Science.gov

Sample records for advance high-speed technology

  1. Advanced MOSFET technologies for high-speed circuits and EPROM

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, A.T.T.

    1987-01-01

    In the first part of the thesis, two novel source-side injection EPROM (SI-EPROM) devices capable of 5-volt only, high-speed programming are studied. Both devices are asymmetrical n-channel stacked-gate MOSFETs, each with a short weak gate-control channel region introduced close to the source. Under high gate bias, a strong-channel electric field for hot-electron generation is created in this local region even at a relatively low drain voltage. Furthermore, the gate oxide field in this region is highly favorable for hot-electron injection into the floating-gate. As a results, a programming speed of 10..mu..s at a drain voltage of 5 volts was demonstrated with one of the SI-EPROM devices fabricated. In the second part of the thesis, technology design considerations accompanying MOSFET scaling are studied for high-speed analog circuits and densely packed digital circuits. It is shown that for sub-micron technologies, especially those for CMOS, the drain/source junction capacitances dominate device parasitic capacitances in digital applications. A novel MOS device structure that employs the COO and DOO schemes is described.

  2. High-speed image transmission via the Advanced Communication Technology Satellite (ACTS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazzill, Todd M.; Huang, H. K.; Thoma, George R.; Long, L. Rodney; Gill, Michael J.

    1996-05-01

    We are developing a wide area test bed network using the Advanced Communication Technology Satellite (ACTS) from NASA for high speed medical image transmission. The two test sites are the University of California, San Francisco, and the National Library of Medicine. The first phase of the test bed runs over a T1 link (1.544 Mbits/sec) using a Very Small Aperture Terminal. The second phase involves the High Data Rate Terminal via an ATM OC 3C (155 Mbits/sec) connection. This paper describes the experimental set up and some preliminary results from phase 1.

  3. Recent advances in high speed photography and associated technologies in the USA

    SciTech Connect

    Paisley, D.L.

    1988-01-01

    In the past decade, high speed photography has been rapidly incorporating electro-optics. More recently, optoelectronics and digital recording of images for specialized laboratory cameras and commerically available systems have helped broaden the versatility and applications of high speed photography and photonics. This paper will highlight some of these technologies and specialized systems. 10 refs., 22 figs.

  4. Performance potential of an advanced technology Mach 3 turbojet engine installed on a conceptual high-speed civil transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, Shelby J., Jr.; Geiselhart, Karl A.; Coen, Peter G.

    1989-01-01

    The performance of an advanced technology conceptual turbojet optimized for a high-speed civil aircraft is presented. This information represents an estimate of performance of a Mach 3 Brayton (gas turbine) cycle engine optimized for minimum fuel burned at supersonic cruise. This conceptual engine had no noise or environmental constraints imposed upon it. The purpose of this data is to define an upper boundary on the propulsion performance for a conceptual commercial Mach 3 transport design. A comparison is presented demonstrating the impact of the technology proposed for this conceptual engine on the weight and other characteristics of a proposed high-speed civil transport. This comparison indicates that the advanced technology turbojet described could reduce the gross weight of a hypothetical Mach 3 high-speed civil transport design from about 714,000 pounds to about 545,000 pounds. The aircraft with the baseline engine and the aircraft with the advanced technology engine are described.

  5. An airline study of advanced technology requirements for advanced high speed commercial engines. 3: Propulsion system requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sallee, G. P.

    1973-01-01

    The advanced technology requirements for an advanced high speed commercial transport engine are presented. The results of the phase 3 effort cover the requirements and objectives for future aircraft propulsion systems. These requirements reflect the results of the Task 1 and 2 efforts and serve as a baseline for future evaluations, specification development efforts, contract/purchase agreements, and operational plans for future subsonic commercial engines. This report is divided into five major sections: (1) management objectives for commercial propulsion systems, (2) performance requirements for commercial transport propulsion systems, (3) design criteria for future transport engines, (4) design requirements for powerplant packages, and (5) testing.

  6. An airline study of advanced technology requirements for advanced high speed commercial transport engines. 2: Engine preliminary design assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sallee, G. P.

    1973-01-01

    The advanced technology requirements for an advanced high speed commercial transport engine are presented. The results of the phase 2 study effort cover the following areas: (1) general review of preliminary engine designs suggested for a future aircraft, (2) presentation of a long range view of airline propulsion system objectives and the research programs in noise, pollution, and design which must be undertaken to achieve the goals presented, (3) review of the impact of propulsion system unreliability and unscheduled maintenance on cost of operation, (4) discussion of the reliability and maintainability requirements and guarantees for future engines.

  7. Benefits associated with advanced technologies applied to a high-speed civil transport concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ozoroski, L. P.; Shields, E. W.; Fenbert, J. W.; Mcelroy, M. O.

    1993-01-01

    Results of a first-order assessment of the mission performance benefits associated with the technology improvements and goals of the Phase II High-Speed Research (HSR) Program are presented. A breakdown of the four major disciplines resulted in the following estimated TOGW savings from the 1990 vehicle: propulsion at 14.3 percent, structures at 11.7 percent, flight-deck systems at 4.0 percent, and aerodynamics at 15.0 percent. Based on 100 percent success of the HSR Phase II proposed technology advancements, the overall combined impact is estimated to result in a 45 percent reduction in TOGW from a 1990 entry-into-service (EIS) date, which could result in a viable 2005 EIS vehicle with an acceptable TOGW that meets Stage III community noise restrictions. Through supersonic laminar flow control and the possible reduction in reserve fuel requirements resulting from synthetic vision capability, the potential exists for an additional 9.6 percent reduction in TOGW.

  8. An airline study of advanced technology requirements for advanced high speed commercial transport engines. 1: Engine design study assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sallee, G. P.

    1973-01-01

    The advanced technology requirements for an advanced high speed commercial tranport engine are presented. The results of the phase 1 study effort cover the following areas: (1) statement of an airline's major objectives for future transport engines, (2) airline's method of evaluating engine proposals, (3) description of an optimum engine for a long range subsonic commercial transport including installation and critical design features, (4) discussion of engine performance problems and experience with performance degradation, (5) trends in engine and pod prices with increasing technology and objectives for the future, (6) discussion of the research objectives for composites, reversers, advanced components, engine control systems, and devices to reduce the impact of engine stall, and (7) discussion of the airline objectives for noise and pollution reduction.

  9. Application of advanced high speed turboprop technology to future civil short-haul transport aircraft design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conlon, J. A.; Bowles, J. V.

    1978-01-01

    With an overall goal of defining the needs and requirements for short-haul transport aircraft research and development, the objective of this paper is to determine the performance and noise impact of short-haul transport aircraft designed with an advanced turboprop propulsion system. This propulsion system features high-speed propellers that have more blades and reduced diameters. Aircraft are designed for short and medium field lengths; mission block fuel and direct operating costs (DOC) are used as performance measures. The propeller diameter was optimized to minimize DOC. Two methods are employed to estimate the weight of the acoustic treatment needed to reduce interior noise to an acceptable level. Results show decreasing gross weight, block fuel, DOC, engine size, and optimum propfan diameter with increasing field length. The choice of acoustic treatment method has a significant effect on the aircraft design.

  10. ADVANCED HIGH SPEED PROGRAMMABLE PREFORMING

    SciTech Connect

    Norris Jr, Robert E; Lomax, Ronny D; Xiong, Fue; Dahl, Jeffrey S; Blanchard, Patrick J

    2010-01-01

    Polymer-matrix composites offer greater stiffness and strength per unit weight than conventional materials resulting in new opportunities for lightweighting of automotive and heavy vehicles. Other benefits include design flexibility, less corrosion susceptibility, and the ability to tailor properties to specific load requirements. However, widespread implementation of structural composites requires lower-cost manufacturing processes than those that are currently available. Advanced, directed-fiber preforming processes have demonstrated exceptional value for rapid preforming of large, glass-reinforced, automotive composite structures. This is due to process flexibility and inherently low material scrap rate. Hence directed fiber performing processes offer a low cost manufacturing methodology for producing preforms for a variety of structural automotive components. This paper describes work conducted at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), focused on the development and demonstration of a high speed chopper gun to enhance throughput capabilities. ORNL and the Automotive Composites Consortium (ACC) revised the design of a standard chopper gun to expand the operational envelope, enabling delivery of up to 20kg/min. A prototype unit was fabricated and used to demonstrate continuous chopping of multiple roving at high output over extended periods. In addition fiber handling system modifications were completed to sustain the high output the modified chopper affords. These hardware upgrades are documented along with results of process characterization and capabilities assessment.

  11. High speed bus technology development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modrow, Marlan B.; Hatfield, Donald W.

    1989-09-01

    The development and demonstration of the High Speed Data Bus system, a 50 Million bits per second (Mbps) local data network intended for avionics applications in advanced military aircraft is described. The Advanced System Avionics (ASA)/PAVE PILLAR program provided the avionics architecture concept and basic requirements. Designs for wire and fiber optic media were produced and hardware demonstrations were performed. An efficient, robust token-passing protocol was developed and partially demonstrated. The requirements specifications, the trade-offs made, and the resulting designs for both a coaxial wire media system and a fiber optics design are examined. Also, the development of a message-oriented media access protocol is described, from requirements definition through analysis, simulation and experimentation. Finally, the testing and demonstrations conducted on the breadboard and brassboard hardware is presented.

  12. Technology needs for high-speed rotorcraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rutherford, John; Orourke, Matthew; Martin, Christopher; Lovenguth, Marc; Mitchell, Clark

    1991-01-01

    A study to determine the technology development required for high-speed rotorcraft development was conducted. The study begins with an initial assessment of six concepts capable of flight at, or greater than 450 knots with helicopter-like hover efficiency (disk loading less than 50 pfs). These concepts were sized and evaluated based on measures of effectiveness and operational considerations. Additionally, an initial assessment of the impact of technology advances on the vehicles attributes was made. From these initial concepts a tilt wing and rotor/wing concepts were selected for further evaluation. A more detailed examination of conversion and technology trade studies were conducted on these two vehicles, each sized for a different mission.

  13. Technology needs for high speed rotorcraft (3)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Detore, Jack; Conway, Scott

    1991-01-01

    The spectrum of vertical takeoff and landing (VTOL) type aircraft is examined to determine which aircraft are most likely to achieve high subsonic cruise speeds and have hover qualities similar to a helicopter. Two civil mission profiles are considered: a 600-n.mi. mission for a 15- and a 30-passenger payload. Applying current technology, only the 15- and 30-passenger tiltfold aircraft are capable of attaining the 450-knot design goal. The two tiltfold aircraft at 450 knots and a 30-passenger tiltrotor at 375 knots were further developed for the Task II technology analysis. A program called High-Speed Total Envelope Proprotor (HI-STEP) is recommended to meet several of these issues based on the tiltrotor concept. A program called Tiltfold System (TFS) is recommended based on the tiltrotor concept. A task is identified to resolve the best design speed from productivity and demand considerations based on the technology that emerges from the recommended programs. HI-STEP's goals are to investigate propulsive efficiency, maneuver loads, and aeroelastic stability. Programs currently in progress that may meet the other technology needs include the Integrated High Performance Turbine Engine Technology (IHPTET) (NASA Lewis) and the Advanced Structural Concepts Program funded through NASA Langley.

  14. High Speed Digital Camera Technology Review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clements, Sandra D.

    2009-01-01

    A High Speed Digital Camera Technology Review (HSD Review) is being conducted to evaluate the state-of-the-shelf in this rapidly progressing industry. Five HSD cameras supplied by four camera manufacturers participated in a Field Test during the Space Shuttle Discovery STS-128 launch. Each camera was also subjected to Bench Tests in the ASRC Imaging Development Laboratory. Evaluation of the data from the Field and Bench Tests is underway. Representatives from the imaging communities at NASA / KSC and the Optical Systems Group are participating as reviewers. A High Speed Digital Video Camera Draft Specification was updated to address Shuttle engineering imagery requirements based on findings from this HSD Review. This draft specification will serve as the template for a High Speed Digital Video Camera Specification to be developed for the wider OSG imaging community under OSG Task OS-33.

  15. High Speed and Slow Motion: The Technology of Modern High Speed Cameras

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vollmer, Michael; Mollmann, Klaus-Peter

    2011-01-01

    The enormous progress in the fields of microsystem technology, microelectronics and computer science has led to the development of powerful high speed cameras. Recently a number of such cameras became available as low cost consumer products which can also be used for the teaching of physics. The technology of high speed cameras is discussed,…

  16. Development of advanced combustion technology for medium- and high-speed natural gas engines. Final report, January 1985-February 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Snyder, W.E.

    1989-07-01

    The project investigated the several variables which influence the performance of pre-chamber equipped, lean-burn natural gas engines in general, and of the pre-chamber in particular. The effort was divided into four closely inter-related phases: Theoretical Analysis, Constant Volume Combustion (CVC) Rig Tests, Single Cylinder Engine Tests and Multi-Cylinder Engine Tests. The Theoretical Analysis was directed toward development of a computer program, called COGEN, which was then used to predict output performance trends resulting from changes to input parameters. The CVC Rig Test program was directed towards an improved understanding of the pre-chamber combustion process using high speed photography and simultaneous measurement of instantaneous pressures. Variations of pre-chamber size, throat design and air-fuel ratio were studied to guide the later engine test programs. The Single Cylinder Engine Tests were directed towards bridging the gap between the CVC Test Rig and the performance to be expected from a commercial multi-cylinder engine. Variations in pre-chamber design as well as engine compression ratio, Intake Manifold Temperature and load were investigated.

  17. High speed research system study. Advanced flight deck configuration effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swink, Jay R.; Goins, Richard T.

    1992-01-01

    In mid-1991 NASA contracted with industry to study the high-speed civil transport (HSCT) flight deck challenges and assess the benefits, prior to initiating their High Speed Research Program (HSRP) Phase 2 efforts, then scheduled for FY-93. The results of this nine-month effort are presented, and a number of the most significant findings for the specified advanced concepts are highlighted: (1) a no nose-droop configuration; (2) a far forward cockpit location; and (3) advanced crew monitoring and control of complex systems. The results indicate that the no nose-droop configuration is critically dependent upon the design and development of a safe, reliable, and certifiable Synthetic Vision System (SVS). The droop-nose configuration would cause significant weight, performance, and cost penalties. The far forward cockpit location, with the conventional side-by-side seating provides little economic advantage; however, a configuration with a tandem seating arrangement provides a substantial increase in either additional payload (i.e., passengers) or potential downsizing of the vehicle with resulting increases in performance efficiencies and associated reductions in emissions. Without a droop nose, forward external visibility is negated and takeoff/landing guidance and control must rely on the use of the SVS. The technologies enabling such capabilities, which de facto provides for Category 3 all-weather operations on every flight independent of weather, represent a dramatic benefits multiplier in a 2005 global ATM network: both in terms of enhanced economic viability and environmental acceptability.

  18. Technology needs for high speed rotorcraft (2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, Mark W.

    1991-01-01

    An analytical study was conducted to identify rotorcraft concepts best capable of combining a cruise speed of 350 to 450 knots with helicopter-like low speed attributes, and to define the technology advancements needed to make them viable by the year 2000. A systematic approach was used to compare the relative attributes and mission gross weights for a wide range of concepts, resulting in a downselect to the most promising concept/mission pairs. For transport missions, tilt-wing and variable diameter tilt-rotor (VDTR) concepts were found to be superior. For a military scout/attack role, the VDTR was best, although a shrouded rotor concept could provide a highly agile, low observable alternative if its weight empty fraction could be reduced. A design speed of 375 to 425 knots was found to be the maximum desirable for transport missions, with higher speed producing rapidly diminishing benefits in productivity. The key technologies that require advancement to make the tilt-wing and VDTR concepts viable are in the areas of wing and proprotor aerodynamics, efficient structural design, flight controls, refinement of the geared flap pitch control system, expansion of the speed/descent envelope, and the structural and aerodynamic tradeoffs of wing thickness and forward sweep. For the shrouded rotor, weight reduction is essential, particularly with respect to the mechanism for covering the rotor in cruise.

  19. High speed imaging technology: yesterday, today, and tomorrow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pendley, Gil J.

    2003-07-01

    The purpose of this discussion is to familiarize readers with an overview of high-speed imaging technology as a means of analyzing objects in motion that occur too fast for the eye to see or conventional photography or video to capture. This information is intended to provide a brief historical narrative from the inception of high-speed imaging in the USA and the acceptance of digital video technology to augment or replace high-speed motion picture cameras. It is not intended a definitive work on the subject. For those interested in greater detail, such as application techniques, formulae, very high-speed and ultra speed technology etc. I recommend the latest text on the subject: High Speed Photography and Photonics first published in 1997 by Focal Press in the UK and copyrighted by the Association for High Speed Photography in the United Kingdom.

  20. The high speed bus technology development program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludvigson, M. T.; Modrow, M. B.; Goldman, P. C.

    The current development status of a high-speed data bus to link MIL-STD-1750A computers in avionics applications is reviewed and illustrated with diagrams and photographs. The bus requirements include data rate 50 Mb/s, a linear token-passing scheme permitting both electronic and fiber-optic implementation, up to 64-terminal capacity, maximum terminal separation 300 ft, latency control via token-rotation-timer priority, self-test and bus-loop test capability, and automatic clock synchronization. The design concept and performance of a breadboard wire bus tested in July 1986 are discussed in detail, with particular attention to the redundancy manager, the output controller, the input controller, the ringmaster topology manager, and typical initial-placement problems.

  1. High speed synchronizer card utilizing VLSI technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Speciale, Nicholas; Wunderlich, Kristin

    1988-01-01

    A generic synchronizer card capable of providing standard NASA communication block telemetry frame synchronization and quality control was fabricated using VLSI technology. Four VLSI chip sets are utilized to shrink all the required functions into a single synchronizer card. The application of VLSI technology to telemetry systems resulted in an increase in performance and a decrease in cost and size.

  2. High-Speed, Three Dimensional Object Composition Mapping Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Ishikawa, M Y

    2001-02-14

    This document overviews an entirely new approach to determining the composition--the chemical-elemental, isotopic and molecular make-up--of complex, highly structured objects, moreover with microscopic spatial resolution in all 3 dimensions. The front cover depicts the new type of pulsed laser system at the heart of this novel technology under adjustment by Alexis Wynne, and schematically indicates two of its early uses: swiftly analyzing the 3-D composition governed structure of a transistor circuit with both optical and mass-spectrometric detectors, and of fossilized dinosaur and turtle bones high-speed probed by optical detection means. Studying the composition-cued 3-D micro-structures of advanced composite materials and the microscopic scale composition-texture of biological tissues are two near-term examples of the rich spectrum of novel applications enabled by this field-opening analytic tool-set.

  3. Aeropropulsion 1987. Session 6: High-Speed Propulsion Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    NASA is conducting aeronautical research over a broad range of Mach numbers. In addition to the advanced CTOL propulsion research described in a separate session, the Lewis Research Center has intensified its efforts towards propulsion technology for selected high-speed flight applications. In a companion program, the Langley Research Center has also accomplished excellent research in Supersonic Combustion Ramjet (SCRAM) propulsion. What is presented in this session is an unclassified review of some of the propulsion research results that are applicable for supersonic to hypersonic vehicles. Not only is a review provided for several key work areas, it also presents a viewpoint on future research directions by calling attention to cycles, components, and facilities involved in this rapidly expanding field of work.

  4. Technology needs for high-speed rotorcraft, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkerson, J. B.; Schneider, J. J.; Bartie, K. M.

    1991-01-01

    High-speed rotorcraft concepts and the technology needed to extend rotorcraft cruise speeds up to 450 knots (while retaining the helicopter attributes of low downwash velocities) were identified. Task I identified 20 concepts with high-speed potential. These concepts were qualitatively evaluated to determine the five most promising ones. These five concepts were designed with optimum wing loading and disk loading to a common NASA-defined military transport mission. The optimum designs were quantitatively compared against 11 key criteria and ranked accordingly. The two highest ranking concepts were selected for the further study.

  5. Advanced superposition methods for high speed turbopump vibration analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nielson, C. E.; Campany, A. D.

    1981-01-01

    The small, high pressure Mark 48 liquid hydrogen turbopump was analyzed and dynamically tested to determine the cause of high speed vibration at an operating speed of 92,400 rpm. This approaches the design point operating speed of 95,000 rpm. The initial dynamic analysis in the design stage and subsequent further analysis of the rotor only dynamics failed to predict the vibration characteristics found during testing. An advanced procedure for dynamics analysis was used in this investigation. The procedure involves developing accurate dynamic models of the rotor assembly and casing assembly by finite element analysis. The dynamically instrumented assemblies are independently rap tested to verify the analytical models. The verified models are then combined by modal superposition techniques to develop a completed turbopump model where dynamic characteristics are determined. The results of the dynamic testing and analysis obtained are presented and methods of moving the high speed vibration characteristics to speeds above the operating range are recommended. Recommendations for use of these advanced dynamic analysis procedures during initial design phases are given.

  6. Technology issues for high-speed civil transports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dollyhigh, Samuel M.

    1989-01-01

    Current efforts to prepare the technology for a new generation of high-speed civil transports are focused primarily on environmental issues. This paper reports on studies to provide: (1) acceptable engine emissions; (2) reduced airport/community noise; and (3) sonic-boom minimization. Attention is also given to technologies that allow a lighter, more efficient vehicle and to other high-payoff technologies, such as supersonic laminar flow; these have the potential for yielding not only better mission performance but also enhanced environmental compatibility for these new vehicles. The technology issues are reviewed in terms of the technologies themselves and their impact on the equally crucial need for economic success.

  7. Analysis and design technology for high-speed aircraft structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starnes, James H., Jr.; Camarda, Charles J.

    1992-01-01

    Recent high-speed aircraft structures research activities at NASA Langley Research Center are described. The following topics are covered: the development of analytical and numerical solutions to global and local thermal and structural problems, experimental verification of analysis methods, identification of failure mechanisms, and the incorporation of analysis methods into design and optimization strategies. The paper describes recent NASA Langley advances in analysis and design methods, structural and thermal concepts, and test methods.

  8. Advanced Ultra-High Speed Motor for Drilling

    SciTech Connect

    Impact Technologies LLC; University of Texas at Arlington

    2007-03-31

    Three (3) designs have been made for two sizes, 6.91 cm (2.72 inch) and 4.29 cm (1.69 inch) outer diameters, of a patented inverted configured Permanent Magnet Synchronous Machines (PMSM) electric motor specifically for drilling at ultra-high rotational speeds (10,000 rpm) and that can utilize advanced drilling methods. Benefits of these motors are stackable power sections, full control (speed and direction) of downhole motors, flow hydraulics independent of motor operation, application of advanced drilling methods (water jetting and abrasive slurry jetting), and the ability of signal/power electric wires through motor(s). Key features of the final designed motors are: fixed non-rotating shaft with stator coils attached; rotating housing with permanent magnet (PM) rotor attached; bit attached to rotating housing; internal channel(s) in a nonrotating shaft; electric components that are hydrostatically isolated from high internal pressure circulating fluids ('muds') by static metal to metal seals; liquid filled motor with smoothed features for minimized turbulence in the motor during operation; and new inverted coated metal-metal hydrodynamic bearings and seals. PMSM, Induction and Switched Reluctance Machines (SRM), all pulse modulated, were considered, but PMSM were determined to provide the highest power density for the shortest motors. Both radial and axial electric PMSM driven motors were designed with axial designs deemed more rugged for ultra-high speed, drilling applications. The 6.91 cm (2.72 inch) OD axial inverted motor can generate 4.18KW (5.61 Hp) power at 10,000 rpm with a 4 Nm (2.95 ft-lbs) of torque for every 30.48 cm (12 inches) of power section. The 6.91 cm (2.72 inch) OD radial inverted motor can generate 5.03 KW (6.74 Hp) with 4.8 Nm (3.54 ft-lb) torque at 10,000 rpm for every 30.48 cm (12 inches) of power section. The 4.29 cm (1.69 inch) OD radial inverted motor can generate 2.56 KW (3.43 Hp) power with 2.44 Nm (1.8 ft-lb) torque at full speed 10

  9. Development of advanced combustion technology for medium- and high-speed natural gas engines. Final report, January 1985-February 1989. Sections A, B, and C. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Snyder, W.E.

    1989-02-01

    The objective of the project was to investigate the variables which influence the performance of medium and high speed natural gas engines. Section A provides a summary and overview of the project; and includes a reprint of a paper on a natural gas engine combustion rig with high-speed photography, and a paper on a study of a lean burn spark ignited gas engine. Section B (Theoretical Analysis - Methods of Increasing Exhaust Heat Recovery and Reducing Specific Fuel Consumption) describes COGEN, a computer program used to predict pre-chamber lean-burn cogeneration natural gas engine performance. Section C (Theoretical Analysis - Methods of Increasing Exhaust Heat Recovery and Reducing Cooling System Losses) describes a survey of possible modifications to adapt an engine to best fit different cogeneration requirements.

  10. Innovative technology summary report: High-speed clamshell pipe cutter

    SciTech Connect

    1998-09-01

    The Hanford Site C Reactor Technology Demonstration Group demonstrated the High-Speed Clamshell Pipe Cutter technology, developed and marketed by Tri Tool Inc. (Rancho Cordova, California). The models demonstrated are portable, split-frame pipe lathes that require minimal radial and axial clearances for severing and/or beveling in-line pipe with ranges of 25 cm to 41 cm and 46 cm to 61 cm nominal diameter. The radial clearance requirement from the walls, floors, or adjacent pipes is 18 cm. The lathes were supplied with carbide insert conversion kits for the cutting bits for the high-speed technique that was demonstrated. Given site-specific factors, this demonstration showed the cost of the improved technology to be approximately 30% higher than the traditional (baseline) technology (oxyacetylene torch) cost of $14,400 for 10 cuts of contaminated 41-cm and 61-cm-diameter pipe at C Reactor. Actual cutting times were faster than the baseline technology; however, moving/staging the equipment took longer. Unlike the baseline torch, clamshell lathes do not involve applied heat, flames, or smoke and can be operated remotely, thereby helping personal exposures to be as low as reasonably achievable. The baseline technology was demonstrated at the C Reactor north and south water pipe tunnels August 19--22, 1997. The improved technology was demonstrated in the gas pipe tunnel December 15--19.

  11. Development of advanced combustion technology for medium- and high-speed natural gas engines. Final report January 1985-February 1989. Sections A through I

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-02-01

    The objective of the project was to investigate the variables which influence the performance of medium and high speed natural gas engines for applications in cogeneration plants. The final report includes the following: Summary and Overview; Theoretical analysis - Methods of increasing exhaust heat recovery and reducing specific fuel consumption; Theoretical analysis - Methods of increasing exhaust heat recovery and reducing cooling system losses; Design of constant volume combustion rig; Effect of pre-chamber geometry and fuel-air ratio; Parametric testing of the Ricardo Atlas single cylinder research engine; Effects of pre-chamber design on the combustion and performance of a lean-burn spark-ignited gas engine; and Effects of engine and operating variables on the performance of a commercial multi-cylinder pre-chamber natural gas engine. All five volumes of the report have been indexed separately for inclusion on the data base. A separate abstract is included for each of the 5 volumes of this set.

  12. Advances In High-Speed Photography 1972-1983

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courtney-Pratt, J. S.

    1984-01-01

    The variety, range and precision of methods available for photographic recording of fast phenomena have been increasing steadily. The capabilities of some of the newer techniques will be described. At the lower end of the speed range, the advances have been mainly in improvements in resolution, and in the introduction of video techniques. At the highest speeds the advances have included increases in dynamic range, a wider acceptance of image tubes, and a more careful analysis and characterization of their limitations. The variety, range and precision of methods available for photographic recording of fast phenomena have been increasing steadily. The capabilities of the newer techniques are considered, classifying the methods by the kind of record obtained. Descriptions of experimental techniques and apparatus, and illustrations, are given in an earlier article entitled, "A Review of the Methods of High-Speed Photography," published in Reports on Progress in Physics in 1957;[1

  13. and in "Advances in High Speed Photography 1957-1972" published in the Proceedings of the Tenth Internatiopal Cngress on High Speed Photography (HSP10) [116 and also in JSMPTE 82 167-175 (1973). L117o This present paper is in the nature of a survey of the limits to which the various techniques have been pressed as compared to the limits attained, or reported in the open literature, at the date of the reviews 10 and 25 years ago. There are a number of recent books and articles which also provide excellent surveys and impressive bibliographies:129 -138 Streak records with drum cameras can give a time resolution of 5 x 10-9 s.[2,3] Rotating mirror streak cameras with a single reflection[15] at present approach 10-9 s and may with multiple reflections achieve 10-10 s. The Schardin limit[ 4] for presently available rotor materials is 0.25 x 10-9 s, but this is predicated upon a single reflection of the light beam from the rotor and can be surpassed if the camera is designed to take

  14. Development of advanced combustion technology for medium- and high-speed natural gas engines. Final report, January 1985-February 1989. Sections D and E. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Snyder, W.E.

    1989-02-01

    A Constant Volume Combustion rig was designed and developed to simulate realistically the conditions in a lean burn pre-chamber engine at its top dead centre position. The rig provided good access for instrumentation and incorporated windows to allow high speed photography of the pre and main-chamber combustion. The rig incorporated a novel valve mechanism which separated the two combustion chambers during the charging process and, when the valve was opened and the injection triggered, gave realistic engine conditions with charge stratification and high pre-chamber turbulence. The combustion movies showed the progress of the flame down into the main-chamber and the ensuing combustion of the main-chamber charge. Recordings from the pressure transducers (one in each chamber) showed the rapid rise of pre-chamber pressure, its characteristic spike, and the subsequent main-chamber combustion and pressure rise. The test work described in the report covers the effect of varying pre-chamber geometry (including throat geometry) and air:fuel ratio in the pre- and main-chambers.

  15. Advanced waveform decomposition for high-speed videoendoscopy analysis.

    PubMed

    Ikuma, Takeshi; Kunduk, Melda; McWhorter, Andrew J

    2013-05-01

    This article presents a novel approach to analyze nonperiodic vocal fold behavior of high-speed videoendoscopy (HSV) data. Although HSV can capture true vibrational motions of the vocal folds, its clinical advantage over the videostroboscopy has not widely been accepted. One of the key advantages of the HSV over the videostroboscopy is its ability to capture vocal folds' nonperiodic behavior, which is more prominent in pathological vocal folds. However, such nonperiodicity in the HSV data has not been fully explored quantitatively beyond simple perturbation analysis. This article presents an advanced waveform modeling and decomposition technique for HSV-based waveforms. Waveforms are modeled to have three components: harmonic signal, deterministic nonharmonic signal, and random nonharmonic signal. This decomposition is motivated by the fact that voice disorders introduce signal content that is nonharmonic but carries deterministic quality such as subharmonic or modulating content. The proposed model is aimed to isolate such disordered behaviors as deterministic nonharmonic signal and quantify them. In addition to the model, the article outlines model parameter estimation procedures and a family of harmonics-to-noise ratio (HNR) parameters. The proposed HNR parameters include harmonics-to-deterministic-noise ratio (HDNR) and harmonics-to-random-noise ratio. A preliminary study demonstrates the effectiveness of the extended model and its HNR parameters. Vocal folds with and without benign lesions (Nwith = 13; Nwithout = 20) were studied with HSV glottal area waveforms. All three HNR parameters significantly distinguished the disordered condition, and the HDNR reported the largest effect size (Cohen's d = 2.04).

  16. Reconfigurable high-speed optoelectronic interconnect technology for multiprocessor computers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Julian

    1995-06-01

    We describe a compact optoelectronic switching technology for interconnecting multiple computer processors and shared memory modules together through dynamically reconfigurable optical paths to provide simultaneous, high speed communication amongst different nodes. Each switch provides a optical link to other nodes as well as electrical access to an individual processor, and it can perform optical and optoelectronic switching to covert digital data between various electrical and optical input/output formats. This multifunctional switching technology is based on the monolithic integration of arrays of vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers with photodetectors and heterojunction bipolar transistors. The various digital switching and routing functions, as well as optically cascaded multistage operation, have been experimentally demonstrated.

  17. High-speed civil transport issues and technology program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hewett, Marle D.

    1992-01-01

    A strawman program plan is presented, consisting of technology developments and demonstrations required to support the construction of a high-speed civil transport. The plan includes a compilation of technology issues related to the development of a transport. The issues represent technical areas in which research and development are required to allow airframe manufacturers to pursue an HSCT development. The vast majority of technical issues presented require flight demonstrated and validated solutions before a transport development will be undertaken by the industry. The author believes that NASA is the agency best suited to address flight demonstration issues in a concentrated effort. The new Integrated Test Facility at NASA Dryden Flight Research Facility is considered ideally suited to the task of supporting ground validations of proof-of-concept and prototype system demonstrations before night demonstrations. An elaborate ground hardware-in-the-loop (iron bird) simulation supported in this facility provides a viable alternative to developing an expensive fill-scale prototype transport technology demonstrator. Drygen's SR-71 assets, modified appropriately, are a suitable test-bed for supporting flight demonstrations and validations of certain transport technology solutions. A subscale, manned or unmanned flight demonstrator is suitable for flight validation of transport technology solutions, if appropriate structural similarity relationships can be established. The author contends that developing a full-scale prototype transport technology demonstrator is the best alternative to ensuring that a positive decision to develop a transport is reached by the United States aerospace industry.

  18. Ultra-high-speed teleradiology with ISDN technology.

    PubMed

    Lear, J L; Manco-Johnson, M; Feyerabend, A; Anderson, G; Robinson, D

    1989-06-01

    A solid-state, personal computer-based, image digitization and transmission system was developed that uses integrated services digital network (ISDN), a technology under development for ultra-high-speed data transmission over normal phone lines. Thousands of images have been transmitted to a site more than 15 miles away, with data rates exceeding 56,000 bits or 7,000 bytes (1 byte = 8 bits) per second with nearly perfect accuracy. Present modification of the system hardware and software should increase the data rate to 128,000 bits, or 16,000 bytes, per second. With this rate of transmission, remote radiologic image transmission should become a practical, routinely available diagnostic tool. PMID:2717765

  19. Development of advanced combustion technology for medium- and high-speed natural gas engines. Final report, January 1985-February 1989. Section I. Volume 5

    SciTech Connect

    Snyder, W.E.

    1989-02-01

    The objective of this phase of the work was to quantify the effects of engine and operating variables on the performance of a commercial multi-cylinder pre-chamber natural gas engine. Of particular interest were the oxides of nitrogen (NOx) and the brake specific fuel consumption (BSFC). Data for thirteen series of tests are presented and the relationship between the variables discussed. The major variables and their effects are as follows: Increased Relative Air-Fuel Ratio--Increased BSFC and decreased NOx; Advanced Timing--Decreased BSFC and increased NOx; Changed Pre-chamber Design--Very little effect on either BSFC or NOx when the delay within the pre-chamber is considered; Increased Intercooler Water Temperature--Decreased BSFC and increased NOx; Dry Exhaust Manifold--Very small effect on either BSFC or NOx Increased exhaust gas temperature; Increased Compression Ratio--Decreased BSFC and increased NOx; and Ebullient Cooling--Decreased BSFC and slightly increased NOx. In every case, as noted above, any change which increased the BSFC also decreased the NOx, and vice versa; optimum performance is therefore a balance between all of these variables.

  20. High-speed civil transport - Advanced flight deck challenges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swink, Jay R.; Goins, Richard T.

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a nine month study of the HSCT flight deck challenges and assessment of its benefits. Operational requirements are discussed and the most significant findings for specified advanced concepts are highlighted. These concepts are a no nose-droop configuration, a far forward cockpit location and advanced crew monitoring and control of complex systems. Results indicate that the no nose-droop configuration is critically dependent on the design and development of a safe, reliable and certifiable synthetic vision system (SVS). This configuration would cause significant weight, performance and cost penalties. A far forward cockpit configuration with a tandem seating arrangement allows either an increase in additional payload or potential downsizing of the vehicle leading to increased performance efficiency and reductions in emissions. The technologies enabling such capabilities, which provide for Category III all-weather opreations on every flight represent a benefit multiplier in a 20005 ATM network in terms of enhanced economic viability and environmental acceptability.

  21. Design of high speed camera based on CMOS technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Sei-Hun; An, Jun-Sick; Oh, Tae-Seok; Kim, Il-Hwan

    2007-12-01

    The capacity of a high speed camera in taking high speed images has been evaluated using CMOS image sensors. There are 2 types of image sensors, namely, CCD and CMOS sensors. CMOS sensor consumes less power than CCD sensor and can take images more rapidly. High speed camera with built-in CMOS sensor is widely used in vehicle crash tests and airbag controls, golf training aids, and in bullet direction measurement in the military. The High Speed Camera System made in this study has the following components: CMOS image sensor that can take about 500 frames per second at a resolution of 1280*1024; FPGA and DDR2 memory that control the image sensor and save images; Camera Link Module that transmits saved data to PC; and RS-422 communication function that enables control of the camera from a PC.

  1. Coherent DWDM technology for high speed optical communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saunders, Ross

    2011-10-01

    The introduction of coherent digital optical transmission enables a new generation of high speed optical data transport and fiber impairment mitigation. An initial implementation of 40 Gb/s coherent systems using Dual Polarization Quadrature Phase Shift Keying (DP-QPSK) is already being installed in carrier networks. New systems running at 100 Gb/s DP-QPSK data rate are in development and early technology lab and field trial phase. Significant investment in the 100 Gb/s ecosystem (optical components, ASICs, transponders and systems) bodes well for commercial application in 2012 and beyond. Following in the footsteps of other telecommunications fields such as wireless and DSL, we can expect coherent optical transmission to evolve from QPSK to higher order modulations schemes such as Mary PSK and/or QAM. This will be an interesting area of research in coming years and poses significant challenges in terms of electro-optic, DSP, ADC/DAC design and fiber nonlinearity mitigation to reach practical implementation ready for real network deployments.

  2. Engine technology challenges for a 21st Century High-Speed Civil Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaw, Robert J.; Gilkey, Samuel; Hines, Richard

    1993-01-01

    Ongoing NASA-funded studies by Boeing, McDonnell-Douglas, General Electric, and Pratt & Whitney indicate that an opportunity exists for a 21st Century High-Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) to become a major part of the international air transportation system. However, before industry will consider an HSCT product launch and an investment estimated to be over $15 billion for design and certification, major technology advances must be made. An overview of the propulsion-specific technology advances that must be in hand before an HSCT product launch could be considered is presented.

  3. Application Of High Speed Photography In Science And Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu Ji-Zong, Wu; Yu-Ju, Lin

    1983-03-01

    The service works in high-speed photography carried out by the Department of Precision Instruments, Tianjin University are described in this paper. A compensation type high-speed camera was used in these works. The photographic methods adopted and better results achieved in the studies of several technical fields, such as velocity field of flow of overflow surface of high dam, combustion process of internal combustion engine, metal cutting, electrical are welding, experiment of piling of steel tube piles for supporting the marine platforms and characteristics of motion of wrist watch escape mechanism and so on are illustrated in more detail. As the extension of human visual organs and for increasing the abi-lities of observing and studying the high-speed processes, high-speed photography plays a very important role. In order to promote the application and development on high-speed photography, we have carried out the consultative and service works inside and outside Tianjin Uni-versity. The Pentazet 35 compensation type high-speed camera, made in East Germany, was used to record the high-speed events in various kinds of technical investigations and necessary results have been ob-tained. 1. Measurement of flow velocity on the overflow surface of high dam. In the design of a key water control project with high head, it is extremely necessary to determinate various characteristics of flow velocity field on the overflow surface of high dam. Since the water flow on the surface of high overflow dam possesses the features of large flow velocity and shallow water depth, therefore it is difficult to use the conventional current meters such as pilot tube, miniature cur-rent meter or electrical measuring methods of non-electrical quantities for studying this problem. Adopting the high-speed photographic method to study analogously the characteristics of flow velocity field on the overflow surface of high dam is a kind of new measuring method. People

  4. High-speed parallel-processing networks for advanced architectures

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, D.R.

    1988-06-01

    This paper describes various parallel-processing architecture networks that are candidates for eventual airborne use. An attempt at projecting which type of network is suitable or optimum for specific metafunction or stand-alone applications is made. However, specific algorithms will need to be developed and bench marks executed before firm conclusions can be drawn. Also, a conceptual projection of how these processors can be built in small, flyable units through the use of wafer-scale integration is offered. The use of the PAVE PILLAR system architecture to provide system level support for these tightly coupled networks is described. The author concludes that: (1) extremely high processing speeds implemented in flyable hardware is possible through parallel-processing networks if development programs are pursued; (2) dramatic speed enhancements through parallel processing requires an excellent match between the algorithm and computer-network architecture; (3) matching several high speed parallel oriented algorithms across the aircraft system to a limited set of hardware modules may be the most cost-effective approach to achieving speed enhancements; and (4) software-development tools and improved operating systems will need to be developed to support efficient parallel-processor use.

  5. High speed photography and photonics applications: An underutilized technology

    SciTech Connect

    Paisley, D.L.

    1996-10-01

    Snapshot: Paisley describes the development of high-speed photography including the role of streak cameras, fiber optics, and lasers. Progress in this field has created a powerful tool for viewing such ultrafast processes as hypersonic events and ballistics. {copyright} {ital 1996 Optical Society of America.} [1047-6938-96-10-9939-04

  6. Advances in high-speed low-latency communications for nanopositioning in advanced microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, Scott C.

    2012-06-01

    We present a comparison of classical and recently developed communications interfacing technologies relevant to scanned imaging. We adopt an applications perspective, with a focus on interfacing techniques as enablers for enhanced resolution, speed, stability, information density or similar benefits. A wealth of such applications have emerged, ranging from nanoscale-stabilized force microscopy yielding 100X resolution improvement thanks to leveraging the latest in interfacing capabilities, to novel approaches in analog interfacing which improve data density and DAC resolution by several orders of magnitude. Our intent is to provide tools to understand, select and implement advanced interfacing to take applications to the next level. We have entered an era in which new interfacing techniques are enablers, in their own right, for novel imaging techniques. For example, clever leveraging of new interfacing technologies has yielded nanoscale stabilization and atomic-force microscopy (AFM) resolution enhancement. To assist in choosing and implementing interfacing strategies that maximize performance and enable new capabilities, we review available interfaces such as USB2, GPIB and Ethernet against the specific needs of positioning for the scanned-imaging community. We spotlight recent developments such as LabVIEW FPGA, which allows non-specialists to quickly devise custom logic and interfaces of unprecedentedly high performance and parallelism. Notable applications are reviewed, including a clever amalgamation of AFM and optical tweezers and a picometer-scaleaccuracy interferometer devised for ultrafine positioning validation. We note the Serial Peripheral Interface (SPI), emerging as a high-speed/low-latency instrumentation interface. The utility of instrument-specific parallel (PIO) and TTL sync/trigger (DIO) interfaces is also discussed. Requirements of tracking and autofocus are reviewed against the time-critical needs of typical applications (to avoid, for example

  7. Advanced weigh-in-motion system for weighing vehicles at high speed

    SciTech Connect

    Beshears, D.L.; Muhs, J.D.; Scudiere, M.B.

    1998-02-01

    A state-of-the-art, Advanced Weigh-In-Motion (WIM) system has been designed, installed, and tested on the west bound side of Interstate I-75/I-40 near the Knox County Weigh Station. The project is a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and International Road Dynamics, Inc. (IRD) sponsored by the Office of Uranium Programs, Facility and Technology Management Division of the Department of Energy under CRADA No. ORNL95-0364. ORNL, IRD, the Federal Highway Administration, the Tennessee Department of Safety and the Tennessee Department of Transportation have developed a National High Speed WIM Test Facility for test and evaluation of high-speed WIM systems. The WIM system under evaluation includes a Single Load Cell WIM scale system supplied and installed by IRD. ORNL developed a stand-alone, custom data acquisition system, which acquires the raw signals from IRD`s in-ground single load cell transducers. Under a separate contract with the Federal Highway Administration, ORNL designed and constructed a laboratory scale house for data collection, analysis and algorithm development. An initial advanced weight-determining algorithm has been developed. The new advanced WIM system provides improved accuracy and can reduce overall system variability by up to 30% over the existing high accuracy commercial WIM system.

  8. Silicon high speed modulator for advanced modulation: device structures and exemplary modulator performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milivojevic, Biljana; Wiese, Stefan; Whiteaway, James; Raabe, Christian; Shastri, Anujit; Webster, Mark; Metz, Peter; Sunder, Sanjay; Chattin, Bill; Anderson, Sean P.; Dama, Bipin; Shastri, Kal

    2014-03-01

    Fiber optics is well established today due to the high capacity and speed, unrivaled flexibility and quality of service. However, state of the art optical elements and components are hardly scalable in terms of cost and size required to achieve competitive port density and cost per bit. Next-generation high-speed coherent optical communication systems targeting a data rate of 100-Gb/s and beyond goes along with innovations in component and subsystem areas. Consequently, by leveraging the advanced silicon micro and nano-fabrication technologies, significant progress in developing CMOS platform-based silicon photonic devices has been made all over the world. These achievements include the demonstration of high-speed IQ modulators, which are important building blocks in coherent optical communication systems. In this paper, we demonstrate silicon photonic QPSK modulator based on a metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) capacitor structure, address different modulator configuration structures and report our progress and research associated with highspeed advanced optical modulation in silicon photonics

  9. High speed GaAs static RAM technology and design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundgren, R. E.; Waldner, M.

    A design and analysis study of potential high-speed GaAs MESFET memory circuits was performed. The results show that a 1-kbit static RAM having a 1-ns access time is feasible using low-power enhancement-mode MESFETs to realize static flip-flop memory cells; power dissipation would be 5 microwatts per cell. To achieve maximum memory speed, the control and drive circuitry incorporates depletion-mode devices throughout; total power dissipation would be about 1 W. Details of the memory design and analysis are presented.

  10. Technology benefits and ground test facilities for high-speed civil transport development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winston, Matthew M.; Shields, Elwood M.; Morris, Shelby J., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    The advanced technology base necessary for successful twenty-first century High-Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) aircraft will require extensive ground testing in aerodynamics, propulsion, acoustics, structures, materials, and other disciplines. This paper analyzes the benefits of advanced technology application to HSCT concepts, addresses the adequacy of existing groundbased test facilities, and explores the need for new facilities required to support HSCT development. A substantial amount of HSCT-related ground testing can be accomplished in existing facilities. The HSCT development effort could also benefit significantly from some new facilities initially conceived for testing in other aeronautical research areas. A new structures testing facility is identified as critically needed to insure timely technology maturation.

  11. High-speed 3D imaging by DMD technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoefling, Roland

    2004-05-01

    The paper presents an advanced solution for capturing the height of an object in addition to the 2D image as it is frequently desired in machine vision applications. Based upon the active fringe projection methodology, the system takes advantage of a series of patterns projected onto the object surface and observed by a camera to provide reliable, accurate and highly resolved 3D data from any scattering object surface. The paper shows how the recording of a projected image series can be significantly accelerated and improved in quality to overcome current limitations. The key is ALP - a metrology dedicated hardware design using the Discovery 1100 platform for the DMD micromirror device of Texas Instruments Inc. The paper describes how this DMD technology has been combined with latest LED illumination, high-performance optics, and recent digital camera solutions. The ALP based DMD projection can be exactly synchronized with one or multiple cameras so that gray value intensities generated by pulse-width modulation (PWM) are recorded with high linearity. Based upon these components, a novel 3D measuring system with outstanding properties is described. The "z-Snapper" represents a new class of 3D imaging devices, it is fast enough for time demanding in-line testing, and it can be built completely mobile: laptop based, hand-held, and battery powered. The turnkey system provides a "3D image" as simple as an usual b/w picture is grabbed. It can be instantly implemented into future machine vision applications that will benefit from the step into the third dimension.

  12. High-speed civil transport flight- and propulsion-control technological issues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, J. K.; Carlin, C. M.; Lambregts, A. A.

    1992-01-01

    Technology advances required in the flight and propulsion control system disciplines to develop a high speed civil transport (HSCT) are identified. The mission and requirements of the transport and major flight and propulsion control technology issues are discussed. Each issue is ranked and, for each issue, a plan for technology readiness is given. Certain features are unique and dominate control system design. These features include the high temperature environment, large flexible aircraft, control-configured empennage, minimizing control margins, and high availability and excellent maintainability. The failure to resolve most high-priority issues can prevent the transport from achieving its goals. The flow-time for hardware may require stimulus, since market forces may be insufficient to ensure timely production. Flight and propulsion control technology will contribute to takeoff gross weight reduction. Similar technology advances are necessary also to ensure flight safety for the transport. The certification basis of the HSCT must be negotiated between airplane manufacturers and government regulators. Efficient, quality design of the transport will require an integrated set of design tools that support the entire engineering design team.

  13. Engine Technology Challenges for the High-Speed Civil Transport Plane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plencner, Robert M.; Misra, Ajay; Graber, Edwin J., Jr.; Shaw, Robert J.; Seng, Gary T.

    1998-01-01

    Ongoing NASA-funded and privately funded studies continue to indicate that an opportunity exists for a second generation supersonic commercial airliner, or High-Speed Civil Transport (HSCT), to become a key part of the 21 st century international air transportation system. Long distance air travel is projected to be the fastest growing segment of the air transportation market by the turn of the century with increases at about 5 percent per annum over the next two decades. This projection suggests that by the year 2015, more than 600,000 passengers per day will be traveling long distances, predominantly over water. These routes would provide the greatest potential for an HSCT to become a significant part of the international air transportation system. The potential market for an HSCT is currently projected to be anywhere from 500-1500 aircraft over the 2005-2030 time period. Such an aircraft fleet size would represent a considerable share of the potential long-range aircraft market. However, this projected HSCT fleet can become a reality only if technologies are developed which will allow an HSCT design that is (1) environmentally compatible and (2) economically viable. Simply stated, the HSCT will be a technology driven airplane. Without significant advances in airframe and propulsion technologies over the levels currently available, there will be no second generation supersonic airliner! This paper will briefly describe the propulsion technology challenges which must be met prior to any product launch decision being made by industry and the progress toward meeting these challenges through NASAs High-Speed Research (HSR) Program, a partnership between NASA and Boeing, General Electric and Pratt & Whitney.

  14. Low emissions combustor technology for high-speed civil transport engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niedzwiecki, Richard W.

    1992-01-01

    The topics covered include the following: NASA High Speed Research (HSR) ozone research objectives; NO(x) formation; emission reduction; High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) supersonic cruise combustion operating conditions; NO(x) correlations; typical NO(x) characteristics of a current technology and low NO(x) combustors; HSCT emission reduction strategies; variation of NO(x) with equivalence ratio; the Emission Reduction Program; and emission reduction milestones.

  15. High-speed limnology: using advanced sensors to investigate spatial variability in biogeochemistry and hydrology.

    PubMed

    Crawford, John T; Loken, Luke C; Casson, Nora J; Smith, Colin; Stone, Amanda G; Winslow, Luke A

    2015-01-01

    Advanced sensor technology is widely used in aquatic monitoring and research. Most applications focus on temporal variability, whereas spatial variability has been challenging to document. We assess the capability of water chemistry sensors embedded in a high-speed water intake system to document spatial variability. This new sensor platform continuously samples surface water at a range of speeds (0 to >45 km h(-1)) resulting in high-density, mesoscale spatial data. These novel observations reveal previously unknown variability in physical, chemical, and biological factors in streams, rivers, and lakes. By combining multiple sensors into one platform, we were able to detect terrestrial-aquatic hydrologic connections in a small dystrophic lake, to infer the role of main-channel vs backwater nutrient processing in a large river and to detect sharp chemical changes across aquatic ecosystem boundaries in a stream/lake complex. Spatial sensor data were verified in our examples by comparing with standard lab-based measurements of selected variables. Spatial fDOM data showed strong correlation with wet chemistry measurements of DOC, and optical NO3 concentrations were highly correlated with lab-based measurements. High-frequency spatial data similar to our examples could be used to further understand aquatic biogeochemical fluxes, ecological patterns, and ecosystem processes, and will both inform and benefit from fixed-site data.

  16. Wind tunnel performance results of swirl recovery vanes as tested with an advanced high speed propeller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gazzaniga, John A.; Rose, Gayle E.

    1992-01-01

    Tests of swirl recovery vanes designed for use in conjunction with advanced high speed propellers were carried out at the NASA Lewis Research Center. The eight bladed 62.23 cm vanes were tested with a 62.23 cm SR = 7A high speed propeller in the NASA Lewis 2.44 x 1.83 m Supersonic Wind Tunnel for a Mach number range of 0.60 to 0.80. At the design operating condition for cruise of Mach 0.80 at an advance ratio of 3.26, the vane contribution to the total efficiency approached 2 percent. At lower off-design Mach numbers, the vane efficiency is even higher, approaching 4.5 percent for the Mach 0.60 condition. Use of the swirl recovery vanes essentially shifts the peak of the high speed propeller efficiency to a higher operating speed. This allows a greater degree of freedom in the selection of rpm over a wider operating range. Another unique result of the swirl recovery vane configuration is their essentially constant torque split between the propeller and the swirl vanes over a wide range of operating conditions for the design vane angle.

  17. Engine technology challenges for a 21st century high speed civil transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaw, Robert J.

    1991-01-01

    Recent NASA funded studies by Boeing and Douglas suggest an opportunity exists for a 21st Century High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) to become part of the international air transportation system. However, before this opportunity for high speed travel can be realized, certain environmental and and economic barrier issues must be overcome. These challenges are outlined. Research activities which NASA has planned to address these barrier issues and to provide a technology base to allow U.S. manufacturers to make an informed go/no go decision on developing the HSCT are discussed.

  18. Advanced organic dye for high-speed, high-density optical media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kodaira, Takuo; Matsuda, Isao; Somei, Hidenori; Tsuzuki, Takeo; Yokoyama, Daizo; Endo, Akihisa; Takeguchi, Kazunobu; Kojo, Shinichi; Miyazawa, Fuyuki; Otsu, Takeshi; Murai, Wakaaki; Hattori, Masashi; Shimomai, Kenichi; Oshita, Junji; Asano, Sho; Shimizu, Atsuo; Fujii, Toru

    2015-09-01

    Advances in organic dye progress are indispensable for high-speed, high-density recording of recordable Blu-ray Disc™ (BD-R) low-to-high (LTH) discs without a low elastic modulus layer. The optimal physical properties of the organic dyes, i.e., a low decomposition calorific value, a low decomposition temperature, and a large n-value, were determined, and a dye with these properties was synthesized. A BD-R disc using the dye conformed to the BD-R LTH standard at 8× recording and ever higher speeds should be possible. Furthermore, the possibility of 33 GB/layer high-density recording was suggested.

  19. Summary and recent results from the NASA advanced High Speed Propeller Research Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, G. A.; Mikkelson, D. C.

    1982-01-01

    Advanced high-speed propellers offer large performance improvements for aircraft that cruise in the Mach 0.7 to 0.8 speed regime. The current status of the NASA research program on high-speed propeller aerodynamics, acoustics, and aeroelastics is described. Recent wind tunnel results for five 8- to 10-blade advanced models are compared with analytical predictions. Test results show that blade sweep was important in achieving net efficiencies near 80 percent at Mach 0.8 and reducing near-field cruise noise by dB. Lifting line and lifting surface aerodynamic analysis codes are under development and some initial lifting line results are compared with propeller force and probe data. Some initial laser velocimeter measurements of the flow field velocities of an 8-bladed 45 deg swept propeller are shown. Experimental aeroelastic results indicate that cascade effects and blade sweep strongly affect propeller aeroelastic characteristics. Comparisons of propeller near-field noise data with linear acoustic theory indicate that the theory adequate predicts near-field noise for subsonic tip speeds but overpredicts the noise for supersonic tip speeds. Potential large gains in propeller efficiency of 7 to 11 percent at Mach 0.8 may be possible with advanced counter-rotation propellers.

