Science.gov

Sample records for advanced backcross population

  1. A New Advanced Backcross Tomato Population Enables High Resolution Leaf QTL Mapping and Gene Identification

    PubMed Central

    Fulop, Daniel; Ranjan, Aashish; Ofner, Itai; Covington, Michael F.; Chitwood, Daniel H.; West, Donelly; Ichihashi, Yasunori; Headland, Lauren; Zamir, Daniel; Maloof, Julin N.; Sinha, Neelima R.

    2016-01-01

    Quantitative Trait Loci (QTL) mapping is a powerful technique for dissecting the genetic basis of traits and species differences. Established tomato mapping populations between domesticated tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) and its more distant interfertile relatives typically follow a near isogenic line (NIL) design, such as the S. pennellii Introgression Line (IL) population, with a single wild introgression per line in an otherwise domesticated genetic background. Here, we report on a new advanced backcross QTL mapping resource for tomato, derived from a cross between the M82 tomato cultivar and S. pennellii. This so-called Backcrossed Inbred Line (BIL) population is comprised of a mix of BC2 and BC3 lines, with domesticated tomato as the recurrent parent. The BIL population is complementary to the existing S. pennellii IL population, with which it shares parents. Using the BILs, we mapped traits for leaf complexity, leaflet shape, and flowering time. We demonstrate the utility of the BILs for fine-mapping QTL, particularly QTL initially mapped in the ILs, by fine-mapping several QTL to single or few candidate genes. Moreover, we confirm the value of a backcrossed population with multiple introgressions per line, such as the BILs, for epistatic QTL mapping. Our work was further enabled by the development of our own statistical inference and visualization tools, namely a heterogeneous hidden Markov model for genotyping the lines, and by using state-of-the-art sparse regression techniques for QTL mapping. PMID:27510891

  2. Association between molecular markers and blast resistance in an advanced backcross population of rice.

    PubMed

    Wu, J-L; Sinha, P K; Variar, M; Zheng, K-L; Leach, J E; Courtois, B; Leung, H

    2004-04-01

    An advanced backcross population consisting of 80 BC(3)F(3) lines derived from rice vars. Vandana/ Moroberekan was analysed for blast resistance and genotyped with 50 candidate genes and 23 simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers. Six candidate defence response genes [thaumatin, three nucleotide-binding site-leucine-rich repeat sequences from maize and two resistance gene analogue (RGA) markers] and one SSR marker (RM21) were significantly associated with partial blast resistance in rice ( P=0.01). These markers accounted for phenotypic variation ranging from 9.6% to 29.4% and contributed to 76% of the total variation of percentage diseased leaf area (DLA) observed under natural infection. Four candidate genes (oxalate oxidase, 14-3-3 protein and two RGA markers) and four SSR markers (RM21, RM168, RM215 and RM250) were significantly associated with resistance to a single pathogen isolate, PO6-6. Among these, two markers were for DLA, five for lesion number and one for lesion size. These markers accounted for 9.1-28.7% of the phenotypic variation. A moderate correlation ( r=0.48, P<0.01) was found between the level of partial resistance measured in the greenhouse and that measured under natural conditions. Analysis of BC(3)F(4) progeny using genotypes of BC(3)F(3) confirmed the phenotypic contribution of these markers. Cluster analysis of DNA profiles showed that the BC(3) population was genetically similar (>85%) to the recurrent parent Vandana. Although no obvious relationship between DNA profiles and resistant phenotypes was observed, three lines (VM19, VM46 and VM76) in a cluster with high similarity to Vandana (89-96%) expressed a high level of partial blast resistance in the field. Analysis of disease progress in the field confirmed the performance of selected lines based on greenhouse and nursery analyses. The advanced backcross progeny with resistance phenotypes tagged by markers will be useful for accumulating blast resistance in upland rice.

  3. Development and genetic characterization of an Advanced Backcross-Nested Association Mapping (AB-NAM) population of wild × cultivated barley

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The ability to access alleles from unadapted germplasm collections is a long-standing problem for geneticists and breeders. Here we developed, characterized, and demonstrated the utility of a wild barley advanced backcross-nested association mapping (AB-NAM) population. We developed this population ...

  4. Identification of rice sheath blight and blast quantitative trait loci in two different O. satival/O. nivara advanced backcross populations

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Two accessions of the rice (Oryza sativa) wild ancestral species, O. nivara identified as being moderately resistant to sheath blight and leaf blast diseases, were used as donor parents to develop two advanced backcross populations with the U.S. rice cultivar, Bengal, as the recurrent parent. The O...

  5. QTL analysis of cotton fiber length in advanced backcross populations derived from a cross between Gossypium hirsutum and G. mustelinum.

    PubMed

    Wang, Baohua; Draye, Xavier; Zhuang, Zhimin; Zhang, Zhengsheng; Liu, Min; Lubbers, Edward L; Jones, Don; May, O Lloyd; Paterson, Andrew H; Chee, Peng W

    2017-06-01

    QTLs for fiber length mapped in three generations of advanced backcross populations derived from crossing Gossypium hirsutum and Gossypium mustelinum showed opportunities to improve elite cottons by introgression from wild relatives. The molecular basis of cotton fiber length in crosses between Gossypium hirsutum and Gossypium mustelinum was dissected using 21 BC3F2 and 12 corresponding BC3F2:3 and BC3F2:4 families. Sixty-five quantitative trait loci (QTLs) were detected by one-way analysis of variance. The QTL numbers detected for upper-half mean length (UHM), fiber uniformity index (UI), and short fiber content (SFC) were 19, 20, and 26 respectively. Twenty-three of the 65 QTLs could be detected at least twice near adjacent markers in the same family or near the same markers across different families/generations, and 32 QTLs were detected in both one-way variance analyses and mixed model-based composite interval mapping. G. mustelinum alleles increased UHM and UI and decreased SFC for five, one, and one QTLs, respectively. In addition to the main-effect QTLs, 17 epistatic QTLs were detected which helped to elucidate the genetic basis of cotton fiber length. Significant among-family genotypic effects were detected at 18, 16, and 16 loci for UHM, UI, and SFC, respectively. Six, two, and two loci showed genotype × family interaction for UHM, UI and SFC, respectively, illustrating complexities that might be faced in introgression of exotic germplasm into cultivated cotton. Co-location of many QTLs for UHM, UI, and SFC accounted for correlations among these traits, and selection of these QTLs may improve the three traits simultaneously. The simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers associated with G. mustelinum QTLs will assist breeders in transferring and maintaining valuable traits from this exotic source during cultivar development.

  6. Development and Genetic Characterization of an Advanced Backcross-Nested Association Mapping (AB-NAM) Population of Wild × Cultivated Barley

    PubMed Central

    Nice, Liana M.; Steffenson, Brian J.; Brown-Guedira, Gina L.; Akhunov, Eduard D.; Liu, Chaochih; Kono, Thomas J. Y.; Morrell, Peter L.; Blake, Thomas K.; Horsley, Richard D.; Smith, Kevin P.; Muehlbauer, Gary J.

    2016-01-01

    The ability to access alleles from unadapted germplasm collections is a long-standing problem for geneticists and breeders. Here we developed, characterized, and demonstrated the utility of a wild barley advanced backcross-nested association mapping (AB-NAM) population. We developed this population by backcrossing 25 wild barley accessions to the six-rowed malting barley cultivar Rasmusson. The 25 wild barley parents were selected from the 318 accession Wild Barley Diversity Collection (WBDC) to maximize allelic diversity. The resulting 796 BC2F4:6 lines were genotyped with 384 SNP markers, and an additional 4022 SNPs and 263,531 sequence variants were imputed onto the population using 9K iSelect SNP genotypes and exome capture sequence of the parents, respectively. On average, 96% of each wild parent was introgressed into the Rasmusson background, and the population exhibited low population structure. While linkage disequilibrium (LD) decay (r2 = 0.2) was lowest in the WBDC (0.36 cM), the AB-NAM (9.2 cM) exhibited more rapid LD decay than comparable advanced backcross (28.6 cM) and recombinant inbred line (32.3 cM) populations. Three qualitative traits: glossy spike, glossy sheath, and black hull color were mapped with high resolution to loci corresponding to known barley mutants for these traits. Additionally, a total of 10 QTL were identified for grain protein content. The combination of low LD, negligible population structure, and high diversity in an adapted background make the AB-NAM an important tool for high-resolution gene mapping and discovery of novel allelic variation using wild barley germplasm. PMID:27182953

  7. Development and Genetic Characterization of an Advanced Backcross-Nested Association Mapping (AB-NAM) Population of Wild × Cultivated Barley.

    PubMed

    Nice, Liana M; Steffenson, Brian J; Brown-Guedira, Gina L; Akhunov, Eduard D; Liu, Chaochih; Kono, Thomas J Y; Morrell, Peter L; Blake, Thomas K; Horsley, Richard D; Smith, Kevin P; Muehlbauer, Gary J

    2016-07-01

    The ability to access alleles from unadapted germplasm collections is a long-standing problem for geneticists and breeders. Here we developed, characterized, and demonstrated the utility of a wild barley advanced backcross-nested association mapping (AB-NAM) population. We developed this population by backcrossing 25 wild barley accessions to the six-rowed malting barley cultivar Rasmusson. The 25 wild barley parents were selected from the 318 accession Wild Barley Diversity Collection (WBDC) to maximize allelic diversity. The resulting 796 BC2F4:6 lines were genotyped with 384 SNP markers, and an additional 4022 SNPs and 263,531 sequence variants were imputed onto the population using 9K iSelect SNP genotypes and exome capture sequence of the parents, respectively. On average, 96% of each wild parent was introgressed into the Rasmusson background, and the population exhibited low population structure. While linkage disequilibrium (LD) decay (r(2) = 0.2) was lowest in the WBDC (0.36 cM), the AB-NAM (9.2 cM) exhibited more rapid LD decay than comparable advanced backcross (28.6 cM) and recombinant inbred line (32.3 cM) populations. Three qualitative traits: glossy spike, glossy sheath, and black hull color were mapped with high resolution to loci corresponding to known barley mutants for these traits. Additionally, a total of 10 QTL were identified for grain protein content. The combination of low LD, negligible population structure, and high diversity in an adapted background make the AB-NAM an important tool for high-resolution gene mapping and discovery of novel allelic variation using wild barley germplasm.

  8. Advanced backcross QTL mapping of resistance to Fusarium head blight and plant morphological traits in a Triticum macha × T. aestivum population.

    PubMed

    Buerstmayr, Maria; Lemmens, Marc; Steiner, Barbara; Buerstmayr, Hermann

    2011-07-01

    While many reports on genetic analysis of Fusarium head blight (FHB) resistance in bread wheat have been published during the past decade, only limited information is available on FHB resistance derived from wheat relatives. In this contribution, we report on the genetic analysis of FHB resistance derived from Triticum macha (Georgian spelt wheat). As the origin of T. macha is in the Caucasian region, it is supposed that its FHB resistance differs from other well-investigated resistance sources. To introduce valuable alleles from the landrace T. macha into a modern genetic background, we adopted an advanced backcross QTL mapping scheme. A backcross-derived recombinant-inbred line population of 321 BC(2)F(3) lines was developed from a cross of T. macha with the Austrian winter wheat cultivar Furore. The population was evaluated for Fusarium resistance in seven field experiments during four seasons using artificial inoculations. A total of 300 lines of the population were genetically fingerprinted using SSR and AFLP markers. The resulting linkage map covered 33 linkage groups with 560 markers. Five novel FHB-resistance QTL, all descending from T. macha, were found on four chromosomes (2A, 2B, 5A, 5B). Several QTL for morphological and developmental traits were mapped in the same population, which partly overlapped with FHB-resistance QTL. Only the 2BL FHB-resistance QTL co-located with a plant height QTL. The largest-effect FHB-resistance QTL in this population mapped at the spelt-type locus on chromosome 5A and was associated with the wild-type allele q, but it is unclear whether q has a pleiotropic effect on FHB resistance or is closely linked to a nearby resistance QTL.

  9. Development and Genetic Characterization of Advanced Backcross Materials and An Introgression Line Population of Solanum incanum in a S. melongena Background

    PubMed Central

    Gramazio, Pietro; Prohens, Jaime; Plazas, Mariola; Mangino, Giulio; Herraiz, Francisco J.; Vilanova, Santiago

    2017-01-01

    Advanced backcrosses (ABs) and introgression lines (ILs) of eggplant (Solanum melongena) can speed up genetics and genomics studies and breeding in this crop. We have developed the first full set of ABs and ILs in eggplant using Solanum incanum, a wild eggplant that has a relatively high tolerance to drought, as a donor parent. The development of these ABs and IL eggplant populations had a low efficiency in the early stages, because of the lack of molecular markers and genomic tools. However, this dramatically improved after performing genotyping-by-sequencing in the first round of selfing, followed by high-resolution-melting single nucleotide polymorphism genotyping in subsequent selection steps. A set of 73 selected ABs covered 99% of the S. incanum genome, while 25 fixed immortal ILs, each carrying a single introgressed fragment in homozygosis, altogether spanned 61.7% of the S. incanum genome. The introgressed size fragment in the ILs contained between 0.1 and 10.9% of the S. incanum genome, with a mean value of 4.3%. Sixty-eight candidate genes involved in drought tolerance were identified in the set of ILs. This first set of ABs and ILs of eggplant will be extremely useful for the genetic dissection of traits of interest for eggplant, and represents an elite material for introduction into the breeding pipelines for developing new eggplant cultivars adapted to the challenges posed by the climate-change scenario. PMID:28912788

  10. Development and Genetic Characterization of Advanced Backcross Materials and An Introgression Line Population of Solanum incanum in a S. melongena Background.

    PubMed

    Gramazio, Pietro; Prohens, Jaime; Plazas, Mariola; Mangino, Giulio; Herraiz, Francisco J; Vilanova, Santiago

    2017-01-01

    Advanced backcrosses (ABs) and introgression lines (ILs) of eggplant (Solanum melongena) can speed up genetics and genomics studies and breeding in this crop. We have developed the first full set of ABs and ILs in eggplant using Solanum incanum, a wild eggplant that has a relatively high tolerance to drought, as a donor parent. The development of these ABs and IL eggplant populations had a low efficiency in the early stages, because of the lack of molecular markers and genomic tools. However, this dramatically improved after performing genotyping-by-sequencing in the first round of selfing, followed by high-resolution-melting single nucleotide polymorphism genotyping in subsequent selection steps. A set of 73 selected ABs covered 99% of the S. incanum genome, while 25 fixed immortal ILs, each carrying a single introgressed fragment in homozygosis, altogether spanned 61.7% of the S. incanum genome. The introgressed size fragment in the ILs contained between 0.1 and 10.9% of the S. incanum genome, with a mean value of 4.3%. Sixty-eight candidate genes involved in drought tolerance were identified in the set of ILs. This first set of ABs and ILs of eggplant will be extremely useful for the genetic dissection of traits of interest for eggplant, and represents an elite material for introduction into the breeding pipelines for developing new eggplant cultivars adapted to the challenges posed by the climate-change scenario.

  11. AB-QTL analysis in winter wheat: II. Genetic analysis of seedling and field resistance against leaf rust in a wheat advanced backcross population.

    PubMed

    Naz, Ali Ahmad; Kunert, Antje; Lind, Volker; Pillen, Klaus; Léon, Jens

    2008-05-01

    The present study aimed to localize exotic quantitative trait locus (QTL) alleles for the improvement of leaf rust (P. triticina) resistance in an advanced backcross (AB) population, B22, which is derived from a cross between the winter wheat cultivar Batis (Triticum aestivum) and the synthetic wheat accession Syn022L. The latter was developed from hybridization of T. turgidum ssp. dicoccoides and T. tauschii. Altogether, 250 BC2F3 lines of B22 were assessed for seedling resistance against the leaf rust isolate 77WxR under controlled conditions. In addition, field resistance against leaf rust was evaluated by assessing symptom severity under natural infestation across multiple environments. Simultaneously, population B22 was genotyped with a total of 97 SSR markers, distributed over the wheat A, B and D genomes. The phenotype and genotype data were subjected to QTL analysis by applying a 3-factorial mixed model analysis of variance including the marker genotype as a fixed effect and the environments, the lines and the marker by environment interactions as random effects. The QTL analysis revealed six putative QTLs for seedling resistance and seven for field resistance. For seedling resistance, the effects of exotic QTL alleles improved resistance at all detected loci. The maximum decrease of disease symptoms (-46.3%) was associated with marker locus Xbarc149 on chromosome 1D. For field resistance, two loci had stable main effects across environments and five loci exhibited marker by environment interaction effects. The strongest effects were detected at marker locus Xbarc149 on chromosome 1D, at which the exotic allele decreased seedling symptoms by 46.3% and field symptoms by 43.6%, respectively. Some of the detected QTLs co-localized with known resistance genes, while others appear to be as novel resistance loci. Our findings indicate, that the exotic wheat accession Syn022L may be useful for the improvement of leaf rust resistance in cultivated wheat.

  12. Identification of QTL for Early Vigor and Stay-Green Conferring Tolerance to Drought in Two Connected Advanced Backcross Populations in Tropical Maize (Zea mays L.).

    PubMed

    Trachsel, Samuel; Sun, Dapeng; SanVicente, Felix M; Zheng, Hongjian; Atlin, Gary N; Suarez, Edgar Antonio; Babu, Raman; Zhang, Xuecai

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to identify quantitative trait loci (QTL) for secondary traits related to grain yield (GY) in two BC1F2:3 backcross populations (LPSpop and DTPpop) under well-watered (4 environments; WW) and drought stressed (6; DS) conditions to facilitate breeding efforts towards drought tolerant maize. GY reached 5.6 and 5.8 t/ha under WW in the LPSpop and the DTPpop, respectively. Under DS, grain yield was reduced by 65% (LPSpop) to 59% (DTPpop) relative to WW. GY was strongly associated with the normalized vegetative index (NDVI; r ranging from 0.61 to 0.96) across environmental conditions and with an early flowering under drought stressed conditions (r ranging from -0.18 to -0.25) indicative of the importance of early vigor and drought escape for GY. Out of the 105 detected QTL, 53 were overdominant indicative of strong heterosis. For 14 out of 18 detected vigor QTL, as well as for eight flowering time QTL the trait increasing allele was derived from CML491. Collocations of early vigor QTL with QTL for stay green (bin 2.02, WW, LPSpop; 2.07, DS, DTPpop), the number of ears per plant (bins 2.02, 2.05, WW, LPSpop; 5.02, DS, LPSpop) and GY (bin 2.07, WW, DTPpop; 5.04, WW, LPSpop), reinforce the importance of the observed correlations. LOD scores for early vigor QTL in these bins ranged from 2.2 to 11.25 explaining 4.6 (additivity: +0.28) to 19.9% (additivity: +0.49) of the observed phenotypic variance. A strong flowering QTL was detected in bin 2.06 across populations and environmental conditions explaining 26-31.3% of the observed phenotypic variation (LOD: 13-17; additivity: 0.1-0.6d). Improving drought tolerance while at the same time maintaining yield potential could be achieved by combining alleles conferring early vigor from the recurrent parent with alleles advancing flowering from the donor. Additionally bin 8.06 (DTPpop) harbored a QTL for GY under WW (additivity: 0.27 t/ha) and DS (additivity: 0.58 t/ha). R2 ranged from 0 (DTPpop, WW) to 26.54% (LPSpop, DS

  13. Identification of QTL for Early Vigor and Stay-Green Conferring Tolerance to Drought in Two Connected Advanced Backcross Populations in Tropical Maize (Zea mays L.)

    PubMed Central

    Trachsel, Samuel; Sun, Dapeng; SanVicente, Felix M.; Zheng, Hongjian; Atlin, Gary N.; Suarez, Edgar Antonio; Babu, Raman; Zhang, Xuecai

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to identify quantitative trait loci (QTL) for secondary traits related to grain yield (GY) in two BC1F2:3 backcross populations (LPSpop and DTPpop) under well-watered (4 environments; WW) and drought stressed (6; DS) conditions to facilitate breeding efforts towards drought tolerant maize. GY reached 5.6 and 5.8 t/ha under WW in the LPSpop and the DTPpop, respectively. Under DS, grain yield was reduced by 65% (LPSpop) to 59% (DTPpop) relative to WW. GY was strongly associated with the normalized vegetative index (NDVI; r ranging from 0.61 to 0.96) across environmental conditions and with an early flowering under drought stressed conditions (r ranging from -0.18 to -0.25) indicative of the importance of early vigor and drought escape for GY. Out of the 105 detected QTL, 53 were overdominant indicative of strong heterosis. For 14 out of 18 detected vigor QTL, as well as for eight flowering time QTL the trait increasing allele was derived from CML491. Collocations of early vigor QTL with QTL for stay green (bin 2.02, WW, LPSpop; 2.07, DS, DTPpop), the number of ears per plant (bins 2.02, 2.05, WW, LPSpop; 5.02, DS, LPSpop) and GY (bin 2.07, WW, DTPpop; 5.04, WW, LPSpop), reinforce the importance of the observed correlations. LOD scores for early vigor QTL in these bins ranged from 2.2 to 11.25 explaining 4.6 (additivity: +0.28) to 19.9% (additivity: +0.49) of the observed phenotypic variance. A strong flowering QTL was detected in bin 2.06 across populations and environmental conditions explaining 26–31.3% of the observed phenotypic variation (LOD: 13–17; additivity: 0.1–0.6d). Improving drought tolerance while at the same time maintaining yield potential could be achieved by combining alleles conferring early vigor from the recurrent parent with alleles advancing flowering from the donor. Additionally bin 8.06 (DTPpop) harbored a QTL for GY under WW (additivity: 0.27 t/ha) and DS (additivity: 0.58 t/ha). R2 ranged from 0 (DTPpop, WW) to 26.54% (LPSpop

  14. Identification of trait-improving quantitative trait loci for grain yield components from a dent corn inbred line in an advanced backcross BC2F2 population and comparison with its F2:3 population in popcorn.

    PubMed

    Li, Y L; Niu, S Z; Dong, Y B; Cui, D Q; Wang, Y Z; Liu, Y Y; Wei, M G

    2007-06-01

    Normal maize germplasm could be used to improve the grain yield of popcorn inbreds. Our first objective was to locate genetic factors associated with trait variation and make first assessment on the efficiency of advanced backcross quantitative trait locus (AB-QTL) analysis for the identification and transfer of favorable QTL alleles for grain yield components from the dent corn inbred. A second objective was to compare the detection of QTL in the BC2F2 population with results using F(2:3) lines of the same parents. Two hundred and twenty selected BC2F2 families developed from a cross between Dan232 and an elite popcorn inbred N04 were evaluated for six grain yield components under two environments, and genotyped by means of 170 SSR markers. Using composite interval mapping (CIM), a total of 19 significant QTL were detected. Eighteen QTL had favorable alleles contributed by the dent corn parent Dan232. Sixteen of these favorable QTL alleles were not in the same or near marker intervals with QTL for popping characteristics. Six QTL were also detected in the F(2:3) population. Improved N04 could be developed from 210 and 208 families with higher grain weight per plant and/or 100-grain weight, respectively, and 35 families with the same or higher popping expansion volume than N04. In addition, near isogenic lines containing detected QTL (QTL-NILs) for grain weight per plant and/or 100-grain weight could be obtained from 12 families. Our study demonstrated that the AB-QTL method can be applied to identify and manipulate favorable QTL alleles from normal corn inbreds and combine QTL detection and popcorn breeding efficiently.

  15. USDA, ARS beit alpha cucumber inbred backcross line population

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A series of Beit Alpha cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) market type inbred backcross were released in January 2010 by the Agricultural Research Service, United States Department of Agriculture. The IBL were made available to U.S. cucumber breeders to supply a source from which they may develop Beit Al...

  16. Identifying Rare FHB-Resistant Segregants in Intransigent Backcross and F2 Winter Wheat Populations

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Anthony J.; Sarti-Dvorjak, Daniela; Brown-Guedira, Gina; Dong, Yanhong; Baik, Byung-Kee; Van Sanford, David A.

    2016-01-01

    Fusarium head blight (FHB), caused mainly by Fusarium graminearum Schwabe [telomorph: Gibberella zeae Schwein.(Petch)] in the US, is one of the most destructive diseases of wheat (Triticum aestivum L. and T. durum L.). Infected grain is usually contaminated with deoxynivalenol (DON), a serious mycotoxin. The challenge in FHB resistance breeding is combining resistance with superior agronomic and quality characteristics. Exotic QTL are widely used to improve FHB resistance. Success depends on the genetic background into which the QTL are introgressed, whether through backcrossing or forward crossing; QTL expression is impossible to predict. In this study four high-yielding soft red winter wheat breeding lines with little or no scab resistance were each crossed to a donor parent (VA01W-476) with resistance alleles at two QTL: Fhb1 (chromosome 3BS) and QFhs.nau-2DL (chromosome 2DL) to generate backcross and F2 progeny. F2 individuals were genotyped and assigned to 4 groups according to presence/ absence of resistance alleles at one or both QTL. The effectiveness of these QTL in reducing FHB rating, incidence, index, severity, Fusarium-damaged kernels (FDK) and DON, in F2-derived lines was assessed over 2 years. Fhb1 showed an average reduction in DON of 17.5%, and conferred significant resistance in 3 of 4 populations. QFhs.nau-2DL reduced DON 6.7% on average and conferred significant resistance in 2 of 4 populations. The combination of Fhb1 and QFhs.nau-2DL resistance reduced DON 25.5% across all populations. Double resistant lines had significantly reduced DON compared to double susceptible lines in 3 populations. Backcross derived progeny were planted in replicated yield trials (2011 and 2012) and in a scab nursery in 2012. Several top yielding lines performed well in the scab nursery, with acceptable DON concentrations, even though the average effect of either QTL in this population was not significant. Population selection is often viewed as an “all or nothing

  17. Analysis of quantitative trait loci affecting chlorophyll content of rice leaves in a double haploid population and two backcross populations.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Gonghao; Zeng, Jing; He, Yuqing

    2014-02-25

    Chlorophyll content, one of the most important physiological parameters related to plant photosynthesis, is usually used to predict yield potential. To map the quantitative trait loci (QTLs) underlying the chlorophyll content of rice leaves, a double haploid (DH) population was developed from an indica/japonica (Zhenshan 97/Wuyujing 2) crossing and two backcross populations were established subsequently by backcrossing DH lines with each of their parents. The contents of chlorophyll a and chlorophyll b were determined by using a spectrophotometer to directly measure the leaf chlorophyll extracts. To determine the leaf chlorophyll retention along with maturation, all measurements were performed on the day of heading and were repeated 30 days later. A total of 60 QTLs were resolved for all the traits using these three populations. These QTLs were distributed on 10 rice chromosomes, except chromosomes 5 and 10; the closer the traits, the more clustering of the QTLs residing on common rice chromosomal regions. In general, the majority of QTLs that specify chlorophyll a content also play a role in determining chlorophyll b content. Strangely, chlorophyll content in this study was found mostly to be lacking or to have a negative correlation with yield. In both backcross F1 populations, overdominant (or underdominant) loci were more important than complete or partially dominant loci for main-effect QTLs and epistatic QTLs, thereby supporting previous findings that overdominant effects are the primary genetic basis for depression in inbreeding and heterosis in rice. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. High resolution genotyping by restriction enzyme-phased sequencing of advanced backcross lines of rice exhibiting differential cold stress recovery

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Advanced backcross rice lines MIb 4853-9 and 6885-2 harbor major seedling cold tolerance QTL qCTS4 and qCTS12 from the temperate japonica M202 in the genetic background of the indica IR50. Previous studies have shown that these lines exhibit the same tolerance, based on visual ratings, under constan...

  19. Hybridization but no evidence for backcrossing and introgression in a sympatric population of great reed warblers and clamorous reed warblers.

    PubMed

    Hansson, Bengt; Tarka, Maja; Dawson, Deborah A; Horsburgh, Gavin J

    2012-01-01

    Hybridization is observed frequently in birds, but often it is not known whether the hybrids are fertile and if backcrossing occurs. The breeding ranges of the great reed warbler (Acrocephalus arundinaceus) and the clamorous reed warbler (A. stentoreus) overlap in southern Kazakhstan and a previous study has documented hybridization in a sympatric population. In the present study, we first present a large set of novel microsatellite loci isolated and characterised in great reed warblers. Secondly, we evaluate whether hybridization in the sympatric breeding population has been followed by backcrossing and introgression.We isolated 181 unique microsatellite loci in great reed warblers. Of 41 loci evaluated, 40 amplified and 30 were polymorphic. Bayesian clustering analyses based on genotype data from 23 autosomal loci recognised two well-defined genetic clusters corresponding to the two species. Individuals clustered to a very high extent to either of these clusters (admixture proportions ≥ 0.984) with the exception of four previously suggested arundinaceus-stentoreus hybrid birds that showed mixed ancestry (admixture proportions 0.495-0.619). Analyses of simulated hybrids and backcrossed individuals showed that the sampled birds do not correspond to first-fourth-generation backcrosses, and that fifth or higher generation backcrosses to a high extent resemble 'pure' birds at this set of markers.We conclude that these novel microsatellite loci provide a useful molecular resource for Acrocephalus warblers. The time to reach reproductive isolation is believed to be very long in birds, approximately 5 Myrs, and with an estimated divergence time of 2 Myrs between these warblers, some backcrossing and introgression could have been expected. However, there was no evidence for backcrossing and introgression suggesting that hybrids are either infertile or their progeny inviable. Very low levels of introgression cannot be excluded, which still may be an important factor as a

  20. Quantitative trait loci with effects on feed efficiency traits in Hereford x composite double backcross populations

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Two half-sib families of backcross progeny were produced by mating F1 Line 1 Hereford (L1) x composite gene combination (CGC) bulls with L1 and CGC cows. Feed intake and periodic weights were measured for 218 backcross progeny. These progeny were genotyped using 232 microsatellite markers that spann...

  1. Registration of a rice gene-mapping population consisting of 'TeQing'-into-'Lemont' backcross introgression lines

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A new rice (Oryza sativa L.) mapping population consisting of 123 'TeQing'-into-'Lemont' backcross introgression lines (TILs) (Reg. No. MP-5, NSL 477436 MAP) was developed by the USDA-ARS Rice Research Unit at the Texas A&M University System AgriLife Research and Extension Center at Beaumont, TX, in...

  2. Selection in backcross programmes

    PubMed Central

    Hospital, Frédéric

    2005-01-01

    Backcrossing is a well-known and long established breeding scheme where a characteristic is introgressed from a donor parent into the genomic background of a recurrent parent. The various uses of backcrossing in modern genetics, particularly with the help of molecular markers, are reviewed here. Selection in backcross programmes is used to either improve the genetic value of plant and animal populations or fine map quantitative trait loci. Both cases are helpful in our understanding of the genetic bases of quantitative traits variation. PMID:16048792

  3. Advanced backcross QTL analysis of a Lycopersicon esculentum x L. pennellii cross and identification of possible orthologs in the Solanaceae.

    PubMed

    Frary, A; Fulton, T M; Zamir, D; Tanksley, S D

    2004-02-01

    In this study, the advanced backcross QTL (AB-QTL) mapping strategy was used to identify loci for yield, processing and fruit quality traits in a population derived from the interspecific cross Lycopersicon esculentum E6203 x Lycopersicon pennellii accession LA1657. A total of 175 BC(2) plants were genotyped with 150 molecular markers and BC(2)F(1) plots were grown and phenotyped for 25 traits in three locations in Israel and California, U.S.A. A total of 84 different QTLs were identified, 45% of which have been possibly identified in other wild-species-derived populations of tomato. Moreover, three fruit-weight/size and shape QTLs ( fsz2b.1, fw3.1/ fsz3.1 and fs8.1) appear to have putative orthologs in the related solanaceous species, pepper and eggplant. For the 23 traits for which allelic effects could be deemed as favorable or unfavorable, 26% of the identified loci had L. pennellii alleles that enhanced the performance of the elite parent. Alleles that could be targeted for further introgression into cultivated tomato were also identified.

  4. Efficient QTL detection for nonhost resistance in wild lettuce: backcross inbred lines versus F2 population

    PubMed Central

    Pelgrom, K.; Stam, P.; Lindhout, P.

    2008-01-01

    In plants, several population types [F2, recombinant inbred lines, backcross inbred lines (BILs), etc.] are used for quantitative trait locus (QTL) analyses. However, dissection of the trait of interest and subsequent confirmation by introgression of QTLs for breeding purposes has not been as successful as that predicted from theoretical calculations. More practical knowledge of different QTL mapping approaches is needed. In this recent study, we describe the detection and mapping of quantitative resistances to downy mildew in a set of 29 BILs of cultivated lettuce (L. sativa) containing genome segments introgressed from wild lettuce (L. saligna). Introgression regions that are associated with quantitative resistance are considered to harbor a QTL. Furthermore, we compare this with results from an already existing F2 population derived from the same parents. We identified six QTLs in our BIL approach compared to only three in the F2 approach, while there were two QTLs in common. We performed a simulation study based on our actual data to help us interpret them. This revealed that two newly detected QTLs in the BILs had gone unnoticed in the F2, due to a combination of recessiveness of the trait and skewed segregation, causing a deficit of the wild species alleles. This study clearly illustrates the added value of extended genetic studies on two different population types (BILs and F2) to dissect complex genetic traits. PMID:18251002

  5. Population genomics reveals a possible history of backcrossing and recombination in the gynogenetic fish Poecilia formosa

    PubMed Central

    Alberici da Barbiano, Laura; Gompert, Zachariah; Aspbury, Andrea S.; Gabor, Caitlin R.; Nice, Chris C.

    2013-01-01

    Unisexual sperm-dependent vertebrates are of hybrid origins, rare, and predicted to be short-lived as a result of several challenges arising from their mode of reproduction. In particular, because of a lack of recombination, clonal species are predicted to have a low potential to respond to natural selection. However, many unisexual sperm-dependent species persist, and assessing the genetic diversity present in these species is fundamental to understanding how they avoid extinction. We used population genomic methods to assess genotypic variation within the unisexual fish Poecilia formosa. Measures of admixture and population differentiation, as well as clustering analyses, indicate that the genomes of individuals of P. formosa are admixed and intermediate between Poecilia latipinna and Poecilia mexicana, consistent with the hypothesis of their hybrid origins. Bayesian genomic cline analyses indicate that about 12% of sampled loci exhibit patterns consistent with inheritance from only one parent. The estimation of observed heterozygosity clearly suggests that P. formosa is not comprised of direct descendants of a single nonrecombining asexual F1 hybrid individual. Additionally, the estimation of observed heterozygosity provides support for the hypothesis that the history of this unisexual species has included backcrossing with the parent species before the onset of gynogenesis. We also document high levels of variation among asexual individuals, which is attributable to recombination (historical or ongoing) and the accumulation of mutations. The high genetic variation suggests that this unisexual vertebrate has more potential to respond to natural selection than if they were frozen F1 hybrids. PMID:23918384

  6. Population genomics reveals a possible history of backcrossing and recombination in the gynogenetic fish Poecilia formosa.

    PubMed

    Alberici da Barbiano, Laura; Gompert, Zachariah; Aspbury, Andrea S; Gabor, Caitlin R; Nice, Chris C

    2013-08-20

    Unisexual sperm-dependent vertebrates are of hybrid origins, rare, and predicted to be short-lived as a result of several challenges arising from their mode of reproduction. In particular, because of a lack of recombination, clonal species are predicted to have a low potential to respond to natural selection. However, many unisexual sperm-dependent species persist, and assessing the genetic diversity present in these species is fundamental to understanding how they avoid extinction. We used population genomic methods to assess genotypic variation within the unisexual fish Poecilia formosa. Measures of admixture and population differentiation, as well as clustering analyses, indicate that the genomes of individuals of P. formosa are admixed and intermediate between Poecilia latipinna and Poecilia mexicana, consistent with the hypothesis of their hybrid origins. Bayesian genomic cline analyses indicate that about 12% of sampled loci exhibit patterns consistent with inheritance from only one parent. The estimation of observed heterozygosity clearly suggests that P. formosa is not comprised of direct descendants of a single nonrecombining asexual F1 hybrid individual. Additionally, the estimation of observed heterozygosity provides support for the hypothesis that the history of this unisexual species has included backcrossing with the parent species before the onset of gynogenesis. We also document high levels of variation among asexual individuals, which is attributable to recombination (historical or ongoing) and the accumulation of mutations. The high genetic variation suggests that this unisexual vertebrate has more potential to respond to natural selection than if they were frozen F1 hybrids.

  7. Fruit cuticle lipid composition and fruit post-harvest water loss in an advanced backcross generation of pepper (Capsicum sp.).

    PubMed

    Parsons, Eugene P; Popopvsky, Sigal; Lohrey, Gregory T; Lü, Shiyou; Alkalai-Tuvia, Sharon; Perzelan, Yaacov; Paran, Ilan; Fallik, Elazar; Jenks, Matthew A

    2012-09-01

    To understand the role of fruit cuticle lipid composition in fruit water loss, an advanced backcross population, the BC(2)F(2) , was created between the Capsicum annuum (PI1154) and the Capsicum chinense (USDA162), which have high and low post-harvest water loss rates, respectively. Besides dramatic differences in fruit water loss, preliminary studies also revealed that these parents exhibited significant differences in both the amount and composition of their fruit cuticle. Cuticle analysis of the BC(2)F(2) fruit revealed that although water loss rate was not strongly associated with the total surface wax amount, there were significant correlations between water loss rate and cuticle composition. We found a positive correlation between water loss rate and the amount of total triterpenoid plus sterol compounds, and negative correlations between water loss and the alkane to triterpenoid plus sterol ratio. We also report negative correlations between water loss rate and the proportion of both alkanes and aliphatics to total surface wax amount. For the first time, we report significant correlations between water loss and cutin monomer composition. We found positive associations of water loss rate with the total cutin, total C(16) monomers and 16-dihydroxy hexadecanoic acid. Our results support the hypothesis that simple straight-chain aliphatic cuticle constituents form more impermeable cuticular barriers than more complex isoprenoid-based compounds. These results shed new light on the biochemical basis for cuticle involvement in fruit water loss.

  8. Mapping quantitative trait loci for lint yield and fiber quality across environments in a Gossypium hirsutum × Gossypium barbadense backcross inbred line population.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jiwen; Zhang, Ke; Li, Shuaiyang; Yu, Shuxun; Zhai, Honghong; Wu, Man; Li, Xingli; Fan, Shuli; Song, Meizhen; Yang, Daigang; Li, Yunhai; Zhang, Jinfa

    2013-01-01

    Identification of stable quantitative trait loci (QTLs) across different environments and mapping populations is a prerequisite for marker-assisted selection (MAS) for cotton yield and fiber quality. To construct a genetic linkage map and to identify QTLs for fiber quality and yield traits, a backcross inbred line (BIL) population of 146 lines was developed from a cross between Upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) and Egyptian cotton (Gossypium barbadense) through two generations of backcrossing using Upland cotton as the recurrent parent followed by four generations of self pollination. The BIL population together with its two parents was tested in five environments representing three major cotton production regions in China. The genetic map spanned a total genetic distance of 2,895 cM and contained 392 polymorphic SSR loci with an average genetic distance of 7.4 cM per marker. A total of 67 QTLs including 28 for fiber quality and 39 for yield and its components were detected on 23 chromosomes, each of which explained 6.65-25.27% of the phenotypic variation. Twenty-nine QTLs were located on the At subgenome originated from a cultivated diploid cotton, while 38 were on the Dt subgenome from an ancestor that does not produce spinnable fibers. Of the eight common QTLs (12%) detected in more than two environments, two were for fiber quality traits including one for fiber strength and one for uniformity, and six for yield and its components including three for lint yield, one for seedcotton yield, one for lint percentage and one for boll weight. QTL clusters for the same traits or different traits were also identified. This research represents one of the first reports using a permanent advanced backcross inbred population of an interspecific hybrid population to identify QTLs for fiber quality and yield traits in cotton across diverse environments. It provides useful information for transferring desirable genes from G. barbadense to G. hirsutum using MAS.

  9. Genetic analysis and identification of SSR markers associated with rice blast disease in a BC2F1 backcross population.

    PubMed

    Hasan, N; Rafii, M Y; Abdul Rahim, H; Nusaibah, S A; Mazlan, N; Abdullah, S

    2017-01-23

    Rice (Oryza sativa L.) blast disease is one of the most destructive rice diseases in the world. The fungal pathogen, Magnaporthe oryzae, is the causal agent of rice blast disease. Development of resistant cultivars is the most preferred method to achieve sustainable rice production. However, the effectiveness of resistant cultivars is hindered by the genetic plasticity of the pathogen genome. Therefore, information on genetic resistance and virulence stability are vital to increase our understanding of the molecular basis of blast disease resistance. The present study set out to elucidate the resistance pattern and identify potential simple sequence repeat markers linked with rice blast disease. A backcross population (BC2F1), derived from crossing MR264 and Pongsu Seribu 2 (PS2), was developed using marker-assisted backcross breeding. Twelve microsatellite markers carrying the blast resistance gene clearly demonstrated a polymorphic pattern between both parental lines. Among these, two markers, RM206 and RM5961, located on chromosome 11 exhibited the expected 1:1 testcross ratio in the BC2F1 population. The 195 BC2F1 plants inoculated against M. oryzae pathotype P7.2 showed a significantly different distribution in the backcrossed generation and followed Mendelian segregation based on a single-gene model. This indicates that blast resistance in PS2 is governed by a single dominant gene, which is linked to RM206 and RM5961 on chromosome 11. The findings presented in this study could be useful for future blast resistance studies in rice breeding programs.

  10. Identification of QTL for Fiber Quality and Yield Traits Using Two Immortalized Backcross Populations in Upland Cotton

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hantao; Huang, Cong; Zhao, Wenxia; Dai, Baosheng; Shen, Chao; Zhang, Beibei; Li, Dingguo; Lin, Zhongxu

    2016-01-01

    Two immortalized backcross populations (DHBCF1s and JMBCF1s) were developed using a recombinant inbred line (RIL) population crossed with the two parents DH962 and Jimian5 (as the males), respectively. The fiber quality and yield component traits of the two backcross populations were phenotyped at four environments (two locations, two years). One hundred seventy-eight quantitative trait loci (QTL) were detected including 76 for fiber qualities and 102 for yield components, explaining 4.08–17.79% of the phenotypic variation (PV). Among the 178 QTL, 22 stable QTL were detected in more than one environment or population. A stable QTL, qFL-c10-1, was detected in the previous F2 population, a RIL population in 3 environments and the current two BCF1 populations in this study, explaining 5.79–37.09% of the PV. Additionally, 117 and 110 main-effect QTL (M-QTL) and 47 and 191 digenic epistatic QTL (E-QTL) were detected in the DHBCF1s and JMBCF1s populations, respectively. The effect of digenic epistasis played a more important role on lint percentage, fiber length and fiber strength. These results obtained in the present study provided more resources to obtain stable QTL, confirming the authenticity and reliability of the QTL for molecular marker-assisted selection breeding and QTL cloning. PMID:27907098

  11. Genetic Analysis and QTL Detection on Fiber Traits Using Two Recombinant Inbred Lines and Their Backcross Populations in Upland Cotton

    PubMed Central

    Shang, Lianguang; Wang, Yumei; Wang, Xiaocui; Liu, Fang; Abduweli, Abdugheni; Cai, Shihu; Li, Yuhua; Ma, Lingling; Wang, Kunbo; Hua, Jinping

    2016-01-01

    Cotton fiber, a raw natural fiber material, is widely used in the textile industry. Understanding the genetic mechanism of fiber traits is helpful for fiber quality improvement. In the present study, the genetic basis of fiber quality traits was explored using two recombinant inbred lines (RILs) and corresponding backcross (BC) populations under multiple environments in Upland cotton based on marker analysis. In backcross populations, no significant correlation was observed between marker heterozygosity and fiber quality performance and it suggested that heterozygosity was not always necessarily advantageous for the high fiber quality. In two hybrids, 111 quantitative trait loci (QTL) for fiber quality were detected using composite interval mapping, in which 62 new stable QTL were simultaneously identified in more than one environment or population. QTL detected at the single-locus level mainly showed additive effect. In addition, a total of 286 digenic interactions (E-QTL) and their environmental interactions [QTL × environment interactions (QEs)] were detected for fiber quality traits by inclusive composite interval mapping. QE effects should be considered in molecular marker-assisted selection breeding. On average, the E-QTL explained a larger proportion of the phenotypic variation than the main-effect QTL did. It is concluded that the additive effect of single-locus and epistasis with few detectable main effects play an important role in controlling fiber quality traits in Upland cotton. PMID:27342735

  12. Genetic Analysis and QTL Detection on Fiber Traits Using Two Recombinant Inbred Lines and Their Backcross Populations in Upland Cotton.

    PubMed

    Shang, Lianguang; Wang, Yumei; Wang, Xiaocui; Liu, Fang; Abduweli, Abdugheni; Cai, Shihu; Li, Yuhua; Ma, Lingling; Wang, Kunbo; Hua, Jinping

    2016-09-08

    Cotton fiber, a raw natural fiber material, is widely used in the textile industry. Understanding the genetic mechanism of fiber traits is helpful for fiber quality improvement. In the present study, the genetic basis of fiber quality traits was explored using two recombinant inbred lines (RILs) and corresponding backcross (BC) populations under multiple environments in Upland cotton based on marker analysis. In backcross populations, no significant correlation was observed between marker heterozygosity and fiber quality performance and it suggested that heterozygosity was not always necessarily advantageous for the high fiber quality. In two hybrids, 111 quantitative trait loci (QTL) for fiber quality were detected using composite interval mapping, in which 62 new stable QTL were simultaneously identified in more than one environment or population. QTL detected at the single-locus level mainly showed additive effect. In addition, a total of 286 digenic interactions (E-QTL) and their environmental interactions [QTL × environment interactions (QEs)] were detected for fiber quality traits by inclusive composite interval mapping. QE effects should be considered in molecular marker-assisted selection breeding. On average, the E-QTL explained a larger proportion of the phenotypic variation than the main-effect QTL did. It is concluded that the additive effect of single-locus and epistasis with few detectable main effects play an important role in controlling fiber quality traits in Upland cotton. Copyright © 2016 Shang et al.

  13. Effectiveness of a detached‐leaf assay as a proxy for stem inoculations in backcrossed chestnut (Castanea) blight resistance breeding populations

    Treesearch

    N. R. LaBonte; J.R. McKenna; K. Woeste

    2016-01-01

    A recently developed detached-leaf blight resistance assay has generated interest because it could reduce the amount of time needed to evaluate backcrossed hybrid trees in the American chestnut blight resistance breeding programme. We evaluated the leaf inoculation technique on a sample of advanced progeny from the Indiana state chapter American Chestnut Foundation...

  14. Identification of Novel Loci Associated with Gastrointestinal Parasite Resistance in a Red Maasai x Dorper Backcross Population

    PubMed Central

    Kemp, Stephen; Mugambi, John M.; Gibson, John P.; Baker, Robert Leyden; Hanotte, Olivier; Marshall, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) parasitic infection is the main health constraint for small ruminant production, causing loss of weight and/or death. Red Maasai sheep have adapted to a tropical environment where extreme parasite exposure is a constant, especially with highly pathogenic Haemonchus contortus. This breed has been reported to be resistant to gastrointestinal parasite infection, hence it is considered an invaluable resource to study associations between host genetics and resistance. The aim of this study was to identify polymorphisms strongly associated with host resistance in a double backcross population derived from Red Maasai and Dorper sheep using a SNP-based GWAS analysis. The animals that were genotyped represented the most resistant and susceptible individuals based on the tails of phenotypic distribution (10% each) for average faecal egg counts (AVFEC). AVFEC, packed cell volume (AVPCV), and live weight (AVLWT) were adjusted for fixed effects and co-variables, and an association analysis was run using EMMAX. Revised significance levels were calculated using 100,000 permutation tests. The top five significant SNP markers with - log10 p-values >3.794 were observed on five different chromosomes for AVFEC, and BLUPPf90/PostGSf90 results confirmed EMMAX significant regions for this trait. One of these regions included a cluster of significant SNP on chromosome (Chr) 6 not in linkage disequilibrium to each other. This genomic location contains annotated genes involved in cytokine signalling, haemostasis and mucus biosynthesis. Only one association detected on Chr 7 was significant for both AVPCV and AVLWT. The results generated here reveal candidate immune variants for genes involved in differential response to infection and provide additional SNP marker information that has potential to aid selection of resistance to gastrointestinal parasites in sheep of a similar genetic background to the double backcross population. PMID:25867089

  15. Use of microsatellite markers in molecular analysis of segregating populations of papaya (Carica papaya L.) derived from backcrossing.

