinical Trials Registry Platform. We included randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that compared early ART initiation (within four weeks after anti-TB treatment starting) and delayed ART initiation (after eight weeks but less than twelve weeks of anti-TB treatment starting) in the course of TB treatment. Pooled estimates with corresponding 95% confidence interval (95%CI) were calculated with random-effects model. Sensitivity analysis was performed to investigate the stability of pooled estimates. Results A meta-analysis was evaluated from six RCTs with 2272 participants. Compared to delayed ART initiation, early ART initiation significantly reduces all-cause mortality in HIV-positive patients with TB [incidence rate ratio (IRR) 0.75, 95%CI 0.59 to 0.95; I2 = 0.00%; p = 0.67], even though there is an increased risk for IRD [IRR 2.29, 95%CI 1.81 to 2.91; I22 = 0.00%; p = 0.56]. Additionally, early ART initiation was not associated with an increased risk for grade 3-4 drug-related adverse events [IRR 0.99, 95%CI 0.83 to 1.18; I2 = 0.00%; p = 0.56]. Conclusions Although limited evidence, our results provide support for early ART initiation in the course of anti-TB treatment. However, more well-designed cohort or intervention studies are required to further confirm our findings. PMID:26000446

  16. First-line antiretroviral treatment failure and associated factors in HIV patients at the University of Gondar Teaching Hospital, Gondar, Northwest Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Ayalew, Mohammed Biset; Kumilachew, Dawit; Belay, Assefa; Getu, Samson; Teju, Derso; Endale, Desalegn; Tsegaye, Yemisirach; Wale, Zebiba

    2016-01-01

    Background Antiretroviral therapy (ART) restores immune function and reduces HIV-related adverse outcomes. But treatment failure erodes this advantage and leads to an increased morbidity and compromised quality of life in HIV patients. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence and factors associated with first-line ART failure in HIV patients at the University of Gondar Teaching Hospital. Patients and methods A retrospective study was conducted on 340 adults who had started ART during the period of September 2011 to May 2015. Data regarding patients’ sociodemographics, baseline characteristics, and treatment-related information were collected through review of their medical charts. Data were analyzed using SPSS version 21. Descriptive statistics, cross-tabs, and binary and multiple logistic regressions were utilized. P<0.05 was used to declare association. Results Among the 340 patients enrolled, 205 were females (60.3%). The mean age at ART initiation was 34.4 years. A total of 14 (4.1%) patients were found to have treatment failure. The median duration of treatment failure from initiation of treatment was 17.5 months (8–36 months). Poor adherence to treatment and low baseline CD4 cell count were found to be significant predictors of treatment failure. Conclusion The prevalence of first-line ART failure was 4.1%. Treatment failure was most likely to occur for the patients who had poor drug adherence and those who were delayed to start ART till their CD4 cell count became very low (<100 cells/mm3). PMID:27621669

  17. Prevalence and risk factors for low bone mineral density in untreated HIV infection: a substudy of the INSIGHT Strategic Timing of AntiRetroviral Treatment trial

    PubMed Central

    Carr, Andrew; Grund, Birgit; Neuhaus, Jacqueline; Schwartz, Ann; Bernardino, Jose I; White, David; Badel-Faesen, Sharlaa; Avihingsanon, Anchalee; Ensrud, Kristine; Hoy, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    Background HIV infection is associated with a higher prevalence of low bone mineral density (BMD) and fractures than the general population. There are limited data in HIV-positive adults, naïve to antiretroviral therapy (ART), to estimate the relative contribution of untreated HIV to bone loss. Methods The START Bone Mineral Density substudy is a randomised comparison of the effect of immediate versus deferred initial ART on bone. We evaluated traditional, demographic, HIV-related, and immunological factors for their associations with baseline hip and lumbar spine BMD, measured by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry, using multiple regression. Results A total of 424 ART-naïve participants were enrolled at 33 sites in six continents; mean (SD) age was 34 (10.1) years, 79.0% were nonwhite, 26.0% were women, and 12.5% had a body mass index (BMI) <20 kg/m2. Mean (SD) Z-scores were -0.41 (0.94) at the spine and -0.36 (0.88) for total hip; 1.9% had osteoporosis and 35.1% had low BMD (hip or spine T-score <-1.0). Factors independently associated with lower BMD at the hip and spine were female sex, Latino/Hispanic ethnicity, lower BMI and higher estimated glomerular filtration rate. Longer time since HIV diagnosis was associated with lower hip BMD. Current or nadir CD4 cell counts, and HIV viral load were not associated with BMD. Conclusions In this geographically and racially diverse population of ART-naïve adults with normal CD4 cell counts, low BMD was common, but osteoporosis was rare. Lower BMD was significantly associated with traditional risk factors but not with CD4 cell count or viral load. PMID:25711332

  18. Maine: Early Head Start Initiatives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Law and Social Policy, Inc. (CLASP), 2012

    2012-01-01

    Maine has two initiatives that build on Early Head Start (EHS). The first initiative, Fund for a Healthy Maine, has since 2001 provided tobacco settlement money to existing Head Start and EHS programs to expand the number of children who receive full-day, full-year services. Local programs have the option of using these funds for EHS, depending on…

  19. Head Start Nutrition Education Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montclair State Coll., Upper Montclair, NJ.

    This multidisciplinary preschool nutrition education curriculum was written for use in the instruction of 3- to 5-year-olds in the National Head Start program. Introductory notes on cooking experiences for Head Start children and suggested menus for young children are followed by nine units. The curriculum incorporates a variety of teaching…

  20. State Funding of Head Start.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Idaho State Legislature, Boise. Office of Performance Evaluation.

    This background paper details Head Start, a federally funded program serving preschool age children from low-income families, and focuses on the program's effectiveness and the adequacy of historic federal funding levels. The paper provides an overview of the Head Start Program, describes federal requirements for local programs, and describes Head…

  1. HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders persist in the era of potent antiretroviral therapy

    PubMed Central

    Heaton, R.K.; Clifford, D.B.; Franklin, D.R.; Woods, S.P.; Ake, C.; Vaida, F.; Ellis, R.J.; Letendre, S.L.; Marcotte, T.D.; Atkinson, J.H.; Rivera-Mindt, M.; Vigil, O.R.; Taylor, M.J.; Collier, A.C.; Marra, C.M.; Gelman, B.B.; McArthur, J.C.; Morgello, S.; Simpson, D.M.; McCutchan, J.A.; Abramson, I.; Gamst, A.; Fennema-Notestine, C.; Jernigan, T.L.; Wong, J.; Grant, I.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: This is a cross-sectional, observational study to determine the frequency and associated features of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) in a large, diverse sample of infected individuals in the era of combination antiretroviral therapy (CART). Methods: A total of 1,555 HIV-infected adults were recruited from 6 university clinics across the United States, with minimal exclusions. We used standardized neuromedical, psychiatric, and neuropsychological (NP) examinations, and recently published criteria for diagnosing HAND and classifying 3 levels of comorbidity (minimal to severe non-HIV risks for NP impairment). Results: Fifty-two percent of the total sample had NP impairment, with higher rates in groups with greater comorbidity burden (40%, 59%, and 83%). Prevalence estimates for specific HAND diagnoses (excluding severely confounded cases) were 33% for asymptomatic neurocognitive impairment, 12% for mild neurocognitive disorder, and only 2% for HIV-associated dementia (HAD). Among participants with minimal comorbidities (n = 843), history of low nadir CD4 was a strong predictor of impairment, and the lowest impairment rate on CART occurred in the subset with suppressed plasma viral loads and nadir CD4 ≥200 cells/mm3 (30% vs 47% in remaining subgroups). Conclusions: The most severe HAND diagnosis (HAD) was rare, but milder forms of impairment remained common, even among those receiving CART who had minimal comorbidities. Future studies should clarify whether early disease events (e.g., profound CD4 decline) may trigger chronic CNS changes, and whether early CART prevents or reverses these changes. GLOSSARY ANI = asymptomatic neurocognitive impairment; CART = combination antiretroviral therapy; CHARTER = CNS HIV Antiretroviral Therapy Effects Research; CIDI = Composite International Diagnostic Interview; CLIA = Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments; CPE = CNS penetration effectiveness; HAD = HIV-associated dementia; HAND = HIV

  2. Antiretroviral Therapy for the Prevention of HIV-1 Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Myron S.; Chen, Ying Q.; McCauley, Marybeth; Gamble, Theresa; Hosseinipour, Mina C.; Kumarasamy, Nagalingeswaran; Hakim, James G.; Kumwenda, Johnstone; Grinsztejn, Beatriz; Pilotto, Jose H.S.; Godbole, Sheela V.; Chariyalertsak, Suwat; Santos, Breno R.; Mayer, Kenneth H.; Hoffman, Irving F.; Eshleman, Susan H.; Piwowar-Manning, Estelle; Cottle, Leslie; Zhang, Xinyi C.; Makhema, Joseph; Mills, Lisa A.; Panchia, Ravindre; Faesen, Sharlaa; Eron, Joseph; Gallant, Joel; Havlir, Diane; Swindells, Susan; Elharrar, Vanessa; Burns, David; Taha, Taha E.; Nielsen-Saines, Karin; Celentano, David D.; Essex, Max; Hudelson, Sarah E.; Redd, Andrew D.; Fleming, Thomas R.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND An interim analysis of data from the HIV Prevention Trials Network (HPTN) 052 trial showed that antiretroviral therapy (ART) prevented more than 96% of genetically linked infections caused by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) in serodiscordant couples. ART was then offered to all patients with HIV-1 infection (index participants). The study included more than 5 years of follow-up to assess the durability of such therapy for the prevention of HIV-1 transmission. METHODS We randomly assigned 1763 index participants to receive either early or delayed ART. In the early-ART group, 886 participants started therapy at enrollment (CD4+ count, 350 to 550 cells per cubic millimeter). In the delayed-ART group, 877 participants started therapy after two consecutive CD4+ counts fell below 250 cells per cubic millimeter or if an illness indicative of the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (i.e., an AIDS-defining illness) developed. The primary study end point was the diagnosis of genetically linked HIV-1 infection in the previously HIV-1– negative partner in an intention-to-treat analysis. RESULTS Index participants were followed for 10,031 person-years; partners were followed for 8509 person-years. Among partners, 78 HIV-1 infections were observed during the trial (annual incidence, 0.9%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.7 to 1.1). Viral-linkage status was determined for 72 (92%) of the partner infections. Of these infections, 46 were linked (3 in the early-ART group and 43 in the delayed-ART group; incidence, 0.5%; 95% CI, 0.4 to 0.7) and 26 were unlinked (14 in the early-ART group and 12 in the delayed-ART group; incidence, 0.3%; 95% CI, 0.2 to 0.4). Early ART was associated with a 93% lower risk of linked partner infection than was delayed ART (hazard ratio, 0.07; 95% CI, 0.02 to 0.22). No linked infections were observed when HIV-1 infection was stably suppressed by ART in the index participant. CONCLUSIONS The early initiation of ART led to a sustained

  3. [Recommendations for initial antiretroviral treatment in HIV-infected children. Update 2003].

    PubMed

    2004-03-01

    Highly active antiretroviral therapy in HIV-infected children has been associated with a dramatic decrease in progression to AIDS and HIV-related deaths, and infected children currently have an excellent quality of life. Antiretroviral drugs cannot eradicate the virus, although they can achieve a situation of latent infection. However, chronic use of these drugs has multiple adverse effects, the most important of which are metabolic complications. The large number of drugs required and patient characteristics such as age, tolerance to drugs, adherence, and social problems make unifying the criteria for initial therapy in HIV-infected children difficult. A balance should be sought between not delaying the start of treatment, to avoid immunologic deterioration, and minimizing the long-term adverse effects of the therapy. The present treatment recommendations are adapted from international guidelines and are based on a literature review and on our own experience. Our group previously published recommendations on the treatment of HIV-infected children and the aim of the present article is to provide an update.

  4. Patient-Reported Symptoms on the Antiretroviral Regimen Efavirenz/Emtricitabine/Tenofovir

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Kirsha; Rodriguez-Barradas, Maria C.; Justice, Amy C.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Most patients (80–90%) newly diagnosed with HIV are started on the antiretroviral regimen efavirenz, emtricitabine, and tenofovir (EFV/FTC/TDF). Existing studies of patient tolerability, however, are limited. We compared symptom experiences of patients on EFV/FTC/TDF, and the subsequent impact on health-related quality of life, with those of patients on other combination antiretroviral therapy (cART). We conducted a cross-sectional analysis of the Veterans Aging Cohort Study from February 2008 to August 2009 to compare the symptom experiences of patients on EFV/FTC/TDF vs. other cART, unadjusted and then adjusted for treatment characteristics, and comorbid disease severity. We then assessed the association between EFV/FTC/TDF use and health-related quality of life. Among the 1,759 patients in our analytic sample, EFV/FTC/TDF use was associated with fewer symptoms than was other cART. The use of EFV/FTC/TDF was independently associated with health-related quality of life, and this association was at least partially explained by symptom burden. PMID:22612469

  5. Dynamics of the HIV infection under antiretroviral therapy: A cellular automata approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González, Ramón E. R.; Coutinho, Sérgio; Zorzenon dos Santos, Rita Maria; de Figueirêdo, Pedro Hugo

    2013-10-01

    The dynamics of human immunodeficiency virus infection under antiretroviral therapy is investigated using a cellular automata model where the effectiveness of each drug is self-adjusted by the concentration of CD4+ T infected cells present at each time step. The effectiveness of the drugs and the infected cell concentration at the beginning of treatment are the control parameters of the cell population’s dynamics during therapy. The model allows describing processes of mono and combined therapies. The dynamics that emerges from this model when considering combined antiretroviral therapies reproduces with fair qualitative agreement the phases and different time scales of the process. As observed in clinical data, the results reproduce the significant decrease in the population of infected cells and a concomitant increase of the population of healthy cells in a short timescale (weeks) after the initiation of treatment. Over long time scales, early treatment with potent drugs may lead to undetectable levels of infection. For late treatment or treatments starting with a low density of CD4+ T healthy cells it was observed that the treatment may lead to a steady state in which the T cell counts are above the threshold associated with the onset of AIDS. The results obtained are validated through comparison to available clinical trial data.

  6. Investigational protease inhibitors as antiretroviral therapies

    PubMed Central

    Midde, Narasimha M.; Patters, Benjamin J.; Rao, PSS; Cory, Theodore J.; Kumar, Santosh

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy (HAART) has tremendously improved the life expectancy of the HIV-infected population over the past three decades. Protease inhibitors have been one of the major classes of drugs in HAART regimens that are effective in treating HIV. However, the emergence of resistance and cross-resistance against protease inhibitors encourages researchers to develop new PIs with broad-spectrum activity, as well as novel means of enhancing the efficacy of existing PIs. Areas covered In this article we discuss recent advances in HIV protease inhibitor (PI) development, focusing on both investigational and experimental agents. We also include a section on pharmacokinetic booster drugs for improved bioavailability of protease inhibitors. Further, we discuss novel drug delivery systems using a variety of nanocarriers for the delivery of PIs across the blood-brain barrier to treat the HIV in the brain. Expert opinion We discuss our opinion on the promises and challenges on the development of novel investigational and experimental PIs that are less toxic and more effective in combating drug-resistance. Further, we discuss the future of novel nanocarriers that have been developed to deliver PIs to the brain cells. Although these are promising findings, many challenges need to be overcome prior to making them a viable option. PMID:27415449

  7. Cerebrospinal Fluid HIV Escape from Antiretroviral Therapy.

    PubMed

    Ferretti, Francesca; Gisslen, Magnus; Cinque, Paola; Price, Richard W

    2015-06-01

    CNS infection is a nearly constant facet of systemic CNS infection and is generally well controlled by suppressive systemic antiretroviral therapy (ART). However, there are instances when HIV can be detected in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) despite suppression of plasma viruses below the clinical limits of measurement. We review three types of CSF viral escape: asymptomatic, neuro-symptomatic, and secondary. The first, asymptomatic CSF escape, is seemingly benign and characterized by lack of discernable neurological deterioration or subsequent CNS disease progression. Neuro-symptomatic CSF escape is an uncommon, but important, entity characterized by new or progressive CNS disease that is critical to recognize clinically because of its management implications. Finally, secondary CSF escape, which may be even more uncommon, is defined by an increase of CSF HIV replication in association with a concomitant non-HIV infection, as a consequence of the local inflammatory response. Understanding these CSF escape settings not only is important for clinical diagnosis and management but also may provide insight into the CNS HIV reservoir.

  8. Antiretroviral procurement and supply chain management.

    PubMed

    Ripin, David J; Jamieson, David; Meyers, Amy; Warty, Umesh; Dain, Mary; Khamsi, Cyril

    2014-01-01

    Procurement, the country-level process of ordering antiretrovirals (ARVs), and supply chain management, the mechanism by which they are delivered to health-care facilities, are critical processes required to move ARVs from manufacturers to patients. To provide a glimpse into the ARV procurement and supply chain, the following pages provide an overview of the primary stakeholders, principal operating models, and policies and regulations involved in ARV procurement. Also presented are key challenges that need to be addressed to ensure that the supply chain is not a barrier to the goal of universal coverage. This article will cover the steps necessary to order and distribute ARVs, including different models of delivery, key stakeholders involved, strategic considerations that vary depending on context and policies affecting them. The single drug examples given illustrate the complications inherent in fragmented supply and demand-driven models of procurement and supply chain management, and suggest tools for navigating these hurdles that will ultimately result in more secure and reliable ARV provision. Understanding the dynamics of ARV supply chain is important for the global health community, both to ensure full and efficient treatment of persons living with HIV as well as to inform the supply chain decisions for other public health products.

  9. Hydrazine engine start system air start performance and controls sizing

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, A.T.

    1992-01-01

    Hydrazine has been used as an energy source in many applications to fuel in-flight main engine starting. In a current application, an existing hydrazine engine start system (ESS) design was adapted to meet new fuel control requirements. This paper presents a brief system description, historical context, and the motivating factors for the hydrazine controls changes and three case studies of controls design and analysis from the ESS program. 4 refs.

  10. The START III bargaining space

    SciTech Connect

    Karas, T.H.

    1998-08-01

    The declining state of the Russian military and precarious Russian economic condition will give the US considerable advantages at the START III bargaining table. Taking the US-RF asymmetries into account, this paper discusses a menu of START III measures the US could ask for, and measures it could offer in return, in attempting to negotiate an equitable treaty. Measures the US might seek in a START III treaty include: further reductions in deployed strategic nuclear warheads, irreversibility of reductions through warhead dismantlement; beginning to bring theater nuclear weapons under mutual control, and increased transparency into the Russian nuclear weapons complex. The US may, however, wish to apply its bargaining advantages to attempting to achieve the first steps toward two long-range goals that would enhance US security: bringing theater nuclear weapons into the US-RF arms control arena, and increasing transparency into the Russian nuclear weapons complex. In exchange for measures relating to these objectives, the US might consider offering to Russia: Further strategic weapons reductions approaching levels at which the Russians believe they could maintain a degree of parity with the US; Measures to decrease the large disparities in potential deliver-system uploading capabilities that appear likely under current START II/START III scenarios; and Financial assistance in achieving START II/START III reductions as rapidly as is technically possible.

  11. Antiretroviral Refill Adherence Correlates with, But Poorly Predicts Retention in HIV Care.

    PubMed

    Bonacci, Robert A; Frasca, Katherine; Swift, Lyles; Sha, Daohang; Bilker, Warren B; Bamford, Laura; Yehia, Baligh R; Gross, Robert

    2016-05-01

    If antiretroviral refill adherence could predict non-retention in care, it could be clinically useful. In a retrospective cohort study of HIV-infected adults in Philadelphia between October 2012 and April 2013, retention in care was measured by show versus no-show at an index visit. Three measures of adherence were defined per person: (1) percent of doses taken for two refills nearest index visit, (2) days late for last refill before index visit, and (3) longest gap between any two refills. Of 393 patients, 108 (27.4 %) no-showed. Adherence was higher in the show group on all measures with longest gap having the greatest difference: 40 days (IQR 33-56) in the show versus 47 days (IQR 38-69) in the no-show group, p < 0.001. Yet, no cut-points of adherence adequately predicted show versus no-show. Antiretroviral adherence being associated, but a poor predictor of retention suggests that these two behaviors are related but distinct phenomena.

  12. Adherence to highly active antiretroviral therapy in Hyderabad, India: barriers, facilitators and identification of target groups.

    PubMed

    Dworkin, Mark S; Douglas, G W; Sabitha Rani, G P; Chakraborty, Apurba

    2016-03-01

    We assessed the barriers and facilitators to highly active antiretroviral therapy adherence and determined their prevalence among HIV/AIDS patients in Hyderabad, India. We conducted a cross-sectional study among HIV-infected adults prescribed highly active antiretroviral therapy and receiving care from nine clinics. Depression was screened using Patient Health Questionnaire 9 and facilitators of HIV medication adherence were assessed using an 11-item scale which yielded a total positive attitude to disease score. Prevalence ratios of non-adherence between different categories of potential risk factors were calculated. We compared mean 'facilitators to adherence' scores between the adherent and non-adherent population. Multivariable Poisson regression with robust variance was used to identify independent risk factors. Among the 211 respondents, nearly 20% were non-adherent, approximately 8% had either moderately severe or severe depression and mean score for combined facilitators to medication adherence was 33.35 (±7.88) out of a possible 44 points. Factors significantly associated with non-adherence included older age, female sex worker, moderate-to-severe depression and the combined facilitators to medication adherence score. These data from a broad range of clinical settings in Hyderabad reveal that key groups to focus on for adherence intervention are female sex workers, older persons and those with depression.

  13. Loss to follow-up of adults in public HIV care systems in Mozambique: Identifying obstacles to treatment

    PubMed Central

    Micek, Mark A; Gimbel-Sherr, Kenneth; Baptista, Alberto João; Matediana, Eduardo; Montoya, Pablo; Pfeiffer, James; Melo, Armando; Gimbel-Sherr, Sarah; Johnson, Wendy; Gloyd, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Access to antiretroviral treatment (ART) has expanded dramatically in resource-limited settings. Evaluating loss to follow-up from HIV testing through post-ART care can help identify obstacles to care. Methods Routine data was analyzed for adults receiving services in two public HIV care systems in central Mozambique. The proportion of people passing through the following steps was determined: (1) HIV testing, (2) enrollment at an ART clinic, (3) CD4 testing, (4) starting ART if eligible, and (5) adhering to ART. Results During the 12-month study period (2004–2005), an estimated 23,430 adults were tested for HIV, and 7,005 (29.9%) were HIV-positive. Only 3,956 (56.5%) of those HIV-positive enrolled at an ART clinic ≤30 days after testing. CD4 testing was obtained in 77.1% ≤30 days of enrollment. Of 1,506 eligible for ART, 471 (31.3%) started ART ≤90 days after CD4 testing. Of 382 with ≥180 days of potential follow-up time on ART, 317 (83.0%) had pharmacy-based adherence rates ≥90%. Discussion Substantial drop-offs were observed for each step between HIV testing and treatment, but were highest for referral from HIV testing to treatment sites and for starting ART. Interventions are needed to improve follow-up and ensure that people benefit from available HIV services. PMID:19550350

  14. Factors influencing global antiretroviral procurement prices

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Antiretroviral medicines (ARVs) are one of the most costly parts of HIV/AIDS treatment. Many countries are struggling to provide universal access to ARVs for all people living with HIV and AIDS. Although substantial price reductions of ARVs have occurred, especially between 2002 and 2008, achieving sustainable access for the next several decades remains a major challenge for most low- and middle-income countries. The objectives of the present study were twofold: first, to analyze global ARV prices between 2005 and 2008 and associated factors, particularly procurement methods and key donor policies on ARV procurement efficiency; second, to discuss the options of procurement processes and policies that should be considered when implementing or reforming access to ARV programs. Methods An ARV-medicines price-analysis was carried out using the Global Price Reporting Mechanism from the World Health Organization. For a selection of 12 ARVs, global median prices and price variation were calculated. Linear regression models for each ARV were used to identify factors that were associated with lower procurement prices. Logistic regression models were used to identify the characteristics of those countries which procure below the highest and lowest direct manufactured costs. Results Three key factors appear to have an influence on a country's ARV prices: (a) whether the product is generic or not; (b) the socioeconomic status of the country; (c) whether the country is a member of the Clinton HIV/AIDS Initiative. Factors which did not influence procurement below the highest direct manufactured costs were HIV prevalence, procurement volume, whether the country belongs to the least developed countries or a focus country of the United States President's Emergency Plan For AIDS Relief. Conclusion One of the principal mechanisms that can help to lower prices for ARV over the next several decades is increasing procurement efficiency. Benchmarking prices could be one useful

  15. Persistent HIV-1 replication during antiretroviral therapy

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Picado, Javier; Deeks, Steven G.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review The present review will highlight some of the recent findings regarding the capacity of HIV-1 to replicate during antiretroviral therapy (ART). Recent findings Although ART is highly effective at inhibiting HIV replication, it is not curative. Several mechanisms contribute to HIV persistence during ART, including HIV latency, immune dysfunction, and perhaps persistent low-level spread of the virus to uninfected cells (replication). The success in curing HIV will depend on efficiently targeting these three aspects. The degree to which HIV replicates during ART remains controversial. Most studies have failed to find any evidence of HIV evolution in blood, even with samples collected over many years, although a recent very intensive study of three individuals suggested that the virus population does shift, at least during the first few months of therapy. Stronger but still not definitive evidence for replication comes from a series of studies in which standard regimens were intensified with an integration inhibitor, resulting in changes in episomal DNA (blood) and cell-associated RNA (tissue). Limited drug penetration within tissues and the presence of immune sanctuaries have been argued as potential mechanisms allowing HIV to spread during ART. Mathematical models suggest that HIV replication and evolution is possible even without the selection of fully drug-resistant variants. As persistent HIV replication could have clinical consequences and might limit the efficacy of curative interventions, determining if HIV replicates during ART and why, should remain a key focus of the HIV research community. Summary Residual viral replication likely persists in lymphoid tissues, at least in a subset of individuals. Abnormal levels of immune activation might contribute to sustain virus replication. PMID:27078619

  16. Immune restoration disease after antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    French, Martyn A; Price, Patricia; Stone, Shelley F

    2004-08-20

    Suppression of HIV replication by highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) often restores protective pathogen-specific immune responses, but in some patients the restored immune response is immunopathological and causes disease [immune restoration disease (IRD)]. Infections by mycobacteria, cryptococci, herpesviruses, hepatitis B and C virus, and JC virus are the most common pathogens associated with infectious IRD. Sarcoid IRD and autoimmune IRD occur less commonly. Infectious IRD presenting during the first 3 months of therapy appears to reflect an immune response against an active (often quiescent) infection by opportunistic pathogens whereas late IRD may result from an immune response against the antigens of non-viable pathogens. Data on the immunopathogenesis of IRD is limited but it suggests that immunopathogenic mechanisms are determined by the pathogen. For example, mycobacterial IRD is associated with delayed-type hypersensitivity responses to mycobacterial antigens whereas there is evidence of a CD8 T-cell response in herpesvirus IRD. Furthermore, the association of different cytokine gene polymorphisms with mycobacterial or herpesvirus IRD provides evidence of different pathogenic mechanisms as well as indicating a genetic susceptibility to IRD. Differentiation of IRD from an opportunistic infection is important because IRD indicates a successful, albeit undesirable, effect of HAART. It is also important to differentiate IRD from drug toxicity to avoid unnecessary cessation of HAART. The management of IRD often requires the use of anti-microbial and/or anti-inflammatory therapy. Investigation of strategies to prevent IRD is a priority, particularly in developing countries, and requires the development of risk assessment methods and diagnostic criteria.