  20. High-speed railway bridge dynamic measurement based on GB-InSAR technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Miao; Ding, Ke-liang; Liu, Xianglei; Song, Zichao

    2015-12-01

    It is an important task to evaluate the safety during the life of bridges using the corresponding vibration parameters. With the advantages of non-contact and high accuracy, the new remote measurement technology of GB-InSAR is suitable to make dynamic measurement for bridges to acquire the vibration parameters. Three key technologies, including stepped frequency-continuous wave technique, synthetic aperture radar and interferometric measurement technique, are introduced in this paper. The GB-InSAR is applied for a high-speed railway bridge to measure of dynamic characteristics with the train passing which can be used to analyze the safety of the monitored bridge. The test results shown that it is an reliable non-contact technique for GB-InSAR to acquire the dynamic vibration parameter for the high-speed railway bridges.

  1. Large-scale Advanced Prop-fan (LAP) high speed wind tunnel test report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, William A.; Wainauski, Harold S.; Arseneaux, Peter J.

    1988-01-01

    High Speed Wind Tunnel testing of the SR-7L Large Scale Advanced Prop-Fan (LAP) is reported. The LAP is a 2.74 meter (9.0 ft) diameter, 8-bladed tractor type rated for 4475 KW (6000 SHP) at 1698 rpm. It was designated and built by Hamilton Standard under contract to the NASA Lewis Research Center. The LAP employs thin swept blades to provide efficient propulsion at flight speeds up to Mach .85. Testing was conducted in the ONERA S1-MA Atmospheric Wind Tunnel in Modane, France. The test objectives were to confirm that the LAP is free from high speed classical flutter, determine the structural and aerodynamic response to angular inflow, measure blade surface pressures (static and dynamic) and evaluate the aerodynamic performance at various blade angles, rotational speeds and Mach numbers. The measured structural and aerodynamic performance of the LAP correlated well with analytical predictions thereby providing confidence in the computer prediction codes used for the design. There were no signs of classical flutter throughout all phases of the test up to and including the 0.84 maximum Mach number achieved. Steady and unsteady blade surface pressures were successfully measured for a wide range of Mach numbers, inflow angles, rotational speeds and blade angles. No barriers were discovered that would prevent proceeding with the PTA (Prop-Fan Test Assessment) Flight Test Program scheduled for early 1987.

  2. The selection of convertible engines with current gas generator technology for high speed rotorcraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eisenberg, Joseph D.

    1990-01-01

    NASA-Lewis has sponsored two studies to determine the most promising convertible engine concepts for high speed rotorcraft. These studies projected year 2000 convertible technology limited to present gas generator technology. Propulsion systems for utilization on aircraft needing thrust only during cruise and those aircraft needing both power and thrust at cruise were investigated. Mission calculations for the two contractors involved were based upon the fold tilt rotor concept. Analysis and comparison of the General Electric concepts (geared UDF, clutched fan, and VIGV fan), and the Allison Gas Turbine concepts (clutched fan, VIGV fan, variable pitch fan, single rotation tractor propfan, and counter rotation tractor propfan) are presented.

  3. The selection of convertible engines with current gas generator technology for high speed rotorcraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eisenberg, Joseph D.

    1990-01-01

    NASA-Lewis sponsored two studies to determine the most promising convertible engine concepts for high speed rotorcraft. These studies projected year 2000 convertible technology limited to present gas generator technology. Propulsion systems for utilization on aircraft needing thrust only during cruise and those aircraft needing both power and thrust at cruise were investigated. Mission calculations for the two contractors involved were based upon the fold tilt rotor concept. Analysis and comparison of the General Electric concepts (geared UDF, clutched fan, and Variable Inlet Guide Vane (VIGV) fan), and the Allison Gas Turbine concepts (clutched fan, VIGV fan, variable pitch fan, single rotation tractor propfan, and counter rotation tractor propfan) are presented.

  4. Monitoring abandoned dreg fields of high-speed railway construction with UAV remote sensing technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Jiayuan; Wang, Zhiliang; Wang, Yangchun; Lin, Yi; Du, Xiaolin

    2015-12-01

    High-speed railway construction will produce a large amount of abandoned dregs, so it is necessary to build enough dreg deposition fields along the railway. The task of the department of soil and water conservation is to monitor the construction and usage of abandoned dreg fields according to the design in the whole process of railway construction. As long linear construction projects, many high-speed railways go through regions of complex terrain, which poses great difficulties to monitoring current status of abandoned dreg fields. With the advantages of low cost, flexible launch and landing, safety, under-cloud-flying, hyperspatial image resolution, Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) are very suitable for obtaining remote sensing imagery along the railway. One segment of the high-speed railway from Chongqing to Wanzhou and its neighborhood was chosen as the study area to demonstrate key technologies and specific procedures of monitoring abandoned dreg fields using the UAV system. The UAV system and its components are introduced along with the flight trajectories, acquired UAV imagery, and attitude data. Image preprocessing and generation of DEM and DOM are described in detail followed by image-based measurement accuracy assessment and abandoned dreg field status investigation on the resulting DOM and DEM. Results prove the feasibility and effectiveness of applying the fixed wing UAV system to rapidly monitoring the construction and usage of abandoned dreg fields

  5. Advanced Software for Analysis of High-Speed Rolling-Element Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poplawski, J. V.; Rumbarger, J. H.; Peters, S. M.; Galatis, H.; Flower, R.

    2003-01-01

    COBRA-AHS is a package of advanced software for analysis of rigid or flexible shaft systems supported by rolling-element bearings operating at high speeds under complex mechanical and thermal loads. These loads can include centrifugal and thermal loads generated by motions of bearing components. COBRA-AHS offers several improvements over prior commercial bearing-analysis programs: It includes innovative probabilistic fatigue-life-estimating software that provides for computation of three-dimensional stress fields and incorporates stress-based (in contradistinction to prior load-based) mathematical models of fatigue life. It interacts automatically with the ANSYS finite-element code to generate finite-element models for estimating distributions of temperature and temperature-induced changes in dimensions in iterative thermal/dimensional analyses: thus, for example, it can be used to predict changes in clearances and thermal lockup. COBRA-AHS provides an improved graphical user interface that facilitates the iterative cycle of analysis and design by providing analysis results quickly in graphical form, enabling the user to control interactive runs without leaving the program environment, and facilitating transfer of plots and printed results for inclusion in design reports. Additional features include roller-edge stress prediction and influence of shaft and housing distortion on bearing performance.

  6. Technology of High-speed Direct Laser Deposition from Ni-based Superalloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimova-Korsmik, Olga; Turichin, Gleb; Zemlyakov, Evgeniy; Babkin, Konstantin; Petrovsky, Pavel; Travyanov, Andrey

    Recently, additive manufacturing is the one of most perspective technologies; it can replace conventional methods of casting and subsequent time-consuming machining. One of the most interesting additive technologies - high-speed direct laser deposition (HSDLD) allows realizing heterophase process during the manufacturing, which there is process takes place with a partial melting of powder. This is particularly important for materials, which are sensitive to strong fluctuations of temperature treatment regimes, like nickel base alloys with high content of gamma prime phase. This alloys are interested for many industrial areas, mostly there are used in engine systems, aircraft and shipbuilding, aeronautics. Heating and cooling rates during the producing process determine structure and affect on its properties. Using HSDLD process it possible to make a products from Ni superalloys with ultrafine microstructure and satisfactory mechanical characteristics without special subsequent heatreatment.

  7. Technology with High-Speed Movies to Analyze the Movement of Internal Organs in Medaka

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe-Asaka, Tomomi; Niihori, Maki; Terada, Masahiro; Oda, Shoji; Iwasaki, Ken-Ichi; Sudoh, Masamichi; Yamada, Shin; Ohshima, Hiroshi; Mukai, Chiaki

    Living organisms are always exposed and respond to various stresses from the external world - the environment, such as temperature, gravity, radiation or circadian. Understanding and addressing the effects of the environment on human health is a major issue. To clarify this issue, we are studying both human and medaka. Medaka is a good model organism to verify the effects of the space environment for their features including their short life cycle, productivity, mapped whole genome sequences, and transparency even in adults. We are trying to evaluate the heartbeat using transparent medaka with live imaging. Despite the importance of functions of internal organs, its observation has been difficult. Imaging technologies has developed remarkably in a decade. With the retirement of the space shuttle, experimental procedures without sample collection will be required. We established an approach to acquire the images and the methodology of the analysis from high-speed movies. We are subsequently going to introduce a method of verifying the movement of internal organs in medaka experiments using high-speed movies.

  8. Bibliography on propulsion airframe integration technologies for high-speed civil transport applications, 1980-1991

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, David J.; Mizukami, Masashi

    1993-01-01

    NASA has initiated the High Speed Research (HSR) program with the goal to develop technologies for a new generation, economically viable, environmentally acceptable, supersonic transport (SST) called the High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT). A significant part of this effort is expected to be in multidisciplinary systems integration, such as in propulsion airframe integration (PAI). In order to assimilate the knowledge database on PAI for SST type aircraft, a bibliography on this subject was compiled. The bibliography with over 1200 entries, full abstracts, and indexes. Related topics are also covered, such as the following: engine inlets, engine cycles, nozzles, existing supersonic cruise aircraft, noise issues, computational fluid dynamics, aerodynamics, and external interference. All identified documents from 1980 through early 1991 are included; this covers the latter part of the NASA Supersonic Cruise Research (SCR) program and the beginnings of the HSR program. In addition, some pre-1980 documents of significant merit or reference value are also included. The references were retrieved via a computerized literature search using the NASA RECON database system.

  9. Advanced fabrication technology for high speed aircraft structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bales, T. T.; Hoffman, E. K.; Bird, R. K.

    1990-01-01

    An overview of the development of the weld-brazing process for fabricating Ti-6Al-4V skin-stiffened panels, a brazing process for fabricating Bsc/Al titanium honeycomb core panels, and the enhanced diffusion bonding (EDB) process for fabricating Ti-14Al-21Nb titanium aluminide structural elements are presented. Data presented include the shear strengths of full-scale weldbrazed Ti-6Al-4V skin stiffened and Bsc/Al titanium honeycomb core sandwich panels designed to meet the requirements of an upper wing panel on the NASA YF-12. These results verified that the materials, fabrication processes, and structural concepts were qualified for Mach 3 flight. Shear strengths of each of the panel concepts following flight service evaluation are also reported. Comparisons made with the cost and weight of the original wing panel indicated that the weldbrazed titanium panels resulted in a 15-20 percent cost savings and the brazed Bsc/Al panel showed a 30 percent weight savings. It was also shown that the strengths of the EDB joints were sufficient to develop stresses in the Ti-14Al-21Nb face sheets of the sandwich structure which were above the yield strength of the material.

  10. NASA-UVa Light Aerospace Alloy and Structures Technology Program: Aluminum-Based Materials for High Speed Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starke, E. A., Jr. (Editor)

    1996-01-01

    This report is concerned with 'Aluminum-Based Materials for High Speed Aircraft' which was initiated to identify the technology needs associated with advanced, low-cost aluminum base materials for use as primary structural materials. Using a reference baseline aircraft, these materials concept will be further developed and evaluated both technically and economically to determine the most attractive combinations of designs, materials, and manufacturing techniques for major structural sections of an HSCT. Once this has been accomplished, the baseline aircraft will be resized, if applicable, and performance objectives and economic evaluations made to determine aircraft operating costs. The two primary objectives of this study are: (1) to identify the most promising aluminum-based materials with respect to major structural use on the HSCT and to further develop those materials, and (2) to assess these materials through detailed trade and evaluation studies with respect to their structural efficiency on the HSCT.

  11. Dense all-optical WDM-SCM technology for high-speed computer interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ih, Charles S.; Tian, Rongsheng; Zhou, H. X.; Xia, Xiang-Gen

    1993-07-01

    We describe a dense and flexible all optical multi-channel communication system for high speed computer interconnects. The system can provide 10 Gb/s for each individual node with a total system capacity to 250 Gb/s using currently available technologies. The system capacity can be scaled to 1 Tb/s using optical amplifiers with a broader bandwidth and higher modulations. The system is based on the multi-beam (heterodyne) modulator (MBM) recently demonstrated in our laboratory and other current technologies in tunable laser arrays and acousto-optical tunable filter (AOTF). Each MBM automatically forms a high frequency microwave sub-carrier multiplexing (SCM) with sub-carrier frequency to tens of GHz. A MBM with sub-carriers at 17 and 21 GHz has already been demonstrated and can be scaled to higher frequencies by using a higher frequency detector. Each SCM group may consist of up to 10 one-Gb/s channels and occupies only 1 nm spectral width. Therefore we can form a conventional WDM with 25 divisions within the bandwidth of commercially available optical amplifiers.

  12. System Analyses of Pneumatic Technology for High Speed Civil Transport Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mavris, Dimitri N.; Tai, Jimmy C.; Kirby, Michelle M.; Roth, Bryce A.

    1999-01-01

    The primary aspiration of this study was to objectively assess the feasibility of the application of a low speed pneumatic technology, in particular Circulation Control (CC) to an HSCT concept. Circulation Control has been chosen as an enabling technology to be applied on a generic High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT). This technology has been proven for various subsonic vehicles including flight tests on a Navy A-6 and computational application on a Boeing 737. Yet, CC has not been widely accepted for general commercial fixed-wing use but its potential has been extensively investigated for decades in wind tunnels across the globe for application to rotorcraft. More recently, an experimental investigation was performed at Georgia Tech Research Institute (GTRI) with application to an HSCT-type configuration. The data from those experiments was to be applied to a full-scale vehicle to assess the impact from a system level point of view. Hence, this study attempted to quantitatively assess the impact of this technology to an HSCT. The study objective was achieved in three primary steps: 1) Defining the need for CC technology; 2) Wind tunnel data reduction; 3) Detailed takeoff/landing performance assessment. Defining the need for the CC technology application to an HSCT encompassed a preliminary system level analysis. This was accomplished through the utilization of recent developments in modern aircraft design theory at Aerospace Systems Design Laboratory (ASDL). These developments include the creation of techniques and methods needed for the identification of technical feasibility show stoppers. These techniques and methods allow the designer to rapidly assess a design space and disciplinary metric enhancements to enlarge or improve the design space. The takeoff and landing field lengths were identified as the concept "show-stoppers". Once the need for CC was established, the actual application of data and trends was assessed. This assessment entailed a reduction of the

  13. Modification of the Sandia National Laboratories/California advanced coordinate measuring machine for high speed scanning

    SciTech Connect

    Baldwin, J.M.; Pilkey, R.D.; Cassou, R.M.; Summerhays, K.D.

    1997-03-01

    The Moore M48V high accuracy coordinate measuring machine (CMM), while mechanically capable of exact measurement of physical artifacts, is not, in its original configuration, well suited for rapid gathering of high density dimensional information. This report describes hardware and software modifications to the original control and data acquisition system that allow relatively high speed scanning of cylindrical features. We also estimate the accuracy of the individual point data on artifacts measured with this system and provide detailed descriptions of the hardware and software apparatus as an aid to others who may wish to apply the system to cylindrical or other simple geometries. 6 refs., 18 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Additional Development and Systems Analyses of Pneumatic Technology for High Speed Civil Transport Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Englar, Robert J.; Willie, F. Scott; Lee, Warren J.

    1999-01-01

    In the Task I portion of this NASA research grant, configuration development and experimental investigations have been conducted on a series of pneumatic high-lift and control surface devices applied to a generic High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) model configuration to determine their potential for improved aerodynamic performance, plus stability and control of higher performance aircraft. These investigations were intended to optimize pneumatic lift and drag performance; provide adequate control and longitudinal stability; reduce separation flowfields at high angle of attack; increase takeoff/climbout lift-to-drag ratios; and reduce system complexity and weight. Experimental aerodynamic evaluations were performed on a semi-span HSCT generic model with improved fuselage fineness ratio and with interchangeable plain flaps, blown flaps, pneumatic Circulation Control Wing (CCW) high-lift configurations, plain and blown canards, a novel Circulation Control (CC) cylinder blown canard, and a clean cruise wing for reference. Conventional tail power was also investigated for longitudinal trim capability. Also evaluated was unsteady pulsed blowing of the wing high-lift system to determine if reduced pulsed mass flow rates and blowing requirements could be made to yield the same lift as that resulting from steady-state blowing. Depending on the pulsing frequency applied, reduced mass flow rates were indeed found able to provide lift augmentation at lesser blowing values than for the steady conditions. Significant improvements in the aerodynamic characteristics leading to improved performance and stability/control were identified, and the various components were compared to evaluate the pneumatic potential of each. Aerodynamic results were provided to the Georgia Tech Aerospace System Design Lab. to conduct the companion system analyses and feasibility study (Task 2) of theses concepts applied to an operational advanced HSCT aircraft. Results and conclusions from these

  15. Advanced high-speed flywheel energy storage systems for pulsed power application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talebi Rafsanjan, Salman

    Power systems on modern commercial transportation systems are moving to more electric based equipment, thus improving the reliability of the overall system. Electrical equipment on such systems will include some loads that require very high power for short periods of time, on the order of a few seconds, especially during acceleration and deceleration. The current approach to solving this problem is sizing the electrical grid for peak power, rather than the average. A method to efficiently store and discharge the pulsed power is necessary to eliminate the cost and weight of oversized generation equipment to support the pulsed power needs of these applications. Highspeed Flywheel Energy Storage Systems (FESS) are effectively capable of filling the niche of short duration, high cycle life applications where batteries and ultra capacitors are not usable. In order to have an efficient high-speed FESS, performing three important steps towards the design of the overall system are extremely vital. These steps are modeling, analysis and control of the FESS that are thoroughly investigated in this dissertation. This dissertation establishes a comprehensive analysis of a high-speed FESS in steady state and transient operations. To do so, an accurate model for the complete FESS is derived. State space averaging approach is used to develop DC and small-signal AC models of the system. These models effectively simplify analysis of the FESS and give a strong physical intuition to the complete system. In addition, they result in saving time and money by avoiding time consuming simulations performed by expensive packages, such as Simulink, PSIM, etc. In the next step, two important factors affecting operation of the Permanent Magnet Synchronous Machine (PMSM) implemented in the high-speed FESS are investigated in detail and outline a proper control strategy to achieve the required performance by the system. Next, a novel design algorithm developed by S.P. Bhattacharyya is used to

  16. Performance of Advanced Heavy-Lift, High-Speed Rotorcraft Configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Wayne; Yeo, Hyeonsoo; Acree, C. W., Jr.

    2007-01-01

    The aerodynamic performance of rotorcraft designed for heavy-lift and high-speed cruise is examined. Configurations considered include the tiltrotor, the compound helicopter, and the lift-offset rotor. Design conditions are hover and 250-350 knot cruise, at 5k/ISA+20oC (civil) or 4k/95oF (military); with cruise conditions at 4000 or 30,000 ft. The performance was calculated using the comprehensive analysis CAMRAD II, emphasizing rotor optimization and performance, including wing-rotor interference. Aircraft performance was calculated using estimates of the aircraft drag and auxiliary propulsion efficiency. The performance metric is total power, in terms of equivalent aircraft lift-to-drag ratio L/D = WV/P for cruise, and figure of merit for hover.

  17. High-resolution imaging of hypervelocity metal jets using advanced high-speed photographic techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, L.L.; Muelder, S.A.

    1995-08-29

    It is now possible to obtain high resolution sequential photographs of the initial formation and evolution of hypervelocity metal jets formed by shaped charge devices fired in air. Researchers have been frustrated by the high velocity of the jet material and the luminous sheath of hot gases cloaking the jet that made detailed observation of the jet body extremely difficult. The camera system that provides the photographs is a large format multi-frame electro-optic camera, referred to as an IC camera (IC stands for image converter), that utilizes electro-optic shuttering, monochromatic pulsed laser illumination and bandpass filtering to provide sequential pictures (in 3D if desired) with minimal degradation due to luminous air shocks or motion blur. The large format (75mm image plane), short exposure (15 ns minimum), ruby laser illumination and bandpass filtering (monochromatic illumination while excluding extraneous light) produces clear, sharp, images of the detailed surface structure of a metal shaped charge jet during early jet formation, elongation of the jet body, jet tip evolution and subsequent particulation (breakup) of the jet body. By utilizing the new camera system in conjunction with the more traditional rotating mirror high speed cameras, pulsed radiography, and electrical sensors, a maximum amount of, often unique, data can be extracted from a single experiment. This paper was intended primarily as an oral presentation. For purposes of continuity and simplicity in these proceedings, the authors have chosen to concentrate on the development of the IC camera system and its impact on the photography of high speed shaped chargejets.

  18. SPADAS: a high-speed 3D single-photon camera for advanced driver assistance systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bronzi, D.; Zou, Y.; Bellisai, S.; Villa, F.; Tisa, S.; Tosi, A.; Zappa, F.

    2015-02-01

    Advanced Driver Assistance Systems (ADAS) are the most advanced technologies to fight road accidents. Within ADAS, an important role is played by radar- and lidar-based sensors, which are mostly employed for collision avoidance and adaptive cruise control. Nonetheless, they have a narrow field-of-view and a limited ability to detect and differentiate objects. Standard camera-based technologies (e.g. stereovision) could balance these weaknesses, but they are currently not able to fulfill all automotive requirements (distance range, accuracy, acquisition speed, and frame-rate). To this purpose, we developed an automotive-oriented CMOS single-photon camera for optical 3D ranging based on indirect time-of-flight (iTOF) measurements. Imagers based on Single-photon avalanche diode (SPAD) arrays offer higher sensitivity with respect to CCD/CMOS rangefinders, have inherent better time resolution, higher accuracy and better linearity. Moreover, iTOF requires neither high bandwidth electronics nor short-pulsed lasers, hence allowing the development of cost-effective systems. The CMOS SPAD sensor is based on 64 × 32 pixels, each able to process both 2D intensity-data and 3D depth-ranging information, with background suppression. Pixel-level memories allow fully parallel imaging and prevents motion artefacts (skew, wobble, motion blur) and partial exposure effects, which otherwise would hinder the detection of fast moving objects. The camera is housed in an aluminum case supporting a 12 mm F/1.4 C-mount imaging lens, with a 40°×20° field-of-view. The whole system is very rugged and compact and a perfect solution for vehicle's cockpit, with dimensions of 80 mm × 45 mm × 70 mm, and less that 1 W consumption. To provide the required optical power (1.5 W, eye safe) and to allow fast (up to 25 MHz) modulation of the active illumination, we developed a modular laser source, based on five laser driver cards, with three 808 nm lasers each. We present the full characterization of

  19. Further comparison of wind tunnel and airplane acoustic data for advanced design high speed propeller models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dittmar, J. H.

    1985-01-01

    Comparisons were made between the SR-2 and SR-3 model propeller noise data taken in the NASA 8-by-6 wind tunnel, in the United Technologies Research Center (UTRC) anechoic tunnel, and with boom and fuselage microphones on the NASA Jetstar airplane. Plots of peak blade passage tone noise versus helical tip Mach number generally showed good agreement. The levels of the airplane fuselage data were somewhat lower than the boom data by an approximately uniform value. The curve shapes were similar except for the UTRC data which was flatter than the other sets. This was attributed to the UTRC data being taken at constant power while the other data were taken at constant advance ratio. General curves of the peak blade passage tone versus helical tip Mach number fit through all the data are also presented. Directivity shape comparisons at the cruise condition were similar for the airplane and 8-by-6 tunnel data. The UTRC data peaked farther forward but, when an angle correction was made for the different axial Mach number used in the UTRC tests, the shape was similar to the others. The general agreement of the data from the four configurations enables the formation of a good consensus of the noise from these propellers.

  20. Outsourcing a High Speed Internet Access Project: An Information Technology Class Case Study in Three Parts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Platt, Richard G.; Carper, William B.; McCool, Michael

    2010-01-01

    In early 2004, the Hilton Hotels Corporation (HHC) required that all of its hotels (both owned and franchised) install high-speed Internet access (HSIA) in all of their rooms by June 2004. This case focuses on how one of its franchise properties located on the northern gulf coast of Florida (the Hilton Sandestin Beach Golf Resort &…

  1. High speed production of YBCO precursor films by advanced TFA-MOD process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichikawa, H.; Nakaoka, K.; Miura, M.; Sutoh, Y.; Nakanishi, T.; Nakai, A.; Yoshizumi, M.; Izumi, T.; Shiohara, Y.

    2009-10-01

    YBa 2Cu 3O 7-y (YBCO) long tapes derived from the metal-organic deposition (MOD) method using the starting solution containing trifluoroacetate (TFA) have been developed with high critical currents ( I c) over 200 A/cm-width. However, high speed production of YBCO films is simultaneously necessary to satisfy the requirements of electric power device applications in terms of cost and the amounts of the tapes. In this work, we developed a new TFA-MOD starting solution using F-free salt of Y, TFA salt of Ba and Cu-Octylate for application to the coating/calcination process and discussed several issues by using the Multi-turn (MT) Reel-to-Reel (RTR) system calcination furnace for the purpose of high throughput without degradation of the properties. The coating system was improved for uniform deposition qualities in both longitudinal and transversal directions. YBCO films using the new starting solution at the traveling rate of 10 m/h in coating/calcination by the MT-RTR calcination furnace showed the values of the critical current density of 1.6 MA/cm 2 as thick as 1.5 μm at 77 K under the self fields after firing at the high heating rate in the crystallization.

  2. High-speed, low-damage grinding of advanced ceramics Phase 1. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Kovach, J.A.; Malkin, S.

    1995-03-01

    In manufacture of structural ceramic components, grinding costs can comprise up to 80% of the entire manufacturing cost. Most of these costs arise from the conventional multi-step grinding process with numerous grinding wheels and additional capital equipment, perishable dressing tools, and labor. In an attempt to reduce structural ceramic grinding costs, a feasibility investigation was undertaken to develop a single step, roughing-finishing process suitable for producing high-quality silicon nitride ceramic parts at high material removal rates at lower cost than traditional, multi-stage grinding. This feasibility study employed combined use of laboratory grinding tests, mathematical grinding models, and characterization of resultant material surface condition. More specifically, this Phase 1 final report provides a technical overview of High-Speed, Low-Damage (HSLD) ceramic grinding and the conditions necessary to achieve the small grain depths of cut necessary for low damage grinding while operating at relatively high material removal rates. Particular issues addressed include determining effects of wheel speed and material removal rate on resulting mode of material removal (ductile or brittle fracture), limiting grinding forces, calculation of approximate grinding zone temperatures developed during HSLD grinding, and developing the experimental systems necessary for determining HSLD grinding energy partition relationships. In addition, practical considerations for production utilization of the HSLD process are also discussed.

  3. High speed low damage grinding of advanced ceramics - Phase II Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Kovach, J.A.; Malkin, S.

    2000-02-01

    In the manufacture of structural ceramic components, grinding costs can comprise up to 80% of the entire manufacturing cost. As a result, one of the most challenging tasks faced by manufacturing process engineers is the development of a ceramic finishing process to maximize part throughput while minimizing costs and associated scrap levels. The efforts summarized in this report represent the second phase of a program whose overall objective was to develop a single-step, roughing-finishing process suitable for producing high-quality silicon nitride parts at high material removal rates and at substantially lower cost than traditional, multi-stage grinding processes. More specifically, this report provides a technical overview of High-Speed, Low-Damage (HSLD) ceramic grinding which employs elevated wheel speeds to achieve the small grain depths of cut necessary for low-damage grinding while operating at relatively high material removal rates. The study employed the combined use of laboratory grinding tests, mathematical grinding models, and characterization of the resultant surface condition. A single-step, roughing-finishing process operating at high removal rates was developed and demonstrated.

  4. Technological Advancements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennedy, Mike

    2010-01-01

    The influx of technology has brought significant improvements to school facilities. Many of those advancements can be found in classrooms, but when students head down the hall to use the washrooms, they are likely to find a host of technological innovations that have improved conditions in that part of the building. This article describes modern…

  5. Applications of endothermic research technology to the high speed civil transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glickstein, M. R.; Spadaccini, L. J.

    1997-01-01

    The success of strategies for controlling emissions and enhancing performance in High Speed Research applications may be increased by more effective utilization of the heat sink afforded by the fuel in the vehicle thermal management system. This study quantifies the potential benefits associated with the use of supercritical preheating and endothermic cracking of jet fuel prior to combustion to enhance the thermal management capabilities of the propulsion systems in the High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT). A fuel-cooled thermal management system, consisting of plate-fin heat exchangers and a small auxiliary compressor, is defined for the HSCT, integrated with the engine, and an assessment of the effect on engine performance, weight, and operating cost is performed. The analysis indicates significant savings due a projected improvement in fuel economy, and the potential for additional benefit if the cycle is modified to take full advantage of all the heat sink available in the fuel.

  6. Applications of Endothermic Reaction Technology to the High Speed Civil Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glickstein, Marvin R.; Spadaccini, Louis J.

    1998-01-01

    The success of strategies for controlling emissions and enhancing performance in High Speed Research applications may be Increased by more effective utilization of the heat sink afforded by the fuel in the vehicle thermal management system. This study quantifies the potential benefits associated with the use of supercritical preheating and endothermic cracking of let fuel prior to combustion to enhance the thermal management capabilities of the propulsion systems in the High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT). A fuel-cooled thermal management system, consisting of plate-fin heat exchangers and a small auxiliary compressor, is defined for the HSCT, Integrated with the engine, and an assessment of the effect on engine performance, weight, and operating cost is performed. The analysis indicates significant savings due a projected improvement in fuel economy, and the potential for additional benefit if the cycle is modified to take full advantage of all the heat sink available in the fuel.

  7. High-speed semiconductor devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sze, S. M.

    An introduction to the physical principles and operational characteristics of high-speed semiconductor devices is presented. Consideration is given to materials and technologies for high-speed devices, device building blocks, the submicron MOSFET, homogeneous field-effect transistors, and heterostructure field-effect transistors. Also considered are quantum-effect devices, microwave diodes, and high-speed photonic devices.

  8. A numerical technique for calculation of the noise of high-speed propellers with advanced blade geometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nystrom, P. A.; Farassat, F.

    1980-01-01

    A numerical technique and computer program were developed for the prediction of the noise of propellers with advanced geometry. The blade upper and lower surfaces are described by a curvilinear coordinate system, which was also used to divide the blade surfaces into panels. Two different acoustic formulations in the time domain were used to improve the speed and efficiency of the noise calculations: an acoustic formualtion with the Doppler factor singularity for panels moving at subsonic speeds and the collapsing sphere formulation for panels moving at transonic or supersonic speeds. This second formulation involves a sphere which is centered at the observer position and whose radius decreases at the speed of sound. The acoustic equation consisted of integrals over the curve of intersection for both the sphere and the panels on the blade. Algorithms used in some parts of the computer program are discussed. Comparisons with measured acoustic data for two model high speed propellers with advanced geometry are also presented.

  9. Long-range high-speed visible light communication system over 100-m outdoor transmission utilizing receiver diversity technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yiguang; Huang, Xingxing; Shi, Jianyang; Wang, Yuan-quan; Chi, Nan

    2016-05-01

    Visible light communication (VLC) has no doubt become a promising candidate for future wireless communications due to the increasing trends in the usage of light-emitting diodes (LEDs). In addition to indoor high-speed wireless access and positioning applications, VLC usage in outdoor scenarios, such as vehicle networks and intelligent transportation systems, are also attracting significant interest. However, the complex outdoor environment and ambient noise are the key challenges for long-range high-speed VLC outdoor applications. To improve system performance and transmission distance, we propose to use receiver diversity technology in an outdoor VLC system. Maximal ratio combining-based receiver diversity technology is utilized in two receivers to achieve the maximal signal-to-noise ratio. A 400-Mb/s VLC transmission using a phosphor-based white LED and a 1-Gb/s wavelength division multiplexing VLC transmission using a red-green-blue LED are both successfully achieved over a 100-m outdoor distance with the bit error rate below the 7% forward error correction limit of 3.8×10-3. To the best of our knowledge, this is the highest data rate at 100-m outdoor VLC transmission ever achieved. The experimental results clearly prove the benefit and feasibility of receiver diversity technology for long-range high-speed outdoor VLC systems.

  10. Improving the critical speeds of high-speed trains using magnetorheological technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Shuaishuai; Deng, Huaxia; Li, Weihua; Du, Haiping; Qing Ni, Yi; Zhang, Jin; Yang, Jian

    2013-11-01

    With the rapid development of high-speed railways, vibration control for maintaining stability, passenger comfort, and safety has become an important area of research. In order to investigate the mechanism of train vibration, the critical speeds of various DOFs with respect to suspension stiffness and damping are first calculated and analyzed based on its dynamic equations. Then, the sensitivity of the critical speed is studied by analyzing the influence of different suspension parameters. On the basis of these analyses, a conclusion is drawn that secondary lateral damping is the most sensitive suspension damper. Subsequently, the secondary lateral dampers are replaced with magnetorheological fluid (MRF) dampers. Finally, a high-speed train model with MRF dampers is simulated by a combined ADAMS and MATLAB simulation and tested in a roller rig test platform to investigate the mechanism of how the MRF damper affects the train’s stability and critical speed. The results show that the semi-active suspension installed with MRF dampers substantially improves the stability and critical speed of the train.

  11. Dynamic Fragmentation of an Advanced Ceramic during High-Speed Impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hogan, James; Farbaniec, Lukasz; Mallick, Debjoy; McCauley, James W.; Ramesh, K. T.; Hopkins Extreme Materials Institute Collaboration

    2015-06-01

    The development of the next generation of light-weight protection materials requires an improved understanding of impact-induced fragmentation of advanced ceramics. We investigate the impact behavior of a hot-pressed boron carbide for impact velocities between 200 and 1000 m/s, and study the response in the context of the material properties, microstructure, and boundary conditions (e.g., confinement). We use measurements of fragment size and shapes to inform us about the mechanisms that are activated during dynamic failure. The fragment measurements are linked with physical evidence of failure processes obtained using scanning electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy.

  12. High speed civil transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcknight, R. L.

    1992-01-01

    The design requirements of the High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) are discussed. The following design concerns are presented: (1) environmental impact (emissions and noise); (2) critical components (the high temperature combustor and the lightweight exhaust nozzle); and (3) advanced materials (high temperature ceramic matrix composites (CMC's)/intermetallic matrix composites (IMC's)/metal matrix composites (MMC's)).

  13. Orbit transfer vehicle engine technology program. Task B-6 high speed turbopump bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Bearing types were evaluated for use on the Orbit Transfer Vehicle (OTV) high pressure fuel pump. The high speed, high load, and long bearing life requirements dictated selection of hydrostatic bearings as the logical candidate for this engine. Design and fabrication of a bearing tester to evaluate these cryogenic hydrostatic bearings was then conducted. Detailed analysis, evaluation of bearing materials, and design of the hydrostatic bearings were completed resulting in fabrication of Carbon P5N and Kentanium hydrostatic bearings. Rotordynamic analyses determined the exact bearing geometry chosen. Instrumentation was evaluated and data acquisition methods were determined for monitoring shaft motion up to speeds in excess of 200,000 RPM in a cryogenic atmosphere. Fabrication of all hardware was completed, but assembly and testing was conducted outside of this contract.

  14. Non-contact Real-time heart rate measurements based on high speed circuit technology research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jizhe; Liu, Xiaohua; Kong, Lingqin; Shi, Cong; Liu, Ming; Hui, Mei; Dong, Liquan; Zhao, Yuejin

    2015-08-01

    In recent years, morbidity and mortality of the cardiovascular or cerebrovascular disease, which threaten human health greatly, increased year by year. Heart rate is an important index of these diseases. To address this status, the paper puts forward a kind of simple structure, easy operation, suitable for large populations of daily monitoring non-contact heart rate measurement. In the method we use imaging equipment video sensitive areas. The changes of light intensity reflected through the image grayscale average. The light change is caused by changes in blood volume. We video the people face which include the sensitive areas (ROI), and use high-speed processing circuit to save the video as AVI format into memory. After processing the whole video of a period of time, we draw curve of each color channel with frame number as horizontal axis. Then get heart rate from the curve. We use independent component analysis (ICA) to restrain noise of sports interference, realized the accurate extraction of heart rate signal under the motion state. We design an algorithm, based on high-speed processing circuit, for face recognition and tracking to automatically get face region. We do grayscale average processing to the recognized image, get RGB three grayscale curves, and extract a clearer pulse wave curves through independent component analysis, and then we get the heart rate under the motion state. At last, by means of compare our system with Fingertip Pulse Oximeter, result show the system can realize a more accurate measurement, the error is less than 3 pats per minute.

  15. Maglev vehicles and superconductor technology: Integration of high-speed ground transportation into the air travel system

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, L.R.; Rote, D.M.; Hull, J.R.; Coffey, H.T.; Daley, J.G.; Giese, R.F.

    1989-04-01

    This study was undertaken to (1) evaluate the potential contribution of high-temperature superconductors (HTSCs) to the technical and economic feasibility of magnetically levitated (maglev) vehicles, (2) determine the status of maglev transportation research in the United States and abroad, (3) identify the likelihood of a significant transportation market for high-speed maglev vehicles, and (4) provide a preliminary assessment of the potential energy and economic benefits of maglev systems. HTSCs should be considered as an enhancing, rather than an enabling, development for maglev transportation because they should improve reliability and reduce energy and maintenance costs. Superconducting maglev transportation technologies were developed in the United States in the late 1960s and early 1970s. Federal support was withdrawn in 1975, but major maglev transportation programs were continued in Japan and West Germany, where full-scale prototypes now carry passengers at speeds of 250 mi/h in demonstration runs. Maglev systems are generally viewed as very-high-speed train systems, but this study shows that the potential market for maglev technology as a train system, e.g., from one downtown to another, is limited. Rather, aircraft and maglev vehicles should be seen as complementing rather than competing transportation systems. If maglev systems were integrated into major hub airport operations, they could become economical in many relatively high-density US corridors. Air traffic congestion and associated noise and pollutant emissions around airports would also be reduced. 68 refs., 26 figs., 16 tabs.

  16. Rotorcraft technology at Boeing Vertol: Recent advances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaw, John; Dadone, Leo; Wiesner, Robert

    1988-01-01

    An overview is presented of key accomplishments in the rotorcraft development at Boeing Vertol. Projects of particular significance: high speed rotor development and the Model 360 Advanced Technology Helicopter. Areas addressed in the overview are: advanced rotors with reduced noise and vibration, 3-D aerodynamic modeling, flight control and avionics, active control, automated diagnostics and prognostics, composite structures, and drive systems.

  17. Unstructured Grid Viscous Flow Simulation Over High-Speed Research Technology Concept Airplane at High-Lift Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghaffari, Farhad

    1999-01-01

    Numerical viscous solutions based on an unstructured grid methodology are presented for a candidate high-speed civil transport configuration, designated as the Technology Concept Airplane (TCA), within the High-Speed Research (HSR) program. The numerical results are obtained on a representative TCA high-lift configuration that consisted of the fuselage and the wing, with deflected full-span leading-edge and trailing-edge flaps. Typical on-and off-surface flow structures, computed at high-lift conditions appropriate for the takeoff and landing, indicated features that are generally plausible. Reasonable surface pressure correlations between the numerical results and the experimental data are obtained at free-stream Mach number M(sub infinity) = 0.25 and Reynolds number based on bar-c R(sub c) = 8 x 10(exp 6) for moderate angles of attack of 9.7 deg. and 13.5 deg. However, above and below this angle-of-attack range, the correlation between computed and measured pressure distributions starts to deteriorate over the examined angle-of-attack range. The predicted longitudinal aerodynamic characteristics are shown to correlate very well with existing experimental data across the examined angle-of-attack range. An excellent agreement is also obtained between the predicted lift-to-drag ratio and the experimental data over the examined range of flow conditions.

  18. Markets for high-speed intercity maglev technology: A systems analysis approach

    SciTech Connect

    Coffey, H.T.; Johnson, L.R.

    1989-06-01

    The technical feasibility of constructing and operating maglev vehicles at speeds of 250--300 mph has been amply demonstrated and is accepted here as a reality. In this paper, the markets into which passenger- or freight-carrying systems based on this technology can be introduced with economic reasonableness are evaluated. The characteristics and capabilities (particularly the capacity and comparative costs) of the system are enumerated and discussed from the points of view of the passengers, the airlines (as potential operators), and the traveling public. It is shown that if the system is integrated into the existing transportation system as a supplement to the airline system, it meets the criteria required for the introduction of any new product or service into a market. The financial enhancement of the maglev system resulting from the use of trunk routes with feeder lines diverging to various ultimate destinations becomes an extremely important consideration. 15 refs., 5 figs., 7 tabs.

  19. NASA-UVa light aerospace alloy and structures technology program supplement: Aluminum-based materials for high speed aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starke, E. A., Jr. (Editor)

    1995-01-01

    This report on the NASA-UVa light aerospace alloy and structure technology program supplement: Aluminum-Based Materials for High Speed Aircraft covers the period from July 1, 1992. The objective of the research is to develop aluminum alloys and aluminum matrix composites for the airframe which can efficiently perform in the HSCT environment for periods as long as 60,000 hours (certification for 120,000 hours) and, at the same time, meet the cost and weight requirements for an economically viable aircraft. Current industry baselines focus on flight at Mach 2.4. The research covers four major materials systems: (1) Ingot metallurgy 2XXX, 6XXX, and 8XXX alloys, (2) Powder metallurgy 2XXX alloys, (3) Rapidly solidified, dispersion strengthened Al-Fe-X alloys, and (4) Discontinuously reinforced metal matrix composites. There are ten major tasks in the program which also include evaluation and trade-off studies by Boeing and Douglas aircraft companies.

  20. Aircraft Emission Scenarios Projected in Year 2015 for the NASA Technology Concept Aircraft (TCA) High Speed Civil Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baughcum, Steven L.; Henderson, Stephen C.

    1998-01-01

    This report describes the development of a three-dimensional database of aircraft fuel burn and emissions (fuel burned, NOx, CO, and hydrocarbons) from projected fleets of high speed civil transports (HSCTs) on a universal airline network. Inventories for 500 and 1000 HSCT fleets, as well as the concurrent subsonic fleets, were calculated. The HSCT scenarios are calculated using the NASA technology concept airplane (TCA) and update an earlier report. These emissions inventories are available for use by atmospheric scientists conducting the Atmospheric Effects of Stratospheric Aircraft (AESA) modeling studies. Fuel burned and emissions of nitrogen oxides (NOx as NO2), carbon monoxide, and hydrocarbons have been calculated on a 1 degree latitude x 1 degree longitude x 1 kilometer pressure altitude grid and delivered to NASA as electronic files.

  1. Several high speed multiplier theory for low-light-level technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiancang; Zhang, Liuqiang; Xiao, Haijun; Zhao, Jun

    2013-08-01

    Low-light-level image intensifier images weak optical signal through electron multiplication process in Low-light-level night vision device, the key technology of intensifier is electron multiplier, the thesis put forward three kinds of electron multiplication methods. One is that the electron multiplier device is the avalanche transistor made use of the semiconductor material, the thesis analyses the photoelectric conversion theory and rapid multiplication avalanche breakdown conditions with PN junction of the avalanche diode under reverse bias by light excitation; the second approach is to use gas discharge theory to explains the electron multiplication process in the low-pressure gas and high-pressure gas discharging breakdown by photon excitation; the third method is photoelectron multiplication gain theory,in the microchannel plate (MCP) as the second generation image intensifier in vacuum condition and the applied voltage. The thesis analyses that the electronic gain efficiency is better than the other two methods ,and proposes the avalanche transistor can be key device of image intensifier.

  2. The Beltsville sperm sexing technology: high-speed sperm sorting gives improved sperm output for in vitro fertilization and AI.

    PubMed

    Johnson, L A; Welch, G R; Rens, W

    1999-01-01

    The Beltsville sperm sexing technology is currently the only effective means of altering the sex ratio of offspring in livestock. The method is based on the flow-cytometric separation of X- and Y-chromosome-bearing sperm based on X/Y DNA content difference. It is an effective means of producing progeny of predetermined sex in cattle, swine, sheep, and laboratory animals. The method involves treating sperm with a DNA-binding fluorochrome, Hoechst 33342, and flow-cytometrically sorting them into separate X and Y populations that can subsequently be used for surgical intratubal or intrauterine insemination, deep-uterine insemination, regular artificial insemination in some cases, in vitro fertilization to produce sexed embryos for transfer, and intracytoplasmic sperm injection of ova. Skewed sex ratios of 85 to 95% of one sex or the other have been repeatably achieved in most species. The method has been used worldwide to produce several hundred morphologically normal animal offspring of the predicted sex. It has also been validated in the laboratory using DNA reanalysis of the sorted sperm populations and by fluorescence in situ hybridization and PCR of individual sperm. We developed a new orienting nozzle that we have fitted to both conventional and high-speed cell sorters that have been modified for sperm sorting. Recently we completed the adaptation of the new orienting nozzle to a Cytomation MoFlo high-speed cell sorter modified for sperm. This adaptation of the nozzle has increased the overall production rate of sorted X and Y sperm from about .35 million/h to 5 or 6 million sperm/h (each population). Calves have been born from cows artificially inseminated using conventional technique and sexed sperm. In addition, numerous litters of pigs have been born after transfer of embryos produced from X or Y sorted sperm. PMID:15526798

  3. High-Speed Photography 101

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidhazy, Andrew

    1997-05-01

    This paper describes the contents of a unique introductory, applications oriented, high speed photography course offered to Imaging and Photographic Technology majors at the Rochester Institute of Technology. The course covers the theory and practice of photographic systems designed to permit analysis of events of very short duration. Included are operational characteristics of intermittent and rotating prism cameras, rotating mirror and drum cameras, synchronization systems and timing controls and high speed flash and stroboscopic systems, and high speed video recording. Students gain basic experience not only in the use of fundamental equipment but also in proper planning, set-up and introductory data reduction techniques through a series of practical experiments.

  4. High speed handpieces.

    PubMed

    Bhandary, Nayan; Desai, Asavari; Shetty, Y Bharath

    2014-02-01

    High speed instruments are versatile instruments used by clinicians of all specialties of dentistry. It is important for clinicians to understand the types of high speed handpieces available and the mechanism of working. The centers for disease control and prevention have issued guidelines time and again for disinfection and sterilization of high speed handpieces. This article presents the recent developments in the design of the high speed handpieces. With a view to prevent hospital associated infections significant importance has been given to disinfection, sterilization & maintenance of high speed handpieces. How to cite the article: Bhandary N, Desai A, Shetty YB. High speed handpieces. J Int Oral Health 2014;6(1):130-2.

  5. NASA-UVa light aerospace alloy and structure technology program supplement: Aluminum-based materials for high speed aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starke, E. A., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    This report on the NASA-UVa Light Aerospace Alloy and Structure Technology Program Supplement: Aluminum-Based Materials for High Speed Aircraft covers the period from January 1, 1992 to June 30, 1992. The objective of the research is to develop aluminum alloys and aluminum matrix composites for the airframe which can efficiently perform in the HSCT environment for periods as long as 60,000 hours (certification for 120,000 hours) and, at the same time, meet the cost and weight requirements for an economically viable aircraft. Current industry baselines focus on flight at Mach 2.4. The research covers four major materials systems: (1) ingot metallurgy 2XXX, 6XXX, and 8XXX alloys, (2) powder metallurgy 2XXX alloys, (3) rapidly solidified, dispersion strengthened Al-Fe-X alloys, and (4) discontinuously reinforced metal matrix composites. There are ten major tasks in the program which also include evaluation and trade-off studies by Boeing and Douglas aircraft companies.

  6. Guidelines for Design and Test of a Built-In Self Test (BIST) Circuit For Space Radiation Studies of High-Speed IC Technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carts, M. A.; Marshall, P. W.; Reed, R.; Curie, S.; Randall, B.; LaBel, K.; Gilbert, B.; Daniel, E.

    2006-01-01

    Serial Bit Error Rate Testing under radiation to characterize single particle induced errors in high-speed IC technologies generally involves specialized test equipment common to the telecommunications industry. As bit rates increase, testing is complicated by the rapidly increasing cost of equipment able to test at-speed. Furthermore as rates extend into the tens of billions of bits per second test equipment ceases to be broadband, a distinct disadvantage for exploring SEE mechanisms in the target technologies. In this presentation the authors detail the testing accomplished in the CREST project and apply the knowledge gained to establish a set of guidelines suitable for designing arbitrarily high speed radiation effects tests.

  7. High speed civil transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogardus, Scott; Loper, Brent; Nauman, Chris; Page, Jeff; Parris, Rusty; Steinbach, Greg

    1990-01-01

    The design process of the High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) combines existing technology with the expectation of future technology to create a Mach 3.0 transport. The HSCT was designed to have a range in excess of 6000 nautical miles and carry up to 300 passengers. This range will allow the HSCT to service the economically expanding Pacific Basin region. Effort was made in the design to enable the aircraft to use conventional airports with standard 12,000 foot runways. With a takeoff thrust of 250,000 pounds, the four supersonic through-flow engines will accelerate the HSCT to a cruise speed of Mach 3.0. The 679,000 pound (at takeoff) HSCT is designed to cruise at an altitude of 70,000 feet, flying above most atmospheric disturbances.

  8. Mechanical-plowing-based high-speed patterning on hard material via advanced-control and ultrasonic probe vibration

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zhihua; Zou, Qingze; Tan, Jun; Jiang, Wei

    2013-11-15

    In this paper, we present a high-speed direct pattern fabrication on hard materials (e.g., a tungsten-coated quartz substrate) via mechanical plowing. Compared to other probe-based nanolithography techniques based on chemical- and/or physical-reactions (e.g., the Dip-pen technique), mechanical plowing is meritorious for its low cost, ease of process control, and capability of working with a wide variety of materials beyond conductive and/or soft materials. However, direct patterning on hard material faces two daunting challenges. First, the patterning throughput is ultimately hindered by the “writing” (plowing) speed, which, in turn, is limited by the adverse effects that can be excited/induced during high-speed, and/or large-range plowing, including the vibrational dynamics of the actuation system (the piezoelectric actuator, the cantilever, and the mechanical fixture connecting the cantilever to the actuator), the dynamic cross-axis coupling between different axes of motion, and the hysteresis and the drift effects related to the piezoelectric actuators. Secondly, it is very challenging to directly pattern on ultra-hard materials via plowing. Even with a diamond probe, the line depth of the pattern via continuous plowing on ultra-hard materials such as tungsten, is still rather small (<0.5 nm), particularly when the “writing” speed becomes high. To overcome these two challenges, we propose to utilize a novel iterative learning control technique to achieve precision tracking of the desired pattern during high-speed, large-range plowing, and introduce ultrasonic vibration of the probe in the normal (vertical) direction during the plowing process to enable direct patterning on ultra hard materials. The proposed approach was implemented to directly fabricate patterns on a mask with tungsten coating and quartz substrate. The experimental results demonstrated that a large-size pattern of four grooves (20 μm in length with 300 nm spacing between lines) can be

  9. High speed civil transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    This report discusses the design and marketability of a next generation supersonic transport. Apogee Aeronautics Corporation has designated its High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT): Supercruiser HS-8. Since the beginning of the Concorde era, the general consensus has been that the proper time for the introduction of a next generation Supersonic Transport (SST) would depend upon the technical advances made in the areas of propulsion (reduction in emissions) and material composites (stronger, lighter materials). It is believed by many in the aerospace industry that these beforementioned technical advances lie on the horizon. With this being the case, this is the proper time to begin the design phase for the next generation HSCT. The design objective for a HSCT was to develop an aircraft that would be capable of transporting at least 250 passengers with baggage at a distance of 5500 nmi. The supersonic Mach number is currently unspecified. In addition, the design had to be marketable, cost effective, and certifiable. To achieve this goal, technical advances in the current SST's must be made, especially in the areas of aerodynamics and propulsion. As a result of these required aerodynamic advances, several different supersonic design concepts were reviewed.

  10. Novel High-Speed High Pressure Torsion Technology for Obtaining Fe-Mn-Si-Cr Shape Memory Alloy Active Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurău, Gheorghe; Gurău, Carmela; Potecaşu, Octavian; Alexandru, Petrică; Bujoreanu, Leandru-Gheorghe

    2014-07-01

    This paper introduces an adapted high-speed high pressure torsion (HS-HPT) method of severe plastic deformation applied for obtaining shape memory alloy (SMA) active elements with revolution symmetry, able to develop axial displacement/force. Billets with circular crown forms were cut from Fe-28Mn-6Si-5Cr (mass%) SMA ingots and, by means of HS-HPT technology, were directly turned into modules, with truncated cone shell configurations. This process was performed, during time intervals of seconds, under the effect of high pressure (up to 1 GPa) cumulated with high rotation speed (hundreds of rotations per minute) applied on the active surfaces of sintered-carbide anvils, specially designed for this purpose. Due to pressure and friction, generated by rotation, the entire sample volume is heated and simultaneously deformed to final shape. During the process, microstructure fragmentation occurred enabling to obtain (ultra)fine grains and nanocrystalline areas, in spite of the heat developed by friction, which was removed by conduction at the contact surface between sample and anvils, before the occurrence of any recrystallization phenomena. When compressed between flat surfaces, the truncated cone modules developed a superelastic-like response, unique among Fe -Mn-Si base SMAs and, when heated in compressed state, they were able to develop either axial strokes or recovery forces by either free or constrained recovery shape memory effect (SME), respectively. By means of optical (OM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) marked structural changes caused by HT-HPT were revealed, along with fine and ultrafine crystalline grains. The presence of stress-induced ɛ-hexagonal close-packed ( hcp) martensite, together with nanocrystalline areas were confirmed by x-ray diffraction.

  11. Test/QA plan for the validation of the verification protocol for high speed pesticide spray drift reduction technologies for row and field crops

    EPA Science Inventory

    This test/QA plan for evaluation the generic test protocol for high speed wind tunnel, representing aerial application, pesticide spray drift reduction technologies (DRT) for row and field crops is in conformance with EPA Requirements for Quality Assurance Project Plans (EPA QA/R...

  12. High speed handpieces

    PubMed Central

    Bhandary, Nayan; Desai, Asavari; Shetty, Y Bharath

    2014-01-01

    High speed instruments are versatile instruments used by clinicians of all specialties of dentistry. It is important for clinicians to understand the types of high speed handpieces available and the mechanism of working. The centers for disease control and prevention have issued guidelines time and again for disinfection and sterilization of high speed handpieces. This article presents the recent developments in the design of the high speed handpieces. With a view to prevent hospital associated infections significant importance has been given to disinfection, sterilization & maintenance of high speed handpieces. How to cite the article: Bhandary N, Desai A, Shetty YB. High speed handpieces. J Int Oral Health 2014;6(1):130-2. PMID:24653618

  13. Safety of high speed guided ground transportation systems: Comparison of magnetic and electric fields of conventional and advanced electrified transportation systems. Final report, September 1992-March 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Dietrich, F.M.; Feero, W.E.; Jacobs, W.L.

