Science.gov

Sample records for advance patient care

  1. Improving patient-centered care through advance care planning.

    PubMed

    Motley, Molly

    2013-06-01

    Advance care planning is crucial for patients confronting incurable, debilitating, or terminal disease. Discussing end-of-life issues can reduce overtreatment and undertreatment as defined by the patient, and improve satisfaction with care. PMID:23805592

  2. Future care planning: a first step to palliative care for all patients with advanced heart disease.

    PubMed

    Denvir, M A; Murray, S A; Boyd, K J

    2015-07-01

    Palliative care is recommended for patients with end-stage heart failure with several recent, randomised trials showing improvements in symptoms and quality of life and more studies underway. Future care planning provides a framework for discussing a range of palliative care problems with patients and their families. This approach can be introduced at any time during the patient's journey of care and ideally well in advance of end-of-life care. Future care planning is applicable to a wide range of patients with advanced heart disease and could be delivered systematically by cardiology teams at the time of an unplanned hospital admission, akin to cardiac rehabilitation for myocardial infarction. Integrating cardiology care and palliative care can benefit many patients with advanced heart disease at increased risk of death or hospitalisation. Larger, randomised trials are needed to assess the impact on patient outcomes and experiences. PMID:25900977

  3. [Study of 4 patients implemented to Advance Care Planning].

    PubMed

    Kawabata, Megumi; Fujiwara, Yoko; Kawabata, Hidenobu

    2015-11-01

    This is a study of 4 patients implemented to Advance Care Planning (ACP) reflecting on the health care professionals' role and the outcomes. ACP has been defined as a process of formal decision making that aims to help patients establish their decision about future care that take effect when they lose capacity. For about two years, we tried to engage all patients who were referred to our palliative care team and their families to ACP since their first consultation. We informed their conditions at that time, how their health might change and how treatment might impact on their life goals. We also attempted to help patients' decision making and then fulfill their wishes in cooperation with patients' families and healthcare professionals. We learned three important elements: understanding patients' values and wishes, explaining prediction of the clinical course of the patients and establishing a collaborative healthcare team in order to fulfill the patients' hopes. ACP improved quality of life (QOL) not only for the patients involved, but also for the family members. ACP can play a crucial role in ensuring that patients receive the care they want throughout various stages of their lives. PMID:26742180

  4. Palliative care for patients with advance chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Douglas, C A

    2014-01-01

    Over the past three decades there has been a dramatic rise in the number of patients with advanced chronic kidney disease. The fastest expanding group receiving dialysis has been the elderly. However, for those patients who are very elderly with co-morbidity, dialysis may not offer a survival advantage. Therefore, active conservative management is a growing service offered by many renal units in the UK and focuses on non-dialytic correction of fluid and electrolyes, management of renal anaemia, and assessment and management of symptoms. The five-year survival of a patient over 75 years of age starting dialysis is 20% and if a patient is over 75 years, has co-morbidity, or a poor performance status, dialysis may not offer any survival advantage. Whether a patient is managed by dialysis or by conservative management the symptom burden suffered is high. These symptoms are under-recognised and often managed poorly because of increased drug toxicity in renal failure. This complex group of patients require close working between renal, palliative care, medicine for the elderly, and community teams, to allow best quality of life and end of life care. This review describes some of the challenges in providing Advanced Care Planning for dialysis and conservatively managed patients, highlights the symptom burden of patients with advanced chronic kidney disease, and offers guidance in how to manage the symptoms effectively. PMID:25318401

  5. [Ethics and palliative care in patients with advanced cancer].

    PubMed

    Tenorio-González, Francisco

    2005-01-01

    Recent research in both the biology of cancer and the treatment of patients has increased the life expectancy of cancer patients with recurrence and who have a longer survival rate. Cancer is no longer considered a lethal but a chronic disease. More patients survive, but above all there are more patients with recurrences thus increasing the need for physical or psychological treatment of patients with longer lives. The American Cancer Society reported in 1992 that in the U.S. more than 8 million people survived between 4 and 5 years. This produces both an ethical and medical challenge for treatment of cancer patients. This paper reviews the actual criteria for palliative care: treatment for pain and the ethical and psychological treatment of advanced cancer patients and their families. PMID:16454965

  6. Care of Patients at the End of Life: Advance Care Planning.

    PubMed

    Ackermann, Richard J

    2016-08-01

    Advance directives are legal documents that give instructions about how to provide care when patients develop life-threatening illnesses and can no longer communicate their wishes. Two types of documents are widely used-a living will and a durable power of attorney for health care. Most states also authorize physician orders for life-sustaining treatment. Physicians should encourage patients, particularly those with severe chronic or terminal conditions, to prepare advance directives. Medicare now reimburses billing codes for advance care consultations. Directions regarding cardiopulmonary resuscitation and artificial ventilation often are included in advance care plans, and use of artificial nutrition and hydration (ANH) also should be addressed, particularly for patients with advanced dementia. Evidence shows that in such patients, ANH does not prolong survival, increase comfort, or improve quality of life. Given the lack of benefit, physicians should recommend against use of ANH for patients with dementia. Finally, physicians should encourage use of hospice services by patients whose life expectancy is 6 months or less. Although Medicare and most other health care insurers cover hospice care, and despite evidence that patient and family satisfaction increase when hospice services are used, many patients do not use these services. PMID:27490070

  7. An overview of advance care planning for patients with advanced chronic kidney disease: The basics.

    PubMed

    Wasylynuk, Betty Ann; Davison, Sara N

    2016-01-01

    As the number of Canadians living with end-stage kidney disease (ESKD) continues to grow, even higher numbers are living with advanced chronic kidney disease (CKD). Many of these people will eventually require renal replacement therapy (RRT), either dialysis or transplantation. More than 50% of patients starting RRT today are aged 65 or older, with the fastest growing group being patients 75 years and older. Despite advances to dialysis technology and dialysis care, the mortality rates remain high and dialysis patients' end-of-life care may not align with their preferences or values. Advance care planning (ACP) is an essential component of quality comprehensive kidney care. Kidney care teams develop strong relationships with their patients and are well positioned to integrate ACP into routine kidney care. This article defines ACP, outlines the essential components of ACP, and discusses the benefits, challenges, and special considerations of ACP. By enhancing the kidney care team's understanding of ACP, this article aims to assist in integrating ACP into routine kidney care for patients with advanced CKD. PMID:27215058

  8. Working with advanced dementia patients in a day care setting.

    PubMed

    Abramowitz, Leah

    2008-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease and most other causes of dementia are regressive by nature. As such one can expect patients with such types of mental impairment to gradually decline in function and ability to participate in day care activities. This paper attempts to show that with the right kind of orientation, staff can "tune into" the more advanced dementia patients, find the key to their personal needs, desires and remaining abilities and design a program that allows them not only to continue to participate in a social and therapeutic framework, but also to gain some meaningful human contact and quality of life despite their cognitive deterioration. PMID:18510188

  9. Integrating Palliative Care Into the Care of Patients With Advanced Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Kapo, Jennifer M; Akgün, Kathleen M

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of death due to malignancy. Although lung cancer mortality has been decreasing in recent years, it remains substantially higher than other causes of cancer death. Median survival for patients with locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer, defined as lung cancer involving regional lymph nodes, is estimated to be approximately 10 to 17 months, and median survival for patients with metastatic disease is only 6 to 9 months. In addition, patients with advanced lung cancer often experience debilitating symptoms and poor quality of life. Pain, dyspnea, and fatigue are most frequently reported and affect at least 65% of patients with advanced lung cancer. Given this burden of symptoms and high mortality, patients and their families facing a diagnosis of advanced lung cancer are in need of support. Palliative care, with its focus on addressing the emotional, physical, and spiritual sources of suffering utilizing the expertise of an interdisciplinary team, can provide this comprehensive support. This review describes the role of supportive and palliative care integrated into the treatment of patients with a diagnosis of advanced lung cancer with sections focused on the evaluation and treatment of pain and dyspnea, approaches to challenging communication tasks, and the support of caregivers who care for patients with advanced lung cancer. PMID:26389769

  10. Urinary Stone Disease: Advancing Knowledge, Patient Care, and Population Health.

    PubMed

    Scales, Charles D; Tasian, Gregory E; Schwaderer, Andrew L; Goldfarb, David S; Star, Robert A; Kirkali, Ziya

    2016-07-01

    Expanding epidemiologic and physiologic data suggest that urinary stone disease is best conceptualized as a chronic metabolic condition punctuated by symptomatic, preventable stone events. These acute events herald substantial future chronic morbidity, including decreased bone mineral density, cardiovascular disease, and CKD. Urinary stone disease imposes a large and growing public health burden. In the United States, 1 in 11 individuals will experience a urinary stone in their lifetime. Given this high incidence and prevalence, urinary stone disease is one of the most expensive urologic conditions, with health care charges exceeding $10 billion annually. Patient care focuses on management of symptomatic stones rather than prevention; after three decades of innovation, procedural interventions are almost exclusively minimally invasive or noninvasive, and mortality is rare. Despite these advances, the prevalence of stone disease has nearly doubled over the past 15 years, likely secondary to dietary and health trends. The NIDDK recently convened a symposium to assess knowledge and treatment gaps to inform future urinary stone disease research. Reducing the public health burden of urinary stone disease will require key advances in understanding environmental, genetic, and other individual disease determinants; improving secondary prevention; and optimal population health strategies in an increasingly cost-conscious care environment. PMID:26964844

  11. Advances in the care of patients with mucinous colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Hugen, Niek; Brown, Gina; Glynne-Jones, Robert; de Wilt, Johannes H W; Nagtegaal, Iris D

    2016-06-01

    The majority of colorectal cancers (CRCs) are classified as adenocarcinoma not otherwise specified (AC). Mucinous carcinoma (MC) is a distinct form of CRC and is found in 10-15% of patients with CRC. MC differs from AC in terms of both clinical and histopathological characteristics, and has long been associated with an inferior response to treatment compared with AC. The debate concerning the prognostic implications of MC in patients with CRC is ongoing and MC is still considered an unfavourable and unfamiliar subtype of the disease. Nevertheless, in the past few years epidemiological and clinical studies have shed new light on the treatment and management of patients with MC. Use of a multidisciplinary approach, including input from surgeons, pathologists, oncologists and radiologists, is beginning to lead to more-tailored approaches to patient management, on an individualized basis. In this Review, the authors provide insight into advances that have been made in the care of patients with MC. The prognostic implications for patients with colon or rectal MC are described separately; moreover, the predictive implications of MC regarding responses to commonly used therapies for CRC, such as chemotherapy, radiotherapy and chemoradiotherapy, and the potential for, and severity of, metastasis are also described. PMID:26323388

  12. Quality Nursing Care for Hospitalized Patients with Advanced Illness: Concept Development

    PubMed Central

    Izumi, Shigeko; Baggs, Judith G.; Knafl, Kathleen A.

    2011-01-01

    The quality of nursing care as perceived by hospitalized patients with advanced illness has not been examined. A concept of quality nursing care for this population was developed by integrating the literature on constructs defining quality nursing care with empirical findings from interviews of 16 patients with advanced illness. Quality nursing care was characterized as competence and personal caring supported by professionalism and delivered with an appropriate demeanor. Although the attributes of competence, caring, professionalism, and demeanor were identified as common components of quality care across various patient populations, the caring domain increased in importance when patients with advanced illness perceived themselves as vulnerable. Assessment of quality nursing care for patients with advanced illness needs to include measures of patient perceptions of vulnerability. PMID:20572095

  13. Advance care planning for cancer patients in primary care: a feasibility study

    PubMed Central

    Boyd, Kirsty; Mason, Bruce; Kendall, Marilyn; Barclay, Stephen; Chinn, David; Thomas, Keri; Sheikh, Aziz; Murray, Scott A

    2010-01-01

    Background Advance care planning is being promoted as a central component of end-of-life policies in many developed countries, but there is concern that professionals find its implementation challenging. Aim To assess the feasibility of implementing advance care planning in UK primary care. Design of study Mixed methods evaluation of a pilot educational intervention. Setting Four general practices in south-east Scotland. Method Interviews with 20 GPs and eight community nurses before and after a practice-based workshop; this was followed by telephone interviews with nine other GPs with a special interest in palliative care from across the UK. Results End-of-life care planning for patients typically starts as an urgent response to clear evidence of a short prognosis, and aims to achieve a ‘good death’. Findings suggest that there were multiple barriers to earlier planning: prognostic uncertainty; limited collaboration with secondary care; a desire to maintain hope; and resistance to any kind of ‘tick-box’ approach. Following the workshop, participants' knowledge and skills were enhanced but there was little evidence of more proactive planning. GPs from other parts of the UK described confusion over terminology and were concerned about the difficulties of implementing inflexible, policy-driven care. Conclusion A clear divide was found between UK policy directives and delivery of end-of-life care in the community that educational interventions targeting primary care professionals are unlikely to address. Advance care planning has the potential to promote autonomy and shared decision making about end-of-life care, but this will require a significant shift in attitudes. PMID:21144189

  14. Differential patient-caregiver opinions of treatment and care for advanced lung cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Amy Y; Zyzanski, Stephen J; Siminoff, Laura A

    2010-04-01

    This study examined the differences of opinion between cancer patients and caregivers with regard to treatment and care decisions. 184 advanced lung cancer patients and 171 primary caregivers were recruited as a convenience sample from hospitals in Cleveland, Ohio. A telephone interview was conducted to collect data using a semi-structured questionnaire. Nonparametric tests and regression analysis were performed. The findings showed that patients and caregivers reported significant disagreement on three main issues: trade-off between treatment side effects and benefits; reporting treatment side effects to physicians, and hospice care. Caregivers were more concerned about patient's quality of life and more willing to discuss hospice issues than were patients (p < or = 01). Perceived family disagreement is associated with depression in both patients and caregivers (p < or = 01; R(2)=8%). The study provided empirical evidence for patient-caregiver disagreement about treatment and care decisions and its significant adverse impact on both patients and caregivers. PMID:20137849

  15. Advance Care Planning.

    PubMed

    Stallworthy, Elizabeth J

    2013-04-16

    Advance care planning should be available to all patients with chronic kidney disease, including end-stage kidney disease on renal replacement therapy. Advance care planning is a process of patient-centred discussion, ideally involving family/significant others, to assist the patient to understand how their illness might affect them, identify their goals and establish how medical treatment might help them to achieve these. An Advance Care Plan is only one useful outcome from the Advance Care Planning process, the education of patient and family around prognosis and treatment options is likely to be beneficial whether or not a plan is written or the individual loses decision making capacity at the end of life. Facilitating Advance Care Planning discussions requires an understanding of their purpose and communication skills which need to be taught. Advance Care Planning needs to be supported by effective systems to enable the discussions and any resulting Plans to be used to aid subsequent decision making. PMID:23586906

  16. Complex Care Options for Patients With Advanced Heart Failure Approaching End of Life.

    PubMed

    Wordingham, Sara E; McIlvennan, Colleen K; Dionne-Odom, J Nicholas; Swetz, Keith M

    2016-02-01

    Care for patients with advanced cardiac disease continues to evolve in a complex milieu of therapeutic options, advanced technological interventions, and efforts at improving patient-centered care and shared decision-making. Despite improvements in quality of life and survival with these interventions, optimal supportive care across the advanced illness trajectory remains diverse and heterogeneous. Herein, we outline challenges in prognostication, communication, and caregiving in advanced heart failure and review the unique needs of patients who experience frequent hospitalizations, require chronic home inotropic support, and who have implantable cardioverter-defibrillators and mechanical circulatory support in situ, to name a few. PMID:26829929

  17. Advance Care Planning Beyond Advance Directives: Perspectives from Patients and Surrogates

    PubMed Central

    McMahan, Ryan; Knight, Sara J.; Fried, Terri R.; Sudore, Rebecca L.

    2014-01-01

    Context Advance care planning (ACP) has focused on documenting life-sustaining treatment preferences in advance directives (ADs). ADs alone may be insufficient to prepare diverse patients and surrogates for complex medical decisions. Objectives To understand what steps best prepare patients and surrogates for decision making. Methods We conducted 13 English/Spanish focus groups with participants from a Veterans Affairs and county hospital and the community. Seven groups included patients (n=38) aged ≥65 years, who reported making serious medical decisions. Six separate groups included surrogates (n=31), aged ≥18 years, who made decisions for others. Semi-structured focus groups asked what activities best prepared participants for decision making. Two investigators independently coded data and performed thematic content analysis. Disputes were resolved by consensus. Results Mean±SD patient age was 78±8 years and 61% were non-white. Mean±SD surrogate age was 57±10 years and 91% were non-white. Qualitative analysis identified four overarching themes about how to best prepare for decision making: 1) identify values based on past experiences and quality of life, 2) choose surrogates wisely and verify they understand their role, 3) decide whether to grant leeway in surrogate decision making, and 4) inform other family and friends of one's wishes to prevent conflict. Conclusion Beyond ADs, patients and surrogates recommend several additional steps to prepare for medical decision making including using past experiences to identify values, verifying the surrogate understands their role, deciding whether to grant surrogates leeway, and informing other family and friends of one's wishes. Future ACP interventions should consider incorporating these additional ACP activities. PMID:23200188

  18. Advanced lung cancer patients' experience with continuity of care and supportive care needs.

    PubMed

    Husain, Amna; Barbera, Lisa; Howell, Doris; Moineddin, Rahim; Bezjak, Andrea; Sussman, Jonathan

    2013-05-01

    As cancer care becomes increasingly complex, the ability to coordinate this care is more difficult for health care providers, patients and their caregivers alike. Despite the widely recognized need for improving continuity and coordination of care, the relationship of continuity of care with patient outcomes has yet to be elucidated. Our study's main finding is that the Continuity and Coordination subscale of the widely used Picker System of Ambulatory Cancer Care Survey is able to distinguish between lung cancer patients with unmet supportive care needs and those without. Specifically, this study shows a new association between this widely implemented continuity and coordination survey and the 'psychological needs' domain, as well as the 'health system and information' domains of supportive care needs. The finding provides support for the idea that interventions to improve continuity may impact tangible indicators of patient care such as supportive care needs being met. The study focuses attention on continuity of care as an important aspect of optimizing outcomes in cancer care. PMID:23274923

  19. Clinician Roles in Early Integrated Palliative Care for Patients with Advanced Cancer: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Park, Elyse R.; Greer, Joseph A.; Jackson, Vicki A.; Jacobsen, Juliet C.; Gallagher, Emily R.; Temel, Jennifer S.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background: Early palliative care provides better quality of life, increased prognostic awareness, and even improved survival for patients with advanced cancer but how the integrated care model achieves these outcomes has not been completely explained. Methods: To better understand the clinical approach to early outpatient care from the clinicians' perspective, we conducted focus groups with the palliative care clinicians who had participated in a randomized trial of early palliative care for metastatic lung cancer. Results: Clinicians described their role in providing early palliative care as having three distinct roles in the outpatient setting: (1) managing symptoms to improve functional status and as a bridge to other issues; (2) engaging patients in emotional work to facilitate coping, accepting, and planning; and (3) interpreting the oncologist for the patient and the patient for the oncologist. Conclusions: These data lay the foundation for developing training programs for clinicians in early integrated palliative care. PMID:25390467

  20. Perceptions of palliative care among patients with advanced cancer and their caregivers

    PubMed Central

    Zimmermann, Camilla; Swami, Nadia; Krzyzanowska, Monika; Leighl, Natasha; Rydall, Anne; Rodin, Gary; Tannock, Ian; Hannon, Breffni

    2016-01-01

    Background: Early palliative care is increasingly recommended but seldom practised. We sought to examine perceptions of palliative care among patients with advanced cancer and their caregivers. Methods: After conducting a cluster randomized controlled trial of early palliative care versus standard care for patients with advanced cancer, we approached patients and their caregivers to participate in semistructured interviews seeking to assess, qualitatively, their attitudes and perceptions about palliative care. We used the grounded theory method for data collection and analysis. Results: A total of 48 patients (26 intervention, 22 control) and 23 caregivers (14 intervention, 9 control) completed interviews. Participants’ initial perceptions of palliative care in both trial arms were of death, hopelessness, dependency and end-of-life comfort care for inpatients. These perceptions provoked fear and avoidance, and often originated from interactions with health care professionals. During the trial, those in the intervention arm developed a broader concept of palliative care as “ongoing care” that improved their “quality of living” but still felt that the term itself carried a stigma. Participants in the intervention group emphasized the need for palliative care to be reframed and better explained by health care professionals. Participants in the control group generally considered it pointless to rename palliative care, but many in the intervention group stated emphatically that a different name was necessary in the early outpatient setting. Interpretation: There is a strong stigma attached to palliative care, which may persist even after positive experiences with an early palliative care intervention. Education of the public, patients and health care providers is paramount if early integration of palliative care is to be successful. PMID:27091801

  1. Patient, Carer and Professional Perspectives on Barriers and Facilitators to Quality Care in Advanced Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Browne, Susan; Macdonald, Sara; May, Carl R.; Macleod, Una; Mair, Frances S.

    2014-01-01

    Background Those with advanced heart failure (HF) experience high levels of morbidity and mortality, similar to common cancers. However, there remains evidence of inequity of access to palliative care services compared to people with cancer. This study examines patient, carer, and professional perspectives on current management of advanced HF and barriers and facilitators to improved care. Methods Qualitative study involving semi-structured interviews and focus groups with advanced HF patients (n = 30), carers (n = 20), and professionals (n = 65). Data analysed using Normalisation Process Theory (NPT) as the underpinning conceptual framework. Findings Uncertainty is ubiquitous in accounts from advanced HF patients and their caregivers. This uncertainty relates to understanding of the implications of their diagnosis, appropriate treatments, and when and how to seek effective help. Health professionals agree this is a major problem but feel they lack knowledge, opportunities, or adequate support to improve the situation. Fragmented care with lack of coordination and poor communication makes life difficult. Poor understanding of the condition extends to the wider circle of carers and means that requests for help may not be perceived as legitimate, and those with advanced HF are not prioritised for social and financial supports. Patient and caregiver accounts of emergency care are uniformly poor. Managing polypharmacy and enduring concomitant side effects is a major burden, and the potential for rationalisation exists. This study has potential limitations because it was undertaken within a single geographical location within the United Kingdom. Conclusions Little progress is being made to improve care experiences for those with advanced HF. Even in the terminal stages, patients and caregivers are heavily and unnecessarily burdened by health care services that are poorly coordinated and offer fragmented care. There is evidence that these poor experiences

  2. Tracking Patient Encounters and Clinical Skills to Determine Competency in Ambulatory Care Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experiences

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Chrystian R.; Harris, Ila M.; Moon, Jean Y.; Westberg, Sarah M.; Kolar, Claire

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To determine if the amount of exposure to patient encounters and clinical skills correlates to student clinical competency on ambulatory care advanced pharmacy practice experiences (APPEs). Design. Students in ambulatory care APPEs tracked the number of patients encountered by medical condition and the number of patient care skills performed. At the end of the APPE, preceptors evaluated students’ competency for each medical condition and skill, referencing the Dreyfus model for skill acquisition. Assessment. Data was collected from September 2012 through August 2014. Forty-six responses from a student tracking tool were matched to preceptor ratings. Students rated as competent saw more patients and performed more skills overall. Preceptors noted minimal impact on workload. Conclusions. Increased exposure to patient encounters and skills performed had a positive association with higher Dreyfus stage, which may represent a starting point in the conversation for more thoughtful design of ambulatory care APPEs. PMID:26941440

  3. [Timing of Advance Care Planning in frail elderly patients: when to start?].

    PubMed

    Ott, Brenda; van Thiel, Ghislaine J M W; de Ruiter, Corinne M; van Delden, Hans J J M

    2015-01-01

    Advance Care Planning (ACP) is the process of discussing and recording patient preferences concerning goals for end-of-life care and to facilitate decision-making. ACP is an essential element of care for frail elderly patients because frailty increases the risks of negative health outcomes and loss of function. In this article, we present three patient cases to illustrate how general practitioners (GPs) can perform ACP and to demonstrate the importance of early and iterative end-of-life discussions with frail elderly patients. Good timing is decisive for the success of the intervention. GPs are in a key position to identify and discuss ACP matters at an early stage, supported by the geriatrician if necessary. Posing the 'surprise question' has proved helpful to determine timing. Complex ACP interventions contribute to care which is better adapted to the needs of frail elderly patients. PMID:25650032

  4. Home Palliative Care for Patients with Advanced Chronic Kidney Disease: Preliminary Results

    PubMed Central

    Teruel, José L.; Rexach, Lourdes; Burguera, Victor; Gomis, Antonio; Fernandez-Lucas, Milagros; Rivera, Maite; Diaz, Alicia; Collazo, Sergio; Liaño, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Healthcare for patients with advanced chronic kidney disease (ACKD) on conservative treatment very often poses healthcare problems that are difficult to solve. At the end of 2011, we began a program based on the care and monitoring of these patients by Primary Care Teams. ACKD patients who opted for conservative treatment were offered the chance to be cared for mainly at home by the Primary Care doctor and nurse, under the coordination of the Palliative Care Unit and the Nephrology Department. During 2012, 2013, and 2014, 76 patients received treatment in this program (mean age: 81 years; mean Charlson age-comorbidity index: 10, and mean glomerular filtration rate: 12.4 mL/min/1.73 m2). The median patient follow-up time (until death or until 31 December 2014) was 165 days. During this period, 51% of patients did not have to visit the hospital’s emergency department and 58% did not require hospitalization. Forty-eight of the 76 patients died after a median time of 135 days in the program; 24 (50%) died at home. Our experience indicates that with the support of the Palliative Care Unit and the Nephrology Department, ACKD patients who are not dialysis candidates may be monitored at home by Primary Care Teams. PMID:27417813

  5. The Meaning of Parenteral Hydration to Family Caregivers and Patients with Advanced Cancer Receiving Hospice Care

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Marlene Z; Torres-Vigil, Isabel; Burbach, Beth E.; de Rosa, Allison; Bruera, Eduardo

    2012-01-01

    Context In the U.S., patients with advanced cancer who are dehydrated or have decreased oral intake virtually always receive parenteral hydration in acute care facilities but rarely in the hospice setting. Objectives To describe the meaning of hydration for terminally ill cancer patients in home hospice care and for their primary caregivers. Methods Phenomenological interviews were conducted at two time points with 85 patients and 84 caregivers enrolled in a randomized, double-blind, controlled trial examining the efficacy of parenteral hydration in patients with advanced cancer receiving hospice care in the southern U.S. Transcripts were analyzed hermeneutically by the interdisciplinary research team until consensus on the theme labels was reached. Results Patients and their family caregivers both saw hydration as meaning hope and comfort. Hope was the view that hydration might prolong a life of dignity and enhance quality of life by reducing symptoms such as fatigue and increasing patients’ alertness. Patients and caregivers also described hydration as improving patients’ comfort by reducing pain, enhancing the effectiveness of pain medication, and nourishing the body, mind and spirit. Conclusion These findings differ from traditional hospice beliefs that dehydration enhances patient comfort given that patients and their families in the study viewed fluids as enhancing comfort, dignity and quality of life. Discussion with patients and families about their preferences for hydration may help tailor care plans to meet specific patient needs. PMID:22459230

  6. Hospitalists caring for patients with advanced cancer: An experience-based guide.

    PubMed

    Koo, Douglas J; Tonorezos, Emily S; Kumar, Chhavi B; Goring, Tabitha N; Salvit, Cori; Egan, Barbara C

    2016-04-01

    Every year, nearly 5 million adults with cancer are hospitalized. Limited evidence suggests that hospitalization of the cancer patient is associated with adverse morbidity and mortality. Hospitalization of the patient with advanced cancer allows for an intense examination of health status in the face of terminal illness and an opportunity for defining goals of care. This experience-based guide reports what is currently known about the topic and outlines a systematic approach to maximizing opportunities, improving quality, and enhancing the well-being of the hospitalized patient with advanced cancer. Journal of Hospital Medicine 2016;11:292-296. © 2015 Society of Hospital Medicine. PMID:26588430

  7. Advance Care Planning

    Cancer.gov

    The thirteenth module of the EPEC-O (Education in Palliative and End-of-Life Care for Oncology) Self-Study: Cultural Considerations When Caring for African Americans explores the attitudes and practices of African Americans related to completion of advance directives, and recommends effective strategies to improve decision-making in the setting of serious, life-threatening illness, in ways that augment patient autonomy and support patient-centered goal-setting and decision-making among African American patients and their families.

  8. Current advances in targeted therapies for metastatic gastric cancer: improving patient care.

    PubMed

    Aguiar, Pedro Nazareth; Muniz, Thiago Pimentel; Miranda, Raelson Rodrigues; Tadokoro, Hakaru; Forones, Nora Manoukian; Monteiro, Ines-de-Paula; Castelo-Branco, Pedro; Janjigian, Yelena Y; de Mello, Ramon Andrade

    2016-03-01

    In this article, we review the literature on the current advances in targeted therapies for metastatic gastric cancer aimed at improving patient care. We conclude that the key to guiding targeted therapy is individual biomarkers, which are not completely elucidated. HER2 overexpression is the only predictive biomarker currently in use. Furthermore, it is necessary to understand that gastric tumors are heterogeneous; therefore, is impossible to evaluate a novel biological compound without evaluating personal biomarkers. The selection of patients who are able to receive each treatment is paramount for improving advanced gastric cancer survival and reducing unnecessary costs. PMID:26838766

  9. Childhood sexual abuse in advanced cancer patients in the palliative care setting.

    PubMed

    Wygant, Carmella; Hui, David; Bruera, Eduardo

    2011-08-01

    Childhood sexual abuse (CSA) is a common, distressing, yet rarely discussed topic in palliative care. The long-term effects of CSA can have a significant impact on patients' quality of life, particularly at the end of life. In this article, we aim to initiate a discussion regarding the need to address CSA in the palliative care setting, using the example of an advanced cancer patient and her caregiver sister who revealed their common past. Specifically, we will be discussing 1) the comorbidities, psychological distress, and family distress associated with CSA, 2) its impact on health care delivery, 3) an approach to initiating conversations regarding CSA, and 4) various management strategies. Successful management of CSA necessitates an interprofessional team approach and may help to improve the quality of life of patients and their families. PMID:21444190

  10. Understanding the views of those who care for patients with cancer on advance care planning and end-of-life care.

    PubMed

    Mattes, Malcolm D; Tung, Kaity; Baum, Rachel; Parikh, Kapila; Ashamalla, Hani

    2015-12-01

    An electronic survey was used to assess the views of a diverse nationwide cohort of health care professionals regarding advance care planning and end-of-life care. A total of 645 responses were received. If diagnosed with a serious incurable illness with limited life expectancy, 97% would want to discuss their prognosis, 74% would refuse cardiopulmonary resuscitation, and 72% favored supportive/comfort care to more aggressive life-prolonging treatments. However, prognosis was thought to be discussed with only 52% of such patients, and just 5% thought doctors were either very or extremely successful at explaining advanced life-sustaining treatments to patients. Greater than 90% believed these discussions should best occur when a patient is thought to have one or more years to live and 80% thought they are best initiated in the outpatient setting. PMID:24939206

  11. Coping Styles, Health Status and Advance Care Planning in Patients with Hematologic Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Loberiza, Fausto R; Swore-Flecther, Barbara A.; Block, Susan D.; Back, Anthony L.; Goldman, Roberta E.; Tulsky, James A.; Lee, Stephanie J.

    2014-01-01

    This study evaluated if measures of psychological well-being, including coping style are associated with advance care planning (ACP). Data were from the HEMA-COMM study, a prospective observational study of physician-patient communication in patients with hematologic malignancies. ACP was defined as having a living will, having a health care proxy, discussing life support with family or friends, and discussing life support with a doctor or nurse. 293 patients participated: only 45 (15%) had all the elements of ACP, 215 (73%) had at least 1 element of ACP, while 33 (11%) did not engage in ACP. In multivariate analysis, specific coping styles but not other measures of psychosocial well being were associated with having written ACP. Verbal ACP was associated with patient-reported health and physician estimate of life expectancy. Our study suggests that tailoring ACP discussions to a patient’s coping style may increase engagement in ACP. PMID:21851220

  12. Racial/Ethnic Differences in Inpatient Palliative Care Consultation for Patients With Advanced Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Rashmi K.; Cameron, Kenzie A.; Chmiel, Joan S.; Von Roenn, Jamie H.; Szmuilowicz, Eytan; Prigerson, Holly G.; Penedo, Frank J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Inpatient palliative care consultation (IPCC) may help address barriers that limit the use of hospice and the receipt of symptom-focused care for racial/ethnic minorities, yet little is known about disparities in the rates of IPCC. We evaluated the association between race/ethnicity and rates of IPCC for patients with advanced cancer. Patients and Methods Patients with metastatic cancer who were hospitalized between January 1, 2009, and December 31, 2010, at an urban academic medical center participated in the study. Patient-level multivariable logistic regression was used to evaluate the association between race/ethnicity and IPCC. Results A total of 6,288 patients (69% non-Hispanic white, 19% African American, and 6% Hispanic) were eligible. Of these patients, 16% of whites, 22% of African Americans, and 20% of Hispanics had an IPCC (overall P < .001). Compared with whites, African Americans had a greater likelihood of receiving an IPCC (odds ratio, 1.21; 95% CI, 1.01 to 1.44), even after adjusting for insurance, hospitalizations, marital status, and illness severity. Among patients who received an IPCC, African Americans had a higher median number of days from IPCC to death compared with whites (25 v 17 days; P = .006), and were more likely than Hispanics (59% v 41%; P = .006), but not whites, to be referred to hospice. Conclusion Inpatient settings may neutralize some racial/ethnic differences in access to hospice and palliative care services; however, irrespective of race/ethnicity, rates of IPCC remain low and occur close to death. Additional research is needed to identify interventions to improve access to palliative care in the hospital for all patients with advanced cancer. PMID:26324373

  13. Care at home of the patient with advanced multiple sclerosis--part 2.

    PubMed

    Reitman, Nancy Clayton

    2010-05-01

    Clinicians caring for patients with advanced MS have choices of different options and approaches. Whatever path is chosen, interventions must incorporate the wishes and capabilities of the patient and be supported by the care team, usually led by the nurse. As the work of the great psychologist Abraham Maslow has shown, in his famous "hierarchy of needs," the basic levels of needs must be met before the highest self-actualization can be accomplished (Maslow, 1943). This is equally true in the nursing care of very ill patients, as authors Zalenski and Raspa write: "The five levels of the hierarchy of needs as adapted to palliative care are: (1) distressing symptoms, such as pain or dyspnea; (2) fears for physical safety, of dying or abandonment; (3) affection, love and acceptance in the face of devastating illness; (4) esteem, respect, and appreciation for the person; (5) self-actualization and transcendence. Maslow's modified hierarchy of palliative care needs could be utilized to provide a comprehensive approach for the assessment of patients' needs and the design of interventions to achieve goals that start with comfort and potentially extend to the experience of transcendence."(Zalenski & Raspa, 2006, p.1120). PMID:20463509

  14. Advanced stages of PD: interventional therapies and related patient-centered care.

    PubMed

    Krüger, Rejko; Hilker, Rüdiger; Winkler, Christian; Lorrain, Michael; Hahne, Matthias; Redecker, Christoph; Lingor, Paul; Jost, Wolfgang H

    2016-01-01

    During the last decades, symptomatic treatment of motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD) improved continuously and is reflected by long-range independency of the patient during the disease course. However, advanced stages of PD still represent an important challenge to patients, caregivers and treating physicians. In patients with advanced PD, interventional therapy strategies are increasingly applied. These device-related treatment strategies using pump-based continuous dopaminergic stimulation (CDS) or deep brain stimulation (DBS) opened new treatment options especially if motor complications predominate. Well-designed clinical studies on these interventional therapeutic approaches provided class 1 evidence for the efficacy of DBS and CDS in advanced PD and opened new perspectives for their use in earlier disease stages also. Therefore, careful selection of patients amenable to the (semi)invasive therapy options becomes more and more important and requires an interdisciplinary setting that accounts for (i) optimal patient information and awareness, (ii) selection of best individual treatment modality, (iii) training of relatives and caregivers, (iv) management of complications, and (v) follow-up care. Here, we address these topics by summarizing current state-of-the-art in patient selection, providing specificities of treatment options and troubleshooting, and defining steps towards an optimized patient-centered care. Interventional therapies pioneer in the area of individualized treatment approaches for PD, and may be complemented in the future by biomarker-based improved stratification and by closed-loop systems for adaptive therapeutic strategies. In the present review, we summarize the proceedings of an Expert Workshop on Parkinson's disease held on November 22, 2014 in Frankfurt, Germany. PMID:26138439

  15. Advance Care Planning

    MedlinePlus

    ... Division of Geriatrics and Clinical Gerontology Division of Neuroscience FAQs Funding Opportunities Intramural Research Program Office of ... Is Advance Care Planning? Advance care planning involves learning about the types of decisions that might need ...

  16. The Importance of Supportive Care in Optimizing Treatment Outcomes of Patients with Advanced Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Optimal oncologic care of older men with prostate cancer, including effective prevention and management of the disease and treatment side effects (so-called best supportive care measures) can prolong survival, improve quality of life, and reduce depressive symptoms. In addition, the proportion of treatment discontinuations can be reduced through early reporting and management of side effects. Pharmacologic care may be offered to manage the side effects of androgen-deprivation therapy and chemotherapy, which may include hot flashes, febrile neutropenia, fatigue, and diarrhea. Nonpharmacologic care (e.g., physical exercise, acupuncture, relaxation) has also been shown to benefit patients. At the Georges Pompidou European Hospital, the Program of Optimization of Chemotherapy Administration has demonstrated that improved outpatient follow-up by supportive care measures can reduce the occurrence of chemotherapy-related side effects, reduce cancellations and modifications of treatment, reduce chemotherapy wastage, and reduce the length of stay in the outpatient unit. The importance of supportive care measures to optimize management and outcomes of older men with advanced prostate cancer should not be overlooked. PMID:23015682

  17. Consensus statement on advancing research in emergency department operations and its impact on patient care.

    PubMed

    Yiadom, Maame Yaa A B; Ward, Michael J; Chang, Anna Marie; Pines, Jesse M; Jouriles, Nick; Yealy, Donald M

    2015-06-01

    The consensus conference on "Advancing Research in Emergency Department (ED) Operations and Its Impact on Patient Care," hosted by The ED Operations Study Group (EDOSG), convened to craft a framework for future investigations in this important but understudied area. The EDOSG is a research consortium dedicated to promoting evidence-based clinical practice in emergency medicine. The consensus process format was a modified version of the NIH Model for Consensus Conference Development. Recommendations provide an action plan for how to improve ED operations study design, create a facilitating research environment, identify data measures of value for process and outcomes research, and disseminate new knowledge in this area. Specifically, we call for eight key initiatives: 1) the development of universal measures for ED patient care processes; 2) attention to patient outcomes, in addition to process efficiency and best practice compliance; 3) the promotion of multisite clinical operations studies to create more generalizable knowledge; 4) encouraging the use of mixed methods to understand the social community and human behavior factors that influence ED operations; 5) the creation of robust ED operations research registries to drive stronger evidence-based research; 6) prioritizing key clinical questions with the input of patients, clinicians, medical leadership, emergency medicine organizations, payers, and other government stakeholders; 7) more consistently defining the functional components of the ED care system, including observation units, fast tracks, waiting rooms, laboratories, and radiology subunits; and 8) maximizing multidisciplinary knowledge dissemination via emergency medicine, public health, general medicine, operations research, and nontraditional publications. PMID:26014365

  18. Evaluation of Spiritual Needs of Patients with Advanced Cancer in a Palliative Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Valls, Joan; Porta, Josep; Viñas, Juan

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Spiritual needs play an important role in palliative care as both a clinical dimension and a therapeutic strategy. However, recent studies have shown that the management of this dimension still remains a challenge at the clinical level of palliative care. Goals: Our goal was to evaluate the spiritual needs of patients diagnosed with advanced and terminal cancer by the palliative care unit of a hospital in Barcelona, Spain. Methods: An observational study was conducted that involved 50 patients who were recruited between May 2007 and January 2008. A questionnaire was used which included 28 items selected from a review of the literature; the responses were analyzed using a five-point Lickert scale. The results were grouped in 11 categories corresponding to different spiritual needs. Results: Two spiritual needs emerged as the most relevant for the patients: their need to be recognized as a person until the end of their life and their need to know the truth about their illness. The least important spiritual needs were identified as those: for continuity and an afterlife; to get rid of obsessions; to achieve freedom from blame and to be able to forgive others; and the need for reconciliation and to feel forgiven by others. Conclusions: When patients knew the truth about their illnesses and they were treated with dignity, their most important needs were likely to be covered. These results suggest that patients receiving palliative care wish to live for the present with as much normality as possible and show only minor concern for their past and future. PMID:24745870

  19. [Advance Care Planning in Cancer Care].

    PubMed

    Kizawa, Yoshiyuki; Yamaguchi, Takashi; Yotani, Nobuyuki

    2016-03-01

    Advance care planning (ACP) is one of the most important issues to consider in providing quality end of life care for cancer patients. ACP has been described as a process whereby a patient, in consultation with health care providers, family members, and important others, makes decisions about his or her future health care, in the event he or she becomes incapable of participating in medical treatment decisions. ACP improves rates of following end of life wishes, increases patient and family satisfaction, and reduces family stress, anxiety, and depression. This article clarifies the differences among ACP, advance directives, and living wills. Additionally, we describe, based on clinical experience, how to introduce ACP most effectively for all stages of cancer care. PMID:27067841

  20. Advance Care Planning: A Qualitative Study of Dialysis Patients and Families

    PubMed Central

    Eneanya, Nwamaka D.; Feinberg, Rebecca; Germain, Michael J.; Marr, Lisa; Berzoff, Joan; Cohen, Lewis M.; Unruh, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Background and objectives More than 90,000 patients with ESRD die annually in the United States, yet advance care planning (ACP) is underutilized. Understanding patients’ and families’ diverse needs can strengthen systematic efforts to improve ACP. Design, setting, participants, & measurements In-depth interviews were conducted with a purposive sample of patients and family/friends from dialysis units at two study sites. Applying grounded theory, interviews were audiotaped, professionally transcribed, and analyzed in an iterative process. Emergent themes were identified, discussed, and organized into major themes and subthemes. Results Thirteen patients and nine family/friends participated in interviews. The mean patient age was 63 years (SD 14) and five patients were women. Participants identified as black (n=1), Hispanic (n=4), Native American (n=4), Pacific Islander (n=1), white (n=11), and mixed (n=1). Three major themes with associated subthemes were identified. The first theme, “Prior experiences with ACP,” revealed that these discussions rarely occur, yet most patients desire them. A potential role for the primary care physician was broached. The second theme, “Factors that may affect perspectives on ACP,” included a desire for more of a connection with the nephrologist, positive and negative experiences with the dialysis team, disenfranchisement, life experiences, personality traits, patient-family/friend relationships, and power differentials. The third theme, “Recommendations for discussing ACP,” included thoughts on who should lead discussions, where and when discussions should take place, what should be discussed and how. Conclusions Many participants desired better communication with their nephrologist and/or their dialysis team. A number expressed feelings of disenfranchisement that could negatively impact ACP discussions through diminished trust. Life experiences, personality traits, and relationships with family and friends may

  1. War and peace? The oncologic and the palliative care perspective on personalized cancer treatment in a patient with advanced cancer.

    PubMed

    Masel, Eva K; Schur, Sophie; Posch, Doris; Weixler, Dietmar; Meran, Johannes G; Schmidinger, Manuela; Watzke, Herbert H

    2015-08-01

    Personalized cancer treatment utilizing targeted therapies in a tailored approach is based on tumor and/or patient-specific molecular profiles. Recent clinical trials continue to look for new potential targets in heavily pretreated patients or rare disease entities. Careful selection of patients who may derive benefit from such therapies constitutes a challenge. This case report presents an experimental personalized cancer treatment in an advanced cancer patient and provides a list of issues for discussion: How can we combine treatment goals and simultaneously meet the individual needs in advanced cancer reconciling both perspectives: oncology and palliative care? PMID:25986998

  2. Palliative care in advanced dementia.

    PubMed

    Merel, Susan E; Merel, Susan; DeMers, Shaune; Vig, Elizabeth

    2014-08-01

    Because neurodegenerative dementias are progressive and ultimately fatal, a palliative approach focusing on comfort, quality of life, and family support can have benefits for patients, families, and the health system. Elements of a palliative approach include discussion of prognosis and goals of care, completion of advance directives, and a thoughtful approach to common complications of advanced dementia. Physicians caring for patients with dementia should formulate a plan for end-of-life care in partnership with patients, families, and caregivers, and be prepared to manage common symptoms at the end of life in dementia, including pain and delirium. PMID:25037291

  3. Determinants of Quality Care and Mortality for Patients With Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer in Virginia

    PubMed Central

    Showalter, Timothy N.; Camacho, Fabian; Cantrell, Leigh A.; Anderson, Roger T.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Outcomes for patients with locally advanced cervical cancer are influenced by receipt of all indicated components of quality care: early diagnosis and receipt of external beam radiation therapy, chemotherapy, and brachytherapy. We performed an observational cohort study to evaluate receipt of quality cancer care and mortality after cancer diagnosis among patients with locally advanced cervical cancer in Virginia. We queried the Virginia state cancer registry to identify patients with International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics Stage IB-IVA cervical cancer who were diagnosed during 2002 to 2012. We evaluated the influence of tumor-related, demographic, and geospatial factors on the receipt of indicated therapies and mortality. Treatment quality score of 0 to 3 was defined based upon the extent of receipt of the components of indicated therapy. A total of 1048 patients were identified; 33.1% received all 3 components of treatment and only 54.0% received brachytherapy. Predictors of higher quality score included younger age group versus 66+ years at diagnosis (18–42 odds ratio [OR] = 12.3, 95% confidence interval: 6.6, 23.0; 42–53 OR = 5.6, CI: 3.3, 9.5; 53–66 OR = 5.5, CI: 3.3, 9.1), lower tumor stages versus IVA (IB2 OR = 3.3, CI: 1.8, 6.2; II OR = 2.7, CI: 1.6, 4.5; IIIx OR = 2.1, CI: 1.3, 3.6), and treatment at a high-volume facility (OR 2.2, CI: 1.2, 4.2). Predictors of increased mortality included earlier year of diagnosis, higher tumor stage, treatment at a lower volume facility, and lower treatment quality score. In a cohort of locally advanced cervical cancer patients in Virginia, we identified a low rate of receipt of complete quality care for cervical cancer and a strong effect of facility volume on quality treatment and survival. Further research is needed to develop strategies to improve access to quality treatment and outcomes for cervical cancer. PMID:26937934

  4. Addressing Spirituality Within the Care of Patients at the End of Life: Perspectives of Patients With Advanced Cancer, Oncologists, and Oncology Nurses

    PubMed Central

    Phelps, Andrea C.; Lauderdale, Katharine E.; Alcorn, Sara; Dillinger, Jennifer; Balboni, Michael T.; Van Wert, Michael; VanderWeele, Tyler J.; Balboni, Tracy A.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Attention to patients' religious and spiritual needs is included in national guidelines for quality end-of-life care, but little data exist to guide spiritual care. Patients and Methods The Religion and Spirituality in Cancer Care Study is a multi-institution, quantitative-qualitative study of 75 patients with advanced cancer and 339 cancer physicians and nurses. Patients underwent semistructured interviews, and care providers completed a Web-based survey exploring their perspectives on the routine provision of spiritual care by physicians and nurses. Theme extraction was performed following triangulated procedures of interdisciplinary analysis. Multivariable ordinal logistic regression models assessed relationships between participants' characteristics and attitudes toward spiritual care. Results The majority of patients (77.9%), physicians (71.6%), and nurses (85.1%) believed that routine spiritual care would have a positive impact on patients. Only 25% of patients had previously received spiritual care. Among patients, prior spiritual care (adjusted odds ratio [AOR], 14.65; 95% CI, 1.51 to 142.23), increasing education (AOR, 1.26; 95% CI, 1.06 to 1.49), and religious coping (AOR, 4.79; 95% CI, 1.40 to 16.42) were associated with favorable perceptions of spiritual care. Physicians held more negative perceptions of spiritual care than patients (P < .001) and nurses (P = .008). Qualitative analysis identified benefits of spiritual care, including supporting patients' emotional well-being and strengthening patient-provider relationships. Objections to spiritual care frequently related to professional role conflicts. Participants described ideal spiritual care to be individualized, voluntary, inclusive of chaplains/clergy, and based on assessing and supporting patient spirituality. Conclusion Most patients with advanced cancer, oncologists, and oncology nurses value spiritual care. Themes described provide an empirical basis for engaging spiritual issues

  5. Predictors of Intensive End-of-Life and Hospice Care in Latino and White Advanced Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Maciejewski, Paul K.; Jimenez, Rachel; Nilsson, Matthew; Paulk, Elizabeth; Stieglitz, Heather; Prigerson, Holly G.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background The role of end-of-life (EOL) care preferences and conversations in receipt of care near death for Latinos is unclear. Objective This study examines rates and predictors of intensive EOL and hospice care among Latino and white advanced cancer patients. Design Two-hundred-and-ninety-two self-reported Latino (n=58) and white (n=234) Stage IV cancer patients participated in a U.S. multisite, prospective, cohort study from September 2002 to August 2008. The Latino and white, non-Hispanic participants were interviewed and followed until death, a median of 118.5 days from baseline. Measurements Patient-reported, baseline predictors of EOL care included EOL care preference; terminal illness acknowledgement; EOL discussion; completion of a DNR order; and religious coping. Caregiver postmortem interviews provided information regarding EOL care received. Intensive EOL care was defined as resuscitation and/or ventilation followed by death in an intensive care unit. Hospice was either in- or outpatient. Results Latino and white patients received intensive EOL and hospice care at similar rates (5.2% and 3.4% for intensive care, p=0.88; 70.7% versus 73.4% for hospice, p=0.33). No white or Latino patient who reported a DNR order or EOL discussion at baseline received intensive EOL care. Religious coping and a preference for life-extending care predicted intensive EOL care for white patients (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 6.69 [p=0.02] and aOR 6.63 [p=0.01], respectively), but not for Latinos. No predictors were associated with Latino hospice care. Conclusions EOL discussions and DNR orders may prevent intensive EOL care among Latino cancer patients. Efforts should continue to engage Latino patients and caregivers in these activities. PMID:24053593

  6. Communication About Sexuality in Advanced Illness Aligns With a Palliative Care Approach to Patient-Centered Care.

    PubMed

    Leung, Margaret W; Goldfarb, Shari; Dizon, Don S

    2016-02-01

    Treatment-related sexual complications are common in cancer patients although rarely discussed in the palliative care setting. Sexuality is an important survivorship issue and remains relevant even in the terminal setting. There are multiple barriers in dialoguing about intimacy and sexual functioning from the patient and provider perspectives. Palliative care providers, while not expected to be sexual health experts, can provide comprehensive patient-centered care by including sexual health as part of their evaluation. They can explore how sexual dysfunction can impair functioning and utilize an interdisciplinary approach to manage symptoms. Palliative care providers can help patients identify their goals of care and explore what anticipated sexual changes and treat-related side effects are tolerable and intolerable to the patient's quality of life. Principles on addressing sexuality in the palliative setting and practical ways of incorporating sexual history into the palliative care assessment are provided. PMID:26769116

  7. Advance Directives and Communication Skills of Prehospital Physicians Involved in the Care of Cardiovascular Patients.

    PubMed

    Gigon, Fabienne; Merlani, Paolo; Ricou, Bara

    2015-12-01

    Advance directives (AD) were developed to respect patient autonomy. However, very few patients have AD, even in cases when major cardiovascular surgery is to follow. To understand the reasons behind the low prevalence of AD and to help decision making when patients are incompetent, it is necessary to focus on the impact of prehospital practitioners, who may contribute to an increase in AD by discussing them with patients. The purpose of this study was to investigate self-rated communication skills and the attitudes of physicians potentially involved in the care of cardiovascular patients toward AD.Self-administered questionnaires were sent to general practitioners, cardiologists, internists, and intensivists, including the Quality of Communication Score, divided into a General Communication score (QOCgen 6 items) and an End-of-life Communication score (QOCeol 7 items), as well as questions regarding opinions and practices in terms of AD.One hundred sixty-four responses were received. QOCgen (mean (±SD)): 9.0/10 (1.0); QOCeol: 7.2/10 (1.7). General practitioners most frequently start discussions about AD (74/149 [47%]) and are more prone to designate their own specialty (30/49 [61%], P < 0.0001). Overall, only 57/159 (36%) physicians designated their own specialty; 130/158 (82%) physicians ask potential cardiovascular patients if they have AD and 61/118 (52%) physicians who care for cardiovascular patients talk about AD with some of them.The characteristics of physicians who do not talk about AD with patients were those who did not personally have AD and those who work in private practices.One hundred thirty-three (83%) physicians rated the systematic mention of patients' AD in the correspondence between physicians as good, while 114 (71%) at the patients' first registration in the private practice.Prehospital physicians rated their communication skills as good, whereas end-of-life communication was rated much lower. Only half of those surveyed speak about AD

  8. Advance directives and nursing home stays associated with less aggressive end-of-life care for patients with severe dementia.

    PubMed

    Nicholas, Lauren H; Bynum, Julie P W; Iwashyna, Theodore J; Weir, David R; Langa, Kenneth M

    2014-04-01

    The number of older adults with cognitive impairment is increasing, and such adults often require a surrogate to make decisions about health care. However, little is known about the aggressiveness of end-of-life care for these people, especially those who reside in the community. We found that cognitive impairment is common among older adults approaching the end of life, whether they live in the community or in a nursing home, and that nearly 30 percent of patients with severe dementia remained in the community until death. Among those patients, having an advance directive in the form of a living will was associated with significantly less aggressive care at the end of life, compared to similar patients without an advance directive-as measured by Medicare spending ($11,461 less per patient), likelihood of in-hospital death (17.9 percentage points lower), and use of the intensive care unit (9.4 percentage points lower). In contrast, advance directives were not associated with differences in care for people with normal cognition or mild dementia, whether they resided in the community or in a nursing home. Timely advance care planning after a diagnosis of cognitive impairment may be particularly important for older adults who reside in the community. PMID:24711329

  9. Advance Care Planning Among Hematopoietic Cell Transplant Patients and Bereaved Caregivers

    PubMed Central

    Loggers, Elizabeth Trice; Lee, Stephanie; Chilson, Kate; Back, Anthony L.; Block, Susan; Loberiza, Fausto R.

    2014-01-01

    Younger, healthier patients contemplating high-risk (but potentially curative) hematopoietic cell transplants (HCT) may not consider advance care planning (ACP). We investigated the effect of pre-transplant ACP in surviving HCT patients and bereaved caregivers using retrospective, audiotaped telephone surveys. Subjects were identified between 2001–2003 via databases at two high-volume HCT centers. Transcripts were coded by 2 investigators, with differences resolved by consensus. HCT survivors (n=18) were interviewed a median of 13 months after HCT for acute leukemia (7), lymphoma (5), or other (6); 50% had living wills, 72% had a formal proxy. Twelve (67%) had discussed mortality risk pre-HCT with the medical team. Of those, 92% felt their hope and perception of the medical team's truthfulness was increased or unchanged (I/U) by the conversation, while all felt clinician commitment to transplant was I/U. Bereaved caregivers (n=11) were interviewed a median of 10 months post-death (median 31 days post-HCT, range 13–152). Nine (82%) had discussed mortality risk pre-HCT with the medical team; 7 (78%) felt hope was I/U, all felt clinician commitment to transplant and truthfulness was I/U, and most felt ACP reduced burden (67%). ACP discussions with patients and caregivers pre-HCT did not affect hope and supported confidence in medical teams. PMID:25068417

  10. Advanced technologies in trauma critical care management.

    PubMed

    Cannon, Jeremy W; Chung, Kevin K; King, David R

    2012-08-01

    Care of critically injured patients has evolved over the 50 years since Shoemaker established one of the first trauma units at Cook County Hospital in 1962. Modern trauma intensive care units offer a high nurse-to-patient ratio, physicians and midlevel providers who manage the patients, and technologically advanced monitors and therapeutic devices designed to optimize the care of patients. This article describes advances that have transformed trauma critical care, including bedside ultrasonography, novel patient monitoring techniques, extracorporeal support, and negative pressure dressings. It also discusses how to evaluate the safety and efficacy of future advances in trauma critical care. PMID:22850154

  11. Advancing educational continuity in primary care residencies: an opportunity for patient-centered medical homes.

    PubMed

    Bowen, Judith L; Hirsh, David; Aagaard, Eva; Kaminetzky, Catherine P; Smith, Marie; Hardman, Joseph; Chheda, Shobhina G

    2015-05-01

    Continuity of care is a core value of patients and primary care physicians, yet in graduate medical education (GME), creating effective clinical teaching environments that emphasize continuity poses challenges. In this Perspective, the authors review three dimensions of continuity for patient care-informational, longitudinal, and interpersonal-and propose analogous dimensions describing continuity for learning that address both residents learning from patient care and supervisors and interprofessional team members supporting residents' competency development. The authors review primary care GME reform efforts through the lens of continuity, including the growing body of evidence that highlights the importance of longitudinal continuity between learners and supervisors for making competency judgments. The authors consider the challenges that primary care residency programs face in the wake of practice transformation to patient-centered medical home models and make recommendations to maximize the opportunity that these practice models provide. First, educators, researchers, and policy makers must be more precise with terms describing various dimensions of continuity. Second, research should prioritize developing assessments that enable the study of the impact of interpersonal continuity on clinical outcomes for patients and learning outcomes for residents. Third, residency programs should establish program structures that provide informational and longitudinal continuity to enable the development of interpersonal continuity for care and learning. Fourth, these educational models and continuity assessments should extend to the level of the interprofessional team. Fifth, policy leaders should develop a meaningful recognition process that rewards academic practices for training the primary care workforce. PMID:25470307

  12. Development of a Pharmacy Capstone Course From Focus Groups to Advanced Patient Care

    PubMed Central

    Cooley, Janet H; Tanner, Natalee E; Hanauer, Courtney N; Schiefer, Danielle M; Herrier, Richard N

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To describe the development of a capstone course using qualitative results of focus groups and to determine the impact of the course using a pre- and postcourse surveys. Design. A course titled Advanced Patient Care was developed using themes emerged from 3 stakeholder focus groups and implemented with case-based sessions, interactive exercises, and Objective Structured Clinical Examinations (OSCEs). Pre- and postcourse surveys were conducted to assess the students’ confidence and knowledge in managing 8 commonly-encountered conditions. Assessment. During the 2-year course implementation, a total of 169 students participated in the pre- and postcourse surveys (87.6% response rate). The mean total confidence score increased significantly from 54.3 (±9.2) to 69.0 (±8.6, p<0.001), and the total mean knowledge score increased significantly from 6.3 to 6.9 (p<0.001). Conclusion. The capstone course, fueled by focus group findings and implemented using interactive sessions and simulations, positively impacted students’ confidence and knowledge for clinical practice experiences and professional practice. PMID:25386021

  13. Feasibility and acceptability of advance care planning in elderly Italian and Greek speaking patients as compared to English-speaking patients: an Australian cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Detering, Karen; Sutton, Elizabeth; Fraser, Scott; Wallis, Kasey; Silvester, William; Mawren, Daveena; Whiteside, Kathryn

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To assess the feasibility and acceptability of facilitated advance care planning (ACP) discussions in elderly Italian and Greek-speaking inpatients compared to English-speaking inpatients. Design, setting and participants This cross-sectional study with convenience sampling was conducted in Melbourne, Australia, and recruited hospital inpatients with medical decision-making capacity, aged 65 years or above, who spoke Greek (25 patients), Italian (24 patients) or English (63 patients). Intervention Facilitated ACP was offered, aiming to assists patients to consider and discuss their goals, values, beliefs and future treatment wishes with their family and doctor; to help them consider how they would like healthcare decisions made in the future if they become unable to do this for themselves; and to complete advance care directives. Main outcome measures The completion of ACP discussions, their duration, advance care directive completion and utilisation of interpreters. Results Of 112 patients, 109 (97%) had at least one discussion, 63 (54%) completed advance care directives, either nominating a substitute decision-maker, documenting their wishes or both, and 76 (68%) included family in discussions. The median duration of discussions for all patients was slightly more than 1 h, over two visits. There were no differences between the Greek-speaking and the Italian-speaking patients, or between the Non-English speaking and the English-speaking patients in any of these measures. Only 14 non-English speaking patients, (30%) utilised interpreters, but when utilised, patients were much more likely (p<0.005) to complete advance care directives. Conclusions Facilitated ACP in elderly Italian and Greek-speaking patients is feasible, acceptable and is similar to that for English-speaking patients. PMID:26319775

  14. Epidemiology of Advance Directives in Extended Care Facility Patients Presenting to the Emergency Department

    PubMed Central

    Wall, Jessica; Hiestand, Brian; Caterino, Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    Introduction We conducted an epidemiologic evaluation of advance directives and do-not-resuscitate (DNR) prevalence among residents of extended care facilities (ECF) presenting to the emergency department (ED). Methods We performed a retrospective medical record review on ED patients originating from an ECF. Data were collected on age, sex, race, triage acuity, ED disposition, DNR status, power-of attorney (POA) status, and living will (LW) status. We generated descriptive statistics, and used logistic regression to evaluate predictors of DNR status. Results A total of 754 patients over 20 months met inclusion criteria; 533 (70.7%) were white, 351 (46.6%) were male, and the median age was 66 years (IQR 54–78). DNR orders were found in 124 (16.4%, 95% CI [13.9–19.1%]) patients. In univariate analysis, there was a significant difference in DNR by gender (10.5% female vs. 6.0% male with DNR, p=0.013), race (13.4% white vs. 3.1% non-white with DNR, p=0.005), and age (4.0% <65 years; 2.9% 65–74 years, p=0.101; 3.3% 75–84 years, p=0.001; 6.2% >84 years, p<0.001). Using multivariate logistic regression, we found that factors associated with DNR status were gender (OR 1.477, p=0.358, note interaction term), POA status (OR 6.612, p<0.001), LW (18.032, p<0.001), age (65–74 years OR 1.261, p=0.478; 75–84 years OR 1.737, p=0.091, >84 years OR 5.258, P<0.001), with interactions between POA and gender (OR 0.294, P=0.016) and between POA and LW (OR 0.227, p<0.005). Secondary analysis demonstrated that DNR orders were not significantly associated with death during admission (p=0.084). Conclusion Age, gender, POA, and LW use are predictors of ECF patient DNR use. Further, DNR presence is not a predictor of death in the hospital. PMID:26759640

  15. Advancing the Future of Patient Safety in Oncology: Implications of Patient Safety Education on Cancer Care Delivery.

