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Sample records for adults young children

  1. Multicultural Literature for Children and Young Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bista, Krishna

    2012-01-01

    In the selection of multicultural literature for children and young adults, educators and researchers focus on two main controversial issues--authority and authenticity--that the authors portray in their writing. What type of author can accurately portray realistic pictures of minority cultures in multicultural literature for young adults? Must it…

  2. Young Children's Attributions: Pink and Blue Are for Adults Only.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cotten-Huston, Annie L.; Lunney, G. Sparks

    The present study compares the attributions of young children 5 to 6.5 years of age with those of adult subjects 20 to 30 years of age, who were engaged in the same competitive situation. It was hypothesized that sex differences would occur in the sample of adults but not in the sample of children. Believing outcomes to be determined by either…

  3. Strategic Selection of Children's and Young Adult Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jiménez, Laura M.; McIlhagga, Kristen K. A.

    2013-01-01

    The authors discuss strategic selection of literature for children and young adults based on the characteristics of written text and images as teachers and parents choose books for classroom and home settings. The topic is approached from two stances/lenses: (1) the cognitive processes used while reading and the ways different genres, topics, and…

  4. Identification of Hearing Loss in Children and Young Adults Using Measures of Transient Otoacoustic Emission Reproducibility.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glattke, Theodore J.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Measures of transient evoked otoacoustic emission (TEOAE) reproducibility were obtained for 506 ears of 260 children and young adults. Findings suggest that TEOAEs provide useful information in routine clinical practice and may be employed to screen for the presence of hearing loss in children and young adults. (DB)

  5. Distinguished Books. Notable Books of 2001; Best Books for Young Adults; Quick Picks for Reluctant Young Adult Readers; Audiobooks for Young Adults; Notable Children's Books; Notable Children's Videos; Notable Recordings for Children; Notable software and Web Sites for Children; Bestsellers of 2001; Literary Prizes, 2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maryles, Daisy; Riippa, Laurele; Ink, Gary

    2002-01-01

    Presents bibliographies of notable books, best books for young adults, audiobooks for young adults, notable children's books, notable children's videos, notable recordings for children, and notable software and Web sites for children; discusses bestsellers; and lists literary prizes awarded in 2001. (LRW)

  6. Young Adult Follow-Up of Hyperactive Children: Antisocial Activities and Drug Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barkley, Russell A.; Fischer, Mariellen; Smallish, Lori; Fletcher, Kenneth

    2004-01-01

    Background: Hyperactive/ADHD children are believed to be a greater risk for adolescent and young adult antisocial activity and drug use/abuse, particularly that subset having comorbid conduct problems/disorder. Method: We report on the lifetime antisocial activities and illegal drug use self-reported at young adult follow-up (mean age 20-21 years;…

  7. Functional Changes in Children, Adolescents, and Young Adults with Cerebral Palsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krakovsky, Gina; Huth, Myra Martz; Lin, Li; Levin, Ron S.

    2007-01-01

    Children with multiple handicaps, including cerebral palsy (CP), often lose or regress in their functional ability through adolescence and young adulthood. The purpose of this study was to examine functional and psychosocial changes in children, adolescents, and young adults with CP. A retrospective chart review and a prospective telephone…

  8. Young adult outcomes of very-low-birth-weight children.

    PubMed

    Hack, Maureen

    2006-04-01

    Information on the young adult outcomes of the initial survivors of neonatal intensive care has been reported from the United States, Canada, Australia, Great Britain and other European countries. The studies have varied with regard to whether they were regional or hospital-based, their birth-weight group and gestational age, rates of survival, socio-demographic background, and measures of assessment and types of outcome studied. Despite these differences the overall results reveal that neurodevelopment and growth sequelae persist to young adulthood. Very-low-birth-weight young adults have, with few exceptions, poorer educational achievement than normal-birth-weight controls, and fewer continue with post-high-school study. Rates of employment are, however, similar. There are no major differences in general health status, but the young adults demonstrate poorer physical abilities, higher mean blood pressure and poorer respiratory function. There is no evidence of major psychiatric disorder, although anxiety and depression are reported more often. The young adults report less risk-taking than control populations. They report fairly normal social lives and quality of life. When differences are noted they are usually due to neurosensory disabilities. Longer-term studies are needed to evaluate ultimate educational and occupational achievement. It will also be important to assess the effects of preterm birth, early growth failure and catch-up growth on later metabolic and cardiovascular health.

  9. Selection Tools for Materials in Spanish for Children and Young Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bern, Alan

    1994-01-01

    Provides an annotated list of recommended selection tools for children's and young adult materials in Spanish. Commercial vendors, books, older lists for retrospective collecting, and periodicals and journals are among the categories included. (five references) (LRW)

  10. From Overlooked to Looking Over: Lesbians in Children's and Young Adult Literature.

    PubMed

    Cummins, June

    2015-01-01

    This introduction focuses on the relative absence of lesbians in scholarly and intellectual conversations about homosexuality in children's and young adult literature. It also discusses the various articles in this special issue of the Journal of Lesbian Studies.

  11. Violence Prevention for Teachers of Young Children. ACT--Adults and Children Together--against Violence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Association for the Education of Young Children, Washington, DC.

    Noting that teachers of young children can help protect children from getting involved in violence, this booklet provides research and practice-based information on preventing violence in young children's lives. The booklet asserts that young children need to feel safe and loved, need to watch peace-loving people, need to be protected from…

  12. Evaluation of spatial validity-invalidity by the P300 component in children and young adults.

    PubMed

    Flores, Angélica B; Gómez, Carlos M; Meneres, Susana

    2010-04-05

    The influence of cerebral maturity on the neurocognitive evaluation of target stimuli that have been cued by a spatial directional central cue, which, validly or invalidly, indicates the spatial position of the upcoming target has been investigated. ERPs and behavioural responses were recorded in 18 children and 20 young adults. P3a and P3b amplitudes were analyzed in the valid and invalid trials to assess possible differences between children and young adults. Young adults showed more activation in anterior (P3a) and posterior (P3b) areas in the invalid than the valid condition, whereas children only showed greater activation in P3b. This may be due to the later maturation of the frontal cortex than the more posterior sites. Children also showed a greater P3 component amplitude and a topography shifting to occipital sites, irrespective of the experimental condition.

  13. Use of Monoclonal Antibodies to Enumerate Spirochetes and Identify Treponema denticola in Dental Plaque of Children, Adolescents and Young Adults,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-01-01

    ANTIBODIES TO ENUMERATE SPIROCHETES AND IDENTIFY TREPONEMA DENTICOLA IN DENTAL PLAQUE OF CHILDREN, ADOLESCENTS AND YOUNG ADULTS S. L. BARRON G. R...TREPONEMA DENTICOLA IN DENTAL PLAQUE OF CHILDREN, ADOLESCENTS AND YOUNG ADULTS S. L. BARRON G. R. RIVIERE L. G. SIMONSON S. A. LUKEHART D. E. TIRA D. W...enumerate spirochetes and identify Treponema denticola o . in dental plaque of children, adolescents and young adults. ’................. Oral Microbiol

  14. Investigating Adult Language Input and Young Children's Responses in Naturalistic Environments: An Observational Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marinac, Julie V.; Woodyatt, Gail C.; Ozanne, Anne E.

    2008-01-01

    This paper reports the design and trial of an original Observational Framework for quantitative investigation of young children's responses to adult language in their typical language learning environments. The Framework permits recording of both the response expectation of the adult utterances, and the degree of compliance in the child's…

  15. Positive, Peaceful Interactions between Adults and Young Children. Growing Together: Building a Peaceful Community.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruning, Merribeth D.

    This paper discusses classroom practices contributing to positive, peaceful interactions between adults and young children. The paper begins with reminders about the development of self-control as a crucial aspect of peacefulness, the role of the toddler's developing autonomy, and the development of a sense of fairness in prekindergarten children.…

  16. Speaking of Poets: Interviews with Poets Who Write for Children and Young Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Copeland, Jeffrey S.

    Presenting informal interviews, this book opens a window into the writing processes, influences, work habits, and personal backgrounds of 16 poets who write for children and young adults. The interviews in the book provide not only critical discussions of poetry but also ideas about how teachers can help children understand poetry and enjoy…

  17. Connecting Science and Math Concepts with Children's and Young Adult Literature in a CCSS World

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jewett, Pamela; Johnson, Denise; Lowery, Ruth McKoy; Stiles, James W.

    2015-01-01

    In this article, the authors provide a synopsis of the 2014 Children's Literature Assembly (CLA) Workshop. The Workshop explored how fiction and nonfiction children's and young adult's literature create opportunities for in-depth learning in the content areas. Participants had the opportunity to hear the stories of authors and illustrators of…

  18. Youth and young adult physical activity and body composition of young adult women: findings from the dietary intervention study in children.

    PubMed

    Hodge, Melissa G; Hovinga, Mary; Shepherd, John A; Egleston, Brian; Gabriel, Kelley; Van Horn, Linda; Robson, Alan; Snetselaar, Linda; Stevens, Victor K; Jung, Seungyoun; Dorgan, Joanne

    2015-02-01

    This study prospectively investigates associations between youth moderate-to-vigorous-intensity physical activity (MVPA) and body composition in young adult women using data from the Dietary Intervention Study in Children (DISC) and the DISC06 Follow-Up Study. MVPA was assessed by questionnaire on 5 occasions between the ages 8 and 18 years and at age 25-29 years in 215 DISC female participants. Using whole body dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA), overall adiposity and body fat distribution were assessed at age 25-29 years by percent body fat (%fat) and android-to-gynoid (A:G) fat ratio, respectively. Linear mixed effects models and generalized linear latent and mixed models were used to assess associations of youth MVPA with both outcomes. Young adult MVPA, adjusted for other young adult characteristics, was significantly inversely associated with young adult %fat (%fat decreased from 37.4% in the lowest MVPA quartile to 32.8% in the highest (p-trend = 0.02)). Adjusted for youth and young adult characteristics including young adult MVPA, youth MVPA also was significantly inversely associated with young adult %fat (β=-0.40 per 10 MET-hrs/wk, p = .02) . No significant associations between MVPA and A:G fat ratio were observed. Results suggest that youth and young adult MVPA are important independent predictors of adiposity in young women.

  19. Nature of Interactions among Young Children and Adult Caregivers in a Children's Museum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dooley, Caitlin McMunn; Welch, Meghan M.

    2014-01-01

    This naturalistic, qualitative study examines the nature of child- and adult-led interactions in a children's museum. Using dialogic learning as a theoretical framework, the study examines how children and adults engage in interactions while learning at a museum. Findings suggest that children and adults are almost equally likely to lead…

  20. Growth hormone deficiency in children and young adults.

    PubMed

    Oświęcimska, Joanna; Roczniak, Wojciech; Mikołajczak, Agata; Szymlak, Agnieszka

    2016-09-13

    Growth hormone (GH) is a naturally occurring polypeptide hormone produced by somatotropic cells in the anterior pituitary. The main function of somatotropin is stimulation of linear growth, but it also affects carbohydrate metabolism, increases bone mass and has potent lipolytic, antinatriuretic and antidiuretic effects. Growth hormone deficiency (GHD) may occur both in children and in adults. At the moment there is no gold standard for the diagnosis of GHD, and the diagnosis should take into account clinical, auxological, biochemical and radiological changes and, if necessary, genetic testing. Recent studies have highlighted that the biochemical diagnosis of GH deficiency is still imperfect. Stimuli used in the tests are non-physiological, and various substances are characterized by a different mechanism of action and potency. A few years ago it was thought that GHD treatment in children must be completed at the end of linear growth. Studies performed in the last two decades have shown that GHD deficiency in adults may result in complex clinical problems, and if untreated shortens the life expectancy and worsens its comfort. Discontinuation of GH therapy after the final height has been reached in fact negatively impacts the physiological processes associated with the transition phase, which is the period of human life between achieving the final height and 25-30 years of age. Given the adverse metabolic effects of GH treatment interruption after linear growth has been completed, the latest recommendations propose reassessment of GH secretion in the period at least one month after cessation of treatment and continuation of the therapy in case of persistent deficit.

  1. A Bibliography of Children's and Young Adult's Books about Illness Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cothern, Nancy B.

    This bibliography presents a list of approximately 360 works of children's and young adult's literature that deal with illness issues or issues connected with adverse life conditions such as various forms of child abuse, alcoholism, AIDS, blindness, cancer, death, handicaps, suicide, and surgery. The bibliography is divided into 42 sections, each…

  2. The Life Course of Children Born to Unmarried Mothers: Childhood Living Arrangements and Young Adult Outcomes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aquilino, William S.

    1996-01-01

    Explored living arrangements among children born to unmarried mothers and the impact of childhood living arrangements on the young adult's life course. Analyses showed that living arrangement patterns after birth to a single mother influenced the likelihood of high school completion, post secondary education, and other conditions. (RJM)

  3. Children's and Young Adult Literature by Latino Writers: A Guide for Librarians, Teachers, Parents, and Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    York, Sherry

    This guide is designed to help librarians, teachers, parents, and students learn and teach about Latinos and find appropriate reading materials by Latinos. The titles in the guide are in print and available for purchase as of the printing of this book. Most books in the guide were written for children or young adults--interest-level designations…

  4. A Mighty River: Intersections of Spiritualities and Activism in Children's and Young Adult Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simon, Lisa; Norton, Nadjwa E. L.

    2011-01-01

    This article seeks to expand the possibilities of support that children's and young adult literature provides to activist-oriented educators. Joining our voices to others who have made significant contributions to this emphasis, our work examines a too-often-silenced aspect of activism: its intersection with spirituality. Using an inclusive…

  5. Reconciling Memories of Internment Camp Experiences During WWII in Children's and Young Adult Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glasgow, Jacqueline N.

    2002-01-01

    Examines the uprooting of Japanese Americans during World War II as portrayed in children's/young adult literature. Discovers the triumph of the spirit of the survivors and replaces suppressed images with empowering ones. Considers stories and narratives in literature as a resource through which readers might shape their understanding of the…

  6. Young Children's Opportunities for Unstructured Environmental Exploration of Nature: Links to Adults' Experiences in Childhood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laird, Shelby Gull; McFarland-Piazza, Laura; Allen, Sydnye

    2014-01-01

    Outdoor environmental education and provision of unstructured exploration of nature are often forgotten aspects of the early childhood experience. The aim of this study was to understand how adults' early experiences in nature relate to their attitudes and practices in providing such experiences for young children. This study surveyed 33 parents…

  7. An Autophotography of the Young Adult Children of Bereaved Families in Korea

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Sungeun

    2012-01-01

    The present study, using autophotography, shows how Korean young adult children experienced the death of a parent and how they created a new life following parental death. The results suggest that the loss of a parent is a continuing process. The parental loss started in the period of struggle in which one parent was dying and the other family…

  8. Contemporary Ghost Stories: Cyberspace in Fiction for Children and Young Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Marla

    2005-01-01

    This essay identifies a genre of popular fiction for children and young adults, prevalent in the 1990s and continuing into the early twenty-first century, that incorporates computers and the internet, e-mails and chat rooms, into its plots. However, along with a focus on technology, this fiction frequently features the supernatural. So, too,…

  9. Comparisons of magnitude estimation scaling of rock music by children, young adults, and older people.

    PubMed

    Fucci, D; Kabler, H; Webster, D; McColl, D

    1999-12-01

    The present study concerned the perceptual processing of complex auditory stimuli in 10 children (M age = 8.1) as compared to 10 young adults (M age = 19.3) and 10 older adult subjects (M age = 54.2). The auditory stimulus used was 10 sec. of rock music (Led Zeppelin, 1969). All three groups provided numerical responses to nine intensities of the rock music stimulus (10, 20, 30, 40, 50, 60, 70, 80, 90 dB above threshold). Analysis showed that the children reported a wider range of numerical responses than both adult groups. The mean numerical responses for the children ranged from .54 to 54.24. For the young adults the range was .76 to 11.37, and for the older subjects it was 1.6 to 23.31. Results suggest that the children were not bound by the same set of rules as the adults with regard to magnitude estimation scaling of the loudness of the rock music stimulus. Their internal scaling mechanisms appeared to be more flexible and broader based than those of the adults who participated in this study.

  10. Distinguished Books. Notable Books of 2002; Best Books for Young Adults; Audiobooks for Young Adults; Quick Picks for Reluctant Young Adult Readers; Notable Children's Books; Notable Children's Videos; Notable Recordings for Children; Notable Software for Children; Bestsellers of 2002; Literary Prizes, 2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maryles, Daisy; Riippa, Laurele; Ink, Gary

    2003-01-01

    Includes bibliographies of notable books of 2002, including fiction, nonfiction, and poetry; books for young adults, including fiction, nonfiction, audiobooks, and titles for reluctant readers; notable books for children; videos for children; children's recordings and software; bestsellers, fiction and nonfiction; paperback bestsellers; almanacs,…

  11. Adult Modelling Facilitates Young Children's Generation of Novel Pretend Acts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nielsen, Mark; Christie, Tamara

    2008-01-01

    The present work investigated the effect of modelling on children's pretend play behaviour. Thirty-seven children aged between 27 and 41 months were given 4 min of free play with a dollhouse and associated toy props (pre-modelling phase). Using dolls, an experimenter then acted out a series of vignettes involving object substitutions, imaginary…

  12. Causes and histopathology of ascending aortic disease in children and young adults

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Deepali; Dietz, Harry C.; Oswald, Gretchen L.; Maleszewski, Joseph J.; Halushka, Marc K.

    2011-01-01

    Background Ascending aortic diseases (aneurysms, dissections, and stenosis) and associated aortic valve disease are rare but important causes of morbidity and mortality in children and young adults. Certain genetic causes, such as Marfan syndrome and congenital bicuspid aortic valve disease, are well known. However, other rarer genetic and nongenetic causes of aortic disease exist. Methods We performed an extensive literature search to identify known causes of ascending aortic pathology in children and young adults. We catalogued both aortic pathologies and other defining systemic features of these diseases. Results We describe 17 predominantly genetic entities that have been associated with thoracic aortic disease in this age group. Conclusions While extensive literature on the common causes of ascending aortic disease exists, there is a need for better histologic documentation of aortic pathology in rarer diseases. PMID:19926309

  13. Deaths among Children, Adolescents, and Young Adults with Down Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miodrag, Nancy; Silverberg, Sophie E.; Urbano, Richard C.; Hodapp, Robert M.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Although life expectancies in Down syndrome (DS) have doubled over the past 3-4 decades, there continue to be many early deaths. Yet, most research focuses on infant mortality or later adult deaths. Materials and Methods: In this US study, hospital discharge and death records from the state of Tennessee were linked to examine 2046…

  14. Contagion in Family Affection: Mothers, Fathers, and Young Adult Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Lynn

    1999-01-01

    Examines affective relationships from the perspective of both parent and child. Results show that parents' affect is related to martial quality and the partner's relationship with the child. Children's affect for mothers and for fathers is related to their feelings toward the other parent but not to their parents' martial quality. Includes…

  15. Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorder as Behavior Technicians for Young Children with Autism: Outcomes of a Behavioral Skills Training Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lerman, Dorothea C.; Hawkins, Lynn; Hillman, Conrad; Shireman, Molly; Nissen, Melissa A.

    2015-01-01

    Adults with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), who were interested in working as behavior technicians for young children with autism, participated in 2 experiments. Participants included 5 adults with Asperger syndrome or pervasive developmental disorder not otherwise specified, 19 to 23 years old, and 11 children with autism, 3 to 7 years old. In…

  16. Haemorrhagic complications with adenotonsillectomy in children and young adults with bleeding disorders.

    PubMed

    Warad, D; Hussain, F T N; Rao, A N; Cofer, S A; Rodriguez, V

    2015-05-01

    Haemorrhagic complications remain a challenge with surgical procedures in patients with bleeding disorders. In children and young adults, the most commonly performed surgeries are tonsillectomies and/or adenoidectomies. Adequate haemostasis in these patients with bleeding disorders is centred on comprehensive perioperative haemostatic support and dexterous surgical technique. The aim of this study was to assess postoperative bleeding complications with tonsillectomy and/or adenoidectomy in children and young adults with known bleeding disorders. Retrospective review of all patients aged <25 years with known bleeding disorders who underwent tonsillectomy and/or adenoidectomy at Mayo Clinic, Rochester MN between July 1992 and July 2012. In contrast to reported literature, we observed a higher rate of bleeding complications (10/19, 53%) despite aggressive haemostatic support and appropriate surgical techniques. Delayed bleeding (>24 h postoperatively) was more common than early bleeding; and recurrent bleeding was associated with older age. Children and young adults with haemorrhagic diatheses undergoing adenotonsillectomy are at a higher risk of delayed bleeding and require close monitoring with haemostatic support for a prolonged duration in the postoperative period. A uniform approach is needed to manage these patients perioperatively by establishing standard practice guidelines and ultimately reduce postsurgical bleeding complications.

  17. Young Adult Literature for Young Adult Males.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gill, Sam D.

    1999-01-01

    Argues that young adult literature can play a significant role in the emotional and mental health of an adolescent as well as help young males become more literate. Offers a 19-item annotated list of young adult novels with male protagonists, sorted by themes: nature and adventure stories, sports stories, genre stories, historical stories, and…

  18. Relationship Between Ties With Adult Children and Life Satisfaction Among the Middle-Aged, the Young-Old, and the Oldest-Old Korean Adults.

    PubMed

    Chai, Hye Won; Jun, Hey Jung

    2016-01-01

    One of the important determinants of well-being among aging parents is their relationship with adult children. Using the two waves of the Korean Longitudinal Study of Ageing, this study examined how different types of ties with adult children affect the life satisfaction of the Korean middle-aged, the young-old, and the oldest-old adults. Multigroup analysis was used to see if the effects of ties with adult children differ by the three age-groups. The results showed that frequency of contact had positive effect on life satisfaction for all of the age-groups. However, coresidence with children had a negative effect for the middle-aged, but a positive effect for the oldest-old. Finally, exchanges of support with adult children had significant effects only for the young-old. These results show that the importance of different types of ties with children change according to aging parents' life stages.

  19. Health Effects of Energy Drinks on Children, Adolescents, and Young Adults

    PubMed Central

    Seifert, Sara M.; Schaechter, Judith L.; Hershorin, Eugene R.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review the effects, adverse consequences, and extent of energy drink consumption among children, adolescents, and young adults. METHODS: We searched PubMed and Google using “energy drink,” “sports drink,” “guarana,” “caffeine,” “taurine,” “ADHD,” “diabetes,” “children,” “adolescents,” “insulin,” “eating disorders,” and “poison control center” to identify articles related to energy drinks. Manufacturer Web sites were reviewed for product information. RESULTS: According to self-report surveys, energy drinks are consumed by 30% to 50% of adolescents and young adults. Frequently containing high and unregulated amounts of caffeine, these drinks have been reported in association with serious adverse effects, especially in children, adolescents, and young adults with seizures, diabetes, cardiac abnormalities, or mood and behavioral disorders or those who take certain medications. Of the 5448 US caffeine overdoses reported in 2007, 46% occurred in those younger than 19 years. Several countries and states have debated or restricted energy drink sales and advertising. CONCLUSIONS: Energy drinks have no therapeutic benefit, and many ingredients are understudied and not regulated. The known and unknown pharmacology of agents included in such drinks, combined with reports of toxicity, raises concern for potentially serious adverse effects in association with energy drink use. In the short-term, pediatricians need to be aware of the possible effects of energy drinks in vulnerable populations and screen for consumption to educate families. Long-term research should aim to understand the effects in at-risk populations. Toxicity surveillance should be improved, and regulations of energy drink sales and consumption should be based on appropriate research. PMID:21321035

  20. Young Children's Access to "Real Life": An Examination of the Growing Boundaries between Children in Child Care and Adults in the Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nimmo, John

    2008-01-01

    Young children in industrialized societies are increasingly separated from the everyday lives of adults in their community. This article explores the historical and cultural dynamics (and contradictions) of a growing boundary between children, particularly those in child care, and adults without primary care-giving roles. The article proposes that…

  1. "Yes Kylie, Echidna's "Are" Almost Wombats!" Adult Responses to Young Children's Answers in Two Languages: Lebanese-Arabic and English.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rieschild, Verna Robertson

    1994-01-01

    Examines some aspects of English and Lebanese-Arabic adult responses to child answers, exploring the way the use of preferred communication strategies reflects culturally based assumptions about learning and guiding learning. The article argues that adults who regularly deal with young children develop preferred interactive strategies deriving…

  2. And along Came a Spider: An Attentional Bias for the Detection of Spiders in Young Children and Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LoBue, Vanessa

    2010-01-01

    Spiders are among the most common targets of fears and phobias in the world. In visual search tasks, adults detect their presence more rapidly than other kinds of stimuli. Reported here is an investigation of whether young children share this attentional bias for the detection of spiders. In a series of experiments, preschoolers and adults were…

  3. How Do Adults Use Repetition? A Comparison of Conversations with Young Children and with Multiply-Handicapped Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bocerean, Christine; Canut, Emmanuelle; Musiol, Michel

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this research is to compare the types and functions of repetitions in two different corpora, one constituted of verbal interactions between adults and multiply-handicapped adolescents, the other between adults and young children of the same mental age as the adolescents. Our overall aim is to observe whether the communicative…

  4. Co-Constructional Task Analysis: Moving beyond Adult-Based Models to Assess Young Children's Task Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Scott Weng Fai

    2013-01-01

    The assessment of young children's thinking competence in task performances has typically followed the novice-to-expert regimen involving models of strategies that adults use when engaged in cognitive tasks such as problem-solving and decision-making. Socio-constructivists argue for a balanced pedagogical approach between the adult and child that…

  5. Young Adult Outcomes of Children Born to Teen Mothers: Effects of Being Born during Their Teen or Later Years

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lipman, Ellen L.; Georgiades, Katholiki; Boyle, Michael H.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Children of teen mothers exhibit adverse outcomes through adolescence. It is unclear whether these adverse outcomes extend to adulthood and apply to all of her children, or only those born when she was a teen. We examine the associations between young adult functioning and being born to a teen mother aged less than or equal to 20 years…

  6. Self-Regulation and Metacognition in Young Children: Does It Matter if Adults Are Present or Not?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robson, Sue

    2016-01-01

    This paper brings together two areas of considerable interest to researchers, practitioners and policy makers: young children's developing self-regulation and metacognition, and the impact of adult (practitioner) presence or absence on their behaviour and learning. One hundred and twenty-eight observations of 29 children aged 4-5 years in a…

  7. The effect of standing desks on manual control in children and young adults.

    PubMed

    Britten, L; Shire, K; Coats, R O; Astill, S L

    2016-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to establish if and how the additional postural constraint of standing affects accuracy and precision of goal directed naturalistic actions. Forty participants, comprising 20 young adults aged 20-23 years and 20 children aged 9-10 years completed 3 manual dexterity tasks on a tablet laptop with a handheld stylus during two separate conditions (1) while standing and (2) while seated. The order of conditions was counterbalanced across both groups of participants. The tasks were (1) a tracking task, where the stylus tracked a dot in a figure of 8 at 3 speeds, (2) an aiming task where the stylus moved from dot to dot with individual movements creating the outline of a pentagram and (3) a tracing task, where participants had to move the stylus along a static pathway or maze. Root mean squared error (RMSE), movement time and path accuracy, respectively, were used to quantify the effect that postural condition had on manual control. Overall adults were quicker and more accurate than children when performing all 3 tasks, and where the task speed was manipulated accuracy was better at slower speeds for all participants. Surprisingly, children performed these tasks more quickly and more accurately when standing compared to when sitting. In conclusion, standing at a desk while performing goal directed tasks did not detrimentally affect children's manual control, and moreover offered a benefit.

  8. Young Adult Services Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boegen, Anne, Ed.

    Designed to offer guidelines, ideas and help to those who provide library service to young adults, this manual includes information about the provision of young adult (YA) services in six sections. The first section, which addresses planning and administration, includes a definition of a young adult and a checklist for determining community needs…

  9. Effects of Prosodic and Lexical Constraints on Parsing in Young Children (and Adults)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snedeker, Jesse; Yuan, Sylvia

    2008-01-01

    Prior studies of ambiguity resolution in young children have found that children rely heavily on lexical information but persistently fail to use referential constraints in online parsing [Trueswell, J.C., Sekerina, I., Hill, N.M., & Logrip, M.L, (1999). The kindergarten-path effect: Studying on-line sentence processing in young children.…

  10. Adults with autism spectrum disorder as behavior technicians for young children with autism: Outcomes of a behavioral skills training program.

    PubMed

    Lerman, Dorothea C; Hawkins, Lynn; Hillman, Conrad; Shireman, Molly; Nissen, Melissa A

    2015-01-01

    Adults with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), who were interested in working as behavior technicians for young children with autism, participated in 2 experiments. Participants included 5 adults with Asperger syndrome or pervasive developmental disorder not otherwise specified, 19 to 23 years old, and 11 children with autism, 3 to 7 years old. In Experiment 1, training of the adults focused on the implementation of mand training via incidental teaching. Experiment 2 focused on teaching participants to use discrete-trial training (DTT) with children who exhibited problem behavior. Both experiments showed that behavioral skills training was effective for teaching the adult participants the behavioral procedures needed to teach children with autism. In addition, the children acquired skills as a result of training. Results of Experiment 2 further demonstrated that the DTT skills generalized across untrained targets and children. Social validity ratings suggested that some participants' teaching was indistinguishable from that of individuals without ASD.

  11. EEG spectral power in phasic and tonic REM sleep: different patterns in young adults and children.

    PubMed

    Simor, Péter; Gombos, Ferenc; Szakadát, Sára; Sándor, Piroska; Bódizs, Róbert

    2016-06-01

    Rapid eye movement sleep is composed of phasic and tonic periods, two distinguishable microstates in terms of arousal thresholds and sensory processing. Background electroencephalogram oscillations are also different between periods with (phasic state) and periods without (tonic state) eye movements. In Study 1, previous findings analysing electroencephalogram spectral power in phasic and tonic rapid eye movement sleep were replicated, and analyses extended to the high gamma range (52-90 Hz). In Study 2, phasic and tonic spectral power differences within a group of 4-8-year-old children were examined. Based on the polysomnographic data of 20 young adults, the phasic state yielded increased delta and theta power in anterior sites, as well as generally decreased high alpha and beta power in comparison to the tonic state. Moreover, phasic periods exhibited greater spectral power in the lower and the higher gamma band. Interestingly, children (n = 18) exhibited a different pattern, showing increased activity in the low alpha range during phasic periods. Moreover, during phasic in contrast to tonic rapid eye movement sleep, increased low and high gamma and enhanced low gamma band power emerged in anterior and posterior regions, respectively. The current findings show that spectral activity within the high gamma range substantially contributes to the differences between phasic and tonic rapid eye movement sleep, especially in adults. Moreover, the current data underscore the heterogeneity of rapid eye movement sleep, and point to marked differences between young adults and children regarding phasic/tonic electroencephalogram spectral power. These results suggest that the differentiation between phasic and tonic rapid eye movement periods undergoes maturation.

  12. Young adult educational and vocational outcomes of children diagnosed with ADHD.

    PubMed

    Kuriyan, Aparajita B; Pelham, William E; Molina, Brooke S G; Waschbusch, Daniel A; Gnagy, Elizabeth M; Sibley, Margaret H; Babinski, Dara E; Walther, Christine; Cheong, Jeewon; Yu, Jihnhee; Kent, Kristine M

    2013-01-01

    Decreased success at work and educational attainment by adulthood are of concern for children with ADHD given their widely documented academic difficulties; however there are few studies that have examined this empirically and even fewer that have studied predictors and individual variability of these outcomes. The current study compares young adults with and without a childhood diagnosis of ADHD on educational and occupational outcomes and the predictors of these outcomes. Participants were from the Pittsburgh ADHD Longitudinal Study (PALS), a prospective study with yearly data collection. Significant group differences were found for nearly all variables such that educational and occupational attainment was lower for adults with compared to adults without histories of childhood ADHD. Despite the mean difference, educational functioning was wide-ranging. High school academic achievement significantly predicted enrollment in post-high school education and academic and disciplinary problems mediated the relationship between childhood ADHD and post-high school education. Interestingly, ADHD diagnosis and disciplinary problems negatively predicted occupational status while enrollment in post-high school education was a positive predictor. Job loss was positively predicted by a higher rate of academic problems and diagnosis of ADHD. This study supports the need for interventions that target the child and adolescent predictors of later educational and occupational outcomes in addition to continuing treatment of ADHD in young adulthood targeting developmentally appropriate milestones, such as completing post-high school education and gaining and maintaining stable employment.

  13. Young Adult Library Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    The Bookmark, 1985

    1985-01-01

    Eight articles in this Spring 1985 issue of The Bookmark focus on young adult library services. In addition to these thematic articles, an introduction and three reports are presented. The issue contains: (1) "In Perspective" (E. J. Josey); (2) "Young Adult Literature in the 1980's--Awesome!" (Ellin Chu); (3) "Young Adult…

  14. Inclusive Literature in the Library and the Classroom: The Importance of Young Adult and Children's Books that Portray Characters with Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wopperer, Emily

    2011-01-01

    Literature for children and young adults is written for many different reasons. It is written purely to entertain, to help children and young adults understand the world they live in, or to help cope with problems they face. It can also be written to introduce new places, ideas, or situations to its readers, or to portray characters with whom…

  15. Reference data for jumping mechanography in Canadian children, adolescents and young adults

    PubMed Central

    Gabel, L.; Macdonald, H.M.; Nettlefold, L.; Race, D.; McKay, H.A.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To provide age- and sex-specific reference data for mechanography-derived parameters of muscle function in Canadian children and youth using the single two-legged jump (S2LJ) with hands-on-waist. Methods: Our sample included 2017 observations from 715 participants (9-21 years; 338 girls). Participants performed three S2LJ with hands-on-waist on a force platform (Leonardo Mechanograph, Novotec). Outcomes were maximum peak power (Pmax), Pmax /mass, peak force/body weight (Fmax /BW), force efficiency, maximum jump height (Hmax), and velocity (Vmax). We used the LMS method to construct age- and sex-specific percentile curves and mixed effects models to examine sex and ethnic differences. Results: With the exception of Efficiency, mechanography outcomes were greater in girls (4-40%, p<0.05) than boys at age 9. Boys’ advantage in mechanography parameters emerged in adolescence (age 11-13 years; 3-65%, p<0.05) and persisted into young adulthood, except for Fmax/BW which was not greater in boys until age 17 (4-10%, p<0.05). Mechanography outcomes were 3-9% (p<0.05) greater in Asian compared with white participants. Conclusions: We provide the first reference data for the S2LJ using the hands-on-waist protocol in children, youth and young adults. These data support previous findings using freely moving arms and can be used when evaluating muscle function in pediatric studies. PMID:27973380

  16. Performance of the DIDGET Blood Glucose Monitoring System in Children, Teens, and Young Adults

    PubMed Central

    Deeb, Larry C; Parkes, Joan L; Pardo, Scott; Schachner, Holly C; Viggiani, Maria T; Wallace, Jane; Bailey, Timothy

    2011-01-01

    Background This study evaluated the performance of the DIDGET® blood glucose monitoring system (BGMS) in the hands of its intended users: children, teens, and young adults with diabetes. Methods Finger stick capillary blood samples were tested in duplicate by subjects (with parent/guardian assistance, if needed) and health care professionals using the DIDGET BGMS, and results were compared with those obtained using a Yellow Springs Instruments (YSI) glucose analyzer. Modified venous blood samples (i.e., glycolyzed or spiked with glucose) were used to analyze meter performance under extreme glucose concentrations. Accuracy was assessed using International Organization for Standardization (ISO) 15197:2003 guidelines (i.e., 95% of meter results within ±15 mg/dl or ±20% of reference values). Results A total of 123 subjects aged 4 to 24 years with type 1 or type 2 diabetes were enrolled. The DIDGET meter achieved accuracy according to ISO 15197:2003 criteria: >97% of meter results were within ±15 mg/dl or ±20% of reference values. Regression analyses showed a high degree of correlation between meter and YSI results: coefficient of determination (R2) = 98.2% for all samples combined and 97.2% for capillary samples only. Clinical accuracy for combined samples was demonstrated by Parkes consensus error grid analyses; 100% of meter results were in zone A (98.5%) or zone B (1.5%). There was no difference in performance or accuracy across age subsets. Hematocrit values did not affect meter blood glucose results. Conclusion The DIDGET BGMS provided accurate test results across all age ranges in children, teens, and young adults with diabetes. PMID:22027310

  17. METABOLIC SYNDROME AND DAILY AMBULATION IN CHILDREN, ADOLESCENTS, AND YOUNG ADULTS

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, Andrew W.; Parker, Donald E.; Krishnan, Sowmya; Chalmers, Laura J.

    2012-01-01

    Purposes To compare daily ambulatory measures in children, adolescents, and young adults with and without metabolic syndrome, and to assess which metabolic syndrome components, demographic measures, and body composition measures are associated with daily ambulatory measures. Methods Two-hundred fifty subjects between the ages of 10 and 30 years were assessed on metabolic syndrome components, demographic and clinical measures, body fat percentage, and daily ambulatory strides, durations, and cadences during seven consecutive days. Forty-five of the 250 subjects had metabolic syndrome, as defined by the International Diabetes Federation. Results Subjects with metabolic syndrome ambulated at a slower daily average cadence than those without metabolic syndrome (13.6 ± 2.2 strides/min vs. 14.9 ± 3.2 strides/min; p=0.012), and they had slower cadences for continuous durations of 60 minutes (p=0.006), 30 minutes (p=0.005), 20 minutes (p=0.003), 5 minutes (p=0.002), and 1 minute (p=0.001). However, the total amount of time spent ambulating each day was not different (p=0.077). After adjustment for metabolic syndrome status, average cadence is linearly associated with body fat percentage (p<0.001) and fat mass (p<0.01). Group difference in average cadence was no longer significant after adjusting for body fat percentage (p=0.683) and fat mass (p=0.973). Conclusion Children, adolescents, and young adults with metabolic syndrome ambulate more slowly and take fewer strides throughout the day than those without metabolic syndrome, even though the total amount of time spent ambulating is not different. Furthermore, the detrimental influence of metabolic syndrome on ambulatory cadence is primarily a function of body fatness. PMID:22811038

  18. Pedometer-Assessed Physical Activity in Children and Young Adults with CKD

    PubMed Central

    Akber, Aalia; Portale, Anthony A.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background and objectives Data on physical activity are limited in children with CKD. The objectives of this study were to measure the level and correlates of physical activity in children and young adults with CKD and to determine the association of physical activity with physical performance and physical functioning. Design, setting, participants, & measurements Physical activity was measured for 7 days using pedometers; physical performance was measured by the 6-minute walk distance (6MWD) and physical functioning with the PedsQL 4.0. Results Study participants were 44 patients 7–20 years of age who had CKD stage 1–4 (n=12), had ESRD and were undergoing dialysis (n=7), or had undergone kidney transplantation (n=25). Participants were very sedentary; they walked 6218 (interquartile range, 3637, 9829) steps per day, considerably less than recommended. Physical activity did not differ among participants in the CKD stage 1–4, ESRD, and transplant groups. Females were less active than males (P<0.01), and physical activity was 44% lower among young adults (18–20 years) than younger participants (P<0.05). Physical activity was associated positively with maternal education and hemoglobin concentration and inversely with body mass index. Respective 6MWD in males and females was 2 and approximately 4 SDs below expected. Low levels of physical activity were associated with poor physical performance and physical functioning, after adjustment for age, sex, and body mass index. Conclusions In most participants with CKD, physical activity was considerably below recommended levels. Future studies are needed to determine whether increasing physical activity can improve physical performance and physical functioning. PMID:22422539

  19. Longitudinal Study of Parents' Impact on Quality of Life of Children and Young Adults with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cramm, Jane M.; Nieboer, Anna P.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Earlier research has distinguished five domains of Quality of life (QoL) for people with ID: material well-being, development and activity, physical well-being, social well-being, and emotional well-being. We investigated parents' perspectives on these domains and QoL for children and young adults with ID and hypothesized that parents'…

  20. A Survey of Library Services to Children and Young Adults in Selected Developing Countries in Africa and Asia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Craver, Kathleen W.

    1985-01-01

    Review of developments in children and young adult library services since 1979 discusses three factors that complicate methods used to combat illiteracy problem: population growth, language, and undeveloped readership. Countries studied are Libya, Kenya, Tanzania, Angola, Zambia, Zimbabwe, Ghana, Nigeria, Gambia, Thailand, Singapore, Philippines,…

  1. Reading Development Electrified: Semantic and Syntactic Integration during Sentence Comprehension in School-Age Children and Young Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    VanDyke, Justine M.

    2011-01-01

    Adults are able to access semantic and syntactic information rapidly as they hear or read in real-time in order to interpret sentences. Young children, on the other hand, tend to rely on syntactically-based parsing routines, adopting the first noun as the agent of a sentence regardless of plausibility, at least during oral comprehension. Little is…

  2. Teachers Moving Forward on a Cultural Self-Awareness Spectrum: Diverse Children, Museums, and Young Adult Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gunn, AnnMarie Alberton

    2016-01-01

    This case study research investigated preservice and in-service teachers' (N = 23) experiences and understandings as they participated in a multicultural children and young adults' literature course that incorporates visits to a Holocaust museum. A graduate level course was redesigned within a framework of social justice pedagogy by focusing on…

  3. Stress and coping among children of alcoholic parents through the young adult transition.

    PubMed

    Hussong, Andrea M; Chassin, Laurie

    2004-01-01

    The transition to young adulthood is both a time when risky health behaviors such as substance misuse peak and a time of opportunity for growth and development through the acquisition of adult roles. In this transition, coping styles include responses to the stressors and opportunities associated with the emergence of adulthood. The extent to which such coping styles are skillfully employed in part determines adjustment into adulthood. The current study used a high-risk, longitudinal design to examine the development of coping styles over adolescence, continuity in these coping styles from adolescence to adulthood, the impact of coping on adult stress and substance misuse, the ability of coping to buffer effects of stress on substance use, and differences in coping between at-risk youth (i.e., children of alcoholics [COAs]) and their peers. A sample of 340 adolescents completed four assessments over ages 11-23. We used latent trajectory models to examine interindividual and intraindividual change in coping over time. Evidence for both change and continuity in the development of coping from adolescence to adulthood was found, although adolescent coping had limited impact on stress and substance use in adulthood. Support was also found for complex stress-buffering and stress-exacerbating effects of coping on the relations between major life events and adult drug use and between stress associated with the new roles of adulthood and heavy alcohol use. Implications of these findings for development and adjustment in the transition to adulthood are discussed.

  4. Differences Between Parents of Young Versus Adult Children Seeking to Participate in Family-to-Family Psychoeducation

    PubMed Central

    Schiffman, Jason; Kline, Emily; Reeves, Gloria; Jones, Amanda; Medoff, Deborah; Lucksted, Alicia; Fang, Li Juan; Dixon, Lisa B.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Parents of individuals with mental illness often play a central role in initiating and supporting their children’s treatment. This study compared psychological symptoms and experiences of parents of younger versus older consumers. Parents were seeking to participate in a family education program for relatives of individuals with mental illness. Methods Domains of caregiving and distress were assessed among parents of youths (N=56), of young adults (N=137), and of adults ≥30 (N=72) who were seeking to participate in the National Alliance on Mental Illness Family-to-Family program. Results Parents of youths endorsed greater burden, difficulties, and emotional distress than parents of young adults, who in turn endorsed greater burden, difficulties, and emotional distress than parents of older adults. Conclusions Findings suggest that burden, difficulties, and emotional distress among parents seeking participation in this program may be highest when children with mental health concerns are younger and that the burdens recede as children age. PMID:24492901

  5. The genetic and environmental structure of verbal and visuospatial memory in young adults and children.

    PubMed

    van Leeuwen, Marieke; van den Berg, Stéphanie M; Hoekstra, Rosa A; Boomsma, Dorret I

    2009-11-01

    The extent to which verbal (VM) and visuospatial memory (VSM) tests measure the same or multiple constructs is unclear. Likewise the relationship between VM and VSM across development is not known. These questions are addressed using genetically informative data, studying two age cohorts (young adults and children) of twins and siblings. VM and VSM were measured in the working memory and short-term memory domain. Multivariate genetic analyses revealed that two highly correlated common genetic factors, one for VM and one for VSM, gave the best description of the covariance structure among the measures. Only in children, specific genetic factors were also present. This led to the following conclusions: In children, one genetic factor is responsible for linking VM and VSM. Specific genetic factors create differences between these two domains. During the course of development, the influence of genetic factors unique to each of these domains disappears and the genetic factor develops into two highly correlated factors, which are specific to VM and VSM respectively. At the environmental level, in both age cohorts, environmental factors create differences between these domains.

  6. Environmental exposure to gasoline and leukemia in children and young adults--an ecology study.

    PubMed

    Nordlinder, R; Järvholm, B

    1997-01-01

    Benzene is an established cause of leukemia in adults, especially acute non-lymphocytic leukemia (ANLL). A few studies have indicated that exposure to gasoline is a cause of childhood leukemia. The purpose of this study was to investigate if environmental exposure to benzene from gasoline and car exhaust was associated with leukemia in children and young adults. The exposure to gasoline and car exhaust was estimated by the number of cars per area. In this ecology study, data on the incidence of cancer in each municipality of Sweden during an 11-year period (1975-1985) were compared with the number of cars per area. Data on the incidence of cancer for persons aged 0-24 years at diagnosis were collected from the National Swedish Cancer Register. The following diagnoses were studied: non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL), chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), and acute myeloid leukemia (AML). We found an association between AML and car density. In municipalities with more than 20 cars/km2 the incidence of AML was 5.5 [95% confidence interval (CI) 4.4-6.8, n = 89] as compared with 3.4 (95% CI 1.9-5.7, n = 15) cases per 1 million person-years in municipalities with less than 5 cars/km2 (P = 0.05). No association was found for the other sites of cancer studied. The association between AML in young adults and car density might be attributable to exposure to benzene from gasoline vapors and exhaust gases, but further investigations are necessary before any definite conclusion can be drawn.