    1993-08-01

    Concerns exist regarding the potential safety, environmental and health effects on the public and on transportation workers due to electrification along new or existing rail corridors, and to proposed maglev and high speed rail operations. Therefore, the characterization of electric and magnetic fields (EMF) produced by both steady (dc) and alternating currents (ac) at power frequency (50 Hz in Europe and 60 Hz in the U.S.) and above, in the Extreme Low Frequency (ELF) range (3-3000 Hz) is of interest. The report summarizes and compares the results of a survey of EMF characteristics (spatial, temporal and frequency bands) for representative conventional railroad and transit and advanced high-speed systems including: the German TR-07 maglev system; the Amtrak Northeast Corridor (NEC) and North Jersey Transit (NJT) trains; the Washington, DC Metrorail (WMATA) and the Boston, MA (MBTA) transit systems; and the French TGV-A high speed rail system. This comprehensive comparative EMF survey produced both detailed data and statistical summaries of EMF profiles, and their variability in time and space. EMF ELF levels for WMATA are also compared to those produced by common environmental sources at home, work, and under power lines, but have specific frequency signatures.

  14. ADVANCED RECIPROCATING COMPRESSION TECHNOLOGY (ARCT)

    SciTech Connect

    Danny M. Deffenbaugh; Klaus Brun; Ralph E. Harris; J. Pete Harrell; Robert J. Mckee; J. Jeffrey Moore; Steven J. Svedeman; Anthony J. Smalley; Eugene L. Broerman; Robert A Hart; Marybeth G. Nored; Ryan S. Gernentz; Shane P. Siebenaler

    2005-12-01

    The U.S. natural gas pipeline industry is facing the twin challenges of increased flexibility and capacity expansion. To meet these challenges, the industry requires improved choices in gas compression to address new construction and enhancement of the currently installed infrastructure. The current fleet of installed reciprocating compression is primarily slow-speed integral machines. Most new reciprocating compression is and will be large, high-speed separable units. The major challenges with the fleet of slow-speed integral machines are: limited flexibility and a large range in performance. In an attempt to increase flexibility, many operators are choosing to single-act cylinders, which are causing reduced reliability and integrity. While the best performing units in the fleet exhibit thermal efficiencies between 90% and 92%, the low performers are running down to 50% with the mean at about 80%. The major cause for this large disparity is due to installation losses in the pulsation control system. In the better performers, the losses are about evenly split between installation losses and valve losses. The major challenges for high-speed machines are: cylinder nozzle pulsations, mechanical vibrations due to cylinder stretch, short valve life, and low thermal performance. To shift nozzle pulsation to higher orders, nozzles are shortened, and to dampen the amplitudes, orifices are added. The shortened nozzles result in mechanical coupling with the cylinder, thereby, causing increased vibration due to the cylinder stretch mode. Valve life is even shorter than for slow speeds and can be on the order of a few months. The thermal efficiency is 10% to 15% lower than slow-speed equipment with the best performance in the 75% to 80% range. The goal of this advanced reciprocating compression program is to develop the technology for both high speed and low speed compression that will expand unit flexibility, increase thermal efficiency, and increase reliability and integrity

  15. The Future Of High Speed Photography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courtney-Pratt, J. S.

    1987-09-01

    The variety, range and precision of methods available for photographic recording of fast phenomena have been increasing steadily. The capabilities of the techniques are considered, classifying the methods by the kind of record obtained. descriptions of experimental techniques and apparatus, and illustrations, are given in earlier articles: "A Review of the Methods of High-Speed Photography," Reports on Progress in Physics in 1957; "Advances in High-Speed Photography 1957-1972," Proceedings of the Tenth International Congress on High-Speed Photography and also JSMPTE 82, pp. 167-175 (1973); "Advances in High-Speed Photograph, updated to 1983 in the Proceedings of SPIE Volume 427.

  16. A rotor technology assessment of the advancing blade concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pleasants, W. A.

    1983-01-01

    A rotor technology assessment of the Advancing Blade Concept (ABC) was conducted in support of a preliminary design study. The analytical methodology modifications and inputs, the correlation, and the results of the assessment are documented. The primary emphasis was on the high-speed forward flight performance of the rotor. The correlation data base included both the wind tunnel and the flight test results. An advanced ABC rotor design was examined; the suitability of the ABC for a particular mission was not considered. The objective of this technology assessment was to provide estimates of the performance potential of an advanced ABC rotor designed for high speed forward flight.

  17. High-Speed Photography

    SciTech Connect

    Paisley, D.L.; Schelev, M.Y.

    1998-08-01

    The applications of high-speed photography to a diverse set of subjects including inertial confinement fusion, laser surgical procedures, communications, automotive airbags, lightning etc. are briefly discussed. (AIP) {copyright} {ital 1998 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers.}

  18. High Speed Research Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Robert E.; Corsiglia, Victor R.; Schmitz, Frederic H. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    An overview of the NASA High Speed Research Program will be presented from a NASA Headquarters perspective. The presentation will include the objectives of the program and an outline of major programmatic issues.

  19. Florida's high-speed rail and maglev projects

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, C.H. )

    1990-04-01

    The author discusses how the State of Florida has taken an innovative approach to meeting its future needs for an efficient transportation system that will complement its extensive highway network and aviation system. This new concept is a statewide, high-speed, fixed guideway ground transportation system. The technologies will include advanced electrified wheels-on-rail trains and magnetically levitated and propelled vehicles.

  20. Proceedings: High-speed rail and maglev workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-04-01

    On October 30 and 31, 1991, the EPRI Public and Advanced Transportation Program sponsored a workshop on high-speed rail (HSR) and maglev. The purpose of this workshop was to provide utility managers with increased knowledge about these technologies, public policy regarding them, and their potential costs and benefits to utilities, including induced economic development. With this information, utilities should be better prepared to make decisions related to the development of these high speed intercity passenger options in their service areas. A main goal, achieved by the workshop, was to provide EPRI and its member utilities with ideas and information for developing an assessment and research agenda on these technologies.

  1. Enantioseparation of racemic trans-δ-viniferin using high speed counter-current chromatography based on induced circular dichroism technology.

    PubMed

    Han, Chao; Xu, Jinfang; Wang, Xiaobing; Xu, Xiaoming; Luo, Jianguang; Kong, Lingyi

    2014-01-10

    A preparative chiral high speed counter-current chromatography (HSCCC) method based on induced circular dichroism (ICD) spectrum was developed to separate trans-δ-viniferin (TVN) enantiomers successfully. The important parameters for the chiral HSCCC separation process, including the type of chiral selector (CS), the concentration of chiral selector and the equilibrium temperature, were optimized using induced circular dichroism spectrum. The final separation procedure was established with a biphasic solvent system composed of n-hexane-ethyl acetate-25 mmol L(-1) hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin aqueous solution (5:5:10, v/v/v) in the head-to-tail elution mode at 5 °C. Under optimum chiral HSCCC separation conditions, 8.2mg of (7S, 8S)-TVN (1) and 9.4 mg of (7R, 8R)-TVN (2) were successfully separated from 20mg TVN enantiomers with the purity of 99.51% and 99.36%, respectively.

  2. Progress Toward Meeting the Propulsion Technology Challenges for a 21st Century High-Speed Civil Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaw, Robert J.; Koops, Leigh; Hines, Richard

    1997-01-01

    Ongoing NASA-funded and privately funded studies continue to indicate that an opportunity exists for a second generation supersonic commercial airliner, or High-Speed Civil Transport (HSCT), to become a key part of the 21st century international air transportation system. Long distance air travel is projected to increase at about 5 percent per annum over the next two decades. This projection suggests that by the year 2015, more than 600,000 passengers per day will be traveling long distances, predominantly over water. These routes would be among the most desirable for an HSCT as part of the international air transportation system. Beyond the year 2000, this portion of the air transportation market is projected to be the fastest growing segment.

  3. Wind-Tunnel Results of Advanced High-Speed Propellers at Takeoff, Climb, and Landing Mach Numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stefko, George L.; Jeracki, Robert J.

    1985-01-01

    Low-speed wind-tunnel performance tests of two advanced propellers have been completed at the NASA Lewis Research Center as part of the NASA Advanced Turboprop Program. The 62.2 cm (24.5 in.) diameter adjustable-pitch models were tested at Mach numbers typical of takeoff, initial climbout, and landing speeds (i.e., from Mach 0.10 to 0.34) at zero angle of attack in the NASA Lewis 10 by 10 Foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel. Both models had eight blades and a cruise-design-point operating condition of Mach 0.80, and 10.668 km (35,000 ft) I.S.A. altitude, a 243.8 m/s (800 ft/sec) tip speed, and a high power loading of 301 kW/sq m (37.5 shp/sq ft). Each model had its own integrally designed area-ruled spinner, but used the same specially contoured nacelle. These features reduced blade-section Mach numbers and relieved blade-root choking at the cruise condition. No adverse or unusual low-speed operating conditions were found during the test with either the straight blade SR-2 or the 45 deg swept SR-3 propeller. Typical efficiencies of the straight and 45 deg swept propellers were 50.2 and 54.9 percent, respectively, at a takeoff condition of Mach 0.20 and 53.7 and 59.1 percent, respectively, at a climb condition of Mach 0.34.

  4. Advanced Manufacturing Technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fikes, John

    2016-01-01

    Advanced Manufacturing Technologies (AMT) is developing and maturing innovative and advanced manufacturing technologies that will enable more capable and lower-cost spacecraft, launch vehicles and infrastructure to enable exploration missions. The technologies will utilize cutting edge materials and emerging capabilities including metallic processes, additive manufacturing, composites, and digital manufacturing. The AMT project supports the National Manufacturing Initiative involving collaboration with other government agencies.

  5. Study of high-speed civil transports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    A systems study to identify the economic potential for a high-speed commercial transport (HSCT) has considered technology, market characteristics, airport infrastructure, and environmental issues. Market forecasts indicate a need for HSCT service in the 2000/2010 time frame conditioned on economic viability and environmental acceptability. Design requirements focused on a 300 passenger, 3 class service, and 6500 nautical mile range based on the accelerated growth of the Pacific region. Compatibility with existing airports was an assumed requirement. Mach numbers between 2 and 25 were examined in conjunction with the appropriate propulsion systems, fuels, structural materials, and thermal management systems. Aircraft productivity was a key parameter with aircraft worth, in comparison to aircraft price, being the airline-oriented figure of merit. Aircraft screening led to determination that Mach 3.2 (TSJF) would have superior characteristics to Mach 5.0 (LNG) and the recommendation that the next generation high-speed commercial transport aircraft use a kerosene fuel. The sensitivity of aircraft performance and economics to environmental constraints (e.g., sonic boom, engine emissions, and airport/community noise) was identified together with key technologies. In all, current technology is not adequate to produce viable HSCTs for the world marketplace. Technology advancements must be accomplished to meet environmental requirements (these requirements are as yet undetermined for sonic boom and engine emissions). High priority is assigned to aircraft gross weight reduction which benefits both economics and environmental aspects. Specific technology requirements are identified and national economic benefits are projected.

  6. Investigation of advanced counterrotation blade configuration concepts for high speed turboprop systems. Task 5: Unsteady counterrotation ducted propfan analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Edward J.; Delaney, Robert A.

    1993-01-01

    The primary objective of this study was the development of a time-marching three-dimensional Euler/Navier-Stokes aerodynamic analysis to predict steady and unsteady compressible transonic flows about ducted and unducted propfan propulsion systems employing multiple blade rows. The computer codes resulting from this study are referred to as ADPAC-AOAR\\CR (Advanced Ducted Propfan Analysis Codes-Angle of Attack Coupled Row). This document is the final report describing the theoretical basis and analytical results from the ADPAC-AOACR codes developed under task 5 of NASA Contract NAS3-25270, Unsteady Counterrotating Ducted Propfan Analysis. The ADPAC-AOACR Program is based on a flexible multiple blocked grid discretization scheme permitting coupled 2-D/3-D mesh block solutions with application to a wide variety of geometries. For convenience, several standard mesh block structures are described for turbomachinery applications. Aerodynamic calculations are based on a four-stage Runge-Kutta time-marching finite volume solution technique with added numerical dissipation. Steady flow predictions are accelerated by a multigrid procedure. Numerical calculations are compared with experimental data for several test cases to demonstrate the utility of this approach for predicting the aerodynamics of modern turbomachinery configurations employing multiple blade rows.

  7. High speed photography, videography, and photonics V; Proceedings of the Meeting, San Diego, CA, Aug. 17-19, 1987

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Howard C. (Editor)

    1988-01-01

    Recent advances in high-speed optical and electrooptic devices are discussed in reviews and reports. Topics examined include data quantification and related technologies, high-speed photographic applications and instruments, flash and cine radiography, and novel ultrafast methods. Also considered are optical streak technology, high-speed videographic and photographic equipment, and X-ray streak cameras. Extensive diagrams, drawings, graphs, sample images, and tables of numerical data are provided.

  8. NASA-UVA Light Aerospace Alloy and Structure Technology Program Supplement: Aluminum-Based Materials for High Speed Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starke, E. A., Jr.

    1997-01-01

    This is the final report of the study "Aluminum-Based Materials for High Speed Aircraft" which had the objectives (1) to identify the most promising aluminum-based materials with respect to major structural use on the HSCT and to further develop those materials and (2) to assess the materials through detailed trade and evaluation studies with respect to their structural efficiency on the HSCT. The research team consisted of ALCOA, Allied-Signal, Boeing, McDonnell Douglas, Reynolds Metals and the University of Virginia. Four classes of aluminum alloys were investigated: (1) I/M 2XXX containing Li and I/M 2XXX without Li, (2) I/M 6XXX, (3) two P/M 2XXX alloys, and (4) two different aluminum-based metal matrix composites (MMC). The I/M alloys were targeted for a Mach 2.0 aircraft and the P/M and MMC alloys were targeted for a Mach 2.4 aircraft. Design studies were conducted using several different concepts including skin/stiffener (baseline), honeycomb sandwich, integrally stiffened and hybrid adaptations (conventionally stiffened thin-sandwich skins). Alloy development included fundamental studies of coarsening behavior, the effect of stress on nucleation and growth of precipitates, and fracture toughness as a function of temperature were an integral part of this program. The details of all phases of the research are described in this final report.

  9. Investigation of Head Injury Mechanisms Using Neutral Density Technology and High-Speed Biplanar X-ray.

    PubMed

    Hardy, W N; Foster, C D; Mason, M J; Yang, K H; King, A I; Tashman, S

    2001-11-01

    The principal focus of this study was the measurement of relative brain motion with respect to the skull using a high-speed, biplanar x-ray system and neutral density targets (NDTs). A suspension fixture was used for testing of inverted, perfused, human cadaver heads. Each specimen was subjected to multiple tests, either struck at rest using a 152-mm-diameter padded impactor face, or stopped against an angled surface from steady-state motion. The impacts were to the frontal and occipital regions. An array of multiple NDTs was implanted in a double-column scheme of 5 and 6 targets, with 10 mm between targets in each column and 80 mm between columns. These columns were implanted in the temporoparietal and occipitoparietal regions. The impacts produced peak resultant accelerations of 10 to 150 g, and peak angular accelerations between 1000 and 8000 rad/s(2). For all but one test, the peak angular speeds ranged from 17 to 22 rad/s. The relative 3D displacements between the skull and the NDTs were analyzed. The localized motions of the brain generally followed loop or figure eight patterns, with peak displacements on the order of +/- 5 mm. These results can be used to further finite-element modeling efforts.

  10. High-speed civil transport study. Summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    A system of study of the potential for a high speed commercial transport aircraft addressed technology, economic, and environmental constraints. Market projections indicated a need for fleets of transport with supersonic or greater cruise speeds by the years 2000 to 2005. The associated design requirements called for a vehicle to carry 250 to 300 passengers over a range of 5000 to 6000 nautical miles. The study was initially unconstrained in terms of vehicle characteristics, such as cruise speed, propulsion systems, fuels, or structural materials. Analyses led to a focus on the most promising vehicle concepts. These were concepts that used a kerosene type fuel and cruised at Mach numbers between 2.0 to 3.2. Further systems study identified the impact of environmental constraints (for community noise, sonic boom, and engine emissions) on economic attractiveness and technological needs. Results showed that current technology cannot produce a viable high speed civil transport. Significant advances are needed to take off gross weight and allow for both economic attractiveness and environment acceptability. Specific technological requirements were identified to meet these needs.

  11. High-speed civil transport study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    A system study of the potential for a high-speed commercial transport has addressed technological, economic, and environmental constraints. Market projections indicate a need for fleets of transports with supersonic or greater cruise speeds by the year 2000 to 2005. The associated design requirements called for a vehicle to carry 250 to 300 passengers over a range of 5,000 to 6,000 nautical miles. The study was initially unconstrained in terms of vehicle characteristic, such as cruise speed, propulsion systems, fuels, or structural materials. Analyses led to a focus on the most promising vehicle concepts. These were concepts that used a kerosene-type fuel and cruised at Mach numbers between 2.0 to 3.2. Further systems study identified the impact of environmental constraints (for community noise, sonic boom, and engine emissions) on economic attractiveness and technological needs. Results showed that current technology cannot produce a viable high-speed civil transport; significant advances are required to reduce takeoff gross weight and allow for both economic attractiveness and environmental accepatability. Specific technological requirements were identified to meet these needs.

  12. High Speed Photometry for BUSCA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cordes, O.; Reif, K.

    The camera BUSCA (Bonn University Simultaneous CAmera) is a standard instrument at the 2.2m telescope at Calar Alto Observatory (Spain) since 2001. At the moment some modifications of BUSCA are planned and partially realised. One major goal is the replacement of the old thick CCDs in the blue, yellow-green, and near-infrared channels. The newer CCDs have better cosmetics and performance in sensitivity. The other goal is to replace the old "Heidelberg"-style controller with a newly designed controller with the main focus on high-speed readout and on an advanced windowing mechanism. We present a theoretical analysis of the new controller design and its advantage in high speed photometry of rapidly pulsating stars. As an example PG1605+072 was chosen which was observed with BUSCA before in 2001 and 2002.

  13. High speed door assembly

    DOEpatents

    Shapiro, Carolyn

    1993-01-01

    A high speed door assembly, comprising an actuator cylinder and piston rods, a pressure supply cylinder and fittings, an electrically detonated explosive bolt, a honeycomb structured door, a honeycomb structured decelerator, and a structural steel frame encasing the assembly to close over a 3 foot diameter opening within 50 milliseconds of actuation, to contain hazardous materials and vapors within a test fixture.

  14. High speed door assembly

    DOEpatents

    Shapiro, C.

    1993-04-27

    A high speed door assembly is described, comprising an actuator cylinder and piston rods, a pressure supply cylinder and fittings, an electrically detonated explosive bolt, a honeycomb structured door, a honeycomb structured decelerator, and a structural steel frame encasing the assembly to close over a 3 foot diameter opening within 50 milliseconds of actuation, to contain hazardous materials and vapors within a test fixture.

  15. Demonstration of high-speed quadrature phase shift keying vector signal generation employing a single Mach-Zehnder modulator with phase precoding technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yanyi; Li, Xinying; Yu, Jianjun

    2016-01-01

    We numerically and experimentally investigate high-speed quadrature phase shift keying (QPSK) vector signal generation based on a single Mach-Zehnder intensity modulator employing a precoding technique. We experimentally demonstrate 16-Gbaud QPSK vector signal generation at 16-GHz carrier adopting optical carrier suppression with precoding technique, and it is the highest baud rate generated by this technology. The 16-Gbaud QPSK modulated vector signal is delivered over a 20-km large effective area fiber or 2-km single-mode fiber with a bit-error-rate less than the hard-decision forward-error-correction threshold of 3.8×10-3.

  16. High-Speed Data Recorder for Space, Geodesy, and Other High-Speed Recording Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taveniku, Mikael

    2013-01-01

    A high-speed data recorder and replay equipment has been developed for reliable high-data-rate recording to disk media. It solves problems with slow or faulty disks, multiple disk insertions, high-altitude operation, reliable performance using COTS hardware, and long-term maintenance and upgrade path challenges. The current generation data recor - ders used within the VLBI community are aging, special-purpose machines that are both slow (do not meet today's requirements) and are very expensive to maintain and operate. Furthermore, they are not easily upgraded to take advantage of commercial technology development, and are not scalable to multiple 10s of Gbit/s data rates required by new applications. The innovation provides a softwaredefined, high-speed data recorder that is scalable with technology advances in the commercial space. It maximally utilizes current technologies without being locked to a particular hardware platform. The innovation also provides a cost-effective way of streaming large amounts of data from sensors to disk, enabling many applications to store raw sensor data and perform post and signal processing offline. This recording system will be applicable to many applications needing realworld, high-speed data collection, including electronic warfare, softwaredefined radar, signal history storage of multispectral sensors, development of autonomous vehicles, and more.

  17. High-Speed Photography with Computer Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winters, Loren M.

    1991-01-01

    Describes the use of a microcomputer as an intervalometer for the control and timing of several flash units to photograph high-speed events. Applies this technology to study the oscillations of a stretched rubber band, the deceleration of high-speed projectiles in water, the splashes of milk drops, and the bursts of popcorn kernels. (MDH)

  18. Advanced sensors technology survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, Tommy G.; Costello, David J.; Davis, Jerry G.; Horst, Richard L.; Lessard, Charles S.; Peel, H. Herbert; Tolliver, Robert

    1992-01-01

    This project assesses the state-of-the-art in advanced or 'smart' sensors technology for NASA Life Sciences research applications with an emphasis on those sensors with potential applications on the space station freedom (SSF). The objectives are: (1) to conduct literature reviews on relevant advanced sensor technology; (2) to interview various scientists and engineers in industry, academia, and government who are knowledgeable on this topic; (3) to provide viewpoints and opinions regarding the potential applications of this technology on the SSF; and (4) to provide summary charts of relevant technologies and centers where these technologies are being developed.

  19. High speed door assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Shapiro, C.

    1991-12-31

    This invention is comprised of a high speed door assembly, comprising an actuator cylinder and piston rods, a pressure supply cylinder and fittings, an electrically detonated explosive bolt, a honeycomb structured door, a honeycomb structured decelerator, and a structural steel frame encasing the assembly to close over a 3 foot diameter opening within 50 milliseconds of actuation, to contain hazardous materials and vapors within a test fixture.

  20. Architectures and applications of high-speed vision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Yoshihiro; Oku, Hiromasa; Ishikawa, Masatoshi

    2014-11-01

    With the progress made in high-speed imaging technology, image processing systems that can process images at high frame rates, as well as their applications, are expected. In this article, we examine architectures for high-speed vision systems, and also dynamic image control, which can realize high-speed active optical systems. In addition, we also give an overview of some applications in which high-speed vision is used, including man-machine interfaces, image sensing, interactive displays, high-speed three-dimensional sensing, high-speed digital archiving, microvisual feedback, and high-speed intelligent robots.

  1. High Speed Vortex Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Richard M.; Wilcox, Floyd J., Jr.; Bauer, Steven X. S.; Allen, Jerry M.

    2000-01-01

    A review of the research conducted at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Langley Research Center (LaRC) into high-speed vortex flows during the 1970s, 1980s, and 1990s is presented. The data reviewed is for flat plates, cavities, bodies, missiles, wings, and aircraft. These data are presented and discussed relative to the design of future vehicles. Also presented is a brief historical review of the extensive body of high-speed vortex flow research from the 1940s to the present in order to provide perspective of the NASA LaRC's high-speed research results. Data are presented which show the types of vortex structures which occur at supersonic speeds and the impact of these flow structures to vehicle performance and control is discussed. The data presented shows the presence of both small- and large scale vortex structures for a variety of vehicles, from missiles to transports. For cavities, the data show very complex multiple vortex structures exist at all combinations of cavity depth to length ratios and Mach number. The data for missiles show the existence of very strong interference effects between body and/or fin vortices and the downstream fins. It was shown that these vortex flow interference effects could be both positive and negative. Data are shown which highlights the effect that leading-edge sweep, leading-edge bluntness, wing thickness, location of maximum thickness, and camber has on the aerodynamics of and flow over delta wings. The observed flow fields for delta wings (i.e. separation bubble, classical vortex, vortex with shock, etc.) are discussed in the context of' aircraft design. And data have been shown that indicate that aerodynamic performance improvements are available by considering vortex flows as a primary design feature. Finally a discussing of a design approach for wings which utilize vortex flows for improved aerodynamic performance at supersonic speed is presented.

  2. High speed flywheel

    DOEpatents

    McGrath, Stephen V.

    1991-01-01

    A flywheel for operation at high speeds utilizes two or more ringlike coments arranged in a spaced concentric relationship for rotation about an axis and an expansion device interposed between the components for accommodating radial growth of the components resulting from flywheel operation. The expansion device engages both of the ringlike components, and the structure of the expansion device ensures that it maintains its engagement with the components. In addition to its expansion-accommodating capacity, the expansion device also maintains flywheel stiffness during flywheel operation.

  3. Laser tabbed die: A repairable, high-speed die-interconnection technology. 1994 LDRD final report 93-SR-089

    SciTech Connect

    Malba, V.; Bernhardt, A.F.

    1995-09-01

    A unique technology for multichip module production is presented. The technology, called Laser Tabbed Die (L-TAB), consists of a method for forming surface-mount-type {open_quotes}gull wing{close_quotes} interconnects on bare dice. The dice are temporarily bonded to a sacrificial substrate which has a polymer thin film coated onto it. The gull wings are formed on the side of the die with a direct-write laser patterning process which allows vertical as well as horizontal image formation. Using the laser patterning system, trenches are formed in a positive electrodeposited photoresist (EDPR) which is plated onto a metal seed layer, allowing copper to be electroplated through the resultant mask. After stripping the resist and the metal seed layer, the polymer film on the substrate is dissolved, releasing the chip with the {open_quotes}gull wings{close_quotes} intact. The chips are then bonded onto a circuit board or permanent substrate with solder or conductive adhesive.

  4. Advanced Cell Technology, Inc.

    PubMed

    Caldwell, William M

    2007-03-01

    Advanced Cell Technology, Inc. (OTCBB: ACTC) is a biotechnology company applying novel human embryonic stem cell technologies in the emerging field of regenerative medicine. We believe that regenerative medicine has the potential to revolutionize the field by enabling scientists to produce human cells of any kind for use in a wide array of therapies.

  5. High speed transient sampler

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, T.E.

    1995-11-28

    A high speed sampler comprises a meandered sample transmission line for transmitting an input signal, a straight strobe transmission line for transmitting a strobe signal, and a plurality of sampling gates along the transmission lines. The sampling gates comprise a four terminal diode bridge having a first strobe resistor connected from a first terminal of the bridge to the positive strobe line, a second strobe resistor coupled from the third terminal of the bridge to the negative strobe line, a tap connected to the second terminal of the bridge and to the sample transmission line, and a sample holding capacitor connected to the fourth terminal of the bridge. The resistance of the first and second strobe resistors is much higher than the signal transmission line impedance in the preferred system. This results in a sampling gate which applies a very small load on the sample transmission line and on the strobe generator. The sample holding capacitor is implemented using a smaller capacitor and a larger capacitor isolated from the smaller capacitor by resistance. The high speed sampler of the present invention is also characterized by other optimizations, including transmission line tap compensation, stepped impedance strobe line, a multi-layer physical layout, and unique strobe generator design. A plurality of banks of such samplers are controlled for concatenated or interleaved sample intervals to achieve long sample lengths or short sample spacing. 17 figs.

  6. High speed transient sampler

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, Thomas E.

    1995-01-01

    A high speed sampler comprises a meandered sample transmission line for transmitting an input signal, a straight strobe transmission line for transmitting a strobe signal, and a plurality of sampling gates along the transmission lines. The sampling gates comprise a four terminal diode bridge having a first strobe resistor connected from a first terminal of the bridge to the positive strobe line, a second strobe resistor coupled from the third terminal of the bridge to the negative strobe line, a tap connected to the second terminal of the bridge and to the sample transmission line, and a sample holding capacitor connected to the fourth terminal of the bridge. The resistance of the first and second strobe resistors is much higher than the signal transmission line impedance in the preferred system. This results in a sampling gate which applies a very small load on the sample transmission line and on the strobe generator. The sample holding capacitor is implemented using a smaller capacitor and a larger capacitor isolated from the smaller capacitor by resistance. The high speed sampler of the present invention is also characterized by other optimizations, including transmission line tap compensation, stepped impedance strobe line, a multi-layer physical layout, and unique strobe generator design. A plurality of banks of such samplers are controlled for concatenated or interleaved sample intervals to achieve long sample lengths or short sample spacing.

  7. HIGH SPEED CAMERA

    DOEpatents

    Rogers, B.T. Jr.; Davis, W.C.

    1957-12-17

    This patent relates to high speed cameras having resolution times of less than one-tenth microseconds suitable for filming distinct sequences of a very fast event such as an explosion. This camera consists of a rotating mirror with reflecting surfaces on both sides, a narrow mirror acting as a slit in a focal plane shutter, various other mirror and lens systems as well as an innage recording surface. The combination of the rotating mirrors and the slit mirror causes discrete, narrow, separate pictures to fall upon the film plane, thereby forming a moving image increment of the photographed event. Placing a reflecting surface on each side of the rotating mirror cancels the image velocity that one side of the rotating mirror would impart, so as a camera having this short a resolution time is thereby possible.

  8. Advanced manufacturing: Technology diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Tesar, A.

    1995-12-01

    In this paper we examine how manufacturing technology diffuses rom the developers of technology across national borders to those who do not have the capability or resources to develop advanced technology on their own. None of the wide variety of technology diffusion mechanisms discussed in this paper are new, yet the opportunities to apply these mechanisms are growing. A dramatic increase in technology diffusion occurred over the last decade. The two major trends which probably drive this increase are a worldwide inclination towards ``freer`` markets and diminishing isolation. Technology is most rapidly diffusing from the US In fact, the US is supplying technology for the rest of the world. The value of the technology supplied by the US more than doubled from 1985 to 1992 (see the Introduction for details). History shows us that technology diffusion is inevitable. It is the rates at which technologies diffuse to other countries which can vary considerably. Manufacturers in these countries are increasingly able to absorb technology. Their manufacturing efficiency is expected to progress as technology becomes increasingly available and utilized.

  9. Advanced Environmental Monitoring Technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jan, Darrell

    2004-01-01

    Viewgraphs on Advanced Environmental Monitoring Technologies are presented. The topics include: 1) Monitoring & Controlling the Environment; 2) Illustrative Example: Canary 3) Ground-based Commercial Technology; 4) High Capability & Low Mass/Power + Autonomy = Key to Future SpaceFlight; 5) Current Practice: in Flight; 6) Current Practice: Post Flight; 7) Miniature Mass Spectrometer for Planetary Exploration and Long Duration Human Flight; 8) Hardware and Data Acquisition System; 9) 16S rDNA Phylogenetic Tree; and 10) Preview of Porter.

  10. High speed packet switching

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    This document constitutes the final report prepared by Proteon, Inc. of Westborough, Massachusetts under contract NAS 5-30629 entitled High-Speed Packet Switching (SBIR 87-1, Phase 2) prepared for NASA-Greenbelt, Maryland. The primary goal of this research project is to use the results of the SBIR Phase 1 effort to develop a sound, expandable hardware and software router architecture capable of forwarding 25,000 packets per second through the router and passing 300 megabits per second on the router's internal busses. The work being delivered under this contract received its funding from three different sources: the SNIPE/RIG contract (Contract Number F30602-89-C-0014, CDRL Sequence Number A002), the SBIR contract, and Proteon. The SNIPE/RIG and SBIR contracts had many overlapping requirements, which allowed the research done under SNIPE/RIG to be applied to SBIR. Proteon funded all of the work to develop new router interfaces other than FDDI, in addition to funding the productization of the router itself. The router being delivered under SBIR will be a fully product-quality machine. The work done during this contract produced many significant findings and results, summarized here and explained in detail in later sections of this report. The SNIPE/RIG contract was completed. That contract had many overlapping requirements with the SBIR contract, and resulted in the successful demonstration and delivery of a high speed router. The development that took place during the SNIPE/RIG contract produced findings that included the choice of processor and an understanding of the issues surrounding inter processor communications in a multiprocessor environment. Many significant speed enhancements to the router software were made during that time. Under the SBIR contract (and with help from Proteon-funded work), it was found that a single processor router achieved a throughput significantly higher than originally anticipated. For this reason, a single processor router was

  11. High-speed data search

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Driscoll, James N.

    1994-01-01

    The high-speed data search system developed for KSC incorporates existing and emerging information retrieval technology to help a user intelligently and rapidly locate information found in large textual databases. This technology includes: natural language input; statistical ranking of retrieved information; an artificial intelligence concept called semantics, where 'surface level' knowledge found in text is used to improve the ranking of retrieved information; and relevance feedback, where user judgements about viewed information are used to automatically modify the search for further information. Semantics and relevance feedback are features of the system which are not available commercially. The system further demonstrates focus on paragraphs of information to decide relevance; and it can be used (without modification) to intelligently search all kinds of document collections, such as collections of legal documents medical documents, news stories, patents, and so forth. The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the usefulness of statistical ranking, our semantic improvement, and relevance feedback.

  12. High Speed Ice Friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seymour-Pierce, Alexandra; Sammonds, Peter; Lishman, Ben

    2014-05-01

    Many different tribological experiments have been run to determine the frictional behaviour of ice at high speeds, ostensibly with the intention of applying results to everyday fields such as winter tyres and sports. However, experiments have only been conducted up to linear speeds of several metres a second, with few additional subject specific studies reaching speeds comparable to these applications. Experiments were conducted in the cold rooms of the Rock and Ice Physics Laboratory, UCL, on a custom built rotational tribometer based on previous literature designs. Preliminary results from experiments run at 2m/s for ice temperatures of 271 and 263K indicate that colder ice has a higher coefficient of friction, in accordance with the literature. These results will be presented, along with data from further experiments conducted at temperatures between 259-273K (in order to cover a wide range of the temperature dependent behaviour of ice) and speeds of 2-15m/s to produce a temperature-velocity-friction map for ice. The effect of temperature, speed and slider geometry on the deformation of ice will also be investigated. These speeds are approaching those exhibited by sports such as the luge (where athletes slide downhill on an icy track), placing the tribological work in context.

  13. High speed transition prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gasperas, Gediminis

    1992-01-01

    The main objective of this work period was to develop, acquire and apply state-of-the-art tools for the prediction of transition at high speeds at NASA Ames. Although various stability codes as well as basic state codes were acquired, the development of a new Parabolized Stability Equation (PSE) code was minimal. The time that was initially allocated for development was used on other tasks, in particular for the Leading Edge Suction problem, in acquiring proficiency in various graphics tools, and in applying these tools to evaluate various Navier-Stokes and Euler solutions. The second objective of this work period was to attend the Transition and Turbulence Workshop at NASA Langley in July and August, 1991. A report on the Workshop follows. From July 8, 1991 to August 2, 1991, the author participated in the Transition and Turbulence Workshop at NASA Langley. For purposes of interest here, analysis can be said to consist of solving simplified governing equations by various analytical methods, such as asymptotic methods, or by use of very meager computer resources. From the composition of the various groups at the Workshop, it can be seen that analytical methods are generally more popular in Great Britain than they are in the U.S., possibly due to historical factors and the lack of computer resources. Experimenters at the Workshop were mostly concerned with subsonic flows, and a number of demonstrations were provided, among which were a hot-wire experiment to probe the boundary layer on a rotating disc, a hot-wire rake to map a free shear layer behind a cylinder, and the use of heating strips on a flat plate to control instability waves and consequent transition. A highpoint of the demonstrations was the opportunity to observe the rather noisy 'quiet' supersonic pilot tunnel in operation.

  14. Advanced solar dynamic technology program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calogeras, James

    1990-01-01

    Viewgraphs and discussion on Advanced Solar Dynamic Technology Program are presented. Topics covered include: advanced solar dynamic technology program; advanced concentrators; advanced heat receivers; power conversion systems; dished all metal honeycomb sandwich panels; Stirling cavity heat pipe receiver; Brayton solar receiver; and thermal energy storage technology.

  15. Update on Douglas' high-speed civil transport studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bunin, Bruce L.

    1992-01-01

    A summary is presented of high speed civil transport (HSCT) studies underway at Douglas Aircraft. A brief review is given of experience with design and development of advanced supersonic transport concepts and associated technology. A review is then presented of past NASA funded contract research studies focused on selection of appropriate concepts for high speed civil transport aircraft to be introduced in the year 2000 time frame for commercial service. Follow-on activities to those studies are then presented which were conducted under independent research studies as well as under further NASA funded efforts. Design Mach number selections and associated baseline design missions are then discussed along with forecasted passenger traffic and associated supersonic fleet sizes, and then proceeds into a discussion of individual issues related either to environmental acceptability or overall technology requirements in order to achieve the required economic viability of the program. A summary is given of current and future plans and activities.

  16. High-Speed Jet Noise Reduction NASA Perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huff, Dennis L.; Handy, J. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    History shows that the problem of high-speed jet noise reduction is difficult to solve. the good news is that high performance military aircraft noise is dominated by a single source called 'jet noise' (commercial aircraft have several sources). The bad news is that this source has been the subject of research for the past 50 years and progress has been incremental. Major jet noise reduction has been achieved through changing the cycle of the engine to reduce the jet exit velocity. Smaller reductions have been achieved using suppression devices like mixing enhancement and acoustic liners. Significant jet noise reduction without any performance loss is probably not possible! Recent NASA Noise Reduction Research Programs include the High Speed Research Program, Advanced Subsonic Technology Noise Reduction Program, Aerospace Propulsion and Power Program - Fundamental Noise, and Quiet Aircraft Technology Program.

  17. Investigation of advanced counterrotation blade configuration concepts for high speed turboprop systems. Task 4: Advanced fan section aerodynamic analysis computer program user's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crook, Andrew J.; Delaney, Robert A.

    1992-01-01

    The computer program user's manual for the ADPACAPES (Advanced Ducted Propfan Analysis Code-Average Passage Engine Simulation) program is included. The objective of the computer program is development of a three-dimensional Euler/Navier-Stokes flow analysis for fan section/engine geometries containing multiple blade rows and multiple spanwise flow splitters. An existing procedure developed by Dr. J. J. Adamczyk and associates at the NASA Lewis Research Center was modified to accept multiple spanwise splitter geometries and simulate engine core conditions. The numerical solution is based upon a finite volume technique with a four stage Runge-Kutta time marching procedure. Multiple blade row solutions are based upon the average-passage system of equations. The numerical solutions are performed on an H-type grid system, with meshes meeting the requirement of maintaining a common axisymmetric mesh for each blade row grid. The analysis was run on several geometry configurations ranging from one to five blade rows and from one to four radial flow splitters. The efficiency of the solution procedure was shown to be the same as the original analysis.

  18. High-speed Civil Transport Aircraft Emissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miake-Lye, Richard C.; Matulaitis, J. A.; Krause, F. H.; Dodds, Willard J.; Albers, Martin; Hourmouziadis, J.; Hasel, K. L.; Lohmann, R. P.; Stander, C.; Gerstle, John H.

    1992-01-01

    Estimates are given for the emissions from a proposed high speed civil transport (HSCT). This advanced technology supersonic aircraft would fly in the lower stratosphere at a speed of roughly Mach 1.6 to 3.2 (470 to 950 m/sec or 920 to 1850 knots). Because it would fly in the stratosphere at an altitude in the range of 15 to 23 km commensurate with its design speed, its exhaust effluents could perturb the chemical balance in the upper atmosphere. The first step in determining the nature and magnitude of any chemical changes in the atmosphere resulting from these proposed aircraft is to identify and quantify the chemically important species they emit. Relevant earlier work is summarized, dating back to the Climatic Impact Assessment Program of the early 1970s and current propulsion research efforts. Estimates are provided of the chemical composition of an HSCT's exhaust, and these emission indices are presented. Other aircraft emissions that are not due to combustion processes are also summarized; these emissions are found to be much smaller than the exhaust emissions. Future advances in propulsion technology, in experimental measurement techniques, and in understanding upper atmospheric chemistry may affect these estimates of the amounts of trace exhaust species or their relative importance.

  19. Advanced composites technology program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, John G., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    This paper provides a brief overview of the NASA Advanced Composites Technology (ACT) Program. Critical technology issues that must be addressed and solved to develop composite primary structures for transport aircraft are delineated. The program schedule and milestones are included. Work completed in the first 3 years of the program indicates the potential for achieving composite structures that weigh less and are cost effective relative to conventional aluminum structure. Selected technical accomplishments are noted. Readers who are seeking more in-depth technical information should study the other papers included in these proceedings.

  20. Advanced Technology Vehicle Testing

    SciTech Connect

    James Francfort

    2004-06-01

    The goal of the U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA) is to increase the body of knowledge as well as the awareness and acceptance of electric drive and other advanced technology vehicles (ATV). The AVTA accomplishes this goal by testing ATVs on test tracks and dynamometers (Baseline Performance testing), as well as in real-world applications (Fleet and Accelerated Reliability testing and public demonstrations). This enables the AVTA to provide Federal and private fleet managers, as well as other potential ATV users, with accurate and unbiased information on vehicle performance and infrastructure needs so they can make informed decisions about acquiring and operating ATVs. The ATVs currently in testing include vehicles that burn gaseous hydrogen (H2) fuel and hydrogen/CNG (H/CNG) blended fuels in internal combustion engines (ICE), and hybrid electric (HEV), urban electric, and neighborhood electric vehicles. The AVTA is part of DOE's FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Program.

  1. Advanced turboprop technology development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dugan, J. F.; Bencze, D. P.; Williams, L. J.

    1977-01-01

    The efficiency of high-speed turboprop propulsion systems is considered with emphasis on fuel savings. Specific topics discussed include: (1) high efficiency and low noise of propeller design; (2) fuselage noise attenuation; (3) propeller and gear box maintenance; and (4) engine-airframe integration.

  2. Advanced geothermal technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whetten, J. T.; Murphy, H. D.; Hanold, R. J.; Myers, C. W.; Dunn, J. C.

    Research and development in advanced technologies for geothermal energy production continue to increase the energy production options for the Nation. The high-risk investment over the past few years by the U.S. Department of Energy in geopressured, hot dry rock, and magma energy resources is producing new means to lower production costs and to take advantage of these resources. The Nation has far larger and more regionally extensive geothermal resources than heretofore realized. At the end of a short 30-day closed-loop flow test, the manmade hot dry rock reservoir at Fenton Hill, New Mexico was producing 10 MW thermal, and still climbing, proving the technical feasibility of this new technology. The scientific feasibility of magma energy extraction was demonstrated, and new field tests to evaluate this technology are planned. Analysis and field tests confirm the viability of geopressured-geothermal energy and the prospect that many dry-hole or depleted petroleum wells can be turned into producing geopressured-geothermal wells. Technological advances achieved through hot dry rock, magma, geopressured, and other geothermal research are making these resources and conventional hydrothermal resources more competitive.

  3. Advanced composite fuselage technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ilcewicz, Larry B.; Smith, Peter J.; Horton, Ray E.

    1993-01-01

    Boeing's ATCAS program has completed its third year and continues to progress towards a goal to demonstrate composite fuselage technology with cost and weight advantages over aluminum. Work on this program is performed by an integrated team that includes several groups within The Boeing Company, industrial and university subcontractors, and technical support from NASA. During the course of the program, the ATCAS team has continued to perform a critical review of composite developments by recognizing advances in metal fuselage technology. Despite recent material, structural design, and manufacturing advancements for metals, polymeric matrix composite designs studied in ATCAS still project significant cost and weight advantages for future applications. A critical path to demonstrating technology readiness for composite transport fuselage structures was created to summarize ATCAS tasks for Phases A, B, and C. This includes a global schedule and list of technical issues which will be addressed throughout the course of studies. Work performed in ATCAS since the last ACT conference is also summarized. Most activities relate to crown quadrant manufacturing scaleup and performance verification. The former was highlighted by fabricating a curved, 7 ft. by 10 ft. panel, with cocured hat-stiffeners and cobonded J-frames. In building to this scale, process developments were achieved for tow-placed skins, drape formed stiffeners, braided/RTM frames, and panel cure tooling. Over 700 tests and supporting analyses have been performed for crown material and design evaluation, including structural tests that demonstrated limit load requirements for severed stiffener/skin failsafe damage conditions. Analysis of tests for tow-placed hybrid laminates with large damage indicates a tensile fracture toughness that is higher than that observed for advanced aluminum alloys. Additional recent ATCAS achievements include crown supporting technology, keel quadrant design evaluation, and

  4. Advanced Technology Vehicle Testing

    SciTech Connect

    James Francfort

    2003-11-01

    The light-duty vehicle transportation sector in the United States depends heavily on imported petroleum as a transportation fuel. The Department of Energy’s Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA) is testing advanced technology vehicles to help reduce this dependency, which would contribute to the economic stability and homeland security of the United States. These advanced technology test vehicles include internal combustion engine vehicles operating on 100% hydrogen (H2) and H2CNG (compressed natural gas) blended fuels, hybrid electric vehicles, neighborhood electric vehicles, urban electric vehicles, and electric ground support vehicles. The AVTA tests and evaluates these vehicles with closed track and dynamometer testing methods (baseline performance testing) and accelerated reliability testing methods (accumulating lifecycle vehicle miles and operational knowledge within 1 to 1.5 years), and in normal fleet environments. The Arizona Public Service Alternative Fuel Pilot Plant and H2-fueled vehicles are demonstrating the feasibility of using H2 as a transportation fuel. Hybrid, neighborhood, and urban electric test vehicles are demonstrating successful applications of electric drive vehicles in various fleet missions. The AVTA is also developing electric ground support equipment (GSE) test procedures, and GSE testing will start during the fall of 2003. All of these activities are intended to support U.S. energy independence. The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory manages these activities for the AVTA.

  5. Advanced gearbox technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, N. E.; Cedoz, R. W.; Salama, E. E.; Wagner, D. A.

    1987-01-01

    An advanced 13,000 HP, counterrotating (CR) gearbox was designed and successfully tested to provide a technology base for future designs of geared propfan propulsion systems for both commercial and military aircraft. The advanced technology CR gearbox was designed for high efficiency, low weight, long life, and improved maintainability. The differential planetary CR gearbox features double helical gears, double row cylindrical roller bearings integral with planet gears, tapered roller prop support bearings, and a flexible ring gear and diaphragm to provide load sharing. A new Allison propfan back-to-back gearbox test facility was constructed. Extensive rotating and stationary instrumentation was used to measure temperature, strain, vibration, deflection and efficiency under representative flight operating conditions. The tests verified smooth, efficient gearbox operation. The highly-instrumented advanced CR gearbox was successfully tested to design speed and power (13,000 HP), and to a 115 percent overspeed condition. Measured CR gearbox efficiency was 99.3 percent at the design point based on heat loss to the oil. Tests demonstrated low vibration characteristics of double helical gearing, proper gear tooth load sharing, low stress levels, and the high load capacity of the prop tapered roller bearings. Applied external prop loads did not significantly affect gearbox temperature, vibration, or stress levels. Gearbox hardware was in excellent condition after the tests with no indication of distress.

  6. Recent advances in hypersonic technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dwoyer, Douglas L.

    1990-01-01

    This paper will focus on recent advances in hypersonic aerodynamic prediction techniques. Current capabilities of existing numerical methods for predicting high Mach number flows will be discussed and shortcomings will be identified. Physical models available for inclusion into modern codes for predicting the effects of transition and turbulence will also be outlined and their limitations identified. Chemical reaction models appropriate to high-speed flows will be addressed, and the impact of their inclusion in computational fluid dynamics codes will be discussed. Finally, the problem of validating predictive techniques for high Mach number flows will be addressed.

  7. First NASA/Industry High Speed Research Program Nozzle Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Long-Davis, Mary Jo

    1999-01-01

    The First High Speed Research (HSR) Nozzle Symposium was hosted by NASA Lewis Research Center on November 17-19, 1992 in Cleveland, Ohio, and was sponsored by the HSR Source Noise Working Group. The purpose of this symposium was to provide a national forum for the government, industry, and university participants in the program to present and discuss important low noise nozzle research results and technology issues related to the development of appropriate nozzles for a commercially viable, environmentally compatible, U.S. High-Speed Civil Transport. The HSR Phase I research program was initiated in FY90 and is approaching the first major milestone (end of FY92) relative to an initial FAR 36 Stage 3 nozzle noise assessment. Significant research results relative to that milestone were presented. The opening session provided a brief overview of the Program and status of the Phase H plan. The next five sessions were technically oriented and highlighted recent significant analytical and experimental accomplishments. The last Session included a panel discussion by the Session Chairs, summarizing the progress seen to date and discussing issues relative to further advances in technology necessary to achieve the Program Goals. Attendance at the Symposium was by invitation only and included only industry, academic, and government participants who are actively involved in the High-Speed Research Program. The technology presented in this meeting is considered commercially sensitive.

  8. High speed nozzles task

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamed, Awatef

    1995-01-01

    Supersonic cruise exhaust nozzles for advanced applications are optimized for a high nozzle pressure ratio (NPR) at design supersonic cruise Mach number and altitude. The performance of these nozzles with large expansion ratios are severely degraded for operations at subsonic speeds near sea level for NPR significantly less than the design values. The prediction of over-expanded 2DCD nozzles performance is critical to evaluating the internal losses and to the optimization of the integrated vehicle and propulsion system performance. The reported research work was aimed at validating and assessing existing computational methods and turbulence models for predicting the flow characteristics and nozzle performance at over-expanded conditions. Flow simulations in 2DCD nozzles were performed using five different turbulence models. The results are compared with the experimental data for the wall pressure distribution and thrust and flow coefficients at over-expanded static conditions.

  9. Advanced optical instruments technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shao, Mike; Chrisp, Michael; Cheng, Li-Jen; Eng, Sverre; Glavich, Thomas; Goad, Larry; Jones, Bill; Kaarat, Philip; Nein, Max; Robinson, William

    1992-01-01

    The science objectives for proposed NASA missions for the next decades push the state of the art in sensitivity and spatial resolution over a wide range of wavelengths, including the x-ray to the submillimeter. While some of the proposed missions are larger and more sensitive versions of familiar concepts, such as the next generation space telescope, others use concepts, common on the Earth, but new to space, such as optical interferometry, in order to provide spatial resolutions impossible with other concepts. However, despite their architecture, the performance of all of the proposed missions depends critically on the back-end instruments that process the collected energy to produce scientifically interesting outputs. The Advanced Optical Instruments Technology panel was chartered with defining technology development plans that would best improve optical instrument performance for future astrophysics missions. At this workshop the optical instrument was defined as the set of optical components that reimage the light from the telescope onto the detectors to provide information about the spatial, spectral, and polarization properties of the light. This definition was used to distinguish the optical instrument technology issues from those associated with the telescope, which were covered by a separate panel. The panel identified several areas for optical component technology development: diffraction gratings; tunable filters; interferometric beam combiners; optical materials; and fiber optics. The panel also determined that stray light suppression instruments, such as coronagraphs and nulling interferometers, were in need of general development to support future astrophysics needs.

  10. State Technologies Advancement Collaborative

    SciTech Connect

    David S. Terry

    2012-01-30

    The U. S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Association of State Energy Officials (NASEO), and Association of State Energy Research and Technology Transfer Institutions (ASERTTI) signed an intergovernmental agreement on November 14, 2002, that allowed states and territories and the Federal Government to better collaborate on energy research, development, demonstration and deployment (RDD&D) projects. The agreement established the State Technologies Advancement Collaborative (STAC) which allowed the states and DOE to move RDD&D forward using an innovative competitive project selection and funding process. A cooperative agreement between DOE and NASEO served as the contracting instrument for this innovative federal-state partnership obligating funds from DOE's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy and Office of Fossil Energy to plan, fund, and implement RDD&D projects that were consistent with the common priorities of the states and DOE. DOE's Golden Field Office provided Federal oversight and guidance for the STAC cooperative agreement. The STAC program was built on the foundation of prior Federal-State efforts to collaborate on and engage in joint planning for RDD&D. Although STAC builds on existing, successful programs, it is important to note that it was not intended to replace other successful joint DOE/State initiatives such as the State Energy Program or EERE Special Projects. Overall the STAC process was used to fund, through three competitive solicitations, 35 successful multi-state research, development, deployment, and demonstration projects with an overall average non-federal cost share of 43%. Twenty-two states were awarded at least one prime contract, and organizations in all 50 states and some territories were involved as subcontractors in at least one STAC project. Projects were funded in seven program areas: (1) Building Technologies, (2) Industrial Technologies, (3) Transportation Technologies, (4) Distributed Energy Resources, (5

  11. High Speed Electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Östling, Mikael; Malm, B. Gunnar

    There is no question about the tremendous impact of the micro- and nanoelectronic technology on the world economy and welfare. Since the introduction of the integrated circuit about 40 years ago, the performance has followed a steady scaling outlined already in 1965 by Gordon Moore [1]. What is fascinating to note is that the most commonly produced human artefact today is the transistor. Each year we produce more than 1018 transistors, which is more than all printed characters each year in all books, magazines, and newspapers in the world. Most amazingly, the price per transistor is lower than the price per printed character in common magazines. We also see that this furious development will continue with unbroken momentum at least another decade. Market forecasts indicate that the gross world product in 2010

  12. High speed optical networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frankel, Michael Y.; Livas, Jeff

    2005-02-01

    This overview will discuss core network technology and cost trade-offs inherent in choosing between "analog" architectures with high optical transparency, and ones heavily dependent on frequent "digital" signal regeneration. The exact balance will be related to the specific technology choices in each area outlined above, as well as the network needs such as node geographic spread, physical connectivity patterns, and demand loading. Over the course of a decade, optical networks have evolved from simple single-channel SONET regenerator-based links to multi-span multi-channel optically amplified ultra-long haul systems, fueled by high demand for bandwidth at reduced cost. In general, the cost of a well-designed high capacity system is dominated by the number of optical to electrical (OE) and electrical to optical (EO) conversions required. As the reach and channel capacity of the transport systems continued to increase, it became necessary to improve the granularity of the demand connections by introducing (optical add/drop multiplexers) OADMs. Thus, if a node requires only small demand connectivity, most of the optical channels are expressed through without regeneration (OEO). The network costs are correspondingly reduced, partially balanced by the increased cost of the OADM nodes. Lately, the industry has been aggressively pursuing a natural extension of this philosophy towards all-optical "analog" core networks, with each demand touching electrical digital circuitry only at the in/egress nodes. This is expected to produce a substantial elimination of OEO costs, increase in network capacity, and a notionally simpler operation and service turn-up. At the same time, such optical "analog" network requires a large amount of complicated hardware and software for monitoring and manipulating high bit rate optical signals. New and more complex modulation formats that provide resiliency to both optical noise and nonlinear propagation effects are important for extended

  13. Design and Test of Fan/Nacelle Models Quiet High-Speed Fan Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Christopher J. (Technical Monitor); Repp, Russ; Gentile, David; Hanson, David; Chunduru, Srinivas

    2003-01-01

    The primary objective of the Quiet High-Speed Fan (QHSF) program was to develop an advanced high-speed fan design that will achieve a 6 dB reduction in overall fan noise over a baseline configuration while maintaining similar performance. The program applies and validates acoustic, aerodynamic, aeroelastic, and mechanical design tools developed by NASA, US industry, and academia. The successful fan design will be used in an AlliedSignal Engines (AE) advanced regional engine to be marketed in the year 2000 and beyond. This technology is needed to maintain US industry leadership in the regional turbofan engine market.

  14. USMC UGS technology advancements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartup, David C.; Barr, Michael E.; Hirz, Philip M.; Kipp, Jason; Fishburn, Thomas A.; Waller, Ezra S.; Marks, Brian A.