    PubMed

    James, Ted A; Goedde, Michael; Bertsch, Tania; Beatty, Dennis

    2016-09-01

    Emerging challenges in health care delivery demand systems of clinical practice capable of ensuring safe and reliable patient care. Oncology in particular is recognized for its high degree of complexity and potential for adverse events. New models of student education hold promise for producing a health care workforce armed with skills in patient safety. This training may have a particular impact on risk reduction in cancer care and ultimately improve clinical performance in oncology. A 1-day student program focused on the principles of patient safety was developed for the third-year medical school class. The core curriculum consisted of an online patient safety module, root cause analyses of actual patient safety events, and simulation scenarios designed to invoke patient safety skills. The program was successfully implemented and received an average of 4.2/5 on evaluations pertaining to its importance and effectiveness. Student surveys demonstrated that 59 % of students were not previously aware of system-based approaches to improving safety, 51 % of students had witnessed or experienced a patient safety issue, while only 10 % reported these events. Students reported feeling more empowered to act on patient safety issues as a result of the program. Educational programs can provide medical students with a foundation for skill development in medical error reduction and help enhance an organization's culture of safety. This has the potential to reduce adverse events in complex patient care settings such as clinical oncology. PMID:25893923

  16. The Role of Technical Advances in the Adoption and Integration of Patient-Reported Outcomes in Clinical Care

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Roxanne E.; Rothrock, Nan E.; DeWitt, Esi Morgan; Spiegel, Brennan; Tucker, Carole A.; Crane, Heidi M.; Forrest, Christopher B.; Patrick, Donald L.; Fredericksen, Rob; Shulman, Lisa M.; Cella, David; Crane, Paul K.

    2016-01-01

    Background Patient-reported outcomes (PROs) are gaining recognition as key measures for improving the quality of patient care in clinical care settings. Three factors have made the implementation of PROs in clinical care more feasible: increased use of modern measurement methods in PRO design and validation, rapid progression of technology (e.g., touch screen tablets, Internet accessibility, and electronic health records (EHRs)), and greater demand for measurement and monitoring of PROs by regulators, payers, accreditors, and professional organizations. As electronic PRO collection and reporting capabilities have improved, the challenges of collecting PRO data have changed. Objectives To update information on PRO adoption considerations in clinical care, highlighting electronic and technical advances with respect to measure selection, clinical workflow, data infrastructure, and outcomes reporting. Methods Five practical case studies across diverse healthcare settings and patient populations are used to explore how implementation barriers were addressed to promote the successful integration of PRO collection into the clinical workflow. The case studies address selecting and reporting of relevant content, workflow integration, pre-visit screening, effective evaluation, and EHR integration. Conclusions These case studies exemplify elements of well-designed electronic systems, including response automation, tailoring of item selection and reporting algorithms, flexibility of collection location, and integration with patient health care data elements. They also highlight emerging logistical barriers in this area, such as the need for specialized technological and methodological expertise, and design limitations of current electronic data capture systems. PMID:25588135

  17. Process and Outcome Measures among COPD Patients with a Hospitalization Cared for by an Advance Practice Provider or Primary Care Physician

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Amitesh; Zhang, Wei; Kuo, YongFang; Sharma, Gulshan

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To examine the process and outcomes of care of COPD patients by Advanced Practice Providers (APPs) and primary care physicians. Methods We conducted a cross sectional retrospective cohort study of Medicare beneficiaries with COPD who had at least one hospitalization in 2010. We examined the process measures of receipt of spirometry evaluation, influenza and pneumococcal vaccine, use of COPD medications, and referral to a pulmonary specialist visit. Outcome measures were emergency department (ER) visit, number of hospitalizations and 30-day readmission in 2010. Results A total of 7,257 Medicare beneficiaries with COPD were included. Of these, 1,999 and 5,258 received primary care from APPs and primary care physicians, respectively. Patients in the APP group were more likely to be white, younger, male, residing in non-metropolitan areas and have fewer comorbidities. In terms of process of care measures, APPs were more likely to prescribe short acting bronchodilators (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 1.18, 95%Confidence Interval [CI] 1.05–1.32), oxygen therapy (aOR = 1.25, 95% CI 1.12–1.40) and consult a pulmonary specialist (aOR = 1.39, 95% CI 1.23–1.56), but less likely to give influenza and pneumococcal vaccinations. Patients receiving care from APPs had lower rates of ER visits for COPD (aOR = 0.84, 95%CI 0.71–0.98) and had a higher follow-up rate with pulmonary specialist within 30 days of hospitalization for COPD (aOR = 1.25, 95%CI 1.07–1.48) than those cared for by physicians. Conclusions Compared to patients cared for by physicians, patients cared for by APPs were more likely to receive short acting bronchodilator, oxygen therapy and been referred to pulmonologist, however they had lower rates of vaccination probably due to lower age group. Patients cared for by APPs were less like to visit an ER for COPD compared to patients care for by physicians, conversely there was no differences in hospitalization or readmission for COPD between MDs and

  18. Genetics/genomics advances to influence care for patients with chronic disease.

    PubMed

    Beery, Theresa Alice; Smith, Carolyn R

    2011-01-01

    Rapid changes in the field of genetics/genomics are affecting the way we practice nursing. Staying current on this dynamic field is a challenge for all healthcare professionals. This article discusses genetics/genomics issues that are likely to have a strong influence on nurses who care for patients with chronic disease. Complex diseases involving the actions of genes and environment are the most common causes of morbidity and mortality. Pharmacogenetics/pharmacogenomics has the potential to alter the way we choose both medications and appropriate doses. Nutrigenomics promises to help us understand how diet affects gene expression and how genetic variants affect the way we use nutrients. Genetic testing can be purchased through the Internet and currently is being marketed directly to consumers. Each of these topics has present and future implications for all healthcare professionals, especially those caring for people with chronic disease. PMID:21473561

  19. Phase III Randomized Clinical Trial Comparing Tremelimumab With Standard-of-Care Chemotherapy in Patients With Advanced Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Ribas, Antoni; Kefford, Richard; Marshall, Margaret A.; Punt, Cornelis J.A.; Haanen, John B.; Marmol, Maribel; Garbe, Claus; Gogas, Helen; Schachter, Jacob; Linette, Gerald; Lorigan, Paul; Kendra, Kari L.; Maio, Michele; Trefzer, Uwe; Smylie, Michael; McArthur, Grant A.; Dreno, Brigitte; Nathan, Paul D.; Mackiewicz, Jacek; Kirkwood, John M.; Gomez-Navarro, Jesus; Huang, Bo; Pavlov, Dmitri; Hauschild, Axel

    2013-01-01

    Purpose In phase I/II trials, the cytotoxic T lymphocyte–associated antigen-4–blocking monoclonal antibody tremelimumab induced durable responses in a subset of patients with advanced melanoma. This phase III study evaluated overall survival (OS) and other safety and efficacy end points in patients with advanced melanoma treated with tremelimumab or standard-of-care chemotherapy. Patients and Methods Patients with treatment-naive, unresectable stage IIIc or IV melanoma were randomly assigned at a ratio of one to one to tremelimumab (15 mg/kg once every 90 days) or physician's choice of standard-of-care chemotherapy (temozolomide or dacarbazine). Results In all, 655 patients were enrolled and randomly assigned. The test statistic crossed the prespecified futility boundary at second interim analysis after 340 deaths, but survival follow-up continued. At final analysis with 534 events, median OS by intent to treat was 12.6 months (95% CI, 10.8 to 14.3) for tremelimumab and 10.7 months (95% CI, 9.36 to 11.96) for chemotherapy (hazard ratio, 0.88; P = .127). Objective response rates were similar in the two arms: 10.7% in the tremelimumab arm and 9.8% in the chemotherapy arm. However, response duration (measured from date of random assignment) was significantly longer after tremelimumab (35.8 v 13.7 months; P = .0011). Diarrhea, pruritus, and rash were the most common treatment-related adverse events in the tremelimumab arm; 7.4% had endocrine toxicities. Seven deaths in the tremelimumab arm and one in the chemotherapy arm were considered treatment related by either investigators or sponsor. Conclusion This study failed to demonstrate a statistically significant survival advantage of treatment with tremelimumab over standard-of-care chemotherapy in first-line treatment of patients with metastatic melanoma. PMID:23295794

  20. Current state of ST-segment myocardial infarction: evidence-based therapies and optimal patient outcomes in advanced systems of care.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Joseph L; French, William J

    2014-08-01

    Advances in reperfusion therapy for ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) provide optimal patient outcomes. Reperfusion therapies, including contemporary primary percutaneous coronary intervention, represent decades of clinical evidence development in large clinical trials and national databases. However, rapid identification of STEMI and guideline-directed management of patients across broad populations have been best achieved in advanced systems of care. Current outcomes in STEMI reflect the evolution of both clinical data and idealized health care delivery networks. PMID:25091964

  1. Pretreatment neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio and its dynamic changes are associated with the overall survival in advanced cancer patients undergoing palliative care

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Weiwei; Wu, Zhenyu; Li, Yintao; Jia, Huixun; Chen, Menglei; Gu, Xiaoli; Liu, Minghui; Zhang, Zhe; Wang, Peng; Cheng, Wenwu

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the prognostic value of pretreatment NLR and its dynamic changes responsive to palliative care in advanced cancer patients. The study was retrospectively assessed in 378 consecutive advanced cancer patients receiving palliative care, and in an extended follow-up study of 106 of those patients. The cutoff value of pretreatment NLR was determined to be 3.0. In the 378 advanced cancer patients, 89 had pretreatment NLR ≤ 3, and 289 had an NLR > 3. Univariate and multivariate analyses showed that tumor stage, palliative care, albumin level, and pretreatment NLR (HR: 1.514, 95% CI: 1.125~2.038, P = 0.006) were independent prognostic indicators of OS. Moreover, in the follow-up cohort of 106 readmitted patients, 43 patients achieved a decreased NLR after palliative care, while the remaining 63 patients showed an increased NLR. Univariate and multivariate analyses showed that an increase in NLR was significantly associated with a poor survival (HR: 2.506, 95% CI: 1.474~4.261, P = 0.001). In conclusion, pretreatment NLR and changes in NLR independently predicted OS in advanced cancer patients undergoing palliative care. Incorporating NLR into clinical practice may better inform the prognosis and therapy decisions of advanced cancer patients in palliative settings. PMID:27510632

  2. Pretreatment neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio and its dynamic changes are associated with the overall survival in advanced cancer patients undergoing palliative care.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Weiwei; Wu, Zhenyu; Li, Yintao; Jia, Huixun; Chen, Menglei; Gu, Xiaoli; Liu, Minghui; Zhang, Zhe; Wang, Peng; Cheng, Wenwu

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the prognostic value of pretreatment NLR and its dynamic changes responsive to palliative care in advanced cancer patients. The study was retrospectively assessed in 378 consecutive advanced cancer patients receiving palliative care, and in an extended follow-up study of 106 of those patients. The cutoff value of pretreatment NLR was determined to be 3.0. In the 378 advanced cancer patients, 89 had pretreatment NLR ≤ 3, and 289 had an NLR > 3. Univariate and multivariate analyses showed that tumor stage, palliative care, albumin level, and pretreatment NLR (HR: 1.514, 95% CI: 1.125~2.038, P = 0.006) were independent prognostic indicators of OS. Moreover, in the follow-up cohort of 106 readmitted patients, 43 patients achieved a decreased NLR after palliative care, while the remaining 63 patients showed an increased NLR. Univariate and multivariate analyses showed that an increase in NLR was significantly associated with a poor survival (HR: 2.506, 95% CI: 1.474~4.261, P = 0.001). In conclusion, pretreatment NLR and changes in NLR independently predicted OS in advanced cancer patients undergoing palliative care. Incorporating NLR into clinical practice may better inform the prognosis and therapy decisions of advanced cancer patients in palliative settings. PMID:27510632

  3. Coping with an Advanced Stage Lung Cancer Diagnosis: Patient, Caregiver, and Provider Perspectives on the Role of the Health Care System.

    PubMed

    Islam, K M; Opoku, Samuel T; Apenteng, Bettye A; Fetrick, Ann; Ryan, June; Copur, M; Tolentino, Addison; Vaziri, Irfan; Ganti, Apar K

    2016-09-01

    Although lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in the USA, there have been few studies on patient-centered advanced lung cancer treatment practices. As part of a larger research study on how to use a patient-inclusive approach in late-stage lung cancer treatment, this present study describes patient, caregiver, and provider perspectives on the role of the health care system in helping patients cope with an advanced stage lung cancer diagnosis. Four focus group sessions were conducted with six to eleven participants per group for a total of 36 participants. Two focus groups were held with patients and family members/caregivers and two with physicians and nurses. A major theme that emerged concerned coping with an advanced lung cancer diagnosis, which is the subject of this paper. The patients, caregivers, and providers spoke passionately about interactions with the health care system and volunteered examples of supportive and non-supportive relationships between patients and clinicians. They advocated for better patient-provider communication practices as well as the expanded use of patient navigation and new patient orientation programs. This study contributes additional knowledge by including the perspectives of caregivers and providers who live and work closely with patients with advanced lung cancer. The findings can inform the development of comprehensive patient-centered care plans for patients living with an advanced lung cancer diagnosis. PMID:25900672

  4. A decision exercise to engage cancer patients and families in Deliberation about Medicare Coverage for advanced Cancer Care

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Concerns about unsustainable costs in the US Medicare program loom as the number of retirees increase and experiences serious and costly illnesses like cancer. Engagement of stakeholders, particularly cancer patients and their families, in prioritizing insured services offers a valuable strategy for informing Medicare coverage policy. We designed and evaluated a decision exercise that allowed cancer patients and family members to choose Medicare benefits for advanced cancer patients. Methods The decision tool, Choosing Health plans All Together (CHAT) was modified to select services for advanced cancer patients. Patients with a cancer history (N = 246) and their family members (N = 194) from North Carolina participated in 70 CHAT sessions. Variables including participants’ socio-demographic characteristics, health status, assessments of the exercise and results of group benefit selections were collected. Routine descriptive statistics summarized participant characteristics and Fisher’s exact test compared group differences. Qualitative analysis of group discussions were used to ascertain reasons for or against selecting benefits. Results Patients and family members (N = 440) participated in 70 CHAT exercises. Many groups opted for such services as palliative care, nursing facilities, and services not currently covered by the Medicare program. In choosing among four levels of cancer treatment coverage, no groups chose basic coverage, 27 groups (39%) selected intermediate coverage, 39 groups (56%) selected high coverage, and 4 groups (6%) chose the most comprehensive cancer coverage. Reasons for or against benefit selection included fairness, necessity, need for prioritizing, personal experience, attention to family needs, holistic health outlook, preference for comfort, freedom of choice, and beliefs about the proper role of government. Participants found the exercise very easy (59%) or fairly easy (39%) to understand and very informative (66%) or

  5. Latest advances in confocal microscopy of skin cancers toward guiding patient care: a Mohs surgeon's review and perspective (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nehal, Kishwer S.; Rajadhyaksha, Milind

    2016-02-01

    Latest advances in confocal microscopy of skin cancers toward guiding patient care: a Mohs surgeon's review and perspective About 350 publications worldwide have reported the ability of reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) imaging to detect melanocytic skin lesions in vivo with specificity of 84-88% and sensitivity of 71-92%, and non-melanocytic skin lesions with specificity of 85-97% and sensitivity 100-92%. Lentigo maligna melanoma can be detected with sensitivity of 93% and specificity 82%. While the sensitivity is comparable to that of dermoscopy, the specificity is 2X superior, especially for lightly- and non-pigmented lesions. Dermoscopy combined with RCM imaging is proving to be both highly sensitive and highly specific. Recent studies have reported that the ratio of equivocal (i.e., would have been biopsied) lesions to detected melanomas dropped by ~2X when guided by dermoscopy and RCM imaging, compared to that with dermoscopy alone. Dermoscopy combined with RCM imaging is now being implemented to guide noninvasive diagnosis (to rule out malignancy and biopsy) and to also guide treatment, with promising initial impact: thus far, about 3,000 patients have been saved from biopsies of benign lesions. These are currently under follow-up monitoring. With fluorescence confocal microscopy (FCM) mosaicing, residual basal cell carcinomas can be detected in Mohs surgically excised fresh tissue ex vivo, with sensitivity of 94-97% and specificity 89-94%. FCM mosaicing is now being implemented for guiding Mohs surgery. To date, about 600 Mohs procedures have been performed, guided with mosaicing, and with pathology being performed in parallel to confirm the final outcome. These latest advances demonstrate the promising ability of RCM and FCM to guide patient care.

  6. [Advances in metabolic and nutritional management of patients in critical care].

    PubMed

    Hasebe, M; Suzuki, H; Nakatani, T; Kobayashi, K

    1999-07-01

    Nutritional management often fails in critically ill patients such as trauma and sepsis because of their acutely progressive malnutrition and metabolic derangement being characteristic of such clinical settings. Nutritional strategies for these patients have been almost established by the methods of clinical epidemiology. A considerable amount of clinical evidences suggests that the following should be of benefit for the patients, enteral delivery of nutrition, a nutrition assessment including metabolic evaluation such as liver function or energy requirements, and supplementation of specialty nutrients. Our current data suggest that the metabolic evaluation should include measurement of energy expenditure, assessment of hepatic mitochondrial function, and measurement of the magnitude of body water deviations. Energy expenditure and hepatic mitochondrial function can be observed by the methods of indirect calorimetry and arterial ketone body measurement, respectively. These parameters are helpful to prevent overfeeding from the patients. We emphasize that application of a new method, body impedance spectrum analysis, is important and useful to evaluate the change of body water distributions resulting from metabolic derangement. PMID:10481846

  7. Patient-centered Care.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, April

    2009-01-01

    Patient-centered care focuses on the patient and the individual's particular health care needs. The goal of patient-centered health care is to empower patients to become active participants in their care. This requires that physicians, radiologic technologists and other health care providers develop good communication skills and address patient needs effectively. Patient-centered care also requires that the health care provider become a patient advocate and strive to provide care that not only is effective but also safe. For radiologic technologists, patient-centered care encompasses principles such as the as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) concept and contrast media safety. Patient-centered care is associated with a higher rate of patient satisfaction, adherence to suggested lifestyle changes and prescribed treatment, better outcomes and more cost-effective care. This article is a Directed Reading. Your access to Directed Reading quizzes for continuing education credit is determined by your area of interest. For access to other quizzes, go to www.asrt.org/store. According to one theory, most patients judge the quality of their healthcare much like they rate an airplane flight. They assume that the airplane is technically viable and is being piloted by competent people. Criteria for judging a particular airline are personal and include aspects like comfort, friendly service and on-time schedules. Similarly, patients judge the standard of their healthcare on nontechnical aspects, such as a healthcare practitioner's communication and "soft skills." Most are unable to evaluate a practitioner's level of technical skill or training, so the qualities they can assess become of the utmost importance in satisfying patients and providing patient-centered care.(1). PMID:19901351

  8. Collaboration and entanglement: An actor-network theory analysis of team-based intraprofessional care for patients with advanced heart failure.

    PubMed

    McDougall, A; Goldszmidt, M; Kinsella, E A; Smith, S; Lingard, L

    2016-09-01

    Despite calls for more interprofessional and intraprofessional team-based approaches in healthcare, we lack sufficient understanding of how this happens in the context of patient care teams. This multi-perspective, team-based interview study examined how medical teams negotiated collaborative tensions. From 2011 to 2013, 50 patients across five sites in three Canadian provinces were interviewed about their care experiences and were asked to identify members of their health care teams. Patient-identified team members were subsequently interviewed to form 50 "Team Sampling Units" (TSUs), consisting of 209 interviews with patients, caregivers and healthcare providers. Results are gathered from a focused analysis of 13 TSUs where intraprofessional collaborative tensions involved treating fluid overload, or edema, a common HF symptom. Drawing on actor-network theory (ANT), the analysis focused on intraprofessional collaboration between specialty care teams in cardiology and nephrology. The study found that despite a shared narrative of common purpose between cardiology teams and nephrology teams, fluid management tools and techniques formed sites of collaborative tension. In particular, care activities involved asynchronous clinical interpretations, geographically distributed specialist care, fragmented forms of communication, and uncertainty due to clinical complexity. Teams 'disentangled' fluid in order to focus on its physiological function and mobilisation. Teams also used distinct 'framings' of fluid management that created perceived collaborative tensions. This study advances collaborative entanglement as a conceptual framework for understanding, teaching, and potentially ameliorating some of the tensions that manifest during intraprofessional care for patients with complex, chronic disease. PMID:27490299

  9. The Real-World Problem of Care Coordination: A Longitudinal Qualitative Study with Patients Living with Advanced Progressive Illness and Their Unpaid Caregivers

    PubMed Central

    Daveson, Barbara A.; Harding, Richard; Shipman, Cathy; Mason, Bruce L.; Epiphaniou, Eleni; Higginson, Irene J.; Ellis-Smith, Clare; Henson, Lesley; Munday, Dan; Nanton, Veronica; Dale, Jeremy R.; Boyd, Kirsty; Worth, Allison; Barclay, Stephen; Donaldson, Anne; Murray, Scott

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To develop a model of care coordination for patients living with advanced progressive illness and their unpaid caregivers, and to understand their perspective regarding care coordination. Design A prospective longitudinal, multi-perspective qualitative study involving a case-study approach. Methods Serial in-depth interviews were conducted, transcribed verbatim and then analyzed through open and axial coding in order to construct categories for three cases (sites). This was followed by continued thematic analysis to identify underlying conceptual coherence across all cases in order to produce one coherent care coordination model. Participants Fifty-six purposively sampled patients and 27 case-linked unpaid caregivers. Settings Three cases from contrasting primary, secondary and tertiary settings within Britain. Results Coordination is a deliberate cross-cutting action that involves high-quality, caring and well-informed staff, patients and unpaid caregivers who must work in partnership together across health and social care settings. For coordination to occur, it must be adequately resourced with efficient systems and services that communicate. Patients and unpaid caregivers contribute substantially to the coordination of their care, which is sometimes volunteered at a personal cost to them. Coordination is facilitated through flexible and patient-centered care, characterized by accurate and timely information communicated in a way that considers patients’ and caregivers’ needs, preferences, circumstances and abilities. Conclusions Within the midst of advanced progressive illness, coordination is a shared and complex intervention involving relational, structural and information components. Our study is one of the first to extensively examine patients’ and caregivers’ views about coordination, thus aiding conceptual fidelity. These findings can be used to help avoid oversimplifying a real-world problem, such as care coordination. Avoiding

  10. [Advance directives, a tool to humanize care].

    PubMed

    Olmari-Ebbing, M; Zumbach, C N; Forest, M I; Rapin, C H

    2000-07-01

    The relationship between the patient and a medical care giver is complex specially as it implies to the human, juridical and practical points of view. It depends on legal and deontological considerations, but also on professional habits. Today, we are confronted to a fundamental modification of this relationship. Professional guidelines exist, but are rarely applied and rarely taught in universities. However, patients are eager to move from a paternalistic relationship to a true partnership, more harmonious and more respectful of individual values ("value based medicine"). Advance directives give us an opportunity to improve our practices and to provide care consistent with the needs and wishes of each patient. PMID:10967645

  11. Periprocedural Patient Care.

    PubMed

    Kohi, Maureen P; Fidelman, Nicholas; Behr, Spencer; Taylor, Andrew G; Kolli, Kanti; Conrad, Miles; Hwang, Gloria; Weinstein, Stefanie

    2015-10-01

    Periprocedural care of patients who undergo image-guided interventions is a task of monumental importance. As physicians who perform procedures, radiologists rely on their noninterpretive skills to optimize patient care. At the center of periprocedural care is proper patient identification. It is imperative to perform the indicated procedure for the correct patient. It is also of great importance to discuss with the patient the nature of the procedure. This conversation should include the indications, risks, benefits, alternatives, and potential complications of the procedure. Once the patient agrees to the procedure and grants informed consent, it is imperative to stop and confirm that the correct procedure is being performed on the correct patient. This universal time-out policy helps decrease errors and improves patient care. To optimize our interpretative and procedural skills, it may be necessary to provide the patient with sedation or anesthesia. However, it is important to understand the continuum of sedation and be able to appropriately monitor the patient and manage the sedation in these patients. To minimize the risks of infection, periprocedural care of patients relies on aseptic or, at times, sterile techniques. Before the procedure, it is important to evaluate the patient's coagulation parameters and bleeding risks and correct the coagulopathy, if needed. During the procedure, the patient's blood pressure and at times the patient's glucose levels will also require monitoring and management. After the procedure, patients must be observed in a recovery unit and deemed safe for discharge. The fundamental components of periprocedural care necessary to enhance patient safety, satisfaction, and care are reviewed to familiarize the reader with the important noninterpretive skills necessary to optimize periprocedural care. PMID:26466184

  12. Patient care in radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Ehrlich, R.A.; McCloskey, E.D.

    1989-01-01

    This book focuses on patient care procedures for radiographers. The authors focus on the role of the radiographer as a member of the health care team. The authors report on such topics as communication in patient care: safety, medico-legal considerations, transfer and positioning; physical needs; infection control; medication; CPR standards, acute situations; examination of the GI tract; contrast media; special imaging techniques and bedside radiography.

  13. Advances in prehospital trauma care

    PubMed Central

    Williamson, Kelvin; Ramesh, Ramaiah; Grabinsky, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    Prehospital trauma care developed over the last decades parallel in many countries. Most of the prehospital emergency medical systems relied on input or experiences from military medicine and were often modeled after the existing military procedures. Some systems were initially developed with the trauma patient in mind, while other systems were tailored for medical, especially cardiovascular, emergencies. The key components to successful prehospital trauma care are the well-known ABCs of trauma care: Airway, Breathing, Circulation. Establishing and securing the airway, ventilation, fluid resuscitation, and in addition, the quick transport to the best-suited trauma center represent the pillars of trauma care in the field. While ABC in trauma care has neither been challenged nor changed, new techniques, tools and procedures have been developed to make it easier for the prehospital provider to achieve these goals in the prehospital setting and thus improve the outcome of trauma patients. PMID:22096773

  14. Information retrieval for patient care.

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, M.

    1997-01-01

    Doctors need clinical information during most consultations with patients, and much of this need could be satisfied by material from online sources. Advances in data communication technologies mean that multimedia information can be transported rapidly to various clinical care locations. However, selecting the few items of information likely to be useful in a particular clinical situation from the mass of information available is a major problem. Current information retrieval systems are designed primarily for use in research rather than clinical care. The design, implementation, and critical evaluation of new information retrieval systems for clinical care should be guided by knowledgeable clinical users. PMID:9099122

  15. Not that way: Advance Care Planning

    PubMed Central

    How, Choon How; Koh, Lip Hoe

    2015-01-01

    Advance Care Planning (ACP) is a process of discussion of healthcare decisions with regard to a patient’s future health and personal care, should they become unable to make or communicate their own decisions in the future. ACP can be as simple as a chat about the patient’s end-of-life wishes with their trusted loved ones, and may involve their doctors, organisations and trained facilitators. The process can be documented with available online resources, such as structured tools. Family physicians, with whom patients share unique therapeutic relationships, are in the best position to introduce and start the ACP conversation with their patients. PMID:25640095

  16. An Online Learning Module to Increase Self-Efficacy and Involvement in Care for Patients With Advanced Lung Cancer: Research Protocol

    PubMed Central

    Nagrial, Adnan; Pene, Christopher; Rabbets, Melanie; Carlino, Matteo; Zachulski, Clare; Phillips, Jane; Birnbaum, Robert; Gandhi, Tejal; Harnett, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Background Improving patient care for individuals with lung cancer is a priority due to the increasing burden of the disease globally. One way this can be done is by improving patient self-management capabilities through increasing their self-efficacy. This can improve positive outcomes for patients with chronic conditions and increase their ability to manage the challenges of such illnesses. Unfortunately, patients with chronic conditions often struggle to travel far from home to engage with patient education events, a common means of improving self-efficacy. The development of more accessible tools for improving patient self-efficacy is required to increase quality of life for patients with chronic conditions. Objective To evaluate the feasibility of delivering symptom identification and management information to patients with advanced lung cancer using an online program. Methods This article describes a pre-post test study to evaluate a Qstream online learning platform to improve patient self-efficacy for managing advanced lung cancer symptoms. Undertaking this program should increase participant knowledge about the side-effects they may experience as a result of their treatment and in turn increase help-seeking behavior and self-efficacy for the participant cohort. Quantitative data collected by the Qstream platform on the completion rates of participants will be used as a tool to evaluate the intervention. Additionally, validated scales will be used to collect data on patient self-efficacy. Qualitative data will also be collected via an exit survey and thematic content analysis of semi-structured interviews. Results The research is in the preliminary stages but thus far a protocol has been approved in support of the project. Additionally, advisory committee members have been identified and initial meetings have been undertaken. Conclusions Development of new approaches for increasing patient understanding of their care is important to ensure high quality care

  17. Phase 2 Randomised Controlled Trial and Feasibility Study of Future Care Planning in Patients with Advanced Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    Denvir, Martin A; Cudmore, Sarah; Highet, Gill; Robertson, Shirley; Donald, Lisa; Stephen, Jacqueline; Haga, Kristin; Hogg, Karen; Weir, Christopher J; Murray, Scott A; Boyd, Kirsty

    2016-01-01

    Future Care Planning (FCP) rarely occurs in patients with heart disease until close to death by which time the potential benefits are lost. We assessed the feasibility, acceptability and tested a design of a randomised trial evaluating the impact of FCP in patients and carers. 50 patients hospitalised with acute heart failure or acute coronary syndrome and with predicted 12 month mortality risk of >20% were randomly allocated to FCP or usual care for 12 weeks upon discharge and then crossed-over for the next 12 weeks. Quality of life, symptoms and anxiety/distress were assessed by questionnaire. Hospitalisation and mortality events were documented for 6 months post-discharge. FCP increased implementation and documentation of key decisions linked to end-of-life care. FCP did not increase anxiety/distress (Kessler score -E 16.7 (7.0) vs D 16.8 (7.3), p = 0.94). Quality of life was unchanged (EQ5D: E 0.54(0.29) vs D 0.56(0.24), p = 0.86) while unadjusted hospitalised nights was lower (E 8.6 (15.3) vs D 11.8 (17.1), p = 0.01). Qualitative interviews indicated that FCP was highly valued by patients, carers and family physicians. FCP is feasible in a randomised clinical trial in patients with acute high risk cardiac conditions. A Phase 3 trial is needed urgently. PMID:27090299

  18. Phase 2 Randomised Controlled Trial and Feasibility Study of Future Care Planning in Patients with Advanced Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Denvir, Martin A.; Cudmore, Sarah; Highet, Gill; Robertson, Shirley; Donald, Lisa; Stephen, Jacqueline; Haga, Kristin; Hogg, Karen; Weir, Christopher J.; Murray, Scott A.; Boyd, Kirsty

    2016-01-01

    Future Care Planning (FCP) rarely occurs in patients with heart disease until close to death by which time the potential benefits are lost. We assessed the feasibility, acceptability and tested a design of a randomised trial evaluating the impact of FCP in patients and carers. 50 patients hospitalised with acute heart failure or acute coronary syndrome and with predicted 12 month mortality risk of >20% were randomly allocated to FCP or usual care for 12 weeks upon discharge and then crossed-over for the next 12 weeks. Quality of life, symptoms and anxiety/distress were assessed by questionnaire. Hospitalisation and mortality events were documented for 6 months post-discharge. FCP increased implementation and documentation of key decisions linked to end-of-life care. FCP did not increase anxiety/distress (Kessler score -E 16.7 (7.0) vs D 16.8 (7.3), p = 0.94). Quality of life was unchanged (EQ5D: E 0.54(0.29) vs D 0.56(0.24), p = 0.86) while unadjusted hospitalised nights was lower (E 8.6 (15.3) vs D 11.8 (17.1), p = 0.01). Qualitative interviews indicated that FCP was highly valued by patients, carers and family physicians. FCP is feasible in a randomised clinical trial in patients with acute high risk cardiac conditions. A Phase 3 trial is needed urgently. PMID:27090299

  19. Progressive Care of Obese Patients.

    PubMed

    Dambaugh, Lori A; Ecklund, Margaret M

    2016-08-01

    Obese patients have complex needs that complicate their care during hospitalization. These patients often have comorbid conditions, including hypertension, heart failure, obstructive sleep apnea, pressure ulcers, and difficulty with mobility. Obese patients may be well served in the progressive care setting because they may require more intensive nursing care than can be delivered in a general care unit. Progressive care nurses have core competencies that enable them to safely and effectively care for obese patients. A plan of care with interdisciplinary collaboration illustrates the integrative care for obese progressive care patients. (Critical Care Nurse 2016; 36[4]:58-63). PMID:27481802

  20. Advance Care Planning for Serious Illness

    MedlinePlus

    ... conversations Caring Connections National Hospice and Palliative Care Organization Links to every state’s advance care directive forms http: / / www. caringinfo. org/ i4a/ pages/ index. cfm? ...

  1. Advances in caring for the older cancer patient: a report from the 2015 conference of the International Society of Geriatric Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Stepney, Rob

    2016-01-01

    A paradox in cancer research is that the majority of patients enrolled in clinical trials are relatively young and fit while typical patients in daily practice are elderly and have comorbidities and impaired organ function. Given these differences, many major studies provide an imperfect guide to optimizing the treatment of the majority of patients. Since cancer incidence is highly correlated with age, and since the world's population is rapidly ageing, this problem can only increase. For this reason, oncologists and geriatricians need to collaborate in developing tools to systematically assess the health status of elderly patients and their fitness to receive cancer therapies of various intensity. Tailoring anti-cancer treatments and supportive care to individual needs should be seen as part of the move towards personalized medicine. Achieving this goal is as much of a challenge to developing and middle-income countries as it is to western nations. The 2015 annual conference of the International Society of Geriatric Oncology (SIOG) held in Prague, Czech Republic, November 2015 and had a global focus on advancing the science of geriatric oncology and supportive care. Central to this approach is the systematic assessment of life expectancy, independent functioning, and the physical and psychological health of older cancer patients. The assumption behind comprehensive geriatric assessment is that elderly cancer patients have complex needs. The implication is that effective intervention will require a multidisciplinary team. Examples of effective geriatric assessment, multidisciplinary working and supportive care were presented at the SIOG conference.

  2. [Physician-assisted suicide and advance care planning--ethical considerations on the autonomy of dementia patients at their end of life].

    PubMed

    Gather, Jakov; Vollmann, Jochen

    2014-10-01

    Physician-assisted suicide (PAS), which is currently the subject of intense and controversial discussion in medical ethics, is barely discussed in psychiatry, albeit there are already dementia patients in Germany and other European countries who end their own lives with the assistance of physicians. Based on the finding that patients who ask for medical assistance in suicide often have in mind the loss of their mental capacity, we submit PAS to an ethical analysis and put it into a broader context of patient autonomy at the end of life. In doing so, we point to advance care planning, through which the patient autonomy of the person concerned can be supported as well as respected in later stages of the disease. If patients adhere to their autonomous wish for PAS, physicians find themselves in an ethical dilemma. A further tabooing of the topic, however, does not provide a solution; rather, an open societal and professional ethical discussion and regulation are essential. PMID:25068685

  3. FAmily CEntered (FACE) advance care planning: Study design and methods for a patient-centered communication and decision-making intervention for patients with HIV/AIDS and their surrogate decision-makers

    PubMed Central

    Kimmel, Allison L.; Wang, Jichuan; Scott, Rachel; Briggs, Linda; Lyon, Maureen E.

    2016-01-01

    Although the Human Immunodeficiency Virus/Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (HIV/AIDS) has become a chronic illness, disease-specific advance care planning has not yet been evaluated for the palliative care needs of adults with HIV/AIDS. This prospective, longitudinal, randomized, two-arm controlled clinical trial aims to test the efficacy of FAmily CEntered Advance Care Planning among adults living with AIDS and/or HIV with co-morbidities on congruence in treatment preferences, healthcare utilization, and quality of life. The FAmily CEntered intervention arm is two face-to-face sessions with a trained, certified facilitator: Session 1) Disease-Specific Advance Care Planning Respecting Choices Interview; Session 2) Completion of advance directive. The Healthy Living control arm is: Session 1) Developmental/Relationship History; Session 2) Nutrition. Follow-up data will be collected at 3, 6, 12, and 18-month post-intervention. A total of 288 patient/surrogate dyads will be enrolled from five hospital-based, out-patient clinics in Washington, District of Columbia. Participants will be HIV positive and ≥21 years of age; surrogates will be ≥18 years of age. Exclusion criteria are homicidality, suicidality, psychosis, and impaired cognitive functioning. We hypothesize that this intervention will enhance patient-centered communication with a surrogate decision-maker about end of life treatment preferences over time, enhance patient quality of life and decrease health care utilization. We further hypothesize that this intervention will decrease health disparities for Blacks in completion of advance directives. If proposed aims are achieved, the benefits of palliative care, particularly increased treatment preferences about end-of-life care and enhanced quality of life, will be extended to people living with AIDS. PMID:26044463

  4. Advanced Directives and Advanced Care Planning for Healthcare Professionals.

    PubMed

    Booth, Adam T; Lehna, Carlee

    2016-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to assess healthcare professionals' need for information on advanced directives and to implement and evaluate an educational plan for change in knowledge and behaviors related to advanced directives. End-of-life (EOL) care is an important topic for patients to discuss with their families and healthcare professionals (HP). Needs assessment data were collected from healthcare providers at an urban trauma intensive care unit (ICU) in Louisville, Kentucky on concepts related to end-of-life. Next, healthcare professionals participated in an educational intervention focused on: knowledge about advanced directives; communication techniques for healthcare professionals to use with patients and their families; awareness of the patient's level of illness in advanced care planning; and specifics about living wills in Kentucky and how to complete one. Pre- and post-test data were collected to evaluate change in knowledge, capability an average of 8.7 years (SD = 9.1; range = 1.9-35 years) in healthcare and worked an average of 8.4 years (SD = 9.3; range = 4 months to 35 years) in their respective ICUs. Eighty-seven percent did not have an AD in place even though their perceived knowledge about AD remained moderate throughout pre- and post-test scores (3.3 to 3.8 on a 5 point scale, respectively). Total post-test scores revealed a 2% improvement in correct responses. These findings point to the need for education of healthcare providers in the ICU to increase early AD and ACP discussions with patients and their families. PMID:27183766

  5. Development of an interactive computer program for advance care planning

    PubMed Central

    Green, Michael J.; Levi, Benjamin H.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To describe the development of an innovative, multimedia decision aid for advance care planning. Background Advance care planning is an important way for people to articulate their wishes for medical care when they are not able to speak for themselves. Living wills and other types of advance directives are the most commonly used tools for advance care planning, but have been criticized for being vague, difficult to interpret, and inconsistent with individuals’ core beliefs and values. Results We developed a multimedia, computer-based decision aid for advance care planning (‘Making Your Wishes Known: Planning Your Medical Future’) to overcome many of the limitations of standard advance directive forms. This computer program guides individuals through the process of advance care planning, and unlike standard advance directives, provides tailored education, values clarification exercises, and a decision-making tool that translates an individual’s values and preferences into a specific medical plan that can be implemented by a health-care team. Pilot testing with 50 adult volunteers recruited from an outpatient primary care clinic showed high levels of satisfaction with the program. Further pilot testing with 34 cancer patients indicated that the program was perceived to be highly accurate at representing patients’ wishes. Conclusions This paper describes the development of an innovative decision aid for advance care planning that was designed to overcome common problems with standard advance directives. Preliminary testing suggests that it is acceptable to users and is accurate. PMID:18823445

  6. A randomised controlled trial on the efficacy of advance care planning on the quality of end-of-life care and communication in patients with COPD: the research protocol

    PubMed Central

    Houben, Carmen H M; Spruit, Martijn A; Wouters, Emiel F M; Janssen, Daisy J A

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Recent research shows that advance care planning (ACP) for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is uncommon and poorly carried out. The aim of the present study was to explore whether and to what extent structured ACP by a trained nurse, in collaboration with the chest physician, can improve outcomes in Dutch patients with COPD and their family. Methods and analysis A multicentre cluster randomised controlled trial in patients with COPD who are recently discharged after an exacerbation has been designed. Patients will be recruited from three Dutch hospitals and will be assigned to an intervention or control group, depending on the randomisation of their chest physician. Patients will be assessed at baseline and after 6 and 12 months. The intervention group will receive a structured ACP session by a trained nurse. The primary outcomes are quality of communication about end-of-life care, symptoms of anxiety and depression, quality of end-of-life care and quality of dying. Secondary outcomes include concordance between patient's preferences for end-of-life care and received end-of-life care, and psychological distress in bereaved family members of deceased patients. Intervention and control groups will be compared using univariate analyses and clustered regression analysis. Ethics and dissemination Ethical approval was received from the Medical Ethical Committee of the Catharina Hospital Eindhoven, the Netherlands (NL42437.060.12). The current project provides recommendations for guidelines on palliative care in COPD and supports implementation of ACP in the regular clinical care. Clinical trial registration number NTR3940. PMID:24384905

  7. [Nurses' knowledge about the health care proxy and advance directives].

    PubMed

    Georget, Jean-Philippe; Cecire-Denoyer, Catherine

    2015-06-01

    The Basse-Normandie palliative care nurses' group carried out a survey regarding nurses' knowledge of the health care proxy and advance directives. The study revealed a lack of connection between these two arrangements, poor knowledge about advance directives but an understanding of the role of the health care proxy. How, therefore, can patients be effectively informed? How should they be supported in this process of determining themselves the conditions of their end of life? PMID:26146326

  8. Advance care planning in South Korea: Social work perspective.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Sung Ae; Kolomer, Stacey

    2016-08-01

    As ethical issues arise concerning the continuation of futile medical treatment for dying patients in Korean society, advance directive planning initiatives have been put into place to guide practice. This article describes the awareness and attitudes of social workers in Korea regarding advance care planning and related factors. A total of 246 gerontological/geriatric social workers completed a mailed or in-person survey regarding awareness and attitudes toward advance care planning. Seventy-three percent (n = 180) of the participants reported no knowledge of advance directives. Social workers who emphasized self-determination as a professional value, professed a preference for hospice care, and who were comfortable discussing death were more likely to have a positive attitudes toward advance care planning. This study reinforces the need for the infusion of advance care planning and end-of-life training in social work education in Korea. PMID:27428654

  9. Palliative Care in Advanced Lung Disease: The Challenge of Integrating Palliation Into Everyday Care.

    PubMed

    Rocker, Graeme M; Simpson, A Catherine; Horton, Robert

    2015-09-01

    The tendency toward "either/or" thinking (either cure or comfort) in traditional biomedical care paradigms does little to optimize care in advancing chronic illness. Calls for improved palliation in chronic lung disease mandate a review of related care gaps and current clinical practices. Although specialist palliative services have their advocates, adding yet another element to an already fragmented, often complex, care paradigm can be a challenge. Instead, we propose a more holistic, patient-centered approach based on elements fundamental to palliative and best care practices generally and integrated as needed across the entire illness trajectory. To support this approach, we review the concept of primary palliative care competencies, identify vulnerability specific to those living with advanced COPD (an exemplar of chronic lung disease), and describe the need for care plans shaped by patient-centered communication, timely palliative responsiveness, and effective advance care planning. A costly systemic issue in the management of chronic lung disease is patients' increasing dependency on episodic ED care to deal with preventable episodic crises and refractory dyspnea. We address this issue as part of a proposed model of care that provides proactive, collaborative case management and the appropriate and carefully monitored use of opioids. We encourage and support a renewed primary care resolve to integrate palliative approaches to care in advanced lung disease that, in concert with judicious referral to appropriate specialist palliative care services, is fundamental to what should be a more sustainable systematic improvement in palliative care delivery. PMID:25742140

  10. Endocrine profile of β-thalassemia major patients followed from childhood to advanced adulthood in a tertiary care center

    PubMed Central

    De Sanctis, Vincenzo; Elsedfy, Heba; Soliman, Ashraf T.; Elhakim, Ihab Zaki; Soliman, Nada A.; Elalaily, Rania; Kattamis, Christos

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Chronic iron overload resulting from frequent transfusions, poor compliance to efficient chelation therapy and chronic liver disease is basically responsible for the most severe complications of thalassemia major (TM). Before conventional treatment, TM was entirely childhood disease with a very short survival. Today, survival improved to 40–50 years and becomes a prevalent disease of adulthood and in the near future it will be one of senility. Furthermore, clinical phenotype of TM is changing with age and appearance of severe complications from the heart and endocrine glands that require special health care from well-informed specialists. Objectives: The aims of our study were to: (1) Imprint the clinical profile of long-lived TM patients; (2) evaluate retrospectively the cumulative incidence of endocrine diseases; (3) identify potential risk factors; and (4) orient the physicians in the modified clinical phenotype and the relative patients' health needs. Design: A retrospective cross-sectional study followed from childhood to adulthood by the same physician in a tertiary thalassemia clinic. Participants: Forty-three long-lived TM patients (mean age: 50.3 ± 10.8 years; range: 45.8–59.5 years; 23 females) were studied. Patients and Methods: An extensive medical history, with detailed clinical and laboratory data, endocrine complications, and current treatments, was obtained. Results: The data indicate that 88.4% of adult TM patients suffered from at least one endocrine complication. The majority of patients developed endocrine complications in the second decade of life when serum ferritin level was very high (12/23 TM female and 8/20 TM male patients, the serum ferritin levels at the diagnosis were above 5.000 ng/ml). Conclusions: These data underline that endocrine and bone complications in adult TM patients are highly prevalent and necessitate close monitoring, treatment, and follow-up. Physicians' strategies to optimize chelation therapy include

  11. Patient navigation through the cancer care continuum: an overview.

    PubMed

    Hopkins, Janice; Mumber, Matthew P

    2009-07-01

    Technologic advances, medical specialization, novel payment structures, and an increased scientific knowledge base have resulted in a health care system requiring trained experts to deliver guidance as patients complete care plans: Enter the concept of patient navigation. PMID:20856626

  12. Advances in bypassing agent therapy for hemophilia patients with inhibitors to close care gaps and improve outcomes.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, Amy D; Hedner, Ulla

    2011-10-01

    In the past, patients with hemophilia and inhibitors have had less-than-optimal treatment and have experienced more orthopedic complications than patients without inhibitors. Bypassing agents offer the potential to close treatment gaps between inhibitor and noninhibitor patients by helping the former better attain key treatment goals, including: facilitating early initiation of treatment and hemostatic control in hemarthroses; providing effective treatment in serious hemorrhagic episodes; and performance of major surgery. Effective treatment with a bypassing agent minimizes joint and/or muscle damage and potentially can serve as an effective prophylactic agent to minimize the number of hemarthroses experienced per year, thereby mitigating the development of arthropathy. The reported efficacy of the currently available bypassing agents ranges from approximately 50-80% (50-64% in controlled studies) for plasma-derived activated prothrombin complex concentrate (pd-aPCC) and 81-91% (in controlled studies) for recombinant activated factor VII (rFVIIa), including use in major orthopedic surgery. Both bypassing agents have undergone key improvements in their formulation and/or properties in recent years. The nanofiltered, vapor-heated formulation of pd-aPCC has diminished the risk of acquiring blood-borne viral infections and the room temperature stable formulation of rFVIIa allows more convenient storage, increased ease to dissolve and inject, and smaller volumes, thereby increasing overall ease of administration. Use of recommended dosing has been demonstrated to provide effective hemostasis with a minimal number of injections for both agents. In this paper, we review the individual characteristics of pd-aPCC and rFVIIa and discuss clinical data from studies conducted in inhibitor patients that demonstrate the potential benefits of these bypassing agents in this difficult-to-treat population, and underscore the potential opportunities to close the gap in care between

  13. [Palliative care needs in advanced chronic illness].

    PubMed

    Tripodoro, Vilma A; Rynkiewicz, María C; Llanos, Victoria; Padova, Susana; De Lellis, Silvina; De Simone, Gustavo

    2016-01-01

    About 75% of population will die from one or more chronic progressive diseases. From this projection WHO urged countries to devise strategies for strengthening palliative treatment as part of comprehensive care. In Catalonia, Spain, direct measurement of the prevalence of these patients with NECPAL CCOMS-ICO© tool was 1.5% of the population. This tool is an indicative, not dichotomous, quali-quantitative multifactorial evaluation to be completed by the treating physician. In Argentina there is no information on these patients. Our goal was to explore and characterize the proportion of chronically ill patients in palliative care needs, by NECPAL CCOMS-ICO© tool, in an accessible population of the City of Buenos Aires. General hospitals of the Health Region 2 (Piñero, álvarez and Santojanni) and its program areas were surveyed. In Health Region 1, we surveyed the Udaondo gastroenterology hospital. A total of 53 physicians (704 patients) were interviewed. It was identified that 29.5% of these patients were affected by advanced chronic diseases; 72.1% of them were NECPAL positive, younger (median 64) than in others studies, and more than 98% presented high levels of comorbidity. Palliative care demand (31.4%) and needs (52.7%) were recorded. Specific indicators of fragility, progression, severity and kind of chronic disease were described. The main finding was to identify, with an instrument not based on mortality that, in Buenos Aires City, 1 in 3 patients with chronic diseases could die in the next year and had palliative care needs. PMID:27295702

  14. Training Advanced Practice Palliative Care Nurses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherman, Deborah Witt

    1999-01-01

    Describes the role and responsibilities of advanced-practice nurses in palliative care and nursing's initiative in promoting high-quality care through the educational preparation of these nurses. (JOW)

  15. End-of-life care in advanced dementia.

    PubMed

    Heron, Christopher R; Simmons, B Brent

    2014-10-01

    In the next 30 years, the average age of the population will continue to increase, as will the prevalence of dementia. The management of advanced dementia requires the careful orchestration of communication, prognostication, patient care, and caregiver education. Understanding the specific tools available to establish prognosis and guide medical management in these complicated medical patients greatly improves patient and caregiver satisfaction at the end of the patient's life. In caring for patients with advanced-stage dementia, providers should be knowledgeable regarding the terminal nature of the condition and its common comorbid diseases, and should be prepared to educate the patients' caregivers, building a structure of support for the patient's benefit and navigating the complexities of end-of-life care. PMID:25414940

  16. Managing lymphoedema in palliative care patients.

    PubMed

    Todd, Marie

    The development of lymphoedema in advanced disease is distressing for patients and their carers and can prove difficult to manage for health-care professionals involved in their care. This article will provide an overview of co-morbidities that cancer patients face that will have an impact on the development, progression or management of lymphoedema. The principles of assessing and managing lymphoedema in palliative care patients is presented, based on the Scottish governments action plan Living and Dying Well. The need for collaboration with other members of the multi-disciplinary team to provide the seamless, patient-centred service advocated in this action plan is also presented. PMID:19377392

  17. Barriers to Advance Care Planning in Cancer, Heart Failure and Dementia Patients: A Focus Group Study on General Practitioners' Views and Experiences

    PubMed Central

    De Vleminck, Aline; Pardon, Koen; Beernaert, Kim; Deschepper, Reginald; Houttekier, Dirk; Van Audenhove, Chantal; Deliens, Luc; Vander Stichele, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Background The long-term and often lifelong relationship of general practitioners (GPs) with their patients is considered to make them the ideal initiators of advance care planning (ACP). However, in general the incidence of ACP discussions is low and ACP seems to occur more often for cancer patients than for those with dementia or heart failure. Objective To identify the barriers, from GPs' perspective, to initiating ACP and to gain insight into any differences in barriers between the trajectories of patients with cancer, heart failure and dementia. Method Five focus groups were held with GPs (n = 36) in Flanders, Belgium. The focus group discussions were transcribed verbatim and analyzed using the method of constant comparative analysis. Results Three types of barriers were distinguished: barriers relating to the GP, to the patient and family and to the health care system. In cancer patients, a GP's lack of knowledge about treatment options and the lack of structural collaboration between the GP and specialist were expressed as barriers. Barriers that occured more often with heart failure and dementia were the lack of GP familiarity with the terminal phase, the lack of key moments to initiate ACP, the patient's lack of awareness of their diagnosis and prognosis and the fact that patients did not often initiate such discussions themselves. The future lack of decision-making capacity of dementia patients was reported by the GPs as a specific barrier for the initiation of ACP. Conclusion The results of our study contribute to a better understanding of the factors hindering GPs in initiating ACP. Multiple barriers need to be overcome, of which many can be addressed through the development of practical guidelines and educational interventions. PMID:24465450

  18. Providing Palliative Care to LGBTQ Patients.

    PubMed

    Barrett, Nina; Wholihan, Dorothy

    2016-09-01

    Nurses should be familiar with and equipped to address the challenges that arise when caring for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, or queer-identified (LGBTQ) patients. LGBTQ individuals have increased rates of certain physical diseases and are at greater risk of suffering from stress-sensitive mental health issues. Negative social attitudes, widespread discrimination and stigma, physical and psychological victimization, and less social support with aging contribute to the complexity of care for these individuals. Open communication, welcoming and accepting attitudes and environments, and sensitivity to unique multidimensional issues improve care to LGBTQ patients with serious advanced illness. Nursing can reach this vulnerable minority and positively impact the quality of care. PMID:27497022

  19. Pediatric advance care planning from the perspective of health care professionals: A qualitative interview study

    PubMed Central

    Jox, Ralf J; Borasio, Gian Domenico; Führer, Monika

    2015-01-01

    Background: Pediatric advance care planning differs from the adult setting in several aspects, including patients’ diagnoses, minor age, and questionable capacity to consent. So far, research has largely neglected the professionals’ perspective. Aim: We aimed to investigate the attitudes and needs of health care professionals with regard to pediatric advance care planning. Design: This is a qualitative interview study with experts in pediatric end-of-life care. A qualitative content analysis was performed. Setting/participants: We conducted 17 semi-structured interviews with health care professionals caring for severely ill children/adolescents, from different professions, care settings, and institutions. Results: Perceived problems with pediatric advance care planning relate to professionals’ discomfort and uncertainty regarding end-of-life decisions and advance directives. Conflicts may arise between physicians and non-medical care providers because both avoid taking responsibility for treatment limitations according to a minor’s advance directive. Nevertheless, pediatric advance care planning is perceived as helpful by providing an action plan for everyone and ensuring that patient/parent wishes are respected. Important requirements for pediatric advance care planning were identified as follows: repeated discussions and shared decision-making with the family, a qualified facilitator who ensures continuity throughout the whole process, multi-professional conferences, as well as professional education on advance care planning. Conclusion: Despite a perceived need for pediatric advance care planning, several barriers to its implementation were identified. The results remain to be verified in a larger cohort of health care professionals. Future research should focus on developing and testing strategies for overcoming the existing barriers. PMID:25389347

  20. Benefits of Early Versus Delayed Palliative Care to Informal Family Caregivers of Patients With Advanced Cancer: Outcomes From the ENABLE III Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Dionne-Odom, J. Nicholas; Azuero, Andres; Lyons, Kathleen D.; Hull, Jay G.; Tosteson, Tor; Li, Zhigang; Li, Zhongze; Frost, Jennifer; Dragnev, Konstantin H.; Akyar, Imatullah; Hegel, Mark T.; Bakitas, Marie A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To determine the effect of early versus delayed initiation of a palliative care intervention for family caregivers (CGs) of patients with advanced cancer. Patients and Methods Between October 2010 and March 2013, CGs of patients with advanced cancer were randomly assigned to receive three structured weekly telephone coaching sessions, monthly follow-up, and a bereavement call either early after enrollment or 3 months later. CGs of patients with advanced cancer were recruited from a National Cancer Institute cancer center, a Veterans Administration Medical Center, and two community outreach clinics. Outcomes were quality of life (QOL), depression, and burden (objective, stress, and demand). Results A total of 122 CGs (early, n = 61; delayed, n = 61) of 207 patients participated; average age was 60 years, and most were female (78.7%) and white (92.6%). Between-group differences in depression scores from enrollment to 3 months (before delayed group started intervention) favored the early group (mean difference, −3.4; SE, 1.5; d = −.32; P = .02). There were no differences in QOL (mean difference, −2; SE, 2.3; d = −.13; P = .39) or burden (objective: mean difference, 0.3; SE, .7; d = .09; P = .64; stress: mean difference, −.5; SE, .5; d = −.2; P = .29; demand: mean difference, 0; SE, .7; d = −.01; P = .97). In decedents' CGs, a terminal decline analysis indicated between-group differences favoring the early group for depression (mean difference, −3.8; SE, 1.5; d = −.39; P = .02) and stress burden (mean difference, −1.1; SE, .4; d = −.44; P = .01) but not for QOL (mean difference, −4.9; SE, 2.6; d = −.3; P = .07), objective burden (mean difference, −.6; SE, .6; d = −.18; P = .27), or demand burden (mean difference, −.7; SE, .6; d = −.23; P = .22). Conclusion Early-group CGs had lower depression scores at 3 months and lower depression and stress burden in the terminal decline analysis. Palliative care for CGs should be initiated

  1. Palliative care in patients with heart failure.

    PubMed

    McIlvennan, Colleen K; Allen, Larry A

    2016-01-01

    Despite advances in cardiac therapy, heart failure (HF) remains a progressive, highly symptomatic, and deadly disease that places great demands on patients, caregivers, and healthcare systems. Palliative care is a multidisciplinary approach to care that focuses on communication, shared decision making, and advance care planning; provides relief from pain and other distressing symptoms; integrates psychological and spiritual aspects of care; and offers a support system to help families cope during illness and bereavement. Palliative care has applications across the stages of heart failure, including early in the course of illness, often in conjunction with other therapies that are intended to prolong life. However, the incorporation of palliative care into the management of heart failure has been suboptimal for several reasons: uncertainty in the disease trajectory, failure to reward communication between healthcare providers and patients, siloed care, lack of knowledge, overlay of comorbidity and frailty, life saving devices with complex trade-offs, and a limited evidence base. This review will summarize the current literature on the emerging role of palliative care in patients with heart failure and the challenges and opportunities for its integration into routine care. It will discuss current initiatives and future directions of the collaborative relationship between the palliative care and heart failure disciplines. PMID:27079896

  2. Documentation of Advance Care Planning for Community-Dwelling Elders

    PubMed Central

    Yung, Victoria Y.; Walling, Anne M.; Min, Lillian; Wenger, Neil S.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Advance planning for end-of-life care has gained acceptance, but actual end-of-life care is often incongruent with patients' previously stated goals. We assessed the flow of advance care planning information from patients to medical records in a community sample of older adults to better understand why advance care planning is not more successful. Methods Our study used structured interview and medical record data from community-dwelling older patients in two previous studies: Assessing Care of Vulnerable Elders (ACOVE)-1 (245 patients age ≥65 years and screened for high risk of death/functional decline in 1998–1999) and ACOVE-2 (566 patients age ≥75 who screened positive for falls/mobility disorders, incontinence, and/or dementia in 2002–2003). We compared interview data on patients' preferences, advance directives, and surrogate decision-makers with findings from the medical record. Results In ACOVE-1, 38% of surveyed patients had thought about limiting the aggressiveness of medical care; 24% of surveyed patients stated that they had spoken to their doctor about this. The vast majority of patients (88%–93%) preferred to die rather than remain permanently in a coma, on a ventilator, or tube fed. Regardless of patients' specific preferences, 15%–22% of patients had preference information in their medical record. Among patients who reported that they had completed an advance directive and had given it to their health-care provider, 15% (ACOVE-1) and 47% (ACOVE-2) had advance directive information in the medical record. Among patients who had not completed an advance directive but had given surrogate decision-maker information to their provider, 0% (ACOVE-1) and 16% (ACOVE-2) had documentation of a surrogate decision-maker in the medical record. Conclusions Community-dwelling elders' preferences for end-of-life care are not consistent with documentation in their medical records. Electronic health records and standardized data

  3. Oncology Advanced Practitioners Bring Advanced Community Oncology Care.

    PubMed

    Vogel, Wendy H

    2016-01-01

    Oncology care is becoming increasingly complex. The interprofessional team concept of care is necessary to meet projected oncology professional shortages, as well as to provide superior oncology care. The oncology advanced practitioner (AP) is a licensed health care professional who has completed advanced training in nursing or pharmacy or has completed training as a physician assistant. Oncology APs increase practice productivity and efficiency. Proven to be cost effective, APs may perform varied roles in an oncology practice. Integrating an AP into an oncology practice requires forethought given to the type of collaborative model desired, role expectations, scheduling, training, and mentoring. PMID:27249776

  4. Advance care planning in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Lum, Hillary D; Sudore, Rebecca L; Bekelman, David B

    2015-03-01

    Key components of advance care planning (ACP) for the elderly include choosing a surrogate decision maker, identifying personal values, communicating with surrogates and clinicians, documenting wishes in advance directives, and translating values and preferences for future medical care into medical orders. ACP often involves multiple brief discussions over time. This article outlines common benefits and barriers to ACP in primary care, and provides practical approaches to integrating key ACP components into primary care for older adults. Opportunities for multidisciplinary teams to incorporate ACP into brief clinic visits are highlighted. PMID:25700590

  5. Health care: economic impact of caring for geriatric patients.

    PubMed

    Rich, Preston B; Adams, Sasha D

    2015-02-01

    National health care expenditures constitute a continuously expanding component of the US economy. Health care resources are distributed unequally among the population, and geriatric patients are disproportionately represented. Characterizing this group of individuals that accounts for the largest percentage of US health spending may facilitate the introduction of targeted interventions in key high-impact areas. Changing demographics, an increasing incidence of chronic disease and progressive disability, rapid technological advances, and systemic market failures in the health care sector combine to drive cost. A multidisciplinary approach will become increasingly necessary to balance the delicate relationship between our constrained supply and increasing demand. PMID:25459539

  6. It's just too hard! Australian health care practitioner perspectives on barriers to advance care planning.

    PubMed

    Boddy, Jennifer; Chenoweth, Lesley; McLennan, Vanette; Daly, Michelle

    2013-01-01

    This article presents findings from six focus groups with health care practitioners in an Australian hospital during 2010, which sought to elicit their perspectives on the barriers for people to plan their future health care should they become unwell. Such knowledge is invaluable in overcoming the barriers associated with advance care planning and enhancing the uptake of advance directives and the appointment of an enduring power of attorney for people of all ages. A person's rights to self-determination in health care, including decision making about their wishes for future care in the event they lose cognitive capacity, should not be overlooked against the backdrop of increasing pressure on health care systems. Findings suggest that multiple barriers exist, from practitioners' perspectives, which can be divided into three major categories, namely: patient-centred, practitioner-centred and system-centred barriers. Specifically, patient-centred barriers include lack of knowledge, accessibility concerns, the small 'window of opportunity' to discuss advance care planning, emotional reactions and avoidance when considering one's mortality, and demographic influences. At the practitioner level, barriers relate to a lack of knowledge and uncertainty around advance care planning processes. Systemically, legislative barriers (including a lack of a central registry and conflicting state legislation), procedural issues (particularly in relation to assessing cognitive capacity and making decisions ad hoc) and questions about delegation, roles and responsibilities further compound the barriers to advance care planning. PMID:22951247

  7. Advanced Respite Care: Medically Challenged. Teacher Edition. Respite Care Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Dept. of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    This curriculum guide is designed to help teachers to provide advanced-level training for care providers who want to work with individuals who are chronically or terminally ill and require specialized care. The curriculum contains seven units. Each of the instructional units includes some or all of these basic components: performance objectives,…

  8. Advance care planning and palliative medicine in advanced dementia: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Jethwa, Ketan Dipak; Onalaja, Oluwademilade

    2015-04-01

    Aims and method To assess the factors that affect the clinical use of advanced care planning and palliative care interventions in patients with dementia. A literature search of Medline, Embase and PsycINFO was performed to identify themes in advanced care planning and palliative care in dementia. Results In total, 64 articles were found, including 12 reviews, and three key areas emerged: barriers to advanced care planning, raising awareness and fostering communication between professionals and patients, and disease-specific interventions. Clinical implications Most of the studies analysed were carried out in the USA or Continental Europe. This narrative review aims to help guide future primary research, systematic reviews and service development in the UK. PMID:26191437

  9. Advance care planning and palliative medicine in advanced dementia: a literature review

    PubMed Central

    Jethwa, Ketan Dipak; Onalaja, Oluwademilade

    2015-01-01

    Aims and method To assess the factors that affect the clinical use of advanced care planning and palliative care interventions in patients with dementia. A literature search of Medline, Embase and PsycINFO was performed to identify themes in advanced care planning and palliative care in dementia. Results In total, 64 articles were found, including 12 reviews, and three key areas emerged: barriers to advanced care planning, raising awareness and fostering communication between professionals and patients, and disease-specific interventions. Clinical implications Most of the studies analysed were carried out in the USA or Continental Europe. This narrative review aims to help guide future primary research, systematic reviews and service development in the UK. PMID:26191437

  10. Palliative and supportive care for glioma patients.

    PubMed

    Walbert, Tobias; Chasteen, Kristen

    2015-01-01

    The diagnosis of a brain tumor is a life-changing event for patients and families. High-grade gliomas are incurable and long-term survival remains limited. While low-grade glioma patients have better outcomes, their quality of life is often affected by a variety of symptoms as well. Helping glioma patients improve quality of life at all stages of illness is an important goal for the interdisciplinary care team. There is evidence from advanced lung cancer patients that early involvement of a palliative care team can improve patient's quality of life, symptom burden, and even survival and a similar approach benefits glioma patients as well. Patients with high-grade and low-grade glioma often suffer from significant symptom burden. We discuss how validated global symptom assessments and symptom-specific screening tools are useful to identify distressing symptoms. Seizures, fatigue, depression, and anxiety are some of the more common symptoms throughout the disease course and should be managed actively. Patients with glioma also have high symptom burden at the end of life and the majority lose decision-making capacity. Advance care planning conversations early in the disease course are essential to elicit the patient's wishes for end of life care and effective communication with surrogate decision makers during all stages of the disease helps ensure that those wishes are respected. PMID:25468232

  11. Legal Briefing: Medicare Coverage of Advance Care Planning.

    PubMed

    Pope, Thaddeus Mason

    2015-01-01

    This issue's "Legal Briefing" column covers the recent decision by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) to expand Medicare coverage of advance care planning, beginning 1 January 2016. Since 2009, most "Legal Briefings" in this journal have covered a wide gamut of judicial, legislative, and regulatory developments concerning a particular topic in clinical ethics. In contrast, this "Legal Briefing" is more narrowly focused on one single legal development. This concentration on Medicare coverage of advance care planning seems warranted. Advance care planning is a frequent subject of articles in JCE. After all, it has long been seen as an important, albeit only partial, solution to a significant range of big problems in clinical ethics. These problems range from medical futility disputes to decision making for incapacitated patients who have no available legally authorized surrogate. Consequently, expanded Medicare coverage of advance care planning is a potentially seismic development. It may materially reduce both the frequency and severity of key problems in clinical ethics. Since the sociological, medical, and ethical literature on advance care planning is voluminous, I will not even summarize it here. Instead, I focus on Medicare coverage. I proceed, chronologically, in six stages: 1. Prior Medicare Coverage of Advance Care Planning 2. Proposed Expanded Medicare Coverage in 2015 3. Proposed Expanded Medicare Coverage in 2016 4. The Final Rule Expanding Medicare Coverage in 2016 5. Remaining Issues for CMS to Address in 2017 6. Pending Federal Legislation. PMID:26752396

  12. Perioperative Smartphone Apps and Devices for Patient-Centered Care.

    PubMed

    Simpao, Allan F; Lingappan, Arul M; Ahumada, Luis M; Rehman, Mohamed A; Gálvez, Jorge A

    2015-09-01

    Smartphones have grown in ubiquity and computing power, and they play an ever-increasing role in patient-centered health care. The "medicalized smartphone" not only enables web-based access to patient health resources, but also can run patient-oriented software applications and be connected to health-related peripheral devices. A variety of patient-oriented smartphone apps and devices are available for use to facilitate patient-centered care throughout the continuum of perioperative care. Ongoing advances in smartphone technology and health care apps and devices should expand their utility for enhancing patient-centered care in the future. PMID:26265239

  13. Advanced cerebral monitoring in neurocritical care.

    PubMed

    Barazangi, Nobl; Hemphill, J Claude

    2008-01-01

    New cerebral monitoring techniques allow direct measurement of brain oxygenation and metabolism. Investigation using these new tools has provided additional insight into the understanding of the pathophysiology of acute brain injury and suggested new ways to guide management of secondary brain injury. Studies of focal brain tissue oxygen monitoring have suggested ischemic thresholds in focal regions of brain injury and demonstrated the interrelationship between brain tissue oxygen tension (P bt O 2 ) and other cerebral physiologic and metabolic parameters. Jugular venous oxygen saturation (SjVO 2 ) monitoring may evaluate global brain oxygen delivery and consumption, providing thresholds for detecting brain hypoperfusion and hyperperfusion. Furthermore, critically low values of P bt O 2 and SjVO 2 have also been predictive of mortality and worsened functional outcome, especially after head trauma. Cerebral microdialysis measures the concentrations of extracellular metabolites which may be relevant to cerebral metabolism or ischemia in focal areas of injury. Cerebral blood flow may be measured in the neurointensive care unit using continuous methods such as thermal diffusion and laser Doppler flowmetry. Initial studies have also attempted to correlate findings from advanced neuromonitoring with neuroimaging using dynamic perfusion computed tomography, positron emission tomography, and Xenon computed tomography. Additionally, new methods of data acquisition, storage, and analysis are being developed to address the increasing burden of patient data from neuromonitoring. Advanced informatics techniques such as hierarchical data clustering, generalized linear models, and heat map dendrograms are now being applied to multivariable patient data in order to better develop physiologic patient profiles to improve diagnosis and treatment. PMID:19127034

  14. Establishment of Pediatric Cardiac Intensive Care Advanced Practice Provider Services.

    PubMed

    Gilliland, Jill; Donnellan, Amy; Justice, Lindsey; Moake, Lindy; Mauney, Jennifer; Steadman, Page; Drajpuch, David; Tucker, Dawn; Storey, Jean; Roth, Stephen J; Koch, Josh; Checchia, Paul; Cooper, David S; Staveski, Sandra L

    2016-01-01

    The addition of advanced practice providers (APPs; nurse practitioners and physician assistants) to a pediatric cardiac intensive care unit (PCICU) team is a health care innovation that addresses medical provider shortages while allowing PCICUs to deliver high-quality, cost-effective patient care. APPs, through their consistent clinical presence, effective communication, and facilitation of interdisciplinary collaboration, provide a sustainable solution for the highly specialized needs of PCICU patients. In addition, APPs provide leadership, patient and staff education, facilitate implementation of evidence-based practice and quality improvement initiatives, and the performance of clinical research in the PCICU. This article reviews mechanisms for developing, implementing, and sustaining advance practice services in PCICUs. PMID:26714997

  15. Exploring Advance Care Planning from the Nephrology Nurse Perspective: A Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Haras, Mary S; Astroth, Kim S; Woith, Wendy L; Kossman, Susan P

    2015-01-01

    Advance care planning is a process that engages healthcare providers and patients to articulate wishes of patients as their illness progresses. Persons with chronic kidney disease require earlier and more frequent advance care planning conversations because they are faced with increased co-morbidities and a shortened lifespan. This literature review explores the phenomenon of advance care planning and the potential factors affecting nephrology nurse engagement in these discussions. PMID:26290915

  16. [Advance care planning for people with intellectual disability].

