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Sample records for adv manuf technol

  1. ADV36 adipogenic adenovirus in human liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Trovato, Francesca M; Catalano, Daniela; Garozzo, Adriana; Martines, G Fabio; Pirri, Clara; Trovato, Guglielmo M

    2014-01-01

    Obesity and liver steatosis are usually described as related diseases. Obesity is regarded as exclusive consequence of an imbalance between food intake and physical exercise, modulated by endocrine and genetic factors. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), is a condition whose natural history is related to, but not completely explained by over-nutrition, obesity and insulin resistance. There is evidence that environmental infections, and notably adipogenic adenoviruses (ADV) infections in humans, are associated not only with obesity, which is sufficiently established, but also with allied conditions, such as fatty liver. In order to elucidate the role, if any, of previous ADV36 infection in humans, we investigated association of ADV36-ADV37 seropositivity with obesity and fatty liver in humans. Moreover, the possibility that lifestyle-nutritional intervention in patients with NAFLD and different ADV36 seropositive status, achieves different clinical outcomes on ultrasound bright liver imaging, insulin resistance and obesity was challenged. ADV36 seropositive patients have a more consistent decrease in insulin resistance, fatty liver severity and body weight in comparison with ADV36 seronegative patients, indicating a greater responsiveness to nutritional intervention. These effects were not dependent on a greater pre-interventional body weight and older age. These results imply that no obvious disadvantage - and, seemingly, that some benefit - is linked to ADV36 seropositivity, at least in NAFLD. ADV36 previous infection can boost weight loss and recovery of insulin sensitivity under interventional treatment. PMID:25356033

  2. The relationship between capsid protein (VP2) sequence and pathogenicity of Aleutian mink disease parvovirus (ADV): a possible role for raccoons in the transmission of ADV infections.

    PubMed Central

    Oie, K L; Durrant, G; Wolfinbarger, J B; Martin, D; Costello, F; Perryman, S; Hogan, D; Hadlow, W J; Bloom, M E

    1996-01-01

    Aleutian mink disease parvovirus (ADV) DNA was identified by PCR in samples from mink and raccoons on commercial ranches during an outbreak of Aleutian disease (AD). Comparison of DNA sequences of the hypervariable portion of VP2, the major capsid protein of ADV, indicated that both mink and raccoons were infected by a new isolate of ADV, designated ADV-TR. Because the capsid proteins of other parvoviruses play a prominent role in the determination of viral pathogenicity and host range, we decided to examine the relationship between the capsid protein sequences and pathogenicity of ADV. Comparison of the ADV-TR hypervariable region sequence with sequences of other isolates of ADV revealed that ADV-TR was 94 to 100% related to the nonpathogenic type 1 ADV-G at both the DNA and amino acid levels but less than 90% related to other pathogenic ADVs like the type 2 ADV-Utah, the type 3 ADV-ZK8, or ADV-Pullman. This finding indicated that a virus with a type 1 hypervariable region could be pathogenic. To perform a more comprehensive analysis, the complete VP2 sequence of ADV-TR was obtained and compared with that of the 647-amino-acid VP2 of ADV-G and the corresponding VP2 sequences of the pathogenic ADV-Utah, ADV-Pullman, and ADV-ZK8. Although the hypervariable region amino acid sequence of ADV-TR was identical to that of ADV-G, there were 12 amino acid differences between ADV-G and ADV-TR. Each of these differences was at a position where other pathogenic isolates also differed from ADV-G. Thus, although ADV-TR had the hypervariable sequence of the nonpathogenic type 1 ADV-G, the remainder of the VP2 sequence resembled sequences of other pathogenic ADVs. Under experimental conditions, ADV-TR and ADV-Utah were highly pathogenic and induced typical AD in trios of both Aleutian and non-Aleutian mink, whereas ADV-Pullman was pathogenic only for Aleutian mink and ADV-G was noninfectious. Trios of raccoons experimentally inoculated with ADV-TR and ADV-Utah all became infected

  3. Stilling Basin Performance Analysis by ADV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleyasin, Sobhan; Fathi, Nima; Vorobieff, Peter

    2014-11-01

    The outlet flow from dams, channels, and pipes, as well as the river flow, can cause damage to the bed of the river or channel and cause scouring of structures such as the saddles of bridges, because of the huge amount of the kinetic energy carried by the flow. One of the ways to dissipate this energy is via the use of stilling basins, which are structures that calm the flow. Here we present a study of one type of stilling basins for pipe outlets based on a widely used standard. During the study, splitters and cellular baffles were placed in the stilling basin, and their locations were changed to assess their effect on the flow dissipation. Velocity at several locations in the basin was measured via acoustic Doppler velocimetry (ADV) for different Froude numbers to investigate the effect of flow rate and inlet velocity. Based on the findings of the experiments, we make several suggestions regarding the efficiency and geometry of stilling basins.

  4. Optimized combination therapies with adefovir dipivoxil (ADV) and lamivudine, telbivudine, or entecavir may be effective for chronic hepatitis B patients with a suboptimal response to ADV monotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiangyong; Jie, Yusheng; You, Xu; Shi, Hong; Zhang, Min; Wu, Yuankai; Lin, Guoli; Li, Xinhua; Gao, Zhiliang; Chong, Yutian

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To identify high risk factors in chronic hepatitis B (CHB) patients for suboptimal response to adefovir dipivoxil (ADV) monotherapy, and to assess the efficacy of optimized therapy combining ADV with lamivudine (LAM), telbivudine (LdT), or entecavir (ETV) in patients with a suboptimal response to ADV alone. Methods: Suboptimal response to ADV monotherapy was defined as having a decline in serum hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA level of more than 1 log compared to baseline, but with viremia still detectable (HBV DNA ≥ 100 IU/mL), after 48 weeks of therapy. All patients who received ADV monotherapy in our clinic were analyzed retrospectively. Both univariate and multivariate logistic regression models were applied for risk factor analysis. Patients who showed suboptimal response completed at least 12 months of optimized combination therapy consisting of ADV plus LAM, ADV plus LdT, ADV plus ETV, or continuous ADV monotherapy. The primary outcome measurement was complete viral suppression, indicated by a reduction of HBV DNA to undetectable levels (CVS, with HBV DNA < 100 IU/mL). Secondary outcome measures were HBeAg seroconversion for HBeAg-positive patients, HBsAg loss, alanine aminotransferase (ALT) normalization and virological breakthrough rates. Results: Of 521 patients who received ADV monotherapy, 170 showed a suboptimal response. These were grouped for continued therapy as follows: 34 in group A (continuous ADV monotherapy), 55 in group B (ADV plus LAM), 38 in group C (ADV plus LdT), and 43 in group D (ADV plus ETV). Using a logistic model, five conditions were identified as high risk factors for suboptimal response: presence of the tyrosine-methionine-aspartate-aspartate (YMDD) HBV DNA polymerase mutation; being HBeAg positive; having a high baseline level of HBV DNA; having a primary virological non-response to ADV; and [initial virological response] to ADV. After 48 weeks of ADV monotherapy, there were no withdrawn patients who had experienced side

  5. Nucleotide sequence and genomic organization of Aleutian mink disease parvovirus (ADV): sequence comparisons between a nonpathogenic and a pathogenic strain of ADV.

    PubMed Central

    Bloom, M E; Alexandersen, S; Perryman, S; Lechner, D; Wolfinbarger, J B

    1988-01-01

    A DNA sequence of 4,592 nucleotides (nt) was derived for the nonpathogenic ADV-G strain of Aleutian mink disease parvovirus (ADV). The 3'(left) end of the virion strand contained a 117-nt palindrome that could assume a Y-shaped configuration similar to, but less stable than, that of other parvoviruses. The sequence obtained for the 5' end was incomplete and did not contain the 5' (right) hairpin structure but ended just after a 25-nt A + T-rich direct repeat. Features of ADV genomic organization are (i) major left (622 amino acids) and right (702 amino acids) open reading frames (ORFs) in different translational frames of the plus-sense strand, (ii) two short mid-ORFs, (iii) eight potential promoter motifs (TATA boxes), including ones at 3 and 36 map units, and (iv) six potential polyadenylation sites, including three clustered near the termination of the right ORF. Although the overall homology to other parvoviruses is less than 50%, there are short conserved amino acid regions in both major ORFs. However, two regions in the right ORF allegedly conserved among the parvoviruses were not present in ADV. At the DNA level, ADV-G is 97.5% related to the pathogenic ADV-Utah 1. A total of 22 amino acid changes were found in the right ORF; changes were found in both hydrophilic and hydrophobic regions and generally did not affect the theoretical hydropathy. However, there is a short heterogeneous region at 64 to 65 map units in which 8 out of 11 residues have diverged; this hypervariable segment may be analogous to short amino acid regions in other parvoviruses that determine host range and pathogenicity. These findings suggested that this region may harbor some of the determinants responsible for the differences in pathogenicity of ADV-G and ADV-Utah 1. PMID:2839709

  6. 17 CFR 279.2 - Form ADV-W, notice of withdrawal from registration as investment adviser.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...: For Federal Register citations affecting Form ADV-W, see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Form ADV-W, notice of... § 279.2 Form ADV-W, notice of withdrawal from registration as investment adviser. This form shall...

  7. Research gaps and technology needs in development of PHM for passive AdvSMR components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Ryan M.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Coble, Jamie B.; Hirt, Evelyn H.; Mitchell, Mark R.; Wootan, David W.; Berglin, Eric J.; Bond, Leonard J.; Henagar, Chuck H., Jr.

    2014-02-01

    Advanced small modular reactors (AdvSMRs), which are based on modularization of advanced reactor concepts, may provide a longer-term alternative to traditional light-water reactors and near-term small modular reactors (SMRs), which are based on integral pressurized water reactor (iPWR) concepts. SMRs are challenged economically because of losses in economy of scale; thus, there is increased motivation to reduce the controllable operations and maintenance costs through automation technologies including prognostics health management (PHM) systems. In this regard, PHM systems have the potential to play a vital role in supporting the deployment of AdvSMRs and face several unique challenges with respect to implementation for passive AdvSMR components. This paper presents a summary of a research gaps and technical needs assessment performed for implementation of PHM for passive AdvSMR components.

  8. Research Gaps and Technology Needs in Development of PHM for Passive AdvSMR Components

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, Ryan M.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Coble, Jamie B.; Hirt, Evelyn H.; Mitchell, Mark R.; Wootan, David W.; Berglin, Eric J.; Bond, Leonard J.; Henager, Charles H.

    2014-01-01

    Advanced small modular reactors (AdvSMRs), which are based on modularization of advanced reactor concepts, may provide a longer-term alternative to traditional light-water reactors and near term small modular reactors (SMRs), which are based on integral pressurized water reactor (iPWR) concepts. SMRs are challenged economically due to losses in economy of scale, thus, there is increased motivation to reduce the controllable operations and maintenance (O&M) costs through automation technologies including prognostics health management (PHM) systems. In this regard, PHM systems have the potential to play a vital role in supporting the deployment of AdvSMRs and face several unique challenges with respect to implementation for passive AdvSMR components. This paper presents a summary of a research gaps and technical needs assessment performed for implementation of PHM for passive AdvSMR components. state-of-the-art in PHM.

  9. Research gaps and technology needs in development of PHM for passive AdvSMR components

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, Ryan M.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Hirt, Evelyn H.; Mitchell, Mark R.; Wootan, David W.; Berglin, Eric J.; Henagar, Chuck H. Jr.; Coble, Jamie B.; Bond, Leonard J.

    2014-02-18

    Advanced small modular reactors (AdvSMRs), which are based on modularization of advanced reactor concepts, may provide a longer-term alternative to traditional light-water reactors and near-term small modular reactors (SMRs), which are based on integral pressurized water reactor (iPWR) concepts. SMRs are challenged economically because of losses in economy of scale; thus, there is increased motivation to reduce the controllable operations and maintenance costs through automation technologies including prognostics health management (PHM) systems. In this regard, PHM systems have the potential to play a vital role in supporting the deployment of AdvSMRs and face several unique challenges with respect to implementation for passive AdvSMR components. This paper presents a summary of a research gaps and technical needs assessment performed for implementation of PHM for passive AdvSMR components.

  10. Research on ADV-Hop localization algorithm in wireless sensor networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Shijun; Xu, Xiulan; Zhang, Zhaohui; Sun, Meiling

    2008-10-01

    Wireless sensor networks (WSN) have wide applicability to many important applications including environmental monitoring, military applications and disaster management, etc. In many applications, sensors are assumed to know their absolute locations. Some localization methods of WSN have been proposed. In these methods, nodes equipped with GPS to get precise location information, namely the anchor nodes, are employed to derive the locations of other nodes. Most of the recent work focuses on increasing the accuracy in position estimation. In this paper, aiming at the high communication cost and average positioning error of DV-hop algorithm, an advanced algorithm which is called ADV-hop algorithm is proposed. Simulations are made by the network simulator NS2. The simulation results show that ADV-hop algorithm has lower communication cost and smaller average positioning error than DV-hop algorithm, which makes ADV-hop algorithm more suitable for the node location of WSN.

  11. Local-Level Prognostics Health Management Systems Framework for Passive AdvSMR Components. Interim Report

    SciTech Connect

    Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Roy, Surajit; Hirt, Evelyn H.; Pardini, Allan F.; Jones, Anthony M.; Deibler, John E.

    2014-09-12

    This report describes research results to date in support of the integration and demonstration of diagnostics technologies for prototypical AdvSMR passive components (to establish condition indices for monitoring) with model-based prognostics methods. The focus of the PHM methodology and algorithm development in this study is at the localized scale. Multiple localized measurements of material condition (using advanced nondestructive measurement methods), along with available measurements of the stressor environment, enhance the performance of localized diagnostics and prognostics of passive AdvSMR components and systems.

  12. EVALUATION OF RANGE ESTIMATES FOR TOYOTA FCHV-ADV UNDER OPEN ROAD DRIVING CONDITIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Anton, D.; Wipke, K.; Sprik, S.

    2009-07-10

    The objective of this evaluation was to independently and objectively verify driving ranges of >400 miles announced by Toyota for its new advanced Fuel Cell Hybrid Vehicle (FCHV-adv) utilizing 70 MPa compressed hydrogen. To accomplish this, participants from both Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) witnessed and participated in a 2-vehicle evaluation with Toyota Motor Engineering & Manufacturing North America, Inc. (TEMA) over a typical open road route for over 11 hours in one day with all relevant data recorded. SRNL and TEMA first entered into discussions of verifying the range of the advanced Toyota Fuel Cell Hybrid Vehicle (FCHV-adv) in August 2008 resulting from reported 400+ mile range by Toyota. After extended negotiations, a CRADA agreement, SRNS CRADA No. CR-04-003, was signed on May 6, 2009. Subsequently, on June 30, 2009 SRNL and NREL participated in an all-day evaluation of the FCHV-adv with TEMA to determine the real-world driving range of this vehicle through on-road driving on an extended round-trip drive between Torrance and San Diego, California. SRNL and NREL observed the vehicles being refueled at Toyota's headquarters the day before the evaluation in Torrance, CA on June 29. At 8:00 AM on June 30, the vehicles departed Torrance north toward downtown Los Angeles, then west to the Pacific Coast Highway, and down to San Diego. After lunch the vehicles retraced their route back to Torrance. The traffic encountered was much heavier than anticipated, causing the vehicles to not return to Torrance until 9 PM. Each vehicle was driven by the same Toyota driver all day, with one SRNL/NREL observer in each vehicle the entire route. Data was logged by Toyota and analyzed by NREL. The maximum range of the FCHV-adv vehicles was calculated to be 431 miles under these driving conditions. This distance was calculated from the actual range of 331.5 miles during over 11 hours driving, plus 99.5 miles of

  13. A test of the ADV-based Reynolds flux method for in situ estimation of sediment settling velocity in a muddy estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cartwright, Grace M.; Friedrichs, Carl T.; Smith, S. Jarrell

    2013-12-01

    Under conditions common in muddy coastal and estuarine environments, acoustic Doppler velocimeters (ADVs) can serve to estimate sediment settling velocity ( w s) by assuming a balance between upward turbulent Reynolds flux and downward gravitational settling. Advantages of this method include simple instrument deployment, lack of flow disturbance, and relative insensitivity to biofouling and water column stratification. Although this method is being used with increasing frequency in coastal and estuarine environments, to date it has received little direct ground truthing. This study compared in situ estimates of w s inferred by a 5-MHz ADV to independent in situ observations from a high-definition video settling column over the course of a flood tide in the bottom boundary layer of the York River estuary, Virginia, USA. The ADV-based measurements were found to agree with those of the settling column when the current speed at about 40 cm above the bed was greater than about 20 cm/s. This corresponded to periods when the estimated magnitude of the settling term in the suspended sediment continuity equation was four or more times larger than the time rate of change of concentration. For ADV observations restricted to these conditions, ADV-based estimates of w s (mean 0.48±0.04 mm/s) were highly consistent with those observed by the settling column (mean 0.45±0.02 mm/s). However, the ADV-based method for estimating w s was sensitive to the prescribed concentration of the non-settling washload, C wash. In an objective operational definition, C wash can be set equal to the lowest suspended solids concentration observed around slack water.

  14. ADV-based estimates of sediment settling velocity on the shelf of the Yellow and East China seas: evidence of marked seasonal and intra-tidal variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bian, Changwei; Mao, Xinyan; Jiang, Wensheng; Gu, Yanzhen

    2015-02-01

    Sediment settling velocity ( w s) patterns are well established at the Huanghe and Changjiang river mouths, but no w s results have been reported for the Yellow Sea and the East China Sea (YSECS) shelves due to the labor-intensive and time-consuming aspect of traditional w s measurement approaches (e.g., settling column method). This disadvantage can be overcome by the acoustic Doppler velocimeter (ADV). In this study, ten ADV-based field campaigns were conducted over various seasons of the years 2011 and 2013 at six YSECS sites, five on the East China Sea shelf (28 to 87 m depth) and one on the Yellow Sea shelf (74 m depth). The results demonstrate that ADV backscatter was a reliable proxy of suspended sediment concentration over a measurement range of 1 to 1,000 mg/L. The ADV-estimated w s was highest (1.43-1.88 mm/s) in summer in the southern East China Sea, and lowest (0.07 mm/s) in spring in the northern Yellow Sea. This can plausibly be explained by the hydrodynamic environment and bottom sediment type at the campaign sites. More importantly, the data reveal evidence of marked seasonal variations of w s in the middle sector of the East China Sea, as well as intra-tidal variations at all campaign sites. However, these variations of w s are not directly regulated by current velocity or suspended sediment concentration. This aspect represents a major challenge in future research in this shelf region and, for that matter, in similar settings worldwide. Evidently, expanding on the well-resolved continuous time series provided by the ADV approach is a key step in this direction.

  15. Work Domain Analysis of a Predecessor Sodium-cooled Reactor as Baseline for AdvSMR Operational Concepts

    SciTech Connect

    Ronald Farris; David Gertman; Jacques Hugo

    2014-03-01

    This report presents the results of the Work Domain Analysis for the Experimental Breeder Reactor (EBR-II). This is part of the phase of the research designed to incorporate Cognitive Work Analysis in the development of a framework for the formalization of an Operational Concept (OpsCon) for Advanced Small Modular Reactors (AdvSMRs). For a new AdvSMR design, information obtained through Cognitive Work Analysis, combined with human performance criteria, can and should be used in during the operational phase of a plant to assess the crew performance aspects associated with identified AdvSMR operational concepts. The main objective of this phase was to develop an analytical and descriptive framework that will help systems and human factors engineers to understand the design and operational requirements of the emerging generation of small, advanced, multi-modular reactors. Using EBR-II as a predecessor to emerging sodium-cooled reactor designs required the application of a method suitable to the structured and systematic analysis of the plant to assist in identifying key features of the work associated with it and to clarify the operational and other constraints. The analysis included the identification and description of operating scenarios that were considered characteristic of this type of nuclear power plant. This is an invaluable aspect of Operational Concept development since it typically reveals aspects of future plant configurations that will have an impact on operations. These include, for example, the effect of core design, different coolants, reactor-to-power conversion unit ratios, modular plant layout, modular versus central control rooms, plant siting, and many more. Multi-modular plants in particular are expected to have a significant impact on overall OpsCon in general, and human performance in particular. To support unconventional modes of operation, the modern control room of a multi-module plant would typically require advanced HSIs that would

  16. MODFLOW-2000 : the U.S. Geological Survey modular ground-water model--documentation of the Advective-Transport Observation (ADV2) Package

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anderman, Evan R.; Hill, Mary Catherine

    2001-01-01

    Observations of the advective component of contaminant transport in steady-state flow fields can provide important information for the calibration of ground-water flow models. This report documents the Advective-Transport Observation (ADV2) Package, version 2, which allows advective-transport observations to be used in the three-dimensional ground-water flow parameter-estimation model MODFLOW-2000. The ADV2 Package is compatible with some of the features in the Layer-Property Flow and Hydrogeologic-Unit Flow Packages, but is not compatible with the Block-Centered Flow or Generalized Finite-Difference Packages. The particle-tracking routine used in the ADV2 Package duplicates the semi-analytical method of MODPATH, as shown in a sample problem. Particles can be tracked in a forward or backward direction, and effects such as retardation can be simulated through manipulation of the effective-porosity value used to calculate velocity. Particles can be discharged at cells that are considered to be weak sinks, in which the sink applied does not capture all the water flowing into the cell, using one of two criteria: (1) if there is any outflow to a boundary condition such as a well or surface-water feature, or (2) if the outflow exceeds a user specified fraction of the cell budget. Although effective porosity could be included as a parameter in the regression, this capability is not included in this package. The weighted sum-of-squares objective function, which is minimized in the Parameter-Estimation Process, was augmented to include the square of the weighted x-, y-, and z-components of the differences between the simulated and observed advective-front locations at defined times, thereby including the direction of travel as well as the overall travel distance in the calibration process. The sensitivities of the particle movement to the parameters needed to minimize the objective function are calculated for any particle location using the exact sensitivity

  17. 75 FR 49233 - Amendments to Form ADV

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-12

    ... Filings, Investment Advisers Act Release No. 664 (Jan. 30, 1979) [44 FR 7870 (Feb. 7, 1979)] (``1979..., Investment Advisers Act Release No. 1092 (Oct. 16, 1987) [52 FR 38400 (Oct. 16, 1987)] (``Release 1092... Associates, Inc. (May 16, 2008) (``T. Rowe Letter''). The standard of materiality under the Advisers Act...

  18. Mississippi Curriculum Framework for Postsecondary Health Information Technology (CIP: 51.0707--Medical Records Technol./Tech.). Postsecondary Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mississippi Research and Curriculum Unit for Vocational and Technical Education, State College.

    This document, which is intended for use by community and junior colleges throughout Mississippi, contains curriculum frameworks for the course sequences in the health information technology program. Presented in the introductory section are a description of the program and suggested course sequence. Section I lists baseline competencies, and…

  19. Carbon Nanomembranes: Carbon Nanomembranes (Adv. Mater. 29/2016).

    PubMed

    Turchanin, Andrey; Gölzhäuser, Armin

    2016-08-01

    Carbon nanomembranes (CNMs), made by radiation-induced crosslinking of aromatic self-assembled monolayers, are described by A. Turchanin and A. Gölzhäuser on page 6075. The image shows a large-area CNM with a thickness of 1 nm, spanning a hexagonal metal grid. This is a microscopy image made by a novel imaging technique - helium-ion microscopy. PMID:27478084

  20. "One-step production of biodiesel from Jatropha oil with high-acid value in ionic liquids" [Bioresour. Technol. 102 (11) (2011)].

    PubMed

    Guo, Feng; Fang, Zhen; Tian, Xiao-fei; Long, Yun-Duo; Jiang, Li-Qun

    2013-07-01

    Catalytic conversion of un-pretreated Jatropha oil with high-acid value (13.8 mg KOH/g) to biodiesel was studied in ionic liquids (ILs) with metal chlorides. Several commercial ILs were used to catalyze the esterification of oleic acid. It was found that 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tosylate {[BMIm][TS]} had high catalytic activity with 93% esterification rate for oleic acid at 140 °C but only 63.7% Jatropha biodiesel yield at 200 °C. When ZnCl2 was added to [BMIm][TS], a maximum Jatropha biodiesel yield of 92.5% was achieved at 180 °C. Addition of metal ions supplied Lewis acidic sites in ILs promoted both esterification and transestrification reactions. It was also found that the transition metal ions performed higher catalytic activity in transestrification than the ions of Group A. Mixture of [BMIm][TS] and ZnCl2 was easily separated from products for reuse to avoid producing pollutants. PMID:23908993

  1. Carbon Nanotubes: Printed Carbon Nanotube Electronics and Sensor Systems (Adv. Mater. 22/2016).

    PubMed

    Chen, Kevin; Gao, Wei; Emaminejad, Sam; Kiriya, Daisuke; Ota, Hiroki; Nyein, Hnin Yin Yin; Takei, Kuniharu; Javey, Ali

    2016-06-01

    Printed electronics and sensors enable new applications ranging from low-cost disposable analytical devices to large-area sensor networks. Recent progress in printed carbon nanotube electronics in terms of materials, processing, devices, and applications is discussed on page 4397 by A. Javey and co-workers. The research challenges and opportunities regarding the processing and system-level integration are also discussed for enabling of practical applications. PMID:27273439

  2. Antimonene: Mechanical Isolation of Highly Stable Antimonene under Ambient Conditions (Adv. Mater. 30/2016).

    PubMed

    Ares, Pablo; Aguilar-Galindo, Fernando; Rodríguez-San-Miguel, David; Aldave, Diego A; Díaz-Tendero, Sergio; Alcamí, Manuel; Martín, Fernando; Gómez-Herrero, Julio; Zamora, Félix

    2016-08-01

    On page 6332, J. Gómez-Herrero, F. Zamora, and co-workers describe the isolation of antimonene, a new allotrope of antimony that consists of a single layer of atoms. They obtain antimonene flakes by the scotch tape method; these flakes are highly stable in ambient conditions and even when immersed in water. The 1.2 eV gap calculated in this study suggests potential applications in optoelectronics. PMID:27493072

  3. Artificial Synapses: Organometal Halide Perovskite Artificial Synapses (Adv. Mater. 28/2016).

    PubMed

    Xu, Wentao; Cho, Himchan; Kim, Young-Hoon; Kim, Young-Tae; Wolf, Christoph; Park, Chan-Gyung; Lee, Tae-Woo

    2016-07-01

    A synapse-emulating electronic device based on organometal halide perovskite thin films is described by T.-W. Lee and co-workers on page 5916. The device successfully emulates important characteristics of a biological synapse. This work extends the application of organometal halide perovskites to bioinspired electronic devices, and contributes to the development of neuromorphic electronics. PMID:27442971

  4. Osteoanabolic Implants: Osteoanabolic Implant Materials for Orthopedic Treatment (Adv. Healthcare Mater. 14/2016).

    PubMed

    Ding, Yun-Fei; Li, Rachel W; Nakai, Masaaki; Majumdar, Trina; Zhang, Dong-Hai; Niinomi, Mitsuo; Birbilis, Nick; Smith, Paul N; Chen, Xiao-Bo

    2016-07-01

    On page 1740, Xiao-Bo Chen and co-workers report an orthopedic implant material specifically designed for osteoporotic bone fractures. A newl strontium phosphate coating applied to a bone-mimicking low elastic titanium alloy with a comparative Young's modulus to that of natural bone results in upregulating the growth of osteoblasts and downregulating that of osteoclasts. Such a promising osteoanabolic effect reveals a suitability in particular for patients who suffer from low quality bone organism and slow fracture recovery. PMID:27436105

  5. Nanoscale Electrodes: Nanoscale Electrodes for Flexible Electronics by Swelling Controlled Cracking (Adv. Mater. 30/2016).

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qiang; Wang, Wenjun; Shao, Jinyou; Li, Xiangming; Tian, Hongmiao; Liu, Lu; Mei, Xuesong; Ding, Yucheng; Lu, Bingheng

    2016-08-01

    The fabrication of nanospaced electrodes on a flexible substrate is a great challenge. W. Wang, J. Shao, and co-workers propose a novel approach to fabricate nanogap electrodes for flexible electronics using a swelling-controlled cracking method, which is described on page 6337. This method has the advantages of high applicability, parallel manufacturing capacity, and compatibility with flexible substrates. It provides a new way to create high-performance flexible electronics in a cost-efficient fashion.

  6. Graphene Topographies: Multiscale Graphene Topographies Programmed by Sequential Mechanical Deformation (Adv. Mater. 18/2016).

    PubMed

    Chen, Po-Yen; Sodhi, Jaskiranjeet; Qiu, Yang; Valentin, Thomas M; Steinberg, Ruben Spitz; Wang, Zhongying; Hurt, Robert H; Wong, Ian Y

    2016-05-01

    P.-Y. Chen, R. H. Hurt, I. Y. Wong and co-workers demonstrate a hierarchical graphene surface architecture generated by using various sequences and combinations of extreme mechanical deformation, as shown in the false-colored SEM image. As described on page 3564, the sequential patterning approach enables the design of feature sizes and orientations across multiple length scales which are retained during mechanical deformations of similar extent. This results in sequence-dependent surface topographies with structural memory. PMID:27151628

  7. Light-Emitting Diodes: Phosphorescent Nanocluster Light-Emitting Diodes (Adv. Mater. 2/2016).

    PubMed

    Kuttipillai, Padmanaban S; Zhao, Yimu; Traverse, Christopher J; Staples, Richard J; Levine, Benjamin G; Lunt, Richard R

    2016-01-13

    On page 320, R. R. Lunt and co-workers demonstrate electroluminescence from earth-abundant phosphorescent metal halide nanoclusters. These inorganic emitters, which exhibit rich photophysics combined with a high phosphorescence quantum yield, are employed in red and near-infrared light-emitting diodes, providing a new platform of phosphorescent emitters for low-cost and high-performance light-emission applications.

  8. Biotactile Sensors: Self-Powered Electronic Skin with Biotactile Selectivity (Adv. Mater. 18/2016).

    PubMed

    Hu, Kesong; Xiong, Rui; Guo, Hengyu; Ma, Ruilong; Zhang, Shuaidi; Wang, Zhong Lin; Tsukruk, Vladimir V

    2016-05-01

    On page 3549, V. V. Tsukruk and co-workers develop self-powered ultrathin flexible films for bio-tactile detection. Graphene oxide materials are engineered for robust self-powered tactile sensing applications harnessing their electrochemical reactivity. The simple quadruple electronic skin sensor can recognize nine spatial bio-tactile positions with high sensitivity and selectivity-an approach that can be expanded towards large-area flexible skin arrays. PMID:27151625

  9. Carbon Nanotubes: Printed Carbon Nanotube Electronics and Sensor Systems (Adv. Mater. 22/2016).

    PubMed

    Chen, Kevin; Gao, Wei; Emaminejad, Sam; Kiriya, Daisuke; Ota, Hiroki; Nyein, Hnin Yin Yin; Takei, Kuniharu; Javey, Ali

    2016-06-01

    Printed electronics and sensors enable new applications ranging from low-cost disposable analytical devices to large-area sensor networks. Recent progress in printed carbon nanotube electronics in terms of materials, processing, devices, and applications is discussed on page 4397 by A. Javey and co-workers. The research challenges and opportunities regarding the processing and system-level integration are also discussed for enabling of practical applications.

  10. Light-Emitting Diodes: Phosphorescent Nanocluster Light-Emitting Diodes (Adv. Mater. 2/2016).

    PubMed

    Kuttipillai, Padmanaban S; Zhao, Yimu; Traverse, Christopher J; Staples, Richard J; Levine, Benjamin G; Lunt, Richard R

    2016-01-13

    On page 320, R. R. Lunt and co-workers demonstrate electroluminescence from earth-abundant phosphorescent metal halide nanoclusters. These inorganic emitters, which exhibit rich photophysics combined with a high phosphorescence quantum yield, are employed in red and near-infrared light-emitting diodes, providing a new platform of phosphorescent emitters for low-cost and high-performance light-emission applications. PMID:26749470

  11. Liquid Crystals: Graphene Oxide Liquid Crystals: Discovery, Evolution and Applications (Adv. Mater. 16/2016).

    PubMed

    Narayan, Rekha; Kim, Ji Eun; Kim, Ju Young; Lee, Kyung Eun; Kim, Sang Ouk

    2016-04-01

    Graphene-oxide liquid crystals (GOLCs) have recently been discovered as a novel 2D material with remarkable properties. On page 3045, S. O. Kim and co-workers review the discovery of different GOLC mesophases and recent progress on fundamental studies and applications. The image displays the nematic schlieren texture (in the background) formed by flowing domains of graphene-oxide liquid crystals and their potential applications in energy storage, optoelectronics and wet-spun fibers.

  12. Gold Nanocups: Colloidal Gold Nanocups with Orientation-Dependent Plasmonic Properties (Adv. Mater. 30/2016).

    PubMed

    Jiang, Ruibin; Qin, Feng; Liu, Yejing; Ling, Xing Yi; Guo, Jun; Tang, Minghua; Cheng, Si; Wang, Jianfang

    2016-08-01

    On page 6322, J. F. Wang and co-workers report a wet-chemistry method for the preparation of colloidal Au nanocups and their plasmonic properties. The Au nanocups are prepared through single-vertex-initiated Au deposition on PbS nano-octahedrons and subsequent selective dissolution of PbS. Owing to the orientation-dependent coupling strengths, the obtained Au nanocups display orientation-dependent plasmonic properties and Raman enhancements when deposited on substrates. PMID:27493069

  13. Tissue Boundaries: Mimicking Tissue Boundaries by Sharp Multiparameter Matrix Interfaces (Adv. Healthcare Mater. 15/2016).

    PubMed

    Sapudom, Jiranuwat; Rubner, Stefan; Martin, Steve; Pompe, Tilo

    2016-08-01

    Engineering interfaces of extracellular compartments mimicking native tissues is key to study cell behavior in a physiologically relevant context and for a successful translation of these new biomaterials engineering principles in regenerative and therapeutic applications. Tilo Pompe and co-workers demonstrate a strategy to engineer multiparameter matrix interfaces using a sequential reconstitution of two well-defined Collagen I based matrices on page 1861. Such matrix interfaces trigger cell migration directionality normal to the interface plane in dependence on matrix pore size. PMID:27511951

  14. 76 FR 255 - Amendments To Form ADV; Extension of Compliance Date

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-04

    ... Procedure Act (5 U.S.C. 553(b)(3)(B)) (``APA'') (an agency may dispense with prior notice and comment when..., in accordance with the APA, which allows effectiveness in less than 30 days after publication for...

  15. Nanoscale Electrodes: Nanoscale Electrodes for Flexible Electronics by Swelling Controlled Cracking (Adv. Mater. 30/2016).

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qiang; Wang, Wenjun; Shao, Jinyou; Li, Xiangming; Tian, Hongmiao; Liu, Lu; Mei, Xuesong; Ding, Yucheng; Lu, Bingheng

    2016-08-01

    The fabrication of nanospaced electrodes on a flexible substrate is a great challenge. W. Wang, J. Shao, and co-workers propose a novel approach to fabricate nanogap electrodes for flexible electronics using a swelling-controlled cracking method, which is described on page 6337. This method has the advantages of high applicability, parallel manufacturing capacity, and compatibility with flexible substrates. It provides a new way to create high-performance flexible electronics in a cost-efficient fashion. PMID:27493073

  16. Phosphorene: Enhanced Photoresponse from Phosphorene-Phosphorene-Suboxide Junction Fashioned by Focused Laser Micromachining (Adv. Mater. 21/2016).

    PubMed

    Lu, Junpeng; Carvalho, Alexandra; Wu, Jing; Liu, Hongwei; Tok, Eng Soon; Neto, Antonio H Castro; Özyilmaz, Barbaros; Sow, Chorng Haur

    2016-06-01

    On page 4090, B. Özyilmaz, C. H. Sow, and co-workers use a focused laser beam to modify the surface of a phosphorene device. With a simple focused laser beam, a part of the phosphorene can be scanned and converted into phosphorene-suboxide species, leaving behind a functional and active phosphorene-phosphorene suboxide junction in the device. Once the junction is formed, the photoresponsivity and photocurrent distribution of the device can be significantly altered with a qualitative difference in behavior. Photovoltaic-like behavior is observed, which is not found in the pristine sample.

  17. Ferromagnetism: Sulfur Doping Induces Strong Ferromagnetic Ordering in Graphene: Effect of Concentration and Substitution Mechanism (Adv. Mater. 25/2016).

    PubMed

    Tuček, Jiří; Błoński, Piotr; Sofer, Zdeněk; Šimek, Petr; Petr, Martin; Pumera, Martin; Otyepka, Michal; Zbořil, Radek

    2016-07-01

    R. Zbořil and co-workers show that doping a graphene lattice with sulfur induces magnetic centers which display ferromagnetic order below ≈62 K. As described on page 5045, sulfur doping promotes magnetically active configurations resembling the gamma-thiothiapyrone motif. Enhanced magnetic properties of sulfur-doped graphene are attributed to two unpaired electrons from each sulfur atom injected into the graphene conducting band where they are delocalized between the S and C atoms. PMID:27372723

  18. Wearable Strain Sensors: Carbonized Silk Fabric for Ultrastretchable, Highly Sensitive, and Wearable Strain Sensors (Adv. Mater. 31/2016).

    PubMed

    Wang, Chunya; Li, Xiang; Gao, Enlai; Jian, Muqiang; Xia, Kailun; Wang, Qi; Xu, Zhiping; Ren, Tianling; Zhang, Yingying

    2016-08-01

    A novel carbonized plain-weave silk-fabric-based wearable strain sensor is proposed by Y. Y. Zhang and co-workers on page 6640. The sensor can be stretched up to 500% with high sensitivity in a wide strain range and can be assembled into wearable devices for the detection of both large and subtle human activities, showing great potential in human-motion detection and robotics. PMID:27511531

  19. Nanocarbon Paper: Flexible, High Temperature, Planar Lighting with Large Scale Printable Nanocarbon Paper (Adv. Mater. 23/2016).

    PubMed

    Bao, Wenzhong; Pickel, Andrea D; Zhang, Qing; Chen, Yanan; Yao, Yonggang; Wan, Jiayu; Fu, Kun Kelvin; Wang, Yibo; Dai, Jiaqi; Zhu, Hongli; Drew, Dennis; Fuhrer, Michael; Dames, Chris; Hu, Liangbing

    2016-06-01

    On page 4684, C. Dames, L. Hu and co-workers report highly efficient, broadband lighting from printed hybrid nanocarbon structures with carbon nanotubes and reduced graphene oxides. The fast response and excellent stability of the flexible lighting can find applications in a range of emerging applications where the shape and format, as well as being lightweight, are important.

  20. High-Resolution Electronics: Spontaneous Patterning of High-Resolution Electronics via Parallel Vacuum Ultraviolet (Adv. Mater. 31/2016).

    PubMed

    Liu, Xuying; Kanehara, Masayuki; Liu, Chuan; Sakamoto, Kenji; Yasuda, Takeshi; Takeya, Jun; Minari, Takeo

    2016-08-01

    On page 6568, T. Minari and co-workers describe spontaneous patterning based on the parallel vacuum ultraviolet (PVUV) technique, enabling the homogeneous integration of complex, high-resolution electronic circuits, even on large-scale, flexible, transparent substrates. Irradiation of PVUV to the hydrophobic polymer surface precisely renders the selected surface into highly wettable regions with sharply defined boundaries, which spontaneously guides a metal nanoparticle ink into a series of circuit lines and gaps with the widths down to a resolution of 1 μm.

  1. High-Resolution Electronics: Spontaneous Patterning of High-Resolution Electronics via Parallel Vacuum Ultraviolet (Adv. Mater. 31/2016).

    PubMed

    Liu, Xuying; Kanehara, Masayuki; Liu, Chuan; Sakamoto, Kenji; Yasuda, Takeshi; Takeya, Jun; Minari, Takeo

    2016-08-01

    On page 6568, T. Minari and co-workers describe spontaneous patterning based on the parallel vacuum ultraviolet (PVUV) technique, enabling the homogeneous integration of complex, high-resolution electronic circuits, even on large-scale, flexible, transparent substrates. Irradiation of PVUV to the hydrophobic polymer surface precisely renders the selected surface into highly wettable regions with sharply defined boundaries, which spontaneously guides a metal nanoparticle ink into a series of circuit lines and gaps with the widths down to a resolution of 1 μm. PMID:27511534

  2. Wearable Strain Sensors: Carbonized Silk Fabric for Ultrastretchable, Highly Sensitive, and Wearable Strain Sensors (Adv. Mater. 31/2016).

    PubMed

    Wang, Chunya; Li, Xiang; Gao, Enlai; Jian, Muqiang; Xia, Kailun; Wang, Qi; Xu, Zhiping; Ren, Tianling; Zhang, Yingying

    2016-08-01

    A novel carbonized plain-weave silk-fabric-based wearable strain sensor is proposed by Y. Y. Zhang and co-workers on page 6640. The sensor can be stretched up to 500% with high sensitivity in a wide strain range and can be assembled into wearable devices for the detection of both large and subtle human activities, showing great potential in human-motion detection and robotics.

  3. Liquid Metals: Stretchable, High-k Dielectric Elastomers through Liquid-Metal Inclusions (Adv. Mater. 19/2016).

    PubMed

    Bartlett, Michael D; Fassler, Andrew; Kazem, Navid; Markvicka, Eric J; Mandal, Pratiti; Majidi, Carmel

    2016-05-01

    An all-soft-matter composite consisting of liquid metal microdroplets embedded in a soft elastomer matrix is presented by C. Majidi and co-workers on page 3726. This composite exhibits a high dielectric constant while maintaining exceptional elasticity and compliance. The image shows the composite's microstructure captured by 3D X-ray imaging using a nano-computed tomographic scanner. PMID:27167031

  4. Gallium Adhesion: Phase Change of Gallium Enables Highly Reversible and Switchable Adhesion (Adv. Mater. 25/2016).

    PubMed

    Ye, Zhou; Lum, Guo Zhan; Song, Sukho; Rich, Steven; Sitti, Metin

    2016-07-01

    M. Sitti and co-workers find that gallium exhibits highly reversible and switchable adhesive characteristics during the liquid-solid phase change. As described on page 5088, this reversible adhesive allows miniature capsule-like robots, which are able to easily pick-and-place objects with irregular geometries and rough surfaces, and thus assemble such objects into a complex structure. The contact interface between gallium and the rough object is illustrated in the magnified image. PMID:27372722

  5. Biphasic Metal Films: Intrinsically Stretchable Biphasic (Solid-Liquid) Thin Metal Films (Adv. Mater. 22/2016).

    PubMed

    Hirsch, Arthur; Michaud, Hadrien O; Gerratt, Aaron P; de Mulatier, Séverine; Lacour, Stéphanie P

    2016-06-01

    On page 4507, S. P. Lacour and co-workers present highly conductive and stretchable solid-liquid films that are formed by physical vapor deposition of gallium onto an alloying gold layer. The image shows patterns defined by lift-off on an elastomer membrane. The magnified view is a false-color scanning electron microscopy (SEM) image (×5000) of the surface of the films under 50% applied strain, showing the liquid Ga (blue-gray) flowing between the AuGa2 /Ga clusters (gold). PMID:27273441

  6. Graphene Films: Synthesis of Graphene Films on Copper Foils by Chemical Vapor Deposition (Adv. Mater. 29/2016).

    PubMed

    Li, Xuesong; Colombo, Luigi; Ruoff, Rodney S

    2016-08-01

    Synthesis of graphene films on copper foils is discussed by X. Li, L. Colombo, and R. S. Ruoff on page 6247. Graphene can grow on metal substrates by chemical vapor deposition of hydrocarbons. Hydrocarbons crack on a metal surface, nucleate, grow, and finally merge to form a continuous graphene film. Copper is one of the best candidates for graphene growth due to the advantages of good control over the graphene thickness, the growth of high-quality graphene, and the ease for graphene transfer, and has been widely used for production of large-area graphene films in both academia and industry. PMID:27478085

  7. Perovskite Solar Cells: High Efficiency Pb-In Binary Metal Perovskite Solar Cells (Adv. Mater. 31/2016).

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhao-Kui; Li, Meng; Yang, Ying-Guo; Hu, Yun; Ma, Heng; Gao, Xing-Yu; Liao, Liang-Sheng

    2016-08-01

    On page 6695, X. Y. Gao, L.-S. Liao, and co-workers describe the fabrication of mixed Pb-In perovskite solar cells, using indium (III) chloride and lead (II) chloride with methylammonium iodide. A maximum power conversion efficiency as high as 17.55% is achieved owing to the high quality of the perovskites with multiple ordered crystal orientations. This work demonstrates the possibility of substituting the Pb (II) by using In (III), which opens a broad route to fabricating alloy perovskite solar cells with mitigated ecological impact.

  8. Batteries: encapsulated monoclinic sulfur for stable cycling of li-s rechargeable batteries (adv. Mater. 45/2013).

    PubMed

    Moon, San; Jung, Young Hwa; Jung, Wook Ki; Jung, Dae Soo; Choi, Jang Wook; Kim, Do Kyung

    2013-12-01

    On page 6547 Do Kyung Kim, Jang Wook Choi and co-workers describe a highly aligned and carbon-encapsulated sulfur cathode synthesized with an AAO template that exhibits a high and long cycle life, and the best rate capability based on the complete encapsulation of sulfur (physical) and implementation of the monoclinic sulfur phase (chemical).

  9. 3D Printing: 3D Printing of Shape Memory Polymers for Flexible Electronic Devices (Adv. Mater. 22/2016).

    PubMed

    Zarek, Matt; Layani, Michael; Cooperstein, Ido; Sachyani, Ela; Cohn, Daniel; Magdassi, Shlomo

    2016-06-01

    On page 4449, D. Cohn, S. Magdassi, and co-workers describe a general and facile method based on 3D printing of methacrylated macromonomers to fabricate shape-memory objects that can be used in flexible and responsive electrical circuits. Such responsive objects can be used in the fabrication of soft robotics, minimal invasive medical devices, sensors, and wearable electronics. The use of 3D printing overcomes the poor processing characteristics of thermosets and enables complex geometries that are not easily accessible by other techniques. PMID:27273436

  10. 3D Printing: 3D Printing of Shape Memory Polymers for Flexible Electronic Devices (Adv. Mater. 22/2016).

    PubMed

    Zarek, Matt; Layani, Michael; Cooperstein, Ido; Sachyani, Ela; Cohn, Daniel; Magdassi, Shlomo

    2016-06-01

    On page 4449, D. Cohn, S. Magdassi, and co-workers describe a general and facile method based on 3D printing of methacrylated macromonomers to fabricate shape-memory objects that can be used in flexible and responsive electrical circuits. Such responsive objects can be used in the fabrication of soft robotics, minimal invasive medical devices, sensors, and wearable electronics. The use of 3D printing overcomes the poor processing characteristics of thermosets and enables complex geometries that are not easily accessible by other techniques.

  11. Perovskite Solar Cells: High Efficiency Pb-In Binary Metal Perovskite Solar Cells (Adv. Mater. 31/2016).

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhao-Kui; Li, Meng; Yang, Ying-Guo; Hu, Yun; Ma, Heng; Gao, Xing-Yu; Liao, Liang-Sheng

    2016-08-01

    On page 6695, X. Y. Gao, L.-S. Liao, and co-workers describe the fabrication of mixed Pb-In perovskite solar cells, using indium (III) chloride and lead (II) chloride with methylammonium iodide. A maximum power conversion efficiency as high as 17.55% is achieved owing to the high quality of the perovskites with multiple ordered crystal orientations. This work demonstrates the possibility of substituting the Pb (II) by using In (III), which opens a broad route to fabricating alloy perovskite solar cells with mitigated ecological impact. PMID:27511533

  12. Flexible Electronics: High Pressure Chemical Vapor Deposition of Hydrogenated Amorphous Silicon Films and Solar Cells (Adv. Mater. 28/2016).

    PubMed

    He, Rongrui; Day, Todd D; Sparks, Justin R; Sullivan, Nichole F; Badding, John V

    2016-07-01

    On page 5939, J. V. Badding and co-workers describe the unrolling of a flexible hydrogenated amorphous silicon solar cell, deposited by high-pressure chemical vapor deposition. The high-pressure deposition process is represented by the molecules of silane infiltrating the small voids between the rolled up substrate, facilitating plasma-free deposition over a very large area. The high-pressure approach is expected to also find application for 3D nanoarchitectures.

  13. Flexible Electronics: High Pressure Chemical Vapor Deposition of Hydrogenated Amorphous Silicon Films and Solar Cells (Adv. Mater. 28/2016).

    PubMed

    He, Rongrui; Day, Todd D; Sparks, Justin R; Sullivan, Nichole F; Badding, John V

    2016-07-01

    On page 5939, J. V. Badding and co-workers describe the unrolling of a flexible hydrogenated amorphous silicon solar cell, deposited by high-pressure chemical vapor deposition. The high-pressure deposition process is represented by the molecules of silane infiltrating the small voids between the rolled up substrate, facilitating plasma-free deposition over a very large area. The high-pressure approach is expected to also find application for 3D nanoarchitectures. PMID:27442970

  14. Organosilica: Chemistry of Mesoporous Organosilica in Nanotechnology: Molecularly Organic-Inorganic Hybridization into Frameworks (Adv. Mater. 17/2016).

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu; Shi, Jianlin

    2016-05-01

    Organic-inorganic hybrid materials can combine the advantages of organic and inorganic materials, and overcome their drawbacks accordingly. On page 3235, Y. Chen and J. L. Shi review and discuss research progress on the design, synthesis, structure, and composition control of organic-inorganic hybrid mesoporous organosilica nanoparticles (MONs). Extensive applications of MONs in nanotechnology, mainly in nanomedicine, nanocatalysis and nanofabrication are discussed.

  15. Graphene Quantum Dots: Molecularly Designed, Nitrogen-Functionalized Graphene Quantum Dots for Optoelectronic Devices (Adv. Mater. 23/2016).

    PubMed

    Tetsuka, Hiroyuki; Nagoya, Akihiro; Fukusumi, Takanori; Matsui, Takayuki

    2016-06-01

    H. Tetsuka and co-workers develop a versatile technique to tune the energy levels and energy gaps of nitrogen-functionalized graphene quantum dots (NGQDs) continuously through molecular structure design, as described on page 4632. The incorporation of layers of NGQDs into the structures markedly improves the performance of optoelectronic devices. PMID:27281048

  16. Carbon Nanotubes: Ultrabreathable and Protective Membranes with Sub-5 nm Carbon Nanotube Pores (Adv. Mater. 28/2016).

    PubMed

    Bui, Ngoc; Meshot, Eric R; Kim, Sangil; Peña, José; Gibson, Phillip W; Wu, Kuang Jen; Fornasiero, Francesco

    2016-07-01

    A flexible membrane with sub-5 nm single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) pores is developed by F. Fornasiero and co-workers, as described on page 5871, for application as a key component of protective, yet breathable fabrics. The SWNTs are shown to enable exceptionally fast transport of water vapor under a concentration driving force. Thus, membranes having SWNTs as moisture-conductive pores feature outstanding breathability and provide a high degree of protection from biological threats by size exclusion.

  17. Flexible Batteries: Hierarchical Assemblies of Carbon Nanotubes for Ultraflexible Li-Ion Batteries (Adv. Mater. 31/2016).

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Shahab; Copic, Davor; George, Chandramohan; De Volder, Michael

    2016-08-01

    An advanced battery architecture composed of 3D carbon nanotube (CNT) current collectors is used to mitigate stresses in flexible batteries. On Page 6705, C. George, M. De Volder, and co-workers describe the fabrication process and characteristics of this new generation of ultraflexible batteries, which show high rate and cyclablility. These batteries may find applications in the powering of flexible displays and logics. PMID:27511532

  18. Adv. Simulation for Additive Manufacturing: 11/2014 Wkshp. Report for U.S. DOE/EERE/AMO

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, John A.; Babu, Sudarsanam Suresh; Blue, Craig A.

    2015-07-01

    The overarching question for the workshop was as following: How do we best utilize advanced modeling and high-performance computing (HPC) to address key challenges and opportunities in order to realize the full potential of additive manufacturing; and what are the key challenges of additive manufacturing to which modeling and simulation can contribute solutions, and what will it take to meet these challenges?

  19. Screening for antibodies against Aleutian disease virus (ADV) in mink. Elucidation of dubious results by additive counterimmunoelectrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Uttenthal, A

    1992-01-01

    In order to distinguish true positive results in counterimmunoelectrophoresis from false positive ones an additive counterimmunoelectrophoresis was developed. The method was tested on selected mink serum samples as part of a routine testing for antibodies towards Aleutian disease virus on 3 million blood samples. The procedure of the method is, that a known positive serum sample is mixed with the patient serum to be tested. The result from a false positive sample will be one precipitin line towards virus and one nonspecific line. If the serum sample is a true positive one, the antibodies originating from the patient serum will be added to the antibodies in the standard positive serum giving only one precipitin line. The system is further extended by testing the serum samples towards an antigen preparation containing all the cellular components but free from virus. PMID:1335756

  20. Flexible Batteries: Hierarchical Assemblies of Carbon Nanotubes for Ultraflexible Li-Ion Batteries (Adv. Mater. 31/2016).

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Shahab; Copic, Davor; George, Chandramohan; De Volder, Michael

    2016-08-01

    An advanced battery architecture composed of 3D carbon nanotube (CNT) current collectors is used to mitigate stresses in flexible batteries. On Page 6705, C. George, M. De Volder, and co-workers describe the fabrication process and characteristics of this new generation of ultraflexible batteries, which show high rate and cyclablility. These batteries may find applications in the powering of flexible displays and logics.

  1. Particle processing technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakka, Yoshio

    2014-02-01

    achievements that are not covered in this special issue. (1) The evolution of hydrogen by the reaction of fine metal particles such as Al [14] and Mg [15] with water; the specific surface area and surface modification are important factors.(2) The realization of new carbon related materials with 1D and 2D structures consisting of fullerenes prepared by liquid-liquid interface precipitation: alkaline-doped superconductive nanotubes consisting of fullerenes [16], application to solar cells of fullerene/cobalt porphyrin hybrid nanosheets [17], etc.(3) The fabrication of textured films and bulk materials with excellent functional properties by colloidal processing methods such as slip casting [5], gel casting [18] and electrophoretic deposition [3, 19], in a high magnetic field, and with subsequent heating; examples of such materials include dye-sensitized TiO2 solar cells, thermoelectric materials and cathode materials for solid state Li-ion batteries and dielectric ceramics.(4) The fabrication of high-strength and high-toughness MAX phase ceramics [20, 21] inspired by the nacreous structure [22].(5) The modeling and development of the ECAS process [6]. This involves two-step pressure application [23] and high-pressure application above 400 MPa to fabricate transparent oxides [24-26], and rapid heating to obtain dense nanocomposites of ceramic-CNT [27] and diamonds [28].(6) The contraction of ternary phase diagrams for oxide ion conductor systems such as zirconia [29] and apatite systems [30], leading to an increased understanding of the stability of such systems and assisting the search for high oxygen ion conductors. Acknowledgments I am grateful to the authors who have contributed to this special issue, and sincerely hope that the readers will expand their knowledge of particle processing technology. References [1] Sakka Y 2006 J. Ceram. Soc. Japan 114 371 [2] Badica P, Crisan A, Aldica G, Endo K, Borodianska H, Togano K, Awaji S, Vasylkiv O and Sakka Y 2011 Sci. Technol. Adv

  2. 77 FR 28909 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; National Stock Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-16

    ... Holder's ADV is at least 10,000,000 shares. SR-NSX-2012-06 also introduced the term ``ADV'', as defined... definition of ``ADV'' as proposed was derived from the previously defined term ``Liquidity Adding ADV'', which defined term was eliminated. The term ``ADV'' differs from ``Liquidity Adding ADV'' in that:...

  3. 3D Tissue Culturing: Tissue in Cube: In Vitro 3D Culturing Platform with Hybrid Gel Cubes for Multidirectional Observations (Adv. Healthcare Mater. 13/2016).

    PubMed

    Hagiwara, Masaya; Kawahara, Tomohiro; Nobata, Rina

    2016-07-01

    An in vitro 3D culturing platform enabling multidirectional observations of 3D biosamples is presented by M. Hagiwara and co-workers on page 1566. 3D recognition of a sample structure can be achieved by facilitating multi-directional views using a standard microscope without a laser system. The cubic platform has the potential to promote 3D culture studies, offering easy handling and compatibility with commercial culture plates at a low price tag. PMID:27384934

  4. Photothermal Gene Delivery: Stimuli-Regulated Enzymatically Degradable Smart Graphene-Oxide-Polymer Nanocarrier Facilitating Photothermal Gene Delivery (Adv. Healthcare Mater. 15/2016).

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyunwoo; Kim, Jinhwan; Lee, Minkyung; Choi, Hee Cheul; Kim, Won Jong

    2016-08-01

    On page 1918, Won Jong Kim and co-workers use disulfide bonding for the rational design of graphene oxide (GO) based nanocarriers. In the lower left side, photothermally triggered gene release is illustrated in cancer cell. Polymer-detached GOis exocytosed, and subsequently gets into the macrophage (middle right). In the macrophage, peroxidase binds to GO, thus degrades it to small fragments which are fluorescent. PMID:27511953

  5. Supercapacitors: A Hierarchical Carbon Derived from Sponge-Templated Activation of Graphene Oxide for High-Performance Supercapacitor Electrodes (Adv. Mater. 26/2016).

    PubMed

    Xu, Jin; Tan, Ziqi; Zeng, Wencong; Chen, Guanxiong; Wu, Shuilin; Zhao, Yuan; Ni, Kun; Tao, Zhuchen; Ikram, Mujtaba; Ji, Hengxing; Zhu, Yanwu

    2016-07-01

    H. Ji, Y. Zhu, and co-workers demonstrate a 3D hierarchically porous carbon by introducing a polyurethane sponge to template graphene oxide into a 3D interconnected structure while KOH activation generates abundant micropores in its backbone. As described on page 5222, a supercapacitor assembled with this carbon material achieves a high energy density of 89 W h kg(-1) (64 W h L(-1) ) and outstanding power density due to its shortened ion transport distance in three dimensions. PMID:27383024

  6. Organic Memory Devices: 2D Mica Crystal as Electret in Organic Field-Effect Transistors for Multistate Memory (Adv. Mater. 19/2016).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaotao; He, Yudong; Li, Rongjin; Dong, Huanli; Hu, Wenping

    2016-05-01

    R. Li, H. Dong, and co-workers describe the exfoliation of cheap and abundant minerals, such as mica, into nanometer-thick 2D crystals with atomically flat surfaces. As described on page 3755, the application of the 2D electret in organic field-effect transistors is well-suited for flexible nonvolatile memory devices. Stored information can be retrieved even after power cycling. Moreover, the devices can be used as full-function transistors with a low-resistance and a high-resistance state.

  7. Single-Molecule Magnets: Giant Hysteresis of Single-Molecule Magnets Adsorbed on a Nonmagnetic Insulator (Adv. Mater. 26/2016).

    PubMed

    Wäckerlin, Christian; Donati, Fabio; Singha, Aparajita; Baltic, Romana; Rusponi, Stefano; Diller, Katharina; Patthey, François; Pivetta, Marina; Lan, Yanhua; Klyatskaya, Svetlana; Ruben, Mario; Brune, Harald; Dreiser, Jan

    2016-07-01

    In Tb(Pc)2 single-molecule magnets, where Pc is phthalocyanine, adsorbed on magnesium oxide, the fluctuations of the terbium magnetic moment are strongly suppressed in contrast to the adsorption on silver. On page 5195, J. Dreiser and co-workers investigate that the molecules are perfectly organized by self-assembly, as seen in the scanning tunnelling microscopy image (top part of the design). The molecules are probed by circularly polarized X-rays depicted as green spirals. PMID:27383020

  8. Water Splitting: Strongly Coupled Nafion Molecules and Ordered Porous CdS Networks for Enhanced Visible-Light Photoelectrochemical Hydrogen Evolution (Adv. Mater. 24/2016).

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xue-Li; Song, Ji-Peng; Ling, Tao; Hu, Zhen Peng; Yin, Peng-Fei; Davey, Kenneth; Du, Xi-Wen; Qiao, Shi-Zhang

    2016-06-01

    T. Ling, X.-W. Du, S. Z. Qiao, and co-workers report strongly coupled Nafion molecules and ordered-porous CdS networks for visible-light water splitting. The image conceptually shows how the three-dimensional ordered structure effectively harvests incoming light. As described on page 4935, the inorganic CdS skeleton is homogeneously passivated by the organic Nafion molecules to facilitate hydrogen generation. PMID:27311095

  9. Explosives: Metal-Organic Framework Templated Synthesis of Copper Azide as the Primary Explosive with Low Electrostatic Sensitivity and Excellent Initiation Ability (Adv. Mater. 28/2016).

    PubMed

    Wang, Qianyou; Feng, Xiao; Wang, Shan; Song, Naimeng; Chen, Yifa; Tong, Wenchao; Han, Yuzhen; Yang, Li; Wang, Bo

    2016-07-01

    On page 5837, L. Yang, B. Wang, and co-workers describe a metal-organic framework (MOF) templating method to synthesize copper azide uniformly anchored in a 3D interconnected carbon matrix and evenly spaced by the electron-conductive joints. This strategy sheds light on the preparation of powerful yet safe primary explosives and fulfills the need for controllable explosive systems. PMID:27442967

  10. Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells: The Future of Using Earth-Abundant Elements in Counter Electrodes for Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells (Adv. Mater. 20/2016).

    PubMed

    Briscoe, Joe; Dunn, Steve

    2016-05-01

    Sustainability is an important concept generating traction in the research community. To be really sustainable the full life cycle of a product needs to be carefully considered. A key aspect of this is using elements that are either readily recycled or accessible in the Earth's biosphere. Jigsawing these materials together in compounds to address our future energy needs represents a great opportunity for the current generation of researchers. On page 3802, S. Dunn and J. Briscoe summarize the performance of a selection of alternative materials to replace platinum in the counter electrodes of dye-sensitized solar cells.

  11. Transition Metal Dichalcogenides: Morphological Engineering of CVD-Grown Transition Metal Dichalcogenides for Efficient Electrochemical Hydrogen Evolution (Adv. Mater. 29/2016).

    PubMed

    Ji, Qingqing; Zhang, Yu; Shi, Jianping; Sun, Jingyu; Zhang, Yanfeng; Liu, Zhongfan

    2016-08-01

    On page 6207, Y. Zhang, Z. Liu and co-workers describe morphologically engineered 2D-MoS2 for the facilitation of efficient hydrogen evolution reaction. Two pathways to achieve such a purpose are highlighted, either by non-equilibrium growth of MoS2 dendrites or by high-density nucleation of MoS2 nanoflakes directly on the electrode materials. Future research directions are also proposed and discussed to further enhance the efficiency of such unique catalysts. PMID:27478081

  12. 3D Printing: 3D Printing of Conductive Complex Structures with In Situ Generation of Silver Nanoparticles (Adv. Mater. 19/2016).

    PubMed

    Fantino, Erika; Chiappone, Annalisa; Roppolo, Ignazio; Manfredi, Diego; Bongiovanni, Roberta; Pirri, Candido Fabrizio; Calignano, Flaviana

    2016-05-01

    On page 3712, E. Fantino, A. Chiappone, and co-workers fabricate conductive 3D hybrid structures by coupling the photo-reduction of metal precursors with 3D printing technology. The generated structures consist of metal nanoparticles embedded in a polymer matrix shaped into complex multilayered architectures. 3D conductive structures are fabricated with a digital light-processing printer incorporating silver salt into photocurable formulations. PMID:27167030

  13. Drug Delivery: Microneedles Integrated with Pancreatic Cells and Synthetic Glucose-Signal Amplifiers for Smart Insulin Delivery (Adv. Mater. 16/2016).

    PubMed

    Ye, Yanqi; Yu, Jicheng; Wang, Chao; Nguyen, Nhu-Y; Walker, Glenn M; Buse, John B; Gu, Zhen

    2016-04-01

    A bio-responsive microneedle-based patch, integrated with a rhodamine-stained glucose-signal amplifier and calcein-AM-stained pancreatic β-cell capsules, is developed by Z. Gu and co-workers. This "smart cell patch", described on page 3115, effectively regulates the blood glucose level of type-1 diabetic mice, achieving a reduction for over 10 h. Image credit: Yanqi Ye. PMID:27105814

  14. Cellular Microcultures: Programming Mechanical and Physicochemical Properties of 3D Hydrogel Cellular Microcultures via Direct Ink Writing (Adv. Healthcare Mater. 9/2016).

    PubMed

    McCracken, Joselle M; Badea, Adina; Kandel, Mikhail E; Gladman, A Sydney; Wetzel, David J; Popescu, Gabriel; Lewis, Jennifer A; Nuzzo, Ralph G

    2016-05-01

    R. Nuzzo and co-workers show on page 1025 how compositional differences in hydrogels are used to tune their cellular compliance by controlling their polymer mesh properties and subsequent uptake of the protein poly-l-lysine (green spheres in circled inset). The cover image shows pyramid micro-scaffolds prepared using direct ink writing (DIW) that differentially direct fibroblast and preosteoblast growth in 3D, depending on cell motility and surface treatment. PMID:27166616

  15. Cellular Microcultures: Programming Mechanical and Physicochemical Properties of 3D Hydrogel Cellular Microcultures via Direct Ink Writing (Adv. Healthcare Mater. 9/2016).

    PubMed

    McCracken, Joselle M; Badea, Adina; Kandel, Mikhail E; Gladman, A Sydney; Wetzel, David J; Popescu, Gabriel; Lewis, Jennifer A; Nuzzo, Ralph G

    2016-05-01

    R. Nuzzo and co-workers show on page 1025 how compositional differences in hydrogels are used to tune their cellular compliance by controlling their polymer mesh properties and subsequent uptake of the protein poly-l-lysine (green spheres in circled inset). The cover image shows pyramid micro-scaffolds prepared using direct ink writing (DIW) that differentially direct fibroblast and preosteoblast growth in 3D, depending on cell motility and surface treatment.

  16. Conducting Fibers: Downsized Sheath-Core Conducting Fibers for Weavable Superelastic Wires, Biosensors, Supercapacitors, and Strain Sensors (Adv. Mater. 25/2016).

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongyan; Liu, Zunfeng; Ding, Jianning; Lepró, Xavier; Fang, Shaoli; Jiang, Nan; Yuan, Ninyi; Wang, Run; Yin, Qu; Lv, Wei; Liu, Zhongsheng; Zhang, Mei; Ovalle-Robles, Raquel; Inoue, Kanzan; Yin, Shougen; Baughman, Ray H

    2016-07-01

    Using intelligent textiles for clothing represents one possibility for weavable superelastic conducting fibers that can store energy, sense body motions, and detect biochemicals. On page 4998, S. Yin, R. H. Baughman, and co-workers demonstrate that these hair-like-diameter fibers, comprising buckled carbon nanotube sheaths on a rubber core, can be used as glucose sensors, supercapacitors, ultrafast strain sensors, and electrical interconnectors. The performance of these structures is maintained also under giant strain. PMID:27372719

  17. Transition Metal Dichalcogenides: Morphological Engineering of CVD-Grown Transition Metal Dichalcogenides for Efficient Electrochemical Hydrogen Evolution (Adv. Mater. 29/2016).

    PubMed

    Ji, Qingqing; Zhang, Yu; Shi, Jianping; Sun, Jingyu; Zhang, Yanfeng; Liu, Zhongfan

    2016-08-01

    On page 6207, Y. Zhang, Z. Liu and co-workers describe morphologically engineered 2D-MoS2 for the facilitation of efficient hydrogen evolution reaction. Two pathways to achieve such a purpose are highlighted, either by non-equilibrium growth of MoS2 dendrites or by high-density nucleation of MoS2 nanoflakes directly on the electrode materials. Future research directions are also proposed and discussed to further enhance the efficiency of such unique catalysts.

  18. Sensors: A Highly Sensitive Diketopyrrolopyrrole-Based Ambipolar Transistor for Selective Detection and Discrimination of Xylene Isomers (Adv. Mater. 21/2016).

    PubMed

    Wang, Bin; Huynh, Tan-Phat; Wu, Weiwei; Hayek, Naseem; Do, Thu Trang; Cancilla, John C; Torrecilla, Jose S; Nahid, Masrur Morshed; Colwell, John M; Gazit, Oz M; Puniredd, Sreenivasa Reddy; McNeill, Christopher R; Sonar, Prashant; Haick, Hossam

    2016-06-01

    An ambipolar organic field-effect transistor (OFET) based on poly(diketopyrrolopyrrole-terthiophene) (PDPPHD-T3) is shown by P. Sonar, H. Haick, and co-workers on page 4012 to sensitively detect xylene isomers at low to 40 ppm level in multiple sensing features. Combined with pattern-recognition algorithms, a sole ambipolar FET sensor, rather than arrays of sensors, is able to discriminate highly similar xylene structural isomers from each other. PMID:27246920

  19. Atomic Layers: Tellurium-Assisted Epitaxial Growth of Large-Area, Highly Crystalline ReS2 Atomic Layers on Mica Substrate (Adv. Mater. 25/2016).

    PubMed

    Cui, Fangfang; Wang, Cong; Li, Xiaobo; Wang, Gang; Liu, Kaiqiang; Yang, Zhou; Feng, Qingliang; Liang, Xing; Zhang, Zhongyue; Liu, Shengzhong; Lei, Zhibin; Liu, Zonghuai; Xu, Hua; Zhang, Jin

    2016-07-01

    H. Xu, J. Zhang, and co-workers synthesize anisotropic 2D-layered rhenium disulfide with high crystal quality and uniform monolayer thickness. As described on page 5019, tellurium-assisted epitaxial growth on a mica substrate is chosen to generate such structures. PMID:27372721

  20. Zinc-Air Batteries: Flexible Rechargeable Zinc-Air Batteries through Morphological Emulation of Human Hair Array (Adv. Mater. 30/2016).

    PubMed

    Fu, Jing; Hassan, Fathy Mohamed; Li, Jingde; Lee, Dong Un; Ghannoum, Abdul Rahman; Lui, Gregory; Hoque, Md Ariful; Chen, Zhongwei

    2016-08-01

    On page 6421, Z. Chen and co-workers describe an electrically rechargeable, nanoarchitectured air electrode that morphologically emulates a human-hair array for solid-state zinc-air batteries. Grown directly on a stainless-steel mesh, the hair-like array can effectively catalyze molecular oxygen to water. Batteries equipped with this electrode show tangible benefits, including improved flexibility and performance. PMID:27493071

  1. Phosphorescent OLEDs: Sky-Blue Phosphorescent OLEDs with 34.1% External Quantum Efficiency Using a Low Refractive Index Electron Transporting Layer (Adv. Mater. 24/2016).

    PubMed

    Shin, Hyun; Lee, Jeong-Hwan; Moon, Chang-Ki; Huh, Jin-Suk; Sim, Bomi; Kim, Jang-Joo

    2016-06-01

    J.-J. Kim and co-workers achieve highly efficient blue organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) using a low-refractive-index layer. As described on page 4920, an external quantum efficiency over 34% is achieved, owing to the low refractive index of the materials. A milepost and a shining entrance of the castle are the metaphor indicating the way to highly efficient blue OLEDs. On the way to the castle, the depicted chemical structures serve as the light-emitting layer.

