Science.gov

Sample records for advanced antifouling coating

  1. Transport and antifouling properties of papain-based antifouling coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peres, Rafael S.; Armelin, Elaine; Moreno-Martínez, Juan A.; Alemán, Carlos; Ferreira, Carlos A.

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this work is to study the antifouling performance and water uptake behaviour of coatings formulated with papain (an environmentally friendly pigment). Antifouling coatings have been formulated using rosin (natural resin) as matrix and papain adsorbed in activated carbon as pigment. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements were used to evaluate the behaviour of the formulated coatings in the marine environment and to calculate the apparent water coefficient of diffusion (D). FTIR and XPS analyses confirm the presence of papain adsorbed inside the activated carbon pores and the release of papain in water. Immersion tests in the Mediterranean Sea were carried out for 7 months to verify the degree of biofouling of the tested coatings. These field assays clearly indicate the excellent behaviour of papain-based antifouling coatings; the results being similar to those achieved using a commercial coating. Additionally, the EIS technique is shown to be a great tool to predict the coating diffusivity of antifouling coatings before immersion tests. Furthermore, the use of biodegradable papain as a nature-friendly antifouling agent can eliminate the negative environmental impact caused by metals and chemical biocides typically used in current commercial formulations.

  2. Industrial Market Research Report: Feasibility of commercialization of the advanced antifouling coating of Copperlok, Inc

    SciTech Connect

    Gormley, G.J.

    1990-10-01

    The Copperlok antifouling process was designed to prevent marine growth on surfaces exposed to sea water. It is a method of bonding thermally sprayed Cu and Cu alloys onto an epoxy material containing microballoons (hollow spheres). After the epoxy cures, the surface is abraded so that the microballoons are fractured, exposing microscopic concave porosity. The sprayed material is directed to the surface, where it impregnates the pores, bridges and then welds across the surface, creating a very thin laminate of the metal materials security bonded to the bond coat and to the substrate. The Copperlok process laminates an approximate layer of Cu-Ni alloy 8 mils thick with an expected active life of 15--20 y. This report addresses the perceived acceptability of the process in several different marketplaces with the hope of directing the invention to the most receptive consumer group. The opinion surveys of the recreational marine industry were limited to the three coastal areas of the Atlantic, Gulf, and Pacific.

  3. Industrial Market Research Report: Feasibility of commercialization of the advanced antifouling coating of Copperlok, Inc.

    SciTech Connect

    Gormley, G.J.

    1990-10-01

    The Copperlok antifouling process was designed to prevent marine growth on surfaces exposed to sea water. It is a method of bonding thermally sprayed Cu and Cu alloys onto an epoxy material containing microballoons (hollow spheres). After the epoxy cures, the surface is abraded so that the microballoons are fractured, exposing microscopic concave porosity. The sprayed material is directed to the surface, where it impregnates the pores, bridges and then welds across the surface, creating a very thin laminate of the metal materials security bonded to the bond coat and to the substrate. The Copperlok process laminates an approximate layer of Cu-Ni alloy 8 mils thick with an expected active life of 15--20 y. This report addresses the perceived acceptability of the process in several different marketplaces with the hope of directing the invention to the most receptive consumer group. The opinion surveys of the recreational marine industry were limited to the three coastal areas of the Atlantic, Gulf, and Pacific.

  4. Switchable antifouling coatings and uses thereof

    DOEpatents

    Denton, Michele L. Baca; Dirk, Shawn M.; Johnson, Ross Stefan

    2017-02-28

    The present invention relates to antifouling coatings capable of being switched by using heat or ultraviolet light. Prior to switching, the coating includes an onium cation component having antimicrobial and antibacterial properties. Upon switching, the coating is converted to a conjugated polymer state, and the cationic component is released with any adsorbed biofilm layer. Thus, the coatings herein have switchable and releasable properties. Methods of making and using such coatings are also described.

  5. Development of Polymeric Coatings for Antifouling Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toumayan, Edward Philip

    Fouling, or the deposition of unwanted material onto a surface, is a serious problem that can impair the function of submerged structures, such as marine-going vessels and underwater equipment. Water filtration membranes are particularly susceptible to fouling due to their microstructure and high water pressure operating conditions. For this reason, there has been considerable interest in developing fouling-resistant, or "antifouling" coatings for membranes, specifically coatings that mitigate fouling propensity while maintain high water flux. Polymer coatings have garnered significant interest in antifouling literature, due to their synthetic versatility and variety, and their promising resistance to a wide range of foulants. However, antifouling research has yet to establish a consistent framework for polymer coating synthesis and fouling evaluation, making it difficult or impossible to compare previously established methodologies. To this end, this work establishes a standardized methodology for synthesizing and evaluating polymer antifouling coatings. Specifically, antifouling coatings are synthesized using a grafting-from polymerization and fouling propensity is evaluated by quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D). Using this framework, a number of different surface functionalization strategies are compared, including grafting-to and grafting-from polymerization. A number of different surface functionalization strategies, including grafting-to and grafting-from, were investigated and the fouling performance of these films was evaluated. Primarily, sulfobetaine methacrylate, and poly(ethylene oxide) methacrylate monomers were investigated, among others. Grafting-to, while advantageous from a characterization standpoint, was ultimately limited to low grafting densities, which did not afford a significant improvement in fouling resistance. However, the higher grafting densities achievable by grafting-from did indicate improved fouling resistance. A

  6. Antifouling properties of zinc oxide nanorod coatings.

    PubMed

    Al-Fori, Marwan; Dobretsov, Sergey; Myint, Myo Tay Zar; Dutta, Joydeep

    2014-01-01

    In laboratory experiments, the antifouling (AF) properties of zinc oxide (ZnO) nanorod coatings were investigated using the marine bacterium Acinetobacter sp. AZ4C, larvae of the bryozoan Bugula neritina and the microalga Tetraselmis sp. ZnO nanorod coatings were fabricated on microscope glass substrata by a simple hydrothermal technique using two different molar concentrations (5 and 10 mM) of zinc precursors. These coatings were tested for 5 h under artificial sunlight (1060 W m(-2) or 530 W m(-2)) and in the dark (no irradiation). In the presence of light, both the ZnO nanorod coatings significantly reduced the density of Acinetobacter sp. AZ4C and Tetraselmis sp. in comparison to the control (microscope glass substratum without a ZnO coating). High mortality and low settlement of B. neritina larvae was observed on ZnO nanorod coatings subjected to light irradiation. In darkness, neither mortality nor enhanced settlement of larvae was observed. Larvae of B. neritina were not affected by Zn(2+) ions. The AF effect of the ZnO nanorod coatings was thus attributed to the reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced by photocatalysis. It was concluded that ZnO nanorod coatings effectively prevented marine micro and macrofouling in static conditions.

  7. Bioinspired catecholic copolymers for antifouling surface coatings.

    PubMed

    Cho, Joon Hee; Shanmuganathan, Kadhiravan; Ellison, Christopher J

    2013-05-01

    We report here a synthetic approach to prepare poly(methyl methacrylate)-polydopamine diblock (PMMA-PDA) and triblock (PDA-PMMA-PDA) copolymers combining mussel-inspired catecholic oxidative chemistry and atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP). These copolymers display very good solubility in a range of organic solvents and also a broad band photo absorbance that increases with increasing PDA content in the copolymer. Spin-cast thin films of the copolymer were stable in water and showed a sharp reduction (by up to 50%) in protein adsorption compared to those of neat PMMA. Also the peak decomposition temperature of the copolymers was up to 43°C higher than neat PMMA. The enhanced solvent processability, thermal stability and low protein adsorption characteristics of this copolymer makes it attractive for variety of applications including antifouling coatings on large surfaces such as ship hulls, buoys, and wave energy converters.

  8. Mussel-inspired antifouling coatings bearing polymer loops.

    PubMed

    Li, Lin; Yan, Bin; Zhang, Ling; Tian, Yu; Zeng, Hongbo

    2015-11-11

    This work reports the preparation of antifouling coatings bearing polymer loops using a mussel-inspired ABA triblock copolymer using a simple drop coating method. With similar end graft density, the loop-bearing surfaces show a more enhanced protein-reduction performance than the brush-bearing surfaces.

  9. Quantitative fabrication, performance optimization and comparison of PEG and zwitterionic polymer antifouling coatings.

    PubMed

    Xing, Cheng-Mei; Meng, Fan-Ning; Quan, Miao; Ding, Kai; Dang, Yuan; Gong, Yong-Kuan

    2017-09-01

    A versatile fabrication and performance optimization strategy of PEG and zwitterionic polymer coatings is developed on the sensor chip of surface plasma resonance (SPR) instrument. A random copolymer bearing phosphorylcholine zwitterion and active ester side chains (PMEN) and carboxylic PEG coatings with comparable thicknesses were deposited on SPR sensor chips via amidation coupling on the precoated polydopamine (PDA) intermediate layer. The PMEN coating showed much stronger resistance to bovine serum albumin (BSA) adsorption than PEG coating at very thin thickness (∼1nm). However, the BSA resistant efficacy of PEG coating could exceed that of PMEN due to stronger steric repelling effect when the thickness increased to 1.5∼3.3nm. Interestingly, both the PEG and PMEN thick coatings (≈3.6nm) showed ultralow fouling by BSA and bovine plasma fibrinogen (Fg). Moreover, changes in the PEG end group from -OH to -COOH, protein adsorption amount could increase by 10-fold. Importantly, the optimized PMEN and PEG-OH coatings were easily duplicated on other substrates due to universal adhesion of the PDA layer, showed excellent resistance to platelet, bacteria and proteins, and no significant difference in the antifouling performances was observed. These detailed results can explain the reported discrepancy in performances between PEG and zwitterionic polymer coatings by thickness. This facile and substrate-independent coating strategy may benefit the design and manufacture of advanced antifouling biomedical devices and long circulating nanocarriers. Prevention of biofouling is one of the biggest challenges for all biomedical applications. However, it is very difficult to fabricate a highly hydrophilic antifouling coating on inert materials or large devices. In this study, PEG and zwitterion polymers, the most widely investigated polymers with best antifouling performance, are conveniently immobilized on different kinds of substrates from their aqueous solutions by

  10. Patterning and biofunctionalization of antifouling hyperbranched polyglycerol coatings.

    PubMed

    Moore, Eli; Delalat, Bahman; Vasani, Roshan; Thissen, Helmut; Voelcker, Nicolas H

    2014-07-14

    We demonstrate the patterned biofunctionalization of antifouling hyperbranched polyglycerol (HPG) coatings on silicon and glass substrates. The ultralow fouling HPG coatings afforded straightforward chemical handles for rapid bioconjugation of amine containing biomolecular species. This was achieved by sodium periodate oxidation of terminal HPG diols to yield reactive aldehyde groups. Patterned microprinting of sodium periodate and cell adhesion mediating cyclic peptides containing the RGD sequence resulted in an array of covalently immobilized bioactive signals. When incubated with mouse fibroblasts, the HPG background resisted cell attachment whereas high density cell attachment was observed on the peptide spots, resulting in high-contrast cell microarrays. We also demonstrated single-step, in situ functionalization of the HPG coatings by printing periodate and peptide concurrently. Our results demonstrate the effectiveness of antifouling and functionalized HPG graft polymer coatings and establish their use in microarray applications for the first time.

  11. Determination of Organotin Structures in Antifouling Coatings by Mossbauer Spectroscopic Techniques.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-06-24

    are related to the molecular geometry. The Mossbauer parameters for organotin polymers used in antifouling coatings and conventional coating...In characterizing the leaching properties of antifouling coatings containing organotin compounds, it has become necessary to determine the structure...formulations containing organotin compounds have been obtained. The quadrupole splitting and rho value in these cases are sensitive to structural changes which

  12. Long-lasting Antifouling Coating from Multi-Armed Polymer

    PubMed Central

    Mizrahi, Boaz; Khoo, Xiaojuan; Chaing, Homer H.; Sher, Katalina J.; Feldman, Rose G.; Lee, Jung-Jae; Irusta, Silvia; Kohane, Daniel S.

    2013-01-01

    We describe a new antifouling surface coating, based on aggregation of a short amphiphilic four-armed PEG-dopamine polymer into particles, and on surface binding by catechol chemistry. An unbroken and smooth polymeric coating layer with an average thickness of approximately 4 microns was formed on top of titanium oxide surfaces by a single step reaction. Coatings conferred excellent resistance to protein adhesion. Cell attachment was completely prevented for at least eight weeks, although the membranes themselves did not appear to be intrinsically cytotoxic. When linear PEG or four-armed PEG of higher molecular weight were used, the resulting coatings were inferior in thickness and in preventing protein adhesion. This coating method has potential applicability for biomedical devices susceptible to fouling after implantation. PMID:23855875

  13. Anti-fouling Coatings of Poly(dimethylsiloxane) Devices for Biological and Biomedical Applications.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongbin; Chiao, Mu

    Fouling initiated by nonspecific protein adsorption is a great challenge in biomedical applications, including biosensors, bioanalytical devices, and implants. Poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS), a popular material with many attractive properties for device fabrication in the biomedical field, suffers serious fouling problems from protein adsorption due to its hydrophobic nature, which limits the practical use of PDMS-based devices. Effort has been made to develop biocompatible materials for anti-fouling coatings of PDMS. In this review, typical nonfouling materials for PDMS coatings are introduced and the associated basic anti-fouling mechanisms, including the steric repulsion mechanism and the hydration layer mechanism, are described. Understanding the relationships between the characteristics of coating materials and the accompanying anti-fouling mechanisms is critical for preparing PDMS coatings with desirable anti-fouling properties.

  14. Entrapment of subtilisin in ceramic sol-gel coating for antifouling applications.

    PubMed

    Regina, Viduthalai Rasheedkhan; Søhoel, Helmer; Lokanathan, Arcot Raghupathi; Bischoff, Claus; Kingshott, Peter; Revsbech, Niels Peter; Meyer, Rikke Louise

    2012-11-01

    Enzymes with antifouling properties are of great interest in developing nontoxic antifouling coatings. A bottleneck in developing enzyme-based antifouling coatings is to immobilize the enzyme in a suitable coating matrix without compromising its activity and stability. Entrapment of enzymes in ceramics using the sol-gel method is known to have several advantages over other immobilization methods. The sol-gel method can be used to make robust coatings, and the aim of this study was to explore if sol-gel technology can be used to develop robust coatings harboring active enzymes for antifouling applications. We successfully entrapped a protease, subtilisin (Savinase, Novozymes), in a ceramic coating using a sol-gel method. The sol-gel formulation, when coated on a stainless steel surface, adhered strongly and cured at room temperature in less than 8 h. The resultant coating was smoother and less hydrophobic than stainless steel. Changes in the coating's surface structure, thickness and chemistry indicate that the coating undergoes gradual erosion in aqueous medium, which results in release of subtilisin. Subtilisin activity in the coating increased initially, and then gradually decreased. After 9 months, 13% of the initial enzyme activity remained. Compared to stainless steel, the sol-gel-coated surfaces with active subtilisin were able to reduce bacterial attachment of both Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria by 2 orders of magnitude. Together, our results demonstrate that the sol-gel method is a promising coating technology for entrapping active enzymes, presenting an interesting avenue for enzyme-based antifouling solutions.

  15. Microencapsulation of Biocides for Reduced Copper, Long-life Antifouling Coatings

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-02-01

    together with Microtek produce microencapsulated DCOIT. Laboratory facilities equipped to produce from 100g – 500kg batches of microcapsules . These...FINAL REPORT Microencapsulation of Biocides for Reduced Copper, Long-life Antifouling Coatings ESTCP Project WP-0306 FEBRUARY 2007...octyl-4-isothi azolin-3-one (DCOIT) hns been microencapsulated nnd incorporated into collUllercially relevanl AF coatings. Re•ulls demon•ll’ntt long

  16. Antibacterial and antifouling catheter coatings using surface grafted PEG-b-cationic polycarbonate diblock copolymers.

    PubMed

    Ding, Xin; Yang, Chuan; Lim, Tze Peng; Hsu, Li Yang; Engler, Amanda C; Hedrick, James L; Yang, Yi-Yan

    2012-10-01

    Intravascular catheter-associated infections (CAIs), which are normally induced by microbial adhesion and subsequent biofilm formation, are a major cause of morbidity and mortality. Therefore, strategies to prevent CAIs are in great demand. In this study, a series of diblock copolymers of PEG and cationic polycarbonate with various compositions were synthesized by metal-free organocatalytic ring-opening polymerization, and coated onto silicone rubber (a commonly used catheter material) at different concentrations via a reactive polydopamine coating. Static contact angle and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements proved the successful coating, and quartz crystal microbalance results showed that the coating thickness increased as polymer concentration increased. Methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) and methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) isolates - leading causes of intravascular CAIs - were employed to evaluate the antibacterial and antifouling activities of the polymer coatings. Polymer coatings with a hydrophobic component effectively killed planktonic MSSA and MRSA in solution and prevented their fouling on silicone rubber surface. Live/dead cell staining experiments revealed that polymer coatings with the optimal polymer composition possessed significantly higher antifouling activity than PEG coating. In addition, scanning electron microscopic studies showed that the polymer coating inhibited S. aureus biofilm formation over a period of 7 days. Furthermore, the polymer coating caused no significant hemolysis, and there was no blood protein adsorption or platelet adhesion observed. Therefore, PEG-b-cationic polycarbonates with optimal compositions are effective antifouling and antibacterial coatings for the prevention of intravascular CAIs. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. XRF measurements of tin, copper and zinc in antifouling paints coated on leisure boats.

    PubMed

    Ytreberg, Erik; Bighiu, Maria Alexandra; Lundgren, Lennart; Eklund, Britta

    2016-06-01

    Tributyltin (TBT) and other organotin compounds have been restricted for use on leisure boats since 1989 in the EU. Nonetheless, release of TBT is observed from leisure boats during hull maintenance work, such as pressure hosing. In this work, we used a handheld X-ray Fluorescence analyser (XRF) calibrated for antifouling paint matrixes to measure tin, copper and zinc in antifouling paints coated on leisure boats in Sweden. Our results show that over 10% of the leisure boats (n = 686) contain >400 μg/cm(2) of tin in their antifouling coatings. For comparison, one layer (40 μm dry film) of a TBT-paint equals ≈ 800 μg Sn/cm(2). To our knowledge, tin has never been used in other forms than organotin (OT) in antifouling paints. Thus, even though the XRF analysis does not provide any information on the speciation of tin, the high concentrations indicate that these leisure boats still have OT coatings present on their hull. On several leisure boats we performed additional XRF measurements by progressively scraping off the top coatings and analysing each underlying layer. The XRF data show that when tin is detected, it is most likely present in coatings close to the hull with several layers of other coatings on top. Thus, leaching of OT compounds from the hull into the water is presumed to be negligible. The risk for environmental impacts arises during maintenance work such as scraping, blasting and high pressure hosing activities. The data also show that many boat owners apply excessive paint layers when following paint manufacturers recommendations. Moreover, high loads of copper were detected even on boats sailing in freshwater, despite the more than 20 year old ban, which poses an environmental risk that has not been addressed until now.

  18. Bioassays and selected chemical analysis of biocide-free antifouling coatings.

    PubMed

    Watermann, B T; Daehne, B; Sievers, S; Dannenberg, R; Overbeke, J C; Klijnstra, J W; Heemken, O

    2005-09-01

    Over the years several types of biocide-free antifouling paints have entered the market. The prohibition of biocidal antifouling paints in special areas of some European countries such as Sweden, Denmark and Germany has favoured the introduction of these paints to the market. Several types of biocide-free antifouling paints were subjected to bioassays and selected chemical analysis of leachate and incorporated substances. Both non-eroding coatings (silicones, fibre coats, epoxies, polyurethane, polyvinyl) and eroding coatings (SPCs, ablative) were tested to exclude the presence of active biocides and dangerous compounds. The paints were subjected to the luminescent bacteria test and the cypris larvae settlement assay, the latter delivering information on toxicity as well as on efficacy. The following chemical analyses of selected compounds of dry-film were performed: The results of the bioassays indicated that none of the coatings analysed contained leachable biocides. Nevertheless, some products contained or leached dangerous compounds. The analyses revealed leaching of nonylphenol (up to 74.7 ng/cm2/d after 48 h) and bisphenol A (up to 2.77 ng/cm2/d after 24 h) from epoxy resins used as substitutes for antifouling paints. The heavy metal, zinc, was measured in dry paint film in quantities up to 576,000 ppm in erodable coatings, not incorporated as a biocide but to control the rate of erosion. Values for TBT in silicone elutriates were mostly below the detection limit of 0.005 mg/kg. Values for DBT ranged between <0.005 and 6.28 mg/kg, deriving from catalysts used as curing agents. Some biocide-free paints contained leachable, toxic and dangerous compounds in the dry film, some of which may act as substitutes for biocides or are incorporated as plasticizers or catalysts. Implications to environmental requirements and legislation are discussed.

  19. Multivalent anchoring and cross-linking of mussel-inspired antifouling surface coatings.

    PubMed

    Wei, Qiang; Becherer, Tobias; Mutihac, Radu-Cristian; Noeske, Paul-Ludwig Michael; Paulus, Florian; Haag, Rainer; Grunwald, Ingo

    2014-08-11

    In this work, we combine nature's amazing bioadhesive catechol with the excellent bioinert synthetic macromolecule hyperbranched polyglycerol (hPG) to prepare antifouling surfaces. hPG can be functionalized by different amounts of catechol groups for multivalent anchoring and cross-linking because of its highly branched architecture. The catecholic hPGs can be immobilized on various surfaces including metal oxides, noble metals, ceramics, and polymers via simple incubation procedures. The effect of the catechol amount on the immobilization, surface morphology, stability, and antifouling performance of the coatings was studied. Both anchoring and cross-linking interactions provided by catechols can enhance the stability of the coatings. When the catechol groups on the hPG are underrepresented, the tethering of the coating is not effective; while an overrepresentation of catechol groups leads to protein adsorption and cell adhesion. Thus, only a well-balanced amount of catechols as optimized and described in this work can supply the coatings with both good stability and antifouling ability.

  20. Bio-inspired self-cleaning PAAS hydrogel released coating for marine antifouling.

    PubMed

    Xue, Lili; Lu, Xili; Wei, Huan; Long, Ping; Xu, Jina; Zheng, Yufeng

    2014-05-01

    In this paper, an antifouling hydrogel coating of slippery hydrogel-released hydrous surface (SHRHS) with the self-cleaning ability of oil-resistance and self-regeneration characters was designed. A physical blending method of loading Sodium polyacrylate (PAAS) powder into the organic silicon resin was employed to prepare the SHRHS coating. The oil-resistance of the intact and scratch SHRHS coatings was performed by time-sequence images of washing dyed beef tallow stain away. The results showed that the SHRHS coating has the greater ability of stain removal. The concentration of Na+ ions released from PAAS hydrogel on the surface of the SHRHS coating was investigated by ion chromatograph (IC). The results revealed that the coating had the ability of self-regeneration by PAAS hydrogel continuously peeling. The biomass of two marine microalgae species, Nitzschia closterium f. minutissima and Navicula climacospheniae Booth attached on the SHRHS was investigated using UV-Visible Spectrophotometer (UV) and Scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results showed that the microalgaes attached a significantly lower numbers on the SHRHS in comparison with the organic silicon coating. In order to confirm the antifouling ability of the SHRHS coating, the field trials were carried out for 12weeks. It showed that the SHRHS may provide an effective attachment resistance to reduce biofouling.

  1. Environmentally benign sol-gel antifouling and foul-releasing coatings.

    PubMed

    Detty, Michael R; Ciriminna, Rosaria; Bright, Frank V; Pagliaro, Mario

    2014-02-18

    Biofouling on ships and boats, characterized by aquatic bacteria and small organisms attaching to the hull, is an important global issue, since over 80000 tons of antifouling paint is used annually. This biofilm, which can form in as little as 48 hours depending on water temperature, increases drag on watercraft, which greatly reduces their fuel efficiency. In addition, biofouling can lead to microbially induced corrosion (MIC) due to H2S formed by the bacteria, especially sulfate-reducing bacteria. When the International Maritime Organization (IMO) international convention banned the use of effective but environmentally damaging coatings containing tributyl tin in 2008, the development of clean and effective antifouling systems became more important than ever. New nonbiocidal coatings are now in high demand. Scientists have developed new polymers, materials, and biocides, including new elastomeric coatings that they have obtained by improving the original silicone (polydimethylsiloxane) formulation patented in 1975. However, the high cost of silicones, especially of fluoropolymer-modified silicones, has generally prevented their large-scale diffusion. In 2009, traditional antifouling coatings using cuprous oxide formulated in copolymer paints still represented 95% of the global market volume of anti-fouling paints. The sol-gel nanochemistry approach to functional materials has emerged as an attractive candidate for creating low fouling surfaces due to the unique structure and properties of silica-based coatings and of hybrid inorganic-organic silicas in particular. Sol-gel formulations easily bind to all types of surfaces, such as steel, fiberglass, aluminum, and wood. In addition, they can cure at room temperature and form thin glassy coatings that are markedly different from thick silicone elastomeric foul-releasing coatings. Good to excellent performance against biofouling, low cure temperatures, enhanced and prolonged chemical and physical stability, ease of

  2. Antifouling zwitterionic hydrogel coating improves hemocompatibility of activated carbon hemoadsorbent.

    PubMed

    Cai, Nana; Li, Qingsi; Zhang, Jiamin; Xu, Tong; Zhao, Weiqiang; Yang, Jing; Zhang, Lei

    2017-10-01

    Activated carbon has been widely used in hemoperfusion treatments. However, its performance has been significantly compromised by their poor hemocompatibility. In this work, we developed a novel antifouling adsorbent based on zwitterionic poly-carboxybetaine (PCB) hydrogel and powdered activated carbon (PAC) to improve hemocompatibility. We found this new adsorbent (PCB-PAC) was highly stable with negligible leakage of activated carbon debris. It could efficiently resist protein adsorption and avoid any hemolysis effect. The adsorption performance of PCB-PAC for methylene blue was not influenced in a single protein solution or even in 100% fetal bovine serum (FBS), in which pristine PAC lost 50% of its adsorption ability. The isotherms results showed that the adsorption process of PCB-PAC fitted the Langmuir isotherm well, indicating that the PAC particles were homogenously distributed in the PCB hydrogel matrix. Moreover, PCB-PAC could also adsorb bilirubin molecules bound to albumin in solution, while pristine PAC showed no discernible adsorption effect. Findings in this work hold great potential to significantly improve the performance and efficiency of current extracorporeal devices for removing toxins from blood directly. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Multivalent anchored and crosslinked hyperbranched polyglycerol monolayers as antifouling coating for titanium oxide surfaces.

    PubMed

    Wei, Qiang; Krysiak, Stefanie; Achazi, Katharina; Becherer, Tobias; Noeske, Paul-Ludwig Michael; Paulus, Florian; Liebe, Hendrik; Grunwald, Ingo; Dernedde, Jens; Hartwig, Andreas; Hugel, Thorsten; Haag, Rainer

    2014-10-01

    A set of new catecholic monolayer coatings was developed to improve the antifouling performance of TiO2 surfaces. To solve the problem of the weak charge-transfer interaction between a single catechol anchor and TiO2, multiple catechol groups were combined with hyperbranched polyglycerol (hPG) which is a distinct dendritic scaffold that exposes its multivalent anchor groups on the surface. Thus, multivalent catecholic hPGs can be easily prepared for surface modification. The immobilization of the compounds was monitored by quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring. Surface properties of the coatings were analyzed by water contact angle, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and atomic force microscopy. The antifouling ability and stability were investigated by protein adsorption and cell adhesion. By increasing the number of catechol groups on the hPG scaffold, the stability and surface coverage could be significantly enhanced. Moreover, the inner-layer crosslinking of the coatings by grafting and initiating vinyl groups clearly improved their long-term stability. As a result, hPG with a catecholic functional degree of 10% (hPG-Cat10) and hPG with both catecholic and vinylic functional degree of 5% (hPG-Cat5-V5) were identified as the best catecholic hPGs to prepare bioinert and stable monolayer coatings on TiO2.

  4. Antifouling Coatings Influence both Abundance and Community Structure of Colonizing Biofilms: a Case Study in the Northwestern Mediterranean Sea

    PubMed Central

    Camps, Mercedes; Barani, Aude; Gregori, Gérald; Bouchez, Agnès; Le Berre, Brigitte; Bressy, Christine; Blache, Yves

    2014-01-01

    When immersed in seawater, substrates are rapidly colonized by both micro- and macroorganisms. This process is responsible for important economic and ecological prejudices, particularly when related to ship hulls or aquaculture nets. Commercial antifouling coatings are supposed to reduce biofouling, i.e., micro- and macrofoulers. In this study, biofilms that primarily settled on seven different coatings (polyvinyl chloride [PVC], a fouling release coating [FRC], and five self-polishing copolymer coatings [SPC], including four commercial ones) were quantitatively studied, after 1 month of immersion in summer in the Toulon Bay (Northwestern Mediterranean Sea, France), by using flow cytometry (FCM), microscopy, and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis. FCM was used after a pretreatment to separate cells from the biofilm matrix, in order to determine densities of heterotrophic bacteria, picocyanobacteria, and pico- and nanoeukaryotes on these coatings. Among diatoms, the only microphytobenthic class identified by microscopy, Licmophora, Navicula, and Nitzschia were determined to be the dominant taxa. Overall, biocide-free coatings showed higher densities than all other coatings, except for one biocidal coating, whatever the group of microorganisms. Heterotrophic bacteria always showed the highest densities, and diatoms showed the lowest, but the relative abundances of these groups varied depending on the coating. In particular, the copper-free SPC failed to prevent diatom settlement, whereas the pyrithione-free SPC exhibited high picocyanobacterial density. These results highlight the interest in FCM for antifouling coating assessment as well as specific selection among microbial communities by antifouling coatings. PMID:24907329

  5. Antifouling coating of cellulose acetate thin films with polysaccharide multilayers.

    PubMed

    Mohan, Tamilselvan; Kargl, Rupert; Tradt, Karin Eva; Kulterer, Martin R; Braćić, Matej; Hribernik, Silvo; Stana-Kleinschek, Karin; Ribitsch, Volker

    2015-02-13

    In this investigation, partially deacetylated cellulose acetate (DCA) thin films were prepared and modified with hydrophilic polysaccharides with the layer-by-layer (LbL) technique. As polysaccharides, chitosan (CHI) and carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) were used. DCA thin films were manufactured by exposing spin coated cellulose acetate to potassium hydroxide solutions for various times. The deacetylation process was monitored by attenuated total reflectance-infrared spectroscopy, film thickness and static water contact angle measurements. A maximum of three bilayers was created from the alternating deposition of CHI and CMC on the DCA films under two different conditions namely constant ionic strengths and varying pH values of the CMC solutions. Precoatings of CMC at pH 2 were used as a base layer. The sequential deposition of CMC and CHI was investigated with a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation, film thickness, static water contact angle and atomic force microscopy (AFM) measurements. The versatility and applicability of the developed functional coatings was shown by removing the multilayers by rinsing with mixtures containing HCl/NaCl. The developed LbL coatings are used for studying the fouling behavior of bovine serum albumin (BSA).

  6. Advanced Multifunctional Coating

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-08-17

    and UV durability of then current chrome free TT-P-2756 SPTC • Leverage APC technology into SPTC • Coating uses same fluoropolyurethane technology...as APC currently used on C-17 • Leverage recent advances in chrome free corrosion inhibitor technology • State of the art chrome free corrosion...coat exposed metal Aluminum Base Metal Original Finish System Aged APC Topcoat Conversion Coat Chromic Acid Anodize Aluminum Cladding Original Primer

  7. Brush-like polycarbonates containing dopamine, cations, and PEG providing a broad-spectrum, antibacterial, and antifouling surface via one-step coating.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chuan; Ding, Xin; Ono, Robert J; Lee, Haeshin; Hsu, Li Yang; Tong, Yen Wah; Hedrick, James; Yang, Yi Yan

    2014-11-19

    An antibacterial and antifouling surface is obtained by simple one-step immersion of a catheter surface with brush-like polycarbonates containing pendent adhesive dopamine, antifouling polyethylene glycol (PEG), and antibacterial cations. This coating demonstrates excellent antibacterial and antifouling activities against both Gram-positive (S. aureus) and Gram-negative (E. coli) bacteria, proteins, and platelets, good stability under simulated blood-flow conditions, and no toxicity.

  8. Development of Antifouling and Bactericidal Coatings for Platelet Storage Bags Using Dopamine Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Hadjesfandiari, Narges; Weinhart, Marie; Kizhakkedathu, Jayachandran N; Haag, Rainer; Brooks, Donald E

    2017-09-29

    Platelets have a limited shelf life, due to the risk of bacterial contamination and platelet quality loss. Most platelet storage bags are made of a mixture of polyvinyl chloride with a plasticizer, denoted as pPVC. To improve biocompatibility of pPVC with platelets and to inhibit bacterial biofilm formation, an antifouling polymer coating is developed using mussel-inspired chemistry. A copolymer of N,N-dimethylacrylamide and N-(3-aminopropyl)methacrylamide hydrochloride is synthesized and coupled with catechol groups, named DA51-cat. Under mild aqueous conditions, pPVC is first equilibrated with an anchoring polydopamine layer, followed by a DA51-cat layer. Measurements show this coating decreases fibrinogen adsorption to 5% of the control surfaces. One-step coating with DA51-cat does not coat pPVC efficiently although it is sufficient for coating silicon wafers and gold substrates. The dual layer coating on platelet bags resists bacterial biofilm formation and considerably decreases platelet adhesion. A cationic antimicrobial peptide, E6, is conjugated to DA51-cat then coated on silicon wafers and introduces bactericidal activity to these surfaces. Time-of-flight second ion-mass spectroscopy is successfully applied to characterize these surfaces. pPVC is widely used in medical devices; this method provides an approach to controlling biofouling and bacterial growth on it without elaborate surface modification procedures. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Preparation of antifouling poly(vinylidene fluoride) membranes via different coating methods using a zwitterionic copolymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Wenzhong; Rajabzadeh, Saeid; Matsuyama, Hideto

    2015-12-01

    To reduce the fouling resistance of poly(vinylidene fluoride) membranes, a copolymer of 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC) and n-butyl methacrylate (BMA) [poly(MPC-co-BMA)] was coated on a membrane and into its pores from an aqueous solution using two different methods, the immersion and flow-through methods. The effects of poly(MPC-co-BMA) coating on the water flux, surface morphology, and fouling propensity of three types of commercial ultrafiltration membranes with molecular-weight cutoffs ranging from 50 to 250 kDa were investigated. The fouling resistances of modified membranes to bovine serum albumin were compared to those of the unmodified membranes. The evaluation of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy of the modified membranes confirmed that poly(MPC-co-BMA) was coated on the membrane surfaces. Although both modification methods effectively prevented protein fouling, the flow-through coating method demonstrated a better antifouling propensity. The coated copolymer stability results indicated that the coated copolymer layer on the membrane surface using both coating methods was quite stable even after ultrasonic treatment.

  10. CuSO4/H2O2-Triggered Polydopamine/Poly(sulfobetaine methacrylate) Coatings for Antifouling Membrane Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chao; Li, Hao-Nan; Du, Yong; Ma, Meng-Qi; Xu, Zhi-Kang

    2017-02-07

    Mussel-inspired polydopamine (PDA) coatings have been broadly exploited for constructing functional membrane surfaces. One-step codeposition of PDA with antifouling polymers, especially zwitterionic polymers, has been regarded as a promising strategy for fabricating antifouling membrane surfaces. However, one challenge is that the codeposition is usually a slow process over 10 h or even several days. Herein, we report that CuSO4/H2O2 is able to notably accelerate the codeposition process of PDA with poly(sulfobetaine methacrylate) (PSBMA). In our case, PSBMA is facilely anchored to the polypropylene microporous membrane (PPMM) surfaces within 1 h with the assistance of PDA because of its strong interfacial adhesion. The PDA/PSBMA-coated PPMMs show excellent surface hydrophilicity, high water permeation flux (7506 ± 528 L/m(2)·h at 0.1 MPa), and an outstanding antifouling property. Moreover, the antifouling property is maintained after the membranes are treated with acid and alkali solutions as well as organic solvents. To recap, it provides a facile, universal, and time-saving strategy for exploiting high-efficiency and durable antifouling membrane surfaces.

  11. Synthesis and evaluation of polystyrene-polybutadiene-polystyrene-dodecafluoroheptyl methacrylate/polystyrene-polybutadiene-polystyrene hybrid antifouling coating.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiang; Wang, Guoqing; Ding, Chunhua; Jiang, Hong; Wang, Peiqing

    2014-11-15

    Copolymers SBS-DFHMA and mesoporous silica SBA-15 were respectively synthesized and SBS-DFHMA were mixed with SBA-15 to prepared hybrid antifouling coatings by a spin-coater. By measuring the surface water contact angle and the attachment of Pseudomonas fluorescens, Chlorella and Diatoms, the antifouling properties of coatings were evaluated. The results shown that the surface of hybrid coatings, the water contact angle arrived 120°, were more hydrophobic than the SBS-DFHMA coatings. In terms of resistance of adhesion, low surface energy coatings of SBS-DFHMA could effectively weaken the adhesion behavior of P.fluorescens and Diatoms, but the role to Chlorella was not obvious. When 0.01 g/ml SBA-15 was added, the adhesion of three marine microorganisms all had a very significant decrease to the hybrid coatings. These indicated that the fluorinated low surface energy antifouling coatings had limitation on resisting Chlorella attaching, and the addition of SBA-15 not only enhanced the ability of resistance to adhesion but also widen the applicability to more fouling and narrowed its limitations. This surprising effect was due to micro-nano convex structure of the coatings surface caused by hybrid. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Dual-Functional Polyethylene Glycol-b-polyhexanide Surface Coating with in Vitro and in Vivo Antimicrobial and Antifouling Activities.

    PubMed

    Zhi, Zelun; Su, Yajuan; Xi, Yuewei; Tian, Liang; Xu, Miao; Wang, Qianqian; Padidan, Sara; Li, Peng; Huang, Wei

    2017-03-29

    In recent years, microbial colonization on the surface of biomedical implants/devices has become a severe threat to human health. Herein, surface-immobilized guanidine derivative block copolymers create an antimicrobial and antifouling dual-functional coating. We report the preparation of an antimicrobial and antifouling block copolymer by the conjugation of polyhexanide (PHMB) with either allyl glycidyl ether or allyloxy polyethylene glycol (APEG; MW 1200 and 2400). The allyl glycidyl ether modified PHMB (A-PHMB) and allyloxy polyethylene glycol1200/2400 modified PHMB (APEG1200/2400-PHMB) copolymers were grafted onto a silicone rubber surface as a bottlebrush-like coating, respectively, using a plasma-UV-assisted surface-initiated polymerization. Both A-PHMB and APEG1200/2400-PHMB coatings exhibited excellent broad-spectrum antimicrobial properties against Gram-negative/positive bacteria and fungi. The APEG2400-PHMB coating displayed an improved antibiofilm as well as antifouling properties and a long reusable cycle, compared with two other coatings, due to its abundant PEG blocks among those copolymers. Also, the APEG2400-PHMB-coated silicone coupons were biocompatible toward mammalian cells, as revealed by in vitro hemocompatibile and cytotoxic assays. An in vivo study showed a significant decline of Escherichia coli colonies with a 5-log reduction, indicating the APEG2400-PHMB coating surface worked effectively in the rodent subcutaneous infection model. This PHMB-based block copolymer coating is believed to be an effective strategy to prevent biomaterial-associated infections.

  13. Turbulent boundary layer measurements over flat surfaces coated by nanostructured marine antifoulings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ünal, Uğur Oral; Ünal, Burcu; Atlar, Mehmet

    2012-06-01

    Whilst recent developments of nanotechnology are being exploited by chemists and marine biologists to understand how the completely environmentally friendly foul release coatings can control marine biofouling and how they can be developed further, the understanding of the hydrodynamic performances of these new generation coatings is being overlooked. This paper aims to investigate the relative boundary layer, roughness and drag characteristics of some novel nanostructured coatings, which were developed through a multi-European and multi-disciplined collaborative research project AMBIO (2010), within the framework of turbulent flows over rough surfaces. Zero-pressure-gradient, turbulent boundary layer flow measurements were conducted over flat surfaces coated with several newly developed nanostructured antifouling paints, along with some classic reference surfaces and a state-of-the-art commercial coating, in the Emerson Cavitation Tunnel (ECT) of Newcastle University. A large flat plane test bed that included interchangeable flat test sections was used for the experiments. The boundary layer data were collected with the aid of a two-dimensional DANTEC Laser Doppler Velocimetry (LDV) system. These measurements provided the main hydrodynamic properties of the newly developed nanostructured coatings including local skin friction coefficients, roughness functions and Reynolds stresses. The tests and subsequent analysis indicated the exceptionally good frictional properties of all coatings tested, in particular, the drag benefit of some new nanostructured coatings in the Reynolds number range investigated. The rapidly decreasing roughness function trends of AKZO19 and AKZO20 as the ks^{ + } increases were remarkable along with the dissimilar roughness function character of all tested coatings to the well-known correlation curves warranting further research at higher Reynolds numbers. The wall similarity concept for the Reynolds stresses was only validated for the

  14. A review of surface roughness in antifouling coatings illustrating the importance of cutoff length.

    PubMed

    Howell, Dickon; Behrends, Brigitte

    2006-01-01

    Surface roughness (SR) can affect the hydrodynamic performance of antifouling (AF) coatings and influence the settlement behaviour of fouling larvae, which makes it an important parameter in the evaluation of novel coatings. This paper reviews the causes and consequences of SR in the shipping industry, the methodology used for measuring it, and the importance of measuring and reporting it correctly. SR is a parameter that originates from marine engineering, but has been used extensively by marine scientists to characterise novel coatings and to investigate microtopographies that might inhibit settlement behaviour. One of the integral components of the SR measurement is the use of a cutoff filter. This is a short-pass filter that lets the high wave-number components through and thus separates the waviness from the roughness. Depending on the length of this filter, roughness at different levels of magnification can be investigated. Much of the published work on SR of AF coatings makes no mention of cutoff length, so that the results cannot be compared. It is suggested that an international standard is needed and that if more researchers were aware of the significance of stating cutoff length when reporting SR, more interdisciplinary work between biologists, engineers and material scientists would be possible in this field.

  15. Anti-fouling poly(2-hydoxyethyl methacrylate) surface coatings with specific bacteria recognition capabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mrabet, Bechir; Nguyen, Minh Ngoc; Majbri, Aymen; Mahouche, Samia; Turmine, Mireille; Bakhrouf, Amina; Chehimi, Mohamed M.

    2009-08-01

    Poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate), PHEMA, brushes were prepared by surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (SI-ATRP) on silanized glass slides bearing grafted initiators. High resolution X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) highlighted the surface chemical changes of the glass slides upon silanization and surface-confined ATRP of HEMA. Particularly, the initiator sites from the silane were detected by their bromine Br3d core electron peak whilst the O/C atomic ratios and the high resolution C1s region of the glass-PHEMA hybrids are comparable to those of pure PHEMA, thus confirming that the PHEMA chains have indeed attached to the surface. The glass-PHEMA hybrids were found to behave as anti-fouling ultrathin coatings as they resisted non-specific Salmonella typhimurium bacterial adhesion. This behaviour is driven by the hydrophilic properties of the glass-PHEMA hybrids which were assessed by contact angle measurements. In contrast, after activation of PHEMA brushes by S.typhimurium antibodies through the trichlorotriazine coupling procedure, the bacteria specifically and strongly attached to the PHEMA-coated glass slides as judged from optical microscope observation.

  16. Investigation of the role of hydrophilic chain length in amphiphilic perfluoropolyether/poly(ethylene glycol) networks: towards high-performance antifouling coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yapei; Pitet, Louis M.; Finlay, John A.; Brewer, Lenora H.; Cone, Gemma; Betts, Douglas E.; Callow, Maureen E.; Callow, James A.; Wendt, Dean E.; Hillmyer, Marc A.; DeSimone, Joseph M.

    2013-03-07

    The facile preparation of amphiphilic network coatings having a hydrophobic dimethacryloxy-functionalized perfluoropolyether (PFPE-DMA; M{sub w} = 1500 g mol{sup -1}) crosslinked with hydrophilic monomethacryloxy functionalized poly(ethylene glycol) macromonomers (PEG-MA; M{sub w} = 300, 475, 1100 g mol{sup -1}), intended as non-toxic high-performance marine coatings exhibiting antifouling characteristics is demonstrated. The PFPE-DMA was found to be miscible with the PEG-MA. Photo-cured blends of these materials containing 10 wt% of PEG-MA oligomers did not swell significantly in water. PFPE-DMA crosslinked with the highest molecular weight PEG oligomer (ie PEG1100) deterred settlement (attachment) of algal cells and cypris larvae of barnacles compared to a PFPE control coating. Dynamic mechanical analysis of these networks revealed a flexible material. Preferential segregation of the PEG segments at the polymer/air interface resulted in enhanced antifouling performance. The cured amphiphilic PFPE/PEG films showed decreased advancing and receding contact angles with increasing PEG chain length. In particular, the PFPE/PEG1100 network had a much lower advancing contact angle than static contact angle, suggesting that the PEG1100 segments diffuse to the polymer/water interface quickly. The preferential interfacial aggregation of the larger PEG segments enables the coating surface to have a substantially enhanced resistance to settlement of spores of the green seaweed Ulva, cells of the diatom Navicula and cypris larvae of the barnacle Balanus amphitrite as well as low adhesion of sporelings (young plants) of Ulva, adhesion being lower than to a polydimethyl elastomer, Silastic T2.

  17. Analysis of long-term mechanical grooming on large-scale test panels coated with an antifouling and a fouling-release coating.

    PubMed

    Hearin, John; Hunsucker, Kelli Z; Swain, Geoffrey; Stephens, Abraham; Gardner, Harrison; Lieberman, Kody; Harper, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Long-term grooming tests were conducted on two large-scale test panels, one coated with a fluorosilicone fouling-release (FR) coating, and one coated with a copper based ablative antifouling (AF) coating. Mechanical grooming was performed weekly or bi-weekly using a hand operated, electrically powered, rotating brush tool. The results indicate that weekly grooming was effective at removing loose or heavy biofilm settlement from both coatings, but could not prevent the permanent establishment of low-profile tenacious biofilms. Weekly grooming was very effective at preventing macrofouling establishment on the AF coating. The effectiveness of weekly grooming at preventing macrofouling establishment on the FR coating varied seasonally. The results suggest that frequent mechanical grooming is a viable method to reduce the fouling rating of ships' hulls with minimal impact to the coating. Frequent grooming could offer significant fuel savings while reducing hull cleaning frequencies and dry dock maintenance requirements.

  18. Development of FDR-AF (Frictional Drag Reduction Anti-Fouling) Marine Coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Inwon; Park, Hyun; Chun, Ho Hwan; GCRC-SOP Team

    2013-11-01

    In this study, a novel skin-friction reducing marine paint has been developed by mixing fine powder of PEO(PolyEthyleneOxide) with SPC (Self-Polishing Copolymer) AF (Anti-Fouling) paint. The PEO is well known as one of drag reducing agent to exhibit Toms effect, the attenuation of turbulent flows by long chain polymer molecules in the near wall region. The frictional drag reduction has been implemented by injecting such polymer solutions to liquid flows. However, the injection holes have been a significant obstacle to marine application. The present PEO-containing marine paint is proposed as an alternative to realize Toms effect without any hole on the ship surface. The erosion mechanism of SPC paint resin and the subsequent dissolution of PEO enable the controlled release of PEO solution from the coating. Various tests such as towing tank drag measurement of flat plate and turbulence measurement in circulating water tunnel demonstrated over 10% frictional drag reduction compared with conventional AF paint. This work was supported by the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) grant funded by the Korea government (MSIP) through GCRC-SOP(No. 2011-0030013).

  19. Advanced Coats' disease.

    PubMed Central

    Haik, B G

    1991-01-01

    Advanced Coats' disease and retinoblastoma can both present with the triad of a retinal detachment, the appearance of a subretinal mass, and dilated retinal vessels. Thus, even the most experienced observer may not be able to differentiate these entities on ophthalmoscopic findings alone. Coats' disease is the most common reason for which eyes are enucleated with the misdiagnosis of retinoblastoma. Ultrasonography is the auxiliary diagnostic test most easily incorporated into the clinical examination, and can be utilized repeatedly without biologic tissue hazard. Ultrasonically identifiable features allowing differentiation between Coats' disease and retinoblastoma include the topography and character of retinal detachment and presence or absence of subretinal calcifications. Ultrasonography is of lesser use in poorly calcified retinoblastoma and in detecting optic nerve or extraocular extension in heavily calcified retinoblastoma. CT is perhaps the single most valuable test because of its ability to: (a) delineate intraocular morphology, (b) quantify subretinal densities, (c) identify vascularities within the subretinal space through the use of contrast enhancement, and (d) detected associated orbital or intracranial abnormalities. Optimal computed tomographic studies, however, require multiple thin slices both before and after contrast introduction and expose the child to low levels of radiation if studies are repeated periodically. MR imaging is valuable for its multiplanar imaging capabilities, its superior contrast resolution, and its ability to provide insights into the biochemical structure and composition of tissues. It is limited in its ability to detect calcium, which is the mainstay of ultrasonic and CT differentiation. Aqueous LDH and isoenzyme levels were not valuable in distinguishing between Coats' disease and retinoblastoma. The value of aqueous NSE levels in the differentiation of advanced Coats' disease and exophytic retinoblastoma deserves

  20. Antifouling coating with controllable and sustained silver release for long-term inhibition of infection and encrustation in urinary catheters.

    PubMed

    Wang, Rong; Neoh, Koon Gee; Kang, En-Tang; Tambyah, Paul Anantharajah; Chiong, Edmund

    2015-04-01

    Urinary tract infections constitute a large proportion of nosocomial infections, and the urinary catheter is the most important predisposing factor. Encrustation induced by urease-producing uropathogens like Proteus mirabilis causes further complications. In the present work, a strategy for controllable and sustained release of silver over several weeks has been developed for combating bacterial infection and encrustation in urinary devices. Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) were first immobilized on polydopamine (PDA) pre-treated silicone catheter surface and this was followed by another PDA coating. The number of AgNP-PDA bilayers could be manipulated to control the amount of silver loaded and its subsequent release. Poly(sulfobetaine methacrylate-co-acrylamide) was then grafted to provide an antifouling outer layer, and to ensure free diffusion of Ag from the surface. The micron-scale combination of an antifouling coating with AgNP-PDA bilayers reduced colonization of the urinary catheter by uropathogens by approximately two orders of magnitude. With one and two AgNP-PDA bilayers, the coated catheter could resist encrustation for 12 and 45 days, respectively, compared with approximately 6 days with the Dover™ silver-coated catheter. Such anti-infective and anti-encrustation catheters can potentially have a large impact on reducing patient morbidity and healthcare expenditure.

  1. Direct patterning of probe proteins on an antifouling PLL-g-dextran coating for reducing the background signal of fluorescent immunoassays.

    PubMed

    Egea, Amandine M C; Trévisiol, Emmanuelle; Vieu, Christophe

    2013-12-01

    The limit of detection of advanced immunoassays, biochips and micro/nano biodetection devices is impacted by the non-specific adsorption of target molecules at the sample surface. In this paper, we present a simple and versatile low cost method for generating active surfaces composed of antibodies arrays surrounded by an efficient anti-fouling layer, capable to decrease drastically the fluorescence background signal obtained after interaction with a solution to be analyzed. The technological process involves the direct micro-contact printing of the antibodies probe molecules on a pre-coated PLL-g-dextran thin layer obtained by contact printing using a flat PDMS stamp. Compared to other blocking strategies (ethanolamine blocking treatment, PLL-g-PEG incubation, PLL-g-dextran incubation, printing on a plasma-deposited PEO layer), our surface chemistry method is more efficient for reducing non-specific interactions responsible for a degraded signal/noise ratio.

  2. Studies on nano-additive for the substitution of hazardous chemical substances in antifouling coatings for the protection of ship hulls.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xiaodong; Fan, Weijie; Duan, Jizhou; Hou, Baorong

    2014-07-01

    Adhesion and growth of biofouling organisms have severe influence on the reliability, service life and environmental adaptability of marine ships. Based on the bactericidal capacity of cuprous oxide and photochemical effect of nano-additive, environment-friendly and efficient marine antifouling paints were prepared in this study. The evaluation of the antifouling paints was carried out by the laboratory method using bacteria and phytoplanktonic microorganisms as target organisms, as well as measurements with panels in shallow submergence in natural seawater. Results showed good agreement of all the tests, indicating the remarkable antifouling performance of the paints. To our knowledge, this was one of the first systematic studies on effects of nano-additive for the substitution of hazardous chemical substances in antifouling coatings for the protection of ship hulls by measurements on bacterial inhibition, algal adhesion and growth of large organisms.

  3. Sunlight-Sensitive Anti-Fouling Nanostructured TiO2 coated Cu Meshes for Ultrafast Oily Water Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Liu, HaoRan; Raza, Aikifa; Aili, Abulimiti; Lu, JinYou; AlGhaferi, Amal; Zhang, TieJun

    2016-01-01

    Nanostructured materials with desired wettability and optical property can play an important role in reducing the energy consumption of oily water treatment technologies. For effective oily water treatment, membrane materials with high strength, sunlight-sensitive anti-fouling, relative low fabrication cost, and controllable wettability are being explored. In the proposed oily water treatment approach, nanostructured TiO2-coated copper (TNS-Cu) meshes are used. These TNS-Cu meshes exhibit robust superhydrophilicity and underwater oleophobicity (high oil intrusion pressure) as well as excellent chemical and thermal stability (≈250 °C). They have demonstrated high separation efficiency (oil residue in the filtrate ≤21.3 ppm), remarkable filtration flux (≥400 kL h−1 m−2), and sunlight-sensitive anti-fouling properties. Both our theoretical analysis and experimental characterization have confirmed the enhanced light absorption property of TNS-Cu meshes in the visible region (40% of the solar spectrum) and consequently strong anti-fouling capability upon direct solar light illumination. With these features, the proposed approach promises great potential in treating produced oily wastewater from industry and daily life. PMID:27160349

  4. Sunlight-Sensitive Anti-Fouling Nanostructured TiO2 coated Cu Meshes for Ultrafast Oily Water Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Haoran; Raza, Aikifa; Aili, Abulimiti; Lu, Jinyou; Alghaferi, Amal; Zhang, Tiejun

    2016-05-01

    Nanostructured materials with desired wettability and optical property can play an important role in reducing the energy consumption of oily water treatment technologies. For effective oily water treatment, membrane materials with high strength, sunlight-sensitive anti-fouling, relative low fabrication cost, and controllable wettability are being explored. In the proposed oily water treatment approach, nanostructured TiO2-coated copper (TNS-Cu) meshes are used. These TNS-Cu meshes exhibit robust superhydrophilicity and underwater oleophobicity (high oil intrusion pressure) as well as excellent chemical and thermal stability (≈250 °C). They have demonstrated high separation efficiency (oil residue in the filtrate ≤21.3 ppm), remarkable filtration flux (≥400 kL h‑1 m‑2), and sunlight-sensitive anti-fouling properties. Both our theoretical analysis and experimental characterization have confirmed the enhanced light absorption property of TNS-Cu meshes in the visible region (40% of the solar spectrum) and consequently strong anti-fouling capability upon direct solar light illumination. With these features, the proposed approach promises great potential in treating produced oily wastewater from industry and daily life.

  5. Sunlight-Sensitive Anti-Fouling Nanostructured TiO2 coated Cu Meshes for Ultrafast Oily Water Treatment.

    PubMed

    Liu, HaoRan; Raza, Aikifa; Aili, Abulimiti; Lu, JinYou; AlGhaferi, Amal; Zhang, TieJun

    2016-05-10

    Nanostructured materials with desired wettability and optical property can play an important role in reducing the energy consumption of oily water treatment technologies. For effective oily water treatment, membrane materials with high strength, sunlight-sensitive anti-fouling, relative low fabrication cost, and controllable wettability are being explored. In the proposed oily water treatment approach, nanostructured TiO2-coated copper (TNS-Cu) meshes are used. These TNS-Cu meshes exhibit robust superhydrophilicity and underwater oleophobicity (high oil intrusion pressure) as well as excellent chemical and thermal stability (≈250 °C). They have demonstrated high separation efficiency (oil residue in the filtrate ≤21.3 ppm), remarkable filtration flux (≥400 kL h(-1 )m(-2)), and sunlight-sensitive anti-fouling properties. Both our theoretical analysis and experimental characterization have confirmed the enhanced light absorption property of TNS-Cu meshes in the visible region (40% of the solar spectrum) and consequently strong anti-fouling capability upon direct solar light illumination. With these features, the proposed approach promises great potential in treating produced oily wastewater from industry and daily life.

  6. Antifouling and Antibacterial Multifunctional Polyzwitterion/Enzyme Coating on Silicone Catheter Material Prepared by Electrostatic Layer-by-Layer Assembly.

    PubMed

    Vaterrodt, Anne; Thallinger, Barbara; Daumann, Kevin; Koch, Dereck; Guebitz, Georg M; Ulbricht, Mathias

    2016-02-09

    The formation of bacterial biofilms on indwelling medical devices generally causes high risks for adverse complications such as catheter-associated urinary tract infections. In this work, a strategy for synthesizing innovative coatings of poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) catheter material, using layer-by-layer assembly with three novel functional polymeric building blocks, is reported, i.e., an antifouling copolymer with zwitterionic and quaternary ammonium side groups, a contact biocidal derivative of that polymer with octyl groups, and the antibacterial hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) producing enzyme cellobiose dehydrogenase (CDH). CDH oxidizes oligosaccharides by transferring electrons to oxygen, resulting in the production of H2O2. The design and synthesis of random copolymers which combine segments that have antifouling properties by zwitterionic groups and can be used for electrostatically driven layer-by-layer (LbL) assembly at the same time were based on the atom-transfer radical polymerization of dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate and subsequent partial sulfobetainization with 1,3-propane sultone followed by quaternization with methyl iodide only or octyl bromide and thereafter methyl iodide. The alternating multilayer systems were formed by consecutive adsorption of the novel polycations with up to 50% zwitterionic groups and of poly(styrenesulfonate) as the polyanion. Due to its negative charge, enzyme CDH was also firmly embedded as a polyanionic layer in the multilayer system. This LbL coating procedure was first performed on prefunctionalized silicon wafers and studied in detail with ellipsometry as well as contact angle (CA) and zetapotential (ZP) measurements before it was transferred to prefunctionalized PDMS and analyzed by CA and ZP measurements as well as atomic force microscopy. The coatings comprising six layers were stable and yielded a more neutral and hydrophilic surface than did PDMS, the polycation with 50% zwitterionic groups having the largest

  7. Fabrication of FDTS-modified PDMS-ZnO nanocomposite hydrophobic coating with anti-fouling capability for corrosion protection of Q235 steel.

    PubMed

    Arukalam, Innocent O; Oguzie, Emeka E; Li, Ying

    2016-12-15

    Perfluorodecyltrichlorosilane-based poly(dimethylsiloxane)-ZnO (FDTS-based PDMS-ZnO) nanocomposite coating with anti-corrosion and anti-fouling capabilities has been prepared using a one-step fabrication technique. XPS analysis and contact angle measurements showed the fluorine content to increase, while the hydrophobicity of the coatings decreased with addition of FDTS. XRD analysis revealed existence of ZnO nanoparticles of dimensions ranging from 11.45 to 93.01nm on the surface of coatings, with the mean particle size decreasing with FDTS addition, and was confirmed by SEM and TEM observations. Interestingly, the anti-corrosion performance and mechanical properties of the coatings increased remarkably on addition of FDTS. Indeed, the observed low adhesion strength, surface energies and the outstanding anti-corrosive properties imply that the obtained coating would be useful in anti-fouling applications.

  8. The use of proactive in-water grooming to improve the performance of ship hull antifouling coatings.

    PubMed

    Tribou, Melissa; Swain, Geoffrey

    2010-01-01

    The US Navy operates a large number of ships, however, unlike most commercial vessels they typically spend long periods of time in port where they may become fouled. This study investigated the feasibility of applying light cleaning (grooming) to maintain four surfaces free from fouling. The test surfaces were an ablative copper antifouling (AF) coating, a silicone fouling release (FR) coating, a two part marine epoxy, and a solid sheet of polytetrafluoroethylene plastic. The surfaces were exposed to static immersion in seawater on the East coast of Florida for 120 days and subjected to 3, 6, 12, and 24-day grooming intervals. Pre-groomed and post-groomed fouling conditions on each test surface were assessed and the maximum required lateral forces at each grooming event were measured. The results showed that grooming prevented or reduced the development of biofilm on the ablative copper coatings. The FR coatings that were groomed at the 3- and 6-day interval remained free from fouling until exposure to severe fouling pressure, which caused the 6-day interval to develop a small amount of fouling. Both the polytetrafluoroethylene and epoxy surfaces became fouled at all grooming frequencies, but fouling was reduced for the 3-day grooming frequency. The lateral forces required to groom the surfaces, with the exception of the FR coatings, increased with time. The results demonstrated that frequent grooming can have prolonged, positive effects on the AF performance of coatings.

  9. Amphiphilic triblock copolymers with PEGylated hydrocarbon structures as environmentally friendly marine antifouling and fouling-release coatings.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhaoli; Calabrese, David R; Taylor, Warren; Finlay, John A; Callow, Maureen E; Callow, James A; Fischer, Daniel; Kramer, Edward J; Ober, Christopher K

    2014-01-01

    The ideal marine antifouling (AF)/fouling-release (FR) coating should be non-toxic, while effectively either resisting the attachment of marine organisms (AF) or significantly reducing their strength of attachment (FR). Many recent studies have shown that amphiphilic polymeric materials provide a promising solution to producing such coatings due to their surface dual functionality. In this work, poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) of different molecular weights (Mw = 350, 550) was coupled to a saturated difunctional alkyl alcohol to generate amphiphilic surfactants (PEG-hydrocarbon-OH). The resulting macromolecules were then used as side chains to covalently modify a pre-synthesized PS8 K-b-P(E/B)25 K-b-PI10 K (SEBI or K3) triblock copolymer, and the final polymers were applied to glass substrata through an established multilayer surface coating technique to prepare fouling resistant coatings. The coated surfaces were characterized with AFM, XPS and NEXAFS, and evaluated in laboratory assays with two important fouling algae, Ulva linza (a green macroalga) and Navicula incerta, a biofilm-forming diatom. The results suggest that these polymer-coated surfaces undergo surface reconstruction upon changing the contact medium (polymer/air vs polymer/water), due to the preferential interfacial aggregation of the PEG segment on the surface in water. The amphiphilic polymer-coated surfaces showed promising results as both AF and FR coatings. The sample with longer PEG chain lengths (Mw = 550 g mol(-1)) exhibited excellent properties against both algae, highlighting the importance of the chemical structures on ultimate biological performance. Besides reporting synthesis and characterization of this new type of amphiphilic surface material, this work also provides insight into the nature of PEG/hydrocarbon amphiphilic coatings, and this understanding may help in the design of future generations of fluorine-free, environmentally friendly AF/FR polymeric coatings.

  10. Advanced Coating Removal Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seibert, Jon

    2006-01-01

    An important step in the repair and protection against corrosion damage is the safe removal of the oxidation and protective coatings without further damaging the integrity of the substrate. Two such methods that are proving to be safe and effective in this task are liquid nitrogen and laser removal operations. Laser technology used for the removal of protective coatings is currently being researched and implemented in various areas of the aerospace industry. Delivering thousands of focused energy pulses, the laser ablates the coating surface by heating and dissolving the material applied to the substrate. The metal substrate will reflect the laser and redirect the energy to any remaining protective coating, thus preventing any collateral damage the substrate may suffer throughout the process. Liquid nitrogen jets are comparable to blasting with an ultra high-pressure water jet but without the residual liquid that requires collection and removal .As the liquid nitrogen reaches the surface it is transformed into gaseous nitrogen and reenters the atmosphere without any contamination to surrounding hardware. These innovative technologies simplify corrosion repair by eliminating hazardous chemicals and repetitive manual labor from the coating removal process. One very significant advantage is the reduction of particulate contamination exposure to personnel. With the removal of coatings adjacent to sensitive flight hardware, a benefit of each technique for the space program is that no contamination such as beads, water, or sanding residue is left behind when the job is finished. One primary concern is the safe removal of coatings from thin aluminum honeycomb face sheet. NASA recently conducted thermal testing on liquid nitrogen systems and found that no damage occurred on 1/6", aluminum substrates. Wright Patterson Air Force Base in conjunction with Boeing and NASA is currently testing the laser remOval technique for process qualification. Other applications of liquid

  11. Integrated antifouling and bactericidal polymer membranes through bioinspired polydopamine/poly(N-vinyl pyrrolidone) coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xianghong; Yuan, Shuaishuai; Shi, Dean; Yang, Yingkui; Jiang, Tao; Yan, Shunjie; Shi, Hengchong; Luan, Shifang; Yin, Jinghua

    2016-07-01

    Polypropylene (PP) non-woven has been widely used as wound dressing; however, the hydrophobic nature of PP can initiate bacterial attachment and subsequent biofilm formation. Herein, we propose a facile approach to functionalize PP non-woven with poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) and poly(N-vinyl pyrrolidone)-iodine complex (PVP-I). PVP and PEG were successively tethered onto PP non-woven surface via versatile bioinspired dopamine (DA) chemistry, followed by complexing iodine with PVP moieties. It was demonstrated through the field emission scanning electron microscope (SEM) and spread plate method that the as-modified PP non-woven integrated both antifouling property of PEG for suppressing bacterial adhesion, and bactericidal property of PVP-I for killing the few adherent bacteria. Meanwhile, it could greatly resist platelet and red blood cell adhesion. The integrated antifouling and bactericidal PP non-woven surfaces might have great potential in various wound dressing applications.

  12. Surface anchored metal-organic frameworks as stimulus responsive antifouling coatings.

    PubMed

    Sancet, Maria Pilar Arpa; Hanke, Maximilian; Wang, Zhengbang; Bauer, Stella; Azucena, Carlos; Arslan, Hasan K; Heinle, Marita; Gliemann, Hartmut; Wöll, Christof; Rosenhahn, Axel

    2013-12-01

    Surface-anchored, crystalline and oriented metal organic frameworks (SURMOFs) have huge potential for biological applications due to their well-defined and highly-porous structure. In this work we describe a MOF-based, fully autonomous system, which combines sensing, a specific response, and the release of an antimicrobial agent. The Cu-containing SURMOF, Cu-SURMOF 2, is stable in artificial seawater and shows stimulus-responsive anti-fouling properties against marine bacteria. When Cobetia marina adheres on the SURMOF, the framework's response is lethal to the adhering microorganism. A thorough analysis reveals that this response is induced by agents secreted from the microbes after adhesion to the substrate, and includes a release of Cu ions resulting from a degradation of the SURMOF. The stimulus-responsive antifouling effect of Cu-SURMOF 2 demonstrates the first application of Cu-SURMOF 2 as autonomous system with great potential for further microbiological and cell culture applications.

  13. Comparison between polyethylene glycol and zwitterionic polymers as antifouling coatings on wearable devices for selective antigen capture from biological tissue.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Kye J; Coffey, Jacob W; Muller, David A; Young, Paul R; Kendall, Mark A F; Thurecht, Kristofer J; Grøndahl, Lisbeth; Corrie, Simon R

    2015-12-07

    Selective capture of disease-related proteins in complex biological fluids and tissues is an important aim in developing sensitive protein biosensors for in vivo applications. Microprojection arrays are biomedical devices whose mechanical and chemical properties can be tuned to allow efficient penetration of skin, coupled with highly selective biomarker capture from the complex biological environment of skin tissue. Herein, the authors describe an improved surface modification strategy to produce amine-modified polycarbonate arrays, followed by the attachment of an antifouling poly(sulfobetaine-methacrylate) (pSBMA) polymer or a linear polyethylene glycol (PEG) polymer of comparative molecular weight and hydrodynamic radius. Using a "grafting to" approach, pSBMA and linear PEG coatings yielded comparative antifouling behavior in single protein solutions, diluted plasma, or when applied to mouse flank skin penetrating into the vascularized dermal tissue. Interestingly, the density of immobilized immunoglobulin G (IgG) or bovine serum albumin protein on pSBMA surfaces was significantly higher than that on the PEG surfaces, while the nonspecific adsorption was comparable for each protein. When incubated in buffer or plasma solutions containing dengue non-structural protein 1 (NS1), anti-NS1-IgG-coated pSBMA surfaces captured significantly more NS1 in comparison to PEG-coated devices. Similarly, when wearable microprojection arrays were applied to the skin of dengue-infected mice using the same coatings, the pSBMA-coated devices showed significantly higher capture efficiency (>2-fold increase in signal) than the PEG-coated substrates, which showed comparative signal when applied to naïve mice. In conclusion, zwitterionic pSBMA polymers (of equivalent hydrodynamic radii to PEG) allowed detection of dengue NS1 disease biomarker in a preclinical model of dengue infection, showing significantly higher signal-to-noise ratio in comparison to the PEG controls. The results of

  14. Biomimetic PEG-catecholates for stabile antifouling coatings on metal surfaces: applications on TiO2 and stainless steel.

    PubMed

    Khalil, Faiza; Franzmann, Elisa; Ramcke, Julian; Dakischew, Olga; Lips, Katrin S; Reinhardt, Alexander; Heisig, Peter; Maison, Wolfgang

    2014-05-01

    Trimeric catecholates have been designed for the stable immobilization of effector molecules on metal surfaces. The design of these catecholates followed a biomimetic approach and was inspired by natural multivalent metal binders, such as mussel adhesion proteins (MAPs) and siderophores. Three catecholates have been conjugated to central scaffolds based on adamantyl or trisalkylmethyl core structures. The resulting triscatecholates have been immobilized on TiO2 and stainless steel. In a proof of concept study we have demonstrated the high stability of the resulting nanolayers at neutral and slightly acidic pH. Furthermore, polyethylene glycol (PEG) conjugates of our triscatecholates have been synthesized and were immobilized on TiO2 and stainless steel. The PEG coated surfaces showed excellent antifouling properties upon exposure to human blood and bacteria as demonstrated by fluorescence microscopy, ellipsometry and a bacterial assay with Staphylococcus epidermidis. In addition, our PEG-triscatecholates showed no cytotoxicity against bone-marrow stem cells on TiO2.

  15. Pioneer marine biofilms on artificial surfaces including antifouling coatings immersed in two contrasting French Mediterranean coast sites.

    PubMed

    Briand, Jean-François; Djeridi, Ikram; Jamet, Dominique; Coupé, Stéphane; Bressy, Christine; Molmeret, Maëlle; Le Berre, Brigitte; Rimet, Frédéric; Bouchez, Agnès; Blache, Yves

    2012-01-01

    Marine biofilm communities that developed on artificial substrata were investigated using molecular and microscopic approaches. Polystyrene, Teflon® and four antifouling (AF) paints were immersed for 2 weeks at two contrasting sites near Toulon on the French Mediterranean coast (Toulon military harbour and the natural protected area of Porquerolles Island). Biofilms comprising bacteria and diatoms were detected on all the coatings. The population structure as well as the densities of the microorganisms differed in terms of both sites and coatings. Lower fouling densities were observed at Porquerolles Island compared to Toulon harbour. All bacterial communities (analysed by PCR-DGGE) showed related structure, controlled both by the sites and the type of substrata. Pioneer microalgal communities were dominated by the same two diatom species, viz. Licmophora gracilis and Cylindrotheca closterium, at both sites, irrespective of the substrata involved. However, the density of diatoms followed the same trend at both sites with a significant effect of all the AF coatings compared to Teflon and polystyrene.