  17. Marked sex differences in all-cause mortality on antiretroviral therapy in low- and middle-income countries: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Beckham, Sarah W; Beyrer, Chris; Luckow, Peter; Doherty, Meg; Negussie, Eyerusalem K; Baral, Stefan D

    2016-01-01

    Introduction While women and girls are disproportionately at risk of HIV acquisition, particularly in low- and middle-income countries (LMIC), globally men and women comprise similar proportions of people living with HIV who are eligible for antiretroviral therapy. However, men represent only approximately 41% of those receiving antiretroviral therapy globally. There has been limited study of men’s outcomes in treatment programmes, despite data suggesting that men living with HIV and engaged in treatment programmes have higher mortality rates. This systematic review (SR) and meta-analysis (MA) aims to assess differential all-cause mortality between men and women living with HIV and on antiretroviral therapy in LMIC. Methods A SR was conducted through searching PubMed, Ovid Global Health and EMBASE for peer-reviewed, published observational studies reporting differential outcomes by sex of adults (≥15 years) living with HIV, in treatment programmes and on antiretroviral medications in LMIC. For studies reporting hazard ratios (HRs) of mortality by sex, quality assessment using Newcastle–Ottawa Scale (cohort studies) and an MA using a random-effects model (Stata 14.0) were conducted. Results A total of 11,889 records were screened, and 6726 full-text articles were assessed for eligibility. There were 31 included studies in the final MA reporting 42 HRs, with a total sample size of 86,233 men and 117,719 women, and total time on antiretroviral therapy of 1555 months. The pooled hazard ratio (pHR) showed a 46% increased hazard of death for men while on antiretroviral treatment (1.35–1.59). Increased hazard was significant across geographic regions (sub-Saharan Africa: pHR 1.41 (1.28–1.56); Asia: 1.77 (1.42–2.21)) and persisted over time on treatment (≤12 months: 1.42 (1.21–1.67); 13–35 months: 1.48 (1.23–1.78); 36–59 months: 1.50 (1.18–1.91); 61 to 108 months: 1.49 (1.29–1.71)). Conclusions Men living with HIV have consistently and

  18. [CLINICAL AND PHARMACOECONOMIC RESULTS OF THE USAGE OF VARIOUS HIV REVERSE TRANSCRIPTASE INHIBITORS IN THE SCHEMES OF ANTIRETROVIRAL THERAPY OF PATIENT RECEIVING THERAPY FOR THE CHRONIC HEPATITIS C VIRUS].

    PubMed

    Moshkovich, G F; Minaeva, S V; Varlova, L W; Goryaeva, M P; Gulyaeva, S S; Tichonova, E V

    2016-01-01

    Efficacy, safety, and economical aspects of treatment with abacavir, zidovudine, stavudine, and phosphazide in the schemes of antiretroviral therapy of the HIV-infected patients receiving therapy for hepatitis C virus were tested. Clinical, immunological, and virologic efficacy of treatment and dynamics of hemoglobin, thrombocytes, and alanine aminotransferase as markers of common adverse events recorded at the start of the antiviral therapy of chronic hepatitis C and after 4, 8, 12, 24, 48 weeks of the treatment were evaluated. The usage of these drugs in the schemes of antiretroviral therapy exhibited efficacy, high tolerability and safety for all HIV reverse transcriptase inhibitors.

  19. Abnormal contingent negative variation in HIV patients receiving antiretroviral therapy

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Linda L.; Cardenas, Valerie A.; Meyerhoff, Dieter J.; Rothlind, Johannes C.; Flenniken, Derek L.; Lindgren, Joselyn A.; Weiner, Michael W.

    2009-01-01

    The contingent negative variation, an event-related potential related to neural activity in the frontal lobe and basal ganglia, neuropsychological tests and structural MRI were used to examine CNS function and structure in HIV-positive patients receiving antiretroviral therapy. Relative to controls, HIV patients had smaller thalamic volume and reduced late contingent negative variation amplitude that correlated with caudal atrophy. Behaviorally, viremic patients were more impaired than virally suppressed patients and controls on neuropsychological measures of psychomotor speed, selective attention and mental flexibility. These results suggest that antiretroviral therapy may not be effective in protecting cortical and subcortical structures against HIV-related neuropathology, regardless of immune function. However, the benefits of antiretroviral therapy on immune function appear to facilitate neurocognitive performance. PMID:14600507

  20. [Allergic hypersensitivity to antiretroviral drugs: etravirine, raltegravir and darunavir].

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Olivas, Manuel Anastacio; Valencia-Zavala, Martha Patricia; Vega-Robledo, Gloria Bertha; Sánchez-Olivas, Jesús Alberto; Velázquez-Sámano, Guillermo; Sepúlveda-Velázquez, Guadalupe

    2015-01-01

    All antiretroviral drugs can have both short-term and long-term adverse events. The risk of specific side effects varies from drug to drug, from drug class to drug class, and from patient to patient. A better understanding of the adverse effects of antiretroviral agents is of interest not only for HIV specialists, but also for other physicians who care allergy reactions in HIV-positive patients. Each antiretroviral medication is associated with its own specific adverse effects or may cause problems only in particular circumstances. In this article some adverse allergic effects of HAART therapy in the treatment of HIV from a patient are reviewed. Our aim is to gain a working knowledge of these adverse effects, promoting the early recognition and reversal of potentially serious adverse effects, and reducing the potential for adverse drug interactions.

  1. Forgiveness of non-adherence to HIV-1 antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Shuter, Jonathan

    2008-04-01

    Superior adherence to HIV-1 antiretroviral therapy is a mainstay of successful HIV management. Studies performed in the early era of highly active antiretroviral therapy demonstrated the need for > or =95% adherence in order to achieve and sustain viral suppression. High rates of viral suppression have been observed at more moderate levels of adherence with newer antiretroviral regimens. The term 'forgiveness' is being used to describe the ability of a regimen to achieve and sustain viral suppression, despite suboptimal adherence. A variety of pharmacological, viral and host properties determine the level of forgiveness of any specific regimen. As the choice of treatment options continues to expand, forgiveness of non-adherence is likely to emerge as an increasingly important factor in therapeutic decision-making.

  2. Management of HIV/AIDS in older patients–drug/drug interactions and adherence to antiretroviral therapy

    PubMed Central

    Burgess, Mary J; Zeuli, John D; Kasten, Mary J

    2015-01-01

    Patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) are living longer with their disease, as HIV has become a chronic illness managed with combination antiretroviral therapy (cART). This has led to an increasing number of patients greater than 50 years old living successfully with HIV. As the number of older adults with HIV has increased, there are special considerations for the management of HIV. Older adults with HIV must be monitored for drug side effects and toxicities. Their other non-HIV comorbidities should also be considered when choosing a cART regimen. Older adults with HIV have unique issues related to medication compliance. They are more likely than the younger HIV patients to have vision loss, cognitive impairment, and polypharmacy. They may have lower expectations of their overall health status. Depression and financial concerns, especially if they are on a fixed income, may also contribute to noncompliance in the aging HIV population. PMID:26604826

  3. Antiretroviral Therapy as HIV Prevention: Status and Prospects

    PubMed Central

    Venkatesh, Kartik K.

    2010-01-01

    As antiretroviral treatment of HIV infection has become increasingly accessible, attention has focused on whether these drugs can used for prevention because of increased tolerability of newer medications, decreased cost, and the limitations of other approaches. We review the status of antiretroviral HIV prevention, including chemoprophylaxis, as well as the effects of treatment of infected individuals on prevention. It is possible that the life-saving agents that have transformed the natural history of AIDS can be a critical component of HIV prevention efforts, but their ultimate role in affecting HIV transmission dynamics remains to be defined. PMID:20724682

  4. In vivo assessment of antiretroviral therapy-associated side effects

    PubMed Central

    Ramos-Sanchez, Eduardo Milton; Goto, Hiro; Rivero, Dolores Helena Rodriguez Ferreira; Mauad, Thais; de Souza, Fernando Nogueira; Monteiro, Andrea Moreira; Gidlund, Magnus

    2014-01-01

    Antiretroviral therapy has been associated with side effects, either from the drug itself or in conjunction with the effects of human immunodeficiency virus infection. Here, we evaluated the side effects of the protease inhibitor (PI) indinavir in hamsters consuming a normal or high-fat diet. Indinavir treatment increased the hamster death rate and resulted in an increase in triglyceride, cholesterol and glucose serum levels and a reduction in anti-oxLDL auto-antibodies. The treatment led to histopathological alterations of the kidney and the heart. These results suggest that hamsters are an interesting model for the study of the side effects of antiretroviral drugs, such as PIs. PMID:25075786

  5. Socioeconomic Predictors of Adherence Behavior Among HIV-Positive Patients Receiving Antiretroviral Therapy in Selangor, Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Abdulrahman, Surajudeen Abiola; Rampal, Lekhraj; Othman, Norlijah; Ibrahim, Faisal; Kadir Shahar, Hayati; Radhakrishnan, Anuradha P

    2017-04-01

    Medication adherence remains a critical link between the prescribed ART regimen and treatment outcome. Several factors may influence adherence behavior. This cross-sectional study aimed to highlight socioeconomic predictors of adherence behavior among a cohort of 242 adult Malaysian patients receiving antiretroviral therapy in Hospital Sungai Buloh, Malaysia, where they were enrolled in a parent study (single-blinded randomized controlled trial) between January and December 2014. Statistical analysis of secondary data on adherence behavior and sociodemographic characteristics of the patients revealed mean age of 33.4 years and ranged from 18 to 64 years; 88.8% were males. A total of 224 (93%) patients who completed 6 months' adherence assessment were included in the model. Of these, 135 (60.3%) achieved optimal adherence. Multivariate binary logistic regression analysis revealed that patient's income and ethnicity were significant predictors of adherence behavior. This may be valuable for targeted programmatic interventions to further enhance successful treatment outcomes among the target population.

  6. A Manual for Conducting Even Start Program Evaluations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Polzella, Donald J.; Fine, Mark A.

    Project Even Start is an intergenerational literacy project that promotes adult literacy, trains parents to support the educational growth of their children, and prepares children for school. The program is designed to facilitate joint participation by parents and children. It includes home-based instruction and child care, and it is integrated…

  7. Impulsively started incompressible turbulent jet

    SciTech Connect

    Witze, P O

    1980-10-01

    Hot-film anemometer measurements are presented for the centerline velocity of a suddenly started jet of air. The tip penetration of the jet is shown to be proportional to the square-root of time. A theoretical model is developed that assumes the transient jet can be characterized as a spherical vortex interacting with a steady-state jet. The model demonstrates that the ratio of nozzle radius to jet velocity defines a time constant that uniquely characterizes the behavior and similarity of impulsively started incompressible turbulent jets.

  8. Maximizing the benefits of antiretroviral therapy for key affected populations

    PubMed Central

    Grubb, Ian R; Beckham, Sarah W; Kazatchkine, Michel; Thomas, Ruth M; Albers, Eliot R; Cabral, Mauro; Lange, Joep; Vella, Stefano; Kurian, Manoj; Beyrer, Chris

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Scientific research has demonstrated the clinical benefits of earlier initiation of antiretroviral treatment (ART), and that ART can markedly reduce HIV transmission to sexual partners. Ensuring universal access to ART for those who need it has long been a core principle of the HIV response, and extending the benefits of ART to key populations is critical to increasing the impact of ART and the overall effectiveness of the HIV response. However, this can only be achieved through coordinated efforts to address political, social, legal and economic barriers that key populations face in accessing HIV services. Discussion Recent analyses show that HIV prevalence levels among key populations are far higher than among the general population, and they experience a range of biological and behavioural factors, and social, legal and economic barriers that increase their vulnerability to HIV and have resulted in alarmingly low ART coverage. World Health Organization 2014 consolidated guidance on HIV among key populations offers the potential for increased access to ART by key populations, following the same principles as for the general adult population. However, it should not be assumed that key populations will achieve greater access to ART unless stigma, discrimination and punitive laws, policies and practices that limit access to ART and other HIV interventions in many countries are addressed. Conclusions Rights-based approaches and investments in critical enablers, such as supportive legal and policy environments, are essential to enable wider access to ART and other HIV interventions for key populations. The primary objective of ART should always be to treat the person living with HIV; prevention is an important, additional benefit. ART should be provided only with informed consent. The preventive benefits of treatment must not be used as a pretext for failure to provide other necessary HIV programming for key populations, including comprehensive harm

  9. Head Start Dental Health Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Administration for Children, Youth, and Families (DHHS), Washington, DC. Head Start Bureau.

    This curriculum for Head Start programs provides preschool learning experiences that teach about dental health. The majority of the curriculum guide is devoted to the following lesson plans: (1) "Introduction of 'Smiley the Super Pup'," an optional puppet character which may be used to review the concepts covered in each lesson; (2)…

  10. Rigor Made Easy: Getting Started

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blackburn, Barbara R.

    2012-01-01

    Bestselling author and noted rigor expert Barbara Blackburn shares the secrets to getting started, maintaining momentum, and reaching your goals. Learn what rigor looks like in the classroom, understand what it means for your students, and get the keys to successful implementation. Learn how to use rigor to raise expectations, provide appropriate…

  11. Off to a Good Start.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffman, Carl

    1994-01-01

    Caring Start is a mobile-clinic program that provides prenatal care, well-baby clinics, childhood immunizations, counseling services, and contraceptives to rural poor families in northwest Pennsylvania. Before the mobile clinic, many rural women (mostly teenagers) went without prenatal health care due to lack of transportation. (LP)

  12. Entrepreneur Training Program. Getting Started.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Maria, Richard

    This student workbook on starting a small business is part of the entrepreneur training program at Ocean County (New Jersey) Vocational-Technical Schools. The workbook consists of 16 units containing goals and objectives, study questions, exercises, sample materials, and information sheets. Unit topics are as follows: being a small business owner;…

  13. Employment Obtaining and Business Starting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lan, Jian

    2009-01-01

    The implementation of business starting education in higher vocational colleges is of important and realistic meanings for cultivating advanced technology application-type talents and for releasing the employment obtaining pressure of higher vocational students. Based on the analysis on the employment situation of higher vocational graduates, this…

  14. Head Start Planned Variation Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klein, Jenny

    There is little agreement concerning which methods of preschool intervention are most effective. In order to evaluate several approaches to early childhood education, Project Head Start, in conjunction with Project Follow Through, has initiated the Planned Variation program. This year only a pilot project is underway with eight schools…

  15. Near Field of Starting Plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johari, H.; Gharib, M.; Dabiri, D.

    1997-11-01

    Although steady jets and plumes have been studied extensively in the past, there is relatively little known about the initial stages of starting buoyant jets. The present investigation examined buoyancy-driven flows resulting from cylindrical containers w ith length to diameter ratios (L/D) between 2 and 13. Density ratios up to ten percent were utilized. A technique was developed to release the column of buoyant fluid with minimal disturbance during the discharge. Our observations indicate that the majori ty of the released fluid gets entrained into the starting vortex ring for L/D < 4. Longer columns result in a jet trailing behind the starting vortex. In all cases, the starting vortex ring becomes unstable as a result of the baroclinic torque generation around its perimeter, and disintegrates into a turbulent mass within the first 5 diameters. This fluid mass then gets reorganized into a larger, more diffuse thermal. The thermal formation occurs closer to the source as the length to diameter ratio of th e buoyant column gets smaller. The temporal evolution of the circulation associated with the buoyant fluid, which was derived from the digital particle image velocimetry technique, will be presented.

  16. Late initiation of combination antiretroviral therapy in Canada: a call for a national public health strategy to improve engagement in HIV care

    PubMed Central

    Cescon, Angela; Patterson, Sophie; Davey, Colin; Ding, Erin; Raboud, Janet M; Chan, Keith; Loutfy, Mona R; Cooper, Curtis; Burchell, Ann N; Palmer, Alexis K; Tsoukas, Christos; Machouf, Nima; Klein, Marina B; Rourke, Sean B; Rachlis, Anita; Hogg, Robert S; Montaner, Julio SG

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Combination antiretroviral therapy (ART) significantly decreases morbidity, mortality and HIV transmission. We aimed to characterize the timing of ART initiation based on CD4 cell count from 2000 to 2012 and identify factors associated with late initiation of treatment. Methods Participants from the Canadian Observational Cohort (CANOC), a multi-site cohort of HIV-positive adults initiating ART naively after 1 January 2000, in three Canadian provinces (British Columbia, Ontario and Québec) were included. Late initiation was defined as a CD4 count <200 cells/mm3 or an AIDS-defining illness before ART initiation (baseline). Temporal trends were assessed using the Cochran–Armitage test, and independent correlates of late initiation were identified using logistic regression. Results In total, 8942 participants (18% female) of median age 40 years (Q1–Q3 33–47) were included. The median baseline CD4 count increased from 190 cells/mm3 (Q1–Q3 80–320) in 2000 to 360 cells/mm3 (Q1–Q3 220–490) in 2012 (p<0.001). Overall, 4274 participants (48%) initiated ART with a CD4 count <200 cells/mm3 or AIDS-defining illness. Late initiation was more common among women, non-MSM, older individuals, participants from Ontario and BC (vs. Québec), persons with injection drug use (IDU) history and individuals starting ART in earlier calendar years. In sub-analysis exploring recent (2008 to 2012) predictors using an updated CD4 criterion (<350 cells/mm3), IDU and residence in BC (vs. Québec) were no longer significant correlates of late initiation. Conclusions This analysis documents increasing baseline CD4 counts over time among Canadians initiating ART. However, CD4 counts at ART initiation remain below contemporary treatment guidelines, highlighting the need for strategies to improve earlier engagement in HIV care. PMID:26443752

  17. Outcomes of Nigeria's HIV/AIDS Treatment Program for Patients Initiated on Antiretroviral Treatment between 2004-2012

    PubMed Central

    Odafe, Solomon; Abiri, Oseni; Debem, Henry; Agolory, Simon; Shiraishi, Ray W.; Auld, Andrew F.; Swaminathan, Mahesh; Dokubo, Kainne; Ngige, Evelyn; Asadu, Chukwuemeka; Abatta, Emmanuel; Ellerbrock, Tedd V.

    2016-01-01

    Background The Nigerian Antiretroviral therapy (ART) program started in 2004 and now ranks among the largest in Africa. However, nationally representative data on outcomes have not been reported. Methods We evaluated retrospective cohort data from a nationally representative sample of adults aged ≥15 years who initiated ART during 2004 to 2012. Data were abstracted from 3,496 patient records at 35 sites selected using probability-proportional-to-size (PPS) sampling. Analyses were weighted and controlled for the complex survey design. The main outcome measures were mortality, loss to follow-up (LTFU), and retention (the proportion alive and on ART). Potential predictors of attrition were assessed using competing risk regression models. Results At ART initiation, 66.4 percent (%) were females, median age was 33 years, median weight 56 kg, median CD4 count 161 cells/mm3, and 47.1% had stage III/IV disease. The percentage of patients retained at 12, 24, 36 and 48 months was 81.2%, 74.4%, 67.2%, and 61.7%, respectively. Over 10,088 person-years of ART, mortality, LTFU, and overall attrition (mortality, LTFU, and treatment stop) rates were 1.1 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.7–1.8), 12.3 (95%CI: 8.9–17.0), and 13.9 (95% CI: 10.4–18.5) per 100 person-years (py) respectively. Highest attrition rates of 55.4/100py were witnessed in the first 3 months on ART. Predictors of LTFU included: lower-than-secondary level education (reference: Tertiary), care in North-East and South-South regions (reference: North-Central), presence of moderate/severe anemia, symptomatic functional status, and baseline weight <45kg. Predictor of mortality was WHO stage higher than stage I. Male sex, severe anemia, and care in a small clinic were associated with both mortality and LTFU. Conclusion Moderate/Advanced HIV disease was predictive of attrition; earlier ART initiation could improve program outcomes. Retention interventions targeting men and those with lower levels of education are

  18. Clinically relevant drug-drug interactions between antiretrovirals and antifungals

    PubMed Central

    Vadlapatla, Ramya Krishna; Patel, Mitesh; Paturi, Durga K; Pal, Dhananjay; Mitra, Ashim K

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Complete delineation of the HIV-1 life cycle has resulted in the development of several antiretroviral drugs. Twenty-five therapeutic agents belonging to five different classes are currently available for the treatment of HIV-1 infections. Advent of triple combination antiretroviral therapy has significantly lowered the mortality rate in HIV patients. However, fungal infections still represent major opportunistic diseases in immunocompromised patients worldwide. Areas covered Antiretroviral drugs that target enzymes and/or proteins indispensable for viral replication are discussed in this article. Fungal infections, causative organisms, epidemiology and preferred treatment modalities are also outlined. Finally, observed/predicted drug-drug interactions between antiretrovirals and antifungals are summarized along with clinical recommendations. Expert opinion Concomitant use of amphotericin B and tenofovir must be closely monitored for renal functioning. Due to relatively weak interactive potential with the CYP450 system, fluconazole is the preferred antifungal drug. High itraconazole doses (> 200 mg/day) are not advised in patients receiving booster protease inhibitor (PI) regimen. Posaconazole is contraindicated in combination with either efavirenz or fosamprenavir. Moreover, voriconazole is contraindicated with high-dose ritonavir-boosted PI. Echino-candins may aid in overcoming the limitations of existing antifungal therapy. An increasing number of documented or predicted drug-drug interactions and therapeutic drug monitoring may aid in the management of HIV-associated opportunistic fungal infections. PMID:24521092

  19. Clinically Relevant Pharmacokinetic Herb-drug Interactions in Antiretroviral Therapy.

    PubMed

    Fasinu, Pius S; Gurley, Bill J; Walker, Larry A

    2015-01-01

    For healthcare professionals, the volume of literature available on herb-drug interactions often makes it difficult to separate experimental/potential interactions from those deemed clinically relevant. There is a need for concise and conclusive information to guide pharmacotherapy in HIV/AIDS. In this review, the bases for potential interaction of medicinal herbs with specific antiretroviral drugs are presented, and several botanicals are discussed for which clinically relevant interactions in humans are established. Such studies have provided, in most cases, sufficient ground to warrant the avoidance of concurrent administration of antiretroviral (ARVs) drugs with St John's wort (Hypericum perforatum), black pepper (Piper species) and grapefruit juice. Other botanicals that require caution in the use with antiretrovirals include African potato (Hypoxis hemerocallidea), ginkgo (Ginkgo biloba), ginseng (Panax species), garlic (Allium sativum), goldenseal (Hydrastis canadensis) and kava kava (Piper methysticum). The knowledge of clinically significant herb-drug interaction will be important in order to avoid herb-induced risk of sub-therapeutic exposure to ARVs (which can lead to viral resistance) or the precipitation of toxicity (which may lead to poor compliance and/or discontinuation of antiretroviral therapy).