  7. Look out below (and above)! Challenging Adult Understandings of Displaying Young Children's Artwork

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Twigg, Danielle

    2011-01-01

    Children's artwork displays are a distinct and key feature of early childhood classrooms. The artwork produced by young children in the classroom is often linked to the educational program. After the completion of the art projects, early childhood educators face the challenge of displaying the children's artwork. With minimal research available on…

  8. Stereoacuity in young children.

    PubMed

    Fox, R; Patterson, R; Francis, E L

    1986-04-01

    Previous investigations of stereopsis in children have found that stereoacuity improves gradually over time and does not reach adult levels until well into childhood. The unusually protracted period of development implied by these data is at odds with the development of other visual capacities, such as acuity, contrast sensitivity, increment thresholds, and flicker fusion. When tested on those dimensions, children, by the age of five, achieve thresholds that are only moderately higher than those achieved by adults. To determine if the elevated thresholds for stereopsis found in children could be attributable to the methods used to obtain them, the authors assessed stereoacuity of children, 3 to 5 yr of age, using a laboratory test combined with procedures designed to optimize the limited attentional, motivational, and response capabilities of young children. The thresholds obtained (median = 12.6 sec) are much lower than previously reported and are close, but not equal, to the thresholds of adults. These data suggest that the development of stereopsis is not unusually protracted relative to the development of other visual capacities. The elevation of threshold relative to adult values is similar to the shortfall found in studies of other visual capacities and has led investigators to suggest, and the authors concur, that children do not possess the sophisticated cognitive strategies that adults can employ when thresholds are approached and uncertainty is high. Given that interpretation, it is suggested that the maturation of stereoscopic capacity is nearly complete in children 3 to 5 yr of age.

  9. Grown-ups are not afraid of scary stuff, but kids are: young children's and adults' reasoning about children's, infants', and adults' fears.

    PubMed

    Sayfan, Liat; Lagattuta, Kristin Hansen

    2008-01-01

    Three-, 5-, and 7-year-olds and adults (N= 64) listened to stories depicting 2 protagonists of different ages (infant and child or child and grown-up) that encounter an entity that looks like a real (e.g., a snake) or an imaginary (e.g., a ghost) fear-inducing creature. Participants predicted and explained each protagonist's intensity of fear. Results showed significant age-related increases in knowledge that infants and adults would experience less intense fears than young children and that people's fears are causally linked to their cognitive mental states. Across age, stories involving imaginary beings elicited more frequent mental explanations for fear than stories about real creatures. Results are discussed in relation to children's developing awareness of the mind as mediating between situations and emotions.

  10. Take advantage of opportunities to reduce ED violence, recidivism among children and young adults.

    PubMed

    2013-05-01

    There is evidence that ED-based interventions can make a difference in short-circuiting the cycle of violence that often impacts children and young adults. Since the Violence Intervention Advocacy Program was launched at Boston Medical Center in 2006, recidivism to the ED among gunshot victims is down by 30% and recidivism among stabbing victims is down by about one-half. At Denver Health Medical Center, the At Risk Intervention and Monitoring (AIM) project just launched in June, but thus far, none of the patients being followed in the program have reappeared in the ED with a violent injury. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports that 700,000 people between the ages of 10 and 24 were treated in EDs for injuries caused by violence in 2009. To effectively intervene with victims of violence, experts recommend that EDs partner with community groups that have deep ties to the neighborhoods most impacted by violence. To avoid re-traumatizing victims of violence, health care personnel need to be trained in how to provide"trauma-informed care," a method of speaking to patients so that they feel empowered and safe. With young victims of violence, the biggest issues requiring attention are mental health, safety, and housing.

  11. Adults' Social Cues Facilitate Young Children's Use of Signs and Symbols

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leekam, Susan R.; Solomon, Tracy L.; Teoh, Yee-San

    2010-01-01

    Three experiments investigated the effect of an adult's social cues on 2- and 3-year-old children's ability to use a sign or symbol to locate a hidden object. Results showed that an adult's positive, engaging facial expression facilitated children's ability to identify the correct referent, particularly for 3-year-olds. A neutral facial expression…

  12. Scaffolding Young Children's Prosocial Responsiveness: Preschoolers' Responses to Adult Sadness, Anger, and Pain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denham, Susanne A.; And Others

    Two studies investigated children's responsiveness to an adult's negative emotions (anger, sadness, and pain). The studies also evaluated effects of adult scaffolding (labeling and explaining negative emotions, and requesting help). In the first study, subjects were 55 preschool children between the ages of 33 and 56 months. During individual play…

  13. Parental divorce and young adult children's romantic relationships: resolution of the divorce experience.

    PubMed

    Shulman, S; Scharf, M; Lumer, D; Maurer, O

    2001-10-01

    Fifty-one romantically involved young Israeli adults, whose parents were divorced, were questioned about their romantic relationship, parents' conflict, and current feelings about and reconstruction of the divorce. An integrative perception of the divorce was found to be related to fewer problems and to higher levels of friendship, enjoyment, and intimacy in the relationship. Implications for research and intervention with young adults are discussed.

  14. Epidemiology of Acute Kidney Injury in Critically Ill Children and Young Adults.

    PubMed

    Kaddourah, Ahmad; Basu, Rajit K; Bagshaw, Sean M; Goldstein, Stuart L

    2017-01-05

    Background The epidemiologic characteristics of children and young adults with acute kidney injury have been described in single-center and retrospective studies. We conducted a multinational, prospective study involving patients admitted to pediatric intensive care units to define the incremental risk of death and complications associated with severe acute kidney injury. Methods We used the Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes criteria to define acute kidney injury. Severe acute kidney injury was defined as stage 2 or 3 acute kidney injury (plasma creatinine level ≥2 times the baseline level or urine output <0.5 ml per kilogram of body weight per hour for ≥12 hours) and was assessed for the first 7 days of intensive care. All patients 3 months to 25 years of age who were admitted to 1 of 32 participating units were screened during 3 consecutive months. The primary outcome was 28-day mortality. Results A total of 4683 patients were evaluated; acute kidney injury developed in 1261 patients (26.9%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 25.6 to 28.2), and severe acute kidney injury developed in 543 patients (11.6%; 95% CI, 10.7 to 12.5). Severe acute kidney injury conferred an increased risk of death by day 28 after adjustment for 16 covariates (adjusted odds ratio, 1.77; 95% CI, 1.17 to 2.68); death occurred in 60 of the 543 patients (11.0%) with severe acute kidney injury versus 105 of the 4140 patients (2.5%) without severe acute kidney injury (P<0.001). Severe acute kidney injury was associated with increased use of mechanical ventilation and renal-replacement therapy. A stepwise increase in 28-day mortality was associated with worsening severity of acute kidney injury (P<0.001 by log-rank test). Assessment of acute kidney injury according to the plasma creatinine level alone failed to identify acute kidney injury in 67.2% of the patients with low urine output. Conclusions Acute kidney injury is common and is associated with poor outcomes, including increased

  15. MATRICS cognitive consensus battery (MCCB) performance in children, adolescents, and young adults

    PubMed Central

    Nitzburg, George C.; DeRosse, Pamela; Burdick, Katherine E.; Peters, Bart D.; Gopin, Chaya B.; Malhotra, Anil K.

    2014-01-01

    Background Neurodevelopmental models of schizophrenia suggest that cognitive deficits may be observed during childhood and adolescence, long before the onset of psychotic symptoms. Elucidating the trajectory of normal cognitive development during childhood and adolescence may therefore provide a basis for identifying specific abnormalities related to the development of schizophrenia. The MATRICS Consensus Cognitive Battery (MCCB), which was designed for use in clinical trials targeting cognitive deficits most common in schizophrenia, may provide a mechanism to understand this trajectory. To date, however, there is no performance data for the MCCB in healthy children and adolescents. The present study sought to establish performance data for the MCCB in healthy children, adolescents, and young adults. Methods The MCCB was administered to a community sample of 190 healthy subjects between the ages of 8 and 23 years. All MCCB domain scores were converted to T-scores using sample means and standard deviations and were compared for significant performance differences between sex and age strata. Results Analyses revealed age effects following quadratic trends in all MCCB domains, which is consistent with research showing a leveling off of childhood cognitive improvement upon approaching late adolescence. Sex effects after controlling for age only presented for one MCCB domain, with males exhibiting well-known spatial reasoning advantages. Conclusions Utilizing this performance data may aid future research seeking to elucidate specific deficits that may be predictive of later development of SZ. PMID:24321710

  16. Targeted therapeutics in treatment of children and young adults with solid tumors: an expert survey and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Grunewald, T G P; Greulich, N; Kontny, U; Frühwald, M; Rutkowski, S; Kordes, U; Scheurlen, W; Schmidt, W; Stachel, D; Metzler, M; Mittler, U; Graf, N; Benesch, M; Burdach, S

    2012-04-01

    Although prognosis of children with solid tumors is steadily improving, long-term survival is not achievable in all patients, especially in patients with recurrent or refractory disease. Despite the increasing number of targeted therapeutics (TT), only very few TT have been introduced into clinical protocols. Accordingly, clinical experience concerning the efficacy and safety of these drugs is limited. This may possibly discourage oncologists from administering TT to children.We performed a comprehensive review of the literature to identify TT that may be considered for treatment of children and young adults with solid tumors. Moreover, we interviewed an expert panel of the Society for Pediatric Oncology and Hematology (GPOH) using questionnaires in a modified Delphi process in order to describe the experts' experiences in the use of these TT.Among 30 TT identified to be possibly useful in children and young adults, imatinib, bevacizumab and rapamycin were most widely used. These drugs were reported as having mostly little to no severe adverse events and seem to induce at least partial responses in a subset of patients. In addition, our study confirms and expands the present knowledge about adverse events and the potential efficacy of 5 other commonly used TT in this population.This information may be useful for oncologists when administering these TT to children and young adults with solid tumors. Controlled clinical trials are urgently needed to test their safety and efficacy.

  17. Outbreak-related mumps vaccine effectiveness among a cohort of children and of young adults in Germany 2011.

    PubMed

    Takla, Anja; Böhmer, Merle M; Klinc, Christina; Kurz, Norbert; Schaffer, Alice; Stich, Heribert; Stöcker, Petra; Wichmann, Ole; Koch, Judith

    2014-01-01

    Mumps outbreaks in populations with high 2-dose vaccination coverage and among young adults are increasingly reported. However, data on the duration of vaccine-induced protection conferred by mumps vaccines are scarce. As part of a supra-regional outbreak in Germany 2010/11, we conducted two retrospective cohort studies in a primary school and among adult ice hockey teams to determine mumps vaccine effectiveness (VE). Via questionnaires we collected information on demography, clinical manifestations, and reviewed vaccination cards. We estimated VE as 1-RR, RR being the rate ratio of disease among two-times or one-time mumps-vaccinated compared with unvaccinated persons. The response rate was 92.6% (100/108--children cohort) and 91.7% (44/48--adult cohort). Fourteen cases were identified in the children and 6 in the adult cohort. In the children cohort (mean age: 9 y), 2-dose VE was 91.9% (95% CI 81.0-96.5%). In the adult cohort (mean age: 26 y), no cases occurred among the 13 2-times vaccinated, while 1-dose VE was 50.0% (95% CI -9.4-87.1%). Average time since last vaccination showed no significant difference for cases and non-cases, but cases were younger at age of last mumps vaccination (children cohort: 2 vs. 3 y, P=0.04; adult cohort: 1 vs. 4 y, P=0.03). We did not observe signs of waning immunity in the children cohort. Due to the small sample size VE in the adult cohort should be interpreted with caution. Given the estimated VE, very high 2-dose vaccination coverage is required to prevent future outbreaks. Intervention efforts to increase coverage must especially target young adults who received<2 vaccinations during childhood.

  18. Natural experience modulates the processing of older adult faces in young adults and 3-year-old children.

    PubMed

    Proietti, Valentina; Pisacane, Antonella; Macchi Cassia, Viola

    2013-01-01

    Just like other face dimensions, age influences the way faces are processed by adults as well as by children. However, it remains unclear under what conditions exactly such influence occurs at both ages, in that there is some mixed evidence concerning the presence of a systematic processing advantage for peer faces (own-age bias) across the lifespan. Inconsistency in the results may stem from the fact that the individual's face representation adapts to represent the most predominant age traits of the faces present in the environment, which is reflective of the individual's specific living conditions and social experience. In the current study we investigated the processing of younger and older adult faces in two groups of adults (Experiment 1) and two groups of 3-year-old children (Experiment 2) who accumulated different amounts of experience with elderly people. Contact with elderly adults influenced the extent to which both adult and child participants showed greater discrimination abilities and stronger sensitivity to configural/featural cues in younger versus older adult faces, as measured by the size of the inversion effect. In children, the size of the inversion effect for older adult faces was also significantly correlated with the amount of contact with elderly people. These results show that, in both adults and children, visual experience with older adult faces can tune perceptual processing strategies to the point of abolishing the discrimination disadvantage that participants typically manifest for those faces in comparison to younger adult faces.

  19. Vital Connections: Young Children, Adults & Music. International Society for Music Education Early Childhood Commission Seminar (Columbus, Missouri, July 11-15, 1994).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1994

    These papers were collected from participants at a conference on young children, adults, and music. Papers include: (1) "Preschool Children's Responses to Music on Television" (Katharine Smithrim, Canada); (2) "Learning to Observe in Order to Join the Musical Activities Better to the Total Development of the Young Child" (Margre van Gestel, The…

  20. Neutropenic enterocolitis in children and young adults with cancer: prognostic value of clinical and image findings.

    PubMed

    Rizzatti, Marcelo; Brandalise, Silvia Regina; de Azevedo, Amilcar Cardoso; Pinheiro, Vitória Régia Pereira; Aguiar, Simone dos Santos

    2010-09-01

    Intensive chemotherapy regimens can result in severe toxicities, particularly those that involve the digestive systems, leading to morbidity and mortality in this group of patients. Acute enterocolitis can be a frequent complication. The authors performed a retrospective review or patients treated at their institution to ascertain the prognostic value of the clinical symptoms and signs of acute enterocolitis, the corresponding abdominal ultrasonographic findings, and the impact of previous chemotherapy. Amongst 1159 patients with cancer treated at the Centro Infantil Boldrini from 2003 to 2007, 188 (16.2%) patients had 1 or more episode of enterocolitis. An intestinal wall thickness of >or=3 mm on ultrasound was considered diagnostic of enterocolitis. There were 231 episodes of enterocolitis with a death rate of 11.7%. Previous therapy with cytarabine and the presence of abdominal distention affected survival. An intestinal wall thickness of >or=10 mm in the ultrasonographic examination was associated with greater mortality. In multivariate analysis, age, gender, tumor type, degree of neutropenia, intestinal wall thickness, and number of intestinal segments were not statistically significant difference. In children and young adults with cancer and enterocolitis, the clinical findings of 4 or more symptoms and presence of abdominal distention were associated with higher risk of death. Use of cytarabine and an intestinal wall thickness of >or=10 mm were associated with a higher death rate.

  1. Effects of Acute Blueberry Flavonoids on Mood in Children and Young Adults.

    PubMed

    Khalid, Sundus; Barfoot, Katie L; May, Gabrielle; Lamport, Daniel J; Reynolds, Shirley A; Williams, Claire M

    2017-02-20

    Epidemiological evidence suggests that consumption of flavonoids (usually via fruits and vegetables) is associated with decreased risk of developing depression. One plausible explanation for this association is the well-documented beneficial effects of flavonoids on executive function (EF). Impaired EF is linked to cognitive processes (e.g., rumination) that maintain depression and low mood; therefore, improved EF may reduce depressionogenic cognitive processes and improve mood. Study 1: 21 young adults (18-21 years old) consumed a flavonoid-rich blueberry drink and a matched placebo in a counterbalanced cross-over design. Study 2: 50 children (7-10 years old) were randomly assigned to a flavonoid-rich blueberry drink or a matched placebo. In both studies, participants and researchers were blind to the experimental condition, and mood was assessed using the Positive and Negative Affect Schedule before and 2 h after consumption of the drinks. In both studies, the blueberry intervention increased positive affect (significant drink by session interaction) but had no effect on negative affect. This observed effect of flavonoids on positive affect in two independent samples is of potential practical value in improving public health. If the effect of flavonoids on positive affect is replicated, further investigation will be needed to identify the mechanisms that link flavonoid interventions with improved positive mood.

  2. Is overweight a risk factor for sports injuries in children, adolescents, and young adults?

    PubMed

    Kemler, E; Vriend, I; Paulis, W D; Schoots, W; van Middelkoop, M; Koes, B

    2015-04-01

    Physical activity and sports participation are promoted to counteract the increased prevalence of overweight and obesity in children and young adults. Both high body mass index and physical activity level have been associated with an increased risk of sports injuries. The objective is to determine the relationship between sports injuries and overweight in sports participants (4-24 years), taking physical activity into account. Data were obtained from the 2006-2011 "Injuries and Physical Activity in the Netherlands" survey. Analyses were based on a representative sample of 3846 sports participants (4-24 years). Univariate and multiple logistic regression analyses were applied to investigate the association between sports injury and weight status. Of all the sports participants, 14.7% were overweight. Compared with normal-weight sports participants, the odds of sustaining a sports injury was 0.73 [confidence interval (CI): 0.53-1.00, P = 0.050] for overweight sports participants; the odds for underweight sports participants was 0.80 (CI: 0.56-1.15, P = 0.226). There is some evidence that overweight sports participants (4-24 years) do not have an increased injury risk compared with normal-weight sports participants, even when the level of physical activity is taken into account. Additional research is recommended regarding overweight people who start to participate in a physically active lifestyle.

  3. Effects of Acute Blueberry Flavonoids on Mood in Children and Young Adults

    PubMed Central

    Khalid, Sundus; Barfoot, Katie L.; May, Gabrielle; Lamport, Daniel J.; Reynolds, Shirley A.; Williams, Claire M.

    2017-01-01

    Epidemiological evidence suggests that consumption of flavonoids (usually via fruits and vegetables) is associated with decreased risk of developing depression. One plausible explanation for this association is the well-documented beneficial effects of flavonoids on executive function (EF). Impaired EF is linked to cognitive processes (e.g., rumination) that maintain depression and low mood; therefore, improved EF may reduce depressionogenic cognitive processes and improve mood. Study 1: 21 young adults (18–21 years old) consumed a flavonoid-rich blueberry drink and a matched placebo in a counterbalanced cross-over design. Study 2: 50 children (7–10 years old) were randomly assigned to a flavonoid-rich blueberry drink or a matched placebo. In both studies, participants and researchers were blind to the experimental condition, and mood was assessed using the Positive and Negative Affect Schedule before and 2 h after consumption of the drinks. In both studies, the blueberry intervention increased positive affect (significant drink by session interaction) but had no effect on negative affect. This observed effect of flavonoids on positive affect in two independent samples is of potential practical value in improving public health. If the effect of flavonoids on positive affect is replicated, further investigation will be needed to identify the mechanisms that link flavonoid interventions with improved positive mood. PMID:28230732

  4. A Prognostic Model Predicting Autologous Transplantation Outcomes in Children, Adolescents and Young Adults with Hodgkin Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Satwani, Prakash; Ahn, Kwang Woo; Carreras, Jeanette; Abdel-Azim, Hisham; Cairo, Mitchell S.; Cashen, Amanda; Chen, Andy I.; Cohen, Jonathon B.; Costa, Luciano J.; Dandoy, Christopher; Fenske, Timothy S.; Freytes, César O.; Ganguly, Siddhartha; Gale, Robert Peter; Ghosh, Nilanjan; Hertzberg, Mark S.; Hayashi, Robert J.; Kamble, Rummurti T.; Kanate, Abraham S.; Keating, Armand; Kharfan-Dabaja, Mohamed A.; Lazarus, Hillard M.; Marks, David I.; Nishihori, Taiga; Olsson, Richard F.; Prestidge, Tim D.; Rolon, Juliana Martinez; Savani, Bipin N.; Vose, Julie M.; Wood, William A.; Inwards, David J.; Bachanova, Veronika; Smith, Sonali M.; Maloney, David G.; Sureda, Anna; Hamadani, Mehdi

    2015-01-01

    Autologous hematopoietic cell transplantation (AutoHCT) is a potentially curative treatment modality for relapsed/refractory Hodgkin lymphoma (HL). However, no large studies have evaluated pre-transplant factors predictive of outcomes of AutoHCT in children, adolescents and young adults (CAYA, age <30 years). In a retrospective study, we analyzed 606 CAYA patients (median age 23 years) with relapsed/refractory HL who underwent AutoHCT between 1995–2010. The probabilities of progression free survival (PFS) at 1, 5 and 10 years were 66% (95% CI: 62–70), 52% (95% CI: 48–57) and 47% (95% CI: 42–51), respectively. Multivariate analysis for PFS demonstrated that at the time of AutoHCT patients with Karnofsky/Lansky score ≥90, no extranodal involvement and chemosensitive disease had significantly improved PFS. Patients with time from diagnosis to first relapse of <1 year had a significantly inferior PFS. A prognostic model for PFS was developed that stratified patients into low, intermediate and high-risk groups, predicting for 5-year PFS probabilities of 72% (95% CI: 64–80), 53% (95% CI: 47–59) and 23% (95% CI: 9–36), respectively. This large study identifies a group of CAYA patients with relapsed/refractory HL who are at high risk for progression after AutoHCT. Such patients should be targeted for novel therapeutic and/or maintenance approaches post-AutoHCT. PMID:26237164

  5. Secondary malignant neoplasms following radiotherapy for primary cancer in children and young adults.

    PubMed

    Harbron, Richard W; Feltbower, Richard G; Glaser, Adam; Lilley, John; Pearce, Mark S

    2014-04-01

    A study was conducted to investigate secondary malignant neoplasm (SMN) occurrence following radiotherapy (RT) for cancer in children and young adults, to examine the spatial distribution of SMNs in relation to the irradiated field, and to evaluate a possible role of bystander effects in SMN distribution. Forty-two SMNs were identified among 7257 subjects diagnosed with cancer while living in Yorkshire, UK. Thirty-two of these occurred in patients receiving RT. Distances between SMN locations and RT field edge were estimated along with dose at SMN site. Expected radiation-induced SMN frequency in remote tissues receiving less than 0.1 Gy was predicted using risk estimates based on atomic bombing data. After a median follow-up period of 7.58 years, patients treated with RT were at a nearly five-fold increased risk of developing a subsequent primary neoplasm than the general population in the 0-29 years age range. The most common type of secondary malignancy associated with RT was of the central nervous system (28%), followed by sarcoma (25%) and leukemia (19%). Considering only solid SMNs developing 5 years or more from treatment, the spatial distribution showed a strong pattern of proximity to the irradiated field, with 68% occurring in-field or within 8 cm of the field edge. The SMN frequency in distant tissues receiving doses of less than 0.1 Gy was low but compatible with local absorbed dose.

  6. Bigger Knows Better: Young Children Selectively Learn Rule Games from Adults Rather than from Peers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rakoczy, Hannes; Hamann, Katharina; Warneken, Felix; Tomasello, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Preschoolers' selective learning from adult versus peer models was investigated. Extending previous research, children from age 3 were shown to selectively learn simple rule games from adult rather than peer models. Furthermore, this selective learning was not confined to preferentially performing certain acts oneself, but more specifically had a…

  7. Young Adult Books.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Epstein, Connie C.

    1987-01-01

    Considers the similarities between science fiction writing and young adult literature, and points out that several well-known authors, such as Robert Heinlein and Jane Yolen, write in both genres. (NKA)

  8. Providing hospice care to children and young adults: A descriptive study of end-of-life organizations

    PubMed Central

    Lindley, Lisa; Mark, Barbara; Lee, Shoou-Yih Daniel

    2010-01-01

    Over the past two decades, end-of-life organizations have served an increasing number of children and young adults and expanded services important to terminally ill youth, and yet we know little about these organizations. The purpose of this study was to describe the characteristics of end-of-life care organizations that admitted children and young adults to hospice care. Using data from the 2007 National Hospice and Palliative Care Organization (NHPCO) Survey, we conducted a descriptive analysis of operational, mission, market, and financial characteristics, and explored a sub-analysis by age group. Our analysis revealed that these organizations had similar profit status, ownership, and payer mix when compared to the hospice industry. However, they differed in agency type, referrals, organizational size, geographic location, team member caseload, and revenues. We also found important differences in organizations that provided hospice care by age groups (infants, toddler, school-age children, and adolescents/young adults) in geographic location, region, agency type, accreditation, and team member caseload. These findings have managerial and policy implications. PMID:20606723

  9. Secular trend in the occurrence of asthma among children and young adults: critical appraisal of repeated cross sectional surveys.

    PubMed Central

    Magnus, P.; Jaakkola, J. J.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To review repeated surveys of the rising prevalence of obstructive lung disease among children and young adults and determine whether systematic biases may explain the observed trends. DESIGN: Review of published reports of repeated cross sectional surveys of asthma and wheezing among children and young adults. The repeated surveys used the same sampling frame, the same definition of outcome variables, and equivalent data collection methods. SETTING: Repeated surveys conducted anywhere in the world. SUBJECTS: All repeated surveys whose last set of results were published in 1983 or later. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Lifetime and current prevalences of asthma and current prevalence of wheezing. The absolute increase (yearly percentage) in the prevalences of asthma and wheezing was calculated and compared between studies. RESULTS: 16 repeated surveys fulfilled the inclusion criteria. 12 reported increases in the current prevalence of asthma (from 0.09% to 0.97% a year) and eight reported increases in the current prevalence of wheezing (from 0.14% to 1.24% a year). Changes in labelling are likely to have occurred for the reporting of asthma, and information biases may have occurred for the reporting of wheezing. Only one study reported an increase in an objective measurement. CONCLUSIONS: The evidence for increased prevalences of asthma and wheezing is weak because the measures used are susceptible to systematic errors. Until repeated surveys incorporating more objective data are available no firm conclusions about increases in obstructive lung disease among children and young adults can be drawn. PMID:9224081

  10. How do adults use repetition? A comparison of conversations with young children and with multiply-handicapped adolescents.

    PubMed

    Bocéréan, Christine; Canut, Emmanuelle; Musiol, Michel

    2012-04-01

    The aim of this research is to compare the types and functions of repetitions in two different corpora, one constituted of verbal interactions between adults and multiply-handicapped adolescents, the other between adults and young children of the same mental age as the adolescents. Our overall aim is to observe whether the communicative (linguistic and pragmatic) behaviour of adults varies according to the interlocutor and, if it does vary, in what ways. The main results show that adults do not use repetition strategy with the same aims according to the interlocutor. When interacting with a child, repetitions form part of a strategy of linguistic 'tutoring' which allow the child to take on board progressively more complex linguistic constructions; it also enriches exchanges from a pragmatic point of view. On the other hand, when adults communicate with multiply-handicapped adolescents, their main aim is the maintaining of dialogue.

  11. Troubled Children Grown-Up: Antisocial Behavior in Young Adult Criminals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kemp, Dawn; Center, David

    2000-01-01

    This study evaluated Eysenck's hypothesis that an antisocial temperament in interaction with socialization, intelligence, and achievement puts an individual at risk of antisocial behavior. Recently paroled young adult males (N=107) were assessed for temperament, socialization, and juvenile behavior. The sample differed in predicted directions from…

  12. Parenting Styles, Drug Use, and Children's Adjustment in Families of Young Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kandel, Denise B.

    1990-01-01

    Examined childrearing practices and child adjustment in longitudinal cohort of young adults for whom detailed drug histories were available. Maternal drug use retained statistically significant unique effect on child control problems when other parental variables were entered simultaneously in multiple regression equation and was one of two…

  13. Neighborhood disadvantage and obesity across childhood and adolescence: Evidence from the NLSY children and young adults cohort (1986-2010).

    PubMed

    Alvarado, Steven Elías

    2016-05-01

    Previous research suggests that youth who grow up in socioeconomically disadvantaged neighborhoods face higher odds of becoming obese. Neighborhood effects scholars, meanwhile, have suggested that contextual influences may increase in strength as children age. This is the first study to examine whether developmental epochs moderate the effect of neighborhood disadvantage on obesity over time. I use thirteen waves of new restricted and geo-coded data on children ages 2-18 from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, Children and Young Adults. Bivariate and pooled logistic regression results suggest that neighborhood disadvantage has a stronger impact on adolescents' likelihood of becoming obese. Fixed effects models reveal that after adjusting for observed and unobserved confounders, adolescents continue to face higher odds of becoming obese due to the conditions associated with living in disadvantaged neighborhoods. Moreover, as research on adults suggests, girls experience larger impacts of neighborhood disadvantage than boys.

  14. Speaking of Poets 2: More Interviews with Poets Who Write for Children and Young Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Copeland, Jeffrey S.; Copeland, Vicky L.

    Spotlighting a variety of venerable poets, as well as some rising stars, this book is the second series of conversations about the lives and works of poets who write mainly for children and young people. The book presents informal interviews with the writers about their childhoods, the influences upon their work, their writing processes, how they…

  15. Exploring How Adults Who Work with Young Children Conceptualise Sustainability and Describe Their Practice Initiatives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Allen; Emery, Sherridan; Nailon, Di; Dyment, Janet; Getenet, Seyum; McCrea, Nadine; Davis, Julie M.

    2014-01-01

    The development of Early Childhood Education for Sustainability (ECEfS) practices with young children from birth to eight years is an emerging area in academic and professional literature. ECEfS practices reflect growing awareness of the imperative for twenty-first century societies to respond to the pressures of unsustainable patterns of living.…

  16. Exercise Performance in Children and Young Adults After Complete and Incomplete Repair of Congenital Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    Rosenblum, Omer; Katz, Uriel; Reuveny, Ronen; Williams, Craig A; Dubnov-Raz, Gal

    2015-12-01

    Few previous studies have addressed exercise capacity in patients with corrected congenital heart disease (CHD) and significant anatomical residua. The aim of this study was to determine the aerobic fitness and peak cardiac function of patients with corrected CHD with complete or incomplete repairs, as determined by resting echocardiography. Children, adolescents and young adults (<40 years) with CHD from both sexes, who had previously undergone biventricular corrective therapeutic interventions (n = 73), and non-CHD control participants (n = 76) underwent cardiopulmonary exercise testing. The CHD group was further divided according to the absence/presence of significant anatomical residua on a resting echocardiogram ("complete"/"incomplete" repair groups). Aerobic fitness and cardiac function were compared between groups using linear regression and analysis of covariance. Peak oxygen consumption, O2 pulse and ventilatory threshold were significantly lower in CHD patients compared with controls (all p < 0.01). Compared with the complete repair group, the incomplete repair group had a significantly lower mean peak work rate, age-adjusted O2 pulse (expressed as % predicted) and a higher VE/VCO2 ratio (all p ≤ 0.05). Peak oxygen consumption was comparable between the subgroups. Patients after corrected CHD have lower peak and submaximal exercise parameters. Patients with incomplete repair of their heart defect had decreased aerobic fitness, with evidence of impaired peak cardiac function and lower pulmonary perfusion. Patients that had undergone a complete repair had decreased aerobic fitness attributed only to deconditioning. These newly identified differences explain why in previous studies, the lowest fitness was seen in patients with the most hemodynamically significant heart malformations.

  17. Bone mineral density in children and young adults with neurofibromatosis type 1.

    PubMed

    Lodish, Maya B; Dagalakis, Urania; Sinaii, Ninet; Bornstein, Ethan; Kim, Aerang; Lokie, Kelsey B; Baldwin, Andrea M; Reynolds, James C; Dombi, Eva; Stratakis, Constantine A; Widemann, Brigitte C

    2012-12-01

    Concern for impaired bone health in children with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF-1) has led to increased interest in bone densitometry in this population. Our study assessed bone mineral apparent density (BMAD) and whole-body bone mineral content (BMC)/height in pediatric patients with NF-1 with a high plexiform neurofibroma burden. Sixty-nine patients with NF-1 (age range 5.2-24.8; mean 13.7 ± 4.8 years) were studied. Hologic dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry scans (Hologic, Inc., Bedford, MA, USA) were performed on all patients. BMD was normalized to derive a reference volume by correcting for height through the use of the BMAD, as well as the BMC. BMAD of the lumbar spine (LS 2-4), femoral neck (FN), and total body BMC/height were measured and Z-scores were calculated. Impaired bone mineral density was defined as a Z-score ≤-2. Forty-seven percent of patients exhibited impaired bone mineral density at any bone site, with 36% at the LS, 18% at the FN, and 20% total BMC/height. BMAD Z-scores of the LS (-1.60 ± 1.26) were more impaired compared with both the FN (-0.54 ± 1.58; P=0.0003) and the whole-body BMC/height Z-scores (-1.16 ± 0.90; P=0.036). Plexiform neurofibroma burden was negatively correlated with LS BMAD (r(s)=-0.36, P=0.01). In pediatric and young adult patients with NF-1, LS BMAD was more severely affected than the FN BMAD or whole-body BMC/height.

  18. Learning of a simple grapho-motor task by young children and adults: similar acquisition but age-dependent retention

    PubMed Central

    Julius, Mona S.; Adi-Japha, Esther

    2015-01-01

    Many new skills are acquired during early childhood. Typical laboratory skill learning tasks are not applicable for developmental studies that involve children younger than 8 years of age. It is not clear whether young children and adults share a basic underlying skill learning mechanism. In the present study, the learning and retention of a simple grapho-motor pattern were studied in three age groups: 5–6, 7–8, and 19–29 years. Each block of the task consists of identical patterns arranged in a spaced writing array. Progression across the block involves on-page movements while producing the pattern, and off-page movements between patterns. The participants practiced the production of the pattern using a digitizing tablet and were tested at 24 h and 2 weeks post-practice. All age groups produced the task blocks more quickly with practice, and the learning rate was inversely related to the initial production time. All groups exhibited additional gains 24 h post-practice that were well-retained 2 weeks later. The accuracy of the participants was maintained throughout the 2-weeks period. These findings suggest that young children and young adults use a similar mechanism when learning the task. Nevertheless, the 6-years-old spent more time off-page during retention testing than when tested at 24 h post-practice, thus supporting the notion that an age advantage may exists in the long-term retention of skills due to planning-dependent aspects. PMID:25798120

  19. Obesity Prevention and Treatment in School-aged Children, Adolescents, and Young Adults-Where Do We Go from Here?

    PubMed

    Karp, Sharon M; Gesell, Sabina B

    The rise in the rate of obesity in school-aged children, adolescents, and young adults in the last 30 years is a clear healthcare crisis that needs to be addressed. Despite recent national reports in the United States highlighting positive downward trends in the rate of obesity in younger children, we are still faced with approximately 12.7 million children struggling with obesity. Given the immediate and long-term health consequences of obesity, much time and effort has been expended to address this epidemic. Yet, despite these efforts, we still only see limited, short-term success from most interventions. Without changes to how we address childhood obesity, we will continue to see inadequate improvements in the health of our children. Clinicians and researchers need to be lobbying for evidence-based policy changes, such as those identified by systems science, in order to improve the nation's health.

  20. Reducing Stress in Young Children's Lives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCracken, Janet Brown, Ed.

    Few adults deliberately set out to cause children stress or to teach them how to deal with it, yet adults do just that with every word, action, and reaction. This book collects work in the field of human development on how adults can help children learn to cope with stress. Each of the 30 chapters previously appeared in "Young Children,"…

  1. Young Children's Story Recall as a Product of Play, Story Familiarity, and Adult Intervention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silvern, Steven B.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Conducted two experiments on kindergarten to third-grade children in which it was hypothesized that the degree of adult intervention would not make a difference in play treatments and that thematic fantasy play would serve to construct metalinguistic understanding. Hypotheses were confirmed. There was also significant interaction between adult…

  2. Decision-making processes shaping the home food environments of young adult women with and without children.

    PubMed

    Raskind, Ilana G; Woodruff, Rebecca C; Ballard, Denise; Cherry, Sabrina T; Daniel, Sandra; Haardörfer, Regine; Kegler, Michelle C

    2017-02-21

    Although young adult women consume the majority of their total daily energy intake from home food sources, the decision-making processes that shape their home food environments have received limited attention. Further, how decision-making may be affected by the transformative experience of motherhood is unknown. In this study, we explore the factors that influence two key decision-making processes-food choices while grocery shopping and the use of non-home food sources-and whether there are differences by motherhood status. In-depth interviews were conducted with 40 women, aged 20-29, living in southwest Georgia. Thematic analysis was used to analyze qualitative data stratified by whether or not children were present in the home. Decision-making was affected by numerous factors, which differed across groups. In regard to grocery shopping, women with children more frequently discussed the influence of nutrition and the preferences of children, while women without children more frequently discussed the influence of taste and the preferences of other household members. Cost, convenience, weight control, and pre-planning meals emerged as salient in both groups. In regard to the use of non-home food sources, convenience and taste were discussed by both groups, while social factors were only discussed by women without children. The cost of eating out was the only reason cited for eating inside the home, and this factor only emerged among women with children. Motherhood may be an important contributor to the decision-making processes that shape young adult women's home food environments. Interventions may find success in framing messaging to emphasize factors identified as motivating healthy decisions, such as protecting the health of children, and practical strategies may be adapted from those already in use, such as pre-planning and budgeting for healthy meals.

  3. Constructing the Autonomous Middle-Class Self in Today's China: The Case of Young-Adult Only-Children University Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Fengshu

    2008-01-01

    This paper explores the identity construction of a number of young-adult only-children who were winners in the fierce competition for a seat at university. The purpose is to gain an understanding of the choices and decisions these young people viewed as significant and how, in negotiating these choices and striving for their life goals, a…

  4. Gaze-contingent reinforcement learning reveals incentive value of social signals in young children and adults

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Tim J.; Senju, Atsushi

    2017-01-01

    While numerous studies have demonstrated that infants and adults preferentially orient to social stimuli, it remains unclear as to what drives such preferential orienting. It has been suggested that the learned association between social cues and subsequent reward delivery might shape such social orienting. Using a novel, spontaneous indication of reinforcement learning (with the use of a gaze contingent reward-learning task), we investigated whether children and adults' orienting towards social and non-social visual cues can be elicited by the association between participants' visual attention and a rewarding outcome. Critically, we assessed whether the engaging nature of the social cues influences the process of reinforcement learning. Both children and adults learned to orient more often to the visual cues associated with reward delivery, demonstrating that cue–reward association reinforced visual orienting. More importantly, when the reward-predictive cue was social and engaging, both children and adults learned the cue–reward association faster and more efficiently than when the reward-predictive cue was social but non-engaging. These new findings indicate that social engaging cues have a positive incentive value. This could possibly be because they usually coincide with positive outcomes in real life, which could partly drive the development of social orienting. PMID:28250186

  5. Gaze-contingent reinforcement learning reveals incentive value of social signals in young children and adults.

    PubMed

    Vernetti, Angélina; Smith, Tim J; Senju, Atsushi

    2017-03-15

    While numerous studies have demonstrated that infants and adults preferentially orient to social stimuli, it remains unclear as to what drives such preferential orienting. It has been suggested that the learned association between social cues and subsequent reward delivery might shape such social orienting. Using a novel, spontaneous indication of reinforcement learning (with the use of a gaze contingent reward-learning task), we investigated whether children and adults' orienting towards social and non-social visual cues can be elicited by the association between participants' visual attention and a rewarding outcome. Critically, we assessed whether the engaging nature of the social cues influences the process of reinforcement learning. Both children and adults learned to orient more often to the visual cues associated with reward delivery, demonstrating that cue-reward association reinforced visual orienting. More importantly, when the reward-predictive cue was social and engaging, both children and adults learned the cue-reward association faster and more efficiently than when the reward-predictive cue was social but non-engaging. These new findings indicate that social engaging cues have a positive incentive value. This could possibly be because they usually coincide with positive outcomes in real life, which could partly drive the development of social orienting.

  6. The Co-Morbidity Burden of Children and Young Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Kohane, Isaac S.; McMurry, Andrew; Weber, Griffin; MacFadden, Douglas; Rappaport, Leonard; Kunkel, Louis; Bickel, Jonathan; Wattanasin, Nich; Spence, Sarah; Murphy, Shawn; Churchill, Susanne

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Use electronic health records Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) to assess the comorbidity burden of ASD in children and young adults. Study Design A retrospective prevalence study was performed using a distributed query system across three general hospitals and one pediatric hospital. Over 14,000 individuals under age 35 with ASD were characterized by their co-morbidities and conversely, the prevalence of ASD within these comorbidities was measured. The comorbidity prevalence of the younger (Age<18 years) and older (Age 18–34 years) individuals with ASD was compared. Results 19.44% of ASD patients had epilepsy as compared to 2.19% in the overall hospital population (95% confidence interval for difference in percentages 13.58–14.69%), 2.43% of ASD with schizophrenia vs. 0.24% in the hospital population (95% CI 1.89–2.39%), inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) 0.83% vs. 0.54% (95% CI 0.13–0.43%), bowel disorders (without IBD) 11.74% vs. 4.5% (95% CI 5.72–6.68%), CNS/cranial anomalies 12.45% vs. 1.19% (95% CI 9.41–10.38%), diabetes mellitus type I (DM1) 0.79% vs. 0.34% (95% CI 0.3–0.6%), muscular dystrophy 0.47% vs 0.05% (95% CI 0.26–0.49%), sleep disorders 1.12% vs. 0.14% (95% CI 0.79–1.14%). Autoimmune disorders (excluding DM1 and IBD) were not significantly different at 0.67% vs. 0.68% (95% CI −0.14-0.13%). Three of the studied comorbidities increased significantly when comparing ages 0–17 vs 18–34 with p<0.001: Schizophrenia (1.43% vs. 8.76%), diabetes mellitus type I (0.67% vs. 2.08%), IBD (0.68% vs. 1.99%) whereas sleeping disorders, bowel disorders (without IBD) and epilepsy did not change significantly. Conclusions The comorbidities of ASD encompass disease states that are significantly overrepresented in ASD with respect to even the patient populations of tertiary health centers. This burden of comorbidities goes well beyond those routinely managed in developmental medicine centers and requires broad multidisciplinary management

  7. What is Young Adult Literature? (Young Adult Literature).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crowe, Chris, Ed.

    1998-01-01

    Outlines some of the many confusions about young adult literature. Sheds some light on what young adult literature is (defining it as all genres of literature published since 1967 that are written for and marketed to young adults). Discusses briefly how it can be used in schools. Offers a list of the author's 20 favorite books for teenagers. (SR)

  8. Exercise and Fatigue in Adolescent and Young Adult Survivors of Hodgkin Lymphoma: A Report from the Children's Oncology Group.

    PubMed

    Macpherson, Catherine Fiona; Hooke, Mary C; Friedman, Debra L; Campbell, Kristin; Withycombe, Janice; Schwartz, Cindy L; Kelly, Kara; Meza, Jane

    2015-09-01

    Fatigue is a significant problem for adolescent and young adult (AYA) Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) survivors. The relationship between exercise and fatigue is complex. This study explored the trajectory of and the relationship between exercise and fatigue over 36 months post-therapy in a cohort of 103 AYA-aged HL survivors treated on Children's Oncology Group (COG) study AHOD0031. Descriptive statistics and generalized estimating equations were used in this secondary data analysis. Exercise and fatigue improved over time but were unrelated; amount of exercise at end of therapy predicted amount of exercise at 12 (p = 0.02) and 36 (p = 0.0008) months post-therapy.

  9. Effects of finger markers on the kinematics of reaching movements in young children and adults.

    PubMed

    Domellöf, Erik; Hopkins, Brian; Francis, Brian; Rönnqvist, Louise

    2007-11-01

    Kinematic studies to date have not considered in what ways surface markers may affect the performance of the analyzed motion. This neglect is particularly apparent in studies of prehensile movements involving surface markers attached to the fingers. In order to specify any such effects, a range of kinematic parameters derived from simple reach-to-grasp movements, both with and without finger markers, by 3-year old children and adults were analyzed. Finger markers affected both the spatial and temporal nature of the children's reaching performance as revealed by a more temporally segmented reaching path, an age-atypically straighter reaching path, and an increased time to establish a pincer grip. The reaching movements made by the adults were unaffected in terms of the kinematic parameters employed.

  10. Establishment and Maintenance of Socially Learned Conditioned Reinforcement in Young Children: Elimination of the Role of Adults and View of Peers' Faces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zrinzo, Michelle; Greer, R. Douglas

    2013-01-01

    Prior research has demonstrated the establishment of reinforcers for learning and maintenance with young children as a function of social learning where a peer and an adult experimenter were present. The presence of an adult experimenter was eliminated in the present study to test if the effect produced in the prior studies would occur with only…

  11. Training Adults with an Autism Spectrum Disorder to Conduct Discrete-Trial Training for Young Children with Autism: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lerman, Dorothea C.; Hawkins, Lynn; Hoffman, Rachel; Caccavale, Mia

    2013-01-01

    We evaluated a behavioral skills training program for adults with autism spectrum disorder and mild or no intellectual disabilities who were interested in learning the skills used by behavior therapists to work with young children with autism and other developmental disabilities. Four adults, aged 21 to 30 years, participated. We trained each…

  12. College-Age & Young Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... Adolescent Brain Comorbidity College-Age & Young Adults Criminal Justice Drugged Driving Drug Testing Drugs and the Brain ... Age & Young Adults College Addiction Studies Programs Criminal Justice Drugged Driving Drug Testing Drugs and the Brain ...

  13. Self-management of diabetes in children and young adults using technology and smartphone applications.

    PubMed

    Sheehy, Siobhan; Cohen, Georgia; Owen, Katharine R

    2014-01-01

    Treatment compliance and adherence are often a challenge in patients with type 1 diabetes, particularly for adolescent and young adult patients. With the availability of the internet and smart phone applications (apps) there is a hope that such technology could provide a means to encourage treatment adherence in this group of patients. This review focuses on whether telemedicine and smartphone technology in diabetes can influence self-management in young people with diabetes. A large number of smartphone apps are targeted at people with diabetes, but a limited number of well designed evaluation studies have been performed. As our review shows, the evidence base for efficacy of most of these applications is minimal and improvement in hard outcomes such as HbA1c and complication development is largely lacking.