    PubMed

    Pinto, F O; Pereira, M G; Luz, L N; Cardozo, D L; Ramos, H C C; Macedo, C M P

    2013-07-08

    Brazil is the world leader in papaya production. However, only a small number of cultivars are registered for commercial planting, mainly owing to delays in obtaining cultivars and the high costs of the field phase of breeding programs. These costs can be reduced when molecular tools are combined with conventional breeding methods. In the present study, we conducted a molecular analysis of a self-fertilized population of a first backcrossing generation of BC1S1 papaya plants via microsatellite markers both to monitor the level of homozygosity and the gene/allele transfer that confers the Golden trait (fruit color) and to assess the parental genomic proportion in the genotypes studied. Based on the analysis of 20 polymorphic microsatellite loci, 19 genotypes with the Golden trait belonging to BC1S1 were evaluated in addition to the parental genotypes. Genetic distance was estimated through weighted index. The genotypes were then grouped using the hierarchical nearest neighbor method, and the analysis of principal coordinates was used to measure the proportion of parental genomes in the segregating genotypes. The mean value of the inbreeding coefficient was 0.36. The analysis of the principal coordinates revealed that on average, 64% of the recurrent parent genome was present in the population. Together, the analyses allowed the selection of 3 individuals for the next backcross cycle (33BC1S1-18, 34BC1S1-16, and 37BC1S1-10). These individuals had a higher proportion of the recurrent parent and were grouped close to the recurrent parent in the cluster analysis.

  16. Identification of quantitative trait loci affecting resistance to gastro-intestinal parasites in a double backcross population of Red Maasai and Dorper sheep

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A genome-wide scan for quantitative trait loci (QTL) affecting gastrointestinal (GI) nematode resistance was completed using a double backcross sheep population derived from Red Maasai and Dorper ewes bred to F1 rams. These breeds were chosen, because Red Maasai sheep are known to be more tolerant ...

  17. Construction of a linkage map based on a Lathyrus sativus backcross population and preliminary investigation of QTLs associated with resistance to ascochyta blight.

    PubMed

    Skiba, B; Ford, R; Pang, E C K

    2004-11-01

    A linkage map of the Lathyrus sativus genome was constructed using 92 backcross individuals derived from a cross between an accession resistant (ATC 80878) to ascochyta blight caused by Mycosphaerella pinodes and a susceptible accession (ATC 80407). A total of 64 markers were mapped on the backcross population, including 47 RAPD, seven sequence-tagged microsatellite site and 13 STS/CAPS markers. The map comprised nine linkage groups, covered a map distance of 803.1 cM, and the average spacing between markers was 15.8 cM. Quantitative trait loci (QTL) associated with ascochyta blight resistance were detected using single-point analysis and simple and composite interval mapping. The backcross population was evaluated for stem resistance in temperature-controlled growth room trials. One significant QTL, QTL1, was located on linkage group 1 and explained 12% of the phenotypic variation in the backcross population. A second suggestive QTL, QTL2, was detected on linkage group 2 and accounted for 9% of the trait variation. The L. sativus R-QTL regions detected may be targeted for future intergenus transfer of the trait into accessions of the closely related species Pisum sativum.

  18. Structural assessment of backcrossing using microsatellite markers

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Backcrossing, coupled with marker or gene assisted selection, can be used to introgress a specific gene or chromosomal region from one population into another. The objective of this study was to assess the genomic structure of cattle produced by backcrossing for loci that are unlinked to a locus tha...

  19. Advanced backcross QTL analysis reveals complicated genetic control of rice grain shape in a japonica × indica cross

    PubMed Central

    Nagata, Kazufumi; Ando, Tsuyu; Nonoue, Yasunori; Mizubayashi, Tatsumi; Kitazawa, Noriyuki; Shomura, Ayahiko; Matsubara, Kazuki; Ono, Nozomi; Mizobuchi, Ritsuko; Shibaya, Taeko; Ogiso-Tanaka, Eri; Hori, Kiyosumi; Yano, Masahiro; Fukuoka, Shuichi

    2015-01-01

    Grain shape is an important trait for improving rice yield. A number of quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for this trait have been identified by using primary F2 mapping populations and recombinant inbred lines, in which QTLs with a small effect are harder to detect than they would be in advanced generations. In this study, we developed two advanced mapping populations (chromosome segment substitution lines [CSSLs] and BC4F2 lines consisting of more than 2000 individuals) in the genetic backgrounds of two improved cultivars: a japonica cultivar (Koshihikari) with short, round grains, and an indica cultivar (IR64) with long, slender grains. We compared the ability of these materials to reveal QTLs for grain shape with that of an F2 population. Only 8 QTLs for grain length or grain width were detected in the F2 population, versus 47 in the CSSL population and 65 in the BC4F2 population. These results strongly suggest that advanced mapping populations can reveal QTLs for agronomic traits under complicated genetic control, and that DNA markers linked with the QTLs are useful for choosing superior allelic combinations to enhance grain shape in the Koshihikari and IR64 genetic backgrounds. PMID:26366113

  20. Genetic mapping of QTL for resistance to Fusarium head blight spread (type 2 resistance) in a Triticum dicoccoides × Triticum durum backcross-derived population.

    PubMed

    Buerstmayr, Maria; Alimari, Abdallah; Steiner, Barbara; Buerstmayr, Hermann

    2013-11-01

    Improvement of resistance to Fusarium head blight (FHB) is a continuous challenge for durum wheat breeders, particularly due to the limited genetic variation within this crop species. We accordingly generated a backcross-derived mapping population using the type 2 FHB resistant Triticum dicoccoides line Mt. Gerizim #36 as donor and the modern Austrian T. durum cultivar Helidur as recipient; 103 BC1F6:7 lines were phenotyped for type 2 FHB resistance using single-spikelet inoculations and genotyped with 421 DNA markers (SSR and AFLP). QTL mapping revealed two highly significant QTL, mapping to chromosomes 3A and 6B, respectively. For both QTL the T. dicoccoides allele improved type 2 FHB resistance. Recombinant lines with both favorable alleles fixed conferred high resistance to FHB similar to that observed in the T. dicoccoides parent. The results appear directly applicable for durum wheat resistance breeding.

  1. The backcross sterility technique

    Treesearch

    V. C. Mastro; A. Pellegrini-Toole

    1991-01-01

    The sterile insect technique (SIT) and the induced inherited (F1) sterility technique have been investigated for a number of lepidopterous pests, including the gypsy moths. Another technique, backcross sterility, which could potentially prove as or more useful for control of pest species has been developed for the control of only one lepidopteran...

  2. Marker-assisted backcrossing: a useful method for rice improvement.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Muhammad Mahmudul; Rafii, Mohd Y; Ismail, Mohd R; Mahmood, Maziah; Rahim, Harun A; Alam, Md Amirul; Ashkani, Sadegh; Malek, Md Abdul; Latif, Mohammad Abdul

    2015-03-04

    The world's population is increasing very rapidly, reducing the cultivable land of rice, decreasing table water, emerging new diseases and pests, and the climate changes are major issues that must be addressed to researchers to develop sustainable crop varieties with resistance to biotic and abiotic stresses. However, recent scientific discoveries and advances particularly in genetics, genomics and crop physiology have opened up new opportunities to reduce the impact of these stresses which would have been difficult if not impossible as recently as the turn of the century. Marker assisted backcrossing (MABC) is one of the most promising approaches is the use of molecular markers to identify and select genes controlling resistance to those factors. Regarding this, MABC can contribute to develop resistant or high-yielding or quality rice varieties by incorporating a gene of interest into an elite variety which is already well adapted by the farmers. MABC is newly developed efficient tool by which using large population sizes (400 or more plants) for the backcross F1 generations, it is possible to recover the recurrent parent genotype using only two or three backcrosses. So far, many high yielding, biotic and abiotic stresses tolerance, quality and fragrance rice varieties have been developed in rice growing countries through MABC within the shortest timeframe. Nowadays, MABC is being used widely in plant breeding programmes to develop new variety/lines especially in rice. This paper reviews recent literature on some examples of variety/ line development using MABC strategy.

  3. Identification of rice sheath blight QTLs in a Bengal/O. nivara advanced backcross population

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Rice wild relatives contain novel genes for important biotic and abiotic stresses. Rice sheath blight disease, caused by Rhizoctonia solani, is a very important disease of rice worldwide. We screened 67 accessions from 15 Oryza species, and identified seven moderately resistant accessions. Using the...

  4. Exploring sheath blight quantitative trait loci in a Lemont/O. meridionalis advanced backcross population

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Oryza meridionalis is the wild Oryza species endemic to Australia. There are eight AA genome Oryza species, one of which is cultivated rice, O. sativa and O. meridionalis is the most diverged of the eight species. An O. eridionalis (IRGC105608) accession was identified as being moderately resistant...

  5. Efficiency gain of marker-assisted backcrossing by sequentially increasing marker densities over generations.

    PubMed

    Prigge, Vanessa; Melchinger, Albrecht E; Dhillon, Baldev S; Frisch, Matthias

    2009-06-01

    Expenses for marker assays are the major costs in marker-assisted backcrossing programs for the transfer of target genes from a donor into the genetic background of a recipient genotype. Our objectives were to (1) investigate the effect of employing sequentially increasing marker densities over backcross generations on the recurrent parent genome (RPG) recovery and the number of marker data points (MDP) required, and (2) determine optimum designs for attaining RPG thresholds of 93-98% with a minimum number of MDP. We simulated the introgression of one dominant target gene for genome models of sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.) and maize (Zea mays L.) with varying marker distances of 5-80 cM and population sizes of 30-250 plants across BC(1) to BC(3) generations. Employing less dense maps in early backcross generations resulted in savings of over 50% in the number of required MDP compared with using a constant set of markers and was accompanied only by small reductions in the attained RPG values. The optimum designs were characterized by increasing marker densities and increasing population sizes in advanced generations for both genome models. We conclude that increasing simultaneously the marker density and the population size from early to advanced backcross generations results in gene introgression with a minimum number of required MDP.

  6. Mapping QTLs for Fertility Restoration of Different Cytoplasmic Male Sterility Types in Rice Using Two Oryza sativa ×O. rufipogon Backcross Inbred Line Populations.

    PubMed

    Hu, Biao-Lin; Xie, Jian-Kun; Wan, Yong; Zhang, Jin-Wei; Zhang, Fan-Tao; Li, Xia

    2016-01-01

    Hybrid rice breeding using cytoplasmic male sterility/fertility restoration (CMS/Rf) systems plays an important role in ensuring global food security. Two backcross inbred line (BIL) populations derived from either Xieqingzao B (XB)//XB/Dongxiang wild rice (DWR) (XXD) or XB//DWR/XB (XDX) were used to detect quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for fertility restoration of Dwarf wild abortive- (DA-), Indonesia Paddy- (ID-), and DWR-type CMS in rice. Lines with ID- and DA-type CMS were testcrossed with both the XXD- and XDX-BILs, while the line with DWR-type CMS was testcrossed with the XDX-BILs only. A total of 16 QTLs for fertility restoration of CMS systems were identified, including three for DWR-type CMS, six for DA-type CMS, and seven for ID-type CMS. All of the additive alleles in the QTLs were derived from Oryza rufipogon. Eleven QTLs were clustered in five chromosomal regions, indicating that common Rf loci restored different CMS systems, and the favorable O. rufipogon alleles could be used to develop restorer lines for various CMS types by marker-assisted selection.

  7. Mapping small-effect and linked quantitative trait loci for complex traits in backcross or DH populations via a multi-locus GWAS methodology

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shi-Bo; Wen, Yang-Jun; Ren, Wen-Long; Ni, Yuan-Li; Zhang, Jin; Feng, Jian-Ying; Zhang, Yuan-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Composite interval mapping (CIM) is the most widely-used method in linkage analysis. Its main feature is the ability to control genomic background effects via inclusion of co-factors in its genetic model. However, the result often depends on how the co-factors are selected, especially for small-effect and linked quantitative trait loci (QTL). To address this issue, here we proposed a new method under the framework of genome-wide association studies (GWAS). First, a single-locus random-SNP-effect mixed linear model method for GWAS was used to scan each putative QTL on the genome in backcross or doubled haploid populations. Here, controlling background via selecting markers in the CIM was replaced by estimating polygenic variance. Then, all the peaks in the negative logarithm P-value curve were selected as the positions of multiple putative QTL to be included in a multi-locus genetic model, and true QTL were automatically identified by empirical Bayes. This called genome-wide CIM (GCIM). A series of simulated and real datasets was used to validate the new method. As a result, the new method had higher power in QTL detection, greater accuracy in QTL effect estimation, and stronger robustness under various backgrounds as compared with the CIM and empirical Bayes methods. PMID:27435756

  8. Mapping QTLs for Fertility Restoration of Different Cytoplasmic Male Sterility Types in Rice Using Two Oryza sativa ×O. rufipogon Backcross Inbred Line Populations

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Biao-lin; Wan, Yong; Zhang, Jin-wei; Zhang, Fan-tao; Li, Xia

    2016-01-01

    Hybrid rice breeding using cytoplasmic male sterility/fertility restoration (CMS/Rf) systems plays an important role in ensuring global food security. Two backcross inbred line (BIL) populations derived from either Xieqingzao B (XB)//XB/Dongxiang wild rice (DWR) (XXD) or XB//DWR/XB (XDX) were used to detect quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for fertility restoration of Dwarf wild abortive- (DA-), Indonesia Paddy- (ID-), and DWR-type CMS in rice. Lines with ID- and DA-type CMS were testcrossed with both the XXD- and XDX-BILs, while the line with DWR-type CMS was testcrossed with the XDX-BILs only. A total of 16 QTLs for fertility restoration of CMS systems were identified, including three for DWR-type CMS, six for DA-type CMS, and seven for ID-type CMS. All of the additive alleles in the QTLs were derived from Oryza rufipogon. Eleven QTLs were clustered in five chromosomal regions, indicating that common Rf loci restored different CMS systems, and the favorable O. rufipogon alleles could be used to develop restorer lines for various CMS types by marker-assisted selection. PMID:27872859

  9. Identification of QTLs for early blight ( Alternaria solani) resistance in tomato using backcross populations of a Lycopersicon esculentum x L. hirsutum cross.

    PubMed

    Foolad, R.; Zhang, P.; Khan, A. A.; Niño-Liu, D.; Lin, Y.

    2002-05-01

    Most commercial cultivars of tomato, Lycopersicon esculentum Mill., are susceptible to early blight (EB), a devastating fungal ( Alternaria solani Sorauer) disease of tomato in the northern and eastern parts of the U.S. and elsewhere in the world. The disease causes plant defoliation, which reduces yield and fruit quality, and contributes to significant crop loss. Sources of resistance have been identified within related wild species of tomato. The purpose of this study was to identify and validate quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for EB resistance in backcross populations of a cross between a susceptible tomato breeding line (NC84173; maternal and recurrent parent) and a resistant Lycopersicon hirsutum Humb. and Bonpl. accession (PI126445). Sixteen hundred BC(1) plants were grown to maturity in a field in 1998. Plants that were self-incompatible, indeterminant in growth habit, and/or extremely late in maturity, were discarded in order to eliminate confounding effects of these factors on disease evaluation, QTL mapping, and future breeding research. The remaining 145 plants (referred to as the BC(1) population) were genotyped for 141 restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) markers and 23 resistance gene analogs (RGAs), and a genetic linkage map was constructed. BC(1) plants were evaluated for disease symptoms throughout the season, and the area under the disease progress curve (AUDPC) and the final percent defoliation (disease severity) were determined for each plant. BC(1) plants were self-pollinated and produced BC(1)S(1) seed. The BC(1)S(1) population, consisting of 145 BC(1)S(1) families, was grown and evaluated for disease symptoms in replicated field trials in two subsequent years (1999 and 2000) and AUDPC and/or final percent defoliation were determined for each family in each year. Two QTL mapping approaches, simple interval mapping (SIM) and composite interval mapping (CIM), were used to identify QTLs for EB resistance in the BC(1) and BC(1)S(1

  10. Evaluating hybrid poplar rooting. II. backcross breeding method exhibits exceptional promise

    Treesearch

    Ronald S., Jr. Zalesny; Don E. Riemenschneider; Richard B. Hall

    2002-01-01

    Backcross breeding uses two crosses to create genotypes with improved traits. The first cross establishes an F1 population, which is then used as the female parent in a set of second crosses. The male parent of the second cross is often a genotype well-adapted to local environments. A currently investigated backcross population is the result of...

  11. Marker-Assisted Introgression in Backcross Breeding Programs

    PubMed Central

    Visscher, P. M.; Haley, C. S.; Thompson, R.

    1996-01-01

    The efficiency of marker-assisted introgression in backcross populations derived from inbred lines was investigated by simulation. Background genotypes were simulated assuming that a genetic model of many genes of small effects in coupling phase explains the observed breed difference and variance in backcross populations. Markers were efficient in introgression backcross programs for simultaneously introgressing an allele and selecting for the desired genomic background. Using a marker spacing of 10-20 cM gave an advantage of one to two backcross generations selection relative to random or phenotypic selection. When the position of the gene to be introgressed is uncertain, for example because its position was estimated from a trait gene mapping experiment, a chromosome segment should be introgressed that is likely to include the allele of interest. Even for relatively precisely mapped quantitative trait loci, flanking markers or marker haplotypes should cover ~10-20 cM around the estimated position of the gene, to ensure that the allele frequency does not decline in later backcross generations. PMID:8978075

  12. Fence Methods for Backcross Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Thuan; Peng, Jie; Jiang, Jiming

    2013-01-01

    Model search strategies play an important role in finding simultaneous susceptibility genes that are associated with a trait. More particularly, model selection via the information criteria, such as the BIC with modifications, have received considerable attention in quantitative trait loci (QTL) mapping. However, such modifications often depend upon several factors, such as sample size, prior distribution, and the type of experiment, e.g., backcross, intercross. These changes make it difficult to generalize the methods to all cases. The fence method avoids such limitations with a unified approach, and hence can be used more broadly. In this paper, this method is studied in the case of backcross experiments throughout a series of simulation studies. The results are compared with those of the modified BIC method as well as some of the most popular shrinkage methods for model selection. PMID:24443613

  13. Genome Reshuffling for Advanced Intercross Permutation (GRAIP): Simulation and permutation for advanced intercross population analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, Jeremy; Broman, Karl; Lu, Lu; Chesler, Elissa J; Zhou, Guomin; Airey, David; Birmingham, Amanda; Williams, Robert

    2008-04-01

    Background: Advanced intercross lines (AIL) are segregating populations created using a multi-generation breeding protocol for fine mapping complex trait loci (QTL) in mice and other organisms. Applying QTL mapping methods for intercross and backcross populations, often followed by na ve permutation of individuals and phenotypes, does not account for the effect of AIL family structure in which final generations have been expanded and leads to inappropriately low significance thresholds. The critical problem with na ve mapping approaches in AIL populations is that the individual is not an exchangeable unit. Methodology/Principal Findings: The effect of family structure has immediate implications for the optimal AIL creation (many crosses, few animals per cross, and population expansion before the final generation) and we discuss these and the utility of AIL populations for QTL fine mapping. We also describe Genome Reshuffling for Advanced Intercross Permutation, (GRAIP) a method for analyzing AIL data that accounts for family structure. GRAIP permutes a more interchangeable unit in the final generation crosses - the parental genome - and simulating regeneration of a permuted AIL population based on exchanged parental identities. GRAIP determines appropriate genome-wide significance thresholds and locus-specific Pvalues for AILs and other populations with similar family structures. We contrast GRAIP with na ve permutation using a large densely genotyped mouse AIL population (1333 individuals from 32 crosses). A na ve permutation using coat color as a model phenotype demonstrates high false-positive locus identification and uncertain significance levels, which are corrected using GRAIP. GRAIP also detects an established hippocampus weight locus and a new locus, Hipp9a. Conclusions and Significance: GRAIP determines appropriate genome-wide significance thresholds and locus-specific Pvalues for AILs and other populations with similar family structures. The effect of

  14. Genome Reshuffling for Advanced Intercross Permutation (GRAIP): Simulation and permutation for advanced intercross population analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, Jeremy; Broman, Karl; Chesler, Elissa J; Zhou, Guomin; Airey, David; Birmingham, Amanda; Williams, Robert

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Advanced intercross lines (AIL) are segregating populations created using a multigeneration breeding protocol for fine mapping complex traits in mice and other organisms. Applying quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping methods for intercross and backcross populations, often followed by na ve permutation of individuals and phenotypes, does not account for the effect of family structure in AIL populations in which final generations have been expanded and leads to inappropriately low significance thresholds. The critical problem with a na ve mapping approach in such AIL populations is that the individual is not an exchangeable unit given the family structure. Methodology/Principal Findings The effect of family structure has immediate implications for the optimal AIL creation (many crosses, few animals per cross, and population expansion before the final generation) and we discuss these and the utility of AIL populations for QTL fine mapping. We also describe Genome Reshuffling for Advanced Intercross Permutation, (GRAIP) a method for analyzing AIL data that accounts for family structure. RAIP permutes a more interchangeable unit in the final generation crosses - the parental genome - and simulating regeneration of a permuted AIL population based on exchanged parental identities. GRAIP determines appropriate genome- ide significance thresholds and locus-specific P-values for AILs and other populations with similar family structures. We contrast GRAIP with na ve permutation using a large densely genotyped mouse AIL population (1333 individuals from 32 crosses). A na ve permutation using coat color as a model phenotype demonstrates high false-positive locus identification and uncertain significance levels in our AIL population, which are corrected by use of GRAIP. We also show that GRAIP detects an established hippocampus weight locus and a new locus, Hipp9a. Conclusions and Significance GRAIP determines appropriate genome-wide significance thresholds

  15. Parental genome contribution in maize DH lines derived from six backcross populations using genotyping by sequencing and its relationship with testcross performance

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Molecular characterization of doubled haploid (DH) maize lines and estimation of parental genome contribution (PGC) may be useful for choosing pairs of DH lines for hybrid make up and new pedigree starts. Six BC1-derived DH populations created by crossing two donor with three recurrent parents were ...

  16. A genetic linkage map of the Durum x Triticum dicoccoides backcross population based on SSRs and AFLP markers, and QTL analysis for milling traits.

    PubMed

    Elouafi, I; Nachit, M M

    2004-02-01

    Durum wheat ( Triticum turgidum L. var durum) is mainly produced and consumed in the Mediterranean region; it is used to produce several specific end-products; such as local pasta, couscous and burghul. To study the genetics of grain-milling quality traits, chromosomal locations, and interaction with the environment, a genetic linkage map of durum was constructed and the quantitative trait loci QTLs for the milling-related traits, test weight (TW) and thousand-kernel weight (TKW), were identified. The population constituted 114 recombinant inbred lines derived from the cross: Omrabi 5 /Triticum dicoccoides 600545// Omrabi 5. TW and TKW were analyzed over 18 environments (sites x years). Single-sequence-repeat markers (SSRs), Amplified-fragment-length-polymorphism markers (AFLPs), and seed storage proteins (SSPs) showed a high level of polymorphism (>60%). The map was constructed with 124 SSRs, 149 AFLPs and 6 SSPs; its length covered 2,288.8 cM (8.2 cM/marker). The map showed high synteny with previous wheat maps, and both SSRs and AFLPs mapped evenly across the genome, with more markers in the B genome. However, some rearrangements were observed. For TW, a high genotypic effect was detected and two QTLs with epistasic effect were identified on 7AS and 6BS, explaining 30% of the total variation. The TKW showed a significant transgressive inheritance and five QTLs were identified, explaining 32% of the total variation, out of which 25% was of a genetic nature, and showing QTLxE interaction. The major TKW-QTLs were around the centromere region of 6B. For both traits, Omrabi 5 alleles had a significant positive effect. This population will be used to determine other QTLs of interest, as its parents are likely to harbor different genes for diseases and drought tolerance.

  17. Backcrossing to increase meiotic stability in triticale.

    PubMed

    Giacomin, R M; Assis, R; Brammer, S P; Nascimento Junior, A; Da-Silva, P R

    2015-09-22

    Triticale (X Triticosecale Wittmack) is an intergeneric hybrid derived from a cross between wheat and rye. As a newly created allopolyploid, the plant shows instabilities during the meiotic process, which may result in the loss of fertility. This genomic instability has hindered the success of triticale-breeding programs. Therefore, strategies should be developed to obtain stable triticale lines for use in breeding. In some species, backcrossing has been effective in increasing the meiotic stability of lineages. To assess whether backcrossing has the same effect in triticale, indices of meiotic abnormalities, meiotic index, and pollen viability were determined in genotypes from multiple generations of triticale (P1, P2, F1, F2, BC1a, and BC1b). All analyzed genotypes exhibited instability during meiosis, and their meiotic index values were all lower than normal. However, the backcrosses BC1a and BC1b showed the lowest mean meiotic abnormalities and the highest meiotic indices, demonstrating higher stability. All genotypes showed a high rate of pollen viability, with the backcrosses BC1a and BC1b again exhibiting the best values. Statistical analyses confirmed that backcrossing positively affects the meiotic stability of triticale. Our results show that backcrossing should be considered by breeders aiming to obtain triticale lines with improved genomic stability.

  18. [Research advances in population dynamics of Orchidaceae].

    PubMed

    Liu, Qiang; Yin, Shou-hua; Lan, Qin-ying

    2010-11-01

    In the study of population dynamics of Orchidaceae, demographic analysis can make us better understand the spatiotemporal variation of plant individuals, the core of the population dynamics study. Nevertheless, many orchid species have an epiphytic or lithophytic habit, which predisposes them to a discrete or patchy distribution. In this case, metapopulation study is a good method to judge the protective scale of the population by analyzing the extent of gene flow among patches. In addition, long-term observation is needed to obtain reliable information on the life history and population dynamics of Orchidaceae, and to understand the relationships between the spatiotemporal variation and functioning of orchid population in certain environmental conditions. As for the short-term study, it's essential for a better understanding of the relationships between the structurally dependent plants and the communities in which they are fund. This paper reviewed the research advances in the population dynamics of Orchidaceae from the viewpoints of the population ecology and ecological characteristics of Orchidaceae.

  19. Genetic variation in salt tolerance during seed germination in a backcross inbred line population and advanced breeding lines derived from upland cotton x pima cotton

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Seed germination is a crucial phase of the plant life cycle that affects its establishment and productivity. However, information on salt tolerance at this phase is limited. Pima cotton (Gossypium barbadense L.) may be more salt tolerant during germination than Upland cotton (G. hirsutum L.) based o...

  20. Monte Carlo simulation models of breeding-population advancement.

    Treesearch

    J.N. King; G.R. Johnson

    1993-01-01

    Five generations of population improvement were modeled using Monte Carlo simulations. The model was designed to address questions that are important to the development of an advanced generation breeding population. Specifically we addressed the effects on both gain and effective population size of different mating schemes when creating a recombinant population for...

  1. Modes of inheritance of two apomixis components, diplospory and parthenogenesis, in Chinese chive (Allium ramosum) revealed by analysis of the segregating population generated by back-crossing between amphimictic and apomictic diploids

    PubMed Central

    Yamashita, Ken-ichiro; Nakazawa, Yoshiko; Namai, Kiyoshi; Amagai, Masayuki; Tsukazaki, Hikaru; Wako, Tadayuki; Kojima, Akio

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the mode of inheritance of apomixis in Chinese chive, the degrees of diplospory and parthenogenesis were evaluated in F1 and BC1 progenies derived from crosses between amphimictic and apomictic diploids (2n = 16, 2x). The F1 population was generated by crossing three amphimictic diploids 94Mo13, 94Mo49 and 94Mo50 with an apomictic diploid KaD2 and comprised 110 diploids and 773 triploids. All the diploid F1 plants examined were completely or highly eusporous and completely syngamic. All the triploid F1 plants examined were highly diplosporous and highly parthenogenetic. KaD2 could not transmit its high level of apomixis via monoploid pollen grains. The BC1 population, generated by crossing 94Mo49 with apomictic triploids found in the F1 offspring, exhibited heteroploidy; it comprised haploid, diploid, triploid, tetraploid and various aneuploid individuals. In this generation, clear segregation was observed between diplospory and parthenogenesis. Analysis of the BC1 population suggests that diplospory and parthenogenesis are each controlled by single dominant genes, D and P, respectively. However, all the BC1 plants characterized as parthenogenetic were diplosporous. The absence of phenotypically eusporous parthenogenetic plants can be explained by assuming that the presence of diplospory gene is a prerequisite for the parthenogenesis gene expression in Chinese chive. PMID:23136527

  2. Modes of inheritance of two apomixis components, diplospory and parthenogenesis, in Chinese chive (Allium ramosum) revealed by analysis of the segregating population generated by back-crossing between amphimictic and apomictic diploids.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Ken-Ichiro; Nakazawa, Yoshiko; Namai, Kiyoshi; Amagai, Masayuki; Tsukazaki, Hikaru; Wako, Tadayuki; Kojima, Akio

    2012-06-01

    To investigate the mode of inheritance of apomixis in Chinese chive, the degrees of diplospory and parthenogenesis were evaluated in F(1) and BC(1) progenies derived from crosses between amphimictic and apomictic diploids (2n = 16, 2x). The F(1) population was generated by crossing three amphimictic diploids 94Mo13, 94Mo49 and 94Mo50 with an apomictic diploid KaD2 and comprised 110 diploids and 773 triploids. All the diploid F(1) plants examined were completely or highly eusporous and completely syngamic. All the triploid F(1) plants examined were highly diplosporous and highly parthenogenetic. KaD2 could not transmit its high level of apomixis via monoploid pollen grains. The BC(1) population, generated by crossing 94Mo49 with apomictic triploids found in the F(1) offspring, exhibited heteroploidy; it comprised haploid, diploid, triploid, tetraploid and various aneuploid individuals. In this generation, clear segregation was observed between diplospory and parthenogenesis. Analysis of the BC(1) population suggests that diplospory and parthenogenesis are each controlled by single dominant genes, D and P, respectively. However, all the BC(1) plants characterized as parthenogenetic were diplosporous. The absence of phenotypically eusporous parthenogenetic plants can be explained by assuming that the presence of diplospory gene is a prerequisite for the parthenogenesis gene expression in Chinese chive.

  3. Identification of molecular markers associated with leptine in reciprocal backcross families of diploid potato.

    PubMed

    Medina, B.; Fogelman, E.; Chani, E.; Miller, R.; Levin, I.; Levy, D.; Veilleux, E.

    2002-11-01

    Solanum phureja clone 1-3 and S. chacoense clone 80-1 have a zero and high leptine content in their foliage, respectively. An F(1) hybrid (CP2) was intermediate for the trait, but self-incompatible. Two reciprocal backcross families, PBCp ( phu 1-3 x CP2) and PBCc (CP2 x phu 1-3), and a family of monoploids derived by anther culture of CP2, were characterized for leptine as the aglycon, acetylleptinidine (ALD), content in leaves by gas chromatography. ALD was present in 43 of 87 genotypes in the PBCp backcross, implying simple genetic control by a dominant gene. However, the ALD levels were low compared to CP2. In the PBCc backcross, only 7 of 42 genotypes expressed ALD at a level generally higher than in PBCp. This ratio was significantly different from the 1:1 segregation observed in the reciprocal backcross and suggests a cytoplasmic influence. ALD levels in the CP2 monoploids ranged from 0 to 8,968 &mgr;g.g(-1) of dry weight (dw) with 18 individuals expressing ALD and five with 0 ALD content. Ten high (mean ALD = 546 &mgr;g.g(-1) of dw) and ten low (mean ALD = 0) individual plants within PBCp and seven high (mean ALD = 3,037 &mgr;g.g(-1) of dw) and eight low (mean ALD = 0) individual plants within PBCc were used for bulk segregant analysis (BSA) using 214 RAPD (randomly amplified polymorphic DNA) primers. Three RAPD primers (OPQ-2, OPT-16 and OPT-20) amplified bands exclusively in bulks containing DNA mixes of high ALD producers in both PBCp and PBCc populations. These results suggest that these markers were associated in coupling to ALD content. ANOVAs for ALD content verified association between the markers and the trait. A CAPS (cleaved amplified polymorphic sequence) marker, GP82A, was also significantly associated with ALD production in both the monoploid and the PBCp populations. None of the RAPD markers was associated to ALD in the monoploids but one was associated in repulsion. The monoploid data indicate the likelihood of a recessive gene(s) that

  4. Estimation of recombination frequency in bi-parental genetic populations.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ziqi; Li, Huihui; Zhang, Luyan; Wang, Jiankang

    2012-06-01

    Summary Linkage analysis plays an important role in genetic studies. In linkage analysis, accurate estimation of recombination frequency is essential. Many bi-parental populations have been used, and determining an appropriate population is of great importance in precise recombination frequency. In this study, we investigated the estimation efficiency of recombination frequency in 12 bi-parental populations. The criteria that we used for comparison were LOD score in testing linkage relationship, deviation between estimated and real recombination frequency, standard error (SE) of estimates and the least theoretical population size (PS) required to observe at least one recombinant and to declare the statistically significant linkage relationship. Theoretical and simulation results indicated that larger PS and smaller recombination frequency resulted in higher LOD score and smaller deviation. Lower LOD score, higher deviation and higher SE for estimating the recombination frequency in the advanced backcrossing and selfing populations are larger than those in backcross and F2 populations, respectively. For advanced backcrossing and selfing populations, larger populations were needed in order to observe at least one recombinant and to declare significant linkage. In comparison, in F2 and F3 populations higher LOD score, lower deviation and SE were observed for co-dominant markers. A much larger population was needed to observe at least one recombinant and to detect loose linkage for dominant and recessive markers. Therefore, advanced backcrossing and selfing populations had lower precision in estimating the recombination frequency. F2 and F3 populations together with co-dominant markers represent the ideal situation for linkage analysis and linkage map construction.

  5. Population Problems and Policies in Economically Advanced Countries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Population Crisis Committee, Washington, DC.

    In October 1972, the Ditchley Foundation supported a conference which sought to assess population conditions and policies in the economically advanced countries of North America and Western Europe, including Britain, together with their international responsibilities and how best they can discharge them. Findings and recommendations summarized in…

  6. Solanum pennellii backcross inbred lines (BILs) link small genomic bins with tomato traits.

    PubMed

    Ofner, Itai; Lashbrooke, Justin; Pleban, Tzili; Aharoni, Asaph; Zamir, Dani

    2016-07-01

    We present a resource for fine mapping of traits derived from the wild tomato species Solanum pennellii (LA0716). The population of backcross inbred lines (BILs) is composed of 446 lines derived after a few generations of backcrosses of the wild species with cultivated tomato (cultivar M82; LA3475), followed by more than seven generations of self-pollination. The BILs were genotyped using the 10K SOL-CAP single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) -Chip, and 3700 polymorphic markers were used to map recombination break points relative to the physical map of Solanum lycopersicum. The BILs carry, on average, 2.7 introgressions per line, with a mean introgression length of 11.7 Mbp. Whereas the classic 76 introgression lines (ILs) partitioned the genome into 106 mapping bins, the BILs generated 633 bins, thereby enhancing the mapping resolution of traits derived from the wild species. We demonstrate the power of the BILs for rapid fine mapping of simple and complex traits derived from the wild tomato species. © 2016 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. High-Speed Mouse Backcrossing Through the Female Germ Line

    PubMed Central

    Grove, Erin; Eckardt, Sigrid; McLaughlin, K. John

    2016-01-01

    Transferring mouse mutations into specific mouse strain backgrounds can be critical for appropriate analysis of phenotypic effects of targeted genomic alterations and quantitative trait loci. Speed congenic breeding strategies incorporating marker-assisted selection of progeny with the highest percentage target background as breeders for the next generation can produce congenic strains within approximately 5 generations. When mating selected donor males to target strain females, this may require more than 1 year, with each generation lasting 10 to 11 weeks including 3 weeks of gestation and 7 to 8 weeks until the males reach sexual maturity. Because ovulation can be induced in female mice as early as 3 weeks of age, superovulation-aided backcrossing of marker-selected females could accelerate the production of congenic animals by approximately 4 weeks per generation, reducing time and cost. Using this approach, we transferred a transgenic strain of undefined genetic background to >99% C57BL/6J within 10 months, with most generations lasting 7 weeks. This involved less than 60 mice in total, with 9 to 18 animals per generation. Our data demonstrate that high-speed backcrossing through the female germline is feasible and practical with small mouse numbers. PMID:27926922

  8. Chilling tolerant U.S. processing cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.): three advanced backcross and ten inbred backcross lines

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Environmental stresses such as chilling temperatures can reduce seed germination rate, seeding emergence rate, flower and fruit development, marketable yield, and postharvest fruit storage longevity in cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.). Chilling temperatures occur in unpredictable patterns, making it d...

  9. Introgression of Ivermectin Resistance Genes into a Susceptible Haemonchus contortus Strain by Multiple Backcrossing

    PubMed Central

    Whitelaw, Fiona; Jackson, Frank; Morrison, Alison; Bartley, David Jon; Gilleard, John Stuart

    2012-01-01

    Anthelmintic drug resistance in livestock parasites is already widespread and in recent years there has been an increasing level of anthelmintic drug selection pressure applied to parasitic nematode populations in humans leading to concerns regarding the emergence of resistance. However, most parasitic nematodes, particularly those of humans, are difficult experimental subjects making mechanistic studies of drug resistance extremely difficult. The small ruminant parasitic nematode Haemonchus contortus is a more amenable model system to study many aspects of parasite biology and investigate the basic mechanisms and genetics of anthelmintic drug resistance. Here we report the successful introgression of ivermectin resistance genes from two independent ivermectin resistant strains, MHco4(WRS) and MHco10(CAVR), into the susceptible genome reference strain MHco3(ISE) using a backcrossing approach. A panel of microsatellite markers were used to monitor the procedure. We demonstrated that after four rounds of backcrossing, worms that were phenotypically resistant to ivermectin had a similar genetic background to the susceptible reference strain based on the bulk genotyping with 18 microsatellite loci and individual genotyping with a sub-panel of 9 microsatellite loci. In addition, a single marker, Hcms8a20, showed evidence of genetic linkage to an ivermectin resistance-conferring locus providing a starting point for more detailed studies of this genomic region to identify the causal mutation(s). This work presents a novel genetic approach to study anthelmintic resistance and provides a “proof-of-concept” of the use of forward genetics in an important model strongylid parasite of relevance to human hookworms. The resulting strains provide valuable resources for candidate gene studies, whole genome approaches and for further genetic analysis to identify ivermectin resistance loci. PMID:22359506

  10. Moving the Dial to Advance Population Health Equity in New York City Asian American Populations

    PubMed Central

    Trinh-Shevrin, Chau; Kwon, Simona C.; Nadkarni, Smiti Kapadia; Islam, Nadia S.

    2015-01-01

    The shift toward a health equity framework for eliminating the health disparities burden of racial/ethnic minority populations has moved away from a disease-focused model to a social determinants framework that aims to achieve the highest attainment of health for all. The New York University Center for the Study of Asian American Health (CSAAH) has identified core themes and strategies for advancing population health equity for Asian American populations in New York City that are rooted in the following: social determinants of health; multisectoral, community-engaged approaches; leveraging community assets; improved disaggregated data collection and access to care; and building sustainability through community leadership and infrastructure-building activities. We describe the strategies CSAAH employed to move the dial on population health equity. PMID:25905858

  11. Genotypic gain with simultaneous selection of production, nutrition, and culinary traits in cowpea crosses and backcrosses using mixed models.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, D G; Rocha, M M; Damasceno-Silva, K J; Sá, F V; Lima, L R L; Resende, M D V

    2017-08-17

    The aim of this study was to estimate the genotypic gain with simultaneous selection of production, nutrition, and culinary traits in cowpea crosses and backcrosses and to compare different selection indexes. Eleven cowpea populations were evaluated in a randomized complete block design with four replications. Fourteen traits were evaluated, and the following parameters were estimated: genotypic variation coefficient, genotypic determination coefficient, experimental quality indicator and selection reliability, estimated genotypic values ​​- BLUE, genotypic correlation coefficient among traits, and genotypic gain with simultaneous selection of all traits. The genotypic gain was estimated based on tree selection indexes: classical, multiplicative, and the sum of ranks. The genotypic variation coefficient was higher than the environmental variation coefficient for the number of days to start flowering, plant type, the weight of one hundred grains, grain index, and protein concentration. The majority of the traits presented genotypic determination coefficient from medium to high magnitude. The identification of increases in the production components is associated with decreases in protein concentration, and the increase in precocity leads to decreases in protein concentration and cooking time. The index based on the sum of ranks was the best alternative for simultaneous selection of traits in the cowpea segregating populations resulting from the crosses and backcrosses evaluated, with emphasis on the F4BC12, F4C21, and F4C12 populations, which had the highest genotypic gains.

  12. Did backcrossing contribute to the origin of hybrid edible bananas?

    PubMed Central

    De Langhe, Edmond; Hřibová, Eva; Carpentier, Sebastien; Doležel, Jaroslav; Swennen, Rony

    2010-01-01

    Background Bananas and plantains (Musa spp.) provide a staple food for many millions of people living in the humid tropics. The cultivated varieties (cultivars) are seedless parthenocarpic clones of which the origin remains unclear. Many are believed to be diploid and polyploid hybrids involving the A genome diploid M. acuminata and the B genome M. balbisiana, with the hybrid genomes consisting of a simple combination of the parental ones. Thus the genomic constitution of the diploids has been classified as AB, and that of the triploids as AAB or ABB. However, the morphology of many accessions is biased towards either the A or B phenotype and does not conform to predictions based on these genomic formulae. Scope On the basis of published cytotypes (mitochondrial and chloroplast genomes), we speculate here that the hybrid banana genomes are unbalanced with respect to the parental ones, and/or that inter-genome translocation chromosomes are relatively common. We hypothesize that the evolution under domestication of cultivated banana hybrids is more likely to have passed through an intermediate hybrid, which was then involved in a variety of backcrossing events. We present experimental data supporting our hypothesis and we propose a set of experimental approaches to test it, thereby indicating other possibilities for explaining some of the unbalanced genome expressions. Progress in this area would not only throw more light on the origin of one of the most important crops, but provide data of general relevance for the evolution under domestication of many other important clonal crops. At the same time, a complex origin of the cultivated banana hybrids would imply a reconsideration of current breeding strategies. PMID:20858591

  13. Did backcrossing contribute to the origin of hybrid edible bananas?

    PubMed

    De Langhe, Edmond; Hribová, Eva; Carpentier, Sebastien; Dolezel, Jaroslav; Swennen, Rony

    2010-12-01

    Bananas and plantains (Musa spp.) provide a staple food for many millions of people living in the humid tropics. The cultivated varieties (cultivars) are seedless parthenocarpic clones of which the origin remains unclear. Many are believed to be diploid and polyploid hybrids involving the A genome diploid M. acuminata and the B genome M. balbisiana, with the hybrid genomes consisting of a simple combination of the parental ones. Thus the genomic constitution of the diploids has been classified as AB, and that of the triploids as AAB or ABB. However, the morphology of many accessions is biased towards either the A or B phenotype and does not conform to predictions based on these genomic formulae. On the basis of published cytotypes (mitochondrial and chloroplast genomes), we speculate here that the hybrid banana genomes are unbalanced with respect to the parental ones, and/or that inter-genome translocation chromosomes are relatively common. We hypothesize that the evolution under domestication of cultivated banana hybrids is more likely to have passed through an intermediate hybrid, which was then involved in a variety of backcrossing events. We present experimental data supporting our hypothesis and we propose a set of experimental approaches to test it, thereby indicating other possibilities for explaining some of the unbalanced genome expressions. Progress in this area would not only throw more light on the origin of one of the most important crops, but provide data of general relevance for the evolution under domestication of many other important clonal crops. At the same time, a complex origin of the cultivated banana hybrids would imply a reconsideration of current breeding strategies.

  14. Cancer Pharmacogenomics: Integrating Discoveries in Basic, Clinical and Population Sciences to Advance Predictive Cancer Care

    Cancer.gov

    Cancer Pharmacogenomics: Integrating Discoveries in Basic, Clinical and Population Sciences to Advance Predictive Cancer Care, a 2010 workshop sponsored by the Epidemiology and Genomics Research Program.

  15. Genetic improvement of thermo-tolerance in wine Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains by a backcross approach.

    PubMed

    Marullo, Philippe; Mansour, Chantal; Dufour, Matthieu; Albertin, Warren; Sicard, Delphine; Bely, Marina; Dubourdieu, Denis

    2009-12-01

    During red wine fermentation, high temperatures may cause stuck fermentation by affecting the physiology of fermenting yeast. This deleterious effect is the result of the complex interaction of temperature with other physicochemical parameters of grape juice, such as sugar and lipid content. The genetic background of fermenting yeast also interacts with this complex matrix and some strains are more resistant to high temperatures than others. Here, the temperature tolerance of nine commercial starters was evaluated, demonstrating that, at high sugar concentrations, half of them are sensitive to temperature. Using a classical backcross approach, one thermo-sensitive commercial starter was genetically improved by introducing quantitative trait loci conferring resistance to temperature. With this breeding program it is possible to obtain a thermo-resistant strain sharing most of its genome with the initial commercial starter. The parental and improved strains were compared for population growth and fermentation ability in various conditions. Despite their common genetic background, these two strains showed slight physiological differences in response to environmental changes that enable identification of the key physiological parameters influencing stuck fermentation.

  16. Mapping six new susceptibility to colon cancer (Scc) loci using a mouse interspecific backcross.

    PubMed

    Eversley, Chevonne D; Yuying, Xie; Pearsall, R Scott; Threadgill, David W

    2012-12-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) has a complex etiology resulting from the combination of multiple genetic and environmental factors, each with small effects. Interactions among susceptibility modifier loci make many of the loci difficult to detect in human genome-wide association studies. Previous analyses in mice have used classical inbred strains, which share large portions of their genomes due to common ancestry. Herein, we used an interspecific backcross between the Mus musculus strain A/J and the Mus spretus strain SPRET/EiJ to map 6 additional CRC modifier loci (Scc16-21) and 2 suggestive loci. Three loci modify the location of tumors along the proximal-distal axis of the colon. Six CRC modifiers previously mapped in intraspecific crosses were also replicated. This work confirms genetic models suggesting that CRC is caused by many small effect alleles and brings the catalog of reported CRC modifier loci to 23 spread across 13 chromosomes. Furthermore, this work provides the foundation for large population-level epistatic interaction tests to identify combinations of low effect alleles that may have large effects on CRC susceptibility.

  17. Evidence from two independent backcross experiments supports genetic linkage of microsatellite Hcms8a20, but not other candidate loci, to a major ivermectin resistance locus in Haemonchus contortus.

    PubMed

    Rezansoff, Andrew M; Laing, Roz; Gilleard, John S

    2016-09-01

    Haemonchus contortus is the leading parasitic nematode species used to study anthelmintic drug resistance. A variety of candidate loci have been implicated as being associated with ivermectin resistance in this parasite but definitive evidence of their importance is still lacking. We have previously performed two independent serial backcross experiments to introgress ivermectin resistance loci from two H. contortus ivermectin-resistant strains - MHco4(WRS) and MHco10(CAVR) - into the genetic background of the ivermectin-susceptible genome reference strain MHco3(ISE). We have interrogated a number of candidate ivermectin resistance loci in the resulting backcross populations and assessed the evidence for their genetic linkage to an ivermectin resistance locus. These include the microsatellite marker Hcms8a20 and six candidate genes Hco-glc-5, Hco-avr-14, Hco-lgc-37 (previously designated Hco-hg-1), Hco-pgp-9 (previously designated Hco-pgp-1), Hco-pgp-2 and Hco-dyf-7. We have sampled the haplotype diversity of amplicon markers within, or adjacent to, each of these loci in the parental strains and fourth generation backcross populations to assess the evidence for haplotype introgression from the resistant parental strain into the genomic background of the susceptible parental strain in each backcross. The microsatellite Hcms8a20 locus showed strong evidence of such introgression in both independent backcrosses, suggesting it is linked to an important ivermectin resistance mutation in both the MHco4(WRS) and MHco10(CAVR) strains. In contrast, Hco-glc-5, Hco-avr-14, Hco-pgp-9 and Hco-dyf-7 showed no evidence of introgression in either backcross. Hco-lgc-37 and Hco-pgp-2 showed only weak evidence of introgression in the MHco3/4 backcross but not in the MHco3/10 backcross. Overall, these results suggest that microsatellite marker Hcms8a20, but not the other candidate genes tested, is linked to a major ivermectin resistance locus in the MHco4(WRS) and MHco10(CAVR) strains

  18. Production, reproduction, health, and growth traits in backcross Holstein × Jersey cows and their Holstein contemporaries.