  20. Simultaneous plasma and genital pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of atazanavir and efavirenz in HIV-infected women starting therapy

    PubMed Central

    Neely, Michael; Louie, Stan; Xu, Jiaao; Anthony, Patricia; Thuvamontolrat, Kasalyn; Mordwinkin, Nicholas; Kovacs, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Few studies characterize longitudinal female plasma and genital antiretroviral pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics. Among 20 regimen-naïve HIV-infected adult women initiating atazanavir- (n=9) or efavirenz-based therapy (n=11), we measured blood CD4+ T-lymphocytes, and paired plasma and genital HIV RNA and atazanavir or efavirenz 2 days before starting therapy, and 2, 4, 7, 10, 21, 28, 60, 120, and 180 days after. The mean (range) log10 baseline plasma viral load was 4.89 (2.64 – 6.09) copies/mL and genital was 3.30 (1.60 – 5.00). In the atazanavir and efavirenz groups, mean (SD) days to 50% decrease in plasma viral load was 8.2 (4.9) vs. 9.3 (7.4), P=0.7, and in the genital tract was 7.3 (3.5) vs. 9.3 (7.7), P=0.5. The median (interquartile range) plasma:genital concentration ratio for atazanavir was 0.11 (0.001 to 0.46), vs. 0.34 (0.05 to 1.30) for efavirenz, P=0.5. Average plasma efavirenz or atazanavir concentrations over time did not affect virologic response. Blood CD4+ percentages increased by +2.3 (P=0.06) and +3.0 (P=0.003) for every 1 mg/L increase in average plasma and genital drug concentration, respectively. Plasma and genital viral pharmacodynamics were similar between the groups and independent of average concentrations, but blood CD4+ response was related in particular to genital extravascular drug concentrations. PMID:25683232

  1. Access to antiretroviral treatment, incidence of sustained therapy interruptions, and risk of clinical events according to sex: evidence from the I.Co.N.A. Study.

    PubMed

    Murri, Rita; Lepri, Alessandro Cozzi; Phillips, Andrew N; Girardi, Enrico; Nasti, Guglielmo; Ferrara, Sergio; Mura, Maria Stella; Mussini, Cristina; Petrelli, Enzo; Arlotti, Massimo; De Stefano, Carlo; Vigano, Paola; Novati, Roberto; Cargnel, Antonietta; Monforte, Antonella D'Arminio

    2003-10-01

    Objectives of the study were to assess the differences between sexes in the likelihood of starting antiretroviral therapy (ART), in rates of sustained discontinuation from highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), and in clinical progression. In a multicenter cohort study (I.Co.N.A. Study), 2323 men and 1335 women previously naive to antiretrovirals were enrolled. As of September 2002, 807 women and 1480 men started ART. The median time to starting ART was 28 weeks for women and 17 weeks for men (P = 0.0003 by log-rank test). This difference was no longer significant after adjusting for either HIV RNA (P = 0.21) or CD4 count (P = 0.28) at enrollment. Women tend to start HAART less frequently than mono/dual ART after adjusting for potential confounders (odds ratio = 0.78, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.60-1.01; P = 0.06). Women who started HAART were 1.4 times more likely than men (95% CI: 1.00-1.99; P = 0.05) to interrupt at least 1 drug because of toxicity. Twenty-one percent of women and 19% of men interrupted HAART altogether for more than 3 months (P = 0.3). Clinical progression was observed in 53 women (22.6%) and 137 men (23.4%; P = 0.56). Risk of developing a clinical event was found to be no different between women and men (relative hazard = 0.84, 95% CI: 0.56-1.26; P = 0.40).

  2. Vaccination in HIV-Infected Adults

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Mark R.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Vaccines are critical components for protecting HIV-infected adults from an increasing number of preventable diseases. However, missed opportunities for vaccination among HIV-infected persons persist, likely due to concerns regarding the safety and efficacy of vaccines, as well as the changing nature of vaccine guidelines. In addition, the optimal timing of vaccination among HIV-infected adults in regards to HIV stage and receipt of antiretroviral therapy remain important questions. This article provides a review of the current recommendations regarding vaccines among HIV-infected adults and a comprehensive summary of the evidence-based literature of the benefits and risks of vaccines among this vulnerable population. PMID:25029589

  3. Antiretroviral therapy reduces neurodegeneration in human immunodeficiency virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Bryant, Alex K.; Ellis, Ronald J.; Umlauf, Anya; Gouaux, Ben; Soontornniyomkij, Virawudh; Letendre, Scott L.; Achim, Cristian L.; Masliah, Eliezer; Grant, Igor; Moore, David J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine the effect of virally-suppressive antiretroviral therapy on cortical neurodegeneration and associated neurocognitive impairment. Design Retrospective, postmortem observational study. Methods Clinical neuropsychological and postmortem neuropathology data were analyzed in 90 human immunodeficiency virus-infected volunteers from the general community who had never undergone antiretroviral therapy (n=7, “naïve”) or who had undergone antiretroviral therapy and whose plasma viral load was detectable (n = 64 “unsuppressed”) or undetectable (n = 19, “suppressed”) at the last clinical visit prior to death. Subjects were predominately male (74/90, 82%) with a mean age of 44.7 years (SD 9.8). Cortical neurodegeneration was quantified by measuring microtubule-associated protein (MAP2) and synaptophysin (SYP) density in midfrontal cortex tissue sections. Results The suppressed group had higher SYP density than the naïve group (p = 0.007) and higher MAP2 density than the unsuppressed group (p = 0.04). The suppressed group had lower odds of human immunodeficiency virus-associated neurocognitive disorders than naïve (OR 0.07, p = 0.03). Higher SYP was associated with lower likelihood of human immunodeficiency virus-associated neurocognitive disorders in univariable (OR 0.8, p=0.03) and multivariable models after controlling for antiretroviral treatment and brain human immunodeficiency virus p24 protein levels (OR 0.72, p=0.01). Conclusions We conclude that virally suppressive antiretroviral treatment protects against cortical neurodegeneration. Further, we find evidence supporting the causal chain from treatment-mediated peripheral and central nervous system viral load suppression to reduced neurodegeneration and improved neurocognitive outcomes. PMID:25686681

  4. School start times for adolescents.

    PubMed

    2014-09-01

    The American Academy of Pediatrics recognizes insufficient sleep in adolescents as an important public health issue that significantly affects the health and safety, as well as the academic success, of our nation's middle and high school students. Although a number of factors, including biological changes in sleep associated with puberty, lifestyle choices, and academic demands, negatively affect middle and high school students' ability to obtain sufficient sleep, the evidence strongly implicates earlier school start times (ie, before 8:30 am) as a key modifiable contributor to insufficient sleep, as well as circadian rhythm disruption, in this population. Furthermore, a substantial body of research has now demonstrated that delaying school start times is an effective countermeasure to chronic sleep loss and has a wide range of potential benefits to students with regard to physical and mental health, safety, and academic achievement. The American Academy of Pediatrics strongly supports the efforts of school districts to optimize sleep in students and urges high schools and middle schools to aim for start times that allow students the opportunity to achieve optimal levels of sleep (8.5-9.5 hours) and to improve physical (eg, reduced obesity risk) and mental (eg, lower rates of depression) health, safety (eg, drowsy driving crashes), academic performance, and quality of life.

  5. Starting apparatus for internal combustion engines

    DOEpatents

    Dyches, G.M.; Dudar, A.M.

    1995-01-01

    This report is a patent description for a system to start an internal combustion engine. Remote starting and starting by hearing impaired persons are addressed. The system monitors the amount of current being drawn by the starter motor to determine when the engine is started. When the engine is started the system automatically deactivates the starter motor. Five figures are included.

  6. Head Start Impact Study: First Year Findings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Puma, Michael; Bell, Stephen; Cook, Ronna; Heid, Camilla; Lopez, Michael

    2005-01-01

    The Congressionally-mandated Head Start Impact Study is being conducted across 84 nationally representative grantee/delegate agencies. Approximately 5,000 newly entering 3- and 4-year-old children applying for Head Start were randomly assigned to either a Head Start group that had access to Head Start program services or to a non-Head Start group…

  7. Variable Impact on Mortality of AIDS-Defining Events Diagnosed during Combination Antiretroviral Therapy: Not All AIDS-Defining Conditions Are Created Equal

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The extent to which mortality differs following individual acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS)–defining events (ADEs) has not been assessed among patients initiating combination antiretroviral therapy. Methods We analyzed data from 31,620 patients with no prior ADEs who started combination antiretroviral therapy. Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate mortality hazard ratios for each ADE that occurred in >50 patients, after stratification by cohort and adjustment for sex, HIV transmission group, number of anti-retroviral drugs initiated, regimen, age, date of starting combination antiretroviral therapy, and CD4+ cell count and HIV RNA load at initiation of combination antiretroviral therapy. ADEs that occurred in <50 patients were grouped together to form a “rare ADEs” category. Results During a median follow-up period of 43 months (interquartile range, 19–70 months), 2880 ADEs were diagnosed in 2262 patients; 1146 patients died. The most common ADEs were esophageal candidiasis (in 360 patients), Pneumocystis jiroveci pneumonia (320 patients), and Kaposi sarcoma (308 patients). The greatest mortality hazard ratio was associated with non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (hazard ratio, 17.59; 95% confidence interval, 13.84–22.35) and progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (hazard ratio, 10.0; 95% confidence interval, 6.70–14.92). Three groups of ADEs were identified on the basis of the ranked hazard ratios with bootstrapped confidence intervals: severe (non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma and progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy [hazard ratio, 7.26; 95% confidence interval, 5.55–9.48]), moderate (cryptococcosis, cerebral toxoplasmosis, AIDS dementia complex, disseminated Mycobacterium avium complex, and rare ADEs [hazard ratio, 2.35; 95% confidence interval, 1.76–3.13]), and mild (all other ADEs [hazard ratio, 1.47; 95% confidence interval, 1.08–2.00]). Conclusions In the combination antiretroviral therapy era, mortality rates

  8. Gender Differences in Health Related Quality of Life among People Living with HIV on Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy in Mekelle Town, Northern Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Tesfay, Amanuel; Gebremariam, Abebe; Abrha, Hailay

    2015-01-01

    Background. Health related quality of life (HRQOL) is an important outcome measure for highly active antiretroviral treatment program. In Ethiopia, studies revealed that there are improved qualities of life among adults living with the viruses taking antiretroviral therapy but there is no explicit data showing gender differences in health related quality of life. Aim. To assess gender differences in HRQOL and its associated factors among people living with HIV and on highly active antiretroviral therapy in public health institutions of Mekelle town, Northern Ethiopia. Methods. A comparative cross-sectional study was conducted among 494 adult people living with HIV taking ART services. Quality of life was measured using WHOQOL-HIV BREF. Result. There was a statistically significant gender difference (P < 0.05) in HRQOL among PLHIV on HAART. Females had low score in all HRQOL domains. High perceived stigma was strongly associated with poor psychological quality of domain among both female and male groups with [AOR = 2.89(1.69,4.96)] and [AOR = 2.5(1.4,4.4)], respectively. Conclusion. There was statistically significant gender difference in all quality of life domains. Public health interventions to improve HRQOL of PLHIV should take in to account the physical, psychological, social, environmental, and spiritual health of PLHIV during treatment, care, and support. PMID:25632393

  9. Discordant Treatment Responses to Combination Antiretroviral Therapy in Rwanda: A Prospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Kayigamba, Felix R.; Franke, Molly F.; Bakker, Mirjam I.; Rodriguez, Carly A.; Bagiruwigize, Emmanuel; Wit, Ferdinand WNM; Rich, Michael L.; Schim van der Loeff, Maarten F.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Some antiretroviral therapy naïve patients starting combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) experience a limited CD4 count rise despite virological suppression, or vice versa. We assessed the prevalence and determinants of discordant treatment responses in a Rwandan cohort. Methods A discordant immunological cART response was defined as an increase of <100 CD4 cells/mm3 at 12 months compared to baseline despite virological suppression (viral load [VL] <40 copies/mL). A discordant virological cART response was defined as detectable VL at 12 months with an increase in CD4 count ≥100 cells/mm3. The prevalence of, and independent predictors for these two types of discordant responses were analysed in two cohorts nested in a 12-month prospective study of cART-naïve HIV patients treated at nine rural health facilities in two regions in Rwanda. Results Among 382 patients with an undetectable VL at 12 months, 112 (29%) had a CD4 rise of <100 cells/mm3. Age ≥35 years and longer travel to the clinic were independent determinants of an immunological discordant response, but sex, baseline CD4 count, body mass index and WHO HIV clinical stage were not. Among 326 patients with a CD4 rise of ≥100 cells/mm3, 56 (17%) had a detectable viral load at 12 months. Male sex was associated with a virological discordant treatment response (P = 0.05), but age, baseline CD4 count, BMI, WHO HIV clinical stage, and travel time to the clinic were not. Conclusions Discordant treatment responses were common in cART-naïve HIV patients in Rwanda. Small CD4 increases could be misinterpreted as a (virological) treatment failure and lead to unnecessary treatment changes. PMID:27438000

  10. Improvement in vitamin D deficiency following antiretroviral regime change: Results from the MONET trial.

    PubMed

    Fox, Julie; Peters, Barry; Prakash, Manyu; Arribas, Jose; Hill, Andrew; Moecklinghoff, Christiane

    2011-01-01

    Low levels of vitamin D are reported in HIV-infected individuals. In HIV-negative people, low vitamin D levels have been associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease and cancer and with worse survival. The MONET trial recruited 256 European patients with HIV RNA <50 copies/ml at screening, while taking either NNRTI- or PI-based HAART. Patients were switched to DRV/r 800/100 mg once daily, either as monotherapy or with two NRTIs. In all, 221 patients were measured for 25-hydroxyvitamin D at a central laboratory before randomized treatment started and at week 96. Multiple regression was used to correlate vitamin D levels with gender, season, ethnic group, treatment group, and use of antiretrovirals. Overall, 80% of patients were male and 91% were white, with a mean age of 44 years. At screening, 170/221 (77%) patients had vitamin D deficiency (<50 nmol/liter). At the screening visit, lower vitamin D levels were significantly associated with calendar month (p = 0.0067), black ethnicity (p = 0.013), use of efavirenz (p = 0.0062), and use of zidovudine (p = 0.015). Mean vitamin D levels were lowest from January to April (mean = 35.8 nmol/liter) and highest in September (mean = 45.4 nmol/liter). Increases in vitamin D between screening and week 96 were significantly greater for patients who discontinued efavirenz or zidovudine before the MONET trial versus those who stopped other antiretrovirals. At screening, lower vitamin D levels were associated with season, race, and use of efavirenz and/or zidovudine. Switching from efavirenz and/or zidovudine to darunavir/ritonavir during the trial led to increases in vitamin D levels. Routine screening of HIV-positive patients for vitamin D should be considered and the optimal management further defined.

  11. Antiretroviral concentrations in breast-feeding infants of mothers receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Mirochnick, Mark; Thomas, Timothy; Capparelli, Edmund; Zeh, Clement; Holland, Diane; Masaba, Rose; Odhiambo, Prisca; Fowler, Mary Glenn; Weidle, Paul J; Thigpen, Michael C

    2009-03-01

    There are limited data describing the concentrations of zidovudine, lamivudine, and nevirapine in nursing infants as a result of transfer via breast milk. The Kisumu Breastfeeding Study is a phase IIb open-label trial of prenatal, intrapartum, and postpartum maternal treatment with zidovudine, lamivudine, and nevirapine from 34 weeks of gestation to 6 months postpartum. In a pharmacokinetic substudy, maternal plasma, breast milk, and infant dried blood spots were collected for drug assay on the day of delivery and at 2, 6, 14, and 24 weeks after delivery. Sixty-seven mother-infant pairs were enrolled. The median concentrations in breast milk of zidovudine, lamivudine, and nevirapine during the study period were 14 ng/ml, 1,214 ng/ml, and 4,546 ng/ml, respectively. Zidovudine was not detectable in any infant plasma samples obtained after the day of delivery, while the median concentrations in infant plasma samples from postpartum weeks 2, 6, and 14 were 67 ng/ml, 32 ng/ml, and 24 ng/ml for lamivudine and 987 ng/ml, 1,032 ng/ml, and 734 ng/ml for nevirapine, respectively. Therefore, lamivudine and nevirapine, but not zidovudine, are transferred to infants via breast milk in biologically significant concentrations. The extent and effect of infant drug exposure via breast milk must be well understood in order to evaluate the benefits and risks of maternal antiretroviral use during lactation.

  12. Formula Feeding FAQs: Starting Solids and Milk

    MedlinePlus

    ... Year-Old Formula Feeding FAQs: Starting Solids and Milk KidsHealth > For Parents > Formula Feeding FAQs: Starting Solids ... When can I start giving my baby cow's milk? Before their first birthday, babies still need the ...

  13. First-line antiretroviral drug discontinuations in children

    PubMed Central

    Fortuin-de Smidt, Melony; de Waal, Reneé; Cohen, Karen; Technau, Karl-Günter; Stinson, Kathryn; Maartens, Gary; Boulle, Andrew; Igumbor, Ehimario U.; Davies, Mary-Ann

    2017-01-01

    Introduction There are a limited number of paediatric antiretroviral drug options. Characterising the long term safety and durability of different antiretrovirals in children is important to optimise management of HIV infected children and to determine the estimated need for alternative drugs in paediatric regimens. We describe first-line antiretroviral therapy (ART) durability and reasons for discontinuations in children at two South African ART programmes, where lopinavir/ritonavir has been recommended for children <3 years old since 2004, and abacavir replaced stavudine as the preferred nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor in 2010. Methods We included children (<16 years at ART initiation) who initiated ≥3 antiretrovirals between 2004–2014 with ≥1 follow-up visit on ART. We estimated the incidence of first antiretroviral discontinuation using Kaplan-Meier analysis. We determined the reasons for antiretroviral discontinuations using competing risks analysis. We used Cox regression to identify factors associated with treatment-limiting toxicity. Results We included 3579 children with median follow-up duration of 41 months (IQR 14–72). At ART initiation, median age was 44 months (IQR 13–89) and median CD4 percent was 15% (IQR 9–21%). At three and five years on ART, 72% and 26% of children respectively remained on their initial regimen. By five years on ART, the most common reasons for discontinuations were toxicity (32%), treatment failure (18%), treatment simplification (5%), drug interactions (3%), and other or unspecified reasons (18%). The incidences of treatment limiting toxicity were 50.6 (95% CI 46.2–55.4), 1.6 (0.5–4.8), 2.0 (1.2–3.3), and 1.3 (0.6–2.8) per 1000 patient years for stavudine, abacavir, efavirenz and lopinavir/ritonavir respectively. Conclusions While stavudine was associated with a high risk of treatment-limiting toxicity, abacavir, lopinavir/ritonavir and efavirenz were well-tolerated. This supports the World Health

  14. Did Universal Access to ARVT in Mexico Impact Suboptimal Antiretroviral Prescriptions?

    PubMed Central

    Caro-Vega, Yanink; Sierra-Madero, Juan; Colchero, M. Arantxa; Crabtree-Ramírez, Brenda; Bautista-Arredondo, Sergio

    2013-01-01

    Background. Universal access to antiretroviral therapy (ARVT) started in Mexico in 2001; no evaluation of the features of ARVT prescriptions over time has been conducted. The aim of the study is to document trends in the quality of ARVT-prescription before and after universal access. Methods. We describe ARVT prescriptions before and after 2001 in three health facilities from the following subsystems: the Mexican Social Security (IMSS), the Ministry of Health (SSA), and National Institutes of Health (INS). Combinations of drugs and reasons for change were classified according to current Mexican guidelines and state-of-the-art therapy. Comparisons were made using χ2 tests. Results. Before 2001, 29% of patients starting ARVT received HAART; after 2001 it increased to 90%. The proportion of adequate prescriptions decreased within the two periods of study in all facilities (P value < 0.01). The INS and SSA were more likely to be prescribed adequately (P value < 0.01) compared to IMSS. The distribution of reasons for change was not significantly different during this time for all facilities (P value > 0.05). Conclusions. Universal ARVT access in Mexico was associated with changes in ARVT-prescription patterns over time. Health providers' performance improved, but not homogeneously. Training of personnel and guidelines updating is essential to improve prescription. PMID:24396592

  15. Impact of antiretroviral therapy on clinical outcomes in HIV + kidney transplant recipients: Review of 58 cases

    PubMed Central

    Lorio, Marco A.; Morris, Michele I.; Abbo, Lilian M.; Simkins, Jacques; Guerra, Giselle; Roth, David; Kupin, Warren L.; Mattiazzi, Adela; Ciancio, Gaetano; Chen, Linda J.; Burke, George W.; Figueiro, Jose M.; Ruiz, Phillip; Camargo, Jose F.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Antiretroviral therapy (ART) poses challenging drug-drug interactions with immunosuppressant agents in transplant recipients.  We aimed to determine the impact of specific antiretroviral regimens in clinical outcomes of HIV + kidney transplant recipients.  Methods: A single-center, retrospective cohort study was conducted at a large academic center. Subjects included 58 HIV - to HIV + adult, first-time kidney transplant patients. The main intervention was ART regimen used after transplantation.  The main outcomes assessed at one- and three-years were: patient survival, death-censored graft survival, and biopsy-proven acute rejection; we also assessed serious infections within the first six months post-transplant.  Results: Patient and graft survival at three years were both 90% for the entire cohort. Patients receiving protease inhibitor (PI)-containing regimens had lower patient survival at one and three years than patients receiving PI-sparing regimens: 85% vs. 100% ( p=0.06) and 82% vs. 100% ( p=0.03), respectively. Patients who received PI-containing regimens had twelve times higher odds of death at 3 years compared to patients who were not exposed to PIs (odds ratio, 12.05; 95% confidence interval, 1.31-1602; p=0.02).  Three-year death-censored graft survival was lower in patients receiving PI vs. patients on PI-sparing regimens (82 vs 100%, p=0.03). Patients receiving integrase strand transfer inhibitors-containing regimens had higher 3-year graft survival. There were no differences in the incidence of acute rejection by ART regimen. Individuals receiving PIs had a higher incidence of serious infections compared to those on PI-sparing regimens (39 vs. 8%, p=0.01).  Conclusions: PI-containing ART regimens are associated with adverse outcomes in HIV + kidney transplant recipients. PMID:28299182

  16. Factors influencing antiretroviral treatment suboptimal adherence among perinatally HIV-infected adolescents in Thailand

    PubMed Central

    Munir, Kerim; Kanabkaew, Cheeraya; Le Coeur, Sophie

    2017-01-01

    Background Existing studies have suggested decreased adherence and rebound in mortality in perinatally HIV-infected adolescents receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART) as compared to adults and young children. Methods We used both quantitative and qualitative approaches to identify factors influencing adherence among perinatally infected adolescents in Thailand. We analyzed data from 568 pairs of perinatally infected adolescents (aged 12–19) and their primary caregivers in the Teens Living With Antiretrovirals (TEEWA) study, a cross-sectional survey conducted in 2010–2012. We also conducted 12 in-depth interviews in 2014 with infected adolescents or their primary caregivers to elicit experiences of living with long-term ART. Results From the quantitative analysis, a total of 275 (48.4%) adolescents had evidence of suboptimal adherence based on this composite outcome: adolescents self-reported missing doses in the past 7 days, caregiver rating of overall adherence as suboptimal, or latest HIV-RNA viral load ≥1000 copies/ml. In multivariate logistic regression analysis, younger age, having grandparents or extended family members as the primary caregiver, caregiver-assessed poor intellectual ability, having a boy/girlfriend, frequent online chatting, self-reported unhappiness and easiness in asking doctors questions were significantly associated with suboptimal adherence. From the in-depth interviews, tensed relationships with caregivers, forgetfulness due to busy schedules, and fear of disclosing HIV status to others, especially boy/girlfriends, were important contributors to suboptimal adherence. Social and emotional support and counseling from peer group was consistently reported as a strong adherence-promoting factor. Conclusion Our findings highlight unique barriers of ART adherence among the perinatally infected adolescents. Future interventions should be targeted at helping adolescents to improve interpersonal relationships and build adaptive skills in

  17. Rapid starting methanol reactor system

    DOEpatents

    Chludzinski, Paul J.; Dantowitz, Philip; McElroy, James F.