    PubMed

    Wagemans, Annemieke M A; van Wijmen, Frans C B

    2014-01-01

    Difficult medical decisions regularly need to be made for people with intellectual disability. They are often unable to play a meaningful role in this and the decisions fall to the family or guardians. A useful aid to proactive medical management is advance care planning. This is a long-term care plan which is centred on the well-being of patients and their quality of life. Ideally it should be a matter for patients and those closest to them, the responsible medical practitioner and those tasked with the day-to-day care of patients. It is important to draw up this plan carefully and to regularly review it in the light of current circumstances. PMID:25424633

  17. Partnering With a Patient and Family Advisory Council to Improve Patient Care Experiences With Pain Management.

    PubMed

    Bookout, Michelle L; Staffileno, Beth A; Budzinsky, Christine M

    2016-04-01

    Patient-centered care is a key driver for the nation's health system, yet patient experience surveys indicate that hospitals are far from achieving favorable outcomes. Partnering with patients and families through a patient and family advisory council (PFAC) advances the practice of patient-centered care to improve outcomes and experiences. This article describes the process of implementing a PFAC and presents outcomes related to patients' perception of pain management in the acute care hospital setting. PMID:26963442

  18. Advance care planning for people with dementia.

    PubMed

    2016-05-27

    Advance care planning (ACP) provides a framework for discussing and documenting care preferences in preparation for situations in which a person loses the cognitive capacity to make decisions. It can be particularly valuable in assisting people in the early stages of living with a dementia, supported by their families, to document their preferences for care at the later stages of their illness. While the potential benefits of ACP are widely acknowledged, there remain gaps in the research evidence on ACP and challenges in implementing ACP in practice. The three recently-published studies described below address these issues. PMID:27231079

  19. Internet patient care applications in ambulatory care.

    PubMed

    Anderson, D G; Stenzel, C

    2001-10-01

    Over the next decade, the Internet and related technologies will revolutionize the administrative and clinical practices of ambulatory care, enhancing the ability of physicians to provide quality care, enabling "virtual care teams" to help patients deal effectively with acute episodes and chronic conditions, and reducing the cost of care. Like any major paradigm shift, this change will not happen overnight. Nor will it be without cost. The explosion of venture capital and meteoric rise of the Nasdaq in 1999 reflected the promise of the Internet to revolutionize many aspects of American business. The Nasdaq's equally rapid descent in 2000 reflected a growing realization that this change will not be free--that "creative destruction," to use Schumpeter's term, will inevitably require significant investment and produce substantial losses. This article takes a longer term view than the ups and downs in the stock market. We believe the forces unleashed by the Internet are inexorable and that 10 years from now we will look back at the millennium's first decade as a period when the practice of ambulatory medicine was transformed by communication technology. PMID:11680237

  20. Caring for transgender patients.

    PubMed

    Abebe, Alyssa

    2016-06-01

    Clinicians need a better understanding of transgender populations and a systematic approach to treating transgender patients medically and psychologically while managing any potential judgment or bias. This article explains key concepts, describes transgender patient health concerns, and discusses how to perform a comprehensive history. PMID:27228044

  1. Impact of a Disease-Specific Advance Care Planning Intervention on End-of-life Care

    PubMed Central

    Kirchhoff, Karin T.; Hammes, Bernard J.; Kehl, Karen A.; Briggs, Linda A.; Brown, Roger L.

    2012-01-01

    Background/Objectives Advance Care Planning (ACP) allows patients to state preferences for their end of life care but these preferences are frequently ignored. Following a Patient-Centered ACP interview (PC-ACP), patients’ preferences were compared to care received at end of life. Design A randomized controlled trial was conducted with patients with Congestive Heart Failure or End-stage Renal Disease and their surrogates who were randomized to receive either PC-ACP or usual care. Setting Two centers in Wisconsin with associated clinics/dialysis units provided patients. Participants Of the 313 patients and their surrogates who completed entry data, 110 died. Intervention During PC-ACP the trained facilitator assessed the patient and surrogate understanding of and experiences with the illness, provided information about disease-specific treatment options and their benefits and burden, assisted in documentation of patient treatment preferences, and assisted the surrogates in understanding the patient’s preferences and their role. Measurements Preferences were documented and then compared to the care received at end of life determined by surrogate interviews or medical charts. Results Patients (74%) frequently continued to make their own decisions about care to the end. The experimental group had fewer (1/62) but not significantly so cases where the patients could not get their wishes met about CPR than control (6/48). Significantly more experimental patients withdrew from dialysis than control. Conclusions Patients and their surrogates were generally willing to discuss preferences with a trained facilitator. Most patients received the care they desired at end of life or altered their preferences to be in accord with the care they could receive. A larger sample with surrogate decision makers is needed to detect significance. PMID:22458336

  2. Improving Transitions of Care With an Advanced Practice Nurse: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Hsueh, Martha; Dorcy, Kathleen

    2016-06-01

    Gaps in complex oncology care coordination between inpatient and outpatient settings can result in treatment and monitoring delays and omissions, which can negatively affect patient outcomes. Gaps also exist for patients facing complex treatment modalities and collaborations between multiple care teams working at geographically distant sites. A pilot advanced practice nurse care coordinator 
(APNCC) role to coordinate these complex care transitions and implement processes for safer and more efficient care has shown promise.
. PMID:27206289

  3. Advanced access: reducing waiting and delays in primary care.

    PubMed

    Murray, Mark; Berwick, Donald M

    2003-02-26

    Delay of care is a persistent and undesirable feature of current health care systems. Although delay seems to be inevitable and linked to resource limitations, it often is neither. Rather, it is usually the result of unplanned, irrational scheduling and resource allocation. Application of queuing theory and principles of industrial engineering, adapted appropriately to clinical settings, can reduce delay substantially, even in small practices, without requiring additional resources. One model, sometimes referred to as advanced access, has increasingly been shown to reduce waiting times in primary care. The core principle of advanced access is that patients calling to schedule a physician visit are offered an appointment the same day. Advanced access is not sustainable if patient demand for appointments is permanently greater than physician capacity to offer appointments. Six elements of advanced access are important in its application balancing supply and demand, reducing backlog, reducing the variety of appointment types, developing contingency plans for unusual circumstances, working to adjust demand profiles, and increasing the availability of bottleneck resources. Although these principles are powerful, they are counter to deeply held beliefs and established practices in health care organizations. Adopting these principles requires strong leadership investment and support. PMID:12597760

  4. Pain: advances and issues in critical care.

    PubMed

    Harrison, M; Cotanch, P H

    1987-09-01

    The milieu of the critical care unit is stressful for both the patient and health care professionals. As such, it has the potential to increase pain perception in patients, and decrease the nurse's awareness of pain relief needs of the patient. Several physical and pharmacologic methods of pain relief were discussed in this article. Nontechnologic analgesia such as hypnosis and relaxation were introduced as adjuncts or alternatives to more familiar methods of pain relief. Although critically ill patients are not always able to express their discomfort, it is the responsibility of the nurse to recognize the potential for pain, and plan treatment accordingly. This article suggests several strategies for dealing with pain in critically ill patients. PMID:3302958

  5. Percentage of Surgical Patients Receiving Recommended Care

    MedlinePlus

    ... Recommended Care Percentage of Surgical Patients Receiving Recommended Care This is a composite measure based on individual ... Age Group Percentage of Surgical Patients Receiving Recommended Care by Age Group uzrc-9bvr Download these data » ...

  6. [Palliative Care for Non-cancer Patients].

    PubMed

    Ikegaki, Junichi

    2016-03-01

    Although palliative care has been developed and implemented as care for cancer pain, it is holistic care for suffering that includes physical, psychosocial and spiritual pain of life-threatening illness. It turned out that non-cancer patients in the end-stage are also suffering from various pain that should be treated as cancer patients. Trajectories of illness in non-cancer patients are with more gradual decline than those of cancer patients with steady progression and it is often difficult to make decision about end-of-life. The purpose of advance care planning was originally to help describe legal documents. This process is proved to contribute to improving QOL of patients and their families to discuss preference, hope, economic problems, spiritual question as well as medical treatment In Japan guideline of decision making process in end-of-life stage has been established. A program of communication training in end-of-life discussion has been made. Under current situation some comments on the role of anesthesiologists are also mentioned. PMID:27097506

  7. WHAT INFLUENCES INDIVIDUALS TO ENGAGE IN ADVANCE CARE PLANNING?

    PubMed Central

    Dellasega, Cheryl; Whitehead, Megan; Green, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Background Advance care planning (ACP) is an under-utilized process that involves thinking about what kind of life-prolonging medical care one would want should the need arise, identifying a spokesperson, and then communicating these wishes. Objective To better understand what influences individuals to engage in ACP. Design Three focus groups using semi-structured interactive interviews were conducted with 23 older individuals from three diverse populations in central Pennsylvania. Results Four categories of influences for engaging in ACP were identified: 1) Concern for Self; 2) Concern for Others; 3) Expectations About the Impact of Advance Care Planning; and 4) Anecdotes, Stories, & Experiences. Conclusions The motivations for undertaking ACP that we have identified offer healthcare providers insight into effective strategies for facilitating the process of ACP with their patients. PMID:20103783

  8. Place of death: hospital-based advanced home care versus conventional care. A prospective study in palliative cancer care.

    PubMed

    Ahlner-Elmqvist, Marianne; Jordhøy, Marit S; Jannert, Magnus; Fayers, Peter; Kaasa, Stein

    2004-10-01

    The purpose of this prospective nonrandomized study was to evaluate time spent at home, place of death and differences in sociodemographic and medical characteristics of patients, with cancer in palliative stage, receiving either hospital-based advanced home care (AHC), including 24-hour service by a multidisciplinary palliative care team or conventional hospital care (CC). Recruitment to the AHC group and to the study was a two-step procedure. The patients were assigned to either hospital-based AHC or CC according to their preferences. Following this, the patients were asked to participate in the study. Patients were eligible for the study if they had malignant disease, were older than 18 years and had a survival expectancy of 2-12 months. A total of 297 patients entered the study and 280 died during the study period of two and a half years, 117 in the AHC group and 163 in the CC group. Significantly more patients died at home in the AHC group (45%) compared with the CC group (10%). Preference for and referral to hospital-based AHC were not related to sociodemographic or medical characteristics. However, death at home was associated with living together with someone. Advanced hospital-based home care targeting seriously ill cancer patients with a wish to remain at home enable a substantial number of patients to die in the place they desire. PMID:15540666

  9. Palliative care in patients with lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Farbicka, Paulina

    2013-01-01

    Lung cancer accounts for 12% of all cancers and has the highest annual rate of mortality in men and women. The overall aim is cure or prolongation of life without evidence of disease. Almost 60% of patients at the moment of diagnosis are not eligible for radical treatment. Therefore soothing and supportive treatment is the only treatment of choice. Patients with lung cancer who have symptoms of dyspnea, chronic cough, severe pain, exhaustion and cachexia syndrome, fear and depression and significantly reduced physical and intellectual activities are qualified for inpatient or home palliative care. Knowledge about various methods used in palliative treatment allows one to alleviate symptoms that occur in an advanced stage of disease with an expected short survival period. Methods of oncological treatment that are often used in patients with advanced lung cancer include radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Drawing attention to the earlier implementation of palliative care is an objective of research carried out during recent years. Advances in surgical and conservative treatment of these patients have contributed to better outcomes and longer survival time. PMID:24596508

  10. Does facilitated Advance Care Planning reduce the costs of care near the end of life? Systematic review and ethical considerations

    PubMed Central

    Klingler, Corinna; in der Schmitten, Jürgen; Marckmann, Georg

    2015-01-01

    Background: While there is increasing evidence that Advance Care Planning has the potential to strengthen patient autonomy and improve quality of care near the end of life, it remains unclear whether it could also reduce net costs of care. Aim: This study aims to describe the cost implications of Advance Care Planning programmes and discusses ethical conflicts arising in this context. Design: We conducted a systematic review based on the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses statement. Data sources: We systematically searched the databases PubMed, NHS EED, EURONHEED, Cochrane Library and EconLit. We included empirical studies (no limitation to study type) that investigated the cost implications of Advance Care Planning programmes involving professionally facilitated end-of-life discussions. Results and discussion: Seven studies met our inclusion criteria. Four of them used a randomised controlled design, one used a before-after design and two were observational studies. Six studies found reductions in costs of care ranging from USD1041 to USD64,827 per patient, depending on the study period and the cost measurement. One study detected no differences in costs. Studies varied considerably regarding the Advance Care Planning intervention, patient selection and costs measured which may explain some of the variations in findings. Normative appraisal: Looking at the impact of Advance Care Planning on costs raises delicate ethical issues. Given the increasing pressure to reduce expenditures, there may be concerns that cost considerations could unduly influence the sensitive communication process, thus jeopardising patient autonomy. Safeguards are proposed to reduce these risks. Conclusion: The limited data indicate net cost savings may be realised with Advance Care Planning. Methodologically robust trials with clearly defined Advance Care Planning interventions are needed to make the costs and returns of Advance Care Planning transparent. PMID

  11. An Assessment of Social Diffusion in the Respecting Choices Advance Care Planning Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moorman, Sara M.; Carr, Deborah; Kirchhoff, Karin T.; Hammes, Bernard J.

    2012-01-01

    This study examines the potential social diffusion effects of the Respecting Choices advance care planning program administered in La Crosse, Wisconsin, since 1991. The program produces educational materials for patients, trains facilitators to help patients prepare for end of life, and ensures that advance directives are connected to patients'…

  12. Experiences of the advanced nurse practitioner role in acute care.

    PubMed

    Cowley, Alison; Cooper, Joanne; Goldberg, Sarah

    2016-05-01

    The aim of the service evaluation presented in this article was to explore the multidisciplinary team's (MDT) experiences and perception of the advanced nurse practitioner (ANP) role on an acute health care of the older person ward. A qualitative case study was carried out comprising semi-structured interviews with members of the MDT, exploring their experiences of the ANP role. An overarching theme of 'Is it a nurse? Is it a doctor? No, it's an ANP' emerged from the data, with three subthemes: the missing link; facilitating and leading holistic care; and safe, high quality care. The ANP role is valued by the MDT working with them and provides a unique skill set that has the potential to enhance care of older patients living with frailty. While there are challenges to its introduction, it is a role worth introducing to older people's wards. PMID:27125941

  13. Orthogeriatric care: improving patient outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Tarazona-Santabalbina, Francisco José; Belenguer-Varea, Ángel; Rovira, Eduardo; Cuesta-Peredó, David

    2016-01-01

    Hip fractures are a very serious socio-economic problem in western countries. Since the 1950s, orthogeriatric units have introduced improvements in the care of geriatric patients admitted to hospital because of hip fractures. During this period, these units have reduced mean hospital stays, number of complications, and both in-hospital mortality and mortality over the middle term after hospital discharge, along with improvements in the quality of care and a reduction in costs. Likewise, a recent clinical trial has reported greater functional gains among the affected patients. Studies in this field have identified the prognostic factors present upon admission or manifesting themselves during admission and that increase the risk of patient mortality or disability. In addition, improved care afforded by orthogeriatric units has proved to reduce costs. Nevertheless, a number of management issues remain to be clarified, such as the optimum anesthetic, analgesic, and thromboprophylactic protocols; the type of diagnostic and therapeutic approach best suited to patients with cognitive problems; or the efficiency of the programs used in convalescence units or in home rehabilitation care. Randomized clinical trials are needed to consolidate the evidence in this regard. PMID:27445466

  14. Strategic targeting of advance care planning interventions: the Goldilocks phenomenon.

    PubMed

    Billings, J Andrew; Bernacki, Rachelle

    2014-04-01

    Strategically selecting patients for discussions and documentation about limiting life-sustaining treatments-choosing the right time along the end-of-life trajectory for such an intervention and identifying patients at high risk of facing end-of-life decisions-can have a profound impact on the value of advance care planning (ACP) efforts. Timing is important because the completion of an advance directive (AD) too far from or too close to the time of death can lead to end-of-life decisions that do not optimally reflect the patient's values, goals, and preferences: a poorly chosen target patient population that is unlikely to need an AD in the near future may lead to patients making unrealistic, hypothetical choices, while assessing preferences in the emergency department or hospital in the face of a calamity is notoriously inadequate. Because much of the currently studied ACP efforts have led to a disappointingly small proportion of patients eventually benefitting from an AD, careful targeting of the intervention should also improve the efficacy of such projects. A key to optimal timing and strategic selection of target patients for an ACP program is prognostication, and we briefly highlight prognostication tools and studies that may point us toward high-value AD interventions. PMID:24493203

  15. Conservative Care of the Elderly CKD Patient: A Practical Guide.

    PubMed

    Raghavan, Divya; Holley, Jean L

    2016-01-01

    Palliative care is a branch of medicine dedicated to the relief of symptoms experienced during the course of illness. Renal palliative medicine or kidney supportive care is an evolving branch of nephrology, which incorporates the principles of palliative care into the care of CKD and ESRD (dialysis, transplant, and conservatively managed) patients. Conservative (non-dialytic) management is a legitimate option for frail, elderly CKD patients in whom dialysis may not lead to an improvement in quality or duration of life. Patients with advanced CKD have a high symptom burden that often worsens before death. Palliative or supportive care by visiting nurses, palliative care programs, or knowledgeable CKD programs should be routine for conservatively managed CKD patients. Decision-making about dialysis or conservative management requires patients and families be given information on prognosis, quality of life on dialysis, and options for supportive care. Advance care planning is the process by which these issues can be explored. In addition to advance care planning, because patients with ESRD have a high symptom burden, this needs to be addressed. Patients with ESRD have a high symptom burden, which needs to be addressed in any treatment plan. Common symptoms include pain, fatigue, insomnia, pruritus, anorexia, and nausea. Symptoms appear to increase as the patient nears death, and this must be anticipated. Recommendations for management are discussed in the article. Hospice care should be offered to all patients who are expected to die within the next 6 months, and supportive care should be provided to all CKD patients managed conservatively or with dialysis. PMID:26709063

  16. Advance Care Planning and Goals of Care Communication in Older Adults with Cardiovascular Disease and Multi-Morbidity.

    PubMed

    Lum, Hillary D; Sudore, Rebecca L

    2016-05-01

    This article provides an approach to advance care planning (ACP) and goals of care communication in older adults with cardiovascular disease and multi-morbidity. The goal of ACP is to ensure that the medical care patients receive is aligned with their values and preferences. In this article, the authors outline common benefits and challenges to ACP for older adults with cardiovascular disease and multimorbidity. Recognizing that these patients experience diverse disease trajectories and receive care in multiple health care settings, the authors provide practical steps for multidisciplinary teams to integrate ACP into brief clinic encounters. PMID:27113144

  17. Bullying, mentoring, and patient care.

    PubMed

    Frederick, Dorothea

    2014-05-01

    The literature suggests that acts of bullying are a root cause of new nurses leaving their units or the profession entirely and have the potential to worsen the nursing shortage. As an effective way to address bullying in the perioperative setting, mentoring benefits the nursing profession. Mentoring can have a direct influence on nurses' longevity in a health care organization, thereby strengthening the nursing workforce. Magnet-designated hospitals support the importance of mentor-mentee relationships for positive employee retention and positive recruitment outcomes. One of the most important tasks that a mentor should undertake is that of a role model. Establishing a culture of mentoring requires authentic leadership, genuine caring and respect for employees, and open communication. The entire nursing profession benefits from a culture of mentoring, as do the patients and families who receive care. PMID:24766920

  18. Palliative care provision for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Yohannes, Abebaw Mengistu

    2007-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a major cause of disability, morbidity and mortality in old age. Patients with advanced stage COPD are most likely to be admitted three to four times per year with acute exacerbations of COPD (AECOPD) which are costly to manage. The adverse events of AECOPD are associated with poor quality of life, severe physical disability, loneliness, and depression and anxiety symptoms. Currently there is a lack of palliative care provision for patients with advanced stage COPD compared with cancer patients despite having poor prognosis, intolerable dyspnoea, lower levels of self efficacy, greater disability, poor quality of life and higher levels of anxiety and depression. These symptoms affect patients' quality of life and can be a source of concern for family and carers as most patients are likely to be housebound and may be in need of continuous support and care. Evidence of palliative care provision for cancer patients indicate that it improves quality of life and reduces health care costs. The reasons why COPD patients do not receive palliative care are complex. This partly may relate to prognostic accuracy of patients' survival which poses a challenge for healthcare professionals, including general practitioners for patients with advanced stage COPD, as they are less likely to engage in end-of-life care planning in contrast with terminal disease like cancer. Furthermore there is a lack of resources which constraints for the wider availability of the palliative care programmes in the health care system. Potential barriers may include unwillingness of patients to discuss advance care planning and end-of-life care with their general practitioners, lack of time, increased workload, and fear of uncertainty of the information to provide about the prognosis of the disease and also lack of appropriate tools to guide general practitioners when to refer patients for palliative care. COPD is a chronic incurable disease; those in an

  19. Palliative care provision for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Yohannes, Abebaw Mengistu

    2007-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a major cause of disability, morbidity and mortality in old age. Patients with advanced stage COPD are most likely to be admitted three to four times per year with acute exacerbations of COPD (AECOPD) which are costly to manage. The adverse events of AECOPD are associated with poor quality of life, severe physical disability, loneliness, and depression and anxiety symptoms. Currently there is a lack of palliative care provision for patients with advanced stage COPD compared with cancer patients despite having poor prognosis, intolerable dyspnoea, lower levels of self efficacy, greater disability, poor quality of life and higher levels of anxiety and depression. These symptoms affect patients' quality of life and can be a source of concern for family and carers as most patients are likely to be housebound and may be in need of continuous support and care. Evidence of palliative care provision for cancer patients indicate that it improves quality of life and reduces health care costs. The reasons why COPD patients do not receive palliative care are complex. This partly may relate to prognostic accuracy of patients' survival which poses a challenge for healthcare professionals, including general practitioners for patients with advanced stage COPD, as they are less likely to engage in end-of-life care planning in contrast with terminal disease like cancer. Furthermore there is a lack of resources which constraints for the wider availability of the palliative care programmes in the health care system. Potential barriers may include unwillingness of patients to discuss advance care planning and end-of-life care with their general practitioners, lack of time, increased workload, and fear of uncertainty of the information to provide about the prognosis of the disease and also lack of appropriate tools to guide general practitioners when to refer patients for palliative care. COPD is a chronic incurable disease; those in an

  20. Paying pharmacists for patient care

    PubMed Central

    Houle, Sherilyn K. D.; Grindrod, Kelly A.; Chatterley, Trish; Tsuyuki, Ross T.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Expansion of scope of practice and diminishing revenues from dispensing are requiring pharmacists to increasingly adopt clinical care services into their practices. Pharmacists must be able to receive payment in order for provision of clinical care to be sustainable. The objective of this study is to update a previous systematic review by identifying remunerated pharmacist clinical care programs worldwide and reporting on uptake and patient care outcomes observed as a result. Methods: Literature searches were performed in several databases, including MEDLINE, Embase and International Pharmaceutical Abstracts, for papers referencing remuneration, pharmacy and cognitive services. Searches of the grey literature and Internet were also conducted. Papers and programs were identified up to December 2012 and were included if they were not reported in our previous review. One author performed data abstraction, which was independently reviewed by a second author. All results are presented descriptively. Results: Sixty new remunerated programs were identified across Canada, the United States, Europe, Australia and New Zealand, ranging in complexity from emergency contraception counseling to minor ailments schemes and comprehensive medication management. In North America, the average fee provided for a medication review is $68.86 (all figures are given in Canadian dollars), with $23.37 offered for a follow-up visit and $15.16 for prescription adaptations. Time-dependent fees were reimbursed at $93.60 per hour on average. Few programs evaluated uptake and outcomes of these services but, when available, indicated slow uptake but improved chronic disease markers and cost savings. Discussion: Remuneration for pharmacists’ clinical care services is highly variable, with few programs reporting program outcomes. Programs and pharmacists are encouraged to examine the time required to perform these activities and the outcomes achieved to ensure that fees are adequate to

  1. End-of-Life Decisions and Palliative Care in Advanced Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Meyers, Deborah E; Goodlin, Sarah J

    2016-09-01

    Advanced heart failure (HF) therapies are focused on extending life and improving function. In contrast, palliative care is a holistic approach that focuses on symptom alleviation and patients' physical, psychosocial, and spiritual needs. HF clinicians can integrate palliative care strategies by incorporating several important components of planning and decision-making for HF patients. Future care planning (FCP) for HF patients should incorporate the basic tenets of shared decision-making (SDM). These include understanding the patient's perspective and care preferences, articulating what is medically feasible, and integrating these considerations into the overall care plan. Use of defined triggers for FCP can stimulate important patient-caregiver conversations. Guidelines advocate an annual review of HF status and future care preferences. Advance directives are important for any individual with a chronic, life-limiting illness and should be integrated into FCP. Nevertheless, use of advance directives by HF patients is extremely low. Consideration of illness trajectories and risk-scoring tools might facilitate prognostication and delivery of appropriate HF care. Decisions about heart transplantation or left ventricular assist device implantation should include planning for potential complications associated with these therapies. Such decisions also should include a discussion of palliative management, as an alternative to intervention and also as an option for managing symptoms or adverse events after intervention. Palliative care, including FCP and SDM, should be integrated into the course of all patients with advanced HF. Clinicians who provide HF care should acquire the skills necessary for conducting FCP and SDM discussions. PMID:27568873

  2. Gay patients. Context for care.

    PubMed Central

    Gibson, G.; Saunders, D. E.

    1994-01-01

    Gays and lesbians are a part of our society and our practices: real people with real lives, not stereotypes. Understanding their inner world and their social milieu is the first step to providing care that is holistic and appropriate. The "coming out" process and other unique health issues are described. Guidance is provided on how to identify and relate to gay and lesbian patients. PMID:8199524

  3. Advanced medical imaging protocol workflow-a flexible electronic solution to optimize process efficiency, care quality and patient safety in the National VA Enterprise.

    PubMed

    Medverd, Jonathan R; Cross, Nathan M; Font, Frank; Casertano, Andrew

    2013-08-01

    Radiologists routinely make decisions with only limited information when assigning protocol instructions for the performance of advanced medical imaging examinations. Opportunity exists to simultaneously improve the safety, quality and efficiency of this workflow through the application of an electronic solution leveraging health system resources to provide concise, tailored information and decision support in real-time. Such a system has been developed using an open source, open standards design for use within the Veterans Health Administration. The Radiology Protocol Tool Recorder (RAPTOR) project identified key process attributes as well as inherent weaknesses of paper processes and electronic emulators of paper processes to guide the development of its optimized electronic solution. The design provides a kernel that can be expanded to create an integrated radiology environment. RAPTOR has implications relevant to the greater health care community, and serves as a case model for modernization of legacy government health information systems. PMID:23288437

  4. A dynamic care pathway to coordinate the use of advanced therapy in diabetic foot ulceration.

    PubMed

    Chadwick, P; Haycocks, S; Bielby, A; Milne, J

    2009-10-01

    The non-coordinated use of advanced therapies is not clinically or cost effective. A care pathway for the sequential use of these interventions on complex wounds provides a more restructured approach, and helped improve patient outcomes. PMID:19816383

  5. Reducing patient suffering through compassionate connected care.

    PubMed

    Dempsey, Christina; Wojciechowski, Sharyl; McConville, Elizabeth; Drain, Maxwell

    2014-10-01

    Patient experience continues to play an increasingly critical role in quality outcomes and reimbursement. Nurse executives are tasked with helping direct-care nurses connect with patients to improve care experiences. Connecting with patients in compassionate ways to alleviate inherent patient suffering and prevent avoidable suffering is key to improving the patient experience. The Compassionate Connected Care framework identifies strategies for meeting the challenges of connecting with patients and reducing suffering. Methods integrate clinical, operational, cultural, and behavioral aspects of care to target patient needs based on condition. Caregivers learn to better express empathy and compassion to patients, and nurse leaders are better equipped to engage nurses at the bedside. PMID:25208270

  6. Bedside Reporting: Protocols for Improving Patient Care.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Teresa D; Howell, Teresa L

    2015-12-01

    Bedside reporting continues to gain much attention and is being investigated to support the premise that "hand-off" communications enhance efficacy in delivery of patient care. Patient inclusion in shift reports enhances good patient outcomes, increased satisfaction with care delivery, enhanced accountability for nursing professionals, and improved communications between patients and their direct care providers. This article discusses the multiple benefits of dynamic dialogue between patients and the health care team, challenges often associated with bedside reporting, and protocols for managing bedside reporting with the major aim of improving patient care. Nursing research supporting the concept of bedside reporting is examined. PMID:26596661

  7. Should health care providers be accountable for patients' care experiences?

    PubMed

    Anhang Price, Rebecca; Elliott, Marc N; Cleary, Paul D; Zaslavsky, Alan M; Hays, Ron D

    2015-02-01

    Measures of patients' care experiences are increasingly used as quality measures in accountability initiatives. As the prominence and financial impact of patient experience measures have increased, so too have concerns about the relevance and fairness of including them as indicators of health care quality. Using evidence from the Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (CAHPS®) surveys, the most widely used patient experience measures in the United States, we address seven common critiques of patient experience measures: (1) consumers do not have the expertise needed to evaluate care quality; (2) patient "satisfaction" is subjective and thus not valid or actionable; (3) increasing emphasis on improving patient experiences encourages health care providers and plans to fulfill patient desires, leading to care that is inappropriate, ineffective, and/or inefficient; (4) there is a trade-off between providing good patient experiences and providing high-quality clinical care; (5) patient scores cannot be fairly compared across health care providers or plans due to factors beyond providers' control; (6) response rates to patient experience surveys are low, or responses reflect only patients with extreme experiences; and (7) there are faster, cheaper, and more customized ways to survey patients than the standardized approaches mandated by federal accountability initiatives. PMID:25416601

  8. The meaning of the music: the role of music in palliative care music therapy as perceived by bereaved caregivers of advanced cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Magill, Lucanne

    2009-01-01

    In an earlier qualitative research study exploring the meaning of preloss music therapy to bereaved caregivers who participated in sessions through a home-based hospice program, various narrative accounts revealed the significance of music in music therapy sessions. In this study, the role of music in palliative care music therapy is examined and representatively summarized, followed by a review of strategies provided by this author to home hospice patients and their caregivers. The reported perceptions of the meaning of music to 7 bereaved caregivers are presented, including a review of themes and associated narrations that illustrated its significance. The caregivers described these aspects of music in sessions to have memorable and lasting effects as follows: "music is a conduit,'' "music gets inside us,'' "live music makes a difference,'' and "music is love.'' Findings support the benefits of preloss music therapy for bereaved caregivers. PMID:19047488

  9. Estimating the Effect of Palliative Care Interventions and Advance Care Planning on ICU Utilization: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Khandelwal, Nita; Kross, Erin K.; Engelberg, Ruth A.; Coe, Norma B.; Long, Ann C.; Curtis, J. Randall

    2015-01-01

    Objective We conducted a systematic review to answer three questions: 1) Do advance care planning and palliative care interventions lead to a reduction in ICU admissions for adult patients with life-limiting illnesses? 2) Do these interventions reduce ICU length of stay? and 3) Is it possible to provide estimates of the magnitude of these effects? Data Sources We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane Controlled Clinical Trials, and Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature databases from 1995 through March 2014. Study Selection We included studies that reported controlled trials (randomized and nonrandomized) assessing the impact of advance care planning and both primary and specialty palliative care interventions on ICU admissions and ICU length of stay for critically ill adult patients. Data Extraction Nine randomized controlled trials and 13 nonrandomized controlled trials were selected from 216 references. Data Synthesis Nineteen of these studies were used to provide estimates of the magnitude of effect of palliative care interventions and advance care planning on ICU admission and length of stay. Three studies reporting on ICU admissions suggest that advance care planning interventions reduce the relative risk of ICU admission for patients at high risk of death by 37% (sd, 23%). For trials evaluating palliative care interventions in the ICU setting, we found a 26% (sd, 23%) relative risk reduction in length of stay with these interventions. Conclusions Despite wide variation in study type and quality, patients who received advance care planning or palliative care interventions consistently showed a pattern toward decreased ICU admissions and reduced ICU length of stay. Although sds are wide and study quality varied, the magnitude of the effect is possible to estimate and provides a basis for modeling impact on healthcare costs. PMID:25574794

  10. Teaching Advance Care Planning to Medical Students with a Computer-Based Decision Aid

    PubMed Central

    Levi, Benjamin H.

    2013-01-01

    Discussing end-of-life decisions with cancer patients is a crucial skill for physicians. This article reports findings from a pilot study evaluating the effectiveness of a computer-based decision aid for teaching medical students about advance care planning. Second-year medical students at a single medical school were randomized to use a standard advance directive or a computer-based decision aid to help patients with advance care planning. Students' knowledge, skills, and satisfaction were measured by self-report; their performance was rated by patients. 121/133 (91%) of students participated. The Decision-Aid Group (n=60) outperformed the Standard Group (n=61) in terms of students´ knowledge (p<0.01), confidence in helping patients with advance care planning (p<0.01), knowledge of what matters to patients (p=0.05), and satisfaction with their learning experience (p<0.01). Likewise, patients in the Decision Aid Group were more satisfied with the advance care planning method (p<0.01) and with several aspects of student performance. Use of a computer-based decision aid may be an effective way to teach medical students how to discuss advance care planning with cancer patients. PMID:20632222

  11. Advanced skin, scar and wound care centre for children: A new era of care

    PubMed Central

    Burd, Andrew; Huang, Lin

    2012-01-01

    Advanced wound care centres are now a well established response to the growing epidemic of chronic wounds in the adult population. Is the concept transferable to children? Whilst there is not the same prevalence of chronic wounds in children there are conditions affecting the integumentary system that do have a profound effect on the quality of life of both children and their families. We have identified conditions involving the skin, scars and wounds which contribute to a critical number of potential patients that can justify the setting up of an advanced skin, scar and wound care centre for children. The management of conditions such as giant naevi, extensive scarring and epidermolysis bullosa challenge medical professionals and lead to new and novel treatments to be developed. The variation between and within such conditions calls for a customizing of individual patient care that involves a close relationship between research scientists and clinicians. This is translational medicine of its best and we predict that this is the future of wound care particularly and specifically in children. PMID:23162215

  12. Recent advance in patient monitoring

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Recent advance in technology has developed a lot of new aspects of clinical monitoring. We can monitor sedation levels during anesthesia using various electroencephalographic (EEG) indices, while it is still not useful for anesthesia depth monitoring. Some attempts are made to monitor the changes in sympathetic nerve activity as one of the indicators of stress, pain/analgesia, or anesthesia. To know the balance of sympathetic and parasympathetic activity, heart rate or blood pressure variability is investigated. For trend of cardiac output, low invasive monitors have been investigated. Improvement of ultrasound enables us to see cardiac structure and function continuously and clearer, increases success rate and decreases complication of central venous puncture and various kinds of nerve blocks. Without inserting an arterial catheter, trends of arterial oxygen tension or carbon dioxide tension can be monitored. Indirect visualization of the airway decreases difficult intubation and makes it easier to teach tracheal intubation. The changes in blood volume can be speculated non-invasively. Cerebral perfusion and metabolism are not ordinary monitored yet, but some studies show their usefulness in management of critically ill. This review introduces recent advances in various monitors used in anesthesia and critical care including some studies of the author, especially focused on EEG and cardiac output. However, the most important is that these new monitors are not almighty but should be used adequately in a limited situation where their meaning is confirmed. PMID:20877698

  13. Care management: agreement between nursing prescriptions and patients' care needs

    PubMed Central

    Faeda, Marília Silveira; Perroca, Márcia Galan

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives: analyze agreement between nursing prescriptions recorded in medical files and patients' care needs; investigate the correlation between the nurses' professional background and agreement of prescriptions. Method: descriptive study with quantitative and documentary approach conducted in the medical clinic, surgical, and specialized units of a university hospital in the interior of São Paulo, Brazil. The new validated version of a Patient Classification Instrument was used and 380 nursing prescriptions written at the times of hospital admission and discharge were assessed. Results: 75% of the nursing prescriptions items were compatible with the patients' care needs. Only low correlation between nursing prescription agreement and professional background was found. Conclusion: the nursing prescriptions did not fully meet the care needs of patients. The care context and work process should be analyzed to enable more effective prescriptions, while strategies to assess the care needs of patients are recommended. PMID:27508902

  14. Assessing Advance Care Planning: Examining Autonomous Selections in an Advance Directive.

    PubMed

    Klugman, Craig M; Tolwin, Nicole M

    2015-01-01

    We examined the management of completed advance directives including why participants completed a document, what procedures and values they chose, with whom they held end-of-life conversations, and where they stored their document. Participants elected to complete a SurveyMonkey survey that was made available to individuals who wrote an advance directive through TexasLivingWill.org; 491 individuals elected to fill out the survey, aged 19 to 94 years. The survey asked multiple questions about why participants completed an advance directive, where they would store it, and with whom they had conversations about their end-of-life wishes. A list of procedures and values allowed participants to indicate what they refused or requested in their advance directive. Advance directives are most often completed to allow patients to prepare and control the healthcare they wish to receive when dying. One-half to two-thirds of individuals refuse common end-of-life medical procedures, and the rest request the procedures. We found a correlation between the choice to refuse or request a procedure and the age of the participant. Participants reported that their end-of-life conversations most often occurred with their spouse. Respondents often reported that their advance directive was stored with their physician and power of attorney for healthcare, conversations with those individuals rarely happened. Advance directives document patients' requests for and refusals of end-of-life care. Physicians and surrogates need to be better educated so that the documents are part of a meaningful conversation with the patient. Because patients' choices change over their lifespan, these documents need to be revisited regularly and not completed as a onetime event. PMID:26399671

  15. Use of advanced technologies across the wound care spectrum: prologue.

    PubMed

    Kirsner, Robert S; Romanelli, Marco

    2016-09-01

    The growing trends of ageing populations and increasing prevalence of diabetes have given rise to an expanding number of problematic acute and chronic wounds. Over the past two decades, the use of negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) with and without instillation of topical wound solutions has expanded to include treatment of a large variety of wounds. Additionally, the use of NPWT specifically designed for use over closed surgical incisions has been associated with favourable results. The recent introduction of an automated epidermal harvesting system, which neither creates a donor site wound nor requires the use of a surgeon, operating room or anaesthesia, has facilitated the use of epidermal grafting. This supplement highlights some of the advanced wound approaches that have been developed to address challenging wounds and the growing burden of wound care affecting both the patient and the health care system. PMID:27547957

  16. Postoperative care for the robotic surgery bowel resection patient.

    PubMed

    Brenner, Zara R; Salathiel, Mary; Macey, Barbara A; Krenzer, Maureen

    2011-01-01

    A new surgical method is available for colon and rectal surgery. Robotic surgery, using the daVinci Si HD Surgical System, offers surgical advances compared with the traditional open or laparoscopic surgical methods. The potential advantages of robotic technology continue to be explored and its most appropriate functions are yet to be determined. In clinical experience, the use of this surgical method has resulted in changes to postoperative nursing care management. This article describes changes in the management of postoperative patient care including fluid and electrolyte balance, and patient and staff education. Modifications were instituted in the clinical pathway to facilitate an accelerated standard of care. New discharge strategies were implemented to ensure ongoing fluid and electrolyte balance by the patient. A true team effort from a multitude of disciplines was required for the changes in patient care routine to be effective. Outcomes including length of stay and patient satisfaction are presented. PMID:21814060

  17. Intensive care patients' evaluations of the informed consent process.

    PubMed

    Clark, Paul Alexander

    2007-01-01

    This study examines the informed consent process from the perspective of intensive care patients. Using the largest single-method database of patient-derived information in the United States, we systematically outlined and tested several key factors that influence patient evaluations of the intensive care unit (ICU) informed consent process. Measures of information, understanding, and decision-making involvement were found to predict overall patient satisfaction and patient loyalty intentions. Specific actions supportive of ICU informed consent, such as giving patients information on advance directives, patient's rights, and organ donation, resulted in significantly higher patient evaluation scores with large effect sizes. This research suggests that the effectiveness of the informed consent process in the ICU from the patient's perspective can be measured and evaluated and that ICU patients place a high value on the elements of the informed consent process. PMID:17704678

  18. Palliative care for advanced dementia in Japan: knowledge and attitudes.

    PubMed

    Nakanishi, Miharu; Miyamoto, Yuki

    This study examined factors contributing to the knowledge and attitudes of nursing home staff regarding palliative care for advanced dementia in Japan. A cross-sectional survey of 275 nurses and other care workers from 74 long-term care facilities was conducted across three prefectures in August 2014. The Japanese versions of the Questionnaire on Palliative Care for Advanced Dementia (qPAD) and Frommelt Attitudes Toward Care of the Dying scale, Form B (FATCOD-B-J) were used. Greater knowledge was exhibited among nursing home staff in facilities that established a manual for end-of-life care. Higher levels of positive attitudes were observed among nursing home staff in facilities that had established a manual and those in facilities with a physician's written opinions on end-of-life care. An organisational effort should be explored to establish end-of-life care policies among nursing home staff for advanced dementia. PMID:26878406

  19. Many COPD Patients Have Trouble Finding Care

    MedlinePlus

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_158830.html Many COPD Patients Have Trouble Finding Care They can face ... first comprehensive look at chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) care in the United States. COPD is the ...

  20. A model of patient-centred care - turning good care into patient-centred care.

    PubMed

    Scambler, S; Asimakopoulou, K

    2014-09-01

    This paper builds on previous work reviewing patient-centred care in dentistry and acknowledges work that has questioned the measurement and effectiveness of patient-centredness in practice. In an attempt to move the debate from rhetoric to practice and enhance the practical utility of the concept, we present a practical hierarchy of patient-centredness that may aid the practical application of patient-centred care in clinical practice by making explicit a series of stages that a dental care professional needs to move through in order to provide care that is patient-centred. The model presented is illustrated through practical examples. The various stages inherent in it are described with the aim of making clear the perhaps automatic and taken for granted assumptions that are often made by dental care professionals and patients through the course of a consultation. Our aim is to encourage dental consultations to have more open, unambiguous communication, both about the risks and benefits of courses of action and about the choices available to patients. PMID:25213518

  1. Advance Care Planning and the Quality of End-of-Life Care among Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Bischoff, Kara E.; Sudore, Rebecca; Miao, Yinghui; Boscardin, W. John; Smith, Alexander K.

    2013-01-01

    Background Advance care planning is increasingly common, but whether it influences end-of-life quality of care remains controversial. Design Medicare data and survey data from the Health and Retirement Study were combined to determine whether advance care planning was associated with quality metrics. Setting The nationally representative Health and Retirement Study. Participants 4394 decedent subjects (mean age 82.6 years at death, 55% women). Measurements Advance care planning was defined as having an advance directive, durable power of attorney or having discussed preferences for end-of-life care with a next-of-kin. Outcomes included previously reported quality metrics observed during the last month of life (rates of hospital admission, in-hospital death, >14 days in the hospital, intensive care unit admission, >1 emergency department visit, hospice admission, and length of hospice ≤3 days). Results Seventy-six percent of subjects engaged in advance care planning. Ninety-two percent of advance directives stated a preference to prioritize comfort. After adjustment, subjects who engaged in advance care planning were less likely to die in a hospital (adjusted RR 0.87, 95% CI 0.80-0.94), more likely to be enrolled in hospice (aRR 1.68, 1.43-1.97), and less likely to receive hospice for ≤3 days before death (aRR 0.88, 0.85-0.91). Having an advance directive, a durable-power-of-attorney or an advance care planning discussion were each independently associated with a significant increase in hospice use (p<0.01 for all). Conclusion Advance care planning was associated with improved quality of care at the end of life, including less in-hospital death and increased use of hospice. Having an advance directive, assigning a durable power of attorney and conducting advance care planning discussions are all important elements of advance care planning. PMID:23350921

  2. Advance Care Planning in Nursing Homes: Correlates of Capacity and Possession of Advance Directives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Rebecca S.; DeLaine, Shermetra R.; Chaplin, William F.; Marson, Daniel C.; Bourgeois, Michelle S.; Dijkstra, Katinka; Burgio, Louis D.

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: The identification of nursing home residents who can continue to participate in advance care planning about end-of-life care is a critical clinical and bioethical issue. This study uses high quality observational research to identify correlates of advance care planning in nursing homes, including objective measurement of capacity. Design…

  3. Improving the Care of Children With Advanced Cancer by Using an Electronic Patient-Reported Feedback Intervention: Results From the PediQUEST Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Wolfe, Joanne; Orellana, Liliana; Cook, E. Francis; Ullrich, Christina; Kang, Tammy; Geyer, Jeffrey Russell; Feudtner, Chris; Weeks, Jane C.; Dussel, Veronica

    2014-01-01

    Purpose This study aimed to determine whether feeding back patient-reported outcomes (PROs) to providers and families of children with advanced cancer improves symptom distress and health-related quality of life (HRQoL). Patients and Methods This study was a parallel, multicentered pilot randomized controlled trial. At most once per week, children age ≥ 2 years old with advanced cancer or their parent completed the computer-based Pediatric Quality of Life and Evaluation of Symptoms Technology (PediQUEST) survey consisting of age- and respondent-adapted versions of the Memorial Symptom Assessment Scale (MSAS), Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory 4.0 Generic Core Scales (PedsQL4.0), and an overall Sickness question. In the intervention group (n = 51), oncologists and families received printed reports summarizing PROs; e-mails were sent to oncologists and subspecialists when predetermined scores were exceeded. No feedback was provided in the control group (n = 53). Primary outcomes included linear trends of MSAS, PedsQL4.0 total and subscale scores, and Sickness scores during 20 weeks of follow-up, along with child, parent, and provider satisfaction with PediQUEST feedback. Results Feedback did not significantly affect average MSAS, PedsQL4.0, or Sickness score trends. Post hoc subgroup analyses among children age ≥ 8 years who survived 20 weeks showed that feedback improved PedsQL4.0 emotional (+8.1; 95% CI, 1.8 to 14.4) and Sickness (−8.2; 95% CI, −14.2 to −2.2) scores. PediQUEST reports were valued by children, parents, and providers and contributed at least sometimes to physician initiation of a psychosocial consult (56%). Conclusion Although routine feedback of PROs did not significantly affect the child's symptoms or HRQoL, changes were in expected directions and improvements observed in emotional HRQoL through exploratory analyses were encouraging. Importantly, children, parents, and providers value PRO feedback. PMID:24616307

  4. Teamwork and Patient Care Teams in an Acute Care Hospital.

    PubMed

    Rochon, Andrea; Heale, Roberta; Hunt, Elena; Parent, Michele

    2015-06-01

    The literature suggests that effective teamwork among patient care teams can positively impact work environment, job satisfaction and quality of patient care. The purpose of this study was to determine the perceived level of nursing teamwork by registered nurses, registered practical nurses, personal support workers and unit clerks working on patient care teams in one acute care hospital in northern Ontario, Canada, and to determine if a relationship exists between the staff scores on the Nursing Teamwork Survey (NTS) and participant perception of adequate staffing. Using a descriptive cross-sectional research design, 600 staff members were invited to complete the NTS and a 33% response rate was achieved (N=200). The participants from the critical care unit reported the highest scores on the NTS, whereas participants from the inpatient surgical (IPS) unit reported the lowest scores. Participants from the IPS unit also reported having less experience, being younger, having less satisfaction in their current position and having a higher intention to leave. A high rate of intention to leave in the next year was found among all participants. No statistically significant correlation was found between overall scores on the NTS and the perception of adequate staffing. Strategies to increase teamwork, such as staff education, among patient care teams may positively influence job satisfaction and patient care on patient care units. PMID:26560255

  5. Perioperative Care of the Transgender Patient.

    PubMed

    Smith, Francis Duval

    2016-02-01

    Transgender patients are individuals whose gender identity is not related to their biological sex. Assuming a new gender identity that does not conform to societal norms often results in discrimination and barriers to health care. The exact number of transgender patients is unknown; however, these patients are increasingly seen in health care. Transgender individuals may experience provider-generated discrimination in health care facilities, including refusal of service, disrespect, and abuse, which contribute to depression and low self-esteem. Transgender therapies include mental health counseling for depression and low self-esteem, hormone therapy, and sex reassignment surgery. Health care professionals require cultural competence, an understanding of the different forms of patient identification, and adaptive approaches to care for transgender patients. VA (Veterans Affairs) hospitals provide a model for the care for transgender patients and staff. PMID:26849981

  6. The perinatal: special care unit: expert care for high-risk patients.

    PubMed

    MacMullen, Nancy J; Meagher, Barbara

    2005-01-01

    Labor and delivery units are often used to provide care for nonlaboring patients requiring intensive medical and nursing care. The utilization of labor beds in this manner, however, can result in a shortage of beds for those patients who are truly in labor. Unfortunately, patient dissatisfaction, use of supplemental staffing, and ill-prepared, overworked nurses can then become the result of this practice. Clearly, an improved, innovative model of providing care for high-risk perinatal patients is needed. The purpose of this article is to describe how one hospital and its interdisciplinary team met the challenge of providing expert care for complex perinatal patients by creating a unique model of patient care delivery, the perinatal special care unit (PSCU). An advanced practice nursing role, the perinatal nurse practitioner (PNNP) was implemented to provide collaborative care for these patients. This article includes a discussion of positive and negative outcomes that occurred after the PSCU became a reality. Overall, housing patients on the PSCU has eliminated inappropriate use of labor and delivery beds and has led to a more satisfying childbearing experience for all involved. PMID:15867684

  7. Insomnia among patients with advanced disease during admission in a Palliative Care Unit: a prospective observational study on its frequency and association with psychological, physical and environmental factors

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The aims of this study were: 1) to assess the frequency of insomnia among patients during admission in a Palliative Care Unit (PCU); 2) to study the association between emotional distress and insomnia, taking physical, environmental and other psychological factors into account. Methods Prospective observational study including patients consecutively admitted to a PCU during eight months, excluding those with severe cognitive problems or too low performance status. Insomnia was assessed by asking a single question and by using the Sleep Disturbance Scale (SDS), and emotional distress using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). Physical, environmental and other psychological factors potentially interfering with sleep quality were evaluated. Association between insomnia and the factors evaluated was studied using univariate and multivariate regression analyses. Results 61 patients were included (mean age 71.5 years; 95% with oncological disease); 38 (62%) answered “yes” to the insomnia single question and 29 (47%) showed moderate to severe insomnia according to the SDS. 65% showed clinically significant emotional distress and 79% had nocturnal rumination. The physical symptoms most often mentioned as interfering with sleep quality were pain (69%) and dyspnoea (36%). 77% reported at least one environmental disturbance. In the univariate analysis, answering “yes” to the insomnia single question was significantly associated with higher HADS score, anxiety, nocturnal rumination, clear knowledge of the diagnosis, higher performance status and dyspnoea; moderate to severe insomnia was significantly associated with nocturnal rumination, higher performance status, environmental disturbances and daytime sleepiness. In the multivariate regression analysis, answering “yes” to the single question was associated with dyspnoea (OR 7.2 [1.65-31.27]; p = 0.009), nocturnal rumination (OR 5.5 [1.05-28.49]; p = 0.04) and higher performance

  8. Care of patients with permanent tracheostomy.

    PubMed

    Everitt, Erica

    The third article in our series on tracheostomy care discusses the care of patients with a permanent tracheostomy. While these patients make up a small proportion of all patients who have a tracheostomy inserted, they have complex needs. This means they require practitioners in both acute and community settings, who have time, support and competent tracheostomy-care skills, to achieve a successful discharge and ongoing management of their tracheostomy. PMID:27396099

  9. The Era of “E”: The Use of New Technologies in Advance Care Planning

    PubMed Central

    Green, Michael J.; Levi, Benjamin H.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we review developments in technology that can help patients, their loved ones, and healthcare providers engage in more effective advance care planning (ACP). We begin with a brief description of ACP and its purpose; then proceed to discuss various electronically available resources for ACP in the U.S.; and finally provide a critical assessment of the achievements, challenges, and future prospects for electronic advance care planning, or “e-planning.” PMID:23141197

  10. The ethics of end-of-life care for patients with ESRD.

    PubMed

    Davison, Sara N

    2012-12-01

    Patients with ESRD have extensive and unique palliative care needs, often for years before death. The vast majority of patients, however, dies in acute care facilities without accessing palliative care services. High mortality rates along with a substantial burden of physical, psychosocial, and spiritual symptoms and an increasing prevalence of decisions to withhold and stop dialysis all highlight the importance of integrating palliative care into the comprehensive management of ESRD patients. The focus of renal care would then extend to controlling symptoms, communicating prognosis, establishing goals of care, and determining end-of-life care preferences. Regretfully, training in palliative care for nephrology trainees is inadequate. This article will provide a conceptual framework for renal palliative care and describe opportunities for enhancing palliative care for ESRD patients, including improved chronic pain management and advance care planning and a new model for delivering high-quality palliative care that includes appropriate consultation with specialist palliative care. PMID:22997341

  11. Decision aids for advance care planning: an overview of the state of the science.

    PubMed

    Butler, Mary; Ratner, Edward; McCreedy, Ellen; Shippee, Nathan; Kane, Robert L

    2014-09-16

    Advance care planning honors patients' goals and preferences for future care by creating a plan for when illness or injury impedes the ability to think or communicate about health decisions. Fewer than 50% of severely or terminally ill patients have an advance directive in their medical record, and physicians are accurate only about 65% of the time when predicting patient preferences for intensive care. Decision aids can support the advance care planning process by providing a structured approach to informing patients about care options and prompting them to document and communicate their preferences. This review, commissioned as a technical brief by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Effective Health Care Program, provides a broad overview of current use of and research related to decision aids for adult advance care planning. Using interviews of key informants and a search of the gray and published literature from January 1990 to May 2014, the authors found that many decision aids are widely available but are not assessed in the empirical literature. The 16 published studies testing decision aids as interventions for adult advance care planning found that most are proprietary or not publicly available. Some are constructed for the general population, whereas others address disease-specific conditions that have more predictable end-of-life scenarios and, therefore, more discrete choices. New decision aids should be designed that are responsive to diverse philosophical perspectives and flexible enough to change as patients gain experience with their personal illness courses. Future efforts should include further research, training of advance care planning facilitators, dissemination and access, and tapping potential opportunities in social media or other technologies. PMID:25069709

  12. Creating an advance-care-planning decision aid for high-risk surgery: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background High-risk surgery patients may lose decision-making capacity as a result of surgical complications. Advance care planning prior to surgery may be beneficial, but remains controversial and is hindered by a lack of appropriate decision aids. This study sought to examine stakeholders’ views on the appropriateness of using decision aids, in general, to support advance care planning among high-risk surgery populations and the design of such a decision aid. Methods Key informants were recruited through purposive and snowball sampling. Semi-structured interviews were conducted by phone until data collected reached theoretical saturation. Key informants were asked to discuss their thoughts about advance care planning and interventions to support advance care planning, particularly for this population. Researchers took de-identified notes that were analyzed for emerging concordant, discordant, and recurrent themes using interpretative phenomenological analysis. Results Key informants described the importance of initiating advance care planning preoperatively, despite potential challenges present in surgical settings. In general, decision aids were viewed as an appropriate approach to support advance care planning for this population. A recipe emerged from the data that outlines tools, ingredients, and tips for success that are needed to design an advance care planning decision aid for high-risk surgical settings. Conclusions Stakeholders supported incorporating advance care planning in high-risk surgical settings and endorsed the appropriateness of using decision aids to do so. Findings will inform the next stages of developing the first advance care planning decision aid for high-risk surgery patients. PMID:25067908

  13. Fewer Advanced Alzheimer's Patients on Feeding Tubes

    MedlinePlus

    ... at someone in the advanced stages of a terminal illness, a feeding tube doesn't make a ... of palliative care (keeping a person with a terminal illness as comfortable as possible), Mitchell said. As ...