    PubMed

    Bjelland, D W; Weigel, K A; Hoffman, P C; Esser, N M; Coblentz, W K; Halbach, T J

    2011-10-01

    A total of 648 purebred Holstein and 319 backcross Holstein × Jersey dairy cattle were compared for production, reproduction, health, linear type, and growth traits. Animals were born between 2003 and 2009 and were housed in the University of Wisconsin-Madison Integrated Dairy Facility. All animals had Holstein dams; lactating dams were mated to unproven Holstein sires to produce purebred (control) Holsteins or to unproven F(1) Jersey × Holstein crossbred sires to produce backcross animals, whereas nulliparous dams were mated to proven Holstein sires to produce purebred (other) Holsteins. Traits were analyzed using mixed linear models with effects of season of birth, age of dam, sire, birth year of sire, days in milk, lactation, and linear type score evaluator. Control Holsteins had greater 305-d milk yield (12,645 vs. 11,456 kg), 305-d mature equivalent milk yield (13,420 vs. 12,180 kg), peak daily milk yield (49.5 vs. 46.4 kg), total lactation milk yield (11,556 vs. 10,796 kg), and daily fat-corrected milk yield (43 vs. 40 kg) compared with backcrosses. Days open and services per conception as a heifer or cow did not differ between control Holsteins, other Holsteins, or backcrosses. The proportion of first-parity births that required assistance was less in control Holsteins than in backcross cows (3.7 vs. 11.2%). The incidence of scours or respiratory problems in calves did not differ between control Holsteins, other Holsteins, and backcrosses, nor did the incidence of mastitis, injury, or feet problems. Control Holstein heifers were heavier (629 vs. 557 kg), with greater hip height (145 vs. 139 cm), body length (167 vs. 163 cm), heart girth (205 vs. 198 cm), and hip width (54 vs. 53 cm) at 22 mo of age. On a 50-point scale for linear type traits, Holsteins were larger in stature compared with backcrosses (41 vs. 28), had wider rumps (37 vs. 33), and wider rear udders (34 vs. 32). Results of this study suggest that backcross Holstein × Jersey cattle have

  19. Genetic dissection of growth, wood basic density and gene expression in interspecific backcrosses of Eucalyptus grandis and E. urophylla

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background F1 hybrid clones of Eucalyptus grandis and E. urophylla are widely grown for pulp and paper production in tropical and subtropical regions. Volume growth and wood quality are priority objectives in Eucalyptus tree improvement. The molecular basis of quantitative variation and trait expression in eucalypt hybrids, however, remains largely unknown. The recent availability of a draft genome sequence (http://www.phytozome.net) and genome-wide genotyping platforms, combined with high levels of genetic variation and high linkage disequilibrium in hybrid crosses, greatly facilitate the detection of quantitative trait loci (QTLs) as well as underlying candidate genes for growth and wood property traits. In this study, we used Diversity Arrays Technology markers to assess the genetic architecture of volume growth (diameter at breast height, DBH) and wood basic density in four-year-old progeny of an interspecific backcross pedigree of E. grandis and E. urophylla. In addition, we used Illumina RNA-Seq expression profiling in the E. urophylla backcross family to identify cis- and trans-acting polymorphisms (eQTLs) affecting transcript abundance of genes underlying QTLs for wood basic density. Results A total of five QTLs for DBH and 12 for wood basic density were identified in the two backcross families. Individual QTLs for DBH and wood basic density explained 3.1 to 12.2% of phenotypic variation. Candidate genes underlying QTLs for wood basic density on linkage groups 8 and 9 were found to share trans-acting eQTLs located on linkage groups 4 and 10, which in turn coincided with QTLs for wood basic density suggesting that these QTLs represent segregating components of an underlying transcriptional network. Conclusion This is the first demonstration of the use of next-generation expression profiling to quantify transcript abundance in a segregating tree population and identify candidate genes potentially affecting wood property variation. The QTLs identified in this

  20. Gene coexpression network analysis of oil biosynthesis in an interspecific backcross of oil palm.

    PubMed

    Guerin, Chloé; Joët, Thierry; Serret, Julien; Lashermes, Philippe; Vaissayre, Virginie; Agbessi, Mawussé D T; Beulé, Thierry; Severac, Dany; Amblard, Philippe; Tregear, James; Durand-Gasselin, Tristan; Morcillo, Fabienne; Dussert, Stéphane

    2016-09-01

    Global demand for vegetable oils is increasing at a dramatic rate, while our understanding of the regulation of oil biosynthesis in plants remains limited. To gain insights into the mechanisms that govern oil synthesis and fatty acid (FA) composition in the oil palm fruit, we used a multilevel approach combining gene coexpression analysis, quantification of allele-specific expression and joint multivariate analysis of transcriptomic and lipid data, in an interspecific backcross population between the African oil palm, Elaeis guineensis, and the American oil palm, Elaeis oleifera, which display contrasting oil contents and FA compositions. The gene coexpression network produced revealed tight transcriptional coordination of fatty acid synthesis (FAS) in the plastid with sugar sensing, plastidial glycolysis, transient starch storage and carbon recapture pathways. It also revealed a concerted regulation, along with FAS, of both the transfer of nascent FA to the endoplasmic reticulum, where triacylglycerol assembly occurs, and of the production of glycerol-3-phosphate, which provides the backbone of triacylglycerols. Plastid biogenesis and auxin transport were the two other biological processes most tightly connected to FAS in the network. In addition to WRINKLED1, a transcription factor (TF) known to activate FAS genes, two novel TFs, termed NF-YB-1 and ZFP-1, were found at the core of the FAS module. The saturated FA content of palm oil appeared to vary above all in relation to the level of transcripts of the gene coding for β-ketoacyl-acyl carrier protein synthase II. Our findings should facilitate the development of breeding and engineering strategies in this and other oil crops. © 2016 The Authors. The Plant Journal published by Society for Experimental Biology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Discussing Advance Care Planning and Directives in the General Population.

    PubMed

    de Caprariis, Pascal J; Rucker, Bronwyn; Lyon, Claudia

    2017-09-01

    The concept of end-of-life planning, along with medical and legal issues, has been discussed and has evolved over several years. The 1990 Patient Self-Determination Act and individual states' Department of Health Advance Directive forms helped overcome past problems. Patients with terminal and chronic illness are now able to have their wishes recognized for their future care. Any healthy individual's decision during an advance care planning (ACP) discussion can be adversely affected by various factors; however, multiple barriers-religion, culture, education, and family dynamics-can influence the process. Healthcare professionals' reluctance to initiate the conversation may result from limited training during medical school and residency programs. These limitations hinder both the initiation and productiveness of an ACP conversation. We explored ACP issues to provide guidance to healthcare professionals on how best to address this planning process with a healthy adult.

  2. [Research advance in autistic traits in non-affected population of autism spectrum disorder].

    PubMed

    Liang, Su-Gai; Si-Tu, Ming-Jing; Huang, Yi

    2014-05-01

    Autistic traits including social reciprocal deficits, communication deficits and stereotyped behaviors, are manifested not only in patients with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and their families, but also in general population. In recent years, there has much research related to autistic traits. This article summarizes research advance of autistic traits in ASD relations and general population.

  3. Population policies in advanced societies: pronatalist and migration strategies.

    PubMed

    Hohn, C

    1988-07-01

    This paper gives examples of pronatalist and migration policies adopted by several European countries, and evaluates their effectiveness: migration is the only practical means of preventing population stagnation. The pronatalist policies of France, German Democratic Republic, Hungary and Romania range from a system of family support so complicated that a special bureau has been set up to interpret it in France, through increasing benefits such as paid maternity leave in GDR, to an inconsistent support system in Hungary to coercive measures in Romania. In 1966 Romania severely restricted abortion and divorce, and even screened working women for pregnancy to prevent abortion. It has been estimated that the effect of these policies has been marginal and temporary: 0.2-0.3 children per woman in France, 0.1 in GDR, and 0.2 in Romania. Childbearing fell to former levels rapidly in Romania, probably a result of illegal abortion. Probably other social policies, such as housing infrastructure and child-care facilities, affect childbearing as much or more so than pronatalist measures. The migration policies of the United Kingdom, Federal Republic of Germany and Switzerland are described. Most have varied over the years, entailing several rationales, such as humanitarianism, recruitment of workers, providing asylum to refugees, as well as maintaining population levels. Success of policies depends on economic conditions, social tensions regarding integration of foreigners and naturalization policies. Pronatalist policies in general are not very effective unless extremely costly and continuous, but they do provide social justice for parents. The solution to prevent harsh changes in population age structure is ultimately to allow migration from less developed countries. To make either of these policies effective, emancipation of (especially male) parents, and education of people about other cultures will be required.

  4. Advancing palliative and end-of-life science in cardiorespiratory populations: The contributions of nursing science.

    PubMed

    Grady, Patricia A

    Nursing science has a critical role to inform practice, promote health, and improve the lives of individuals across the lifespan who face the challenges of advanced cardiorespiratory disease. Since 1997, the National Institute of Nursing Research (NINR) has focused attention on the importance of palliative and end-of-life care for advanced heart failure and advanced pulmonary disease through the publication of multiple funding opportunity announcements and by supporting a cadre of nurse scientists that will continue to address new priorities and future directions for advancing palliative and end-of-life science in cardiorespiratory populations.

  5. Populating the Advanced National Seismic System Comprehensive Earthquake Catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Earle, P. S.; Perry, M. R.; Andrews, J. R.; Withers, M. M.; Hellweg, M.; Kim, W. Y.; Shiro, B.; West, M. E.; Storchak, D. A.; Pankow, K. L.; Huerfano Moreno, V. A.; Gee, L. S.; Wolfe, C. J.

    2016-12-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey maintains a repository of earthquake information produced by networks in the Advanced National Seismic System with additional data from the ISC-GEM catalog and many non-U.S. networks through their contributions to the National Earthquake Information Center PDE bulletin. This Comprehensive Catalog (ComCat) provides a unified earthquake product while preserving attribution and contributor information. ComCat contains hypocenter and magnitude information with supporting phase arrival-time and amplitude measurements (when available). Higher-level products such as focal mechanisms, earthquake slip models, "Did You Feel It?" reports, ShakeMaps, PAGER impact estimates, earthquake summary posters, and tectonic summaries are also included. ComCat is updated as new events are processed and the catalog can be accesed at http://earthquake.usgs.gov/earthquakes/search/. Throughout the past few years, a concentrated effort has been underway to expand ComCat by integrating global and regional historic catalogs. The number of earthquakes in ComCat has more than doubled in the past year and it presently contains over 1.6 million earthquake hypocenters. We will provide an overview of catalog contents and a detailed description of numerous tools and semi-automated quality-control procedures developed to uncover errors including systematic magnitude biases, missing time periods, duplicate postings for the same events, and incorrectly associated events.

  6. Nonlinear Population Pharmacokinetics of Sirolimus in Patients With Advanced Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wu, K; Cohen, E E W; House, L K; Ramírez, J; Zhang, W; Ratain, M J; Bies, R R

    2012-01-01

    Sirolimus, the prototypical inhibitor of the mammalian target of rapamycin, has substantial antitumor activity. In this study, sirolimus showed nonlinear pharmacokinetic characteristics over a wide dose range (from 1 to 60 mg/week). The objective of this study was to develop a population pharmacokinetic (PopPK) model to describe the nonlinearity of sirolimus. Whole blood concentration data, obtained from four phase I clinical trials, were analyzed using a nonlinear mixed-effects modeling (NONMEM) approach. The influence of potential covariates was evaluated. Model robustness was assessed using nonparametric bootstrap and visual predictive check approaches. The data were well described by a two-compartment model incorporating a saturable Michaelis–Menten kinetic absorption process. A covariate analysis identified hematocrit as influencing the oral clearance of sirolimus. The visual predictive check indicated that the final pharmacokinetic model adequately predicted observed concentrations. The pharmacokinetics of sirolimus, based on whole blood concentrations, appears to be nonlinear due to saturable absorption. PMID:23887441

  7. Survival and growth of chestnut backcross seeds and seedlings on surface mines.

    PubMed

    Skousen, J; Cook, T; Wilson-Kokes, L; Pena-Yewtukhiw, E

    2013-01-01

    Some scientists consider the loss of the American chestnut from forests in the eastern United States as one of the greatest forest ecological disasters in the 20th century. The American Chestnut Foundation has been attempting to restore chestnut by backcrossing blight-resistant Chinese chestnut to American chestnut and selecting those strains with blight resistance. Third-generation backcross seeds and seedlings have been produced and planted by researchers. Surface-mined lands provide a land base where these backcross chestnut seedlings may be introduced back into forests. In 2008, seeds of two parent species of chestnut (100% American and 100% Chinese) and three breeding generations (BF, BF, and BF backcrosses) were planted into loosely graded mine soils with and without tree shelters. First-year establishment from seeds averaged 81%. After the fourth year, survival without shelters declined for all chestnut stock types except for Chinese (80%): American 40%, BF 70%, BF 40%, and BF 55%. Survival with shelters was only slightly better after the fourth year (average, 60% with shelters and 57% without). Height growth was not different among stock types, and average height after the fourth year was 43 cm without shelters and 56 cm with shelters. In 2009, seeds and seedlings of the same chestnut stock types were planted into brown (pH 4.5) or gray (pH 6.6) mine soils. Only six out of 250 seeds germinated, which was very poor considering 81% average seed germination in 2008. Transplanted chestnut seedling survival was much better. After the third year, seedling survival was 85% in brown and 80% in gray soil, but significant differences were found with stock types. Survival was significantly higher with American, Chinese, and BF stock types (75%) than with BF and BF (60%). Height after the third season averaged 90 cm on brown and 62 cm on gray soil. Chestnut backcrosses displayed no hybrid vigor and were not better in survival and growth than the parent stock. All five

  8. Effect of seven antibiotics on the growth and reproduction of Heliothis subflexa X H. virescens interspecific hydrids and backcross males

    SciTech Connect

    LaChance, L.E.; Karpenko, C.P.

    1981-09-01

    To test the hypothesis that a maternally transmitted cytoplasmic microorganism is involved in male hybrid sterility found in H. subflexa (Guenee) X H. virescens (F.) hybrid and backcross progeny, we reared H. subflexa, hybrids and backcross progeny on larval diets containing high concentrations of tetracycline, penicillin G, chloramphenicol, ampicillin, gentamicin, rifampin, and 5-iodo-2'-deoxyuridine. The insects tolerated relatively high concentrations (from 120 mg/liter to 6 g/liter) of antibiotics in the larval diet and showed virtually no changes in larval or pupal developmental time, adult lifespan, or fertility. Hybrid and backcross males reared on such adulterated diets were as sterile as those reared on conventional diets.

  9. Pericarp polypeptides and SRAP markers associated with fruit quality traits in an interspecific tomato backcross.

    PubMed

    Pereira da Costa, J H; Rodríguez, G R; Pratta, G R; Picardi, L A; Zorzoli, R

    2014-01-24

    The aim of this study was to detect polypeptides and genomic regions associated with fruit quality traits in a backcross generation using as parent the Argentinean cultivated tomato Caimanta of Solanum lycopersicum and the wild accession LA722 of S. pimpinellifolium. We tested two types of molecular marker: polypeptide profile (at two ripening stages, mature green and red ripe) and SRAP (sequence-related amplified polymorphism). A polypeptide of 45 kDa present in the wild parents at the mature green stage was associated with larger fruit and long shelf life. Some amplification fragments from SRAP markers were associated with more than one quality trait such as fruit color, firmness, titratable acidity, and fruit soluble solids content. This study demonstrated for the first time the usefulness of the polypeptide profiles of pericarp and SRAP markers in finding associations with quality fruit traits in a tomato backcross generation.

  10. Hybridization and back-crossing in giant petrels (Macronectes giganteus and M. halli) at Bird Island, South Georgia, and a summary of hybridization in seabirds.

    PubMed

    Brown, Ruth M; Techow, N M S Mareile; Wood, Andrew G; Phillips, Richard A

    2015-01-01

    Hybridization in natural populations provides an opportunity to study the evolutionary processes that shape divergence and genetic isolation of species. The emergence of pre-mating barriers is often the precursor to complete reproductive isolation. However, in recently diverged species, pre-mating barriers may be incomplete, leading to hybridization between seemingly distinct taxa. Here we report results of a long-term study at Bird Island, South Georgia, of the extent of hybridization, mate fidelity, timing of breeding and breeding success in mixed and conspecific pairs of the sibling species, Macronectes halli (northern giant petrel) and M. giganteus (southern giant petrel). The proportion of mixed-species pairs varied annually from 0.4-2.4% (mean of 1.5%), and showed no linear trend with time. Mean laying date in mixed-species pairs tended to be later than in northern giant petrel, and always earlier than in southern giant petrel pairs, and their breeding success (15.6%) was lower than that of conspecific pairs. By comparison, mixed-species pairs at both Marion and Macquarie islands always failed before hatching. Histories of birds in mixed-species pairs at Bird Island were variable; some bred previously or subsequently with a conspecific partner, others subsequently with a different allospecific partner, and some mixed-species pairs remained together for multiple seasons. We also report the first verified back-crossing of a hybrid giant petrel with a female northern giant petrel. We discuss the potential causes and evolutionary consequences of hybridization and back-crossing in giant petrels and summarize the incidence of back-crossing in other seabird species.

  11. Hybridization and Back-Crossing in Giant Petrels (Macronectes giganteus and M. halli) at Bird Island, South Georgia, and a Summary of Hybridization in Seabirds

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Ruth M.; Techow, N. M. S. Mareile; Wood, Andrew G.; Phillips, Richard A.

    2015-01-01

    Hybridization in natural populations provides an opportunity to study the evolutionary processes that shape divergence and genetic isolation of species. The emergence of pre-mating barriers is often the precursor to complete reproductive isolation. However, in recently diverged species, pre-mating barriers may be incomplete, leading to hybridization between seemingly distinct taxa. Here we report results of a long-term study at Bird Island, South Georgia, of the extent of hybridization, mate fidelity, timing of breeding and breeding success in mixed and conspecific pairs of the sibling species, Macronectes halli (northern giant petrel) and M. giganteus (southern giant petrel). The proportion of mixed-species pairs varied annually from 0.4–2.4% (mean of 1.5%), and showed no linear trend with time. Mean laying date in mixed-species pairs tended to be later than in northern giant petrel, and always earlier than in southern giant petrel pairs, and their breeding success (15.6%) was lower than that of conspecific pairs. By comparison, mixed-species pairs at both Marion and Macquarie islands always failed before hatching. Histories of birds in mixed-species pairs at Bird Island were variable; some bred previously or subsequently with a conspecific partner, others subsequently with a different allospecific partner, and some mixed-species pairs remained together for multiple seasons. We also report the first verified back-crossing of a hybrid giant petrel with a female northern giant petrel. We discuss the potential causes and evolutionary consequences of hybridization and back-crossing in giant petrels and summarize the incidence of back-crossing in other seabird species. PMID:25815478

  12. Allopolyploid speciation and ongoing backcrossing between diploid progenitor and tetraploid progeny lineages in the Achillea millefolium species complex: analyses of single-copy nuclear genes and genomic AFLP.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jin-Xiu; Li, Yan-Nan; Vogl, Claus; Ehrendorfer, Friedrich; Guo, Yan-Ping

    2010-04-13

    In the flowering plants, many polyploid species complexes display evolutionary radiation. This could be facilitated by gene flow between otherwise separate evolutionary lineages in contact zones. Achillea collina is a widespread tetraploid species within the Achillea millefolium polyploid complex (Asteraceae-Anthemideae). It is morphologically intermediate between the relic diploids, A. setacea-2x in xeric and A. asplenifolia-2x in humid habitats, and often grows in close contact with either of them. By analyzing DNA sequences of two single-copy nuclear genes and the genomic AFLP data, we assess the allopolyploid origin of A. collina-4x from ancestors corresponding to A. setacea-2x and A. asplenifolia-2x, and the ongoing backcross introgression between these diploid progenitor and tetraploid progeny lineages. In both the ncpGS and the PgiC gene tree, haplotype sequences of the diploid A. setacea-2x and A. asplenifolia-2x group into two clades corresponding to the two species, though lineage sorting seems incomplete for the PgiC gene. In contrast, A. collina-4x and its suspected backcross plants show homeologous gene copies: sequences from the same tetraploid individual plant are placed in both diploid clades. Semi-congruent splits of an AFLP Neighbor Net link not only A. collina-4x to both diploid species, but some 4x individuals in a polymorphic population with mixed ploidy levels to A. setacea-2x on one hand and to A. collina-4x on the other, indicating allopolyploid speciation as well as hybridization across ploidal levels. The findings of this study clearly demonstrate the hybrid origin of Achillea collina-4x, the ongoing backcrossing between the diploid progenitor and their tetraploid progeny lineages. Such repeated hybridizations are likely the cause of the great genetic and phenotypic variation and ecological differentiation of the polyploid taxa in Achillea millefolium agg.

  13. Allopolyploid speciation and ongoing backcrossing between diploid progenitor and tetraploid progeny lineages in the Achillea millefolium species complex: analyses of single-copy nuclear genes and genomic AFLP

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background In the flowering plants, many polyploid species complexes display evolutionary radiation. This could be facilitated by gene flow between otherwise separate evolutionary lineages in contact zones. Achillea collina is a widespread tetraploid species within the Achillea millefolium polyploid complex (Asteraceae-Anthemideae). It is morphologically intermediate between the relic diploids, A. setacea-2x in xeric and A. asplenifolia-2x in humid habitats, and often grows in close contact with either of them. By analyzing DNA sequences of two single-copy nuclear genes and the genomic AFLP data, we assess the allopolyploid origin of A. collina-4x from ancestors corresponding to A. setacea-2x and A. asplenifolia-2x, and the ongoing backcross introgression between these diploid progenitor and tetraploid progeny lineages. Results In both the ncpGS and the PgiC gene tree, haplotype sequences of the diploid A. setacea-2x and A. asplenifolia-2x group into two clades corresponding to the two species, though lineage sorting seems incomplete for the PgiC gene. In contrast, A. collina-4x and its suspected backcross plants show homeologous gene copies: sequences from the same tetraploid individual plant are placed in both diploid clades. Semi-congruent splits of an AFLP Neighbor Net link not only A. collina-4x to both diploid species, but some 4x individuals in a polymorphic population with mixed ploidy levels to A. setacea-2x on one hand and to A. collina-4x on the other, indicating allopolyploid speciation as well as hybridization across ploidal levels. Conclusions The findings of this study clearly demonstrate the hybrid origin of Achillea collina-4x, the ongoing backcrossing between the diploid progenitor and their tetraploid progeny lineages. Such repeated hybridizations are likely the cause of the great genetic and phenotypic variation and ecological differentiation of the polyploid taxa in Achillea millefolium agg. PMID:20388203

  14. Introgression of Shoot Fly (Atherigona soccata L. Moench) Resistance QTLs into Elite Post-rainy Season Sorghum Varieties Using Marker Assisted Backcrossing (MABC).

    PubMed

    Gorthy, Sunita; Narasu, Lakshmi; Gaddameedi, Anil; Sharma, Hari C; Kotla, Anuradha; Deshpande, Santosh P; Are, Ashok K

    2017-01-01

    Shoot fly (Atherigona soccata L. Moench) is a serious pest in sorghum production. Management of shoot fly using insecticides is expensive and environmentally un-safe. Developing host-plant resistance is the best method to manage shoot fly infestation. Number of component traits contribute for imparting shoot fly resistance in sorghum and molecular markers have been reported which were closely linked to QTLs controlling these component traits. In this study, three QTLs associated with shoot fly resistance were introgressed into elite cultivars Parbhani Moti (= SPV1411) and ICSB29004 using marker assisted backcrossing (MABC). Crosses were made between recurrent parents and the QTL donors viz., J2658, J2614, and J2714. The F1s after confirmation for QTL presence were backcrossed to recurrent parents and the resultant lines after two backcrosses were selfed thrice for advancement. The foreground selection was carried out in F1 and BCnF1 generations with 22 polymorphic markers. Forty-three evenly distributed simple sequence repeat markers in the sorghum genome were used in background selection to identify plants with higher recurrent parent genome recovery. By using two backcrosses and four rounds of selfing, six BC2F4 progenies were selected for ICSB29004 × J2658, five BC2F4 progenies were selected for ICSB29004 × J2714 and six BC2F4 progenies were selected for Parbhani Moti × J2614 crosses. Phenotyping of these lines led to the identification of two resistant lines for each QTL region present on chromosome SBI-01, SBI-07 and SBI-10 in ICSB 29004 and Parbhani Moti. All the introgression lines (ILs) showed better shoot fly resistance than the recurrent parents and their agronomic performance was the same or better than the recurrent parents. Further, the ILs had medium plant height, desirable maturity with high yield potential which makes them better candidates for commercialization. In the present study, MABC has successfully improved the shoot fly resistance in

  15. Introgression of Shoot Fly (Atherigona soccata L. Moench) Resistance QTLs into Elite Post-rainy Season Sorghum Varieties Using Marker Assisted Backcrossing (MABC)

    PubMed Central

    Gorthy, Sunita; Narasu, Lakshmi; Gaddameedi, Anil; Sharma, Hari C.; Kotla, Anuradha; Deshpande, Santosh P.; Are, Ashok K.

    2017-01-01

    Shoot fly (Atherigona soccata L. Moench) is a serious pest in sorghum production. Management of shoot fly using insecticides is expensive and environmentally un-safe. Developing host–plant resistance is the best method to manage shoot fly infestation. Number of component traits contribute for imparting shoot fly resistance in sorghum and molecular markers have been reported which were closely linked to QTLs controlling these component traits. In this study, three QTLs associated with shoot fly resistance were introgressed into elite cultivars Parbhani Moti (= SPV1411) and ICSB29004 using marker assisted backcrossing (MABC). Crosses were made between recurrent parents and the QTL donors viz., J2658, J2614, and J2714. The F1s after confirmation for QTL presence were backcrossed to recurrent parents and the resultant lines after two backcrosses were selfed thrice for advancement. The foreground selection was carried out in F1 and BCnF1 generations with 22 polymorphic markers. Forty-three evenly distributed simple sequence repeat markers in the sorghum genome were used in background selection to identify plants with higher recurrent parent genome recovery. By using two backcrosses and four rounds of selfing, six BC2F4 progenies were selected for ICSB29004 × J2658, five BC2F4 progenies were selected for ICSB29004 × J2714 and six BC2F4 progenies were selected for Parbhani Moti × J2614 crosses. Phenotyping of these lines led to the identification of two resistant lines for each QTL region present on chromosome SBI-01, SBI-07 and SBI-10 in ICSB 29004 and Parbhani Moti. All the introgression lines (ILs) showed better shoot fly resistance than the recurrent parents and their agronomic performance was the same or better than the recurrent parents. Further, the ILs had medium plant height, desirable maturity with high yield potential which makes them better candidates for commercialization. In the present study, MABC has successfully improved the shoot fly resistance in

  16. Experimental hybridization and backcrossing reveal forces of reproductive isolation in Microbotryum

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Hybridization and reproductive isolation are central to the origin and maintenance of species, and especially for sympatric species, gene flow is often inhibited through barriers that depend upon mating compatibility factors. The anther-smut fungi (genus Microbotryum) serve as models for speciation in the face of sympatry, and previous studies have tested for but not detected assortative mating. In addition, post-mating barriers are indicated by reduced fitness of hybrids, but sources of those barriers (i.e. ecological maladaptation or genetic incompatibilities) have not yet been detected. Here, backcrossing experiments, specifically controlling for the fungal species origins of the mating compatibility factors, were used to investigate reproductive isolation in the recently-derived species Microbotryum lychnidis-dioicae and Microbotryum silenes-dioicae. Results Assortative mating was detected during backcrossing and was manifested by the preferential conjugation of the hybrid-produced gametes with non-hybrid gametes containing mating compatibility factors from the same parental species. Patterns of post-mating performance supported either a level of extrinsic isolation mechanism, where backcross progeny with a higher proportion of the pathogen genome adapted to the particular host environment were favored, or an infection advantage attributed to greater genetic contribution to the hybrid from the M. lychnidis-dioicae genome. Conclusion The use of controlled backcrossing experiments reveals significant species-specific mating type effects on conjugations between recently-derived sister species, which are likely to play important roles in both maintaining species separation and the nature of hybrids lineages that emerge in sympatry between Microbotryum species. PMID:24112452

  17. Characterization of Three Rice Multiparent Advanced Generation Intercross (MAGIC) Populations for Quantitative Trait Loci Identification.

    PubMed

    Meng, Lijun; Guo, Longbiao; Ponce, Kimberly; Zhao, Xiangqian; Ye, Guoyou

    2016-07-01

    Three new rice ( L.) multiparent advanced generation intercross (MAGIC) populations were developed using eight elite rice varieties from different breeding programs. These three populations were two recombinant inbred line (RIL) populations derived from two 4-way crosses, DC1 and DC2, and one RIL population derived from an 8-way cross. These populations were genotyped using an Illumina Infinium rice 6K SNP chip. The potential of the three MAGIC populations in identifying marker-trait associations was demonstrated using the plant height (PH) and heading date (HD) measured in 2014. A population of 248 IRRI breeding lines and a population of 323 Chinese breeding lines were also included to compare genetic diversity and linkage disequilibrium (LD) pattern. Our study discovered that (i) the 8-way population had a higher gene diversity than the DC1, DC2, and IRRI populations; (ii) all three MAGIC populations showed no clear population structure; (iii) LD decayed to < 0.2 at about 2.5, 2.5, 1.25, 1.75, and 4.0 Mb for the DC1, DC2, 8-way, IRRI, and Chinese populations, respectively; and (iv) the 8-way population was more powerful than the DC1, DC2, and IRRI populations on QTL identification. The association analysis identified two and three QTL for PH and HD, respectively. Four of the five QTL had peak markers close to known genes. A novel QTL for PH was identified on chromosome 12 using the 8-way population. Therefore, our study suggests that the three new MAGIC populations are valuable resources for QTL identification.

  18. Coordinated Genetic Regulation of Growth and Lignin Revealed by Quantitative Trait Locus Analysis of cDNA Microarray Data in an Interspecific Backcross of Eucalyptus1

    PubMed Central

    Kirst, Matias; Myburg, Alexander A.; De León, José P.G.; Kirst, Mariana E.; Scott, Jay; Sederoff, Ronald

    2004-01-01

    Phenotypic, genotypic, and transcript level (microarray) data from an interspecific backcross population of Eucalyptus grandis and Eucalyptus globulus were integrated to dissect the genetic and metabolic network underlying growth variation. Transcript abundance, measured for 2,608 genes in the differentiating xylem of a 91 (E. grandis × E. globulus) × E. grandis backcross progeny was correlated with diameter variation, revealing coordinated down-regulation of genes encoding enzymes of the lignin biosynthesis and associated methylation pathways in fast growing individuals. Lignin analysis of wood samples confirmed the content and quality predicted by the transcript levels measured on the microarrays. Quantitative trait locus (QTL) analysis of transcript levels of lignin-related genes showed that their mRNA abundance is regulated by two genetic loci, demonstrating coordinated genetic control over lignin biosynthesis. These two loci colocalize with QTLs for growth, suggesting that the same genomic regions are regulating growth, and lignin content and composition in the progeny. Genetic mapping of the lignin genes revealed that most of the key biosynthetic genes do not colocalize with growth and transcript level QTLs, with the exception of the locus encoding the enzyme S-adenosylmethionine synthase. This study illustrates the power of integrating quantitative analysis of gene expression data and genetic map information to discover genetic and metabolic networks regulating complex biological traits. PMID:15299141

  19. Terminal Versus Advanced Cancer: Do the General Population and Health Care Professionals Share a Common Language?

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sang Hyuck; Shin, Dong Wook; Kim, So Young; Yang, Hyung Kook; Nam, Eunjoo; Jho, Hyun Jung; Ahn, Eunmi; Cho, Be Long; Park, Keeho; Park, Jong-Hyock

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Many end-of-life care studies are based on the assumption that there is a shared definition of language concerning the stage of cancer. However, studies suggest that patients and their families often misperceive patients’ cancer stages and prognoses. Discrimination between advanced cancer and terminal cancer is important because the treatment goals are different. In this study, we evaluated the understanding of the definition of advanced versus terminal cancer of the general population and determined associated socio-demographic factors. Materials and Methods A total of 2,000 persons from the general population were systematically recruited. We used a clinical vignette of a hypothetical advanced breast cancer patient, but whose cancer was not considered terminal. After presenting the brief history of the case, we asked respondents to choose the correct cancer stage from a choice of early, advanced, terminal stage, and don’t know. Multinomial logistic regression analysis was performed to determine sociodemographic factors associated with the correct response, as defined in terms of medical context. Results Only 411 respondents (20.6%) chose “advanced,” while most respondents (74.5%) chose “terminal stage” as the stage of the hypothetical patient, and a small proportion of respondents chose “early stage” (0.7%) or “don’t know” (4.4%). Multinomial logistic regression analysis found no consistent or strong predictor. Conclusion A large proportion of the general population could not differentiate advanced cancer from terminal cancer. Continuous effort is required in order to establish common and shared definitions of the different cancer stages and to increase understanding of cancer staging for the general population. PMID:26323640

  20. Availability of Advanced Breast Imaging at Screening Facilities Serving Vulnerable Populations.

    PubMed

    Lee, Christoph I; Bogart, Andy; Germino, Jessica C; Goldman, L Elizabeth; Hubbard, Rebecca A; Haas, Jennifer S; Hill, Deirdre A; Tosteson, Anna Na; Alford-Teaster, Jennifer A; DeMartini, Wendy B; Lehman, Constance D; Onega, Tracy L

    2016-03-01

    Among vulnerable women, unequal access to advanced breast imaging modalities beyond screening mammography may lead to delays in cancer diagnosis and unfavourable outcomes. We aimed to compare on-site availability of advanced breast imaging services (ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging [MRI], and image-guided biopsy) between imaging facilities serving vulnerable patient populations and those serving non-vulnerable populations. 73 imaging facilities across five Breast Cancer Surveillance Consortium regional registries in the United States during 2011 and 2012. We examined facility and patient characteristics across a large, national sample of imaging facilities and patients served. We characterized facilities as serving vulnerable populations based on the proportion of mammograms performed on women with lower educational attainment, lower median income, racial/ethnic minority status, and rural residence.We performed multivariable logistic regression to determine relative risks of on-site availability of advanced imaging at facilities serving vulnerable women versus facilities serving non-vulnerable women. Facilities serving vulnerable populations were as likely (Relative risk [RR] for MRI = 0.71, 95% Confidence Interval [CI] 0.42, 1.19; RR for MRI-guided biopsy = 1.07 [0.61, 1.90]; RR for stereotactic biopsy = 1.18 [0.75, 1.85]) or more likely (RR for ultrasound = 1.38 [95% CI 1.09, 1.74]; RR for ultrasound-guided biopsy = 1.67 [1.30, 2.14]) to offer advanced breast imaging services as those serving non-vulnerable populations. Advanced breast imaging services are physically available on-site for vulnerable women in the United States, but it is unknown whether factors such as insurance coverage or out-of-pocket costs might limit their use. © The Author(s) 2015.

  1. Identifying rare FHB-resistant transgressive segregants in intransigent backcross and F2 winter wheat populations

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Fusarium head blight (FHB), caused mainly by Fusarium graminearum Schwabe [telomorph: Gibberella zeae Schwein.(Petch)] in the US, is one of the most destructive diseases of wheat (Triticum aestivum L. and T. durum L.). FHB-infected grain is usually contaminated with deoxynivalenol (DON) a mycotoxin ...

  2. Molecular screening of walnut backcross populations for a DNA marker linked to cherry leafroll virus resistance

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Blackline disease, a graft union disorder caused by infection of English walnut (Juglans regia) trees by Cherry leafroll virus (CLRV) is a major problem for walnut production in Northern California where scions are grafted onto virus resistant black walnut (J. hindsii) or ‘Paradox’ (J. hindsii × J. ...

  3. Genetic-molecular characterization of backcross generations for sexual conversion in papaya (Carica papaya L.).

    PubMed

    Ramos, H C C; Pereira, M G; Pereira, T N S; Barros, G B A; Ferreguetti, G A

    2014-12-04

    The low number of improved cultivars limits the expansion of the papaya crop, particularly because of the time required for the development of new varieties using classical procedures. Molecular techniques associated with conventional procedures accelerate this process and allow targeted improvements. Thus, we used microsatellite markers to perform genetic-molecular characterization of papaya genotypes obtained from 3 backcross generations to monitor the inbreeding level and parental genome proportion in the evaluated genotypes. Based on the analysis of 20 microsatellite loci, 77 genotypes were evaluated, 25 of each generation of the backcross program as well as the parental genotypes. The markers analyzed were identified in 11 of the 12 linkage groups established for papaya, ranging from 1 to 4 per linkage group. The average values for the inbreeding coefficient were 0.88 (BC1S4), 0.47 (BC2S3), and 0.63 (BC3S2). Genomic analysis revealed average values of the recurrent parent genome of 82.7% in BC3S2, 64.4% in BC1S4, and 63.9% in BC2S3. Neither the inbreeding level nor the genomic proportions completely followed the expected average values. This demonstrates the significance of molecular analysis when examining different genotype values, given the importance of such information for selection processes in breeding programs.

  4. Incorporation of Bacterial Blight Resistance Genes Into Lowland Rice Cultivar Through Marker-Assisted Backcross Breeding.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, Sharat Kumar; Nayak, Deepak Kumar; Pandit, Elssa; Behera, Lambodar; Anandan, Annamalai; Mukherjee, Arup Kumar; Lenka, Srikanta; Barik, Durga Prasad

    2016-07-01

    Bacterial blight (BB) of rice caused by Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae is a major disease of rice in many rice growing countries. Pyramided lines carrying two BB resistance gene combinations (Xa21+xa13 and Xa21+xa5) were developed in a lowland cultivar Jalmagna background through backcross breeding by integrating molecular markers. In each backcross generation, markers closely linked to the disease resistance genes were used to select plants possessing the target genes. Background selection was continued in those plants carrying resistant genes until BC(3) generation. Plants having the maximum contribution from the recurrent parent genome were selected in each generation and hybridized with the recipient parent. The BB-pyramided line having the maximum recipient parent genome recovery of 95% was selected among BC3F1 plants and selfed to isolate homozygous BC(3)F(2) plants with different combinations of BB resistance genes. Twenty pyramided lines with two resistance gene combinations exhibited high levels of tolerance against the BB pathogen. In order to confirm the resistance, the pyramided lines were inoculated with different X. oryzae pv. oryzae strains of Odisha for bioassay. The genotypes with combination of two BB resistance genes conferred high levels of resistance to the predominant X. oryzae pv. oryzae isolates prevalent in the region. The pyramided lines showed similarity with the recipient parent with respect to major agro-morphologic traits.

  5. Epistatic interactions between skin tumor modifier loci in interspecific (spretus/musculus) backcross mice.

    PubMed

    Nagase, H; Mao, J H; de Koning, J P; Minami, T; Balmain, A

    2001-02-15

    The development of cancer is influenced both by exposure to environmental carcinogens and by the host genetic background. Epistatic interactions between genes are important in determining phenotype in plant and animal systems and are likely to be major contributors to cancer susceptibility in humans. Several tumor modifier loci have been identified from studies of mouse models of human cancer, and genetic interactions between modifier loci have been detected by genome scanning using recombinant congenic strains of mice (R. Fijneman et al., Nat. Genet., 14: 465-467, 1996; T. van Wezel et al., Nat. Genet., 14: 468-470, 1996; W. N. Frankel et al., Nat. Genet., 14, 371-373, 1996). We demonstrate here that strong genetic interactions between skin tumor modifier loci can be detected by hierarchical whole genome scanning of a complete interspecific backcross [outbred Mus spretus X Mus musculus (NIH/Ola)]. A locus on chromosome 7 (Skts1) showed a highly significant interaction with Skts5 on chromosome 12 (P < 10(-16)), whereas additional significant interactions were detected between loci on chromosomes 4 and 5, and 16 and 15. Some of these quantitative trait loci and their interactions, in particular the Skts1-Skts5 interaction, were confirmed in two completely independent backcrosses using inbred spretus strains (SEG/Pas and SPRET/Ei) and NIH/Ola. These results, therefore, illustrate the general use of interspecific crosses between Mus musculus and Mus spretus for the detection of strong genetic interactions between tumor modifier genes.

  6. A Random-Model Approach to QTL Mapping in Multiparent Advanced Generation Intercross (MAGIC) Populations.

    PubMed

    Wei, Julong; Xu, Shizhong

    2016-02-01

    Most standard QTL mapping procedures apply to populations derived from the cross of two parents. QTL detected from such biparental populations are rarely relevant to breeding programs because of the narrow genetic basis: only two alleles are involved per locus. To improve the generality and applicability of mapping results, QTL should be detected using populations initiated from multiple parents, such as the multiparent advanced generation intercross (MAGIC) populations. The greatest challenges of QTL mapping in MAGIC populations come from multiple founder alleles and control of the genetic background information. We developed a random-model methodology by treating the founder effects of each locus as random effects following a normal distribution with a locus-specific variance. We also fit a polygenic effect to the model to control the genetic background. To improve the statistical power for a scanned marker, we release the marker effect absorbed by the polygene back to the model. In contrast to the fixed-model approach, we estimate and test the variance of each locus and scan the entire genome one locus at a time using likelihood-ratio test statistics. Simulation studies showed that this method can increase statistical power and reduce type I error compared with composite interval mapping (CIM) and multiparent whole-genome average interval mapping (MPWGAIM). We demonstrated the method using a public Arabidopsis thaliana MAGIC population and a mouse MAGIC population.

  7. A Random-Model Approach to QTL Mapping in Multiparent Advanced Generation Intercross (MAGIC) Populations

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Julong; Xu, Shizhong

    2016-01-01

    Most standard QTL mapping procedures apply to populations derived from the cross of two parents. QTL detected from such biparental populations are rarely relevant to breeding programs because of the narrow genetic basis: only two alleles are involved per locus. To improve the generality and applicability of mapping results, QTL should be detected using populations initiated from multiple parents, such as the multiparent advanced generation intercross (MAGIC) populations. The greatest challenges of QTL mapping in MAGIC populations come from multiple founder alleles and control of the genetic background information. We developed a random-model methodology by treating the founder effects of each locus as random effects following a normal distribution with a locus-specific variance. We also fit a polygenic effect to the model to control the genetic background. To improve the statistical power for a scanned marker, we release the marker effect absorbed by the polygene back to the model. In contrast to the fixed-model approach, we estimate and test the variance of each locus and scan the entire genome one locus at a time using likelihood-ratio test statistics. Simulation studies showed that this method can increase statistical power and reduce type I error compared with composite interval mapping (CIM) and multiparent whole-genome average interval mapping (MPWGAIM). We demonstrated the method using a public Arabidopsis thaliana MAGIC population and a mouse MAGIC population. PMID:26715662

  8. Do transgenesis and marker-assisted backcross breeding produce substantially equivalent plants? - A comparative study of transgenic and backcross rice carrying bacterial blight resistant gene Xa21

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The potential impact of genetically modified (GM) plants on human health has attracted much attention worldwide, and the issue remains controversial. This is in sharp contrast to the broad acceptance of plants produced by breeding through Marker Assisted Backcrossing (MAB). Results Focusing on transcriptome variation and perturbation to signaling pathways, we assessed the molecular and biological aspects of substantial equivalence, a general principle for food safety endorsed by the Food and Agricultural Organization and the World Health Organization, between a transgenic crop and a plant from MAB breeding. We compared a transgenic rice line (DXT) and a MAB rice line (DXB), both of which contain the gene Xa21 providing resistance to bacterial leaf blight. By using Next-Generation sequencing data of DXT, DXB and their parental line (D62B), we compared the transcriptome variation of DXT and DXB. Remarkably, DXT had 43% fewer differentially expressed genes (DEGs) than DXB. The genes exclusively expressed in DXT and in DXB have pathogen and stress defense functions. Functional categories of DEGs in DXT were comparable to that in DXB, and seven of the eleven pathways significantly affected by transgenesis were also perturbed by MAB breeding. Conclusions These results indicated that the transgenic rice and rice from MAB breeding are substantial equivalent at the transcriptome level, and paved a way for further study of transgenic rice, e.g., understanding the chemical and nutritional properties of the DEGs identified in the current study. PMID:24165682

  9. Genotype × Environment Interactions of Yield Traits in Backcross Introgression Lines Derived from Oryza sativa cv. Swarna/Oryza nivara

    PubMed Central

    Balakrishnan, Divya; Subrahmanyam, Desiraju; Badri, Jyothi; Raju, Addanki Krishnam; Rao, Yadavalli Venkateswara; Beerelli, Kavitha; Mesapogu, Sukumar; Surapaneni, Malathi; Ponnuswamy, Revathi; Padmavathi, G.; Babu, V. Ravindra; Neelamraju, Sarla

    2016-01-01

    Advanced backcross introgression lines (BILs) developed from crosses of Oryza sativa var. Swarna/O. nivara accessions were grown and evaluated for yield and related traits. Trials were conducted for consecutive three seasons in field conditions in a randomized complete block design with three replications. Data on yield traits under irrigated conditions were analyzed using the Additive Main Effect and Multiplicative Interaction (AMMI), Genotype and Genotype × Environment Interaction (GGE) and modified rank-sum statistic (YSi) for yield stability. BILs viz., G3 (14S) and G6 (166S) showed yield stability across the seasons along with high mean yield performance. G3 is early in flowering with high yield and has good grain quality and medium height, hence could be recommended for most of the irrigated locations. G6 is a late duration genotype, with strong culm strength, high grain number and panicle weight. G6 has higher yield and stability than Swarna but has Swarna grain type. Among the varieties tested DRRDhan 40 and recurrent parent Swarna showed stability for yield traits across the seasons. The component traits thousand grain weight, panicle weight, panicle length, grain number and plant height explained highest genotypic percentage over environment and interaction factors and can be prioritized to dissect stable QTLs/ genes. These lines were genotyped using microsatellite markers covering the entire rice genome and also using a set of markers linked to previously reported yield QTLs. It was observed that wild derived lines with more than 70% of recurrent parent genome were stable and showed enhanced yield levels compared to genotypes with higher donor genome introgressions. PMID:27807437

  10. Population-based advanced practice nursing: where does oncology fit in?

    PubMed

    Lattimer, Jennie Greco

    2013-12-01

    A national work group met in 2004 to discuss the future of advanced practice nursing. The representatives were nursing education, certification, accreditation, and regulation experts, and the goal was to develop a consensus model for advanced practice nursing regulation (Nevidjon et al., 2010). As a result, a set of recommendations was published in an article that defined a new consensus model for advanced practice registered nurse (APRN) regulation (APRN Consensus Workgroup, 2008; Goudreau, 2009). The new model included six population-based focuses of practice (i.e., family and individual across the lifespan, adult and gerontology, neonatal, pediatrics, women's health- and gender-related, and psychiatric and mental health) (Johnson, Dawson, & Brassard, 2010). A goal of the new model was to standardize the licensure, certification, and regulation of nurse practitioners into specific focuses. State boards were facing an increasing number of requests to recognize nurse practitioner specialties (e.g., organ specific, body systems, diseases) (Johnson et al., 2010). The new model helped standardize education programs, which may help certifying agencies set up curriculum review processes to ensure appropriate credentials for APRNs (Johnson et al., 2010). It also supported the mission of nursing to meet future healthcare needs of the public and to protect the public (Johnson et al., 2010). Some advantages exist to delineating into population-based focuses, but the new model leaves out many specialties (e.g., oncology) that encompass the whole person as well as concentrate on certain diseases.