  2. Field-Effect Transistors: Ultrathin MXene-Micropattern-Based Field-Effect Transistor for Probing Neural Activity (Adv. Mater. 17/2016).

    PubMed

    Xu, Bingzhe; Zhu, Minshen; Zhang, Wencong; Zhen, Xu; Pei, Zengxia; Xue, Qi; Zhi, Chunyi; Shi, Peng

    2016-05-01

    A field-effect transistor (FET) based on ultrathin Ti3 C2 -MXene micropatterns is developed by C. Zhi, P. Shi, and co-workers, as described on page 3333. The FET can be utilized for label-free probing of small molecules in typical biological environments, e.g., for fast detection of action potentials in primary neurons. This device is produced with a microcontact printing technique, harnessing the unique advantages for easy fabrication. PMID:27122113

  3. Flexible Electronics: An Epidermal Stimulation and Sensing Platform for Sensorimotor Prosthetic Control, Management of Lower Back Exertion, and Electrical Muscle Activation (Adv. Mater. 22/2016).

    PubMed

    Xu, Baoxing; Akhtar, Aadeel; Liu, Yuhao; Chen, Hang; Yeo, Woon-Hong; Park, Sung Ii; Boyce, Brandon; Kim, Hyunjin; Yu, Jiwoo; Lai, Hsin-Yen; Jung, Sungyoung; Zhou, Yuhao; Kim, Jeonghyun; Cho, Seongkyu; Huang, Yonggang; Bretl, Timothy; Rogers, John A

    2016-06-01

    The design of an ultrathin, conformal electronic device that integrates electrotactile stimulation with electromyography, temperature, and strain sensing in a single, simple platform is reported by J. A. Rogers and co-workers on page 4462. Demonstrated application possibilities include prosthetic control with sensory feedback, monitors, and stimulation signals related to lower back exertion, and electrical muscle stimulation with feedback control. PMID:27273442

  4. Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells: The Future of Using Earth-Abundant Elements in Counter Electrodes for Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells (Adv. Mater. 20/2016).

    PubMed

    Briscoe, Joe; Dunn, Steve

    2016-05-01

    Sustainability is an important concept generating traction in the research community. To be really sustainable the full life cycle of a product needs to be carefully considered. A key aspect of this is using elements that are either readily recycled or accessible in the Earth's biosphere. Jigsawing these materials together in compounds to address our future energy needs represents a great opportunity for the current generation of researchers. On page 3802, S. Dunn and J. Briscoe summarize the performance of a selection of alternative materials to replace platinum in the counter electrodes of dye-sensitized solar cells. PMID:27197641

  5. Stem Cell Bioprinting: Functional 3D Neural Mini-Tissues from Printed Gel-Based Bioink and Human Neural Stem Cells (Adv. Healthcare Mater. 12/2016).

    PubMed

    Gu, Qi; Tomaskovic-Crook, Eva; Lozano, Rodrigo; Chen, Yu; Kapsa, Robert M; Zhou, Qi; Wallace, Gordon G; Crook, Jeremy M

    2016-06-01

    On page 1429 G. G. Wallace, J. M. Crook, and co-workers report the first example of fabricating neural tissue by 3D bioprinting human neural stem cells. A novel polysaccharide based bioink preserves stem cell viability and function within the printed construct, enabling self-renewal and differentiation to neurons and supporting neuroglia. Neurons are predominantly GABAergic, establish networks, are spontaneously active, and show a bicuculline induced increased calcium response. PMID:27333401

  6. 3D Tissue Culturing: Tissue in Cube: In Vitro 3D Culturing Platform with Hybrid Gel Cubes for Multidirectional Observations (Adv. Healthcare Mater. 13/2016).

    PubMed

    Hagiwara, Masaya; Kawahara, Tomohiro; Nobata, Rina

    2016-07-01

    An in vitro 3D culturing platform enabling multidirectional observations of 3D biosamples is presented by M. Hagiwara and co-workers on page 1566. 3D recognition of a sample structure can be achieved by facilitating multi-directional views using a standard microscope without a laser system. The cubic platform has the potential to promote 3D culture studies, offering easy handling and compatibility with commercial culture plates at a low price tag.

  7. Photoacoustic Imaging: Semiconducting Oligomer Nanoparticles as an Activatable Photoacoustic Probe with Amplified Brightness for In Vivo Imaging of pH (Adv. Mater. 19/2016).

    PubMed

    Miao, Qingqing; Lyu, Yan; Ding, Dan; Pu, Kanyi

    2016-05-01

    Despite the great potential of photoacoustic imaging in the life sciences, the development of smart activatable photoacoustic probes remains elusive. On page 3662, K. Pu and co-workers report a facile nanoengineering approach based on semiconducting oligomer nano-particles to develop ratiometric photoacoustic probes with amplified brightness and enhanced sensing capability for accurate photoacoustic mapping of pH in the tumors of living mice.

  8. Photodetectors: Broad Detection Range Rhenium Diselenide Photodetector Enhanced by (3-Aminopropyl)Triethoxysilane and Triphenylphosphine Treatment (Adv. Mater. 31/2016).

    PubMed

    Jo, Seo-Hyeon; Park, Hyung-Youl; Kang, Dong-Ho; Shim, Jaewoo; Jeon, Jaeho; Choi, Seunghyuk; Kim, Minwoo; Park, Yongkook; Lee, Jaehyeong; Song, Young Jae; Lee, Sungjoo; Park, Jin-Hong

    2016-08-01

    The effects of triphenylphosphine (PPh3 ) and (3-amino-propyl)triethoxysilane (APTES) on a rhenium diselenide (ReSe2 ) photodetector are systematically studied by J.-H. Park and co-workers on page 6711 in comparison with a conventional MoS2 device. A very high performance ReSe2 photodetector is demonstrated, which has a broad photodetection range, high photoresponsivity (1.18 × 10(6) A W(-1) ), and fast photoswitching speed (rising/decaying time: 58/263 ms).

  9. Solar Cells: Homo-Tandem Polymer Solar Cells with VOC >1.8 V for Efficient PV-Driven Water Splitting (Adv. Mater. 17/2016).

    PubMed

    Gao, Yangqin; Le Corre, Vincent M; Gaïtis, Alexandre; Neophytou, Marios; Hamid, Mahmoud Abdul; Takanabe, Kazuhiro; Beaujuge, Pierre M

    2016-05-01

    On page 3366, P. M. Beaujuge and co-workers describe homo-tandem solar cells constructed by stacking identical subcells solution-processed from blends of the wide-bandgap polymer donor PBDTTPD and the fullerene acceptor PCBM, which achieve power conversion efficiencies >8% and open-circuit voltages >1.8 V. The homo-tandem devices provide sufficient voltage to induce the dissociation of water in an electrochemical cell. The authors acknowledge Hyun Ho Hwang (Heno) for developing the artwork. PMID:27122114

  10. Single-Molecule Magnets: Giant Hysteresis of Single-Molecule Magnets Adsorbed on a Nonmagnetic Insulator (Adv. Mater. 26/2016).

    PubMed

    Wäckerlin, Christian; Donati, Fabio; Singha, Aparajita; Baltic, Romana; Rusponi, Stefano; Diller, Katharina; Patthey, François; Pivetta, Marina; Lan, Yanhua; Klyatskaya, Svetlana; Ruben, Mario; Brune, Harald; Dreiser, Jan

    2016-07-01

    In Tb(Pc)2 single-molecule magnets, where Pc is phthalocyanine, adsorbed on magnesium oxide, the fluctuations of the terbium magnetic moment are strongly suppressed in contrast to the adsorption on silver. On page 5195, J. Dreiser and co-workers investigate that the molecules are perfectly organized by self-assembly, as seen in the scanning tunnelling microscopy image (top part of the design). The molecules are probed by circularly polarized X-rays depicted as green spirals.

  11. Explosives: Metal-Organic Framework Templated Synthesis of Copper Azide as the Primary Explosive with Low Electrostatic Sensitivity and Excellent Initiation Ability (Adv. Mater. 28/2016).

    PubMed

    Wang, Qianyou; Feng, Xiao; Wang, Shan; Song, Naimeng; Chen, Yifa; Tong, Wenchao; Han, Yuzhen; Yang, Li; Wang, Bo

    2016-07-01

    On page 5837, L. Yang, B. Wang, and co-workers describe a metal-organic framework (MOF) templating method to synthesize copper azide uniformly anchored in a 3D interconnected carbon matrix and evenly spaced by the electron-conductive joints. This strategy sheds light on the preparation of powerful yet safe primary explosives and fulfills the need for controllable explosive systems.

  12. Photodetectors: Broad Detection Range Rhenium Diselenide Photodetector Enhanced by (3-Aminopropyl)Triethoxysilane and Triphenylphosphine Treatment (Adv. Mater. 31/2016).

    PubMed

    Jo, Seo-Hyeon; Park, Hyung-Youl; Kang, Dong-Ho; Shim, Jaewoo; Jeon, Jaeho; Choi, Seunghyuk; Kim, Minwoo; Park, Yongkook; Lee, Jaehyeong; Song, Young Jae; Lee, Sungjoo; Park, Jin-Hong

    2016-08-01

    The effects of triphenylphosphine (PPh3 ) and (3-amino-propyl)triethoxysilane (APTES) on a rhenium diselenide (ReSe2 ) photodetector are systematically studied by J.-H. Park and co-workers on page 6711 in comparison with a conventional MoS2 device. A very high performance ReSe2 photodetector is demonstrated, which has a broad photodetection range, high photoresponsivity (1.18 × 10(6) A W(-1) ), and fast photoswitching speed (rising/decaying time: 58/263 ms). PMID:27511529

  13. Osteochondral Regeneration: Tuning Cell Differentiation into a 3D Scaffold Presenting a Pore Shape Gradient for Osteochondral Regeneration (Adv. Healthcare Mater. 14/2016).

    PubMed

    Di Luca, Andrea; Lorenzo-Moldero, Ivan; Mota, Carlos; Lepedda, Antonio; Auhl, Dietmar; Van Blitterswijk, Clemens; Moroni, Lorenzo

    2016-07-01

    A combination of human mesenchymal stem cells with additive manufacturing technology for the fabrication of scaffolds with instructive properties is presented by Lorenzo Moroni and co-workers on page 1753. This new fiber deposition pattern allows the generation of pores of different shapes within the same construct. The most rhomboidal pore geometry sustained enhances alkaline phosphatase activity and osteogenic related genes expression with respect to the other gradient zones when the gradient scaffold is cultured in a medium supporting both osteogenic and chondrogenic differentiation. This may contribute to enhance osteochondral regeneration in orthopedic treatments. PMID:27436107

  14. 3D Printing: 3D Printing of Conductive Complex Structures with In Situ Generation of Silver Nanoparticles (Adv. Mater. 19/2016).

    PubMed

    Fantino, Erika; Chiappone, Annalisa; Roppolo, Ignazio; Manfredi, Diego; Bongiovanni, Roberta; Pirri, Candido Fabrizio; Calignano, Flaviana

    2016-05-01

    On page 3712, E. Fantino, A. Chiappone, and co-workers fabricate conductive 3D hybrid structures by coupling the photo-reduction of metal precursors with 3D printing technology. The generated structures consist of metal nanoparticles embedded in a polymer matrix shaped into complex multilayered architectures. 3D conductive structures are fabricated with a digital light-processing printer incorporating silver salt into photocurable formulations.

  15. Inside Front Cover: Manipulating the Local Light Emission in Organic Light-Emitting Diodes by using Patterned Self-Assembled Monolayers (Adv. Mater. 14/2008).

    PubMed

    Mathijssen, Simon G J; van Hal, Paul A; van den Biggelaar, Ton J M; Smits, Edsger C P; de Boer, Bert; Kemerink, Martijn; Janssen, René A J; de Leeuw, Dago M

    2008-07-17

    The inside cover shows an optical micrograph picture of an organic light-emitting diode with patterned, micro-contact-printed self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) that modify the work function of the anode, reported by Simon Mathijssen, Dago de Leeuw, and co-workers on p. 2703. In this particular light-emitting diode a fluorinated alkanethiol has been used that increases the work function and therefore improves the injection of holes. This results in a higher light emission on the positions where the SAM has been printed, which can be observed as the red pattern. PMID:25213911

  16. Sensors: A Highly Sensitive Diketopyrrolopyrrole-Based Ambipolar Transistor for Selective Detection and Discrimination of Xylene Isomers (Adv. Mater. 21/2016).

    PubMed

    Wang, Bin; Huynh, Tan-Phat; Wu, Weiwei; Hayek, Naseem; Do, Thu Trang; Cancilla, John C; Torrecilla, Jose S; Nahid, Masrur Morshed; Colwell, John M; Gazit, Oz M; Puniredd, Sreenivasa Reddy; McNeill, Christopher R; Sonar, Prashant; Haick, Hossam

    2016-06-01

    An ambipolar organic field-effect transistor (OFET) based on poly(diketopyrrolopyrrole-terthiophene) (PDPPHD-T3) is shown by P. Sonar, H. Haick, and co-workers on page 4012 to sensitively detect xylene isomers at low to 40 ppm level in multiple sensing features. Combined with pattern-recognition algorithms, a sole ambipolar FET sensor, rather than arrays of sensors, is able to discriminate highly similar xylene structural isomers from each other.

  17. Phosphorescent OLEDs: Sky-Blue Phosphorescent OLEDs with 34.1% External Quantum Efficiency Using a Low Refractive Index Electron Transporting Layer (Adv. Mater. 24/2016).

    PubMed

    Shin, Hyun; Lee, Jeong-Hwan; Moon, Chang-Ki; Huh, Jin-Suk; Sim, Bomi; Kim, Jang-Joo

    2016-06-01

    J.-J. Kim and co-workers achieve highly efficient blue organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) using a low-refractive-index layer. As described on page 4920, an external quantum efficiency over 34% is achieved, owing to the low refractive index of the materials. A milepost and a shining entrance of the castle are the metaphor indicating the way to highly efficient blue OLEDs. On the way to the castle, the depicted chemical structures serve as the light-emitting layer. PMID:27311092

  18. Designed Stem Cell Aggregates: Enhanced Biological Functions of Human Mesenchymal Stem-Cell Aggregates Incorporating E-Cadherin-Modified PLGA Microparticles (Adv. Healthcare Mater. 15/2016).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan; Mao, Hongli; Gao, Chao; Li, Suhua; Shuai, Qizhi; Xu, Jianbin; Xu, Ke; Cao, Lei; Lang, Ren; Gu, Zhongwei; Akaike, Toshihiro; Yang, Jun

    2016-08-01

    E-cadherin-modified poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (hE-cad-PLGA) microparticles were fabricated and then mediated the 3D cell aggregates of human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) on page 1949 by Jun Yang and co-workers. The hE-cad-Fc matrix and the PLGA microparticles synergistically regulate the proliferation and bioactive factors secretions of MSCs by activating EGFR, AKT and ERK1/2 signaling pathways. The hE-cad-PLGA microparticles offer a novel route to expand multipotent stem cell-based clinical applications. PMID:27511954

  19. Water Splitting: Strongly Coupled Nafion Molecules and Ordered Porous CdS Networks for Enhanced Visible-Light Photoelectrochemical Hydrogen Evolution (Adv. Mater. 24/2016).

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xue-Li; Song, Ji-Peng; Ling, Tao; Hu, Zhen Peng; Yin, Peng-Fei; Davey, Kenneth; Du, Xi-Wen; Qiao, Shi-Zhang

    2016-06-01

    T. Ling, X.-W. Du, S. Z. Qiao, and co-workers report strongly coupled Nafion molecules and ordered-porous CdS networks for visible-light water splitting. The image conceptually shows how the three-dimensional ordered structure effectively harvests incoming light. As described on page 4935, the inorganic CdS skeleton is homogeneously passivated by the organic Nafion molecules to facilitate hydrogen generation.

  20. Zinc-Air Batteries: Flexible Rechargeable Zinc-Air Batteries through Morphological Emulation of Human Hair Array (Adv. Mater. 30/2016).

    PubMed

    Fu, Jing; Hassan, Fathy Mohamed; Li, Jingde; Lee, Dong Un; Ghannoum, Abdul Rahman; Lui, Gregory; Hoque, Md Ariful; Chen, Zhongwei

    2016-08-01

    On page 6421, Z. Chen and co-workers describe an electrically rechargeable, nanoarchitectured air electrode that morphologically emulates a human-hair array for solid-state zinc-air batteries. Grown directly on a stainless-steel mesh, the hair-like array can effectively catalyze molecular oxygen to water. Batteries equipped with this electrode show tangible benefits, including improved flexibility and performance.

  1. The PHITS code for space applications: status and recent developments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sihver, Lembit; Ploc, Ondrej; Sato, Tatsuhiko; Niita, Koji; Hashimoto, Shintaro; El-Jaby, Samy

    Since COSPAR 2012, the Particle and Heavy Ion Transport code System, PHITS, has been upgraded and released to the public [1]. The code has been improved and so has the contents of its package, such as the attached data libraries. In the new version, the intra-nuclear cascade models INCL4.6 and INC-ELF have been implemented as well as the Kurotama model for the total reaction cross sections. The accuracies of the new reaction models for transporting the galactic cosmic-rays were investigated by comparing with experimental data. The incorporation of these models has improved the capabilities of PHITS to perform particle transport simulations for different space applications. A methodology for assessing the pre-mission exposure of space crew aboard the ISS has been developed in terms of an effective dose equivalent [2]. PHITS was used to calculate the particle transport of the GCR and trapped radiation through the hull of the ISS. By using the predicted spectra, and fluence-to-dose conversion factors, the semi-empirical ISSCREM [3,4,5] code was then scaled to predict the effective dose equivalent. This methodology provides an opportunity for pre-flight predictions of the effective dose equivalent, which can be compared to post-flight estimates, and therefore offers a means to assess the impact of radiation exposure on ISS flight crew. We have also simulated [6] the protective curtain experiment, which was performed to test the efficiency of water-soaked hygienic tissue wipes and towels as a simple and cost-effective additional spacecraft shielding. The dose from the trapped particles and low energetic GCR, was significantly reduced, which shows that the protective curtains are efficient when they are applied on spacecraft at LEO. The results of these benchmark calculations, as well as the mentioned applications of PHITS to space dosimetry, will be presented. [1] T. Sato et al. J. Nucl. Sci. Technol. 50, 913-923 (2013). [2] S. El-Jaby, et al. Adv. Space Res. doi: http

  2. Otolith Asymmetry and kinetotic Behaviour of Fish in Parabolic Flights and under simulated Parabolic Flight "Micro"Gravity - a Drop-Tower Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knie, M.; Hilbig, R.; Anken, R.

    We have shown earlier that some fish of a given batch reveal motion sickness a kinetosis at the transition from earth gravity to diminished gravity The percentual ratios of the various types of behaviour normal swimming and kinetotic swimming kinetotic specimens revealed looping responses LR or spinning movements SM however highly differed depending on the quality of diminished gravity Anken and Hilbig Microgravity Sci Technol 15 52-57 2004 Whereas kinetoses were exhibited by some 90 of the individuals who had experienced flights at high quality microgravity HQM 10-6g ZARM drop-tower only some 15-25 depending on the batch of all animals had shown a kinetotic behaviour during parabolic aircraft flights PFs low quality microgravity LQM 0 03-0 05g Probably LQM is sufficient for most fish to be perceived - in relation to the individual shape or weight of otoliths and thus the performance of the vestibular system - and used as a cue for postural control In striking contrast to the results gained using PF specimens according to which otolith asymmetry differences in the size and calcium incorporation of the inner ear stones between the left and right side of the body was significantly higher in kinetotic specimens as compared to normally swimming fish a comparable asymmetry between the kinetotically and normally swimming drop-tower samples could statistically not be verified Anken et al Adv Space Res submitted The present study was designed to further elucidate the role of otolith asymmetry concerning an individually different

  3. Tumor Vascular Targeted Delivery of Polymer-conjugated Adenovirus Vector for Cancer Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Xinglei; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Morishige, Tomohiro; Eto, Yusuke; Narimatsu, Shogo; Kawai, Yasuaki; Mizuguchi, Hiroyuki; Gao, Jian-Qing; Mukai, Yohei; Okada, Naoki; Nakagawa, Shinsaku

    2011-01-01

    Previously, we generated a cancer-specific gene therapy system using adenovirus vectors (Adv) conjugated to polyethylene glycol (Adv-PEG). Here, we developed a novel Adv that targets both tumor tissues and tumor vasculatures after systemic administration by conjugating CGKRK tumor vasculature homing peptide to the end of a 20-kDa PEG chain (Adv-PEGCGKRK). In a primary tumor model, systemic administration of Adv-PEGCGKRK resulted in ~500- and 100-fold higher transgene expression in tumor than that of unmodified Adv and Adv-PEG, respectively. In contrast, the transgene expression of Adv-PEGCGKRK in liver was about 400-fold lower than that of unmodified Adv, and was almost the same as that of Adv-PEG. We also demonstrated that transgene expression with Adv-PEGCGKRK was enhanced in tumor vessels. Systemic administration of Adv-PEGCGKRK expressing the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSVtk) gene (Adv-PEGCGKRK-HSVtk) showed superior antitumor effects against primary tumors and metastases with negligible side effects by both direct cytotoxic effects and inhibition of tumor angiogenesis. These results indicate that Adv-PEGCGKRK has potential as a prototype Adv with suitable efficacy and safety for systemic cancer gene therapy against both primary tumors and metastases. PMID:21673661

  4. Antiviral Therapy in Lamivudine-Resistant Chronic Hepatitis B Patients: A Systematic Review and Network Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui-Lian; Lu, Xi; Yang, Xudong; Xu, Nan

    2016-01-01

    The relative efficacy of different strategies for chronic hepatitis B (CHB) patients with lamivudine resistance (LAM-R) has not yet been systematically studied. Clinical trials were searched in PUBMED, MEDLINE, EMBASE, and CNKI databases up to February 15, 2016. Nine trials including 764 patients met the entry criteria. In direct meta-analysis, TDF showed a stronger antiviral effect than any one of ETV, LAM/ADV, and ADV against LAM-R hepatitis B virus. LAM/ADV therapy was superior to ADV in suppressing viral replication. ETV achieved similar rate of HBV DNA undetectable compared to ADV or LAM/ADV. In network meta-analysis, TDF had higher rates of HBV DNA undetectable compared to ETV (OR, 24.69; 95% CrI: 5.36-113.66), ADV (OR, 37.28; 95% CrI: 9.73-142.92), or LAM/ADV (OR, 21.05; 95% CrI: 5.70-77.80). However, among ETV, ADV, and LAM/ADV, no drug was clearly superior to others in HBV DNA undetectable rate. Moreover, no significant difference in the rate of ALT normalization or HBeAg loss was observed compared the four rescue strategies with each other. TDF appears to be a more effective rescue therapy than LAM/ADV, ETV, or ADV. LAM plus ADV therapy was a better treatment option than ETV or ADV alone for patients with LAM-R. PMID:27672391

  5. Antiviral Therapy in Lamivudine-Resistant Chronic Hepatitis B Patients: A Systematic Review and Network Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Xi; Yang, Xudong; Xu, Nan

    2016-01-01

    The relative efficacy of different strategies for chronic hepatitis B (CHB) patients with lamivudine resistance (LAM-R) has not yet been systematically studied. Clinical trials were searched in PUBMED, MEDLINE, EMBASE, and CNKI databases up to February 15, 2016. Nine trials including 764 patients met the entry criteria. In direct meta-analysis, TDF showed a stronger antiviral effect than any one of ETV, LAM/ADV, and ADV against LAM-R hepatitis B virus. LAM/ADV therapy was superior to ADV in suppressing viral replication. ETV achieved similar rate of HBV DNA undetectable compared to ADV or LAM/ADV. In network meta-analysis, TDF had higher rates of HBV DNA undetectable compared to ETV (OR, 24.69; 95% CrI: 5.36–113.66), ADV (OR, 37.28; 95% CrI: 9.73–142.92), or LAM/ADV (OR, 21.05; 95% CrI: 5.70–77.80). However, among ETV, ADV, and LAM/ADV, no drug was clearly superior to others in HBV DNA undetectable rate. Moreover, no significant difference in the rate of ALT normalization or HBeAg loss was observed compared the four rescue strategies with each other. TDF appears to be a more effective rescue therapy than LAM/ADV, ETV, or ADV. LAM plus ADV therapy was a better treatment option than ETV or ADV alone for patients with LAM-R. PMID:27672391

  6. Antiviral Therapy in Lamivudine-Resistant Chronic Hepatitis B Patients: A Systematic Review and Network Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Xi; Yang, Xudong; Xu, Nan

    2016-01-01

    The relative efficacy of different strategies for chronic hepatitis B (CHB) patients with lamivudine resistance (LAM-R) has not yet been systematically studied. Clinical trials were searched in PUBMED, MEDLINE, EMBASE, and CNKI databases up to February 15, 2016. Nine trials including 764 patients met the entry criteria. In direct meta-analysis, TDF showed a stronger antiviral effect than any one of ETV, LAM/ADV, and ADV against LAM-R hepatitis B virus. LAM/ADV therapy was superior to ADV in suppressing viral replication. ETV achieved similar rate of HBV DNA undetectable compared to ADV or LAM/ADV. In network meta-analysis, TDF had higher rates of HBV DNA undetectable compared to ETV (OR, 24.69; 95% CrI: 5.36–113.66), ADV (OR, 37.28; 95% CrI: 9.73–142.92), or LAM/ADV (OR, 21.05; 95% CrI: 5.70–77.80). However, among ETV, ADV, and LAM/ADV, no drug was clearly superior to others in HBV DNA undetectable rate. Moreover, no significant difference in the rate of ALT normalization or HBeAg loss was observed compared the four rescue strategies with each other. TDF appears to be a more effective rescue therapy than LAM/ADV, ETV, or ADV. LAM plus ADV therapy was a better treatment option than ETV or ADV alone for patients with LAM-R.

  7. Porous Carbon Spheres: Rational Design of Si/SiO2 @Hierarchical Porous Carbon Spheres as Efficient Polysulfide Reservoirs for High-Performance Li-S Battery (Adv. Mater. 16/2016).

    PubMed

    Rehman, Sarish; Guo, Shaojun; Hou, Yanglong

    2016-04-01

    S. Guo, Y. Hou, and S. Rehman develop a new class of silicon crosslinked with hierarchical porous carbon spheres usable as an efficient polysulfide reservoir for enhancing the performance of lithium-sulfur batteries. As described on page 3167, the developed hybrid material adsorbs negatively charged polysulfides via both chemical and physical adsorption. Remarkably, the hybrid spheres show a high specific capacity, an excellent rate capability and long cyclability. PMID:27105813

  8. Targeted Drug Delivery: Carbon-Quantum-Dots-Loaded Mesoporous Silica Nanocarriers with pH-Switchable Zwitterionic Surface and Enzyme-Responsive Pore-Cap for Targeted Imaging and Drug Delivery to Tumor (Adv. Healthcare Mater. 12/2016).

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhongning; Chen, Xin; Zhang, Xiaojin; Gooding, John Justin; Zhou, Yongsheng

    2016-06-01

    On page 1401 X. Chen, X. Zhang, Y. Zhou, and co-workers describe the synthesis of mesoporous silica nanocarriers with pH-switchable antifouling zwitterionic surfaces and blue fluorescence that are capable of enzyme-responsive drug release. The system combines tumor treatment and tracking. It shows great potential for cancer treatment, since it exhibits prolonged circulation in the blood system with zero premature release while offering selective cellular uptake, tumor labeling, and intracellular drug release in tumor tissue. PMID:27333399

  9. Li-Ion Battery Cathodes: Enhancing Interfacial Bonding between Anisotropically Oriented Grains Using a Glue-Nanofiller for Advanced Li-Ion Battery Cathode (Adv. Mater. 23/2016).

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyejung; Lee, Sanghan; Cho, Hyeon; Kim, Junhyeok; Lee, Jieun; Park, Suhyeon; Joo, Se Hun; Kim, Su Hwan; Cho, Yoon-Gyo; Song, Hyun-Kon; Kwak, Sang Kyu; Cho, Jaephil

    2016-06-01

    The formation of a spinel Lix CoO2 layer in a Ni-rich secondary particle for lithium-ion batteries is reported by S. K. Kwak, J. Cho, and co-workers on page 4705, who find that the spinel-like Lix CoO2 layer, between layered primary particles, can enhance the mechanical strength of secondary particles by enhancing the interfacial binding energy among the grains. Moreover, the layer can effectively protect the unstable surface of the primary particles and offers a fast electron-ion pathway, resulting in overall enhancements of stability and kinetics in battery performance. PMID:27281047

  10. Human Neuron Cultures: Micropatterning Facilitates the Long-Term Growth and Analysis of iPSC-Derived Individual Human Neurons and Neuronal Networks (Adv. Healthcare Mater. 15/2016).

    PubMed

    Burbulla, Lena F; Beaumont, Kristin G; Mrksich, Milan; Krainc, Dimitri

    2016-08-01

    Dimitri Krainc, Milan Mrksich, and co-workers demonstrate the utility of microcontact printing technology for culturing of human neurons in defined patterns over extended periods of time on page 1894. This approach facilitates studies of neuronal development, cellular trafficking, and related mechanisms that require assessment of individual neurons and neuronal networks. PMID:27511952

  11. Flexible Supercapacitors: A Simple Approach to Boost Capacitance: Flexible Supercapacitors Based on Manganese Oxides@MOFs via Chemically Induced In Situ Self-Transformation (Adv. Mater. 26/2016).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi-Zhou; Cheng, Tao; Wang, Yang; Lai, Wen-Yong; Pang, Huan; Huang, Wei

    2016-07-01

    W.-Y. Lai, H. Pang, W. Huang, and co-workers present a simple and effective method for transforming nanocubic MOFs (metal-organic frameworks) into MnOx -nanoflower-decorated MOFs. This liquid-phase method is metaphorically illustrated by the ocean background, as is the transformation process by the different cubes. The application of these materials in flexible supercapacitors is further described on page 5242. PMID:27383023

  12. Targeted Cancer Therapy: Correlative Light-Electron Microscopy Shows RGD-Targeted ZnO Nanoparticles Dissolve in the Intracellular Environment of Triple Negative Breast Cancer Cells and Cause Apoptosis with Intratumor Heterogeneity (Adv. Healthcare Mater. 11/2016).

    PubMed

    Othman, Basmah A; Greenwood, Christina; Abuelela, Ayman F; Bharath, Anil A; Chen, Shu; Theodorou, Ioannis; Douglas, Trevor; Uchida, Maskai; Ryan, Mary; Merzaban, Jasmeen S; Porter, Alexandra E

    2016-06-01

    On page 1310 J. S. Merzaban, A. E. Porter, and co-workers present fluorescently labeled RGD-targeted ZnO nanoparticles (NPs; green) for the targeted delivery of cytotoxic ZnO to integrin αvβ3 receptors expressed on triple negative breast cancer cells. Correlative light-electron microscopy shows that NPs dissolve into ionic Zn(2+) (blue) upon uptake and cause apoptosis (red) with intra-tumor heterogeneity, thereby providing a possible strategy for targeted breast cancer therapy. Cover design by Ivan Gromicho. PMID:27275627

  13. Human Neuron Cultures: Micropatterning Facilitates the Long-Term Growth and Analysis of iPSC-Derived Individual Human Neurons and Neuronal Networks (Adv. Healthcare Mater. 15/2016).

    PubMed

    Burbulla, Lena F; Beaumont, Kristin G; Mrksich, Milan; Krainc, Dimitri

    2016-08-01

    Dimitri Krainc, Milan Mrksich, and co-workers demonstrate the utility of microcontact printing technology for culturing of human neurons in defined patterns over extended periods of time on page 1894. This approach facilitates studies of neuronal development, cellular trafficking, and related mechanisms that require assessment of individual neurons and neuronal networks.

  14. Comparison of theory and experiment for solute transport in highly heterogeneous porous medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golfier, Fabrice; Quintard, Michel; Cherblanc, Fabien; Zinn, Brendan A.; Wood, Brian D.

    2007-11-01

    In this work we compare the recently developed two-region mass transfer theory reported by Ahmadi et al. [A. Ahmadi, M. Quintard, S. Whitaker (1998), Transport in chemically and mechanically heterogeneous porous media, V, two-equation model for solute transport with adsorption, Adv. Water Resour. 1998;22:59-86] with experimental results reported by Zinn et al. [Zinn, B., L. C. Meigs, C. F. Harvey, R. Haggerty, W. J. Peplinski, C. F. Von Schwerin. Experimental visualization of solute transport and mass transfer processes in two-dimensional conductivity fields with connected regions of high conductivity. Environ Sci Technol 2004;38:3916-3926]. We find that the constant mass transfer coefficient predicted by the steady-state closure to the theory, when used with the macroscale transport equation, provides a reasonable prediction of the observed breakthrough curve. However, the use of a constant mass transfer coefficient does not allow good representation of the tailing that is observed in the data. We show that the mass transfer coefficient can be represented in terms of the eigenvalue expansion of a Green's function. For a steady solution to the closure problem, this expansion leads to the effective mass transfer coefficient being defined in terms of the harmonic average of the eigenvalues of the expansion; this is consistent with previous work on this topic. To further investigate the influence of using a single, constant value for the mass transfer coefficient, we examine the solution to the mass transfer problem in terms of a mixed model, where the eigenvalues of one region (the inclusions) are kept, while the second region (the matrix) is treated as a homogenized material. The results from this comparison indicate that the mass transfer coefficient predicted via volume averaging using a quasi-steady closure could potentially be improved upon by development of new methods that retain more of the eigenvalues of the system.

  15. Analysis of the quantity of antiviral antibodies from mink infected with different Aleutian disease virus strains.

    PubMed

    Aasted, B; Tierney, G S; Bloom, M E

    1984-05-01

    Mink persistently infected with Aleutian disease virus (ADV) develop hypergammaglobulinaemia and immune complex disease. Radiolabelled antibodies from mink infected with ADV-G, DK, Pullman , and Utah I strains of ADV were reacted against all four ADV strains in radioimmunoassay (RIA). The amount of anti-ADV antibody in two equally hypergammaglobulinaemic serum pools varied from 13% (anti- Pullman ) to 57% (anti-Utah I). Serum pools from two other sources (anti-DK and anti-ADV-G), although less hypergammaglobulinaemic , had 5% and 13%, respectively, indicating that 43-95% of the Ig in the sera of mink with AD was not specific antibody to ADV structural antigens. The possibility of a general polyclonal activation of the humoral immune system is being discussed. Comparison of plateau RIA binding levels for the four serum pools against the four viral antigens suggested three patterns of reactivity: DK and Utah I reacted similarly, but Pullman and ADV-G reacted serologically different.

  16. 17 CFR 275.203A-2 - Exemptions from prohibition on Commission registration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... amendment to Form ADV (17 CFR 279.1). (c) Investment advisers controlling, controlled by, or under common... Commission becomes effective; (2) Indicates on Schedule D of its Form ADV (17 CFR 279.1) that it will... § 275.203A-1(b)(2) of this chapter, files a completed Form ADV-W (17 CFR 279.2) withdrawing...

  17. 17 CFR 275.203A-2 - Exemptions from prohibition on Commission registration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... amendment to Form ADV (17 CFR 279.1). (c) Investment advisers controlling, controlled by, or under common... Commission becomes effective; (2) Indicates on Schedule D of its Form ADV (17 CFR 279.1) that it will... § 275.203A-1(b)(2) of this chapter, files a completed Form ADV-W (17 CFR 279.2) withdrawing...

  18. 17 CFR 275.203-2 - Withdrawal from investment adviser registration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... application). (b) Electronic filing. Once you have filed your Form ADV (17 CFR 279.1) (or any amendments to... Withdrawal from investment adviser registration. (a) Form ADV-W. You must file Form ADV-W (17 CFR 279.2)...

  19. Molecular Detection and Phylogenetic Characterization of Bat and Human Adenoviruses in Southern China.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xue-Yan; Qiu, Min; Chen, Hui-Fang; Chen, Shao-Wei; Xiao, Jian-Peng; Jiang, Li-Na; Huo, Shu-Ting; Shi, Ting-Li; Ma, Li-Zhen; Liu, Shan; Zhou, Jun-Hua; Zhang, Qiong-Hua; Li, Xing; Chen, Zhong; Wu, Yi; Li, Jin-Ming; Guan, Wei-Jie; Xiong, Yi-Quan; Ma, Shu-Juan; Zhong, Xue-Shan; Ge, Jing; Cen, Shu-Wen; Chen, Qing

    2016-06-01

    Several novel adenoviruses (AdVs) have recently been identified in humans and other animal species. In this study, we report the molecular detection of and phylogenetically characterize bat and human AdVs detected in fecal or rectal swab samples collected in southern China. To detect AdVs, a 252-261 bp fragment of the DNA polymerase (DPOL) gene was amplified using nested PCR. A total of 520 rectal swab samples were collected from eight bat species in four geographic regions of southern China (Guangzhou, Yunfu, Huizhou, and Haikou city). Thirty-six (6.9%) samples from the following species tested positive for AdVs: Myotis ricketti, Miniopterus schreibersii, Scotophilus kuhlii, Taphozous melanopogon, Rhinolophus blythi, and Cynopterus sphinx. Eight novel AdVs were detected in 13.3% of the samples from C. sphinx. Of 328 fecal samples from patients with diarrhea, 16 (4.9%) were positive for classical human AdVs. Phylogenetic analysis showed that human AdVs shared low similarity (57.1-69.3%) with bat AdVs in deduced amino acid sequences of the AdV DPOL region. Thus, our study indicated that bat AdVs and human AdVs are species specific. As such, there is no evidence of cross-species transmission of AdV between bats and humans based on current data. PMID:27057618

  20. Adolescent Dating Violence Prevention and Intervention in a Community Setting: Perspectives of Young Adults and Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martsolf, Donna S.; Colbert, Crystal; Draucker, Claire B.

    2012-01-01

    Adolescent dating violence (ADV) is a significant community problem. In this study, we examine the perspectives of two groups (young adults who experienced ADV as teens and professionals who work with teens) on ADV prevention/intervention in a community context. We interviewed 88 young adults and 20 professionals. Our research team used Thorne's…

  1. 78 FR 62778 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; EDGX Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-22

    ...) (``Fee Schedule'') to add orders yielding Flag AA to the calculation of the average daily trading (``ADV... add orders yielding Flag AA to the calculation of the ADV threshold required to meet the MidPoint... orders yielding Flag AA (MidPoint Match Cross (same MPID)) to the calculation of the ADV...

  2. [Sequencing Analyses of the Hypervariable Region within the VP2 Gene of a Strain of the Aleutian Mink Disease Virus].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Hu, Bo; Bai, Xue; Zhang, Hailing; Zhao, Jianjun; Wang, Zhenjun; Ma, Fanshu; Yan, Xijun; Wu, Wei; Xu, Shujuan

    2015-05-01

    To analyze the molecular mechanisms of cross-host transmission of the Aleutian mink disease vi rus (ADV), the hypervariable region fragment of the VP2 gene of the ADV in Jilin Province (China) was amplified. Sequencing analyses showed diversity at residue 174 by comparison with other VP2 genes in GenBank. The phylogenetic tree indicated that the ADV-JL strain had a close relationship with the highly pathogenic strain from Denmark: ADV-K. Results implied that residue 174 may be associated with ADV infectivity. PMID:26470526

  3. Cost-effectiveness analysis of lamivudine, telbivudine, and entecavir in treatment of chronic hepatitis B with adefovir dipivoxil resistance

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guiliang; Liu, Yan; Qiu, Ping; Zhou, Shu-Feng; Xu, Linfang; Wen, Ping; Wen, Jianbo; Xiao, Xianzhong

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the cost-effectiveness of lamivudine (LMV), telbivudine (LdT), and entecavir (ETV) in treatment of chronic hepatitis B with adefovir dipivoxil (ADV) resistance. Two hundred and fifty-two patients were recruited and screened for resistance to ADV and randomly assigned into three groups: LMV + ADV, LdT + ADV, and ETV + ADV. The ratio of biochemical response, virological response, seroconversion of hepatitis Be antigen (HBeAg)/hepatitis Be antibody (HBeAb), viral breakthrough, and the cost and effectiveness of treatments were analyzed. A comparison of the results of the ratio of biochemical response, virological response and seroconversion of HBeAg/HBeAb, showed no statistical difference between the three groups, with the economic cost of LMV + ADV the lowest, LdT + ADV the middle, and ETV + ADV the highest. The side effects of the three plans are all rare and tolerable. LMV + ADV is the optimal rescue strategy, and LdT + ADV the alternative selection in the economically less developed regions, while ETV + ADV was used in the economically developed regions. PMID:26082614

  4. Lamivudine-resistant rtL180M and rtM204I/V are persistently dominant during combination rescue therapy with entecavir and adefovir for hepatitis B

    PubMed Central

    WANG, YANG; LIU, SHUANG; CHEN, YU; ZHENG, SUJUN; ZHOU, LI; LU, FENGMIN; DUAN, ZHONGPING

    2016-01-01

    Adefovir (ADV) sequential monotherapy was included in the 2005 Asia-Pacific guidelines for the management of patients with lamivudine (LAM) resistance. However, following the development of ADV resistance, the proportion of resistant variants during combined rescue therapy with ADV and entecavir (ETV) were unknown. The present study characterized the dynamics of resistant variants in patients with chronic hepatitis B (CHB) and LAM-resistant variants during antiviral therapy consisting of ADV monotherapy followed by ADV-ETV combination therapy. A total of 3 patients were selected from a cohort of 55 patients with CHB due to developing ADV resistance. The patients had been previously treated with LAM (100 mg daily) for 21–24 months. At the initiation of sequential monotherapy with ADV, LAM-resistant variants (rtM204V/I and rtL180M) were detected in the three patients. These patients developed ADV resistance during 19–30 months of ADV sequential monotherapy, and then switched their antiviral regimen to ADV-ETV combination therapy. During ADV monotherapy and ADV-ETV combination therapy, the patients were monitored every 3 months for the first year of therapy, and then every 6 months thereafter. A total of 30 serum samples were collected from the patients throughout the monitoring period. In total, 10 mutants that were associated with commonly-used antiviral drugs were detected by pyrosequencing. During ADV sequential monotherapy, LAM-resistant variants were gradually decreased, whereas ADV-resistant rtA181V/T and rtN236T variants gradually increased in the viral population. During 30–41 months of ADV-ETV combination therapy, viral load reduction was 2.59–3.28 log10 copies/ml; ADV-resistant variants rtA181T/V and rtN236T were undetectable following 11–24 months of combination therapy; and rtL180M and rtM204I/V remained dominant in the viral population. In conclusion, the results of the present study suggested that, in patients with LAM and ADV

  5. FOREWORD: Focus on Superconductivity in Semiconductors Focus on Superconductivity in Semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takano, Yoshihiko

    2008-12-01

    Since the discovery of superconductivity in diamond, much attention has been given to the issue of superconductivity in semiconductors. Because diamond has a large band gap of 5.5 eV, it is called a wide-gap semiconductor. Upon heavy boron doping over 3×1020 cm-3, diamond becomes metallic and demonstrates superconductivity at temperatures below 11.4 K. This discovery implies that a semiconductor can become a superconductor upon carrier doping. Recently, superconductivity was also discovered in boron-doped silicon and SiC semiconductors. The number of superconducting semiconductors has increased. In 2008 an Fe-based superconductor was discovered in a research project on carrier doping in a LaCuSeO wide-gap semiconductor. This discovery enhanced research activities in the field of superconductivity, where many scientists place particular importance on superconductivity in semiconductors. This focus issue features a variety of topics on superconductivity in semiconductors selected from the 2nd International Workshop on Superconductivity in Diamond and Related Materials (IWSDRM2008), which was held at the National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), Tsukuba, Japan in July 2008. The 1st workshop was held in 2005 and was published as a special issue in Science and Technology of Advanced Materials (STAM) in 2006 (Takano 2006 Sci. Technol. Adv. Mater. 7 S1). The selection of papers describe many important experimental and theoretical studies on superconductivity in semiconductors. Topics on boron-doped diamond include isotope effects (Ekimov et al) and the detailed structure of boron sites, and the relation between superconductivity and disorder induced by boron doping. Regarding other semiconductors, the superconducting properties of silicon and SiC (Kriener et al, Muranaka et al and Yanase et al) are discussed, and In2O3 (Makise et al) is presented as a new superconducting semiconductor. Iron-based superconductors are presented as a new series of high

  6. Survey of the July 17, 2006 Central Javan tsunami reveals 21m runup heights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritz, H.; Goff, J.; Harbitz, C.; McAdoo, B.; Moore, A.; Latief, H.; Kalligeris, N.; Kodjo, W.; Uslu, B.; Titov, V.; Synolakis, C.

    2006-12-01

    measures, including sirens, identification of rapid evacuation routes, and emergency drills, which were under way some locations the team visited. Synolakis, C.E., What went wrong Wall Street Journal. p. 12, July 25, 2006. Synolakis, C.E., and E.A. Okal, 1992--2002: Perspective on a decade of post-tsunami surveys, in: Tsunamis: Case studies, K. Satake (ed), Adv. Natur. Technol. Hazards, 23 1--30, 2005. Okal, E.A., and Synolakis, C.E., Source discriminants for nearfield tsunamis, Geophysical Journal International, 158, 899?-912, 2004. Synolakis, C.E., Imamura, F., Tsuji, Y., Matsutomi, S., Tinti, B., Cook, B., and Ushman, M. Damage, Conditions of East Java tsunami of 1994 analyzed, EOS, 76, (26), 257 and 261-?262, 1995.

  7. Aleutian disease of mink: the antibody response of sapphire and pastel mink to Aleutian disease virus.

    PubMed

    Bloom, M E; Race, R E; Hadlow, W J; Chesebro, B

    1975-10-01

    The specific antiviral antibody response of sapphire and pastel mink to Pullman strain of ADV has been examined. Sapphire mink inoculated with from 300,000-3 LD50 developed high levels of specific antibody and AD. Pastel mink inoculated with parallel doses of ADV also produced antibody but did not develop AD. The low incidence of AD in pastel mink inoculated with Pullman strain of ADV is probably related to factors other than antiviral antibody.

  8. Replication of Aleutian Mink Disease Parvovirus In Vivo Is Influenced by Residues in the VP2 Protein

    PubMed Central

    Fox, James M.; McCrackin Stevenson, Mary A.; Bloom, Marshall E.

    1999-01-01

    Aleutian mink disease parvovirus (ADV) is the etiological agent of Aleutian disease of mink. Several ADV isolates have been identified which vary in the severity of the disease they elicit. The isolate ADV-Utah replicates to high levels in mink, causing severe Aleutian disease that results in death within 6 to 8 weeks, but does not replicate in Crandell feline kidney (CrFK) cells. In contrast, ADV-G replicates in CrFK cells but does not replicate in mink. The ability of the virus to replicate in vivo is determined by virally encoded determinants contained within a defined region of the VP2 gene (M. E. Bloom, J. M. Fox, B. D. Berry, K. L. Oie, and J. B. Wolfinbarger. Virology 251:288–296, 1998). Within this region, ADV-G and ADV-Utah differ at only five amino acid residues. To determine which of these five amino acid residues comprise the in vivo replication determinant, site-directed mutagenesis was performed to individually convert the amino acid residues of ADV-G to those of ADV-Utah. A virus in which the ADV-G VP2 residue at 534, histidine (H), was converted to an aspartic acid (D) of ADV-Utah replicated in CrFK cells as efficiently as ADV-G. H534D also replicated in mink, causing transient viremia at 30 days postinfection and a strong antibody response. Animals infected with this virus developed diffuse hepatocellular microvesicular steatosis, an abnormal accumulation of intracellular fat, but did not develop classical Aleutian disease. Thus, the substitution of an aspartic acid at residue 534 for a histidine allowed replication of ADV-G in mink, but the ability to replicate was not sufficient to cause classical Aleutian disease. PMID:10482625

  9. 17 CFR 275.203A-1 - Eligibility for SEC registration; switching to or from SEC registration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Form ADV-W (17 CFR 279.2) to withdraw your SEC registration within 180 days of your fiscal year end... management of at least $30,000,000, as reported on your Form ADV (17 CFR 279.1); or (ii) You are an... least $25,000,000 but less than $30,000,000, as reported on your Form ADV (17 CFR 279.1). This...

  10. 17 CFR 275.203A-1 - Eligibility for SEC registration; switching to or from SEC registration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Form ADV-W (17 CFR 279.2) to withdraw your SEC registration within 180 days of your fiscal year end... management of at least $30,000,000, as reported on your Form ADV (17 CFR 279.1); or (ii) You are an... least $25,000,000 but less than $30,000,000, as reported on your Form ADV (17 CFR 279.1). This...

  11. Fatal systemic adenoviral infection superimposed on pulmonary mucormycosis in a child with acute leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Yu Mi; Hwang-Bo, Seok; Kim, Seong koo; Han, Seung Beom; Chung, Nack-Gyun; Kang, Jin Han

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Although adenovirus (ADV) infection usually causes self-limiting respiratory disorders in immune competent children; severe and systemic ADV infection in children undergoing chemotherapy for leukemia has been continuously reported. Nevertheless, there has been no consensus on risk factors and treatment strategies for severe ADV infection in children undergoing chemotherapy. Case summary: We report a case of a 15-year-old boy with a fatal systemic ADV infection. He had received reinduction chemotherapy for relapsed acute lymphoblastic leukemia under continuing antifungal therapy for previously diagnosed fungal pneumonia. He complained of fever and right shoulder pain 4 days after completing the reinduction chemotherapy. In spite of appropriate antibiotic and antifungal therapy, pneumonia was aggravated and gross hematuria was accompanied. A multiplex polymerase chain reaction test for respiratory viruses was positive for ADV in a blood sample, and a urine culture was positive for ADV. He received oral ribavirin, intravenous immunoglobulin, and intravenous cidofovir therapy; however, he eventually died. Relapsed leukemia, concurrent fungal pneumonia, and delayed cidofovir administration were considered the cause of the grave outcome in this patient. Conclusion: ADV may cause severe infections not only in allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplant recipients, but also in patients undergoing chemotherapy for acute leukemia. The risk factors for severe ADV infection in patients undergoing chemotherapy should be determined in the future studies, and early antiviral therapy should be administered to immune compromised patients with systemic ADV infection. PMID:27749571

  12. Expression of Aleutian mink disease parvovirus capsid proteins in defined segments: localization of immunoreactive sites and neutralizing epitopes to specific regions.

    PubMed Central

    Bloom, M E; Martin, D A; Oie, K L; Huhtanen, M E; Costello, F; Wolfinbarger, J B; Hayes, S F; Agbandje-McKenna, M

    1997-01-01

    The capsid proteins of the ADV-G isolate of Aleutian mink disease parvovirus (ADV) were expressed in 10 nonoverlapping segments as fusions with maltose-binding protein in pMAL-C2 (pVP1, pVP2a through pVP2i). The constructs were designed to capture the VP1 unique sequence and the portions analogous to the four variable surface loops of canine parvovirus (CPV) in individual fragments (pVP2b, pVP2d, pVP2e, and pVP2g, respectively). The panel of fusion proteins was immunoblotted with sera from mink infected with ADV. Seropositive mink infected with either ADV-TR, ADV-Utah, or ADV-Pullman reacted preferentially against certain segments, regardless of mink genotype or virus inoculum. The most consistently immunoreactive regions were pVP2g, pVP2e, and pVP2f, the segments that encompassed the analogs of CPV surface loops 3 and 4. The VP1 unique region was also consistently immunoreactive. These findings indicated that infected mink recognize linear epitopes that localized to certain regions of the capsid protein sequence. The segment containing the hypervariable region (pVP2d), corresponding to CPV loop 2, was also expressed from ADV-Utah. An anti-ADV-G monoclonal antibody and a rabbit anti-ADV-G capsid antibody reacted exclusively with the ADV-G pVP2d segment but not with the corresponding segment from ADV-Utah. Mink infected with ADV-TR or ADV-Utah also preferentially reacted with the pVP2d sequence characteristic of that virus. These results suggested that the loop 2 region may contain a type-specific linear epitope and that the epitope may also be specifically recognized by infected mink. Heterologous antisera were prepared against the VP1 unique region and the four segments capturing the variable surface loops of CPV. The antisera against the proteins containing loop 3 or loop 4, as well as the anticapsid antibody, neutralized ADV-G infectivity in vitro and bound to capsids in immune electron microscopy. These results suggested that regions of the ADV capsid proteins

  13. Prognostics Health Management for Advanced Small Modular Reactor Passive Components

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, Ryan M.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Coble, Jamie B.; Mitchell, Mark R.; Wootan, David W.; Hirt, Evelyn H.; Berglin, Eric J.; Bond, Leonard J.; Henager, Charles H.

    2013-10-18

    In the United States, sustainable nuclear power to promote energy security is a key national energy priority. Advanced small modular reactors (AdvSMR), which are based on modularization of advanced reactor concepts using non-light-water reactor (LWR) coolants such as liquid metal, helium, or liquid salt may provide a longer-term alternative to more conventional LWR-based concepts. The economics of AdvSMRs will be impacted by the reduced economy-of-scale savings when compared to traditional LWRs and the controllable day-to-day costs of AdvSMRs are expected to be dominated by operations and maintenance costs. Therefore, achieving the full benefits of AdvSMR deployment requires a new paradigm for plant design and management. In this context, prognostic health management of passive components in AdvSMRs can play a key role in enabling the economic deployment of AdvSMRs. In this paper, the background of AdvSMRs is discussed from which requirements for PHM systems are derived. The particle filter technique is proposed as a prognostics framework for AdvSMR passive components and the suitability of the particle filter technique is illustrated by using it to forecast thermal creep degradation using a physics-of-failure model and based on a combination of types of measurements conceived for passive AdvSMR components.

  14. Reply to the comments by Willem J. Zaadnoordijk on "An analytical solution for predicting the transient seepage from a subsurface drainage system" by P. Xin, H.C. Dan, T. Zhou, C. Lu, J. Kong, L. Li [Adv. Water Resour. 91 (2016) 1-10

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, Pei; Dan, Han-Cheng; Zhou, Tingzhang; Lu, Chunhui; Kong, Jun; Li, Ling

    2016-10-01

    We appreciate Willem J. Zaadnoordijk's comments, which led us to revisit the results in Xin et al. (2016). Zaadnoordijk (2016) solved numerically the Boussinesq equation-based (BE) model, Eq. (6) in Xin et al. (2016), and found that (1) the transient groundwater tables predicted by the numerical BE model didn't match Fig. 5b in Xin et al. (2016) and (2) with an adjusted effective specific yield (discussed further below), the BE model predicted similar results to the analytical solution that accounts for the unsaturated zone effects. We address these two points in the following. (1) The results of Fig. 5b in Xin et al. (2016) were calculated from the analytical solution with the unsaturated zone neglected. Although the governing equation of the saturated-unsaturated mathematical model presented in Xin et al. (2016) can be reduced to the Boussinesq equation with the unsaturated zone neglected (i.e., α and β approaching infinity), the application of the approximate analytical solution directly to this limiting condition incurs large errors as contained in Fig. 5b of Xin et al. (2016). In this reply we derive a new analytical solution separately for the BE model (detailed derivation given in the appendix) with such errors removed.

  15. Investigation of Adenovirus Occurrence in Pediatric Tumor Entities▿

    PubMed Central

    Kosulin, Karin; Haberler, Christine; Hainfellner, Johannes A.; Amann, Gabriele; Lang, Susanna; Lion, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    Adenoviruses (AdVs) contain genes coding for proteins with transforming potential, and certain AdV serotypes have been shown to induce tumors in rodents. However, data on the possible oncogenicity of AdVs in humans are scarce. We have therefore employed a real-time quantitative PCR (RQ-PCR) assay permitting highly sensitive detection of all 51 currently known human AdV serotypes to screen more than 500 tumor specimens derived from 17 different childhood cancer entities including leukemias, lymphomas, and solid tumors. Most tumor entities analyzed showed no evidence for the presence of AdV sequences, but AdV DNA was detected by RQ-PCR in different brain tumors including 25/30 glioblastomas, 22/30 oligodendrogliomas, and 20/30 ependymomas. Nonmalignant counterparts of AdV-positive brain tumors, including specimens of ependymal cells, plexus choroideus, and periventricular white matter, were screened for control purposes and revealed the presence of AdV DNA in most specimens tested. Identification of the AdV types present in positive malignant and nonmalignant brain tissue specimens revealed predominantly representatives of species B and D and, less commonly, C. To exclude contamination as a possible cause of false-positive results, specimens with AdV sequences detectable by PCR were subsequently analyzed by in situ hybridization, which confirmed the PCR findings in all instances. The central nervous system appears to represent a common site of AdV infection with virus persistence, thus providing the first evidence for the possible contribution of AdVs to the multistep process of tumor pathogenesis in brain tissue. PMID:17494079

  16. Novel Adenoviruses in Wild Primates: a High Level of Genetic Diversity and Evidence of Zoonotic Transmissions ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Wevers, Diana; Metzger, Sonja; Babweteera, Fred; Bieberbach, Marc; Boesch, Christophe; Cameron, Kenneth; Couacy-Hymann, Emmanuel; Cranfield, Mike; Gray, Maryke; Harris, Laurie A.; Head, Josephine; Jeffery, Kathryn; Knauf, Sascha; Lankester, Felix; Leendertz, Siv Aina J.; Lonsdorf, Elizabeth; Mugisha, Lawrence; Nitsche, Andreas; Reed, Patricia; Robbins, Martha; Travis, Dominic A.; Zommers, Zinta; Leendertz, Fabian H.; Ehlers, Bernhard

    2011-01-01

    Adenoviruses (AdVs) broadly infect vertebrate hosts, including a variety of nonhuman primates (NHPs). In the present study, we identified AdVs in NHPs living in their natural habitats, and through the combination of phylogenetic analyses and information on the habitats and epidemiological settings, we detected possible horizontal transmission events between NHPs and humans. Wild NHPs were analyzed with a pan-primate AdV-specific PCR using a degenerate nested primer set that targets the highly conserved adenovirus DNA polymerase gene. A plethora of novel AdV sequences were identified, representing at least 45 distinct AdVs. From the AdV-positive individuals, 29 nearly complete hexon genes were amplified and, based on phylogenetic analysis, tentatively allocated to all known human AdV species (Human adenovirus A to Human adenovirus G [HAdV-A to -G]) as well as to the only simian AdV species (Simian adenovirus A [SAdV-A]). Interestingly, five of the AdVs detected in great apes grouped into the HAdV-A, HAdV-D, HAdV-F, or SAdV-A clade. Furthermore, we report the first detection of AdVs in New World monkeys, clustering at the base of the primate AdV evolutionary tree. Most notably, six chimpanzee AdVs of species HAdV-A to HAdV-F revealed a remarkably close relationship to human AdVs, possibly indicating recent interspecies transmission events. PMID:21835802

  17. Identification of a Cell Surface Protein from Crandell Feline Kidney Cells That Specifically Binds Aleutian Mink Disease Parvovirus

    PubMed Central

    Fox, James M.; Bloom, Marshall E.

    1999-01-01

    Aleutian mink disease parvovirus (ADV) is the etiological agent of Aleutian disease of mink. The acute disease caused by ADV consists of permissive infection of alveolar type II cells that results in interstitial pneumonitis. The permissive infection is experimentally modeled in vitro by infecting Crandell feline kidney (CrFK) cells with a tissue culture-adapted isolate of ADV, ADV-G. ADV-G VP2 empty virions expressed in a recombinant baculovirus system were analyzed for the ability to bind to the surface of CrFK cells. Radiolabeled VP2 virions bound CrFK cells specifically, while they did not bind either Mus dunni or Spodoptera frugiperda cells, cells which are resistant to ADV infection. The binding to CrFK cells was competitively inhibited by VP2 virions but not by virions of cowpea chlorotic mottle virus (CCMV), another unenveloped virus similar in size to ADV. Furthermore, preincubation of CrFK cells with the VP2 virions blocked infection by ADV-G. The VP2 virions were used in a virus overlay protein binding assay to identify a single protein of approximately 67 kDa, named ABP (for ADV binding protein), that demonstrates specific binding of VP2 virions. Exogenously added VP2 virions were able to competitively inhibit the binding of labeled VP2 virions to ABP, while CCMV virions had no effect. Polyclonal antibodies raised against ABP reacted with ABP on the outer surface of CrFK cells and blocked infection of CrFK cells by ADV-G. In addition, VP2 virion attachment to CrFK cells was blocked when the VP2 virions were preincubated with partially purified ABP. Taken together, these results indicate that ABP is a cellular receptor for ADV. PMID:10196278

  18. Two parvoviruses that cause different diseases in mink have different transcription patterns: transcription analysis of mink enteritis virus and Aleutian mink disease parvovirus in the same cell line.

    PubMed Central

    Storgaard, T; Oleksiewicz, M; Bloom, M E; Ching, B; Alexandersen, S

    1997-01-01

    The two parvoviruses of mink cause very different diseases. Mink enteritis virus (MEV) is associated with rapid, high-level viral replication and acute disease. In contrast, infection with Aleutian mink disease parvovirus (ADV) is associated with persistent, low-level viral replication and chronic severe immune dysregulation. In the present report, we have compared viral transcription in synchronized CRFK cells infected with either MEV or ADV using a nonradioactive RNase protection assay. The overall level of viral transcription was 20-fold higher in MEV- than in ADV-infected cells. Furthermore, MEV mRNA encoding structural proteins (MEV mRNA R3) was dominant throughout the infectious cycle, comprising approximately 80% of the total viral transcription products. In marked contrast, in ADV-infected cells, transcripts encoding nonstructural proteins (ADV mRNA R1 and R2) comprised more than 84% of the total transcripts at all times after infection, whereas ADV mRNA R3 comprised less than 16%. Thus, the ADV mRNA coding for structural proteins (ADV mRNA R3) was present at a level at least 100-fold lower than the corresponding MEV mRNA R3. These findings paralleled previous biochemical studies analyzing in vitro activities of the ADV and MEV promoters (J. Christensen, T. Storgaard, B. Viuff, B. Aasted, and S. Alexandersen, J. Virol. 67:1877-1886, 1993). The overall low levels of ADV mRNA and the paucity of the mRNA coding for ADV structural proteins may reflect an adaptation of the virus for low-level restricted infection. PMID:9188563

  19. A novel adenovirus of Western lowland gorillas (Gorilla gorilla gorilla).

    PubMed

    Wevers, Diana; Leendertz, Fabian H; Scuda, Nelly; Boesch, Christophe; Robbins, Martha M; Head, Josephine; Ludwig, Carsten; Kühn, Joachim; Ehlers, Bernhard

    2010-11-05

    Adenoviruses (AdV) broadly infect vertebrate hosts including a variety of primates. We identified a novel AdV in the feces of captive gorillas by isolation in cell culture, electron microscopy and PCR. From the supernatants of infected cultures we amplified DNA polymerase (DPOL), preterminal protein (pTP) and hexon gene sequences with generic pan primate AdV PCR assays. The sequences in-between were amplified by long-distance PCRs of 2-10 kb length, resulting in a final sequence of 15.6 kb. Phylogenetic analysis placed the novel gorilla AdV into a cluster of primate AdVs belonging to the species Human adenovirus B (HAdV-B). Depending on the analyzed gene, its position within the cluster was variable. To further elucidate its origin, feces samples of wild gorillas were analyzed. AdV hexon sequences were detected which are indicative for three distinct and novel gorilla HAdV-B viruses, among them a virus nearly identical to the novel AdV isolated from captive gorillas. This shows that the discovered virus is a member of a group of HAdV-B viruses that naturally infect gorillas. The mixed phylogenetic clusters of gorilla, chimpanzee, bonobo and human AdVs within the HAdV-B species indicate that host switches may have been a component of the evolution of human and non-human primate HAdV-B viruses.

  20. 17 CFR 275.206(4)-2 - Custody of funds or securities of clients by investment advisers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Act (15 U.S.C. 80b-3), it is a fraudulent, deceptive, or manipulative act, practice or course of... certificate on Form ADV-E (17 CFR 279.8) with the Commission within 120 days of the time chosen by the... qualified custodian in connection with advisory services you provide to clients: (i) The independent...

  1. 76 FR 50529 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; New York Stock Exchange LLC; Notice of Filing and Immediate...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-15

    ... COMMISSION Self-Regulatory Organizations; New York Stock Exchange LLC; Notice of Filing and Immediate...,\\2\\ notice is hereby given that, on August 1, 2011, New York Stock Exchange LLC (the ``Exchange'' or... combination of numerical thresholds and percentage thresholds of US ADV (e.g., 1.25% of US ADV).\\3\\...

  2. Molecular characterization, phylogeny analysis and pathogenicity of a Muscovy duck adenovirus strain isolated in China in 2014

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study aimed to characterize a novel adenovirus (AdV) isolated from diseased Muscovy ducks in China. After the AdV was successfully propagated in duck embryo fibroblasts, the morphological and physicochemical properties of the virions were studied by electron microscopy and different tests. The ...

  3. Complete genome sequence and integrated protein localization and interaction map for alfalfa dwarf virus, which combines properties of both cytoplasmic and nuclear plant rhabdoviruses

    SciTech Connect

    Bejerman, Nicolás; Giolitti, Fabián; Breuil, Soledad de; Trucco, Verónica; Nome, Claudia; Lenardon, Sergio; Dietzgen, Ralf G.

    2015-09-15

    Summary: We have determined the full-length 14,491-nucleotide genome sequence of a new plant rhabdovirus, alfalfa dwarf virus (ADV). Seven open reading frames (ORFs) were identified in the antigenomic orientation of the negative-sense, single-stranded viral RNA, in the order 3′-N-P-P3-M-G-P6-L-5′. The ORFs are separated by conserved intergenic regions and the genome coding region is flanked by complementary 3′ leader and 5′ trailer sequences. Phylogenetic analysis of the nucleoprotein amino acid sequence indicated that this alfalfa-infecting rhabdovirus is related to viruses in the genus Cytorhabdovirus. When transiently expressed as GFP fusions in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves, most ADV proteins accumulated in the cell periphery, but unexpectedly P protein was localized exclusively in the nucleus. ADV P protein was shown to have a homotypic, and heterotypic nuclear interactions with N, P3 and M proteins by bimolecular fluorescence complementation. ADV appears unique in that it combines properties of both cytoplasmic and nuclear plant rhabdoviruses. - Highlights: • The complete genome of alfalfa dwarf virus is obtained. • An integrated localization and interaction map for ADV is determined. • ADV has a genome sequence similarity and evolutionary links with cytorhabdoviruses. • ADV protein localization and interaction data show an association with the nucleus. • ADV combines properties of both cytoplasmic and nuclear plant rhabdoviruses.

  4. 17 CFR 275.206(4)-2 - Custody of funds or securities of clients by investment advisers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... certificate on Form ADV-E (17 CFR 279.8) with the Commission within 120 days of the time chosen by the... Regulation S-X (17 CFR 210.1-02(d))): (i) At least annually and distributes its audited financial statements... companies. You are not required to comply with this section (17 CFR 275.206(4)-2) with respect to...

  5. 17 CFR 275.206(4)-2 - Custody of funds or securities of clients by investment advisers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... certificate on Form ADV-E (17 CFR 279.8) with the Commission within 120 days of the time chosen by the... Regulation S-X (17 CFR 210.1-02(d))): (i) At least annually and distributes its audited financial statements... companies. You are not required to comply with this section (17 CFR 275.206(4)-2) with respect to...

  6. 17 CFR 275.206(4)-2 - Custody of funds or securities of clients by investment advisers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... certificate on Form ADV-E (17 CFR 279.8) with the Commission within 120 days of the time chosen by the... Regulation S-X (17 CFR 210.1-02(d))): (i) At least annually and distributes its audited financial statements... companies. You are not required to comply with this section (17 CFR 275.206(4)-2) with respect to...

  7. Effects of Levels of Automation for Advanced Small Modular Reactors: Impacts on Performance, Workload, and Situation Awareness

    SciTech Connect

    Johanna Oxstrand; Katya Le Blanc

    2014-07-01

    The Human-Automation Collaboration (HAC) research effort is a part of the Department of Energy (DOE) sponsored Advanced Small Modular Reactor (AdvSMR) program conducted at Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The DOE AdvSMR program focuses on plant design and management, reduction of capital costs as well as plant operations and maintenance costs (O&M), and factory production costs benefits.

  8. Adenovirus vectors lacking virus-associated RNA expression enhance shRNA activity to suppress hepatitis C virus replication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pei, Zheng; Shi, Guoli; Kondo, Saki; Ito, Masahiko; Maekawa, Aya; Suzuki, Mariko; Saito, Izumu; Suzuki, Tetsuro; Kanegae, Yumi

    2013-12-01

    First-generation adenovirus vectors (FG AdVs) expressing short-hairpin RNA (shRNA) effectively downregulate the expressions of target genes. However, this vector, in fact, expresses not only the transgene product, but also virus-associated RNAs (VA RNAs) that disturb cellular RNAi machinery. We have established a production method for VA-deleted AdVs lacking expression of VA RNAs. Here, we showed that the highest shRNA activity was obtained when the shRNA was inserted not at the popularly used E1 site, but at the E4 site. We then compared the activities of shRNAs against hepatitis C virus (HCV) expressed from VA-deleted AdVs or conventional AdVs. The VA-deleted AdVs inhibited HCV production much more efficiently. Therefore, VA-deleted AdVs were more effective than the currently used AdVs for shRNA downregulation, probably because of the lack of competition between VA RNAs and the shRNAs. These VA-deleted AdVs might enable more effective gene therapies for chronic hepatitis C.

  9. Adenovirus 36 and Obesity: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Ponterio, Eleonora; Gnessi, Lucio

    2015-01-01

    There is an epidemic of obesity starting about 1980 in both developed and undeveloped countries definitely associated with multiple etiologies. About 670 million people worldwide are obese. The incidence of obesity has increased in all age groups, including children. Obesity causes numerous diseases and the interaction between genetic, metabolic, social, cultural and environmental factors are possible cofactors for the development of obesity. Evidence emerging over the last 20 years supports the hypothesis that viral infections may be associated with obesity in animals and humans. The most widely studied infectious agent possibly linked to obesity is adenovirus 36 (Adv36). Adv36 causes obesity in animals. In humans, Adv36 associates with obesity both in adults and children and the prevalence of Adv36 increases in relation to the body mass index. In vivo and in vitro studies have shown that the viral E4orf1 protein (early region 4 open reading frame 1, Adv) mediates the Adv36 effect including its adipogenic potential. The Adv36 infection should therefore be considered as a possible risk factor for obesity and could be a potential new therapeutic target in addition to an original way to understand the worldwide rise of the epidemic of obesity. Here, the data indicating a possible link between viral infection and obesity with a particular emphasis to the Adv36 will be reviewed. PMID:26184280

  10. 78 FR 41132 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; EDGX Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-09

    ... Terms of Substance of the Proposed Rule Change The Exchange proposes to amend its fees and rebates... share if the Member: (i) Posts 0.12% of the TCV in ADV more than their February 2011 ADV added to EDGX... liquidity posted on EDGX if they: (i) add a minimum of 0.15% of the TCV on a daily basis,......