  14. How do patients with exacerbated chronic obstructive pulmonary disease experience care in the intensive care unit?

    PubMed Central

    Torheim, Henny; Kvangarsnes, Marit

    2014-01-01

    The aim was to gain insight into how patients with advanced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) experience care in the acute phase. The study has a qualitative design with a phenomenological approach. The empirics consist of qualitative in-depth interviews with ten patients admitted to the intensive care units in two Norwegian hospitals. The interviews were carried out from November 2009 to June 2011. The data have been analysed through meaning condensation, in accordance with Amadeo Giorgi's four-step method. Kari Martinsen's phenomenological philosophy of nursing has inspired the study. An essential structure of the patients' experiences of care in the intensive care unit by acute COPD-exacerbation may be described as: Feelings of being trapped in a life-threatening situation in which the care system assumes control over their lives. This experience is conditioned not only by the medical treatment, but also by the entire interaction with the caregivers. The essence of the phenomenon is presented through three themes which describe the patient's lived experience: preserving the breath of life, vulnerable interactions and opportunities for better health. Acute COPD-exacerbation is a traumatic experience and the patients become particularly vulnerable when they depend on others for breathing support. The phenomenological analysis shows that the patients experience good care during breath of life preservation when the care is performed in a way that gives patients more insight into their illness and gives new opportunities for the future. PMID:24313779

  15. Advancing critical care: time to kiss the right frog

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The greatest advances in critical care over the past two decades have been achieved through doing less to the patient. We have learnt through salutary experience that our burgeoning Master-of-the-Universe capabilities and the oh-so-obvious stratagems instilled in us from youth were often ineffective or even deleterious. This re-education process, however, is far from complete. We are now rightly agonizing over the need for better characterization of pathophysiology, earlier identification of disease processes and a more directed approach to therapeutic intervention. We need to delineate the point at which intrinsic and protective adaptation ends and true harmful pathology begins, and how our iatrogenic meddling either helps or hinders. We need to improve trial design in the heterogeneous populations we treat, and to move away from syndromic fixations that, while offering convenience, have generally proved counterproductive. Importantly, we need to discover a far more holistic approach to patient care, evolving from the prevailing overmedicalized, number-crunching perspective towards a true multidisciplinary effort that embraces psychological as well as physiological well-being, with appropriate pharmacological minimization or supplementation. Complacency, with an unfair apportion of blame on the patient for not getting better, is the biggest threat to continued improvement. PMID:23514321

  16. Real-world hospital costs for nonchemotherapy drugs and nondrug care associated with platinum-based doublets in the first-line setting for advanced nonsquamous non-small-cell lung cancer in Chinese patients: a retrospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jianhua; Wu, Shengqi; Hu, Chenping; Yang, Yicheng; Rajan, Narayan; Chen, Yun; Yang, Canjuan; Li, Jianfeng; Chen, Wendong

    2016-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to compare hospital costs per treatment cycle (HCTC) for nonchemotherapy drugs and nondrug care associated with platinum-based doublets in the first-line setting for advanced nonsquamous non-small-cell lung cancer (AdvNS-NSCLC) in Chinese patients. Methods Patients receiving platinum-based doublets in the first-line setting for AdvNS-NSCLC from 2010 to 2012 in two Chinese tertiary hospitals were identified to create the retrospective study cohort. Propensity score methods were used to create matched treatment groups for head-to-head comparisons on HCTC between pemetrexed–platinum and other platinum-based doublets. Multiple linear regression analyses were performed to rank studied platinum-based doublets for their associations with the log10 scale of HCTC for nonchemotherapy drugs and nondrug care. Results Propensity score methods created matched treatment groups for pemetrexed–platinum versus docetaxel–platinum (61 pairs), paclitaxel–platinum (39 pairs), gemcitabine–platinum (93 pairs), and vinorelbine–platinum (73 pairs), respectively. Even though the log10 scale of HCTC for nonchemotherapy drugs and nondrug care associated with pemetrexed–platinum was ranked lowest in all patients (coefficient −0.174, P=0.015), which included patients experiencing any hematological adverse events (coefficient −0.199, P=0.013), neutropenia (coefficient −0.426, P=0.021), or leukopenia (coefficient −0.406, P=0.001), pemetrexed–platinum had the highest total HCTC (median difference from RMB 1,692 to RMB 7,400, P<0.001) among platinum-based doublets because of its higher drug acquisition costs (median difference from RMB 4,636 to RMB 7,332, P<0.001). Conclusion Among Chinese patients receiving platinum-based doublets in the first-line setting for AdvNS-NSCLC, the higher acquisition costs for nonplatinum cytotoxic drugs associated with pemetrexed–platinum could be partially offset by its significantly lower hospital

  17. Impact of a Care Directives Activity Tab in the Electronic Health Record on Documentation of Advance Care Planning

    PubMed Central

    Turley, Marianne; Wang, Susan; Meng, Di; Kanter, Michael; Garrido, Terhilda

    2016-01-01

    Context: To ensure patient-centered end-of-life care, advance care planning (ACP) must be documented in the medical record and readily retrieved across care settings. Objective: To describe use of the Care Directives Activity tab (CDA), a single-location feature in the electronic health record for collecting and viewing ACP documentation in inpatient and ambulatory care settings, and to assess its association with ACP documentation rates. Design: Retrospective pre- and postimplementation analysis in 2012 and 2013 at Kaiser Permanente Southern California among 113,309 patients aged 65 years and older with ACP opportunities during outpatient or inpatient encounters. Main Outcome Measures: Providers’ CDA use rates and documentation rates of advance directives and physician orders for life-sustaining treatments stratified by CDA use. Results: Documentation rates of advance directives and physician orders for life-sustaining treatments among patients with outpatient and inpatient encounters were 3.5 to 9.6 percentage points higher for patients with CDA use vs those without it. The greatest differences were for orders for life-sustaining treatments among patients with inpatient encounters and for advance directives among patients with outpatient encounters; both were 9.6 percentage points higher among those with CDA use than those without it. All differences were significant after controlling for yearly variation (p < 0.001). Conclusion: Statistically significant differences in documentation rates between patients with and without CDA use suggest the potential of a standardized location in the electronic health record to improve ACP documentation. Further research is required to understand effects of CDA use on retrieval of preferences and end-of-life care. PMID:27057820

  18. Counseling patients to counsel physicians on future care in the event of patient incompetence.

    PubMed

    Schneiderman, L J; Arras, J D

    1985-05-01

    Physicians and patients share a common interest in clarifying and maximizing the powers and protection of advanced directives for future care in the event of patient incompetence. Although the complexity and unpredictability of health care circumstances make it impossible to guarantee complete control over therapeutic measures to be used when survival is in question, physicians should offer their patients the opportunity to reflect on their values and wishes and to express them explicitly. The ideal advanced directive should clearly state the author's intentions; contain clear documentation regarding authorship; be flexible, allowing family and caregivers to respond appropriately to changing circumstances; be available when needed; and be supported by legal powers that grant patients the right of enforcement and grant health care providers protection from liability. Advanced directives can be set as instruction directives or proxy directives, each form having advantages and disadvantages. PMID:3985517

  19. Health Care Outcomes and Advance Care Planning in Older Adults Who Receive Home-Based Palliative Care: A Pilot Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Thorsteinsdottir, Bjorg; Cha, Stephen S.; Hanson, Gregory J.; Peterson, Stephanie M.; Rahman, Parvez A.; Naessens, James M.; Takahashi, Paul Y.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: Approximately 20% of seniors live with five or more chronic medical illnesses. Terminal stages of their lives are often characterized by repeated burdensome hospitalizations and advance care directives are insufficiently addressed. This study reports on the preliminary results of a Palliative Care Homebound Program (PCHP) at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota to service these vulnerable populations. Objective: The study objective was to evaluate inpatient hospital utilization and the adequacy of advance care planning in patients who receive home-based palliative care. Methods: This is a retrospective pilot cohort study of patients enrolled in the PCHP between September 2012 and March 2013. Two control patients were matched to each intervention patient by propensity scoring methods that factor in risk and prognosis. Primary outcomes were six-month hospital utilization including ER visits. Secondary outcomes evaluated advance care directive completion and overall mortality. Results: Patients enrolled in the PCHP group (n=54) were matched to 108 controls with an average age of 87 years. Ninety-two percent of controls and 33% of PCHP patients were admitted to the hospital at least once. The average number of hospital admissions was 1.36 per patient for controls versus 0.35 in the PCHP (p<0.001). Total hospital days were reduced by 5.13 days. There was no difference between rates of ER visits. Advanced care directive were completed more often in the intervention group (98%) as compared to controls (31%), with p<0.001. Goals of care discussions were held at least once for all patients in the PCHP group, compared to 41% in the controls. PMID:25375663

  20. Multidisciplinary Care of the Patient with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kuzma, Anne Marie; Meli, Yvonne; Meldrum, Catherine; Jellen, Patricia; Butler-Lebair, Marianne; Koczen-Doyle, Debra; Rising, Peter; Stavrolakes, Kim; Brogan, Frances

    2008-01-01

    The National Emphysema Treatment Trial used a multidisciplinary team approach to implement the maximum medical care protocol, including adjustment of medications and outpatient pulmonary rehabilitation for all patients and nutritional and psychological counseling as needed. This article discusses the benefits of such an approach in the care of the patient with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Team member roles complement each other and contribute to the goal of providing the highest-quality medical care. The primary focus of the team is to reinforce the medical plan and to provide patient education and support. This article reviews the elements of the initial patient assessment and the functional and nutritional assessment. Patient education focuses on medication use, recognition and management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease exacerbation symptoms, smoking cessation, advance directives, and travel. PMID:18453373

  1. Integrating Compassionate, Collaborative Care (the "Triple C") Into Health Professional Education to Advance the Triple Aim of Health Care.

    PubMed

    Lown, Beth A; McIntosh, Sharrie; Gaines, Martha E; McGuinn, Kathy; Hatem, David S

    2016-03-01

    Empathy and compassion provide an important foundation for effective collaboration in health care. Compassion (the recognition of and response to the distress and suffering of others) should be consistently offered by health care professionals to patients, families, staff, and one another. However, compassion without collaboration may result in uncoordinated care, while collaboration without compassion may result in technically correct but depersonalized care that fails to meet the unique emotional and psychosocial needs of all involved. Providing compassionate, collaborative care (CCC) is critical to achieving the "triple aim" of improving patients' health and experiences of care while reducing costs. Yet, values and skills related to CCC (or the "Triple C") are not routinely taught, modeled, and assessed across the continuum of learning and practice. To change this paradigm, an interprofessional group of experts recently recommended approaches and a framework for integrating CCC into health professional education and postgraduate training as well as clinical care. In this Perspective, the authors describe how the Triple C framework can be integrated and enhance existing competency standards to advance CCC across the learning and practice continuum. They also discuss strategies for partnering with patients and families to improve health professional education and health care design and delivery through quality improvement projects. They emphasize that compassion and collaboration are important sources of professional, patient, and family satisfaction as well as critical aspects of professionalism and person-centered, relationship-based high-quality care. PMID:26717505

  2. Using Adult Learning Concepts To Assist Patients in Completing Advance Directives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, Rose Mary

    2000-01-01

    Advance directives that enable individuals to control their health care are underused due to lack of patient knowledge. Nurses can teach patients about them using adult learning principles, transformation theory, and skills for learning how to learn. (SK)

  3. Quality of Care in the Cirrhotic Patient

    PubMed Central

    Volk, Michael L; Kanwal, Fasiha

    2016-01-01

    Cirrhosis is a common, complex, chronic condition requiring care by multiple specialists in different locations. Emerging data demonstrates limitations in the quality of care these patients receive—in large part due to the problems with care coordination rather than failures of individual providers. This article will discuss approaches for measuring quality, and provide a step-by-step guide for developing quality improvement programs for this patient population. PMID:27101005

  4. On Strengthening Compassionate Care for Muslim Patients.

    PubMed

    Zaidi, Danish

    2015-09-01

    In this piece, I contribute to an ongoing conversation on compassionate care for Muslim patients. I address the various barriers hindering such care and ways in which to work around them. In providing an introductory understanding of general Islamic beliefs on the definition of life, the use of palliative care, etc., I hope this reflection can offer insight into the general background of Muslim patients and spark interest in further reading and research. PMID:26463856

  5. Relational sustainability: environments for long-term critical care patients.

    PubMed

    Mammen, Jens; Laude, Cum; Costello, Brenna

    2014-01-01

    Patients undergoing bone marrow transplant, using spinal cord services, and with traumatic brain injury represent a relatively new patient type, requiring both intense care and long-term care in the same facility. As medical advances allow these patients the opportunity to recover from their critical illnesses or injuries, designers and caregivers must give increased attention to the long-term critical care environment. Designing for this type of care requires an understanding of new technologies and the potential for the built environment to address the wide range of physical, sensory, and psychological issues long-term inpatients face. Recent work by SmithGroupJJR has provided valuable insights into the ways in which lighting, patient room and unit layouts, spatial volumes, and other design elements can contribute to the recovery of patients who must spend weeks or months in a critical care environment. This knowledge was gained through an approach that allows design professionals to immerse themselves in a health care institution's values, culture, and work processes. By mapping both operational flow and patients' experiences, project teams can develop design solutions that sustain the well-being of higher-acuity patients and their family members and caregivers. PMID:24309460

  6. Does Multidisciplinary Care Enhance the Management of Advanced Breast Cancer?: Evaluation of Advanced Breast Cancer Multidisciplinary Team Meetings

    PubMed Central

    Chirgwin, Jacquie; Craike, Melinda; Gray, Christine; Watty, Kathy; Mileshkin, Linda; Livingston, Patricia M.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the contribution of the advanced breast cancer (ABC) multidisciplinary team meetings (MDMs) to patient care and clinical outcomes. Methods: Members of ABC MDMs at two health services completed questionnaires in November 2007. The questionnaire asked about the performance of the MDMs and their contribution to improvement in patient care in five domains: medical management, psychosocial care, palliative care, care in the community, and benefits for team members. A final section covered the perceived value and importance of the MDM in patient management. Descriptive statistics (frequencies, mean, and standard deviation) were used to summarize the performance, improvement, and importance scores. Results: A total of 27 multidisciplinary team members (73%) completed the questionnaire. The MDM performed best in medical management (mean performance score out of 5 [M] = 3.78) and palliative care (M = 3.77). These were also the areas that were most improved through the MDM. Benefits to team members and care in the community (both M = 3.05) ranked lowest by both measures. The MDM provided the most benefit for patient management in the areas of “awareness of services available” (M = 4.32), “efficiency of referrals” (M = 4.27) and “supportive care for patients” (M = 4.27). “Awareness of services available,” “psychological care for patients,” and “continuity of care” were considered the most important (M = 4.64). Conclusion: The study provides evidence that MDMs make an important contribution to the logistical and medical management of patients with advanced breast cancer. PMID:21358959

  7. [The Nutrition Care of Severe Burn Patients].

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Yu-Hsiu

    2016-02-01

    In addition to recent advances in burn patient care techniques such as maintaining warm circumambient temperature, the early excision of wounds, and the use of closed dressing, providing nutrition support through early feeding has proven instrumental in greatly increasing the survival rate of burn patients. Severe burns complicated by many factors initiate tremendous physiological stress that leads to postburn hypermetabolism that includes enhanced tissue catabolism, the loss of muscle mass, and decreases in the body's reservoirs of protein and energy. These problems have become the focus of burn therapy. Treating severe burns aims not only to enhance survival rates but also to restore normal bodily functions as completely as possible. Recent research evaluating the application of anabolic agents and immune-enhance formula for severe burns therapy has generated significant controversy. Inadequate caloric intake is one of the main differences among the related studies, with the effect of many special nutrients such as bran acid amides not taken into consideration. Therefore, considering the sufficiency of caloric and protein intake is critical in assessing effectiveness. Only after patients receive adequate calories and protein may the effect of special nutrients such as glutamine and supplements be evaluated effectively. PMID:26813059

  8. [Breast cancer: patient care, rehabilitation, psychooncology].

    PubMed

    Kahán, Zsuzsanna; Szántó, István; Molnár, Mária; Rohánszky, Magda; Koncz, Zsuzsa; Mailáth, Mónika; Kapitány, Zsuzsanna; Dudás, Rita

    2016-09-01

    The development of a recommendation was intended for the follow-up of breast cancer patients treated with curative intent in Hungary. Follow-up includes the permanent contact with and health education of the patient, the surveillance and control of the adverse effects of oncological therapies or radiotherapy, the screening of metachron cancers, and the comprehensive (physical, psychological and social) rehabilitation of the patient. The early detection of local/regional tumor relapse is essential with careful follow-up, but there is no need for screening of distant metastases by means of imaging studies or tumor marker tests. If adjuvant endocrine therapy is needed, optimal adherence should be ensured with supportive therapy. In rare cases, special issues such as breast cancer risk/genetic mutation, pregnancy are raised, which should be thoughtfully discussed in view of recent advances in oncology. Follow-up is generally practised by the oncologist, however, in some cases the social worker, the physiotherapist, the psychooncologist, or in special cases, the lymphoedema expert is to be involved. The follow-up approach should be comprehensive and holistic. PMID:27579724

  9. Orphan symptoms in advanced cancer patients followed at home.

    PubMed

    Mercadante, Sebastiano; Porzio, Giampiero; Valle, Alessandro; Fusco, Flavio; Aielli, Federica; Adile, Claudio; Casuccio, Alessandra

    2013-12-01

    Orphan symptoms are rarely assessed, particularly at home. The aim of this multicenter prospective study was to assess the prevalence of these symptoms and eventual factors possibly associated in advanced cancer patients at admission of a home care program. A prospective study was performed at three home care programs in Italy. Patients' data were collected, including age, sex, diagnosis, and Karnofsky status. Possible contributing factors were analyzed; preexisting neurological diseases, cerebral metastases, hyperthermia, diabetes, a state of dehydration clinically evident and/or oliguria, possible biochemical parameters when available, data regarding recent chemotherapy, opioids and doses, use of neuroleptics, benzodiazepine or anticonvulsants, corticosteroids, anti-inflammatory, and antibiotics were collected. Myoclonus, hiccup, sweating, pruritus, and tenesmus, either rectal or vesical, were assessed, according to a preliminary definition, at time of home care program admission. Three hundred sixty-two patients were surveyed at the three home care programs. Globally, 48 patients presented one or more orphan symptoms in the period taken into consideration, and 7 patients presented more than 1 symptom. One patient presented occasional and diffuse myoclonus. Nineteen patients presented sweating, 13 patients presented pruritus, and 14 patients presented hiccup. Finally, nine patients presented rectal or vesical tenesmus. There was a significant correlation between sweating and transdermal fentanyl use (P = 0.044), fever (P = 0.001), hiccup (P < 0.0005), and vesical tenesmus (P = 0.028). Pruritus was not associated to any factor. Hiccup was associated with gender (males, P = 0.006) and sweating (P < 0.0005). Vesical tenesmus was associated with fever (P = 0.019) and sweating (P = 0.028). Although the symptoms examined have a low prevalence in advanced cancer patients admitted to home care, the distress for patients may be high and

  10. Discussing the Evidence for Upstream Palliative Care in Improving Outcomes in Advanced Cancer.

    PubMed

    LeBlanc, Thomas W; Nickolich, Myles S; El-Jawahri, Areej; Temel, Jennifer S

    2016-01-01

    Palliative care has received increasing attention at the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Annual Meeting since the publication of its provisional clinical opinion on the topic in 2012. Despite frequent discussion, palliative care remains a source of some controversy and confusion in clinical practice, especially concerning who should provide it, what it encompasses, and when and how it can help patients and their families. In this article, we provide a formal definition of palliative care and review the state of the science of palliative care in oncology. Several randomized controlled trials now show that palliative care improves important outcomes for patients with cancer. Related outcome improvements include a reduction in symptoms, improved quality of life, better prognostic understanding, less depressed mood, less aggressive end-of-life care, reduced resource utilization, and even prolonged survival. As such, ASCO recommends early integration of palliative care into comprehensive cancer care for all patients with advanced disease and/or significant symptom burden. Our aim is that this summary will facilitate greater understanding about palliative care and encourage further integration of palliative care services into cancer care. More research is needed to illuminate the mechanisms of action of palliative care and to improve the specificity of palliative care applications to unique scenarios and populations in oncology. PMID:27249764

  11. [Depression screening and possible applications of advance care planning].

    PubMed

    Wada, Taizo

    2013-01-01

    Depression screening was conducted to determine the health status of community-dwelling elderly individuals, and the concept of advance care planning was introduced. While depression screening among the elderly often uses the Geriatric Depression Scale, a single question regarding depressive mood also provides a valid measure of depression in elderly persons. Depression is associated with lower activities of daily living, competence, and subjective quality of life among the elderly living in Vietnam and Indonesia, as well as in Japan. Advance care planning is a process of discussion between individuals and their care providers to make decisions about future care preferences and priorities, while they are still capable. If they wish, they may prepare an advance directive to inform others about their decisions and best interests, such as a written advance decision to refuse treatment and/or appointment of a person with lasting powers of attorney. The purpose of advance care planning is to enable elderly persons to receive better end-of-life care. To promote introduction of advance care planning in Japan, voluntary discussion among family members should be encouraged. PMID:23979330

  12. Models of primary care for frail patients

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Christopher; Wilson, C. Ruth

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective To discuss models of care for frail seniors provided in primary care settings and those developed by Canadian FPs. Sources of information Ovid MEDLINE and the Cochrane database were searched from 2010 to January 2014 using the terms models of care, family medicine, elderly, and geriatrics. Main message New models of funding for primary care have opened opportunities for ways of caring for complex frail older patients. Severity of frailty is an important factor, and more severe frailty should prompt consideration of using an alternate model of care for a senior. In Canada, models in use include integrated care systems, shared care models, home-based care models, and family medicine specialty clinics. No one model should take precedence but FPs should be involved in developing and implementing strategies that meet the needs of individual patients and communities. Organizational and remunerative supports will need to be put in place to achieve widespread uptake of such models. Conclusion Given the increased numbers of frail seniors and the decrease in access to hospital beds, prioritized care models should include ones focused on optimizing health, decreasing frailty, and helping to avoid hospitalization of frail and well seniors alike. The Health Care of the Elderly Program Committee at the College of Family Physicians of Canada is hosting a repository for models of care used by FPs and is asking physicians to submit their ideas for how to best care for frail seniors. PMID:26380850

  13. [Hospital-based advanced home-care, models from Ekenäs, Finland].

    PubMed

    Wikström, U; Weibull, H; Klockars, M

    1998-12-01

    In 1995, advanced home treatment services were introduced at Västra Nyland district hospital in Finland. For selected patients the new services constitute an alternative where hospitalisation would otherwise be necessary. Some of the hospital bed resources were moved to the patients' homes together with a trained team with immediate responsibility for the patients and providing 24-hour care, backed up by access to hospital resources in terms of specialised knowledge and sophisticated technology. Two years' experience of 500 patients so treated showed their diseases to have represented the complete spectrum of specialists fields. The most common diagnoses were oncological and infectious diseases. Although preliminary assessment suggests advanced home care to be a cheaper alternative than hospitalised care, the preeminent advantage from the patients' point of view was improved quality of life. PMID:9894412

  14. THE ROLE OF INFORMATICS IN PROMOTING PATIENT-CENTERED CARE

    PubMed Central

    Snyder, Claire F.; Wu, Albert W.; Miller, Robert S.; Jensen, Roxanne E.; Bantug, Elissa T.; Wolff, Antonio C.

    2011-01-01

    Patient-centered care is an important aspect of high-quality care. Health informatics, particularly advances in technology, has the potential to facilitate, or detract from, patient-centered cancer care. Informatics can provide a mechanism for patients to provide their clinician(s) with critical information, and to share information with family, friends, and other patients. This information may enable patients to exert greater control over their own care. Clinicians may use information systems (e.g., electronic medical records) to coordinate care and share information with other clinicians. Patients and clinicians may use communication tools and information resources to interact with one another in new ways. Caution in using new information resources is warranted to avoid reliance on biased or inappropriate data, and clinicians may need to direct patients to appropriate information resources. Perhaps the greatest challenge for both patients and providers is identifying information that is high-quality and which enhances (and does not impede) their interactions. PMID:21799327

  15. [Guidelines for psychosocial care of cancer patients].

    PubMed

    Caminiti, Caterina

    2013-01-01

    Guidelines for psychosocial care of cancer patients. The Italian Association of Medical Oncologists published in 2013 the update of the first edition of the Psychosocial Guidelines for the care of cancer patients. The guidelines, produced by a multidisciplinary group (medical doctors, nurses, oncologists, psychologists and patients) aim at recognizing the importance of psychosocial care in helping the patients and their relatives to overcome the effects of the diagnosis and the treatments on mental health and emotional wellbeing. In some cases the evidences available are not as hard as those supporting drug treatments: many outcomes such as the effectiveness of educational interventions, the patients' wellbeing, thrust, perception of support, for their nature and complexity require both quantitative and qualitative measurements. Lack of robust evidences such as those obtained from clinical trials, does not necessarily correspond to lack of effectiveness of the intervention nor should make us forget that patients' rights (to good care, information and support) should be guaranteed. PMID:24441468

  16. Clinical review: The critical care management of the burn patient

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Between 4 and 22% of burn patients presenting to the emergency department are admitted to critical care. Burn injury is characterised by a hypermetabolic response with physiologic, catabolic and immune effects. Burn care has seen renewed interest in colloid resuscitation, a change in transfusion practice and the development of anti-catabolic therapies. A literature search was conducted with priority given to review articles, meta-analyses and well-designed large trials; paediatric studies were included where adult studies were lacking with the aim to review the advances in adult intensive care burn management and place them in the general context of day-to-day practical burn management. PMID:24093225

  17. Measuring patient satisfaction in complex continuing care/rehabilitation care.

    PubMed

    Malik, Navin; Alvaro, Celeste; Kuluski, Kerry; Wilkinson, Andrea J

    2016-04-18

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to develop a psychometrically validated survey to assess satisfaction in complex continuing care (CCC)/rehabilitation patients. Design/methodology/approach - A paper or computer-based survey was administered to 252 CCC/rehabilitation patients (i.e. post-acute hospital care setting for people who require ongoing care before returning home) across two hospitals in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Findings - Using factor analysis, five domains were identified with loadings above 0.4 for all but one item. Behavioral intention and information/communication showed the lowest patient satisfaction, while patient centredness the highest. Each domain correlated positively and significantly predicted overall satisfaction, with quality and safety showing the strongest predictive power and the healing environment the weakest. Gender made a significant contribution to predicting overall satisfaction, but age did not. Research limitations/implications - Results provide evidence of the survey's psychometric properties. Owing to a small sample, supplemental testing with a larger patient group is required to confirm the five-factor structure and to assess test-retest reliability. Originality/value - Improving the health system requires integrating patient perspectives. The patient experience, however, will vary depending on the population being served. This is the first psychometrically validated survey specific to a smaller specialty patient group receiving care at a CCC/rehabilitation facility in Canada. PMID:27120509

  18. A Palliative Approach to Dialysis Care: A Patient-Centered Transition to the End of Life

    PubMed Central

    Moss, Alvin H.; Cohen, Lewis M.; Fischer, Michael J.; Germain, Michael J.; Jassal, S. Vanita; Perl, Jeffrey; Weiner, Daniel E.; Mehrotra, Rajnish

    2014-01-01

    As the importance of providing patient-centered palliative care for patients with advanced illnesses gains attention, standard dialysis delivery may be inconsistent with the goals of care for many patients with ESRD. Many dialysis patients with life expectancy of <1 year may desire a palliative approach to dialysis care, which focuses on aligning patient treatment with patients’ informed preferences. This commentary elucidates what comprises a palliative approach to dialysis care and describes its potential and appropriate use. It also reviews the barriers to integrating such an approach into the current clinical paradigm of care and existing infrastructure and outlines system-level changes needed to accommodate such an approach. PMID:25104274

  19. The Evolution of Health Care Advance Planning Law and Policy

    PubMed Central

    Sabatino, Charles P

    2010-01-01

    Context: The legal tools of health care advance planning have substantially changed since their emergence in the mid-1970s. Thirty years of policy development, primarily at the state legislative level addressing surrogate decision making and advance directives, have resulted in a disjointed policy landscape, yet with important points of convergence evolving over time. An understanding of the evolution of advance care planning policy has important implications for policy at both the state and federal levels. Methods: This article is a longitudinal statutory and literature review of health care advance planning from its origins to the present. Findings: While considerable variability across the states still remains, changes in law and policy over time suggest a gradual paradigm shift from what is described as a “legal transactional approach” to a “communications approach,” the most recent extension of which is the emergence of Physician Orders for Life-Sustaining Treatment, or POLST. The communications approach helps translate patients’ goals into visible and portable medical orders. Conclusions: States are likely to continue gradually moving away from a legal transactional mode of advance planning toward a communications model, albeit with challenges to authentic and reliable communication that accurately translates patients’ wishes into the care they receive. In the meantime, the states and their health care institutions will continue to serve as the primary laboratory for advance care planning policy and practice. PMID:20579283

  20. Experiences of critical care nurses caring for unresponsive patients.

    PubMed

    Villanueva, N E

    1999-08-01

    Grounded theory methodology was utilized to explore the experiences of critical care nurses caring for patients who were unable to respond due to a traumatic brain injury or receiving neuromuscular blocking agents. The registered nurses participating in the study worked in a neuroscience intensive care unit. Saturation of the categories was achieved with 16 interviews. The core category that emerged from the study is Giving the Patient a Chance. The subcategories of Learning about My Patient, Maintaining and Monitoring, Talking to My Patient, Working with Families, Struggling with Dilemmas and Personalizing the Experience all centered upon the focus of doing everything to help the patient attain the best possible outcome. Factors influencing each of the subcategories were identified such as the acuity of the patient, experience level of the nurse and the presence or absence of family members or significant others. These factors accounted for the variations in the nurses' experience. Several reasons accounting for the variations were determined. The study identified areas that need to be addressed in both general nursing education and nursing practice, such as instruction on talking to comatose patients, working with families and orientation information for nurses new to caring for these populations. Recommendations for improvement in these areas, as well as for future studies are discussed. PMID:10553569

  1. Promoting perioperative advance care planning: a systematic review of advance care planning decision aids.

    PubMed

    Aslakson, Rebecca A; Schuster, Anne L R; Reardon, Jessica; Lynch, Thomas; Suarez-Cuervo, Catalina; Miller, Judith A; Moldovan, Rita; Johnston, Fabian; Anton, Blair; Weiss, Matthew; Bridges, John F P

    2015-11-01

    This systematic review identifies possible decision aids that promote perioperative advance care planning (ACP) and synthesizes the available evidence regarding their use. Using PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane, SCOPUS, Web of Science, CINAHL, PsycINFO and Sociological Abstracts, researchers identified and screened articles for eligibility. Data were abstracted and risk of bias assessed for included articles. Thirty-nine of 5327 articles satisfied the eligibility criteria. Primarily completed in outpatient ambulatory populations, studies evaluated a variety of ACP decision aids. None were evaluated in a perioperative population. Fifty unique outcomes were reported with no head-to-head comparisons conducted. Findings are likely generalizable to a perioperative population and can inform development of a perioperative ACP decision aid. Future studies should compare the effectiveness of ACP decision aids. PMID:26346494

  2. Advanced practice nursing in performing arts health care.

    PubMed

    Weslin, Anna T; Silva-Smith, Amy

    2010-06-01

    Performing arts medicine is a growing health care profession specializing in the needs of performing artists. As part of the performing arts venue, the dancer, a combination of athlete and artist, presents with unique health care needs requiring a more collaborative and holistic health care program. Currently there are relatively few advanced practice nurses (APNs) who specialize in performing arts health care. APNs, with focus on collaborative and holistic health care, are ideally suited to join other health care professionals in developing and implementing comprehensive health care programs for the performing artist. This article focuses on the dancer as the client in an APN practice that specializes in performing arts health care. PMID:20644180

  3. Patient stoma care: educational theory in practice.

    PubMed

    Williams, Jenny

    Patients undergoing stoma formation encounter many challenges including psychosocial issues, relationship concerns and fear of leakage. Leakage, inappropriate product usage and poor patient adaptation post stoma formation has cost implications for the NHS. Developing good, practical stoma care skills has been identified as improving patient outcomes, promoting the provision of quality care and improving efficiency within the NHS. However, a thorough literature search indicated that there is little research available on patient stoma care education. This is considered surprising by Metcalf (1999), O'Connor (2005) and the author of this article. This article considers and adapts generic educational theory to make it pertinent to patient stoma care education in order to bridge the gap between theory and practice. PMID:22874778

  4. Standards of care for patients with spondyloarthritis.

    PubMed

    Abad, Miguel Ángel; Ariza, Rafael Ariza; Aznar, Juan José; Batlle, Enrique; Beltrán, Emma; de Dios Cañete, Juan; de Miguel, Eugenio; Escudero, Alejandro; Fernández-Carballido, Cristina; Gratacós, Jordi; Loza, Estíbaliz; Linares, Luis Francisco; Montilla, Carlos; Ramos, Manuel Moreno; Mulero, Juan; Queiro, Rubén; Raya, Enrique; Lozano, Carlos Rodríguez; Moreno, Jesús Rodríguez; Sanz, Jesús; Silva-Fernández, Lucía; Torre Alonso, Juan Carlos; Zarco, Pedro; Fernández-Sueiro, José Luis; Juanola, Xavier

    2014-02-01

    To define and give priory to standards of care in patients with spondyloarthritis (SpA). A systematic literature review on SpA standards of care and a specific search in relevant and related sources was performed. An expert panel was established who developed the standards of care and graded their priority (high, mild, low, or no priority) following qualitative methodology and Delphi process. An electronic survey was sent to a representative sample of 167 rheumatologists all around the country, who also gave priority to the standards of care (same scale). A descriptive analysis is presented. The systematic literature review retrieved no article specifically related to SpA patients. A total of 38 standards of care were obtained-12 related to structure, 20 to process, and 6 to result. Access to care, treatment, and safety standards of care were given a high priority by most of rheumatologists. Standards not directly connected to daily practice were not given such priority, as standards which included a time framework. The standards generated for the performance evaluation (including patient and professionals satisfaction) were not considered especially important in general. This set of standards of care should help improve the quality of care in SpA patients. PMID:24390635

  5. Comprehensive care of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis patients: a care model.

    PubMed

    Güell, Maria Rosa; Antón, Antonio; Rojas-García, Ricardo; Puy, Carmen; Pradas, Jesus

    2013-12-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a devastating neurodegenerative disease that presents with muscle weakness, causing progressive difficulty in movement, communication, eating and ultimately, breathing, creating a growing dependence on family members and other carers. The ideal way to address the problems associated with the disease, and the decisions that must be taken, is through multidisciplinary teams. The key objectives of these teams are to optimise medical care, facilitate communication between team members, and thus to improve the quality of care. In our centre, we have extensive experience in the care of patients with ALS through an interdisciplinary team whose aim is to ensure proper patient care from the hospital to the home setting. In this article, we describe the components of the team, their roles and our way of working. PMID:23540596

  6. Building on Individual, State, and Federal Initiatives for Advance Care Planning, an Integral Component of Palliative and End-of-Life Cancer Care

    PubMed Central

    Epstein, Andrew S.; Volandes, Angelo E.; O'Reilly, Eileen M.

    2011-01-01

    Federal and state provisions for advance care planning—the process by which patients, families, and medical professionals plan for future and, in particular, end-of-life care—continue to receive attention. Such planning remains an integral component of palliative care, complementing the recognition and treatment of pain and other symptoms that patients with advanced malignancies and their families encounter. Historically, advance care planning interventions (particularly those involving advance directives) have been unable to consistently demonstrate positive outcomes for patients with life-threatening illnesses. However, more recent literature, including that on patients with cancer, illustrates that both patients and caregivers report improved quality of life and less distress after discussions with their health care teams about end-of-life care. Herein, we discuss recent federal and state public policy that focuses on advance care planning, suggesting the promise for care delivery improvements and the means by which existing barriers might be surmounted. These care delivery issues apply to several disease states but are particularly pertinent to the adult oncology setting. PMID:22379415

  7. Incorporating Patient-Reported Outcomes Into Health Care To Engage Patients And Enhance Care.

    PubMed

    Lavallee, Danielle C; Chenok, Kate E; Love, Rebecca M; Petersen, Carolyn; Holve, Erin; Segal, Courtney D; Franklin, Patricia D

    2016-04-01

    The provision of patient-centered care requires a health care environment that fosters engagement between patients and their health care team. One way to encourage patient-centered care is to incorporate patient-reported outcomes into clinical settings. Collecting these outcomes in routine care ensures that important information only the patient can provide is captured. This provides insights into patients' experiences of symptoms, quality of life, and functioning; values and preferences; and goals for health care. Previously embraced in the research realm, patient-reported outcomes have started to play a role in successful shared decision making, which can enhance the safe and effective delivery of health care. We examine the opportunities for using patient-reported outcomes to enhance care delivery and outcomes as health care information needs and technology platforms change. We highlight emerging practices in which patient-reported outcomes provide value to patients and clinicians and improve care delivery. Finally, we examine present and future challenges to maximizing the use of patient-reported outcomes in the clinic. PMID:27044954

  8. Advanced practice roles in the managed care environment.

    PubMed

    Madden, M J; Ponte, P R

    1994-01-01

    The role of the advanced practice nurse is based on expert clinical knowledge and skill and is practiced in multiple settings. As healthcare reform emerges, the context in which healthcare is delivered changes. The authors describe a creative approach to packaging and marketing the services of advanced practice nurses to the customers of the managed care system. PMID:8308561

  9. Religious Coping and Behavioral Disengagement: Opposing Influences on Advance Care Planning and Receipt of Intensive Care Near Death

    PubMed Central

    Maciejewski, Paul K.; Phelps, Andrea C.; Kacel, Elizabeth L.; Balboni, Tracy A.; Balboni, Michael; Wright, Alexi A.; Pirl, William; Prigerson, Holly G.

    2011-01-01

    Objective This study examines the relationships between methods of coping with advanced cancer, completion of advance care directives, and receipt of intensive, life-prolonging care near death. Methods The analysis is based on a sample of 345 patients interviewed between January 1, 2003, and August 31, 2007, and followed until death as part of the Coping with Cancer Study, an NCI/NIMH-funded, multi-site, prospective, longitudinal, cohort study of patients with advanced cancer. The Brief COPE was used to assess active coping, use of emotional-support, and behavioral disengagement. The Brief RCOPE was used to assess positive and negative religious coping. The main outcome was intensive, life-prolonging care near death, defined as receipt of ventilation or resuscitation in the last week of life. Results Positive religious coping was associated with lower rates of having a living will (AOR=0.39, p=0.003) and predicted higher rates of intensive, life-prolonging care near death (AOR, 5.43; p<0.001), adjusting for other coping methods and potential socio-demographic and health status confounds. Behavioral disengagement was associated with higher rates of DNR order completion (AOR, 2.78; p=0.003) and predicted lower rates of intensive life-prolonging care near death (AOR, 0.20; p=0.036). Not having a living will partially mediated the influence of positive religious coping on receipt of intensive, life-prolonging care near death. Conclusion Positive religious coping and behavioral disengagement are important determinants of completion of advance care directives and receipt of intensive, life-prolonging care near death. PMID:21449037

  10. Advance care planning for older people in Australia presenting to the emergency department from the community or residential aged care facilities.

    PubMed

    Street, Maryann; Ottmann, Goetz; Johnstone, Megan-Jane; Considine, Julie; Livingston, Patricia M

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this retrospective, cross-sectional study was to determine the prevalence of advance care planning (ACP) among older people presenting to an Emergency Department (ED) from the community or a residential aged care facility. The study sample comprised 300 older people (aged 65+ years) presenting to three Victorian EDs in 2011. A total of 150 patients transferred from residential aged care to ED were randomly selected and then matched to 150 people who lived in the community and attended the ED by age, gender, reason for ED attendance and triage category on arrival. Overall prevalence of ACP was 13.3% (n = 40/300); over one-quarter (26.6%, n = 40/150) of those presenting to the ED from residential aged care had a documented Advance Care Plan, compared to none (0%, n = 0/150) of the people from the community. There were no significant differences in the median ED length of stay, number of investigations and interventions undertaken in ED, time seen by a doctor or rate of hospital admission for those with an Advance Care Plan compared to those without. Those with a comorbidity of cerebrovascular disease or dementia and those assessed with impaired brain function were more likely to have a documented Advance Care Plan on arrival at ED. Length of hospital stay was shorter for those with an Advance Care Plan [median (IQR) = 3 days (2-6) vs. 6 days (2-10), P = 0.027] and readmission lower (0% vs. 13.7%). In conclusion, older people from the community transferred to ED were unlikely to have a documented Advance Care Plan. Those from residential aged care who were cognitively impaired more frequently had an Advance Care Plan. In the ED, decisions of care did not appear to be influenced by the presence or absence of Advance Care Plans, but length of hospital admission was shorter for those with an Advance Care Plan. PMID:25443161

  11. Emotional intelligence and patient-centred care

    PubMed Central

    Birks, Yvonne F; Watt, Ian S

    2007-01-01

    The principles of patient-centred care are increasingly stressed as part of health care policy and practice. Explanations for why some practitioners seem more successful in achieving patient-centred care vary, but a possible role for individual differences in personality has been postulated. One of these, emotional intelligence (EI), is increasingly referred to in health care literature. This paper reviews the literature on EI in health care and poses a series of questions about the links between EI and patient-centred outcomes. Papers concerning empirical examinations of EI in a variety of settings were identified to determine the evidence base for its increasing popularity. The review suggests that a substantial amount of further research is required before the value of EI as a useful concept can be substantiated. PMID:17682030

  12. The views of older Malaysians on advanced directive and advanced care planning: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Htut, Y; Shahrul, K; Poi, P J H

    2007-01-01

    The provision of optimum care for the ageing population is dependent on the understanding of their views and values on end of life issues. A qualitative descriptive study was conducted to describe views of elderly Malaysians on Advanced Care Planning (henceforth ACP) and Advanced Directives (henceforth AD), and explore factors influencing these views. Fifteen elderly subjects with ages ranging from 65 to 83 years, representing different ethnic and religious groups in Malaysia were selected for in-depth interviews guided by a questionnaire. Five core themes were extracted from the interviews: 1) Considering the future 2) Contingency plans for future illnesses 3) Attitudes towards life prolonging treatment procedures 4) Doctor-patient relationships and 5) Influence of religion on decisions related to future illness. Despite the lack of knowledge on ACP and AD, older respondents were very receptive to their concept. Although the majority agreed on the importance of planning for future medical management and having open discussion on end of life issues with their doctor, they felt it unnecessary to make a formal written AD. Most felt that the future was best left to fate or God, and none had made any contingency plan for severe future illnesses citing religion as reason for this view. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation, mechanical ventilation and dialysis were considered by most to be invasive life prolonging treatments. We suggest that doctors initiate discussions on end of life care with every older patient and their family so as to promote awareness and introduce the concept of ACP/AD to a Malaysian setting. PMID:18330404

  13. Patient access innovations: integrating patients within the system of care.

    PubMed

    Marino, Daniel J; Faber, William; Duncan, Meredith

    2015-12-01

    Clinically integrated networks seeking to ensure in-network access and strengthen patient engagement should adopt five strategic areas of focus: Extend access beyond traditional models. Manage out-migration. Make it easy for patients to stay in the network. Build patient engagement into clinical care models. Explore innovative methods to engage patients. PMID:26793943

  14. Problems faced by relatives caring for cancer patients at home.

    PubMed

    Tsigaroppoulos, Thomas; Mazaris, Evangelos; Chatzidarellis, Eleftherios; Skolarikos, Andreas; Varkarakis, Ioannis; Deliveliotis, Charalambos

    2009-02-01

    The care of patients suffering from advanced cancer is not limited in the hospital setting. It continues at home where the burden of care is borne by specific individuals. The aim of the present study was to survey and record the various problems faced by those who care for cancer patients at home. The study was conducted in our hospital during the summer of 2007. All participants completed, during a personal interview, a questionnaire which covered pathologic, social, psychological, spiritual/religious and financial problems. Seventy-six carers returned fully completed questionnaires. The most frequent problems reported were: anxiety regarding the patient's future (61.8%), troublesome symptoms such as pain (54%), increased economic burden-financial difficulty (51.3%), problems with patient's feeding (50%), unhappiness or depression (48,7%), emotional upset (47.4%), worsening of the patient's behaviour and personality (38.2%), difficulty of establishing a positive attitude regarding their current status (34.2%), transport to hospital (32.9%), assistance from the wider family circle (25%). Taking care of cancer patients at home creates several problems among carers. Many of them remain undetected. The acknowledgement and recognition of these problems by health-care professionals might contribute to finding solutions in order to assist the difficult task of these individuals. PMID:19187163

  15. Leadership: improving the quality of patient care.

    PubMed

    Clegg, A

    The satisfaction staff achieve from their work is in part determined by the style of management they work under. This article analyses the impact of a proactive leadership style on team performance and the quality of patient care. PMID:11973895

  16. Effective Perioperative Communication to Enhance Patient Care.

    PubMed

    Garrett, J Hudson

    2016-08-01

    Breakdowns in health care communication are a significant cause of sentinel events and associated patient morbidity and mortality. Effective communication is a necessary component of a patient safety program, which enables all members of the interdisciplinary health care team to effectively manage their individual roles and responsibilities in the perioperative setting; set expectations for safe, high-reliability care; and measure and assess outcomes. To sustain a culture of safety, effective communication should be standardized, complete, clear, brief, and timely. Executive leadership and support helps remove institutional barriers and address challenges to support the engagement of patients in health care communication, which has been shown to improve outcomes, reduce costs, and improve the patient experience. PMID:27472971

  17. Care of patients who have died.

    PubMed

    Pattison, Natalie

    This article outlines the steps involved in preparing the patient after death--known as last offices. It addresses legal and non-legal issues, religious considerations, hygiene care and aftercare for the family. PMID:18429457

  18. Direct Patient Care: A Viable Career Choice?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colavecchio, Ruth

    1982-01-01

    Examines nurses' attitudes about direct patient care in hospitals. Suggests a new perspective on nursing careers, one that should stimulate nursing administrators' thinking about developing programs that retain experienced clinicians, reward their practice, and acknowledge their contributions. (JOW)

  19. [Psychiatric complications in patients under intensive care].

    PubMed

    Brand, M P; Suter, P; Gunn-Séchéhaye, A; Gardaz, J P; Gemperlé, M

    1978-01-01

    Ten adult patients with psychiatric disorders in the intensive care ward were examined. The length of stay varied from one week to four months and mechanical ventilation was necessary for all patients. Their experience of intensive care and their psychosensorial problems were as follows: temperospatial disorientation, perturbation of the sense of posture, hallucinations which could go as far as oneiric delirium, anguish and symptoms of depression. No psychotic syndrome, literraly speaking, was observed objectively. In the monthes that followed the stay under intensive care many patients presented important psychosomatic disorders. Organic factors are responsible for these complications, though the environment of the intensive care could induce a marked disafferentation. An effort by the attending staff, aimed at orientating or "reafferenting" these patients, could reduce these problems. PMID:30349

  20. Partial Knee with Personalized Patient Care

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    Oxford® Partial Knee with Signature™ Personalized Patient Care You must have Javascript enabled in your web browser. View Program Transcript Click Here to view the OR-Live, Inc. Privacy Policy and ...

  1. Spiritual Care For Jewish Patients Facing A Life Threatening Illness

    PubMed Central

    Bluman, Rabbi Olga F.; Klein, Linda; Thomas, Jay; Ferrell, Betty

    2013-01-01

    Providing biopsychosocial/spiritual care for patients facing a life threatening illness can be complex, and this complexity can be amplified when a patient identifies as Jewish. A common but incorrect assumption is that a person who identifies him or herself as Jewish abides by the tenets of the Jewish religion. However, many Jews consider themselves Jewish in an ethnic or cultural sense rather than connected to a religion or belief in God. This case report presents an ethnic/cultural Jew with a life threatening illness of advanced lung cancer. Despite evidence of spiritual/existential suffering, this patient declined spiritual care. From an analysis of this case and clinical experience, we suggest exploratory questions that clinicians can use in response to common questions or statements made by such patients. This exploration may lead to a chaplain referral and we highlight interventions that chaplains and clinicians may find helpful as they come alongside Jewish patients. PMID:23614173

  2. Military nursing care of Iraqi patients.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Petra; Edge, Bethany; Agazio, Janice; Prue-Owens, Kathy

    2013-09-01

    The purpose of this phenomenological study was to understand military nurses' experiences of care for Iraqi patients. Analysis yielded three themes-expanding practice, ethical dilemmas, and the cultural divide. "Expanding practice" is the nurses' descriptions of their personal initiative to seek opportunities for learning additional knowledge and skills so that they would be competent to provide care for all ages of patients from newborns to the elderly with a wide variety of complex diagnoses. "Ethical dilemmas" represented the mental distress the nurses experienced when confronted with moral imperatives related to the safe care of the patient. Nurses were faced with feelings of animosity toward provision of care of host nation patients, lack of trust in interpreters, and distressed because of their inability to ensure continuity of care. The "cultural divide" showed the challenges that the nurses confronted when caring for a population with a different language, value system, customs, and traditions. The themes support existing research and extend information about care of host nation patients adding depth and breadth to specific content areas. These nurses developed situated knowledge needed for particular challenges and experienced personal and professional growth. PMID:24005551

  3. Recent advances in the treatment of advanced renal cell carcinoma: towards multidisciplinary personalized care.

    PubMed

    Bex, Axel; Gore, Martin; Mulders, Peter; Sternberg, Cora N

    2012-11-01

    What's known on the subject? and What does the study add? With recent improvements in the prognosis for patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC), focus is now shifting towards maximising clinical benefit from targeted therapies. Factors other than efficacy data are increasingly being considered when selecting a treatment strategy, with a view towards optimising clinical outcomes. This review examines the development and efficacy of targeted agents for the management of mRCC and discusses the potential factors, including resistance mechanisms, sequential therapy, prognostic and predictive markers of response, and adverse event management, that may contribute to successful individually tallored treatment of patients with this disease. • Targeted agents have substantially improved outcomes for patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC). • Treatment focus is now shifting towards achieving a continuum of care such that long-term benefit and extended survival may be achieved through the optimal use of targeted agents. • To achieve this goal, a number of factors which impact on treatment selection and outcomes need to be considered when treating patients with mRCC, such as the optimal sequence of targeted therapies (and the related issue of resistance mechanisms). • Recent advances are also likely to impact on the future treatment of mRCC. Examples include the identification of predictive biomarkers as well as a consideration of patient risk profiles or the safety profile of the selected targeted agent. In addition, attention is focusing on re-defining the role of surgery for the treatment of RCC in the context of targeted therapies. • This review examines the recent and future advances that offer the potential for personalizing treatment by selecting the most appropriate treatment for each patient with a view towards optimizing clinical outcomes. PMID:22624610

  4. Home care for brain tumor patients

    PubMed Central

    Pace, Andrea; Villani, Veronica; Di Pasquale, Antonella; Benincasa, Dario; Guariglia, Lara; Ieraci, Sonia; Focarelli, Silvia; Carapella, Carmine Maria; Pompili, Alfredo

    2014-01-01

    Background Brain tumor patients are quite different from other populations of cancer patients due to the complexity of supportive care needs, the trajectory of disease, the very short life expectancy, and resulting need for a specific palliative approach. Methods A pilot program of comprehensive palliative care for brain tumor patients was started in the Regina Elena National Cancer Institute of Rome in October 2000, supported by the Lazio Regional Health System. The aim of this model of assistance was to meet patient's needs for care in all stages of disease, support the families, and reduce the rehospitalization rate. The efficacy of the model of care was evaluated analyzing the place of death, caregiver satisfaction, rehospitalization rate, and the impact on costs to the health system. Results From October 2000 to December 2012, 848 patients affected by brain tumor were enrolled in a comprehensive program of neuro-oncological home care. Out of 529 patients who died, 323 (61%) were assisted at home until death, 117 (22.2%) died in hospital, and 89 (16.8%) died in hospice. A cost-effectiveness analysis demonstrated a significant reduction in hospital readmission rates in the last 2 months of life compared with the control group (16.7% vs 38%; P < .001). Conclusions Our findings concerning death at home, rehospitalization rate, quality of life, and satisfaction of patients and their relatives with the care received suggest that a neuro-oncologic palliative home-care program has a positive impact on the quality of care for brain tumor patients, particularly at the end of life. PMID:26034609

  5. Prospective integration of cultural consideration in biomedical research for patients with advanced cancer: recommendations from an international conference on malignant bowel obstruction in palliative care.

    PubMed

    Fineberg, Iris Cohen; Grant, Marcia; Aziz, Noreen M; Payne, Richard; Kagawa-Singer, Marjorie; Dunn, Geoffrey P; Kinzbrunner, Barry M; Palos, Guadalupe; Shinagawa, Susan Matsuko; Krouse, Robert S

    2007-07-01

    In the setting of an international conference on malignant bowel obstruction as a model for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) in palliative care, we discuss the importance of incorporating prospective cultural considerations into research design. The approach commonly used in biomedical research has traditionally valued the RCT as the ultimate "way of knowing" about how to best treat a medical condition. The foremost limitation of this approach is the lack of recognition of the impact of cultural viewpoints on research outcomes. We propose that interest relevant to cultural viewpoints should be emphasized in conceptualizing and interpreting research questions, designs, and results. In addition to recognizing our cultural biases as individuals and researchers, we recommend two major shifts in designing and implementing RCTs: 1) inclusion of a multidisciplinary team of researchers to inform the diversity of perspectives and expertise brought to the research, and 2) use of mixed methods of inquiry, reflecting both deductive and inductive modes of inference. PMID:17532174

  6. Nuclear oncology: From genotype to patient care

    SciTech Connect

    1997-12-31

    Nuclear medicine is the medical specialty best suited to translate the exploding body of knowledge obtained from research in genetics and molecular biology into the care of patients. This fourth annual nuclear oncology conference will address how this can be done and how positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission tomography (SPECT) can be used in the care of patients with cancer or with increased genetic risk of developing cancer. The course will include illustrative patient studies showing how PET and SPECT can help in diagnosis, staging and treatment planning and monitoring of patients with cancer.

  7. Development and evaluation of an aged care specific Advance Care Plan

    PubMed Central

    Silvester, William; Parslow, Ruth A; Lewis, Virginia J; Fullam, Rachael S; Sjanta, Rebekah; Jackson, Lynne; White, Vanessa; Hudson, Rosalie

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To report on the quality of advance care planning (ACP) documents in use in residential aged care facilities (RACF) in areas of Victoria Australia prior to a systematic intervention; to report on the development and performance of an aged care specific Advance Care Plan template used during the intervention. Design An audit of the quality of pre-existing documentation used to record resident treatment preferences and end-of-life wishes at participating RACFs; development and pilot of an aged care specific Advance Care Plan template; an audit of the completeness and quality of Advance Care Plans completed on the new template during a systematic ACP intervention. Participants and setting 19 selected RACFs (managed by 12 aged care organisations) in metropolitan and regional areas of Victoria. Results Documentation in use at facilities prior to the ACP intervention most commonly recorded preferences regarding hospital transfer, life prolonging treatment and personal/cultural/religious wishes. However, 7 of 12 document sets failed to adequately and clearly specify the resident's preferences as regards life prolonging medical treatment. The newly developed aged care specific Advance Care Plan template was met with approval by participating RACFs. Of 203 Advance Care Plans completed on the template throughout the project period, 49% included the appointment of a Medical Enduring Power of Attorney. Requests concerning medical treatment were specified in almost all completed documents (97%), with 73% nominating the option of refusal of life-prolonging treatment. Over 90% of plans included information concerning residents’ values and beliefs, and future health situations that the resident would find to be unacceptable were specified in 78% of completed plans. Conclusions Standardised procedures and documentation are needed to improve the quality of processes, documents and outcomes of ACP in the residential aged care sector. PMID:23626906

  8. Care of Patients With HIV Infection: Primary Care.

    PubMed

    Bolduc, Philip; Roder, Navid; Colgate, Emily; Cheeseman, Sarah H

    2016-04-01

    With the advent of antiretroviral therapy and improved access to care, the average life expectancy of patients with HIV infection receiving optimal treatment approaches that of patients in the general population. AIDS-related opportunistic infections and malignancies are no longer the primary issues; instead, traditional age- and lifestyle-related conditions are a growing concern. Patients with HIV infection are at higher risk of cardiovascular disease, diabetes, hypertension, and some non-AIDS-related cancers than patients in the general population. Family physicians need to be knowledgeable about screening for and managing chronic comorbid conditions as this population ages. Health maintenance, including appropriate vaccinations, prophylaxis against opportunistic infections, and routine screening for sexually transmitted infections, remains an important part of care. As HIV infection becomes a chronic condition, emerging strategies in prevention, including preexposure prophylaxis, fall within the scope of practice of the family physician. PMID:27092565

  9. End-of-life communication in Korean older adults: With focus on advance care planning and advance directives.

    PubMed

    Shin, Dong Wook; Lee, Ji Eun; Cho, BeLong; Yoo, Sang Ho; Kim, SangYun; Yoo, Jun-Hyun

    2016-04-01

    The present article aimed to provide a comprehensive review of current status of end-of-life (EOL) care and sociocultural considerations in Korea, with focus on the EOL communication and use of advance directives (AD) in elderly Koreans. Through literature review, we discuss the current status of EOL care and sociocultural considerations in Korea, and provide a look-ahead. In Korea, patients often receive life-sustaining treatment until the very end of life. Advance care planning is rare, and most do-not-resuscitate decisions are made between the family and physician at the very end of patient's life. Koreans, influenced mainly by Confucian tradition, prefer a natural death and discontinuation of life-sustaining treatment. Although Koreans generally believe that death is natural and unavoidable, they tend not to think about or discuss death, and regard preparation for death as unnecessary. As a result, AD are completed by just 4.7% of the general adult population. This situation can be explained by several sociocultural characteristics including opting for natural death, wish not to burden others, preference for family involvement and trust in doctor, avoidance of talking about death, and filial piety. Patients often receive life-sustaining treatment until the very EOL, advance care planning and the use of AD is not common in Korea. This was related to unique sociocultural characteristics of Korea. A more active role of physicians, development of a more deliberate EOL discussion process, development of culturally appropriate AD and promotion of advance care planning might be required to provide good EOL care in Korea. PMID:26459613

  10. Improving acute care for patients with dementia.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Kate

    People with dementia are more likely to experience a decline in function, fall or fracture when admitted to hospital than the general hospital population. Informal carers' views were sought on the care their relative with dementia received in hospital. Participants were concerned about a lack of essential nursing care, harmful incidents, a decline in patient function, poor staff communication and carers' needs not being acknowledged. Care can be improved through further training, more effective communication, consideration of the appropriate place to care for people and more use of carers' knowledge. PMID:27017677

  11. Cancer follow-up care. Patients' perspectives.

    PubMed Central

    Miedema, Baukje; MacDonald, Ian; Tatemichi, Sue

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess family physicians' and specialists' involvement in cancer follow-up care and how this involvement is perceived by cancer patients. DESIGN: Self-administered survey. SETTING: A health region in New Brunswick. PARTICIPANTS: A nonprobability cluster sample of 183 participants. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Patients' perceptions of cancer follow-up care. RESULTS: More than a third of participants (36%) were not sure which physician was in charge of their cancer follow-up care. As part of follow-up care, 80% of participants wanted counseling from their family physicians, but only 20% received it. About a third of participants (32%) were not satisfied with the follow-up care provided by their family physicians. In contrast, only 18% of participants were dissatisfied with the follow-up care provided by specialists. Older participants were more satisfied with cancer follow-up care than younger participants. CONCLUSION: Cancer follow-up care is increasingly becoming part of family physicians' practices. Family physicians need to develop an approach that addresses patients' needs, particularly in the area of emotional support. PMID:12901486

  12. Reconciling employment with caring for a husband with an advanced illness

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Little is known about combining work with caring for a person with advanced illness. This is important given the increasing number of women in the workforce and current policy seeking to increase care in the community. The aim of this paper was to explore the meaning of work for women caring for a husband with an advanced illness and the consequences of combining these two roles. Methods A purposive sample of 15 carers was recruited from a hospital and from the community, via the patients they cared for. Their illnesses included chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, cancer, motor neurone disease, and heart failure. Data were collected through semi-structured, in-depth interviews that were tape-recorded and transcribed verbatim. A Grounded Theory approach was used and case studies were developed. NVivo software facilitated the management and analysis of the data. Results Caring presented challenges to carers' work life. It diminished productivity or the quality of work, and led to missed opportunities for promotion. Work had an effect on the quality of care and the relationship with the patient, which eventually led to work being given up for caring. Three carers resisted the pressures to give up work and used it as a coping strategy. Conclusion A positive choice to remain in employment does not necessarily signal reluctance to care. Caring arrangements need to be understood from the common and separate interests of carers and the people they support. PMID:19939262

  13. Palliative Care, Hospice, and Advance Care Planning: Views of People Living with HIV and Other Chronic Conditions.

    PubMed

    Slomka, Jacquelyn; Prince-Paul, Maryjo; Webel, Allison; Daly, Barbara J

    2016-01-01

    People living with HIV (PLWH) who survive to older adulthood risk developing multiple chronic medical conditions. Health policymakers recognize the role of early palliative care and advance care planning in improving health quality for at-risk populations, but misperceptions about palliative care, hospice, and advance care planning are common. Before testing a program of early palliative care for PLWH and other chronic conditions, we conducted focus groups to elicit perceptions of palliative care, hospice, and advance care planning in our target population. Overall, participants were unfamiliar with the term palliative care, confused concepts of palliative care and hospice, and/or associated hospice care with dying. Participants misunderstood advance care planning, but valued communication about health care preferences. Accepting palliative care was contingent on distinguishing it from hospice and historical memories of HIV and dying. Provision of high-quality, comprehensive care will require changing public perceptions and individuals' views in this high-risk population. PMID:27053406

  14. Parkinson patients as partners in care.

    PubMed

    Hirsch, Mark A; Sanjak, Mohammed; Englert, Danielle; Iyer, Sanjay; Quinlan, Margaret M

    2014-01-01

    Increasing physical activity, as part of an active lifestyle, is an important health goal for individuals with Parkinson's disease (PD). Exercise can positively impact health related quality of life. Given this, how can we promote physically active lifestyles among PD patients (most of whom are sedentary)? Here we suggest that health care professionals could significantly expand their impact by collaborating with PD patients and their spouses (or caregivers) as partners-in-care. We outline reasons why partners-in-care approaches are important in PD, including the need to increase social capital, which deals with issues of trust and the value of social networks in linking members of a community. We then present results of a qualitative study involving partners-in-care exercise beliefs among 19 PD patients and spouses, and conclude with our perspective on future benefits of this approach. PMID:24262175

  15. [Nursing care of unilateral neglect patients].