    2008-04-01

    Technology advancements for the USMC UGS system are described. Integration of the ARL Blue Radio/CSR into the System Controller and Radio Repeater permit the TRSS system to operate seamlessly within the Family of UGS concept. In addition to the Blue Radio/CSR, the TRSS system provides VHF and SATCOM radio links. The TRSS system is compatible with a wide range of imagers, including those with both analog and digital interfaces. The TRSS System Controller permits simultaneous monitoring of 2 camera inputs. To complement enhanced compatibility and improved processing, the mechanical housing of the TRSS System Controller has been updated. The SDR-II, a system monitoring device, also incorporates four Blue Radio/CSRs along with other communication capabilities, making it an ideal choice for a monitoring station within the Family of UGS. Field testing of L-3 Nova's UGS system at YPG has shown flawless performance, capturing all 126 targets.

  15. Gated high speed optical detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, S. I.; Carson, L. M.; Neal, G. W.

    1973-01-01

    The design, fabrication, and test of two gated, high speed optical detectors for use in high speed digital laser communication links are discussed. The optical detectors used a dynamic crossed field photomultiplier and electronics including dc bias and RF drive circuits, automatic remote synchronization circuits, automatic gain control circuits, and threshold detection circuits. The equipment is used to detect binary encoded signals from a mode locked neodynium laser.

  16. NASA-UVA Light Aerospace Alloy and Structures Technology Program (LA2ST). Supplement: Research on Materials for the High Speed Civil Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gangloff, Richard P.; Starke, Edgar A., Jr.

    1997-01-01

    This report documents the progress achieved over the past 6 to 12 months on four graduate student projects conducted within the NASA-UVA Light Aerospace Alloy and Structures Technology Program. These studies were aimed specifically at light metallic alloy issues relevant to the High Speed Civil Transport. Research on Hydrogen-Enhanced Fracture of High-Strength Titanium Alloy Sheet refined successfully the high resolution R-curve method necessary to characterize initiation and growth fracture toughnesses. For solution treated and aged Low Cost Beta without hydrogen precharging, fracture is by ductile transgranular processes at 25 C, but standardized initiation toughnesses are somewhat low and crack extension is resolved at still lower K-levels. This fracture resistance is degraded substantially, by between 700 and 1000 wppm of dissolved hydrogen, and a fracture mode change is affected. The surface oxide on P-titanium alloys hinders hydrogen uptake and complicates the electrochemical introduction of low hydrogen concentrations that are critical to applications of these alloys. Ti-15-3 sheet was obtained for study during the next reporting period. Research on Mechanisms of deformation and Fracture in High-Strength Titanium Alloys is examining the microstructure and fatigue resistance of very thin sheet. Aging experiments on 0. 14 mm thick (0.0055 inch) foil show microstructural agility that may be used to enhance fatigue performance. Fatigue testing of Ti-15-3 sheet has begun. The effects of various thermo-mechanical processing regimens on mechanical properties will be examined and deformation modes identified. Research on the Effect of Texture and Precipitates on Mechanical Property Anisotropy of Al-Cu-Mg-X and Al-Cu alloys demonstrated that models predict a minor influence of stress-induced alignment of Phi, caused by the application of a tensile stress during aging, on the yield stress anisotropy of both modified AA2519 and a model Al-Cu binary alloy. This project

  17. Testing of high speed network components

    SciTech Connect

    Wing, W.R.

    1997-06-30

    At the time of the start of this project, a battle was being fought between the computer networking technologies and telephone networking technologies. The telecommunications industry wanted to standardize on Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM) as the technology of choice for carrying all cross-country traffic. The computer industry wanted to use Packet Transfer Mode (PTM). The project had several goals, some unspoken. At the highest, most obvious level, the project goals were to test the high-speed components being developed by the computer technology industry. However, in addition, both industrial partners were having trouble finding markets for the high-speed networking technology they were developing and deploying. Thus, a part of the project was to demonstrate applications developed at Oak Ridge which would stretch the limits of the network, and thus demonstrate the utility of high-speed networks. Finally, an unspoken goal of the computer technology industry was to convince the telecommunications industry that packet switching was superior to cell switching. Conversely, the telecommunications industry hoped to see the computer technology industry`s packet switch fail to perform in a real-world test. Project was terminated early due to failure of one of the CRADA partners to deliver needed component.

  18. NASA-UVA Light Aerospace Alloy and Structures Technology Program (LA2ST). Research on Materials for the High Speed Civil Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gangloff, Richard P.; Starke, Edgar A., Jr.; Kelly, Robert G.; Scully, John R.; Stoner, Glenn E.; Wert, John A.

    1997-01-01

    Since 1986, the NASA-Langley Research Center has sponsored the NASA-UVa Light Alloy and Structures Technology (LA2ST) Program at the University of Virginia (UVa). The fundamental objective of the LA2ST program is to conduct interdisciplinary graduate student research on the performance of next generation, light-weight aerospace alloys, composites and thermal gradient structures. The LA2ST program has aimed to product relevant data and basic understanding of material mechanical response, environmental/corrosion behavior, and microstructure; new monolithic and composite alloys; advanced processing methods; measurement and modeling advances; and a pool of educated graduate students for aerospace technologies. The scope of the LA2ST Program is broad. Research areas include: (1) Mechanical and Environmental Degradation Mechanisms in Advanced Light Metals and Composites, (2) Aerospace Materials Science, (3) Mechanics of materials for Aerospace Structures, and (4) Thermal Gradient Structures. A substantial series of semi-annual progress reports issued since 1987 documents the technical objectives, experimental or analytical procedures, and detailed results of graduate student research in these topical areas.

  19. Sensor study for high speed autonomous operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Anne; La Celle, Zachary; Lacaze, Alberto; Murphy, Karl; Del Giorno, Mark; Close, Ryan

    2015-06-01

    As robotic ground systems advance in capabilities and begin to fulfill new roles in both civilian and military life, the limitation of slow operational speed has become a hindrance to the wide-spread adoption of these systems. For example, military convoys are reluctant to employ autonomous vehicles when these systems slow their movement from 60 miles per hour down to 40. However, these autonomous systems must operate at these lower speeds due to the limitations of the sensors they employ. Robotic Research, with its extensive experience in ground autonomy and associated problems therein, in conjunction with CERDEC/Night Vision and Electronic Sensors Directorate (NVESD), has performed a study to specify system and detection requirements; determined how current autonomy sensors perform in various scenarios; and analyzed how sensors should be employed to increase operational speeds of ground vehicles. The sensors evaluated in this study include the state of the art in LADAR/LIDAR, Radar, Electro-Optical, and Infrared sensors, and have been analyzed at high speeds to study their effectiveness in detecting and accounting for obstacles and other perception challenges. By creating a common set of testing benchmarks, and by testing in a wide range of real-world conditions, Robotic Research has evaluated where sensors can be successfully employed today; where sensors fall short; and which technologies should be examined and developed further. This study is the first step to achieve the overarching goal of doubling ground vehicle speeds on any given terrain.

  20. High-Speed Civil Transport Will Revolutionize Air Travel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    NASA is developing advanced technologies that will allow industry to build a high-speed civil transport that will revolutionize overseas air travel. The technology challenges include developing low-cost materials and structural concepts as well as supersonic engines that can meet stringent noise and emissions standards. NASA's goal is to provide enabling technologies that will reduce the travel time to the Far East by 50 percent within 25 years, and do so at today's subsonic ticket prices. This research is part of NASA's Aeronautics and Space Transportation Technology (ASTT) Enterprise's strategy to sustain U.S. leadership in aeronautics and space. The Enterprise has set bold goals that are grouped into Three Pillars: Global Civil Aviation, Revolutionary Technology Leaps and Access to Space.

  1. Aerodynamic design on high-speed trains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, San-San; Li, Qiang; Tian, Ai-Qin; Du, Jian; Liu, Jia-Li

    2016-04-01

    Compared with the traditional train, the operational speed of the high-speed train has largely improved, and the dynamic environment of the train has changed from one of mechanical domination to one of aerodynamic domination. The aerodynamic problem has become the key technological challenge of high-speed trains and significantly affects the economy, environment, safety, and comfort. In this paper, the relationships among the aerodynamic design principle, aerodynamic performance indexes, and design variables are first studied, and the research methods of train aerodynamics are proposed, including numerical simulation, a reduced-scale test, and a full-scale test. Technological schemes of train aerodynamics involve the optimization design of the streamlined head and the smooth design of the body surface. Optimization design of the streamlined head includes conception design, project design, numerical simulation, and a reduced-scale test. Smooth design of the body surface is mainly used for the key parts, such as electric-current collecting system, wheel truck compartment, and windshield. The aerodynamic design method established in this paper has been successfully applied to various high-speed trains (CRH380A, CRH380AM, CRH6, CRH2G, and the Standard electric multiple unit (EMU)) that have met expected design objectives. The research results can provide an effective guideline for the aerodynamic design of high-speed trains.

  2. Design and analysis issues of integrated control systems for high-speed civil transports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccarty, Craig A.; Feather, John B.; Dykman, John R.; Page, Mark A.; Hodgkinson, John

    1992-01-01

    A study was conducted to identify, rank, and define development plans for the critical guidance and control design and analysis issues as related to economically viable and environmentally acceptable high-speed civil transport. The issues were identified in a multistep process. First, pertinent literature on supersonic cruise aircraft was reviewed, and experts were consulted to establish the fundamental characteristics and problems inherent to supersonic cruise aircraft. Next, the advanced technologies and strategies being pursued for the high-speed civil transport were considered to determine any additional unique control problems the transport may have. Finally, existing technologies and methods were examined to determine their capabilities for the design and analysis of high-speed civil transport control systems and to identify the shortcomings and issues. Three priority levels - mandatory, highly beneficial, and desirable - were established. Within each of these levels, the issues were further ranked. Technology development plans for each issue were defined. Each plan contains a task breakdown and schedule.

  3. Software Developed for Analyzing High- Speed Rolling-Element Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleming, David P.

    2005-01-01

    COBRA-AHS (Computer Optimized Ball & Roller Bearing Analysis--Advanced High Speed, J.V. Poplawski & Associates, Bethlehem, PA) is used for the design and analysis of rolling element bearings operating at high speeds under complex mechanical and thermal loading. The code estimates bearing fatigue life by calculating three-dimensional subsurface stress fields developed within the bearing raceways. It provides a state-of-the-art interactive design environment for bearing engineers within a single easy-to-use design-analysis package. The code analyzes flexible or rigid shaft systems containing up to five bearings acted upon by radial, thrust, and moment loads in 5 degrees of freedom. Bearing types include high-speed ball, cylindrical roller, and tapered roller bearings. COBRA-AHS is the first major upgrade in 30 years of such commercially available bearing software. The upgrade was developed under a Small Business Innovation Research contract from the NASA Glenn Research Center, and incorporates the results of 30 years of NASA and industry bearing research and technology.

  4. Advanced Adaptive Optics Technology Development

    SciTech Connect

    Olivier, S

    2001-09-18

    The NSF Center for Adaptive Optics (CfAO) is supporting research on advanced adaptive optics technologies. CfAO research activities include development and characterization of micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) deformable mirror (DM) technology, as well as development and characterization of high-resolution adaptive optics systems using liquid crystal (LC) spatial light modulator (SLM) technology. This paper presents an overview of the CfAO advanced adaptive optics technology development activities including current status and future plans.

  5. High-Speed Electrochemical Imaging.

    PubMed

    Momotenko, Dmitry; Byers, Joshua C; McKelvey, Kim; Kang, Minkyung; Unwin, Patrick R

    2015-09-22

    The design, development, and application of high-speed scanning electrochemical probe microscopy is reported. The approach allows the acquisition of a series of high-resolution images (typically 1000 pixels μm(-2)) at rates approaching 4 seconds per frame, while collecting up to 8000 image pixels per second, about 1000 times faster than typical imaging speeds used up to now. The focus is on scanning electrochemical cell microscopy (SECCM), but the principles and practicalities are applicable to many electrochemical imaging methods. The versatility of the high-speed scan concept is demonstrated at a variety of substrates, including imaging the electroactivity of a patterned self-assembled monolayer on gold, visualization of chemical reactions occurring at single wall carbon nanotubes, and probing nanoscale electrocatalysts for water splitting. These studies provide movies of spatial variations of electrochemical fluxes as a function of potential and a platform for the further development of high speed scanning with other electrochemical imaging techniques.

  6. SEAL FOR HIGH SPEED CENTRIFUGE

    DOEpatents

    Skarstrom, C.W.

    1957-12-17

    A seal is described for a high speed centrifuge wherein the centrifugal force of rotation acts on the gasket to form a tight seal. The cylindrical rotating bowl of the centrifuge contains a closure member resting on a shoulder in the bowl wall having a lower surface containing bands of gasket material, parallel and adjacent to the cylinder wall. As the centrifuge speed increases, centrifugal force acts on the bands of gasket material forcing them in to a sealing contact against the cylinder wall. This arrangememt forms a simple and effective seal for high speed centrifuges, replacing more costly methods such as welding a closure in place.

  7. Quiet High Speed Fan II (QHSF II): Final Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kontos, Karen; Weir, Don; Ross, Dave

    2012-01-01

    This report details the aerodynamic, mechanical, structural design and fabrication of a Honey Engines Quiet High Speed Fan II (lower hub/tip ratio and higher specific flow than the Baseline I fan). This fan/nacelle system incorporates features such as advanced forward sweep and an advanced integrated fan/fan exit guide vane design that provides for the following characteristics: (1) Reduced noise at supersonic tip speeds, in comparison to current state-of-the-art fan technology; (2) Improved aeroelastic stability within the anticipated operating envelope; and (3) Aerodynamic performance consistent with current state-of-the-art fan technology. This fan was fabricated by Honeywell and tested in the NASA Glenn 9- by 15-Ft Low Speed Wind Tunnel for aerodynamic, aeromechanical, and acoustic performance.

  8. Pulse Detonation Engines for High Speed Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Povinelli, Louis A.

    2002-01-01

    Revolutionary concepts in propulsion are required in order to achieve high-speed cruise capability in the atmosphere and for low cost reliable systems for earth to orbit missions. One of the advanced concepts under study is the air-breathing pulse detonation engine. Additional work remains in order to establish the role and performance of a PDE in flight applications, either as a stand-alone device or as part of a combined cycle system. In this paper, we shall offer a few remarks on some of these remaining issues, i.e., combined cycle systems, nozzles and exhaust systems and thrust per unit frontal area limitations. Currently, an intensive experimental and numerical effort is underway in order to quantify the propulsion performance characteristics of this device. In this paper, we shall highlight our recent efforts to elucidate the propulsion potential of pulse detonation engines and their possible application to high-speed or hypersonic systems.

  9. High Speed Research Program Sonic Fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rizzi, Stephen A. (Technical Monitor); Beier, Theodor H.; Heaton, Paul

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this sonic fatigue summary is to provide major findings and technical results of studies, initiated in 1994, to assess sonic fatigue behavior of structure that is being considered for the High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT). High Speed Research (HSR) program objectives in the area of sonic fatigue were to predict inlet, exhaust and boundary layer acoustic loads; measure high cycle fatigue data for materials developed during the HSR program; develop advanced sonic fatigue calculation methods to reduce required conservatism in airframe designs; develop damping techniques for sonic fatigue reduction where weight effective; develop wing and fuselage sonic fatigue design requirements; and perform sonic fatigue analyses on HSCT structural concepts to provide guidance to design teams. All goals were partially achieved, but none were completed due to the premature conclusion of the HSR program. A summary of major program findings and recommendations for continued effort are included in the report.

  10. High speed multiwire photon camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lacy, Jeffrey L. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    An improved multiwire proportional counter camera having particular utility in the field of clinical nuclear medicine imaging. The detector utilizes direct coupled, low impedance, high speed delay lines, the segments of which are capacitor-inductor networks. A pile-up rejection test is provided to reject confused events otherwise caused by multiple ionization events occurring during the readout window.

  11. High speed multiwire photon camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lacy, Jeffrey L. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    An improved multiwire proportional counter camera having particular utility in the field of clinical nuclear medicine imaging. The detector utilizes direct coupled, low impedance, high speed delay lines, the segments of which are capacitor-inductor networks. A pile-up rejection test is provided to reject confused events otherwise caused by multiple ionization events occuring during the readout window.

  12. High-speed pulse camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawson, J. R.

    1968-01-01

    Miniaturized, 16 mm high speed pulse camera takes spectral photometric photographs upon instantaneous command. The design includes a low-friction, low-inertia film transport, a very thin beryllium shutter driven by a low-inertia stepper motor for minimum actuation time after a pulse command, and a binary encoder.

  13. 49 CFR 38.175 - High-speed rail cars, monorails and systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false High-speed rail cars, monorails and systems. 38....175 High-speed rail cars, monorails and systems. (a) All cars for high-speed rail systems, including but not limited to those using “maglev” or high speed steel-wheel-on-steel rail technology,...

  14. 49 CFR 38.175 - High-speed rail cars, monorails and systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false High-speed rail cars, monorails and systems. 38....175 High-speed rail cars, monorails and systems. (a) All cars for high-speed rail systems, including but not limited to those using “maglev” or high speed steel-wheel-on-steel rail technology,...

  15. 49 CFR 38.175 - High-speed rail cars, monorails and systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false High-speed rail cars, monorails and systems. 38....175 High-speed rail cars, monorails and systems. (a) All cars for high-speed rail systems, including but not limited to those using “maglev” or high speed steel-wheel-on-steel rail technology,...

  16. 49 CFR 38.175 - High-speed rail cars, monorails and systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false High-speed rail cars, monorails and systems. 38....175 High-speed rail cars, monorails and systems. (a) All cars for high-speed rail systems, including but not limited to those using “maglev” or high speed steel-wheel-on-steel rail technology,...

  17. 49 CFR 38.175 - High-speed rail cars, monorails and systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false High-speed rail cars, monorails and systems. 38....175 High-speed rail cars, monorails and systems. (a) All cars for high-speed rail systems, including but not limited to those using “maglev” or high speed steel-wheel-on-steel rail technology,...

  18. Unique research challenges for high-speed civil transports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Charlie M., Jr.; Morris, Charles E. K., Jr.

    1987-01-01

    Market growth and technological advances are expected to lead to a generation of long-range transports that cruise at supersonic or even hypersonic speeds. Current NASA/industry studies will define the market windows in terms of time frame, Mach number, and technology requirements for these aircraft. Initial results indicate that, for the years 2000 to 2020, economically attractive vehicles could have a cruise speed up to Mach 6. The resulting research challenges are unique. They must be met with technologies that will produce commercially successful and environmentally compatible vehicles where none have existed. Several important areas of research were identified for the high-speed civil transports. Among these are sonic boom, takeoff noise, thermal management, lightweight structures with long life, unique propulsion concepts, unconventional fuels, and supersonic laminar flow.

  19. A new approach to live reaction monitoring using active flow technology in ultra-high-speed HPLC with mass spectral detection.

    PubMed

    Kocic, Danijela; Andrew Shalliker, R

    2015-12-01

    A new type of chromatography column referred to as a parallel segmented flow (PSF) column enables ultra-high-speed high-performance liquid chromatography-MS to be undertaken. This occurs because the separation efficiency obtained on PSF columns has been shown in prior studies to be superior to conventional columns, and the flow stream is split radially inside the outlet end fitting of the column, rather than in an axial post-column flow stream split. As a result, the flow through the column can be five times higher than the flow through the MS. In this work, the degradation of amino acids in dilute nitric acid was used to illustrate the process. Separations were obtained in less than 12 s, although the reinjection process was initiated 6 s after the previous injection. The degradation rate constant of tryptophan, in the presence of tyrosine and phenylalanine, was determined.

  20. Advanced Materials Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blankenship, C. P. (Compiler); Teichman, L. A. (Compiler)

    1982-01-01

    Composites, polymer science, metallic materials (aluminum, titanium, and superalloys), materials processing technology, materials durability in the aerospace environment, ceramics, fatigue and fracture mechanics, tribology, and nondestructive evaluation (NDE) are discussed. Research and development activities are introduced to the nonaerospace industry. In order to provide a convenient means to help transfer aerospace technology to the commercial mainstream in a systematic manner.

  1. Advanced interdisciplinary technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, John L.

    1990-01-01

    The following topics are presented in view graph form: (1) breakthrough trust (space research and technology assessment); (2) bionics (technology derivatives from biological systems); (3) biodynamics (modeling of human biomechanical performance based on anatomical data); and (4) tethered atmospheric research probes.

  2. Advance warning of high-speed ejecta based on real-time shock analyses: When fast-moving ejecta appear to be overtaking slow-moving shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paulson, Kristoff W.; Taylor, David K.; Smith, Charles W.; Vasquez, Bernard J.; Hu, Q.

    2012-12-01

    Interplanetary shocks propagating into the magnetosphere can have significant space weather consequences. However, for many purposes it is the ejecta behind the shock that is the greater threat. The ejecta can be fast moving, impart significant momentum upon the magnetopause, and may contain a flux rope with strong southward magnetic fields. When transient solar wind activity strikes the magnetosphere, it can lead to enhanced magnetospheric currents and elevated radiation levels in the near-Earth environment. It is therefore desirable to use the observed shocks ahead of ejecta to predict any aspects of the approaching ejecta that can be predicted. We have examined 39 shocks observed by the Advanced Composition Explorer spacecraft in the years 1998 to 2003. Within the selection are shocks that were chosen because they appear to propagate significantly more slowly than the speed of the ejecta behind it. While appearing at first to be a contradiction, we show that the shocks are propagating across the radial direction and at significant angles to the velocity of the ejecta. These slow-moving shocks are actually precursors of fast-moving and potentially significant ejecta. Reversing the analysis, we are able to predict the peak speed of the ejecta well in advance of their observation, up to or in excess of 10 h following the shock crossing, when slow-moving shocks are seen, and we have incorporated this feature into our real-time shock analysis.

  3. Characterization and Compensation of High Speed Digitizers

    SciTech Connect

    Fong, P; Teruya, A; Lowry, M

    2005-04-04

    Increasingly, ADC technology is being pressed into service for single single-shot instrumentation applications that were formerly served by vacuum-tube based oscilloscopes and streak cameras. ADC technology, while convenient, suffers significant performance impairments. Thus, in these demanding applications, a quantitative and accurate representation of these impairments is critical to an understanding of measurement accuracy. We have developed a phase-plane behavioral model, implemented it in SIMULINK and applied it to interleaved, high-speed ADCs (up to 4 gigasamples/sec). We have also developed and demonstrated techniques to effectively compensate for these impairments based upon the model.

  4. Advanced technology composite aircraft structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ilcewicz, Larry B.; Walker, Thomas H.

    1991-01-01

    Work performed during the 25th month on NAS1-18889, Advanced Technology Composite Aircraft Structures, is summarized. The main objective of this program is to develop an integrated technology and demonstrate a confidence level that permits the cost- and weight-effective use of advanced composite materials in primary structures of future aircraft with the emphasis on pressurized fuselages. The period from 1-31 May 1991 is covered.

  5. Enabling propulsion materials for high-speed civil transport engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, Joseph R.; Herbell, Thomas P.

    1992-01-01

    NASA Headquarters and LeRC have advocated an Enabling Propulsion Materials Program (EPM) to begin in FY-92. The High Speed Research Phase 1 program which began in FY-90 has focused on the environmental acceptability of a High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT). Studies by industry, including Boeing, McDonnell Douglas, GE Aircraft Engines, and Pratt & Whitney Aircraft, and in-house studies by NASA concluded that NO(x) emissions and airport noise reduction can only be economically achieved by revolutionary advancements in materials technologies. This is especially true of materials for the propulsion system where the combustor is the key to maintaining low emissions, and the exhaust nozzle is the key to reducing airport noise to an acceptable level. Both of these components will rely on high temperature composite materials that can withstand the conditions imposed by commercial aircraft operations. The proposed EPM program will operate in conjunction with the HSR Phase 1 Program and the planned HSR Phase 2 program slated to start in FY-93. Components and subcomponents developed from advanced materials will be evaluated in the HSR Phase 2 Program.

  6. Design and overall performance of four highly loaded, high speed inlet stages for an advanced high-pressure-ratio core compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reid, L.; Moore, R. D.

    1978-01-01

    The detailed design and overall performances of four inlet stages for an advanced core compressor are presented. These four stages represent two levels of design total pressure ratio (1.82 and 2.05), two levels of rotor aspect ratio (1.19 and 1.63), and two levels of stator aspect ratio (1.26 and 1.78). The individual stages were tested over the stable operating flow range at 70, 90, and 100 percent of design speeds. The performances of the low aspect ratio configurations were substantially better than those of the high aspect ratio configurations. The two low aspect ratio configurations achieved peak efficiencies of 0.876 and 0.872 and corresponding stage efficiencies of 0.845 and 0.840. The high aspect ratio configurations achieved peak ratio efficiencies of 0.851 and 0.849 and corresponding stage efficiencies of 0.821 and 0.831.

  7. New advances in erectile technology.

    PubMed

    Stein, Marshall J; Lin, Haocheng; Wang, Run

    2014-02-01

    New discoveries and technological advances in medicine are rapid. The role of technology in the treatment of erectile dysfunction (ED) will be widened and more options will be available in the years to come. These erectile technologies include external penile support devices, penile vibrators, low intensity extracorporeal shockwave, tissue engineering, nanotechnology and endovascular technology. Even for matured treatment modalities for ED, such as vacuum erectile devices and penile implants, there is new scientific information and novel technology available to improve their usage and to stimulate new ideas. We anticipate that erectile technologies may revolutionize ED treatment and in the very near future ED may become a curable condition.

  8. Design optimization of high-speed proprotor aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schleicher, David R.; Phillips, James D.; Carbajal, Kevin B.

    1993-01-01

    NASA's high-speed rotorcraft (HSRC) studies have the objective of investigating technology for vehicles that have both low downwash velocities and forward flight speed capability of up to 450 knots. This paper investigates a tilt rotor, a tilt wing, and a folding tilt rotor designed for a civil transport mission. Baseline aircraft models using current technology are developed for each configuration using a vertical/short takeoff and landing (V/STOL) aircraft design synthesis computer program to generate converged vehicle designs. Sensitivity studies and numerical optimization are used to illustrate each configuration's key design tradeoffs and constraints. Minimization of the gross takeoff weight is used as the optimization objective function. Several advanced technologies are chosen, and their relative impact on future configurational development is discussed. Finally, the impact of maximum cruise speed on vehicle figures of merit (gross weight, productivity, and direct operating cost) is analyzed. The three most important conclusions from the study are payload ratios for these aircraft will be commensurate with current fixed-wing commuter aircraft; future tilt rotors and tilt wings will be significantly lighter, more productive, and cheaper than competing folding tilt rotors; and the most promising technologies are an advanced-technology proprotor for both tilt rotor and tilt wing and advanced structural materials for the folding tilt rotor.

  9. Fusion: ultra-high-speed and IR image sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Etoh, T. Goji; Dao, V. T. S.; Nguyen, Quang A.; Kimata, M.

    2015-08-01

    Most targets of ultra-high-speed video cameras operating at more than 1 Mfps, such as combustion, crack propagation, collision, plasma, spark discharge, an air bag at a car accident and a tire under a sudden brake, generate sudden heat. Researchers in these fields require tools to measure the high-speed motion and heat simultaneously. Ultra-high frame rate imaging is achieved by an in-situ storage image sensor. Each pixel of the sensor is equipped with multiple memory elements to record a series of image signals simultaneously at all pixels. Image signals stored in each pixel are read out after an image capturing operation. In 2002, we developed an in-situ storage image sensor operating at 1 Mfps 1). However, the fill factor of the sensor was only 15% due to a light shield covering the wide in-situ storage area. Therefore, in 2011, we developed a backside illuminated (BSI) in-situ storage image sensor to increase the sensitivity with 100% fill factor and a very high quantum efficiency 2). The sensor also achieved a much higher frame rate,16.7 Mfps, thanks to the wiring on the front side with more freedom 3). The BSI structure has another advantage that it has less difficulties in attaching an additional layer on the backside, such as scintillators. This paper proposes development of an ultra-high-speed IR image sensor in combination of advanced nano-technologies for IR imaging and the in-situ storage technology for ultra-highspeed imaging with discussion on issues in the integration.

  10. Pulsed laser triggered high speed microfluidic switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ting-Hsiang; Gao, Lanyu; Chen, Yue; Wei, Kenneth; Chiou, Pei-Yu

    2008-10-01

    We report a high-speed microfluidic switch capable of achieving a switching time of 10 μs. The switching mechanism is realized by exciting dynamic vapor bubbles with focused laser pulses in a microfluidic polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) channel. The bubble expansion deforms the elastic PDMS channel wall and squeezes the adjacent sample channel to control its fluid and particle flows as captured by the time-resolved imaging system. A switching of polystyrene microspheres in a Y-shaped channel has also been demonstrated. This ultrafast laser triggered switching mechanism has the potential to advance the sorting speed of state-of-the-art microscale fluorescence activated cell sorting devices.

  11. Advances in photovoltaic technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landis, G. A.; Bailey, S. G.

    1992-01-01

    The advances in solar cell efficiency, radiation tolerance, and cost in the last 10 years are presented. The potential performance of thin-film solar cells in space is examined, and the cost and the historical trends in production capability of the photovoltaics industry are considered with respect to the needs of satellite solar power systems. Attention is given to single-crystal cells, concentrator and cascade cells, and thin-film solar cells.

  12. Investigation of advanced counterrotation blade configuration concepts for high speed turboprop systems. Task 5: Unsteady counterrotation ducted propfan analysis. Computer program user's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Edward J.; Delaney, Robert A.; Adamczyk, John J.; Miller, Christopher J.; Arnone, Andrea; Swanson, Charles

    1993-01-01

    The primary objective of this study was the development of a time-marching three-dimensional Euler/Navier-Stokes aerodynamic analysis to predict steady and unsteady compressible transonic flows about ducted and unducted propfan propulsion systems employing multiple blade rows. The computer codes resulting from this study are referred to as ADPAC-AOACR (Advanced Ducted Propfan Analysis Codes-Angle of Attack Coupled Row). This report is intended to serve as a computer program user's manual for the ADPAC-AOACR codes developed under Task 5 of NASA Contract NAS3-25270, Unsteady Counterrotating Ducted Propfan Analysis. The ADPAC-AOACR program is based on a flexible multiple blocked grid discretization scheme permitting coupled 2-D/3-D mesh block solutions with application to a wide variety of geometries. For convenience, several standard mesh block structures are described for turbomachinery applications. Aerodynamic calculations are based on a four-stage Runge-Kutta time-marching finite volume solution technique with added numerical dissipation. Steady flow predictions are accelerated by a multigrid procedure. Numerical calculations are compared with experimental data for several test cases to demonstrate the utility of this approach for predicting the aerodynamics of modern turbomachinery configurations employing multiple blade rows.

  13. Investigation of advanced counterrotation blade configuration concepts for high speed turboprop systems. Task 2: Unsteady ducted propfan analysis computer program users manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Edward J.; Delaney, Robert A.; Bettner, James L.

    1991-01-01

    The primary objective of this study was the development of a time-dependent three-dimensional Euler/Navier-Stokes aerodynamic analysis to predict unsteady compressible transonic flows about ducted and unducted propfan propulsion systems at angle of attack. The computer codes resulting from this study are referred to as Advanced Ducted Propfan Analysis Codes (ADPAC). This report is intended to serve as a computer program user's manual for the ADPAC developed under Task 2 of NASA Contract NAS3-25270, Unsteady Ducted Propfan Analysis. Aerodynamic calculations were based on a four-stage Runge-Kutta time-marching finite volume solution technique with added numerical dissipation. A time-accurate implicit residual smoothing operator was utilized for unsteady flow predictions. For unducted propfans, a single H-type grid was used to discretize each blade passage of the complete propeller. For ducted propfans, a coupled system of five grid blocks utilizing an embedded C-grid about the cowl leading edge was used to discretize each blade passage. Grid systems were generated by a combined algebraic/elliptic algorithm developed specifically for ducted propfans. Numerical calculations were compared with experimental data for both ducted and unducted propfan flows. The solution scheme demonstrated efficiency and accuracy comparable with other schemes of this class.

  14. All aboard for high-speed rail

    SciTech Connect

    Herman, D.

    1996-09-01

    A sleek, bullet-nosed train whizzing across the countryside is a fairly common sight in many nations. Since the Train a Grande Vitesse (TGV)--the record-setting ``train with great speed``--was introduced in France in 1981, Germany, Japan, and other countries have joined the high-speed club. In addition, the Eurostar passenger train, which travels between Great Britain and France through the Channel Tunnel, can move at 186 miles per hour once it reaches French tracks. Despite the technology`s growth elsewhere, rapid rail travel has not been seen on US shores beyond a few test runs by various manufacturers. Before the end of the century, however, American train spotters will finally be able to see some very fast trains here too. In March, Washington, DC-based Amtrak announced the purchase of 18 American Flyer high-speed train sets for the Northeast Corridor, which stretches from Boston through new York to the nation`s capital. Furthermore, Florida will get its own system by 2004, and other states are now taking a look at the technology. The American Flyer--designed by Montreal-based Bombardier and TGV manufacturer GEC Alsthom Transport in Paris--should venture onto US rails by 1999. Traveling at up to 150 miles per hour, the American Flyer will cut the New York-Boston run from 4 1/2 hours to 3 hours and reduce New York-Washington trip time from 3 hours to less than 2 3/4. Amtrak hopes the new trains and better times will earn it a greater share of travelers from air shuttles and perhaps from Interstate 95. This article describes how technologies that tilt railcars and propel the world`s fastest trains will be merged into one train set for the American Flyer, Amtrak`s first trip along high-speed rails.

  15. Advanced composites technology

    SciTech Connect

    DeTeresa, S J; Groves, S E; Sanchez, R J

    1998-10-01

    The development of fiber composite components in next-generation munitions, such as sabots for kinetic energy penetrators and lightweight cases for advanced artillery projectiles, relies on design trade-off studies using validated computer code simulations. We are developing capabilities to determine the failure of advanced fiber composites under multiaxial stresses to critically evaluate three-dimensional failure models and develop new ones if necessary. The effects of superimposed hydrostatic pressure on failure of composites are being investigated using a high-pressure testing system that incorporates several unique features. Several improvements were made to the system this year, and we report on the first tests of both isotropic and fiber composite materials. The preliminary results indicate that pressure has little effect on longitudinal compression strength of unidirectional composites, but issues with obtaining reliable failures in these materials still remain to be resolved. The transverse compression strength was found to be significantly enhanced by pressure, and the trends observed for this property and the longitudinal strength are in agreement with recent models for failure of fiber composites.

  16. Superplane! High Speed Civil Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    The High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT). This light-hearted promotional piece explains what the HSCT 'Superplane' is and what advantages it will have over current aircraft. As envisioned, the HSCT is a next-generation supersonic (faster than the speed of sound) passenger jet that would fly 300 passengers at more than 1,500 miles per hour -- more than twice the speed of sound. It will cross the Pacific or Atlantic in less than half the time of modern subsonic jets, and at a ticket price less than 20 percent above comparable, slower flights

  17. High-Speed TCP Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooks, David E.; Gassman, Holly; Beering, Dave R.; Welch, Arun; Hoder, Douglas J.; Ivancic, William D.

    1999-01-01

    Transmission Control Protocol (TCP) is the underlying protocol used within the Internet for reliable information transfer. As such, there is great interest to have all implementations of TCP efficiently interoperate. This is particularly important for links exhibiting long bandwidth-delay products. The tools exist to perform TCP analysis at low rates and low delays. However, for extremely high-rate and lone-delay links such as 622 Mbps over geosynchronous satellites, new tools and testing techniques are required. This paper describes the tools and techniques used to analyze and debug various TCP implementations over high-speed, long-delay links.

  18. High speed quantitative digital microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castleman, K. R.; Price, K. H.; Eskenazi, R.; Ovadya, M. M.; Navon, M. A.

    1984-01-01

    Modern digital image processing hardware makes possible quantitative analysis of microscope images at high speed. This paper describes an application to automatic screening for cervical cancer. The system uses twelve MC6809 microprocessors arranged in a pipeline multiprocessor configuration. Each processor executes one part of the algorithm on each cell image as it passes through the pipeline. Each processor communicates with its upstream and downstream neighbors via shared two-port memory. Thus no time is devoted to input-output operations as such. This configuration is expected to be at least ten times faster than previous systems.

  19. High-speed phosphor thermometry.

    PubMed

    Fuhrmann, N; Baum, E; Brübach, J; Dreizler, A

    2011-10-01

    Phosphor thermometry is a semi-invasive surface temperature measurement technique utilising the luminescence properties of doped ceramic materials. Typically, these phosphor materials are coated onto the object of interest and are excited by a short UV laser pulse. Up to now, primarily Q-switched laser systems with repetition rates of 10 Hz were employed for excitation. Accordingly, this diagnostic tool was not applicable to resolve correlated temperature transients at time scales shorter than 100 ms. This contribution reports on the first realisation of a high-speed phosphor thermometry system employing a highly repetitive laser in the kHz regime and a fast decaying phosphor. A suitable material was characterised regarding its temperature lifetime characteristic and its measurement precision. Additionally, the influence of laser power on the phosphor coating was investigated in terms of heating effects. A demonstration of this high-speed technique has been conducted inside the thermally highly transient system of an optically accessible internal combustion engine. Temperatures have been measured with a repetition rate of 6 kHz corresponding to one sample per crank angle degree at 1000 rpm. PMID:22047319

  20. Remote Transmission at High Speed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Omni and NASA Test Operations at Stennis entered a Dual-Use Agreement to develop the FOTR-125, a 125 megabit-per-second fiber-optic transceiver that allows accurate digital recordings over a great distance. The transceiver s fiber-optic link can be as long as 25 kilometers. This makes it much longer than the standard coaxial link, which can be no longer than 50 meters.The FOTR-125 utilizes laser diode transmitter modules and integrated receivers for the optical interface. Two transmitters and two receivers are employed at each end of the link with automatic or manual switchover to maximize the reliability of the communications link. NASA uses the transceiver in Stennis High-Speed Data Acquisition System (HSDAS). The HSDAS consists of several identical systems installed on the Center s test stands to process all high-speed data related to its propulsion test programs. These transceivers allow the recorder and HSDAS controls to be located in the Test Control Center in a remote location while the digitizer is located on the test stand.

  1. High-speed phosphor thermometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuhrmann, N.; Baum, E.; Brübach, J.; Dreizler, A.

    2011-10-01

    Phosphor thermometry is a semi-invasive surface temperature measurement technique utilising the luminescence properties of doped ceramic materials. Typically, these phosphor materials are coated onto the object of interest and are excited by a short UV laser pulse. Up to now, primarily Q-switched laser systems with repetition rates of 10 Hz were employed for excitation. Accordingly, this diagnostic tool was not applicable to resolve correlated temperature transients at time scales shorter than 100 ms. This contribution reports on the first realisation of a high-speed phosphor thermometry system employing a highly repetitive laser in the kHz regime and a fast decaying phosphor. A suitable material was characterised regarding its temperature lifetime characteristic and its measurement precision. Additionally, the influence of laser power on the phosphor coating was investigated in terms of heating effects. A demonstration of this high-speed technique has been conducted inside the thermally highly transient system of an optically accessible internal combustion engine. Temperatures have been measured with a repetition rate of 6 kHz corresponding to one sample per crank angle degree at 1000 rpm.

  2. High-speed phosphor thermometry.

    PubMed

    Fuhrmann, N; Baum, E; Brübach, J; Dreizler, A

    2011-10-01

    Phosphor thermometry is a semi-invasive surface temperature measurement technique utilising the luminescence properties of doped ceramic materials. Typically, these phosphor materials are coated onto the object of interest and are excited by a short UV laser pulse. Up to now, primarily Q-switched laser systems with repetition rates of 10 Hz were employed for excitation. Accordingly, this diagnostic tool was not applicable to resolve correlated temperature transients at time scales shorter than 100 ms. This contribution reports on the first realisation of a high-speed phosphor thermometry system employing a highly repetitive laser in the kHz regime and a fast decaying phosphor. A suitable material was characterised regarding its temperature lifetime characteristic and its measurement precision. Additionally, the influence of laser power on the phosphor coating was investigated in terms of heating effects. A demonstration of this high-speed technique has been conducted inside the thermally highly transient system of an optically accessible internal combustion engine. Temperatures have been measured with a repetition rate of 6 kHz corresponding to one sample per crank angle degree at 1000 rpm.

  3. [Technological advances in neurorehabilitation].

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-Martínez, Josefina; Núñez-Gaona, Marco Antonio; Carrillo-Mora, Paul

    2014-07-01

    Neurological rehabilitation arose as formal method in the 60's, for the therapeutic treatment of patients with stroke or spinal cord injury, which develop severe sequelae that affect their motor and sensory abilities. Although the Central Nervous System has plasticity mechanisms for spontaneous recovery, a high percentage of patients should receive specialized therapies to regain motor function, such as Constraint Induced Movement Therapy or Upright physical Therapy. The neurorehabilitation has undergone drastic changes over the last two decades due to the incorporation of computer and robotic electronic devices, designed to produce positive changes in cortical excitability of the cerebral hemisphere damaged and so to improve neuroplasticity. Among equipment, we can mention those for electrotherapy devices, apparatus for transcranial magnetic stimulation, the robotic lower limb orthoses, robot for upper limb training, systems for functional electrical stimulation, neuroprosthesis and brain computer interfaces. These devices have caused controversy because of its application and benefits reported in the literature. The aim of Neurorehabilitation technologies is to take advantage of the functional neuromuscular structures preserved, and they compensate or re-learn the functions that previously made the damaged areas. The purpose of this article is to mention some clinical applications and benefits that these technologies offer to patients with neuronal injury.

  4. Calculated performance, stability and maneuverability of high-speed tilting-prop-rotor aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Wayne; Lau, Benton H.; Bowles, Jeffrey V.

    1986-01-01

    The feasibility of operating tilting-prop-rotor aircraft at high speeds is examined by calculating the performance, stability, and maneuverability of representative configurations. The rotor performance is examined in high-speed cruise and in hover. The whirl-flutter stability of the coupled-wing and rotor motion is calculated in the cruise mode. Maneuverability is examined in terms of the rotor-thrust limit during turns in helicopter configuration. Rotor airfoils, rotor-hub configuration, wing airfoil, and airframe structural weights representing demonstrated advance technology are discussed. Key rotor and airframe parameters are optimized for high-speed performance and stability. The basic aircraft-design parameters are optimized for minimum gross weight. To provide a focus for the calculations, two high-speed tilt-rotor aircraft are considered: a 46-passenger, civil transport and an air-combat/escort fighter, both with design speeds of about 400 knots. It is concluded that such high-speed tilt-rotor aircraft are quite practical.

  5. Advances in energy technology

    SciTech Connect

    Sauer, H.J. Jr.; Hegler, B.E.

    1982-01-01

    Papers on various topics of energy conservation, new passive solar heating and storage devices, governmental particiaption in developing energy technologies, and the development of diverse energy sources and safety features are presented. Attention is given to recent shifts in the federal and state government roles in energy research, development and economic incentives. The applications of passive solar walls, flat plate collectors and trombe walls as retorfits for houses, institutions, and industries were examined. Attention was given to the implementation of wind power by a zoo and the use of spoilers as speed control devices in a Darrieus wind turbine. Aspects of gasohol, coal, synfuel, and laser-pyrolyzed coal products use are investigated. Finally, the economic, social, and political factors influencing energy system selection are explored, together with conservation practices in housing, government, and industry, and new simulators for enhancing nuclear power plant safety.

  6. Advanced Aerogel Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Steven

    2013-01-01

    The JPL Aerogel Laboratory has made aerogels for NASA flight missions, e.g., Stardust, 2003 Mars Exploration Rovers and the 2011 Mars Science Laboratory, as well as NASA research projects for the past 14 years. During that time it has produced aerogels of a range of shapes, sizes, densities and compositions. Research is ongoing in the development of aerogels for future sample capture and return missions and for thermal insulation for both spacecraft and scientific instruments. For the past several years, the JPL Aerogel Laboratory has been developing, producing and testing a new composite material for use as the high temperature thermal insulation in the Advanced Sterling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG) being developed by Lockheed Martin and NASA. The composite is made up of a glass fiber felt, silica aerogel, Titania powder, and silica powder. The oxide powders are included to reduce irradiative heat transport at elevated temperatures. These materials have thermal conductivity values that are the same as the best commercially produced high temperature insulation materials, and yet are 40% lighter. By greatly reducing the amount of oxide powder in the composite, the density, and therefore for the value of the thermal conductivity, would be reduced. The JPL Aerogel Laboratory has experimented with using glass fiber felt, expanded glass fiber felt and loose fibers to add structural integrity to silica aerogels. However, this work has been directed toward high temperature applications. By conducting a brief investigation of the optimal combination of fiber reinforcement and aerogel density, a durable, extremely efficient thermal insulation material for ambient temperature applications would be produced. If a transparent thermal insulation is desired, then aerogel is an excellent candidate material. At typical ambient temperatures, silica aerogel prevents the transport of heat via convection and conduction due to its highly porous nature. To prevent irradiative thermal

  7. Advanced Technology for Engineering Education

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, Ahmed K. (Compiler); Malone, John B. (Compiler)

    1998-01-01

    This document contains the proceedings of the Workshop on Advanced Technology for Engineering Education, held at the Peninsula Graduate Engineering Center, Hampton, Virginia, February 24-25, 1998. The workshop was jointly sponsored by the University of Virginia's Center for Advanced Computational Technology and NASA. Workshop attendees came from NASA, other government agencies, industry and universities. The objectives of the workshop were to assess the status of advanced technologies for engineering education and to explore the possibility of forming a consortium of interested individuals/universities for curriculum reform and development using advanced technologies. The presentations covered novel delivery systems and several implementations of new technologies for engineering education. Certain materials and products are identified in this publication in order to specify adequately the materials and products that were investigated in the research effort. In no case does such identification imply recommendation or endorsement of products by NASA, nor does it imply that the materials and products are the only ones or the best ones available for this purpose. In many cases equivalent materials and products are available and would probably produce equivalent results.

  8. First Annual High-Speed Research Workshop, part 4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitehead, Allen H., Jr. (Compiler)

    1992-01-01

    Papers presented at the First Annual High Speed Research Workshop held in Williamsburg, Viginia, on May 14-16, 1991 are presented. This NASA-sponsored workshop provided a national forum for presenting and discussing important technology issues related to the definition of an economically viable and environmentally compatible High Speed Civil Transport. The sessions are developed around the technical components of NASA's Phase 1 High Speed Research Program which addresses the environmental issues of atmospheric emissions, community noise, and sonic boom. In particular, this part of the publication, Part 4, addresses high lift research and supersonic laminar flow control.

  9. First Annual High-Speed Research Workshop, part 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitehead, Allen H., Jr. (Compiler)

    1992-01-01

    The First High-Speed Research (HSR) Workshop was hosted by NASA LaRC and was held 14-16 May 1991, in Williamsburg, Virginia. The purpose of the workshop was to provide a national forum for the government, industry, and university participants to present and discuss important technology issues related to the development of a commercially viable, environmentally compatible, U.S. High-Speed Civil Transport. The workshop sessions are organized around the major task elements in NASA's Phase 1 High-Speed Research Program which basically addresses the environmental issues of atmospheric emissions, community noise, and sonic boom.

  10. High-speed wavelength-swept lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Kevin

    2006-05-01

    High-speed wavelength-swept lasers capable of providing wide frequency chirp and flexible temporal waveforms could enable numerous advanced functionalities for defense and security applications. Powered by high spectral intensity at rapid sweep rates across a wide wavelength range in each of the 1060nm, 1300nm, and 1550nm spectral windows, these swept-laser systems have demonstrated real-time monitoring and superior signal-to-noise ratio measurements in optical frequency domain imaging, fiber-optic sensor arrays, and near-IR spectroscopy. These same capabilities show promising potentials in laser radar and remote sensing applications. The core of the high-speed swept laser incorporates a semiconductor gain module and a high-performance fiber Fabry- Perot tunable filter (FFP-TF) to provide rapid wavelength scanning operations. This unique design embodies the collective advantages of the semiconductor amplifier's broad gain-bandwidth with direct modulation capability, and the FFP-TF's wide tuning ranges (>200nm), high finesse (1000 to 10,000), low-loss (<3dB), and fast scan rates reaching 20KHz. As a result, the laser can sweep beyond 100nm in 25μsec, output a scanning peak power near mW level, and exhibit excellent peak signal-to-spontaneous-emission ratio >80dB in static mode. When configured as a seed laser followed by post amplification, the swept spectrum and power can be optimized for Doppler ranging and remote sensing applications. Furthermore, when combined with a dispersive element, the wavelength sweep can be converted into high-speed and wide-angle spatial scanning without moving parts.

  11. Energy Storage (II): Developing Advanced Technologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Arthur L

    1974-01-01

    Energy storage, considered by some scientists to be the best technological and economic advancement after advanced nuclear power, still rates only modest funding for research concerning the development of advanced technologies. (PEB)

  12. Small Scale High Speed Turbomachinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    London, Adam P. (Inventor); Droppers, Lloyd J. (Inventor); Lehman, Matthew K. (Inventor); Mehra, Amitav (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A small scale, high speed turbomachine is described, as well as a process for manufacturing the turbomachine. The turbomachine is manufactured by diffusion bonding stacked sheets of metal foil, each of which has been pre-formed to correspond to a cross section of the turbomachine structure. The turbomachines include rotating elements as well as static structures. Using this process, turbomachines may be manufactured with rotating elements that have outer diameters of less than four inches in size, and/or blading heights of less than 0.1 inches. The rotating elements of the turbomachines are capable of rotating at speeds in excess of 150 feet per second. In addition, cooling features may be added internally to blading to facilitate cooling in high temperature operations.

  13. High speed laser tomography system.

    PubMed

    Samsonov, D; Elsaesser, A; Edwards, A; Thomas, H M; Morfill, G E

    2008-03-01

    A high speed laser tomography system was developed capable of acquiring three-dimensional (3D) images of optically thin clouds of moving micron-sized particles. It operates by parallel-shifting an illuminating laser sheet with a pair of galvanometer-driven mirrors and synchronously recording two-dimensional (2D) images of thin slices of the imaged volume. The maximum scanning speed achieved was 120,000 slices/s, sequences of 24 volume scans (up to 256 slices each) have been obtained. The 2D slices were stacked to form 3D images of the volume, then the positions of the particles were identified and followed in the consecutive scans. The system was used to image a complex plasma with particles moving at speeds up to cm/s.

  14. Experiments on high speed ejectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, J. J.

    1986-01-01

    Experimental studies were conducted to investigate the flow and the performance of thrust augmenting ejectors for flight Mach numbers in the range of 0.5 to 0.8, primary air stagnation pressures up to 107 psig (738 kPa), and primary air stagnation temperatures up to 1250 F (677 C). The experiment verified the existence of the second solution ejector flow, where the flow after complete mixing is supersonic. Thrust augmentation in excess of 1.2 was demonstrated for both hot and cold primary jets. The experimental ejector performed better than the corresponding theoretical optimal first solution ejector, where the mixed flow is subsonic. Further studies are required to realize the full potential of the second solution ejector. The research program was started by the Flight Dynamics Research Corporation (FDRC) to investigate the characteristic of a high speed ejector which augments thrust of a jet at high flight speeds.

  15. High speed laser tomography system.

    PubMed

    Samsonov, D; Elsaesser, A; Edwards, A; Thomas, H M; Morfill, G E

    2008-03-01

    A high speed laser tomography system was developed capable of acquiring three-dimensional (3D) images of optically thin clouds of moving micron-sized particles. It operates by parallel-shifting an illuminating laser sheet with a pair of galvanometer-driven mirrors and synchronously recording two-dimensional (2D) images of thin slices of the imaged volume. The maximum scanning speed achieved was 120,000 slices/s, sequences of 24 volume scans (up to 256 slices each) have been obtained. The 2D slices were stacked to form 3D images of the volume, then the positions of the particles were identified and followed in the consecutive scans. The system was used to image a complex plasma with particles moving at speeds up to cm/s. PMID:18377040

  16. Advanced Operating System Technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cittolin, Sergio; Riccardi, Fabio; Vascotto, Sandro

    . Our work started in the second half of 1994, with a research agreement between CERN and Chorus Systemes (France), world leader in the micro-kernel OS technology. The Chorus OS is targeted to distributed real-time applications, and it can very efficiently support different "OS personalities" in the same environment, like Posix, UNIX, and a CORBA compliant distributed object architecture. Projects are being set-up to verify the suitability of our work for LHC applications, we are building a scaled-down prototype of the DAQ system foreseen for the CMS experiment at LHC, where we will directly test our protocols and where we will be able to make measurements and benchmarks, guiding our development and allowing us to build an analytical model of the system, suitable for simulation and large scale verification.

  17. High speed sampler and demultiplexer

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, T.E.

    1995-12-26

    A high speed sampling demultiplexer based on a plurality of sampler banks, each bank comprising a sample transmission line for transmitting an input signal, a strobe transmission line for transmitting a strobe signal, and a plurality of sampling gates at respective positions along the sample transmission line for sampling the input signal in response to the strobe signal. Strobe control circuitry is coupled to the plurality of banks, and supplies a sequence of bank strobe signals to the strobe transmission lines in each of the plurality of banks, and includes circuits for controlling the timing of the bank strobe signals among the banks of samplers. Input circuitry is included for supplying the input signal to be sampled to the plurality of sample transmission lines in the respective banks. The strobe control circuitry can repetitively strobe the plurality of banks of samplers such that the banks of samplers are cycled to create a long sample length. Second tier demultiplexing circuitry is coupled to each of the samplers in the plurality of banks. The second tier demultiplexing circuitry senses the sample taken by the corresponding sampler each time the bank in which the sampler is found is strobed. A plurality of such samples can be stored by the second tier demultiplexing circuitry for later processing. Repetitive sampling with the high speed transient sampler induces an effect known as ``strobe kickout``. The sample transmission lines include structures which reduce strobe kickout to acceptable levels, generally 60 dB below the signal, by absorbing the kickout pulses before the next sampling repetition. 16 figs.

  18. High speed sampler and demultiplexer

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, Thomas E.

    1995-01-01

    A high speed sampling demultiplexer based on a plurality of sampler banks, each bank comprising a sample transmission line for transmitting an input signal, a strobe transmission line for transmitting a strobe signal, and a plurality of sampling gates at respective positions along the sample transmission line for sampling the input signal in response to the strobe signal. Strobe control circuitry is coupled to the plurality of banks, and supplies a sequence of bank strobe signals to the strobe transmission lines in each of the plurality of banks, and includes circuits for controlling the timing of the bank strobe signals among the banks of samplers. Input circuitry is included for supplying the input signal to be sampled to the plurality of sample transmission lines in the respective banks. The strobe control circuitry can repetitively strobe the plurality of banks of samplers such that the banks of samplers are cycled to create a long sample length. Second tier demultiplexing circuitry is coupled to each of the samplers in the plurality of banks. The second tier demultiplexing circuitry senses the sample taken by the corresponding sampler each time the bank in which the sampler is found is strobed. A plurality of such samples can be stored by the second tier demultiplexing circuitry for later processing. Repetitive sampling with the high speed transient sampler induces an effect known as "strobe kickout". The sample transmission lines include structures which reduce strobe kickout to acceptable levels, generally 60 dB below the signal, by absorbing the kickout pulses before the next sampling repetition.

  19. Advanced Air Bag Technology Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phen, R. L.; Dowdy, M. W.; Ebbeler, D. H.; Kim. E.-H.; Moore, N. R.; VanZandt, T. R.