  16. Spatio-Temporal Variations of Marine Biofilm Communities Colonizing Artificial Substrata Including Antifouling Coatings in Contrasted French Coastal Environments.

    PubMed

    Briand, Jean-François; Barani, Aude; Garnier, Cédric; Réhel, Karine; Urvois, Félix; LePoupon, Christophe; Bouchez, Agnès; Debroas, Didier; Bressy, Christine

    2017-04-03

    Surface colonization in seawater first corresponds to the selection of specific microbial biofilm communities. By coupling flow cytometry, microscopy and high throughput sequencing (HTS, 454 pyrosequencing) with artificial surfaces and environmental analyses, we intend to identify the contribution of biofilm community drivers at two contrasted French sites, one temperate and eutrophic (Lorient, Atlantic coast) and the other at a mesotrophic but highly contaminated bay (Toulon, North-Western Mediterranean Sea). Microbial communities were shaped by high temperatures, salinity and lead at Toulon by but nutrients and DOC at Lorient. Coatings including pyrithione exhibited a significant decrease of their microbial densities except for nanoeukaryotes. Clustering of communities was mainly based on the surface type and secondly the site, whereas seasons appeared of less importance. The in-depth HTS revealed that γ- and α-proteobacteria, but also Bacteroidetes, dominated highly diversified bacterial communities with a relative low β-diversity. Sensitivity to biocides released by the tested antifouling coatings could be noticed at different taxonomic levels: the percentage of Bacteroidetes overall decreased with the presence of pyrithione, whereas the α/γ-proteobacteria ratio decreased at Toulon when increased at Lorient. Small diatom cells (Amphora and Navicula spp.) dominated on all surfaces, whereas site-specific sub-dominant taxa appeared clearly more sensitive to biocides. This overall approach exhibited the critical significance of surface characteristics in biofilm community shaping.

  17. Robust, Nontoxic, Antifouling Polymer.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-02-23

    POLYMER 2 3 BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION 4 5 Field of the Invention 6 The present invention is directed to a bulk material, a coating and a process... polymer of the presently disclosed 14 invention (either as a bulk material or as a coating) has a nontoxic surface which is 15 minimally attractive to the...and 9 tin and move quickly toward the use of nontoxic antifouling compounds as soon as 10 effective substitutes become available. 11 Organic polymers

  18. In situ glass antifouling using Pt nanoparticle coating for periodic electrolysis of seawater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Yuxi; Zhao, Jin; Qiu, Ri; Zheng, Jiyong; Lin, Cunguo; Ma, Bojiang; Wang, Peng

    2015-12-01

    In situ electrochemical chlorination is a promising way to prohibit the biofouling on glass used for optical devices in seawater. To make this approach practical, a conductive glass should have low overpotential to generate Cl2, so that the electrical energy consumption, a critical issue for field application, will be low. Moreover, a long sustainability should also be taken into consideration from the application perspective. Following these criteria, we propose Pt/ITO surface to electrochemically generate Cl2, which immunizes biofouling for glass substrate. In this report, firstly, Pt nanoparticle/ITO is prepared via an electrodeposition approach. Secondly, electrocatalysis capability of Pt/ITO is elucidated, which shows the catalysis for Cl2 generation from NaCl solution and seawater has been sparked with Pt on the surface. Also, Pt/ITO is more sustainable and efficient than the bare ITO in natural seawater. Thirdly, the antifouling property is evaluated taking diatom as the target organism. Electrochemical chlorination on Pt/ITO can efficiently prevent the glass from fouling.

  19. Bubbles versus biofilms: a novel method for the removal of marine biofilms attached on antifouling coatings using an ultrasonically activated water stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salta, M.; Goodes, L. R.; Maas, B. J.; Dennington, S. P.; Secker, T. J.; Leighton, T. G.

    2016-09-01

    The accumulation of marine organisms on a range of manmade surfaces, termed biofouling, has proven to be the Achilles’ heel of the shipping industry. Current antifouling coatings, such as foul release coatings (FRCs), only partially inhibit biofouling, since biofilms remain a major issue. Mechanical ship hull cleaning is commonly employed to remove biofilms, but these methods tend to damage the antifouling coating and often do not result in full removal. Here, we report the effectiveness of biofilm removal from FRCs through a novel cleaning device that uses an ultrasonically activated stream (UAS). In this device, ultrasound enhances the cleaning properties of microbubbles in a freely flowing stream of water. The UAS was applied on two types of commercial FRCs which were covered with biofilm growth following twelve days immersion in the marine environment. Biofilm removal was quantified in terms of reduction in biovolume and surface roughness, both measured using an optical profilometer, which were then compared with similar measurements after cleaning with a non-ultrasonically activated water stream. It was found that the UAS significantly improves the cleaning capabilities of a water flow, up to the point where no detectable biofilm remained on the coating surfaces. Overall biofilm surface coverage was significantly lower on the FRC coatings cleaned with the UAS system when compared to the coatings cleaned with water or not cleaned at all. When biofilm biomass removal was investigated, the UAS system resulted in significantly lower biovolume values even when compared to the water cleaning treatment with biovolume values close to zero. Remarkably, the surface roughness of the coatings after cleaning with the UAS was found to be comparable to that of the blank, non-immersed coatings, illustrating that the UAS did not damage the coatings in the process. The data supporting this study are openly available from the University of Southampton repository at http

  20. Bioassays and field immersion tests: a comparison of the antifouling activity of copper-free poly(methacrylic)-based coatings containing tertiary amines and ammonium salt groups.

    PubMed

    Bressy, C; Hellio, C; Marechal, J P; Tanguy, B; Margaillan, A

    2010-10-01

    This paper focuses on the activity spectrum of three dimethylalkyl tertiary amines as potential active molecules and the corresponding ammonium salt-based antifouling (AF) paints. Bioassays (using marine bacteria, microalgae and barnacles) and field tests were combined to assess the AF activity of coatings. Bioassay results demonstrated that the ammonium salt-based paints did not inhibit the growth of microorganisms (except the dimethyldodecylammonium-based coatings) and that the tertiary amines were potent towards bacteria, diatoms, and barnacle larvae at non-toxic concentrations (therapeutic ratio, LC50/EC50, <1). The results from field tests indicated that the ammonium salt-based coatings inhibited the settlement of macrofouling and the dimethylhexadecylammonium-based coatings provided protection against slime in comparison with PVC blank panels. Thus, results from laboratory assays did not fully concur with the AF activity of the paints in the field trial.

  1. Antifouling coatings based on covalently cross-linked agarose film via thermal azide-alkyne cycloaddition.

    PubMed

    Xu, Li Qun; Pranantyo, Dicky; Neoh, Koon-Gee; Kang, En-Tang; Teo, Serena Lay-Ming; Fu, Guo Dong

    2016-05-01

    Coatings based on thin films of agarose-poly(ethylene glycol) (Agr-PEG) cross-linked systems are developed as environmentally-friendly and fouling-resistant marine coatings. The Agr-PEG cross-linked systems were prepared via thermal azide-alkyne cycloaddition (AAC) using azido-functionalized Agr (AgrAz) and activated alkynyl-containing poly(2-propiolamidoethyl methacrylate-co-poly(ethylene glycol)methyl ether methacrylate) P(PEMA-co-PEGMEMA) random copolymers as the precursors. The Agr-PEG cross-linked systems were further deposited onto a SS surface, pre-functionalized with an alkynyl-containing biomimetic anchor, dopamine propiolamide, to form a thin film after thermal treatment. The thin film-coated SS surfaces can effectively reduce the adhesion of marine algae and the settlement of barnacle cyprids. Upon covalent cross-linking, the covalently cross-linked Agr-PEG films coated SS surfaces exhibit good stability in flowing artificial seawater, and enhanced resistance to the settlement of barnacle cyprids, in comparison to that of the surfaces coated with physically cross-linked AgrAz films.

  2. Advanced thermal barrier coating systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorfman, M. R.; Reardon, J. D.

    1985-01-01

    Current state-of-the-art thermal barrier coating (TBC) systems consist of partially stabilized zirconia coatings plasma sprayed over a MCrAlY bond coat. Although these systems have excellent thermal shock properties, they have shown themselves to be deficient for a number of diesel and aircraft applications. Two ternary ceramic plasma coatings are discussed with respect to their possible use in TBC systems. Zirconia-ceria-yttria (ZCY) coatings were developed with low thermal conductivities, good thermal shock resistance and improved resistance to vanadium containing environments, when compared to the baseline yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) coatings. In addition, dense zirconia-titania-yttria (ZTY) coatings were developed with particle erosion resistance exceeding conventional stabilized zirconia coatings. Both coatings were evaluated in conjunction with a NiCr-Al-Co-Y2O3 bond coat. Also, multilayer or hybrid coatings consisting of the bond coat with subsequent coatings of zirconia-ceria-yttria and zirconia-titania-yttria were evaluated. These coatings combine the enhanced performance characteristics of ZCY with the improved erosion resistance of ZTY coatings. Improvement in the erosion resistance of the TBC system should result in a more consistent delta T gradient during service. Economically, this may also translate into increased component life simply because the coating lasts longer.

  3. Comparison of anti-fouling surface coatings for applications in bacteremia diagnostics

    PubMed Central

    Boardman, Anna K.; Allison, Sandra; Sharon, Andre; Sauer-Budge, Alexis F.

    2012-01-01

    To accurately diagnose microbial infections in blood, it is essential to recover as many microorganisms from a sample as possible. Unfortunately, recovering such microorganisms depends significantly on their adhesion to the surfaces of diagnostic devices. Consequently, we sought to minimize the adhesion of methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) to the surface of polypropylene- and acrylic-based bacteria concentration devices. These devices were treated with 11 different coatings having various charges and hydrophobicities. Some coatings promoted bacterial adhesion under centrifugation, whereas others were more likely to prevent it. Experiments were run using a simple buffer system and lysed blood, both inoculated with MSSA. Under both conditions, Hydromer’s 7-TS-13 and Aqua65JL were most effective at reducing bacterial adhesion. PMID:25147402

  4. Comparison of anti-fouling surface coatings for applications in bacteremia diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Boardman, Anna K; Allison, Sandra; Sharon, Andre; Sauer-Budge, Alexis F

    2013-01-01

    To accurately diagnose microbial infections in blood, it is essential to recover as many microorganisms from a sample as possible. Unfortunately, recovering such microorganisms depends significantly on their adhesion to the surfaces of diagnostic devices. Consequently, we sought to minimize the adhesion of methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) to the surface of polypropylene- and acrylic-based bacteria concentration devices. These devices were treated with 11 different coatings having various charges and hydrophobicities. Some coatings promoted bacterial adhesion under centrifugation, whereas others were more likely to prevent it. Experiments were run using a simple buffer system and lysed blood, both inoculated with MSSA. Under both conditions, Hydromer's 7-TS-13 and Aqua65JL were most effective at reducing bacterial adhesion.

  5. Performance of the Tin-Free Antifouling Coating International Ecoloflex in DSTO/RAN Trials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-10-01

    Defence Science and Technology Organisation 506 Lorimer St Fishermans Bend, Victoria 3207 Australia Telephone: (03) 9626 7000 Fax: (03) 9626 7999...at Williamstown in northern Port Phillip Bay, Victoria , and at the tropical site in Trinity Inlet, Cairns, Queensland. For each of these sites...Trial 1179) To assess the performance of tin-free products for harbour and support craft, strips of 5 coatings, including Ecoloflex, were applied to

  6. Non-Leaching, Benign Antifouling Multilayer Polymer Coatings for Marine Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-01

    copolymer precursors for SABC synthesis. Additionally, they compression molded thick sheets of extruded SEBS thermoplastic elastomer (TPE) onto...of Ulva Spores and Release of Ulva Sporelings 27 4.3 Biofouling Assay – Barnacle Settlement and Growth on SABC Coatings 28 4.4 Biofouling Assay...5.3.1.1 Results of SABC Leachate Toxicity Test 74 iii 5.3.1.2 Results of Ulva Spore Settlement, Growth and Release Testing 74 5.3.1.3 Results of

  7. Zwitterions coated hollow fiber membranes with enhanced antifouling properties for osmotic power generation from municipal wastewater.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Dieling; Qiu, Guanglei; Li, Xue; Wan, Chunfeng; Lu, Kangjia; Chung, Tai-Shung

    2016-11-01

    Fouling on pressure-retarded osmosis (PRO) membranes leads to severe declines in water flux and power density because their porous substrates are facing the wastewater feed. Thus, inorganics, organics and microorganisms in the wastewater are prone to depositing on the substrate surface and even in its pores. In order to reduce the fouling propensity, coating the substrate surface of PRO membranes with zwitterionic materials proves to be an effective way. In this work, 2-methacryloyloxyethylphosphorylcholine (MPC), is modified and grafted onto the polydopamine (PDA) coated poly (ether sulfone) (PES) hollow fiber substrate. Both the synthesis and surface coating of MPC are easy and facile to be scaled up. Compared with the pristine PES and PES-PDA substrates, the MPC modified substrate (PES-PDA-MPC) exhibits high resistance to protein adsorption as well as bacteria adhesion. By using a state-of-the-art thin-film composite poly (ether sulfone) (TFC-PES) hollow fiber membrane as the control for power generation, the power density of the TFC-PES-PDA-MPC membrane can achieve as high as 7.7 W/m(2) while the unmodified one has only 6.0 W/m(2) after 3 h's PRO tests. In conclusion, the osmotic power generation of PRO membranes can be significantly sustained by modifying the membrane surface with zwitterions.

  8. Scanning Electron Microscope Observations of Marine Microorganisms on Surfaces Coated with Antifouling Paints.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-06-01

    Vacuum Corporation , Cherry Hill, New Jersey. The size of the pedestal upon which the plating was done per- mitted only one slide to be coated at a time...Chemical Corporation , durez plastics division, 14120 Walck Road, North Tonawanda, New Jersey. 4. CAB-O-SIL M-5 is manufactured by Cabot Corpora- tion, 125...505 is an epoxy resin with a density of 1.01 g/cc. It is manufactured by the Celanese Corporation . 4. The organotin component of this formulation is

  9. Designing biomimetic antifouling surfaces.

    PubMed

    Salta, Maria; Wharton, Julian A; Stoodley, Paul; Dennington, Simon P; Goodes, Liam R; Werwinski, Stéphane; Mart, Ugar; Wood, Robert J K; Stokes, Keith R

    2010-10-28

    Marine biofouling is the accumulation of biological material on underwater surfaces, which has plagued both commercial and naval fleets. Biomimetic approaches may well provide new insights into designing and developing alternative, non-toxic, surface-active antifouling (AF) technologies. In the marine environment, all submerged surfaces are affected by the attachment of fouling organisms, such as bacteria, diatoms, algae and invertebrates, causing increased hydrodynamic drag, resulting in increased fuel consumption, and decreased speed and operational range. There are also additional expenses of dry-docking, together with increased fuel costs and corrosion, which are all important economic factors that demand the prevention of biofouling. Past solutions to AF have generally used toxic paints or coatings that have had a detrimental effect on marine life worldwide. The prohibited use of these antifoulants has led to the search for biologically inspired AF strategies. This review will explore the natural and biomimetic AF surface strategies for marine systems.

  10. Hybrid Antifouling and Antimicrobial Coatings Prepared by Electroless Co-Deposition of Fluoropolymer and Cationic Silica Nanoparticles on Stainless Steel: Efficacy against Listeria monocytogenes.

    PubMed

    Huang, Kang; Chen, Juhong; Nugen, Sam R; Goddard, Julie M

    2016-06-29

    Controlling formation, establishment, and proliferation of microbial biofilms on surfaces is critical for ensuring public safety. Herein, we report on the synthesis of antimicrobial nanoparticles and their co-deposition along with fluorinated nanoparticles during electroless nickel plating of stainless steel. Plating bath composition is optimized to ensure sufficiently low surface energy to resist fouling and microbial adhesion as well as to exert significant (>99.99% reduction) antimicrobial activity against Listeria monocytogenes. The resulting coatings present hybrid antifouling and antimicrobial character, can be applied onto stainless steel, and do not rely on leaching or migration of the antimicrobial nanoparticles to be effective. Such coatings can support reducing public health issues related to microbial cross-contamination in areas such as food processing, hospitals, and water purification.

  11. Development of the primary bacterial microfouling layer on antifouling and fouling release coatings in temperate and tropical environments in Eastern Australia.

    PubMed

    Molino, Paul J; Childs, Samantha; Eason Hubbard, Maeve R; Carey, Janet M; Burgman, Mark A; Wetherbee, Richard

    2009-01-01

    The role played by bacteria during the pioneering stages of colonisation on marine coatings was investigated over three distinct seasons in both tropical and temperate environments. Novel methods were developed to facilitate the study of the adhered bacterial population on the test coatings in their native, hydrated state. The approach eliminated destructive sample preparation techniques, including sample dehydration and/or removal from the substratum surface prior to analysis. Bacterial colonisation during initial biofilm formation was evaluated on two antifouling paints, Intersmooth 360 and Super Yacht 800, and a fouling release coating, Intersleek 700. Bacterial colonisation was quantified on all three coating surfaces. Intersleek 700 displayed the quickest colonisation by bacteria, resulting in major modification of the substratum surface within 2-4 days following immersion in the ocean. Whilst fouling accumulated more quickly on Intersleek 700, by 16 days all three coatings were fouled significantly. Bacterial fouling was correlated to both location and season, with fouling occurring at a more rapid rate at the Cairns location, as well as during the summer months, when higher water temperatures were recorded. Successful colonisation of all coatings by bacteria soon after immersion modifies the characteristics of the surfaces at the hull/water interface, and subsequent settlement by higher biofouling organisms must be moderated by these modified surfaces.

  12. Colonisation and succession of marine biofilm-dwelling ciliate assemblages on biocidal antifouling and fouling-release coatings in temperate Australia.

    PubMed

    Watson, Matthew G; Scardino, Andrew J; Zalizniak, Liliana; Shimeta, Jeff

    2015-01-01

    Ciliate assemblages are often overlooked, but ubiquitous components of microbial biofilms which require a better understanding. Ciliate, diatom and bacterial colonisation were evaluated on two fouling-release (FR) coatings, viz. Intersleek 970 and Hempasil X3, and two biocidal antifouling (AF) coatings, viz. Intersmooth 360 and Interspeed 5640, in Port Phillip Bay, Australia. A total of 15 genera were identified during the 10 week deployment. Intersleek 970 displayed the most rapid fouling by ciliates, reaching 63.3(± 5.9) cells cm(-2). After 10 weeks, all four coatings were extensively fouled. However, the toxicity of the AF coatings still significantly inhibited microbial fouling compared to the FR coatings. On all treatments, colonies of sessile peritrichs dominated the ciliate assemblage in the early stage of succession, but as the biofilm matured, vagile ciliates exerted more influence on the assemblage structure. The AF coatings showed selective toxic effects, causing significant differences in the ciliate species assemblages among the treatments.

  13. Quantification of bacteria on abiotic surfaces by laser scanning cytometry: an automated approach to screen the antifouling properties of new surface coatings.

    PubMed

    Regina, Viduthalai Rasheedkhan; Poulsen, Morten; Søhoel, Helmer; Bischoff, Claus; Meyer, Rikke Louise

    2012-08-01

    Bacterial biofilms are a persistent source of contamination, and much effort has been invested in developing antifouling surfaces or coatings. A bottleneck in developing such coatings is often the time-consuming task of screening and evaluating a large number of surface materials. An automated high-throughput assay is therefore needed. In this study, we present a promising technique, laser scanning cytometry (LSC), for automated quantification of bacteria on surfaces. The method was evaluated by quantifying young Staphylococcus xylosus biofilms on glass surfaces using LSC and comparing the results with cell counts obtained by fluorescence microscopy. As an example of application, we quantified bacterial adhesion to seven different sol-gel-based coatings on stainless steel. The surface structure and hydrophobicity of the coatings were analyzed using atomic force microscopy and water contact angle measurements. Among the coatings tested, a significant reduction in adhesion of S. xylosus was observed only for one coating, which also had a unique surface microstructure. LSC was particularly sensitive for quantification at low cell densities, and the adhered bacteria could be quantified both as cell number and as area coverage. The method proved to be an excellent alternative to microscopy for fast and reproducible quantification of microbial colonization on abiotic surfaces.

  14. Complex shaped ZnO nano- and microstructure based polymer composites: mechanically stable and environmentally friendly coatings for potential antifouling applications.

    PubMed

    Hölken, Iris; Hoppe, Mathias; Mishra, Yogendra K; Gorb, Stanislav N; Adelung, Rainer; Baum, Martina J

    2016-03-14

    Since the prohibition of tributyltin (TBT)-based antifouling paints in 2008, the development of environmentally compatible and commercially realizable alternatives is a crucial issue. Cost effective fabrication of antifouling paints with desired physical and biocompatible features is simultaneously required and recent developments in the direction of inorganic nanomaterials could play a major role. In the present work, a solvent free polymer/particle-composite coating based on two component polythiourethane (PTU) and tetrapodal shaped ZnO (t-ZnO) nano- and microstructures has been synthesized and studied with respect to mechanical, chemical and biocompatibility properties. Furthermore, antifouling tests have been carried out in artificial seawater tanks. Four different PTU/t-ZnO composites with various t-ZnO filling fractions (0 wt%, 1 wt%, 5 wt%, 10 wt%) were prepared and the corresponding tensile, hardness, and pull-off test results revealed that the composite filled with 5 wt% t-ZnO exhibits the strongest mechanical properties. Surface free energy (SFE) studies using contact angle measurements showed that the SFE value decreases with an increase in t-ZnO filler amounts. The influence of t-ZnO on the polymerization reaction was confirmed by Fourier transform infrared-spectroscopy measurements and thermogravimetric analysis. The immersion tests demonstrated that fouling behavior of the PTU/t-ZnO composite with a 1 wt% t-ZnO filler has been decreased in comparison to pure PTU. The composite with a 5 wt% t-ZnO filler showed almost no biofouling.

  15. Advanced Polyelectrolyte-Modified Zinc Phosphate Coatings

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-09-01

    September 1995 4 . TITLE AND SUBTITLE Advanced Polyelectrolyte-Modified Zinc Phosphate Coatings 6. AUTHOR(S) T. Sugama, N. Carciello and C.I...ADVANCED POLYELECTROLYTE-MODIFIED ZINC PHOSPHATE COATINGS ft PAL - ?y- 3 $> Phase I. Annual Report (October 1994 - September 1995) ^ by T. Sugama, N...and Cr-nitrates, 3 ) the substitution of environmentally safe polyelectrolyte for the conventional chrome-based compounds in the rinsing process, 4

  16. Quantitative exploration of the contribution of settlement, growth, dispersal and grazing to the accumulation of natural marine biofilms on antifouling and fouling-release coatings

    PubMed Central

    Van Mooy, Benjamin A. S.; Hmelo, Laura R.; Fredricks, Helen F.; Ossolinski, Justin E.; Pedler, Byron E.; Bogorff, Daniel J.; Smith, Peter J.S.

    2014-01-01

    The accumulation of microbial biofilms on ships' hulls negatively affects ships' performance and efficiency while also moderating the establishment of even more detrimental hard-fouling communities. However, there is little quantitative information on how the accumulation rate of microbial biofilms is impacted by the balance of the rates of cell settlement, in situ production (ie growth), dispersal to surrounding waters and mortality induced by grazers. These rates were quantified on test panels coated with copper-based antifouling or polymer-based fouling-release coatings by using phospholipids as molecular proxies for microbial biomass. The results confirmed the accepted modes of efficacy of these two types of coatings. In a more extensive set of experiments with only the fouling-release coatings, it was found that seasonally averaged cellular production rates were 1.5 ± 0.5 times greater than settlement and the dispersal rates were 2.7 ± 0.8 greater than grazing. The results of this study quantitatively describe the dynamic balance of processes leading to microbial biofilm accumulation on coatings designed for ships' hulls. PMID:24417212

  17. Quantitative exploration of the contribution of settlement, growth, dispersal and grazing to the accumulation of natural marine biofilms on antifouling and fouling-release coatings.

    PubMed

    Van Mooy, Benjamin A S; Hmelo, Laura R; Fredricks, Helen F; Ossolinski, Justin E; Pedler, Byron E; Bogorff, Daniel J; Smith, Peter J S

    2014-02-01

    The accumulation of microbial biofilms on ships' hulls negatively affects ship performance and efficiency while also playing a role in the establishment of even more detrimental hard-fouling communities. However, there is little quantitative information on how the accumulation rate of microbial biofilms is impacted by the balance of the rates of cell settlement, in situ production (ie growth), dispersal to surrounding waters and mortality induced by grazers. These rates were quantified on test panels coated with copper-based antifouling (AF) or polymer-based fouling-release (FR) coatings by using phospholipids as molecular proxies for microbial biomass. The results confirmed the accepted modes of efficacy of these two types of coatings. In a more extensive set of experiments with only the FR coatings, it was found that seasonally averaged cellular production rates were 1.5 ± 0.5 times greater than settlement and the dispersal rates were 2.7 ± 0.8 greater than grazing. The results of this study quantitatively describe the dynamic balance of processes leading to the accumulation of microbial biofilm on coatings designed for ships' hulls.

  18. Synthesis of chitosan capped copper oxide nanoleaves using high intensity (30kHz) ultrasound sonication and their application in antifouling coatings.

    PubMed

    Abiraman, Tamilselvan; Ramanathan, Ethirajan; Kavitha, Ganapathy; Rengasamy, Ramasamy; Balasubramanian, Sengottuvelan

    2017-01-01

    The synthesis of chitosan capped copper oxide nanoleaves (CCCO NLs) was carried out under three different reaction conditions viz. 1) room temperature, 2) 70°C and 3) high intensity ultrasound (30kHz) sonication method and it has been found that the high intensity ultrasound (30kHz) sonication is the best method when compared to other two methods. The advantages of the present synthetic method are: i) easy one step process, ii) lesser reaction time, iii) good yield, iv) reproducible and v) calcination is not required. The resulting chitosan capped copper oxide nanoleaves were characterized by Diffuse Reflectance UV-Visible Spectroscopy (DRS), Fourier Transform Infra-Red Spectroscopy (FT-IR), X-ray Diffraction (XRD), X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM), High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM) and Thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA). The CCCO NLs were blended with commercial paints such as polyurethane clear, polyurethane white and acrylic emulsion and applied on to three different surfaces (wood, mild steel and cement slab panels). The hydrophilicity of CCCONP coated panels was analyzed by water contact angle measurement and their antifouling behavior was investigated against three different green and marine algae viz. Arthrospira, Chlorella and Amphora. The antifouling efficiency of the CCCO NLs against the algae was found to be 78-92%.

  19. Advanced Fuels Campaign Cladding & Coatings Meeting Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Not Listed

    2013-03-01

    The Fuel Cycle Research and Development (FCRD) Advanced Fuels Campaign (AFC) organized a Cladding and Coatings operational meeting February 12-13, 2013, at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Representatives from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), national laboratories, industry, and universities attended the two-day meeting. The purpose of the meeting was to discuss advanced cladding and cladding coating research and development (R&D); review experimental testing capabilities for assessing accident tolerant fuels; and review industry/university plans and experience in light water reactor (LWR) cladding and coating R&D.

  20. Smooth Compliant Antifoulant Coatings.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-09-30

    mercury * Organic arsenic compounds such as oxybisphenoxarsine e Variations on the tri-organo tin salts * Napthenic acids and their heavy metal salts...potential. Likewise, the new azelaic anhydride shows promise as an alter- native blend in the three-dimensional composites. The acoustic behavior of these

  1. Zwitterionic materials for antifouling membrane surface construction.

    PubMed

    He, Mingrui; Gao, Kang; Zhou, Linjie; Jiao, Zhiwei; Wu, Mengyuan; Cao, Jialin; You, Xinda; Cai, Ziyi; Su, Yanlei; Jiang, Zhongyi

    2016-08-01

    Membrane separation processes are often perplexed by severe and ubiquitous membrane fouling. Zwitterionic materials, keeping electric neutrality with equivalent positive and negative charged groups, are well known for their superior antifouling properties and have been broadly utilized to construct antifouling surfaces for medical devices, biosensors and marine coatings applications. In recent years, zwitterionic materials have been more and more frequently utilized for constructing antifouling membrane surfaces. In this review, the antifouling mechanisms of zwitterionic materials as well as their biomimetic prototypes in cell membranes will be discussed, followed by the survey of common approaches to incorporate zwitterionic materials onto membrane surfaces including surface grafting, surface segregation, biomimetic adhesion, surface coating and so on. The potential applications of these antifouling membranes are also embedded. Finally, we will present a brief perspective on the future development of zwitterionic materials modified antifouling membranes. Membrane fouling is a severe problem hampering the application of membrane separation technology. The properties of membrane surfaces play a critical role in membrane fouling and antifouling behavior/performance. Antifouling membrane surface construction has evolved as a hot research issue for the development of membrane processes. Zwitterionic modification of membrane surfaces has been recognized as an effective strategy to resist membrane fouling. This review summarizes the antifouling mechanisms of zwitterionic materials inspired by cell membranes as well as the popular approaches to incorporate them onto membrane surfaces. It can help form a comprehensive knowledge about the principles and methods of modifying membrane surfaces with zwitterionic materials. Finally, we propose the possible future research directions of zwitterionic materials modified antifouling membranes. Copyright © 2016 Acta Materialia Inc

  2. Antifouling marine concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Vind, H P; Mathews, C W

    1980-07-01

    Various toxic agents were evaluated as to their capability to prevent or inhibit the attachment of marine fouling organisms to concrete for OTEC plants. Creosote and bis-(tri-n-butyltin) oxide (TBTO) were impregnated into porous aggregate which was used in making concrete. Cuprous oxide, triphenyltin hydroxide (TPTH), and 2-2-bis-(p-methoxyphenyl)-1,1,1-trichloroethane (methoxychlor) were used as dry additives. Two proprietary formulations were applied as coatings on untreated concrete. Test specimens were exposed at Port Hueneme, CA, and Key Biscayne, FL. The efficacy of toxicants was determined by periodically weighing the adhering fouling organisms. Concrete prepared with an aggregate impregnated with a TBTO/creosote mixture has demonstrated the best antifouling performance of those specimens exposed for more than one year. The two proprietary coatings and the concrete containing methoxychlor, TPTH, and cuprous oxide as dry additives have exhibited good antifouling properties, but they have been exposed for a shorter time. The strength of concrete containing the toxicants was acceptable, and the toxicants did not increase the corrosion rate of reinforcing rods. Organotin compounds were essentially unchanged in concrete specimens exposed 6-1/2 years in seawater.

  3. Antifouling marine concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Vind, H P; Mathews, C W

    1980-07-01

    Various toxic agents were evaluated as the their capability to prevent or inhibit the attachment of marine fouling organisms to concrete. Creosote and bis-(tri-n-butyltin) oxide (TBTO) were impregnated into porous aggregate which was used in making concrete. Cuprous oxide, triphenyltin hydroxide (TPTH), and 2-2-bis-(p-methoxyphenyl)-1,1,1-trichloroethane (methoxychlor) were used as dry additives. Two proprietary formulations were applied as coatings on untreated concrete. Test specimens were exposed at Port Hueneme, CA, and Key Biscayne, FL. The efficacy of toxicants was determined by periodically weighing the adhering fouling organisms. Concrete prepared with an aggregate impregnated with a TBTO/creosote mixture has demonstrated the best antifouling performance of those specimens exposed for more than one year. The two proprietary coatings and the concrete containing methoxychlor, TPTH, and cuprous oxide as dry additives have exhibited good antifouling properties, but they have been exposed for a shorter time. The strength of concrete containing the toxicants was acceptable, and the toxicants did not increase the corrosion rate of reinforcing rods. Organotin compounds were essentially unchanged in concrete specimens exposed 6 1/2 years in seawater.

  4. Adsorption of pH-responsive amphiphilic copolymer micelles and gel on membrane surface as an approach for antifouling coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muppalla, Ravikumar; Rana, Harpalsinh H.; Devi, Sadhna; Jewrajka, Suresh K.

    2013-03-01

    A new approach for the surface modification of polymer membranes prepared by phase inversion technique for antifouling properties is reported. Direct deposition of poly(2-dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate)-b-poly(methyl methacrylate)-b-poly(2-dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate) (PDMA-b-PMMA-b-PDMA) copolymer micelles (core-shell) and gel formed from mixture of polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) and PDMA-b-PMMA-b-PDMA on the polysulfone (PSf-virgin) ultrafiltration membrane surface successfully provides modified membranes with improved antifouling properties and pH-responsive behaviour during both water and protein filtrations. Successful deposition and adsorption of such type of micelle and gel particles on the membrane surface was assessed by combination of SEM, AFM, contact angle, ATR-IR, and zeta potential measurements. The micelle and gel particles preferentially remained on the membranes surface due to their bigger size than the pores on the skin layer and also due to adsorption on the membrane surface by hydrophobic interaction. The modified membranes exhibited much higher rejection of macromolecules and almost steady trend in flux compared to corresponding virgin membranes during filtration operation. The major advantage of this protocol is that the deposited micelles and gel remained on the membrane surface even after filtration and storage of the membrane in water and the modified membranes retained similar performance. The effect of all the micelles and gel components on the membrane performance has been elucidated.

  5. Highly effective permeability and antifouling performances of polypropylene non-woven fabric membranes modified with graphene oxide by inkjet printing and immersion coating methods.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chuan-Qi; Xu, Xiao-Chen; Li, Rui-Yun; Chen, Jie; Yang, Feng-Lin

    2013-01-01

    In the current study, graphene oxide (GO)-modified polypropylene non-woven fabric (PP-NWF) membranes were prepared via inkjet printing and immersion coating methods. Scanning electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, contact angle measurements, pure water permeation (JPWP) and protein adsorption were tested to evaluate the impact of the GO nanosheet on the characteristics and performance of modified PP-NWF membranes. The results showed that the exfoliated GO nanosheets uniformly deposited on the membrane surface and firmly embedded into the interlaced fibers, resulting in the improvement of membrane hydrophilicity, permeability and antifouling properties comparing with original PP-NWF membranes. The GO-printed and GO-coated membranes had 113 and 188% higher fluxes, and 70.95 and 75.74% lower protein adsorptions than the original PP-NWF membranes, respectively. After cross-linked treatment, ultrasound processing was conducted to evaluate the stability of the modified PP-NWF membranes. The results demonstrated that there was almost no decrease in permeation after ultrasonic treatment indicating that the cross-linking treatment could enhance the immobilization of the GO nanosheets on and into the modified membranes.

  6. Investigation of antifouling and disinfection potential of chitosan coated iron oxide-PAN hollow fiber membrane using Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Munmun; De, Sirshendu

    2017-06-01

    Chitosan coated iron oxide nanoparticles were impregnated into polyacrylonitrile based hollow fiber membrane. The molecular weight cut off was varied in the range of 120 to 145kDa with the concentration of nanoparticles. Incorporation of nanoparticles improved the permeability, mechanical property and hydrophilicity of the membrane. The contact angle of the membrane decreased from 80° to 51° and the permeability increased by 31% at 0.5wt% nanoparticles concentration. The antibacterial and antifouling property of the membrane were investigated with two biofilm causing Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria. The damage of cell membrane was directly confirmed by release of cellular constituent absorbing in 260nm. The cellular deformation on the membrane surface was evident by direct microscopic observation in FESEM. This damage was likely caused by electrostatic interaction between NH3(+) group of nanoparticles and anionic components of phosphoryl group of bacteria. The hollow fiber membrane shows promising antibiofouling property even after long experimental run as evident by 95% flux recovery ratio. The effect of operating conditions on rejection and flux profile was investigated during long experimental run. The result indicated that there was no detectable iron in the permeate sample that could impose adverse health hazard. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Evaluation of Erosion Resistance of Advanced Turbine Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming; Kuczmarski, Maria A.; Miller, Robert A.; Cuy, Michael D.

    2007-01-01

    The erosion resistant turbine thermal barrier coating system is critical to aircraft engine performance and durability. By demonstrating advanced turbine material testing capabilities, we will be able to facilitate the critical turbine coating and subcomponent development and help establish advanced erosion-resistant turbine airfoil thermal barrier coatings design tools. The objective of this work is to determine erosion resistance of advanced thermal barrier coating systems under simulated engine erosion and/or thermal gradient environments, validating advanced turbine airfoil thermal barrier coating systems based on nano-tetragonal phase toughening design approaches.

  8. Progress to Develop an Advanced Solar-Selective Coating

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, C. E.

    2008-03-01

    The progress to develop a durable advanced solar-selective coating will be described. Experimental work has focused on modeling high-temperature, solar-selective coatings; depositing the individual layers and modeled coatings; measuring the optical, thermal, morphology, and compositional properties and using the data to validate the modeled and deposited properties; re-optimizing the coating; and testing the coating performance and durability.

  9. Recent development of antifouling polymers: structure, evaluation, and biomedical applications in nano/micro-structures.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lingyun; Li, Wenchen; Liu, Qingsheng

    2014-01-01

    Antifouling polymers have been proven to be vital to many biomedical applications such as medical implants, drug delivery, and biosensing. This review covers the major development of antifouling polymers in the last 2 decades, including the material chemistry, structural factors important to antifouling properties, and how to challenge or evaluate the antifouling performances. We then discuss the applications of antifouling polymers in nano/micro-biomedical applications in the form of nanoparticles, thin coatings for medical devices (e.g., artificial joint, catheter, wound dressing), and nano/microscale fibers. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Vitreoretinal surgery in advanced coats disease.

    PubMed

    Ozdamar, Yasemin; Berker, Nilufer; Batman, Cosar; Zilelioglu, Orhan

    2009-01-01

    To report the outcomes of vitreoretinal surgery for a patient with total retinal detachment and a subretinal nodule associated with Coats disease (CD). A 20-year-old woman stage 3B CD underwent vitreoretinal surgery with triamcinolone acetonide-assisted pars plana vitrectomy, limited retinotomy, removal of the subretinal nodule and membrane, endolaser photocoagulation, and silicone oil tamponade. The surgical outcomes were observed. Retinal attachment was achieved after vitreoretinal surgery, removal of the subretinal membrane, and endoresection of the subretinal fibrous nodule. No intraoperative or postoperative complications occurred due to the surgical technique. The retina remained attached during the postoperative follow-up period of 6 months. Vitreoretinal surgery is an effective surgical technique that provides successful reattachment of the retina and enables endoresection of the subretinal fibrous nodule in eyes with advanced CD. It also prevents the devastating intraocular complications leading to enucleation.

  11. Thermal Conductivity and Sintering Behavior of Advanced Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming; Miller, Robert A.

    2002-01-01

    Advanced thermal barrier coatings, having significantly reduced long-term thermal conductivities, are being developed using an approach that emphasizes real-time monitoring of thermal conductivity under conditions that are engine-like in terms of temperatures and heat fluxes. This is in contrast to the traditional approach where coatings are initially optimized in terms of furnace and burner rig durability with subsequent measurement in the as-processed or furnace-sintered condition. The present work establishes a laser high-heat-flux test as the basis for evaluating advanced plasma-sprayed and physical vapor-deposited thermal barrier coatings under the NASA Ultra Efficient Engine Technology (UEET) Program. The candidate coating materials for this program are novel thermal barrier coatings that are found to have significantly reduced thermal conductivities due to an oxide-defect-cluster design. Critical issues for designing advanced low conductivity coatings with improved coating durability are also discussed.

  12. Thermal Barrier Coatings for Advanced Gas Turbine and Diesel Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming; Miller, Robert A.

    1999-01-01

    Ceramic thermal barrier coatings (TBCS) have been developed for advanced gas turbine and diesel engine applications to improve engine reliability and fuel efficiency. However, durability issues of these thermal barrier coatings under high temperature cyclic conditions are still of major concern. The coating failure depends not only on the coating, but also on the ceramic sintering/creep and bond coat oxidation under the operating conditions. Novel test approaches have been established to obtain critical thermomechanical and thermophysical properties of the coating systems under near-realistic transient and steady state temperature and stress gradients encountered in advanced engine systems. This paper presents detailed experimental and modeling results describing processes occurring in the ZrO2-Y2O3 thermal barrier coating systems, thus providing a framework for developing strategies to manage ceramic coating architecture, microstructure and properties.

  13. Antifouling leaching technique for optical lenses

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Strahle, William J.; Perez, C. L.; Martini, Marinna A.

    1994-01-01

    The effectiveness of optical lenses deployed in water less than 100 m deep is significantly reduced by biofouling caused by the settlement of macrofauna, such as barnacles, hydroids, and tunicates. However, machineable porous plastic rings can be used to dispense antifoulant into the water in front of the lens to retard macrofaunal growth without obstructing the light path. Unlike coatings which can degrade the optical performance, antifouling rings do not interfere with the instrument optics. The authors have designed plastic, reusable cup-like antifouling rings to slip over the optical lenses of a transmissometer. These rings have been used for several deployments on shallow moorings in Massachusetts Bay, MA and have increased the time before fouling degrades optical characteristics

  14. Superhydrophobicity for antifouling microfluidic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Shirtcliffe, N J; Roach, P

    2013-01-01

    Fouling of surfaces is often problematic in microfluidic devices, particularly when using protein or -enzymatic solutions. Various coating methods have been investigated to reduce the tendency for protein molecules to adsorb, mostly relying on hydrophobic surface chemistry or the antifouling ability of -polyethylene glycol. Here we present the potential use of superhydrophobic surfaces to not only reduce the amount of surface contamination but also to induce self-cleaning under flow conditions. The methodology is presented in order to prepare superhydrophobic surface coatings having micro- and nanoscale feature dimensions, as well as a step-by-step guide to quantify adsorbed protein down to nanogram levels. The fabrication of these surfaces as coatings via silica sol-gel and copper nano-hair growth is presented, which can be applied within microfluidic devices manufactured from various materials.

  15. Thermal and Environmental Barrier Coatings for Advanced Propulsion Engine Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dong-Ming; Miller, Robert A.

    2004-01-01

    Ceramic thermal and environmental barrier coatings (TEBCs) are used in gas turbine engines to protect engine hot-section components in the harsh combustion environments, and extend component lifetimes. For future high performance engines, the development of advanced ceramic barrier coating systems will allow these coatings to be used to simultaneously increase engine operating temperature and reduce cooling requirements, thereby leading to significant improvements in engine power density and efficiency. In order to meet future engine performance and reliability requirements, the coating systems must be designed with increased high temperature stability, lower thermal conductivity, and improved thermal stress and erosion resistance. In this paper, ceramic coating design and testing considerations will be described for high temperature and high-heat-flux engine applications in hot corrosion and oxidation, erosion, and combustion water vapor environments. Further coating performance and life improvements will be expected by utilizing advanced coating architecture design, composition optimization, and improved processing techniques, in conjunction with modeling and design tools.

  16. Challenges for the Development of New Non-Toxic Antifouling Solutions

    PubMed Central

    Maréchal, Jean-Philippe; Hellio, Claire

    2009-01-01

    Marine biofouling is of major economic concern to all marine industries. The shipping trade is particularly alert to the development of new antifouling (AF) strategies, especially green AF paint as international regulations regarding the environmental impact of the compounds actually incorporated into the formulations are becoming more and more strict. It is also recognised that vessels play an extensive role in invasive species propagation as ballast waters transport potentially threatening larvae. It is then crucial to develop new AF solutions combining advances in marine chemistry and topography, in addition to a knowledge of marine biofoulers, with respect to the marine environment. This review presents the recent research progress made in the field of new non-toxic AF solutions (new microtexturing of surfaces, foul-release coatings, and with a special emphasis on marine natural antifoulants) as well as the perspectives for future research directions. PMID:20087457

  17. Mickey Leland Energy Fellowship Report: Development of Advanced Window Coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Bolton, Ladena A.; Alvine, Kyle J.; Schemer-Kohrn, Alan L.

    2014-08-05

    Advanced fenestration technologies for light and thermal management in building applications are of great recent research interest for improvements in energy efficiency. Of these technologies, there is specific interest in advanced window coating technologies that have tailored control over the visible and infrared (IR) scattering into a room for both static and dynamic applications. Recently, PNNL has investigated novel subwavelength nanostructured coatings for both daylighting, and IR thermal management applications. Such coatings rese still in the early stages and additional research is needed in terms of scalable manufacturing. This project investigates aspects of a potential new methodology for low-cost scalable manufacture of said subwavelength coatings.

  18. Antifouling properties of hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Murosaki, Takayuki; Ahmed, Nafees; Ping Gong, Jian

    2011-01-01

    Marine sessile organisms easily adhere to submerged solids such as rocks, metals and plastics, but not to seaweeds and fishes, which are covered with soft and wet ‘hydrogel’. Inspired by this fact, we have studied long-term antifouling properties of hydrogels against marine sessile organisms. Hydrogels, especially those containing hydroxy group and sulfonic group, show excellent antifouling activity against barnacles both in laboratory assays and in the marine environment. The extreme low settlement on hydrogels in vitro and in vivo is mainly caused by antifouling properties against the barnacle cypris. PMID:27877456

  19. Antifouling properties of hydrogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murosaki, Takayuki; Ahmed, Nafees; Gong, Jian Ping

    2011-12-01

    Marine sessile organisms easily adhere to submerged solids such as rocks, metals and plastics, but not to seaweeds and fishes, which are covered with soft and wet 'hydrogel'. Inspired by this fact, we have studied long-term antifouling properties of hydrogels against marine sessile organisms. Hydrogels, especially those containing hydroxy group and sulfonic group, show excellent antifouling activity against barnacles both in laboratory assays and in the marine environment. The extreme low settlement on hydrogels in vitro and in vivo is mainly caused by antifouling properties against the barnacle cypris.

  20. Advanced ceramic coating development for industrial/utility gas turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vogan, J. W.; Stetson, A. R.

    1982-01-01

    A program was conducted with the objective of developing advanced thermal barrier coating (TBC) systems. Coating application was by plasma spray. Duplex, triplex and graded coatings were tested. Coating systems incorporated both NiCrAly and CoCrAly bond coats. Four ceramic overlays were tested: ZrO2.82O3; CaO.TiO2; 2CaO.SiO2; and MgO.Al2O3. The best overall results were obtained with a CaO.TiO2 coating applied to a NiCrAly bond coat. This coating was less sensitive than the ZrO2.8Y2O3 coating to process variables and part geometry. Testing with fuels contaminated with compounds containing sulfur, phosphorus and alkali metals showed the zirconia coatings were destabilized. The calcium titanate coatings were not affected by these contaminants. However, when fuels were used containing 50 ppm of vanadium and 150 ppm of magnesium, heavy deposits were formed on the test specimens and combustor components that required frequent cleaning of the test rig. During the program Mars engine first-stage turbine blades were coated and installed for an engine cyclic endurance run with the zirconia, calcium titanate, and calcium silicate coatings. Heavy spalling developed with the calcium silicate system. The zirconia and calcium titanate systems survived the full test duration. It was concluded that these two TBC's showed potential for application in gas turbines.

  1. Advanced optical coatings for astronomical instrumentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradal, Fabien; Leplan, Hervé; Vayssade, Hervé; Geyl, Roland

    2016-07-01

    Recently Safran Reosc worked and progressed on various thin film technology for: Large mirrors with low stress and stable coatings. Large lens elements with strong curvature and precise layer specifications. Large filters with high spectral response uniformity specifications. IR coatings with low stress and excellent resistance to cryogenic environment for NIR to LWIR domains. Pixelated coatings. Results will be presented and discussed on the basis of several examples.

  2. Antifouling Thermoplastic Composites with Maleimide Encapsulated in Clay Nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Fu, Ye; Gong, Congcong; Wang, Wencai; Zhang, Liqun; Ivanov, Evgenii; Lvov, Yuri

    2017-09-06

    An antifouling ethylene-vinyl acetate copolymer (EVA) coating with halloysite clay nanotubes loaded with maleimide (TCPM) is prepared. Such antifoulant encapsulation allowed for extended release of TCPM and a long-lasting, efficient protection of the coated surface against marine microorganisms proliferation. Halloysite also induces the composite's anisotropy due to parallel alignment of the nanotubes. The maleimide loaded halloysite incorporated into the polymer matrix allowed for 12-month release of the bacterial inhibitor preventing fouling; it is much longer than the 2-3 month protection when TCPM is directly admixed into EVA. The antifouling properties of the EVA-halloysite nanocomposites were tested by monitoring surface adhesion and proliferation of marine V. natriegens bacteria with SEM. As compared to the composite directly doped with TCPM-antifoulant, there were much less bacteria accumulated on the EVA-halloysite-TCPM coating after a 2-month exposure to seawater. Field tests at South China Sea marine station further confirmed the formulation efficiency. The doping of 28 wt % TCPM loaded halloysite drastically enhanced material antifouling property, which promises wide applications for protective marine coating.

  3. Advanced protective coatings for gas turbine blading

    SciTech Connect

    Czech, N.; Stamm, W.

    1998-07-01

    The new gas turbines now being marketed are characterized by outputs and efficiencies which were unthinkable just a few years ago. A key factor for achieving efficiency is the highest possible turbine inlet temperature, currently approx. 1,400 C. In such a machine, it is the turbine blades which are subjected to the greatest thermal and mechanical stresses. They are also subjected to extreme chemical stress in the form of oxidation, which in the following is understood as the corrosive action due almost exclusively to the temperature of the turbine blade surface and (to a much lesser degree) the pressure and oxygen content of the hot gas. In many cases, this is compounded by hot corrosion, which results in accelerated oxidation due to impurities in the fuel and air. In terms of physics, this demanding challenge requires the use of cooling techniques which push the envelope of feasibility. In terms of materials engineering, an innovative multifaceted solution is called for. In more concrete terms, this means a combination of convection, impingement and film cooling of blades made of the strongest high-temperature alloy materials and coated with one or possibly multiple coatings. The base material ensures the blade's mechanical integrity while the coating(s) provide(s) protection against the oxidizing and corrosive attack, as well as the thermal stresses which cannot be sufficiently mitigated by cooling. The superiority of single crystal materials over polycrystalline or directionally solidified nickel-base superalloys is illustrated. The coating is a third-generation NiCoCrAIY VPS (vacuum plasma spray) coating. In the paper, the authors discuss the current status of coating developments for large, stationary gas turbines and present solutions for achieving important development objectives.

  4. Advanced Low Conductivity Thermal Barrier Coatings: Performance and Future Directions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming; Miller, Robert A.

    2008-01-01

    Thermal barrier coatings will be more aggressively designed to protect gas turbine engine hot-section components in order to meet future engine higher fuel efficiency and lower emission goals. In this presentation, thermal barrier coating development considerations and performance will be emphasized. Advanced thermal barrier coatings have been developed using a multi-component defect clustering approach, and shown to have improved thermal stability and lower conductivity. The coating systems have been demonstrated for high temperature combustor applications. For thermal barrier coatings designed for turbine airfoil applications, further improved erosion and impact resistance are crucial for engine performance and durability. Erosion resistant thermal barrier coatings are being developed, with a current emphasis on the toughness improvements using a combined rare earth- and transition metal-oxide doping approach. The performance of the toughened thermal barrier coatings has been evaluated in burner rig and laser heat-flux rig simulated engine erosion and thermal gradient environments. The results have shown that the coating composition optimizations can effectively improve the erosion and impact resistance of the coating systems, while maintaining low thermal conductivity and cyclic durability. The erosion, impact and high heat-flux damage mechanisms of the thermal barrier coatings will also be described.

  5. Development of Advanced Low Conductivity Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dong-Ming; Miller, Robert A.

    2004-01-01

    Advanced multi-component, low conductivity oxide thermal barrier coatings have been developed using an approach that emphasizes real-time monitoring of thermal conductivity under conditions that are engine-like in terms of temperatures and heat fluxes. This is in contrast to the traditional approach where coatings are initially optimized in terms of furnace and burner rig durability with subsequent measurement in the as-processed or furnace-sintered condition. The present work establishes a laser high-heat-flux test as the basis for evaluating advanced plasma-sprayed and electron beam-physical vapor deposited (EB-PVD) thermal barrier coatings under the NASA Ultra-Efficient Engine Technology (UEET) Program. The candidate coating materials for this program are novel thermal barrier coatings that are found to have significantly reduced thermal conductivities and improved thermal stability due to an oxide-defect-cluster design. Critical issues for designing advanced low conductivity coatings with improved coating durability are also discussed.

  6. Advanced Environmental Barrier Coatings Development for Si-Based Ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dong-Ming; Choi, R. Sung; Robinson, Raymond C.; Lee, Kang N.; Bhatt, Ramakrishna T.; Miller, Robert A.

    2005-01-01

    Advanced environmental barrier coating concepts based on multi-component HfO2 (ZrO2) and modified mullite systems are developed for monolithic Si3N4 and SiC/SiC ceramic matrix composite (CMC) applications. Comprehensive testing approaches were established using the water vapor cyclic furnace, high pressure burner rig and laser heat flux steam rig to evaluate the coating water vapor stability, cyclic durability, radiation and erosion resistance under simulated engine environments. Test results demonstrated the feasibility and durability of the environmental barrier coating systems for 2700 to 3000 F monolithic Si3N4 and SiC/SiC CMC component applications. The high-temperature-capable environmental barrier coating systems are being further developed and optimized in collaboration with engine companies for advanced turbine engine applications.

  7. Therma1 Conductivity and Durability of Advanced Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dong-Ming; Miller, Robert A.

    2003-01-01

    Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) will play a crucial role in advanced gas turbine engines because of their ability to further increase engine operating temperature and reduce cooling, thus helping to achieve engine emission and efficiency goals. Future TBCs must be designed with increased phase stability, lower thermal conductivity, and improved sintering and thermal stress resistance in order to effectively protect engine hot-section components. Advanced low conductivity TBCs are being developed at NASA by incorporating multi-component oxide dopants into zirconia-yttria or hafnia-yttria to promote the formation of thermodynamically stable defect clusters within the coating structures. This presentation will primarily focus on thermal conductivity and durability of the novel defect cluster thermal barrier coatings for turbine airfoil and combustor applications, determined by a unique CO2 laser heat-flux approach. The laser heat-flux testing approach emphasizes the real-time monitoring and assessment of the coating thermal conductivity under simulated engine temperature and thermal gradient conditions. The conductivity increase due to coating sintering (and/or phase change) and the conductivity decrease due to coating delamination have been determined under steady-state, cyclic, uniform or non-uniform heat-flux conditions. The coating radiation flux resistance has been evaluated by varying coating thermal gradients, and also by using a laser-heated radiative-flux source. Advanced multi-component TBC systems have been shown to have significantly reduced thermal conductivity and improved high temperature stability due to the nano-sized, low mobility defect clusters associated with the paired rare earth dopant additions. The effect of oxide defect cluster dopants on coating thermal conductivity, thermal stability and furnace cyclic durability will also be discussed. The current low conductivity TBC systems have demonstrated long-term cyclic durability at very high

  8. Therma1 Conductivity and Durability of Advanced Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dong-Ming; Miller, Robert A.

    2003-01-01

    Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) will play a crucial role in advanced gas turbine engines because of their ability to further increase engine operating temperature and reduce cooling, thus helping to achieve engine emission and efficiency goals. Future TBCs must be designed with increased phase stability, lower thermal conductivity, and improved sintering and thermal stress resistance in order to effectively protect engine hot-section components. Advanced low conductivity TBCs are being developed at NASA by incorporating multi-component oxide dopants into zirconia-yttria or hafnia-yttria to promote the formation of thermodynamically stable defect clusters within the coating structures. This presentation will primarily focus on thermal conductivity and durability of the novel defect cluster thermal barrier coatings for turbine airfoil and combustor applications, determined by a unique CO2 laser heat-flux approach. The laser heat-flux testing approach emphasizes the real-time monitoring and assessment of the coating thermal conductivity under simulated engine temperature and thermal gradient conditions. The conductivity increase due to coating sintering (and/or phase change) and the conductivity decrease due to coating delamination have been determined under steady-state, cyclic, uniform or non-uniform heat-flux conditions. The coating radiation flux resistance has been evaluated by varying coating thermal gradients, and also by using a laser-heated radiative-flux source. Advanced multi-component TBC systems have been shown to have significantly reduced thermal conductivity and improved high temperature stability due to the nano-sized, low mobility defect clusters associated with the paired rare earth dopant additions. The effect of oxide defect cluster dopants on coating thermal conductivity, thermal stability and furnace cyclic durability will also be discussed. The current low conductivity TBC systems have demonstrated long-term cyclic durability at very high

  9. Progress in advanced high temperature turbine materials, coatings, and technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freche, J. C.; Ault, G. M.

    1978-01-01

    Advanced materials, coatings, and cooling technology is assessed in terms of improved aircraft turbine engine performance. High cycle operating temperatures, lighter structural components, and adequate resistance to the various environmental factors associated with aircraft gas turbine engines are among the factors considered. Emphasis is placed on progress in development of high temperature materials for coating protection against oxidation, hot corrosion and erosion, and in turbine cooling technology. Specific topics discussed include metal matrix composites, superalloys, directionally solidified eutectics, and ceramics.

  10. Advanced electrochemical methods for characterizing the performance of organic coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Upadhyay, Vinod

    Advanced electrochemical techniques such as electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), electrochemical noise method (ENM) and coulometry as tools to study and extract information about the coating system is the focus of this thesis. This thesis explored three areas of research. In all the three research areas, advanced electrochemical techniques were used to extract information and understand the coating system. The first area was to use EIS and coulometric technique for extracting information using AC-DC-AC method. It was examined whether the total charge passing through the coating during the DC polarization step of AC-DC-AC determines coating failure. An almost constant total amount of charge transfer was required by the coating before it failed and was independent of the applied DC polarization. The second area focused in this thesis was to investigate if embedded sensors in coatings are sensitive enough to monitor changes in environmental conditions and to locate defects in coatings by electrochemical means. Influence of topcoat on embedded sensor performance was also studied. It was observed that the embedded sensors can distinguish varying environmental conditions and locate defects in coatings. Topcoat could influence measurements made using embedded sensors and the choice of topcoat could be very important in the successful use of embedded sensors. The third area of research of this thesis work was to examine systematically polymer-structure coating property relationships using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. It was observed that the polymer modifications could alter the electrochemical properties of the coating films. Moreover, it was also observed that by cyclic wet-dry capacitance measurement using aqueous electrolyte and ionic liquid, ranking of the stability of organic polymer films could be performed.

  11. Application of advanced coating techniques to rocket engine components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verma, S. K.

    1988-01-01

    The materials problem in the space shuttle main engine (SSME) is reviewed. Potential coatings and the method of their application for improved life of SSME components are discussed. A number of advanced coatings for turbine blade components and disks are being developed and tested in a multispecimen thermal fatigue fluidized bed facility at IIT Research Institute. This facility is capable of producing severe strains of the degree present in blades and disk components of the SSME. The potential coating systems and current efforts at IITRI being taken for life extension of the SSME components are summarized.

  12. Advances in the electrospark deposition coating process

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, R.N.; Sheldon, G.L.

    1986-11-01

    Electrospark deposition (ESD) is a pulsed-arc microwelding process using short-duration, high-current electrical pulses to deposit an electrode material on a metallic substrate. It is one of the few methods available by which a fused, metallurgically bonded coating can be applied with such a low total heat input that the bulk substrate material remains at or near ambient temperatures. The short duration of the electrical pulse allows an extremely rapid solidification of the deposited material and results in an exceptionally fine-grained, homogeneous coating that approaches (and with some materials, actually is) an amorphous structure. This structure is believed to contribute to the good tribological and corrosion performance observed for hardsurfacing materials used in the demanding environments of high temperatures, liquid metals, and neutron irradiation. A brief historical review of the process is provided, followed by descriptions of the present state of the art and of the performance and applications of electrospark deposition coating in liquid--metal-cooled nuclear reactors.

  13. Silica suspension and coating developments for Advanced LIGO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cagnoli, G.; Armandula, H.; Cantley, C. A.; Crooks, D. R. M.; Cumming, A.; Elliffe, E.; Fejer, M. M.; Gretarsson, A. M.; Harry, G. M.; Heptonstall, A.; Hough, J.; Jones, R.; Mackowski, J.-M.; Martin, I.; Murray, P.; Penn, S. D.; Perreur-Lloyd, M.; Reid, S.; Route, R.; Rowan, S.; Robertson, N. A. A.; Sneddon, P. H.; Strain, K. A.

    2006-03-01

    The proposed upgrade to the LIGO detectors to form the Advanced LIGO detector system is intended to incorporate a low thermal noise monolithic fused silica final stage test mass suspension based on developments of the GEO 600 suspension design. This will include fused silica suspension elements jointed to fused silica test mass substrates, to which dielectric mirror coatings are applied. The silica fibres used for GEO 600 were pulled using a Hydrogen-Oxygen flame system. This successful system has some limitations, however, that needed to be overcome for the more demanding suspensions required for Advanced LIGO. To this end a fibre pulling machine based on a CO2 laser as the heating element is being developed in Glasgow with funding from EGO and PPARC. At the moment a significant limitation for proposed detectors like Advanced LIGO is expected to come from the thermal noise of the mirror coatings. An investigation on mechanical losses of silica/tantala coatings was carried out by several labs involved with Advanced LIGO R&D. Doping the tantala coating layer with titania was found to reduce the coating mechanical dissipation. A review of the results is given here.

  14. Membranes with Surface-Enhanced Antifouling Properties for Water Purification

    PubMed Central

    Shahkaramipour, Nima; Tran, Thien N.; Ramanan, Sankara; Lin, Haiqing

    2017-01-01

    Membrane technology has emerged as an attractive approach for water purification, while mitigation of fouling is key to lower membrane operating costs. This article reviews various materials with antifouling properties that can be coated or grafted onto the membrane surface to improve the antifouling properties of the membranes and thus, retain high water permeance. These materials can be separated into three categories, hydrophilic materials, such as poly(ethylene glycol), polydopamine and zwitterions, hydrophobic materials, such as fluoropolymers, and amphiphilic materials. The states of water in these materials and the mechanisms for the antifouling properties are discussed. The corresponding approaches to coat or graft these materials on the membrane surface are reviewed, and the materials with promising performance are highlighted. PMID:28273869

  15. Advanced Materials and Coatings for Aerospace Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa

    2004-01-01

    In the application area of aerospace tribology, researchers and developers must guarantee the highest degree of reliability for materials, components, and systems. Even a small tribological failure can lead to catastrophic results. The absence of the required knowledge of tribology, as Professor H.P. Jost has said, can act as a severe brake in aerospace vehicle systems-and indeed has already done so. Materials and coatings must be able to withstand the aerospace environments that they encounter, such as vacuum terrestrial, ascent, and descent environments; be resistant to the degrading effects of air, water vapor, sand, foreign substances, and radiation during a lengthy service; be able to withstand the loads, stresses, and temperatures encountered form acceleration and vibration during operation; and be able to support reliable tribological operations in harsh environments throughout the mission of the vehicle. This presentation id divided into two sections: surface properties and technology practice related to aerospace tribology. The first section is concerned with the fundamental properties of the surfaces of solid-film lubricants and related materials and coatings, including carbon nanotubes. The second is devoted to applications. Case studies are used to review some aspects of real problems related to aerospace systems to help engineers and scientists to understand the tribological issues and failures. The nature of each problem is analyzed, and the tribological properties are examined. All the fundamental studies and case studies were conducted at the NASA Glenn Research Center.

  16. ADVANCED HOT SECTION MATERIALS AND COATINGS TEST RIG

    SciTech Connect

    Scott Reome; Dan Davies

    2004-04-30

    The Hyperbaric Advanced Hot Section Materials & Coating Test Rig program provides design and implementation of a laboratory rig capable of simulating the hot gas path conditions of coal-gas fired industrial gas turbine engines. The principal activity during this reporting period were the evaluation of syngas combustor concepts, the evaluation of test section concepts and the selection of the preferred rig configuration.

  17. Case history advanced coatings for water treatment plant components

    SciTech Connect

    Stephenson, L.D.; Kumar, A.

    2008-12-15

    Components of water treatment plants (WTPs) are susceptible to corrosion from constant immersion in water. A case history of corrosion and proximity to chlorine problems and their treatment at an Army WTP is presented. Solutions included using high micro-silica restoration mortar and advanced coal tar epoxy coatings.

  18. Advanced Hot Section Materials and Coatings Test Rig

    SciTech Connect

    Dan Davies

    2004-10-30

    The Hyperbaric Advanced Hot Section Materials & Coating Test Rig program provides design and implementation of a laboratory rig capable of simulating the hot gas path conditions of coal-gas fired industrial gas turbine engines. The principal activities during this reporting period were the continuation of test section detail design and developing specifications for auxiliary systems and facilities.

  19. Degradation of antifouling biocides.

    PubMed

    Callow, M E; Willingham, G L

    1996-01-01

    The relative biodegradability in seawater of a number of compounds in current use in antifouling paints viz. Sea-Nine™ 211 antifoulant (4,5-dichloro-2-n-octyl-4-isothiazolin-3-one), Irgarol(R) 1051 (2-methylthio-4-tert-butylamino-6-cyclopropylamino-s-triazine), diuron (3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)l-l-dimethylurea), chlorothalonil (tetrachloroisophthalonitrile) and TBTO (tributyltin oxide) was investigated. The disappearance of the each compound from seawater was monitored over 8 w by bioassay using the ship-fouling diatom Amphora coffeaeformis. The results show, that under the test conditions employed, biodegradability ranges from very readily biodegradable (Sea-Nine 211) to non-biodegradable (diuron and Irgarol 1051). The results are discussed in relation to published data on biocide degradation.

  20. Thermal and Environmental Barrier Coatings for Advanced Turbine Engine Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dong-Ming; Miller, Robert A.

    2005-01-01

    Ceramic thermal and environmental barrier coatings (T/EBCs) will play a crucial role in advanced gas turbine engine systems because of their ability to significantly increase engine operating temperatures and reduce cooling requirements, thus help achieve engine low emission and high efficiency goals. Advanced T/EBCs are being developed for the low emission SiC/SiC ceramic matrix composite (CMC) combustor applications by extending the CMC liner and vane temperature capability to 1650 C (3000 F) in oxidizing and water vapor containing combustion environments. Low conductivity thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) are also being developed for metallic turbine airfoil and combustor applications, providing the component temperature capability up to 1650 C (3000 F). In this paper, ceramic coating development considerations and requirements for both the ceramic and metallic components will be described for engine high temperature and high-heat-flux applications. The underlying coating failure mechanisms and life prediction approaches will be discussed based on the simulated engine tests and fracture mechanics modeling results.

  1. Coating parameters of zirconium carbide on advanced TRISO fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dulude, Michael C.

    The feasibility of using very high temperature reactors (VHTR) as part of the next generation of nuclear reactors greatly depends on the tri-structural isotropic (TRISO) fuel particles reliability to retain both gaseous and metallic fission products created in irradiated UO2. Most research devoted to TRISO fuel particles has focused on the characteristics and retention ability of silicon carbide as the main barrier against metallic fission products. This work investigates the deposition parameters necessary to create advanced TRISO particles consisting of the standard SiC TRISO coatings with an additional layer of ZrC applied directly to the UO2 fuel kernel. The additional ZrC layer will act as an oxygen getter to prevent failure mechanisms experienced in TRISO particles. Two failure mechanisms that are of the most concern are the over pressurization of the particles and kernel migration within the TRISO particles. In this study successful ZrC coatings were created and the deposition characteristics were analyzed via optical and SEM microscopy techniques. The ZrC layer was confirmed through XRD analysis. This investigation also reduced U3O8 microspheres to UO2 in an argon atmosphere. The oxygen to metal ratio from the reduced U3O8 was back calculated from oxidation analysis performed with a TGA machine. Once consistent repeatability is shown with coating surrogate zirconia kernels, advanced TRISO coatings will be deposited on the UO2 fuel kernels.

  2. Spin-Casting Polymer Brush Films for Stimuli-Responsive and Anti-Fouling Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Xu, Binbin; Feng, Chun; Hu, Jianhua; Shi, Ping; Gu, Guangxin; Wang, Lei; Huang, Xiaoyu

    2016-03-01

    Surfaces modified with amphiphilic polymers can dynamically alter their physicochemical properties in response to changes of their environmental conditions; meanwhile, amphiphilic polymer coatings with molecular hydrophilic and hydrophobic patches, which can mitigate biofouling effectively, are being actively explored as advanced coatings for antifouling materials. Herein, a series of well-defined amphiphilic asymmetric polymer brushes containing hetero side chains, hydrophobic polystyrene (PS) and hydrophilic poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG), was employed to prepare uniform thin films by spin-casting. The properties of these films were investigated by water contact angle, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and quartz crystal microbalance (QCM). AFM showed smooth surfaces for all films with the roughness less than 2 nm. The changes in water contact angle and C/O ratio (XPS) evidenced the enrichment of PEG or PS chains at film surface after exposed to selective solvents, indicative of stimuli- responsiveness. The adsorption of proteins on PEG functionalized surface was quantified by QCM and the results verified that amphiphilic polymer brush films bearing PEG chains could lower or eliminate protein-material interactions and resist to protein adsorption. Cell adhesion experiments were performed by using HaCaT cells and it was found that polymer brush films possess good antifouling ability.

  3. ADVANCED HOT SECTION MATERIALS AND COATINGS TEST RIG

    SciTech Connect

    Scott Reome; Dan Davies

    2004-01-01

    The Hyperbaric Advanced Hot Section Materials & Coating Test Rig program initiated this quarter, provides design and implementation of a laboratory rig capable of simulating the hot gas path conditions of coal-gas fired industrial gas turbine engines. The principle activity during this first reporting period were preparing for and conducting a project kick-off meeting, working through plans for the project implementation, and beginning the conceptual design of the test section.