  11. Adenovirus detection in Guthrie cards from paediatric leukaemia cases and controls

    PubMed Central

    Vasconcelos, G M; Kang, M; Pombo-de-Oliveira, M S; Schiffman, J D; Lorey, F; Buffler, P; Wiemels, J L

    2008-01-01

    Archived neonatal blood cards (Guthrie cards) from children who later contracted leukaemia and matched normal controls were assayed for adenovirus (AdV) C DNA content using two highly sensitive methods. In contrast to a previous report, AdV DNA was not detected at a higher frequency among neonates who later developed leukaemia, when compared with controls. PMID:19002185

  12. In situ molecular hybridization for detection of Aleutian mink disease parvovirus DNA by using strand-specific probes: identification of target cells for viral replication in cell cultures and in mink kits with virus-induced interstitial pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Alexandersen, S; Bloom, M E; Wolfinbarger, J; Race, R E

    1987-08-01

    Strand-specific hybridization probes were utilized in in situ molecular hybridization specifically to localize replicative form DNA of Aleutian mink disease parvovirus (ADV). Throughout in vitro infection, duplex replicative form DNA of ADV was located in the cell nuclei. Single-stranded virion DNA and capsid proteins were present in the nuclei early in infection, but were later translocated to the cytoplasm. In neonatal mink, ADV causes acute interstitial pneumonia, and replicative forms of viral DNA were found predominantly in alveolar type II cells of the lung. Viral DNA was also found in other organs, but strand-specific probes made it possible to show that most of this DNA represented virus sequestration. In addition, glomerular immune complexes containing intact virions were detected, suggesting that ADV virions may have a role in the genesis of ADV-induced glomerulonephritis.

  13. Draft Function Allocation Framework and Preliminary Technical Basis for Advanced SMR Concepts of Operations

    SciTech Connect

    Jacques Hugo; John Forester; David Gertman; Jeffrey Joe; Heather Medema; Julius Persensky; April Whaley

    2013-08-01

    This report presents preliminary research results from the investigation into the development of new models and guidance for Concepts of Operations in advanced small modular reactor (AdvSMR) designs. AdvSMRs are nuclear power plants (NPPs), but unlike conventional large NPPs that are constructed on site, AdvSMRs systems and components will be fabricated in a factory and then assembled on site. AdvSMRs will also use advanced digital instrumentation and control systems, and make greater use of automation. Some AdvSMR designs also propose to be operated in a multi-unit configuration with a single central control room as a way to be more cost-competitive with existing NPPs. These differences from conventional NPPs not only pose technical and operational challenges, but they will undoubtedly also have regulatory compliance implications, especially with respect to staffing requirements and safety standards.

  14. Adenovirus-36 Is Associated with Obesity in Children and Adults in Sweden as Determined by Rapid ELISA

    PubMed Central

    Almgren, Malin; Atkinson, Richard; He, Jia; Hilding, Agneta; Hagman, Emilia; Wolk, Alicja; Thorell, Anders; Marcus, Claude; Näslund, Erik; Östenson, Claes-Göran; Schalling, Martin; Lavebratt, Catharina

    2012-01-01

    Background Experimental and natural human adenovirus-36 (Adv36) infection of multiple animal species results in obesity through increasing adipogenesis and lipid accumulation in adipocytes. Presence of Adv36 antibodies detected by serum neutralization assay has previously been associated with obesity in children and adults living in the USA, South Korea and Italy, whereas no association with adult obesity was detected in Belgium/the Netherlands nor among USA military personnel. Adv36 infection has also been shown to reduce blood lipid levels, increase glucose uptake by adipose tissue and skeletal muscle biopsies, and to associate with improved glycemic control in non-diabetic individuals. Principal Findings Using a novel ELISA, 1946 clinically well-characterized individuals including 424 children and 1522 non-diabetic adults, and 89 anonymous blood donors, residing in central Sweden representing the population in Stockholm area, were studied for the presence of antibodies against Adv36 in serum. The prevalence of Adv36 positivity in lean individuals increased from ∼7% in 1992–1998 to 15–20% in 2002–2009, which paralleled the increase in obesity prevalence. We found that Adv36-positive serology was associated with pediatric obesity and with severe obesity in females compared to lean and overweight/mildly obese individuals, with a 1.5 to 2-fold Adv36 positivity increase in cases. Moreover, Adv36 positivity was less common among females and males on antilipid pharmacological treatment or with high blood triglyceride level. Insulin sensitivity, measured as lower HOMA-IR, showed a higher point estimate in Adv36-positive obese females and males, although it was not statistically significant (p = 0.08). Conclusion Using a novel ELISA we show that Adv36 infection is associated with pediatric obesity, severe obesity in adult females and lower risk of high blood lipid levels in non-diabetic Swedish individuals. PMID:22848557

  15. Genetic characterization of Aleutian mink disease viruses isolated in China.

    PubMed

    Li, Yanwu; Huang, Juan; Jia, Yun; Du, Yijun; Jiang, Ping; Zhang, Rui

    2012-08-01

    Aleutian mink disease virus (AMDV) is a parvovirus that causes an immune complex mediated disease in minks. To understand the genetic characterization of AMDV in China, the genomic sequences of three isolates, ADV-LN1, ADV-LN2, and ADV-LN3, from different farms in the Northern China were analyzed. The results showed that the lengths of genomic sequences of three isolates were 4,543, 4,566, and 4,566 bp, respectively. They shared only 95.5-96.3 % nucleotide identity with each other. The nucleotide and amino acid homology of genome sequence between the Chinese isolates and European or American strains (ADV-G, ADV-Utah1, and ADV-SL3) were 92.4-95.0 % and 92.1-93.8 %, respectively. The amino acid substitutions randomly distributed in the genome, especially NS gene. ADV-LN1 strain had a 9-amino-acid deletion at amino acid positions 70 and 72-79 in the VP1 gene, comparing with ADV-G strain; ADV-LN2 and ADV-LN3 strains had 1-amino-acid deletion at amino acid positions 70 in the VP1. Some potential glycosylation site mutations in VP and NS genes were also observed. Phylogenetic analysis results showed that the three strains belonged to two different branches based on the complete coding sequence of VP2 gene. However, they all were in the same group together with the strains from United States based on the NS1 sequence. It indicated that Chinese AMDV isolates had genetic diversity. The origin of the ancestors of the Chinese AMDV strains might be associated with the American strains. PMID:22415541

  16. DEMONSTRATION BULLETIN: SOLIDIFICATION/STABILIZATION PROCESS, Hazcon, Inc.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The solidification/stabilization technology mixes hazardous wastes, cement, water and an additive called Chloranan. Chloranan, a nontoxic chemical, encapsulates organic molecules, rendering them ineffective in retarding or inhibiting solidification. This treatment technol...

  17. The relationship between adenovirus-36 seropositivity, obesity and metabolic profile in Turkish children and adults.

    PubMed

    Karamese, M; Altoparlak, U; Turgut, A; Aydogdu, S; Karamese, S Aksak

    2015-12-01

    Obesity potentially arising from viral infection is known as 'infectobesity'. The latest reports suggest that adenovirus-36 (Adv36) is related to obesity in adults and children. Our aim was not only to determine the Adv36 seropositivity in both obese and non-obese children and adults, but also to investigate correlations between antibody positivity and serum lipid profiles. Both Adv36 positivity and tumour-necrosis-factor-alpha, leptin and interleukin-6 levels were detected in blood samples collected from 146 children and 130 adults by ELISA. Fasting plasma triglycerides, total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein levels were also measured. Adv36 positivity was determined to be 27·1% and 6% in obese and non-obese children and 17·5% and 4% in obese and non-obese adults, respectively. There was no difference with regard to total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein, triglyceride, tumour-necrosis-factor-alpha and interleukin-6 levels (P > 0·05). However, there was a significant difference between groups in terms of leptin levels (P < 0·05). We determined the prevalence of Adv36 positivity in obese children and adults. Our results showed that Adv36 may be an obesity agent for both adults and children, parallel with current literature data. However, the available data on a possible relationship between Adv36 infection and obesity both in children and adults do not completely solve the problem.

  18. Components of Adenovirus Genome Packaging

    PubMed Central

    Ahi, Yadvinder S.; Mittal, Suresh K.

    2016-01-01

    Adenoviruses (AdVs) are icosahedral viruses with double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) genomes. Genome packaging in AdV is thought to be similar to that seen in dsDNA containing icosahedral bacteriophages and herpesviruses. Specific recognition of the AdV genome is mediated by a packaging domain located close to the left end of the viral genome and is mediated by the viral packaging machinery. Our understanding of the role of various components of the viral packaging machinery in AdV genome packaging has greatly advanced in recent years. Characterization of empty capsids assembled in the absence of one or more components involved in packaging, identification of the unique vertex, and demonstration of the role of IVa2, the putative packaging ATPase, in genome packaging have provided compelling evidence that AdVs follow a sequential assembly pathway. This review provides a detailed discussion on the functions of the various viral and cellular factors involved in AdV genome packaging. We conclude by briefly discussing the roles of the empty capsids, assembly intermediates, scaffolding proteins, portal vertex and DNA encapsidating enzymes in AdV assembly and packaging. PMID:27721809

  19. Acoustic Droplet Vaporization in Biology and Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Pitt, William G.

    2013-01-01

    This paper reviews the literature regarding the use of acoustic droplet vaporization (ADV) in clinical applications of imaging, embolic therapy, and therapeutic delivery. ADV is a physical process in which the pressure waves of ultrasound induce a phase transition that causes superheated liquid nanodroplets to form gas bubbles. The bubbles provide ultrasonic imaging contrast and other functions. ADV of perfluoropentane was used extensively in imaging for preclinical trials in the 1990s, but its use declined rapidly with the advent of other imaging agents. In the last decade, ADV was proposed and explored for embolic occlusion therapy, drug delivery, aberration correction, and high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) sensitization. Vessel occlusion via ADV has been explored in rodents and dogs and may be approaching clinical use. ADV for drug delivery is still in preclinical stages with initial applications to treat tumors in mice. Other techniques are still in preclinical studies but have potential for clinical use in specialty applications. Overall, ADV has a bright future in clinical application because the small size of nanodroplets greatly reduces the rate of clearance compared to larger contrast agent bubbles and yet provides the advantages of ultrasonographic contrast, acoustic cavitation, and nontoxicity of conventional perfluorocarbon contrast agent bubbles. PMID:24350267

  20. Ofu and Ologesa survey of the 29 September 2009 tsunami

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foteinis, S.; Synolakis, C.; Titov, V. V.

    2009-12-01

    and then returned back to their homes. The tsunami was a no show, nonetheless it was clear that there is substantial outreach work needed to reinforce the concept that people should wait for official notifications for the all clear and that evacuations can not take place by car, particularly where there are hills within hundreds of feet from the shoreline. The airport was not closed and airline employees reported that there was no official information there either. Some eyewitnesses questioned the false alarm, and, despite the catastrophe only a week earlier, doubted they would keep self-evacuating if there were more of the same. We conclude that education saves lives and should be continuously reinforced through lectures discussing lessons learned, and explaining that for near field events occasional false alarms are inevitable. Local authorities should begin paying attention to broadcasting information during the warning and eventually all clear messages as soon as practical. Synolakis, C.E., and E.A. Okal, 1992-2002: Perspective on a decade of post-tsunami surveys, Adv. Natur. Technol. Hazards, 23, 1-30, 2005.

  1. Identification of Aleutian Mink Disease Parvovirus Capsid Sequences Mediating Antibody-Dependent Enhancement of Infection, Virus Neutralization, and Immune Complex Formation

    PubMed Central

    Bloom, Marshall E.; Best, Sonja M.; Hayes, Stanley F.; Wells, Richard D.; Wolfinbarger, James B.; McKenna, Robert; Agbandje-McKenna, Mavis

    2001-01-01

    Aleutian mink disease parvovirus (ADV) causes a persistent infection associated with circulating immune complexes, immune complex disease, hypergammaglobulinemia, and high levels of antiviral antibody. Although antibody can neutralize ADV infectivity in Crandell feline kidney cells in vitro, virus is not cleared in vivo, and capsid-based vaccines have proven uniformly ineffective. Antiviral antibody also enables ADV to infect macrophages, the target cells for persistent infection, by Fc-receptor-mediated antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE). The antibodies involved in these unique aspects of ADV pathogenesis may have specific targets on the ADV capsid. Prominent differences exist between the structure of ADV and other, more-typical parvoviruses, which can be accounted for by short peptide sequences in the flexible loop regions of the capsid proteins. In order to determine whether these short sequences are targets for antibodies involved in ADV pathogenesis, we studied heterologous antibodies against several peptides present in the major capsid protein, VP2. Of these antibodies, a polyclonal rabbit antibody to peptide VP2:428-446 was the most interesting. The anti-VP2:428-446 antibody aggregated virus particles into immune complexes, mediated ADE, and neutralized virus infectivity in vitro. Thus, antibody against this short peptide can be implicated in key facets of ADV pathogenesis. Structural modeling suggested that surface-exposed residues of VP2:428-446 are readily accessible for antibody binding. The observation that antibodies against a single target peptide in the ADV capsid can mediate both neutralization and ADE may explain the failure of capsid-based vaccines. PMID:11602751

  2. Differences in microstructure and properties between selective laser melting and traditional manufacturing for fabrication of metal parts: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Bo; Zhao, Xiao; Li, Shuai; Han, Changjun; Wei, Qingsong; Wen, Shifeng; Liu, Jie; Shi, Yusheng

    2015-06-01

    Selective laser melting (SLM), as one of the additive manufacturing technologies, is widely investigated to fabricate metal parts. In SLM, parts are manufactured directly from powders in a layer-by-layer fashion; SLM also provides several advantages, such as production of complex parts with high three-dimensional accuracy, compared with other additive manufacturing technologies. Therefore, SLM can be applied in aeronautics, astronautics, medicine, and die and mould industry. However, this technique differs from traditional methods, such as casting and forging; for instance, the former greatly differs in terms of microstructure and properties of products. This paper summarizes relevant studies on metal material fabrication through SLM. Based on a work completed in Huazhong Univ. Sci Tech., Rapid Manuf. Center (HUST-RMC) and compared with characteristics described in other reported studies, microstructure, properties, dimensional accuracy, and application of SLM are presented.

  3. Subcellular localization of Aleutian mink disease parvovirus proteins and DNA during permissive infection of Crandell feline kidney cells.

    PubMed Central

    Oleksiewicz, M B; Costello, F; Huhtanen, M; Wolfinbarger, J B; Alexandersen, S; Bloom, M E

    1996-01-01

    Confocal microscopy allowed us to localize viral nonstructural (NS) and capsid (VP) proteins and DNA simultaneously in cells permissively infected with Aleutian mink disease parvovirus (ADV). Early after infection, NS proteins colocalized with viral DNA to form intranuclear inclusions, whereas VP proteins formed hollow intranuclear shells around the inclusions. Later, nuclei had irregular outlines and were virtually free of ADV products. In these cells, inclusions of viral DNA with or without associated NS protein were embedded in cytoplasmic VP protein. These findings implied that ADV replication within an infected cell is regulated spatially as well as temporally. PMID:8627805

  4. On Enhancing Risk Monitors for Advanced Small Modular Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Coble, Jamie B.; Coles, Garill A.; Meyer, Ryan M.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep

    2013-08-01

    Advanced small modular reactors (AdvSMRs) can contribute to safe, sustainable, and carbon-neutral energy production. However, the economics of AdvSMRs suffer from the loss of economy-of-scale for both construction and operation. The controllable day-to-day costs of AdvSMRs are expected to be dominated by operations and maintenance (O&M) costs. These expenses could potentially be managed through optimized scheduling of O&M activities for components, reactor modules, power blocks, and the full plant. Accurate, real-time risk assessment with integrated health monitoring of key active components can support scheduling of both online and offline inspection and maintenance activities.

  5. Compact, Robust Chips Integrate Optical Functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    Located in Bozeman, Montana, AdvR Inc. has been an active partner in NASA's Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) and Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) programs. Langley Research Center engineers partnered with AdvR through the SBIR program to develop new, compact, lightweight electro-optic components for remote sensing systems. While the primary customer for this technology will be NASA, AdvR foresees additional uses for its NASA-derived circuit chip in the fields of academic and industrial research anywhere that compact, low-cost, stabilized single-frequency lasers are needed.

  6. DM-2 Chilling

    NASA Video Gallery

    How do you chill down 1.4 million pounds of solid rocket fuel in the hot Utah desert? Lots of air conditioning! Learn how ATK chilled down DM-2, the second Ares first stage development motor in adv...

  7. 75 FR 20597 - Radio Broadcasting Services; AM or FM Proposals To Change the Community of License

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-20

    ... 165378, BPH-20100312AAQ, From MASON, TX, To HUNT, TX; RINCON BROADCASTING LS LLC, Station KIST- FM, Facility ID 31434, BPH-20100301ADV, From SANTA BARBARA, CA, To CARPINTERIA, CA; RINCON BROADCASTING LS...

  8. Demonstration of Aleutian disease virus-specific lymphocyte response in mink with progressive Aleutian disease: comparison of sapphire and pastel mink infected with different virus strains.

    PubMed

    Race, R E; Bloom, M E; Coe, J E

    1983-09-01

    Lymphocyte blastogenesis was used to study the antiviral lymphocyte response of sapphire (Aleutian) and pastel (nonAleutian) mink inoculated with Pullman or Utah 1 Aleutian disease virus (ADV). Both mink genotypes developed a virus-specific response when inoculated with Utah 1 ADV. In contrast, after inoculation of Pullman ADV, sapphire mink had a positive virus-specific response, whereas pastel mink did not. Response occurred late after infection (8 wk) and correlated with the development of progressive Aleutian disease (AD). The response to keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH) and concanavalin A (Con A) was also determined. Most mink of either genotype, inoculated with either virus strain, maintained an anti-KLH response during disease. Most mink also responded to Con A, although some exhibited suppressed Con A response late in the disease course. These results indicated that mink develop an anti-ADV lymphocyte response during progressive AD and are not immunosuppressed with regard to other antigens or mitogens.

  9. Antibody-forming cells and serum hemolysin responses of pastel and sapphire mink inoculated with Aleutian disease virus.

    PubMed

    Lodmell, D L; Bergman, R K; Hadlow, W J

    1973-11-01

    The effect of Aleutian disease virus (ADV) on serum hemolysin titers and antibody-forming cells in lymph nodes and spleens of sapphire and pastel mink inoculated with goat erythrocytes (G-RBC) was investigated. ADV injected 1 day after primary antigenic stimulation with G-RBC did not depress the immune responses of either color phase for a period of 26 days. However, when G-RBC were injected 47 days after ADV, both the number of antibody-forming cells and hemolysin titers were more markedly depressed in sapphire than in pastel mink. The results are discussed in relation to the greater susceptibility of sapphire mink and the variable susceptibility of pastel mink to the Pullman isolate of ADV.

  10. Urinary β-2 Microglobulin Levels Sensitively Altered in an Osteomalacia Patient Receiving Add-on Adefovir Dipivoxil Therapy for Hepatitis B Virus Infection.

    PubMed

    Takagi, Junko; Morita, Hiroyuki; Ito, Kiyoaki; Ohashi, Tomohiko; Hirase, Sho; Ito, Tatsuo; Morishima, Takkan; Otake, Kazuo; Yoneda, Masashi

    2016-01-01

    Adefovir dipivoxil (ADV) is effective for hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection; however, ADV may provoke renal injury resulting in osteomalacia, and this side effect is seldom recognized until bone fractures emerge. We herein present a 66-year-old woman with HBV infection who received ADV for 6 years. Although she exhibited no sign of bone fractures, her urinary β-2 microglobulin (β2MG) level increased to 83,837 μg/L and scintigraphy revealed minimal fractures of the third rib. ADV was subsequently reduced and her urinary β2MG rapidly fell to 3,637 μg/L. Conversely, her urinary N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase, and serum phosphate, alkaline phosphatase levels did not respond. PMID:27301512

  11. Antibody-Forming Cells and Serum Hemolysin Responses of Pastel and Sapphire Mink Inoculated with Aleutian Disease Virus

    PubMed Central

    Lodmell, Donald L.; Bergman, R. Kaye; Hadlow, William J.

    1973-01-01

    The effect of Aleutian disease virus (ADV) on serum hemolysin titers and antibody-forming cells in lymph nodes and spleens of sapphire and pastel mink inoculated with goat erythrocytes (G-RBC) was investigated. ADV injected 1 day after primary antigenic stimulation with G-RBC did not depress the immune responses of either color phase for a period of 26 days. However, when G-RBC were injected 47 days after ADV, both the number of antibody-forming cells and hemolysin titers were more markedly depressed in sapphire than in pastel mink. The results are discussed in relation to the greater susceptibility of sapphire mink and the variable susceptibility of pastel mink to the Pullman isolate of ADV. PMID:4584051

  12. 17 CFR 275.204-1 - Amendments to application for registration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... registration. (a) When amendment is required. You must amend your Form ADV (17 CFR 279.1): (1) At least... Registration Depository (“IARD”) is available on our website at www.sec.gov/iard. (b) Electronic filing...

  13. The Design and Characterization of Wideband Spline-profiled Feedhorns for Advanced Actpol

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, Sara M.; Austermann, Jason; Beall, James A.; Choi, Steve K.; Coughlin, Kevin P.; Duff, Shannon M.; Gallardo, Patricio A.; Henderson, Shawn W.; Hills, Felicity B.; Ho, Shuay-Pwu Patty; Hubmayr, Johannes; Josaitis, Alec; Koopman, Brian J.; McMahon, Jeff J.; Nati, Federico; Newburgh, Laura; Niemack, Michael D.; Salatino, Maria; Schillaci, Alessandro; Wollack, Edward J.

    2016-01-01

    Advanced ACTPol (AdvACT) is an upgraded camera for the Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT) that will measure the cosmic microwave background in temperature and polarization over a wide range of angular scales and five frequency bands from 28-230 GHz. AdvACT will employ four arrays of feedhorn-coupled, polarization- sensitive multichroic detectors. To accommodate the higher pixel packing densities necessary to achieve Ad- vACTs sensitivity goals, we have developed and optimized wideband spline-profiled feedhorns for the AdvACT multichroic arrays that maximize coupling efficiency while carefully controlling polarization systematics. We present the design, fabrication, and testing of wideband spline-profiled feedhorns for the multichroic arrays of AdvACT.

  14. 17 CFR 275.203A-1 - Eligibility for SEC registration; Switching to or from SEC registration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...)), you must file Form ADV-W (17 CFR 279.2) to withdraw your SEC registration within 180 days of your... and registration buffer. You may, but are not required to register with the Commission if you...

  15. Progress Towards Prognostic Health Management of Passive Components in Advanced Small Modular Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, Ryan M.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Hirt, Evelyn H.; Pardini, Allan F.; Suter, Jonathan D.; Prowant, Matthew S.

    2014-08-01

    Sustainable nuclear power to promote energy security and to reduce greenhouse gas emissions are two key national energy priorities. The development of deployable small modular reactors (SMRs) is expected to support these objectives by developing technologies that improve the reliability, sustain safety, and improve affordability of new reactors. Advanced SMRs (AdvSMRs) refer to a specific class of SMRs and are based on modularization of advanced reactor concepts. Prognostic health management (PHM) systems can benefit both the safety and economics of deploying AdvSMRs and can play an essential role in managing the inspection and maintenance of passive components in AdvSMR systems. This paper describes progress on development of a prototypic PHM system for AdvSMR passive components, with thermal creep chosen as the target degradation mechanism.

  16. Polyethyleneimine-coating enhances adenoviral transduction of mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Yao, Xinglei; Zhou, Na; Wan, Li; Su, Xiaodong; Sun, Zhao; Mizuguchi, Hiroyuki; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Nakagawa, Shinsaku; Zhao, Robert Chunhua; Gao, Jian-Qing

    2014-05-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are non-hematopoietic cells with multi-lineage potential, which makes them attractive targets for regenerative medicine applications. Efficient gene transfer into MSCs is essential for basic research in developmental biology and for therapeutic applications involving gene-modification in regenerative medicine. Adenovirus vectors (Advs) can efficiently and transiently introduce an exogenous gene into many cell types via their primary receptors, the coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptors (CARs), but not into MSCs, which lack CAR expression. To overcome this problem, an Adv coated with cationic polymer polyethyleneimine (PEI) was developed. In this study, we demonstrated that PEI coating with an optimal ratio can enhance adenoviral transduction of MSCs without cytotoxicity. We also investigated the physicochemical properties and internalization mechanisms of the PEI-coated Adv. These results could help to evaluate the potentiality of the PEI-coated Adv as a prototype vector for efficient and safe transduction into MSCs. PMID:24727452

  17. Rapid detection and identification of human adenovirus species by adenoplex, a multiplex PCR-enzyme hybridization assay.

    PubMed

    Pehler-Harrington, Karen; Khanna, Marilyn; Waters, Chris R; Henrickson, Kelly J

    2004-09-01

    Human adenoviruses (AdV) have been implicated in a wide variety of diseases and are ubiquitous in populations worldwide. These agents are of concern particularly in immunocompromised patients, children, and military recruits, resulting in severe disease or death. Clinical diagnosis of AdV is usually achieved through routine viral cell culture, which can take weeks for results. Immunofluorescence and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay-based techniques are more timely but lack sensitivity. The ability to distinguish between the six different AdV species (A to F) is diagnostically relevant, as infections with specific AdV species are often associated with unique clinical outcomes and epidemiological features. Therefore, we developed a multiplex PCR-enzyme hybridization assay, the Adenoplex, using primers to the fiber gene that can simultaneously detect all six AdV species A through F in a single test. The limit of detection (LOD) based on the viral 50% tissue culture infective dose/ml for AdV A, B, C, D, E, and F was 10(-2), 10(-1), 10(-1), 10(-2), 10(-1), and 10(-2), respectively. Similarly, the LOD for the six DNA controls ranged from 10(2) to 10(3) copies/ml. Twelve common respiratory pathogens were tested with the Adenoplex, and no cross-reactivity was observed. We also validated our assay using clinical specimens spiked with different concentrations of AdV strains of each species type and tested by multiplex PCR and culture. The results demonstrated an overall sensitivity and specificity of Adenoplex of 100%. This assay can be completed in as few as 5 h and provides a rapid, specific, and sensitive method to detect and subtype AdV species A through F.

  18. Technical Needs for Prototypic Prognostic Technique Demonstration for Advanced Small Modular Reactor Passive Components

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, Ryan M.; Coble, Jamie B.; Hirt, Evelyn H.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Mitchell, Mark R.; Wootan, David W.; Berglin, Eric J.; Bond, Leonard J.; Henager, Charles H.

    2013-05-17

    This report identifies a number of requirements for prognostics health management of passive systems in AdvSMRs, documents technical gaps in establishing a prototypical prognostic methodology for this purpose, and describes a preliminary research plan for addressing these technical gaps. AdvSMRs span multiple concepts; therefore a technology- and design-neutral approach is taken, with the focus being on characteristics that are likely to be common to all or several AdvSMR concepts. An evaluation of available literature is used to identify proposed concepts for AdvSMRs along with likely operational characteristics. Available operating experience of advanced reactors is used in identifying passive components that may be subject to degradation, materials likely to be used for these components, and potential modes of degradation of these components. This information helps in assessing measurement needs for PHM systems, as well as defining functional requirements of PHM systems. An assessment of current state-of-the-art approaches to measurements, sensors and instrumentation, diagnostics and prognostics is also documented. This state-of-the-art evaluation, combined with the requirements, may be used to identify technical gaps and research needs in the development, evaluation, and deployment of PHM systems for AdvSMRs. A preliminary research plan to address high-priority research needs for the deployment of PHM systems to AdvSMRs is described, with the objective being the demonstration of prototypic prognostics technology for passive components in AdvSMRs. Greater efficiency in achieving this objective can be gained through judicious selection of materials and degradation modes that are relevant to proposed AdvSMR concepts, and for which significant knowledge already exists. These selections were made based on multiple constraints including the analysis performed in this document, ready access to laboratory-scale facilities for materials testing and measurement, and

  19. A novel baseline hepatitis B virus sequencing-based strategy for predicting adefovir antiviral response.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu-Wei; Shan, Xuefeng; Huang, Yao; Deng, Haijun; Huang, Wen-Xiang; Zhang, Da-Zhi; Chen, Juan; Tang, Ni; Shan, You-Lan; Guo, Jin-Jun; Huang, Ailong

    2015-07-01

    Adefovir dipivoxil (ADV) is used as first-line monotherapy or rescue therapy in chronic hepatitis B (CHB) patients. In this study, we sought to identify nucleotide changes in the reverse transcriptase (RT) of hepatitis B virus (HBV) at baseline and explore their predictive value for ADV antiviral response. Ultra-deep pyrosequencing (UDPS) was utilized to determine HBV genetic variability within the RT region at baseline and during a 48-week ADV therapy. According to the viral load at the end of ADV treatment, all patients were classified into responders (HBV DNA level reduction of ⩾ 3 log 10 IU/mL) and suboptimal responders (HBV DNA level reduction of <3 log 10 IU/mL). Based on UDPS data at baseline, we identified 11 nucleotide substitutions whose combination frequency was significantly associated with the antiviral response among 36 CHB patients in the study group. However, the baseline distribution and frequency of rt181 and rt236 substitutions known to confer ADV resistance was a poor predictor for the antiviral response. Compared with baseline serum HBeAg, HBV-DNA and ALT levels, the baseline HBV sequence-based model showed higher predictive accuracy for ADV response. In an independent cohort of 31 validation patients with CHB, the sequence-based model provided greater predictive potency than the HBeAg/HBV-DNA/ALT and the HBeAg/HBV-DNA/ALT/sequence combinations. Taken together, we confirm the presence of ADV resistance variants in treatment-naïve patients and firstly unravel the predictive value of the baseline mutations in the HBV RT region for ADV antiviral response.

  20. Alfalfa dwarf cytorhabdovirus P protein is a local and systemic RNA silencing supressor which inhibits programmed RISC activity and prevents transitive amplification of RNA silencing.

    PubMed

    Bejerman, Nicolás; Mann, Krin S; Dietzgen, Ralf G

    2016-09-15

    Plants employ RNA silencing as an innate defense mechanism against viruses. As a counter-defense, plant viruses have evolved to express RNA silencing suppressor proteins (RSS), which target one or more steps of the silencing pathway. In this study, we show that the phosphoprotein (P) encoded by the negative-sense RNA virus alfalfa dwarf virus (ADV), a species of the genus Cytorhabdovirus, family Rhabdoviridae, is a suppressor of RNA silencing. ADV P has a relatively weak local RSS activity, and does not prevent siRNA accumulation. On the other hand, ADV P strongly suppresses systemic RNA silencing, but does not interfere with the short-distance spread of silencing, which is consistent with its lack of inhibition of siRNA accumulation. The mechanism of suppression appears to involve ADV P binding to RNA-induced silencing complex proteins AGO1 and AGO4 as shown in protein-protein interaction assays when ectopically expressed. In planta, we demonstrate that ADV P likely functions by inhibiting miRNA-guided AGO1 cleavage and prevents transitive amplification by repressing the production of secondary siRNAs. As recently described for lettuce necrotic yellows cytorhabdovirus P, but in contrast to other viral RSS known to disrupt AGO activity, ADV P sequence does not contain any recognizable GW/WG or F-box motifs, which suggests that cytorhabdovirus P proteins may use alternative motifs to bind to AGO proteins.

  1. Sustained Viremia and High Viral Load in Respiratory Tract Secretions Are Predictors for Death in Immunocompetent Adults with Adenovirus Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Bing; Yu, Xiaomin; Li, Hui; Cao, Bin

    2016-01-01

    The predictors for fatal adenovirus (AdV) pneumonia among immunocompetent adults are unclear. Laboratory-confirmed, hospitalized AdV pneumonia adults were prospectively enrolled in Beijing Chao-Yang hospital from March to June 2013. Clinical data and serial whole blood and respiratory tract secretions from such patients were collected. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction was performed to quantify the viral load. A total of 14 AdV pneumonia cases were consecutively enrolled, and four of them were fatal. Ten cases were caused by AdV-55, three by AdV-7 and one by AdV-3. There were no differences in age, gender or underlying diseases between the patients in the fatal cases and surviving cases. At admission (on day 5–7 after illness onset), the patients in fatal cases presented higher initial viral loads in respiratory tract secretions (8.578 ± 2.115 vs 6.263 ± 1.225 Log10 copies/ml, p = 0.023). All patients in fatal cases presented with viremia on day 12–14 (100% vs 66.7%, p = 0.017). A higher initial viral load in the respiratory tract and sustained viremia (more than 2 weeks) may be predictors for fatal clinical outcomes. PMID:27532864

  2. The Role of Endosomal Escape and Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases in Adenoviral Activation of the Innate Immune Response

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Jeffrey S.; Xu, Zhili; Tian, Jie; Palmer, Donna J.; Ng, Philip; Byrnes, Andrew P.

    2011-01-01

    Adenoviral vectors (AdV) activate multiple signaling pathways associated with innate immune responses, including mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs). In this study, we investigated how systemically-injected AdVs activate two MAPK pathways (p38 and ERK) and the contribution of these kinases to AdV-induced cytokine and chemokine responses in mice. Mice were injected intravenously either with a helper-dependent Ad2 vector that does not express viral genes or transgenes, or with the Ad2 mutant ts1, which is defective in endosomal escape. We found that AdV induced rapid phosphorylation of p38 and ERK as well as a significant cytokine response, but ts1 failed to activate p38 or ERK and induced only a limited cytokine response. These results demonstrate that endosomal escape of virions is a critical step in the induction of these innate pathways and responses. We then examined the roles of p38 and ERK pathways in the innate cytokine response by administering specific kinase inhibitors to mice prior to AdV. The cytokine and chemokine response to AdV was only modestly suppressed by a p38 inhibitor, while an ERK inhibitor has mixed effects, lowering some cytokines and elevating others. Thus, even though p38 and ERK are rapidly activated after i.v. injection of AdV, cytokine and chemokine responses are mostly independent of these kinases. PMID:22046344

  3. Development and validation of a novel hydrolysis probe real-time polymerase chain reaction for agamid adenovirus 1 in the central bearded dragon (Pogona vitticeps).

    PubMed

    Fredholm, Daniel V; Coleman, James K; Childress, April L; Wellehan, James F X

    2015-03-01

    Agamid adenovirus 1 (AgAdv-1) is a significant cause of disease in bearded dragons (Pogona sp.). Clinical manifestations of AgAdv-1 infection are variable and often nonspecific; the manifestations range from lethargy, weight loss, and inappetence, to severe enteritis, hepatitis, and sudden death. Currently, diagnosis of AgAdv-1 infection is achieved through a single published method: standard nested polymerase chain reaction (nPCR) and sequencing. Standard nPCR with sequencing provides reliable sensitivity, specificity, and validation of PCR products. However, this process is comparatively expensive, laborious, and slow. Probe hybridization, as used in a TaqMan assay, represents the best option for validating PCR products aside from the time-consuming process of sequencing. This study developed a real-time PCR (qPCR) assay using a TaqMan probe-based assay, targeting a highly conserved region of the AgAdv-1 genome. Standard curves were generated, detection results were compared with the gold standard conventional PCR and sequencing assay, and limits of detection were determined. Additionally, the qPCR assay was run on samples known to be positive for AgAdv-1 and samples known to be positive for other adenoviruses. Based on the results of these evaluations, this assay allows for a less expensive, rapid, quantitative detection of AgAdv-1 in bearded dragons.

  4. Chemistry and Mineralogy of Antarctica Dry Valley Soils: Implications for Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quinn, J. E.; Golden, D. C.; Graff, T. G.; Ming, D. W.; Morris, R. V.; Douglas, S.; Kounaves, S. P.; McKay, C. P.; Tamppari, L, K.; Smith, P. H.; Zent, A. P.; Archer, P. D., Jr.

    2011-01-01

    The Antarctic Dry Valleys (ADV) comprise the largest ice-free region of Antarctica. Precipitation almost always occurs as snow, relative humidity is frequently low, and mean annual temperatures are about -20 C. The ADV soils have previously been categorized into three soil moisture regimes: subxerous, xerous and ultraxerous, based on elevation and climate influences. The subxerous regime is predominately a coastal zone soil, and has the highest average temperature and precipitation, while the ultraxerous regime occurs at high elevation (>1000 m) and have very low temperature and precipitation. The amounts and types of salts present in the soils vary between regions. The nature, origin and significance of salts in the ADV have been previously investigated. Substantial work has focused on soil formation in the ADVs, however, little work has focused on the mineralogy of secondary alteration phases. The dominant weathering process in the ADV region is physical weathering, however, chemical weathering has been well documented. The objective of this study was to characterize the chemistry and mineralogy, including the alteration mineralogy, of soils from two sites, a subxerous soil in Taylor Valley, and an ultraxerous soil in University Valley. The style of aqueous alteration in the ADVs may have implications for pedogenic processes on Mars.

  5. Prevalence of neutralising antibodies against adenoviruses in lizards and snakes.

    PubMed

    Ball, Inna; Ofner, Sabine; Funk, Richard S; Griffin, Chris; Riedel, Ulf; Möhring, Jens; Marschang, Rachel E

    2014-10-01

    Adenoviruses (AdVs) are relatively common in lizards and snakes, and several genetically distinct AdVs have been isolated in cell culture. The aims of this study were to examine serological relationships among lizard and snake AdVs and to determine the frequency of AdV infections in these species. Isolates from a boa constrictor (Boa constrictor), a corn snake (Pantherophis gutattus) and a central bearded dragon (Pogona vitticeps), and two isolates from helodermatid lizards (Heloderma horridum and H. suspectum) were used in neutralisation tests for the detection of antibodies in plasma from 263 lizards from seven families (including 12 species) and from 141 snakes from four families (including 28 species) from the USA and Europe. Most lizard and snake samples had antibodies against a range of AdV isolates, indicating that AdV infection is common among these squamates. Neutralisation tests with polyclonal antibodies raised in rabbits demonstrated serological cross-reactivity between both helodermatid lizard isolates. However, squamate plasma showed different reactions to each of these lizard isolates in neutralisation tests. PMID:25163614

  6. Prevalence of neutralising antibodies against adenoviruses in lizards and snakes.

    PubMed

    Ball, Inna; Ofner, Sabine; Funk, Richard S; Griffin, Chris; Riedel, Ulf; Möhring, Jens; Marschang, Rachel E

    2014-10-01

    Adenoviruses (AdVs) are relatively common in lizards and snakes, and several genetically distinct AdVs have been isolated in cell culture. The aims of this study were to examine serological relationships among lizard and snake AdVs and to determine the frequency of AdV infections in these species. Isolates from a boa constrictor (Boa constrictor), a corn snake (Pantherophis gutattus) and a central bearded dragon (Pogona vitticeps), and two isolates from helodermatid lizards (Heloderma horridum and H. suspectum) were used in neutralisation tests for the detection of antibodies in plasma from 263 lizards from seven families (including 12 species) and from 141 snakes from four families (including 28 species) from the USA and Europe. Most lizard and snake samples had antibodies against a range of AdV isolates, indicating that AdV infection is common among these squamates. Neutralisation tests with polyclonal antibodies raised in rabbits demonstrated serological cross-reactivity between both helodermatid lizard isolates. However, squamate plasma showed different reactions to each of these lizard isolates in neutralisation tests.

  7. Ad 2.0: a novel recombineering platform for high-throughput generation of tailored adenoviruses

    PubMed Central

    Mück-Häusl, Martin; Solanki, Manish; Zhang, Wenli; Ruzsics, Zsolt; Ehrhardt, Anja

    2015-01-01

    Recombinant adenoviruses containing a double-stranded DNA genome of 26–45 kb were broadly explored in basic virology, for vaccination purposes, for treatment of tumors based on oncolytic virotherapy, or simply as a tool for efficient gene transfer. However, the majority of recombinant adenoviral vectors (AdVs) is based on a small fraction of adenovirus types and their genetic modification. Recombineering techniques provide powerful tools for arbitrary engineering of recombinant DNA. Here, we adopted a seamless recombineering technology for high-throughput and arbitrary genetic engineering of recombinant adenoviral DNA molecules. Our cloning platform which also includes a novel recombination pipeline is based on bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs). It enables generation of novel recombinant adenoviruses from different sources and switching between commonly used early generation AdVs and the last generation high-capacity AdVs lacking all viral coding sequences making them attractive candidates for clinical use. In combination with a novel recombination pipeline allowing cloning of AdVs containing large and complex transgenes and the possibility to generate arbitrary chimeric capsid-modified adenoviruses, these techniques allow generation of tailored AdVs with distinct features. Our technologies will pave the way toward broader applications of AdVs in molecular medicine including gene therapy and vaccination studies. PMID:25609697

  8. Alfalfa dwarf cytorhabdovirus P protein is a local and systemic RNA silencing supressor which inhibits programmed RISC activity and prevents transitive amplification of RNA silencing.

    PubMed

    Bejerman, Nicolás; Mann, Krin S; Dietzgen, Ralf G

    2016-09-15

    Plants employ RNA silencing as an innate defense mechanism against viruses. As a counter-defense, plant viruses have evolved to express RNA silencing suppressor proteins (RSS), which target one or more steps of the silencing pathway. In this study, we show that the phosphoprotein (P) encoded by the negative-sense RNA virus alfalfa dwarf virus (ADV), a species of the genus Cytorhabdovirus, family Rhabdoviridae, is a suppressor of RNA silencing. ADV P has a relatively weak local RSS activity, and does not prevent siRNA accumulation. On the other hand, ADV P strongly suppresses systemic RNA silencing, but does not interfere with the short-distance spread of silencing, which is consistent with its lack of inhibition of siRNA accumulation. The mechanism of suppression appears to involve ADV P binding to RNA-induced silencing complex proteins AGO1 and AGO4 as shown in protein-protein interaction assays when ectopically expressed. In planta, we demonstrate that ADV P likely functions by inhibiting miRNA-guided AGO1 cleavage and prevents transitive amplification by repressing the production of secondary siRNAs. As recently described for lettuce necrotic yellows cytorhabdovirus P, but in contrast to other viral RSS known to disrupt AGO activity, ADV P sequence does not contain any recognizable GW/WG or F-box motifs, which suggests that cytorhabdovirus P proteins may use alternative motifs to bind to AGO proteins. PMID:27543392

  9. Prevalence of adenovirus and rotavirus infection in immunocompromised patients with acute gastroenteritis in Portugal

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, Joana; Ferreira, Delfim; Arrabalde, Célia; Almeida, Sandra; Baldaque, Inês; Sousa, Hugo

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To characterize the prevalence of rotavirus (RV) and adenovirus (AdV) infections in immunocompromised patients with acute gastroenteritis. METHODS: The presence of RV and AdV (serotypes 40 and 41) was evaluated in 509 stool samples obtained between January 2009 and December 2010 from 200 immunocompromised patients (83 females and 117 males; median age 21 years old, range 0-72. The diagnosis of infection was performed as a routine procedure and the presence of RV and AdV (serotypes 40 and 41) was determined by immunochromatography using the RIDA® Quick Rota-Adeno-Kombi kit (r-Biopharm, Darmstadt, Germany). The data analysis and description of seasonal frequencies were performed using computer software IBM® SPSS® (Statistical Package for Social Sciences) Statistics version 20.0 for Mac. The frequencies of infection were compared into different age and gender groups by χ2 test. RESULTS: The study revealed 12.4% AdV positive samples and 0.8% RV positive samples, which correspond to a prevalence of 6.5% and 1.5%, respectively. AdV was more frequent between October 2009 and April 2010, while RV was identified in April 2010 and July 2010. The stool analysis revealed that from the 509 samples, 63 (12.4%) were positive for AdV and 4 (0.8%) positive for RV, which by resuming the information of each patient, lead to an overall prevalence of AdV and RV of 6.5% (13/200 patients) and 1.5% (3/200 patients), respectively. The stratification of the analysis regarding age groups showed a tendency to an increased prevalence of infection in paediatric patients between 0-10 years old. Considering the seasonal distribution of these infections, our study revealed that AdV infection was more frequent between October 2009 and April 2010, while RV infection was characterized by two distinct peaks (April 2010 and July 2010). CONCLUSION: The overall prevalence of AdV and RV infection in immunocompromised patients with acute gastroenteritis was 8% and AdV was the most prevalent agent

  10. Investigation of enteric adenovirus and poliovirus removal by coagulation processes and suitability of bacteriophages MS2 and φX174 as surrogates for those viruses.

    PubMed

    Shirasaki, N; Matsushita, T; Matsui, Y; Marubayashi, T; Murai, K

    2016-09-01

    We evaluated the removal of enteric adenovirus (AdV) type 40 and poliovirus (PV) type 1 by coagulation, using water samples from 13 water sources for drinking water treatment plants in Japan. The behaviors of two widely accepted enteric virus surrogates, bacteriophages MS2 and φX174, were compared with the behaviors of AdV and PV. Coagulation with polyaluminum chloride (PACl, basicity 1.5) removed AdV and PV from virus-spiked source waters: the infectious AdV and PV removal ratios evaluated by means of a plaque-forming-unit method were 0.1-1.4-log10 and 0.5-2.4-log10, respectively. A nonsulfated high-basicity PACl (basicity 2.1) removed infectious AdV and PV more efficiently than did other commercially available PACls (basicity 1.5-2.1), alum, and ferric chloride. The MS2 removal ratios tended to be larger than those of AdV and PV, partly because of differences in the hydrophobicities of the virus particles and the sensitivity of the virus to the virucidal activity of PACl; the differences in removal ratios were not due to differences in the surface charges of the virus particles. MS2, which was more hydrophobic than the other viruses, was inactivated during coagulation with PACl. Therefore, MS2 does not appear to be an appropriate surrogate for AdV and PV during coagulation. In contrast, because φX174, like AdV and PV, was not inactivated during coagulation, and because the hydrophobicity of φX174 was similar to or somewhat lower than the hydrophobicities of AdV and PV, the φX174 removal ratios tended to be similar to or somewhat smaller than those of the enteric viruses. Therefore, φX174 is a potential conservative surrogate for AdV and PV during coagulation. In summary, the surface hydrophobicity of virus particles and the sensitivity of the virus to the virucidal activity of the coagulant are probably important determinants of the efficiency of virus removal during coagulation. PMID:27135564

  11. Current and future disease progression of the chronic HCV population in the United States.

    PubMed

    Zalesak, Martin; Francis, Kevin; Gedeon, Alex; Gillis, John; Hvidsten, Kyle; Kidder, Phyllis; Li, Hong; Martyn, Derek; Orne, Leslie; Smith, Amanda; Kwong, Ann

    2013-01-01

    Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection can lead to advanced liver disease (AdvLD), including cirrhosis, decompensated cirrhosis, and liver cancer. The aim of this study was to determine recent historical rates of HCV patient progression to AdvLD and to project AdvLD prevalence through 2015. We first determined total 2008 US chronic HCV prevalence from the National Health and Nutrition Evaluation Surveys. Next, we examined disease progression and associated non-pharmacological costs of diagnosed chronic HCV-infected patients between 2007-2009 in the IMS LifeLink and CMS Medicare claims databases. A projection model was developed to estimate AdvLD population growth through 2015 in patients diagnosed and undiagnosed as of 2008, using the 2007-2009 progression rates to generate a "worst case" projection of the HCV-related AdvLD population (i.e., scenario where HCV treatment is the same in the forecasted period as it was before 2009). We found that the total diagnosed chronic HCV population grew from 983,000 to 1.19 million in 2007-2009, with patients born from 1945-1964 accounting for 75.0% of all patients, 83.7% of AdvLD patients, and 79.2% of costs in 2009, indicating that HCV is primarily a disease of the "baby boomer" population. Non-pharmacological costs grew from $7.22 billion to $8.63 billion, with the majority of growth derived from the 60,000 new patients that developed AdvLD in 2007-2009, 91.5% of whom were born between 1945 and 1964. The projection model estimated the total AdvLD population would grow from 195,000 in 2008 to 601,000 in 2015, with 73.5% of new AdvLD cases from patients undiagnosed as of 2008. AdvLD prevalence in patients diagnosed as of 2008 was projected to grow 6.5% annually to 303,000 patients in 2015. These findings suggest that strategies to diagnose and treat HCV-infected patients are urgently needed to increase the likelihood that progression is interrupted, particularly for patients born from 1945-1964.

  12. CONSORT: Effects of adding adefovirdipivoxil to peginterferon alfa-2a at different time points on HBeAg-positivepatients

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ka; Cao, Hong; Liang, Jiayi; Shu, Xin; Sun, Haixia; Li, Gang; Xu, Qihuan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: The aims of this study were to compare the efficacy and safety of the addition of adefovir dipivoxil (ADV) (started at different time points) to pegylated interferon alpha-2a (PEG-INF-α2a) and PEG-INF-α2a monotherapy. This prospective, randomized study sought to evaluate the safety and efficacy of the combination of PEG-INF-α2a and ADV at different time points.120 patients were randomized into groups that received PEG-INF-α2a as monotherapy (group A) or in combination with ADV started at week 0 (group B), 12 (group C), or 24 (group D). All patients were followed for 48 weeks. Efficacy and safety analyses were performed. Methods: Patients in group a received 135 μg of PEG-INF-α2a by subcutaneous injection once weekly for 48 weeks. Patients in the ADV add-on group received 135 μg of PEG-INF-α2a subcutaneously once weekly and received 10 mg of ADV administered once daily for 48 weeks. HBV DNA, HBsAg, HBeAg, and hepatitis B e antibody levels were determined. Responses were determined at week 12 (ADV add-on), the end of treatment for PEG-INF-α2a (48weeks) and ADV (EOT) and at the end of 96 weeks of follow-up (EOF). Results: The rate of HBV DNA loss were higher in the combination groups than group A at the week 12, week 48, the EOT and EOF (P < 0.05). The rates of HBeAg seroconversion and HBsAg loss were similar among the treatment groups (P>0.05). The alanineaminotransferase (ALT) normalization rate was higher in the combination group than group A only at the EOT (P = 0.007). By the EOF, the patients with ADV added at week 12 achieved higher rates of HBV DNA loss (71.9%), HBeAg seroconversion (50.0%), HBsAg loss (15.6%), and ALT normalization (78.1%). Conclusions: PEG-INF-α2a plus ADV combination therapy is safe and superior to PEG-INF-α2amonotherapyfor decreasing serum HBV DNA and normalizing the ALT level but has no significant impact on the rate of HBeAg seroconversion and HBsAg loss. Adding ADV at week 12 may be an

  13. Investigation of enteric adenovirus and poliovirus removal by coagulation processes and suitability of bacteriophages MS2 and φX174 as surrogates for those viruses.

    PubMed

    Shirasaki, N; Matsushita, T; Matsui, Y; Marubayashi, T; Murai, K

    2016-09-01

    We evaluated the removal of enteric adenovirus (AdV) type 40 and poliovirus (PV) type 1 by coagulation, using water samples from 13 water sources for drinking water treatment plants in Japan. The behaviors of two widely accepted enteric virus surrogates, bacteriophages MS2 and φX174, were compared with the behaviors of AdV and PV. Coagulation with polyaluminum chloride (PACl, basicity 1.5) removed AdV and PV from virus-spiked source waters: the infectious AdV and PV removal ratios evaluated by means of a plaque-forming-unit method were 0.1-1.4-log10 and 0.5-2.4-log10, respectively. A nonsulfated high-basicity PACl (basicity 2.1) removed infectious AdV and PV more efficiently than did other commercially available PACls (basicity 1.5-2.1), alum, and ferric chloride. The MS2 removal ratios tended to be larger than those of AdV and PV, partly because of differences in the hydrophobicities of the virus particles and the sensitivity of the virus to the virucidal activity of PACl; the differences in removal ratios were not due to differences in the surface charges of the virus particles. MS2, which was more hydrophobic than the other viruses, was inactivated during coagulation with PACl. Therefore, MS2 does not appear to be an appropriate surrogate for AdV and PV during coagulation. In contrast, because φX174, like AdV and PV, was not inactivated during coagulation, and because the hydrophobicity of φX174 was similar to or somewhat lower than the hydrophobicities of AdV and PV, the φX174 removal ratios tended to be similar to or somewhat smaller than those of the enteric viruses. Therefore, φX174 is a potential conservative surrogate for AdV and PV during coagulation. In summary, the surface hydrophobicity of virus particles and the sensitivity of the virus to the virucidal activity of the coagulant are probably important determinants of the efficiency of virus removal during coagulation.

  14. S-phase-dependent cell cycle disturbances caused by Aleutian mink disease parvovirus.

    PubMed Central

    Oleksiewicz, M B; Alexandersen, S

    1997-01-01

    We examined replication of the autonomous parvovirus Aleutian mink disease parvovirus (ADV) in relation to cell cycle progression of permissive Crandell feline kidney (CRFK) cells. Flow cytometric analysis showed that ADV caused a composite, binary pattern of cell cycle arrest. ADV-induced cell cycle arrest occurred exclusively in cells containing de novo-synthesized viral nonstructural (NS) proteins. Production of ADV NS proteins, indicative of ADV replication, was triggered during S-phase traverse. The NS+ cells that were generated during later parts of S phase did not undergo cytokinesis and formed a distinct population, termed population A. Formation of population A was not prevented by VM-26, indicating that these cells were arrested in late S or G2 phase. Cells in population A continued to support high-level ADV DNA replication and production of infectious virus after the normal S phase had ceased. A second, postmitotic, NS+ population (termed population B) arose in G0/G1, downstream of population A. Population B cells were unable to traverse S phase but did exhibit low-level DNA synthesis. Since the nature of this DNA synthesis was not examined, we cannot at present differentiate between G1 and early S arrest in population B. Cells that became NS+ during S phase entered population A, whereas population B cells apparently remained NS- during S phase and expressed high NS levels postmitosis in G0/G1. This suggested that population B resulted from leakage of cells with subthreshold levels of ADV products through the late S/G2 block and, consequently, that the binary pattern of ADV-induced cell cycle arrest may be governed merely by viral replication levels within a single S phase. Flow cytometric analysis of propidium iodide fluorescence and bromodeoxyuridine uptake showed that population A cells sustained significantly higher levels of DNA replication than population B cells during the ADV-induced cell cycle arrest. Therefore, the type of ADV-induced cell

  15. Analysis of Aleutian disease virus infection in vitro and in vivo: demonstration of Aleutian disease virus DNA in tissues of infected mink.

    PubMed Central

    Bloom, M E; Race, R E; Aasted, B; Wolfinbarger, J B

    1985-01-01

    Aleutian disease virus (ADV) infection was analyzed in vivo and in vitro to compare virus replication in cell culture and in mink. Initial experiments compared cultures of Crandell feline kidney (CRFK) cells infected with the avirulent ADV-G strain or the highly virulent Utah I ADV. The number of ADV-infected cells was estimated by calculating the percentage of cells displaying ADV antigen by immunofluorescence (IFA), and several parameters of infection were determined. Infected cells contained large quantities of viral DNA (more than 10(5) genomes per infected cell) as estimated by dot-blot DNA-DNA hybridization, and much of the viral DNA, when analyzed by Southern blot hybridization, was found to be of a 4.8-kilobase-pair duplex monomeric replicative form (DM DNA). Furthermore, the cultures contained 7 to 67 fluorescence-forming units (FFU) per infected cell, and the ADV genome per FFU ratio ranged between 2 X 10(3) and 164 X 10(3). Finally, the pattern of viral antigen detected by IFA was characteristically nuclear, although cytoplasmic fluorescence was often found in the same cells. Because no difference was noted between the two virus strains when cultures containing similar numbers of infected cells were compared, it seemed that both viruses behaved similarly in infected cell culture. These data were used as a basis for the analysis of infection of mink by virulent Utah I ADV. Ten days after infection, the highest levels of viral DNA were detected in spleen (373 genomes per cell), mesenteric lymph node (MLN; 750 genomes per cell), and liver (373 genomes per cell). In marked contrast to infected CRFK cells, the predominant species of ADV DNA in all tissues was single-stranded virion DNA; however, 4.8-kilobase-pair DM DNA was found in MLN and spleen. This observation suggested that MLN and spleen were sites of virus replication, but that the DNA found in liver reflected sequestration of virus produced elsewhere. A final set of experiments examined MLN taken

  16. EDITORIAL: Siberia Integrated Regional Study: multidisciplinary investigations of the dynamic relationship between the Siberian environment and global climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordov, E. P.; Vaganov, E. A.

    2010-03-01

    ] Groisman P Y et al 2009 The Northern Eurasia Earth Science Partnership: an example of science applied to societal needs Bull. Am. Meteorol. Soc. 90 671-88 [6] Shiklomanov and Lammers R L 2009 Record Russian river discharge in 2007 and the limits of analysis Environ. Res. Lett. 4 045015 [7] Tchebakova N M, Parfenova E and Soja A J 2009 The effects of climate, permafrost and fire on vegetation change in Siberia in a changing climate Environ. Res. Lett. 4 045013 [8] Soja A et al 2007 Climate-induced boreal forest change: predictions versus current observations Global Planet. Change 56 274-96 [9] Groisman P Y and Bartalev S V 2007 Northern Eurasia Earth Science Partnership Initiative (NEESPI): science plan overview Global Planet. Change 56 215-34 [10] Gordov E P and Begni G 2005 Siberia integrated regional study development Comput. Technol. 10 149-55 [11] Gordov E P, Begni G, Heiman M, Kabanov M V, Lykossov V N, Shvidenko A Z and Vaganov E A 2006 Siberia integrated regional study as a basis for international scientific cooperation Comput. Technol. 11 16-28 [12] Baklanov A and Gordov E P 2006 Man-induced environmental risks: monitoring, management and remediation of man-made changes in Siberia Comput. Technol. 11 162-71 [13] Gordov E P 2004 Computational and information technologies for environmental sciences Comput. Technol. 9 3-10 Gordov E P 2004 Modern tendencies in regional environmental studies Geogr. Nat. Resources. (special issue) 11-18 Akhlyostin A Yu and Fazliev A Z 2003 Software for presentation of scientific information in the framework of a WEB portal Proc. SPIE 5396 111-8 Gordov E P, De Rudder A, Lykosov V N, Fazliev A Z and Fedra K 2004 Web-portal ATMOS as basis for integrated investigations of Siberia environment Comput. Technol. 9 3-13 Gordov E P, Lykosov V N and Fazliev A Z 2006 Web portal on environmental sciences 'ATMOS' Adv. Geosci. 8 33-8 Okladnikov I G and Titov A G 2006 Web-system for processing and visualization of meteorological data Environmental

  17. Cell-free and cell-associated viremia in pigs after oronasal infection with Aujeszky's disease virus.

    PubMed

    Nawynck, H J; Pensaert, M B

    1995-03-01

    Nine pigs were examined for the presence of viremia during the first week after oronasal inoculation of 10(8.0) TCID50 Aujeszky's disease virus (ADV). Blood was taken at 1, 2, 3, 5 and 7 days post inoculation (PI) and the presence of cell-free ADV in plasma and of ADV-infected mononuclear cells was examined by titration and by cocultivation with permissive cells, respectively. The mononuclear cells of 6 of the 9 pigs, collected at 3 and 5 days PI were further separated into subpopulations of enriched monocytes and enriched lymphocytes. Both subpopulations were cocultivated. Nasal secretions were collected from 4 of the 9 pigs for the determination of virus titers and interferon concentrations. Both infected mononuclear cells and cell-free ADV were demonstrated in 5 pigs, infected mononuclear cells only were found in 2 pigs, and neither cell-associated or cell-free ADV were detected in 2 pigs. Two of the 7 viremic animals were positive on one single day, 3 on 2 days, 1 on 3 days and 1 on 4 days. The number of infected cells was approximately 5 times higher in monocytes than in lymphocytes. The highest virus titers were present in those nasal fluids with the lowest alpha-interferon concentration. A correlation between the titer of locally produced ADV in the nose and the presence of a viremia was not found. In conclusion, we can state that a viremia regularly occurs under both cell-free and cell-associated form after an oronasal inoculation of ADV and that monocytes are the most susceptible mononuclear cells.

  18. A long-term serological survey on Aujeszky's disease virus infections in wild boar in East Germany.

    PubMed

    Pannwitz, G; Freuling, C; Denzin, N; Schaarschmidt, U; Nieper, H; Hlinak, A; Burkhardt, S; Klopries, M; Dedek, J; Hoffmann, L; Kramer, M; Selhorst, T; Conraths, F J; Mettenleiter, T; Müller, T

    2012-02-01

    Between 1985 and 2008, a total of 102,387 wild boar sera originating from Eastern Germany covering an area of 108 589 km2 were tested for the presence of Aujeszky's disease virus (ADV)-specific antibodies. From 1985 until 1991 and from 1992 until 2008, wild boar sera were exclusively investigated using either conventional seroneutralization assays (n=39 621) or commercial gB and full antigen ELISAs (n=62,766), respectively. Spatial-temporal analysis revealed an increasing ADV seroprevalence from 0·4% to 15·9%, on average, during the 24-year observation period that went along with a continuous spread of the infection in a western direction. During 2006 and 2008, 18% of the 66 affected districts had ADV seroprevalences >30%. There was a significant correlation between ADV seroprevalence and the hunting index of population density (HIPD) of wild boar in the entire study area, although this did not hold true for some regions. Seroprevalences did not differ between sexes but were age-dependent. East Germany has been officially free of Aujeszky's disease (pseudorabies) in domestic pigs since 1985. Although a risk for domestic pigs cannot be completely ruled out, experience has shown that ADV in domestic pigs could be eliminated although the virus was present in the wild boar population. Despite increasing ADV seroprevalence in the East German wild boar population no spillover infections from wild boar to domestic pigs have been reported. To further trace ADV infections in the wild boar population in Germany, a nationwide serological monitoring programme should be implemented. PMID:21320372

  19. Antiviral activity of Plantago major extracts and related compounds in vitro.

    PubMed

    Chiang, L C; Chiang, W; Chang, M Y; Ng, L T; Lin, C C

    2002-07-01

    Plantago major L., a popular traditional Chinese medicine, has long been used for treating various diseases varying from cold to viral hepatitis. The aim of present study was to examine the antiviral activity of aqueous extract and pure compounds of P. major. Studies were conducted on a series of viruses, namely herpesviruses (HSV-1, HSV-2) and adenoviruses (ADV-3, ADV-8, ADV-11). The antiviral activity of EC50 was defined as the concentration achieved 50% cyto-protection against virus infection and the selectivity index (SI) was determined by the ratio of CC50 (concentration of 50% cellular cytotoxicity) to EC50. Results showed that aqueous extract of P. major possessed only a slight anti-herpes virus activity. In contrast, certain pure compounds belonging to the five different classes of chemicals found in extracts of this plant exhibited potent antiviral activity. Among them, caffeic acid exhibited the strongest activity against HSV-1 (EC50=15.3 microg/ml, SI=671), HSV-2 (EC50=87.3 microg/ml, SI=118) and ADV-3 (EC50=14.2 microg/ml, SI=727), whereas chlorogenic acid possessed the strongest anti-ADV-11 (EC50=13.3 microg/ml, SI=301) activity. The present study concludes that pure compounds of P. major, which possess antiviral activities are mainly derived from the phenolic compounds, especially caffeic acid. Its mode of action against HSV-2 and ADV-3 was found to be at multiplication stages (postinfection of HSV-1: 0-12 h; ADV-3: 0-2 h), and with SI values greater than 400, suggesting the potential use of this compound for treatment of the infection by these two viruses. PMID:12076751

  20. Antiviral activity of Plantago major extracts and related compounds in vitro.

    PubMed

    Chiang, L C; Chiang, W; Chang, M Y; Ng, L T; Lin, C C

    2002-07-01

    Plantago major L., a popular traditional Chinese medicine, has long been used for treating various diseases varying from cold to viral hepatitis. The aim of present study was to examine the antiviral activity of aqueous extract and pure compounds of P. major. Studies were conducted on a series of viruses, namely herpesviruses (HSV-1, HSV-2) and adenoviruses (ADV-3, ADV-8, ADV-11). The antiviral activity of EC50 was defined as the concentration achieved 50% cyto-protection against virus infection and the selectivity index (SI) was determined by the ratio of CC50 (concentration of 50% cellular cytotoxicity) to EC50. Results showed that aqueous extract of P. major possessed only a slight anti-herpes virus activity. In contrast, certain pure compounds belonging to the five different classes of chemicals found in extracts of this plant exhibited potent antiviral activity. Among them, caffeic acid exhibited the strongest activity against HSV-1 (EC50=15.3 microg/ml, SI=671), HSV-2 (EC50=87.3 microg/ml, SI=118) and ADV-3 (EC50=14.2 microg/ml, SI=727), whereas chlorogenic acid possessed the strongest anti-ADV-11 (EC50=13.3 microg/ml, SI=301) activity. The present study concludes that pure compounds of P. major, which possess antiviral activities are mainly derived from the phenolic compounds, especially caffeic acid. Its mode of action against HSV-2 and ADV-3 was found to be at multiplication stages (postinfection of HSV-1: 0-12 h; ADV-3: 0-2 h), and with SI values greater than 400, suggesting the potential use of this compound for treatment of the infection by these two viruses.

  1. Preferential and Bidirectional Labeling of the Rubrospinal Tract with Adenovirus-GFP for Monitoring Normal and Injured Axons

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaofei; Smith, George M.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract The rodent rubrospinal tract (RST) has been studied extensively to investigate regeneration and remodeling of central nervous system (CNS) axons. Currently no retrograde tracers can specifically label rubrospinal axons and neurons (RSNs). The RST can be anterogradely labeled by injecting tracers into the red nucleus (RN), but accurately locating the RN is a technical challenge. Here we developed a recombinant adenovirus carrying a green fluorescent protein reporter gene (Adv-GFP) which can preferentially, intensely, and bi-directionally label the RST. When Adv-GFP was injected into the second lumbar spinal cord, the GFP was specifically transported throughout the entire RST, with peak labeling seen at 2 weeks post-injection. When Adv-GFP was injected directly into the RN, GFP was anterogradely transported throughout the RST. Following spinal cord injury (SCI), injection of Adv-GFP resulted in visualization of GFP in transected, spared, or sprouted RST axons bi-directionally. Thus Adv-GFP could be used as a novel tool for monitoring and evaluating strategies designed to maximize RST axonal regeneration and remodeling following SCI. PMID:21299337

  2. Treatment of murine tumors using acoustic droplet vaporization-enhanced high intensity focused ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Meili; Jiang, Lixing; Fabiilli, Mario L.; Zhang, Aili; Fowlkes, J. Brian; Xu, Lisa X.

    2013-09-01

    High intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) can be applied focally and noninvasively to thermally ablate solid tumors. Long treatment times are typically required for large tumors, which can expose patients to certain risks while potentially decreasing the therapeutic efficacy of the treatment. Acoustic droplet vaporization (ADV) is a promising modality that can enhance the efficacy of tumor treatment using HIFU. In this study, the therapeutic effects of combined HIFU and ADV was evaluated in mice bearing subcutaneously-implanted 4T1 tumors. Histological examination showed that the combination of HIFU and ADV generated a mean necrotic area in the tumor that was 2.9-fold larger than with HIFU alone. A significant enhancement of necrosis was found in the periphery of the tumor, where the blood supply was abundant. Seven days after treatment, the tumors treated with combined HIFU and ADV were 30-fold smaller in volume than tumors treated with HIFU alone. The study demonstrates the potential advantage of combining HIFU and ADV in tumor treatment.

  3. Modeling and Simulating Dynamics of Complete- and Poor-Response Chronic Hepatitis B Chinese Patients for Adefovir and Traditional Chinese Medicine Plus Adefovir Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Min, Lequan; Chen, Xiao; Ye, Yongan; Zhang, Qun; Ru, Shuying; Li, Xiaoke

    2013-01-01

    ChiCTR-TRC-11001263 study was the first large-scale double-blind randomized placebo-controlled traditional Chinese medicines (TCMs) and adefovir (ADV) antihepatitis B virus (HBV) infection trial in the world. A total of 560 hepatitis B e antigen- (HBeAg-) positive Chinese patients with chronical HBV were randomly classified, in 1 : 1 ratio, into two groups: experimental group (EXG) receiving TCMs + ADV and controlled group (CTG) receiving ADV + TCM-placebo treatment for 48 weeks. This paper introduces two models to model and simulate the evolutions of dynamics for the complete-response patients and the poor-response patients in EXG and CTG, respectively. The stimulated mean HBV DNA and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) levels were close to the patients' experimental data. Analysis and simulations suggest that the activated patients' immune functions by TCMs + ADV may not only clear infected hepatocytes, but also clear HBV, which made the complete-response patients' mean serum HBV DNA levels in EXG reduce rapidly 12 weeks' earlier than the ones in CTG. One can assume that both the TCMs and ADV have the function of preventing complete-response patients' infected hepatocytes from being injured by cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs); the patients' activated immune cells may also block HBV replications. PMID:24282437

  4. Characterization of single disseminated prostate cancer cells reveals tumor cell heterogeneity and identifies dormancy associated pathways.

    PubMed

    Chéry, Lisly; Lam, Hung-Ming; Coleman, Ilsa; Lakely, Bryce; Coleman, Roger; Larson, Sandy; Aguirre-Ghiso, Julio A; Xia, Jing; Gulati, Roman; Nelson, Peter S; Montgomery, Bruce; Lange, Paul; Snyder, Linda A; Vessella, Robert L; Morrissey, Colm

    2014-10-30

    Cancer dormancy refers to the prolonged clinical disease-free time between removal of the primary tumor and recurrence, which is common in prostate cancer (PCa), breast cancer, esophageal cancer, and other cancers. PCa disseminated tumor cells (DTC) are detected in both patients with no evidence of disease (NED) and advanced disease (ADV). However, the molecular and cellular nature of DTC is unknown. We performed a first-in-field study of single DTC transcriptomic analyses in cancer patients to identify a molecular signature associated with cancer dormancy. We profiled eighty-five individual EpCAM⁺/CD45⁻ cells from the bone marrow of PCa patients with NED or ADV. We analyzed 44 DTC with high prostate-epithelial signatures, and eliminated 41 cells with high erythroid signatures and low prostate epithelial signatures. DTC were clustered into 3 groups: NED, ADV_1, and ADV_2, in which the ADV_1 group presented a distinct gene expression pattern associated with the p38 stress activated kinase pathway. Additionally, DTC from the NED group were enriched for a tumor dormancy signature associated with head and neck squamous carcinoma and breast cancer. This study provides the first clinical evidence of the p38 pathway as a potential biomarker for early recurrence and an attractive target for therapeutic intervention.

  5. Characterization of deoxyribonucleic acid from cells infected with Aleutian disease virus

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, E.C.; Ramos, L.; Kenyon, A.J.

    1983-07-01

    Viral DNA was extracted from Crandell feline kidney (CRFK) cells infected with Aleutian disease virus (ADV) and labeled with (/sup 3/H)thymidine. The sedimentation coefficient in alkaline sucrose gradients was 16S corresponding to a molecular weight of 1.5 X 10(6). The buoyant densities of DNA from infected and control cells were determined by isopyknic sedimentation in CsCl and NaI gradients. Two additional peaks of (/sup 3/H)DNA were found in infected cells, but not in control cell extracts. Fractionation of this DNA on hydroxylapatite indicated that the new peaks represented a single-stranded component, density 1.728 g/cm3, and a double-stranded component, presumed to be a viral replicative intermediate, density 1.718 g/cm3. The target antigen formation in CRFK cells was measured by gamma-irradiation of ADV and assayed for focus formation. The calculated size of ADV based on these measurements was 1.1 X 10(6). The H-1 parvovirus also was shown to have a size of 1.5 X 10(6) daltons for both antigen and plaque formation. The data indicated similarities existed between ADV and other autonomously replicating parvoviruses in most properties, except that less-than-unit length genome of ADV may be transcribed.