    1998-01-01

    As a result of the concern for the growing number of air-bag-induced injuries and fatalities, the administrators of the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) agreed to a cooperative effort that "leverages NHTSA's expertise in motor vehicle safety restraint systems and biomechanics with NASAs position as one of the leaders in advanced technology development... to enable the state of air bag safety technology to advance at a faster pace..." They signed a NASA/NHTSA memorandum of understanding for NASA to "evaluate air bag to assess advanced air bag performance, establish the technological potential for improved technology (smart) air bag systems, and identify key expertise and technology within the agency (i.e., NASA) that can potentially contribute significantly to the improved effectiveness of air bags." NASA is committed to contributing to NHTSAs effort to: (1) understand and define critical parameters affecting air bag performance; (2) systematically assess air bag technology state of the art and its future potential; and (3) identify new concepts for air bag systems. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) was selected by NASA to respond to the memorandum of understanding by conducting an advanced air bag technology assessment. JPL analyzed the nature of the need for occupant restraint, how air bags operate alone and with safety belts to provide restraint, and the potential hazards introduced by the technology. This analysis yielded a set of critical parameters for restraint systems. The researchers examined data on the performance of current air bag technology, and searched for and assessed how new technologies could reduce the hazards introduced by air bags while providing the restraint protection that is their primary purpose. The critical parameters which were derived are: (1) the crash severity; (2) the use of seat belts; (3) the physical characteristics of the occupants; (4) the

  20. Titanium Aluminide Applications in the High Speed Civil Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartolotta, Paul A.; Krause, David L.

    1999-01-01

    It is projected that within the next two decades, overseas air travel will increase to over 600,000 passengers per day. The High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) is a second-generation supersonic commercial aircraft proposed to meet this demand. The expected fleet of 500 to 1500 aircraft is required to meet EPA environmental goals; the HSCT propulsion system requires advanced technologies to reduce exhaust and noise pollution. A part of the resultant strategy for noise attenuation is the use of an extremely large exhaust nozzle. In the nozzle, several critical components are fabricated from titanium aluminide: the divergent nap uses wrought gamma; the nozzle sidewall is a hybrid fabrication of both wrought gamma face sheet and cast gamma substructure. This paper describes the HSCT program and the use of titanium aluminide for its components.

  1. Advancing Binaural Cochlear Implant Technology.

    PubMed

    Dietz, Mathias; McAlpine, David

    2015-12-30

    This special issue contains a collection of 13 papers highlighting the collaborative research and engineering project entitled Advancing Binaural Cochlear Implant Technology-ABCIT-as well as research spin-offs from the project. In this introductory editorial, a brief history of the project is provided, alongside an overview of the studies.

  2. Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gedney, Richard T.; Schertler, Ronald J.

    1989-01-01

    The NASA Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) was conceived to help maintain U.S. leadership in the world's communications-satellite market. This experimental satellite is expected to be launched by NASA in 1992 and to furnish the technology necessary for establishing very small aperture terminal digital networks which provide on-demand full-mesh connectivity, and 1.544-MBPS services with only a single hop. Utilizing on-board switching and processing, each individual voice or data circuit can be separately routed to any location in the network. This paper provides an overview of the ACTS and discusses the value of the technology for future communications systems.

  3. Faster Is Better: High-Speed Modems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roth, Cliff

    1995-01-01

    Discusses using high-speed modems to access the Internet. Examines internal and external modems, data speeds, compression and error reduction, faxing and voice capabilities, and software features. Considers ISDN (Integrated Services Digital Network) as the future replacement of high-speed modems. Sidebars present high-speed modem product…

  4. The high speed civil transport and NASA's High Speed Research (HSR) program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaw, Robert J.

    1994-01-01

    Ongoing studies being conducted not only in this country but in Europe and Asia suggest that a second generation supersonic transport, or High-Speed Civil Transport (HSCT), could become an important part of the 21st century international air transportation system. However, major environmental compatibility and economic viability issues must be resolved if the HSCT is to become a reality. This talk will overview the NASA High-Speed Research (HSR) program which is aimed at providing the U.S. industry with a technology base to allow them to consider launching an HSCT program early in the next century. The talk will also discuss some of the comparable activities going on within Europe and Japan.

  5. High speed imager test station

    DOEpatents

    Yates, George J.; Albright, Kevin L.; Turko, Bojan T.

    1995-01-01

    A test station enables the performance of a solid state imager (herein called a focal plane array or FPA) to be determined at high image frame rates. A programmable waveform generator is adapted to generate clock pulses at determinable rates for clock light-induced charges from a FPA. The FPA is mounted on an imager header board for placing the imager in operable proximity to level shifters for receiving the clock pulses and outputting pulses effective to clock charge from the pixels forming the FPA. Each of the clock level shifters is driven by leading and trailing edge portions of the clock pulses to reduce power dissipation in the FPA. Analog circuits receive output charge pulses clocked from the FPA pixels. The analog circuits condition the charge pulses to cancel noise in the pulses and to determine and hold a peak value of the charge for digitizing. A high speed digitizer receives the peak signal value and outputs a digital representation of each one of the charge pulses. A video system then displays an image associated with the digital representation of the output charge pulses clocked from the FPA. In one embodiment, the FPA image is formatted to a standard video format for display on conventional video equipment.

  6. High speed imager test station

    DOEpatents

    Yates, G.J.; Albright, K.L.; Turko, B.T.

    1995-11-14

    A test station enables the performance of a solid state imager (herein called a focal plane array or FPA) to be determined at high image frame rates. A programmable waveform generator is adapted to generate clock pulses at determinable rates for clock light-induced charges from a FPA. The FPA is mounted on an imager header board for placing the imager in operable proximity to level shifters for receiving the clock pulses and outputting pulses effective to clock charge from the pixels forming the FPA. Each of the clock level shifters is driven by leading and trailing edge portions of the clock pulses to reduce power dissipation in the FPA. Analog circuits receive output charge pulses clocked from the FPA pixels. The analog circuits condition the charge pulses to cancel noise in the pulses and to determine and hold a peak value of the charge for digitizing. A high speed digitizer receives the peak signal value and outputs a digital representation of each one of the charge pulses. A video system then displays an image associated with the digital representation of the output charge pulses clocked from the FPA. In one embodiment, the FPA image is formatted to a standard video format for display on conventional video equipment. 12 figs.

  7. High-speed laser photography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Roger J.

    1988-08-01

    High-speed movies of solid propellant deflagration have long provided useful qualitative information on propellant behavior. Consequently, an extension of performance to include quantitative behavior of the surface, particularly the spatial relationship of particles across the surface, the temporal behavior of particles through extended periods of time, and accurate measurements of particle sizes, is highly desirable. Such measurements require the ability to take detailed movies across an extensive surface through the propellant flame for longer periods than the residence time of a given particle. The modulation transfer function (MTF) of the camera optics and film will greatly affect performance. The MTF of the optics can be improved by a factor of two or more at practical spatial frequencies by the use of monochromatic light, such as the reflected light from a laser. The use of an intense, short-pulsed laser has the additional advantage of suppressing flame brightness and motion blur. High resolution at unity magnification is achieved by the use of 2 mJ of illumination energy per pulse in conjunction with a fine-grain film. The surfaces of the wide-distribution propellants were found to be molten.

  8. High-speed pressure clamp.

    PubMed

    Besch, Stephen R; Suchyna, Thomas; Sachs, Frederick

    2002-10-01

    We built a high-speed, pneumatic pressure clamp to stimulate patch-clamped membranes mechanically. The key control element is a newly designed differential valve that uses a single, nickel-plated piezoelectric bending element to control both pressure and vacuum. To minimize response time, the valve body was designed with minimum dead volume. The result is improved response time and stability with a threefold decrease in actuation latency. Tight valve clearances minimize the steady-state air flow, permitting us to use small resonant-piston pumps to supply pressure and vacuum. To protect the valve from water contamination in the event of a broken pipette, an optical sensor detects water entering the valve and increases pressure rapidly to clear the system. The open-loop time constant for pressure is 2.5 ms for a 100-mmHg step, and the closed-loop settling time is 500-600 micros. Valve actuation latency is 120 micros. The system performance is illustrated for mechanically induced changes in patch capacitance.

  9. Quiet High-Speed Fan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lieber, Lysbeth; Repp, Russ; Weir, Donald S.

    1996-01-01

    A calibration of the acoustic and aerodynamic prediction methods was performed and a baseline fan definition was established and evaluated to support the quiet high speed fan program. A computational fluid dynamic analysis of the NASA QF-12 Fan rotor, using the DAWES flow simulation program was performed to demonstrate and verify the causes of the relatively poor aerodynamic performance observed during the fan test. In addition, the rotor flowfield characteristics were qualitatively compared to the acoustic measurements to identify the key acoustic characteristics of the flow. The V072 turbofan source noise prediction code was used to generate noise predictions for the TFE731-60 fan at three operating conditions and compared to experimental data. V072 results were also used in the Acoustic Radiation Code to generate far field noise for the TFE731-60 nacelle at three speed points for the blade passage tone. A full 3-D viscous flow simulation of the current production TFE731-60 fan rotor was performed with the DAWES flow analysis program. The DAWES analysis was used to estimate the onset of multiple pure tone noise, based on predictions of inlet shock position as a function of the rotor tip speed. Finally, the TFE731-60 fan rotor wake structure predicted by the DAWES program was used to define a redesigned stator with the leading edge configured to minimize the acoustic effects of rotor wake / stator interaction, without appreciably degrading performance.

  10. Propulsion challenges and opportunities for high-speed transport aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strack, William C.

    1987-01-01

    For several years there was a growing interest in the subject of efficient sustained supersonic cruise technology applied to a high-speed transport aircraft. The major challenges confronting the propulsion community for supersonic transport (SST) applications are identified. Both past progress and future opportunities are discussed in relation to perceived technology shortfalls for an economically successful SST that satisfies environmental constraints. A very large improvement in propulsion system efficiency is needed both at supersonic and subsonic cruise conditions. Toward that end, several advanced engine concepts are being considered that, together with advanced discipline and component technologies, promise at least 40 percent better efficiency that the Concorde engine. The quest for higher productivity through higher speed is also thwarted by the lack of a conventional, low-priced fuel that is thermally stable at the higher temperatures associated with faster flight. Airport noise remains a tough challenge because previously researched concepts fall short of achieving FAR 36 Stage 3 noise levels. Innovative solutions may be necessary to reach acceptably low noise. While the technical challenges are indeed formidable, it is reasonable to assume that the current shortfalls in fuel economy and noise can be overcome through an aggressive propulsion research program.

  11. Subsea completion technology needs advances

    SciTech Connect

    Ledbetter, R.

    1995-09-18

    Subsea technology needs further advances to reduce operational costs before operators will expand the use of subsea well completions in the Gulf of Mexico. They will continue to choose surface completion-oriented systems as long as these are more economical operationally than subsea system. Designs of subsea equipment such as trees, connectors, control pods, umbilicals, and flow lines, must bring about reductions in the cost of both installation and workover compatibility. Remote operated vehicle (ROV) manipulation is one avenue that should be exploited. The bottom line is that significant cooperation between equipment manufacturers and ROV companies is needed to develop advanced ROV technology, and operators should be involved to help guide operational strategies.

  12. Center for Advanced Computational Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, Ahmed K.

    2000-01-01

    The Center for Advanced Computational Technology (ACT) was established to serve as a focal point for diverse research activities pertaining to application of advanced computational technology to future aerospace systems. These activities include the use of numerical simulations, artificial intelligence methods, multimedia and synthetic environments, and computational intelligence, in the modeling, analysis, sensitivity studies, optimization, design and operation of future aerospace systems. The Center is located at NASA Langley and is an integral part of the School of Engineering and Applied Science of the University of Virginia. The Center has four specific objectives: 1) conduct innovative research on applications of advanced computational technology to aerospace systems; 2) act as pathfinder by demonstrating to the research community what can be done (high-potential, high-risk research); 3) help in identifying future directions of research in support of the aeronautical and space missions of the twenty-first century; and 4) help in the rapid transfer of research results to industry and in broadening awareness among researchers and engineers of the state-of-the-art in applications of advanced computational technology to the analysis, design prototyping and operations of aerospace and other high-performance engineering systems. In addition to research, Center activities include helping in the planning and coordination of the activities of a multi-center team of NASA and JPL researchers who are developing an intelligent synthesis environment for future aerospace systems; organizing workshops and national symposia; as well as writing state-of-the-art monographs and NASA special publications on timely topics.

  13. Advanced digital image archival system using MPEG technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Wo

    2009-08-01

    Digital information and records are vital to the human race regardless of the nationalities and eras in which they were produced. Digital image contents are produced at a rapid pace from cultural heritages via digitalization, scientific and experimental data via high speed imaging sensors, national defense satellite images from governments, medical and healthcare imaging records from hospitals, personal collection of photos from digital cameras. With these mass amounts of precious and irreplaceable data and knowledge, what standards technologies can be applied to preserve and yet provide an interoperable framework for accessing the data across varieties of systems and devices? This paper presents an advanced digital image archival system by applying the international standard of MPEG technologies to preserve digital image content.

  14. Merging of High Speed Argon Plasma Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Case, Andrew; Messer, Sarah; Brockington, Sam; Wu, Lin-Chun; Witherspoon, F. Douglas

    2012-10-01

    Formation of an imploding plasma liner for the Plasma Liner Experiment (PLX) requires individual plasma jets to merge into a uniform shell of plasma converging on the target region. Understanding dynamics of the merging process requires knowledge of the plasma phenomena involved. We present here results from the study of the merging of six plasma jets in three dimensional geometry. The experiments were performed using HyperV Technologies Corp. one centimeter MiniRailguns using a preionized Argon plasma armature on a vacuum chamber designed to partially reproduce the port geometry of the PLX vacuum chamber. Diagnostics include fast imaging, spectroscopy, interferometry, fast pressure probes, B-dot probes, and high speed spatially resolved photodiodes, permitting measurements of plasma density, temperature, velocity, stagnation pressure, and magnetic field. These experimental results are compared with simulation results from the LSP 3D hybrid PIC code.

  15. Merging of high speed argon plasma jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Case, A.; Messer, S.; Brockington, S.; Wu, L.; Witherspoon, F. D.; Elton, R.

    2013-01-01

    Formation of an imploding plasma liner for the plasma liner experiment (PLX) requires individual plasma jets to merge into a quasi-spherical shell of plasma converging on the origin. Understanding dynamics of the merging process requires knowledge of the plasma phenomena involved. We present results from the study of the merging of three plasma jets in three dimensional geometry. The experiments were performed using HyperV Technologies Corp. 1 cm Minirailguns with a preionized argon plasma armature. The vacuum chamber partially reproduces the port geometry of the PLX chamber. Diagnostics include fast imaging, spectroscopy, interferometry, fast pressure probes, B-dot probes, and high speed spatially resolved photodiodes, permitting measurements of plasma density, temperature, velocity, stagnation pressure, magnetic field, and density gradients. These experimental results are compared with simulation results from the LSP 3D hybrid PIC code.

  16. Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plecity, Mark S.; Nall, Mark E.

    1991-01-01

    The NASA Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) provides high risk technologies having the potential to dramatically enhance the capabilities of the satellite communications industry. This experimental satellite, which will be launched by NASA in 1993, will furnish the technology necessary for providing a range of services. Utilizing the ACTS very-high-gain-hopping spot-beam antennas with on-board routing and processing, Very Small Aperture Terminal (VSAT) digital networks which provide on-demand, full-mesh-convectivity 1.544-MBPS services with only a single hop can be established. The high-gain spot-beam antenna at Ka-band permits wide area, flexible networks providing high data rate services between modest-size earth terminals.

  17. Advances in single chain technology.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Burgos, Marina; Latorre-Sanchez, Alejandro; Pomposo, José A

    2015-10-01

    The recent ability to manipulate and visualize single atoms at atomic level has given rise to modern bottom-up nanotechnology. Similar exquisite degree of control at the individual polymeric chain level for producing functional soft nanoentities is expected to become a reality in the next few years through the full development of so-called "single chain technology". Ultra-small unimolecular soft nano-objects endowed with useful, autonomous and smart functions are the expected, long-term valuable output of single chain technology. This review covers the recent advances in single chain technology for the construction of soft nano-objects via chain compaction, with an emphasis in dynamic, letter-shaped and compositionally unsymmetrical single rings, complex multi-ring systems, single chain nanoparticles, tadpoles, dumbbells and hairpins, as well as the potential end-use applications of individual soft nano-objects endowed with useful functions in catalysis, sensing, drug delivery and other uses. PMID:26505056

  18. Advances in single chain technology.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Burgos, Marina; Latorre-Sanchez, Alejandro; Pomposo, José A

    2015-10-01

    The recent ability to manipulate and visualize single atoms at atomic level has given rise to modern bottom-up nanotechnology. Similar exquisite degree of control at the individual polymeric chain level for producing functional soft nanoentities is expected to become a reality in the next few years through the full development of so-called "single chain technology". Ultra-small unimolecular soft nano-objects endowed with useful, autonomous and smart functions are the expected, long-term valuable output of single chain technology. This review covers the recent advances in single chain technology for the construction of soft nano-objects via chain compaction, with an emphasis in dynamic, letter-shaped and compositionally unsymmetrical single rings, complex multi-ring systems, single chain nanoparticles, tadpoles, dumbbells and hairpins, as well as the potential end-use applications of individual soft nano-objects endowed with useful functions in catalysis, sensing, drug delivery and other uses.

  19. Center for Advanced Separation Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Honaker, Rick

    2013-09-30

    The U.S. is the largest producer of mining products in the world. In 2011, U.S. mining operations contributed a total of $232 billion to the nation’s GDP plus $138 billion in labor income. Of this the coal mining industry contributed a total of $97.5 billion to GDP plus $53 billion in labor income. Despite these contributions, the industry has not been well supported with research and development funds as compared to mining industries in other countries. To overcome this problem, the Center for Advanced Separation Technologies (CAST) was established to develop technologies that can be used by the U.S. mining industry to create new products, reduce production costs, and meet environmental regulations. Originally set up by Virginia Tech and West Virginia University, CAST is now a five-university consortium – Virginia Tech, West Virginia University, University of Kentucky, University of Utah and Montana Tech, - that is supported through U.S. DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FE0000699, Center for Advanced Separation Technology. Much of the research to be conducted with Cooperative Agreement funds will be longer term, high-risk, basic research and will be carried out in two broad areas: Advanced Pre-Combustion Clean Coal Technologies and Gas-Gas Separations. Distribution of funds is handled via competitive solicitation of research proposals through Site Coordinators at the five member universities. These were reviewed and the selected proposals were forwarded these to the DOE/NETL Project Officer for final review and approval. The successful projects are listed below by category, along with abstracts from their final reports.

  20. Advances in SIS receiver technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frerking, M. A.

    1988-01-01

    Significant advances in SIS receiver technology since the last Asilomar meeting include: superconductor materials, integrated inductive tuning elements, and planar mounting structures. The effect of these advances is to push the upper frequency operating limit from about 600 to 1500 GHz, and to enhance the feasibility of focal plane arrays of heterodyne receivers. A fundamental high frequency operating limit of SIS mixers is set by the superconducting energy gap. A practical limitation for high frequency operation of SIS junctions is their parasitic capacitance and resistance. The performance of the mixer will be degraded by the Resistor-Capacitor rolloff. Several designs were reported for inductive elements integrated on the same substrate as the SIS junctions to tune out the bulk junction capacitance. Most millimeter SIS-based heterodyne receivers have used waveguide coupling structures. Technology has advanced to the state where programs that have a high probability of success can be defined to produce arrays of SIS receivers for frequencies as high as 1500 GHz.

  1. Review of high speed communications photomultiplier detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Enck, R. S.; Abraham, W. G.

    1978-01-01

    Four types of newly developed high speed photomultipliers are discussed: all electrostatic; static crossed field; dynamic crossed field; and hybrid (EBS). Design, construction, and performance parameters of each class are presented along with limitations of each class of device and prognosis for its future in high speed light detection. The particular advantage of these devices lies in high speed applications using low photon flux, large cathode areas, and broadband optical detection.

  2. NASA/HAA Advanced Rotorcraft Technology and Tilt Rotor Workshop. Volume 6: Vehicle Configuration Session

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Five high speed rotorcraft configurations are considered: the high speed helicopter, compound helicopter, ABC, tilt rotor and the X wing. The technology requirements and the recommended actions are discussed.

  3. Advances in Genome Biology & Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas J. Albert, Jon R. Armstrong, Raymond K. Auerback, W. Brad Barbazuk, et al.

    2007-12-01

    This year's meeting focused on the latest advances in new DNA sequencing technologies and the applications of genomics to disease areas in biology and biomedicine. Daytime plenary sessions highlighted cutting-edge research in areas such as complex genetic diseases, comparative genomics, medical sequencing, massively parallel DNA sequencing, and synthetic biology. Technical approaches being developed and utilized in contemporary genomics research were presented during evening concurrent sessions. Also, as in previous years, poster sessions bridged the morning and afternoon plenary sessions. In addition, for the third year in a row, the Advances in Genome Biology and Technology (AGBT) meeting was preceded by a pre-meeting workshop that aimed to provide an introductory overview for trainees and other meeting attendees. This year, speakers at the workshop focused on next-generation sequencing technologies, including their experiences, findings, and helpful advise for others contemplating using these platforms in their research. Speakers from genome centers and core sequencing facilities were featured and the workshop ended with a roundtable discussion, during which speakers fielded questions from the audience.

  4. Advances in nondestructive evaluation technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heyman, J. S.

    1982-01-01

    Research at NASA Langley's Materials Characterization Instrumentation Section has followed the philosophy of improving the science base of nondestructive evaluation and advancing the state of the art of quantitative interpretability of physical measurements of materials. Details of several R&D programs choosen to highlight the last several years are given. Applications of these technologies are presented in the area of stress measurement, characterization of metal heat treatment, and evaluation of material internal structure. A second focus of the program is on quantitative transducers/measurements that have resulted in better data in irregular inhomogeneous materials such as composites. Examples are presented of new capabilities resulting from these advances that include fatigue and impact damage evaluation.

  5. [Technological advances: the coming radiology].

    PubMed

    García, César; Ortega, Dulia

    2002-06-01

    We are living in a changing world, acknowledging all kinds of changes: social, technological, and ethical. This is the environment encircling medical and radiological work: demanding, with high expectations and a cohort of amazing technological advances, in all areas of human knowledge. We need to make the necessary reflections about these faster and faster changes. Radiology, as an important part of clinical work, is facing no minor challenges: technological and other most prevalent like: Who will be specialists in the next future? How are we prepared to face the radiological teaching and formation of radiologists? How to finance this technological developments? Meanwhile, in our context of an underdeveloped country, this sounds as far as the Moon, but changes will reach us sooner or later. We must resolve some problems that are a little bit more basic, such as a good level of education and health care for our people, then we will be ready to incorporate some of these amazing new technologies. PMID:12194695

  6. High-Speed Ring Bus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wysocky, Terry; Kopf, Edward, Jr.; Katanyoutananti, Sunant; Steiner, Carl; Balian, Harry

    2010-01-01

    The high-speed ring bus at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) allows for future growth trends in spacecraft seen with future scientific missions. This innovation constitutes an enhancement of the 1393 bus as documented in the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) 1393-1999 standard for a spaceborne fiber-optic data bus. It allows for high-bandwidth and time synchronization of all nodes on the ring. The JPL ring bus allows for interconnection of active units with autonomous operation and increased fault handling at high bandwidths. It minimizes the flight software interface with an intelligent physical layer design that has few states to manage as well as simplified testability. The design will soon be documented in the AS-1393 standard (Serial Hi-Rel Ring Network for Aerospace Applications). The framework is designed for "Class A" spacecraft operation and provides redundant data paths. It is based on "fault containment regions" and "redundant functional regions (RFR)" and has a method for allocating cables that completely supports the redundancy in spacecraft design, allowing for a complete RFR to fail. This design reduces the mass of the bus by incorporating both the Control Unit and the Data Unit in the same hardware. The standard uses ATM (asynchronous transfer mode) packets, standardized by ITU-T, ANSI, ETSI, and the ATM Forum. The IEEE-1393 standard uses the UNI form of the packet and provides no protection for the data portion of the cell. The JPL design adds optional formatting to this data portion. This design extends fault protection beyond that of the interconnect. This includes adding protection to the data portion that is contained within the Bus Interface Units (BIUs) and by adding to the signal interface between the Data Host and the JPL 1393 Ring Bus. Data transfer on the ring bus does not involve a master or initiator. Following bus protocol, any BIU may transmit data on the ring whenever it has data received from its host. There

  7. Numerical Simulation of High-Speed Turbulent Reacting Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaberi, F. A.; Colucci, P. J.; James, S.; Givi, P.

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to continue our efforts in advancing the state of knowledge in large eddy simulation (LES) methods for computational analysis of high-speed reacting turbulent flows. We have just completed the first year of Phase 3 of this research.

  8. Materials Advance Chemical Propulsion Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2012-01-01

    In the future, the Planetary Science Division of NASA's Science Mission Directorate hopes to use better-performing and lower-cost propulsion systems to send rovers, probes, and observers to places like Mars, Jupiter, and Saturn. For such purposes, a new propulsion technology called the Advanced Materials Bipropellant Rocket (AMBR) was developed under NASA's In-Space Propulsion Technology (ISPT) project, located at Glenn Research Center. As an advanced chemical propulsion system, AMBR uses nitrogen tetroxide oxidizer and hydrazine fuel to propel a spacecraft. Based on current research and development efforts, the technology shows great promise for increasing engine operation and engine lifespan, as well as lowering manufacturing costs. In developing AMBR, ISPT has several goals: to decrease the time it takes for a spacecraft to travel to its destination, reduce the cost of making the propulsion system, and lessen the weight of the propulsion system. If goals like these are met, it could result in greater capabilities for in-space science investigations. For example, if the amount (and weight) of propellant required on a spacecraft is reduced, more scientific instruments (and weight) could be added to the spacecraft. To achieve AMBR s maximum potential performance, the engine needed to be capable of operating at extremely high temperatures and pressure. To this end, ISPT required engine chambers made of iridium-coated rhenium (strong, high-temperature metallic elements) that allowed operation at temperatures close to 4,000 F. In addition, ISPT needed an advanced manufacturing technique for better coating methods to increase the strength of the engine chamber without increasing the costs of fabricating the chamber.

  9. Development and Performance of the ACTS High Speed VSAT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quintana, J.; Tran, Q.; Dendy, R.

    1999-01-01

    The Advanced Communication Technology Satellite (ACTS), developed by the U.S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has demonstrated the breakthrough technologies of Ka-band, spot beam antennas, and on-board processing. These technologies have enabled the development of very small aperture terminals (VSAT) and ultra-small aperture terminals (USAT) which have capabilities greater than were previously possible with conventional satellite technologies. However, the ACTS baseband processor (BBP) is designed using a time division multiple access (TDMA) scheme, which requires each earth station using the BBP to transmit data at a burst rate which is much higher than the user throughput data rate. This tends to mitigate the advantage of the new technologies by requiring a larger earth station antenna and/or a higher-powered uplink amplifier than would be necessary for a continuous transmission at the user data rate. Conversely, the user data rate is much less than the rate that can be supported by the antenna size and amplifier. For example, the ACTS TI VSAT operates at a burst rate of 27.5 Mbps, but the maximum user data rate is 1.792 Mbps. The throughput efficiency is slightly more than 6.5%. For an operational network, this level of overhead will greatly increase the cost of the user earth stations, and that increased cost must be repeated thousands of times, which may ultimately reduce the market for such a system. The ACTS High Speed VSAT (HS VSAT) is an effort to experimentally demonstrate the maximum user throughput data rate which can be achieved using the technologies developed and implemented on ACTS. Specifically, this was done by operating the system uplinks as frequency division multiple access (FDMA), essentially assigning all available TDMA time slots to a single user on each of two uplink frequencies. Preliminary results show that using a 1.2-m antenna in this mode, the HS VSAT can achieve between 22 and 24 Mbps out of the 27.5 Mbps burst

  10. Advances in traction drive technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loewenthal, S. H.; Anderson, N. E.; Rohn, D. A.

    1983-01-01

    Traction drives are traced from early uses as main transmissions in automobiles at the turn of the century to modern, high-powered traction drives capable of transmitting hundreds of horsepower. Recent advances in technology are described which enable today's traction drive to be a serious candidate for off-highway vehicles and helicopter applications. Improvements in materials, traction fluids, design techniques, power loss and life prediction methods will be highlighted. Performance characteristics of the Nasvytis fixed-ratio drive are given. Promising future drive applications, such as helicopter main transmissions and servo-control positioning mechanisms are also addressed.

  11. Advanced Artificial Intelligence Technology Testbed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anken, Craig S.

    1993-01-01

    The Advanced Artificial Intelligence Technology Testbed (AAITT) is a laboratory testbed for the design, analysis, integration, evaluation, and exercising of large-scale, complex, software systems, composed of both knowledge-based and conventional components. The AAITT assists its users in the following ways: configuring various problem-solving application suites; observing and measuring the behavior of these applications and the interactions between their constituent modules; gathering and analyzing statistics about the occurrence of key events; and flexibly and quickly altering the interaction of modules within the applications for further study.

  12. Exhaust Nozzle Materials Development for the High Speed Civil Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grady, J. E.

    1999-01-01

    The United States has embarked on a national effort to develop the technology necessary to produce a Mach 2.4 High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) for entry into service by the year 2005. The viability of this aircraft is contingent upon its meeting both economic and environmental requirements. Two engine components have been identified as critical to the environmental acceptability of the HSCT. These include a combustor with significantly lower emissions than are feasible with current technology, and a lightweight exhaust nozzle that meets community noise standards. The Enabling Propulsion Materials (EPM) program will develop the advanced structural materials, materials fabrication processes, structural analysis and life prediction tools for the HSCT combustor and low noise exhaust nozzle. This is being accomplished through the coordinated efforts of the NASA Lewis Research Center, General Electric Aircraft Engines and Pratt & Whitney. The mission of the EPM Exhaust Nozzle Team is to develop and demonstrate this technology by the year 1999 to enable its timely incorporation into HSCT propulsion systems.

  13. Development of high-speed balancing technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demuth, R.; Zorzi, E.

    1981-01-01

    An investigation into laser material removal showed that laser burns act in a manner typical of mechanical stress raisers causing a reduction in fatigue strength; the fatigue strength is lowered relative to the smooth specimen fatigue strength. Laser-burn zones were studied for four materials: Alloy Steel 4340, Stainless Steel 17-4 PH, Inconel 718, and Aluminum Alloy 6061-T6. Calculations were made of stress concentration factors K, for laser-burn grooves of each material type. A comparison was then made to experimentally determine the fatigue strength reduction factor. These calculations and comparisons indicated that, except for the 17-4 PH material, good agreement (a ratio of close to 1.0) existed between Kt and Kf. The performance of the 17-4 PH material has been attributed to early crack initiation due to the lower fatigue resistance of the soft, unaged laser-affected zone. Also covered in this report is the development, implementation, and testing of an influence coefficient approach to balancing a long, slender shaft under applied-torque conditions. Excellent correlation existed between the analytically predicted results and those data obtained from testing.

  14. Quality of service on high-speed data networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbero, Ezio; Antonelli, Ferruccio

    1995-02-01

    Since the beginning of this century the issue of `quality' has been gaining increasing importance in a number of fields of human activities. For telecommunication services, too, the quality perceived by customers has been taken into account early on as an issue of strategic importance. Whilst for telephony the Quality of Service (QoS) has been already investigated and identified in terms of parameters and related test methodology, the situation for high speed data services (i.e. CBDS/SMDS, Frame Relay, etc.), provided by means of high speed network based on Asynchronous Transfer Moe (ATM) or Metropolitan Area Network technologies, can still be considered `under study'. There is a death of experience not only in terms of measurement instruments and procedures, but also in terms of knowledge of the relationship between the QoS provided at a network level and the quality perceived by the user on his or her terminal. The complexity of the equipment involved in setting up an end-to-end solution based on high speed data communications makes the problems of knowledge and supply of quality very hard to solve. Starting from the experience gained in carrying out high- speed network field trials based on Metropolitan Area Networks and, more recently, on ATM technology, the paper mainly deals with the problem of defining, measuring and then offering a specific QoS. First, the issue of what the user expects from the `high-speed network' is addressed. This analysis is carried out trying to gather what is peculiar to high-speed data communications from the user standpoint. Next, the focus is on how to cope with the requirements due to users' expectations, while carefully considering the basic principles of quality. Finally, a solution is proposed, starting from the experience gained from high speed networks installed in Italy.

  15. Modeling Compressibility Effects in High-Speed Turbulent Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarkar, S.

    2004-01-01

    Man has strived to make objects fly faster, first from subsonic to supersonic and then to hypersonic speeds. Spacecraft and high-speed missiles routinely fly at hypersonic Mach numbers, M greater than 5. In defense applications, aircraft reach hypersonic speeds at high altitude and so may civilian aircraft in the future. Hypersonic flight, while presenting opportunities, has formidable challenges that have spurred vigorous research and development, mainly by NASA and the Air Force in the USA. Although NASP, the premier hypersonic concept of the eighties and early nineties, did not lead to flight demonstration, much basic research and technology development was possible. There is renewed interest in supersonic and hypersonic flight with the HyTech program of the Air Force and the Hyper-X program at NASA being examples of current thrusts in the field. At high-subsonic to supersonic speeds, fluid compressibility becomes increasingly important in the turbulent boundary layers and shear layers associated with the flow around aerospace vehicles. Changes in thermodynamic variables: density, temperature and pressure, interact strongly with the underlying vortical, turbulent flow. The ensuing changes to the flow may be qualitative such as shocks which have no incompressible counterpart, or quantitative such as the reduction of skin friction with Mach number, large heat transfer rates due to viscous heating, and the dramatic reduction of fuel/oxidant mixing at high convective Mach number. The peculiarities of compressible turbulence, so-called compressibility effects, have been reviewed by Fernholz and Finley. Predictions of aerodynamic performance in high-speed applications require accurate computational modeling of these "compressibility effects" on turbulence. During the course of the project we have made fundamental advances in modeling the pressure-strain correlation and developed a code to evaluate alternate turbulence models in the compressible shear layer.

  16. Advanced Mirror & Modelling Technology Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Effinger, Michael; Stahl, H. Philip; Abplanalp, Laura; Maffett, Steven; Egerman, Robert; Eng, Ron; Arnold, William; Mosier, Gary; Blaurock, Carl

    2014-01-01

    The 2020 Decadal technology survey is starting in 2018. Technology on the shelf at that time will help guide selection to future low risk and low cost missions. The Advanced Mirror Technology Development (AMTD) team has identified development priorities based on science goals and engineering requirements for Ultraviolet Optical near-Infrared (UVOIR) missions in order to contribute to the selection process. One key development identified was lightweight mirror fabrication and testing. A monolithic, stacked, deep core mirror was fused and replicated twice to achieve the desired radius of curvature. It was subsequently successfully polished and tested. A recently awarded second phase to the AMTD project will develop larger mirrors to demonstrate the lateral scaling of the deep core mirror technology. Another key development was rapid modeling for the mirror. One model focused on generating optical and structural model results in minutes instead of months. Many variables could be accounted for regarding the core, face plate and back structure details. A portion of a spacecraft model was also developed. The spacecraft model incorporated direct integration to transform optical path difference to Point Spread Function (PSF) and between PSF to modulation transfer function. The second phase to the project will take the results of the rapid mirror modeler and integrate them into the rapid spacecraft modeler.

  17. High Speed Video for Airborne Instrumentation Application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tseng, Ting; Reaves, Matthew; Mauldin, Kendall

    2006-01-01

    A flight-worthy high speed color video system has been developed. Extensive system development and ground and environmental. testing hes yielded a flight qualified High Speed Video System (HSVS), This HSVS was initially used on the F-15B #836 for the Lifting Insulating Foam Trajectory (LIFT) project.

  18. Reducing Heating In High-Speed Cinematography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slater, Howard A.

    1989-01-01

    Infrared-absorbing and infrared-reflecting glass filters simple and effective means for reducing rise in temperature during high-speed motion-picture photography. "Hot-mirror" and "cold-mirror" configurations, employed in projection of images, helps prevent excessive heating of scenes by powerful lamps used in high-speed photography.

  19. Advanced Modular Inverter Technology Development

    SciTech Connect

    Adam Szczepanek

    2006-02-04

    Electric and hybrid-electric vehicle systems require an inverter to convert the direct current (DC) output of the energy generation/storage system (engine, fuel cells, or batteries) to the alternating current (AC) that vehicle propulsion motors use. Vehicle support systems, such as lights and air conditioning, also use the inverter AC output. Distributed energy systems require an inverter to provide the high quality AC output that energy system customers demand. Today's inverters are expensive due to the cost of the power electronics components, and system designers must also tailor the inverter for individual applications. Thus, the benefits of mass production are not available, resulting in high initial procurement costs as well as high inverter maintenance and repair costs. Electricore, Inc. (www.electricore.org) a public good 501 (c) (3) not-for-profit advanced technology development consortium assembled a highly qualified team consisting of AeroVironment Inc. (www.aerovironment.com) and Delphi Automotive Systems LLC (Delphi), (www.delphi.com), as equal tiered technical leads, to develop an advanced, modular construction, inverter packaging technology that will offer a 30% cost reduction over conventional designs adding to the development of energy conversion technologies for crosscutting applications in the building, industry, transportation, and utility sectors. The proposed inverter allows for a reduction of weight and size of power electronics in the above-mentioned sectors and is scalable over the range of 15 to 500kW. The main objective of this program was to optimize existing AeroVironment inverter technology to improve power density, reliability and producibility as well as develop new topology to reduce line filter size. The newly developed inverter design will be used in automotive and distribution generation applications. In the first part of this program the high-density power stages were redesigned, optimized and fabricated. One of the main tasks

  20. High-Speed Fiber Switches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margulis, Walter; Tarasenko, Oleksandr; Yu, Zhangwei; Fonjallaz, Pierre-Yves; Knape, Harald

    2008-10-01

    All-fiber optical switches based on fiber with electrodes exhibit transition times <10 ns. The devices are monolithic and robust, they are simple and could potentially be manufactured at low cost. The insertion loss is extremely low and the devices are compatible with single mode fiber technology. Two types of switches are discussed, one based on polarization rotation, the other one relying on the wavelength shift of a fiber Bragg grating (FBG).

  1. Advances in Thin Film Sensor Technologies for Engine Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lei, Jih-Fen; Martin, Lisa C.; Will, Herbert A.

    1997-01-01

    Advanced thin film sensor techniques that can provide accurate surface strain and temperature measurements are being developed at NASA Lewis Research Center. These sensors are needed to provide minimally intrusive characterization of advanced materials (such as ceramics and composites) and structures (such as components for Space Shuttle Main Engine, High Speed Civil Transport, Advanced Subsonic Transports and General Aviation Aircraft) in hostile, high-temperature environments and for validation of design codes. This paper presents two advanced thin film sensor technologies: strain gauges and thermocouples. These sensors are sputter deposited directly onto the test articles and are only a few micrometers thick; the surface of the test article is not structurally altered and there is minimal disturbance of the gas flow over the surface. The strain gauges are palladium-13% chromium based and the thermocouples are platinum-13% rhodium vs. platinum. The fabrication techniques of these thin film sensors in a class 1000 cleanroom at the NASA Lewis Research Center are described. Their demonstration on a variety of engine materials, including superalloys, ceramics and advanced ceramic matrix composites, in several hostile, high-temperature test environments are discussed.

  2. Advanced microfabrication technologies for microspacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghezzo, M.; Bagepalli, B.; Kodiyalam, S.; Korham, C.; Browall, K.; Alexander, Norman

    1993-06-01

    Advanced microfabrication technologies offer the prospect of reducing the weight and size of spacecraft through the use of lighter and stronger materials in conjunction with new mechanical/structural design concepts and design optimization methods. At the same time, electronic components have been scaled down while increasing functional utility. A two-fold benefit is derived for space applications through the use of less expensive components and the lower launch costs associated with lighter components. GE-CRD is actively pursuing research in these key technologies for a wide range of applications including satellites. These key technologies will be reviewed and an update on GE progress will be given. The need to reduce weight and lower cost, while maintaining product quality and reliability are primary drivers in the design of satellites, in general, and microsatellites in particular. For the structural subsystem, these requirements pose a complex design problem unless new mechanical design concepts and computer-aided design optimization methods are employed. Several new concepts, such as battery packs doubling as panel reinforcements and fuel tanks as integral structural members, need to utilized. In addition, new viscoelastic material damping concepts for spacecraft components provide for lighter weight/lower cost designs, while satisfying the structural dynamics requirements. High density interconnect (HDI) technology permits the use of bare IC's on a ceramic substrate with 90 percent active area utilization. A copper/polyimide multilayer structure is the backbone of the technology, which has demonstrated a size/weight reduction of greater than 10x compared to printed circuit board with performance up to the GHz level. HDI modules have exceptional mechanical robustness as evidenced by survival of 180 kg rapid acceleration tests. Microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) are redefining sensors and actuators by miniaturization through micromachining techniques

  3. The 1989 high-speed civil transport studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The results are presented for the Douglas Aircraft Company system studies related to high speed civil transports (HSCTs). The system studies were conducted to assess the environmental compatibility of a HSCT at a design Mach number of 3.2. Sonic boom minimization, exterior noise, and engine emissions were assessed together with the effect of a laminar flow control (LFC) technology on vehicle gross weight. The general results indicated that (1) achievement of a 90 PLdB sonic boom loudness level goal at Mach 3.2 may not be practical; (2) the high flow engine cycle concept shows promise of achieving the side line FAR Part 36 noise limit but may not achieve the aircraft range design goal of 6,500 nautical miles; (3) the rich burn/quick quench (RB/QQ) combustor concept shows promise for achieving low EINO(sub x) levels when combined with a premixed pilot stage/advanced technology high power stage duct burner in the P and W variable stream control engine (VSCE); and (4) full chord wing LFC has significant performance and economic advantages relative to the turbulent wing baseline.

  4. Waste heat recovery with ultra high-speed turbomachinery

    SciTech Connect

    Vakkilainen, E.; Larjola, J.; Lindgren, O.

    1984-08-01

    A new ORC heat recovery system which converts waste heat to electricity has been developed in Lappeenranta University of Technology with support from Department of Energy in Finnish Ministry of Trade and Industry. Use of ultra high-speed turbomachinery (10 000 rpm - 200 000 rpm) promises lower unit costs, higher efficiencies and fast amortization rate, 2,4 - 3,0 years.

  5. First Annual High-Speed Research Workshop, part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitehead, Allen H., Jr. (Compiler)

    1992-01-01

    The workshop was presented to provide a national forum for the government, industry, and university participants in the program to present and discuss important technology issues related to the development of a commercially viable, environmentally compatible U.S. High Speed Civil Transport. The workshop sessions were organized around the major task elements in NASA's Phase 1 High Speed Research Program which basically addressed the environmental issues of atmospheric emissions, community noise, and sonic boom. This volume is divided into three sessions entitled: Plenary Session (which gives overviews from NASA, Boeing, Douglas, GE, and Pratt & Whitney on the HSCT program); Airframe Systems Studies; and Atmospheric Effects.

  6. High speed quantum communication testbed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Carl J.; Tang, Xiao; Heikkero, Mikko; Rouzaud, Julie; Lu, Richang; Goedecke, Andreas; Migdall, Alan L.; Mink, Alan; Nakassis, Anastase; Pibida, Leticia S.; Wen, Jesse; Hagley, Edward; Clark, Charles W.

    2002-12-01

    We describe the status of the NIST Quantum Communication Testbed (QCT) facility. QCT is a facility for exploring quantum communication in an environment similar to that projected for early commercial implementations: quantum cryptographic key exchange on a gigabit/second free-space optical (FSO) channel. Its purpose is to provide an open platform for testing and validating performance in the application, network, and physical layers of quantum communications systems. The channel uses modified commercial FSO equipment to link two buildings on the Gaithersburg, MD campus of the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), separated by approximately 600 meters. At the time of writing, QCT is under construction; it will eventually be made available to the research community as a user facility. This paper presents the basic design considerations underlying QCT, and reports the status of the project.

  7. Important advances in technology: echocardiography.

    PubMed

    Nagueh, Sherif F; Quiñones, Miguel A

    2014-01-01

    Echocardiography has evolved over the past 45 years from a simple M-mode tracing to an array of technologies that include two-dimensional imaging, pulsed and continuous wave spectral Doppler, color flow and tissue Doppler, and transesophageal echocardiography. Together, these modalities provide a comprehensive anatomic and functional evaluation of cardiac chambers and valves, pericardium, and ascending and descending aorta. The switch from analog to digital signal processing revolutionized the field of ultrasound, resulting in improved image resolution, smaller instrumentation that allows bedside evaluation and diagnosis of patients, and digital image storage for more accurate quantification and comparison with previous studies. It also opened the door for new advances such as harmonic imaging, automated border detection and quantification, 3-dimensional imaging, and speckle tracking. This article offers an overview of some newer developments in echocardiography and their promising applications.

  8. Advanced digital modulation: Communication techniques and monolithic GaAs technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, S. G.; Oliver, J. D., Jr.; Kot, R. C.; Richards, C. R.

    1983-01-01

    Communications theory and practice are merged with state-of-the-art technology in IC fabrication, especially monolithic GaAs technology, to examine the general feasibility of a number of advanced technology digital transmission systems. Satellite-channel models with (1) superior throughput, perhaps 2 Gbps; (2) attractive weight and cost; and (3) high RF power and spectrum efficiency are discussed. Transmission techniques possessing reasonably simple architectures capable of monolithic fabrication at high speeds were surveyed. This included a review of amplitude/phase shift keying (APSK) techniques and the continuous-phase-modulation (CPM) methods, of which MSK represents the simplest case.

  9. Advanced Technology Composite Fuselage - Manufacturing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilden, K. S.; Harris, C. G.; Flynn, B. W.; Gessel, M. G.; Scholz, D. B.; Stawski, S.; Winston, V.

    1997-01-01

    The goal of Boeing's Advanced Technology Composite Aircraft Structures (ATCAS) program is to develop the technology required for cost-and weight-efficient use of composite materials in transport fuselage structure. Carbon fiber reinforced epoxy was chosen for fuselage skins and stiffening elements, and for passenger and cargo floor structures. The automated fiber placement (AFP) process was selected for fabrication of stringer-stiffened and sandwich skin panels. Circumferential and window frames were braided and resin transfer molded (RTM'd). Pultrusion was selected for fabrication of floor beams and constant-section stiffening elements. Drape forming was chosen for stringers and other stiffening elements cocured to skin structures. Significant process development efforts included AFP, braiding, RTM, autoclave cure, and core blanket fabrication for both sandwich and stiffened-skin structure. Outer-mold-line and inner-mold-line tooling was developed for sandwich structures and stiffened-skin structure. The effect of design details, process control and tool design on repeatable, dimensionally stable, structure for low cost barrel assembly was assessed. Subcomponent panels representative of crown, keel, and side quadrant panels were fabricated to assess scale-up effects and manufacturing anomalies for full-scale structures. Manufacturing database including time studies, part quality, and manufacturing plans were generated to support the development of designs and analytical models to access cost, structural performance, and dimensional tolerance.

  10. Advances in nanopore sequencing technology.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yongqiang; Liu, Ruoyu; Xie, Haiqiang; Hui, Yanting; Jiao, Rengang; Gong, Yu; Zhang, Yiyu

    2013-07-01

    Much tremendous break through have been obtained in recent years for nanopore sequencing to achieve the goal of $1000 genome. As a method of single molecule sequencing, nanopore sequencing can discriminate the individual molecules of the target DNA strand rapidly due to the current blockages by translocating the nucleotides through a nano-scale pore. Both the protein-pores and solid-state nanopore channels which called single nanopore sequencing have been studied widely for the application of nanopore sequencing technology. This review will give a detail representation to protein nanopore and solid-state nanopore sequencing. For protein nanopore sequencing technology, we will introduce different nanopore types, device assembly and some challenges still exist at present. We will focus on more research fields for solid-state nanopore sequencing in terms of materials, device assembly, fabricated methods, translocation process and some specific challenges. The review also covers some of the technical advances in the union nanopore sequencing, which include nanopore sequencing combine with exonuclease, hybridization, synthesis and design polymer.

  11. Advanced Training Technologies and Learning Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, Ahmed K. (Compiler); Malone, John B. (Compiler)

    1999-01-01

    This document contains the proceedings of the Workshop on Advanced Training Technologies and Learning Environments held at NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia, March 9-10, 1999. The workshop was jointly sponsored by the University of Virginia's Center for Advanced Computational Technology and NASA. Workshop attendees were from NASA, other government agencies, industry, and universities. The objective of the workshop was to assess the status and effectiveness of different advanced training technologies and learning environments.

  12. ControlNet features high speed

    SciTech Connect

    McEldowney, D.

    1996-11-01

    ControlNet is a high-speed, high-capacity network providing a connection among controllers and I/O subsystems. It was designed for applications in which data integrity, determinism, high speeds, and high data capacities are required. ControlNet addresses applications needing tighter control over processes as well as demanding remote I/O or interlocked PLC applications, both discrete- and process-related. Some examples include high-speed conveyors, transfer lines, cut-to-length lines, high-speed assembly, bottling, and packaging. Process examples, or those typically requiring heavy remote analog I/O, include water/wastewater, test stands, chemical, beverage, food, marine control, and utility balance-of-plant.

  13. Lubrication and cooling for high speed gears

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, D. P.

    1985-01-01

    The problems and failures occurring with the operation of high speed gears are discussed. The gearing losses associated with high speed gearing such as tooth mesh friction, bearing friction, churning, and windage are discussed with various ways shown to help reduce these losses and thereby improve efficiency. Several different methods of oil jet lubrication for high speed gearing are given such as into mesh, out of mesh, and radial jet lubrication. The experiments and analytical results for the various methods of oil jet lubrication are shown with the strengths and weaknesses of each method discussed. The analytical and experimental results of gear lubrication and cooling at various test conditions are presented. These results show the very definite need of improved methods of gear cooling at high speed and high load conditions.

  14. Damping Bearings In High-Speed Turbomachines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Von Pragenau, George L.

    1994-01-01

    Paper presents comparison of damping bearings with traditional ball, roller, and hydrostatic bearings in high-speed cryogenic turbopumps. Concept of damping bearings described in "Damping Seals and Bearings for a Turbomachine" (MFS-28345).

  15. Optical receiver for high-speed communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, Paul A.; Grib, Valerie J.

    2010-04-01

    For through-the-air optical communication applications, we present a high speed detector module with high bandwidth and large active area. The detector has achieved a rise time of 220 pS with a full-width-half-max of 420 pS. Data rates are expected to approach 2 GHz. The active area of the input window is 12 mm, giving a large collection surface for through-the-air applications. The detector module includes an integrated power supply having low power consumption. In comparison with other detector technologies, this new detector exceeds the speed of conventional photomultiplier designs by 3 to 5 times. In comparison with microchannel plate detectors, the speed is comparable, but the throughput of the new detector is much higher - tens of microamperes of signal current can be obtained indefinitely. Optical communication applications can be served by two different designs. In the first case, the module utilizes gain based on ordinary secondary emission materials to achieve current gains of 1500. This design is suitable for applications at the limit of the detector's bandwidth where light power is relatively high. In another design, the secondary emission material was changed to diamond film which allows five times higher gain. While the current design uses an ordinary, blue sensitive input light conversion material, higher efficiency materials are in development for signals at longer wavelength.

  16. High Speed Research - External Vision System (EVS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Imagine flying a supersonic passenger jet (like the Concorde) at 1500 mph with no front windows in the cockpit - it may one day be a reality, as seen in this animation still. NASA engineers are working to develop technology that would replace the forward cockpit windows in future supersonic passenger jets with large sensor displays. These displays would use video images, enhanced by computer-generated graphics, to take the place of the view out the front windows. The envisioned eXternal Visibility System (XVS) would guide pilots to an airport, warn them of other aircraft near their path, and provide additional visual aides for airport approaches, landings and takeoffs. Currently, supersonic transports like the Anglo-French Concorde droop the front of the jet (the 'nose') downward to allow the pilots to see forward during takeoffs and landings. By enhancing the pilots' vision with high-resolution video displays, future supersonic transport designers could eliminate the heavy and expensive, mechanically-drooped nose. A future U.S. supersonic passenger jet, as envisioned by NASA's High-Speed Research (HSR) program, would carry 300 passengers more than 5000 nautical miles per hour more than 1500 miles per hour (more than twice the speed of sound). Traveling from Los Angeles to Tokyo would take only four hours, with an anticipated fare increase of only 20 percent over current ticket prices for substantially slower subsonic flights. Animation by Joey Ponthieux, Computer Sciences Corporation, Inc.

  17. Micromachining technology for advanced weapon systems

    SciTech Connect

    Sniegowski, J.J.

    1996-12-31

    An overview of planned uses for polysilicon surface-micromachining technology in advanced weapon systems is presented. Specifically, this technology may allow consideration of fundamentally new architectures for realization of surety component functions.

  18. Recent advances in flue gas desulfurization technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Y.S.

    1991-01-01

    Recent advances in flue gas desulfurization (FGD) technologies are reported. The technological advances include conventional wet FGD system improvements, advanced wet FGD system development, spray dryer system operations, technologies for furnace sorbent injections, post-combustion dry technologies, combined SO{sub 2}/NO{sub x} technologies, and several emerging FGD technologies. In addition, progress of by-product utilization that affects the operating cost of FGD systems is described. Economics of some commercially available and nearly maturing FGD technologies is also discussed. The materials included in this report are obtained from technical presentations made through September 1990, at several national and international conferences. This report is intended to document current advances and status of various FGD technologies. 101 refs., 16 figs.

  19. COSTS FOR ADVANCED COAL COMBUSTION TECHNOLOGIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of an evaluation of the development status of advanced coal combustion technologies and discusses the preparation of performance and economic models for their application to electric utility plants. he technologies addressed were atmospheric fluidized bed...

  20. Integrated design and manufacturing for the high speed civil transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jae Moon; Gupta, Anurag; Mueller, Craig; Morrisette, Monica; Dec, John; Brewer, Jason; Donofrio, Kevin; Sturisky, Hilton; Smick, Doug; An, Meng Lin

    1994-01-01

    In June 1992, the School of Aerospace Engineering at Georgia Tech was awarded a three year NASA University Space Research Association (USRA) Advanced Design Program (ADP) grant to address issues associated with the Integrated Design and Manufacturing of High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) configurations in its graduate Aerospace Systems Design courses. This report provides an overview of the on-going Georgia Tech initiative to address these design/manufacturing issues during the preliminary design phases of an HSCT concept. The new design methodology presented here has been incorporated in the graduate aerospace design curriculum and is based on the concept of Integrated Product and Process Development (IPPD). The selection of the HSCT as a pilot project was motivated by its potential global transportation payoffs; its technological, environmental, and economic challenges; and its impact on U.S. global competitiveness. This pilot project was the focus of each of the five design courses that form the graduate level aerospace systems design curriculum. This year's main objective was the development of a systematic approach to preliminary design and optimization and its implementation to an HSCT wing/propulsion configuration. The new methodology, based on the Taguchi Parameter Design Optimization Method (PDOM), was established and was used to carry out a parametric study where various feasible alternative configurations were evaluated. The comparison criterion selected for this evaluation was the economic impact of this aircraft, measured in terms of average yield per revenue passenger mile ($/RPM).