  4. Advanced Tribological Coatings for High Specific Strength Alloys

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-09-29

    Hard Anodised 4 HSSA12 (SHT) Plasma Nitrided 1 HSSA13 (H&G) Plasma Nitrided 2 HSSA14 (SHT) High Temperature Nitrocarburized 1 HSSA15 (H&G) Nitrox 1...HSSA26 ( High Temperature Plasma Nitriding) has recently arrived, and is currently undergoing metallographic examination. The remaining samples are still...Report No 3789/607 Advanced Tribological Coatings For High Specific Strength Alloys, R&D 5876-MS-01 Contract DAJ A45-87-C-0044 5th Interim Report

  5. Coated Tungsten Powders for Advanced Ordnance Applications, Phase 2, SBIR.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-05-01

    ORDNANCE APPLICATIONS, PHASE II, SBIR May 1992 DTIC BRIAN E. WILLIAMS , JACOB J. STIGLICH, Jr., and DT I F.CTI RICHARD B. KAPLAN 0TO5 199.U Ultramet...Include Security Classification) COATED TUNGSTEN POWDERS FOR ADVANCED ORDNANCE APPLICATIONS, PHASE II, SBIR 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) Brian E. Williams , Jacob...1988 to 30 July 1991. The principal investigator was Richard B. Kaplan, supported by Brian E. Williams as project engineer and Jacob J. Stiglich Jr

  6. Improved estimates of environmental copper release rates from antifouling products.

    PubMed

    Finnie, Alistair A

    2006-01-01

    The US Navy Dome method for measuring copper release rates from antifouling paint in-service on ships' hulls can be considered to be the most reliable indicator of environmental release rates. In this paper, the relationship between the apparent copper release rate and the environmental release rate is established for a number of antifouling coating types using data from a variety of available laboratory, field and calculation methods. Apart from a modified Dome method using panels, all laboratory, field and calculation methods significantly overestimate the environmental release rate of copper from antifouling coatings. The difference is greatest for self-polishing copolymer antifoulings (SPCs) and smallest for certain erodible/ablative antifoulings, where the ASTM/ISO standard and the CEPE calculation method are seen to typically overestimate environmental release rates by factors of about 10 and 4, respectively. Where ASTM/ISO or CEPE copper release rate data are used for environmental risk assessment or regulatory purposes, it is proposed that the release rate values should be divided by a correction factor to enable more reliable generic environmental risk assessments to be made. Using a conservative approach based on a realistic worst case and accounting for experimental uncertainty in the data that are currently available, proposed default correction factors for use with all paint types are 5.4 for the ASTM/ISO method and 2.9 for the CEPE calculation method. Further work is required to expand this data-set and refine the correction factors through correlation of laboratory measured and calculated copper release rates with the direct in situ environmental release rate for different antifouling paints under a range of environmental conditions.

  7. Advanced stent coating for drug delivery and in vivo biocompatibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yi; Wang, Wuchen; Acharya, Gayathri; Shim, Yoon-Bo; Choe, Eun Sang; Lee, Chi H.

    2013-10-01

    As an effort to alleviate stent-induced cardiovascular injury including restenosis and thrombosis, advanced drug-eluting stent (ADES) with a bilayer construct composed of a top-coat made of collagen and a base-coat incorporated with N-nitrosomelatonin (NOMela)-loaded PLGA nanoparticles has been developed. NOMela is a hydrophobic prodrug of nitric oxide (NO) that is an endogenous anti-platelet compound. ADES was coated with PLGA nanoparticles via either electrophoretic deposition (EPD) technique or dip-coating technique, and their coating characteristics and efficacies were compared. The drug-loading efficacy and in vitro drug-release profiles from ADES were expressed with various variables including the additives to the collagen layer, the number of layers of the collagen top-coat, the hydrophobicity/hydrophilicity of the loaded drug, the coating technique of nanoparticles, and the concentration of coating emulsions in the EPD method. The morphological status of cross-section and surface of ADES was evaluated by laser scanning confocal microscope and scanning electronic microscope. The real-time release profiles of NO were assessed using the NO-microbiosensor. The anti-platelet activity of ADES was evaluated on the rabbit whole blood using an aggregometer. The intima formation and protein expression in aorta were examined using an in vivo rat model. Both collagen and PLGA used in ADES are biodegradable polymers that fully degrade and consequently produce less inflammation responses. NO released from ADES significantly reduced platelet aggregation in the rabbit blood as compared with those exposed to the control stents. ADES coated with a double layer consisted of collagen and PLGA and containing NOMela was less antigenic at the implanted sites and alleviating intima formation and thrombosis. An external exposure of aorta to NO elicits distinct and specific effects on mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (Ca

  8. Thin coatings for heavy industry: Advanced coatings for pipes and valves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vernhes, Luc

    Pipes and valves are pressure vessels that regulate the flow of materials (liquids, gases, and slurries) by controlling the passageways. To optimize processes, reduce costs, and comply with government regulations, original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) must maintain their products in state-of-the-art condition. The first valves were invented over 3,000 years ago to supply water to farms and cities. They were made with bronze alloys, providing good corrosion resistance and acceptable tribological performance. The industrial revolution drove manufacturers to develop new and improved tribological materials. In the 20th century, innovative alloys such as Monel copper-nickel and Stellite cobalt-chrome as well as hard chrome plating were introduced to better control tribological properties and maximize in-service life. Since then, new materials have been regularly introduced to extend the range of applications for valves. For example, Teflon fluoropolymers are used in corrosive chemical and petrochemical processes, the nickel-based superalloys Hastelloy and Inconel for petrochemical applications, and creep-resistant chromium-rich F91 steel for supercritical power plants. Recently, the valve industry has embraced the use of hard thermal sprayed coatings for the most demanding applications, and is investing heavily in research to develop the most suitable coatings for specific uses. There is increasing evidence that the optimal solution to erosive, corrosive, and fretting wear problems lies in the design and manufacture of multi-layer, graded, and/or nanostructured coatings and coating systems that combine controlled hardness with high elastic modulus, high toughness, and good adhesion. The overall objectives of this thesis were 1) to report on advances in the development of structurally controlled hard protective coatings with tailored mechanical, elastoplastic, and thermal properties; and 2) to describe enhanced wear-, erosion-, and corrosion-resistance and other

  9. Antifouling Compounds from Marine Macroalgae.

    PubMed

    Dahms, Hans Uwe; Dobretsov, Sergey

    2017-08-28

    Marine macroalgae produce a wide variety of biologically-active metabolites that have been developed into commercial products, such as antibiotics, immunosuppressive, anti-inflammatory, cytotoxic agents, and cosmetic products. Many marine algae remain clean over longer periods of time, suggesting their strong antifouling potential. Isolation of biogenic compounds and the determination of their structure could provide leads for the development of environmentally-friendly antifouling paints. Isolated substances with potent antifouling activity belong to fatty acids, lipopeptides, amides, alkaloids, lactones, steroids, terpenoids, and pyrroles. It is unclear as yet to what extent symbiotic microorganisms are involved in the synthesis of these compounds. Algal secondary metabolites have the potential to be produced commercially using genetic and metabolic engineering techniques. This review provides an overview of publications from 2010 to February 2017 about antifouling activity of green, brown, and red algae. Some researchers were focusing on antifouling compounds of brown macroalgae, while metabolites of green algae received less attention. Several studies tested antifouling activity against bacteria, microalgae and invertebrates, but in only a few studies was the quorum sensing inhibitory activity of marine macroalgae tested. Rarely, antifouling compounds from macroalgae were isolated and tested in an ecologically-relevant way.

  10. PEG-b-AGE Polymer Coated Magnetic Nanoparticle Probes with Facile Functionalization and Anti-fouling Properties for Reducing Non-specific Uptake and Improving Biomarker Targeting

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Liya; Huang, Jing; Wu, Hui; Cheng, Guojun; Zhou, Zhengyang; MacDonald, Tobey; Yang, Lily; Mao, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Non-specific surface adsorption of bio-macromolecules (e.g. proteins) on nanoparticles, known as biofouling, and the uptake of nanoparticles by the mononuclear phagocyte system (MPS) and reticuloendothelial system (RES) lead to substantial reduction in the efficiency of target-directed imaging and delivery in biomedical applications of engineered nanomaterials in vitro and in vivo. In this work, a novel copolymer consisting of blocks of poly ethylene glycol and allyl glycidyl ether (PEG-b-AGE) was developed for coating magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) to reduce non-specific protein adhesion that leads to formation of “protein corona” and uptake by macrophages. The facile surface functionalization was demonstrated by using targeting ligands of a small peptide of RGD or a whole protein of transferrin (Tf). The PEG-b-AGE coated IONPs exhibited anti-biofouling properties with significantly reduced protein corona formation and non-specific uptake by macrophages before and after the surface functionalization, thus improving targeting of RGD-conjugated PEG-b-AGE coated IONPs to integrins in U87MG glioblastoma and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells that overexpress αvβ3 integrins, and Tf-conjugated PEG-b-AGE coated IONPs to transferrin receptor (TfR) in D556 and Daoy medulloblastoma cancer cells with high overexpression of transferrin receptor, compared to respective control cell lines. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of cancer cells treated with targeted IONPs with or without anti-biofouling PEG-b-AGE coating polymers demonstrated the target specific MRI contrast change using anti-biofouling PEG-b-AGE coated IONP with minimal off-targeted background compared to the IONPs without anti-biofouling coating, promising the highly efficient active targeting of nanoparticle imaging probes and drug delivery systems and potential applications of imaging quantification of targeted biomarkers. PMID:26594360

  11. PEG-b-AGE Polymer Coated Magnetic Nanoparticle Probes with Facile Functionalization and Anti-fouling Properties for Reducing Non-specific Uptake and Improving Biomarker Targeting.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuancheng; Lin, Run; Wang, Liya; Huang, Jing; Wu, Hui; Cheng, Guojun; Zhou, Zhengyang; MacDonald, Tobey; Yang, Lily; Mao, Hui

    2015-05-07

    Non-specific surface adsorption of bio-macromolecules (e.g. proteins) on nanoparticles, known as biofouling, and the uptake of nanoparticles by the mononuclear phagocyte system (MPS) and reticuloendothelial system (RES) lead to substantial reduction in the efficiency of target-directed imaging and delivery in biomedical applications of engineered nanomaterials in vitro and in vivo. In this work, a novel copolymer consisting of blocks of poly ethylene glycol and allyl glycidyl ether (PEG-b-AGE) was developed for coating magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) to reduce non-specific protein adhesion that leads to formation of "protein corona" and uptake by macrophages. The facile surface functionalization was demonstrated by using targeting ligands of a small peptide of RGD or a whole protein of transferrin (Tf). The PEG-b-AGE coated IONPs exhibited anti-biofouling properties with significantly reduced protein corona formation and non-specific uptake by macrophages before and after the surface functionalization, thus improving targeting of RGD-conjugated PEG-b-AGE coated IONPs to integrins in U87MG glioblastoma and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells that overexpress αvβ3 integrins, and Tf-conjugated PEG-b-AGE coated IONPs to transferrin receptor (TfR) in D556 and Daoy medulloblastoma cancer cells with high overexpression of transferrin receptor, compared to respective control cell lines. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of cancer cells treated with targeted IONPs with or without anti-biofouling PEG-b-AGE coating polymers demonstrated the target specific MRI contrast change using anti-biofouling PEG-b-AGE coated IONP with minimal off-targeted background compared to the IONPs without anti-biofouling coating, promising the highly efficient active targeting of nanoparticle imaging probes and drug delivery systems and potential applications of imaging quantification of targeted biomarkers.

  12. Advanced Hot Section Materials and Coatings Test Rig

    SciTech Connect

    Dan Davis

    2006-09-30

    Phase I of the Hyperbaric Advanced Hot Section Materials & Coating Test Rig Program has been successfully completed. Florida Turbine Technologies has designed and planned the implementation of a laboratory rig capable of simulating the hot gas path conditions of coal gas fired industrial gas turbine engines. Potential uses of this rig include investigations into environmental attack of turbine materials and coatings exposed to syngas, erosion, and thermal-mechanical fatigue. The principle activities during Phase 1 of this project included providing several conceptual designs for the test section, evaluating various syngas-fueled rig combustor concepts, comparing the various test section concepts and then selecting a configuration for detail design. Conceptual definition and requirements of auxiliary systems and facilities were also prepared. Implementation planning also progressed, with schedules prepared and future project milestones defined. The results of these tasks continue to show rig feasibility, both technically and economically.

  13. Reducing Non-Specific Binding and Uptake of Nanoparticles and Improving Cell Targeting with an Antifouling PEO-b-PγMPS Copolymer Coating

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hongwei; Yeh, Julie; Wang, Liya; Wu, Xinying; Cao, Zehong; Wang, Y. Andrew; Zhang, Minming; Yang, Lily; Mao, Hui

    2010-01-01

    One of the major limitations impeding the sensitivity and specificity of biomarker targeted nanoparticles is non-specific binding by biomolecules and uptake by the reticuloendothelial system (RES). We report the development of an antibiofouling polysiloxane containing amphiphilic diblock copolymer, poly(ethylene oxide)-block-poly(γ-methacryloxypropyltrimethoxysilane) (PEO-b-PγMPS), for coating and functionalizing high quality hydrophobic nanocrystals such as iron oxide nanoparticles and quantum dots. These PEO-b-PγMPS coated nanocrystals were colloidally stable in biological medium and showed low non-specific binding by macromolecules after incubation with 100% fetal bovine serum. Both in vitro experiments with macrophages and in vivo biodistribution studies in mice revealed that PEO-b-PγMPS copolymer coated nanocrystals have an antibiofouling effect that reduces non-specific cell and RES uptake. Surface functionalization with amine groups was accomplished through co-crosslinking the polysiloxane coating layer and (3-Aminopropyl) trimethoxysilane in aqueous solution. Tumor integrin αvβ3 targeting peptide cyclo-RGD ligands were conjugated on the nanoparticles through a heterobifunctional linker. The resulting integrin αvβ3 targeting nanoparticle conjugates showed improved cancer cell targeting with a stronger affinity to U87MG glioma cells, which have a high expression of αvβ3 integrins, but minimal binding to MCF-7 (low expression of αvβ3 integrins). PMID:20398933

  14. Antifouling membranes for sustainable water purification: strategies and mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Runnan; Liu, Yanan; He, Mingrui; Su, Yanlei; Zhao, Xueting; Elimelech, Menachem; Jiang, Zhongyi

    2016-10-24

    One of the greatest challenges to the sustainability of modern society is an inadequate supply of clean water. Due to its energy-saving and cost-effective features, membrane technology has become an indispensable platform technology for water purification, including seawater and brackish water desalination as well as municipal or industrial wastewater treatment. However, membrane fouling, which arises from the nonspecific interaction between membrane surface and foulants, significantly impedes the efficient application of membrane technology. Preparing antifouling membranes is a fundamental strategy to deal with pervasive fouling problems from a variety of foulants. In recent years, major advancements have been made in membrane preparation techniques and in elucidating the antifouling mechanisms of membrane processes, including ultrafiltration, nanofiltration, reverse osmosis and forward osmosis. This review will first introduce the major foulants and the principal mechanisms of membrane fouling, and then highlight the development, current status and future prospects of antifouling membranes, including antifouling strategies, preparation techniques and practical applications. In particular, the strategies and mechanisms for antifouling membranes, including passive fouling resistance and fouling release, active off-surface and on-surface strategies, will be proposed and discussed extensively.

  15. Advanced manufacturing technologies for the BeCOAT telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sweeney, Michael N.; Rajic, Slobodan; Seals, Roland D.

    1994-02-01

    The beryllium cryogenic off-axis telescope (BeCOAT) uses a two-mirror, non re-imaging, off- axis, Ritchey Chretian design with all-beryllium optics, structures and baffles. The purpose of this telescope is the system level demonstration of advanced manufacturing technologies for optics, optical benches, and baffle assemblies. The key issues that are addressed are single point diamond turning of beryllium optics, survivable fastening techniques, minimum beryllium utilization, and technologies leading to self-aligning, all-beryllium optical systems.

  16. The effect of surface colour on the adhesion strength of Elminius modestus Darwin on a commercial non-biocidal antifouling coating at two locations in the UK.

    PubMed

    Robson, Martha A; Williams, David; Wolff, Kirsten; Thomason, Jeremy C

    2009-01-01

    A number of factors affect the adhesion strength of organisms to fouling-release coatings, and except for a few studies focussing on black or white surfaces none have dealt specifically with the effect of coating colour. The aim was to test the effect of colour on the adhesion strength of the barnacle Elminius modestus. Panels coated in six commercial colours of Intersleek 700 were submerged at two field sites and barnacles were pushed-off using a standard assay procedure. The strength of adhesion (SOA) varied between and within sites for colour and by barnacle basal area, SOA per unit area being higher for smaller barnacles. Higher SOA with a small basal area may be because of size-specific predation, differential hydrodynamic effects or adhesive failure with age. The complex effect of colour on barnacle adhesion may be because of physico-chemical surface characteristics varying with pigments, and their interactions with local environmental conditions, as well as interactions with the settling barnacle larvae.

  17. Facile modification of electrospun fibrous structures with antifouling zwitterionic hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Xu, Tong; Yang, Jing; Zhang, Jiamin; Zhu, Yingnan; Li, Qingsi; Pan, Chao; Zhang, Lei

    2017-09-01

    Electrospinning technology can easily produce different shaped fibrous structures, making them highly valuable to various biomedical applications. However, surface contamination of biomolecules, cells, or blood has emerged as a significant challenge to the success of electrospun devices, especially artificial blood vessels, catheters and wound dressings etc. Many efforts have been made to resist the surface non-specific biomolecules or cells adsorption, but most of them require complex pre-treatment processes, hard-to-remove metal catalysts or rigorous reaction conditions. In addition, the stability of antifouling coatings, especially in complex conditions, is still a major concern. In this work, inspired by the interpenetrating polymer network (IPN) and reinforced concrete structure, an efficient and facile strategy for modifying hydrophobic electrospun meshes and tubes with antifouling zwitterionic hydrogels has been introduced. The resulting products could efficiently resist the adhesion of proteins, cells, or even fresh whole blood. Meanwhile, they could maintain the shapes and mechanical strength of the original electrospun structures. Furthermore, the hydrogel structures could retain stable in a physiological condition for at least 3 months. This paper provided a general antifouling and hydrophilicity surface modification strategy for various fibrous structures, and could be of great value for many biomedical applications where antifouling properties are critical. © 2017 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  18. Comparative environmental assessment of biocides used in antifouling paints.

    PubMed

    Voulvoulis, Nikolaos; Scrimshaw, Mark D; Lester, John N

    2002-05-01

    In response to increasing scientific evidence on the toxicity and persistence of organotin residues from antifouling paints in the aquatic environment, the use of triorganotin antifouling products was banned on boats of less than 25 m length in many countries during 1987. Alternatives to tributyltin (TBT) paint are mainly copper based coatings containing organic booster biocides to improve the efficacy of the formulation, and have been utilised on small boats for the last 10 years. With policies encouraging a total ban on TBT, it is expected that these biocides will be used to a greater extent in the future. Limited data and information are available on the environmental occurrence, fate, toxicity, and persistence of these biocides, and thus any decisions on policies regulating antifoulants cannot be fully informed. In this study, a multicriteria comparison of alternative biocides, based on a general assessment of available information in the literature, provided support for the use of the precautionary principle with respect to policies on antifouling products. This assessment was validated by a more detailed comparison of four selected biocides and TBT. Results indicate that TCMS pyridine and TCMTB demonstrate environmental characteristics similar to TBT and thus detail risk assessments are needed before their use is permitted. The widespread use of the other biocides should be allowed only after research to fill the gaps in knowledge with respect to their toxicity and persistence in aquatic environments.

  19. Inhibition of marine bacteria by extracts of macroalgae: potential use for environmentally friendly antifouling paints.

    PubMed

    Hellio, C; De La Broise, D; Dufossé, L; Le Gal, Y; Bourgougnon, N

    2001-09-01

    Although a total ban on the use of TBT coatings is not expected in the short term, there is a growing need for environmentally safe antifouling systems. A search for new non-toxic antifoulants has been carried out among marine macroalgae. Antifouling activity of aqueous, ethanolic and dichloromethane extracts from 30 marine algae from Brittany coast (France) was examined in vitro against 35 isolates of marine bacteria. About 20% of the extracts were found to be active. The high levels of inhibitory activities against bacteria recorded in some extracts and the absence of toxicity on the development of oyster and sea urchin larvae and to mouse fibroblast growth suggests a potential for novel active ingredients in antifouling preparations.

  20. The development of a marine natural product-based antifouling paint.

    PubMed

    Burgess, J Grant; Boyd, Kenneth G; Armstrong, Evelyn; Jiang, Zhong; Yan, Liming; Berggren, Matz; May, Ulrika; Pisacane, Tony; Granmo, Ake; Adams, David R

    2003-04-01

    Problems with tin and copper antifouling compounds have highlighted the need to develop new environmentally friendly antifouling coatings. Bacteria isolated from living surfaces in the marine environment are a promising source of natural antifouling compounds. Four isolates were used to produce extracts that were formulated into ten water-based paints. All but one of the paints showed activity against a test panel of fouling bacteria. Five of the paints were further tested for their ability to inhibit the settlement of barnacle larvae, Balanus amphitrite, and algal spores of Ulva lactuca, and for their ability to inhibit the growth of U. lactuca. Two paints caused a significant decrease in the number of settled barnacles. One paint containing extract of Pseudomonas sp. strain NUDMB50-11, showed excellent activity in all assays. The antifouling chemicals responsible for the activity of the extract were isolated, using bioassay guided fractionation, and their chemical structures determined.

  1. Design and mechanisms of antifouling materials for surface plasmon resonance sensors.

    PubMed

    Liu, Boshi; Liu, Xia; Shi, Se; Huang, Renliang; Su, Rongxin; Qi, Wei; He, Zhimin

    2016-08-01

    Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensors have many possible applications, but are limited by sensor chip surface fouling, which blocks immobilization and specific binding by the recognizer elements. Therefore, there is a pressing need for the development of antifouling surfaces. In this paper, the mechanisms of antifouling materials were firstly discussed, including both theories (hydration and steric hindrance) and factors influencing antifouling effects (molecular structures and self-assembled monolayer (SAM) architectures, surface charges, molecular hydrophilicity, and grafting thickness and density). Then, the most recent advances in antifouling materials applied on SPR biosensors were systematically reviewed, together with the grafting strategies, antifouling capacity, as well as their merits and demerits. These materials included, but not limited to, zwitterionic compounds, polyethylene glycol-based, and polysaccharide-based materials. Finally, the prospective research directions in the development of SPR antifouling materials were discussed. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) is a powerful tool in monitoring biomolecular interactions. The principle of SPR biosensors is the conversion of refractive index change caused by molecular binding into resonant spectral shifts. However, the fouling on the surface of SPR gold chips is ubiquitous and troublesome. It limits the application of SPR biosensors by blocking recognition element immobilization and specific binding. Hence, we write this paper to review the antifouling mechanisms and the recent advances of the design of antifouling materials that can improve the accuracy and sensitivity of SPR biosensors. To our knowledge, this is the first review focusing on the antifouling materials that were applied or had potential to be applied on SPR biosensors. Copyright © 2016 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Research on chemical vapor deposition processes for advanced ceramic coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosner, Daniel E.

    1993-01-01

    Our interdisciplinary background and fundamentally-oriented studies of the laws governing multi-component chemical vapor deposition (VD), particle deposition (PD), and their interactions, put the Yale University HTCRE Laboratory in a unique position to significantly advance the 'state-of-the-art' of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) R&D. With NASA-Lewis RC financial support, we initiated a program in March of 1988 that has led to the advances described in this report (Section 2) in predicting chemical vapor transport in high temperature systems relevant to the fabrication of refractory ceramic coatings for turbine engine components. This Final Report covers our principal results and activities for the total NASA grant of $190,000. over the 4.67 year period: 1 March 1988-1 November 1992. Since our methods and the technical details are contained in the publications listed (9 Abstracts are given as Appendices) our emphasis here is on broad conclusions/implications and administrative data, including personnel, talks, interactions with industry, and some known applications of our work.

  3. Preparation and Analysis of Type II Xerogel Films with Antifouling/Foul Release Characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolova, Anastasiya

    In order to combat biofouling, xerogel coatings comprised of aminopropyl, fluorocarbon, and hydrocarbon silanes were prepared and tested for their antifouling/foul release properties against Ulva, Navicula, barnacles, and tubeworms. Many of the coatings showed settlement and removal of Ulva to be as good as or better than the poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMSE) standard. Barnacle removal assays showed excellent results for some coatings while others did not fair so well. The best foul release coatings for barnacles were comprised of aminopropyl/hydrocarbon- and fluorocarbon/hydrocarbon-modified silanes. For the majority of coatings tested, water wettability and surface energy did not play a role in the antifouling/ foul release properties of the coatings.

  4. Antifouling activities of marine bacteria associated with sponge ( Sigmadocia sp.)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satheesh, S.; Soniamby, A. R.; Sunjaiy Shankar, C. V.; Mary Josephine Punitha, S.

    2012-09-01

    The present study aimed at assessing the antifouling activity of bacteria associated with marine sponges. A total of eight bacterial strains were isolated from the surface of sponge Sigmadocia sp., of them, SS02, SS05 and SS06 showed inhibitory activity against biofilm-forming bacteria. The extracts of these 3 strains considerably affected the extracellular polymeric substance producing ability and adhesion of biofilm-forming bacterial strains. In addition to disc diffusion assay, microalgal settlement assay was carried out with the extracts mixed with polyurethane wood polish and coated onto stainless steel coupons. The extract of strain SS05 showed strong microalgal settlement inhibitory activity. Strain SS05 was identified as Bacillus cereus based on its 16S rRNA gene. Metabolites of the bacterial strains associated with marine invertebrates promise to be developed into environment-friendly antifouling agents.

  5. Influence of antifouling paint on freshwater invertebrates (Mytilidae, Chironomidae and Naididae): density, richness and composition.

    PubMed

    Fujita, D S; Takeda, A M; Coutinho, R; Fernandes, F C

    2015-11-01

    We conducted a study about invertebrates on artificial substrates with different antifouling paints in order to answer the following questions 1) is there lower accumulation of organic matter on substrates with antifouling paints, 2) is invertebrate colonization influenced by the release of biocides from antifouling paints, 3) is the colonization of aquatic invertebrates positively influenced by the material accumulated upon the substrate surface and 4) is the assemblage composition of invertebrates similar among the different antifouling paints? To answer these questions, four structures were installed in the Baía River in February 1st, 2007. Each structure was composed of 7 wood boards: 5 boards painted with each type of antifouling paints (T1, T2, T3, T4 and T5), one painted only with the primer (Pr) and the other without any paint (Cn). After 365 days, we observed a greater accumulation of organic matter in the substrates with T2 and T3 paint coatings. Limnoperna fortunei was recorded in all tested paints, with higher densities in the control, primer, T2 and T3. The colonization of Chironomidae and Naididae on the substrate was positively influenced by L. fortunei density. The non-metric multidimensional scaling (NMDS) of the invertebrate community provided evidence of the clear distinction of invertebrate assemblages among the paints. Paints T2 and T3 were the most similar to the control and primer. Our results suggest that antifouling paints applied on substrates hinder invertebrate colonization by decreasing the density and richness of invertebrates.

  6. Advanced Porous Coating for Low-Density Ceramic Insulation Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leiser, Daniel B.; Churchward, Rex; Katvala, Victor; Stewart, David; Balter, Aliza

    1988-01-01

    The need for improved coatings on low-density reusable surface insulation (RSI) materials used on the space shuttle has stimulated research into developing tougher coatings. The processing of a new porous composite "coating" for RST called toughened unipiece fibrous insulation Is discussed. Characteristics including performance in a simulated high-speed atmospheric entry, morphological structure before and after this exposure, resistance to Impact, and thermal response to a typical heat pulse are described. It is shown that this coating has improved impact resistance while maintaining optical and thermal properties comparable to the previously available reaction-cured glass coating.

  7. Advanced Porous Coating for Low-Density Ceramic Insulation Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leiser, Daniel B.; Churchward, Rex; Katvala, Victor; Stewart, David; Balter, Aliza

    1988-01-01

    The need for improved coatings on low-density reusable surface insulation (RSI) materials used on the space shuttle has stimulated research into developing tougher coatings. The processing of a new porous composite "coating" for RST called toughened unipiece fibrous insulation Is discussed. Characteristics including performance in a simulated high-speed atmospheric entry, morphological structure before and after this exposure, resistance to Impact, and thermal response to a typical heat pulse are described. It is shown that this coating has improved impact resistance while maintaining optical and thermal properties comparable to the previously available reaction-cured glass coating.

  8. Copper emissions from antifouling paint on recreational vessels.

    PubMed

    Schiff, Kenneth; Diehl, Dario; Valkirs, Aldis

    2004-02-01

    Trace metals, especially copper, are commonly occurring contaminants in harbors and marinas. One source of copper to these environs is copper-based antifouling coatings used on vessel hulls. The objective of this study was to measure dissolved copper contributions from recreational vessel antifouling coatings for both passive leaching and hull cleaning activities. To accomplish this goal, three coating formulations, including hard vinyl, modified epoxy and a biocide free bottom paint were applied on fiberglass panels and placed in a harbor environment. In situ measurements of passive leaching were made using a recirculating dome system. Monthly average flux rates of dissolved copper for the hard vinyl and modified epoxy coatings were 3.7 and 4.3 microg/cm(2)/day, respectively, while flux rates for the biocide free coating was 0.2 microg/cm(2)/day. The highest passive flux rates were measured initially after cleaning activities, rapidly decreasing to a baseline rate within three days, regardless of copper-based coating formulation. Hull cleaning activities generated between 8.6 and 3.8 microg dissolved copper/cm(2)/event for the modified epoxy and hard vinyl coatings, respectively. Aggressive cleaning using an abrasive product doubled the copper emissions from the modified epoxy coating, but produced virtually no change in the much tougher hard vinyl coating. When compared on a mass basis, roughly 95% of copper is emitted during passive leaching compared to hull cleaning activities over a monthly time period for a typical 9.1 m power boat.

  9. Advanced thermal barrier coatings for operation in high hydrogen content fueled gas turbines.

    SciTech Connect

    Sampath, Sanjay

    2015-04-02

    The Center for Thermal Spray Research (CTSR) at Stony Brook University in partnership with its industrial Consortium for Thermal Spray Technology is investigating science and technology related to advanced metallic alloy bond coats and ceramic thermal barrier coatings for applications in the hot section of gasified coal-based high hydrogen turbine power systems. In conjunction with our OEM partners (GE and Siemens) and through strategic partnership with Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) (materials degradation group and high temperature materials laboratory), a systems approach, considering all components of the TBC (multilayer ceramic top coat, metallic bond coat & superalloy substrate) is being taken during multi-layered coating design, process development and subsequent environmental testing. Recent advances in process science and advanced in situ thermal spray coating property measurement enabled within CTSR has been incorporated for full-field enhancement of coating and process reliability. The development of bond coat processing during this program explored various aspects of processing and microstructure and linked them to performance. The determination of the bond coat material was carried out during the initial stages of the program. Based on tests conducted both at Stony Brook University as well as those carried out at ORNL it was determined that the NiCoCrAlYHfSi (Amdry) bond coats had considerable benefits over NiCoCrAlY bond coats. Since the studies were also conducted at different cycling frequencies, thereby addressing an associated need for performance under different loading conditions, the Amdry bond coat was selected as the material of choice going forward in the program. With initial investigations focused on the fabrication of HVOF bond coats and the performance of TBC under furnace cycle tests , several processing strategies were developed. Two-layered HVOF bond coats were developed to render optimal balance of density and surface roughness

  10. Thermal and Environmental Barrier Coating Development for Advanced Propulsion Engine Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming; Miller, Robert A.; Fox, Dennis S.

    2008-01-01

    Ceramic thermal and environmental barrier coatings (TEBCs) are used in gas turbine engines to protect engine hot-section components in the harsh combustion environments, and extend component lifetimes. Advanced TEBCs that have significantly lower thermal conductivity, better thermal stability and higher toughness than current coatings will be beneficial for future low emission and high performance propulsion engine systems. In this paper, ceramic coating design and testing considerations will be described for turbine engine high temperature and high-heat-flux applications. Thermal barrier coatings for metallic turbine airfoils and thermal/environmental barrier coatings for SiC/SiC ceramic matrix composite (CMC) components for future supersonic aircraft propulsion engines will be emphasized. Further coating capability and durability improvements for the engine hot-section component applications can be expected by utilizing advanced modeling and design tools.

  11. Development of Advanced Thermal and Environmental Barrier Coatings Using a High-Heat-Flux Testing Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming; Miller, Robert A.

    2003-01-01

    The development of low conductivity, robust thermal and environmental barrier coatings requires advanced testing techniques that can accurately and effectively evaluate coating thermal conductivity and cyclic resistance at very high surface temperatures (up to 1700 C) under large thermal gradients. In this study, a laser high-heat-flux test approach is established for evaluating advanced low conductivity, high temperature capability thermal and environmental barrier coatings under the NASA Ultra Efficient Engine Technology (UEET) program. The test approach emphasizes the real-time monitoring and assessment of the coating thermal conductivity, which initially rises under the steady-state high temperature thermal gradient test due to coating sintering, and later drops under the cyclic thermal gradient test due to coating cracking/delamination. The coating system is then evaluated based on damage accumulation and failure after the combined steady-state and cyclic thermal gradient tests. The lattice and radiation thermal conductivity of advanced ceramic coatings can also be evaluated using laser heat-flux techniques. The external radiation resistance of the coating is assessed based on the measured specimen temperature response under a laser- heated intense radiation-flux source. The coating internal radiation contribution is investigated based on the measured apparent coating conductivity increases with the coating surface test temperature under large thermal gradient test conditions. Since an increased radiation contribution is observed at these very high surface test temperatures, by varying the laser heat-flux and coating average test temperature, the complex relation between the lattice and radiation conductivity as a function of surface and interface test temperature may be derived.

  12. Protection of Advanced Copper Alloys With Lean Cu-Cr Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenbauer-Seng, L. (Technical Monitor); Thomas-Ogbuji, L.

    2003-01-01

    Advanced copper alloys are used as liners of rocket thrusters and nozzle ramps to ensure dissipation of the high thermal load generated during launch, and Cr-lean coatings are preferred for the protection of these liners from the aggressive ambient environment. It is shown that adequate protection can be achieved with thin Cu-Cr coatings containing as little as 17 percent Cr.

  13. Public Notice: Advanced Coatings Company Inc., CWA-01-2015-0034

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Notice of Proposed Assessment of Class II Clean Water Act Section 309(g)(2)(B) and 311(b)(6)(B)(ii) Administrative Penalties and Opportunity to Comment for Advanced Coatings Company Inc., CWA-01-2015-0034

  14. Public Notice: Advanced Coatings Company Inc., CWA-01-2015-0034

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Notice of Proposed Assessment of Class II Clean Water Act Section 309(g)(2)(B) and 311(b)(6)(B)(ii) Administrative Penalties and Opportunity to Comment for Advanced Coatings Company Inc., CWA-01-2015-0034

  15. Bio-inspired Design Approached Antifouling Strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzsimons, L.; Chapman, J.; Lawlor, A.; Regan, F.

    2012-04-01

    Biofouling exists as the undesirable accumulation of flora and fauna on a given substrate when immersed into an aquatic media. Its presence causes a range of deleterious effects for anyone faced in tackling the problem, which is more than often financially testing. Generally, the initial biofouling stage is stochastic and the attachment of microorganisms held fast in biofilm matrices is irreversible. Stability of the biofilm occurs when exopolymeric substances (EPS) are produced forming a protective surrounding, allowing the cohered microorganisms to colonise and thrive upon the surface. Therefore, if this initial stage of biofilm development can be prevented then it could be possible to prevent subsequent macro events that ensue. Environmental monitoring is one area that faces this challenge and forms the impetus of the work presented herein. In order to improve a monitoring device's lifetime, surface coatings with biocidal agents are applied to counteract these steps. This work shows the development of a range of novel materials, which demonstrate the ability to counteract and inhibit the initial stages of biofouling for monitoring devices. Natural bio-inspired surfaces have been developed using nano-functionalised coatings. All materials are tested in the field and positive results in reducing the biofouling challenge are demonstrated. The results from the deployment of antifouling materials, together with real-time, long-term water quality data from the test site are also shown.

  16. Investigation of PACVD protective coating processes using advanced diagnostics techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Roman, W.C.

    1993-05-07

    Objective is to understand the mechanisms governing nonequilibrium plasma atomistic or molecular deposition of hard face coatings. Laser diagnostic methods include coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) and laser-induced fluorescence. TiB[sub 2] and diamonds were used as the hard face coating materials. Diborane was used as precursor to TiB[sub 2].

  17. Advanced Thermal-Barrier Bond Coatings for Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Secura, Stephen

    1987-01-01

    New and improved bond coatings developed for use in thermal-barrier systems on Ni, Co-, and Fe-base alloy substrates. Use of these new bond coatings, containing ytterbium instead of yttrium, significantly increased lives of resultant thermal-barrier systems. Uses include many load-bearing applications in high-temperature, hostile environments.

  18. Proceedings of the 1987 coatings for advanced heat engines workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-01-01

    This Workshop was conducted to enhance communication among those involved in coating development for improved heat engine performance and durability. We were fortunate to have Bill Goward review the steady progress and problems encountered along the way in the use of thermal barrier coatings (TBC) in aircraft gas turbine engines. Navy contractors discussed their work toward the elusive goal of qualifying TBC for turbine airfoil applications. In the diesel community, Caterpillar and Cummins are developing TBC for combustion chamber components as part of the low heat rejection diesel engine concept. The diesel engine TBC work is based on gas turbine technology with a goal of more than twice the thickness used on gas turbine engine components. Adoption of TBC in production for diesel engines could justify a new generation of plasma spray coating equipment. Increasing interests in tribology were evident in this Workshop. Coatings have a significant role in reducing friction and wear under greater mechanical loadings at higher temperatures. The emergence of a high temperature synthetic lubricant could have an enormous impact on diesel engine design and operating conditions. The proven coating processes such as plasma spray, electron-beam physical vapor deposition, sputtering, and chemical vapor deposition have shown enhanced capabilities, particularly with microprocessor controls. Also, the newer coating schemes such as ion implantation and cathodic arc are demonstrating intriguing potential for engine applications. Coatings will play an expanding role in higher efficiency, more durable heat engines.

  19. Protective coatings for FUV to NIR advanced telescope mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balasubramanian, Kunjithapatham; Nikzad, S.; Hennessy, J.; Raouf, N.; Green, J. C.; Scowen, P. A.

    2014-01-01

    The NASA Cosmic Origins Program Annual Technology Report of Oct 2011 defined the goal for the “Development of UV coatings with high reflectivity (>90-95%), high uniformity (<1-0.1%), and wide bandpasses 100 nm to 300-1000 nm)”. We address this goal by exploring applicable materials and processes to produce protected aluminum mirror coatings that will satisfy the needs of future space telescope systems of interest to NASA and the astrophysics community. Void-free thin films of absorption-free materials are required to protect and maintain high reflectivity and durability of aluminum mirrors in laboratory and pre-launch environments. Precisely controllable and scalable deposition process is also required to produce such coatings on large telescope mirrors. In this report, we present our preliminary experimental studies on various fluoride coatings by conventional coating techniques. MgF2 coating by Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD), a promising technique, is also presented. Spectrophotometric and ellipsometric measurements of the optical properties of these coatings are reported.

  20. Advancement in Preparation of Hydroxyapatite/bioglass Graded Coatings by Electrophoretic Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Liang; Chen, Chuanzhong; Wang, Diangang; Bao, Quanhe; Ma, Jie

    Electrophoretic deposition is a good method in the preparation of hydroxyapatite/bioglass graded coatings. Its processing parameters are easy to be operated. As it is nonbeeline process, it can be used in the deposition of complex shape and porous surface. This paper reviewed the advancement of the graded coatings in recent years, concluded the principles, characters, steps of electrophoretic deposition of bioceramic coatings and analyzed influencing factors in detail, such as granularity of suspension, aging of suspension, dispersion media, PH of suspension, electricity, voltage, deposition time, pretreatment of substrate and sintering. The foreground of hydroxyapatite/bioglass graded coatings is expected.

  1. Advanced Environmental Barrier Coating Development for SiC-SiC Ceramic Matrix Composite Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming; Harder, Bryan; Bhatt, Ramakrishna; Kiser, Doug; Wiesner, Valerie L.

    2016-01-01

    This presentation reviews the NASA advanced environmental barrier coating (EBC) system development for SiCSiC Ceramic Matrix Composite (CMC) components for next generation turbine engines. The emphasis has been placed on the current design challenges of the 2700F environmental barrier coatings; coating processing and integration with SiCSiC CMCs and component systems; and performance evaluation and demonstration of EBC-CMC systems. This presentation also highlights the EBC-CMC system temperature capability and durability improvements through advanced compositions and architecture designs, as shown in recent simulated engine high heat flux, combustion environment, in conjunction with mechanical creep and fatigue loading testing conditions.

  2. Advances in Thermal Spray Coatings for Gas Turbines and Energy Generation: A Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardwicke, Canan U.; Lau, Yuk-Chiu

    2013-06-01

    Functional coatings are widely used in energy generation equipment in industries such as renewables, oil and gas, propulsion engines, and gas turbines. Intelligent thermal spray processing is vital in many of these areas for efficient manufacturing. Advanced thermal spray coating applications include thermal management, wear, oxidation, corrosion resistance, sealing systems, vibration and sound absorbance, and component repair. This paper reviews the current status of materials, equipment, processing, and properties' aspects for key coatings in the energy industry, especially the developments in large-scale gas turbines. In addition to the most recent industrial advances in thermal spray technologies, future technical needs are also highlighted.

  3. 75 FR 24973 - Notice Pursuant to the National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993-Advanced Coatings...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-06

    ... Coatings for Infrastructure Joint Venture Agreement Notice is hereby given that, on March 10, 2010... seq. (``the Act''), Advanced Coatings for Infrastructure Joint Venture Agreement (``Advanced Coatings... Commission disclosing (1) the identities of the parties and (2) the nature and objectives of the venture. The...

  4. Progress in advanced high temperature turbine materials, coatings, and technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freche, J. C.; Ault, G. M.

    1977-01-01

    Material categories as well as coatings and recent turbine cooling developments are reviewed. Current state of the art is identified, and as assessment, when appropriate, of progress, problems, and future directions is provided.

  5. Advanced Antireflection Coatings for High-Performance Solar Energy Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pan, Noren

    2015-01-01

    Phase II objectives: Develop and refine antireflection coatings incorporating lanthanum titanate as an intermediate refractive index material; Investigate wet/dry thermal oxidation of aluminum containing semiconductor compounds as a means of forming a more transparent window layer with equal or better optical properties than its unoxidized form; Develop a fabrication process that allows integration of the oxidized window layer and maintains the necessary electrical properties for contacting the solar cell; Conduct an experimental demonstration of the best candidates for improved antireflection coatings.

  6. Evaluation of anticorrosion and antifouling paint performance after exposure under seawater Surabaya-Madura (Suramadu) bridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuraini, Lutviasari; Prifiharni, Siska; Priyotomo, Gadang; Sundjono, Gunawan, Hadi

    2017-03-01

    Antifouling paints are used widely to coat the underwater structures to prevent various fouling organisms. The evaluation of the performance for the two commercial anticorrosion and antifouling paints was carried out in the piles of Suramadu Bridge, East Java during 1 month exposure. The 20 cm width × 25 cm high × 0.3 cm thick specimens of mild steel were sandblasted and coated by anticorrosion and antifouling paint. Blank specimen (without exposed) were also prepared as a control. On the other hand, the 7.5 cm width × 15 cm high × 0.3 cm thick specimen bare mild steel was prepared for measure the corrosion rate throught weight loss method. The test panels containing specimens were exposure up to 1 month for immersion in splash zone and tidal zone (0, 1, 3, meters from sea level). Sea water parameters consisting of temperature, pH, salinity, conductivity and dissolved oxygen (DO) were also measured. The thickness, glossy, hardness and adhesion strength of the coating performance were carried out. The results show that both surfaces of anticorrosive paint and bare mild steel specimen covered by fouling organisms, whereas no fouling took place on the surface of antifouling paint. The corrosion rate of bare mild steel in the 0, 1, and 3 meters are 15.1;13.7 and 17.0 mpy, respectively.

  7. A novel XRF method to measure environmental release of copper and zinc from antifouling paints.

    PubMed

    Ytreberg, Erik; Lagerström, Maria; Holmqvist, Albin; Eklund, Britta; Elwing, Hans; Dahlström, Magnus; Dahl, Peter; Dahlström, Mia

    2017-03-22

    The release of copper (Cu) and zinc (Zn) from vessels and leisure crafts coated with antifouling paints can pose a threat to water quality in semi-enclosed areas such as harbors and marinas as well as to coastal archipelagos. However, no reliable, practical and low-cost method exists to measure the direct release of metals from antifouling paints. Therefore, the paint industry and regulatory authorities are obliged to use release rate measurements derived from either mathematical models or from laboratory studies. To bridge this gap, we have developed a novel method using a handheld X-Ray Fluorescence spectrometer (XRF) to determine the cumulative release of Cu and Zn from antifouling paints. The results showed a strong linear relationship between XRF Kα net intensities and metal concentrations, as determined by ICP-MS. The release of Cu and Zn were determined for coated panels exposed in harbors located in the Baltic Sea and in Kattegat. The field study showed salinity to have a strong impact on the release of Cu, i.e. the release increased with salinity. Contrary, the effect of salinity on Zn was not as evident. As exemplified in this work, the XRF method also makes it possible to identify the governing parameters to the release of Cu and Zn, e.g. salinity and type of paint formulation. Thus, the XRF method can be used to measure environmentally relevant releases of metallic compounds to design more efficient and optimized antifouling coatings.

  8. Advanced Low Conductivity Thermal Barrier Coatings: Performance and Future Directions (Invited paper)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming; Miller, Robert A.

    2008-01-01

    Thermal barrier coatings will be more aggressively designed to protect gas turbine engine hot-section components in order to meet future engine higher fuel efficiency and lower emission goals. In this presentation, thermal barrier coating development considerations and performance will be emphasized. Advanced thermal barrier coatings have been developed using a multi-component defect clustering approach, and shown to have improved thermal stability and lower conductivity. The coating systems have been demonstrated for high temperature combustor applications. For thermal barrier coatings designed for turbine airfoil applications, further improved erosion and impact resistance are crucial for engine performance and durability. Erosion resistant thermal barrier coatings are being developed, with a current emphasis on the toughness improvements using a combined rare earth- and transition metal-oxide doping approach. The performance of the toughened thermal barrier coatings has been evaluated in burner rig and laser heat-flux rig simulated engine erosion and thermal gradient environments. The results have shown that the coating composition optimizations can effectively improve the erosion and impact resistance of the coating systems, while maintaining low thermal conductivity and cyclic durability. The erosion, impact and high heat-flux damage mechanisms of the thermal barrier coatings will also be described.

  9. Advanced Thermal Barrier and Environmental Barrier Coating Development at NASA GRC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming; Robinson, Craig

    2017-01-01

    This presentation summarizes NASA's advanced thermal barrier and environmental barrier coating systems, and the coating performance improvements that has recently been achieved and documented in laboratory simulated rig test conditions. One of the emphases has been placed on the toughness and impact resistance enhancements of the low conductivity, defect cluster thermal barrier coating systems. The advances in the next generation environmental barrier coatings for SiCSiC ceramic matrix composites have also been highlighted, particularly in the design of a new series of oxide-silicate composition systems to be integrated with next generation SiC-SiC turbine engine components for 2700F coating applications. Major technical barriers in developing the thermal and environmental barrier coating systems are also described. The performance and model validations in the rig simulated turbine combustion, heat flux, steam and calcium-magnesium-aluminosilicate (CMAS) environments have helped the current progress in improved temperature capability, environmental stability, and long-term fatigue-environment system durability of the advanced thermal and environmental barrier coating systems.

  10. Antimicrobial nanospheres thin coatings prepared by advanced pulsed laser technique

    PubMed Central

    Holban, Alina Maria; Grumezescu, Valentina; Vasile, Bogdan Ştefan; Truşcă, Roxana; Cristescu, Rodica; Socol, Gabriel; Iordache, Florin

    2014-01-01

    Summary We report on the fabrication of thin coatings based on polylactic acid-chitosan-magnetite-eugenol (PLA-CS-Fe3O4@EUG) nanospheres by matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE). Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) investigation proved that the homogenous Fe3O4@EUG nanoparticles have an average diameter of about 7 nm, while the PLA-CS-Fe3O4@EUG nanospheres diameter sizes range between 20 and 80 nm. These MAPLE-deposited coatings acted as bioactive nanosystems and exhibited a great antimicrobial effect by impairing the adherence and biofilm formation of Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) bacteria strains. Moreover, the obtained nano-coatings showed a good biocompatibility and facilitated the normal development of human endothelial cells. These nanosystems may be used as efficient alternatives in treating and preventing bacterial infections. PMID:24991524

  11. Antimicrobial nanospheres thin coatings prepared by advanced pulsed laser technique.

    PubMed

    Holban, Alina Maria; Grumezescu, Valentina; Grumezescu, Alexandru Mihai; Vasile, Bogdan Ştefan; Truşcă, Roxana; Cristescu, Rodica; Socol, Gabriel; Iordache, Florin

    2014-01-01

    We report on the fabrication of thin coatings based on polylactic acid-chitosan-magnetite-eugenol (PLA-CS-Fe3O4@EUG) nanospheres by matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE). Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) investigation proved that the homogenous Fe3O4@EUG nanoparticles have an average diameter of about 7 nm, while the PLA-CS-Fe3O4@EUG nanospheres diameter sizes range between 20 and 80 nm. These MAPLE-deposited coatings acted as bioactive nanosystems and exhibited a great antimicrobial effect by impairing the adherence and biofilm formation of Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) bacteria strains. Moreover, the obtained nano-coatings showed a good biocompatibility and facilitated the normal development of human endothelial cells. These nanosystems may be used as efficient alternatives in treating and preventing bacterial infections.

  12. Issues and Advancements in Space Durable Multi-Functional Thermal Control Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dever, Joyce A.; Deshpande, Mukund S.; Jaworske, Donald A.; Cerbus, Clifford A.

    2006-01-01

    Passive spacecraft thermal control coatings are required to possess properties of low solar absorptance, high thermal emittance, and stability to survive the space environment for the mission duration. The white paint coatings Z-93, YB-71 and S13G/LO, originally developed in the 1960s, have been successfully used for satellite thermal control and have served as standards for spacecraft white thermal control paints. Since their original development, these coatings have gone through re-formulations as original raw materials became unavailable; however, their replacement products continue to serve as standards for spaceflight thermal control. Unique conditions of space exploration and space science missions have required that additional functionalities be incorporated into spacecraft thermal control coatings. Coating development efforts have addressed needs for long-life stability, surface conductivity, and the ability to clean coating surfaces. Advancements in development of lightweight composite structures for spacecraft have led to the need for thermal control coatings that are adherent and compatible with these composite substrates, whereas the original formulations of white paints were developed for application to aluminum substrates. The pursuit of nuclear reactor powered spacecraft for future missions requires coating/substrate systems which are not only compatible with harsh space radiation environmental exposures, but must also perform at higher temperatures than have been previously required. Future missions to the lunar and Martian surfaces will additionally require thermal control coatings for which dust accumulation can be mitigated. Although advancements continue in the area of thermal control materials technologies, thermal control coatings are not currently commercially available to meet all of these advanced requirements. This paper presents some of the unique challenges for thermal control material systems for future space missions and some current

  13. Improve the performance of coated cemented hip stem through the advanced composite materials.

    PubMed

    Hedia, H S; Fouda, N

    2015-01-01

    Design of hip joint implant using functionally graded material (FGM) (advanced composite material) has been used before through few researches. It gives great results regarding the stress distribution along the implant and bone interfaces. However, coating of orthopaedic implants has been widely investigated through many researches. The effect of using advanced composite stem material, which mean by functionally graded stem material, in the total hip replacement coated with the most common coated materials has not been studied yet. Therefore, this study investigates the effect of utilizing these two concepts together; FGM and coating, in designing new stem material. It is concluded that the optimal FGM cemented stem is consisting from titanium at the upper stem layers graded to collagen at a lower stem layers. This optimal graded stem coated with hydroxyapatite found to reduce stress shielding by 57% compared to homogenous titanium stem coated with hydroxyapatite. However, the optimal functionally graded stem coated with collagen reduced the stress shielding by 51% compared to homogenous titanium stem coated with collagen.

  14. Advanced thermal barrier coating system development. Technical progress report

    SciTech Connect

    1996-06-10

    The objectives of the program are to provide an improved TBC system with increased temperature capability and improved reliability relative to current state of the art TBC systems. The development of such a coating system is essential to the ATS engine meeting its objectives. The base program consists of three phases: Phase 1: Program Planning--Complete; Phase 2: Development; Phase 3: Selected Specimen--Bench Test. Work is currently being performed in Phase 2 of the program. In Phase 2, process improvements will be married with new bond coat and ceramic materials systems to provide improvements over currently available TBC systems. Coating reliability will be further improved with the development of an improved lifing model and NDE techniques. This will be accomplished by conducting the following program tasks: II.1 Process Modeling; II.2 Bond Coat Development; II.3 Analytical Lifing Model; II.4 Process Development; II.5 NDE, Maintenance and Repair; II.6 New TBC Concepts. A brief summary is given of progress made in each of these 6 areas.

  15. Synthesis of advanced aluminide intermetallic coatings by low-energy Al-ion radiation

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Mingli; Gu, Yan; Zhao, Panpan; Zhu, Shenglong; Wang, Fuhui

    2016-01-01

    Metals that work at high temperatures (for instance, superalloys in gas-turbines) depend on thermally grown oxide (TGO, commonly alumina) to withstand corrosion attack. Nickel Aluminide (NiAl) as one superior alumina TGO former plays an important role in protective coatings for turbine blades in gas-turbine engines used for aircraft propulsion and power generation. Lowering TGO growth rate is essentially favored for offering sustainable protection, especially in thermal barrier coatings (TBC). However, it can only be achieved currently by a strategy of adding the third element (Pt or reactive elements) into NiAl during traditional diffusion- or deposition-based synthesis of the coating. Here we present a highly flexible Al-ion radiation-based synthesis of advanced NiAl coatings, achieving low TGO growth rate without relying on the third element addition. Our results expand the strategy for lowering TGO growth rate and demonstrate potentials for ion radiation in advancing materials synthesis. PMID:27194417

  16. Synthesis of advanced aluminide intermetallic coatings by low-energy Al-ion radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Mingli; Gu, Yan; Zhao, Panpan; Zhu, Shenglong; Wang, Fuhui

    2016-05-01

    Metals that work at high temperatures (for instance, superalloys in gas-turbines) depend on thermally grown oxide (TGO, commonly alumina) to withstand corrosion attack. Nickel Aluminide (NiAl) as one superior alumina TGO former plays an important role in protective coatings for turbine blades in gas-turbine engines used for aircraft propulsion and power generation. Lowering TGO growth rate is essentially favored for offering sustainable protection, especially in thermal barrier coatings (TBC). However, it can only be achieved currently by a strategy of adding the third element (Pt or reactive elements) into NiAl during traditional diffusion- or deposition-based synthesis of the coating. Here we present a highly flexible Al-ion radiation-based synthesis of advanced NiAl coatings, achieving low TGO growth rate without relying on the third element addition. Our results expand the strategy for lowering TGO growth rate and demonstrate potentials for ion radiation in advancing materials synthesis.

  17. Advanced Oxide Material Systems For 1650 C Thermal/Environmental Barrier Coating Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming; Fox, Dennis S.; Bansal, Narottam P.; Miller, Robert A.

    2004-01-01

    Advanced thermal/environmental barrier coatings (T/EBCs) are being developed for low emission SiC/SiC ceramic matrix composite (CMC) combustor and vane applications to extend the CMC liner and vane temperature capability to 1650 C (3000 F) in oxidizing and water-vapor containing combustion environments. The 1650 C T/EBC system is required to have better thermal stability, lower thermal conductivity, and improved sintering and thermal stress resistance than current coating systems. In this paper, the thermal conductivity, water vapor stability and cyclic durability of selected candidate zirconia-/hafnia-, pyrochlore- and magnetoplumbite-based T/EBC materials are evaluated. The test results have been used to downselect the T/EBC coating materials, and help demonstrate advanced 1650OC coatings feasibility with long-term cyclic durability.

  18. Synthesis of advanced aluminide intermetallic coatings by low-energy Al-ion radiation.

    PubMed

    Shen, Mingli; Gu, Yan; Zhao, Panpan; Zhu, Shenglong; Wang, Fuhui

    2016-05-19

    Metals that work at high temperatures (for instance, superalloys in gas-turbines) depend on thermally grown oxide (TGO, commonly alumina) to withstand corrosion attack. Nickel Aluminide (NiAl) as one superior alumina TGO former plays an important role in protective coatings for turbine blades in gas-turbine engines used for aircraft propulsion and power generation. Lowering TGO growth rate is essentially favored for offering sustainable protection, especially in thermal barrier coatings (TBC). However, it can only be achieved currently by a strategy of adding the third element (Pt or reactive elements) into NiAl during traditional diffusion- or deposition-based synthesis of the coating. Here we present a highly flexible Al-ion radiation-based synthesis of advanced NiAl coatings, achieving low TGO growth rate without relying on the third element addition. Our results expand the strategy for lowering TGO growth rate and demonstrate potentials for ion radiation in advancing materials synthesis.

  19. CMAS Interactions with Advanced Environmental Barrier Coatings Deposited via Plasma Spray- Physical Vapor Deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harder, B. J.; Wiesner, V. L.; Zhu, D.; Johnson, N. S.

    2017-01-01

    Materials for advanced turbine engines are expected to have temperature capabilities in the range of 1370-1500C. At these temperatures the ingestion of sand and dust particulate can result in the formation of corrosive glass deposits referred to as CMAS. The presence of this glass can both thermomechanically and thermochemically significantly degrade protective coatings on metallic and ceramic components. Plasma Spray- Physical Vapor Deposition (PS-PVD) was used to deposit advanced environmental barrier coating (EBC) systems for investigation on their interaction with CMAS compositions. Coatings were exposed to CMAS and furnace tested in air from 1 to 50 hours at temperatures ranging from 1200-1500C. Coating composition and crystal structure were tracked with X-ray diffraction and microstructure with electron microscopy.

  20. Audio-band coating thermal noise measurement for Advanced LIGO with a multimode optical resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gras, S.; Yu, H.; Yam, W.; Martynov, D.; Evans, M.

    2017-01-01

    In modern high precision optical instruments, such as in gravitational wave detectors or frequency references, thermally induced fluctuations in the reflective coatings can be a limiting noise source. This noise, known as coating thermal noise, can be reduced by choosing materials with low mechanical loss. Examination of new materials becomes a necessity in order to further minimize the coating thermal noise and thus improve sensitivity of next generation instruments. We present a novel approach to directly measure coating thermal noise using a high finesse folded cavity in which multiple Hermite-Gaussian modes coresonate. This method is used to probe surface fluctuations on the order 10-17 m /√{Hz } in the frequency range 30-400 Hz. We applied this technique to measure thermal noise and loss angle of the coating used in Advanced LIGO.

  1. Functionally gradient materials for thermal barrier coatings in advanced gas turbine systems

    SciTech Connect

    Banovic, S.W.; Barmak, K.; Chan, H.M.

    1995-10-01

    New designs for advanced gas turbine engines for power production are required to have higher operating temperatures in order to increase efficiency. However, elevated temperatures will increase the magnitude and severity of environmental degradation of critical turbine components (e.g. combustor parts, turbine blades, etc{hor_ellipsis}). To offset this problem, the usage of thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) has become popular by allowing an increase in maximum inlet temperatures for an operating engine. Although thermal barrier technology is over thirty years old, the principle failure mechanism is the spallation of the ceramic coating at or near the ceramic/bond coat interface. Therefore, it is desirable to develop a coating that combines the thermal barrier qualities of the ceramic layer and the corrosion protection by the metallic bond coat without the detrimental effects associated with the localization of the ceramic/metal interface to a single plane.

  2. Mining marine shell wastes for polyelectrolyte chitosan anti-biofoulants: Fabrication of high-performance economic and ecofriendly anti-biofouling coatings.

    PubMed

    Elshaarawy, Reda F M; Mustafa, Fatma H A; van Geelen, Lasse; Abou-Taleb, Amaal E A; Tadros, Hermine R Z; Kalscheuer, Rainer; Janiak, Christoph

    2017-09-15

    Banning organotins as antifouling biocides in 2003 was the starting point for many researchers to search for novel economic and environmentally-friendly anti-fouling biocides. In our present contribution, we have successfully functionalized a natural biopolymer, chitosan (CS), isolated from marine wastes with polyelectrolyte brushes akin to ionic liquids. These antifouling biopolymers anchoring polyelectrolyte brushes were in vitro assessed for their ability to eradicate or inhibit the Staphylococcal/Escherichia biofilms. Moreover, these anti-fouling candidates were incorporated into the matrix of commercial paint to formulate antifouling coatings which were subjected to a field static immersion test in the Mediterranean Sea in comparison to a standard antifoulant, Diuron(®). The obtained results revealed the prevention of biofilms along with a promising anti-fouling performance. So the new polyelectrolyte chitosan architectures may offer promising anti-foulants additives for biofouling coating applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Mechanical Properties and Durability of Advanced Environmental Barrier Coatings in Calcium-Magnesium-Alumino-Silicate Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miladinovich, Daniel S.; Zhu, Dongming

    2011-01-01

    Environmental barrier coatings are being developed and tested for use with SiC/SiC ceramic matrix composite (CMC) gas turbine engine components. Several oxide and silicate based compositons are being studied for use as top-coat and intermediate layers in a three or more layer environmental barrier coating system. Specifically, the room temperature Vickers-indentation-fracture-toughness testing and high-temperature stability reaction studies with Calcium Magnesium Alumino-Silicate (CMAS or "sand") are being conducted using advanced testing techniques such as high pressure burner rig tests as well as high heat flux laser tests.

  4. Advanced Multi-Component Defect Cluster Oxide Doped Zirconia-Yttria Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming; Miller, Robert A.

    1990-01-01

    The advantages of using ceramic thermal barrier coatings in gas turbine engine hot sections include increased fuel efficiency and improved engine reliability. However, current thermal barrier coatings will not have the low thermal conductivity and necessary sintering resistance under higher operating temperatures and thermal gradients required by future advanced ultra-efficient and low-emission aircraft engines. In this paper, a novel oxide defect cluster design approach is described for achieving low thermal conductivity and excellent thermal stability of the thermal barrier coating systems. This approach utilizes multi-component rare earth and other metal cluster oxide dopants that are incorporated in the zirconia-yttria based systems, thus significantly reducing coating thermal conductivity and sintering resistance by effectively promoting the formation of thermodynamically stable, essentially immobile defect clusters and/or nanoscale phases. The performance of selected plasma-sprayed cluster oxide thermal barrier coating systems has been evaluated. The advanced multi-component thermal barrier coating systems were found to have significantly lower initial and long-term thermal conductivities, and better high temperature stability. The effect of oxide cluster dopants on coating thermal conductivity, sintering resistance, oxide grain growth behavior and durability will be discussed.

  5. Advanced Multi-Component Defect Cluster Oxide Doped Zirconia-Yttria Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming; Miller, Robert A.

    2003-01-01

    The advantages of using ceramic thermal barrier coatings in gas turbine engine hot sections include increased fuel efficiency and improved engine reliability. However, current thermal barrier coatings will not have the low thermal conductivity and necessary sintering resistance under higher operating temperatures and thermal gradients required by future advanced ultra efficient and low emission aircraft engines. In this paper, a novel oxide defect cluster design approach is described for achieving low thermal conductivity and excellent thermal stability of the thermal barrier coating systems. This approach utilizes multi-component rare earth and other metal cluster oxide dopants that are incorporated in the zirconia-yttna based systems, thus significantly reducing coating thermal conductivity and sintering resistance by effectively promoting the formation of thermodynamically stable, essentially immobile defect clusters and/or nanoscale phases. The performance of selected plasma-sprayed cluster oxide thermal barrier coating systems has been evaluated. The advanced multi-component thermal barrier coating systems were found to have significantly lower initial and long-term thermal conductivities, and better high temperature stability. The effect of oxide cluster dopants on coating thermal conductivity, sintering resistance, oxide grain growth behavior and durability will be discussed.

  6. Update on UCO's advanced coating lab development of silver-based mirror coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Andrew C.; Fryauf, David M.; Kobayashi, Nobuhiko P.; DuPraw, Brian; Cheleden, Spencer; Ratliff, Christopher; Bolte, Michael J.; Cowley, David

    2016-08-01

    We present progress in efforts underway at the University of California Observatories to develop high performance durable silver-based mirror coatings for telescope and instruments. Silver-based coatings are extremely prone to tarnish and/or corrosion, and successful coatings depend not only on the materials used but also the deposition processes employed. Our physical vapor deposition (PVD) chamber allows both sputtering and ion-assisted e-beam depositions for head-to-head comparison of deposition processes, and we present results of these comparisons. In this paper, we review the problem and discuss our recent activities and findings. We discuss a systematic study to determine which oxides, nitrides and fluorides provide the best protection in environmental tests. We present initial results into the effects of stress in our specific thin films, and thee effects of stress on mirror coating durability. We also discuss studies using Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) over-coating of Ag, and we describe a large ALD research chamber currently under construction that will demonstrate ALD processes on larger substrates (70 cm diameter).

  7. Advanced Oxide Material Systems for 1650 C Thermal/Environmental Barrier Coating Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dong-Ming; Fox, Dennis S.; Bansal, Narottam P.; Miller, Robert A.

    2004-01-01

    Advanced thermal and environmental barrier coatings (TEBCs) are being developed for low-emission SiC/SiC ceramic matrix composite (CMC) combustor and vane applications to extend the CMC liner and vane temperature capability to 1650 C (3000 F) in oxidizing and water-vapor-containing combustion environments. The advanced 1650 C TEBC system is required to have a better high-temperature stability, lower thermal conductivity, and more resistance to sintering and thermal stress than current coating systems under engine high-heat-flux and severe thermal cycling conditions. In this report, the thermal conductivity and water vapor stability of selected candidate hafnia-, pyrochlore- and magnetoplumbite-based TEBC materials are evaluated. The effects of dopants on the materials properties are also discussed. The test results have been used to downselect the TEBC materials and help demonstrate the feasibility of advanced 1650 C coatings with long-term thermal cycling durability.

  8. Innovative Superhard Materials and Sustainable Coatings for Advanced Manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jay; Novikov, Nikolay

    The book contains the results of the latest achievements of leading researchers from 9 countries in the field of diamond and diamond-like carbon, cubic boron nitride and other superhard materials; high-density engineering ceramics; high pressure-high temperature technique; computer-aided modeling; diamond, cubic boron nitride, ceramic and cemented carbide tools; development, production and applications of nanostructured materials; films and wear-resistant coating; methods for quality control of tool materials and tools.

  9. Advanced Coatings from Natural-Based Polymers for Metals

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-07-01

    polysaccharide biopolymers originating from pectin, starch, and chitosan as renewable agricultural and marine resources, and on assessing their potential as the...excellent salt-spray resistance. 14. SUBJECT TERMS 15. NUMBER IF PAGES Coating, Corrosion, Aluminum, Biopolymer, Starch, Chitosan 7 16. PRICE CODE 17...The natural polymers used in this program were the corn-or potato- starch and crab or shrimp shells- chitosan obtained from renewable agricultural and

  10. A review of the recent advances in antimicrobial coatings for urinary catheters.

    PubMed

    Singha, Priyadarshini; Locklin, Jason; Handa, Hitesh

    2017-03-01

    More than 75% of hospital-acquired or nosocomial urinary tract infections are initiated by urinary catheters, which are used during the treatment of 15-25% of hospitalized patients. Among other purposes, urinary catheters are primarily used for draining urine after surgeries and for urinary incontinence. During catheter-associated urinary tract infections, bacteria travel up to the bladder and cause infection. A major cause of catheter-associated urinary tract infection is attributed to the use of non-ideal materials in the fabrication of urinary catheters. Such materials allow for the colonization of microorganisms, leading to bacteriuria and infection, depending on the severity of symptoms. The ideal urinary catheter is made out of materials that are biocompatible, antimicrobial, and antifouling. Although an abundance of research has been conducted over the last forty-five years on the subject, the ideal biomaterial, especially for long-term catheterization of more than a month, has yet to be developed. The aim of this review is to highlight the recent advances (over the past 10years) in developing antimicrobial materials for urinary catheters and to outline future requirements and prospects that guide catheter materials selection and design.

  11. The corrosivity and performance evaluation of antifouling paint exposed in seawater Muara Baru Port, Jakarta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuraini, L.; Prifiharni, S.; Priyotomo, G.; Sundjono

    2017-04-01

    Antifouling paints were applied on a wide range of the under seawater structures in order to protect them from the growth of fouling organisms. The performance investigation of two commercial anticorrosion and antifouling paints was conducted in Muara Baru port, Jakarta. The specimens were coated by anticorrosion and/or antifouling paint. Blank specimen (without exposed) were also prepared as a control. On the other hand, bare mild steel was prepared for measure the corrosion rate through weight loss method. The test panels containing specimens were exposed up to 3 months for immersion depths of 0, 1, 2, 3 meters from sea level. Sea water parameters such as temperature, pH, salinity, conductivity and dissolved oxygen (DO) were also measured. The evaluation of coating performance was carried out such as thickness, glossy, hardness and adhesion strength. The results showed that both surfaces of anticorrosion paint and bare mild steel specimen covered by fouling organisms, whereas no fouling took place on the surface of antifouling paint. The corrosion rate of bare mild steel in the depths of 0, 1, 2, 3 meters were 12.5; 11.6; 8.3; 10.4 mpy, respectively.

  12. Corrosion-Protection Coatings for Aluminum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Higgins, R. H.

    1983-01-01

    Study investigates 21 combinatios of surface treatments, primers and topcoats. Study considers several types of coatings, including primers, enamels, chlorinated rubbers, alkyds, epoxies, vinyls, polyurethanes, waterbased paints, and antifouling paints. 20-page report summarizes the study.

  13. Corrosion-Protection Coatings for Aluminum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Higgins, R. H.

    1983-01-01

    Study investigates 21 combinatios of surface treatments, primers and topcoats. Study considers several types of coatings, including primers, enamels, chlorinated rubbers, alkyds, epoxies, vinyls, polyurethanes, waterbased paints, and antifouling paints. 20-page report summarizes the study.

  14. 5,6-Dichloro-1-methylgramine, a non-toxic antifoulant derived from a marine natural product.

    PubMed

    Kawamata, M; Kon-ya, K; Miki, W

    2006-01-01

    The laboratory culture of the barnacle, Balanus amphitrite has made it possible to supply cypris larvae for antifouling assays all year round. The settlement of cyprids obtained from cultured B. amphitrite was indistinguishable from cyprids reared from field-collected barnacles. In laboratory cyprid settlement assays of extracts from marine sessile organisms, antifouling activity was expressed as the 99% inhibitory concentration (IC99), and toxicity as the 30% lethal concentration (LC30). The lipophilic extract of the marine bryozoan, Zoobotryon pellucidum, which showed promising antifouling activity, yielded 2,5,6-tribromo-1-methylgramine (TBG) by bioassay-guided isolation. The inhibitory activity of TBG was 6 times as strong as that of bis-(n-butyltin)oxide (TBTO), while its toxicity to cypris larvae was one-tenth that of TBTO. A structure-activity relationship study with 155 indole derivatives led to the discovery of the non-toxic antifoulant candidates 5,6-dichlorogramine, 5-chloro-2-methylgramine, and 5,6-dichrolo-1-methylgramine (DCMG), the latter being selected as the antifouling paint ingredient for performance evaluation tests (panel tests) following the results of a preliminary safety tests. A silicone-based antifouling paint containing 5-10% of DCMG was prepared and tested in the field; the painted surfaces remained almost barnacle-free for 1.5 years similar to silicone coatings such as Biox. Since the leaching rate of DCMG from the paint surface could be controlled by the addition of an acrylic acid-styrene copolymer (ASP), the life of the antifouling performance is expected to be improved. Thus, an extremely non-toxic silicone-based antifouling paint containing DCMG is under development.