  11. A population based analysis of prognostic factors in advanced biliary tract cancer

    PubMed Central

    Renouf, Daniel; Lim, Howard

    2014-01-01

    Background Data regarding prognostic factors in advanced biliary tract cancer (BTC) remains scarce. The aim of this study was to review our institutional experience with cisplatin and gemcitabine in advanced BTC as well as to evaluate potential prognostic factors for overall survival (OS). Material and methods Consecutive patients with advanced BTC who initiated palliative chemotherapy with cisplatin and gemcitabine from 2009 to 2012 at the BC Cancer Agency were identified using the pharmacy database. Clinicopathologic variables and treatment outcome were retrospectively collected. Potential prognostic factors were assessed by univariate and multivariate analyses. Results A total of 106 patients were included in the analysis. Median OS was 8.5 months (95% CI: 6.5-10.5). On univariate analysis, poor ECOG performance status (ECOG PS) at diagnosis, primary tumor location (extra-hepatic cholangiocarcinoma, and unknown biliary cancer), and sites of advanced disease (extra-hepatic metastasis) were significantly associated with worse OS (P<0.001, 0.036 and 0.034, respectively). Age, gender, CA19-9, CEA, hemoglobin, neutrophil count, and prior stent were not significantly associated with OS. On multivariate analysis, ECOG PS 2/3 was the only predictor of poor OS (P<0.001), while primary location (P=0.089) and sites of advanced disease (P=0.079) had a non-significant trend towards prognostic significance. Conclusions In this population based analysis, a poorer performance status was significantly prognostic of worse OS. Although not significant in our analysis, primary tumor location and sites of advanced disease may also have prognostic relevance. PMID:25436121

  12. A prediction model for advanced colorectal neoplasia in an asymptomatic screening population.

    PubMed

    Hong, Sung Noh; Son, Hee Jung; Choi, Sun Kyu; Chang, Dong Kyung; Kim, Young-Ho; Jung, Sin-Ho; Rhee, Poong-Lyul

    2017-01-01

    An electronic medical record (EMR) database of a large unselected population who received screening colonoscopies may minimize sampling error and represent real-world estimates of risk for screening target lesions of advanced colorectal neoplasia (CRN). Our aim was to develop and validate a prediction model for assessing the probability of advanced CRN using a clinical data warehouse. A total of 49,450 screenees underwent their first colonoscopy as part of a health check-up from 2002 to 2012 at Samsung Medical Center, and the dataset was constructed by means of natural language processing from the computerized EMR system. The screenees were randomized into training and validation sets. The prediction model was developed using logistic regression. The model performance was validated and compared with existing models using area under receiver operating curve (AUC) analysis. In the training set, age, gender, smoking duration, drinking frequency, and aspirin use were identified as independent predictors for advanced CRN (adjusted P < .01). The developed model had good discrimination (AUC = 0.726) and was internally validated (AUC = 0.713). The high-risk group had a 3.7-fold increased risk of advanced CRN compared to the low-risk group (1.1% vs. 4.0%, P < .001). The discrimination performance of the present model for high-risk patients with advanced CRN was better than that of the Asia-Pacific Colorectal Screening score (AUC = 0.678, P < .001) and Schroy's CAN index (AUC = 0.672, P < .001). The present 5-item risk model can be calculated readily using a simple questionnaire and can identify the low- and high-risk groups of advanced CRN at the first screening colonoscopy. This model may increase colorectal cancer risk awareness and assist healthcare providers in encouraging the high-risk group to undergo a colonoscopy.

  13. Two-generation marker-aided backcrossing for rapid conversion of normal maize lines to quality protein maize (QPM).

    PubMed

    Babu, R; Nair, S K; Kumar, A; Venkatesh, S; Sekhar, J C; Singh, N N; Srinivasan, G; Gupta, H S

    2005-09-01

    The low nutritive value of maize endosperm protein is genetically corrected in quality protein maize (QPM), which contains the opaque 2 gene along with numerous modifiers for kernel hardness. We report here a two generation marker-based backcross breeding program for incorporation of the opaque 2 gene along with phenotypic selection for kernel modification in the background of an early maturing normal maize inbred line, V25. Using the flanking marker distances from opaque 2 gene in the cross V 25 xCML 176, optimum population size for the BC(2) generation was computed in such a way that at least one double recombinant could be obtained. Whole genome background selection in the BC(2) generation identified three plants with 93 to 96% recurrent parent genome content. The three BC(2)F(2) families derived from marker identified BC(2) individuals were subjected to foreground selection and phenotypic selection for kernel modification. The tryptophan concentration in endosperm protein was significantly enhanced in all the three classes of kernel modification viz., less than 25%, 25--50% and more than 50% opaqueness. BC(2)F(3) lines developed from the hard endosperm kernels were evaluated for desirable agronomic and biochemical traits in replicated trials and the best line was chosen to represent the QPM version of V25, with tryptophan concentration of 0.85% in protein. The integrated breeding strategy reported here can be applied to reduce genetic drag as well as the time involved in a conventional line conversion program, and would prove valuable in rapid development of specialty corn germ plasm.

  14. Leaf physiology and morphology of Castanea dentata (Marsh) Borkh., Castanea mollissima Blume, and three backcross breeding generations planted in the southern Appalachians, USA

    Treesearch

    Benjamin O. Knapp; G. Geoff Wang; Stacy L Clark; Lauren S. Pile; Scott E. Schlarbaum

    2014-01-01

    Backcross breeding programs have been used to transfer disease resistance and other traits from one forest tree species to another in order to meet restoration objectives. Evaluating the field performance of such material is critical for determining the success of breeding programs. In eastern North America, The American Chestnut Foundation has a backcross breeding...

  15. [Drought resistance evaluation system for backcross lines of Dongxiang common wild rice (Oryza rufipogon Griff.)].

    PubMed

    Fu, Xue-Qin; He, Hao-Hua; Wen, Piao; Luo, Xiang-Dong; Xie, Jian-Kun

    2012-05-01

    A total of 79 rice materials containing Dongxiang wild rice (Oryza rufipogon Griff. ) backcross lines (Dwr)/Xie-qingzao B (Xqz B)//Xqz B and their parents were chosen as the test objects to study the relationships between the drought resistance of these materials and the 31 drought resistance indices at germinating stage, seedling stage, booting stage, and mature stage. The results showed that the drought resistance index or the drought resistance coefficient of these materials were significantly correlated to the relative germination energy (RGE) under 15% PEG-6000 drought stress, the germination drought resistance index (GDRI) and relative germination energy (RGE) under 20% PEG-6000 drought stress, and the relative value of maximum root length (MRL), seeding height (SH), fresh root mass (FRM), dry root mass (DRM), root relative water content (RRWC), wilting rate (WR), leaf soluble sugar content (LSSC), leaf proline content (LPC), leaf MDA content (LMDAC), leaf relative water content (LRWC), level of rolling leaf (RL), plant height (PH), tiller number per plant (TNP), productive tiller number per plant (PTNP), filled spikelets per panicle (FSP), panicle density (PD), seed setting rate (SR), and 1000-grain mass (TGM) under water stress. Through stepwise regression analysis, nine drought resistance indices including the RGE under 20% PEG-6000 drought stress and the relative values of DRM, RRWC, LSSC, LPC, LMDAC, ETNP, SR, and TGM under water stress were selected. Base on these indices and their partial correlation coefficients, the drought resistance evaluation equation (D value) and evaluation system were established, which could well assess the drought resistance of the Dongxiang common wild rice backcross lines at different growth stages.

  16. Autism risk across generations: a population-based study of advancing grandpaternal and paternal age.

    PubMed

    Frans, Emma M; Sandin, Sven; Reichenberg, Abraham; Långström, Niklas; Lichtenstein, Paul; McGrath, John J; Hultman, Christina M

    2013-05-01

    Advancing paternal age has been linked to autism. To further expand knowledge about the association between paternal age and autism by studying the effect of grandfathers' age on childhood autism. Population-based, multigenerational, case-control study. Nationwide multigeneration and patient registers in Sweden. We conducted a study of individuals born in Sweden since 1932. Parental age at birth was obtained for more than 90% of the cohort. Grandparental age at the time of birth of the parent was obtained for a smaller subset (5936 cases and 30 923 controls). International Classification of Diseases diagnosis of childhood autism in the patient registry. A statistically significant monotonic association was found between advancing grandpaternal age at the time of birth of the parent and risk of autism in grandchildren. Men who had fathered a daughter when they were 50 years or older were 1.79 times (95% CI, 1.35-2.37; P < .001) more likely to have a grandchild with autism, and men who had fathered a son when they were 50 years or older were 1.67 times (95% CI, 1.35-2.37; P < .001) more likely to have a grandchild with autism, compared with men who had fathered children when they were 20 to 24 years old, after controlling for birth year and sex of the child, age of the spouse, family history of psychiatric disorders, highest family educational level, and residential county. A statistically significant monotonic association was also found between advancing paternal age and risk of autism in the offspring. Sensitivity analyses indicated that these findings were not the result of bias due to missing data on grandparental age. Advanced grandparental age was associated with increased risk of autism, suggesting that risk of autism could develop over generations. The results are consistent with mutations and/or epigenetic alterations associated with advancing paternal age.

  17. The first research plantings of third-generation, third-backcross American chestnut (Castanea dentata) in the southeastern United States

    Treesearch

    Stacy Clark; S.E. Schlarbaum; F,V Saxton

    2014-01-01

    Production of American chestnut (Castanea dentata) resistant to the chestnut blight fungus (Cryphonectria parasitica) is being conducted currently through traditional breeding and genetic transformation. Sufficient material for field testing is currently available from The American Chestnut Foundation’s backcross breeding program. We planted approximately 4500 chestnut...

  18. Recurrent parent genome recovery analysis in a marker-assisted backcrossing program of rice (Oryza sativa L.).

    PubMed

    Miah, Gous; Rafii, Mohd Y; Ismail, Mohd R; Puteh, Adam B; Rahim, Harun A; Latif, Mohammad A

    2015-02-01

    Backcross breeding is the most commonly used method for incorporating a blast resistance gene into a rice cultivar. Linkage between the resistance gene and undesirable units can persist for many generations of backcrossing. Marker-assisted backcrossing (MABC) along with marker-assisted selection (MAS) contributes immensely to overcome the main limitation of the conventional breeding and accelerates recurrent parent genome (RPG) recovery. The MABC approach was employed to incorporate (a) blast resistance gene(s) from the donor parent Pongsu Seribu 1, the blast-resistant local variety in Malaysia, into the genetic background of MR219, a popular high-yielding rice variety that is blast susceptible, to develop a blast-resistant MR219 improved variety. In this perspective, the recurrent parent genome recovery was analyzed in early generations of backcrossing using simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers. Out of 375 SSR markers, 70 markers were found polymorphic between the parents, and these markers were used to evaluate the plants in subsequent generations. Background analysis revealed that the extent of RPG recovery ranged from 75.40% to 91.3% and from 80.40% to 96.70% in BC1F1 and BC2F1 generations, respectively. In this study, the recurrent parent genome content in the selected BC2F2 lines ranged from 92.7% to 97.7%. The average proportion of the recurrent parent in the selected improved line was 95.98%. MAS allowed identification of the plants that are more similar to the recurrent parent for the loci evaluated in backcross generations. The application of MAS with the MABC breeding program accelerated the recovery of the RP genome, reducing the number of generations and the time for incorporating resistance against rice blast. Copyright © 2014 Académie des sciences. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Prescription Patterns of Sorafenib and Outcomes of Patients with Advanced Hepatocellular Carcinoma: A National Population Study.

    PubMed

    Lu, Li-Chun; Chen, Pei-Jer; Yeh, Yi-Chun; Hsu, Chih-Hung; Chen, Ho-Min; Lai, Mei-Shu; Shao, Yu-Yun; Cheng, Ann-Lii

    2017-05-01

    Sorafenib is the current standard treatment for advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). We analyzed national prescription patterns and treatment outcomes of patients who received sorafenib for advanced HCC. We established a nation-wide cohort of patients who started receiving treatment with sorafenib for advanced HCC between August 2012 and July 2013 from the National Health Insurance Research Database of Taiwan and also retrieved demographic and prescription data. The databases of National Death Registry and Taiwan Cancer Registry were used for survival outcomes and cancer diagnosis information, respectively. A total of 3,293 patients were enrolled. The median overall survival (OS) and time to treatment discontinuation (TTD) of all patients were 6.8 and 2.6 months, respectively. Upon the first prescription of sorafenib, 58.4% of patients received the standard dose (800 mg/day). Among them, 61.9% had subsequent dose reduction. A total of 41.6% of patients initially received lower than standard doses; 36.1% of them had subsequent dose escalation to 800 mg/day. Being male (odds ratio=1.41; p<0.001) and treatment year of 2012 (odds ratio=1.28; p=0.002) were associated with the standard initial dose. Patients who received standard initial dose of sorafenib, compared to patients who received lower initial doses, exhibited longer OS (median of 7.8 vs. 6.6 months, p<0.001) but similar TTD (median of 2.6 vs. 2.9 months, p=0.840). A considerable number of patients with advanced HCC received less than the standard dose of sorafenib. The treatment outcomes in the general population were consistent with those reported in clinical trials. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  20. Advances in Substance Abuse Prevention and Treatment Interventions Among Racial, Ethnic, and Sexual Minority Populations

    PubMed Central

    Blume, Arthur W.

    2016-01-01

    Substance abuse research among racial, ethnic, and sexual minority populations historically has lagged behind that conducted with majority samples. However, interesting and potentially important advances in prevention, brief interventions, and treatment have been made in the last few years, at least among some minority populations, such as American Indian youth. New prevention efforts have focused on point-of-sale interventions for alcohol, as well as on family-unit interventions designed with subpopulation cultural values in mind. In addition, previously established evidence-based and culturally relevant interventions are being combined with computer technology. Empirical data support using brief interventions with patients of color in medical settings, capitalizing on teachable and reachable moments during a physical trauma or other health crisis. Finally, use of empirically supported treatment may be helpful, with a caveat that these interventions must appropriately match cultural traditions and respect the values of the clients. More research clearly is needed, especially among certain minority populations in the United States. A greater emphasis should be placed on developing novel, culturally grounded interventions in partnership with communities, in addition to adapting existing mainstream interventions for use by other cultures. PMID:27159811

  1. Advances in Substance Abuse Prevention and Treatment Interventions Among Racial, Ethnic, and Sexual Minority Populations.

    PubMed

    Bloom, Arthur W

    2016-01-01

    Substance abuse research among racial, ethnic, and sexual minority populations historically has lagged behind that conducted with majority samples. However, interesting and potentially important advances in prevention, brief interventions, and treatment have been made in the last few years, at least among some minority populations, such as American Indian youth. New prevention efforts have focused on point-of-sale interventions for alcohol, as well as on family-unit interventions designed with subpopulation cultural values in mind. In addition, previously established evidence-based and culturally relevant interventions are being combined with computer technology. Empirical data support using brief interventions with patients of color in medical settings, capitalizing on teachable and reachable moments during a physical trauma or other health crisis. Finally, use of empirically supported treatment may be helpful, with a caveat that these interventions must appropriately match cultural traditions and respect the values of the clients. More research clearly is needed, especially among certain minority populations in the United States. A greater emphasis should be placed on developing novel, culturally grounded interventions in partnership with communities, in addition to adapting existing mainstream interventions for use by other cultures.

  2. Primary surgery versus chemoradiotherapy for advanced oropharyngeal cancers: a longitudinal population study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Treatment for advanced stage oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC) includes combined chemoradiation therapy or surgery followed by radiation therapy alone or in combination with chemotherapy. The goal of this study was to utilize available evidence to examine survival outcome differences in patients with advanced stage OPSCC treated with these different modalities. Methods Patients with advanced stage OPSCC were identified. Primary outcome measurements were disease specific and overall survival rates with differences examined via Kaplan-Meier and logistic regression analysis. Results 344 patients were enrolled. 94 patients underwent triple modality therapy inclusive of surgery followed by adjuvant combined chemotherapy and radiation therapy (S-CRT). 131 had surgery and radiation therapy (S-RT), while 56 had chemoradiation (CRT) therapy as their primary treatment. A total of 63 patients had single modality radiation therapy and were excluded from analysis due to the large number of palliative patients. Kaplan-Meier overall survival analysis showed that therapy with S-CRT had the highest disease specific survival at five years (71.1%). This is contrasted against S-RT and CRT, with five year survival rates at 53.9%, and 48.6%, respectively. Cox regression showed that the comparison of S-CRT vs. S-RT, and CRT is associated with statistically significant increased hazard ratios of 1.974, and 2.785, indicating that both S-RT and CRT are associated with a reduced likelihood of survival at 5 years when compared to S-CRT. Conclusions In this population based cohort study S-CRT is associated with a 17–22% 5 year disease specific survival benefit compared to CRT or S-RT. PMID:23663568

  3. Primary surgery versus chemoradiotherapy for advanced oropharyngeal cancers: a longitudinal population study.

    PubMed

    O'Connell, Daniel; Seikaly, Hadi; Murphy, Russell; Fung, Charles; Cooper, Tim; Knox, Aaron; Scrimger, Rufus; Harris, Jeffrey R

    2013-01-01

    Treatment for advanced stage oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC) includes combined chemoradiation therapy or surgery followed by radiation therapy alone or in combination with chemotherapy. The goal of this study was to utilize available evidence to examine survival outcome differences in patients with advanced stage OPSCC treated with these different modalities. Patients with advanced stage OPSCC were identified. Primary outcome measurements were disease specific and overall survival rates with differences examined via Kaplan-Meier and logistic regression analysis. 344 patients were enrolled. 94 patients underwent triple modality therapy inclusive of surgery followed by adjuvant combined chemotherapy and radiation therapy (S-CRT). 131 had surgery and radiation therapy (S-RT), while 56 had chemoradiation (CRT) therapy as their primary treatment. A total of 63 patients had single modality radiation therapy and were excluded from analysis due to the large number of palliative patients. Kaplan-Meier overall survival analysis showed that therapy with S-CRT had the highest disease specific survival at five years (71.1%). This is contrasted against S-RT and CRT, with five year survival rates at 53.9%, and 48.6%, respectively. Cox regression showed that the comparison of S-CRT vs. S-RT, and CRT is associated with statistically significant increased hazard ratios of 1.974, and 2.785, indicating that both S-RT and CRT are associated with a reduced likelihood of survival at 5 years when compared to S-CRT. In this population based cohort study S-CRT is associated with a 17-22% 5 year disease specific survival benefit compared to CRT or S-RT.

  4. De Novo Advanced Adult-Onset Offending: New Evidence from a Population of Federal Correctional Clients.

    PubMed

    DeLisi, Matt; Tahja, Katherine N; Drury, Alan J; Elbert, Michael J; Caropreso, Daniel E; Heinrichs, Timothy

    2017-05-11

    Adult antisocial behavior is almost always predated by delinquency during childhood or adolescence; however, there is also evidence of adult-onset criminal offending. This study examined this controversial subgroup of offenders using self-reported and official data from a total population of federal correctional clients selected from the Midwestern United States. Difference of means t-tests, chi-square tests, and logistic regression models found that 11.7% of clients had an adult onset of offending and 2.7% of clients (n = 23) had an onset occurring at age 60 years or older. This group-introduced as de novo advanced adult-onset offenders-had high socioeconomic status, mixed evidence of adverse childhood experiences, and virtually no usage of drugs with the exception of alcohol. These offenders were primarily convicted of social security and white-collar crimes and evinced remarkably low psychopathology and criminal risk. More research is needed to replicate the phenomenon of de novo advanced adult-onset offending. © 2017 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  5. Advances in pediatric asthma in 2014: Moving toward a population health perspective.

    PubMed

    Szefler, Stanley J

    2015-03-01

    Last year's "Advances in pediatric asthma in 2013: Coordinating asthma care" concluded that, "Enhanced communication systems will be necessary among parents, clinicians, health care providers and the pharmaceutical industry so that we continue the pathway of understanding the disease and developing new treatments that address the unmet needs of patients who are at risk for severe consequences of unchecked disease persistence or progression." This year's summary will focus on further advances in pediatric asthma related to prenatal and postnatal factors altering the natural history of asthma, assessment of asthma control, and new insights regarding the management of asthma in children as indicated in Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology publications in 2014. A major theme of this review is how new research reports can be integrated into medical communication in a population health perspective to assist clinicians in asthma management. The asthma specialist is in a unique position to convey important messages to the medical community related to factors that influence the course of asthma, methods to assess and communicate levels of control, and new targets for intervention, as well as new immunomodulators. By enhancing communication among patients, parents, primary care physicians, and specialists within provider systems, the asthma specialist can provide timely information that can help to reduce asthma morbidity and mortality. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Hybrids between common and Antarctic minke whales are fertile and can back-cross.

    PubMed

    Glover, Kevin A; Kanda, Naohisa; Haug, Tore; Pastene, Luis A; Øien, Nils; Seliussen, Bjørghild B; Sørvik, Anne G E; Skaug, Hans J

    2013-04-15

    Minke whales are separated into two genetically distinct species: the Antarctic minke whale found in the southern hemisphere, and the common minke whale which is cosmopolitan. The common minke whale is further divided into three allopatric sub-species found in the North Pacific, southern hemisphere, and the North Atlantic. Here, we aimed to identify the genetic ancestry of a pregnant female minke whale captured in the North Atlantic in 2010, and her fetus, using data from the mtDNA control region, 11 microsatellite loci and a sex determining marker. All statistical parameters demonstrated that the mother was a hybrid displaying maternal and paternal contribution from North Atlantic common and Antarctic minke whales respectively. Her female fetus displayed greater genetic similarity to North Atlantic common minke whales than herself, strongly suggesting that the hybrid mother had paired with a North Atlantic common minke whale. This study clearly demonstrates, for the first time, that hybrids between minke whale species may be fertile, and that they can back-cross. Whether contact between these species represents a contemporary event linked with documented recent changes in the Antarctic ecosystem, or has occurred at a low frequency over many years, remains open.

  7. Multivariate analysis to determine the genetic distance among backcross papaya (Carica papaya) progenies.

    PubMed

    Ramos, H C C; Pereira, M G; Gonçalves, L S A; Berilli, A P C G; Pinto, F O; Ribeiro, E H

    2012-05-14

    Morpho-agronomic and molecular (RAPD and ISSR markers) data were used to evaluate genetic distances between papaya backcross progenies in order to help identify agronomically superior genotypes. Thirty-two papaya progenies were evaluated based on 15 morpho-agronomic characteristics, 20 ISSR and 19 RAPD primers. Manhattan, Jaccard and Gower distances were used to estimate differences based on continuous and binary data and combined analyses, respectively. Except for production, there were significant differences in the continuous variables among the genotypes. The molecular analysis revealed 193 dominant markers (ISSR and RAPD), being 53 polymorphic loci. Among the various clusters that were generated, the one based on a combined analysis of morpho-agronomic and molecular data gave the highest cophenetic correlation (0.72) compared to individual analysis, consistently allocating the progenies into six groups. We found that the Gower algorithm was more coherent in the discrimination of the genotypes, demonstrating that a combination of molecular and agronomic data is valuable for studies of genetic dissimilarity in papaya.

  8. Hybrids between common and Antarctic minke whales are fertile and can back-cross

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Minke whales are separated into two genetically distinct species: the Antarctic minke whale found in the southern hemisphere, and the common minke whale which is cosmopolitan. The common minke whale is further divided into three allopatric sub-species found in the North Pacific, southern hemisphere, and the North Atlantic. Here, we aimed to identify the genetic ancestry of a pregnant female minke whale captured in the North Atlantic in 2010, and her fetus, using data from the mtDNA control region, 11 microsatellite loci and a sex determining marker. Results All statistical parameters demonstrated that the mother was a hybrid displaying maternal and paternal contribution from North Atlantic common and Antarctic minke whales respectively. Her female fetus displayed greater genetic similarity to North Atlantic common minke whales than herself, strongly suggesting that the hybrid mother had paired with a North Atlantic common minke whale. Conclusion This study clearly demonstrates, for the first time, that hybrids between minke whale species may be fertile, and that they can back-cross. Whether contact between these species represents a contemporary event linked with documented recent changes in the Antarctic ecosystem, or has occurred at a low frequency over many years, remains open. PMID:23586609

  9. Genetic analysis of abnormal male sexual development in Aedes aegypti and Ae. mascarensis backcross progeny.

    PubMed

    Hilburn, L R; Rai, K S

    1982-01-01

    When male hybrids of Aedes aegypti females and A. mascarensis males were backcrossed to A. aegypti females, 32.8 percent of the male progeny exhibited abnormal sexual development, including failure of the terminalia to rotate, a split sternite of the eighth abdominal segment with partially duplicated telomeres, or feminization that gives rise to sterile intersexes. Observations made on three morphological marker loci and five isozyme loci with characteristic electromorphs in the two parental species suggested that when the sex-determining M locus is derived from A. mascarensis and the chromosome regions including s, LDH, and lDH2 on chromosome 2 and blt and 6PGD on chromosome 3 are homozygous for genes from A. aegypti, the frequency of abnormal sexual development is increased. An even greater percentage of males suffer aberrant development if recombination also occurs between the M and re locus of chromosome 1. The data suggest that genes on chromosome 2 control normal development of the male terminalia, genes on chromosome 3 control sexual differentiation, and the entire process is controlled by genes on chromosome 1 that are linked to, but not identical with, the M locus.

  10. Economic Impact of an Advanced Illness Consultation Program within a Medicare Advantage Plan Population.

    PubMed

    Colaberdino, Vincent; Marshall, Colleen; DuBose, Paul; Daitz, Mitchell

    2016-06-01

    In the United States the quality and cost associated with medical treatment for individuals experiencing an advanced illness is highly variable and is often misaligned with the patient's and family's quality of life values and priorities. Many of the obstacles that stand in the way of aligning the care that an individual receives with their priorities are well understood in the context of behavioral science. Through employing behavioral based approaches to improve the quality of communication and shared decision making processes among patients, providers and families it is possible to enhance the efficiency of delivering care which is also more highly aligned with the individual's preferences. The study objectives were to measure the economic impact of a proprietary advanced illness behavioral consultation program, the Vital Decisions Living Well Consultation Program (LWCP), on the cost of care delivered during the last six and three months of life for enrolled members in a Medicare Advantage plan. Retrospective matched case control analysis examined medical, pharmaceutical, and capitation expenses after an offset by premium revenue. The treatment population consisted of participating members of the LWCP who died between October 1, 2011 and March 31, 2013 (N = 1755). The control population consisted of plan members who died between July 1, 2008 and June 1, 2011, prior to the introduction of the LWCP (N = 5560). Criteria used to match treatment subjects with one or more control subjects were diagnosis, age at death, and health care costs incurred prior to the time under examination. A paired t-test evaluated the significance of differences between the matched treatment and control members. The mean cost reduction during the last six months of life for treatment members compared to matched control group members was $13,956 (p < 0.001) during the last six months of life and $9,285 (p < 0.001) during the last three months of life. Members with advanced

  11. Recent advances in systemic lupus erythematosus genetics in an Asian population.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hye-Soon; Bae, Sang Cheol

    2015-02-01

    Recent advances in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) genetics in Asian populations have been achieved by genome-wide association studies (GWASs) and following replication studies, which expanded the genetic information about shared or population-specific risk genes between ethnic groups. Meta-analyses and multi-ethnic replication studies may be possible approaches that could demonstrate stronger or more suggestive evidence for multiple variants for SLE. In addition to the susceptibility of SLE itself, several genotype-phenotype analyses have shown that the specific phenotypes of SLE can also be influenced by genetic factors. Almost all SLE genetic loci are involved in the potential pathways of SLE pathogenesis, such as Toll-like receptor/type I interferon signaling, nuclear factor κB signaling, immune complex clearing mechanism, immune cell (B, T cell, neutrophil and monocyte) function and signaling, cell-cycle regulation, DNA methylation and autophagy. Further studies, including the next generation sequencing technology and the systematic strategy using bioinformatics, in addition to international collaboration among SLE genetic researchers, will give us better understanding of the genetic basis of SLE. © 2014 Asia Pacific League of Associations for Rheumatology and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  12. High rates of advance care planning in New York City's elderly population.

    PubMed

    Morrison, R Sean; Meier, Diane E

    Previous studies have demonstrated low rates of advance care planning (ACP), particularly among nonwhite populations, raising questions about the generalizability of this decision-making process. To explore factors that may influence patients' willingness to engage in ACP. Survey. Thirty-four randomly selected New York City senior centers. A total of 700 African American (n = 239), Hispanic (n = 237), and white (n = 224) adults 60 years and older. Participants were administered a 51-item survey that assessed attitudes, beliefs, and practices regarding ACP. Attitudes and beliefs about physicians' trustworthiness, fatalism, beliefs about surrogate decision making, and comfort discussing end-of-life medical care; factors associated with health care proxy completion; and health care proxy completion rates. More than one third of the participants had completed a health care proxy. There were no significant differences in completion rates across the 3 ethnic groups. Respondents who had a primary care physician (odds ratio [OR], 2.0; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.3-3.2), were more knowledgeable about advance directives (OR, 2.0; 95% CI, 1.4-2.9), or had seen a friend or family member use a mechanical ventilator (OR, 1.5; 95% CI, 1.02-2.1) were significantly more likely to have designated a health care proxy. Respondents who were only comfortable discussing ACP if the discussion was initiated by the physician (OR, 0.6; 95% CI, 0.0-0.8) were significantly less likely to have completed a health care proxy. African American, Hispanic, and white community-dwelling, older adults had similarly high rates of advance directive completion. The primary predictors of advance directive completion involved modifiable factors such as established primary care physicians, personal experience with mechanical ventilation, knowledge about the process of ACP, and physicians' willingness to effectively initiate such discussions. Some of the racial/ethnic differences in desire for collective

  13. Marker-assisted selection to improve drought adaptation in maize: the backcross approach, perspectives, limitations, and alternatives.

    PubMed

    Ribaut, Jean-Marcel; Ragot, Michel

    2007-01-01

    A number of different marker-assisted selection (MAS) approaches do exist for the improvement of polygenic traits. Results of a marker-assisted backcross (MABC) selection experiment aimed at improving grain yield under drought conditions in tropical maize are presented and compared with alternative MAS strategies. The introgression of favourable alleles at five target regions involved in the expression of yield components and flowering traits increased grain yield and reduced the asynchrony between male and female flowering under water-limited conditions. Eighty-five per cent of the recurrent parent's genotype at non-target loci was recovered in only four generations of MABC by screening large segregating populations (2200 individuals) for three of the four generations. Selected MABC-derived BC(2)F(3) families were crossed with two testers and evaluated under different water regimes. Mean grain yield of MABC-derived hybrids was consistently higher than that of control hybrids (crosses from the recurrent parent to the same two testers as the MABC-derived families) under severe water stress conditions. Under those conditions, the best five MABC-derived hybrids yielded, on average, at least 50% more than control hybrids. Under mild water stress, defined as resulting in <50% yield reduction, no difference was observed between MABC-derived hybrids and the control plants, thus confirming that the genetic regulation for drought tolerance is dependent on stress intensity. MABC conversions involving several target regions are likely to result in partial rather than complete line conversion. Simulations were conducted to assess the utility of such partial conversions, i.e. containing favourable donor alleles at non-target regions, for subsequent phenotypic selection. The results clearly showed that selecting several genotypes (10-20) at each MABC cycle was most efficient. In the light of these results, alternative approaches to MABC are discussed, including recurrent

  14. Assessment of testcross performance and genetic diversity of yellow endosperm maize lines derived from adapted x exotic backcrosses.

    PubMed

    Menkir, A; Olowolafe, M O; Ingelbrecht, I; Fawole, I; Badu-Apraku, B; Vroh, B I

    2006-06-01

    Introduction of exotic maize (Zea mays L.) into adapted tropical germplasm may enhance genetic variability and lead to greater progress from selection. The first objective of this study was to determine if yellow endosperm lines derived from adapted x exotic backcrosses contain exotic alleles that are superior to the recurrent adapted parental line for yield and other agronomic traits in tropical environments. Thirteen exotic yellow maize inbred lines were crossed to an adapted orange line (KUSR) and the F1s were backcrossed to KUSR to generate the first backcrosses. Fifty BC1F4 lines derived from these backcrosses and the recurrent parent were crossed to a common inbred tester (L4001) to form testcrosses, which were evaluated at eight environments in Nigeria. Testcrosses of the BC-derived lines differed significantly for grain yield and other agronomic traits. Only two testcrosses yielded significantly less than L4001 x KUSR, with the best 15 testcrosses producing between 289 and 1,056 kg/ha more grain yield than L4001 x KUSR. The best testcrosses were similar to or better than L4001 x KUSR for other agronomic traits. The second objective of this study was to assess the extent of genetic diversity present among the BC-derived lines. We genotyped 46 BC-derived lines including KUSR and L4001 with 10 AFLP primer pairs and found 491 polymorphic fragments. The average allelic diversity of the lines was 0.30 +/- 0.01. The genetic distance of each BC-derived line from KUSR ranged between 0.49 and 0.91. The average genetic distance for all pairs of the BC-derived lines was 0.68 +/- 0.004, varying from 0.34 to 0.92. The increased grain yield and genetic diversity observed in these studies provide evidence that exotic germplasm can contribute new alleles to expand the genetic base of tropical maize and develop high-yielding hybrids.

  15. Population pharmacokinetics of erlotinib in Japanese patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Emoto-Yamamoto, Y; Iida, S; Kawanishi, T; Fukuoka, M

    2015-04-01

    This study aimed to elucidate the pharmacokinetics of erlotinib in Japanese patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and to investigate the relationship between erlotinib exposure and the occurrence of interstitial lung disease (ILD)-like events. Population pharmacokinetics analysis was performed using nonlinear mixed-effects modelling software (NONMEM) based on 348 plasma samples from 97 patients obtained in two phase II clinical studies. Individual empirical Bayesian estimates (EBEs) of apparent oral clearance (CL/F) and Cmax were compared between the patients who developed and did not develop ILD-like events. A 1-compartment model with first-order absorption and first-order elimination was used to describe the plasma concentrations of erlotinib. The estimated population pharmacokinetics parameters were as follows: 4·71 L/h for CL/F, 163 L for apparent volume of distribution (Vc /F) and 1·97 h(-1) for absorption rate constant (Ka ). Total bilirubin (TBIL) and alpha 1-acid glycoprotein (AGP) were identified as statistically significant covariates for CL/F. No differences in CL/F and Cmax were observed between the patients with ILD-like events and those without ILD-like events. A population pharmacokinetics model of erlotinib was developed and validated in Japanese patients. There was no relationship between exposure of erlotinib before the occurrence of ILD-like events and the occurrence of ILD-like events when erlotinib was administered at the same dosage. The high plasma concentration of erlotinib reported in patients after the onset of ILD-like events may be explained by CL/F decrease which occurs along with increasing levels of AGP which was identified as a covariate for CL/F. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Advances in automated 3-D image analyses of cell populations imaged by confocal microscopy.

    PubMed

    Ancin, H; Roysam, B; Dufresne, T E; Chestnut, M M; Ridder, G M; Szarowski, D H; Turner, J N

    1996-11-01

    Automated three-dimensional (3-D) image analysis methods are presented for rapid and effective analysis of populations of fluorescently labeled cells or nuclei in thick tissue sections that have been imaged three dimensionally using a confocal microscope. The methods presented here greatly improve upon our earlier work (Roysam et al.:J Microsc 173: 115-126, 1994). The principal advances reported are: algorithms for efficient data pre-processing and adaptive segmentation, effective handling of image anisotrophy, and fast 3-D morphological algorithms for separating overlapping or connected clusters utilizing image gradient information whenever available. A particular feature of this method is its ability to separate densely packed and connected clusters of cell nuclei. Some of the challenges overcome in this work include the efficient and effective handling of imaging noise, anisotrophy, and large variations in image parameters such as intensity, object size, and shape. The method is able to handle significant inter-cell, intra-cell, inter-image, and intra-image variations. Studies indicate that this method is rapid, robust, and adaptable. Examples were presented to illustrate the applicability of this approach to analyzing images of nuclei from densely packed regions in thick sections of rat liver, and brain that were labeled with a fluorescent Schiff reagent.

  17. Genetic analysis of variation in lifespan using a multiparental advanced intercross Drosophila mapping population.

    PubMed

    Highfill, Chad A; Reeves, G Adam; Macdonald, Stuart J

    2016-08-02

    Considerable natural variation for lifespan exists within human and animal populations. Genetically dissecting this variation can elucidate the pathways and genes involved in aging, and help uncover the genetic mechanisms underlying risk for age-related diseases. Studying aging in model systems is attractive due to their relatively short lifespan, and the ability to carry out programmed crosses under environmentally-controlled conditions. Here we investigate the genetic architecture of lifespan using the Drosophila Synthetic Population Resource (DSPR), a multiparental advanced intercross mapping population. We measured lifespan in females from 805 DSPR lines, mapping five QTL (Quantitative Trait Loci) that each contribute 4-5 % to among-line lifespan variation in the DSPR. Each of these QTL co-localizes with the position of at least one QTL mapped in 13 previous studies of lifespan variation in flies. However, given that these studies implicate >90 % of the genome in the control of lifespan, this level of overlap is unsurprising. DSPR QTL intervals harbor 11-155 protein-coding genes, and we used RNAseq on samples of young and old flies to help resolve pathways affecting lifespan, and identify potentially causative loci present within mapped QTL intervals. Broad age-related patterns of expression revealed by these data recapitulate results from previous work. For example, we see an increase in antimicrobial defense gene expression with age, and a decrease in expression of genes involved in the electron transport chain. Several genes within QTL intervals are highlighted by our RNAseq data, such as Relish, a critical immune response gene, that shows increased expression with age, and UQCR-14, a gene involved in mitochondrial electron transport, that has reduced expression in older flies. The five QTL we isolate collectively explain a considerable fraction of the genetic variation for female lifespan in the DSPR, and implicate modest numbers of genes. In several cases

  18. Multi-parent advanced generation inter-cross (MAGIC) populations in rice: progress and potential for genetics research and breeding.

    PubMed

    Bandillo, Nonoy; Raghavan, Chitra; Muyco, Pauline Andrea; Sevilla, Ma Anna Lynn; Lobina, Irish T; Dilla-Ermita, Christine Jade; Tung, Chih-Wei; McCouch, Susan; Thomson, Michael; Mauleon, Ramil; Singh, Rakesh Kumar; Gregorio, Glenn; Redoña, Edilberto; Leung, Hei

    2013-05-06

    This article describes the development of Multi-parent Advanced Generation Inter-Cross populations (MAGIC) in rice and discusses potential applications for mapping quantitative trait loci (QTLs) and for rice varietal development. We have developed 4 multi-parent populations: indica MAGIC (8 indica parents); MAGIC plus (8 indica parents with two additional rounds of 8-way F1 inter-crossing); japonica MAGIC (8 japonica parents); and Global MAGIC (16 parents - 8 indica and 8 japonica). The parents used in creating these populations are improved varieties with desirable traits for biotic and abiotic stress tolerance, yield, and grain quality. The purpose is to fine map QTLs for multiple traits and to directly and indirectly use the highly recombined lines in breeding programs. These MAGIC populations provide a useful germplasm resource with diverse allelic combinations to be exploited by the rice community. The indica MAGIC population is the most advanced of the MAGIC populations developed thus far and comprises 1328 lines produced by single seed descent (SSD). At the S4 stage of SSD a subset (200 lines) of this population was genotyped using a genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS) approach and was phenotyped for multiple traits, including: blast and bacterial blight resistance, salinity and submergence tolerance, and grain quality. Genome-wide association mapping identified several known major genes and QTLs including Sub1 associated with submergence tolerance and Xa4 and xa5 associated with resistance to bacterial blight. Moreover, the genome-wide association study (GWAS) results also identified potentially novel loci associated with essential traits for rice improvement. The MAGIC populations serve a dual purpose: permanent mapping populations for precise QTL mapping and for direct and indirect use in variety development. Unlike a set of naturally diverse germplasm, this population is tailor-made for breeders with a combination of useful traits derived from multiple elite

  19. The relative contribution of target-site mutations in complex acaricide resistant phenotypes as assessed by marker assisted backcrossing in Tetranychus urticae.

    PubMed

    Riga, Maria; Bajda, Sabina; Themistokleous, Christos; Papadaki, Stavrini; Palzewicz, Maria; Dermauw, Wannes; Vontas, John; Leeuwen, Thomas Van

    2017-08-23

    The mechanisms underlying insecticide and acaricide resistance in insects and mites are often complex, including additive effects of target-site insensitivity, increased metabolism and transport. The extent to which target-site resistance mutations contribute to the resistance phenotype is, however, not well studied. Here, we used marker-assisted backcrossing to create 30 congenic lines carrying nine mutations (alone, or in combination in a few cases) associated with resistance to avermectins, pyrethroids, mite growth inhibitors and mitochondrial complex III inhibitors (QoI) in a polyphagous arthropod pest, the spider mite Tetranychus urticae. Toxicity tests revealed that mutations in the voltage-gated sodium channel, chitin synthase 1 and cytochrome b confer high levels of resistance and, when fixed in a population, these mutations alone can result in field failure of acaricide treatment. In contrast, although we confirmed the implication of mutations in glutamate-gated chloride channels in abamectin and milbemectin insensitivity, these mutations do not lead to the high resistance levels that are often reported in abamectin resistant strains of T. urticae. Overall, this study functionally validates reported target-site resistance mutations in T. urticae, by uncoupling them from additional mechanisms, allowing to finally investigate the strength of the conferred phenotype in vivo.

  20. Association between advanced oxidation protein products and 5-year mortality risk among amazon riparian elderly population.

    PubMed

    Silva, T O; Jung, I E C; Moresco, R N; Barbisan, F; Ribeiro, E E; Ribeiro, E A M; Motta, K; Britto, E; Tasch, E; Bochi, G; Duarte, M M F; Oliveira, A R; Marcon, M; Belló, C; dos Santos Montagner, G F; da Cruz, I B M

    2015-02-01

    Proteins are important targets of several modifications caused by oxidative stress, leading to structural changes and consequently partial or total loss of their functions. The oxidized proteins include advanced oxidation protein products (AOPP) derived from oxidation-modified albumin, as well as fibrinogen and lipoproteins. An increase in AOPP levels indicates an oxidative stress state and the presence of coexisting inflammation. Several investigations have also suggested an association between high AOPP levels and aging-related diseases. However, the link between elevated AOPP levels and elderly mortality risk has not yet been investigated. Here, we report on a 5-year longitudinal study that investigated the potential association between AOPP levels and mortality using a population-based representative sample of riparian elders living in Brazilian Amazon region (Maués-AM). Age, sex, socioeconomic and cultural conditions, chronic morbidities, polypharmacy, and previous morbidities were also tested as potential confounders. The AOPP levels were measured in 540 (84.78%) individuals, all of whom were followed over a 5-year period in order to establish the mortality rate. Within this study period, 74 (13.7%) elders died and 466 (86.3%) survived. The AOPP levels were higher among the elders who died within the 5-year period (46.27 ± 40.6 mmol/L) compared with those who survived (36.79 ± 20.84 mmol/L) (p = 0.002). The analysis confirmed the link between high AOPP levels and mortality risk, independent of other intervenient factors. These results suggest that elevated AOPP levels could be used to predict mortality risk in elderly patients.

  1. Population Characteristics. School Enrollment in the United States: October 1973 (Advance Report). Current Population Reports. Series P-20, No. 261.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of the Census (DOC), Suitland, MD.

    The school enrollment statistics reported in this publication are based on the Current Population Survey conducted in October 1973 by the Bureau of the Census. Although this report features the school enrollment of persons 3-34 years of age, 787,000 additional persons 35 and over are reported as enrolled in college. Two tables provide information…

  2. Transfer of Dicamba Tolerance from Sinapis arvensis to Brassica napus via Embryo Rescue and Recurrent Backcross Breeding.

    PubMed

    Jugulam, M; Ziauddin, Asma; So, Kenny K Y; Chen, Shu; Hall, J Christopher

    2015-01-01

    Auxinic herbicides (e.g. dicamba) are extensively used in agriculture to selectively control broadleaf weeds. Although cultivated species of Brassicaceae (e.g. Canola) are susceptible to auxinic herbicides, some biotypes of Sinapis arvensis (wild mustard) were found dicamba resistant in Canada. In this research, dicamba tolerance from wild mustard was introgressed into canola through embryo rescue followed by conventional breeding. Intergeneric hybrids between S. arvensis (2n = 18) and B. napus (2n = 38) were produced through embryo rescue. Embryo formation and hybrid plant regeneration was achieved. Transfer of dicamba tolerance from S. arvensis into the hybrid plants was determined by molecular analysis and at the whole plant level. Dicamba tolerance was introgressed into B. napus by backcrossing for seven generations. Homozygous dicamba-tolerant B. napus lines were identified. The ploidy of the hybrid progeny was assessed by flow cytometry. Finally, introgression of the piece of DNA possibly containing the dicamba tolerance gene into B. napus was confirmed using florescence in situ hybridization (FISH). This research demonstrates for the first time stable introgression of dicamba tolerance from S. arvensis into B. napus via in vitro embryo rescue followed by repeated backcross breeding. Creation of dicamba-tolerant B. napus varieties by this approach may have potential to provide options to growers to choose a desirable herbicide-tolerant technology. Furthermore, adoption of such technology facilitates effective weed control, less tillage, and possibly minimize evolution of herbicide resistant weeds.

  3. Comparison of phenotypic versus marker-assisted background selection for the SUB1 QTL during backcrossing in rice

    PubMed Central

    Iftekharuddaula, Khandakar M.; Salam, Muhammad A.; Newaz, Muhammad A.; Ahmed, Helal U.; Collard, Bertrand C. Y.; Septiningsih, Endang M.; Sanchez, Darlene L.; Pamplona, Alvaro M.; Mackill, David J.

    2012-01-01

    Marker assisted backcrossing has been used effectively to transfer the submergence tolerance gene SUB1 into popular rice varieties, but the approach can be costly. The selection strategy comprising foreground marker and phenotypic selection was investigated as an alternative. The non-significant correlation coefficients between ranking of phenotypic selection and ranking of background marker selection in BC2F1, BC3F1 and BC3F2 generations indicated inefficiency of phenotypic selection compared to marker-assisted background selection with respect to recovery of the recipient genome. In addition, the introgression size of the chromosome fragment containing SUB1 was approximately 17 Mb, showing the effects of linkage drag. The significant correlation coefficient between rankings of phenotypic selection with the percentage of recipient alleles in the BC1F1 generation suggested that background selection could be avoided in this generation to minimize the genotyping cost. The phenotypically selected best plant of the BC3F1 generation was selfed and backcross recombinant lines were selected in the resulting BC3F4 generation. The selection strategy could be appropriate for the introgression of SUB1 QTL in countries that lack access to high-throughput genotyping facilities. PMID:23226081

  4. GENETIC FACTORS CONTROLLING ANTI-SHEEP ERYTHROCYTE ANTIBODY RESPONSE AND IMMUNOGLOBULIN SYNTHESIS IN BACKCROSS AND F2 PROGENY OF MICE GENETICALLY SELECTED FOR "HIGH" OR "LOW" ANTIBODY SYNTHESIS

    PubMed Central

    Lieberman, R.; Stiffel, C.; Asofsky, R.; Mouton, D.; Biozzi, G.; Benacerraf, B.

    1972-01-01

    Agglutinin responses to sheep erythrocytes and immunoglobulin heavy chain phenotypes determined in F1, F2, and backcross progeny of mice genetically selected for high and low antibody synthesis indicated that an immune response gene for sheep erythrocytes is linked to the immunoglobulin heavy chain allotype. Mice homozygous for the phenotype of the high line had significantly higher titers than mice homozygous for the phenotype of the low line. An association was also observed in some progeny of the backcross of the F1 generation with the low line. However, the control of the immune response was clearly multigenic since heterozygous mice of the same phenotype (2/3, 5) resulting from the two backcrosses (high and low) had very different immune responses. Immunoglobulin levels in the same progeny showed no linkage to the immunoglobulin allotype but a rather simple pattern of inheritance. PMID:4115709

  5. Application of microsatellite markers in conservation genetics and fisheries management: recent advances in population structure analysis and conservation strategies.

    PubMed

    Abdul-Muneer, P M

    2014-01-01

    Microsatellites are the most popular and versatile genetic marker with myriads of applications in population genetics, conservation biology, and evolutionary biology. These are the arrays of DNA sequences, consisting of tandemly repeating mono-, di-, tri-, and tetranucleotide units, which are distributed throughout the genomes of most eukaryotic species. Microsatellites are codominant in nature, highly polymorphic, easily typed, and Mendelian inherited, all properties which make them very suitable for the study of population structure and pedigree analysis and capable of detecting differences among closely related species. PCR for microsatellites can be automated for identifying simple sequence repeat polymorphism. Small amount of blood samples or alcohol preserved tissue is adequate for analyzing them. Most of the microsatellites are noncoding, and therefore variations are independent of natural selection. These properties make microsatellites ideal genetic markers for conservation genetics and fisheries management. This review addresses the applications of microsatellite markers in conservation genetics and recent advances in population structure analysis in the context of fisheries management.

  6. [Advanced approaches to studying the population diversity of marine fishes: new opportunities for fisheries control and management].

    PubMed

    Zelenina, D A; Martinson, Ia T; Ogden, R; Volkov, A A; Zelenina, I A; Carvalho, G R

    2011-12-01

    Recent conceptual and technological advances now enable fisheries geneticists to detect and monitor the dynamics and distribution of marine fish populations more effectively than ever before. Information on the extent of genetically-based divergence among populations, so-called "population diversity", is crucial in the quest to manage exploited living resources sustainably since it endows evolutionary potential in the face of environmental change. The generally limited dialogue between scientists, fisheries managers and policy makers, however, continues to constrain integration of population genetic data into tangible policy applications. Largely drawing on the approach and outputs from a European research project, FishPopTrace, we provide an example how the uncovering of marine fish population diversity enables players from genetics, forensics, management and the policy realm to generate a framework tackling key policy-led questions relating to illegal fishing and traceability. We focus on the use of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in European populations of cod, herring, hake and common sole, and explore how forensics together with a range of analytical approaches, and combined with improved communication of research results to stakeholders, can be used to secure sufficiently robust, tractable and targeted data for effective engagement between science and policy. The essentially binary nature of SNPs, together with generally elevated signals of population discrimination by SNPs under selection, allowed assignment of fish to populations from more areas and with higher certainty than previously possible, reaching standards suitable for use in a court of law. We argue that the use of such tools in enforcement and deterrence, together with the greater integration of population genetic principles and methods into fisheries management, provide tractable elements in the arsenal of tools to achieve sustainable exploitation and conservation of depleted marine fish

  7. Empirical population and public health ethics: A review and critical analysis to advance robust empirical-normative inquiry.