  1. Application of DSP Blackfin in data acquisition of high speed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Chao

    2015-12-01

    In the traditional digital collection, the use of FIFO and MCU is usually used. Traditional data acquisition systems are expensive and slow, When the input is a fast changing signal, the output will have a large distortion, which makes the whole system performance degradation, and not suitable for large amounts of data. In this paper, a new method of high speed data acquisition based on Blackfin DSP is presented, The analog signal is processed by the signal processing circuit, so that the amplitude of the signal is limited to the input range of the A/D converter. The whole collection system is determined by the data acquisition and control circuit. In order to further improve the speed of data transmission, DSP Blackfin uses advanced DMA technology. In the algorithm, the system is mainly used in the same sampling points for the average value of the method. Experimental results show, Using the traditional system, it will lose a lot of details, the destruction of the integrity of the signal. Using this system can well reconstruct the analog signal input, Especially in the large amount of data, it shows the incomparable advantages.

  2. Plastic straw: future of high-speed signaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Ha Il; Jin, Huxian; Bae, Hyeon-Min

    2015-11-01

    The ever-increasing demand for bandwidth triggered by mobile and video Internet traffic requires advanced interconnect solutions satisfying functional and economic constraints. A new interconnect called E-TUBE is proposed as a cost-and-power-effective all-electrical-domain wideband waveguide solution for high-speed high-volume short-reach communication links. The E-TUBE achieves an unprecedented level of performance in terms of bandwidth-per-carrier frequency, power, and density without requiring a precision manufacturing process unlike conventional optical/waveguide solutions. The E-TUBE exhibits a frequency-independent loss-profile of 4 dB/m and has nearly 20-GHz bandwidth over the V band. A single-sideband signal transmission enabled by the inherent frequency response of the E-TUBE renders two-times data throughput without any physical overhead compared to conventional radio frequency communication technologies. This new interconnect scheme would be attractive to parties interested in high throughput links, including but not limited to, 100/400 Gbps chip-to-chip communications.

  3. Plastic straw: future of high-speed signaling

    PubMed Central

    Song, Ha Il; Jin, Huxian; Bae, Hyeon-Min

    2015-01-01

    The ever-increasing demand for bandwidth triggered by mobile and video Internet traffic requires advanced interconnect solutions satisfying functional and economic constraints. A new interconnect called E-TUBE is proposed as a cost-and-power-effective all-electrical-domain wideband waveguide solution for high-speed high-volume short-reach communication links. The E-TUBE achieves an unprecedented level of performance in terms of bandwidth-per-carrier frequency, power, and density without requiring a precision manufacturing process unlike conventional optical/waveguide solutions. The E-TUBE exhibits a frequency-independent loss-profile of 4 dB/m and has nearly 20-GHz bandwidth over the V band. A single-sideband signal transmission enabled by the inherent frequency response of the E-TUBE renders two-times data throughput without any physical overhead compared to conventional radio frequency communication technologies. This new interconnect scheme would be attractive to parties interested in high throughput links, including but not limited to, 100/400 Gbps chip-to-chip communications. PMID:26525653

  4. 78 FR 28940 - Environmental Impact Statement for the Atlanta to Charlotte Portion of the Southeast High Speed...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-16

    ... Southeast High Speed Rail Corridor AGENCY: Federal Rail Administration (FRA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of Intent... between Atlanta, GA and Charlotte, NC, along the Southeast High-Speed Rail Corridor (SEHSR) as designated by the USDOT. The Study is being advanced consistent with the federal High-Speed Intercity...

  5. High Speed/ Low Effluent Process for Ethanol

    SciTech Connect

    M. Clark Dale

    2006-10-30

    n this project, BPI demonstrated a new ethanol fermentation technology, termed the High Speed/ Low Effluent (HS/LE) process on both lab and large pilot scale as it would apply to wet mill and/or dry mill corn ethanol production. The HS/LE process allows very rapid fermentations, with 18 to 22% sugar syrups converted to 9 to 11% ethanol ‘beers’ in 6 to 12 hours using either a ‘consecutive batch’ or ‘continuous cascade’ implementation. This represents a 5 to 8X increase in fermentation speeds over conventional 72 hour batch fermentations which are the norm in the fuel ethanol industry today. The ‘consecutive batch’ technology was demonstrated on a large pilot scale (4,800 L) in a dry mill corn ethanol plant near Cedar Rapids, IA (Xethanol Biofuels). The pilot demonstrated that 12 hour fermentations can be accomplished on an industrial scale in a non-sterile industrial environment. Other objectives met in this project included development of a Low Energy (LE) Distillation process which reduces the energy requirements for distillation from about 14,000 BTU/gal steam ($0.126/gal with natural gas @ $9.00 MCF) to as low as 0.40 KW/gal electrical requirements ($0.022/gal with electricity @ $0.055/KWH). BPI also worked on the development of processes that would allow application of the HS/LE fermentation process to dry mill ethanol plants. A High-Value Corn ethanol plant concept was developed to produce 1) corn germ/oil, 2) corn bran, 3) ethanol, 4) zein protein, and 5) nutritional protein, giving multiple higher value products from the incoming corn stream.

  6. Technological advances in adoptive immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Oelke, Mathias; Krueger, Christine; Schneck, Jonathan P

    2005-01-01

    Adoptive immunotherapy is an attractive and elegant strategy for treating a variety of life-threatening diseases. Several approaches have been developed to generate antigen-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cells for adoptive T-cell therapy in cancer and infectious diseases. Currently, many approaches are based on either the use of autologous peptide pulsed dendritic cells as antigen-presenting cells or nonspecific expansion of T cells. Unfortunately, current approaches lack the ability to serve as reproducible and economically viable methods. Several groups are developing new artificial approaches to overcome problems associated with dendritic cells and the nonspecific expansion of T-cell clones in order to make adoptive immunotherapy more feasible and effective. Thus, by increasing the availability of adoptive immunotherapy, we will be able to better determine the efficacy of the approaches in the treatment of a variety of diseases. In this review, we focus on technological advances that will facilitate adoptive immunotherapy. Specifically, we summarize current strategies which are either based on artificial antigen-presenting cells or on T-cell receptor gene transfer. PMID:15753966

  7. Technological advances in powered wheelchairs.

    PubMed

    Edlich, Richard F; Nelson, Kenneth P; Foley, Marni L; Buschbacher, Ralph M; Long, William B; Ma, Eva K

    2004-01-01

    During the last 40 years, there have been revolutionary advances in power wheelchairs. These unique wheelchair systems, designed for the physically immobile patient, have become extremely diversified, allowing the user to achieve different positions, including tilt, recline, and, more recently, passive standing. Because of this wide diversity of powered wheelchair products, there is a growing realization of the need for certification of wheeled mobility suppliers. Legislation in Tennessee (Consumer Protection Act for Wheeled Mobility) passed in 2003 will ensure that wheeled mobility suppliers must have Assistive Technology Supplier certification and maintain their continuing education credits when fitting individuals in wheelchairs for long-term use. Fifteen other legislative efforts are currently underway in general assemblies throughout the US. Manufacturers, dealers, hospitals, and legislators are working toward the ultimate goal of passing federal legislation delineating the certification process of wheeled mobility suppliers. The most recent advance in the design of powered wheelchairs is the development of passive standing positions. The beneficial effects of passive standing have been documented by comprehensive scientific studies. These benefits include reduction of seating pressure, decreased bone demineralization, increased bladder pressure, enhanced orthostatic circulatory regulation, reduction in muscular tone, decrease in upper extremity muscle stress, and enhanced functional status in general. In February 2003, Permobil, Inc., introduced the powered Permobil Chairman 2K Stander wheelchair, which can tilt, recline, and stand. Other companies are now manufacturing powered wheelchairs that can achieve a passive standing position. These wheelchairs include the Chief SR Powerchair, VERTRAN, and LifeStand Compact. Another new addition to the wheelchair industry is the iBOT, which can elevate the user to reach cupboards and climb stairs but has no passive

  8. Elements of NASA's high-speed research program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Darden, Christine M.; Olson, Erik D.; Shields, Elwood W.

    1993-01-01

    A brief description is given of the history of supersonic transport research, of feasibility studies commissioned by NASA in 1986, and of the NASA High-Speed Research Program which is an outgrowth of those feasibility studies. The paper places particular emphasis on airport and community-noise reduction through advanced takeoff procedures and high-lift devices and sonic-boom reduction through configuration design. Sonic-boom acceptability studies and atmospheric propagation methods are also discussed.

  9. Comparison of high-speed rail and maglev systems

    SciTech Connect

    Najafi, F.T.; Nassar, F.E.

    1996-07-01

    European and Japanese high-speed rail (HSR) and magnetically levitated (maglev) systems were each developed to respond to specific transportation needs within local economic, social, and political constraints. Not only is maglev technology substantially different from that of HSR, but also HSR and maglev systems differ in trainset design, track characteristics, cost structure, and cost sensitivity to design changes. This paper attempts to go beyond the traditional technology comparison table and focuses on the characteristics and conditions for which existing European and Japanese systems were developed. The technologies considered are the French train a grand vitesse (TGV), the Swedish X2000, the German Intercity Express (ICE) and Transrapid, and the Japanese Shinkansen, MLU, and high-speed surface train (HSST).

  10. Theoretical and experimental comparisons for high-speed and blade-vortex interaction noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iannielo, S.; di Francescantonio, P.; Tarica, D.; de Bernardis, E.

    1992-09-01

    Helicopter rotor noise calculations to validate two numerical codes currently being developed are presented. BENP code results for high-speed impulse noise are illustrated for helicopters in forward flight up to very high advancing blade tip Mach number. The HERNOP and WOPWOP codes are compared for high-speed flight.

  11. Benefits of advanced technology in industrial cogeneration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barna, G. J.; Burns, R. K.

    1979-01-01

    This broad study is aimed at identifying the most attractive advanced energy conversion systems for industrial cogeneration for the 1985 to 2000 time period and assessing the advantages of advanced technology systems compared to using today's commercially available technology. Energy conversion systems being studied include those using steam turbines, open cycle gas turbines, combined cycles, diesel engines, Stirling engines, closed cycle gas turbines, phosphoric acid and molten carbonate fuel cells and thermionics. Specific cases using today's commercially available technology are being included to serve as a baseline for assessing the advantages of advanced technology.

  12. NASA and Industry Benefits of ACTS High Speed Network Interoperability Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zernic, M. J.; Beering, D. R.; Brooks, D. E.

    2000-01-01

    This paper provides synopses of the design. implementation, and results of key high data rate communications experiments utilizing the technologies of NASA's Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS). Specifically, the network protocol and interoperability performance aspects will be highlighted. The objectives of these key experiments will be discussed in their relevant context to NASA missions, as well as, to the comprehensive communications industry. Discussion of the experiment implementation will highlight the technical aspects of hybrid network connectivity, a variety of high-speed interoperability architectures, a variety of network node platforms, protocol layers, internet-based applications, and new work focused on distinguishing between link errors and congestion. In addition, this paper describes the impact of leveraging government-industry partnerships to achieve technical progress and forge synergistic relationships. These relationships will be the key to success as NASA seeks to combine commercially available technology with its own internal technology developments to realize more robust and cost effective communications for space operations.

  13. Aerodynamics of High-Speed Trains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schetz, Joseph A.

    This review highlights the differences between the aerodynamics of high-speed trains and other types of transportation vehicles. The emphasis is on modern, high-speed trains, including magnetic levitation (Maglev) trains. Some of the key differences are derived from the fact that trains operate near the ground or a track, have much greater length-to-diameter ratios than other vehicles, pass close to each other and to trackside structures, are more subject to crosswinds, and operate in tunnels with entry and exit events. The coverage includes experimental techniques and results and analytical and numerical methods, concentrating on the most recent information available.

  14. High speed databus evaluation - Further work

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Andrew J.

    Communication elements of avionic architectures and tools for assessing their capabilities are discussed with emphasis placed on the most recent study aimed at understanding and using of high speed databuses. The latter include Linear Token Passing Bus, High Speed Ring Bus, and Fiber Distributed Data Interface. Simulation techniques for evaluating the performance of communication system elements provide a cost-effective and time efficient method of assessment. Further work is aimed at providing a unique capability capable of simulating the hardware and software functionality as well as communication elements. This tool will be used to assess complete avionic architectures.

  15. High Speed Quantum Key Distribution Over Optical Fiber Network System.

    PubMed

    Ma, Lijun; Mink, Alan; Tang, Xiao

    2009-01-01

    The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has developed a number of complete fiber-based high-speed quantum key distribution (QKD) systems that includes an 850 nm QKD system for a local area network (LAN), a 1310 nm QKD system for a metropolitan area network (MAN), and a 3-node quantum network controlled by a network manager. This paper discusses the key techniques used to implement these systems, which include polarization recovery, noise reduction, frequency up-conversion detection based on a periodically polled lithium nitrate (PPLN) waveguide, custom high-speed data handling boards and quantum network management. Using our quantum network, a QKD secured video surveillance application has been demonstrated. Our intention is to show the feasibility and sophistication of QKD systems based on current technology. PMID:27504218

  16. JPL Advanced Thermal Control Technology Roadmap - 2012

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birur, Gaj; Rodriguez, Jose I.

    2012-01-01

    NASA's new emphasis on human exploration program for missions beyond LEO requires development of innovative and revolutionary technologies. Thermal control requirements of future NASA science instruments and missions are very challenging and require advanced thermal control technologies. Limited resources requires organizations to cooperate and collaborate; government, industry, universities all need to work together for the successful development of these technologies.

  17. Identifying Advanced Technologies for Education's Future.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Gwendolyn B.; Yin, Robert K.

    A study to determine how three advanced technologies might be applied to the needs of special education students helped inspire the development of a new method for identifying such applications. This new method, named the "Hybrid Approach," combines features of the two traditional methods: technology-push and demand-pull. Technology-push involves…

  18. Advanced technologies for Mission Control Centers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dalton, John T.; Hughes, Peter M.

    1991-01-01

    Advance technologies for Mission Control Centers are presented in the form of the viewgraphs. The following subject areas are covered: technology needs; current technology efforts at GSFC (human-machine interface development, object oriented software development, expert systems, knowledge-based software engineering environments, and high performance VLSI telemetry systems); and test beds.

  19. First Annual High-Speed Research Workshop, part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitehead, Allen H., Jr. (Compiler)

    1992-01-01

    This workshop provided a national forum for presenting and discussing important technology issues related to the definition of an economically viable and environmentally compatible High Speed Civil Transport. The workshop was organized into 13 sessions. This volume is part 2 of 4 and covers 4 of the 13 sessions: (1) source noise; (2) sonic boom (aerodynamic performance); (3) propulsion systems studies; and (4) emission reduction.

  20. NASA/GE Collaboration on Open Rotors - High Speed Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanZante, Dale E.

    2011-01-01

    A low-noise open rotor system is being tested in collaboration with General Electric and CFM International, a 50/50 joint company between Snecmaand GE. Candidate technologies for lower noise will be investigated as well as installation effects such as pylon integration. Current test status for the 8x6 SWT high speed testing is presented as well as future scheduled testing which includes the FAA/CLEEN test entry. The tunnel blockage and propeller thrust calibration configurations are shown.

  1. Laryngeal High-Speed Videoendoscopy: Rationale and Recommendation for Accurate and Consistent Terminology

    PubMed Central

    Deliyski, Dimitar D.; Hillman, Robert E.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The authors discuss the rationale behind the term laryngeal high-speed videoendoscopy to describe the application of high-speed endoscopic imaging techniques to the visualization of vocal fold vibration. Method Commentary on the advantages of using accurate and consistent terminology in the field of voice research is provided. Specific justification is described for each component of the term high-speed videoendoscopy, which is compared and contrasted with alternative terminologies in the literature. Results In addition to the ubiquitous high-speed descriptor, the term endoscopy is necessary to specify the appropriate imaging technology and distinguish among modalities such as ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging, and nonendoscopic optical imaging. Furthermore, the term video critically indicates the electronic recording of a sequence of optical still images representing scenes in motion, in contrast to strobed images using high-speed photography and non-optical high-speed magnetic resonance imaging. High-speed videoendoscopy thus concisely describes the technology and can be appended by the desired anatomical nomenclature such as laryngeal. Conclusions Laryngeal high-speed videoendoscopy strikes a balance between conciseness and specificity when referring to the typical high-speed imaging method performed on human participants. Guidance for the creation of future terminology provides clarity and context for current and future experiments and the dissemination of results among researchers. PMID:26375398

  2. Isotope separation and advanced manufacturing technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpenter, J.; Kan, T.

    This is the fourth issue of a semiannual report for the Isotope Separation and Advanced Materials Manufacturing (ISAM) Technology Program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Primary objectives include: (1) the Uranium Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (UAVLIS) process, which is being developed and prepared for deployment as an advanced uranium enrichment capability; (2) Advanced manufacturing technologies, which include industrial laser and E-beam material processing and new manufacturing technologies for uranium, plutonium, and other strategically important materials in support of DOE and other national applications. This report features progress in the ISAM Program from October 1993 through March 1994.

  3. Low speed propellers: Impact of advanced technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keiter, I. D.

    1980-01-01

    Sensitivity studies performed to evaluate the potential of several advanced technological elements on propeller performance, noise, weight, and cost for general aviation aircraft are discussed. Studies indicate that the application of advanced technologies to general aviation propellers can reduce fuel consumption in future aircraft an average of ten percent, meeting current regulatory noise limits. Through the use of composite blade construction, up to 25 percent propeller weight reduction can be achieved. This weight reduction in addition to seven percent propeller efficiency improvements through application of advanced technologies result in four percent reduction in direct operating costs, ten percent reduction in aircraft acquisition cost, and seven percent lower gross weight for general aviation aircraft.

  4. Investigation of fullerenes for high speed low latency, photonic switching

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, H. W. H; Shelton, R.N.

    1997-02-13

    The components in high-speed, all-optical photonic systems must satisfy two essential requirements: (1) high switching speeds in the range of Tbit/s, and (2) low latency, where the latency is the amount of time that the optical signal remains in the device. An important problem precluding the practical implementation of high-speed, all- optical switching is the lack of a material with appropriate nonlinear optical properties needed to effect the switching. Numerous material systems have been studied in the past, but none have met all the necessary requirements. Development of such a material and its incorporation into photonic devices would advance the field tremendously. This Lab-wide LDRD project resolved this critical problem.

  5. Introduction of the M-85 high-speed rotorcraft concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stroub, Robert H.

    1991-01-01

    As a result of studying possible requirements for high-speed rotorcraft and studying many high-speed concepts, a new high-speed rotorcraft concept, designated as M-85, was derived. The M-85 is a helicopter that is reconfigured to a fixed-wing aircraft for high-speed cruise. The concept was derived as an approach to enable smooth, stable conversion between fixed-wing and rotary-wing while retaining hover and low-speed flight characteristics of a low disk loading helicopter. The name, M-85, reflects the high-speed goals of 0.85 Mach number at high altitude. For a high-speed rotorcraft, it is expected that a viable concept must be a cruise-efficient, fixed-wing aircraft so it may be attractive for a multiplicity of missions. It is also expected that a viable high-speed rotorcraft concept must be cruise efficient first and secondly, efficient in hover. What makes the M-85 unique is the large circular hub fairing that is large enough to support the aircraft during conversion between rotary-wind and fixed-wing modes. With the aircraft supported by this hub fairing, the rotor blades can be unloaded during the 100 percent change in rotor rpm. With the blades unloaded, the potential for vibratory loads would be lessened. In cruise, the large circular hub fairing would be part of the lifting system with additional lifting panels deployed for better cruise efficiency. In hover, the circular hub fairing would slightly reduce lift potential and/or decrease hover efficiency of the rotor system. The M-85 concept is described and estimated forward flight performance characteristics are presented in terms of thrust requirements and L/D with airspeed. The forward flight performance characteristics reflect recent completed wind tunnel tests of the wing concept. Also presented is a control system technique that is critical to achieving low oscillatory loads in rotary-wing mode. Hover characteristics, C(sub p) versus C(sub T) from test data, is discussed. Other techniques pertinent to

  6. A high-speed hydroplane accident.

    PubMed

    Flaherty, G N

    1975-03-29

    This report records the investigation into a high-speed hydroplane accident in which the driver died. He was ejected head first into the water at 117 to 126 ft/sec (80 to 85 mph), suffering brain damage and a fractured skull. Suggestions are made to minimize the effects of these inevitable crashes. PMID:1143139

  7. High speed hydrogen/graphite interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, A. J.; Hamman, R.; Sharma, O. P.; Harrje, D. T.

    1974-01-01

    Various aspects of a research program on high speed hydrogen/graphite interaction are presented. Major areas discussed are: (1) theoretical predictions of hydrogen/graphite erosion rates; (2) high temperature, nonequilibrium hydrogen flow in a nozzle; and (3) molecular beam studies of hydrogen/graphite erosion.

  8. Italian High-speed Airplane Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bona, C F

    1940-01-01

    This paper presents an account of Italian high-speed engine designs. The tests were performed on the Fiat AS6 engine, and all components of that engine are discussed from cylinders to superchargers as well as the test set-up. The results of the bench tests are given along with the performance of the engines in various races.

  9. High-speed data word monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wirth, M. N.

    1975-01-01

    Small, portable, self-contained device provides high-speed display of bit pattern or any selected portion of transmission, can suppress filler patterns so that display is not updated, and can freeze display so that specific event may be observed in detail.

  10. High speed cryogenic self-acting, shaft seals for liquid rocket turbopumps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burcham, R. E.

    1983-01-01

    Three self acting lift pad liquid oxygen face seals and two self acting gaseous helium circumferential seals for high speed liquid oxygen turbopump were evaluated. The development of a technology for reliable, 10 hour life, multiple start seals for use in high speed liquid oxygen turbopumps is discussed.

  11. Methods for Prediction of High-Speed Reacting Flows in Aerospace Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drummond, J. Philip

    2014-01-01

    Research to develop high-speed airbreathing aerospace propulsion systems was underway in the late 1950s. A major part of the effort involved the supersonic combustion ramjet, or scramjet, engine. Work had also begun to develop computational techniques for solving the equations governing the flow through a scramjet engine. However, scramjet technology and the computational methods to assist in its evolution would remain apart for another decade. The principal barrier was that the computational methods needed for engine evolution lacked the computer technology required for solving the discrete equations resulting from the numerical methods. Even today, computer resources remain a major pacing item in overcoming this barrier. Significant advances have been made over the past 35 years, however, in modeling the supersonic chemically reacting flow in a scramjet combustor. To see how scramjet development and the required computational tools finally merged, we briefly trace the evolution of the technology in both areas.

  12. Costs and Benefits of Advanced Aeronautical Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bobick, J. C.; Denny, R. E.

    1983-01-01

    Programs available from COSMIC used to evaluate economic feasibility of applying advanced aeronautical technology to civil aircraft of future. Programs are composed of three major models: Fleet Accounting Module, Airframe manufacturer Module, and Air Carrier Module.

  13. Advancing Binaural Cochlear Implant Technology

    PubMed Central

    McAlpine, David

    2015-01-01

    This special issue contains a collection of 13 papers highlighting the collaborative research and engineering project entitled Advancing Binaural Cochlear Implant Technology—ABCIT—as well as research spin-offs from the project. In this introductory editorial, a brief history of the project is provided, alongside an overview of the studies. PMID:26721929

  14. Benefits of advanced propulsion technology for the advanced supersonic transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hines, R. W.; Sabatella, J. A.

    1973-01-01

    Future supersonic transports will have to provide improvement in the areas of economics, range, and emissions relative to the present generation of supersonic transports, as well as meeting or improving upon FAR 36 noise goals. This paper covers the promising propulsion systems including variable-cycle engine concepts for long-range supersonic commercial transport application. The benefits of applying advanced propulsion technology to solve the economic and environmental problems are reviewed. The advanced propulsion technologies covered are in the areas of structures, materials, cooling techniques, aerodynamics, variable engine geometry, jet noise suppressors, acoustic treatment, and low-emission burners. The results of applying the advanced propulsion technology are presented in terms of improvement in overall system takeoff gross weight and return on investment.

  15. [Advances in genetic modification technologies].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Baixue; Sun, Qixin; Li, Haifeng

    2015-08-01

    Genetic modification technology is a new molecular tool for targeted genome modification. It includes zinc finger nucleases (ZFN) technology, transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALEN) technology and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)-associated (Cas) (CRISPR-Cas) nucleases technology. All of these nucleases create DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) at chromosomal targeted sites and induce cell endogenous mechanisms that are primarily repaired by the non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) or homologous recombination (HR) pathway, resulting in targeted endogenous gene knock-out or exogenous gene insertion. In recent years, genetic modification technologies have been successfully applied to bacteria, yeast, human cells, fruit fly, zebra fish, mouse, rat, livestock, cynomolgus monkey, Arabidopsis, rice, tobacco, maize, sorghum, wheat, barley and other organisms, showing its enormous advantage in gene editing field. Especially, the newly developed CRISPR-Cas9 system arose more attention because of its low cost, high effectiveness, simplicity and easiness. We reviewed the principles and the latest research progress of these three technologies, as well as prospect of future research and applications.

  16. Policy issues inherent in advanced technology development

    SciTech Connect

    Baumann, P.D.

    1994-12-31

    In the development of advanced technologies, there are several forces which are involved in the success of the development of those technologies. In the overall development of new technologies, a sufficient number of these forces must be present and working in order to have a successful opportunity at developing, introducing and integrating into the marketplace a new technology. This paper discusses some of these forces and how they enter into the equation for success in advanced technology research, development, demonstration, commercialization and deployment. This paper limits itself to programs which are generally governmental funded, which in essence represent most of the technology development efforts that provide defense, energy and environmental technological products. Along with the identification of these forces are some suggestions as to how changes may be brought about to better ensure success in a long term to attempt to minimize time and financial losses.

  17. Advanced Technology Lifecycle Analysis System (ATLAS) Technology Tool Box (TTB)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doyle, Monica; ONeil, Daniel A.; Christensen, Carissa B.

    2005-01-01

    The Advanced Technology Lifecycle Analysis System (ATLAS) is a decision support tool designed to aid program managers and strategic planners in determining how to invest technology research and development dollars. It is an Excel-based modeling package that allows a user to build complex space architectures and evaluate the impact of various technology choices. ATLAS contains system models, cost and operations models, a campaign timeline and a centralized technology database. Technology data for all system models is drawn from a common database, the ATLAS Technology Tool Box (TTB). The TTB provides a comprehensive, architecture-independent technology database that is keyed to current and future timeframes.

  18. Thermal structures and materials for high-speed flight

    SciTech Connect

    Thornton, E.A. )

    1992-01-01

    This book presents a collection of papers originally presented at the First University of Virginia Thermal Structures Conference. A fundamental goal of the conference was to expose participants to important problems and emerging technologies needed for the interdisciplinary design and development of thermal structures for high-speed flight. Aerothermal loads exerted on external surfaces of a flight vehicle consist of pressure, skin friction, and aerodynamic heating. Pressure and skin friction have important roles for aerodynamic forces and moments, but aerodynamic heating is the predominant structural load in high-speed flight. Aerodynamic heating is extremely important because induced elevated temperatures can affect structural behavior in several detrimental ways. Elevated temperatures degrade a material's ability to withstand loads because properties such as the elastic modulus and yield strength are reduced. Time-dependent inelastic behavior may come into play. Thermal stresses are introduced due to restrained local or global thermal expansions or contractions.

  19. The US market for high-speed maglev vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Rote, D.M.; Coffey, H.; Johnson, L.; Daniels, E.

    1989-01-01

    Recent studies at Argonne National Laboratory have shown that the market for high-speed magnetically levitated vehicles in the US, and in the rest of North America as well, depends strongly on how the technology is implemented. As an upgraded railway technology, it would have important benefits. However, competition with airlines would tend to make the technology uneconomical. Designed as aerospace-type vehicles with special attention to low mass and optimal aerodynamic performance and integrated into airport/airline operations, the technology would complement rather than compete with airlines. The social and economic benefits of maglev technology are discussed, and the economic viability of maglev as an airline/aerospace technology is compared to that as a railroad technology. Governing factors for potential market size and geographic distribution are addressed in detail, and the expected principal routes are described. 8 refs., 3 figs., 6 tabs.

  20. Supersonic throughflow fans for high-speed aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ball, Calvin L.

    1987-01-01

    Increased need for more efficient long-range supersonic flight has revived interest in the supersonic throughflow fan as a possible component for advanced high-speed propulsion systems. A fan that can operate with supersonic inlet axial Mach numbers would reduce the inlet losses incurred in diffusing the flow from supersonic Mach numbers to a subsonic one at the fan face. In addition, the size and weight of an all-supersonic inlet will be substantially lower than those of a conventional inlet. However, the data base for components of this type is practically nonexistent. Therefore, in order to furnish the required information for assessing the potential for this type of fan, the NASA Lewis Research Center has begun a program to design, analyze, build, and test a fan stage that is capable of operating with supersonic axial velocities from inlet to exit. The objectives are to demonstrate the feasibility and potential of supersonic throughflow fans, to gain a fundamental understanding of the flow physics associated with such systems, and to develop an experimental data base for design and analysis code validation. A brief overview of past supersonic throughflow fan activities are provided; the technology needs discussed; the design of a supersonic throughflow fan stage, a facility inlet, and a downstream diffuser described; and the results from the analysis codes used in executing the design are presented. Also presented is an engine concept intended to permit establishing supersonic throughflow within the fan on the runway and maintaining the supersonic throughflow condition within the fan throughout the flight envelope.

  1. Advanced Refrigerator/Freezer Technology Development. Technology Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaseor, Thomas; Hunter, Rick; Hamill, Doris

    1996-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center, through contract with Oceaneering Space Systems, is engaged in a project to develop advanced refrigerator/freezer (R/F) technologies for future Life and Biomedical Sciences space flight missions. The first phase of this project, a technology assessment, has been completed to identify the advanced R/F technologies needed and best suited to meet the requirements for the five R/F classifications specified by Life and Biomedical Science researchers. Additional objectives of the technology assessment were to rank those technologies based on benefit and risk, and to recommend technology development activities that can be accomplished within this project. This report presents the basis, the methodology, and results of the R/F technology assessment, along with technology development recommendations.

  2. Friction in high-speed impact experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelak, Robert A.; Rightley, Paul; Hammerberg, J. E.

    2000-04-01

    The physical interactions at the contact interface between two metals moving relative to one another are not well understood, particularly when the relative velocity between the bodies becomes a significant fraction of the sound speed in either material. Our goal is to characterize the interfacial dynamics occurring between two metal surfaces sliding at high loads (up to 300 kbar) and at high speeds (greater than 100 m/s). We are developing a technique where a high-speed spinning projectile is fired from a rifled gun at a rod instrumented with electrical resistance strain gauges for measuring both longitudinal and torsional strain waves. The observed traces, in conjunction with computer simulations, are used to estimate the normal and tangential force components at the interface to produce an estimate of the coefficient of friction. A preliminary estimate for a copper/steel interface is presented.

  3. High-speed massively parallel scanning

    DOEpatents

    Decker, Derek E.

    2010-07-06

    A new technique for recording a series of images of a high-speed event (such as, but not limited to: ballistics, explosives, laser induced changes in materials, etc.) is presented. Such technique(s) makes use of a lenslet array to take image picture elements (pixels) and concentrate light from each pixel into a spot that is much smaller than the pixel. This array of spots illuminates a detector region (e.g., film, as one embodiment) which is scanned transverse to the light, creating tracks of exposed regions. Each track is a time history of the light intensity for a single pixel. By appropriately configuring the array of concentrated spots with respect to the scanning direction of the detection material, different tracks fit between pixels and sufficient lengths are possible which can be of interest in several high-speed imaging applications.

  4. High speed printing with polygon scan heads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stutz, Glenn

    2016-03-01

    To reduce and in many cases eliminate the costs associated with high volume printing of consumer and industrial products, this paper investigates and validates the use of the new generation of high speed pulse on demand (POD) lasers in concert with high speed (HS) polygon scan heads (PSH). Associated costs include consumables such as printing ink and nozzles, provisioning labor, maintenance and repair expense as well as reduction of printing lines due to high through put. Targets that are applicable and investigated include direct printing on plastics, printing on paper/cardboard as well as printing on labels. Market segments would include consumer products (CPG), medical and pharmaceutical products, universal ID (UID), and industrial products. In regards to the POD lasers employed, the wavelengths include UV(355nm), Green (532nm) and IR (1064nm) operating within the repetition range of 180 to 250 KHz.

  5. High speed receiver for capsule endoscope.

    PubMed

    Woo, S H; Yoon, K W; Moon, Y K; Lee, J H; Park, H J; Kim, T W; Choi, H C; Won, C H; Cho, J H

    2010-10-01

    In this study, a high-speed receiver for a capsule endoscope was proposed and implemented. The proposed receiver could receive 20 Mbps data that was sufficient to receive images with a higher resolution than conventional receivers. The receiver used a 1.2 GHz band to receive radio frequency (RF) signal, and demodulated the signal to an intermediate frequency (IF) stage (150 MHz). The demodulated signal was amplified, filtered, and under-sampled by a high-speed analog-to-digital converter (ADC). In order to decode the under-sampled data in real time, a simple frequency detection algorithm was selected and was implemented by using a FPGA. The implemented system could receive 20 Mbps data.

  6. High-Speed Granular Chute Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McElwaine, J.

    2014-12-01

    Accurate models for high speed granular flows are critical for understanding long runout landslides and rockfalls. However reproducible experimental data is extremely limited and is mostly only available for steady state flows on moderate inclinations. We report on experiments over a much greater range of slope angles 30-50 degrees and flow depths 4-130 particle diameters with upto 20kg/s of sand flowing steadily. The data suggests that friction can be much larger than the μ(I)mu(I) rheology or kinetic theories predict and suggest and that there may be constant velocity states above the angle of vanishing hstop. We show similar high speed steady flows at angles up to 50 degress in Discrete Element Simuations and discuss how these can be understood theoretically.

  7. Advanced clean coal utilization technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Moritomi, Hiroshi

    1993-12-31

    The most important greenhouse gas is CO{sub 2} from coal utilization. Ways of mitigating CO{sub 2} emissions include the use of alternative fuels, using renewable resources and increasing the efficiency of power generation and end use. Adding to such greenhouse gas mitigation technologies, post combustion control by removing CO{sub 2} from power station flue gases and then storing or disposing it will be available. Although the post combustion control have to be evaluated in a systematic manner relating them to whether they are presently available technology, to be available in the near future or long term prospects requiring considerable development, it is considered to be a less promising option owing to the high cost and energy penalty. By contrast, abatement technologies aimed at improving conversion efficiency or reducing energy consumption will reduce emissions while having their own commercial justification.

  8. Development of high-speed video cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Etoh, Takeharu G.; Takehara, Kohsei; Okinaka, Tomoo; Takano, Yasuhide; Ruckelshausen, Arno; Poggemann, Dirk

    2001-04-01

    Presented in this paper is an outline of the R and D activities on high-speed video cameras, which have been done in Kinki University since more than ten years ago, and are currently proceeded as an international cooperative project with University of Applied Sciences Osnabruck and other organizations. Extensive marketing researches have been done, (1) on user's requirements on high-speed multi-framing and video cameras by questionnaires and hearings, and (2) on current availability of the cameras of this sort by search of journals and websites. Both of them support necessity of development of a high-speed video camera of more than 1 million fps. A video camera of 4,500 fps with parallel readout was developed in 1991. A video camera with triple sensors was developed in 1996. The sensor is the same one as developed for the previous camera. The frame rate is 50 million fps for triple-framing and 4,500 fps for triple-light-wave framing, including color image capturing. Idea on a video camera of 1 million fps with an ISIS, In-situ Storage Image Sensor, was proposed in 1993 at first, and has been continuously improved. A test sensor was developed in early 2000, and successfully captured images at 62,500 fps. Currently, design of a prototype ISIS is going on, and, hopefully, will be fabricated in near future. Epoch-making cameras in history of development of high-speed video cameras by other persons are also briefly reviewed.

  9. Data Capture Technique for High Speed Signaling

    DOEpatents

    Barrett, Wayne Melvin; Chen, Dong; Coteus, Paul William; Gara, Alan Gene; Jackson, Rory; Kopcsay, Gerard Vincent; Nathanson, Ben Jesse; Vranas, Paylos Michael; Takken, Todd E.

    2008-08-26

    A data capture technique for high speed signaling to allow for optimal sampling of an asynchronous data stream. This technique allows for extremely high data rates and does not require that a clock be sent with the data as is done in source synchronous systems. The present invention also provides a hardware mechanism for automatically adjusting transmission delays for optimal two-bit simultaneous bi-directional (SiBiDi) signaling.

  10. Turbulence modeling for high speed compressible flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chandra, Suresh

    1993-01-01

    The following grant objectives were delineated in the proposal to NASA: to offer course work in computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and related areas to enable mechanical engineering students at North Carolina A&T State University (N.C. A&TSU) to pursue M.S. studies in CFD, and to enable students and faculty to engage in research in high speed compressible flows. Since no CFD-related activity existed at N.C. A&TSU before the start of the NASA grant period, training of students in the CFD area and initiation of research in high speed compressible flows were proposed as the key aspects of the project. To that end, graduate level courses in CFD, boundary layer theory, and fluid dynamics were offered. This effort included initiating a CFD course for graduate students. Also, research work was performed on studying compressibility effects in high speed flows. Specifically, a modified compressible dissipation model, which included a fourth order turbulent Mach number term, was incorporated into the SPARK code and verified for the air-air mixing layer case. The results obtained for this case were compared with a wide variety of experimental data to discern the trends in the mixing layer growth rates with varying convective Mach numbers. Comparison of the predictions of the study with the results of several analytical models was also carried out. The details of the research study are described in the publication entitled 'Compressibility Effects in Modeling Turbulent High Speed Mixing Layers,' which is attached to this report.

  11. Turbulence modeling for high speed compressible flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandra, Suresh

    1993-08-01

    The following grant objectives were delineated in the proposal to NASA: to offer course work in computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and related areas to enable mechanical engineering students at North Carolina A&T State University (N.C. A&TSU) to pursue M.S. studies in CFD, and to enable students and faculty to engage in research in high speed compressible flows. Since no CFD-related activity existed at N.C. A&TSU before the start of the NASA grant period, training of students in the CFD area and initiation of research in high speed compressible flows were proposed as the key aspects of the project. To that end, graduate level courses in CFD, boundary layer theory, and fluid dynamics were offered. This effort included initiating a CFD course for graduate students. Also, research work was performed on studying compressibility effects in high speed flows. Specifically, a modified compressible dissipation model, which included a fourth order turbulent Mach number term, was incorporated into the SPARK code and verified for the air-air mixing layer case. The results obtained for this case were compared with a wide variety of experimental data to discern the trends in the mixing layer growth rates with varying convective Mach numbers. Comparison of the predictions of the study with the results of several analytical models was also carried out. The details of the research study are described in the publication entitled 'Compressibility Effects in Modeling Turbulent High Speed Mixing Layers,' which is attached to this report.

  12. Assurance Technology Challenges of Advanced Space Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chern, E. James

    2004-01-01

    The initiative to explore space and extend a human presence across our solar system to revisit the moon and Mars post enormous technological challenges to the nation's space agency and aerospace industry. Key areas of technology development needs to enable the endeavor include advanced materials, structures and mechanisms; micro/nano sensors and detectors; power generation, storage and management; advanced thermal and cryogenic control; guidance, navigation and control; command and data handling; advanced propulsion; advanced communication; on-board processing; advanced information technology systems; modular and reconfigurable systems; precision formation flying; solar sails; distributed observing systems; space robotics; and etc. Quality assurance concerns such as functional performance, structural integrity, radiation tolerance, health monitoring, diagnosis, maintenance, calibration, and initialization can affect the performance of systems and subsystems. It is thus imperative to employ innovative nondestructive evaluation methodologies to ensure quality and integrity of advanced space systems. Advancements in integrated multi-functional sensor systems, autonomous inspection approaches, distributed embedded sensors, roaming inspectors, and shape adaptive sensors are sought. Concepts in computational models for signal processing and data interpretation to establish quantitative characterization and event determination are also of interest. Prospective evaluation technologies include ultrasonics, laser ultrasonics, optics and fiber optics, shearography, video optics and metrology, thermography, electromagnetics, acoustic emission, x-ray, data management, biomimetics, and nano-scale sensing approaches for structural health monitoring.

  13. Technological Advances and the Study of Reading.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henk, William A.

    Recent technological advances in neuroanatomy and neurophysiology have unearthed structural and functional patterns in the brain that can be associated with severe reading disabilities. As a response, this paper examines several computer-driven technologies whose capabilities shed light on brain-related issues germane to reading, with the intent…

  14. One Micron Laser Technology Advancements at GSFC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heaps, William S.

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the advancements made in one micron laser technology at Goddard Space Flight Center. It includes information about risk factors that are being addressed by GSFC, and overviews of the various programs that GSFC is currently managing that are using 1 micron laser technology.

  15. Advancing Careers in Information Science and Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanton, Wilbur W.; Templeton, Dennie E.; Chase, Joe D.; Rose, Melinda; Eaton, Carlotta

    2005-01-01

    The authors discuss the joining of 12 Virginia community colleges from the Appalachian region of southwestern Virginia with Radford University to form the Regional Technology Education Consortium (RTEC), a three-year project funded by the National Science Foundation Advanced Technological Education program and designed to develop articulation…

  16. Responding to Industry Demands: Advanced Technology Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Elizabeth Brient

    1991-01-01

    Discusses characteristics identified by the Center for Occupational Research and Development as indicative of fully functioning advanced technology centers, including the provision of training and retraining in such areas as design, manufacturing, materials science, and electro-optics; technology transfer; demonstration sites; needs assessment;…

  17. TECHcitement: Advances in Technological Education, 2007

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patton, Madeline

    2007-01-01

    This publication presents the following nine articles: (1) ATE [Advanced Technological Education] Readies Technicians for International Competition; (2) Technicians in Demand Worldwide; (3) Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology Endorses International Protocols for Technicians; (4) Entrepreneurial Educator Creates InnovaBio to Meet…

  18. Advanced Lost Foam Casting Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Charles E. Bates; Harry E. Littleton; Don Askeland; Taras Molibog; Jason Hopper; Ben Vatankhah

    2000-11-30

    This report describes the research done under the six tasks to improve the process and make it more functional in an industrial environment. Task 1: Pattern Pyrolysis Products and Pattern Properties Task 2: Coating Quality Control Task 3: Fill and Solidification Code Task 4: Alternate Pattern Materials Task 5: Casting Distortion Task 6: Technology Transfer

  19. Advances in femtosecond laser technology

    PubMed Central

    Callou, Thais Pinheiro; Garcia, Renato; Mukai, Adriana; Giacomin, Natalia T; de Souza, Rodrigo Guimarães; Bechara, Samir J

    2016-01-01

    Femtosecond laser technology has become widely adopted by ophthalmic surgeons. The purpose of this study is to discuss applications and advantages of femtosecond lasers over traditional manual techniques, and related unique complications in cataract surgery and corneal refractive surgical procedures, including: LASIK flap creation, intracorneal ring segment implantation, presbyopic treatments, keratoplasty, astigmatic keratotomy, and intrastromal lenticule procedures. PMID:27143847

  20. Advances in femtosecond laser technology.

    PubMed

    Callou, Thais Pinheiro; Garcia, Renato; Mukai, Adriana; Giacomin, Natalia T; de Souza, Rodrigo Guimarães; Bechara, Samir J

    2016-01-01

    Femtosecond laser technology has become widely adopted by ophthalmic surgeons. The purpose of this study is to discuss applications and advantages of femtosecond lasers over traditional manual techniques, and related unique complications in cataract surgery and corneal refractive surgical procedures, including: LASIK flap creation, intracorneal ring segment implantation, presbyopic treatments, keratoplasty, astigmatic keratotomy, and intrastromal lenticule procedures.

  1. High Speed Mobility Through On-Demand Aviation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Mark D.; Goodrich, Ken; Viken, Jeff; Smith, Jeremy; Fredericks, Bill; Trani, Toni; Barraclough, Jonathan; German, Brian; Patterson, Michael

    2013-01-01

    automobiles. ?? Community Noise: Hub and smaller GA airports are facing increasing noise restrictions, and while commercial airliners have dramatically decreased their community noise footprint over the past 30 years, GA aircraft noise has essentially remained same, and moreover, is located in closer proximity to neighborhoods and businesses. ?? Operating Costs: GA operating costs have risen dramatically due to average fuel costs of over $6 per gallon, which has constrained the market over the past decade and resulted in more than 50% lower sales and 35% less yearly operations. Infusion of autonomy and electric propulsion technologies can accomplish not only a transformation of the GA market, but also provide a technology enablement bridge for both larger aircraft and the emerging civil Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS) markets. The NASA Advanced General Aviation Transport Experiments (AGATE) project successfully used a similar approach to enable the introduction of primary composite structures and flat panel displays in the 1990s, establishing both the technology and certification standardization to permit quick adoption through partnerships with industry, academia, and the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA). Regional and airliner markets are experiencing constant pressure to achieve decreasing levels of community emissions and noise, while lowering operating costs and improving safety. But to what degree can these new technology frontiers impact aircraft safety, the environment, operations, cost, and performance? Are the benefits transformational enough to fundamentally alter aircraft competiveness and productivity to permit much greater aviation use for high speed and On-Demand Mobility (ODM)? These questions were asked in a Zip aviation system study named after the Zip Car, an emerging car-sharing business model. Zip Aviation investigates the potential to enable new emergent markets for aviation that offer "more flexibility than the existing transportation solutions

  2. High-speed wireless optical LANs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oe, Kunishige; Sato, Syuichi; Okayama, Motoyuki; Kubota, Toshihiro

    2001-11-01

    Study on high speed indoor wireless optical LAN system enabling 100Mbps signal transmission with low bit error rate (10-9) is presented. To realize the optical LAN system handling 100 Mbps signal, a directed line of sight (LOS) system is adopted as the optical receiver sensitivity for a bit error rate of 10-9 for 100 Mbps signals is fairly large. In the system, new approaches are introduced: WDM technology which enables bi-directional transmission in full duplex manner is applied using a 1.3 micrometers laser diode for down-link and 0.65 micrometers red laser diode for up-link light sources. As the wavelengths of the two lasers are quite separated from each other, this WDM technology brings an advantage that two kind of semiconductor materials can be used for detectors; GaInAs is used for down-link while Si is applied for up-link. GaInAs PD cannot detect the up-link laser light of 0.65 micrometers and Si PD or APD cannot detect the down-link laser light of 1.3micrometers . Therefore full duplex transmission can be achieved in this configuration. In the indoor wireless optical LAN system, one of the critical points is the transmitter configuration for down- link which enables to deliver optical power enough for 100 Mbps transmission to user areas as wide as possible with inexpensive prices. To realize the point, a special 1.3micrometers laser diode, a spot-size converter integrated laser (SS-LD), is introduced in company with convex lens and an object lens to deliver optical power to areas as wide as possible. As the far-field patterns of the SS-LD are fairly narrow, most of the output power of the LD could be collected to and spread wide by the object lens of 40 magnifications. Using the device, 3m diameter circle area in the plane 2m apart from the 1.3micrometers SS-LD emitting 20 mW optical power, could receive optical power above the receiver sensitivity for a bit error rate of 10-9 for 100 Mbps signals. The visible red light is convenient for not only position

  3. Advanced Cogeneration Technology Economic Optimization Study (ACTEOS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nanda, P.; Ansu, Y.; Manuel, E. H., Jr.; Price, W. G., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    The advanced cogeneration technology economic optimization study (ACTEOS) was undertaken to extend the results of the cogeneration technology alternatives study (CTAS). Cost comparisons were made between designs involving advanced cogeneration technologies and designs involving either conventional cogeneration technologies or not involving cogeneration. For the specific equipment cost and fuel price assumptions made, it was found that: (1) coal based cogeneration systems offered appreciable cost savings over the no cogeneration case, while systems using coal derived liquids offered no costs savings; and (2) the advanced cogeneration systems provided somewhat larger cost savings than the conventional systems. Among the issues considered in the study included: (1) temporal variations in steam and electric demands; (2) requirements for reliability/standby capacity; (3) availability of discrete equipment sizes; (4) regional variations in fuel and electricity prices; (5) off design system performance; and (6) separate demand and energy charges for purchased electricity.

  4. Advanced Communication Technology Satellite (ACTS) multibeam antenna technology verification experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acosta, Roberto J.; Larko, Jeffrey M.; Lagin, Alan R.

    1992-01-01

    The Advanced Communication Technology Satellite (ACTS) is a key to reaching NASA's goal of developing high-risk, advanced communications technology using multiple frequency bands to support the nation's future communication needs. Using the multiple, dynamic hopping spot beams, and advanced on board switching and processing systems, ACTS will open a new era in communications satellite technology. One of the key technologies to be validated as part of the ACTS program is the multibeam antenna with rapidly reconfigurable hopping and fixed spot beam to serve users equipped with small-aperature terminals within the coverage areas. The proposed antenna technology experiments are designed to evaluate in-orbit ACTS multibeam antenna performance (radiation pattern, gain, cross pol levels, etc.).

  5. Plasma Heating: An Advanced Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The Mercury and Apollo spacecraft shields were designed to protect astronauts from high friction temperatures (well over 2,000 degrees Fahrenheit) when re-entering the Earth's atmosphere. It was necessary to test and verify the heat shield materials on Earth before space flight. After exhaustive research and testing, NASA decided to use plasma heating as a heat source. This technique involves passing a strong electric current through a rarefied gas to create a plasma (ionized gas) that produces an intensely hot flame. Although NASA did not invent the concept, its work expanded the market for commercial plasma heating systems. One company, Plasma Technology Corporation (PTC), was founded by a member of the team that developed the Re-entry Heating Simulator at Ames Research Center (ARC). Dr. Camacho, President of PTC, believes the technology has significant environmental applications. These include toxic waste disposal, hydrocarbon, decomposition, medical waste disposal, asbestos waste destruction, and chemical and radioactive waste disposal.

  6. Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schertler, Ronald J.; Gedney, Richard T.

    1992-01-01

    An overview of the NASA ACTS program is presented. The key technologies of ACTS include spot beams, on-board baseband processing and routing, wide bandwidth (900 MHz), and Ka-band transponders. The discussion covers system description, current status of the spacecraft development, ACTS earth stations, NGS traffic terminal, USAT, land and aeronautical mobiles, high data rate and propagation receive only terminals, and ACTS experiments program.

  7. Modular high speed counter employing edge-triggered code

    DOEpatents

    Vanstraelen, G.F.

    1993-06-29

    A high speed modular counter (100) utilizing a novel counting method in which the first bit changes with the frequency of the driving clock, and changes in the higher order bits are initiated one clock pulse after a 0'' to 1'' transition of the next lower order bit. This allows all carries to be known one clock period in advance of a bit change. The present counter is modular and utilizes two types of standard counter cells. A first counter cell determines the zero bit. The second counter cell determines any other higher order bit. Additional second counter cells are added to the counter to accommodate any count length without affecting speed.

  8. Modular high speed counter employing edge-triggered code

    DOEpatents

    Vanstraelen, Guy F.

    1993-06-29

    A high speed modular counter (100) utilizing a novel counting method in which the first bit changes with the frequency of the driving clock, and changes in the higher order bits are initiated one clock pulse after a "0" to "1" transition of the next lower order bit. This allows all carries to be known one clock period in advance of a bit change. The present counter is modular and utilizes two types of standard counter cells. A first counter cell determines the zero bit. The second counter cell determines any other higher order bit. Additional second counter cells are added to the counter to accommodate any count length without affecting speed.

  9. High speed optical links between LLNL and Berkeley

    SciTech Connect

    Lennon, W.J.; Thombley, R.L.

    1994-08-08

    The Advanced Telecommunications Program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, in collaboration with Pacific Bell, is developing an experimental high speed, four wavelength, protocol independent optical link for evaluating wide area networking interconnection schemes and the use of fiber amplifiers. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, as a super-user, supercomputer, and super-application site, is anticipating the future bandwidth and protocol requirements to connect to other such sites as well as to connect to remote sited control centers and experiments. In this paper we discuss our vision of the future of Wide Area Networking and describe the plans for the wavelength division multiplexed link between Livermore and the University of California at Berkeley.

  10. High-speed imaging of blood splatter patterns

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, T.E.; Albright, K.A.; King, N.S.P.; Yates, G.J. ); Levine, G.F. . Bureau of Forensic Services)

    1993-01-01

    The interpretation of blood splatter patterns is an important element in reconstructing the events and circumstances of an accident or crime scene. Unfortunately, the interpretation of patterns and stains formed by blood droplets is not necessarily intuitive and study and analysis are required to arrive at a correct conclusion. A very useful tool in the study of blood splatter patterns is high-speed photography. Scientists at the Los Alamos National Laboratory, Department of Energy (DOE), and Bureau of Forensic Services, State of California, have assembled a high-speed imaging system designed to image blood splatter patterns. The camera employs technology developed by Los Alamos for the underground nuclear testing program and has also been used in a military mine detection program. The camera uses a solid-state CCD sensor operating at approximately 650 frames per second (75 MPixels per second) with a microchannel plate image intensifier that can provide shuttering as short as 5 ns. The images are captured with a laboratory high-speed digitizer and transferred to an IBM compatible PC for display and hard copy output for analysis. The imaging system is described in this paper.

  11. Influence of Tool Balancing in High Speed Machining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bašovská, Klaudia; Peterka, Jozef

    2014-12-01

    The high speed machining (HSM) is now considered as one of the key manufacturing technologies for higher throughput and productivity. HSM used higher rotational speed of the spindle (40,000 min-1 and higher). With increasing high speed spindle rotations raises a number of dynamic forces. Even a small mass unbalance in the spindle and tooling generates tool vibration. Tool vibration shortens tool life and lowers the quality of the machined surface. It is necessary to minimize this vibration by balancing tool and tool holder. The balancing process improves the mass distribution of a cutting tool and its holder, allowing the combination of the two to rotate with the minimum amount of unbalanced centrifugal forces. Machining with balanced tool will provide better surface quality, accuracy and less tool and machine wear. In this study is focused on unbalance cutting tools, definitions, balancing techniques, sources, effects, processes and machineries. The aim of this article was to examine the relationship between unbalance and tool holders used in high speed metalworking machine tools

  12. High-speed imaging of blood splatter patterns

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, T.E.; Albright, K.A.; King, N.S.P.; Yates, G.J.; Levine, G.F.

    1993-05-01

    The interpretation of blood splatter patterns is an important element in reconstructing the events and circumstances of an accident or crime scene. Unfortunately, the interpretation of patterns and stains formed by blood droplets is not necessarily intuitive and study and analysis are required to arrive at a correct conclusion. A very useful tool in the study of blood splatter patterns is high-speed photography. Scientists at the Los Alamos National Laboratory, Department of Energy (DOE), and Bureau of Forensic Services, State of California, have assembled a high-speed imaging system designed to image blood splatter patterns. The camera employs technology developed by Los Alamos for the underground nuclear testing program and has also been used in a military mine detection program. The camera uses a solid-state CCD sensor operating at approximately 650 frames per second (75 MPixels per second) with a microchannel plate image intensifier that can provide shuttering as short as 5 ns. The images are captured with a laboratory high-speed digitizer and transferred to an IBM compatible PC for display and hard copy output for analysis. The imaging system is described in this paper.

  13. Hybrid hydrostatic/ball bearings in high-speed turbomachinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nielson, C. E.