  15. Advanced Coatings Enabling High Performance Instruments for Astrophysics Missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikzad, Shouleh

    We propose a three-year effort to develop techniques for far-ultraviolet (FUV) and ultraviolet coatings both as reflective optics coatings and as out-of-band-rejection (solar-blind) filters that will have a dramatic effect on the throughput and efficiency of instruments. This is an ideal time to address this problem. On the one hand, exciting new science questions posed in UV and optical realm place exacting demands on instrument capabilities far beyond HST-COS, FUSE, and GALEX with large focal plane arrays and high efficiency requirements. And on the other hand, the development of techniques and process such as atomic layer deposition with its atomically precise capability and nano-engineered materials approach enables us to address the challenging materials issues in the UV where interaction of photons and matter happen in the first few nanometers of the material surface. Aluminum substrates with protective overlayers (typically XFy, where X = Li, Mg, or Ca) have been the workhorse of reflective coatings for ultraviolet and visible instruments; however, they have demonstrated severe limitations. The formation of oxide at the Al-XFy interface and thick protective layers both affect the overall optical performance, leading to diminished reflection at shorter wavelengths. To address these long-standing shortcomings of coatings, we will use our newly developed processes and equipment to produce high-quality single- and multi-layer films of a variety of dielectrics and metals deposited with nano-scale control. JPL s new ALD system affords high uniformity, low oxygen background, good plasma processes, and precise temperature control, which are vital to achieving the large scale, uniform, and ultrathin films that are free of oxygen at interfaces. For example, ALD-grown aluminum can be protected using our newly developed chemistry for ALD magnesium fluoride. Our work will verify that the ALD technique reliably prevents the oxidation of aluminum, and will subsequently be

  16. Fabrication of advanced organic-inorganic nanocomposite coatings for biomedical applications by electrodeposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Xin

    Novel electrodeposition strategies have been developed for the fabrication of thick adherent zirconia ceramic and composite coatings for biomedical applications. The new method is based on the electrophoretic deposition (EPD) of polyelectrolyte additives combined with the cathodic precipitation of zirconia. The method enables the room-temperature electrosynthesis of crystalline zirconia nanoparticles in the polymer matrix. Adherent crack-free coatings up to several microns thick were obtained. The deposits were studied by thermogravimetric and differential thermal analysis, X-ray diffraction analysis, scanning and transmission electron microscopy, and atomic force microscopy. Obtained results pave the way for electrodeposition of other ceramic-polymer composites. Novel advanced nanocomposite coatings based on bioceramic hydroxyapatite (HA) have been developed for the surface modification of orthopaedic and dental implant metals. HA nanopartic1es prepared by a chemical precipitation method were used for the fabrication of novel HA-chitosan nanocomposite coatings. The use of chitosan enables room-temperature fabrication of the composite coatings. The problems related to the sintering of HA can be avoided. A new electrodeposition strategy, based on the EPD of HA nanoparticles and electrochemical deposition of chitosan macromolecules, has been developed. The method enabled the formation of dense, adherent and uniform coatings of various thicknesses in the range of up to 60 mum. Bioactive composite coatings containing 40.9-89.8 wt% HA were obtained. The deposit composition and microstructure can be tailored by varying the chitosan and HA concentrations in the deposition bath. A mathematical model describing the formation of the HA-chitosan composite deposit has been developed. X-ray studies revealed preferred orientation of HA nanoparticles in the nanocomposites. Obtained coatings provide corrosion protection of the substrates and can be utilized for the fabrication of

  17. High Pressure Burner Rig Testing of Advanced Environmental Barrier Coatings for Si3N4 Turbine Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming; Fox, Dennis S.; Pastel, Robert T.

    2007-01-01

    Advanced thermal and environmental barrier coatings are being developed for Si3N4 components for turbine engine propulsion applications. High pressure burner rig testing was used to evaluate the coating system performance and durability. Test results demonstrated the feasibility and durability of the coating component systems under the simulated engine environments.

  18. Advances in flow visualization using liquid-crystal coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, Bruce J.; Obara, Clifford J.

    1987-01-01

    This paper discusses a new four-part mixing method for visualizing boundary layer flows, including transitions, separation, and shock locations, by the use of liquid-crystal coatings. The method controls the event temperature and color-play bandwidth best suited to specific experimental conditions, and is easily learned. The method is applicable almost throughout the altitude and speed ranges for subsonic aircraft flight envelopes, and is also applicable to supersonic flow visualization and for general use in high- and low-speed wind tunnel and water tunnel testing.

  19. Surface Diagnostics in Tribology Technology and Advanced Coatings Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa

    1999-01-01

    This paper discusses the methodologies used for surface property measurement of thin films and coatings, lubricants, and materials in the field of tribology. Surface diagnostic techniques include scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, stylus profilometry, x-ray diffraction, electron diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, Rutherford backscattering, elastic recoil spectroscopy, and tribology examination. Each diagnostic technique provides specific measurement results in its own unique way. In due course it should be possible to coordinate the different pieces of information provided by these diagnostic techniques into a coherent self-consistent description of the surface properties. Examples are given on the nature and character of thin diamond films.

  20. Bio-inspired antifouling approaches: the quest towards non-toxic and non-biocidal materials.

    PubMed

    Nir, Sivan; Reches, Meital

    2016-06-01

    Biofouling is an undesirable process in which organisms and their by-products encrust a surface. Antifouling solutions are of great importance since biofouling has negative effects on numerous species, ecosystems, and areas including water treatment facilities, health-care systems, and marine devices. Many useful solutions have been developed in the last few decades. However, with the emergence of environmental issues, the search for new promising non-toxic materials has expanded. One approach tries to mimic natural antifouling surfaces and relies on mechanisms of action derived from nature. Since these materials are based on natural systems, they are mostly biocompatible and more efficient against complex fouling. In this review, we cover the latest advances in the field of antifouling materials. We specifically focus on biomaterials that are based on the chemical and physical behavior of biological systems.

  1. Advanced Environmental Barrier Coating Development for SiC/SiC Ceramic Matrix Composites: NASA's Perspectives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming

    2016-01-01

    This presentation reviews NASA environmental barrier coating (EBC) system development programs and the coating materials evolutions for protecting the SiC/SiC Ceramic Matrix Composites in order to meet the next generation engine performance requirements. The presentation focuses on several generations of NASA EBC systems, EBC-CMC component system technologies for SiC/SiC ceramic matrix composite combustors and turbine airfoils, highlighting the temperature capability and durability improvements in simulated engine high heat flux, high pressure, high velocity, and with mechanical creep and fatigue loading conditions. The current EBC development emphasis is placed on advanced NASA 2700F candidate environmental barrier coating systems for SiC/SiC CMCs, their performance benefits and design limitations in long-term operation and combustion environments. Major technical barriers in developing environmental barrier coating systems, the coating integrations with next generation CMCs having the improved environmental stability, erosion-impact resistance, and long-term fatigue-environment system durability performance are described. The research and development opportunities for advanced turbine airfoil environmental barrier coating systems by utilizing improved compositions, state-of-the-art processing methods, and simulated environment testing and durability modeling are discussed.

  2. Anti-fouling bioactive surfaces.

    PubMed

    Yu, Qian; Zhang, Yanxia; Wang, Hongwei; Brash, John; Chen, Hong

    2011-04-01

    Bioactive surfaces refer to surfaces with immobilized bioactive molecules aimed specifically at promoting or supporting particular interactions. Such surfaces are of great importance for various biomedical and biomaterials applications. In the past few years, considerable effort has been made to create bioactive surfaces by forming specific biomolecule-modified surfaces on a non-biofouling "base" or "background". Hydrophilic and bioinert polymers have been widely used as anti-fouling layers that resist non-specific protein interactions. They can also serve as "spacers" to effectively move the immobilized biomolecule away from the surface, thus enhancing its bioactivity. In this review we summarize several successful approaches for the design and preparation of bioactive surfaces based on different types of anti-fouling/spacer materials. Some perspectives on future research in this area are also presented.

  3. Advanced thermal barrier coating system development: Technical progress report

    SciTech Connect

    1996-08-07

    Objectives are to provide an improved TBC system with increased temperature capability and improved reliability, for the Advanced Turbine Systems program (gas turbine). The base program consists of three phases: Phase I, program planning (complete); Phase II, development; and Phase III (selected specimen-bench test). Work is currently being performed in Phase II.

  4. HYDROTHERMALLY SELF-ADVANCING HYBRID COATINGS FOR MITIGATING CORROSION OF CARBON STEEL.

    SciTech Connect

    SUGAMA, T.

    2006-11-22

    Hydrothermally self-advancing hybrid coatings were prepared by blending two starting materials, water-borne styrene acrylic latex (SAL) as the matrix and calcium aluminate cement (CAC) as the hydraulic filler, and then their usefulness was evaluated as the room temperature curable anti-corrosion coatings for carbon steel in CO{sub 2}-laden geothermal environments at 250 C. The following two major factors supported the self-improving mechanisms of the coating during its exposure in an autoclave: First was the formation of a high temperature stable polymer structure of Ca-complexed carboxylate groups containing SAL (Ca-CCG-SAL) due to hydrothermal reactions between SAL and CAC; second was the growth with continuing exposure time of crystalline calcite and boehmite phases coexisting with Ca-CCG-SAL. These two factors promoted the conversion of the porous microstructure in the non-autoclaved coating into a densified one after 7 days exposure. The densified microstructure not only considerably reduced the conductivity of corrosive ionic electrolytes through the coatings' layers, but also contributed to the excellent adherence of the coating to underlying steel' s surface that, in turn, retarded the cathodic oxygen reduction reaction at the corrosion site of steel. Such characteristics including the minimum uptake of corrosive electrolytes by the coating and the retardation of the cathodic corrosion reaction played an important role in inhibiting the corrosion of carbon steel in geothermal environments.

  5. Light-Emitting Diodes with Hierarchical and Multifunctional Surface Structures for High Light Extraction and an Antifouling Effect.

    PubMed

    Leem, Young-Chul; Park, Jung Su; Kim, Joon Heon; Myoung, NoSoung; Yim, Sang-Youp; Jeong, Sehee; Lim, Wantae; Kim, Sung-Tae; Park, Seong-Ju

    2016-01-13

    Bioinspired hierarchical structures on the surface of vertical light-emitting diodes (VLEDs) are demonstrated by combining a self-assembled dip-coating process and nanopatterning transfer method using thermal release tape. This versatile surface structure can efficiently reduce the total internal reflection and add functions, such as superhydrophobicity and high oleophobicity, to achieve an antifouling effect for VLEDs.

  6. Advanced, Non-Toxic, Anti-Corrosion, Anti-Fouling and Foul-Release Coatings Based on Covalently Attached Monolayers, Multilayers and Polymers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-08-08

    McCarthy Polymer Science and Engineering Department, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, Massachusetts 01003 Electrophilic aromatic substitution reactions...with a fluorinated silane reagent. Reduction of the amide groups with borane-THF (BH 3-THF) complex leads to a 69% conversion of surface amides to the

  7. Antifouling Electrospun Nanofiber Mats Functionalized with Polymer Zwitterions.

    PubMed

    Kolewe, Kristopher W; Dobosz, Kerianne M; Rieger, Katrina A; Chang, Chia-Chih; Emrick, Todd; Schiffman, Jessica D

    2016-10-06

    In this study, we exploit the excellent fouling resistance of polymer zwitterions and present electrospun nanofiber mats surface functionalized with poly(2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine) (polyMPC). This zwitterionic polymer coating maximizes the accessibility of the zwitterion to effectively limit biofouling on nanofiber membranes. Two facile, scalable methods yielded a coating on cellulose nanofibers: (i) a two-step sequential deposition featuring dopamine polymerization followed by the physioadsorption of polyMPC, and (ii) a one-step codeposition of polydopamine (PDA) with polyMPC. While the sequential and codeposited nanofiber mat assemblies have an equivalent average fiber diameter, hydrophilic contact angle, surface chemistry, and stability, the topography of nanofibers prepared by codeposition were smoother. Protein and microbial antifouling performance of the zwitterion modified nanofiber mats along with two controls, cellulose (unmodified) and PDA coated nanofiber mats were evaluated by dynamic protein fouling and prolonged bacterial exposure. Following 21 days of exposure to bovine serum albumin, the sequential nanofiber mats significantly resisted protein fouling, as indicated by their 95% flux recovery ratio in a water flux experiment, a 300% improvement over the cellulose nanofiber mats. When challenged with two model microbes Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus for 24 h, both zwitterion modifications demonstrated superior fouling resistance by statistically reducing microbial attachment over the two controls. This study demonstrates that, by decorating the surfaces of chemically and mechanically robust cellulose nanofiber mats with polyMPC, we can generate high performance, free-standing nanofiber mats that hold potential in applications where antifouling materials are imperative, such as tissue engineering scaffolds and water purification technologies.

  8. Mimetic marine antifouling films based on fluorine-containing polymethacrylates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Qianhui; Li, Hongqi; Xian, Chunying; Yang, Yihang; Song, Yanxi; Cong, Peihong

    2015-07-01

    Novel methacrylate copolymers containing catechol and trifluoromethyl pendant side groups were synthesized by free radical polymerization of N-(3,4-dihydroxyphenyl)ethyl methacrylamide (DMA) and 2,2,2-trifluoroethyl methacrylate (TFME) with α,α‧-azobisisobutyronitrile (AIBN) as initiator. A series of copolymers with different content of TFME ranging from 3% to 95% were obtained by changing the molar ratio of DMA to TFME from 25:1 to 1:25. Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, gel permeation chromatography (GPC), thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were used to characterize the copolymers, which displayed a certain degree of hardness and outstanding thermostability reflected from their high glass transition temperatures. The copolymers could adhere to surfaces of glass, plastics and metals due to introduction of catechol groups as multivalent hydrogen bonding anchors. Water contact angle on the polymer films was up to 117.4°. Chemicals resistance test manifested that the polymer films possessed excellent resistance to water, salt, acid and alkali. Moreover, the polymer films displayed fair antifouling property and might be used as promising environmentally friendly marine antifouling coatings.

  9. Predicted concentrations of biocides from antifouling paints in Visakhapatnam Harbour.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, A; Rao, K V Mohan; Ramesh, U S

    2009-02-01

    The concentrations of biocides leached from antifouling coatings are monitored in most of the developed countries. However, in India and many other developing countries, there is very little data available on the concentrations of biocides in ports and harbours. The first step was to obtain the order of magnitude levels of concentrations of biocides in the marine environment of the Visakhapatnam Harbour, and the MAM-PEC (Marine Antifoulant Model to Predict Environmental Concentrations) model was used to predict these values. The Visakhapatnam Port lies on the eastern coast of India, roughly halfway between Chennai and Kolkata, and is the largest port in India. This port is a natural harbour; the long and narrow outlet to the open sea makes it a 'poorly flushed' harbour. Predicted concentrations of tributyltin (TBT), copper, dichlofluanid, seanine, irgarol, diuron, tolylfluanid, and zinc pyrithione were computed. The results of the computations indicate that the levels of these biocides are comparable to those in many western countries. This gives credence to the fact that persistence of TBT and some other biocides is a global problem that cannot be ignored.

  10. Thermal barrier coatings issues in advanced land-based gas turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parks, W. P.; Lee, W. Y.; Wright, I. G.

    1995-01-01

    The Department of Energy's Advanced Turbine System (ATS) program is aimed at forecasting the development of a new generation of land-based gas turbine systems with overall efficiencies significantly beyond those of current state-of-the-art machines, as well as greatly increased times between inspection and refurbishment, improved environmental impact, and decreased cost. The proposed duty cycle of ATS turbines will require the use of different criteria in the design of the materials for the critical hot gas path components. In particular, thermal barrier coatings will be an essential feature of the hot gas path components in these machines. While such coatings are routinely used in high-performance aircraft engines and are becoming established in land-based turbines, the requirements of the ATS turbine application are sufficiently different that significant improvements in thermal barrier coating technology will be necessary. In particular, it appears that thermal barrier coatings will have to function on all airfoil sections of the first stage vanes and blades to provide the significant temperature reduction required. In contrast, such coatings applied to the blades and vances of advanced aircraft engines are intended primarily to reduce air cooling requirements and extend component lifetime; failure of those coatings can be tolerated without jeopardizing mechanical or corrosion performance. A major difference is that in ATS turbines these components will be totally reliant on thermal barrier coatings which will, therefore, need to be highly reliable even over the leading edges of first stage blades. Obviously, the ATS program provides a very challenging opportunity for TBC's, and involves some significant opportunities to extend this technology.

  11. Hafnia-Based Nanostructured Thermal Barrier Coatings for Advanced Hydrogen Turbine Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Ramana, Chintalapalle; Choudhuri, Ahsan

    2013-01-31

    Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) are critical technologies for future gas turbine engines of advanced coal based power generation systems. TBCs protect engine components and allow further increase in engine temperatures for higher efficiency. In this work, nanostructured HfO{sub 2}-based coatings, namely Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}-stabilized HfO{sub 2} (YSH), Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}-stabilized HfO{sub 2} (GSH) and Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}-stabilized ZrO{sub 2}-HfO{sub 2} (YSZH) were investigated for potential TBC applications in hydrogen turbines. Experimental efforts are aimed at creating a fundamental understanding of these TBC materials. Nanostructured ceramic coatings of YSH, GSH and YSZH were grown by physical vapor deposition methods. The effects of processing parameters and ceramic composition on the microstructural evolution of YSH, GSH and YSZH nanostructured coatings was studied using combined X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Electron microscopy analyses. Efforts were directed to derive a detailed understanding of crystal-structure, morphology, and stability of the coatings. In addition, thermal conductivity as a function of composition in YSH, YSZH and GSH coatings was determined. Laboratory experiments using accelerated test environments were used to investigate the relative importance of various thermo-mechanical and thermo-chemical failure modes of TBCs. Effects of thermal cycling, oxidation and their complex interactions were evaluated using a syngas combustor rig.

  12. Nanocasting technique to prepare lotus-leaf-like superhydrophobic electroactive polyimide as advanced anticorrosive coatings.

    PubMed

    Chang, Kung-Chin; Lu, Hsin-I; Peng, Chih-Wei; Lai, Mei-Chun; Hsu, Sheng-Chieh; Hsu, Min-Hsiang; Tsai, Yuan-Kai; Chang, Chi-Hao; Hung, Wei-I; Wei, Yen; Yeh, Jui-Ming

    2013-02-01

    Nanocasting technique was used to obtain a biomimetic superhydrophobic electroactive polyimide (SEPI) surface structure from a natural Xanthosoma sagittifolium leaf. An electroactive polyimide (EPI) was first synthesized through thermal imidization. An impression of the superhydrophobic Xanthosoma sagittifolium leaf was then nanocasted onto the surface of the EPI so that the resulting EPI was superhydrophobic and would prevent corrosion. Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) was then used as a negative template to transfer the impression of the superhydrophobic surface of the biomimetic EPI onto a cold-rolled steel (CRS) electrode. The superhydrophobic electroactive material could be used as advanced coatings that protect metals against corrosion. The morphology of the surface of the as-synthesized SEPI coating was investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The surface showed numerous micromastoids, each decorated with many nanowrinkles. The water contact angle (CA) for the SEPI coating was 155°, which was significantly larger than that for the EPI coating (i.e., CA = 87°). The significant increase in the contact angle indicated that the biomimetic morphology effectively repelled water. Potentiodynamic and electrochemical impedance spectroscopic measurements indicated that the SEPI coating offered better protection against corrosion than the EPI coating did.

  13. 76 FR 54419 - International Anti-Fouling System Certificate

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-01

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 46 CFR Part 8 RIN 1625-AB79 International Anti-Fouling System Certificate AGENCY... vessel inspection regulations to add the International Anti-fouling System (IAFS) Certificate to the list... Convention on the Control of Harmful Anti-fouling Systems on Ships, 2001. This proposed rule would enable...

  14. 76 FR 76896 - International Anti-Fouling System Certificate

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-09

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 46 CFR Part 8 RIN 1625-AB79 International Anti-Fouling System Certificate AGENCY... regulations to add the International Anti-fouling System (IAFS) Certificate to the list of certificates a... Harmful Anti-fouling Systems on Ships, 2001. This final rule will enable recognized classification...

  15. Progress in advanced high temperature turbine materials, coatings, and technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freche, J. C.; Ault, G. M.

    1977-01-01

    Several NASA-sponsored benefit-cost studies have shown that very substantial benefits can be obtained by increasing material capability for aircraft gas turbines. Prealloyed powder processing holds promise for providing superalloys with increased strength for turbine disk applications. The developement of advanced powder metallurgy disk alloys must be based on a design of optimum processing and heat treating procedures. Materials considered for high temperature application include oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) alloys, directionally solidified superalloys, ceramics, directionally solidified eutectics, materials combining the high strength of a gamma prime strengthened alloy with the elevated temperature strength of an ODS, and composites. Attention is also given to the use of high pressure turbine seals, approaches for promoting environmental protection, and turbine cooling technology.

  16. Antifouling activity of twelve demosponges from Brazil.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, S M; Rogers, R; Rubem, A C; Da Gama, B A P; Muricy, G; Pereira, R C

    2013-08-01

    Benthic marine organisms are constantly exposed to fouling, which is harmful to most host species. Thus, the production of secondary metabolites containing antifouling properties is an important ecological advantage for sessile organisms and may also provide leading compounds for the development of antifouling paints. High antifouling potential of sponges has been demonstrated in the Indian and Pacific oceans and in the Caribbean and Mediterranean seas. Brazilian sponges remain understudied concerning antifouling activities. Only two scientific articles reported this activity in sponges of Brazil. The objective of this study was to test crude extracts of twelve species of sponges from Brazil against the attachment of the mussel Perna perna through laboratorial assays, and highlight promising species for future studies. The species Petromica citrina, Amphimedon viridis, Desmapsamma anchorata, Chondrosia sp., Polymastia janeirensis, Tedania ignis, Aplysina fulva, Mycale angulosa, Hymeniacidon heliophila, Dysidea etheria, Tethya rubra, and Tethya maza were frozen and freeze-dried before extraction with acetone or dichloromethane. The crude extract of four species significantly inhibited the attachment of byssus: Tethya rubra (p = 0.0009), Tethya maza (p = 0.0039), Petromica citrina (p = 0.0277), and Hymeniacidon heliophila (p = 0.00003). These species, specially, should be the target of future studies to detail the substances involved in the ability antifouling well as to define its amplitude of action.

  17. Hydrogel brushes grafted from stainless steel via surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization for marine antifouling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jingjing; Wei, Jun

    2016-09-01

    Crosslinked hydrogel brushes were grafted from stainless steel (SS) surfaces for marine antifouling. The brushes were prepared by surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (SI-ATRP) of 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC) and poly(ethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylate (PEGMA) respectively with different fractions of crosslinker in the feed. The grafted layers prepared with different thickness were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), atomic force microscopy (AFM), ellipsometry and water contact angle measurements. With the increase in the fraction of crosslinker in the feed, the thickness of the grafted layer increased and the surface became smooth. All the brush-coated SS surfaces could effectively reduce the adhesion of bacteria and microalgae and settlement of barnacle cyprids, as compared to the pristine SS surface. The antifouling efficacy of the PEGMA polymer (PPEGMA)-grafted surface was higher than that of the MPC polymer (PMPC)-grafted surfaces. Furthermore, the crosslinked hydrogel brush-grafted surfaces exhibited better fouling resistance than the non-crosslinked polymer brush-grafted surfaces, and the antifouling efficacy increased with the crosslinking density. These hydrogel coatings of low toxicity and excellent anti-adhesive characteristics suggested their useful applications as environmentally friendly antifouling coatings.

  18. Materials selection of surface coatings in an advanced size reduction facility. [For decommissioned stainless steel equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Briggs, J. L.; Younger, A. F.

    1980-06-02

    A materials selection test program was conducted to characterize optimum interior surface coatings for an advanced size reduction facility. The equipment to be processed by this facility consists of stainless steel apparatus (e.g., glove boxes, piping, and tanks) used for the chemical recovery of plutonium. Test results showed that a primary requirement for a satisfactory coating is ease of decontamination. A closely related concern is the resistance of paint films to nitric acid - plutonium environments. A vinyl copolymer base paint was the only coating, of eight paints tested, with properties that permitted satisfactory decontamination of plutonium and also performed equal to or better than the other paints in the chemical resistance, radiation stability, and impact tests.

  19. Natural antifouling compounds: Effectiveness in preventing invertebrate settlement and adhesion.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Joana R; Vasconcelos, Vitor

    2015-01-01

    Biofouling represents a major economic issue regarding maritime industries and also raise important environmental concern. International legislation is restricting the use of biocidal-based antifouling (AF) coatings, and increasing efforts have been applied in the search for environmentally friendly AF agents. A wide diversity of natural AF compounds has been described for their ability to inhibit the settlement of macrofouling species. However poor information on the specific AF targets was available before the application of different molecular approaches both on invertebrate settlement strategies and bioadhesive characterization and also on the mechanistic effects of natural AF compounds. This review focuses on the relevant information about the main invertebrate macrofouler species settlement and bioadhesive mechanisms, which might help in the understanding of the reported effects, attributed to effective and non-toxic natural AF compounds towards this macrofouling species. It also aims to contribute to the elucidation of promising biotechnological strategies in the development of natural effective environmentally friendly AF paints.

  20. Protein antifouling and fouling-release in perfluoropolyether surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molena, Elena; Credi, Caterina; De Marco, Carmela; Levi, Marinella; Turri, Stefano; Simeone, Giovanni

    2014-08-01

    Perfluoropolyether polymers have been described as high performance fouling-release materials for marine coatings. Moreover, they have a good potential to be exploited in the biomedical field too. In this article several perfuoropolyether photopolymers were characterized in terms of surface and mechanical properties outlining the relationship between these properties and the polymer molecular structure. In particular the anti-fouling and fouling-release performances, evaluated using Bovine Serum Albumin as testing protein, was correlated to other material properties, like a parameter considering both surface tension components γ and elastic modulus E. A good correlation between the anti-fouling/fouling-release of perfluoropolyethers and (E*γpolar)1/2 can actually be established. Our results show that perfluoropolyether photopolymers are good protein anti-fouling/fouling-release materials.

  1. A degradable polydopamine coating based on disulfide-exchange reaction.

    PubMed

    Hong, Daewha; Lee, Hojae; Kim, Beom Jin; Park, Taegyun; Choi, Ji Yu; Park, Matthew; Lee, Juno; Cho, Hyeoncheol; Hong, Seok-Pyo; Yang, Sung Ho; Jung, Sun Ho; Ko, Sung-Bo; Choi, Insung S

    2015-12-21

    Although the programmed degradation of biocompatible films finds applications in various fields including biomedical and bionanotechnological areas, coating methods have generally been limited to be substrate-specific, not applicable to any kinds of substrates. In this paper, we report a dopamine derivative, which allows for both universal coating of various substrates and stimuli-responsive film degradation, inspired by mussel-adhesive proteins. Two dopamine moieties are linked together by the disulfide bond, the cleavage of which enables the programmed film degradation. Mechanistic analysis of the degradable films indicates that the initial cleavage of the disulfide linkage causes rapid uptake of water molecules, hydrating the films, which leads to rapid degradation. Our substrate-independent coating of degradable films provides an advanced tool for drug delivery systems, tissue engineering, and anti-fouling strategies.

  2. Advanced study of thermal behaviour of CSZ comparing with the classic YSZ coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dragomirescu, A.; Constantin, N.; Ştefan, A.; Manoliu, V.; Truşcă, R.

    2017-01-01

    Thermal barrier coatings (TBC) are advanced materials typically applied to metal surfaces subjected to extreme temperatures to protect them and increase their lifetime. Ceria stabilized zirconia ceramic layer (CSZ) is increasingly used as an alternative improved as replace for classical TBC system - yttria stabilized zirconia - thanks to superior properties, including mechanical and high resistance to thermal corrosion. The paper describes the thermal shock testing of two types of thermal barrier coatings used to protect a nickel super alloy. For the experimental procedure, it was used plate samples from nickel super alloy with a bond coat and a ceramic top coat. The top coat was different: on some samples, it was used YSZ and on others CSZ. Ni based super alloys have good corrosion resistance in reducing environments action, but poor in oxidizing conditions. Extreme environments can lead to loss of material by oxidation / corrosion, along with decreased mechanical properties of the substrate due to damaging elements which diffuses into the substrate at high temperatures. Using laboratory equipment, the TBC systems were exposed repeatedly to extreme high temperatures for a short time and then cooled. After the thermal shock tests, the samples were morph-structured characterized using electronic microscopy to analyze the changes. The experimental results were compared to rank the TBC systems in order of performance.

  3. Analytical investigation of thermal barrier coatings on advanced power generation gas turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amos, D. J.

    1977-01-01

    An analytical investigation of present and advanced gas turbine power generation cycles incorporating thermal barrier turbine component coatings was performed. Approximately 50 parametric points considering simple, recuperated, and combined cycles (including gasification) with gas turbine inlet temperatures from current levels through 1644K (2500 F) were evaluated. The results indicated that thermal barriers would be an attractive means to improve performance and reduce cost of electricity for these cycles. A recommended thermal barrier development program has been defined.

  4. Coatings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Dennis G.

    1989-01-01

    This review covers analytical techniques applicable to the examination of coatings, raw materials, and substrates upon which coatings are placed. Techniques include chemical and electrochemical methods, chromatography, spectroscopy, thermal analysis, microscopy, and miscellaneous techniques. (MVL)

  5. Coatings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Dennis G.

    1989-01-01

    This review covers analytical techniques applicable to the examination of coatings, raw materials, and substrates upon which coatings are placed. Techniques include chemical and electrochemical methods, chromatography, spectroscopy, thermal analysis, microscopy, and miscellaneous techniques. (MVL)

  6. ­A practical application of reduced-copper antifouling paint in marine biological research

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Biofouling of experimental cages and other field apparatuses can be problematic for scientists and has traditionally been addressed using frequent manual removal (e.g., scraping, scrubbing). Recent environmental restrictions and legislative changes have driven the development of less hazardous antifouling products, making antifouling paint a potential alternative option to manual removal. Consequently, the viability of using these newly developed products as a replacement for the manual cleaning of exclusion cages was experimentally investigated. There were six treatments tested, comprising three with settlement tiles in experimental cages coated with antifouling paint, two with settlement tiles in unpainted experimental cages, and one cage-free suspended tile. The three antifouling treatments comprised two reduced-copper paints (21% Cu2O and 40% Cu2O) and one copper-free, Econea™-based paint (labeled “ecofriendly”). Antifouling paints were assessed for performance of preventing fouling of the cages and whether they elicited local effects on settlement tiles contained within them. All three paints performed well to reduce fouling of the cages during the initial six weeks of the experiment, but the efficacy of “ecofriendly” paint began to decrease during an extended deployment that lasted 14 weeks. The macro-community composition, biomass, and percent cover of settled organism on tiles within cages treated with copper-based paints (21% and 40% concentrations) were indistinguishable from tiles within the manually scrubbed cages. In contrast, settlement to tiles from the “ecofriendly” treatment was different in composition of macro-community and lower in biomass, suggesting the presence of local effects and therefore rendering it unsuitable for use in settlement experiments. The results of this study suggest that reduced-copper paints have the potential to serve as an alternative to manual maintenance, which may be useful for deployments in locations

  7. -A practical application of reduced-copper antifouling paint in marine biological research.

    PubMed

    Jerabek, Andrea S; Wall, Kara R; Stallings, Christopher D

    2016-01-01

    Biofouling of experimental cages and other field apparatuses can be problematic for scientists and has traditionally been addressed using frequent manual removal (e.g., scraping, scrubbing). Recent environmental restrictions and legislative changes have driven the development of less hazardous antifouling products, making antifouling paint a potential alternative option to manual removal. Consequently, the viability of using these newly developed products as a replacement for the manual cleaning of exclusion cages was experimentally investigated. There were six treatments tested, comprising three with settlement tiles in experimental cages coated with antifouling paint, two with settlement tiles in unpainted experimental cages, and one cage-free suspended tile. The three antifouling treatments comprised two reduced-copper paints (21% Cu2O and 40% Cu2O) and one copper-free, Econea (™)-based paint (labeled "ecofriendly"). Antifouling paints were assessed for performance of preventing fouling of the cages and whether they elicited local effects on settlement tiles contained within them. All three paints performed well to reduce fouling of the cages during the initial six weeks of the experiment, but the efficacy of "ecofriendly" paint began to decrease during an extended deployment that lasted 14 weeks. The macro-community composition, biomass, and percent cover of settled organism on tiles within cages treated with copper-based paints (21% and 40% concentrations) were indistinguishable from tiles within the manually scrubbed cages. In contrast, settlement to tiles from the "ecofriendly" treatment was different in composition of macro-community and lower in biomass, suggesting the presence of local effects and therefore rendering it unsuitable for use in settlement experiments. The results of this study suggest that reduced-copper paints have the potential to serve as an alternative to manual maintenance, which may be useful for deployments in locations that are

  8. Hafnia-Based Materials Developed for Advanced Thermal/Environmental Barrier Coating Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming; Miller, Robert A.

    2004-01-01

    Thermal and environmental barrier coatings (T/EBCs) will play a crucial role in advanced gas turbine engine systems because of their ability to significantly increase engine operating temperatures and reduce cooling requirements, and thus help achieve engine goals of low emissions and high efficiency. Under the NASA Ultra-Efficient Engine Technology (UEET) Project, advanced T/EBCs are being developed for low-emission SiC/SiC ceramic matrix composite (CMC) combustor applications by extending the CMC liner and vane temperature capability to 1650 C (3000 F) in oxidizing and water-vaporcontaining combustion environments. The coating system is required to have increased phase stability, lower lattice and radiation thermal conductivity, and improved sintering and thermal stress resistance under high-heat-flux and thermal-cycling engine conditions. Advanced heat-flux testing approaches (refs. 1 to 4) have been established at the NASA Glenn Research Center for 1650 C coating developments. The simulated combustion water-vapor environment is also being incorporated into the heat-flux test capabilities (ref. 3).

  9. DOD Initiatives to Rapidly Transition Advanced Coating and Surface Finishing Technologies for Military Turbine Engine Manufacture and Repair

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-03-21

    of PEWG Projects Involving Plating, Coating, and Surface Finishing • Advanced thermal spray coatings (HVOF) • Electrospark deposition • Laser...EWI, GEAE, P&W, Rolls-Royce FUNDING SOURCES RTOC STATUS OC-ALC request for FY06 Funding 3/21/2005 22 Other Technologies • Electrospark Deposition for...Aircraft Engines PEWG MANAGER Chuck Alford, Anteon Corp TECHNOLOGY OPPORTUNITY ADVANTAGES: Kinetic spray technologies deposit thick coatings with a

  10. A degradable polydopamine coating based on disulfide-exchange reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Daewha; Lee, Hojae; Kim, Beom Jin; Park, Taegyun; Choi, Ji Yu; Park, Matthew; Lee, Juno; Cho, Hyeoncheol; Hong, Seok-Pyo; Yang, Sung Ho; Jung, Sun Ho; Ko, Sung-Bo; Choi, Insung S.

    2015-11-01

    Although the programmed degradation of biocompatible films finds applications in various fields including biomedical and bionanotechnological areas, coating methods have generally been limited to be substrate-specific, not applicable to any kinds of substrates. In this paper, we report a dopamine derivative, which allows for both universal coating of various substrates and stimuli-responsive film degradation, inspired by mussel-adhesive proteins. Two dopamine moieties are linked together by the disulfide bond, the cleavage of which enables the programmed film degradation. Mechanistic analysis of the degradable films indicates that the initial cleavage of the disulfide linkage causes rapid uptake of water molecules, hydrating the films, which leads to rapid degradation. Our substrate-independent coating of degradable films provides an advanced tool for drug delivery systems, tissue engineering, and anti-fouling strategies.Although the programmed degradation of biocompatible films finds applications in various fields including biomedical and bionanotechnological areas, coating methods have generally been limited to be substrate-specific, not applicable to any kinds of substrates. In this paper, we report a dopamine derivative, which allows for both universal coating of various substrates and stimuli-responsive film degradation, inspired by mussel-adhesive proteins. Two dopamine moieties are linked together by the disulfide bond, the cleavage of which enables the programmed film degradation. Mechanistic analysis of the degradable films indicates that the initial cleavage of the disulfide linkage causes rapid uptake of water molecules, hydrating the films, which leads to rapid degradation. Our substrate-independent coating of degradable films provides an advanced tool for drug delivery systems, tissue engineering, and anti-fouling strategies. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Synthesis, characterization, and other additional details. See DOI: 10

  11. Universal Surface-initiated Polymerization of Antifouling Zwitterionic Brushes Using A Mussel-Mimetic Peptide Initiator

    PubMed Central

    Kuang, Jinghao; Messersmith, Phillip B.

    2012-01-01

    We report a universal method for the surface-initated polymerization (SIP) of a antifouling polymer brush on various classes of surfaces, including noble metals, metal oxides and inert polymers. Inspired by the versatility of mussel adhesive proteins, we synthesized a novel bifunctional tripeptide bromide (BrYKY) which combines an atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) initiating alkyl bromide with l-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA) and lysine. Simple dip-coating of substrates with variable wetting properties and compositions, including Teflon®, in a BrYKY solution at pH 8.5 led to formation of a thin film of cross-linked BrYKY. Subsequently, we showed that the BrYKY layer initiated the ATRP of a zwitterionic monomer, sulfobetaine methacrylate (SBMA) on all substrates, resulting in high density antifouling pSBMA brushes. Both BrYKY deposition and pSBMA grafting were unambiguously confirmed by ellipsometry, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and goniometry. All substrates that were coated with BrYKY/pSBMA dramatically reduced bacterial adhesion for 24 h and also resisted mammalian cell adhesion for at least 4 months, demonstrating the long-term stability of the BrYKY anchoring and antifouling properties of pSBMA. The use of BrYKY as a primer and polymerization initiator has the potential to be widely employed in surface grafted polymer brush modifications for biomedical and other applications. PMID:22506651

  12. Erosion Coatings for High-Temperature Polymer Composites: A Collaborative Project With Allison Advanced Development Company

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutter, James K.

    2000-01-01

    composite (ASTM D 4541 95 "Pull Off Strength of Coatings"). Glenn and Allison Advanced Development Company collaborated to optimize erosion coatings for gas turbine fan and compressor applications. All the coating systems survived aggressive thermal cycling without spalling. During erosion tests (see the final photo), the most promising coating systems tested had Cr3C2-NiCr and WC-Co as the hard topcoats. In all cases, these coating systems performed significantly better than that with a TiN hard topcoat. When material depth (thickness) loss is considered, the Cr3C2-NiCr and WC-Co coating systems provided, on average, an erosion resistance 8.5 times greater than that for the uncoated PMR 15/T650 35 composite. Similarly, Cr3C2-NiCr and WC-Co coating systems adhered to the PMC substrate during tensile tests significantly better than systems containing a TiN topcoat. Differences in topcoats of Cr3C2-NiCr and WC-Co were determined by considering issues such as cost and environmental impact. The preferred erosion-resistant coating system for PMR 15/T650 35 has WC-Co as the hard topcoat. This system provides the following benefits in comparison to the coating system with Cr3C2-NiCr topcoat: lower powder material cost (15 to 20 percent), environmentally friendly materials (Cr3C2-NiCr is hazardous), and higher deposition yield (10 to 15 percent), which results in less waste.

  13. Surface sensing and stress-signalling in Ulva and fouling diatoms - potential targets for antifouling: a review.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Stephanie E M; Coates, Juliet C

    2017-05-01

    Understanding the underlying signalling pathways that enable fouling algae to sense and respond to surfaces is essential in the design of environmentally friendly coatings. Both the green alga Ulva and diverse diatoms are important ecologically and economically as they are persistent biofoulers. Ulva spores exhibit rapid secretion, allowing them to adhere quickly and permanently to a ship, whilst diatoms secrete an abundance of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS), which are highly adaptable to different environmental conditions. There is evidence, now supported by molecular data, for complex calcium and nitric oxide (NO) signalling pathways in both Ulva and diatoms being involved in surface sensing and/or adhesion. Moreover, adaptation to stress has profound effects on the biofouling capability of both types of organism. Targets for future antifouling coatings based on surface sensing are discussed, with an emphasis on pursuing NO-releasing coatings as a potentially universal antifouling strategy.

  14. Plasma-enhanced deposition of antifouling layers on silicone rubber surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Hongquan

    In food processing and medical environments, biofilms serve as potential sources of contamination, and lead to food spoilage, transmission of diseases or infections. Because of its ubiquitous and recalcitrant nature, Listeria monocytogenes biofilm is especially hard to control. Generating antimicrobial surfaces provide a method to control the bacterial attachment. The difficulty of silver deposition on polymeric surfaces has been overcome by using a unique two-step plasma-mediated method. First silicone rubber surfaces were plasma-functionalized to generate aldehyde groups. Then thin silver layers were deposited onto the functionalized surfaces according to Tollen's reaction. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), atomic force spectroscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) showed that silver particles were deposited. By exposing the silver coated surfaces to L. monocytogenes, it was demonstrated that they were bactericidal to L. monocytogenes. No viable bacteria were detected after 12 to 18 h on silver-coated silicone rubber surfaces. Another antifouling approach is to generate polyethylene glycol (PEG) thin layer instead of silver on polymer surfaces. Covalent bond of PEG structures of various molecular weights to cold-plasma-functionalized polymer surfaces, such as silicone rubber, opens up a novel way for the generation of PEG brush-like or PEG branch-like anti-fouling layers. In this study, plasma-generated surface free radicals can react efficiently with dichlorosilane right after plasma treatment. With the generation of halo-silane groups, this enables PEG molecules to be grafted onto the modified surfaces. XPS data clearly demonstrated the presence of PEG molecules on plasma-functionalized silicone rubber surfaces. AFM images showed the changed surface morphologies as a result of covalent attachment to the surface of PEG molecules. Biofilm experiment results suggest that the PEG brush-like films have the potential ability to be the next

  15. Antifouling Transparent ZnO Thin Films Fabricated by Atmospheric Pressure Cold Plasma Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzaki, Yoshifumi; Du, Jinlong; Yuji, Toshifumi; Miyagawa, Hayato; Ogawa, Kazufumi

    2015-09-01

    One problem with outdoor-mounted solar panels is that power generation efficiency is reduced by face plate dirt; a problem with electronic touch panels is the deterioration of screen visibility caused by finger grease stains. To solve these problems, we should fabricate antifouling surfaces which have superhydrophobic and oil-repellent properties without spoiling the transparency of the transparent substrate. In this study, an antifouling surface with both superhydrophobicity and oil-repellency was fabricated on a glass substrate by forming a fractal microstructure. The fractal microstructure was constituted of transparent silica particles 100 nm in diameter and transparent zinc-oxide columns grown on silica particles through atmospheric pressure cold plasma deposition; the sample surface was coated with a chemically adsorbed monomolecular layer. Samples were obtained which had a superhydrophobic property (with a water droplet contact angle of more than 150°) and a high average transmittance of about 90% (with wavelengths ranging from 400 nm to 780 nm).

  16. Novel antifouling oligo(ethylene glycol) methacrylate particles via surfactant-free emulsion polymerization.

    PubMed

    Buyukserin, Fatih; Camli, Sevket Tolga; Yavuz, Mustafa Selman; Budak, Gurer Guven

    2011-03-01

    The use of particle formulations with antifouling surface properties attracts increasing interest in several biotechnological applications. Majority of these studies utilize a poly(ethylene glycol) coating to render the corresponding surface nonrecognizable to biological macromolecules. Herein, we report a simple way to prepare novel antifouling colloids composed of oligo(ethylene glycol) backbones via surfactant-free emulsion polymerization. Monodisperse cross-linked poly(ethylene glycol) ethyl ether methacrylate particles were characterized by dynamic light scattering and transmission electron microscopy. The effects of monomer, cross-linker and initiator on particle characteristics were investigated. More importantly, a prominent blockage of bovine serum albumin adsorption was obtained for the poly(ethylene glycol)-based sub-micron (~200 nm) particles when compared with similar-sized poly(methyl methacrylate) counterparts.

  17. Novel Non-toxic Antifouling/Fouling Release Nanocomposite Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Jason

    2008-03-01

    Biofouling is a significant environmental problem. Traditional solutions to this problem have involved incorporation of toxic organometallic species into the paint. This approach while effective, is harmful to the environment. The resultant ban on the use of many of these coatings has created a need for alternative systems to control marine fouling. Silicones represent the only class of polymers currently used commercially, due to their inherently low surface energy, glass transition temperature, and modulus, combined with good chemical stability and ease of application. In this talk I will present our efforts to develop a new generation of practical, non-toxic coatings that combine antifouling/fouling release characteristics with good mechanical properties, ease of application and low cost. Specifically we have been focusing on a series of fouling release coatings based on PDMS-polyurea segmented copolymers and nanocomposites. The PDMS copolymers are much stronger than pure PDMS yet they exhibit fouling release performance comparable and, in some cases, better than pure PDMS.

  18. Risks of using antifouling biocides in aquaculture.

    PubMed

    Guardiola, Francisco Antonio; Cuesta, Alberto; Meseguer, José; Esteban, Maria Angeles

    2012-01-01

    Biocides are chemical substances that can deter or kill the microorganisms responsible for biofouling. The rapid expansion of the aquaculture industry is having a significant impact on the marine ecosystems. As the industry expands, it requires the use of more drugs, disinfectants and antifoulant compounds (biocides) to eliminate the microorganisms in the aquaculture facilities. The use of biocides in the aquatic environment, however, has proved to be harmful as it has toxic effects on the marine environment. Organic booster biocides were recently introduced as alternatives to the organotin compounds found in antifouling products after restrictions were imposed on the use of tributyltin (TBT). The replacement products are generally based on copper metal oxides and organic biocides. The biocides that are most commonly used in antifouling paints include chlorothalonil, dichlofluanid, DCOIT (4,5-dichloro-2-n-octyl-4-isothiazolin-3-one, Sea-nine 211(®)), Diuron, Irgarol 1051, TCMS pyridine (2,3,3,6-tetrachloro-4-methylsulfonyl pyridine), zinc pyrithione and Zineb. There are two types of risks associated with the use of biocides in aquaculture: (i) predators and humans may ingest the fish and shellfish that have accumulated in these contaminants and (ii) the development of antibiotic resistance in bacteria. This paper provides an overview of the effects of antifouling (AF) biocides on aquatic organisms. It also provides some insights into the effects and risks of these compounds on non-target organisms.

  19. Risks of Using Antifouling Biocides in Aquaculture

    PubMed Central

    Guardiola, Francisco Antonio; Cuesta, Alberto; Meseguer, José; Esteban, Maria Angeles

    2012-01-01

    Biocides are chemical substances that can deter or kill the microorganisms responsible for biofouling. The rapid expansion of the aquaculture industry is having a significant impact on the marine ecosystems. As the industry expands, it requires the use of more drugs, disinfectants and antifoulant compounds (biocides) to eliminate the microorganisms in the aquaculture facilities. The use of biocides in the aquatic environment, however, has proved to be harmful as it has toxic effects on the marine environment. Organic booster biocides were recently introduced as alternatives to the organotin compounds found in antifouling products after restrictions were imposed on the use of tributyltin (TBT). The replacement products are generally based on copper metal oxides and organic biocides. The biocides that are most commonly used in antifouling paints include chlorothalonil, dichlofluanid, DCOIT (4,5-dichloro-2-n-octyl-4-isothiazolin-3-one, Sea-nine 211®), Diuron, Irgarol 1051, TCMS pyridine (2,3,3,6-tetrachloro-4-methylsulfonyl pyridine), zinc pyrithione and Zineb. There are two types of risks associated with the use of biocides in aquaculture: (i) predators and humans may ingest the fish and shellfish that have accumulated in these contaminants and (ii) the development of antibiotic resistance in bacteria. This paper provides an overview of the effects of antifouling (AF) biocides on aquatic organisms. It also provides some insights into the effects and risks of these compounds on non-target organisms. PMID:22408407

  20. Liquid Feedstock Plasma Spraying: An Emerging Process for Advanced Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markocsan, Nicolaie; Gupta, Mohit; Joshi, Shrikant; Nylén, Per; Li, Xin-Hai; Wigren, Jan

    2017-08-01

    Liquid feedstock plasma spraying (LFPS) involves deposition of ultrafine droplets of suspensions or solution precursors (typically ranging from nano- to submicron size) and permits production of coatings with unique microstructures that are promising for advanced thermal barrier coating (TBC) applications. This paper reviews the recent progress arising from efforts devoted to development of high-performance TBCs using the LFPS approach. Advancements in both suspension plasma spraying and solution precursor plasma spraying, which constitute the two main variants of LFPS, are presented. Results illustrating the different types of the microstructures that can be realized in LFPS through appropriate process parameter control, model-assisted assessment of influence of coating defects on thermo-mechanical properties and the complex interplay between pore coarsening, sintering and crystallite growth in governing thermal conductivity are summarized. The enhancement in functional performances/lifetime possible in LFPS TBCs with multilayered architectures and by incorporating new pyrochlore chemistries such as gadolinium zirconate, besides the conventional single 8 wt.% yttria-stabilized zirconia insulating ceramic layer, is specifically highlighted.

  1. A Method for Evaluating the Efficacy of Antifouling Paints Using Mytilus galloprovincialis in the Laboratory in a Flow-Through System.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Ryuji; Kobayashi, Seiji; Satuito, Cyril Glenn Perez; Katsuyama, Ichiro; Ando, Hirotomo; Seki, Yasuyuki; Senda, Tetsuya

    2016-01-01

    A laboratory test with a flow-through system was designed and its applicability for testing antifouling paints of varying efficacies was investigated. Six different formulations of antifouling paints were prepared to have increasing contents (0 to 40 wt.%) of Cu2O, which is the most commonly used antifouling substance, and each formulation of paint was coated on just one surface of every test plate. The test plates were aged for 45 days by rotating them at a speed of 10 knots inside a cylinder drum. A behavioral test was then conducted using five mussels (Mytilus galloprovincialis) that were pasted onto the coated surface of each aged test plate. The number of the byssus threads produced by each mussel generally decreased with increasing Cu2O content of the paint. The newly designed method was considered valid owing to the high consistency of its results with observations from the field experiment.

  2. A Method for Evaluating the Efficacy of Antifouling Paints Using Mytilus galloprovincialis in the Laboratory in a Flow-Through System

    PubMed Central

    Satuito, Cyril Glenn Perez; Katsuyama, Ichiro; Ando, Hirotomo; Seki, Yasuyuki; Senda, Tetsuya

    2016-01-01

    A laboratory test with a flow-through system was designed and its applicability for testing antifouling paints of varying efficacies was investigated. Six different formulations of antifouling paints were prepared to have increasing contents (0 to 40 wt.%) of Cu2O, which is the most commonly used antifouling substance, and each formulation of paint was coated on just one surface of every test plate. The test plates were aged for 45 days by rotating them at a speed of 10 knots inside a cylinder drum. A behavioral test was then conducted using five mussels (Mytilus galloprovincialis) that were pasted onto the coated surface of each aged test plate. The number of the byssus threads produced by each mussel generally decreased with increasing Cu2O content of the paint. The newly designed method was considered valid owing to the high consistency of its results with observations from the field experiment. PMID:27959916

  3. Advanced thermal barrier coating system development. Technical progress report, June 1, 1996--July 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1996-08-07

    An improved thermal barrier coating system with good reliability and thermal performance is described. The report discusses the coating process, manufacturing, repair, deposition, and microstructure of the coatings.

  4. Color deviation controlling of phosphor conformal coating by advanced spray painting technology for white LEDs.

    PubMed

    Yang, Liang; Wang, Simin; Lv, Zhicheng; Liu, Sheng

    2013-04-01

    An advanced phosphor conformal coating technology is proposed, good correlated color temperature (CCT) and chromaticity uniformity samples are fabricated through phosphor spray painting technology. Spray painting technology is also suitable for phosphor conformal coating of whole LED wafers. The samples of different CCTs are obtained through controlling the phosphor film thickness in the range of 6-80 μm; CCT variation of samples can be controlled in the range of ±200 K. The experimental Δuv reveals that the spray painting method can obtain a much smaller CCT variation (Δuv of 1.36e(-3)) than the conventional dispensing method (Δuv of 11.86e(-3)) when the light is emitted at angles from -90° to +90°, and chromaticity area uniformity is also improved significantly.

  5. Minimally Adhesive, Advanced Non-toxic Coatings of Dendrimeric Catalysts in Sol-Gel Matrices

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-19

    topography. The use of longc-hain fluorocarbons allows the generation of phase separated materials with antifouling/fouling-release characteristics. 15...organisms/ materials and strength of adhesion of fouling organisms/ materials . 3) Xerogels incorporating TFPTMOS, PhTEOS, C3TMOS, C8TEOS, TEOS...barnacles and algal sporelings. This may be a consequence of the formation of nanopores on the surface of the xerogel. 5) Leachate studies show

  6. Sea-nine antifoulant: an environmentally acceptable alternative to organotin antifoulants.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, A H; Willingham, G L

    2000-08-21

    This article reviews previously reported data on the performance, environmental fate, and environmental modeling of Sea-Nine 211 antifoulant (4,5-dichloro-2-n-octyl-4-isothiazolin-3-one). Since organotins are an industry standard, the environmental fate and environmental modeling results of tributyltin (TBT) are compared to those of the Sea-Nine antifoulant for reference. Laboratory and field tests results have shown Sea-Nine antifoulant to be highly effective. Five years of commercial use has confirmed this. Sea-Nine antifoulant and TBT were compared in an environmental risk assessment to predict their effects on the environment. Sea-Nine antifoulant was degraded rapidly in the environment by microorganisms. Its half-life in aerobic and anaerobic microcosm studies was less than 1 h. TBT degraded slowly under aerobic and anaerobic conditions with half-lives ranging from 6 to 9 months. The degradation products of Sea-Nine antifoulant were ring-opened compounds with greatly reduced toxicity. TBT degraded to dibutyltin species, which were still toxic and persistent in the environment. Bioaccumulation studies in fish showed essentially no bioaccumulation of the Sea-Nine biocide. The bioaccumulation of TBT was significant, with bioconcentration factors as high as 10000. The Sea-Nine antifoulant showed no chronic or reproductive toxicity to marine species, while TBT showed a wide range of effects on growth, development, and reproduction at levels as low as 2 parts per trillion (ppt). Computer modeling using the Exposure Analysis Modeling System (EXAMS) predicted maximum concentrations of Sea-Nine biocide of up to 10 ppt, far below the maximum acceptable environmental concentration (MAEC) of 630 ppt. The maximum predicted concentrations of TBT were as high as 345 ppt, far above the UK Environmental Standard in seawater of 2 ppt.

  7. Development of processing procedures for advanced silicon solar cells. [antireflection coatings and short circuit currents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott-Monck, J. A.; Stella, P. M.; Avery, J. E.

    1975-01-01

    Ten ohm-cm silicon solar cells, 0.2 mm thick, were produced with short circuit current efficiencies up to thirteen percent and using a combination of recent technical advances. The cells were fabricated in conventional and wraparound contact configurations. Improvement in cell collection efficiency from both the short and long wavelengths region of the solar spectrum was obtained by coupling a shallow junction and an optically transparent antireflection coating with back surface field technology. Both boron diffusion and aluminum alloying techniques were evaluated for forming back surface field cells. The latter method is less complicated and is compatible with wraparound cell processing.

  8. Environmental management aspects for TBT antifouling wastes from the shipyards.

    PubMed

    Kotrikla, Anna

    2009-02-01

    Tributyltin (TBT)-based antifouling paints have been successfully used for over 40 years to protect a ship's hull from biofouling. However, due to its high toxicity to marine organisms, the International Maritime Organization (IMO), in 1990, adopted a resolution recommending governments to adopt measures to eliminate antifouling paints containing TBT. High concentrations of TBT are detected in the vicinity of ports and shipyards. TBT is also usually detected in the sediment, in which it accumulates. This study reviews recent literature for the best management practices (BMPs) in order to minimize the environmental effects of TBT. The paper focuses on the evaluation of the available techniques for the removal of TBT from shipyard wastes and from the sediment. The most effective treatment methods are highlighted. BMPs include recycling of abrasive materials, use of cleaner abrasive materials, reuse of spent abrasive materials, substitution of hydroblasting by vacuum blasting or containment or ultra-high-pressure water blasting and confinement of pollution by enclosure and containment systems. The treatment of the TBT wastes by conventional biological wastewater treatment processes is probably not suitable, because the concentrations of TBT found in shipyards' wastewaters are toxic to microorganisms. Advanced technologies such as activated carbon adsorption and dissolved air flotation, in combination with filtration and coagulation-clarification, photodegradation and electrochemical treatment, are required to remove TBT. However, advanced methods should be further optimized to meet the regulatory limit of 200 ng/L. To date, only one published work examines the efficiency of incineration for the treatment of solid sandblast wastes. Regarding the treatment of sediment, land deposition of the less polluted fraction of sediment is a feasible option. Such treatment must take into account the risk of contamination of groundwater and the surroundings, and it requires

  9. Transparent antifouling material for improved operative field visibility in endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Sunny, Steffi; Cheng, George; Daniel, Daniel; Lo, Peter; Ochoa, Sebastian; Howell, Caitlin; Vogel, Nicolas; Majid, Adnan; Aizenberg, Joanna

    2016-01-01

    Camera-guided instruments, such as endoscopes, have become an essential component of contemporary medicine. The 15–20 million endoscopies performed every year in the United States alone demonstrate the tremendous impact of this technology. However, doctors heavily rely on the visual feedback provided by the endoscope camera, which is routinely compromised when body fluids and fogging occlude the lens, requiring lengthy cleaning procedures that include irrigation, tissue rubbing, suction, and even temporary removal of the endoscope for external cleaning. Bronchoscopies are especially affected because they are performed on delicate tissue, in high-humidity environments with exposure to extremely adhesive biological fluids such as mucus and blood. Here, we present a repellent, liquid-infused coating on an endoscope lens capable of preventing vision loss after repeated submersions in blood and mucus. The material properties of the coating, including conformability, mechanical adhesion, transparency, oil type, and biocompatibility, were optimized in comprehensive in vitro and ex vivo studies. Extensive bronchoscopy procedures performed in vivo on porcine lungs showed significantly reduced fouling, resulting in either unnecessary or ∼10–15 times shorter and less intensive lens clearing procedures compared with an untreated endoscope. We believe that the material developed in this study opens up opportunities in the design of next-generation endoscopes that will improve visual field, display unprecedented antibacterial and antifouling properties, reduce the duration of the procedure, and enable visualization of currently unreachable parts of the body, thus offering enormous potential for disease diagnosis and treatment. PMID:27688761

  10. First evaluation of the threat posed by antifouling biocides in the Southern Adriatic Sea.

    PubMed

    Manzo, Sonia; Ansanelli, Giuliana; Parrella, Luisa; Di Landa, Giuseppe; Massanisso, Paolo; Schiavo, Simona; Minopoli, Carmine; Lanza, Bruno; Boggia, Raffaella; Aleksi, Pellumb; Tabaku, Afrim

    2014-08-01

    The CARISMA project (characterization and ecological risk analysis of antifouling biocides in the Southern Adriatic Sea) aims to appraise the quality of the Southern Adriatic Sea between Italy (Apulia region) and Albania and, in particular, the impact due to the use of biocidal antifouling coatings. Under this project, a preliminary survey at the main hot spots of contamination (e.g. ports and marinas) was conducted at the end of the nautical season in 2012. Chemical seawater analyses were complemented with ecotoxicological assays and the results were analyzed by principal component analysis (PCA). As expected, PCA splits the Albanian and Italian ports, according to the different degrees of contamination indicated for the two countries by the experimental data, highlighting the most critical situation in one port of Apulia. In addition, in order to assess the potential adverse ecological effects posed by antifouling agents (i.e. tributyltin (TBT)-irgarol-diuron) on non-target marine organisms, hazard quotients (HQ) were calculated. The results showed a low risk posed by irgarol and diuron whereas the probability of adverse effects was high in the case of TBT.

  11. Selection of commercial hydrolytic enzymes with potential antifouling activity in marine environments.

    PubMed

    Zanaroli, Giulio; Negroni, Andrea; Calisti, Cecilia; Ruzzi, Maurizio; Fava, Fabio

    2011-12-10

    In this work, the marine antifouling potential of some commercially available hydrolytic enzymes acting on the main constituents of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) involved in bacterial biofilm formation was determined. The selected protease (i.e., alpha-chymotrypsin from bovine pancreas), carbohydrase (i.e., alpha-amylase from porcine pancreas) and lipase (from porcine pancreas) exhibited remarkable hydrolytic activities towards target macromolecules typically composing EPS under a wide range of pHs (6.5-9.0 for alpha-chymotrysin and alpha-amylase; 7.0-8.5 for the lipase) and temperatures (from 10 °C to 30 °C), as well as relevant half-lives (from about 2 weeks to about 2 months), in a marine synthetic water. The activity displayed by each enzyme was poorly affected by the co-presence of the other enzymes, thus indicating their suitability to be employed in combination. None of the enzymes was able to inhibit the formation of biofilm by an actual site marine microbial community when applied singly. However, a mixture of the same enzymes reduced biofilm formation by about 90% without affecting planktonic growth of the same microbial community. This indicates that multiple hydrolytic activities are required to efficiently prevent biofilm formation by complex microbial communities, and that the mixture of enzymes selected in this study has the potential to be employed as an environmental friendly antifouling agent in marine antifouling coatings.

  12. Worldwide occurrence and effects of antifouling paint booster biocides in the aquatic environment: a review.

    PubMed

    Konstantinou, I K; Albanis, T A

    2004-04-01

    Organic booster biocides were recently introduced as alternatives to organotin compounds in antifouling products, after restrictions imposed on the use of tributyltin (TBT) in 1987. Replacement products are generally based on copper metal oxides and organic biocides. This ban has led to an increase in alternative coating products containing the above biocides. The most commonly used biocides in antifouling paints are: Irgarol 1051, diuron, Sea-nine 211, dichlofluanid, chlorothalonil, zinc pyrithione, TCMS (2,3,3,6-tetrachloro-4-methylsulfonyl) pyridine, TCMTB [2-(thiocyanomethylthio) benzothiazole], and zineb. Since 1993, several studies have demonstrated the presence of these biocides in European coastal environment as a result of their increased use. More recently, the presence of these biocides was also revealed in waters from Japan, United States, Singapore, Australia and Bermuda. This paper reviews the currently available data on the occurrence of these biocides in the aquatic environment. Some data dealing with the environmental fate, partitioning, behaviour and risk assessment of antifouling paint booster biocides are also reported in order to discuss the detected levels of contamination.

  13. An Assessment of the Residual Stresses in Low Pressure Plasma Sprayed Coatings on an Advanced Copper Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raj, S. V.; Ghosn, L. J.; Agarwal, A.; Lachtrupp, T. P.

    2002-01-01

    Modeling studies were conducted on low pressure plasma sprayed (LPPS) NiAl top coat applied to an advanced Cu-8(at.%)Cr-4%Nb alloy (GRCop-84) substrate using Ni as a bond coat. A thermal analysis suggested that the NiAl and Ni top and bond coats, respectively, would provide adequate thermal protection to the GRCop-84 substrate in a rocket engine operating under high heat flux conditions. Residual stress measurements were conducted at different depths from the free surface on coated and uncoated GRCop-84 specimens by x-ray diffraction. These data are compared with theoretically estimated values assessed by a finite element analysis simulating the development of these stresses as the coated substrate cools down from the plasma spraying temperature to room temperature.

  14. Zwitterionic sulfobetaine polymer-immobilized surface by simple tyrosinase-mediated grafting for enhanced antifouling property.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Ho Joon; Lee, Yunki; Phuong, Le Thi; Seon, Gyeung Mi; Kim, Eunsuk; Park, Jong Chul; Yoon, Hyunjin; Park, Ki Dong

    2017-10-01

    Introducing antifouling property to biomaterial surfaces has been considered an effective method for preventing the failure of implanted devices. In order to achieve this, the immobilization of zwitterions on biomaterial surfaces has been proven to be an excellent way of improving anti-adhesive potency. In this study, poly(sulfobetaine-co-tyramine), a tyramine-conjugated sulfobetaine polymer, was synthesized and simply grafted onto the surface of polyurethane via a tyrosinase-mediated reaction. Surface characterization by water contact angle measurements, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy demonstrated that the zwitterionic polymer was successfully introduced onto the surface of polyurethane and remained stable for 7days. In vitro studies revealed that poly(sulfobetaine-co-tyramine)-coated surfaces dramatically reduced the adhesion of fibrinogen, platelets, fibroblasts, and S. aureus by over 90% in comparison with bare surfaces. These results proved that polyurethane surfaces grafted with poly(sulfobetaine-co-tyramine) via a tyrosinase-catalyzed reaction could be promising candidates for an implantable medical device with excellent bioinert abilities. Antifouling surface modification is one of the key strategy to prevent the thrombus formation or infection which occurs on the surface of biomaterial after transplantation. Although there are many methods to modify the surface have been reported, necessity of simple modification technique still exists to apply for practical applications. The purpose of this study is to modify the biomaterial's surface by simply immobilizing antifouling zwitterion polymer via enzyme tyrosinase-mediated reaction which could modify versatile substrates in mild aqueous condition within fast time period. After modification, pSBTA grafted surface becomes resistant to various biological factors including proteins, cells, and bacterias. This approach appears to be a promising method to impart antifouling property on

  15. Thermal Conductivity of Advanced Ceramic Thermal Barrier Coatings Determined by a Steady-state Laser Heat-flux Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dong-Ming; Miller, Robert A.

    2004-01-01

    The development of low conductivity and high temperature capable thermal barrier coatings requires advanced testing techniques that can accurately and effectively evaluate coating thermal conductivity under future high-performance and low-emission engine heat-flux conditions. In this paper, a unique steady-state CO2 laser (wavelength 10.6 microns) heat-flux approach is described for determining the thermal conductivity and conductivity deduced cyclic durability of ceramic thermal and environmental barrier coating systems at very high temperatures (up to 1700 C) under large thermal gradients. The thermal conductivity behavior of advanced thermal and environmental barrier coatings for metallic and Si-based ceramic matrix composite (CMC) component applications has also been investigated using the laser conductivity approach. The relationships between the lattice and radiation conductivities as a function of heat flux and thermal gradient at high temperatures have been examined for the ceramic coating systems. The steady-state laser heat-flux conductivity approach has been demonstrated as a viable means for the development and life prediction of advanced thermal barrier coatings for future turbine engine applications.

  16. Durability and CMAS Resistance of Advanced Environmental Barrier Coatings Systems for SiC/SiC Ceramic Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming

    2015-01-01

    Environmental barrier coatings (EBCs) and SiCSiC ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) systems will play a crucial role in next generation turbine engines for hot-section component applications because of their ability to significantly increase engine operating temperatures with improved efficiency, reduce engine weight and cooling requirements. This paper will emphasize advanced environmental barrier coating developments for SiCSiC turbine airfoil components, by using advanced coating compositions and processing, in conjunction with mechanical and environment testing and durability validations. The coating-CMC degradations and durability in the laboratory simulated engine fatigue-creep and complex operating environments are being addressed. The effects of Calcium-Magnesium-Alumino-Silicate (CMAS) from road sand or volcano-ash deposits on the degradation mechanisms of the environmental barrier coating systems will be discussed. The results help understand the advanced EBC-CMC system performance, aiming at the durability improvements of more robust, prime-reliant environmental barrier coatings for successful applications of the component technologies and lifing methodologies.

  17. Microstructure Evolution and Durability of Advanced Environmental Barrier Coating Systems for SiC/SiC Ceramic Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming; Evans, Laura J.; McCue, Terry R.; Harder, Bryan

    2016-01-01

    Environmental barrier coated SiC-SiC ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) systems will play a crucial role in next generation turbine engines for hot-section component applications because of their ability to significantly increase engine operating temperatures with improved efficiency, reduce engine weight and cooling requirements. Advanced HfO2 and rare earth silicate environmental barrier coatings (EBCs), along with multicomponent hafnium and rare earth silicide EBC bond coats have been developed. The coating degradation mechanisms in the laboratory simulated engine thermal cycling, and fatigue-creep operating environments are also being investigated. This paper will focus on the microstructural and compositional evolutions of an advanced environmental barrier coating system on a SiC-SiC CMC substrate during the high temperature simulated durability tests, by using a Field Emission Gun Scanning Electron Microscopy, Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS) and Wavelength Dispersive Spectroscopy (WDS). The effects of Calcium-Magnesium-Alumino-Silicate (CMAS) from road sand or volcano-ash deposits on the degradation mechanisms of the environmental barrier coating systems will also be discussed. The detailed analysis results help understand the EBC-CMC system performance, aiming at the durability improvements to achieve more robust, prime-reliant environmental barrier coatings.

  18. Design and Performance Optimizations of Advanced Erosion-Resistant Low Conductivity Thermal Barrier Coatings for Rotorcraft Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming; Miller, Robert A.; Kuczmarski, Maria A.

    2012-01-01

    Thermal barrier coatings will be more aggressively designed to protect gas turbine engine hot-section components in order to meet future rotorcraft engine higher fuel efficiency and lower emission goals. For thermal barrier coatings designed for rotorcraft turbine airfoil applications, further improved erosion and impact resistance are crucial for engine performance and durability, because the rotorcraft are often operated in the most severe sand erosive environments. Advanced low thermal conductivity and erosion-resistant thermal barrier coatings are being developed, with the current emphasis being placed on thermal barrier coating toughness improvements using multicomponent alloying and processing optimization approaches. The performance of the advanced thermal barrier coatings has been evaluated in a high temperature erosion burner rig and a laser heat-flux rig to simulate engine erosion and thermal gradient environments. The results have shown that the coating composition and architecture optimizations can effectively improve the erosion and impact resistance of the coating systems, while maintaining low thermal conductivity and cyclic oxidation durability

  19. Bile Flow Phantom Model and Animal Bile Duct Dilation Model for Evaluating Biliary Plastic Stents with Advanced Hydrophilic Coating.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Chang-Il; Kim, Gwangil; Jeong, Seok; Lee, Won Seop; Lee, Don Haeng; Ko, Kwang Hyun; Hong, Sung Pyo; Hahm, Ki Baik

    2016-07-15

    The efforts to improve biliary plastic stents (PSs) for decreasing biofilm formation and overcome short patency time have been continued. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of advanced hydrophilic coating for patency and biodurability of PS. Using an in vitro bile flow phantom model, we compared patency between prototype PS with hydrophilic coating (PS+HC) and prototype PS without hydrophilic coating (PS-HC). We performed an analysis of the degree of luminal narrowing by microscopic examination. Using an in vivo swine bile duct dilation model made by endoscopic papillary closure and stent insertion, we evaluated biodurability of hydrophilic coating. In the phantom model, PS+HC showed less biofilm formation and luminal narrowing than PS-HC at 8 weeks (p<0.05). A total of 31 stents were inserted into the dilated bile duct of seven swine models, and 24 stents were successfully retrieved 8 weeks later. There was no statistical difference of stent patency between the polyethylene PS+HC and the polyurethane PS+HC. The biodurability of hydrophilic coating was sustained up to 8 weeks, when assessing the coating layer by scanning electron microscopy examination. Advanced hydrophilic coating technology may extend the patency of PS compared to uncoated PS.