  6. Mechanical Design and Development of TES Bolometer Detector Arrays for the Advanced ACTPol Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ward, Jonathan T.; Austermann, Jason; Beall, James A.; Choi, Steve K.; Crowley, Kevin T.; Devlin, Mark J.; Duff, Shannon M.; Gallardo, Patricio M.; Henderson, Shawn W.; Ho, Shuay-Pwu Patty; Hilton, Gene; Hubmayr, Johannes; Khavari, Niloufar; Klein, Jeffrey; Koopman, Brian J.; Li, Dale; McMahon, Jeffrey; Mumby, Grace; Nati, Federico; Wollack, Edward J.

    2016-01-01

    The next generation Advanced ACTPol (AdvACT) experiment is currently underway and will consist of four Transition Edge Sensor (TES) bolometer arrays, with three operating together, totaling 5800 detectors on the sky. Building on experience gained with the ACTPol detector arrays, AdvACT will utilize various new technologies, including 150 mm detector wafers equipped with multichroic pixels, allowing for a more densely packed focal plane. Each set of detectors includes a feedhorn array of stacked silicon wafers which form a spline pro le leading to each pixel. This is then followed by a waveguide interface plate, detector wafer, back short cavity plate, and backshort cap. Each array is housed in a custom designed structure manufactured from high purity copper and then gold plated. In addition to the detector array assembly, the array package also encloses cryogenic readout electronics. We present the full mechanical design of the AdvACT high frequency (HF) detector array package along with a detailed look at the detector array stack assemblies. This experiment will also make use of extensive hardware and software previously developed for ACT, which will be modi ed to incorporate the new AdvACT instruments. Therefore, we discuss the integration of all AdvACT arrays with pre-existing ACTPol infrastructure.

  7. Controlling O&M Costs of Advanced SMRs using Prognostics and Enhanced Risk Monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Hirt, Evelyn H.; Coles, Garill A.; Meyer, Ryan M.; Coble, Jamie B.; Wood, Richard T.

    2014-02-25

    Advanced small modular reactors (AdvSMRs) can contribute to safe, sustainable, and carbon-neutral energy production. The economics of small reactors (including AdvSMRs) will be impacted by the reduced economy-of-scale savings when compared to traditional light water reactors. The most significant controllable element of the day-to-day costs involves operations and maintenance (O&M). Enhancing affordability of AdvSMRs through technologies that help control O&M costs will be critical to ensuring their practicality for wider deployment.A significant component of O&M costs is the management and mitigation of degradation of components due to their impact on planning maintenance activities and staffing levels. Technologies that help characterize real-time risk of failure of key components are important in this context. Given the possibility of frequently changing AdvSMR plant configurations, approaches are needed to integrate three elements – advanced plant configuration information, equipment condition information, and risk monitors – to provide a measure of risk that is customized for each AdvSMR unit and support real-time decisions on O&M. This article describes an overview of ongoing research into diagnostics/prognostics and enhanced predictive risk monitors (ERM) for this purpose.

  8. Localization of neutralization epitopes on adenovirus fiber knob from species C.

    PubMed

    Lang, Shuai; Wang, Lizheng; Wang, Zixuan; Zhu, Rui; Yan, Jingyi; Wang, Baoming; Wu, Jiaxin; Zhang, Haihong; Wu, Hui; Zhou, Yan; Kong, Wei; Yu, Bin; Yu, Xianghui

    2016-04-01

    Although potential neutralization epitopes on the fiber knob of adenovirus (AdV) serotype 2 (Ad2) and Ad5 have been revealed, few studies have been carried out to identify neutralization epitopes on the knob from a broader panel of AdV serotypes. In this study, based on sequence and structural analysis of knobs from Ad1, Ad2, Ad5 and Ad6 (all from species C), several trimeric chimeric knob proteins were expressed in Escherichia coli to identify the locations of neutralization epitopes on the knobs by analysing their reactivity with mouse and rabbit polyclonal sera raised against AdVs and human sera with natural AdV infection. The dominant neutralization epitopes were located mainly in the N-terminal part of knobs from Ad1, Ad2 and Ad5, but they seemed to be located in the C-terminal part of the Ad6 knob, with some individual differences in rabbit and human populations. Our study adds to our understanding of humoral immune responses to AdVs and will facilitate the construction of more desirable capsid-modified recombinant Ad5 vectors.

  9. The Evolution of Advanced Merger (U)LIRGs on the Color-Stellar Mass Diagram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Rui; Hao, Cai-Na; Xia, Xiao-Yang

    2016-08-01

    Based on a sample of 79 local advanced merger (adv-merger) (U)LIRGs, we search for evidence of quenching processes by investigating the distributions of star formation history indicators (EW(Hα), EW(HΔA) and Dn(4000)) on the NUV-r color-mass and SFR-M * diagrams. The distributions of EW(Hα) and Dn(4000) on the NUV-r color-mass diagram show clear trends that at a given stellar mass, galaxies with redder NUV-r colors have smaller EW(Hα) and larger D n (4000). The reddest adv-merger (U)LIRGs close to the green valley mostly have D n (4000)> 1.4. In addition, in the SFR-M * diagram, as the SFR decreases, the EW(Hα) decreases and the D n (4000) increases, implying that the adv-merger (U)LIRGs on the star formation main sequence have more evolved stellar populations than those above the main sequence. These results indicate that a fraction of the adv-merger (U)LIRGs have already exhibited signs of fading from the starburst phase and that the NUV-r reddest adv-merger (U)LIRGs are likely at the initial stage of post-starbursts with an age of ∼ 1 Gyr, which is consistent with the gas exhaustion time-scales. Therefore, our results offer additional support for the fast evolutionary track from the blue cloud to the red sequence.

  10. High-Density Superconducting Cables for Advanced ACTPol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pappas, C. G.; Austermann, J.; Beall, J. A.; Duff, S. M.; Gallardo, P. A.; Grace, E.; Henderson, S. W.; Ho, S. P.; Koopman, B. J.; Li, D.; McMahon, J.; Nati, F.; Niemack, M. D.; Niraula, P.; Salatino, M.; Schillaci, A.; Schmitt, B. L.; Simon, S. M.; Staggs, S. T.; Stevens, J. R.; Vavagiakis, E. M.; Ward, J. T.; Wollack, E. J.

    2016-07-01

    Advanced ACTPol (AdvACT) is an upcoming Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT) receiver upgrade, scheduled to deploy in 2016, that will allow measurement of the cosmic microwave background polarization and temperature to the highest precision yet with ACT. The AdvACT increase in sensitivity is partly provided by an increase in the number of transition-edge sensors (TESes) per array by up to a factor of two over the current ACTPol receiver detector arrays. The high-density AdvACT TES arrays require 70 \\upmu m pitch superconducting flexible cables (flex) to connect the detector wafer to the first-stage readout electronics. Here, we present the flex fabrication process and test results. For the flex wiring layer, we use a 400-nm-thick sputtered aluminum film. In the center of the cable, the wiring is supported by a polyimide substrate, which smoothly transitions to a bare (uncoated with polyimide) silicon substrate at the ends of the cable for a robust wedge wire-bonding interface. Tests on the first batch of flex made for the first AdvACT array show that the flex will meet the requirements for AdvACT, with a superconducting critical current above 1 mA at 500 mK, resilience to mechanical and cryogenic stress, and a room temperature yield of 97 %.

  11. Hospitalization Incidence, Mortality, and Seasonality of Common Respiratory Viruses Over a Period of 15 Years in a Developed Subtropical City

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Paul K.S.; Tam, Wilson W.S.; Lee, Tsz Cheung; Hon, Kam Lun; Lee, Nelson; Chan, Martin C.W.; Mok, Hing Yim; Wong, Martin C.S.; Leung, Ting Fan; Lai, Raymond W.M.; Yeung, Apple C.M.; Ho, Wendy C.S.; Nelson, E. Anthony S.; Hui, David S.C.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Information on respiratory viruses in subtropical region is limited. Incidence, mortality, and seasonality of influenza (Flu) A/B, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), adenovirus (ADV), and parainfluenza viruses (PIV) 1/2/3 in hospitalized patients were assessed over a 15-year period (1998–2012) in Hong Kong. Male predominance and laterally transversed J-shaped distribution in age-specific incidence was observed. Incidence of Flu A, RSV, and PIV decreased sharply from infants to toddlers; whereas Flu B and ADV increased slowly. RSV conferred higher fatality than Flu, and was the second killer among hospitalized elderly. ADV and PIV were uncommon, but had the highest fatality. RSV, PIV 2/3 admissions increased over the 15 years, whereas ADV had decreased significantly. A “high season,” mainly contributed by Flu, was observed in late-winter/early-spring (February–March). The “medium season” in spring/summer (April–August) was due to Flu and RSV. The “low season” in late autumn/winter (October–December) was due to PIV and ADV. Seasonality varied between viruses, but predictable distinctive pattern for each virus existed, and temperature was the most important associating meteorological variable. Respiratory viruses exhibit strong sex- and age-predilection, and with predictable seasonality allowing strategic preparedness planning. Hospital-based surveillance is crucial for real-time assessment on severity of new variants. PMID:26579810

  12. [Antiviral therapy for patients with chronic hepatitis B with multi-drug resistance to nucleoside analogues].

    PubMed

    Ozeki, Itaru; Hige, Shuhei; Karino, Yoshiyasu; Kimura, Mutsuumi; Arakawa, Tomohiro; Nakajima, Tomoaki; Kuwata, Yasuaki; Ohmura, Takumi; Sato, Takahiro; Toyota, Joji

    2013-01-01

    In 18 of 547 patients who had received nucleoside analogue preparations for 1 year or more, multi-drug resistance was detected, after a median follow-up of 53 months. No patient showed liver failure related to multi-drug resistance acquisition. Multi-drug resistance was associated with entecavir (ETV) therapy in 7 lamivudine (LAM) -resistant patients, combination therapy with adefovir dipivoxil (ADV) in 8 LAM-resistant patients, LAM switching to ETV in 2 patients, and initial ETV administration in 1. For treatment, combination therapy with LAM and ADV was performed. In non-responders, combination therapy with ADV and ETV was employed. In all LAM- and ADV-resistant patients, and the HBV DNA level decreased to 3.0LC/ml or less. However, a similar decrease was noted in 7 (58.3%) of 12 LAM- and ETV-resistant patients. Of the 18 patients, 1 did not respond to combination therapy with ADV and ETV. Therapy with tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF) was required.

  13. Localization of neutralization epitopes on adenovirus fiber knob from species C.

    PubMed

    Lang, Shuai; Wang, Lizheng; Wang, Zixuan; Zhu, Rui; Yan, Jingyi; Wang, Baoming; Wu, Jiaxin; Zhang, Haihong; Wu, Hui; Zhou, Yan; Kong, Wei; Yu, Bin; Yu, Xianghui

    2016-04-01

    Although potential neutralization epitopes on the fiber knob of adenovirus (AdV) serotype 2 (Ad2) and Ad5 have been revealed, few studies have been carried out to identify neutralization epitopes on the knob from a broader panel of AdV serotypes. In this study, based on sequence and structural analysis of knobs from Ad1, Ad2, Ad5 and Ad6 (all from species C), several trimeric chimeric knob proteins were expressed in Escherichia coli to identify the locations of neutralization epitopes on the knobs by analysing their reactivity with mouse and rabbit polyclonal sera raised against AdVs and human sera with natural AdV infection. The dominant neutralization epitopes were located mainly in the N-terminal part of knobs from Ad1, Ad2 and Ad5, but they seemed to be located in the C-terminal part of the Ad6 knob, with some individual differences in rabbit and human populations. Our study adds to our understanding of humoral immune responses to AdVs and will facilitate the construction of more desirable capsid-modified recombinant Ad5 vectors. PMID:26801881

  14. INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION REPORT: RADIO FREQUENCY HEATING, KAI TECHNOLOGIES, INC.

    EPA Science Inventory

    A demonstration of KAI Technologies in-situ radio frequency heating system for soil treatment was conducted from January 1994 to July 1994 at Kelly Air Force Base in San Antonio, Texas. This demonstration was conducted as a joint effort between the USEPA and the USAF. The technol...

  15. Exploring Pupils' Beliefs about Designers and Designing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trebell, Donna

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to report on an investigation into pupil beliefs about designers and designing conducted as part of a research project focusing on Designerly Activity in Secondary Design and Technology which builds upon a pilot study (Barlex and Trebell in "Int J Technol Design Educ," 2007). Four research questions drove this element…

  16. Measuring Meaningful Outcomes in Consequential Contexts: Searching for a Happy Medium in Educational Technology Research (Phase II)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, Steven M.; Morrison, Jennifer R.

    2014-01-01

    In a paper published 25 years ago, Ross and Morrison ("Educ Technol Res Dev" 37(1):19-33, 1989) called for a "happy medium" in educational technology research, to be achieved by balancing high rigor of studies (internal validity) with relevance to real-world applications (external validity). In this paper, we argue that,…

  17. BIOREMEDIATION OF HAZARDOUS WASTES - RESEARCH, DEVELOPMENT AND FIELD EVALUATIONS - 1995

    EPA Science Inventory

    The proceedings of the 1995 Symposium on Bioremediation of Hazardous Wastes, hosted by the Office of Research and Development (ORD) of the EPA in Rye Brook, New York. he symposium was the eighth annual meeting for the presentation of research conducted by EPA's Biosystems Technol...

  18. THE EFFECT OF AMOUNT OF CRUDE OIL ON EXTENT OF ITS BIODEGRADATION IN OPEN WATER- AND SANDY BEACH- LABORATORY SIMULATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Lepo, J.E., C. R. Cripe, J.L. Kavanaugh, S. Zhang and G.P. Norton. 2003. Effect of Amount of Crude Oil on Extent of Its Biodegradation in Open Water- and Sandy Beach-Laboratory Simulations. Environ. Technol. 24(10):1291-1302. (ERL,GB 1109).

    We examined the biodegradation ...

  19. Navigating Tensions between Conceptual and Metaconceptual Goals in the Use of Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delgado, Cesar

    2015-01-01

    Science education involves learning about phenomena at three levels: concrete (facts and generalizations), conceptual (concepts and theories), and metaconceptual (epistemology) (Snir et al. in "J Sci Educ Technol" 2(2):373-388, 1993). Models are key components in science, can help build conceptual understanding, and may also build…

  20. REMOTE SENSING DEVELOPMENTS, RESEARCH AND ACTIVITIES AT THE ENVIRONMENTAL PHOTOGRAPHIC INTERPRETATION CENTER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Environmental Photographic Interpretation Center (EPIC) has a 30+ year history of providing remote sensing support to EPA Regional and Program Offices. In addition to the its standard Technical Support mission, EPIC has developed a research program related to emerging technol...

  1. Improvement of fuel properties of cottonseed oil methyl esters with commercial additives

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The low temperature operability and oxidative stability of cottonseed (Gossypium hirsutum L.) oil methyl esters (CSME) were improved with addition of commercial additives. Four commercial anti-gel additives: Technol® B100 Biodiesel Cold Flow Improver, Gunk® Premium Diesel Fuel Anti-Gel, Heet® Dies...

  2. THE U.S. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY'S SITE EMERGING TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Under the SITE Emerging Technology Program, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is seeking to foster the further development of technol- ogies that have been successfully tested at bench-scale and are now ready for pilot-scale testing, prior to field- or full-scale demonstra...

  3. Determining Virtual Environment "Fit": The Relationship between Navigation Style in a Virtual Field Trip, Student Self-Reported Desire to Visit the Field Trip Site in the Real World, and the Purposes of Science Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tutwiler, M. Shane; Lin, Ming-Chao; Chang, Chun-Yen

    2013-01-01

    In this study, a follow-up analysis of the data reported in Lin et al. ("Learn Media Technol." doi: 10.1080/17439884.2011.629660 , 2011), we investigated the relationship between student use of a virtual field trip (VFT) system and the probability of students reporting wanting to visit the national park site upon which the VFT was modeled,…

  4. Research in Technology Education: Looking Back to Move Forward … Again

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, P. John

    2016-01-01

    In 2013 I published, in this Journal, a review of journals and conference publications in Technology Education from 2006 to 2010 as one measure of the nature of research that was being conducted in the area (Williams in "Int J Technol Des Educ" 23(1):1-9, 2013). An element of that review was a prediction of trends, from the findings, to…

  5. Development of an Acoustic Droplet Vaporization, Ultrasound Drug Delivery Emulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabiilli, Mario L.; Sebastian, Ian E.; Fowlkes, J. Brian

    2010-03-01

    Many therapeutic applications of ultrasound (US) include the use of pefluorocarbon (PFC) microbubbles or emulsions. These colloidal systems can be activated in the presence of US, which in the case of emulsions, results in the production of bubbles—a process known as acoustic droplet vaporization (ADV). ADV can be used as a drug delivery mechanism, thereby yielding the localized release of toxic agents such a chemotherapeutics. In this work, emulsions that contain PFC and chlorambucil, a chemotherapy drug, are formulated using albumin or lipid shells. For albumin droplets, the oil phase—which contained CHL—clearly enveloped the PFC phase. The albumin emulsion also displayed better retention of CHL in the absence of US, which was evaluated by incubating Chinese hamster ovary cells with the various formulations. Thus, the developed emulsions are suitable for further testing in ADV-induced release of CHL.

  6. Shedding patterns of endemic Eurasian wild boar (Sus scrofa) pathogens.

    PubMed

    González-Barrio, David; Martín-Hernando, María Paz; Ruiz-Fons, Francisco

    2015-10-01

    The Eurasianwild boar has experienced aworldwide demographic explosion that increases awareness on shared pathogens. However, shedding routes of relevant wild boar pathogens are unknown. Previous observations on sex- and age-related differences in Aujeszky's disease virus (ADV) exposure led us to hypothesize that shedding patterns of endemicwild boar pathogens may be influenced by individual traits.We investigated shedding routes of ADV, porcine parvovirus (PPV), porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) and Coxiella burnetii and analysed the effect of host sex and age on pathogen shedding patterns. The presence of pathogen antibodies in serumand of pathogen DNA in oral, nasal, genital and rectal swabswas analysed by ELISA and PCR, respectively. The influence of sex and age in pathogen shedding prevalencewas tested statistically.Main routes of ADV, PPV, PCV2 and C. burnetii shedding were identified but the hypothesis of sex- and/or age-related shedding patterns couldn't be confirmed. PMID:26412545

  7. Hepatic Delivery of Artificial Micro RNAs Using Helper-Dependent Adenoviral Vectors.

    PubMed

    Crowther, Carol; Mowa, Betty; Arbuthnot, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    The potential of RNA interference (RNAi)-based gene therapy has been demonstrated in many studies. However, clinical application of this technology has been hampered by a paucity of efficient and safe methods of delivering the RNAi activators. Prolonged transgene expression and improved safety of helper-dependent adenoviral vectors (HD AdVs) makes them well suited to delivery of engineered artificial intermediates of the RNAi pathway. Also, AdVs' natural hepatotropism makes them potentially useful for liver-targeted gene delivery. HD AdVs may be used for efficient delivery of cassettes encoding short hairpin RNAs and artificial primary microRNAs to the mouse liver. Methods for the characterization of HD AdV-mediated delivery of hepatitis B virus-targeting RNAi activators are described here.

  8. Description of advanced third-stage larvae of Gnathostoma lamothei Bertoni-Ruiz et al. 2005 (Nematoda: Gnathostomatidae) from experimental hosts and contributions to its life cycle.

    PubMed

    Gaspar-Navarro, Jorge; Almeyda-Artigas, Roberto Javier; Sánchez-Miranda, Elizabeth; Carranza-Calderón, Laura; Mosqueda-Cabrera, Miguel Angel

    2013-01-01

    The advanced third-stage larvae (AdvL(3)) of Gnathostoma lamothei was obtained from experimental hosts. Frogs Lithobates heckscheri and snakes Nerodia fasciata pictiventris were compatible hosts allowing optimal larval development. AdvL(3) are 4,487.94 μm long, have two lateral cervical papillae between rows 10 and 16 and an excretory pore at row 23. The average counts of the cephalic bulb hooklets from the four rows are 39.3, 43.3, 44.2, and 47.3. Larvae show an esophagus that represents 40 % of the body width. These findings indicate that amphibians and reptiles could be involved as G. lamothei natural hosts; nevertheless, their role as etiological agents of human gnathostomiasis is uncertain. This paper reports for the first time the taxonomic description of G. lamothei AdvL(3) obtained from experimental hosts and contributes to the understanding of its life cycle.

  9. Detection of Known and Novel Adenoviruses in Cattle Wastes via Broad-Spectrum Primers ▿

    PubMed Central

    Sibley, Samuel D.; Goldberg, Tony L.; Pedersen, Joel A.

    2011-01-01

    The critical assessment of bovine adenoviruses (BAdV) as indicators of environmental fecal contamination requires improved knowledge of their prevalence, shedding dynamics, and genetic diversity. We examined DNA extracted from bovine and other animal waste samples collected in Wisconsin for atadenoviruses and mastadenoviruses using novel, broad-spectrum PCR primer sets. BAdV were detected in 13% of cattle fecal samples, 90% of cattle urine samples, and 100% of cattle manure samples; 44 percent of BAdV-positive samples contained both Atadenovirus and Mastadenovirus DNA. Additionally, BAdV were detected in soil, runoff water from a cattle feedlot, and residential well water. Overall, we detected 8 of 11 prototype BAdV, plus bovine, rabbit, and porcine mastadenoviruses that diverged significantly from previously reported genotypes. The prevalence of BAdV shedding by cattle supports targeting AdV broadly as indicators of the presence of fecal contamination in aqueous environments. Conversely, several factors complicate the use of AdV for fecal source attribution. Animal AdV infecting a given livestock host were not monophyletic, recombination among livestock mastadenoviruses was detected, and the genetic diversity of animal AdV is still underreported. These caveats highlight the need for continuing genetic surveillance for animal AdV and for supporting data when BAdV detection is invoked for fecal source attribution in environmental samples. To our knowledge, this is the first study to report natural BAdV excretion in urine, BAdV detection in groundwater, and recombination in AdV of livestock origin. PMID:21622778

  10. Suppressing tumor growth of nasopharyngeal carcinoma by hTERTC27 polypeptide delivered through adeno-associated virus plus adenovirus vector cocktail

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiong; Li, Xiang-Ping; Peng, Ying; Ng, Samuel S.; Yao, Hong; Wang, Zi-Feng; Wang, Xiao-Mei; Kung, Hsiang-Fu; Lin, Marie C.M.

    2012-01-01

    Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is a metastatic carcinoma that is highly prevalent in Southeast Asia. Our laboratory has previously demonstrated that the C-terminal 27-kDa polypeptide of human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERTC27) inhibits the growth and tumorigenicity of human glioblastoma and melanoma cells. In this study, we investigated the antitumor effect of hTERTC27 in human C666-1 NPC cells xenografted in a nude mouse model. A cocktail of vectors comprising recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) and recombinant adenovirus (rAdv) that each carry hTERTC27 (rAAV-hTERTC27 and rAdv-hTERTC27; the cocktail was abbreviated to rAAV/rAdv-hTERTC27) was more effective than either rAAV-hTERTC27 or rAdv-hTERTC27 alone in inhibiting the growth of C666-1 NPC xenografts. Furthermore, we established three tumors on each mouse and injected rAAV/rAdv-hTERTC27 into one tumor per mouse. Although hTERTC27 expression could only be detected in the injected tumors, reduced tumor growth was observed in the injected tumor as well as the uninjected tumors, demonstrating that the vector cocktail could provoke an antitumor effect on distant, metastasized tumors. Further studies showed the observed antitumor effects included inducing necrosis and apoptosis and reducing microvessel density. Together, our data suggest that the rAAV/rAdv-hTERTC27 cocktail can potently inhibit NPC tumor growth in both local and metastasized tumors and should be further developed as a novel gene therapy strategy for NPC. PMID:23149313

  11. Synergistic tumor suppression by adenovirus-mediated ING4/PTEN double gene therapy for gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, H; Zhou, X; Xu, C; Yang, J; Xiang, J; Tao, M; Xie, Y

    2016-01-01

    Both inhibitor of growth 4 (ING4) and phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) have been shown to be strong candidate tumor suppressors. However, the combined efficacy of ING4 and PTEN for human gastric cancer remains to be determined. In this report, we constructed a multiple promoter expression cassette-based recombinant adenovirus coexpressing ING4 and PTEN (AdVING4/PTEN), assessed the combined effects of AdVING4/PTEN on gastric cancer using wild-type p53 AGS and SNU-1 human gastric cancer cell lines, and elucidated its underlying mechanisms. We found that AdVING4/PTEN-induced synergistic growth inhibition and apoptosis in vitro AGS or SNU-1 tumor cells and in vivo AGS xenografted tumors subcutaneously inoculated in athymic BALB/c nude mice. Mechanistically, AdVING4/PTEN exhibited an enhanced effect on upregulation of p53, Ac-p53 (K382), P21, Bax, PUMA, Noxa, cleaved Caspase-9, cleaved Caspase-3 and cleaved PARP as well as downregulation of Bcl-2 in vitro and in vivo. In addition, AdVING4/PTEN synergistically downregulated tumor vessel CD34 expression and reduced microvessel density, and additively inhibited vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression in vivo. The synergistic tumor suppression elicited by AdVING4/PTEN was closely associated with the synergistic induction of apoptosis possibly via enhancement of endogenous p53 responses through cooperatively facilitating p53's stability and acetylation, and the synergistic inhibition of tumor angiogenesis probably via overlapping reduction of VEGF through cooperatively downregulating hypoxia inducible factor-1α's level and transcription activity. Thus, our results indicate that cancer gene therapy combining ING4 and PTEN may constitute a novel and effective therapeutic modality for human gastric cancer and other cancers.

  12. The Effect of Prophylactic Lamivudine plus Adefovir Therapy Compared with Lamivudine Alone in Preventing Hepatitis B Reactivation in Lymphoma Patients with High Baseline HBV DNA during Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Shaoxu; Geng, Qirong; Huang, Huiqiang; Lin, Tongyu; Jiang, Wenqi; Xia, Zhongjun; Duan, Huaxin; Rao, Huilan; Yao, Mengfei; Hu, Liyang

    2016-01-01

    Prophylactic antiviral therapy is essential for lymphoma patients with high baseline HBV DNA who undergo cytotoxic chemotherapy. However, there are limited data on the optimal options. The present study was designed to compare the efficacy of prophylactic lamivudine (LAM) with lamivudine plus adefovir dipivoxil (LAM+ADV) in preventing hepatitis B virus (HBV) reactivation in lymphoma with, pre-chemotherapy HBV DNA load ≥2000 IU/ml. We retrospectively analyzed the medical records of 86 lymphoma patients with baseline HBV DNA load ≥2000 IU/ml during chemotherapy and received LAM or LAM+ADV as prophylaxis between January 1, 2008 and November 30, 2014 at Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center, China. Sixty-five patients received LAM and 21 received LAM+ADV. The rate was significantly lower in the LAM+ADV group compared with the LAM group for HBV reactivation (23.8% vs 55.4%; p = 0.012), while no difference was observed between the two groups in patients for HBV-related hepatitis (21.3% vs 33.3%; p   =  0.349), and chemotherapy disruption (10.9% vs 19.0%; p = 0.337). In a multivariate analysis of factors associated with HBV reactivation in these patients, LAM+ADV treatment and HBeAg negative were the independent protective factors. Therefore, LAM+ADV should be considered for antiviral prophylaxis in lymphoma patients with pre-chemotherapy HBV DNA load ≥2000 IU/ml. Further study is warranted to confirm these findings. PMID:27711135

  13. In the rat liver, Adenoviral gene transfer efficiency is comparable to AAV.

    PubMed

    Montenegro-Miranda, P S; Pichard, V; Aubert, D; Ten Bloemendaal, L; Duijst, S; de Waart, D R; Ferry, N; Bosma, P J

    2014-02-01

    Adenoviral (AdV) and Adenovirus-associated viral (AAV) vectors both are used for in vivo gene therapy of inherited liver disorders, such as Crigler-Najjar syndrome type 1. In a relevant animal model, the Gunn rat, both vectors efficiently correct the severe hyperbilirubinemia characteristic of this liver disorder. Although the clinical use of AAV is more advanced, as demonstrated by the successful phase 1 trial in hemophilia B patients, because of its large cloning capacity AdV remains an attractive option. A direct comparison of the efficacy of these two vectors in the liver in a relevant disease model has not been reported. Aim of this study was to compare the efficiency of clinically applicable doses of both vectors in the Gunn rat. AdV or scAAV (self-complimentary AAV) ferrying identical liver-specific expression cassettes of the therapeutic gene, UGT1A1, were injected into the tail vein. As the titration methods of these two vectors are very different, a comparison based on vector titers is not valid. Therefore, their efficacy was compared by determining the amount of vector genomes delivered to the liver required for therapeutic correction of serum bilirubin. Like AAV, the liver-specific first-generation AdV also provided sustained correction in this relevant disease model. UGT1A1 mRNA expression provided per genome was comparable for both vectors. Flanking the expression cassette in AdV with AAV-ITRs (inverted terminal repeats), increased UGT1A1 mRNA expression eightfold which resulted in a significant improvement of efficacy. Compared with AAV, less AdV genomes were needed for complete correction of hyperbilirubinemia.

  14. Role of coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR) expression and viral load of adenovirus and enterovirus in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Mirnalini; Mishra, Baijayantimala; Saikia, Uma Nahar; Bahl, Ajay; Ratho, Radha Kanta; Talwar, Kewal Kishan

    2016-01-01

    Enteroviruses (EVs) and adenoviruses (AdVs) are two important etiological agents of viral myocarditis and dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). Both these viruses share a common receptor, the coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR), for their infection. However, the role of viral load and CAR expression in disease severity has not yet been completely elucidated. The present study aimed to determine viral load of EV and AdV in DCM patients and correlate them with the level of CAR expression in these patients. Sixty-three DCM cases and 30 controls, each of whom died of heart disease other than DCM and non-cardiac disease respectively, were included. Viral load was determined by TaqMan real-time PCR using primers and probes specific for the AdV hexon gene and the 5'UTR region of EV. The CAR mRNA level was semi-quantitated by RT-PCR, and antigen expression was studied by immunohistochemistry. A significantly high AdV load (p < 0.05) and CAR expression (p < 0.05) were observed in DCM cases versus controls, whereas the EV load showed no significant difference. The data suggests a clinical threshold of 128 AdV copies/500 ng of DNA for DCM, with 66.7 % sensitivity and 65 % specificity. A positive correlation between AdV load and CAR expression (p < 0.001) was also observed in DCM cases. The high adenoviral load and increased CAR expression in DCM and their association with adverse disease outcome indicates role of both virus and receptor in disease pathogenesis. Thus, the need for targeting both the virus and the receptor for treatment of viral myocarditis and early DCM requires further confirmation with larger studies.

  15. An oral Aujeszky's disease vaccine (YS-400) induces neutralizing antibody in pigs

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Aujeszky's disease (AD) is an economically important disease affecting both wild and domestic pigs of the species Sus scrofa. A previous study yielded serological evidence of AD in Korean wild boars, which could spread AD to other animals. A new Aujeszky's disease virus (ADV) bait vaccine is required to prevent AD outbreaks in swine. In the present study, we investigated the safety and immunogenicity of a gE-deleted marker vaccine, strain YS-400, in young domestic pigs. Materials and Methods The YS-400 strain was propagated in Vero cells, and the trial ADV bait vaccine (a vaccine blister in a matrix including an attractant) was prepared. Pigs were orally immunized with the vaccine (2 mL, 107.5 TCID50/mL) delivered using a syringe or in the bait vaccine. The animals were observed for 9 weeks after vaccination, and immunogenicity was assessed using a virus neutralization (VN) test and enzyme linked immunosorbent assay. Results The YS-400 strain was non-pathogenic to pigs when given orally and induced high VN titers (1:32-1:128) 6 weeks post-administration. Of the pigs given the ADV bait vaccine twice or three times, 40% were seropositive by 2 weeks, and 100% were seropositive by 7 weeks after the first dose. Pigs that consumed the AD bait vaccine three times developed VN titers that were slightly higher than those of pigs given the vaccine twice. Conclusion Domestic pigs given the trial ADV bait vaccine exhibited no adverse effects and developed high VN titers against ADV, indicating that the YS-400 strain is safe and can prevent ADV infection in domestic pigs. PMID:27489803

  16. Detection of known and novel adenoviruses in cattle wastes via broad-spectrum primers.

    PubMed

    Sibley, Samuel D; Goldberg, Tony L; Pedersen, Joel A

    2011-07-01

    The critical assessment of bovine adenoviruses (BAdV) as indicators of environmental fecal contamination requires improved knowledge of their prevalence, shedding dynamics, and genetic diversity. We examined DNA extracted from bovine and other animal waste samples collected in Wisconsin for atadenoviruses and mastadenoviruses using novel, broad-spectrum PCR primer sets. BAdV were detected in 13% of cattle fecal samples, 90% of cattle urine samples, and 100% of cattle manure samples; 44 percent of BAdV-positive samples contained both Atadenovirus and Mastadenovirus DNA. Additionally, BAdV were detected in soil, runoff water from a cattle feedlot, and residential well water. Overall, we detected 8 of 11 prototype BAdV, plus bovine, rabbit, and porcine mastadenoviruses that diverged significantly from previously reported genotypes. The prevalence of BAdV shedding by cattle supports targeting AdV broadly as indicators of the presence of fecal contamination in aqueous environments. Conversely, several factors complicate the use of AdV for fecal source attribution. Animal AdV infecting a given livestock host were not monophyletic, recombination among livestock mastadenoviruses was detected, and the genetic diversity of animal AdV is still underreported. These caveats highlight the need for continuing genetic surveillance for animal AdV and for supporting data when BAdV detection is invoked for fecal source attribution in environmental samples. To our knowledge, this is the first study to report natural BAdV excretion in urine, BAdV detection in groundwater, and recombination in AdV of livestock origin.

  17. Investigation of the pathogenesis of transplacental transmission of Aleutian mink disease parvovirus in experimentally infected mink.

    PubMed Central

    Broll, S; Alexandersen, S

    1996-01-01

    The transplacental transmission of Aleutian mink disease parvovirus (ADV) was studied in experimental infection of 1-year-old female non-Aleutian mink. The ADV-seronegative female mink were inoculated with ADV prior to mating or after the expected implantation of the embryos during pregnancy. A group of uninfected females served as a control group. Animals from each group were killed prior to or shortly after parturition. The in situ hybridization technique with radiolabeled strand-specific RNA probes was used to determine target cells of virus infection and virus replication. In both infected groups, ADV crossed the endotheliochorial placental barrier, although animals infected before mating already had high antibody titers against ADV at the time of implantation. The percentage of dead and resorbed fetuses was much higher in dams infected before mating. In the placentae of these mink, virus DNA and viral mRNA were detected in cells in the mesenchymal stroma of the placental labyrinth and hematoma but only occasionally in the cytotrophoblast of the placental hematoma. Placentae of animals infected during pregnancy showed in addition very high levels of virus and also viral replication in a large number of cytotrophoblast cells in the placental hematoma, which exhibited distinct inclusion bodies. In both groups, neither virus nor virus replication could be detected in maternal endothelial cells or fetal syncytiotrophoblast of the placental labyrinth. Fetuses were positive for virus and viral replication at high levels in a wide range of tissues. Possible routes of transplacental transmission of ADV and the role of trophoblast cells as targets for viral replication are discussed. PMID:8627663

  18. Random sampling of the Central European bat fauna reveals the existence of numerous hitherto unknown adenoviruses.

    PubMed

    Vidovszky, Márton; Kohl, Claudia; Boldogh, Sándor; Görföl, Tamás; Wibbelt, Gudrun; Kurth, Andreas; Harrach, Balázs

    2015-12-01

    From over 1250 extant species of the order Chiroptera, 25 and 28 are known to occur in Germany and Hungary, respectively. Close to 350 samples originating from 28 bat species (17 from Germany, 27 from Hungary) were screened for the presence of adenoviruses (AdVs) using a nested PCR that targets the DNA polymerase gene of AdVs. An additional PCR was designed and applied to amplify a fragment from the gene encoding the IVa2 protein of mastadenoviruses. All German samples originated from organs of bats found moribund or dead. The Hungarian samples were excrements collected from colonies of known bat species, throat or rectal swab samples, taken from live individuals that had been captured for faunistic surveys and migration studies, as well as internal organs of dead specimens. Overall, 51 samples (14.73%) were found positive. We detected 28 seemingly novel and six previously described bat AdVs by sequencing the PCR products. The positivity rate was the highest among the guano samples of bat colonies. In phylogeny reconstructions, the AdVs detected in bats clustered roughly, but not perfectly, according to the hosts' families (Vespertilionidae, Rhinolophidae, Hipposideridae, Phyllostomidae and Pteropodidae). In a few cases, identical sequences were derived from animals of closely related species. On the other hand, some bat species proved to harbour more than one type of AdV. The high prevalence of infection and the large number of chiropteran species worldwide make us hypothesise that hundreds of different yet unknown AdV types might circulate in bats. PMID:26599097

  19. Effects of an advanced temperature cycle on smolt development and endocrinology indicate that temperature is not a zeitgeber for smolting in Atlantic salmon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCormick, S.D.; Shrimpton, J.M.; Moriyama, S.; Bjornsson, Bjorn Thrandur

    2002-01-01

    Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) juveniles were reared under simulated conditions of normal photoperiod (LDN) or short days (LD 9:15) and ambient temperature (AMB: normal temperature increases in April) or an advanced temperature cycle (ADV: temperature increases in February). Under both photoperiod conditions, the timing of increased and peak levels of gill Na+,K+-ATPase activity were not altered by temperature, although the rate of increase was initially greater under ADV. ADV/LD 9:15 resulted in peak gill Na+,K+-ATPase activity that was half of that seen under normal photoperiod and temperature conditions. Plasma growth hormone (GH) levels increased threefold in late March under ADV/LDN, but not under ADV/LD 9:15, indicating that there is a photoperiod-dependent effect of temperature on levels of this hormone. Plasma insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) increased in spring in all groups, with increases occurring significantly earlier in the ADV/LDN group. In each photoperiod condition, the advanced temperature cycle resulted in large decreases in plasma thyroxine (T4) levels in March, which subsequently recovered, whereas plasma 3,5,3???-triiodo-L-thyronine (T3) levels were not substantially affected by either photoperiod or temperature. There was no consistent pattern of change in plasma cortisol levels. The results do not provide support for the role of temperature as a zeitgeber, but do indicate that temperature has a role in the timing of smolting by affecting the rate of development and interacting with the photoperiod.

  20. The Role of Major Gas-rich Mergers on the Evolution of Galaxies from the Blue Cloud to the Red Sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Rui; Hao, Cai-Na; Xia, X. Y.; Mao, Shude; Shi, Yong

    2016-07-01

    With the aim of exploring the fast evolutionary path from the blue cloud of star-forming galaxies to the red sequence of quiescent galaxies in the local universe, we select a local advanced merging infrared luminous and ultraluminous galaxy (adv-merger (U)LIRGs) sample and perform careful dust extinction corrections to investigate their positions in the star formation rate-M *, u - r, and NUV - r color-mass diagrams. The sample consists of 89 (U)LIRGs at the late merger stage, obtained from cross-correlating the Infrared Astronomical Satellite Point Source Catalog Redshift Survey and 1 Jy ULIRGs samples with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey DR7 database. Our results show that 74 % +/- 5 % of adv-merger (U)LIRGs are localized above the 1σ line of the local star-forming galaxy main sequence. We also find that all adv-merger (U)LIRGs are more massive than and as blue as the blue cloud galaxies after corrections for Galactic and internal dust extinctions, with 95 % +/- 2 % and 81 % +/- 4 % of them outside the blue cloud on the u - r and NUV - r color-mass diagrams, respectively. These results, combined with the short timescale for exhausting the molecular gas reservoir in adv-merger (U)LIRGs (3× {10}7 to 3× {10}8 years), imply that the adv-merger (U)LIRGs are likely at the starting point of the fast evolutionary track previously proposed by several groups. While the number density of adv-merger (U)LIRGs is only ˜ 0.1 % of the blue cloud star-forming galaxies in the local universe, this evolutionary track may play a more important role at high redshift.

  1. Assessing Photocatalytic Oxidation Using Modified TiO 2 Nanomaterials for Virus Inactivation in Drinking Water: Mechanisms and Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liga, Michael Vincent

    Photocatalytic oxidation is an alternative water treatment method under consideration for disinfecting water. Chlorine disinfection can form harmful byproducts, and some viruses (e.g. adenoviruses) are resistant to other alternative disinfection methods. Photocatalytic oxidation using nano-sized photocatalytic particles (e.g. TiO2, fullerene) holds promise; however, it is limited by its low efficiency and long required treatment times. This research focuses on improving virus inactivation by photocatalytic oxidation by modifying catalysts for improved activity, by analyzing virus inactivation kinetics, and by elucidating the inactivation mechanisms of adenovirus serotype 2 (AdV2) and bacteriophage MS2. Modifying TiO2 with silver (nAg/TiO2) or silica (SiO2-TiO2) improves the inactivation kinetics of bacteriophage MS2 by a factor of 3-10. nAg/ TiO2 increases hydroxyl radical (HO·) production while SiO2 increases the adsorption of MS2 to TiO 2. These results suggest that modifying the photocatalyst surface to increase contaminant adsorption is an important improvement strategy along with increasing HO· production. The inactivation kinetics of AdV2 by P25 TiO2 is much slower than the MS2 inactivation kinetics and displays a strong shoulder, which is not present in the MS2 kinetics. nAg/TiO2 initially improves the inactivation rate of AdV2. SiO2-TiO2 reduces the AdV2 inactivation kinetics since adsorption is not significantly enhanced, as it is with MS2. Amino-C60 is highly effective for AdV2 inactivation under visible light irradiation, making it a good material for use in solar disinfection systems. The efficacy of amino-fullerene also demonstrates that singlet oxygen is effective for AdV2 inactivation. When exposed to irradiated TiO2, AdV2 hexon proteins are heavily damaged resulting in the release of DNA. DNA damage is also present but may occur after capsids break. With MS2, the host interaction protein is rapidly damaged, but not the coat protein. The kinetics

  2. Wideband acoustic activation and detection of droplet vaporization events using a capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducer.

    PubMed

    Novell, Anthony; Arena, Christopher B; Oralkan, Omer; Dayton, Paul A

    2016-06-01

    An ongoing challenge exists in understanding and optimizing the acoustic droplet vaporization (ADV) process to enhance contrast agent effectiveness for biomedical applications. Acoustic signatures from vaporization events can be identified and differentiated from microbubble or tissue signals based on their frequency content. The present study exploited the wide bandwidth of a 128-element capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducer (CMUT) array for activation (8 MHz) and real-time imaging (1 MHz) of ADV events from droplets circulating in a tube. Compared to a commercial piezoelectric probe, the CMUT array provides a substantial increase of the contrast-to-noise ratio. PMID:27369143

  3. [Investigation of adenovirus isolation frequency from the stool samples of patients suspected with acute flaccid paralysis].

    PubMed

    Bayrakdar, Fatma; Coşgun, Yasemin; Salman Atak, Tunca; Karademir, Hülya; Korukluoğlu, Gülay

    2016-04-01

    Although adenoviruses (AdVs) generally cause upper respiratory tract infections, conjunctivitis/epidemic keratoconjunctivitis, gastroenteritis and pneumonia, they can lead to the involvement of central nervous system. Acute flaccid paralysis (AFP) is a type of seizure, characterized by rapid and sudden onset of extreme weakness in hands and feet, including (less frequently) weakness of respiratory and swallowing, representing with decreased muscle tone, especially in children below 15-year-old. The major viral cause of AFP is polioviruses, however non-polio enteroviruses, mumps virus, rabies virus and flaviviruses can also be responsible for AFP. The data of some recent studies have pointed out the probable aetiological role of AdVs in AFP. The aim of this study was to investigate the frequency of AdVs from stool samples of AFP-suspected patients and their contacts. A total of 6130 stool samples from patients (age range: 0-15 years) prediagnosed as AFP (n= 3185) and their contacts (n= 2945), which were sent to our laboratory from the health care centers located at different regions of Turkey for the monitorization of poliomyelitis as part of national AFP surveillance programme, between 2000-2014, have been retrospectively evaluated in terms of adenovirus isolation frequency. Samples were analyzed according to the algorithm recommended by World Health Organization and inoculated in Hep-2, RD, and L20B cell lines for cultivation. Apart from enteroviruses, in case of the presence of characteristic cytopathic effects for AdVs observed in L20B cells were confirmed by a commercial Adeno agglutination kit (Diarlex Adeno; Orion Diagnostica, Finland). It was noted that AdVs have been isolated from 1.6% (97/6130) of the samples, and out of positive samples 76.3% (74/97) were from AFP-suspected cases, while 23.7% (23/97) were from their contacts. Accordingly the frequencies of AdVs from AFP-suspected cases and their contacts were found as 2.3% (74/3185) and 0.8% (23

  4. High-level recombinant protein production in CHO cells using an adenoviral vector and the cumate gene-switch.

    PubMed

    Gaillet, Bruno; Gilbert, Rénald; Amziani, Rachid; Guilbault, Claire; Gadoury, Christine; Caron, Antoine W; Mullick, Alaka; Garnier, Alain; Massie, Bernard

    2007-01-01

    To facilitate and accelerate the production of eukaryotic proteins with correct post-translational modifications, we have developed a protein production system based on the transduction of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells using adenovirus vectors (AdVs). We have engineered a CHO cell line (CHO-cTA) that stably expresses the transactivator (cTA) of our newly developed cumate gene-switch transcription system. This cell line is adapted to suspension culture and can grow in serum-free and protein-free medium. To increase the transduction level of AdVs, we have also generated a cell line (CHO-cTA-CAR) that expresses additional amounts of the coxackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR) on its surface. Recombinant protein production was tested using an AdV carrying the secreted alkaline phosphatase (SEAP) under the control of the CR5 promoter, which is strongly and specifically activated by binding to cTA. The SEAP expression was linked to the expression of the green fluorescent protein (GFP) through an internal ribosome entry site (IRES) to facilitate titration of the AdV. We monitored SEAP expression on a daily basis for 9 days after transduction of CHO-cTA and CHO-cTA-CAR using different quantities of AdVs at 37 and 30 degrees C. Incubation at the latter temperature increased the production of SEAP at least 10-fold, and the presence of CAR increased the transduction level of the AdV. Maximum SEAP production (63 mg/L) was achieved at 6-7 days post-infection at 30 degrees C by transducing CHO-cTA-CAR with 500 infectious particles/cell. Because numerous AdVs can now be generated within a few weeks and large-scale production of AdVs is now a routine procedure, this system could be used to produce rapidly milligram quantities of a battery of recombinant proteins as well as for large-scale protein production.

  5. Improvement of the free-surface tension model in shallow water basin by using in-situ bottom-friction measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alekseenko, Elena; Kuznetsov, Konstantin; Roux, Bernard

    2016-04-01

    . Lazure P. and Dumas F.: An external-internal mode coupling for a 3D hydrodynamical model for applications at regional scale (MARS). Adv. Wat. Res. 31: 233-250, 2008. 6. Paquier A-E.: - Interactions de la dynamique hydro-sédimentaire avec les herbiers de phanérogames, Étang de Berre ; PhD thesis Aix-Marseille University; 27 Nov. 2014. 7. Taylor P. and Yelland M.: The Dependence of Sea Surface Roughness on the Height and Steepness of the Waves, Physical Oceanography, 2000. 8. Young I.R., Banner M.L., Donelan M.A., Babanin A.V., Melville W.K., Veron F., and McCormic C.: An Integrated Study of the Wind Wave Source Term Balance in Finite Depth Water, J. Atmos. Oceanic Technol. 22: 814-831, 2004. 9. Zhang H, Sannasiraj S.A., and Chan E.S.: Wind Wave Effects on Hydrodynamic Modeling of Ocean Circulation in the South China Sea, The Open Civil Engineering Journal, 3, 48-61, 2009.

  6. Sensitivity Analysis of OECD Benchmark Tests in BISON

    SciTech Connect

    Swiler, Laura Painton; Gamble, Kyle; Schmidt, Rodney C.; Williamson, Richard

    2015-09-01

    This report summarizes a NEAMS (Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation) project focused on sensitivity analysis of a fuels performance benchmark problem. The benchmark problem was defined by the Uncertainty Analysis in Modeling working group of the Nuclear Science Committee, part of the Nuclear Energy Agency of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD ). The benchmark problem involv ed steady - state behavior of a fuel pin in a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR). The problem was created in the BISON Fuels Performance code. Dakota was used to generate and analyze 300 samples of 17 input parameters defining core boundary conditions, manuf acturing tolerances , and fuel properties. There were 24 responses of interest, including fuel centerline temperatures at a variety of locations and burnup levels, fission gas released, axial elongation of the fuel pin, etc. Pearson and Spearman correlatio n coefficients and Sobol' variance - based indices were used to perform the sensitivity analysis. This report summarizes the process and presents results from this study.

  7. Intelligent micro blood typing system using a fuzzy algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Taeyun; Lee, Seung-Jae; Kim, Yonggoo; Lee, Gyoo-Whung; Cho, Dong-Woo

    2010-01-01

    ABO typing is the first analysis performed on blood when it is tested for transfusion purposes. The automated machines used in hospitals for this purpose are typically very large and the process is complicated. In this paper, we present a new micro blood typing system that is an improved version of our previous system (Kang et al 2004 Trans. ASME, J. Manuf. Sci. Eng. 126 766, Lee et al 2005 Sensors Mater. 17 113). This system, fabricated using microstereolithography, has a passive valve for controlling the flow of blood and antibodies. The intelligent micro blood typing system has two parts: a single-line micro blood typing device and a fuzzy expert system for grading the strength of agglutination. The passive valve in the single-line micro blood typing device makes the blood stop at the entrance of a micro mixer and lets it flow again after the blood encounters antibodies. Blood and antibodies are mixed in the micro mixer and agglutination occurs in the chamber. The fuzzy expert system then determines the degree of agglutination from images of the agglutinated blood. Blood typing experiments using this device were successful, and the fuzzy expert system produces a grading decision comparable to that produced by an expert conducting a manual analysis.

  8. Random Sampling of Squamate Reptiles in Spanish Natural Reserves Reveals the Presence of Novel Adenoviruses in Lacertids (Family Lacertidae) and Worm Lizards (Amphisbaenia).

    PubMed

    Szirovicza, Leonóra; López, Pilar; Kopena, Renáta; Benkő, Mária; Martín, José; Pénzes, Judit J

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the results of a large-scale PCR survey on the prevalence and diversity of adenoviruses (AdVs) in samples collected randomly from free-living reptiles. On the territories of the Guadarrama Mountains National Park in Central Spain and of the Chafarinas Islands in North Africa, cloacal swabs were taken from 318 specimens of eight native species representing five squamate reptilian families. The healthy-looking animals had been captured temporarily for physiological and ethological examinations, after which they were released. We found 22 AdV-positive samples in representatives of three species, all from Central Spain. Sequence analysis of the PCR products revealed the existence of three hitherto unknown AdVs in 11 Carpetane rock lizards (Iberolacerta cyreni), nine Iberian worm lizards (Blanus cinereus), and two Iberian green lizards (Lacerta schreiberi), respectively. Phylogeny inference showed every novel putative virus to be a member of the genus Atadenovirus. This is the very first description of the occurrence of AdVs in amphisbaenian and lacertid hosts. Unlike all squamate atadenoviruses examined previously, two of the novel putative AdVs had A+T rich DNA, a feature generally deemed to mirror previous host switch events. Our results shed new light on the diversity and evolution of atadenoviruses. PMID:27399970

  9. Polyfluoroalkyl Chemicals in the Serum and Milk of Breastfeeding Women.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Polyfluoroalkyl chemicals (PFCs) comprise a group of man-made organic compounds, some of which are persistent contaminants with developmental toxicity shown in laboratory animals. There is a paucity of human perinatal exposure data. The US EPA conducted a pilot study (Methods Adv...

  10. The efficiency of concentration methods used to detect enteric viruses in anaerobically digested sludge

    PubMed Central

    Prado, Tatiana; Guilayn, Wilma de Carvalho Pereira Bonet; Gaspar, Ana Maria Coimbra; Miagostovich, Marize Pereira

    2013-01-01

    The presence of enteric viruses in biosolids can be underestimated due to the inefficient methods (mainly molecular methods) used to recover the viruses from these matrices. Therefore, the goal of this study was to evaluate the different methods used to recover adenoviruses (AdV), rotavirus species A (RVA), norovirus genogroup II (NoV GII) and the hepatitis A virus (HAV) from biosolid samples at a large urban wastewater treatment plant in Brazil after they had been treated by mesophilic anaerobic digestion. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used for spiking experiments to compare the detection limits of feasible methods, such as beef extract elution and ultracentrifugation. Tests were performed to detect the inhibition levels and the bacteriophage PP7 was used as an internal control. The results showed that the inhibitors affected the efficiency of the PCR reaction and that beef extract elution is a suitable method for detecting enteric viruses, mainly AdV from biosolid samples. All of the viral groups were detected in the biosolid samples: AdV (90%), RVA, NoV GII (45%) and HAV (18%), indicating the viruses' resistance to the anaerobic treatment process. This is the first study in Brazil to detect the presence of RVA, AdV, NoV GII and HAV in anaerobically digested sludge, highlighting the importance of adequate waste management. PMID:23440119

  11. Corrigendum.

    PubMed

    2016-06-01

    Maltais, F., Singh, S., Donald, A., Crater, G., Church, A., Goh, A. et al. (2014) Effects of a combination of umeclidinium/vilanterol on exercise endurance in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: two randomized, double-blind clinical trials. Ther Adv Respir Dis 8: 169-181. PMID:27255756

  12. Enhancing Active Learning in the Student Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Modell, Harold I.; Michael, Joel A.; Adamson, Tom; Horwitz, Barbara

    2004-01-01

    We previously examined how three approaches to directing students in a laboratory setting impacted their ability to repair a faulty mental model in respiratory physiology (Modell, HI, Michael JA, Adamson T, Goldberg J, Horwitz BA, Bruce DS, Hudson ML, Whitescarver SA, and Williams S. Adv Physiol Educ 23: 82?90, 2000). This study addresses issues…

  13. Persistence versus reversion of 3TC resistance in HIV-1 determine the rate of emergence of NVP resistance.

    PubMed

    Rath, Barbara A; Olshen, Richard A; Halpern, Jerry; Merigan, Thomas C

    2012-08-01

    When HIV-1 is exposed to lamivudine (3TC) at inhibitory concentrations, resistant variants carrying the reverse transcriptase (RT) substitution M184V emerge rapidly. This substitution confers high-level 3TC resistance and increased RT fidelity. We established a novel in vitro system to study the effect of starting nevirapine (NVP) in 3TC-resistant/NNRTI-naïve clinical isolates, and the impact of maintaining versus dropping 3TC pressure in this setting. Because M184V mutant HIV-1 seems hypersusceptible to adefovir (ADV), we also tested the effect of ADV pressure on the same isolates. We draw four conclusions from our experiments simulating combination therapy in vitro. (1) The presence of low-dose (1 μM) 3TC prevented reversal to wild-type from an M184V mutant background. (2) Adding low-dose 3TC in the presence of NVP delayed the selection of NVP-associated mutations. (3) The presence of ADV, in addition to NVP, led to more rapid reversal to wild-type at position 184 than NVP alone. (4) ADV plus NVP selected for greater numbers of mutations than NVP alone. Inference about the "selection of mutation" is based on two statistical models, one at the viral level, more telling, and the other at the level of predominance of mutation within a population. Multidrug pressure experiments lend understanding to mechanisms of HIV resistance as they bear upon new treatment strategies.

  14. A Recombinant Adenovirus Expressing P12A and 3C Protein of the Type O Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus Stimulates Systemic and Mucosal Immune Responses in Mice.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yinli; Gao, Peng; Li, Zhiyong

    2016-01-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is a highly contagious livestock disease of cloven-hoofed animals which causes severe economic losses. The replication-deficient, human adenovirus-vectored FMD vaccine has been proven effective against FMD. However, the role of T-cell-mediated antiviral responses and the mucosae-mediated antiviral responses induced by the adenovirus-vectored FMD vaccine was rarely examined. Here, the capsid protein precursor P1-2A and viral protease 3C of the type O FMDV were expressed in replicative-deficient human adenovirus type 5 vector. BALB/c mice immunized intramuscularly and intraperitoneally with recombinant adenovirus rAdv-P12A3C elicited higher FMDV-specific IgG antibodies, IFN-γ, and IL-4 cytokines than those in mice immunized with inactivated FMDV vaccine. Moreover, BALB/c mice immunized with recombinant adenovirus rAdv-P12A3C by oral and intraocular-nasal immunization induced high FMDV-specific IgA antibodies. These results show that the recombinant adenovirus rAdv-P12A3C could resist FMDV comprehensively. This study highlights the potential of rAdv-P12A3C to serve as a type O FMDV vaccine. PMID:27478836

  15. A SHORT TERM REPRODUCTIVE ASSAY WITH THE FATHEAD MINNOW (PIMEPHALES PROMELAS). 1. METHOD DESCRIPTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Due to the time and expense associated with full life-cycle testing, most current toxicology tests with fish do not explicity consider reproductive output as an endpoint but, rather, focus on early life-stage survival and development. However, some classes of chemicals could adve...

  16. Inhibition of hepatocellular carcinoma growth by adenovirus-mediated expression of human telomerase reverse transcriptase COOH-27 terminal polypeptide in mice

    PubMed Central

    HE, LEI; GONG, HAN-XIAN; LI, XIANG-PEN; WANG, YI-DONG; LI, YI; HUANG, JUN-JIAN; XIE, DAN; KUNG, HSIANG-FU; PENG, YING

    2013-01-01

    A 27-kDa C-terminal fragment of human telomerase reverse transcriptase, hTERTC27, has previously been reported to inhibit the growth and tumorigenicity of HeLa human cervical cancer cells and U87-MG human glioblastoma multiforme cells. However, the antitumor effects of hTERTC27 in hepatoma and its underlying mechanisms are unclear. In the current study, the therapeutic effect of hTERTC27, mediated by recombinant adenovirus, in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) was explored in vitro and in vivo to investigate the possible mechanisms. The results indicated that recombinant adenovirus carrying hTERTC27 (rAdv-hTERTC27) effectively inhibited the growth and induced apoptosis of the Hepa 1–6 HCC cells. Dendritic cells transduced with rAdv-hTERTC27 were highly effective at inducing antigen-specific T cell proliferation and increasing the activated cytotoxicity of T cells against Hepa 1–6 cells. HCC was inhibited significantly when a single dose of 5×107 pfu rAdv-hTERTC27 was administered intravenously. In summary, the results of this study demonstrated that rAdv-hTERTC27 may serve as a reagent for intravenous administration when combined with telomerase-based gene therapy and immunotherapy for cancer. PMID:24137404

  17. In vitro cytotoxic, antiviral and immunomodulatory effects of Plantago major and Plantago asiatica.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Lien-Chai; Chiang, Wen; Chang, Mei-Yin; Lin, Chun-Ching

    2003-01-01

    Plantago major linn. and P. asiatica Linn. (Plantaginaceae) are commonly used as folk medicine in Taiwan for treating infectious diseases related to the respiratory, urinary and digestive tracts. In this study, we investigated the antiviral, cytotoxic and immunomodulatory activities of hot water extracts of these two species in vitro on a series of viruses, namely herpesviruses (HSV-1 and HSV-2), adenoviruses (ADV-3, ADV-8 and ADV-11), and on various human leukemia, lymphoma and carcinoma cells with XTT, BrdU and IFN-gamma kits. Results showed that hot water extract of P. asiatica possessed significant inhibitory activity on the proliferation of lymphoma (U937) and carcinoma (bladder, bone, cervix, kidney, lung and stomach) cells and on viral infection (HSV-2 and ADV-11). P. major and P. asiatica both exhibited dual effects of immunodulatory activity, enhancing lymphocyte proliferation and secretion of interferon-gamma at low concentrations (< 50 microg/ml), but inhibiting this effect at high concentration (> 50 microg/ml). The present study concludes that hot water extracts of P. major and P. asiatica possess abroad-spectrum of antileukemia, anticarcinoma and antiviral activities, as well as activities which modulate cell-mediated immunity. Further investigations to elucidate the active component(s) of P. asiatica and P. major and to evaluate their clinical application are warranted.

  18. Efficacy and safety of myocardial gene transfer of adenovirus, adeno-associated virus and lentivirus vectors in the mouse heart.

    PubMed

    Merentie, M; Lottonen-Raikaslehto, L; Parviainen, V; Huusko, J; Pikkarainen, S; Mendel, M; Laham-Karam, N; Kärjä, V; Rissanen, R; Hedman, M; Ylä-Herttuala, S

    2016-03-01

    Gene therapy is a promising new treatment option for cardiac diseases. For finding the most suitable and safe vector for cardiac gene transfer, we delivered adenovirus (AdV), adeno-associated virus (AAV) and lentivirus (LeV) vectors into the mouse heart with sophisticated closed-chest echocardiography-guided intramyocardial injection method for comparing them with regards to transduction efficiency, myocardial damage, effects on the left ventricular function and electrocardiography (ECG). AdV had the highest transduction efficiency in cardiomyocytes followed by AAV2 and AAV9, and the lowest efficiency was seen with LeV. The local myocardial inflammation and fibrosis in the left ventricle (LV) was proportional to transduction efficiency. AdV caused LV dilatation and systolic dysfunction. Neither of the locally injected AAV serotypes impaired the LV systolic function, but AAV9 caused diastolic dysfunction to some extent. LeV did not affect the cardiac function. We also studied systemic delivery of AAV9, which led to transduction of cardiomyocytes throughout the myocardium. However, also diffuse fibrosis was present leading to significantly impaired LV systolic and diastolic function and pathological ECG changes. Compared with widely used AdV vector, AAV2, AAV9 and LeV were less effective in transducing cardiomyocytes but also less harmful. Local administration of AAV9 was safer and more efficient compared with systemic administration.

  19. 78 FR 75396 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; NYSE Arca, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-11

    ... ETP Holder must, among other things, provide liquidity an average daily volume (``ADV'') of 0.70% or... or a multiple thereof. \\5\\ See Securities Exchange Act Release No. 70794 (October 31, 2013), 78 FR...), 78 FR 66788 (November 6, 2013) (File No. S7-24-89) (Order Approving Amendment No. 30 to the...

  20. MODELS-3 COMMUNITY MULTISCALE AIR QUALITY (CMAQ) MODEL AEROSOL COMPONENT 2. MODEL EVALUATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ambient air concentrations of particulate matter (atmospheric suspensions of solid of liquid materials, i.e., aerosols) continue to be a major concern for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). High particulate matter (PM) concentrations are associated not only with adv...

  1. DEVELOPING AZO AND FORMAZAN DYES BASED ON ENVIRONMENTAL CONSIDERATIONS: SALMONELLA MUTAGENICITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract
    In previous papers, the synthesis and chemical properties of iron-complexed azo and formazan dyes were reported. In this regard, it was shown that in certain cases iron could be substituted for the traditionally used metals, chromium and cobalt, without having an adve...

  2. 77 FR 76542 - Millstone Power Station, Unit 2; Exemption

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-28

    ... minute time requirement and that after AFW flow is established, the atmospheric dump valves (ADVs) are... plant in Cold Shutdown. 3.1.4.2 Charging System Flow 3.1.4.2.1 OMAs 2 and 6--Open Valve 2-CH-429 to Establish Charging Pump Flow Path and Open Breaker to Fail Valve 2-CH-517 Closed The licensee stated...

  3. 78 FR 62907 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Y-Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-22

    ... calculation of ADV and average daily TCV. \\8\\ Securities Exchange Act Release No. 69794 (June 18, 2013), 78 FR... COMMISSION Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Y-Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of Proposed Rule Change Related to Fees for Use of BATS Y-Exchange, Inc. October 11, 2013....

  4. 78 FR 25101 - Proposal Review Panel for Physics, Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-29

    ... Proposal Review Panel for Physics, Notice of Meeting In accordance with the Federal Advisory Committee Act...: AdvLIGO Construction Review Site Visit at Livingston Observatory for Physics, 1208 Date and Time.... Contact Person: Mark Coles, Director of Large Facilities, Division of Physics, National Science...

  5. Corrigendum.

    PubMed

    2015-07-01

    Stinchcombe, T. (2014) Novel agents in development for advanced non-small cell lung cancer. Ther Adv Med Oncol 6(5): 240-253. In the sentence on page 246, the subset analysis of patients with adenocarcinoma histology comprised 658 patients and not 568, as stated.[This corrects the article DOI: 10.1177/1758834014532510.]. PMID:26136855

  6. Operator identities involving the bivariate Rogers-Szegö polynomials and their applications to the multiple q-series identities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhizheng; Wang, Tianze

    2008-07-01

    In this paper, we first give several operator identities involving the bivariate Rogers-Szegö polynomials. By applying the technique of parameter augmentation to the multiple q-binomial theorems given by Milne [S.C. Milne, Balanced summation theorems for U(n) basic hypergeometric series, AdvE Math. 131 (1997) 93-187], we obtain several new multiple q-series identities involving the bivariate Rogers-Szegö polynomials. These include multiple extensions of Mehler's formula and Rogers's formula. Our U(n+1) generalizations are quite natural as they are also a direct and immediate consequence of their (often classical) known one-variable cases and Milne's fundamental theorem for An or U(n+1) basic hypergeometric series in Theorem 1E49 of [S.C. Milne, An elementary proof of the Macdonald identities for , Adv. Math. 57 (1985) 34-70], as rewritten in Lemma 7.3 on p. 163 of [S.C. Milne, Balanced summation theorems for U(n) basic hypergeometric series, Adv. Math. 131 (1997) 93-187] or Corollary 4.4 on pp. 768-769 of [S.C. Milne, M. Schlosser, A new An extension of Ramanujan's summation with applications to multilateral An series, Rocky Mountain J. Math. 32 (2002) 759-792].

  7. Providing Assistance to the Victims of Adolescent Dating Violence: A National Assessment of School Nurses' Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khubchandani, Jagdish; Telljohann, Susan K.; Price, James H.; Dake, Joseph A.; Hendershot, Candace

    2013-01-01

    Background: This study assessed the perceptions and practices of school nurses regarding adolescent dating violence (ADV). Methods: The membership list of the National Association of School Nurses was used to identify a national random cross-sectional sample of high school nurses in the United States (N?=?750). A valid and reliable survey…

  8. The Kidney and Acid-Base Regulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koeppen, Bruce M.

    2009-01-01

    Since the topic of the role of the kidneys in the regulation of acid base balance was last reviewed from a teaching perspective (Koeppen BM. Renal regulation of acid-base balance. Adv Physiol Educ 20: 132-141, 1998), our understanding of the specific membrane transporters involved in H+, HCO , and NH transport, and especially how these…

  9. MICRO DOSE ASESSMENT OF INHALED PARTICLES IN HUMAN LUNGS: A STEP CLOSER TOWARDS THE TARGET TISSUE DOSE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rationale: Inhaled particles deposit inhomogeneously in the lung and this may result in excessive deposition dose at local regions of the lung, particularly at the anatomic sites of bifurcations and junctions of the airways, which in turn leads to injuries to the tissues and adve...

  10. 17 CFR 275.0-7 - Small entities under the Investment Advisers Act for purposes of the Regulatory Flexibility Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... annual updating amendment to Form ADV (17 CFR 279.1), of less than $25 million, or such higher amount as... Investment Advisers Act for purposes of the Regulatory Flexibility Act. 275.0-7 Section 275.0-7 Commodity and... Regulatory Flexibility Act. (a) For purposes of Commission rulemaking in accordance with the provisions...

  11. 17 CFR 275.0-7 - Small entities under the Investment Advisers Act for purposes of the Regulatory Flexibility Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... annual updating amendment to Form ADV (17 CFR 279.1), of less than $25 million, or such higher amount as... Investment Advisers Act for purposes of the Regulatory Flexibility Act. 275.0-7 Section 275.0-7 Commodity and... Regulatory Flexibility Act. (a) For purposes of Commission rulemaking in accordance with the provisions...

  12. 17 CFR 275.0-7 - Small entities under the Investment Advisers Act for purposes of the Regulatory Flexibility Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... annual updating amendment to Form ADV (17 CFR 279.1), of less than $25 million, or such higher amount as... Investment Advisers Act for purposes of the Regulatory Flexibility Act. 275.0-7 Section 275.0-7 Commodity and... Regulatory Flexibility Act. (a) For purposes of Commission rulemaking in accordance with the provisions...

  13. 17 CFR 275.0-7 - Small entities under the Investment Advisers Act for purposes of the Regulatory Flexibility Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... annual updating amendment to Form ADV (17 CFR 279.1), of less than $25 million, or such higher amount as... Investment Advisers Act for purposes of the Regulatory Flexibility Act. 275.0-7 Section 275.0-7 Commodity and... Regulatory Flexibility Act. (a) For purposes of Commission rulemaking in accordance with the provisions...

  14. 17 CFR 275.0-7 - Small entities under the Investment Advisers Act for purposes of the Regulatory Flexibility Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... annual updating amendment to Form ADV (17 CFR 279.1), of less than $25 million, or such higher amount as... Investment Advisers Act for purposes of the Regulatory Flexibility Act. 275.0-7 Section 275.0-7 Commodity and... Regulatory Flexibility Act. (a) For purposes of Commission rulemaking in accordance with the provisions...

  15. 78 FR 69470 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-19

    ... strategies at the Exchange's affiliate, BATS Y-Exchange, Inc. (``BYX''); and (2) modify the way that, for purposes of tiered pricing on the Exchange's equities trading platform (``BATS Equities''), the Exchange calculates ADV, ADAV, and TCV (as such terms are defined below). Routing Strategies to BYX BYX...

  16. PROCESS TRANSFER FUNCTIONS TO RELATE STREAM ECOLOGICAL CONDITION METRICS TO NITRATE RETENTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ecologists have developed hydrological metrics to characterize the nutrient processing capability of streams. In most cases these are used qualitatively to draw inferences on ecological function. In this work, several of these metrics have been integrated in a nonsteady state adv...

  17. Peer Influences on the Dating Aggression Process among Brazilian Street Youth: A Brief Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Antonio, Tiago; Koller, Silvia H.; Hokoda, Audrey

    2012-01-01

    This study explored risk factors for adolescent dating aggression (ADA) among Brazilian street youth. Forty-three adolescents, between the ages of 13 and 17 years, were recruited at services centers in Porto Alegre, Brazil. Simultaneous multiple regression revealed that ADA was significantly predicted by adolescent dating victimization (ADV), and…

  18. 75 FR 28083 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; The Chicago Stock Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-19

    ... Effectiveness of Proposed Rule Change To Establish a Fixed Provide Credit for CHX-Registered Institutional... Schedule''), effective May 3, 2010, to establish a fixed provide credit for CHX-registered institutional... entitled to a fixed provide credit irrespective of its ADV for orders subject to the Agency Execution...