    1984-01-01

    The invention relates to a methanol-to-hydrogen cracking reactor for use with a fuel cell vehicular power plant. The system is particularly designed for rapid start-up of the catalytic methanol cracking reactor after an extended shut-down period, i.e., after the vehicular fuel cell power plant has been inoperative overnight. Rapid system start-up is accomplished by a combination of direct and indirect heating of the cracking catalyst. Initially, liquid methanol is burned with a stoichiometric or slightly lean air mixture in the combustion chamber of the reactor assembly. The hot combustion gas travels down a flue gas chamber in heat exchange relationship with the catalytic cracking chamber transferring heat across the catalyst chamber wall to heat the catalyst indirectly. The combustion gas is then diverted back through the catalyst bed to heat the catalyst pellets directly. When the cracking reactor temperature reaches operating temperature, methanol combustion is stopped and a hot gas valve is switched to route the flue gas overboard, with methanol being fed directly to the catalytic cracking reactor. Thereafter, the burner operates on excess hydrogen from the fuel cells.

  18. Vibrational spectra and quantum mechanical calculations of antiretroviral drugs: Nevirapine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayala, A. P.; Siesler, H. W.; Wardell, S. M. S. V.; Boechat, N.; Dabbene, V.; Cuffini, S. L.

    2007-02-01

    Nevirapine (11-cyclopropyl-5,11-dihydro-4-methyl-6H-dipyrido[3,2-b:2',3'e][1,4]diazepin-6-one) is an antiretroviral drug belonging to the class of the non-nucleoside inhibitors of the HIV-1 virus reverse transcriptase. As most of this kind of antiretroviral drugs, nevirapine displays a butterfly-like conformation which is preserved in complexes with the HIV-1 reverse transcriptase. In this work, we present a detailed vibrational spectroscopy investigation of nevirapine by using mid-infrared, near-infrared, and Raman spectroscopies. These data are supported by quantum mechanical calculations, which allow us to characterize completely the vibrational spectra of this compound. Based on these results, we discuss the correlation between the vibrational modes and the crystalline structure of the most stable form of nevirapine.

  19. Antiretroviral Tissue Kinetics: In Vivo Imaging Using Positron Emission Tomography▿

    PubMed Central

    Di Mascio, Michele; Srinivasula, Sharat; Bhattacharjee, Abesh; Cheng, Lily; Martiniova, Lucia; Herscovitch, Peter; Lertora, Juan; Kiesewetter, Dale

    2009-01-01

    Our current knowledge on the antiviral efficacy, dosing, and toxicity of available highly active antiretroviral therapy regimens is mostly derived from plasma or blood kinetics of anti-human immunodeficiency virus (anti-HIV) drugs. However, the blood comprises only 2% of the total target cells in the body. Tissue drug levels may differ substantially from corresponding plasma levels, and drug distribution processes may be characterized by high intertissue variability, leading to suboptimal target site concentrations and the potential risk for therapeutic failures. Positron emission tomography has greatly expanded the scope of the pharmacokinetic measurements that can be performed noninvasively in animal models or humans. We have prepared [18F]FPMPA, a fluorine-18-radiolabeled analogue of tenofovir, to study antiretroviral tissue kinetics in vivo noninvasively and tested the imaging probe in rats. The biodistribution of the fluorine-18 analogue closely follows that of nonfluorinated tenofovir. Compared to that in the blood, the levels of penetration of the antiretroviral drug were found to be significantly reduced in the spleen and submandibular lymph nodes (∼2-fold), in the mesenteric lymph nodes and the testes (∼4-fold), and in the brain compartment (∼25-fold). Intersubject variability of the trough drug concentration (measured at 120 min) in certain tissues, like the colon (coefficient of variation, >100%), is not reflected by the intersubject variability in the blood compartment (coefficient of variation, 24%). Positron emission tomography imaging of the fluorine-18 analogue revealed the accumulation of the antiretroviral drug in the cortex of the kidneys, a potential correlate of tenofovir-induced nephrotoxicity observed in HIV-1-infected treated patients. Thus, [18F]FPMPA is a promising radiotracer for evaluation of tenofovir biodistribution under carefully controlled drug administration protocols. PMID:19667288

  20. Susceptibility of porcine endogenous retrovirus to anti-retroviral inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Argaw, Takele; Colon-Moran, Winston; Wilson, Carolyn

    2016-01-01

    Background Porcine endogenous retrovirus (PERV) is an endogenous retrovirus that poses a risk of iatrogenic transmission in the context of pig-to-human xenotransplantation. The lack of a means to control PERV infection in the context of pig-to-human xenotransplantation is a major concern in the field. In this study, we set out to evaluate the ability of currently licensed anti-HIV drugs, and other types of anti-retroviral compounds, to inhibit PERV infection in vitro. Methods We used target cells stably expressing one of the known PERV viral receptors, an infectious molecular clone, PERV-A 14/220, and at least one drug from each class of anti-retroviral inhibitors as well as off-label drugs shown to have anti-viral activities. The susceptibility of PERV-A 14/220 LacZ to the anti-retroviral drugs was determined from infected cells by histochemical staining. Results We extend the results of previous studies by showing that, in addition to raltegravir, dolutegravir is found to have a potent inhibitory activity against PERV replication (IC50 8.634 ±0.336 and IC50 3.06 ± 0.844 nm, respectively). The anti-HIV drug zidovudine (AZT) showed considerable anti-PERV activity with IC50 of 1.923 ±0.691 μm as well. Conclusions The study results indicate that some of the licensed antiretroviral drugs may be useful for controlling PERV infection. However, the efficacy at nanomolar concentrations put forward integrase inhibitors as a drug that has the potential to be useful in the event that xenotransplantation recipients have evidence of PERV transmission and replication. PMID:27028725

  1. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of antiretrovirals in the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Calcagno, Andrea; Di Perri, Giovanni; Bonora, Stefano

    2014-10-01

    HIV-positive patients may be effectively treated with highly active antiretroviral therapy and such a strategy is associated with striking immune recovery and viral load reduction to very low levels. Despite undeniable results, the central nervous system (CNS) is commonly affected during the course of HIV infection, with neurocognitive disorders being as prevalent as 20-50 % of treated subjects. This review discusses the pathophysiology of CNS infection by HIV and the barriers to efficacious control of such a mechanism, including the available data on compartmental drug penetration and on pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic relationships. In the reviewed articles, a high variability in drug transfer to the CNS is highlighted with several mechanisms as well as methodological issues potentially influencing the observed results. Nevirapine and zidovudine showed the highest cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) to plasma ratios, although target concentrations are currently unknown for the CNS. The use of the composite CSF concentration effectiveness score has been associated with better virological outcomes (lower HIV RNA) but has been inconsistently associated with neurocognitive outcomes. These findings support the CNS effectiveness of commonly used highly antiretroviral therapies. The use of antiretroviral drugs with increased CSF penetration and/or effectiveness in treating or preventing neurocognitive disorders however needs to be assessed in well-designed prospective studies.

  2. Adverse effects of antiretroviral therapy for HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Montessori, Valentina; Press, Natasha; Harris, Marianne; Akagi, Linda; Montaner, Julio S G

    2004-01-20

    Long-term remission of HIV-1 disease can be readily achieved by combinations of antiretroviral agents. The suppression of plasma viral loads to less than the limit of quantification of the most sensitive commercially available assays (i.e., less than 50 copies/mL) and the coincident improvement in CD4 T cell counts is associated with resolution of established opportunistic infections and a decrease in the risk of new opportunistic infections. However, prolonged treatment with combination regimens can be difficult to sustain because of problems with adherence and toxic effects. All antiretroviral drugs can have both short-term and long-term adverse events. The risk of specific side effects varies from drug to drug, from drug class to drug class, and from patient to patient. A better understanding of the adverse effects of antiretroviral agents is of interest not only for HIV specialists as they try to optimize therapy, but also for other physicians who care for HIV-positive patients.

  3. Anaemia and zidovudine-containing antiretroviral therapy in paediatric antiretroviral programmes in the IeDEA Paediatric West African Database to evaluate AIDS

    PubMed Central

    Renner, Lorna A; Dicko, Fatoumata; Kouéta, Fla; Malateste, Karen; Gueye, Ramatoulaye D; Aka, Edmond; Eboua, Tanoh K; Azondékon, Alain; Okomo, Uduok; Touré, Pety; Ekouévi, Didier; Leroy, Valeriane

    2013-01-01

    Introduction There is a risk of anaemia among HIV-infected children on antiretroviral therapy (ART) containing zidovudine (ZDV) recommended in first-line regimens in the WHO guidelines. We estimated the risk of severe anaemia after initiation of a ZDV-containing regimen in HIV-infected children included in the IeDEA West African database. Methods Standardized collection of data from HIV-infected children (positive PCR<18 months or positive serology ≥18 months) followed up in HIV programmes was included in the regional IeDEA West Africa collaboration. Ten clinical centres from seven countries contributed (Benin, Burkina Faso, Côte d'Ivoire, Gambia, Ghana, Mali and Senegal) to this collection. Inclusion criteria were age <16 years and starting ART. We explored the data quality of haemoglobin documentation over time and the incidence and predictors of severe anaemia (Hb<7g/dL) per 100 child-years of follow-up over the duration of first-line antiretroviral therapy. Results As of December 2009, among the 2933 children included in the collaboration, 45% were girls, median age was five years; median CD4 cell percentage was 13%; median weight-for-age z-score was −2.7; and 1772 (60.4%) had a first-line ZDV-containing regimen. At baseline, 70% of the children with a first-line ZDV-containing regimen had a haemoglobin measure available versus 76% in those not on ZDV (p≤0.01): the prevalence of severe anaemia was 3.0% (n=38) in the ZDV group versus 10.2% (n=89) in those without (p<0. 01). Over the first-line follow-up, 58.9% of the children had ≥1 measure of haemoglobin available in those exposed to ZDV versus 60.4% of those not (p=0.45). Severe anaemia occurred in 92 children with an incidence of 2.47 per 100 child-years of follow-up in those on a ZDV-containing regimen versus 4.25 in those not (p≤0.01). Adjusted for age at ART initiation and first-line regimen, a weight-for-age z-score ≤−3 was a strong predictor associated with a 5.59 times risk of severe

  4. The Home Start Demonstration Program: An Overview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Child Development (DHEW), Washington, DC.

    Following a discussion of the Home Start program and its evaluation plan, the 16 Office of Child Development-funded Home Start projects in the United States are described. Home start is a 3-year Head Start demonstration program, aimed at the 3-5 years of age range, which focuses on enhancing the quality of children's lives by building upon…

  5. 30 CFR 75.1913 - Starting aids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Starting aids. 75.1913 Section 75.1913 Mineral... SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Diesel-Powered Equipment § 75.1913 Starting aids. (a) Volatile fuel starting aids shall be used in accordance with recommendations provided by the starting...

  6. 30 CFR 75.1913 - Starting aids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Starting aids. 75.1913 Section 75.1913 Mineral... SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Diesel-Powered Equipment § 75.1913 Starting aids. (a) Volatile fuel starting aids shall be used in accordance with recommendations provided by the starting...

  7. 30 CFR 75.1913 - Starting aids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Starting aids. 75.1913 Section 75.1913 Mineral... SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Diesel-Powered Equipment § 75.1913 Starting aids. (a) Volatile fuel starting aids shall be used in accordance with recommendations provided by the starting...

  8. 30 CFR 75.1913 - Starting aids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Starting aids. 75.1913 Section 75.1913 Mineral... SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Diesel-Powered Equipment § 75.1913 Starting aids. (a) Volatile fuel starting aids shall be used in accordance with recommendations provided by the starting...

  9. 30 CFR 75.1913 - Starting aids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Starting aids. 75.1913 Section 75.1913 Mineral... SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Diesel-Powered Equipment § 75.1913 Starting aids. (a) Volatile fuel starting aids shall be used in accordance with recommendations provided by the starting...

  10. Demographic and HIV-specific characteristics of participants enrolled in the INSIGHT Strategic Timing of AntiRetroviral Treatment trial

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, S; Babiker, AG; Emery, S; Gordin, FM; Lundgren, JD; Neaton, JN; Bakowska, E; Schechter, M; Wiselka, MJ; Wolff, MJ

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The risks and benefits of initiating antiretroviral treatment (ART) at high CD4 cell counts have not been reliably quantified. The Strategic Timing of AntiRetroviral Treatment (START) study is a randomised international clinical trial that compares immediate with deferred initiation of ART for HIV-positive individuals with CD4 cell counts above 500 cells/μL. We describe the demographics, HIV-specific characteristics and medical history of this cohort. Methods Data collected at baseline include demographics, HIV-specific laboratory values, prior medical diagnoses and concomitant medications. Baseline characteristics were compared by geographical region, gender, and age. Results START enrolled 4685 HIV-positive participants from 215 sites in 35 countries. The median age is 36 years (IQR: 29-44), 27% are female, 45% self-identify as white, 30% black, 14% Latino/Hispanic, 8% Asian and 3% other. HIV acquisition is reported as 55% men who have sex with men, 38% heterosexual sex, 1% injecting drug use, and 5% other/unknown. Median time since HIV diagnosis is 1.0 year (IQR: 0.4-3.0) and the median CD4 and HIV RNA values at study entry are 651 cells/μL (584-765) and 12,754 copies/mL (IQR: 3,014-43,607), respectively. Conclusion START has enrolled a diverse group of ART-naïve individuals with high CD4 cell counts who are comparable to the HIV-positive population from the regions they were enrolled. The information collected with this robust study design will provide a database to evaluate the risks and benefits of early ART use for many important outcomes. PMID:25711321

  11. [New and "old" antiretroviral drugs in Pediatrics: new doses, formulations and associations].

    PubMed

    Villarroel B, Julia

    2010-10-01

    Of the 25 antiretroviral drugs available in the market, only 16 are allowed for prescription in the pediatric patients. The antiretroviral, pertaining to the first three families, used for two decades, remain valid and are important components of antiretroviral therapy in naive children. We describe doses, presentations and current associations for these drugs in children, and also discuss new co-formulations that will reduce the number of doses, improve tolerance and therefore achieve better adherence of pediatric patients.

  12. Facial Emotion Processing in Aviremic HIV-infected Adults.

    PubMed

    González-Baeza, A; Carvajal, F; Bayón, C; Pérez-Valero, I; Montes-Ramírez, M; Arribas, J R

    2016-08-01

    The emotional processing in human immunodeficiency virus-seropositive individuals (HIV+) has been scarcely studied. We included HIV+ individuals (n = 107) on antiretroviral therapy (≥2 years) who completed 6 facial processing tasks and neurocognitive testing. We compared HIV+ and healthy adult (HA) participants (n = 40) in overall performance of each facial processing task. Multiple logistic regressions were conducted to explore predictors of poorer accuracy in those measures in which HIV+ individuals performed poorer than HA participants. We separately explored the impact of neurocognitive status, antiretroviral regimen, and hepatitis C virus (HCV) coinfection on the tasks performance. We found similar performance in overall facial emotion discrimination, recognition, and recall between HIV+ and HA participants. The HIV+ group had poorer recognition of particular negative emotions. Lower WAIS-III Vocabulary scores and active HCV predicted poorer accuracy in recognition of particular emotions. Our results suggest that permanent damage of emotion-related brain systems might persist despite long-term effective antiretroviral therapy.

  13. Decrease in sexual risk behaviours after early initiation of antiretroviral therapy: a 24-month prospective study in Côte d'Ivoire

    PubMed Central

    Jean, Kévin; Gabillard, Delphine; Moh, Raoul; Danel, Christine; Desgrées-du-Loû, Annabel; N'takpe, Jean-Baptiste; Carrou, Jérôme Le; Badjé, Anani; Eholié, Serge; Lert, France; Anglaret, Xavier; Dray-Spira, Rosemary

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Whether early antiretroviral therapy (ART) initiation could impact sexual risk behaviours remains to be documented. We aimed to investigate changes in sexual behaviours within the 24 months following an early versus standard ART initiation in HIV-positive adults with high CD4 counts. Methods We used data from a prospective behavioural study nested in a randomized controlled trial of early ART (Temprano-ANRS12136). Time trends in sexual behaviours from enrolment in the trial (M0) to 12-month (M12) and 24-month (M24) visits were measured and compared, using Generalized Estimating Equations models, between participants randomly assigned either to initiate ART immediately (early ART) or to defer ART initiation until on-going WHO starting criteria are met (standard ART). Indicators of sexual behaviours included 1) sexual activity in the past year, 2) multiple partnership in the past year, 3) unprotected sex at last intercourse and 4) risky sex (i.e. unprotected sex with a partner of HIV negative/unknown status) at last intercourse. Results Analyses included 1952 participants (975 with early ART and 977 with standard ART; overall median baseline CD4 count: 469/mm3). Among participants with early ART, significant decreases were found between M0 and M24 in sexual activity (Odds Ratio [OR] 0.72, 95% Confidence Interval [95% CI] 0.57–0.92), multiple partnership (OR 0.57, 95% CI 0.41–0.79), unprotected sex (OR 0.59, 95% CI 0.47–0.75) and risky sex (OR 0.58, 95% CI 0.45–0.76). Among participants with standard ART, sexual behaviours showed similar trends over time. These decreases mostly occurred within the 12 months following enrolment in the trial in both groups and prior to ART initiation in participants with standard ART. For unprotected sex and risky sex, decreases were or tended to be more pronounced among patients reporting that their last sexual partner was non-cohabiting. Conclusions In these sub-Saharan adults with high CD4 counts, entry into HIV

  14. Treatment of HIV in the CNS: effects of antiretroviral therapy and the promise of non-antiretroviral therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Peluso, Michael J; Spudich, Serena

    2014-09-01

    The growing recognition of the burden of neurologic disease associated with HIV infection in the last decade has led to renewed efforts to characterize the pathophysiology of the virus within the central nervous system (CNS). The concept of the AIDS-dementia complex is now better understood as a spectrum of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND), which range from asymptomatic disease to severe impairment. Recent work has shown that even optimally treated patients can experience not only persistent HAND, but also the development of new neurologic abnormalities despite viral suppression. This has thrown into question what the impact of antiretroviral therapy has been on the incidence and prevalence of neurocognitive dysfunction. In this context, the last few years have seen a concentrated effort to identify the effects that antiretroviral therapy has on the neurologic manifestations of HIV and to develop therapeutic modalities that might specifically alter the trajectory of HIV within the CNS.

  15. Reported consent processes and demographics: a substudy of the INSIGHT Strategic Timing of AntiRetroviral Treatment trial

    PubMed Central

    Denning, Eileen; Sharma, Shweta; Smolskis, Mary; Touloumi, Giota; Walker, Sarah; Babiker, Abdel; Clewett, Megan; Emanuel, Ezekiel; Florence, Eric; Papadopoulos, Antonios; Sánchez, Adriana; Tavel, Jorge; Grady, Christine

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Efforts are needed to improve informed consent of participants in research. The Strategic Timing of AntiRetroviral Therapy (START) study provides a unique opportunity to study the effect of length and complexity of informed consent documents on understanding and satisfaction among geographically diverse participants. Methods Interested START sites were randomised to use either the standard consent form or the concise consent form for all of the site’s participants. Results A total of 4473 HIV-positive participants at 154 sites worldwide took part in the Informed Consent Substudy, with consent given in 11 primary languages. Most sites sent written information to potential participants in advance of clinic visits, usually including the consent form. At about half the sites, staff reported spending less than an hour per participant in the consent process. The vast majority of sites assessed participant understanding using informal nonspecific questions or clinical judgment. Conclusions These data reflect the interest of START research staff in evaluating the consent process and improving informed consent. The START Informed Consent Substudy is by far the largest study of informed consent intervention ever conducted. Its results have the potential to impact how consent forms are written around the world. PMID:25711320

  16. Third National Even Start Evaluation: Program Impacts and Implications for Improvement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    St. Pierre, Robert; Ricciuti, Anne; Tao, Fumiyo; Creps, Cindy; Swartz, Janet; Lee, Wang; Parsad, Amanda; Rimdzius, Tracy

    The Even Start Literacy Program, established in 1989, aims to simultaneously improve the literacy of children and their parents through (1) early childhood education; (2) parenting education; (3) adult education; and (4) parent-child joint literacy activities. The report details findings from the third national Even Start evaluation. The…

  17. Prevalence of oral candidiasis in HIV/AIDS children in highly active antiretroviral therapy era. A literature analysis.

    PubMed

    Gaitán-Cepeda, Luis Alberto; Sánchez-Vargas, Octavio; Castillo, Nydia

    2015-08-01

    SummaryHighly active antiretroviral therapy has decreased the morbidity and mortality related to HIV infection, including oral opportunistic infections. This paper offers an analysis of the scientific literature on the epidemiological aspects of oral candidiasis in HIV-positive children in the combination antiretroviral therapy era. An electronic databases search was made covering the highly active antiretroviral therapy era (1998 onwards). The terms used were oral lesions, oral candidiasis and their combination with highly active antiretroviral therapy and HIV/AIDS children. The following data were collected from each paper: year and country in which the investigation was conducted, antiretroviral treatment, oral candidiasis prevalence and diagnostic parameters (clinical or microbiological). Prevalence of oral candidiasis varied from 2.9% in American HIV-positive children undergoing highly active antiretroviral therapy to 88% in Chilean HIV-positive children without antiretroviral therapy. With respect to geographical location and antiretroviral treatment, higher oral candidiasis prevalence in HIV-positive children on combination antiretroviral therapy/antiretroviral therapy was reported in African children (79.1%) followed by 45.9% reported in Hindu children. In HIV-positive Chilean children on no antiretroviral therapy, high oral candidiasis prevalence was reported (88%) followed by Nigerian children (80%). Oral candidiasis is still frequent in HIV-positive children in the highly active antiretroviral therapy era irrespective of geographical location, race and use of antiretroviral therapy.