    PubMed

    Knight, Rod

    2016-05-01

    The field of population and public health ethics (PPHE) has yet to fully embrace the generation of evidence as an important project. This article reviews the philosophical debates related to the 'empirical turn' in clinical bioethics, and critically analyses how PPHE has and can engage with the philosophical implications of generating empirical data within the task of normative inquiry. A set of five conceptual and theoretical issues pertaining to population health that are unresolved and could potentially benefit from empirical PPHE approaches to normative inquiry are discussed. Each issue differs from traditional empirical bioethical approaches, in that they emphasize (1) concerns related to the population, (2) 'upstream' policy-relevant health interventions - within and outside of the health care system and (3) the prevention of illness and disease. Within each theoretical issue, a conceptual example from population and public health approaches to HIV prevention and health promotion is interrogated. Based on the review and critical analysis, this article concludes that empirical-normative approaches to population and public health ethics would be most usefully pursued as an iterative project (rather than as a linear project), in which the normative informs the empirical questions to be asked and new empirical evidence constantly directs conceptualizations of what constitutes morally robust public health practices. Finally, a conceptualization of an empirical population and public health ethics is advanced in order to open up new interdisciplinary 'spaces', in which empirical and normative approaches to ethical inquiry are transparently (and ethically) integrated. © The Author(s) 2015.

  8. An Eight-Parent Multiparent Advanced Generation Inter-Cross Population for Winter-Sown Wheat: Creation, Properties, and Validation

    PubMed Central

    Mackay, Ian J.; Bansept-Basler, Pauline; Barber, Toby; Bentley, Alison R.; Cockram, James; Gosman, Nick; Greenland, Andy J.; Horsnell, Richard; Howells, Rhian; O’Sullivan, Donal M.; Rose, Gemma A.; Howell, Phil J.

    2014-01-01

    MAGIC populations represent one of a new generation of crop genetic mapping resources combining high genetic recombination and diversity. We describe the creation and validation of an eight-parent MAGIC population consisting of 1091 F7 lines of winter-sown wheat (Triticum aestivum L.). Analyses based on genotypes from a 90,000-single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array find the population to be well-suited as a platform for fine-mapping quantitative trait loci (QTL) and gene isolation. Patterns of linkage disequilibrium (LD) show the population to be highly recombined; genetic marker diversity among the founders was 74% of that captured in a larger set of 64 wheat varieties, and 54% of SNPs segregating among the 64 lines also segregated among the eight founder lines. In contrast, a commonly used reference bi-parental population had only 54% of the diversity of the 64 varieties with 27% of SNPs segregating. We demonstrate the potential of this MAGIC resource by identifying a highly diagnostic marker for the morphological character "awn presence/absence" and independently validate it in an association-mapping panel. These analyses show this large, diverse, and highly recombined MAGIC population to be a powerful resource for the genetic dissection of target traits in wheat, and it is well-placed to efficiently exploit ongoing advances in phenomics and genomics. Genetic marker and trait data, together with instructions for access to seed, are available at http://www.niab.com/MAGIC/. PMID:25237112

  9. Development of a new genetic map for testing effects of creeping wildrye genes in basin wildrye backcross populations

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Basin wildrye (Leymus cinereus) is the largest native grass in western North America. Creeping wildrye (Leymus triticoides) is strongly rhizomatous grass that forms fertile hybrids with basin wildrye. Inter-specific hybrids, designated "TC" from the species epithets, display biomass heterosis and ...

  10. Genetic variation in salt tolerance at the seedling stage in an interspecific backcross inbred line population of cultivated tetraploid cotton

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Soil salinity reduces cotton growth, yield, and fiber quality and has become a serious problem in the arid southwestern region of the Unites States. Development and planting of salt-tolerant cultivars could ameliorate the deleterious effects. The objectives of this study were to assess the genetic v...

  11. Marker-assisted backcross selection in an interspecific Cucumis population broadens the genetic base of cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) is a major cucurbit vegetable species whose genetic base has been drastically reduced during its domestication. The crop's narrow genetic base (3-12% DNA polymorphism) has resulted from the use of limited genetic material and intense selection during plant improvement....

  12. Caring for Special Populations: Total Pain Theory in Advanced Heart Failure: Applications to Research and Practice

    PubMed Central

    Goebel, Joy R.; Doering, Lynn V.; Lorenz, Karl A.; Maliski, Sally L.; Nyamathi, Adeline M.; Evangelista, Lorraine S.

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE Describe total pain theory and apply it to research and practice in advanced heart failure (HF). SOURCE OF INFORMATION Total pain theory provides a holistic perspective for improving care, especially at the end of life. In advanced HF, multiple domains of well-being known to influence pain perception are adversely affected by declining health and increasing frailty. A conceptual framework is suggested which addresses domains of well-being identified by total pain theory. CONCLUSION By applying total pain theory, providers may be more effective in mitigating the suffering of individuals with progressive, life-limiting diseases. PMID:19691653

  13. Advancing the Science of Recruitment and Retention of Ethnically Diverse Populations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Napoles, Anna M.; Chadiha, Letha A.

    2011-01-01

    We highlight several critical challenges that must be addressed to accelerate the advancement of the science on recruitment and retention of ethnically diverse older adults into health research. These include the relative lack of attention by researchers to methodological issues related to recruitment and retention of ethnically diverse…

  14. Breeding and quantitative genetics advances in sunflower Sclerotinia research

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In 2010, we continued the process of backcrossing the head rot QTL from the HA 441 x RHA 439 population into confectionery and elite oilseed backgrounds. Progress is slow due to complexities in scoring of alleles in breeding progenies (dominant markers sometimes in repulsion phase, and many gel band...

  15. Using a Vulnerability Theoretical Model to Assess the Malignant Hyperthermia Susceptible Population: Implications for Advanced Practice Emergency Nurses.

    PubMed

    Denholm, Bonnie G

    2015-01-01

    Malignant hyperthermia (MH) is a high-risk, low-occurrence medical emergency with symptoms that include a severe increased rate of metabolic activity and rigid skeletal muscles. Clinicians should be knowledgeable and prepared for an MH event because it can occur in areas outside the operating room and without anesthetic triggers. Patients who have this rare genetic condition may come to the emergency department (ED) presenting with symptoms of heat stroke. However, the incidence of suspected MH in the ED or other critical care areas is not easily quantifiable because clinicians may not report cases to a centralized registry. The purpose of this article is to describe the MH-susceptible vulnerable population, to apply a vulnerability theoretical model to assess patients and families, to identify strategies for health promotion to reduce vulnerability, and to discuss how advanced practice nurses who specialize in emergency care can help decrease the vulnerability of MH-susceptible patients and families. By using a vulnerability model to assess the MH-susceptible population, nurses can effectively sort out strategies to prevent poor patient outcomes related to MH and promote health for this high-risk population. Measuring accurate core temperatures, applying effective cooling methods, and administering dantrolene are key concepts in caring for a patient who is experiencing an MH event. Advanced practice emergency nurses can participate in reducing vulnerability for this population by applying the Emergency Nurses Association Clinical Nurse Specialist competencies to MH-related vulnerabilities. Enhancing preparedness, evaluating and coordinating education programs, advocating for report submissions to the North American Malignant Hyperthermia Registry, and assessing opportunities for community collaboration are among the strategies discussed for reducing vulnerability for the MH-susceptible population.

  16. Advancing Community–Based Research with Urban American Indian Populations: Multidisciplinary Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Hartmann, William E.; Wendt, Dennis C.; Saftner, Melissa A.; Marcus, John; Momper, Sandra L.

    2014-01-01

    The U.S. has witnessed significant growth among urban AI populations in recent decades, and concerns have been raised that these populations face equal or greater degrees of disadvantage than their reservation counterparts. Surprisingly little urban AI research or community work has been documented in the literature, and even less has been written about the influences of urban settings on community-based work with these populations. Given the deep commitments of community psychology to empowering disadvantaged groups and understanding the impact of contextual factors on the lives of individuals and groups, community psychologists are well suited to fill these gaps in the literature. Toward informing such efforts, this work offers multidisciplinary insights from distinct idiographic accounts of community-based behavioral health research with urban AI populations. Accounts are offered by three researchers and one urban AI community organization staff member, and particular attention is given to issues of community heterogeneity, geography, membership, and collaboration. Each first-person account provides “lessons learned” from the urban context in which the research occurred. Together, these accounts suggest several important areas of consideration in research with urban AIs, some of which also seem relevant to reservation-based work. Finally, the potential role of research as a tool of empowerment for urban AI populations is emphasized, suggesting future research attend to the intersections of identity, sense of community, and empowerment in urban AI populations. PMID:24659391

  17. Advancing community-based research with urban American Indian populations: multidisciplinary perspectives.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, William E; Wendt, Dennis C; Saftner, Melissa A; Marcus, John; Momper, Sandra L

    2014-09-01

    The US has witnessed significant growth among urban American Indian (AI) populations in recent decades, and concerns have been raised that these populations face equal or greater degrees of disadvantage than their reservation counterparts. Surprisingly little urban AI research or community work has been documented in the literature, and even less has been written about the influences of urban settings on community-based work with these populations. Given the deep commitments of community psychology to empowering disadvantaged groups and understanding the impact of contextual factors on the lives of individuals and groups, community psychologists are well suited to fill these gaps in the literature. Toward informing such efforts, this work offers multidisciplinary insights from distinct idiographic accounts of community-based behavioral health research with urban AI populations. Accounts are offered by three researchers and one urban AI community organization staff member, and particular attention is given to issues of community heterogeneity, geography, membership, and collaboration. Each first-person account provides “lessons learned” from the urban context in which the research occurred. Together, these accounts suggest several important areas of consideration in research with urban AIs, some of which also seem relevant to reservation-based work. Finally, the potential role of research as a tool of empowerment for urban AI populations is emphasized, suggesting future research attend to the intersections of identity, sense of community, and empowerment in urban AI populations.

  18. Compositional differences between near-isogenic GM and conventional maize hybrids are associated with backcrossing practices in conventional breeding.

    PubMed

    Venkatesh, Tyamagondlu V; Cook, Kevin; Liu, Bing; Perez, Timothy; Willse, Alan; Tichich, Ryan; Feng, Ping; Harrigan, George G

    2015-02-01

    Here, we show that differences between genetically modified (GM) and non-GM comparators cannot be attributed unequivocally to the GM trait, but arise because of minor genomic differences in near-isogenic lines. Specifically, this study contrasted the effect of three GM traits (drought tolerance, MON 87460; herbicide resistance, NK603; insect protection, MON 89034) on maize grain composition relative to the effects of residual genetic variation from backcrossing. Important features of the study included (i) marker-assisted backcrossing to generate genetically similar inbred variants for each GM line, (ii) high-resolution genotyping to evaluate the genetic similarity of GM lines to the corresponding recurrent parents and (iii) introgression of the different GM traits separately into a wide range of genetically distinct conventional inbred lines. The F1 hybrids of all lines were grown concurrently at three replicated field sites in the United States during the 2012 growing season, and harvested grain was subjected to compositional analysis. Proximates (protein, starch and oil), amino acids, fatty acids, tocopherols and minerals were measured. The number of statistically significant differences (α = 0.05), as well as magnitudes of difference, in mean levels of these components between corresponding GM variants was essentially identical to that between GM and non-GM controls. The largest sources of compositional variation were the genetic background of the different conventional inbred lines (males and females) used to generate the maize hybrids and location. The lack of any compositional effect attributable to GM suggests the development of modern agricultural biotechnology has been accompanied by a lack of any safety or nutritional concerns. © 2014 Society for Experimental Biology, Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Performance of container-grown seedlings of American chestnut backcross hybrids BC3 F3 generation in central Louisiana

    Treesearch

    Shi-Jean Susana Sung; Stacy L. Clark; Scott Schlarbaum; Daniel C. Dey; Daniel J. Leduc

    2016-01-01

    Seedlings from two families of the BC3F3 backcross generation of the American chestnut (Castanea dentata) and Chinese chestnut (C. mollissima) were cultured in 2013 in Missouri using the Root Production Method®, a container-based system used to avoid disease problems associated with...

  20. Effects of temporal dynamics, nut weight and nut size on growth of American chestnut, Chinese chestnut and backcross generations in a commercial nursery

    Treesearch

    Cornelia Pinchot; Stacy Clark; Scott Schlarbaum; Arnold Saxton; Shi-Jean Sung; Frederick. Hebard

    2015-01-01

    Blight-resistant American chestnut (Castanea dentata) may soon be commercially available, but few studies have tested methods to produce high quality seedlings that will be competitive after planting. This study evaluated the performance of one American, one Chinese (C. mollissima), one second-generation backcross (BC3...

  1. Use of backcross recurrent selection and QTL mapping to identify loci contributing to southern leaf blight resistance in a highly resistant maize line

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    B73 is a commonly used maize line with excellent yield potential but high susceptibility to the foliar disease southern leaf blight (SLB). NC292 and NC330 are B73 near-isogenic lines (NILs) that are highly resistant to SLB. They were derived by repeated backcrossing an elite source of SLB resistanc...

  2. Interspecific hybridization, polyploidization, and backcross of Brassica oleracea var. alboglabra with B. rapa var. purpurea morphologically recapitulate the evolution of Brassica vegetables.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaohui; Liu, Tongjin; Li, Xixiang; Duan, Mengmeng; Wang, Jinglei; Qiu, Yang; Wang, Haiping; Song, Jiangping; Shen, Di

    2016-01-04

    Brassica oleracea and B. rapa are two important vegetable crops. Both are composed of dozens of subspecies encompassing hundreds of varieties and cultivars. Synthetic B. napus with these two plants has been used extensively as a research model for the investigation of allopolyploid evolution. However, the mechanism underlying the explosive evolution of hundreds of varieties of B. oleracea and B. rapa within a short period is poorly understood. In the present study, interspecific hybridization between B. oleracea var. alboglabra and B. rapa var. purpurea was performed. The backcross progeny displayed extensive morphological variation, including some individuals that phenocopied subspecies other than their progenitors. Numerous interesting novel phenotypes and mutants were identified among the backcross progeny. The chromosomal recombination between the A and C genomes and the chromosomal asymmetric segregation were revealed using Simple Sequence Repeats (SSR) markers. These findings provide direct evidence in support of the hypothesis that interspecific hybridization and backcrossing have played roles in the evolution of the vast variety of vegetables among these species and suggest that combination of interspecific hybridization and backcrossing may facilitate the development of new mutants and novel phenotypes for both basic research and the breeding of new vegetable crops.

  3. Interspecific hybridization, polyploidization, and backcross of Brassica oleracea var. alboglabra with B. rapa var. purpurea morphologically recapitulate the evolution of Brassica vegetables

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaohui; Liu, Tongjin; Li, Xixiang; Duan, Mengmeng; Wang, Jinglei; Qiu, Yang; Wang, Haiping; Song, Jiangping; Shen, Di

    2016-01-01

    Brassica oleracea and B. rapa are two important vegetable crops. Both are composed of dozens of subspecies encompassing hundreds of varieties and cultivars. Synthetic B. napus with these two plants has been used extensively as a research model for the investigation of allopolyploid evolution. However, the mechanism underlying the explosive evolution of hundreds of varieties of B. oleracea and B. rapa within a short period is poorly understood. In the present study, interspecific hybridization between B. oleracea var. alboglabra and B. rapa var. purpurea was performed. The backcross progeny displayed extensive morphological variation, including some individuals that phenocopied subspecies other than their progenitors. Numerous interesting novel phenotypes and mutants were identified among the backcross progeny. The chromosomal recombination between the A and C genomes and the chromosomal asymmetric segregation were revealed using Simple Sequence Repeats (SSR) markers. These findings provide direct evidence in support of the hypothesis that interspecific hybridization and backcrossing have played roles in the evolution of the vast variety of vegetables among these species and suggest that combination of interspecific hybridization and backcrossing may facilitate the development of new mutants and novel phenotypes for both basic research and the breeding of new vegetable crops. PMID:26727246

  4. Advancing the evolution of healthcare: information technology in a person-focused population health model.

    PubMed

    Velianoff, George D

    2014-01-01

    The current changes introduced into the healthcare delivery system through the Affordable Care Act require more than the isolated, quality/cost process solutions utilized to date. Robust information systems with capabilities to push information and provide valid analytics and decision support utilizing point-of-care data input are required to achieve a complex, person-centered, lifetime-focused model. This article presents a review of the current state of population health, a model identifying components within population health, and an example of information technology integration.

  5. Recent advances in assessing gene flow between diverging populations and species.

    PubMed

    Hey, Jody

    2006-12-01

    The evolutionary process of divergence, which ultimately leads to the generation of new species, is thought to occur usually without any gene exchange between the diverging populations. However, until the recent growth of multi-locus datasets, and the development of new population genetic methods, it has been very difficult to assess whether or not closely related species have, or have not, exchanged genes during their divergence. Several recent studies have found significant signals of gene flow during species formation, calling into question the conventional wisdom that gene flow is absent during speciation.

  6. Selective Advance for Accelerated Development of Recombinant Inbred QTL Mapping Populations

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Recombinant inbred lines, conventionally used for QTL mapping in biparental populations of self-pollinating plant species, afford limited mapping resolution. Intercrossing during line development is sometimes used to counter this disadvantage, but is tedious. It is desirable to improve mapping resol...

  7. Towards genetic manipulation of wild mosquito populations to combat malaria: advances and challenges.

    PubMed

    Riehle, Michael A; Srinivasan, Prakash; Moreira, Cristina K; Jacobs-Lorena, Marcelo

    2003-11-01

    Malaria kills millions of people every year, yet there has been little progress in controlling this disease. For transmission to occur, the malaria parasite has to complete a complex developmental cycle in the mosquito. The mosquito is therefore a potential weak link in malaria transmission, and generating mosquito populations that are refractory to the parasite is a potential means of controlling the disease. There has been considerable progress over the last decade towards developing the tools for creating a refractory mosquito. Accomplishments include germline transformation of several important mosquito vectors, the completed genomes of the mosquito Anopheles gambiae and the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum, and the identification of promoters and effector genes that confer resistance in the mosquito. These tools have provided researchers with the ability to engineer a refractory mosquito vector, but there are fundamental gaps in our knowledge of how to transfer this technology safely and effectively into field populations. This review considers strategies for interfering with Plasmodium development in the mosquito, together with issues related to the transfer of laboratory-acquired knowledge to the field, such as minimization of transgene fitness load to the mosquito, driving genes through populations, avoiding the selection of resistant strains, and how to produce and release populations of males only.

  8. Polymorphism analysis of multi-parent advanced generation inter-cross (MAGIC) populations of upland cotton developed in China.

    PubMed

    Li, D G; Li, Z X; Hu, J S; Lin, Z X; Li, X F

    2016-12-19

    Upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) is an important cash crop that provides renewable natural fiber worldwide. Currently limited genetic base leads to a decrease in upland cotton genetic diversity. Multi-parent advance generation inter-cross (MAGIC) populations can be used to evaluate complex agronomic traits in crops. In this study, we developed an upland cotton MAGIC population. A total of 258 MAGIC population lines and their twelve founder lines were analyzed, using 432 pairs of simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers. Gene diversity indices and the polymorphism information content were calculated using polymorphism analyses. Our genotype analysis showed that 258 inbred lines could be divided into 158 genotypes. Among these, we identified 17 pairs of specific SSR primers on the A chromosome subgroups and 24 pairs of specific SSR primers on the B chromosome subgroups of upland cotton. These were related to 77 and 128 genotypes, respectively. Our results suggest that the upland cotton MAGIC population contained abundant genetic diversity and may provide enormous resources for future genetic breeding.

  9. Advancing suicide prevention research with rural American Indian and Alaska Native populations.

    PubMed

    Wexler, Lisa; Chandler, Michael; Gone, Joseph P; Cwik, Mary; Kirmayer, Laurence J; LaFromboise, Teresa; Brockie, Teresa; O'Keefe, Victoria; Walkup, John; Allen, James

    2015-05-01

    As part of the National Action Alliance for Suicide Prevention's American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) Task Force, a multidisciplinary group of AI/AN suicide research experts convened to outline pressing issues related to this subfield of suicidology. Suicide disproportionately affects Indigenous peoples, and remote Indigenous communities can offer vital and unique insights with relevance to other rural and marginalized groups. Outcomes from this meeting include identifying the central challenges impeding progress in this subfield and a description of promising research directions to yield practical results. These proposed directions expand the alliance's prioritized research agenda and offer pathways to advance the field of suicide research in Indigenous communities and beyond.

  10. Population

    EPA Science Inventory

    Population growth influences many stressors on Narragansett Bay and its Watershed, including all landscape and chemical stressors discussed in other chapters of this report. In numerous ways, population growth affects the condition of the Bay ecosystem, Watershed ecosystem, and h...

  11. Sequential triage in the first trimester may enhance advanced ultrasound scanning in population screening for trisomy 21.

    PubMed

    Gyselaers, W J A; Roets, E R A; Van Holsbeke, C D Y J; Vereecken, A J; Van Herck, E J H; Straetmans, D P L; Ombelet, W U A M; Nijhuis, J G

    2006-06-01

    To design a trisomy 21 screening protocol for sequential triage in the first trimester, and to evaluate whether it reduces the need for advanced ultrasound scanning to such an extent that this could be dealt with by a limited number of well-trained sonographers only. Screening results of 31 trisomy 21 affected pregnancies and 16 096 unaffected pregnancies from the first trimester screening program of Algemeen Medisch Laboratorium in Antwerp, Belgium, were used to define high-risk, intermediate-risk and low-risk groups. A serum screening result (age, pregnancy-associated plasma protein-A (PAPP-A) and free beta-human chorionic gonadotropin (beta-hCG)) of >or=1 : 30 and/or a nuchal translucency thickness (NT) measurement of >or= 3.5 mm were classified as high risk. A serum screening result of < 1 : 1000 together with an NT of < 3.5 mm were classified as low risk. Other results were considered intermediate risk, for which further advanced ultrasound screening would be indicated. This protocol was then evaluated prospectively in another population of 13 493 first-trimester pregnancies. Of the total population, 1.9% was identified as being high risk (14 trisomy 21 pregnancies and 222 unaffected pregnancies; prevalence, 1 : 17), 59.6% was identified as being low risk (three trisomy 21 pregnancies and 9615 unaffected pregnancies; prevalence, 1 : 3206) and 38.4% was identified as being intermediate risk (10 trisomy 21 pregnancies and 6190 unaffected pregnancies; prevalence, 1 : 620). A similar distribution was found in the prospective arm of the study. There was no reduction of overall screening performance compared with our current first-trimester combined screening program. The number of intermediate-risk pregnancies was sufficiently low as to enable advanced ultrasound scanning by well-trained sonographers only. In population screening for fetal trisomy 21, sequential triage in the first trimester can be achieved using very simple methods. Pregnancies at high or at low

  12. The Use of Advanced Hydroelectric Turbines to Improve Water Quality and Fish Populations

    SciTech Connect

    Brookshier, P A; Cada, G F; Flynn, J V; Rinehart, B N; Sale, M J; Sommers, G L

    1999-09-20

    Hydroelectric power contributes about 10 percent of the electrical energy generated in the United States, and nearly 20 percent of the world's electrical energy. It is a renewable energy source that can contribute significantly to reduction of greenhouse gases by offsetting conventional carbon-based electricity generation. However, rather than growing in importance, hydroelectric generation has actually declined in recent years, often as a consequence of environmental concerns centering around (1) restriction of upstream and downstream fish passage by the dam, and (2) alteration of water quality and river flows by the impoundment. The Advanced Hydropower Turbine System (AHTS) Program of the U.S. Department of Energy is developing turbine technology which would help to maximize global hydropower resources while minimizing adverse environmental effects. Major technical goals for the Program are (1) the reduction of mortality among turbine-passed fish to 2 percent or less, compared to current levels ranging up to 30 percent or greater; and (2) development of aerating turbines that would ensure that water discharged from reservoirs has a dissolved oxygen concentration of at least 6 mg/L. These advanced, "environmentally friendly" turbines would be suitable both for new hydropower installations and for retrofitting at existing dams. Several new turbine designs that have been developed in the initial phases of the AHTS program are described.

  13. [Population].

    PubMed

    1979-01-01

    Data on the population of Venezuela between 1975 and 1977 are presented in descriptive tables and graphs. Information is included on the employed population according to category, sex, and type of economic activity, and by sex, age, and area on the employment rate and the total, the economically active, and the unemployed population.

  14. Population.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Pat; Landahl, John

    This pamphlet has been prepared in response to a new problem, a rapidly increasing population, and a new need, population education. It is designed to help teachers provide their students with some basic population concepts with stress placed on the elements of decision making. In the first section of the pamphlet, some of the basic concepts of…

  15. Microbial Population Differentials between Mucosal and Submucosal Intestinal Tissues in Advanced Crohn's Disease of the Ileum

    PubMed Central

    Chiodini, Rodrick J.; Dowd, Scot E.; Chamberlin, William M.; Galandiuk, Susan; Davis, Brian; Glassing, Angela

    2015-01-01

    Since Crohn's disease is a transmural disease, we hypothesized that examination of deep submucosal tissues directly involved in the inflammatory disease process may provide unique insights into bacterial populations transgressing intestinal barriers and bacterial populations more representative of the causes and agents of the disease. We performed deep 16s microbiota sequencing on isolated ilea mucosal and submucosal tissues on 20 patients with Crohn's disease and 15 non-inflammatory bowel disease controls with a depth of coverage averaging 81,500 sequences in each of the 70 DNA samples yielding an overall resolution down to 0.0001% of the bacterial population. Of the 4,802,328 total sequences generated, 98.9% or 4,749,183 sequences aligned with the Kingdom Bacteria that clustered into 8545 unique sequences with <3% divergence or operational taxonomic units enabling the identification of 401 genera and 698 tentative bacterial species. There were significant differences in all taxonomic levels between the submucosal microbiota in Crohn's disease compared to controls, including organisms of the Order Desulfovibrionales that were present within the submucosal tissues of most Crohn's disease patients but absent in the control group. A variety of organisms of the Phylum Firmicutes were increased in the subjacent submucosa as compared to the parallel mucosal tissue including Ruminococcus spp., Oscillospira spp., Pseudobutyrivibrio spp., and Tumebacillus spp. In addition, Propionibacterium spp. and Cloacibacterium spp. were increased as well as large increases in Proteobacteria including Parasutterella spp. and Methylobacterium spp. This is the first study to examine the microbial populations within submucosal tissues of patients with Crohn's disease and to compare microbial communities found deep within the submucosal tissues with those present on mucosal surfaces. Our data demonstrate the existence of a distinct submucosal microbiome and ecosystem that is not well

  16. Networks as a type of social entrepreneurship to advance population health.

    PubMed

    Wei-Skillern, Jane

    2010-11-01

    A detailed case study from the field of social entrepreneurship is used to illustrate the network approach, which does not require more resources but rather makes better use of existing resources. Leaders in public health can use networks to overcome some of the barriers that inhibit the widespread adoption of a population health approach to community health. Public health leaders who embrace social entrepreneurship may be better able to accomplish their missions by building their networks rather than just their organizations.

  17. Larval retention and connectivity among populations of corals and reef fishes: history, advances and challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, G. P.; Almany, G. R.; Russ, G. R.; Sale, P. F.; Steneck, R. S.; van Oppen, M. J. H.; Willis, B. L.

    2009-06-01

    The extent of larval dispersal on coral reefs has important implications for the persistence of coral reef metapopulations, their resilience and recovery from an increasing array of threats, and the success of protective measures. This article highlights a recent dramatic increase in research effort and a growing diversity of approaches to the study of larval retention within (self-recruitment) and dispersal among (connectivity) isolated coral reef populations. Historically, researchers were motivated by alternative hypotheses concerning the processes limiting populations and structuring coral reef assemblages, whereas the recent impetus has come largely from the need to incorporate dispersal information into the design of no-take marine protected area (MPA) networks. Although the majority of studies continue to rely on population genetic approaches to make inferences about dispersal, a wide range of techniques are now being employed, from small-scale larval tagging and paternity analyses, to large-scale biophysical circulation models. Multiple approaches are increasingly being applied to cross-validate and provide more realistic estimates of larval dispersal. The vast majority of empirical studies have focused on corals and fishes, where evidence for both extremely local scale patterns of self-recruitment and ecologically significant connectivity among reefs at scales of tens of kilometers (and in some cases hundreds of kilometers) is accumulating. Levels of larval retention and the spatial extent of connectivity in both corals and fishes appear to be largely independent of larval duration or reef size, but may be strongly influenced by geographic setting. It is argued that high levels of both self-recruitment and larval import can contribute to the resilience of reef populations and MPA networks, but these benefits will erode in degrading reef environments.

  18. Microbial Population Differentials between Mucosal and Submucosal Intestinal Tissues in Advanced Crohn's Disease of the Ileum.

    PubMed

    Chiodini, Rodrick J; Dowd, Scot E; Chamberlin, William M; Galandiuk, Susan; Davis, Brian; Glassing, Angela

    2015-01-01

    Since Crohn's disease is a transmural disease, we hypothesized that examination of deep submucosal tissues directly involved in the inflammatory disease process may provide unique insights into bacterial populations transgressing intestinal barriers and bacterial populations more representative of the causes and agents of the disease. We performed deep 16s microbiota sequencing on isolated ilea mucosal and submucosal tissues on 20 patients with Crohn's disease and 15 non-inflammatory bowel disease controls with a depth of coverage averaging 81,500 sequences in each of the 70 DNA samples yielding an overall resolution down to 0.0001% of the bacterial population. Of the 4,802,328 total sequences generated, 98.9% or 4,749,183 sequences aligned with the Kingdom Bacteria that clustered into 8545 unique sequences with <3% divergence or operational taxonomic units enabling the identification of 401 genera and 698 tentative bacterial species. There were significant differences in all taxonomic levels between the submucosal microbiota in Crohn's disease compared to controls, including organisms of the Order Desulfovibrionales that were present within the submucosal tissues of most Crohn's disease patients but absent in the control group. A variety of organisms of the Phylum Firmicutes were increased in the subjacent submucosa as compared to the parallel mucosal tissue including Ruminococcus spp., Oscillospira spp., Pseudobutyrivibrio spp., and Tumebacillus spp. In addition, Propionibacterium spp. and Cloacibacterium spp. were increased as well as large increases in Proteobacteria including Parasutterella spp. and Methylobacterium spp. This is the first study to examine the microbial populations within submucosal tissues of patients with Crohn's disease and to compare microbial communities found deep within the submucosal tissues with those present on mucosal surfaces. Our data demonstrate the existence of a distinct submucosal microbiome and ecosystem that is not well

  19. Incorporating intersectionality theory into population health research methodology: challenges and the potential to advance health equity.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Greta R

    2014-06-01

    Intersectionality theory, developed to address the non-additivity of effects of sex/gender and race/ethnicity but extendable to other domains, allows for the potential to study health and disease at different intersections of identity, social position, processes of oppression or privilege, and policies or institutional practices. Intersectionality has the potential to enrich population health research through improved validity and greater attention to both heterogeneity of effects and causal processes producing health inequalities. Moreover, intersectional population health research may serve to both test and generate new theories. Nevertheless, its implementation within health research to date has been primarily through qualitative research. In this paper, challenges to incorporation of intersectionality into population health research are identified or expanded upon. These include: 1) confusion of quantitative terms used metaphorically in theoretical work with similar-sounding statistical methods; 2) the question of whether all intersectional positions are of equal value, or even of sufficient value for study; 3) distinguishing between intersecting identities, social positions, processes, and policies or other structural factors; 4) reflecting embodiment in how processes of oppression and privilege are measured and analysed; 5) understanding and utilizing appropriate scale for interactions in regression models; 6) structuring interaction or risk modification to best convey effects, and; 7) avoiding assumptions of equidistance or single level in the design of analyses. Addressing these challenges throughout the processes of conceptualizing and planning research and in conducting analyses has the potential to improve researchers' ability to more specifically document inequalities at varying intersectional positions, and to study the potential individual- and group-level causes that may drive these observed inequalities. A greater and more thoughtful incorporation

  20. Centralized primary care of advanced ovarian cancer improves complete cytoreduction and survival - A population-based cohort study.

    PubMed

    Dahm-Kähler, Pernilla; Palmqvist, Charlotte; Staf, Christian; Holmberg, Erik; Johannesson, Liza

    2016-08-01

    To evaluate centralized primary care of advanced ovarian and fallopian tube cancers in a complete population cohort in relation to complete cytoreduction, time interval from surgery to chemotherapy and relative survival. A regional population-based cohort study of women diagnosed with primary ovarian and fallopian tube cancers and included in the Swedish Quality Registry (SQR) during 2008-2013 in a region where primary care of advanced stages was centralized in 2011. Surgical, oncological characteristics, outcomes, follow-ups and relative survivals were analyzed. There were 817 women diagnosed with ovarian and fallopian tube cancers during 2008-2013 and 523 were classified as FIGO stage III-IV and further analyzed. Primary debulking surgery (PDS) was performed in 81% and neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT) followed by interval debulking surgery (IDS) in 11%. Complete cytoreduction at PDS was performed in 37% before compared to 49% after centralization (p<0.03). The chemotherapy protocols were identical in the cohorts and they received and completed the planned chemotherapy equally. The time interval between PDS and chemotherapy was 36days (median) before compared to 24days after centralization (p<0.01). The relative 3-year survival rate in women treated by PDS was 44% compared to 65% after centralization and the estimated excess mortality rate ratio (EMRR) was reduced (RR 0.58; 95% CI 0.42-0.79). Comparing the complete cohorts before and after centralization, regardless primary treatment, the relative 3-year survival rate increased from 40% to 61% with reduced EMRR (RR 0.59; 95% CI 0.45-0.76). Centralized primary care of advanced ovarian and fallopian tube cancers increases complete cytoreduction, decreases time interval from PDS to chemotherapy and improves relative survival significantly. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. The relationship between neuraxial anesthesia and advanced ovarian cancer-related outcomes in the Chilean population.

    PubMed

    Lacassie, Hector J; Cartagena, Jaime; Brañes, Jorge; Assel, Melissa; Echevarría, Ghislaine C

    2013-09-01

    Mixed evidence has been published relating the use of regional anesthesia during oncologic surgery to a decrease in time to cancer recurrence and improvement in overall survival. We investigated whether the use of epidural anesthesia, in addition to general analgesia during and/or after surgical removal of advanced ovarian cancer, has an impact on time to recurrence and overall survival. Patients were identified from a prospective clinical registry. Eighty patients with advanced ovarian cancer (International Federation of Gynecologists and Obstetricians, stage IIIC and IV) undergoing surgery between January 2000 and March 2011 were studied. Propensity scoring (PS) methods (matching and inverse weighting) were used to compare the time to recurrence and overall survival of patients who did and did not receive epidural anesthesia and/or analgesia (EA), after controlling for selection bias. The median time to recurrence was 1.6 and 0.9 years for the EA and no EA groups, respectively (P = 0.02). After PS matching, the median time to recurrence was 1.6 and 1.4 years for the EA and no EA groups, respectively (P = 0.30). Similarly, PS weighting did not demonstrate an improvement in time to recurrence with the use of EA. Using a Cox proportional hazards model in the PS-matched sample, the estimated hazard ratio for EA exposure (0.72; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.40-1.33) did not change substantially after adjusting for chemotherapy (0.73; 95% CI, 0.40-1.31). Similar results were obtained using PS weighting. The median survival time was 3.3 and 1.9 years for the EA and no EA groups, respectively (P = 0.01). After PS matching, the median survival time was 3.3 and 2.7 years for the EA and no EA groups, respectively (P = 0.37). Similarly, PS weighting did not demonstrate an improved survival with the use of EA. The estimated hazard ratio (0.74; 95% CI, 0.36-1.49) in the PS matched sample did not change substantially after adjusting for chemotherapy, with similar results when

  2. Symptoms and health-related quality of life in patients with advanced cancer - A population-based study in Greenland.

    PubMed

    Augustussen, Mikaela; Sjøgren, Per; Timm, Helle; Hounsgaard, Lise; Pedersen, Michael Lynge

    2017-06-01

    The aims were to describe symptoms and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in Greenlandic patients with advanced cancer and to assess the applicability and internal consistency of the Greenlandic version of the EORTC-QLQ-C30 core version 3.0. A Greenlandic version of the EORTC QLQ-C30 v.3.0 was developed. The translation process included independent forward translation, reconciliation and independent back translation by native Greenlandic-speaking translators who were fluent in English. After pilot testing, a population-based cross-sectional study of patients with advanced cancer receiving palliative treatment was conducted. Internal consistency was examined by calculating Cronbach's alpha coefficients for five function scales and three symptom scales. Of the 58 patients who participated in the study, 47% had reduced social functioning, 36% had reduced physical and role functioning and 19% had reduced emotional and cognitive functioning. Furthermore, 48% reported fatigue, and 33% reported financial problems. The Greenlandic version of the EORTC had good applicability in the assessment of symptoms and quality of life. Acceptable Cronbach's alpha coefficients (above 0.70) were observed for the physical, role and social functioning scales, the fatigue scale and the global health status scale. Patients with undergoing palliative treatment in Greenland for advanced cancer reported high levels of social and financial problems and reduced physical functioning. This indicates a potential for improving palliative care service and increasing the focus on symptom management. The Greenlandic version of the EORTC-QLQ-C30 represents an applicable and reliable tool to describe symptoms and health-related quality of life among Greenlandic patients with advanced cancer. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Cardiovascular Toxicity of Multi-Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors in Advanced Solid Tumors: A Population-Based Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Srikanthan, Amirrtha; Ethier, Josee-Lyne; Ocana, Alberto; Seruga, Bostjan; Krzyzanowska, Monika K.; Amir, Eitan

    2015-01-01

    Background Treatment with small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) has improved survival in many cancers, yet has been associated with an increased risk of adverse events. Warnings of cardiovascular events are common in drug labels of many TKIs. Despite these warnings, cardiovascular toxicity of patients treated with TKIs remains unclear. Here, we evaluate the cardiovascular outcomes of advanced cancer patients treated with small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Methods A population based cohort study was undertaken involving adults aged >18 years in Ontario, Canada, diagnosed with any advanced malignancy between 2006 and 2012. Data were extracted from linked administrative governmental databases. Adults with advanced cancer receiving TKIs were identified and followed throughout the time period. The main outcomes of interest were rates of hospitalization for ischemic heart disease (acute myocardial infarction and angina) or cerebrovascular accidents and death. Results 1642 patients with a mean age of 62.5 years were studied; 1046 were treated with erlotinib, 166 with sorafenib and 430 with sunitinib. Over the 380 day median follow-up period (range 6-1970 days), 1.1% of all patients had ischemic heart events, 0.7% had cerebrovascular accidents and 72.1% died. Rates of cardiovascular events were similar to age and gender-matched individuals without cancer. In a subgroup analysis of treatment patients with a prior history of ischemic heart disease, 3.3% had ischemic heart events while 1.2% had cerebrovascular accidents. Conclusions TKIs do not appear to increase the cause-specific hazard of ischemic heart disease and cerebrovascular accidents compared to age and gender-matched individuals without advanced cancer. PMID:25815472

  4. Advancing Suicide Prevention Research With Rural American Indian and Alaska Native Populations

    PubMed Central

    Chandler, Michael; Gone, Joseph P.; Cwik, Mary; Kirmayer, Laurence J.; LaFromboise, Teresa; Brockie, Teresa; O’Keefe, Victoria; Walkup, John; Allen, James

    2015-01-01

    As part of the National Action Alliance for Suicide Prevention’s American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) Task Force, a multidisciplinary group of AI/AN suicide research experts convened to outline pressing issues related to this subfield of suicidology. Suicide disproportionately affects Indigenous peoples, and remote Indigenous communities can offer vital and unique insights with relevance to other rural and marginalized groups. Outcomes from this meeting include identifying the central challenges impeding progress in this subfield and a description of promising research directions to yield practical results. These proposed directions expand the alliance’s prioritized research agenda and offer pathways to advance the field of suicide research in Indigenous communities and beyond. PMID:25790403

  5. Predicting advanced neoplasia at colonoscopy in a diverse population with the National Cancer Institute colorectal cancer risk-assessment tool.

    PubMed

    Ladabaum, Uri; Patel, Ashley; Mannalithara, Ajitha; Sundaram, Vandana; Mitani, Aya; Desai, Manisha

    2016-09-01

    Tailoring screening to colorectal cancer (CRC) risk could improve screening effectiveness. Most CRCs arise from advanced neoplasia (AN) that dwells for years. To date, no available colorectal neoplasia risk score has been validated externally in a diverse population. The authors explored whether the National Cancer Institute (NCI) CRC risk-assessment tool, which was developed to predict future CRC risk, could predict current AN prevalence in a diverse population, thereby allowing its use in risk stratification for screening. This was a prospective examination of the relation between predicted 10-year CRC risk and the prevalence of AN, defined as advanced or multiple (≥3 adenomatous, ≥5 serrated) adenomatous or sessile serrated polyps, in individuals undergoing screening colonoscopy. Among 509 screenees (50% women; median age, 58 years; 61% white, 5% black, 10% Hispanic, and 24% Asian), 58 (11%) had AN. The prevalence of AN increased progressively from 6% in the lowest risk-score quintile to 17% in the highest risk-score quintile (P = .002). Risk-score distributions in individuals with versus without AN differed significantly (median, 1.38 [0.90-1.87] vs 1.02 [0.62-1.57], respectively; P = .003), with substantial overlap. The discriminatory accuracy of the tool was modest, with areas under the curve of 0.61 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.54-0.69) overall, 0.59 (95% CI, 0.49-0.70) for women, and 0.63 (95% CI, 0.53-0.73) for men. The results did not change substantively when the analysis was restricted to adenomatous lesions or to screening procedures without any additional incidental indication. The NCI CRC risk-assessment tool displays modest discriminatory accuracy in predicting AN at screening colonoscopy in a diverse population. This tool may aid shared decision-making in clinical practice. Cancer 2016. © 2016 American Cancer Society. Cancer 2016;122:2663-2670. © 2016 American Cancer Society. © 2016 American Cancer Society.

  6. Use of an Advanced Intercross Line Population for Precise Mapping of Quantitative Trait Loci for Gray Leaf Spot Resistance in Maize

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Grey leaf spot (GLS) (caused by Cercospora zeae-maydis) of maize (Zea mays L.)is an important fungal disease of maize in the U.S. and worldwide. The IBM population, an advanced intercross recombinant inbred line population derived from a cross between the maize lines Mo17 (resistant) and B73 (sus...

  7. Single-cell analysis of population context advances RNAi screening at multiple levels

    PubMed Central

    Snijder, Berend; Sacher, Raphael; Rämö, Pauli; Liberali, Prisca; Mench, Karin; Wolfrum, Nina; Burleigh, Laura; Scott, Cameron C; Verheije, Monique H; Mercer, Jason; Moese, Stefan; Heger, Thomas; Theusner, Kristina; Jurgeit, Andreas; Lamparter, David; Balistreri, Giuseppe; Schelhaas, Mario; De Haan, Cornelis A M; Marjomäki, Varpu; Hyypiä, Timo; Rottier, Peter J M; Sodeik, Beate; Marsh, Mark; Gruenberg, Jean; Amara, Ali; Greber, Urs; Helenius, Ari; Pelkmans, Lucas

    2012-01-01

    Isogenic cells in culture show strong variability, which arises from dynamic adaptations to the microenvironment of individual cells. Here we study the influence of the cell population context, which determines a single cell's microenvironment, in image-based RNAi screens. We developed a comprehensive computational approach that employs Bayesian and multivariate methods at the single-cell level. We applied these methods to 45 RNA interference screens of various sizes, including 7 druggable genome and 2 genome-wide screens, analysing 17 different mammalian virus infections and four related cell physiological processes. Analysing cell-based screens at this depth reveals widespread RNAi-induced changes in the population context of individual cells leading to indirect RNAi effects, as well as perturbations of cell-to-cell variability regulators. We find that accounting for indirect effects improves the consistency between siRNAs targeted against the same gene, and between replicate RNAi screens performed in different cell lines, in different labs, and with different siRNA libraries. In an era where large-scale RNAi screens are increasingly performed to reach a systems-level understanding of cellular processes, we show that this is often improved by analyses that account for and incorporate the single-cell microenvironment. PMID:22531119

  8. Advances in statistical methods to map quantitative trait loci in outbred populations.

    PubMed

    Hoeschele, I; Uimari, P; Grignola, F E; Zhang, Q; Gage, K M

    1997-11-01

    Statistical methods to map quantitative trait loci (QTL) in outbred populations are reviewed, extensions and applications to human and plant genetic data are indicated, and areas for further research are identified. Simple and computationally inexpensive methods include (multiple) linear regression of phenotype on marker genotypes and regression of squared phenotypic differences among relative pairs on estimated proportions of identity-by-descent at a locus. These methods are less suited for genetic parameter estimation in outbred populations but allow the determination of test statistic distributions via simulation or data permutation; however, further inferences including confidence intervals of QTL location require the use of Monte Carlo or bootstrap sampling techniques. A method which is intermediate in computational requirements is residual maximum likelihood (REML) with a covariance matrix of random QTL effects conditional on information from multiple linked markers. Testing for the number of QTLs on a chromosome is difficult in a classical framework. The computationally most demanding methods are maximum likelihood and Bayesian analysis, which take account of the distribution of multilocus marker-QTL genotypes on a pedigree and permit investigators to fit different models of variation at the QTL. The Bayesian analysis includes the number of QTLs on a chromosome as an unknown.

  9. Advances in Statistical Methods to Map Quantitative Trait Loci in Outbred Populations

    PubMed Central

    Hoeschele, I.; Uimari, P.; Grignola, F. E.; Zhang, Q.; Gage, K. M.

    1997-01-01

    Statistical methods to map quantitative trait loci (QTL) in outbred populations are reviewed, extensions and applications to human and plant genetic data are indicated, and areas for further research are identified. Simple and computationally inexpensive methods include (multiple) linear regression of phenotype on marker genotypes and regression of squared phenotypic differences among relative pairs on estimated proportions of identity-by-descent at a locus. These methods are less suited for genetic parameter estimation in outbred populations but allow the determination of test statistic distributions via simulation or data permutation; however, further inferences including confidence intervals of QTL location require the use of Monte Carlo or bootstrap sampling techniques. A method which is intermediate in computational requirements is residual maximum likelihood (REML) with a covariance matrix of random QTL effects conditional on information from multiple linked markers. Testing for the number of QTLs on a chromosome is difficult in a classical framework. The computationally most demanding methods are maximum likelihood and Bayesian analysis, which take account of the distribution of multilocus marker-QTL genotypes on a pedigree and permit investigators to fit different models of variation at the QTL. The Bayesian analysis includes the number of QTLs on a chromosome as an unknown. PMID:9383084

  10. Application of Microsatellite Markers in Conservation Genetics and Fisheries Management: Recent Advances in Population Structure Analysis and Conservation Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Abdul-Muneer, P. M.

    2014-01-01

    Microsatellites are the most popular and versatile genetic marker with myriads of applications in population genetics, conservation biology, and evolutionary biology. These are the arrays of DNA sequences, consisting of tandemly repeating mono-, di-, tri-, and tetranucleotide units, which are distributed throughout the genomes of most eukaryotic species. Microsatellites are codominant in nature, highly polymorphic, easily typed, and Mendelian inherited, all properties which make them very suitable for the study of population structure and pedigree analysis and capable of detecting differences among closely related species. PCR for microsatellites can be automated for identifying simple sequence repeat polymorphism. Small amount of blood samples or alcohol preserved tissue is adequate for analyzing them. Most of the microsatellites are noncoding, and therefore variations are independent of natural selection. These properties make microsatellites ideal genetic markers for conservation genetics and fisheries management. This review addresses the applications of microsatellite markers in conservation genetics and recent advances in population structure analysis in the context of fisheries management. PMID:24808959

  11. Lessons from San Francisco: health impact assessments have advanced political conditions for improving population health.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, Rajiv; Corburn, Jason

    2011-12-01

    Health impact assessment is a structured decision support tool used to systematically characterize the anticipated health effects, both adverse and beneficial, of societal decisions. In San Francisco, the use of health impact assessments has not only produced evidence to inform health policy decision making but has also contributed to the political conditions needed to achieve optimal population health. Health impact assessments have helped increase public awareness of the determinants of health, routine monitoring of these determinants, cooperation among institutions, health-protective laws and regulations, and organizational networks for health advocacy and accountability. Drawing on more than a decade of local experience, we identify the direct and indirect effects of the assessments on the politics of governance as well as on health. We demonstrate that health impact assessment is both an analytic tool and a process that helps build the social institutions that can improve health.