    1983-01-01

    A high speed, high pressure liquid hydrogen turbopump was designed, fabricated, and tested under a previous contract. This design was then modified to incorporate hybrid hydrostatic/ball bearings on both the pump end and turbine end to replace the original conventional ball bearing packages. The design, analysis, turbopump modification, assembly, and testing of the turbopump with hybrid bearings is presented here. Initial design considerations and rotordynamic performance analysis was made to define expected turbopump operating characteristics and are reported. The results of testing the turbopump to speeds of 9215 rad/s (88,000 rpm) using a wide range of hydrostatic bearing supply pressures are presented. The hydrostatic bearing test data and the rotordynamic behavior of the turbopump was closely analyzed and are included in the report. The testing of hybrid hydrostatic/ball bearings on a turbopump to the high speed requirements has indicated the configuration concept is feasible. The program has presented a great deal of information on the technology requirements of integrating the hybrid bearing into high speed turbopump designs for improved bearing life.

  14. Modern Imaging Technology: Recent Advances

    SciTech Connect

    Welch, Michael J.; Eckelman, William C.

    2004-06-18

    This 2-day conference is designed to bring scientist working in nuclear medicine, as well as nuclear medicine practitioners together to discuss the advances in four selected areas of imaging: Biochemical Parameters using Small Animal Imaging, Developments in Small Animal PET Imaging, Cell Labeling, and Imaging Angiogenesis Using Multiple Modality. The presentations will be on molecular imaging applications at the forefront of research, up to date on the status of molecular imaging in nuclear medicine as well as in related imaging areas. Experts will discuss the basic science of imaging techniques, and scheduled participants will engage in an exciting program that emphasizes the current status of molecular imaging as well as the role of DOE funded research in this area.

  15. Advances in core drilling technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holdsworth, G.

    Some notable technical advances in drill design were reported at the meeting, held in Canada August 30-September 1, 1982, at the University of Calgary. Chief amongst these was a battery powered, computer assisted electromechanical core drill which has recently been used by the Danes in Greenland to continuously core to the base of the ice sheet at 2038 m. This is the deepest coring operation so far on the Greenland ice sheet. (The record for deep glacier drilling is held by the U.S. Army Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory for the continuous coring through 2164 m of ice to bedrock at Byrd Station, Antarctica, in 1968). In early 1982, a current Soviet core drilling operation was reported to be at a depth of 2000 m at Vostok station, Antarctica, where the total ice thickness is about 4000 m; the goal of core drilling the entire ice thickness there could be achieved before the end of 1983.

  16. Advances in pipe prover technology

    SciTech Connect

    Jakubenas, P.P.

    1996-09-01

    The petroleum industry has used pipe provers for on line calibration of liquid flow meters for over 30 years. Recently a number of innovations have come to the forefront that enhance the reliability of pipe provers, reduce their size, make them more accurate, and increase their value to the end users. With the widespread use of turbine meters for custody transfer, accurate measurement is more dependent on frequent proving, thus the industry will continue to demand advanced provers and proving techniques. The author will discuss the aforementioned subject with regard to both bidirectional and unidirectional pipe provers. A description of the operational principles of pipe provers and the enhancements that are now available in terms of prover mechanical configuration and electronic instrumentation will be described in detail. In addition, information will be provided concerning integration of pipe provers into measurement systems and design and use of sophisticated computer control systems for automated proving.

  17. Status of NASA High-Speed Research Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitehead, Allen H., Jr.

    1998-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the NASA High-Speed Research (HSR) Program dedicated to establishing the technology foundation to support the US transport industry's decision for an environmentally acceptable, economically viable 300 passenger, 5000 n.mi., Mach 2.4 aircraft. The HSR program, begun in 1990, is supported by a team of US aerospace companies. The international economic stakes are high. The projected market for more than 500 High-Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) airplanes introduced between the years 2000 and 2015 translates to more than $200 billion in aircraft sales, and the potential of 140,000 new jobs. The paper addresses the history of supersonic commercial air transportation beginning with the Concorde and TU-144 developments in the early 1960 time period. The technology goals for the HSR program are derived from market study results, projections on environmental requirements, and technical goals for each discipline area referenced to the design and operational features of the Concorde. Progress since the inception of the program is reviewed and a summary of some of the lessons learned will be highlighted. An outline is presented of the remaining technological challenges. Emphasis in this paper will be on the traditional aeronautical technologies that lead to higher performance to ensure economic viability. Specific discussion will center around aerodynamic performance, flight deck research, materials and structures development and propulsion systems. The environmental barriers to the HSCT and that part of the HSR program that addresses those technologies are reviewed and assessed in a companion paper.

  18. High Speed Video Applications In The Pharmaceutical Industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stapley, David

    1985-02-01

    The pursuit of quality is essential in the development and production of drugs. The pursuit of excellence is relentless, a never ending search. In the pharmaceutical industry, we all know and apply wide-ranging techniques to assure quality production. We all know that in reality none of these techniques are perfect for all situations. We have all experienced, the damaged foil, blister or tube, the missing leaflet, the 'hard to read' batch code. We are all aware of the need to supplement the traditional techniques of fault finding. This paper shows how high speed video systems can be applied to fully automated filling and packaging operations as a tool to aid the company's drive for high quality and productivity. The range of products involved totals some 350 in approximately 3,000 pack variants, encompassing creams, ointments, lotions, capsules, tablets, parenteral and sterile antibiotics. Pharmaceutical production demands diligence at all stages, with optimum use of the techniques offered by the latest technology. Figure 1 shows typical stages of pharmaceutical production in which quality must be assured, and highlights those stages where the use of high speed video systems have proved of value to date. The use of high speed video systems begins with the very first use of machine and materials: commissioning and validation, (the term used for determining that a process is capable of consistently producing the requisite quality) and continues to support inprocess monitoring, throughout the life of the plant. The activity of validation in the packaging environment is particularly in need of a tool to see the nature of high speed faults, no matter how infrequently they occur, so that informed changes can be made precisely and rapidly. The prime use of this tool is to ensure that machines are less sensitive to minor variations in component characteristics.

  19. Ceramic Technology for Advanced Heat Engines Project

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-08-01

    The Ceramic Technology For Advanced Heat Engines Project was developed by the Department of Energy's Office of Transportation Systems (OTS) in Conservation and Renewable Energy. This project, part of the OTS's Advanced Materials Development Program, was developed to meet the ceramic technology requirements of the OTS's automotive technology programs. Significant accomplishments in fabricating ceramic components for the Department of Energy (DOE), National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), and Department of Defense (DOD) advanced heat engine programs have provided evidence that the operation of ceramic parts in high-temperature engine environments is feasible. However, these programs have also demonstrated that additional research is needed in materials and processing development, design methodology, and data base and life prediction before industry will have a sufficient technology base from which to produce reliable cost-effective ceramic engine components commercially. An assessment of needs was completed, and a five year project plan was developed with extensive input from private industry. The objective of the project is to develop the industrial technology base required for reliable ceramics for application in advanced automotive heat engines. The project approach includes determining the mechanisms controlling reliability, improving processes for fabricating existing ceramics, developing new materials with increased reliability, and testing these materials in simulated engine environments to confirm reliability. Although this is a generic materials project, the focus is on structural ceramics for advanced gas turbine and diesel engines, ceramic hearings and attachments, and ceramic coatings for thermal barrier and wear applications in these engines.

  20. Space platform advanced technology study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, G.

    1981-01-01

    Current and past space platform and power module studies were utilized to point the way to areas of development for mechanical devices that will be required for the ultimate implementation of a platform erected and serviced by the Shuttle/Orbiter. The study was performed in accordance with a study plan which included: a review of space platform technology; orbiter berthing system requirements; berthing latch interface requirements, design, and model fabrication; berthing umbilical interface requirements and design; adaptive end effector design and model fabrication; and adaptive end effector requirements.

  1. Advanced neutral-beam technology

    SciTech Connect

    Berkner, K.H.

    1980-09-01

    Extensive development will be required to achieve the 50- to 75-MW, 175- to 200-keV, 5- to 10-sec pulses of deuterium atoms envisioned for ETF and INTOR. Multi-megawatt injector systems are large (and expansive); they consist of large vacuum tanks with many square meters of cryogenic pumping panels, beam dumps capable of dissipating several megawatts of un-neutralized beam, bending magnets, electrical power systems capable of fast turnoff with low (capacity) stored energy, and, of course, the injector modules (ion sources and accelerators). The technology requirements associated with these components are described.

  2. CROSSCUTTING TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT AT THE CENTER FOR ADVANCED SEPARATION TECHNOLOGIES

    SciTech Connect

    Christopher E. Hull

    2005-11-04

    This Technical Progress Report describes progress made on the twenty nine subprojects awarded in the second year of Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-02NT41607: Crosscutting Technology Development at the Center for Advanced Separation Technologies. This work is summarized in the body of the main report: the individual sub-project Technical Progress Reports are attached as Appendices.

  3. CROSSCUTTING TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT AT THE CENTER FOR ADVANCED SEPARATION TECHNOLOGIES

    SciTech Connect

    Christopher E. Hull

    2006-05-15

    This Technical Progress Report describes progress made on the twenty nine subprojects awarded in the second year of Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-02NT41607: Crosscutting Technology Development at the Center for Advanced Separation Technologies. This work is summarized in the body of the main report: the individual sub-project Technical Progress Reports are attached as Appendices.

  4. Crosscutting Technology Development at the Center for Advanced Separation Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Christopher E. Hull

    2006-09-30

    This Technical Progress Report describes progress made on the twenty nine subprojects awarded in the second year of Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-02NT41607: Crosscutting Technology Development at the Center for Advanced Separation Technologies. This work is summarized in the body of the main report: the individual sub-project Technical Progress Reports are attached as Appendices.

  5. Need of advanced technologies for coal ash utilization programs

    SciTech Connect

    Dube, S.K.

    1997-09-01

    National Thermal Power Corporation Ltd. (NTPC) alone produces year about 17 million tonnes of coal ash every year, out of 13 coal based stations having about 12,000 MW coal based installed capacity. The coal ash utilization program in NTPC has explored the uses of ash in the areas of raising of ash dykes, structural fills, development of low lying lands, construction of road, building materials, small brick plants, PPC, etc. In taking the studies further the Center for Power Efficiency and Environmental Protection (Cenpeep) of NTPC is evaluating the scope of employing the advanced technologies in coal ash utilization to maximize its consumption and with improved productivity. To start with it is being suggested to develop the ash ponds using more economical compacting techniques to increase the life of current ash pond. The other areas include the development of suitable grout for back filling of mine without sacrificing the productivity of mine, use of fly ash and bottom ash in the road base construction work, manufacture of clay-ash and lime ash bricks using high speed brick plants and manufacture of light weight aggregates near the consumption center. There are many other areas also where ash can find its application in large volumes.

  6. Advanced RF Front End Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herman, M. I.; Valas, S.; Katehi, L. P. B.

    2001-01-01

    The ability to achieve low-mass low-cost micro/nanospacecraft for Deep Space exploration requires extensive miniaturization of all subsystems. The front end of the Telecommunication subsystem is an area in which major mass (factor of 10) and volume (factor of 100) reduction can be achieved via the development of new silicon based micromachined technology and devices. Major components that make up the front end include single-pole and double-throw switches, diplexer, and solid state power amplifier. JPL's Center For Space Microsystems - System On A Chip (SOAC) Program has addressed the challenges of front end miniaturization (switches and diplexers). Our objectives were to develop the main components that comprise a communication front end and enable integration in a single module that we refer to as a 'cube'. In this paper we will provide the latest status of our Microelectromechanical System (MEMS) switches and surface micromachined filter development. Based on the significant progress achieved we can begin to provide guidelines of the proper system insertion for these emerging technologies. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  7. Advanced nuclear energy analysis technology.

    SciTech Connect

    Gauntt, Randall O.; Murata, Kenneth K.; Romero, Vicente JosÔe; Young, Michael Francis; Rochau, Gary Eugene

    2004-05-01

    A two-year effort focused on applying ASCI technology developed for the analysis of weapons systems to the state-of-the-art accident analysis of a nuclear reactor system was proposed. The Sandia SIERRA parallel computing platform for ASCI codes includes high-fidelity thermal, fluids, and structural codes whose coupling through SIERRA can be specifically tailored to the particular problem at hand to analyze complex multiphysics problems. Presently, however, the suite lacks several physics modules unique to the analysis of nuclear reactors. The NRC MELCOR code, not presently part of SIERRA, was developed to analyze severe accidents in present-technology reactor systems. We attempted to: (1) evaluate the SIERRA code suite for its current applicability to the analysis of next generation nuclear reactors, and the feasibility of implementing MELCOR models into the SIERRA suite, (2) examine the possibility of augmenting ASCI codes or alternatives by coupling to the MELCOR code, or portions thereof, to address physics particular to nuclear reactor issues, especially those facing next generation reactor designs, and (3) apply the coupled code set to a demonstration problem involving a nuclear reactor system. We were successful in completing the first two in sufficient detail to determine that an extensive demonstration problem was not feasible at this time. In the future, completion of this research would demonstrate the feasibility of performing high fidelity and rapid analyses of safety and design issues needed to support the development of next generation power reactor systems.

  8. Advancements in Aptamer Discovery Technologies.

    PubMed

    Gotrik, Michael R; Feagin, Trevor A; Csordas, Andrew T; Nakamoto, Margaret A; Soh, H Tom

    2016-09-20

    Affinity reagents that specifically bind to their target molecules are invaluable tools in nearly every field of modern biomedicine. Nucleic acid-based aptamers offer many advantages in this domain, because they are chemically synthesized, stable, and economical. Despite these compelling features, aptamers are currently not widely used in comparison to antibodies. This is primarily because conventional aptamer-discovery techniques such as SELEX are time-consuming and labor-intensive and often fail to produce aptamers with comparable binding performance to antibodies. This Account describes a body of work from our laboratory in developing advanced methods for consistently producing high-performance aptamers with higher efficiency, fewer resources, and, most importantly, a greater probability of success. We describe our efforts in systematically transforming each major step of the aptamer discovery process: selection, analysis, and characterization. To improve selection, we have developed microfluidic devices (M-SELEX) that enable discovery of high-affinity aptamers after a minimal number of selection rounds by precisely controlling the target concentration and washing stringency. In terms of improving aptamer pool analysis, our group was the first to use high-throughput sequencing (HTS) for the discovery of new aptamers. We showed that tracking the enrichment trajectory of individual aptamer sequences enables the identification of high-performing aptamers without requiring full convergence of the selected aptamer pool. HTS is now widely used for aptamer discovery, and open-source software has become available to facilitate analysis. To improve binding characterization, we used HTS data to design custom aptamer arrays to measure the affinity and specificity of up to ∼10(4) DNA aptamers in parallel as a means to rapidly discover high-quality aptamers. Most recently, our efforts have culminated in the invention of the "particle display" (PD) screening system, which

  9. Advancements in Aptamer Discovery Technologies.

    PubMed

    Gotrik, Michael R; Feagin, Trevor A; Csordas, Andrew T; Nakamoto, Margaret A; Soh, H Tom

    2016-09-20

    Affinity reagents that specifically bind to their target molecules are invaluable tools in nearly every field of modern biomedicine. Nucleic acid-based aptamers offer many advantages in this domain, because they are chemically synthesized, stable, and economical. Despite these compelling features, aptamers are currently not widely used in comparison to antibodies. This is primarily because conventional aptamer-discovery techniques such as SELEX are time-consuming and labor-intensive and often fail to produce aptamers with comparable binding performance to antibodies. This Account describes a body of work from our laboratory in developing advanced methods for consistently producing high-performance aptamers with higher efficiency, fewer resources, and, most importantly, a greater probability of success. We describe our efforts in systematically transforming each major step of the aptamer discovery process: selection, analysis, and characterization. To improve selection, we have developed microfluidic devices (M-SELEX) that enable discovery of high-affinity aptamers after a minimal number of selection rounds by precisely controlling the target concentration and washing stringency. In terms of improving aptamer pool analysis, our group was the first to use high-throughput sequencing (HTS) for the discovery of new aptamers. We showed that tracking the enrichment trajectory of individual aptamer sequences enables the identification of high-performing aptamers without requiring full convergence of the selected aptamer pool. HTS is now widely used for aptamer discovery, and open-source software has become available to facilitate analysis. To improve binding characterization, we used HTS data to design custom aptamer arrays to measure the affinity and specificity of up to ∼10(4) DNA aptamers in parallel as a means to rapidly discover high-quality aptamers. Most recently, our efforts have culminated in the invention of the "particle display" (PD) screening system, which

  10. Development of High Speed Digital Camera: EXILIM EX-F1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nojima, Osamu

    The EX-F1 is a high speed digital camera featuring a revolutionary improvement in burst shooting speed that is expected to create entirely new markets. This model incorporates a high speed CMOS sensor and a high speed LSI processor. With this model, CASIO has achieved an ultra-high speed 60 frames per second (fps) burst rate for still images, together with 1,200 fps high speed movie that captures movements which cannot even be seen by human eyes. Moreover, this model can record movies at full High-Definition. After launching it into the market, it was able to get a lot of high appraisals as an innovation camera. We will introduce the concept, features and technologies about the EX-F1.

  11. Advanced Microwave/Millimeter-Wave Imaging Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Zuowei; Yang, Lu; Luhmann, N. C., Jr.; Domier, C. W.; Ito, N.; Kogi, Y.; Liang, Y.; Mase, A.; Park, H.; Sakata, E.; Tsai, W.; Xia, Z. G.; Zhang, P.

    Millimeter wave technology advances have made possible active and passive millimeter wave imaging for a variety of applications including advanced plasma diagnostics, radio astronomy, atmospheric radiometry, concealed weapon detection, all-weather aircraft landing, contraband goods detection, harbor navigation/surveillance in fog, highway traffic monitoring in fog, helicopter and automotive collision avoidance in fog, and environmental remote sensing data associated with weather, pollution, soil moisture, oil spill detection, and monitoring of forest fires, to name but a few. The primary focus of this paper is on technology advances which have made possible advanced imaging and visualization of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) fluctuations and microturbulence in fusion plasmas. Topics of particular emphasis include frequency selective surfaces, planar Schottky diode mixer arrays, electronically controlled beam shaping/steering arrays, and high power millimeter wave local oscillator and probe sources.

  12. Advanced technologies for remote sensing imaging applications

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, L.L.

    1993-06-07

    Generating and returning imagery from great distances has been generally associated with national security activities, with emphasis on reliability of system operation. (While the introduction of such capabilities was usually characterized by high levels of innovation, the evolution of such systems has followed the classical track of proliferation of ``standardized items`` expressing ever more incremental technological advances.) Recent focusing of interest on the use of remote imaging systems for commercial and scientific purposes can be expected to induce comparatively rapid advances along the axes of efficiency and technological sophistication, respectively. This paper reviews the most basic reasons for expecting the next decade of advances to dwarf the impressive accomplishments of the past ten years. The impact of these advances clearly will be felt in all major areas of large-scale human endeavor, commercial, military and scientific.

  13. DOE/JPL advanced thermionic technology program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Progress made in different tasks of the advanced thermionic technology program is described. The tasks include surface and plasma investigations (surface characterization, spectroscopic plasma experiments, and converter theory); low temperature converter development (tungsten emitter, tungsten oxide collector and tungsten emitter, nickel collector); component hardware development (hot shell development); flame-fired silicon carbide converters; high temperature and advanced converter studies; postoperational diagnostics; and correlation of design interfaces.

  14. Electrochromic Windows: Advanced Processing Technology

    SciTech Connect

    SAGE Electrochromics, Inc

    2006-12-13

    This project addresses the development of advanced fabrication capabilities for energy saving electrochromic (EC) windows. SAGE EC windows consist of an inorganic stack of thin films deposited onto a glass substrate. The window tint can be reversibly changed by the application of a low power dc voltage. This property can be used to modulate the amount of light and heat entering buildings (or vehicles) through the glazings. By judicious management of this so-called solar heat gain, it is possible to derive significant energy savings due to reductions in heating lighting, and air conditioning (HVAC). Several areas of SAGE’s production were targeted during this project to allow significant improvements to processing throughput, yield and overall quality of the processing, in an effort to reduce the cost and thereby improve the market penetration. First, the overall thin film process was optimized to allow a more robust set of operating points to be used, thereby maximizing the yield due to the thin film deposition themselves. Other significant efforts aimed at improving yield were relating to implementing new procedures and processes for the manufacturing process, to improve the quality of the substrate preparation, and the quality of the IGU fabrication. Furthermore, methods for reworking defective devices were developed, to enable devices which would otherwise be scrapped to be made into useful product. This involved the in-house development of some customized equipment. Finally, the improvements made during this project were validated to ensure that they did not impact the exceptional durability of the SageGlass® products. Given conservative estimates for cost and market penetration, energy savings due to EC windows in residences in the US are calculated to be of the order 0.026 quad (0.026×1015BTU/yr) by the year 2017.

  15. Aeroacoustic sources of high speed maglev trains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanson, Carl E.

    This paper summarizes information from several studies regarding aeroacoustic sources of highspeed magnetically levitated trains (maglev). At low speed, the propulsion system, auxiliary equipment, and mechanical/structural radiation are the predominant sources of noise from maglev. At high speed, aeroacoustic sources dominate the noise. Noise from airflow over a train (aeroacoustic noise) is generated by flow separation and reattachment at the front, turbulent boundary layer over the entire surface of the train, flow interactions with edges and appendages, and flow interactions between moving and stationary components of the system. This paper discusses aeroacoustic mechanisms at the noise, the mechanisms related to the turbulent boundary layer, and edge mechanisms.

  16. High-speed multispectral confocal imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carver, Gary E.; Locknar, Sarah A.; Morrison, William A.; Farkas, Daniel L.

    2013-02-01

    A new approach for generating high-speed multispectral images has been developed. The central concept is that spectra can be acquired for each pixel in a confocal spatial scan by using a fast spectrometer based on optical fiber delay lines. This concept merges fast spectroscopy with standard spatial scanning to create datacubes in real time. The spectrometer is based on a serial array of reflecting spectral elements, delay lines between these elements, and a single element detector. The spatial, spectral, and temporal resolution of the instrument is described, and illustrated by multispectral images of laser-induced autofluorescence in biological tissues.

  17. High-speed multispectral confocal biomedical imaging

    PubMed Central

    Carver, Gary E.; Locknar, Sarah A.; Morrison, William A.; Krishnan Ramanujan, V.; Farkas, Daniel L.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. A new approach for generating high-speed multispectral confocal images has been developed. The central concept is that spectra can be acquired for each pixel in a confocal spatial scan by using a fast spectrometer based on optical fiber delay lines. This approach merges fast spectroscopy with standard spatial scanning to create datacubes in real time. The spectrometer is based on a serial array of reflecting spectral elements, delay lines between these elements, and a single element detector. The spatial, spectral, and temporal resolution of the instrument is described and illustrated by multispectral images of laser-induced autofluorescence in biological tissues. PMID:24658777

  18. The Hubble Space Telescope high speed photometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vancitters, G. W., Jr.; Bless, R. C.; Dolan, J. F.; Elliot, J. L.; Robinson, E. L.; White, R. L.

    1988-01-01

    The Hubble Space Telescope will provide the opportunity to perform precise astronomical photometry above the disturbing effects of the atmosphere. The High Speed Photometer is designed to provide the observatory with a stable, precise photometer with wide dynamic range, broad wavelenth coverage, time resolution in the microsecond region, and polarimetric capability. Here, the scientific requirements for the instrument are examined, the unique design features of the photometer are explored, and the improvements to be expected over the performance of ground-based instruments are projected.

  19. High Speed SPM of Functional Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Huey, Bryan D.

    2015-08-14

    The development and optimization of applications comprising functional materials necessitates a thorough understanding of their static and dynamic properties and performance at the nanoscale. Leveraging High Speed SPM and concepts enabled by it, efficient measurements and maps with nanoscale and nanosecond temporal resolution are uniquely feasible. This includes recent enhancements for topographic, conductivity, ferroelectric, and piezoelectric properties as originally proposed, as well as newly developed methods or improvements to AFM-based mechanical, friction, thermal, and photoconductivity measurements. The results of this work reveal fundamental mechanisms of operation, and suggest new approaches for improving the ultimate speed and/or efficiency, of data storage systems, magnetic-electric sensors, and solar cells.

  20. Superplane!High Speed Civil Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    The High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT). This light-hearted promotional piece explains what the HSCT 'Superplane' is and what advantages it will have over current aircraft. As envisioned, the HSCT is a next-generation supersonic (faster than the speed of sound) passenger jet that would fly 300 passengers at more than 1,500 miles per hour -- more than twice the speed of sound. It will cross the Pacific or Atlantic in less than half the time of modern subsonic jets, and at a ticket price less than 20 percent above comparable, slower flights

  1. Some problems of high speed travel

    PubMed Central

    Reader, D. C.

    1975-01-01

    Some aspects of high speed flight are examined to investigate whether increase in speed implies any lowering of safety standards. The problem of circadian dysrhythmia is discussed and methods of attenuating its effects are explained and some new hypnotic drugs are mentioned. The risk of decompression has been quantified and predictions have been made for risks in commercial service. Cosmic radiation in supersonic aircraft is unlikely to limit commercial operation or significantly increase risks to passengers and crew. The supersonic boom is likely to limit the terrain over which supersonic aircraft can operate and regulations covering engine noise on the ground could restrict some flights. PMID:1208294

  2. The Very High Speed Integrated Circuit Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thornton, C. G.

    The DOD's Very High Speed Integrated Circuits (VHSIC) Program was established in order to gain and maintain a lead over adversaries in the military field of high density signal processing microelectronic subsystems. The advantages anticipated for VHSIC systems include order-of-magnitude reductions in signal processor size, weight and power requirements, as well as improvements in system performance capabilities, reliability, logistics support, and radiation hardness. VHSIC will be applied to systems involved in communications, intelligence, surveillance, target acquisition, and missile guidance and control.

  3. Initial performance of the High Speed Photometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richards, Evan; Percival, Jeff; Nelson, Matt; Hatter, ED; Fitch, John; White, Rick

    1991-01-01

    The Hubble Space Telescope High Speed Photometer has four image dissector tubes, two with UV sensitive photocathodes, two sensitive to the near UV and to visual light, and a single red sensitive photomultiplier tube. The HSP is capable of photometric measurements from 1200 to 7500 A with time resolution of 11 microseconds and has no moving parts. An initial analysis of the on-orbit engineering performance of the HSP is presented with changes in operating procedures resulting from the primary mirror spherical aberration and experience gained during the verification period.

  4. Technological Advances in Psychiatric Nursing: An update.

    PubMed

    Bostrom, Andrea C

    2016-06-01

    Understanding and treating mental illness has improved in many ways as a result of the fast pace of technological advances. The technologies that have the greatest potential impact are those that (1) increase the knowledge of how the brain functions and changes based on interventions, (2) have the potential to personalize interventions based on understanding genetic factors of drug metabolism and pharmacodynamics, and (3) use information technology to provide treatment in the absence of an adequate mental health workforce. Technologies are explored for psychiatric nurses to consider. Psychiatric nurses are encouraged to consider the experiences of psychiatric patients, including poor health, stigmatization, and suffering.

  5. Technological advances for studying human behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roske-Hofstrand, Renate J.

    1990-01-01

    Technological advances for studying human behavior are noted in viewgraph form. It is asserted that performance-aiding systems are proliferating without a fundamental understanding of how they would interact with the humans who must control them. Two views of automation research, the hardware view and the human-centered view, are listed. Other viewgraphs give information on vital elements for human-centered research, a continuum of the research process, available technologies, new technologies for persistent problems, a sample research infrastructure, the need for metrics, and examples of data-link technology.

  6. The Advanced Technology Operations System: ATOS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufeler, J.-F.; Laue, H. A.; Poulter, K.; Smith, H.

    1993-01-01

    Mission control systems supporting new space missions face ever-increasing requirements in terms of functionality, performance, reliability and efficiency. Modern data processing technology is providing the means to meet these requirements in new systems under development. During the past few years the European Space Operations Centre (ESOC) of the European Space Agency (ESA) has carried out a number of projects to demonstrate the feasibility of using advanced software technology, in particular, knowledge based systems, to support mission operations. A number of advances must be achieved before these techniques can be moved towards operational use in future missions, namely, integration of the applications into a single system framework and generalization of the applications so that they are mission independent. In order to achieve this goal, ESA initiated the Advanced Technology Operations System (ATOS) program, which will develop the infrastructure to support advanced software technology in mission operations, and provide applications modules to initially support: Mission Preparation, Mission Planning, Computer Assisted Operations, and Advanced Training. The first phase of the ATOS program is tasked with the goal of designing and prototyping the necessary system infrastructure to support the rest of the program. The major components of the ATOS architecture is presented. This architecture relies on the concept of a Mission Information Base (MIB) as the repository for all information and knowledge which will be used by the advanced application modules in future mission control systems. The MIB is being designed to exploit the latest in database and knowledge representation technology in an open and distributed system. In conclusion the technological and implementation challenges expected to be encountered, as well as the future plans and time scale of the project, are presented.

  7. Advanced MCT technologies in France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Destefanis, Gérard; Tribolet, Philippe

    2007-04-01

    In this paper we present an overview of the very recent developments of the HgCdTe infrared detector technology developed by CEA-LETI and industrialized by Sofradir in France. Today Sofradir uses in production for more than 15years a very mature, reproducible, well mastered and fully understood, planar n on p ion implanted technology. This process that allows very high yields to be achieved in all infrared bands from SWIR to LWIR uses the very conventional approach of LPE growth of MCT on lattice-matched CdZnTe substrates. Progress in this field is continuous from 20years and has recently leaded to the fabrication of high performance VLWIR FPA (320x256 with cut off wavelengths as high as 20μm). Moreover, thanks to the design of the epitaxial structure and to the substrate removal step MCT FPAs present the unique features to have very high quantum efficiency (above 70%) from the cut off wavelength down to the UV. This effect, which opens new application fields, was recently demonstrated in SWIR 320x256 FPAs with cut off wavelength of 2.5μm. Very high quality FPAs (1280x1024) with pitches as small as 15μm have already been demonstrated last year using the MBE growth of MWIR MCT epilayers on 4 inches germanium substrates, n on p ion implanted photodiodes and the hot welding indium bump hybridization technique. At the same time, with the MBE growth, bicolor and dual band FPAs which uses more complex multi hetero-junctions architectures (both 4 layers npn and 'pseudo planar' structures and extrinsically doped MCT layers) were fabricated with formats of 320x256 and pitches as small as 25μm. A very new area of development concerns avalanche photodiodes (APD) made with MCT. This semiconductor presents a unique feature among all the over semiconductors. Extremely high avalanche gains can be obtained on n on p photodiodes without absolutely any noise excess (F(K)=1): MCT APDs act as perfect amplifiers. These results open new interesting fields of investigation for low

  8. NEMO: Advanced energy systems and technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lund, P.

    In this report, the contents and major results of the national research program on advanced energy system and technologies (NEMO) are presented. The NEMO-program was one of the energy research programs of the Ministry of Trade and Industry during 1988-1992. Helsinki University of Technology had the responsibility of the overall coordination of the program. NEMO has been the largest resource allocation into advanced energy systems in Finland so far. The total budget was 70 million FIM. The focus of the program has been in solar energy, wind power, and energy storage. Hydrogen and fuel cells have been included in smaller amount. On all major fields of the NEMO-program, useful and high quality results have been obtained. Results of international significance include among others arctic wind energy, new approaches for the energy storage problem in solar energy applications, and the development of a completely new storage battery. International collaboration has been given high priority. The NEMO-program has also been active in informing the industries of the various business and utilization possibilities that advanced energy technologies offer. For example, major demonstration plants of each technology group have been realized. It is recommended that the further R and D should be still more focused on commercial applications. Through research efforts at universities, a good technology base should be maintained, whereas the industries should take a stronger position in commercializing new technology. Parallel to technology R and D, more public resources should be allocated for market introduction.

  9. Advanced Propfan Engine Technology (APET) and Single-rotation Gearbox/Pitch Change Mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sargisson, D. F.

    1985-01-01

    The projected performance, in the 1990's time period, of the equivalent technology level high bypass ratio turbofan powered aircraft (at the 150 passenger size) is compared with advanced turboprop propulsion systems. Fuel burn analysis, economic analysis, and pollution (noise, emissions) estimates were made. Three different cruise Mach numbers were investigated for both the turbofan and the turboprop systems. Aerodynamic design and performance estimates were made for nacelles, inlets, and exhaust systems. Air to oil heat exchangers were investigated for oil cooling advanced gearboxes at the 12,500 SHP level. The results and conclusions are positive in that high speed turboprop aircraft will exhibit superior fuel burn characteristics and lower operating costs when compared with equivalent technology turbofan aircraft.

  10. Advancing Autonomous Operations Technologies for NASA Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruzen, Craig; Thompson, Jerry Todd

    2013-01-01

    This paper discusses the importance of implementing advanced autonomous technologies supporting operations of future NASA missions. The ability for crewed, uncrewed and even ground support systems to be capable of mission support without external interaction or control has become essential as space exploration moves further out into the solar system. The push to develop and utilize autonomous technologies for NASA mission operations stems in part from the need to reduce operations cost while improving and increasing capability and safety. This paper will provide examples of autonomous technologies currently in use at NASA and will identify opportunities to advance existing autonomous technologies that will enhance mission success by reducing operations cost, ameliorating inefficiencies, and mitigating catastrophic anomalies.

  11. Advanced sensing technology in environmental field.

    PubMed

    Wakida, Shin-ichi

    2009-01-01

    Before the introduction of advanced sensing technology in environmental fields, environmental issues were discussed as several categories, such as local environmental issues in the 1970s, global environmental issues in the 1980s, living environmental issues in the 2000s and environmental stress issues in near future, which are of increasing interest in Japan. Using advanced sensing technologies, such as electrochemical sensors, chemically-sensitive field-effect transistors (ChemFETs) based on micro-electro mechanical system (MEMS) micromachining technology and subsequently electrophoretic separation and microfluidic Lab-on-a-Chip using MEMS technology, we have steered several kinds of environmental monitoring projects timely in response to the environmental issues for over the last 25 years. Among the local environmental issues, the global environmental issues and the living environmental issues, some fruits of R&D project will be introduced. Finally, our latest concern of the environmental stress monitoring was discussed and preliminary results were also introduced.

  12. Friction in high-speed impact experiments.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rightley, Paul; Pelak, Robert A.; Hammerberg, James E.

    1999-06-01

    The physical interactions at the contact interface between two metals moving relative to one another are not well understood. Current knowledge is particularly limited when the relative velocity between the bodies becomes a significant fraction of the sound speed in either material. Our goal is to characterize the interfacial dynamics occurring between two metal surfaces sliding at high loads (up to 300 kBar) and at high speeds (up to 10 mm/μs). In our primary experimental geometry, a high-speed, spinning projectile is fired from a rifled gun at a rod instrumented with electrical resistance strain gauges for measuring both longitudinal and torsional strain waves. The observed traces are then used to determine the normal and tangential force components at the interface to produce an estimate of the coefficient of friction. Such an estimate for a copper/steel interface will be presented. New simulations of the impact dynamics which include the large-scale plastic deformation processes are being used to optimize the experimental design.

  13. Aerodynamics of high-speed railway train

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raghunathan, Raghu S.; Kim, H.-D.; Setoguchi, T.

    2002-10-01

    Railway train aerodynamic problems are closely associated with the flows occurring around train. Much effort to speed up the train system has to date been paid on the improvement of electric motor power rather than understanding the flow around the train. This has led to larger energy losses and performance deterioration of the train system, since the flows around train are more disturbed due to turbulence of the increased speed of the train, and consequently the flow energies are converted to aerodynamic drag, noise and vibrations. With the speed-up of train, many engineering problems which have been neglected at low train speeds, are being raised with regard to aerodynamic noise and vibrations, impulse forces occurring as two trains intersect each other, impulse wave at the exit of tunnel, ear discomfort of passengers inside train, etc. These are of major limitation factors to the speed-up of train system. The present review addresses the state of the art on the aerodynamic and aeroacoustic problems of high-speed railway train and highlights proper control strategies to alleviate undesirable aerodynamic problems of high-speed railway train system.

  14. Ultra-high-speed embossed radiography system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Eiichi; Abderyim, Purkhet; Osawa, Akihiro; Enomoto, Toshiyuki; Tanaka, Etsuro; Sato, Koetsu; Izumisawa, Mitsuru; Ogawa, Akira; Sato, Shigehiro; Takayama, Kazuyoshi

    2008-11-01

    Embossed radiography is an important technique for imaging target region by decreasing absorption contrast of objects. The ultra-high-speed embossed radiography system consists of a computed radiography system, an intense flash x-ray generator, and a computer program for shifting the image pixel. In the flash x-ray generator, a high-voltage condenser of 200 nF was charged to 50 kV, and the electric charges in the condenser were discharged to the flash x-ray tube after triggering the cathode electrode. The molybdenum-target evaporation lead to the formation of weakly ionized linear plasma, and intense molybdenum K-series x-rays were produced. High-speed radiography was performed using molybdenum K-rays, and the embossed radiography was carried out utilizing single-energy subtraction after the image shifting. The minimum spatial resolution was equal to the sampling pitch of the CR system of 87.5 μm, and concavoconvex radiography such as phase-differential imaging was performed with an x-ray duration of approximately 0.5 Μs.

  15. Debris transport around high-speed snowplows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakhla, Hany Kamel

    2001-08-01

    The distribution of airborne debris around high-speed snowplows affects visibility and thus road safety. A combination of calculations, windtunnel experiments, and road trials are presented to provide knowledge of debris distributions and to obtain understanding of the mechanisms that can reduce suspended debris. Measurements obtained around windtunnel models show the influence of a variety of plow geometries on the location of debris around plowing trucks. Debris trajectories were calculated around plows with and without overplow deflectors by solution of Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations with cutting-edge and particle-tracking models. Calculations extrapolated windtunnel results over the wide range of snow conditions from light powder to slushy ice. Road trials compared visibility of conventional and modified snowplows with image analysis that quantified visible area, contrast and color intensity. In full scale tests, snow did not blow overtop of plow configurations that had trap angles less than 50 degrees, as predicted in windtunnel and computational results. Packing and junction flaps deflected discharge snow back into the consolidated discharge stream and decreased the amount of loose debris. Side-mounted hopper vanes kept rearward- facing surfaces clearer and made rear lighting and signage more effective. The visible area of high-speed snowplows outfitted with overplow deflector, packing flap, junction flap and hopper vanes was measured to be more than 50% larger than conventional plows for following motorists in all wind conditions and this was linked to reductions in the quantity of debris in the downstream snow cloud.

  16. Aerodynamic Characteristics of Airfoils at High Speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Briggs, L J; Hull, G F; Dryden, H L

    1925-01-01

    This report deals with an experimental investigation of the aerodynamical characteristics of airfoils at high speeds. Lift, drag, and center of pressure measurements were made on six airfoils of the type used by the air service in propeller design, at speeds ranging from 550 to 1,000 feet per second. The results show a definite limit to the speed at which airfoils may efficiently be used to produce lift, the lift coefficient decreasing and the drag coefficient increasing as the speed approaches the speed of sound. The change in lift coefficient is large for thick airfoil sections (camber ratio 0.14 to 0.20) and for high angles of attack. The change is not marked for thin sections (camber ratio 0.10) at low angles of attack, for the speed range employed. At high speeds the center of pressure moves back toward the trailing edge of the airfoil as the speed increases. The results indicate that the use of tip speeds approaching the speed of sound for propellers of customary design involves a serious loss in efficiency.

  17. Compact high-speed scanning lidar system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickinson, Cameron; Hussein, Marwan; Tripp, Jeff; Nimelman, Manny; Koujelev, Alexander

    2012-06-01

    The compact High Speed Scanning Lidar (HSSL) was designed to meet the requirements for a rover GN&C sensor. The eye-safe HSSL's fast scanning speed, low volume and low power, make it the ideal choice for a variety of real-time and non-real-time applications including: 3D Mapping; Vehicle guidance and Navigation; Obstacle Detection; Orbiter Rendezvous; Spacecraft Landing / Hazard Avoidance. The HSSL comprises two main hardware units: Sensor Head and Control Unit. In a rover application, the Sensor Head mounts on the top of the rover while the Control Unit can be mounted on the rover deck or within its avionics bay. An Operator Computer is used to command the lidar and immediately display the acquired scan data. The innovative lidar design concept was a result of an extensive trade study conducted during the initial phase of an exploration rover program. The lidar utilizes an innovative scanner coupled with a compact fiber laser and high-speed timing electronics. Compared to existing compact lidar systems, distinguishing features of the HSSL include its high accuracy, high resolution, high refresh rate and large field of view. Other benefits of this design include the capability to quickly configure scan settings to fit various operational modes.

  18. Pressure Distribution Over Airfoils at High Speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Briggs, L J; Dryden, H L

    1927-01-01

    This report deals with the pressure distribution over airfoils at high speeds, and describes an extension of an investigation of the aerodynamic characteristics of certain airfoils which was presented in NACA Technical Report no. 207. The results presented in report no. 207 have been confirmed and extended to higher speeds through a more extensive and systematic series of tests. Observations were also made of the air flow near the surface of the airfoils, and the large changes in lift coefficients were shown to be associated with a sudden breaking away of the flow from the upper surface. The tests were made on models of 1-inch chord and comparison with the earlier measurements on models of 3-inch chord shows that the sudden change in the lift coefficient is due to compressibility and not to a change in the Reynolds number. The Reynolds number still has a large effect, however, on the drag coefficient. The pressure distribution observations furnish the propeller designer with data on the load distribution at high speeds, and also give a better picture of the air-flow changes.

  19. High-speed inlet research program and supporting analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coltrin, Robert E.

    1990-01-01

    The technology challenges faced by the high speed inlet designer are discussed by describing the considerations that went into the design of the Mach 5 research inlet. It is shown that the emerging three dimensional viscous computational fluid dynamics (CFD) flow codes, together with small scale experiments, can be used to guide larger scale full inlet systems research. Then, in turn, the results of the large scale research, if properly instrumented, can be used to validate or at least to calibrate the CFD codes.

  20. Advanced Technology Development for Stirling Convertors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thieme, Lanny G.; Schreiber, Jeffrey G.

    2004-01-01

    A high-efficiency Stirling Radioisotope generator (SRG) for use on potential NASA space missions is being developed by the Department of Energy, Lockheed Martin, Stirling Technology Company, and NASA Glenn Research Center. GRC is also developing advanced technology for Stirling converters, aimed at substantially improving the specific power and efficiency of the converter.The status and results to date will be discussed in this paper.

  1. Development of advanced combustion technology for medium- and high-speed natural gas engines. Final report, January 1985-February 1989. Section F. Volume 3

    SciTech Connect

    Snyder, W.E.

    1989-02-01

    The test work was carried out on the Ricardo Atlas single cylinder research engine. This had been specially adapted to run as a spark ignited pre-chamber natural gas fuelled engine. A series of tests across the operational range of air:fuel ratios and ignition timings for various engine operating conditions were undertaken. The parameters tested were: 3 compression ratios, 2 air manifold temperatures, 3 load conditions, Swirl introduced into main chamber charge. In-cylinder pressure data was obtained from both the pre- and main-chambers as well as normal engine pressure and temperature measurements. Analysis of this information was undertaken using in-house computer programs. The analysis identified the effects of the parametric changes on such conditions as rates of burn, cylinder pressures, exhaust emissions, fuel consumption, heat balance etc. The effect of the changing engine operation on BSGC and BSNOx trade offs was studied and the major causes of limitations to this trade off were identified as incomplete combustion and reduced combustion efficiency when operating with lean air:fuel ratios. The effects on overall engine performance, particularly with a view to co-generation applications were investigated. The changes in high grade and low grade heat output from the engine exhaust and cooling fluids were studied, and the results are presented.

  2. Development of advanced combustion technology for medium- and high-speed natural gas engines. Final report, January 1985-February 1989. Sections G and H. Volume 4

    SciTech Connect

    Snyder, W.E.

    1989-02-01

    A test program has been carried out on the Ricardo Atlas engine to examine the effects of pre-chamber design on the combustion and performance of a lean-burn spark-ignited gas engine. The tests assessed the effects of pre-chamber throat size, number of holes, gas entry position and pre-chamber volume. For each build, the mixture strength and spark timing were varied over the operating range. In the single-cylinder engine tests, the pre-chamber design had a significant effect on engine performance and on the trade-off between gas consumption and NOx emissions. This effect is in marked contrast to both the constant volume combustion rig tests and the multi-cylinder engine tests where the pre-chamber design (within limits) had little effect on engine performance. Some reasons for the effect of pre-chamber design were proposed but many questions remain unanswered even though a large amount of analysis was done on the results. To improve clarity only the data and analysis which has led to this understanding has been included in the report. Other data is stored on computer file. The lean limit of the engine was limited entirely by the mixture strength in the pre-chamber. More development is required to extend the pre-chamber ignition limit.

  3. Advances in technologies and study design

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Completion of the initial draft sequence of the human genome was the proving ground for and has ushered in significant advancements in technology of increasing sophistication and ever increasing amounts of data. Often, this combination has a multiplicative effect of stimulating research groups to co...

  4. Advanced Technological Education Survey 2011 Fact Sheet

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wingate, Lori; Westine, Carl; Gullickson, Arlen

    2011-01-01

    This fact sheet summarizes data gathered in the 2011 survey of National Science Foundation (NSF) Advanced Technological Education (ATE) grant recipients. Conducted by EvaluATE, the evaluation resource center for the ATE program located at The Evaluation Center at Western Michigan University, this was the twelfth annual survey of ATE projects and…

  5. Advanced Technological Education Survey 2012 Fact Sheet

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wingate, Lori; Smith, Corey; Westine, Carl; Gullickson, Arlen

    2012-01-01

    This fact sheet summarizes data gathered in the 2012 survey of National Science Foundation (NSF) Advanced Technological Education (ATE) grant recipients. Conducted by EvaluATE, the evaluation resource center for the ATE program located at The Evaluation Center at Western Michigan University, this was the thirteenth annual survey of ATE projects…

  6. TECHcitement: Advances in Technological Education, 2006

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Association of Community Colleges (NJ1), 2006

    2006-01-01

    This publication includes 13 articles: (1) ATE [Advanced Technological Education] Attuned to Global Competition; (2) Materials Science Center Supplies Information on Often-Overlooked Field; (3) CSEC [Cyber Security Education Consortium] Builds Corps of Cyber Technicians; (4) KCTCS [Kentucky Community and Technical College System] Is U.S. Partner…

  7. Advanced Technological Education Survey 2010 Fact Sheet

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wingate, Lori; Westine, Carl; Gullickson, Arlen

    2010-01-01

    This fact sheet summarizes data gathered in the 2010 survey of National Science Foundation (NSF) Advanced Technological Education (ATE) grant recipients. Conducted by EvaluATE, the evaluation resource center for the ATE program located at The Evaluation Center at Western Michigan University, this was the eleventh annual survey of ATE projects and…

  8. Advanced Technological Education Survey 2009 Fact Sheet

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wingate, Lori; Gullickson, Arlen

    2009-01-01

    This fact sheet summarizes data gathered in the 2009 survey of National Science Foundation (NSF) Advanced Technological Education (ATE) grant recipients. Conducted by The Evaluation Center at Western Michigan University, this was the tenth annual survey of ATE projects and centers. Included here are statistics about the program's grantees and…

  9. Why Video? How Technology Advances Method

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Downing, Martin J., Jr.

    2008-01-01

    This paper reports on the use of video to enhance qualitative research. Advances in technology have improved our ability to capture lived experiences through visual means. I reflect on my previous work with individuals living with HIV/AIDS, the results of which are described in another paper, to evaluate the effectiveness of video as a medium that…

  10. TECHcitement: Advances in Technology Education, 2008

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patton, Madeline

    2008-01-01

    This publication presents the following articles: (1) Advanced Technological Education (ATE) Develops Student Recruitment and Retention Strategies; (2) Marketer Advises Tech Educators Appeal to Teens' Emotions, Desires to Do Something Important; (3) Digital Bridge Academy Gets At-Risk Students on Paths to Knowledge-Based Careers; (4) Project…

  11. TECHcitement: Advances in Technological Education, 2004

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Association of Community Colleges (NJ1), 2004

    2004-01-01

    This edition of "TECHcitement" contains the following articles: (1) ATE Program Leads to Student Success; (2) Doing Whatever It Takes for Aquaculture; (3) The Bridge to Biotech; (4) Girls See What They Can Do With Technology at Camp; (5) Students Advancing Solutions to Business Problems; (6) CREATE Recreates Technical Education in California; (7)…

  12. Advances in technologies and study design.

    PubMed

    Parnell, Laurence D

    2012-01-01

    The initial draft sequence of the human genome was the proving ground for significant technological advancements, and its completion has ushered in increasingly sophisticated tools and ever-increasing amounts of data. Often, this combination has multiplicative effects such as stimulating research groups to consider subsequent experiments of at least equal if not greater complexity or employ advanced technologies. As applied to the fields of nutrigenetics and nutrigenomics, these advances in technology and experimental design allow researchers to probe the biological, biochemical, and physiological mechanisms underpinning the response to micro- and macronutrients, along with downstream health effects. It is becoming ever more apparent that effects on gene expression as a consequence of genetic variation and perturbations to cellular and physiological systems are an important cornerstone of nutrigenomics and nutrigenetics research. A critical, near-term objective, however, must be to determine where and how nutrients and their metabolites augment or disrupt the genetic variation-gene expression axis. Downstream effects on protein and metabolite measures are also seen with growing regularity as vital components to this research. Thus, this chapter reviews the scope of recent progress and innovation in genomics and associated technologies as well as study designs as applied to nutrigenomics and nutrigenetics research and provides concrete examples of the application of those advancements in genomics-oriented nutrition research.

  13. Advanced Stirling Convertor (ASC) Technology Maturation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wong, Wayne A.; Wilson, Scott; Collins, Josh; Wilson, Kyle

    2016-01-01

    The Advanced Stirling Convertor (ASC) development effort was initiated by NASA Glenn Research Center with contractor Sunpower, Inc., to develop high-efficiency thermal-to-electric power conversion technology for NASA Radioisotope Power Systems (RPSs). Early successful performance demonstrations led to the expansion of the project as well as adoption of the technology by the Department of Energy (DOE) and system integration contractor Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company as part of the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG) flight project. The ASRG integrates a pair of ASCs to convert the heat from a pair of General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) modules into electrical power. The expanded NASA ASC effort included development of several generations of ASC prototypes or engineering units to help prepare the ASC technology and Sunpower for flight implementation. Sunpower later had two parallel contracts allowing the last of the NASA engineering units called ASC-E3 to serve as pathfinders for the ASC-F flight convertors being built for DOE. The ASC-E3 convertors utilized the ASC-F flight specifications and were built using the ASC-F design and process documentation. Shortly after the first ASC-F pair achieved initial operation, due to budget constraints, the DOE ASRG flight development contract was terminated. NASA continues to invest in the development of Stirling RPS technology including continued production of the ASC-E3 convertors, seven of which have been delivered with one additional unit in production. Starting in fiscal year 2015, Stirling Convertor Technology Maturation has been reorganized as an element of the RPS Stirling Cycle Technology Development (SCTD) Project and long-term plans for continued Stirling technology advancement are in reformulation. This paper provides a status on the ASC project, an overview of advancements made in the design and production of the ASC at Sunpower, and a summary of acceptance tests, reliability tests, and tactical

  14. Advanced Stirling Convertor (ASC) Technology Maturation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wong, Wayne A.; Wilson, Scott; Collins, Josh; Wilson, Kyle

    2015-01-01

    The Advanced Stirling Convertor (ASC) development effort was initiated by NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) with contractor Sunpower Inc. to develop high efficiency thermal-to-electric power conversion technology for NASA Radioisotope Power Systems. Early successful performance demonstrations led to the expansion of the project as well as adoption of the technology by the Department of Energy (DOE) and system integration contractor Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company as part of the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG) flight project. The ASRG integrates a pair of ASCs to convert the heat from a pair of General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) modules into electrical power. The expanded NASA ASC effort included development of several generations of ASC prototypes or Engineering Units to help prepare the ASC technology and Sunpower for flight implementation. Sunpower later had two parallel contracts allowing the last of the NASA Engineering Units called ASC-E3 to serve as pathfinders for the ASC-F flight convertors being built for DOE. The ASC-E3 convertors utilized the ASC-F flight specifications and were built using the ASC-F design and process documentation. Shortly after the first ASC-F Pair achieved initial operation, due to budget constraints, the DOE ASRG flight development contract was terminated. NASA continues to invest in the development of Stirling RPS technology including continued production of the ASC-E3 convertors, seven of which have been delivered with one additional unit in production. Starting in FY2015, Stirling Convertor Technology Maturation has been reorganized as an element of the RPS Stirling Cycle Technology Development (SCTD) Project and long-term plans for continued Stirling technology advancement are in reformulation. This paper provides a status on the ASC project, an overview of advancements made in the design and production of the ASC at Sunpower, and a summary of acceptance tests, reliability tests, and tactical tests at NASA

  15. NASA/industry advanced turboprop technology program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ziemianski, Joseph A.; Whitlow, John B., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    Experimental and analytical effort shows that use of advanced turboprop (propfan) propulsion instead of conventional turbofans in the older narrow-body airline fleet could reduce fuel consumption for this type of aircraft by up to 50 percent. The NASA Advanced Turboprop (ATP) program was formulated to address the key technologies required for these thin, swept-blade propeller concepts. A NASA, industry, and university team was assembled to develop and validate applicable design codes and prove by ground and flight test the viability of these propeller concepts. Some of the history of the ATP Project, an overview of some of the issues, and a summary of the technology developed to make advanced propellers viable in the high-subsonic cruise speed application are presented. The ATP program was awarded the prestigious Robert J. Collier Trophy for the greatest achievement in aeronautics and astronautics in America in 1987.

  16. NASA/industry advanced turboprop technology program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ziemianski, Joseph A.; Whitlow, John B., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    Experimental and analytical effort shows that use of advanced turboprop (propfan) propulsion instead of conventional turbofans in the older narrow-body airline fleet could reduce fuel consumption for this type of aircraft by up to 50 percent. The NASA Advanced Turboprop (ATP) program was formulated to address the key technologies required for these thin, swept-blade propeller concepts. A NASA, industry, and university team was assembled to develop and validate applicable design codes and prove by ground and flight test the viability of these propeller concepts. Some of the history of the ATP project, an overview of some of the issues, and a summary of the technology developed to make advanced propellers viable in the high-subsonic cruise speed application are presented. The ATP program was awarded the prestigious Robert J. Collier Trophy for the greatest achievement in aeronautics and astronautics in America in 1987.

  17. Advanced Engineering Technology for Measuring Performance.

    PubMed

    Rutherford, Drew N; D'Angelo, Anne-Lise D; Law, Katherine E; Pugh, Carla M

    2015-08-01

    The demand for competency-based assessments in surgical training is growing. Use of advanced engineering technology for clinical skills assessment allows for objective measures of hands-on performance. Clinical performance can be assessed in several ways via quantification of an assessee's hand movements (motion tracking), direction of visual attention (eye tracking), levels of stress (physiologic marker measurements), and location and pressure of palpation (force measurements). Innovations in video recording technology and qualitative analysis tools allow for a combination of observer- and technology-based assessments. Overall the goal is to create better assessments of surgical performance with robust validity evidence.