  18. High prevalence of HIV-1 drug resistance among patients on first-line antiretroviral treatment in Lomé, Togo

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background With widespread use of antiretroviral (ARV) drugs in Africa, one of the major potential challenges is the risk of emergence of ARV drug-resistant HIV strains. Our objective is to evaluate the virological failure and genotypic drug-resistance mutations in patients receiving first-line highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) in routine clinics that use the World Health Organization public health approach to monitor antiretroviral treatment (ART) in Togo. Methods Patients on HAART for one year (10-14 months) were enrolled between April and October 2008 at three sites in Lomé, the capital city of Togo. Plasma viral load was measured with the NucliSENS EasyQ HIV-1 assay (Biomérieux, Lyon, France) and/or a Generic viral load assay (Biocentric, Bandol, France). Genotypic drug-resistance testing was performed with an inhouse assay on plasma samples from patients with viral loads of more than 1000 copies/ml. CD4 cell counts and demographic data were also obtained from medical records. Results A total of 188 patients receiving first-line antiretroviral treatment were enrolled, and 58 (30.8%) of them experienced virologic failure. Drug-resistance mutations were present in 46 patients, corresponding to 24.5% of all patients enrolled in the study. All 46 patients were resistant to non-nucleoside reverse-transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs): of these, 12 were resistant only to NNRTIs, 25 to NNRTIs and lamivudine/emtricitabine, and eight to all three drugs of their ARV regimes. Importantly, eight patients were already predicted to be resistant to etravirine, the new NNRTI, and three patients harboured the K65R mutation, inducing major resistance to tenofovir. Conclusions In Togo, efforts to provide access to ARV therapy for infected persons have increased since 2003, and scaling up of ART started in 2007. The high number of resistant strains observed in Togo shows clearly that the emergence of HIV drug resistance is of increasing concern in countries where ART is

  19. Starting a Lung Transplant Program

    PubMed Central

    Eberlein, Michael; Geist, Lois; Keech, John; Zabner, Joseph; Gruber, Peter J.; Iannettoni, Mark D.; Parekh, Kalpaj

    2015-01-01

    Lung transplantation is an effective therapy for many patients with end-stage lung disease. Few centers across the United States offer this therapy, as a successful lung transplant program requires significant institutional resources and specialized personnel. Analysis of the United Network of Organ Sharing database reveals that the failure rate of new programs exceeds 40%. These data suggest that an accurate assessment of program viability as well as a strategy to continuously assess defined quality measures is needed. As part of strategic planning, regional availability of recipient and donors should be assessed. Additionally, analysis of institutional expertise at the physician, support staff, financial, and administrative levels is necessary. In May of 2007, we started a new lung transplant program at the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics and have performed 101 transplants with an average recipient 1-year survival of 91%, placing our program among the top in the country for the past 5 years. Herein, we review internal and external factors that impact the viability of a new lung transplant program. We discuss the use of four prospectively identified quality measures: volume, recipient outcomes, financial solvency, and academic contribution as one approach to achieve programmatic excellence. PMID:25940255

  20. Lower Levels of Antiretroviral Therapy Enrollment Among Men with HIV Compared with Women - 12 Countries, 2002-2013.

    PubMed

    Auld, Andrew F; Shiraishi, Ray W; Mbofana, Francisco; Couto, Aleny; Fetogang, Ernest Benny; El-Halabi, Shenaaz; Lebelonyane, Refeletswe; Pilatwe, Pilatwe Tlhagiso; Hamunime, Ndapewa; Okello, Velephi; Mutasa-Apollo, Tsitsi; Mugurungi, Owen; Murungu, Joseph; Dzangare, Janet; Kwesigabo, Gideon; Wabwire-Mangen, Fred; Mulenga, Modest; Hachizovu, Sebastian; Ettiegne-Traore, Virginie; Mohamed, Fayama; Bashorun, Adebobola; Nhan, Do Thi; Hai, Nguyen Huu; Quang, Tran Huu; Van Onacker, Joelle Deas; Francois, Kesner; Robin, Ermane G; Desforges, Gracia; Farahani, Mansour; Kamiru, Harrison; Nuwagaba-Biribonwoha, Harriet; Ehrenkranz, Peter; Denison, Julie A; Koole, Olivier; Tsui, Sharon; Torpey, Kwasi; Mukadi, Ya Diul; van Praag, Eric; Menten, Joris; Mastro, Timothy D; Hamilton, Carol Dukes; Abiri, Oseni Omomo; Griswold, Mark; Pierre, Edna; Xavier, Carla; Alfredo, Charity; Jobarteh, Kebba; Letebele, Mpho; Agolory, Simon; Baughman, Andrew L; Mutandi, Gram; Preko, Peter; Ryan, Caroline; Ao, Trong; Gonese, Elizabeth; Herman-Roloff, Amy; Ekra, Kunomboa A; Kouakou, Joseph S; Odafe, Solomon; Onotu, Dennis; Dalhatu, Ibrahim; Debem, Henry H; Nguyen, Duc B; Yen, Le Ngoc; Abdul-Quader, Abu S; Pelletier, Valerie; Williams, Seymour G; Behel, Stephanie; Bicego, George; Swaminathan, Mahesh; Dokubo, E Kainne; Adjorlolo-Johnson, Georgette; Marlink, Richard; Lowrance, David; Spira, Thomas; Colebunders, Robert; Bangsberg, David; Zee, Aaron; Kaplan, Jonathan; Ellerbrock, Tedd V

    2015-11-27

    Equitable access to antiretroviral therapy (ART) for men and women with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is a principle endorsed by most countries and funding bodies, including the U.S. President's Emergency Plan for AIDS (acquired immunodeficiency syndrome) Relief (PEPFAR) (1). To evaluate gender equity in ART access among adults (defined for this report as persons aged ≥15 years), 765,087 adult ART patient medical records from 12 countries in five geographic regions* were analyzed to estimate the ratio of women to men among new ART enrollees for each calendar year during 2002-2013. This annual ratio was compared with estimates from the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS)(†) of the ratio of HIV-infected adult women to men in the general population. In all 10 African countries and Haiti, the most recent estimates of the ratio of adult women to men among new ART enrollees significantly exceeded the UNAIDS estimates for the female-to-male ratio among HIV-infected adults by 23%-83%. In six African countries and Haiti, the ratio of women to men among new adult ART enrollees increased more sharply over time than the estimated UNAIDS female-to-male ratio among adults with HIV in the general population. Increased ART coverage among men is needed to decrease their morbidity and mortality and to reduce HIV incidence among their sexual partners. Reaching more men with HIV testing and linkage-to-care services and adoption of test-and-treat ART eligibility guidelines (i.e., regular testing of adults, and offering treatment to all infected persons with ART, regardless of CD4 cell test results) could reduce gender inequity in ART coverage.

  1. Impact of Extended Combination Antiretroviral Therapy on the Decline of HIV Prevalence in Pregnant Women in Malawi.

    PubMed

    Liotta, Giuseppe; Chimbwandira, Frank; Wouters, Kristien; Nielsen-Saines, Karin; Jere, Haswell; Mancinelli, Sandro; Ceffa, Susanna; Erba, Fulvio; Palombi, Leonardo; Marazzi, Maria Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Combination antiretroviral therapy has been shown to reduce HIV transmission and incident infections. In recent years, Malawi has significantly increased the number of individuals on combination antiretroviral drugs through more inclusive treatment policies. Using a retrospective observational cohort design, records with HIV test results were reviewed for pregnant women attending a referral hospital in Malawi over a 5-year period, with viral load measurements recorded. HIV prevalence over time was determined, and results correlated with population viral load. A total of 11 052 women were included in this analysis, with 440 (4.1%) HIV infections identified. HIV prevalence rates in pregnant women in Malawi halved from 6.4% to 3.0% over 5 years. Mean viral loads of adult patients decreased from 120 000 copies/mL to less than 20 000 copies/mL. Results suggest that community viral load has an effect on HIV incidence rates in the population, which in turn correlates with reduced HIV prevalence rates in pregnant women.

  2. Community-based treatment of advanced HIV disease: introducing DOT-HAART (directly observed therapy with highly active antiretroviral therapy).

    PubMed Central

    Farmer, P.; Léandre, F.; Mukherjee, J.; Gupta, R.; Tarter, L.; Kim, J. Y.

    2001-01-01

    In 2000, acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) overtook tuberculosis (TB) as the world's leading infectious cause of adult deaths. In affluent countries, however, AIDS mortality has dropped sharply, largely because of the use of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). Antiretroviral agents are not yet considered essential medications by international public health experts and are not widely used in the poor countries where human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) takes its greatest toll. Arguments against the use of HAART have mainly been based on the high cost of medications and the lack of the infrastructure necessary for using them wisely. We re- examine these arguments in the setting of rising AIDS mortality in developing countries and falling drug prices, and describe a small community-based treatment programme based on lessons gained in TB control. With the collaboration of Haitian community health workers experienced in the delivery of home-based and directly observed treatment for TB, an AIDS-prevention project was expanded to deliver HAART to a subset of HIV patients deemed most likely to benefit. The inclusion criteria and preliminary results are presented. We conclude that directly observed therapy (DOT) with HAART, "DOT-HAART", can be delivered effectively in poor settings if there is an uninterrupted supply of high-quality drugs. PMID:11799447

  3. Oklahoma City FILM Even Start Family Literacy Program Evaluation, 2000-2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richardson, Donna Castle; Shove, Joanie; Brickman, Sharon; Terrell, Sherry; Shields, Jane

    This report presents findings from the evaluation of the Oklahoma City Public Schools Even Start Program, also called the Family Intergenerational Literacy Model (FILM), now in its twelfth full year of operation. The evaluation focuses on the total population of adult students, preschoolers, adult graduates, and preschool graduates. The…

  4. Low immunologic response to highly active antiretroviral therapy in naive vertically human immunodeficiency virus type 1-infected children with severe immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    Resino, Salvador; Alvaro-Meca, Alejandro; de José, Maria Isabel; Martin-Fontelos, Pablo; Gutiérrez, Maria Dolores Gurbindo; Léon, Juan Antonio; Ramos, José Tomás; Ciria, Luis; Muñoz-Fernández, Maria Angeles

    2006-04-01

    We conducted a retrospective study to analyze the CD4 recovery of naive vertically human immunodeficiency virus-infected children with severe immunodeficiency who were followed up during at least 4 years of receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). Children with baseline CD4 of <15% did not reach a mean CD4 of > or =25% after the 4th year on HAART. We conclude that starting HAART after severe immunosuppression of naive HIV-infected children may not be effective for recovery of normal %CD4.

  5. The development of antiretroviral therapy and its impact on the HIV-1/AIDS pandemic

    PubMed Central

    Broder, Samuel

    2010-01-01

    In the last 25 years, HIV-1, the retrovirus responsible for the Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS), has gone from being an “inherently untreatable” infectious agent to one eminently susceptible to a range of approved therapies. During a five-year period, starting in the mid-1980s, my group at the National Cancer Institute played a role in the discovery and development of the first generation of antiretroviral agents, starting in 1985 with Retrovir® (zidovudine, AZT) in a collaboration with scientists at the Burroughs-Wellcome Company (now GlaxoSmithKline). We focused on AZT and related congeners in the dideoxynucleoside family of nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs), taking them from the laboratory to the clinic in response to the pandemic of AIDS, then a terrifying and lethal disease. These drugs proved, above all else, that HIV-1 infection is treatable, and such proof provided momentum for new therapies from many sources, directed at a range of viral targets, at a pace that has rarely if ever been matched in modern drug development. Antiretroviral therapy has brought about a substantial decrease in the death rate due to HIV-1 infection, changing it from a rapidly lethal disease into a chronic manageable condition, compatible with very long survival. This has special implications within the classic boundaries of public health around the world, but at the same time in certain regions may also affect a cycle of economic and civil instability in which HIV-1/AIDS is both cause and consequence. Many challenges remain, including 1.) the life-long duration of therapy; 2.) the ultimate role of pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP); 3.) the cardiometabolic side effects or other toxicities of long-term therapy; 4.) the emergence of drug-resistance and viral genetic diversity (non-B subtypes); 5.) the specter of new cross-species transmissions from established retroviral reservoirs in apes and Old World monkeys; and 6.) the continued pace of new HIV-1

  6. Prevention Starts in Early Childhood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maciel, B. A. P. C.; Neto, R. P.; Hartmann, R. P.; Melo, M. O.; Gonçalves, M.; Marques, G.; Rocha, F. L.; Silveira, G. M.

    2014-12-01

    Unlike other natural hazards, earthquakes strike suddenly and without warning. Consequently, prevention is the best we can do to ensure safety. In spite of the large and medium earthquakes, some of them tsunamigenic, that affected Portugal in the past, the Portuguese society is little aware of the seismic risk and has not developed an adequate culture of prevention. This is most probably due to the long time interval between destructive earthquakes. Earthquakes can be a real danger to societies, damaging human-made structures and endangering human lives. Earthquakes can trigger additional emergencies, and individuals should also be prepared to contend with it. By planning and practicing what to do if an earthquake strikes, children and their family can learn to react correctly and automatically when the shaking begins. Risks can then be dramatically lessened if the population is educated on how to react before, during and after an earthquake. Children's knowledge is ever growing. They have a fundamental role in changing societies. By educating the children of today we are forming better adults of tomorrow. We are simultaneously passing this knowledge to their caregivers and families. Through demonstrating how fundamental it is to be conscious of those issues, not only will the children will be informed, but also their relatives will be aware of such risks. We use this approach to explain children how to assess risk in a broader sense. We teach them other preventive measures, namely those related with electricity, gas and the danger on non-potable water, essential topics on "what to do before an earthquake" but also on the daily routines. This presentation will highlight the importance of encouraging a culture of prevention. This project funded by the Portuguese "Ciência Viva" program, and is conducted by science high-school students, teachers and the parents association. Scientific support is given by the seismology research group at Instituto Dom Luíz.

  7. Formula Feeding FAQs: Starting Solids and Milk

    MedlinePlus

    ... right, start with a single-grain, iron-fortified cereal for babies (rice cereal has traditionally been the first food for babies, ... prefer). Start with one or two tablespoons of cereal mixed with formula to achieve the right consistency. ( ...

  8. PCR hot-start using duplex primers.

    PubMed

    Kong, Deming; Shen, Hanxi; Huang, Yanping; Mi, Huaifeng

    2004-02-01

    A new technique of PCR hot-start using duplex primers has been developed which can decrease the undesirable products arising throughout PCR amplification thereby giving better results than a manual hot-start method.

  9. Patient-Reported Barriers to Adherence to Antiretroviral Therapy: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Mills, Edward J.; Nachega, Jean B.; Nsanzimana, Sabin; Penazzato, Martina; Appolo, Tsitsi; Ford, Nathan

    2016-01-01

    Background Maintaining high levels of adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) is a challenge across settings and populations. Understanding the relative importance of different barriers to adherence will help inform the targeting of different interventions and future research priorities. Methods and Findings We searched MEDLINE via PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, and PsychINFO from 01 January 1997 to 31 March 2016 for studies reporting barriers to adherence to ART. We calculated pooled proportions of reported barriers to adherence per age group (adults, adolescents, and children). We included data from 125 studies that provided information about adherence barriers for 17,061 adults, 1,099 children, and 856 adolescents. We assessed differences according to geographical location and level of economic development. The most frequently reported individual barriers included forgetting (adults 41.4%, 95% CI 37.3%–45.4%; adolescents 63.1%, 95% CI 46.3%–80.0%; children/caregivers 29.2%, 95% CI 20.1%–38.4%), being away from home (adults 30.4%, 95% CI 25.5%–35.2%; adolescents 40.7%, 95% CI 25.7%–55.6%; children/caregivers 18.5%, 95% CI 10.3%–26.8%), and a change to daily routine (adults 28.0%, 95% CI 20.9%–35.0%; adolescents 32.4%, 95% CI 0%–75.0%; children/caregivers 26.3%, 95% CI 15.3%–37.4%). Depression was reported as a barrier to adherence by more than 15% of patients across all age categories (adults 15.5%, 95% CI 12.8%–18.3%; adolescents 25.7%, 95% CI 17.7%–33.6%; children 15.1%, 95% CI 3.9%–26.3%), while alcohol/substance misuse was commonly reported by adults (12.9%, 95% CI 9.7%–16.1%) and adolescents (28.8%, 95% CI 11.8%–45.8%). Secrecy/stigma was a commonly cited barrier to adherence, reported by more than 10% of adults and children across all regions (adults 13.6%, 95% CI 11.9%–15.3%; children/caregivers 22.3%, 95% CI 10.2%–34.5%). Among adults, feeling sick (15.9%, 95% CI 13.0%–18.8%) was a more commonly cited barrier to

  10. Engine management during NTRE start up

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bulman, Mel; Saltzman, Dave

    1993-01-01

    The topics are presented in viewgraph form and include the following: total engine system management critical to successful nuclear thermal rocket engine (NTRE) start up; NERVA type engine start windows; reactor power control; heterogeneous reactor cooling; propellant feed system dynamics; integrated NTRE start sequence; moderator cooling loop and efficient NTRE starting; analytical simulation and low risk engine development; accurate simulation through dynamic coupling of physical processes; and integrated NTRE and mission performance.

  11. Mutations Related to Antiretroviral Resistance Identified by Ultra-Deep Sequencing in HIV-1 Infected Children under Structured Interruptions of HAART

    PubMed Central

    Vazquez-Guillen, Jose Manuel; Palacios-Saucedo, Gerardo C.; Rivera-Morales, Lydia G.; Garcia-Campos, Jorge; Ortiz-Lopez, Rocio; Noguera-Julian, Marc; Paredes, Roger; Vielma-Ramirez, Herlinda J.; Ramirez, Teresa J.; Chavez-Garcia, Marcelino; Lopez-Guillen, Paulo; Briones-Lara, Evangelina; Sanchez-Sanchez, Luz M.; Vazquez-Martinez, Carlos A.; Rodriguez-Padilla, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Although Structured Treatment Interruptions (STI) are currently not considered an alternative strategy for antiretroviral treatment, their true benefits and limitations have not been fully established. Some studies suggest the possibility of improving the quality of life of patients with this strategy; however, the information that has been obtained corresponds mostly to studies conducted in adults, with a lack of knowledge about its impact on children. Furthermore, mutations associated with antiretroviral resistance could be selected due to sub-therapeutic levels of HAART at each interruption period. Genotyping methods to determine the resistance profiles of the infecting viruses have become increasingly important for the management of patients under STI, thus low-abundance antiretroviral drug-resistant mutations (DRM’s) at levels under limit of detection of conventional genotyping (<20% of quasispecies) could increase the risk of virologic failure. In this work, we analyzed the protease and reverse transcriptase regions of the pol gene by ultra-deep sequencing in pediatric patients under STI with the aim of determining the presence of high- and low-abundance DRM’s in the viral rebounds generated by the STI. High-abundance mutations in protease and high- and low-abundance mutations in reverse transcriptase were detected but no one of these are directly associated with resistance to antiretroviral drugs. The results could suggest that the evaluated STI program is virologically safe, but strict and carefully planned studies, with greater numbers of patients and interruption/restart cycles, are still needed to evaluate the selection of DRM’s during STI. PMID:26807922

  12. Strategies for Living with the Challenges of HIV and Antiretroviral Use in Zambia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Deborah; Zulu, Isaac; Mumbi, Miriam; Chitalu, Ndashi; Vamos, Szonja; Gomez, Jacqueline; Weiss, Stephen M.

    2009-01-01

    This study sought to identify strategies for living with the challenges of HIV and antiretroviral (ARV) use among new medication users in urban Zambia. Participants (n = 160) were recruited from urban Lusaka, Zambia. Qualitative Data was drawn from monthly ARV treatment education intervention groups addressing HIV and antiretroviral use. Themes…

  13. Approaches to rationing antiretroviral treatment: ethical and equity implications.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Sara; Chanfreau, Catherine

    2005-07-01

    Despite a growing global commitment to the provision of antiretroviral therapy (ART), its availability is still likely to be less than the need. This imbalance raises ethical dilemmas about who should be granted access to publicly-subsidized ART programmes. This paper reviews the eligibility and targeting criteria used in four case-study countries at different points in the scale-up of ART, with the aim of drawing lessons regarding ethical approaches to rationing. Mexico, Senegal, Thailand and Uganda have each made an explicit policy commitment to provide antiretrovirals to all those in need, but are achieving this goal in steps--beginning with explicit rationing of access to care. Drawing upon the case-studies and experiences elsewhere, categories of explicit rationing criteria have been identified. These include biomedical factors, adherence to treatment, prevention-driven factors, social and economic benefits, financial factors and factors driven by ethical arguments. The initial criteria for determining eligibility are typically clinical criteria and assessment of adherence prospects, followed by a number of other factors. Rationing mechanisms reflect several underlying ethical theories and the ethical underpinnings of explicit rationing criteria should reflect societal values. In order to ensure this alignment, widespread consultation with a variety of stakeholders, and not only policy-makers or physicians, is critical. Without such explicit debate, more rationing will occur implicitly and this may be more inequitable. The effects of rationing mechanisms upon equity are critically dependent upon the implementation processes. As antiretroviral programmes are implemented it is crucial to monitor who gains access to these programmes.

  14. Antiretroviral adherence during pregnancy and postpartum in Latin America.

    PubMed

    Kreitchmann, Regis; Harris, D Robert; Kakehasi, Fabiana; Haberer, Jessica E; Cahn, Pedro; Losso, Marcelo; Teles, Elizabete; Pilotto, Jose H; Hofer, Cristina B; Read, Jennifer S

    2012-08-01

    Adherence to antiretrovirals by pregnant women (and postpartum women if breastfeeding) is crucial to effectively decrease maternal viral load and decrease the risk of mother-to-child transmission of HIV. Our objectives were to describe self-reported adherence to antiretrovirals during the antepartum (after 22 weeks of pregnancy) and postpartum periods (6-12 weeks and 6 months), and identify predictors of adherence among HIV-infected women enrolled and followed in a prospective cohort study from June 2008 to June 2010 at multiple sites in Latin America. Adherence was evaluated using the number of missed and expected doses during the 3 days before the study visit. At the pre-delivery visit, 340 of 376 women (90%) reported perfect adherence. This rate significantly decreased by 6-12 weeks (171/214 [80%]) and 6 months postpartum (163/199 [82%], p<0.01). The odds for less than perfect adherence at the pre-delivery visit was significantly higher for pregnant women with current tobacco use (odds ratio [OR]=2.9, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.46-6.14; p=0.0029). At 6-12 weeks postpartum, the probability of non-perfect adherence increased by 6% for each 1 year increase in age (OR=1.06, 95% CI: 1.00-1.12, p=0.0497). At 6 months postpartum, the odds of nonperfect adherence was higher for those who were currently using alcohol (OR=3.04, 95% CI: 1.34-6.90; p=0.0079). Although a self-report measure of adherence based on only 3 days may lead to overestimation of actual adherence over time, women with perfect adherence had lower viral loads and higher CD4 counts. Adherence to antiretrovirals decreased significantly postpartum. Interventions should target women at high risk for lower adherence during pregnancy and postpartum, including tobacco and alcohol users.

  15. Antiretroviral Adherence During Pregnancy and Postpartum in Latin America

    PubMed Central

    Harris, D. Robert; Kakehasi, Fabiana; Haberer, Jessica E.; Cahn, Pedro; Losso, Marcelo; Teles, Elizabete; Pilotto, Jose H.; Hofer, Cristina B.; Read, Jennifer S.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Adherence to antiretrovirals by pregnant women (and postpartum women if breastfeeding) is crucial to effectively decrease maternal viral load and decrease the risk of mother-to-child transmission of HIV. Our objectives were to describe self-reported adherence to antiretrovirals during the antepartum (after 22 weeks of pregnancy) and postpartum periods (6–12 weeks and 6 months), and identify predictors of adherence among HIV-infected women enrolled and followed in a prospective cohort study from June 2008 to June 2010 at multiple sites in Latin America. Adherence was evaluated using the number of missed and expected doses during the 3 days before the study visit. At the pre-delivery visit, 340 of 376 women (90%) reported perfect adherence. This rate significantly decreased by 6–12 weeks (171/214 [80%]) and 6 months postpartum (163/199 [82%], p<0.01). The odds for less than perfect adherence at the pre-delivery visit was significantly higher for pregnant women with current tobacco use (odds ratio [OR]=2.9, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.46–6.14; p=0.0029). At 6–12 weeks postpartum, the probability of non-perfect adherence increased by 6% for each 1 year increase in age (OR=1.06, 95% CI: 1.00–1.12, p=0.0497). At 6 months postpartum, the odds of nonperfect adherence was higher for those who were currently using alcohol (OR=3.04, 95% CI: 1.34–6.90; p=0.0079). Although a self-report measure of adherence based on only 3 days may lead to overestimation of actual adherence over time, women with perfect adherence had lower viral loads and higher CD4 counts. Adherence to antiretrovirals decreased significantly postpartum. Interventions should target women at high risk for lower adherence during pregnancy and postpartum, including tobacco and alcohol users. PMID:22663185

  16. Approaches to rationing antiretroviral treatment: ethical and equity implications.

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Sara; Chanfreau, Catherine

    2005-01-01

    Despite a growing global commitment to the provision of antiretroviral therapy (ART), its availability is still likely to be less than the need. This imbalance raises ethical dilemmas about who should be granted access to publicly-subsidized ART programmes. This paper reviews the eligibility and targeting criteria used in four case-study countries at different points in the scale-up of ART, with the aim of drawing lessons regarding ethical approaches to rationing. Mexico, Senegal, Thailand and Uganda have each made an explicit policy commitment to provide antiretrovirals to all those in need, but are achieving this goal in steps--beginning with explicit rationing of access to care. Drawing upon the case-studies and experiences elsewhere, categories of explicit rationing criteria have been identified. These include biomedical factors, adherence to treatment, prevention-driven factors, social and economic benefits, financial factors and factors driven by ethical arguments. The initial criteria for determining eligibility are typically clinical criteria and assessment of adherence prospects, followed by a number of other factors. Rationing mechanisms reflect several underlying ethical theories and the ethical underpinnings of explicit rationing criteria should reflect societal values. In order to ensure this alignment, widespread consultation with a variety of stakeholders, and not only policy-makers or physicians, is critical. Without such explicit debate, more rationing will occur implicitly and this may be more inequitable. The effects of rationing mechanisms upon equity are critically dependent upon the implementation processes. As antiretroviral programmes are implemented it is crucial to monitor who gains access to these programmes. PMID:16175829

  17. JumpStart III Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Arthur M.; Brawer, Florence B.; Kozeracki, Carol A.