  12. Polymorphism analysis in advanced mutant population of oat (Avena sativa L.) using ISSR markers.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Pawan; Tiwari, Sharad; Tripathi, Niraj; Mehta, Anoop K

    2016-01-01

    Present investigation was carried out to evaluate genetic diversity among 38 M6 population of oat cv. JO-1. To validate the observed morpho-physiological variations, these lines were analyzed with 21 ISSR primers. A total of 132 loci were amplified by these 21 ISSR markers and 116 loci were found to be polymorphic (87.87 %). The genetic similarity coefficient values among 39 oat genotypes based on ISSR analysis ranged from 0.305 to 0.957. The cluster analysis divided the oat genotypes into two groups. Mutants JMO 81 and JMO 82 were found to be most divergent, hence can be used as parents in breeding program for the development of superior cultivars.

  13. Population.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Planned Parenthood Federation, London (England).

    In an effort to help meet the growing interest and concern about the problems created by the rapid growth of population, The International Planned Parenthood Federation has prepared this booklet with the aim of assisting the study of the history and future trends of population growth and its impact on individual and family welfare, national,…

  14. Advanced glycation end products measured by skin autofluorescence in a population with central obesity.

    PubMed

    den Engelsen, Corine; van den Donk, Maureen; Gorter, Kees J; Salomé, Philippe L; Rutten, Guy E

    2012-01-01

    Accumulation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) is enhanced by chronic hyperglycemia and oxidative stress and this process may contribute to the pathogenesis of vascular disease. Skin autofluorescence (AF), a measure of accumulation of AGEs in skin collagen, is associated with vascular disease in patients with diabetes.   Because central obesity enhances oxidative stress people with central obesity might already have increased accumulation of AGEs before diabetes or cardiovascular disease become manifest. To test this hypothesis, we compared the distribution of skin AF and its association with clinical and biochemical parameters in individuals with and without central obesity. Skin AF was measured by a validated AGE Reader in 816 persons with and 431 persons without central obesity, aged 20-70 y. Mean skin AF increased with age and smoking and was higher in centrally obese individuals compared with non-obese individuals (p = 0.001, after adjustment for age and smoking p = 0.13). Mean skin AF in the subgroups without central obesity and without other risk factors (n = 106), central obesity without other risk factors (n = 74) and central obesity with other risk factors (n = 742) was 1.63 ± 0.37, 1.74 ± 0.44 and 1.87 ± 0.43 AU, respectively (p for trend < 0.001, after adjustment for age and smoking p for trend = 0.12). In the group with central obesity age, current smoking, alcohol consumption, waist circumference, creatinine clearance and hs-CRP were independently associated with skin AF (R(2) = 29.4%). Waist circumference hardly contributed to the explained variance. The relationship between waist circumference and skin AF is not as obvious as we hypothesized.

  15. QUANTITATIVE TRAIT LOCI FOR BONE MINERAL DENSITY AND FEMORAL MORPHOLOGY IN AN ADVANCED INTERCROSS POPULATION OF MICE

    PubMed Central

    Leamy, Larry J.; Kelly, Scott A.; Hua, Kunjie; Farber, Charles R.; Pomp, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Osteoporosis, characterized by low levels of bone mineral density (BMD), is a prevalent medical condition in humans. We investigated its genetic and environmental basis by searching for quantitative trait loci (QTLs) affecting six skeletal (including three BMD) traits in a G10 advanced intercross population produced from crosses of mice from the inbred strain C57BL/6J with mice from a strain selected for high voluntary wheel running. The mice in this population were fed either a high-fat or a matched control diet throughout the study, allowing us to test for QTL by diet interactions for the skeletal traits. Our genome scan uncovered a number of QTLs, the great majority of which were different from QTLs previously found for these same traits in an earlier (G4) generation of the same intercross. Further, the confidence intervals for the skeletal trait QTLs were reduced from an average of 18.5 Mb in the G4 population to an equivalent of about 9 Mb in the G10 population. We uncovered a total of 50 QTLs representing 32 separate genomic sites affecting these traits, with a distal region on chromosome 1 harboring several QTLs with large effects on the BMD traits. One QTL was located on chromosome 5 at 4.0 Mb with a confidence interval spanning from 4.0 to 4.6 Mb. Only three protein coding genes reside in this interval, and one of these, Cyp51, is an attractive candidate as others have shown that developing Cyp51 knockout embryos exhibit shortened and bowed limbs and synotosis of the femur and tibia. Several QTLs showed significant interactions with sex, although only two QTLs interacted with diet, both affecting only mice fed the high-fat diet. PMID:23486184

  16. Risks of Serious Toxicities from Intermittent versus Continuous Androgen Deprivation Therapy for Advanced Prostate Cancer: A Population Based Study.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Huei-Ting; Pfeiffer, Ruth M; Philips, George K; Barac, Ana; Fu, Alex Z; Penson, David F; Zhou, Yingjun; Potosky, Arnold L

    2017-05-01

    Randomized trials have shown that intermittent androgen deprivation therapy for patients with advanced prostate cancer may improve sexual and physical functioning compared to continuous androgen deprivation therapy without compromising survival. To our knowledge it is unknown whether intermittent androgen deprivation therapy alters the risk of serious toxicities associated with continuous androgen deprivation therapy. We performed a population based cohort study of 9,772 men 66 years old or older who were diagnosed with advanced prostate cancer from 2002 to 2011 and treated with androgen deprivation therapy. Intermittent androgen deprivation therapy was defined as a single 90-day interval between 2 androgen deprivation therapy sessions during which patients visited their physicians or underwent prostate specific antigen testing. Outcomes included acute myocardial infarction, stroke, heart failure, type 2 diabetes and fracture. We used Cox proportional hazard models to estimate the HRs of the comparative risk of serious toxicities between intermittent and continuous androgen deprivation therapy. A total of 2,113 (22%), 769 (9%) and 899 men (9%) had a new cardiovascular event, diabetes or fracture, respectively, within 5 years of starting androgen deprivation therapy. Compared to the continuous androgen deprivation therapy group, the intermittent therapy group was at lower risk for serious cardiovascular events (HR 0.64, 95% CI 0.53-0.77), particularly in reducing the risk of heart failure (HR 0.62, 95% CI 0.49-0.78) and fracture (HR 0.52, 95% CI 0.38-0.70, each p <0.0001). Intermittent androgen deprivation therapy was associated with a lower risk of heart failure and fracture compared to continuous androgen deprivation therapy. This raises toxicity concerns for continuous relative to intermittent therapy and suggests that intermittent androgen deprivation therapy may represent a safer therapeutic choice in elderly men with advanced prostate cancer. Copyright © 2017

  17. Advanced maternal age increases the risk of very preterm birth, irrespective of parity: a population-based register study.

    PubMed

    Waldenström, U; Cnattingius, S; Vixner, L; Norman, M

    2017-07-01

    To investigate whether advanced maternal age is associated with preterm birth, irrespective of parity. Population-based registry study. Swedish Medical Birth Register. First, second, and third live singleton births to women aged 20 years or older in Sweden, from 1990 to 2011 (n = 2 009 068). Logistic regression analysis was used in each parity group to estimate risks of very and moderately preterm births to women at 20-24, 25-29, 30-34, 35-39, and 40 years or older, using 25-29 years as the reference group. Odds ratios (ORs) were adjusted for year of birth, education, country of birth, smoking, body mass index, and history of preterm birth. Age-related risks of spontaneous and medically indicated preterm births were also investigated. Very preterm (22-31 weeks of gestation) and moderately preterm (32-36 weeks) births. Risks of very preterm birth increased with maternal age, irrespective of parity: adjusted ORs in first, second, and third births ranged from 1.18 to 1.28 at 30-34 years, from 1.59 to 1.70 at 35-39 years, and from 1.97 to 2.40 at ≥40 years. In moderately preterm births, age-related associations were weaker, but were statistically significant from 35-39 years in all parity groups. Advanced maternal age increased the risks of both spontaneous and medically indicated preterm births. Advanced maternal age is associated with an increased risk of preterm birth, irrespective of parity, especially very preterm birth. Women aged 35 years and older, expecting their first, second, or third births, should be regarded as a risk group for very preterm birth. Women aged 35 years and older should be regarded as a risk group for very preterm birth, irrespective of parity. © 2016 Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists.

  18. High-Resolution Mapping of Complex Traits with a Four-Parent Advanced Intercross Yeast Population

    PubMed Central

    Cubillos, Francisco A.; Parts, Leopold; Salinas, Francisco; Bergström, Anders; Scovacricchi, Eugenio; Zia, Amin; Illingworth, Christopher J. R.; Mustonen, Ville; Ibstedt, Sebastian; Warringer, Jonas; Louis, Edward J.; Durbin, Richard; Liti, Gianni

    2013-01-01

    A large fraction of human complex trait heritability is due to a high number of variants with small marginal effects and their interactions with genotype and environment. Such alleles are more easily studied in model organisms, where environment, genetic makeup, and allele frequencies can be controlled. Here, we examine the effect of natural genetic variation on heritable traits in a very large pool of baker’s yeast from a multiparent 12th generation intercross. We selected four representative founder strains to produce the Saccharomyces Genome Resequencing Project (SGRP)-4X mapping population and sequenced 192 segregants to generate an accurate genetic map. Using these individuals, we mapped 25 loci linked to growth traits under heat stress, arsenite, and paraquat, the majority of which were best explained by a diverging phenotype caused by a single allele in one condition. By sequencing pooled DNA from millions of segregants grown under heat stress, we further identified 34 and 39 regions selected in haploid and diploid pools, respectively, with most of the selection against a single allele. While the most parsimonious model for the majority of loci mapped using either approach was the effect of an allele private to one founder, we could validate examples of pleiotropic effects and complex allelic series at a locus. SGRP-4X is a deeply characterized resource that provides a framework for powerful and high-resolution genetic analysis of yeast phenotypes and serves as a test bed for testing avenues to attack human complex traits. PMID:24037264

  19. The HCV Treatment Revolution Continues: Resistance Considerations, Pangenotypic Efficacy, and Advances in Challenging Populations.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Ira M

    2016-10-01

    The US Food and Drug Administration has now approved 10 direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) for the management of hepatitis C virus (HCV). These therapies are combined into 6 regimens that are given for varying durations, with or without ribavirin, depending on the viral genotype, the presence or absence of baseline resistance-associated variants (RAVs), and the patient type. RAVs may be present before exposure to a drug or may become detectable de novo during exposure to a drug. Emerging resistant strains are the most common cause of failure of HCV DAA regimens. Second-generation DAAs provide superior coverage of resistant variants compared with first-generation members of that class. They may also cover a broader range of viral genotypes. Numerous clinical trials have evaluated the safety and efficacy of DAAs in a variety of patient populations, including those with cirrhosis, HIV, and end-stage renal disease. This article evaluates the data from these studies, and discusses recommendations from the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases (AASLD) and the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) guidance document.

  20. The HCV Treatment Revolution Continues: Resistance Considerations, Pangenotypic Efficacy, and Advances in Challenging Populations

    PubMed Central

    Jacobson, Ira M.

    2016-01-01

    The US Food and Drug Administration has now approved 10 direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) for the management of hepatitis C virus (HCV). These therapies are combined into 6 regimens that are given for varying durations, with or without ribavirin, depending on the viral genotype, the presence or absence of baseline resistance-associated variants (RAVs), and the patient type. RAVs may be present before exposure to a drug or may become detectable de novo during exposure to a drug. Emerging resistant strains are the most common cause of failure of HCV DAA regimens. Second-generation DAAs provide superior coverage of resistant variants compared with first-generation members of that class. They may also cover a broader range of viral genotypes. Numerous clinical trials have evaluated the safety and efficacy of DAAs in a variety of patient populations, including those with cirrhosis, HIV, and end-stage renal disease. This article evaluates the data from these studies, and discusses recommendations from the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases (AASLD) and the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) guidance document. PMID:28070174

  1. High speed dynamic characterization of an E. coli population using advanced optical methods (DDM and DFM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Rongjing; Wilson, Laurence

    2012-02-01

    The motility of microbes/bacteria in a complex environment, especially the average motility of the whole group of microorganisms, is directly related to behavior such as virulence, biofilm formation, etc. It is challenging to use traditional tracking methods to quantify the average motility of a large population. It is even more challenging when the environment is constantly changing. Two optical methods were developed to solve the problem: differential dynamic microscopy (DDM) and dark field flickering microscopy (DFM). The key features of bacteria motility were quantified automatically: average swimming speed, motile fraction, diffusion coefficient, cell body rotation speed and flagellar bundle rotation speed. This method is able to measure ˜10^4 cells simultaneously. With the help of a high speed camera, the timescale of the dynamic measurement can be in a wide range from 10-4 s to 10^5 s. Using this tool, temperature effects on E. coli motility were studied. Potential biomedically-relevant applications will also be discussed.

  2. A population-based study of prognosis in advanced stage follicular lymphoma managed by watch and wait.

    PubMed

    El-Galaly, Tarec Christoffer; Bilgrau, Anders E; de Nully Brown, Peter; Mylam, Karen J; Ahmad, Syed A; Pedersen, Lars M; Gang, Anne O; Bentzen, Hans H; Juul, Maja B; Bergmann, Olav J; Pedersen, Robert S; Nielsen, Berit J; Johnsen, Hans E; Dybkaer, Karen; Bøgsted, Martin; Hutchings, Martin

    2015-05-01

    Watch and wait (WAW) is a common approach for asymptomatic, advanced stage follicular lymphoma (FL), but single-agent rituximab is an alternative for these patients. In this nationwide study we describe the outcome of patients selected for WAW. A cohort of 286 out of 849 (34%) stage III-IVA FL patients seen between 2000 and 2011, were managed expectantly and included. The 5-year progression-free survival (PFS) was 35% [95% confidence interval (CI) 29-42]. The 10-year overall survival (OS) was 65% (95%CI 54-78), and the cumulative risk of dying from lymphoma within 10 years of diagnosis was 13% (95%CI 7-20). Elevated lactate dehydrogenase and > four nodal regions involved were associated with a higher risk of lymphoma treatment and death from lymphoma. The WAW patients and a matched background population had similar OS during the first 50 months after diagnosis (P = 0·7), but WAW patients had increased risk of death after 50 months (P < 0·001). The estimated loss of residual life after 10 years was 6·8 months. The 10-year cumulative risk of histological transformation was 22% (95%CI 15-29) and the 3-year OS after transformation was 71% (95%CI 58-87%). In conclusion, advanced stage FL managed by WAW had a favourable outcome and abandoning this strategy could lead to overtreatment in some patients.

  3. Improving salt tolerance of lowland rice cultivar 'Rassi' through marker-aided backcross breeding in West Africa.

    PubMed

    Bimpong, Isaac Kofi; Manneh, Baboucarr; Sock, Mamadou; Diaw, Faty; Amoah, Nana Kofi Abaka; Ismail, Abdelbagi M; Gregorio, Glenn; Singh, Rakesh Kumar; Wopereis, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Salt stress affects about 25% of the 4.4 million ha of irrigated and lowland systems for rice cultivation in West Africa (WA). A major quantitative trait locus (QTLs) on chromosome 1 (Saltol) that enhances tolerance to salt stress at the vegetative stage has enabled the use of marker-assisted selection (MAS) to develop salt-tolerant rice cultivar(s) in WA. We used 3 cycles of backcrossing with selection based on DNA markers and field-testing using 'FL478' as tolerant donor and the widely grown 'Rassi' as recurrent parent. In the BC3F2 stage, salt-tolerant lines with over 80% Rassi alleles except in the region around Saltol segment were selected. 429 introgression lines (Saltol-ILs) were identified as tolerant at vegetative stage, of which 116 were field-tested for four seasons at the reproductive stage. Sixteen Saltol-ILs had less yield loss (3-26% relative to control trials), and 8 Saltol-ILs showed high yield potential under stress and non-stress conditions. The 16 Saltol-ILs had been included for further African-wide testing prior to release in 6 WA countries. MAS reduced the time for germplasm improvement from at least 7 to about 4 years. Our objective is to combine different genes/QTLs conferring tolerance to stresses under one genetic background using MAS.

  4. Using molecular markers to map multiple quantitative trait loci: models for backcross, recombinant inbred, and doubled haploid progeny.

    PubMed

    Knapp, S J

    1991-03-01

    To maximize parameter estimation efficiency and statistical power and to estimate epistasis, the parameters of multiple quantitative trait loci (QTLs) must be simultaneously estimated. If multiple QTL affect a trait, then estimates of means of QTL genotypes from individual locus models are statistically biased. In this paper, I describe methods for estimating means of QTL genotypes and recombination frequencies between marker and quantitative trait loci using multilocus backcross, doubled haploid, recombinant inbred, and testcross progeny models. Expected values of marker genotype means were defined using no double or multiple crossover frequencies and flanking markers for linked and unlinked quantitative trait loci. The expected values for a particular model comprise a system of nonlinear equations that can be solved using an interative algorithm, e.g., the Gauss-Newton algorithm. The solutions are maximum likelihood estimates when the errors are normally distributed. A linear model for estimating the parameters of unlinked quantitative trait loci was found by transforming the nonlinear model. Recombination frequency estimators were defined using this linear model. Certain means of linked QTLs are less efficiently estimated than means of unlinked QTLs.

  5. Clinical features of colorectal cancer patients in advanced age: a population-based approach.

    PubMed

    Maffei, Stefania; Colantoni, Alessandra; Kaleci, Shaniko; Benatti, Piero; Tesini, Ester; de Leon, Maurizio Ponz

    2016-03-01

    In the immediate future, the number of geriatric patients will continue to rise; consequently we should expect an increase of colorectal cancer, a disease of the elderly population. Through the data of a Cancer Registry, we examined (a) the effect of ageing on the main features of colorectal cancer; (b) changes in management, especially for individuals older than 80 years; and (c) changes in prognosis and survival in subgroups of patients with different age. The Registry provided information on colorectal cancer up to 2010 (27 years). A total of 5293 patients were registered; these were divided into three groups: A (0-64 years), B (65-79) and C (80 or more). Three periods of observation were chosen: 1 (1984-1992), 2 (1993-2001) and 3 (2001-2010). Group A included 1571 patients (29 %), Group B 2539 (48 %) and Group C 1183 (22.3 %). The fraction of old individuals increased during the 27 years of the investigation. In these patients, tumours were predominantly localized to the right colon (42.6 %). The rate of surgery and ratio between curative and palliative approaches were similar among the three groups (p < 0.38). There was disparity (p < 0.002) in the administration of chemotherapy (5.8 % of the elderly vs 34.4 % in remaining patients). Survival increased over time in all three groups. In the elderly, average 5-year survival was 31 % in period 1 and 55 % in period 3. These data show that in Western countries, the standard of care for colorectal cancer diagnosed in geriatric patients has improved over the last 30 years.

  6. Advanced paternal age increases the risk of schizophrenia and obsessive-compulsive disorder in a Chinese Han population.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yuejing; Liu, Xiang; Luo, Hongrong; Deng, Wei; Zhao, Gaofeng; Wang, Qiang; Zhang, Lan; Ma, Xiaohong; Liu, Xiehe; Murray, Robin A; Collier, David A; Li, Tao

    2012-08-15

    Using the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV, patient and non-patient version (SCID-P/NP), this study investigated 351 patients with schizophrenia, 122 with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), and 238 unrelated healthy volunteers in a Chinese Han population. The relative risks posed by advanced paternal age for schizophrenia and OCD in offspring were computed under logistic regression analyses and adjusted for the participant's sex, age and co-parent age at birth. Compared to the offspring with paternal age of 25-29 years old, the relative risks rose from 2.660 to 10.183 in the paternal age range of 30-34 and ≥35. The relative risks for OCD increased from 2.225 to 5.413 in 30-34 and ≥35. For offspring with paternal age of <25, the odds ratios of developing schizophrenia and OCD were 0.628 and 0.289 respectively, whereas an association between increased maternal age and risk for schizophrenia/OCD was not seen. Interaction analysis showed an interaction effect between paternal age and maternal age at birth. Such a tendency of risk affected by parental age for schizophrenia and OCD existed after splitting out the data of early onset patients. Sex-specific analyses found that the relative risks for schizophrenia with paternal age of 30-34 and ≥35 in male offspring were 2.407 and 10.893, and in female offspring were 3.080 and 9.659. The relative risks for OCD with paternal age of 30-34 and ≥35 in male offspring were 3.493 and 7.373, and in female offspring 2.005 and 4.404. The mean paternal age of schizophrenia/OCD patients born before the early 1980s was much greater than that of patients who were born after then. The findings illustrated that advanced paternal age is associated with increased risk for both schizophrenia and OCD in a Chinese Han population, prominently when paternal age is over 35. Biological and non-biological mechanisms may both be involved in the effects of advanced paternal age on schizophrenia and OCD.

  7. Asymptomatic bacteriuria: prevalence rates of causal microorganisms, etiology of infection in different patient populations, and recent advances in molecular detection.

    PubMed

    Ipe, Deepak S; Sundac, Lana; Benjamin, William H; Moore, Kate H; Ulett, Glen C

    2013-09-01

    Bacteriuria, or the presence of bacteria in urine, is associated with both asymptomatic and symptomatic urinary tract infection and underpins much of the dynamic of microbial colonization of the urinary tract. The prevalence of bacteriuria in dissimilar patient groups such as healthy adults, institutionalized elderly, pregnant women, and immune-compromised patients varies widely. In addition, assessing the importance of 'significant bacteriuria' in infected individuals represents a diagnostic challenge, partly due to various causal microorganisms, and requires careful consideration of the distinct etiologies of bacteriuria in different populations and circumstances. Recent molecular discoveries have revealed how some bacterial traits can enable organisms to grow in human urine, which, as a fitness adaptation, is likely to influence the progression of bacteriuria in some individuals. In this review, we comprehensively analyze currently available data on the prevalence of causal organisms with a focus on asymptomatic bacteriuria in dissimilar populations. We evaluate recent advances in the molecular detection of bacteriuria from a diagnostic viewpoint and briefly discuss the potential benefits and some of the challenges of these approaches. Overall, this review provides an update on the comparative prevalence and etiology of bacteriuria from both microbiological and clinical perspectives. © 2013 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. The genetics of pubertal timing in the general population: recent advances and evidence for sex-specificity

    PubMed Central

    Cousminer, Diana L.; Widén, Elisabeth; Palmert, Mark R.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review To overview advances in the genetics of puberty based on studies in the general population, describe evidence for sex-specific genetic effects on pubertal timing, and briefly review possible mechanisms mediating sexually dimorphic genetic effects. Recent findings Pubertal timing is highly polygenic, and many loci are conserved among ethnicities. A number of identified loci underlie both pubertal timing and related traits such as height and body mass index (BMI). It is increasingly apparent that understanding the factors modulating the onset of puberty is important because the timing of this developmental stage is associated with a wider range of adult health outcomes than previously appreciated. While most of the genetic effects underlying the timing of puberty are common between boys and girls, some effects show sex-specificity and many are epigenetically modulated. Several potential mechanisms, including hormone-independent ones, may be responsible for observed sex differences. Summary Studies of pubertal timing in the general population have provided new knowledge about the genetic architecture of this complex trait. Increasing attention paid to sex-specific effects may provide key insights into the sexual dimorphism in pubertal timing and even into the associations between puberty and adult health risks by identifying common underlying biological pathways. PMID:26574646

  9. The species flocks of East African cichlid fishes: recent advances in molecular phylogenetics and population genetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salzburger, Walter; Meyer, Axel

    With more than 3,000 species, the fish family Cichlidae is one of the most species-rich families of vertebrates. Cichlids occur in southern and central America, Africa, Madagascar, and India. The hotspot of their biodiversity is East Africa, where they form adaptive radiations composed of hundreds of endemic species in several lakes of various sizes and ages. The unparalleled species richness of East African cichlids has been something of a conundrum for evolutionary biologists and ecologists, since it has been in doubt whether these hundreds of species arose by allopatric speciation or whether it is necessary to invoke somewhat less traditional models of speciation, such as micro-allopatric, peripatric, or even sympatric speciation or evolution through sexual selection mediated by female choice. Ernst Mayr's analyses of these evolutionary uniquely diverse species assemblages have contributed to a more direct approach to this problem and have led to a deeper understanding of the patterns and processes that caused the formation of these huge groups of species. We review here recent molecular data on population differentiation and phylogenetics, which have helped to unravel, to some extent, the patterns and processes that led to the formation and ecological maintenance of cichlid species flocks. It is becoming apparent that sexually selected traits do play an important role in speciation in micro-allopatric or even sympatric settings. Species richness seems to be roughly correlated with the surface area, but not the age, of the lakes. We observe that the oldest lineages of a species flock of cichlids are often less species-rich and live in the open water or deepwater habitats. While the species flocks of the Lake Malawai and the Lake Victoria areas were shown to be monophyletic, the cichlid assemblage of Lake Tanganyika seems to consist of several independent species flocks. Cichlids emerge as an evolutionary model system in which many fundamental questions in

  10. NC-6004 Phase I study in combination with gemcitabine for advanced solid tumors and population PK/PD analysis.

    PubMed

    Doi, Toshihiko; Hamaguchi, Tetsuya; Shitara, Kohei; Iwasa, Satoru; Shimada, Yasuhiro; Harada, Mitsunori; Naito, Kenichiro; Hayashi, Naoto; Masada, Atsuhiro; Ohtsu, Atsushi

    2017-03-01

    This study was an open-label phase I study to confirm the safety and tolerability of NC-6004 in combination with gemcitabine in Japanese patients with advanced solid tumors and to assess the PK effects of NC-6004 monotherapy. This phase I study used a 3 + 3 design to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) and recommended dose of NC-6004 combined with gemcitabine. Safety and pharmacokinetics were assessed. The administration of NC-6004 alone was started at 60 mg/m(2) every treatment cycle (21 days per cycle). From the second through eighth cycles, patients received NC-6004 in combination with 1000 mg/m(2) of gemcitabine that was administered on day 1 and day 8 of each cycle, except for the first treatment cycle. Twelve patients with advanced solid tumors received 60 or 90 mg/m(2) NC-6004. Both MTD and RD were determined to be 90 mg/m(2). The most common drug-related adverse events were neutrophil decrease (66.7%) and white blood cell count decrease (41.7%). Population pharmacokinetic (PK) analysis revealed that NC-6004 PK profile in Japanese study was not significantly different from that in a previous Caucasian study. Both MTD and RD of NC-6004 were determined to be 90 mg/m(2). The pharmacodynamic (PD) model well explained the time course of estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and amplitude of decrease in eGFR. The decrease in eGFR appeared to reach saturation at >100 mg/m(2) with NC-6004. Estimated probability of acute kidney injury on this PK/PD simulation was 30% with NC-6004 and 70% with cisplatin, which may better explain the renal toxicity profile.

  11. Improvement of Basmati rice varieties for resistance to blast and bacterial blight diseases using marker assisted backcross breeding.

    PubMed

    Ellur, Ranjith K; Khanna, Apurva; Yadav, Ashutosh; Pathania, Sandeep; Rajashekara, H; Singh, Vikas K; Gopala Krishnan, S; Bhowmick, Prolay K; Nagarajan, M; Vinod, K K; Prakash, G; Mondal, Kalyan K; Singh, Nagendra K; Vinod Prabhu, K; Singh, Ashok K

    2016-01-01

    Marker assisted backcross breeding was employed to incorporate the blast resistance genes, Pi2 and Pi54 and bacterial blight (BB) resistance genes xa13 and Xa21 into the genetic background of Pusa Basmati 1121 (PB1121) and Pusa Basmati 6. Foreground selection for target gene(s) was followed by arduous phenotypic and background selection which fast-tracked the recovery of recurrent parent genome (RPG) to an extent of 95.8% in one of the near-isogenic lines (NILs) namely, Pusa 1728-23-33-31-56, which also showed high degree of resemblance to recurrent parent, PB6 in phenotype. The phenotypic selection prior to background selection provided an additional opportunity for identifying the novel recombinants viz., Pusa 1884-9-12-14 and Pusa 1884-3-9-175, superior to parental lines in terms of early maturity, higher yield and improved quality parameters. There was no significant difference between the RPG recovery estimated based on SSR or SNP markers, however, the panel of SNPs markers was considered as the better choice for background selection as it provided better genome coverage and included SNPs in the genic regions. Multi-location evaluation of NILs depicted their stable and high mean performance in comparison to the respective recurrent parents. The Pi2+Pi54 carrying NILs were effective in combating a pan-India panel of Magnaporthe oryzae isolates with high level of field resistance in northern, eastern and southern parts of India. Alongside, the PB1121-NILs and PB6-NILs carrying BB resistance genes xa13+Xa21 were resistant against Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae races of north-western, southern and eastern parts of the country. Three of NILs developed in this study, have been promoted to final stage of testing during the ​Kharif 2015 in the Indian National Basmati Trial. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Leaf physiology and biomass allocation of backcross hybrid American chestnut (Castanea dentata) seedlings in response to light and water availability.

    PubMed

    Brown, Caleb E; Mickelbart, Michael V; Jacobs, Douglass F

    2014-12-01

    Partial canopy cover promotes regeneration of many temperate forest trees, but the consequences of shading on seedling drought resistance are unclear. Reintroduction of blight-resistant American chestnut (Castanea dentata (Marsh.) Borkh.) into eastern North American forests will often occur on water-limited sites and under partial canopy cover. We measured leaf pre-dawn water potential (Ψpd), leaf gas exchange, and growth and biomass allocation of backcross hybrid American chestnut seedlings from three orchard sources grown under different light intensities (76, 26 and 8% full photosynthetically active radiation (PAR)) and subjected to well-watered or mid-season water-stressed conditions. Seedlings in the water-stress treatment were returned to well-watered conditions after wilting to examine recovery. Seedlings growing under medium- and high-light conditions wilted at lower leaf Ψpd than low-light seedlings. Recovery of net photosynthesis (Anet) and stomatal conductance (gs) was greater in low and medium light than in high light. Seed source did not affect the response to water stress or light level in most cases. Between 26 and 8% full PAR, light became limiting to the extent that the effects of water stress had no impact on some growth and morphological traits. We conclude that positive and negative aspects of shading on seedling drought tolerance and recovery are not mutually exclusive. Partial shade may help American chestnut tolerate drought during early establishment through effects on physiological conditioning. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Testcross performance of rye introgression lines developed by marker-assisted backcrossing using an Iranian accession as donor.

    PubMed

    Falke, K C; Susić, Z; Wilde, P; Wortmann, H; Möhring, J; Piepho, H-P; Geiger, H H; Miedaner, T

    2009-05-01

    Introgression libraries facilitate the identification of favorable exotic alleles or genomic regions, which can be exploited for improving elite breeding material. We evaluated the first two introgression libraries in rye (Secale cereale L.) on the phenotypic and molecular level. Our objectives were to detect candidate introgression lines (pre-ILs) with a better testcross performance than the recurrent parent and identify donor chromosome segments (DCS) responsible for the improved performance. We introduced DCS from the self-incompatible heterozygous exotic Iranian primitive rye accession Altevogt 14160 (donor) into the genetic background of the elite inbred line L2053-N (recurrent parent) by marker-assisted backcrossing and developed 40 BC(2)S(3) lines in each introgression library. Testcross performance for three agronomic and six quality traits was evaluated in replicated field trials across two testers at five locations over 2 years. The phenotypic effect of the DCS was analyzed for all traits. The pre-ILs had on average a testcross performance comparable to that of the recurrent parent. Significant (P < 0.05) differences between individual pre-ILs and the recurrent parent were detected for all traits except for heading date. For more than 60% of the significant (P < 0.05) differences, the pre-ILs were superior to the recurrent parent. For some pre-ILs, specific DCS were identified containing presumably quantitative trait loci responsible for the superior hybrid performance. Consequently, our study revealed that the development and employment of introgression libraries offers the opportunity for a targeted increase of genetic diversity of elite rye material for hybrid performance of agronomically important traits.

  14. Exercise and diet affect quantitative trait loci for body weight and composition traits in an advanced intercross population of mice.

    PubMed

    Leamy, Larry J; Kelly, Scott A; Hua, Kunjie; Pomp, Daniel

    2012-12-01

    Driven by the recent obesity epidemic, interest in understanding the complex genetic and environmental basis of body weight and composition is great. We investigated this by searching for quantitative trait loci (QTLs) affecting a number of weight and adiposity traits in a G(10) advanced intercross population produced from crosses of mice in inbred strain C57BL/6J with those in a strain selected for high voluntary wheel running. The mice in this population were fed either a high-fat or a control diet throughout the study and also measured for four exercise traits prior to death, allowing us to test for pre- and postexercise QTLs as well as QTL-by-diet and QTL-by-exercise interactions. Our genome scan uncovered a number of QTLs, of which 40% replicated QTLs previously found for similar traits in an earlier (G(4)) generation. For those replicated QTLs, the confidence intervals were reduced from an average of 19 Mb in the G(4) to 8 Mb in the G(10). Four QTLs on chromosomes 3, 8, 13, and 18 were especially prominent in affecting the percentage of fat in the mice. About of all QTLs showed interactions with diet, exercise, or both, their genotypic effects on the traits showing a variety of patterns depending on the diet or level of exercise. It was concluded that the indirect effects of these QTLs provide an underlying genetic basis for the considerable variability in weight or fat loss typically found among individuals on the same diet and/or exercise regimen.

  15. Trends in cancer prognosis in a population-based cohort survey: can recent advances in cancer therapy affect the prognosis?

    PubMed

    Kawabata-Shoda, Eri; Charvat, Hadrien; Ikeda, Ai; Inoue, Manami; Sawada, Norie; Iwasaki, Motoki; Sasazuki, Shizuka; Shimazu, Taichi; Yamaji, Taiki; Kimura, Hiromichi; Masuda, Sachiko; Tsugane, Shoichiro

    2015-02-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate trends in cancer prognosis by examining the relationship between period of diagnosis and probability of death from cancer in a population-based cohort. Within a cohort of Japanese men and women aged 40-69 years and free of prior diagnosis of cancer and cardiovascular disease at baseline, data from 4403 patients diagnosed with cancer between 1990 and 2006 and followed up until 2012 were analyzed using survival regression models to assess the presence of an effect of the period of diagnosis (before 1998 versus after 1998) on the risk of dying from cancer. We noted a significant decrease in risk of dying from cancer among individuals diagnosed after 1998 with lung cancer (hazard ratio [HR]=0.676 [0.571-0.800]) or colorectal cancer (HR=0.801 [0.661-0.970]). A decrease in the estimated five-year probability of death from cancer was also noted between the first (before 1998) and the second (after 1998) period of diagnosis for lung and colorectal cancers (e.g., 85.4% vs. 73.3% for lung cancer and 44.6% vs. 37.7% for colorectal cancer, respectively, for stage III in men aged 60 at diagnosis). This study presented the first scientific evidence of improvement in prognosis for lung and colorectal cancer patients in a population-based cohort in Japan. Our results suggest that recent advances in cancer treatment could have influenced cancer survival differently among lung, colorectal and gastric cancers. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Exercise and diet affect quantitative trait loci for body weight and composition traits in an advanced intercross population of mice

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Scott A.; Hua, Kunjie; Pomp, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Driven by the recent obesity epidemic, interest in understanding the complex genetic and environmental basis of body weight and composition is great. We investigated this by searching for quantitative trait loci (QTLs) affecting a number of weight and adiposity traits in a G10 advanced intercross population produced from crosses of mice in inbred strain C57BL/6J with those in a strain selected for high voluntary wheel running. The mice in this population were fed either a high-fat or a control diet throughout the study and also measured for four exercise traits prior to death, allowing us to test for pre- and postexercise QTLs as well as QTL-by-diet and QTL-by-exercise interactions. Our genome scan uncovered a number of QTLs, of which 40% replicated QTLs previously found for similar traits in an earlier (G4) generation. For those replicated QTLs, the confidence intervals were reduced from an average of 19 Mb in the G4 to 8 Mb in the G10. Four QTLs on chromosomes 3, 8, 13, and 18 were especially prominent in affecting the percentage of fat in the mice. About of all QTLs showed interactions with diet, exercise, or both, their genotypic effects on the traits showing a variety of patterns depending on the diet or level of exercise. It was concluded that the indirect effects of these QTLs provide an underlying genetic basis for the considerable variability in weight or fat loss typically found among individuals on the same diet and/or exercise regimen. PMID:23048196

  17. Association of Polymorphisms of the Receptor for Advanced Glycation Endproducts Gene with Schizophrenia in a Han Chinese Population

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Jiawu; Zuo, Xiang; Yin, Jingwen; Luo, Xudong; Li, Zheng; Lin, Juda

    2017-01-01

    Receptor for Advanced Glycation Endproducts (RAGE) is a member of the immunoglobulin superfamily that binds diverse ligands involved in the development of inflammatory damage and diverse chronic diseases including schizophrenia. Here, three single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) (G82S, -374T/A, and -429T/C) in the RAGE gene were genotyped in 923 patients with schizophrenia and 874 healthy-matched controls in a Han Chinese population using the SNaPshot technique. Additionally, we investigated the association among aforementioned SNPs with the clinical psychotic symptoms of the patients and neurocognitive function. Our study demonstrated that the frequencies of the TC + CC genotypes and the C allele in the -429T/C polymorphism were significantly lower in the patients compared with the controls (p = 0.031 and p = 0.034, resp.). However, the significant effect disappeared when using Bonferroni correction (p = 0.093 and p = 0.102, resp.). And there were no significant differences in the genotype and allele frequencies between the patients and the controls for G82S and -374T/A polymorphisms. Additionally, the -429T/C C allele carriers had marginally higher Symbol coding scores than the subjects with the TT genotypes [p = 0.031 and p (corr) = 0.093]. Our data indicate that the RAGE -429T/C polymorphism may be associated with the susceptibility of schizophrenia. PMID:28373983

  18. Comparative costs of programmes to conserve chicken genetic variation based on maintaining living populations or storing cryopreserved material

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Consolidations in the poultry breeding industry and academic poultry departments have resulted in the loss of avian populations. The cost of maintaining living populations is high, but ex-situ alternatives are now available. Semen can be cryopreserved and lines can be recovered by backcrossing, or...

  19. Characterization of Quantitative Trait Loci Controlling Genetic Variation for Preharvest Sprouting in Synthetic Backcross-Derived Wheat Lines

    PubMed Central

    Imtiaz, Muhammad; Ogbonnaya, Francis C.; Oman, Jason; van Ginkel, Maarten

    2008-01-01

    Aegilops tauschii, the wild relative of wheat, has stronger seed dormancy, a major component of preharvest sprouting resistance (PHSR), than bread wheat. A diploid Ae. tauschii accession (AUS18836) and a tetraploid (Triticum turgidum L. ssp. durum var. Altar84) wheat were used to construct a synthetic wheat (Syn37). The genetic architecture of PHS was investigated in 271 BC1F7 synthetic backcross lines (SBLs) derived from Syn37/2*Janz (resistant/susceptible). The SBLs were evaluated in three environments over 2 years and PHS was assessed by way of three measures: the germination index (GI), which measures grain dormancy, the whole spike assay (SI), which takes into account all spike morphology, and counted visually sprouted seeds out of 200 (VI). Grain color was measured using both Chroma Meter- and NaOH-based approaches. QTL for PHSR and grain color were mapped and their additive and epistatic effects as well as their interactions with environment were estimated by a mixed linear-model approach. Single-locus analysis following composite interval mapping revealed four QTL for GI, two QTL for SI, and four QTL for VI on chromosomes 3DL and 4AL. The locus QPhs.dpiv-3D.1 on chromosome 3DL was tightly linked to the red grain color (RGC) at a distance of 5 cM. The other locus on chromosome 3D, “QPhs.dpiv-3D.2” was independent of RGC locus. Two-locus analysis detected nine QTL with main effects and 18 additive × additive interactions for GI, SI, and VI. Two of the nine main effects QTL and two epistatic QTL showed significant interactions with environments. Both additive and epistatic effects contributed to phenotypic variance in PHSR and the identified markers are potential candidates for marker-assisted selection of favorable alleles at multiple loci. SBLs derived from Ae. tauschii proved to be a promising tool to dissect, introgress, and pyramid different PHSR genes into adapted wheat genetic backgrounds. The enhanced expression of PHS resistance in SBLs enabled

  20. The Cluster Population of the Irregular Galaxy NGC 4449 as Seen by the Hubble Advanced Camera for Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Annibali, F.; Tosi, M.; Aloisi, A.; van der Marel, R. P.

    2011-10-01

    We present a study of the star cluster population in the starburst irregular galaxy NGC 4449 based on B, V, I, and Hα images taken with the Advanced Camera for Surveys on the Hubble Space Telescope. We derive cluster properties such as size, ellipticity, and total magnitude. Cluster ages and masses are derived fitting the observed spectral energy distributions with different population synthesis models. Our analysis is strongly affected by the age-metallicity degeneracy; however, if we assume a metallicity of ~1/4 solar, as derived from spectroscopy of H II regions, we find that the clusters have ages distributed quite continuously over a Hubble time, and they have masses from ~103 M sun up to ~2 × 106 M sun, assuming a Salpeter initial mass function down to 0.1 M sun. Young clusters are preferentially located in regions of young star formation (SF), while old clusters are distributed over the whole NGC 4449 field of view, like the old stars (although we note that some old clusters follow linear structures, possibly a reflection of past satellite accretion). The high SF activity in NGC 4449 is confirmed by its specific frequency of young massive clusters, higher than the average value found in nearby spirals and in the Large Magellanic Cloud (but lower than in other starburst dwarfs such as NGC 1705 and NGC 1569), and by the flat slope of the cluster luminosity function (dN(LV )vpropL -1.5 V dL for clusters younger than 1 Gyr). We use the upper envelope of the cluster log(mass) versus log(age) distribution to quantify cluster disruption, and do not find evidence for the high (90%) long-term infant mortality found by some studies. For the red clusters, we find correlations between size, ellipticity, luminosity, and mass: brighter and more massive clusters tend to be more compact, and brighter clusters also tend to be more elliptical. Based on observations with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute which is operated

  1. THE CLUSTER POPULATION OF THE IRREGULAR GALAXY NGC 4449 AS SEEN BY THE HUBBLE ADVANCED CAMERA FOR SURVEYS

    SciTech Connect

    Annibali, F.; Tosi, M.; Aloisi, A.; Van der Marel, R. P.

    2011-10-15

    We present a study of the star cluster population in the starburst irregular galaxy NGC 4449 based on B, V, I, and H{alpha} images taken with the Advanced Camera for Surveys on the Hubble Space Telescope. We derive cluster properties such as size, ellipticity, and total magnitude. Cluster ages and masses are derived fitting the observed spectral energy distributions with different population synthesis models. Our analysis is strongly affected by the age-metallicity degeneracy; however, if we assume a metallicity of {approx}1/4 solar, as derived from spectroscopy of H II regions, we find that the clusters have ages distributed quite continuously over a Hubble time, and they have masses from {approx}10{sup 3} M{sub sun} up to {approx}2 x 10{sup 6} M{sub sun}, assuming a Salpeter initial mass function down to 0.1 M{sub sun}. Young clusters are preferentially located in regions of young star formation (SF), while old clusters are distributed over the whole NGC 4449 field of view, like the old stars (although we note that some old clusters follow linear structures, possibly a reflection of past satellite accretion). The high SF activity in NGC 4449 is confirmed by its specific frequency of young massive clusters, higher than the average value found in nearby spirals and in the Large Magellanic Cloud (but lower than in other starburst dwarfs such as NGC 1705 and NGC 1569), and by the flat slope of the cluster luminosity function (dN(L{sub V} ){proportional_to}L{sup -1.5}{sub V} dL for clusters younger than 1 Gyr). We use the upper envelope of the cluster log(mass) versus log(age) distribution to quantify cluster disruption, and do not find evidence for the high (90%) long-term infant mortality found by some studies. For the red clusters, we find correlations between size, ellipticity, luminosity, and mass: brighter and more massive clusters tend to be more compact, and brighter clusters also tend to be more elliptical.

  2. Pollination biology in hybridizing Baptisia (Fabaceae) populations.

    PubMed

    Leebens-Mack, J; Milligan, B

    1998-04-01

    In their classic study, Alston and Turner (American Journal of Botany, vol. 50, 159-173, 1963) documented extensive hybridization among four morphologically distinct Baptisia species native to East Texas. While Alston and Turner found putative F1 hybrids in great numbers, they found no evidence of backcrossing. In this study prezygotic and postzygotic reproductive barriers between two of these species, B. leucophaea and B. sphaerocarpa, were investigated and found to be quite weak. Flowering times overlap and bumble bees were observed visiting both species and intermediate hybrids. While pollinator constancy in flights between B. leucophaea and B. sphaerocarpa was moderately strong, significant levels of constancy were not observed in flights involving hybrids and either parental species. Thus, backcrossing was not impeded by pollinator behavior. Further, hybrid pollen was highly stainable (93.5%) and able to effectively set seed in crossing experiments with both parental species. Pollinator behavior was compared in experimental populations with and without hybrid ramets and found to differ between these two treatments. Hybrids were found to facilitate pollinator movement between species. In total, these results suggest that reproductive isolation is not responsible for the rarity of backcrossing in naturally hybridizing B. leucophaea and B. sphaerocarpa populations.

  3. The prevalence in the general population of advance directives on euthanasia and discussion of end-of-life wishes: a nationwide survey.

    PubMed

    De Vleminck, Aline; Pardon, Koen; Houttekier, Dirk; Van den Block, Lieve; Vander Stichele, Robert; Deliens, Luc

    2015-12-07

    To determine the extent to which members of the general population have talked to their physician about their wishes regarding medical treatment at the end of life, to describe the prevalence of advance directives on euthanasia, and to identify associated factors. This study used data from the cross-sectional Health Interview Study (HIS) 2008 that collected data from a representative sample (N = 9651) of the Belgian population. Of all respondents, 4.4 % had spoken to their physician about their wishes regarding medical treatment at the end of life, while 1.8 % had an advance directive on euthanasia. Factors positively associated with discussions regarding wishes for medical treatment at the end of life were being female, being older in age, having poorer health status and having more GP contacts. People older than 55 years and living in Flanders or Brussels were more likely than the youngest age categories to have an advance directive on euthanasia. Younger people, men, people living in the Walloon region of Belgium, people without a longstanding illness, chronic condition or disability and people with few GP contacts could represent a target group for education regarding advance care planning. Public information campaigns and education of physicians may help to enable the public and physicians to engage more in advance care planning.

  4. Evaluation of reciprocal differences in Bos indicus x Bos taurus backcross calves produced through embryo transfer: I. Birth and weaning traits.

    PubMed

    Amen, T S; Herring, A D; Sanders, J O; Gill, C A

    2007-02-01

    Angus (A) and Bos indicus (B; Brahman or Nellore) reciprocal backcross, embryo transfer calves, belonging to 28 full-sib families, were evaluated for differences in birth weight, gestation length, and weaning weight. Two methods were investigated; method I made no distinction between how the F(1) parents were produced, whereas method II distinguished between the 2 types of F(1) parents (AB vs. BA corresponding to A x B vs. B x A, respectively). Bos indicus backcross calves had a 4.3 d longer (P < 0.05) gestation length but did not differ in their average birth weight from A backcrosses. Among B backcrosses, B x F(1) calves had a 5.2 d longer (P = 0.01) gestation length than F(1) x B calves (290.5 vs. 285.3, respectively). Under method II analysis, there was a consistent trend for gestation length, in which BA F(1) parents produced calves that ranked greater than calves from AB F(1) parents, as sires and dams. Crosses with a greater proportion of B in the sire in relation to the amount in the dam had a heavier (P < 0.05) birth weight (F(1) x A and B x F(1); 38.1 and 38.4 kg, respectively) than their respective reciprocal crosses (A x F(1) and F(1) x B; 34.3 and 33.5 kg, respectively). The F(1) x A and B x F(1) crosses showed a large difference in birth weight between males and females (5.3 and 4.1 kg, respectively), whereas A x F(1) and F(1) x B crosses showed a small difference (P > 0.10) in birth weight between males and females (1.5 and 1.1 kg, respectively). Further examination within each sex showed a difference between male reciprocals that was generally much larger than that between female reciprocals. Calves with a greater percentage of B in the sire compared with the proportion in the dam ranked heavier for weaning weight as for birth weight, though these differences were not significant. In breeding systems involving B x Bos taurus crosses, even when using embryo transfer, not only does the breed composition of the calves affect their preweaning

  5. Effectiveness of the immunochemical fecal test (FIT) for detection of advanced adenomas in colorectal carcinoma screening in an asymptomatic population.