    PubMed

    Dai, Chin-Ying; Lin, Li-Chan

    2015-02-01

    The prevalence of unilateral neglect among stroke patients has risen to 82% and 69%, respectively, in acute wards and rehabilitation units. Neglect may restrict the activities of patients and reduce their quality of life. Patients are often unaware of their neglect behavior and of their inability to see or feel persons or objects on their affected side. Healthcare providers should pay greater attention to the signs of neglect behavior in patients. Neglect is a silent syndrome for both patients and healthcare providers. This article reviews the definition of unilateral neglect as well as its associated characteristics, theoretical interpretations, rehabilitation, and nursing care. The authors hope that the contents of this article may help healthcare professionals assess and provide care to patients with neglect problems in order to decrease the negative impacts of neglect on patients and improve their daily functions. PMID:25631189

  16. Care of the patient receiving radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Yasko, J.M.

    1982-12-01

    External radiation therapy, or teletherapy, is the use of ionizing radiation to destroy cancer cells. Clinical use of ionizing radiation as treatment for cancer began with the discovery of x-rays in 1895, the identification of natural radioactivity (radium) in 1896, and the first reported cure of cancer, a basal cell epithelioma, induced by radiation in 1899. Initially, radiation was administered as a single large dose and produced severe, life-threatening side effects. The basis for the use of ionizing radiation in daily increments for a period of weeks was provided by Regaud in 1922; ten years later, Coutard clinically developed the method of dose fractionation, which remains in use today. Although the use of ionizing radiation as a treatment is over eighty years old, only in recent years have advancements in its clinical application been based on research related to the biologic effect of radiation on human cells. To effectively care for the patient prior to, during, and at the completion of external radiation therapy, the nurse must know the physical and biologic basis of external radiation therapy and its clinical application.

  17. What Do Patients Want? Patient Preference in Wound Care

    PubMed Central

    Corbett, Lisa Q.; Ennis, William J.

    2014-01-01

    Patient preferences are statements made or actions taken by consumers that reflect their desirability of a range of health options. The concept occupies an increasingly prominent place at the center of healthcare reform, and is connected to all aspects of healthcare, including discovery, research, delivery, outcome, and payment. Patient preference research has focused on shared decisions, decisional aids, and clinical practice guideline development, with limited study in acute and chronic wound care populations. The wound care community has focused primarily on patient focused symptoms and quality of life measurement. With increasing recognition of wound care as a medical specialty and as a public health concern that consumes extensive resources, attention to the preferences of end-users with wounds is necessary. This article will provide an overview of related patient-centered concepts and begin to establish a framework for consideration of patient preference in wound care. PMID:25126474

  18. ‘Reality and desire’ in the care of advanced chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Marrón, Belén; Craver, Lourdes; Remón, César; Prieto, Mario; Gutiérrez, Josep Mª; Ortiz, Alberto

    2010-01-01

    There is a long distance between the actual worldwide reality in advanced chronic kidney disease care and the desire of how these patients should be managed to decrease cardiovascular and general morbidity and mortality. Implementation of adequate infrastructures may improve clinical outcomes and increase the use of home renal replacement therapies (RRT). Current pitfalls should be addressed to optimise care: inadequate medical training for nephrological referral and RRT selection, late referral to nephrologists, inadequate patient education for choice of RRT modality, lack of multidisciplinary advanced kidney disease clinics and lack of programmed RRT initiation. These deficiencies generate unintended consequences, such as inequality of care and limitations in patient education and selection-choice for RRT technique with limited use of peritoneal dialysis. Multidisciplinary advanced kidney disease clinics may have a direct impact on patient survival, morbidity and quality of life. There is a common need to reduce health care costs and scenarios increasing PD incidence show better efficiency. The following proposals may help to improve the current situation: defining the scope of the problem, disseminating guidelines with specific targets and quality indicators, optimising medical speciality training, providing adequate patient education, specially through the use of general decision making tools that will allow patients to choose the best possible RRT in accordance with their values, preferences and medical advice, increasing planned dialysis starts and involving all stakeholders in the process. PMID:25984045

  19. A typology of advance statements in mental health care.

    PubMed

    Henderson, Claire; Swanson, Jeffrey W; Szmukler, George; Thornicroft, Graham; Zinkler, Martin

    2008-01-01

    Advance statements documenting mental health service consumers' preferences for treatment during a future mental health crisis or period of incapacity have gained currency in recent years in the United States and some European countries. Several kinds of advance statements have emerged -- some as legal instruments, others as treatment planning methods -- but no formal comparison has been made among them. This article reviews the literature in English and German to develop a comparative typology of advance statements: joint crisis plans, crisis cards, treatment plans, wellness recovery action plans, and psychiatric advance directives (with and without formal facilitation). The features that distinguish them are the extent to which they are legally binding, whether health care providers are involved in their production, and whether an independent facilitator assists in their production. The differing nature of advance statements is related to the diverse models of care upon which they are based and the legislative and service contexts in which they have been developed. However, there is recent convergence between the United Kingdom and the United States with respect to research interventions that facilitate the production of advance statements, as evidence emerges for the effectiveness of facilitated psychiatric advance directives and joint crisis plans. Different types of advance statements can coexist and in some cases may interact in complementary ways. However, the relationship of advance statements to involuntary treatment is more problematic, as is their effective implementation in many mental health service settings. PMID:18182541

  20. Quicker cancer care: reshaping patient pathways.

    PubMed

    Towler, Lucy

    2009-07-01

    A new pathway has been devised for patients with ovarian cancer who attend a day-care unit for chemotherapy. This pathway, which is provided by nurses and doctors, has reduced patients' waiting time for treatment. Its implementation shows, therefore, that good clinical leadership can effect positive change. PMID:19639906

  1. Introducing Optometry Students to Clinical Patient Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gable, Eileen M.

    2001-01-01

    Describes the innovative content and structure of an introductory course on clinical patient care at the Illinois College of Optometry. Critiques its success based on student grades and feedback, concluding that it was successful in imparting skills of data analysis but had minimal impact on students' ability to empathize with patients. (EV)

  2. Clinical Curriculum Reform and Advanced Care Training at the New England College of Optometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Roger

    1998-01-01

    Discusses how the New England College of Optometry has expanded clinical education so graduates are equipped to handle new and advanced clinical and patient-care responsibilities and meet the changing standards of professional entry-level competency. The reform process, third- and fourth-year curriculum components, rotations, and plans for…

  3. Postoperative Care of the Transplanted Patient

    PubMed Central

    Schumacher, Kurt R; Gajarski, Robert J

    2011-01-01

    The successful delivery of optimal peri-operative care to pediatric heart transplant recipients is a vital determinant of their overall outcomes. The practitioner caring for these patients must be familiar with and treat multiple simultaneous issues in a patient who may have been critically ill preoperatively. In addition to the complexities involved in treating any child following cardiac surgery, caretakers of newly transplanted patients encounter multiple transplant-specific issues. This chapter details peri-operative management strategies, frequently encountered early morbidities, initiation of immunosuppression including induction, and short-term outcomes. PMID:22548034

  4. Cultural competent patient-centered nursing care.

    PubMed

    Darnell, Linda K; Hickson, Shondell V

    2015-03-01

    This article provides a theoretic framework for culturally diverse practice, provides a model for developing cultural competency, and provides best-practice guidelines for conducting a cultural assessment on patients to identify their diverse needs to integrate into a patient-centered plan of care. The role of ethics is discussed to empower mutual respect, equality, and trust building in patients to promote positive health care outcomes. Cultural diversity tool kits from the National League for Nursing and the American Association of Colleges of Nursing are reviewed to provide educational resources to the front line nurse. PMID:25680490

  5. Patient poverty and workload in primary care

    PubMed Central

    Muldoon, Laura; Rayner, Jennifer; Dahrouge, Simone

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Objective To determine if patient poverty is associated with increased workload for primary care providers (PCPs). Design Linkage of administrative data identifying patient poverty and comorbidity with survey data about the organizational structure of community health centres (CHCs). Setting Ontario’s 73 CHCs. Participants A total of 64 CHC sites (N = 63 included in the analysis). Main outcome measures Patient poverty was determined in 2 different ways: based on receipt of Ontario Drug Benefits (identifying recipients of welfare, provincial disability support, and low-income seniors’ benefits) or residence in low-income neighbourhoods. Patient comorbidities were determined through administrative diagnostic data from the CHCs and the Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences. Primary care workload was determined by examining PCP panel size (the number of patients cared for by a full-time-equivalent PCP during a 2-year interval). Results The CHCs with higher proportions of poor patients had smaller panel sizes. The smaller panel sizes were entirely explained by the medical comorbidity profile of the poor patients. Conclusion Poor patients generate a higher workload for PCPs in CHCs; however, this is principally because they are sicker than higher-income patients are. Further information is required about the spectrum of services used by poor patients in CHCs. PMID:23585609

  6. Redefining the “Planning” in Advance Care Planning: Preparing for End-of-Life Decision Making

    PubMed Central

    Sudore, Rebecca L.; Fried, Terri R.

    2010-01-01

    The traditional objective of advance care planning has been to have patients make treatment decisions in advance in an attempt to provide care consistent with their goals. We argue that the objective for advance care planning ought to be the preparation of patients and surrogates to participate with clinicians in making the best possible in-the-moment medical decisions. We provide practical steps for clinicians to help patients and surrogate decision makers achieve this objective in the outpatient setting. Preparation for in-the-moment decision making shifts the focus from having patients make premature decisions based on incomplete information to preparing patients and their surrogates for the types of decisions and conflicts they may encounter when they do have to engage in in-the-moment decision making. This approach does not preclude the completion of advance directives, but acknowledges that they are but one piece of information to be used at the time of decision making. PMID:20713793

  7. Critical Care for the Patient With Multiple Trauma.

    PubMed

    Radomski, Michal; Zettervall, Sara; Schroeder, Mary Elizabeth; Messing, Jonathan; Dunne, James; Sarani, Babak

    2016-06-01

    Trauma remains the leading cause of death worldwide and the leading cause of death in those less than 44 years old in the United States. Admission to a verified trauma center has been shown to decrease mortality following a major injury. This decrease in mortality has been a direct result of improvements in the initial evaluation and resuscitation from injury as well as continued advances in critical care. As such, it is vital that intensive care practitioners be familiar with various types of injuries and their associated treatment strategies as well as their potential complications in order to minimize the morbidity and mortality frequently seen in this patient population. PMID:25673631

  8. [Institutional psychotherapy, caring for patients and the place of care].

    PubMed

    Drogoul, Frank

    2013-01-01

    Institutional psychotherapy was developed in the specific context of the "assassination" of the Spanish revolution. There are two distinct movements or two periods. The first, based around Georges Daumézon and Henri Ey gave birth to the sector. The second, around FrançoisTosquelles and Jean Oury emphasised the asylum as the place of care. The function of institutional psychotherapy is to care not only for the patients but also the place of treatment. To fulfil this function, it has a tool box: transfer, the fight against the overvaluation of hierarchy as well as the function of the therapeutic club. PMID:23757889

  9. Informatics Systems and Tools to Facilitate Patient-centered Care Coordination

    PubMed Central

    Kneale, L.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Introduction There is a growing international focus on patient-centered care. A model designed to facilitate this type of care in the primary care setting is the patient-centered medical home. This model of care strives to be patient-focused, comprehensive, team-based, coordinated, accessible, and focused on quality and safety of care. Objective The objective of this paper is to identify the current status and future trends of patient-centered care and the role of informatics systems and tools in facilitating this model of care. Methods In this paper we review recent scientific literature of the past four years to identify trends and state of current evidence when it comes to patient-centered care overall, and more specifically medical homes. Results There are several studies that indicate growth and development in seven informatics areas within patient-centered care, namely clinical decision support, registries, team care, care transitions, personal health records, telehealth, and measurement. In some cases we are still lacking large randomized clinical trials and the evidence base is not always solid, but findings strongly indicate the potential of informatics to support patient-centered care. Conclusion Current evidence indicates that advancements have been made in implementing and evaluating patient-centered care models. Technical, legal, and practical challenges still remain. Further examination of the impact of patient-centered informatics tools and systems on clinical outcomes is needed. PMID:26293847

  10. Medical futility and care of dying patients.

    PubMed Central

    Jecker, N S

    1995-01-01

    In this article, I address ethical concerns related to forgoing futile medical treatment in terminally ill and dying patients. Any discussion of medical futility should emphasize that health professionals and health care institutions have ethical responsibilities regarding medical futility. Among the topics I address are communicating with patients and families, resolving possible conflicts, and developing professional standards. Finally, I explore why acknowledging the futility of life-prolonging medical interventions can be so difficult for patients, families, and health professionals. PMID:7571593

  11. End-of-Life Treatment Preferences: A Key to Reducing Ethnic/Racial Disparities in Advance Care Planning?

    PubMed Central

    Garrido, Melissa M.; Harrington, Shannon T.; Prigerson, Holly G.

    2014-01-01

    Background This study sought to identify targets for interventions to reduce end-of-life care disparities among patients with advanced cancer. To do this, we evaluated the degree to which end-of-life care values and preferences are associated with advance care planning within racial/ethnic minority groups. Methods The Coping with Cancer study recruited patients with advanced cancer from outpatient clinics in five states from 2002-2008. We examined rates of one type of advance care planning, do not resuscitate [DNR] orders, reported at baseline interviews by 606 patients. Bivariate tests determined associations among DNR order completion, religious values, and treatment preferences within racial/ethnic groups. Results Non-Latino White patients were significantly more likely to have a DNR order (45%) than Black (25%) and Latino (20%) patients (p <.001). Preferences against specific life-prolonging treatments (e.g. chemotherapy, ventilation) were the only factor significantly associated with higher DNR order likelihood in each group, with non-Latino White patients more likely than Latino or Black patients to express preferences against life-prolonging care (e.g. 26% of non-Latino White, 46% of Black, and 41% of Latino patients wanted a feeding tube if it would extend life for one more day, p<.001). Conclusions Preferences against life-prolonging care differ dramatically by race/ethnicity, but they are uniformly significantly associated with DNR order completion rates across racial/ethnic groups of patients with advanced cancer. Advance care planning interventions that target preferences associated with DNR orders across racial/ethnic groups may reach a broad patient population and reduce end-of-life care disparities. PMID:25145489

  12. Research sensitivities to palliative care patients.

    PubMed

    Addington-Hall, J

    2002-09-01

    This paper considers the methodological challenges of researching the health care experiences of palliative care patients and their families. Difficulties in defining a 'palliative care patient' are highlighted, and the question of whether there are specific ethical issues when researching palliative care explored. Methodological issues are discussed, including the negotiation of access via health professionals, the choice of appropriate data collection methods and tools, the consequences of high attrition rates and the use of retrospective surveys of bereaved relatives. Key areas for research are identified. These include patients' and families' experiences of research participation, the impact of being approached on those who decline, how the characteristics of those who participate differ from those who do not and the likely impact of this on findings. Research is also needed into patient and family motivations for participation, and whether and how these change as the disease progresses. To ensure that the voices of palliative care patients and their families are heard by both service providers and policy-makers, research in this area needs to address the methodological challenges raised in this paper, as well as continuing to explore users' views. PMID:12296842

  13. Goals of care in advanced dementia: quality of life, dignity and comfort.

    PubMed

    Volicer, L

    2007-01-01

    Prolongation of human lifespan is increasing the number of individuals suffering from Alzheimer's disease and other progressive dementia worldwide. There are about 5 million of these individuals in both United States and European Union and many more in other countries of the world (1). Because there is no curative treatment for these diseases, most individuals with dementia survive to an advanced stage of dementia at which time many of them require institutional care. Home care for individuals with advanced dementia and especially institutional care are very expensive and are becoming major public health problems. The cost of care for advanced dementia is often increased by the use of aggressive medical interventions that may not be in the best interest of the patient. Because advanced dementia is currently incurable, it should be considered a terminal illness, similar to terminal cancer. Therefore, palliative care may be the most appropriate strategy for management of advanced dementia (2). The goals of palliative care are maintenance of quality of life, dignity and comfort and the four articles in this special issue are addressing these goals. Enhancement of quality of life in dementia requires attention to three main domains: provision of meaningful activities, appropriate medical care, and treatment of behavioral symptoms (3). Individuals with advanced dementia may not be able to participate in many activity programs but they still may maintain some quality of life if they are provided care in a pleasant environment with constant presence of a caregiver. Simard describes a program, Namaste Care, which is specifically tailored for individuals with advanced dementia. This program requires neither major expenditure nor increased staffing and should be instituted in all facilities that care for individuals with advanced dementia. Maintaining functional status of individuals with advanced dementia is important because it improves their self esteem and facilitates

  14. Neonatal ethical issues: viability, advance directives, family centered care.

    PubMed

    Sudia-Robinson, Tanya

    2011-01-01

    Ethical issues in perinatal and NICU settings can arise from a variety of situations. This article focuses on issues surrounding viability and the incorporation of advance directives and family-centered care. Prenatal education about infant viability, probable scenarios, and parental involvement in decision-making are addressed. Considerations for advance directives for complex births and critical decisions at the time of birth are also discussed. Implications for nurses and suggested dialogue strategies are provided. PMID:21407121

  15. Episodic pain in patients with advanced cancer.

    PubMed

    Zeppetella, Giovambattista; Ribeiro, Maria D C

    2002-01-01

    Episodic pain is a common problem for patients with advanced cancer and is often difficult to manage successfully. In this article, the daily variations in cancer-related episodic pain in a patient with metastatic lung cancer are described. The definition, etiology, prevalence, and pharmacological management of episodic pain are also reviewed PMID:12141792

  16. [Advanced directives document and neurologist-patient relationship].

    PubMed

    Boada Rovira, M

    2004-12-01

    Perception of health and disease, pain and suffering, quality of life, personal relationships, privacy and intimacy, culture and social values, can now be stated in a written document, by way of a living will, giving legal legitimacy to each patient's way of being and understanding life, to be used when the subject cannot express it by him/herself. In this way, the patients will participate in the therapeutic process and will incorporate their desires and decisions through the Informed Consent and the Advanced Directives Document (ADD). Both documents translate and indicate how to treat and care for a patient who will progressively lose his/her cognitive faculties and others will decided for him/her, in the case of dementias. The basis of ADD is respect and promotion of the patient's autonomy, prolonging his/her right to decide in the stages in which he/she cannot do it. It consists in some instructions or orientations for the patient to be cared for in a certain way, according to his/her will. To this effect, a representative will be named who will act in the subject's name and who will help to interpret and make decisions when the patient cannot. Specifically, in Alzheimer's disease, ADD allows the patient to decide, in full lucidity, freedom and autonomy, how to live a progressive and irreversible disease. Explicit mention can be made to the will of making his/her disease known publically or not, the care of its aspect, privacy, type of care, whether institutionalized or home care, limitation of visits, treatment intensity and prolongation, palliative cares, donation of biological samples, participation in drug clinical trials. PMID:15719290

  17. Coordinating care and treatment for cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Yip, Cheng Har; Samiei, Massoud; Cazap, Eduardo; Rosenblatt, Eduardo; Datta, Niloy Ranjan; Camacho, Rolando; Weller, David; Pannarunothai, Supasit; Goh, Cynthia; Black, Fraser; Kaur, Ranjit; Fitch, Margaret; Sutcliffe, Catherine; Sutcliffe, Simon

    2012-01-01

    integration of these services into national cancer control plans; the need for public education to reduce the fear and stigma associated with cancer so that patients are better able to make informed decisions regarding follow-up care and treatment; and the need to recognize the challenges and needs of survivors, their increasing number, the necessity to integrate survivorship into cancer control plans and the economic and societal value of functional survival after cancer. Discussions highlighted that coordinated care and treatment for cancer patients is both a ' systems'challenge and solution, requiring the consideration of patient and family circumstances, societal values and priorities, the functioning of the health system (access, capacity, resources, etc.) and the importance assigned to health and illness management within public policy. PMID:22631594

  18. [Enriching patient care with aromatherapy].

    PubMed

    Sogno-Lalloz, Isabelle

    2014-01-01

    There are increasing numbers of initiatives in healthcare institutions focusing on the benefits of essential oils. Received positively by patients who appreciate the resulting wellbeing, these innovative approaches around aromatherapy are based on the initiative of pioneering caregivers. Following on from an international congress held each year in Grasse, this article presents some example schemes. PMID:25065196

  19. Implementation of Advanced Health Care Technology into Existing Competency-Based Health Care Program. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klemovage, Shirley

    A project was undertaken to develop new curriculum materials that could be incorporated into an existing health assistant program to cover recent advances in health care technology. Area physicians' offices were toured and meetings were held with administrators of local hospitals in order to discover what kinds of advances in health care…

  20. Patient Care Partnership: Understanding Expectations, Rights and Responsibilities

    MedlinePlus

    ` e Patient Care Partnership Understanding Expectations, Rights and Responsibilities What to expect during your hospital stay: • High ... e Patient Care Partnership Understanding Expectations, Rights and Responsibilities W hen you need hospital care, your doctor ...

  1. Perioperative Care of the Liver Transplant Patient.

    PubMed

    Keegan, Mark T; Kramer, David J

    2016-07-01

    With the evolution of surgical and anesthetic techniques, liver transplantation has become "routine," allowing for modifications of practice to decrease perioperative complications and costs. There is debate over the necessity for intensive care unit admission for patients with satisfactory preoperative status and a smooth intraoperative course. Postoperative care is made easier when the liver graft performs optimally. Assessment of graft function, vigilance for complications after the major surgical insult, and optimization of multiple systems affected by liver disease are essential aspects of postoperative care. The intensivist plays a vital role in an integrated multidisciplinary transplant team. PMID:27339683

  2. Patients report positive impacts of collaborative care.

    PubMed

    Wasson, John H; Johnson, Deborah J; Benjamin, Regina; Phillips, Jill; MacKenzie, Todd A

    2006-01-01

    Collaborative Care refers to a partnership between healthcare professionals and patients who feel confident to manage their health conditions. Using an Internet-based assessment of health needs and healthcare quality, we surveyed 24,609 adult Americans aged 19 to 69 who had common chronic diseases or significant dysfunction. In these patients, we examined the association of Collaborative Care with specific measures for treatment effect, disease control, prevention, and economic impacts. These measures were adjusted for respondents' demographic characteristics, burden of illness, health behaviors, and overall quality of healthcare. Only 21% of respondents participated in good Collaborative Care, 36% attained fair Collaborative Care, and 43% experienced poor Collaborative Care. Regardless of overall care quality or the respondents' personal characteristics, burden of illness, or health behaviors, good Collaborative Care was associated with better control of blood pressure, blood glucose level, serum cholesterol level, and treatment effectiveness for pain and emotional problems. Some preventive actions were better, and some adverse economic impacts of illness were mitigated. PMID:16788352

  3. Reply to "transforming oncology care": advancing value, accessing innovation.

    PubMed

    Paradis, Rebecca

    2015-09-01

    Alternative payment models in oncology are already successfully standardizing care, curbing costs, and improving the patient experience. Yet, it is unclear whether decision makers are adequately considering patient access to innovation when creating these models, which could have severe consequences for a robust innovation ecosystem and the lives of afflicted patients. The suggested chart includes recommendations on: Allowing for the adoption of new, promising therapies; Promoting the measurement of patient-centered outcomes; and Providing support for personalized medicine. PMID:26618436

  4. Protocol Directed Patient Care using a Computer

    PubMed Central

    Blum, B.; Lenhard, R.; McColligan, E.

    1980-01-01

    The Johns Hopkins Oncology Center has developed a clinical information system which assists in the care of the 2,000 patients currently under treatment at the Center. The system maintains a data base containing a summary diagnostic and treatment history plus complete tabulations of laboratory results, therapies, and other clinical findings. These data are organized and displayed in formats which aid decision-making. For the past year the Center has been working with an extension to the data system which produces daily care plans for each inpatient and outpatient treated at the Center. These plans are a function of the disease, treatment protocol, and current clinical status of each patient. This paper describes the objectives, organization, and experience to date with the use of computer generated plans for protocol directed patient care.

  5. Recent advances in topical wound care

    PubMed Central

    Sarabahi, Sujata

    2012-01-01

    There are a wide variety of dressing techniques and materials available for management of both acute wounds and chronic non-healing wounds. The primary objective in both the cases is to achieve a healed closed wound. However, in a chronic wound the dressing may be required for preparing the wound bed for further operative procedures such as skin grafting. An ideal dressing material should not only accelerate wound healing but also reduce loss of protein, electrolytes and fluid from the wound, and help to minimize pain and infection. The present dictum is to promote the concept of moist wound healing. This is in sharp contrast to the earlier practice of exposure method of wound management wherein the wound was allowed to dry. It can be quite a challenge for any physician to choose an appropriate dressing material when faced with a wound. Since wound care is undergoing a constant change and new products are being introduced into the market frequently, one needs to keep abreast of their effect on wound healing. This article emphasizes on the importance of assessment of the wound bed, the amount of drainage, depth of damage, presence of infection and location of wound. These characteristics will help any clinician decide on which product to use and where,in order to get optimal wound healing. However, there are no ‘magical dressings’. Dressings are one important aspect that promotes wound healing apart from treating the underlying cause and other supportive measures like nutrition and systemic antibiotics need to be given equal attention. PMID:23162238

  6. An Assessment of Social Diffusion in the Respecting Choices Advance Care Planning Program

    PubMed Central

    Moorman, Sara M.; Carr, Deborah; Kirchhoff, Karin T.; Hammes, Bernard J.

    2012-01-01

    This study examines the potential social diffusion effects of the Respecting Choices® advance care planning program, administered in La Crosse, Wisconsin since 1991. The program produces educational materials for patients, trains facilitators to help patients prepare for end-of-life, and ensures that advance directives are connected to patients' medical records. Using data from a survey of more than 5,000 white Wisconsin high school graduates in their mid-60s, we found that participants who were living in the La Crosse area were significantly less likely than their peers living elsewhere to have executed a living will or appointed a health care power of attorney. This pattern may reflect psychological reactance, where individuals reject a message or lesson when they perceive compliance as a threat to their autonomy. There was no evidence of social diffusion effects; participants who lived in the La Crosse region themselves or who had social network members residing in the area were no more likely than those with no known ties to the region to have engaged in advance care planning. Future studies should explore the processes through which individuals learn and share with others their knowledge of advance care planning. PMID:24567988

  7. Emergent interfacility evacuation of critical care patients in combat.

    PubMed

    Franco, Yvonne E; De Lorenzo, Robert A; Salyer, Steven W

    2012-01-01

    During the Second Iraq War (Operation Iraqi Freedom), high-intensity, low-utilization medical and surgical services, such as neurosurgical care, were consolidated into a centralized location within the combat zone. This arrangement necessitated intra-theater air medical evacuation of critically ill or injured patients from outlying combat support hospitals (CSH) to another combat zone facility having the needed services. A case series is presented of intratheater transfer of neurosurgical patients in Iraq during 2005-06. Ninety-eight patients are included in the series, with typical transfer distances of 40 miles (approximately 20-25 minutes of flight time). All patients were transported with a CSH nurse in addition to the standard Army EMT-B flight medic. Seventy-six percent of cases were battle injury, 17% were non-battle injuries, and the balance were classified as non-injury mechanisms. Seventy-six percent of cases were head injuries, with the balance involving burns, stroke, and other injuries. At 30 days, 12% of the patients had died, and 9% remained hospitalized in a critical care setting. None of the patients died during evacuation. Intratheater and interfacility transfer of critical care patients in the combat theater often involves severely head-injured and other neurosurgical cases. Current Army staffing for helicopter transport in these case requires a nurse or other advanced personnel to supplement the standard EMT-B flight medic. PMID:22748416

  8. Advance care planning: A systematic review of randomised controlled trials conducted with older adults.

    PubMed

    Weathers, Elizabeth; O'Caoimh, Rónán; Cornally, Nicola; Fitzgerald, Carol; Kearns, Tara; Coffey, Alice; Daly, Edel; O'Sullivan, Ronan; McGlade, Ciara; Molloy, D William

    2016-09-01

    Advance care planning (ACP), involving discussions between patients, families and healthcare professionals on future healthcare decisions, in advance of anticipated impairment in decision-making capacity, improves satisfaction and end-of-life care while respecting patient autonomy. It usually results in the creation of a written advanced care directive (ACD). This systematic review examines the impact of ACP on several outcomes (including symptom management, quality of care and healthcare utilisation) in older adults (>65years) across all healthcare settings. Nine randomised controlled trials (RCTs) were identified by searches of the CINAHL, PubMed and Cochrane databases. A total of 3646 older adults were included (range 72-88 years). Seven studies were conducted with community dwellers and the other two RCTs were conducted in nursing homes. Most studies did not implement a standardised ACD, or measure the impact on quality of end-of-life care or on the death and dying experience. All studies had some risk of bias, with most scoring poorly on the Oxford Quality Scale. While ACP interventions are well received by older adults and generally have positive effects on outcomes, this review highlights the need for well-designed RCTs that examine the economic impact of ACP and its effect on quality of care in nursing homes and other sectors. PMID:27451328

  9. End-of-life care--what do cancer patients want?

    PubMed

    Khan, Shaheen A; Gomes, Barbara; Higginson, Irene J

    2014-02-01

    Patients with cancer frequently suffer from debilitating physical symptoms and psychological distress, particularly at the end of life. Interventions to help alleviate these problems are often complex and multifactorial. Palliative care services and therapeutic interventions have developed in a variable manner, often with limited evaluation of clinical effectiveness and affordability, resulting in a relatively weak evidence base. The health care provided to patients with advanced-stage cancer does not always correlate with what is known about their preferences for care. In this Review, we discuss the preferences of patients with cancer regarding their end of life care, including the importance of early provision of palliative care, and the central role of advance care planning in meeting patients' preferences. It has been shown that many patients with cancer wish to die at home. We discuss the factors that contribute to the place of death, including environmental factors, disease-specific issues, and the availability of resources. There has been a recent upward trend in the number of patients with cancer who die in their preferred place of care, and important contributors--such as community palliative care, advance care planning, and improvements in palliative care services as a result of robust research studies--are considered. PMID:24281062

  10. Managing addiction in advanced cancer patients: why bother?

    PubMed

    Passik, S D; Theobald, D E

    2000-03-01

    The management of addiction in patients with advanced cancer can be time-consuming, labor-intensive, and difficult. Some clinicians believe that it is not worth the effort, due in part to a failure to appreciate the deleterious impact of addiction on palliative care efforts and a view of addiction as intractable in any case. Indeed, it is possible that some clinicians perceive addiction not only fatalistically but, because of common misconceptions, believe that managing or attempting to decrease the patient's use of alcohol or illicit substances would be tantamount to depriving a dying patient of a source of pleasure. In this paper, we argue that managing addiction is an essential aspect of palliative care for chemically-dependent and alcoholic patients. The goal of such efforts is not complete abstinence, but exerting enough control over illicit drug and alcohol use to allow palliative care interventions to decrease suffering. To illustrate this view, we describe two patients with chemical-dependency. We highlight the impact of unchecked substance abuse on patients' perpetuation of their own suffering, the complication of symptom management, the diagnosis and treatment of mood/anxiety disorders, and the effect on the patients' family and caregivers. PMID:10760628

  11. Advances in laparoscopy for acute care surgery and trauma

    PubMed Central

    Mandrioli, Matteo; Inaba, Kenji; Piccinini, Alice; Biscardi, Andrea; Sartelli, Massimo; Agresta, Ferdinando; Catena, Fausto; Cirocchi, Roberto; Jovine, Elio; Tugnoli, Gregorio; Di Saverio, Salomone

    2016-01-01

    The greatest advantages of laparoscopy when compared to open surgery include the faster recovery times, shorter hospital stays, decreased postoperative pain, earlier return to work and resumption of normal daily activity as well as cosmetic benefits. Laparoscopy today is considered the gold standard of care in the treatment of cholecystitis and appendicitis worldwide. Laparoscopy has even been adopted in colorectal surgery with good results. The technological improvements in this surgical field along with the development of modern techniques and the acquisition of specific laparoscopic skills have allowed for its utilization in operations with fully intracorporeal anastomoses. Further progress in laparoscopy has included single-incision laparoscopic surgery and natural orifice trans-luminal endoscopic surgery. Nevertheless, laparoscopy for emergency surgery is still considered challenging and is usually not recommended due to the lack of adequate experience in this area. The technical difficulties of operating in the presence of diffuse peritonitis or large purulent collections and diffuse adhesions are also given as reasons. However, the potential advantages of laparoscopy, both in terms of diagnosis and therapy, are clear. Major advantages may be observed in cases with diffuse peritonitis secondary to perforated peptic ulcers, for example, where laparoscopy allows the confirmation of the diagnosis, the identification of the position of the ulcer and a laparoscopic repair with effective peritoneal washout. Laparoscopy has also revolutionized the approach to complicated diverticulitis even when intestinal perforation is present. Many other emergency conditions can be effectively managed laparoscopically, including trauma in select hemodynamically-stable patients. We have therefore reviewed the most recent scientific literature on advances in laparoscopy for acute care surgery and trauma in order to demonstrate the current indications and outcomes associated with a

  12. Advances in laparoscopy for acute care surgery and trauma.

    PubMed

    Mandrioli, Matteo; Inaba, Kenji; Piccinini, Alice; Biscardi, Andrea; Sartelli, Massimo; Agresta, Ferdinando; Catena, Fausto; Cirocchi, Roberto; Jovine, Elio; Tugnoli, Gregorio; Di Saverio, Salomone

    2016-01-14

    The greatest advantages of laparoscopy when compared to open surgery include the faster recovery times, shorter hospital stays, decreased postoperative pain, earlier return to work and resumption of normal daily activity as well as cosmetic benefits. Laparoscopy today is considered the gold standard of care in the treatment of cholecystitis and appendicitis worldwide. Laparoscopy has even been adopted in colorectal surgery with good results. The technological improvements in this surgical field along with the development of modern techniques and the acquisition of specific laparoscopic skills have allowed for its utilization in operations with fully intracorporeal anastomoses. Further progress in laparoscopy has included single-incision laparoscopic surgery and natural orifice trans-luminal endoscopic surgery. Nevertheless, laparoscopy for emergency surgery is still considered challenging and is usually not recommended due to the lack of adequate experience in this area. The technical difficulties of operating in the presence of diffuse peritonitis or large purulent collections and diffuse adhesions are also given as reasons. However, the potential advantages of laparoscopy, both in terms of diagnosis and therapy, are clear. Major advantages may be observed in cases with diffuse peritonitis secondary to perforated peptic ulcers, for example, where laparoscopy allows the confirmation of the diagnosis, the identification of the position of the ulcer and a laparoscopic repair with effective peritoneal washout. Laparoscopy has also revolutionized the approach to complicated diverticulitis even when intestinal perforation is present. Many other emergency conditions can be effectively managed laparoscopically, including trauma in select hemodynamically-stable patients. We have therefore reviewed the most recent scientific literature on advances in laparoscopy for acute care surgery and trauma in order to demonstrate the current indications and outcomes associated with a

  13. Exploring care transitions from patient, caregiver, and health-care provider perspectives.

    PubMed

    Fuji, Kevin T; Abbott, Amy A; Norris, Joan F

    2013-08-01

    Care transitions involve coordination of patient care across multiple care settings. Many problems occur during care transitions resulting in negative patient outcomes and unnecessary readmissions. The purpose of this study was to describe the experience of care transitions from patient, caregiver, and health-care provider perspectives in a single metropolitan Midwest city. A qualitative descriptive design was used to solicit patients', caregivers', and health-care providers' perceptions of care transitions, their role within the process, barriers to effective care transitions, and strategies to overcome these barriers. Five themes emerged: preplanned admissions are ideal; lack of needed patient information upon admission; multiple services are needed in preparing patients for discharge; rushed or delayed discharges lead to patient misunderstanding; and difficulties in following aftercare instructions. Findings illustrated provider difficulty in meeting multiple care needs, and the need for patient-centered care to achieve positive outcomes associated with quality measures, reduced readmissions, and care transitions. PMID:23113935

  14. Augmenting Advance Care Planning in Poor Prognosis Cancer with a Video Decision Aid: A Pre-Post Study

    PubMed Central

    Volandes, Angelo E.; Levin, Tomer T.; Slovin, Susan; Carvajal, Richard D.; O’Reilly, Eileen M.; Keohan, Mary Louise; Theodoulou, Maria; Dickler, Maura; Gerecitano, John F.; Morris, Michael; Epstein, Andrew S.; Naka-Blackstone, Anastazia; Walker-Corkery, Elizabeth S.; Chang, Yuchiao; Noy, Ariela

    2012-01-01

    Background We tested whether an educational video on the goals of care in advanced cancer (life-prolonging, basic or comfort care) can help patients understand these goals and impact preferences for resuscitation. Methods Survey of 80 advanced cancer patients before and after viewing the video. Outcomes included changes in goals-of-care preference and knowledge, and consistency of preferences with code status. Results Before viewing the video, 10 patients (13%) preferred life-prolonging care; 24 (30%) basic care; and 29 (36%) comfort care; 17 (21%) were unsure. Preferences did not change after the video: 9 (11%) chose life-prolonging care; 28 (35%) basic care; 29 (36%) comfort care; and, 14 (18%) were unsure (p=0.28). Compared to baseline, after the video presentation more patients did not want CPR (71 vs 61%, p=0.03) or ventilation (79 vs 67%, p=0.008). Knowledge about goals of care and likelihood of resuscitation increased post-video (p<.001). Of the patients who did not want CPR or ventilation after the video augmentation, only 4 (5%) had a documented DNR order in the medical record (kappa statistic −0.01; 95% CI −0.06 – 0.04). Acceptability of the video was high. Conclusion Patients with advanced cancer did not change care preferences after viewing the video, but fewer wanted CPR or ventilation. Documented code status was inconsistent with patient preferences. Patients were more knowledgeable after the video, found the video acceptable, and would recommend it to others. Video may enable visualization of “goals of care,” enriching patient understanding of worsening health states and better informing decision-making. PMID:22252775

  15. Care of the patient with chronic pain: part II.

    PubMed

    Wells-Federman, C L

    2000-01-01

    Chronic nonmalignant pain frequently results in significant physical, behavioral, psychological, social, and spiritual issues for patients and their families. It is often misunderstood and unsuccessfully managed. Advanced practice nurses who are knowledgeable about chronic pain and the complex biopsychosocial-spiritual needs of this patient population serve an important role in recognizing these patients and intervening appropriately in their care. The purpose of this two-part article is to provide that information. Part I [Clinical Excellence for Nurse Practitioners, 3 (4), 192-204] outlined the pathophysiology, assessment, biopsychosocial-spiritual aspects, and pharmacologic treatment of chronic pain. In Part II, a variety of nonpharmacologic and self-management interventions one can use in the primary care setting to treat these difficult health problems are introduced. PMID:11858295

  16. Care of the patient with chronic pain: Part I.

    PubMed

    Wells-Federman, C L

    1999-07-01

    Chronic nonmalignant pain is estimated to affect over 50 million Americans. It frequently results in significant physical, behavioral, psychological, social, and spiritual problems for patients and their families. In spite of its prevalence and consequences, chronic pain is often misunderstood and inadequately managed by healthcare professionals. Advanced practice nurses who are knowledgeable about chronic pain and the complex biopsychosocial-spiritual needs of this patient population serve an important role in recognizing these patients and intervening appropriately in their care. The purpose of this two-part article is to provide that information. Part I outlines the pathophysiology, assessment, biopsychosocial-spiritual aspects, and pharmacological treatment of chronic pain. Part II addresses a variety of nonpharmacologic and self-management interventions one can use in the primary care setting to treat these difficult health problems. PMID:10711057

  17. Protein Innovations Advance Drug Treatments, Skin Care

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2012-01-01

    Dan Carter carefully layered the sheets of tracing paper on the light box. On each sheet were renderings of the atomic components of an essential human protein, one whose structure had long been a mystery. With each layer Carter laid down, a never-before-seen image became clearer. Carter joined NASA s Marshall Space Flight Center in 1985 and began exploring processes of protein crystal growth in space. By bouncing intense X-rays off the crystals, researchers can determine the electron densities around the thousands of atoms forming the protein molecules, unveiling their atomic structures. Cultivating crystals of sufficient quality on Earth was problematic; the microgravity conditions of space were far more accommodating. At the time, only a few hundred protein structures had been mapped, and the methods were time consuming and tedious. Carter hoped his work would help reveal the structure of human serum albumin, a major protein in the human circulatory system responsible for ferrying numerous small molecules in the blood. More was at stake than scientific curiosity. Albumin has a high affinity for most of the world s pharmaceuticals, Carter explains, and its interaction with drugs can change their safety and efficacy. When a medication enters the bloodstream a cancer chemotherapy drug, for example a majority of it can bind with albumin, leaving only a small percentage active for treatment. How a drug interacts with albumin can influence considerations like the necessary effective dosage, playing a significant role in the design and application of therapeutic measures. In spite of numerous difficulties, including having no access to microgravity following the 1986 Space Shuttle Challenger disaster, the image Carter had hoped to see was finally clarifying. In 1988, his lab had acquired specialized X-ray and detection equipment a tipping point. Carter and his colleagues began to piece together albumin s portrait, the formation of its electron densities coalescing on

  18. The web site of the center to advance palliative care.

    PubMed

    Gavrin, Jonathan R

    2004-01-01

    The web site of the Center to Advance Palliative Care is reviewed. This is an excellent resource containing resources that address financial tutorials and customizable Excel worksheets, development and marketing tools, particularly the decision checklists, satisfaction tools, the information on tracking and reporting outcomes, bereavement tools and a press kit. PMID:15760811

  19. [Choice of Expiration for Cancer Patients under Home Medical Care - Palliative Care Unit or Home].

    PubMed

    Okino, Takashi; Okagaki, Tetsuya; Nakamura, Hiromi; Okino, Akie

    2015-12-01

    Kohka Public Hospital(KPH)was rebuilt at a new place in April 2013. The Palliative Care Unit(PCU)was newly constructed during renovation. We examined the will and outcome of cancer patients, especially on expiration. A 123 patients died in 2014: 27 died at the PCU, and the remaining 7 at home. Of 27 patients, 20 were willing to die at the PCU, and one patient visited the hospital after judgment by the Visiting Nurse Center. Other 6 patients were admitted finally after their families experienced fatigue. Six of seven patients who died at home, showed a strong will to stay at home. We think that patients' will drives the clinical course, especially in their end-stage. In this context, the majority of the patients decided their terminal place based on their will. On the contrary, there were several cases whose requests were not fulfilled. To overcome the problem, we should discuss cancer patients' will to make a choice regarding death at the end-stage of their lives and the place of expiration in advance. We including the staff of social care and regional medical resources, should co-operate and share information on these patients to solve the problems. PMID:26809413

  20. Application of Transformational Leadership Principles in the Development and Integration of Palliative Care Within an Advanced Heart Failure Program.

    PubMed

    George, Susan; Leasure, A Renee

    2016-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) is a major health problem in United States, and it has reached epidemic proportions. Heart failure is associated with significant morbidity, mortality, and cost. Although the prognosis of HF is worse than many forms of cancer, many patients, families, and clinicians are unaware of the dire prognosis. As the disease progress to advanced HF, patients are faced with many challenges, such as poor quality of life due to worsening symptoms and frequent hospitalizations. Heart failure management adds significant financial burden to the health care system. Palliative care can be integrated into HF care to improve quality of life and symptom management and to address physical, spiritual, and psychosocial needs of patients and families. Palliative care can be used concurrently with or independent of curative or life-prolonging HF therapies. Transformational leadership principles were used to guide the development of a plan to enhance integration of palliative care within traditional advanced HF care. PMID:26836596

  1. Intervention thresholds: a conceptual frame for advance care planning choices

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Advance care planning (ACP) provides for decisions in the event of decisional incapacity. Determining ahead of time what a person may want is challenging and limits the utility of ACP. We present empirical evidence for a new approach to ACP: the individual’s “intervention threshold.” The intervention threshold is intuitively understood by clinicians and lay people, but has not been thoroughly described, measured, or analyzed. Methods Using a mixed-methods approach to address the concept of the intervention thresholds, we recruited 52 subjects from a population of chronically ill outpatients for structured telephone interviews assessing knowledge, attitudes, and prior ACP activities. Respondents were presented with 11 interventions for each of four medical scenarios. For each scenario, they were asked whether they would accept each intervention. Data was evaluated by descriptive statistics and chi-squared statistics. Results Complete data were obtained from 52 patients, mean age of 64.5, 34.6% of whom were male. Only 17.3% reported prior ACP discussion with a physician. Rates of accepting and refusing interventions varied by scenario (p < 0.0001) and intervention intensity (p < 0.0001). Conclusions These data provide evidence that people display transitions between wanting or not wanting interventions based on scenarios. Further research is needed to determine effective ways to identify, measure, and represent the components of an individual’s intervention threshold in order to facilitate informed decision making during future incapacity. PMID:24721698

  2. Psychiatric care for patients with breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Koh, K B

    1999-10-01

    Psychiatric management of patients with breast cancer, as well as women's emotional reactions to all phases of breast cancer, were reviewed. These patients face two major losses; one is the physical loss of part of the body and a threat to life, and the other is the loss of femininity. The patients are also likely to suffer from various psychiatric problems including anxiety and depression. Oncologists should be alert to each patient's emotional reactions and potential psychiatric problems, and if necessary, should refer them to a psychiatrist. A combination of psychotherapeutic, behavioural, and pharmacologic techniques is available for the care of patients with breast cancer. Psychotherapeutic modalities include individual therapy, family therapy, group therapy, and self-help treatment. The author divided individual therapy into general and specific treatment. General treatment deals with a crisis-intervention and cognitive-behavioral approach, whereas specific treatment deals with issues relevant to patients with breast cancer. Some of the therapeutic processes were illustrated in a case report. These guidelines will contribute to the relief and prevention of emotional suffering stemming from an encounter with the most common form of cancer in women. Also, proper and effective care for patients with breast cancer requires combined use of a variety of therapeutic modalities as well as a multi-disciplinary approach including psychiatric care. PMID:10565263

  3. Analgesia for patients with advanced disease: 2

    PubMed Central

    Hall, E; Sykes, N

    2004-01-01

    The first article in this series explored epidemiology and patterns of pain in advanced disease, non-pharmacological treatments, and the use of opioids to manage pain. This second article examines the use of non-opioid drugs and anaesthetic interventions for pain relief in advanced disease. It also discusses an approach to managing analgesia in dying patients and finally looks at future developments. PMID:15082837

  4. Point-of-Care Blood Glucose Testing for Diabetes Care in Hospitalized Patients

    PubMed Central

    Rajendran, Rajesh

    2014-01-01

    Glycemic control in hospitalized patients with diabetes requires accurate near-patient glucose monitoring systems. In the past decade, point-of-care blood glucose monitoring devices have become the mainstay of near-patient glucose monitoring in hospitals across the world. In this article, we focus on its history, accuracy, clinical use, and cost-effectiveness. Point-of-care devices have evolved from 1.2 kg instruments with no informatics to handheld lightweight portable devices with advanced connectivity features. Their accuracy however remains a subject of debate, and new standards for their approval have now been issued by both the International Organization for Standardization and the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute. While their cost-effectiveness remains to be proved, their clinical value for managing inpatients with diabetes remains unchallenged. This evidence-based review provides an overall view of its use in the hospital setting. PMID:25355711

  5. An unequivocal good? Acknowledging the complexities of advance care planning.

    PubMed

    Robins-Browne, K; Palmer, V; Komesaroff, P

    2014-10-01

    Over the past few decades advance care planning (ACP) has become the subject of debate, research and legislation in many countries. Encouraging people to express their preference for treatment in advance, ideally in written form, seems a natural way to identify what someone might have wanted when they can no longer participate in decision-making. The notion of ACP as an unequivocal good permeates much of the research and policy work in this area. For example, ACP is now actively encouraged in Australian federal and state government policies and the Victorian Government has recently published a practical ACP strategy for Victorian health services (2014-2018). However, advance care plan is ethically complex and the introduction of the Victorian health services strategy provides an opportunity to reflect on this complexity, particularly on the benefits and risks of ACP. PMID:25302719

  6. Palliative Care Patients in the Emergency Department

    PubMed Central

    LAWSON, BEVERLEY J.; BURGE, FREDERICK I.; MCINTYRE, PAUL; FIELD, SIMON; MAXWELL, DAVID

    2016-01-01

    Although end-of-life care is not a primary function of the emergency department (ED), in reality, many access this department in the later stages of illness. In this study, ED use by patients registered with the Capital Health Integrated Palliative Care Service (CHIPCS) is examined and CHIPCS patient characteristics associated with ED use identified. Overall, 27% of patients made at least one ED visit while registered with CHIPCS; 54% of these resulted in a hospital admission. ED visiting was not associated with time of day or day of the week. Multivariate logistic regression results suggest older patients were significantly less likely to make an ED visit. Making an ED visit was associated with hospital death, rural residence (particularly for women), and having a parent or relative other than a spouse or child as the primary caregiver. Further research may suggest strategies to reduce unnecessary ED visits during the end of life. PMID:19227016

  7. Self-care at the end of life in patients with heart failure.

    PubMed

    Zambroski, Cheryl

    2008-01-01

    Promoting adherence to self-care illness management strategies among patients with heart failure (HF) has been associated with a number of positive health outcomes. Yet, little is known about health outcomes related to self-care in the "sickest of the sick"-those patients with advanced HF who are approaching the end of life. Clinicians and researchers must determine how self-care interventions are defined in the advanced HF population. For example, what is meant by self-care illness management in patients who are symptomatic with exertion may differ from that of patients who are predominantly symptomatic at rest. Our challenge is to develop the simplest, least burdensome self-care illness management interventions that target the most meaningful outcomes for patients, their families, and the healthcare system. PMID:18437069

  8. A patient-centered research agenda for the care of the acutely ill older patient.

    PubMed

    Wald, Heidi L; Leykum, Luci K; Mattison, Melissa L P; Vasilevskis, Eduard E; Meltzer, David O

    2015-05-01

    Hospitalists and others acute-care providers are limited by gaps in evidence addressing the needs of the acutely ill older adult population. The Society of Hospital Medicine sponsored the Acute Care of Older Patients Priority Setting Partnership to develop a research agenda focused on bridging this gap. Informed by the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute framework for identification and prioritization of research areas, we adapted a methodology developed by the James Lind Alliance to engage diverse stakeholders in the research agenda setting process. The work of the Partnership proceeded through 4 steps: convening, consulting, collating, and prioritizing. First, the steering committee convened a partnership of 18 stakeholder organizations in May 2013. Next, stakeholder organizations surveyed members to identify important unanswered questions in the acute care of older persons, receiving 1299 responses from 580 individuals. Finally, an extensive and structured process of collation and prioritization resulted in a final list of 10 research questions in the following areas: advanced-care planning, care transitions, delirium, dementia, depression, medications, models of care, physical function, surgery, and training. With the changing demographics of the hospitalized population, a workforce with limited geriatrics training, and gaps in evidence to inform clinical decision making for acutely ill older patients, the identified research questions deserve the highest priority in directing future research efforts to improve care for the older hospitalized patient and enrich training. PMID:25877486

  9. A patient-centered research agenda for the care of the acutely ill older patient

    PubMed Central

    Wald, Heidi L.; Leykum, Luci K.; Mattison, Melissa L. P.; Vasilevskis, Eduard E.; Meltzer, David O.

    2015-01-01

    Hospitalists and others acute care providers are limited by gaps in evidence addressing the needs of the acutely ill older adult population. The Society of Hospital Medicine (SHM) sponsored the Acute Care of Older Patients (ACOP) Priority Setting Partnership to develop a research agenda focused on bridging this gap. Informed by the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI) framework for identification and prioritization of research areas, we adapted a methodology developed by the James Lind Alliance to engage diverse stakeholders in the research agenda setting process. The work of the Partnership proceeded through four steps: convening, consulting, collating, and prioritizing. First, the steering committee convened a Partnership of 18 stakeholder organizations in May 2013. Next, stakeholder organizations surveyed members to identify important unanswered questions in the acute care of older persons, receiving 1299 responses from 580 individuals. Finally, an extensive and structured process of collation and prioritization resulted in a final list of ten research questions in the following areas: advanced care planning, care transitions, delirium, dementia, depression, medications, models of care, physical function, surgery, and training. With the changing demographics of the hospitalized population, a workforce with limited geriatrics training, and gaps in evidence to inform clinical decision-making for acutely ill older patients, the identified research questions deserve the highest priority in directing future research efforts to improve care for the older hospitalized patient and enrich training. PMID:25877486

  10. Fluoroscopic chest tube insertion and patient care.

    PubMed Central

    Collins, J. D.; Shaver, M. L.; Disher, A. C.; Miller, T. Q.

    1992-01-01

    Catheters and chest tubes may be placed under fluoroscopic control to reduce pleural effusions. This procedure has been adopted as a routine procedure at the UCLA School of Medicine in Los Angeles, California to improve patient care. This technique was modified for the placement of large chest tubes, which can be placed by a radiologist without multiple attempts or complications. Our experience with 2234 patients who underwent this procedure between 1977 and 1990 is described. PMID:1404463

  11. Physician orders to supplement advance directives: rescuing patient autonomy.

    PubMed

    Miller, Ronald B

    2009-01-01

    To adapt Churchill's comment on democracy, "No one pretends that [POLSTs are] perfect..." but physicians' orders about life-sustaining treatments are a very important supplement to advance directives, especially for patients who are extremely or terminally ill, and most particularly for patients who require emergency treatment by first responders or by physicians who do not know them as persons. The standardized orders of limited options, however, are no substitute for a detailed treatment directive of a patient with a known illness, with predictable trajectories and complications. And, in this latter circumstance, a thoroughly informed proxy may also assist physicians in selecting appropriate treatment for patients who have lost decisional capacity and/or the ability to express it. I believe all patients should have an advance directive, preferably a combined proxy-treatment directive, and preferably one that has been thoroughly discussed with the attending physician and with the proxy, successor proxies, and preferably relatives and friends. Nurses, social workers, and chaplains may be very helpful to the patient in thinking through his or her preferences, especially if the severity of illness and the limited efficacy of interventions are such that the patient would wish to omit life-sustaining treatment or to discontinue it after a time-limited trial. Finally, because POLST is new or yet to be initiated in many areas of the country, it behooves all physicians to become knowledgeable of POLST and to initiate discussion of it with colleagues, patients, patients' proxies, and with relatives of patients. Even more recent is the combined advance directive/physician's orders to permit natural dying, actionable immediately for patients suffering severely and irremediably, but actionable at a future time if the patient progresses to advanced stages of dementia or other devastating brain disorders. In order to encourage physicians to initiate advance care planning with

  12. Managing the Patient with Pulmonary Hypertension: Specialty Care Centers, Coordinated Care, and Patient Support.

    PubMed

    Chakinala, Murali M; Duncan, Maribeth; Wirth, Joel

    2016-08-01

    Pulmonary hypertension remains a challenging condition to diagnose and manage. Decentralized care for pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) has led to shortcomings in the diagnosis and management of PAH. The Pulmonary Hypertension Association-sponsored Pulmonary Hypertension Care Center program is designed to recognize specialty centers capable of providing multidisciplinary and comprehensive care of PAH. Ideally, Pulmonary Hypertension Care Centers will comanage PAH patients with community-based practitioners and address the growing needs of this emerging population of long-term PAH patients. PMID:27443143

  13. The patient-as-partner approach in health care: a conceptual framework for a necessary transition.

    PubMed

    Karazivan, Philippe; Dumez, Vincent; Flora, Luigi; Pomey, Marie-Pascale; Del Grande, Claudio; Ghadiri, Djahanchah Philip; Fernandez, Nicolas; Jouet, Emmanuelle; Las Vergnas, Olivier; Lebel, Paule

    2015-04-01

    The prevalence of chronic diseases today calls for new ways of working with patients to manage their care. Although patient-centered approaches have contributed to significant advances in care and to treatments that more fully respect patients' preferences, values, and personal experiences, the reality is that health care professionals still hold a monopoly on the role of healer. Patients live with their conditions every day and are experts when it comes to their own experiences of illness; this expertise should be welcomed, valued, and fostered by other members of the care team. The patient-as-partner approach embodies the ideal of making the patient a bona fide member of the health care team, a true partner in his or her care. Since 2010, the University of Montreal, through the Direction of Collaboration and Patient Partnership, has embraced this approach. Patients are not only active members of their own health care team but also are involved in research and provide valuable training to health sciences students. Including patients as full partners in the health care team entails a significant shift in both the medical practice and medical education cultures. In this perspective, the authors describe this innovative approach to patient care, including the conceptual framework used in its development and the main achievements of patient partners in education, health care, and research. PMID:25607943

  14. Implementing advance care planning: a qualitative study of community nurses' views and experiences

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Advance care planning (ACP) is a process of discussion about goals of care and a means of setting on record preferences for care of patients who may lose capacity or communication ability in the future. Implementation of ACP is widely promoted by policy makers. This study examined how community palliative care nurses in England understand ACP and their roles within ACP. It sought to identify factors surrounding community nurses' implementation of ACP and nurses' educational needs. Methods An action research strategy was employed. 23 community nurses from two cancer networks in England were recruited to 6 focus group discussions and three follow up workshops. Data were analysed using a constant comparison approach. Findings Nurses understood ACP to be an important part of practice and to have the potential to be a celebration of good nursing care. Nurses saw their roles in ACP as engaging with patients to elicit care preferences, facilitate family communication and enable a shift of care focus towards palliative care. They perceived challenges to ACP including: timing, how to effect team working in ACP, the policy focus on instructional directives which related poorly to patients' concerns; managing differences in patients' and families' views. Perceived barriers included: lack of resources; lack of public awareness about ACP; difficulties in talking about death. Nurses recommended the following to be included in education programmes: design of realistic scenarios; design of a flow chart; practical advice about communication and documentation; insights into the need for clinical supervision for ACP practice. Conclusions Nurses working in the community are centrally involved with patients with palliative care needs who may wish to set on record their views about future care and treatment. This study reveals some important areas for practice and educational development to enhance nurses' use and understanding of ACP. PMID:20377876

  15. Patient expectation: what is comprehensive health care?

    PubMed

    Starr, G C; Norris, R; Patil, K D; Young, P R

    1979-01-01

    A patient expectation survey was developed and implemented in order to define the spectrum of health care activities expected from the University of Nebraska Family Health Centers. The hypothesis underlying the survey is that patient expectations or opinions vary considerably among the members of any given population. High expectation is present for office visits, emergency services, yearly physical examination, and performance of chest x-ray, blood test, proctoscopy, and eye examination. Psychiatric services, marital counseling, youth counseling, nursing home care, and health education are indicated as not necessary by a plurality of the respondents. Examination of the responses by age, sex, and payment status through canonical correlation reveals a number of strong correlations of specific subgroups and expectations. Factor analysis revealed three independent factors or clusters representating health care issues as perceived by the patient. This study and further similar studies will be helpful in aiding the family physician's understanding of what patients expect. Through a better understanding of patient expectation, patient satisfaction and compliance may be improved. PMID:759540

  16. Patient Care Assistant. Florida Vocational Program Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida State Univ., Tallahassee. Center for Instructional Development and Services.