  20. Bile Flow Phantom Model and Animal Bile Duct Dilation Model for Evaluating Biliary Plastic Stents with Advanced Hydrophilic Coating

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Chang-Il; Kim, Gwangil; Jeong, Seok; Lee, Won Seop; Lee, Don Haeng; Ko, Kwang Hyun; Hong, Sung Pyo; Hahm, Ki Baik

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims The efforts to improve biliary plastic stents (PSs) for decreasing biofilm formation and overcome short patency time have been continued. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of advanced hydrophilic coating for patency and biodurability of PS. Methods Using an in vitro bile flow phantom model, we compared patency between prototype PS with hydrophilic coating (PS+HC) and prototype PS without hydrophilic coating (PS−HC). We performed an analysis of the degree of luminal narrowing by microscopic examination. Using an in vivo swine bile duct dilation model made by endoscopic papillary closure and stent insertion, we evaluated biodurability of hydrophilic coating. Results In the phantom model, PS+HC showed less biofilm formation and luminal narrowing than PS−HC at 8 weeks (p<0.05). A total of 31 stents were inserted into the dilated bile duct of seven swine models, and 24 stents were successfully retrieved 8 weeks later. There was no statistical difference of stent patency between the polyethylene PS+HC and the polyurethane PS+HC. The biodurability of hydrophilic coating was sustained up to 8 weeks, when assessing the coating layer by scanning electron microscopy examination. Conclusions Advanced hydrophilic coating technology may extend the patency of PS compared to uncoated PS. PMID:27021507

  1. Fabrication of transparent antifouling thin films with fractal structure by atmospheric pressure cold plasma deposition.

    PubMed

    Miyagawa, Hayato; Yamauchi, Koji; Kim, Yoon-Kee; Ogawa, Kazufumi; Yamaguchi, Kenzo; Suzaki, Yoshifumi

    2012-12-21

    Antifouling surface with both superhydrophobicity and oil-repellency has been fabricated on glass substrate by forming fractal microstructure(s). The fractal microstructure was constituted by transparent silica particles of 100 nm diameter and transparent zinc-oxide columns grown on silica particles by atmospheric pressure cold plasma deposition. The sample surface was coated with a chemically adsorbed monomolecular layer. We found that one sample has the superhydrophobic ability with a water droplet contact angle of more than 150°, while another sample has a high transmittance of more than 85% in a wavelength range from 400 to 800 nm.

  2. New Antifouling Platform Characterized by Single-Molecule Imaging

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Antifouling surfaces have been widely studied for their importance in medical devices and industry. Antifouling surfaces mostly achieved by methoxy-poly(ethylene glycol) (mPEG) have shown biomolecular adsorption less than 1 ng/cm2 which was measured by surface analytical tools such as surface plasmon resonance (SPR) spectroscopy, quartz crystal microbalance (QCM), or optical waveguide lightmode (OWL) spectroscopy. Herein, we utilize a single-molecule imaging technique (i.e., an ultimate resolution) to study antifouling properties of functionalized surfaces. We found that about 600 immunoglobulin G (IgG) molecules are adsorbed. This result corresponds to ∼5 pg/cm2 adsorption, which is far below amount for the detection limit of the conventional tools. Furthermore, we developed a new antifouling platform that exhibits improved antifouling performance that shows only 78 IgG molecules adsorbed (∼0.5 pg/cm2). The antifouling platform consists of forming 1 nm TiO2 thin layer, on which peptidomimetic antifouling polymer (PMAP) is robustly anchored. The unprecedented antifouling performance can potentially revolutionize a variety of research fields such as single-molecule imaging, medical devices, biosensors, and others. PMID:24503420

  3. Field results of antifouling techniques for optical instruments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Strahle, W.J.; Hotchkiss, F.S.; Martini, M.A.

    1998-01-01

    An anti-fouling technique is developed for the protection of optical instruments from biofouling which leaches a bromide compound into a sample chamber and pumps new water into the chamber prior to measurement. The primary advantage of using bromide is that it is less toxic than the metal-based antifoulants. The drawback of the bromide technique is also discussed.

  4. A New Hard Coat on Cover Layer for Cartridge-Free Blu-ray Disc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Mi Young; Kang, Tae-Sik; Lee, Seong-Keun; Jang, Sung Hoon; Seo, Hun; Lee, Chang-Ho

    2004-07-01

    A new UV-curable hard coat resin with an excellent antifouling property has been developed. A 3-μm-thick hard coat layer was stacked onto a 97-μm-thick cover layer by spin coating. The characteristics of the hard coat layer, such as pencil hardness, microscratch resistance, adhesion, water contact angle and jitter, have been investigated.

  5. Thermal barrier coatings issues in advanced land-based gas turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Parks, W.P.; Lee, W.Y.; Wright, I.G.

    1995-06-01

    The Department of Energy`s Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) program is aimed at fostering the development of a new generation of land-based gas turbine systems with overall efficiencies significantly beyond those of current state-of-the-art machines, as well as greatly increased times between inspection and refurbishment, improved environmental impact, and decreased cost. The proposed duty cycle of ATS machines will emphasize different criteria in the selection of materials for the critical components. In particular, thermal barrier coatings (TBCS) will be an essential feature of the hot gas path components in these machines. In fact, the goals of the ATS will require significant improvements in TBC technology, since these turbines will be totally reliant on TBCs, which will be required to function on critical components such as the first stage vanes and blades for times considerably in excess of those experienced in current applications. Issues that assume increased importance are the mechanical and chemical stability of the ceramic layer and of the metallic bond coat; the thermal expansion characteristics and compliance of the ceramic layer; and the thermal conductivity across the thickness of the ceramic layer. Obviously, the ATS program provides a very challenging opportunity for TBCs, and involves some significant opportunities to extend this technology. A significant TBC development effort is planned in the ATS program which will address these key issues.

  6. Calcium-Magnesium-Aluminosilicate (CMAS) Reactions and Degradation Mechanisms of Advanced Environmental Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahlborg, Nadia L.; Zhu, Dongming

    2013-01-01

    The thermochemical reactions between calcium-magnesium-aluminosilicate- (CMAS-) based road sand and several advanced turbine engine environmental barrier coating (EBC) materials were studied. The phase stability, reaction kinetics and degradation mechanisms of rare earth (RE)-silicates Yb2SiO5, Y2Si2O7, and RE-oxide doped HfO2 and ZrO2 under the CMAS infiltration condition at 1500 C were investigated, and the microstructure and phase characteristics of CMAS-EBC specimens were examined using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and X-ray Diffraction (XRD). Experimental results showed that the CMAS dissolved RE-silicates to form crystalline, highly non-stoichiometric apatite phases, and in particular attacking the silicate grain boundaries. Cross-section images show that the CMAS reacted with specimens and deeply penetrated into the EBC grain boundaries and formed extensive low-melting eutectic phases, causing grain boundary recession with increasing testing time in the silicate materials. The preliminary results also showed that CMAS reactions also formed low melting grain boundary phases in the higher concentration RE-oxide doped HfO2 systems. The effect of the test temperature on CMAS reactions of the EBC materials will also be discussed. The faster diffusion exhibited by apatite and RE-doped oxide phases and the formation of extensive grain boundary low-melting phases may limit the CMAS resistance of some of the environmental barrier coatings at high temperatures.

  7. Novel conformal organic antireflective coatings for advanced I-line lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deshpande, Shreeram V.; Nowak, Kelly A.; Fowler, Shelly; Williams, Paul; Arjona, Mikko

    2001-08-01

    Flash memory chips are playing a critical role in semiconductor devices due to increased popularity of hand held electronic communication devices such as cell phones and PDAs (personal Digital Assistants). Flash memory offers two primary advantages in semiconductor devices. First, it offers flexibility of in-circuit programming capability to reduce the loss from programming errors and to significantly reduce commercialization time to market for new devices. Second, flash memory has a double density memory capability through stacked gate structures which increases the memory capability and thus saves significantly on chip real estate. However, due to stacked gate structures the requirements for manufacturing of flash memory devices are significantly different from traditional memory devices. Stacked gate structures also offer unique challenges to lithographic patterning materials such as Bottom Anti-Reflective Coating (BARC) compositions used to achieve CD control and to minimize standing wave effect in photolithography. To be applicable in flash memory manufacturing a BARC should form a conformal coating on high topography of stacked gate features as well as provide the normal anti-reflection properties for CD control. In this paper we report on a new highly conformal advanced i-line BARC for use in design and manufacture of flash memory devices. Conformal BARCs being significantly thinner in trenches than the planarizing BARCs offer the advantage of reducing BARC overetch and thus minimizing resist thickness loss.

  8. Thermal barrier coatings issues in advanced land-based gas turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parks, William P.; Hoffman, Eugene E.; Lee, Woo Y.; Wright, Ian G.

    1995-01-01

    The Department of Energy's Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) program is aimed at fostering the development of a new generation of land-based gas turbine systems with overall efficiencies significantly beyond those of current state-of-the-art machines, as well as greatly increased times between inspection and refurbishment, improved environmental impact, and decreased cost. The proposed duty cycle of ATS machines will emphasize different criteria in the selection of materials for the critical components. In particular, thermal barrier coatings (TBC's) will be an essential feature of the hot gas path components in these machines. In fact, the goals of the ATS will require significant improvements in TBC technology, since these turbines will be totally reliant on TBC's, which will be required to function on critical components such as the first stage vanes and blades for times considerably in excess of those experienced in current applications. Issues that assume increased importance are the mechanical and chemical stability of the ceramic layer and of the metallic bond coat; the thermal expansion characteristics and compliance of the ceramic layer; and the thermal conductivity across the thickness of the ceramic layer. Obviously, the ATS program provides a very challenging opportunity for TBC's, and involves some significant opportunities to extend this technology. A significant TBC development effort is planned in the ATS program which will address these key issues.

  9. Thermal barrier coatings issues in advanced land-based gas turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parks, W. P.; Hoffman, E. E.; Lee, W. Y.; Wright, I. G.

    1997-06-01

    The Department of Energy’s Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) program is aimed at fostering the devel-opment of a new generation of land-based gas turbine systems with overall efficiencies significantly be-yond those of current state-of-the-art machines, as well as greatly increased times between inspection and refurbishment, improved environmental impact, and decreased cost. The proposed duty cycle of ATS ma-chines will emphasize different criteria in the selection of materials for the critical components. In par-ticular, thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) will be an essential feature of the hot gas path components in these machines. The goals of the ATS will require significant improvements in TBC technology, since these turbines will be totally reliant on TBCs, which will be required to function on critical components such as the first-stage vanes and blades for times considerably longer than those experienced in current applications. Important issues include the mechanical and chemical stability of the ceramic layer and the metallic bond coat, the thermal expansion characteristics and compliance of the ceramic layer, and the thermal conductivity across the thickness of the ceramic layer.

  10. Calcium-magnesium Aluminosilicate (CMAS) Interactions with Advanced Environmental Barrier Coating Material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiesner, Valerie L.; Bansal, Narottam P.

    2015-01-01

    Particulates, like sand and volcanic ash, threaten the development of robust environmental barrier coatings (EBCs) that protect next-generation silicon-based ceramic matrix composite (CMC) turbine engine components from harsh combustion environments during service. The siliceous particulates transform into molten glassy deposits of calcium-magnesium aluminosilicate (CMAS) when ingested by an aircraft engine operating at temperatures above 1200C. In this study, a sample of desert sand was melted into CMAS glass to evaluate high-temperature interactions between the sand glass and an advanced EBC material. Desert sand glass was added to the surface of hot-pressed EBC substrates, which were then heated in air at temperatures ranging from 1200C to 1500C. Scanning electron microscopy and X-ray energy-dispersive spectroscopy were used to evaluate microstructure and phase compositions of specimens and the CMASEBC interface after heat treatments.

  11. Pseudoalteromonas spp. serve as initial bacterial attractants in mesocosms of coastal waters but have subsequent antifouling capacity in mesocosms and when embedded in paint.

    PubMed

    Bernbom, Nete; Ng, Yoke Yin; Olsen, Stefan Møller; Gram, Lone

    2013-11-01

    The purpose of the present study was to determine if the monoculture antifouling effect of several pigmented pseudoalteromonads was retained in in vitro mesocosm systems using natural coastal seawater and when the bacteria were embedded in paint used on surfaces submerged in coastal waters. Pseudoalteromonas piscicida survived on a steel surface and retained antifouling activity for at least 53 days in sterile seawater, whereas P. tunicata survived and had antifouling activity for only 1 week. However, during the first week, all Pseudoalteromonas strains facilitated rather than prevented bacterial attachment when used to coat stainless steel surfaces and submerged in mesocosms with natural seawater. The bacterial density on surfaces coated with sterile growth medium was 10(5) cells/cm(2) after 7 days, whereas counts on surfaces precoated with Pseudoalteromonas were significantly higher, at 10(6) to 10(8) cells/cm(2). However, after 53 days, seven of eight Pseudoalteromonas strains had reduced total bacterial adhesion compared to the control. P. piscicida, P. antarctica, and P. ulvae remained on the surface, at levels similar to those in the initial coating, whereas P. tunicata could not be detected. Larger fouling organisms were observed on all plates precoated with Pseudoalteromonas; however, plates coated only with sterile growth medium were dominated by a bacterial biofilm. Suspensions of a P. piscicida strain and a P. tunicata strain were incorporated into ship paints (Hempasil x3 87500 and Hempasil 77500) used on plates that were placed at the Hempel A/S test site in Jyllinge Harbor. For the first 4 months, no differences were observed between control plates and treated plates, but after 5 to 6 months, the control plates were more fouled than the plates with pseudoalteromonad-based paint. Our study demonstrates that no single laboratory assay can predict antifouling effects and that a combination of laboratory and real-life methods must be used to determine

  12. Pseudoalteromonas spp. Serve as Initial Bacterial Attractants in Mesocosms of Coastal Waters but Have Subsequent Antifouling Capacity in Mesocosms and when Embedded in Paint

    PubMed Central

    Bernbom, Nete; Ng, Yoke Yin; Olsen, Stefan Møller

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to determine if the monoculture antifouling effect of several pigmented pseudoalteromonads was retained in in vitro mesocosm systems using natural coastal seawater and when the bacteria were embedded in paint used on surfaces submerged in coastal waters. Pseudoalteromonas piscicida survived on a steel surface and retained antifouling activity for at least 53 days in sterile seawater, whereas P. tunicata survived and had antifouling activity for only 1 week. However, during the first week, all Pseudoalteromonas strains facilitated rather than prevented bacterial attachment when used to coat stainless steel surfaces and submerged in mesocosms with natural seawater. The bacterial density on surfaces coated with sterile growth medium was 105 cells/cm2 after 7 days, whereas counts on surfaces precoated with Pseudoalteromonas were significantly higher, at 106 to 108 cells/cm2. However, after 53 days, seven of eight Pseudoalteromonas strains had reduced total bacterial adhesion compared to the control. P. piscicida, P. antarctica, and P. ulvae remained on the surface, at levels similar to those in the initial coating, whereas P. tunicata could not be detected. Larger fouling organisms were observed on all plates precoated with Pseudoalteromonas; however, plates coated only with sterile growth medium were dominated by a bacterial biofilm. Suspensions of a P. piscicida strain and a P. tunicata strain were incorporated into ship paints (Hempasil x3 87500 and Hempasil 77500) used on plates that were placed at the Hempel A/S test site in Jyllinge Harbor. For the first 4 months, no differences were observed between control plates and treated plates, but after 5 to 6 months, the control plates were more fouled than the plates with pseudoalteromonad-based paint. Our study demonstrates that no single laboratory assay can predict antifouling effects and that a combination of laboratory and real-life methods must be used to determine the

  13. Blanch Resistant and Thermal Barrier NiAl Coating Systems for Advanced Copper Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raj, Sai V. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A method of forming an environmental resistant thermal barrier coating on a copper alloy is disclosed. The steps include cleansing a surface of a copper alloy, depositing a bond coat on the cleansed surface of the copper alloy, depositing a NiAl top coat on the bond coat and consolidating the bond coat and the NiAl top coat to form the thermal barrier coating. The bond coat may be a nickel layer or a layer composed of at least one of copper and chromium-copper alloy and either the bond coat or the NiAl top coat or both may be deposited using a low pressure or vacuum plasma spray.

  14. Blanch Resistant and Thermal Barrier NiAl Coating Systems for Advanced Copper Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raj, Sai V. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A method of forming an environmental resistant thermal barrier coating on a copper alloy is disclosed. The steps include cleansing a surface of a copper alloy, depositing a bond coat on the cleansed surface of the copper alloy, depositing a NiAl top coat on the bond coat and consolidating the bond coat and the NiAl top coat to form the thermal barrier coating. The bond coat may be a nickel layer or a layer composed of at least one of copper and chromium-copper alloy and either the bond coat or the NiAl top coat or both may be deposited using a low pressure or vacuum plasma spray.

  15. New hybrid materials based on poly(ethyleneoxide)-grafted polysilazane by hydrosilylation and their anti-fouling activities.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Thi Dieu Hang; Perrin, François-Xavier; Nguyen, Dinh Lam

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this work was to develop new coating materials based on poly(ethyleneoxide) (PEO), which was grafted onto polysilazane (PSZ) by hydrosilylation. Three types of PEO with different molecular weights (350, 750, 2000 g/mol) were studied. The kinetics and yields of this reaction have been surveyed by (1)H and (13)C NMR spectroscopy. The PEO grafting-density onto PSZ by hydrosilylation increases with a reduction of the S-H/allyl ratio and a decrease of the PEO chain-length. The PEO-graft-PSZ (PSZ-PEO) hybrid coatings, which can be used to prevent the adhesion of marine bacteria on surfaces, were applied by moisture curing at room temperature. The anti-adhesion performance, and thus the anti-fouling activity, of the coatings against three marine bacteria species, Clostridium sp. SR1, Neisseria sp. LC1 and Neisseria sp. SC1, was examined. The anti-fouling activity of the coatings depends on the grafting density and the chain length of PEO. The shortest PEO(350 g/mol)-graft-PSZ with the highest graft density was found to have the best anti-fouling activity. As the density of grafted PEO(750 g/mol) and PEO(2000 g/mol) chains onto the PSZ surface is approximately equal, the relative effectiveness of these two types of PEO is controlled by the length of the PEO chain. The PEO(2000 g/mol)-graft-PSZ coatings are more efficient than the PEO(750 g/mol)-graft-PSZ coatings for the bacterial anti-adhesion.

  16. New hybrid materials based on poly(ethyleneoxide)-grafted polysilazane by hydrosilylation and their anti-fouling activities

    PubMed Central

    Perrin, François-Xavier; Nguyen, Dinh Lam

    2013-01-01

    Summary The objective of this work was to develop new coating materials based on poly(ethyleneoxide) (PEO), which was grafted onto polysilazane (PSZ) by hydrosilylation. Three types of PEO with different molecular weights (350, 750, 2000 g/mol) were studied. The kinetics and yields of this reaction have been surveyed by 1H and 13C NMR spectroscopy. The PEO grafting-density onto PSZ by hydrosilylation increases with a reduction of the S–H/allyl ratio and a decrease of the PEO chain-length. The PEO-graft-PSZ (PSZ-PEO) hybrid coatings, which can be used to prevent the adhesion of marine bacteria on surfaces, were applied by moisture curing at room temperature. The anti-adhesion performance, and thus the anti-fouling activity, of the coatings against three marine bacteria species, Clostridium sp. SR1, Neisseria sp. LC1 and Neisseria sp. SC1, was examined. The anti-fouling activity of the coatings depends on the grafting density and the chain length of PEO. The shortest PEO(350 g/mol)-graft-PSZ with the highest graft density was found to have the best anti-fouling activity. As the density of grafted PEO(750 g/mol) and PEO(2000 g/mol) chains onto the PSZ surface is approximately equal, the relative effectiveness of these two types of PEO is controlled by the length of the PEO chain. The PEO(2000 g/mol)-graft-PSZ coatings are more efficient than the PEO(750 g/mol)-graft-PSZ coatings for the bacterial anti-adhesion. PMID:24205462

  17. Does antifouling paint select for antibiotic resistance?

    PubMed

    Flach, Carl-Fredrik; Pal, Chandan; Svensson, Carl Johan; Kristiansson, Erik; Östman, Marcus; Bengtsson-Palme, Johan; Tysklind, Mats; Larsson, D G Joakim

    2017-07-15

    There is concern that heavy metals and biocides contribute to the development of antibiotic resistance via co-selection. Most antifouling paints contain high amounts of such substances, which risks turning painted ship hulls into highly mobile refuges and breeding grounds for antibiotic-resistant bacteria. The objectives of this study were to start investigate if heavy-metal based antifouling paints can pose a risk for co-selection of antibiotic-resistant bacteria and, if so, identify the underlying genetic basis. Plastic panels with one side painted with copper and zinc-containing antifouling paint were submerged in a Swedish marina and biofilms from both sides of the panels were harvested after 2.5-4weeks. DNA was isolated from the biofilms and subjected to metagenomic sequencing. Biofilm bacteria were cultured on marine agar supplemented with tetracycline, gentamicin, copper sulfate or zinc sulfate. Biofilm communities from painted surfaces displayed lower taxonomic diversity and enrichment of Gammaproteobacteria. Bacteria from these communities showed increased resistance to both heavy metals and tetracycline but not to gentamicin. Significantly higher abundance of metal and biocide resistance genes was observed, whereas mobile antibiotic resistance genes were not enriched in these communities. In contrast, we found an enrichment of chromosomal RND efflux system genes, including such with documented ability to confer decreased susceptibility to both antibiotics and biocides/heavy metals. This was paralleled by increased abundances of integron-associated integrase and ISCR transposase genes. The results show that the heavy metal-based antifouling paint exerts a strong selection pressure on marine bacterial communities and can co-select for certain antibiotic-resistant bacteria, likely by favoring species and strains carrying genes that provide cross-resistance. Although this does not indicate an immediate risk for promotion of mobile antibiotic resistance, the

  18. New analytical application for metal determination in antifouling paints.

    PubMed

    Ytreberg, Erik; Lundgren, Lennart; Bighiu, Maria Alexandra; Eklund, Britta

    2015-10-01

    Despite the ban of applying TBT coatings on leisure boats in the late 80s, recent studies show an ongoing spread of TBT from leisure boats, particularly during hull cleaning events. Therefore, countries in EU have adopted expensive measures to clean this wash water. A more cost-efficient measure is to focus directly on the source, i.e. identify leisure boats with high concentrations of TBT and prescribe boat owners to remove the paint. We have developed a new antifouling paint application for a handheld X-ray fluorescence (XRF) analyzer to be used for identifying boats with high area concentrations (µg/cm(2)) of Sn (indication that the hull contains TBT paint residues). Copper and zinc are also included in the application since these metals are used in the vast majority of today's paints. A blind test with up to four layers of TBT-, copper- and zinc-based paints showed good correlation between XRF-measured area concentrations and chemically analyzed concentrations. Future usage of the applications involves identification of boat hulls in particular with high Sn concentrations and also with high Cu and Zn concentrations. This method has the potential to become a useful tool in regulatory management of existence and use of toxic elements on boat hulls. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Development of antifouling surfaces to reduce bacterial attachment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, Mary Viola

    Bacteria are exceptionally good at adhering to surfaces and forming complex structures known as biofilms. This process, known as biofouling, can cause problems for infrastructure (eg, clogging and damaging pipes), for the food industry (eg, contamination of processing surfaces and equipment, and for the medical industry (eg, contamination of indwelling medical devices). Accordingly, multiple strategies have been explored to combat biofouling, including chemical modification of surfaces, development of antibiotic coatings, and more recently, the use of engineered surface topography. When designed properly, engineered surface topographies can significantly reduce bacterial surface attachment, ultimately limiting surface colonization. In this work, we hypothesized that the morphology, size, spacing, and surface pre-treatment of topographical features should directly correlate with the size and shape of target organisms, in order to reduce biofouling. Topographical features with size and spacing from 0.25 to 2 mum were fabricated in silicone elastomer and tested against rod shaped bacteria with an average size of 0.5 x 2 mum and spherical bacteria (cocci) ranging from 0.5 - 1 μm in diameter. Antifouling properties of the different topographical features were tested in both static and flow-based assays, and under oxygen plasma-treated (hydrophilic) and untreated (hydrophobic) surface conditions. We found that surface pre-treatment universally affects the ability bacteria to attach to surfaces, while surface topography limits attachment in a manner dependent on the bacterial size/shape and the size/spacing of the topography.

  20. Nontoxic piperamides and their synthetic analogues as novel antifouling reagents.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiang-Zhong; Xu, Ying; Zhang, Yi-Fan; Zhang, Yu; Wong, Yue Him; Han, Zhuang; Yin, Yan; Qian, Pei-Yuan

    2014-01-01

    Bioassay-guided isolation of an acetone extract from a terrestrial plant Piper betle produced four known piperamides with potent antifouling (AF) activities, as evidenced by inhibition of settlement of barnacle cypris larvae. The AF activities of the four piperamides and 15 synthesized analogues were compared and their structure-activity relationships were probed. Among the compounds, piperoleine B and 1-[1-oxo-7-(3',4'-methylenedioxyphenyl)-6E-heptenyl]-piperidine (MPHP) showed strong activity against settlement of cyprids of the barnacle Balanus amphitrite, having EC50 values of 1.1 ± 0.3 and 0.5 ± 0.2 μg ml(-1), respectively. No toxicity against zebra fish was observed following incubation with these two compounds. Besides being non-toxic, 91% of piperoleine B-treated cyprids and 84% of MPHP-treated cyprids at a concentration of 100 μM completed normal metamorphosis in recovery bioassays, indicating that the anti-settlement effect of these two compounds was reversible. Hydrolysis and photolysis experiments indicated that MPHP could be decomposed in the marine environment. It is concluded that piperamides are promising compounds for use in marine AF coatings.

  1. Cross-linked polyelectrolyte multilayers for marine antifouling applications.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiaoying; Jańczewski, Dominik; Lee, Serina Siew Chen; Teo, Serena Lay-Ming; Vancso, G Julius

    2013-07-10

    A polyionic multilayer film was fabricated by layer-by-layer (LbL) sequential deposition followed by cross-linking under mild conditions on a substrate surface to inhibit marine fouling. A novel polyanion, featuring methyl ester groups for an easy cross-linking was used as a generic solution for stabilization of LbL films in a harsh environment. Covalent cross-linking was confirmed by FTIR and XPS spectroscopy. AFM was used to observe film morphology and its variation because of cross-linking, as well as to measure the thickness of the LbL films. Cross-linking improved the stability of the LbL film when it was immersed in artificial seawater, natural seawater, and in a polar organic solvent (DMSO). No changes in the thickness and topography of the film were observed in these media. The LbL films prevented settlement of Amphibalanus amphitrite barnacle cyprids and reduced adhesion of the benthic diatom Amphora coffeaeformis. Assay results indicated that the cross-linking process did not weaken the antifouling effect of LbL films. The high stability and low degree of fouling make these coatings potentially promising candidates in marine applications.

  2. Bioinspired Surface for Low Drag, Self-Cleaning, and Antifouling: Shark Skin, Butterfly and Rice Leaf Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bixler, Gregroy D.

    In this thesis, first presented is an overview of inorganic-fouling and biofouling which is generally undesirable for many medical, marine, and industrial applications. A survey of nature's flora and fauna are studied in order to discover new antifouling methods that could be mimicked for engineering applications. New antifouling methods will presumably incorporate a combination of physical and chemical controls. Presented are mechanisms and experimental results focusing on laminar and turbulent drag reducing shark skin inspired riblet surfaces. This includes new laser etched and riblet film samples for closed channel drag using water, oil, and air as well as in wind tunnel. Also presented are mechanisms and experimental results focusing on the newly discovered rice and butterfly wing effect surfaces. Morphology, drag, self-cleaning, contact angle, and contact angle hysteresis data are presented to understand the role of sample geometrical dimensions, wettability, viscosity, and velocity. Hierarchical liquid repellent coatings combining nano- and micro-sized features and particles are utilized to recreate or combine various effects. Such surfaces have been fabricated with photolithography, soft lithography, hot embossing, and coating techniques. Discussion is provided along with new conceptual models describing the role of surface structures related to low drag, self-cleaning, and antifouling properties. Modeling provides design guidance when developing novel low drag and self-cleaning surfaces for medical, marine, and industrial applications.

  3. Antifouling biocides in discarded marine paint particles.

    PubMed

    Parks, Rachel; Donnier-Marechal, Marion; Frickers, Patricia E; Turner, Andrew; Readman, James W

    2010-08-01

    Antifouling paint fragments collected from marinas and leisure boat maintenance facilities and in the vicinity of abandoned boats have been chemically characterised. High concentrations of Cu (23-380mgg(-1)) and Zn (14-160mgg(-1)) in the samples (n=14) are consistent with the use of these metals in the principal biocidal and non-biocidal pigments in contemporary antifouling formulations. Up to about 2% and 7% of the respective metals were solvent-extractable, suggesting that organo-forms of Cu and Zn (e.g. pyrithiones) were also present. Of the organic biocides, dichlofluanid was present in most samples and at concentrations up to about 20mgg(-1). Chlorothalonil and Irgarol 1051(R) were only detected in one and four cases, respectively, and Sea Nine 211(R) was not detected in any sample. Results are discussed in terms of UK legislation regarding biocide usage and the likely effects and fate of discarded paint particles in coastal environments where boats are repaired or moored. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Searching for "environmentally-benign" antifouling biocides.

    PubMed

    Cui, Yan Ting; Teo, Serena L M; Leong, Wai; Chai, Christina L L

    2014-05-26

    As the result of the ecological impacts from the use of tributyltins (TBT) in shipping, environmental legislation for the registration of chemicals for use in the environment has grown to a monumental challenge requiring product dossiers to include information on the environmental fate and behavior of any chemicals. Specifically, persistence, bioaccumulation and toxicity, collectively known as PBT, are properties of concern in the assessment of chemicals. However, existing measurements of PBT properties are a cumbersome and expensive process, and thus not applied in the early stages of the product discovery and development. Inexpensive methods for preliminary PBT screening would minimize risks arising with the subsequent registration of products. In this article, we evaluated the PBT properties of compounds reported to possess anti-fouling properties using QSAR (quantitative structure-activity relationship) prediction programs such as BIOWIN™ (a biodegradation probability program), KOWWIN™ (log octanol-water partition coefficient calculation program) and ECOSAR™ (Ecological Structure Activity Relationship Programme). The analyses identified some small (Mr < 400) synthetic and natural products as potential candidates for environmentally benign biocides. We aim to demonstrate that while these methods of estimation have limitations, when applied with discretion, they are powerful tools useful in the early stages of research for compound selection for further development as anti-foulants.

  5. Bio-Inspired Design and Fabrication of Micro/Nano-Brush Dual Structural Surfaces for Switchable Oil Adhesion and Antifouling.

    PubMed

    Du, Tao; Ma, Shuanhong; Pei, Xiaowei; Wang, Shutao; Zhou, Feng

    2017-01-01

    The underwater superoleophobic surfaces play a significant role in anti-oil contamination, marine antifouling, etc. Inspired by the Gecko's feet and its self-cleaning property, a hierarchical structure composed of poly (acrylic acid) gel micro-brushes is designed by the liquid-infused method. This surface exhibits underwater superoleophobicity with very low oil adhesion. It is then modified with stimuli-responsive polymer nano-brushes via surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization from the embedded initiator. The micro/nano-brush dual structural surfaces can switch the underwater oil adhesion between low and high while keeping the superoleophobicity. The antifouling properties against algae attachment under different mediums are also investigated to show a strong link between oleophobicity and antibiofouling property. The model surface will be very useful in directing the design of marine self-cleaning coatings to both living and non-living species.

  6. Enhanced permeability and antifouling performance of cellulose acetate ultrafiltration membrane assisted by l-DOPA functionalized halloysite nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Mu, Keguang; Zhang, Dalun; Shao, Ziqiang; Qin, Dujian; Wang, Yalong; Wang, Shuo

    2017-10-15

    l-Dopa functionalized halloysite nanotubes (HNTs) were prepared by the self-polymerization of l-dopa in the weak alkaline condition. Then different contents of l-dopa coated HNTs (LPDHNTs) were blended into cellulose acetate to prepare enhanced performance ultrafiltration membranes via the phase inversion method. The HNTs and LPDHNTs were characterized by FTIR, XPS, and TEM anysis. And the membranes morphologies, separation performance, antifouling performance, mechanical properties and hydrophilicity were also investigated. It was found that the composite membranes exhibited excellent antifouling performance. The pure water flux of 3.0wt% LPDHNTs/CA membrane increased from 11.4Lm(-2)h(-1) to 92.9Lm(-2)h(-1), while the EA rejection ratio of the membrane was about 91.2%. In addition, the mechanical properties of the resultant membranes were strengthened compared with the CA ultrafiltration membrane. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. The role of nano-roughness in antifouling

    SciTech Connect

    Scardino, A.J.; Zhang, H.; Cookson, D.J.; Lamb, R.N.; de Nys, R.

    2010-02-19

    Nano-engineered superhydrophobic surfaces have been investigated for potential fouling resistance properties. Integrating hydrophobic materials with nanoscale roughness generates surfaces with superhydrophobicity that have water contact angles ({theta}) >150{sup o} and concomitant low hysteresis (<10{sup o}). Three superhydrophobic coatings (SHCs) differing in their chemical composition and architecture were tested against major fouling species (Amphora sp., Ulva rigida, Polysiphonia sphaerocarpa, Bugula neritina, Amphibalanus amphitrite) in settlement assays. The SHC which had nanoscale roughness alone (SHC 3) deterred the settlement of all the tested fouling organisms, compared to selective settlement on the SHCs with nano- and micro-scale architectures. The presence of air incursions or nanobubbles at the interface of the SHCs when immersed was characterized using small angle X-ray scattering, a technique sensitive to local changes in electron density contrast resulting from partial or complete wetting of a rough interface. The coating with broad spectrum antifouling properties (SHC 3) had a noticeably larger amount of unwetted interface when immersed, likely due to the comparatively high work of adhesion (60.77 mJ m{sup -2} for SHC 3 compared to 5.78 mJ m-2 for the other two SHCs) required for creating solid/liquid interface from the solid/vapour interface. This is the first example of a non-toxic, fouling resistant surface against a broad spectrum of fouling organisms ranging from plant cells and non-motile spores, to complex invertebrate larvae with highly selective sensory mechanisms. The only physical property differentiating the immersed surfaces is the nano-architectured roughness which supports longer standing air incursions providing a novel non-toxic broad spectrum mechanism for the prevention of biofouling.

  8. The effects of a copper-based antifouling paint on mortality and enzymatic activity of a non-target marine organism.

    PubMed

    Katranitsas, A; Castritsi-Catharios, J; Persoone, G

    2003-11-01

    Antifouling paints are used on a wide range of underwater structures in order to protect them from the development of fouling organisms. The leaching of the toxic substances from the matrix of the paint causes toxic effects not only to the fouling organisms but also on other "non-target" biota. The present study addresses the impact of the antifouling paint Flexgard VI-II on brine shrimp nauplii selected as convenient test organisms. The surface to volume (S/V) concept developed by Persoone and Castritsi-Catharios (1989) was used to determine S/V-LC50s for the test biota exposed to PVC test panels of 400-1000 mm2 surface coated with the antifouling paint in test vessels containing 20 ml seawater. Total ATPase and Mg2+-ATPase were also analyzed for coated surface areas inducing less than 50% mortality in the brine shrimp nauplii. The calculated S/V-LC50 (24 h) was 24.6 mm2/ml, which shows the high toxic character of the antifouling paint. Decreased enzymatic activities were noted in the brine shrimp nauplii exposed to test panels of 50 and 100 mm2 in 20 ml seawater. The present study indicates that the "surface to volume" concept is an interesting methodology that can be applied with both lethal and sublethal effect criteria for the determination of toxic stress from leaches of painted surfaces.

  9. Antifouling and antimicrobial polymer membranes based on bioinspired polydopamine and strong hydrogen-bonded poly(N-vinyl pyrrolidone).

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jinhong; Zhu, Liping; Zhu, Lijing; Zhang, Hongtao; Zhu, Baoku; Xu, Youyi

    2013-12-26

    A facile and versatile approach for the preparation of antifouling and antimicrobial polymer membranes has been developed on the basis of bioinspired polydopamine (PDA) in this work. It is well-known that a tightly adherent PDA layer can be generated over a wide range of material surfaces through a simple dip-coating process in dopamine aqueous solution. The resulting PDA coating is prone to be further surface-tailored and functionalized via secondary treatments because of its robust reactivity. Herein, a typical hydrophobic polypropylene (PP) porous membrane was first coated with a PDA layer and then further modified by poly(N-vinyl pyrrolidone) (PVP) via multiple hydrogen-bonding interactions between PVP and PDA. Data of water contact angle measurements showed that hydrophilicity and wettability of the membranes were significantly improved after introducing PDA and PVP layers. Both permeation fluxes and antifouling properties of the modified membranes were enhanced as evaluated in oil/water emulsion filtration, protein filtration, and adsorption tests. Furthermore, the modified membranes showed remarkable antimicrobial activity after iodine complexation with the PVP layer. The PVP layer immobilized on the membrane had satisfying long-term stability and durability because of the strong noncovalent forces between PVP and PDA coating. The strategy of material surface modification reported here is substrate-independent, and applicable to a broad range of materials and geometries, which allows effective development of materials with novel functional coatings based on the mussel-inspired surface chemistry.

  10. Preparation and characterization of B4C coatings for advanced research light sources

    PubMed Central

    Störmer, Michael; Siewert, Frank; Sinn, Harald

    2016-01-01

    X-ray optical elements are required for beam transport at the current and upcoming free-electron lasers and synchrotron sources. An X-ray mirror is a combination of a substrate and a coating. The demand for large mirrors with single layers consisting of light or heavy elements has increased during the last few decades; surface finishing technology is currently able to process mirror lengths up to 1 m with microroughness at the sub-nanometre level. Additionally, thin-film fabrication is able to deposit a suitable single-layer material, such as boron carbide (B4C), some tens of nanometres thick. After deposition, the mirror should provide excellent X-ray optical properties with respect to coating thickness errors, microroughness values and slope errors; thereby enabling the mirror to transport the X-ray beam with high reflectivity, high beam flux and an undistorted wavefront to an experimental station. At the European XFEL, the technical specifications of the future mirrors are extraordinarily challenging. The acceptable shape error of the mirrors is below 2 nm along the whole length of 1 m. At the Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht (HZG), amorphous layers of boron carbide with thicknesses in the range 30–60 nm were fabricated using the HZG sputtering facility, which is able to cover areas up to 1500 mm long by 120 mm wide in one step using rectangular B4C sputtering targets. The available deposition area is suitable for the specified X-ray mirror dimensions of upcoming advanced research light sources such as the European XFEL. The coatings produced were investigated by means of X-ray reflectometry and interference microscopy. The experimental results for the B4C layers are discussed according to thickness uniformity, density, microroughness and thermal stability. The variation of layer thickness in the tangential and sagittal directions was investigated in order to estimate the achieved level of uniformity over the whole deposition area, which is

  11. Preparation and characterization of B4C coatings for advanced research light sources.

    PubMed

    Störmer, Michael; Siewert, Frank; Sinn, Harald

    2016-01-01

    X-ray optical elements are required for beam transport at the current and upcoming free-electron lasers and synchrotron sources. An X-ray mirror is a combination of a substrate and a coating. The demand for large mirrors with single layers consisting of light or heavy elements has increased during the last few decades; surface finishing technology is currently able to process mirror lengths up to 1 m with microroughness at the sub-nanometre level. Additionally, thin-film fabrication is able to deposit a suitable single-layer material, such as boron carbide (B4C), some tens of nanometres thick. After deposition, the mirror should provide excellent X-ray optical properties with respect to coating thickness errors, microroughness values and slope errors; thereby enabling the mirror to transport the X-ray beam with high reflectivity, high beam flux and an undistorted wavefront to an experimental station. At the European XFEL, the technical specifications of the future mirrors are extraordinarily challenging. The acceptable shape error of the mirrors is below 2 nm along the whole length of 1 m. At the Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht (HZG), amorphous layers of boron carbide with thicknesses in the range 30-60 nm were fabricated using the HZG sputtering facility, which is able to cover areas up to 1500 mm long by 120 mm wide in one step using rectangular B4C sputtering targets. The available deposition area is suitable for the specified X-ray mirror dimensions of upcoming advanced research light sources such as the European XFEL. The coatings produced were investigated by means of X-ray reflectometry and interference microscopy. The experimental results for the B4C layers are discussed according to thickness uniformity, density, microroughness and thermal stability. The variation of layer thickness in the tangential and sagittal directions was investigated in order to estimate the achieved level of uniformity over the whole deposition area, which is considerably

  12. Advances in Concentrating Solar Power Collectors: Mirrors and Solar Selective Coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Kenendy, C. E.

    2007-10-10

    The intention is to explore the feasibility of depositing the coating by lower-cost methods and to perform a rigorous cost analysis after a viable high-temperature solar-selective coating is demonstrated by e-beam.

  13. Corrosion Testing of Advanced Coatings in Accordance with Hard Chrome Alternatives Team Actuator Joint Test Protocol

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-01-24

    Spray (TS) Coatings • Tungsten Carbide alloys • Chromium Carbide alloys • Proprietary TS coatings • Electrospark deposition • EHC Enhancement...Environmental, safety, and health concerns regarding potential exposure to hexavalent chromium during EHC deposition process • Regulatory

  14. Advanced thermal barrier coating system development. Technical progress report, January 1, 1996--March 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1996-04-08

    Objectives of this program are to provide a thermal barrier coating system with increased temperature capability and improved reliability relative to current state of the art systems. This report describes the bond coat deposition process, manufacturing, and repair.

  15. Advanced High Temperature Coating Systems Beyond Current State of the Art Systems.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-04-15

    and diffusion aluminide coatings . The approach which was used .. consisted of attempting to obtain reaction product barriers with improved protective...Bauer(9 9 ). Most of the work in this area has involved silicide coatings on refractory metals and superalloys in which the coatings are formed by Si...3, 1976, pp. 163-187. 20. T. E. Strangman, Thermal Fatique of Oxidation Resistant Overlay Coatings for Superalloys , PhD Disseration, University of

  16. Fireside Corrosion Behavior of HVOF and Plasma-Sprayed Coatings in Advanced Coal/Biomass Co-Fired Power Plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussain, T.; Dudziak, T.; Simms, N. J.; Nicholls, J. R.

    2013-06-01

    This article presents a systematic evaluation of coatings for advanced fossil fuel plants and addresses fireside corrosion in coal/biomass-derived flue gases. A selection of four candidate coatings: alloy 625, NiCr, FeCrAl and NiCrAlY were deposited onto superheaters/reheaters alloy (T91) using high-velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) and plasma spraying. A series of laboratory-based fireside corrosion exposures were carried out on these coated samples in furnaces under controlled atmosphere for 1000 h at 650 °C. The tests were carried out using the "deposit-recoat" test method to simulate the environment that was anticipated from air-firing 20 wt.% cereal co-product mixed with a UK coal. The exposures were carried out using a deposit containing Na2SO4, K2SO4, and Fe2O3 to produce alkali-iron tri-sulfates, which had been identified as the principal cause of fireside corrosion on superheaters/reheaters in pulverized coal-fired power plants. The exposed samples were examined in an ESEM with EDX analysis to characterize the damage. Pre- and post-exposure dimensional metrologies were used to quantify the metal damage in terms of metal loss distributions. The thermally sprayed coatings suffered significant corrosion attack from a combination of aggressive combustion gases and deposit mixtures. In this study, all the four plasma-sprayed coatings studied performed better than the HVOF-sprayed coatings because of a lower level of porosity. NiCr was found to be the best performing coating material with a median metal loss of ~87 μm (HVOF sprayed) and ~13 μm (plasma sprayed). In general, the median metal damage for coatings had the following ranking (in the descending order: most to the least damage): NiCrAlY > alloy 625 > FeCrAl > NiCr.

  17. Environmental Barrier Coating Development for SiC/SiC Ceramic Matrix Composites: Recent Advances and Future Directions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming

    2016-01-01

    This presentation briefly reviews the SiC/SiC major environmental and environment-fatigue degradations encountered in simulated turbine combustion environments, and thus NASA environmental barrier coating system evolution for protecting the SiC/SiC Ceramic Matrix Composites for meeting the engine performance requirements. The presentation will review several generations of NASA EBC materials systems, EBC-CMC component system technologies for SiC/SiC ceramic matrix composite combustors and turbine airfoils, highlighting the temperature capability and durability improvements in simulated engine high heat flux, high pressure, high velocity, and with mechanical creep and fatigue loading conditions. This paper will also focus on the performance requirements and design considerations of environmental barrier coatings for next generation turbine engine applications. The current development emphasis is placed on advanced NASA candidate environmental barrier coating systems for SiC/SiC CMCs, their performance benefits and design limitations in long-term operation and combustion environments. The efforts have been also directed to developing prime-reliant, self-healing 2700F EBC bond coat; and high stability, lower thermal conductivity, and durable EBC top coats. Major technical barriers in developing environmental barrier coating systems, the coating integrations with next generation CMCs having the improved environmental stability, erosion-impact resistance, and long-term fatigue-environment system durability performance will be described. The research and development opportunities for turbine engine environmental barrier coating systems by utilizing improved compositions, state-of-the-art processing methods, and simulated environment testing and durability modeling will be briefly discussed.

  18. Advances in multi-spectral Diamond-Like Carbon (DLC) coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keck, Jason; Karp, Christopher

    2014-05-01

    We discuss the development and applications of a new approach to Diamond-Like Carbon (DLC) coating that provides the durability of traditional DLC coatings, with the addition of significantly more transmission at visible wavelengths and greater transmission in the IR. We developed a deposition system design that incorporates multiple coating technologies, allowing for multiple material design approaches. This has enabled the manufacture of DLC coatings with improved extended spectral properties, suitable for applications in which the coating must withstand airborne particulate impacts, corrosive fluids, environmental extremes, and abrasive physical handling, while offering better than typical transmission in the visible or infrared wavelength regions, or both.

  19. Fission Product Monitoring of TRISO Coated Fuel For The Advanced Gas Reactor -1 Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Dawn M. Scates; John K. Hartwell; John b. Walter

    2010-10-01

    The US Department of Energy has embarked on a series of tests of TRISO-coated particle reactor fuel intended for use in the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) as part of the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) program. The AGR-1 TRISO fuel experiment, currently underway, is the first in a series of eight fuel tests planned for irradiation in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The AGR-1 experiment reached a peak compact averaged burn up of 9% FIMA with no known TRISO fuel particle failures in March 2008. The burnup goal for the majority of the fuel compacts is to have a compact averaged burnup greater than 18% FIMA and a minimum compact averaged burnup of 14% FIMA. At the INL the TRISO fuel in the AGR-1 experiment is closely monitored while it is being irradiated in the ATR. The effluent monitoring system used for the AGR-1 fuel is the Fission Product Monitoring System (FPMS). The FPMS is a valuable tool that provides near real-time data indicative of the AGR-1 test fuel performance and incorporates both high-purity germanium (HPGe) gamma-ray spectrometers and sodium iodide [NaI(Tl)] scintillation detector-based gross radiation monitors. To quantify the fuel performance, release-to-birth ratios (R/B’s) of radioactive fission gases are computed. The gamma-ray spectra acquired by the AGR-1 FPMS are analyzed and used to determine the released activities of specific fission gases, while a dedicated detector provides near-real time count rate information. Isotopic build up and depletion calculations provide the associated isotopic birth rates. This paper highlights the features of the FPMS, encompassing the equipment, methods and measures that enable the calculation of the release-to-birth ratios. Some preliminary results from the AGR-1 experiment are also presented.

  20. Fission Product Monitoring of TRISO Coated Fuel For The Advanced Gas Reactor -1 Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Dawn M. Scates; John K Hartwell; John B. Walter

    2008-09-01

    The US Department of Energy has embarked on a series of tests of TRISO-coated particle reactor fuel intended for use in the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) as part of the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) program. The AGR-1 TRISO fuel experiment, currently underway, is the first in a series of eight fuel tests planned for irradiation in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The AGR-1 experiment reached a peak compact averaged burn up of 9% FIMA with no known TRISO fuel particle failures in March 2008. The burnup goal for the majority of the fuel compacts is to have a compact averaged burnup greater than 18% FIMA and a minimum compact averaged burnup of 14% FIMA. At the INL the TRISO fuel in the AGR-1 experiment is closely monitored while it is being irradiated in the ATR. The effluent monitoring system used for the AGR-1 fuel is the Fission Product Monitoring System (FPMS). The FPMS is a valuable tool that provides near real-time data indicative of the AGR-1 test fuel performance and incorporates both high-purity germanium (HPGe) gamma-ray spectrometers and sodium iodide [NaI(Tl)] scintillation detector-based gross radiation monitors. To quantify the fuel performance, release-to-birth ratios (R/B’s) of radioactive fission gases are computed. The gamma-ray spectra acquired by the AGR-1 FPMS are analyzed and used to determine the released activities of specific fission gases, while a dedicated detector provides near-real time count rate information. Isotopic build up and depletion calculations provide the associated isotopic birth rates. This paper highlights the features of the FPMS, encompassing the equipment, methods and measures that enable the calculation of the release-to-birth ratios. Some preliminary results from the AGR-1 experiment are also presented.

  1. Ultrathin coatings of nanoporous materials as property enhancements for advanced functional materials.

    SciTech Connect

    Coker, Eric Nicholas

    2010-11-01

    This report summarizes the findings of a five-month LDRD project funded through Sandia's NTM Investment Area. The project was aimed at providing the foundation for the development of advanced functional materials through the application of ultrathin coatings of microporous or mesoporous materials onto the surface of substrates such as silicon wafers. Prior art teaches that layers of microporous materials such as zeolites may be applied as, e.g., sensor platforms or gas separation membranes. These layers, however, are typically several microns to several hundred microns thick. For many potential applications, vast improvements in the response of a device could be realized if the thickness of the porous layer were reduced to tens of nanometers. However, a basic understanding of how to synthesize or fabricate such ultra-thin layers is lacking. This report describes traditional and novel approaches to the growth of layers of microporous materials on silicon wafers. The novel approaches include reduction of the quantity of nutrients available to grow the zeolite layer through minimization of solution volume, and reaction of organic base (template) with thermally-oxidized silicon wafers under a steam atmosphere to generate ultra-thin layers of zeolite MFI.

  2. Advances in Surface Plasmon Resonance Imaging enable quantitative measurement of laterally heterogeneous coatings of nanoscale thickness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raegen, Adam; Reiter, Kyle; Clarke, Anthony; Lipkowski, Jacek; Dutcher, John

    2013-03-01

    The Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) phenomenon is routinely exploited to qualitatively probe changes to the optical properties of nanoscale coatings on thin metallic surfaces, for use in probes and sensors. Unfortunately, extracting truly quantitative information is usually limited to a select few cases - uniform absorption/desorption of small biomolecules and films, in which a continuous ``slab'' model is a good approximation. We present advancements in the SPR technique that expand the number of cases for which the technique can provide meaningful results. Use of a custom, angle-scanning SPR imaging system, together with a refined data analysis method, allow for quantitative kinetic measurements of laterally heterogeneous systems. We first demonstrate the directionally heterogeneous nature of the SPR phenomenon using a directionally ordered sample, then show how this allows for the calculation of the average coverage of a heterogeneous sample. Finally, the degradation of cellulose microfibrils and bundles of microfibrils due to the action of cellulolytic enzymes will be presented as an excellent example of the capabilities of the SPR imaging system.

  3. Probing structure-antifouling activity relationships of polyacrylamides and polyacrylates.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chao; Zhao, Jun; Li, Xiaosi; Wu, Jiang; Chen, Shenfu; Chen, Qiang; Wang, Qiuming; Gong, Xiong; Li, Lingyan; Zheng, Jie

    2013-07-01

    We have synthesized two different polyacrylamide polymers with amide groups (polySBAA and polyHEAA) and two corresponding polyacrylate polymers without amide groups (polySBMA and polyHEA), with particular attention to the evaluation of the effect of amide group on the hydration and antifouling ability of these systems using both computational and experimental approaches. The influence of polymer architectures of brushes, hydrogels, and nanogels, prepared by different polymerization methods, on antifouling performance is also studied. SPR and ELISA data reveal that all polymers exhibit excellent antifouling ability to repel proteins from undiluted human blood serum/plasma, and such antifouling ability can be further enhanced by presenting amide groups in polySBAA and polyHEAA as compared to polySBMA and polyHEA. The antifouling performance is positively correlated with the hydration properties. Simulations confirm that four polymers indeed have different hydration characteristics, while all presenting a strong hydration overall. Integration of amide group with pendant hydroxyl or sulfobetaine group in polymer backbones is found to increase their surface hydration of polymer chains and thus to improve their antifouling ability. Importantly, we present a proof-of-concept experiment to synthesize polySBAA nanogels, which show a switchable property between antifouling and pH-responsive functions driven by acid-base conditions, while still maintaining high stability in undiluted fetal bovine serum and minimal toxicity to cultured cells. This work provides important structural insights into how very subtle structural changes in polymers can yield great improvement in biological activity, specifically the inclusion of amide group in polymer backbone/sidechain enables to obtain antifouling materials with better performance for biomedical applications.

  4. Chitosan-zinc oxide nanocomposite coatings for the prevention of marine biofouling.

    PubMed

    Al-Naamani, Laila; Dobretsov, Sergey; Dutta, Joydeep; Burgess, J Grant

    2017-02-01

    Marine biofouling is a worldwide problem affecting maritime industries. Global concerns about the high toxicity of antifouling paints have highlighted the need to develop less toxic antifouling coatings. Chitosan is a natural polymer with antimicrobial, antifungal and antialgal properties that is obtained from partial deacetylation of crustacean waste. In the present study, nanocomposite chitosan-zinc oxide (chitosan-ZnO) nanoparticle hybrid coatings were developed and their antifouling activity was tested. Chitosan-ZnO nanoparticle coatings showed anti-diatom activity against Navicula sp. and antibacterial activity against the marine bacterium Pseudoalteromonas nigrifaciens. Additional antifouling properties of the coatings were investigated in a mesocosm study using tanks containing natural sea water under controlled laboratory conditions. Each week for four weeks, biofilm was removed and analysed by flow cytometry to estimate total bacterial densities on the coated substrates. Chitosan-ZnO hybrid coatings led to better inhibition of bacterial growth in comparison to chitosan coatings alone, as determined by flow cytometry. This study demonstrates the antifouling potential of chitosan-ZnO nanocomposite hybrid coatings, which can be used for the prevention of biofouling.

  5. Corrosion resistant coatings. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). NewSearch

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-11-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the technology and evaluation of corrosion resistant coatings. Citations discuss plastic, ceramic, antifouling, metal, and antireflecting coatings. References to applications of coatings in nuclear reactors, underwater equipment, and military equipment are included. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  6. Ultrasonic Mastering of Filter Flow and Antifouling of Renewable Resources.

    PubMed

    Radziuk, Darya; Möhwald, Helmuth

    2016-04-04

    Inadequate access to pure water and sanitation requires new cost-effective, ergonomic methods with less consumption of energy and chemicals, leaving the environment cleaner and sustainable. Among such methods, ultrasound is a unique means to control the physics and chemistry of complex fluids (wastewater) with excellent performance regarding mass transfer, cleaning, and disinfection. In membrane filtration processes, it overcomes diffusion limits and can accelerate the fluid flow towards the filter preventing antifouling. Here, we outline the current state of knowledge and technological design, with a focus on physicochemical strategies of ultrasound for water cleaning. We highlight important parameters of ultrasound for the delivery of a fluid flow from a technical perspective employing principles of physics and chemistry. By introducing various ultrasonic methods, involving bubbles or cavitation in combination with external fields, we show advancements in flow acceleration and mass transportation to the filter. In most cases we emphasize the main role of streaming and the impact of cavitation with a perspective to prevent and remove fouling deposits during the flow. We also elaborate on the deficiencies of present technologies and on problems to be solved to achieve a wide-spread application.

  7. Materials for Advanced Turbine Engines (MATE). Project 4: Erosion resistant compressor airfoil coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rashid, J. M.; Freling, M.; Friedrich, L. A.

    1987-01-01

    The ability of coatings to provide at least a 2X improvement in particulate erosion resistance for steel, nickel and titanium compressor airfoils was identified and demonstrated. Coating materials evaluated included plasma sprayed cobalt tungsten carbide, nickel carbide and diffusion applied chromium plus boron. Several processing parameters for plasma spray processing and diffusion coating were evaluated to identify coating systems having the most potential for providing airfoil erosion resistance. Based on laboratory results and analytical evaluations, selected coating systems were applied to gas turbine blades and evaluated for surface finish, burner rig erosion resistance and effect on high cycle fatigue strength. Based on these tests, the following coatings were recommended for engine testing: Gator-Gard plasma spray 88WC-12Co on titanium alloy airfoils, plasma spray 83WC-17Co on steel and nickel alloy airfoils, and Cr+B on nickel alloy airfoils.

  8. [Research advances on controlled-release mechanisms of nutrients in coated fertilizers].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haijun; Wu, Zhijie; Liang, Wenju; Xie, Hongtu

    2003-12-01

    Using encapsulation techniques to coat easily soluble fertilizers is an important way to improve fertilizer use efficiency while reduce environmental hazards. Based on a wide range of literature collection on coated fertilizer research, the theories, processes, and characters of nutrient controlled-release from coated fertilizer were discussed, and the factors affecting nutrient controlled-release and the mathematical simulations on it were reviewed. The main tendencies related to this research in China were also put forward.

  9. Advances in supercritical fluid spray application of low-pollution coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Nielsen, K.A.; Dickson, D.J.; Derderian, E.J.; Glancy, C.W.; Goad, J.D.

    1991-12-31

    The volatile organic compound (VOC) content of coating formulations, which causes ozone formation in the environment, has now been reduced up to 80% by using supercritical carbon dioxide to replace volatile organic solvents in conventional coating formulations. Toxic solvents classified as hazardous air pollutants by the Clean Air Act can be totally eliminated. The concept can also be applied to high-solids coatings (1) to further reduce VOC emissions and (2) to improve coating performance by using higher molecular weight polymers. Commercial fluid delivery equipment and spray guns are now available. The technology is being demonstrated on industrial spray lines.

  10. Effects of a candidate antifouling compound (medetomidine) on pheromone induced mate search in the amphipod Corophium volutator.

    PubMed

    Krång, Anna-Sara; Dahlström, Mia

    2006-12-01

    Environmental hazards associated with traditional, toxic antifouling coatings based on heavy metals calls for the development of alternative, environmentally acceptable antifouling compounds. Medetomidine ((+/-)-4-[1-(2,3-dimethylphenyl)ethyl]-1H-imidazole) is a candidate antifouling biocide which impedes settlement of barnacles in the nanomolar range. Prior to introducing novel biocides it is of great importance to consider potential effects on non-target organisms. This study is the first to investigate the effects of medetomidine on the amphipod Corophium volutator, specifically effects on male mate search behaviour. In a laboratory, Y-maze bioassay, C. volutator males were allowed to follow female pheromones after 24 h exposure to 0 (control), 0.01 and 0.1 microg mL(-1) medetomidine. We found that exposure to medetomidine at both concentrations significantly reduced pheromone induced mate search (by 42-71%), with fewer males crawling towards female odour. The results obtained indicate that medetomidine may impair the reproductive fitness of non-target crustaceans, an aspect that needs to be considered before further commercialisation.

  11. Antifouling properties of poly(methyl methacrylate) films grafted with poly(ethylene glycol) monoacrylate immersed in seawater.

    PubMed

    Iguerb, O; Poleunis, C; Mazéas, F; Compère, C; Bertrand, P

    2008-11-04

    Biofouling of all structures immersed in seawater constitutes an important problem, and many strategies are currently being developed to tackle it. In this context, our previous work shows that poly(ethylene glycol) monoacrylate (PEGA) macromonomer grafted on preoxidized poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMAox) films exhibits an excellent repellency against the bovine serum albumin used as a model protein. This study aims to evaluate the following: (1) the prevention of a marine extract material adsorption by the modified surfaces and (2) the antifouling property of the PEGA-g-PMMAox substrates when immersed in natural seawater during two seasons (season 1: end of April-beginning of May 2007, and season 2: end of October-beginning of November 2007). The antifouling performances of the PEGA-g-PMMAox films are investigated for different PEG chain lengths and macromonomer concentrations into the PEGA-based coatings. These two parameters are followed as a function of the immersion time, which evolves up to 14 days. The influence of the PEGA layer on marine compounds (proteins and phospholipids) adsorption is evidenced by time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). It was found that the antifouling efficiency of the PEGA-grafted surfaces increases with both PEGA concentration and PEG chain length.

  12. The potential for translocation of marine species via small-scale disruptions to antifouling surfaces.

    PubMed

    Piola, Richard F; Johnston, Emma L

    2008-01-01

    Vessel hull fouling is a major vector for the translocation of nonindigenous species (NIS). Antifouling (AF) paints are the primary method for preventing the establishment and translocation of fouling species. However, factors such as paint age, condition and method of application can all reduce the effectiveness of these coatings. Areas of hull that escape AF treatment (through limited application or damage) constitute key areas that may be expected to receive high levels of fouling. The investigation focused on whether small-scale (mm(2) to cm(2)) areas of unprotected surface or experimental 'scrapes' provided sufficient area for the formation of fouling assemblages within otherwise undamaged AF surfaces. Recruitment of fouling taxa such as algae, spirorbids and hydroids was recorded on scrapes as narrow as 0.5 cm wide. The abundance and species richness of fouling assemblages developing on scrapes > or =1 cm often equalled or surpassed levels observed in reference assemblages totally unprotected by AF coatings. Experiments were conducted at three sites within the highly protected and isolated marine park surrounding Lady Elliott Island at the southernmost tip of the Great Barrier Reef, Australia. Several NIS were recorded on scrapes of AF coated surfaces at this location, with 1-cm scrapes showing the greatest species richness and abundance of NIS relative to all other treatments (including controls) at two of the three sites investigated. Slight disruptions to newly antifouled surfaces may be all that is necessary for the establishment of fouling organisms and the translocation of a wide range of invasive taxa to otherwise highly protected marine areas.

  13. New advances in the 3D characterization of mineral coating layers on paper.

    PubMed

    Chinga-Carrasco, G; Kauko, H; Myllys, M; Timonen, J; Wang, B; Zhou, M; Fossum, J O

    2008-11-01

    The surface characteristics of a large set of commercial lightweight coated paper grades are explored. The quantification of the 3D structure is revealed by atomic force microscopy, laser profilometry and X-ray microtomography. This comprehensive study demonstrates the suitability of different and modern methods for assessing critical coating layer properties, thus identifying the right tools for specific structural analyses. Based on the assessment of the top and bottom surfaces of 25 commercial lightweight coated samples, three main conclusions can be drawn: (1) the facet orientation polar angle is a function of roughness, (2) skewness did not describe the surface details affecting the gloss of the commercial lightweight coated samples assessed in this study and (3) surface roughness at wavelengths below approximately 1.0 microm does not affect the paper gloss significantly. This is important knowledge for the understanding of lightweight coated paper surface structure and its properties.

  14. A general strategy toward graphitized carbon coating on iron oxides as advanced anodes for lithium-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Chunyan; Zhou, Weiwei; Wang, Bin; Li, Xin; Wang, Dong; Zhang, Yong; Wen, Guangwu

    2017-08-01

    Integration of carbon materials with benign iron oxides is blazing a trail in constructing high-performance anodes for lithium-ion batteries (LIBs). In this paper, a unique general, simple, and controllable strategy is developed toward in situ uniform coating of iron oxide nanostructures with graphitized carbon (GrC) layers. The basic synthetic procedure only involves a simple dip-coating process for the loading of Ni-containing seeds and a subsequent Ni-catalyzed chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process for the growth of GrC layers. More importantly, the CVD treatment is conducted at a quite low temperature (450 °C) and with extremely facile liquid carbon sources consisting of ethylene glycol (EG) and ethanol (EA). The GrC content of the resulting hybrids can be controllably regulated by altering the amount of carbon sources. The electrochemical results reveal remarkable performance enhancements of iron oxide@GrC hybrids compared with pristine iron oxides in terms of high specific capacity, excellent rate and cycling performance. This can be attributed to the network-like GrC coating, which can improve not only the electronic conductivity but also the structural integrity of iron oxides. Moreover, the lithium storage performance of samples with different GrC contents is measured, manifesting that optimized electrochemical property can be achieved with appropriate carbon content. Additionally, the superiority of GrC coating is demonstrated by the advanced performance of iron oxide@GrC compared with its corresponding counterpart, i.e., iron oxides with amorphous carbon (AmC) coating. All these results indicate the as-proposed protocol of GrC coating may pave the way for iron oxides to be promising anodes for LIBs.

  15. A general strategy toward graphitized carbon coating on iron oxides as advanced anodes for lithium-ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Ding, Chunyan; Zhou, Weiwei; Wang, Bin; Li, Xin; Wang, Dong; Zhang, Yong; Wen, Guangwu

    2017-08-25

    Integration of carbon materials with benign iron oxides is blazing a trail in constructing high-performance anodes for lithium-ion batteries (LIBs). In this paper, a unique general, simple, and controllable strategy is developed toward in situ uniform coating of iron oxide nanostructures with graphitized carbon (GrC) layers. The basic synthetic procedure only involves a simple dip-coating process for the loading of Ni-containing seeds and a subsequent Ni-catalyzed chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process for the growth of GrC layers. More importantly, the CVD treatment is conducted at a quite low temperature (450 °C) and with extremely facile liquid carbon sources consisting of ethylene glycol (EG) and ethanol (EA). The GrC content of the resulting hybrids can be controllably regulated by altering the amount of carbon sources. The electrochemical results reveal remarkable performance enhancements of iron oxide@GrC hybrids compared with pristine iron oxides in terms of high specific capacity, excellent rate and cycling performance. This can be attributed to the network-like GrC coating, which can improve not only the electronic conductivity but also the structural integrity of iron oxides. Moreover, the lithium storage performance of samples with different GrC contents is measured, manifesting that optimized electrochemical property can be achieved with appropriate carbon content. Additionally, the superiority of GrC coating is demonstrated by the advanced performance of iron oxide@GrC compared with its corresponding counterpart, i.e., iron oxides with amorphous carbon (AmC) coating. All these results indicate the as-proposed protocol of GrC coating may pave the way for iron oxides to be promising anodes for LIBs.

  16. In situ assembly of antifouling/bacterial silver nanoparticle-hydrogel composites with controlled particle release and matrix softening.

    PubMed

    Baek, Kwanghyun; Liang, Jing; Lim, Wan Ting; Zhao, Huimin; Kim, Dong Hyun; Kong, Hyunjoon

    2015-07-22

    Controlling bacterial contamination has been a major challenge for protecting human health and welfare. In this context, hydrogels loaded with silver nanoparticles have been used to prevent biofilm formation on substrates of interest. However, such gel composites are often plagued by rapid loss of silver nanoparticles and matrix softening, and thus the gel becomes less effective for antifouling. To this end, this study demonstrates that in situ photoreaction of an aqueous mixture of silver nitrates, poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate, and vinylpyrrolidone results in a silver nanoparticle-laden hydrogel composite with minimal nanoparticle loss and matrix softening due to enhanced binding between nanoparticles and the gel. The resulting gel composite successfully inhibits the bacterial growth in media and the bacterial adhesion to surfaces of interest. We suggest that the results of this study serve to advance quality of materials with antifouling/bacterial activities.

  17. Sol-gel broadband antireflective coatings for advanced laser-glass amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Floch, Herve G.; Belleville, Philippe F.; Pegon, Philippe M.

    1994-10-01

    The cost of a large laser system is a strong function of the overall electrical to final photon efficiency. To improve the stored energy and therefore the pumping efficiency of sophisticated and costly laser-glass amplifiers, we have developed a novel two-layer broadband antireflective coating for the blast-shield component. The blast-shield is an optic placed between the flashlamps and the laser disk amplifiers to prevent damage of laser disks by possible explosion of a flashlamp. The sol-gel antireflective coating was dip-coated at room temperature onto 8-cm diameter glass samples. The coating basically consisted of a halfwave- thick high-index material such as ZrO2-PVP (PolyVinyl Pyrrolidone) and a quarterwave- thick low-index material such as SiO2-siloxane. To improve the abrasion resistance of the coated part, a lubricating and water-repellent material was applied as a very thin overcoat. In addition to a 6.5 to 7.2% transmission gain over the spectrum of interest, the coating was moderately abrasion resistant and chemically durable. Flashlamp-induced damage to the antireflective coating for 1000 glow discharges at 10 to 12 J/cm2 were minimal and similar to uncoated parts.

  18. Application of advanced methods for durability assessment of new absorber coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frei, Ulrich; Brunold, Stefan; Koehl, Michael; Brucker, Franz; Carlsson, Bo; Moeller, K.

    1995-08-01

    Accelerated life testing of solar energy materials has been one of the main topics within the former Task X 'Solar Materials Research and Development' of the International Energy Agency (IEA) Solar Heating and Cooling Programme. In the case study of some selective solar absorber coating materials for domestic hot water systems procedures are presented for service time assessment, applicable for example to absorber coating materials. As a continuation of the finalized Task X a working group, 'Materials in Solar Thermal Systems' also in the framework of the International Energy Agency (IEA) 'Solar Heating and Cooling Programme' was initiated. One of the first projects is described here. Its aim is to investigate the conformity of the durability assessment, applied on solar absorber coatings tested by different laboratories. Each lab is working independently, this means there is no information exchange between the labs until the results are on paper. Test samples are delivered by the participants. Four different absorber coatings are identified to be useful for the project. The coating materials as well as the production procedures of the coatings are not relevant for the study, therefore no information is given. The experimental procedures as well as the judgement over the different absorber coatings are described in detail. Some comparisons between individual results of the different labs indicates possible weaknesses and further necessary refinements. Finally, expected costs for the whole procedure are presented.

  19. Recent advances in short-wavelength AR coatings for thinned CCDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blouke, Morley; Nelson, Michael D.; Serra, M.; Knoesen, Andre; Higgins, B.; Delamere, W. Alan; Womack, Gary L.; Flores, James S.; Duncan, T. M.; Reed, R.

    1992-08-01

    This paper discusses the development of two materials as AR coatings for thinned backilluminated charge-coupled devices. The first material is the heavy metal oxide Ta205 deposited as a spin on layer using sol-gel technology. The second material is Si3N4. Both these films have the high index of refraction and low absorption coefficients needed to produce good AR coatings in the near UV down to 300 nm. The goal of the program was to produce a coating which would yield devices with quantum efficiencies of greater than 50 at 300 nm. Both these materials satisfy this goal. Data on test devices will be reported. . 1.

  20. Advanced Electron Microscopy and Micro analytical technique development and application for Irradiated TRISO Coated Particles from the AGR-1 Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Van Rooyen, Isabella Johanna; Lillo, Thomas Martin; Wen, Haiming; Wright, Karen Elizabeth; Madden, James Wayne; Aguiar, Jeffery Andrew

    2017-01-01

    A series of up to seven irradiation experiments are planned for the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Quantification Program, with irradiation completed at the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) for the first experiment (i.e., AGR-1) in November 2009 for an effective 620 full power days. The objective of the AGR-1 experiment was primarily to provide lessons learned on the multi-capsule test train design and to provide early data on fuel performance for use in fuel fabrication process development and post-irradiation safety testing data at high temperatures. This report describes the advanced microscopy and micro-analysis results on selected AGR-1 coated particles.