    This final report for the JumpStart III program presents a summary of the entrepreneurship training programs developed by each of the four JumpStart III partners selected in March 1997. Grants for the colleges totaled $354,546 over 2 years. The Jumpstart funding has been only a starting point for these and the other 12 Jumpstart partners in…

  18. What Happens at the Lesson Start?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saloviita, Timo

    2016-01-01

    Transitional periods, such as lesson starts, are necessary steps from one activity to another, but they also compete with time for actual learning. The aim of the present study was to replicate a previous pilot study on lesson starts and explore possible disturbances. In total, 130 lesson starts in Finnish basic education in grades 1-9 were…

  19. Baseline Cellular HIV DNA Load Predicts HIV DNA Decline and Residual HIV Plasma Levels during Effective Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Andreis, Samantha; Mengoli, Carlo; Scaggiante, Renzo; Ferretto, Roberto; Manfrin, Vinicio; Cruciani, Mario; Giobbia, Mario; Boldrin, Caterina; Basso, Monica; Andreoni, Massimo; Palù, Giorgio; Sarmati, Loredana

    2012-01-01

    Cellular human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) DNA may be considered a marker of disease progression with significant predictive power, but published data on its correlation with plasma HIV RNA levels and CD4 counts in acute and chronic patients are not conclusive. We evaluated a cohort of 180 patients naïve for antiretroviral therapy before the beginning of treatment and after a virological response in order to define the indicators correlated with HIV DNA load decrease until undetectability. The following variables were evaluated as continuous variables: age, CD4 cell count and log10 HIV DNA level at baseline and follow-up, and baseline log10 HIV RNA level. Primary HIV infection at the start of therapy, an HIV RNA level at follow-up of <2.5 copies/ml, origin, gender, and transmission risk were evaluated as binary variables. The decline of HIV DNA values during effective therapy was directly related to baseline HIV DNA and HIV RNA values, to an increase in the number of CD4 cells, and to the achievement of an HIV RNA load of <2.5 copies/ml. An undetectable cellular HIV DNA load was achieved by 21.6% of patients at the follow-up time point and correlated significantly with lower baseline cellular HIV DNA values and with being in the primary stage of infection when therapy started. In conclusion, early treatment facilitated the achievement of undetectable levels of plasma viremia and cellular HIV DNA and a better recovery of CD4 lymphocytes. HIV DNA levels before and during highly active antiretroviral therapy may be used as a new tool for monitoring treatment efficacy. PMID:22135262

  20. Changes in Inflammatory and Coagulation Biomarkers: A Randomized Comparison of Immediate Versus Deferred Antiretroviral Therapy in Patients with HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Jason V; Neuhaus, Jacqueline; Duprez, Daniel; Kuller, Lewis H.; Tracy, Russell; Belloso, Waldo H.; De Wit, Stephane; Drummond, Fraser; Lane, H. Clifford; Ledergerber, Bruno; Lundgren, Jens; Nixon, Daniel E.; Paton, Nicholas I.; Neaton, James D.

    2010-01-01

    Ojectives Among a subgroup of participants in the Strategies for Management of Antiretroviral Therapy (SMART) Trial that were naïve to antiretroviral therapy (ART) or off ART (≥6 months) at study entry, risk of AIDS and serious non-AIDS events was increased for participants who deferred ART compared to those randomized to (re)initiate ART immediately. Our objective was to determine whether ART initiation in this group reduced markers of inflammation and coagulation that have been associated with increased mortality risk in SMART. Changes in these biomarkers have been described after stopping ART, but not after starting ART in SMART. Methods Stored specimens for 254 participants (126 DC and 128 VS) who were naïve to ART or off ART (≥6 months) were analyzed for interleukin-6 (IL-6), high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) and D-dimer at baseline and months 2 and 6. Results At month 6, 62% of VS group had HIV RNA <400copies/mL and median CD4 count was 190 cells/mm3 higher than for the DC group (590 vs. 400 cells/mm3). Compared with DC, the VS group had 32% (95%CI: 19 to 43%) lower D-dimer levels at month 6 (p<0.001); differences were not significant for hsCRP or IL-6 levels. Conclusions In this randomized comparison of immediate versus delayed ART initiation, D-dimer, but not IL-6 and hsCRP, declined significantly after starting ART. Further studies are needed to determine whether improvements in D-dimer are associated with reduced risk of clinical disease, and whether adjunct treatments used in combination with ART can reduce inflammation among individuals with HIV infection. PMID:20930640

  1. Effect of Antiretroviral Therapy on HIV Reservoirs in Elite Controllers

    PubMed Central

    Chun, Tae-Wook; Shawn Justement, J.; Murray, Danielle; Kim, Connie J.; Blazkova, Jana; Hallahan, Claire W.; Benko, Erika; Costiniuk, Cecilia T.; Kandel, Gabor; Ostrowski, Mario; Kaul, Rupert; Moir, Susan; Casazza, Joseph P.; Koup, Richard A.; Kovacs, Colin; Fauci, Anthony S.

    2013-01-01

    Elite controllers suppress human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) viremia to below the limit of detection in the absence of antiretroviral therapy (ART). However, precise frequencies of CD4+ T cells carrying replication-competent HIV and/or the dynamics of the infectious viral reservoirs in response to initiation and discontinuation of ART in elite controllers are unknown. We show that the size of the pool of CD4+ T cells harboring infectious HIV diminished significantly after initiation of ART and rebounded to baseline upon cessation of therapy. Our data provide compelling evidence that persistent viral replication occurs in untreated elite controllers even in the absence of detectable plasma viremia. PMID:23847057

  2. Epidemiology and Management of Antiretroviral-Associated Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Chastain, Daniel B; Henderson, Harold; Stover, Kayla R

    2015-01-01

    Risk and manifestations of cardiovascular disease (CVD) in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) will continue to evolve as improved treatments and life expectancy of these patients increases. Although initiation of antiretroviral (ARV) therapy has been shown to reduce this risk, some ARV medications may induce metabolic abnormalities, further compounding the risk of CVD. In this patient population, both pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic strategies should be employed to treat and reduce further risk of CVD. This review summarizes epidemiology data of the risk factors and development of CVD in HIV and provides recommendations to manage CVD in HIV-infected patients. PMID:25866592

  3. Progressive human immunodeficiency virus-associated vasculopathy: time to revise antiretroviral therapy guidelines?

    PubMed

    Ntusi, N B A; Taylor, D; Naidoo, N G; Mendelson, M

    2011-01-01

    Cardiovascular abnormalities were appreciated early in the epidemic of the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), even before the aetiological agent, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) was isolated and characterised. The aetiology and pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease in HIV infection is still the subject of intense speculation, and is likely multi-factorial. HIV affects every aspect of the cardiac axis, causing pericarditis, myocarditis, cardiomyopathy, coronary artery disease and microvascular dysfunction, valvular heart disease, pulmonary vascular disease and pulmonary hypertension, stroke and peripheral vascular disease. HIV-associated vasculopathy is an increasingly recognised clinical entity, causing high morbidity and increasing mortality in southern Africa, particularly from stroke and cardiovascular disease. HIV causes disease of the vascular tree, either by a direct effect on vascular or perivascular tissue, or indirectly via immune complex-mediated mechanisms, associated opportunistic infections and malignancies. As a result, highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) may have an important role in controlling disease progression. We report a case of histologically defined primary HIV vasculopathy in which the chance to start HAART was initially missed and in which the patient progressed to require bilateral amputations, but obtained disease quiescence upon commencement of HAART.

  4. Disseminated rhodococcus equi infection in HIV infection despite highly active antiretroviral therapy

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Rhodococcus equi (R.equi) is an acid fast, GRAM + coccobacillus, which is widespread in the soil and causes pulmonary and extrapulmonary infections in immunocompromised people. In the context of HIV infection, R.equi infection (rhodococcosis) is regarded as an opportunistic disease, and its outcome is influenced by highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). Case presentation We report two cases of HIV-related rhodococcosis that disseminated despite suppressive HAART and anti-rhodococcal treatment; in both cases there was no immunological recovery, with CD4+ cells count below 200/μL. In the first case, pulmonary rhodococcosis presented 6 months after initiation of HAART, and was followed by an extracerebral intracranial and a cerebral rhodococcal abscess 1 and 8 months, respectively, after onset of pulmonary infection. The second case was characterized by a protracted course with spread of infection to various organs, including subcutaneous tissue, skin, colon and other intra-abdominal tissues, and central nervous system; the spread started 4 years after clinical resolution of a first pulmonary manifestation and progressed over a period of 2 years. Conclusions Our report highlights the importance of an effective immune recovery, despite fully suppressive HAART, along with anti-rhodococcal therapy, in order to clear rhodococcal infection. PMID:22168333

  5. Nevirapine versus efavirenz-based antiretroviral therapy regimens in antiretroviral-naive patients with HIV and tuberculosis infections in India: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Administration of rifampicin along with nevirapine reduces the plasma concentration of nevirapine in human immunodeficiency virus positive individuals with concomitant tuberculosis (HIV-TB patients). Nevirapine is a much cheaper drug than its alternative efavirenz, and might be beneficial in resource constrained settings. Methods A randomised open label trial was conducted at All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India. During the regimen of an antiretroviral therapy (ART), naive HIV-TB patients were randomly assigned to receive either nevirapine or efavirenz based ART with concomitant rifampicin based anti-tubercular therapy (ATT). Participants were followed for 24 months after starting ART. The end points were virological, immunological and clinical responses, and progression of HIV disease marked by failure of ART. Results Of the 135 HIV-TB patients, who were receiving rifampicin based ATT, 68 were selected randomly to receive efavirenz based ART and 67 to receive nevirapine based ART. The virological failure rates in the overall population, and the nevirapine and efavirenz groups were 14.1% (19/135); 14.9% (10/67) and 13.2% (9/68), respectively (p = 0.94). No significant difference was found between the groups in the rate of clinical, immunological or virological failures. The overall mortality was 17% with no significant difference between the two groups. Except for the lead in period on day 14, the mean nevirapine concentration remained above 3 mg/L. No association was found between plasma levels of nevirapine and incidence of unfavourable outcomes in this group. Conclusions Outcome of ART in HIV-TB patients on rifampicin based ATT showed no significant difference, irrespective of whether efavirenz or nevirapine was used. Therefore, nevirapine based ART could be an alternative in the resource limited settings in patients with HIV and tuberculosis co-infection. Trial registration NCT No. 01805258. PMID:24134449

  6. Antiretroviral drug resistance among antiretroviral-naïve and treatment experienced patients infected with HIV in Iran.

    PubMed

    Baesi, Kazem; Ravanshad, Mehrdad; Ghanbarisafari, Maryam; Saberfar, Esmaeil; Seyedalinaghi, Seyedahmad; Volk, Jonathan E

    2014-07-01

    Resistance to antiretroviral therapy (ART) threatens the success of programs to reduce HIV morbidity and mortality, particularly in countries with few treatment options. In the present study, genotype and phenotype data from ART-naïve and experienced hospitalized patients infected with HIV in Tehran, Iran were used to assess the prevalence and types of transmitted (TDR) and acquired drug resistance (ADR) mutations. All 30 participants naïve to ART and 62 of 70 (88.6%) participants receiving ART had detectable viral loads. Among participants receiving ART with sequencing data available (n = 62), 36 (58.1%) had at least one drug resistance mutation; the most common mutations were K103N (21.0%), M184V (19.4%), and the thymidine analogue mutations. Seven (11.3%), 27 (43.5%), and two (3.2%) of these participants had resistance to one, two, and three drug classes, respectively. High-level resistance to efavirenz (EFV) was more common among participants on EFV-based regimens than high-level lopinavir/ritonivar (LPV/r) resistance among those on LPV/r-based regimens (55.3% vs. 6.7%, P < 0.0001). Two (6.7%) antiretroviral-naïve participants had K103N mutations. These findings document an alarmingly high frequency of multiple HIV drug class resistance in Iran, confirm the presence of TDR, and highlight the need for systematic viral load monitoring and drug resistance testing, including at diagnosis. Expanded access to new antiretroviral medications from additional drug classes is needed.

  7. [Persons living with HIV/AIDS: factors associated with adherence to antiretroviral treatment].

    PubMed

    Seidl, Eliane Maria Fleury; Melchíades, Adriana; Farias, Vivyanne; Brito, Alexander

    2007-10-01

    This study aimed to describe the adherence of persons living with HIV/AIDS to antiretroviral therapy (ART) and to investigate adherence predictors among the following: level of schooling, presence of side effects, current or previous interruption of ART by the persons themselves, self-esteem, self-efficacy expectation, coping strategies, social support, and satisfaction with the health professional-patient relationship. Adherence was measured by self-reported number of ART pills/capsules missed during the previous week and previous month, evaluated as satisfactory when less than 5%. 101 HIV+ adults took part in this study, 60.4% males, ranging from 20 to 71 years of age (mean = 37.9 years), and 73.3% symptomatic. Data procedures included interviews and the use of validated instruments. The majority of participants (n = 73; 72.3%) reported adherence of > 95%. Logistic regression showed that a history of self-reported ART interruption and self-efficacy expectations were significant adherence predictors. Upgrading of care with interdisciplinary teams is needed to develop an appropriate approach to the medical and psychosocial difficulties of ART adherence by persons with HIV/AIDS.

  8. Lipodystrophy among patients with HIV infection on antiretroviral therapy: a systematic review protocol

    PubMed Central

    Lana, Lorena Gomes Cunha; Junqueira, Daniela Rezende Garcia; Perini, Edson; Menezes de Pádua, Cristiane

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Lipodystrophy is a frequent and disfiguring adverse effect of antiretroviral therapy (ART) in patients with HIV. It affects the quality of life of the patient and adherence to treatment, and generates new needs for comprehensive healthcare services. The aim of this study will be to conduct a systematic review of the literature from observational studies and describe lipodystrophy among patients with HIV infection during current or previous use of ART. Methods and analysis A systematic review of observational studies published in MEDLINE, CINAHL, LILACS, EMBASE and International Pharmaceutical Abstracts will be carried out. Citations of included studies will be checked to identify additional studies not identified in the electronic searches. It will include any observational study that considered lipodystrophy as the primary or secondary outcome and that had enrolled adolescent and adult patients with HIV infection who were on current or previous ART for at least 6 months. Data extraction and analysis will be performed independently by two reviewers. The extracted data will be discussed, decisions documented and, where necessary, the authors of the studies will be contacted for clarification. Measures of frequency, prevalence and incidence of lipodystrophy will be stratified according to definition, method of diagnosis and risk factors of the outcome. Ethics and dissemination Ethics is not required given this is a protocol for a systematic review. The findings of this study will be widely disseminated through peer-reviewed publications and conference presentations. Updates of the review will be conducted to inform and guide healthcare practice. Protocol registration PROSPERO—42013005450. PMID:24625638

  9. Association of First-Line and Second-Line Antiretroviral Therapy Adherence

    PubMed Central

    Ramadhani, Habib O.; Bartlett, John A.; Thielman, Nathan M.; Pence, Brian W.; Kimani, Stephen M.; Maro, Venance P.; Mwako, Mtumwa S.; Masaki, Lazaro J.; Mmbando, Calvin E.; Minja, Mary G.; Lirhunde, Eileen S.; Miller, William C.

    2014-01-01

    Background  Adherence to first-line antiretroviral therapy (ART) may be an important indicator of adherence to second-line ART. Evaluating this relationship may be critical to identify patients at high risk for second-line failure, thereby exhausting their treatment options, and to intervene and improve patient outcomes. Methods  Adolescents and adults (n = 436) receiving second-line ART were administered standardized questionnaires that captured demographic characteristics and assessed adherence. Optimal and suboptimal cumulative adherence were defined as percentage adherence of ≥90% and <90%, respectively. Bivariable and multivariable binomial regression models were used to assess the prevalence of suboptimal adherence percentage by preswitch adherence status. Results  A total of 134 of 436 (30.7%) participants reported suboptimal adherence to second-line ART. Among 322 participants who had suboptimal adherence to first-line ART, 117 (36.3%) had suboptimal adherence to second-line ART compared with 17 of 114 (14.9%) who had optimal adherence to first-line ART. Participants who had suboptimal adherence to first-line ART were more likely to have suboptimal adherence to second-line ART (adjusted prevalence ratio, 2.4; 95% confidence interval, 1.5–3.9). Conclusions  Adherence to first-line ART is an important predictor of adherence to second-line ART. Targeted interventions should be evaluated in patients with suboptimal adherence before switching into second-line therapy to improve their outcomes. PMID:25734147

  10. Development of antiretroviral resistance in children with HIV in low- and middle-income countries.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, Felicity; Penazzato, Martina; Gibb, Diana

    2013-06-15

    With antiretroviral therapy (ART) recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO) for children aged <2 years with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and continuing global ART roll-out, ART coverage in children is rising. However ART coverage in children lags considerably behind that in adults (28% vs 58%). Long duration of therapy needed for HIV-infected children requires maximal efficacy, minimal toxicity, and prevention of development of drug resistance. This requires consideration of ways to improve sequencing of regimens during childhood to minimize development of resistance and treatment failure. We consider aspects of virological failure and development of resistance in vertically HIV-infected children in resource-limited settings. We review evidence guiding choices of first- and second-line ART, the impact of drugs given to prevent mother-to-child transmission, adherence issues and, availability of appropriate drug formulations. Recommendations made during the Collaborative HIV and Anti-HIV Drug Resistance Network (CHAIN)/WHO meeting (October 2012) are summarized.

  11. The future of antiretroviral therapy: challenges and needs.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Santiago; López Aldeguer, Jose; Arribas, José Ramón; Domingo, Pere; Iribarren, Jose Antonio; Ribera, Esteban; Rivero, Antonio; Pulido, Federico

    2010-05-01

    The introduction of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) has substantially modified the natural history of HIV infection. At the beginning of the cART era the objective was focused on HIV-1-associated mortality and morbidity, but as this objective was accomplished other issues emerged, including toxicity, resistance and compliance with treatment. Moreover, the participation of other disease mechanisms, such as proinflammatory activity, in the so-called non-AIDS events is becoming increasingly important. To overcome these issues, therapeutic options have dramatically expanded, which has made the management of HIV-1-infected patients increasingly complex. The intense changes seen raise the question of what will be the future of HIV infection and its treatment. A projection into the future may help to reflect on current limitations, needs and research priorities, to optimize patient care. To debate on this topic a group of 38 experts has initiated The HIV 2020 Project, with the aim of reflecting on the future of HIV infection and identifying the needs that should be the attention of research in different areas. This document summarizes the group's conclusions on the future of antiretroviral treatment, presented as 20 relevant questions. Each question includes the current status of the topic and our vision for the future.

  12. Drug-drug interactions: antiretroviral drugs and recreational drugs.

    PubMed

    Staltari, Orietta; Leporini, Christian; Caroleo, Benedetto; Russo, Emilio; Siniscalchi, Antonio; De Sarro, Giovambattista; Gallelli, Luca

    2014-01-01

    With the advances in antiretroviral (ARV) therapy, patients with Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infection are living longer, however, some patients encounter co- morbidities which sometimes require treatment. Therefore, during the treatment with ARV drugs these patients could take several recreational drugs (e.g. amphetamines, hallucinogenes, opiates, or alcohol) with a possible development of drug-drug interactions (DDIs). In particular, Nucleoside/nucleotide reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs/NtRTIs) are mainly excreted through the kidney and are not substrates of the cytochrome P450 or P-glycoprotein, therefore the DDIs during this treatment are minimal. In contrast, the other ARV drugs (i.e. non-nucleoside reversetranscriptase inhibitors, Protease inhibitors, Integrase inhibitors, chemokine receptor 5 antagonists and HIV-fusion inhibitors) are an important class of antiretroviral medications that are frequent components of HAART regimens but show several DDIs related to interaction with the cytochrome P450 or P-glycoprotein. In this paper we will review data concerning the possibility of DDI in HIV patients treated with ARV and taking recreational drugs.

  13. Negotiation Strategies for Antiretroviral Drug Purchasers in the United States.

    PubMed

    Linnemayr, Sebastian; Ryan, Gery W; Karir, Veena; Liu, Jenny; Palar, Kartika

    2012-01-01

    Antiretroviral treatment has transformed HIV from a death sentence to a chronic condition, allowing people with HIV to live longer and healthier lives. However, they face significant barriers to accessing and affording life-saving-but expensive-antiretroviral (ARV) medications. These barriers are particularly severe for low-income patients, and they disproportionately affect racial and ethnic minorities. High ARV prices create pressure for government insurers to contain costs either by rationing care or by restricting eligibility for public programs. Limited funding, coupled with a growing demand for HIV care and treatment, is likely to make programmatic decisions about who is covered become more difficult over time. Therefore, it is important to identify options for reducing the cost of providing ARVs to allow more people to receive treatment. This study examines a variety of options for negotiating lower ARV procurement costs in U.S. markets. A case-study approach is used to assess options that different stakeholders could use in negotiating ARV price discounts with drug manufacturers given the regulatory and market constraints that exist in the United States.

  14. HIV Drug Resistance Among Children Initiating First-Line Antiretroviral Treatment in Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Sigaloff, Kim Catherina Eve; Boender, Tamara Sonia; Kaudha, Elizabeth; Kayiwa, Joshua; Musiime, Victor; Mukuye, Andrew; Kiconco, Mary; Nankya, Immaculate; Nakatudde-Katumba, Llilian; Calis, Job C.J.; Rinke de Wit, Tobias F.; Mugyenyi, Peter N.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: There are limited data on primary human immunodeficiency virus drug resistance (HIVDR) in pediatric populations. This study aimed to assess the prevalence of primary HIVDR and associated risk factors among children initiating first-line antiretroviral therapy (ART) in Uganda. Methods: At three Ugandan clinics, children (age <12 years) requiring ART were recruited between January 2010 and August 2011. Before starting ART, blood was collected for viral load and pol gene sequencing. Drug resistance mutations were determined using the 2010 International AIDS Society–USA mutation list. Risk factors for HIVDR were assessed with multivariate regression analysis. Results: Three hundred nineteen HIV-infected children with a median age of 4.9 years were enrolled. Sequencing was successful in 279 children (87.5%). HIVDR was present in 10% of all children and 15.2% of children <3 years. Nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs), non-NRTI (NNRTI), and dual-class resistance was present in 5.7%, 7.5%, and 3.2%, respectively. HIVDR occurred in 35.7% of prevention of mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT)–exposed children, 15.6% in children with unknown PMTCT history, and 7.7% among antiretroviral-naive children. History of PMTCT exposure [adjusted odds ratio (AOR): 2.6, 95% CI: 1.3–5.1] or unknown PMTCT status (AOR: 3.8, 95% CI: 1.1–13.5), low CD4 (AOR: 2.2, 95% CI: 1.3–3.6), current breastfeeding (AOR: 7.4, 95% CI: 2.6–21), and current maternal ART use (AOR: 6.4, 95% CI: 3.4–11.9) emerged as risk factors for primary HIVDR in multivariate analysis. Conclusion: Pretreatment HIVDR is high, especially in children with PMTCT exposure. Protease inhibitor (PI)–based regimens are advocated by the World Health Organization, but availability in children is limited. Children with (unknown) PMTCT exposure, low CD4 count, current breastfeeding, or maternal ART need to be prioritized to receive PI-based regimens. PMID:26723018

  15. A three-tier framework for monitoring antiretroviral therapy in high HIV burden settings

    PubMed Central

    Osler, Meg; Hilderbrand, Katherine; Hennessey, Claudine; Arendse, Juanita; Goemaere, Eric; Ford, Nathan; Boulle, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    The provision of antiretroviral therapy (ART) in low and middle-income countries is a chronic disease intervention of unprecedented magnitude and is the dominant health systems challenge for high-burden countries, many of which rank among the poorest in the world. Substantial external investment, together with the requirement for service evolution to adapt to changing needs, including the constant shift to earlier ART initiation, makes outcome monitoring and reporting particularly important. However, there is growing concern at the inability of many high-burden countries to report on the outcomes of patients who have been in care for various durations, or even the number of patients in care at a particular point in time. In many instances, countries can only report on the number of patients ever started on ART. Despite paper register systems coming under increasing strain, the evolution from paper directly to complex electronic medical record solutions is not viable in many contexts. Implementing a bridging solution, such as a simple offline electronic version of the paper register, can be a pragmatic alternative. This paper describes and recommends a three-tiered monitoring approach in low- and middle-income countries based on the experience implementing such a system in the Western Cape province of South Africa. A three-tier approach allows Ministries of Health to strategically implement one of the tiers in each facility offering ART services. Each tier produces the same nationally required monthly enrolment and quarterly cohort reports so that outputs from the three tiers can be aggregated into a single database at any level of the health system. The choice of tier is based on context and resources at the time of implementation. As resources and infrastructure improve, more facilities will transition to the next highest and more technologically sophisticated tier. Implementing a three-tier monitoring system at country level for pre-antiretroviral wellness, ART

  16. A three-tier framework for monitoring antiretroviral therapy in high HIV burden settings.

    PubMed

    Osler, Meg; Hilderbrand, Katherine; Hennessey, Claudine; Arendse, Juanita; Goemaere, Eric; Ford, Nathan; Boulle, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    The provision of antiretroviral therapy (ART) in low and middle-income countries is a chronic disease intervention of unprecedented magnitude and is the dominant health systems challenge for high-burden countries, many of which rank among the poorest in the world. Substantial external investment, together with the requirement for service evolution to adapt to changing needs, including the constant shift to earlier ART initiation, makes outcome monitoring and reporting particularly important. However, there is growing concern at the inability of many high-burden countries to report on the outcomes of patients who have been in care for various durations, or even the number of patients in care at a particular point in time. In many instances, countries can only report on the number of patients ever started on ART. Despite paper register systems coming under increasing strain, the evolution from paper directly to complex electronic medical record solutions is not viable in many contexts. Implementing a bridging solution, such as a simple offline electronic version of the paper register, can be a pragmatic alternative. This paper describes and recommends a three-tiered monitoring approach in low- and middle-income countries based on the experience implementing such a system in the Western Cape province of South Africa. A three-tier approach allows Ministries of Health to strategically implement one of the tiers in each facility offering ART services. Each tier produces the same nationally required monthly enrolment and quarterly cohort reports so that outputs from the three tiers can be aggregated into a single database at any level of the health system. The choice of tier is based on context and resources at the time of implementation. As resources and infrastructure improve, more facilities will transition to the next highest and more technologically sophisticated tier. Implementing a three-tier monitoring system at country level for pre-antiretroviral wellness, ART

  17. Liver toxicity of antiretroviral combinations including fosamprenavir plus ritonavir 1400/100 mg once daily in HIV/hepatitis C virus-coinfected patients.