  14. Vestibulo-Ocular Response and Balance Control in Children and Young Adults with Mild-to-Moderate Intellectual and Developmental Disability: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zur, Oz; Ronen, Ayelet; Melzer, Itshak; Carmeli, Eli

    2013-01-01

    The vestibulo-ocular response (VOR) may not be fully developed in children with an intellectual and developmental disability (IDD). This study aimed to identify the presence of VOR deficit in children and young adults with unspecified mild-to-moderate intellectual and developmental disability and its effect on balance control. Twenty-one children…

  15. Blood Lead Concentration Is Not Altered by High Dose Vitamin D Supplementation in Children and Young Adults with HIV

    PubMed Central

    Groleau, Veronique; Herold, Rachel A; Schall, Joan I; Wagner, Julia L; Dougherty, Kelly A; Zemel, Babette S; Rutstein, Richard M; Stallings, Virginia A

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Optimal vitamin D status is known to have beneficial health effects and vitamin D supplements are commonly used. It has been suggested that vitamin D supplementation may increase blood lead in children and adults with previous lead exposure. The objective was to determine the safety regarding lead toxicity during 12 weeks of high dose vitamin D3 supplementation in children and young adults with HIV. METHODS Subjects with HIV (age 8 to 24 yrs) were randomized to vitamin D3 supplementation of 4000 IU/day or 7000 IU/day and followed at 6 and 12 weeks for changes in 25D and whole blood lead concentration. This was a secondary analysis of a larger study of vitamin D3 supplementation in children and adolescents with HIV. RESULTS In 44 subjects (75% African American), the baseline mean ± SD serum 25D was 48.3 ± 18.6 nmol/L. 50% of subjects had baseline serum 25D < 50.0 nmol/L. Serum 25D increased significantly with D3 supplementation over the 12 weeks. No subject had a whole blood lead >5.0 μg/dL at baseline or during subsequent visits. Whole blood lead and 25D were not correlated at baseline, and were negatively correlated after 12 weeks of supplementation (p= 0.014). Whole blood lead did not differ between those receiving 4000 IU versus 7000 IU of vitamin D3. CONCLUSION High dose vitamin D3 supplementation and the concomitant increased serum 25D did not result in increased whole blood lead concentration in this sample of children and young adults living in a northeastern urban city. PMID:23059649

  16. The development of anticipatory cognitive control processes in task-switching: an ERP study in children, adolescents, and young adults.

    PubMed

    Manzi, Alberto; Nessler, Doreen; Czernochowski, Daniela; Friedman, David

    2011-09-01

    To investigate the development of advance task-set updating and reconfiguration, behavioral and event-related potential (ERP) data were recorded in children (9-10 years), adolescents (13-14 years), and young adults (20-27 years) in a cued task-switching paradigm. In pure blocks, the same task was repeated. In mixed blocks, comprised of stay and switch trials, two tasks were intermixed. Age differences were found for stay-pure performance (mixing costs) in the 600-ms but not in the 1200-ms cue-target interval (CTI). Children showed larger reaction time mixing costs than adults. The ERPs suggested that the larger costs were due to delayed anticipatory task-set updating in children. Switch-stay performance decrements (switch costs) were age-invariant in both CTIs. However, ERP data suggested that children reconfigured the task-set on some stay trials, rather than only on switch trials, suggesting the continued maturation of task-set reconfiguration processes.

  17. Characterization of Localized Osteosarcoma of the Extremity in Children, Adolescents, and Young Adults From a Single Institution in South Texas

    PubMed Central

    Jiwani, Alisha; Ketchum, Norma S.; Cornell, John; Williams, Ronald; Heim-Hall, Josefine; Hung, Jaclyn Y.; Langevin, Anne-Marie

    2014-01-01

    Background: Osteosarcoma is the most common bone malignancy in children, adolescents, and young adults. Most study cohorts have 10% to 15% Hispanic patients that encompass many different Hispanic backgrounds. This study characterizes the effect of mainly Mexican American ethnicity on the outcome of children, adolescents, and young adults with osteosarcoma. Methods: A retrospective analysis of demographics, tumor characteristics, response to treatment, and survival outcome of all localized osteosarcoma of the extremity patients below 30 years of age was performed. A Kaplan-Meier estimates with log-rank tests and Cox proportional hazard regression models were used. Results: Fifty patients (median age, 15; range, 2 to 28 y) with localized high-grade osteosarcoma of the extremity were diagnosed between January 2000 and December 2010. The cohort was 70% Mexican Americans. With a median follow-up of 39 months (range, 5 to 142 mo), patients had a 5-year overall survival and event-free survival of 65% and 48%, respectively. We observed a significantly decreased 5-year event-free survival in patients diagnosed before age 12 relative to patients diagnosed between ages 12 and 29 (11% vs. 57%, P<0.001). We also found that tumor necrosis was not predictive of outcome in our patients. Conclusions: The preadolescent patients of predominately Mexican American ethnicity had an increased rate of relapse when compared with previous studies. Tumor necrosis is not directly predictive of outcome in this population. PMID:24487915

  18. Neuro-oscillatory mechanisms of intersensory selective attention and task switching in school-aged children, adolescents and young adults.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Jeremy W; Foxe, John J; Molholm, Sophie

    2016-05-01

    The ability to attend to one among multiple sources of information is central to everyday functioning. Just as central is the ability to switch attention among competing inputs as the task at hand changes. Such processes develop surprisingly slowly, such that even into adolescence, we remain slower and more error prone at switching among tasks compared to young adults. The amplitude of oscillations in the alpha band (~8-14 Hz) tracks the top-down deployment of attention, and there is growing evidence that alpha can act as a suppressive mechanism to bias attention away from distracting sensory input. Moreover, the amplitude of alpha has also been shown to be sensitive to the demands of switching tasks. To understand the neural basis of protracted development of these executive functions, we recorded high-density electrophysiology from school-aged children (8-12 years), adolescents (13-17), and young adults (18-34) as they performed a cued inter-sensory selective attention task. The youngest participants showed increased susceptibility to distracting inputs that was especially evident when switching tasks. Concordantly, they showed weaker and delayed onset of alpha modulation compared to the older groups. Thus the flexible and efficient deployment of alpha to bias competition among attentional sets remains underdeveloped in school-aged children.

  19. Nutrition and Young Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frank, Mary, Ed.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    The special issue of the journal contains 12 articles on nutrition and young children. The following titles and authors are included: "Overview--Nutritional Needs of Young Children" (M. Scialabba); "Nurturance--Mutually Created--Mother and Child" (M. McFarland); "Feeding the Special Needs Child" (E. Croup); "Maternal and Neonatal Nutrition--Long…

  20. Concerts for Young Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suthers, Louie

    2008-01-01

    Concerts designed to introduce young children to music and live performance are staged by a variety of organisations and ensembles across Australia. Shows featuring a wide range of performers are advertised for young children. Such concerts include Babies' Proms, Family Concerts by symphony orchestras, Play School Concerts, performances by…

  1. Contacts with children and young people and adult risk of suffering herpes zoster.

    PubMed

    Salleras, M; Domínguez, A; Soldevila, N; Prat, A; Garrido, P; Torner, N; Borrás, E; Salleras, L

    2011-10-13

    We carried out a matched case-control study to analyze the possible association between exposure to the children and the risk of suffering herpes-zoster in adulthood. Cases of herpes zoster in immunocompetent healthy patients aged ≥ 25 years seen in the dermatology department of the Sagrado Corazón Hospital in 2007-2008 were matched with four controls. Data were analyzed using conditional logistic regression. 153 cases and 604 matched controls were included. Contacts with children were significantly associated with a reduction in the risk of suffering herpes zoster in adulthood (adjusted OR 0.56 [0.37-0.85]). Herpes-zoster vaccination in immunocompetent people aged ≥ 50 years could counteract the possible negative effects of mass varicella vaccination in childhood on the epidemiology of herpes zoster in adults.

  2. Health, integrity, and doping in sports for children and young adults. A resolution of the European Academy of Paediatrics.

    PubMed

    Crawley, Francis P; Hoyer, Peter; Mazur, Artur; Siderius, Liesbeth; Grosek, Stefan; Stiris, Tom; Neubauer, David

    2017-04-01

    The European Academy of Paediatrics (EAP) is dedicated to promoting healthy lifestyles for children from birth into young adulthood. Physical exercise and leisure are essential to the development of healthy bodies, strong minds, and social skills. All children, without regard to their physical or mental capacities, should be provided with the time, the leadership, the facilities, and the equipment needed to exercise through sports while enjoying playing, even competing, in an environment appropriate to their capacities and aspirations. During exercise and sports, children should be assured of a safe and an appropriate environment that protects and promotes their human rights. Top sports that engage the best competitive athletes in an age group, in a region, in a country, or in the world should provide role models and even dreams for all children. These top sports, however, are also most usually surrounded by large political, economic, and/or business interests where only the best can compete while at times exacting a too high physical and/or psychological cost for those who have survived the cut, made the grade. Alongside this more and more children are being raised in environments with fewer open spaces as well as inside a media and digital culture making significantly less room for the enjoyment of physical exercise and leisure. Children's diets have also been changed dramatically by a significant intake of calorierich foods, which often have little nutritional value and which even a child's high metabolism rates not able to burn off efficiently. Conclusion With this Resolution, the EAP is calling for a renewed look at the role of sports and leisure in the lives of children and, by implication, at the way we structure, finance, and promote sports in Europe. The EAP is also asking that this Resolution be adopted by all organizers of sports involving children and young adults in Europe (and beyond), be that on the playground, in schools, in clubs, or in

  3. Lifespan changes in multi-tasking: concurrent walking and memory search in children, young, and older adults.

    PubMed

    Krampe, Ralf Th; Schaefer, Sabine; Lindenberger, Ulman; Baltes, Paul B

    2011-03-01

    We investigated dual-task performance of cognitive (semantic fluency) and sensorimotor tasks (walking) in 120 children and adults from four age groups (9-year olds, M=9.52 years; 11-year olds, M=11.51 years; young adults, M=25.34 years; older adults, M=64.28 years; N=30 per group). Distances walked during 90 s and numbers of category exemplars generated in the semantic fluency task showed an inverted U-shape function with age. In line with general resource models proportional dual-task costs in walking also showed a U-shaped relation as a function of age with pronounced decrements in the youngest and oldest groups. Only 9-year olds showed significant costs in the cognitive task. Individual differences in single-task performance accounted for more than half of the variance in dual-task performance. Reliable age-related residual variance implicated additional factors particularly in children's developing multi-tasking performances.

  4. A systematic review of patient-reported outcome measures of neuropathy in children, adolescents and young adults

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Lillian; Stark, Daniel; Frazier, A. Lindsay; Rosenberg, Abby R.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Peripheral neuropathy is an important, yet poorly studied, side effect of pediatric cancer treatment. There are many measures of patient-reported peripheral neuropathy in adults but very few in children. We aimed to systematically review and summarize reliable and valid patient-reported peripheral neuropathy scales used in pediatrics. Methods Four major electronic databases (Medline, Embase, EBSCO Host in Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, and PsycINFO) were reviewed for studies that measured peripheral neuropathy in pediatric patients. Studies eligible for inclusion were those that described use of any patient-reported scale of peripheral neuropathy among children, adolescents, and young adults with any underlying diagnosis (not limited to cancer). Results From a total of 765 articles retrieved, 5 met eligibility criteria and were included. One was a neuropathy symptom score used in patients with diabetes, and the remaining four were in oncology patients and all were based on the total neuropathy score. All involved objective assessments conducted by trained professionals; none relied purely on patient report. Conclusions There are no validated instruments that consist solely of a patient-reported outcome measure of neuropathy in pediatrics and adolescents. Because the clinical evaluation of neuropathy requires specialized training, it is not generalizable in large studies conducted in many diverse institutions. Future studies should validate adult patient-reported neuropathy scales in pediatric and adolescent populations, or develop novel instruments designed for this population. PMID:27037813

  5. Difference in Postural Control during Quiet Standing between Young Children and Adults: Assessment with Center of Mass Acceleration.

    PubMed

    Oba, Naoko; Sasagawa, Shun; Yamamoto, Akio; Nakazawa, Kimitaka

    2015-01-01

    The development of upright postural control has often been investigated using time series of center of foot pressure (COP), which is proportional to the ankle joint torque (i.e., the motor output of a single joint). However, the center of body mass acceleration (COMacc), which can reflect joint motions throughout the body as well as multi-joint coordination, is useful for the assessment of the postural control strategy at the whole-body level. The purpose of the present study was to investigate children's postural control during quiet standing by using the COMacc. Ten healthy children and 15 healthy young adults were instructed to stand upright quietly on a force platform with their eyes open or closed. The COMacc as well as the COP in the anterior-posterior direction was obtained from ground reaction force measurement. We found that both the COMacc and COP could clearly distinguish the difference between age groups and visual conditions. We also found that the sway frequency of COMacc in children was higher than that in adults, for which differences in biomechanical and/or neural factors between age groups may be responsible. Our results imply that the COMacc can be an alternative force platform measure for assessing developmental changes in upright postural control.

  6. An electrophysiological study on children and young adults with Alport's syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Jeffrey, B G; Jacobs, M; Sa, G; Barratt, T M; Taylor, D; Kriss, A

    1994-01-01

    Alport's syndrome is characterised by progressive haematuric nephritis and high tone sensorineural hearing loss. Ocular signs are variable, the most consistent findings being anterior lenticonus and retinal flecks in the macula and mid peripheral areas. Previous electrophysiological studies on patients with Alport's syndrome have mostly been on adult patients undergoing haemodialysis, or after renal transplantation. A group of young patients with Alport's syndrome were studied to assess if early electrophysiological changes were detectable. A total of 20 patients (15 males and five females) between the ages of 3.5 and 22 years (mean 12.7 (years) were examined and compared with control subjects. Visual evoked potentials and electroretinograms were obtained following flash and pattern reversal stimulation. Electro-oculograms were also recorded. No significant electrophysiological changes were found in any of the 20 patients, including four who had visible fundus changes. PMID:8110699

  7. Expression of Bcl-2 and Bax protein in normal pineal gland in children and young adult.

    PubMed

    Marcol, Wiesław; Kotulska, Katarzyna; Larysz-Brysz, Magdalena; Malinowska-Kołodziej, Izabela; Mandera, Marek; Lewin-Kowalik, Joanna

    2006-01-01

    The Bcl family contains both pro and antiapoptotic proteins participating in the regulation of neuronal cell death in several pathological conditions. However, very little is known about physiological profiles of Bcl-2/Bax expression in normal brain. In this study, we examined expression profile of Bcl-2 and Bax proteins in normal pineal gland in children. The material for analysis was obtained by biopsy of pineal parenchyma during surgery of pineal cysts. All specimens were labeled immunohistochemically and analyzed by means of confocal laser scanning microscope. We found only few Bcl-2 expressing (0.7%) and no Bax-immunopositive (0.0%) pinealocytes. Bcl-2-positive cells were mature neurons, neither young ones nor glia.

  8. Anterior eye tissue morphology: Scleral and conjunctival thickness in children and young adults

    PubMed Central

    Read, Scott A.; Alonso-Caneiro, David; Vincent, Stephen J.; Bremner, Alexander; Fothergill, Annabel; Ismail, Brittney; McGraw, Rebecca; Quirk, Charlotte J.; Wrigley, Elspeth

    2016-01-01

    The sclera and conjunctiva form part of the eye’s tough, protective outer coat, and play important roles in the eye’s mechanical protection and immune defence, as well as in determining the size and shape of the eye globe. Advances in ocular imaging technology now allow these tissues in the anterior eye to be imaged non-invasively and with high resolution, however there is a paucity of data examining the dimensions of these tissues in paediatric populations. In this study, we have used optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging to examine the normal in vivo thickness profile of the anterior sclera and overlying conjunctiva in 111 healthy young participants, including a large proportion of paediatric subjects. We demonstrate that the thickness of the anterior sclera varies significantly with measurement location and meridian. Tissue thickness also varied significantly with age, with younger subjects exhibiting significantly thinner scleras and significantly greater conjunctival thickness. Males were also found to exhibit significantly greater scleral thickness. Refractive error however was not significantly associated with either scleral or conjunctival thickness in this population. These findings provide new data describing the normative dimensions of anterior eye tissues in children and the factors that can influence these dimensions in young populations. PMID:27646956

  9. Educating Young Children: Active Learning Practices for Preschool and Child Care Programs [and] A Study Guide to Educating Young Children: Exercises for Adult Learners. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hohmann, Mary; Weikart, David P.

    High/Scope preschool curriculum is a model for developing high-quality early childhood programs that encourage and support children's initiatives and active learning experiences. This revised manual for early childhood practitioners and students presents essential strategies adults can use to make active learning a reality in their programs. The…

  10. [Young children and books].

    PubMed

    Diatkine, R; Bonnafé, M; Roy, J; Camus, C; Brandao, C

    1986-01-01

    Children come into contact very early with the written language. The work of Emilia Ferreiro, a student of Piaget, has shown that from early on, well before they can read, they know that the written word has a meaning. Their successive hypotheses show an elaboration which does not occur by chance. Experience shows that babies have a specific interest for a book as an object. They recognize the value of the pictures, as much representations of their mental representations as are words, whereas these two capacities evolve in a complementary fashion. The capacity to be interested by a narrative introduces a new form of organization in the chain of representations, whether they refer to absent or imaginary objects. A good story has a special place among the narratives the child hears, which actually have the specific structures of the written language. The authors of this work report a number of examples of very young children who are put in contact with books. They see in this a new model for mental health work which can be set up by virtue of meetings outside the school rooms, the mental health services, and even of the libraries, by people of different professional skills, in order to loosen the vice of the children's daily routine, and to give the child time to dream with the books, and to draw the adults in to a salutary disorder.

  11. Training adults with an autism spectrum disorder to conduct discrete-trial training for young children with autism: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Lerman, Dorothea C; Hawkins, Lynn; Hoffman, Rachel; Caccavale, Mia

    2013-01-01

    We evaluated a behavioral skills training program for adults with autism spectrum disorder and mild or no intellectual disabilities who were interested in learning the skills used by behavior therapists to work with young children with autism and other developmental disabilities. Four adults, aged 21 to 30 years, participated. We trained each individually using verbal and written instructions, modeling, and role play with feedback to teach 2 basic skills to an adult who played the role of a young child with autism. We evaluated generalization of the discrete-trial training skills by having the participant (a) teach the adult confederate 2 additional targets that we had not included in training and (b) teach a new skill to a young child with autism. Results indicated that 3 of the 4 participants rapidly acquired discrete-trial training skills and that these skills generalized to new targets with the confederate adults and to teaching an actual child with autism.

  12. Reduced fitness and abnormal cardiopulmonary responses to maximal exercise testing in children and young adults with sickle cell anemia

    PubMed Central

    Liem, Robert I; Reddy, Madhuri; Pelligra, Stephanie A; Savant, Adrienne P; Fernhall, Bo; Rodeghier, Mark; Thompson, Alexis A

    2015-01-01

    Physiologic contributors to reduced exercise capacity in individuals with sickle cell anemia (SCA) are not well understood. The objective of this study was to characterize the cardiopulmonary response to maximal cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET) and determine factors associated with reduced exercise capacity among children and young adults with SCA. A cross-sectional cohort of 60 children and young adults (mean 15.1 ± 3.4 years) with hemoglobin SS or S/β0 thalassemia and 30 matched controls (mean 14.6 ± 3.5 years) without SCA or sickle cell trait underwent maximal CPET by a graded, symptom-limited cycle ergometry protocol with breath-by-breath, gas exchange analysis. Compared to controls without SCA, subjects with SCA demonstrated significantly lower peak VO2 (26.9 ± 6.9 vs. 37.0 ± 9.2 mL/kg/min, P < 0.001). Subjects demonstrated slower oxygen uptake (ΔVO2/ΔWR, 9 ± 2 vs. 12 ± 2 mL/min/watt, P < 0.001) and lower oxygen pulse (ΔVO2/ΔHR, 12 ± 4 vs. 20 ± 7 mL/beat, P < 0.001) as well as reduced oxygen uptake efficiency (ΔVE/ΔVO2, 42 ± 8 vs. 32 ± 5, P < 0.001) and ventilation efficiency (ΔVE/ΔVCO2, 30.3 ± 3.7 vs. 27.3 ± 2.5, P < 0.001) during CPET. Peak VO2 remained significantly lower in subjects with SCA after adjusting for age, sex, body mass index (BMI), and hemoglobin, which were independent predictors of peak VO2 for subjects with SCA. In the largest study to date using maximal CPET in SCA, we demonstrate that children and young adults with SCA have reduced exercise capacity attributable to factors independent of anemia. Complex derangements in gas exchange and oxygen uptake during maximal exercise are common in this population. PMID:25847915

  13. Reduced fitness and abnormal cardiopulmonary responses to maximal exercise testing in children and young adults with sickle cell anemia.

    PubMed

    Liem, Robert I; Reddy, Madhuri; Pelligra, Stephanie A; Savant, Adrienne P; Fernhall, Bo; Rodeghier, Mark; Thompson, Alexis A

    2015-04-01

    Physiologic contributors to reduced exercise capacity in individuals with sickle cell anemia (SCA) are not well understood. The objective of this study was to characterize the cardiopulmonary response to maximal cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET) and determine factors associated with reduced exercise capacity among children and young adults with SCA. A cross-sectional cohort of 60 children and young adults (mean 15.1 ± 3.4 years) with hemoglobin SS or S/β(0) thalassemia and 30 matched controls (mean 14.6 ± 3.5 years) without SCA or sickle cell trait underwent maximal CPET by a graded, symptom-limited cycle ergometry protocol with breath-by-breath, gas exchange analysis. Compared to controls without SCA, subjects with SCA demonstrated significantly lower peak VO2 (26.9 ± 6.9 vs. 37.0 ± 9.2 mL/kg/min, P < 0.001). Subjects demonstrated slower oxygen uptake (ΔVO2/ΔWR, 9 ± 2 vs. 12 ± 2 mL/min/watt, P < 0.001) and lower oxygen pulse (ΔVO2/ΔHR, 12 ± 4 vs. 20 ± 7 mL/beat, P < 0.001) as well as reduced oxygen uptake efficiency (ΔVE/ΔVO2, 42 ± 8 vs. 32 ± 5, P < 0.001) and ventilation efficiency (ΔVE/ΔVCO2, 30.3 ± 3.7 vs. 27.3 ± 2.5, P < 0.001) during CPET. Peak VO2 remained significantly lower in subjects with SCA after adjusting for age, sex, body mass index (BMI), and hemoglobin, which were independent predictors of peak VO2 for subjects with SCA. In the largest study to date using maximal CPET in SCA, we demonstrate that children and young adults with SCA have reduced exercise capacity attributable to factors independent of anemia. Complex derangements in gas exchange and oxygen uptake during maximal exercise are common in this population.

  14. Anxious/depressed symptoms are linked to right ventromedial prefrontal cortical thickness maturation in healthy children and young adults.

    PubMed

    Ducharme, Simon; Albaugh, Matthew D; Hudziak, James J; Botteron, Kelly N; Nguyen, Tuong-Vi; Truong, Catherine; Evans, Alan C; Karama, Sherif

    2014-11-01

    The relationship between anxious/depressed traits and neuromaturation remains largely unstudied. Characterizing this relationship during healthy neurodevelopment is critical to understanding processes associated with the emergence of child/adolescent onset mood/anxiety disorders. In this study, mixed-effects models were used to determine longitudinal cortical thickness correlates of Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL) and Young Adult Self Report Anxious/Depressed scores in healthy children. Analyses included 341 subjects from 4.9 to 22.3 year-old with repeated MRI at up to 3 time points, at 2-year intervals (586 MRI scans). There was a significant "CBCL Anxious/Depressed by Age" interaction on cortical thickness in the right ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC), including the medial orbito-frontal, gyrus rectus, and subgenual anterior cingulate areas. Anxious/Depressed scores were negatively associated with thickness at younger ages (<9 years), but positively associated with thickness at older ages (15-22 years), with the shift in polarity occurring around age 12. This was secondary to a slower rate of vmPFC cortical thinning in subjects with higher scores. In young adults (18-22 years), Anxious/Depressed scores were also positively associated with precuneus/posterior cingulate cortical thickness. Potential neurobiological mechanisms underlying this maturation pattern are proposed. These results demonstrate the dynamic impact of age on relations between vmPFC and negative affect in the developing brain.

  15. Anxious/Depressed Symptoms are Linked to Right Ventromedial Prefrontal Cortical Thickness Maturation in Healthy Children and Young Adults

    PubMed Central

    Ducharme, Simon; Albaugh, Matthew D.; Hudziak, James J.; Botteron, Kelly N.; Nguyen, Tuong-Vi; Truong, Catherine; Evans, Alan C.; Karama, Sherif; Ball, William S.; Byars, Anna Weber; Schapiro, Mark; Bommer, Wendy; Carr, April; German, April; Dunn, Scott; Rivkin, Michael J.; Waber, Deborah; Mulkern, Robert; Vajapeyam, Sridhar; Chiverton, Abigail; Davis, Peter; Koo, Julie; Marmor, Jacki; Mrakotsky, Christine; Robertson, Richard; McAnulty, Gloria; Brandt, Michael E.; Fletcher, Jack M.; Kramer, Larry A.; Yang, Grace; McCormack, Cara; Hebert, Kathleen M.; Volero, Hilda; Botteron, Kelly; McKinstry, Robert C.; Warren, William; Nishino, Tomoyuki; Almli, C. Robert; Todd, Richard; Constantino, John; McCracken, James T.; Levitt, Jennifer; Alger, Jeffrey; O'Neil, Joseph; Toga, Arthur; Asarnow, Robert; Fadale, David; Heinichen, Laura; Ireland, Cedric; Wang, Dah-Jyuu; Moss, Edward; Zimmerman, Robert A.; Bintliff, Brooke; Bradford, Ruth; Newman, Janice; Evans, Alan C.; Arnaoutelis, Rozalia; Pike, G. Bruce; Collins, D. Louis; Leonard, Gabriel; Paus, Tomas; Zijdenbos, Alex; Das, Samir; Fonov, Vladimir; Fu, Luke; Harlap, Jonathan; Leppert, Ilana; Milovan, Denise; Vins, Dario; Zeffiro, Thomas; Van Meter, John; Lange, Nicholas; Froimowitz, Michael P.; Botteron, Kelly; Almli, C. Robert; Rainey, Cheryl; Henderson, Stan; Nishino, Tomoyuki; Warren, William; Edwards, Jennifer L.; Dubois, Diane; Smith, Karla; Singer, Tish; Wilber, Aaron A.; Pierpaoli, Carlo; Basser, Peter J.; Chang, Lin-Ching; Koay, Chen Guan; Walker, Lindsay; Freund, Lisa; Rumsey, Judith; Baskir, Lauren; Stanford, Laurence; Sirocco, Karen; Gwinn-Hardy, Katrina; Spinella, Giovanna; McCracken, James T.; Alger, Jeffry R.; Levitt, Jennifer; O'Neill, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    The relationship between anxious/depressed traits and neuromaturation remains largely unstudied. Characterizing this relationship during healthy neurodevelopment is critical to understanding processes associated with the emergence of child/adolescent onset mood/anxiety disorders. In this study, mixed-effects models were used to determine longitudinal cortical thickness correlates of Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL) and Young Adult Self Report Anxious/Depressed scores in healthy children. Analyses included 341 subjects from 4.9 to 22.3 year-old with repeated MRI at up to 3 time points, at 2-year intervals (586 MRI scans). There was a significant “CBCL Anxious/Depressed by Age” interaction on cortical thickness in the right ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC), including the medial orbito-frontal, gyrus rectus, and subgenual anterior cingulate areas. Anxious/Depressed scores were negatively associated with thickness at younger ages (<9 years), but positively associated with thickness at older ages (15–22 years), with the shift in polarity occurring around age 12. This was secondary to a slower rate of vmPFC cortical thinning in subjects with higher scores. In young adults (18–22 years), Anxious/Depressed scores were also positively associated with precuneus/posterior cingulate cortical thickness. Potential neurobiological mechanisms underlying this maturation pattern are proposed. These results demonstrate the dynamic impact of age on relations between vmPFC and negative affect in the developing brain. PMID:23749874

  16. Sexting among young adults

    PubMed Central

    Gordon-Messer, Deborah; Bauermeister, Jose Arturo; Grodzinski, Alison; Zimmerman, Marc

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Sexting has stirred debate over its legality and safety, but few researchers have documented the relationship between sexting and health. We describe the sexting behavior of young adults in the United States, and examine its association with sexual behavior and psychological well-being. Methods Using an adapted web version of Respondent-Driven Sampling (webRDS) we recruited a sample of U.S. young adults (ages 18 to 24; N=3447). We examined participant sexting behavior using 4 categories of sexting: 1) Non-Sexters, 2) Receivers, 3) Senders, and 4) Two-way Sexters. We then assessed the relationships between sexting categories and sociodemographic characteristics, sexual behavior and psychological well-being. Results Over half (57%) of respondents were Non-Sexters, 28.2% of the sample were Two-way Sexters, 12.6% were Receivers, and 2% were Senders. Males were more likely to be Receivers than females. Sexually active respondents were more likely to be Two-way Sexters than non-sexually active respondents. Among participants who were sexually active in the past 30 days, we found no differences across sexting groups in number of sexual partners, or number of unprotected sex partners in the past 30 days. We also found no relationship between sexting and psychological well-being. Conclusions Our results suggest that sexting is not related to sexual risk behavior or psychological well-being. We discuss the findings of this study and propose directions for further research on sexting. PMID:23299018

  17. Young Children Prefer and Remember Satisfying Explanations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frazier, Brandy N.; Gelman, Susan A.; Wellman, Henry M.

    2016-01-01

    Research with preschool children has shown that explanations are important to them in that they actively seek explanations in their conversations with adults. But what sorts of explanations do they prefer, and what, if anything, do young children learn from the explanations they receive? Following a preliminary study with adults (N = 67) to…

  18. Cause-specific mortality among children and young adults with epilepsy: Results from the U.S. National Child Death Review Case Reporting System.

    PubMed

    Tian, Niu; Shaw, Esther C; Zack, Matthew; Kobau, Rosemarie; Dykstra, Heather; Covington, Theresa M

    2015-04-01

    We investigated causes of death in children and young adults with epilepsy by using data from the U.S. National Child Death Review Case Reporting System (NCDR-CRS), a passive surveillance system composed of comprehensive information related to deaths reviewed by local child death review teams. Information on a total of 48,697 deaths in children and young adults 28days to 24years of age, including 551 deaths with epilepsy and 48,146 deaths without epilepsy, was collected from 2004 through 2012 in 32 states. In a proportionate mortality analysis by official manner of death, decedents with epilepsy had a significantly higher percentage of natural deaths but significantly lower percentages of deaths due to accidents, homicide, and undetermined causes compared with persons without epilepsy. With respect to underlying causes of death, decedents with epilepsy had significantly higher percentages of deaths due to drowning and most medical conditions including pneumonia and congenital anomalies but lower percentages of deaths due to asphyxia, weapon use, and unknown causes compared with decedents without epilepsy. The increased percentages of deaths due to pneumonia and drowning in children and young adults with epilepsy suggest preventive interventions including immunization and better instruction and monitoring before or during swimming. State-specific and national population-based mortality studies of children and young adults with epilepsy are recommended.

  19. Dreams Do Come True: The Creation and Growth of a Recreational Dance Program for Children and Young Adults with Additional Needs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reinders, Nicole; Fletcher, Paula; Bryden, Pam

    2015-01-01

    There are many benefits to dance, both for typically developing individuals and for individuals with additional needs. The purpose of this narrative case study was to analyse a dance program for children and young adults with additional needs from the perspective of the program creator and primary dance instructor. Data collection occurred at two…

  20. Multicultural Literature for Children and Young Adults. A Selected Listing of Books 1980-1990 by and about People of Color. Third Edition. Bulletin No. 1923.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kruse, Ginny Moore; Horning, Kathleen T.

    Selected children's and young adult books with multicultural themes and topics which were published in the United States and Canada between 1980 and 1990 are represented in this annotated bibliography. The term multicultural is used to refer to people of color, including African-Americans, American Indians, Asian-Americans, and Hispanic-Americans.…

  1. Multicultural Literature for Children and Young Adults. A Selected Listing of Books by and about People of Color. Volume Two: 1991-1996.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kruse, Ginny Moore; Horning, Kathleen T.; Schliesman, Megan

    This annotated bibliography represents a selection of children's and young adult books with multicultural themes and topics which were published in the United States and Canada between 1991 and 1996. The term "multicultural": is used to refer to people of color, including Africans, Afro-Caribbeans and African-Americans, American Indians,…

  2. Effects of Age on the Types and Severity of Excessive Fear or the Absence of Fear in Children and Young Adults with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richman, David M.; Dotson, Wesley H.; Rose, Chad A.; Thompson, Samuel; Abby, Layla

    2012-01-01

    This study identified (a) patterns of fearful stimuli for children and young adults with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), (b) the severity of the fear, and (c) whether excessive fear or the absence of fear negatively affected the participant's quality of life. A web-based survey was used to distribute a modified and extended version of the Fear…

  3. Influence of Planning Time and First-Move Strategy on Tower of Hanoi Problem-Solving Performance of Mentally Retarded Young Adults and Nonretarded Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spitz, Herman H.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    In two experiments using a computer-interfaced problem, planning time of 50 retarded young adults was as long as or longer than that of higher performing nonretarded children. In neither group was there a reliable correlation between planning time and performance. There were group differences in preferred strategies, possibly associated with…

  4. Predictors of Relapse and End Stage Kidney Disease in Proliferative Lupus Nephritis: Focus on Children, Adolescents, and Young Adults

    PubMed Central

    Gipson, Debbie S.; Massengill, Susan A.; Dooley, Mary Anne; Primack, William A.; Ferris, Maria A.; Hogan, Susan L.

    2009-01-01

    Background and objectives: The prevalence and significance of remission and relapse in children, adolescents, and young adults with lupus nephritis in the United States are poorly understood. Patterns and predictors of disease progression in a southeastern U.S. pediatric cohort with severe lupus nephritis are presented. Design, settings, participants, & measurements: Individuals age 21 or less with kidney biopsy-proven lupus nephritis followed in the Glomerular Disease Collaborative Network were included. Cox regression models were used to evaluate predictors of relapse and end stage kidney disease (ESKD). Results: Seventy-three subjects with a mean age of 15.6 ± 3.4 yr were included. Five-year kidney survival was 77%. Complete and partial remission rates within 1 yr of induction therapy were 25 and 64%, respectively. Relapse and ESKD rates were similar between complete and partial responders. Relapse occurred in 35% of responders (complete or partial) in 45 ± 32 mo. Disease relapse was a predictor of ESKD (HR = 10.12, P < 0.0001). Treatment resistance was documented in African Americans more often than non-African Americans (eight versus 0; P = 0.03). ESKD HR associated with treatment resistance was 6.25, P < 0.002. Conclusions: Remission whether complete or partial is associated with improved kidney survival in children with lupus nephritis. Nephritis relapse is a strong predictor of progression to ESKD. Treatment resistance portends a high risk of ESKD and disproportionately affects African American children with lupus nephritis. PMID:19820130

  5. Assessment of executive functioning in children and young adults treated for frontal lobe tumours using ecologically valid tests.

    PubMed

    Longaud-Valès, A; Chevignard, M; Dufour, C; Grill, J; Puget, S; Sainte-Rose, C; Valteau-Couanet, D; Dellatolas, G

    2016-08-01

    There is a lack of studies assessing executive functions (EF) using ecologically valid tests in children with frontal lobe lesions. This study aimed to (1) evaluate EF in children, adolescents and young adults treated for childhood frontal lobe tumours, (2) identify factors influencing performance, such as age at diagnosis or type of treatment, and (3) examine correlations between intellectual ability and classical and ecological tests of EF. Twenty-one patients, aged 8-27 years, treated for a childhood benign or malignant frontal lobe tumour, and 42 healthy controls (matched for gender, age and socio-economic status) were assessed using classical tests of EF, and the BADS-C ecological battery. Patients also underwent assessment of intellectual ability and parent and teacher ratings of the BRIEF questionnaire. IQ scores ranged from 45 to 125 (mean FSIQ = 84) and were lower in case of epilepsy, hydrocephalus and lower parental education. Patients displayed deficits in most, but not all measures of EF. Most classical and ecological measures of EF were strongly correlated to IQ. This study confirms the frequency of EF deficits in this population; it also highlights the utility of ecological measures of EF and some limitations of classical tests of EF in children.

  6. Mothers with borderline personality and their young children: Adult Attachment Interviews, mother-child interactions, and children's narrative representations.

    PubMed

    Macfie, Jenny; Swan, Scott A; Fitzpatrick, Katie L; Watkins, Christopher D; Rivas, Elaine M

    2014-05-01

    Borderline personality disorder (BPD) involves disruptions in attachment, self, and self-regulation, domains conceptually similar to developmental tasks of early childhood. Because offspring of mothers with BPD are at elevated risk of developing BPD themselves (White, Gunderson, Zanarini, & Hudson, 2003), studying them may inform precursors to BPD. We sampled 31 children age 4-7 whose mothers have BPD and 31 normative comparisons. We examined relationships between mothers' Adult Attachment Interview (AAI) representations (George, Kaplan, & Main, 1984), mothers' observed parenting, and children's narrative representations. Replicating previous studies, mothers with BPD were more likely to be classified as preoccupied and unresolved on the AAI. In a larger sample, which included the current one, we also replicated two underlying AAI dimensions found in normative samples (Roisman, Fraley, & Belsky, 2007; Whipple, Bernier, & Mageau, 2011). Controlling for current mood, anxiety, and other personality disorders, mothers with BPD were significantly higher than were comparisons on the preoccupied/unresolved, but not the dismissive, dimension. Children's narrative representations relevant to disruptions in attachment (fear of abandonment and role reversal), self (incongruent child and self/fantasy confusion), and self-regulation (destruction of objects) were significantly correlated with the preoccupied/unresolved, but not the dismissive, dimension. Furthermore, mothers' parenting significantly mediated the relationship between the preoccupied/unresolved dimension and their children's narrative representations of fear of abandonment.

  7. Clinical Studies of Escherichia coli O157:H7 Conjugate Vaccines in Adults and Young Children.

    PubMed

    Szu, Shousun Chen; Ahmed, Amina

    2014-12-01

    Pediatric immunization has been the most effective measure to prevent and reduce the burden of infectious diseases in children. The recent inclusion of pneumococcal and meningococcal polysaccharide conjugates in infant immunization further reinforces their importance. Currently there is no human vaccine against enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) infections. This review focuses on the human EHEC vaccine that has been studied clinically, in particular, the polysaccharide conjugate against E. coli O157. The surface polysaccharide antigen, O-specific polysaccharide, was linked to rEPA, recombinant exotoxin A of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. In adults and children 2 to 5 years old, O157-rEPA conjugates, shown to be safe, induced high levels of antilipopolysaccharide immunoglobulin G with bactericidal activities against E. coli O157, a functional bioassay that mimics the killing of inoculum in vivo. A similar construct using the B subunit of Shiga toxin (Stx) 1 as the carrier protein elicited both bactericidal and toxin-neutralizing antibodies in mice. So far there is no clinical study of Stx-based human vaccine. Passive immunization of Stx-specific antibodies with humanized, chimeric, or human monoclonal antibodies, produced in transgenic mice, showed promising data in animal models and offered high prospects. Demonstrations of their safety and effectiveness in treating hemolytic-uremic syndrome or patients with EHEC infections are under way, and results are much anticipated. For future development, other virulence factors such as the nontoxic Stx B subunit or intimin should be included, either as carrier protein in conjugates or as independent components. The additional antigens from O157 may provide broader coverage to non-O157 Stx-producing E. coli and facilitate both preventive and therapeutic treatment.

  8. Violence and Young Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sauerwein, Kristina

    1995-01-01

    Schools must increasingly deal with children who brandish weapons and exhibit antisocial or violent behavior. Psychologists agree that young children are very susceptible to violence and that stored violent images can warp their interpretation of reality. To combat youth violence, many schools have adopted antiviolence curricula and conflict…

  9. Language Use in Multiethnic Literature For Young Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christianson, Darcy

    This study analyzed ethnic authenticity with regard to language use in 16 books for children and young adults used in Central Michigan University's English 582 course, "Cultural Pluralism in Children and Young Adult Literature." Four ethnic groups were included: Native American, African American, Asian American, and Hispanic American. To evaluate…

  10. Literature for Today's Young Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donelson, Kenneth L.; Nilsen, Alleen Pace

    Defining young adult literature to include any book freely chosen for reading by a person between the ages of 12 and 20, this book is intended to help educate professionals in related fields about the growing body of such literature. The first section of the book provides an introduction to young adult literature, including a discussion of the…

  11. A Critical Analysis of Preservice Teachers' Efforts to Make Sense of Young Children's Sexual Acts towards Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alat, Zeynep

    2015-01-01

    This study explored Turkish early childhood education teacher candidates' efforts to make sense of sexual behaviors of both young girls and boys towards them or their colleagues during their field experience or in their daily experiences with young children. Semi-structured interviews with 13 female teacher candidates revealed that their…

  12. The development of evidence-based guidelines on mouth care for children, teenagers and young adults treated for cancer.

    PubMed

    Glenny, A M; Gibson, F; Auld, E; Coulson, S; Clarkson, J E; Craig, J V; Eden, O B; Khalid, T; Worthington, H V; Pizer, B

    2010-05-01

    The aim was to produce evidence-based guidelines on mouth care for children, teenagers and young adults receiving chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy. Systematic reviews were undertaken and research was graded according to the methods of the Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network. Where no relevant research was identified, an opinion-gathering process was undertaken. 'Best practice' recommendations were developed with regard to appropriate dental care and basic oral hygiene. An evaluation of oral assessment tools identified seven which had been assessed for reliability and/or validity. Only Eilers' Oral Assessment Guide was felt to be relevant for daily clinical practice. A variety of interventions have been used for the management of oral mucositis, candidiasis, xerostomia and herpes simplex virus; few are supported by research evidence. Careful oral management of children treated for cancer can improve the quality of life during treatment. The guidelines have the potential to improve patient care by promoting interventions of proven benefit and discouraging use of ineffective or potentially harmful practices which may result in adverse patient outcomes.

  13. The Marble in the Water: Essays on Contemporary Writers of Fiction for Children and Young Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rees, David

    The purposes of this collection of 15 essays on specific works of fiction for children and adolescents are threefold: to explore some of the similarities and differences in fiction for children in England and the United States; to point out some of the qualities of American literature that are of particular interest to children in England and to…

  14. Young Adult Outcome of Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eaves, Linda C.; Ho, Helena H.

    2008-01-01

    To learn about the lives of young adults with ASD, families with children born 1974-1984, diagnosed as preschoolers and followed into adolescence were contacted by mail. Of 76 eligible, 48 (63%) participated in a telephone interview. Global outcome scores were assigned based on work, friendships and independence. At mean age 24, half had good to…

  15. Executive functioning in hyperactive children as young adults: attention, inhibition, response perseveration, and the impact of comorbidity.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Mariellen; Barkley, Russell A; Smallish, Lori; Fletcher, Kenneth

    2005-01-01

    Tests of several executive functions (EFs) as well as direct observations of symptoms of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) during testing were collected at the young adult follow-up (M = 20 years) on a large sample of hyperactive (H; N = 147) and community control (CC; N = 71) children. The EF tasks included tests of attention, inhibition, and response perseveration. The H group was subdivided into those with and without ADHD (+ or w/o) at follow-up. The H+ADHD group made significantly more inhibition errors than the CC group on a Continuous Performance Test (CPT) and showed more ADHD symptoms while performing the CPT. The H+ADHD group also displayed more ADHD symptoms during a letter cancellation task than did both the hyperactive w/o ADHD and CC groups. Both H groups showed slower reaction times during a Card Playing Task. That subset of hyperactive probands with Conduct Disorder (CD) displayed significantly more perseverative responding on that task than did those without CD, but otherwise it did not differ on any other measures. Current level of anxiety contributed adversely to both CPT commission errors and ADHD behavior during the CPT. Comorbid depression did not contribute to any group differences on these tests. Although developmental improvements were found in both the H and the CC groups in their CPT inattention and inhibition scores since adolescence, the H groups remained distinguishable from the CC groups over this period. We conclude that formerly hyperactive children manifest greater EF deficits at follow-up in the areas of inattention, disinhibition, and slowed reaction time and greater ADHD behavior during testing, but these problems are mostly confined to those with current ADHD. Response perseveration, however, was limited to those hyperactive children with CD by follow-up, consistent with Quay's theory of these two disorders.

  16. "Expanding the Circle": Projects for Children and Young Adults Who Are Deaf-Blind. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parr, Susan

    This paper describes activities and achievements of a South Dakota project to improve the delivery of educational services to children with deaf-blindness and their families. Accomplishments are provided for specific objectives under the following goals: (1) children with deaf-blindness and their families will have enhanced skills and abilities…

  17. Class Discussions: Locating Social Class in Novels for Children and Young Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLeod, Cynthia Anne

    2008-01-01

    Few studies on representations of social class in children's literature have been published in the United States. As a language arts teacher and media specialist in a high poverty school, the author describes children's novels that directly address social class and the subtopic of the labor movement and consider the continued relevance of social…

  18. Acquisition Performance by Mentally Retarded Children and Young Adults on Complex Benchwork Task.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynch, Kevin P.

    1984-01-01

    To assess the capacity of younger handicapped children to learn a benchwork assembly, 18 children (mean age 12.7) were taught a complex worksample, and various acquisition measures were compared with the performance of 60 older subjects on the same task. Only one significant difference was found between all measures of acquisition. (Author/CL)

  19. The Components of Young Children's Emotion Knowledge: Which Are Enhanced by Adult Emotion Talk?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salmon, Karen; Evans, Ian M.; Moskowitz, Sophie; Grouden, Melissa; Parkes, Fiona; Miller, Emily

    2013-01-01

    This research adopted observational and experimental paradigms to investigate the relationships between components of emotion knowledge in three- to four-year-old children. In Study 1, 88 children were assessed on the Emotion Matching Task (Morgan, Izard, & King), and two tasks requiring the generation of emotion labels and causes. Most tasks…

  20. Nutritional status and obesity in children and young adults with disabilities in Punta Arenas, Patagonia, Chile.

    PubMed

    Vélez, Juan C; Fitzpatrick, Annette L; Barbosa, Clara I; Díaz, Mauricio; Urzua, Miyochi; Andrade, Asterio H

    2008-12-01

    Childhood obesity is reaching epidemic proportions throughout the world; however, little is known on the nutritional status of children with disabilities. To address this issue, medical records of 748 children aged 18 years or younger receiving physical therapy during 2004-2005 at a privately sponsored free rehabilitation clinic in Punta Arenas, Patagonia, Chile were abstracted. Data included demographic, clinical, and anthropometric information recorded at the first visit. As a comparison, height and weight were also collected in 215 children attending local schools. Nutritional status was calculated as body mass index (above 6 years of age) or evaluated by growth curves (6 years of age or below) as undernourished, normal, overweight, obese, or morbidly obese. Logistic regression was used to determine risk factors for obesity in these children. Overall, a significant difference in nutritional status between disabled and non-disabled children was found (P<0.001). Children with disabilities had a higher prevalence of both below and above normal weight than non-disabled children. Risk factors for obesity included increasing age and living with a grandparent independent of other socioeconomic factors. Compared with normal children, risk of obesity was doubled for those with developmental delays [odds ratio (OR): 1.96; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.16-3.34] and neurological disorders (OR: 2.58, 95% CI: 1.26-5.29), whereas individuals with cerebral palsy were less than half as likely to be obese than non-disabled children (OR: 0.46, 95% CI: 0.20-1.03). We conclude that overnutrition continues to be a problem for both disabled and non-disabled children in Patagonia. Programs to increase physical activity and improve nutrition are needed in this isolated part of the world.