  1. Antifouling composites with self-adaptive controlled release based on an active compound intercalated into layered double hydroxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Miaosen; Gu, Lianghua; Yang, Bin; Wang, Li; Sun, Zhiyong; Zheng, Jiyong; Zhang, Jinwei; Hou, Jian; Lin, Cunguo

    2017-12-01

    This paper reports a novel method to prepare the antifouling composites with properties of self-adaptive controlled release (defined as control the release rate autonomously and adaptively according to the change of environmental conditions) by intercalation of sodium paeonolsilate (PAS) into MgAl and ZnAl layered double hydroxide (LDH) with the molar ratio (M2+/M3+) of 2:1 and 3:1, respectively. The powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) confirm the intercalation of PAS into the galleries of LDH. The controlled release behavior triggered by temperature for the PAS-LDH composites has been investigated, and the results show that the release rate of all PAS-LDH composites increases as the increase of temperature. However, the MgAl-PAS-LDH composites (Mg2Al-PAS-LDH and Mg3Al-PAS-LDH) exhibit the increased release rate of 0.21 ppm/°C from 15 to 30 °C in 3.5% NaCl solution, more than three times of the ZnAl-PAS-LDH composites (0.06 ppm/°C), owing to the confined microenvironment influenced by metal types in LDH layers. In addition, a possible diffusion-controlled process with surface diffusion, bulk diffusion and heterogeneous flat surface diffusion has been revealed via fitting four kinetic equations. Moreover, to verify the practical application of the PAS-LDH composites, a model coating denoted as Mg2Al-PAS-LDH coating was fabricated. The release result displays that the release rate increases or decreases as temperature altered at 15 and 25 °C alternately, indicating its self-adaptive controlled release behavior with temperature. Moreover, the superior resistance to the settlement of Ulva spores at 15 and 25 °C was observed for the Mg2Al-PAS-LDH coating, as a result of the controllable release of antifoulant. Therefore, this work provides a facile and effective method for the fabrication of antifouling composites with self-adaptive controlled release behavior in response to temperature, which can be used to prolong

  2. Development of Advanced Environmental Barrier Coatings for SiC/SiC Ceramic Matrix Composites: Path Toward 2700 F Temperature Capability and Beyond

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming; Harder, Bryan; Hurst, Janet B.; Good, Brian; Costa, Gustavo; Bhatt, Ramakrishna T.; Fox, Dennis S.

    2017-01-01

    Advanced environmental barrier coating systems for SiC-SiC Ceramic Matrix Composite (CMC) turbine and combustor hot section components are currently being developed to meet future turbine engine emission and performance goals. One of the significant coating development challenges is to achieve prime-reliant environmental barrier coating systems to meet the future 2700F EBC-CMC temperature stability and environmental durability requirements. This presentation will emphasize recent NASA environmental barrier coating system testing and down-selects, particularly the development path and properties towards 2700-3000F durability goals by using NASA hafnium-hafnia-rare earth-silicon-silicate composition EBC systems for the SiC-SiC CMC turbine component applications. Advanced hafnium-based compositions for enabling next generation EBC and CMCs capabilities towards ultra-high temperature ceramic coating systems will also be briefly mentioned.

  3. Advances in Percutaneous Therapies for Peripheral Artery Disease: Drug-Coated Balloons.

    PubMed

    Al-Bawardy, Rasha F; Waldo, Stephen W; Rosenfield, Kenneth

    2017-08-24

    This review paper provides a summary on the use of drug-coated balloons in peripheral artery disease. It covers the main drug-coated balloon (DCB) trials. It is divided into categories of lesions: superficial femoral artery and popliteal lesions, infra-popliteal lesions and in-stent restenosis. It also includes an overview of the future of DCBs, highlighting the main ongoing trials. The latest research on DCB focuses on newer types of DCBs, mainly paclitaxel-coated but with lower doses. Another area of latest DCB research is its use in superficial femoral artery and popliteal artery in-stent restenosis, with superior outcomes. Drug-coated balloons produce better outcomes than percutaneous transluminal angioplasty alone in de novo and in-stent restenosis lesions of superficial femoral artery and popliteal arteries. More data are needed to demonstrate efficacy and safety of DCBs in infrapopliteal disease. Newer DCBs and adjunctive therapy may provide improved outcomes for peripheral artery disease interventions.

  4. Advanced thermal barrier coating system development. Technical progress report, April 1, 1996--May 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1996-06-10

    Objectives of this program are to provide an improved thermal barrier system with increased temperature capability and reliability relative to current systems. This report describes the bond coat development and deposition, manufacturing, and repair.

  5. Method and Process Development of Advanced Atmospheric Plasma Spraying for Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mihm, Sebastian; Duda, Thomas; Gruner, Heiko; Thomas, Georg; Dzur, Birger

    2012-06-01

    Over the last few years, global economic growth has triggered a dramatic increase in the demand for resources, resulting in steady rise in prices for energy and raw materials. In the gas turbine manufacturing sector, process optimizations of cost-intensive production steps involve a heightened potential of savings and form the basis for securing future competitive advantages in the market. In this context, the atmospheric plasma spraying (APS) process for thermal barrier coatings (TBC) has been optimized. A constraint for the optimization of the APS coating process is the use of the existing coating equipment. Furthermore, the current coating quality and characteristics must not change so as to avoid new qualification and testing. Using experience in APS and empirically gained data, the process optimization plan included the variation of e.g. the plasma gas composition and flow-rate, the electrical power, the arrangement and angle of the powder injectors in relation to the plasma jet, the grain size distribution of the spray powder and the plasma torch movement procedures such as spray distance, offset and iteration. In particular, plasma properties (enthalpy, velocity and temperature), powder injection conditions (injection point, injection speed, grain size and distribution) and the coating lamination (coating pattern and spraying distance) are examined. The optimized process and resulting coating were compared to the current situation using several diagnostic methods. The improved process significantly reduces costs and achieves the requirement of comparable coating quality. Furthermore, a contribution was made towards better comprehension of the APS of ceramics and the definition of a better method for future process developments.

  6. Controlling cell-material interactions using coatings with advanced polymer architectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koegler, Peter; Pasic, Paul; Johnson, Graham; Bean, Penny; Lorenz, Guenter; Meagher, Laurence; Thissen, Helmut

    2011-12-01

    Polymeric coatings which allow the effective control of biointerfacial interactions and cellular responses are of increasing interest in a range of biomedical applications in vitro and in vivo such as cell culture tools, biosensors and implantable medical devices. A variety of coating strategies have been developed to gain control over cell-surface interactions but many of them are limited with respect to their function and transferability between different substrate materials. Here, our aim was to establish an easily transferable coating that reduces non-specific cell-surface interactions to a minimum while at the same time presenting functional groups which allow for the subsequent immobilisation of bioactive signals. To achieve this, we have applied an allylamine plasma polymer coating followed by the covalent immobilisation of a macro-initiator providing iniferter functional groups. Subsequent controlled free radical graft polymerisation using the monomers acrylamide and acrylic acid in different molar ratios resulted in highly uniform polymer coatings. Non-specific cell attachment was significantly reduced on coatings representing molar ratios of less than 10% acylic acid. At the same time, we have demonstrated the suitability of these coatings for the subsequent covalent binding of bioactive compounds carrying amine functional groups using the label 2,2,2-trifluoroethylamine. Successful surface modifications were confirmed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and profilometry. The cellular response was evaluated using HeLa cell attachment experiments for up to 24 hours. We expect that the coating platform established in this study will be translated into a number of biomedical applications, including applications in implantable devices and regenerative medicine.

  7. Role of monomer sequence and backbone structure in polypeptoid and polypeptide polymers for anti-fouling applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patterson, Anastasia; Rizis, Georgios; Wenning, Brandon; Finlay, John; Ober, Christopher; Segalman, Rachel

    Polymeric coatings rely on a fine balance of surface properties to achieve biofouling resistance. Bioinsipired polymers and oligomers provide a modular strategy for the inclusion of multiple functionalities with controlled architecture, sequence and surface properties. In this work, polypeptoid and polypeptide functionalized coatings based on PEO and PDMS block copolymers were compared with respect to surface presentation and fouling by Ulva linza. While polypeptoids and polypeptides are simple isomers of each other, the lack of backbone chirality and hydrogen bonding in polypeptoids leads to surprisingly different surface behavior. Specifically, the polypeptoids surface segregate much more strongly than analogous polypeptide functionalized polymers, which in turn affects the performance of the coating. Indeed, polypeptoid functionalized surfaces were significantly better both in terms of anti-fouling and fouling release than the corresponding polypeptide-bearing polymers. The role of specific monomer sequence and backbone chemistry will be further discussed in this poster.

  8. Recent advances in edible coatings for fresh and minimally processed fruits.

    PubMed

    Vargas, Maria; Pastor, Clara; Chiralt, Amparo; McClements, D Julian; González-Martínez, Chelo

    2008-06-01

    The development of new edible coatings with improved functionality and performance for fresh and minimally processed fruits is one of the challenges of the post harvest industry. In the past few years, research efforts have focused on the design of new eco-friendly coatings based on biodegradable polymers, which not only reduce the requirements of packaging but also lead to the conversion of by-products of the food industry into value added film-forming components. This work reviews the different coating formulations and applications available at present, as well as the main results of the most recent investigations carried out on the topic. Traditionally, edible coatings have been used as a barrier to minimize water loss and delay the natural senescence of coated fruits through selective permeability to gases. However, the new generation of edible coatings is being especially designed to allow the incorporation and/or controlled release of antioxidants, vitamins, nutraceuticals, and natural antimicrobial agents by means of the application of promising technologies such as nanoencapsulation and the layer-by-layer assembly.

  9. Advanced treatment of cephalosporin pharmaceutical wastewater by nano-coated electrode and perforated electrode.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bo; Zuo, Jiane; Gan, Lili; Yu, Xin; Liu, Fenglin; Tang, Xinyao; Wang, Yajiao

    2014-09-19

    The objective of this study was to investigate the degradation of nonbiodegradable organic pollutants in biologically cephalosporin pharmaceutical wastewater using different electrodes such as non-nano-scale electrode (traditional coated), nano-scale (nano-coated) electrode, and perforated electrode after biotreatment. The traditional coated electrode plate, nano-coated electrode plate, and two different perforated titanium dioxide (TiO2) electrode plates with an average pore size of 10 μm and 20 μm were chosen as the anode. The results demonstrated that traditional coated electrode, nano-scale electrode, and perforated electrode could effectively remove nonbiodegradable organic pollutants from pharmaceutical wastewater. The perforated electrode with an average pore size of 10 μm exhibited the best degradation effect with a 90 % decrease in the chemical oxygen demand (COD) (COD content reduced from 320 mg L(-1) to 32 mg L(-1)). During catalytic degradation, the electrical conductivity of pharmaceutical wastewater increased and the pH increased and finally reached equilibrium. It was also found that the perforated TiO2 electrode produced relatively large amounts of dissolved oxygen during the catalytic oxidation process, reaching above 4 mg L(-1), whereas the nano-coated electrode produced little dissolved oxygen. The biotoxicities of all wastewater samples increased firstly then decreased slightly during the electrical catalytic oxidation, but the final biotoxicities were all higher than initial ones.

  10. Evaluation of Advanced Solid Lubricant Coatings for Foil Air Bearings Operating at 25 and 500 C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DellaCorte, Christopher; Fellenstein, James A.; Benoy, Patricia A.

    1998-01-01

    The tribological properties of one chrome oxide and one chrome carbide based solid lubricant coating were evaluated in a partial-arc foil bearing at 25 and 500 C. Start/stop bearing operation up to 20,000 cycles were run under 10 kPa (1.5 psi) static deadweight load. Bearing friction (torque) was measured during the test. Specimen wear and SEM/EDS surface analyses were conducted after testing to understand and elucidate the tribological characteristics observed. The chrome oxide coating which contains both (Ag) and (BaF2/CaF2) for low and high temperature lubrication, exhibited low friction in sliding against Al2O3 coated foils at 25 and 500 C. The chrome carbide coating, which lacked a low temperature lubricant but contained BaF2/CaF2 as a high temperature lubricant, exhibited high friction at 25 C and low friction at 500 C against both bare and Al2O3 coated superalloy foil surfaces. Post test surface analyses suggest that improved tribological performance is exhibited when a lubricant film from the coating transfers to the foil surface.

  11. Speciation of antifoulant organotin compounds in water

    SciTech Connect

    Van Nguyen, V.; Posey, I.J.; Eng, G.

    1984-01-01

    The fate of several antifoulant organotin compounds, Ph/sub 3/SnOH, Ph/sub 3/SnCl, and Ph/sub 3/SnOCOCH/sub 3/ in water has been investigated using IR spectroscopy and thin-layer chromatography. Except for the residue resulting from the extract of aqueous Ph/sub 3/SnOCOCH/sub 3/, the IR spectrum of each residue was identical to that of the starting organotin compound. The IR spectrum of the residue obtained from the chloroform extract of aqueous Ph/sub 3/SnOCOCH/sub 3/ which has been shaken for 7 days showed the presence of Ph/sub 3/SnOH as confirmed by the presence of a small doublet around 910 and 897 cm/sup -1/. Also, the pH measurement of each of the aqueous Ph/sub 3/SnX solutions decreased with time. These results are interpreted to suggest that the organotin compounds studied ionize in aqueous media. Thin-layer chromatography results give further support to these findings. The study suggests that the X group in the compounds of the type Ph/sub 3/SnX is labile in polar solvents and that Ph/sub 3/SnOH and/or Ph/sub 3/SnX are the species formed in aqueous solution. 6 references, 1 figure, 2 tables.

  12. Low Friction Property of Diamond-Like Carbon Coating Films and Oxygen Transmission Ratio of Amorphous Carbon Films Deposited by Advanced Coating Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Toshiyuki; Kano, Makoto; Yoshida, Kentaro; Suzuki, Tetsuya

    2012-09-01

    The topics of the applied technology of amorphous carbon film to reduce friction using diamond-like carbon (DLC) coated by the vacuum arc ion plating process and to improve the gas barrier property using the amorphous carbon film by the atmospheric pressure plasma process are introduced with the basic experimental results. For reducing friction, the super low friction coefficient below 0.01 has been found when the tetrahedral amorphous carbon coating deposited by T-shape filtered arc deposition method [ta-C(T)] was evaluated the friction property under oleic acid lubrication at pure sliding condition. It was thought that the low share strength tribofilm composed of water and oleic acid mono-layer seemed to be formed on the sliding interface. For gas barrier performance, the amorphous carbon film deposited by the atmospheric pressure plasma chemical vapour deposition (CVD) technique on poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) substrate was improved the oxygen transmission ratio (OTR) around 30% compared with that of uncoated PET substrate. These advanced performance obtained by the optimum material combination of DLC with lubricant and the original atmospheric pressure plasma CVD technique are expected to be applied on the actual application for the different types of the industrial fields in near future.

  13. ranibizumab in the management of advanced Coats disease Stages 3B and 4: long-term outcomes.

    PubMed

    Gaillard, Marie-Claire; Mataftsi, Assimina; Balmer, Aubin; Houghton, Susan; Munier, Francis L

    2014-11-01

    Laser photocoagulation and cryotherapy to completely destroy telangiectatic vessels and ischemic retina in Coats disease is barely applicable in advanced cases with total retinal detachment, and globe survival is notoriously poor in Stages 3B and 4. Anti-vascular endothelial growth factor intravitreal injections may offer new prospects for these patients. This study is a retrospective review of all consecutive patients with Coats disease treated with neoadjuvant or adjuvant intravitreal ranibizumab plus conventional and amblyopia treatment as appropriate. Nine patients (median age, 13 months) presenting Coats Stages 3B and 4 (5 and 4 eyes, respectively) were included. Iris neovascularization resolved within 2 weeks and retinal reapplication within 4 months in all patients. At last follow-up, globe survival was 100% with anatomical success in 8 of the 9 eyes. With a median follow-up of 50 months, fibrotic vitreoretinopathy was developed in 5 of the 9 cases, one leading to tractional retinal detachment and ultimately phthisis bulbi. The remaining 4 of the 9 eyes achieved some vision (range, 0.02-0.063). To the best of the authors' knowledge, this is the largest reported series of late-stage Coats undergoing anti-vascular endothelial growth factor therapy, a homogenous cohort of patients treated with a single agent and with the longest follow-up. This study supports the role of ranibizumab in advanced disease by transient restoration of the hemato-retinal barrier and suppression of neovascularization to facilitate classic treatment. At the last follow-up, the authors report unprecedented anatomical success and functional outcome.

  14. Biomimetic anchors for antifouling and antibacterial polymer brushes on stainless steel.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wen Jing; Cai, Tao; Neoh, Koon-Gee; Kang, En-Tang; Dickinson, Gary H; Teo, Serena Lay-Ming; Rittschof, Daniel

    2011-06-07

    Barnacle cement (BC) was beneficially applied on stainless steel (SS) to serve as the initiator anchor for surface-initiated polymerization. The amine and hydroxyl moieties of barnacle cement reacted with 2-bromoisobutyryl bromide to provide the alkyl halide initiator for the surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) of 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA). The hydroxyl groups of HEMA polymer (PHEMA) were then converted to carboxyl groups for coupling of chitosan (CS) to impart the SS surface with both antifouling and antibacterial properties. The surface-functionalized SS reduced bovine serum albumin adsorption, bacterial adhesion, and exhibited antibacterial efficacy against Escherichia coli (E. coli). The effectiveness of barnacle cement as an initiator anchor was compared to that of dopamine, a marine mussel inspired biomimetic anchor previously used in surface-initiated polymerization. The results indicate that the barnacle cement is a stable and effective anchor for functional surface coatings and polymer brushes.

  15. Mussel-Inspired Anchoring of Polymer Loops That Provide Superior Surface Lubrication and Antifouling Properties.

    PubMed

    Kang, Taegon; Banquy, Xavier; Heo, Jinhwa; Lim, Chanoong; Lynd, Nathaniel A; Lundberg, Pontus; Oh, Dongyeop X; Lee, Han-Koo; Hong, Yong-Ki; Hwang, Dong Soo; Waite, John Herbert; Israelachvili, Jacob N; Hawker, Craig J

    2016-01-26

    We describe robustly anchored triblock copolymers that adopt loop conformations on surfaces and endow them with unprecedented lubricating and antifouling properties. The triblocks have two end blocks with catechol-anchoring groups and a looping poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) midblock. The loops mediate strong steric repulsion between two mica surfaces. When sheared at constant speeds of ∼2.5 μm/s, the surfaces exhibit an extremely low friction coefficient of ∼0.002-0.004 without any signs of damage up to pressures of ∼2-3 MPa that are close to most biological bearing systems. Moreover, the polymer loops enhance inhibition of cell adhesion and proliferation compared to polymers in the random coil or brush conformations. These results demonstrate that strongly anchored polymer loops are effective for high lubrication and low cell adhesion and represent a promising candidate for the development of specialized high-performance biomedical coatings.

  16. Antifouling activities of β-cyclodextrin stabilized peg based silver nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Punitha, N.; Saravanan, P.; Mohan, R.; Ramesh, P. S.

    2017-01-01

    Self-polishing polymer composites which release metal biocide in a controlled rate have been widely used in the design of antimicrobial agents and antifouling coatings. The present work focuses on the environmental friendly green synthesis of PEG based SNCs and their application to biocidal activity including marine biofouling. Biocompatible polymer β-CD and adhesive resistance polymer PEG were used to functionalize the SNPs and the as synthesized SNCs exhibit excellent micro fouling activities. The structural and optical properties were confirmed by XRD and UV-visible techniques respectively. The particle surface and cross sectional characteristics were examined by SEM-EDS, HR-TEM, AFM and FTIR. The surface potential was evaluated using ZP analysis and assessment of antibiofouling property was investigated using static immersion method.

  17. Antifouling strategies: history and regulation, ecological impacts and mitigation.

    PubMed

    Dafforn, Katherine A; Lewis, John A; Johnston, Emma L

    2011-03-01

    Biofouling increases drag on marine vessels resulting in higher fuel consumption and can also facilitate the transport of harmful non-indigenous species (NIS). Antifouling technologies incorporating biocides (e.g., copper and tributyltin) have been developed to prevent settlement of organisms on vessels, but their widespread use has introduced high levels of contamination into the environment and raised concerns about their toxic effects on marine communities. The recent global ban on tributyltin (1 January 2008) and increasing regulation of copper have prompted research and development of non-toxic paints. This review synthesises existing information regarding the ecological impact of biocides in a wide range of organisms and highlights directions for the management of antifouling paints. We focus particularly on representatives of the recent past (copper and tributyltin) and present (copper and 'booster') biocides. We identify knowledge gaps in antifouling research and provide recommendations relating to the regulation and phasing-out of copper.

  18. Advanced optical coating technology used in the development of concentrator arrays for solar space power applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fulton, Michael L.; O'Neill, Mark J.

    2006-08-01

    Since 1990 thin film optical coatings have taken a prominent role in the development of highly efficient solar power concentrators for future space applications. During the initial development of this coating technology, the Boeing High Technology Center explored various ways of protecting ENTECH's DC93-500 silicone Fresnel lenses from the harsh space environment. ENTECH's mini-dome lenses focused solar energy onto small high-efficiency solar cells for generating electrical power. To protect the silicone lenses from solar UV darkening, one early approach involved a cerium-doped glass cover cemented over the lens. Unfortunately, during launch simulation shock testing the glass lens covers cracked. We next explored the deposition of a UV blocking thin film coating directly to the silicone lens surface. This was a problem of immense proportions analogous to pouring concrete on to the surface of a reservoir filled with "Jell-O." Differential in coefficient of thermal expansion between the DC93-500 silicone and the deposited dielectric optical coating had to be balanced with intrinsic stress of the optical coating materials. Ion Beam Optics' work has culminated, some fifteen years later, in the current coating technology that is being incorporated in the Stretched Lens Array SquareRigger (SLASR). SLASR is designed to replace classic flat panel solar arrays with a lighter, lower cost, and more efficient (30%) concentrator arrays for future space applications. This paper will describe the coating technology and show its performance and benefits for SLASR space power systems. Results from both ground tests and space flight tests will be presented.

  19. Advances in far-ultraviolet reflective and transmissive coatings for space applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-de Marcos, Luis; Aznárez, José A.; Méndez, José A.; Larruquert, Juan I.; Vidal-Dasilva, M.; Malvezzi, A. Marco; Giglia, Angelo; Capobianco, Gerardo; Massone, Giuseppe; Fineschi, Silvano; Nannarone, Stefano

    2016-07-01

    Exploitation of far ultraviolet (FUV, 100-200 nm) observations extends to most areas of modern astronomy, from detailed observations of Solar System objects, the interstellar medium, exoplanets, stars and galaxies, to studies of crucial cosmological relevance. Despite several developments in recent decades, yet many observations are not possible due to technical limitations, of which one of the most important is the lack of optical coatings with high throughput. Development and optimization of such efficient FUV coatings have been identified in several roadmap reports as a key goal for future missions. The success of this development will ultimately improve the performance of nowadays feasible optical instruments and will enable new scientific imaging capabilities. GOLD's research is devoted to developing novel coatings with enhanced performance for space optics. Several deposition systems are available for the deposition of multilayer coatings. A deposition system was developed to deposit FUV coatings to satisfy space requirements. It consists of a 75-cm-diameter deposition chamber pumped with a cryo-pump and placed in an ISO-6 clean room. This chamber is available for deposition by evaporation of top-requirement coatings such as Al/ MgF2 mirrors or (Al/MgF2)n multilayer coatings for transmittance filters. A plan to add an Ion-Beam-Sputtering system in this chamber is under way. In this and other chambers at GOLD the following FUV coatings can be prepared: Transmittance filters based on (Al/MgF2)n multilayer coatings. These filters can be designed to have a peak at the FUV spectral line or band of interest and a high peak-to-visible transmittance ratio. Filters can be designed with a peak transmittance at a wavelength as short as 120 nm and with a transmittance in the visible smaller than 10-5. Narrowband reflective coatings peaked close to H Lyman β (102.6 nm) with a reflectance at H Lyman α (121.6 nm) two orders of magnitude below the one at 102.6 nm. Other

  20. Advanced ceramic coating development for industrial/utility gas turbine applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andersson, C. A.; Lau, S. K.; Bratton, R. J.; Lee, S. Y.; Rieke, K. L.; Allen, J.; Munson, K. E.

    1982-01-01

    The effects of ceramic coatings on the lifetimes of metal turbine components and on the performance of a utility turbine, as well as of the turbine operational cycle on the ceramic coatings were determined. When operating the turbine under conditions of constant cooling flow, the first row blades run 55K cooler, and as a result, have 10 times the creep rupture life, 10 times the low cycle fatigue life and twice the corrosion life with only slight decreases in both specific power and efficiency. When operating the turbine at constant metal temperature and reduced cooling flow, both specific power and efficiency increases, with no change in component lifetime. The most severe thermal transient of the turbine causes the coating bond stresses to approach 60% of the bond strengths. Ceramic coating failures was studied. Analytic models based on fracture mechanics theories, combined with measured properties quantitatively assessed both single and multiple thermal cycle failures which allowed the prediction of coating lifetime. Qualitative models for corrosion failures are also presented.

  1. Advanced oxidation of natural organic matter using hydrogen peroxide and iron-coated pumice particles.

    PubMed

    Kitis, M; Kaplan, S S

    2007-08-01

    The oxidative removal of natural organic matter (NOM) from waters using hydrogen peroxide and iron-coated pumice particles as heterogeneous catalysts was investigated. Two NOM sources were tested: humic acid solution and a natural source water. Iron coated pumice removed about half of the dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentration at a dose of 3000 mg l(-1) in 24 h by adsorption only. Original pumice and peroxide dosed together provided UV absorbance reductions as high as 49%, mainly due to the presence of metal oxides including Al(2)O(3), Fe(2)O(3) and TiO(2) in the natural pumice, which are known to catalyze the decomposition of peroxide forming strong oxidants. Coating the original pumice particles with iron oxides significantly enhanced the removal of NOM with peroxide. A strong linear correlation was found between iron contents of coated pumices and UV absorbance reductions. Peroxide consumption also correlated with UV absorbance reduction. Control experiments proved the effective coating and the stability of iron oxide species bound on pumice surfaces. Results overall indicated that in addition to adsorptive removal of NOM by metal oxides on pumice surfaces, surface reactions between iron oxides and peroxide result in the formation of strong oxidants, probably like hydroxyl radicals, which further oxidize both adsorbed NOM and remaining NOM in solution, similar to those in Fenton-like reactions.

  2. Advanced Anticorrosion Coating Materials Derived from Sunflower Oil with Bifunctional Properties.

    PubMed

    Balakrishnan, Thiruparasakthi; Sathiyanarayanan, Sadagopan; Mayavan, Sundar

    2015-09-09

    High-performance barrier films preventing permeation of moisture, aggressive chloride ions, and corrosive acids are important for many industries ranging from food to aviation. In the current study, pristine sunflower oil was used to form uniform adherent films on iron (Fe) via a simple single-step thermal treatment (without involving any initiator/mediator/catalyst). Oxidation of oil on heating results in a highly conjugated (oxidized) crystalline lamellar network with interlayer separation of 0.445 nm on Fe. The electrochemical corrosion tests proved that the coating exhibits superior anticorrosion performance with high coating resistance (>10(9) ohm cm2) and low capacitance values (<10(-10) F cm(-2)) as compared to bare Fe, graphene, and conducting polymer based coatings in 1 M hydrochloric acid solutions. The electrochemical analyses reveal that the oil coatings developed in this study provided a two-fold protection of passivation from the oxide layer and barrier from polymeric films. It is clearly observed that there is no change in structure, morphology, or electrochemical properties even after a prolonged exposure time of 80 days. This work indicates the prospect of developing highly inert, environmentally green, nontoxic, and micrometer level passivating barrier coatings from more sustainable and renewable sources, which can be of interest for numerous applications.

  3. Evaluation of dihydrooroidin as an antifouling additive in marine paint.

    PubMed

    Melander, Christian; Moeller, Peter D R; Ballard, T Eric; Richards, Justin J; Huigens, Robert W; Cavanagh, John

    2009-06-01

    Methods used to deter biofouling of underwater structures and marine vessels present a serious environmental issue and are both problematic and costly for government and commercial marine vessels worldwide. Current antifouling methods include compounds that are toxic to aquatic wildlife and marine ecosystems. Dihydrooroidin (DHO) was shown to completely inhibit Halomonas pacifica biofilms at 100 μM in a static biofilm inhibition assay giving precedence for the inhibition of other marine-biofilm-forming organisms. Herein we present DHO as an effective paint-based, non-cytotoxic, antifouling agent against marine biofouling processes in a marine mesocosm.

  4. Evaluation of dihydrooroidin as an antifouling additive in marine paint

    PubMed Central

    Melander, Christian; Moeller, Peter D. R.; Ballard, T. Eric; Richards, Justin J.; Huigens, Robert W.; Cavanagh, John

    2013-01-01

    Methods used to deter biofouling of underwater structures and marine vessels present a serious environmental issue and are both problematic and costly for government and commercial marine vessels worldwide. Current antifouling methods include compounds that are toxic to aquatic wildlife and marine ecosystems. Dihydrooroidin (DHO) was shown to completely inhibit Halomonas pacifica biofilms at 100 μM in a static biofilm inhibition assay giving precedence for the inhibition of other marine-biofilm-forming organisms. Herein we present DHO as an effective paint-based, non-cytotoxic, antifouling agent against marine biofouling processes in a marine mesocosm. PMID:23874076

  5. Analytical investigation of thermal barrier coatings for advanced power generation combustion turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amos, D. J.

    1977-01-01

    An analytical evaluation was conducted to determine quantitatively the improvement potential in cycle efficiency and cost of electricity made possible by the introduction of thermal barrier coatings to power generation combustion turbine systems. The thermal barrier system, a metallic bond coat and yttria stabilized zirconia outer layer applied by plasma spray techniques, acts as a heat insulator to provide substantial metal temperature reductions below that of the exposed thermal barrier surface. The study results show the thermal barrier to be a potentially attractive means for improving performance and reducing cost of electricity for the simple, recuperated, and combined cycles evaluated.

  6. MICROSTRUCTURAL EXAMINATION AND DEUTERIUM PERMEATION TESTING OF ADVANCED COATINGS FOR TRITIUM SERVICE

    SciTech Connect

    Korinko, P.

    2004-01-24

    A plant directed research and development task to develop and study new, improved, and low cost tritium permeation barriers was initiated in FY02. The project was intended to determine the permeation rate and permeation reduction factor of substrate materials and coated materials. The samples were characterized for microstructural and microchemical consistency. Permeation tests were also run. The sample geometry and sample sealing method selected for the coatings posed significant schedule and technical challenges. Diffusivity were consistent with published values but permeation data exhibited an unexpected sample to sample variation. The effort has lead to an improved sample design that will be used to support a Process Development task.

  7. Recent advances in modified atmosphere packaging and edible coatings to maintain quality of fresh-cut fruits and vegetables.

    PubMed

    Ghidelli, Christian; Pérez-Gago, María B

    2016-07-28

    Processing of fruits and vegetables generates physiological stresses in the still living cut tissue, leading to quality deterioration and shorter shelf-life as compared with fresh intact produces. Several strategies can be implemented with the aim to reduce the rate of deterioration of fresh-cut commodities. Such strategies include low temperature maintenance from harvest to retail and the application of physical and chemical treatments such as modified atmosphere packaging (MAP) with low O2 and high CO2 levels and antioxidant dips. Other technologies such as edible coatings with natural additives, new generation of coatings using nanotechnological solutions such as nanoparticles, nanoencapsulation, and multilayered systems, and non-conventional atmospheres such as the use of pressurized inert/noble gases and high levels of O2 have gained a lot of interest as a possibility to extend the shelf life of minimally processed fruits and vegetables. However, the high perishability of these products challenges in many cases their marketability by not achieving sufficient shelf life to survive the distribution system, requiring the combination of treatments to assure safety and quality. This review reports the recent advances in the use of MAP, edible coatings, and the combined effect of both technologies to extend the shelf life of fresh-cut fruits and vegetables.

  8. Advanced biopolymer-coated drug-releasing titania nanotubes (TNTs) implants with simultaneously enhanced osteoblast adhesion and antibacterial properties.

    PubMed

    Kumeria, Tushar; Mon, Htwe; Aw, Moom Sinn; Gulati, Karan; Santos, Abel; Griesser, Hans J; Losic, Dusan

    2015-06-01

    Here, we report on the development of advanced biopolymer-coated drug-releasing implants based on titanium (Ti) featuring titania nanotubes (TNTs) on its surface. These TNT arrays were fabricated on the Ti surface by electrochemical anodization, followed by the loading and release of a model antibiotic drug, gentamicin. The osteoblastic adhesion and antibacterial properties of these TNT-Ti samples are significantly improved by loading antibacterial payloads inside the nanotubes and modifying their surface with two biopolymer coatings (PLGA and chitosan). The improved osteoblast adhesion and antibacterial properties of these drug-releasing TNT-Ti samples are confirmed by the adhesion and proliferation studies of osteoblasts and model Gram-positive bacteria (Staphylococcus epidermidis). The adhesion of these cells on TNT-Ti samples is monitored by fluorescence and scanning electron microscopies. Results reveal the ability of these biopolymer-coated drug-releasing TNT-Ti substrates to promote osteoblast adhesion and proliferation, while effectively preventing bacterial colonization by impeding their proliferation and biofilm formation. The proposed approach could overcome inherent problems associated with bacterial infections on Ti-based implants, simultaneously enabling the development of orthopedic implants with enhanced and synergistic antibacterial functionalities and bone cell promotion.

  9. NASA's Advanced Environmental Barrier Coatings Development for SiC/SiC Ceramic Matrix Composites: Understanding Calcium Magnesium Alumino-Silicate (CMAS) Degradations and Resistance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming

    2014-01-01

    Environmental barrier coatings (EBCs) and SiCSiC ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) systems will play a crucial role in next generation turbine engines for hot-section component applications because of their ability to significantly increase engine operating temperatures with improved efficiency, reduce engine weight and cooling requirements. The development of prime-reliant environmental barrier coatings is essential to the viability and reliability of the envisioned CMC engine component applications, ensuring integrated EBC-CMC system durability and designs are achievable for successful applications of the game-changing component technologies and lifing methodologies.This paper will emphasize recent NASA environmental barrier coating developments for SiCSiC turbine airfoil components, utilizing advanced coating compositions, state-of-the-art processing methods, and combined mechanical and environment testing and durability evaluations. The coating-CMC degradations in the engine fatigue-creep and operating environments are particularly complex; one of the important coating development aspects is to better understand engine environmental interactions and coating life debits, and we have particularly addressed the effect of Calcium-Magnesium-Alumino-Silicate (CMAS) from road sand or volcano-ash deposits on the durability of the environmental barrier coating systems, and how the temperature capability, stability and cyclic life of the candidate rare earth oxide and silicate coating systems will be impacted in the presence of the CMAS at high temperatures and under simulated heat flux conditions. Advanced environmental barrier coating systems, including HfO2-Si with rare earth dopant based bond coat systems, will be discussed for the performance improvements to achieve better temperature capability and CMAS resistance for future engine operating conditions.

  10. Advanced mortar coatings for cultural heritage protection. Durability towards prolonged UV and outdoor exposure.

    PubMed

    Pino, F; Fermo, P; La Russa, M; Ruffolo, S; Comite, V; Baghdachi, J; Pecchioni, E; Fratini, F; Cappelletti, G

    2016-10-01

    In the present work, two kinds of hybrid polymeric-inorganic coatings containing TiO2 or SiO2 particles and prepared starting from two commercial resins (Alpha®SI30 and Bluesil®BP9710) were developed and applied to two kinds of mortars (an air-hardening calcic lime mortar [ALM] and a natural hydraulic lime mortar [HLM]) to achieve better performances in terms of water repellence and consequently damage resistance. The two pure commercial resins were also applied for comparison purposes. Properties of the coated materials and their performance were studied using different techniques such as contact angle measurements, capillary absorption test, mercury intrusion porosimetry, surface free energy, colorimetric measurements and water vapour permeability tests. Tests were also performed to determine the weathering effects on both the commercial and the hybrid coatings in order to study their durability. Thus, exposures to UV radiation, to UV radiation/condensed water cycles and to a real polluted atmospheric environment have been performed. The effectiveness of the hybrid SiO2 based coating was demonstrated, especially in the case of the HLM mortar.

  11. Development of Advanced Coating Techniques for Highly-durable Casting Dies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, S.; Takagi, M.; Mano, T.

    2013-03-01

    In order to improve the durability of aluminum die-casting molds, we applied microstructure-controlled PVD coating techniques. Single-layer and multilayer films consisting of chromium nitride (CrN) or titanium aluminum nitride (TiAlN) were prepared using an ion plating process. Structures of multilayer films were observed using transmission electron microscopy. Pin-shaped mold steel specimens coated with each of the films were soaked in the molten aluminum alloy at 953 K different periods of time, and the amount of weight loss due to erosion was evaluated. The weight losses for the multilayer CrN and TiAlN specimens were found to be less than those for the single-layer specimens. As a practical test, five specimens of core pins used in aluminum die casting of automobile parts were coated with multilayer films, and the number of maintenance operations required to remove aluminum alloy remaining on the specimen surfaces after several thousand castings was counted and compared with six control specimens (core pins treated using a commercial salt bath diffusion process). The number of maintenance operations for CrN- and TiAlN-based multilayer-coated core pins was found to be lower than for the control specimens.

  12. Advanced formulation design of venlafaxine hydrochloride coated and triple-layer tablets containing hypromellose.

    PubMed

    Gohel, Mukesh; Bariya, Shital H

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this research work was to develop venlafaxine hydrochloride-coated and layered matrix tablets using hypromellose adopting wet granulation technique. The granules and the tablets were characterized. The monolithic tablets were coated with different ratios of ethyl cellulose and hypromellose. The in vitro dissolution study was performed in distilled water. In the layered tablets, the middle layer containing drug was covered with barrier layers containing high viscosity grade hypromellose. Simplex lattice design was used for formulating the layered tablets. The dissolution study of the optimized batches and a reference product was carried out in 0.1 N HCl, phosphate buffer and hydroalcoholic solution. Burst drug release was exhibited by the uncoated tablets, probably due to high aqueous solubility of venlafaxine HCl. The coated tablets showed sustained drug release without burst effect. The drug release was best explained by Weibull model. A unified Weibull equation was evolved to express drug release from the coated tablets. The layered tablets also exhibited sustained release without burst effect due to effective area reduction. The optimized batches showed identical drug release in 0.1 N HCl, phosphate buffer and 10% v/v aqueous alcohol. Layered tablets may well be adopted by the industry due to the possibility of achieving a high production rate.

  13. Advanced fiber information systems seed coat neps baseline response from diverse mediums

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    An extensive literature search has revealed that no papers have been published regarding selectivity calculation of the AFIS seed coat neps (SCN) determination over interfering material in cotton. A prerequisite to selectivity measurements is to identify suitable fiber medium(s) that give baseline ...

  14. Profile Coating for KB Mirror Applications at the Advanced Photon Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, C.; Assoufid, L.; Macrander, A.; Ice, G.; Tischler, J.

    2002-01-01

    For microfocusing x-ray mirrors, an ellipse shape is desirable for aberration-free optics. However, it is difficult to polish elliptical mirrors to x-ray quality smoothness. A differential coating method to convert a cylindrical mirror to an elliptical one has been previously reported The differential coating was obtained by varying the sputter source power while the mirror was passed through. Here we report a new method of profile coating to achieve the same goal more effectively. In the profile coating, the sputter source power is kept constant, while the substrate is passed over a contoured mask at a constant speed. The mask is placed very close to the substrate level (within 1.0 mm) on a shield-can over the sputter gun. Four-inch-diameter Si wafers were coated through a 100-mm-long by 152-mm-wide aperture on the top of the shield-can. The thickness distribution was then obtained using a spectroscopic ellipsometer with computer-controlled X-Y translation stages. A model has been developed to fit the measured thickness distribution of stationary growth. The relative thickness weightings are then digitized at every point 1 mm apart for the entire open area of the aperture. When the substrate is moving across the shield-can during a deposition, the film thickness is directly proportional to the length of the opening on the can along the moving direction. By equating the summation of relative weighting to the required relative thickness at the same position, the length of the opening at that position can be determined. By repeating the same process for the whole length of the required profile, a contour can be obtained for a desired thickness profile. The contoured mask is then placed on the opening of the shield-can. The number of passes and the moving speed of the substrate are determined according to the required thickness and the growth-rate calibration. The mirror coating profile is determined from the ideal surface figure of a focus ellipse and that obtained

  15. Profile coating for KB mirror applications at the Advanced Photon Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chian; Assoufid, L.; Macrander, Albert T.; Ice, Gene E.; Tischler, J. Z.

    2002-12-01

    For microfocusing x-ray mirrors, an ellipse shape is desirable for aberration-free optics. However, it is difficult to polish elliptical mirrors to x-ray quality smoothness. A differential coating method to convert a cylindrical mirror to an elliptical one has been previously reported The differential coating was obtained by varying the sputter source power while the mirror was passed through. Here we report a new method of profile coating to achieve the same goal more effectively. In the profile coating, the sputter source power is kept constant, while the substrate is passed over a contoured mask at a constant speed. The mask is placed very close to the substrate level (within 1.0 mm) on a shield-can over the sputter gun. Four-inch-diameter Si wafers were coated through a 100-mm-long by 152-mm-wide aperture on the top of the shield-can. The thickness distribution was then obtained using a spectroscopic ellipsometer with computer-controlled X-Y translation stages. A model has been developed to fit the measured thickness distribution of stationary growth. The relative thickness weightings are then digitized at every point 1 mm apart for the entire open area of the aperture. When the substrate is moving across the shield-can during a deposition, the film thickness is directly proportional to the length of the opening on the can along the moving direction. By equating the summation of relative weighting to the required relative thickness at the same position, the length of the opening at that position can be determined. By repeating the same process for the whole length of the required profile, a contour can be obtained for a desired thickness profile. The contoured mask is then placed on the opening of the shield-can. The number of passes and the moving speed of the substrate are determined according to the required thickness and the growth-rate calibration. The mirror coating profile is determined from the ideal surface figure of a focus ellipse and that obtained

  16. Influence of photo-induced superhydrophilicity of titanium dioxide nanoparticles on the anti-fouling performance of ultrafiltration membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madaeni, S. S.; Ghaemi, N.; Alizadeh, A.; Joshaghani, M.

    2011-05-01

    Fouling is one of the most present prominent problems in almost all membrane processes. An increase in the membrane hydrophilicity is one of the effective ways to improve the membrane resistance to fouling. In this research, TiO 2 nanoparticles were deposited on the surface of composite ultrafiltration (UF) membrane, and then irradiated by ultraviolet (UV) light. The coating of the membrane surface with TiO 2 nanoparticles and radiation with (UV) light led to the considerable increase of hydrophilicity on the membrane surface. The deposition of TiO 2 nanoparticles was carried out through coordinance bonds with OH functional groups of the polymer on the membrane surface. The flux through a coated and (UV) light radiated membrane was increased to a large extent compared to a virgin membrane. In this research, the effect of different concentrations of TiO 2 nanoparticles in the presence and absence of (UV) irradiation was investigated, and the role of increasing of hydrophilicity on the anti-fouling property of membranes was studied. In order to characterize the membranes FTIR, XRD, SEM, water contact angle and cross-flow filtration were employed. This procedure is a useful technique for improvement of hydrophilicity to decrease (increase) fouling (anti-fouling performance) and enhance the permeation of membranes.

  17. Optically and biologically active mussel protein-coated double-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Jung, Yong Chae; Muramatsu, Hiroyuki; Fujisawa, Kazunori; Kim, Jin Hee; Hayashi, Takuya; Kim, Yoong Ahm; Endo, Morinobu; Terrones, Mauricio; Dresselhaus, Mildred S

    2011-12-02

    A method of dispersing strongly bundled double-walled carbon nanotubes (DWNTs) via a homogeneous coating of mussel protein in an aqueous solution is presented. Optical activity, mechanical strength, as well as electrical conductivity coming from the nanotubes and the versatile biological activity from the mussel protein make mussel-coated DWNTs promising as a multifunctional scaffold and for anti-fouling materials.

  18. Antiparasitic, Nematicidal and Antifouling Constituents from Juniperus Berries

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A bioassay-guided fractionation of Juniperus procera berries yielded antiparasitic, nematicidal and antifouling constituents, including a wide range of known abietane, pimarane and labdane diterpenes. Among these, abieta-7,13-diene (1) demonstrated in vitro antimalarial activity against Plasmodium f...

  19. Antifouling activity of secondary metabolites isolated from chinese marine organisms.

    PubMed

    Li, Yong-Xin; Wu, Hui-Xian; Xu, Ying; Shao, Chang-Lun; Wang, Chang-Yun; Qian, Pei-Yuan

    2013-10-01

    Biofouling results in tremendous economic losses to maritime industries around the world. A recent global ban on the use of organotin compounds as antifouling agents has further raised demand for safe and effective antifouling compounds. In this study, 49 secondary metabolites, including diterpenoids, steroids, and polyketides, were isolated from soft corals, gorgonians, brown algae, and fungi collected along the coast of China, and their antifouling activity was tested against cyprids of the barnacle Balanus (Amphibalanus) amphitrite. Twenty of the compounds were found to inhibit larval settlement significantly at a concentration of 25 μg ml(-1). Two briarane diterpenoids, juncin O (2) and juncenolide H (3), were the most promising non-toxic antilarval settlement candidates, with EC50 values less than 0.13 μg ml(-1) and a safety ratio (LC50/EC50) higher than 400. A preliminary structure-activity relationships study indicated that both furanon and furan moieties are important for antifouling activity. Intriguingly, the presence of hydroxyls enhanced their antisettlement activity.

  20. Moving graphene devices from lab to market: advanced graphene-coated nanoprobes.

    PubMed

    Hui, Fei; Vajha, Pujashree; Shi, Yuanyuan; Ji, Yanfeng; Duan, Huiling; Padovani, Andrea; Larcher, Luca; Li, Xiao Rong; Xu, Jing Juan; Lanza, Mario

    2016-04-28

    After more than a decade working with graphene there is still a preoccupying lack of commercial devices based on this wonder material. Here we report the use of high-quality solution-processed graphene sheets to fabricate ultra-sharp probes with superior performance. Nanoprobes are versatile tools used in many fields of science, but they can wear fast after some experiments, reducing the quality and increasing the cost of the research. As the market of nanoprobes is huge, providing a solution for this problem should be a priority for the nanotechnology industry. Our graphene-coated nanoprobes not only show enhanced lifetime, but also additional unique properties of graphene, such as hydrophobicity. Moreover, we have functionalized the surface of graphene to provide piezoelectric capability, and have fabricated a nano relay. The simplicity and low cost of this method, which can be used to coat any kind of sharp tip, make it suitable for the industry, allowing production on demand.

  1. Resistance of Coated and Uncoated IR Windows to Seawater Corrosion. Phase V. Summary

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-02-01

    competitive substrate materials, uncoated; single-layer AR coatings on germanium and zinc selenide; multiple-layer AR coatings on germanium; overcoatings on...testing) whose plastic coating has torn and peeled away from the substrate , leaving the substrate exposed to corrosion by seawater... 21 12. A coated...II examined two substrate materials (germanium and chalcogenide glass), and antifouling methods such as forced seawater circulation and electric

  2. Research and Development on Advanced Graphite Materials. Volume 34- Oxidation-Resistance Coatings for Graphite

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1963-06-01

    by incurs no responsibility nor any obligation whatsoever; and the fact that the Government may have formulated, furnished, .or in any way sup- plied...other person or corporation, or conveying any rights or permis- sion to manufacture, use, or sell any patented invention that may in any way be related...51 20. Magnesium Zirconate Coating, Etched, 400 X ........... 51 Z1. Electrical- Resistan ..e Apparatus for Testing Oxidation- Protection

  3. Carbon-coated Li3 N nanofibers for advanced hydrogen storage.

    PubMed

    Xia, Guanglin; Li, Dan; Chen, Xiaowei; Tan, Yingbin; Tang, Ziwei; Guo, Zaiping; Liu, Huakun; Liu, Zongwen; Yu, Xuebin

    2013-11-20

    3D porous carbon-coated Li3 N nanofibers are successfully fabricated via the electrospinning technique. The as-prepared nanofibers exhibit a highly improved hydrogen-sorption performance in terms of both thermodynamics and kinetics. More interestingly, a stable regeneration can be achieved due to the unique structure of the nanofibers, over 10 cycles of H2 sorption at a temperature as low as 250 °C.

  4. Corrosion Protection of Al Alloys for Aircraft by Coatings With Advanced Properties and Enhanced Performance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-12-20

    Sim6es, D. E. Tallman, G. P. Bierwagen, "Electrochemical Behaviour of a Mg-Rich Primer in the Protection of Al Alloys ," Corrosion Science 48 (2006...December 20, 200 Final Report July 1, 2004-June 30, 2007 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Sa. CONTRACT NUMBER Corrosion Protection of Al Alloys for Aircraft by...Prof. Dennis E. Tallman: A) New Scanning Probe Studies of Novel Cr-free Active Coatings B) Examination of the Influence of Surface Preparation of Al

  5. Antifouling potential of bacteria isolated from a marine biofilm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Min; Wang, Ke; Su, Rongguo; Li, Xuzhao; Lu, Wei

    2014-10-01

    Marine microorganisms are a new source of natural antifouling compounds. In this study, two bacterial strains, Kytococcus sedentarius QDG-B506 and Bacillus cereus QDG-B509, were isolated from a marine biofilm and identified. The bacteria fermentation broth could exert inhibitory effects on the growth of Skeletonema costatum and barnacle larvae. A procedure was employed to extract and identify the antifouling compounds. Firstly, a toxicity test was conducted by graduated pH and liquid-liquid extraction to determine the optimal extraction conditions. The best extraction conditions were found to be pH 2 and 100% petroleum ether. The EC 50 value of the crude extract of K. sedentarius against the test microalgae was 236.7 ± 14.08 μg mL-1, and that of B. cereus was 290.6 ± 27.11 μg mL-1. Secondly, HLB SPE columns were used to purify the two crude extracts. After purification, the antifouling activities of the two extracts significantly increased: the EC 50 of the K. sedentarius extract against the test microalgae was 86.4 ± 3.71 μg mL-1, and that of B. cereus was 92.6 ± 1.47 μg mL-1. These results suggest that the metabolites produced by the two bacterial strains are with high antifouling activities and they should be fatty acid compounds. Lastly, GC-MS was used for the structural elucidation of the compounds. The results show that the antifouling compounds produced by the two bacterial strains are myristic, palmitic and octadecanoic acids.

  6. The four dimensions of clathrin coats in living cells measured by advanced fluorescence microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davoust, Jean; Cosson, Pierre

    1991-05-01

    After microinjection into cultured Vero cells, rhodamine-labeled clathrin triskelions gave rise to a punctuate fluorescence pattern typical for clathrin, with two major localizations: the plasma membrane and the perinuclear region of the cells. We analyzed clathrin motion by Fluorescence Recovery After Photobleaching and its 3 dimensional distribution by Confocal Microscopy. Altogether, 55% of total clathrin is polymerized into coats which are turning over with a half time of 11 seconds and 45% of total diffuses freely in the cytoplasm. Various conditions known to affect membrane traffic were investigated. Cytosolic acidification or ATP depletion stabilized the polymerized clathrin coats without modifying the ratio of free versus polymerized clathrin. Low temperature (6 °C) or hypertonic media dramatically increased both the stability and the amount of the polymerized clathrin. We conclude that ATP and pH homeostasis are needed to support a very high turnover of the clathrin coats in living cells whereas low temperature and high osmotic strength promote an extensive polymerization of clathrin.

  7. Latest Researches Advances of Plasma Spraying: From Splat to Coating Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fauchais, P.; Vardelle, M.; Goutier, S.

    2016-12-01

    The plasma spray process with solid feedstock, mainly ceramics powders, studied since the sixties is now a mature technology. The plasma jet and particle in-flight characterizations are now well established. The use of computer-aided robot trajectory allows spraying on industrial parts with complex geometries. Works about splat formation have shown the importance of: the substrate preheating over the transition temperature to get rid of adsorbates and condensates, substrate chemistry, crystal structure and substrate temperature during the whole coating process. These studies showed that coating properties strongly depend on the splat formation and layering. The first part of this work deals with a summary of conventional plasma spraying key points. The second part presents the current knowledge in plasma spraying with liquid feedstock, technology developed for about two decades with suspensions of particles below micrometers or solutions of precursors that form particles a few micrometers sized through precipitation. Coatings are finely structured and even nanostructured with properties arousing the interest of researchers. However, the technology is by far more complex than the conventional ones. The main conclusions are that models should be developed further, plasma torches and injection setups adapted, and new measuring techniques to reliably characterize these small particles must be designed.

  8. Low-Thermal-Conductivity Pyrochlore Oxide Materials Developed for Advanced Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bansal, Narottam P.; Zhu, Dong-Ming

    2005-01-01

    When turbine engines operate at higher temperatures, they consume less fuel, have higher efficiencies, and have lower emissions. The upper-use temperatures of the base materials (superalloys, silicon-based ceramics, etc.) used for the hot-section components of turbine engines are limited by the physical, mechanical, and corrosion characteristics of these materials. Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) are applied as thin layers on the surfaces of these materials to further increase the operating temperatures. The current state-of-the-art TBC material in commercial use is partially yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ), which is applied on engine components by plasma spraying or by electron-beam physical vapor deposition. At temperatures higher than 1000 C, YSZ layers are prone to sintering, which increases thermal conductivity and makes them less effective. The sintered and densified coatings can also reduce thermal stress and strain tolerance, which can reduce the coating s durability significantly. Alternate TBC materials with lower thermal conductivity and better sintering resistance are needed to further increase the operating temperature of turbine engines.

  9. Marine pollution from antifouling paint particles.

    PubMed

    Turner, Andrew

    2010-02-01

    Antifouling paint particles (APP) are generated during the maintenance of boats and are shed from abandoned structures and grounded ships. Although they afford a highly visible, colourful reflection of contamination in the vicinity of the source, little systematic study has been undertaken regarding the distribution, composition and effects of APP in the wider marine environment. This paper reviews the state of knowledge in respect of APP, with particular emphasis on those generated by recreational boatyards. The likely biogeochemical pathways of the biocidal and non-biocidal metals in current use (mainly Cu and Zn) are addressed in light of recent research and an understanding of the more general behaviour of contaminants in marine systems. Analyses of paint fragment composites from recreational facilities in the UK reveal chemical compositions that are similar to those representing the net signal of the original formulations; significantly, dry weight concentrations of Cu and Zn of up to about 35% and 15%, respectively, are observed and, relative to ambient dusts and sediment, elevated concentrations of other trace metals, like Ba, Cd, Cr, Ni, Pb and Sn, occur. These metals leach more rapidly from APP than a painted surface due to the greater surface area of pigments and additives exposed to the aqueous medium. In suspension, APP are subject to greater and more rapid environmental variation (e.g. salinity, pH, dissolved oxygen) than painted hulls, while settled APP represent an important source of persistent and degradable biocides to poorly circulating environments. Through diffusion and abrasion, high concentrations of contaminants are predicted in interstitial waters that may be accumulated directly by benthic invertebrates. Animals that feed non-selectively and that are exposed to or ingest paint-contaminated sediment are able to accelerate the leaching, deposition and burial of biocides and other substances, and represent an alternative vehicle for

  10. Test Method Designed to Evaluate Cylinder Liner-Piston Ring Coatings for Advanced Heat Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radil, Kevin C.

    1997-01-01

    Research on advanced heat engine concepts, such as the low-heat-rejection engine, have shown the potential for increased thermal efficiency, reduced emissions, lighter weight, simpler design, and longer life in comparison to current diesel engine designs. A major obstacle in the development of a functional advanced heat engine is overcoming the problems caused by the high combustion temperatures at the piston ring/cylinder liner interface, specifically at top ring reversal (TRR). Therefore, advanced cylinder liner and piston ring materials are needed that can survive under these extreme conditions. To address this need, researchers at the NASA Lewis Research Center have designed a tribological test method to help evaluate candidate piston ring and cylinder liner materials for advanced diesel engines.

  11. Nano-silica fabricated with silver nanoparticles: antifouling adsorbent for efficient dye removal, effective water disinfection and biofouling control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Sujoy K.; Khan, Md. Motiar R.; Parandhaman, T.; Laffir, Fathima; Guha, Arun K.; Sekaran, G.; Mandal, Asit Baran

    2013-05-01

    A nano-silica-AgNPs composite material is proposed as a novel antifouling adsorbent for cost-effective and ecofriendly water purification. Fabrication of well-dispersed AgNPs on the nano-silica surface, designated as NSAgNP, has been achieved through protein mediated reduction of silver ions at ambient temperature for development of sustainable nanotechnology. The coated proteins on AgNPs led to the formation of stable NSAgNP and protected the AgNPs from oxidation and other ions commonly present in water. The NSAgNP exhibited excellent dye adsorption capacity both in single and multicomponent systems, and demonstrated satisfactory tolerance against variations in pH and dye concentration. The adsorption mainly occurred through electrostatic interaction, though π-π interaction and pore diffusion also contributed to the process. Moreover, the NSAgNP showed long-term antibacterial activity against both planktonic cells and biofilms of Gram-negative Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The antibacterial activity of AgNPs retarded the initial attachment of bacteria on NSAgNP and thus significantly improved the antifouling properties of the nanomaterial, which further inhibited biofilm formation. Scanning electron and fluorescence microscopic studies revealed that cell death occurred due to irreversible damage of the cell membrane upon electrostatic interaction of positively charged NSAgNP with the negatively charged bacterial cell membrane. The high adsorption capacity, reusability, good tolerance, removal of multicomponent dyes and E. coli from the simulated contaminated water and antifouling properties of NSAgNP will provide new opportunities to develop cost-effective and ecofriendly water purification processes.A nano-silica-AgNPs composite material is proposed as a novel antifouling adsorbent for cost-effective and ecofriendly water purification. Fabrication of well-dispersed AgNPs on the nano-silica surface, designated as NSAgNP, has been achieved through

  12. Thermal Properties of Oxides With Magnetoplumbite Structure for Advanced Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bansal, Narottam P.; Zhu, Dongming; Eslamloo-Grami, Maryam

    2007-01-01

    Oxides having magnetoplumbite structure are promising candidate materials for applications as high temperature thermal barrier coatings because of their high thermal stability, high thermal expansion, and low thermal conductivity. In this study, powders of LaMgAl11O19, GdMgAl11O19, SmMgAl11O19, and Gd0.7Yb0.3MgAl11O19 magnetoplumbite oxides were synthesized by citric acid sol-gel method and hot pressed into disk specimens. The thermal expansion coefficients (CTE) of these oxide materials were measured from room temperature to 1500 C. The average CTE value was found to be approx.9.6x10(exp -6)/C. Thermal conductivity of these magnetoplumbite-based oxide materials was also evaluated using steady-state laser heat flux test method. The effects of doping on thermal properties were also examined. Thermal conductivity of the doped Gd0.7Yb0.3MgAl11O19 composition was found to be lower than that of the undoped GdMgAl11O19. In contrast, thermal expansion coefficient was found to be independent of the oxide composition and appears to be controlled by the magnetoplumbite crystal structure. Thermal conductivity testing of LaMgAl11O19 and LaMnAl11O19 magnetoplumbite oxide coatings plasma sprayed on NiCrAlY/Rene N5 superalloy substrates indicated resistance of these coatings to sintering even at temperatures as high as 1600 C.

  13. Moving graphene devices from lab to market: advanced graphene-coated nanoprobes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hui, Fei; Vajha, Pujashree; Shi, Yuanyuan; Ji, Yanfeng; Duan, Huiling; Padovani, Andrea; Larcher, Luca; Li, Xiao Rong; Xu, Jing Juan; Lanza, Mario

    2016-04-01

    After more than a decade working with graphene there is still a preoccupying lack of commercial devices based on this wonder material. Here we report the use of high-quality solution-processed graphene sheets to fabricate ultra-sharp probes with superior performance. Nanoprobes are versatile tools used in many fields of science, but they can wear fast after some experiments, reducing the quality and increasing the cost of the research. As the market of nanoprobes is huge, providing a solution for this problem should be a priority for the nanotechnology industry. Our graphene-coated nanoprobes not only show enhanced lifetime, but also additional unique properties of graphene, such as hydrophobicity. Moreover, we have functionalized the surface of graphene to provide piezoelectric capability, and have fabricated a nano relay. The simplicity and low cost of this method, which can be used to coat any kind of sharp tip, make it suitable for the industry, allowing production on demand.After more than a decade working with graphene there is still a preoccupying lack of commercial devices based on this wonder material. Here we report the use of high-quality solution-processed graphene sheets to fabricate ultra-sharp probes with superior performance. Nanoprobes are versatile tools used in many fields of science, but they can wear fast after some experiments, reducing the quality and increasing the cost of the research. As the market of nanoprobes is huge, providing a solution for this problem should be a priority for the nanotechnology industry. Our graphene-coated nanoprobes not only show enhanced lifetime, but also additional unique properties of graphene, such as hydrophobicity. Moreover, we have functionalized the surface of graphene to provide piezoelectric capability, and have fabricated a nano relay. The simplicity and low cost of this method, which can be used to coat any kind of sharp tip, make it suitable for the industry, allowing production on demand. Electronic

  14. Determination of Five Alternative Antifouling Agents Found Along the Korean Coasts.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seongeon; Lee, Dongsup; Lee, Yong-Woo

    2017-07-01

      Since the ban of tri-butyl tin, other various alternative antifouling agents have been used. In this study, the contamination levels from these antifouling agents were examined in the main harbors in Korea. The sampled harbors were classified into four types and the levels of contamination from the antifouling agents were analyzed. The highest degree of contamination was found in the big harbors, followed by the fishing harbors, harbors near agricultural areas, and military and coast guard harbors. In addition, an increase in the number of ships that entered the ports significantly influenced the contamination by the antifouling agents. Correlation analysis was conducted to characterize the alternative antifouling agents. The results revealed strong correlations between the dichlofluanid and chlorothalonil, and between the chlorothalonil and TCMTB, because unlike Irgarol 1051 and SEA-NINE 211, which are used only as antifouling agents, chlorothalonil, dichlofluanid, and TCMTB are also used in agriculture.

  15. Advanced Fabrication Method for the Preparation of MOF Thin Films: Liquid-Phase Epitaxy Approach Meets Spin Coating Method.

    PubMed

    Chernikova, Valeriya; Shekhah, Osama; Eddaoudi, Mohamed

    2016-08-10

    Here, we report a new and advanced method for the fabrication of highly oriented/polycrystalline metal-organic framework (MOF) thin films. Building on the attractive features of the liquid-phase epitaxy (LPE) approach, a facile spin coating method was implemented to generate MOF thin films in a high-throughput fashion. Advantageously, this approach offers a great prospective to cost-effectively construct thin-films with a significantly shortened preparation time and a lessened chemicals and solvents consumption, as compared to the conventional LPE-process. Certainly, this new spin-coating approach has been implemented successfully to construct various MOF thin films, ranging in thickness from a few micrometers down to the nanometer scale, spanning 2-D and 3-D benchmark MOF materials including Cu2(bdc)2·xH2O, Zn2(bdc)2·xH2O, HKUST-1, and ZIF-8. This method was appraised and proved effective on a variety of substrates comprising functionalized gold, silicon, glass, porous stainless steel, and aluminum oxide. The facile, high-throughput and cost-effective nature of this approach, coupled with the successful thin film growth and substrate versatility, represents the next generation of methods for MOF thin film fabrication. Therefore, paving the way for these unique MOF materials to address a wide range of challenges in the areas of sensing devices and membrane technology.

  16. Advances in the Development of a WCl6 CVD System for Coating UO2 Powders with Tungsten

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mireles, Omar R.; Tieman, Alyssa; Broadway, Jeramie; Hickman, Robert

    2013-01-01

    W-UO2 CERMET fuels are under development to enable Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (NTP) for deep space exploration. Research efforts with an emphasis on fuel fabrication, testing, and identification of potential risks is underway. One primary risk is fuel loss due to CTE mismatch between W and UO2 and the grain boundary structure of W particles resulting in higher thermal stresses. Mechanical failure can result in significant reduction of the UO2 by hot hydrogen. Fuel loss can be mitigated if the UO2 particles are coated with a layer of high density tungsten before the consolidation process. This paper discusses the work to date, results, and advances of a fluidized bed chemical vapor deposition (CVD) system that utilizes the H2-WCl6 reduction process. Keywords: Space, Nuclear, Thermal, Propulsion, Fuel, CERMET, CVD, Tungsten, Uranium

  17. TiN-based coatings on fuel cladding tubes for advanced nuclear reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Ickchan Kim; Fauzia Khatkhatay; Liang Jiao; Greg Swadener; James Cole; Jian Gan; Haiyan Wang

    2012-10-01

    Titanium nitride (TiN) thin films are coated on HT-9 and MA957 fuel cladding tubes and bars to explore their mechanical strength, thermal stability, diffusion barrier properties, and thermal conductivity properties. The ultimate goal is to implement TiN as an effective diffusion barrier to prevent the inter-diffusion between the nuclear fuel and the cladding material, and thus lead to a longer life time of the cladding tubes. Mechanical tests including hardness and scratch tests for the samples before and after thermal cycle tests show that the films have a high hardness of 28 GPa and excellent adhesion properties despite the thermal treatment. Thermal conductivity measurements demonstrate that the thin TiN films have very minimal impact on the overall thermal conductivity of the MA957 and HT9 substrates, i.e., the thermal conductivity of the uncoated HT-9 and MA957 substrates was 26.25 and 28.44 W m-1K-1 , and that of the coated ones was 26.21 and 28.38 W m-1K-1, respectively. A preliminary Ce diffusion test on the couple of Ce/TiN/HT-9 suggests that TiN has excellent material compatibility and good diffusion barrier properties.

  18. Additive Manufacturing of Advanced High Temperature Masking Fixtures for EBPVD TBC Coating

    SciTech Connect

    List, III, Frederick Alyious; Feuerstein, Albert; Dehoff, Ryan; Kirka, Michael; Carver, Keith

    2016-03-30

    The purpose of this Manufacturing Demonstration Facility (MDF) technical collaboration project between Praxair Surface Technologies, Inc. (PST) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) was to develop an additive manufacturing process to fabricate next generation high temperature masking fixtures for coating of turbine airfoils with ceramic Thermal Barrier Coatings (TBC) by the Electron Beam Physical Vapor Deposition (EBPVD) process. Typical masking fixtures are sophisticated designs and require complex part manipulation in order to achieve the desired coating distribution. Fixtures are typically fabricated from high temperature nickel (Ni) based superalloys. The fixtures are fabricated from conventional processes by welding of thin sheet material into a complex geometry, to decrease the weight load for the manipulator and to reduce the thermal mass of the fixture. Recent attempts have been made in order to fabricate the fixtures through casting, but thin walled sections are difficult to cast and have high scrap rates. This project focused on understanding the potential for fabricating high temperature Ni based superalloy fixtures through additive manufacturing. Two different deposition processes; electron beam melting (EBM) and laser powder bed fusion were evaluated to determine the ideal processing route of these materials. Two different high temperature materials were evaluated. The high temperature materials evaluated were Inconel 718 and another Ni base alloy, designated throughout the remainder of this document as Alloy X, as the alloy composition is sensitive. Inconel 718 is a more widely utilized material for additive manufacturing although it is not currently the material utilized for current fixtures. Alloy X is the alloy currently used for the fixtures, but is not a commercially available alloy for additive manufacturing. Praxair determined it was possible to build the fixture using laser powder bed technology from Inconel 718. ORNL fabricated the fixture

  19. The ion beam sputtering facility at KURRI: Coatings for advanced neutron optical devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hino, Masahiro; Oda, Tatsuro; Kitaguchi, Masaaki; Yamada, Norifumi L.; Tasaki, Seiji; Kawabata, Yuji

    2015-10-01

    We describe a film coating facility for the development of multilayer mirrors for use in neutron optical devices that handle slow neutron beams. Recently, we succeeded in fabricating a large neutron supermirror with high reflectivity using an ion beam sputtering system (KUR-IBS), as well as all neutron supermirrors in two neutron guide tubes at BL06 at J-PARC/MLF. We also realized a large flexible self-standing m=5 NiC/Ti supermirror and very small d-spacing (d=1.65 nm) multilayer sheets. In this paper, we present an overview of the performance and utility of non-magnetic neutron multilayer mirrors fabricated with the KUR-IBS

  20. Advanced Environmental Barrier Coatings Developed for SiC/SiC Composite Vanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Kang N.; Fox, Dennis S.; Eldridge, Jeffrey I.; Zhu, Dongming; Bansal, Narottam P.; Miller, Robert A.

    2003-01-01

    Ceramic components exhibit superior high-temperature strength and durability over conventional component materials in use today, signifying the potential to revolutionize gas turbine engine component technology. Silicon-carbide fiber-reinforced silicon carbide ceramic matrix composites (SiC/SiC CMCs) are prime candidates for the ceramic hotsection components of next-generation gas turbine engines. A key barrier to the realization of SiC/SiC CMC hot-section components is the environmental degradation of SiC/SiC CMCs in combustion environments. This is in the form of surface recession due to the volatilization of silica scale by water vapor. An external environmental barrier coating (EBC) is a logical approach to achieve protection and long-term durability.

  1. Probing nanoscale chemical segregation and surface properties of antifouling hybrid xerogel films.

    PubMed

    Destino, Joel F; Gatley, Caitlyn M; Craft, Andrew K; Detty, Michael R; Bright, Frank V

    2015-03-24

    Over the past decade there has been significant development in hybrid polymer coatings exhibiting tunable surface morphology, surface charge, and chemical segregation-all believed to be key properties in antifouling (AF) coating performance. While a large body of research exists on these materials, there have yet to be studies on all the aforementioned properties in a colocalized manner with nanoscale spatial resolution. Here, we report colocalized atomic force microscopy, scanning Kelvin probe microscopy, and confocal Raman microscopy on a model AF xerogel film composed of 1:9:9 (mol:mol:mol) 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES), n-octyltriethoxysilane (C8), and tetraethoxysilane (TEOS) formed on Al2O3. This AF film is found to consist of three regions that are chemically and physically unique in 2D and 3D across multiple length scales: (i) a 1.5 μm thick base layer derived from all three precursors; (ii) 2-4 μm diameter mesa-like features that are enriched in free amine (from APTES), depleted in the other species and that extend 150-400 nm above the base layer; and (iii) 1-2 μm diameter subsurface inclusions within the base layer that are enriched in hydrogen-bonded amine (from APTES) and depleted in the other species.