    PubMed

    Miuţescu, B; Sporea, I; Popescu, Alina; Bota, Simona; Iovănescu, Dana; Burlea, Amelia; Mos, Liana; Palaghia, Mădălina; Vasilescu, A; Miuţescu, E

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the benefit of the immunochemical fecal blood test (FIT) for detection of advanced adenomas. We have conducted a screening study on a average-risk cohort of subjects, aged 50 -74 years. We used a rapid quantitative FIT to perform the screening. Colonoscopy was recommended in all participants with positive FIT. We assessed the participation rate and analyzed advanced adenomas detected in the screening examinations. Our study enrolled 1111 asymptomatic participants. Immunochemical test results were positive in 72 subjects (6.5%). Colonoscopy was performed by 50/72 (69.4%) subjects. The detection rate for advanced adenomas was 2.2%. A total number of 28 advanced adenomas were detected in 24 subjects, meaning 1.2 advanced adenoma/subject. Analyzing the 3 characteristics of advanced adenomas, we observed in our study that 25/28 adenomas (89.3%) had sizes > or = 10 mm, 11/28 adenomas (39.3%) were tubulovillous/villous and 19/28 adenomas (67.9%) had high dysplasia. The majority of advanced adenomas were found in the left colon as compared to the right colon: 71.4% vs. 28.6%. p = 0.0008. In our study was obtained a 2.2% detection rate for advanced adenomas, most of them (71.4%) being located in the left colon. The dominant feature of advanced adenomas detected was the size > or = 10 mm (89.3% of cases).

  6. Selected Characteristics of Persons and Families of Mexican, Puerto Rican, and Other Spanish Origin: March 1972. (Advance Data from March 1972 Sample Survey.) Population Characteristics: Current Population Reports.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of the Census (DOC), Suitland, MD.

    Data on a variety of social and economic characteristics for persons and families in the United States of Mexican, Puerto Rican, Cuban, and other Spanish origin and comparative data for the remaining population were selected from the March 1972 Bureau of the Census Current Population Survey (CPS). Revisions in the March 1972 CPS, as compared to…

  7. High prevalence of advanced colorectal neoplasia in the Thai population: a prospective screening colonoscopy of 1,404 cases.

    PubMed

    Siripongpreeda, Bunchorn; Mahidol, Chulabhorn; Dusitanond, Navara; Sriprayoon, Tassanee; Muyphuag, Bunlung; Sricharunrat, Thaniya; Teerayatanakul, Narongchai; Chaiwong, Watanya; Worasawate, Wipra; Sattayarungsee, Prassanee; Sangthongdee, Juthamas; Prarom, Jirapa; Sornsamdang, Gaidganok; Soonklang, Kamonwan; Wittayasak, Kasiruck; Auewarakul, Chirayu U

    2016-08-23

    Increasing morbidity and mortality from colorectal cancer is evident in recent years in the developing Asian nations. Particularly in Thailand and most neighbouring low-income countries, screening colonoscopy is not yet recommended nor implemented at the national policy level. Screening colonoscopy was offered to 1,500 healthy volunteers aged 50-65 years old who were registered into the program between July 2009 and June 2010. Biopsy and surgery was performed depending on the identified lesions. Fecal immunochemical tests (FIT) were additionally performed for comparison with colonoscopy. There were 1,404 participants who underwent colonoscopy. The mean age of the cohort was 56.9 ± 4.2 years and 69.4 % were females. About 30 % (411 cases) of all colonoscopies had abnormal colonoscopic findings, and of these, 256 cases had adenomatous polyps. High risk adenomas (villous or tubulovillous or high grade dysplasia or size > 1 cm or > 3 adenomatous polyps) were found in 98 cases (7 %), low risk adenoma in 158 cases (11.3 %), and hyperplastic polyps in 119 cases (8.5 %). Eighteen cases (1.3 %) had colorectal cancer and 90 % of them (16 cases) were non-metastatic including five stage 0 cases, seven stage I cases, and four stage IIA cases. Only two cases had metastasis: one to regional lymph nodes (stage IIIB) and another to other organs (stage IVA). The most common cancer site was the distal intestine including rectum (7 cases, 38.9 %) and sigmoid colon (7 cases, 38.9 %). Ten colorectal cancer cases had positive FIT whereas 8 colorectal cancer cases were FIT-negative. The sensitivity and specificity of FIT was 55.6 % and 96.2 %, respectively, while the positive predictive value was 16.4 % and negative predictive value was 99.4 %. The overall survival of colorectal cancer cases at 5-year was 83.3 %. High prevalence of colorectal cancer and high-risk adenoma was found in the Thai population aged 50-65 years old by screening colonoscopy. FIT was

  8. Mitigation using a tandem construct containing a selectively unfit gene precludes establishment of Brassica napus transgenes in hybrids and backcrosses with weedy Brassica rapa.

    PubMed

    Al-Ahmad, Hani; Gressel, Jonathan

    2006-01-01

    Transgenic oilseed rape (Brassica napus) plants can interbreed with nearby weedy Brassica rapa, potentially enhancing the weediness and/or invasiveness of subsequent hybrid offspring. We have previously demonstrated that transgenic mitigation effectively reduces the fitness of the transgenic dwarf and herbicide-resistant B. napus volunteers. We now report the efficacy of such a tandem construct, including a primary herbicide-resistant gene and a dwarfing mitigator gene, to preclude the risks of gene establishment in the related weed B. rapa and its backcross progeny. The transgenically mitigated and non-transgenic B. rapa x B. napus interspecific hybrids and the backcrosses (BC(1)) with B. rapa were grown alone and in competition with B. rapa weed. The reproductive fitness of hybrid offspring progressively decreased with increased B. rapa genes in the offspring, illustrating the efficacy of the concept. The fitness of F(2) interspecific non-transgenic hybrids was between 50% and 80% of the competing weedy B. rapa, whereas the fitness of the comparable T(2) interspecific transgenic hybrids was never more than 2%. The reproductive fitness of the transgenic T(2) BC(1) mixed with B. rapa was further severely suppressed to 0.9% of that of the competing weed due to dwarfism. Clearly, the mitigation technology works efficiently in a rapeseed crop-weed system under biocontainment-controlled environments, but field studies should further validate its utility for minimizing the risks of gene flow.

  9. Development of next-generation mapping populations: Multi-parent Advanced Generation Inter-Cross (MAGIC) and Marker-Assisted Recurrent Selection (MARS) populations in peanut

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Generation Inter-Cross (MAGIC) and Marker-Assisted Recurrent Selection (MARS) have been proposed and used in many crops to dissect complex traits or QTL. MAGIC allows for dissecting genomic structure, and for improving breeding populations by integrating multiple alleles from different parents. MAR...

  10. School Enrollment--Social and Economic Characteristics of Students: October 1977 (Advance Report). Current Population Reports. Population Characteristics. Series P-20, No. 321.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of the Census (DOC), Suitland, MD.

    This report presents a summary of recent trends in school and college enrollment based on the October 1977 Current Population Survey (CPS) and earlier surveys. Enrollment statistics representing growth and decline at various educational levels are evaluated in written summaries. Comparative and distributive enrollment statistics of the population…

  11. Impact of Home Hospice Care on Patients with Advanced Lung Cancer: A Longitudinal Population-Based Study in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Jui-Kun; Kao, Yee-Hsin

    2016-04-01

    The effectiveness of home hospice care was helping patients to die at home, and reducing symptom burden. The study objective was to explore the impact of home hospice care on death at home, end-of-life (EOL) care, and health care costs among patients with advanced lung cancer in their last month of life. Using Taiwan's National Health Insurance Claims Database, we analyzed factors associated with home hospice care using logistic regression analysis. We enrolled 568 patients with advanced lung cancer under hospice care who died during 1997-2011, of which 238 (41.9%) received home hospice care. Compared with the inpatient hospice (IH) group, the home hospice (HH) group had a larger portion die at home (55.5% versus 22.1%, p < 0.001), but a smaller portion stayed in hospital more than 14 days in their last month of life (67.3% versus 40.8%, p < 0.001). The mean health care cost was less in the HH group than in the IH group (US $1,385.00 ± $1,370.00 and US $2,155.00 ± $1,739.00 [p < 0.001], respectively). Female patients' (p = 0.001) decreased hospital stay in the last month of life (p < 0.001) and longer hospice care duration (p = 0.003) were predictors of receiving home hospice care in advanced lung patients. Home hospice care enables patients with advanced lung cancer to increase the 33.4% chance of dying at home, to spend an average of eight-days less in hospital stay, and to save 35.7% health care costs in the last month of life, compared with their counterparts with only inpatient hospice care. Female patients' decreased hospital stay and longer hospice care duration were the predictors of receiving home hospice care.

  12. Phenotypic analysis of first-year traits in a pseudo-backcross {(slash x loblolly) x slash} and the ope-pollinated families of the pure-species progenitors

    Treesearch

    Patricio R. Munoz Del Valle; Dudley A. Huber; John R. Butnor

    2011-01-01

    A single test, including one pseudo-backcross (Pinus elliottii x Pinus taeda) x P. elliottii and openpollinated families of the pure species progenitors, was established in North Central Florida in December 2007 to study the transfer of the fast-growing characteristics from a P. taeda L. (loblolly pine) parent into the P. elliottii Engelm. (slash pine) background....

  13. Range shift and introgression of the rear and leading populations in two ecologically distinct Rubus species.

    PubMed

    Mimura, Makiko; Mishima, Misako; Lascoux, Martin; Yahara, Tetsukazu

    2014-10-25

    The margins of a species' range might be located at the margins of a species' niche, and in such cases, can be highly vulnerable to climate changes. They, however, may also undergo significant evolutionary changes due to drastic population dynamics in response to climate changes, which may increase the chances of isolation and contact among species. Such species interactions induced by climate changes could then regulate or facilitate further responses to climatic changes. We hypothesized that climate changes lead to species contacts and subsequent genetic exchanges due to differences in population dynamics at the species boundaries. We sampled two closely related Rubus species, one temperate (Rubus palmatus) and the other subtropical (R. grayanus) near their joint species boundaries in southern Japan. Coalescent analysis, based on molecular data and ecological niche modelling during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM), were used to infer past population dynamics. At the contact zones on Yakushima (Yaku Island), where the two species are parapatrically distributed, we tested hybridization along altitudinal gradients. Coalescent analysis suggested that the southernmost populations of R. palmatus predated the LGM (~20,000 ya). Conversely, populations at the current northern limit of R. grayanus diverged relatively recently and likely represent young outposts of a northbound range shift. These population dynamics were partly supported by the ensemble forecasting of six different species distribution models. Both past and ongoing hybridizations were detected near and on Yakushima. Backcrosses and advanced-generation hybrids likely generated the clinal hybrid zones along altitudinal gradients on the island where the two species are currently parapatrically distributed. Climate oscillations during the Quaternary Period and the response of a species in range shifts likely led to repeated contacts with the gene pools of ecologically distinct relatives. Such species interactions

  14. Experience of childbirth in first-time mothers of advanced age - a Norwegian population-based study.

    PubMed

    Aasheim, Vigdis; Waldenström, Ulla; Rasmussen, Svein; Schytt, Erica

    2013-02-27

    Delaying the first childbirth to an advanced age has increased significantly during the last decades, but little is known about older first time mothers' experience of childbirth. This study investigates the associations between advanced maternal age in primiparous women and the postnatal assessment of childbirth. The study was based on the National Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (MoBa) conducted by the Norwegian Institute of Public Health. Data on 30 065 nulliparous women recruited in the second trimester 1999-2008 were used. Three questionnaires were completed: around gestational week 17 and 30, and at 6 months postpartum. Medical data were retrieved from the national Medical Birth Register. Advanced age was defined as ≥32 years and the reference group as 25-31 years. Descriptive and multiple logistic regression analyses were conducted. Primiparous women aged 32 years and above expressed more worry about the upcoming birth than the younger women (adjusted OR 1.13; 95% CI 1.06-1.21), and 6 months after the birth they had a slightly higher risk of having experienced childbirth as 'worse than expected' (adjusted OR 1.09; 95% CI 1.02-1.16). The difference in birth experience was explained by mode of delivery. Comparisons within subgroups defined by the same mode of delivery showed that the risk of a more negative birth experience in the older women only applied to those with a spontaneous vaginal birth (adjusted OR 1.12; 95% CI 1.02-1.22). In women delivered by cesarean section, the older more often than younger women rated childbirth as 'better than expected' (elective cesarean delivery: adjusted OR 1.36; 95% CI 1.01-1.85, emergency cesarean delivery: adjusted OR 1.38; 95% CI 1.03-1.84). Postponing childbirth to ≥32 years of age only marginally affected the experience of childbirth. Older women seemed to manage better than younger with having an operative delivery.

  15. Economic Analysis of First-Line Treatment with Erlotinib in an EGFR-Mutated Population with Advanced NSCLC.

    PubMed

    Vergnenegre, Alain; Massuti, Bartomeu; de Marinis, Filippo; Carcereny, Enric; Felip, Enriqueta; Do, Pascal; Sanchez, Jose Miguel; Paz-Arez, Luis; Chouaid, Christos; Rosell, Rafael

    2016-06-01

    The cost-effectiveness of first-line tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapy in epidermal growth factor receptor gene (EGFR)-mutated advanced-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is poorly documented. We therefore conducted a cost-effectiveness analysis of first-line treatment with erlotinib versus standard chemotherapy in European patients with advanced-stage EGFR-mutated NSCLC who were enrolled in the European Erlotinib versus Chemotherapy trial. The European Erlotinib versus Chemotherapy study was a multicenter, open-label, randomized phase III trial performed mainly in Spain, France, and Italy. We based our economic analysis on clinical data and data on resource consumption (drugs, drug administration, adverse events, and second-line treatments) collected during this trial. Utility values were derived from the literature. Incremental cost-effectiveness ratios were calculated for the first-line treatment phase and for the overall strategy from the perspective of the three participating countries. Sensitivity analyses were performed by selecting the main cost drivers. Compared with standard first-line chemotherapy, the first-line treatment with erlotinib was cost saving (€7807, €17,311, and €19,364 for Spain, Italy and France, respectively) and yielded a gain of 0.117 quality-adjusted life-years. A probabilistic sensitivity analysis indicated that, given a willingness to pay at least €90,000 for 1 quality-adjusted life-year, the probability that a strategy of first-line erlotinib would be cost-effective was 100% in France, 100% in Italy, and 99.8% in Spain. This economic analysis shows that first-line treatment with erlotinib, versus standard chemotherapy, is a dominant strategy for EGFR-mutated advanced-stage NSCLC in three European countries. Copyright © 2016 International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Special populations: telehealth advance practice nursing: the lived experiences of individuals with acute infections transitioning in the home.

    PubMed

    Marineau, Michelle L

    2007-01-01

    This paper aims to describe the "lived experience" of individuals with acute infections transitioning in the home with support by an advance practice nurse using telehealth. The use of telehealth in individuals' homes in the United States is increasing in an effort to cut cost by limiting admissions to hospitals and/or reducing length of stay. This increase has not been driven by conclusive research findings in support of this technology; furthermore, the majority of research conducted has been in the area of chronic disease management. A qualitative approach was used to describe the essential structure of the lived experience as told during taped interviews by individuals who had been enrolled in a pilot quantitative telehealth study over the past 2 years. Major findings consisted of three theme categories: Initial response, Engaging in care, and Experiencing the downside. The transition that occurred when an individual with an acute infection was discharged from the hospital to the home supported by telehealth technology revealed an overall positive experience from the 10 participants. There was one negative experience in a participant who had two separate telehealth enrollments. The findings add valuable insight for advanced practice nurses into the experience of participants with acute illness who are receiving telehealth as they transition from hospital care to home care. The findings highlighted the importance of the participants having a sense of control when recovering from their illness, which could be achieved at home with a family member acting as a substitute nurse. The participants shared that the hospital environment may not be optimal for recovering from an illness. This provides the advanced practice nurse with information on risk and benefits of telehealth from the individuals' perspective.

  17. Quality of life domains important and relevant to family caregivers of advanced cancer patients in an Asian population: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Lee, Geok Ling; Ow, Mandy Yen Ling; Akhileswaran, Ramaswamy; Pang, Grace Su Yin; Fan, Gilbert Kam Tong; Goh, Brandon Huat Heng; Wong, Cai Fong; Cheung, Yin Bun; Wee, Hwee Lin

    2015-04-01

    This study aims to identify domains of quality of life (QoL) that are culturally relevant to Chinese caregivers of advanced cancer patients in Singapore and to evaluate content adequacy of currently available instruments for use in the target population. English- and Chinese-speaking caregivers of advanced cancer patients receiving care under a tertiary cancer center and/or a community hospice home care/day care provider were recruited for in-depth interviews. The interviews were analyzed using thematic analysis. The identified domains, themes and sub-themes were compared to concepts addressed by items from five existing cancer-specific caregiver QoL instruments. Eighteen female and eight male caregivers aged 28-74 years participated in the study. Twenty-nine QoL themes and 59 sub-themes were identified in six domains, namely physical health, mental health, social health, spiritual health, financial health and daily life. Collectively, but not individually, the content of the five existing instruments adequately cover the physical health domain, social health domain and some themes on mental health domain for the study population. Content gaps were identified in the domains of mental health, spiritual health, daily life and financial health. The present study found culturally and contextually specific themes and sub-themes about positive emotional health, spiritual health and financial health.

  18. The Promise and Potential Perils of Big Data for Advancing Symptom Management Research in Populations at Risk for Health Disparities.

    PubMed

    Bakken, Suzanne; Reame, Nancy

    2016-01-01

    Symptom management research is a core area of nursing science and one of the priorities for the National Institute of Nursing Research, which specifically focuses on understanding the biological and behavioral aspects of symptoms such as pain and fatigue, with the goal of developing new knowledge and new strategies for improving patient health and quality of life. The types and volume of data related to the symptom experience, symptom management strategies, and outcomes are increasingly accessible for research. Traditional data streams are now complemented by consumer-generated (i.e., quantified self) and "omic" data streams. Thus, the data available for symptom science can be considered big data. The purposes of this chapter are to (a) briefly summarize the current drivers for the use of big data in research; (b) describe the promise of big data and associated data science methods for advancing symptom management research; (c) explicate the potential perils of big data and data science from the perspective of the ethical principles of autonomy, beneficence, and justice; and (d) illustrate strategies for balancing the promise and the perils of big data through a case study of a community at high risk for health disparities. Big data and associated data science methods offer the promise of multidimensional data sources and new methods to address significant research gaps in symptom management. If nurse scientists wish to apply big data and data science methods to advance symptom management research and promote health equity, they must carefully consider both the promise and perils.

  19. Mutation and expression of multiple treatment response-related genes in a population with locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    LU, HONG-YANG; SU, DAN; PAN, XIAO-DAN; JIANG, HONG; MA, SHENG-LIN

    2012-01-01

    Individual therapy based on various pathohistological types and biological characteristics may be the practical trend of advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treatment. To provide a molecular criterion for drug selection, we investigated the incidence of somatic mutation and mRNA expression levels of common genes relevant to treatment response in a population with locally advanced NSCLC. Mutant-enriched and branched DNA-liquidchip technology (bDNA-LCT) were used to detect the somatic mutations in the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), KRAS, BRAF and phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase catalytic α (PIK3CA) genes, and mRNA levels of EGFR, ERCC1, class III β-tubulin (TUBB3) and TYMS, separately, in paraffin tissue blocks from 30 patients with stage IIIA NSCLC. Our current findings revealed that 6, 4 and 2 out of 30 samples were found with mutations in exons 19, 21 and 20 of the EGFR gene, respectively. The mutation incidence of exons 19 and 21 had a positive correlation with EGFR mRNA expression. Mutations in exons 12 and 13 of the K-ras gene were found in 2 out of 30, and 1 out of 30 samples, separately. Three out of 30 samples were found with mutations in codon 542 of the PIK3CA gene. No mutations were found in the BRAF gene. The expression levels of ERCC1 and TUBB3 mRNAs were higher in patients with adenocarcinoma than those in patients with squamous cell carcinoma. The expression of TYMS mRNA in patients with adenocarcinoma was lower than that in patients with squamous cell carcinoma. In conclusion, mutations and mRNA expression of these commonly studied genes provides a basis for the selection of suitable molecular markers for individual treatment in a population with locally advanced NSCLC. PMID:22740923

  20. Recent trends in long-term survival of patients with chronic myelocytic leukemia: disclosing the impact of advances in therapy on the population level.

    PubMed

    Brenner, Hermann; Gondos, Adam; Pulte, Dianne

    2008-10-01

    Within the past decades, major advances in therapy for chronic myelocytic leukemia, including allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, interferon therapy, and, more recently, also therapy with the tyrosine kinase inhibitor imatinib, have entered clinical practice. The impact of these advances on long-term survival on the population level should be disclosed as timely as possible. We estimated trends in age specific 5- and 10-year relative survival of chronic myelocytic leukemia patients in the United States from 1990-1992 to 2002-2004. Our analysis is based on records from 8,329 patients aged 15 years or older with a first diagnosis of chronic myelocytic leukemia included in the 1973-2004 data base of the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program. Period analysis was used to disclose recent developments with minimum delay. Overall, 5-year relative survival increased from 27 to 49%, and 10-year relative survival increased from 9.5 to 34% between 1990-92 and 2002-04. The increase was most dramatic for younger patients, with 10-year relative survival increasing from 16 to 72% in age group 15-44 years, from 12 to 54% in age group 45-54 years, and from 8 to 34% in age group 55-64 years (p<0.0001 in all cases). Improvements were more modest and not statistically significant, and survival remained at much lower levels among age groups 65-74 and 75+ years. Our analysis discloses a dramatic recent increase in long-term survival of younger patients with chronic myelocytic leukemia which most likely reflects rapid dissemination of advances in therapy on the population level.

  1. Quantitative trait locus mapping for Verticillium wilt resistance in a backcross inbred line population of cotton (Gossypium hirsutum × Gossypium barbadense) based on RGA-AFLP analysis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Verticillium wilt (VW), caused by Verticillium dahliae, is one of the most important diseases in cotton. Development and growing of VW resistant cultivars is the most effective and economic strategy in controlling the disease. However, little is currently known on the genetic basis of VW resistanc...

  2. Effect of advanced intercrossing on genome structure and on the power to detect linked quantitative trait loci in a multi-parent population: a simulation study in rice

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In genetic analysis of agronomic traits, quantitative trait loci (QTLs) that control the same phenotype are often closely linked. Furthermore, many QTLs are localized in specific genomic regions (QTL clusters) that include naturally occurring allelic variations in different genes. Therefore, linkage among QTLs may complicate the detection of each individual QTL. This problem can be resolved by using populations that include many potential recombination sites. Recently, multi-parent populations have been developed and used for QTL analysis. However, their efficiency for detection of linked QTLs has not received attention. By using information on rice, we simulated the construction of a multi-parent population followed by cycles of recurrent crossing and inbreeding, and we investigated the resulting genome structure and its usefulness for detecting linked QTLs as a function of the number of cycles of recurrent crossing. Results The number of non-recombinant genome segments increased linearly with an increasing number of cycles. The mean and median lengths of the non-recombinant genome segments decreased dramatically during the first five to six cycles, then decreased more slowly during subsequent cycles. Without recurrent crossing, we found that there is a risk of missing QTLs that are linked in a repulsion phase, and a risk of identifying linked QTLs in a coupling phase as a single QTL, even when the population was derived from eight parental lines. In our simulation results, using fewer than two cycles of recurrent crossing produced results that differed little from the results with zero cycles, whereas using more than six cycles dramatically improved the power under most of the conditions that we simulated. Conclusion Our results indicated that even with a population derived from eight parental lines, fewer than two cycles of crossing does not improve the power to detect linked QTLs. However, using six cycles dramatically improved the power, suggesting

  3. Association mapping for frost tolerance using multi-parent advanced generation inter-cross (MAGIC) population in faba bean (Vicia faba L.).

    PubMed

    Sallam, Ahmed; Martsch, Regina

    2015-08-01

    A multi-parent advanced generation inter-cross (MAGIC) derived from 11 founder lines in faba bean was used in this study to identify quantitative trait loci (QTL) for frost tolerance traits using the association mapping method with 156 SNP markers. This MAGIC population consists of a set of 189 genotypes from the Göttingen Winter Bean Population. The association panel was tested in two different experiments, i.e. a frost and a hardening experiment. Six morphological traits, leaf fatty acid composition, relative water content in shoots were scored in this study. The genotypes presented a large genetic variation for all traits that were highly heritable after frost and after hardening. High phenotypic significant correlations were established between traits. The principal coordinates analysis resulted in no clear structure in the current population. Association mapping was performed using a general linear model and mixed linear model with kinship. A False discovery rate of 0.20 (and 0.05) was used to test the significance of marker-trait association. As a result, many putative QTLs for 13 morphological and physiological traits were detected using both models. The results reveal that QTL mapping by association analysis is a powerful method of detecting the alleles associated with frost tolerance in the winter faba bean which can be used in accelerating breeding programs.

  4. Rapid morphological changes in populations of hybrids between Africanized and European honey bees.

    PubMed

    Francoy, T M; Gonçalves, L S; De Jong, D

    2012-09-17

    African honey bees, introduced to Brazil in 1956, rapidly dominated the previously introduced European subspecies. To better understand how hybridization between these different types of bees proceeded, we made geometric morphometric analyses of the wing venation patterns of specimens resulting from crosses made between Africanized honey bees (predominantly Apis mellifera scutellata) and Italian honey bees (A. mellifera ligustica) from 1965 to 1967, at the beginning of the Africanization process, in an apiary about 150 km from the original introduction site. Two virgin queens reared from an Italian parental were instrumentally inseminated with semen from drones from an Africanized parental. Six F(1) queens from one of these colonies were open mated with Africanized drones. Resultant F(1) drones were backcrossed to 50 Italian and 50 Africanized parental queens. Five backcross workers were collected from each of eight randomly selected colonies of each type of backcross (N = 5 bees x 8 colonies x 2 types of backcrosses). The F1 progeny (40 workers and 30 drones) was found to be morphologically closer to the Africanized than to the European parental (N = 20 drones and 40 workers, each); Mahalanobis square distances = 21.6 versus 25.8, respectively, for the workers, and 39.9 versus 46.4, respectively, for the drones. The worker progenies of the backcrosses (N = 40, each) were placed between the respective parental and the F(1) progeny, although closer to the Africanized than to the Italian parentals (Mahalanobis square distance = 6.2 versus 12.1, respectively). Consequently, the most common crosses at the beginning of the Africanization process would have generated individuals more similar to Africanized than to Italian bees. This adds a genetic explanation for the rapid changes in the populational morphometric profile in recently colonized areas. Africanized alleles of wing venation pattern genes are apparently dominant and epistatic.

  5. Advancing paternal age and risk of autism: new evidence from a population-based study and a meta-analysis of epidemiological studies.

    PubMed

    Hultman, C M; Sandin, S; Levine, S Z; Lichtenstein, P; Reichenberg, A

    2011-12-01

    Advanced paternal age has been suggested as a risk factor for autism, but empirical evidence is mixed. This study examines whether the association between paternal age and autism in the offspring (1) persists controlling for documented autism risk factors, including family psychiatric history, perinatal conditions, infant characteristics and demographic variables; (2) may be explained by familial traits associated with the autism phenotype, or confounding by parity; and (3) is consistent across epidemiological studies. Multiple study methods were adopted. First, a Swedish 10-year birth cohort (N=1 075 588) was established. Linkage to the National Patient Register ascertained all autism cases (N=883). Second, 660 families identified within the birth cohort had siblings discordant for autism. Finally, meta-analysis included population-based epidemiological studies. In the birth cohort, autism risk increased monotonically with increasing paternal age. Offspring of men aged ≥50 years were 2.2 times (95% confidence interval: 1.26-3.88: P=0.006) more likely to have autism than offspring of men aged ≤29 years, after controlling for maternal age and documented risk factors for autism. Within-family analysis of discordant siblings showed that affected siblings had older paternal age, adjusting for maternal age and parity (P<0.0001). Meta-analysis demonstrated advancing paternal age association with increased risk of autism across studies. These findings provide the strongest evidence to date that advanced paternal age is a risk factor for autism in the offspring. Possible biological mechanisms include de novo aberration and mutations or epigenetic alterations associated with aging.

  6. Association of young and advanced age of pregnant women with the risk of isolated congenital abnormalities in Hungary - a population-based case-matched control study.

    PubMed

    Csermely, Gyula; Susánszky, Éva; Czeizel, Andrew E

    2015-03-01

    To analyze the possible association of maternal age with the risk of all congenital abnormalities (CAs) in a population-based large case-matched control data set. The Hungarian Case-Control Surveillance of Congenital Abnormalities included 21,494 cases with isolated CA and their 34,311 matched controls. First the distribution of maternal age groups in 24 CA-groups and their matched controls was compared. In the second step, young (19 years or less) and advanced (35 years or more) age groups were compared. Finally, the subgroups of neural-tube defects, congenital heart defects and abdominal wall's CA were evaluated separately. A higher risk of gastroschisis, congenital heart defects, particularly left-sided obstructive defects, undescended testis and clubfoot was found in the youngest age group (19 years or less) of cases. The higher proportion of pregnant women with advanced age (i.e. 35 years or more) showed only a borderline excess in cases with clubfoot. The so-called U-shaped risk of maternal age distribution was found in cases with clubfoot and in the total group of isolated CAs. The maternal age is a contributing factor to the origin of some isolated CAs mainly in young pregnant women.

  7. Molecular and Functional Characterization of GR2-R1 Event Based Backcross Derived Lines of Golden Rice in the Genetic Background of a Mega Rice Variety Swarna

    PubMed Central

    Bollinedi, Haritha; S., Gopala Krishnan; Prabhu, Kumble Vinod; Singh, Nagendra Kumar; Mishra, Sushma; Khurana, Jitendra P.; Singh, Ashok Kumar

    2017-01-01

    Homozygous Golden Rice lines developed in the background of Swarna through marker assisted backcross breeding (MABB) using transgenic GR2-R1 event as a donor for the provitamin A trait have high levels of provitamin A (up to 20 ppm) but are dwarf with pale green leaves and drastically reduced panicle size, grain number and yield as compared to the recurrent parent, Swarna. In this study, we carried out detailed morphological, biochemical and molecular characterization of these lines in a quest to identify the probable reasons for their abnormal phenotype. Nucleotide blast analysis with the primer sequences used to amplify the transgene revealed that the integration of transgene disrupted the native OsAux1 gene, which codes for an auxin transmembrane transporter protein. Real time expression analysis of the transgenes (ZmPsy and CrtI) driven by endosperm-specific promoter revealed the leaky expression of the transgene in the vegetative tissues. We propose that the disruption of OsAux1 disturbed the fine balance of plant growth regulators viz., auxins, gibberellic acid and abscisic acid, leading to the abnormalities in the growth and development of the lines homozygous for the transgene. The study demonstrates the conserved roles of OsAux1 gene in rice and Arabidopsis. PMID:28068433

  8. Molecular and Functional Characterization of GR2-R1 Event Based Backcross Derived Lines of Golden Rice in the Genetic Background of a Mega Rice Variety Swarna.

    PubMed

    Bollinedi, Haritha; S, Gopala Krishnan; Prabhu, Kumble Vinod; Singh, Nagendra Kumar; Mishra, Sushma; Khurana, Jitendra P; Singh, Ashok Kumar

    2017-01-01

    Homozygous Golden Rice lines developed in the background of Swarna through marker assisted backcross breeding (MABB) using transgenic GR2-R1 event as a donor for the provitamin A trait have high levels of provitamin A (up to 20 ppm) but are dwarf with pale green leaves and drastically reduced panicle size, grain number and yield as compared to the recurrent parent, Swarna. In this study, we carried out detailed morphological, biochemical and molecular characterization of these lines in a quest to identify the probable reasons for their abnormal phenotype. Nucleotide blast analysis with the primer sequences used to amplify the transgene revealed that the integration of transgene disrupted the native OsAux1 gene, which codes for an auxin transmembrane transporter protein. Real time expression analysis of the transgenes (ZmPsy and CrtI) driven by endosperm-specific promoter revealed the leaky expression of the transgene in the vegetative tissues. We propose that the disruption of OsAux1 disturbed the fine balance of plant growth regulators viz., auxins, gibberellic acid and abscisic acid, leading to the abnormalities in the growth and development of the lines homozygous for the transgene. The study demonstrates the conserved roles of OsAux1 gene in rice and Arabidopsis.

  9. [Application of somatic hybrids between dihaploids of potato Solanum tuberosum L. and wild diploid species from Mexico in breeding: generation and backcrossing of dihaploids of somatic hybrids].

    PubMed

    Ermishin, A P; Makhan'ko, O V; Voronkova, E V

    2006-12-01

    The efficiency of an original approach to involvement of the valuable genetic pool of wild diploid potato species from Mexico is estimated. The essence of this method is in generation of dihaploids (2n = 2x = 24) of tetraploid somatic hybrids (2n = 4x = 48) followed by backcrossing with dihaploids of Solanum tuberosum. A haploid producer, S. phureja IvP35, was used to generate ten dihaploids of S. tuberosum + S. pinnatisectum, all of which crossed with fertile S. tuberosum dihaploids and developed plump viable seeds. This gives the possibility of an efficient introgression of the genes valuable for breeding from wild species to the bred plants at a diploid level, which has several advantages compared with the corresponding procedure at a tetraploid level. A part of the dihaploids produced was compatible (the pollen tubes reached the ovary) with diploid and tetraploid forms of S. pinnatisectum; however, no viable seeds were developed. The attempt to generate the dihaploids of S. tuberosum + S. bulbocastanum somatic hydrides using the haploid producer S. phureja IvP35 was unsuccessful.

  10. Visualization of A- and B-genome chromosomes in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) x jointed goatgrass (Aegilops cylindrica Host) backcross progenies.

    PubMed

    Wang, Z N; Hang, A; Hansen, J; Burton, C; Mallory-Smith, C A; Zemetra, R S

    2000-12-01

    Wheat (Triticum aestivum) and jointed goatgrass (Aegilops cylindrica) can cross with each other, and their self-fertile backcross progenies frequently have extra chromosomes and chromosome segments, presumably retained from wheat, raising the possibility that a herbicide resistance gene might transfer from wheat to jointed goatgrass. Genomic in situ hybridization (GISH) was used to clarify the origin of these extra chromosomes. By using T. durum DNA (AABB genome) as a probe and jointed goatgrass DNA (CCDD genome) as blocking DNA, one, two, and three A- or B-genome chromosomes were identified in three BC2S2 individuals where 2n = 29, 30, and 31 chromosomes, respectively. A translocation between wheat and jointed goatgrass chromosomes was also detected in an individual with 30 chromosomes. In pollen mother cells with meiotic configuration of 14 II + 2 I, the two univalents were identified as being retained from the A or B genome of wheat. By using Ae. markgrafii DNA (CC genome) as a probe and wheat DNA (AABBDD genome) as blocking DNA. 14 C-genome chromosomes were visualized in all BC2S2 individuals. The GISH procedure provides a powerful tool to detect the A or B-genome chromatin in a jointed goatgrass background, making it possible to assess the risk of transfer of herbicide resistance genes located on the A or B genome of wheat to jointed goatgrass.

  11. [Long-Term Care Preferences Among Individuals of Advanced Age in Germany: Results of a Population-Based Study].

    PubMed

    Hajek, André; Lehnert, Thomas; Wegener, Annemarie; Riedel-Heller, Steffi G; König, Hans-Helmut

    2017-03-07

    The need for long-term care is expected to increase markedly in the next decades as a result of demographic ageing. Consequently, it is important to know the long-term care preferences. This study investigated the long-term care preferences among older individuals in Germany. Based on a systematic review and expert interviews, a questionnaire was designed to assess long-term care preferences. Data were gathered from a representative telephone survey of the German population (n=1,006; 65 years and above) in 2015. The mean age was 75.2 years (±6.6 years, ranging from 65 to 96 years). While nearly 90% of the individuals preferred home care, other care settings such as nursing care abroad were mostly undesired. In case of home care, most of the individuals preferred care provided by friends/family or formal caregivers, whereas the idea of all-day care services (such as employed private caregivers) was less popular. With respect to home care, additional services such as household assistance, transportation services, and emergency call systems were highly valued by the study participants, whereas continual supervision throughout the day was seen as less important. In case of inpatient care, more than 90% of the individuals preferred a private room, with the inpatient facility located near home or close to relatives' homes. A wide range of activities was appreciated. Given these preferences, it is assumed that there is a gap between expectations (preferences) and reality (utilization) regarding long-term care in Germany. Interventions aimed at minimizing this gap are urgently needed. For example, strategies to raise the awareness of private long-term care provision might be fruitful.

  12. Positive association of circulating levels of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) with pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF) in a general population.

    PubMed

    Yamagishi, Sho-Ichi; Matsui, Takanori; Adachi, Hisashi; Takeuchi, Masayoshi

    2010-02-01

    We have recently found that serum levels of pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF), a glycoprotein with anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory properties, are elevated in proportion to the accumulation of the number of the components of the metabolic syndrome. Since formation and accumulation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) progress under the metabolic syndrome and that PEDF could inhibit the AGE-elicited tissue damage, it is conceivable that PEDF levels may be increased as a counter-system against AGEs in patients with the metabolic syndrome. However, correlation between circulating levels of AGEs and PEDF in humans remains to be elucidated. In this study, we investigated the relationship between serum AGE and PEDF levels in a general population and examined the effects of AGEs on PEDF gene expression in vitro. One hundred ninety-six Japanese subjects in a general population underwent a complete history and physical examination, determination of blood chemistries, including serum levels of AGEs and PEDF. In multiple regression analyses, creatinine, body mass index, triglycerides, AGEs and insulin were independently correlated with serum PEDF levels. AGEs dose-dependently increased PEDF gene expression in cultured adipocytes and liver cells. Our present study demonstrated first that circulating AGEs were one of the independent correlates of serum levels of PEDF. Adipose tissue and liver may be target organs for the AGE-induced PEDF overexpression in humans. Serum PEDF levels may be elevated in response to circulating AGEs as a counter-system against the AGE-elicited tissue damage.

  13. The role of habitat-selection in restricting invasive blue mussel advancement to protect native populations in San Francisco Bay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mittal, N.; Saarman, N. P.; Pogson, G.

    2013-12-01

    Introduced species contribute to decline of biodiversity and ecosystem services. Introduced species threaten native species by increasing competition for space and resources, changing their habitat, and disrupting species interactions. Protecting native species is crucial to preserving ecosystem services (i.e. medicinal, agricultural, ecological, and cultural benefits) for future generations. In marine communities, the number of invasive species is dramatically increasing every year, further magnifying the negative impact on native species. This research determines if habitat-specific selection can protect native species from their invasive relatives, and could allow targeted habitat restoration for native species to maintain high levels of biodiversity. Blue mussels provide an ideal system for studying the impact of an invasive species (Mytilus galloprovincialis) on native mussels (M. trossulus), because M. galloprovincialis is marked as one of the world's 100 worst invasive species. Hybridization between M. galloprovincialis and M. trossulus occurs wherever their distributions overlap (i.e. Japan, Puget Sound, and central California). In central California, hybrids form in a broad variety of habitats ever since M. galloprovincialis was introduced about 100 years ago. The current level of threat posed to native mussels in central California is unknown. When population growth rate of an invasive species is higher than the native within a hybrid zone, the invader's genes become more prominent in the hybrids than the native species' genes. This uneven mix of genes and decrease of pure native mussels threatens to drive M. trossulus to extinction. Therefore, it is important to research which environment fosters highest success of pure native species. We conducted a field experiment in San Francisco Bay where mussels were reared in different habitats. We then collected samples and extracted DNA from each treatment, and genotyped them by a next-generation sequencing

  14. Factors affecting the accuracy of genomic selection for growth and wood quality traits in an advanced-breeding population of black spruce (Picea mariana).

    PubMed

    Lenz, Patrick R N; Beaulieu, Jean; Mansfield, Shawn D; Clément, Sébastien; Desponts, Mireille; Bousquet, Jean

    2017-04-28

    Genomic selection (GS) uses information from genomic signatures consisting of thousands of genetic markers to predict complex traits. As such, GS represents a promising approach to accelerate tree breeding, which is especially relevant for the genetic improvement of boreal conifers characterized by long breeding cycles. In the present study, we tested GS in an advanced-breeding population of the boreal black spruce (Picea mariana [Mill.] BSP) for growth and wood quality traits, and concurrently examined factors affecting GS model accuracy. The study relied on 734 25-year-old trees belonging to 34 full-sib families derived from 27 parents and that were established on two contrasting sites. Genomic profiles were obtained from 4993 Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) representative of as many gene loci distributed among the 12 linkage groups common to spruce. GS models were obtained for four growth and wood traits. Validation using independent sets of trees showed that GS model accuracy was high, related to trait heritability and equivalent to that of conventional pedigree-based models. In forward selection, gains per unit of time were three times higher with the GS approach than with conventional selection. In addition, models were also accurate across sites, indicating little genotype-by-environment interaction in the area investigated. Using information from half-sibs instead of full-sibs led to a significant reduction in model accuracy, indicating that the inclusion of relatedness in the model contributed to its higher accuracies. About 500 to 1000 markers were sufficient to obtain GS model accuracy almost equivalent to that obtained with all markers, whether they were well spread across the genome or from a single linkage group, further confirming the implication of relatedness and potential long-range linkage disequilibrium (LD) in the high accuracy estimates obtained. Only slightly higher model accuracy was obtained when using marker subsets that were

  15. Incidence and prevalence of basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and locally advanced BCC (LABCC) in a large commercially insured population in the United States: A retrospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Goldenberg, Gary; Karagiannis, Tom; Palmer, Jacqueline Blanche; Lotya, Juzer; O'Neill, Caitriona; Kisa, Renata; Herrera, Vivian; Siegel, Daniel M

    2016-11-01

    Accurate evaluation of basal cell carcinoma (BCC) in the United States was not possible before the 2011 release of BCC-specific International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification codes. We sought to describe BCC (including locally advanced BCC [LABCC]) incidence/prevalence and the characteristics of patients in a commercially insured US population. This retrospective cohort study used Truven Health MarketScan database insurance claims. Patients, aged 18 years or older with 2 or more BCC claims at least 30 days apart from October 1, 2011, to September 30, 2012, were continuously enrolled in medical and pharmacy benefits for 12 months before and after the index claim. A specific algorithm was used to classify patients with LABCC. A total of 56,987 patients with BCC were identified (39,035 incident cases; 17,952 prevalent cases). Age-adjusted BCC incidence and prevalence were 226.09 and 342.64 per 100,000 persons, respectively. These values project to 542,782 patients (incidence) and 822,593 patients (prevalence) in the 2012 US population. LABCC was uncommon (471 cases identified; projected US incidence and prevalence: 4399 and 7940 patients, respectively). Use of medical claims data and retrospective analysis are limitations. In a study designed to distinguish patients with LABCC from the general BCC population based on BCC-specific International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification codes, 0.8% were found to have LABCC, the majority having pre-existing disease. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Utilization of intraperitoneal chemotherapy for optimally cytoreduced advanced stage epithelial ovarian cancer: A 10-year single institution experience with a racially diverse urban population.

    PubMed

    Miller, Eirwen M; Tymon-Rosario, Joan; Xie, Xianhong; Xue, Xiaonan; Gressel, Gregory M; Miller, Devin T; Kuo, Dennis Ys; Nevadunsky, Nicole S

    2017-10-01

    The goal of our study was to define utilization and clinical results of intraperitoneal (IV/IP) compared to intravenous (IV) chemotherapy in a racially and ethnically diverse population with optimally debulked advanced stage epithelial ovarian cancer. After IRB approval, all patients diagnosed with epithelial ovarian cancer that underwent primary cytoreductive surgery at our institution from 2005 to 2016 were identified. Death was verified by the National Social Security Death Index. Patients who received at least one IV/IP cycle were analyzed in the IV/IP cohort. Kaplan-Meier and Cox proportional hazards models were performed. 96 patients with advanced stage optimally cytoreduced epithelial ovarian cancer (median follow up 33months) were identified. 51% and 49% of patients received IV/IP and IV chemotherapy, respectively. 27%, 22%, and 39% of patients were of white, black, and other race. Compared with IV chemotherapy only, IV/IP chemotherapy was associated with longer OS (log rank <0.002) and IV/IP chemotherapy versus IV chemotherapy alone was associated with a lower risk of death (HR=0.31, 95% CI 0.16-0.62, P<0.001). The median overall survival for the IV/IP and IV groups was 76months (95% CI 62 - not estimated) and 38months (95% CI 30-55), respectively. There was a trend toward higher risk of death for patients who completed fewer than 6cycles of IV/IP chemotherapy compared to women who completed 6 IV/IP cycles (HR=3.2, 95% CI 0.98-9.27 (P=0.05). No differences in patient or tumor characteristics were identified between these two groups of patients. In our racially diverse urban patients, 50% of patients received IV/IP chemotherapy and it was associated with improved overall survival compared to IV chemotherapy alone. Further investigation is needed to identify barriers to use of IV/IP chemotherapy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Meta-analysis of first-line therapies with maintenance regimens for advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in molecularly and clinically selected populations.

    PubMed

    Tan, Pui San; Bilger, Marcel; de Lima Lopes, Gilberto; Acharyya, Sanchalika; Haaland, Benjamin

    2017-08-01

    Evidence has suggested survival benefits of maintenance for advanced NSCLC patients not progressing after first-line chemotherapy. Additionally, particular first-line targeted therapies have shown survival improvements in selected populations. Optimal first-line and maintenance therapies remain unclear. Here, currently available evidence was synthesized to elucidate optimal first-line and maintenance therapy within patient groups. Literature was searched for randomized trials evaluating first-line and maintenance regimens in advanced NSCLC patients. Bayesian network meta-analysis was performed within molecularly and clinically selected groups. The primary outcome was combined clinically meaningful OS and PFS benefits. A total of 87 records on 56 trials evaluating first-line treatments with maintenance were included. Results showed combined clinically meaningful OS and PFS benefits with particular first-line with maintenance treatments, (1) first-line intercalated chemotherapy+erlotinib, maintenance erlotinib in patients with EGFR mutations, (2) first-line afatinib, maintenance afatinib in patients with EGFR deletion 19, (3) first-line chemotherapy + bevacizumab, maintenance bevacizumab in EGFR wild-type patients, (4) chemotherapy+conatumumab, maintenance conatumumab in patients with squamous histology, (5) chemotherapy+cetuximab, maintenance cetuximab or chemotherapy + necitumumab, maintenance necitumumab in EGFR FISH-positive patients with squamous histology, and (6) first-line chemotherapy+bevacizumab, maintenance bevacizumab or first-line sequential chemotherapy+gefitinib, maintenance gefitinib in patients clinically enriched for EGFR mutations with nonsquamous histology. No treatment showed combined clinically meaningful OS and PFS benefits in patients with EGFR L858R or nonsquamous histology. Particular first-line with maintenance treatments show meaningful OS and PFS benefits in patients selected by EGFR mutation or histology. Further research is needed

  18. Risk of Pathologic Upgrading or Locally Advanced Disease in Early Prostate Cancer Patients Based on Biopsy Gleason Score and PSA: A Population-Based Study of Modern Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Caster, Joseph M.; Falchook, Aaron D.; Hendrix, Laura H.; Chen, Ronald C.

    2015-06-01

    Purpose: Radiation oncologists rely on available clinical information (biopsy Gleason score and prostate-specific antigen [PSA]) to determine the optimal treatment regimen for each prostate cancer patient. Existing published nomograms correlating clinical to pathologic extent of disease were based on patients treated in the 1980s and 1990s at select academic institutions. We used the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database to examine pathologic outcomes (Gleason score and cancer stage) in early prostate cancer patients based on biopsy Gleason score and PSA concentration. Methods and Materials: This analysis included 25,858 patients whose cancer was diagnosed between 2010 and 2011, with biopsy Gleason scores of 6 to 7 and clinical stage T1 to T2 disease, who underwent radical prostatectomy. In subgroups based on biopsy Gleason score and PSA level, we report the proportion of patients with pathologically advanced disease (positive surgical margin or pT3-T4 disease) or whose Gleason score was upgraded. Logistic regression was used to examine factors associated with pathologic outcomes. Results: For patients with biopsy Gleason score 6 cancers, 84% of those with PSA <10 ng/mL had surgical T2 disease with negative margins; this decreased to 61% in patients with PSA of 20 to 29.9 ng/mL. Gleason score upgrading was seen in 43% (PSA: <10 ng/mL) to 61% (PSA: 20-29.9 ng/mL) of biopsy Gleason 6 patients. Patients with biopsy Gleason 7 cancers had a one-third (Gleason 3 + 4; PSA: <10 ng/mL) to two-thirds (Gleason 4 + 3; PSA: 20-29.9 ng/mL) probability of having pathologically advanced disease. Gleason score upgrading was seen in 11% to 19% of patients with biopsy Gleason 4 + 3 cancers. Multivariable analysis showed that higher PSA and older age were associated with Gleason score upgrading and pathologically advanced disease. Conclusions: This is the first population-based study to examine pathologic extent of disease and pathologic Gleason score

  19. The extent and position of homoeologous recombination in a distant hybrid of Alstroemeria: a molecular cytogenetic assessment of first generation backcross progenies.