  19. Occurrence of Bacterial and Viral Pathogens in Common and Noninvasive Diagnostic Sampling from Parrots and Racing Pigeons in Slovenia.

    PubMed

    Dovč, Alenka; Jereb, Gregor; Krapež, Uroš; Gregurić-Gračner, Gordana; Pintarič, Štefan; Slavec, Brigita; Knific, Renata Lindtner; Kastelic, Marjan; Kvapil, Pavel; Mićunović, Jasna; Vadnjal, Stanka; Ocepek, Matjaž; Zadravec, Marko; Zorman-Rojs, Olga

    2016-06-01

    Airborne pathogens can cause infections within parrot (Psittaciformes) and pigeon (Columbiformes) holdings and, in the case of zoonoses, can even spread to humans. Air sampling is a useful, noninvasive method which can enhance the common sampling methods for detection of microorganisms in bird flocks. In this study, fecal and air samples were taken from four parrot holdings. Additionally, cloacal and oropharyngeal swabs as well as air samples were taken from 15 racing pigeon holdings. Parrots were examined for psittacine beak and feather disease virus (PBFDV), proventricular dilatation disease virus (PDDV), adenoviruses (AdVs), avian paramyxovirus type-1 (APMV-1), avian influenza virus (AIV), Chlamydia psittaci (CP), and Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC). MAC and AdVs were detected in three parrot holdings, CP was detected in two parrot holdings, and PBFDV and PDDV were each detected in one parrot holding. Pigeons were examined for the pigeon circovirus (PiCV), AdVs, and CP; PiCV and AdVs were detected in all investigated pigeon holdings and CP was detected in five pigeon holdings.

  20. DESTRUCTION OF PCBS USING SULFATE RADICAL-BASED ADVANCED OXIDATION PROCESSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are a class of 209 congeners that were extensively used in industrial applications during 1929 to early 1970s, The presence of PCBs in the environment poses long-term risk to public health and wildlife due to their persistent and toxic nature. Adv...

  1. 17 CFR 275.203-1 - Application for investment adviser registration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... as an investment adviser, you must complete and file Form ADV (17 CFR 279.1) by following the... the List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the Finding Aids section of the printed volume and... the IARD is available on the Commission's website at http://www.sec.gov/iard. (2) You are not...

  2. Effects of viscosity on endothelial cell damage under acoustic droplet vaporization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seda, Robinson; Singh, Rahul; Li, David; Pitre, John; Putnam, Andrew; Fowlkes, J. Brian; Bull, Joseph

    2014-11-01

    Acoustic droplet vaporization (ADV) is a process by which stabilized superheated microdroplets are able to undergo phase transition with the aid of focused ultrasound. Gas bubbles resulting from ADV can provide local occlusion of the blood vessels supplying diseased tissue, such as tumors. The ADV process can also induce bioeffects that increase vessel permeability, which is beneficial for localized drug delivery. Previous in vitro studies have demonstrated that vaporization at the endothelial layer will affect cell attachment and viability. Several hypotheses have been proposed to elucidate the mechanism of damage including the generation of normal and shear stresses during bubble expansion. A single 3.5 MHz ultrasound pulse consisting of 8 cycles (~2.3 μs) and a 6 MPa peak rarefactional pressure was used to induce ADV on endothelial cells in media of different viscosities. Carboxylmethyl cellulose was added to the cell media to increase the viscosity up to 300 cP to and aid in the reduction of stresses during bubble expansion. The likelihood of cell damage was decreased when compared to our control (~1 cP), but it was still present in some cases indicating that the mechanism of damage does not depend entirely on viscous stresses associated with bubble expansion. This work was supported by NIH Grant R01EB006476.

  3. Are endothelial cell bioeffects from acoustic droplet vaporization proximity dependent?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seda, Robinson; Li, David; Fowlkes, J. Brian; Bull, Joseph

    2013-11-01

    Acoustic droplet vaporization (ADV) produces gas microbubbles that provide a means of selective occlusion in gas embolotherapy. Vaporization and subsequent occlusion occur inside blood vessels supplying the targeted tissue, such as tumors. Theoretical and computational studies showed that ADV within a vessel can impart high fluid mechanical stresses on the vessel wall. Previous in vitro studies have demonstrated that vaporization at an endothelial layer may affect cell attachment and viability. The current study is aimed at investigating the role of vaporization distance away from the endothelial layer. HUVECs were cultured in OptiCell™ chambers until reaching confluence. Dodecafluoropentane microdroplets were added, attaining a 10:1 droplet to cell ratio. A single ultrasound pulse (7.5 MHz) consisting of 16 cycles (~ 2 μs) and a 5 MPa peak rarefactional pressure was used to produce ADV while varying the vaporization distance from the endothelial layer (0 μm, 500 μm, 1000 μm). Results indicated that cell attachment and viability was significantly different if the distance was 0 μm (at the endothelial layer). Other distances were not significantly different from the control. ADV will significantly affect the endothelium if droplets are in direct contact with the cells. Droplet concentration and flow conditions inside blood vessels may play an important role. This work was supported by NIH grant R01EB006476.

  4. Random Sampling of Squamate Reptiles in Spanish Natural Reserves Reveals the Presence of Novel Adenoviruses in Lacertids (Family Lacertidae) and Worm Lizards (Amphisbaenia)

    PubMed Central

    Szirovicza, Leonóra; López, Pilar; Kopena, Renáta; Benkő, Mária; Martín, José; Pénzes, Judit J.

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the results of a large-scale PCR survey on the prevalence and diversity of adenoviruses (AdVs) in samples collected randomly from free-living reptiles. On the territories of the Guadarrama Mountains National Park in Central Spain and of the Chafarinas Islands in North Africa, cloacal swabs were taken from 318 specimens of eight native species representing five squamate reptilian families. The healthy-looking animals had been captured temporarily for physiological and ethological examinations, after which they were released. We found 22 AdV-positive samples in representatives of three species, all from Central Spain. Sequence analysis of the PCR products revealed the existence of three hitherto unknown AdVs in 11 Carpetane rock lizards (Iberolacerta cyreni), nine Iberian worm lizards (Blanus cinereus), and two Iberian green lizards (Lacerta schreiberi), respectively. Phylogeny inference showed every novel putative virus to be a member of the genus Atadenovirus. This is the very first description of the occurrence of AdVs in amphisbaenian and lacertid hosts. Unlike all squamate atadenoviruses examined previously, two of the novel putative AdVs had A+T rich DNA, a feature generally deemed to mirror previous host switch events. Our results shed new light on the diversity and evolution of atadenoviruses. PMID:27399970

  5. Comment on ``Photoelectron spectroscopic studies of polyatomic molecules: Theory for spin polarization''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherepkov, N. A.; Kuznetsov, V. V.

    1991-08-01

    The relation between the theory developed recently by Chandra [Phys. Rev. A 40, 752 (1989)] and our theory, derived previously [N. A. Cherepkov, J. Phys. B 16, 1543 (1983); 14, 2165 (1981); Adv. At. Mol. Phys. 19, 395 (1983); N. A. Cherepkov and V. V. Kuznetsov, Z. Phys. D 7, 271 (1987)], is established.

  6. 17 CFR 275.204-2 - Books and records to be maintained by investment advisers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... defined in § 275.203(b)(3)-1), and the adviser or any related person (as defined in Form ADV (17 CFR 279.1..., see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the Finding Aids section of the printed volume... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Books and records to...

  7. CONCENTRATION AND PROCESSING OF WATERBORNE VIRUSES BY POSITIVE CHARGE 1MDS CARTRIDGE FILTERS AND ORGANIC FLOCCULATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    This chapter describes the most widely used virus adsorption-elution (VIRADEL) method for recovering human enteric viruses from water matrices (Fout et al., 1996). The method takes advantage of postively charged cartridge filters to concentrate viruses from water. The major adv...

  8. In vitro colchicine-induced polyploid plantlet production and regeneration from leaf explants of the diploid pear (Pyrus communis L.) cultivar, 'Fertility'

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Polyploid plantlets, including triploid, tetraploid and other polyploids, were induced from in vitro leaves of a European pear (Pyrus communis L.) cultivar 'Fertility' by a colchicine treatment. In vitro leaves were incubated in 0.4% colchicine solution for 24, 48 or 72 h, and transferred to an adv...

  9. In vitro cytotoxic, antiviral and immunomodulatory effects of Plantago major and Plantago asiatica.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Lien-Chai; Chiang, Wen; Chang, Mei-Yin; Lin, Chun-Ching

    2003-01-01

    Plantago major linn. and P. asiatica Linn. (Plantaginaceae) are commonly used as folk medicine in Taiwan for treating infectious diseases related to the respiratory, urinary and digestive tracts. In this study, we investigated the antiviral, cytotoxic and immunomodulatory activities of hot water extracts of these two species in vitro on a series of viruses, namely herpesviruses (HSV-1 and HSV-2), adenoviruses (ADV-3, ADV-8 and ADV-11), and on various human leukemia, lymphoma and carcinoma cells with XTT, BrdU and IFN-gamma kits. Results showed that hot water extract of P. asiatica possessed significant inhibitory activity on the proliferation of lymphoma (U937) and carcinoma (bladder, bone, cervix, kidney, lung and stomach) cells and on viral infection (HSV-2 and ADV-11). P. major and P. asiatica both exhibited dual effects of immunodulatory activity, enhancing lymphocyte proliferation and secretion of interferon-gamma at low concentrations (< 50 microg/ml), but inhibiting this effect at high concentration (> 50 microg/ml). The present study concludes that hot water extracts of P. major and P. asiatica possess abroad-spectrum of antileukemia, anticarcinoma and antiviral activities, as well as activities which modulate cell-mediated immunity. Further investigations to elucidate the active component(s) of P. asiatica and P. major and to evaluate their clinical application are warranted. PMID:12856861

  10. 75 FR 76499 - Approval of Investment Adviser Registration Depository Filing Fees

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-08

    ... Investment Management, Securities and Exchange Commission, 100 F Street, NE., Washington, DC 20549-8549...; Amendments to Form ADV, Investment Advisers Act Release No. 1897 (Sept. 12, 2000) [65 FR 57438 (Sept. 22.... 2564 (Oct. 26, 2006), Investment Advisers Act Release No. 2806 (Oct. 30, 2008) [73 FR 65900 (Nov....

  11. 17 CFR 275.203-1 - Application for investment adviser registration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Application for investment adviser registration. 275.203-1 Section 275.203-1 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND... Application for investment adviser registration. (a) Form ADV. Subject to paragraph (b), to apply...

  12. Aleutian mink disease: puzzles and paradigms.

    PubMed

    Bloom, M E; Kanno, H; Mori, S; Wolfinbarger, J B

    1994-12-01

    Aleutian mink disease (AD) is a naturally occurring persistent virus infection of mink caused by the Aleutian mink disease parvovirus (ADV). The classical form of AD, which occurs in adult mink, is notable for high titers of antiviral antibodies, hypergammaglobulinemia, plasmacytosis, and immune complex disease. In addition, there is a progressive renal disease characterized by mesangial proliferative glomerulonephritis and severe interstitial nephritis. Development of AD depends on both host and viral factors, and mink of certain genotypes fail to develop progressive disease when inoculated with low-virulence strains of virus. In newborn mink kits, ADV causes a fatal, acute interstitial pneumonitis associated with permissive viral replication in alveolar type 2 cells, but treatment of newborn kits with anti-viral antibody aborts the acute disease and converts into one resembling the persistent infection observed in adults. In infected adult mink, ADV is sequestered as immune complexes in lymphoid organs, but actual viral replication is restricted at the level of the individual cell and can be detected in only a small population of macrophages and follicular dendritic cells. ADV infection of mink primary macrophages and the human macrophage cell line U937 is antibody dependent and leads to the production of the cytokine interleukin-6. Furthermore, levels of interleukin-6 are increased in lymph node culture supernatants from infected mink. Chronic production of interleukin-6 may promote development of the immune disorder characteristic of AD. PMID:7889316

  13. Mineralogy of Antarctica Dry Valley Soils: Implications for Pedogenic Processes on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quinn, J. E.; Ming, D. W.; Morris, R. V.; Douglas, S.; Kounaves, S. P.; McKay, C. P.; Tamppari, L, K.; Smith, P. H.; Zent, A. P.; Archer, P. D., Jr.

    2010-01-01

    The Antarctic Dry Valleys (ADVs) located in the Transantarctic Mountains are the coldest and driest locations on Earth. The mean annual air temperature is -20 C or less and the ADVs receive 100mm or less of precipitation annually in the form of snow. The cold and dry climate in the ADVs is one of the best terrestrial analogs for the climatic conditions on Mars [2]. The soils in the ADVs have been categorized into three soil moisture zones: subxerous, xerous and ultraxerous. The subxerous zone is a coastal region in which soils have ice-cemented permafrost relatively close to the surface. Moisture is available in relatively large amounts and soil temperatures are above freezing throughout the soil profile (above ice permafrost) in summer months. The xerous zone, the most widespread of the three zones, is an inland region with a climate midway between the subxerous and ultraxerous. The soils from this zone have dry permafrost at moderate depths (30-75cm) but have sufficient water in the upper soil horizons to allow leaching of soluble materials. The ultraxerous zone is a high elevation zone, where both temperature and precipitation amounts are very low resulting in dry permafrost throughout the soil profile. The three moisture regime regions are similar to the three microclimatic zones (coastal thaw, inland mixed, stable upland) defined by Marchant and Head.

  14. A Multicenter, Open-label Study of CMX001 Treatment of Serious Diseases or Conditions Caused by dsDNA Viruses

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-08-28

    Male or Female Patients With a Serious or Immediately Life-threatening; Disease or Condition Caused by CMV, ADV, HSV, VAVC, VARV or; Monkeypox Viruses(s) Who Have a Life Expectancy of ≥ 2 Weeks and for; Whom no Comparable or Satisfactory Alternative Therapy is Available

  15. Information Processing, Specificity of Practice, and the Transfer of Learning: Considerations for Reconsidering Fidelity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grierson, Lawrence E. M.

    2014-01-01

    Much has been made in the recent medical education literature of the incorrect characterization of simulation along a continuum of low to high fidelity (Cook et al. "JAMA" 306(9): 978-988, 2011; Norman et al. "Med Educ" 46(7): 636-647, 2012; Teteris et al. "Adv Health Sci Educ" 17(1): 137-144, 2012). For the most…

  16. The Relationship between Preservice Early Childhood Teachers' Cultural Values and Their Perceptions of Scientists' Cultural Values

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akerson, Valarie L.; Buzzelli, Cary A.; Eastwood, Jennifer

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes research that compares preservice early childhood teachers' cultural values and the values they believe are held by scientists. Using the Schwartz Values Inventory (SVI) (Schwartz (1992) "Adv Exp Soc Psychol" 25:331-351) preservice early childhood teachers cultural values were assessed, followed by an assessment of the values…

  17. 17 CFR 275.206(4)-5 - Political contributions by certain investment advisers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... investment adviser that has reported on its annual updating amendment to Form ADV (17 CFR 279.1) that it has... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Political contributions by....206(4)-5 Political contributions by certain investment advisers. (a) Prohibitions. As a...

  18. 17 CFR 275.206(4)-5 - Political contributions by certain investment advisers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... investment adviser that has reported on its annual updating amendment to Form ADV (17 CFR 279.1) that it has... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Political contributions by....206(4)-5 Political contributions by certain investment advisers. (a) Prohibitions. As a...

  19. 17 CFR 275.206(4)-5 - Political contributions by certain investment advisers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... investment adviser that has reported on its annual updating amendment to Form ADV (17 CFR 279.1) that it has... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Political contributions by....206(4)-5 Political contributions by certain investment advisers. (a) Prohibitions. As a...

  20. 17 CFR 275.206(4)-5 - Political contributions by certain investment advisers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... investment adviser that has reported on its annual updating amendment to Form ADV (17 CFR 279.1) that it has... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Political contributions by....206(4)-5 Political contributions by certain investment advisers. (a) Prohibitions. As a...

  1. Acoustic droplet-hydrogel composites for spatial and temporal control of growth factor delivery and scaffold stiffness.

    PubMed

    Fabiilli, Mario L; Wilson, Christopher G; Padilla, Frédéric; Martín-Saavedra, Francisco M; Fowlkes, J Brian; Franceschi, Renny T

    2013-07-01

    Wound healing is regulated by temporally and spatially restricted patterns of growth factor signaling, but there are few delivery vehicles capable of the "on-demand" release necessary for recapitulating these patterns. Recently we described a perfluorocarbon double emulsion that selectively releases a protein payload upon exposure to ultrasound through a process known as acoustic droplet vaporization (ADV). In this study, we describe a delivery system composed of fibrin hydrogels doped with growth factor-loaded double emulsion for applications in tissue regeneration. Release of immunoreactive basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) from the composites increased up to 5-fold following ADV and delayed release was achieved by delaying exposure to ultrasound. Releasates of ultrasound-treated materials significantly increased the proliferation of endothelial cells compared to sham controls, indicating that the released bFGF was bioactive. ADV also triggered changes in the ultrastructure and mechanical properties of the fibrin as bubble formation and consolidation of the fibrin in ultrasound-treated composites were accompanied by up to a 22-fold increase in shear stiffness. ADV did not reduce the viability of cells suspended in composite scaffolds. These results demonstrate that an acoustic droplet-hydrogel composite could have broad utility in promoting wound healing through on-demand control of growth factor release and/or scaffold architecture. PMID:23535233

  2. Development of In Vitro Assays to Assess Chemicals and Environmental Samples for Thyroid Hormone Synthesis Inhibition

    EPA Science Inventory

    This abstract presents research being conducted at MED under the Safe Pesticides/Safe Products and Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals research area. The research described herein is in response to the mandate to the Agency to develop a research program to evaluate the potential adve...

  3. Comparison between Sendai virus and adenovirus vectors to transduce HIV-1 genes into human dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Hosoya, Noriaki; Miura, Toshiyuki; Kawana-Tachikawa, Ai; Koibuchi, Tomohiko; Shioda, Tatsuo; Odawara, Takashi; Nakamura, Tetsuya; Kitamura, Yoshihiro; Kano, Munehide; Kato, Atsushi; Hasegawa, Mamoru; Nagai, Yoshiyuki; Iwamoto, Aikichi

    2008-03-01

    Immuno-genetherapy using dendritic cells (DCs) can be applied to human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection. Sendai virus (SeV) has unique features such as cytoplasmic replication and high protein expression as a vector for genetic manipulation. In this study, we compared the efficiency of inducing green fluorescent protein (GFP) and HIV-1 gene expression in human monocyte-derived DCs between SeV and adenovirus (AdV). Human monocyte-derived DCs infected with SeV showed the maximum gene expression 24 hr after infection at a multiplicity of infection (MOI) of 2. Although SeV vector showed higher cytopathic effect on DCs than AdV, SeV vector induced maximum gene expression earlier and at much lower MOI. In terms of cell surface phenotype, both SeV and AdV vectors induced DC maturation. DCs infected with SeV as well as AdV elicited HIV-1 specific T-cell responses detected by interferon gamma (IFN-gamma) enzyme-linked immunospot (Elispot). Our data suggest that SeV could be one of the reliable vectors for immuno-genetherapy for HIV-1 infected patients. PMID:18205221

  4. Incidence of virus infection as a cause of Meniere's disease or endolymphatic hydrops assessed by electrocochleography.

    PubMed

    Selmani, Ziane; Marttila, Timo; Pyykkö, Ilmari

    2005-04-01

    Meniere's disease (MD) may follow viral infection such as by neurotropic viruses known to invade the endolymphatic sac (ES) and provoke endolymphatic hydrops (EH). The objective of this study was to investigate whether neurotropic viruses may cause infection of the inner ear and provoke EH. Antiviral immunoglobulin (IgG) assay against herpes simplex 1 (HSV1), herpes simplex 2 (HSV2), adenovirus (ADV), varicella zoster virus (VZV) and cytomegalovirus (CMV) were performed in 109 patients with an advanced stage of MD and compared with those obtained from 26 patients operated on because of vestibular schwannoma (VS), who served as a control group, to evaluate whether there is an association between the IgG levels and the ECoGs summating potential/action potential ratio (SP/AP ratio) in the MD group. In MD patients, the IgG titre against VZV and ADV were significantly higher than in the control (schwannoma) group. However, no correlation was found between the IgG levels against ADV and VZV with the SP/AP ratio. Neurotropic viruses such VZV and ADV may play a role in the pathogenesis of MD, despite the absence of association between the levels of IgG titres and the SP/AP ratio.

  5. Random Sampling of Squamate Reptiles in Spanish Natural Reserves Reveals the Presence of Novel Adenoviruses in Lacertids (Family Lacertidae) and Worm Lizards (Amphisbaenia).

    PubMed

    Szirovicza, Leonóra; López, Pilar; Kopena, Renáta; Benkő, Mária; Martín, José; Pénzes, Judit J

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the results of a large-scale PCR survey on the prevalence and diversity of adenoviruses (AdVs) in samples collected randomly from free-living reptiles. On the territories of the Guadarrama Mountains National Park in Central Spain and of the Chafarinas Islands in North Africa, cloacal swabs were taken from 318 specimens of eight native species representing five squamate reptilian families. The healthy-looking animals had been captured temporarily for physiological and ethological examinations, after which they were released. We found 22 AdV-positive samples in representatives of three species, all from Central Spain. Sequence analysis of the PCR products revealed the existence of three hitherto unknown AdVs in 11 Carpetane rock lizards (Iberolacerta cyreni), nine Iberian worm lizards (Blanus cinereus), and two Iberian green lizards (Lacerta schreiberi), respectively. Phylogeny inference showed every novel putative virus to be a member of the genus Atadenovirus. This is the very first description of the occurrence of AdVs in amphisbaenian and lacertid hosts. Unlike all squamate atadenoviruses examined previously, two of the novel putative AdVs had A+T rich DNA, a feature generally deemed to mirror previous host switch events. Our results shed new light on the diversity and evolution of atadenoviruses.

  6. 17 CFR 275.203A-1 - Eligibility for SEC registration; Switching to or from SEC registration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...)), you must file Form ADV-W (17 CFR 279.2) to withdraw your SEC registration within 180 days of your... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Eligibility for SEC registration; Switching to or from SEC registration. 275.203A-1 Section 275.203A-1 Commodity and...

  7. 17 CFR 275.203A-1 - Eligibility for SEC registration; Switching to or from SEC registration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...)), you must file Form ADV-W (17 CFR 279.2) to withdraw your SEC registration within 180 days of your... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Eligibility for SEC registration; Switching to or from SEC registration. 275.203A-1 Section 275.203A-1 Commodity and...

  8. Occurrence of Bacterial and Viral Pathogens in Common and Noninvasive Diagnostic Sampling from Parrots and Racing Pigeons in Slovenia.

    PubMed

    Dovč, Alenka; Jereb, Gregor; Krapež, Uroš; Gregurić-Gračner, Gordana; Pintarič, Štefan; Slavec, Brigita; Knific, Renata Lindtner; Kastelic, Marjan; Kvapil, Pavel; Mićunović, Jasna; Vadnjal, Stanka; Ocepek, Matjaž; Zadravec, Marko; Zorman-Rojs, Olga

    2016-06-01

    Airborne pathogens can cause infections within parrot (Psittaciformes) and pigeon (Columbiformes) holdings and, in the case of zoonoses, can even spread to humans. Air sampling is a useful, noninvasive method which can enhance the common sampling methods for detection of microorganisms in bird flocks. In this study, fecal and air samples were taken from four parrot holdings. Additionally, cloacal and oropharyngeal swabs as well as air samples were taken from 15 racing pigeon holdings. Parrots were examined for psittacine beak and feather disease virus (PBFDV), proventricular dilatation disease virus (PDDV), adenoviruses (AdVs), avian paramyxovirus type-1 (APMV-1), avian influenza virus (AIV), Chlamydia psittaci (CP), and Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC). MAC and AdVs were detected in three parrot holdings, CP was detected in two parrot holdings, and PBFDV and PDDV were each detected in one parrot holding. Pigeons were examined for the pigeon circovirus (PiCV), AdVs, and CP; PiCV and AdVs were detected in all investigated pigeon holdings and CP was detected in five pigeon holdings. PMID:27309292

  9. Acoustic droplet–hydrogel composites for spatial and temporal control of growth factor delivery and scaffold stiffness

    PubMed Central

    Fabiilli, Mario L.; Wilson, Christopher G.; Padilla, Frédéric; Martín-Saavedra, Francisco M.; Fowlkes, J. Brian; Franceschi, Renny T.

    2013-01-01

    Wound healing is regulated by temporally and spatially restricted patterns of growth factor signaling, but there are few delivery vehicles capable of the “on-demand” release necessary for recapitulating these patterns. Recently we described a perfluorocarbon double emulsion that selectively releases a protein payload upon exposure to ultrasound through a process known as acoustic droplet vaporization (ADV). In this study, we describe a delivery system composed of fibrin hydrogels doped with growth factor-loaded double emulsion for applications in tissue regeneration. Release of immunoreactive basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) from the composites increased up to 5-fold following ADV and delayed release was achieved by delaying exposure to ultrasound. Releasates of ultrasound-treated materials significantly increased the proliferation of endothelial cells compared to sham controls, indicating that the released bFGF was bioactive. ADV also triggered changes in the ultrastructure and mechanical properties of the fibrin as bubble formation and consolidation of the fibrin in ultrasound-treated composites were accompanied by up to a 22-fold increase in shear stiffness. ADV did not reduce the viability of cells suspended in composite scaffolds. These results demonstrate that an acoustic droplet–hydrogel composite could have broad utility in promoting wound healing through on-demand control of growth factor release and/or scaffold architecture. PMID:23535233

  10. 78 FR 60364 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; NYSE Arca, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-01

    ... Substance of the Proposed Rule Change The Exchange proposes to amend the NYSE Arca Options Fee Schedule... fees; following the reallocation, if the issue traded a monthly ADV of 100 or fewer Customer contracts... participants on the Exchange. As a result of the fee increase, LMMs that wish to request......

  11. 78 FR 78460 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-26

    ...-Regulatory Organization's Statement of the Terms of the Substance of the Proposed Rule Change The Exchange... average daily added volume calculated as the number of shares added and ``ADV'' means average daily volume calculated as the number of shares added or removed, combined, per day. ADAV and......

  12. A Recombinant Adenovirus Expressing P12A and 3C Protein of the Type O Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus Stimulates Systemic and Mucosal Immune Responses in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Peng

    2016-01-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is a highly contagious livestock disease of cloven-hoofed animals which causes severe economic losses. The replication-deficient, human adenovirus-vectored FMD vaccine has been proven effective against FMD. However, the role of T-cell-mediated antiviral responses and the mucosae-mediated antiviral responses induced by the adenovirus-vectored FMD vaccine was rarely examined. Here, the capsid protein precursor P1-2A and viral protease 3C of the type O FMDV were expressed in replicative-deficient human adenovirus type 5 vector. BALB/c mice immunized intramuscularly and intraperitoneally with recombinant adenovirus rAdv-P12A3C elicited higher FMDV-specific IgG antibodies, IFN-γ, and IL-4 cytokines than those in mice immunized with inactivated FMDV vaccine. Moreover, BALB/c mice immunized with recombinant adenovirus rAdv-P12A3C by oral and intraocular-nasal immunization induced high FMDV-specific IgA antibodies. These results show that the recombinant adenovirus rAdv-P12A3C could resist FMDV comprehensively. This study highlights the potential of rAdv-P12A3C to serve as a type O FMDV vaccine. PMID:27478836

  13. 77 FR 63900 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; NYSE MKT LLC; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-17

    ... ADV is comprised of those equity and ETF option contracts that clear in the customer account type at OCC and does not include contracts that clear in either the firm or market maker account type at OCC... that in turn do not charge Customer fees, which the Exchange does not pass along to OFPs. The...

  14. Adefovir- or Lamivudine-Induced Renal Tubular Dysfunction after Liver Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jae Geun; Lee, Juhan; Lee, Jung Jun; Song, Seung Hwan; Ju, Man Ki; Choi, Gi Hong; Kim, Myoung Soo; Choi, Jin Sub; Kim, Soon Il; Joo, Dong Jin

    2015-01-01

    Abstract To reduce hepatitis B virus reinfection after liver transplantation (LT), patients often receive antihepatitis B immunoglobulin (HBIG) alone or combined with antiviral nucleoside/nucleotide analogs (NUCs); however, proximal renal tubular dysfunction (RTD) that was induced by NUCs in liver recipients was rarely reported. Here, we analyzed RTD and renal impairment (RI) following adefovir (ADV) and lamivudine (LAM) treatment in liver recipients. We retrospectively reviewed medical records of patients treated with HBIG alone (group 1, n = 42) or combined with ADV or LAM (group 2, n = 21) after LT. We compared RTD and RI incidence during the 12 months after LT. An RTD diagnosis required manifestation of at least 3 of the following features: hypophosphatemia, RI, hypouricemia, proteinuria, or glucosuria. No significant differences were observed regarding sex, age, donor type, model of end-stage liver score, and estimated glomerular filtration rate at pre-LT between the 2 groups. Hepatitis B virus recurrence within 12 months was 4.8% in both groups (P = 1.000); however, the RTD incidence was 0% in group 1 and 19.0% in group 2 (P = 0.010). RI occurrence did not differ between the groups. The only risk factor for RI was HBIG administration combined with both LAM and ADV (odds ratio 11.27, 95% confidence interval 1.13–112.07, P = 0.039, vs HBIG alone). RTD occurred more frequently in patients treated with HBIG combined with LAM or ADV compared with HBIG alone. Thus, LAM or ADV therapy can induce RTD after LT, and when administered, liver recipients should be monitored. PMID:26402818

  15. Production of first generation adenoviral vectors for preclinical protocols: amplification, purification and functional titration.

    PubMed

    Armendáriz-Borunda, Juan; Bastidas-Ramírez, Blanca Estela; Sandoval-Rodríguez, Ana; González-Cuevas, Jaime; Gómez-Meda, Belinda; García-Bañuelos, Jesús

    2011-11-01

    Gene therapy represents a promising approach in the treatment of several diseases. Currently, the ideal vector has yet to be designed; though, adenoviral vectors (Ad-v) have provided the most utilized tool for gene transfer due principally to their simple production, among other specific characteristics. Ad-v viability represents a critical variable that may be affected by storage or shipping conditions and therefore it is advisable to be assessed previously to protocol performance. The present work is unique in this matter, as the complete detailed process to obtain Ad-v of preclinical grade is explained. Amplification in permissive HEK-293 cells, purification in CsCl gradients in a period of 10 h, spectrophotometric titration of viral particles (VP) and titration of infectious units (IU), yielding batches of AdβGal, AdGFP, AdHuPA and AdMMP8, of approximately 10¹³-10¹⁴ VP and 10¹²-10¹³ IU were carried out. In vivo functionality of therapeutic AdHuPA and AdMMP8 was evidenced in rats presenting CCl₄-induced fibrosis, as more than 60% of fibrosis was eliminated in livers after systemic delivery through iliac vein in comparison with irrelevant AdβGal. Time required to accomplish the whole Ad-v production steps, including IU titration was 20 to 30 days. We conclude that production of Ad-v following standard operating procedures assuring vector functionality and the possibility to effectively evaluate experimental gene therapy results, leaving aside the use of high-cost commercial kits or sophisticated instrumentation, can be performed in a conventional laboratory of cell culture.

  16. Relationships between environmental changes, maturity, growth rate and plasma insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) in female rainbow trout.

    PubMed

    Taylor, J F; Porter, M J R; Bromage, N R; Migaud, H

    2008-01-15

    Size reflecting growth rate, energy balance or nutritional status is regarded as an important determinant of the ability of trout to undergo puberty. The relationship of a change in photoperiod, either natural (SNP) or advancing (ADV), with growth, IGF-I and reproduction was investigated in virgin female rainbow trout. Under SNP 63% of the population attained maturity while only 29% spawned 6 months in advance in the ADV regime. Under SNP both size and growth rate in late spring-early summer appeared to determine whether an individual may initiate reproduction while condition factor appeared to be a better predictor in the ADV regime. A complete seasonal relationship between plasma IGF-I, daylength and temperature was demonstrated under natural conditions, and provides direct evidence for the relationship between reproduction and IGF-I. Conversely, trout maintained under ADV exhibited a significantly different plasma IGF-I profile relative to those under a natural photoperiod. Furthermore, IGF-I levels accurately reflected growth rate prior to elevations in sex steroids, suggesting that IGF-I may provide an endocrine signal between the somatotropic and reproductive axes that growth rate and/or size is sufficient to initiate gonad development. In addition, maturing individuals under SNP typically expressed higher circulating IGF-I levels than those that remained immature and may reflect a greater opportunity for IGF-I to act on the pituitary to stimulate gonadotropin production. We observed elevated levels in maturing fish for 3 months under SNP compared to only 1 month under ADV were observed. This may reflect a reduction in the window of opportunity to initiate reproduction under advancing photoperiods and hence explain the reduction in fish successfully recruited.

  17. Mechanical bioeffects of acoustic droplet vaporization in vessel-mimicking phantoms.

    PubMed

    Kang, Shih-Tsung; Lin, Yi-Chen; Yeh, Chih-Kuang

    2014-09-01

    This study investigated the mechanical bioeffects exerted by acoustic droplet vaporization (ADV) under different experimental conditions using vessel phantoms with a 200-μm inner diameter but different stiffness for imitating the microvasculature in various tumors. High-speed microscopy, passive cavitation detection, and ultrasound attenuation measurement were conducted to determine the morphological characteristics of vascular damage and clarify the mechanisms by which the damage was initiated and developed. The results show that phantom erosion was initiated under successive ultrasound exposure (2 MHz, 3 cycles) at above 8-MPa peak negative pressures (PNPs) when ADV occurred with inertial cavitation (IC), producing lesions whose morphological characteristics were dependent on the amount of vaporized droplets. Slight injury occurred at droplet concentrations below (2.6±0.2)×10(6) droplets/mL, forming shallow and rugged surfaces on both sides of the vessel walls. Increasing the droplet concentration to up to (2.6±0.2)×10(7) droplets/mL gradually suppressed the damage on the distal wall, and turned the rugged surface on the proximal wall into tunnels rapidly elongating in the direction opposite to ultrasound propagation. Increasing the PNP did not increase the maximum tunnel depth after the ADV efficiency reached a plateau (about 71.6±2.7% at 10 MPa). Increasing the pulse duration effectively increased the maximum tunnel depth to more than 10 times the diameter of the vessel even though there was no marked enhancement in IC dose. It can be inferred that substantial bubble generation in single ADV events may simultaneously distort the acoustic pressure distribution. The backward ultrasound reinforcement and forward ultrasound shielding relative to the direction of wave propagation augment the propensity of backward erosion. The results of the present work provide information that is valuable for the prevention or utilization of ADV-mediated mechanical

  18. Evaluation of a virucidal quantitative carrier test for surface disinfectants.

    PubMed

    Rabenau, Holger F; Steinmann, Jochen; Rapp, Ingrid; Schwebke, Ingeborg; Eggers, Maren

    2014-01-01

    Surface disinfectants are part of broader preventive strategies preventing the transmission of bacteria, fungi and viruses in medical institutions. To evaluate their virucidal efficacy, these products must be tested with appropriate model viruses with different physico-chemical properties under conditions representing practical application in hospitals. The aim of this study was to evaluate a quantitative carrier assay. Furthermore, different putative model viruses like adenovirus type 5 (AdV-5) and different animal parvoviruses were evaluated with respect to their tenacity and practicability in laboratory handling. To evaluate the robustness of the method, some of the viruses were tested in parallel in different laboratories in a multi-center study. Different biocides, which are common active ingredients of surface disinfectants, were used in the test. After drying on stainless steel discs as the carrier, model viruses were exposed to different concentrations of three alcohols, peracetic acid (PAA) or glutaraldehyde (GDA), with a fixed exposure time of 5 minutes. Residual virus was determined after treatment by endpoint titration. All parvoviruses exhibited a similar stability with respect to GDA, while AdV-5 was more susceptible. For PAA, the porcine parvovirus was more sensitive than the other parvoviruses, and again, AdV-5 presented a higher susceptibility than the parvoviruses. All parvoviruses were resistant to alcohols, while AdV-5 was only stable when treated with 2-propanol. The analysis of the results of the multi-center study showed a high reproducibility of this test system. In conclusion, two viruses with different physico-chemical properties can be recommended as appropriate model viruses for the evaluation of the virucidal efficacy of surface disinfectants: AdV-5, which has a high clinical impact, and murine parvovirus (MVM) with the highest practicability among the parvoviruses tested.

  19. Technical Report on Preliminary Methodology for Enhancing Risk Monitors with Integrated Equipment Condition Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Coles, Garill A.; Coble, Jamie B.; Hirt, Evelyn H.

    2013-09-17

    Small modular reactors (SMRs) generally include reactors with electric output of ~350 MWe or less (this cutoff varies somewhat but is substantially less than full-size plant output of 700 MWe or more). Advanced SMRs (AdvSMRs) refer to a specific class of SMRs and are based on modularization of advanced reactor concepts. AdvSMRs may provide a longer-term alternative to traditional light-water reactors (LWRs) and SMRs based on integral pressurized water reactor concepts currently being considered. Enhancing affordability of AdvSMRs will be critical to ensuring wider deployment. AdvSMRs suffer from loss of economies of scale inherent in small reactors when compared to large (~greater than 600 MWe output) reactors. Some of this loss can be recovered through reduced capital costs through smaller size, fewer components, modular fabrication processes, and the opportunity for modular construction. However, the controllable day-to-day costs of AdvSMRs will be dominated by operation and maintenance (O&M) costs. Technologies that help characterize real-time risk are important for controlling O&M costs. Risk monitors are used in current nuclear power plants to provide a point-in-time estimate of the system risk given the current plant configuration (e.g., equipment availability, operational regime, and environmental conditions). However, current risk monitors are unable to support the capability requirements listed above as they do not take into account plant-specific normal, abnormal, and deteriorating states of active components and systems. This report documents technology developments that are a step towards enhancing risk monitors that, if integrated with supervisory plant control systems, can provide the capability requirements listed and meet the goals of controlling O&M costs. The report describes research results from an initial methodology for enhanced risk monitors by integrating real-time information about equipment condition and POF into risk monitors.

  20. Mutational analysis of reverse transcriptase and surface proteins of patients with partial virological response during mono and combination antiviral therapies in genotype D chronic hepatitis B

    PubMed Central

    Mahabadi, Mostafa; Alavian, Seyed Moayed; Norouzi, Mehdi; Keyvani, Hossein; Mahmoudi, Mahmood; Jazayeri, Seyed Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The mutational pattern of chronic Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is unclear in patients who show incomplete response to antiviral therapy. The aims of this study were 1) to determine the benefit of combination therapy with adefovir dipivoxil (ADV) and Lamivudine (LAM) versus ADV or LAM alone in maintaining virological, biochemical and histological responses and 2) to investigate the patterns of mutations in the reverse transcriptase and surface proteins of HBV with LAM and/or ADF-resistant in partially-responded chronic hepatitis B (CHB) patients. Methods The study group consisted of 186 chronic HBV carriers who were admitted to the Tehran Hepatitis Network from 2010 to 2013. We retrospectively selected 86 patients who partially responded to different nucleoside analogue regimens. After 48 weeks of therapy, five groups of patients were defined including eight Lamivudine (LAM) Group (I), 30 Adefovir (ADV) Group (II), 16 ADV add on LAM Group (III), 32 ADV+LAM Group (IV), and 100 controls (no therapy). Reverse transcriptase (RT) and surface genes were amplified and sequenced for mutational analysis. Results All groups showed differences between mean values for age, gender, alanine transaminase (ALT), aspartate transaminase (AST), and HBV DNA levels groups showed significant differences than other groups (p < 0.05). The mutation frequencies for groups were I (1.7%), II (1.39%), III (2.28%), IV (2.0%), and V (0.38%). T54N, L80I/V, I91L/V, L180M, M204I/V, Q215P/S, and F221Y/S showed the highest number of mutations in all groups with different frequencies. Four new, unreported mutations were found. Conclusion Those patients who failed to respond in the first 48 weeks, whether they were receiving mono or combination therapy, should be tested genotypically, for the early modification of treatment. PMID:27504160

  1. Comparison of the clinical outcomes between antiviral-naïve patients treated with entecavir and lamivudine-resistant patients receiving adefovir add-on lamivudine combination treatment

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hong Joo; Park, Soo Kyung; Yang, Hyo Joon; Jung, Yoon Suk; Park, Jung Ho; Park, Dong Il; Cho, Yong Kyun; Sohn, Chong Il; Jeon, Woo Kyu; Kim, Byung Ik; Choi, Kyu Yong

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims To analyze the effects of preexisting lamivudine (LAM) resistance and applying antiviral treatment (adefovir [ADV] add-on LAM combination treatment) on long-term treatment outcomes, and comparing the clinical outcomes of antiviral-naïve chronic hepatitis B patients receiving entecavir (ETV) monotherapy. Methods This study enrolled 73 antiviral-naïve patients who received 0.5-mg ETV as an initial therapy and 54 patients who received ADV add-on LAM combination treatment as a rescue therapy from July 2006 to July 2010. Results During 24-month treatments, the decreases in serum log10HBV-DNA values (copies/mL) were significantly greater in the antiviral-naïve patients treated with ETV than the patients receiving ADV add-on LAM combination treatment. The biochemical response rates for alanine aminotransferase normalization at 6 months (ETV) and 12 months (ADV add-on LAM) were 90.4% (66/73) and 77.8% (42/54), respectively (P=0.048). A Kaplan-Meier analysis indicated that the rates of serologic response, viral breakthrough, and emergence of genotypic resistance did not differ significantly between the two patient groups. There were also no significant intergroup differences in the rates of disease progression (PD) and new development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Conclusion The long-term clinical outcomes of antiviral-naïve patients treated with ETV and LAM-resistant patients receiving ADV add-on LAM combination treatment were comparable in terms of the emergence of HCC and disease progression. PMID:27729626

  2. Etiology of maculopapular rash in measles and rubella suspected patients from Belarus.

    PubMed

    Yermalovich, Marina A; Semeiko, Galina V; Samoilovich, Elena O; Svirchevskaya, Ekaterina Y; Muller, Claude P; Hübschen, Judith M

    2014-01-01

    As a result of successful implementation of the measles/rubella elimination program, the etiology of more and more double negative cases remains elusive. The present study determined the role of different viruses as causative agents in measles or rubella suspected cases in Belarus. A total of 856 sera sent to the WHO National Laboratory between 2009 and 2011 were tested for specific IgM antibodies to measles virus (MV), rubella virus (RV) and human parvovirus B19 (B19V). The negatives were further investigated for antibodies to enterovirus (EV) and adenovirus (AdV). Children of up to 3 years were tested for IgM antibodies to human herpesvirus 6 (HHV6). A viral etiology was identified in 451 (52.7%) cases, with 6.1% of the samples being positive for MV; 2.6% for RV; 26.2% for B19V; 9.7% for EV; 4.6% for AdV; and 3.6% for HHV6. Almost all measles and rubella cases occurred during limited outbreaks in 2011 and nearly all patients were at least 15 years old. B19V, EV and AdV infections were prevalent both in children and adults and were found throughout the 3 years. B19V occurred mainly in 3-10 years old children and 20-29 years old adults. EV infection was most common in children up to 6 years of age and AdV was confirmed mainly in 3-6 years old children. HHV6 infection was mostly detected in 6-11 months old infants. Laboratory investigation of measles/rubella suspected cases also for B19V, EV, AdV and HHV6 allows diagnosing more than half of all cases, thus strengthening rash/fever disease surveillance in Belarus.

  3. Admiralty Inlet Advanced Turbulence Measurements: May 2015

    DOE Data Explorer

    Kilcher, Levi

    2015-05-18

    This data is from measurements at Admiralty Head, in Admiralty Inlet (Puget Sound) in May of 2015. The measurements were made using Inertial Motion Unit (IMU) equipped ADVs mounted on a 'StableMoor' (Manufacturer: DeepWater Buoyancy) buoy and a Tidal Turbulence Mooring (TTM). These platforms position ADV heads above the seafloor to make mid-depth turbulence measurements. The inertial measurements from the IMU allows for removal of mooring motion in post processing. The mooring and buoy motion has been removed from the stream-wise and vertical velocity signals (u, w). The lateral (v) velocity has some 'persistent motion contamination' due to mooring sway. The TTM was deployed with one ADV, it's position was: 48 09.145', -122 41.209' The StableMoor was deployed twice, the first time it was deployed in 'wing-mode' with two ADVs ('Port' and 'Star') at: 48 09.166', -122 41.173' The second StableMoor deployment was in 'Nose' mode with one ADV at: 48 09.166', -122 41.174' Units ----- - Velocity data (_u, urot, uacc) is in m/s. - Acceleration (Accel) data is in m/s^2. - Angular rate (AngRt) data is in rad/s. - The components of all vectors are in 'ENU' orientation. That is, the first index is True East, the second is True North, and the third is Up (vertical). - All other quantities are in the units defined in the Nortek Manual. Motion correction and rotation into the ENU earth reference frame was performed using the Python-based open source DOLfYN library (http://lkilcher.github.io/dolfyn/). Details on motion correction can be found there. Additional details on TTM measurements at this site can be found in the included Marine Energy Technology Symposium paper.

  4. Admiralty Inlet Advanced Turbulence Measurements: June 2014

    DOE Data Explorer

    Kilcher, Levi

    2014-06-30

    This data is from measurements at Admiralty Head, in Admiralty Inlet (Puget Sound) in June of 2014. The measurements were made using Inertial Motion Unit (IMU) equipped ADVs mounted on Tidal Turbulence Mooring's (TTMs). The TTM positions the ADV head above the seafloor to make mid-depth turbulence measurements. The inertial measurements from the IMU allows for removal of mooring motion in post processing. The mooring motion has been removed from the stream-wise and vertical velocity signals (u, w). The lateral (v) velocity has some 'persistent motion contamination' due to mooring sway. Each ttm was deployed with two ADVs. The 'top' ADV head was positioned 0.5m above the 'bottom' ADV head. The TTMs were placed in 58m of water. The position of the TTMs were: ttm01 : (48.1525, -122.6867) ttm01b : (48.15256666, -122.68678333) ttm02b : (48.152783333, -122.686316666) Deployments TTM01b and TTM02b occurred simultaneously and were spaced approximately 50m apart in the cross-stream direction. Units ----- - Velocity data (_u, urot, uacc) is in m/s. - Acceleration (Accel) data is in m/s^2. - Angular rate (AngRt) data is in rad/s. - The components of all vectors are in 'ENU' orientation. That is, the first index is True East, the second is True North, and the third is Up (vertical). - All other quantities are in the units defined in the Nortek Manual. Motion correction and rotation into the ENU earth reference frame was performed using the Python-based open source DOLfYN library (http://lkilcher.github.io/dolfyn/). Details on motion correction can be found there. Additional details on TTM measurements at this site can be found in the included Marine Energy Technology Symposium paper.

  5. Characterization of acoustic droplet vaporization for control of bubble generation under flow conditions.

    PubMed

    Kang, Shih-Tsung; Huang, Yi-Luan; Yeh, Chih-Kuang

    2014-03-01

    This study investigated the manipulation of bubbles generated by acoustic droplet vaporization (ADV) under clinically relevant flow conditions. Optical microscopy and high-frequency ultrasound imaging were used to observe bubbles generated by 2-MHz ultrasound pulses at different time points after the onset of ADV. The dependence of the bubble population on droplet concentration, flow velocity, fluid viscosity and acoustic parameters, including acoustic pressure, pulse duration and pulse repetition frequency, was investigated. The results indicated that post-ADV bubble growth spontaneously driven by air permeation markedly affected the bubble population after insonation. The bubbles can grow to a stable equilibrium diameter as great as twice the original diameter in 0.5-1 s, as predicted by the theoretical calculation. The growth trend is independent of flow velocity, but dependent on fluid viscosity and droplet concentration, which directly influence the rate of gas uptake by bubbles and the rate of gas exchange across the wall of the semipermeable tube containing the bubbles and, hence, the gas content of the host medium. Varying the acoustic pressure does not markedly change the formation of bubbles as long as the ADV thresholds of most droplets are reached. Varying pulse duration and pulse repetition frequency markedly reduces the number of bubbles. Lengthening pulse duration favors the production of large bubbles, but reduces the total number of bubbles. Increasing the PRF interestingly provides superior performance in bubble disruption. These results also suggest that an ADV bubble population cannot be assessed simply on the basis of initial droplet size or enhancement of imaging contrast by the bubbles. Determining the optimal acoustic parameters requires careful consideration of their impact on the bubble population produced for different application scenarios.

  6. Evaluation of a virucidal quantitative carrier test for surface disinfectants.

    PubMed

    Rabenau, Holger F; Steinmann, Jochen; Rapp, Ingrid; Schwebke, Ingeborg; Eggers, Maren

    2014-01-01

    Surface disinfectants are part of broader preventive strategies preventing the transmission of bacteria, fungi and viruses in medical institutions. To evaluate their virucidal efficacy, these products must be tested with appropriate model viruses with different physico-chemical properties under conditions representing practical application in hospitals. The aim of this study was to evaluate a quantitative carrier assay. Furthermore, different putative model viruses like adenovirus type 5 (AdV-5) and different animal parvoviruses were evaluated with respect to their tenacity and practicability in laboratory handling. To evaluate the robustness of the method, some of the viruses were tested in parallel in different laboratories in a multi-center study. Different biocides, which are common active ingredients of surface disinfectants, were used in the test. After drying on stainless steel discs as the carrier, model viruses were exposed to different concentrations of three alcohols, peracetic acid (PAA) or glutaraldehyde (GDA), with a fixed exposure time of 5 minutes. Residual virus was determined after treatment by endpoint titration. All parvoviruses exhibited a similar stability with respect to GDA, while AdV-5 was more susceptible. For PAA, the porcine parvovirus was more sensitive than the other parvoviruses, and again, AdV-5 presented a higher susceptibility than the parvoviruses. All parvoviruses were resistant to alcohols, while AdV-5 was only stable when treated with 2-propanol. The analysis of the results of the multi-center study showed a high reproducibility of this test system. In conclusion, two viruses with different physico-chemical properties can be recommended as appropriate model viruses for the evaluation of the virucidal efficacy of surface disinfectants: AdV-5, which has a high clinical impact, and murine parvovirus (MVM) with the highest practicability among the parvoviruses tested. PMID:24475079

  7. Nanomodified vermiculite NMV - a new material for recycling ammonium nitrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rama, Miradije; Laiho, Taina; Eklund, Olav; Lehto, Kirsi; Shebanov, Alex; Smått, Jan-Henrik

    2016-04-01

    Vermiculites ((Mg,Fe,Al)3(Al,Si)4O10(OH)24H2O) are naturally occurring minerals from hydromica group with a high cation exchange capacity and large surface area. Since vermiculite is a hydrated mineral, its structure can be changed with heat. In this study vermiculite samples were heated in an oven until the interlayer distance of them diminished from 14 Å to 11.7 Å. This method for improving vermiculites intake of ammonium ions by heating, is an invention made at the University of Turku. Nanomodified vermiculite (NMV) is able to absorb up to 4.7 wt% of ammonium. NMV can be used as an efficient filter and immobilizer of ammonium in different environments. NMV has been efficiently tested on waste water from a biogas plant, human urine, combustion experiments, industrial chimneys, excrements from farms etc. Ammonium doped vermiculite (ADV) is further developed for fertilizer use. Performed experiments have testified the usability of ADV as a fertilizer. At first step the NMV was processed with the reject water from a biogas plant, were it absorbed NH4+ into the lattice. At second, the ADV was used as nutrient source for garden plants. Geraniums and begonias were used as test plants of the work. Plant growth rate was evaluated based on plant weight. Results showed that significant increase of the growth of geraniums and of begonias were observed when comparing to those cultivations where plants have got normal fertilization. Moreover, ADV has been tested as a fertilizer in greenhouse experiments with spruces and pines. After five months, the weight of the plants that had grown in a substrate containing ADV was 10 times the weight of plants growing in the reference substrate.

  8. Sound practices for consistent human visual inspection.

    PubMed

    Melchore, James A

    2011-03-01

    Numerous presentations and articles on manual inspection of pharmaceutical drug products have been released, since the pioneering articles on inspection by Knapp and associates Knapp and Kushner (J Parenter Drug Assoc 34:14, 1980); Knapp and Kushner (Bull Parenter Drug Assoc 34:369, 1980); Knapp and Kushner (J Parenter Sci Technol 35:176, 1981); Knapp and Kushner (J Parenter Sci Technol 37:170, 1983). This original work by Knapp and associates provided the industry with a statistical means of evaluating inspection performance. This methodology enabled measurement of individual inspector performance, performance of the entire inspector pool and provided basic suggestions for the conduct of manual inspection. Since that time, numerous subject matter experts (SMEs) have presented additional valuable information for the conduct of manual inspection Borchert et al. (J Parenter Sci Technol 40:212, 1986); Knapp and Abramson (J Parenter Sci Technol 44:74, 1990); Shabushnig et al. (1994); Knapp (1999); Knapp (2005); Cherris (2005); Budd (2005); Barber and Thomas (2005); Knapp (2005); Melchore (2007); Leversee and Ronald (2007); Melchore (2009); Budd (2007); Borchert et al. (1986); Berdovich (2005); Berdovich (2007); Knapp (2007); Leversee and Shabushing (2009); Budd (2009). Despite this abundance of knowledge, neither government regulations nor the multiple compendia provide more than minimal guidance or agreement for the conduct of manual inspection. One has to search the literature for useful information that has been published by SMEs in the field of Inspection. The purpose of this article is to restate the sound principles proclaimed by SMEs with the hope that they serve as a useful guideline to bring greater consistency to the conduct of manual inspection.

  9. A New Family of Schroder's Method and Its Variants Based on Power Means for Multiple Roots of Nonlinear Equations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kanwar, V.; Sharma, Kapil K.; Behl, Ramandeep

    2010-01-01

    In this article, we derive one-parameter family of Schroder's method based on Gupta et al.'s (K.C. Gupta, V. Kanwar, and S. Kumar, "A family of ellipse methods for solving non-linear equations", Int. J. Math. Educ. Sci. Technol. 40 (2009), pp. 571-575) family of ellipse methods for the solution of nonlinear equations. Further, we introduce new…

  10. Possibility of incongruous interface behavior of In on GaAs(110)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chin, K. K.; Lindau, I.

    1985-11-01

    Photoemission spectroscopy has been used to study the Schottky-barrier formation of In on n- and p-type GaAs(110) interfaces. Our result is different from that reported by R. R. Daniels et al. [J. Vac. Sci. Technol. A 2(2), 831 (1984)]. It is suggested that this incongruous behavior of In on GaAs(110) is due to the kinetics of interface defect formation. Various experimental details which may affect the kinetics are also discussed.

  11. Critical transition for the edge shear layer formation: Comparison of model and experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Carreras, B. A.; Garcia, L.; Pedrosa, M. A.; Hidalgo, C.

    2006-12-15

    The experimental results for the emergence of the plasma edge shear flow layer in TJ-II [C. Alehaldre et al.Fusion Technol. 17, 131 (1990)] can be explained using a simple model for a second-order transition based on the sheared flow amplification by Reynolds stress and turbulence suppression by shearing. In the dynamics of the model, the resistive interchange instability is used. This model gives power dependence on density gradients before and after the transition, consistent with experiment.

  12. Risk factors for molecular detection of adenovirus in pediatric hematopoietic stem cell transplantation recipients.

    PubMed

    Watson, Theresa; MacDonald, David; Song, Xiaoyan; Bromwich, Kira; Campos, Joseph; Sande, Jane; DeBiasi, Roberta L

    2012-08-01

    Adenovirus (AdV) infections are a major cause of morbidity and mortality in patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). To evaluate the use of molecular AdV testing in HSCT at our institution and identify risk factors for AdV viremia and disease, we performed a retrospective cohort study of all HSCT recipients who had undergone AdV polymerase chain reaction testing over a 2-year period. Two cohorts were identified: cohort 1, comprising patients testing positive for AdV (n = 7) and cohort 2, comprising patients testing negative (n = 36). Overall patient characteristics were not statistically significantly different between the 2 cohorts. A comparison of cohort 1 and cohort 2 identified the following medication exposures as risk factors influencing AdV status: preparatory regimens using fludarabine (relative risk [RR], 8.73; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.18-64.27; P = .006), melphalan (RR, 3.47; 95% CI, 0.76-15.94: P = .08), and/or cyclophosphamide (RR, 0.18; 95% CI, 0.02-1.4; P = .05), and GVHD prophylaxis with methylprednisone (RR, 3.73; 95% CI, 1.01-13.9; P = .04). AdV-positive patients had higher grades of GVHD and higher rates of GVHD of the gastrointestinal tract (RR, 4; 95% CI, 1.18-13.5; P = .03) compared with AdV-negative patients. Four of the 7 AdV-positive patients had concomitant clinical manifestations of disease, including pneumonia, diarrhea, and/or disseminated disease. Clinical outcomes in symptomatic patients included resolution of disease in 2 patients and death in 2 patients. All 7 AdV-positive patients received antiviral therapy, including 1 patient with severe disseminated disease that resolved after administration of liposomal cidofovir. Our study at a large pediatric HSCT center provides important preliminary data for the development of a prospective trial destined to identify specific HCST patient subpopulations that might benefit most from molecular screening and early preemptive therapy. PMID:22281300

  13. INITIATORS AND TRIGGERING CONDITIONS FOR ADAPTIVE AUTOMATION IN ADVANCED SMALL MODULAR REACTORS

    SciTech Connect

    Katya L Le Blanc; Johanna h Oxstrand

    2014-04-01

    It is anticipated that Advanced Small Modular Reactors (AdvSMRs) will employ high degrees of automation. High levels of automation can enhance system performance, but often at the cost of reduced human performance. Automation can lead to human out-of the loop issues, unbalanced workload, complacency, and other problems if it is not designed properly. Researchers have proposed adaptive automation (defined as dynamic or flexible allocation of functions) as a way to get the benefits of higher levels of automation without the human performance costs. Adaptive automation has the potential to balance operator workload and enhance operator situation awareness by allocating functions to the operators in a way that is sensitive to overall workload and capabilities at the time of operation. However, there still a number of questions regarding how to effectively design adaptive automation to achieve that potential. One of those questions is related to how to initiate (or trigger) a shift in automation in order to provide maximal sensitivity to operator needs without introducing undesirable consequences (such as unpredictable mode changes). Several triggering mechanisms for shifts in adaptive automation have been proposed including: operator initiated, critical events, performance-based, physiological measurement, model-based, and hybrid methods. As part of a larger project to develop design guidance for human-automation collaboration in AdvSMRs, researchers at Idaho National Laboratory have investigated the effectiveness and applicability of each of these triggering mechanisms in the context of AdvSMR. Researchers reviewed the empirical literature on adaptive automation and assessed each triggering mechanism based on the human-system performance consequences of employing that mechanism. Researchers also assessed the practicality and feasibility of using the mechanism in the context of an AdvSMR control room. Results indicate that there are tradeoffs associated with each

  14. Acoustic droplet vaporization for diagnostic and therapeutic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kripfgans, Oliver Daniel

    A technology, termed Acoustic Droplet Vaporization (ADV), is developed whereby superheated droplets are caused to vaporize by application of an ultrasonic field. The droplet emulsion (90% <6 um diameter) is made by mixing saline, albumin, and perfluorocarbon at high speed. It has been observed that an acoustic pressure threshold exists above which the droplets vaporize into bubbles approximately 25-times the original droplet diameter. For frequencies between 1.5 and 8 MHz, the threshold decreases from 4.5 to 0.75 MPa peak rarefactional pressure. The single pulse efficiency of ADV has been measured as 26%. This technology might be useful for tissue occlusion in cancer treatment as well as for aberration correction in acoustic imaging. To demonstrate these potential applications, gas bubbles were made in vivo in animal models by ADV. It was found that ADV could be used to temporarily form large gas bubbles (>30 um) in vivo, which at large number density occluded targeted tissues and reduced the blood flow by 34%. Alternatively, for a very sparse droplet population, gas bubbles could serve as potential point beacons for phase aberration correction given their backscatter amplitudes of 24 dB above tissue background. Other possible applications include drug delivery, indicator for cryo therapy, pressure/radiation beacons, hyperthermia, and cavitation nuclei. ADV of individual droplets showed that during acoustic irradiation, droplets perform dipole-type oscillations and that such oscillations increased in amplitude with acoustic intensity. Smaller droplets required more acoustic intensity for vaporization than larger droplets; however, independent of droplet diameter, a maximum oscillation amplitude of 1.3 um, was required. This threshold corresponds to a Reynolds number of ˜5 x 104. Vaporization started either as a spot on the axis of oscillation close to a pole of the droplet, or homogeneously throughout the droplet's imaged cross-section. It is concluded that

  15. Summary of the Preliminary Optical ICHMI Design Study: A Preliminary Engineering Design Study for a Standpipe Viewport

    SciTech Connect

    Anheier, Norman C.; Qiao, Hong; Berglin, Eric J.; Hatchell, Brian K.

    2013-12-26

    This summary report examines an in-vessel optical access concept intended to support standoff optical instrumentation, control and human-machine interface (ICHMI) systems for future advanced small modular reactor (AdvSMR) applications. Optical-based measurement and sensing systems for AdvSMR applications have several key benefits over traditional instrumentation and control systems used to monitor reactor process parameters, such as temperature, flow rate, pressure, and coolant chemistry (Anheier et al. 2013). Direct and continuous visualization of the in-vessel components can be maintained using external cameras. Many optical sensing techniques can be performed remotely using open optical beam path configurations. Not only are in-vessel cables eliminated by these configurations, but also sensitive optical monitoring components (e.g., electronics, lasers, detectors, and cameras) can be placed outside the reactor vessel in the instrument vault, containment building, or other locations where temperatures and radiation levels are much lower. However, the extreme AdvSMR environment present challenges for optical access designs and optical materials. Optical access is not provided in any commercial nuclear power plant or featured in any reactor design, although successful implementation of optical access has been demonstrated in test reactors (Arkani and Gharib 2009). This report outlines the key engineering considerations for an AdvSMR optical access concept. Strict American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) construction codes must be followed for any U.S. nuclear facility component (ASME 2013); however, the scope of this study is to evaluate the preliminary engineering issues for this concept, rather than developing a nuclear-qualified design. In addition, this study does not consider accident design requirements. In-vessel optical access using a standpipe viewport concept serves as a test case to explore the engineering challenges and performance requirements

  16. [Experimental gene therapy using p21/WAF1 gene in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma--adenovirus infection and gene gun technology].

    PubMed

    Fujii, T; Tanaka, Y; Tanaka, T; Matono, S; Sueyoshi, S; Fujita, H; Shirouzu, K; Kato, S; Yamana, H

    2001-10-01

    p21/WAF1 (p21) inhibits the activity of the cyclin/cdk complex and controls the G1 to S cell phase transition. In the present study, we used a recombinant adenoviral approach and gene gun technology to introduce p21 into esophageal cancer cells in order to assess the effect of p21 on cell growth. Infection with the p21 adenovirus (AdV) using gene gun technology resulted in inhibition of TE9 and KE3 cell growth. The levels of involucrin, which is a marker of squamous epithelium differentiation, markedly increased at 48 h and 72 h after p21 AdV infection in TE9 cells. These results indicate that p21 plays an important role in esophageal cancer cell proliferation. Overexpression of the p21 gene can inhibit cell growth and induce differentiation in esophageal cancer cells. p21 gene therapy may prove beneficial in the treatment of esophageal cancer.

  17. The Advanced Virgo monolithic fused silica suspension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aisa, D.; Aisa, S.; Campeggi, C.; Colombini, M.; Conte, A.; Farnesini, L.; Majorana, E.; Mezzani, F.; Montani, M.; Naticchioni, L.; Perciballi, M.; Piergiovanni, F.; Piluso, A.; Puppo, P.; Rapagnani, P.; Travasso, F.; Vicerè, A.; Vocca, H.

    2016-07-01

    The detection of gravitational waves is one of the most challenging prospects faced by experimental physicists. Suspension thermal noise is an important noise source at operating frequencies between approximately 10 and 30 Hz, and represents a limit to the sensitivity of the ground based interferometric gravitational wave detectors. Its effects can be reduced by minimizing the losses and by optimizing the geometry of the suspension fiber as well as its attachment system. In this proceeding we will describe the mirrors double stage monolithic suspension system to be used in the Advanced Virgo (AdV) detector. We also present the results of the thermal noise study, performed with the help of a finite elements model, taking into account the precise geometry of the fibers attachment systems on the suspension elements. We shall demonstrate the suitability of this suspension for installation in AdV.

  18. Integrating fluorescent dye flow-curve testing and acoustic Doppler velocimetry profiling for in situ hydraulic evaluation and improvement of clarifier performance.

    PubMed

    Tarud, F; Aybar, M; Pizarro, G; Cienfuegos, R; Pastén, P

    2010-08-01

    Enhancing the performance of clarifiers requires a thorough understanding of their hydraulics. Fluorescence spectroscopy and acoustic doppler velocimeter (ADV) profiling generally have been used separately to evaluate secondary settlers. We propose that simultaneous use of these techniques is needed to obtain a more reliable and useful evaluation. Experiments were performed on laboratory- and full-scale clarifiers. Factors affecting Fluorescein and Rhodamine 6G properties were identified. Underestimations up to 500% in fluorescence intensities may be derived from differential fluorescence quenching by oxygen. A careful control and interpretation of fluorescent dye experiments is needed to minimize artifacts in real settings. While flow-curve tests constructed under controlled conditions provided a more accurate overall quantitative estimation of the hydraulic performance, ADV velocity and turbulence profiling provided a detailed spatial understanding of flow patterns that was used to troubleshoot and fix the causes of hydraulic short-circuits.

  19. Quantifying Turbulence for Tidal Power Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Thomson, Jim; Richmond, Marshall C.; Polagye, Brian; Durgesh, Vibhav

    2010-08-01

    Using newly collected data from a tidal power site in Puget Sound, WA, metrics for turbulence quantification are assessed and discussed. The quality of raw ping Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) data for turbulence studies is evaluated against Acoustic Doppler Velocimeter (ADV) data at a point. Removal of Doppler noise from the raw ping data is shown to be a crucial step in turbulence quantification. Excluding periods of slack tide, the turbulent intensity estimates at a height of 4.6 m above the seabed are 8% and 11% from the ADCP and ADV, respectively. Estimates of the turbulent dissipation rate are more variable, from 10e-3 to 10e-1 W/m^3. An example analysis of coherent Turbulent Kinetic Energy (TKE) is presented.

  20. High-Fidelity Down-Conversion Source for Secure Communications Using On-Demand Single Photons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Tony

    2015-01-01

    AdvR, Inc., has built an efficient, fully integrated, waveguide-based source of spectrally uncorrelated photon pairs that will accelerate research and development (R&D) in the emerging field of quantum information science. Key to the innovation is the use of submicron periodically poled waveguides to produce counter propagating photon pairs, which is enabled by AdvR's patented segmented microelectrode poling technique. This novel device will provide a high brightness source of down-conversion pairs with enhanced spectral properties and low attenuation, and it will operate in the visible to the mid-infrared spectral region. A waveguide-based source of spectrally and spatially pure heralded photons will contribute to a wide range of NASA's advanced technology development efforts, including on-demand single photon sources for high-rate spaced-based secure communications.

  1. TIDAL TURBULENCE SPECTRA FROM A COMPLIANT MOORING

    SciTech Connect

    Thomson, Jim; Kilcher, Levi; Richmond, Marshall C.; Talbert, Joe; deKlerk, Alex; Polagye, Brian; Guerra, Maricarmen; Cienfuegos, Rodrigo

    2013-06-13

    A compliant mooring to collect high frequency turbulence data at a tidal energy site is evaluated in a series of short demon- stration deployments. The Tidal Turbulence Mooring (TTM) improves upon recent bottom-mounted approaches by suspend- ing Acoustic Doppler Velocimeters (ADVs) at mid-water depths (which are more relevant to tidal turbines). The ADV turbulence data are superior to Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) data, but are subject to motion contamination when suspended on a mooring in strong currents. In this demonstration, passive stabilization is shown to be sufficient for acquiring bulk statistics of the turbulence, without motion correction. With motion cor- rection (post-processing), data quality is further improved; the relative merits of direct and spectral motion correction are dis- cussed.

  2. Coordinating Chemical and Mineralogical Analyses of Antarctic Dry Valley Sediments as Potential Analogs for Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patel, S. N.; Bishop, J. L.; Englert, P.; Gibson, E. K.

    2015-01-01

    The Antarctic Dry Valleys (ADV) provide a unique terrestrial analog for Martian surface processes as they are extremely cold and dry sedimentary environments. The surface geology and the chemical composition of the Dry Valleys that are similar to Mars suggest the possible presence of these soil-formation processes on Mars. The soils and sediments from Wright Valley, Antarctica were investigated in this study to examine mineralogical and chemical changes along the surface layer in this region and as a function of depth. Surface samples collected near Prospect Mesa and Don Juan Pond of the ADV were analyzed using visible/near-infrared (VNIR) and mid-IR reflectance spectroscopy and major and trace element abundances.

  3. Demonstration of a mid-water mooring for tidal turbulence measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomson, J. M.; Talbert, J.; deKlerk, A.; Richmond, M. C.; Durgesh, V.; Polagye, B. L.; Kilcher, L. F.; Nelson, E.

    2012-12-01

    An approach to collect high frequency turbulence data at a tidal energy site is evaluated in a short demonstration deployment. The Tidal Turbulence Mooring improves upon recent bottom-mounted approaches by suspending Acoustic Doppler Velocimeters (ADVs) at mid-water depths (which are relevant to tidal turbines). The ADV turbulence data are superior to Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) data, but are subject to motion contamination when suspended on a mooring in strong currents. In this demonstration, passive stabilization is shown to be sufficient for acquiring bulk statistics of the turbulence, without motion correction. With motion correction (post-processing), data quality is further improved; the relative merits of direct and spectral motion correction are investigated.

  4. Pathologic Femoral Neck Fracture Due to Fanconi Syndrome Induced by Adefovir Dipivoxil Therapy for Hepatitis B.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yoon-Suk; Kim, Byung-Kook; Lee, Ho-Jae; Dan, Jinmyoung

    2016-06-01

    In Fanconi syndrome, hypophosphatemic osteomalacia is caused by proximal renal tubule dysfunction which leads to impaired reabsorption of amino acids, glucose, urate, and phosphate. We present a rare case of a 43-year-old Korean male who was found to have insufficiency stress fracture of the femoral neck secondary to osteomalacia due to Fanconi syndrome. He had been receiving low-dose adefovir dipivoxil (ADV, 10 mg/day) for the treatment of chronic hepatitis B virus infection for 7 years and he subsequently developed severe hypophosphatemia and proximal renal tubule dysfunction. The incomplete femoral neck fracture was fixed with multiple cannulated screws to prevent further displacement of the initial fracture. After cessation of ADV and correction of hypophosphatemia with oral phosphorus supplementation, the patient's clinical symptoms, such as bone pain, muscle weakness, and laboratory findings improved. PMID:27247753

  5. Integrating fluorescent dye flow-curve testing and acoustic Doppler velocimetry profiling for in situ hydraulic evaluation and improvement of clarifier performance.