  1. Clueless? Adult Mysteries with Young Adult Appeal.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Charles, John; Morrison, Joanna

    1997-01-01

    Presents a list of adult mystery titles for young adult readers. Includes first titles in a series (for reading in order); new and lesser-known mystery authors' works are the focus. Annotations include plot summary. The rest of each annotation is for professional use (includes date and name of award bestowed). (AEF)

  2. Regulating Worry, Promoting Hope: How Do Children, Adolescents, and Young Adults Cope with Climate Change?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ojala, Maria

    2012-01-01

    Learning about global problems, such as climate change, is not only a cognitive endeavor, but also involves emotions evoked by the seriousness and complexity of these problems. Few studies, however, have explored how young people cope with emotions related to climate change. Since coping strategies could be as important as the emotions themselves…

  3. Mobility and Young Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bernard van Leer Foundation Newsletter, 1994

    1994-01-01

    This newsletter theme issue deals with the phenomenon of mobility or transience in India, Kenya, Greece, Ireland, Malaysia, Thailand and Israel. The primary focus is on mobility's effect on young children, specifically their health and education; some of the broader concerns also addressed by the newsletter are the causes of mobility and its…

  4. Young children's harmonic perception.

    PubMed

    Costa-Giomi, Eugenia

    2003-11-01

    Harmony and tonality are two of the most difficult elements for young children to perceive and manipulate and are seldom taught in the schools until the end of early childhood. Children's gradual harmonic and tonal development has been attributed to their cumulative exposure to Western tonal music and their increasing experiential knowledge of its rules and principles. Two questions that are relevant to this problem are: (1) Can focused and systematic teaching accelerate the learning of the harmonic/tonal principles that seem to occur in an implicit way throughout childhood? (2) Are there cognitive constraints that make it difficult for young children to perceive and/or manipulate certain harmonic and tonal principles? A series of studies specifically addressed the first question and suggested some possible answers to the second one. Results showed that harmonic instruction has limited effects on children's perception of harmony and indicated that the drastic improvement in the perception of implied harmony noted approximately at age 9 is due to development rather than instruction. I propose that young children's difficulty in perceiving implied harmony stems from their attention behaviors. Older children have less memory constraints and more strategies to direct their attention to the relevant cues of the stimulus. Younger children focus their attention on the melody, if present in the stimulus, and specifically on its concrete elements such as rhythm, pitch, and contour rather than its abstract elements such as harmony and key. The inference of the abstract harmonic organization of a melody required in the perception of implied harmony is thus an elusive task for the young child.

  5. Collaborative Writing for Young Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hadley, Lee; Irwin, Annabelle

    1992-01-01

    Presents a dialogue between the authors on what it is like to collaborate in writing young adult fiction. Discusses their writing processes, how they come up with ideas for their books, and how they get the books published. (RS)

  6. Responding to Young Adult Literature. Young Adult Literature Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monseau, Virginia R.

    This book focuses on how readers respond to the power of young adult literature--negating the assumption that because such literature appeals to adolescents it cannot possibly be worthy of a place in the language arts curriculum. The book serves two purposes: it describes and discusses the oral and written response of adolescents and adults to…

  7. Life Course Status and Exchanges of Support between Young Adults and Parents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bucx, Freek; van Wel, Frits; Knijn, Trudie

    2012-01-01

    The authors investigated intergenerational support exchanges in relation to young adults' life course status. In a sample of 2,022 young adults (ages 18-34 years) in The Netherlands, single young adults reported receiving more advice from parents than married young adults, and those with children of their own received more practical support.…

  8. All the Teachers Are Friends Here: The Case for Strong Relationships among Adults Who Work with Young Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenow, Nancy

    2012-01-01

    The author thought about the kinds of things adults unwittingly convey to children every day. If children can sense the strong and (mostly) positive relationships among staff members on their team, then it's just as likely they can sense when there's tension and unease. And, when human beings work together, there will inevitably be times when…

  9. Anomalous aortic origin of a coronary artery with an interarterial course: understanding current management strategies in children and young adults.

    PubMed

    Brothers, Julie; Gaynor, J William; Paridon, Stephen; Lorber, Richard; Jacobs, Marshall

    2009-10-01

    Anomalous aortic origin of a coronary artery from the opposite sinus of Valsalva with an interarterial course (AAOCA) is a rare congenital anomaly that is the second leading cardiovascular cause of sudden death in children and adolescents. Management practices with respect to this lesion vary among clinicians. We surveyed practitioners' opinions on treatment and management strategies for patients with AAOCA. A 17-question "Patient Management Questionnaire" was sent to all Congenital Heart Surgeons' Society (CHSS) members (n = 90), who were asked to respond and to distribute the questionnaire to pediatric cardiologists and nurse practitioners at their institutions. Questions addressed patient presentation, diagnostic modalities, therapeutic intervention, complications to therapy, follow-up visits, and type and frequency of follow-up testing. Descriptive statistics were used for analyses. We received 113 responses. Almost all respondents agree that ischemia at presentation or with provocative testing warrants surgical repair, whereas the majority believes that any patient with symptoms but no evidence of ischemia should have surgery. Approximately one-half and one-third of the respondents manage patients who are awaiting surgery or not having surgery by completely restricting exercise or not allowing competitive athletics, respectively. In asymptomatic patients, patient age determines timing of surgical repair but almost one-quarter did not believe that an asymptomatic child should undergo surgery. Among patients managed medically, there were six sudden deaths; there were two deaths in those who had surgical repair. There is marked heterogeneity in physician opinions regarding AAOCA treatment and management. A multicenter registry would facilitate the development of evidence-based treatment and management guidelines for children and young adults with AAOCA.

  10. Young Children's Understanding of Joint Commitments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grafenhain, Maria; Behne, Tanya; Carpenter, Malinda; Tomasello, Michael

    2009-01-01

    When adults make a joint commitment to act together, they feel an obligation to their partner. In 2 studies, the authors investigated whether young children also understand joint commitments to act together. In the first study, when an adult orchestrated with the child a joint commitment to play a game together and then broke off from their joint…

  11. Reading the Intentionality of Young Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forman, George E.

    2010-01-01

    Through six video clips and accompanying commentary, the author argues that by carefully observing how very young children play, adults can gain insight into their high-level thinking and their knowledge, as well as the implications that their strategies hold for their assumptions, theories, and expectations. Adults can then become more protective…

  12. Helping Young Children in Frightening Times.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young Children, 2001

    2001-01-01

    Presents ways parents and other adults can help young children deal with tragedy and violence in the wake of terrorist attacks on the United States. Suggests giving reassurance and physical comfort, providing structure and stability, expecting a range of reactions, helping children to talk if they are ready, turning off the television, and…

  13. FREQUENCY OF MOUTHING BEHAVIOR IN YOUNG CHILDREN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Young children, as compared to adults, are more likely to be exposed after a pesticide application due to potential hand- and object-to-mouth contacts in contaminated areas. However, relatively few studies have specifically evaluated mouthing behavior in children <60 months of...

  14. Young Children's Automatic Encoding of Social Categories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weisman, Kara; Johnson, Marissa V.; Shutts, Kristin

    2015-01-01

    The present research investigated young children's automatic encoding of two social categories that are highly relevant to adults: gender and race. Three- to 6-year-old participants learned facts about unfamiliar target children who varied in either gender or race and were asked to remember which facts went with which targets. When participants…

  15. Cooperative Activities in Young Children and Chimpanzees

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warneken, Felix; Chen, Frances; Tomasello, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Human children 18-24 months of age and 3 young chimpanzees interacted in 4 cooperative activities with a human adult partner. The human children successfully participated in cooperative problem-solving activities and social games, whereas the chimpanzees were uninterested in the social games. As an experimental manipulation, in each task the adult…

  16. Conversational Support for Assertives in Young Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marcos, Haydee; Rabain-Jamin, Jacqueline

    2005-01-01

    The goal of this study was to find out how, in young children, conversations with an adult contribute to establishing a shared expression of beliefs through assertive speech acts. Children age 22 months were observed in a picture-book situation with their mother. On the basis of work on early semantic relations, 3 categories of assertives were…

  17. FREQUENCY OF MOUTHING BEHAVIOR IN YOUNG CHILDREN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Young children may be more likely than adults to be exposed to pesticides following a residential application as a result of hand- and object-to-mouth contacts in contaminated areas. However, relatively few studies have specifically evaluated mouthing behavior in children less ...

  18. Promoter Polymorphisms in the Plasma Glutathione Peroxidase (GPx-3) Gene: A Novel Risk Factor for Arterial Ischemic Stroke among Young Adults and Children

    PubMed Central

    Voetsch, Barbara; Jin, Richard C.; Bierl, Charlene; Benke, Kelly S.; Kenet, Gili; Simioni, Paolo; Ottaviano, Filomena; Damasceno, Benito P.; Annichino-Bizacchi, Joyce M.; Handy, Diane E.; Loscalzo, Joseph

    2006-01-01

    Background and purpose Plasma glutathione peroxidase (GPx-3) deficiency increases extracellular oxidant stress, decreases bioavailable nitric oxide, and promotes platelet activation. The aim of this study is to identify polymorphisms in the GPx-3 gene, examine their relationship to arterial ischemic stroke (AIS) in a large series of children and young adults, and determine their functional molecular consequences. Methods We studied the GPx-3 gene promoter from 123 young adults with idiopathic AIS and 123 age- and gender-matched controls by single-stranded conformational polymorphism and sequencing analysis. A second, independent population with childhood stroke was used for a replication study. We identified eight, novel, strongly linked polymorphisms in the GPx-3 gene promoter that formed two main haplotypes (H1 and H2). The transcriptional activity of the two most prevalent haplotypes was studied with luciferase reporter gene constructs. Results The H2 haplotype was overrepresented in both patient populations and associated with an independent increase in the risk of AIS in young adults (OR=2.07, 95% CI=1.03–4.47; p=0.034) and children (OR=2.13, 95% CI=1.23–4.90; p=0.027). In adults simultaneously exposed to vascular risk factors, the risk of AIS approximately doubled (OR=5.18, 95% CI=1.82–15.03, p<0.001). Transcriptional activity of the H2 haplotype was lower than that of the H1 haplotype, especially after upregulation by hypoxia (normalized relative luminescence: 3.54±0.32 vs. 2.47±0.26; p=0.0083). Conclusion These findings indicate that a novel GPx-3 promoter haplotype is an independent risk factor for AIS in children and young adults. This haplotype reduces the gene’s transcriptional activity, thereby compromising gene expression and plasma antioxidant and antithrombotic activities. PMID:17122425

  19. Young Adult Educational and Vocational Outcomes of Children Diagnosed with ADHD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuriyan, Aparajita B.; Pelham, William E., Jr.; Molina, Brooke S. G.; Waschbusch, Daniel A.; Gnagy, Elizabeth M.; Sibley, Margaret H.; Babinski, Dara E.; Walther, Christine; Cheong, JeeWon; Yu, Jihnhee; Kent, Kristine M.

    2013-01-01

    Decreased success at work and educational attainment by adulthood are of concern for children with ADHD given their widely documented academic difficulties; however there are few studies that have examined this empirically and even fewer that have studied predictors and individual variability of these outcomes. The current study compares young…

  20. Chronic Pulmonary Disease in Children and Young Adults. Community Visitation Training Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New Mexico Regional Medical Program, Albuquerque.

    This curriculum guide outlines the subject matter, techniques, and demonstrations presented to medical and paramedical personnel in a 1-week course offered at the New Mexico Pulmonary Center on the diagnostic evaluation of and the use of the most recent therapeutic techniques for children with chronic respiratory disorders. The manual's five…

  1. Caring about Caring: What Adults Can Do to Promote Young Children's Prosocial Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hyson, Marilou; Taylor, Jackie L.

    2011-01-01

    Many early childhood educators are seriously concerned about bullying and aggression. Children's negative social behaviors also dominate the media and are the focus of much current research. Recent studies result in some progress in understanding the early origins and harmful effects of physical and relational aggression and designing…

  2. Bringing Fantasy Alive for Children and Young Adults. Professional Growth Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wadham, Tim; Wadham, Rachel L.

    Suggesting that the general bias among librarians against fantasy literature can be overcome, this book hopes to convey the magic found in fantasy literature to children and adolescents through their teachers and librarians. It provides some basic definitions of fantasy; presents commentary on issues that have caused some to find fantasy…

  3. Integrating Philosophy for Children and Young Adults into the Public Schools: Tales from Long Beach, California

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goering, Sara; Whittaker, Debbie

    2007-01-01

    In this article we describe our experiences in developing and expanding a philosophy in the schools program in Long Beach, California. We point to similarities and differences between our program and other philosophy for children programs, and describe the concerns and growing pains our program has experienced in its first seven years of…

  4. Development of the pediatric quality of life inventory neurofibromatosis type 1 module items for children, adolescents and young adults: qualitative methods.

    PubMed

    Nutakki, Kavitha; Varni, James W; Steinbrenner, Sheila; Draucker, Claire B; Swigonski, Nancy L

    2017-01-11

    Health-related quality of life (HRQOL) is arguably one of the most important measures in evaluating effectiveness of clinical treatments. At present, there is no disease-specific outcome measure to assess the HRQOL of children, adolescents and young adults with Neurofibromatosis Type 1 (NF1). This study aimed to develop the items and support the content validity for the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory™ (PedsQL™) NF1 Module for children, adolescents and young adults. The iterative process included multiphase qualitative methods including a literature review, survey of expert opinions, semi-structured interviews, cognitive interviews and pilot testing. Fifteen domains were derived from the qualitative methods, with content saturation achieved, resulting in 115 items. The domains include skin, pain, pain impact, pain management, cognitive functioning, speech, fine motor, balance, vision, perceived physical appearance, communication, worry, treatment, medicines and gastrointestinal symptoms. This study is limited because all participants are recruited from a single-site. Qualitative methods support the content validity for the PedsQL™ NF1 Module for children, adolescents and young adults. The PedsQL™ NF1 Module is now undergoing national multisite field testing for the psychometric validation of the instrument development.

  5. Preterm birth and unintentional injuries: risks to children, adolescents and young adults show no consistent pattern

    PubMed Central

    Calling, Susanna; Palmér, Karolina; Jönsson, Lena; Sundquist, Jan; Winkleby, Marilyn; Sundquist, Kristina

    2012-01-01

    Aim Preterm birth is associated with a number of physical and mental health issues. The aim of this study was to find out if there was also any association between individuals born preterm in Sweden between 1984 and 2006 and the risk of unintentional injuries during childhood, adolescence and young adulthood. Methods The study followed 2,297,134 individuals, including 5.9% born preterm, from 1985 to 2007 for unintentional injuries leading to hospitalisation or death (n=244,021). The males and females were divided into four age groups: 1–5 years, 6–12 years, 13–18 years and 19–23 years. Hazard ratios were calculated for falls, transport injuries and other injuries. Results After adjusting for a comprehensive set of covariates, some of the preterm subgroups demonstrated slightly increased risks of unintentional injuries, while others showed slightly decreased risks. However, most of the estimates were borderline or non-significant in both males and females. In addition, the absolute risk differences between individuals born preterm and full term were small. Conclusion Despite the association between preterm birth and a variety of physical and mental health consequences, this study shows that there is no consistent risk pattern between preterm birth and unintentional injuries in childhood, adolescence and young adulthood. PMID:23181809

  6. Far from Oblivion: the Nanking Massacre in Japanese historical writing for children and young adults.

    PubMed

    Penney, Matthew

    2008-01-01

    The Nanking Massacre of 1937 frequently has been described as a forgotten genocidal act or "Holocaust." Concentrating on atrocity as reflected in Japanese popular historical writing for children and adolescents since the 1960s, this essay argues that such war crimes are far from ignored. Representations of the Nanking Massacre in particular, and of Japanese World War II atrocities in general, have been widely mobilized in Japan to inculcate an anti-war philosophy.

  7. Environmental Design for Young Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frank, Mary, Ed.

    1977-01-01

    The special issue of the journal, Children in Contemporary Society, contains 17 brief articles on environmental design for young handicapped and normal children. Articles have the following titles: "Introduction", "Environmental Design and Architecture", "Why Is Environmental Design Important to Young Children", "Children's Hospital National…

  8. Spinal column shortening for tethered cord syndrome associated with myelomeningocele, lumbosacral lipoma, and lipomyelomeningocele in children and young adults.

    PubMed

    Aldave, Guillermo; Hansen, Daniel; Hwang, Steven W; Moreno, Amee; Briceño, Valentina; Jea, Andrew

    2017-03-31

    OBJECTIVE Tethered cord syndrome is the clinical manifestation of an abnormal stretch on the spinal cord, presumably causing mechanical injury, a compromised blood supply, and altered spinal cord metabolism. Tethered cord release is the standard treatment for tethered cord syndrome. However, direct untethering of the spinal cord carries potential risks, such as new neurological deficits from spinal cord injury, a CSF leak from opening the dura, and retethering of the spinal cord from normal scar formation after surgery. To avoid these risks, the authors applied spinal column shortening to children and transitional adults with primary and secondary tethered cord syndrome and report treatment outcomes. The authors' aim with this study was to determine the safety and efficacy of spinal column shortening for tethered cord syndrome by analyzing their experience with this surgical technique. METHODS The authors retrospectively reviewed the demographic and procedural data of children and young adults who had undergone spinal column shortening for primary or secondary tethered cord syndrome. RESULTS Seven patients with tethered cord syndrome caused by myelomeningocele, lipomyelomeningocele, and transitional spinal lipoma were treated with spinal column shortening. One patient with less than 24 months of follow-up was excluded from further analysis. There were 3 males and 4 females; the average age at the time was surgery was 16 years (range 8-30 years). Clinical presentations for our patients included pain (in 5 patients), weakness (in 4 patients), and bowel/bladder dysfunction (in 4 patients). Spinal column osteotomy was most commonly performed at the L-1 level, with fusion between T-12 and L-2 using a pedicle screw-rod construct. Pedicle subtraction osteotomy was performed in 6 patients, and vertebral column resection was performed in 1 patient. The average follow-up period was 31 months (range 26-37 months). Computed tomography-based radiographic outcomes showed solid

  9. Pseudoprogression in children, adolescents and young adults with non-brainstem high grade glioma and diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma.

    PubMed

    Carceller, Fernando; Fowkes, Lucy A; Khabra, Komel; Moreno, Lucas; Saran, Frank; Burford, Anna; Mackay, Alan; Jones, David T W; Hovestadt, Volker; Marshall, Lynley V; Vaidya, Sucheta; Mandeville, Henry; Jerome, Neil; Bridges, Leslie R; Laxton, Ross; Al-Sarraj, Safa; Pfister, Stefan M; Leach, Martin O; Pearson, Andrew D J; Jones, Chris; Koh, Dow-Mu; Zacharoulis, Stergios

    2016-08-01

    Pseudoprogression (PsP) is a treatment-related phenomenon which hinders response interpretation. Its prevalence and clinical impact have not been evaluated in children/adolescents. We assessed the characteristics, risk factors and prognosis of PsP in children/adolescents and young-adults diagnosed with non-brainstem high grade gliomas (HGG) and diffuse intrinsic pontine gliomas (DIPG). Patients aged 1-21 years diagnosed with HGG or DIPG between 1995 and 2012 who had completed radiotherapy were eligible. PsP was assessed according to study-specific criteria and correlated with first-line treatment, molecular biomarkers and survival. Ninety-one patients (47 HGG, 44 DIPG) were evaluable. Median age: 10 years (range, 2-20). Eleven episodes of PsP were observed in 10 patients (4 HGG, 6 DIPG). Rates of PsP: 8.5 % (HGG); 13.6 % (DIPG). Two episodes of PsP were based on clinical findings alone; nine episodes had concurrent radiological changes: increased size of lesions (n = 5), new focal enhancement (n = 4). Temozolomide, MGMT methylation or H3F3A mutations were not found to be associated with increased occurrence of PsP. For HGG, 1-year progression-free survival (PFS) was 41.9 % no-PsP versus 100 % PsP (p = 0.041); differences in 1-year overall survival (OS) were not significant. For DIPG, differences in 1-year PFS and OS were not statistically significant. Hazard ratio (95 %CI) of PsP for OS was 0.551 (0.168-1.803; p = 0.325) in HGG; and 0.308 (0.107-0.882; p = 0.028) in DIPG. PsP occurred in both pediatric HGG and DIPG patients at a comparable rate to adult HGG. PsP was associated with improved 1-yr PFS in HGG patients. PsP had a protective effect upon OS in DIPG patients.

  10. Precision grasps of children and young and old adults: individual differences in digit contact strategy, purchase pattern, and digit posture.

    PubMed

    Wong, Yvonne J; Whishaw, Ian Q

    2004-09-23

    The evolutionary origins and variations of the precision grip, in which an object is held between the thumb and other digits, are poorly understood. This is surprising because the neural basis of this grasp pattern, including the motor cortex and pyramidal tract have received extensive study. Most previous work has shown that features of an object to be grasped (external factors) determine grasp patterns. The objective of the present study was to investigate individual differences (central factors) in use of the pincer and other precision grips. The grasping patterns of male and female young adults, older adults and children were examined as they reached (with both left and right hand) for five small beads (3-16 mm diameter). Frame-by-frame analysis of grasping indicated a high degree of variability in digit contact strategies, purchase patterns and digit posture both within and between subjects. (1) The contact strategies consisted of five variations, depending on whether the thumb or the index finger dragged or stabilized the bead for grasping. (2) Purchase patterns consisted of seven different types of precision grips, involving the thumb and various combinations of other digits. (3) There were four variations stemming from the posture of the non-grasping digits. Grip patterns of the left and right hands were correlated in individual subjects, as were strategies used for different bead sizes. Females displayed slightly more variability in grasp patterns than did males, and digit width (obtained from photocopies of the subjects' hands) was weakly correlated with the grasp patterns used. Although it was expected that the pincer would be used for all objects, it was preferentially used for only the smallest object except for older adults who used the pincer grasp on most objects. The variability in digit contact strategies, purchase patterns, and posture of the non-grasping digits indicates that central factors (innate or learning-induced architecture of the left

  11. Analysis Article: Accuracy of the DIDGET Glucose Meter in Children and Young Adults with Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sarah

    2011-01-01

    Diabetes is one of the most common chronic diseases among American children. Although studies show that intensive management, including frequent glucose testing, improves diabetes control, this is difficult to accomplish. Bayer's DIDGET® glucose meter system pairs with a popular handheld video game system and couples good blood glucose testing habits with video-game-based rewards. In this issue, Deeb and colleagues performed a study demonstrating the accuracy of the DIDGET meter, a critical asset to this novel product designed to alleviate some of the challenges of managing pediatric diabetes. PMID:22027311

  12. Visual performance and ocular abnormalities in deaf children and young adults: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Hollingsworth, Richard; Ludlow, Amanda K; Wilkins, Arnold; Calver, Richard; Allen, Peter M

    2014-06-01

    Visual defects are common in deaf individuals. Refractive error and ocular motor abnormalities are frequently reported, with hyperopia, myopia, astigmatism and anomalies of binocular vision, all showing a greater prevalence in deaf individuals compared with the general population. Near visual function in deaf individuals has been relatively neglected in the literature to date. Comparisons between studies are problematic due to differences in methodology and population characteristics. Any untreated visual defect has the potential to impair the development of language, with consequences for education more generally, and there is a need to improve screening and treatments of deaf children.

  13. WT1 peptide immunotherapy for cancer in children and young adults.

    PubMed

    Hashii, Yoshiko; Sato, Emiko; Ohta, Hideaki; Oka, Yoshihiro; Sugiyama, Haruo; Ozono, Keiichi

    2010-08-01

    Wilms tumor gene (WT1) can be overexpressed in childhood cancers. We evaluated the efficacy of WT1 vaccination for five children with solid cancer or acute leukemia. WT1 vaccine was administered to HLA-A*2402-positive patients with WT1-overexpressing residual tumor despite prior conventional treatment. One patient showed complete response and one patient showed stable disease according to the Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors; the remaining three showed progressive disease. Treatment-related adverse effects were limited to local injection site erythema. These results suggest that WT1 vaccination has therapeutic potential, but any beneficial effect may be insufficient in the presence of gross residual disease.

  14. Transfer of spatial search between environments in human adults and young children (Homo sapiens): implications for representation of local geometry by spatial systems.

    PubMed

    Lew, Adina R; Usherwood, Barrie; Fragkioudaki, Frantzeska; Koukoumi, Varvara; Smith, Shamus P; Austen, Joe M; McGregor, Anthony

    2014-04-01

    Whether animals represent environmental geometry in a global and/or local way has been the subject of recent debate. We applied a transfer of search paradigm between rectangular- and kite-shaped arenas to examine the performance of human adults (using virtual environments) and children of 2.5-3.5 years (using real arenas). Adults showed robust transfer to a congruent corner in a kite-shaped arena, following training in a rectangular-shaped arena in two paradigms modeled on those used with rats and young children respectively. In contrast, the children showed no evidence of transfer of search, despite above chance performance in the rectangular arena, and above chance performance in a study where search occurred in the kite arena only. The pattern of findings suggests global aspects of environmental geometry may be used to re-establish heading, and that the matching of elements of local geometry in new global contexts may be an advanced developmental achievement.

  15. America's Young Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... with those age 25 and older. Young adults’ employment rates are lower than those of the population ... is associated with many other measures, including income, employment, and political participation, and is an indicator of ...

  16. Young Adult Books.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rochman, Hazel

    1986-01-01

    Applies the idea of the theme booktalk to "Wuthering Heights," which serves as a springboard for talking about themes of family rage, confrontation, quarrel and rebellion in other works of literature with relevance to contemporary young people. (JK)

  17. Gender identity of children and young adults with 5alpha-reductase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Praveen, E P; Desai, Ankush K; Khurana, M L; Philip, Jim; Eunice, Marumudi; Khadgawat, Rajesh; Kulshreshtha, Bindu; Kucheria, Kiran; Gupta, Devendra K; Seith, Ashu; Ammini, Ariachery C

    2008-02-01

    Male pseudohermaphroditism (46,XY DSD) due to 5alpha-reductase deficiency has been recognized for the last few decades. There is scant literature on this entity in India. We compiled data on five patients with this disorder. Four of our five patients were reared as females. Our assessment of these children reveals that they had male gender identity from childhood. Three of the four reared as females chose to change gender role at adolescence, while the fourth is still prepubertal. We conclude that all these patients had male gender identity from early childhood. The parents took note of this only after the appearance of male secondary sexual characteristics at puberty, thereby giving an impression of change in gender identity and gender role.

  18. Using Young Adult Realistic Literature to Help Troubled Teenagers: Something New, Tried and True, and Recommended Nonfiction (Young Adult Literature).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaywell, Joan F.

    1997-01-01

    Describes a seven-step process that uses young adult literature to help teenagers understand and deal with their troubles. Offers brief annotations of five young adult titles in each of nine areas: alienation and identity; divorce; dropouts, delinquency, and gangs; poverty; teenage pregnancy; abused children; alcohol and drugs; homosexuality; and…

  19. Utility of the bispectral index for assessing natural physiological sleep stages in children and young adults.

    PubMed

    Benissa, Mohamed-Rida; Khirani, Sonia; Hartley, Sarah; Adala, Annie; Ramirez, Adriana; Fernandez-Bolanos, Marta; Quera-Salva, Maria-Antonia; Fauroux, Brigitte

    2016-12-01

    Polysomnography (PSG) is the gold standard for the analysis of sleep architecture but is not always available in routine practice, as it is time consuming and cumbersome for patients. Bispectral index (BIS), developed to quantify the deepness of general anesthesia, may be used as a simplified tool to evaluate natural sleep depth. We objectively recorded sleep architecture in young patients using the latest BIS Vista monitor and correlated BIS values with PSG sleep stages in order to determine BIS thresholds. Patients, referred for the screening of sleep apnea/hypopnea syndrome or differential diagnosis of hypersomnia were recruited. Overnight PSG and BIS were performed simultaneously. BIS values were averaged for each sleep stage. Pre-sleep wakefulness (W) and wake after sleep onset (WASO) were also differentiated. BIS values were discarded for a signal quality index <90 %. ROC curves were plotted to discriminate sleep stages from each other. Twelve patients (5.7-29.3 years old) were included. Mean BIS values were 83 ± 8, 76 ± 12, 77 ± 11, 70 ± 10, 43 ± 10, and 75 ± 10 for W, WASO, N1, N2, N3 and R (REM) stages, respectively. BIS failed to distinguish W, WASO, N1 and R stages. BIS threshold that identified stage N2 was <73 (AUC = 0.784, p < 0.001) with low sensitivity (75 %) and poor specificity (64 %). BIS threshold that identified stage N3 was <55 (AUC = 0.964, p < 0.001) with an 87 %-sensitivity and a 93 %-specificity. BIS identified stage N3 with satisfactory sensitivity and specificity but is limited by its inability to distinguish REM sleep from wake. Further studies combining BIS with chin electromyogram and/or electrooculogram could be of interest.

  20. Epidemiology of imported malaria among children and young adults in Barcelona (1990-2008)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Increasing international travel and migration is producing changes in trends in infectious diseases, especially in children from many European cities. The objective of this study was to describe the epidemiology and determine the trends of imported malaria in patients under 20 years old in the city of Barcelona, Spain, during an 18-year period. Methods The study included malaria cases that were laboratory confirmed and reported to the malaria register at the Public Health Agency of Barcelona from 1990 to 2008, residing in Barcelona and less than 20 years old. Patients were classified as natives (born in Spain) or immigrants. Differences in the distribution of demographic, clinical characteristics, and incidence per 100,000 person-year evolution were analysed. Natives and immigrants were compared by logistic regression by calculating the odds ratio (OR) with a 95% confidence interval (CI) and Chi-square for a linear trend (p < 0.05). Results Of the total 174 cases, 143 (82.1%) were immigrants, 100 (57.5%) were female, 121 (69.5%) Plasmodium falciparum, and 108 (62.1%) were visiting friends and relatives (VFR) as the reason for travel. Among the immigrants, 99 (67.8%) were from Equatorial Guinea. Immigrant cases more frequently travelled to Africa than natives (p = 0.02). The factors associated with imported malaria among immigrant residents was travelling for VFR (OR: 6.2 CI 1.9-20.2) and age 15-19 (OR: 3.7 CI 1-13.3). The incidence increased from 1990 to 1999 (p < 0.001) and decreased from 2000 to 2008 (p = 0.01), although the global linear trend was not statistically significant (p = 0.41). The fatality rate was 0.5%. Conclusions The majority of cases of malaria in population less than 20 years in Barcelona were immigrants, travelling to Africa for VFR and Plasmodium falciparum was most frequently detected. The trend analysis of the entire study period did not show a statistically significant decline. It is recommended to be aware of malaria, especially

  1. Primary intracranial soft tissue sarcomas in children, adolescents, and young adults: single institution experience and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Maher, Ossama M; Khatua, Soumen; Mukherjee, Devashis; Olar, Adriana; Lazar, Alexander; Luthra, Raja; Liu, Diane; Wu, Jimin; Ketonen, Leena; Zaky, Wafik

    2016-03-01

    There is a paucity of literature reporting the outcome of intracranial sarcomas (IS) in children, adolescents, and young adults (CAYA). A multimodal therapeutic approach is commonly used, with no well-established treatment consensus. We conducted a retrospective review of CAYA with IS, treated at our institution, to determine their clinical findings, treatments, and outcomes. Immunohistochemistry (PDGFRA and EGFR) and DNA sequencing were performed on 5 tumor samples. A literature review of IS was also conducted. We reviewed 13 patients (median age, 7 years) with a primary diagnosis of IS between 1990 and 2015. Diagnoses included unclassified sarcoma (n = 9), chondrosarcoma (n = 2), and rhabdomyosarcoma (n = 2). Five patients underwent upfront gross total resection (GTR) of the tumor. The 5-drug regimen (vincristine, doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide, etoposide, and ifosfamide) was the most common treatment used. Nine patients died due to progression or recurrence (n = 8) or secondary malignancy (n = 1). The median follow-up period of the 4 surviving patients was 1.69 years (range 1.44-5.17 years). The 5-year progression-free survival and overall survival rates were 21 and 44 %, respectively. BRAF, TP53, KRAS, KIT, ERBB2, MET, RET, ATM, and EGFR mutations were detected in 4 of the 5 tissue samples. All 5 samples were immunopositive for PDGFRA, and only 2 were positive for EGFR. IS remain a therapeutic challenge due to high progression and recurrence rates. Collaborative multi-institutional studies are warranted to delineate a treatment consensus and investigate tumor biology to improve the disease outcome.

  2. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in children and young adults with secondary myelodysplastic syndrome and acute myelogenous leukemia after aplastic anemia.

    PubMed

    Yoshimi, Ayami; Strahm, Brigitte; Baumann, Irith; Furlan, Ingrid; Schwarz, Stephan; Teigler-Schlegel, Andrea; Walther, Joachim-Ulrich; Schlegelberger, Brigitte; Göhring, Gudrun; Nöllke, Peter; Führer, Monika; Niemeyer, Charlotte M

    2014-03-01

    Secondary myelodysplastic syndrome and acute myelogenous leukemia (sMDS/sAML) are the most serious secondary events occurring after immunosuppressive therapy in patients with aplastic anemia. Here we evaluate the outcome of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) in 17 children and young adults with sMDS/sAML after childhood aplastic anemia. The median interval between the diagnosis of aplastic anemia and the development of sMDS/sAML was 2.9 years (range, 1.2 to 13.0 years). At a median age of 13.1 years (range, 4.4 to 26.7 years), patients underwent HSCT with bone marrow (n = 6) or peripheral blood stem cell (n = 11) grafts from HLA-matched sibling donors (n = 2), mismatched family donors (n = 2), or unrelated donors (n = 13). Monosomy 7 was detected in 13 patients. The preparative regimen consisted of busulfan, cyclophosphamide, and melphalan in 11 patients and other agents in 6 patients. All patients achieved neutrophil engraftment. The cumulative incidence of grade II-IV acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) was 47%, and that of chronic GVHD was 70%. Relapse occurred in 1 patient. The major cause of death was transplant-related complication (n = 9). Overall survival and event-free survival at 5 years after HSCT were both 41%. In summary, this study indicates that HSCT is a curative therapy for some patients with sMDS/sAML after aplastic anemia. Future efforts should focus on reducing transplantation-related mortality.

  3. The genomic landscape of acute lymphoblastic leukemia in children and young adults.

    PubMed

    Mullighan, Charles G

    2014-12-05

    Our understanding of the genetic basis of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) has been greatly advanced by genomic profiling and sequencing studies. These efforts have characterized the genetic basis of recently described and poorly understood subtypes of ALL, including early T-cell precursor ALL, Philadelphia chromosome-like (Ph-like) ALL, and ALL with intrachromosomal amplification of chromosome 21, and have identified several rational therapeutic targets in high-risk ALL, notably ABL1-class and JAK-STAT inhibitors in Ph-like ALL. Deep sequencing studies are also refining our understanding of the genetic basis of clonal heterogeneity and relapse. These studies have elucidated the nature of clonal evolution during disease progression and identified genetic changes that confer resistance to specific therapeutic agents, including CREBBP and NT5C2. Genomic profiling has also identified common and rare inherited genetic variants that influence the risk of developing leukemia. These efforts are now being extended to ALL in adolescents and adults with the goal of fully defining the genetic landscape of ALL to further improve treatment outcomes in high-risk populations.

  4. Jaw Dysfunction Related to Pterygoid and Masseter Muscle Dosimetry After Radiation Therapy in Children and Young Adults With Head-and-Neck Sarcomas

    SciTech Connect

    Krasin, Matthew J.; Wiese, Kristin M.; Spunt, Sheri L.; Hua, Chia-ho; Daw, Najat; Navid, Fariba; Davidoff, Andrew M.; McGregor, Lisa; Merchant, Thomas E.; Kun, Larry E.; McCrarey, Lola; and others

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the relationship between jaw function, patient and treatment variables, and radiation dosimetry of the mandibular muscles and joints in children and young adults receiving radiation for soft-tissue and bone sarcomas. Methods and Materials: Twenty-four pediatric and young adult patients with head-and-neck sarcomas were treated on an institutional review board-approved prospective study of focal radiation therapy for local tumor control. Serial jaw depression measurements were related to radiation dosimetry delivered to the medial and lateral pterygoid muscles, masseter muscles, and temporomandibular joints to generate mathematical models of jaw function. Results: Baseline jaw depression was only influenced by the degree of surgical resection. In the first 12 weeks from initiation of radiation, surgical procedures greater than a biopsy, administration of cyclophosphamide containing chemotherapy regimes, and large gross tumor volumes adversely affected jaw depression. Increasing dose to the pterygoid and masseter muscles above 40 Gy predicted loss of jaw function over the full course of follow-up. Conclusions: Clinical and treatment factors are related to initial and subsequent jaw dysfunction. Understanding these complex interactions and the affect of specific radiation doses may help reduce the risk for jaw dysfunction in future children and young adults undergoing radiation therapy for the management of soft-tissue and bone sarcomas.

  5. Clinical characteristics of children and young adults with co-occurring autism spectrum disorder and epilepsy.

    PubMed

    El Achkar, Christelle M; Spence, Sarah J

    2015-06-01

    The association between autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and epilepsy has been described for decades, and yet we still lack the full understanding of this relationship both clinically and at the pathophysiologic level. This review evaluates the available data in the literature pertaining to the clinical characteristics of patients with autism spectrum disorder who develop epilepsy and, conversely, patients with epilepsy who develop autism spectrum disorder. Many studies demonstrate an increased risk of epilepsy in individuals with ASD, but rates vary widely. This variability is likely secondary to the different study methods employed, including the study population and definitions of the disorders. Established risk factors for an increased risk of epilepsy in patients with ASD include intellectual disability and female gender. There is some evidence of an increased risk of epilepsy associated with other factors such as ASD etiology (syndromic), severity of autistic features, developmental regression, and family history. No one epilepsy syndrome or seizure type has been associated, although focal or localization-related seizures are often reported. The age at seizure onset can vary from infancy to adulthood with some evidence of a bimodal age distribution. The severity and intractability of epilepsy in populations with ASD have not been well studied, and there is very little investigation of the role that epilepsy plays in the autism behavioral phenotype. There is evidence of abnormal EEGs (especially epileptiform abnormalities) in children with ASD even in the absence of clinical seizures, but very little is known about this phenomenon and what it means. The development of autism spectrum disorder in patients with epilepsy is less well studied, but there is evidence that the ASD risk is greater in those with epilepsy than in the general population. One of the risk factors is intellectual disability, and there is some evidence that the presence of a particular seizure

  6. Young Children's Understanding of Denial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Austin, Keith; Theakston, Anna; Lieven, Elena; Tomasello, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Although a fair amount is known about young children's production of negation, little is known about their comprehension. Here, we focus on arguably the most complex basic form, denial, and how young children understand denial, when it is expressed in response to a question with gesture, single word, or sentence. One hundred twenty-six children in…

  7. Using Puppets with Young Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skelton, Sarah C.; Hamilton, Anne C.

    This paper examines aspects of the use of puppets with young children and provides guidelines on proper times for puppet use, basic movements, and patterns. The use of puppetry in dramatic play provides young children with opportunities for refining communication skills and defining self. Puppetry provides a means for children to explore their…

  8. [Mental health of children, adolescents and young adults--part 1: prevalence, illness persistence, adversities, service use, treatment delay and consequences].

    PubMed

    Lambert, M; Bock, T; Naber, D; Löwe, B; Schulte-Markwort, M; Schäfer, I; Gumz, A; Degkwitz, P; Schulte, B; König, H H; Konnopka, A; Bauer, M; Bechdolf, A; Correll, C; Juckel, G; Klosterkötter, J; Leopold, K; Pfennig, A; Karow, A

    2013-11-01

    Numerous birth-control studies, epidemiological studies, and observational studies have investigated mental health and health care in childhood, adolescence and early adulthood, including prevalence, age at onset, adversities, illness persistence, service use, treatment delay and course of illness. Moreover, the impact of the burden of illness, of deficits of present health care systems, and the efficacy and effectiveness of early intervention services on mental health were evaluated. According to these data, most mental disorders start during childhood, adolescence and early adulthood. Many children, adolescents and young adults are exposed to single or multiple adversities, which increase the risk for (early) manifestations of mental diseases as well as for their chronicity. Early-onset mental disorders often persist into adulthood. Service use by children, adolescents and young adults is low, even lower than for adult patients. Moreover, there is often a long delay between onset of illness and first adequate treatment with a variety of linked consequences for a poorer psychosocial prognosis. This leads to a large burden of illness with respect to disability and costs. As a consequence several countries have implemented so-called "early intervention services" at the interface of child and adolescent and adult psychiatry. Emerging studies show that these health-care structures are effective and efficient. Part 1 of the present review summarises the current state of mental health in childhood, adolescence and early adulthood, including prevalence, age at onset, adversities, illness persistence, service use, and treatment delay with consequences.

  9. [The influence of metabolic disturbances present in diabetes mellitus type I on vestibulo-spinal reflexes in children and young adults].

    PubMed

    Gawron, Wojciech; Pośpiech, Lucyna; Orendorz-Fraczkowska, Krystyna; Noczyńska, Anna

    2002-01-01

    Diabetic neuropathy encompasses various disturbances concerning somatic and autonomic nervous system and has significant impact on prognosis and course of diabetes mellitus. The aim of the work is an evaluation of vestibulo-spinal reflexes in children and young adults suffering from diabetes mellitus type 1. Material--95 children and young adults aged from 6 to 28 years with diabetes mellitus type 1 diagnosed. The control group consisted of 44 otoneurologically healthy subjects aged from 6 to 28 years. After detailed medical history collection and physical ENT examination stato-posturography was performed in each case. Posturographer PE 62 Model 04 was applied in the studies. Static posturography as well as dynamic one (one leg standing test) was performed in each case. 6 patients belonging to diabetic group complained about vertigo or dizziness. There were worse stabilograms parameters in diabetic group in comparison to control one, statistically significant in younger children. There were better stabilogram parameters in diabetic patients with longer history of the disease. The parameters analysed were significantly worse in the subgroup with not compensated diabetes. The parameters were slightly better in relation to the presence of hypoglycaemic incidents. No apparent differences in stabilograms parameters were present in relation to the presence of diabetic complications. Diabetes mellitus type 1 with slight or without complications does not have significant influence on vestibulo-spinal reflexes and posture stability of the patients. Balance organ disturbances in diabetes mellitus type 1 in children and young adults despite their presence have subclinical course. Perhaps one should consider monitoring of those disturbances in the course of the disease.

  10. Therapy with low-dose azacitidine for MDS in children and young adults: a retrospective analysis of the EWOG-MDS study group.

    PubMed

    Cseh, Annamaria M; Niemeyer, Charlotte M; Yoshimi, Ayami; Catala, Albert; Frühwald, Michael C; Hasle, Henrik; van den Heuvel-Eibrink, Mary M; Lauten, Melchior; De Moerloose, Barbara; Smith, Owen P; Bernig, Toralf; Gruhn, Bernd; Kulozik, Andreas E; Metzler, Markus; Olcay, Lale; Suttorp, Meinolf; Furlan, Ingrid; Strahm, Brigitte; Flotho, Christian

    2016-03-01

    Low-dose azacitidine is efficient and safe in the therapy of malignant myeloid disorders in adults but data in children are lacking. We present a retrospective analysis of 24 children and young adults with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) who received azacitidine at the time of first diagnosis or relapse after allotransplant (2 children were treated with azacitidine both initially and for relapse). Diagnoses were refractory cytopenia of childhood (N = 4), advanced primary MDS (N = 9) and secondary MDS (N = 11). The median duration of treatment was four cycles. Azacitidine was well tolerated, but cytopenias led to dose reduction in five cases. Treatment was discontinued in one child because of impaired renal function. Sixteen MDS patients were treated with azacitidine at first diagnosis. One complete clinical remission was observed and one child showed complete marrow remission; six children experienced stable disease with haematological improvement. Ten children received azacitidine for relapsed MDS after transplant: of these, seven experienced stable disease for 2-30 cycles (median 3), including one patient with haematological improvement for seven cycles. In summary, azacitidine is effective in some children with MDS and appears to be a non-toxic option in palliative situations to prolong survival.

  11. Moral Dilemmas of Young Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rest, James R.

    This study describes moral dilemmas that young adults (ages 18-24) formulate spontaneously and examines the relationship between these dilemmas and the subjects' environment and scores on a standardized test. Fifty-two subjects were tested both in 1976 and 1978, creating 104 subject-oriented dilemmas. Thirty-two were in college, 17 were not, and…

  12. Young Adults' Choices for 2008

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Adolescent & Adult Literacy, 2008

    2008-01-01

    This article presents annotations of 30 trade books on the 2008 list of Young Adults' Choices that are the result of voting by students in five different regions of the United States. Trade books (books other than textbooks) published in 2006 were submitted by more than 50 publishers. Each book had to have at least two positive reviews from…

  13. A meta-analysis of adherence to antiretroviral therapy and virologic responses in HIV-infected children, adolescents, and young adults.