    This program guide identifies primary considerations in the organization, operation, and evaluation of a patient care assistant program. An occupational description and program content are presented. A curriculum framework specifies the exact course title, course number, levels of instruction, major course content, laboratory activities, special…

  17. Integration of Early Specialist Palliative Care in Cancer Care and Patient Related Outcomes: A Critical Review of Evidence

    PubMed Central

    Salins, Naveen; Ramanjulu, Raghavendra; Patra, Lipika; Deodhar, Jayita; Muckaden, Mary Ann

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: World Health Organization and American Society of Clinical Oncology recommend early integration of specialist palliative care in patients with cancer. This paper focuses on critical review of evidence on integration of early specialist palliative care in cancer care and patient-related outcomes. Methods: The question for the literature search was – Does integration of early specialist palliative care in cancer care influences patient-related outcomes? 31 articles related to literature search review question were included in this paper. Results: Ten patient-related outcomes of early specialist palliative care in adult cancer care was studied. Studies by Temel et al. (2012), Bakitas et al. (2009), Zimmermann et al. (2014), Rugno et al. (2014), Lowery et al. (2013) and Walker et al. (2014) showed early specialist palliative care improves health-related quality of life (HRQOL). Studies by Pirl et al. (2012), Lowery et al. (2013), and Walker et al. (2014) showed early specialist palliative care improved mood depression and anxiety. Studies by Zimmermann et al. and Rugno et al. (2014) showed symptom control benefit of early specialist palliative care. Studies by Temel (2010), Bakitas (2015) and Rugno et al. (2014) showed survival improvement with early specialist palliative care. All these studies were carried in ambulatory palliative care setting. No survival benefit of palliative care intervention was seen in inpatient palliative care setting. The studies by Geer et al. (2012), Rugno et al. (2014), and Lowery et al. (2013) showed that early palliative care intervention positively influences treatment decision making. All the studies showed that palliative care intervention group received less intravenous chemotherapy in last few weeks of life. Studies by Yoong et al. and Temel et al. (2011) shows early specialist palliative care improves advanced care planning. Studies by Temel et al. (2010), Greer et al. (2012), McNamara et al. (2013), Hui et al. (2014

  18. Developing Navigation Competencies to Care for Older Rural Adults with Advanced Illness.

    PubMed

    Duggleby, Wendy; Robinson, Carole A; Kaasalainen, Sharon; Pesut, Barbara; Nekolaichuk, Cheryl; MacLeod, Roderick; Keating, Norah C; Santos Salas, Anna; Hallstrom, Lars K; Fraser, Kimberly D; Williams, Allison; Struthers-Montford, Kelly; Swindle, Jennifer

    2016-06-01

    Navigators help rural older adults with advanced illness and their families connect to needed resources, information, and people to improve their quality of life. This article describes the process used to engage experts - in rural aging, rural palliative care, and navigation - as well as rural community stakeholders to develop a conceptual definition of navigation and delineate navigation competencies for the care of this population. A discussion paper on the important considerations for navigation in this population was developed followed by a four-phased Delphi process with 30 expert panel members. Study results culminated in five general navigation competencies for health care providers caring for older rural persons and their families at end of life: provide patient/family screening; advocate for the patient/family; facilitate community connections; coordinate access to services and resources; and promote active engagement. Specific competencies were also developed. These competencies provide the foundation for research and curriculum development in navigation. PMID:27093177

  19. Lessons learned from New York's community approach to advance care planning and MOLAT.

    PubMed

    Bomba, Patricia A; Orem, Katie

    2015-01-01

    This article reviews the lessons learned from the development and implementation of New York's community approach to advance care planning (ACP) as a wellness initiative and the key components of the complementary programs: Community Conversations on Compassionate Care (CCCC) and Medical Orders for Life-Sustaining Treatment (MOLST). Shared, informed medical decision-making is a patient-centered process that is critical to ensuring patient preferences for care are honored at the end of life. Providers must be trained, qualified, and comfortable with the discussions needed for effective shared, informed medical decision-making. Development, implementation, outcomes, lessons learned and sustainability of the CCCC and MOLST programs highlight the success of a healthcare and community collaborative initiative focused on improving care at the end of life. Community data support the value of implementing the CCCC and New York's MOLST throughout the country. PMID:25813415

  20. Measuring engagement in advance care planning: a cross-sectional multicentre feasibility study

    PubMed Central

    Howard, Michelle; Bonham, Aaron J; Heyland, Daren K; Sudore, Rebecca; Fassbender, Konrad; Robinson, Carole A; McKenzie, Michael; Elston, Dawn; You, John J

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To assess the feasibility, acceptability and clinical sensibility of a novel survey, the advance care planning (ACP) Engagement Survey, in various healthcare settings. Setting A target sample of 50 patients from each of primary care, hospital, cancer care and dialysis care settings. Participants A convenience sample of patients without cognitive impairment who could speak and read English was recruited. Patients 50 and older were eligible in primary care; patients 80 and older or 55 and older with clinical markers of advanced chronic disease were recruited in hospital; patients aged 19 and older were recruited in cancer and renal dialysis centres. Outcomes We assessed feasibility, acceptability and clinical sensibility of the ACP Engagement Survey using a 6-point scale. The ACP Engagement Survey measures ACP processes (knowledge, contemplation, self-efficacy and readiness) on 5-point Likert scales and actions (yes/no). Results 196 patients (38–96 years old, 50.5% women) participated. Mean (±SD) time to administer was 48.8±19.6 min. Mean acceptability scores ranged from 3.2±1.3 in hospital to 4.7±0.9 in primary care, and mean relevance ranged from 3.5±1.0 in hospital to 4.9±0.9 in dialysis centres (p<0.001 for both). The mean process score was 3.1±0.6 and the mean action score was 11.2±5.6 (of a possible 25). Conclusions The ACP Engagement Survey demonstrated feasibility and acceptability in outpatient settings but was less feasible and acceptable among hospitalised patients due to length. A shorter version may improve feasibility. Engagement in ACP was low to moderate. PMID:27338877

  1. Satisfaction with care in peritoneal dialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Kirchgessner, J; Perera-Chang, M; Klinkner, G; Soley, I; Marcelli, D; Arkossy, O; Stopper, A; Kimmel, P L

    2006-10-01

    Patient satisfaction is an important aspect of dialysis care, only recently evaluated in clinical studies. We developed a tool to assess peritoneal dialysis (PD) customer satisfaction, and sought to evaluate and validate the Customer Satisfaction Questionnaire (CSQ), quantifying PD patient satisfaction. The CSQ included questions regarding administrative issues, Delivery Service, PD Training, Handling Requests, and transportation. The study was performed using interviews in all Hungarian Fresenius Medical Care dialysis centers offering PD. CSQ results were compared with psychosocial measures to identify if patient satisfaction was associated with perception of social support and illness burden, or depression. We assessed CSQ internal consistency and validity. Factor analysis explored potential underlying dimensions of the CSQ. One hundred and thirty-three patients treated with PD for end-stage renal disease for more than 3 months were interviewed. The CSQ had high internal consistency. There was high patient satisfaction with customer service. PD patient satisfaction scores correlated with quality of life (QOL) and social support measures, but not with medical or demographic factors, or depressive affect. The CSQ is a reliable tool to assess PD customer satisfaction. PD patient satisfaction is associated with perception of QOL. Efforts to improve customer satisfaction may improve PD patients' quantity as well as QOL. PMID:16900092

  2. Patient neglect in 21st century health-care institutions: a community health psychology perspective.

    PubMed

    Reader, Tom W; Gillespie, Alex; Mannell, Jenevieve

    2014-01-01

    Despite the technological and organisational advances of 21st century health-care systems, care scandals and burgeoning complaints from patients have raised concerns about patient neglect in hospitals. This article reviews the concept of patient neglect and the role of community health psychology in understanding its occurrence. Patient neglect has previously been conceptualised as a problem associated with hospital staff attitudes and behaviours, with regulation and training cited as solutions. Yet, a community health psychology perspective shows that the wider symbolic, material and relational aspects of care are crucial for understanding why patient neglect occurs and for outlining new solutions to augment existing interventions. PMID:24058107

  3. Can Imaging Put the “Advanced” Back in Advanced Wound Care?

    PubMed Central

    DaCosta, Ralph S.; Ottolino-Perry, Kathryn; Banerjee, Jaideep

    2016-01-01

    An effective, scientifically validated, diagnostic tool helps clinicians make better, timely, and more objective medical decisions in the care of their patients. Today, the need for such tools is especially urgent in the field of wound care where patient-centric care is the goal, under ever tightening clinical budget constraints. In an era of countless “innovative” treatment options, that is, advanced dressings, negative pressure devices, and various debridement instruments available to the wound care clinical team, one area that has arguably languished in the past decade has been innovation in wound diagnostics. Whereas medical imaging is a mainstay in the diagnostic toolkit across many other medical fields (oncology, neurology, gastroenterology, orthopedics, etc.), the field of wound care has yet to realize the full potential that advances in imaging technologies have to offer the clinician. In this issue, the first of a series in wound imaging and diagnostics, four articles have been assembled, highlighting some of the recent advances in wound imaging technologies. PMID:27602251

  4. Using patient stories to reflect on care.

    PubMed

    Buckley, Alison; Corless, Louise; Mee, Steve

    There is an increasing emphasis on, and commitment to, using patient narratives in nursing practice and nurse education. Listening to the voices of those receiving our care is just the beginning. The challenge is to use these narratives to improve practice and the patient experience. This seven-part series will present narratives from three fields of nursing: adult, mental health and learning disability. Each article will include opportunities to reflect on the stories presented and consider their implications for practice. Part 1 explores how patient narratives can be used as an evidence base for nursing practice. It uses a patient story to explore the unintended consequences of communication between a nurse and a patient, as well as how the environment in which patients find themselves can relay important messages. PMID:27141722

  5. Advanced practice nursing students' knowledge, self-efficacy, and attitudes related to depression in older adults: teaching holistic depression care.

    PubMed

    Delaney, Colleen; Barrere, Cynthia

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the knowledge, attitudes, and self-efficacy of advanced practice nursing students toward depression in older adults. Findings suggest that advanced practice nursing students are interested in caring for the whole person and desired more information on the physical and emotional-spiritual needs of older patients with depression. Suggestions for holistic nursing depression care education are presented. PMID:22694866

  6. Caring for Surgical Patients With Piercings.

    PubMed

    Smith, Francis Duval

    2016-06-01

    Body piercing, a type of body modification that is practiced in many cultures, creates an unnatural tract through tissue that is then held open by artificial means. Today, professional body piercing is often performed in piercing establishments that are subject to dissimilar forms of regulation. The most frequently reported medical complication of body piercing and similar body modifications, such as dermal implantation, is infection. Patients with piercings who undergo surgery may have additional risks for infection, electrical burns, trauma, or airway obstruction. The published research literature on piercing prevalence, complications, regulations, education, and nursing care is outdated. The purpose of this article is to educate nurses on topics related to nursing care for patients with piercings and similar body modifications, including the history, prevalence, motivations for, and perceptions of body piercings as well as possible complications, devices used, locations, healing times, regulations, patient education, and other health concerns. PMID:27234793

  7. Is There a Need for Early Palliative Care in Patients With Life-Limiting Illnesses? Interview Study With Patients About Experienced Care Needs From Diagnosis Onward.

    PubMed

    Beernaert, Kim; Deliens, Luc; De Vleminck, Aline; Devroey, Dirk; Pardon, Koen; Block, Lieve Van den; Cohen, Joachim

    2016-06-01

    The early integration of specialist palliative care has been shown to benefit the quality of life of patients with advanced cancer. In order to explore whether other seriously ill people and people at even earlier phases would also benefit from early palliative care, we conducted 18 qualitative interviews with people having cancer, chronic obstructive lung disease, heart failure, or dementia at different phases of the illness trajectory about how they experienced care needs related to their disease from diagnosis onward. Respondents experienced needs within the different domains of palliative care at different stages of the illness and different illness types or duration of the illness. This study contributes to the understanding of primary care needs of patients for whom palliative care (not necessarily specialized palliative care) could be beneficial. PMID:25852203

  8. Reduction of Behavioral Psychological Symptoms of Dementia by Multimodal Comprehensive Care for Vulnerable Geriatric Patients in an Acute Care Hospital: A Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Honda, Miwako; Ito, Mio; Ishikawa, Shogo; Takebayashi, Yoichi; Tierney, Lawrence

    2016-01-01

    Management of Behavioral and Psychological Symptoms of Dementia (BPSD) is a key challenge in geriatric dementia care. A multimodal comprehensive care methodology, Humanitude, with eye contact, verbal communication, and touch as its elements, was provided to three geriatric dementia patients for whom conventional nursing care failed in an acute care hospital. Each episode was evaluated by video analysis. All patients had advanced dementia with BPSD. Failure of care was identified by patient's shouting, screaming, or abrupt movements of limbs. In this case series, conventional care failed for all three patients. Each element of care communication was much shorter than in Humanitude care, which was accepted by the patients. The average of the elements performed during the care was eye contact 0.6%, verbal communication 15.7%, and touch 0.1% in conventional care and 12.5%, 54.8%, and 44.5% in Humanitude care, respectively. The duration of aggressive behavior of each patient during care was 25.0%, 25.4%, and 66.3% in conventional care and 0%, 0%, and 0.3% in Humanitude, respectively. In our case series, conventional care was provided by less eye contact, verbal communication, and touch. The multimodal comprehensive care approach, Humanitude, decreased BPSD and showed success by patients' acceptance of care. PMID:27069478

  9. A comprehensive review of palliative care in patients with cancer.

    PubMed

    Jaiswal, Reena; Alici, Yesne; Breitbart, William

    2014-02-01

    One of the most challenging roles for the psychiatrist is to help guide terminally ill patients physically, psychologically and spiritually through the dying process. Patients with advanced cancer, and other life-threatening medical illnesses are at increased risk for developing major psychiatric complications and have an enormous burden of both physical as well as psychological symptoms. In fact, surveys suggest that psychological symptoms such as depression, anxiety, and hopelessness are as frequent, if not more so, than pain and other physical symptoms in palliative care settings. Psychiatrists have a unique role and opportunity to offer competent and compassionate palliative care to those with life-threatening illness. In this article we provide a comprehensive review of basic concepts and definitions of palliative care and the experience of dying, and the role of the psychiatrist in palliative care including assessment and management of common psychiatric disorders in the terminally ill, with an emphasis on suicide and desire for hastened death. Psychotherapies developed for use in palliative care settings, and management of grief and bereavement are also reviewed. PMID:24716503

  10. [Specifics of Analgesia in Palliative Care Patients at Home].

    PubMed

    Pautex, Sophie

    2015-02-25

    Pain management at home for a patient, suffering from one or more advanced progressive diseases, goes beyond the prescription of an opioid. Apart from the importance of finding the most suitable analgesic drug (controlled pain with least possible adverse effects), three important dimensions will be addressed: interprofessionnal care (shared care goals, evaluation, monitoring of pain and other symptoms; physiotherapy, etc.) information, education and support for patients and relatives in particular on the use of opioids, and finally the importance of anticipation. This includes for example the requirement of breakthrough pain treatment in case of pain exacerbation or the definition of the place of hospitalization in case of worsening general condition or of death. PMID:25711785

  11. Integrative and complementary therapies for patients with advanced cancer.

    PubMed

    Marchand, Lucille

    2014-07-01

    In integrative medicine, well-being is emphasized, and in palliative care, quality of life (QOL) is a similar concept or goal. Both can occur despite advanced cancer. Integrative medicine serves to combine the best of alternative, complementary and conventional therapies to optimize well-being and QOL, whether or not a person is at the end of their life. When integrative medicine is combined with palliative care modalities, the toolbox to provide symptom control and well-being or QOL is increased or broadened. Palliative care and integrative medicine are best provided early in the trajectory of illness such as cancer, and increase in amount as the illness progresses toward end of life. In cancer care, symptoms of the cancer, as well as symptoms produced by cancer therapies, are addressed with conventional and integrative therapies. Goals of care change as the disease progresses, and a patient's unique situation creates a different balance of integrative and conventional therapies. Integrative therapies such as music, aromatherapy, and massage might appeal to more patients than more specific, less common integrative therapies that might be more expensive, or seem more unusual such as Ayurvedic medicine and energy modalities. Each person may be drawn to different integrative modalities depending on factors such as cultural traditions, beliefs, lifestyle, internet information, advice from family and friends, books, etc. This review focuses on how integrative and complementary modalities can be included in comprehensive palliative care for patients with advanced malignancies. Nutrition and movement, often neglected in conventional treatment strategies, will also be included in the larger context of integrative and palliative modalities. Both conventional and integrative modalities in palliative care help patients live with empowerment, hope, and well-being no matter how long their lives last. A comprehensive review of all integrative and complementary therapies is

  12. Planning quality patient care in today's marketplace.

    PubMed

    Malloch, K

    2000-06-01

    New skills and perspectives are essential for nursing to meet the demands of shrinking resources without co-opting professional standards. Planning patient care in a definitive, value-based framework that ensures a balance among cost, work time, and quality outcomes for the consumer is the new work of nursing. Translating current practice into a value-based model requires an orientation to the content of our care, the context in which it is provided, and the effectiveness of our collaborative skills. PMID:11249282

  13. End-of-Life Care for Undocumented Immigrants With Advanced Cancer: Documenting the Undocumented.

    PubMed

    Jaramillo, Sylvia; Hui, David

    2016-04-01

    There are approximately 11.1 million undocumented immigrants in the United States, with a majority being Latino. Cancer is now the leading cause of death in Latinos. There is little research guiding providers on how to deliver optimal end-of-life care in this population. We describe a case of an undocumented Latino patient with advanced cancer, and provide a review of the literature on end-of-life care in undocumented immigrants. Our patient encountered many challenges as he navigated through the healthcare system in the last months of life. These included delayed diagnosis, limited social support, financial issues, fear of deportation, and language and cultural barriers, which resulted in significant physical and psychological distress. Within the undocumented patient population, there is often a lack of advance care planning, prognostic understanding, mistrust, religious practices, and cultural beliefs that may affect decision making. Given the growing number of undocumented immigrants in the United States, it is important for clinicians and policy makers to have a better understanding of the issues surrounding end-of-life care for undocumented immigrants, and work together to improve the quality of life and quality of end-of-life care for these disadvantaged individuals. PMID:26681362

  14. How Outpatient Palliative Care Teleconsultation Facilitates Empathic Patient-Professional Relationships: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    van Gurp, Jelle; van Selm, Martine; Vissers, Kris; van Leeuwen, Evert; Hasselaar, Jeroen

    2015-01-01

    Objective The problems and needs of advanced cancer patients and proxies normally increase as the disease progresses. Home-based advanced cancer patients and their proxies benefit from collaborations between primary care physicians and hospital-based palliative care specialists when confronted with complex problems in the last phase of life. Telemedicine might facilitate direct, patient-centered communication between patients and proxies, primary care physicians, and specialist palliative care teams (SPCTs). This study focuses on the impact of teleconsultation technologies on the relationships between home-based palliative care patients and hospital-based palliative care specialists. Methods This work consists of a qualitative study among patients, family members, and caregivers that utilizes long-term direct observations, semi-structured interviews, and open interviews following the observations. Results The analysis of the empirical data resulted in three key concepts that describe the impact of teleconsultation on the patient-professional relationship in palliative homecare: transcending the institutional walls of home and hospital; transparency of teleconsultation technology; and technologized, intimate patient-professional relationships. Teleconsultation offers (1) condensed encounters between home-based palliative care patients and distant professionals, (2) a unique insight into the patients’ daily lives for palliative care specialists, and (3) long-term interaction that results in trustful relationships and experiences of intimacy and relief. Conclusions Teleconsultation fits the practice of home-based palliative care. Teleconsultation can, if well applied, facilitate computer-mediated but empathic patient-palliative care specialist relationships, which enable professional care attuned to the patient’s context as well as patient involvement. This article proposes a teleconsultation implementation guide for optimal use of teleconsultation in daily

  15. Promoting Patient- and Family-Centered Care Through Personal Stories.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Beverley H

    2016-03-01

    Patient- and family-centered care is an approach to the planning, delivery, and evaluation of health care that is grounded in mutually beneficial partnerships among patients, their families, and health care professionals. It redefines the relationships in health care by placing an emphasis on collaborating with patients of all ages, and their families, at all levels of care, in all health care settings, and in organizational change and improvement. This collaboration ensures that health care is responsive to an individual's priorities, preferences, and values. In patient- and family-centered care, patients define their "family" and determine how they and their family will participate in care and decision making. While patient- and family-centered care can improve the experience of care, safety, and quality, it also can improve the learning environment for students and trainees. The author shares personal stories to illustrate the core concepts of patient- and family-centered care, when they are present in health care interactions, and when they are not. Drawing from these stories and the author's experience in working with academic medical centers and other health care organizations over many decades, recommendations for changes in medical education are suggested that can contribute to the development of a health care workforce with the skills and commitment to partner respectfully, effectively, and authentically with patients and families. The implementation of the Affordable Care Act gives new impetus for building a health care delivery system and related educational programs to support patient- and family-centered practice. PMID:26796094

  16. Coordination of care for individuals with advanced progressive conditions: a multi-site ethnographic and serial interview study

    PubMed Central

    Mason, Bruce; Epiphaniou, Eleni; Nanton, Veronica; Donaldson, Anne; Shipman, Cathy; Daveson, Barbara A; Harding, Richard; Higginson, Irene; Munday, Dan; Barclay, Stephen; Boyd, Kirsty; Dale, Jeremy; Kendall, Marilyn; Worth, Allison; Murray, Scott A

    2013-01-01

    Background Coordination of care for individuals with advanced progressive conditions is frequently poor. Aim To identify how care is coordinated in generalist settings for individuals with advanced progressive conditions in the last year of life. Design and setting A mixed methods study of three UK generalist clinical settings producing three parallel case studies: an acute admissions unit in a regional hospital, a large general practice, and a respiratory outpatient service. Method Ethnographic observations in each setting, followed by serial interviews of patients with advanced progressive conditions and their family carers in the community. A spectrum of clinicians and healthcare workers were also interviewed. Results Ethnographic observations were conducted for 22 weeks. A total of 56 patients, 25 family carers and 17 clinicians yielded 198 interviews. Very few participants had been identified for a palliative approach. Rapid throughput of hospital patients and time pressures in primary care hindered identification of palliative care needs. Lack of care coordination was evident during emergency admissions and discharges. Patient, families, and professionals identified multiple problems relating to lack of information, communication, and collaboration at care transitions. Family carers or specialist nurses, where present, usually acted as the main care coordinators. Conclusion Care is poorly coordinated in generalist settings for patients in the last year of life, although those with cancer have better coordinated care than other patients. A model to improve coordination of care for all individuals approaching the end of life must ensure that patients are identified in a timely way, so that they can be assessed and their care planned accordingly. PMID:23972199

  17. Rheumatoid arthritis patients' experience of climate care.

    PubMed

    Vaks, Katrin; Sjöström, Rita

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to understand and examine how patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) experience climate care and its effects. A qualitative approach was chosen for the study. Two men and six women were interviewed according to a semistructured interview guide. The text was analyzed using a manifest content analysis. The analysis resulted in four categories and 10 subcategories. The interviewees experienced climate care positively. The training was perceived increasing gradually. The patients felt that they performed to a maximum capacity during training and were impressed by the staff's enthusiasm and encouragement. The patients felt that they were involved in the goal setting and the choice of treatment, and the staff noticed individual needs. There was a feeling among the patients of being acknowledged by the staff. Information about the disease was perceived as individualized. The climate and beautiful surroundings were viewed as encouraging physical activity and a feeling of well-being. Patients made new friends, had fun together and also shared experiences about their disease. Furthermore, the patients described a sense of belonging to a group as well as a feeling of not being the only one that was sick among the healthy. Not having to do everyday tasks and having time to themselves were perceived positively. Several factors contributed to the positive experiences of climate care; climate, environment, physical activity, social context, staff involvement, and information about the disease were described as interacting together and resulting in a sense of well-being. A proposal for future research would be to examine if/how the various factors might interact and affect the RA patients' illness and quality of life. PMID:26730385

  18. Discussing Health Care Costs with Patients

    PubMed Central

    Hardee, James T; Platt, Frederic W; Kasper, Ilene K

    2005-01-01

    Escalating health care costs are affecting patients across the country. As employers and insurance companies face higher expenses, they may move to a cost-sharing strategy, which potentially increases financial burdens on patients. In this situation, physicians may find themselves serving as both medical and financial advisors for their patients. Clinical encounters in which patients experience financial hardship can be awkward and frustrating for both parties. Physicians must learn to discuss issues of affordability in a manner that builds, rather than detracts, from a therapeutic alliance. This article describes our experiences using several communication skills that can help in the discussion of health care costs with patients. The primary skill, empathic communication, which includes “we” statements and “I wish …” statements, serves to create a platform for shared decision-making, negotiation, and a search for alternatives. In addition, it is helpful if physician offices have resource materials available and strategies identified to assist patients facing financial hardship. PMID:16050867

  19. Patient Autonomy Investigation under the Technology-Based Health Care System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Yi

    2012-01-01

    With widespread advances in the diffusion and application of medical technologies, the phenomena of misuse and overuse have become pervasive. These phenomena not only increase the cost of health care systems and deplete the accessibility and availability of health care services, they also jeopardize patient autonomy. From a literature review on…

  20. Bioinformatics Methods and Tools to Advance Clinical Care

    PubMed Central

    Lecroq, T.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Objectives To summarize excellent current research in the field of Bioinformatics and Translational Informatics with application in the health domain and clinical care. Method We provide a synopsis of the articles selected for the IMIA Yearbook 2015, from which we attempt to derive a synthetic overview of current and future activities in the field. As last year, a first step of selection was performed by querying MEDLINE with a list of MeSH descriptors completed by a list of terms adapted to the section. Each section editor has evaluated separately the set of 1,594 articles and the evaluation results were merged for retaining 15 articles for peer-review. Results The selection and evaluation process of this Yearbook’s section on Bioinformatics and Translational Informatics yielded four excellent articles regarding data management and genome medicine that are mainly tool-based papers. In the first article, the authors present PPISURV a tool for uncovering the role of specific genes in cancer survival outcome. The second article describes the classifier PredictSNP which combines six performing tools for predicting disease-related mutations. In the third article, by presenting a high-coverage map of the human proteome using high resolution mass spectrometry, the authors highlight the need for using mass spectrometry to complement genome annotation. The fourth article is also related to patient survival and decision support. The authors present datamining methods of large-scale datasets of past transplants. The objective is to identify chances of survival. Conclusions The current research activities still attest the continuous convergence of Bioinformatics and Medical Informatics, with a focus this year on dedicated tools and methods to advance clinical care. Indeed, there is a need for powerful tools for managing and interpreting complex, large-scale genomic and biological datasets, but also a need for user-friendly tools developed for the clinicians in their

  1. Comparison of two pain assessment tools in nonverbal critical care patients.

    PubMed

    Paulson-Conger, Melissa; Leske, Jane; Maidl, Carolyn; Hanson, Andrew; Dziadulewicz, Laurel

    2011-12-01

    It is recommended that patient's self-report of pain should be obtained as often as possible as the "gold standard." Unfortunately in critical care, many factors can alter verbal communication with patients, making pain assessment more difficult. Scientific advances in understanding pain mechanisms, multidimensional methods of pain assessment, and analgesic pharmacology have improved pain management strategies. However, pain assessment for nonverbal patients in critical care continues to present a challenge for clinicians and researchers. The purpose of this study was to compare the Pain Assessment in Advanced Dementia (PAINAD) and the Critical-Care Pain Observation Tool (CPOT) scores for assessment in nonverbal critical care patients. A descriptive, comparative, prospective design was used in this study. A convenience sample of 100 critical care, nonverbal, adult patients of varying medical diagnoses who required pain evaluation were assessed with the PAINAD and CPOT scales. Data were collected over a 6-month period in all critical care areas. Observations of pain assessments for nonverbal patients who required pain evaluation were recorded on the PAINAD and the CPOT successively. Internal consistency reliability for the PAINAD was 0.80 and for the CPOT 0.72. Limits of agreement indicated that there was no difference in PAINAD and CPOT scores for assessing pain in nonverbal patients in critical care. Further research in the area of pain assessment for nonverbal patients in critical care is needed. PMID:22117753

  2. Advances in Pediatric Asthma in 2013: Coordinating Asthma Care

    PubMed Central

    Szefler, Stanley J.

    2014-01-01

    Last year’s Advances in Pediatric Asthma: Moving Toward Asthma Prevention concluded that: “We are well on our way to creating a pathway around wellness in asthma care and also to utilize new tools to predict the risk for asthma and take steps to not only prevent asthma exacerbations but also to prevent the early manifestations of the disease and thus prevent its evolution to severe asthma.” This year’s summary will focus on recent advances in pediatric asthma on pre- and postnatal factors altering the natural history of asthma, assessment of asthma control, and new insights regarding potential therapeutic targets for altering the course of asthma in children as indicated in Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology publications in 2013 and early 2014. Recent reports continue to shed light on methods to understand factors that influence the course of asthma, methods to assess and communicate levels of control, and new targets for intervention as well as new immunomodulators. It will now be important to carefully assess risk factors for the development of asthma as well as the risk for asthma exacerbations and to improve the way we communicate this information in the health care system. This will allow parents, primary care physicians, specialists and provider systems to more effectively intervene in altering the course of asthma and to further reduce asthma morbidity and mortality. PMID:24581430

  3. Accuracy of a Decision Aid for Advance Care Planning: Simulated End-of-Life Decision Making

    PubMed Central

    Levi, Benjamin H.; Heverley, Steven R.; Green, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Advance directives have been criticized for failing to help physicians make decisions consistent with patients’ wishes. This pilot study sought to determine if an interactive, computer-based decision aid that generates an advance directive can help physicians accurately translate patients’ wishes into treatment decisions. Methods We recruited 19 patient-participants who had each previously created an advance directive using a computer-based decision aid, and 14 physicians who had no prior knowledge of the patient-participants. For each advance directive, three physicians were randomly assigned to review the advance directive and make five to six treatment decisions for each of six (potentially) end-of-life clinical scenarios. From the three individual physicians’ responses, a “consensus physician response” was generated for each treatment decision (total decisions = 32). This consensus response was shared with the patient whose advance directive had been reviewed, and she/he was then asked to indicate how well the physician translated his/her wishes into clinical decisions. Results Patient-participants agreed with the consensus physician responses 84 percent (508/608) of the time, including 82 percent agreement on whether to provide mechanical ventilation, and 75 percent on decisions about cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Across the six vignettes, patient-participants’ rating of how well physicians translated their advance directive into medical decisions was 8.4 (range = 6.5–10, where 1 = extremely poorly, and 10 = extremely well). Physicians’ overall rating of their confidence at accurately translating patients’ wishes into clinical decisions was 7.8 (range = 6.1–9.3, 1 = not at all confident, 10 = extremely confident). Conclusion For simulated cases, a computer-based decision aid for advance care planning can help physicians more confidently make end-of-life decisions that patients will endorse. PMID:22167985

  4. Caring for risky patients: duty or virtue?

    PubMed

    Tomlinson, T

    2008-06-01

    The emergence several years ago of SARS, with its high rate of infection and death among healthcare workers, resurrected a recurring ethical question: do health professionals have a duty to provide care to patients with deadly infectious diseases, even at some substantial risk to themselves and their families? The conventional answer, repeated on the heels of the SARS epidemic, is that they do. In this paper, I argue that the arguments in support of such a duty are wanting in significant respects, and that the language of duty is simply not adequate to an understanding of all the moral dimensions of professional responses to the care of risky patients. Instead, we should speak the language of virtues and ideals if we want to do justice to the complexity of such harrowing circumstances. PMID:18511620

  5. Apprenticeships enhance patient safety and care.

    PubMed

    Smith, Sue

    Poor standards of numeracy and literacy pose a danger to patient safety. Recruiting staff through the modern apprenticeship programme can address this. Staff are tested for numeracy and literacy when they enter and complete the programme, and problems they may experience during their apprenticeship can be immediately addressed. Training days and regular feedback from senior nurses to ward staff about audits of clinical care can also contribute to building a culture of safety at a trust. PMID:21560938

  6. Crew Management Processes Revitalize Patient Care

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    In 2005, two physicians, former NASA astronauts, created LifeWings Partners LLC in Memphis, Tennessee and began using Crew Resource Management (CRM) techniques developed at Ames Research Center in the 1970s to help improve safety and efficiency at hospitals. According to the company, when hospitals follow LifeWings? training, they can see major improvements in a number of areas, including efficiency, employee satisfaction, operating room turnaround, patient advocacy, and overall patient outcomes. LifeWings has brought its CRM training to over 90 health care organizations and annual sales have remained close to $3 million since 2007.

  7. Care of the liver transplant patient

    PubMed Central

    Bhat, Mamatha; Al-Busafi, Said A; Deschênes, Marc; Ghali, Peter

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To provide an approach to the care of liver transplant (LT) patients, a growing patient population with unique needs. METHODS: A literature search of PubMed for guidelines and review articles using the keywords “liver transplantation”, “long term complications” and “medical management” was conducted, resulting in 77 articles. RESULTS: As a result of being on immunosuppression, LT recipients are at increased risk of infections and must be screened regularly for metabolic complications and malignancies. DISCUSSION: Although immunosuppression is key to maintaining allograft health after transplantation, it comes with its own set of medical issues to follow. Physicians following LT recipients must be aware of the greater risk for hypertension, diabetes, dyslipidemia, renal failure, metabolic bone disease and malignancies in these patients, all of whom require regular monitoring and screening. Vaccination, quality of life, sexual function and pregnancy must be specifically addressed in transplant patients. PMID:24729996

  8. Accessing primary care: a simulated patient study

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, John L; Carter, Mary; Davey, Antoinette; Roberts, Martin J; Elliott, Marc N; Roland, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Background Simulated patient, or so-called ‘mystery-shopper’, studies are a controversial, but potentially useful, approach to take when conducting health services research. Aim To investigate the construct validity of survey questions relating to access to primary care included in the English GP Patient Survey. Design and setting Observational study in 41 general practices in rural, urban, and inner-city settings in the UK. Method Between May 2010 and March 2011, researchers telephoned practices at monthly intervals, simulating patients requesting routine, but prompt, appointments. Seven measures of access and appointment availability, measured from the mystery-shopper contacts, were related to seven measures of practice performance from the GP Patient Survey. Results Practices with lower access scores in the GP Patient Survey had poorer access and appointment availability for five out of seven items measured directly, when compared with practices that had higher scores. Scores on items from the national survey that related to appointment availability were significantly associated with direct measures of appointment availability. Patient-satisfaction levels and the likelihood that patients would recommend their practice were related to the availability of appointments. Patients’ reports of ease of telephone access in the national survey were unrelated to three out of four measures of practice call handling, but were related to the time taken to resolve an appointment request, suggesting responders’ possible confusion in answering this question. Conclusion Items relating to the accessibility of care in a the English GP patient survey have construct validity. Patients’ satisfaction with their practice is not related to practice call handling, but is related to appointment availability. PMID:23561783

  9. Advanced nurse practitioner-led referral for specialist care and rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Mashlan, Wendy; Hayes, Julie; Thomas, Ceri

    2016-02-01

    In response to the need for appropriate and timely care of frail older patients admitted to hospital, a dedicated advanced nurse practitioner (ANP)-led referral service was developed. The service has continued to evolve over the 13 years since its implementation in accordance with changing service demands. This article describes the role of the ANP in care of the elderly/rehabilitation medicine and focuses on one area of clinical practice developed by the team: an ANP-led referral service. The aim of developing the service was to ensure that patients who required specialist care and rehabilitation could be identified and assessed as soon as possible after admission, with the premise that they could be transferred to a bed in care of the elderly medical wards. This was perceived by the ANPs to be advantageous for patients, who would receive care from a specialist team, and for care of the elderly staff who could use their knowledge and skills appropriately and safely. PMID:26938608

  10. Advanced Practice Registered Nurses: Gateway to Screening for Bipolar Disorder in Primary Care

    PubMed Central

    Kriebel-Gasparro, Ann Marie

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The goal of this mixed methods descriptive study was to explore Advanced Practice Registered Nurses’ (APRNs’) knowledge of bipolar disorder (BPD) and their perceptions of facilitators and barriers to screening patients with known depression for BPD. Methods: A mixed method study design using surveys on BPD knowledge and screening practices as well as focus group data collection method for facilitators and barriers to screening. Results: 89 APRNs completed the survey and 12 APRNs participated in the focus groups. APRNs in any practice setting had low knowledge scores of BPD. No significant differences in screening for BPD for primary and non primary care APRNs. Qualitative findings revealed screening relates to tool availability; time, unsure of when to screen, fear of sigma, symptoms knowledge of BPD, accessible referral system, personal experiences with BPD, and therapeutic relationships with patients. Conclusion: Misdiagnosis of BPD as unipolar depression is common in primary care settings, leading to a long lag time to optimal diagnosis and treatment. The wait time to diagnosis and treatment could be reduced if APRNs in primary care settings screen patients with a diagnosis of depression by using validated screening tools. These results can inform APRN practice and further research on the effectiveness of screening for reducing the morbidity and mortality of BPDs in primary care settings; underscores the need for integration of mental health care into primary care as well as the need for more APRN education on the diagnosis and management of bipolar disorders. PMID:27347256

  11. Effect of Organizational Culture on Patient Access, Care Continuity, and Experience of Primary Care.

    PubMed

    Hung, Dorothy; Chung, Sukyung; Martinez, Meghan; Tai-Seale, Ming

    2016-01-01

    This study examined relationships between organizational culture and patient-centered outcomes in primary care. Generalized least squares regression was used to analyze patient access, care continuity, and reported experiences of care among 357 physicians in 41 primary care departments. Compared with a "Group-oriented" culture, a "Rational" culture type was associated with longer appointment wait times, and both "Hierarchical" and "Developmental" culture types were associated with less care continuity, but better patient experiences with care. Understanding the unique effects of organizational culture can enhance the delivery of more patient-centered care. PMID:27232685

  12. Advanced Technology in Pediatric Intensive Care Units: Have They Improved Outcomes?

    PubMed

    Frederick, Sean A

    2016-04-01

    In medicine, providers strive to produce quality outcomes and work to continually improve those outcomes. Whether it is reducing cost, decreasing length of stay, mitigating nosocomial infections, or improving survival, there are a myriad of complex factors that contribute to each outcome. One of the greatest challenges to outcome improvement is in pediatric intensive care units, which tend to host the sickest, most complex, smallest, and frailest of pediatric patients. This article highlights some studies and advances in informatics that have influenced intensive care unit outcomes. PMID:27017036

  13. Advance care planning in stroke: influence of time on engagement in the process

    PubMed Central

    Green, Theresa; Gandhi, Shreyas; Kleissen, Tessa; Simon, Jessica; Raffin-Bouchal, Shelley; Ryckborst, Karla

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Individuals who experience stroke have a higher likelihood of subsequent stroke events, making it imperative to plan for future medical care. In the event of a further serious health event, engaging in the process of advanced care planning (ACP) can help family members and health care professionals (HCPs) make medical decisions for individuals who have lost the capacity to do so. Few studies have explored the views and experiences of patients with stroke about discussing their wishes and preferences for future medical events, and the extent to which stroke HCPs engage in conversations around planning for such events. In this study, we sought to understand how the process of ACP unfolded between HCPs and patients post-stroke. Patients and methods Using grounded theory (GT) methodology, we engaged in direct observation of HCP and patient interactions on an acute stroke unit and two stroke rehabilitation units. Using semi-structured interviews, 14 patients and four HCPs were interviewed directly about the ACP process. Results We found that open and continual ACP conversations were not taking place, patients experienced an apparent lack of urgency to engage in ACP, and HCPs were uncomfortable initiating ACP conversations due to the sensitive nature of the topic. Conclusion In this study, we identified lack of engagement in ACP post-stroke, attributable to patient and HCP factors. This encourages us to look further into the process of ACP in order to develop open communication between the patient with stroke, their families, and stroke HCPs. PMID:24493922

  14. Improving medical graduates’ training in palliative care: advancing education and practice

    PubMed Central

    Head, Barbara A; Schapmire, Tara J; Earnshaw, Lori; Chenault, John; Pfeifer, Mark; Sawning, Susan; Shaw, Monica A

    2016-01-01

    The needs of an aging population and advancements in the treatment of both chronic and life-threatening diseases have resulted in increased demand for quality palliative care. The doctors of the future will need to be well prepared to provide expert symptom management and address the holistic needs (physical, psychosocial, and spiritual) of patients dealing with serious illness and the end of life. Such preparation begins with general medical education. It has been recommended that teaching and clinical experiences in palliative care be integrated throughout the medical school curriculum, yet such education has not become the norm in medical schools across the world. This article explores the current status of undergraduate medical education in palliative care as published in the English literature and makes recommendations for educational improvements which will prepare doctors to address the needs of seriously ill and dying patients. PMID:26955298

  15. Using photovoice to explore patient perceptions of patient-centered care in the Veterans Affairs health care system

    PubMed Central

    Balbale, Salva Najib; Morris, Megan A.; LaVela, Sherri L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Accounting for patient views and context is essential in evaluating and improving patient-centered care initiatives, yet few studies have examined the patient perspective. In the Veterans Affairs (VA) Health Care System, several VA facilities have transitioned from traditionally disease- or problem-based care to patient-centered care. We used photovoice to explore perceptions and experiences related to patient-centered care among Veterans receiving care in VA facilities that have implemented patient-centered care initiatives. Design Participants were provided prompts to facilitate their photography, and were asked to capture salient features in their environment that may describe their experiences and perceptions related to patient-centered care. Follow-up interviews were conducted with each participant to learn more about their photographs and intended meanings. Participant demographic data were also collected. Results Twenty-two Veteran patients (n=22) across two VA sites participated in the photovoice protocol. Participants defined patient-centered care broadly as caring for a person as a whole while accommodating for individual needs and concerns. Participant-generated photography and interview data revealed various contextual factors influencing patient-centered care perceptions, including patient-provider communication and relationships, physical and social environments of care, and accessibility of care. Conclusions This study contributes to the growing knowledge base around patient views and preferences regarding their care, care quality, and environments of care. Factors that shaped patient-centered care perceptions and the patient experience included communication with providers and staff, décor and signage, accessibility and transportation, programs and services offered, and informational resources. Our findings may be integrated into system redesign innovations and care design strategies that embody what is most meaningful to patients. PMID

  16. Dental care of patients with substance abuse.

    PubMed

    Bullock, K

    1999-07-01

    Patients who abuse alcohol, crack, heroin or prescription drugs, are likely to interact with the dental professional. The dentist should therefore be able to identify problems of abuse and provide informed care and referral. Substance abuse should be a consideration in all patients who present with dental trauma and those who present with frequent vague complaints, multiple pain medication allergies, and regimens with multiple narcotic medications. Polydrug use, either prescription or illicit, is also a possibility, and effective treatment requires prompt recognition. Dentists should be alert to drug-seeking behavior within the context of pain management, and because pain severity is an objective experience, each patient must be treated carefully and sensitively. Unrelieved or unremitting pain can be a relapse trigger and therefore adequate pain control is a necessity in the recovering chemically dependent patient. New modalities, such as coanalgesia with low-dose ketamine in the opioid addicted have been shown to work effectively. In the post-dental surgical patient with chemical dependency, agents with less psychoactive activity than their drugs of abuse, such as extended-release morphine (MS Contin) have been tried with variable success. An informed treatment plan includes recognition of substance abuse, appropriate intervention, and referral. This plan may include universal screening, followed by brief interventional therapy for positive patients and in some cases, pharmacological pain control. On discharge from the office, instructions concerning referral to a substance abuse program or, in the case of the patient who may require more immediate treatment, to the emergency department are important. PMID:10516924

  17. [How to develop advanced practice nursing in complex health care systems?].

    PubMed

    Lecocq, Dan; Mengal, Yves; Pirson, Magali

    2015-01-01

    Over the last few decades, advanced nursing practitioners (ANP) have developed new roles in health care systems and this tendency is continuing to grow. Postgraduate trainedANP interact directly with the person, i.e. the individual and his/her family - in many fields of practice and in a context of collaboration withfellow nurses and other health care professionals. The potential benefits of ANP interventions have been demonstrated in many fields. In particular, ANP are public health actors, able to participate in the interdisciplinary response to supportive care ofpatients with chronic diseases. However, the development of advanced practice nursing (APN) in a complex health care system requires a systemic approach coordinated with the various levels of training of nursing practitioners and other health care professionals. This is an essential prerequisite to allow ANPs to develop new roles adapted to their capacities (legal qualification, high level, specialist training, modalities of collaboration, etc.). To achieve an added value for patients, for the health care system in terms ofresults and to ensure adequate nursing conditions, the authors emphasize the importance of structured development of APN and propose an awareness phase comprising adoption of a conceptual model of APN and the establishment of a structured list of existing nursing practices in order to prepare a methodical implementation strategy. PMID:26168623

  18. Mini Review of Integrated Care and Implications for Advanced Practice Nurse Role

    PubMed Central

    McIntosh, Diana; Startsman, Laura F.; Perraud, Suzanne

    2016-01-01

    Literature related to primary care and behavioral health integration initiatives is becoming abundant. The United States’ 2010 Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act included provisions encouraging increased collaboration of care for individuals with behavioral and physical health service needs in the public sector. There is relatively little known of Advanced Practice Registered Nurses’ (APRNs) roles with integrating primary and behavioral healthcare. The goal of this review article is to: (a) define integration of physical and behavioral healthcare and potential models; (b) answer the question as to what are effective evidence based models/strategies for integrating behavioral health and primary care; (c) explore the future role and innovations of APRNs in the integration of physical and behavioral healthcare. Results: The evidence- based literature is limited to three systematic reviews and six randomized controlled trials. It was difficult to generalize the data and the effective integration strategies varied from such interventions as care management to use of sertraline to depression management and to access. There were, though, implications for the integrated care advanced practice nurse to have roles inclusive of competencies, leadership, engagement, collaboration and advocacy. PMID:27347258

  19. [Psychosocial nursing care patient with major burns].

    PubMed

    Callejas Herrero, Aurea; Cuadrado Rodríguez, Cristina; Peña Lorenzo, Alicia; Díez Sanz, Ma Jesús

    2014-02-01

    We must consider the patient as a human being from a holistic point of view; that is, not only from a physical point of view, but also from a mental emotional and spiritual perspective (not to be confused with religion). A patient with major burns is seen as a critical patient by the physician, and for him the most important issue is the survival of the patient. It is when the patient is admitted in the Burns Unit when the long and not easy road to recovery begins, in the understanding this is a new way to integrate, feel and ultimately learn to live again. The role of nursing during this journey will be vital. The prompt and better recovery of the patient will largely depend on the link established between nurse and patient, as well as his/her integration in the new life that awaits him. The following topics are developed in this article: Emotional evolution during his stage in the Burns Unit. Psychoemotional nursing care (fear, pain, image change, long hospital stay, resources). Management of the self-protection measures of the nursing staff to maintain its own emotional stability. PMID:24738175

  20. Advanced practice nursing, health care teams, and perceptions of team effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Kilpatrick, Kelley; Lavoie-Tremblay, Mélanie; Ritchie, Judith A; Lamothe, Lise

    2014-01-01

    This article summarizes the results of an extensive review of the organizational and health care literature of advanced practice nursing (APN) roles, health care teams, and perceptions of team effectiveness. Teams have a long history in health care. Managers play an important role in mobilizing resources, guiding expectations of APN roles in teams and within organizations, and facilitating team process. Researchers have identified a number of advantages to the addition of APN roles in health care teams. The process within health care teams are dynamic and responsive to their surrounding environment. It appears that teams and perceptions of team effectiveness need to be understood in the broader context in which the teams are situated. Key team process are identified for team members to perceive their team as effective. The concepts of teamwork, perceptions of team effectiveness, and the introduction of APN roles in teams have been studied disparately. An exploration of the links between these concepts may further our understanding the health care team's perceptions of team effectiveness when APN roles are introduced. Such knowledge could contribute to the effective deployment of APN roles in health care teams and improve the delivery of health care services to patients and families. PMID:25397338

  1. Advanced practice nursing, health care teams, and perceptions of team effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Kilpatrick, Kelley; Lavoie-Tremblay, Mélanie; Ritchie, Judith A; Lamothe, Lise

    2011-01-01

    This article summarizes the results of an extensive review of the organizational and health care literature of advanced practice nursing (APN) roles, health care teams, and perceptions of team effectiveness. Teams have a long history in health care. Managers play an important role in mobilizing resources, guiding expectations of APN roles in teams and within organizations, and facilitating team process. Researchers have identified a number of advantages to the addition of APN roles in health care teams. The process within health care teams are dynamic and responsive to their surrounding environment. It appears that teams and perceptions of team effectiveness need to be understood in the broader context in which the teams are situated. Key team process are identified for team members to perceive their team as effective. The concepts of teamwork, perceptions of team effectiveness, and the introduction of APN roles in teams have been studied disparately. An exploration of the links between these concepts may further our understanding the health care team's perceptions of team effectiveness when APN roles are introduced. Such knowledge could contribute to the effective deployment of APN roles in health care teams and improve the delivery of health care services to patients and families. PMID:21808173

  2. Patient-Centered Care: Depends on the Point of View

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lorig, Kate

    2012-01-01

    Patient-centered care is now front-and-center in health care reform. The federal government has established the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute to study this new phenomenon and health care delivery systems such as patient-centered medical homes. Where is the health education profession in all of this? Despite what it has to offer, to…

  3. Telepathology for patient care: what am I getting myself into?

    PubMed

    Williams, Saunya; Henricks, Walter H; Becich, Michael J; Toscano, Michael; Carter, Alexis B

    2010-03-01

    The vast advancements in telecommunications and converting medical information to a digital format have increased the number of applications within telemedicine. Telepathology, in simplest terms, is the practice of formally rendering a pathologic diagnosis based upon examination of an image rather than of a glass slide through traditional microscopy. The use of telepathology for clinical patient care has so far been limited to relatively few large academic institutions. Although a number of challenges remain, there is increasing demand for the use of information technology in pathology as a whole owing to the expansion of health care networks and the opportunity to enhance the quality of service delivered to patients. The software used to acquire, display, and manage digital images for clinical patient care may be subject to national and federal regulations just as is any other electronic information system. Despite the barriers, telepathology systems possess the capability to help manage pathology cases on a global scale, improve laboratory workload distribution, increase standardization of practice and enable new classes of ancillary studies to facilitate diagnosis and education even in the most remote parts of the earth. PMID:20179435

  4. Advance Care Planning among People Living with Dialysis

    PubMed Central

    Elliott, Barbara A.; Gessert, Charles E.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Recent nephrology literature focuses on the need for discussions regarding advance care planning (ACP) for people living with dialysis (PWD). PWD and their family members’ attitudes toward ACP and other aspects of late-life decision making were assessed in this qualitative study. Methodology: Thirty-one interviews were completed with 20 PWD over the age of 70 (mean dialysis 34 months) and 11 family members, related to life experiences, making medical decisions, and planning for the future. Interviews were recorded, transcribed and analyzed. Findings: Four themes regarding ACP emerged from this secondary analysis of the interviews: how completing ACP, advance directives (AD), and identifying an agent fit into PWD experiences; PWD understanding of their prognosis; what gives PWD lives meaning and worth; and PWD care preferences when their defined meaning and worth are not part of their experience. These PWD and family members revealed that ACP is ongoing and common among them. They did not seem to think their medical providers needed to be part of these discussions, since family members were well informed. Practical implications: These results suggest that if health care providers and institutions need AD forms completed, it will important to work with both PWD and their family members to assure personal wishes are documented and honored. PMID:27417605

  5. Modeling Safety Outcomes on Patient Care Units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patil, Anita; Effken, Judith; Carley, Kathleen; Lee, Ju-Sung

    In its groundbreaking report, "To Err is Human," the Institute of Medicine reported that as many as 98,000 hospitalized patients die each year due to medical errors (IOM, 2001). Although not all errors are attributable to nurses, nursing staff (registered nurses, licensed practical nurses, and technicians) comprise 54% of the caregivers. Therefore, it is not surprising, that AHRQ commissioned the Institute of Medicine to do a follow-up study on nursing, particularly focusing on the context in which care is provided. The intent was to identify characteristics of the workplace, such as staff per patient ratios, hours on duty, education, and other environmental characteristics. That report, "Keeping Patients Safe: Transforming the Work Environment of Nurses" was published this spring (IOM, 2004).

  6. Barriers and facilitators for general practitioners to engage in advance care planning: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Objective The aim of this systematic review is to identify the perceived factors hindering or facilitating GPs in engaging in advance care planning (ACP) with their patients about care at the end of life. Design Studies from 1990 to 2011 were found in four electronic databases (PubMed, CINAHL, EMBASE, PsycINFO); by contacting first authors of included studies and key experts; and searching through relevant journals and reference lists. Studies were screened, graded for quality, and analysed independently by two authors; those reporting the perception by GPs of barriers and facilitators to engagement in ACP were included. Results Eight qualitative studies and seven cross-sectional studies were included for data extraction. All barriers and facilitators identified were categorized as GP characteristics, perceived patient factors, or health care system characteristics. Stronger evidence was found for the following barriers: lack of skills to deal with patients’ vague requests, difficulties with defining the right moment, the attitude that it is the patient who should initiate ACP, and fear of depriving patients of hope. Stronger evidence was found for the following facilitators: accumulated skills, the ability to foresee health problems in the future, skills to respond to a patient's initiation of ACP, personal convictions about who to involve in ACP, and a longstanding patient–GP relationship and the home setting. Conclusion Initiation of ACP in general practice may be improved by targeting the GPs’ skills, attitudes, and beliefs but changes in health care organization and financing could also contribute. PMID:24299046

  7. Pattern of Referral of Noncancer Patients to Palliative Care in the Eastern Province of Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Ghanem, Hafez M; Shaikh, Rawabi M; Alia, Ahmad M Abou; Al-Zayir, Amani S; Alsirafy, Samy A

    2011-01-01

    Aim: The palliative care (PC) needs of patients with noncancer life-threatening illnesses are comparable to that of cancer patients. This report describes the contribution of noncancer patients to the population of PC patients in a tertiary care hospital in the Eastern Province of Saudi Arabia. Materials and Methods: This is a retrospective review of the “palliative care inpatient database” of 21 months. Results: From 474 patients, 20 (4.2%) had a noncancer diagnosis. The main reason for the referral of noncancer patients was pain control. The most prevalent diagnoses were sickle cell disease (SCD) in 6 (30%) patients and peripheral arterial disease (PAD) in 5 (25%). Conclusions: These findings suggest that the PC needs of noncancer patients are largely unmet in our region. Further efforts are necessary to advance noncancer PC in Saudi Arabia. The PC needs of patients with SCD and PAD need to be addressed in future research. PMID:22346049

  8. Advance care planning: identifying system-specific barriers and facilitators

    PubMed Central

    Hagen, N.A.; Howlett, J.; Sharma, N.C.; Biondo, P.; Holroyd-Leduc, J.; Fassbender, K.; Simon, J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Advance care planning (acp) is an important process in health care today. How to prospectively identify potential local barriers and facilitators to uptake of acp across a complex, multi-sector, publicly funded health care system and how to develop specific mitigating strategies have not been well characterized. Methods We surveyed a convenience sample of clinical and administrative health care opinion leaders across the province of Alberta to characterize system-specific barriers and facilitators to uptake of acp. The survey was based on published literature about the barriers to and facilitators of acp and on the Michie Theoretical Domains Framework. Results Of 88 surveys, 51 (58%) were returned. The survey identified system-specific barriers that could challenge uptake of acp. The factors were categorized into four main domains. Three examples of individual system-specific barriers were “insufficient public engagement and misunderstanding,” “conflict among different provincial health service initiatives,” and “lack of infrastructure.” Local system-specific barriers and facilitators were subsequently explored through a semi-structured informal discussion group involving key informants. The group identified approaches to mitigate specific barriers. Conclusions Uptake of acp is a priority for many health care systems, but bringing about change in multi-sector health care systems is complex. Identifying system-specific barriers and facilitators to the uptake of innovation are important elements of successful knowledge translation. We developed and successfully used a simple and inexpensive process to identify local system-specific barriers and enablers to uptake of acp, and to identify specific mitigating strategies. PMID:26300673

  9. Drug Seems to Extend Survival for Advanced Melanoma Patients

    MedlinePlus

    ... html Drug Seems to Extend Survival for Advanced Melanoma Patients One-third of study participants lived 5 ... HealthDay News) -- More than one-third of advanced melanoma patients were still alive five years after starting ...

  10. Building successful coalitions to promote advance care planning.

    PubMed

    Marchand, Lucille; Fowler, Kathryn J; Kokanovic, Obrad

    2005-01-01

    This qualitative study explored the challenges and successes of an advance care planning (ACP) coalition formed at the University of Wisconsin called Life Planning 2000. Data were obtained from key informant interviews (n = 24) and grounded theory. Major themes included commitment (the need for leadership, recruitment of key persons, and funding); cohesiveness (disparate groups collaborating toward a common purpose); and outcomes (including educational tool development). Coalitions need to define short-, intermediate-, and long-term goals that result in measurable outcomes and an evaluation process. Resources must be commensurate with goals. Results indicate that strong leadership, paid staff adequate funding, and the collaboration of diverse groups working toward a common goal are essential if a coalition promoting end-of-life (EOL) care planning is to be successful. PMID:16323714

  11. Exercise And Heart Failure: Advancing Knowledge And Improving Care

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez, Paulino; Hannawi, Bashar; Guha, Ashrith

    2016-01-01

    Exercise limitation is the hallmark of heart failure, and an increasing degree of intolerance is associated with poor prognosis. Objective evaluation of functional class (e.g., cardiopulmonary exercise testing) is essential for adequate prognostication in patients with advanced heart failure and for implementing an appropriate exercise training program. A graded exercise program has been shown to be beneficial in patients with heart failure and has become an essential component of comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation in these patients. An exercise program tailored to the patient's preferences, possibilities, and physiologic reserve has the greatest chance of being successful. Despite being safe, effective, and a guideline-recommended treatment to improve quality of life, exercise training remains grossly underutilized. Patient, physician, insurance and practice barriers need to be addressed to improve this quality gap. PMID:27486494

  12. Satisfaction with Care of Patients on Hemodialysis

    PubMed Central

    Paine, Susan S.; Grobert, Megan E.; Stidley, Christine A.; Gabbay, Ezra; Harford, Antonia M.; Zager, Philip G.; Miskulin, Dana C.; Meyer, Klemens B.

    2015-01-01

    Background and objectives Little is known about patients receiving dialysis who respond to satisfaction and experience of care surveys and those who do not respond, nor is much known about the corollaries of satisfaction. This study examined factors predicting response to Dialysis Clinic, Inc. (DCI)’s patient satisfaction survey and factors associated with higher satisfaction among responders. Design, setting, participants, & measurement A total of 10,628 patients receiving in-center hemodialysis care at 201 DCI facilities between January 1, 2011, and December 31, 2011, aged ≥18 years, treated during the survey administration window, and at the facility for ≥3 months before survey administration. Primary outcome was response to at least one of the nine survey questions; secondary outcome was overall satisfaction with care. Results Response rate was 77.3%. In adjusted logistic regression (odds ratios with 95% confidence intervals), race other than black (white race, 1.23 [1.10 to 1.37]), missed treatments (1.16 [1.02 to 1.32]) or shortened treatments (≥5 treatments, 1.40 [1.22 to 1.60]), more hospital days (>3 days in the last 3 months, 1.89 [1.66 to 2.15]), and lower serum albumin (albumin level <3.5 g/dl, 1.4 [1.28 to 1.73]) all independently predicted nonresponse. In adjusted linear regression, the following were more satisfied with care: older patients (age ≥63 years, 1.84 [1.78 to 1.90]; age <63 years, 1.91 [1.86 to 1.97]; P<0.001), white patients (1.76 [1.71 to 1.81]) versus black patients (1.93 [1.88 to 1.99]) or those of other race (1.93 [1.83 to 2.03]) (P<0.001), patients with shorter duration of dialysis (≤2.5 years, 1.79 [1.73 to 1.84]; >2.5 years, 1.96 [1.91 to 2.02]; P<0.001), patients who had missed one or fewer treatments (1.83 [1.78 to 1.88]) versus those who had missed more than one treatment (1.92 [1.85 to 1.98]; P=0.002) and those who had shortened treatment (for one treatment or less, 1.84 [1.77 to 1.90]; for two to four treatments, 1

  13. Supervision Requirements: Criteria for the Nurse and Auxiliary Staff When Providing Patient Care Visits.

    PubMed

    Vargo, Deanna; Vargo, Paige

    2016-01-01

    Physician or advanced care clinicians' (advanced practice nurses, physician assistants) orders are routinely carried out by nursing staff, with the goals of implementing treatment plans and improving patient outcomes. In the outpatient setting, nurses must consider the regulations imposed by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services when initiating care and billing for services. Nurses, advanced practice nurses, and other clinicians may deliver care ordered by physicians without the physician being physically present in the room. Such services are considered to be "incident to" the physician's care, and there are requirements of supervision that must be met pertaining to the specific care setting. These guidelines and the implications for WOC nurses are the focus of this article. PMID:27163681

  14. Patient care outcomes: implications for the Military Health Services System.

    PubMed

    Jennings, B M

    1993-05-01

    Policy makers are targeting patient outcomes and the effectiveness of interventions as possible ways to curb spiraling health care costs. Quality assurance/improvement programs are focusing on patient outcomes as a way to evaluate and improve care delivery. Consequently, members of the Military Health Services System need a solid understanding of the current emphasis on the outcomes of care to be knowledgeable participants in the health care changes precipitated by highlighting patient outcomes. PMID:8502389

  15. Using a Question Prompt List As a Communication Aid in Advanced Cancer Care

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, Jonathan C.; Jennifer Cheng, M.; Chung, Christine H.; Smith, Thomas J.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Oncologists and patients often avoid discussing prognosis, treatment failure, and end-of-life planning. Thus, many patients still overestimate their prognosis and possibility of cure, impairing decision making. We piloted a question prompt list (QPL) covering these issues to determine whether it would affect patient anxiety and how it would be used and received by new oncology patients. Materials and Methods A one-page checklist of common questions surrounding cancer care, quality of life, and end of life was created from previous instruments. A total of 30 patients with advanced or metastatic head and neck cancer were recruited from outpatient clinics. Patients received the QPL before their initial consultation. Patient anxiety, satisfaction, and information/decision-making preferences were assessed using validated instruments. Patient opinions regarding the QPL were solicited through Likert-scale items. Results During their visit, 27 patients (90%) used the QPL, but notably, none shared it directly with their oncologist. Most participants felt that the QPL was relevant and helpful (90%) and recommended that more physicians use this sort of list (90%) while disagreeing that the QPL made them feel anxious (80%). Generally, participants were highly satisfied with the consultation, and their anxiety decreased during the visit (P < .005). Conclusion A simple, one-page QPL addressing cancer treatment, prognosis, quality of life, and end-of-life issues was well received by new oncology patients and did not affect patient anxiety or physician workflow. Follow-up studies will determine whether use of the QPL increases knowledge, facilitates decision making, and improves advance-care planning. PMID:24594680

  16. Sialadenosis in Patients with Advanced Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Close, John M.; Eghtesad, Bijan

    2009-01-01

    Sialadenosis (sialosis) has been associated most often with alcoholic liver disease and alcoholic cirrhosis, but a number of nutritional deficiencies, diabetes, and bulimia have also been reported to result in sialadenosis. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of sialadenosis in patients with advanced liver disease. Patients in the study group consisted of 300 candidates for liver transplantation. Types of liver disease in subjects with clinical evidence of sialadenosis were compared with diagnoses in cases who had no manifestations of sialadenosis. The data were analyzed for significant association. Sialadenosis was found in 28 of the 300 subjects (9.3%). Among these 28 cases, 11 (39.3%) had alcoholic cirrhosis. The remaining 17 (60.7%) had eight other types of liver disease. There was no significant association between sialadenosis and alcoholic cirrhosis (P = 0.389). These findings suggest that both alcoholic and non-alcoholic cirrhosis may lead to the development of sialadenosis. Advanced liver disease is accompanied by multiple nutritional deficiencies which may be exacerbated by alcohol. Similar metabolic abnormalities may occur in patients with diabetes or bulimia. Malnutrition has been associated with autonomic neuropathy, the pathogenic mechanism that has been proposed for sialadenosis. PMID:19644542

  17. Advances in addressing technical challenges of point-of-care diagnostics in resource-limited settings

    PubMed Central

    Wang, ShuQi; Lifson, Mark A.; Inci, Fatih; Liang, Li-Guo; Sheng, Ye-Feng; Demirci, Utkan

    2016-01-01

    The striking prevalence of HIV, TB and malaria, as well as outbreaks of emerging infectious diseases, such as influenza A (H7N9), Ebola and MERS, poses great challenges for patient care in resource-limited settings (RLS). However, advanced diagnostic technologies cannot be implemented in RLS largely due to economic constraints. Simple and inexpensive point-of-care (POC) diagnostics, which rely less on environmental context and operator training, have thus been extensively studied to achieve early diagnosis and treatment monitoring in non-laboratory settings. Despite great input from material science, biomedical engineering and nanotechnology for developing POC diagnostics, significant technical challenges are yet to be overcome. Summarized here are the technical challenges associated with POC diagnostics from a RLS perspective and the latest advances in addressing these challenges are reviewed. PMID:26777725

  18. Advances in addressing technical challenges of point-of-care diagnostics in resource-limited settings.

    PubMed

    Wang, ShuQi; Lifson, Mark A; Inci, Fatih; Liang, Li-Guo; Sheng, Ye-Feng; Demirci, Utkan

    2016-04-01

    The striking prevalence of HIV, TB and malaria, as well as outbreaks of emerging infectious diseases, such as influenza A (H7N9), Ebola and MERS, poses great challenges for patient care in resource-limited settings (RLS). However, advanced diagnostic technologies cannot be implemented in RLS largely due to economic constraints. Simple and inexpensive point-of-care (POC) diagnostics, which rely less on environmental context and operator training, have thus been extensively studied to achieve early diagnosis and treatment monitoring in non-laboratory settings. Despite great input from material science, biomedical engineering and nanotechnology for developing POC diagnostics, significant technical challenges are yet to be overcome. Summarized here are the technical challenges associated with POC diagnostics from a RLS perspective and the latest advances in addressing these challenges are reviewed. PMID:26777725

  19. The Nebraska experience in biocontainment patient care.

    PubMed

    Beam, Elizabeth L; Boulter, Kathleen C; Freihaut, Frank; Schwedhelm, Shelly; Smith, Philip W

    2010-01-01

    Public health nurses in local health departments may receive the first call regarding a potential case of avian influenza, monkeypox, or viral hemorrhagic fever. One public health approach to containing these dangerous infectious disease outbreaks is the use of specialized isolation units. Early access to a biocontainment patient care unit (BPCU) for isolation during a bioterrorism or public health emergency event along with appropriate use of epidemiological and therapeutic interventions in the community may dramatically impact the size and severity of a disease outbreak (Smith et al., 2006). As emerging infectious agents, pandemics, resistant organisms, and terrorism continue to threaten human life; health care and emergency care providers must be empowered to work with nurses and other professionals in public health to plan for the consequences. This article describes the evolution of Nebraska's BPCU strategy for public health preparedness in the face of a biological threat. Design priorities, unit management, challenges, and lessons learned will be shared to guide others in establishing similar infrastructure. PMID:20433668

  20. Patient safety in the pediatric emergency care setting.

    PubMed

    Krug, Steven E; Frush, Karen

    2007-12-01

    Patient safety is a priority for all health care professionals, including those who work in emergency care. Unique aspects of pediatric care may increase the risk of medical error and harm to patients, especially in the emergency care setting. Although errors can happen despite the best human efforts, given the right set of circumstances, health care professionals must work proactively to improve safety in the pediatric emergency care system. Specific recommendations to improve pediatric patient safety in the emergency department are provided in this policy statement. PMID:18055687

  1. Advanced lung disease: quality of life and role of palliative care.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Christopher R; Smith, Cecilia M

    2009-02-01

    . Recognition and correction of nocturnal hypoxemia and other sleep disturbances should enhance quality of life in patients with restrictive lung disease; however, there is currently no evidence to support this claim. End-of-life care needs more attention by clinicians in the decision-making and preparatory phase. Physicians need to maintain their focus on quality-of-life issues as medical management shifts from curative therapies to comfort management therapies. Palliative care and hospice appear to be underused in patients with advanced diseases other than cancer. Because the only curative option for some end-stage restrictive lung diseases is lung transplantation, if transplantation is not an option, palliation of symptoms and hospice care may offer patients and families the opportunity to die with dignity and comfort. PMID:19170219

  2. Lost in Translation: The Unintended Consequences of Advance Directive Law on Clinical Care

    PubMed Central

    Castillo, Lesley S.; Williams, Brie A.; Hooper, Sarah M.; Sabatino, Charles P.; Weithorn, Lois A.; Sudore, Rebecca L.