  18. Advanced Turbine Technology Applications Project (ATTAP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    Work to develop and demonstrate the technology of structural ceramics for automotive engines and similar applications is described. Long-range technology is being sought to produce gas turbine engines for automobiles with reduced fuel consumption and reduced environmental impact. The Advanced Turbine Technology Application Project (ATTAP) test bed engine is designed such that, when installed in a 3,000 pound inertia weight automobile, it will provide low emissions, 42 miles per gallon fuel economy on diesel fuel, multifuel capability, costs competitive with current spark ignition engines, and noise and safety characteristics that meet Federal standards.

  19. Technology advancement of an oxygen generation subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, M. K.; Burke, K. A.; Schubert, F. H.; Wynveen, R. A.

    1979-01-01

    An oxygen generation subsystem based on water electrolysis was developed and tested to further advance the concept and technology of the spacecraft air revitalization system. Emphasis was placed on demonstrating the subsystem integration concept and hardware maturity at a subsystem level. The integration concept of the air revitalization system was found to be feasible. Hardware and technology of the oxygen generation subsystem was demonstrated to be close to the preprototype level. Continued development of the oxygen generation technology is recommended to further reduce the total weight penalties of the oxygen generation subsystem through optimization.

  20. Advanced technologies for perimeter intrusion detection sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, J.D.

    1995-03-01

    The development of integrated circuit fabrication techniques and the resulting devices have contributed more to the advancement of exterior intrusion detectors and alarm assessment devices than any other technology. The availability of this technology has led to the improvements in and further development of smaller more powerful computers, microprocessors, solid state memories, solid state cameras, thermal imagers, low-power lasers, and shorter pulse width and higher frequency electronic circuitry. This paper presents information on planning a perimeter intrusion detection system, identifies the site characteristics that affect its performance, and describes improvements to perimeter intrusion detection sensors and assessment devices that have been achieved by using integrated circuit technology.

  1. Temperature prediction in high speed bone grinding using motor PWM signal.

    PubMed

    Tai, Bruce L; Zhang, Lihui; Wang, Anthony C; Sullivan, Stephen; Wang, Guangjun; Shih, Albert J

    2013-10-01

    This research explores the feasibility of using motor electrical feedback to estimate temperature rise during a surgical bone grinding procedure. High-speed bone grinding is often used during skull base neurosurgery to remove cranial bone and approach skull base tumors through the nasal corridor. Grinding-induced heat could propagate and potentially injure surrounding nerves and arteries, and therefore, predicting the temperature in the grinding region would benefit neurosurgeons during the operation. High-speed electric motors are controlled by pulse-width-modulation (PWM) to alter the current input and thus maintain the rotational speed. Assuming full mechanical to thermal power conversion in the grinding process, PWM can be used as feedback for heat generation and temperature prediction. In this study, the conversion model was established from experiments under a variety of grinding conditions and an inverse heat transfer method to determine heat flux. Given a constant rotational speed, the heat conversion was represented by a linear function, and could predict temperature from the experimental data with less than 20% errors. Such results support the advance of this technology for practical application.

  2. Recent advances in imaging technologies in dentistry

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Naseem; Bansal, Nikhil; Logani, Ajay

    2014-01-01

    Dentistry has witnessed tremendous advances in all its branches over the past three decades. With these advances, the need for more precise diagnostic tools, specially imaging methods, have become mandatory. From the simple intra-oral periapical X-rays, advanced imaging techniques like computed tomography, cone beam computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasound have also found place in modern dentistry. Changing from analogue to digital radiography has not only made the process simpler and faster but also made image storage, manipulation (brightness/contrast, image cropping, etc.) and retrieval easier. The three-dimensional imaging has made the complex cranio-facial structures more accessible for examination and early and accurate diagnosis of deep seated lesions. This paper is to review current advances in imaging technology and their uses in different disciplines of dentistry. PMID:25349663

  3. Elderly people's interaction with advanced technology.

    PubMed

    Blažun, Helena; Vošner, Janez; Kokol, Peter; Saranto, Kaija; Rissanen, Sari

    2014-01-01

    Aging of population is an inevitable process by which the number of elderly people is increasing. Rapid development of information and communication technology (ICT) is changing basic needs of elderly people; therefore society should ensure opportunities for elderly to learn and use ICT in a way to manage their daily life activities and in this way enable them participation in the information and knowledge society. The purpose of the study was to find out whether elderly are acquainted with the advanced technology and to what extent they use it or they desire to use it. Within the single point study we interviewed 100 randomly selected elderly people from different geographical regions in Slovenia. Results showed the differences in the use of advanced technology by Slovenian regions; therefore in the future activities should be focused on organizing promotional and demonstrational activities including ICT courses to increase elderly's motivation for ICT interaction.

  4. Overview of advanced law enforcement electronic technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harden, W. R.

    1995-05-01

    Law enforcement and security management are using advanced electronic equipment to increase the effectiveness and efficiency of the budget restricted police officer force. Currently there is also significant national attention concerning the possible utilization of 'military' electronic hardware to implement the much sought after 'force multiplier' which can help to alleviate each jurisdictions economic restrictions. However, as we are now finding, the transfer of 'military' hardware for utilization by law enforcement personnel is not as economically viable as hoped. This paper will address some of the recent advances in electronic technology that are being derived from the military technology base. Additionally, comments are given concerning the economic impact as the technology is transferred to the law enforcement community.

  5. ESA's advanced relay and technology mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lechte, H.; Bird, A. G.; van Holtz, L.; Oppenhauser, G.

    1990-05-01

    The Advanced Relay and Technology Mission is discussed. The objective of the mission is to develop, launch, and operate a single geostationary satellite. The proposed satellite includes advanced communications payloads with data-relay, mobile, and fixed-service applications. The semiconductor laser intersatellite link experiment (Silex), which is aimed at developing an optical communications data-relay system, is described. The Silex configuration is designed for LEO or GEO applications and has a 65 Mbit/s data rate over the optical return link. Consideration is given to the phased-array technology utilized in the S-band data-relay payload; the L-band land mobile payload; diagnostics and propagation packages; and technology experiments for improving the platform.

  6. HIGH SPEED KERR CELL FRAMING CAMERA

    DOEpatents

    Goss, W.C.; Gilley, L.F.

    1964-01-01

    The present invention relates to a high speed camera utilizing a Kerr cell shutter and a novel optical delay system having no moving parts. The camera can selectively photograph at least 6 frames within 9 x 10/sup -8/ seconds during any such time interval of an occurring event. The invention utilizes particularly an optical system which views and transmits 6 images of an event to a multi-channeled optical delay relay system. The delay relay system has optical paths of successively increased length in whole multiples of the first channel optical path length, into which optical paths the 6 images are transmitted. The successively delayed images are accepted from the exit of the delay relay system by an optical image focusing means, which in turn directs the images into a Kerr cell shutter disposed to intercept the image paths. A camera is disposed to simultaneously view and record the 6 images during a single exposure of the Kerr cell shutter. (AEC)

  7. High speed civil transport aerodynamic optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, James S.

    1994-01-01

    This is a report of work in support of the Computational Aerosciences (CAS) element of the Federal HPCC program. Specifically, CFD and aerodynamic optimization are being performed on parallel computers. The long-range goal of this work is to facilitate teraflops-rate multidisciplinary optimization of aerospace vehicles. This year's work is targeted for application to the High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT), one of four CAS grand challenges identified in the HPCC FY 1995 Blue Book. This vehicle is to be a passenger aircraft, with the promise of cutting overseas flight time by more than half. To meet fuel economy, operational costs, environmental impact, noise production, and range requirements, improved design tools are required, and these tools must eventually integrate optimization, external aerodynamics, propulsion, structures, heat transfer, controls, and perhaps other disciplines. The fundamental goal of this project is to contribute to improved design tools for U.S. industry, and thus to the nation's economic competitiveness.

  8. Active control system for high speed windmills

    DOEpatents

    Avery, D.E.

    1988-01-12

    A pump stroke is matched to the operating speed of a high speed windmill. The windmill drives a hydraulic pump for a control. Changes in speed of a wind driven shaft open supply and exhaust valves to opposite ends of a hydraulic actuator to lengthen and shorten an oscillating arm thereby lengthening and shortening the stroke of an output pump. Diminishing wind to a stall speed causes the valves to operate the hydraulic cylinder to shorten the oscillating arm to zero. A pressure accumulator in the hydraulic system provides the force necessary to supply the hydraulic fluid under pressure to drive the actuator into and out of the zero position in response to the windmill shaft speed approaching and exceeding windmill stall speed. 4 figs.

  9. Active control system for high speed windmills

    DOEpatents

    Avery, Don E.

    1988-01-01

    A pump stroke is matched to the operating speed of a high speed windmill. The windmill drives a hydraulic pump for a control. Changes in speed of a wind driven shaft open supply and exhaust valves to opposite ends of a hydraulic actuator to lengthen and shorten an oscillating arm thereby lengthening and shortening the stroke of an output pump. Diminishing wind to a stall speed causes the valves to operate the hydraulic cylinder to shorten the oscillating arm to zero. A pressure accumulator in the hydraulic system provides the force necessary to supply the hydraulic fluid under pressure to drive the actuator into and out of the zero position in response to the windmill shaft speed approaching and exceeding windmill stall speed.

  10. Design of a high speed business transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The design of a High Speed Business Transport (HSBT) was considered by the Aeronautical Design Class during the academic year 1989 to 1990. The project was chosen to offer an opportunity to develop user friendliness for some computer codes such as WAVE DRAG, supplied by NASA/Langley, and to experiment with several design lessons developed by Dr. John McMasters and his colleages at Boeing. Central to these design lessons was an appeal to marketing and feasibility considerations. There was an emphasis upon simplified analytical techniques to study trades and to stimulate creative thinking before committing to extensive analytical activity. Two designs stood out among all the rest because of the depth of thought and consideration of alternatives. One design, the Aurora, used a fixed wing design to satisfy the design mission: the Viero used a swept wing configuration to overcome problems related to supersonic flight. A summary of each of these two designs is given.

  11. High-speed electrical motor evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-02-03

    Under this task, MTI conducted a general review of state-of-the-art high-speed motors. The purpose of this review was to assess the operating parameters, limitations and performance of existing motor designs, and to establish commercial sources for a motor compatible with the requirements of the Brayton-cycle system. After the motor requirements were established, a list of motor types, manufacturers and designs capable of achieving the requisite performance was compiled. This list was based on an in-house evaluation of designs. Following the establishment of these options, a technical evaluation of the designs selected was conducted. In parallel with their evaluations, MTI focused on the establishment of commercial sources.

  12. Computation of high-speed reacting flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clutter, James Keith

    A computational study has been conducted for high-speed reacting flows relevant to munition problems, including shock-induced combustion and gun muzzle blast. The theoretical model considers inviscid and viscous flows, multi-species, finite rate chemical reaction schemes, and turbulence. Both the physical and numerical aspects are investigated to determine their impact on simulation accuracy. A range of hydrogen and oxygen reaction mechanisms are evaluated for the shock-induced combustion flow scenario. Characteristics of the mechanisms such as the induction time, heat release rate, and second explosion limit are found to impact the accuracy of the computation. On the numerical side, reaction source term treatments, including logarithmic weighting and scaling modifications, are investigated to determine their effectiveness in addressing numerical errors caused by disparate length scales between chemical reactions and fluid dynamics. It is demonstrated that these techniques can enhance solution accuracy. Computations of shock-induced combustion have also been performed using a κ-ɛ model to account for the turbulent transport of species and heat. An algebraic model of the temperature fluctuations has been used to estimate the impact of the turbulent effect on the chemical reaction source terms. The turbulence effects when represented with the current models are found to be minimal in the shock-induced combustion flow investigated in the present work. For the gun system simulations, computations for both a large caliber howitzer and small caliber firearms are carried out. A reduced kinetic scheme and an algebraic turbulence model are employed. The present approach, which accounts for the chemical reaction aspects of the gun muzzle blast problem, is found to improve the prediction of peak overpressures and can capture the effects produced by small caliber firearm sound suppressors. The present study has established the numerical and physical requirements for

  13. Applied high-speed imaging for the icing research program at NASA Lewis Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slater, Howard; Owens, Jay; Shin, Jaiwon

    1992-01-01

    The Icing Research Tunnel at NASA Lewis Research Center provides scientists a scaled, controlled environment to simulate natural icing events. The closed-loop, low speed, refrigerated wind tunnel offers the experimental capability to test for icing certification requirements, analytical model validation and calibration techniques, cloud physics instrumentation refinement, advanced ice protection systems, and rotorcraft icing methodology development. The test procedures for these objectives all require a high degree of visual documentation, both in real-time data acquisition and post-test image processing. Information is provided to scientific, technical, and industrial imaging specialists as well as to research personnel about the high-speed and conventional imaging systems will be on the recent ice protection technology program. Various imaging examples for some of the tests are presented. Additional imaging examples are available from the NASA Lewis Research Center's Photographic and Printing Branch.

  14. Long haul communications in the HF spectrum utilizing high speed modems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, Robert H.

    1988-03-01

    In the past ten years reliable high-speed satellite systems have pushed slower less reliable communication systems to the bottom of the list for development programs. Concern over reduced budgets, vulnerability of expensive satellite systems, and recent advances in HF technology are creating new interest in upgrading existing HF communication systems. Nondevelopment Items (NDI) are defined as the use of off-the-shelf commercial items instead of costly, time-consuming conventional research and development programs. The Navy Department's current policies are designed to insure the maximum use of NDI to fulfill Navy requirements. The speed of HF systems can be improved using current signaling and modulation techniques, and reliability can be increased by error-correcting codes or error detection used in conjunction with automatic repeat request (ARQ) schemes. Improved HF systems not only provide survivable back-up capability, but increased capacity for present communication needs.

  15. Applied high-speed imaging for the icing research program at NASA Lewis Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slater, Howard; Owens, Jay; Shin, Jaiwon

    1991-01-01

    The Icing Research Tunnel at NASA Lewis Research Center provides scientists a scaled, controlled environment to simulate natural icing events. The closed-loop, low speed, refrigerated wind tunnel offers the experimental capability to test for icing certification requirements, analytical model validation and calibration techniques, cloud physics instrumentation refinement, advanced ice protection systems, and rotorcraft icing methodology development. The test procedures for these objectives all require a high degree of visual documentation, both in real-time data acquisition and post-test image processing. Information is provided to scientific, technical, and industrial imaging specialists as well as to research personnel about the high-speed and conventional imaging systems will be on the recent ice protection technology program. Various imaging examples for some of the tests are presented. Additional imaging examples are available from the NASA Lewis Research Center's Photographic and Printing Branch.

  16. High-speed laser-assisted cutting of strong transparent materials using picosecond Bessel beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhuyan, M. K.; Jedrkiewicz, O.; Sabonis, V.; Mikutis, M.; Recchia, S.; Aprea, A.; Bollani, M.; Trapani, P. Di

    2015-08-01

    We report single-pass cutting of strong transparent glass materials of 700 μm thickness with a speed up to 270 mm/s using single-shot nanostructuring technique exploiting picosecond, zero-order Bessel beams at laser wavelength of 1030 nm. Particularly, we present results of a systematic study of cutting of tempered glass which has high resistance to thermal and mechanical shocks due to the inhomogeneous material properties along its thickness, and homogeneous glass that identify a unique focusing geometry and a finite pitch dependency, for which cutting with high quality and high reproducibility can be achieved. These results represent a significant advancement in the field of high-speed cutting of technologically important transparent materials.

  17. The 1995 NASA High-Speed Research Program Sonic Boom Workshop. Volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baize, Daniel G. (Editor)

    1996-01-01

    The High-Speed Research Program and NASA Langley Research Center sponsored the NASA High-Speed Research Program Sonic Boom Workshop on September 12-13, 1995. The workshop was designed to bring together NASAs scientists and engineers and their counterparts in industry, other Government agencies, and academia working together in the sonic boom element of NASAs High-Speed Research Program. Specific objectives of this workshop were to (1) report the progress and status of research in sonic boom propagation, acceptability, and design; (2) promote and disseminate this technology within the appropriate technical communities; (3) help promote synergy among the scientists working in the Program; and (4) identify technology pacing the development of viable reduced-boom High-Speed Civil Transport concepts. The Workshop included these sessions: Session 1 - Sonic Boom Propagation (Theoretical); Session 2 - Sonic Boom Propagation (Experimental); and Session 3 - Acceptability Studies - Human and Animal.

  18. A second-generation high speed civil transport: Stingray

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engdahl, Sean; Lopes, Kevin; Ngan, Angelen; Perrin, Joseph; Phipps, Marcus; Westman, Blake; Yeo, Urn

    1992-01-01

    The Stingray is the second-generation High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) designed for the 21st Century. This aircraft is designed to be economically viable and environmentally sound transportation competitive in markets currently dominated by subsonic aircraft such as the Boeing 747 and upcoming McDonnell Douglas MD-12. With the Stringray coming into service in 2005, a ticket price of 21 percent over current subsonic airlines will cover operational costs with a 10 percent return on investment. The cost per aircraft will be $202 million with the Direct Operating Cost equal to $0.072 per mile per seat. This aircraft has been designed to be a realistic aircraft that can be built within the next ten to fifteen years. There was only one main technological improvement factor used in the design, that being for the engine specific fuel consumption. The Stingray, therefore, does not rely on technology that does not exist. The Stingray will be powered by four mixed flow turbofans that meet both nitrous oxide emissions and FAR 36 Stage 3 noise regulations. It will carry 250 passengers a distance of 5200 nautical miles at a speed of Mach 2.4. The shape of the Stingray, while optimized for supersonic flight, is compatible with all current airline facilities in airports around the world. As the demand for economical, high-speed flight increases, the Stingray will be ready and able to meet those demands.

  19. Sustainability assessment of advanced wastewater treatment technologies.

    PubMed

    Høibye, L; Clauson-Kaas, J; Wenzel, H; Larsen, H F; Jacobsen, B N; Dalgaard, O

    2008-01-01

    As a consequence of the EU Water Framework Directive more focus is now on discharges of hazardous substances from wastewater treatment plants and sewers. Thus, many municipalities in Denmark may have to adopt to future advanced treatment technologies. This paper describes a holistic assessment, which includes technical, economical and environmental aspects. The technical and economical assessment is performed on 5 advanced treatment technologies: sand filtration, ozone treatment, UV exclusively for disinfection of pathogenic microorganisms, membrane bioreactor (MBR) and UV in combination with advanced oxidation. The technical assessment is based on 12 hazardous substances comprising heavy metals, organic pollutants, endocrine disruptors as well as pathogenic microorganisms. The environmental assessment is performed by life cycle assessment (LCA) comprising 9 of the specific hazardous substances and three advanced treatment methods; sand filtration, ozone treatment and MBR. The technical and economic assessment showed that UV solely for disinfection purposes or ozone treatment is the most advantageous advanced treatment methods if the demands are restricted to pathogenic microorganisms. In terms of sustainability, sand filtration is the most advantageous method based on the technical and environmental assessment due to the low energy consumption and high efficiency with regards to removal of heavy metals.

  20. Advances in Bioprinting Technologies for Craniofacial Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Visscher, Dafydd O; Farré-Guasch, Elisabet; Helder, Marco N; Gibbs, Susan; Forouzanfar, Tymour; van Zuijlen, Paul P; Wolff, Jan

    2016-09-01

    Recent developments in craniofacial reconstruction have shown important advances in both the materials and methods used. While autogenous tissue is still considered to be the gold standard for these reconstructions, the harvesting procedure remains tedious and in many cases causes significant donor site morbidity. These limitations have subsequently led to the development of less invasive techniques such as 3D bioprinting that could offer possibilities to manufacture patient-tailored bioactive tissue constructs for craniofacial reconstruction. Here, we discuss the current technological and (pre)clinical advances of 3D bioprinting for use in craniofacial reconstruction and highlight the challenges that need to be addressed in the coming years.

  1. Electrochemical carbon dioxide concentrator advanced technology tasks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, J. J.; Schubert, F. H.; Hallick, T. M.; Woods, R. R.

    1975-01-01

    Technology advancement studies are reported on the basic electrochemical CO2 removal process to provide a basis for the design of the next generation cell, module and subsystem hardware. An Advanced Electrochemical Depolarized Concentrator Module (AEDCM) is developed that has the characteristics of low weight, low volume, high CO2, removal, good electrical performance and low process air pressure drop. Component weight and noise reduction for the hardware of a six man capacity CO2 collection subsystem was developed for the air revitalization group of the Space Station Prototype (SSP).

  2. Advances in Bioprinting Technologies for Craniofacial Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Visscher, Dafydd O; Farré-Guasch, Elisabet; Helder, Marco N; Gibbs, Susan; Forouzanfar, Tymour; van Zuijlen, Paul P; Wolff, Jan

    2016-09-01

    Recent developments in craniofacial reconstruction have shown important advances in both the materials and methods used. While autogenous tissue is still considered to be the gold standard for these reconstructions, the harvesting procedure remains tedious and in many cases causes significant donor site morbidity. These limitations have subsequently led to the development of less invasive techniques such as 3D bioprinting that could offer possibilities to manufacture patient-tailored bioactive tissue constructs for craniofacial reconstruction. Here, we discuss the current technological and (pre)clinical advances of 3D bioprinting for use in craniofacial reconstruction and highlight the challenges that need to be addressed in the coming years. PMID:27113634

  3. Maneuvering technology for advanced fighter aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, Michael G.; Harris, Scott H.; Byers, Richard H.

    1992-01-01

    The need for increased maneuverability has its genesis from the first aerial combat engagement when two adversaries entangled themselves in a deadly aerial dance trying to gain the advantage over the other. It has only been in the past two decades that technologies have been investigated to increase aircraft control at maneuver attitudes that are typically dominated by highly separated flows. These separated flow regions are aggravated by advanced fighter aircraft shapes required to defeat an electronic enemy. This paper discusses passive and active devices that can be used to enhance the maneuverability of advanced fighter aircraft through vortex flow control, boundary layer control, and innovative flow manipulation.

  4. Advanced endoscopic technologies for colorectal cancer screening

    PubMed Central

    Obstein, Keith L; Valdastri, Pietro

    2013-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer in men and the second most common cancer in women worldwide. Diagnosing colorectal has been increasingly successful due to advances in technology. Flexible endoscopy is considered to be an effective method for early diagnosis and treatment of gastrointestinal cancer, making it a popular choice for screening programs. However, millions of people who may benefit from endoscopic colorectal cancer screening fail to have the procedure performed. Main reasons include psychological barriers due to the indignity of the procedure, fear of procedure related pain, bowel preparation discomfort, and potential need for sedation. Therefore, an urgent need for new technologies addressing these issues clearly exists. In this review, we discuss a set of advanced endoscopic technologies for colorectal cancer screening that are either already available or close to clinical trial. In particular, we focus on visual-inspection-only advanced flexible colonoscopes, interventional colonoscopes with alternative propulsion mechanisms, wireless capsule colonoscopy, and technologies for intraprocedural bowel cleansing. Many of these devices have the potential to reduce exam related patient discomfort, obviate the need for sedation, increase diagnostic yield, reduce learning curves, improve access to screening, and possibly avert the need for a bowel preparation. PMID:23382621

  5. Role of the eye in high-speed motion analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyzer, William G.

    1997-05-01

    Prior to the investigation of the photographic process over 150 years ago, the analyses of rapid motions were limited by the dynamic efficacies of the human eye, which has a temporal resolution of approximately 1/10 sec and a maximum information acquisition rate estimated at 103 to 104 bits/sec. At high rates of object motion, only the simplest actions can be resolved, comprehended and retained in human memory. Advances in the field of high-speed photography drastically changed all this by providing us with the ability today to capture permanent images of transient events at acquisition rates in excess of 1012 bits/sec. As remarkable as these improvements in temporal resolution and image retention may be, the final step in correctly interpreting any image still rests largely upon the analyst's ability to process visual data. Those who enter the field of image analysis soon learn how capricious the eye can be in this task. It is incumbent upon anyone performing important image analyses to have at least a basic understanding of the eye's performance characteristics, especially its limitations and capricious anomalies. Exemplary data presented in this paper are drawn from the scientific literature and the author's forty years of experience as a researcher, author and educator in the field of high-speed imaging.

  6. 2048 line by 2048 pixel high-speed image processor for digital fluoroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beardslee, Andrew W.; Stevener, Timothy L.; Lutz, Norm M.; Breithaupt, Dave W.

    1995-04-01

    Utilizing advances in camera technology and electronic components while developing an optimized system architecture resulted in the development of a 2048 line by 2048 pixel by 10- bit high-speed image processor for digital fluoroscopy. The image processor is capable of image acquisition of progressive or interlaced 2 K images at 7.5 frames per second, as well as true progressive or interlaced 1 K by 1 K image acquisition at 30 frames per second. High- speed components, some specifically designed for the system, are applied to perform 2048 line by 2048 pixel image processing at the required speeds. A multimode high-resolution TV camera with a 2000 line Plumbicon tube is used and the input video samples at 40 MHz to provide 10-bit digital image data. High-speed BTL imaging busses, 2 K video RAMs, and multiple processors are used within the system architecture to provide required processing bandwidth. Images are compressed using 2 to 1 lossless compression, and optionally lossy compression, to increase system performance and provide a cost-effective method to achieve required image storage capacity. A high resolution monitor is used for image display and a standard digital interface for hardcopy is provided which is capable of 2 K image transfer. A VME based CPU with a real-time multitasking operating system is used for system control and image management. The system architecture provides multiple image processing busses designed to provide simultaneous acquisition, review, and hardcopy operations. Functionally, the system architecture supports image acquisition and digitization, real-time image processing and display, image storage to RAM, archival to a hard drive, and hardcopy of an image to a digital laser. In addition, interfaces wit the x-ray generator and user interface devices are provided. The system may be configured to support multiple fluoroscopic suites, display configurations, and user interface stations. The 2048 line by 2048 pixel high-speed image

  7. Advanced control technology and its potential for future transport aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The topics covered include fly by wire, digital control, control configured vehicles, applications to advanced flight vehicles, advanced propulsion control systems, and active control technology for transport aircraft.

  8. Advances in Robotic Servicing Technology Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gefke, Gardell G.; Janas, Alex; Pellegrino, Joseph; Sammons, Matthew; Reed, Benjamin

    2015-01-01

    NASA's Satellite Servicing Capabilities Office (SSCO) has matured robotic and automation technologies applicable to in-space robotic servicing and robotic exploration over the last six years. This paper presents the progress of technology development activities at the Goddard Space Flight Center Servicing Technology Center and on the ISS, with an emphasis on those occurring in the past year. Highlighted advancements are design reference mission analysis for servicing in low Earth orbit (LEO) and asteroid redirection; delivery of the engineering development unit of the NASA Servicing Arm; an update on International Space Station Robotic Refueling Mission; and status of a comprehensive ground-based space robot technology demonstration expanding in-space robotic servicing capabilities beginning fall 2015.

  9. Advances in Robotic Servicing Technology Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gefke, Gardell G.; Janas, Alex; Pellegrino, Joseph; Sammons, Matthew; Reed, Benjamin

    2015-01-01

    NASA's Satellite Servicing Capabilities Office (SSCO) has matured robotic and automation technologies applicable to in-space robotic servicing and robotic exploration over the last six years. This paper presents the progress of technology development activities at the Goddard Space Flight Center Servicing Technology Center and on the ISS, with an emphasis on those occurring in the past year. Highlighted advancements are design reference mission analysis for servicing in low Earth orbit (LEO) and near Earth asteroid boulder retrieval; delivery of the engineering development unit of the NASA Servicing Arm; an update on International Space Station Robotic Refueling Mission; and status of a comprehensive ground-based space robot technology demonstration expanding in-space robotic servicing capabilities beginning fall 2015.

  10. Ceramic technology for advanced heat engines project

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-01

    The Ceramic Technology for Advanced Heat Engines Project was developed by the Department of Energy's Office of Transportation Systems in Conservation and Renewable Energy. This project was developed to meet the ceramic technology requirements of the OTT's automotive technology programs. This project is managed by ORNL and is closely coordinated with complementary ceramics tasks funded by other DOE offices, NASA, DoD, and industry. Research is discussed under the following topics; Turbomilling of SiC Whiskers; microwave sintering of silicon nitride; and milling characterization; processing of monolithics; silicon nitride matrix; oxide matrix; silicate matrix; thermal and wear coatings; joining; design; contact interfaces; time-dependent behavior; environmental effects; fracture mechanics; nondestructive evaluation; and technology transfer. References, figures, and tables are included with each topic.

  11. Design and implementation of interface units for high speed fiber optics local area networks and broadband integrated services digital networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tobagi, Fouad A.; Dalgic, Ismail; Pang, Joseph

    1990-01-01

    The design and implementation of interface units for high speed Fiber Optic Local Area Networks and Broadband Integrated Services Digital Networks are discussed. During the last years, a number of network adapters that are designed to support high speed communications have emerged. This approach to the design of a high speed network interface unit was to implement package processing functions in hardware, using VLSI technology. The VLSI hardware implementation of a buffer management unit, which is required in such architectures, is described.

  12. Advances and trends in computational structures technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, A. K.; Venneri, S. L.

    1990-01-01

    The major goals of computational structures technology (CST) are outlined, and recent advances in CST are examined. These include computational material modeling, stochastic-based modeling, computational methods for articulated structural dynamics, strategies and numerical algorithms for new computing systems, multidisciplinary analysis and optimization. The role of CST in the future development of structures technology and the multidisciplinary design of future flight vehicles is addressed, and the future directions of CST research in the prediction of failures of structural components, the solution of large-scale structural problems, and quality assessment and control of numerical simulations are discussed.

  13. Advanced Sciences and Technology Research for Astrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jah, M.

    The Advanced Sciences and Technology Research Institute for Astrodynamics (ASTRIA) has been created as a research endeavor that focuses all astrodynamics R&D within the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL). ASTRIA is mainly a consortium of academic partners brought together to bear on the nation's challenges as related to astrodynamics sciences and technologies. An overview of ASTRIA is presented as well as examples of several research efforts that are relevant to data/track association, UCT/cross-tagging mitigation, and attitude recovery from light curve data.

  14. Second NASA Advanced Composites Technology Conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, John G., Jr. (Compiler); Bohon, Herman L. (Compiler)

    1992-01-01

    The conference papers are presented. The Advanced Composite Technology (ACT) Program is a major multi-year research initiative to achieve a national goal of technology readiness before the end of the decade. Conference papers recorded results of research in the ACT Program in the specific areas of automated fiber placement, resin transfer molding, textile preforms, and stitching as these processes influence design, performance, and cost of composites in aircraft structures. These papers will also be included in the Ninth Conference Proceedings to be published by the Federal Aviation Administration as a separate document.

  15. Advances in computed tomography imaging technology.

    PubMed

    Ginat, Daniel Thomas; Gupta, Rajiv

    2014-07-11

    Computed tomography (CT) is an essential tool in diagnostic imaging for evaluating many clinical conditions. In recent years, there have been several notable advances in CT technology that already have had or are expected to have a significant clinical impact, including extreme multidetector CT, iterative reconstruction algorithms, dual-energy CT, cone-beam CT, portable CT, and phase-contrast CT. These techniques and their clinical applications are reviewed and illustrated in this article. In addition, emerging technologies that address deficiencies in these modalities are discussed.

  16. Advanced rotorcraft technology: Task force report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The technological needs and opportunities related to future civil and military rotorcraft were determined and a program plan for NASA research which was responsive to the needs and opportunities was prepared. In general, the program plan places the primary emphasis on design methodology where the development and verification of analytical methods is built upon a sound data base. The four advanced rotorcraft technology elements identified are aerodynamics and structures, flight control and avionic systems, propulsion, and vehicle configurations. Estimates of the total funding levels that would be required to support the proposed program plan are included.

  17. Personnel screening with advanced multistatic imaging technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Sherif S.

    2013-05-01

    Personnel screening is demanded nowadays for securing air traffic as well as critical infrastructures. The millimeter-waves are able to penetrate clothes and detect concealed objects, making them an attractive choice for security screening. Imaging methods based on multistatic architecture can ensure high quality imagery in terms of resolution and dynamic range. Following the advances in semiconductor technology, fully electronic solutions delivering real-time imaging are becoming feasible. Furthermore, the continuously increasing capabilities of digital signal processing units allow for the utilization of digital-beamforming techniques for image reconstruction, thus offering new opportunities for imaging systems to use sophisticated operation modes. Based on these modern technologies, an advanced realization addressing personnel screening in E-band with planar multistatic sparse array design is demonstrated.

  18. Advanced manufacturing: Technology and international competitiveness

    SciTech Connect

    Tesar, A.

    1995-02-01

    Dramatic changes in the competitiveness of German and Japanese manufacturing have been most evident since 1988. All three countries are now facing similar challenges, and these challenges are clearly observed in human capital issues. Our comparison of human capital issues in German, Japanese, and US manufacturing leads us to the following key judgments: Manufacturing workforces are undergoing significant changes due to advanced manufacturing technologies. As companies are forced to develop and apply these technologies, the constituency of the manufacturing workforce (especially educational requirements, contingent labor, job content, and continuing knowledge development) is being dramatically and irreversibly altered. The new workforce requirements which result due to advanced manufacturing require a higher level of worker sophistication and responsibility.

  19. Advanced pyrochemical technologies for minimizing nuclear waste

    SciTech Connect

    Bronson, M.C.; Dodson, K.E.; Riley, D.C.

    1994-06-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is seeking to reduce the size of the current nuclear weapons complex and consequently minimize operating costs. To meet this DOE objective, the national laboratories have been asked to develop advanced technologies that take uranium and plutonium, from retired weapons and prepare it for new weapons, long-term storage, and/or final disposition. Current pyrochemical processes generate residue salts and ceramic wastes that require aqueous processing to remove and recover the actinides. However, the aqueous treatment of these residues generates an estimated 100 liters of acidic transuranic (TRU) waste per kilogram of plutonium in the residue. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is developing pyrochemical techniques to eliminate, minimize, or more efficiently treat these residue streams. This paper will present technologies being developed at LLNL on advanced materials for actinide containment, reactors that minimize residues, and pyrochemical processes that remove actinides from waste salts.

  20. Recent technological advancements in breast ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Eisenbrey, John R; Dave, Jaydev K; Forsberg, Flemming

    2016-08-01

    Ultrasound is becoming increasingly common as an imaging tool for the detection and characterization of breast tumors. This paper provides an overview of recent technological advancements, especially those that may have an impact in clinical applications in the field of breast ultrasound in the near future. These advancements include close to 100% fractional bandwidth high frequency (5-18MHz) 2D and 3D arrays, automated breast imaging systems to minimize the operator dependence and advanced processing techniques, such as those used for detection of microcalcifications. In addition, elastography and contrast-enhanced ultrasound examinations that are expected to further enhance the clinical importance of ultrasound based breast tumor screening are briefly reviewed. These techniques have shown initial promise in clinical trials and may translate to more comprehensive clinical adoption in the future.

  1. Recent technological advancements in breast ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Eisenbrey, John R; Dave, Jaydev K; Forsberg, Flemming

    2016-08-01

    Ultrasound is becoming increasingly common as an imaging tool for the detection and characterization of breast tumors. This paper provides an overview of recent technological advancements, especially those that may have an impact in clinical applications in the field of breast ultrasound in the near future. These advancements include close to 100% fractional bandwidth high frequency (5-18MHz) 2D and 3D arrays, automated breast imaging systems to minimize the operator dependence and advanced processing techniques, such as those used for detection of microcalcifications. In addition, elastography and contrast-enhanced ultrasound examinations that are expected to further enhance the clinical importance of ultrasound based breast tumor screening are briefly reviewed. These techniques have shown initial promise in clinical trials and may translate to more comprehensive clinical adoption in the future. PMID:27179143

  2. Development of Advanced Ceramic Manufacturing Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Pujari, V.K.

    2001-04-05

    Advanced structural ceramics are enabling materials for new transportation engine systems that have the potential for significantly reducing energy consumption and pollution in automobiles and heavy vehicles. Ceramic component reliability and performance have been demonstrated in previous U.S. DOE initiatives, but high manufacturing cost was recognized as a major barrier to commercialization. Norton Advanced Ceramics (NAC), a division of Saint-Gobain Industrial Ceramics, Inc. (SGIC), was selected to perform a major Advanced Ceramics Manufacturing Technology (ACMT) Program. The overall objectives of NAC's program were to design, develop, and demonstrate advanced manufacturing technology for the production of ceramic exhaust valves for diesel engines. The specific objectives were (1) to reduce the manufacturing cost by an order of magnitude, (2) to develop and demonstrate process capability and reproducibility, and (3) to validate ceramic valve performance, durability, and reliability. The program was divided into four major tasks: Component Design and Specification, Component Manufacturing Technology Development, Inspection and Testing, and Process Demonstration. A high-power diesel engine valve for the DDC Series 149 engine was chosen as the demonstration part for this program. This was determined to be an ideal component type to demonstrate cost-effective process enhancements, the beneficial impact of advanced ceramics on transportation systems, and near-term commercialization potential. The baseline valve material was NAC's NT451 SiAION. It was replaced, later in the program, by an alternate silicon nitride composition (NT551), which utilized a lower cost raw material and a simplified powder-processing approach. The material specifications were defined based on DDC's engine requirements, and the initial and final component design tasks were completed.

  3. High-speed rail transportation. Hearing before the Subcommittee on Transportation and Hazardous Materials of the Committee on Energy and Commerce, US House of Representatives, One Hundred Second Congress, First Session, October 16, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    H.R. 1087 would authorize a high speed rail transportation development and commercialization program, establish a national high speed rail transportation policy, and promote development and commercialization of high speed rail transportation by providing Federal guarantees of certain investments in high speed rail transportation facilities. Testimony was heard from representatives of MAGLEV USA, Federal Railroad Administration, National Railroad Passenger Corporation (Amtrak), the Office of Technology Assessment, MAGLEV, Inc., National Maglev Initiative, High Speed Rail Association, and the Texas High-Speed Rail Association. Additional information was supplied by the Coalition of Northeastern Governors, Republic Locomotive, Washington State High Speed Ground Transportation, and the Texas High Speed Authority.

  4. A new design for a high speed spindle

    SciTech Connect

    Weck, M.; Fischer, S.; Holster, P.; Carlisle, K.; Chen, Y.

    1996-12-31

    Precision grinding and micromachining both impose high demands on the machine behavior, since the achievable workpiece accuracy is determined not only by the technological parameters but also by the characteristics of the applicated machine components. Ultraprecision surface quality and the mechanical fabrication of structures in the micron range can only be achieved by using machine tools which have appropriate spindles. Structures cannot be manufactured using spindle types of which the radial error motion is greater than the level of contour accuracy or surface roughness required. In addition, the spindle speed is an important value. Not only a certain cutting speed is needed from the technological point of view, but also the machining time required for microstructuring surfaces is reduced by deploying a high frequency spindle, thereby increasing the economic efficiency of the technique. Hence, the main purpose of the project was to develop a high speed spindle with properties concerning accuracy, speed and stiffness beyond commercially available ones.

  5. Man-machine interface requirements - advanced technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Remington, R. W.; Wiener, E. L.

    1984-01-01

    Research issues and areas are identified where increased understanding of the human operator and the interaction between the operator and the avionics could lead to improvements in the performance of current and proposed helicopters. Both current and advanced helicopter systems and avionics are considered. Areas critical to man-machine interface requirements include: (1) artificial intelligence; (2) visual displays; (3) voice technology; (4) cockpit integration; and (5) pilot work loads and performance.

  6. Medical technology advances from space research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pool, S. L.

    1972-01-01

    Details of medical research and development programs, particularly an integrated medical laboratory, as derived from space technology are given. The program covers digital biotelemetry systems, automatic visual field mapping equipment, sponge electrode caps for clinical electroencephalograms, and advanced respiratory analysis equipment. The possibility of using the medical laboratory in ground based remote areas and regional health care facilities, as well as long duration space missions is discussed.

  7. Advanced technologies for future environmental satellite systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dittberner, Gerald J.; Crison, Michael J.; Bajpai, Shyam; Diedrich, Benjamin L.

    2004-09-01

    Environmental satellites today are designed to meet the most requirements possible within the constraints of budget, reliability, availability, robustness, manufacturability, and the state of the art in affordable technology. As we learn more and more about observing and forecasting, requirements continue to be developed and validated for measurements that can benefit from for advances in technology. The goal is to incorporate new technologies into operational systems as quickly as possible. Technologies that exist or are being developed in response to growing requirements can be categorized as "requirements pull" whereas technologies rooted in basic research and engineering exploration fall in to a "technology push" category. NOAA has begun exploration into technologies for future NOAA satellite systems. Unmet requirements exist that drive the need to locate, explore, exploit, assess, and encourage development in several technologies. Areas needing advanced technologies include: atmospheric aerosols; cloud parameters; precipitation; profiles of temperature, moisture, pressure, and wind; atmospheric radiation; trace gas abundance and distribution; land surface; ocean surface; and space weather components such as neutral density and electron density. One of the more interesting ideas in the technology push category is a constellation of satellites at Medium Earth Orbit (MEO) altitudes, here described as circular orbits near 11,000 km altitude. Consider the vision of being able to observe the environment anywhere on the Earth, at anytime, with any repeat look frequency, and being able to communicate these measurements to anyone, anywhere, anytime, in real time. Studies suggest that a constellation of MEO satellites occupying equatorial and polar orbits (inclination = 90 degrees) could, in principle, accomplish this task. Also new on the horizon is solar sail technology. NOAA has been looking at solar sails as providing a propulsive system that could be used to

  8. High speed point derivative microseismic detector

    DOEpatents

    Uhl, James Eugene; Warpinski, Norman Raymond; Whetten, Ernest Blayne

    1998-01-01

    A high speed microseismic event detector constructed in accordance with the present invention uses a point derivative comb to quickly and accurately detect microseismic events. Compressional and shear waves impinging upon microseismic receiver stations disposed to collect waves are converted into digital data and analyzed using a point derivative comb including assurance of quiet periods prior to declaration of microseismic events. If a sufficient number of quiet periods have passed, the square of a two point derivative of the incoming digital signal is compared to a trip level threshold exceeding the determined noise level to declare a valid trial event. The squaring of the derivative emphasizes the differences between noise and signal, and the valid event is preferably declared when the trip threshold has been exceeded over a temporal comb width to realize a comb over a given time period. Once a trial event has been declared, the event is verified through a spatial comb, which applies the temporal event comb to additional stations. The detector according to the present invention quickly and accurately detects initial compressional waves indicative of a microseismic event which typically exceed the ambient cultural noise level by a small amount, and distinguishes the waves from subsequent larger amplitude shear waves.

  9. High speed exhaust gas recirculation valve

    DOEpatents

    Fensom, Rod; Kidder, David J.

    2005-01-18

    In order to minimize pollutants such as Nox, internal combustion engines typically include an exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) valve that can be used to redirect a portion of exhaust gases to an intake conduit, such as an intake manifold, so that the redirected exhaust gases will be recycled. It is desirable to have an EGR valve with fast-acting capabilities, and it is also desirable to have the EGR valve take up as little space as possible. An exhaust gas recirculation valve is provided that includes an exhaust passage tube, a valve element pivotally mounted within the exhaust passage tube, a linear actuator; and a gear train. The gear train includes a rack gear operatively connected to the linear actuator, and at least one rotatable gear meshing with the rack gear and operatively connected to the valve element to cause rotation of the valve element upon actuation of the linear actuator. The apparatus provides a highly compact package having a high-speed valve actuation capability.

  10. High speed point derivative microseismic detector

    DOEpatents

    Uhl, J.E.; Warpinski, N.R.; Whetten, E.B.

    1998-06-30

    A high speed microseismic event detector constructed in accordance with the present invention uses a point derivative comb to quickly and accurately detect microseismic events. Compressional and shear waves impinging upon microseismic receiver stations disposed to collect waves are converted into digital data and analyzed using a point derivative comb including assurance of quiet periods prior to declaration of microseismic events. If a sufficient number of quiet periods have passed, the square of a two point derivative of the incoming digital signal is compared to a trip level threshold exceeding the determined noise level to declare a valid trial event. The squaring of the derivative emphasizes the differences between noise and signal, and the valid event is preferably declared when the trip threshold has been exceeded over a temporal comb width to realize a comb over a given time period. Once a trial event has been declared, the event is verified through a spatial comb, which applies the temporal event comb to additional stations. The detector according to the present invention quickly and accurately detects initial compressional waves indicative of a microseismic event which typically exceed the ambient cultural noise level by a small amount, and distinguishes the waves from subsequent larger amplitude shear waves. 9 figs.

  11. High speed curved position sensitive detector

    DOEpatents

    Hendricks, Robert W.; Wilson, Jack W.

    1989-01-01

    A high speed curved position sensitive porportional counter detector for use in x-ray diffraction, the detection of 5-20 keV photons and the like. The detector employs a planar anode assembly of a plurality of parallel metallic wires. This anode assembly is supported between two cathode planes, with at least one of these cathode planes having a serpentine resistive path in the form of a meander having legs generally perpendicular to the anode wires. This meander is produced by special microelectronic fabrication techniques whereby the meander "wire" fans outwardly at the cathode ends to produce the curved aspect of the detector, and the legs of the meander are small in cross-section and very closely spaced whereby a spatial resolution of about 50 .mu.m can be achieved. All of the other performance characteristics are about as good or better than conventional position sensitive proportional counter type detectors. Count rates of up to 40,000 counts per second with 0.5 .mu.s shaping time constants are achieved.

  12. 8-Foot High Speed Tunnel (HST)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1953-01-01

    Semi-automatic readout equipment installed in the 1950s used for data recording and reduction in the 8-Foot High Speed Tunnel (HST). A 1957 NACA report on wind tunnel facilities at Langley included these comments on the data recording and reduction equipment for the 8-foot HST: 'The data recording and reduction equipment used for handling steady force and pressure information at the Langley 8-foot transonic tunnel is similar to that described for the Langley 16-foot transonic tunnel. Very little dynamic data recording equipment, however, is available.' The description of the 16-foot transonic tunnel equipment is as follows: 'A semiautomatic force data readout system provides tabulated raw data and punch card storage of raw data concurrent with the operation of the wind tunnel. Provision is made for 12 automatic channels of strain gage-data output, and eight channels of four-digit manually operated inputs are available for tabulating and punching constants, configuration codes, and other information necessary for data reduction and identification. The data are then processed on electronic computing machines to obtain the desired coefficients. These coefficients and their proper identification are then machine tabulated to provide a printed record of the results. The punched cards may also be fed into an automatic plotting device for the preparation of plots necessary for data analysis.'

  13. Hubble Space Telescope, High Speed Photometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    This drawing illustrates the Hubble Space Telescope's (HST's) High Speed Photometer (HSP). The HSP measures the intensity of starlight (brightness), which will help determine astronomical distances. Its principal use will be to measure extremely-rapid variations or pulses in light from celestial objects, such as pulsating stars. The HSP produces brightness readings. Light passes into one of four special signal-multiplying tubes that record the data. The HSP can measure energy fluctuations from objects that pulsate as rapidly as once every 10 microseconds. From HSP data, astronomers expect to learn much about such mysterious objects as pulsars, black holes, and quasars. The purpose of the HST, the most complex and sensitive optical telescope ever made, is to study the cosmos from a low-Earth orbit. By placing the telescope in space, astronomers are able to collect data that is free of the Earth's atmosphere. The HST views galaxies, stars, planets, comets, possibly other solar systems, and even unusual phenomena such as quasars, with 10 times the clarity of ground-based telescopes. The HST was deployed from the Space Shuttle Discovery (STS-31 mission) into Earth orbit in April 1990. The Marshall Space Flight Center had responsibility for design, development, and construction of the HST. The Perkin-Elmer Corporation, in Danbury, Cornecticut, developed the optical system and guidance sensors.

  14. Exhaust emissions from high speed passenger ferries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, D. A.

    Exhaust emission measurements have been carried out on-board three high-speed passenger ferries (A, B and C) during normal service routes. Ship A was powered by conventional, medium-speed, marine diesel engines, Ship B by gas turbine engines and Ship C conventional, medium-speed, marine diesel engines equipped with selective catalytic reduction (SCR) systems for NO x abatement. All ships had similar auxiliary engines (marine diesels) for generating electric power on-board. Real-world emission factors of NOx, SO2, CO, CO 2, NMVOC, CH4, N2O, NH3, PM and PAH at steady-state engine loads and for complete voyages were determined together with an estimate of annual emissions. In general, Ship B using gas turbines showed favourable NO x, PM and PAH emissions but at the expense of higher fuel consumption and CO 2 emissions. Ship C with the SCR had the lowest NO x emissions but highest NH 3 emissions especially during harbour approaches and stops. The greatest PM and PAH specific emissions were measured from auxiliary engines operating at low engine loads during harbour stops. Since all ships used a low-sulphur gas oil, SO 2 emissions were relatively low in all cases.

  15. High speed homology search with FPGAs.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Yoshiki; Maruyama, Tsutomu; Konagaya, Akihiko

    2002-01-01

    We will introduce a way how we can achieve high speed homology search by only adding one off-the-shelf PCI board with one Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) to a Pentium based computer system in use. FPGA is a reconfigurable device, and any kind of circuits, such as pattern matching program, can be realized in a moment. The performance is almost proportional to the size of FPGA which is used in the system, and FPGAs are becoming larger and larger following Moore's law. We can easily obtain latest/larger FPGAs in the form off-the-shelf PCI boards with FPGAs, at low costs. The result which we obtained is as follows. The performance is most comparable with small to middle class dedicated hardware systems when we use a board with one of the latest FPGAs and the performance can be furthermore accelerated by using more number of FPGA boards. The time for comparing a query sequence of 2,048 elements with a database sequence of 64 million elements by the Smith-Waterman algorithm is about 34 sec, which is about 330 times faster than a desktop computer with a 1 GHz Pentium III. We can also accelerate the performance of a laptop computer using a PC card with one smaller FPGA. The time for comparing a query sequence (1,024) with the database sequence (64 million) is about 185 sec, which is about 30 times faster than the desktop computer.

  16. High-Speed RaPToRS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henchen, Robert; Esham, Benjamin; Becker, William; Pogozelski, Edward; Padalino, Stephen; Sangster, Thomas; Glebov, Vladimir

    2008-11-01

    The High-Speed Rapid Pneumatic Transport of Radioactive Samples (HS-RaPToRS) system, designed to quickly and safely move radioactive materials, was assembled and tested at the Mercury facility of the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) in Washington D.C. A sample, which is placed inside a four-inch-diameter carrier, is activated before being transported through a PVC tube via airflow. The carrier travels from the reaction chamber to the end station where it pneumatically brakes prior to the gate. A magnetic latch releases the gate when the carrier arrives and comes to rest. The airflow, optical carrier-monitoring devices, and end gate are controlled manually or automatically with LabView software. The installation and testing of the RaPToRS system at NRL was successfully completed with transport times of less than 3 seconds. The speed of the carrier averaged 16 m/s. Prospective facilities for similar systems include the Laboratory for Laser Energetics and the National Ignition Facility.

  17. RUBIN Microsatellites for Advanced Space Technology Demonstration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalnins, Indulis

    The first new space technology demonstration payload BIRD-RUBIN was developed by OHB- System in co-operation with students from the University of Applied Sciences, Bremen, and was successfully launched July 15th, 2000 together with the scientific satellites CHAMP and MITA onboard a COSMOS 3M launcher. The BIRD-RUBIN mission has tested the telematics technology in space via ORBCOMM network. Small data packages were sent by the hatbox sized system to the ORBCOMM satellite net, then transmitted further on to the ground stations and from that point entered into the internet. The payload user could retrieve the data direct via email account and was able to send commands back to payload in orbit. The next micro satellite RUBIN-2 for advanced space technology demonstration will be launched at the end of 2002 as "secondary" payload on the Russian launcher DNEPR. The RUBIN-2 micro satellite platform will use again the inter-satellite communication mode via Orbcomm network and offers an orbital testbed with low cost, bi-directional and near real-time Internet access. In parallel to the further inter satellite link experiments using Orbcomm, several additional leading edge technology experiments will be done onboard Rubin-2 (electrical propulsion, two loop miniaturized thermal control system, GPS navigation, LI-Ion Battery, etc.). This paper provides an overview of RUBIN micro satellites for advanced space technology demonstrations. The main results of the first BIRD-RUBIN experiment and the goals of the second Rubin-2 mission are described. The potential of low cost technology demonstration missions using Internet and inter satellite communication technology via commercial satellite systems and the piggyback flight opportunities on Russian launchers are discussed.

  18. Anthropometry as a predictor of high speed performance.

    PubMed

    Caruso, J F; Ramey, E; Hastings, L P; Monda, J K; Coday, M A; McLagan, J; Drummond, J

    2009-07-01

    To assess anthropometry as a predictor of high-speed performance, subjects performed four seated knee- and hip-extension workouts with their left leg on an inertial exercise trainer (Impulse Technologies, Newnan GA). Workouts, done exclusively in either the tonic or phasic contractile mode, entailed two one-minute sets separated by a 90-second rest period and yielded three performance variables: peak force, average force and work. Subjects provided the following anthropometric data: height, weight, body mass index, as well as total, upper and lower left leg lengths. Via multiple regression, anthropometry attempted to predict the variance per performance variable. Anthropometry explained a modest (R2=0.27-0.43) yet significant degree of variance from inertial exercise trainer workouts. Anthropometry was a better predictor of peak force variance from phasic workouts, while it accounted for a significant degree of average force and work variance solely from tonic workouts. Future research should identify variables that account for the unexplained variance from high-speed exercise performance.

  19. High-speed uncooled MWIR hostile fire indication sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, L.; Pantuso, F. P.; Jin, G.; Mazurenko, A.; Erdtmann, M.; Radhakrishnan, S.; Salerno, J.

    2011-06-01

    Hostile fire indication (HFI) systems require high-resolution sensor operation at extremely high speeds to capture hostile fire events, including rocket-propelled grenades, anti-aircraft artillery, heavy machine guns, anti-tank guided missiles and small arms. HFI must also be conducted in a waveband with large available signal and low background clutter, in particular the mid-wavelength infrared (MWIR). The shortcoming of current HFI sensors in the MWIR is the bandwidth of the sensor is not sufficient to achieve the required frame rate at the high sensor resolution. Furthermore, current HFI sensors require cryogenic cooling that contributes to size, weight, and power (SWAP) in aircraft-mounted applications where these factors are at a premium. Based on its uncooled photomechanical infrared imaging technology, Agiltron has developed a low-SWAP, high-speed MWIR HFI sensor that breaks the bandwidth bottleneck typical of current infrared sensors. This accomplishment is made possible by using a commercial-off-the-shelf, high-performance visible imager as the readout integrated circuit and physically separating this visible imager from the MWIR-optimized photomechanical sensor chip. With this approach, we have achieved high-resolution operation of our MWIR HFI sensor at 1000 fps, which is unprecedented for an uncooled infrared sensor. We have field tested our MWIR HFI sensor for detecting all hostile fire events mentioned above at several test ranges under a wide range of environmental conditions. The field testing results will be presented.

  20. Design of a high-speed reliable ball bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singer, Herbert B.; Gelotte, Erik

    1994-01-01

    A high-speed, reliable ball bearing has been designed for at least fifteen years of operation in space effectors, MWA's, and RWA's. Advanced bearing concepts have been used in this design, such as: no ball retainer, which eliminates all retainer-related problems; an external lubricazing system that will supply the lubricant at a specified flow rate; and a cartridge assembly that will allow the instrument user to purchase a ready to use bearing assembly, with lubricator. Currently, two assemblies are on life test at 12,000 RPM and have accumulated over 20,000 hours each, with consistent low-torque losses. This paper will describe each of the salient features.