    PubMed

    Kahana, Shoshana Y; Rohan, Jennifer; Allison, Susannah; Frazier, Thomas W; Drotar, Dennis

    2013-01-01

    The relationship between adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) and virologic outcomes in HIV+ children, adolescents, and young adults has been notably understudied, with much of the extant research focused on specific sub-literatures, such as resource-limited regions, specific clinical outcomes and time frames. The authors sought to better characterize the relationship between adherence to ART and virologic functioning along various sample and methodological factors. The authors conducted a meta-analysis of thirty-seven studies and utilized a random effects model to generate weighted mean effect sizes. In addition, the authors conducted meta-ANOVAs to examine potential factors influencing the relationship between adherence and three categories of clinical outcomes, specifically Viral Load (VL) <100, VL < 400, and continuously measured VL. The analyses included 5,344 HIV+ children, adolescents, and young adults. The relationship between adherence behaviors and virologic outcomes varied across different methods of measurement and analysis. The relationship between adherence and continuously measured VL was significantly larger than for dichotomously-coded VL < 400 at Qb (20.69(1), p < .0005). Caregiver self-report indices elicited very small to small magnitude effects across both VL < 100 and VL < 400 outcomes and combined informant reporting (youth/adolescent and parent) produced significantly larger effects than caregiver report alone with adherence and VL < 400 outcomes at Qb (9.28(1), p < .005). More recently published trials reported smaller relationships between adherence and categorical clinical outcomes, such that year of publication significantly negatively correlated with VL < 100 (r = -.71(14), p < .005) and VL < 400 (r = -.43(26), p < .02). The data suggest that the magnitude of the relationship between ART adherence and virologic outcomes among heterogeneous samples of HIV+ children, adolescents and young adults varies across virologic outcomes and

  14. Discovering Nature with Young Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chalufour, Ingrid; Worth, Karen

    Young children's curiosity about nature and their need to make sense of the world presents an opportunity to incorporate science as a natural and critical part of children's early learning. This guide, part of a preschool science curriculum, uses an inquiry approach to encourage young naturalists to observe life more closely, build an…

  15. Young Adult Realism: Conventions, Narrators, and Readers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, Catherine Sheldrick

    1985-01-01

    Examination of a subset of books popular with young adults--problem novels or young adult realism--is based on deductions concerning nature of reading response that text invites. Young adult realism as formula of popular culture, changes in conventions, narrators and narratees, and identification and distance are discussed. (34 references) (EJS)

  16. Raising "Hot Topics" through Young Adult Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Groenke, Susan; Maples, Joellen; Henderson, Jill

    2010-01-01

    While young adult literature increases adolescents' motivation to read, and adolescents choose to read young adult novels over more canonical works when given opportunities to choose, the authors present yet another reason for teaching young adult literature in the middle school classroom: it provides a medium through which adolescents and their…

  17. Advice for families traveling to developing countries with young children.

    PubMed

    Doan, Sylvia; Steele, Russell W

    2013-09-01

    Young children are most likely to travel to developing countries with their parents to visit relatives. Preparation for such travel must include careful counseling and optimal use of preventive vaccines and chemoprophylaxis. For infants and very young children, data defining safety and efficacy of these agents are often limited. However, accumulated experience suggests that young travelers may be managed similarly to older children and adults.

  18. Gender stereotypes across the ages: On-line processing in school-age children, young and older adults.

    PubMed

    Siyanova-Chanturia, Anna; Warren, Paul; Pesciarelli, Francesca; Cacciari, Cristina

    2015-01-01

    Most research to date on implicit gender stereotyping has been conducted with one age group - young adults. The mechanisms that underlie the on-line processing of stereotypical information in other age groups have received very little attention. This is the first study to investigate real time processing of gender stereotypes at different age levels. We investigated the activation of gender stereotypes in Italian in four groups of participants: third- and fifth-graders, young and older adults. Participants heard a noun that was stereotypically associated with masculine (preside "headmaster") or feminine roles (badante "social care worker"), followed by a male (padre "father") or female kinship term (madre "mother"). The task was to decide if the two words - the role noun and the kinship term - could describe the same person. Across all age groups, participants were significantly faster to respond, and significantly more likely to press 'yes,' when the gender of the target was congruent with the stereotypical gender use of the preceding prime. These findings suggest that information about the stereotypical gender associated with a role noun is incorporated into the mental representation of this word and is activated as soon as the word is heard. In addition, our results show differences between male and female participants of the various age groups, and between male- and female-oriented stereotypes, pointing to important gender asymmetries.

  19. Gender stereotypes across the ages: On-line processing in school-age children, young and older adults

    PubMed Central

    Siyanova-Chanturia, Anna; Warren, Paul; Pesciarelli, Francesca; Cacciari, Cristina

    2015-01-01

    Most research to date on implicit gender stereotyping has been conducted with one age group – young adults. The mechanisms that underlie the on-line processing of stereotypical information in other age groups have received very little attention. This is the first study to investigate real time processing of gender stereotypes at different age levels. We investigated the activation of gender stereotypes in Italian in four groups of participants: third- and fifth-graders, young and older adults. Participants heard a noun that was stereotypically associated with masculine (preside “headmaster”) or feminine roles (badante “social care worker”), followed by a male (padre “father”) or female kinship term (madre “mother”). The task was to decide if the two words – the role noun and the kinship term – could describe the same person. Across all age groups, participants were significantly faster to respond, and significantly more likely to press ‘yes,’ when the gender of the target was congruent with the stereotypical gender use of the preceding prime. These findings suggest that information about the stereotypical gender associated with a role noun is incorporated into the mental representation of this word and is activated as soon as the word is heard. In addition, our results show differences between male and female participants of the various age groups, and between male- and female-oriented stereotypes, pointing to important gender asymmetries. PMID:26441763

  20. Discrimination and Identification of a Third Formant Frequency Cue to Place of Articulation by Young Children and Adults.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Kelly; Sussman, Joan E

    2017-03-01

    Typically-developing children, 4 to 6 years of age, and adults participated in discrimination and identification speech perception tasks using a synthetic consonant-vowel continuum ranging from /da/ to /ga/. The seven-step synthetic /da/-/ga/ continuum was created by adjusting the first 40 ms of the third formant frequency transition. For the discrimination task, listeners participated in a Change/No-Change paradigm with four different stimuli compared to the endpoint-1 /da/ token. For the identification task, listeners labeled each token along the /da/-/ga/ continuum as either "DA" or "GA." Results of the discrimination experiment showed that sensitivity to the third-formant transition cue improved for the adult listeners as the stimulus contrast increased, whereas the performance of the children remained poor across all stimulus comparisons. Results of the identification experiment support previous hypotheses of age-related differences in phonetic categorization. Results have implications for normative data on identification and discrimination tasks. These norms provide a metric against which children with auditory-based speech sound disorders can be compared. Furthermore, the results provide some insight into the developmental nature of categorical and non-categorical speech perception.

  1. Helping Young Children Manage Stress.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Child Care, 2002

    2002-01-01

    Describes the common symptoms of stress exhibited by young children including: (1) social or behavioral; (2) physical; (3) emotional; (4) cognitive; and (5) language. Addresses causes of stress, which typically represent change, fear, or loss in children. Offers strategies for easing children's stress including muscle relaxation, deep breathing,…

  2. Poor Growth, Thyroid Dysfunction and Vitamin D Deficiency Remain Prevalent Despite Reduced Intensity Chemotherapy for Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation in Children and Young Adults

    PubMed Central

    Myers, Kasiani C; Howell, Jonathan C.; Wallace, Gregory; Dandoy, Christopher; El-Bietar, Javier; Lane, Adam; Davies, Stella M.; Jodele, Sonata; Rose, Susan R.

    2016-01-01

    Myeloablative conditioning regimens for hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) are known to affect endocrine function, but little is known regarding reduced intensity conditioning (RIC) regimens. We retrospectively reviewed 114 children and young adults after single RIC HSCT. Analysis was grouped by age (<2y and ≥2y), and diagnosis (HLH/XLP, other immune disorders, metabolic/genetic disorders). All groups displayed short stature by mean height adjusted Z-score (HAZ) before −1.29 and after HSCT (HAZ −1.38, p=0.47). After HSCT, younger children with HLH/XLP grew better (HAZ −3.41 vs −1.65, p= 0.006), while older subjects had worsening (HAZ −0.8 vs −1.01, p= 0.06). Those with steroid therapy beyond standard GVHD prophylaxis were shorter than those without (p 0.04). After HSCT, older subjects with HLH/XLP became thinner with mean BMI Z-score of 1.20 vs. 0.64, p=0.02, likewise in metabolic/genetic disorders (BMI-Z= 0.59 vs. −0.99, p<0.001). BMI increased among younger children in these same groups. Thyroid function was abnormal in 24% (18/76). 25-OH vitamin D levels, were insufficient in 73% (49/65), with low bone mineral density in 8 of 19 evaluable subjects. Despite RIC, children and young adults still have significant late endocrine effects. Further research is required to compare post-transplant endocrine effects after RIC to standard chemotherapy protocols. PMID:26974276

  3. Adult children of parents with young-onset dementia narrate the experiences of their youth through metaphors

    PubMed Central

    Johannessen, Aud; Engedal, Knut; Thorsen, Kirsten

    2015-01-01

    Background Limited research exists on the development and needs of children of parents with young-onset dementia (YOD) (<65 years old). There is scarce knowledge of how these children experience the situation of growing up with a parent with dementia. This study investigates the stories of children of persons with YOD and interprets their metaphorical expressions of their experiences as a source of understanding their situation and needs during the development and course of their parent’s dementia. Methods Qualitative interviews with 14 informants (aged 18–30 years; nine daughters, five sons) were conducted in 2014 and subsequently analyzed by the informants’ use of metaphors. Steger’s three-step method for analyzing metaphors was applied. Results The analysis identified four themes in the metaphors: the informants’ relations to the disease, to the self, to the parent, and to others. From these themes, four core metaphors were abstracted: “my parent is sliding away”; “emotional chaos”; “becoming a parent to my parent”; and “a battle”. Conclusion The study revealed that growing up with a parent with dementia has a great impact on the children’s situation and their experiences of their personal development. Children of a parent with YOD are a group with unmet needs for support. A formalized system where the children can get into contact with service providers to receive tailored information and individual follow-up needs to be established. The service providers must listen to the children’s stories, perceive how metaphors convey their experiences, and recognize their need for support for their own development. PMID:26060403

  4. Time dilation in children and adults: The idea of a slower internal clock in young children tested with different click frequencies.

    PubMed

    Droit-Volet, Sylvie

    2017-03-09

    This experiment examined the effect of a train of regular repetitive clicks of different frequencies (8Hz, 20Hz) on time judgment in a bisection task in children aged 5 and 8 years old and adults with two duration ranges (200/800 and 400/1600ms). Participants' scores on neurospychological tests assessing memory, information processing speed and different components of attention control were also measured. The results showed that a train of clicks produced a time dilation in the children as well as in the adults, with the result that the perceived duration was judged to last longer with than without clicks. However, the time dilation reached a maximum level at a lower click frequency value (8Hz) in the children than in the adults (20Hz). In addition, beyond this click value (8Hz), a reversal effect was observed in the youngest children, who responded "long" less often, while the time dilation was extended in the adults. In addition, while the differences in the time dilation between the click and the no-click condition were not correlated with the individual cognitive capacities, those that occurred when the click frequency increased from 8 to 20Hz were significantly correlated with individual capacities in terms of attention and working memory. The hypothesis of a slower internal clock in the younger children is discussed as are the attentional interference processes involved in the click effect on time judgment.

  5. Healthy Young Children: A Manual for Programs, 4th Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aronson, Susan S., Ed.

    Noting that the health component of child care should be planned to respond to the developmental patterns of young children, this manual was developed as a reference and resource guide for program directors and teachers of young children and can be used as a textbook for adult learners. The manual, based on national standards and reviewed by…

  6. Parentification, Parental Alcoholism, and Academic Status among Young Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chase, Nancy D.; Wells, Marolyn C.; Deming, Mary P.

    1998-01-01

    Examines young adults (N=360) in terms of their perceptions of having assumed a parentified role in their family of origin as a function of academic status and classification as children of alcoholics or nonalcoholics. Low academic status participants reported having greater caretaking responsibilities and worries in their families. Children of…

  7. Grownups Are Not Afraid of Scary Stuff, but Kids Are: Young Children's and Adults' Reasoning about Children's, Infants', and Adults' Fears

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sayfan, Liat; Lagattuta, Kristin Hansen

    2008-01-01

    Three-, 5-, and 7-year-olds and adults (N = 64) listened to stories depicting 2 protagonists of different ages (infant and child or child and grownup) that encounter an entity that looks like a real (e.g., a snake) or an imaginary (e.g., a ghost) fear-inducing creature. Participants predicted and explained each protagonist's intensity of fear.…

  8. Just How Adult Is This Young Adult Book: Young Adult Books for the Junior High Readers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Decker, Charlotte

    1999-01-01

    Discusses young adult novels and presents a bibliography to acquaint librarians with titles and authors that are suitable for emerging young adult readers in grades five through nine. Subject categories include realistic fiction, in the news, historical fiction, short stories, legendary characters, mysteries, science fiction/fantasy/horror, and…

  9. Daytime sleepiness in young adults.

    PubMed

    Levine, B; Roehrs, T; Zorick, F; Roth, T

    1988-02-01

    The daytime sleepiness of a large sample (n = 129) of healthy, young (age 18-29) adults with no sleep-wake complaints was measured and compared with that of a sample (n = 47) of older (age 30-80) healthy, normal sleeping, subjects. Each spent 8 h in the laboratory on 1 night and received the Multiple Sleep Latency Test (MSLT) the following day. Sleep latency was measured at 1000, 1200, 1400, and 1600 h. Mean sleep latency ranged from 2 to 20 min within each group, but the shape of the distribution of latency between groups was different. The mean latency of young subjects (particularly college students) was shorter than that of the older subjects, with the differences occurring between the sleepiest 80% of each distribution. Among the college students, those with higher nocturnal sleep efficiencies (the previous night) were sleepier the following day than those with lower sleep efficiencies. The relation between nocturnal sleep efficiency and daytime sleepiness suggests that the increased sleepiness of average young adults is due to mild sleep restriction.

  10. How Does Homework "Work" for Young Children? Children's Accounts of Homework in Their Everyday Lives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farrell, Ann; Danby, Susan

    2015-01-01

    Homework is an increasing yet under-researched part of young children's everyday lives. Framed by the international agendas of starting strong and school accountability, homework in the lives of young children has been either overlooked or considered from the perspective of adults rather than from the perspective of children themselves. This paper…

  11. Neuropsychological status in children and young adults with benign and low-grade brain tumors treated prospectively with focal stereotactic conformal radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Jalali, Rakesh . E-mail: rjalali@medscape.com; Goswami, Savita; Sarin, Rajiv; More, Niteen; Siddha, Manish; Kamble, Rashmi

    2006-11-15

    Purpose: To present prospective neuropsychological data at baseline and follow-up in children and young adults with benign and low-grade gliomas treated with focal stereotactic conformal radiotherapy (SCRT). Methods and Materials: A total of 22 patients (age 4-25 years) with residual/progressive benign and low-grade brain tumors considered suitable for SCRT underwent detailed and in-depth neuropsychological and cognitive testing at baseline before SCRT. The test battery included measurement of age-adjusted intelligence quotients (IQs) and cognitive parameters of visual, spatial, visuomotor, and attention concentrations. Anxiety was measured using the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory for Children and Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale for patients >16 years old. Patients were treated with high-precision conformal radiotherapy under stereotactic guidance to a dose of 54 Gy in 30 fractions. All neuropsychological assessments were repeated at 6 and 24 months after SCRT completion and compared with the baseline values. Results: The baseline mean full-scale IQ before starting RT for patients <16 years was 82 (range, 33-105). For those >16 years, the corresponding value was 72 (range, 64-129). Of 20 evaluable patients, 14 (70%) had less than average IQs at baseline, even before starting radiotherapy. The verbal IQ, performance IQ, and full-scale IQ, as well as other cognitive scores, did not change significantly at the 6- and 24-month follow-up assessments for all patients. The memory quotient in older children and young adults was maintained at 6 and 24 months after SCRT, with a mean value of 93 and 100, respectively, compared with a mean baseline value of 81 before RT. The mean anxiety score in children measured by the C1 and C2 components of the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory for Children (STAIC) was 48 and 40, respectively, which improved significantly to mean values of 30 and 26, respectively, at the 24-month follow-up assessment (p = 0.005). The mean depression score in

  12. Attractiveness judgments and discrimination of mommies and grandmas: perceptual tuning for young adult faces.

    PubMed

    Short, Lindsey A; Mondloch, Catherine J; Hackland, Anne T

    2015-01-01

    Adults are more accurate in detecting deviations from normality in young adult faces than in older adult faces despite exhibiting comparable accuracy in discriminating both face ages. This deficit in judging the normality of older faces may be due to reliance on a face space optimized for the dimensions of young adult faces, perhaps because of early and continuous experience with young adult faces. Here we examined the emergence of this young adult face bias by testing 3- and 7-year-old children on a child-friendly version of the task used to test adults. In an attractiveness judgment task, children viewed young and older adult face pairs; each pair consisted of an unaltered face and a distorted face of the same identity. Children pointed to the prettiest face, which served as a measure of their sensitivity to the dimensions on which faces vary relative to a norm. To examine whether biases in the attractiveness task were specific to deficits in referencing a norm or extended to impaired discrimination, we tested children on a simultaneous match-to-sample task with the same stimuli. Both age groups were more accurate in judging the attractiveness of young faces relative to older faces; however, unlike adults, the young adult face bias extended to the match-to-sample task. These results suggest that by 3 years of age, children's perceptual system is more finely tuned for young adult faces than for older adult faces, which may support past findings of superior recognition for young adult faces.

  13. Utility of Echocardiography in the Assessment of Left Ventricular Diastolic Function and Restrictive Physiology in Children and Young Adults with Restrictive Cardiomyopathy: A Comparative Echocardiography-Catheterization Study.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Thomas D; Madueme, Peace C; Jefferies, John L; Michelfelder, Erik C; Towbin, Jeffrey A; Woo, Jessica G; Sahay, Rashmi D; King, Eileen C; Brown, Roberta; Moore, Ryan A; Grenier, Michelle A; Goldstein, Bryan H

    2017-02-01

    The aim of the study is to determine the utility of echocardiography in the assessment of diastolic function in children and young adults with restrictive cardiomyopathy (RCM). RCM is a rare disease with high mortality requiring frequent surveillance. Accurate, noninvasive echocardiographic measures of diastolic function may reduce the need for invasive catheterization. Single-center, prospective, observational study of pediatric and young adult RCM patients undergoing assessment of diastolic parameters by simultaneous transthoracic echocardiogram (TTE) and invasive catheterization. Twenty-one studies in 15 subjects [median (IQR) = 13.8 years (7.0-19.2), 60% female] were acquired with median left ventricular end-diastolic pressure (LVEDP) 21 (IQR 18-25) mmHg. TTE parameters of diastolic function, including pulmonary vein A wave duration (r s  = 0.79) and indexed left atrial volume (r s  = 0.49), demonstrated significant positive correlation, while mitral valve A (r s  = -0.44), lateral e' (r s  = -0.61) and lateral a' (r s  = -0.61) velocities showed significant negative correlation with LVEDP. Lateral a' velocity (≤0.042 m/s) and pulmonary vein A wave duration (≥156 m/s) both had sensitivity and specificity ≥80% for LVEDP ≥ 20 mmHg. In pediatric and young adult patients with RCM, lateral a' velocity and pulmonary vein A wave duration predicted elevated LVEDP with high sensitivity and specificity; however, due to technical limitations the latter was reliably measured in 12/21 patients. These noninvasive parameters may have utility in identifying patients that require further assessment with invasive testing. These findings require validation in a multicenter prospective cohort prior to widespread clinical implementation.

  14. Health and Nutrition Literacy and Adherence to Treatment in Children, Adolescents, and Young Adults With Chronic Kidney Disease and Hypertension, North Carolina, 2015

    PubMed Central

    Ferris, Maria; Rak, Eniko

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Adherence to treatment and dietary restrictions is important for health outcomes of patients with chronic/end-stage kidney disease and hypertension. The relationship of adherence with nutritional and health literacy in children, adolescents, and young adults is not well understood. The current study examined the relationship of health literacy, nutrition knowledge, nutrition knowledge–behavior concordance, and medication adherence in a sample of children and young people with chronic/end-stage kidney disease and hypertension. Methods We enrolled 74 patients (aged 7–29 y) with a diagnosis of chronic/end-stage kidney disease and hypertension from the University of North Carolina Kidney Center. Participants completed instruments of nutrition literacy (Disease-Specific Nutrition Knowledge Test), health literacy (Newest Vital Sign), nutrition behavior (Nutrition Knowledge–Behavior Concordance Scale), and medication adherence (Morisky Medication Adherence Scale). Linear and binary logistic regressions were used to test the associations. Results In univariate comparisons, nutrition knowledge was significantly higher in people with adequate health literacy. Medication adherence was related to nutrition knowledge and nutrition knowledge–behavior concordance. Multivariate regression models demonstrated that knowledge of disease-specific nutrition restrictions did not significantly predict nutrition knowledge–behavior concordance scores. In logistic regression, knowledge of nutrition restrictions did not significantly predict medication adherence. Lastly, health literacy and nutrition knowledge–behavior concordance were significant predictors of medication adherence. Conclusion Nutrition knowledge and health literacy skills are positively associated. Nutrition knowledge, health literacy, and nutrition knowledge–behavior concordance are positively related to medication adherence. Future research should focus on additional factors that may predict

  15. Coping efforts and resilience among adult children who grew up with a parent with young-onset dementia: a qualitative follow-up study

    PubMed Central

    Johannessen, Aud; Engedal, Knut; Thorsen, Kirsten

    2016-01-01

    Background It is estimated that one in four persons with young-onset dementia (YOD) (<65 years old) has children younger than 18 years old at the onset of the dementia. These children experience a childhood different from what is expected. Adult children of parents with YOD are seldom addressed in research, and the impact of the dementia on the children's development over time has rarely been studied. Aim The goal of this study was to explore how adult children experienced the influence of their parents’ dementia on their own development during adolescence; what coping efforts, strategies, and resources they employed; and how they evaluated the most recent changes in their life situation. Method A follow-up, grounded theory approach in two phases was used. Qualitative interviews with 14 informants (18–30 years of age) were conducted in 2014 and one year later, in 2015. Findings Nearly all the informants expressed that their emotional well-being and their life situation were better at the second interview compared to the time of dementia onset in their parents. To overcome the difficulties of being a child of a parent with YOD, they used different instrumental, cognitive, and emotional coping strategies, subsumed analytically under the concept detachment. This category covers three subcategories of coping strategies: moving apart, greater personal distance, and calmer emotional reactions. Another category, resilience, designates combinations of the coping strategies. Vital for the development of coping resources and resilience was the need the informants had for social support—for people they saw who listened to them and responded to their needs. Conclusion Most of the informants reported that they experienced a better life situation and less emotional stress over time as their parent's dementia progressed. They developed better coping capacities and greater resilience. Vital for the development of coping resources and resilience was the need the informants

  16. Cerebral Palsy Checklist: Teens & Young Adult (13 to 21)

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2-Year-Old Cerebral Palsy Checklist: Teens & Young Adults KidsHealth > For Parents > Cerebral Palsy Checklist: Teens & Young ... plan healthy meals. continue Step 3: Explore Young-Adult Education Young adults with cerebral palsy are entitled ...

  17. Young adults' relations with grandparents following recent parental divorce.

    PubMed

    Cooney, T M; Smith, L A

    1996-03-01

    This study employed a large survey of young adults to consider the association between recent parental divorce and intergenerational solidarity between adult grandchildren and their grandparents. The results indicate no significant association between parental divorce and young adults' reports of affective, associational, or functional solidarity in relation to either maternal or paternal grandparents. Adult grandchildren from divorced families, however, were more likely than those from intact families to initiate contacts with their grandparents on their own, and to see their paternal grandparents without their father accompanying them. We conclude that parental divorce does not influence adult grandchild-grandparent relations because, at least in part, adult grandchildren are less dependent than young children on the middle-generation parent to facilitate this relationship.

  18. Developmental aspects of automatic word processing: language lateralization of early ERP components in children, young adults and middle-aged subjects.

    PubMed

    Spironelli, Chiara; Angrilli, Alessandro

    2009-01-01

    Reading words elicits a very early evoked potential termed "recognition potential" with a latency of about 150 ms and clearly located in left posterior regions. A review of the current literature indicates that N150 marks the automatic lexical classification of a word, is relatively independent of the task, and is followed by a later negative and more anterior component which is sensitive to the task. However, from the literature it is not clear whether the left lateralization of the neural networks involved in word recognition changes with age and experience, and how this lateralization is related with behavioral performance. To this aim, based on a previously validated paradigm [Spironelli, C., Angrilli, A., 2006. Language lateralization in Phonological, Semantic and Orthographic tasks: a slow evoked potential study. Behavioral Brain Research 175, 296-304; Spironelli, C., Angrilli, A., 2007. Influence of Phonological, Semantic and Orthographic tasks on the early linguistic components N150 and N350. International Journal of Psychophysiology 64, 190-198], we ran an experiment on three samples of subjects, 28 children (mean: 10 years), 22 young adults (23 years) and 20 middle-aged subjects (59 years). Subjects had to read the same sample of words in three blocked tasks, Orthographic, Phonological and Semantic, while EEG was recorded from 38 scalp locations. Analysis performed on N150 and four regions of interest/quadrants revealed typical significant left posterior negativity in young and aged subjects, but reversed lateralization and greater right negativity in children compared with the two adult groups. Analysis of the later N350 revealed a significant three-way group x laterality x task interaction, showing greater left negativity on the Phonological task only in the two adult groups, and a bilateral component in children. Results indicate that the functional lateralization of linguistic neural networks involved in automatic word recognition and in phonological

  19. Parasympathetic reactivity and disruptive behavior problems in young children during interactions with their mothers and other adults: A preliminary investigation.

    PubMed

    Cooper-Vince, Christine E; DeSerisy, Mariah; Cornacchio, Danielle; Sanchez, Amanda; McLaughlin, Katie A; Comer, Jonathan S

    2017-03-06

    Parasympathetic nervous system influences on cardiac functions-commonly indexed via respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA)-are central to self-regulation. RSA suppression during challenging emotional and cognitive tasks is often associated with better emotional and behavioral functioning in preschoolers. However, the links between RSA suppression and child behavior across various challenging interpersonal contexts remains unclear. The present study experimentally evaluated the relationship between child RSA reactivity to adult (mother vs. study staff) direction and disruptive behavior problems in children ages 3-8 with varying levels of disruptive behavior problems (N = 43). Reduced RSA suppression in the context of mothers' play-based direction was associated with more severe child behavior problems. In contrast, RSA suppression in the context of staff play-based direction was not associated with behavior problems. Findings suggest that the association between RSA suppression and child behavior problems may vary by social context (i.e., mother vs. other adult direction-givers). Findings are discussed in regard to RSA as an indicator of autonomic self-regulation that has relevance to child disruptive behavior problems.

  20. Young Children's Notations for Fractions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brizuela, Barbara M.

    2006-01-01

    This paper focuses on the kinds of notations young children make for fractional numbers. The extant literature in the area of fractional numbers acknowledges children's difficulties in conceptualizing fractional numbers. Some of the research suggests possibly delaying an introduction to conventional notations for algorithms and fractions until…

  1. Teaching Chess to Young Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bankauskas, Deborah

    2000-01-01

    Presents suggestions for teaching chess to young children as part of the problem-solving component of a kindergarten mathematics curriculum. Discusses the introduction of pairs of chess characters, playing challenge games with teachers to enhance skill development, and writing down the rules of the game. Notes that children's problem-solving and…

  2. Interpreting Literature for Young Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Post, Robert M.

    1983-01-01

    Looks at the performance of children's literature by college students with respect to the value of reading to young children, selecting and performing the literature, purposes of a unit or course in the oral interpretation of this genre of literature, and some practical performance considerations. (PD)

  3. Young Children's Influence in Preschool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emilson, Anette

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate how very young children can influence their daily life in preschool, in relation to teacher control. The specific questions studied were: What opportunities do the children have to make their own choices and take the initiative? How does teacher control manifest itself? What form do permanent…

  4. Supporting Young Children with Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hebbeler, Kathleen; Spiker, Donna

    2016-01-01

    What do we know about young children with delays and disabilities, and how can we help them succeed in prekindergarten through third grade? To begin with, Kathleen Hebbeler and Donna Spiker write, identifying children with delays and disabilities to receive specialized services under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act poses several…

  5. Grief: Helping Young Children Cope

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, Frances B.

    2008-01-01

    In their role as caregivers supporting the children they teach, it is important for teachers to understand the grieving process and recognize symptoms of grief. The author explains Elisabeth Kubler-Ross's five stages of grief and offers 10 classroom strategies to help young children cope with their feelings.

  6. Creating Environments for Young Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanoff, Henry

    The planning and design of child care centers has been undertaken without sufficient knowledge of children's spatial behavior, resulting in centers not providing appropriate physical conditions for young children's developmental needs. Research suggests that physical environment is important in supporting child development. Child care settings…

  7. Stravinsky's "Firebird" and Young Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roebuck, Edith

    1999-01-01

    Describes how the young children of the Early Learning Center in the Chelsea (Massachusetts) school district learned about Igor Stravinsky's ballet suite, "The Firebird." Explains that children in three kindergarten classes depicted the ballet's characters in a participatory performance. Highlights some qualitative observations. (CMK)

  8. Observing Young Children's Creative Thinking: Engagement, Involvement and Persistence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robson, Sue; Rowe, Victoria

    2012-01-01

    This paper looks at young children's creative thinking as inferred through observations of their activities. A total of 52 episodes of child-initiated and adult-initiated activities in 3- to 4-year-olds in an English Children's Centre were analysed using the Analysing Children's Creative Thinking (ACCT) Framework. Results showed that activities…

  9. Personality Profiles of Physically Impaired Young Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richman, Lynn C.; Harper, Dennis C.

    1980-01-01

    Different forms of chronic observable disability may have differing impacts on adult personality adjustment. Young adults with cleft lip/palate display fewer personality adjustment problems than those with orthopedic impairment. (Author)

  10. Anthropometrics provide a better estimate of urinary organic acid anion excretion than a dietary mineral intake-based estimate in children, adolescents, and young adults.

    PubMed

    Berkemeyer, Shoma; Remer, Thomas

    2006-05-01

    The role of elevated net endogenous acid production (NEAP) in the causation of osteoporosis, muscle wasting, and kidney stones is currently under discussion. The aim of this study was to examine whether urinary organic acid anion excretion, a major component of NEAP, is predicted primarily by anthropometric- (OA(anthro)) or diet- (OA(diet)) based estimates. Dietary intakes, anthropometric data, and 24-h urinary excretion rates of organic acids (24h-OA(urine)) were determined cross sectionally in healthy children (6-7 y; n = 217), adolescents (13-14 y; n = 91), and young adults (18-22 y; n = 82). OA(anthro) was computed from body surface area and OA(diet) calculated using a published algorithm based on dietary intakes of mineral anions and cations. There was a significant increase (P < 0.0001) in 24h-OA(urine) across the age groups that was no longer discernible after correction for body surface area. In almost all sex-stratified subsamples, OA(anthro) had a higher correlation with 24h-OA(urine) than OA(diet). Multiple regression analyses, using energy-corrected diet variables, revealed that OA(anthro) was consistently the primary predictor of 24h-OA(urine) (R(2) varying from 0.15 to 0.39) and dietary fat and protein were sporadic predictors. In accordance with the observed age independency of 24h-OA(urine) after body surface area correction, our findings indicate that OA(anthro) is a better estimate of 24h-OA(urine) in healthy children, adolescents, and young adults than OA(diet). This further confirms that the (principally diet-dependent) NEAP comprises a component, i.e., organic acid anions, that is reasonably predictable by anthropometrics. Consequently, the other component, i.e., the potential renal acid load, appears to be the primary parameter that characterizes the diet-induced acid load.

  11. Influence of intranasal steroids during the grass pollen season on bronchial responsiveness in children and young adults with asthma and hay fever

    PubMed Central

    Thio, B; Slingerland, G; Fredriks, A; Nagelkerke, A; Scheeren, R; Neijens, H; Roord, J; Dankert-Roelse, J

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND—It has been reported that intranasal corticosteroids can influence bronchial hyperresponsiveness (BHR) in asthmatic subjects with seasonal rhinitis. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the effect of intranasal fluticasone propionate and beclomethasone dipropionate on BHR and bronchial calibre (forced expiratory volume in one second, FEV1) in children and young adults with seasonal rhinitis and mild asthma during two consecutive grass pollen seasons.
METHODS—In the first pollen season 25 patients aged 8-28 years were included in a double blind, placebo controlled study. The active treatment group used fluticasone aqueous spray 200 µg once daily. In the second pollen season 72 patients aged 8-28 years participated in a double blind, placebo controlled study of a similar design to that of the previous year except that an additional treatment group of patients using beclomethasone 200 µg twice daily was included. FEV1 was measured before and after three and six weeks of treatment; BHR to methacholine (PD20) was measured before and after six weeks of treatment.
RESULTS—In the first season the mean (SD) logPD20 of the patients decreased significantly both in the fluticasone group (from 2.43(0.8) µg to 1.86 (0.85) µg) and in the placebo group (from 2.41(0.42) µg to 1.87 (0.78) µg) without any intergroup difference in the change in logPD20. In the second pollen season the mean logPD20 in the fluticasone, beclomethasone, and placebo groups did not change significantly.
CONCLUSIONS—Intranasal steroids did not influence BHR during two grass pollen seasons in children and young adults with seasonal rhinitis and mild asthma.

 PMID:10992533

  12. Evaluation of a combined blood glucose monitoring and gaming system (Didget®) for motivation in children, adolescents, and young adults with type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Klingensmith, Georgeanna J; Aisenberg, Javier; Kaufman, Francine; Halvorson, Mary; Cruz, Eric; Riordan, Mary Ellen; Varma, Chandrasekhar; Pardo, Scott; Viggiani, Maria T; Wallace, Jane F; Schachner, Holly C; Bailey, Timothy

    2013-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the performance and acceptability of a blood glucose meter coupled with a gaming system for children, adolescents, and young adults with type 1 diabetes. During an in-clinic visit, duplicate blood samples were tested by subjects (N = 147; aged 5-24 yr) and health care providers (HCPs) to evaluate the accuracy and precision of the Didget® system. Subjects' meter results were compared against Yellow Springs Instruments (YSI) reference results and HCP results using least squares regression and error grid analyses. Precision was measured by average within-subject and within-HCP coefficient of variation (CV). During the home-use component of this study, subjects (n = 58) tested their blood glucose at least two to three times daily for 3-5 d to evaluate routine use of the system. Subjects' meter results showed significant correlations with both YSI (r(2) = 0.94; p < 0.001 for regression slope) and HCP results (r(2) = 0.96; p < 0.001). Average within-subject and within-HCP CVs were 5.9 and 7.2%, respectively. Overall satisfaction was assessed by subjects, their parents or guardians, and HCP surveys. Subject satisfaction with the Didget® system was good to excellent; most subjects found the system easy to use, motivating, and helpful for building good blood glucose monitoring habits. Most HCPs agreed that the system fulfilled a need in diabetes management. In conclusion, the Didget® system was precise and clinically accurate in the hands of children, adolescents, and young adults with type 1 diabetes.

  13. Rate of change in adiposity and its relationship to concomitant changes in cardiovascular risk variables among biracial (black-white) children and young adults: The Bogalusa Heart Study.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, S R; Myers, L; Berenson, G S

    2001-03-01

    To assess the annual rate of change in adiposity and its relationship to concomitant changes in cardiovascular risk variables during childhood and young adulthood, serial data on black and white children (n = 3,459; initial and follow-up mean age, 8.1 and 14.4 years) and young adults (n = 1,263; initial and follow-up mean age, 22.5 and 30.9 years) enrolled in the Bogalusa Heart Study were examined. Body mass index (BMI) and sum of subscapular and triceps skinfolds were used as indicators of adiposity. In addition, measurements were made of systolic and diastolic blood pressure and fasting levels of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, triglycerides, insulin, and glucose. Annualized rate of change for each variable was estimated. The rate of increase in adiposity was significantly more pronounced during childhood versus adulthood. Race difference (blacks > whites) in the rate of increase in adiposity was seen only among females. Females, black females in particular, displayed greater rate of increase in adiposity than males. In a multivariate analysis, the rate of increase in adiposity was related independently of baseline age and baseline adiposity to adverse changes in measured cardiovascular risk variables, except glucose. Many of these associations were modulated significantly by race, sex, and age group. The impact was relatively greater for blood pressure and LDL cholesterol in adults and for triglycerides in children. The changes in blood pressure, LDL cholesterol, and HDL cholesterol were greater in whites, while the rate of increase in insulin was greater in blacks. Females displayed greater changes in blood pressure, HDL cholesterol, and insulin. On the other hand, the rate of increase in triglycerides was greater in males. These results indicate that increases in adiposity regardless of initial status of body fatness alter cardiovascular risk variables towards increased risk beginning in childhood, and

  14. Reading Their World: The Young Adult Novel in the Classroom. Second Edition. Young Adult Literature Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monseau, Virginia R., Ed.; Salvner, Gary M., Ed.

    This book was born of a desire to provide students, teachers, and all interested readers with a collection of essays that address issues of selection, pedagogy, and worth of the young adult novel. A primary purpose of the book is to enter the world of young adult readers through a literary form they know well, the modern young adult novel. Another…

  15. Age-related trends of inhibitory control in Stroop-like big-small task in 3 to 12-year-old children and young adults.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Yoshifumi; Okuzumi, Hideyuki; Kokubun, Mitsuru

    2014-01-01

    Inhibitory control is the ability to suppress competing, dominant, automatic, or prepotent cognitive processing at perceptual, intermediate, and output stages. Inhibitory control is a key cognitive function of typical and atypical child development. This study examined age-related trends of Stroop-like interference in 3 to 12-year-old children and young adults by administration of a computerized Stroop-like big-small task with reduced working memory demand. This task used a set of pictures displaying a big and small circle in black and included the same condition and the opposite condition. In the same condition, each participant was instructed to say "big" when viewing the big circle and to say "small" when viewing the small circle. In the opposite condition, each participant was instructed to say "small" when viewing the big circle and to say "big" when viewing the small circle. The opposite condition required participants to inhibit the prepotent response of saying the same, a familiar response to a perceptual stimulus. The results of this study showed that Stroop-like interference decreased markedly in children in terms of error rates and correct response time. There was no deterioration of performance occurring between the early trials and the late trials in the sessions of the day-night task. Moreover, pretest failure rate was relatively low in this study. The Stroop-like big-small task is a useful tool to assess the development of inhibitory control in young children in that the task is easy to understand and has small working memory demand.

  16. Maternal Punitive Reactions to Children's Negative Emotions and Young Adult Trait Anger: Effect of Gender and Emotional Closeness

    PubMed Central

    Perry, Nicole B.; Cavanaugh, Alyson; Dunbar, Angel; Leerkes, Esther M.

    2015-01-01

    The current study tested whether young adult’s recollected reports of their mother’s punitive reactions to their negative emotions in childhood predicted anger expression in young adulthood and whether emotional closeness weakens this association. Further, a three-way interaction was tested to examine whether emotional closeness is a stronger protective factor for young women than for young men. Results revealed a significant three-way interaction (gender X emotional closeness X maternal punitive reactions). For young men, maternal punitive reactions to negative emotions were directly associated with increased anger expressions. Maternal punitive reactions to young women’s negative emotions in childhood were associated with increased anger in adulthood only when they reported low maternal emotional closeness. Findings suggest that maternal emotional closeness may serve as a buffer against the negative effects of maternal punitive reactions for women’s anger expression in young adulthood. PMID:26568644

  17. Shadows: Young Taiwanese Children's Views and Understanding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Shu-Min

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine young children's views about shadows. Young children hear references to or are involved in many scientific experiences in their everyday lives, and shadows are a part of children's everyday experiences. Young children may have constructed their knowledge about shadows through their daily experiences.…

  18. Efficacy of 68Ga-DOTATOC Positron Emission Tomography (PET) CT in Children and Young Adults With Brain Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-07

    Acoustic Schwannoma; Adult Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Adult Anaplastic Ependymoma; Adult Anaplastic Meningioma; Adult Anaplastic Oligodendroglioma; Adult Brain Stem Glioma; Adult Choroid Plexus Tumor; Adult Craniopharyngioma; Adult Diffuse Astrocytoma; Adult Ependymoblastoma; Adult Ependymoma; Adult Giant Cell Glioblastoma; Adult Glioblastoma; Adult Gliosarcoma; Adult Grade I Meningioma; Adult Grade II Meningioma; Adult Medulloblastoma; Adult Meningeal Hemangiopericytoma; Adult Mixed Glioma; Adult Myxopapillary Ependymoma; Adult Oligodendroglioma; Adult Papillary Meningioma; Adult Pilocytic Astrocytoma; Adult Pineal Gland Astrocytoma; Adult Pineoblastoma; Adult Pineocytoma; Adult Subependymal Giant Cell Astrocytoma; Adult Subependymoma; Adult Supratentorial Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor (PNET); Childhood Choroid Plexus Tumor; Childhood Craniopharyngioma; Childhood Ependymoblastoma; Childhood Grade I Meningioma; Childhood Grade II Meningioma; Childhood Grade III Meningioma; Childhood High-grade Cerebellar Astrocytoma; Childhood High-grade Cerebral Astrocytoma; Childhood Infratentorial Ependymoma; Childhood Low-grade Cerebellar Astrocytoma; Childhood Low-grade Cerebral Astrocytoma; Childhood Medulloepithelioma; Childhood Supratentorial Ependymoma; Meningeal Melanocytoma; Newly Diagnosed Childhood Ependymoma; Recurrent Adult Brain Tumor; Recurrent Childhood Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Anaplastic Oligoastrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Anaplastic Oligodendroglioma; Recurrent Childhood Brain Stem Glioma; Recurrent Childhood Cerebellar Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Cerebral Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Diffuse Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Ependymoma; Recurrent Childhood Fibrillary Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Gemistocytic Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Giant Cell Glioblastoma; Recurrent Childhood Glioblastoma; Recurrent Childhood Gliomatosis Cerebri; Recurrent Childhood Gliosarcoma; Recurrent Childhood Medulloblastoma; Recurrent Childhood

  19. Young children's understanding of joint commitments.

    PubMed

    Gräfenhain, Maria; Behne, Tanya; Carpenter, Malinda; Tomasello, Michael

    2009-09-01

    When adults make a joint commitment to act together, they feel an obligation to their partner. In 2 studies, the authors investigated whether young children also understand joint commitments to act together. In the first study, when an adult orchestrated with the child a joint commitment to play a game together and then broke off from their joint activity, 3-year-olds (n = 24) reacted to the break significantly more often (e.g., by trying to re-engage her or waiting for her to restart playing) than when she simply joined the child's individual activity unbidden. Two-year-olds (n = 24) did not differentiate between these 2 situations. In the second study, 3- and 4-year-old children (n = 30 at each age) were enticed away from their activity with an adult. Children acknowledged their leaving (e.g., by looking to the adult or handing her the object they had been playing with) significantly more often when they had made a joint commitment to act together than when they had not. By 3 years of age, children thus recognize both when an adult is committed and when they themselves are committed to a joint activity.

  20. The Relevance of Young Adult Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stallworth, B. Joyce

    2006-01-01

    Although young adult literature is often recommended as a reading bridge to the classics, Stallworth insists that the genre deserves a prominent place in the middle school canon in its own right. She describes several examples from middle school classrooms of how young adult novels can enhance tweens' "life literacy" by both helping them develop…

  1. Developing Public Library Services for Young Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Jim

    From November 1992 through May 1993, a series of staff development and training workshops were presented as part of the project, "Developing Library Services for Young Adults." The workshops included: "Redirecting Young Adult Behavior" (Glenna O. Auxier & Bob Perchalski); "The Youth Services Librarian and the Law"…

  2. Multiple Voices in Young Adult Novels.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Capan, Mary Ann

    A stylistic device that has been used by many authors over the years is to alternate the point of view between two or more characters. Authors of young adult novels choose this technique of multiple narrative voices for a variety of reasons. Multiple voices offer a challenge to many young adult readers because the point of view is much more…

  3. Young and Older Adults' Reading of Distracters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kemper, Susan; Mcdowd, Joan; Metcalf, Kim; Liu, Chiung-Ju

    2008-01-01

    Eye-tracking technology was employed to examine young and older adults' performance in the reading with distraction paradigm. Distracters of 1, 2, and 4 words that formed meaningful phrases were used. There were marked age differences in fixation patterns. Young adults' fixations to the distracters and targets increased with distracter length.…

  4. Film and the Young Adult Novel.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foster, Harold M.

    1994-01-01

    Discusses films based on young adult novels and why they are often considered failures. Describes various films about young adults and their problems that have proven to be artistic successes. Gives close attention to film versions of S. E. Hinton's novels and of Robert Cormier's "The Chocolate War." (HB)

  5. Literature for Today's Young Adults. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nilsen, Alleen Pace; Donelson, Kenneth L.

    Reflecting the rapid changes that have occurred in young adult literature, this second edition provides teachers with the history and background needed to stay current with what adolescents are reading and how such literature can be taught. The book is organized much as a literature course is taught: first, an introduction to young adults and…

  6. Best Books for Young Adults. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Betty

    This book presents an annotated listing of the Young Adult Library Services Association's "Best Books for Young Adults" (BBYA) from 1966-99. Selected books are listed in topical bibliographies under the following subjects: Too Good To Miss; Adventure; Animals; Family; Fantasy; Friendship; Historical Fiction; The Holocaust; Humor;…

  7. Adults' responsiveness to children's facial expressions.

    PubMed

    Aradhye, Chinmay; Vonk, Jennifer; Arida, Danielle

    2015-07-01

    We investigated the effect of young children's (hereafter children's) facial expressions on adult responsiveness. In Study 1, 131 undergraduate students from a midsized university in the midwestern United States rated children's images and videos with smiling, crying, or neutral expressions on cuteness, likelihood to adopt, and participants' experienced distress. Looking times at images and videos along with perception of cuteness, likelihood to adopt, and experienced distress using 10-point Likert scales were measured. Videos of smiling children were rated as cuter and more likely to be adopted and were viewed for longer times compared with videos of crying children, which evoked more distress. In Study 2, we recorded responses from 101 of the same participants in an online survey measuring gender role identity, empathy, and perspective taking. Higher levels of femininity (as measured by Bem's Sex Role Inventory) predicted higher "likely to adopt" ratings for crying images. These findings indicate that adult perception of children and motivation to nurture are affected by both children's facial expressions and adult characteristics and build on existing literature to demonstrate that children may use expressions to manipulate the motivations of even non-kin adults to direct attention toward and perhaps nurture young children.

  8. Young Children's Haptic Exploratory Procedures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalagher, Hilary; Jones, Susan S.