    2011-01-01

    Background Advance directive law may compromise the clinical effectiveness of advance directives. Purpose To identify unintended legal consequences of advance directive law that may prevent patients from communicating end-of-life preferences. Data Sources Advance directive legal statutes for all 50 U.S. states and the District of Columbia and English-language searches of LexisNexis, Westlaw, and MEDLINE from 1966 to August 2010. Study Selection Two independent reviewers selected 51 advance directive statutes and 20 articles. Three independent legal reviewers selected 105 legal proceedings. Data Extraction Two reviewers independently assessed data sources and used critical content analysis to determine legal barriers to the clinical effectiveness of advance directives. Disagreements were resolved by consensus. Data Synthesis Legal and content-related barriers included poor readability (that is, laws in all states were written above a 12th-grade reading level), health care agent or surrogate restrictions (for example, 40 states did not include same-sex or domestic partners as default surrogates), and execution requirements needed to make forms legally valid (for example, 35 states did not allow oral advance directives, and 48 states required witness signatures, a notary public, or both). Vulnerable populations most likely to be affected by these barriers included patients with limited literacy, limited English proficiency, or both who cannot read or execute advance directives; same-sex or domestic partners who may be without legally valid and trusted surrogates; and unbefriended, institutionalized, or homeless patients who may be without witnesses and suitable surrogates. Limitation Only appellate-level legal cases were available, which may have excluded relevant cases. Conclusion Unintended negative consequences of advance directive legal restrictions may prevent all patients, and particularly vulnerable patients, from making and communicating their end

  3. Barriers to Quality Care for Dying Patients in Rural Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Vorst, Rebecca F.; Crane, Lori A.; Barton, Phoebe Lindsey; Kutner, Jean S.; Kallail, K. James; Westfall, John M.

    2006-01-01

    Context: Barriers to providing optimal palliative care in rural communities are not well understood. Purpose: To identify health care personnel's perceptions of the care provided to dying patients in rural Kansas and Colorado and to identify barriers to providing optimal care. Methods: An anonymous self-administered survey was sent to health care…

  4. Clinical nursing care for transgender patients with cancer.

    PubMed

    Levitt, Nathan

    2015-06-01

    Transgender people often face barriers in their pursuit of receiving sensitive and informed health care, and many avoid preventive care and care for life threatening conditions because of those obstacles. This article focuses on cancer care of the transgender patient, as well as ways that nurses and other providers can help to create a transgender-sensitive healthcare environment. PMID:26000586

  5. Patient Activation and Mental Health Care Experiences Among Women Veterans.

    PubMed

    Kimerling, Rachel; Pavao, Joanne; Wong, Ava

    2016-07-01

    We utilized a nationally representative survey of women veteran primary care users to examine associations between patient activation and mental health care experiences. A dose-response relationship was observed, with odds of high quality ratings significantly greater at each successive level of patient activation. Higher activation levels were also significantly associated with preference concordant care for gender-related preferences (use of female providers, women-only settings, and women-only groups as often as desired). Results add to the growing literature documenting better health care experiences among more activated patients, and suggest that patient activation may play an important role in promoting engagement with mental health care. PMID:25917224

  6. Patient Activation and Mental Health Care Experiences Among Women Veterans

    PubMed Central

    Pavao, Joanne; Wong, Ava

    2016-01-01

    We utilized a nationally representative survey of women veteran primary care users to examine associations between patient activation and mental health care experiences. A dose–response relationship was observed, with odds of high quality ratings significantly greater at each successive level of patient activation. Higher activation levels were also significantly associated with preference concordant care for gender-related preferences (use of female providers, women-only settings, and women-only groups as often as desired). Results add to the growing literature documenting better health care experiences among more activated patients, and suggest that patient activation may play an important role in promoting engagement with mental health care. PMID:25917224

  7. Myofacial Trigger Points in Advanced Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Hasuo, Hideaki; Ishihara, Tatsuhiko; Kanbara, Kenji; Fukunaga, Mikihiko

    2016-01-01

    Myofascial pain syndrome is started to be recognized as one of important factors of pain in cancer patients. However, no reports on features of myofascial trigger points were found in terminally-ill cancer populations. This time, we encountered 5 patients with myofascial pain syndrome and terminal cancer in whom delirium developed due to increased doses of opioid without a diagnosis of myofascial pain syndrome on initial presentation. The delirium subsided with dose reductions of opioid and treatment of myofascial pain syndrome. The common reason for a delayed diagnosis among the patients included an incomplete palpation of the painful sites, which led to unsuccessful myofascial trigger points identification. The features of myofascial trigger points included single onset in the cancer pain management site with opioid and the contralateral abdominal side muscles of the non-common sites. Withdrawal reflexes associated with cancer pain in the supine position, which are increasingly seen in the terminal cancer patients, were considered to have contributed to this siuation. We consider that careful palpation of the painful site is important, in order to obtain greater knowledge and understanding of the features of myofascial trigger points. PMID:26962285

  8. The Power of Advance Care Planning in Promoting Hospice and Out-of-Hospital Death in a Dialysis Unit

    PubMed Central

    Weaner, Barbara B.; Long, Dustin

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: Despite mortality rates that exceed those of most cancers, hospice remains underutilized in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) on dialysis and nearly half of all dialysis patients die in the hospital. Objective: To review the impact of advance care planning on withdrawal from dialysis, use of hospice, and location of death. Design: Retrospective review. Setting: A rural outpatient dialysis unit. Participants: Former dialysis patients who died over a 5-year period. Exposure: Advance care planning, the use of physician orders for life-sustaining therapy program (POLST). Main Outcome and Measure: Use of hospice among patients withdrawing from dialysis, location of death. Results: Advance care planning was associated with a low incidence of in-hospital death and among those who withdrew, a high use of hospice. Conclusions and Relevance: Comprehensive and systematic advance care planning among patients with ESRD on dialysis promotes greater hospice utilization and may facilitate the chance that death will occur out of hospital. PMID:25006866

  9. Assisting patients with motor neurone disease to make decisions about their care.

    PubMed

    Gale, Caroline

    2015-05-01

    Motor neurone disease (MND), is a progressive terminal illness affecting the central nervous system, causing paralysis of the muscles affecting limb movement, breathing and bulbar function, with an average life expectancy of 2-4 years. Patients are presented with repeated loss and the constant need to make adjustments to their lifestyle and expectations. Within palliative care there has been a move to formalise planning by undertaking advance care planning, giving the patient the opportunity to plan whether they would consider medical interventions and how they would like their care and death to be managed. There are now a multitude of forms and documents to complete if the patient is willing to do so. Advance care planning may not be something all patients wish to embrace, and this poses the question of whether there are cases where the repeated demand to think forward to a time when further losses are experienced is serving the agenda of the health professional at the expense of the patient. Nevertheless, health professionals might be concerned that a delay in decision making could impact on the patient's future care. There is potential for conflict between the wish of the patient--to remain focused on the positive--and the health professional's perception of the benefits of completing an advance care plan or discussing interventions which, if persued, might lead to a breakdown of the therapeutic relationship. A more flexible approach, focusing on the agenda set by the patient, underpinned by a therapeutic and trusting relationship, can avoid distress for the patient, while ensuring good care and the best outcome for the patient. PMID:26107548

  10. Meaningful Use of Data in Care Coordination by the Advanced Practice Registered Nurse: The TeleFamilies Project

    PubMed Central

    Looman, Wendy S.; Erickson, Mary M.; Garwick, Ann W.; Cady, Rhonda G.; Kelly, Anne; Pettey, Carrie; Finkelstein, Stanley M.

    2012-01-01

    Meaningful use of electronic health records to coordinate care requires skillful synthesis and integration of subjective and objective data by practitioners to provide context for information. This is particularly relevant in the coordination of care for children with complex special health care needs. The purpose of this paper is to present a conceptual framework and example of meaningful use within an innovative telenursing intervention to coordinate care for children with complex special health care needs. The TeleFamilies intervention engages an advanced practice nurse in a full-time care coordinator role within an existing hospital-based medical home for children with complex special health care needs. Care coordination is facilitated by the synthesis and integration of internal and external data using an enhanced electronic health record and telehealth encounters via telephone and videoconferencing between the advanced practice nurse and the family at home. The advanced practice nurse’s ability to maintain an updated plan of care that is shared across providers and systems and build a relationship over time with the patient and family supports meaningful use of these data. PMID:22948406

  11. Using modeling to inform patient-centered care choices at the end of life

    PubMed Central

    Hajizadeh, Negin; Crothers, Kristina; Braithwaite, R Scott

    2014-01-01

    Aim Advance directives are often under-informed due to a lack of disease-specific prognostic information. Without well-informed advance directives patients may receive default care that is incongruent with their preferences. We aimed to further inform advance care planning in patients with severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease by estimating outcomes with alternative advance directives. Methods We designed a Markov microsimulation model estimating outcomes for patients choosing between the Full Code advance directive (permitting invasive mechanical ventilation), and the Do Not Intubate directive (only permitting noninvasive ventilation). Results Our model estimates Full Code patients have marginally increased one-year survival after admission for severe respiratory failure, but are more likely to be residing in a nursing home and have frequent rehospitalizations for respiratory failure. Conclusion Patients with severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease may consider these potential tradeoffs between survival, rehospitalizations and institutionalization when making informed advance care plans and end-of-life decisions. We highlight outcomes research needs for variables most influential to the model’s outcomes, including the risk of complications of invasive mechanical ventilation and failing noninvasive mechanical ventilation. PMID:24236746

  12. Point of care diagnostics for sexually transmitted infections: perspectives and advances

    PubMed Central

    Gaydos, Charlotte; Hardick, Justin

    2014-01-01

    Accurate and inexpensive point-of-care (POC) tests are urgently needed to control sexually transmitted infection (STI) epidemics, so that patients can receive immediate diagnoses and treatment. Current POC assays for Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae perform inadequately and require better assays. Diagnostics for Trichomonas vaginalis rely on wet preparation, with some notable advances. Serological POC assays for syphilis can impact resource-poor settings, with many assays available, but only one available in the U.S. HIV POC diagnostics demonstrate the best performance, with excellent assays available. There is a rapid assay for HSV lesion detection; but no POC serological assays are available. Despite the inadequacy of POC assays for treatable bacterial infections, application of technological advances offers the promise of advancing POC diagnostics for all STIs. PMID:24484215

  13. Patient-centered care in lung cancer: exploring the next milestones.

    PubMed

    Ben-Arye, Eran; Samuels, Noah

    2015-10-01

    In this editorial, the authors comment on a recently published review paper by Molassiotis et al. on the developments made over the past 40 years in supportive care for patients with lung cancer. During this period, a paradigm shift promoting patient-centered care (PCC) has led to an important change in the approach of supportive cancer care, from a purely disease-centered approach, measuring survival-related outcomes, to recognizing the importance of quality of life outcomes as well. This change of understanding in supportive and palliative care for patients with lung cancer can be further advanced through the understanding that there is a need to address bio-psycho-spiritual concerns and health belief models, within the context of the family socio-cultural environment, for both patients and their caregivers. There is also a need to address the psycho-spiritual effects of cancer on those health care professionals treating patients with lung cancer, in order to reduce compassion fatigue and increase resilience. Future directions for supportive care for patients with lung cancer may include the development of a patient-tailored treatment approach, assisted by the integration of a multidisciplinary team of health care providers and evidence-based complementary medicine practices, within conventional supportive care practice. PMID:26629435

  14. Patient-centered care in lung cancer: exploring the next milestones

    PubMed Central

    Samuels, Noah

    2015-01-01

    In this editorial, the authors comment on a recently published review paper by Molassiotis et al. on the developments made over the past 40 years in supportive care for patients with lung cancer. During this period, a paradigm shift promoting patient-centered care (PCC) has led to an important change in the approach of supportive cancer care, from a purely disease-centered approach, measuring survival-related outcomes, to recognizing the importance of quality of life outcomes as well. This change of understanding in supportive and palliative care for patients with lung cancer can be further advanced through the understanding that there is a need to address bio-psycho-spiritual concerns and health belief models, within the context of the family socio-cultural environment, for both patients and their caregivers. There is also a need to address the psycho-spiritual effects of cancer on those health care professionals treating patients with lung cancer, in order to reduce compassion fatigue and increase resilience. Future directions for supportive care for patients with lung cancer may include the development of a patient-tailored treatment approach, assisted by the integration of a multidisciplinary team of health care providers and evidence-based complementary medicine practices, within conventional supportive care practice. PMID:26629435

  15. Shared Care Contributions to Self-Care and Quality of Life in Chronic Cardiac Patients.

    PubMed

    Sebern, Margaret; Brown, Roger; Flatley-Brennan, Patricia

    2016-07-01

    Shared care is an interpersonal interaction system composed of communication, decision making, and reciprocity; it is used by patients and family caregivers (care dyads) to exchange social support. This study's purpose was to describe the contributions of shared care to outcomes for individuals with cardiac disease. A secondary data analysis was used to answer the following questions. What is the association between elements of shared care and patient outcomes? Do dyad perceptions of shared care differentially contribute to patient outcomes? Participants in this study were 93 individuals with a cardiac disease and 93 family caregivers. Composite index structured equation modeling was the analytic tool. Caregiver communication and reciprocity were related to patient mental quality of life. Patient communication and reciprocity were related to their own mental and physical quality of life and self-care confidence. Findings from this study contribute a better understanding of how care dyads are integral to patient outcomes. PMID:26864996

  16. Promoting Excellence in End-of-Life Care: lessons learned from a cohort of nursing home residents with advanced Huntington disease.

    PubMed

    Dellefield, Mary E; Ferrini, Rebecca

    2011-08-01

    Huntington disease (HD) is a genetic neurodegenerative disorder that progresses over decades and is ultimately terminal. As HD advances, patients are frequently placed in institutional care settings, including nursing homes and hospices where family, nursing staff, and interdisciplinary team members are challenged to help patients live to their highest potential and die with dignity. Edgemoor, a distinct part of the San Diego County Psychiatric Hospital, is a regional referral facility for patients with HD. Over the past 8 years, we have cared for 53 patients with advanced HD and describe our experiences by presenting their demographic characteristics and the lessons we have learned in caring for them. Ultimately, we found that the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation's Promoting Excellence in End-of-Life Care Initiative provided a meaningful framework for setting clinical priorities. This framework is used to summarize the clinical lessons that nursing staff and interdisciplinary team members learned about caring well for institutionalized individuals with advanced HD. PMID:21796039

  17. Palliative Care and the Humanities: Centralizing the Patient at the End of Life

    PubMed Central

    Franke, Richard J.

    2016-01-01

    Palliative care is a quickly growing facet of modern medicine. While scientific advancements have broken new ground for the possibilities of end-of-life care, sensitive treatment of the patient as an individual has lagged behind and has frequently led to an unsatisfactory experience for patients, families, and the medical community at large. This essay argues that centralizing patients during the terminal phases of treatment by using humanistic perspectives has the potential to bring new meaning and improved effectiveness to patients and physicians alike. PMID:27505023

  18. Ethical and legal issues in the care of the elderly cancer patient.

    PubMed

    Thomasma, D C

    1987-08-01

    Contemporary cancer care is complex. Although its purpose is to cure, treatment of elderly patients requires recognition that incompetence and death may occur in the near future. The best way to honor the wishes of elderly patients is to construct a treatment decision status contract with them in advance. Through dialogue about probable outcomes of interventions, both patients and physicians can explore fundamental values to be respected in the course of treatment. In this way, physicians can preserve their traditional role of championing the value of life while respecting the considered judgments of elderly patients about their care. PMID:3308049

  19. Palliative Care and the Humanities: Centralizing the Patient at the End of Life.

    PubMed

    Franke, Richard J

    2016-03-01

    Palliative care is a quickly growing facet of modern medicine. While scientific advancements have broken new ground for the possibilities of end-of-life care, sensitive treatment of the patient as an individual has lagged behind and has frequently led to an unsatisfactory experience for patients, families, and the medical community at large. This essay argues that centralizing patients during the terminal phases of treatment by using humanistic perspectives has the potential to bring new meaning and improved effectiveness to patients and physicians alike. PMID:27505023

  20. Prehospital Management of Gunshot Patients at Major Trauma Care Centers: Exploring the Gaps in Patient Care

    PubMed Central

    Norouzpour, Amir; Khoshdel, Ali Reza; Modaghegh, Mohammad-Hadi; Kazemzadeh, Gholam-Hossein

    2013-01-01

    Background Prehospital management of gunshot-wounded (GW) patients influences injury-induced morbidity and mortality. Objectives To evaluate prehospital management to GW patients emphasizing the protocol of patient transfer to appropriate centers. Patients and Methods This prospective study, included all GW patients referred to four major, level-I hospitals in Mashhad, Iran. We evaluated demographic data, triage, transport vehicles of patients, hospitalization time and the outcome. Results There were 66 GW patients. The most affected body parts were extremities (60.6%, n = 40); 59% of cases (n = 39) were transferred to the hospitals with vehicles other than an ambulance. Furthermore, 77.3% of patients came to the hospitals directly from the site of event, and 22.7% of patients were referred from other medical centers. EMS action intervals from dispatchers to scene departure was not significantly different from established standards; however, arrival to hospital took longer than optimal standards. Additionally, time spent at emergency wards to stabilize vital signs was significantly less in patients who were transported by EMS ambulances (P = 0.01), but not with private ambulances (P = 0.47). However, ambulance pre-hospital care was not associated with a shorter hospital stay. Injury Severity was the only determinant of hospital stay duration (β = 0.36, P = 0.01) in multivariate analysis. Conclusions GW was more frequent in extremities and the most patients were directly transferred from the accident site. EMS (but not private) ambulance transport improved patients' emergency care and standard time intervals were achieved by EMS; however more than a half of the cases were transferred by vehicles other than an ambulance. Nevertheless, ambulance transportation (either by EMS or by private ambulance) was not associated with a shorter hospital stay. This showed that upgrade of ambulance equipment and training of private ambulance personnel may be needed. PMID:24350154

  1. [Early hospital care of the patient with multiple sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Cramet, Sébastien

    2015-05-01

    The initial period in an MS patient's care is decisive. The priority is to establish a relationship of trust and to draw up an accurate assessment in order to create a personalised care plan. PMID:26145689

  2. Patient Simulation Software to Augment an Advanced Pharmaceutics Course

    PubMed Central

    Schonder, Kristine

    2011-01-01

    Objective To implement and assess the effectiveness of adding a pharmaceutical care simulation program to an advanced therapeutics course. Design PharmaCAL (University of Pittsburgh), a software program that uses a branched-outcome decision making model, was used to create patient simulations to augment lectures given in the course. In each simulation, students were presented with a challenge, given choices, and then provided with consequences specific to their choices. Assessments A survey was administered at the end of the course and students indicated the simulations were enjoyable (92%), easy to use (90%), stimulated interest in critically ill patients (82%), and allowed for application of lecture material (91%). A 5-item presimulation and postsimulation test on the anemia simulation was administered to assess learning. Students answered significantly more questions correctly on the postsimulation test than on the presimulation test (p < 0.001). Seventy-eight percent of students answered the same 5 questions correctly on the final examination. Conclusion Patient simulation software that used a branched-outcome decision model was an effective supplement to class lectures in an advanced pharmaceutics course and was well-received by pharmacy students. PMID:21519411

  3. Patient involvement in diabetes care: experiences in nine diabetes care groups

    PubMed Central

    de Bruin, Simone R.; Struijs, Jeroen N.; Rijken, Mieke; Nijpels, Giel; Baan, Caroline A.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Despite the expected beneficial effects on quality of care, patient involvement in diabetes care groups, which deliver a bundled paid integrated care programme for diabetes type 2, seems to be limited. The aim of this study was to gain insight into levels and methods of patient involvement, into facilitators and barriers, and into the future preferences of care groups and patient representatives. Theory and methods Semi-structured interviews were held with 10 representatives of care groups and 11 representatives of patient advocacy groups. An adapted version of Arnstein's ladder of citizen participation was used to define five levels of patient involvement. Results Patient involvement in care groups was mostly limited to informing and consulting patients. Higher levels, i.e., advising, co-producing and decision-making, were less frequently observed. Care groups and patient representatives perceived largely the same barriers and facilitators and had similar preferences regarding future themes and design of patient involvement. Conclusion Constructive collaboration between diabetes care groups and patient representatives to enhance patient involvement in the future seems viable. Several issues such as the lack of evidence for effectiveness of patient involvement, differences in viewpoints on the role and responsibilities of care groups and perceived barriers need to be addressed. PMID:27118961

  4. [Respect for autonomy of "incompetent" patients?--the ethical problem of advanced directives].

    PubMed

    Rehbock, Theda

    2005-12-01

    In addressing the ethical and legal problems of advanced directives, the article discusses whether respect for the autonomy of the so-called "incompetent" patients is possible and morally required. Starting with a critique of how modern medicine threatens patient autonomy and care (2.), the author goes on to highlight the mutual interdependence between respect for autonomy and patient care as two moral requirements arising from respect for human dignity (3.). Finally; the article elucidates the practical consequences as they relate to a treatment approach for each patient that is simultaneously caring and respectful of their autonomy, commenting on the ramifications for a sensitive and conscientious approach to advanced medical directives and for the special -role of nursing in this context. PMID:16398303

  5. Positioning advanced practice registered nurses for health care reform: consensus on APRN regulation.

    PubMed

    Stanley, Joan M; Werner, Kathryn E; Apple, Kathy

    2009-01-01

    Advanced practice registered nurses (APRNs) have positioned themselves to serve an integral role in national health care reform. This article addresses both the policy and the process to develop this policy that has placed them in a strategic position. A successful transformation of the nation's health system will require utilization of all clinicians, particularly primary care providers, to the full extent of their education and scope of practice. APRNs are highly qualified clinicians who provide cost-effective, accessible, patient-centered care and have the education to provide the range of services at the heart of the reform movement, including care coordination, chronic care management, and wellness and preventive care. The APRN community faces many challenges amidst the opportunities of health reform. However, the APRN community's triumph in reaching consensus on APRN regulation signifies a cohesive approach to overcoming the obstacles. The consensus model for APRN regulation, endorsed by 44 national nursing organizations, will serve as a beacon for nursing, as well as a guidepost for consumers and policymakers, on titling, education, certification, accreditation, and licensing for all four APRN roles. PMID:19942200

  6. Quality of advance care planning policy and practice in residential aged care facilities in Australia

    PubMed Central

    Silvester, William; Fullam, Rachael S; Parslow, Ruth A; Lewis, Virginia J; Sjanta, Rebekah; Jackson, Lynne; White, Vanessa; Gilchrist, Jane

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To assess existing advance care planning (ACP) practices in residential aged care facilities (RACFs) in Victoria, Australia before a systematic intervention; to assess RACF staff experience, understanding of and attitudes towards ACP. Design Surveys of participating organisations concerning ACP-related policies and procedures, review of existing ACP-related documentation, and pre-intervention survey of RACF staff covering their role, experiences and attitudes towards ACP-related procedures. Setting 19 selected RACFs in Victoria. Participants 12 aged care organisations (representing 19 RACFs) who provided existing ACP-related documentation for review, 12 RACFs who completed an organisational survey and 45 staff (from 19 RACFs) who completed a pre-intervention survey of knowledge, attitudes and behaviour. Results Findings suggested that some ACP-related practices were already occurring in RACFs; however, these activities were inconsistent and variable in quality. Six of the 12 responding RACFs had written policies and procedures for ACP; however, none of the ACP-related documents submitted covered all information required to meet ACP best practice. Surveyed staff had limited experience of ACP, and discrepancies between self reported comfort, and levels of knowledge and confidence to undertake ACP-related activities, indicated a need for training and ongoing organisational support. Conclusions Surveyed organisations â policies and procedures related to ACP were limited and the quality of existing documentation was poor. RACF staff had relatively limited experience in developing advance care plans with facility residents, although attitudes were positive. A systematic approach to the implementation of ACP in residential aged care settings is required to ensure best practice is implemented and sustained. PMID:24644755

  7. An opportunity for coordinated cancer care: intersection of health care reform, primary care providers, and cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Collins, Lauren G; Wender, Richard; Altshuler, Marc

    2010-01-01

    The US health care system has become increasingly unsustainable, threatened by poor quality and spiraling costs. Many Americans are not receiving recommended preventive care, including cancer screening tests. Passage of the Affordable Care Act in March 2010 has the potential to reverse this course by increasing access to primary care providers, extending coverage and affordability of health insurance, and instituting proven quality measures. In order for health care reform to succeed, it will require a stronger primary care workforce, a new emphasis on patient-centered care, and payment incentives that reward quality over quantity. Innovations such as patient-centered medical homes, accountable care organizations, and improved quality reporting methods are central features of a redesigned health care delivery system and will ultimately change the face of cancer care in the United States. PMID:21131791

  8. Implementing chronic care for COPD: planned visits, care coordination, and patient empowerment for improved outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Fromer, Len

    2011-01-01

    Current primary care patterns for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) focus on reactive care for acute exacerbations, often neglecting ongoing COPD management to the detriment of patient experience and outcomes. Proactive diagnosis and ongoing multifactorial COPD management, comprising smoking cessation, influenza and pneumonia vaccinations, pulmonary rehabilitation, and symptomatic and maintenance pharmacotherapy according to severity, can significantly improve a patient’s health-related quality of life, reduce exacerbations and their consequences, and alleviate the functional, utilization, and financial burden of COPD. Redesign of primary care according to principles of the chronic care model, which is implemented in the patient-centered medical home, can shift COPD management from acute rescue to proactive maintenance. The chronic care model and patient-centered medical home combine delivery system redesign, clinical information systems, decision support, and self-management support within a practice, linked with health care organization and community resources beyond the practice. COPD care programs implementing two or more chronic care model components effectively reduce emergency room and inpatient utilization. This review guides primary care practices in improving COPD care workflows, highlighting the contributions of multidisciplinary collaborative team care, care coordination, and patient engagement. Each primary care practice can devise a COPD care workflow addressing risk awareness, spirometric diagnosis, guideline-based treatment and rehabilitation, and self-management support, to improve patient outcomes in COPD. PMID:22162647

  9. Drinking Motives Among HIV Primary Care Patients

    PubMed Central

    Elliott, Jennifer C.; Aharonovich, Efrat; O’Leary, Ann; Wainberg, Milton; Hasin, Deborah

    2013-01-01

    Heavy drinking among individuals with HIV is associated with poor medication adherence and other health problems. Understanding reasons for drinking (drinking motives) in this population is therefore important and could inform intervention. Using concepts of drinking motives from previous alcohol research, we assessed these motives and drinking in 254 HIV-positive primary care patients (78.0% male; 94.5% African American or Hispanic) prior to their participation in an alcohol intervention trial. Three motives had good factor structure and internal consistency: “drinking to cope with negative affect”, “drinking for social facilitation” (both associated with heavier drinking), and “drinking due to social pressure” (associated with less drinking). Drinking motives may provide important content for alcohol intervention; clinical trials could indicate whether inclusion of such content improves intervention efficacy. Discussing motives in session could help providers assist clients in better managing psychological and social aspects of their lives without reliance on alcohol. PMID:24165984

  10. Health Care Employee Perceptions of Patient-Centered Care: A Photovoice Project

    PubMed Central

    Balbale, Salva Najib; Turcios, Stephanie; LaVela, Sherri L.

    2015-01-01

    Given the importance of health care employees in the delivery of patient-centered care, understanding their unique perspective is essential for quality improvement. The purpose of this study was to use photovoice to evaluate perceptions and experiences around patient-centered care among Veterans Affairs (VA) health care employees. We asked participants to take photographs of salient features in their environment related to patient-centered care. We used the photographs to facilitate dialogue during follow-up interviews. Twelve VA health care employees across two VA sites participated in the project. Although most participants felt satisfied with their work environment and experiences at the VA, several areas for improvement were identified. These included a need for more employee health and wellness initiatives and a need for enhanced opportunities for training and professional growth. Application of photovoice enabled us to learn about employees' unique perspectives around patient-centered care while engaging them in an evaluation of care delivery. PMID:25274626

  11. Dying tax free: the modern advance directive and patients' financial values.

    PubMed

    Kirk, Timothy W; Luck, George R

    2010-03-01

    Advance directives are often used to help patients articulate their end-of-life treatment preferences and guide proxy decision makers in making health care decisions when patients cannot. This case study and commentary puts forth a situation in which a palliative care consultation team encountered a patient with an advance directive that instructed her proxy decision maker to consider estate tax implications when making end-of-life decisions. Following presentation of the case, the authors focus on two ethical issues: 1) the appropriateness of considering patients' financial goals and values in medical decision making and 2) whether certain kinds of patient values should be considered more or less relevant than others as reasons for expressed treatment preferences. Clinicians are encouraged to accept a wide range of patient values as relevant to the clinical decision-making process and to balance the influence of those values with more traditional notions of clinical harm and benefit. PMID:20303033

  12. Integrated transitional care: patient, informal caregiver and health care provider perspectives on care transitions for older persons with hip fracture

    PubMed Central

    Toscan, Justine; Mairs, Katie; Hinton, Stephanie; Stolee, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Complex older adults, such as those with hip fracture, frequently require care from multiple professionals across a variety of settings. Integrated care both between providers and across settings is important to ensure care quality and patient safety. The purpose of this study was to determine the core factors related to poorly integrated care when hip fracture patients transition between care settings. Methods A qualitative, focused ethnographic approach was used to guide data collection and analysis. Patients, their informal caregivers and health care providers were interviewed and observed at each care transition. A total of 45 individual interviews were conducted. Interview transcripts and field notes were coded and analysed to uncover emerging themes in the data. Results Four factors related to poorly integrated transitional care were identified: confusion with communication about care, unclear roles and responsibilities, diluted personal ownership over care, and role strain due to system constraints. Conclusions Our research supports a broader notion of collaborative practice that extends beyond specific care settings and includes an appropriate, informed role for patients and informal caregivers. This research can help guide system-level and setting-specific interventions designed to promote high-quality, patient-centred care during care transitions. PMID:22977426

  13. 42 CFR 494.90 - Condition: Patient plan of care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Condition: Patient plan of care. 494.90 Section 494.90 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION CONDITIONS FOR COVERAGE FOR END-STAGE RENAL DISEASE FACILITIES Patient Care § 494.90 Condition: Patient...

  14. Patient Stratification for Preventive Care in Dentistry

    PubMed Central

    Giannobile, W.V.; Braun, T.M.; Caplis, A.K.; Doucette-Stamm, L.; Duff, G.W.; Kornman, K.S.

    2013-01-01

    Prevention reduces tooth loss, but little evidence supports biannual preventive care for all adults. We used risk-based approaches to test tooth loss association with 1 vs. 2 annual preventive visits in high-risk (HiR) and low-risk (LoR) patients. Insurance claims for 16 years for 5,117 adults were evaluated retrospectively for tooth extraction events. Patients were classified as HiR for progressive periodontitis if they had ≥ 1 of the risk factors (RFs) smoking, diabetes, interleukin-1 genotype; or as LoR if no RFs. LoR event rates were 13.8% and 16.4% for 2 or 1 annual preventive visits (absolute risk reduction, 2.6%; 95%CI, 0.5% to 5.8%; p = .092). HiR event rates were 16.9% and 22.1% for 2 and 1 preventive visits (absolute risk reduction, 5.2%; 95%CI, 1.8% to 8.4%; p = .002). Increasing RFs increased events (p < .001). Oral health care costs were not increased by any single RF, regardless of prevention frequency (p > .41), but multiple RFs increased costs vs. no (p < .001) or 1 RF (p = .001). For LoR individuals, the association between preventive dental visits and tooth loss was not significantly different whether the frequency was once or twice annually. A personalized medicine approach combining gene biomarkers with conventional risk factors to stratify populations may be useful in resource allocation for preventive dentistry (ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT01584479). PMID:23752171

  15. [Interdisciplinary care for a patient suffering from Diogenes syndrome].

    PubMed

    Beggah-Alioua, Sabah; Berger, Jérôme; Cheseaux, Michel

    2014-06-25

    Interdisciplinarity is the combined care of a patient by two or more healthcare professionals. Taking into account the contribution of the different healthcare partners improves patient follow-up, quality of the care and use of resources. General practitioner (GP) becomes the pivot of a combined interdisciplinary ambulatory care allowing a prolonged staying at home and avoiding the multiplication of care offers. This paper, by the clinical description of a patient suffering from Diogenes Syndrome, allows a cross of the care between the GP, home nurse and pharmacist. It deals with follow-up questions, acceptance, objectives of treatment, communication between healthcare partners and "false notes" in the follow-up. PMID:25055477

  16. Patient Satisfaction With Breast and Colorectal Cancer Survivorship Care Plans

    PubMed Central

    Sprague, Brian L.; Dittus, Kim L.; Pace, Claire M.; Dulko, Dorothy; Pollack, Lori A.; Hawkins, Nikki A.; Geller, Berta M.

    2015-01-01

    Cancer survivors face several challenges following the completion of active treatment, including uncertainty about late effects of treatment and confusion about coordination of follow-up care. The authors evaluated patient satisfaction with personalized survivorship care plans designed to clarify those issues. The authors enrolled 48 patients with breast cancer and 10 patients with colorectal cancer who had completed treatment in the previous two months from an urban academic medical center and a rural community hospital. Patient satisfaction with the care plan was assessed by telephone interview. Overall, about 80% of patients were very or completely satisfied with the care plan, and 90% or more agreed that it was useful, it was easy to understand, and the length was appropriate. Most patients reported that the care plan was very or critically important to understanding an array of survivorship issues. However, only about half felt that it helped them better understand the roles of primary care providers and oncologists in survivorship care. The results provide evidence that patients with cancer find high value in personalized survivorship care plans, but the plans do not eliminate confusion regarding the coordination of follow-up care. Future efforts to improve care plans should focus on better descriptions of how survivorship care will be coordinated. PMID:23722604

  17. Assessing patients' experience of integrated care: a survey of patient views in the North West London Integrated Care Pilot

    PubMed Central

    Mastellos, Nikolaos; Gunn, Laura; Harris, Matthew; Majeed, Azeem; Car, Josip; Pappas, Yannis

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Despite the importance of continuity of care and patient engagement, few studies have captured patients' views on integrated care. This study assesses patient experience in the Integrated Care Pilot in North West London with the aim to help clinicians and policymakers understand patients' acceptability of integrated care and design future initiatives. Methods A survey was developed, validated and distributed to 2029 randomly selected practice patients identified as having a care plan. Results A total of 405 questionnaires were included for analysis. Respondents identified a number of benefits associated with the pilot, including increased patient involvement in decision-making, improved patient–provider relationship, better organisation and access to care, and enhanced inter-professional communication. However, only 22.4% were aware of having a care plan, and of these only 37.9% had a copy of the care plan. Knowledge of care plans was significantly associated with a more positive experience. Conclusions This study reinforces the view that integrated care can improve quality of care and patient experience. However, care planning was a complex and technically challenging process that occurred more slowly than planned with wide variation in quality and time of recruitment to the pilot, making it difficult to assess the sustainability of benefits. PMID:24987321

  18. Curing and Caring: The Work of Primary Care Physicians With Dementia Patients

    PubMed Central

    CarolinaApesoa-Varano, Ester; Barker, Judith C.; Hinton, Ladson

    2013-01-01

    The symbolic framework guiding primary care physicians’ (PCPs) practice is crucial in shaping the quality of care for those with degenerative dementia. Examining the relationship between the cure and care models in primary care offers a unique opportunity for exploring change toward a more holistic approach to health care. The aims of this study were to (a) explore how PCPs approach the care of patients with Alzheimer’s disease (AD), and (b) describe how this care unfolds from the physicians’ perspectives. This was a cross-sectional study of 40 PCPs who completed semistructured interviews as part of a dementia caregiving study. Findings show that PCPs recognize the limits of the cure paradigm and articulate a caring, more holistic model that addresses the psychosocial needs of dementia patients. However, caring is difficult to uphold because of time constraints, emotional burden, and jurisdictional issues. Thus, the care model remains secondary and temporary. PMID:21685311

  19. Health Information Technology Coordination to Support Patient-centered Care Coordination

    PubMed Central

    Gregg, W.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Objective To select papers published in 2014, illustrating how information technology can contribute to and improve patient-centered care coordination. Method The two section editors performed a literature review from Medline and Web of Science to select a list of candidate best papers on the use of information technology for patient-centered care coordination. These papers were peer-reviewed by external reviewers and three of them were selected as “best papers”. Results The first selected paper reports a qualitative study exploring the gap between current practices of care coordination in various settings and idealized longitudinal care plans. The second selected paper illustrates several unintended consequences of HIT designed to improve care coordination. The third selected paper shows that advanced analytic techniques in medical informatics can be instrumental in studying patient-centered care coordination. Conclusions The realization of true patient-centered care coordination is dependent upon a number of factors. Standardization of clinical documentation and HIT interoperability across organization and settings is a critical prerequisite for HIT to support patient-centered care coordination. Enabling patient involvement is an efficient means for goal setting and health information sharing. Additionally, unintended consequences of HIT tools (both positive and negative) must be measured and taken into account for quality improvement. PMID:26293848

  20. Use and impact of a computer-generated patient summary worksheet for primary care.

    PubMed

    Wilcox, Adam B; Jones, Spencer S; Dorr, David A; Cannon, Wayne; Burns, Laurie; Radican, Kelli; Christensen, Kent; Brunker, Cherie; Larsen, Ann; Narus, Scott P; Thornton, Sidney N; Clayton, Paul D

    2005-01-01

    Advanced clinical information systems have been proposed to improve patient care in terms of safety, effectiveness, and efficiency. In order to be effective, such systems require detailed patient-specific clinical information in a form easily reviewed by clinicians. We have developed a patient summary worksheet for use in outpatient clinics, which presents a structured overview of patient health information. The worksheet provides patient demographic information, specific problems and conditions, the patient's current medication profile, laboratory test results pertinent to patient problems, and disease-specific or preventive care actionable advisories. Usage has grown from a few hundred to over 25,000 unique patients per month during a two-year period. Diabetic patients for whom the worksheet is accessed are significantly more likely to be in compliance with accepted testing regimens for glycosolated hemoglobin (OR 1.47, 95% CI 1.28, 1.61). PMID:16779155

  1. Educational potential of a virtual patient system for caring for traumatized patients in primary care

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Virtual Patients (VPs) have been used in undergraduate healthcare education for many years. This project is focused on using VPs for training professionals to care for highly vulnerable patient populations. The aim of the study was to evaluate if Refugee Trauma VPs was perceived as an effective and engaging learning tool by primary care professionals (PCPs) in a Primary Health Care Centre (PHC). Methods A VP system was designed to create realistic and engaging VP cases for Refugee Trauma for training refugee patient interview, use of established trauma and mental health instruments as well as to give feedback to the learners. The patient interview section was based on video clips with a Bosnian actor with a trauma story and mental health problems. The video clips were recorded in Bosnian language to further increase the realism, but also subtitled in English. The system was evaluated by 11 volunteering primary health clinicians at the Lynn Community Health Centre, Lynn, Massachusetts, USA. The participants were invited to provide insights/feedback about the system’s usefulness and educational value. A mixed methodological approach was used, generating both quantitative and qualitative data. Results Self-reported dimensions of clinical care, pre and post questionnaire questions on the PCPs clinical worldview, motivation to use the VP, and IT Proficiency. Construct items used in these questionnaires had previously demonstrated high face and construct validity. The participants ranked the mental status examination more positively after the simulation exercise compared to before the simulation. Follow up interviews supported the results. Conclusions Even though virtual clinical encounters are quite a new paradigm in PHC, the participants in the present study considered our VP case to be a relevant and promising educational tool. Next phase of our project will be a RCT study including comparison with specially prepared paper-cases and determinative input on

  2. Promoting Healthy Eating Attitudes Among Uninsured Primary Care Patients.

    PubMed

    Kamimura, Akiko; Tabler, Jennifer; Nourian, Maziar M; Jess, Allison; Stephens, Tamara; Aguilera, Guadalupe; Wright, Lindsey; Ashby, Jeanie

    2016-08-01

    Obesity is associated with a number of chronic health problems such as cardiovascular disease, diabetes and cancer. While common prevention and treatment strategies to control unhealthy weight gain tend to target behaviors and lifestyles, the psychological factors which affect eating behaviors among underserved populations also need to be further addressed and included in practice implementations. The purpose of this study is to examine positive and negative emotional valence about food among underserved populations in a primary care setting. Uninsured primary care patients (N = 621) participated in a self-administered survey from September to December in 2015. Higher levels of perceived benefits of healthy food choice were associated with lower levels of a negative emotional valence about food while higher levels of perceived barriers to healthy food choice are related to higher levels of a negative emotional valence about food. Greater acceptance of motivation to eat was associated with higher levels of positive and negative emotional valence about food. Spanish speakers reported greater acceptance of motivation to eat and are more likely to have a negative emotional valence about food than US born or non-US born English speakers. The results of this study have important implications to promote healthy eating among underserved populations at a primary care setting. Healthy food choice or healthy eating may not always be achieved by increasing knowledge. Psychological interventions should be included to advance healthy food choice. PMID:26831483

  3. Regardless of age: Incorporating principles from geriatric medicine to improve care transitions for patients with complex needs.

    PubMed

    Arbaje, Alicia I; Kansagara, Devan L; Salanitro, Amanda H; Englander, Honora L; Kripalani, Sunil; Jencks, Stephen F; Lindquist, Lee A

    2014-06-01

    With its focus on holistic approaches to patient care, caregiver support, and delivery system redesign, geriatrics has advanced our understanding of optimal care during transitions. This article provides a framework for incorporating geriatrics principles into care transition activities by discussing the following elements: (1) identifying factors that make transitions more complex, (2) engaging care "receivers" and tailoring home care to meet patient needs, (3) building "recovery plans" into transitional care, (4) predicting and avoiding preventable readmissions, and (5) adopting a palliative approach, when appropriate, that optimizes patient and family goals of care. The article concludes with a discussion of practical aspects of designing, implementing, and evaluating care transitions programs for those with complex care needs, as well as implications for public policy. PMID:24557511

  4. Dietary intake of advanced cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Walsh, T D; Bowman, K B; Jackson, G P

    1983-02-01

    A state registered dietitian assessed the voluntary dietary intake of 13 advanced cancer inpatients on one ward of St. Christopher's Hospice for five consecutive days. There were 11 females, two males; median age 74 years (range 56 to 83). Two patients died on the fourth day of the study. A partially individualised weighed technique was used. Standard sized scoops and spoons were used to serve the food in small, medium or large standard portions (depending on appetite) and were weighed as served. Individual plate waste (by weight) was subtracted to give estimated individual intake. Foods provided by visitors was not included. The median and range of individual mean daily intakes (estimated) were: energy 5760 (938-8945) kJ, 1376 (224-2137) kcal; protein 44 (11-86) g; fat 52 (9-93) g; carbohydrate 169 (21-194) g; calcium 748 (268-1457) mg; iron 4.8 (0.5-21.0) mg; dietary fibre 5.0 (0.5-21.0) g. Compared to recommended amounts, energy, iron and dietary fibre intakes were low; calcium intake was high. Nutritional status may affect prognosis and/or subjective well-being in advanced cancer. The value of nutritional supplementation and the role of appetite stimulants in improving nutritional status needs investigation. PMID:6841131

  5. Palliative care and pulmonary rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Janssen, Daisy J A; McCormick, James R

    2014-06-01

    Numerous barriers exist to the timely introduction of palliative care in patients with advanced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The complex needs of patients with advanced COPD require the integration of curative-restorative care and palliative care. Palliative care and pulmonary rehabilitation are both important components of integrated care for patients with chronic respiratory diseases. Pulmonary rehabilitation provides the opportunity to introduce palliative care by implementing education about advance care planning. Education about advance care planning addresses the information needs of patients and can be an effective strategy to promote patient-physician discussion about these issues. PMID:24874135

  6. Advance Care Planning: practicalities, legalities, complexities and controversies.

    PubMed

    Horridge, Karen A

    2015-04-01

    Increasing numbers, complexities and technology dependencies of children and young people with life-limiting conditions require paediatricians to be well prepared to meet their changing needs. Paediatric Advance Care Planning provides a framework for paediatricians, families and their multidisciplinary teams to consider, reflect and record the outcome of their conversations about what might happen in the future in order to optimise quality of clinical care and inform decision-making. For some children and young people this will include discussions about the possibility of death in childhood. This may be unexpected and sudden, in the context of an otherwise active management plan or may be expected and necessitate discussions about the process of dying and attention to symptoms. Decision-making about appropriate levels of intervention must take place within a legal and ethical framework, recognising that the UK Equality Act (2010) protects the rights of disabled children and young people and infants and children of all ages to the same high quality healthcare as anyone else. PMID:25275088

  7. Usefulness of Palliative Care to Complement the Management of Patients on Left Ventricular Assist Devices.

    PubMed

    Luo, Nancy; Rogers, Joseph G; Dodson, Gwen C; Patel, Chetan B; Galanos, Anthony N; Milano, Carmelo A; O'Connor, Christopher M; Mentz, Robert J

    2016-09-01

    Within the last decade, advancements in left ventricular assist device therapy have allowed patients with end-stage heart failure (HF) to live longer and with better quality of life. Like other life-saving interventions, however, there remains the risk of complications including infections, bleeding episodes, and stroke. The candidate for left ventricular assist device therapy faces complex challenges going forward, both physical and psychological, many of which may benefit from the application of palliative care principles by trained specialists. Despite these advantages, palliative care remains underused in many advanced HF programs. Here, we describe the benefits of palliative care, barriers to use within HF, and specific applications to the integrated care of patients on mechanical circulatory support. PMID:27474339

  8. Value Based Care and Patient-Centered Care: Divergent or Complementary?

    PubMed

    Tseng, Eric K; Hicks, Lisa K

    2016-08-01

    Two distinct but overlapping care philosophies have emerged in cancer care: patient-centered care (PCC) and value-based care (VBC). Value in healthcare has been defined as the quality of care (measured typically by healthcare outcomes) modified by cost. In this conception of value, patient-centeredness is one important but not necessarily dominant quality measure. In contrast, PCC includes multiple domains of patient-centeredness and places the patient and family central to all decisions and evaluations of quality. The alignment of PCC and VBC is complicated by several tensions, including a relative lack of patient experience and preference measures, and conceptions of cost that are payer-focused instead of patient-focused. Several strategies may help to align these two philosophies, including the use of patient-reported outcomes in clinical trials and value determinations, and the purposeful integration of patient preference in clinical decisions and guidelines. Innovative models of care, including accountable care organizations and oncology patient-centered medical homes, may also facilitate alignment through improved care coordination and quality-based payment incentives. Ultimately, VBC and PCC will only be aligned if patient-centered outcomes, perspectives, and preferences are explicitly incorporated into the definitions and metrics of quality, cost, and value that will increasingly influence the delivery of cancer care. PMID:27262855

  9. Patient Care Planning Discussions for Patients at the End of Life: An Evidence-Based Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Baidoobonso, S

    2014-01-01

    Background Ontario spends about 9% of its health budget on care for people at the end of life (EoL), most of whom die from chronic, prolonged conditions. For many people, patient care planning discussions (PCPDs) can improve the quality and reduce the cost of care. Objectives This evidence-based analysis aimed to examine the effectiveness of PCPDs in achieving better patient-centred outcomes for people at the EoL. Data Sources A systematic literature search was conducted in MEDLINE, Embase, CINAHL, and EBM Reviews to identify relevant literature published between January 1, 2004, and October 9, 2013. Review Methods Peer-reviewed reports from randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and observational studies were examined. Outcomes included quality of life (QoL), satisfaction, concordance, advance care planning (ACP), and health care use. Quality of evidence was assessed using GRADE. Results While the effects of PCPDs on QoL are unclear, single-provider PCPDs were associated with family members being very satisfied with EoL care (odds ratio [OR]: 5.17 [95% CI: 1.52, 17.58]), improved concordance between patients’ and families’ wishes (OR: 4.32, P < 0.001), fewer episodes of hospital care (mean difference [MD]: −0.21, P = 0.04), spending fewer days in hospital (MD: −1.8, P = 0.03), and receiving hospice care (OR: 5.17 [95% CI: 2.03, 13.17]). Team-based PCPDs were associated with greater patient satisfaction (standardized mean difference [SMD]: 0.39 [95% CI: 0.17, 0.60]) and fewer outpatient visits (MD: −5.20 [95% CI: −9.70, −0.70]). Overall, PCPDs were associated with more ACP and more optimal health care use. Limitations Most of the RCTs were unblinded, intervention was measured or described inadequately in some studies, and the term “usual care” was often undefined. Conclusions Patients at the EoL and their families benefited from PCPDs. Furthermore, PCPDs occurring earlier in the course of illness were associated with better outcomes than those

  10. Perception of primary care doctors and nurses about care provided to sickle cell disease patients

    PubMed Central

    Xavier Gomes, Ludmila Mourão; de Andrade Barbosa, Thiago Luis; Souza Vieira, Elen Débora; Caldeira, Antônio Prates; de Carvalho Torres, Heloísa; Viana, Marcos Borato

    2015-01-01

    Objective To analyze the perception of primary care physicians and nurses about access to services and routine health care provided to sickle cell disease patients. Methods This descriptive exploratory study took a qualitative approach by surveying thirteen primary care health professionals who participated in a focus group to discuss access to services and assistance provided to sickle cell disease patients. The data were submitted to thematic content analysis. Results Access to primary care services and routine care for sickle cell disease patients were the categories that emerged from the analysis. Interaction between people with sickle cell disease and primary care health clinics was found to be minimal and limited mainly to scheduling appointments. Patients sought care from the primary care health clinics only in some situations, such as for pain episodes and vaccinations. The professionals noted that patients do not recognize primary care as the gateway to the system, and reported that they feel unprepared to assist sickle cell disease patients. Conclusion In the perception of these professionals, there are restrictions to accessing primary care health clinics and the primary care assistance for sickle cell disease patients is affected. PMID:26190428

  11. The formal mental health care burden among recently deinstitutionalized patients.

    PubMed

    Deb, P; Holmes, A M

    1998-08-01

    This article examines the extent to which the costs of formal health care are shifted from third-party payers to the patient and his or her family, especially during the transition to the community after discharge from a state hospital. Findings indicate that patients residing in the community are as likely to receive some care as their counterparts in institutions, but are at higher risk for uncovered care. Uncovered care is more likely to manifest as an unmet need for patients who have been recently discharged, especially for racial minorities, and as an out-of-pocket expense for patients who are established in the community. PMID:9685753

  12. Reliability of an interactive computer program for advance care planning.

    PubMed

    Schubart, Jane R; Levi, Benjamin H; Camacho, Fabian; Whitehead, Megan; Farace, Elana; Green, Michael J

    2012-06-01

    Despite widespread efforts to promote advance directives (ADs), completion rates remain low. Making Your Wishes Known: Planning Your Medical Future (MYWK) is an interactive computer program that guides individuals through the process of advance care planning, explaining health conditions and interventions that commonly involve life or death decisions, helps them articulate their values/goals, and translates users' preferences into a detailed AD document. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate that (in the absence of major life changes) the AD generated by MYWK reliably reflects an individual's values/preferences. English speakers ≥30 years old completed MYWK twice, 4 to 6 weeks apart. Reliability indices were assessed for three AD components: General Wishes; Specific Wishes for treatment; and Quality-of-Life values (QoL). Twenty-four participants completed the study. Both the Specific Wishes and QoL scales had high internal consistency in both time periods (Knuder Richardson formula 20 [KR-20]=0.83-0.95, and 0.86-0.89). Test-retest reliability was perfect for General Wishes (κ=1), high for QoL (Pearson's correlation coefficient=0.83), but lower for Specific Wishes (Pearson's correlation coefficient=0.57). MYWK generates an AD where General Wishes and QoL (but not Specific Wishes) statements remain consistent over time. PMID:22512830

  13. Reliability of an Interactive Computer Program for Advance Care Planning

    PubMed Central

    Levi, Benjamin H.; Camacho, Fabian; Whitehead, Megan; Farace, Elana; Green, Michael J

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Despite widespread efforts to promote advance directives (ADs), completion rates remain low. Making Your Wishes Known: Planning Your Medical Future (MYWK) is an interactive computer program that guides individuals through the process of advance care planning, explaining health conditions and interventions that commonly involve life or death decisions, helps them articulate their values/goals, and translates users' preferences into a detailed AD document. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate that (in the absence of major life changes) the AD generated by MYWK reliably reflects an individual's values/preferences. English speakers ≥30 years old completed MYWK twice, 4 to 6 weeks apart. Reliability indices were assessed for three AD components: General Wishes; Specific Wishes for treatment; and Quality-of-Life values (QoL). Twenty-four participants completed the study. Both the Specific Wishes and QoL scales had high internal consistency in both time periods (Knuder Richardson formula 20 [KR-20]=0.83–0.95, and 0.86–0.89). Test-retest reliability was perfect for General Wishes (κ=1), high for QoL (Pearson's correlation coefficient=0.83), but lower for Specific Wishes (Pearson's correlation coefficient=0.57). MYWK generates an AD where General Wishes and QoL (but not Specific Wishes) statements remain consistent over time. PMID:22512830

  14. Care of Patients with Diabetic Foot Disease in Oman

    PubMed Central

    Al-Busaidi, Ibrahim S.; Abdulhadi, Nadia N.; Coppell, Kirsten J.

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a major public health challenge and causes substantial morbidity and mortality worldwide. Diabetic foot disease is one of the most debilitating and costly complications of diabetes. While simple preventative foot care measures can reduce the risk of lower limb ulcerations and subsequent amputations by up to 85%, they are not always implemented. In Oman, foot care for patients with diabetes is mainly provided in primary and secondary care settings. Among all lower limb amputations performed in public hospitals in Oman between 2002–2013, 47.3% were performed on patients with diabetes. The quality of foot care among patients with diabetes in Oman has not been evaluated and unidentified gaps in care may exist. This article highlights challenges in the provision of adequate foot care to Omani patients with diabetes. It concludes with suggested strategies for an integrated national diabetic foot care programme in Oman. PMID:27606104

  15. Care of Patients with Diabetic Foot Disease in Oman.

    PubMed

    Al-Busaidi, Ibrahim S; Abdulhadi, Nadia N; Coppell, Kirsten J

    2016-08-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a major public health challenge and causes substantial morbidity and mortality worldwide. Diabetic foot disease is one of the most debilitating and costly complications of diabetes. While simple preventative foot care measures can reduce the risk of lower limb ulcerations and subsequent amputations by up to 85%, they are not always implemented. In Oman, foot care for patients with diabetes is mainly provided in primary and secondary care settings. Among all lower limb amputations performed in public hospitals in Oman between 2002-2013, 47.3% were performed on patients with diabetes. The quality of foot care among patients with diabetes in Oman has not been evaluated and unidentified gaps in care may exist. This article highlights challenges in the provision of adequate foot care to Omani patients with diabetes. It concludes with suggested strategies for an integrated national diabetic foot care programme in Oman. PMID:27606104

  16. Family Involvement in the Care of Hospitalized Elderly Patients.

    PubMed

    Nayeri, Nahid Dehghan; Gholizadeh, Leila; Mohammadi, Eesa; Yazdi, Khadijeh

    2015-09-01

    Family participation in caregiving to elderly inpatients is likely to improve the quality of care to older patients. This qualitative design study applied semi-structured interviews to elicit experiences from nurses, families, and patients on the notion of family participation in the care of elderly patients in two general teaching hospitals in Iran. Data were gathered using individual interviews, field notes, and participant observations. Interviews were recorded, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed using manifest and latent content analysis. The following main themes emerged through the data analysis process: (a) safety and quality in patient care and (b) unplanned and unstructured patient care participation. The study concludes that family involvement in caregiving to elderly patients is important, yet the participation should be based upon a planned and structured framework to ensure a safe and satisfying experience for patients, families, and health care team. PMID:24652880

  17. Adaptive practices in heart failure care teams: implications for patient-centered care in the context of complexity

    PubMed Central

    Tait, Glendon R; Bates, Joanna; LaDonna, Kori A; Schulz, Valerie N; Strachan, Patricia H; McDougall, Allan; Lingard, Lorelei

    2015-01-01

    Background Heart failure (HF), one of the three leading causes of death, is a chronic, progressive, incurable disease. There is growing support for integration of palliative care’s holistic approach to suffering, but insufficient understanding of how this would happen in the complex team context of HF care. This study examined how HF care teams, as defined by patients, work together to provide care to patients with advanced disease. Methods Team members were identified by each participating patient, generating team sampling units (TSUs) for each patient. Drawn from five study sites in three Canadian provinces, our dataset consists of 209 interviews from 50 TSUs. Drawing on a theoretical framing of HF teams as complex adaptive systems (CAS), interviews were analyzed using the constant comparative method associated with constructivist grounded theory. Results This paper centers on the dominant theme of system practices, how HF care delivery is reported to work organizationally, socially, and practically, and describes two subthemes: “the way things work around here”, which were commonplace, routine ways of doing things, and “the way we make things work around here”, which were more conscious, effortful adaptations to usual practice in response to emergent needs. An adaptive practice, often a small alteration to routine, could have amplified effects beyond those intended by the innovating team member and could extend to other settings. Conclusion Adaptive practices emerged unpredictably and were variably experienced by team members. Our study offers an empirically grounded explanation of how HF care teams self-organize and how adaptive practices emerge from nonlinear interdependencies among diverse agents. We use these insights to reframe the question of palliative care integration, to ask how best to foster palliative care-aligned adaptive practices in HF care. This work has implications for health care’s growing challenge of providing care to those with

  18. Using Online Health Communities to Deliver Patient-Centered Care to People With Chronic Conditions

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Our health care system faces major threats as the number of people with multiple chronic conditions rises dramatically. Objective To study the use of Online Health Communities (OHCs) as a tool to facilitate high-quality and affordable health care for future generations. Methods OHCs are Internet-based platforms that unite either a group of patients, a group of professionals, or a mixture of both. Members interact using modern communication technologies such as blogs, chats, forums, and wikis. We illustrate the use of OHCs for ParkinsonNet, a professional network for Parkinson disease whose participants—both patients and professionals—use various types of OHCs to deliver patient-centered care. Results We discuss several potential applications in clinical practice. First, due to rapid advances in medical knowledge, many health professionals lack sufficient expertise to address the complex health care needs of chronic patients. OHCs can be used to share experiences, exchange knowledge, and increase disease-specific expertise. Second, current health care delivery is fragmented, as many patients acquire relationships with multiple professionals and institutions. OHCs can bridge geographical distances and enable interdisciplinary collaboration across institutions and traditional echelons. Third, chronic patients lack adequate tools to self-manage their disease. OHCs can be used to actively engage and empower patients in their health care process and to tailor care to their individual needs. Personal health communities of individual patients offer unique opportunities to store all medical information in one central place, while allowing transparent communication across all members of each patient’s health care team. Conclusions OHCs are a powerful tool to address some of the challenges chronic care faces today. OHCs help to facilitate communication among professionals and patients and support coordination of care across traditional echelons, which does

  19. Cancer Pharmacogenomics: Integrating Discoveries in Basic, Clinical and Population Sciences to Advance Predictive Cancer Care

    Cancer.gov

    Cancer Pharmacogenomics: Integrating Discoveries in Basic, Clinical and Population Sciences to Advance Predictive Cancer Care, a 2010 workshop sponsored by the Epidemiology and Genomics Research Program.

  20. Cutaneous wound healing: Current concepts and advances in wound care

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Kenneth C; Guha, Somes Chandra

    2014-01-01

    A non-healing wound is defined as showing no measurable signs of healing for at least 30 consecutive treatments with standard wound care.[1] It is a snapshot of a patient's total health as well as the ongoing battle between noxious factors and the restoration of optimal macro and micro circulation, oxygenation and nutrition. In practice, standard therapies for non-healing cutaneous wounds include application of appropriate dressings, periodic debridement and eliminating causative factors.[2] The vast majority of wounds would heal by such approach with variable degrees of residual morbidity, disability and even mortality. Globally, beyond the above therapies, newer tools of healing are selectively accessible to caregivers, for various logistical or financial reasons. Our review will focus on the use of hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT), as used at our institution (CAMC), and some other modalities that are relatively accessible to patients. HBOT is a relatively safe and technologically simpler way to deliver care worldwide. However, the expense for including HBOT as standard of care for recognized indications per UHMS(Undersea and Hyperbaric Medical Society) may vary widely from country to country and payment system.[3] In the USA, CMS (Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services) approved indications for HBOT vary from that of the UHMS for logistical reasons.[1] We shall also briefly look into other newer therapies per current clinical usage and general acceptance by the medical community. Admittedly, there would be other novel tools with variable success in wound healing worldwide, but it would be difficult to include all in this treatise. PMID:25593414

  1. Adaptation of the AACN Synergy Model for Patient Care to Critical Care Transport

    PubMed Central

    SWICKARD, SCOTT; SWICKARD, WENDY; REIMER, ANDREW; LINDELL, DEBORAH; WINKELMAN, CHRIS

    2014-01-01

    Today’s health care delivery system relies heavily on interhospital transfer of patients who require higher levels of care. Although numerous tools and algorithms have been used for the prehospital determination of mode of transport, no tool for the transfer of patients between hospitals has been widely accepted. Typically, the interfacility transport decision is left to the discretion of the referring provider, who may or may not be aware of the level of care provided or the means of transport available. A need exists to determine the appropriate level of care required to meet the needs of patients during transport. The American Association of Critical-Care Nurses (AACN) Synergy Model for Patient Care is a patient-centered model that focuses on optimizing patient care by matching the characteristics of the patient with the competencies of the nurse. This model shows significant promise in providing the theoretical backing to guide the decision on the level of care necessary to complete interfacility transfers safely and effectively. This article describes a new tool inspired by the AACN Synergy Model for Patient Care to determine the appropriate level of care required for interfacility transport. PMID:24488887

  2. Advance Care Planning Discussions: Why They Should Happen, Why They Don't, and How We Can Facilitate the Process.

    PubMed

    Norals, Taira Everett; Smith, Thomas J

    2015-08-01

    Recent data suggest that we are not successfully getting the message across about the importance of advance care planning for patients who have a life-ending illness. Half to three-quarters of patients with incurable cancer think that they might be cured by chemotherapy, radiation, or surgery. The source of this denial may lie with them, it may be traceable to their physicians, or it may be a combination of the two. This avoidance has consequences, since those patients with "prognostic awareness" have end-of-life care pathways that involve little use of the hospital, ICU, end-of-life chemo, or "codes" with almost no chance of success, and much more dying at home with hospice care. If we can successfully initiate advance care planning discussions with our patients and families, their end-of-life processes will improve, resulting in better care, less use of the hospital, and more honoring of newly discerned choices. We show how this can be done in regular oncology practice by introducing the Johns Hopkins "Palliative Care Temporary Tattoo" and by providing some ways to discuss cardiopulmonary resuscitation in settings where it will not be helpful. PMID:26281841

  3. [Advanced nursing practice: a must for the quality of care and mental health services].