    PubMed

    Tarud, F; Aybar, M; Pizarro, G; Cienfuegos, R; Pastén, P

    2010-08-01

    Enhancing the performance of clarifiers requires a thorough understanding of their hydraulics. Fluorescence spectroscopy and acoustic doppler velocimeter (ADV) profiling generally have been used separately to evaluate secondary settlers. We propose that simultaneous use of these techniques is needed to obtain a more reliable and useful evaluation. Experiments were performed on laboratory- and full-scale clarifiers. Factors affecting Fluorescein and Rhodamine 6G properties were identified. Underestimations up to 500% in fluorescence intensities may be derived from differential fluorescence quenching by oxygen. A careful control and interpretation of fluorescent dye experiments is needed to minimize artifacts in real settings. While flow-curve tests constructed under controlled conditions provided a more accurate overall quantitative estimation of the hydraulic performance, ADV velocity and turbulence profiling provided a detailed spatial understanding of flow patterns that was used to troubleshoot and fix the causes of hydraulic short-circuits. PMID:20853746

  6. Novel bat adenoviruses with an extremely large E3 gene.

    PubMed

    Tan, Bing; Yang, Xing-Lou; Ge, Xing-Yi; Peng, Cheng; Zhang, Yun-Zhi; Zhang, Li-Biao; Shi, Zheng-Li

    2016-07-01

    Bats carry diverse RNA viruses, some of which are responsible for human diseases. Compared to bat-borne RNA viruses, relatively little information is known regarding bat-borne DNA viruses. In this study, we isolated and characterized three novel bat adenoviruses (BtAdV WIV9-11) from Rhinolophus sinicus. Their genomes, which are highly similar to each other but distinct from those of previously sequenced adenoviruses (AdVs), are 37 545, 37 566 and 38 073 bp in size, respectively. An unusually large E3 gene was identified in their genomes. Phylogenetic and taxonomic analyses suggested that these isolates represent a distinct species of the genus Mastadenovirus. Cell susceptibility assays revealed a broad cell tropism for these isolates, indicating that they have a potentially wide host range. Our results expand the understanding of genetic diversity of bat AdVs. PMID:27032099

  7. Bead-rod-spring models in random flows.

    PubMed

    Plan, Emmanuel Lance Christopher Vi Medillo; Ali, Aamir; Vincenzi, Dario

    2016-08-01

    Bead-rod-spring models are the foundation of the kinetic theory of polymer solutions. We derive the diffusion equation for the probability density function of the configuration of a general bead-rod-spring model in short-correlated Gaussian random flows. Under isotropic conditions, we solve this equation analytically for the elastic rhombus model introduced by Curtiss, Bird, and Hassager [Adv. Chem. Phys. 35, 31 (1976)]. PMID:27627227

  8. Viral etiology of acute lower respiratory tract infections in hospitalized young children in a children's referral hospital in Iran.

    PubMed

    Pourakbari, Babak; Mahmoudi, Shima; Movahedi, Zahra; Halimi, Shahnaz; Momeni, Shervin; Hosseinpour-Sadeghi, Reihaneh; Mamishi, Setareh

    2014-01-01

    Viruses are considered major causes of acute respiratory tract infections among children under 5 years old. In this study we investigated the prevalence of three respiratory viruses--respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), influenza virus (INF) and adenovirus (ADV)--among hospitalized children with acute viral lower respiratory tract infections (LRTIs). Nasopharyngeal aspirates were collected from children under five who had been hospitalized for LRTIs. The clinical data, including demographic data (age and sex), vital symptoms and signs at admission, duration of fever, duration of hospitalization, chest X-ray findings and outcome were considered. All inpatient specimens were tested by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) for RSV and the INF-A, INF-B and parainfluenza viruses and by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for ADV. Out of those from 232 patients, 58 (25%) specimens were positive for either RSV, INF or ADV. The most predominant pathogens were RSV (40 cases, 17.2%), followed by INF (10 cases, 4%; including 8 type A and 2 type B) and ADV (8 cases, 3.4%). A total of 32 (55.1%) viral cases were identified in the spring, followed by 19 (32.7%) in the autumn and 7 (12%) in the winter. There was no significant correlation between clinical symptoms and the individual virus detected. In our study, RSV and INF were the two most common causes of LRTIs. These data are helpful for guiding the development of further vaccines as well as the use of antiviral drugs. Further studies will be needed to investigate other respiratory viruses such as parainfluenza, human metapneumovirus and rhinovirus. PMID:25818953

  9. Detection and molecular characterization of diarrhea causing viruses in single and mixed infections in children: a comparative study between Bangladesh and Turkey.

    PubMed

    Mitui, Marcelo Takahiro; Bozdayi, Gulendam; Ahmed, Selim; Matsumoto, Takashi; Nishizono, Akira; Ahmed, Kamruddin

    2014-07-01

    The incidence and mortality caused by diarrhea differ among countries. The prevalence of different enteric viruses, their molecular characteristics, and infections with multiple viruses might affect the disease incidence and mortality caused by diarrhea. The objective of this study was to determine the distribution and molecular characteristics of enteric viruses in children with diarrhea in Turkey and Bangladesh. A total of 288 stool samples that were negative for group A rotavirus were collected from children aged <5 years with acute diarrhea who presented to hospitals in Turkey and Bangladesh. The samples were screened for human bocavirus (HBoV), astrovirus (HAstV), norovirus (NoV), and adenovirus (AdV). Phylogenetic analyses of the targeted virus genes were performed. In Turkey, viruses were detected in 87/150 samples (58%), which included 69 (79.3%) with single viruses and 18 (20.7%) with multiple viruses. AdV was the most common virus, followed by HBoV. In Bangladesh, viruses were detected in 123/138 samples (89.1%), which included 29 (23.6%) with single viruses and 94 (76.4%) with multiple viruses. NoV GII was the most common, followed by AdV. The dominant genotypes among the virus species were HBoV 2A, HAstV 1, NoV GI type 1, and AdV 40. For NoV GII, the Hunter variant of genotype 4 in Turkey and genotype 17 in Bangladesh were the most common among the sequenced strains. It was concluded that the distribution of the viruses associated with diarrhea in Turkish and Bangladeshi children was different. Enteric viruses and mixed infections were more prevalent in Bangladesh than in Turkey. PMID:24105741

  10. The Sturm-Liouville Hierarchy of Evolution Equations and Limits of Algebro-Geometric Initial Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Russell; Zampogni, Luca

    2014-03-01

    The Sturm-Liouville hierarchy of evolution equations was introduced in [Adv. Nonlinear Stud. 11 (2011), 555-591] and includes the Korteweg-de Vries and the Camassa-Holm hierarchies. We discuss some solutions of this hierarchy which are obtained as limits of algebro-geometric solutions. The initial data of our solutions are (generalized) reflectionless Sturm-Liouville potentials [Stoch. Dyn. 8 (2008), 413-449].

  11. [Effects of different ecological conditions on grain quality and RVA profile of japonica rice from Yunnan of China and Korea].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhen-hua; Kim, Ki-young; Yuan, Ping-rong; Zhao, Guo-zhen; Su, Zhen-xi; Liao, Xin-hua; Yang, Sea-jun; Dai, Lu-yuan

    2009-12-01

    Taking sixteen japonica rice varieties from Yunnan of China and Korea growing at three locations with different altitudes in Yunnan Plateau as test materials, this paper studied the effects of different ecological conditions on their grain quality, including brown rice length (BRL), brown rice width (BRW), length-width ratio (L/W), chalky rate (CR), whiteness (WH), amylose content (AC), protein content (PC), and alkali digestion value (ADV), and their starch RVA profile, including peak viscosity (PKV), hot viscosity (HTV), final viscosity (FLV), breakdown viscosity (BDV), setback viscosity (SBV), consistence viscosity( CTV), peak time (PeT), and pasting temperature (PaT). Of all the test parameters, SBV had the largest coefficient of variation. The coefficients of variation of BRL, CR, AC, PC, ADV, FLV, SBV, and PeT of Yunnan varieties were higher than those of Korean varieties, while the BRW, L/W, WH, PKV, HTV, BDV, CTV, and PaT of Korean varieties had higher coefficients of variation than those of Yunnan varieties. With increasing altitude, the BRL, BRW, L/W, WH, AC, ADV, FLV, and CTV of Yunnan varieties, and the BRL, BRW, WH, PC, PKV, HTV and BDV of Korean varieties decreased significantly, while the CR, PC, HTV, and PeT of Yunnan varieties, and the L/W, AC, ADV, SBV and CTV of Korean varieties increased significantly. The CR of Korean varieties had no obvious change. The PKV, BDV, and PaT of Yunnan varieties and the PaT of Korean varieties increased after an initial decrease, whereas the SBV of Yunnan varieties and the FLV and PeT of Korean varieties were in reverse. PMID:20353061

  12. Muscle-specific overexpression of the adenovirus primary receptor CAR overcomes low efficiency of gene transfer to mature skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Nalbantoglu, J; Larochelle, N; Wolf, E; Karpati, G; Lochmuller, H; Holland, P C

    2001-05-01

    Significant levels of adenovirus (Ad)-mediated gene transfer occur only in immature muscle or in regenerating muscle, indicating that a developmentally regulated event plays a major role in limiting transgene expression in mature skeletal muscle. We have previously shown that in developing mouse muscle, expression of the primary Ad receptor CAR is severely downregulated during muscle maturation. To evaluate how global expression of CAR throughout muscle affects Ad vector (AdV)-mediated gene transfer into mature skeletal muscle, we produced transgenic mice that express the CAR cDNA under the control of the muscle-specific creatine kinase promoter. Five-month-old transgenic mice were compared to their nontransgenic littermates for their susceptibility to AdV transduction. In CAR transgenics that had been injected in the tibialis anterior muscle with AdVCMVlacZ, increased gene transfer was demonstrated by the increase in the number of transduced muscle fibers (433 +/- 121 in transgenic mice versus 8 +/- 4 in nontransgenic littermates) as well as the 25-fold increase in overall beta-galactosidase activity. Even when the reporter gene was driven by a more efficient promoter (the cytomegalovirus enhancer-chicken beta-actin gene promoter), differential transducibility was still evident (893 +/- 149 versus 153 +/- 30 fibers; P < 0.001). Furthermore, a fivefold decrease in the titer of injected AdV still resulted in significant transduction of muscle (253 +/- 130 versus 14 +/- 4 fibers). The dramatic enhancement in AdV-mediated gene transfer to mature skeletal muscle that is observed in the CAR transgenics indicates that prior modulation of the level of CAR expression can overcome the poor AdV transducibility of mature skeletal muscle and significant transduction can be obtained at low titers of AdV.

  13. An Updated Methodology for Enhancing Risk Monitors with Integrated Equipment Condition Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Hirt, Evelyn H.; Coles, Garill A.; Bonebrake, Christopher A.; Ivans, William J.; Wootan, David W.; Mitchell, Mark R.

    2014-07-18

    Small modular reactors (SMRs) generally include reactors with electric output of ~350 MWe or less (this cutoff varies somewhat but is substantially less than full-size plant output of 700 MWe or more). Advanced SMRs (AdvSMRs) refer to a specific class of SMRs and are based on modularization of advanced reactor concepts. Enhancing affordability of AdvSMRs will be critical to ensuring wider deployment, as AdvSMRs suffer from loss of economies of scale inherent in small reactors when compared to large (~greater than 600 MWe output) reactors and the controllable day-to-day costs of AdvSMRs will be dominated by operation and maintenance (O&M) costs. Technologies that help characterize real-time risk are important for controlling O&M costs. Risk monitors are used in current nuclear power plants to provide a point-in-time estimate of the system risk given the current plant configuration (e.g., equipment availability, operational regime, and environmental conditions). However, current risk monitors are unable to support the capability requirements listed above as they do not take into account plant-specific normal, abnormal, and deteriorating states of active components and systems. This report documents technology developments towards enhancing risk monitors that, if integrated with supervisory plant control systems, can provide the capability requirements listed and meet the goals of controlling O&M costs. The report describes research results on augmenting an initial methodology for enhanced risk monitors that integrate real-time information about equipment condition and POF into risk monitors. Methods to propagate uncertainty through the enhanced risk monitor are evaluated. Available data to quantify the level of uncertainty and the POF of key components are examined for their relevance, and a status update of this data evaluation is described. Finally, we describe potential targets for developing new risk metrics that may be useful for studying trade-offs for economic

  14. Safety, immunogenicity, and tolerability of three influenza vaccines in older adults: results of a randomized, controlled comparison.

    PubMed

    Scheifele, David W; McNeil, Shelly A; Ward, Brian J; Dionne, Marc; Cooper, Curtis; Coleman, Brenda; Loeb, Mark; Rubinstein, Ethan; McElhaney, Janet; Hatchette, Todd; Li, Yan; Montomoli, Emanuele; Schneeberg, Amy; Bettinger, Julie A; Halperin, Scott A

    2013-11-01

    To determine if newer influenza vaccines can safely improve seroprotection rates of older adults, we compared three licensed trivalent inactivated vaccines (TIVs) in a randomized, controlled trial with evaluator blinding. Participants were non-frail adults ≥ 65 y old, annually TIV-immunized. Study vaccines included intradermal (IDV), MF59-adjuvanted (ADV) and subunit (TIV) formulations of equal potency and strain composition. Blood was obtained before vaccination (V1) and 21 (V2) and 180 d (V3) afterward and tested by hemagglutination inhibition (HAI) assay. Safety diaries were completed daily by participants and specific tolerability questions were posed regarding injections and symptoms. In total, 911 participants were immunized and 887 (97.4%) completed V3. Groups had similar demographics. General symptom rates post-vaccination were similar among groups. Rates of injection site redness after IDV/ADV/TIV were 75%/13%/13% and rates of pain were 29%/38%/20%, respectively, but each vaccine was well tolerated, with symptoms causing little bother. Baseline antibody titers did not differ significantly among groups but B/Brisbane titers were too high for meaningful response assessments. At V2, seroprotection rates (HAI titer ≥ 40) were highest after ADV, the rate advantage over IDV and TIV being significant at 11.8% and 11.4% for H3N2 and 10.2% and 12.5% for H1N1, respectively. At day 180, seroprotection rates had declined ~25% and no longer differed significantly among groups. While IDV and TIV were also well tolerated, ADV induced modestly higher antibody titers in seniors to influenza A strains at 3 weeks but not 6 mo post-vaccination. Immune responses to IDV and TIV were similar in this population.

  15. Field measurement of critical shear stress for erosion and deposition of fine muddy sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salehi, M.; Strom, K. B.; Field Study

    2010-12-01

    The movement of muddy sediment from one region to another is linked to the fate and transport of pollutants that can be attached to this sediment. Important in understanding this movement is the need to know the critical conditions for erosion and deposition of the fine muddy sediment. For non-cohesion sediment, such as sands and gravels, reasonable estimates for the critical conditions can often be made theoretically without in situ measurements of the critical fluid condition or sediment transport rate. However, the shear stress needed for the incipient motion of the mud (cohesive sediments) is inherently difficult to calculate theoretically or in research flumes due to the influence of (1) flow history; (2) local sediment composition; (3) biological activity within the bed; (4) water content of the bed; and (5) salinity of the water column. The complexity of the combination of these factors makes the field measurement necessary. A field experiment was conducted under tidal flow in the region surrounding the Houston Ship Channel (near Houston, TX) to determine these conditions. Observations were made using single point, simultaneous, in situ measurement of turbulent flow and suspended sediment concentration within bottom boundary layer. Measurements were primarily made with a 6 MHz Nortek Vector velocimeter (ADV). The ADV was programmed to record 3-minute turbulent velocity with 32 Hz frequency every 10 minute. The suspended sediment concentration (SSC) was measured using the calibration of acoustic backscatter recorded by ADV against sample derived SSC. Different methods such as turbulent kinetic energy (TKE), TKEw and direct covariance method (COV) are compared together. TKE showed much more reasonable estimation on bed shear stress. Combination of time varying SSC, distance from the bed to the sampling volume recorded by ADV and calculation of shear stress made the determination of critical conditions for erosion and deposition possible.

  16. Hopf algebras and topological recursion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esteves, João N.

    2015-11-01

    We consider a model for topological recursion based on the Hopf algebra of planar binary trees defined by Loday and Ronco (1998 Adv. Math. 139 293-309 We show that extending this Hopf algebra by identifying pairs of nearest neighbor leaves, and thus producing graphs with loops, we obtain the full recursion formula discovered by Eynard and Orantin (2007 Commun. Number Theory Phys. 1 347-452).

  17. Adenovirus-mediated p53 and ING4 gene co-transfer elicits synergistic antitumor effects through enhancement of p53 acetylation in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jie; Zhu, Yanbo; Xu, Chun; Xu, Hong; Zhou, Xiumin; Yang, Jicheng; Xie, Yufeng; Tao, Min

    2016-01-01

    Multigene-based combination therapy may be an effective practice in cancer gene therapy. Substantial studies have demonstrated that tumor suppressor p53 acetylation is indispensable for p53 activation. Inhibitor of growth 4 (ING4), as a novel tumor suppressor, is capable of remarkably enhancing p53 acetylation and its transcriptional activity. Hence, we assumed that combined treatment of p53 and ING4 double tumor suppressors would exhibit enhanced antitumor effects. The combined therapeutic efficacy of p53 and ING4 for human cancers has not been previously reported. We thus generated multiple promoter expression cassette-based recombinant adenovirus-co-expressing ING4 and p53 double tumor suppressor genes (AdVING4/p53), evaluated the combined effects of AdVING4/p53 on breast cancer using the MDA-MB-231 (mutant p53) human breast cancer cell line, and also elucidated its underlying molecular mechanisms. We demonstrated that AdVING4/p53-mediated p53 and ING4 co-expression induced synergistic growth inhibition and apoptosis as well as enhanced effects on upregulation of acetylated p53, P21, Bax, PUMA, Noxa, cleaved caspase-9, cleaved caspase-3 and cleaved PARP, and downregulation of Bcl-2, CD31 and microvessel density (MVD) in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer in vitro and/or in vivo subcutaneous (s.c.) xenografted tumors. The synergistic antitumor activity elicited by AdVING4/p53 was closely associated with the enhanced activation of the intrinsic apoptotic pathway and synergistic inhibition of tumor angiogenesis, very possibly via ING4-mediated enhancement of p53 acetylation and activity. Thus, our results indicate that cancer gene therapy combining two or more tumor suppressors such as p53 and ING4 may constitute a novel and effective therapeutic modality for human breast cancer and other cancers.

  18. Epidemiologic differences of four major respiratory viruses between children, adolescents, and adults in Korea.

    PubMed

    Seo, Yu Bin; Cheong, Hee Jin; Song, Joon Young; Noh, Ji Youn; Kim, In Seon; Song, Dae Jin; Kim, Woo Joo

    2014-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the epidemiology of four major respiratory viruses among the Korean population. This retrospective study was conducted over four years, from January 2005 to December 2008. Among a total of 23,806 specimens, 5512 virus isolates underwent culture for influenza A and B viruses (IFA/B), parainfluenza virus (PIV), respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), and adenovirus (ADV). Patients were divided into two groups: children/adolescents and adults. The viruses detected in specimens from children/adolescents included PIV (7.8%), RSV (7.3%), ADV (4.0%), IFA (2.9%), and IFB (2.2%). In adults, IFB (5.6%), IFA (4.4%), RSV (1.1%), PIV (0.5%), and ADV (0.2%) were detected, thus demonstrating two distinct patterns of virus infection. Influenza viruses had similar seasonal patterns and periods of infection among children/adolescents and adults; however, the isolation rate in adults was slightly higher than that in children and adolescents. Correlation coefficient analysis based on weekly seasonal patterns indicated that influenza viruses were detected a week earlier in children than in adults. RSV, PIV, and ADV did not show similar trends between the two age groups due to low detection rates and sporadic isolations among adult patients. Of note, different respiratory viruses should be considered depending on patient age when a clinical respiratory viral infection is suspected. Furthermore, in the case of influenza, a preceding epidemic among a pediatric population could be useful to predict a subsequent epidemic among adults.

  19. A five years study of antiviral effect of entecavir in Chinese chronic hepatitis B patients

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Kehui; Xiang, Xiaogang; Bao, Rebecca; Chen, Rong; Liu, Yunye; Xie, Jingdong; Guo, Qing; Bao, Shisan; Xie, Qing; Wang, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Entecavir (ETV) is a potent viral replication inhibitor for chronic hepatitis B (CHB) patients. To investigate the efficacy of ETV in Chinese nucleos(t)ide(NA)-experienced CHB patients. Among 89 CHB patients with ETV monotherapy for ≥6 months, 33/89 (37%) or 56/89 (73%) were NA-naïve or NA-experienced. During a median follow-up of 5.75 years, all NA-naïve CHB patients achieved VR without genotypic ETV-resistance. However, VR was observed in 50/56 (~90%) of NA-experienced CHB patients during a median follow-up of 4.75 years. Antiviral efficacy was not reduced in patients with previous lamivudine (LAM) with/without LAM-resistance (HR 0.465; 95% CI 0.196–1.100; p > 0.05) (HR 0.472; 95% CI 0.205–1.091; p > 0.05). Patients with a primary treatment failure to adefovir (ADV) had a reduced probability of achieving VR compared to NA-naïve (HR 0.496; 95% CI 0.287–0.857; p < 0.01). Previous ADV-experienced patients with a partial VR (HR 1.253; 95% CI 0.429–3.665; p > 0.05) did not influence antiviral response to ETV. The antiviral efficacy of ETV is not influenced by previous treatment LAM with/without LAM-resistance. ETV may still be an option in ADV-experienced patients with a partial VR, but not advised in patients with a primary treatment failure to ADV. PMID:27364728

  20. A five years study of antiviral effect of entecavir in Chinese chronic hepatitis B patients.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kehui; Xiang, Xiaogang; Bao, Rebecca; Chen, Rong; Liu, Yunye; Xie, Jingdong; Guo, Qing; Bao, Shisan; Xie, Qing; Wang, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Entecavir (ETV) is a potent viral replication inhibitor for chronic hepatitis B (CHB) patients. To investigate the efficacy of ETV in Chinese nucleos(t)ide(NA)-experienced CHB patients. Among 89 CHB patients with ETV monotherapy for ≥6 months, 33/89 (37%) or 56/89 (73%) were NA-naïve or NA-experienced. During a median follow-up of 5.75 years, all NA-naïve CHB patients achieved VR without genotypic ETV-resistance. However, VR was observed in 50/56 (~90%) of NA-experienced CHB patients during a median follow-up of 4.75 years. Antiviral efficacy was not reduced in patients with previous lamivudine (LAM) with/without LAM-resistance (HR 0.465; 95% CI 0.196-1.100; p > 0.05) (HR 0.472; 95% CI 0.205-1.091; p > 0.05). Patients with a primary treatment failure to adefovir (ADV) had a reduced probability of achieving VR compared to NA-naïve (HR 0.496; 95% CI 0.287-0.857; p < 0.01). Previous ADV-experienced patients with a partial VR (HR 1.253; 95% CI 0.429-3.665; p > 0.05) did not influence antiviral response to ETV. The antiviral efficacy of ETV is not influenced by previous treatment LAM with/without LAM-resistance. ETV may still be an option in ADV-experienced patients with a partial VR, but not advised in patients with a primary treatment failure to ADV. PMID:27364728

  1. Microgravity can activate signals urging cells to S-phase entry during tissue and organ regeneration in Urodele amphibians exposed to real and simulated microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigoryan, E.; Anton, H.-J.; Mitashov, V.

    Regenerative response following local injury or tissue removal in urodele amphibians is dependent on cell cycle entry of cells sources for regeneration in the remaining tissue. In a number of our experiments performed aboard biosatellites in orbital flights and fast rotated clinostat we found enhanced proliferative activity and, as a result, regeneration quicker than that in controls. In each investigated case an activity of cell proliferation evaluated by 3H-thymidine radioautography and BrdU assay at the early stages of lens, retina, forelimb and tail regeneration in newts was about 1,2-1,7 fold higher both under conditions of real and physiological weightlessness as compared with controls. Faster S-phase entry under conditions of micro- g was demonstrated by cycling multipotent cells as well as by differentiated postmitotic cells both participated in regeneration. Important, that cycling cells outside areas of regeneration were also found as displayed faster cellular growth. In our papers (1,2,3,4) we offered some hypothesis that could explain mechanisms of low g stimulating effect upon cell growth in regeneration in Urodela. In particular, changes in expression of some growth factors and their receptors, as well as the synthesis of specific range of generalized stress proteins (AGSPs) were proposed. However, in fact, molecular mechanisms of micro- g effect upon cell proliferation are mediated by changes on organismic level induced by micro- g environment. Some of them which are able to trigger off signaling changes on the cellular level that, in turn, evoke cells to grow faster would be represented in our report. 1. Mitashov V. et al. Adv. Space Res. 1996. 17 (6/7): 241-255 2. Anton H.-J. et al. Adv. Space Res. 1996. 17 (6/7): 55-65 3. Grigoryan E. et al. Adv. Space Res. 1998. 22 (2): 293-301 4. Grigoryan E. et al. Adv. Space Res. 2002. 30 (4): 757-764

  2. Clinical and epidemiological features of respiratory virus infections in preschool children over two consecutive influenza seasons in southern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Giamberardin, Heloisa I G; Homsani, Sheila; Bricks, Lucia F; Pacheco, Ana P O; Guedes, Matilde; Debur, Maria C; Raboni, Sonia M

    2016-08-01

    This study reports the results of a systematic screening for respiratory viruses in pediatric outpatients from an emergency department (ED) in southern Brazil during two consecutive influenza seasons. Children eligible for enrollment in this study were aged 24-59 months and presented with acute respiratory symptoms and fever. Naso- and oropharyngeal swabs were collected and multiplex reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR) was performed to identify the respiratory viruses involved. In total, 492 children were included in this study: 248 in 2010 and 244 in 2011. In 2010, 136 samples (55%) were found to be positive for at least one virus and the most frequently detected viruses were human rhinovirus (HRV) (18%), adenovirus (AdV) (13%), and human coronavirus (CoV) (5%). In 2011, 158 samples (65%) were found to be positive for at least one virus, and the most frequently detected were HRV (29%), AdV (12%), and enterovirus (9%). Further, the presence of asthma (OR, 3.17; 95% CI, 1.86-5.46) was independently associated with HRV infection, whereas fever was associated with AdV (OR, 3.86; 95% CI, 1.31-16.52) and influenza infections (OR, 3.74; 95% CI, 1.26-16.06). Ten patients (2%) were diagnosed with pneumonia, and six of these tested positive for viral infection (4 HRV, 1 RSV, and 1 AdV). Thus, this study identified the most common respiratory viruses found in preschool children in the study region and demonstrated their high frequency, highlighting the need for improved data collection, and case management in order to stimulate preventive measures against these infections. J. Med. Virol. 88:1325-1333, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Technical Readiness and Gaps Analysis of Commercial Optical Materials and Measurement Systems for Advanced Small Modular Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Anheier, Norman C.; Suter, Jonathan D.; Qiao, Hong; Andersen, Eric S.; Berglin, Eric J.; Bliss, Mary; Cannon, Bret D.; Devanathan, Ramaswami; Mendoza, Albert; Sheen, David M.

    2013-08-06

    This report intends to support Department of Energy’s Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) Nuclear Energy Research and Development Roadmap and industry stakeholders by evaluating optical-based instrumentation and control (I&C) concepts for advanced small modular reactor (AdvSMR) applications. These advanced designs will require innovative thinking in terms of engineering approaches, materials integration, and I&C concepts to realize their eventual viability and deployability. The primary goals of this report include: 1. Establish preliminary I&C needs, performance requirements, and possible gaps for AdvSMR designs based on best available published design data. 2. Document commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) optical sensors, components, and materials in terms of their technical readiness to support essential AdvSMR in-vessel I&C systems. 3. Identify technology gaps by comparing the in-vessel monitoring requirements and environmental constraints to COTS optical sensor and materials performance specifications. 4. Outline a future research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) program plan that addresses these gaps and develops optical-based I&C systems that enhance the viability of future AdvSMR designs. The development of clean, affordable, safe, and proliferation-resistant nuclear power is a key goal that is documented in the Nuclear Energy Research and Development Roadmap. This roadmap outlines RD&D activities intended to overcome technical, economic, and other barriers, which currently limit advances in nuclear energy. These activities will ensure that nuclear energy remains a viable component to this nation’s energy security.

  4. Degeneration of Trigonometric Dynamical Difference Equations for Quantum Loop Algebras to Trigonometric Casimir Equations for Yangians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balagović, Martina

    2015-03-01

    We show that, under Drinfeld's degeneration (Proceedings of the International Congress of Mathematicians. American Mathematical Society, Providence, pp 798-820, 1987) of quantum loop algebras to Yangians, the trigonometric dynamical difference equations [Etingof and Varchenko (Adv Math 167:74-127, 2002)] for the quantum affine algebra degenerate to the trigonometric Casimir differential equations [Toledano Laredo (J Algebra 329:286-327, 2011)] for Yangians.

  5. Comments on “Steady- and transient-state inversion in hydrogeology by successive flux estimation” by P. Pasquier and D. Marcotte

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponzini, Giansilvio; Giudici, Mauro; Vassena, Chiara

    2007-09-01

    Pasquier and Marcotte [Pasquier P, Marcotte D. Steady- and transient-state inversion in hydrogeology by successive flux estimation. Adv Wat Res 2006;29:1934-52] propose some modifications to the Comparison Model Method (CMM), in order to apply it to transient 3D ground water flow data for conductivity identification. We present some remarks on that paper to improve the comprehension of the basic features of the CMM and of the real value of the novelties introduced by Pasquier and Marcotte.

  6. Respiratory Viral Detections During Symptomatic and Asymptomatic Periods in Young Andean Children

    PubMed Central

    Howard, Leigh M.; Johnson, Monika; Williams, John V.; Zhu, Yuwei; Gil, Ana I.; Edwards, Kathryn M.; Griffin, Marie R.; Lanata, Claudio F.; Grijalva, Carlos G.

    2015-01-01

    Background Viruses are commonly detected in children with acute respiratory illnesses (ARI) and in asymptomatic children. Longitudinal studies of viral detections during asymptomatic periods surrounding ARI could facilitate interpretation of viral detections but are currently scant. Methods We used reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) to analyze respiratory samples from young Andean children for viruses during asymptomatic periods within 8-120 days of index ARI (cough or fever). We compared viral detections over time within children and explored RT-PCR cycle thresholds (CT) as surrogates for viral loads. Results At least one respiratory virus was detected in 367 (43%) of 859 samples collected during asymptomatic periods, with more frequent detections in periods with rhinorrhea (49%) than those without (34%, p<0.001). Relative to index ARI with human rhinovirus (HRV), adenovirus (AdV), respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), and parainfluenza virus (PIV) detected, the same virus was also detected during 32%, 22%, 10%, and 3% of asymptomatic periods, respectively. RSV was only detected 8-30 days after index RSV ARI, whereas HRV and AdV were detected throughout asymptomatic periods. Human metapneumovirus (MPV) and influenza were rarely detected during asymptomatic periods (<3%). No significant differences were observed in the CT for HRV or AdV during asymptomatic periods relative to ARI. For RSV, CT were significantly lower during ARI relative to the asymptomatic period (p=0.03). Conclusions These findings indicate that influenza, MPV, PIV, and RSV detections in children with ARI usually indicate a causal relationship. When HRV or AdV is detected during ARI, the causal relationship is less certain. PMID:26121205

  7. Quantizing the Discrete Painlevé VI Equation: The Lax Formalism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasegawa, Koji

    2013-08-01

    A discretization of Painlevé VI equation was obtained by Jimbo and Sakai (Lett Math Phys 38:145-154, 1996). There are two ways to quantize it: (1) use the affine Weyl group symmetry (of {D_5^{(1)}}) (Hasegawa in Adv Stud Pure Math 61:275-288, 2011), (2) Lax formalism, i.e. monodromy preserving point of view. It turns out that the second approach is also successful and gives the same quantization as in the first approach.

  8. Typing of human adenoviruses in specimens from immunosuppressed patients by PCR-fragment length analysis and real-time quantitative PCR.

    PubMed

    Ebner, Karin; Rauch, Margit; Preuner, Sandra; Lion, Thomas

    2006-08-01

    Currently, 51 human adenovirus (AdV) serotypes, which are divided into six species (A to F), are known. AdV infections are a major cause of morbidity and mortality in immunosuppressed individuals, particularly in allogeneic stem cell transplant (SCT) recipients. Any AdV species may cause life-threatening disease, but little information is available on the clinical relevance of individual serotypes. The use of serological testing for serotype identification is limited due to the impaired immune response during the posttransplant period. A new molecular approach to serotype identification is presented here that exploits variable regions within the hexon gene. All serotypes belonging to the species A, B, C, E, and F can be determined by fragment length analysis of a single PCR product. For species C, which is the most prevalent in many geographic regions, an alternative technique based on serotype-specific real-time quantitative PCR was established. Of 135 consecutive pediatric patients screened for AdV infections after allogeneic SCT, 40 tested positive. Detailed analysis revealed the presence of 10 different serotypes; serotypes 1 and 2 from species C (C01 and C02) showed the highest prevalence, accounting for 77% of the AdV-positive cases. Representatives of other species were observed less commonly: serotype A12 in 6.5%; serotype A31 in 4.5%; and B03, B16, C05, C06, D19, and F41 in 2%. The approach to rapid molecular serotype analysis presented here provides a basis for detailed studies on adenovirus epidemiology and on the transmission of nosocomial infections. Moreover, in view of the increasing importance of tailored therapy approaches, serotype identification may in the future have implications for the selection of the most appropriate antiviral treatment. PMID:16891496

  9. Bead-rod-spring models in random flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plan, Emmanuel Lance Christopher Medillo, VI; Ali, Aamir; Vincenzi, Dario

    2016-08-01

    Bead-rod-spring models are the foundation of the kinetic theory of polymer solutions. We derive the diffusion equation for the probability density function of the configuration of a general bead-rod-spring model in short-correlated Gaussian random flows. Under isotropic conditions, we solve this equation analytically for the elastic rhombus model introduced by Curtiss, Bird, and Hassager [Adv. Chem. Phys. 35, 31 (1976)].

  10. Impact of gravitational radiation higher order modes on single aligned-spin gravitational wave searches for binary black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calderón Bustillo, Juan; Husa, Sascha; Sintes, Alicia M.; Pürrer, Michael

    2016-04-01

    Current template-based gravitational wave searches for compact binary coalescences use waveform models that omit the higher order modes content of the gravitational radiation emitted, considering only the quadrupolar (ℓ,|m |)=(2 ,2 ) modes. We study the effect of such omission for the case of aligned-spin compact binary coalescence searches for equal-spin (and nonspinning) binary black holes in the context of two versions of Advanced LIGO: the upcoming 2015 version, known as early Advanced LIGO (eaLIGO) and its zero-detuned high-energy power version, which we will refer to as Advanced LIGO (AdvLIGO). In addition, we study the case of a nonspinning search for initial LIGO (iLIGO). We do this via computing the effectualness of the aligned-spin SEOBNRv1 reduced order model waveform family, which only considers quadrupolar modes, toward hybrid post-Newtonian/numerical relativity waveforms which contain higher order modes. We find that for all LIGO versions losses of more than 10% of events occur in the case of AdvLIGO for mass ratio q ≥6 and total mass M ≥100 M⊙ due to the omission of higher modes, this region of the parameter space being larger for eaLIGO and iLIGO. Moreover, while the maximum event loss observed over the explored parameter space for AdvLIGO is of 15% of events, for iLIGO and eaLIGO, this increases up to (39,23)%. We find that omission of higher modes leads to observation-averaged systematic parameter biases toward lower spin, total mass, and chirp mass. For completeness, we perform a preliminar, nonexhaustive comparison of systematic biases to statistical errors. We find that, for a given signal-to-noise ratio, systematic biases dominate over statistical errors at much lower total mass for eaLIGO than for AdvLIGO.

  11. A Mars/phobos Transportation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    A transportation system will be necessary to support construction and operation of bases on Phobos and Mars beginning in the year 2020 or later. An approach to defining a network of vehicles and the types of vehicles which may be used in the system are presented. The network will provide a convenient, integrated means for transporting robotically constructed bases to Phobos and Mars. All the technology needed for the current plan is expected to be available for use at the projected date of cargo departure from the Earth system. The modular design of the transportation system provides easily implemented contingency plans, so that difficulties with any one vehicle will have a minimal effect on the progress of the total mission. The transportation network proposed consists of orbital vehicles and atmospheric entry vehicles. Initially, only orbital vehicles will participate in the robotic construction phase of the Phobos base. The Interplanetary Transfer Vehicle (ITV) will carry the base and construction equipment to Phobos where the Orbital Maneuvering Vehicles (OMV's) will participate in the initial construction of the base. When the Mars base is ready to be sent, one or more ITV's will be used to transport the atmospheric entry vehicles from Earth. These atmospheric vehicles are the One Way Landers (OWL's) and the Ascent/Descent Vehicles (ADV's). They will be used to carry the base components and/or construction equipment. The OMV's and the Orbital Transfer Vehicles (OTV's) will assist in carrying the atmospheric entry vehicles to low Martian orbit where the OWL's or ADV's will descent to the planet surface. The ADV's were proposed to accommodate expansion of the system. Additionally, a smaller version of the ADV class is capable of transporting personnel between Mars and Phobos.

  12. Inflow Characterization for Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Devices. FY-2010 Annual Progress Report

    SciTech Connect

    Richmond, Marshall C.; Durgesh, Vibhav; Thomson, Jim; Polagye, Brian

    2011-01-31

    Marine and Hydro Kinetic devices (MHK) are being widely studied as a source of renewable energy. The Marrowstone Island site is a potential location for installing MHK devices because the tidal currents observed that are sufficient for power generation. In order to quantify the effects of turbulence on MHK devices and the surrounding environment at this site, a prelimi- nary fluid flow field study was conducted here by the Pacific Northwest National Lab (PNNL) in collaboration with the Applied Physics Lab at the University of Washington (APL-UW). This study entailed continuous The Acoustic Doppler Velocimetry (ADV), Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) and Conductivity, Temperature and Depth (CTD) measurements from May 4, 2010 to May 22, 2010, in order to obtain information about turbulence effects during different tidal conditions. The instruments used for collecting the above measurements were deployed at the Marrowstone site using a R/V Jack Robertson provided by the University of Washington (APL-UW). All the measurements were taken at the site with an average depth of 22 m below the sea surface. ADV acquired velocity data at 32 Hz sampling frequency at 4.6 m above the seabed, and ADCP acquired velocity profile data at a sampling frequency of 2 Hz, from a height of 2.6 m above the seabed to the surface with a bin resolution of 0.5 m. The ADV and ADCP measurements showed that the horizontal velocity had a turbulence intensity of 10%. Further- more, the spectral analysis from ADV measurements showed that the flow is fully turbulent with -5/3 slope in the inertial sub-range of the spectra. Moreover, the temporal-frequency analysis showed presence of ”eddies” at high frequencies. These preliminary studies provided initial flow field and site characteristics, showed the limitations of the instruments used and highlighted changes that need to be made in the experimental setup for deployment in FY-2011 studies.

  13. Detection and molecular characterization of diarrhea causing viruses in single and mixed infections in children: a comparative study between Bangladesh and Turkey.

    PubMed

    Mitui, Marcelo Takahiro; Bozdayi, Gulendam; Ahmed, Selim; Matsumoto, Takashi; Nishizono, Akira; Ahmed, Kamruddin

    2014-07-01

    The incidence and mortality caused by diarrhea differ among countries. The prevalence of different enteric viruses, their molecular characteristics, and infections with multiple viruses might affect the disease incidence and mortality caused by diarrhea. The objective of this study was to determine the distribution and molecular characteristics of enteric viruses in children with diarrhea in Turkey and Bangladesh. A total of 288 stool samples that were negative for group A rotavirus were collected from children aged <5 years with acute diarrhea who presented to hospitals in Turkey and Bangladesh. The samples were screened for human bocavirus (HBoV), astrovirus (HAstV), norovirus (NoV), and adenovirus (AdV). Phylogenetic analyses of the targeted virus genes were performed. In Turkey, viruses were detected in 87/150 samples (58%), which included 69 (79.3%) with single viruses and 18 (20.7%) with multiple viruses. AdV was the most common virus, followed by HBoV. In Bangladesh, viruses were detected in 123/138 samples (89.1%), which included 29 (23.6%) with single viruses and 94 (76.4%) with multiple viruses. NoV GII was the most common, followed by AdV. The dominant genotypes among the virus species were HBoV 2A, HAstV 1, NoV GI type 1, and AdV 40. For NoV GII, the Hunter variant of genotype 4 in Turkey and genotype 17 in Bangladesh were the most common among the sequenced strains. It was concluded that the distribution of the viruses associated with diarrhea in Turkish and Bangladeshi children was different. Enteric viruses and mixed infections were more prevalent in Bangladesh than in Turkey.

  14. Impact of Adenovirus infection in host cell metabolism evaluated by (1)H-NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Silva, Ana Carina; P Teixeira, Ana; M Alves, Paula

    2016-08-10

    Adenovirus-based vectors are powerful vehicles for gene transfer applications in vaccination and gene therapy. Although highly exploited in the clinical setting, key aspects of the adenovirus biology are still not well understood, in particular the subversion of host cell metabolism during viral infection and replication. The aim of this work was to gain insights on the metabolism of two human cell lines (HEK293 and an amniocyte-derived cell line, 1G3) after infection with an adenovirus serotype 5 vector (AdV5). In order to profile metabolic alterations, we used (1)H-NMR spectroscopy, which allowed the quantification of 35 metabolites in cell culture supernatants with low sample preparation and in a relatively short time. Significant differences between both cell lines in non-infected cultures were identified, namely in glutamine and acetate metabolism, as well as by-product secretion. The main response to AdV5 infection was an increase in glucose consumption and lactate production rates. Moreover, cultures performed with or without glutamine supplementation confirmed the exhaustion of this amino acid as one of the main causes of lower AdV5 production at high cell densities (10- and 1.5-fold less specific yields in HEK293 and 1G3 cells, respectively), and highlighted different degrees of glutamine dependency of adenovirus replication in each cell line. The observed metabolic alterations associated with AdV5 infection and specificity of the host cell line can be useful for targeted bioprocess optimization. PMID:27215342

  15. Targeting the Genital Tract Mucosa with a Lipopeptide/Recombinant Adenovirus Prime/Boost Vaccine Induces Potent and Long-Lasting CD8+ T Cell Immunity Against Herpes: Importance of Myeloid Differentiation Factor 881

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiuli; Dervillez, Xavier; Chentoufi, Aziz Alami; Badakhshan, Tina; Bettahi, Ilham; BenMohamed, Lbachir

    2012-01-01

    Targeting the mucosal immune system of the genital tract (GT) with subunit vaccines failed to induce potent and durable local CD8+ T cell immunity, crucial for protection against many sexually transmitted viral (STV) pathogens, including herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) that causes genital herpes. In this study, we aimed to investigate the potential of a novel lipopeptide/adenovirus type 5 (Lipo/rAdv5) prime/boost mucosal vaccine for induction of CD8+ T cell immunity to protect the female genital tract from herpes. The lipopeptide and the rAdv5 vaccine express the immunodominant HSV-2 CD8+ T cell epitope (gB498-505) and both were delivered intravaginally (IVAG) in the progesterone-induced B6 mouse model of genital herpes. Compared to its homologous lipopeptide/lipopeptide (Lipo/Lipo); the Lipo/rAdv5 prime/boost immunized mice: (i) developed potent and sustained HSV-specific CD8+ T cells, detected in both the GT draining nodes (GT-DLN) and in the vaginal mucosa (VM); (ii) had significantly lower virus titers; (iii) had decreased overt signs of genital herpes disease; and (iv) did not succumb to lethal infection (p < 0.005), following intravaginal HSV-2 challenge. Polyfunctional CD8+ T cells, producing IFN-γ, TNF-α and IL-2 and exhibiting cytotoxic activity, were associated with protection (p < 0.005). The protective CD8+ T cell response was significantly compromised in the absence of the adaptor myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88) (p = 0.0001). Taken together, these findings indicate that targeting the VM with a Lipo/rAdv5 prime/boost vaccine elicits a potent, MyD88-dependent, and long-lasting mucosal CD8+ T cell protective immunity against sexually transmitted herpes infection and disease. PMID:23018456

  16. Mineralogical analyses of surface sediments in the Antarctic Dry Valleys: coordinated analyses of Raman spectra, reflectance spectra and elemental abundances.

    PubMed

    Bishop, Janice L; Englert, Peter A J; Patel, Shital; Tirsch, Daniela; Roy, Alex J; Koeberl, Christian; Böttger, Ute; Hanke, Franziska; Jaumann, Ralf

    2014-12-13

    Surface sediments at Lakes Fryxell, Vanda and Brownworth in the Antarctic Dry Valleys (ADV) were investigated as analogues for the cold, dry environment on Mars. Sediments were sampled from regions surrounding the lakes and from the ice cover on top of the lakes. The ADV sediments were studied using Raman spectra of individual grains and reflectance spectra of bulk particulate samples and compared with previous analyses of subsurface and lakebottom sediments. Elemental abundances were coordinated with the spectral data in order to assess trends in sediment alteration. The surface sediments in this study were compared with lakebottom sediments (Bishop JL et al. 2003 Int. J. Astrobiol. 2, 273-287 (doi:10.1017/S1473550403001654)) and samples from soil pits (Englert P et al. 2013 In European Planetary Science Congress, abstract no. 96; Englert P et al. 2014 In 45th Lunar and Planetary Science Conf., abstract no. 1707). Feldspar, quartz and pyroxene are common minerals found in all the sediments. Minor abundances of carbonate, chlorite, actinolite and allophane are also found in the surface sediments, and are similar to minerals found in greater abundance in the lakebottom sediments. Surface sediment formation is dominated by physical processes; a few centimetres below the surface chemical alteration sets in, whereas lakebottom sediments experience biomineralization. Characterizing the mineralogical variations in these samples provides insights into the alteration processes occurring in the ADV and supports understanding alteration in the cold and dry environment on Mars. PMID:25368345

  17. [Survival of Aujeszky's disease virus in infected pig slurry].

    PubMed

    Smíd, B; Valícek, L; Rodák, L; Jurák, E; Herzig, I; Dvorácek, L

    1985-07-01

    It has been demonstrated that after experimental infection of pig slurry from the space under the slatted floor (infection dose of 10(6)PFU per ml), the Aujeszky's disease virus (ADV) survived for 72 hours at the temperature of 15 degrees C and at pH 6.5, but was inactivated after 96 hours. When technologically treated pig slurry from the storage tanks was saturated with water and infected with ADV at the dose of 10(5)PFU per ml, the virus survived for 23 days when kept at 15 degrees C and 4 degrees C and at pH 6.8, but was inactivated under the same conditions after 30 days. When the infective ADV dose in the technologically treated pig slurry in the storage tanks was reduced to 10(4)PFU per ml, the virus survived 16 days at +4 degrees C and pH 7.0 and 8.0 but was inactivated within 23 days after infection.

  18. Linear Stability Analysis of an Acoustically Vaporized Droplet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siddiqui, Junaid; Qamar, Adnan; Samtaney, Ravi

    2015-11-01

    Acoustic droplet vaporization (ADV) is a phase transition phenomena of a superheat liquid (Dodecafluoropentane, C5F12) droplet to a gaseous bubble, instigated by a high-intensity acoustic pulse. This approach was first studied in imaging applications, and applicable in several therapeutic areas such as gas embolotherapy, thrombus dissolution, and drug delivery. High-speed imaging and theoretical modeling of ADV has elucidated several physical aspects, ranging from bubble nucleation to its subsequent growth. Surface instabilities are known to exist and considered responsible for evolving bubble shapes (non-spherical growth, bubble splitting and bubble droplet encapsulation). We present a linear stability analysis of the dynamically evolving interfaces of an acoustically vaporized micro-droplet (liquid A) in an infinite pool of a second liquid (liquid B). We propose a thermal ADV model for the base state. The linear analysis utilizes spherical harmonics (Ynm, of degree m and order n) and under various physical assumptions results in a time-dependent ODE of the perturbed interface amplitudes (one at the vapor/liquid A interface and the other at the liquid A/liquid B interface). The perturbation amplitudes are found to grow exponentially and do not depend on m. Supported by KAUST Baseline Research Funds.

  19. Sero-surveillance of wild boar in The Netherlands, 1996-1999.

    PubMed

    Elbers, A R; Dekkers, L J; van der Giessen, J W

    2000-12-01

    From 1996 to 1999, blood samples were collected from wild boar shot during the hunting season in Crown properties, national parks and the free wildlife belt in the Netherlands. Sera were screened for the presence of antibodies against classical swine fever virus (CSFV), swine vesicular disease virus (SVDV), Aujeszky's disease virus (ADV) and Trichinella spiralis. The results of the sero-surveillance system indicate that CSFV, SVDV and ADV are uncommon within the wild boar population. Hence, the wild boar population is not thought to be an important reservoir of these viruses in the Netherlands. Infection with ADV and CSFV is endemic in the wild boar population in Germany. Since contact between the wild boar populations of Germany and the Netherlands cannot be excluded in the southern part of the Netherlands, continuation of the sero-surveillance system seems appropriate. In the decade before 1998, no antibodies to Trichinella spp. were found in the wild boar population of the Netherlands. The detection of some seropositive animals during the hunting season of 1998-1999 corresponds to the previous findings in wild boar before 1988. However, the recent data do not have consequences for the pig industry of the Netherlands, since the country has been considered Trichinella-free for many decades.

  20. Studies on disease transmission in spacecraft environments. [as experienced onboard Skylab 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenyon, A. J.

    1974-01-01

    The effects of the Skylab gas mixtures on general health and immunocompetence of mice and ferrets subjected to the Skylab space cabin environment (SCE) were initially studied in a stainless steel low pressure facility which was maintained at gas ratios of 30% nitrogen and 70% oxygen under 5 psia, and which consisted of two subchambers, that permitted mutual isolation of experimental groups and/or selective removal of animals without return of the entire cabin to ambient pressure was developed. The studies demonstrated that ferrets immunized with Brucella Strain 19 prior to being housed in SCE had decreased synthesis of IgG compared to their respective controls. The possibility of latent infections being responsible for stress-induced upper respiratory diseases of astronauts required that the role of neutralizing antibody as a function of antibody affinity/avidity be investigated. The model consisted of Aleutian disease virus (ADV) which infects ferrets and mink resulting in nonneutralized immune complexes. These studies demonstrated that early antibody to ADV had lower affinity/avidity than late antibody with respect to chronicity. These studies culminated in a description of antibody affinity, first isolation of ADV and its cultivation in vitro.

  1. Mimicking filtration and transport of rotavirus and adenovirus in sand media using DNA-labeled, protein-coated silica nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Pang, Liping; Farkas, Kata; Bennett, Grant; Varsani, Arvind; Easingwood, Richard; Tilley, Richard; Nowostawska, Urszula; Lin, Susan

    2014-10-01

    Rotavirus (RoV) and adenovirus (AdV) are important viral pathogens for the risk analysis of drinking water. Despite this, little is known about their retention and transport behaviors in porous media due to a lack of representative surrogates. We developed RoV and AdV surrogates by covalently coupling 70-nm sized silica nanoparticles with specific proteins and a DNA marker for sensitive detection. Filtration experiments using beach sand columns demonstrated the similarity of the surrogates' concentrations, filtration efficiencies and attachment kinetics to those of the target viruses. The surrogates showed the same magnitude of concentration reduction as the viruses. Conversely, MS2 phage (a traditional virus model) over-predicted concentrations of AdV and RoV by 1- and 2-orders of magnitude respectively. The surrogates remained stable in size, surface charge and DNA concentration for at least one year. They can be easily and rapidly detected down to a single particle. Preliminary tests suggest that they were readily detectable in a number of environmental waters and treated effluent. With up-scaling validation in pilot trials, the surrogates developed here could be a cost-effective new tool for studying virus retention and transport in porous media. Examples include assessing filter efficacy in water and wastewater treatment, tracking virus migration in groundwater after effluent land disposal, and establishing safe setback distances for groundwater protection. PMID:24954130

  2. The Role of Noise in Finite Ensembles of Nanomagnetic Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neklyudov, Mikhail; Prohl, Andreas

    2013-11-01

    The dynamics of finitely many nanomagnetic particles are described by the stochastic Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation. We show that the system relaxes exponentially quickly to the unique invariant measure which is described by a Boltzmann distribution. We present two approaches to verify this result. The first uses the general theory of (Meyn and Tweedy, Adv Appl Prob 24:542-574, 1992; Meyn and Tweedy, Adv Appl Prob 25:487-517 1993; Meyn and Tweedy, Adv Appl Prob 25:518-548, 1993) for Markov chains, which involves the concepts of a Lyapunov structure, and irreducibility of transition probabilities; we show exponential convergence in a supremum topology, but lack explicit rates. The second approach shows exponential ergodicity in a weaker L 2 topology, with an explicit rate of convergence of the Arrhenius type law. Then, we discuss two implicit discretizations to approximate transition functions at both finite and infinite times: the first scheme is shown to inherit the geometric `unit-length' property of single spins, as well as the Lyapunov structure, and is shown to be geometrically ergodic; moreover, iterates converge strongly with a rate for finite times. The second scheme is computationally more efficient since it is linear; it is shown to converge weakly at an optimal rate for all finite times. We use a general result of Shardlow and Stuart (Siam J Numer Anal 37(4):1120-1137 2000) to conclude convergence to the invariant measure of the limiting problem for both discretizations.

  3. Diagnosing Aleutian mink disease infection by a new fully automated ELISA or by counter current immunoelectrophoresis: a comparison of sensitivity and specificity.

    PubMed

    Dam-Tuxen, Rebekka; Dahl, Jan; Jensen, Trine Hammer; Dam-Tuxen, Thomas; Struve, Tina; Bruun, Leif

    2014-04-01

    Aleutian disease (AD) is a severe disease characterized by hypergammaglobulinemia causing multiple symptoms such as acute renal failure, arteritis, reduced reproductive performance and pneumonia in mink. AD is caused by the parvovirus Aleutian mink disease virus (ADV) and diagnosed primarily based on ADV serology sometimes supplemented by organ PCR analysis. In Denmark, approximately 3.5-4 million serum samples are tested every year for the presence of anti ADV antibodies as part of a national eradication program. The present study compares the diagnostic performance of the two most commonly used assays for serological screening for Aleutian disease: counter current immunoelectrophoresis (CIEP) and ELISA. In total, 3810 mink were sampled in doublets and analyzed by CIEP and a newly developed fully automated ELISA. The results show that the two assays have a comparable diagnostic performance with the ELISA having a higher sensitivity but lower specificity than the CIEP assay. The ELISA has been approved by the Danish authorities for diagnosing Aleutian disease in mink.

  4. Mineralogical analyses of surface sediments in the Antarctic Dry Valleys: coordinated analyses of Raman spectra, reflectance spectra and elemental abundances.

    PubMed

    Bishop, Janice L; Englert, Peter A J; Patel, Shital; Tirsch, Daniela; Roy, Alex J; Koeberl, Christian; Böttger, Ute; Hanke, Franziska; Jaumann, Ralf

    2014-12-13

    Surface sediments at Lakes Fryxell, Vanda and Brownworth in the Antarctic Dry Valleys (ADV) were investigated as analogues for the cold, dry environment on Mars. Sediments were sampled from regions surrounding the lakes and from the ice cover on top of the lakes. The ADV sediments were studied using Raman spectra of individual grains and reflectance spectra of bulk particulate samples and compared with previous analyses of subsurface and lakebottom sediments. Elemental abundances were coordinated with the spectral data in order to assess trends in sediment alteration. The surface sediments in this study were compared with lakebottom sediments (Bishop JL et al. 2003 Int. J. Astrobiol. 2, 273-287 (doi:10.1017/S1473550403001654)) and samples from soil pits (Englert P et al. 2013 In European Planetary Science Congress, abstract no. 96; Englert P et al. 2014 In 45th Lunar and Planetary Science Conf., abstract no. 1707). Feldspar, quartz and pyroxene are common minerals found in all the sediments. Minor abundances of carbonate, chlorite, actinolite and allophane are also found in the surface sediments, and are similar to minerals found in greater abundance in the lakebottom sediments. Surface sediment formation is dominated by physical processes; a few centimetres below the surface chemical alteration sets in, whereas lakebottom sediments experience biomineralization. Characterizing the mineralogical variations in these samples provides insights into the alteration processes occurring in the ADV and supports understanding alteration in the cold and dry environment on Mars.

  5. Interferon response in normal and Aleutian disease virus-infected mink.

    PubMed

    Wiedbrauk, D L; Hadlow, W J; Ewalt, L C; Lodmell, D L

    1986-08-01

    Studies were done to determine whether differences in interferon production are responsible for the resistance of pastel mink to Aleutian disease. The abilities of normal pastel and sapphire mink to produce interferon when inoculated with either Newcastle disease virus or a synthetic polyribonucleotide, poly (I):poly (C), were identical, even to the production of a novel, acid-labile interferon. The resistance of pastel mink to Aleutian disease did not correlate with interferon production, because neither sapphire nor pastel mink produced detectable amounts of interferon when infected with either the Pullman strain of Aleutian disease virus (ADV) or the highly virulent Utah I strain. Sapphire mink infected with the Pullman strain responded normally to poly (I):poly (C) early in the course of the disease, but interferon production was impaired late, when the mink were hypergammaglobulinemic and had renal, vascular, and hepatic lesions. These data suggest that ADV Pullman neither stimulates nor interferes with interferon production in infected mink and may represent a mechanism whereby ADV can more readily establish infection.

  6. The comparative bioavailability of an extended-release niacin and lovastatin fixed dose combination tablet versus extended-release niacin tablet, lovastatin tablet and a combination of extended-release niacin tablet and lovastatin tablet.

    PubMed

    Menon, R; Tolbert, D; Cefali, E

    2007-09-01

    Lovastatin and extended-release (ER) niacin in a fixed dose combination (Advicor) is approved for the treatment of dyslipidemia. Since both drugs are extensively metabolized, this study investigated the bioavailability and pharmacokinetics of their co-administration following single-dose administration. In a 4-way crossover study 40 subjects received: two 1000/20 Advicor tablets (ADV), two 1000 mg niacin ER tablets (NSP), two 20mg lovastatin tablets (Mevacor; MEV), and two niacin ER 1000 mg tablets with two lovastatin 20mg tablets (NSP+MEV). Plasma was assayed for niacin, nicotinuric acid (NUA), lovastatin, lovastatin acid and HMGCoA reductase inhibition. Urine was assayed for niacin and its metabolites, NUA, N-methylnicotinamide and N-methyl-2pyridone-5-carboxamide. Least square mean ratios and 90% confidence intervals for C(max) and AUC((0-t)) were determined for NSP+MEV versus MEV or NSP, ADV versus MEV or NSP, and ADV versus NSP+MEV. Co-administration of niacin and lovastatin did not significantly influence C(max) and AUC((0-t)) of lovastatin, niacin, NUA and total urinary recovery of niacin and metabolites. A 22 to 25% decrease in lovastatin acid C(max) was observed while lovastatin acid AUC((0-t)) was not affected. The HMGCoA reductase inhibition C(max) and AUC((0-t)) were not affected indicating that the difference in lovastatin acid C(max) was not clinically relevant.

  7. A serosurvey for selected pathogens in Greek European wild boar

    PubMed Central

    Touloudi, A.; Valiakos, G.; Athanasiou, L. V.; Birtsas, P.; Giannakopoulos, A.; Papaspyropoulos, K.; Kalaitzis, C.; Sokos, C.; Tsokana, C. N.; Spyrou, V.; Petrovska, L.; Billinis, C.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Serum samples, collected from 94 European wild boar (Sus scrofa) during the hunting seasons 2006 -2010 from different regions of Greece, were examined in order to estimate the role of these wildlife species as reservoir of pathogens important for livestock and/or public health. Materials and Methods The assays used for this purpose were commercial indirect ELISA for the detection of antibodies against porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV-2), porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (virus) (PRRSV), Aujeszky's disease virus (ADV), influenza A (IA) virus, Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae, Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae, Salmonella species, Trichinella species and indirect immunofluorescence antibody test for the detection of antibodies against Toxoplasma gondii and Neospora caninum. Results Antibodies against PCV-2, PRRSV, ADV, IA virus,A. pleuropneumoniae, M. hyopneumoniae,Salmonella species, Trichinella species, T. gondii and N. caninum were detected in 19.1 per cent, 12.8 per cent, 35.1 per cent, 1.1 per cent, 57.4 per cent, 0 per cent, 4.3 per cent, 6.4 per cent, 5.2 per cent and 1.1 per cent of the samples, respectively. Cluster analysis revealed a hot spot of seropositivity near Bulgarian border; seropositivity to ADV was more common among female animals. Conclusions These results indicate exposure of wild boar to most of the above-mentioned pathogens, raising concern about the possibility that these species may pose a significant health risk for livestock and/or humans. PMID:26392908

  8. Optimal Stopping with Information Constraint

    SciTech Connect

    Lempa, Jukka

    2012-10-15

    We study the optimal stopping problem proposed by Dupuis and Wang (Adv. Appl. Probab. 34:141-157, 2002). In this maximization problem of the expected present value of the exercise payoff, the underlying dynamics follow a linear diffusion. The decision maker is not allowed to stop at any time she chooses but rather on the jump times of an independent Poisson process. Dupuis and Wang (Adv. Appl. Probab. 34:141-157, 2002), solve this problem in the case where the underlying is a geometric Brownian motion and the payoff function is of American call option type. In the current study, we propose a mild set of conditions (covering the setup of Dupuis and Wang in Adv. Appl. Probab. 34:141-157, 2002) on both the underlying and the payoff and build and use a Markovian apparatus based on the Bellman principle of optimality to solve the problem under these conditions. We also discuss the interpretation of this model as optimal timing of an irreversible investment decision under an exogenous information constraint.

  9. Surface water quality in the Sinos River basin, in Southern Brazil: tracking microbiological contamination and correlation with physicochemical parameters.

    PubMed

    Dalla Vecchia, Andréia; Rigotto, Caroline; Staggemeier, Rodrigo; Soliman, Mayra Cristina; Gil de Souza, Fernanda; Henzel, Andreia; Santos, Eliane Lemos; do Nascimento, Carlos Augusto; de Quevedo, Daniela Muller; Fleck, Juliane Deise; Heinzelmann, Larissa Schemes; de Matos Almeida, Sabrina Esteves; Spilki, Fernando Rosado

    2015-07-01

    Around the world, enteric viruses are often found in surface waters. This study set out to evaluate the occurrence of adenoviruses (AdVs) in water samples, and its relation to different physical, chemical, and bacteriological parameters [total coliform (TC) and fecal coliform (FC), represented by Escherichia coli]. Monthly samples of 500 ml of raw water were collected from May 2011 to June 2013 in eight abstraction points water treatment stations along three stretches of the Sinos River Basin (SRB), in Southern Brazil and, subsequently, were analyzed using real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). AdVs from different species, from human (HAdV), and from other animals (CAV1-2, BAdV, PAdV, and AvAdV) were detected along the three stretches of the basin, indicating fecal contamination from different sources and proving the inefficiency of the wastewater treatment in the waters of the SRB and intensifying the strong influence of human activities that can contribute to the presence of inhibitory substances such as organic acids in surface of these waters. Statistical analyses revealed no significant correlations between the concentrations of TC and FC and the concentrations of AdVs. We observed a small, nonconstant, and unstable correlation between viruses and physicochemical parameters. These correlations were not sufficiently consistent to establish a reliable association; therefore, this study corroborates that only the viral assay itself is reliable for the diagnosis of fecal contamination by viruses in environmental samples. PMID:25649392

  10. The spread of adenoviral vectors to central nervous system through pathway of cochlea in mimetic aging and young rats.

    PubMed

    Chen, X; Zhao, X; Hu, Y; Lan, F; Sun, H; Fan, G; Sun, Y; Wu, J; Kong, W; Kong, W

    2015-11-01

    There is no definitive conclusion concerning the spread of viral vectors to the brain after a cochlear inoculation. In addition, some studies have reported different distribution profiles of viral vectors in the central auditory system after a cochlear inoculation. Thus, rats were grouped into either a mimetic aging group or a young group and transfected with adenoviral vectors (AdVs) by round window membrane injection. The distribution of AdV in central nervous system (CNS) was demonstrated in the two groups with transmission electron microscopy and immunofluorescence. We found that the AdV could disseminate into the CNS and that the neuronal damage and stress-induced GRP78 expression were reduced after transfection with PGC-1α, as compared with the control vectors, especially in the mimetic aging group. We also found that the host immune response was degraded in CNS in the mimetic aging group after transduction through the cochlea, as compared with the young group. These results demonstrate that viral vectors can disseminate into the CNS through the cochlea. Moreover, mimetic aging induced by D-galactose could facilitate the spread of viral vectors into the CNS from the cochlea. These findings may indicate a new potential approach for gene therapy against age-related diseases in the CNS.

  11. Mimicking Retention and Transport of Rotavirus and Adenovirus in Sand Media Using DNA-labeled, Protein-coated Silica Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Liping; Farkas, Kata; Bennett, Grant; Varsani, Arvind; Easingwood, Richard; Tilley, Richard; Nowostawska, Urszula; Lin, Susan

    2014-05-01

    Rotavirus (RoV) and adenovirus (AdV) are important viral pathogens for the risk analysis of drinking water. Despite this, little is known about their retention and transport behaviors in porous media (e.g. sand filtered used for water treatment and groundwater aquifers due to a lack of representative surrogates. In this study, we developed RoV and AdV surrogates by covalently coating 70-nm sized silica nanoparticles with specific proteins and a DNA marker for sensitive detection. Filtration experiments using beach sand columns demonstrated the similarity of the surrogates' concentrations, attachment, and filtration efficiencies to the target viruses. The surrogates showed the same magnitude of concentration reduction as the viruses. Conversely, MS2 phage (a traditional virus model) over predicted concentrations of AdV and RoV by 1- and 2-orders of magnitude, respectively. The surrogates remained stable in size, surface charge and DNA concentration for at least one year. They can be easily and rapidly detected at concentrations down to one particle per PCR reaction and are readily detectable in natural waters and even in effluent. With up-scaling validation in pilot trials, the surrogates can be a useful cost-effective new tool for studying virus retention and transport in porous media, e.g. for assessing filter efficiency in water and wastewater treatment, tracking virus migration in groundwater after effluent land disposal, and establishing safe setback distances for groundwater protection.

  12. Use of an Innovative Web-Based Laboratory Surveillance Platform to Analyze Mixed Infections Between Human Metapneumovirus (hMPV) and Other Respiratory Viruses Circulating in Alberta (AB), Canada (2009–2012)

    PubMed Central

    Fathima, Sumana; Lee, Bonita E.; May-Hadford, Jennifer; Mukhi, Shamir; Drews, Steven J.

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the proportions of mono vs. mixed infections for human metapneumovirus (hMPV) as compared to adenovirus (ADV), four types of coronavirus (CRV), parainfluenza virus (PIV), RSV, and enterovirus/rhinovirus (ERV) in Alberta, Canada. Using the Data Integration for Alberta Laboratories (DIAL) platform, 26,226 respiratory specimens at ProvLab between 1 July 2009 and 30 June 2012 were selected and included in the study. Using the Respiratory Virus Panel these specimens tested positive for one or more respiratory virus and negative for influenza A and B. From our subset hMPV was the fourth most common virus (n=2,561) with 373 (15%) identified as mixed infection using DIAL. Mixed infection with hMPV was most commonly found in infants less than 6 months old and ERV was most commonly found in mixed infection with hMPV (230/373, 56%) across all age groups. The proportion of mixed-infection vs. mono-infection was highest for ADV (46%), followed by CRV 229E (32%), CRV HKU1 (31%), CRV NL63 (28%), CRV OC43 (23%), PIV (20%), RSV (17%), hMPV (15%) and ERV (13%). hMPV was significantly more likely to be identified in mono infection as compared with ADV, CRV, PIV, and RSV with the exception of ERV [p<0.05]. PMID:23202503

  13. Phylogenomic evidence for recombination of adenoviruses in wild gorillas.

    PubMed

    Hoppe, Eileen; Pauly, Maude; Robbins, Martha; Gray, Maryke; Kujirakwinja, Deo; Nishuli, Radar; Boji Mungu-Akonkwa, Dieu-Donné; Leendertz, Fabian H; Ehlers, Bernhard

    2015-10-01

    Human adenoviruses (HAdVs) of species Human mastadenovirus B (HAdV-B) are genetically highly diverse and comprise several pathogenic types. AdVs closely related to members of HAdV-B infect African great apes and the evolutionary origin of HAdV-B has recently been determined in ancient gorillas. Genetic evidence for intra- and inter-species recombination has been obtained for AdVs of humans and captive great apes, but evidence from wild great apes is lacking. In this study, potential HAdV-B members of wild Eastern gorillas were analysed for evidence of recombination. One near-complete genome was amplified from primary sample material and sequenced, and from another six individuals genome fragments were obtained. In phylogenomic analysis, their penton base, pVII-pVI, hexon and fiber genes were compared with those of all publicly available HAdV-B full-genome sequences of humans and captive great apes. Evidence for intra-species recombination between different HAdV-B members of wild gorillas as well as between HAdV-B members of chimpanzees and gorillas was obtained. Since zoonotic AdVs have been reported to cause respiratory outbreaks in both humans and monkeys, and humans in West and Central Africa frequently hunt and butcher primates thereby increasing the chance of zoonotic transmission, such HAdV-B recombinants might widen the pool of potential human pathogens. PMID:26219820

  14. Influence of the incubation temperature and the batch components on the sensitivity of an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay to detect Aujeszky's disease virus glycoprotein E (gE).

    PubMed

    Cay, A B; Van der Stede, Y

    2010-12-01

    Although licensed batches of an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for Aujeszky's disease virus (ADV) were used, and the assays were performed within an ISO/IEC 17025 accredited quality control system, certain routine runs of the ADV ELISA were not validated using the quality system criteria, even when all technical parameters were controlled. Incubation at different temperatures and batch composition were identified as parameters that could result in non-validated assays/runs. Therefore, the effect of incubation temperature and batch composition on the analytical sensitivity of the ELISA was investigated. The World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) standard reference serum ADV1 was diluted 1:8 and tested in 94 different glycoprotein E ELISA runs performed with different batches and different incubation temperatures. The incubation temperature and batch components had a significant influence on the qualitative result for the OIE standard reference serum. An incubation temperature of at least 22 degrees C was recommended, based on the results of this analysis. Which of the batch components caused these differences in sensitivity was not investigated further. PMID:21309455

  15. Excited triplet states as photooxidants in surface waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canonica, S.