    2011-01-01

    Adults vary their haptic exploratory behavior reliably with variation both in the sensory input and in the task goals. Little is known about the development of these connections between perceptual goals and exploratory behaviors. A total of 36 children ages 3, 4, and 5 years and 20 adults completed a haptic intramodal match-to-sample task.…

  9. Marriage and mental health among young adults.

    PubMed

    Uecker, Jeremy E

    2012-03-01

    Marriage is widely thought to confer mental health benefits, but little is known about how this apparent benefit may vary across the life course. Early marriage, which is nonnormative, could have no, or even negative, mental health consequences for young adults. Using survey data from waves 1 and 3 of the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (n = 11,695), I find that married young adults exhibit levels of psychological distress that are similar to those of young adults in any kind of romantic relationship. Married and engaged young adults also report lower frequency of drunkenness than those who are not in a romantic relationship. Married young adults, especially those who first married at ages 22 to 26, report higher life satisfaction than those in other type of romantic relationships,those in no romantic relationship, and those who married prior to age 22. Explanations for these findings are examined, and their implications are discussed.

  10. Feeding Young Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poulton, Suzanne; Sexton, David

    1996-01-01

    Presents a digest of basic developmental information about children's feeding skills and behaviors, and gives general feeding recommendations. Also addresses requirements for feeding children with developmental disabilities and chronic medical conditions for which adapted environments or monitored nutrient intake may be necessary. (ET)

  11. Sexuality and Young Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Honig, Alice Sterling

    2000-01-01

    Describes normal aspects of sexuality during the early years, including masturbation and children's fanciful sexual ideas. Presents inappropriately mature sexual knowledge as a danger sign of abuse. Discusses whether and what teachers/caregivers should tell children about sexuality, and notes the importance of teaching staff about sexual identity…

  12. Abuse of Prescription (Rx) Drugs Affects Young Adults Most

    MedlinePlus

    ... Affects Young Adults Most Abuse of Prescription (Rx) Drugs Affects Young Adults Most Email Facebook Twitter Text Description of Infographic Young adults (age 18 to 25) are the biggest abusers of prescription (Rx) opioid pain relievers, ADHD stimulants, ...

  13. Growing-Related Changes in Arterial Properties of Healthy Children, Adolescents, and Young Adults Nonexposed to Cardiovascular Risk Factors: Analysis of Gender-Related Differences

    PubMed Central

    Curcio, S.; García-Espinosa, V.; Arana, M.; Farro, I.; Chiesa, P.; Giachetto, G.; Zócalo, Y.; Bia, D.

    2016-01-01

    The aims of our work were to determine normal aging rates for structural and functional arterial parameters in healthy children, adolescents, and young adults and to identify gender-related differences in these aging rates. Methods. 161 subjects (mean: 15 years (range: 4–28 years), 69 females) were studied. Subjects included had no congenital or chronic diseases, nor had they been previously exposed to traditional cardiovascular risk factors. Arterial parameters assessed were (1) central blood pressure (BP) and aortic pulse wave analysis, (2) arterial local (pressure-strain elastic modulus) and regional (pulse wave velocity, PWV) stiffness, and (3) arterial diameters and carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT). Simple linear regression models (age as the independent variable) were obtained for all the parameters and the resulting rates of change were compared between genders. Results. No gender-related differences were found in mean values of arterial structural and functional parameters in prepubertal ages (4–8 years), but they started to appear at ~15 years. Boys showed a greater rate of change for central systolic BP, central pulse pressure, CIMT, and carotid-femoral PWV. Conclusion. Gender-related differences in arterial characteristics of adults can be explained on the basis of different growing-related patterns between boys and girls, with no existing differences in prepubertal ages. PMID:26989504

  14. Kluver Bucy syndrome in young children.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, S; Singh, M N; Pandey, N

    1998-12-01

    For the first time, Kluver Bucy syndrome (KBS) is described in young children who had no environmental learning of sex. The syndrome has so far been noted only in adults after bilateral temporal lobe affection. A few of its components, especially the hypersexuality and hypermetamorphosis, are likely to manifest differently in very young children. Seven patients in the pre-pubertal age group, who developed KBS as a post-encephalitic sequelae, are described. The patients, 2.5-6 years old, suffered from acute herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE) at 10 months-5.5 years of age and developed KBS on regaining consciousness and ambulation. Altered emotional behaviour, changes in dietary habits, hyperorality and hypersexuality were present in all, while psychic blindness and hypermetamorphosis were noted in a few of the patients. All showed marked indifference and lack of emotional attachment towards their close relatives. Apathy and easy distractibility were rare. Bulimia and strong urge to put non-food items into the mouth were common. Hypersexuality manifested as frequent holding of genitals, intermittent pelvic thrusting movements and rubbing of genitals to the bed on lying prone. Due to lack of environmental learning of sex and also, due to emotional and physical dependence on parents, the manifestations in young children showed modification over those of adults.

  15. Motorsports Involvement among Adolescents and Young Adults with Childhood ADHD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wymbs, Brian T.; Molina, Brooke S. G.; Belendiuk, Katherine A.; Pedersen, Sarah L.; Walther, Christine A. P.; Cheong, Jee Won; McGinley, James S.; Marshal, Michael P.; Gnagy, Elizabeth M.; Pelham, William E.

    2013-01-01

    Although children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are at risk for impulsive, health-endangering behavior, few studies have examined nonsubstance, use-related risk-taking behaviors. This study examined whether adolescents and young adults with ADHD histories were more likely than those without ADHD histories to report frequent…

  16. Not so Fast: Reassessing Gender Essentialism in Young Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eidson, R. Cole; Coley, John D.

    2014-01-01

    We examined young adults' essentialist reasoning about gender categories. Previous developmental results suggest that until age 9 or 10, children show marked essentialist reasoning about gender, but this disappears by early adulthood. In contrast, results from social cognition suggest that essentialist thinking about social categories persists…

  17. Young adult palliative care: challenges and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Clark, Jennifer K; Fasciano, Karen

    2015-02-01

    Young adulthood is a time of immense growth and possibilities. As a result, it is also a time when serious illness can have profound effects. This review examines the current data pertinent to young adult palliative care and discusses the challenges and opportunities where palliative medicine can enhance the care provided to this growing and vulnerable population. From the data, 2 primary themes emerged (1) ongoing young adult development not only generates unique biologic disease burdens and clinical treatment options but also requires frequent assessment and promotion and (2) binary health care systems often leave young adults without access to developmentally appropriate health care. Given its interdisciplinary approach, palliative care is uniquely poised to address the challenges known to caring for the seriously ill young adult.

  18. Moral Development: How Adults Reason With Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olejnik, Anthony B.

    The interrelationships among young adults' levels of moral reasoning, their preferred discipline style, and how they reason with children on moral issues was investigated. After initial screening, 25 males and 25 females completed a test on defining issues of moral judgement. Then 20 subjects were classified at the high principled level, and 30 at…

  19. Mathematical Modelling with Young Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    English, Lyn D.; Watters, James J.

    2004-01-01

    This paper addresses the first year of a three-year, longitudinal study which introduces mathematical modeling to young children and provides professional development for their teachers. Four classes of third-graders (8 years of age) and their teachers participated in the first year of the program, which involved several preliminary modeling…

  20. Fact Sheet: Vulnerable Young Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, Evelyn, Comp.; Goode, Sue, Comp.

    2008-01-01

    This fact sheet provides data on infants, toddlers and young children who are experiencing high stress as a result of a number of risk factors specifically identified in the Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act of 2004 (IDEA 2004), including substantiated abuse or neglect, foster care placement, homelessness, exposure to family…

  1. Sex Education with Young Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koblinsky, Sally; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Discusses guidelines (developed by the Oregon State University Early Childhood Sex Education Project) for developing teacher-parent cooperation in providing sex education to young children. The guidelines concern how to talk about body differences and body functions; how to deal with masturbation, sex play and obscene language; and how to involve…

  2. Writing in Young Deaf Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Cheri; Mayer, Connie

    2015-01-01

    The authors conducted an integrative review of the research literature on the writing development, writing instruction, and writing assessment of young deaf children ages 3 to 8 years (or preschool through third grade) published between 1990 and 2012. A total of 17 studies were identified that met inclusion criteria. The analysis examined research…

  3. Promoting Creativity in Young Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Honig, Alice Sterling

    This paper discusses creativity in young children and what teachers can do to support and promote it. Topics addressed in the paper include: (1) teacher interest in promoting creativity; (2) defining creativity; (3) creativity in the socioemotional domain; (4) the relationship between creativity and empathy for others; (4) bibliotherapy; (5)…

  4. Strokes in young adults: epidemiology and prevention.

    PubMed

    Smajlović, Dževdet

    2015-01-01

    Strokes in young adults are reported as being uncommon, comprising 10%-15% of all stroke patients. However, compared with stroke in older adults, stroke in the young has a disproportionately large economic impact by leaving victims disabled before their most productive years. Recent publications report an increased incidence of stroke in young adults. This is important given the fact that younger stroke patients have a clearly increased risk of death compared with the general population. The prevalence of standard modifiable vascular risk factors in young stroke patients is different from that in older patients. Modifiable risk factors for stroke, such as dyslipidemia, smoking, and hypertension, are highly prevalent in the young stroke population, with no significant difference in geographic, climatic, nutritional, lifestyle, or genetic diversity. The list of potential stroke etiologies among young adults is extensive. Strokes of undetermined and of other determined etiology are the most common types among young patients according to TOAST (Trial of Org 10172 in Acute Stroke Treatment) criteria. Prevention is the primary treatment strategy aimed at reducing morbidity and mortality related to stroke. Therefore, primary prevention is very important with regard to stroke in young adults, and aggressive treatment of risk factors for stroke, such as hypertension, smoking, and dyslipidemia, is essential. The best form of secondary stroke prevention is directed toward stroke etiology as well as treatment of additional risk factors. However, there is a lack of specific recommendations and guidelines for stroke management in young adults. In conclusion, strokes in young adults are a major public health problem and further research, with standardized methodology, is needed in order to give us more precise epidemiologic data. Given the increasing incidence of stroke in the young, there is an objective need for more research in order to reduce this burden.

  5. Effective Smallpox Immunization of Young Adults.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-07-01

    Immunization of Young Adults by Abram S. Benenson, M.D. and Irving A. Phillips University of Kentucky College of Medicine Department of Community Medicine...sPRINB.fELD, VA. 22161 U.SLI WUmmn * cIn*= Umb Tech" lmof to. Wri AD-A027 210 EFFECTIVE SMALLPOX IMMUNIZATION OF YOUNG ADULTS KENTUCKY UNIVERSITY PREPARED...shedding 0: V N -5I uWrIVE SMALLPOX IMNIZATION OF YOUNG ADULTS Abrim S. Denenson and Irving A. Phillips University of Kentucky College of Medicine

  6. Getting and Maintaining Attention in Talk to Young Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Estigarribia, Bruno; Clark, Eve V.

    2007-01-01

    When two people talk about an object, they depend on joint attention, a prerequisite for setting up common ground in a conversational exchange. In this study, we analyze this process for parent and child, with data from 40 dyads, to show how adults initiate joint attention in talking to young children (mean ages 1 ; 6 and 3 ; 0). Adults first get…

  7. Young Children. IDRA Focus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    IDRA Newsletter, 1998

    1998-01-01

    This theme issue includes five articles that focus on educational, cognitive, and brain research with implications for early childhood educators, including those who work with limited-English-proficient, minority, and economically disadvantaged children. "Coming to Grips with Reading Instruction at the Early Grades" (Christie L. Goodman)…

  8. A New Harmonized Approach to Estimate Busulfan Exposure Predicts Survival and Toxicity after Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation in Children and Young Adults: a Multicenter Retrospective Cohort Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Bartelink, I.H.; Lalmohamed, Arief; van Reij, Elisabeth M.L.; Dvorak, Chris C.; Savic, Rada M.; Zwaveling, Juliette; Bredius, Robbert. G.M.; Egberts, Antoine C.G.; Bierings, M.; Kletzel, M.; Shaw, Peter J.; Nath, Christa E.; Hempel, George; Ansari, M.; Krajinovic, M.; Theoret, Yves; Duval, Michel; Keizer, Ron J.; Bittencourt, Henriette; Hassan, Moustapha; Güngör, Tayfun; Wynn, Robert F.; Veys, Paul; Cuvelier, Geoff D.E.; Marktel, Sarah; Chiesa, Robert; Cowan, Morton J.; Slatter, Mary A.; Stricherz, Melisa K.; Jennissen, Cathryn; Long-Boyle, Janel R.; Boelens, Jaap Jan

    2016-01-01

    Background Intravenous-busulfan (IV-busulfan) combined with therapeutic drug monitoring to guide dosing improves outcomes after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (allo-HCT). The best method to estimate busulfan exposure and the optimal exposure in children/young adults remains unclear. We therefore evaluated three approaches to estimate IV-Bu exposure (expressed as cumulative-area-under-the-curve; AUC) and associated busulfan-AUC with clinical outcomes in children/young adults undergoing allo-HCT. Methods In this retrospective analysis, patients (0.1–30.4 years) receiving busulfan-based conditioning regimen from 15 centers were included. Cumulative AUC was calculated by numerical integration using non-linear mixed effect modeling (AUCNONMEM), non-compartmental analysis (AUC0-infinity and AUC to the end of the dose interval AUC0-tau) and by individual centers using a variety of approaches (AUCcenter). Main outcome of interest was event-free survival (EFS). Other outcomes of interest were overall survival, graft-failure, relapse, transplantation related mortality (TRM), acute toxicity (veno-occlusive disease (VOD) and/or acute graft versus-host disease (aGvHD), chronic GvHD (cGvHD) and cGVHD-free event-free survival (GEFS). Propensity score adjusted cox proportional hazard models, Weibull models, and Fine-Gray competing risk regressions were used. Results 674 patients were included (41% malignant, 59% non-malignant) Estimated 2-year EFS was 69.7%. The median busulfan AUCNONMEM was 74.4 mg*h/L (CI95% 31.1–104.6 mg*h/L). The median AUCNONMEM correlated poorly with AUCcenter (R2 = 0.254). Patients with optimal IV-busulfan AUC of 78–101 mg*h/L showed 81% EFS at 2 years compared to 66.1% and 49.5% in the low (<78 mg*h/L) and high (>101 mg*h/L) busulfan AUC group respectively (P=0.011). Graft-failure/relapse occurred more frequently in the low AUC group (HR=1.75 P<0.001). Acute toxicity, cGvHD and TRM was significantly higher in the high AUC group (HR 1

  9. Mathematics Anxiety in Young Children: An Exploratory Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harari, Rachel R.; Vukovic, Rose K.; Bailey, Sean P.

    2013-01-01

    This study explored the nature of mathematics anxiety in a sample of 106 ethnically and linguistically diverse first-grade students. Although much is known about mathematics anxiety in older children and adults, little is known about when mathematics anxiety first emerges or its characteristics in young children. Results from exploratory factor…

  10. Using Computer-Based Testing with Young Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnes, Susan Kubic

    2010-01-01

    In this era of increased accountability in education, there is a need for tools to use in assessing the abilities and instructional levels of young children. Computers have been used successfully to assess older children and adults. However, there is a dearth of empirical research to provide evidence that computer-based testing (CBT) is…

  11. Foundations for Young Children to the Indiana Academic Standards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Indiana State Dept. of Education, Indianapolis.

    Noting that young children need early childhood settings supporting the development of the full range of capacities that will serve as a foundation for future school learning, and that adults have an opportunity and an obligation to assist children in becoming active participants in the learning process, this document details foundations to…

  12. Media and young children's learning.

    PubMed

    Kirkorian, Heather L; Wartella, Ellen A; Anderson, Daniel R

    2008-01-01

    Electronic media, particularly television, have long been criticized for their potential impact on children. One area for concern is how early media exposure influences cognitive development and academic achievement. Heather Kirkorian, Ellen Wartella, and Daniel Anderson summarize the relevant research and provide suggestions for maximizing the positive effects of media and minimizing the negative effects. One focus of the authors is the seemingly unique effect of television on children under age two. Although research clearly demonstrates that well-designed, age-appropriate, educational television can be beneficial to children of preschool age, studies on infants and toddlers suggest that these young children may better understand and learn from real-life experiences than they do from video. Moreover, some research suggests that exposure to television during the first few years of life may be associated with poorer cognitive development. With respect to children over two, the authors emphasize the importance of content in mediating the effect of television on cognitive skills and academic achievement. Early exposure to age-appropriate programs designed around an educational curriculum is associated with cognitive and academic enhancement, whereas exposure to pure entertainment, and violent content in particular, is associated with poorer cognitive development and lower academic achievement. The authors point out that producers and parents can take steps to maximize the positive effects of media and minimize the negative effects. They note that research on children's television viewing can inform guidelines for producers of children's media to enhance learning. Parents can select well-designed, age-appropriate programs and view the programs with their children to maximize the positive effects of educational media. The authors' aim is to inform policymakers, educators, parents, and others who work with young children about the impact of media, particularly

  13. The Behavioral Treatment of a Young Adult with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder and a Fear of Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwartz, Cynthia; And Others

    1997-01-01

    Evaluates in vivo desensitization and self-modeling for effectiveness in treating a 29-year-old female with an intense fear of children. Following 19 sessions over a six-month period the subject stopped avoiding situations involving children, heart rate and blood pressure decreased slightly, confidence increased, and multiple fears were reduced.…

  14. Parentification of Adult Children of Divorce: A Multidimensional Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jurkovic, Gregory J.; Thirkield, Alison; Morrell, Richard

    2001-01-01

    Compared the responses of 381 late adolescent and young adult children of divorce and nondivorce on a new multidimensional measure of parentification assessing the extent and fairness of past and present family caregiving. Evidence that problematic forms of parentification in children of divorce continue into late adolescence and young adulthood…

  15. Caring for Young Children in the Home.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Birckmayer, Jennifer; And Others

    Group leaders of 10- to 13-year-olds may use this program guide to help the preteens interact with young children through six discussion meetings and five visits with a preschool child at home. Discussion topics concern (1) the family environment of young children, (2) children's play; (3) children's play areas at home, (4) safety at home, (5)…

  16. Introduction to Adolescent and Young Adult Cancers

    Cancer.gov

    Cancer researchers, advocates, and a cancer survivor introduce the topic of adolescent and young adult (AYA) cancers, covering distinct aspects of cancer in these patients and research questions to answer.

  17. Minimally invasive aesthetic procedures in young adults

    PubMed Central

    Wollina, Uwe; Goldman, Alberto

    2011-01-01

    Age is a significant factor in modifying specific needs when it comes to medical aesthetic procedures. In this review we will focus on young adults in their third decade of life and review minimally invasive aesthetic procedures other than cosmetics and cosmeceuticals. Correction of asymmetries, correction after body modifying procedures, and facial sculpturing are important issues for young adults. The implication of aesthetic medicine as part of preventive medicine is a major ethical challenge that differentiates aesthetic medicine from fashion. PMID:21673871

  18. Neuroinflammation, hyperphosphorylated tau, diffuse amyloid plaques, and down-regulation of the cellular prion protein in air pollution exposed children and young adults.

    PubMed

    Calderón-Garcidueñas, Lilian; Kavanaugh, Michael; Block, Michelle; D'Angiulli, Amedeo; Delgado-Chávez, Ricardo; Torres-Jardón, Ricardo; González-Maciel, Angelica; Reynoso-Robles, Rafael; Osnaya, Norma; Villarreal-Calderon, Rodolfo; Guo, Ruixin; Hua, Zhaowei; Zhu, Hongtu; Perry, George; Diaz, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    Air pollution exposures have been linked to neuroinflammation and neuropathology. Autopsy samples of the frontal cortex from control (n = 8) and pollution-exposed (n = 35) children and young adults were analyzed by RT-PCR (n = 43) and microarray analysis (n = 12) for gene expression changes in oxidative stress, DNA damage signaling, NFκB signaling, inflammation, and neurodegeneration pathways. The effect of apolipoprotein E (APOE) genotype on the presence of protein aggregates associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathology was also explored. Exposed urbanites displayed differential (>2-fold) regulation of 134 genes. Forty percent exhibited tau hyperphosphorylation with pre-tangle material and 51% had amyloid-β (Aβ) diffuse plaques compared with 0% in controls. APOE4 carriers had greater hyperphosphorylated tau and diffuse Aβ plaques versus E3 carriers (Q = 7.82, p = 0.005). Upregulated gene network clusters included IL1, NFκB, TNF, IFN, and TLRs. A 15-fold frontal down-regulation of the prion-related protein (PrP(C)) was seen in highly exposed subjects. The down-regulation of the PrP(C) is critical given its important roles for neuroprotection, neurodegeneration, and mood disorder states. Elevation of indices of neuroinflammation and oxidative stress, down-regulation of the PrP(C) and AD-associated pathology are present in young megacity residents. The inducible regulation of gene expression suggests they are evolving different mechanisms in an attempt to cope with the constant state of inflammation and oxidative stress related to their environmental exposures. Together, these data support a role for air pollution in CNS damage and its impact upon the developing brain and the potential etiology of AD and mood disorders.

  19. Literature for Today's Young Adults. Fourth Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nilsen, Alleen Pace; Donelson, Kenneth L.

    Designed to help teachers open young minds to literature, this book presents criteria for evaluating books in all genres and their suggested classroom uses, an examination of hotly debated topics, and an overview of the significance of young adult literature. The fourth edition of the book features 30 boxed inserts containing essays by some of the…

  20. Increasing Employment Opportunities for Disadvantaged Young Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hossain, Farhana; Terwelp, Emily

    2015-01-01

    In the past four decades, profound changes in the U.S. economy--including falling wages, widening inequality, and the polarization of jobs at the top and bottom of the education and wage distributions--have had dramatic implications for the labor-market fortunes of young adults. Only about half of young people ages 16 to 24 held jobs in 2014, and…

  1. Long-term speech and language outcomes in prelingually deaf children, adolescents and young adults who received cochlear implants in childhood.

    PubMed

    Ruffin, Chad V; Kronenberger, William G; Colson, Bethany G; Henning, Shirley C; Pisoni, David B

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated long-term speech and language outcomes in 51 prelingually deaf children, adolescents and young adults who received cochlear implants (CIs) prior to 7 years of age and had used their implants for at least 7 years. Average speech perception scores were similar to those found in prior research with other samples of experienced CI users. Mean language test scores were lower than norm-referenced scores from nationally representative normal-hearing, typically developing samples, although a majority of the CI users scored within 1 standard deviation of the normative mean or higher on the Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test, Fourth Edition (63%), and the Clinical Evaluation of Language Fundamentals, Fourth Edition (69%). Speech perception scores were negatively associated with a meningitic etiology of hearing loss, older age at implantation, poorer preimplant unaided pure-tone average thresholds, lower family income and the use of 'total communication'. Subjects who had used CIs for 15 years or more were more likely to have these characteristics and were more likely to score lower on measures of speech perception compared to those who had used CIs for 14 years or less. The aggregation of these risk factors in the >15 years of CI use subgroup accounts for their lower speech perception scores and may stem from more conservative CI candidacy criteria in use at the beginning of pediatric cochlear implantation.

  2. EEG Studies with Young Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flohr, John W.; Miller, Daniel C.; deBeus, Roger

    2000-01-01

    Describes how electroencephalogram (EEG) data are collected and how brain function is measured. Discusses studies on the effects of music experiences with adult subjects and studies focusing on the effects of music training on EEG activity of children and adolescents. Considers the implications of the studies and the future directions of this…

  3. Usefulness of insulin like growth factor 1 as a marker of heart failure in children and young adults after the Fontan palliation procedure.

    PubMed

    Avitabile, Catherine M; Leonard, Mary B; Brodsky, Jill L; Whitehead, Kevin K; Ravishankar, Chitra; Cohen, Meryl S; Gaynor, J William; Rychik, Jack; Goldberg, David J

    2015-03-15

    Growth hormone and its mediator, insulinlike growth factor 1 (IGF-1), are key determinants of growth in children and young adults. As patients with Fontan physiology often experience diminished longitudinal growth, we sought to describe IGF-1 levels in this population and to identify factors associated with IGF-1 deficiency. Forty-one Fontan subjects ≥5 years were evaluated in this cross-sectional study. Age- and gender-specific height Z scores were generated using national data. Laboratory testing included IGF-1 and brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) levels. IGF-1 levels were converted to age-, gender-, and Tanner stage-specific Z scores. BNP levels were log transformed to achieve a normal distribution (log-BNP). Medical records were reviewed for pertinent clinical variables. Predictors of IGF-1 Z score were assessed through the Student t test and Pearson's correlation. Median age was 11.1 years (range 5.1 to 33.5 years), and time from Fontan was 8.2 years (1.1 to 26.7). Mean height Z score was -0.2 ± 0.9 with a mean IGF-1 Z score of -0.1 ± 1.3. There was no association between IGF-1 Z score and height Z score. Longer interval since Fontan (R = -0.32, p = 0.04), higher log-BNP (R = -0.40; p = 0.01), and lower indexed systemic flow on cardiac magnetic resonance (R = 0.55, p = 0.02) were associated with lower IGF-1 Z scores. In conclusion, in this cohort with Fontan physiology, higher BNP and lower systemic flow were associated with lower IGF-1 Z score. Longitudinal studies are needed to determine if these relations represent a mechanistic explanation for diminished growth in children with this physiology and with other forms of congenital heart disease.

  4. Usefulness of Insulinlike Growth Factor 1 as a Marker of Heart Failure in Children and Young Adults After the Fontan Palliation Procedure

    PubMed Central

    Avitabile, Catherine M.; Leonard, Mary B.; Brodsky, Jill L.; Whitehead, Kevin K.; Ravishankar, Chitra; Cohen, Meryl S.; Gaynor, J. William; Rychik, Jack; Goldberg, David J.

    2015-01-01

    Growth hormone and its mediator, insulinlike growth factor 1 (IGF-1), are key determinants of growth in children and young adults. As patients with Fontan physiology often experience diminished longitudinal growth, we sought to describe IGF-1 levels in this population and to identify factors associated with IGF-1 deficiency. Forty-one Fontan subjects ≥5 years were evaluated in this cross-sectional study. Age- and gender-specific height Z scores were generated using national data. Laboratory testing included IGF-1 and brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) levels. IGF-1 levels were converted to age-, gender-, and Tanner stage–specific Z scores. BNP levels were log transformed to achieve a normal distribution (log-BNP). Medical records were reviewed for pertinent clinical variables. Predictors of IGF-1 Z score were assessed through the Student t test and Pearson’s correlation. Median age was 11.1 years (range 5.1 to 33.5 years), and time from Fontan was 8.2 years (1.1 to 26.7). Mean height Z score was −0.2 ± 0.9 with a mean IGF-1 Z score of −0.1 ± 1.3. There was no association between IGF-1 Z score and height Z score. Longer interval since Fontan (R = −0.32, p = 0.04), higher log-BNP (R = −0.40; p = 0.01), and lower indexed systemic flow on cardiac magnetic resonance (R = 0.55, p = 0.02) were associated with lower IGF-1 Z scores. In conclusion, in this cohort with Fontan physiology, higher BNP and lower systemic flow were associated with lower IGF-1 Z score. Longitudinal studies are needed to determine if these relations represent a mechanistic explanation for diminished growth in children with this physiology and with other forms of congenital heart disease. PMID:25616534

  5. Self-Reported Psychosomatic Complaints In Swedish Children, Adolescents, and Young Adults Living in Rural and Urban Areas: An Internet-Based Survey

    PubMed Central

    van den Bosch, Matilda; Chen, Yun; Friberg, Peter; Osika, Walter

    2017-01-01

    Background Frequencies in reported psychosomatic illnesses have increased in Sweden among children, adolescents, and young adults. Little is known about demographic differences in self-reported psychosomatic complaints, such as between urban and rural areas, and whether surveys launched on the Internet could be a useful method in sampling such data. Objectives This study examines the connection between psychosomatic illnesses and demographics in Swedish children and youth. The feasibility of using the Internet to gather large amounts of data regarding psychosomatic complaints in this group is another major objective of this study. Methods A cross-sectional study using 7 validated questions about psychosomatic health, were launched in a controlled way onto a recognized Swedish Internet community site, which targeted users 10 to 24 years of age. The subjects were able to answer the items while they were logged in to their personal domain. The results were analyzed cross-geographically within Sweden. Results In total, we received 100,000 to 130,000 individual answers per question. Subjects of both sexes generally reported significantly higher levels of self-reported psychosomatic complaints in major city areas as compared with minor city/rural areas, even though the differences between the areas were small. For example, 12.00% (4472/37,265) of females in minor regions reported always feeling tense, compared with 13.80% (3156/22,873) of females in major regions (P<.001). In males, the answer pattern was similar, 16.40% (4887/29,801) in major regions versus 15.60% (2712/17,386) in minor regions, (P=.006). Females reported significantly higher frequencies of psychosomatic complaints than males (P<.001). Conclusions In subjects aged 10 to 24 years, higher levels of psychosomatic complaints appear to correlate with living in major city areas in comparison with minor city/rural areas. Surveys launched on the Internet could be a useful method in sampling data regarding

  6. Young adults: beloved by food and drink marketers and forgotten by public health?

    PubMed

    Freeman, Becky; Kelly, Bridget; Vandevijvere, Stefanie; Baur, Louise

    2016-12-01

    Young adults are a highly desirable target population for energy-dense, nutrient-poor (EDNP) food and beverage marketing. But little research, resources, advocacy and policy action have been directed at this age group, despite the fact that young adults are gaining weight faster than previous generations and other population groups. Factors such as identity development and shifting interpersonal influences differentiate young adulthood from other life stages and influence the adoption of both healthy and unhealthy eating behaviours. EDNP food and beverage marketing campaigns use techniques to normalize brands within young adult culture, in particular through online social media. Young adults must be a priority population in future obesity prevention efforts. Stronger policies to protect young adults from EDNP food and beverage marketing may also increase the effectiveness of policies that are meant to protect younger children. Restrictions on EDNP food and beverage marketing should be extended to include Internet-based advertising and also aim to protect vulnerable young adults.

  7. From Insider to Outsider: The Evolution of Young Adult Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cart, Michael

    2001-01-01

    Discusses changes in the field of young adult literature since the 1980s. Examines how the definition of "young adult" has evolved. Offers a brief overview of the history of young adult literature from the 1940s. Considers the rise of awards for merit in young adult publishing, noting three in particular. Concludes this is a golden age of young…

  8. The Influence of Play Context and Adult Attitudes on Young Children's Physical Risk-Taking during Outdoor Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Little, Helen; Wyver, Shirley; Gibson, Frances

    2011-01-01

    Many children naturally seek challenging physically active play which may involve injury-risk. Prior studies have attempted to describe the characteristics of risky play but to date none have considered factors that impact on opportunities for risky play or the likely resultant outcomes. Using semi-structured interviews and naturalistic…

  9. Books in Spanish for Children and Young Adults: An Annotated Guide (Libros Infantiles y Juveniles en Espanol: Una Guia Anotada).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schon, Isabel

    Intended to aid teachers, librarians, and others in the selection of Spanish-language books for children in grades K-12, the annotated guide includes books by Hispanic authors which highlight the lifestyle, folklore, heroes, history, fiction, poetry, theatre, and classical literature of Hispanic cultures. Most books included in the guide have been…

  10. Young children's selective trust in informants

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Paul L.; Corriveau, Kathleen H.

    2011-01-01

    Young children readily act on information from adults, setting aside their own prior convictions and even continuing to trust informants who make claims that are manifestly false. Such credulity is consistent with a long-standing philosophical and scientific conception of young children as prone to indiscriminate trust. Against this conception, we argue that children trust some informants more than others. In particular, they use two major heuristics. First, they keep track of the history of potential informants. Faced with conflicting claims, they endorse claims made by someone who has provided reliable care or reliable information in the past. Second, they monitor the cultural standing of potential informants. Faced with conflicting claims, children endorse claims made by someone who belongs to a consensus and whose behaviour abides by, rather than deviating from, the norms of their group. The first heuristic is likely to promote receptivity to information offered by familiar caregivers, whereas the second heuristic is likely to promote a broader receptivity to informants from the same culture. PMID:21357240

  11. Young children's preference for unique owned objects.

    PubMed

    Gelman, Susan A; Davidson, Natalie S

    2016-10-01

    An important aspect of human thought is the value we place on unique individuals. Adults place higher value on authentic works of art than exact replicas, and young children at times value their original possessions over exact duplicates. What is the scope of this preference in early childhood, and when do children understand its subjective nature? On a series of trials, we asked three-year-olds (N=36) to choose between two toys for either themselves or the researcher: an old (visibly used) toy vs. a new (more attractive) toy matched in type and appearance (e.g., old vs. brand-new blanket). Focal pairs contrasted the child's own toy with a matched new object; Control pairs contrasted toys the child had never seen before. Children preferred the old toys for Focal pairs only, and treated their own preferences as not shared by the researcher. By 3years of age, young children place special value on unique individuals, and understand the subjective nature of that value.

  12. Popular Postmodernism for Young Adult Readers: "Walk Two Moons,""Holes," and "Monster."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yearwood, Stephenie

    2002-01-01

    Examines arguments as to whether, how, and to what extent children's and adolescent literature is becoming postmodern. Suggests young adult literature has fully embraced the postmodern mode. Discusses three young adult novels that use postmodernist ideas and techniques: Sharon Creech's "Walk Two Moons," Louis Sachar's "Holes,"…

  13. Educator Perceptions of Visual Support Systems and Social Skills for Young Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, David James

    2016-01-01

    Young adults with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) face unique social skills challenges as they transition into independent living environments and seek fulfilling relationships within their communities. Research has focused on social education and interventions for children with autism, while transitioning young adults with ASD have received…

  14. Psychological Treatments for Symptoms of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder in Children, Adolescents, and Young Adults: A Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Gutermann, Jana; Schreiber, Franziska; Matulis, Simone; Schwartzkopff, Laura; Deppe, Julia; Steil, Regina

    2016-06-01

    Meta-analyses of the treatment of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in childhood and adolescence are restricted to specific trauma, selected interventions, and methodologically rigorous studies. This large meta-analysis quantifies the effects of psychological treatments for PTSD symptoms in children and adolescents. An extensive literature search yielded a total of 13,040 articles; 135 studies with 150 treatment conditions (N = 9562 participants) met the inclusion criteria (psychological interventions with children and/or adolescents with PTSD symptoms that report quantitative measures of symptom change). The mean effect sizes (ESs) for PTSD symptoms ranged from large to small, depending on the control condition. Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) yielded the highest ESs. Age and caretaker involvement were identified as moderators. CBT, especially when conducted in individual treatment with the inclusion of parents, is a highly effective treatment for trauma symptoms. Psychological treatments need to be modified to address younger patients' specific needs.

  15. The acute phase inflammatory response to maximal exercise testing in children and young adults with sickle cell anaemia.

    PubMed

    Liem, Robert I; Onyejekwe, Kasiemobi; Olszewski, Marie; Nchekwube, Chisalu; Zaldivar, Frank P; Radom-Aizik, Shlomit; Rodeghier, Mark J; Thompson, Alexis A

    2015-12-01

    Although individuals with sickle cell anaemia (SCA) have elevated baseline inflammation and endothelial activation, the acute phase response to maximal exercise has not been evaluated among children with SCA. We measured the acute phase response to maximal exercise testing for soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule (sVCAM) as well as interleukin 6 (IL6), total white blood cell (WBC) count, C-reactive protein (CRP) and D-dimer in a cohort of children with SCA and matched controls at baseline, immediately after, and 30, 60 and 120 min following exercise. Despite higher baseline levels of all biomarkers except CRP, the acute phase response from baseline to immediately after exercise was significantly greater in subjects versus controls for CRP (2·1 vs. 0·2 mg/l, P = 0·02) and D-dimer (160 vs. 10 μg/l, P < 0·01) only. Similar between-group trends were observed over time for all biomarkers, including sVCAM, IL6, total WBC, CRP and D-dimer. Lower fitness, defined by peak oxygen consumption (VO2 ), was independently associated with greater acute phase responses to exercise for sVCAM. Our results suggest maximal exercise may not be associated with any greater escalation of endothelial activation or inflammation in SCA and provide preliminary biomarker evidence for the safety of brief, high-intensity physical exertion in children with SCA.

  16. Six Years after a Modified Constraint Induced Movement Therapy (CIMT) Program--What Happens when the Children Have Become Young Adults?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nordstrand, L.; Eliasson, A. C.

    2013-01-01

    The aim is to describe the development of hand function in young adults with unilateral cerebral palsy (CP), who participated in a 2-week Constraint Induced Movement Therapy (CIMT) camp 6 years earlier. Eleven participants, 16-21 years at follow-up, were assessed at three occasions during 2005 and once in 2011. At the 6-year follow-up, performance…

  17. The Comparison of Adults’ and Young Children’s Perceptions of Website User Interface Pleasure Based on Their Metacognitive Awareness

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-06-01

    generate potential Website design factors to facilitate the design of pleasurable Website user interfaces. By doing so, both adults and young...participants’ metacognitive strategies used to help browse through the Websites. In the second experiment, three important Website design factors...the experiments, participants were asked to interact with several pre-selected Websites. The Website design guidelines regarding interface

  18. Young Adult Literature for Less Able Adult Readers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Radebaugh, Muriel Rogie

    1982-01-01

    Presents an annotated bibliography of 20 recent young adult novels that are also appropriate for use with adult readers in community college reading programs. Suggests ways of helping such students improve their reading comprehension by analyzing the novels' themes, conflicts, settings, characterization, and symbolism. (AEA)

  19. Building Resilience: Helping Young Adults in the Adult Education Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Elly

    2000-01-01

    Because of changes in welfare eligibility, the education system, and employment and training opportunities, it has become more likely that young people who have had difficulty with the mainstream schooling system and who face a lack of employment options will end up in adult education. Educators in the adult education classroom have an opportunity…

  20. A Tool for Change: Young Adult Literature in the Lives of Young Adult African-Americans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, Carol Joan

    1993-01-01

    Discusses the role of young adult literature written from an authentic black cultural perspective in helping black young adults achieve the skills and knowledge they require to succeed in this society. Examples of relevant titles are given in the genres of realistic fiction, biography, autobiography, and folklore. (Contains 35 references.) (LRW)

  1. Mixed Heritage in Young Adult Literature. Scarecrow Studies in Young Adult Literature #32

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reynolds, Nancy Thalia

    2009-01-01

    Mixed-heritage people are one of the fastest-growing groups in the United States, yet culturally they have been largely invisible, especially in young adult literature. "Mixed Heritage in Young Adult Literature" is a critical exploration of how mixed-heritage characters (those of mixed race, ethnicity, religion, and/or adoption) and real-life…

  2. What nurses need to know about fecal microbiota transplantation: education, assessment, and care for children and young adults.

    PubMed

    Samuel, Bennett P; Crumb, Teri L; Duba, Mary M

    2014-01-01

    Fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) is an emerging experimental therapy for treatment of recurrent Clostridium difficile infection. In the future, FMT has the potential to be a treatment modality in other diseases that involve gut dysbiosis. As use of FMT is likely to expand, pediatric nurses need a clear understanding of FMT to provide appropriate education, assessment, and care for these patients. Pediatric research and clinical nurses are a resource to help children and parents understand the procedure. Important topics include donor screening, patient assessment before, during, and after treatment; routes of administration and positioning; preparation for discharge and followup evaluation.

  3. Seven Myths about Young Children and Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plowman, Lydia; McPake, Joanna

    2013-01-01

    Parents and educators tend to have many questions about young children's play with computers and other technologies at home. They can find it difficult to know what is best for children because these toys and products were not around when they were young. Some will say that children have an affinity for technology that will be valuable in their…

  4. Young Children and Families Experiencing Homelessness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Allison B.; Squires, Jane

    2014-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of homelessness among young children and families in the United States is described, as is the developmental impact on young children and cost to society. Although services are mandated for this population under the McKinney­-Vento Act, Education of Homeless Children and Youth Program, and the Individuals With…

  5. Healing Art: Young Children Coping With Stress.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hale, Judy Ann

    Helping young children to cope with stress plays a vital role in today's classroom. It is normal for children to experience stress, which comes from pressures such as family, friends, and school. Some of the indicators of stress in young children are behavioral changes (e.g., mood swings, changes in sleep patterns, and incontinence) and physical…

  6. CNS Metastases from Bone and Soft Tissue Sarcomas in Children, Adolescents, and Young Adults: Are They Really So Rare?

    PubMed Central

    Duczkowska, Agnieszka; Duczkowski, Marek; Bragoszewska, Hanna; Romaniuk-Doroszewska, Anna; Iwanowska, Beata; Szkudlinska-Pawlak, Sylwia; Madzik, Jaroslaw; Bilska, Katarzyna; Raciborska, Anna

    2017-01-01

    Purpose. To check whether primary involvement of brain/spinal cord by bone/soft tissue sarcomas' metastases in children is as rare as described and to present various morphological forms of bone/soft tissue sarcomas' CNS metastases. Methods. Patients with first diagnosis in 1999–2014 treated at single center were included with whole course of disease evaluation. Brain/spinal canal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)/computed tomography were performed in cases suspicious for CNS metastases. Extension from skull/vertebral column metastases was excluded. Results. 550 patients were included. MRI revealed CNS metastases in 19 patients (incidence 3.45%), 14 boys, aged 5–22 years. There were 12/250 osteosarcoma cases, 2/200 Ewing's sarcoma, 1/50 chondrosarcoma, 3/49 rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS), and 1/1 malignant mesenchymoma. There were 10 single metastases and 7 cases of multiple ones; in 2 RMS cases only leptomeningeal spread in brain and spinal cord was found. Calcified metastases were found in 3 patients and hemorrhagic in 4. In one RMS patient there were numerous solid, cystic, hemorrhagic lesions and leptomeningeal spread. Conclusions. CNS metastases are rare and late in children with bone/soft tissue sarcomas, although in our material more frequent (3.45%) than in other reports (0.7%). Hematogenous spread to brain and hemorrhagic and calcified lesions dominated in osteosarcoma. Ewing sarcoma tended to metastasize to skull bones. Soft tissue sarcomas presented various morphological forms. PMID:28243595

  7. From features to dimensions: cognitive and motor development in pop-out search in children and young adults.

    PubMed

    Grubert, Anna; Indino, Marcello; Krummenacher, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    In an experiment involving a total of 124 participants, divided into eight age groups (6-, 8-, 10-, 12-, 14-, 16-, 18-, and 20-year-olds) the development of the processing components underlying visual search for pop-out targets was tracked. Participants indicated the presence or absence of color or orientation feature singleton targets. Observers also solved a detection task, in which they responded to the onset of search arrays. There were two main results. First, analyses of inter-trial effects revealed differences in the search strategies of the 6-year-old participants compared to older age groups. Participants older than 8 years based target detection on feature-less dimensional salience signals (indicated by cross-trial RT costs in target dimension change relative to repetition trials), the 6-year-olds accessed the target feature to make a target present or absent decision (cross-trial RT costs in target feature change relative to feature repetition trials). The result agrees with predictions derived from the Dimension Weighting account and previous investigations of inter-trial effects in adult observers (Müller et al., 1995; Found and Müller, 1996). The results are also in line with theories of cognitive development suggesting that the ability to abstract specific visual features into feature categories is developed after the age of 7 years. Second, overall search RTs decreased with increasing age in a decelerated fashion. RT differences between consecutive age groups can be explained by sensory-motor maturation up to the age of 10 years (as indicated by RTs in the onset detection task). Expedited RTs in older age groups (10-, vs. 12-year-olds; 14- vs. 16-year-olds), but also in the 6- vs. 8-year-olds, are due to the development of search-related (cognitive) processes. Overall, the results suggest that the level of adult performance in visual search for pop-out targets is achieved by the age of 16.

  8. The static examination of children and young adults with cerebral palsy in the gait analysis laboratory: technique and observer agreement.

    PubMed

    Keenan, W Nigel; Rodda, Jill; Wolfe, Rory; Roberts, Sam; Borton, David C; Graham, H Kerr

    2004-01-01

    The assessment of ambulant children with spastic cerebral palsy frequently includes an evaluation in the motion analysis laboratory, consisting of a standardized physical examination and instrumented gait analysis. We therefore designed a repeatability study to evaluate observer agreement of five joint range of motion parameters, in 20 patients with cerebral palsy aged 5-25 years. These five parameters are some of the most important measurements made during the static examination in the gait laboratory. Intra-observer agreement was high (concordance correlation coefficient range, 0.67 -0.96), and using Bland and Altman analysis it was clinically acceptable with 95% limits of agreement of all parameters close to within +/- 10degrees. The level of inter-observer agreement was less satisfactory, particularly in hip flexion deformity.

  9. SAFETY AND EFFICACY OF HIGH DOSE DAILY VITAMIN D3 SUPPLEMENTATION IN CHILDREN AND YOUNG ADULTS WITH SICKLE CELL DISEASE

    PubMed Central

    Dougherty, Kelly A.; Bertolaso, Chiara; Schall, Joan I.; Smith-Whitley, Kim; Stallings, Virginia A.

    2015-01-01

    Suboptimal vitamin D (vitD) status (<32 ng/ml) is ubiquitous among African American children with type SS sickle cell disease (SCD-SS). The vitD supplemental dose to normalize vitD status is unknown. Five to 20-year-old African-American children with (n=21) and without (n=23) SCD-SS were randomized to vitD3 supplementation (4,000 or 7,000 IU/day) and evaluated at 6- and 12-weeks for changes in vitD and SCD status. A dose was considered unsafe if serum calcium was elevated associated with elevated serum 25 hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D)). At baseline 95% of subjects with SCD-SS and 87% of healthy controls had suboptimal vitD status (mean ± SD, 19.2 ± 7.2 and 22.3 ± 9.3 ng/ml, respectively). After 12-weeks supplementation, both D3 doses were safe and well tolerated. Neither group achieved the a priori efficacy criterion of 25(OH)D ≥ 32 ng/ml in >80% of subjects (45% in SCD-SS and 63% in controls). However for both subjects with SCD-SS and healthy subjects by 12-weeks, deficient (< 20 ng/ml) vitD status was eliminated only in those receiving 7,000 IU/d. For subjects with SCD-SS, by 12-weeks there was a significant (all P<0.05) increase in fetal hemoglobin, decrease in HS-CRP, and reduction in the percentage of subjects with a high platelet count. PMID:25985241

  10. The non-advertising effects of screen-based sedentary activities on acute eating behaviours in children, adolescents, and young adults. A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Marsh, Samantha; Ni Mhurchu, Cliona; Maddison, Ralph

    2013-12-01

    Sedentary screen time may be an important determinant of childhood obesity. A number of potential mechanisms to explain the link between screen time and increased bodyweight have been proposed; however, the relationship appears to be best explained by the effects on dietary intake, which is attributed to either food advertising or effects independent of food advertising. Technological advances have allowed for greater accessibility and exposure to advertisement-free screen-based media. This review was conducted to systematically synthesise the evidence from laboratory based studies which have investigated the non-advertising effects of screen time (TV viewing, sedentary video games, and computer use) on dietary intake in children, adolescents, and young adults. MEDLINE, PubMed, PsychInfo, CINAHL, and Embase were searched from inception through 5 July 2013. Ten trials met the inclusion criteria and were included in the review. Risk of study bias was judged to range from low to high. Screen time in the absence of food advertising was consistently found to be associated with increased dietary intake compared with non-screen behaviours. Suggested explanations for this relationship included: distraction, interruption of physiologic food regulation, screen time as a conditioned cue to eat, disruption of memory formation, and the effects of the stress-induced reward system. Due to the limited number of high-quality studies available for this review, our findings are preliminary. More work is required to better establish the link between dietary intake and advertisement-free screen time and assess whether differences exist between the different screen-based activities.