    PubMed

    Ricard, Nicole; Page, Claire; Laflamme, France

    2014-01-01

    New professional legislation and reorganization of mental health services have had a significant influence on mental health nursing practice. Many nurses have demonstrated clinical leadership and have been able to adapt their services to the needs of the population specially in the primary health care setting. However, many believe that the role of nurses is not sufficiently known and optimally utilized in mental health services. In this article we take a critical look at the mental health nursing practice in Quebec and at the essential requirements for its development. This review aims to: 1) describe current trends in the changing roles and the modernization of mental health nursing practice in Quebec, 2) provide an overview of the development of advanced nursing practice and its impact on the quality of mental health services; 3) clarify the concept of advanced nursing practice and position its development in Quebec and 4) propose various strategies for optimizing the role of nurses and their complementarity with other professionals providing mental health services. This review presents innovative practices developed by nurses in the context of the restructuring of mental health services. For example, new nursing roles have been developed to improve the collaboration with general practitioners groups in primary care settings and facilitate the evaluation and monitoring of patient presenting medical and psychological problems. Another interesting innovation was set up by nurses in developing a new service to allow timely access to integrated care for patients with substance abuse and mental health problems. The various testimonies reported in this article illustrate the potential contribution of these nursing innovations in improving the mental health services in Quebec. Also, in few countries, the reform of mental health services has been a good time to recognize this potential. Thus, some countries have repositioned the role of mental health nurses and

  4. The Role of Social Workers in Spiritual Care to Facilitate Coping With Chronic Illness and Self-Determination in Advance Care Planning.

    PubMed

    Francoeur, Richard B; Burke, Nancy; Wilson, Alicia M

    2016-01-01

    Spiritual values and beliefs of patients and families influence resilience during chronic illness and shape patient choices during advance care planning. The spiritual needs of Baby Boomers will be more diverse than previous generations, in connection with the questioning, experimental mind-set of this group and the fact that it includes a higher proportion of immigrant populations outside the Judeo-Christian tradition. Social workers are trained explicitly to intervene with diverse populations and are well positioned to offer spiritual support in ways that do not necessarily conform to traditional religions. To the extent of their individual expertise and competence, social workers should assess and provide spiritual care to clients, including those who either are underserved or prefer not to seek assistance from clergy or chaplains because they feel alienated from religious institutions and representatives. They should also be aware of ethical dilemmas in consulting with spiritual care professionals in developing spiritual interventions. Social work education should address clients' humanistic and existential concerns, beliefs and behaviors of the major religions, and forms of nontraditional religious and spiritual experiences; it should also provide experiential opportunities for engaging with grief and earlier advance care planning. There should be attention to different theodical perspectives of the major religions regarding the problem of good and evil, which may preoccupy even clients who no longer participate in organized religion, because these unresolved existential issues may weaken client coping with chronic conditions and may diminish clarity and self-awareness for engaging authentically and effectively in advance care planning. PMID:27187806

  5. Association of Experience with Illness and End-of-life Care with Advance Care Planning in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Amjad, Halima; Towle, Virginia; Fried, Terri

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To examine whether experiences with illness and end-of-life care are associated with increased readiness to participate in advance care planning (ACP). Design Observational cohort study. Setting Community. Participants Persons age ≥ 60 recruited from physician offices and a senior center. Measurements Participants were asked about personal experience with major illness or surgery and experience with others’ end-of-life care, including whether they had made a medical decision for someone dying, knew someone who had a bad death due to too much/too little medical care, or experienced the death of a loved one who made end-of-life wishes known. Stages of change were assessed for specific ACP behaviors: completion of living will and healthcare proxy, communication with loved ones regarding life-sustaining treatments and quantity versus quality of life, and communication with physicians about these same topics. Stages of change included precontemplation, contemplation, preparation and action/maintenance corresponding to whether the participant was not ready to complete the behavior, was considering participation in the next six months, was planning participation within thirty days, or had already participated. Results Of 304 participants, 84% had one or more personal experiences or experience with others. Personal experiences were not associated with increased readiness for most ACP behaviors. In contrast, having one or more experiences with others was associated with increased readiness to complete a living will and healthcare proxy, discuss life-sustaining treatment with loved ones and discuss quantity versus quality of life with loved ones and with physicians. Conclusion Older individuals who have experience with end-of-life care for others demonstrate increased readiness to participate in ACP. Discussions with older patients regarding these experiences may be a useful tool in promoting ACP. PMID:24934237

  6. The top 4 advances in antithrombotic care in the last year.

    PubMed

    Turpie, Alexander G G

    2008-01-01

    Important clinical data with a significant impact on the clinical management of venous thromboembolism (VTE) were presented at The International Society of Thrombosis and Haemostasis (ISTH) meeting, held in Geneva, Switzerland in July of 2007. In addition, 2 new guidelines for the management of patients with acute coronary syndromes (ACS) were published in 2007, and will have a significant impact on daily practice. Finally, the approval of new practice-changing, paradigm-shifting oral anticoagulants is on the horizon. This article will review the top 4 advances in antithrombotic care and discuss their impact on the clinical management of VTE. PMID:18834617

  7. Patient-centered care for people living with multimorbidity

    PubMed Central

    Boyd, Cynthia M.; Lucas, Gregory M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review The purpose of this review is to consider a patient-centred approach to the care of people living with HIV (PLWH) who have multimorbidity, irrespective of the specific conditions. Recent findings Interdisciplinary care to achieve patient-centred care for people with multimorbidity is recognized as important, but the evaluation of models designed to achieve this goal are needed. Key elements of such approaches include patient preferences, interpretation of the evidence, prognosis as a tool to inform patient-centred care, clinical feasibility and optimization of treatment regimens. Summary Developing and evaluating the best models of patient-centred care for PLWH who also have multimorbidity is essential. This challenge represents an opportunity to leverage the lessons learned from the care of people with multimorbidity in general, and vice versa. PMID:24871089

  8. Patient and public involvement in emergency care research.

    PubMed

    Hirst, Enid; Irving, Andy; Goodacre, Steve

    2016-09-01

    Patients participate in emergency care research and are the intended beneficiaries of research findings. The public provide substantial funding for research through taxation and charitable donations. If we do research to benefit patients and the public are funding the research, then patients and the public should be involved in the planning, prioritisation, design, conduct and oversight of research, yet patient and public involvement (or more simply, public involvement, since patients are also members of the public) has only recently developed in emergency care research. In this article, we describe what public involvement is and how it can help emergency care research. We use the development of a pioneering public involvement group in emergency care, the Sheffield Emergency Care Forum, to provide insights into the potential and challenges of public involvement in emergency care research. PMID:27044949

  9. Patient-Reported Quality of Supportive Care Among Patients With Colorectal Cancer in the Veterans Affairs Health Care System

    PubMed Central

    van Ryn, Michelle; Phelan, Sean M.; Arora, Neeraj K.; Haggstrom, David A.; Jackson, George L.; Zafar, S. Yousuf; Griffin, Joan M.; Zullig, Leah L.; Provenzale, Dawn; Yeazel, Mark W.; Jindal, Rahul M.; Clauser, Steven B.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose High-quality supportive care is an essential component of comprehensive cancer care. We implemented a patient-centered quality of cancer care survey to examine and identify predictors of quality of supportive care for bowel problems, pain, fatigue, depression, and other symptoms among 1,109 patients with colorectal cancer. Patients and Methods Patients with new diagnosis of colorectal cancer at any Veterans Health Administration medical center nationwide in 2008 were ascertained through the Veterans Affairs Central Cancer Registry and sent questionnaires assessing a variety of aspects of patient-centered cancer care. We received questionnaires from 63% of eligible patients (N = 1,109). Descriptive analyses characterizing patient experiences with supportive care and binary logistic regression models were used to examine predictors of receipt of help wanted for each of the five symptom categories. Results There were significant gaps in patient-centered quality of supportive care, beginning with symptom assessment. In multivariable modeling, the impact of clinical factors and patient race on odds of receiving wanted help varied by symptom. Coordination of care quality predicted receipt of wanted help for all symptoms, independent of patient demographic or clinical characteristics. Conclusion This study revealed substantial gaps in patient-centered quality of care, difficult to characterize through quality measurement relying on medical record review alone. It established the feasibility of collecting patient-reported quality measures. Improving quality measurement of supportive care and implementing patient-reported outcomes in quality-measurement systems are high priorities for improving the processes and outcomes of care for patients with cancer. PMID:24493712

  10. A patient perspective in research on intercultural caring in maternity care: A meta-ethnography.

    PubMed

    Wikberg, Anita; Bondas, Terese

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study is to explore and describe a patient perspective in research on intercultural caring in maternity care. In total, 40 studies are synthesized using Noblit and Hare's meta-ethnography method. The following opposite metaphors were found: caring versus non-caring; language and communication problems versus information and choice; access to medical and technological care versus incompetence; acculturation: preserving the original culture versus adapting to a new culture; professional caring relationship versus family and community involvement; caring is important for well-being and health versus conflicts cause interrupted care; vulnerable women with painful memories versus racism. Alice in Wonderland emerged as an overarching metaphor to describe intercultural caring in maternity care. Furthermore, intercultural caring is seen in different dimensions of uniqueness, context, culture, and universality. There are specific cultural and maternity care features in intercultural caring. There is an inner core of caring consisting of respect, presence, and listening as well as external factors such as economy and organization that impact on intercultural caring. Moreover, legal status of the patient, as well as power relationships and racism, influences intercultural caring. Further meta-syntheses about well-documented intercultural phenomena and ethnic groups, as well as empirical studies about current phenomena, are suggested. PMID:20640028

  11. A patient perspective in research on intercultural caring in maternity care: A meta-ethnography

    PubMed Central

    Wikberg, Anita; Bondas, Terese

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study is to explore and describe a patient perspective in research on intercultural caring in maternity care. In total, 40 studies are synthesized using Noblit and Hare's meta-ethnography method. The following opposite metaphors were found: caring versus non-caring; language and communication problems versus information and choice; access to medical and technological care versus incompetence; acculturation: preserving the original culture versus adapting to a new culture; professional caring relationship versus family and community involvement; caring is important for well-being and health versus conflicts cause interrupted care; vulnerable women with painful memories versus racism. Alice in Wonderland emerged as an overarching metaphor to describe intercultural caring in maternity care. Furthermore, intercultural caring is seen in different dimensions of uniqueness, context, culture, and universality. There are specific cultural and maternity care features in intercultural caring. There is an inner core of caring consisting of respect, presence, and listening as well as external factors such as economy and organization that impact on intercultural caring. Moreover, legal status of the patient, as well as power relationships and racism, influences intercultural caring. Further meta-syntheses about well-documented intercultural phenomena and ethnic groups, as well as empirical studies about current phenomena, are suggested. PMID:20640028

  12. Towards better patient care: drugs to avoid.

    PubMed

    2013-04-01

    Common sense dictates that one should choose tried and tested drugs with proven, concrete benefits that outweigh their adverse effects. Many new drugs are approved each year, often despite a lack of solid evidence that they are any better than existing treatments. Worse, some are approved despite being less effective or more harmful than current options. Massive promotion is used to ensure that such drugs achieve a positive image in the eyes of healthcare professionals and patients. Renowned "opinion leaders" intervene in their favour at conferences and in specialist media, and their opinions are further propagated by specialists in the field. Finally, campaigns in the lay media are used to highlight the target illness, encouraging patients to request a prescription. New data sometimes show that older, initially promising drugs are less effective or more harmful than first thought. For all these reasons, many drugs that are now present on the market are more harmful than beneficial and should be avoided. Unfortunately, negative assessment data and warnings are often drowned in the flood of promotion and advertising. Front-line healthcare professionals who are determined to act in their patients' best interests can find themselves swimming against a tide of specialist opinion, marketing authorisation, and reimbursement decisions. By leaving drugs that are more harmful than beneficial on the market and contenting themselves with simple half-measures, healthcare authorities are failing in their duty to protect patients. Prescrire, a journal funded solely by its subscribers, does not seek to do the work of health authorities, and does not have the means to do so. Prescrire's goal is simply to help healthcare professionals provide better care. The following text lists the principal drugs that we consider more harmful than beneficial, based on our reviews published between 2010 and 2012 in our French edition. These drugs should not be used. Patients and healthcare

  13. Can patients reliably identify safe, high quality care?

    PubMed Central

    Tevis, Sarah E.; Schmocker, Ryan K.; Kennedy, Gregory D.

    2015-01-01

    The Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS) survey is a publicly reported tool that measures patient satisfaction. As both patients and Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) reimbursement rely on survey results as a metric of quality of care, we reviewed the current literature to determine if patient satisfaction correlates with quality, safety, or patient outcomes. We found varying associations between safety culture, process of care measure compliance, and patient outcomes with patient satisfaction on the HCAHPS survey. Some studies found inverse relationships between quality and safety metrics and patient satisfaction. The measure that most reliably correlated with high patient satisfaction was low readmission rate. Future studies using patient specific data are needed to better identify which factors most influence patient satisfaction and to determine if patient satisfaction is a marker of safer and better quality care. Furthermore, the HCAHPS survey should continue to undergo evaluations to assure it generates predictable results. PMID:26413179

  14. Advance Care Planning in Norwegian nursing homes-Who is it for?

    PubMed

    Thoresen, Lisbeth; Ahlzén, Rolf; Solbrække, Kari Nyheim

    2016-08-01

    Advance care planning (ACP) is an international concept for improving patient autonomy and communication in the context of anticipated deterioration and end-of-life care. In a preparatory conversation, health care professionals facilitate one or more conversations where nursing home residents are invited to reflect on, and articulate wishes and preferences concerning future medical treatment and end-of-life care. Our aim with this study was to increase knowledge of existing ACP practices in Norwegian nursing homes. We wanted to know how nursing home residents, relatives and nursing home staff take part in the conversations, and to what extent these conversations can be regarded as promoting autonomy, legal rights and individual needs for the residents. We conducted participant observation of seven preparatory conversations, followed by interviews with health care staff (together) and resident and relative (together). In the result section, we present an informative case example of an ACP conversation where common and important characteristics running through our data are present. These are further elaborated under the following headings: Life critical questions, Residents' quiet participation in the conversations, the Dying phase - a clinical issue, Nurses and physicians; different domains and Timing. We find that nursing home staff in our study wants to contribute to open awareness, autonomy and a good death, but there are little reflections about the purpose and content of the conversations, how they should be carried out and when, and what frail nursing home residents are able to understand and express in ACP conversations. PMID:27531449

  15. Optical coherence tomography for advanced screening in the primary care office

    PubMed Central

    Shelton, Ryan L.; Jung, Woonggyu; Sayegh, Samir I.; McCormick, Daniel T.; Kim, Jeehyun; Boppart, Stephen A.

    2013-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has long been used as a diagnostic tool in the field of ophthalmology. The ability to observe microstructural changes in the tissues of the eye has proved very effective in diagnosing ocular disease. However, this technology has yet to be introduced into the primary care office, where indications of disease are first encountered. We have developed a portable, handheld imaging probe for use in the primary care setting and evaluated its tissue site accessibility, ability to observe diseased tissue, and screening capabilities in in vivo human patients, particularly for pathologies related to the eye, ear and skin. Various stages of diabetic retinopathy were investigated using the handheld probe and early-stage diabetic retinopathy was flagged as abnormal from the OCT images. At such early stages of disease, it is difficult to observe abnormalities with the limited tools that are currently available to primary care physicians. These results indicate that OCT shows promise to transform from being a diagnostic technology in the medical and surgical specialities to a screening technology in the primary care office and at the front-line of healthcare. In vivo cross-sectional images of four examples of common pathologies in humans encountered by a primary care physician. All images were taken using a novel handheld OCT imaging probe. (A) Human cornea after LASIK surgery. (B) Advanced diabetic retinopathy. (C) Tympanic membrane with accompanying biofilm. (D) Skin abscess showing layer separation and fluid-filled pockets. PMID:23606343

  16. Patient-centred care: making cancer treatment centres accountable.

    PubMed

    Zucca, Alison; Sanson-Fisher, Rob; Waller, Amy; Carey, Mariko

    2014-07-01

    Patient-centred care is argued to be an essential component in the delivery of quality health and cancer care. This manuscript discusses the need to generate credible data which indicates the quality of patient-centred care provided by cancer treatment centres. Patient-centred care covers six domains including physical comfort; emotional support; respect for patients' preferences and values; integration and coordination; involvement of family and friends; and the provision of information, communication and education to enable patients to understand and make informed decisions about their care. First, we identify priority areas within each domain. Next, we propose three questions that should be asked of every patient across the six domains of patient-centred care. The first question explores whether patients were specifically asked by a healthcare provider at the cancer treatment centre about their concerns, values and preferences. Research indicates that it cannot be assumed that clinicians are aware of patient's needs or preferences in these six areas. Second, if the answer from the patient suggests that they would like assistance, then it would be expected that this would be offered. Thirdly, if the patient indicates that they would like such assistance and it is provided, then it might be expected that the patient would report that the provided assistance did relieve their suffering, or the assistance provided was consistent with their preferences, needs and values. Regular measurement and reporting of these aspects of patient-centred cancer care has the potential to identify deficits and inequities in care delivery, allow for comparisons across treatment centres and stimulate an improvement in the patient-centred care provided to cancer patients. PMID:24696084

  17. Classifying outcomes of care for injured patients

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Nathaniel; Sobolev, Boris; Townson, Andrea; Evans, David C.; Anton, Hugh; Simons, Richard K.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Many trauma survivors face challenges of impaired functioning, limited activities and reduced participation. Recovery from injury after acute care, therefore, becomes an important public health issue. This commentary discusses a framework for evaluating outcomes of acute care. PMID:25421077

  18. Information Technology in Critical Care: Review of Monitoring and Data Acquisition Systems for Patient Care and Research

    PubMed Central

    De Georgia, Michael A.; Kaffashi, Farhad; Jacono, Frank J.; Loparo, Kenneth A.

    2015-01-01

    There is a broad consensus that 21st century health care will require intensive use of information technology to acquire and analyze data and then manage and disseminate information extracted from the data. No area is more data intensive than the intensive care unit. While there have been major improvements in intensive care monitoring, the medical industry, for the most part, has not incorporated many of the advances in computer science, biomedical engineering, signal processing, and mathematics that many other industries have embraced. Acquiring, synchronizing, integrating, and analyzing patient data remain frustratingly difficult because of incompatibilities among monitoring equipment, proprietary limitations from industry, and the absence of standard data formatting. In this paper, we will review the history of computers in the intensive care unit along with commonly used monitoring and data acquisition systems, both those commercially available and those being developed for research purposes. PMID:25734185

  19. Information technology in critical care: review of monitoring and data acquisition systems for patient care and research.

    PubMed

    De Georgia, Michael A; Kaffashi, Farhad; Jacono, Frank J; Loparo, Kenneth A

    2015-01-01

    There is a broad consensus that 21st century health care will require intensive use of information technology to acquire and analyze data and then manage and disseminate information extracted from the data. No area is more data intensive than the intensive care unit. While there have been major improvements in intensive care monitoring, the medical industry, for the most part, has not incorporated many of the advances in computer science, biomedical engineering, signal processing, and mathematics that many other industries have embraced. Acquiring, synchronizing, integrating, and analyzing patient data remain frustratingly difficult because of incompatibilities among monitoring equipment, proprietary limitations from industry, and the absence of standard data formatting. In this paper, we will review the history of computers in the intensive care unit along with commonly used monitoring and data acquisition systems, both those commercially available and those being developed for research purposes. PMID:25734185

  20. Gaps in Care Can Harm Patients After Heart Attack

    MedlinePlus

    ... html Gaps in Care Can Harm Patients After Heart Attack Waiting too long for first medical apppointment after ... 23, 2016 WEDNESDAY, March 23, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Heart attack patients who wait a long period to have ...

  1. Early Palliative Care Improves Patients' Quality of Life

    MedlinePlus

    ... fullstory_160885.html Early Palliative Care Improves Patients' Quality of Life Also increases chances of having end- ... incurable cancer helps patients cope and improves their quality of life, a new study shows. It also ...

  2. Patient Centeredness and Engagement in Quality-of-Care Oncology Research.

    PubMed

    Clauser, Steven B; Gayer, Christopher; Murphy, Elizabeth; Majhail, Navneet S; Baker, K Scott

    2015-05-01

    More than a decade after the Institute of Medicine (IOM) first studied the quality of cancer care, obstacles to achieving high-quality care remain, and studies suggest that cancer care is often not as patient centered, accessible, coordinated, or evidence based as it could be. Patients, their families, and clinicians face a wide range of complex and often confusing choices regarding their health and health care concerns and require trustworthy information to decide which options are best for them. The Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI) strives to fund clinical comparative effectiveness research, guided by patients, caregivers, and the broader health care community, that will provide high-integrity, evidence-based information to help people make informed health care decisions. This mission is well aligned with the IOM's recent conceptual framework and corresponding recommendations that recognize that addressing the needs of patients with cancer and their families is the most important component of a high-quality cancer care delivery system. PCORI seeks the opportunity to partner with diverse interdisciplinary research teams who demonstrate a strong commitment to the inclusion and engagement of patients and stakeholders as they work to develop high-quality cancer care delivery systems. We see rich opportunities for such partnership in the cancer care community, given the wealth of well-established patient advocacy groups and organizations and cutting-edge research institutions, all of which are working toward the common goal of improving the quality of cancer care for patients and their families. This article and the project it describes provide an example of an avenue for advancing this goal. PMID:25852140

  3. The view of caring among patients and personnel.

    PubMed

    Lövgren, G; Sandman, P O; Engström, B; Norberg, A; Eriksson, S

    1998-01-01

    All patients in hospital care and primary health care in the country of Västerbotten, Sweden (n = 5158) were asked to express their level of satisfaction with the quality of care. The study was carried out on one specific day. All personnel on duty that day (n = 2824) were also included and asked to give their interpretations of their patients' experiences. A questionnaire containing positive and negative statements concerning both the relationship and the task aspects of care was used. The results showed that the youngest and oldest patients expressed the highest degree of satisfaction, while young and middle-aged patients expressed a more restrained view. The least satisfactory aspects concerned the opportunities to express criticism and the possibilities of receiving information about access to help outside the health care organization. The personnel's responses agreed with those of the patients, but fewer personnel thought that their patients were satisfied than was in fact the case. PMID:9601444

  4. Tobacco use treatment in primary care patients with psychiatric illness.

    PubMed

    Cerimele, Joseph M; Halperin, Abigail C; Saxon, Andrew J

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of smoking is higher in patients with psychiatric illness compared with the general population. Smoking causes chronic illnesses, which lead to premature mortality in those with psychiatric illness, is associated with greater burden of psychiatric symptoms, and contributes to the social isolation experienced by individuals with psychiatric disorders. Most patients with a psychiatric illness present initially to primary care rather than specialty care settings, and some patients receive care exclusively in the primary care setting. Therefore, family physicians and other primary care clinicians have an important role in the recognition and treatment of tobacco use disorders in patients with psychiatric illnesses. In this article we review common myths associated with smoking and psychiatric illness, techniques for implementing evidence-based tobacco use treatments, the evidence base for tobacco use treatment for patients with specific psychiatric diagnoses, and factors to consider when treating tobacco use disorders in patients with psychiatric illness. PMID:24808119

  5. Impact of Physician Asthma Care Education on Patient Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cabana, Michael D.; Slish, Kathryn K.; Evans, David; Mellins, Robert B.; Brown, Randall W.; Lin, Xihong; Kaciroti, Niko; Clark, Noreen M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: We evaluated the effectiveness of a continuing medical education program, Physician Asthma Care Education, in improving pediatricians' asthma therapeutic and communication skills and patients' health care utilization for asthma. Methods: We conducted a randomized trial in 10 regions in the United States. Primary care providers…

  6. Obstetrics Patients' Assessment of Medical Students' Role in Their Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magrane, Diane

    1988-01-01

    Obstetric patients rated the skills and assessed the roles of students caring for them during a clinical clerkship. They rated skills and attitudes high, generally, with lower ratings for their ability to answer questions and preparation to participate in care. Most felt students improved their care, primarily in supportive ways. (Author/MSE)

  7. Family-centred care during midface advancement with a rigid external device: what do families need?

    PubMed

    Bredero-Boelhouwer, H; Joosten, K F M; van Veen-van der Hoek, M; Mathijssen, I M J

    2013-08-01

    Midface advancement with distraction osteogenesis using the rigid external device (RED) is an effective but invasive treatment to correct the hypoplastic midface. This study draws up an inventory of the stressors, needs and coping strategies of families during this treatment, to determine the best conditions for family-centred care. Data were collected by reviewing the patients' files and administering semi-structured interviews. The data were analysed using the software program Atlas.ti and were re-analysed by an independent researcher. Parents and patients were interviewed separately. Fourteen families participated. Four patients had an absolute indication for surgery. All families were eager to have the patient's facial appearance improved. Nevertheless, despite psychological counselling, they experienced stress when confronted with the changed facial appearance. Another stressor was weight loss. Six patients were in a state of acute malnutrition and needed supplementary feeding. We conclude that the best conditions for family-centred care should be aligned to the different phases of treatment. Leading up to surgery it is important to screen families' expectations regarding aesthetic, functional and social outcomes and to assess their capacity to cope with the long treatment and effects of changed facial appearance. Peer contact and psychosocial training to increase self-esteem are tools to enhance co-operation and satisfaction. During the distraction and stabilisation phase, we advise the monitoring of nutritional intake and weight. During all phases of treatment easy accessibility to the team is recommended. PMID:23664572

  8. Patient-initiated appointments compared with standard outpatient care for rheumatoid arthritis: a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Fredriksson, Cecilia; Ebbevi, David; Waldheim, Eva; Lindblad, Staffan; Ernestam, Sofia

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To test the hypothesis that implementing a patient-initiated system of care could improve clinical outcome in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) using disease activity guided management. Methods An 18-month controlled blinded end point two-centre study with 131 patients with RA randomised to intervention (n=64) or control (n=67). The intervention group participants were guaranteed appointments to a rheumatologist within 10 working days if they subjectively experienced a flare in disease activity. The control group participants were booked in advance according to guidelines. Independent assessments were performed in the two groups at 0, 3, 6, 12 and 18 months. Outcome measures included: Disease Activity Score 28 (DAS28), a Visual Analogue Scale (satisfaction with care, confidence in care), number of appointments with a rheumatologist. Results DAS28 decreased. Median satisfaction and confidence in care were >90 mm on Visual Analog Scale. Median number of appointments was 3. There were no significant differences between the groups among these outcomes. Visits in the intervention group more often resulted in change of treatment than in the control group (p<0.001). Conclusions Patient-initiated care was neither better nor inferior to traditional care in terms of outcomes analysed. Patient-initiated appointments can safely be used in everyday outpatient care of RA to empower the patient, if disease activity guided management is applied. Further research should investigate if this intervention can target a subgroup of patients and hence also result in released resources. PMID:27042334

  9. Providing care for critically ill surgical patients: challenges and recommendations.

    PubMed

    Tisherman, Samuel A; Kaplan, Lewis; Gracias, Vicente H; Beilman, Gregory J; Toevs, Christine; Byrnes, Matthew C; Coopersmith, Craig M

    2013-07-01

    Providing optimal care for critically ill and injured surgical patients will become more challenging with staff shortages for surgeons and intensivists. This white paper addresses the historical issues behind the present situation, the need for all intensivists to engage in dedicated critical care per the intensivist model, and the recognition that intensivists from all specialties can provide optimal care for the critically ill surgical patient, particularly with continuing involvement by the surgeon of record. The new acute care surgery training paradigm (including trauma, surgical critical care, and emergency general surgery) has been developed to increase interest in trauma and surgical critical care, but the number of interested trainees remains too few. Recommendations are made for broadening the multidisciplinary training and practice opportunities in surgical critical care for intensivists from all base specialties and for maintaining the intensivist model within acute care surgery practice. Support from academic and administrative leadership, as well as national organizations, will be needed. PMID:23754675

  10. Dialysis patients' utilization of health care services covered by long-term care insurance in Japan.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Utako; Mitadera, Yuji; Aoki, Hagiko; Akazawa, Kouhei

    2015-01-01

    Hemodialysis patients in Japan are aging and thus more patients need support for attending hemodialysis facilities. This study aimed to clarify how dialysis patients utilize the services covered by Japan's public long-term care insurance (LTCI) system. This cross-sectional study was based on LTCI data of March 31, 2009, the latest available data provided by Niigata City, located on the northwest coast of Honshu. Among 30,349 LTCI users in Niigata City, there were 234 dialysis patients. To clarify the characteristics of the dialysis patients, we compared the utilization of LTCI services between the dialysis patients (234 users) and randomly selected 765 non-dialysis users. We also calculated the annual transportation service costs per patient for dialysis patients who continued home care (home care group) and those who switched to long-term hospital care at LTCI care levels 4 and 5 (hospital admission group). These care levels indicate difficulty in walking or maintaining a sitting posture without assistance. The dialysis group more frequently utilized home care and equipment services, such as renting or purchasing care-support products and support for home equipment repair, and utilized facility services and short-stay services (respite care) less frequently (both p < 0.001). Cost per patient was higher in the home care group than in the hospital admission group, because the transportation services for dialysis patients at care levels 4 and 5 involve higher costs. These findings indicate that LTCI services usable for dialysis patients were limited. Therefore, instead of merely subsidizing transportation expenses, transportation services must be improved. PMID:25891160

  11. Potential benefits of relationship continuity in patient care.

    PubMed

    Williams, Jenny

    Continuity of care, in the author's opinion, is synonymous with quality care. The benefits of developing relationship continuity are highlighted as beneficial to patient, department, trust and the NHS. An in-house audit revealed that the care provided in the author's stoma care department was fragmented and how a change in strategy was required to bring about the necessary changes. This paper explores the benefits of patient/relationship continuity and outlines the changes made for over 250 new ostomy patients annually. PMID:24642770

  12. Barriers to excellent end-of-life care for patients with dementia.

    PubMed

    Sachs, Greg A; Shega, Joseph W; Cox-Hayley, Deon

    2004-10-01

    While great strides have been made recently in improving end-of-life care in the United States, people with dementia often die with inadequate pain control, with feeding tubes in place, and without the benefits of hospice care. In this paper, we discuss the most important and persistent challenges to providing excellent end-of-life care for patients with dementia, including dementia not being viewed as a terminal illness; the nature of the course and treatment decisions in advanced dementia; assessment and management of symptoms; the caregiver experience and bereavement; and health systems issues. We suggest approaches for overcoming these barriers in the domains of education, clinical practice, and public policy. As the population ages, general internists increasingly will be called upon to provide primary care for a growing number of patients dying with dementia. There are great opportunities to improve end-of-life care for this vulnerable and underserved population. PMID:15482560

  13. 42 CFR 413.9 - Cost related to patient care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Cost related to patient care. 413.9 Section 413.9... PROGRAM PRINCIPLES OF REASONABLE COST REIMBURSEMENT; PAYMENT FOR END-STAGE RENAL DISEASE SERVICES... Rules § 413.9 Cost related to patient care. (a) Principle. All payments to providers of services must...

  14. 42 CFR 413.9 - Cost related to patient care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cost related to patient care. 413.9 Section 413.9... PROGRAM PRINCIPLES OF REASONABLE COST REIMBURSEMENT; PAYMENT FOR END-STAGE RENAL DISEASE SERVICES... Rules § 413.9 Cost related to patient care. (a) Principle. All payments to providers of services must...

  15. Patient-Centered Electroconvulsive Therapy Care: A Call to Action.

    PubMed

    Coffey, M Justin; Coffey, C Edward

    2016-06-01

    We present our experience applying the IOM's "10 Simple Rules" to our ECT Service at a major teaching hospital in order to achieve patient-centered care. We encourage all ECT providers to partner with their patients in engaging family members and significant others in each aspect of ECT care, especially the ECT treatment itself. PMID:26252555

  16. Use of Care Paths to Improve Patient Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Suzann K.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this special issue of Physical & Occupational Therapy in Pediatrics is to present an evidence-based system to guide the physical therapy management of patients in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU). Two systematic guides to patient management will be presented. The first is a care path intended primarily for use by physical…

  17. A patient-centered care ethics analysis model for rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Hunt, Matthew R; Ells, Carolyn

    2013-09-01

    There exists a paucity of ethics resources tailored to rehabilitation. To help fill this ethics resource gap, the authors developed an ethics analysis model specifically for use in rehabilitation care. The Patient-Centered Care Ethics Analysis Model for Rehabilitation is a process model to guide careful moral reasoning for particularly complex or challenging matters in rehabilitation. The Patient-Centered Care Ethics Analysis Model for Rehabilitation was developed over several iterations, with feedback at different stages from rehabilitation professionals and bioethics experts. Development of the model was explicitly informed by the theoretical grounding of patient-centered care and the context of rehabilitation, including the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health. Being patient centered, the model encourages (1) shared control of consultations, decisions about interventions, and management of the health problems with the patient and (2) understanding the patient as a whole person who has individual preferences situated within social contexts. Although the major process headings of the Patient-Centered Care Ethics Analysis Model for Rehabilitation resemble typical ethical decision-making and problem-solving models, the probes under those headings direct attention to considerations relevant to rehabilitation care. The Patient-Centered Care Ethics Analysis Model for Rehabilitation is a suitable tool for rehabilitation professionals to use (in real time, for retrospective review, and for training purposes) to help arrive at ethical outcomes. PMID:23636083

  18. 21 CFR 870.5050 - Patient care suction apparatus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Patient care suction apparatus. 870.5050 Section 870.5050 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... suction apparatus. (a) Identification. A patient care suction apparatus is a device used with...

  19. 21 CFR 870.5050 - Patient care suction apparatus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Patient care suction apparatus. 870.5050 Section 870.5050 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... suction apparatus. (a) Identification. A patient care suction apparatus is a device used with...

  20. Advance directives in action in a regional palliative care service: "road testing" the provisions of the Medical Treatment Act 1988 (VIC).

    PubMed

    Brown, Margaret; Fisher, John W; Brumley, David J; Ashby, Michael A; Milliken, Jan

    2005-11-01

    In order to explore the usefulness and acceptability of the provisions of the Medical Treatment Act 1988 (Vic) for palliative care patients in a rural region in Victoria, Australia, between July and December 2004 patients were given information explaining the Act and the opportunity to discuss it with the research officer. Grounded theory methodology was used to evaluate client responses. Findings suggested that palliative care patients are willing to engage in advance care planning but they have to be well enough and need skilled, practical, face-to-face assistance to complete the required legal forms. Written materials alone are not adequate, but provide the opportunity for medical staff to have conversations about death and dying. Doctors and nurses should understand the provisions of the Act to assist patients and families. It is recommended that advance care planning, appropriate to the jurisdiction, be an integral part of the palliative care assessment process. PMID:16304759

  1. Palliative care for patients with non-malignant respiratory disease.

    PubMed

    McVeigh, Clare

    2015-05-01

    Non-malignant respiratory disease is a chronic life-limiting condition that requires holistic palliative care. Patients with non-malignant respiratory disease have a range of biopsychosocial and spiritual needs, which healthcare professionals should recognise and manage effectively. Healthcare professionals have an important role in enabling the delivery of effective palliative care to this group of patients and their carers, and in recognising the many factors that may impede delivery of palliative care. PMID:25942985

  2. Improving organizational climate for excellence in patient care.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Edwin

    2013-01-01

    Managers in health care organizations today are expected to achieve higher-quality patient care at a lower cost. Developing and maintaining a positive organizational climate can help improve motivation and foster higher employee performance. In turn, this will help the organization deliver better patient care at a lower cost. This article offers metrics for assessing organizational climate, analyzes barriers to a positive climate, and explores strategies that managers can use to build the type of climate that fosters high performance. PMID:23903945

  3. The influence of "quiet time" for patients in critical care.

    PubMed

    Maidl, Carolyn A; Leske, Jane S; Garcia, Annette E

    2014-10-01

    The primary aim was to examine the influence of "quiet time" in critical care. A dual-unit, nonrandomized, uncontrolled trial of a quiet time (QT) protocol was completed. A sample of adult patients from the Neurosciences Intensive Care Unit (NICU) and Cardiovascular Intensive Care Unit (CVICU) participated. Environmental stressors were reduced and patient rest promoted prior to QT. One hundred twenty-nine patients participated in 205 QTs. A one-way, repeated measure analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) was calculated comparing Richards-Campbell Sleep Questionnaire scores, pain and anxiety over three consecutive QTs. No significant statistical effect was found. However, patients rated sleep higher and anxiety levels decreased over consecutive QTs. Ninety-three percent of patients reported QT mattered to them. The combined efforts of nursing, medicine, and ancillary staff are necessary to foster periods of uninterrupted rest, thereby optimizing patient care. Further research is needed to determine if successive QTs positively influence patient outcomes. PMID:23847172

  4. Health care professional development: Working as a team to improve patient care

    PubMed Central

    Babiker, Amir; El Husseini, Maha; Al Nemri, Abdurrahman; Al Frayh, Abdurrahman; Al Juryyan, Nasir; Faki, Mohamed O; Assiri, Asaad; Al Saadi, Muslim; Shaikh, Farheen; Al Zamil, Fahad

    2014-01-01

    In delivering health care, an effective teamwork can immediately and positively affect patient safety and outcome. The need for effective teams is increasing due to increasing co-morbidities and increasing complexity of specialization of care. Time has gone when a doctor or a dentist or any other health practitioner in whatsoever health organization would be able to solely deliver a quality care that satisfies his or her patients. The evolution in health care and a global demand for quality patient care necessitate a parallel health care professional development with a great focus on patient centred teamwork approach. This can only be achieved by placing the patient in the centre of care and through sharing a wide based culture of values and principles. This will help forming and developing an effective team able to deliver exceptional care to the patients. Aiming towards this goal, motivation of team members should be backed by strategies and practical skills in order to achieve goals and overcome challenges. This article highlights values and principles of working as a team and principles and provides team players with a practical approach to deliver quality patient care. PMID:27493399

  5. Hypertensive patients in primary health care: access, connection and care involved in spontaneous demands.

    PubMed

    Girão, Ana Lívia Araújo; Freitas, Consuelo Helena Aires de

    2016-06-01

    Objective To assess the impacts of inclusion of care for spontaneous demands in the treatment of hypertensive patients in primary health care. Methods Third generation qualitative assessment survey conducted with 16 workers in a Primary Care Health Unit (PHCU) of the city of Fortaleza, state of Ceara, in the period between July and September of 2015. To collect data, systematic field observation and semi-structured interviews were used, and the stages of thematic content analysis were adopted for data analysis. Results Participants revealed that access, connection and care are fundamental to the treatment of hypertension. However, they said that the introduction of free access for spontaneous demands compromised the flow of care in the hypertension programs. Conclusion A dichotomy between the practice of care recommended by health policies and the one existing in the reality of PHCUs was shown, causing evident losses to the care of hypertensive patients in primary care. PMID:27253602

  6. HIV Care and Treatment Beliefs among Patients Initiating Antiretroviral Treatment (ART) in Oromia, Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Tymejczyk, Olga; Hoffman, Susie; Kulkarni, Sarah Gorrell; Gadisa, Tsigereda; Lahuerta, Maria; Remien, Robert H; Elul, Batya; El-Sadr, Wafaa; Melaku, Zenebe; Nash, Denis

    2016-05-01

    To better understand patient beliefs, which may influence adherence to HIV care and treatment, we examined three dimensions of beliefs among Ethiopian adults (n = 1177) initiating antiretroviral therapy (ART). Beliefs about benefits of ART/HIV clinical care were largely accurate, but few patients believed in the ability of ART to prevent sexual transmission and many thought Holy Water could cure HIV. Factors associated with lower odds of accurate beliefs included advanced HIV, lack of formal education, and Muslim religion (benefits of ART/clinical care); secondary or university education and more clinic visits (ART to prevent sexual transmission); and pregnancy and Orthodox Christian religion (Holy Water). Assessment of patient beliefs may help providers identify areas needing reinforcement. In this setting, counselors also need to stress the benefits of ART as prevention and that Holy Water should not be used to the exclusion of HIV care and ART. PMID:26346333

  7. Responding to vulnerability in old age: patient-centred care.

    PubMed

    Abley, Clare

    Patient-centred care is a term widely used in health policy and is familiar to staff as a principle or commonly agreed approach to care. However, nursing and multidisciplinary teams often do not agree how it should be provided for older patients. This article outlines three different models of patient-centred care applicable to the care of older people. The article also explores the concept of vulnerability in old age, highlighting differences between the perspectives of older people and those of professionals and how clinical practice can be improved to achieve a more patient-centred approach. The links between patient-centred care and vulnerability in old age are considered along with the implications of this for clinical practice. PMID:23240515

  8. Bevacizumab improves survival for patients with advanced cervical cancer

    Cancer.gov

    Patients with advanced, recurrent, or persistent cervical cancer that was not curable with standard treatment who received the drug bevacizumab (Avastin) lived 3.7 months longer than patients who did not receive the drug, according to an interim analysis

  9. Self-Care Among Patients With Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Yngman-Uhlin, Pia; Hjortswang, Henrik; Riegel, Barbara; Stjernman, Henrik; Hollman Frisman, Gunilla

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a chronic disease of unknown etiology. The disease occurs early in life and the burden of symptoms is significant. Patients need to perform self-care to handle their symptoms, but knowledge about what kind of self-care patients do is limited and these individuals need to learn how to manage the symptoms that arise. The aim of this study was to explore self-care among patients with IBD. Twenty adult patients with IBD, 25–66 years of age, were interviewed. Data were analyzed by performing a qualitative content analysis. Four categories with 10 subcategories emerged from the analysis of the interviews. The self-care patients perform consists of symptom recognition (subcategories: physiological sensations and psychological sensations), handling of symptoms (subcategories: adapting the diet, using medical treatment, stress management, and using complementary alternative medicine), planning life (subcategories: planning for when to do activities and when to refrain from activities), and seeking new options (subcategories: seeking knowledge and personal contacts). Self-care consists of symptom recognition, handling life through planning, and accommodating the existing situation with the ultimate goal of maintaining well-being. Being one step ahead facilitates living with IBD. A decision to actively participate in care of a chronic illness is a prerequisite for self-care. Healthcare professionals must consider patients' potential for and desire for self-care when giving advice on self-care activities. Doing so may help people better cope with IBD. PMID:26166423

  10. Gastrostomy tube placement in patients with advanced dementia or near end of life.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Denise Baird; Barrocas, Albert; Wesley, John R; Kliger, Gustavo; Pontes-Arruda, Alessandro; Márquez, Humberto Arenas; James, Rosemarie Lembo; Monturo, Cheryl; Lysen, Lucinda K; DiTucci, Angela

    2014-12-01

    Based on current scientific literature, gastrostomy tube (G-tube) placement or other long-term enteral access devices should be withheld in patients with advanced dementia or other near end-of-life conditions. In many instances healthcare providers are not optimally equipped to implement this recommendation at the bedside. Autonomy of the patient or surrogate decision maker should be respected, as should the patient's cultural, religious, social, and emotional value system. Clinical practice needs to address risks, burdens, benefits, and expected short-term and long-term outcomes in order to clarify practice changes. This paper recommends a change in clinical practice and care strategy based on the results of a thorough literature review and provides tools for healthcare clinicians, particularly in the hospital setting, including an algorithm for decision making and a checklist to use prior to the placement of G-tubes or other long-term enteral access devices. Integrating concepts of patient-centered care, shared decision making, health literacy, and the teach-back method of education enhances the desired outcome of ethical dilemma prevention. The goal is advance care planning and a timely consensus among health team members, family members, and significant others regarding end-of-life care for patients who do not have an advance directive and lack the capacity to advocate for themselves. Achieving this goal requires interdisciplinary collaboration and proactive planning within a supportive healthcare institution environment. PMID:25293595

  11. Differences in Parent-Provider Concordance Regarding Prognosis and Goals of Care Among Children With Advanced Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rosenberg, Abby R.; Orellana, Liliana; Kang, Tammy I.; Geyer, J. Russell; Feudtner, Chris; Dussel, Veronica; Wolfe, Joanne

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Concordance between parents of children with advanced cancer and health care providers has not been described. We aimed to describe parent-provider concordance regarding prognosis and goals of care, including differences by cancer type. Patients and Methods A total of 104 pediatric patients with recurrent or refractory cancer were enrolled at three large children's hospitals. On enrollment, their parents and providers were invited to complete a survey assessing perceived prognosis and goals of care. Patients' survival status was retrospectively abstracted from medical records. Concordance was assessed via discrepancies in perceived prognosis, κ statistics, and McNemar's test. Distribution of categorical variables and survival rates across cancer type were compared with Fisher's exact and log-rank tests, respectively. Results Data were available from 77 dyads (74% of enrolled). Parent-provider agreement regarding prognosis and goals of care was poor (κ, 0.12 to 0.30). Parents were more likely to report cure was likely (P < .001). The frequency of perceived likelihood of cure and the goal of cure varied by cancer type for both parents and providers (P < .001 to .004). Relatively optimistic responses were more common among parents and providers of patients with hematologic malignancies, although there were no differences in survival. Conclusion Parent-provider concordance regarding prognosis and goals in advanced pediatric cancer is generally poor. Perceptions of prognosis and goals of care vary by cancer type. Understanding these differences may inform parent-provider communication and decision making. PMID:25024073

  12. Point-of-Care Technologies for the Advancement of Precision Medicine in Heart, Lung, Blood, and Sleep Disorders.

    PubMed

    Bigelow, Mary Emma Gorham; Jamieson, Brian G; Chui, Chi On; Mao, Yufei; Shin, Kyeong-Sik; Huang, Tony Jun; Huang, Po-Hsun; Ren, Liqiang; Adhikari, Bishow; Chen, Jue; Iturriaga, Erin

    2016-01-01

    The commercialization of new point of care technologies holds great potential in facilitating and advancing precision medicine in heart, lung, blood, and sleep (HLBS) disorders. The delivery of individually tailored health care to a patient depends on how well that patient's health condition can be interrogated and monitored. Point of care technologies may enable access to rapid and cost-effective interrogation of a patient's health condition in near real time. Currently, physiological data are largely limited to single-time-point collection at the hospital or clinic, whereas critical information on some conditions must be collected in the home, when symptoms occur, or at regular intervals over time. A variety of HLBS disorders are highly dependent on transient variables, such as patient activity level, environment, time of day, and so on. Consequently, the National Heart Lung and Blood Institute sponsored a request for applications to support the development and commercialization of novel point-of-care technologies through small businesses (RFA-HL-14-011 and RFA-HL-14-017). Three of the supported research projects are described to highlight particular point-of-care needs for HLBS disorders and the breadth of emerging technologies. While significant obstacles remain to the commercialization of such technologies, these advancements will be required to achieve precision medicine. PMID:27602308

  13. Education and Advance Care Planning in Nursing Homes: The Impact of Ownership Type.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Leslie C.; Bradley, Elizabeth H.

    1998-01-01

    A study of 25 nonprofit and 87 for-profit nursing homes showed both types likely to offer education on advance care planning. However, nonprofits were more likely to have ongoing discussions that covered more than life support decisions and to have ethics committees to support advance care planning. (SK)

  14. Health Care Providers and Dying Patients: Critical Issues in Terminal Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benoliel, Jeanne Quint

    1988-01-01

    Identifies three major areas of concern in relationship between health care providers and dying patients: (1) nature of difficulties and stresses associated with terminal care; (2) education of providers for work; and (3) influence of organizational structure and institutionalized values on services for dying patients and families. Reviews…

  15. Five Year Experience with Collaborative Care of Opioid Addicted Patients using Buprenorphine in Primary Care

    PubMed Central

    Alford, Daniel P.; LaBelle, Colleen T.; Kretsch, Natalie; Bergeron, Alexis; Winter, Michael; Botticelli, Michael; Samet, Jeffrey H.

    2010-01-01

    Background Opioid addiction is a chronic disease treatable in primary care settings with buprenorphine, but this treatment remains underutilized. We describe a collaborative care model for managing opioid addiction with buprenorphine. Methods This is a cohort study of patients treated for opioid addiction utilizing collaborative care between nurse care managers and generalist physicians in an urban academic primary care practice over 5 years. We examine patient characteristics, 12-month treatment success (i.e., retention or taper after 6 months), and predictors of successful outcomes. Results From 2003 to 2008, 408 patients with opioid addiction were treated with buprenorphine. Twenty-six patients were excluded from analysis as they left treatment due to preexisting legal or medical conditions or a need for transfer to another buprenorphine program. At 12 months 51% of patients (196/382) underwent successful treatment. Of patients remaining in treatment at 3-, 6-, 9- and 12 months, 93% were no longer using illicit opioids or cocaine based on urine drug tests. On admission, patients who were older, employed, and used illicit buprenorphine had significantly higher odds of treatment success; those of African American or Hispanic race had significantly lower odds of treatment success. These outcomes were achieved with a model that facilitated physician involvement. Conclusions Collaborative care with nurse care managers in an urban primary care practice is an alternative and successful method of service delivery for the majority of patients with opioid addiction while effectively utilizing the time of physicians prescribing buprenorphine. PMID:21403039

  16. Patient-centered care: the key to cultural competence.

    PubMed

    Epner, D E; Baile, W F

    2012-04-01

    Much of the early literature on 'cultural competence' focuses on the 'categorical' or 'multicultural' approach, in which providers learn relevant attitudes, values, beliefs, and behaviors of certain cultural groups. In essence, this involves learning key 'dos and don'ts' for each group. Literature and educational materials of this kind focus on broad ethnic, racial, religious, or national groups, such as 'African American', 'Hispanic', or 'Asian'. The problem with this categorical or 'list of traits' approach to clinical cultural competence is that culture is multidimensional and dynamic. Culture comprises multiple variables, affecting all aspects of experience. Cultural processes frequently differ within the same ethnic or social group because of differences in age cohort, gender, political association, class, religion, ethnicity, and even personality. Culture is therefore a very elusive and nebulous concept, like art. The multicultural approach to cultural competence results in stereotypical thinking rather than clinical competence. A newer, cross cultural approach to culturally competent clinical practice focuses on foundational communication skills, awareness of cross-cutting cultural and social issues, and health beliefs that are present in all cultures. We can think of these as universal human beliefs, needs, and traits. This patient centered approach relies on identifying and negotiating different styles of communication, decision-making preferences, roles of family, sexual and gender issues, and issues of mistrust, prejudice, and racism, among other factors. In the current paper, we describe 'cultural' challenges that arise in the care of four patients from disparate cultures, each of whom has advanced colon cancer that is no longer responding to chemotherapy. We then illustrate how to apply principles of patient centered care to these challenges. PMID:22628414

  17. Exploring uncertainty in advance care planning in African Americans: does low health literacy influence decision making preference at end of life.

    PubMed

    Melhado, Lolita; Bushy, Angeline

    2011-11-01

    African Americans over 65 represent 3.5 of the 35.6 million Americans. Morbidity and mortality rates are highest among this group; associated with lack of resources and awareness of health problems. But health needs are the same at end of life, yet care is less than optimal. African Americans are less likely to have advance directives nonetheless desire communication, information, respect, and a trusting doctor-patient relationship. Low health literacy may contribute to this disparity. This scholarly review examines the health literacy in advance care planning and refines concepts of uncertainty in illness theory deriving a model for advance care planning in African Americans. PMID:21398263

  18. Integrating Palliative Care into Primary Care.

    PubMed

    Gorman, Rosemary D

    2016-09-01

    Improved quality of life, care consistent with patient goals of care, and decreased health care spending are benefits of palliative care. Palliative care is appropriate for anyone with a serious illness. Advances in technology and pharmaceuticals have resulted in increasing numbers of seriously ill individuals, many with a high symptom burden. The numbers of individuals who could benefit from palliative care far outweighs the number of palliative care specialists. To integrate palliative care into primary care it is essential that resources are available to improve generalist palliative care skills, identify appropriate patients and refer complex patients to specialist palliative care providers. PMID:27497014

  19. Advancing asthma care: the glass is only half full!!

    PubMed Central

    Szefler, Stanley J.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Over the past 20 years there has been a concerted effort in the United States to reduce morbidity related to chronic disease including asthma. Attention was initially directed towards asthma in response to the recognition that asthma mortality was increasing and that the burden of disease was significant. These efforts to address asthma mortality led to many new initiatives to develop clinical practice guidelines, implement the asthma guidelines into clinical practice, conduct research to fill the gaps in the guidelines, and to continuously revise the asthma guidelines as more information became available. An assessment of our progress shows significant accomplishments in relation to reducing asthma mortality and hospitalizations. Consequently, we are now at a crossroads in asthma care. Although we have recognized some remarkable accomplishments in reducing asthma mortality and morbidity, the availability of new tools to monitor disease activity, including biomarkers and epigenetic markers, along with information technology systems to monitor asthma control hold some promise in identifying gaps in disease management. These advances should prompt the evolution of new strategies and new treatments to further reduce disease burden. It now becomes imperative to continue a focus on ways to further reduce the burden of asthma and prevent its onset. PMID:21798579

  20. Advanced Basal cell carcinoma in a patient with schizoaffective disorder: constraints and management.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Elise J; Golas, Liliya; Martel, Joseph R; Martel, James B

    2013-01-01

    The approach used by the authors for managing a patient with a schizoaffective disorder and advanced basal cell carcinoma involving the eyelids, orbit, and face is presented. Complexities included the advanced nature of the disease, neglect of the patient's condition due to schizoaffective disorder, the difficulty of obtaining informed consent, the required aggressive surgical intervention, reconstruction, and the necessary management during the postsurgical period. A multidisciplinary team approach with psychiatry, ophthalmology, ear, nose, and throat, plastic surgery, radiation oncology, oncology, legal, and bioethics specialties is required in patients with cognitive disabilities. Curative treatment requires complete excision, reconstruction, and proper postoperative care, which can be prohibitive in a schizophrenic patient from a surgical and ethical perspective. Staging of this condition after proper informed consent with biopsy, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging is presented. The options for management are discussed, including surgical intervention and palliative care. PMID:23235512

  1. Promoting patient-centred fundamental care in acute healthcare systems.

    PubMed

    Feo, Rebecca; Kitson, Alison

    2016-05-01

    Meeting patients' fundamental care needs is essential for optimal safety and recovery and positive experiences within any healthcare setting. There is growing international evidence, however, that these fundamentals are often poorly executed in acute care settings, resulting in patient safety threats, poorer and costly care outcomes, and dehumanising experiences for patients and families. Whilst care standards and policy initiatives are attempting to address these issues, their impact has been limited. This discussion paper explores, through a series of propositions, why fundamental care can be overlooked in sophisticated, high technology acute care settings. We argue that the central problem lies in the invisibility and subsequent devaluing of fundamental care. Such care is perceived to involve simple tasks that require little skill to execute and have minimal impact on patient outcomes. The propositions explore the potential origins of this prevailing perception, focusing upon the impact of the biomedical model, the consequences of managerial approaches that drive healthcare cultures, and the devaluing of fundamental care by nurses themselves. These multiple sources of invisibility and devaluing surrounding fundamental care have rendered the concept underdeveloped and misunderstood both conceptually and theoretically. Likewise, there remains minimal role clarification around who should be responsible for and deliver such care, and a dearth of empirical evidence and evidence-based metrics. In explicating these propositions, we argue that key to transforming the delivery of acute healthcare is a substantial shift in the conceptualisation of fundamental care. The propositions present a cogent argument that counters the prevailing perception that fundamental care is basic and does not require systematic investigation. We conclude by calling for the explicit valuing and embedding of fundamental care in healthcare education, research, practice and policy. Without this

  2. Improving the care of cancer patients: holistic needs assessment.

    PubMed

    Young, Jenny; Cund, Audrey; Renshaw, Marian; Quigley, Angela; Snowden, Austyn

    This discussion paper presents a review of holistic needs assessments (HNAs) in the care of patients with cancer. HNAs entail a structured review of patient needs as articulated by the patient. This discussion then leads to a care plan grounded in issues pertinent to that patient. Despite policy guidance advocating its use, there are barriers to overcome in order to integrate HNAs into routine care. This article discusses what role communication skills and clinician confidence may have on the use of HNAs in practice, and suggests a strategy to support HNAs becoming the norm. PMID:25723367

  3. Patient safety in primary care dentistry: where are we now?

    PubMed

    Bailey, E; Tickle, M; Campbell, S

    2014-10-01

    In contemporary healthcare settings, ensuring patient safety must be an underlying principal through which systems, teams, individuals and environments work in tandem to strive for. The adoption of a culture in the NHS where patient safety is given greater priority is key to improvement. Recent events at Mid-Staffordshire hospitals among others have brought patient safety into the minds of the public and it increasingly demands attention from clinicians, the press and governments. However, much of the work into patient safety has been completed in the secondary care field with very little work completed in primary care settings. In primary care dentistry, improving patient safety is a relatively new concept with a distinct lack of evidence base. In this article, we discuss what patient safety is and debate its relevance to primary care dentistry. We also look at previous work completed in this field and make recommendations for future work to address the current lack of research. PMID:25303580

  4. 'Palliative care': a contradiction in terms? A qualitative study of cancer patients with a Turkish or Moroccan background, their relatives and care providers

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Palliative cancer care aims to improve quality of life and ultimately quality of dying, while prolonging life is not an objective anymore when death nears. The question is, however, whether these perspectives on palliative care are congruent with the perspectives of immigrant families with a Turkish or Moroccan background. Methods A qualitative design was used as we were looking for the personal views of 'very ill' cancer patients with a Turkish or Moroccan background, their family members and their Dutch care providers. We interviewed 83 people, involved in 33 cases to obtain information about their views, values and norms on 'good care'. Results The main concerns about 'good care' expressed by Turkish and Moroccan families were: maximum treatment and curative care until the end of their lives, never having hope taken away, devoted care by their families, avoiding shameful situations, dying with a clear mind and being buried in their own country. Their views conflict, to some extent, with the dominant principles in palliative care, for example, the emphasis on quality of life and advanced care planning, which includes discussing diagnosis and prognosis with the patient. Conclusions Patients and their families with a Turkish or Moroccan background often have different ideas about 'good care' than their Dutch care providers. As many of them are aiming at cure until the end of life, they find 'good palliative care' a contradiction in terms. PMID:20831777

  5. Care Coordination for the Chronically Ill: Understanding the Patient's Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Maeng, Daniel D; Martsolf, Grant R; Scanlon, Dennis P; Christianson, Jon B

    2012-01-01

    Objective To identify factors associated with perception of care coordination problems among chronically ill patients. Methods Patient-level data were obtained from a random-digit dial telephone survey of adults with chronic conditions. The survey measured respondents' self-report of care coordination problems and level of patient activation, using the Patient Activation Measure (PAM-13). Logistic regression was used to assess association between respondents' self-report of care coordination problems and a set of patient characteristics. Results Respondents in the highest activation stage had roughly 30–40 percent lower odds of reporting care coordination problems compared to those in the lowest stage (p < .01). Respondents with multiple chronic conditions were significantly more likely to report coordination problems than those with hypertension only. Respondents' race/ethnicity, employment, insurance status, income, and length of illness were not significantly associated with self-reported care coordination problems. Conclusion We conclude that patient activation and complexity of chronic illness are strongly associated with patients' self-report of care coordination problems. Developing targeted strategies to improve care coordination around these patient characteristics may be an effective way to address the issue. PMID:22985032

  6. Patient stress in intensive care: comparison between a coronary care unit and a general postoperative unit

    PubMed Central

    Dias, Douglas de Sá; Resende, Mariane Vanessa; Diniz, Gisele do Carmo Leite Machado

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate and compare stressors identified by patients of a coronary intensive care unit with those perceived by patients of a general postoperative intensive care unit. Methods This cross-sectional and descriptive study was conducted in the coronary intensive care and general postoperative intensive care units of a private hospital. In total, 60 patients participated in the study, 30 in each intensive care unit. The stressor scale was used in the intensive care units to identify the stressors. The mean score of each item of the scale was calculated followed by the total stress score. The differences between groups were considered significant when p < 0.05. Results The mean ages of patients were 55.63 ± 13.58 years in the coronary intensive care unit and 53.60 ± 17.47 years in the general postoperative intensive care unit. For patients in the coronary intensive care unit, the main stressors were “being in pain”, “being unable to fulfill family roles” and “being bored”. For patients in the general postoperative intensive care unit, the main stressors were “being in pain”, “being unable to fulfill family roles” and “not being able to communicate”. The mean total stress scores were 104.20 ± 30.95 in the coronary intensive care unit and 116.66 ± 23.72 (p = 0.085) in the general postoperative intensive care unit. When each stressor was compared separately, significant differences were noted only between three items. “Having nurses constantly doing things around your bed” was more stressful to the patients in the general postoperative intensive care unit than to those in the coronary intensive care unit (p = 0.013). Conversely, “hearing unfamiliar sounds and noises” and “hearing people talk about you” were the most stressful items for the patients in the coronary intensive care unit (p = 0.046 and 0.005, respectively). Conclusion The perception of major stressors and the total stress score were similar between patients

  7. The palliative care needs of ethnic minority patients: staff perspectives.

    PubMed

    Diver, Fiona; Molassiotis, Alexander; Weeks, Les

    2003-08-01

    The aim of this study was to assess palliative care staff's perceptions of multicultural care provision and explore the barriers and facilitators to culturally sensitive care. Qualitative semi-structured interviews with five palliative care staff were conducted. Staff showed awareness of inter-cultural diversity and the importance of individualized care. It also became apparent that staff did not possess ethnocentric attitudes. Facilitators of multicultural care that emerged from the data included training, learning from experience, the use of culturally specific literature and resources, and effective communication channels in the team. However, barriers were present, including limited interpreting services, and some staff and other