  2. Corals Like It Waxed: Paraffin-Based Antifouling Technology Enhances Coral Spat Survival

    PubMed Central

    Tebben, Jan; Guest, James R.; Sin, Tsai M.; Steinberg, Peter D.; Harder, Tilmann

    2014-01-01

    The early post-settlement stage is the most sensitive during the life history of reef building corals. However, few studies have examined the factors that influence coral mortality during this period. Here, the impact of fouling on the survival of newly settled coral spat of Acropora millepora was investigated by manipulating the extent of fouling cover on settlement tiles using non-toxic, wax antifouling coatings. Survival of spat on coated tiles was double that on control tiles. Moreover, there was a significant negative correlation between percentage cover of fouling and spat survival across all tiles types, suggesting that fouling in direct proximity to settled corals has detrimental effects on early post-settlement survival. While previous studies have shown that increased fouling negatively affects coral larval settlement and health of juvenile and adult corals, to the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to show a direct relationship between fouling and early post-settlement survival for a broadcast spawning scleractinian coral. The negative effects of fouling on this sensitive life history stage may become more pronounced in the future as coastal eutrophication increases. Our results further suggest that targeted seeding of coral spat on artificial surfaces in combination with fouling control could prove useful to improve the efficiency of sexual reproduction-based coral propagation for reef rehabilitation. PMID:24489936

  3. Corals like it waxed: paraffin-based antifouling technology enhances coral spat survival.

    PubMed

    Tebben, Jan; Guest, James R; Sin, Tsai M; Steinberg, Peter D; Harder, Tilmann

    2014-01-01

    The early post-settlement stage is the most sensitive during the life history of reef building corals. However, few studies have examined the factors that influence coral mortality during this period. Here, the impact of fouling on the survival of newly settled coral spat of Acropora millepora was investigated by manipulating the extent of fouling cover on settlement tiles using non-toxic, wax antifouling coatings. Survival of spat on coated tiles was double that on control tiles. Moreover, there was a significant negative correlation between percentage cover of fouling and spat survival across all tiles types, suggesting that fouling in direct proximity to settled corals has detrimental effects on early post-settlement survival. While previous studies have shown that increased fouling negatively affects coral larval settlement and health of juvenile and adult corals, to the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to show a direct relationship between fouling and early post-settlement survival for a broadcast spawning scleractinian coral. The negative effects of fouling on this sensitive life history stage may become more pronounced in the future as coastal eutrophication increases. Our results further suggest that targeted seeding of coral spat on artificial surfaces in combination with fouling control could prove useful to improve the efficiency of sexual reproduction-based coral propagation for reef rehabilitation.

  4. Mini-Review: Antifouling Natural Products from Marine Microorganisms and Their Synthetic Analogs.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kai-Ling; Wu, Ze-Hong; Wang, Yu; Wang, Chang-Yun; Xu, Ying

    2017-08-28

    Biofouling causes huge economic loss and generates serious ecological issues worldwide. Marine coatings incorporated with antifouling (AF) compounds are the most common practices to prevent biofouling. With a ban of organotins and an increase in the restrictions regarding the use of other AF alternatives, exploring effective and environmentally friendly AF compounds has become an urgent demand for marine coating industries. Marine microorganisms, which have the largest biodiversity, represent a rich and important source of bioactive compounds and have many medical and industrial applications. This review summarizes 89 natural products from marine microorganisms and 13 of their synthetic analogs with AF EC50 values ≤ 25 μg/mL from 1995 (the first report about marine microorganism-derived AF compounds) to April 2017. Some compounds with the EC50 values < 5 μg/mL and LC50/EC50 ratios > 50 are highlighted as potential AF compounds, and the preliminary analysis of structure-relationship (SAR) of these compounds is also discussed briefly. In the last part, current challenges and future research perspectives are proposed based on opinions from many previous reviews. To provide clear guidance for the readers, the AF compounds from microorganisms and their synthetic analogs in this review are categorized into ten types, including fatty acids, lactones, terpenes, steroids, benzenoids, phenyl ethers, polyketides, alkaloids, nucleosides and peptides. In addition to the major AF compounds which targets macro-foulers, this review also includes compounds with antibiofilm activity since micro-foulers also contribute significantly to the biofouling communities.

  5. Surface modification of polyamide reverse osmosis membrane with sulfonated polyvinyl alcohol for antifouling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yang; Wan, Ying; Pan, Guoyuan; Shi, Hongwei; Yan, Hao; Xu, Jian; Guo, Min; Wang, Zhe; Liu, Yiqun

    2017-10-01

    Sulfonated polyvinyl alcohol (SPVA) was synthesized by esterification reaction of PVA and sulfuric acid, and the structure was characterized by FTIR spectrum. Then a series of TFC membranes modified with cross-linked SPVA layer were fabricated by coating method, with glutaraldehyde as the cross-linker. The resulting TFC membranes were characterized by SEM, AFM, ATR-FTIR, XPS, streaming potential as well as static contact angle. The TFC membranes modified with SPVA exhibit decreased water flux and increased NaCl rejection with SPVA content increasing in the coating aqueous solution. The optimal PA-SPVA-0.5 sample exhibits a NaCl rejection of 99.18%, which is higher than the 98.32% of the virgin PA membrane. More importantly, the PA-SPVA-0.5 membrane shows much more improved fouling resistance to BSA and CTAB than virgin PA membrane and the TFC sample modified with PVA (PA-PVA-0.5). PA-SPVA-0.5 membrane loses about 8% of the initial flux after BSA fouling for 12 h, which is much lower than those of virgin PA and PA-PVA-0.5 membranes (28% and 15%, respectively). Furthermore, the flux recovery of the PA-SPVA-0.5 membrane reaches above 95% after cleaning. Thus, the PA-SPVA-0.5 membrane shows potential applications as antifouling RO membrane for desalination and purification.

  6. Progress report on understanding AFIS seed coat nep levels in pre-opened slivers on the Advanced Fiber Information System (AFIS)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The Advanced Fiber Information System (AFIS) is utilized in this segment of the research project to study how seed coat neps are measured. A patent search was conducted, and studied to assist with the understanding of the AFIS measurement of this impurity in raw cotton. The older AFIS 2 is primari...

  7. Zwitteration: Coating Surfaces with Zwitterionic Functionality to Reduce Nonspecific Adsorption

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Coating surfaces with thin or thick films of zwitterionic material is an effective way to reduce or eliminate nonspecific adsorption to the solid/liquid interface. This review tracks the various approaches to zwitteration, such as monolayer assemblies and polymeric brush coatings, on micro- to macroscopic surfaces. A critical summary of the mechanisms responsible for antifouling shows how zwitterions are ideally suited to this task. PMID:24754399

  8. New Marine Antifouling Compounds from the Red Alga Laurencia sp.

    PubMed

    Oguri, Yuko; Watanabe, Mami; Ishikawa, Takafumi; Kamada, Takashi; Vairappan, Charles S; Matsuura, Hiroshi; Kaneko, Kensuke; Ishii, Takahiro; Suzuki, Minoru; Yoshimura, Erina; Nogata, Yasuyuki; Okino, Tatsufumi

    2017-08-28

    Six new compounds, omaezol, intricatriol, hachijojimallenes A and B, debromoaplysinal, and 11,12-dihydro-3-hydroxyretinol have been isolated from four collections of Laurencia sp. These structures were determined by MS and NMR analyses. Their antifouling activities were evaluated together with eight previously known compounds isolated from the same samples. In particular, omaezol and hachijojimallene A showed potent activities (EC50 = 0.15-0.23 µg/mL) against larvae of the barnacle Amphibalanus amphitrite.

  9. Evaluation of Anti-fouling Materials for Optical Sensors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-09-30

    Hani R., Waldron C. and Farmer D. A. (1994) Gel-Free Paint Containing Zinc Pyrithione , Cuprous Oxide, and Carboxylic Acid. U.S. Patent 5342437, Olin Corp...2. Hani R., Waldron C. and Farmer D. A. Jr. (1992) Stabilization of Paints Containing Zinc Pyrithione and Cuprous Oxide Antifouling Agents. U.S...using ESEM. The following commercially prepared formulations provided by Magellan Co., Inc. were evaluated: 1) 10,000 ppm zinc pyrithione1,2,3 + 300 ppm

  10. Environmental fate of the antifouling compound zinc pyrithione in seawater.

    PubMed

    Grunnet, Katja S; Dahllöf, Ingela

    2005-12-01

    To perform a thorough risk assessment of the new antifouling compound zinc pyrithione (ZnPT2), additional information regarding the fate of the compound is needed. The present study examined the recovery and transchelation of ZnPT2 in controlled laboratory experiments, photodegradation experiments, and a fate study in a large-scale field experiment. Chemical analyses were performed using a newly developed method for simultaneous analyses of ZnPT2 and copper pyrithione (CuPT2). Furthermore, two antifouling paints containing ZnPT2 were examined for the fate of leaching biocide. Naturally occurring ligands and metals in seawater influence the stability of ZnPT2. The presence of free Cu2+, which is present naturally in the seawater or is released from copper-containing paints, results in a partial transchelation of ZnPT2 into CuPT2. A complete transchelation of ZnPT2 into CuPT2 was observed when Cu2+ was present at an equimolar concentration in the absence of interfering ligands. When ZnPT2 was leached from antifouling paints containing both ZnPT2 and Cu2O, CuPT2 was found, with no trace of ZnPT2. Photodegradation was low in natural waters and absent from 1 m or more below the surface. The results show that ZnPT2 has a low persistence in seawater when leached from antifouling paints. However, the more stable and toxic transchelation product CuPT2 is formed, which has the potential to accumulate in the sediments and, therefore, should be included in both chemical analysis and risk assessment of ZPT2.

  11. Antifouling potential of Nature-inspired sulfated compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almeida, Joana R.; Correia-da-Silva, Marta; Sousa, Emília; Antunes, Jorge; Pinto, Madalena; Vasconcelos, Vitor; Cunha, Isabel

    2017-02-01

    Natural products with a sulfated scaffold have emerged as antifouling agents with low or nontoxic effects to the environment. In this study 13 sulfated polyphenols were synthesized and tested for antifouling potential using the anti-settlement activity of mussel (Mytilus galloprovincialis) plantigrade post-larvae and bacterial growth inhibition towards four biofilm-forming bacterial strains. Results show that some of these Nature-inspired compounds were bioactive, particularly rutin persulfate (2), 3,6-bis(β-D-glucopyranosyl) xanthone persulfate (6), and gallic acid persulfate (12) against the settlement of plantigrades. The chemical precursors of sulfated compounds 2 and 12 were also tested for anti-settlement activity and it was possible to conclude that bioactivity is associated with sulfation. While compound 12 showed the most promising anti-settlement activity (EC50 = 8.95 μg.mL-1), compound 2 also caused the higher level of growth inhibition in bacteria Vibrio harveyi (EC20 = 12.5 μg.mL-1). All the three bioactive compounds 2, 6, and 12 were also found to be nontoxic to the non target species Artemia salina (<10% mortality at 250 μM) and Vibrio fischeri (LC50 > 1000 μg.mL-1). This study put forward the relevance of synthesizing non-natural sulfated small molecules to generate new nontoxic antifouling agents.

  12. Persistence of antifouling agents in the marine biosphere.

    PubMed

    Ranke, Johannes

    2002-04-01

    Risk indicators provide an interesting way to compare chemical substances with respect to the risks of their large-scaled release. The present study implies that, for antifouling agents used in commercial shipping, residence times in the marine biosphere are especially suitable to represent their inherent potential to cause exposure of organisms. A simple box model is described providing the possibility to estimate residence times in the marine biosphere from water-particle equilibrium partitioning constants and half-lives in water and sediment. Resulting residence times in the marine biosphere range from about 5 d (4,5-dichloro-2-n-octyl-4-isothiazolin-3-one) up to about 40,000 yr (copper). For an evaluation of the validity of the model, calculated values are compared with measured environmental concentrations. Remaining uncertainties are also discussed. The main purpose of the presented residence times is to serve as a basis for decisions in antifouling paint development or environmentally conscious purchasing of antifouling paints.

  13. Antifouling paint booster biocide contamination in Greek marine sediments.

    PubMed

    Albanis, T A; Lambropoulou, D A; Sakkas, V A; Konstantinou, I K

    2002-08-01

    Organic booster biocides were recently introduced as alternatives to organotin compounds in antifouling products, after restrictions imposed on the use of tributyltin in 1987. In this study, the concentrations of three biocides commonly used as antifoulants, Irgarol 1051 (2-methylthio-4-tertiary-butylamino-6-cyclopropylamino-s-triazine), dichlofluanid (N-dichlorofluoromethylthio-N',N'-dimethyl-N-phenyl sulphamide) and chlorothalonil (2,4,5,6-tetrachloro isophthalonitrile) were determined in sediments from ports and marinas of Greece. Piraeus (Central port, Mikrolimano and Pasalimani marinas), Thessaloniki (Central port and marina), Patras (Central port and marina), Elefsina, Igoumenitsa, Aktio and Chalkida marinas were chosen as representative study sites for comparison with previous monitoring surveys of biocides in coastal sediments from other European countries. Samples were collected at the end of one boating season (October 1999), as well before and during the 2000 boating season. All the compounds monitored were detected at most of sites and seasonal dependence of biocide concentrations were found, with maxima during the period June-September, while the winter period (December-February) lower values were encountered. The concentrations levels ranged from 3 to 690 ng/g dw (dry weight). Highest levels of the biocides were found in marinas (690, 195 and 165 ng/g dw, for Irgarol, dichlofluanid and chlorothalonil respectively) while in ports lower concentrations were observed. Antifouling paints are implicated as the likely sources of biocides since agricultural applications possibly contributed for chlorothalonil and dichlofluanid inputs in a few sampling sites.

  14. Study of erodable paint properties involved in antifouling activity.

    PubMed

    Thouvenin, M; Langlois, V; Briandet, R; Langlois, J Y; Guerin, P H; Peron, J J; Haras, D; Vallee-Rehel, K

    2003-06-01

    To produce ecological marine paints, it is necessary to understand the phenomena involved in antifouling activity. Due to the multivariable components which have to be taken into account and due to their analytical intricacy, only studies based on selected properties are conceivable. In this study, four properties have been chosen, viz. erosion, biocide release, roughness and the physicochemical characteristics of the film surface. A principal-component analysis (PCA) of the experimental data has shown that, among the selected properties, only erosion affected antifouling efficiency. A more detailed investigation of erosion by quantifying global hydration and hydrolysis of immersed paints revealed the difficulty in linking the chemical structure of binders to the final erosion properties. Biocide release from paints, quantified by chromatographic methods coupled with UV detection, was inferior to the doses stated by the paint producers. These observations allowed the conceiving of formulations with reduced amounts of active molecules. The development of erodable, biodegradable binders associated with non toxic compounds is a promising way to obtain efficient antifouling paints compatible with existing, preventive systems.

  15. Engineered antifouling microtopographies: surface pattern effects on cell distribution.

    PubMed

    Decker, Joseph T; Sheats, Julian T; Brennan, Anthony B

    2014-12-23

    Microtopography has been observed to lead to altered attachment behavior for marine fouling organisms; however, quantification of this phenomenon is lacking in the scientific literature. Here, we present quantitative measurement of the disruption of normal attachment behavior of the fouling algae Ulva linza by antifouling microtopographies. The distribution of the diatom Navicula incerta was shown to be unaffected by the presence of topography. The radial distribution function was calculated for both individual zoospores and cells as well as aggregates of zoospores from attachment data for a variety topographic configurations and at a number of different attachment densities. Additionally, the screening distance and maximum values were mapped according to the location of zoospore aggregates within a single unit cell. We found that engineered topographies decreased the distance between spore aggregates compared to that for a smooth control surface; however, the distributions for individual spores were unchanged. We also found that the local attachment site geometry affected the screening distance for aggregates of zoospores, with certain geometries decreasing screening distance and others having no measurable effect. The distribution mapping techniques developed and explored in this article have yielded important insight into the design parameters for antifouling microtopographies that can be implemented in the next generation of antifouling surfaces.

  16. Antifouling potential of Nature-inspired sulfated compounds

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Joana R.; Correia-da-Silva, Marta; Sousa, Emília; Antunes, Jorge; Pinto, Madalena; Vasconcelos, Vitor; Cunha, Isabel

    2017-01-01

    Natural products with a sulfated scaffold have emerged as antifouling agents with low or nontoxic effects to the environment. In this study 13 sulfated polyphenols were synthesized and tested for antifouling potential using the anti-settlement activity of mussel (Mytilus galloprovincialis) plantigrade post-larvae and bacterial growth inhibition towards four biofilm-forming bacterial strains. Results show that some of these Nature-inspired compounds were bioactive, particularly rutin persulfate (2), 3,6-bis(β-D-glucopyranosyl) xanthone persulfate (6), and gallic acid persulfate (12) against the settlement of plantigrades. The chemical precursors of sulfated compounds 2 and 12 were also tested for anti-settlement activity and it was possible to conclude that bioactivity is associated with sulfation. While compound 12 showed the most promising anti-settlement activity (EC50 = 8.95 μg.mL−1), compound 2 also caused the higher level of growth inhibition in bacteria Vibrio harveyi (EC20 = 12.5 μg.mL−1). All the three bioactive compounds 2, 6, and 12 were also found to be nontoxic to the non target species Artemia salina (<10% mortality at 250 μM) and Vibrio fischeri (LC50 > 1000 μg.mL−1). This study put forward the relevance of synthesizing non-natural sulfated small molecules to generate new nontoxic antifouling agents. PMID:28205590

  17. New biocide-free anti-fouling paints are toxic.

    PubMed

    Karlsson, Jenny; Eklund, Britta

    2004-09-01

    A number of new anti-fouling paints claimed to be more friendly to the environment, have entered the market since prohibition of biocide containing paints have been enforced in many areas. Leakage waters from five new anti-fouling paints were tested for toxic effects to the macro algae Ceramium tenuicorne and Ceramium strictum and to the crustacean Nitocra spinipes. A banned copper and irgarol 1051 containing anti-fouling paint was used as reference. Five of the six paints tested were toxic to all or some of the organisms after two weeks of leakage with EC50 ranging from 0.08 to around 2% leakage water and LC50 ranging from 1.1% to 88%. The toxicity of leakage water from these paints was still high after 16 weeks. We conclude that these paints contain substances toxic to common organisms in the coastal Baltic ecosystem. A silicone based paint did not exhibit toxic effects to the two organisms. We recommend that biological tests should be used to identify the most harmful products before they are released on the market.

  18. Biological effects and environmental fate of antifouling substances. (Latest citations from the Life Sciences Collection data base). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-09-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the environmental effects and eventual fate of antifouling substances used to control biofouling. Topics include toxicity studies, the effects of regulations on pollution distribution, bioaccumulation and sediment accumulation, resistant organisms, and biodeterioration of antifouling substances. Antifouling materials considered include copper, nickel, and organotin compounds. Marine fouling, cooling system fouling, and antifouling paints are discussed in separate bibliographies. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  19. Conductive Polymer-Coated VS4 Submicrospheres As Advanced Electrode Materials in Lithium-Ion Batteries.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yanli; Li, Yanlu; Yang, Jing; Tian, Jian; Xu, Huayun; Yang, Jian; Fan, Weiliu

    2016-07-27

    VS4 as an electrode material in lithium-ion batteries holds intriguing features like high content of sulfur and one-dimensional structure, inspiring the exploration in this field. Herein, VS4 submicrospheres have been synthesized via a simple solvothermal reaction. However, they quickly degrade upon cycling as an anode material in lithium-ion batteries. So, three conductive polymers, polythiophene (PEDOT), polypyrrole (PPY), and polyaniline (PANI), are coated on the surface to improve the electron conductivity, suppress the diffusion of polysulfides, and modify the interface between electrode/electrolyte. PANI is the best in the polymers. It improves the Coulombic efficiency to 86% for the first cycle and keeps the specific capacity at 755 mAh g(-1) after 50 cycles, higher than the cases of naked VS4 (100 mAh g(-1)), VS4@PEDOT (318 mAh g(-1)), and VS4@PPY (448 mAh g(-1)). The good performances could be attributed to the improved charge-transfer kinetics and the strong interaction between PANI and VS4 supported by theoretical simulation. The discharge voltage ∼2.0 V makes them promising cathode materials.

  20. Effects of Doping on Thermal Conductivity of Pyrochlore Oxides for Advanced Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bansal, Narottam P.; Zhu, Dongming; Eslamloo-Grami, Maryam

    2006-01-01

    Pyrochlore oxides of general composition, A2B2O7, where A is a 3(+) cation (La to Lu) and B is a 4(+) cation (Zr, Hf, Ti, etc.) have high melting point, relatively high coefficient of thermal expansion, and low thermal conductivity which make them suitable for applications as high-temperature thermal barrier coatings. The effect of doping at the A site on the thermal conductivity of a pyrochlore oxide La2Zr2O7, has been investigated. Oxide powders of various compositions La2Zr2O7, La(1.7)Gd(0.3)Zr2O7, La(1.7)Yb(0.3)Zr2O7 and La(1.7)Gd(0.15)Yb(0.15)Zr2O7 were synthesized by the citric acid sol-gel method. These powders were hot pressed into discs and used for thermal conductivity measurements using a steady-state laser heat flux test technique. The rare earth oxide doped pyrochlores La(1.7)Gd(0.3)Zr2O7, La(1.7)Yb(0.3)Zr2O7 and La(1.7)Gd(0.15)Yb(0.15)Zr2O7 had lower thermal conductivity than the un-doped La2Zr2O7. The Gd2O3 and Yb2O3 co-doped composition showed the lowest thermal conductivity.

  1. Microstructure characterization of advanced protective Cr/CrN+a-C:H/a-C:H:Cr multilayer coatings on carbon fibre composite (CFC).

    PubMed

    Major, L; Janusz, M; Lackner, J M; Kot, M; Major, B

    2016-06-01

    Studies of advanced protective chromium-based coatings on the carbon fibre composite (CFC) were performed. Multidisciplinary examinations were carried out comprising: microstructure transmission electron microscopy (TEM, HREM) studies, micromechanical analysis and wear resistance. Coatings were prepared using a magnetron sputtering technique with application of high-purity chromium and carbon (graphite) targets deposited on the CFC substrate. Selection of the CFC for surface modification in respect to irregularities on the surface making the CFC surface more smooth was performed. Deposited coatings consisted of two parts. The inner part was responsible for the residual stress compensation and cracking initiation as well as resistance at elevated temperatures occurring namely during surgical tools sterilization process. The outer part was responsible for wear resistance properties and biocompatibility. Experimental studies revealed that irregularities on the substrate surface had a negative influence on the crystallites growth direction. Chromium implanted into the a-C:H structure reacted with carbon forming the cubic nanocrystal chromium carbides of the Cr23 C6 type. The cracking was initiated at the coating/substrate interface and the energy of brittle cracking was reduced because of the plastic deformation at each Cr interlayer interface. The wear mechanism and cracking process was described in micro- and nanoscale by means of transmission electron microscope studies. Examined materials of coated CFC type would find applications in advanced surgical tools. © 2016 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2016 Royal Microscopical Society.

  2. Advanced Materials for Aircraft Propulsion Systems. Phase I. Investigation of Corrosion Resistant Coatings for Service at 3000 F and above.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    diffusion barrier between the coating and metallic substrate. Preliminary studies were limited to development of coatings that would be applicable to the protection of Ni-base and Co-base superalloys. (Author)

  3. Material Science for High-Efficiency Photovoltaics: From Advanced Optical Coatings to Cell Design for High-Temperature Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perl, Emmett Edward

    Solar cells based on III-V compound semiconductors are ideally suited to convert solar energy into electricity. The highest efficiency single-junction solar cells are made of gallium arsenide, and have attained an efficiency of 28.8%. Multiple III-V materials can be combined to construct multijunction solar cells, which have reached record efficiencies greater than 45% under concentration. III-V solar cells are also well suited to operate efficiently at elevated temperatures, due in large part to their high material quality. These properties make III-V solar cells an excellent choice for use in concentrator systems. Concentrator photovoltaic systems have attained module efficiencies that exceed 40%, and have the potential to reach the lowest levelized cost of electricity in sunny places like the desert southwest. Hybrid photovoltaic-thermal solar energy systems can utilize high-temperature III-V solar cells to simultaneously achieve dispatchability and a high sunlight-to-electricity efficiency. This dissertation explores material science to advance the state of III-V multijunction solar cells for use in concentrator photovoltaic and hybrid photovoltaic-thermal solar energy systems. The first half of this dissertation describes work on advanced optical designs to improve the efficiency of multijunction solar cells. As multijunction solar cells move to configurations with four or more subcells, they utilize a larger portion of the solar spectrum. Broadband antireflection coatings are essential to realizing efficiency gains for these state-of-the-art cells. A hybrid design consisting of antireflective nanostructures placed on top of multilayer interference-based optical coatings is developed. Antireflection coatings that utilize this hybrid approach yield unparalleled performance, minimizing reflection losses to just 0.2% on sapphire and 0.6% on gallium nitride for 300-1800nm light. Dichroic mirrors are developed for bonded 5-junction solar cells that utilize InGaN as

  4. Hazard assessment of silicone oils (polydimethylsiloxanes, PDMS) used in antifouling-/foul-release-products in the marine environment.

    PubMed

    Nendza, Monika

    2007-08-01

    Non-eroding silicone-based coatings can effectively reduce fouling of ship hulls and are an alternative to biocidal and heavy metal-based antifoulings. The products, whose formulations and make up are closely guarded proprietary knowledge, consist of a silicone resin matrix and may contain unbound silicone oils (1-10%). If these oils leach out, they can have impacts on marine environments: PDMS are persistent, adsorb to suspended particulate matter and may settle into sediment. If oil films build up on sediments, infiltration may inhibit pore water exchange. PDMS do not bioaccumulate in marine organisms and soluble fractions have low toxicity to aquatic and benthic organisms. At higher exposures, undissolved silicone oil films or droplets can cause physical-mechanic effects with trapping and suffocation of organisms. These 'new' effects are not covered by current assessment schemes. PDMS make the case that very low water solubility and bioavailability do not necessarily preclude damage to marine environments.

  5. Hierarchical micro-lamella-structured 3D porous copper current collector coated with tin for advanced lithium-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Hyeji; Um, Ji Hyun; Choi, Hyelim; Yoon, Won-Sub; Sung, Yung-Eun; Choe, Heeman

    2017-03-01

    A Novel 3D porous Sn-Cu architecture is prepared as an anode material for use in an advanced lithium-ion battery. Micro-lamellar-structured 3D porous Cu foam, which is electroless-plated with Sn as an active material, is used as anode current collector. Compared to Sn-coated Cu foil, the 3D Sn-Cu foam exhibits superior Li-ion capacity and stable capacity retention, demonstrating the advantage of 3D porous architecture by preserving its structural integrity. In addition, the effect of heat-treatment after Sn plating is investigated. Sn/Sn6Cu5 and SnO2/Cu10Sn3 were formed on and in the 3D Sn-Cu foam under the heat-treatment at 150 °C and 500 °C, respectively. The development of Cu10Sn3 in the 3D Sn-Cu foam heat-treated at 500 °C can be a key factor for the enhanced cyclic stability because the Cu10Sn3 inactively reacts with Li-ion and alleviates the volume expansion of SnO2 as an inactive matrix.

  6. Incorporation of Nicotine into Silicone Coatings for Marine Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaramillo, Sandy Tuyet

    PDMS-based marine coatings presently used are limited by their inability to mitigate microfouling which limits their application to high speed vessels. PDMS coatings are favored when viable, due to their foul release properties of macrofouling organisms. Natural products have been investigated for antifouling properties for potential use in these marine antifouling coatings but few have incorporated natural products into coatings or coating systems. The purpose of the research was to establish the corrosion inhibiting properties of nicotine and to incorporate nicotine, a biodegradable and readily available natural product, into a PDMS coating to demonstrate the use of a natural product in a coating for marine applications. The corrosion inhibiting properties of nicotine was examined using potentiodynamic polarization scans, material characterization techniques such as scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction, quartz crystal microbalance and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Nicotine was determined to be an anodic corrosion inhibitor for mild steel immersed in simulated seawater with the ability to precipitate a protective calcium carbonate film. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy was used to evaluate the performance of the developed nicotine incorporated coatings on mild steel immersed in simulated seawater over 21 days of immersion. The coatings with 2 wt.% of nicotine incorporated in the coating with a ratio of 1:30 of additional platinum catalyst to nicotine exhibited the best performance for intact coatings. This coating had the most favorable balance of the amount of nicotine and platinum catalyst of all the coatings evaluated. Overall, all nicotine incorporated coatings had a performance improvement when compared to the control PDMS coating. Of the nicotine incorporated coatings that were tested with an artificial pin-hole defect, the 2PDMS coating also exhibited the best performance with significant

  7. Flowerlike CeO2 microspheres coated with Sr2Fe1.5Mo0.5Ox nanoparticles for an advanced fuel cell

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yanyan; Tang, Yongfu; Ma, Zhaohui; Singh, Manish; He, Yunjuan; Dong, Wenjing; Sun, Chunwen; Zhu, Bin

    2015-01-01

    Flowerlike CeO2 coated with Sr2Fe1.5Mo0.5Ox (Sr-Fe-Mo-oxide) nanoparticles exhibits enhanced conductivity at low temperatures (300–600 oC), e.g. 0.12 S cm−1 at 600 oC, this is comparable to pure ceria (0.1 S cm−1 at 800 oC). Advanced single layer fuel cell was constructed using the flowerlike CeO2/Sr-Fe-Mo-oxide layer attached to a Ni-foam layer coated with the conducting transition metal oxide. Such fuel cell has yielded a peak power density of 802 mWcm−2 at 550 oC. The mechanism of enhanced conductivity and cell performance were analyzed. These results provide a promising strategy for developing advanced low-temperature SOFCs. PMID:26154917

  8. Antifouling Activity of Synthetic Alkylpyridinium Polymers Using the Barnacle Model

    PubMed Central

    Piazza, Veronica; Dragić, Ivanka; Sepčić, Kristina; Faimali, Marco; Garaventa, Francesca; Turk, Tom; Berne, Sabina

    2014-01-01

    Polymeric alkylpyridinium salts (poly-APS) isolated from the Mediterranean marine sponge, Haliclona (Rhizoniera) sarai, effectively inhibit barnacle larva settlement and natural marine biofilm formation through a non-toxic and reversible mechanism. Potential use of poly-APS-like compounds as antifouling agents led to the chemical synthesis of monomeric and oligomeric 3-alkylpyridinium analogues. However, these are less efficient in settlement assays and have greater toxicity than the natural polymers. Recently, a new chemical synthesis method enabled the production of poly-APS analogues with antibacterial, antifungal and anti-acetylcholinesterase activities. The present study examines the antifouling properties and toxicity of six of these synthetic poly-APS using the barnacle (Amphibalanus amphitrite) as a model (cyprids and II stage nauplii larvae) in settlement, acute and sub-acute toxicity assays. Two compounds, APS8 and APS12-3, show antifouling effects very similar to natural poly-APS, with an anti-settlement effective concentration that inhibits 50% of the cyprid population settlement (EC50) after 24 h of 0.32 mg/L and 0.89 mg/L, respectively. The toxicity of APS8 is negligible, while APS12-3 is three-fold more toxic (24-h LC50: nauplii, 11.60 mg/L; cyprids, 61.13 mg/L) than natural poly-APS. This toxicity of APS12-3 towards nauplii is, however, 60-fold and 1200-fold lower than that of the common co-biocides, Zn- and Cu-pyrithione, respectively. Additionally, exposure to APS12-3 for 24 and 48 h inhibits the naupliar swimming ability with respective IC50 of 4.83 and 1.86 mg/L. PMID:24699112

  9. Antifouling activity of synthetic alkylpyridinium polymers using the barnacle model.

    PubMed

    Piazza, Veronica; Dragić, Ivanka; Sepčić, Kristina; Faimali, Marco; Garaventa, Francesca; Turk, Tom; Berne, Sabina

    2014-04-02

    Polymeric alkylpyridinium salts (poly-APS) isolated from the Mediterranean marine sponge, Haliclona (Rhizoniera) sarai, effectively inhibit barnacle larva settlement and natural marine biofilm formation through a non-toxic and reversible mechanism. Potential use of poly-APS-like compounds as antifouling agents led to the chemical synthesis of monomeric and oligomeric 3-alkylpyridinium analogues. However, these are less efficient in settlement assays and have greater toxicity than the natural polymers. Recently, a new chemical synthesis method enabled the production of poly-APS analogues with antibacterial, antifungal and anti-acetylcholinesterase activities. The present study examines the antifouling properties and toxicity of six of these synthetic poly-APS using the barnacle (Amphibalanus amphitrite) as a model (cyprids and II stage nauplii larvae) in settlement, acute and sub-acute toxicity assays. Two compounds, APS8 and APS12-3, show antifouling effects very similar to natural poly-APS, with an anti-settlement effective concentration that inhibits 50% of the cyprid population settlement (EC₅₀) after 24 h of 0.32 mg/L and 0.89 mg/L, respectively. The toxicity of APS8 is negligible, while APS12-3 is three-fold more toxic (24-h LC₅₀: nauplii, 11.60 mg/L; cyprids, 61.13 mg/L) than natural poly-APS. This toxicity of APS12-3 towards nauplii is, however, 60-fold and 1200-fold lower than that of the common co-biocides, Zn- and Cu-pyrithione, respectively. Additionally, exposure to APS12-3 for 24 and 48 h inhibits the naupliar swimming ability with respective IC₅₀ of 4.83 and 1.86 mg/L.

  10. Various mortars for anti-fouling purposes in marine environments

    SciTech Connect

    Kanematsu, Hideyuki; Masuda, Tomoka; Miura, Yoko; Kuroda, Daisuke; Hirai, Nobumitsu; Yokoyama, Seiji

    2014-02-20

    The antifouling properties for some mortars with steel making slags were investigated by real marine immersion tests and a unique laboratory acceleration tests with a specially devised biofilm acceleration reactors. Mortars mixed with steel making slags containing abundant iron elements tended to form biofilm and also bifouling. The two kinds of biofilm formation tests were used in this study. Real immersion in marine environments and laboratory test with a specially devised biofilm acceleration reactor. The former evaluated the biofouling characteristics more properly, while the latter did the biofilm formation characteristics more effectively.

  11. Various mortars for anti-fouling purposes in marine environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanematsu, Hideyuki; Masuda, Tomoka; Miura, Yoko; Hirai, Nobumitsu; Kuroda, Daisuke; Yokoyama, Seiji

    2014-02-01

    The antifouling properties for some mortars with steel making slags were investigated by real marine immersion tests and a unique laboratory acceleration tests with a specially devised biofilm acceleration reactors. Mortars mixed with steel making slags containing abundant iron elements tended to form biofilm and also bifouling. The two kinds of biofilm formation tests were used in this study. Real immersion in marine environments and laboratory test with a specially devised biofilm acceleration reactor. The former evaluated the biofouling characteristics more properly, while the latter did the biofilm formation characteristics more effectively.

  12. A new simple method with high precision for determining the toxicity of antifouling paints on brine shrimp larvae (Artemia): first results.

    PubMed

    Castritsi-Catharios, J; Bourdaniotis, N; Persoone, G

    2007-04-01

    The use of antifouling paints is the only truly effective method for the protection of underwater structures from the development of fouling organisms. In the present study, the surface to volume concept constitutes the basis for the development of a new and improved method for determining the toxicity of antifouling paints on marine organisms. Particular emphasis is placed on the attainment of a standardized uniformity of coated surfaces. Failure to control the thickness of the coat of paint in previous studies of this type, has led to inaccurate evaluation of the relative toxicity of samples. Herein, an attempt is made to solve this problem using a simple technique which gives completely uniform and smooth surfaces. The effectiveness of this technique is assessed through two series of experiments using two different types of test containers: 50 ml modified syringes and 7 ml multiwells. The results of the toxicity experiments follow a normal distribution around the average value which allows to consider these values as reliable for comparison of the level of toxic effect detected with the two types of test containers. The mean lethal concentration L(S/V)(50) in the test series conducted in the multiwells (20.38 mm(2)ml(-1)) does not differ significantly from that obtained in the test series using modified syringes (20.065 mm(2)ml(-1)). It can thus be concluded from this preliminary study that the new method and the two different ways of exposing the test organisms to the antifouling paints and their leachates gave reliable and replicable results.

  13. Advanced thermal barrier system bond coatings for use on Ni, Co-, and Fe-base alloy substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecura, S.

    1985-01-01

    New and improved Ni-, Co-, and Fe-base bond coatings have been identified for the ZrO2-Y2O3 thermal barrier coatings to be used on NI-, Co-, and Fe-base alloy substrates. These bond coatings were evaluated in a cyclic furnace between 1120 and 1175 C. It was found that MCrAlYb (where M = Ni, Co, or Fe) bond coating thermal barrier systems. The longest life was obtained with the FeCrAlYb thermal barrier system followed by NiCrAlYb and CoCrAlYb thermal barrier systems in that order.

  14. Antifouling potentials of eight deep-sea-derived fungi from the South China Sea.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao-Yong; Xu, Xin-Ya; Peng, Jiang; Ma, Chun-Feng; Nong, Xu-Hua; Bao, Jie; Zhang, Guang-Zhao; Qi, Shu-Hua

    2014-04-01

    Marine-derived microbial secondary metabolites are promising potential sources of nontoxic antifouling agents. The search for environmentally friendly and low-toxic antifouling components guided us to investigate the antifouling potentials of eight novel fungal isolates from deep-sea sediments of the South China Sea. Sixteen crude ethyl acetate extracts of the eight fungal isolates showed distinct antibacterial activity against three marine bacteria (Loktanella hongkongensis UST950701-009, Micrococcus luteus UST950701-006 and Pseudoalteromonas piscida UST010620-005), or significant antilarval activity against larval settlement of bryozoan Bugula neritina. Furthermore, the extract of Aspergillus westerdijkiae DFFSCS013 displayed strong antifouling activity in a field trial lasting 4 months. By further bioassay-guided isolation, five antifouling alkaloids including brevianamide F, circumdatin F and L, notoamide C, and 5-chlorosclerotiamide were isolated from the extract of A. westerdijkiae DFFSCS013. This is the first report about the antifouling potentials of metabolites of the deep-sea-derived fungi from the South China Sea, and the first stage towards the development of non- or low-toxic antifouling agents from deep-sea-derived fungi.

  15. Multifunctional copolymer coating of polyethylene glycol, glycidyl methacrylate, and REDV to enhance the selectivity of endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Wei, Yu; Zhang, Jingxun; Li, Haolie; Zhang, Li; Bi, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Multifunctional polymer coatings have potential applications in biomaterials. These coatings possess reactive functional groups for the immobilization of specific biological factors that can influence cellular behavior. These coatings also display low nonspecific protein adsorption. In this study, we prepared a multifunctional polymer coating through the deposition of random copolymers of poly(ethylene glycol) methacrylate (PEGMA) and glycidyl methacrylate (GMA) to prevent nonspecific attachment and enable the covalence of Arg-Glu-Asp-Val (REDV) peptide with endothelial cells (ECs) selectivity. Coatings were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The adhesion and proliferation of ECs and smooth muscle cells (SMCs) onto the REDV-modified surface were investigated to understand the synergistic action of antifouling PEG and EC selective REDV peptide conjugated GMA. The copolymers containing GMA and PEG groups are very useful as a multifunctional coating material with anti-fouling and ECs specific adhesion for implant materials surface modification.

  16. Developing antifouling biointerfaces based on bioinspired zwitterionic dopamine through pH-modulated assembly.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chun-Jen; Wang, Lin-Chuan; Shyue, Jing-Jong; Chang, Ying-Chih

    2014-10-28

    The use of synthetic biomaterials as implantable devices typically is accompanied by considerable nonspecific adsorption of proteins, cells, and bacteria. These may eventually induce adverse pathogenic problems in clinical practice, such as thrombosis and biomaterial-associated infection. Thus, an effective surface coating for medical devices has been pursued to repel nonspecific adsorption from surfaces. In this study, we employ an adhesive dopamine molecule conjugated with zwitterionic sulfobetaine moiety (SB-DA), developed based on natural mussels, as a surface ligand for the modification of TiO2. The electrochemical study shows that the SB-DA exhibits fully reversible reduction-oxidation behavior at pH 3, but it is irreversible at pH 8. A contact angle goniometer and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy were utilized to explore the surface hydration, chemical states, and bonding mechanism of SB-DA. The results indicate that the binding between hydroxyl groups of SB-DA and TiO2 converts from hydrogen bonds to bidentate binding upon the pH transition from pH 3 to 8. In order to examine the antifouling properties of SB-DA thin films, the modified substrates were brought into contact with bovine serum albumin and bacteria solutions. The fouling levels were monitored using a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation sensor and fluorescence optical microscope. Tests showed that the sample prepared via the pH transition approach provides the best resistance to nonspecific adsorption due to the high coverage and stability of the SB-DA films. These findings support the mechanism of the pH-modulated assembly of SB-DA molecules, and for the first time we demonstrate the antifouling properties of the SB-DA to be comparable with traditional thiol-based zwitterionic self-assemblies. The success of modification with SB-DA opens an avenue for developing a biologically inspired surface chemistry and can have applications over a wide spectrum of bioapplications. The strategy of

  17. Tuning the underwater oleophobicity of graphene oxide coatings via UV irradiation.

    PubMed

    Li, Hang; Huang, Yi; Mao, Yating; Xu, Weiwei L; Ploehn, Harry J; Yu, Miao

    2014-09-07

    Ultraviolet (UV) irradiation was utilized to gradually modify the chemistry and structure of graphene oxide (GO) flakes, as confirmed by XPS and AFM. Ultrathin GO coatings/membranes, made of UV-irradiated flakes, showed tunable underwater oleophobicity. UV-treated, superoleophobic GO membranes exhibited excellent antifouling capability for oil/water separation.

  18. Investigation of PACVD protective coating processes using advanced diagnostics techniques. Performance report, 1 September 1992--30 April 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Roman, W.C.

    1993-05-07

    Objective is to understand the mechanisms governing nonequilibrium plasma atomistic or molecular deposition of hard face coatings. Laser diagnostic methods include coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) and laser-induced fluorescence. TiB{sub 2} and diamonds were used as the hard face coating materials. Diborane was used as precursor to TiB{sub 2}.

  19. Advanced turbine systems - research and development of thermal barrier coatings technology: 3rd bimonthly report, April 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1996-04-01

    Objective of the ATS program is the development of ultra-highly efficient, environmentally superior, and cost-competitive gas turbine systems, using thermal barrier coatings. These coatings should be stable in the thermal and corrosive environments of the industrial engine for up to 2500 hours. Phase II (development) is current.

  20. RESULTS OF TESTS TO DEMONSTRATE A SIX-INCH-DIAMETER COATER FOR PRODUCTION OF TRISO-COATED PARTICLES FOR ADVANCED GAS REACTOR EXPERIMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Charles M Barnes

    2008-09-01

    The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP)/Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program includes a series of irradiation experiments in Idaho National Laboratory’s (INL’s) Advanced Test Reactor. TRISOcoated particles for the first AGR experiment, AGR-1, were produced at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in a two inch diameter coater. A requirement of the NGNP/AGR Program is to produce coated particles for later experiments in coaters more representative of industrial scale. Toward this end, tests have been performed by Babcock and Wilcox (B&W) in a six-inch diameter coater. These tests are expected to lead to successful fabrication of particles for the second AGR experiment, AGR-2. While a thorough study of how coating parameters affect particle properties was not the goal of these tests, the test data obtained provides insight into process parameter/coated particle property relationships. Most relationships for the six-inch diameter coater followed trends found with the ORNL two-inch coater, in spite of differences in coater design and bed hydrodynamics. For example the key coating parameters affecting pyrocarbon anisotropy were coater temperature, coating gas fraction, total gas flow rate and kernel charge size. Anisotropy of the outer pyrolytic carbon (OPyC) layer also strongly correlates with coater differential pressure. In an effort to reduce the total particle fabrication run time, silicon carbide (SiC) was deposited with methyltrichlorosilane (MTS) concentrations up to 3 mol %. Using only hydrogen as the fluidizing gas, the high concentration MTS tests resulted in particles with lower than desired SiC densities. However when hydrogen was partially replaced with argon, high SiC densities were achieved with the high MTS gas fraction.

  1. RESULTS OF TESTS TO DEMONSTRATE A SIX-INCH DIAMETER COATER FOR PRODUCTION OF TRISO-COATED PARTICLES FOR ADVANCED GAS REACTOR EXPERIMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Douglas W. Marshall

    2008-09-01

    The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP)/Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program includes a series of irradiation experiments in Idaho National Laboratory's (INL's) Advanced Test Reactor. TRISOcoated particles for the first AGR experiment, AGR-1, were produced at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in a twoinch diameter coater. A requirement of the NGNP/AGR Program is to produce coated particles for later experiments in coaters more representative of industrial scale. Toward this end, tests have been performed by Babcock and Wilcox (B&W) in a six-inch diameter coater. These tests are expected to lead to successful fabrication of particles for the second AGR experiment, AGR-2. While a thorough study of how coating parameters affect particle properties was not the goal of these tests, the test data obtained provides insight into process parameter/coated particle property relationships. Most relationships for the six-inch diameter coater followed trends found with the ORNL two-inch coater, in spite of differences in coater design and bed hydrodynamics. For example the key coating parameters affecting pyrocarbon anisotropy were coater temperature, coating gas fraction, total gas flow rate and kernel charge size. Anisotropy of the outer pyrolytic carbon (OPyC) layer also strongly correlates with coater differential pressure. In an effort to reduce the total particle fabrication run time, silicon carbide (SiC) was deposited with methyltrichlorosilane (MTS) concentrations up to 3 mol %. Using only hydrogen as the fluidizing gas, the high concentration MTS tests resulted in particles with lower than desired SiC densities. However when hydrogen was partially replaced with argon, high SiC densities were achieved with the high MTS gas fraction.

  2. Surface Grafted Polysarcosine as a Peptoid Antifouling Polymer Brush

    PubMed Central

    Lau, King Hang Aaron; Ren, Chunlai; Sileika, Tadas S.; Park, Sung Hyun; Szleifer, Igal; Messersmith, Phillip B.

    2012-01-01

    Poly(N-substituted glycine) “peptoids” are a class of peptidomimetic molecules receiving significant interest as engineered biomolecules. Sarcosine (i.e. poly(N-methyl glycine)) has the simplest sidechain chemical structure of this family. In this contribution, we demonstrate that surface-grafted polysarcosine (PSAR) brushes exhibit excellent resistance to non-specific protein adsorption and cell attachment. Polysarcosine was coupled to a mussel adhesive protein inspired DOPA-Lys pentapeptide, which enabled solution grafting and control of the surface chain density of the PSAR brushes. Protein adsorption was found to decrease monotonically with increasing grafted chain densities, and protein adsorption could be completely inhibited above certain critical chain densities specific to different polysarcosine chain-lengths. The dependence of protein adsorption on chain length and density was also investigated by a molecular theory. PSAR brushes at high chain length and density were shown to resist fibroblast cell attachment over a 7 wk period, as well as resist the attachment of some clinically relevant bacteria strains. The excellent antifouling performance of PSAR may be related to the highly hydrophilic character of polysarcosine, which was evident from high-pressure liquid chromatography measurements of polysarcosine and water contact angle measurements of the PSAR brushes. Peptoids have been shown to resist proteolytic degradation and polysarcosine could be produced in large quantities by N-carboxy anhydride polymerization. In summary, surface grafted polysarcosine peptoid brushes hold great promise for antifouling applications. PMID:23101930

  3. Exploitation of marine algae: biogenic compounds for potential antifouling applications.

    PubMed

    Bhadury, Punyasloke; Wright, Phillip C

    2004-08-01

    Marine algae are one of the largest producers of biomass in the marine environment. They produce a wide variety of chemically active metabolites in their surroundings, potentially as an aid to protect themselves against other settling organisms. These active metabolites, also known as biogenic compounds, produced by several species of marine macro- and micro-algae, have antibacterial, antialgal, antimacrofouling and antifungal properties, which are effective in the prevention of biofouling, and have other likely uses, e.g. in therapeutics. The isolated substances with potent antifouling activity belong to groups of fatty acids, lipopeptides, amides, alkaloids, terpenoids, lactones, pyrroles and steroids. These biogenic compounds have the potential to be produced commercially using metabolic engineering techniques. Therefore, isolation of biogenic compounds and determination of their structure could provide leads for future development of, for example, environmentally friendly antifouling paints. This paper mainly discusses the successes of such research, and the future applications in the context of understanding the systems biology of micro-algae and cyanobacteria.

  4. Bio-inspired strategies for designing antifouling biomaterials.

    PubMed

    Damodaran, Vinod B; Murthy, N Sanjeeva

    2016-01-01

    Contamination of biomedical devices in a biological medium, biofouling, is a major cause of infection and is entirely avoidable. This mini-review will coherently present the broad range of antifouling strategies, germicidal, preventive and cleaning using one or more of biological, chemical and physical techniques. These techniques will be discussed from the point of view of their ability to inhibit protein adsorption, usually the first step that eventually leads to fouling. Many of these approaches draw their inspiration from nature, such as emulating the nitric oxide production in endothelium, use of peptoids that mimic protein repellant peptides, zwitterionic functionalities found in membrane structures, and catechol functionalities used by mussel to immobilize poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG). More intriguing are the physical modifications, creation of micropatterns on the surface to control the hydration layer, making them either superhydrophobic or superhydrophilic. This has led to technologies that emulate the texture of shark skin, and the superhyprophobicity of self-cleaning textures found in lotus leaves. The mechanism of antifouling in each of these methods is described, and implementation of these ideas is illustrated with examples in a way that could be adapted to prevent infection in medical devices.

  5. Efficacy of different antifouling treatments for seawater cooling systems.

    PubMed

    López-Galindo, Cristina; Casanueva, José F; Nebot, Enrique

    2010-11-01

    In an industrial seawater cooling system, the effects of three different antifouling treatments, viz. sodium hypochlorite (NaClO), aliphatic amines (Mexel®432) and UV radiation, on the characteristics of the fouling formed were evaluated. For this study a portable pilot plant, as a side-stream monitoring system and seawater cooling system, was employed. The pilot plant simulated a power plant steam condenser, having four titanium tubes under different treatment patterns, where fouling progression could be monitored. The nature of the fouling obtained was chiefly inorganic, showing a clear dependence on the antifouling treatment employed. After 72 days the tubes under treatment showed a reduction in the heat transfer resistance (R) of around 70% for NaClO, 48% for aliphatic amines and 55% for UV, with respect to the untreated tube. The use of a logistic model was very useful for predicting the fouling progression and the maximum asymptotic value of the increment in the heat transfer resistance (ΔR(max)). The apparent thermal conductivity (λ) of the fouling layer showed a direct relationship with the percentage of organic matter in the collected fouling. The characteristics and mode of action of the different treatments used led to fouling with diverse physicochemical properties.

  6. Searching for “Environmentally-Benign” Antifouling Biocides

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Yan Ting; Teo, Serena L. M.; Leong, Wai; Chai, Christina L. L.

    2014-01-01

    As the result of the ecological impacts from the use of tributyltins (TBT) in shipping, environmental legislation for the registration of chemicals for use in the environment has grown to a monumental challenge requiring product dossiers to include information on the environmental fate and behavior of any chemicals. Specifically, persistence, bioaccumulation and toxicity, collectively known as PBT, are properties of concern in the assessment of chemicals. However, existing measurements of PBT properties are a cumbersome and expensive process, and thus not applied in the early stages of the product discovery and development. Inexpensive methods for preliminary PBT screening would minimize risks arising with the subsequent registration of products. In this article, we evaluated the PBT properties of compounds reported to possess anti-fouling properties using QSAR (quantitative structure-activity relationship) prediction programs such as BIOWIN™ (a biodegradation probability program), KOWWIN™ (log octanol-water partition coefficient calculation program) and ECOSAR™ (Ecological Structure Activity Relationship Programme). The analyses identified some small (Mr < 400) synthetic and natural products as potential candidates for environmentally benign biocides. We aim to demonstrate that while these methods of estimation have limitations, when applied with discretion, they are powerful tools useful in the early stages of research for compound selection for further development as anti-foulants. PMID:24865489

  7. Mini-Review: Antifouling Natural Products from Marine Microorganisms and Their Synthetic Analogs

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Ze-Hong; Wang, Yu; Wang, Chang-Yun; Xu, Ying

    2017-01-01

    Biofouling causes huge economic loss and generates serious ecological issues worldwide. Marine coatings incorporated with antifouling (AF) compounds are the most common practices to prevent biofouling. With a ban of organotins and an increase in the restrictions regarding the use of other AF alternatives, exploring effective and environmentally friendly AF compounds has become an urgent demand for marine coating industries. Marine microorganisms, which have the largest biodiversity, represent a rich and important source of bioactive compounds and have many medical and industrial applications. This review summarizes 89 natural products from marine microorganisms and 13 of their synthetic analogs with AF EC50 values ≤ 25 μg/mL from 1995 (the first report about marine microorganism-derived AF compounds) to April 2017. Some compounds with the EC50 values < 5 μg/mL and LC50/EC50 ratios > 50 are highlighted as potential AF compounds, and the preliminary analysis of structure-relationship (SAR) of these compounds is also discussed briefly. In the last part, current challenges and future research perspectives are proposed based on opinions from many previous reviews. To provide clear guidance for the readers, the AF compounds from microorganisms and their synthetic analogs in this review are categorized into ten types, including fatty acids, lactones, terpenes, steroids, benzenoids, phenyl ethers, polyketides, alkaloids, nucleosides and peptides. In addition to the major AF compounds which targets macro-foulers, this review also includes compounds with antibiofilm activity since micro-foulers also contribute significantly to the biofouling communities. PMID:28846626

  8. ABC triblock surface active block copolymer with grafted ethoxylated fluoroalkyl amphiphilic side chains for marine antifouling/fouling-release applications.

    PubMed

    Weinman, Craig J; Finlay, John A; Park, Daewon; Paik, Marvin Y; Krishnan, Sitaraman; Sundaram, Harihara S; Dimitriou, Michael; Sohn, Karen E; Callow, Maureen E; Callow, James A; Handlin, Dale L; Willis, Carl L; Kramer, Edward J; Ober, Christopher K

    2009-10-20

    An amphiphilic triblock surface-active block copolymer (SABC) possessing ethoxylated fluoroalkyl side chains was synthesized through the chemical modification of a polystyrene-block-poly(ethylene-ran-butylene)-block-polyisoprene polymer precursor. Bilayer coatings on glass slides consisting of a thin layer of the amphiphilic SABC spray coated on a thick layer of a polystyrene-block-poly(ethylene-ran-butylene)-block-polystyrene (SEBS) thermoplastic elastomer were prepared for biofouling assays with the green alga Ulva and the diatom Navicula. Dynamic water contact angle analysis and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were used to characterize the surfaces. Additionally, the effect of the Young's modulus of the coating on the release properties of sporelings (young plants) of the green alga Ulva was examined through the use of two different SEBS thermoplastic elastomers possessing modulus values of an order of magnitude in difference. The amphiphilic SABC was found to reduce the settlement density of zoospores of Ulva as well as the strength of attachment of sporelings. The attachment strength of the sporelings was further reduced for the amphiphilic SABC on the "low"-modulus SEBS base layer. The weaker adhesion of diatoms, relative to a PDMS standard, further highlights the antifouling potential of this amphiphilic triblock hybrid copolymer.

  9. Advanced thermal barrier system bond coatings for use on nickel-, cobalt- and iron-base alloy substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecura, S.

    1986-01-01

    New and improved Ni-, Co-, and Fe-base bond coatings have been identified for the ZrO2-Y2O3 thermal barrier coatings to be used on Ni-, Co-, and Fe-base alloy substrates. These bond coatings were evaluated in a cyclic furnace between 1120 and 1175 C. It was found that MCrAlYb (where M = Ni, Co, or Fe) bond coating thermal barrier systems have significantly longer lives than MCrAlY bond coating thermal barrier systems. The longest life was obtained with the FeCrAlYb thermal barrier system followed by NiCrAlYb and CoCrAlYb thermal barrier systems in that order.

  10. Advanced thermal barrier system bond coatings for use on nickel-, cobalt- and iron-base alloy substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecura, S.

    1986-01-01

    New and improved Ni-, Co-, and Fe-base bond coatings have been identified for the ZrO2-Y2O3 thermal barrier coatings to be used on Ni-, Co-, and Fe-base alloy substrates. These bond coatings were evaluated in a cyclic furnace between 1120 and 1175 C. It was found that MCrAlYb (where M = Ni, Co, or Fe) bond coating thermal barrier systems have significantly longer lives than MCrAlY bond coating thermal barrier systems. The longest life was obtained with the FeCrAlYb thermal barrier system followed by NiCrAlYb and CoCrAlYb thermal barrier systems in that order.

  11. Corrosion resistant coatings. (Latest citations from the EI compendex*plus database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    1995-01-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the anticorrosive behavior of protective coatings based on such materials as ceramics, metals, and polymers. Topics include high and low temperature corrosion, surface structure, mechanical and chemical properties, applications, and performance evaluations. Paints and powder coatings, and methods of application are also considered. Protective coatings for specific applications such as gas turbines, coal gasification, power plants, papermaking, carbon steels, reinforced concrete, pipelines, antifouling coatings, and conversion coatings are examined in separate bibliographies. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  12. A Study of Advanced Materials for Gas Turbine Coatings at Elevated Temperatures Using Selected Microstructures and Characteristic Environments for Syngas Combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Ravinder Diwan; Patrick Mensah; Guoqiang Li; Nalini Uppu; Strphen Akwaboa; Monica Silva; Ebubekir Beyazoglu; Ogad Agu; Naresh Polasa; Lawrence Bazille; Douglas Wolfe; Purush Sahoo

    2011-02-10

    Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) that can be suitable for use in industrial gas turbine engines have been processed and compared with electron beam physical vapor deposition (EBPVD) microstructures for applications in advanced gas turbines that use coal-derived synthesis gas. Thermo-physical properties have been evaluated of the processed air plasma sprayed TBCs with standard APS-STD and vertically cracked APS-VC coatings samples up to 1300 C. Porosity of these selected coatings with related microstructural effects have been analyzed in this study. Wet and dry thermal cycling studies at 1125 C and spalling resistance thermal cycling studies to 1200 C have also been carried out. Type I and Type II hot corrosion tests were carried out to investigate the effects of microstructure variations and additions of alumina in YSZ top coats in multi-layered TBC structures. The thermal modeling of turbine blade has also been carried out that gives the capability to predict in-service performance temperature gradients. In addition to isothermal high temperature oxidation kinetics analysis in YSZ thermal barrier coatings of NiCoCrAlY bond coats with 0.25% Hf. This can affect the failure behavior depending on the control of the thermally grown oxide (TGO) growth at the interface. The TGO growth kinetics is seen to be parabolic and the activation energies correspond to interfacial growth kinetics that is controlled by the diffusion of O{sub 2} in Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The difference between oxidation behavior of the VC and STD structures are attributed to the effects of microstructure morphology and porosity on oxygen ingression into the zirconia and TGO layers. The isothermal oxidation resistance of the STD and VC microstructures is similar at temperatures up to 1200 C. However, the generally thicker TGO layer thicknesses and the slightly faster oxidation rates in the VC microstructures are attributed to the increased ingression of oxygen through the grain boundaries of the vertically

  13. Phenotypic Heterogeneity in Attachment of Marine Bacteria toward Antifouling Copolymers Unraveled by AFM

    PubMed Central

    El-Kirat-Chatel, Sofiane; Puymege, Aurore; Duong, The H.; Van Overtvelt, Perrine; Bressy, Christine; Belec, Lénaïk; Dufrêne, Yves F.; Molmeret, Maëlle

    2017-01-01

    Up to recent years, bacterial adhesion has mostly been evaluated at the population level. Single cell level has improved in the past few years allowing a better comprehension of the implication of individual behaviors as compared to the one of a whole community. A new approach using atomic force microscopy (AFM) to measure adhesion forces between a live bacterium attached via a silica microbead to the AFM tipless cantilever and the surface has been recently developed. The objectives of this study is to examine the bacterial adhesion to a surface dedicated to ship hulls at the population and the cellular level to understand to what extent these two levels could be correlated. Adhesion of marine bacteria on inert surfaces are poorly studied in particular when substrata are dedicated to ship hulls. Studying these interactions in this context are worthwhile as they may involve different adhesion behaviors, taking place in salty conditions, using different surfaces than the ones usually utilized in the literacy. FRC (fouling release coatings)–SPC (self-polishing coatings) hybrids antifouling coatings have been used as substrata and are of particular interest for designing environmentally friendly surfaces, combining progressive surface erosion and low adhesion properties. In this study, a hybrid coating has been synthetized and used to study the adhesion of three marine bacteria, displaying different surface characteristics, using microplate assays associated with confocal scanning laser microscopy (CSLM) and AFM. This study shows that the bacterial strain that appeared to have the weakest adhesion and biofilm formation abilities when evaluated at the population level using microplates assays and CSLM, displayed stronger adhesion forces on the same surfaces at the single cell level using AFM. In addition, one of the strains tested which presented a strong ability to adhere and to form biofilm at the population level, displayed a heterogeneous phenotypic behavior at

  14. Conceptual issues in designing a policy to phase out metal-based antifouling paints on recreational boats in San Diego Bay.

    PubMed

    Carson, Richard T; Damon, Maria; Johnson, Leigh T; Gonzalez, Jamie A

    2009-06-01

    In marine areas throughout the world where recreational boats are densely located, concentrations of copper in the water are being found to be in excess of government standards, due to the hull coatings used on these boats. Copper-based hull coatings are intended to be antifouling in that they retard the growth of algae, barnacles and tubeworms; but alternatives exist that can eliminate the harm that copper contamination does to marine organisms. A variety of policy options are available to mandate or provide economic incentives to switch to these less harmful alternatives. This paper puts forth a conceptual framework for thinking about how to design and evaluate alternative policies to transition to nontoxic boat hulls, drawing from the authors' experience designing a policy for use in San Diego Bay. Many of the issues raised are broadly applicable to environmental problems where the solution involves a large-scale replacement of durable consumer goods.

  15. Development of the initial diatom microfouling layer on antifouling and fouling-release surfaces in temperate and tropical Australia.

    PubMed

    Molino, Paul J; Campbell, Ewan; Wetherbee, Richard

    2009-11-01

    Diatoms are a major component of the slime layers that form on artificial surfaces in marine environments. In this article, the role played by diatoms during the pioneering stages of colonization of three marine antifouling (AF) coatings, viz Intersmooth 360, Super Yacht 800 and a fouling-release (FR) coating Intersleek 700, was investigated. The study was conducted over three distinct seasons in two very different marine environments in Australia, ie temperate Williamstown, Victoria and tropical Cairns, Queensland. Diatom fouling occurred more rapidly on the FR coating Intersleek 700, compared to both biocidal AF paints. However, colonization by diatoms on all three coatings was generally slow during the 16-day study. Benthic diatoms do not subsist by floating around in the water column, rather they only gain the opportunity to colonize new surfaces when they either voluntarily release or are displaced from their benthic habitat, thereafter entering the water column where the opportunity to adhere to a new surface presents itself. However, once settled, fouling diatoms grow exponentially from the site of attachment, spreading out until they populate large areas of the surface. This mode of surface colonization correlates more with an 'infection' type, epidemiology model, a mechanism that accounts for the colonization of significant regions of the coating surface from a single fouling diatom cell, forming 'clonal patches'. This is in comparison to the bacterial colonization of the surface, which exhibits far more rapid recruitment and growth of cells on the substratum surface. Therefore, it is hypothesized that fouling diatoms may be characterized more by their ability to adhere and grow on surfaces already modified by bacterial biofilms, rather than on their strength of adhesion. Cell morphology and the ability to avoid shear may also be an important factor.

  16. Determination of the concentrations of alternative antifouling agents on the Korean coast.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seongeon; Lee, Yong-Woo

    2016-12-15

    Since the ban on tributyltin (TBT) in 2008, dozens of alternative antifouling agents have been used instead. Unfortunately, these alternative antifouling agents contain diverse toxic components, which have contaminated the coasts. From 2006 to 2013, the concentration of chlorothalonil, dichlofluanid, and Irgarol 1051 were monitored continuously, and their mean concentrations increased due to the increase in maritime cargo and consequent increase in the incoming and outgoing ships in harbors. An analysis of the sampling points according to harbor type showed that the contamination was more severe in fishing and big harbors, where there are more incoming and outgoing ships. A correlation analysis indicated a high correlation between chlorothalonil and dichlofluanid. Unlike Irgarol 1051, which is only used as an antifouling agent, the other two substances are used as agricultural chemicals as well, which could explain the high correlation. This study suggests that these alternative antifouling agents should be tracked continuously. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Efficacy and toxicity of self-polishing biocide-free antifouling paints.

    PubMed

    Löschau, Margit; Krätke, Renate

    2005-11-01

    The ban on harmful substances in antifouling paints requires the development of new antifouling strategies. Alternatives should be as effective as conventional paints but of lower toxicity. In the present study two commercially available, self-polishing antifouling paints were examined in order to get information on their antifouling properties and toxicological potential. Efficacy was shown in settlement assays with the marine barnacle species Balanus amphitrite, however, efficacy was related to toxic effects observed on target and non-target organisms. Toxicity of the paint extracts was concentration-dependent and differed according to the paint and the species investigated. Toxicity could at least partially be attributed to zinc leached from the paints. Effects of a water-soluble paint were more pronounced in larvae of B. amphitrite, Artemia salina and in the green algae Dunaliella tertiolecta. Embryos of the freshwater species Danio rerio and Vibrio fisheri were more affected by a paint based on organic solvents.

  18. Phylogenetic relationship and antifouling activity of bacterial epiphytes from the marine alga Ulva lactuca.

    PubMed

    Egan, S; Thomas, T; Holmström, C; Kjelleberg, S

    2000-06-01

    It is widely accepted that bacterial epiphytes can inhibit the colonization of surfaces by common fouling organisms. However, little information is available regarding the diversity and properties of these antifouling bacteria. This study assessed the antifouling traits of five epiphytes of the common green alga, Ulva lactuca. All isolates were capable of preventing the settlement of invertebrate larvae and germination of algal spores. Three of the isolates also inhibited the growth of a variety of bacteria and fungi. Their phylogenetic positions were determined by 16S ribosomal subunit DNA sequencing. All isolates showed a close affiliation with the genus Pseudoalteromonas and, in particular, with the species P. tunicata. Strains of this bacterial species also display a variety of antifouling activities, suggesting that antifouling ability may be an important trait for members of this genus to be highly successful colonizers of animate surfaces and for such species to protect their host against fouling.

  19. An anti-fouling aptasensor for detection of thrombin by dual polarization interferometry.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yu; Hu, Tao; Chen, Chuanxia; Yang, Fan; Yang, Xiurong

    2015-04-04

    An anti-fouling surface was designed to effectively resist nonspecific protein adsorption using dual polarization interferometry, based on which the aptasensor for detection of thrombin was fabricated according to the specific interaction between thrombin and its 15-mer aptamer.

  20. Anti-fouling properties of microstructured surfaces bio-inspired by rice leaves and butterfly wings.

    PubMed

    Bixler, Gregory D; Theiss, Andrew; Bhushan, Bharat; Lee, Stephen C

    2014-04-01

    Material scientists often look to biology for new engineering solutions to materials science problems. For example, unique surface characteristics of rice leaves and butterfly wings combine the shark skin (antifouling) and lotus leaf (self-cleaning) effects, producing the so-called rice and butterfly wing effect. In this paper, we study antifouling properties of four microstructured surfaces inspired by rice leaves and fabricated with photolithography and hot embossing techniques. Anti-biofouling effectiveness is determined with bioassays using Escherichia coli whilst inorganic fouling with simulated dirt particles. Antifouling data are presented to understand the role of surface geometrical features resistance to fouling. Conceptual modeling provides design guidance when developing novel antifouling surfaces for applications in the medical, marine, and industrial fields.

  1. Application of ICH Q9 Quality Risk Management Tools for Advanced Development of Hot Melt Coated Multiparticulate Systems.

    PubMed

    Stocker, Elena; Becker, Karin; Hate, Siddhi; Hohl, Roland; Schiemenz, Wolfgang; Sacher, Stephan; Zimmer, Andreas; Salar-Behzadi, Sharareh

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to apply quality risk management based on the The International Conference on Harmonisation guideline Q9 for the early development stage of hot melt coated multiparticulate systems for oral administration. N-acetylcysteine crystals were coated with a formulation composing tripalmitin and polysorbate 65. The critical quality attributes (CQAs) were initially prioritized using failure mode and effects analysis. The CQAs of the coated material were defined as particle size, taste-masking efficiency, and immediate release profile. The hot melt coated process was characterized via a flowchart, based on the identified potential critical process parameters (CPPs) and their impact on the CQAs. These CPPs were prioritized using a process failure mode, effects, and criticality analysis and their critical impact on the CQAs was experimentally confirmed using a statistical design of experiments. Spray rate, atomization air pressure, and air flow rate were identified as CPPs. Coating amount and content of polysorbate 65 in the coating formulation were identified as critical material attributes. A hazard and critical control points analysis was applied to define control strategies at the critical process points. A fault tree analysis evaluated causes for potential process failures. We successfully demonstrated that a standardized quality risk management approach optimizes the product development sustainability and supports the regulatory aspects. Copyright © 2016 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Injectable Self-Healing Hydrogel with Antimicrobial and Antifouling Properties.

    PubMed

    Li, Lin; Yan, Bin; Yang, Jingqi; Huang, Weijuan; Chen, Lingyun; Zeng, Hongbo

    2017-03-22

    Microbial adhesion, biofilm formation and associated microbial infection are common challenges faced by implanted biomaterials (e.g., hydrogels) in bioengineering applications. In this work, an injectable self-healing hydrogel with antimicrobial and antifouling properties was prepared through self-assembly of an ABA triblock copolymer employing catechol functionalized polyethylene glycol (PEG) as A block and poly{[2-(methacryloyloxy)-ethyl] trimethylammonium iodide}(PMETA) as B block. This hydrogel exhibits excellent thermosensitivity, and can effectively inhibit the growth of E. coli (>99.8% killing efficiency) and prevent cell attachment. It can also heal autonomously from repeated damage, through mussel-inspired catechol-mediated hydrogen bonding and aromatic interactions, exhibiting great potential in bioengineering applications.

  3. Scalable antifouling reverse osmosis membranes utilizing perfluorophenyl azide photochemistry.

    PubMed

    McVerry, Brian T; Wong, Mavis C Y; Marsh, Kristofer L; Temple, James A T; Marambio-Jones, Catalina; Hoek, Eric M V; Kaner, Richard B

    2014-09-01

    We present a method to produce anti-fouling reverse osmosis (RO) membranes that maintains the process and scalability of current RO membrane manufacturing. Utilizing perfluorophenyl azide (PFPA) photochemistry, commercial reverse osmosis membranes were dipped into an aqueous solution containing PFPA-terminated poly(ethyleneglycol) species and then exposed to ultraviolet light under ambient conditions, a process that can easily be adapted to a roll-to-roll process. Successful covalent modification of commercial reverse osmosis membranes was confirmed with attenuated total reflectance infrared spectroscopy and contact angle measurements. By employing X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, it was determined that PFPAs undergo UV-generated nitrene addition and bind to the membrane through an aziridine linkage. After modification with the PFPA-PEG derivatives, the reverse osmosis membranes exhibit high fouling-resistance. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Processing of antifouling paint particles by Mytilus edulis.