    2012-12-01

    The chromophoric components of dissolved organic matter (DOM) are generally the main absorbers of sunlight in surface waters and therefore a source of transient reactants under irradiation. Such short-lived species can be relevant for the fate of various classes of chemical contaminants in the aquatic environment. The present contribution focuses on the role of excited triplet states of chromophoric DOM, 3CDOM*, as transient photooxidants initiating the transformation and degradation of organic chemical contaminants. An early study [1] indicated that 3CDOM* may play a dominant role in the photo-induced transformation of electron-rich phenols, a conclusion which was later fortified by the results of transient absorption investigations using aromatic ketones as model photosensitizers [2] and by a recent careful analysis of the effect of oxygen concentration on transformation rates [3]. The variety of aquatic contaminants shown to be affected by triplet-induced oxidation has kept increasing, phenylurea herbicides [4], sulfonamide antibiotics [5] and some phytoestrogens [6] being prominent examples. Recent research has shown that the triplet-induced transformation of specific contaminants, especially aromatic nitrogen compounds, could be inhibited by the presence of DOM, very probably due to its antioxidant moieties [7]. While such moieties are not relevant for the quenching of 3CDOM*, they are expected to react with it in a similar way as the studied contaminants. Analogous reactions can be postulated to occur in liquid or solid phases of the atmospheric environment, as demonstrated in the case of HONO formation [8]. References 1. Canonica, S.; Jans, U.; Stemmler, K.; Hoigné, J. Transformation kinetics of phenols in water: Photosensitization by dissolved natural organic material and aromatic ketones. Environ. Sci. Technol. 1995, 29 (7), 1822-1831. 2. Canonica, S.; Hellrung, B.; Wirz, J. Oxidation of phenols by triplet aromatic ketones in aqueous solution. J. Phys

  16. Genotype-specific mutations in the polymerase gene of hepatitis B virus potentially associated with resistance to oral antiviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Mirandola, Silvia; Sebastiani, Giada; Rossi, Cristina; Velo, Emanuela; Erne, Elke Maria; Vario, Alessandro; Tempesta, Diego; Romualdi, Chiara; Campagnolo, Davide; Alberti, Alfredo

    2012-12-01

    The evolution of hepatitis B virus (HBV) and the role of different variants during antiviral therapy may be influenced by HBV genotype. We have therefore analysed substitutions potentially related to nucleos(t)ide analogues (NAs) resistance at 42 positions within RT-region in a cohort of patients with chronic hepatitis B in relation to HBV-genotype. RT mutations analysis was performed by direct sequencing in 200 NAs-naïve patients and in 64 LAM or LAM+ADV experienced patients with NAs resistance, infected mainly by HBV-genotypes D and A. 27 polymorphic-sites were identified among the 42 positions analysed and 64 novel mutations were detected in 23 positions. Genotype-D displayed the highest mutation frequency (6.4%) among all HBV-genotypes analysed. Single or multiple mutations were detected in 80% of naïve patients. Overall, the most frequent single mutations were at residues rt54, rt53 and rt91 which may associate with significantly lower HBV-DNA levels (p=0.001). Comparison with sequencing data of patients failing LMV or LAM+ADV therapy revealed an higher frequency of novel genotype-specific mutations if compared with naïve patients: 3 mutations under LAM monotherapy in HBV-D (rtS85F; rtL91I; rtC256G) and 3 mutations under ADV therapy in HBV-A (rtI53V; rtW153R; rtF221Y). In HBV-D treated patients the dominant resistance mutation was rtL80V (31.4%) and rtM204I (60%) in LAM+ADV group while LAM-treated patients showed a preference of rtM204V (51.9%). Interestingly, none of HBV-A patients had mutation rtM204I under ADV add-on treatment but all of them had the "V" AA substitution. These results suggested that in patients with CHB, HBV-genotype might be relevant in the evolution and development of drug resistance showing also different mutation patterns in the YMDD motif between HBV genotype D and A. PMID:23026293

  17. Advanced Reactor Technology -- Regulatory Technology Development Plan (RTDP)

    SciTech Connect

    Moe, Wayne Leland

    2015-05-01

    This DOE-NE Advanced Small Modular Reactor (AdvSMR) regulatory technology development plan (RTDP) will link critical DOE nuclear reactor technology development programs to important regulatory and policy-related issues likely to impact a “critical path” for establishing a viable commercial AdvSMR presence in the domestic energy market. Accordingly, the regulatory considerations that are set forth in the AdvSMR RTDP will not be limited to any one particular type or subset of advanced reactor technology(s) but rather broadly consider potential regulatory approaches and the licensing implications that accompany all DOE-sponsored research and technology development activity that deal with commercial non-light water reactors. However, it is also important to remember that certain “minimum” levels of design and safety approach knowledge concerning these technology(s) must be defined and available to an extent that supports appropriate pre-licensing regulatory analysis within the RTDP. Final resolution to advanced reactor licensing issues is most often predicated on the detailed design information and specific safety approach as documented in a facility license application and submitted for licensing review. Because the AdvSMR RTDP is focused on identifying and assessing the potential regulatory implications of DOE-sponsored reactor technology research very early in the pre-license application development phase, the information necessary to support a comprehensive regulatory analysis of a new reactor technology, and the resolution of resulting issues, will generally not be available. As such, the regulatory considerations documented in the RTDP should be considered an initial “first step” in the licensing process which will continue until a license is issued to build and operate the said nuclear facility. Because a facility license application relies heavily on the data and information generated by technology development studies, the anticipated regulatory

  18. Atmospheric Heat Redistribution on Hot Jupiters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez-Becker, D.; Showman, A. P.

    2013-12-01

    advection, τadv. Only because τadv ~ τvert for hot Jupiters does the commonly assumed timescale comparison between τrad and τadv yield approximately correct predictions for the heat redistribution efficiency. We show that the τrad vs. τadv comparison is a poor predictor for heat redistribution efficiency in the general case where τvert and τadv are different.

  19. The NINJA-2 project: detecting and characterizing gravitational waveforms modelled using numerical binary black hole simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aasi, J.; Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T.; Abernathy, M. R.; Accadia, T.; Acernese, F.; Ackley, K.; Adams, C.; Adams, T.; Addesso, P.; Adhikari, R. X.; Affeldt, C.; Agathos, M.; Aggarwal, N.; Aguiar, O. D.; Ain, A.; Ajith, P.; Alemic, A.; Allen, B.; Allocca, A.; Amariutei, D.; Andersen, M.; Anderson, R.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arai, K.; Araya, M. C.; Arceneaux, C.; Areeda, J.; Aston, S. M.; Astone, P.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Austin, L.; Aylott, B. E.; Babak, S.; Baker, P. T.; Ballardin, G.; Ballmer, S. W.; Barayoga, J. C.; Barbet, M.; Barish, B. C.; Barker, D.; Barone, F.; Barr, B.; Barsotti, L.; Barsuglia, M.; Barton, M. A.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Basti, A.; Batch, J. C.; Bauchrowitz, J.; Bauer, Th S.; Behnke, B.; Bejger, M.; Beker, M. G.; Belczynski, C.; Bell, A. S.; Bell, C.; Bergmann, G.; Bersanetti, D.; Bertolini, A.; Betzwieser, J.; Beyersdorf, P. T.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Birch, J.; Biscans, S.; Bitossi, M.; Bizouard, M. A.; Black, E.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blackburn, L.; Blair, D.; Bloemen, S.; Blom, M.; Bock, O.; Bodiya, T. P.; Boer, M.; Bogaert, G.; Bogan, C.; Bond, C.; Bondu, F.; Bonelli, L.; Bonnand, R.; Bork, R.; Born, M.; Boschi, V.; Bose, Sukanta; Bosi, L.; Bradaschia, C.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Branchesi, M.; Brau, J. E.; Briant, T.; Bridges, D. O.; Brillet, A.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, D. A.; Brown, D. D.; Brückner, F.; Buchman, S.; Bulik, T.; Bulten, H. J.; Buonanno, A.; Burman, R.; Buskulic, D.; Buy, C.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Calderón Bustillo, J.; Calloni, E.; Camp, J. B.; Campsie, P.; Cannon, K. C.; Canuel, B.; Cao, J.; Capano, C. D.; Carbognani, F.; Carbone, L.; Caride, S.; Castiglia, A.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglià, M.; Cavalier, F.; Cavalieri, R.; Celerier, C.; Cella, G.; Cepeda, C.; Cesarini, E.; Chakraborty, R.; Chalermsongsak, T.; Chamberlin, S. J.; Chao, S.; Charlton, P.; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y.; Chincarini, A.; Chiummo, A.; Cho, H. S.; Chow, J.; Christensen, N.; Chu, Q.; Chua, S. S. Y.; Chung, S.; Ciani, G.; Clara, F.; Clark, J. A.; Cleva, F.; Coccia, E.; Cohadon, P.-F.; Colla, A.; Collette, C.; Colombini, M.; Cominsky, L.; Constancio, M., Jr.; Conte, A.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T. R.; Cordier, M.; Cornish, N.; Corpuz, A.; Corsi, A.; Costa, C. A.; Coughlin, M. W.; Coughlin, S.; Coulon, J.-P.; Countryman, S.; Couvares, P.; Coward, D. M.; Cowart, M.; Coyne, D. C.; Coyne, R.; Craig, K.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Crowder, S. G.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, L.; Cuoco, E.; Dahl, K.; Dal Canton, T.; Damjanic, M.; Danilishin, S. L.; D'Antonio, S.; Danzmann, K.; Dattilo, V.; Daveloza, H.; Davier, M.; Davies, G. S.; Daw, E. J.; Day, R.; Dayanga, T.; Debreczeni, G.; Degallaix, J.; Deléglise, S.; Del Pozzo, W.; Denker, T.; Dent, T.; Dereli, H.; Dergachev, V.; De Rosa, R.; DeRosa, R. T.; DeSalvo, R.; Dhurandhar, S.; Díaz, M.; Di Fiore, L.; Di Lieto, A.; Di Palma, I.; Di Virgilio, A.; Donath, A.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doravari, S.; Dossa, S.; Douglas, R.; Downes, T. P.; Drago, M.; Drever, R. W. P.; Driggers, J. C.; Du, Z.; Dwyer, S.; Eberle, T.; Edo, T.; Edwards, M.; Effler, A.; Eggenstein, H.; Ehrens, P.; Eichholz, J.; Eikenberry, S. S.; Endrőczi, G.; Essick, R.; Etzel, T.; Evans, M.; Evans, T.; Factourovich, M.; Fafone, V.; Fairhurst, S.; Fang, Q.; Farinon, S.; Farr, B.; Farr, W. M.; Favata, M.; Fehrmann, H.; Fejer, M. M.; Feldbaum, D.; Feroz, F.; Ferrante, I.; Ferrini, F.; Fidecaro, F.; Finn, L. S.; Fiori, I.; Fisher, R. P.; Flaminio, R.; Fournier, J.-D.; Franco, S.; Frasca, S.; Frasconi, F.; Frede, M.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Fricke, T. T.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fulda, P.; Fyffe, M.; Gair, J.; Gammaitoni, L.; Gaonkar, S.; Garufi, F.; Gehrels, N.; Gemme, G.; Genin, E.; Gennai, A.; Ghosh, S.; Giaime, J. A.; Giardina, K. D.; Giazotto, A.; Gill, C.; Gleason, J.; Goetz, E.; Goetz, R.; Gondan, L.; González, G.; Gordon, N.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Gossan, S.; Goßler, S.; Gouaty, R.; Gräf, C.; Graff, P. B.; Granata, M.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.; Greenhalgh, R. J. S.; Gretarsson, A. M.; Groot, P.; Grote, H.; Grover, K.; Grunewald, S.; Guidi, G. M.; Guido, C.; Gushwa, K.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Hammer, D.; Hammond, G.; Hanke, M.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hanson, J.; Harms, J.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Harstad, E. D.; Hart, M.; Hartman, M. T.; Haster, C.-J.; Haughian, K.; Heidmann, A.; Heintze, M.; Heitmann, H.; Hello, P.; Hemming, G.; Hendry, M.; Heng, I. S.; Heptonstall, A. W.; Heurs, M.; Hewitson, M.; Hild, S.; Hoak, D.; Hodge, K. A.; Holt, K.; Hooper, S.; Hopkins, P.; Hosken, D. J.; Hough, J.; Howell, E. J.; Hu, Y.; Hughey, B.; Husa, S.; Huttner, S. H.; Huynh, M.; Huynh-Dinh, T.; Ingram, D. R.; Inta, R.; Isogai, T.; Ivanov, A.; Iyer, B. R.; Izumi, K.; Jacobson, M.; James, E.; Jang, H.; Jaranowski, P.; Ji, Y.

    2014-06-01

    The Numerical INJection Analysis (NINJA) project is a collaborative effort between members of the numerical relativity and gravitational-wave (GW) astrophysics communities. The purpose of NINJA is to study the ability to detect GWs emitted from merging binary black holes (BBH) and recover their parameters with next-generation GW observatories. We report here on the results of the second NINJA project, NINJA-2, which employs 60 complete BBH hybrid waveforms consisting of a numerical portion modelling the late inspiral, merger, and ringdown stitched to a post-Newtonian portion modelling the early inspiral. In a ‘blind injection challenge’ similar to that conducted in recent Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory (LIGO) and Virgo science runs, we added seven hybrid waveforms to two months of data recoloured to predictions of Advanced LIGO (aLIGO) and Advanced Virgo (AdV) sensitivity curves during their first observing runs. The resulting data was analysed by GW detection algorithms and 6 of the waveforms were recovered with false alarm rates smaller than 1 in a thousand years. Parameter-estimation algorithms were run on each of these waveforms to explore the ability to constrain the masses, component angular momenta and sky position of these waveforms. We find that the strong degeneracy between the mass ratio and the BHs’ angular momenta will make it difficult to precisely estimate these parameters with aLIGO and AdV. We also perform a large-scale Monte Carlo study to assess the ability to recover each of the 60 hybrid waveforms with early aLIGO and AdV sensitivity curves. Our results predict that early aLIGO and AdV will have a volume-weighted average sensitive distance of 300 Mpc (1 Gpc) for 10M⊙ + 10M⊙ (50M⊙ + 50M⊙) BBH coalescences. We demonstrate that neglecting the component angular momenta in the waveform models used in matched-filtering will result in a reduction in sensitivity for systems with large component angular momenta. This

  20. 3D-calibration of three- and four-sensor hot-film probes based on collocated sonic using neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kit, Eliezer; Liberzon, Dan

    2016-09-01

    High resolution measurements of turbulence in the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) are critical to the understanding of physical processes and parameterization of important quantities, such as the turbulent kinetic energy dissipation. Low spatio-temporal resolution of standard atmospheric instruments, sonic anemometers and LIDARs, limits their suitability for fine-scale measurements of ABL. The use of miniature hot-films is an alternative technique, although such probes require frequent calibration, which is logistically untenable in field setups. Accurate and truthful calibration is crucial for the multi-hot-films applications in atmospheric studies, because the ability to conduct calibration in situ ultimately determines the turbulence measurements quality. Kit et al (2010 J. Atmos. Ocean. Technol. 27 23-41) described a novel methodology for calibration of hot-film probes using a collocated sonic anemometer combined with a neural network (NN) approach. An important step in the algorithm is the generation of a calibration set for NN training by an appropriate low-pass filtering of the high resolution voltages, measured by the hot-film-sensors and low resolution velocities acquired by the sonic. In Kit et al (2010 J. Atmos. Ocean. Technol. 27 23-41), Kit and Grits (2011 J. Atmos. Ocean. Technol. 28 104-10) and Vitkin et al (2014 Meas. Sci. Technol. 25 75801), the authors reported on successful use of this approach for in situ calibration, but also on the method’s limitations and restricted range of applicability. In their earlier work, a jet facility and a probe, comprised of two orthogonal x-hot-films, were used for calibration and for full dataset generation. In the current work, a comprehensive laboratory study of 3D-calibration of two multi-hot-film probes (triple- and four-sensor) using a grid flow was conducted. The probes were embedded in a collocated sonic, and their relative pitch and yaw orientation to the mean flow was changed by means of motorized

  1. Influence Of Nanoparticles Diameter On Structural Properties Of Magnetic Fluid In Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kúdelčík, Jozef; Bury, Peter; Hardoň, Štefan; Kopčanský, Peter; Timko, Milan

    2015-07-01

    The properties of magnetic fluids depend on the nanoparticle diameter, their concentration and the carrier liquid. The structural changes in magnetic fluids with different nanoparticle diameter based on transformer oils TECHNOL and MOGUL under the effect of a magnetic field and temperature were studied by acoustic spectroscopy. At a linear and jump changes of the magnetic field at various temperatures a continuous change was observed of acoustic attenuation caused by aggregation of the magnetic nanoparticles to structures. From the anisotropy of acoustic attenuation and using the Taketomi theory the basic parameters of the structures are calculated and the impact of nanoparticle diameters on the size of structures is confirmed.

  2. Municipal solid waste and dung cake burning: discoloring the Taj Mahal and human health impacts in Agra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lal, Raj M.; Nagpure, Ajay S.; Luo, Lina; Tripathi, Sachchida N.; Ramaswami, Anu; Bergin, Michael H.; Russell, Armistead G.

    2016-10-01

    The Taj Mahal—an iconic World Heritage monument built of white marble—has become discolored with time, due, in part, to high levels of particulate matter (PM) soiling its surface (Bergin et al 2015 Environ. Sci. Technol. 49 808–812). Such discoloration has required extensive and costly treatment (2015 Two Hundred Sixty Second Report on Effects of Pollution on Taj Parliament of India Rajya Sabha, New Delhi) and despite previous interventions to reduce pollution in its vicinity, the haze and darkening persists (Bergin et al 2015 Environ. Sci. Technol. 49 808–812 2015 Two Hundred Sixty Second Report on Effects of Pollution on Taj Parliament of India Rajya Sabha, New Delhi). PM responsible for the soiling has been attributed to a variety of sources including industrial emissions, vehicular exhaust and biomass burning, but the contribution of the emissions from the burning of open municipal solid waste (MSW) may also play an important role. A recent source apportionment study of fine particulate matter (PM2.5) at the Taj Mahal showed biomass burning emissions, which would include MSW emissions, accounted for nearly 40% of organic matter (OM)—a component of PM—deposition to its surface (Bergin et al 2015 Environ. Sci. Technol. 49 808–812) dung cake burning, used extensively for cooking in the region, was the suggested culprit and banned within the city limits (2015 Two Hundred Sixty Second Report on Effects of Pollution on Taj Parliament of India Rajya Sabha, New Delhi), although the burning of MSW, a ubiquitous practice in the area (Nagpure et al 2015 Environ. Sci. Technol. 49 12904–12), may play a more important role in local air quality. Using spatially detailed emission estimates and air quality modeling, we find that open MSW burning leads to about 150 (±130) mg m‑2 yr‑1 of PM2.5 being deposited to the surface of the Taj Mahal compared to about 12 (±3.2) mg m‑2 yr‑1 from dung cake burning. Those two sources, combined, also lead to an

  3. Experimental Observation of a Periodically Oscillating Plasma Sphere in a Gridded Inertial Electrostatic Confinement Device

    SciTech Connect

    Park, J.; Nebel, R.A.; Stange, S.; Murali, S. Krupakar

    2005-07-01

    The periodically oscillating plasma sphere (POPS) [D. C. Barnes and R. A. Nebel, Phys. Plasmas 5, 2498 (1998).] oscillation has been observed in a gridded inertial electrostatic confinement device. In these experiments, ions in the virtual cathode exhibit resonant behavior when driven at the POPS frequency. Excellent agreement between the observed POPS resonance frequency and theoretical predictions has been observed for a wide range of potential well depths and for three different ion species. The results provide the first experimental validation of the POPS concept proposed by Barnes and Nebel [R. A. Nebel and D. C. Barnes, Fusion Technol. 34, 28 (1998).].

  4. Numerical Analysis of Weakly Nonlinear Propagation of Ultrasound in Bubbly Liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanagawa, Tetsuya; Kawahara, Junya

    Weakly nonlinear propagation of plane progressive wave in liquids uniformly containing microbubbles is numerically studied. The computation is executed by solving two types of nonlinear wave equations [Kanagawa et al., J. Fluid Sci. Technol. 5, (2010) 351] via a finite difference method. The dissipation and dispersion effects appear in the process of nonlinear wave propagation with generation of higher-harmonics components; the former transforms the kinetic energy in higher-order harmonics to the thermal energy, and the latter causes the separation of each wavenumber component with its own phase velocity.

  5. Localized heating of electrons in ionization zones: Going beyond the Penning-Thornton paradigm in magnetron sputtering

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, Andre

    2014-12-07

    The fundamental question of how energy is supplied to a magnetron discharge is commonly answered by the Penning-Thornton paradigm invoking secondary electrons. Huo et al. (Plasma Sources Sci. Technol. 22, 045005, (2013)) used a global discharge model to show that electron heating in the electric field of the magnetic presheath is dominant. In this contribution, this concept is applied locally taking into account the electric potential structure of ionization zones. Images of ionization zones can and should be interpreted as diagrams of the localization of electric potential and related electron energy, where certain collisions promote or dampen their formation.

  6. A Study of Tube Extrusion Process

    SciTech Connect

    Haghighat, H.; Mohammadinoori, S.

    2011-01-17

    An upper bound solution for tube extrusion is developed in this paper. The dead zone is assumed to have the sine profile and a kinematically admissible velocity field is proposed. From the proposed velocity field, the upper bound solution on relative punch pressure and extrusion load is determined with respect to chosen process parameters. The results are compared with theoretical and experimental results from a reference to illustrate the validity of the proposed velocity field. This indicates that the analysis presented here renders better upper bound solution than that given by Ebrahimi et al.. [An upper-bound analysis of the tube extrusion process (2008) J. Mater. Process. Technol. 99:214-220].

  7. A Study of Tube Extrusion Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haghighat, H.; Mohammadinoori, S.

    2011-01-01

    An upper bound solution for tube extrusion is developed in this paper. The dead zone is assumed to have the sine profile and a kinematically admissible velocity field is proposed. From the proposed velocity field, the upper bound solution on relative punch pressure and extrusion load is determined with respect to chosen process parameters. The results are compared with theoretical and experimental results from a reference to illustrate the validity of the proposed velocity field. This indicates that the analysis presented here renders better upper bound solution than that given by Ebrahimi et al.. [An upper-bound analysis of the tube extrusion process (2008) J. Mater. Process. Technol. 99:214-220].

  8. Stauts of the Laser Inertial Fusion Energy (LIFE) Hohlraum Point Design

    SciTech Connect

    Amendt, P; Dunne, M; Ho, D; Lasinski, B; Meeker, D; Ross, J S

    2012-04-10

    Progress on the hohlraum point design for the LIFE engine is described. New features in the original design [Amendt et al., Fus. Sci. Technol. 60, 49 (2011)] are incorporated that address the imperatives of low target cost, high manufacturing throughput, efficient and prompt material recycling, an ability for near-term testing of key target design uncertainties on the National Ignition Facility, and robustness to target chamber environment and injection insults. To this end, the novel use of Pb hohlraums and aerogel-supported liquid DT fuel loading within a high-density-carbon (HDC) ablator is implemented in the hohlraum point design.

  9. 3D-calibration of three- and four-sensor hot-film probes based on collocated sonic using neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kit, Eliezer; Liberzon, Dan

    2016-09-01

    High resolution measurements of turbulence in the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) are critical to the understanding of physical processes and parameterization of important quantities, such as the turbulent kinetic energy dissipation. Low spatio-temporal resolution of standard atmospheric instruments, sonic anemometers and LIDARs, limits their suitability for fine-scale measurements of ABL. The use of miniature hot-films is an alternative technique, although such probes require frequent calibration, which is logistically untenable in field setups. Accurate and truthful calibration is crucial for the multi-hot-films applications in atmospheric studies, because the ability to conduct calibration in situ ultimately determines the turbulence measurements quality. Kit et al (2010 J. Atmos. Ocean. Technol. 27 23–41) described a novel methodology for calibration of hot-film probes using a collocated sonic anemometer combined with a neural network (NN) approach. An important step in the algorithm is the generation of a calibration set for NN training by an appropriate low-pass filtering of the high resolution voltages, measured by the hot-film-sensors and low resolution velocities acquired by the sonic. In Kit et al (2010 J. Atmos. Ocean. Technol. 27 23–41), Kit and Grits (2011 J. Atmos. Ocean. Technol. 28 104–10) and Vitkin et al (2014 Meas. Sci. Technol. 25 75801), the authors reported on successful use of this approach for in situ calibration, but also on the method’s limitations and restricted range of applicability. In their earlier work, a jet facility and a probe, comprised of two orthogonal x-hot-films, were used for calibration and for full dataset generation. In the current work, a comprehensive laboratory study of 3D-calibration of two multi-hot-film probes (triple- and four-sensor) using a grid flow was conducted. The probes were embedded in a collocated sonic, and their relative pitch and yaw orientation to the mean flow was changed by means of

  10. Progress towards thick liquid fusion chambers for assisted-pinch and solenoid focusings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debonnel, C. S.; Yu, S. S.; Peterson, P. F.

    2005-05-01

    The "robust point design" (RPD) (Fusion Sci. Technol. 44 (2003) 266) describes a self-consistent heavy-ion inertial fusion power plant based on a single linear accelerator and the neutralized ballistic beam transport scheme. The heavy-ion fusion community is exploring the feasibility of a modular driver made of several, medium-sized accelerators—this approach has the potential to offer a faster and cheaper development path to a viable fusion power plant. Thick-liquid target chambers compatible with the assisted-pinch and solenoid final-focusing schemes are discussed. Gas dynamics simulations performed with the Berkeley TSUNAMI code are presented for the assisted-pinch chamber.

  11. An angle encoder for super-high resolution and super-high accuracy using SelfA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Tsukasa; Kon, Masahito; Nabeshima, Nobuo; Taniguchi, Kayoko

    2014-06-01

    Angular measurement technology at high resolution for applications such as in hard disk drive manufacturing machines, precision measurement equipment and aspherical process machines requires a rotary encoder with high accuracy, high resolution and high response speed. However, a rotary encoder has angular deviation factors during operation due to scale error or installation error. It has been assumed to be impossible to achieve accuracy below 0.1″ in angular measurement or control after the installation onto the rotating axis. Self-calibration (Lu and Trumper 2007 CIRP Ann. 56 499; Kim et al 2011 Proc. MacroScale; Probst 2008 Meas. Sci. Technol. 19 015101; Probst et al Meas. Sci. Technol. 9 1059; Tadashi and Makoto 1993 J. Robot. Mechatronics 5 448; Ralf et al 2006 Meas. Sci. Technol. 17 2811) and cross-calibration (Probst et al 1998 Meas. Sci. Technol. 9 1059; Just et al 2009 Precis. Eng. 33 530; Burnashev 2013 Quantum Electron. 43 130) technologies for a rotary encoder have been actively discussed on the basis of the principle of circular closure. This discussion prompted the development of rotary tables which achieve reliable and high accuracy angular verification. We apply these technologies for the development of a rotary encoder not only to meet the requirement of super-high accuracy but also to meet that of super-high resolution. This paper presents the development of an encoder with 221 = 2097 152 resolutions per rotation (360°), that is, corresponding to a 0.62″ signal period, achieved by the combination of a laser rotary encoder supplied by Magnescale Co., Ltd and a self-calibratable encoder (SelfA) supplied by The National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science & Technology (AIST). In addition, this paper introduces the development of a rotary encoder to guarantee ±0.03″ accuracy at any point of the interpolated signal, with respect to the encoder at the minimum resolution of 233, that is, corresponding to a 0.0015″ signal period after

  12. Solving multi-customer FPR model with quality assurance and discontinuous deliveries using a two-phase algebraic approach.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Yuan-Shyi Peter; Chou, Chung-Li; Chang, Huei-Hsin; Chiu, Singa Wang

    2016-01-01

    A multi-customer finite production rate (FPR) model with quality assurance and discontinuous delivery policy was investigated in a recent paper (Chiu et al. in J Appl Res Technol 12(1):5-13, 2014) using differential calculus approach. This study employs mathematical modeling along with a two-phase algebraic method to resolve such a specific multi-customer FPR model. As a result, the optimal replenishment lot size and number of shipments can be derived without using the differential calculus. Such a straightforward method may assist practitioners who with insufficient knowledge of calculus in learning and managing the real multi-customer FPR systems more effectively. PMID:27186457

  13. Mechanics of dielectric elastomer-activated deformable transmission grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yin; Zhou, Jinxiong; Sun, Wenjie; Wu, Xiaohong; Zhang, Ling

    2014-09-01

    Laminating a thin layer of elastomeric grating on the surface of a prestretched dielectric elastomer (DE) membrane forms a basic design of electrically tunable transmission grating. We analyze the inhomogeneous deformation of a circular multiple-region configuration. Variation of the geometric and material parameters, as well as of the critical condition determined by loss of tension instability, is probed to aid the design of a DE-based deformable grating. The predicted changes in the grating period agree substantially with the experimental results reported by Aschwanden et al (Aschwanden et al 2007 IEEE Photon. Technol. Lett. 19 1090).

  14. Comment on the paper ‘The impact of Langmuir probe geometries on electron current collection and the integral relation for obtaining electron energy distribution functions’

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsankov, Tsanko V.; Czarnetzki, Uwe

    2016-08-01

    A paper by El Saghir and Shannon (2012 Plasma Sources Sci. Technol. 21 025003) raises the question about the validity of the widely-used Druyvesteyn formula for obtaining the electron energy distribution function by cylindrical probes. They conclude that there are deviations between the Druyvesteyn formula for cylindrical and for spherical probes. In this comment this conclusion is questioned and the correct expressions are derived. It is shown that no such difference exists when all three velocity components are correctly accounted for. Furthermore, the disturbance to the plasma introduced by the probe is estimated.

  15. On vortex dust structures in magnetized dusty plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Nebbat, E.; Annou, R.

    2010-09-15

    To explain the generation of vortex patterns of dust grains in a magnetized dusty plasma [Huang et al., Plasma Sci. Technol. 9, 1 (2007)], a time dependent nonlinear model that describes vortices as a result of an instability is proposed. Grain-grain as well as grain-ion interactions, particle attachment, and grains drift and diffusion are key elements in the present model. It is found that the latter reproduces the experimental results quite well, whereas the stability analysis shows that the vortex core is grain size dependent.

  16. Chaotic density fluctuations in L-mode plasmas of the DIII-D tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maggs, J. E.; Rhodes, T. L.; Morales, G. J.

    2015-04-01

    Analysis of the time series obtained with the Doppler backscattering system (Hillsheim et al 2009 Rev. Sci. Instrum. 80 0835070) in the DIII-D tokamak (Luxon 2005 Fusion Sci. Technol. 48 828) shows that intermediate wave number plasma density fluctuations in low confinement (L-mode) tokamak plasmas are chaotic. The supporting evidence is based on the shape of the power spectrum; the location of the signal in the complexity-entropy plane (C-H plane) (Rosso et al 2007 Phys. Rev. Lett. 99 154102); and the population of the corresponding Bandt-Pompe (Bandt and Pompe 2002 Phys. Rev. Lett. 88 174102) probability distributions.

  17. Sediment and Soil Profiles of Taylor and Wright Valleys, Antarctica, as Analogs for Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Englert, P. A.; Bishop, J. L.; Patel, S.; Koeberl, C.; Gibson, E. K.

    2013-12-01

    The Antarctic Dry Valleys are extremely cold and dry desert environments. They represent a unique analog for Martian surface development conditions. Chemistry and mineralogy of soils and sediments from Taylor and Wright Valleys were analyzed [1-4]. Samples from selected lakes, ponds and nearby surface areas were collected in 1979/1980, from sediments below Lake Hoare in 1994/95, and from lake surfaces in 2005/06. Surface samples are from Lakes Brownworth, Vanda and Fryxell; sediment cores from Lake Hoare, Don Juan and Don Quixote ponds. Systematic analysis by INAA, XRD, VNIR and mid-infrared spectroscopy, and other methods is underway for all samples. Classical major element weathering / pedogenesis ratiosand major element weathering indices are applied to ADV as well as MER and MSL rocks and soils. The Chemical Index of Alteration (CIA) values were used to characterize weathering conditions in Antarctic soils of Barton Peninsula [5] and for sediment layers in Antarctic drill cores [6]. The CIAs of sediment layers in drill cores are largely explained by the CIAs of source materials and reflect little or isochemical weathering. At Barton Peninsula with a less arid environment than the ADVs, CIAs of soils generally exceed those of source rocks. In Figure 1, two of several ADV soil source rocks and three sets of ADV soil and sediment CIAs are compared to molar Al2O3/TiO2 ratios. ADV CIA data are clustered and, as expected, lower than those of Barton Penisula, indicating a lesser degree of weathering. Very low ADV soil CIAs indicate sulfur rich samples. Full geochemical analysis as proposed will provide good indicators of weathering where historical to contemporary alteration conditions are liquid water based. Investigating elemental relationships for analogs that can be applied to Mars elemental abundance data bases is therefore important to assist in evaluating the extent of water based alteration derived from indicators in the Martian surface. References: [1] Gibson

  18. The effects of select factors on the pour point, cloud point, and cold filter plugging point of soybean-, choice white grease-, and corn-based biodiesel blends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jezierski, Kelly

    Soybean-, choice white grease-, and corn-based biodiesel from different sources blended with cold flow modifiers from 0.0% to 4.0% by weight were tested for cloud point (CP), cold filter plugging point (CFPP), and pour point (PP). The soybean-based blend that showed the best result was four weight percent of TechnolRTM B100 Biodiesel Cold Flow Improver used on B99 obtained from Wacker Oil, which resulted in a CP of -3°C, a PP of -18 °C, and a CFPP of -7°C. The TechnolRTM product slightly improved the CFPP of corn-based biodiesel when used at 2.0 weight percent, reducing it from -1°C to -4°C. No significant improvements were observed on choice white grease-based biodiesel blends. It was shown that, CFPP is not a linear function of the CP; the order of cold flow properties here occasionally follows the trend of the Cloud Point being greater than or equal to the Pour Point which is greater than or equal to the Cold Filter Plugging Point; and the source of the biodiesel also has a significant effect on the cold flow properties.

  19. Investigation of InP etching mechanisms in a Cl{sub 2}/H{sub 2} inductively coupled plasma by optical emission spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Gatilova, L.; Bouchoule, S.; Guilet, S.; Chabert, P.

    2009-03-15

    Optical emission spectroscopy (OES) has been used in order to investigate the InP etching mechanisms in a Cl{sub 2}-H{sub 2} inductively coupled plasma. The authors have previously shown that anisotropic etching of InP could be achieved for a H{sub 2} percentage in the 35%-45% range where the InP etch rate also presents a local maximum [J. Vac. Sci. Technol. B 24, 2381 (2006)], and that anisotropic etching was due to an enhanced passivation of the etched sidewalls by a silicon oxide layer [J. Vac. Sci. Technol. B 26, 666 (2008)]. In this work, it is shown that this etching behavior is related to a maximum in the H atom concentration in the plasma. The possible enhancement of the sidewall passivation process in the presence of H is investigated by comparing OES measurements and etching results obtained for Cl{sub 2}-H{sub 2} and Cl{sub 2}-Ar gas mixtures.

  20. Surface-Wave Excitation in High-Density Planar Plasma Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghanashev, I.; Morita, S.; Nagatsu, M.; Sugai, H.; Toyoda, N.

    1998-10-01

    Electromagnetic surface waves introduced into a metal chamber through large(K. Komachi J. Vac. Sci. Technol. A) 11 (1993) 164. or slot-type(H. Sugai et al Plasma Sources Sci. Technol.) 7 (1998) 192. apertures of various shapes can sustain overdense plasmas in a wide range of gas pressures. A simple cavity model(I. Ghanashev et al Jpn. J. Appl. Phys.) 36 (1997) 337. successfully identifies the eigen-modes in the case of single-mode operation and small slot antennas, while neglecting the latter. The stability analysis(I. Ghanashev et al Jpn. J. Appl. Phys.) 36 (1997) 4704. suggests that the source performance is governed by the dependence of the chamber power reflection coefficient R on the plasma density n_e. The values of R depend on the geometry of the coupling aperture(s) and thus cannot be suggested by a simple theory neglecting them. In this communication we present a full-wave electromagnetic analysis taking into account the aperture(s), along with experimental results for the character of the R--ne dependence. The simulation results suggest, in accordance with the experimental observations, that, depending on the operating conditions, both single- and multi-mode regimes can be realised. This work was supported by Toshiba Corp. and Nisshin Electronic MFG Co., Ltd.

  1. Process diagnostics and monitoring using the multipole resonance probe in an inhomogeneous plasma for ion-assisted deposition of optical coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Styrnoll, T.; Harhausen, J.; Lapke, M.; Storch, R.; Brinkmann, R. P.; Foest, R.; Ohl, A.; Awakowicz, P.

    2013-08-01

    The application of a multipole resonance probe (MRP) for diagnostic and monitoring purposes in a plasma ion-assisted deposition (PIAD) process is reported. Recently, the MRP was proposed as an economical and industry compatible plasma diagnostic device (Lapke et al 2011 Plasma Sources Sci. Technol. 20 042001). The major advantages of the MRP are its robustness against dielectric coating and its high sensitivity to measure the electron density. The PIAD process investigated is driven by the advanced plasma source (APS), which generates an ion beam in the deposition chamber for the production of high performance optical coatings. With a background neutral pressure of p0 ˜ 20 mPa the plasma expands from the source region into the recipient, leading to an inhomogeneous spatial distribution. Electron density and electron temperature vary over the distance from substrate (ne ˜ 109 cm-3 and Te,eff ˜ 2 eV) to the APS (ne ≳ 1012 cm-3 and Te,eff ˜ 20 eV) (Harhausen et al 2012 Plasma Sources Sci. Technol. 21 035012). This huge variation of the plasma parameters represents a big challenge for plasma diagnostics to operate precisely for all plasma conditions. The results obtained by the MRP are compared to those from a Langmuir probe chosen as reference diagnostics. It is demonstrated that the MRP is suited for the characterization of the PIAD plasma as well as for electron density monitoring. The latter aspect offers the possibility to develop new control schemes for complex industrial plasma environments.

  2. The "Mendel syndrome" in science: durability of scientific literature and its effects on bibliometric analysis of individual scientists.

    PubMed

    Costas, Rodrigo; van Leeuwen, Thed N; van Raan, Anthony F J

    2011-10-01

    The obsolescence and "durability" of scientific literature have been important elements of debate during many years, especially regarding the proper calculation of bibliometric indicators. The effects of "delayed recognition" on impact indicators have importance and are of interest not only to bibliometricians but also among research managers and scientists themselves. It has been suggested that the "Mendel syndrome" is a potential drawback when assessing individual researchers through impact measures. If publications from particular researchers need more time than "normal" to be properly acknowledged by their colleagues, the impact of these researchers may be underestimated with common citation windows. In this paper, we answer the question whether the bibliometric indicators for scientists can be significantly affected by the Mendel syndrome. Applying a methodology developed previously for the classification of papers according to their durability (Costas et al., J Am Soc Inf Sci Technol 61(8):1564-1581, 2010a; J Am Soc Inf Sci Technol 61(2):329-339, 2010b), the scientific production of 1,064 researchers working at the Spanish Council for Scientific Research (CSIC) in three different research areas has been analyzed. Cases of potential "Mendel syndrome" are rarely found among researchers and these cases do not significantly outperform the impact of researchers with a standard pattern of reception in their citations. The analysis of durability could be included as a parameter for the consideration of the citation windows used in the bibliometric analysis of individuals. PMID:21957319

  3. Interaction and Viscoelastic Deformation of Polymeric Surfaces Measured with the Atomic Force Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Attard, Phil

    2007-03-01

    Methods are described for the measurement and analysis of deformable surfaces with the atomic force microscope (AFM). It is shown how to obtain the zero of separation and how to calibrate the photo-diode for quantitative force measurement [1]. The properties of viscoelastic materials (relaxation times, Youngs moduli) may be extracted by modeling particular sorts of force measurements [2]. Results are shown for a biopolymer agar [3], and for a polyelectrolyte polydimethylsiloxane [4], both of which are viscoelastic, and for polystyrene, which is elastic [5]. The potential for using the AFM as a nanorheometer is discussed. [1] P. Attard, ``Friction, Adhesion, and Deformation: Dynamic Measurements with the Atomic Force Microscope'', J. Adhesion Sci. Technol. 16, 753--791 (2002). [2] P. Attard, ``Interaction and Deformation of Viscoelastic Particles. Non-adhesive Particles'', Phys. Rev. E 63, 061604 (2001) [3] J. W. G. Tyrrell and P. Attard, ``A Viscoelastic Study Using and Atomic Force Microscope Modified to Operate as a Nanorheometer'', Langmuir 19, 5254--5260 (2003) [4] G. S. Gillies, C. A. Prestidge, and P. Attard, ``An AFM Study of the Deformation and Nano-rheology of Cross-Linked PDMS Droplets'', Langmuir 18, 1674--1679 (2002) [5] M. W. Rutland, J. W. G. Tyrrell, and P. Attard, ``Analysis of Atomic Force Microscopy Data for Deformable Materials'', J. Adhesion Sci. Technol. 18, 1199--1216 (2004)

  4. SI-traceable determination of the spring constant of a soft cantilever using the nanonewton force facility based on electrostatic methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nesterov, V.; Belai, O.; Nies, D.; Buetefisch, S.; Mueller, M.; Ahbe, T.; Naparty, D.; Popadic, R.; Wolff, H.

    2016-08-01

    The PTB’s (Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Germany) nanonewton force facility, first presented in work by Nesterov (2007 Meas. Sci. Technol. 18 360-6), Nesterov (2009 Meas. Sci. Technol. 20 084012) and Nesterov et al (2009 Metrologia 46 277-82), has been significantly improved and used to measure the stiffness of a cantilever. The facility is based on a disc pendulum with electrostatic reduction of its deflection and stiffness. In this paper, we will demonstrate that the facility is able to measure horizontal forces in the range below 1 μN with a resolution below 5 pN and an uncertainty below 2.7% for a measured force of 1 nN at a measurement duration of about 20 s. We will demonstrate the possibility of using this facility as a calibration device that can accurately determine spring constants of soft cantilevers (K ≲ 0.1 N m-1) with traceability to the SI units. The method and the results of measuring the spring constant of a soft cantilever (K  =  0.125 N m-1) in air, in a medium vacuum, in a high vacuum and in nitrogen are presented. We will show that a relative standard uncertainty of the spring constant calibration of better than 0.3% (measurement in a medium vacuum) and a repeatability of better than 0.04% are achieved.

  5. Methane oxidation in Swedish landfills quantified with the stable carbon isotope technique in combination with an optical method for emitted methane.

    PubMed

    Börjesson, Gunnar; Samuelsson, Jerker; Chanton, Jeffrey

    2007-10-01

    Methane budgets (production = emissions + oxidation + recovery) were estimated for six landfill sites in Sweden. Methane oxidation was measured in downwind plumes with a stable isotope technique (Chanton, J. P., et al., Environ. Sci Technol. 1999, 33, 3755-3760.) Positions in plumes for isotope sampling as well as methane emissions were determined with an optical instrument (Fourier Transform InfraRed) in combination with N20 as tracer gas (Galle, B., et al., Environ. Sci Technol. 2001, 35, 21-25.) Two landfills had been closed for years prior to the measurements, while four were active. Measurements at comparable soil temperatures showed that the two closed landfills had a significantly higher fraction of oxidized methane (38-42% of emission) relative to the four active landfills (4.6-15% of emission). These results highlight the importance of installing and maintaining effective landfill covers and also indicate that substantial amounts of methane escape from active landfills. Based on these results we recommend that the IPCC default values for methane oxidation in managed landfills could be set to 10% for active sites and 20% for closed sites. Gas recovery was found to be highly variable at the different sites, with values from 14% up to 65% of total methane production. The variance can be attributed to different waste management practices. PMID:17969681

  6. Integrated predictive modelling simulations of burning plasma experiment designs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bateman, Glenn; Onjun, Thawatchai; Kritz, Arnold H.

    2003-11-01

    Models for the height of the pedestal at the edge of H-mode plasmas (Onjun T et al 2002 Phys. Plasmas 9 5018) are used together with the Multi-Mode core transport model (Bateman G et al 1998 Phys. Plasmas 5 1793) in the BALDUR integrated predictive modelling code to predict the performance of the ITER (Aymar A et al 2002 Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 44 519), FIRE (Meade D M et al 2001 Fusion Technol. 39 336), and IGNITOR (Coppi B et al 2001 Nucl. Fusion 41 1253) fusion reactor designs. The simulation protocol used in this paper is tested by comparing predicted temperature and density profiles against experimental data from 33 H-mode discharges in the JET (Rebut P H et al 1985 Nucl. Fusion 25 1011) and DIII-D (Luxon J L et al 1985 Fusion Technol. 8 441) tokamaks. The sensitivities of the predictions are evaluated for the burning plasma experimental designs by using variations of the pedestal temperature model that are one standard deviation above and below the standard model. Simulations of the fusion reactor designs are carried out for scans in which the plasma density and auxiliary heating power are varied.

  7. SI-traceable determination of the spring constant of a soft cantilever using the nanonewton force facility based on electrostatic methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nesterov, V.; Belai, O.; Nies, D.; Buetefisch, S.; Mueller, M.; Ahbe, T.; Naparty, D.; Popadic, R.; Wolff, H.

    2016-08-01

    The PTB’s (Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Germany) nanonewton force facility, first presented in work by Nesterov (2007 Meas. Sci. Technol. 18 360–6), Nesterov (2009 Meas. Sci. Technol. 20 084012) and Nesterov et al (2009 Metrologia 46 277–82), has been significantly improved and used to measure the stiffness of a cantilever. The facility is based on a disc pendulum with electrostatic reduction of its deflection and stiffness. In this paper, we will demonstrate that the facility is able to measure horizontal forces in the range below 1 μN with a resolution below 5 pN and an uncertainty below 2.7% for a measured force of 1 nN at a measurement duration of about 20 s. We will demonstrate the possibility of using this facility as a calibration device that can accurately determine spring constants of soft cantilevers (K ≲ 0.1 N m‑1) with traceability to the SI units. The method and the results of measuring the spring constant of a soft cantilever (K  =  0.125 N m‑1) in air, in a medium vacuum, in a high vacuum and in nitrogen are presented. We will show that a relative standard uncertainty of the spring constant calibration of better than 0.3% (measurement in a medium vacuum) and a repeatability of better than 0.04% are achieved.

  8. Optimization of non-oxidative carbon-removal techniques by nitrogen-containing plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, J. A.; Tabarés, F. L.; Tafalla, D.

    2009-06-01

    The continuous control of tritium inventory in ITER calls for the development of new conditioning techniques [G. Federici et al., Nucl. Fus. 41 (2001) 1967]. For carbon plasma-facing components, this implies the removal of the T-rich carbon co-deposits. In the presence of strong oxygen getters, such Be, the use of oxygen-based techniques will be discouraged. In addition, tritiated water generated by these techniques poses extra problems in terms of safety issues [G. Saji, Fus. Eng. Des. 69 (2003) 631; G. Bellanger, J.J. Rameau, Fus. Technol. 32 (1997) 196; T. Hayashi, et al., Fus. Eng. Des. 81 (2006) 1365]. In the present work, oxygen-free (nitrogen and ammonia) glow discharge plasmas for carbon film removal were investigated. The following gas mixtures were fed into a DC glow discharge running in a ˜200 nm carbon film coated chamber. Erosion rate was measured in situ by laser interferometry, RGA (Residual Gas Analysis) and CTAMS (Cryotrapping Assisted Mass Spectrometry) [J.A. Ferreira, F.L. Tabarés, J. Vac. Sci. Technol. A25(2) (2007) 246] were used for the characterization of the reaction products. Very high erosion rates (similar to those obtained in helium-oxygen glow discharge [J.A. Ferreira et al., J. Nucl. Mater. 363-365 (2007) 252]) were recorded for ammonia glow discharge.

  9. Helicon mode formation and rf power deposition in a helicon source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraemer, Michael; Niemi, Kari

    2007-11-01

    The nonlinear nature of the rf absorption in a helicon-produced plasma was investigated on the helicon device HE-L [1] with the aid of a double pulse technique providing high and low amplitude helicon propagation under nearly identical conditions. Time- and space-resolved (2D) measurements of the rf magnetic field (amplitude and phase of all components) were carried out by means of a B-dot probe array. For high rf power, a small narrow peak arises on top of the density profile close to the axis leading to focusing of the rf field energy and the rf power deposition. Nevertheless, in accordance with the linear helicon theory for a non-uniform plasma, the axial wavenumber remains nearly the same as for low power. The rf power deposition in the core of the helicon discharge deduced from the energy flux balance was compared with that obtained from the rf field distribution assuming collisional absorption. It turns out that collisions are by far not sufficient to account for the absorption of helicon modes, particularly for high rf power. Nonlinear processes, most likely associated with the parametric excitation of electrostatic fluctuations [2], are thus involved.- This work was supported by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (Sonderforschungsbereich 591, Project A7).- [1] M. Kr"amer, B. Lorenz, B. Clarenbach, Plasma Sources Sci. Technol. 11A (2002) 120. [2] B. Lorenz, M. Kr"amer, V.L. Selenin, Yu.M. Aliev, Plasma Sources Sci. Technol. 14, 623 (2005).

  10. Modeling cathode boundary layer discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munoz-Serrano, E.; Boeuf, J. P.; Pitchford, L. C.

    2009-10-01

    A Cathode Boundary Layer Discharge or CBL (Schoenbach, et al Plasma Sources Sci. Technol. 13, 177,2004) is an electrode/dielectric/electrode sandwich with a central hole pierced through the dielectric and one of the electrodes (the anode). Thus, the cathode surface area available to the discharge is limited by the annular dielectric, and the discharge operates in an abnormal glow mode with a positive V-I characteristic at higher current. Using a two-dimensional fluid model, we have studied the electrical properties of CBLs in argon at 100 and 400 torr pressure. The spatial profiles of charged particle and metastable densities, potential, and gas temperature, as well as calculated V-I characteristics will be shown for a range of conditions for a 800 micron hole diameter. One interesting result (anticipated in the work of Belostotskiy, et al, Plasma Sources Sci. Technol 17, 045018, 2008) is that there is a sharp increase in the slope of the V-I characteristic when gas heating is taken into account. This current limiting effect is not observed when the discharge is able to expand on the outer surface of the cathode as in the case of the MicroHollow Cathode Discharge (MHCD) configuration, for example.

  11. Antiviral therapy improves the survival rate and decreases recurrences and fatalities in liver cancer patients following curative resection: A meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, HAO; ZHOU, YUCHEN; YUAN, GUOSHENG; ZHOU, GUANGYAO; YANG, DINGHUA; ZHOU, YUANPING

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the impact of postoperative antiviral treatment on tumor recurrence, fatalities and survival of patients with chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection-related primary hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). A systematic meta-analysis was performed. All the studies comparing nucleos(t)ide analogues (NAs) versus placebo or no treatment were considered. The results were expressed as relative ratio (RR) for 1-, 3- and 5-year recurrence-free survival (RFS) and overall survival (OS), recurrence HCC and fatalities with 95% confidence intervals (CI) using STATA 11.0. In total, 15 trials with 7,619 patients were included. There were significant improvements for 1-, 3- and 5-year RFS (RR, 1.09; P=0.003; RR, 1.202; P<0.001; and RR, 1.219; P=0.02; respectively) and in 3- and 5-year OS (RR, 1.087, P=0.006; and RR, 1.186; P<0.001) in the NAs group compared with the control group. Sensitivity analyses confirmed the robustness of the results. In addition, the significantly high rate of recurrence HCC and fatalities existed in the control group (RR, 1.301; P=0.002; and RR, 1.816, P<0.001). One study was for an entecavir (ETV)-treated group compared with an adefovir (ADV)-treated group and lamivudine (LAM)-treated group. The 3-year disease-free survival rate for the ETV group was significantly better compared with the ADV and LAM groups [hazard ratio (HR), 0.810; P=0.049; and HR, 0.737; P=0.007]. The present study demonstrated the beneficial effects of NAs therapy following curative treatment of HBV-related HCC. ETV may be the superior choice compared to ADV or LAM for the antiviral treatment. PMID:26807227

  12. Noise correction of turbulent spectra obtained from Acoustic Doppler Velocimeters

    SciTech Connect

    Durgesh, Vibhav; Thomson, Jim; Richmond, Marshall C.; Polagye, Brian

    2014-03-02

    Accurately estimated auto-spectral density functions are essential for characterization of turbulent flows, and they also have applications in computational fluid dynamics modeling, site and inflow characterization for hydrokinetic turbines, and inflow turbulence generation. The Acoustic Doppler Velocimeter (ADV) provides single-point temporally resolved data, that are used to characterize turbulent flows in rivers, seas, and oceans. However, ADV data are susceptible to contamination from various sources, including instrument noise, which is the intrinsic limit to the accuracy of acoustic velocity measurements. Due to the presence of instrument noise, the spectra obtained are altered at high frequencies. The focus of this study is to develop a robust and effective method for accurately estimating auto-spectral density functions from ADV data by reducing or removing the spectral contribution derived from instrument noise. For this purpose, the “Noise Auto-Correlation” (NAC) approach was developed, which exploits the correlation properties of instrument noise to identify and remove its contribution from spectra. The spectra estimated using the NAC approach exhibit increased fidelity and a slope of -5/3 in the inertial range, which is typically observed for turbulent flows. Finally, this study also compares the effectiveness of low-pass Gaussian filters in removing instrument noise with that of the NAC approach. For the data used in this study, both the NAC and Gaussian filter approaches are observed to be capable of removing instrument noise at higher frequencies from the spectra. However, the NAC results are closer to the expected frequency power of -5/3 in the inertial sub-range.

  13. Synthesis, characterization and biological activity of a niobium-substituted-heteropolytungstate on hepatitis B virus.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hong; Qi, Yanfei; Ding, Yanhua; Wang, Juan; Li, Qingmei; Zhang, Jingzhou; Jiang, Yanfang; Chi, Xiumei; Li, Juan; Niu, Junqi

    2012-02-15

    To synthesise and characterize the polyoxometalate Cs(2)K(4)Na[SiW(9)Nb(3)O(40)]·H(2)O 1 for its anti-hepatitis B virus (HBV) properties by using the HepG2.2.15 cell. The methylthiazol tetrazolium assay was used to evaluate the growth inhibitory effect of Compound 1 on HepG2.2.15 cell. By using ELISA and real-time PCR, respectively, the presence of extracellular hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg), e antigen (HBeAg), and HBV DNA were measured. The levels of intracellular HBV DNA and mRNA were determined by using Southern blot or reverse-transcription-PCR, respectively. Intracellular distribution of antigen were measured by Western blot. A 1995 μmol/L concentration of the commercially-available hepatitis B drug, adefovir dipivoxil (ADV), was required to achieve 50% cytotoxicity against cultured cells (CC(50)) by day nine; in contrast, only 1747 μmol/L of Compound 1 was required for the same result. Treatment of HepG2.2.15 cells with Compound 1 effectively suppress the secretion of HBV antigens and HBV DNA in a dose-dependent and time-dependent manner. IC(50) values were determined to be 80 μmol/L for HBsAg, 75 μmol/L for HBeAg and 3.72 μmol/L for supernatant HBV DNA at day nine post-exposure, as opposed to 266, 296, 30.09 μmol/L, respectively, for ADV. Intracellular HBV DNA, mRNA and antigen were also found to be decreased by Compound 1. The same dose of ADV yielded a significantly less robust inhibitory effect. Compound 1 can clear HBV from hepatic cells and may represent a therapeutic agent to treat HBV infection.

  14. Treatment for hepatitis B in patients with drug resistance

    PubMed Central

    Kroy, Daniela C.

    2016-01-01

    Persistent hepatitis B virus (HBV) infections affect about 240 million patients worldwide that are at risk of developing liver cirrhosis or hepatocellular carcinoma. HBV is a small, partially double stranded DNA virus with four overlapping genes and a unique life cycle, which involves the generation of an RNA template for replication via reverse transcription. Mutations occur frequently during chronic infection, and particular selection pressures select distinct mutants. Nucleoside and nucleotide analogues like lamivudine (LMV), entecavir (ETV), telbivudine (LdT), adefovir dipivoxil (ADV) and tenofovir (TDF) are used to achieve long-term suppression of viral replication. Importantly, these drugs have different barriers to resistance, explaining the higher incidence of treatment failure in the past due to drug resistant viral strains for the older compounds LMV, LdT and ADV. On a molecular level, drug resistant mutations usually affect the reverse transcriptase domain of the HBV polymerase protein. Secondary compensatory mutations restore the replication fitness of the mutant virus. From a clinical point of view, patients undergoing antiviral therapy require regular testing for HBV DNA (every 3–6 months). In case of insufficient viral suppression or viral breakthrough (>1 log increase in HBV DNA above nadir), strict adherence to therapy needs to be ensured. If drug resistance is suspected or even molecularly confirmed, rescue therapy strategies exist, usually switching to a noncross-resistant antiviral drug. LMV, LdT and ETV resistant HBV can be treated with TDF monotherapy, ADV resistance with ETV or TDF, and insufficient responses to TDF may require ETV either as mono- or combination therapy. Complex treatment histories with many antivirals may sometimes necessitate the combination of highly effective antivirals like ETV and TDF. Novel treatment targets such as core (capsid) inhibitors, siRNA targeting protein translation, entry inhibitors or immune modulators

  15. RADIAL TRANSPORT OF LARGE-SCALE MAGNETIC FIELDS IN ACCRETION DISKS. II. RELAXATION TO STEADY STATES

    SciTech Connect

    Takeuchi, Taku; Okuzumi, Satoshi

    2014-12-20

    We study the time evolution of a large-scale magnetic flux threading an accretion disk. The induction equation of the mean poloidal field is solved under the standard viscous disk model. Magnetic flux evolution is controlled by two timescales: one is the timescale of the inward advection of the magnetic flux, τ{sub adv}. This is induced by the dragging of the flux by the accreting gas. The other is the outward diffusion timescale of the magnetic flux τ{sub dif}. We consider diffusion due to the Ohmic resistivity. These timescales can be significantly different from the disk viscous timescale τ{sub disk}. The behaviors of the magnetic flux evolution are quite different depending on the magnitude relationship of the timescales τ{sub adv}, τ{sub dif}, and τ{sub disk}. The most interesting phenomena occur when τ{sub adv} << τ{sub dif}, τ{sub disk}. In such a case, the magnetic flux distribution approaches a quasi-steady profile much faster than the viscous evolution of the gas disk, and the magnetic flux has also been tightly bundled to the inner part of the disk. In the inner part, although the poloidal magnetic field becomes much stronger than the interstellar magnetic field, the field strength is limited to the maximum value that is analytically given by our previous work. We also find a condition for the initial large magnetic flux, which is a fossil of the magnetic field dragging during the early phase of star formation that survives for a duration in which significant gas disk evolution proceeds.

  16. Alpha fetoprotein DNA prime and adenovirus boost immunization of two hepatocellular cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Alpha fetoprotein (AFP) is an oncofetal antigen over-expressed by many hepatocellular cancers (HCC). We previously demonstrated that HLA-A2-restricted epitopes derived from AFP are immunogenic in vitro and in vivo despite high circulating levels of this oncofetal antigen. In order to test a more broadly applicable, HLA-unrestricted, inexpensive, cell-free vaccine platform capable of activating tumor antigen-specific CD8+ and CD4+ T cells, we tested full length AFP in a plasmid DNA construct in combination with an AFP-expressing replication-deficient adenovirus (AdV) in a prime-boost vaccine strategy. Methods HCC patients who had an AFP+ tumor and previous treatment for HCC were screened and two patients received vaccination with three plasmid DNA injections followed by a single AdV injection, all delivered intramuscularly (i.m.). Results The vaccine was well tolerated and safe. Both patients showed immunologic evidence of immunization. The first patient had a weak AFP-specific T cell response, a strong AdV-specific cellular response and recurred with an AFP-expressing HCC at nine months. The second patient developed a strong AFP-specific CD8+ and CD4+ cellular response and an AdV neutralizing antibody response, and recurred at 18 months without an increase in serum AFP. Conclusions The AFP DNA prime-AdV boost vaccine was safe and immunogenic. Circulating anti-AdV neutralizing antibodies at baseline did not prohibit the development of AFP-specific cellular immunity. The patient who developed CD8+ and CD4+ AFP-specific T cell immunity had more favorable progression-free survival. The observations with these two patients support development of this vaccine strategy in a larger clinical trial. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00093548 PMID:24708667

  17. Long-term monitoring of 10 selected pathogens in wild boar (Sus scrofa) in Sierra Nevada National Park, southern Spain.

    PubMed

    Cano-Manuel, Francisco J; López-Olvera, Jorge; Fandos, Paulino; Soriguer, Ramón C; Pérez, Jesús M; Granados, José E

    2014-11-01

    Wild boar (Sus scrofa) populations are increasing in the Iberian Peninsula, and population management must include disease management and control. In this study, the epidemiology of 10 selected pathogens (Aujeszky's disease virus - ADV, porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus - PRRSV, porcine influenza virus, porcine circovirus, porcine parvovirus, Erysipelotrix rhusiopathiae, Leptospira pomona, Chlamydia/Chlamydiaceae sp., Salmonella sp. and Mycobacterium bovis) in the wild boar population in Sierra Nevada National Park (SNNP), an open unfenced area, is reported, taking into account wild boar population abundance variation in space and time in an open unfenced environment. A total of 1103 wild boar were sampled in 141 hunting events randomly carried out for sampling in seven hunting seasons (October to February from 2002-2003 to 2009-2010 (except 2007-2008). Prevalence was overall lower than those previously reported for fenced wild boar populations in Spain, but all the pathogens analyzed except PRRSV were considered endemic in the SNNP. ADV, E. rhusiopathiae and total pathogen prevalence were positively correlated to wild boar density. Prevalence in the positive areas was significantly higher in females for ADV, E. rhusiopathiae, L. pomona, Chlamydia/Chlamydiaceae sp. and Salmonella sp., and in males for M. bovis. This longitudinal study provides the first data on the health status of the relatively unmanaged and low density wild boar population of SNNP. It is concluded that non-intensively managed wild boar populations are able to maintain the circulation of several pathogens, even in low prevalences and in open unfenced areas with natural density variation both in time and space.

  18. Performance evaluation of Puritan® universal transport system (UniTranz-RT™) for preservation and transport of clinical viruses.

    PubMed

    Brasel, Trevor; Madhusudhan, Kunapuli T; Agans, Krystle; Dearen, Karen; Jones, Sara L; Sherwood, Robert L

    2015-10-01

    The ability of a non-propagating microbial transport medium to maintain the viability of clinically relevant viruses was compared to a similar commercial medium to establish performance equivalence. Two dilutions of stock of test viruses, namely adenovirus (AdV), cytomegalovirus (CMV), echovirus Type 30 (EV), herpes simplex virus (HSV) types 1 and 2, influenza A, parainfluenza 3 (PIV), respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), and varicella zoster virus (VZV), were spiked into Puritan® Medical Products Company Universal Transport System (UniTranz-RT™) and BD(TM) Universal Viral Transport System (UVT) and incubated at 4 °C and room temperature (RT) for up to 72 hr. Post incubation assessment of recovery of AdV, EV, HSV-2, PIV, and VZV from UniTranz-RT™ and UVT using shell vial assays followed by immunofluorescence staining demonstrated statistically significant differences between both transport media. In general, significantly higher recoveries of AdV, EV, and VZV were found from UniTranz-RT™ than UVT whereas HSV-2 and PIV were recovered better from UVT than UniTranz-RT™, under specific test conditions. The recovery of HSV-1, influenza A, PIV, and RSV showed no significant differences between transport media. Sulforhodamine B-based assay analysis of UniTranz-RT™ lots prior to and at expiration exhibited no cytotoxicity. The overall results of the study validate the full performance of UniTranz-RT™ as a viral transport medium and establish its effectiveness on par with the UVT.

  19. CD123 redirected multiple virus-specific T cells for acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Li; Liu, Xin; Wang, Xingbing; Sun, Zimin; Song, Xiao-Tong

    2016-02-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) has been increasingly used as a curative treatment for acute myeloid leukemia (AML). However, relapse rates after HSCT in complete remission (CR) are reported between 30% and 70%. In addition, numerous studies suggested that secondary viral infection from a variety of viruses including Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), adenovirus (Adv), and cytomegalovirus (CMV) are among the most common causes of death post-HSCT. Currently, chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-based T cells have been developed to treat AML in clinical studies, while virus-specific cytotoxic T cells (VST) have been proven to be able to effectively prevent or treat viral infection after HSCT. Thus it would be desirable to develop T cells with the ability of simultaneously targeting AML relapse and viral infection. In this article, we now describe the generation of VST cells that are engineered to express CAR for a specific AML cell-surface antigen CD123 (CD123-CAR-VST). Using Dendritic cells (DCs) pulsed with EBV, Adv, and CMV peptides as sources of viral antigens, we generated VST from A2 donor peripheral mononuclear cells (PBMC). VST were then transduced with retroviral vector encoding CD123-CAR to generate CD123-CAR-VST. We demonstrated that CD123-CAR-VST recognized EBV, Adv, and CMV epitopes and had HLA-restricted virus-specific cytotoxic effector function against EBV target. In addition, CD123-CAR-VST retained the specificity against CD123-positive AML cell lines such as MOLM13 and THP-1 in vitro. Thus our results suggested that CD123-CAR-VST might be a valuable candidate to simultaneously prevent or treat relapse and viral infection in AML HSCT recipients. PMID:26740053

  20. Adenovirus-specific T-cell Subsets in Human Peripheral Blood and After IFN-γ Immunomagnetic Selection.

    PubMed

    Qian, Chongsheng; Wang, Yingying; Cai, Huili; Laroye, Caroline; De Carvalho Bittencourt, Marcelo; Clement, Laurence; Stoltz, Jean-François; Decot, Véronique; Reppel, Loïc; Bensoussan, Danièle

    2016-01-01

    Adoptive antiviral cellular immunotherapy by infusion of virus-specific T cells (VSTs) is becoming an alternative treatment for viral infection after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. The T memory stem cell (TSCM) subset was recently described as exhibiting self-renewal and multipotency properties which are required for sustained efficacy in vivo. We wondered if such a crucial subset for immunotherapy was present in VSTs. We identified, by flow cytometry, TSCM in adenovirus (ADV)-specific interferon (IFN)-γ+ T cells before and after IFN-γ-based immunomagnetic selection, and analyzed the distribution of the main T-cell subsets in VSTs: naive T cells (TN), TSCM, T central memory cells (TCM), T effector memory cell (TEM), and effector T cells (TEFF). In this study all of the different T-cell subsets were observed in the blood sample from healthy donor ADV-VSTs, both before and after IFN-γ-based immunomagnetic selection. As the IFN-γ-based immunomagnetic selection system sorts mainly the most differentiated T-cell subsets, we observed that TEM was always the major T-cell subset of ADV-specific T cells after immunomagnetic isolation and especially after expansion in vitro. Comparing T-cell subpopulation profiles before and after in vitro expansion, we observed that in vitro cell culture with interleukin-2 resulted in a significant expansion of TN-like, TCM, TEM, and TEFF subsets in CD4IFN-γ T cells and of TCM and TEM subsets only in CD8IFN-γ T cells. We demonstrated the presence of all T-cell subsets in IFN-γ VSTs including the TSCM subpopulation, although this was weakly selected by the IFN-γ-based immunomagnetic selection system. PMID:26641259

  1. Survey Strategy Optimization for the Atacama Cosmology Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De Bernardis, F.; Stevens, J. R.; Hasselfield, M.; Alonso, D.; Bond, J. R.; Calabrese, E.; Choi, S. K.; Crowley, K. T.; Devlin, M.; Wollack, E. J.

    2016-01-01

    In recent years there have been significant improvements in the sensitivity and the angular resolution of the instruments dedicated to the observation of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB). ACTPol is the first polarization receiver for the Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT) and is observing the CMB sky with arcmin resolution over approximately 2000 square degrees. Its upgrade, Advanced ACTPol (AdvACT), will observe the CMB in five frequency bands and over a larger area of the sky. We describe the optimization and implementation of the ACTPol and AdvACT surveys. The selection of the observed fields is driven mainly by the science goals, that is, small angular scale CMB measurements, B-mode measurements and cross-correlation studies. For the ACTPol survey we have observed patches of the southern galactic sky with low galactic foreground emissions which were also chosen to maximize the overlap with several galaxy surveys to allow unique cross-correlation studies. A wider field in the northern galactic cap ensured significant additional overlap with the BOSS spectroscopic survey. The exact shapes and footprints of the fields were optimized to achieve uniform coverage and to obtain cross-linked maps by observing the fields with different scan directions. We have maximized the efficiency of the survey by implementing a close to 24-hour observing strategy, switching between daytime and nighttime observing plans and minimizing the telescope idle time. We describe the challenges represented by the survey optimization for the significantly wider area observed by AdvACT, which will observe roughly half of the low-foreground sky. The survey strategies described here may prove useful for planning future ground-based CMB surveys, such as the Simons Observatory and CMB Stage IV surveys.

  2. Broadband light absorption enhancement in polymer photovoltaics using metal nanowall gratings as transparent electrodes.

    PubMed

    Ye, Zhuo; Chaudhary, Sumit; Kuang, Ping; Ho, Kai-Ming

    2012-05-21

    The authors investigate light absorption in organic solar cells in which indium tin oxide (ITO) is replaced by a new metallic architecture (grating) as a transparent electrode. Different from typical metal nanowire gratings, our gratings consist of metal nanowalls with nanoscale footprint and (sub)microscale height [Adv. Mater. 23, 2469 (2011)], thus ensuring high optical transmittance and electrical conductivity. Simulations reveal that a broadband and polarization-insensitive light absorption enhancement is achieved via two mechanisms, when such silver nanowall gratings are employed in P3HT:PCBM based solar cells. Overall absorption enhanced by ~23% compared to a reference cell with ITO electrode.

  3. Viral persistence in surface and drinking water: Suitability of PCR pre-treatment with intercalating dyes.

    PubMed

    Prevost, B; Goulet, M; Lucas, F S; Joyeux, M; Moulin, L; Wurtzer, S

    2016-03-15

    After many outbreaks of enteric virus associated with consumption of drinking water, the study of enteric viruses in water has increased significantly in recent years. In order to better understand the dynamics of enteric viruses in environmental water and the associated viral risk, it is necessary to estimate viral persistence in different conditions. In this study, two representative models of human enteric viruses, adenovirus 41 (AdV 41) and coxsackievirus B2 (CV-B2), were used to evaluate the persistence of enteric viruses in environmental water. The persistence of infectious particles, encapsidated genomes and free nucleic acids of AdV 41 and CV-B2 was evaluated in drinking water and surface water at different temperatures (4 °C, 20 °C and 37 °C). The infectivity of AdV 41 and CV-B2 persisted for at least 25 days, whatever the water temperature, and for more than 70 days at 4 °C and 20 °C, in both drinking and surface water. Encapsidated genomes persisted beyond 70 days, whatever the water temperature. Free nucleic acids (i.e. without capsid) also were able to persist for at least 16 days in drinking and surface water. The usefulness of a detection method based on an intercalating dye pre-treatment, which specifically targets preserved particles, was investigated for the discrimination of free and encapsidated genomes and it was compared to virus infectivity. Further, the resistance of AdV 41 and CV-B2 against two major disinfection treatments applied in drinking water plants (UV and chlorination) was evaluated. Even after the application of UV rays and chlorine at high doses (400 mJ/cm(2) and 10 mg.min/L, respectively), viral genomes were still detected with molecular biology methods. Although the intercalating dye pre-treatment had little use for the detection of the effects of UV treatment, it was useful in the case of treatment by chlorination and less than 1 log10 difference in the results was found as compared to the infectivity measurements

  4. On the nature of Parr functions to predict the most reactive sites along organic polar reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamorro, Eduardo; Pérez, Patricia; Domingo, Luis R.