    PubMed

    Merchante, Nicolás; López-Cortés, Luis F; Delgado-Fernández, Marcial; Ríos-Villegas, Maria J; Márquez-Solero, Manuel; Merino, Dolores; Pasquau, Juan; García-Figueras, Carolina; Martínez-Pérez, Maria Angeles; Omar, Mohamed; Rivero, Antonio; Macías, Juan; Mata, Rosario; Pineda, Juan Antonio

    2011-07-01

    Abstract Our objective was to evaluate the liver toxicity of antiretroviral regimens including fosamprenavir plus ritonavir (FPV/r) 1400/100 mg once daily (QD) in HIV/hepatitis C virus (HCV)-coinfected patients. This was a prospective cohort study that included 117 HIV/HCV-coinfected patients who started FPV/r 1400/100 mg QD-based antiretroviral therapy (ART) and who neither had received a previous antiretroviral regimen containing FPV nor had a past history of virologic failure while receiving protease inhibitors (PI). The primary end point of the study was the occurrence of grade 3-4 liver enzymes elevations (LEE) within 1 year after starting FPV/r QD. Factors potentially associated with grade 3-4 LEE, including baseline liver fibrosis, were analyzed. Eleven (9%) patients had a grade 3-4 LEE during the follow-up, resulting in an incidence of severe liver toxicity of 9% (95% confidence interval 4.1-14.6%). None of these cases led to FPV/r discontinuation. Baseline liver fibrosis could be assessed in 97 (83%) patients. Six of 71 patients (8%) with significant fibrosis had a grade 3-4 LEE versus 2 of 26 (8%) without significant fibrosis (p=1.0). Twenty (21%) patients had cirrhosis at baseline. There were no cases of LEE among cirrhotics. In conclusion, the incidence of severe liver toxicity after 1 year of therapy with FPV/r QD-based ART in HIV/HCV-coinfected patients is similar to what has been reported with other boosted PIs. In addition, the presence of significant fibrosis or cirrhosis was not associated with the emergence of liver toxicity. Thus, ART regimens containing FPV/r QD may be considered safe in HIV/HCV-coinfected patients, including those with cirrhosis.

  18. Incidence and risk factors of HIV-related non-Hodgkin's lymphoma in the era of combination antiretroviral therapy: a European multicohort study

    PubMed Central

    Bohlius, Julia; Schmidlin, Kurt; Costagliola, Dominique; Fätkenheuer, Gerd; May, Margaret; Maria Caro-Murillo, Ana; Mocroft, Amanda; Bonnet, Fabrice; Clifford, Gary; Karafoulidou, Anastasia; Miro, Jose M.; Lundgren, Jens; Chene, Genevieve; Egger, Matthias

    2009-01-01

    Background Incidence and risk factors of HIV-associated non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) are not well defined in the era of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART). Methods 56,305 adult HIV-1 infected patients who started cART in one of 22 prospective studies in Europe were included. Weibull random-effects models were used to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) for developing systemic NHL, including CD4 cell counts and viral load as time-updated variables. Results During 212,042 person-years of follow-up, 521 patients were diagnosed with systemic NHL and 62 with primary brain lymphoma (PBL). The incidence rate of systemic NHL was 463 per 100,000 person-years not on cART and 205 per 100,000 person-years in treated patients, for a rate ratio of 0.44 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.37 to 0.53). The corresponding incidence rates of PBL were 57 and 24 per 100,000 person-years (rate ratio 0.43; 95% CI 0.25 to 0.73). Suppression of HIV-1 replication on cART (HR 0.60, 95% CI 0.44–0.81, comparing ≤500 with 10,000–99,999 viral copies/ml) and increases in CD4 counts (HR 0.30, 0.22–0.42, comparing ≥350 with 100–199 cells/μL) were protective; a history of Kaposi sarcoma (HR 1.70, 1.08–2.68, compared to no history of AIDS), transmission through sex between men (HR 1.57, 1.19–2.08, compared to heterosexual transmission) and older age (HR 3.72, 2.38–5.82, comparing ≥50 with 16–29 years) were risk factors for systemic NHL. Conclusions The incidence rates of both systemic NHL and PBL are substantially reduced in patients on cART. Timely initiation of therapy is key to the prevention of NHL in the era of cART. PMID:20032536

  19. Microcomputer controlled soft start of motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Miao; Wang, Yanpeng; Li, Shian

    2005-12-01

    Improving the starting characteristics of a motor is an important part of the motor control. An intelligent soft starting technique was adopted in the starter and used in the present study because of its many advantages compared with conventional starting processes. The core of the soft starter was a single chip (Atmel 8098), its soul was the software and its control object was a Silicon Controlled Rectifier (SCR). The starter achieved not only current-limit starting, but also closed-loop control with a stator current detection circuit. In conclusion, as a result of digital control, starting characteristic can be conveniently chosen according to the load. In addition the starter is of small size, and starting is smooth and reliable due to current feedback.

  20. Family Connections: Helping Early Head Start/Head Start Staff and Parents Address Mental Health Challenges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beardslee, William R.; Avery, Mary Watson; Ayoub, Catherine; Watts, Caroline L.

    2009-01-01

    Early Head Start/Head Start teachers and staff encounter parents who have wrestled with depression and other adversities every day. This article describes an innovative program of trainings for and consultation to Early Head Start/Head Start staff to help them effectively deal with mental heath challenges faced by parents and children. The program…

  1. Start II, red ink, and Boris Yeltsin

    SciTech Connect

    Arbatov, A.

    1993-04-01

    Apart from the vulnerability implied by the START II treaty, it will bear the burden of the general political opposition to the Yeltsin administration. START II will be seen as part of an overall Yeltsin-Andrei Kozyrev foreign policy that is under fire for selling out Russian national interests in Yugoslavia, the Persian Gulf, and elsewhere. This article discusses public opinion concerning START II, the cost of its implementation, and the general purpose of the treaty.

  2. Broadening the use of antiretroviral therapy: the case for feline leukemia virus

    PubMed Central

    Greggs, Willie M; Clouser, Christine L; Patterson, Steven E; Mansky, Louis M

    2011-01-01

    Antiretroviral drugs have saved and extended the lives of millions of individuals infected with HIV. The major classes of anti-HIV drugs include reverse transcriptase inhibitors, protease inhibitors, integrase inhibitors, and entry/fusion inhibitors. While antiretroviral drug regimens are not commonly used to treat other types of retroviral infections, there are instances where there is a perceived need for re-evaluation of the benefits of antiretroviral therapy. One case in point is that of feline leukemia virus (FeLV), an infection of companion felines. While vaccines exist to prevent FeLV infection and spread, they have not eliminated FeLV infection. For FeLV-infected felines and their human companions, antiretroviral therapy would be desirable and of practical importance if good options were available. Here, we discuss FeLV biology and current treatment options, and propose that there is a need for antiretroviral treatment options for FeLV infection. The comparative use and analysis of antiretroviral therapy can provide new insights into the mechanism of antiretroviral drug action. PMID:21479142

  3. Monitoring of HAART regime antiretrovirals in serum of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome patients by micellar liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Casas-Breva, I; Peris-Vicente, J; Rambla-Alegre, M; Carda-Broch, S; Esteve-Romero, J

    2012-09-21

    A methodology based on micellar liquid chromatography to monitor five antiretroviral drugs (lamivudine, stavudine, tenofovir, zidovudine and efavirenz) was proposed. Antiretrovirals were studied in sets of three, corresponding to each highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) regime, prescribed to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS)-infected patients. Four aqueous micellar mobile phases buffered at pH 7 were optimized to separate these compounds, using sodium dodecyl sulfate as the tensioactive, and 1-propanol or 1-pentanol as the organic modifier. The composition of each mobile phase was optimized for each antiretroviral. The common separation conditions were: C18 apolar column (125 × 4.6 mm, 5 μm particle size), UV detection set at 214 nm, and mobile phase running at 1 mL min(-1) without controlling the temperature. The finally suggested method was validated for five analysed antiretroviral drugs following the US Food and Drug Administration guidelines in terms of: linearity between 0.5 and 50 ppm (r(2) > 0.9995), sensitivity (LOD lower than 0.25 ppm), intra- and inter-day precision (<7.1 and <5.2%, respectively) and accuracy (recovery 88.5-105.3% and 93.5-101.3%, respectively), as well as robustness (<6.5%). The proposed method was used to monitor the level of antiretrovirals in the serum of AIDS patients. The suggested methodology was found to be useful in the routine analysis of antiretrovirals in serum samples.

  4. START user manual version 2.1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mooij, E.

    1993-07-01

    The Simulation Tool for Atmospheric Reentry Trajectories (START) version 2.1 is presented. The software is capable of doing six degrees of freedom reentry simulations, starting with a deorbit burn maneuver in orbit. After the atmospheric entry, the descent under a parachute can be simulated as well. Central bodies included are: Earth, the Moon, Mars and Titan. The program was equipped with a menu oriented user interface, giving full access to the input data. The manual is focused on how to use the software. Before discussing the capabilities of START, a short overview of START and some general remarks on the user interface are given.

  5. Enteric pathogens, immune status and therapeutic response in diarrhea in HIV/AIDS adult subjects from north India.

    PubMed

    Jha, Arun Kumar; Uppal, Beena; Chadha, Sanjim; Aggarwal, Prabhav; Ghosh, Roumi; Dewan, Richa

    2013-06-01

    Intestinal infection causing diarrheal disease is a dominant contributor to high morbidity and mortality in developing countries. This intervention study aimed to assess the response of specific anti-microbial and anti-retroviral therapy (ART) on enteropathogens identified in HIV/AIDS adult subjects from northern India. Seventy five ART naive (group 1) and seventy five ART adherent (group 2) HIV/AIDS adult subjects with diarrhea were enrolled. Stool samples from all subjects were examined for enteropathogens by wet mount, staining methods, culture and ELISA. Subjects with enteropathogens were started on specific therapy as per National AIDS Control Organisation, Government of India's guidelines. Follow-up stool samples were examined after 2-4 weeks of completion of therapy for persistence/clearing of enteropathogens. CD4+ T lymphocyte count was done for all subjects. At enrollment, group 1 had 26.13% bacterial, 57.66% parasitic & 16.22% fungal pathogens while group 2 had 11.9%, 69.05% & 19.05% pathogens, respectively. Parasitic diarrhea was more common than bacterial diarrhea. The coccidian parasites (Cryptosporidium spp. & Isospora belli) were the common parasites identified. Clearance of enteric pathogens was significant after specific anti-microbial therapy (p = 0.0001). Persistence of enteropathogens was seen primarily for coccidian parasites. Clearance of enteropathogens after specific therapy and the diagnostic yield of stool specimens were influenced by the CD4+ counts. Immune competence coupled with specific anti-microbial therapy displays the best response against enteric pathogens.

  6. Pregnancy-related changes of antiretroviral pharmacokinetics: an argument for TDM.

    PubMed

    Simonetti, Francesco R; Cattaneo, Dario; Zanchetta, Nadia; Giacomet, Vania; Micheli, Valeria; Ciminera, Nadia; Gervasoni, Cristina

    2017-01-04

    Here we describe a case of an HIV-infected young woman with extensive drug-resistant virus, who was successfully switched from a raltegravir-based regimen to a dolutegravir-based intensified antiretroviral regimen a few days before scheduled caesarean section because of the still detectable viral load. The trough concentrations of all antiretroviral drugs before and after delivery are also described.Our case underlines both the difficult management of young women, HIV-infected at young age with very limited treatment options and the great variability in the pregnancy-related physiologic changes affecting the pharmacokinetics of antiretrovirals.

  7. Immune reconstitution syndromes in human immuno-deficiency virus infection following effective antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Behrens, G M; Meyer, D; Stoll, M; Schmidt, R E

    2000-08-01

    Effective antiretroviral therapy leads to rapid decrease in plasma HIV-1 RNA, frequently followed by an increase in CD4 T-helper cell counts. The improvement of immune function during highly active antiretroviral therapy has important impact on natural history of AIDS-related opportunistic disorders. Here we describe cases of unusual clinical inflammatory syndromes in CMV retinitis, hepatitis C, and atypical mycobacteriosis in HIV-1 infected patients associated with the initiation of antiretroviral therapy. Pathogenetic implications and therapeutic management of these new immunopathologic syndromes are discussed.

  8. Head Start Home-Based Resource Directory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trans-Management Systems, Inc.

    A revision of the 1989 publication, this directory was compiled in order to help parents and professionals involved with Head Start home-based programming in meeting the needs of young children and families. The directory lists a broad range of guides and resources on topics related to Head Start home-based programs. Each listing provides the…

  9. Head Start. What Works Clearinghouse Intervention Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    What Works Clearinghouse, 2015

    2015-01-01

    "Head Start" is a national, federally funded program that provides services to promote school readiness for children from birth to age 5 from predominantly low-income families. Based on a review of the research, the WWC found "Head Start" to have potentially positive effects on general reading achievement and no discernible…

  10. Start-up analysis for marketing strategy.

    PubMed

    Griffith, M J; Baloff, N

    1984-01-01

    The complex start-up effect on utilization of health care services is too often overlooked or underestimated by marketing planners, leading to a range of negative consequences for both the users of services and the provider organization. Start-up analysis allows accurate estimation of these utilization effects for coordinated strategic planning among marketing finance, and operations.

  11. When Do Start-Ups Make Sense?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Langemeyer, Clement J.

    2005-01-01

    The start-up has received considerable attention in the last few years. While the National Research Council of Canada has generated many start-ups over its 88-year history, the creation of a formal entrepreneurship programme in the mid-1990s dramatically accelerated the pace at which they were created. Many factors come into play in the decision…

  12. National Head Start Bulletin, 1993-1995.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Head Start Bulletin, 1995

    1995-01-01

    This document consists of the 15 issues of the "National Head Start Bulletin" published during the three-year period 1993-1995. The bulletin is devoted to subjects of concern to Head Start teachers and administrators; each issue focuses on one topic. A main article and several smaller articles discuss various aspects of the topic for…

  13. Head Start Impact Study. Technical Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Puma, Michael; Bell, Stephen; Cook, Ronna; Heid, Camilla; Shapiro, Gary; Broene, Pam; Jenkins, Frank; Fletcher, Philip; Quinn, Liz; Friedman, Janet; Ciarico, Janet; Rohacek, Monica; Adams, Gina; Spier, Elizabeth

    2010-01-01

    This Technical Report is designed to provide technical detail to support the analysis and findings presented in the "Head Start Impact Study Final Report" (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, January 2010). Chapter 1 provides an overview of the Head Start Impact Study and its findings. Chapter 2 provides technical information on the…

  14. Assisted Workouts: Starting My Own Workout Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cousminer, Douglas

    2003-01-01

    As an undergraduate student with cerebral palsy, I found it difficult to achieve my goal of starting a regular exercise program at my school, the University of Central Florida. However, when I started a program called Assisted Workouts in spring 2003. the struggle proved to be well worth it. The program is not only beneficial to me, but it has…

  15. The Texas Head Start Metro Models.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riley, Mary Tom, Ed.; Flores, Alfredo R., Ed.

    The Texas Metro Network (TMN) is an informal group of Head Start Directors and Executive Directors organized for the purposes of improving the delivery of training and technical assistance and for assisting communication between large scale Head Start programs in the metropolitan areas of Texas. In pursuit of these aims, each member unit of the…

  16. Administration for Children and Families: Head Start

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Department of Health and Human Services, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of the Head Start program. Under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (Recovery Act), $1 billion will be provided to the Office of Head Start to promote the school readiness of low-income children, including children on federally-recognized reservations and children of migratory farm workers, by enhancing…

  17. 30 CFR 57.10010 - Starting precautions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Starting precautions. 57.10010 Section 57.10010 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Aerial Tramways § 57.10010 Starting precautions. Where...

  18. 30 CFR 56.10010 - Starting precautions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Starting precautions. 56.10010 Section 56.10010 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Aerial Tramways § 56.10010 Starting precautions. Where...

  19. Starting Silicon-Ribbon Growth Automatically

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mchugh, J. P.

    1984-01-01

    Semiautomatic system starts growth of silicon sheets more reliably than system with purely manual control. Control signals for starting sheetcrystal growth consist of ramps (during which signal changes linearly from one value to another over preset time interval) and soaks (during which signal remains constant). Ramps and soaks for best temperature and pulling speed determined by experimentation.

  20. Starting flow in regular polygonal ducts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, C. Y.

    2016-06-01

    The starting flows in regular polygonal ducts of S = 3, 4, 5, 6, 8 sides are determined by the method of eigenfunction superposition. The necessary S-fold symmetric eigenfunctions and eigenvalues of the Helmholtz equation are found either exactly or by boundary point match. The results show the starting time is governed by the first eigenvalue.

  1. Head Start Impact Study. Final Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Puma, Michael; Bell, Stephen; Cook, Ronna; Heid, Camilla; Shapiro, Gary; Broene, Pam; Jenkins, Frank; Fletcher, Philip; Quinn, Liz; Friedman, Janet; Ciarico, Janet; Rohacek, Monica; Adams, Gina; Spier, Elizabeth

    2010-01-01

    This report addresses the following four questions by reporting on the impacts of Head Start on children and families during the children's preschool, kindergarten, and 1st grade years: (1) What difference does Head Start make to key outcomes of development and learning (and in particular, the multiple domains of school readiness) for low-income…

  2. Trident SSBNS in START. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Ackley, R.T.

    1990-04-30

    This report advocates not agreeing to ballistic missile warhead sublimits in START in order to place maximum reliance on the Trident/D-5 strategic weapon system. With reduced numbers in our post-START inventory, it is mandatory to emphasize our most survivable, capable, flexible and affordable systems for deterrence and defense.

  3. What Time is it? Adherence to Antiretroviral Therapy in Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Tiruneh, Yordanos M.; Wilson, Ira B.

    2016-01-01

    This study assessed adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) among people living with HIV/AIDS in Ethiopia and explored the sociocultural context in which they relate to their regimen requirements. Data were collected through semi-structured in-depth interviews with 105 patients on ART and observations held at the study clinic. We analyzed data using both qualitative and quantitative methods. Our findings indicate that study participants are highly adherent to dose but less adherent to dose schedule. Strict dose time instructions were reported as stressful and unrealistic. The discrepancy between adherence to dose and dose schedule could be explained by time perception, difficulty with the strictness of medication regimens, or beliefs about dose timing adherence. Care providers should acknowledge the complexities of medication practices and engage in shared decision-making to incorporate patients’ perspectives and identify effective interventions. PMID:26873491

  4. Antiretroviral therapy adherence among transgender women living with HIV.

    PubMed

    Sevelius, Jae M; Carrico, Adam; Johnson, Mallory O

    2010-01-01

    Despite disproportionate rates of HIV among transgender women and evidence that medication adherence is necessary for treatment success and increased likelihood of survival, there has been little investigation into antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence issues among transgender women. This study examined rates of self-reported ART adherence among transgender women on ART (n = 35) and well-established correlates of nonadherence, including depression, adherence self-efficacy, patient perceptions of interactions with their providers, and perceived adverse side effects of ART compared to other respondents (n = 2,770). Transgender women on ART were less likely to report 90% adherence rates or higher and reported less confidence in their abilities to integrate treatment regimens into their daily lives. When transgender women were compared to other respondents, regardless of the current medication regimen, they reported significantly fewer positive interactions with their health care providers. Training for providers and integration of hormone therapy into HIV care is recommended.

  5. Collaboration between health professionals in the era of antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Chetty, Verusia; Maharaj, Sonil S

    2013-01-01

    After antiretroviral therapy (ART) became available in South Africa, persons living with HIV (PLWH) began to survive, but they often experienced disability as a result of their illness and treatments. Management of HIV is more often successful with a holistic approach including medicine, rehabilitation, and social care. There is limited literature on collaborations between nurses and allied health professionals in the rehabilitation of PLWH, with no documentation of partnerships between nurses and physiotherapists in high-HIV burdened countries. We investigated the collaboration between nurses and physiotherapists in the rehabilitation of PLWH. We conducted two focus groups with experienced nurses at two residential facilities for PLWH in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa, using Van Manen's pedagogy on interpretive phenomenology as the conceptual framework. Three barriers to collaboration were found: role governance, environmental structure, and organizational variance. Education and in-service programs and workshops were suggested to curb the divide.

  6. Early Combination Antiretroviral Therapy Limits HIV-1 Persistence in Children.

    PubMed

    Luzuriaga, Katherine

    2016-01-01

    Globally, 240,000 infants are newly infected with HIV-1 each year and 3.2 million children are living with the infection. Combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) has reduced HIV-1-related disease and mortality in children but is not curative owing to the early generation of a latent reservoir of long-lived memory CD4(+) T cells bearing replication-competent HIV-1 provirus integrated into cellular DNA. This review focuses on recent advances in our understanding of the establishment of HIV-1 persistence in children and how early initiation of cART in the setting of the developing infant immune system limits the formation of the long-lived latent CD4(+) cell reservoir that remains a barrier to remission or cure.

  7. Pharmacokinetic, Pharmacogenetic, and Other Factors Influencing CNS Penetration of Antiretrovirals

    PubMed Central

    Babalola, Chinedum Peace; Morse, Gene D.; Taiwo, Babafemi

    2016-01-01

    Neurological complications associated with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) are a matter of great concern. While antiretroviral (ARV) drugs are the cornerstone of HIV treatment and typically produce neurological benefit, some ARV drugs have limited CNS penetration while others have been associated with neurotoxicity. CNS penetration is a function of several factors including sieving role of blood-brain and blood-CSF barriers and activity of innate drug transporters. Other factors are related to pharmacokinetics and pharmacogenetics of the specific ARV agent or mediated by drug interactions, local inflammation, and blood flow. In this review, we provide an overview of the various factors influencing CNS penetration of ARV drugs with an emphasis on those commonly used in sub-Saharan Africa. We also summarize some key associations between ARV drug penetration, CNS efficacy, and neurotoxicity. PMID:27777797

  8. Literacy, education and adherence to antiretroviral therapy in The Gambia.

    PubMed

    Hegazi, A; Bailey, R L; Ahadzie, B; Alabi, A; Peterson, K

    2010-11-01

    We examined the relationship of patients' literacy and education to antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence in an urban treatment centre in The Gambia. Information on education and literacy systematically collected before ART initiation was compared against selected adherence outcomes. Formally educated patients were significantly more likely to achieve virological suppression at both six and 12 months (87% vs. 67%, OR=3.13, P=0.03; 88% vs. 63%, OR=4.49, P=0.007, respectively). Literate patients had similar benefit at 12 months (OR=3.39 P=0.03), with improved virological outcomes associated with degree of literacy (P=0.003). A trend towards similar results was seen at 6 months for Koranically educated patients; however, this was no longer apparent at 12 months. No significant correlation was seen between socio-demographic characteristics and missed appointments. Our study suggests that literacy, formal education and possibly Koranic education may impact favourably on adherence to ART.