    PubMed

    Turner, Andrew; Barrett, Mark; Brown, Murray T

    2009-01-01

    Particles of spent antifouling paint collected from a marine boatyard were ground and subsequently administered to the filter-feeding bivalve, Mytilus edulis, maintained in static aquaria. Concentrations of Cu and Zn were measured in seawater throughout a 16 h feeding phase and a 24 h depuration phase, in rejected and egested particles collected during the respective phases, and in the organisms themselves at the end of the experiments. Concentrations and distributions of Cu and Zn in processed particles indicated that M. edulis was able to ingest paint particles, regardless of whether nutritionally viable silt was present, and no mechanism of particle discrimination was evident. Enrichment of Cu and Zn in the visceral mass of individuals and in the aqueous phase during depuration supported these assertions, although elevated concentrations in other compartments of the organism (e.g. shell, gill) suggested that biotic and abiotic uptake of aqueous metal was also important.

  5. Identification of a new degradation product of the antifouling agent Irgarol 1051 in natural samples

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ferrer, I.; Barcelo, D.

    2001-01-01

    A main degradation product of Irgarol [2-(methylthio)-4-(tert-butylamino)-6-(cyclopropylamino)-s-triazine], one of the most widely used compounds in antifouling paints, was detected at trace levels in seawater and sediment samples collected from several marinas on the Mediterranean coast. This degradation product was identified as 2-methylthio-4-tert-butylamino-s-triazine. The unequivocal identification of this compound in seawater samples was carried out by solid-phase extraction (SPE) coupled on-line with liquid chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-mass spectrometry (LC-APCI-MS). SPE was carried out by passing 150 ml of seawater sample through a cartridge containing a polymeric phase (PLRP-s), with recoveries ranging from 92 to 108% (n=5). Using LC-MS detection in positive ion mode, useful structural information was obtained by increasing the fragmentor voltage, thus permitting the unequivocal identification of this compound in natural samples. Method detection limits were in the range of 0.002 to 0.005 ??g/l. Overall, the combination of on-line SPE and LC-APCI-MS represents an important advance in environmental analysis of herbicide degradation products in seawater, since it demonstrates that trace amounts of new polar metabolites may be determined rapidly. This paper reports the LC-MS identification of the main degradation product of Irgarol in seawater and sediment samples. ?? 2001 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Diamond Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Advances in materials technology have demonstrated that it is possible to get the advantages of diamond in a number of applications without the cost penalty, by coating and chemically bonding an inexpensive substrate with a thin film of diamond-like carbon (DLC). Diamond films offer tremendous technical and economic potential in such advances as chemically inert protective coatings; machine tools and parts capable of resisting wear 10 times longer; ball bearings and metal cutting tools; a broad variety of optical instruments and systems; and consumer products. Among the American companies engaged in DLC commercialization is Diamonex, Inc., a diamond coating spinoff of Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. Along with its own proprietary technology for both polycrystalline diamond and DLC coatings, Diamonex is using, under an exclusive license, NASA technology for depositing DLC on a substrate. Diamonex is developing, and offering commercially, under the trade name Diamond Aegis, a line of polycrystalline diamond-coated products that can be custom tailored for optical, electronic and engineering applications. Diamonex's initial focus is on optical products and the first commercial product is expected in late 1990. Other target applications include electronic heat sink substrates, x-ray lithography masks, metal cutting tools and bearings.

  7. Mussel-inspired modification of dextran for protein-resistant coatings of titanium oxide.

    PubMed

    Park, Jae Yoon; Kim, Jee Seon; Nam, Yoon Sung

    2013-09-12

    Surface modification of inorganic materials to prevent non-specific protein adsorption is critically important for developing a biocompatible materials' platform for medical implantation, diagnostics, and therapeutics. Here we report mussel-inspired chemical modification of dextran for anti-fouling coatings of metal oxide. Catechols are conjugated to dextran via a carbamate ester linkage, producing catechol-grafted dextran with a grafting density of 7.3 mol.%. Titanium dioxide (TiO₂) is coated with the catechol-grafted dextran, and the anti-fouling effect of dextran coatings is examined by using the adsorption of human serum albumin. The mussel-inspired dextran coatings show excellent resistance to non-specific protein adsorption: the adsorption equilibrium constant (K) is 0.69 Lg(-1) for dextran-coated TiO₂ while that for pristine TiO₂ surface is 3.53 Lg(-1). This study suggests that catechol-grafted dextran is a promising material for effective anti-fouling coatings of implantable inorganic materials.

  8. A nanomolecular approach to decrease adhesion of biofouling-producing bacteria to graphene-coated material.

    PubMed

    Parra, Carolina; Dorta, Fernando; Jimenez, Edra; Henríquez, Ricardo; Ramírez, Cristian; Rojas, Rodrigo; Villalobos, Patricio

    2015-11-16

    Biofouling, the colonization of artificial and natural surfaces by unwanted microorganisms, has an important economic impact on a wide range of industries. Low cost antifouling strategies are typically based on biocides which exhibit a negative environmental impact, affecting surrounding organisms related and not related to biofouling. Considering that the critical processes resulting in biofouling occur in the nanoscale/microscale dimensions, in this work we present a bionanotechnological approach to reduce adhesion of biofilm-producing bacteria Halomonas spp. CAM2 by introducing single layer graphene coatings. The use of this nanomaterial has been poorly explored for antifouling application. Our study revealed that graphene coatings modify material surface energy and electrostatic interaction between material and bacteria. Such nanoscale surface modification determine an important reduction over resulting bacterial adhesion and reduces the expression levels of genes related to adhesion when bacteria are in contact with graphene-coated material. Our results demonstrate that graphene coatings reduce considerably adhesion and expression levels of adhesion genes of biofilm-producing bacteria Halomonas spp. CAM2. Hydrophobic-hydrophilic interaction and repulsive electrostatic force dominate the interactions between Halomonas spp. CAM2 and material surface in saline media, impacting the final adhesion process. In addition no bactericide effect of graphene coatings was observed. The effect over biofilm formation is localized right at coated surface, in contrast to other antifouling techniques currently used, such as biocides.

  9. Advances in microreaction technology for portable fuel cell applications: Wall coating of thin catalytic films in microreactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bravo Bersano, Jaime Cristian

    This research has focused on the need to coat microreactor systems composed of channels in the micron size range of 100 to 1000 mum. The experimental procedures and learning are outlined in terms of slurry and surface preparation requirements which are detailed in the experimental section. This system is motivated and applied to micro methanol steam reformers. Thus, a detailed discussion on the driving motivation is given in the introduction. The low temperatures required for steam-reforming of methanol ˜ 493°K (220°C) make it possible to utilize the reformate as a feed to the fuel cell anode. The group of catalysts that shows the highest activity for methanol steam reforming (SR) at low temperature has composition of CuO/ZnO/Al 2O3, which is also the catalyst used for methanol synthesis. Steam reforming of methanol is a highly endothermic process. Conventional reactor configurations, such as a packed bed reactor, operate in a heat transfer limited mode for this reaction. Using catalyst in packed bed form for portable devices is also not convenient due to high pressure drop and possible channeling of gases in addition to poor heat transfer. A wall-coated catalyst represents a superior geometry since it provides lower pressure drop and ease of manufacturing. Due to their small size, microreactors are especially suited for endothermic reactions whose reactivity depends on the rate of heat input. A brief review on microreaction technology is given with a comprehensive survey for catalyst integration into microreactors for catalytic heterogeneous gas phase reactions. The strength of this research is the model that was developed to coat the interior of micron sized capillaries with coats of CuO/ZnO/Al2O 3 slurries as thick as 25 mum in the dry state. The details of the model are given in terms Taylor's theory and Rayleigh's theory. A model is presented that can predict the coat thickness based on experimental conditions The model combines Taylor's experimental work

  10. Marine biofouling on the fluorocarbon coatings comprising PTFE powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhan-ping; Qi, Yu-hong; Liu, Hong; Zhang, Zheng

    2009-07-01

    Fluorocarbon coatings were developed with respectively 10%, 20% and 30% PTFE powder to prevent marine biofouling. Influence of content of PTFE on microstructures and roughness of coatings was investigated using SEM and roughometer. It was studied that the effects of coating roughness on settlement of benthic diatom and Ectocarpus by using biological microscope, stereo microscope, image processing and spectrophotometer. Results indicated that the surface roughness of coatings decreases and the quantity of benthic diatom and Ectocarpus reduces attaching onto the coating with the increase of content of PTFE in paint studied. Benthic diatoms attached much more on horizontal specimen than on vertical one; they prefer to settle onto the coatings that there are lots of micro-cracks in it. These results are helpful for developing new non-toxic antifouling paints.

  11. Advanced zirconia-coated carbonyl-iron particles for acidic magnetorheological finishing of chemical-vapor-deposited ZnS and other IR materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salzman, S.; Giannechini, L. J.; Romanofsky, H. J.; Golini, N.; Taylor, B.; Jacobs, S. D.; Lambropoulos, J. C.

    2015-10-01

    We present a modified version of zirconia-coated carbonyl-iron (CI) particles that were invented at the University of Rochester in 2008. The amount of zirconia on the coating is increased to further protect the iron particles from corrosion when introduced to an acidic environment. Five low-pH, magnetorheological (MR) fluids were made with five acids: acetic, hydrochloric, nitric, phosphoric, and hydrofluoric. All fluids were based on the modified zirconia-coated CI particles. Off-line viscosity and pH stability were measured for all acidic MR fluids to determine the ideal fluid composition for acidic MR finishing of chemical-vapor-deposited (CVD) zinc sulfide (ZnS) and other infrared (IR) optical materials, such as hot-isostatic-pressed (HIP) ZnS, CVD zinc selenide (ZnSe), and magnesium fluoride (MgF2). Results show significant reduction in surface artifacts (millimeter-size, pebble-like structures on the finished surface) for several standard-grade CVD ZnS substrates and good surface roughness for the non-CVD MgF2 substrate when MR finished with our advanced acidic MR fluid.

  12. Click synthesis of neutral, cationic, and zwitterionic poly(propargyl glycolide)-co-poly(ɛ-caprolactone)-based aliphatic polyesters as antifouling biomaterials.

    PubMed

    Tu, Qin; Wang, Jian-Chun; Liu, Rui; Chen, Yun; Zhang, Yanrong; Wang, Dong-En; Yuan, Mao-Sen; Xu, Juan; Wang, Jinyi

    2013-08-01

    With the development of polymer-based biomaterials, aliphatic polyesters have attracted considerable interest because of their non-toxicity, non-allergenic property, and good biocompatibility. However, the hydrophobic nature and the lack of side chain functionalities of aliphatic polyesters limit their biomedical applications. In this study, we prepared four new polyesters: poly(sulfobetaine methacrylate)-, poly(2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphotidylcholine)-, poly(ethylene glycol)-, and quaternized poly[(2-dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate]-grafted poly(propargyl glycolide)-co-poly(ɛ-caprolactone). Their synthesis was conducted through ring-opening polymerization of acetylene-functionalized lactones and subsequent graft of bioactive units using click chemistry. The chemical structures of the polyesters were characterized through nuclear magnetic resonance and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, and their physical properties (including molecular weight, glass transition temperature, and melting point) were determined using gel permeation chromatography and differential scanning calorimetry. For studies on their hydrophilicity, stability, and anti-bioadhesive property, a series of polymeric surfaces of these polyesters was prepared by coating them onto glass substrates. The hydrophilicity and stability of these polyester surfaces were examined by contact angle measurements and attenuated total reflection Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy. Their anti-bioadhesive property was investigated through protein adsorption, as well as cellular and bacterial adhesion assays. The prepared polyesters showed good hydrophilicity and long-lasting stability, as well as significant anti-fouling property. The newly prepared polyesters could be developed as promising anti-fouling materials with extensive biomedical applications.

  13. The synergistic effect of inert oxide and metal fluoride dual coatings on advanced cathode materials for lithium ion battery applications.

    PubMed

    Park, Kwangjin; Lee, Byoung-Sun; Park, Jun-Ho; Hong, Suk-Gi

    2016-06-21

    The effect of Al2O3/LiF dual coatings on the electrochemical performance of over-lithiated layered oxide (OLO) has been investigated. A uniform coating of Al2O3 and LiF is obtained on the surface of the layered pristine material. The OLO with a dual Al2O3/LiF coating with a ratio of 1 : 1.5 exhibits excellent electrochemical performance. An initial discharge capacity of 265.66 mA h g(-1) is obtained at a C-rate of 0.1C. This capacity is approximately 15 mA h g(-1) higher than that of pristine OLO. The capacity retention (92.8% at the 50th cycle) is also comparable to that of pristine OLO (91.4% at the 50th cycle). Coating the cathode with a dual layer comprising Al2O3 and LiF leads to improved charging and discharging kinetics, and prevents direct contact between the cathode and the electrolyte.

  14. Advances in the Development of a WCl6 CVD System for Coating UO2 Powders with Tungsten

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mireles, Omar R.; Tieman, Alyssa; Broadway, Jeramie; Hickman, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Demonstrated viability and utilization of: a) Fluidized powder bed. b) WCl6 CVD process. c) Coated spherical particles with tungsten. The highly corrosive nature of the WCl6 solid reagent limits material of construction. Indications that identifying optimized process variables with require substantial effort and will likely vary with changes in fuel requirements.

  15. Advanced turbine systems - research and development of thermal barrier coatings technology: 2nd bimonthly report, February 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1996-02-01

    Objective of the ATS program is the development of ultra-highly efficient, environmentally superior, and cost-competitive gas turbine systems, with long, less cyclic operating profiles than aircraft gas turbine engines. Durability and performance demands of ATS can be achieved by means of thermal barrier coatings. Phase I (program plan) is complete. Phase II is in progress.

  16. Conformal Coating of Three-Dimensional Nanostructures via Atomic Layer Deposition for Development of Advanced Energy Storage Devices and Plasmonic Transparent Conductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malek, Gary A.

    Due to the prodigious amount of electrical energy consumed throughout the world, there exists a great demand for new and improved methods of generating electrical energy in a clean and renewable manner as well as finding more effective ways to store it. This enormous task is of great interest to scientists and engineers, and much headway is being made by utilizing three-dimensional (3D) nanostructured materials. This work explores the application of two types of 3D nanostructured materials toward fabrication of advanced electrical energy storage and conversion devices. The first nanostructured material consists of vertically aligned carbon nanofibers. This three-dimensional structure is opaque, electrically conducting, and contains active sites along the outside of each fiber that are conducive to chemical reactions. Therefore, they make the perfect 3D conducting nanostructured substrate for advanced energy storage devices. In this work, the details for transforming vertically aligned carbon nanofiber arrays into core-shell structures via atomic layer deposition as well as into a mesoporous manganese oxide coated supercapacitor electrode are given. Another unique type of three-dimensional nanostructured substrate is nanotextured glass, which is transparent but non-conducting. Therefore, it can be converted to a 3D transparent conductor for possible application in photovoltaics if it can be conformally coated with a conducting material. This work details that transformation as well as the addition of plasmonic gold nanoparticles to complete the transition to a 3D plasmonic transparent conductor.

  17. Biological effects and environmental fate of antifouling substances. January 1978-July 1989 (Citations from the Life Sciences Collection data base). Report for January 1978-July 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-08-01

    This bibliography contains citations concerning the environmental effects of antifouling substances used to control biofouling and their eventual fate in the biosphere. Toxicity studies, the effects of regulations on pollution distribution, bioaccumulation and sediment accumulation, resistant organisms, and biodeterioration of antifouling substances are discussed. Antifouling materials considered include copper, nickel, and organotin compounds. Marine fouling, cooling system fouling, and antifouling paints are discussed in separate bibliographies. (Contains 152 citations fully indexed and including a title list.)

  18. Applications of advanced electrochemical techniques in the study of microbial fuel cells and corrosion protection by polymer coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manohar, Aswin Karthik

    determined by the sum of the polarization resistance of the anode (Rap) and the cathode (Rcp), and therefore Rint depends on V. The ohmic contribution to the Rint was very small. It has been found that Rint decreased with decreasing cell voltage as the increasing current flow decreased R ap and Rcp. In the presence of MR-1, Rint was lower by a factor of about 100 than Rint of the MFC with buffer and lactate as anolyte. Additions of SS balls to the anode compartment produced a very large decrease of Rint. For the MFC containing SS balls in the anode compartment no significant further decrease of Rint could be observed when MR-1 was added to the anolyte. In Chapter 2, EIS has been used to determine the properties and stability of polymer coatings based on different chromate or chromate-free pretreatments and primers. Five sets of coated aluminum 2024 samples were exposed to 0.5N NaCl for a period of 31 days. Impedance spectra of the samples were measured during this period and the changes of the properties of the different coatings were studied as a function of time. From the analysis of the fit parameters of the impedance spectra, it was found that the corrosion protection of the coated samples depended on the type of primer used. The coating with the chromate based primer provided better corrosion protection than the coating with the chromate free primer. After 31 days of exposure, one sample from each set was scribed and exposed to 0.5N NaCl. The corrosion behavior of the scribed coatings was found to be dependent upon the type of pretreatment employed. The samples with the chromate conversion coating pretreatment showed better corrosion resistance in the scribed area than the samples that were treated by the trivalent chromium based method.

  19. Thin film deposition at atmospheric pressure using dielectric barrier discharges: Advances on three-dimensional porous substrates and functional coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fanelli, Fiorenza; Bosso, Piera; Mastrangelo, Anna Maria; Fracassi, Francesco

    2016-07-01

    Surface processing of materials by atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharges (DBDs) has experienced significant growth in recent years. Considerable research efforts have been directed for instance to develop a large variety of processes which exploit different DBD electrode geometries for the direct and remote deposition of thin films from precursors in gas, vapor and aerosol form. This article briefly reviews our recent progress in thin film deposition by DBDs with particular focus on process optimization. The following examples are provided: (i) the plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition of thin films on an open-cell foam accomplished by igniting the DBD throughout the entire three-dimensional (3D) porous structure of the substrate, (ii) the preparation of hybrid organic/inorganic nanocomposite coatings using an aerosol-assisted process, (iii) the DBD jet deposition of coatings containing carboxylic acid groups and the improvement of their chemical and morphological stability upon immersion in water.

  20. Blocked-micropores, surface functionalized, bio-compatible and silica-coated iron oxide nanocomposites as advanced MRI contrast agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darbandi, Masih; Laurent, Sophie; Busch, Martin; Li, Zi-An; Yuan, Ying; Krüger, Michael; Farle, Michael; Winterer, Markus; Vander Elst, Luce; Muller, Robert N.; Wende, Heiko

    2013-05-01

    Biocompatible magnetic nanoparticles have been found promising in several biomedical applications for tagging, imaging, sensing and separation in recent years. In this article, a systematic study of the design and development of surface-modification schemes for silica-coated iron oxide nanoparticles (IONP) via a one-pot, in situ method at room temperature is presented. Silica-coated IONP were prepared in a water-in-oil microemulsion, and subsequently the surface was modified via addition of organosilane reagents to the microemulsion system. The structure and the morphology of the as synthesized nanoparticles have been investigated by means of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and measurement of N2 adsorption-desorption. Electron diffraction and high-resolution transmission electron microscopic (TEM) images of the nanoparticles showed the highly crystalline nature of the IONP structures. Nitrogen adsorption indicates microporous and blocked-microporous structures for the silica-coated and amine functionalized silica-coated IONP, respectively which could prove less cytotoxicity of the functionalized final product. Besides, the colloidal stability of the final product and the presence of the modified functional groups on top of surface layer have been proven by zeta-potential measurements. Owing to the benefit from the inner IONP core and the hydrophilic silica shell, the as-synthesized nanocomposites were exploited as an MRI contrast enhancement agent. Relaxometric results prove that the surface functionalized IONP have also signal enhancement properties. These surface functionalized nanocomposites are not only potential candidates for highly efficient contrast agents for MRI, but could also be used as ultrasensitive biological-magnetic labels, because they are in nanoscale size, having magnetic properties, blocked-microporous and are well dispersible in biological environment.

  1. Characterization of terpenoids from the root of Ceriops tagal with antifouling activity.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jun-De; Yi, Rui-Zao; Lin, Yi-Ming; Feng, Dan-Qing; Zhou, Hai-Chao; Wang, Zhan-Chang

    2011-01-01

    One new dimeric diterpenoid, 8(14)-enyl-pimar-2'(3')-en-4'(18')-en-15'(16')-endolabr- 16,15,2',3'-oxoan-16-one (1) and five known terpenoids: Tagalsin C (2), Tagalsin I (3), lup-20(29)-ene-3β,28-diol (4), 3-oxolup-20(29)-en-28-oic acid (5) and 28-hydroxylup- 20(29)-en-3-one (6) were isolated from the roots of the mangrove plant Ceriops tagal. Their structures and relative stereochemistry were elucidated by means of extensive NMR, IR and MS analysis. The antifouling activity against larval settlement of the barnacle Balanus albicostatus were evaluated using capsaicin as a positive control. All these terpenoids exhibited antifouling activity against cyprid larvae of the barnacle without significant toxicity. The structure-activity relationship results demonstrated that the order of antifouling activity was diterpenoid (Compound 2) > triterpenoid (Compounds 4, 5 and 6) > dimeric diterpenoid (Compounds 1 and 3). The functional groups on the C-28 position of lupane triterpenoid significantly affect the antifouling activity. The diterpenoid dimmer with two identical diterpenoid subunits might display more potent antifouling activity than one with two different diterpenoid subunits. The stability test showed that Compounds 2, 4, 5 and 6 remained stable over 2-month exposure under filtered seawater.

  2. Molecular Design of Antifouling Polymer Brushes Using Sequence-Specific Peptoids

    DOE PAGES

    Lau, King Hang Aaron; Sileika, Tadas S.; Park, Sung Hyun; ...

    2014-11-26

    Material systems that can be used to flexibly and precisely define the chemical nature and molecular arrangement of a surface would be invaluable for the control of complex biointerfacial interactions. For example, progress in antifouling polymer biointerfaces that prevents nonspecific protein adsorption and cell attachment, which can significantly improve the performance of an array of biomedical and industrial applications, is hampered by a lack of chemical models to identify the molecular features conferring their properties. Poly(N-substituted glycine) “peptoids” are peptidomimetic polymers that can be conveniently synthesized with specific monomer sequences and chain lengths, and are presented as a versatile platformmore » for investigating the molecular design of antifouling polymer brushes. Zwitterionic antifouling polymer brushes have captured significant recent attention, and a targeted library of zwitterionic peptoid brushes with different charge densities, hydration, separations between charged groups, chain lengths, and grafted chain densities, is quantitatively evaluated for their antifouling properties through a range of protein adsorption and cell attachment assays. Specific zwitterionic brush designs are found to give rise to distinct but subtle differences in properties. In conclusion, the results also point to the dominant roles of the grafted chain density and chain length in determining the performance of antifouling polymer brushes.« less

  3. Molecular Understanding and Structural-Based Design of Polyacrylamides and Polyacrylates as Antifouling Materials.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hong; Zhao, Chao; Zhang, Mingzhen; Chen, Qiang; Ma, Jie; Zheng, Jie

    2016-04-12

    Design and synthesis of highly bioinert and biocompatible antifouling materials are crucial for a broad range of biomedical and engineering applications. Among antifouling materials, polyacrylamides and polyacrylates have proved so promising because of cheap raw materials, ease of synthesis and applicability, and abundant functional groups. The strong surface hydration and the high surface packing density of polyacrylamides and polyacrylates are considered to be the key contributors to their antifouling property. In this article, we review our studies on the design and synthesis of a series of polyacrylamides and polyacrylates with different molecular structures. These polymers can be fabricated into different architectural forms (brushes, nanoparticles, nanogels, and hydrogels), all of which are highly resistant to the attachment of proteins, cells, and bacteria. We find that small structural changes in the polymers can lead to large enhancement in surface hydration and antifouling performance, both showing a positive correlation. This reveals a general design rule for effective antifouling materials. Furthermore, polyacrylamides and polyacrylates are readily functionalized with other bioactive compounds to achieve different new multifunctionalities.

  4. Evaluation of toxicity of capsaicin and zosteric acid and their potential application as antifoulants.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qingwei; Barrios, Carlos A; Cutright, Teresa; Zhang Newby, Bi-min

    2005-10-01

    The toxicity of two natural product antifoulants, capsaicin and zosteric acid, was evaluated using the Microtox assay and a static toxicity test. The EC50 values obtained from the Microtox assay for capsaicin and zosteric acid were 11.75 +/- 1.02 and 442 +/- 100 mg/L, respectively. The static toxicity test, conducted with freshwater organisms, yielded capsaicin EC50 values of 5.5 +/- 0.5 and 23 +/- 2.0 mg/L for P. putida and Lake Erie bacteria, respectively. Zosteric acid EC50 values were 167 +/- 3.9 and 375 +/- 10 mg/L for P. putida and Lake Erie bacteria, respectively. Tests with marine organisms resulted in capsaicin EC50 values of 6.9 +/- 0.2 and 15.6 +/- 0.4 mg/L for V. natriegens and V. parahaemolyticus, respectively; whereas zosteric acid EC50 values were 7.4 +/- 0.1 and 18 +/- 0.6 mg/L for V. natriegens and V. parahaemolyticus, respectively. These results indicate that zosteric acid is much less toxic than capsaicin and that both are substantially less toxic than the currently used antifoulants, such as TBT (EC50 < 0.01 ppb). Their effectiveness as natural antifoulants was demonstrated by preliminary attachments studies. As the aqueous antifoulant concentration increased, significant inhibition of bacteria attachment or prevention of biofilm formation was achieved. Hence, both capsaicin and zosteric acid could be attractive alternatives as new antifouling compounds.

  5. Zebra Mussel Antifouling Activity of the Marine Natural Product Aaptamine and Analogs

    PubMed Central

    Diers, Jeffrey A.; Bowling, John J.; Duke, Stephen O.; Wahyuono, Subagus; Kelly, Michelle; Hamann, Mark T.

    2016-01-01

    Several aaptamine derivatives were selected as potential zebra mussel (Dreissena polymorpha) antifoulants because of the noteworthy absence of fouling observed on Aaptos sponges. Sponges of the genus Aaptos collected in Manado, Indonesia consistently produce aaptamine-type alkaloids. To date, aaptamine and its derivatives have not been carefully evaluated for their antifoulant properties. Structure–activity relationship studies were conducted using several aaptamine derivatives in a zebra mussel antifouling assay. From these data, three analogs have shown significant antifouling activity against zebra mussel attachment. Aaptamine, isoaaptamine, and the demethylated aaptamine compounds used in the zebra mussel assay produced EC50 values of 24.2, 11.6, and 18.6 μM, respectively. In addition, neither aaptamine nor isoaaptamine produced a phytotoxic response (as high as 300 μM) toward a nontarget organism, Lemna pausicostata, in a 7-day exposure. The use of these aaptamine derivatives from Aaptos sp. as potential environmentally benign antifouling alternatives to metal-based paints and preservatives is significant, not only as a possible control of fouling organisms, but also to highlight the ecological importance of these and similar biochemical defenses. PMID:16718618

  6. On the hydration of subnanometric antifouling organosilane adlayers: a molecular dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Sheikh, Sonia; Blaszykowski, Christophe; Nolan, Robert; Thompson, Damien; Thompson, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The connection between antifouling and surface hydration is a fascinating but daunting question to answer. Herein, we use molecular dynamics (MD) computer simulations to gain further insight into the role of surface functionalities in the molecular-level structuration of water (surface kosmotropicity)--within and atop subnanometric organosilane adlayers that were shown in previous experimental work to display varied antifouling behavior. Our simulations support the hypothesized intimate link between surface hydration and antifouling, in particular the importance of both internal and interfacial hydrophilicity and kosmotropicity. The antifouling mechanism is also discussed in terms of surface dehydration energy and water dynamicity (lability and mobility), notably the crucial requirement for clustered water molecules to remain tightly bound for extensive periods of time--i.e. exhibit slow exchange dynamics. A substrate effect on surface hydration, which would also participate in endowing antifouling adlayers with hydrogel-like characteristics, is also proposed. In contrast, the role of adlayer flexibility, if any, is assigned a secondary role in these ultrathin structures made of short building blocks. The conclusions from this work are well in line with those previously drawn in the literature.

  7. Molecular Design of Antifouling Polymer Brushes Using Sequence-Specific Peptoids

    SciTech Connect

    Lau, King Hang Aaron; Sileika, Tadas S.; Park, Sung Hyun; Sousa, Ana M. L.; Burch, Patrick; Szleifer, Igal; Messersmith, Phillip B.

    2014-11-26

    Material systems that can be used to flexibly and precisely define the chemical nature and molecular arrangement of a surface would be invaluable for the control of complex biointerfacial interactions. For example, progress in antifouling polymer biointerfaces that prevents nonspecific protein adsorption and cell attachment, which can significantly improve the performance of an array of biomedical and industrial applications, is hampered by a lack of chemical models to identify the molecular features conferring their properties. Poly(N-substituted glycine) “peptoids” are peptidomimetic polymers that can be conveniently synthesized with specific monomer sequences and chain lengths, and are presented as a versatile platform for investigating the molecular design of antifouling polymer brushes. Zwitterionic antifouling polymer brushes have captured significant recent attention, and a targeted library of zwitterionic peptoid brushes with different charge densities, hydration, separations between charged groups, chain lengths, and grafted chain densities, is quantitatively evaluated for their antifouling properties through a range of protein adsorption and cell attachment assays. Specific zwitterionic brush designs are found to give rise to distinct but subtle differences in properties. In conclusion, the results also point to the dominant roles of the grafted chain density and chain length in determining the performance of antifouling polymer brushes.

  8. Preparation of hydrophilic vinyl chloride copolymer hollow fiber membranes with antifouling properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajabzadeh, Saeid; Sano, Rie; Ishigami, Toru; Kakihana, Yuriko; Ohmukai, Yoshikage; Matsuyama, Hideto

    2015-01-01

    Hydrophilic vinyl chloride copolymer hollow fiber membranes with antifouling properties were prepared from brominated vinyl chloride-hydroxyethyl methacrylate copolymer (poly(VC-co-HEMA-Br)). The base membrane was grafted with two different zwitterionic monomers, (2-methacryloyloxyethylphosphorylcholine) (MPC) and [2-(methacryloyloxy) ethyl] dimethyl (3-sulfopropyl) ammonium hydroxide) (MEDSAH), and poly(ethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylate (PEGMA). The effect of the grafting on the base membrane hydrophilicity and antifouling properties was investigated. For comparison of the results, the pure water permeabilities and pore sizes at the outer surfaces of the grafted hollow fiber membranes were controlled to be similar. A poly(VC-co-HEMA-Br) hollow fiber membrane with similar pure water permeability and pore size was also prepared as a control membrane. A BSA solution was used as a model fouling solution for evaluation of the antifouling properties. Grafting with zwitterionic monomers and PEGMA improved the antifouling properties compared with the control membrane. The PEGMA grafted membrane showed the best antifouling properties among the grafted membranes

  9. Pyrolytic Carbon Coatings on Aligned Carbon Nanotube Assemblies and Fabrication of Advanced Carbon Nanotube/Carbon Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faraji, Shaghayegh

    Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) is a technique used to create a pyrolytic carbon (PyC) matrix around fibrous preforms in carbon/carbon (C/C) composites. Due to difficulties in producing three-dimensional carbon nanotube (CNT) assemblies, use of nanotubes in CVD fabricated CNT/C composites is limited. This dissertation describes efforts to: 1) Study the microstructure of PyC deposited on CNTs in order to understand the effect of microstructure and morphology of carbon coatings on graphitization behavior of CNT/PyC composites. This understanding helped to suggest a new approach for controlled radial growth of CNTs. 2) Evaluate the properties of CNT/PyC structures as a novel form of CNT assemblies with resilient, anisotropic and tunable properties. PyC was deposited on aligned sheets of nanotubes, drawn from spinnable CNT arras, using CVD of acetylene gas. At longer deposition times, the microstructure of PyC changed from laminar turbostratic carbon to a disordered carbon. For samples with short PyC deposition times (up to 30 minutes), deposited carbon layer rearranged during graphitization treatment and resulted in a crystalline structure where the coating and original tube walls could not be easily differentiated. In contrast, in samples with longer carbon deposition durations, carbon layers close to the surface of the coating remained disordered even after graphitization thermal treatment. Understanding the effect of PyC microstructure transition on graphitization behavior of CNT/PyC composites was used to develop a new method for controlled radial growth of CNTs. Carbon coated aligned CNT sheets were graphitized after each short (20 minutes) carbon deposition cycle. This prevented development of disorder carbon during subsequent PyC deposition cycles. Using cyclic-graphitization method, thick PyC coating layers were successfully graphitized into a crystalline structure that could not be differentiated from the original nanotube walls. This resulted into radial

  10. Measurement of copper release rates from antifouling paint under laboratory and in situ conditions: implications for loading estimation to marine water bodies.

    PubMed

    Valkirs, Aldis O; Seligman, Peter F; Haslbeck, Elizabeth; Caso, Joaquin S

    2003-06-01

    The release of biocides, such as copper (Cu), from antifouling (AF) coatings on vessel hulls represents a significant proportion of overall Cu loading in those harbors and estuaries where substantial numbers of small craft or large vessels are berthed. Copper release rates were measured on several self-polishing, tin-free coatings and an ablative Cu reference coating applied to steel panels using three measurement methods. The panels were exposed in natural seawater in San Diego Bay, and release rates were measured both in the laboratory and field over 2 years. Results with the static (20 cm x 30 cm) panels indicated that Cu release rates were initially high (25-65 microg Cu cm(-2)day(-1)), with a large range of values between paint types. Release rates declined to substantially lower rates (8-22 microg cm(-2)day(-1)) with reduced variability within 2 months. Release rates continued to decrease over time for approximately 6 months when relatively constant release rates were observed for most coatings. Over time, relative differences in Cu release rates measured by three exposure methods decreased, with all coatings exhibiting similar behavior toward the end of the study. Lowest overall Cu release rates were observed with the self-polishing experimental paint no. 7 in static-dynamic and in situ treatments. The highest periodic release rates were measured from panels that experienced periods of both static and dynamic exposure (8.7 ms(-1) rotation). The lowest release rates were measured from panels that experienced static, constant depth exposure, and where release rates were evaluated in situ, using a novel diver-deployed measurement system. Results from this in situ technique suggests that it more closely reflects actual Cu release rates on vessel hulls measured with intact natural biofilms under ambient conditions than measurements using standardized laboratory release rate methods. In situ measurements made directly on the AF surface of vessels demonstrated

  11. The influence of antifouling practices on marine invasions.

    PubMed

    Piola, Richard F; Dafforn, Katherine A; Johnston, Emma L

    2009-10-01

    Vessel hull-fouling is increasingly recognised as one of the major vectors for the transfer of marine non-indigenous species. For hundreds of years, copper (Cu) has been used as a primary biocide to prevent the establishment of fouling assemblages on ships' hulls. Some non-indigenous fouling taxa continue to be transferred via hull-fouling despite the presence of Cu antifouling biocides. In addition, several of these species appear to enjoy a competitive advantage over similar native taxa within metal-polluted environments. This metal tolerance may further assist their establishment and spread in new habitats. This review synthesises existing research on the links between Cu and the invasion of fouling species, and shows that, with respect to the vector of hull-fouling, tolerance to Cu has the potential to play a role in the transfer of non-indigenous fouling organisms. Also highlighted are the future directions for research into this important nexus between industry, ecology and environmental management.

  12. Copper and copper-nickel alloys as zebra mussel antifoulants

    SciTech Connect

    Dormon, J.M.; Cottrell, C.M.; Allen, D.G.; Ackerman, J.D.; Spelt, J.K.

    1996-04-01

    Copper has been used in the marine environment for decades as cladding on ships and pipes to prevent biofouling by marine mussels (Mytilus edulis L.). This motivated the present investigation into the possibility of using copper to prevent biofouling in freshwater by both zebra mussels and quagga mussels (Dreissena polymorpha and D. bugensis collectively referred to as zebra mussels). Copper and copper alloy sheet proved to be highly effective in preventing biofouling by zebra mussels over a three-year period. Further studies were conducted with copper and copper-nickel mesh (lattice of expanded metal) and screen (woven wire with a smaller hole size), which reduced the amount of copper used. Copper screen was also found to be strongly biofouling-resistant with respect to zebra mussels, while copper mesh reduced zebra mussel biofouling in comparison to controls, but did not prevent it entirely. Preliminary investigations into the mechanism of copper antifouling, using galvanic couples, indicated that the release of copper ions from the surface of the exposed metal into the surrounding water is directly or indirectly responsible for the biofouling resistance of copper.

  13. Inhibition of coral photosynthesis by the antifouling herbicide Irgarol 1051.

    PubMed

    Owen, Richard; Knap, Anthony; Toaspern, Megan; Carbery, Kelly

    2002-07-01

    International regulation of organotin compounds for use in antifouling paints has led to the development and increased use of replacement compounds, notably the s-triazine herbicide Irgarol 1051. Little is known about the distribution of Irgarol 1051 in tropical waters. Nor has the potential impact of this triazine upon photosynthesis of endosymbiotic microalgae (zooxanthellae) in corals been assessed. In this study Irgarol 1051 was detected in marinas, harbours and coastal waters of the Florida Keys, Bermuda and St. Croix, with concentrations ranging between 3 and 294 ng 1(-1). 14C incubation experiments with isolated zooxanthellae from the common inshore coral Madracis mirabilis showed no incorporation of H14CO3- from the sea water medium after 4-8 h exposure to Irgarol 1051 concentrations as low as 63 ng 1(-1). Reduction in net photosynthesis of intact corals was found at concentrations of l00 ng 1(-1) with little or no photosynthesis at concentrations exceeding 1000 ng 1(-1) after 2-8 h exposure at all irradiances. The data suggest Irgarol 1051 to be both prevalent in tropical marine ecosystems and a potent inhibitor of coral photosynthesis at environmentally relevant concentrations.

  14. Antifouling strategies and corrosion control in cooling circuits.

    PubMed

    Cristiani, P; Perboni, G

    2014-06-01

    Biofouling and corrosion phenomena dramatically reduce the functionality of industrial cooling circuits, especially in marine environments. This study underlines the effectiveness of a low level chlorination treatment of seawater to prevent biological fouling and biocorrosion. Reported examples emphasize the reaction of chlorine with bromide, ammonia and organic compounds in seawater and the effectiveness of a treatment performed in such a way to guarantee a residual concentration lower than 3μM at the outlet of the condensers. In a brief review of antifouling strategies, alternatives to chlorination and the monitoring approach able to optimize the treatments are also reported. An integrated, on-line system based on electrochemical probes (Biox system and a linear polarization resistance probe) demonstrated to be sufficient to monitor in real time: corrosion, biofilm growth and chemical treatments based on chlorine or alternative oxidant products (chlorine dioxide, etc.). A careful electrochemical monitoring and the optimized treatments help the plant operators of industrial cooling circuits prevent the decay of the equipment performance, allowing at the same time the control of the halogenated by-products formation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Combining a photocatalyst with microtopography to develop effective antifouling materials.

    PubMed

    Vucko, M J; Poole, A J; Sexton, B A; Glenn, F L; Carl, C; Whalan, S; de Nys, R

    2013-01-01

    Polydimethylsiloxane surfaces textured with a square-wave linear grating profile (0, 20, 200, 300 and 600 μm), and embedded with a range of photocatalytic titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticle loadings (3.75, 7.5, 11.25 and 15 wt.%), were used to test the combined efficacy of these technologies as antifouling materials. Settlement of the fouling bryozoan species Bugula neritina was quantified in the laboratory under two intensities of UV light. The lowest settlement rates were observed on 20 μm surfaces. However, texture effects were not as critical to larval settlement as the presence of TiO2. In conjunction with UV light, TiO2 completely inhibited larval metamorphosis even at the lowest loading (3.75 wt.%) and the lowest intensity of UV light (24 W m(-2)). Recruitment of B. neritina was also quantified in field trials and showed similar results to laboratory assays. The lowest recruitment was observed on 20 and 200 μm surfaces, with recruitment being significantly lower on all surfaces containing TiO2. Therefore for B. neritina, although all TiO2 loadings were effective, 3.75 wt.% can be used as a minimum inhibitory concentration to deter larval settlement and the addition of a 20 μm texture further increases the deterrent effect.

  16. AFCATT (Anti-Fouling Chemical Additive Test Tower)

    SciTech Connect

    Philpot, E.F.; Newton, M.T.; Noble, R.T.

    1995-06-01

    Polyvinylchloride (PVC) film-type cellular fill is the fill of choice in replacing cement asbestos board fill in existing cooling towers and in new cooling towers because of its high thermal performance, ease of installation, and low initial cost. However, PVC fill has been found to foul quickly with biological and sediment material, significantly reducing tower performance and the fill`s useful life. The Anti-Fouling Chemical Additives Test Tower (AFCATT) has been build to study accumulation rates of fouling deposits in corrugated PVC film fill and to study methods of cleaning and preventing the fouling deposits. This small mechanical draft cooling tower is located next to the Unit 4 natural draft cooling tower at Georgia Power Company`s Plant Bowen. The once-through mechanical draft tower receives hot water from the condenser and returns the cold water to the basin of the host tower. The pilot tower is divided into four chambers allowing for three different treatment programs and one control to be run simultaneously. PVC fill packs are suspended from load cells to allow the weight of the fill packs to be measured continuously. Six vendors participated in the summer 1993 test program. Each proposed different methods of cleaning the fouled fill and were given the opportunity to try their proposed method of fill cleaning. To determine the success of these different treatment programs, statistical analyses were performed on the collected data and the changes in the accumulation rates compared.

  17. Antifouling biocides: Impairment of bivalve immune system by chlorothalonil.

    PubMed

    Guerreiro, Amanda da Silveira; Rola, Regina Coimbra; Rovani, Monique Tomazele; Costa, Simone Rutz da; Sandrini, Juliana Zomer

    2017-08-01

    Marine ecosystems are subjected to a variety of contaminants. Antifouling paints, for example, have been extensively used to protect ship surfaces from marine biofouling, but their toxicity has generated great concern. Thus, we evaluated the effect of the biocide chlorothalonil on the immune system of Perna perna mussels. The mussels were exposed to 0 (control), 0.1μg/L and 10μg/L of chlorothalonil for up to 96h. After 24h and 96h of exposure, the following immune-related parameters were analyzed in the hemolymph of mussels: total hemocyte count, cell adhesion, phagocytic activity, level of reactive oxygen species, cell viability and comet assay. After 24h and 96h of chlorothalonil exposure, cellular adhesion increased and the hemocyte viability reduced. Moreover, an increase in phagocytic activity was also observed after 96h of exposure to cholorothalonil. The exposure to 10μg/L of chlorothalonil for 96h reduced the air survival capacity of mussels. Total hemocyte count, ROS generation and DNA damage were not affected by the contaminant exposure. Our results indicate that chlorothalonil affected important immune responses of the bivalves, demonstrating that this biocide has effects on non-target species. This modulation of immune system reduced the health status of mussels, which could compromise their ability to survive in the environment. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Oxygen-depleted surfaces: a new antifouling technology.

    PubMed

    Lindgren, J Fredrik; Haeffner, Mikael; Ericsson, Claes T; Jonsson, Per R

    2009-01-01

    A novel, non-toxic strategy to combat marine biofouling is presented. The technology is paint with additions of up to 43% of industrial protein. Through microbial degradation of the protein component, an oxygen-depleted layer rapidly forms in a 0.2 mm layer close to the paint surface. With the present paint formulations, a stable, O(2)-depleted layer can persist for 16 weeks. Barnacle larvae (cyprids) did not settle on panels where oxygen saturation was <20%, and cyprids were killed when exposed to O(2)-free water for more than 1 h. It is also shown that the O(2)-depleted layer will rapidly reform (within 15 min) after exposure to turbulent flow. Field exposure of panels for 16 weeks showed that paint with protein reduced fouling by barnacles and bryozoans by 80% and close to 100%, respectively. The results suggest that this novel technology may be developed into a non-toxic alternative to copper-based antifouling paints, especially for pleasure boats in sensitive environments. There is clearly potential for further development of the paint formulation, and a full-scale test on a boat-hull suggested that service-life under realistic operations needs to be improved.

  19. Designing thermo-responsive nanocomposites with anti-fouling properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ya; McFarlin, Gerald; Yong, Xin; Kuksenok, Olga; Balazs, Anna

    2015-03-01

    Inspired by marine organisms that utilize active ``defense'' (such as active cilia) to prevent the biofouling of their surfaces, we use computational modeling to design synthetic gel-based composite films that provide dual ``defense'' for antifouling applications. We design a nanocomposite gel film that can be harnessed to repel a variety of particles via either a temperature change or an imposed shear. Incorporation of stiff hydrophobic posts into a gel composed of cross-linked poly(N-isoproylacrylamide) chains allows us to drastically alter the film's surface properties when gel undergoes temperature-induced volume phase transition. Depending on whether the system's temperature is below or above the lower critical solution temperature (LCST) of the gel, the posts are hidden in the swollen gel or exposed to the external solution. We model our system using dissipative particle dynamics (DPD); we validate our model through comparisons with Flory-Rehner theory. We focus on the influence of shear and temperature on the position of the particle in the system and isolate the conditions under which adsorption of particles of different sizes to the substrate is effectively prevented.

  20. Bioaccessibility of metals in soils and dusts contaminated by marine antifouling paint particles.

    PubMed

    Turner, Andrew; Singh, Nimisha; Richards, Jonathan P

    2009-05-01

    Fragments of antifouling paint and environmental geosolids have been sampled from the island of Malta and analysed for total and bioaccessible metals. Total concentrations of Ba, Cd, Cu, Pb, Sn and Zn were two to three orders of magnitude higher in spent antifouling composites relative to respective values in background soils and road dusts. Paint fragments were visible in geosolids taken from the immediate vicinity of boat maintenance facilities and mass balance calculations, based on Ba as a paint tracer, suggested that the most contaminated soils, road dusts and boatyard dusts contained about 1%, 7% and 9%, respectively, of antifouling particles. Human bioaccessibilities of metals were evaluated in selected samples using a physiologically based extraction technique. Accessibilities of Cd, Cu, Pb and Zn in the most contaminated solids were sufficient to be cause for concern for individuals working in the boat repair industry and to the wider, local community.

  1. Hydrophilicity and antifouling property of membrane materials from cellulose acetate/polyethersulfone in DMAc.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhonghua; Chen, Fushan

    2016-10-01

    In this study, cellulose acetate (CA) was blended with polyethersulfone (PES) to endow the ultrafiltration membrane with the improved hydrophilicity and antifouling property by using N,N-dimethylacetamide (DMAc) as the solvent. The effects of blend composition and evaporation time on the mechanical strength and pure water flux were investigated. It was found that the optimal composition of the casting solution was: 18wt% (PES), 4wt% (Polyvinylpyrrolidone K30), 3wt% (CA) and 20s (Evaporation time). The characteristics of CA-PES blend membranes were investigated through the methods of contact angle goniometer, antifouling property, compatibility, thermo gravimetric analysis and SEM. The results showed that the hydrophilicity and antifouling property of CA-PES ultrafiltration membranes were enhanced in comparison with the pure PES membranes. The CA-PES membranes exhibited semi-compatibility and good thermal stability below 270°C. This study provided a potential industrial application prospect of CA-PES membranes prepared in DMAc.

  2. Antifouling activity of macroalgal extracts on Fragilaria pinnata (Bacillariophyceae): a comparison with Diuron.

    PubMed

    Silkina, Alla; Bazes, Alexandra; Vouvé, Florence; Le Tilly, Véronique; Douzenel, Philippe; Mouget, Jean-Luc; Bourgougnon, Nathalie

    2009-10-04

    The tributyltin-based products and organic biocides which are incorporated into antifouling paints have had a negative impact on the marine environment, and the ban on tributyltin-based antifouling products has urged the industry to find substitutes to prevent the development of fouling on ship hulls. Natural antifouling agents could be isolated from marine resources, providing an alternative option for the industry. The effects of different marine seaweed extracts from Sargassum muticum and Ceramium botryocarpum on the growth, pigment content and photosynthetic apparatus of the marine diatom Fragilaria pinnata were compared with those of Diuron, a biocide widely used in antifouling paints. The addition of the macroalgal extracts in the culture medium resulted in an inhibition of the growth of F. pinnata, but this inhibition was lower than that obtained with Diuron. After transfer to a biocide-free medium, F. pinnata cells previously exposed to the macroalgal extracts exhibited normal growth, in contrast to Diuron-treated cells, which died, demonstrating that the effects of the natural antifouling agents were reversible. Macroalgal extracts and Diuron-induced modifications in F. pinnata cellular pigment content. Chlorophyll a, fucoxanthin, and the xanthophyll pool, diadinoxanthin and diatoxanthin, were the most affected. Changes in the structure and function of the photosynthetic apparatus were studied by microspectrofluorimetry, and provided a comprehensive evaluation of the inhibition of the diatom Photosystem II (PSII) by the biocides. This study confirms that natural extracts from the macroalgae studied have the potential to be used as a substitute to commercial biocides in antifouling paints.

  3. Versailles Project on Advanced Materials and Standards Interlaboratory Study on Measuring the Thickness and Chemistry of Nanoparticle Coatings Using XPS and LEIS.

    PubMed

    Belsey, Natalie A; Cant, David J H; Minelli, Caterina; Araujo, Joyce R; Bock, Bernd; Brüner, Philipp; Castner, David G; Ceccone, Giacomo; Counsell, Jonathan D P; Dietrich, Paul M; Engelhard, Mark H; Fearn, Sarah; Galhardo, Carlos E; Kalbe, Henryk; Won Kim, Jeong; Lartundo-Rojas, Luis; Luftman, Henry S; Nunney, Tim S; Pseiner, Johannes; Smith, Emily F; Spampinato, Valentina; Sturm, Jacobus M; Thomas, Andrew G; Treacy, Jon P W; Veith, Lothar; Wagstaffe, Michael; Wang, Hai; Wang, Meiling; Wang, Yung-Chen; Werner, Wolfgang; Yang, Li; Shard, Alexander G

    2016-10-27

    We report the results of a VAMAS (Versailles Project on Advanced Materials and Standards) inter-laboratory study on the measurement of the shell thickness and chemistry of nanoparticle coatings. Peptide-coated gold particles were supplied to laboratories in two forms: a colloidal suspension in pure water and; particles dried onto a silicon wafer. Participants prepared and analyzed these samples using either X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) or low energy ion scattering (LEIS). Careful data analysis revealed some significant sources of discrepancy, particularly for XPS. Degradation during transportation, storage or sample preparation resulted in a variability in thickness of 53 %. The calculation method chosen by XPS participants contributed a variability of 67 %. However, variability of 12 % was achieved for the samples deposited using a single method and by choosing photoelectron peaks that were not adversely affected by instrumental transmission effects. The study identified a need for more consistency in instrumental transmission functions and relative sensitivity factors, since this contributed a variability of 33 %. The results from the LEIS participants were more consistent, with variability of less than 10 % in thickness and this is mostly due to a common method of data analysis. The calculation was performed using a model developed for uniform, flat films and some participants employed a correction factor to account for the sample geometry, which appears warranted based upon a simulation of LEIS data from one of the participants and comparison to the XPS results.

  4. Versailles Project on Advanced Materials and Standards Interlaboratory Study on Measuring the Thickness and Chemistry of Nanoparticle Coatings Using XPS and LEIS

    SciTech Connect

    Belsey, Natalie A.; Cant, David J. H.; Minelli, Caterina; Araujo, Joyce R.; Bock, Bernd; Brüner, Philipp; Castner, David G.; Ceccone, Giacomo; Counsell, Jonathan D. P.; Dietrich, Paul M.; Engelhard, Mark H.; Fearn, Sarah; Galhardo, Carlos E.; Kalbe, Henryk; Kim, Jeong Won; Lartundo-Rojas, Luis; Luftman, Henry S.; Nunney, Tim S.; Pseiner, Johannes; Smith, Emily F.; Spampinato, Valentina; Sturm, Jacobus M.; Thomas, Andrew G.; Treacy, Jon P. W.; Veith, Lothar; Wagstaffe, Michael; Wang, Hai; Wang, Meiling; Wang, Yung-Chen; Werner, Wolfgang; Yang, Li; Shard, Alexander G.

    2016-10-27

    We report the results of a VAMAS (Versailles Project on Advanced Materials and Standards) inter-laboratory study on the measurement of the shell thickness and chemistry of nanoparticle coatings. Peptide-coated gold particles were supplied to laboratories in two forms: a colloidal suspension in pure water and; particles dried onto a silicon wafer. Participants prepared and analyzed these samples using either X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) or low energy ion scattering (LEIS). Careful data analysis revealed some significant sources of discrepancy, particularly for XPS. Degradation during transportation, storage or sample preparation resulted in a variability in thickness of 53 %. The calculation method chosen by XPS participants contributed a variability of 67 %. However, variability of 12 % was achieved for the samples deposited using a single method and by choosing photoelectron peaks that were not adversely affected by instrumental transmission effects. The study identified a need for more consistency in instrumental transmission functions and relative sensitivity factors, since this contributed a variability of 33 %. The results from the LEIS participants were more consistent, with variability of less than 10 % in thickness and this is mostly due to a common method of data analysis. The calculation was performed using a model developed for uniform, flat films and some participants employed a correction factor to account for the sample geometry, which appears warranted based upon a simulation of LEIS data from one of the participants and comparison to the XPS results.

  5. Advanced fibroblast proliferation inhibition for biocompatible coating by electrostatic layer-by-layer assemblies of heparin and chitosan derivatives.

    PubMed

    Follmann, Heveline D M; Naves, Alliny F; Martins, Alessandro F; Félix, Olivier; Decher, Gero; Muniz, Edvani C; Silva, Rafael

    2016-07-15

    Heparin and different chitosan derivatives were applied to produce stable electrostatic layer-by-layer assemblies and further used as coating technique to inhibit natural inflammatory response to implants. Heparin was assembled with chitosan and N-methylated chitosan derivatives, namely N,N-dimethyl chitosan (DMC) and N,N,N-trimethyl chitosan (TMC), by dipping method. DMC and TMC (chitosan derivatives) were synthesized and characterized before LbL assembly. Ellipsometry, quartz crystal microbalance (QCM-D), and contact angle were used to demonstrate the deposition of polyelectrolyte multilayers onto silicon wafers using polyelectrolyte solutions with different ionic strength. The biological properties of these films were evaluated by cell culture assays using NIH/3T3 fibroblast cells. LbL assemblies of Heparin and chitosan derivatives showed to be biocompatible, and at the same time they strongly hinder the proliferation speed of fibroblasts up to 40-fold factors. Therefore, the multilayers prepared from heparin and chitosan derivatives have good features to be used as an alternative coating treatment for biomedical implants with reduced body rejection properties. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Formation of porous nitrogen-doped carbon-coating MnO nanospheres for advanced reversible lithium storage.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lingling; Ge, Danhua; Qu, Genlong; Zheng, Junwei; Cao, Xueqin; Gu, Hongwei

    2017-05-04

    Herein, we have developed a facile and effective approach for synthesizing a novel kind of porous nitrogen-doped carbon-coated MnO nanosphere. The porous Mn2O3 nanospheres are initially obtained by the calcination treatment of a coordination self-assembled aggregation precursor (referred to as Mn(OAc)2-C-8). Then, MnO@N-doped carbon composites (MnO@NCs) are obtained by the calcination of the Mn2O3 nanospheres coated with polydopamine (Mn2O3@PDA). The MnO@NCs are evaluated as an anode for lithium ion batteries (LIBs), which exhibit high specific capacity, stable cycling performance (1096.6 mA h g(-1) after 100 cycles at 100 mA g(-1)) and high coulombic efficiency (about 99% over 100 cycles). The unique structure design and synergistic effect not only settle the challenges of low conductivity and poor cycling stability of transition metal oxides but also resolve the imperfection of inferior specific capacity of traditional graphite materials. Importantly, it may provide a commendable conception for developing new-fashioned anode materials to improve the lithium storage capability and electrochemical performance.

  7. Advanced Spin Coating Film Transfer and Hot-Pressing Process for Global Planarization with Dielectric-Material-Viscosity Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Norio; Machida, Katsuyuki; Yano, Masaki; Kudou, Kazuhisa; Kyuragi, Hakaru

    2002-04-01

    A novel method of controlling the viscosity of dielectric material was developed for global planarization by the spin coating film transfer and hot-pressing (STP) technique. In the STP technique, a base film is spin-coated with a dielectric, the dielectric is hot-pressed to a wafer in vacuum, and the base film is then peeled off from the dielectric. For global planarization in the above steps, the viscosity of the dielectric material is one of the most important factors. We propose controlling the viscosity by vacuum drying in the process chamber. The relationship between viscosity and vacuum drying was investigated experimentally, and the effect of viscosity on gap-filling was clarified by analytical modeling. We applied the control method to STP experiments using patterned wafers and a low-k organic material, and found that it achieves complete gap-filling and good uniformity in film thickness. STP planarized line-and-spaces as large as 100 μm wide achieving a small variation in planarity of ± 0.43%. With this viscosity-control method, the STP technique is applicable to low-k materials.

  8. Presence and effects of marine microbial biofilms on biocide-based antifouling paints.

    PubMed

    Yebra, Diego Meseguer; Kiil, Søren; Weinell, Claus E; Dam-Johansen, Kim

    2006-01-01

    Marine microorganisms are capable of successfully colonizing toxic surfaces through the formation of biofilm structures. In this article, most of the literature reporting the presence of marine biofilms on chemically-active antifouling paints is briefly reviewed. Of special concern is the influence of the dense extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) matrix on the release rate of the compounds involved in antifouling paint performance (i.e. active compounds and controlled-release binder molecules). A deeper understanding of these phenomena is of interest for both environmental legislators and paint formulators.

  9. Electrospark deposition coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheely, W. F.

    1986-11-01

    Hard surfacing for wear resistant and low-friction coatings has been improved by means of advances in the computer controls in electronic circuitry of the electrospark deposition (ESD) process. coatings of nearly any electrically conductive metal alloy or cermet can be deposited on conductive materials. Thickness is usually two mils or less, but can be as high as 10 mils. ESD coatings can quadrupole cutting tool life.

  10. Electrospark deposition coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Sheely, W.F.

    1986-11-19

    Hard surfacing for wear resistant and low-friction coatings has been improved by means of advances in the computer controls in electronic circuitry of the electrospark deposition (ESD) process. coatings of nearly any electrically conductive metal alloy or cermet can be deposited on conductive materials. Thickness is usually two mils or less, but can be as high as 10 mils. ESD coatings can quadrupole cutting tool life. (DLC)

  11. In Situ Surface Tailoring with Zwitterionic Carboxybetaine Moieties on Self-Assembled Thin Film for Antifouling Biointerfaces

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chun-Jen; Chang, Ying-Chih

    2014-01-01

    A novel biointerface bearing zwitterionic carboxybetaine moieties was developed for effective resistance to nonspecific adsorption of proteins and blood cells. Self-assembled thin films (SAFs) of (N,N-dimethylaminopropyl) trimethoxysilane were formed as mattress layers by either vapor or solution deposition. Subsequently, the tertiary amine head groups on SAFs were reacted with β-propiolactone to give zwitterionic carboxybetaine moieties via in situ synthesis. The optimal reaction time of 8 h for both preparation methods was verified by static contact angle measurements. According to the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, 67.3% of amine groups on SAFs prepared from the vapor deposition was converted to the zwitterionic structures after reaction of β-propiolactone. The antifouling properties of the zwitterionic biointerfaces were quantitatively evaluated in the presence of protein solutions using a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation, showing a great improvement by factors of 6.5 and 20.2 from tertiary amine SAFs and bare SiO2 surfaces, respectively. More importantly, the zwitterionic SAFs were brought to contact with undiluted human blood in chaotic-mixer microfluidic systems; the results present their capability to effectively repel blood cell adhesion. Accordingly, in this work, development of carboxybetaine SAFs offers a facile yet effective strategy to fabricate biocompatible biointerfaces for a variety of potential applications in surface coatings for medical devices. PMID:28788445

  12. Enhanced permeability, selectivity, and antifouling ability of CNTs/Al2O3 membrane under electrochemical assistance.

    PubMed

    Fan, Xinfei; Zhao, Huimin; Liu, Yanming; Quan, Xie; Yu, Hongtao; Chen, Shuo

    2015-02-17

    Membrane filtration provides effective solutions for removing contaminants, but achieving high permeability, good selectivity, and antifouling ability remains a great challenge for existing membrane filtration technologies. In this work, membrane filtration coupled with electrochemistry has been developed to enhance the filtration performance of a CNTs/Al2O3 membrane. The as-prepared CNTs/Al2O3 membrane, obtained by coating interconnected CNTs on an Al2O3 substrate, presented good pore-size tunability, mechanical stability, and electroconductivity. For the removal of a target (silica spheres as a probe) with a size comparable to the membrane pore size, the removal efficiency and flux at +1.5 V were 1.1 and 1.5 times higher, respectively, than those without electrochemical assistance. Moreover, the membrane also exhibited a greatly enhanced removal efficiency for contaminants smaller than the membrane pores, providing enhancements of 4 orders of magnitude and a factor of 5.7 for latex particles and phenol, respectively. These results indicated that both the permeability and the selectivity of CNTs/Al2O3 membranes can be significantly improved by electrochemical assistance, which was further confirmed by the removal of natural organic matter (NOM). The permeate flux and NOM removal efficiency at +1.5 V were about 1.6 and 3.0 times higher, respectively, than those without electrochemical assistance. In addition, the lost flux of the fouled membrane was almost completely recovered by an electrochemically assisted backwashing process.

  13. Influence of the molecular design on the antifouling performance of poly(ethylene glycol) monolayers grafted on (111) Si.

    PubMed

    Perez, Emmanuel; Lahlil, Khalid; Rougeau, Cyrille; Moraillon, Anne; Chazalviel, Jean-Noël; Ozanam, François; Gouget-Laemmel, Anne Chantal

    2012-10-16

    Various poly(ethylene glycol) monomethyl ether moieties were grafted onto hydrogenated silicon surfaces in order to investigate the influence of the molecular design on the antifouling performance of such coatings. The grafted chains were either oligo(ethylene oxide) chains (EG)(n)OMe bound to silicon via Si-O-C covalent bonds, or hybrid alkyl/oligo(ethylene oxide) chains C(p)(EG)(n)OMe bound via Si-C covalent bonds (from home-synthesized precursors). Quantitative IR spectroscopy gave the molecular coverage of the grafted layers, and AFM imaging demonstrated that a proper surfactinated rinse yields C(p)(EG)(n)OMe layers free of unwanted residues. The protein-repellent character of these grafted layers (here, toward BSA) was studied by IR and AFM imaging. C(p)(EG)(n)OMe layers exhibit a lower surface concentration than (EG)(n)OMe layers, because of the presence of a solvent in the grafting solution; they however demonstrate high resistance against BSA adsorption for high values of the n/p ratio and a higher stability than (EG)(n)OMe. This behavior is consistently explained by the poor ordering capability of the alkyl part of the layer, contrary to what is observed for similar layers on Au, and the key role of an entangled arrangement of the ethylene oxide chains which forms when these chains are long enough.

  14. Thermochemistry of Calcium-Magnesium-Aluminum-Silicate (CMAS) and Components of Advanced Thermal and Environmental Barrier Coating Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Costa, Gustavo C. C.; Acosta, Waldo A.; Zhu, Dongming; Ghoshal, Anindya

    2017-01-01

    There is increasing interest in the degradation mechanism studies of thermal and environmental barrier coatings (TEBCs) of gas turbines by molten CaO-MgO-Al(exp. 2)O(exp. 3)-SiO(exp. 2) CMAS). CMAS minerals are usually referred as silicon-containing sand dust and volcano ash materials that are carried by the intake air into gas turbines, e.g. in aircraft engines, and their deposits often react at high temperatures (greater than 1200 degrees C) with the engine turbine coating systems and components. The high temperature reactions causes degradation and accelerated failure of the static and rotating components of the turbine engines. We discuss some results of the reactions between the CMAS and Rare-Earth (RE = Y, Yb, Dy, Gd, Nd and Sm) - oxide stabilized ZrO(exp. 2) or HfO(exp. 2) systems, and the stability of the resulting oxides and silicates. Plasma sprayed hollow tube samples (outside diameter = 4.7 mm, wall thickness = 0.76 mm and = 26 mm height) were half filled with CMAS powder, wrapped and sealed with platinum foil, and heat treated at 1310 degrees C for 5h. Samples were characterized by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), X-ray diffraction, and cross-section electron microscopy analysis and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. It was found that CMAS penetrated the samples at the grain boundaries and dissolved the TEBC materials to form silicate phases containing the rare-earth elements. Furthermore, it was found that apatite crystalline phases were formed in the samples with total rare-earth content higher than 12 mol% in the reaction zone for the ZrO(exp. 2) system. In general, samples with the nominal compositions (30YSZ), HfO(exp. 2)-7Dy(exp. 2)O(exp. 2) and ZrO(exp. 2)-9.5Y(exp. 2)O(exp. 3)-2.25Gd(exp. 2)O(exp. 3)-2.25Yb(exp. 2)O(exp. 3) exhibited lower reactivity or more resistance to CMAS than the other coating compositions of this work.

  15. Pyrithiones as antifoulants: environmental fate and loss of toxicity.

    PubMed

    Turley, Patricia A; Fenn, Robert J; Ritter, James C; Callow, Maureen E

    2005-01-01

    The environmental fate and the loss of toxicity of two important antifouling actives, zinc pyrithione (ZnPT) and copper pyrithione (CuPT), were investigated using a bioassay study and an outdoor microcosm study. The bioassay used inhibition of the growth of a marine diatom (Amphora coffeaeformis) to measure the toxicity of ZnPT and CuPT over time in sterile, natural, and sediment-supplemented seawater. In natural seawater and sediment-supplemented seawater in the dark and in sterile seawater exposed to light, growth inhibition was reduced at rates corresponding to the rapid degradation rates for ZnPT and CuPT measured in previous aquatic metabolism, die-away, and photolysis studies. Similarly, the bioassay results from sterile seawater in the dark were consistent with the slower degradation rates measured in abiotic hydrolysis studies. In addition to corroborating the rapid degradation of pyrithione upon exposure to light or sediment, the loss of toxicity indicated that the degradation products were not toxic at the concentrations produced from the dose, which was much higher than predicted environmental concentrations. To supplement environmental fate studies designed to elucidate single-pathway transformations, a microcosm study was conducted to integrate all of the degradation pathways. The study used two sediment and water systems, one of which was dosed during the day and the other at night. The pyrithione degraded rapidly in the water phase, with very little accumulation in the sediment. 2-Pyridine sulfonic acid (PSA) and carbon dioxide were the only detectable degradation products 30 d after dosing. Aquatic toxicity studies with PSA showed no observable effect at concentrations at least three orders of magnitude higher than those for either ZnPT or CuPT. As a result, the worst-case environmental concentration of PSA is expected to be far below the no observable effect concentration.

  16. Managing the Use of Copper-Based Antifouling Paints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivasan, Mridula; Swain, Geoffrey W.

    2007-03-01

    Copper is the biocide of choice for present-day antifouling (AF) paints. It is also a major source of copper loading in to the marine environment and, as such, might cause local copper levels to exceed water quality criteria. The present study is multifaceted and looks into the overall impact of copper-based AF paints on copper concentrations along a 64-km stretch of the Indian River Lagoon and at Port Canaveral, Florida. This preliminary study is one of the first to outline issues and present background evidence on the current status of copper and copper-based AF usage in Florida and to address the need for management. Previous measurements of copper levels in these waters show a history of copper contamination close to marinas, boatyards, and at Port Canaveral that often exceed state and federal water quality standards. Further, we estimate that the total annual copper input into the Indian River Lagoon is between 1.7 tons/year (sailboats) and 2.1 tons/year (powerboats) from boats in 14 marinas. We estimate the copper input into Port Canaveral to be about 1.4 tons/year from seven cruise ships. A brief survey of marina operators and boat owners revealed attitudes and practices associated with AF paint usage that ranged from excellent to inferior. Management recommendations are made for a proactive approach to improving AF paint selection and application, assessing the environmental status of copper, and redefining existing management practices for sustainable AF paint usage and environmental health.

  17. Managing the use of copper-based antifouling paints.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Mridula; Swain, Geoffrey W

    2007-03-01

    Copper is the biocide of choice for present-day antifouling (AF) paints. It is also a major source of copper loading in to the marine environment and, as such, might cause local copper levels to exceed water quality criteria. The present study is multifaceted and looks into the overall impact of copper-based AF paints on copper concentrations along a 64-km stretch of the Indian River Lagoon and at Port Canaveral, Florida. This preliminary study is one of the first to outline issues and present background evidence on the current status of copper and copper-based AF usage in Florida and to address the need for management. Previous measurements of copper levels in these waters show a history of copper contamination close to marinas, boatyards, and at Port Canaveral that often exceed state and federal water quality standards. Further, we estimate that the total annual copper input into the Indian River Lagoon is between 1.7 tons/year (sailboats) and 2.1 tons/year (powerboats) from boats in 14 marinas. We estimate the copper input into Port Canaveral to be about 1.4 tons/year from seven cruise ships. A brief survey of marina operators and boat owners revealed attitudes and practices associated with AF paint usage that ranged from excellent to inferior. Management recommendations are made for a proactive approach to improving AF paint selection and application, assessing the environmental status of copper, and redefining existing management practices for sustainable AF paint usage and environmental health.

  18. Evaluation of polymeric coatings on their efficiency of inhibiting the adhesion of inorganic scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sousa, M. F. B.; Bertran, C. A.; Penna, M. O.

    2015-11-01

    The use of polymer coatings allows modulating wettability and can contribute decisively to mitigate the formation of scale in pipes and equipment. In this work critical surface energy (CSE) and surface free energy (SFE) were determined for several polymer coatings (epoxy phenol novolac resins and fluoropolymers), aiming the evaluation of their antifouling capacity against brines reproducing formation waters from pre salt wells. Coatings with lower values for SFE and CSE presented the lowest degree of fouling as determined by wet analysis using inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP - AES).

  19. Impact-Resistant Ceramic Coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, W. H.; Creedon, J. F.; Izu, Y. D.

    1986-01-01

    Refractory fibers more than double strength of coating. Impact strengths of ceramic coatings increase with increasing whisker content. Silicon carbide whiskers clearly produce largest increase, and improvement grows even more with high-temperature sintering. Coating also improves thermal and mechanical properties of electromagnetic components, mirrors, furnace linings, and ceramic parts of advanced internal-combustion engines.

  20. Environmental Effects from In-Water Hull Cleaning of Ablative Copper Antifouling Coatings

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-07-01

    Shields. 1963 Cancer magister zoea 96-hr LCso 0.049 Bretler et al., 1984 Cancer maenas 48-hr LC5o 100 Portmann, 1968 Crangon crangon 48-hr LC 5o 30...used to produce the results discussed in this report. The Owik-Lite chlorophyll assay uses microalgae as test organisms in a static non-renewal...exposure system. The premise of this assay is that a toxic response of microalgae to chemical exposure can be a change in growth rate or biomass. This change