    2013-09-01

    Very recently, local electrophilic and nucleophilic “Parr functions” were empirically introduced (L.R. Domingo, P. Pérez, J.A. Saez RSC Adv. 3 (2013) 1486) in order to properly characterize the most reactive sites along polar chemical reactions. This Letter reports a theoretical advance to the new methodology by identifying these quantities with key Fukui descriptors of the spin-polarized density functional theory. Given such framework properly incorporates the treatment of both charge-transfer and spin-polarization, this finding provides a significant insight and substantial step forward within the field of a chemical reactivity theory based on the conceptual framework of density functional theory.

  5. Inflow Characterization for Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Devices. FY-2011: Annual Progress Report

    SciTech Connect

    Richmond, Marshall C.; Durgesh, Vibhav; Thomson, Jim; Polagye, Brian

    2011-06-09

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), in collaboration with the Applied Physics Laboratory at the University of Washington (APL-UW), has carried out a detailed preliminary fluid flow field study at site selected for testing of marine and hydrokinetic turbines using Acoustic Doppler Velocimetry (ADV) measurements, Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) measurements, and Conductivity, Temperature and Depth (CTD) measurements. In FY-2011 these measurements were performed continuously for two weeks, in order to collect data during neap and spring tides, as well as during diurnal tidal variations.

  6. Economic Conditions and Factors Affecting New Nuclear Power Deployment

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, Thomas J.

    2014-10-01

    This report documents work performed in support of the US Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy’s Advanced Small Modular Reactor (AdvSMR) program. The report presents information and results from economic analyses to describe current electricity market conditions and those key factors that may impact the deployment of AdvSMRs or any other new nuclear power plants. Thus, this report serves as a reference document for DOE as it moves forward with its plans to develop advanced reactors, including AdvSMRs. For the purpose of this analysis, information on electricity markets and nuclear power plant operating costs will be combined to examine the current state of the nuclear industry and the process required to successfully move forward with new nuclear power in general and AdvSMRs in particular. The current electricity market is generally unfavorable to new nuclear construction, especially in deregulated markets with heavy competition from natural gas and subsidized renewables. The successful and profitable operation of a nuclear power plant (or any power plant) requires the rate at which the electricity is sold to be sufficiently greater than the cost to operate. The wholesale rates in most US markets have settled into values that provide profits for most operating nuclear power plants but are too low to support the added cost of capital recovery for new nuclear construction. There is a strong geographic dependence on the wholesale rate, with some markets currently able to support new nuclear construction. However, there is also a strong geographic dependence on pronuclear public opinion; the areas where power prices are high tend to have unfavorable views on the construction of new nuclear power plants. The use of government-backed incentives, such as subsidies, can help provide a margin to help justify construction projects that otherwise may not seem viable. Similarly, low interest rates for the project will also add a positive margin to the economic

  7. Beyond Standard Model Physics: At the Frontiers of Cosmology and Particle Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez-Suarez, Alejandro O.

    I begin to write this thesis at a time of great excitement in the field of cosmology and particle physics. The aim of this thesis is to study and search for beyond the standard model (BSM) physics in the cosmological and high energy particle fields. There are two main questions, which this thesis aims to address: 1) what can we learn about the inflationary epoch utilizing the pioneer gravitational wave detector Adv. LIGO?, and 2) what are the dark matter particle properties and interactions with the standard model particles?. This thesis will focus on advances in answering both questions.

  8. Rheological behavior of Slide Ring Gels.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Vivek; Park, Jong Seung; Park, Jung O.; Srinivasarao, Mohan

    2006-03-01

    Slide ring gels were synthesized by chemically crosslinking, sparsely populated α-cyclodextrin (α-CD) present on the polyrotaxanes consisting of α-CD and polyethylene glycol (PEG). [1] Unlike physically or chemically crosslinked gels, slide ring gels are topological gels where crosslinks can slide along the chain. [2] We investigate the rheological behavior of these gels swollen in water and compare their viscoelastic properties to those of physical and chemical gels. We also study the equilibrium swelling behavior of these gels. [1] Okumura and Ito, Adv. Mater. 2001, 13, 485 [2] C. Zhao et al, J. Phys. Cond. Mat. 2005, 17, S2841

  9. An Inspire-Konform 3d Building Model of Bavaria Using Cadastre Information, LIDAR and Image Matching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roschlaub, R.; Batscheider, J.

    2016-06-01

    The federal governments of Germany endeavour to create a harmonized 3D building data set based on a common application schema (the AdV-CityGML-Profile). The Bavarian Agency for Digitisation, High-Speed Internet and Surveying has launched a statewide 3D Building Model with standardized roof shapes for all 8.1 million buildings in Bavaria. For the acquisition of the 3D Building Model LiDAR-data or data from Image Matching are used as basis in addition with the building ground plans of the official cadastral map. The data management of the 3D Building Model is carried out by a central database with the usage of a nationwide standardized CityGML-Profile of the AdV. The update of the 3D Building Model for new buildings is done by terrestrial building measurements within the maintenance process of the cadaster and from image matching. In a joint research project, the Bavarian State Agency for Surveying and Geoinformation and the TUM, Chair of Geoinformatics, transformed an AdV-CityGML-Profilebased test data set of Bavarian LoD2 building models into an INSPIRE-compliant schema. For the purpose of a transformation of such kind, the AdV provides a data specification, a test plan for 3D Building Models and a mapping table. The research project examined whether the transformation rules defined in the mapping table, were unambiguous and sufficient for implementing a transformation of LoD2 data based on the AdV-CityGML-Profile into the INSPIRE schema. The proof of concept was carried out by transforming production data of the Bavarian 3D Building Model in LoD2 into the INSPIRE BU schema. In order to assure the quality of the data to be transformed, the test specifications according to the test plan for 3D Building Models of the AdV were carried out. The AdV mapping table was checked for completeness and correctness and amendments were made accordingly.

  10. Extreme Value Analysis of Tidal Stream Velocity Perturbations

    SciTech Connect

    Harding, Samuel; Thomson, Jim; Polagye, Brian; Richmond, Marshall C.; Durgesh, Vibhav; Bryden, Ian

    2011-04-26

    This paper presents a statistical extreme value analysis of maximum velocity perturbations from the mean flow speed in a tidal stream. This study was performed using tidal velocity data measured using both an Acoustic Doppler Velocimeter (ADV) and an Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) at the same location which allows for direct comparison of predictions. The extreme value analysis implements of a Peak-Over-Threshold method to explore the effect of perturbation length and time scale on the magnitude of a 50-year perturbation.

  11. Nonlinear optical properties of confined excitions in clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leegwater, Jan A.; Fried, Laurence E.; Mukamel, Shaul

    1993-03-01

    Size effects in femtosecond photon echo spectroscopy of neat clusters are calculated using a quasiparticle representation of the nonlinear response. We extend our previous study of cooperative effects on the nonlinear response of assemblies of two level molecules [J. A. Leegwater and S. Mukamel, Phys. Rev. A 46, 452 (1992)] to allow for nuclear motion and to have an s-p model of polarizable atoms. Photon echos in Benzene/Argon clusters are calculated using a semiclassical phase averaging procedure [L. E. Fried and S. Mukamel, Adv. Chem. Phys. (in Press)].

  12. Error correction for encoded quantum annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastawski, Fernando; Preskill, John

    2016-05-01

    Recently, W. Lechner, P. Hauke, and P. Zoller [Sci. Adv. 1, e1500838 (2015), 10.1126/sciadv.1500838] have proposed a quantum annealing architecture, in which a classical spin glass with all-to-all pairwise connectivity is simulated by a spin glass with geometrically local interactions. We interpret this architecture as a classical error-correcting code, which is highly robust against weakly correlated bit-flip noise, and we analyze the code's performance using a belief-propagation decoding algorithm. Our observations may also apply to more general encoding schemes and noise models.

  13. Hydrokinetic canal measurements: inflow velocity, wake flow velocity, and turbulence

    DOE Data Explorer

    Gunawan, Budi

    2014-06-11

    The dataset consist of acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) velocity measurements in the wake of a 3-meter diameter vertical-axis hydrokinetic turbine deployed in Roza Canal, Yakima, WA, USA. A normalized hub-centerline wake velocity profile and two cross-section velocity contours, 10 meters and 20 meters downstream of the turbine, are presented. Mean velocities and turbulence data, measured using acoustic Doppler velocimeter (ADV) at 50 meters upstream of the turbine, are also presented. Canal dimensions and hydraulic properties, and turbine-related information are also included.

  14. Thermometry and refrigeration in a two-component Mott insulator of ultracold atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Weld, David M.; Miyake, Hirokazu; Medley, Patrick; Pritchard, David E.; Ketterle, Wolfgang

    2010-11-15

    Interesting spin Hamiltonians can be realized with ultracold atoms in a two-component Mott insulator (2CMI) [Adv. Phys. 56, 243 (2007); Rev. Mod. Phys. 80, 885 (2008)]. It was recently demonstrated that the application of a magnetic field gradient to the 2CMI enables new techniques of thermometry [Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 245301 (2009)] and adiabatic cooling [e-print arXiv:1006.4674]. Here we present a theoretical description which provides quantitative analysis of these two techniques. We show that adiabatic reduction of the field gradient is capable of cooling below the Curie or Neel temperature of certain spin-ordered phases.

  15. Conceptual models used by nurses working in coronary care units--a discussion paper.

    PubMed

    Timmins, Fiona

    2006-12-01

    In the UK, Europe and the USA conceptual models of nursing are features of many undergraduate nursing curricula [Alligood MR. The nature of knowledge needed for nursing practice. In Alligood MR, Marriner-Tomey A, editors. Nursing theory utilisation and application. London: Mosby, 2002, Tierney AJ. Nursing models extant or extinct? J Adv Nurs 1998;8(1):77-85] and commonly used in practice. However, UK nurses in practice continue to be dissatisfied with conceptual model use [Griffiths P. An investigation into the description of patients' problems by nurses using two different needs-based nursing models. J Adv Nurs 1998;28(5):969-977, Mason C. Guide to practice or 'load of rubbish'? The influence of care plans on nursing practice in five clinical areas in Northern Ireland. J Adv Nurs 1999;29(2):380-387, Murphy K, Cooney A, Casey D, Connor M, O'Connor J., Dineen B. The Roper, Logan and Tierney Model: perceptions and operationalization of the model in psychiatric nursing within one health board in Ireland. J Adv Nurs 2000;31(6):1333-1341]. An association with increased paperwork and documentation together with a belief that these abstract concepts do not quite fit with the practice setting has resulted in a generalised apathy towards their use in some areas [Timmins F. Critical care nursing in the 21st Century. Intensive Crit Care Nurs 2002;18:118-127]. In an era of concerns about both cost and quality, together with an increased impetus towards multi-professional working patterns and role expansion, alternative models of care, such as critical pathways and care pathways are gaining increased favour in the clinical setting [Johnson S, editor. Pathways of care. Oxford; Blackwell Science 1997]. The aim of this paper is to consider whether or not the traditional conceptual models of nursing are apt for today's practicing coronary care nurse. Specific questions to be addressed are: what is the research evidence that informs conceptual model use in coronary care and what are

  16. Development of a Technical Basis and Guidance for Advanced SMR Function Allocation

    SciTech Connect

    Jacques Hugo; David Gertman; Jeffrey Joe; Ronal Farris; April Whaley; Heather Medema

    2013-09-01

    This report presents the results from three key activities for FY13 that influence the definition of new concepts of operations for advanced Small Modular Reactors (AdvSMR: a) the development of a framework for the analysis of the functional environmental, and structural attributes, b) the effect that new technologies and operational concepts would have on the way functions are allocated to humans or machines or combinations of the two, and c) the relationship between new concepts of operations, new function allocations, and human performance requirements.

  17. On the von Staudt-Clausen theorem for q-Euler numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, T.

    2013-03-01

    The q-Euler numbers and polynomials were recently constructed [T. Kim, "The Modified q-Euler Numbers and Polynomials," Adv. Stud. Contemp. Math., 16, 161-170 (2008)]. These q-Euler numbers and polynomials have interesting properties. In this paper, we prove a theorem of the von Staudt-Clausen type for q-Euler numbers; namely, we prove that the q-Euler numbers are p-adic integers. Finally, we prove Kummer-type congruences for the q-Euler numbers.

  18. Are Soft Short Tests Good Indicators of Internal Li-ion Cell Defects?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeevarajan, J.; Chung, J.-S.; Jung, K.; Park, J.

    2013-01-01

    day); continue for total of 14 days with 1 reading per day 2. Soft Short Test 1: Fully charge; cells discharged to manufacturer's end of disch. Voltage (EODV) cutoff at C/5 rate; stand for 30 minutes; discharge with C/500 to the same EODV. stand for another 30 minutes; discharge the cells again using C/1000 current to the same EODV. OCV measurements twice a day for 72 hours and then for total of 14 days (data collection same as in 1.) 3. Soft Short Test 2: Fully charge; cells discharged to the manuf. EODV with a C/13 constant current; provide a 10 hour rest, discharge again to the same EODV with a current of C/250, provide a 10 hour rest, discharge again using a C/250 rate, provide a 24 hour rest, charge using C/250 to 3.15 V (for 12 hours). OCV measurements twice a day for at 72 hours. (data collection same as in 1.) 4. Soft Short Test 3: Fully charge; cells shall be discharged using C/10 current to manuf. EODV. Allow the cell to remain at Open circuit for 10 seconds. Discharge the cell at C/20 rate to the same EODV, hold open circuit for 24 hours. Discharge the cells at C/200 rate to the same end of voltage cutoff and hold open circuit for 24 hours. Discharge the cells one more time at C/200 rate to the same EODV and hold open circuit for 36 hours. Charge at C/200 rate to 3.15 V and hold for 3 days. Record OCV during the open circuit stand periods every 12 hours and at the beginning and end of the 3 day hold (include the 12 hour OCV recording during this time also). Capacity Cycling: Cells with declining voltages - one cell from each manufacturer chosen for cycling Destructive Physical Analysis (DPA): Cells with and without decline chosen from each lot for DPA.

  19. PREFACE: Superconductivity in ultrathin films and nanoscale systems Superconductivity in ultrathin films and nanoscale systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianconi, Antonio; Bose, Sangita; Garcia-Garcia, Antonio Miguel

    2012-12-01

    appears to enhance the critical temperature [4]. This is a hot topic as in the past year many works have clarified the nanoscale phase separation in electron-doped chalcogenides, showing the key role of a complex texture of nanograins and opening new avenues for the fundamental understanding of quantum phenomena in networks of superconducting nanograins. The advances in nanotechnology allow the exploration of the possible existence of superconductivity in single carbon nanotubes [5]. The technological applications presented by Gomez [6] and Lehtinen [7] show the fundamental physics of superconductivity at the nanoscale to promote new advances in quantum devices. We hope that this combination will make these focus papers in Superconductor Science and Technology interesting and promote cross-fertilization among the different sub-branches of the field which all share the same goal of addressing the key questions on nanoscale superconductors. References [1]Croitoru M D, Vagov A, Shanenko A A and Axt V M 2012 The Cooper problem in nanoscale: enhancement of the coupling due to confinement Supercond. Sci. Technol. 25 124001 [2]Perali A, Innocenti A, Valletta A and Bianconi A 2012 Anomalous isotope effect near a 2.5 Lifshitz transition in a multi-band multi-condensate superconductor made of a superlattice of stripes Supercond. Sci. Technol. 25 124002 [3]Zeng S W, Huang Z, Wang X, Lü W M, Liu Z Q, Zhang B M, Dhar S, Venkatesan T and Ariando 2012 The influence of La substitution and oxygen reduction in ambipolar La-doped YBa2Cu3Oy thin films Supercond. Sci. Technol. 25 124003 [4]Poccia N, Bianconi A, Campi G, Fratini M and Ricci A 2012 Size evolution of the oxygen interstitial nanowires in La2CuO4+y by thermal treatments and x-ray continuous illumination Supercond. Sci. Technol. 25 124004 [5]Yang Y, Fedorov G, Zhang J, Tselev A, Shafranjuk S and Barbara P 2012 The search for superconductivity at van Hove singularities in carbon nanotubes Supercond. Sci. Technol. 25 124005 [6]Gomez

  20. A novel total flux normalized correlation equation for predicting single-collector efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sethi, R.; Messina, F.; Marchisio, D.

    2015-12-01

    In this study a novel total flux normalized correlation equation is proposed for predicting single-collector efficiency under a broad range of parameters. The correlation equation does not exploit the additivity approach introduced by Yao et al. (1971), but includes mixed terms that account for the mutual interaction of concomitant transport mechanisms (i.e., advection, gravity and Brownian motion) and of finite size of the particles (steric effect). The correlation equation is based on a combination of Eulerian and Lagrangian simulations performed, under Smoluchowski-Levich conditions, in a geometry which consists of a sphere enveloped by a cylindrical control volume. The normalization of the deposited flux is performed accounting for all of the particles entering into the control volume through all transport mechanisms (not just the upstream convective flux as conventionally done) to provide efficiency values lower than one over a wide range of parameters. In order to guarantee the independence of each term, the correlation equation is derived through a rigorous hierarchical parameter estimation process, accounting for single and mutual interacting transport mechanisms. The correlation equation, valid both for point and finite-size particles, is extended to include porosity dependency and it is compared with previous models. Reduced forms are proposed by elimination of the less relevant terms.References:F Messina, DL Marchisio, R Sethi . Journal of colloid and interface science 446, (2015) 185-193 T Tosco, DL Marchisio, F Lince, R Sethi, Transport in porous media 96 (1), (2013) 1-20 A Tiraferri, T Tosco, R Sethi Environmental Earth Sciences 63 (4), (2011) 847-859 K.E. Nelson, T.R. Ginn, T. Kemai, Environ Sci Technol 47 (2013) 8078. G. Boccardo, D.L. Marchisio, R. Sethi, J Colloid Interface Sci 417 (2014) 227. H. Ma, J. Pedel, P. Fife, W.P. Johnson, (2009). N. Tufenkji, M. Elimelech, Environ Sci Technol 38 (2004) 529.K.M. Yao, M.M. Habibian, C.R. O'Melia, Environ

  1. Mathematical modeling of slope flows with entrainment as flows of non-Newtonian fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zayko, Julia; Eglit, Margarita

    2015-04-01

    Non-Newtonian fluids in which the shear stresses are nonlinear functions of the shear strain rates are used to model slope flows such as snow avalanches, mudflows, debris flows. The entrainment of bottom material is included into the model basing on the assumption that in entraining flows the bed friction is equal to the shear stress of the bottom material (Issler et al, 2011). Unsteady motion down long homogeneous slopes with constant inclines is studied numerically for different flow rheologies and different slope angles. Variation of the velocity profile, increase of the flow depth and velocity due to entrainment as well as the value of the entrainment rate is calculated. Asymptotic formulae for the entrainment rate are derived for unsteady flows of different rheological properties. REFERENCES Chowdhury M., Testik F., 2011. Laboratory testing of mathematical models for high-concentration fluid mud turbidity currents. Ocean Engineering 38, 256-270. Eglit, M.E., Demidov, K.S., 2005. Mathematical modeling of snow entrainment in avalanche motion. Cold Reg. Sci. Technol. 43 (1-2), 10-23. Eglit M. E., Yakubenko A. E., 2012, Mathematical Modeling of slope flows entraining bottom material. Eglit M. E., Yakubenko A. E., 2014, Numerical modeling of slope flows entraining bottom material. Cold Reg. Sci. Technol. 108, 139-148. Issler D, M. Pastor Peréz. 2011. Interplay of entrainment and rheology in snow avalanches; a numerical study. Annals of Glaciology, 52(58), pp.143-147 Kern M. A., Tiefenbacher F., McElwaine J., N., 2004. The rheology of snow in large chute flows. Cold Regions Science and Technology, 39, 181 -192. Naaim, M., Faug, T., Naaim-Bouvet, F., 2003. Dry granular flow modelling including erosion and deposition. Surv. Geophys. 24, 569-585. Naaim, M., Naaim-Bouvet, F., Faug, T., Bouchet, A., 2004. Dense snow avalanche modeling: flow, erosion, deposition and obstacle effects. Cold Reg. Sci. Technol. 39, 193-204. Rougier, J & Kern, M 2010, 'Predicting snow

  2. Virtual Impactor for Sub-micron Aerosol Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolshakov, A. A.; Strawa, A. W.; Hallar, A. G.

    2005-12-01

    , B.A. Paldus, J. Atm. Ocean. Technol., 20, 454-465 (2003). 2. V.A. Marple, K.L. Rubow, B.A. Olson, Aerosol Sci. Technol., 22, 140-150 (1995). 3. B.T. Chen, H.C. Yeh, Y.S. Cheng, J. Aerosol Sci., 16, 343-354 (1985). 4. V.A. Marple, C.M. Chien, Environ. Sci. Technol., 14, 976-985 (1980).

  3. Effective detection of human adenovirus in hawaiian waters using enhanced pcr methods

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The current criteria for recreational water quality evaluation are primarily based on measurements of fecal indicator bacteria growth. However, these criteria often fail to predict the presence of waterborne human pathogenic viruses. To explore the possibility of direct use of human enteric viruses as improved human fecal contamination indicators, human adenovirus (HAdV) was tested as a model in this study. Findings In order to establish a highly sensitive protocol for effective detection of HAdV in aquatic environments, sixteen published PCR primer sets were re-optimized and comparatively evaluated. Primer sets nehex3deg/nehex4deg, ADV-F/ADV-R, and nested PCR primer sets hex1deg/hex2deg and nehex3deg/nehex4deg were identified to be the most sensitive ones, with up to 1,000 fold higher detection sensitivity compared to other published assays. These three PCR protocols were successfully employed to detect HAdV in both treated and untreated urban wastewaters, and also in 6 of 16 recreational water samples collected around the island of Oahu, Hawaii. Conclusions Findings from this study support the possible use of enteric viruses for aquatic environmental monitoring, specifically for the essential routine monitoring of Hawaiian beach waters using the optimized PCR protocol to detect HAdV at certain water sites to ensure a safe use of recreational waters. PMID:21303549

  4. EVOLVE historical and projected orbital debris test environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krisko, P. H.

    2004-01-01

    The NASA/JSC orbital debris research effort within the Earth's low-altitude regime continues with the upgrade of the debris environment simulation model EVOLVE. Two main contributions to this new version will include a more streamlined structure (transparent to the analyst) and an updated, expanded set of launch/orbital insertion files. The new database includes such improvements as high fidelity launch times and orbital elements, dataderived area-to-mass ratios, and individual object dry mass and physical description. As an additional test of the new code, a version of the Anz-Meador [Adv. Space Res. (2004)] explosive fragmentation model is implemented and the resulting historical and projected LEO environments are compared to those of the US Space Surveillance Network (SSN) Catalog, ORDEM2000, and EVOLVE 4.1 (the current production version of the code) historical and projection periods EVOLVE test historical environments compare well with the catalog and ORDEM2000 environments over the 1-mm and larger size range. However, it should be noted that SRM slag is not included in EVOLVE at this time. Differences between the EVOLVE test and the EVOLVE 4.1 long-term projection environments are traced directly to the modified launch cycle and the chosen form of the Anz-Meador [Adv. Space Res. (2004)] breakup model of this EVOLVE test.

  5. Molecular strategies to engineer transgenic rice seed compartments for large-scale production of plant-made pharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Greenham, Trevor; Altosaar, Illimar

    2013-01-01

    The use of plants as bioreactors for the large-scale production of recombinant proteins has emerged as an exciting area of research. The current shortages in protein therapeutics due to the capacity and economic bottlenecks faced with modern protein production platforms (microbial, yeast, mammalian) has driven considerable attention towards molecular pharming. Utilizing plants for the large-scale production of recombinant proteins is estimated to be 2-10% the cost of microbial platforms, and up to 1,000-fold more cost effective than mammalian platforms (Twyman et al. Trends Biotechnol 21:570-578, 2003; Sharma and Sharma, Biotechnol Adv 27:811-832, 2009). In order to achieve an economically feasible plant production host, protein expression and accumulation must be optimized. The seed, and more specifically the rice seed has emerged as an ideal candidate in molecular pharming due to its low protease activity, low water content, stable protein storage environment, relatively high biomass, and the molecular tools available for manipulation (Lau and Sun, Biotechnol Adv 27:1015-1022, 2009).

  6. Turbulent stresses in the surf-zone: Which way is up?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haines, John W.; Gelfenbaum, Guy; Edge, B.L

    1997-01-01

    Velocity observations from a vertical stack of three-component Acoustic Doppler Velocimeters (ADVs) within the energetic surf-zone are presented. Rapid temporal sampling and small sampling volume provide observations suitable for investigation of the role of turbulent fluctuations in surf-zone dynamics. While sensor performance was good, failure to recover reliable measures of tilt from the vertical compromise the data value. We will present some cursory observations supporting the ADV performance, and examine the sensitivity of stress estimates to uncertainty in the sensor orientation. It is well known that turbulent stress estimates are highly sensitive to orientation relative to vertical when wave motions are dominant. Analyses presented examine the potential to use observed flow-field characteristics to constrain sensor orientation. Results show that such an approach may provide a consistent orientation to a fraction of a degree, but the inherent sensitivity of stress estimates requires a still more restrictive constraint. Regardless, the observations indicate the degree to which stress estimates are dependent on orientation, and provide some indication of the temporal variability in time-averaged stress estimates.

  7. Vertical velocity distribution in open-channel flow with rigid vegetation.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Changjun; Hao, Wenlong; Chang, Xiangping

    2014-01-01

    In order to experimentally investigate the effects of rigid vegetation on the characteristics of flow, the vegetations were modeled by rigid cylindrical rod. Flow field is measured under the conditions of submerged rigid rod in flume with single layer and double layer vegetations. Experiments were performed for various spacings of the rigid rods. The vegetation models were aligned with the approaching flow in a rectangular channel. Vertical distributions of time-averaged velocity at various streamwise distances were evaluated using an acoustic Doppler velocimeter (ADV). The results indicate that, in submerged conditions, it is difficult to described velocity distribution along the entire depth using unified function. The characteristic of vertical distribution of longitudinal velocity is the presence of inflection. Under the inflection, the line is convex and groove above inflection. The interaction of high and low momentum fluids causes the flow to fold and creates strong vortices within each mixing layer. Understanding the flow phenomena in the area surrounding the tall vegetation, especially in the downstream region, is very important when modeling or studying the riparian environment. ADV measures of rigid vegetation distribution of the flow velocity field can give people a new understanding.

  8. Mucosal immunity induced by adenovirus-based H5N1 HPAI vaccine confers protection against a lethal H5N2 avian influenza virus challenge

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Ki Seok; Lee, Jiyeung; Ahn, So Shin; Byun, Young-Ho; Seong, Baik Lin; Baek, Yun Hee; Song, Min-Suk; Choi, Young Ki; Na, Yun Jeong; Hwang, Inhwan; Sung, Young Chul; Lee, Chang Geun

    2009-12-20

    Development of effective vaccines against highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1 viruses is a global public health priority. Considering the difficulty in predicting HPAI H5N1 pandemic strains, one strategy used in their design includes the development of formulations with the capacity of eliciting broad cross-protective immunity against multiple viral antigens. To this end we constructed a replication-defective recombinant adenovirus-based avian influenza virus vaccine (rAdv-AI) expressing the codon-optimized M2eX-HA-hCD40L and the M1-M2 fusion genes from HPAI H5N1 human isolate. Although there were no significant differences in the systemic immune responses observed between the intramuscular prime-intramuscular boost regimen (IM/IM) and the intranasal prime-intramuscular boost regimen (IN/IM), IN/IM induced more potent CD8{sup +} T cell and antibody responses at mucosal sites than the IM/IM vaccination, resulting in more effective protection against lethal H5N2 avian influenza (AI) virus challenge. These findings suggest that the strategies used to induce multi-antigen-targeted mucosal immunity, such as IN/IM delivery of rAdv-AI, may be a promising approach for developing broad protective vaccines that may be more effective against the new HPAI pandemic strains.

  9. Development of an Automated Decision-Making Tool for Supervisory Control System

    SciTech Connect

    Cetiner, Sacit M.; Muhlheim, Michael David; Flanagan, George F.; Fugate, David L.; Kisner, Roger A.

    2014-09-01

    This technical report was generated as a product of the Supervisory Control for Multi-Modular Small Modular Reactor (SMR) Plants project within the Instrumentation, Control and Human-Machine Interface technology area under the Advanced Small Modular Reactor (AdvSMR) Research and Development Program of the US Department of Energy. The report documents the definition of strategies, functional elements, and the structural architecture of a supervisory control system for multi-modular AdvSMR plants. This research activity advances the state of the art by incorporating real-time, probabilistic-based decision-making into the supervisory control system architectural layers through the introduction of a tiered-plant system approach. The report provides background information on the state of the art of automated decision-making, including the description of existing methodologies. It then presents a description of a generalized decision-making framework, upon which the supervisory control decision-making algorithm is based. The probabilistic portion of automated decision-making is demonstrated through a simple hydraulic loop example.

  10. Framework for Human-Automation Collaboration: Conclusions from Four Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Johanna Oxstrand; Katya L. Le Blanc; John O'Hara; Jeffrey C. Joe; April M. Whaley; Heather Medema

    2013-11-01

    The Human Automation Collaboration (HAC) research project is investigating how advanced technologies that are planned for Advanced Small Modular Reactors (AdvSMR) will affect the performance and the reliability of the plant from a human factors and human performance perspective. The HAC research effort investigates the consequences of allocating functions between the operators and automated systems. More specifically, the research team is addressing how to best design the collaboration between the operators and the automated systems in a manner that has the greatest positive impact on overall plant performance and reliability. Oxstrand et al. (2013 - March) describes the efforts conducted by the researchers to identify the research needs for HAC. The research team reviewed the literature on HAC, developed a model of HAC, and identified gaps in the existing knowledge of human-automation collaboration. As described in Oxstrand et al. (2013 – June), the team then prioritized the research topics identified based on the specific needs in the context of AdvSMR. The prioritization was based on two sources of input: 1) The preliminary functions and tasks, and 2) The model of HAC. As a result, three analytical studies were planned and conduced; 1) Models of Teamwork, 2) Standardized HAC Performance Measurement Battery, and 3) Initiators and Triggering Conditions for Adaptive Automation. Additionally, one field study was also conducted at Idaho Falls Power.

  11. First description of Adenovirus, Enterovirus, Rotavirus and Torque teno virus in water samples collected from the Arroio Dilúvio, Porto Alegre, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Vecchia, A D; Fleck, J D; Comerlato, J; Kluge, M; Bergamaschi, B; Da Silva, J V S; Da Luz, R B; Teixeira, T F; Garbinatto, G N; Oliveira, D V; Zanin, J G; Van der Sand, S; Frazzon, A P G; Franco, A C; Roehe, P M; Spilki, F R

    2012-05-01

    Adenovirus (AdV), enterovirus (EV), genogroup A rotaviruses (GARV) and Torque teno virus (TTV) are non-enveloped viral agents excreted in feces and so may contaminate water bodies. In the present study, the molecular detection of these viruses was performed in samples of surface water collected from the Arroio Dilúvio, a waterstream that crosses the city of Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil, receiving great volumes of non-treated sewage from a large urban area. Sampling was performed during 2009, in three different occasions (January, April and September). The highest detection rate was observed for EV (64.28%), followed by TTV (28.57%) and AdV (21.43%). Rotaviruses were not detected. More than on kind of tested virus was detected in five (35. 71%) of 14 samples. January was the month with the highest viral detection rate, being all samples, collected in this month, positive for at least one group of tested virus. The correlation between the detection of these different viral agents and environmental factors is discussed. To the knowledge of the authors, this is the first description of viral genomes in water samples taken from the Arroio Dilúvio, Porto Alegre (Brazil).

  12. Co-occurrence of mylodontid sloths and insights on their potential distributions during the late Pleistocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varela, Luciano; Fariña, Richard A.

    2016-01-01

    Species distribution models (SDMs) for the last interglacial (LIG), the global last glacial maximum (LGM) and the Holocene climatic optimum (HCO) were generated for three extinct South American Pleistocene mylodontid giant sloths, Glossotherium robustum, Lestodon armatus and Mylodon darwinii. They are recorded co-occurring in some localities including Arroyo del Vizcaíno site (AdV) in Uruguay. Co-occurrence records were studied based on the overlap of their generated areas of potential distributions, and compared with the available biome reconstructions of South America during the LGM to analyze their distribution patterns, ecological requirements and possible interactions between them. Our results suggest that these sloths could have co-existed mainly in the Chaco-Paraná Basin and the plains in the Río de la Plata area. Areas of high suitability were observed for submerged parts of the continental shelf that were exposed during the LGM showing an overall increase in potential habitat compared to the LIG and HCO. This suggests that there was a drastic reduction in total available areas of preferred habitat at the end of the Pleistocene. The co-occurrence of these sloths at the AdV site suggests the presence of vegetation indicative of mainly open, cold to temperate habitats but with mixed patches typical of humid climates.

  13. Enteric viruses in New Zealand drinking-water sources.

    PubMed

    Williamson, W M; Ball, A; Wolf, S; Hewitt, J; Lin, S; Scholes, P; Ambrose, V; Robson, B; Greening, G E

    2011-01-01

    This study determined whether human pathogenic viruses are present in two New Zealand surface waters that are used as drinking-water sources. Enteric viruses were concentrated using hollow-fibre ultrafiltration and detected using PCR for adenovirus (AdV), and reverse transcription PCR for norovirus (NOV) genogroups I-III, enterovirus, rotavirus (RoV) and hepatitis E virus (HEV). Target viruses were detected in 106/109 (97%) samples, with 67/109 (61%) samples positive for three or more viral types at any one time. AdV, NoV and ROV were detected the most frequently, and HEV the least frequently. Human NoV was not usually associated with animal NOV. Our results suggest that New Zealand would be well served by assessing the ability of drinking-water treatment plants to remove viruses from the source waters, and that this assessment could be based on the viral concentration of AdV-NoV-RoV. The long-term aim of our work is to use this information to estimate the risk of waterborne viral infection. PMID:21866776

  14. Opportunistic virus DNA levels after pediatric stem cell transplantation: serostatus matching, anti-thymocyte globulin, and total body irradiation are additive risk factors.

    PubMed

    Kullberg-Lindh, C; Mellgren, K; Friman, V; Fasth, A; Ascher, H; Nilsson, S; Lindh, M

    2011-04-01

    Viral opportunistic infections remain a threat to survival after stem cell transplantation (SCT). We retrospectively investigated infections caused by cytomegalovirus (CMV), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), human herpesvirus type 6 (HHV6), or adenovirus (AdV) during the first 6-12 months after pediatric SCT. Serum samples from 47 consecutive patients were analyzed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction assay. DNAemia at any time point occurred for CMV in 47%, for EBV in 45%, for HHV6 in 28%, and for AdV in 28%. Three patients (6.3%) died of CMV-, EBV-, or AdV-related complications 4, 9, and 24 weeks after SCT, respectively, representing 21% of total mortality. These 3 cases were clearly distinguishable by DNAemia increasing to high levels. Serum positivity for CMV immunoglobulin G in either recipient or donor at the time of SCT, total body irradiation, and anti-thymocyte globulin conditioning were independent risk factors for high CMV or EBV DNA levels. We conclude that DNAemia levels help to distinguish significant viral infections, and that surveillance and prophylactic measures should be focused on patients with risk factors in whom viral complications rapidly can become fatal.

  15. Aleutian Disease: An Emerging Disease in Free-Ranging Striped Skunks (Mephitis mephitis) From California.

    PubMed

    LaDouceur, E E B; Anderson, M; Ritchie, B W; Ciembor, P; Rimoldi, G; Piazza, M; Pesti, D; Clifford, D L; Giannitti, F

    2015-11-01

    Aleutian disease virus (ADV, Amdovirus, Parvoviridae) primarily infects farmed mustelids (mink and ferrets) but also other fur-bearing animals and humans. Three Aleutian disease (AD) cases have been described in captive striped skunks; however, little is known about the relevance of AD in free-ranging carnivores. This work describes the pathological findings and temporospatial distribution in 7 cases of AD in free-ranging striped skunks. All cases showed neurologic disease and were found in a 46-month period (2010-2013) within a localized geographical region in California. Lesions included multisystemic plasmacytic and lymphocytic inflammation (ie, interstitial nephritis, myocarditis, hepatitis, meningoencephalitis, pneumonia, and splenitis), glomerulonephritis, arteritis with or without fibrinoid necrosis in several organs (ie, kidney, heart, brain, and spleen), splenomegaly, ascites/hydrothorax, and/or encephalomalacia with cerebral microangiopathy. ADV infection was confirmed in all cases by specific polymerase chain reaction and/or in situ hybridization. The results suggest that AD is an emerging disease in free-ranging striped skunks in California. PMID:25445322

  16. The prevalence of norovirus, astrovirus and adenovirus infections among hospitalised children with acute gastroenteritis in Porto Velho, state of Rondônia, western Brazilian Amazon

    PubMed Central

    Amaral, Maria Sandra Costa; Estevam, Grecy Kelli; Penatti, Marilene; Lafontaine, Roger; Lima, Ian Carlos Gomes; Spada, Paula Katharine Pontes; Gabbay, Yvone Benchimol; Matos, Najla Benevides

    2015-01-01

    Although viruses are well-established causes of acute gastroenteritis, few data on the circulation of these pathogens in Porto Velho, state of Rondônia, Brazil, are available. Thus, faecal samples from hospitalised diarrhoeic children, under six years of age, were collected and tested for the presence of norovirus (NoV), adenovirus (AdV) and astrovirus (AstV) from February 2010-February 2012. Specimens were screened by reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction and viruses were found in 10.7% (63/591) of the cases. NoV, AdV and AstV were detected in 7.8%, 2% and 0.8% of the samples, respectively. NoV infection was observed at all ages and was most prevalent in zero-18-month-old children (84.7%; p = 0.002). A higher incidence of NoV was detected from February-April 2010, when it was found in 52.2% of the cases. Co-infections involving these viruses, rotavirus and enteropathogenic bacteria were detected in 44.4% (28/63) of the children with viral diarrhoea. Nosocomial infections were demonstrated in 28.6% (18/63) of the cases in which viruses were detected. The present paper reports, for the first time, the circulation of NoV and AstV among the paediatric population of Porto Velho and it contributes to our understanding of the roles of these pathogens in gastrointestinal infections. PMID:25946245

  17. The Short Time Scale Events of Acoustic Droplet Vaporization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, David S.; Kripfgans, Oliver D.; Fowlkes, J. Brian; Bull, Joseph L.

    2012-11-01

    The conversion of a liquid microdroplets to gas bubbles initiated by an acoustic pulse, known as acoustic droplet vaporization (ADV), has been proposed as a method to selectively generate gas emboli for therapeutic purposes (gas embolotherapy), specifically for vascularized tumors. In this study we focused on the first 10 microseconds of the ADV process, namely the gas nucleation site formation and bubble evolution. BSA encapsulated dodecafluoropentane (CAS: 678-26-2) microdroplets were isolated at the bottom of a degassed water bath held at 37°C. Microdroplets, diameters ranging from 5-65 microns, were vaporized using a single pulse (4-16 cycles) from a 7.5 MHz focused single element transducer ranging from 2-5 MPa peak negative pressure and images of the vaporization process were recorded using an ultra-high speed camera (SIM802, Specialised Imaging Ltd). It was observed that typically two gas nuclei were formed in series with one another on axis with ultrasound pulse. However, relative positioning of the nucleation sites within the droplet depended on droplet diameter. Additionally, depending on acoustic parameters the bubble could deform into a toroidal shape. Such dynamics could suggest acoustic parameters that may result in tissue damage. This work is supported by NIH grant R01EB006476.

  18. Selection-free gene repair after adenoviral vector transduction of designer nucleases: rescue of dystrophin synthesis in DMD muscle cell populations

    PubMed Central

    Maggio, Ignazio; Stefanucci, Luca; Janssen, Josephine M.; Liu, Jin; Chen, Xiaoyu; Mouly, Vincent; Gonçalves, Manuel A.F.V.

    2016-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a fatal X-linked muscle-wasting disorder caused by mutations in the 2.4 Mb dystrophin-encoding DMD gene. The integration of gene delivery and gene editing technologies based on viral vectors and sequence-specific designer nucleases, respectively, constitutes a potential therapeutic modality for permanently repairing defective DMD alleles in patient-derived myogenic cells. Therefore, we sought to investigate the feasibility of combining adenoviral vectors (AdVs) with CRISPR/Cas9 RNA-guided nucleases (RGNs) alone or together with transcriptional activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs), for endogenous DMD repair through non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ). The strategies tested involved; incorporating small insertions or deletions at out-of-frame sequences for reading frame resetting, splice acceptor knockout for DNA-level exon skipping, and RGN-RGN or RGN-TALEN multiplexing for targeted exon(s) removal. We demonstrate that genome editing based on the activation and recruitment of the NHEJ DNA repair pathway after AdV delivery of designer nuclease genes, is a versatile and robust approach for repairing DMD mutations in bulk populations of patient-derived muscle progenitor cells (up to 37% of corrected DMD templates). These results open up a DNA-level genetic medicine strategy in which viral vector-mediated transient designer nuclease expression leads to permanent and regulated dystrophin synthesis from corrected native DMD alleles. PMID:26762977

  19. Vertical Velocity Distribution in Open-Channel Flow with Rigid Vegetation

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Changjun; Hao, Wenlong; Chang, Xiangping

    2014-01-01

    In order to experimentally investigate the effects of rigid vegetation on the characteristics of flow, the vegetations were modeled by rigid cylindrical rod. Flow field is measured under the conditions of submerged rigid rod in flume with single layer and double layer vegetations. Experiments were performed for various spacings of the rigid rods. The vegetation models were aligned with the approaching flow in a rectangular channel. Vertical distributions of time-averaged velocity at various streamwise distances were evaluated using an acoustic Doppler velocimeter (ADV). The results indicate that, in submerged conditions, it is difficult to described velocity distribution along the entire depth using unified function. The characteristic of vertical distribution of longitudinal velocity is the presence of inflection. Under the inflection, the line is convex and groove above inflection. The interaction of high and low momentum fluids causes the flow to fold and creates strong vortices within each mixing layer. Understanding the flow phenomena in the area surrounding the tall vegetation, especially in the downstream region, is very important when modeling or studying the riparian environment. ADV measures of rigid vegetation distribution of the flow velocity field can give people a new understanding. PMID:24883352

  20. Efficient Unstructured Grid Adaptation Methods for Sonic Boom Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Richard L.; Carter, Melissa B.; Deere, Karen A.; Waithe, Kenrick A.

    2008-01-01

    This paper examines the use of two grid adaptation methods to improve the accuracy of the near-to-mid field pressure signature prediction of supersonic aircraft computed using the USM3D unstructured grid flow solver. The first method (ADV) is an interactive adaptation process that uses grid movement rather than enrichment to more accurately resolve the expansion and compression waves. The second method (SSGRID) uses an a priori adaptation approach to stretch and shear the original unstructured grid to align the grid with the pressure waves and reduce the cell count required to achieve an accurate signature prediction at a given distance from the vehicle. Both methods initially create negative volume cells that are repaired in a module in the ADV code. While both approaches provide significant improvements in the near field signature (< 3 body lengths) relative to a baseline grid without increasing the number of grid points, only the SSGRID approach allows the details of the signature to be accurately computed at mid-field distances (3-10 body lengths) for direct use with mid-field-to-ground boom propagation codes.

  1. Differentiability in density-functional theory: Further study of the locality theorem

    SciTech Connect

    Lindgren, Ingvar; Salomonson, Sten

    2004-09-01

    The locality theorem in density-functional theory (DFT) states that the functional derivative of the Hohenberg-Kohn universal functional can be expressed as a local multiplicative potential function, and this is the basis of DFT and of the successful Kohn-Sham model. Nesbet has in several papers [Phys. Rev. A 58, R12 (1998); ibid.65, 010502 (2001); Adv. Quant. Chem, 43, 1 (2003)] claimed that this theorem is in conflict with fundamental quantum physics, and as a consequence that the Hohenberg-Kohn theory cannot be generally valid. We have commented upon these works [Comment, Phys. Rev. A 67, 056501 (2003)] and recently extended the arguments [Adv. Quantum Chem. 43, 95 (2003)]. We have shown that there is no such conflict and that the locality theorem is inherently exact. In the present work we have furthermore verified this numerically by constructing a local Kohn-Sham potential for the 1s2s{sup 3}S state of helium that generates the many-body electron density and shown that the corresponding 2s Kohn-Sham orbital eigenvalue agrees with the ionization energy to nine digits. Similar result is obtained with the Hartree-Fock density. Therefore, in addition to verifying the locality theorem, this result also confirms the so-called ionization-potential theorem.

  2. Molecular strategies to engineer transgenic rice seed compartments for large-scale production of plant-made pharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Greenham, Trevor; Altosaar, Illimar

    2013-01-01

    The use of plants as bioreactors for the large-scale production of recombinant proteins has emerged as an exciting area of research. The current shortages in protein therapeutics due to the capacity and economic bottlenecks faced with modern protein production platforms (microbial, yeast, mammalian) has driven considerable attention towards molecular pharming. Utilizing plants for the large-scale production of recombinant proteins is estimated to be 2-10% the cost of microbial platforms, and up to 1,000-fold more cost effective than mammalian platforms (Twyman et al. Trends Biotechnol 21:570-578, 2003; Sharma and Sharma, Biotechnol Adv 27:811-832, 2009). In order to achieve an economically feasible plant production host, protein expression and accumulation must be optimized. The seed, and more specifically the rice seed has emerged as an ideal candidate in molecular pharming due to its low protease activity, low water content, stable protein storage environment, relatively high biomass, and the molecular tools available for manipulation (Lau and Sun, Biotechnol Adv 27:1015-1022, 2009). PMID:23135861

  3. Self-pinning of a nanosuspension droplet: Molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Baiou; Webb, Edmund B.

    2016-07-01

    Results are presented from molecular dynamics simulations of Pb(l) nanodroplets containing dispersed Cu nanoparticles (NPs) and spreading on solid surfaces. Three-dimensional simulations are employed throughout, but droplet spreading and pinning are reduced to two-dimensional processes by modeling cylindrical NPs in cylindrical droplets; NPs have radius RNP≅3 nm while droplets have initial R0≅42 nm . At low particle loading explored here, NPs in sufficient proximity to the initial solid-droplet interface are drawn into advancing contact lines; entrained NPs eventually bind with the underlying substrate. For relatively low advancing contact angle θadv, self-pinning on entrained NPs occurs; for higher θadv, depinning is observed. Self-pinning and depinning cases are compared and forces on NPs at the contact line are computed during a depinning event. Though significant flow in the droplet occurs in close proximity to the particle during depinning, resultant forces are relatively low. Instead, forces due to liquid atoms confined between the particles and substrate dominate the forces on NPs; that is, for the NP size studied here, forces are interface dominated. For pinning cases, a precursor wetting film advances ahead of the pinned contact line but at a significantly slower rate than for a pure droplet. This is because the precursor film is a bilayer of liquid atoms on the substrate surface but it is instead a monolayer film as it crosses over pinning particles; thus, mass delivery to the bilayer structure is impeded.

  4. Broad spectrum antiviral T cells for viral complications after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Maecker-Kolhoff, Britta

    2015-01-01

    Major complications of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) or solid organ transplantation (SOT), such as graft rejection and graft-versus-host-disease (GvHD), are countered by suppressing the host immune system via chemotherapy and radiation, immunosuppressive drugs, or conditioning regimens such as in vivo or in vitro T-cell depletion. While immunocompromised, the patient is rendered susceptible to a number of viral infections and reactivations mainly caused by endogenous herpes viruses like cytomegalovirus (CMV) and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and by lytic agents such as adenovirus (ADV). In the paper entitled “Activity of broad-spectrum T cells as treatment for ADV, EBV, CMV, BKV, and HHV6 Infections after HSCT” published recently in Science Translational Medicine, Anastasia Papadopoulou and colleagues reported a suitable technology for rapid generation of antiviral T cells with a broad specificity in a single-culture for clinical application. In a small clinical trial with 11 patients they demonstrated safety and efficacy of adoptive multivirus-specific T-cell transfer. PMID:26046087

  5. Occurrence of norovirus and other enteric viruses in untreated groundwaters of Korea.

    PubMed

    Jung, Ji Hee; Yoo, Chang Hoon; Koo, Eung Seo; Kim, Hak Min; Na, Youjin; Jheong, Weon Hwa; Jeong, Yong Seok

    2011-09-01

    A total of 39 water samples from 23 different groundwater wells in Korea were collected and analyzed in order to monitor the occurrence of norovirus (NoV) and other indicator microbes as the first part of a national survey of groundwater. More than 500 L of untreated groundwater were filtered through 1MDS filters. Following elution and concentration by organic flocculation, PCR and sequence analysis were employed to detect and identify NoV, enterovirus, rotavirus, hepatitis A virus and adenovirus (Adv). Somatic and F-specific phages, heterotrophic bacteria, total coliforms and Escherichia coli were also analyzed to infer possible fecal contamination. NoVs were detected in 18% of the 39 samples. Five out of seven NoV-positive samples (71%) were identified as GI while the other two (29%) were GII. Enteroviruses and Advs were detected in two and three samples, respectively. Rotavirus and hepatitis A virus were not detected. Total coliforms, E. coli and coliphages were detected in 49, 15 and 13% of the samples, respectively, but did not appear to be suitable indicators of enteric virus contamination in groundwater. These results suggest that additional treatment may be needed for a significant number of groundwaters prior to use as drinking water.

  6. Admiralty Inlet Hub-Height Turbulence Measurements from June 2012

    DOE Data Explorer

    Kilcher, Levi

    2012-06-18

    This data is from measurements at Admiralty Head, in admiralty inlet. The measurements were made using an IMU equipped ADV mounted on a mooring, the 'Tidal Turbulence Mooring' or 'TTM'. The inertial measurements from the IMU allows for removal of mooring motion in post processing. The mooring motion has been removed from the stream-wise and vertical velocity signals (u, w). The lateral (v) velocity may have some 'persistent motion contamination' due to mooring sway. The ADV was positioned 11m above the seafloor in 58m of water at 48.1515N, 122.6858W. Units ----- - Velocity data (_u, urot, uacc) is in m/s. - Acceleration (Accel) data is in m/s^2. - Angular rate (AngRt) data is in rad/s. - The components of all vectors are in 'ENU' orientation. That is, the first index is True East, the second is True North, and the third is Up (vertical). - All other quantities are in the units defined in the Nortek Manual. Motion correction and rotation into the ENU earth reference frame was performed using the Python-based open source DOLfYN library (http://lkilcher.github.io/dolfyn/). Details on motion correction can be found there. For additional details on this dataset see the included Marine Energy Technology Symposium paper.

  7. AlMn Transition Edge Sensors for Advanced ACTPol

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Dale; Austermann, Jason E.; Beall, James A.; Tucker, Daniel T.; Duff, Shannon M.; Gallardo, Patricio A.; Henderson, Shawn W.; Hilton, Gene C.; Ho, Shuay-Pwu; Hubmayr, Johannes; Koopman, Brian J.; McMahon, Jeffrey J.; Nati, Federico; Niemack, Michael D.; Pappas, Christine G.; Salatino, Maria; Schmitt, Benjamin L.; Simon, Sara M.; Staggs, Suzanne T.; Van Lanen, Jeff; Ward, Jonathan T.; Wollack, Edward J.

    2016-01-01

    Advanced ACTPol (Adv ACT) will use an array of multichroic polarization sensitive AIMn transition edge sensor (TES) bolometers read out through time-division multiplexing. Aluminum doped with a low concentration of manganese can be deposited to a bulk film thickness for a more reliable superconducting critical temperature uniformity compared to thin bilayers. To build the TES, the AlMn alloy is deposited, over Nb wiring, to a specific thickness to set the TES normal resistance. The doping concentration of manganese coarsely defines the TES critical temperature, while a fine tuning is achieved by heating the deposited film to a specific temperature. The TES island is connected to the thermal bath via four silicon-nitride membranes, where their geometry defines the thermal conductance to the temperature of the bath. Lastly, the TES heat capacity is increased by addition of PdAu electrically connected to the AlMn film. Designs and performance characteristics of these AlMn TESs are presented for use in AdvACT.

  8. Mercury'S Radar Bright Region C: Mg-rich Orthopyroxene And Olivine, K-spar, Iron-free Tio2, Ca- And Mg-garnet Indicate Possible Deep Crust Or Mantle Rock Exposures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlowski, Richard W.; Donaldson Hanna, K. L.; Sprague, A. L.; Helbert, J.; Maturilli, A.

    2008-09-01

    We identify mineral phases and approximate abundances on Mercury's surface for a large (600 by 600 km) region at and around radar bright region C (Harmon, 1997, Adv. Space Res.). Our results are obtained by fitting spectra obtained with the Mid-Infrared Spectrometer and Imager (MIRSI) at the Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF) using an established spectral deconvolution algorithm (Ramsey 1996, Ph.D. Dissertation, ASU; Ramsey and Christiansen 1998, JGR). We have assembled several laboratory mineral spectral libraries (JHU, Salisbury et al. 1987, Open-File Report 87-263, USGS; JPL, http://speclib.jpl.nasa.gov; RELAB, http://www.planetary.brown.edu/relab; ASU, Christensen et al. 2000, JGR; BED, Helbert et al. 2007, Adv. Space Res.; USGS, Clark et al. 2007, USGS digital spectral library) with a wide range of known mineral compositions with grain sizes ranging from the finest separates, 0 - 45 µm, incrementally increasing to 250 - 400 µm. For the region 110° to 130° E longitude and 0° to 20° N latitude we find enstatite and Mg-rich hypersthene, K-spar (either sanidine or orthoclase), intermediate plagioclase compositions, Mg-rich olivine, an iron-free opaque phase of either (TiO2) or perovskite (CaTiO3). Small abundances of Mg- and Ca- rich garnet are also apparently present. These minerals are indicative of possible excavated upper mantle material that may be causing the high radar backscatter at this location. This work was funded by NSF AST0406796.

  9. Force field measurements within the exclusion zone of water.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chi-Shuo; Chung, Wei-Ju; Hsu, Ian C; Wu, Chien-Ming; Chin, Wei-Chun

    2012-01-01

    Water molecules play critical roles in many biological functions, such as protein dynamics, enzymatic activities, and cellular responses. Previous nuclear magnetic resonance and neutron scattering studies have shown that water molecules bind to specific sites on surfaces and form localized clusters. However, most current experimental techniques cannot measure dynamic behaviors of ordered water molecules on cell-size (10 μm) scale. Recently, the long-distance effect of structured water has been demonstrated by Pollack and his colleagues. Namely, there is a structured water layer near the hydrophilic surface that can exclude solutes (Zheng et al, Adv Colloid Interface Sci 127:19-27, 2006; Pollack 2006, Adv Colloid Interface Sci 103:173-196, 2003). The repelling forces of water clusters inside this exclusion region are investigated in this study. With a laser tweezers system, we found the existence of an unexpected force fields inside the solute-free exclusion zone near a Nafion surface. Our results suggest that the water clusters could transduce mechanical signals on the micrometer range within the exclusion zone. This unexpected inhomogeneous force field near the hydrophilic surface would provide a new insight into cellular activities, leading to a potential new physical chemistry mechanism for cell biology. PMID:23277674

  10. AlMn Transition Edge Sensors for Advanced ACTPol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Dale; Austermann, Jason E.; Beall, James A.; Becker, Daniel T.; Duff, Shannon M.; Gallardo, Patricio A.; Henderson, Shawn W.; Hilton, Gene C.; Ho, Shuay-Pwu; Hubmayr, Johannes; Koopman, Brian J.; McMahon, Jeffrey J.; Nati, Federico; Niemack, Michael D.; Pappas, Christine G.; Salatino, Maria; Schmitt, Benjamin L.; Simon, Sara M.; Staggs, Suzanne T.; Van Lanen, Jeff; Ward, Jonathan T.; Wollack, Edward J.

    2016-07-01

    Advanced ACTPol (AdvACT) will use an array of multichroic polarization-sensitive AlMn transition edge sensor (TES) bolometers read out through time-division multiplexing. Aluminum doped with a low concentration of manganese can be deposited to a bulk film thickness for a more reliable superconducting critical temperature uniformity compared to thin bilayers. To build the TES, the AlMn alloy is deposited, over Nb wiring, to a specific thickness to set the TES normal resistance. The doping concentration of manganese coarsely defines the TES critical temperature, while a fine tuning is achieved by heating the deposited film to a specific temperature. The TES island is connected to the thermal bath via four silicon-nitride membranes, where their geometry defines the thermal conductance to the temperature of the bath. Lastly, the TES heat capacity is increased by addition of PdAu electrically connected to the AlMn film. Designs and performance characteristics of these AlMn TESs are presented for use in AdvACT.

  11. Three-Dimensional Structure of Aleutian Mink Disease Parvovirus: Implications for Disease Pathogenicity

    PubMed Central

    McKenna, Robert; Olson, Norman H.; Chipman, Paul R.; Baker, Timothy S.; Booth, Tim F.; Christensen, Jesper; Aasted, Bent; Fox, James M.; Bloom, Marshall E.; Wolfinbarger, James B.; Agbandje-McKenna, Mavis

    1999-01-01

    The three-dimensional structure of expressed VP2 capsids of Aleutian mink disease parvovirus strain G (ADVG-VP2) has been determined to 22 Å resolution by cryo-electron microscopy and image reconstruction techniques. A structure-based sequence alignment of the VP2 capsid protein of canine parvovirus (CPV) provided a means to construct an atomic model of the ADVG-VP2 capsid. The ADVG-VP2 reconstruction reveals a capsid structure with a mean external radius of 128 Å and several surface features similar to those found in human parvovirus B19 (B19), CPV, feline panleukopenia virus (FPV), and minute virus of mice (MVM). Dimple-like depressions occur at the icosahedral twofold axes, canyon-like regions encircle the fivefold axes, and spike-like protrusions decorate the threefold axes. These spikes are not present in B19, and they are more prominent in ADV compared to the other parvoviruses owing to the presence of loop insertions which create mounds near the threefold axes. Cylindrical channels along the fivefold axes of CPV, FPV, and MVM, which are surrounded by five symmetry-related β-ribbons, are closed in ADVG-VP2 and B19. Immunoreactive peptides made from segments of the ADVG-VP2 capsid protein map to residues in the mound structures. In vitro tissue tropism and in vivo pathogenic properties of ADV map to residues at the threefold axes and to the wall of the dimples. PMID:10400786

  12. Etiology and Clinical Characteristics of Single and Multiple Respiratory Virus Infections Diagnosed in Croatian Children in Two Respiratory Seasons.

    PubMed

    Ljubin-Sternak, Sunčanica; Marijan, Tatjana; Ivković-Jureković, Irena; Čepin-Bogović, Jasna; Gagro, Alenka; Vraneš, Jasmina

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the causative agent of acute respiratory infection (ARI) in hospitalized children, as well as investigate the characteristics of ARIs with single and multiple virus detection in two respiratory seasons. In 2010 and 2015, nasopharyngeal and pharyngeal swabs from a total of 134 children, admitted to the hospital due to ARI, were tested using multiplex PCR. Viral etiology was established in 81.3% of the patients. Coinfection with two viruses was diagnosed in 27.6% of the patients, and concurrent detection of three or more viruses was diagnosed in 12.8% of the patients. The most commonly diagnosed virus in both seasons combined was respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) (28.6%), followed by parainfluenza viruses (PIVs) types 1-3 (18.4%), rhinovirus (HRV) (14.3%), human metapneumovirus (10.1%), adenovirus (AdV) (7.1%), influenza viruses types A and B (4.8%), and coronaviruses (4.2%). In 2015, additional pathogens were investigated with the following detection rate: enterovirus (13.2%), bocavirus (HBoV) (10.5%), PIV-4 (2.6%), and parechovirus (1.3%). There were no statistical differences between single and multiple virus infection regarding patients age, localization of infection, and severity of disease (P > 0.05). AdV, HRV, HBoV, and PIVs were significantly more often detected in multiple virus infections compared to the other respiratory viruses (P < 0.001). PMID:27656298

  13. Graphene sheets stacked polyacrylate latex composites for ultra-efficient electromagnetic shielding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yong; Zhang, Song; Ni, Yuwei

    2016-07-01

    Graphene sheets (GS) are at the forefront of electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding/attenuation materials science research because of their excellent electrical properties (Wen B et al 2014 Adv. Mater. 26 3484, Zhang Y et al 2015 Adv. Mater. 27 2049). GS/polyacrylate (PA) composites were prepared using a solvent-free latex technology, which favored the build-up of a segregated GS architecture stacked in the polymer matrix. GS were obtained from graphite flakes (GF) via a mechanical delamination approach in water. The microstructure, electrical, dielectric and electromagnetic shielding properties of the GS/PA composites were correlated in this manuscript. A remarkably low percolation threshold of ∼0.11 mass per cent for room-temperature electrical conductivity was obtained in the GS/PA composites owing to the stacked architecture of GS with high aspect ratios. This unique nanostructured GS architecture not only enhanced the electrical conductivity of composites, but also dramatically increased complex permittivity by inducing strong Maxwell–Wagner–Sillars (MWS) polarization at the highly conductive GS/non-conductive PA interfaces. The EMI shielding effectiveness (SE) of these composites was enhanced with increasing GS content, and the composite with 6 wt% GS loading exhibited a high EMI SE of ∼66 dB over a frequency of 8.2–12.4 GHz, resulting from the pronounced conduction loss, dielectric relaxation, and multi-scattering.

  14. Acoustic Droplet Vaporization, Cavitation, and Therapeutic Properties of Copolymer-Stabilized Perfluorocarbon Nanoemulsions

    SciTech Connect

    Nam, Kweon-Ho; Christensen, Douglas A.; Rapoport, Natalya; Kennedy, Anne M.

    2009-04-14

    Acoustic and therapeutic properties of Doxorubicin (DOX) and paclitaxel (PTX)-loaded perfluorocarbon nanoemulsions have been investigated in a mouse model of ovarian cancer. The nanoemulsions were stabilized by two biodegradable amphiphilic block copolymers that differed in the structure of the hydrophobic block. Acoustic droplet vaporization (ADV) and cavitation parameters were measured as a function of ultrasound frequency, pressure, duty cycles, and temperature. The optimal parameters that induced ADV and inertial cavitation of the formed microbubbles were used in vivo in the experiments on the ultrasound-mediated chemotherapy of ovarian cancer. A combination tumor treatment by intravenous injections of drug-loaded perfluoropentane nanoemulsions and tumor-directed 1-MHz ultrasound resulted in a dramatic decrease of ovarian or breast carcinoma tumor volume and sometimes complete tumor resolution. However, tumors often recurred three to six weeks after the treatment indicating that some cancer cells survived the treatment. The recurrent tumors proved more aggressive and resistant to the repeated therapy than initial tumors suggesting selection for the resistant cells during the first treatment.

  15. Neurotrophin-3 gene modified mesenchymal stem cells promote remyelination and functional recovery in the demyelinated spinal cord of rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu-Jiao; Zhang, Wei; Lin, Cheng-Guang; Ding, Ying; Huang, Si-Fan; Wu, Jin-Lang; Li, Yan; Dong, Hongxin; Zeng, Yuan-Shan

    2012-02-15

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a debilitating neurodegenerative disease characterized by axonal/neuronal damage that may be caused by defective remyelination. Current therapies aim to slow the rate of degeneration, however there are no treatment options that can stop or reverse the myelin sheath damage. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are a potential candidate for the cell implantation-targeted therapeutic strategies, but the pro-remyelination effects of MSCs when directly injected into a demyelinated cord lesion have been questioned. Neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) has been shown to serve a crucial role in the proliferation, differentiation and maturation of oligodendrocyte lineages. Here, we showed that implantation of NT-3 gene-modified MSCs via a recombinant adenoviral vector (Adv) into a region of ethidium bromide (EB)-induced demyelination in the spinal cord resulted in significant improvement of locomotor function and restoration of electrophysiological properties in rats. The morphological basis of this recovery was evidenced by robust myelin basic protein (MBP) expression and the extensive remyelination. AdvNT-3-MSC implants promote the endogenous remyelinating cells to participate directly in myelination, which was confirmed under light and electron microscopy. Our study suggested that genetically modified MSCs could be a potential therapeutic avenue for improving the efficacy of stem cell treatment for neurodegenerative diseases such as MS.

  16. Turbulence Effects of Axial Flow Hydrokinetic Turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, C.; Chamorro, L. P.; Neary, V. S.; Morton, S.; Sotiropoulos, F.

    2011-12-01

    Axial flow hydrokinetic turbines provide a method for extracting the kinetic energy available in unidirectional (river), bidirectional (tidal) and marine currents; however, a deep understanding of the wake dynamics, momentum recovery, geomorphologic effects, and ecological interaction with these hydrokinetic turbines is required to guarantee their economical and environmental viability. The St. Anthony Falls Laboratory (SAFL) at the University of Minnesota (UMN) has performed physical modeling experiments using a 1:10 scale axial flow tidal turbine in the SAFL Main Channel, a 2.75m x 1.8m x 80m open channel test facility. A sophisticated control system allows synchronous measurements of turbine torque and rotational speed along with high resolution 3-D velocity measurements within the channel. Using acoustic Doppler velocimeters (ADVs), high resolution 3-D velocity profile data were collected up to 15 turbine diameters downstream of the turbine location. These data provide valuable information on the wake characteristics (turbulence, Reynolds stresses, etc.) resulting from a rotating axial flow hydrokinetic machine. Regions of high turbulence and shear zones that persist in the near wake regions are delineated along with the velocity deficit and momentum recovery within the wake downstream of the device. Synchronous ADV data shed light on the rotational and meandering characteristics of the wake and its potential impacts on the local geomorphology and hydrodynamic environment. This dataset on single hydrokinetic turbine flow characteristics is the basis for further work on the optimal arrangement and performance environment for arrays of similar hydrokinetic devices.

  17. How the risky features of previous selection affect subsequent decision-making: evidence from behavioral and fMRI measures

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Guangheng; Zhang, Yifen; Xu, Jiaojing; Lin, Xiao; Du, Xiaoxia

    2015-01-01

    Human decision making is rarely conducted in temporal isolation. It is often biased and affected by environmental variables, particularly prior selections. In this study, we used a task that simulates a real gambling process to explore the effect of the risky features of a previous selection on subsequent decision making. Compared with decision making after an advantageous risk-taking situation (Risk_Adv), that after a disadvantageous risk-taking situation (Risk_Disadv) is associated with a longer response time (RT, the time spent in making decisions) and higher brain activations in the caudate and the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC). Compared with decisions after Risk_Adv, those after Risk_Disadv in loss trials are associated with higher brain activations in the left superior temporal gyrus (STG) and the precuneus. Brain activity and relevant RTs significantly correlated. Overall, people who experience disadvantageous risk-taking selections tend to focus on current decision making and engage cognitive endeavors in value evaluation and in the regulation of their risk-taking behaviors during decision making. PMID:26500486

  18. Etiology and Clinical Characteristics of Single and Multiple Respiratory Virus Infections Diagnosed in Croatian Children in Two Respiratory Seasons

    PubMed Central

    Marijan, Tatjana; Ivković-Jureković, Irena; Čepin-Bogović, Jasna; Gagro, Alenka; Vraneš, Jasmina

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the causative agent of acute respiratory infection (ARI) in hospitalized children, as well as investigate the characteristics of ARIs with single and multiple virus detection in two respiratory seasons. In 2010 and 2015, nasopharyngeal and pharyngeal swabs from a total of 134 children, admitted to the hospital due to ARI, were tested using multiplex PCR. Viral etiology was established in 81.3% of the patients. Coinfection with two viruses was diagnosed in 27.6% of the patients, and concurrent detection of three or more viruses was diagnosed in 12.8% of the patients. The most commonly diagnosed virus in both seasons combined was respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) (28.6%), followed by parainfluenza viruses (PIVs) types 1–3 (18.4%), rhinovirus (HRV) (14.3%), human metapneumovirus (10.1%), adenovirus (AdV) (7.1%), influenza viruses types A and B (4.8%), and coronaviruses (4.2%). In 2015, additional pathogens were investigated with the following detection rate: enterovirus (13.2%), bocavirus (HBoV) (10.5%), PIV-4 (2.6%), and parechovirus (1.3%). There were no statistical differences between single and multiple virus infection regarding patients age, localization of infection, and severity of disease (P > 0.05). AdV, HRV, HBoV, and PIVs were significantly more often detected in multiple virus infections compared to the other respiratory viruses (P < 0.001). PMID:27656298

  19. Phase camera experiment for Advanced Virgo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agatsuma, Kazuhiro; van Beuzekom, Martin; van der Schaaf, Laura; van den Brand, Jo

    2016-07-01

    We report on a study of the phase camera, which is a frequency selective wave-front sensor of a laser beam. This sensor is utilized for monitoring sidebands produced by phase modulations in a gravitational wave (GW) detector. Regarding the operation of the GW detectors, the laser modulation/demodulation method is used to measure mirror displacements and used for the position controls. This plays a significant role because the quality of controls affect the noise level of the GW detector. The phase camera is able to monitor each sideband separately, which has a great benefit for the manipulation of the delicate controls. Also, overcoming mirror aberrations will be an essential part of Advanced Virgo (AdV), which is a GW detector close to Pisa. Especially low-frequency sidebands can be affected greatly by aberrations in one of the interferometer cavities. The phase cameras allow tracking such changes because the state of the sidebands gives information on mirror aberrations. A prototype of the phase camera has been developed and is currently tested. The performance checks are almost completed and the installation of the optics at the AdV site has started. After the installation and commissioning, the phase camera will be combined to a thermal compensation system that consists of CO2 lasers and compensation plates. In this paper, we focus on the prototype and show some limitations from the scanner performance.

  20. Towards aberration correction of transcranial ultrasound using acoustic droplet vaporization.

    PubMed

    Haworth, Kevin J; Fowlkes, J Brian; Carson, Paul L; Kripfgans, Oliver D

    2008-03-01

    We report on the first experiments demonstrating the transcranial acoustic formation of stable gas bubbles that can be used for transcranial ultrasound aberration correction. It is demonstrated that the gas bubbles can be formed transcranially by phase-transitioning single, superheated, micron-size, liquid dodecafluoropentane droplets with ultrasound, a process known as acoustic droplet vaporization (ADV). ADV was performed at 550 kHz, where the skull is less attenuating and aberrating, allowing for higher-amplitudes to be reached at the focus. Additionally, it is demonstrated that time-reversal focusing at 1 MHz can be used to correct for transcranial aberrations with a single gas bubble acting as a point beacon. Aberration correction was performed using a synthetic aperture approach and verified by the realignment of the scattered waveforms. Under the conditions described below, time-reversal aberration correction using gas bubbles resulted in a gain of 1.9 +/- 0.3 in an introduced focusing factor. This is a small fraction of the gain anticipated from complete transmit-receive of a fully-populated two-dimensional array with sub-wavelength elements. (E-mail: khaworth@umich.edu).