  11. “Silent” Dissemination of Klebsiella pneumoniae Isolates Bearing K. pneumoniae Carbapenemase in a Long-term Care Facility for Children and Young Adults in Northeast Ohio

    PubMed Central

    Viau, Roberto A.; Hujer, Andrea M.; Marshall, Steven H.; Perez, Federico; Hujer, Kristine M.; Briceño, David F.; Dul, Michael; Jacobs, Michael R.; Grossberg, Richard; Toltzis, Philip

    2012-01-01

    Background. Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates harboring the K. pneumoniae carbapenemase gene (blaKPC) are creating a significant healthcare threat in both acute and long-term care facilities (LTCFs). As part of a study conducted in 2004 to determine the risk of stool colonization with extended-spectrum cephalosporin-resistant gram-negative bacteria, 12 isolates of K. pneumoniae that exhibited nonsusceptibility to extended-spectrum cephalosporins were detected. All were gastrointestinal carriage isolates that were not associated with infection. Methods. Reassessment of the carbapenem minimum inhibitory concentrations using revised 2011 Clinical Laboratory Standards Institute breakpoints uncovered carbapenem resistance. To further investigate, a DNA microarray assay, PCR-sequencing of bla genes, immunoblotting, repetitive-sequence-based PCR (rep-PCR) and multilocus sequence typing (MLST) were performed. Results. The DNA microarray detected blaKPC in all 12 isolates, and blaKPC-3 was identified by PCR amplification and sequencing of the amplicon. In addition, a blaSHV-11 gene was detected in all isolates. Immunoblotting revealed “low-level” production of the K. pneumoniae carbapenemase, and rep-PCR indicated that all blaKPC-3-positive K. pneumoniae strains were genetically related (≥98% similar). According to MLST, all isolates belonged to sequence type 36. This sequence type has not been previously linked with blaKPC carriage. Plasmids from 3 representative isolates readily transferred the blaKPC-3 to Escherichia coli J-53 recipients. Conclusions. Our findings reveal the “silent” dissemination of blaKPC-3 as part of Tn4401b on a mobile plasmid in Northeast Ohio nearly a decade ago and establish the first report, to our knowledge, of K. pneumoniae containing blaKPC-3 in an LTCF caring for neurologically impaired children and young adults. PMID:22492318

  12. Emotional responses to food, body dissatisfaction and other eating disorder features in children, adolescents and young adults.

    PubMed

    McNamara, Caroline; Hay, Phillipa; Katsikitis, Mary; Chur-Hansen, Anna

    2008-01-01

    We aimed to assess and compare emotional responses to different foods in relationship to eating disorder and associated features, across gender and age groups. We hypothesized that negative emotional responses to images of foods would be higher in (i) those with higher body dissatisfaction and (ii) older females. Five hundred and thirty-six (18% Grade 5, 39% Grade 8 or 9, and 43% Grade 11 or 12) school, and 93 university students participated. Emotive responses to images of foods were assessed with a PowerPoint presentation of 16 differing food and four 'neutral' images shown over 30s intervals. Responses were rated on three 10-cm visual analog scales measuring levels of happiness, fear and disgust. Body image concern was assessed with the nine-item body dissatisfaction subscale of the EDI and eating disorder symptoms with the Eating Disorder Examination Questionnaire. With increasing age all three emotional responses towards food fell and body dissatisfaction increased. Compared to females, males showed significantly higher levels of a 'happy' response to food, and in adult females a fear emotive response correlated positively with eating concern and body dissatisfaction. In men, positive emotive responses to food may be indicative of broader factors that reduce their vulnerability to eating disorders.

  13. [Ischemic stroke in the young adult].

    PubMed

    Calvet, D

    2016-01-01

    Ischemic stroke is not rare in young adults since one in ten stroke patients are less than 50 years old. This incidence increased over the past last years, mainly due to the rise in the prevalence of traditional vascular risk factors in this sub-group of age but also of illegal drug use. Even though both survival and functional outcome of young stroke patients are better than those observed in older patients, socio-economic and quality of life consequences make this disease a main objective in terms of primary and secondary prevention. Identifying the cause of ischemic stroke in young adults is of major importance to prevent stroke recurrence. However, given the wide variety of potential underlying causes, the etiologic work-up of stroke in young adults requires a different approach from that in the elderly. In this context, a sequential diagnostic work-up is needed in order to optimize the yield of diagnostic tests, to reduce their cost and risks for the patient. Arterial dissection is the most frequent cause of stroke in young adults but other less frequent causes are numerous. Despite a comprehensive work-up, about one third of cases remains unexplained leading to the diagnosis of cryptogenic ischemic stroke.

  14. Neurological abnormalities in young adults born preterm

    PubMed Central

    Allin, M; Rooney, M; Griffiths, T; Cuddy, M; Wyatt, J; Rifkin, L; Murray, R

    2006-01-01

    Objective Individuals born before 33 weeks' gestation (very preterm, VPT) have an increased likelihood of neurological abnormality, impaired cognitive function, and reduced academic performance in childhood. It is currently not known whether neurological signs detected in VPT children persist into adulthood or become attenuated by maturation of the CNS. Method We assessed 153 VPT individuals and 71 term‐born controls at 17–18 years old, using a comprehensive neurological examination. This examination divides neurological signs into primary and integrative domains, the former representing the localising signs of classical neurology, and the latter representing signs requiring integration between different neural networks or systems. Integrative signs are sub‐divided into three groups: sensory integration, motor confusion, and sequencing. The VPT individuals have been followed up since birth, and neonatal information is available on them, along with the results of neurological assessment at 4 and 8 years of age and neuropsychological assessment at 18 years of age. Results The total neurology score and primary and integrative scores were significantly increased in VPT young adults compared to term‐born controls. Within the integrative domain, sensory integration and motor confusion scores were significantly increased in the VPT group, but sequencing was not significantly different between the VPT and term groups. Integrative neurological abnormalities at 18 were strongly associated with reduced IQ but primary abnormalities were not. Conclusions Neurological signs are increased in VPT adults compared to term‐born controls, and are strongly associated with reduced neuropsychological function. PMID:16543529

  15. Universe Awareness For Young Children

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scorza, C.; Miley, G.; Ödman, C.; Madsen, C.

    2006-08-01

    Universe Awareness (UNAWE) is an international programme that will expose economically disadvantaged young children aged between 4 and 10 years to the inspirational aspects of modern astronomy. The programme is motivated by the premise that access to simple knowledge about the Universe is a basic birth right of everybody. These formative ages are crucial in the development of a human value system. This is also the age range in which children can learn to develop a 'feeling' for the vastness of the Universe. Exposing young children to such material is likely to broaden their minds and stimulate their world-view. The goals of Universe Awareness are in accordance with two of the United Nations Millennium goals, endorsed by all 191 UN member states, namely (i) the achievement of universal primary education and (ii) the promotion of gender equality in schools. We propose to commence Universe Awareness with a pilot project that will target disadvantaged regions in about 4 European countries (possibly Spain, France, Germany and The Netherlands) and several non-EU countries (possibly Chile, Colombia, India, Tunisia, South Africa and Venezuela). There will be two distinct elements in the development of the UNAWE program: (i) Creation and production of suitable UNAWE material and delivery techniques, (ii) Training of educators who will coordinate UNAWE in each of the target countries. In addition to the programme, an international network of astronomy outreach will be organised. We present the first results of a pilot project developed in Venezuela, where 670 children from different social environments, their teachers and members of an indigenous tribe called Ye´kuana from the Amazon region took part in a wonderful astronomical and cultural exchange that is now being promoted by the Venezuelan ministry of Education at the national level.

  16. Young Children's Stereotyping of Facial Attractiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dion, Karen K.

    1973-01-01

    When shown photographs, young children preferred children with attractive faces as potential friends, and attributed prosocial behaviors to them. They disliked unattractive faces and attributed antisocial behaviors to them. (ST)

  17. Young adults as users of adult healthcare: experiences of young adults with complex or life-limiting conditions.

    PubMed

    Beresford, B; Stuttard, L

    2014-08-01

    Awareness is growing that young adults may have distinctive experiences of adult healthcare and that their needs may differ from those of other adult users. In addition, the role of adult health teams in supporting positive transitions from paediatrics is increasingly under discussion. This paper contributes to these debates. It reports a qualitative study of the experiences of young adults - all with complex chronic health conditions - as users of adult health services. Key findings from the study are reported, including an exploration of factors that help to explain interviewees' experiences. Study findings are discussed in the context of existing evidence from young adults in adult healthcare settings and theories of 'young adulthood'. Implications for training and practice are considered, and priorities for future research are identified.

  18. Healthy Children: Networking of People Concerned about the Quality of Life of Young Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Patti-Beth; Carlton, M. Patricia

    The move from disease treatment to disease prevention represents an exciting and positive step forward in promoting the health of young children. In modern society, though, health-related messages are part of a broad socialization process in which adults often transmit confusing and contradictory messages to children. To counter this condition,…

  19. Young Adults, Partners and Parents: Individual Agency and the Problems of Support

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Gill; O'Sullivan, Ann; Rouse, Julia

    2006-01-01

    Although young adults in the United Kingdom increasingly defer economic independence, they are still "adult" in other respects. Family and household formation often occur before economic independence is achieved. Parents have increased power to influence their adult children's early partnership behaviour, by providing or withholding…

  20. Social categories guide young children's preferences for novel objects

    PubMed Central

    Shutts, Kristin; Banaji, Mahzarin R.; Spelke, Elizabeth S.

    2009-01-01

    To whom do children look when deciding on their own preferences? To address this question, three-year-old children were asked to choose between objects or activities that were endorsed by unfamiliar people who differed in gender, race (White, Black), or age (child, adult). In Experiment 1, children demonstrated robust preferences for objects and activities endorsed by children of their own gender, but less consistent preferences for objects and activities endorsed by children of their own race. In Experiment 2, children selected objects and activities favored by people of their own gender and age. In neither study did most children acknowledge the influence of these social categories. These findings suggest that gender and age categories are encoded spontaneously and influence children's preferences and choices. For young children, gender and age may be more powerful guides to preferences than race. PMID:20590724

  1. What Do Young Children Dream about?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Honig, Alice Sterling; Nealis, Arlene L.

    2012-01-01

    Young children's dreams can be a way for teachers and caregivers to share with children and an opportunity for children to describe and even draw dreams. In two different preschool settings, in two different geographical locales, 94 children, aged 3-5 years, shared 266 dreams with a trusted, familiar teacher. Dreams were coded anonymously. The…

  2. The semantics of secrecy: young children's classification of secret content.

    PubMed

    Anagnostaki, Lida; Wright, Michael J; Bourchier-Sutton, Alison J

    2010-01-01

    The authors explored whether young children can distinguish potential secrets from nonsecrets by their content, as can older children, adolescents, and adults. Ninety children, 4, 5, and 6 years old, rated the secrecy of items from an adult-validated list of personal information about an age- and gender-appropriate puppet. Two factors of the children's data corresponded to the adult categories of nonsecrets and secrets, and a third factor corresponded to surprises. All ages rated surprises as significantly more secret than nonsecret items; however, the surprise items contained linguistic cues to secrecy. A tendency to rate nonsecrets as secret decreased with age, but only the 6-year-olds rated secrets other than surprises as significantly more secret than nonsecrets. Thus, children acquire the implicit rules defining secret content from a somewhat later age than that reported for the cognitive or behavioral capacities for secrecy.

  3. A Voice for Children and Young People in the City

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilks, Judith; Rudner, Julie

    2013-01-01

    A major challenge for researchers and urban planning practitioners is how to obtain meaningful and influential contributions on urban and environmental planning activities from children and young people within the constraints of adult policy and practice. The key elements of this challenge concern traditional methods of communication between…

  4. Selecting Really Excellent Software for Young Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Polly, Jean Armour

    1985-01-01

    This article discusses criteria of a good computer software package to aid the public librarian in the building, weeding, and maintenance of a software collection for young adults. Highlights include manuals or documentation; bells, whistles, and color; and the true test of time. (EJS)

  5. Young Adult Literature: From Romance to Realism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cart, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Today's young adult (YA) literature is every bit as complex as the audience it's written for, unflinchingly addressing such topics as homosexuality, mental illness, AIDS and drug abuse. In this much expanded revision of his 1996 book, veteran author Michael Cart shows how the best of contemporary YA lit has evolved to tackle such daunting subjects…

  6. Young Adult Literature 2.0

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton, Buffy

    2009-01-01

    Web 2.0 tools enable today's writers to connect with their audience in unprecedented ways. The advent of social networking and other Web 2.0 tools have changed the rules for how authors and book publishers market and communicate with their audience. Through tools like blogs, Twitter, MySpace, and Facebook, Young Adult (YA) lit authors can choose…

  7. The Prevalence of Lisping in Young Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Borsel, John; Van Rentergem, Sigrid; Verhaeghe, Leen

    2007-01-01

    This paper reports the results of a pilot study that investigated the prevalence of lisping in a cohort of young adults. The motivation for the study was the observation that a substantial number of incoming students in speech language pathology at the Ghent University (Belgium), still presented with frontal lisping of the /s/, /z/ and sometimes…

  8. Challenging Perspectives on Young Adult Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conners, Sean P.

    2013-01-01

    As proponents of the Common Core State Standards (CCSS) publish lists of "Exemplar Texts" that are said to represent the degree of textual complexity appropriate for the different grade levels, and that are overwhelmingly canonical, those who value young adult literature and recognize a place for it in the high school literature…

  9. Young Adult Literature in Developmental Reading Classes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawk, Jane Ward; Lester, Virda K.

    One of the most effective means of achieving a successful program in reading is the use of the young adult novel to stimulate the adolescent's interest in free reading or even to instill an interest where there is none. A novel which provides pleasurable reading experiences with interesting material at the proper level (such as novels by Judy…

  10. Reducing Underage and Young Adult Drinking

    PubMed Central

    Windle, Michael; Zucker, Robert A.

    2010-01-01

    Forty years ago, when the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA) was founded, alcoholism was considered an adult disease driven principally by physiological determinants. As NIAAA expanded its research portfolio, new data and insights were obtained that led to an increased focus on underage and young adult drinking. Fostered by interdisciplinary research, etiologic models were developed that recognized the multiplicity of relevant genetic and environmental influences. This shift in conceptualizing alcohol use disorders also was based on findings from large-scale, national studies indicating that late adolescence and early young adulthood were peak periods for the development of alcohol dependence and that early initiation of alcohol use (i.e., before age 15) was associated with a fourfold increase in the probability of subsequently developing alcohol dependence. In recent years, developmental studies and models of the initiation, escalation, and adverse consequences of underage and early young adult drinking have helped us to understand how alcohol use may influence, and be influenced by, developmental transitions or turning points. Major risk and protective factors are being identified and integrated into screening, prevention, and treatment programs to optimize interventions designed to reduce drinking problems among adolescents and young adults. In addition, regulatory policies, such as the minimum drinking age and zero-tolerance laws, are being implemented and evaluated for their impact on public health. PMID:23579934

  11. Young Adult Literature and Alternative Assessment Measures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Comer, Melissa

    2011-01-01

    The principal purpose of assessment, regardless of teaching level, should be to guide instruction. Unlike evaluation, the goal of assessment is not to arrive at a grade for students. Rather, it is to inform the educator as to what needs to be addressed in the classroom. Assessment in a young adult literature (YAL) curriculum is no different. Its…

  12. Iron Deficiency in Adolescents and Young Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Risser, William L.; Risser, Jan M. H.

    1990-01-01

    Reviews the prevalence, natural history, causes, impact on performance, diagnosis, and treatment of iron deficiency in adolescent and young adult athletes. All athletes should be screened and treated. The best diagnosis involves determining serum ferritin and hemoglobin levels. Treatment requires therapeutic doses of oral ferrous iron for several…

  13. Literary Maps for Young Adult Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snodgrass, Mary Ellen

    The activities presented in this handbook are designed to help students envision the locations and landmarks of sites along journeys described in popular young adult literature (e.g., "The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn,""Born Free,""The Call of the Wild,""Catcher in the Rye,""I Know Why the Caged Bird…

  14. Cultural Orientation. Young Adult Curriculum: Introduction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Applied Linguistics, Washington, DC. Refugee Service Center.

    The cultural orientation curriculum for young adults in the International Catholic Migration Commission's Philippine Refugee Processing Center is discussed and outlined. The program's goals for emotional and character development (self-awareness and self-esteem, cultural awareness, pro-activity, personal responsibility), knowledge of cultural…

  15. Young Adult Literature and Professional Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bach, Jacqueline; Choate, Laura Hensley; Parker, Bruce

    2011-01-01

    As the body of high quality young adult literature (YAL) continues to grow, what role might these texts play in professional development for educators? This article describes ways in which schools can develop book study programs that use this literature to promote meaningful dialogue and understanding of contemporary adolescent issues. Based on…

  16. Young Adult Books: "Watch Out for #1."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forman, Jack

    1985-01-01

    Attacks the trend in recent young adult novels to focus on individual adolescents and their self-centered concerns without having these characters confront the consequences of their actions and their effects on other people. Specifically examines the novels of Judy Blume and Alice Bach. (RBW)

  17. Classic Readers Theatre for Young Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barchers, Suzanne I.; Kroll, Jennifer L.

    This book presents 16 original scripts that have been adapted from classic works of literature for use for readers theatre with young adults and ESL (English as a Second Language) students. Adaptations of the following works are included: "Little Women" (Louisa May Alcott); episodes from "Don Quixote" (Miguel de Cervantes; "The Necklace" (Guy de…

  18. Lesson Plans for Teaching Young Adult Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Carolina State Dept. of Public Instruction, Raleigh.

    Intended for teachers, this book is a collection of lesson plans created by 28 teachers in North Carolina to provide opportunities that support integrated learning. Using recommended young adult literature, the book presents activities which promote the integration of listening, speaking, reading, writing, and viewing. The book provides two or…

  19. The Glory of Young Adult Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Ly

    Young adult literature (YAL) is an important and valuable tool for helping students learn and for motivating them to read. YAL also helps students gain insights into themselves and others. YAL (1) is written and marketed primarily for teenagers; (2) has main characters similar in age (12-25) to its readership; (3) has relatively uncomplicated plot…

  20. The adult children of alcoholics trauma inventory.

    PubMed

    Mackrill, Thomas; Hesse, Morten

    2011-01-01

    The Adult Children of Alcoholics Trauma Inventory (ACATI) registers variations in the recalled experience of growing up with problem drinkers. The ACATI includes measures of the duration and severity of parental alcohol-use-related problems, the drinking parents' behavior when intoxicated and sober, physical, psychological, and sexual abuse, and environmental factors. The ACATI correlated well with the Family Tree Questionnaire and showed excellent 14-day test-retest reliability for most variables. The test-retest was carried out in 2009 at a counseling service for young adults from families with alcohol-use-related problems in Denmark (N = 49).

  1. Young Children and Trauma: Intervention and Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osofsky, Joy D., Ed.

    2004-01-01

    Recent years have seen significant advances in knowledge about the effects of exposure to psychological trauma on young children from birth to age 5. This volume brings together leading experts to address practical considerations in working with traumatized young children and their caregivers. State-of-the-art assessment and treatment approaches…

  2. [Prosocial Development of Very Young Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pawl, Jeree, Ed.

    1992-01-01

    This newsletter presents five articles focusing on the social development of infants and very young children. The first article, "Sympathetic Behavior in Very Young Children," by Lois Barclay Murphy, gives examples of early sympathetic behavior, traces the development of sympathy, identifies individual patterns of sympathetic response,…

  3. Providing Rich Art Activities for Young Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulcahey, Christine

    2009-01-01

    Using works of art with young children is a perfect way to bridge the gap between art activities that are too open or too closed. Teachers of young children sometimes try to find a middle ground by allowing free painting time at an easel in addition to recipe-oriented activities such as putting together precut shapes to create a spider or an apple…

  4. Outdoor Experiences for Young Children. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rivkin, Mary S.

    This digest examines the value of outdoor experience for young children, reasons for its decline, ways to enhance school play spaces, and aspects of developmentally appropriate outdoor environments. Young children appear to benefit from being outdoors and especially need the broad experiential base provided by being outdoors. The richness and…

  5. The Novice Researcher: Interviewing Young Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Danby, Susan; Ewing, Lynette; Thorpe, Karen

    2011-01-01

    Being a novice researcher undertaking research interviews with young children requires understandings of the interview process. By investigating the interaction between a novice researcher undertaking her first interview and a child participant, the authors attend to theoretical principles, such as the competence of young children as informants,…

  6. Input Devices for Young Handicapped Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Karen

    The versatility of the computer can be expanded considerably for young handicapped children by using input devices other than the typewriter-style keyboard. Input devices appropriate for young children can be classified into four categories: alternative keyboards, contact switches, speech input devices, and cursor control devices. Described are…

  7. Philosophy for Young Children: A Practical Guide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaut, Berys; Gaut, Morag

    2011-01-01

    Co-written by a professor of philosophy and a practising primary school teacher, "Philosophy for Young Children" is a concise, practical guide for teachers. It contains detailed session plans for 36 philosophical enquiries--enough for a year's work--that have all been successfully tried, tested and enjoyed with young children from the age of three…

  8. Influence of birth weight on white blood cell count in biracial (black-white) children, adolescents, and young adults: the Bogalusa Heart Study.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei; Srinivasan, Sathanur R; Berenson, Gerald S

    2009-01-15

    The effect of birth weight on white blood cell (WBC) count among blacks and whites was examined in 2,080 children (aged 4-11 years, 57.4% white, and 49.2% male), 892 adolescents (aged 12-17 years, 57.2% white, and 50.8% male), and 1,872 adults (aged 18-38 years, 68.4% white, and 41.9% male) from Bogalusa, Louisiana, in 2005. After adjustment for age, sex, race, body mass index, and smoking status (in adolescents and adults), the WBC count decreased across quartiles of increasing birth weight specific for race, sex, and gestational age in children (P(trend) = 0.0007) and adults (P(trend) = 0.005). In multivariate regression analyses that included the covariates above, birth weight was inversely associated with WBC count in children (beta coefficients (unit, cells/microL per kg) = -256, -241, and -251 for whites, blacks, and the combined sample, with P = 0.003, 0.029, and <0.001, respectively) and in adults (beta = -224 and -211 for whites and the combined sample, with P = 0.015 and 0.008, respectively). These results show that low birth weight is associated with increased systemic inflammation as depicted by the WBC count in childhood and adulthood, thereby potentially linking fetal growth retardation to cardiovascular disease and diabetes.

  9. Molecular Analysis of Adenovirus Isolates from Previously Vaccinated Young Adults

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-04-01

    NAVAL HEALTH RESEARCH CENTER MOLECULAR ANALYSIS OF ADENOVIRUS ISOLATES FROM PREVIOUSLY VACCINATED YOUNG ADULTS D. A. Blasiole...Molecular Analysis of Adenovirus Isolates From Previously Vaccinated Young Adults . 6. AUTHORS Daniel A Blasiole, David Metzgar, Luke T Daum, Margaret AK

  10. Young Adults' Perceptions of Calcium Intake and Health.

    PubMed

    Marcinow, Michelle L; Randall Simpson, Janis A; Whiting, Susan J; Jung, Mary E; Buchholz, Andrea C

    2017-02-01

    Many young Canadian adults are not meeting dietary calcium recommendations. This is concerning as adequate calcium is important throughout young adulthood to maximize peak bone mass for osteoporosis prevention. There are limited studies that have explored young adults' perceptions toward calcium and health. Our objectives were to determine young adults' (18-34 years) knowledge of calcium in relation to health, facilitators and barriers to adequate calcium intake, and to explore both their suggestions for individual strategies to increase calcium intake and ways to communicate calcium-related messaging to this population. Eight gender-specific focus groups (18 men; 35 women) were conducted using a semistructured interview guide, guided by social cognitive theory. Deductive thematic analysis was used to generate themes. Participants perceived adequate calcium intake to be important for children and older adults but were uncertain of the benefits for their own age group. Perceived positive outcomes (e.g., aesthetics such as strong nails) associated with adequate calcium intake were cited as a motivator to increase intake. Perceived barriers to achieving increased calcium intake included the high cost and inconvenience of milk products and negative practices of dairy farmers. Participants suggested planning healthy well-balanced meals and forming a habit of consuming calcium-rich foods as individual strategies to increase calcium intake. Strategies to convey calcium-related information to young adults included increasing awareness of the importance of calcium via credible sources of information and developing nutrition education curricula. Social media and advertising were perceived as ineffective. Our findings provide key information for nutrition education initiatives.

  11. Traumatic Symptomatology Characteristics of Adult Children of Alcoholics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Cathy W.; Webster, Raymond E.

    2002-01-01

    Assesses traumatic experience symptomatology, resiliency factors, and stress among young adults who had experienced alcohol within their family of origin. Results indicated adult children of alcoholics had more self-reported stress, more difficulty initiating the use of mediating factors in response to life events, and more symptoms of personal…

  12. Young adults with intellectual disability recall their childhood.

    PubMed

    Starke, Mikaela

    2011-12-01

    Eleven young adults with an intellectual disability were interviewed for this exploratory study aimed at charting their experiences of growing up in homes where at least one parent had the same or a similar disability. Two main themes emerged from the interviews. Firstly, a clear majority of the young adults had positive experiences of family life during their upbringing, as expressed especially through their memories of their grandparents. Secondly, the study participants all described experiences of being bullied and harassed outside the family context. The results obtained in this study highlight the importance of the parents, the family, and informal networks in the upbringing of these children. The study also considers the consequences that the study participants' negative experiences of peer contacts and their sense of exclusion might have for their prospects in later life.

  13. "What's Your Name?": Names, Naming Practices, and Contextualized Selves of Young Korean American Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Jinhee; Lee, Kyunghwa

    2011-01-01

    This study examined how young Korean American children and the adults around these children perform naming practices and what these practices mean to the children. As part of a large ethnographic study on Korean American children's peer culture in a heritage language school in the United States, data were collected by observing 11 prekindergarten…

  14. Give Me a Hand: Differential Effects of Gesture Type in Guiding Young Children's Problem-Solving

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vallotton, Claire; Fusaro, Maria; Hayden, Julia; Decker, Kalli; Gutowski, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Adults' gestures support children's learning in problem-solving tasks, but gestures may be differentially useful to children of different ages, and different features of gestures may make them more or less useful to children. The current study investigated parents' use of gestures to support their young children (1.5-6 years) in a block puzzle…

  15. Bare Bones Young Adult Services: Tips for Public Library Generalists.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vaillancourt, Renee J.

    This book is a hands-on guide to the philosophy and practice of young adult services in the public libraries. The following chapters are included: (1) "Young Adult Services Philosophy," including reasons to serve teens, why teens are the way they are, who serves young adults, and how to interact with teens; (2) "Youth Participation," including…

  16. Value Preferences Predicting Narcissistic Personality Traits in Young Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gungor, Ibrahim Halil; Eksi, Halil; Aricak, Osman Tolga

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed at showing how the value preferences of young adults could predict the narcissistic characteristics of young adults according to structural equation modeling. 133 female (59.6%) and 90 male (40.4%), total 223 young adults participated the study (average age: 25.66, ranging from 20 to 38). Ratio group sampling method was used while…

  17. Young Adults Deserve the Best: YALSA's Competencies in Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flowers, Sarah

    2010-01-01

    As high school enrollment continues to rise, the need for effective librarianship serving young adults is greater than ever before. "Young Adults Deserve the Best: Competencies for Librarians Serving Youth," developed by Young Adult Library Services Association (YALSA), is a document outlining areas of focus for providing quality library service…

  18. Immune Response Genotypes and Risk of Young Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-09-01

    1) To identify, enroll and collect blood specimens from 368 adolescents and young adults 18 years of age or older at the time of participation... Young Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Wendy Cozen, Victoria Cortessis...COVERED 1 Sep 2007 – 31 Aug 2008 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Immune Response Genotypes and Risk of Young Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma 5b

  19. Defining Success in Young Adults with Emotional Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carrescia, Susanne G.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop a definition of success by constructing a portrait of successful young adults with emotional disabilities. Nine young adults with emotional disabilities were interviewed individually after graduating from high school. The research questions that guided the study centered on the young adults'…

  20. Connecting the Canon to Current Young Adult Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rybakova, Katie; Roccanti, Rikki

    2016-01-01

    In this article we discuss the respective roles of young adult literature and literary texts in the secondary level English Language Arts classroom and explore the connections that can be made between popular young adult books and the traditional canon. We provide examples showing how young adult literature bestsellers such as "The Book…

  1. 32 CFR 199.26 - TRICARE Young Adult.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... military treatment facilities and pharmacies. TRICARE Young Adult coverage features the per service cost... to TRICARE Young Adult. (B) The TRICARE Dental Program (§ 199.13 of this part) and the TRICARE Retiree Dental Program (§ 199.22 of this part) are not covered under TRICARE Young Adult. (C)...

  2. 32 CFR 199.26 - TRICARE Young Adult.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... military treatment facilities and pharmacies. TRICARE Young Adult coverage features the per service cost... to TRICARE Young Adult. (B) The TRICARE Dental Program (§ 199.13 of this part) and the TRICARE Retiree Dental Program (§ 199.22 of this part) are not covered under TRICARE Young Adult. (C)...

  3. 2009 YALSA Fabulous Films & Amazing Audiobooks for Young Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Library Journal, 2009

    2009-01-01

    The Young Adult Library Services Association (YALSA), a division of the American Library Association (ALA), announced its 2009 annual lists of Fabulous Films for Young Adults and Amazing Audiobooks for Young Adults ages 12 to 18. This article presents the titles that were released in January 2009 during the ALA Midwinter Meeting in Denver,…

  4. 2010 YALSA Fabulous Films and Amazing Audiobooks for Young Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Library Journal, 2010

    2010-01-01

    The Young Adult Library Services Association (YALSA), a division of the American Library Association (ALA), announced its 2010 annual lists of Fabulous Films for Young Adults and Amazing Audiobooks for Young Adults ages 12 to 18. This article presents the list of titles that were released in January 2010 during the ALA Midwinter Meeting in Boston,…

  5. Financial Literacy of Young Adults: The Importance of Parental Socialization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jorgensen, Bryce L.; Savla, Jyoti

    2010-01-01

    This article tests a conceptual model of perceived parental influence on the financial literacy of young adults. Structural equation modeling was used to test whether (a) parents were perceived to influence young adults' financial knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors and (b) the degree to which young adults' financial attitudes mediated financial…

  6. Child to adult: transitional care for young adults with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Al-Yateem, Nabeel

    Managing the transitional care needs of young adults with a complex chronic illness such as cystic fibrosis (CF) as they move from a child-orientated to adult setting has been reported in the literature as challenging and stressful, and may impart additional risks to the young person's health. However, in the Republic of Ireland, which has the highest incidence of CF in the world, the current services provided for children during this transitional period are still reported as underdeveloped. The aim of the author's research was to explore and understand the experience of young people before and after their transitional care, and the factors that both contribute to and hinder that experience. A qualitative approach guided by phenomenological tradition, and using in-depth interviews. The findings suggest that there are a range of needs required for patients during this transitional period, including the need for information, interventions that decrease the negative feelings associated with transition (e.g. distress, anxiety, uncertainty), structured service, and an approach to care that focuses on young adults. The author concludes that health professionals in the clinical setting who have responsibility for young adults in transitional care should focus on these needs to provide a more relevant and effective transition service.

  7. Well-Being Narratives and Young Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Estola, Eila; Farquhar, Sandy; Puroila, Anna-Maija

    2014-01-01

    Whereas research on children's well-being in education has largely focused on adult perspectives rather than on children's understandings, recent scholarship argues for a stronger focus on children's experience and perceptions of their own well-being. Adopting a narrative approach, this article puts children's stories centre stage as we explore a…

  8. Treatment of Adolescent and Young Adults with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Ribera, Josep-Maria; Ribera, Jordi; Genescà, Eulàlia

    2014-01-01

    The primary objective of this review was to update and discuss the current concepts and the results of the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) in adolescents and young adults (AYA). After a brief consideration of the epidemiologic and clinicobiologic characteristics of ALL in the AYA population, the main retrospective comparative studies stating the superiority of pediatric over adult-based protocols were reviewed. The most important prospective studies in young adults using pediatric inspired or pediatric unmodified protocols were also reviewed emphasizing their feasibility at least up to the age of 40 yr and their promising results, with event-free survival rates of 60–65% or greater. Results of trials from pediatric groups have shown that the unfavourable prognosis of adolescents is no more adequate. The majority of the older adolescents with ALL can be cured with risk-adjusted and minimal residual disease-guided intensive chemotherapy, without stem cell transplantation. However, some specific subgroups, which are more frequent in adolescents than in children (e.g., early pre-T, iAMP21, and BCR-ABL-like), deserve particular attention. In summary, the advances in treatment of ALL in adolescents have been translated to young adults, and that explains the significant improvement in survival of these patients in recent years. PMID:25045460

  9. Developmental Counseling: The Young Adult Period. Critical Issues in Young Adult Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beaty, Lee A.

    In this paper, development during the adolescent period is considered from a counseling perspective. Although many of the issues of young adults continue to confront older adults, this paper discusses the issues that are special to this age group. It suggests that the emotional and social domain is best represented by the theory of Erikson, which…

  10. Young Children's Playfully Complex Communication: Distributed Imagination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alcock, Sophie

    2010-01-01

    This paper draws on research exploring young children's playful and humorous communication. It explores how playful activity mediates and connects children in complex activity systems where imagination, cognition, and consciousness become distributed across individuals. Children's playfulness is mediated and distributed via artefacts (tools, signs…

  11. Young Children's Reports of when Learning Occurred

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tang, Connie M.; Bartsch, Karen; Nunez, Narina

    2007-01-01

    This study investigated young children's reports of when learning occurred. A total of 96 4-, 5-, and 6-year-olds were recruited from suburban preschools and elementary schools. The children learned an animal fact and a body movement. A week later, children learned another animal fact and another body movement and then answered questions about…

  12. Qualitative Investigation of Young Children's Music Preferences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roulston, Kathryn

    2006-01-01

    This qualitative study examined young children's music preferences through group conversations with children, interviews with parents, and non-participant observation of classroom settings in daycare and elementary classrooms. Data were analyzed inductively to generate themes, and revealed that (1) children expressed distinct preferences for an…

  13. Testing Young Children's Ideas of Mass Measurement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheeseman, Jill; McDonough, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    This article reports an innovative use of photographs in a pencil-and-paper test which was developed to assess young children's understanding of mass measurement. Two hundred and ninety-five tests were administered by thirteen teachers of Years 1 and 2 children in 3 urban and rural schools. Many of these children of 6-8 years of age were able to…

  14. Book Ownership and Young Children's Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tadesse, Selamawit; Washington, Patsy

    2013-01-01

    Research indicates that there are positive effects when young children read and explore books for pleasure, as such activities help build the skills and knowledge that are critical to schooling. Reading for pleasure is facilitated when children have access to books in their own homes. There are great variations in children's book ownership…

  15. Toluene effects on the motor activity of adolescent, young-adult, middle-age and senescent male Brown Norway rats.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Life stage is an important risk factor for toxicity. Children and aging adults, for example, are more susceptible to certain chemicals than are young adults. In comparison to children, relatively little is known about susceptibility in older adults. Additionally, few studies have...

  16. Adolescents and young adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Stock, Wendy

    2010-01-01

    During the last decade, increasing attention has been paid to a unique group of patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) who lie at the crossroad of therapeutic care by pediatric and adult hematologists/oncologists. ALL is a disease that affects infants, children, adolescents, and adult patients. With current therapies, the vast majority of children with ALL are now long-term survivors; unfortunately, the same good results have not yet been obtained for adults with ALL. This review will describe current controversies surrounding the treatment of adolescents and young adults with ALL--a group who finds themselves in the transition from "pediatric" to "adult" treatment approaches. The review focuses on recent insights into disease biology, prognostic factors, and treatment outcomes that have led to a series of prospective clinical trials specifically designed for adolescents and younger adults (AYAs) with ALL. These trials have been designed to provide important new clinical, psychosocial, and biological insights, and to further improve the survival of this challenging and unique group of patients.

  17. Safe Play Areas for Prevention of Young Children Drowning in Farm Dams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Depczynski, Julie; Fragar, Lyn; Hawkins, Antonia; Stiller, Laurence

    2009-01-01

    Injuries are the leading cause of death to young children in rural Australia, with drowning in farm dams being a major risk. This paper assesses the impact of an intervention to increase safe play areas on farms to prevent unsupervised access by young children to water bodies and other hazards. Surveys of 1,117 adult farmers attending Ag Quip…

  18. Young Children Follow Pointing over Words in Interpreting Acts of Reference

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grassmann, Susanne; Tomasello, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Adults refer young children's attention to things in two basic ways: through the use of pointing (and other deictic gestures) and words (and other linguistic conventions). In the current studies, we referred young children (2- and 4-year-olds) to things in conflicting ways, that is, by pointing to one object while indicating linguistically (in…

  19. Parents, Mental Illness, and the Primary Health Care of Infants and Young Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fenichel, Emily, Ed.

    1993-01-01

    This bulletin issue contains five papers on the theme of adults with mental illness who are parents of very young children. "Parents, Mental Illness, and the Primary Health Care of Infants and Young Children" (John N. Constantino) offers the experience of a trainee in a combined residency in pediatrics and psychiatry, focusing on…

  20. Intrinsic connectivity network mapping in young children during natural sleep

    PubMed Central

    Manning, Janessa H.; Courchesne, Eric; Fox, Peter T.

    2013-01-01

    Structural and functional neuroimaging have substantively informed the pathophysiology of numerous adult neurological and psychiatric disorders. While structural neuroimaging is readily acquired in sedated young children, pediatric application of functional neuroimaging has been limited by the behavioral demands of in-scanner task performance. Here, we investigated whether functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) acquired during natural sleep and without experimental stimulation offers a viable strategy for studying young children. We targeted the lengthy epoch of non-Rapid Eye Movement, stage 3 (NREM3) sleep typically observed at sleep onset in sleep-deprived children. Seven healthy, preschool-aged children (24-58 months) were studied, acquiring fMRI measurements of cerebral blood flow (CBF) and of intrinsic connectivity networks (ICNs), with concurrent sleep-stage monitoring. ICN data (T2* fMRI) were reliably obtained during NREM3 sleep; CBF data (arterial spin labeled fMRI) were not reliably obtained, as scanner noises disrupted sleep. Applying independent components analysis (ICA) to T2* data, distinct ICNs were observed which corresponded closely with those reported in the adult literature. Notably, a network associated with orthography in adults was not observed, suggesting that ICNs exhibit a developmental trajectory. We conclude that resting-state fMRI obtained in sleep is a promising paradigm for neurophysiological investigations of young children. PMID:23727317

  1. Priorities for children and young people - opportunities and challenges for children and young people's nurses.

    PubMed

    Smith, Fiona

    2016-05-09

    Across Europe children's nurses today face many challenges, including rising childhood obesity, the soaring incidence of issues with the mental health of children and young people, the effects of social media, child maltreatment and the impact of poverty, war and conflict on children and families. There are opportunities for children's nurses to undertake new roles and to influence both policy and practice to improve the health outcomes of children and young people, and thereby the future health of the population.

  2. Distress among young adults from divorced families.

    PubMed

    Laumann-Billings, L; Emery, R E

    2000-12-01

    Researchers find that most children from divorced families function normally, but some clinicians assert that young people are disturbed even many years after a divorce. These accounts may be less discrepant than they appear, because research typically focuses on notably problematic behavior (disorder), whereas case studies emphasize more subtle inner turmoil (distress). In Study 1 college students reported painful feelings, beliefs, and memories about their parents divorce on a reliable new measure, but they also reported accepting the divorce and having few psychological symptoms. Distress about family life was greater among students from divorced than from married families. Study 2 replicated these findings in a community sample of young people from low-income divorced families. In both studies, greater distress was associated with children's residence, frequency of contact with fathers, interparental conflict, and psychological symptoms.

  3. Informal Mentoring and Young Adult Employment

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    This study explores the role of informal mentoring (i.e., developing an important relationship with a non-parental adult) in the transition to full time employment among young adults (age 23-28). Multivariate analysis of the Add Health data reveals that mentoring is positively related to the likelihood of full time employment, and the relationship involves both selection and causation processes. Entrance into the world of work facilitates the development of mentoring relationships, especially among youth who identify work-related mentors after adolescence. These relationships have the potential for promoting attachment to the labor force. Mentoring relationships that develop outside of work settings and during adolescence have a positive impact on the odds of full time employment. The receipt of guidance and advice from mentors, as well as access to weak-tied mentoring relationships, teacher mentors, and friend mentors all contribute to the increased odds of employment in young adulthood. However, adolescent mentoring may be less effective among young women than it is among young men. PMID:19050736

  4. Specific Cognitive Deficits in Young Children with Cystinosis

    PubMed Central

    Trauner, Doris A.; Spilkin, Amy M.; Williams, Jennifer; Babchuck, Lynne

    2007-01-01

    Objectives Infantile nephropathic cystinosis is associated with a specific cognitive deficit in visual spatial processing in older children and adults. The cause of this deficit is unknown. This study was designed to determine whether the cognitive deficit is present in young children with cystinosis, suggesting an early effect of the genetic disorder on brain development. Study design Young children (n=25; ages 3− 8 years) with cystinosis, and 25 matched controls, underwent cognitive testing including tests of intelligence, visual perceptual, visual spatial, and visual motor functions. Results Children with cystinosis performed significantly more poorly on tests of visual spatial and visual motor function than did controls. Visual perceptual abilities were equivalent in the two groups. Conclusion The fact that the same pattern of visual spatial deficit is present in very young children with cystinosis as has previously been demonstrated in older children and adults suggests that there may be an influence of the cystinosis gene on brain development, rather than an adverse effect of prolonged cystine accumulation in the brain during childhood. PMID:17643777

  5. Naming in young children: a dumb attentional mechanism?

    PubMed

    Smith, L B; Jones, S S; Landau, B

    1996-08-01

    Previous studies have shown that young children selectively attend to some object properties and ignore others when generalizing a newly learned object name. Moreover, the specific properties children attend to depend on the stimulus and task context. The present study tested an attentional account: that children's feature selection in name generalization is guided by non-strategic attentional processes that are minimally influenced by new conceptual information presented in the task. Four experiments presented 3-year-old children and adults with novel artifacts consisting of distinctive base objects with appended parts. In a Name condition, subjects were asked whether test objects had the same name as the exemplar. In a Similarity condition, subjects made similarity judgments for the same objects. Subjects in two experiments were shown a function for either the base object or the parts. Both adults' naming and similarity judgments were influenced by the functional information. Children's similarity judgments were also influenced by the functions. However, children's naming was immune to influence from information about function. Instead, children's feature selection in naming was shifted only by changes in the relative salience of base objects and parts. The results are consistent with the idea that dumb attentional processes are responsible for young children's smart generalizations of novel words to new instances. Potential mechanisms to explain these findings are discussed.

  6. Adult outcomes of preterm children.

    PubMed

    Hack, Maureen

    2009-10-01

    The survivors of the initial years of neonatal intensive care of preterm infants reached adulthood during the last decade. Reports of their adult outcomes examined have included neurodevelopmental, behavioral and health outcomes as well as social functioning and reproduction. Despite statistically significant differences between preterm young adults and controls in most outcomes studied, the majority of preterm survivors do well and live fairly normal lives. The two major predictors of adult outcomes are lower gestational age that reflect perinatal injury and family sociodemographic status which reflects both genetic and environmental effects.

  7. Teaching Time Concepts to Young Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muir, Sharon Pray

    1986-01-01

    Presents many activity ideas for teaching young children about time using chronological events, clocks, and calendars. Jerome Bruner's enactive-iconic-symbolic sequence of concept development is used as a guide for these learning experiences. (LP)

  8. Interdisciplinary Training Relating to Young Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Myrtle M.

    1975-01-01

    Describes a program designed to equip persons who will be leaders in the educational field and who have as a main career goal functioning as an interface person in settings which concern young children. (PD)

  9. Teething & Dental Hygiene for Young Children

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health & Hygiene for Young Children Page Content Article Body As you might guess, the number-one dental problem among preschoolers is tooth decay . One out of 10 two- year-olds already have one or more cavities ...

  10. Young Children's Play Behaviors and Cognitive Styles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saracho, Olivia N.

    1985-01-01

    Reviews research studies examining relationship between play behaviors and cognitive styles in young children, particularly emphasizing field dependence and field independence, social behavior, and educational and research implications are also presented. (DST)

  11. Marriage Matters But How Much? Marital Centrality Among Young Adults.

    PubMed

    Willoughby, Brian J; Hall, Scott S; Goff, Saige

    2015-01-01

    Marriage, once a gateway to adulthood, is no longer as widely considered a requirement for achieving adult status. With declining marriage rates and delayed marital transitions, some have wondered whether current young adults have rejected the traditional notion of marriage. Utilizing a sample of 571 young adults, the present study explored how marital centrality (the expected importance to be placed on the marital role relative to other adult roles) functioned as a unique and previously unexplored marital belief among young adults. Results suggested that marriage remains an important role for many young adults. On average, young adults expected that marriage would be more important to their life than parenting, careers, or leisure activities. Marital centrality profiles were found to significantly differ based on both gender and religiosity. Marital centrality was also associated with various outcomes including binge-drinking and sexual activity. Specifically, the more central marriage was expected to be, the less young adults engaged in risk-taking or sexual behaviors.