  9. Platelet count kinetics following interruption of antiretroviral treatment

    PubMed Central

    Zetterberg, Eva; Neuhaus, Jacqueline; Baker, Jason V.; Somboonwit, Charurut; Llibre, Josep M.; Palfreeman, Adrian; Chini, Maria; Lundgren, Jens D.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the mechanisms of platelet kinetics in the Strategies for Management of Antiretroviral Therapy (SMART) study that demonstrated excess mortality with CD4 guided episodic antiretroviral therapy (ART) drug conservation compared with continuous treatment viral suppression. Follow-up analyses of stored plasma samples demonstrated increased activation of both inflammatory and coagulation pathways after stopping ART. Design SMART patients from sites that determined platelets routinely. Methods Platelet counts were retrospectively collected from 2206 patients from visits at study entry, and during follow-up. D-dimer levels were measured at study entry, month 1, and 2. Results Platelet levels decreased in the drug conservation group following randomization, but remained stable in the viral suppression group [median (IQR) decline from study entry to month 4: −24 000/µl (−54 000 to 4000) vs. 3000 (−22 000 to 24 000), respectively, P < 0.0001)] and the rate of developing thrombocytopenia (<100 000/µl) was significantly higher in the drug conservation vs. the viral suppression arm (unadjusted drug conservation/viral suppression [HR (95%CI) = 1.8 (1.2–2.7)]. The decline in platelet count among drug conservation participants on fully suppressive ART correlated with the rise in D-dimer from study entry to either month 1 or 2 (r = −0.41; P = 0.02). Among drug conservation participants who resumed ART 74% recovered to their study entry platelet levels. Conclusion Interrupting ART increases the risk of thrombocytopenia, but reinitiation of ART typically reverses it. Factors contributing to declines in platelets after interrupting ART may include activation of coagulation pathways or HIV-1 replication itself. The contribution of platelets in HIV-related procoagulant activity requires further study. PMID:23018440

  10. Economics of antiretroviral treatment vs. circumcision for HIV prevention.

    PubMed

    Bärnighausen, Till; Bloom, David E; Humair, Salal

    2012-12-26

    The HIV Prevention Trials Network (HPTN) 052 study, which showed the effectiveness of antiretroviral treatment in reducing HIV transmission, has been hailed as a "game changer" in the fight against HIV, prompting calls for scaling up treatment as prevention (TasP). However, it is unclear how TasP can be financed, given flat-lining support for global HIV programs. We assess whether TasP is indeed a game changer or if comparable benefits are obtainable at similar or lower cost by increasing coverage of medical male circumcision (MMC) and antiretroviral treatment (ART) at CD4 <350/μL. We develop a new mathematical model and apply it to South Africa, finding that high ART coverage combined with high MMC coverage provides approximately the same HIV incidence reduction as TasP, for $5 billion less over 2009-2020. MMC outperforms ART significantly in cost per infection averted ($1,096 vs. $6,790) and performs comparably in cost per death averted ($5,198 vs. $5,604). TasP is substantially less cost effective at $8,375 per infection and $7,739 per death averted. The prevention benefits of HIV treatment are largely reaped with high ART coverage. The most cost-effective HIV prevention strategy is to expand MMC coverage and then scale up ART, but the most cost-effective HIV-mortality reduction strategy is to scale up MMC and ART jointly. TasP is cost effective by commonly used absolute benchmarks but it is far less cost effective than MMC and ART. Given South Africa's current annual ART spending, the $5 billion in savings offered by MMC and ART over TasP in the next decade, for similar health benefits, challenges the widely hailed status of TasP as a game changer.

  11. Alcohol consumption enhances antiretroviral painful peripheral neuropathy by mitochondrial mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, Luiz F; Levine, Jon D

    2010-09-01

    A major dose-limiting side effect of human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) chemotherapies, such as the nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs), is a small-fiber painful peripheral neuropathy, mediated by its mitochondrial toxicity. Co-morbid conditions may also contribute to this dose-limiting effect of HIV/AIDS treatment. Alcohol abuse, which alone also produces painful neuropathy, is one of the most important co-morbid risk factors for peripheral neuropathy in patients with HIV/AIDS. Despite the prevalence of this problem and its serious impact on the quality of life and continued therapy in HIV/AIDS patients, the mechanisms by which alcohol abuse exacerbates highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART)-induced neuropathic pain has not been demonstrated. In this study, performed in rats, we investigated the cellular mechanism by which consumed alcohol impacts antiretroviral-induced neuropathic pain. NRTI 2',3'-dideoxycytidine (ddC; 50 mg/kg) neuropathy was mitochondrial-dependent and PKCε-independent, and alcohol-induced painful neuropathy was PKCε-dependent and mitochondrial-independent. At low doses, ddC (5 mg/kg) and alcohol (6.5% ethanol diet for 1 week), which alone do not affect nociception, together produce profound mechanical hyperalgesia. This hyperalgesia is mitochondrial-dependent but PKCε-independent. These experiments, which provide the first model for studying the impact of co-morbidity in painful neuropathy, support the clinical impression that alcohol consumption enhances HIV/AIDS therapy neuropathy, and provide evidence for a role of mitochondrial mechanisms underlying this interaction.

  12. HBV influence on Response to Antiretroviral Therapy in Horizontally HIV-HBV Coinfected Patient during Early Childhood

    PubMed Central

    Niculescu, Irina; Cupşa, A.M.; Stoian, Andreea Cristina; Dumitrescu, FLorentina; Giubelan, L.I.; Alexandru, D.O.

    2013-01-01

    Background: There are few studies on pediatric HIV-HBV coinfection, so evidences about relationships between the two viruses are scarce. Objectives: influence of HBV infection on virological and immunological response to antiretroviral therapy (ART) in antiretroviral-naïve horizontally HIV-HBV coinfected subjects during early childhood. Material and methods: observational study on 826 HIV+ subjects in evidence of Craiova Regional Centre (CRC); we analyzed the immunological and virological response at 6-12 months after starting first antiretroviral regimens compared in 2 groups: horizontally HIV-HBV coinfected subjects during early childhood (CoS) versus horizontally HIV infected subjects during early childhood without HBV infection (non-CoS). Results: Number of subjects: CoS-66 subjects, non-CoS-132 subjects. Demographic data: CoS-gender ratio F:M=0.886, the majority lived in rural area (57.58%), mean age on diagnosis-9.288±4.607 years, non-CoS-gender ratio F:M=0.859, the majority lived in urban area (53.79%), mean age on diagnosis-10.742±5.107 years. At baseline, HIV category was: CoS-A-1.52%, B-80.30%, C-18.18%, non-CoS-A-2.27%, B-70.45%, C-27.27% (p Chi2=0.332), the mean CD4+ cell count was: CoS-148.33±148.10 cells/ml, non-CoS-163.17±155.39 cells/ml (p Student=0.521) and the mean HIV viral load (HIV VL) was: CoS-5.06±0.80 lgcopies/ml (for 29 subjects), non-CoS-5.04±0.84 lgcopies/ml (for 61 subjects) (p Student=0.978). At the end of the studied period, the mean increase in CD4+ cell count was: CoS-177.068±141.676 cells/ml, non-CoS-176.015±191.751 cells/ml (p Student=0.969) and the mean decrease in HIV VL was: CoS-5.04±0.79 lgcopies/ml, non-COS-4.69±2.04 lgcopies/ml (p Student=0.911). Conclusions: The presence of HBV coinfection does not influence immunological or virological response to ART. PMID:24778861

  13. Adult Learning Styles and the College Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leith, Karen Pezza

    Malcolm Knowles, in his theory of adult learning (1972, revised 1980), presents adults as motivated, self-directed learners. Basically, once a person starts seeing himself or herself as an adult, he or she has an expectation of being independent in decision-making, valuing personal experience, and desiring respect. Courses, curriculum, and…

  14. A European Vision for Adult Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waddington, Sue; Tuckett, Alan; Boucher, Fiona

    2012-01-01

    The National Institute of Adult Continuing Education (NIACE) is the UK national coordinator for the European Agenda for Adult Learning, with the challenge of creating a coherent message across the four countries to inform European cooperation on adult learning. To start the debate, the journal staff asked Sue Waddington, Alan Tuckett, and Fiona…

  15. Maternal Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy Reduces Vertical Cytomegalovirus Transmission But Does Not Reduce Breast Milk Cytomegalovirus Levels.

    PubMed

    Slyker, Jennifer A; Richardson, Barbra; Chung, Michael H; Atkinson, Claire; Ásbjörnsdóttir, Kristjana H; Lehman, Dara A; Boeckh, Michael; Emery, Vincent; Kiarie, James; John-Stewart, Grace

    2017-04-01

    To evaluate the impact of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) on CMV transmission and breast milk level in the context of maternal HIV. Specimens from a randomized trial conducted in Nairobi, Kenya between 2003-2005 were used to compare CMV transmission and breast milk levels between mother-infant pairs randomized to HAART versus short-course antenatal zidovudine plus single-dose nevirapine (ZDV/sdNVP) for prevention of mother-to-child HIV transmission (PMTCT). Fifty-one antiretroviral-naïve women ≤32 weeks gestation, and CD4 between 200-500 cells/mm(3) were randomized at 34 weeks to begin either antenatal ZDV/sdNVP, or HAART through 6 months postpartum. Mean breast milk CMV levels and transmission were compared between arms. Age, sociodemographics, CD4%, and HIV plasma RNA viral load were similar between arms at baseline. CMV viral loads were measured from 243 infant plasma and 185 breast milk specimens during the first year postpartum. The probability of infant CMV infection at 12 months was 19% lower in the HAART arm compared to ZDV/sdNVP (75% vs. 94%, p = .04). All women had CMV detected in breast milk, with 72%, 98%, and 97% testing positive during the first, second, and third weeks postpartum, respectively. There was a trend for early higher mean breast milk CMV level in the HAART arm at 1 week (p = .08), and there was significantly slower decline in breast milk CMV levels (area under the curve, p = .01). HAART started during the third trimester may decrease infant CMV infections, by mechanisms independent of breast milk CMV levels.

  16. Evaluation of improvement of onychomycosis in HIV-infected patients after initiation of combined antiretroviral therapy without antifungal treatment.

    PubMed

    Ruíz-López, Patricia; Moreno-Coutiño, Gabriela; Fernández-Martínez, Ramón; Espinoza-Hernández, Jessica; Rodríguez-Zulueta, Patricia; Reyes-Terán, Gustavo

    2015-09-01

    Onychomycosis in HIV-infected patients has a prevalence of 20-44% and is more frequently seen with CD4(+) T cell counts ≤450 cel μl(-1). There are case reports of improvement in onychomycosis after initiation of combined antiretroviral therapy (cART), but there are no prospective studies that prove the existence and frequency of this phenomenon. The aim of this study was to evaluate if HIV-infected patients with onychomycosis who begin cART improve and/or cure without antifungal treatment. We included HIV-infected patients with onychomycosis who had not started cART and nor received antifungal therapy during 6 months prior to the study. We evaluated affected the nails with the Onychomycosis Severity Index (OSI); nail scrapings were collected and direct microscopy with potassium hydroxide (KOH) as well as mycological culture were performed. We repeated these procedures at 3 and 6 months to assess changes. CD4 T cell counts and HIV viral load were obtained. A total of 16 patients were included, with male gender predominance (68.7%); distal and lateral subungual onychomycosis (DLSO) was the most common form (31.3%). Trichophyton rubrum was the most frequently isolated microorganism. OSI decreased 21.5% at 3 months and 40% at 6 months after initiation of antiretrovirals (P = 0.05). We found a non-significant tendency towards improvement with higher CD4(+) T cell counts and with viral loads <100 000 copies ml(-1). This could be due to the increase in CD4(+) T cells, decreased percentage of Treg (CD4(+)CD25(+)) among CD4(+) Tcells and/or a decreased viral load; further studies are necessary to prove these hypothesis.

  17. Adherence to Antiretroviral Therapy During and After Pregnancy: Cohort Study on Women Receiving Care in Malawi's Option B+ Program

    PubMed Central

    Haas, Andreas D.; Msukwa, Malango T.; Egger, Matthias; Tenthani, Lyson; Tweya, Hannock; Jahn, Andreas; Gadabu, Oliver J.; Tal, Kali; Salazar-Vizcaya, Luisa; Estill, Janne; Spoerri, Adrian; Phiri, Nozgechi; Chimbwandira, Frank; van Oosterhout, Joep J.; Keiser, Olivia

    2016-01-01

    Background. Adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) is crucial to preventing mother-to-child transmission of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and ensuring the long-term effectiveness of ART, yet data are sparse from African routine care programs on maternal adherence to triple ART. Methods. We analyzed data from women who started ART at 13 large health facilities in Malawi between September 2011 and October 2013. We defined adherence as the percentage of days “covered” by pharmacy claims. Adherence of ≥90% was deemed adequate. We calculated inverse probability of censoring weights to adjust adherence estimates for informative censoring. We used descriptive statistics, survival analysis, and pooled logistic regression to compare adherence between pregnant and breastfeeding women eligible for ART under Option B+, and nonpregnant and nonbreastfeeding women who started ART with low CD4 cell counts or World Health Organization clinical stage 3/4 disease. Results. Adherence was adequate for 73% of the women during pregnancy, for 66% in the first 3 months post partum, and for about 75% during months 4–21 post partum. About 70% of women who started ART during pregnancy and breastfeeding adhered adequately during the first 2 years of ART, but only about 30% of them had maintained adequate adherence at every visit. Risk factors for inadequate adherence included starting ART with an Option B+ indication, at a younger age, or at a district hospital or health center. Conclusions. One-third of women retained in the Option B+ program adhered inadequately during pregnancy and breastfeeding, especially soon after delivery. Effective interventions to improve adherence among women in this program should be implemented. PMID:27461920

  18. The biomechanical structure of swim start performance.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Sebastian; Kibele, Armin

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this study was to analyse the significance of various biomechanical parameters in swim start performance for the grab and track start techniques. To do so, structural equation models were analysed, incorporating measurements for the take-off phase, flight phase and entry phase. Forty-six elite German swimmers (18 female and 28 male; age: 20.1 ± 4.2 yrs; PB (100 m Freestyle): 53.6 ± 2.9 s) participated in the study. Their swim start performance was examined within a 25-m sprint test. Structural equation modelling was conducted in separate models for the block time, flight time and water time and in a combined model for swim start time. Our main finding was that swim start time is predominantly related to water time and determined to a lesser extent by block time and flight time. We conclude that more emphasis should be given to the water immersion behaviour and the gliding phase when analysing swim start performance. Furthermore, significant differences were found between the grab start and track techniques as regards the biomechanical parameters representing the take-off phase and water phase.

  19. Healthy start program participation: the consumers' perspective.

    PubMed

    Ley, Christine E; Copeland, Valire Carr; Flint, Cheryl Squire

    2011-01-01

    In 1991, the federal Maternal and Child Health Bureau developed the Healthy Start Initiative as a comprehensive community-based program to eliminate the high rates of poor pregnancy outcomes among women of color. To date, few studies of the programmatic outcomes of this Initiative have examined the views of Healthy Start consumers. To understand the benefits of Healthy Start from their consumers' perspective, the Pittsburgh Allegheny County Healthy Start project conducted a survey of 202 of their Healthy Start participants in 2003. The participants completing the survey reported benefits of participating in the program including stress reduction, receiving resources and referrals, and consistent social support of program staff. According to the project's annual statistics, Healthy Start has improved pregnancy outcomes among African American women participants in the Pittsburgh community. However, and according to these participants, the quality of staff and consumer connectedness, availability and consistency of material resources, and social support are as critical as more traditional health interventions to their satisfaction, motivation to participate, and willingness to refer others to the program. Women of color will often forego health services perceived as intimidating and/or culturally insensitive, but programs such as the Healthy Start Initiative offer a critical link that encourages participation and, as a result, improves maternal and child health status.

  20. Start 2: Thinking one move ahead

    SciTech Connect

    Gaines, L.L.

    1991-11-01

    At their summit meeting in the spring of 1990, Presidents Bush and Gorbachev issued a joint statement expressing their intentions to continue the process of strategic arms control beyond the Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty (START), which was eventually signed in July 1991, toward agreement on further reductions. They set general goals for negotiation of a follow-on treaty to START, which has been called START II. President Bush`s historic speech on September 27, 1991, reinforced those goals and specified several actions the US would take. It is the purpose of this report to examine possible provisions of START II and the implications of those provisions for achievement of the goals set at the 1990 summit, for verifiability, and for US force planning. This look ahead will contribute to advance planning of appropriate negotiating positions, verification research and development (R&D), and force modernization and restructuring. This report describes the goals for a START II treaty and possible means for achieving them. It postulates one set of provisions for such a treaty, while it examines force structures for the US that could result from adoption of a treaty with these provisions. The adequacy of methods for verifying START II are examined and the implications of a START II treaty are postulated.

  1. Start 2: Thinking one move ahead

    SciTech Connect

    Gaines, L.L.

    1991-11-01

    At their summit meeting in the spring of 1990, Presidents Bush and Gorbachev issued a joint statement expressing their intentions to continue the process of strategic arms control beyond the Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty (START), which was eventually signed in July 1991, toward agreement on further reductions. They set general goals for negotiation of a follow-on treaty to START, which has been called START II. President Bush's historic speech on September 27, 1991, reinforced those goals and specified several actions the US would take. It is the purpose of this report to examine possible provisions of START II and the implications of those provisions for achievement of the goals set at the 1990 summit, for verifiability, and for US force planning. This look ahead will contribute to advance planning of appropriate negotiating positions, verification research and development (R D), and force modernization and restructuring. This report describes the goals for a START II treaty and possible means for achieving them. It postulates one set of provisions for such a treaty, while it examines force structures for the US that could result from adoption of a treaty with these provisions. The adequacy of methods for verifying START II are examined and the implications of a START II treaty are postulated.

  2. The vulnerability of men to virologic failure during antiretroviral therapy in a public routine clinic in Burkina Faso

    PubMed Central

    Penot, Pauline; Héma, Arsène; Bado, Guillaume; Kaboré, Firmin; Soré, Ibrahim; Sombié, Diamasso; Traoré, Jean-Richard; Guiard-Schmid, Jean-Baptiste; Fontanet, Arnaud; Slama, Laurence; Sawadogo, Adrien Bruno; Laurent, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Gender differences in antiretroviral therapy (ART) outcomes are critical in sub-Saharan Africa. We assessed the association between gender and virologic failure among adult patients treated in a public routine clinic (one of the largest in West Africa) in Burkina Faso. Methods We performed a case-control study between July and October 2012 among patients who had received ART at the Bobo Dioulasso Day Care Unit. Patients were eligible if they were 15 years or older, positive for HIV-1 or HIV-1+2, and on first-line ART for at least six months. Cases were all patients with two consecutive HIV loads >1000 copies/mL (Biocentric Generic or Abbott Real Time assays), or one HIV load >1000 copies/mL associated with immunologic or clinical failure criteria. Controls were all patients who only had HIV loads <300 copies/mL. The association between gender and virologic failure was assessed using a multivariate logistic regression, adjusted on age, level of education, baseline CD4+ T cell count, first and current antiretroviral regimens and time on ART. Results Of 2303 patients (74.2% women; median age: 40 years; median time on ART: 34 months), 172 had virologic failure and 2131 had virologic success. Among the former, 130 (75.6%) had confirmed virologic failure, 38 (22.1%) had viro-immunologic failure, and four (2.3%) had viro-clinical failure. The proportion of men was significantly higher among the cases than among the controls (37.2% vs. 24.9%; p<0.001). Compared to controls, cases were also younger, more immunodeficient at ART initiation, less likely to receive a protease inhibitor-based antiretroviral regimen and had spent a longer period of time on ART. After adjustment, male gender remained strongly associated with virologic failure (odds ratio 2.52, 95% CI: 1.77–3.60; p<0.001). Conclusions Men on ART appeared more vulnerable to virologic failure than women. Additional studies are needed to confirm the poorer prognosis of men in this setting and to

  3. Nanoformulated antiretroviral drug combinations extend drug release and antiretroviral responses in HIV-1-infected macrophages: implications for neuroAIDS therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Nowacek, Ari S; McMillan, JoEllyn; Miller, Reagan; Anderson, Alec; Rabinow, Barrett; Gendelman, Howard E

    2010-12-01

    We posit that improvements in pharmacokinetics and biodistributions of antiretroviral therapies (ART) for human immunodeficiency virus type one-infected people can be achieved through nanoformulationed drug delivery systems. To this end, we manufactured nanoparticles of atazanavir, efavirenz, and ritonavir (termed nanoART) and treated human monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM) in combination therapies to assess antiretroviral responses. This resulted in improved drug uptake, release, and antiretroviral efficacy over monotherapy. MDM rapidly, within minutes, ingested nanoART combinations, at equal or similar rates, as individual formulations. Combination nanoART ingested by MDM facilitated individual drug release from 15 to >20 days. These findings are noteworthy as a nanoART cell-mediated drug delivery provides a means to deliver therapeutics to viral sanctuaries, such as the central nervous system during progressive human immunodeficiency virus type one infection. The work brings us yet another step closer to realizing the utility of nanoART for virus-infected people.

  4. CD4+ T cell counts in initiation of antiretroviral therapy in HIV infected asymptomatic individuals; controversies and inconsistencies.

    PubMed

    Maina, E K; Bonney, E Y; Bukusi, E A; Sedegah, M; Lartey, M; Ampofo, W K

    2015-12-01

    The primary goal when devising strategies to define the start of therapy in HIV infected individuals is to avoid HIV disease progression and toxicity from antiretroviral therapy (ART). Intermediate goals includes, avoiding resistance by suppressing HIV replication, reducing transmission, limiting spread and diversity of HIV within the body and protecting the immune system from harm. The question of how early or late to start ART and achieve both primary and intermediate goals has dominated HIV research. The distinction between early and late treatment of HIV infection is currently a matter of CD4+ T cells count, a marker of immune status, rather than on viral load, a marker of virus replication. Discussions about respective benefits of early or delayed therapy, as well as the best CD4+ T cell threshold during the course of HIV infection at which ART is initiated remains inconclusive. Guidelines issued by various agencies, provide different initiation recommendations. This can be confusing for clinicians and policy-makers when determining the best time to initiate therapy. Optimizing ART initiation strategies are clearly complex and must be balanced between individual and broader public health needs. This review assesses available data that contributes to the debate on optimal time to initiate therapy in HIV-infected asymptomatic individuals. We also review reports on CD4+ T cell threshold to guide initiation of ART and finally discuss arguments for and against early or late initiation of ART.

  5. Starting Circuit For Erasable Programmable Logic Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cole, Steven W.

    1990-01-01

    Voltage regulator bypassed to supply starting current. Starting or "pullup" circuit supplies large inrush of current required by erasable programmable logic device (EPLD) while being turned on. Operates only during such intervals of high demand for current and has little effect any other time. Performs needed bypass, acting as current-dependent shunt connecting battery or other source of power more nearly directly to EPLD. Input capacitor of regulator removed when starting circuit installed, reducing probability of damage to transistor in event of short circuit in or across load.

  6. Once-daily antiretroviral therapy in a cohort of HIV-infected children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Montero, Beatriz; Beceiro, José; de José-Gómez, M Isabel; González-Tomé, M Isabel; Gurbindo-Gutierrez, Dolores; Martínez-Pérez, Jorge; Mellado-Peña, M José; Navarro-Gómez, M Luisa; Roa-Francia, Miguel A; Rojo-Conejo, Pablo; Saavedra-Lozano, Jesús; Jiménez de Ory, Santiago; Ramos-Amador, José T

    2014-10-01

    We evaluated the evolution over time of once-daily antiretroviral therapy in HIV-infected children and its relationship with adherence. An increase on the prevalence of once-daily antiretroviral therapy was observed over time (from 0.9% in 2002 to 44.2% in 2011). There was no difference in adherence regarding once-daily or BID regimens in 2011. Adherence was related to age and pill burden.

  7. Guidelines for the Use of Antiretroviral Agents in Pediatric HIV Infection. Vol. 47/No. RR-4.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-04-17

    INTERNET DOCUMENT INFORMATION FORM A . Report Title: Guidelines for the Use of Antiretroviral Agents in Pediatric HIV Infection B. DATE Report...No. RR-4 Recommendations and Reports MORBIDITY AND MORTALITY WEEKLY REPORT Guidelines for the Use of Antiretroviral Agents in Pediatric HIV...Services, Atlanta, GA 30333. SUGGESTED CITATION Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Guidelines for the use of antiretro- viral agents in

  8. Head Start: The Nation's Pride, A Nation's Challenge. Recommendations for Head Start in the 1990s.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lombardi, Joan

    1990-01-01

    Based on the May 1990 report of Head Start's Silver Ribbon Panel, this article provides background information on the panel, summarizes Head Start's successes and challenges, outlines the commendations, and discusses implications of the panel's report. (BG)