  12. Young Children and War Play.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlsson-Paige, Nancy; Levin, Diane E.

    1988-01-01

    In a recent survey of parents and early childhood professionals the prevalence of war play among children and an increase in the amount of violence in children's play was noted. Outlines how the deregulation of children's television during the Reagan administration has affected children's exposure to violence in children's television programming.…

  13. Transfer to Adult Care--Experiences of Young Adults with Congenital Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    Asp, Ann; Bratt, Ewa-Lena; Bramhagen, Ann-Cathrine

    2015-01-01

    More than 90% of children born with congenital heart disease survive into adulthood due to successes of cardiac surgery and medical management. Interviews with 16 young adults with congenital heart disease to explore their experiences of transfer from pediatric to adult care were performed. The analysis identified five themes; Feeling secure during the transfer process, Experiencing trust in the care, Expecting to be involved, Assuming responsibility for one's health is a process and Lack of knowledge leads to uncertainty. In conclusion; a structured and gradual transfer process was necessary to enable the informants to shoulder the responsibility for self-care.

  14. Young Adult Outcomes of the Abecedarian and CARE Early Childhood Educational Interventions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Frances A.; Wasik, Barbara H.; Pungello, Elizabeth; Burchinal, Margaret; Barbarin, Oscar; Kainz, Kirsten; Sparling, Joseph J.; Ramey, Craig T.

    2008-01-01

    Adult benefits for participants in Project CARE were compared with those of the Abecedarian Project, a closely related randomized study of early childhood educational intervention for children from low-income families who were at risk of developmental delays and school failure. CARE replicated Abecedarian's young adult treatment-related…

  15. Psychiatric Comorbidity in Young Adults with a Clinical Diagnosis of Asperger Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lugnegard, Tove; Hallerback, Maria Unenge; Gillberg, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    In children with autism spectrum disorders, previous studies have shown high rates of psychiatric comorbidity. To date, studies on adults have been scarce. The aim of the present study was to investigate psychiatric comorbidity in young adults with Asperger syndrome. Participants were 26 men and 28 women (mean age 27 years) with a clinical…

  16. Suicide Risks among Adolescents and Young Adults in Rural China

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Sibo; Zhang, Jie

    2014-01-01

    Background: In China, suicide is one of the major causes of death among adolescents and young adults aged 15 to 34 years. Aim: The current study examines how risk factors vary by age groups in rural China, referring to those aged 15 to 24 years and those aged 25 to 34 years. Method: A case-control psychological autopsy (PA) study is conducted in sixteen counties from three Chinese provinces, including 392 suicide cases and 416 community living controls in the sample. Results: In China, young adults aged 25 to 34 years have a higher risk for suicide than adolescents aged 15 to 24 years, and it holds true even controlling for relevant social factors. In addition, age-related factors such as education, marital status, whether having children, status in the family, physical health, and personal income all have varying degrees of impact on suicide risks for rural youth. Conclusions: This study shows that there are some age-related risk factors for suicide at certain life stages and emphasizes that young adults in rural China aged 25 to 34 years have an increased risk of suicide as a result of experiencing more psychological strains with age. PMID:25546276

  17. Immigrant Narratives: Power, Difference, and Representation in Young-Adult Novels with Immigrant Protagonists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clifford, Elizabeth; Kalyanpur, Maya

    2011-01-01

    As of 2008, about 23% of children in the United States were immigrants or the children of immigrants. This paper examines how immigrants are portrayed in books aimed at teenagers. From a sample of 20 young-adult novels we look at the demographics of both protagonist and author and examine how three main themes are addressed: (1) experiences prior…

  18. Antibody titers against vaccine and contemporary wild poliovirus type 1 in children immunized with IPV+OPV and young adults immunized with OPV.

    PubMed

    Lukashev, Alexander N; Yarmolskaya, Maria S; Shumilina, Elena Yu; Sychev, Daniil A; Kozlovskaya, Liubov I

    2016-02-02

    In 2010, a type 1 poliovirus outbreak in Congo with 445 lethal cases was caused by a virus that was neutralized by sera of German adults vaccinated with inactivated polio vaccine with a reduced efficiency. This seroprevalence study was done in two cohorts immunized with other vaccination schedules. Russian children aged 3-6 years immunized with a combination of inactivated and live polio vaccines were reasonably well protected against any wild type poliovirus 1, including the Congolese isolate. Adults aged 20-29 years immunized only with live vaccine were apparently protected against the vaccine strain (92% seropositive), but only 50% had detectable antibodies against the Congo-2010 isolate. Both waning immunity and serological divergence of the Congolese virus could contribute to this result.

  19. Stress Management Techniques for Young Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piper, Francesca M.

    The director of a not-for-profit nursery school adapted the adult stress management techniques of exercise and relaxation for use with 3- to 5-year-old children. Specifically, children were taught visualization techniques and yoga exercises involving deep breathing. The goal of the practicum was to rechannel children's negative stress-related…

  20. Storytelling: Enhancing Language Acquisition in Young Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Speaker, Kathryne McGrath; Taylor, Deborah; Kamen, Ruth

    2004-01-01

    We know that children are active participants in their acquisition of language. Their language patterns are learned in social contexts while they are interacting with other children and adults. Studies continue to confirm that the development of vocabulary and syntactic complexity in language are more advanced in children who are frequently…

  1. Does Active Rehearsal Improve Young Children's Recall?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Medlin, Richard

    This study investigates different methods of increasing children's use of active rehearsal in recall, and the extent to which this active rehearsal improves their recall. Seven groups of second grade children and one group of adults were asked to memorize a list of everyday words in four study-test trials. Two of the groups of children were given…

  2. Priorities for young adults when accessing UK primary care: literature review.

    PubMed

    Davey, Antoinette; Carter, Mary; Campbell, John L

    2013-10-01

    This literature review focuses on what matters to young adults when they access primary care services in the United Kingdom. Patients' access to and experience of primary care services differs across age groups. Existing research has largely focused on the needs and experiences of children, adolescents, and adults. There is some evidence to suggest the views of young adults (aged 18-25 years) that may differ from the views of other age groups, and research has not previously reported specifically on the views of this group of the population. The literature was reviewed to identify the views and priorities of young UK adults regarding primary healthcare provision, and furthermore, to identify those related topics that would benefit from further research. Relevant academic publications and grey literature published from 2000 onwards was reviewed and synthesised. We identified and reported emerging themes that were of importance to young adults in respect of the UK primary care provision. A total of 19 papers met our inclusion criteria. Young adults access primary care services less frequently than other age groups; this may be because of their experience of primary care throughout childhood and adolescence. Five aspects of primary care provision emerged as being of importance to young adults--the accessibility and availability of services, the confidentiality of health-related information, issues relating to communication with healthcare professionals, continuity of care, and behaviours and attitudes expressed towards young adults by healthcare professionals. There is a lack of focus of current research on the expectations, needs, and primary healthcare experiences of young adults. Young adults may hold views that are distinct from other age groups. Further research is needed to better understand the needs of a young adult population as their needs may impact the future use of services.

  3. Young Children: Active Learners in a Technological Age.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, June L., Ed.; Shade, Daniel D., Ed.

    This book addresses the issues of appropriate use of computers with young children and how children and early childhood educators interact with the computer in early childhood settings. Part 1, "Young Children as Active Learners," contains chapter 1: "Listen to the Children: Observing Young Children's Discoveries with the…

  4. Demographic Demise: The Declining Young Adult Population in New England

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gittell, Ross

    2007-01-01

    Young adult workers provide businesses with the dynamic labor force and fresh ideas they need to innovate and grow. With their contributions to cultural, intellectual and social life, young adults also make New England a vibrant and interesting place to live. Young families support local schools and demand a strong educational system. Yet New…

  5. Young children's beliefs about the stability of traits: protective optimism?

    PubMed

    Lockhart, Kristi L; Chang, Bernard; Story, Tyler

    2002-01-01

    Prior research has demonstrated individual differences in children's beliefs about the stability of traits, but this focus on individuals may have masked important developmental differences. In a series of four studies, younger children (5-6 years old, Ns = 53, 32, 16, and 16, respectively) were more optimistic in their beliefs about traits than were older children (7-10 years old, Ns = 60, 32, 16, and 16, respectively) and adults (Ns = 130, 100, 48, and 48, respectively). Younger children were more likely to believe that negative traits would change in an extreme positive direction over time (Study 1) and that they could control the expression of a trait (Study 3). This was true not only for psychological traits, but also for biological traits such as missing a finger and having poor eyesight. Young children also optimistically believed that extreme positive traits would be retained over development (Study 2). Study 4 extended these findings to groups, and showed that young children believed that a majority of people can have above average future outcomes. All age groups made clear distinctions between the malleability of biological and psychological traits, believing negative biological traits to be less malleable than negative psychological traits and less subject to a person's control. Hybrid traits (such as intelligence and body weight) fell midway between these two with respect to malleability. The sources of young children's optimism and implications of this optimism for age differences in the incidence of depression are discussed.

  6. How race and age experiences shape young children's face processing abilities.

    PubMed

    Macchi Cassia, Viola; Luo, Lizhu; Pisacane, Antonella; Li, Hong; Lee, Kang

    2014-04-01

    Despite recent advances in research on race and age biases, the question of how race and age experiences combine to affect young children's face perception remains unexplored. To fill this gap, the current study tested two ethnicities of 3-year-old children using a combined cross-race/cross-age design. Caucasian children with and without older siblings and Mainland Chinese children without older siblings were tested for their ability to discriminate adult and child Caucasian faces as well as adult and child Asian faces in both upright and inverted orientations. Children of both ethnicities manifested an own-race bias, which was confined to adult faces, and an adult face bias, which was confined to own-race faces. Likewise, sibling experience affected Caucasian children's processing of own-race child faces, but this effect did not generalize to other-race faces. Results suggest that race and age information are represented at the same hierarchical level in young children's memory.

  7. Young Children's Drawings in Problem Solving

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bakar, Kamariah Abu; Way, Jennifer; Bobis, Janette

    2016-01-01

    This paper explores young children's drawings (6 years old) in early number and addition activities in Malaysia. Observation, informal interviews and analysis of drawings revealed two types of drawing, and gave insight into the transitional process required for children to utilise drawings in problem solving. We argue the importance of valuing and…

  8. Violence Prevention for Families of Young Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Psychological Association, Washington, DC.

    Based on the view that violent behavior is learned and often learned early in life, this pamphlet shows parents how they can help protect young children from getting involved with violence and increase that child's chances for a safe and productive future. The pamphlet cautions parents that early learning is powerful and that children learn how to…

  9. Visual Impairment in Infants and Young Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teplin, Stuart W.

    1995-01-01

    This article reviews the structure, development, function, and assessment of the visual system and then considers: common eye problems of young children with visual impairment; impacts of severe impairment on child development; and the roles of early intervention professionals, ophthalmologists, and pediatricians in working with these children and…

  10. Young Children's Development of Swinging Behaviors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Jill Englebright; Tipps, R. Steven

    1995-01-01

    Examined development of young children's psychomotor behaviors on outdoor swings, devising a Guttman hierarchical scale. Found that children consolidate basic movements into proficient swinging skills, and then experiment with the physical properties of the swing and with the social context. Modeling, informal instruction, and practice contribute…

  11. Language: The Greatest Resource for Young Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curry-Rood, Leah

    2001-01-01

    Argues that the single greatest resource to share and focus on with young children is language. Provides guidelines and specific titles for selection of books most appropriate for each stage of development: (1) for infants; (2) for toddlers and twos; and (3) for three-year-olds. Includes a buyer's directory guide for children's books. (SD)

  12. Emergence of Lying in Very Young Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Angela D.; Lee, Kang

    2013-01-01

    Lying is a pervasive human behavior. Evidence to date suggests that from the age of 42 months onward, children become increasingly capable of telling lies in various social situations. However, there is limited experimental evidence regarding whether very young children will tell lies spontaneously. The present study investigated the emergence of…

  13. Teaching Young Children to Use Contact Lenses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathews, Judith R.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Four young children were taught contact lens wear using a shaping procedure, which involved praise and tangibles for compliance and time-outs or restraint for noncompliance. At followup, levels of compliance were high for three children, while a subject with Down's syndrome showed low compliance with need for physical restraint throughout.…

  14. Creativity in Young Children - Attitude or Ability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dudek, Stephanie Z.

    There are many myths about young children based on the definition of creativity as an innate capacity for openness to experience. This definition of creativity as a personality trait or attitude (creativity as expressiveness) has little relationship to creativity as the making of original and socially valuable products. Studies of children's art…

  15. Screen Media and Young Children: Who Benefits?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cardany, Audrey Berger

    2010-01-01

    Since the airing of "Sesame Street" in 1985, television produced for children has expanded to more television shows and educational media that includes videos, DVDs, and computer products. Viewing screen media is pervasive in the environments of young children, and companies are designing products for our youngest viewers--infants and toddlers.…

  16. Young Children's Trust in Overtly Misleading Advice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heyman, Gail D.; Sritanyaratana, Lalida; Vanderbilt, Kimberly E.

    2013-01-01

    The ability of 3- and 4-year-old children to disregard advice from an overtly misleading informant was investigated across five studies (total "n" =212). Previous studies have documented limitations in young children's ability to reject misleading advice. This study was designed to test the hypothesis that these limitations are primarily…

  17. Talking with Young Children about Adoption.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watkins, Mary; Fisher, Susan

    Even though current wisdom holds that adoptive parents should talk with their child about adoption as early as possible, no guidelines exist to prepare parents for the various ways their children might respond when these conversations take place. This book discusses how young children make sense of the fact that they are adopted, how their…

  18. Young Children's Scripted-Story Recall.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doiron, Renee; Cameron, Catherine Ann

    A study investigated the effects of presentation mode and type of content on young children's recall of nouns in a scripted narrative. Forty-nine children in the second month of first grade were presented a fictional narrative in which were embedded 18 target nouns classified as high-scripted, medium-scripted, or low-scripted. Subjects then viewed…

  19. Influence of Television Commercials on Young Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lam, Pamela Y. Y.

    This study investigated the influence of television commercials for toys and cereals on young children. Forty-four children, ranging in age from 4 to 7 years, were interviewed regarding their television viewing habits, their attitudes toward television commercials, their demands for their mothers to buy cereals and toys, and their interpretation…

  20. The Varieties of Speech to Young Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huttenlocher, Janellen; Vasilyeva, Marina; Waterfall, Heidi R.; Vevea, Jack L.; Hedges, Larry V.

    2007-01-01

    This article examines caregiver speech to young children. The authors obtained several measures of the speech used to children during early language development (14-30 months). For all measures, they found substantial variation across individuals and subgroups. Speech patterns vary with caregiver education, and the differences are maintained over…

  1. Very Young Children's Development in Moviemaking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthews, John

    2006-01-01

    In this study, I gave a group of six to eight very young Chinese Singaporean children (between 2 and 4 years of age) three identical digital video cameras, plus tripods, and tracked their development in moviemaking over a 2-year period. The children were allowed to explore the cameras freely, though the investigators offered advice and support as…

  2. Planning Environments for Young Children: Physical Space.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kritchevsky, Sybil; And Others

    This monograph, illustrated with photographs and diagrams, explains how to use physical space to encourage children to involve themselves constructively in particular program activities. Program goals should be stated in specific and concrete terms to allow self-direction of young children and teacher flexibility. Analysis is made of the parts of…

  3. Young Gifted Children: Strategies for Preschool Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kitano, Margie

    1982-01-01

    Briefly reviews the literature on gifted education for young children, offers specific methods, and recommends guidelines for working with gifted children in the regular preschool setting. A sample social studies unit on animals and a sample science unit are included in the text. (Author/RH)

  4. Assessment of Young Children: A Collaborative Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fiore, Lisa B.

    2012-01-01

    In an era of standards and norms where assessment tends to minimize or dismiss individual differences and results in punitive outcomes or no action at all, Assessment of Young Children provides teachers with an approach to assessment that is in the best interest of both children and their families. Author Lisa B. Fiore explores a variety of ways…

  5. Perceptions of Social Support among Young Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gamble, Wendy C; Woulbroun, E. Jeanne

    1995-01-01

    Examined how young children participating in early childhood programs perceive the social support they receive. Results indicated that pre- and early elementary school-age children can respond to questions about their social support networks in reasonably reliable and valid ways. Significant correlations with indices of perceived competence and…

  6. Health-Related Fitness and Young Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gabbard, Carl; LeBlanc, Betty

    Because research indicates that American youth have become fatter since the 1960's, the development of fitness among young children should not be left to chance. Simple games, rhythms, and dance are not sufficient to insure fitness, for, during the regular free play situation, children very seldom experience physical activity of enough intensity…

  7. Young Children's Knowledge about Printed Names

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Treiman, Rebecca; Cohen, Jeremy; Mulqueeny, Kevin; Kessler, Brett; Schechtman, Suzanne

    2007-01-01

    Four experiments examined young children's knowledge about the visual characteristics of writing, specifically personal names. Children younger than 4 years of age, even those who could read no simple words, showed some knowledge about the horizontal orientation of English names, the Latin letters that make them up, and their left-to-right…

  8. Health and social care costs for young adults with epilepsy in the UK.

    PubMed

    Beecham, Jennifer; Snell, Tom; Perkins, Margaret; Knapp, Martin

    2010-09-01

    Maintaining contact with services will help improve clinical and social outcomes as children with epilepsy move into their adult lives. This study has collated evidence on the extent to which young adults with epilepsy are supported by health and social care services posttransition, and the costs of such support. UK prevalence and service use data were taken from policy and research literature, as well as national data sets and reports. Costs were attached to these data to arrive at agency and overall total costs. There are approximately 42,000 young adults (18-25 years) with epilepsy costing the UK health and social care budgets 715.3 pound million per annum, on average 17,000 found per young adult with epilepsy. A further 61 pound million falls to the social security budget. Most young adults with epilepsy will rarely use these services, but those with additional health needs have high and often long-term support needs, including supported accommodation and personal care. Current resources used by these young adults are summarised but deficits in service availability can mean long waiting times and sub-optimal treatment. Young adults also want more support to help them take advantage of education and employment opportunities and more information about managing the impacts of epilepsy on their lives. Improving services will cost money, but has the potential to lead to better outcomes for young adults.

  9. Weight-Related Health Behaviors and Body Mass: Associations between Young Adults and Their Parents, Moderated by Parental Authority

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Niemeier, Brandi S.; Hektner, Joel M.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Parents' behaviors could contribute to the development of their children's weight-related health behaviors. Purpose: Relationships of young adults' (N = 151) and their parents' weight-related behaviors were examined along with parental authority styles. Methods: Questionnaires were completed by young adults and their parents.…

  10. Secondary Level Re-Entry of Young Canadian Adult Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacGregor, Cassandra; Ryan, Thomas G.

    2011-01-01

    This paper illuminates and details some of the traits, pressures and semi-autonomy of the young adult between the ages of 18 and 24 who must confront the barriers and challenges upon returning to secondary school within the high school and the adult education centre context. Focusing on these young adults is fundamentally important to begin to…

  11. Factors Affecting Sentence Severity for Young Adult Offenders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenwood, Peter W.; And Others

    This document analyzes the sentencing of young adult defendants in comparison with older adult and younger juvenile offenders, and disputes prior research which held that young adults received more lenient sentencing, perhaps because of the restrictions on disclosing juvenile delinquency histories. The document presents data from samples of young…

  12. Sexual Prejudice among Puerto Rican young adults

    PubMed Central

    Bauermeister, José A.; Morales, Mercedes M.; Seda, Gretchen; González-Rivera, Milagritos

    2014-01-01

    Sexual prejudice is linked to hate crimes, mental health, risk behaviors, and stigma. Few studies have examined sexual prejudice among Latinos. We surveyed 382 college students in Puerto Rico. A structural model tested whether contact and positive experiences with homosexuals, perceived similarities with peers' attitudes toward homosexuality, and religiosity were predictive of sexual prejudice among Puerto Rican young adults. Sex differences in the structural model were explored. With the exception of peers' attitudes toward homosexuality, all study variables predict sexual prejudice. No sex differences were found. Implications for decreasing sexual prejudice among Puerto Rican youth in a college setting are discussed. PMID:18689195

  13. Understanding Young Children's Capabilities: Approaches to Interviews with Young Children Experiencing Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Underwood, Kathryn; Chan, Cherry; Koller, Donna; Valeo, Angela

    2015-01-01

    This study examines the efficacy of engaging young children with disabilities in interviews to elicit their perspectives on their own capabilities. Using the theoretical framework of the capability approach, the authors investigated the efficacy of different interview techniques to engage young children with disabilities in research about their…

  14. Emotion Knowledge in Young Neglected Children

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, Margaret W.; Bennett, David S.; Carpenter, Kim; Lewis, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Young neglected children may be at risk for emotion knowledge deficits. Children with histories of neglect or with no maltreatment were initially seen at age 4 and again 1 year later to assess their emotion knowledge. Higher IQ was associated with better emotion knowledge, but neglected children had consistently poorer emotion knowledge over time compared to non-neglected children after controlling for IQ. Because both neglected status and IQ may contribute to deficits in emotional knowledge, both should be assessed when evaluating these children to appropriately design and pace emotion knowledge interventions. PMID:18299632

  15. Ecological Human Brain and Young Children's "Naturalist Intelligence" from the Perspective of Developmentally and Culturally Appropriate Practice (DCAP).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hyun, Eunsook

    Based on the view that young children have a different intellectual culture from adults' in the way they know and understand nature, this paper explores ecological human brain development, children's intellectual culture of naturalist intelligence, and developmentally and culturally congruent curricula for young children. The paper discusses the…

  16. Nonmedical use of prescription medications in young adults.

    PubMed

    Tapscott, Brian E; Schepis, Ty S

    2013-12-01

    Nonmedical use of prescription medications (NUPM) is an area of increasing public health concern, particularly in young adults. Young adults aged 18 to 25 have the highest annual and monthly rates of NUPM of any age group in the US, with notable consequences from using opioid, stimulant, tranquilizer and sedative medication. This article will review the literature on young adult NUPM, focusing first on the characteristics of those young adults engaged in NUPM. Then, we will examine the most common motives for NUPM, the sources young adults use to engage in nonmedical use and the related process of medication diversion. Finally, we will outline treatment and make specific recommendations of ways clinicians can help prevent the spread of NUPM in young adults, completing the work by covering future directions for research.

  17. Parental Caregiving by Adult Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stoller, Eleanor Palo

    1983-01-01

    Explored the impact of employment and familial responsibilities on the assistance provided to elderly parents (N=153) by adult children (N=502). Results showed hours of assistance varied with the level of parental impairment, the presence of the older parents' spouse, and competing demands on the helpers' time. (JAC)

  18. Adult Children and Aging Parents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myers, Jane E.

    This book was developed to assist counselors and other caregivers in working with adult children and their aging parents. The first chapter addresses normative developmental issues in later life. This includes the demography of aging, theories of aging, and attitudes toward older persons, along with suggestions for identifying at-risk populations,…

  19. Merchandising Library Materials to Young Adults. Libraries Unlimited Professional Guides for Young Adult Librarians Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nichols, Mary Anne

    By addressing the concept of merchandising, this handbook shows librarians how to turn their young adult collection into one that will attract teenagers. Delivering an introduction to marketing and merchandising concepts, the author shares years of experience as a teen services librarian, combined with the latest studies and research findings on…

  20. Causal Attributions in Young Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friedberg, Robert D.; Dalenberg, Constance J.

    1990-01-01

    Investigated the causal explanations children use to account for common experiences. In the study, 60 preschoolers watched videotaped puppet shows designed to elicit causal attributions. Most children predominantly used internal, unstable, and specific attributions. (CB)

  1. Counseling Young Children of Alcoholics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brake, Kathryn J.

    1988-01-01

    Provides a rationale for services to children of alcoholics and describes school-based interventions to help these children. Asserts that schools are the logical setting for providing knowledge, skills, and support to help children of alcoholics understand the dysfunctional effects of familial alcoholism. Offers suggestions for school counselors…

  2. Immune Response Genotypes and Risk of Young Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-09-01

    TECHNICAL OBJECTIVES 1) To identify, enroll and collect blood specimens from 368 adolescents and young adults 18-to 45 years old diagnosed with Hodgkin... Young Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Wendy Cozen Victoria Cortessis, Ph.D. David Conti, Ph.D. David...Genotypes and Risk of Young Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-06-1-0683 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Wendy Cozen

  3. Emotion Regulation and Impulsivity in Young Adults

    PubMed Central

    Schreiber, Liana R.N.; Grant, Jon E.; Odlaug, Brian L.

    2012-01-01

    Past research has linked both emotion regulation and impulsivity with the development and maintenance of addictions. However, no research has investigated the relationship between emotion regulation and impulsivity within young adults. In the present study, we analyzed 194 young adults (27.8% female; 21.3 ± 3.32 years old; 91.8% single; 85.1% Caucasian), grouping them as low, average, or high emotionally dysregulated, and compared self-reported impulsivity, impulsive behaviors (such as alcohol and substance use and gambling) and cognitive impulsivity. We hypothesized that those with high levels of emotion dysregulation would score higher on self-reported and cognitive impulsivity, and report more impulsive behaviors. Analysis indicated that compared to low, the high emotion dysregulation group scored significantly higher on two self-report measures of impulsivity, harm avoidance, and cognitive reasoning. No significant differences were found between groups in impulsive behaviors and cognitive impulsivity. Overall, this study highlights the relationship between emotion dysregulation and impulsivity, suggesting that emotion regulation may be an important factor to consider when assessing individuals at a higher risk for developing an addiction. PMID:22385661

  4. Genetics of ischaemic stroke in young adults

    PubMed Central

    Terni, Eva; Giannini, Nicola; Brondi, Marco; Montano, Vincenzo; Bonuccelli, Ubaldo; Mancuso, Michelangelo

    2014-01-01

    Background Stroke may be a clinical expression of several inherited disorders in humans. Recognition of the underlined genetic disorders causing stroke is important for a correct diagnosis, for genetic counselling and, even if rarely, for a correct therapeutic management. Moreover, the genetics of complex diseases such the stroke, in which multiple genes interact with environmental risk factors to increase risk, has been revolutionized by the Genome-Wide Association Study (GWAS) approach. Scope of review Here we review the single-gene causes of ischemic stroke, bringing the reader from the candidate gene method toward the exciting new horizons of genetic technology. Major conclusions The aetiological diagnosis of ischemic stroke in young adults is more complex than in the elderly. The identification of a genetic cause is important to provide appropriate counseling and to start a correct therapy, when available. The advent of GWAS technology, such as for other complex pathological conditions, has contributed enormously to the understanding of many of these genetic bases. For success large, well phenotyped case cohorts are required, and international collaborations are essential. General significance This review focuses on the main causes of genetically-based ischemic stroke in young adults, often classified as indeterminate, investigating also the recent findings of the GWAS, in order to improve diagnostic and therapeutic management. PMID:26672892

  5. Young Adults' Implicit and Explicit Attitudes towards the Sexuality of Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Ashley E; O'Sullivan, Lucia F; Byers, E Sandra; Shaughnessy, Krystelle

    2014-09-01

    Sexual interest and capacity can extend far into later life and result in many positive health outcomes. Yet there is little support for sexual expression in later life, particularly among young adults. This study assessed and compared young adults' explicit and implicit attitudes towards older adult sexuality. A sample of 120 participants (18-24 years; 58% female) completed a self-report (explicit) measure and a series of Implicit Association Tests capturing attitudes towards sexuality among older adults. Despite reporting positive explicit attitudes, young people revealed an implicit bias against the sexual lives of older adults. In particular, young adults demonstrated implicit biases favouring general, as compared to sexual, activities and young adults as compared to older adults. Moreover, the bias favouring general activities was amplified with regard to older adults as compared to younger adults. Our findings challenge the validity of research relying on self-reports of attitudes about older adult sexuality.

  6. Young Children Surfing: Gender Differences in Computer Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirmani, Mubina Hassanali; Davis, Marcia H.; Kalyanpur, Maya

    2009-01-01

    Computers have become an important part of young children's lives, both as a source of entertainment and education. The National Association for the Education of Young Children's (NAEYC) position statement on Technology and Young Children (2006) supports the need for equal access to technology for all children with attention to eliminating gender…

  7. Differences among Adolescent, Young Adult, and Adult Callers of Suicide Help Lines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Anda, Diane; Smith, Melanie A.

    1993-01-01

    Examined data on 165 adolescents, 65 young adults, and 175 adults who called 2 suicide help lines. Adults and young adults reported depression as primary reason for contemplating suicide; adolescents reported interpersonal problems. Although callers reported suicide ideation, very small percentage fell into high-risk categories with regard to…

  8. Young children as protagonists and the role of participatory, visual methods in engaging multiple perspectives.

    PubMed

    Clark, Alison

    2010-09-01

    How can the perspectives, insights and interests of young children, under 6 years-old, be given status in processes of change? This paper will examine the contribution participatory and visual methods can make to enabling young children to document their experiences and to facilitate exchange with adults. Examples will be drawn from three research studies in educational settings which have developed a specific research method, the Mosaic approach (Clark and Moss 2001; Clark 2004; Clark 2005) which brings together visual and verbal research tools. This paper will discuss how researching with young children rather than on young children can redraw the boundaries between adults' and children's roles in the research process including the relationship with the research audience.

  9. Childhood Predictors of Young Adult Male Crime.

    PubMed

    Ou, Suh-Ruu; Reynolds, Arthur J

    2010-08-01

    The study sample was drawn from the Chicago Longitudinal Study (CLS), an ongoing investigation of a panel of low-income minority children (93% Black) growing up in high-poverty neighborhoods in Chicago. The study sample included 733 males who were active by age 26. Adult criminal records were collected through administrative records and supplemented with self-reports. Outcome measures included incarceration, conviction, and felony conviction by age 26. Probit regression was used to analyze the data. Findings indicated that common childhood predictors were AFDC participation by child's age 3, negative home environment, maltreatment experience, trouble making behavior, and number of school moves. Unique predictors were mother unemployed by child's age 3 for incarceration or jail, four or more children in household by child's age 3 for felony conviction, and mother did not complete high school by child's age 3 and social competence for both incarceration or jail and felony conviction. Implications on crime prevention were discussed.

  10. Gaining Representations of Children's and Adults' Constructions of Sustainability Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barraza, Laura; Robottom, Ian

    2008-01-01

    In this decade of Education for Sustainable Development, it is timely to consider the methodological issues associated with researching this topic not only with adults but also with the young children who, as members of the next generation, will experience the success or otherwise of current environmental sustainability efforts. We argue that it…

  11. Spotlight on Young Children and Social Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koralek, Derry, Ed.; Mindes, Gayle, Ed.

    2006-01-01

    When engaged in social studies, with guidance and encouragement from adults, children develop awareness of self and family and become active participants in the larger community. The knowledge and skills learned through social studies prepare children to become informed and engaged citizens of their country and the world. In this collection of…

  12. Both young and older adults discount suggestions from older adults on a social memory test.

    PubMed

    Davis, Sara D; Meade, Michelle L

    2013-08-01

    In the present study, we examined the impacts of participant age and confederate age on social memory processes. During a collaborative recall phase, young and older adult participants were exposed to the erroneous memory reports of a young or an older adult confederate. On a subsequent individual recall test, young and older adult participants were equally likely to incorporate the confederates' erroneous suggestions into their memory reports, suggesting that participant age had a minimal effect on social memory processes. However, confederate age did have a marked effect: Young adult participants were less likely to incorporate misleading suggestions from older adult confederates and less likely to report "remembering" items suggested by older adult confederates. Critically, older adult participants were also less likely to incorporate misleading information from fellow older adult confederates. Both young and older adult participants discounted older adult confederates' contributions to a memory test.

  13. Supporting communication in young children with developmental disabilities.

    PubMed

    Kaiser, A P; Hester, P P; McDuffie, A S

    2001-01-01

    The behavior of parents, adult caregivers, and peers comprises the critical features of community support for the development of communication in young children with developmental disabilities. In a bio-ecological model of development, communication development is the result of the interactions of individuals with specific characteristics, in particular contexts over time. From the perspective of this model, foundational findings of intervention research to current views of communication development in children with developmental disabilities are summarized. The contributions of individual child characteristics to child-caregiver interactions that support language development are illustrated based on research with children who have autism, Williams syndrome, Down syndrome, and children who use augmentative communication systems. Parent-child interaction and the quality and quantity of parent talk are discussed as factors in children's language development. The effects of young children's delayed language on their interactions with peers, the contributions of peers to children's language learning and use, and the critical features of classroom settings that support child language development are reviewed. MRDD Research Reviews 7:143-150, 2001.

  14. Investigating Science with Young Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Althouse, Rosemary

    Teaching science by a process approach is an exciting adventure for both teachers and their students. Process science is an open ended approach, and the direction learning will take place is determined, for the most part, by the children. This method requires that teachers understand how children learn, know the possibilities a topic offers for…

  15. Candy consumption in childhood is not predictive of weight, adiposity measures or cardiovascular risk factors in young adults: the Bogalusa Heart Study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There are limited data available on the longitudinal relationship between candy consumption by children on weight and other cardiovascular risk factors (CVRF) in young adults. The present study investigated whether candy consumption in children was predictive of weight and CVRF in young adults. A lo...

  16. Spatial Construction Skills of Chimpanzees ("Pan Troglodytes") and Young Human Children ("Homo Sapiens Sapiens")

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poti, Patrizia; Hayashi, Misato; Matsuzawa, Tetsuro

    2009-01-01

    Spatial construction tasks are basic tests of visual-spatial processing. Two studies have assessed spatial construction skills in chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) and young children (Homo sapiens sapiens) with a block modelling task. Study 1a subjects were three young chimpanzees and five adult chimpanzees. Study 1b subjects were 30 human children…

  17. Trust and trustworthiness in young and older adults.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Phoebe E; Slessor, Gillian; Rieger, Matthias; Rendell, Peter G; Moustafa, Ahmed A; Ruffman, Ted

    2015-12-01

    In a series of 1-shot economic trust games in which participants could make real monetary profits, but also risked losing money, 2 studies compared young and older adults' trust (amount invested with trustees) and trustworthiness (amount returned to investors by trustees). In Study 1, young (n = 35) and older (n = 32) participants acted as investors, and the age of simulated trustees (young, older) was manipulated. In Study 2, young (n = 61) and older (n = 67) participants acted in real life as both investors and trustees. They completed 2 face-to-face trust games with same- and other-age partners, and 3 anonymous trust games with same-, other-, and unknown-age partners. Study 1 found that young and older participants rate older trustees as appearing more trustworthy than young trustees, but neither group invest more with older than young trustees. Rather, older participants were more likely than young participants to invest money averaged across trustee age. In Study 2, there were no age-related differences in trust, but older adults were more trustworthy than young adults in anonymous games with same- and unknown-age partners. It was also found that young adults demonstrate greater reputational concerns than older adults by reciprocating more trust when face-to-face than anonymous. We discuss the complex influences of age on trust game investing and reciprocation, as well as the implications for older adults' wellbeing and financial security.

  18. Curriculum for Young Deaf Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Restaino, Lillian C. R.; And Others

    Presented is a curriculum designed to provide the teacher of the young deaf child with learning disabilities with a description of developmental objectives and methods for fulfilling these objectives in the areas of gross motor development, sensory motor integration, visual analysis, attention and memory, and conceptualization. The objectives are…

  19. Do Young Children Understand Relative Value Comparisons?

    PubMed Central

    Benenson, Joyce F.; Markovits, Henry; Whitmore, Bjorn; Van, Christophe; Margolius, Sara; Wrangham, Richard W.

    2015-01-01

    Many forms of judgments, such as those used in economic games or measures of social comparison, require understanding relative value, as well as the more complex ability to make comparisons between relative values. To examine whether young children can accurately compare relative values, we presented children 4 to 7 years with simple judgments of relative value in two scenarios. Children then were asked to compare the relative values in the two scenarios. Results show that even the youngest children downgraded evaluations of a reward when another has a larger amount, indicating the ability to make relative value judgments. When asked to compare relative values however, only the oldest children were able to make these comparisons consistently. We then extended this analysis to economic game performance. Specifically, previous results using economic games suggest that younger children are more generous than older ones. We replicate this result, and then show that a simple change in procedure, based on the initial study, is sufficient to change young children’s choices. Our results strongly suggest that conclusions regarding young children’s pro-social motives based on relative value comparisons should be viewed cautiously. PMID:25875949

  20. Young Children Treat Robots as Informants.

    PubMed

    Breazeal, Cynthia; Harris, Paul L; DeSteno, David; Kory Westlund, Jacqueline M; Dickens, Leah; Jeong, Sooyeon

    2016-04-01

    Children ranging from 3 to 5 years were introduced to two anthropomorphic robots that provided them with information about unfamiliar animals. Children treated the robots as interlocutors. They supplied information to the robots and retained what the robots told them. Children also treated the robots as informants from whom they could seek information. Consistent with studies of children's early sensitivity to an interlocutor's non-verbal signals, children were especially attentive and receptive to whichever robot displayed the greater non-verbal contingency. Such selective information seeking is consistent with recent findings showing that although young children learn from others, they are selective with respect to the informants that they question or endorse.

  1. Identifying Correlates of Young Adults' Weight Behavior: Survey Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larson, Nicole; Neumark-Sztainer, Dianne; Story, Mary; van den Berg, Patricia; Hannan, Peter J.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To describe the development and psychometric properties of survey measures relevant to eating, physical activity, and weight-related behaviors among young adults. Methods: Focus groups and reliability testing guided the development of the Project EAT-III survey. The final survey was completed by 2287 young adults. Results: The…

  2. Reinforcement Learning in Young Adults with Developmental Language Impairment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Joanna C.; Tomblin, J. Bruce

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the study was to examine reinforcement learning (RL) in young adults with developmental language impairment (DLI) within the context of a neurocomputational model of the basal ganglia-dopamine system (Frank, Seeberger, & O'Reilly, 2004). Two groups of young adults, one with DLI and the other without, were recruited. A probabilistic…

  3. Serving Adolescents' Reading Interests through Young Adult Literature. Fastback 258.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fuchs, Lucy

    Intended to help parents and teachers select books for young people that reflect the actual interests of adolescents, this booklet discusses titles that both appeal to teenagers and help adults gain insight into their needs, their concerns, and their values. Titles of chapters in the booklet are as follows: (1) "Are Young Adult Books…

  4. List Memory in Young Adults with Language Learning Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheng, Li; Byrd, Courtney T.; McGregor, Karla K.; Zimmerman, Hannah; Bludau, Kadee

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to characterize the verbal memory limitations of young adults with language learning disability (LLD). Method: Sixteen young adults with LLD and 34 age- and education-matched controls with typical language participated in a Deese-Roediger-McDermott (DRM; Deese, 1959; Roediger & McDermott, 1995) list…

  5. Perceptions of Resiliency and Coping: Homeless Young Adults Speak Out

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Sanna J.; Ryan, Tiffany N.; Montgomery, Katherine L.; Lippman, Angie Del Prado; Bender, Kimberly; Ferguson, Kristin

    2016-01-01

    This study explored the perceptions of resilience and coping among homeless young adults, a focus that differs from previous research by considering the unconventional resilience and coping of this high-risk population. Semistructured qualitative interviews were conducted with 45 homeless young adults. Individual interviews were audio recorded,…

  6. Sexual Behaviors and AIDS Concerns among Young Adult Heterosexual Males.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pomerantz, Sherry C.; Vergare, Michael J.

    As the human immunodeficiency virus spreads beyond homosexuals and intravenous drug users into the heterosexual community, there is heightened interest in the sexual behavior of sexually active young adults. There is little information on young adult black males, who may be at increased risk, since blacks in this country are contracting Acquired…

  7. Social Cognitive Correlates of Young Adult Sport Competitors' Sunscreen Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berndt, Nadine C.; O'Riordan, David L.; Winkler, Elisabeth; McDermott, Liane; Spathonis, Kym; Owen, Neville

    2011-01-01

    Young adults participating in outdoor sports represent a high-risk group for excessive sun exposure. The purpose of this study was to identify modifiable social cognitive correlates of sunscreen use among young adult competitors. Participants aged 18 to 30 years who competed in soccer (n = 65), surf-lifesaving (n = 63), hockey (n = 61), and tennis…

  8. Economic Socialization, Saving and Assets in European Young Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webley, Paul; Nyhus, Ellen K.

    2013-01-01

    We analyze the role economic socialization plays in the economic behavior and asset accumulation of young adults by parents using data from European young adults and teenagers. We study the role of four distinct strands of economic socialization (providing pocket money, jobs at home, work for others, and parental encouragement) using a Dutch…

  9. Young Adults' Linguistic Manipulation of English in Bangla in Bangladesh

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sultana, Shaila

    2014-01-01

    It is commonly assumed in the print media that bilingual young adults in Bangladesh are subjugated by the colonial legacy of English and they are "polluting" Bangla, the national language of Bangladesh, by their indiscriminate insertion of English in it. However, this ethnographic study on a group of young adults in a university in…

  10. Young Adult Literature in the Malaysian Secondary School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Govindarajoo, Mallika V.; Mukundan, Jayakaran

    2013-01-01

    This article presents the results of a study on the experience of the Malaysian secondary school student with Young Adult Literature in the English language classroom. The study aimed to determine the extent to which the Malaysian secondary school student identified with the young adult protagonists and issues in the novels which have been…

  11. Dental Care among Young Adults with Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kancherla, Vijaya; Van Naarden Braun, Kim; Yeargin-Allsopp, Marshalyn

    2013-01-01

    Dental care among young adults with intellectual disability (ID) is poorly documented and largely unmet. By using population-based data from the Metropolitan Atlanta Developmental Disabilities Follow-Up Study, we assessed factors associated with at least one or two dental visits per year among young adults with and without ID. Significantly fewer…

  12. Intergenerational Relationships and Affectual Solidarity between Grandparents and Young Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monserud, Maria A.

    2008-01-01

    This study examines whether both parents' relationships with their offspring, parents, and parents-in-law matter for young adults' perceptions of closeness to grandparents. This study focuses on two groups of grandchildren (ages 18-23) in Wave 2 of the National Survey of Families and Households: young adults with married biological parents (N =…

  13. Transitions and Loss: Illuminating Parameters of Young Adults' Mental Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowling, Louise; Weber, Zita; Scanlon, Lesley

    2005-01-01

    Different disciplinary groups are increasingly questioning current conceptualisations of young adults' educational, social and personal lives after compulsory schooling. New perspectives are being advanced on the life trajectories of choice and complexity now experienced by school leavers. A consistent theme is the changed nature of young adults'…

  14. Using Young Adult Literature with Adolescent Learners of English.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watts, Elizabeth L.

    1999-01-01

    Discusses (1) a rationale for using young adult literature with adolescent English-as-a-Second-Language learners; (2) an approach to teaching the novel "Make Lemonade" by Virginia Euwer Wolff; (3) activities in which students engaged and samples of their work; and (4) implications for teachers who explore young adult literature with…

  15. Teens' Favorite Books: Young Adults' Choices 1987-1992.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Reading Association, Newark, DE.

    Designed to make the job of encouraging adolescents to read less of a challenge, this book provides descriptions of all of the approximately 150 examples of young adult literature that were selected "Young Adults' Choices" in the yearly voting by teenagers conducted from 1987 to 1992. Each entry in the book includes bibliographic…

  16. Preservice Teachers' Discussion of a Multicultural Young Adult Novel.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bean, Thomas W.; Valerio, Paul Cantu; Mallette, Marla H.; Readence, John E.

    1999-01-01

    Explores preservice elementary teachers' literature-circle discussion of a multicultural young-adult novel with a focus on two research questions: how preservice teachers discuss a multicultural young-adult novel, and what are the views and theories that informed their understanding of literature response discussion. Participants in the discussion…

  17. Reading Interests of Young Adults in Medina County, Ohio.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fronius, Sandra K.

    The purpose of this study was to determine the reading interests of the young adult participants in the summer reading program at Medina County District Library (Ohio). Findings were compared to research done in other locations and to current bibliographies of recommended reading for young adults. The study looked at a systematic sample of reader…

  18. Caffeine consumption in young children.

    PubMed

    Warzak, William J; Evans, Shelby; Floress, Margaret T; Gross, Amy C; Stoolman, Sharon

    2011-03-01

    Two hundred twenty-eight surveyed parents reported that their 5 to 7 year old children drank approximately 52 mg of caffeine daily and their 8 to 12 year old children drank 109 mg daily. Caffeine consumption and hours slept were significantly negatively correlated, but caffeine consumption and enuresis were not significantly correlated. Spanish-speaking parents reported fewer bedwetting events than their English-speaking peers.

  19. Quality Books about Bullying in the Young Adult Tradition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larson, Joanne; Hoover, John H.

    2012-01-01

    Anti-bullying experts employ trade books in dealing with contemporary issues facing young people, including bullying. At least three conceptual strands underpin the application of young adult literature (YAL) in such enterprises: (1) reliance on tested voices appealing to young readers; (2) the potential effect of quality YAL on literacy…

  20. Neural correlates of letter reversal in children and adults.

    PubMed

    Blackburne, Liwei King; Eddy, Marianna D; Kalra, Priya; Yee, Debbie; Sinha, Pawan; Gabrieli, John D E

    2014-01-01

    Children often make letter reversal errors when first learning to read and write, even for letters whose reversed forms do not appear in normal print. However, the brain basis of such letter reversal in children learning to read is unknown. The present study compared the neuroanatomical correlates (via functional magnetic resonance imaging) and the electrophysiological correlates (via event-related potentials or ERPs) of this phenomenon in children, ages 5-12, relative to young adults. When viewing reversed letters relative to typically oriented letters, adults exhibited widespread occipital, parietal, and temporal lobe activations, including activation in the functionally localized visual word form area (VWFA) in left occipito-temporal cortex. Adults exhibited significantly greater activation than children in all of these regions; children only exhibited such activation in a limited frontal region. Similarly, on the P1 and N170 ERP components, adults exhibited significantly greater differences between typical and reversed letters than children, who failed to exhibit significant differences between typical and reversed letters. These findings indicate that adults distinguish typical and reversed letters in the early stages of specialized brain processing of print, but that children do not recognize this distinction during the early stages of processing. Specialized brain processes responsible for early stages of letter perception that distinguish between typical and reversed letters may develop slowly and remain immature even in older children who no longer produce letter reversals in their writing.