    PubMed

    Kamstra, S A; Kuipers, A G; De Jeu, M J; Ramanna, M S; Jacobsen, E

    1999-04-01

    To estimate the extent and position of homoeologous recombination during meiosis in an interspecific hybrid between two distantly related Alstroemeria species, the chromosome constitution of six first generation backcross (BC1) plants was analysed using sequential fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) and genomic in situ hybridization (GISH) analysis. Four different probes were used for the FISH analysis: two species-specific and two rDNA probes. The six BC1 plants were obtained from crosses between the hybrid A. aurea x A. inodora with its parent A. inodora. GISH clearly identified all chromosomes of both parental genomes as well as recombinant chromosomes. The sequential GISH and FISH analysis enabled the accurate identification of all individual chromosomes in the BC1 plants, resulting in the construction of detailed karyotypes of the plants. The identification of the recombinant chromosomes provided evidence which chromosomes of the two species are homoeologous. Two of the BC1 plants were aneuploid (2n=2x+1=17) and four triploid (2n=3x=24), indicating that both n and 2n gametes were functional in the F1 hybrid. Using GISH, it was possible to estimate homeologous recombination in two different types of gametes in the F1 hyrid. The positions of the crossover points ranged from highly proximal to distal and the maximum number of crossover points per chromosome arm was three. Compared with the aneuploid plants, the triploid plants (which received 2n gametes) clearly possessed fewer crossovers per chromosome, indicating reduced chromosome pairing/recombination prior to the formation of the 2n gametes. Besides homeologous recombination, evidence was found for the presence of structural rearrangements (inversion and translocation) between the chromosomes of the parental species. The presence of the ancient translocation was confirmed through FISH analysis of mitotic and meiotic chromosomes.

  20. Advance and stagnation in the treatment of patients with lymphoma and myeloma: Analysis using population-based cancer registry data in Japan from 1993 to 2006.

    PubMed

    Chihara, Dai; Ito, Hidemi; Izutsu, Koji; Hattori, Masakazu; Nishino, Yoshikazu; Ioka, Akiko; Matsuda, Tomohiro; Ito, Yuri

    2015-09-01

    There have been significant advances in the treatment of patients with lymphoma and myeloma. Although the improvements in survival outcome have been clearly addressed by clinical trials, these studies includes patients who are otherwise healthy and would be eligible for trials that the actual improvement in survival in the general patient population over time is yet to be elucidated. Therefore, we reviewed the cancer-registry data of patients with lymphoma and myeloma in Japan from 1993 to 2006 and estimated relative survival (adjusted for competing causes of death in same-age members of the general population) according to three periods of diagnosis (1993-1997, 1998-2002 and 2003-2006). We also estimated conditional 5-year relative survival (5-year survival rate of patients who have survived 5 years). A total of 26,141 patients were reviewed and analyzed. Relative survival improved in Hodgkin lymphoma (HL, N = 853, +20% improvement), diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL, N = 4,919, +14% improvement) and follicular lymphoma (FL, N = 1,333, +13% improvement). In contrast, we found no significant improvement in survival since 1993 in peripheral T-cell lymphoma (PTCL, N = 667, +4% improvement), adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL, N = 2,166, -5% improvement) or multiple myeloma (MM, N = 4,914, -2% improvement). Conditional 5-year survival of HL, DLBCL, FL, PTCL, ATLL and MM was 88, 87, 79, 63, 53 and 45%, respectively. Relative survival of patients with HL, DLBCL and FL significantly improved from 1993 to 2006 in Japan; in contrast, no improvement was seen in other diseases, suggesting unmet need of novel treatment strategies. © 2015 UICC.

  1. Optimizing Training Population Size and Genotyping Strategy for Genomic Prediction Using Association Study Results and Pedigree Information. A Case of Study in Advanced Wheat Breeding Lines

    PubMed Central

    Jahoor, Ahmed; Orabi, Jihad; Andersen, Jeppe R.; Janss, Luc L.; Jensen, Just

    2017-01-01

    Wheat breeding programs generate a large amount of variation which cannot be completely explored because of limited phenotyping throughput. Genomic prediction (GP) has been proposed as a new tool which provides breeding values estimations without the need of phenotyping all the material produced but only a subset of it named training population (TP). However, genotyping of all the accessions under analysis is needed and, therefore, optimizing TP dimension and genotyping strategy is pivotal to implement GP in commercial breeding schemes. Here, we explored the optimum TP size and we integrated pedigree records and genome wide association studies (GWAS) results to optimize the genotyping strategy. A total of 988 advanced wheat breeding lines were genotyped with the Illumina 15K SNPs wheat chip and phenotyped across several years and locations for yield, lodging, and starch content. Cross-validation using the largest possible TP size and all the SNPs available after editing (~11k), yielded predictive abilities (rGP) ranging between 0.5–0.6. In order to explore the Training population size, rGP were computed using progressively smaller TP. These exercises showed that TP of around 700 lines were enough to yield the highest observed rGP. Moreover, rGP were calculated by randomly reducing the SNPs number. This showed that around 1K markers were enough to reach the highest observed rGP. GWAS was used to identify markers associated with the traits analyzed. A GWAS-based selection of SNPs resulted in increased rGP when compared with random selection and few hundreds SNPs were sufficient to obtain the highest observed rGP. For each of these scenarios, advantages of adding the pedigree information were shown. Our results indicate that moderate TP sizes were enough to yield high rGP and that pedigree information and GWAS results can be used to greatly optimize the genotyping strategy. PMID:28081208

  2. Association Between Serum Endogenous Secretory Receptor for Advanced Glycation End Products and Risk of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus with Combined Depression in the Chinese Population

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yulian; Wang, Tao; Liang, Jixing; Lin, Wei; Li, Liantao; Wen, Junping; Lin, Lixiang

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Objective The role of the endogenous secretory receptor for advanced glycation end products (esRAGE) in depression of diabetes patients and its clinical significance are unclear. This study investigated the role of serum esRAGE in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus with depression in the Chinese population. Patients and Methods One hundred nineteen hospitalized patients with type 2 diabetes were recruited at Fujian Provincial Hospital (Fuzhou, China) from February 2010 to January 2011. All selected subjects were assessed with the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HAMD). Among them, 71 patients with both type 2 diabetes and depression were included. All selected subjects were examined for the following: esRAGE concentration, glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c), blood lipids, C-reactive protein, trace of albumin in urine, and carotid artery intima-media thickness (IMT). Association between serum esRAGE levels and risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus with depression was also analyzed. Results There were statistically significant differences in gender, age, body mass index, waist circumference, and treatment methods between the group with depression and the group without depression (P<0.05). Multiple linear regression analysis showed that HAMD scores were negatively correlated with esRAGE levels (standard regression coefficient −0.270, P<0.01). HAMD-17 scores were positively correlated with IMT (standard regression coefficient 0.183, P<0.05) and with HbA1c (standard regression coefficient 0.314, P<0.01). Conclusions Female gender, younger age, obesity, poor glycemic control, complications, and insulin therapy are all risk factors of type 2 diabetes mellitus with combined depression in the Chinese population. Inflammation and atherosclerosis play an important role in the pathogenesis of depression. esRAGE is a protective factor of depression among patients who have type 2 diabetes. PMID:22856651

  3. 2245G/A polymorphism of the receptor for advanced glycation end-products (RAGE) gene is associated with diabetic retinopathy in the Malaysian population.

    PubMed

    Ng, Zhi Xiang; Kuppusamy, Umah Rani; Tajunisah, Iqbal; Fong, Kenneth Choong Sian; Koay, Adrian Choon Aun; Chua, Kek Heng

    2012-02-01

    The receptor for advanced glycation end-products (RAGE) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of diabetic microvascular complications. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between 2245G/A gene polymorphism of the RAGE gene and retinopathy in Malaysian type 2 diabetic patients. 342 unrelated type 2 diabetic patients (171 with retinopathy (DR), 171 without retinopathy (DNR)) and 235 unrelated healthy subjects from all over Malaysia were recruited for this study. Genomic DNA was isolated from 3 ml samples of whole blood using a modified conventional DNA extraction method. The genotype and allele frequencies of 2245G/A were studied using the polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) method. A statistically significant difference in 2245A minor allele frequency was found between control (5.5%) and DR groups (15.2%) (p<0.001, OR=3.06, 95% CI 1.87 to 5.02) as well as between DNR (8.2%) and DR (15.2%) groups (p<0.01, OR=2.01, 95% CI 1.24 to 3.27). However, when the frequency was compared between control and DNR groups, there was no significant difference (p>0.05). This is the first study that shows an association between the 2245A allele of the RAGE gene and development of diabetic retinopathy in the Malaysian population.

  4. Modern Treatments in Advanced Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: Temporal Trends and Effect on Survival. A French Population-Based Study.

    PubMed

    Carpentier, Olivier; Selvaggi, Lucia; Jégu, Jérémie; Purohit, Ashok; Prim, Nathalie; Velten, Michel; Quoix, Elisabeth

    2015-11-01

    Extrapolation of clinical trials results to the general population is always challenging. We analysed 1047 patients diagnosed with an advanced stage disease between 1998 and 2005 in a french administrative department and found a good spread of modern chemotherapy since 1998 and targeted therapy since 2002. Moreover, the outcomes in patients treated according to guidelines are very proximal from those obtained in clinical trials. Management of metastatic non-small-cell lung cancer has considerably evolved during the past 2 decades. In this study we aimed to assess how treatments have spread at a population-based level and their effect on survival. Medical records of patients diagnosed from 1998 to 2005 in the French department of Bas-Rhin were checked to collect data on patient characteristics and treatments received. Multivariate analysis of survival was performed using pretherapeutic and therapeutic factors including targeted therapies received as third-line treatment. We included 1047 patients with stage IIIB to IV non-small-cell lung cancer. The proportion of patients who underwent chemotherapy increased from 373/471 (79.2%) to 491/576 (85.2%) over the 1998 to 2001 and 2002 to 2005 periods, and there was an increased use of third-generation drugs associated with platin. Third-line treatment was gefitinib or erlotinib in 73/155 (47.1%) of the cases among patients diagnosed from 2002 to 2005. Compared with older agents, targeted therapy administered as third-line treatment was associated with a longer survival but there was no significant difference in survival with recent chemotherapy agents in multivariate analyses (hazard ratio, 0.773; 95% confidence interval, 0.445-1.343). Results of our study showed a good spread of modern chemotherapy and targeted therapy use at a population-based level. However, even if the general outcomes were improved along the years, the results observed in real clinical practice were slightly different from those reported in clinical

  5. Health check-ups and family screening allow detection of hereditary hemochromatosis with less advanced liver fibrosis and survival comparable with the general population.

    PubMed

    Aleman, Soo; Endalib, Sanam; Stål, Per; Lööf, Lars; Lindgren, Stefan; Sandberg-Gertzén, Hanna; Almer, Sven; Olsson, Sigvard; Danielsson, Ake; Wallerstedt, Sven; Hultcrantz, Rolf

    2011-09-01

    The information concerning the morbidity and mortality of hereditary hemochromatosis is based primarily on clinical cohorts of symptomatic patients. The major aim of this study was to analyze the long-term prognosis for Swedish patients with this condition, with respect to both clinical features and survival, in relation to the route by which the disease was detected. 373 patients with hemochromatosis detected through routine health check-ups (n = 153), family screening (n = 44), symptoms of arthralgia (n = 23), investigation of other diseases/symptoms (n = 108) or signs of liver disease (n = 45) were monitored for a mean period of 11.9 ± 5.8 years. The degree of liver fibrosis and survival were analyzed. Overall survival among these patients was not significantly different from that of a matched normal population. The patients diagnosed through health check-ups and family screening were detected at an earlier age and had the highest rate of survival. Liver biopsy at the time of diagnosis revealed cirrhosis in 9% of those detected through the health check-ups and 5% in the case of family screening, compared with 13% for the group with arthralgia, 17% for other diseases/symptoms and 42% for liver disease. Health check-ups and family screening allow detection of hereditary hemochromatosis at an earlier age and with less advanced liver fibrosis, although a few of these patients have already developed cirrhosis. Our study indicates that iron indices should be included in health check-ups, and if abnormal, should lead to further investigation.

  6. Advanced maternal age and the risk of Down syndrome characterized by the meiotic stage of the chromosomal error: A population-based study

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, P.W.; Khoury, M.J.; Freeman, S.B.

    1996-03-01

    The identification of DNA polymorphisms makes it possible to classify trisomy 21 according to the parental origin and stage (meiosis I [MI], meiosis II [MII], or postzygotic mitotic) of the chromosomal error. Studying the effect of parental age on these subgroups could shed light on parental exposures and their timing. From 1989 through 1993, 170 infants with trisomy 21 and 267 randomly selected control infants were ascertained in a population-based, case-control study in metropolitan Atlanta. Blood samples for genetic studies were obtained from case infants and their parents. Using logistic regression, we independently examined the association between maternal and paternal age and subgroups of trisomy 21 defined by parental origin and meiotic stage. The distribution of trisomy 21 by origin was 86% maternal (75% MI and 25% MII), 9% paternal (50% MI and 50% MII), and 5% mitotic. Compared with women <25 years of age, women {>=}40 years old had an odds ratio of 5.2 (95% confidence interval, 1.0-27.4) for maternal MI (MMI) errors and 51.4 (95% confidence interval, 2.3-999.0) for maternal MII (MMII) errors. Birth-prevalence rates for women {>=}40 years old were 4.2/1,000 births for MMI errors and 1.9/1,000 births for MMII errors. These results support an association between advanced maternal age and both MMI and MMII errors. The association with MI does not pinpoint the timing of the error; however, the association with MII implies that there is at least one maternal age-related mechanism acting around the time of conception. 16 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  7. Predictors of Surgery Types after Neoadjuvant Therapy for Advanced Stage Breast Cancer: Analysis from Florida Population-Based Cancer Registry (1996–2009)

    PubMed Central

    Al-Azhri, Jamila; Koru-Sengul, Tulay; Miao, Feng; Saclarides, Constantine; Byrne, Margaret M.; Avisar, Eli

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE Despite the established guidelines for breast cancer treatment, there is still variability in surgical treatment after neoadjuvant therapy (NT) for women with large breast tumors. Our objective was to identify predictors of the type of surgical treatment: mastectomy versus breast-conserving surgery (BCS) in women with T3/T4 breast cancer who received NT. METHODS Population-based Florida Cancer Data System Registry, Florida’s Agency for Health Care Administration, and US census from 1996 to 2009 were linked for women diagnosed with T3/T4 breast cancer and received NT followed by either BCS or mastectomy. Analysis of multiple variables, such as sociodemographic characteristics (race, ethnicity, socioeconomic status, age, marital status, and urban/rural residency), tumor’s characteristics (estrogen/progesterone receptor status, histology, grade, SEER stage, and regional nodes positivity), treatment facilities (hospital volume and teaching status), patients’ comorbidities, and type of NT, was performed. RESULTS Of 1,056 patients treated with NT for T3/T4 breast cancer, 107 (10%) had BCS and 949 (90%) had mastectomy. After adjusting with extensive covariables, Hispanic patients (adjusted odds ratio (aOR) = [3.50], 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.38–8.84, P = 0.008) were more likely to have mastectomy than BCS. Compared to localized SEER stage, regional stage with direct extension (aOR = [3.24], 95% CI: 1.60–6.54, P = 0.001), regional stage with direct extension and nodes (aOR = [4.35], 95% CI: 1.72–11.03, P = 0.002), and distant stage (aOR = [4.44], 95% CI: 1.81–10.88, P = 0.001) were significantly more likely to have mastectomy than BCS. Compared to patients who received both chemotherapy and hormonal therapy, patients who received hormonal NT only (aOR = [0.29], 95% CI: 0.12–0.68, P = 0.004) were less likely to receive mastectomy. CONCLUSION Our study suggests that Hispanic ethnicity, advanced SEER stage, and type of NT are significant

  8. Source population characteristics affect heterosis following genetic rescue of fragmented plant populations

    PubMed Central

    Pickup, M.; Field, D. L.; Rowell, D. M.; Young, A. G.

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the relative importance of heterosis and outbreeding depression over multiple generations is a key question in evolutionary biology and is essential for identifying appropriate genetic sources for population and ecosystem restoration. Here we use 2455 experimental crosses between 12 population pairs of the rare perennial plant Rutidosis leptorrhynchoides (Asteraceae) to investigate the multi-generational (F1, F2, F3) fitness outcomes of inter-population hybridization. We detected no evidence of outbreeding depression, with inter-population hybrids and backcrosses showing either similar fitness or significant heterosis for fitness components across the three generations. Variation in heterosis among population pairs was best explained by characteristics of the foreign source or home population, and was greatest when the source population was large, with high genetic diversity and low inbreeding, and the home population was small and inbred. Our results indicate that the primary consideration for maximizing progeny fitness following population augmentation or restoration is the use of seed from large, genetically diverse populations. PMID:23173202

  9. Study of the Contribution of Population Education to Educational Renewal and Innovation in El Salvador, The Republic of Korea, Philippines and Tunisia. Co-ordinated Action Programme for the Advancement of Population Education (CAPAPE).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization, Paris (France). Population Education Section.

    Presented are four national case studies carried out by the Population Education Section of the United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization (Unesco). Designed to assess the effects of population education programs on the educational process, these research projects focused on El Salvador, The Republic of Korea, Philippines,…

  10. Socio-Cultural Case Studies for Population Education in Morocco, Peru, Rwanda and the United Republic of Tanzania. Co-ordinated Action Programme for the Advancement of Population Education (CAPAPE).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization, Paris (France). Population Education Section.

    Developed to serve as a guide, this document contains four case studies which demonstrate the application of a conceptual and methodological reference model which promotes the use of socio-cultural research in national population education projects. Information obtained from these kinds of studies can be used in developing population education…

  11. Selection against hybrids in mixed populations of Brassica rapa and Brassica napus: model and synthesis.

    PubMed

    de Jong, Tom J; Hesse, Elze

    2012-06-01

    Pollen of the crop oilseed rape (Brassica napus, AACC) can cross-fertilize ovules of Brassica rapa (AA), which leads to an influx of unpaired C-chromosomes into wild B. rapa populations. The presence of such extra chromosomes is thought to be an indicator of introgression. Backcrosses and F(1) hybrids were found in Danish populations but, surprisingly, only F(1) hybrids were found in the UK and the Netherlands. Here, a model tests how the level of selection and biased vs unbiased transmission affect the population frequency of C-chromosomes. In the biased-transmission scenario the experimental results of the first backcross are extrapolated to estimate survival of gametes with different numbers of C-chromosomes from all crosses in the population. With biased transmission, the frequency of C-chromosomes always rapidly declines to zero. With unbiased transmission, the continued presence of plants with extra C-chromosomes depends on selection in the adult stage and we argue that this is the most realistic option for modeling populations. We suggest that selection in the field against plants with unpaired C-chromosomes is strong in Dutch and UK populations. The model highlights what we do not know and makes suggestions for further research on introgression.

  12. Advancing the Integration of Population Medicine into Medical Curricula at The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University: A New Master's Degree Program.

    PubMed

    Mello, Michael J; Feller, Edward; George, Paul; Borkan, Jeffrey

    2015-09-01

    Additional knowledge, attitudes and skills are required for the next generation of medical students as they expand the traditional focus on individual patients to include population-based health and scholarly investigation. The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University (AMS) is initiating a master's degree program as a key component of the new Primary Care-Population Medicine program at AMS leading to both a Doctorate in Medicine (MD) and Master of Science in Population Medicine (ScM) degrees in four years. The ScM is composed of a series of nine courses, integrated into the four-year MD curriculum, as well as a thesis. Additional attention will be given to leadership and quality improvement training. The goal is to produce graduates competent in the care of individual patients, panels, communities, and populations.

  13. Genetic variation and differentiation in parent-descendant cattle and bison populations.

    PubMed

    Cronin, M A; Leesburg, V L R

    2016-11-01

    Genetic variation and differentiation at 32 microsatellite loci was quantified for parent-descendant cattle populations and parent-descendant bison () populations. We compared heterozygosity () and allelic richness () for 587 cattle of four breeds and three lines derived from them, and 188 bison in three pairs of parent-descendant populations. and were less in the Line 1 Hereford inbred cattle population than in the parent Hereford breed. and were intermediate in a composite population (CGC, derived from crossing Red Angus, Charolais, and Tarentaise) compared to the three parent breeds. Crossbreeding of Line 1 with CGC resulted in an F generation with increased and relative to Line 1 and CGC, followed by decreased and in 2 backcross generations to Line1. Three transplanted wild bison populations had smaller and than their respective parent populations. These data demonstrate that genetic variation reduced from founder effects or inbreeding can be restored with crossbreeding and gene flow.

  14. An investigation into trends in Advanced Placement test taking in science and mathematics among student sub-populations using a longitudinal growth model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, D. Michael

    The lack of preparation, participation, and equal access of students in mathematics and the science education continues to afflict America's high school system (Ratliff, 2001). Additionally, gender and ethnic status have become significant factors as females and minority subgroups such as African Americans and Hispanics continue to be underrepresented in these two subject fields. Recognizing and understanding these trends is extremely important for the future of this country. As fewer minorities and females become involved in advanced mathematics and science curriculum there will be a continued lack of minorities and females in mathematics and science careers. Additionally, this insufficient representation leads to fewer numbers of females and minorities in industry and educational leadership positions in mathematics and science to promote participation and equality in these fields. According to Brainard and Carlin (2003) as trends currently stand, these two groups will be under-represented in the fields of math and science and will continue to be denied economic and social power. Thus, a better understanding of these trends in participation in mathematics and science among these groups of students is warranted. This study is intended to accomplish four objectives. The first objective is to identify the extent to which opportunities are increasing or decreasing for students in high schools taking mathematics and science Advanced Placement exams by examining six years of student testing data from the College Board. A second objective is to identify features of high schools that relate to greater expansion in Advanced Placement test taking for females and minority groups in the areas of both math and science. A third objective is to explore whether, and to what extent, any social or educational features such as economic status, regional school and living locations, and ethnic backgrounds have enhanced or reduced Advanced Placement testing in these schools. Lastly

  15. Increasing use of radical prostatectomy for locally advanced prostate cancer in the USA and Germany: a comparative population-based study.

    PubMed

    Hager, B; Kraywinkel, K; Keck, B; Katalinic, A; Meyer, M; Zeissig, S R; Scheufele, R; Wirth, M P; Huber, J

    2017-03-01

    Current guidelines do not recommend a preferred treatment modality for locally advanced prostate cancer. The aim of the study was to compare treatment patterns found in the USA and Germany and to analyze possible trends over time. We compared 'Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results' (SEER) data (USA) with reports from four German federal epidemiological cancer registries (Eastern Germany, Bavaria, Rhineland-Palatinate, Schleswig-Holstein), both from 2004 to 2012. We defined locally advanced prostate cancer as clinical stage T3 or T4. Exclusion criteria were metastatic disease and age over 79 years. We identified 9127 (USA) and 11 051 (Germany) patients with locally advanced prostate cancer. The share was 2.1% in the USA compared with 6.0% in Germany (P<0.001). In the United States, the utilization of radiotherapy (RT) and radical prostatectomy (RP) was comparably high with 42.0% (RT) and 42.8% (RP). In Germany, the major treatment option was RP with 36.7% followed by RT with 22.1%. During the study period, the use of RP increased in both countries (USA P=0.001 and Germany P=0.003), whereas RT numbers declined (USA P=0.003 and Germany P=0.002). The share of adjuvant RT (aRT) was similar in both countries (USA 21.7% vs Germany 20.7%). We found distinctive differences in treating locally advanced prostate cancer between USA and Germany, but similar trends over time. In the last decade, a growing number of patients underwent RP as a possible first step within a multimodal concept.

  16. Preliminary results of CO2 laser-assisted sclerectomy surgery (CLASS) in the treatment of advanced glaucoma in a Chinese population

    PubMed Central

    Yick, Doris W.F.; Lee, Jacky W.Y.; Tsang, Susanna; Yeung, Barry Y.M.; Yuen, Can Y.F.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To evaluate the efficacy and safety of CO2 laser-assisted sclerectomy surgery (CLASS) in Chinese patients with advanced glaucoma. Patients with advanced glaucoma who were candidates for glaucoma filtration surgery were included. The intraocular pressure (IOP) and number of antiglaucoma medications were documented before surgery and at all postoperative clinic visits. All intra- and postoperative complications were documented. The primary outcome measures were the changes in IOP and medication use before and after the procedure as well as complications from the procedure. The secondary outcome measure included the CLASS success rate. Twenty patients (23 eyes) underwent CLASS between November 2014 and September 2015. Nineteen eyes had primary open-angle glaucoma, 2 eyes had primary angle-closure glaucoma, and 2 eyes had uveitic glaucoma. One patient was lost to follow-up. The mean age of subjects was 68.1 ± 11.9 years. IOP was significantly reduced at 1 day and 1 week after CLASS. At 6 months, the IOP and number of medications were significantly reduced by 19.0% and 38.2%, respectively (both P < 0.0001). One patient had intraoperative trabeculo-Descemet membrane perforation. Two patients required laser goniopuncture and 2 required needling between 3 and 6 months postoperatively. The overall success rate was 81.8% at 6 months. CLASS achieved a modest IOP reduction in the early postoperative period and was overall a safe procedure for advanced glaucoma. PMID:27828849

  17. Preliminary results of CO2 laser-assisted sclerectomy surgery (CLASS) in the treatment of advanced glaucoma in a Chinese population.

    PubMed

    Yick, Doris W F; Lee, Jacky W Y; Tsang, Susanna; Yeung, Barry Y M; Yuen, Can Y F

    2016-11-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and safety of CO2 laser-assisted sclerectomy surgery (CLASS) in Chinese patients with advanced glaucoma.Patients with advanced glaucoma who were candidates for glaucoma filtration surgery were included. The intraocular pressure (IOP) and number of antiglaucoma medications were documented before surgery and at all postoperative clinic visits. All intra- and postoperative complications were documented. The primary outcome measures were the changes in IOP and medication use before and after the procedure as well as complications from the procedure. The secondary outcome measure included the CLASS success rate.Twenty patients (23 eyes) underwent CLASS between November 2014 and September 2015. Nineteen eyes had primary open-angle glaucoma, 2 eyes had primary angle-closure glaucoma, and 2 eyes had uveitic glaucoma. One patient was lost to follow-up. The mean age of subjects was 68.1 ± 11.9 years. IOP was significantly reduced at 1 day and 1 week after CLASS. At 6 months, the IOP and number of medications were significantly reduced by 19.0% and 38.2%, respectively (both P < 0.0001). One patient had intraoperative trabeculo-Descemet membrane perforation. Two patients required laser goniopuncture and 2 required needling between 3 and 6 months postoperatively. The overall success rate was 81.8% at 6 months.CLASS achieved a modest IOP reduction in the early postoperative period and was overall a safe procedure for advanced glaucoma.

  18. DIETARY RECONSTRUCTION OF AN EARLY TO MIDDLE HOLOCENE HUMAN POPULATION FROM THE CENTRAL CALIFORNIA COAST: INSIGHTS FROM ADVANCED STABLE ISOTOPE MIXING MODELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The inherent sampling and preservational biases of the archaeological record make it difficult
    to quantify prehistoric human diets, especially in coastal settings, where populations had access to a wide range of marine and terrestrial food sources. In certain cases, geochemica...

  19. An Appropriate Population for Acute Inpatient Rehabilitation? A Case Series of Three Patients With Advanced Heart Failure on Continuous Inotropic Support.

    PubMed

    McCormick, Zachary L; Chu, Samuel K; Goodman, Daniel; Oswald, Matthew; Reger, Christopher; Sliwa, James

    2015-06-01

    The number of individuals with heart failure and the treatment modalities available to manage heart failure are increasing. Continuous inotropic support is a treatment modality used in cases of severe heart failure. Although most patients initiated on continuous inotropic support are discharged home, those with greater functional compromise, comorbid conditions that cause disability, or other significant medical complexity may be referred to acute inpatient rehabilitation. The feasibility and benefits of acute inpatient rehabilitation in this population, however, has yet to be investigated. We report the functional progress and medical complications of 3 patients on continuous inotropic support who participated in acute inpatient rehabilitation. The patients demonstrated varying levels of success, highlighting a need for evidence-based, preadmission screening criteria for this population. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Genetic consequences of many generations of hybridization between divergent copepod populations.

    PubMed

    Edmands, S; Feaman, H V; Harrison, J S; Timmerman, C C

    2005-01-01

    Crosses between populations of the copepod Tigriopus californicus typically result in outbreeding depression. In this study, replicate hybrid populations were initiated with first generation backcross hybrids between two genetically distinct populations from California: Royal Palms (RP) and San Diego (SD). Reciprocal F(1) were backcrossed to SD, resulting in expected starting frequencies of 25% RP/75% SD nuclear genes on either a pure RP cytoplasmic or a pure SD cytoplasmic background. After 1 year of hybridization (up to 15 generations), seven microsatellite loci were scored in two replicates on each cytoplasmic background. Frequencies of the rarer RP alleles increased significantly in all four replicates, regardless of cytoplasmic source, producing a mean hybridity of 0.97 (maximum = 1), instead of the expected 0.50. Explicit tests for heterozygote excess across loci and replicates showed significant deviations. Only the two physically linked markers showed linkage disequilibrium in all replicates. Subsequent fitness assays in parental populations and early generation hybrids revealed lower fitness in RP than SD, and significant F(2) breakdown. Computer simulations showed that selection must be invoked to explain the shift in allele frequencies. Together, these results suggest that hybrid inferiority in early generations gave way to hybrid superiority in later generations.

  1. Lenalidomide, melphalan and dexamethasone in a population of patients with immunoglobulin light chain amyloidosis with high rates of advanced cardiac involvement.

    PubMed

    Dinner, Shira; Witteles, Wesley; Afghahi, Anosheh; Witteles, Ronald; Arai, Sally; Lafayette, Richard; Schrier, Stanley L; Liedtke, Michaela

    2013-10-01

    Immunoglobulin light chain amyloidosis remains incurable despite recent therapeutic advances, and is particularly difficult to treat in patients with amyloid cardiomyopathy. Based on evidence of activity in multiple myeloma, we designed a pilot study of an oral regimen of lenalidomide in combination with dexamethasone and low-dose melphalan in order to evaluate its safety and efficacy in patients with amyloidosis, including those with advanced cardiac involvement. Twenty-five patients were enrolled. Ninety-two percent of patients had cardiac involvement by amyloidosis, and 36% of patients met the criteria for Mayo Clinic cardiac stage III disease. Patients received up to nine cycles of treatment, consisting of lenalidomide 10 mg/day orally on days 1 - 21 (28-day cycle); melphalan 0.18 mg/kg orally on days 1-4; and dexamethasone 40 mg orally on days 1, 8, 15, and 22. High rates (33%) of cardiac arrhythmias and low rates of treatment completion (12.5%) were observed. Ten patients died during the study, all within the first several months of treatment due to acute cardiac events. The overall hematologic response rate was 58%, however organ responses were seen in only 8% of patients. The overall survival rate at 1 year was 58%. While we confirmed the hematologic response rates observed with similar regimens, front-line treatment with melphalan, lenalidomide and dexamethasone was toxic, ineffective, and did not alter survival outcomes for patients with high-risk cardiac disease. Our data highlight the importance of developing novel treatment approaches for amyloid cardiomyopathy. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov (NCT00890552).

  2. Genome-wide SNP discovery and QTL mapping for fruit quality traits in inbred backcross lines (IBLs) of solanum pimpinellifolium using genotyping by sequencing.

    PubMed

    Celik, Ibrahim; Gurbuz, Nergiz; Uncu, Ali Tevfik; Frary, Anne; Doganlar, Sami

    2017-01-03

    Solanum pimpinellifolium has high breeding potential for fruit quality traits and has been used as a donor in tomato breeding programs. Unlocking the genetic potential of S. pimpinellifolium requires high-throughput polymorphism identification protocols for QTL mapping and introgression of favourable alleles into cultivated tomato by both positive and background selection. In this study we identified SNP loci using a genotyping by sequencing (GBS) approach in an IBL mapping population derived from the cross between a high yielding fresh market tomato and S. pimpinellifolium (LA1589) as the recurrent and donor parents, respectively. A total of 120,983,088 reads were generated by the Illumina HiSeq next-generation sequencing platform. From these reads 448,539 sequence tags were generated. A majority of the sequence tags (84.4%) were uniquely aligned to the tomato genome. A total of 3.125 unique SNP loci were identified as a result of tag alignment to the genome assembly and were used in QTL analysis of 11 fruit quality traits. As a result, 37 QTLs were identified. S. pimpinellifolium contributed favourable alleles for 16 QTLs (43.2%), thus confirming the high breeding potential of this wild species. The present work introduced a set of SNPs at sufficiently high density for QTL mapping in populations derived from S. pimpinellifolium (LA1589). Moreover, this study demonstrated the high efficiency of the GBS approach for SNP identification, genotyping and QTL mapping in an interspecific tomato population.

  3. Population Pharmacokinetics of Selumetinib and Its Metabolite N-desmethyl-selumetinib in Adult Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors and Children With Low-Grade Gliomas.

    PubMed

    Patel, Y T; Daryani, V M; Patel, P; Zhou, D; Fangusaro, J; Carlile, D J; Martin, P D; Aarons, L; Stewart, C F

    2017-03-22

    Selumetinib (AZD6244, ARRY-142886), a mitogen activated protein kinases (MEK1 and 2) inhibitor, has been granted orphan drug designation for differentiated thyroid cancer. The primary aim of this analysis was to characterize the population pharmacokinetics of selumetinib and its active metabolite N-desmethyl-selumetinib in patients with cancer. Concentration-time data from adult and pediatric clinical trials were pooled to develop a population pharmacokinetic model using a sequential approach where selumetinib and N-desmethyl-selumetinib data were modeled separately. A sequential zero- and first-order absorption with lag time with a two-compartment model for selumetinib and a two-compartment model for N-desmethyl-selumetinib best described the concentration-time data. Intrapatient variability in absorption was higher than interpatient variability. The apparent drug clearance (CL/F) from the central compartment was 13.5 L/hr (RSE 4.9%). Significant covariates for CL/F were age, alanine aminotransferase, and body surface area. This study confirms that flat dosing is appropriate in adults, whereas body-surface area based dosing should be used in pediatric patients.

  4. Sexuality in patients with advanced cancer: a prospective study in a population admitted to an acute pain relief and palliative care unit.

    PubMed

    Vitrano, Valentina; Catania, Viviana; Mercadante, Sebastiano

    2011-05-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize sexuality attitudes and feelings in a larger sample of patients with advanced cancer in comparison with their previous status before diagnosis. Of the 100 patients randomized, 65 patients answered to all the questions included in the questionnaire. Of these 65, 25 patients were male and 40 were female, with a mean Karnofsky of 58 (range 40-70) and a mean well-being sensation of 5.67 (range 2-10). In all, 60% of patients did not feel to be less attractive after disease, 30% of patients a little, and only 10% very much. Most patients (86.4%) considered important to talk about sexuality and to face such an issue with skilled people. About half of the patients (47%) reported that sexuality was very important for psychological well-being. Only 7.6% of patients had a good sexual intercourse, 15.2% had a light activity, 39.4% had an insufficient activity, and 37.8% did not have any activity. A significant relationship was observed with age (0.002), Karfnosky status (P = .024), and well-being (P = .004). Only 12.1% of patients had a good sexual satisfaction, 12.1% experienced a mild satisfaction, 30.3% had insufficient satisfaction, and 45.5% had no sexual satisfaction. The difference was significant (P < .001). A significant relationship was observed with age (.047), Karfnosky status (P = .001), and well-being (P = .009). Only 3% of patients had a good frequency, 7.6% had a mild frequency, 37.9% had a limited frequency, and 51.5% had no sexual intercourses (P = .01). Emotional aspects maintained a relevant role in sexuality, as in 50% of patients these aspects were very important and for 12.1% important. Despite sexual activities decreased after the development of cancer, most patients considered important to talk about sexuality and to face such an issue with some experienced operators. Moreover, some patients were still able to maintain a sufficient sexual activity, in terms of quality and quantity. The emotional aspects had a

  5. Properties of the H II Region Populations of M51 and NGC 4449 from Hα Images with the Advanced Camera for Surveys on the Hubble Space Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutiérrez, Leonel; Beckman, John E.; Buenrostro, Valeria

    2011-04-01

    We have used images from the Advanced Camera for Surveys on the Hubble Space Telescope in Hα, and in the neighboring continuum, to produce flux-calibrated images of the large spiral galaxy M51 and the dwarf irregular NGC 4449. From these images, we have derived the absolute luminosities in Hα, the areas, and the positions with respect to the galactic centers as reference points of over 2600 H II regions in M51 and over 270 H II regions in NGC 4449. Using this database, we have derived luminosity-volume (L-V) relations for the regions in the two galaxies, showing that within the error limits these obey the equation L ~ V 2/3, which differs from the linear relation expected for regions of constant uniform electron density. We briefly discuss possible models which would give rise to this behavior—notably models with strong density inhomogeneities within the regions. Plotting the luminosity functions for the two galaxies, we find a break in the slope for M51 at log(L) = 38.5 dex (units in erg s-1) for M51 in good agreement with the previous ground-based study by Rand, and above this luminosity NGC 4449 also shows a sharp decline in its luminosity function, although the number of regions is too small to plot the function well at higher luminosities. The cumulative diameter distribution for the H II regions of M51 shows dual behavior, with a break at a radius close to 100 pc, the radius of regions with the break luminosity. Here too we indicate possible physical implications.

  6. A randomized double-blind study of the effect of distant healing in a population with advanced AIDS. Report of a small scale study.

    PubMed Central

    Sicher, F; Targ, E; Moore, D; Smith, H S

    1998-01-01

    Various forms of distant healing (DH), including prayer and "psychic healing," are widely practiced, but insufficient formal research has been done to indicate whether such efforts actually affect health. We report on a double-blind randomized trial of DH in 40 patients with advanced AIDS. Subjects were pair-matched for age, CD4+ count, and number of AIDS-defining illnesses and randomly selected to either 10 weeks of DH treatment or a control group. DH treatment was performed by self-identified healers representing many different healing and spiritual traditions. Healers were located throughout the United States during the study, and subjects and healers never met. Subjects were assessed by psychometric testing and blood draw at enrollment and followed for 6 months. At 6 months, a blind medical chart review found that treatment subjects acquired significantly fewer new AIDS-defining illnesses (0.1 versus 0.6 per patient, P = 0.04), had lower illness severity (severity score 0.8 versus 2.65, P = 0.03), and required significantly fewer doctor visits (9.2 versus 13.0, P = 0.01), fewer hospitalizations (0.15 versus 0.6, P = 0.04), and fewer days of hospitalization (0.5 versus 3.4, P = 0.04). Treated subjects also showed significantly improved mood compared with controls (Profile of Mood States score -26 versus 14, P = 0.02). There were no significant differences in CD4+ counts. These data support the possibility of a DH effect in AIDS and suggest the value of further research. PMID:9866433

  7. Hybridization in natural sympatric populations of Dermacentor ticks in northwestern North America

    PubMed Central

    Araya-Anchetta, A; Scoles, G A; Giles, J; Busch, J D; Wagner, D M

    2013-01-01

    Hybridization in ticks has been described in a handful of species and mostly as a result of laboratory experiments. We used 148 AFLP loci to describe putative hybridization events between D. andersoni and D. variabilis in sympatric populations from northwestern North America. Recently, D. variabilis has expanded its range westward into the natural range of D. andersoni. Using a sample of 235 D. andersoni and 62 D. variabilis, we identified 31 individuals as putative hybrids: four F2 individuals and 27 backcrosses to D. andersoni (as defined by NewHybrids). We found no evidence of hybrids backcrossing into D. variabilis. Furthermore, all hybrids presented 16S mtDNA signatures characteristic of D. andersoni, which indicates the directionality of the hybrid crosses: female D. andersoni × male D. variabilis. We also discovered 13 species-specific AFLP fragments for D. andersoni. These loci were found to have a decreased occurrence in the putative hybrids and were absent altogether in D. variabilis samples. AFLP profiles were also used to determine the levels of genetic population structure and gene flow among nine populations of D. andersoni and three of D. variabilis. Genetic structure exists in both species (D. andersoni, ΦST = 0.110; D. variabilis, ΦST = 0.304) as well as significant estimates of isolation by distance (D. andersoni, ρ = 0.066, P = 0.001; D. variabilis, ρ = 0.729, P = 0.001). PMID:23531531

  8. Current advance methods for the identification of blast resistance genes in rice.

    PubMed

    Tanweer, Fatah A; Rafii, Mohd Y; Sijam, Kamaruzaman; Rahim, Harun A; Ahmed, Fahim; Latif, Mohammad A

    2015-05-01

    Rice blast caused by Magnaporthe oryzae is one of the most devastating diseases of rice around the world and crop losses due to blast are considerably high. Many blast resistant rice varieties have been developed by classical plant breeding and adopted by farmers in various rice-growing countries. However, the variability in the pathogenicity of the blast fungus according to environment made blast disease a major concern for farmers, which remains a threat to the rice industry. With the utilization of molecular techniques, plant breeders have improved rice production systems and minimized yield losses. In this article, we have summarized the current advanced molecular techniques used for controlling blast disease. With the advent of new technologies like marker-assisted selection, molecular mapping, map-based cloning, marker-assisted backcrossing and allele mining, breeders have identified more than 100 Pi loci and 350 QTL in rice genome responsible for blast disease. These Pi genes and QTLs can be introgressed into a blast-susceptible cultivar through marker-assisted backcross breeding. These molecular techniques provide timesaving, environment friendly and labour-cost-saving ways to control blast disease. The knowledge of host-plant interactions in the frame of blast disease will lead to develop resistant varieties in the future.

  9. An Interspecific Backcross of Lycopersicon Esculentum X L. Hirsutum: Linkage Analysis and a Qtl Study of Sexual Compatibility Factors and Floral Traits

    PubMed Central

    Bernacchi, D.; Tanksley, S. D.

    1997-01-01

    A BC(1) population of the self-compatible tomato Lycopersicon esculentum and its wild self-incompatible relative L. hirsutum f. typicum was used for restriction fragment length polymorphism linkage analysis and quantitative trait loci (QTL) mapping of reproductive behavior and floral traits. The self-incompatibility locus, S, on chromosome 1 harbored the only QTL for self-incompatibility indicating that the transition to self-compatibility in the lineage leading to the cultivated tomato was primarily the result of mutations at the S locus. Moreover, the major QTL controlling unilateral incongruity also mapped to the S locus, supporting the hypothesis that self-incompatibility and unilateral incongruity are not independent mechanisms. The mating behavior of near-isogenic lines carrying the L. hirsutum allele for the S locus on chromosome 1 in an otherwise L. esculentum background support these conclusions. The S locus region of chromosome 1 also harbors most major QTL for several floral traits important to pollination biology (e.g., number and size of flowers), suggesting a gene complex controlling both genetic and morphological mechanisms of reproduction control. Similar associations in other flowering plants suggest that such complex may have been conserved since early periods of plant evolution or else reflect a convergent evolutionary process. PMID:9335620

  10. The shift toward neo-adjuvant chemotherapy and interval debulking surgery for management of advanced ovarian and related cancers in a population-based setting: Impact on clinical outcomes.

    PubMed

    Nicklin, James L; McGrath, Shaun; Tripcony, Lee; Garrett, Andrea; Land, Russell; Tang, Amy; Perrin, Lewis; Chetty, Naven; Jagasia, Nisha; Crandon, Alex J; Nascimento, Marcelo; Walker, Graeme; Sanday, Karen; Obermair, Andreas

    2017-07-18

    The aim of this study was to determine the proportion of patients with advanced ovarian and related cancers (EOC+RC), treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy and interval debulking surgery (NACT - IDS), and to determine if there was any relationship with optimal cytoreduction rates and overall survival (OS) in a state-wide gynaecologic oncology service over time. A retrospective review was undertaken using a population-based database of patients with stages 3 and 4 EOC+RC treated from 1982 till 2013 at the Queensland Centre for Gynaecological Cancer (QCGC). The proportion of patients treated with NACT - IDS compared with primary debulking surgery (PDS) was determined and compared with debulking rates and with the moving five-year OS probability. From 1982-2013, 2601 patients with advanced EOC+RC were managed at QCGC. No patients received NACT - IDS till 1995 when the first two patients received this treatment, rising to 55% of patients in 2013. Surgical cytoreduction rates to no macroscopic residual (R0) were achieved 32% of the time by 2006, rising to 48% in 2009, and 62% in 2013. Despite the increase in utilisation of NACT - IDS, our unit has noted a continued rise in the OS probability at five years to 45%. The increasing utilisation of NACT - IDS in the setting of a large centralised clinical service has been associated with increasing rates of optimal cytoreduction and survival rates have continued to rise in excess of those achieved in the trials reported to date. © 2017 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists.

  11. Hybridization following population collapse in a critically endangered antelope.

    PubMed

    Vaz Pinto, Pedro; Beja, Pedro; Ferrand, Nuno; Godinho, Raquel

    2016-01-06

    Population declines may promote interspecific hybridization due to the shortage of conspecific mates (Hubb's 'desperation' hypothesis), thus greatly increasing the risk of species extinction. Yet, confirming this process in the wild has proved elusive. Here we combine camera-trapping and molecular surveys over seven years to document demographic processes associated with introgressive hybridization between the critically endangered giant sable antelope (Hippotragus niger variani), and the naturally sympatric roan antelope (H. equinus). Hybrids with intermediate phenotypes, including backcrosses with roan, were confirmed in one of the two remnant giant sable populations. Hybridization followed population depletion of both species due to severe wartime poaching. In the absence of mature sable males, a mixed herd of sable females and hybrids formed and grew progressively over time. To prevent further hybridization and recover this small population, all sable females were confined to a large enclosure, to which sables from the other remnant population were translocated. Given the large scale declines in many animal populations, hybridization and introgression associated with the scarcity of conspecific mates may be an increasing cause of biodiversity conservation concern. In these circumstances, the early detection of hybrids should be a priority in the conservation management of small populations.

  12. Hybridization following population collapse in a critically endangered antelope

    PubMed Central

    Vaz Pinto, Pedro; Beja, Pedro; Ferrand, Nuno; Godinho, Raquel

    2016-01-01

    Population declines may promote interspecific hybridization due to the shortage of conspecific mates (Hubb’s ‘desperation’ hypothesis), thus greatly increasing the risk of species extinction. Yet, confirming this process in the wild has proved elusive. Here we combine camera-trapping and molecular surveys over seven years to document demographic processes associated with introgressive hybridization between the critically endangered giant sable antelope (Hippotragus niger variani), and the naturally sympatric roan antelope (H. equinus). Hybrids with intermediate phenotypes, including backcrosses with roan, were confirmed in one of the two remnant giant sable populations. Hybridization followed population depletion of both species due to severe wartime poaching. In the absence of mature sable males, a mixed herd of sable females and hybrids formed and grew progressively over time. To prevent further hybridization and recover this small population, all sable females were confined to a large enclosure, to which sables from the other remnant population were translocated. Given the large scale declines in many animal populations, hybridization and introgression associated with the scarcity of conspecific mates may be an increasing cause of biodiversity conservation concern. In these circumstances, the early detection of hybrids should be a priority in the conservation management of small populations. PMID:26732144

  13. Knowledge, Attitudes, and Preferences of Advance Decisions, End-of-Life Care, and Place of Care and Death in Hong Kong. A Population-Based Telephone Survey of 1067 Adults.

    PubMed

    Chung, Roger Yat-Nork; Wong, Eliza Lai-Yi; Kiang, Nicole; Chau, Patsy Yuen-Kwan; Lau, Janice Y C; Wong, Samuel Yeung-Shan; Yeoh, Eng-Kiong; Woo, Jean W

    2017-04-01

    According to the 2015 Quality of Death Index published by the Intelligence Unit of the Economist, Hong Kong is ranked 22nd in terms of quality of palliative care in the world, behind many other major developed countries in Asia, including Taiwan, Singapore, Japan, and South Korea. The objectives of the present study were to describe the knowledge, attitude, and preferences of the general Hong Kong adult population across different age groups regarding end-of-life (EOL) care decisions, place of care and death, as well as advance directive (AD). This was a population-based cross-sectional survey conducted by telephone. A total of 1067 adults over 30 years old were contacted through residential telephone lines using a random sampling method and were interviewed. Information on sociodemographic factors, general health status, chronic diseases, knowledge, attitude and preferences of advance decisions, EOL care, and place of death were collected. A total of 85.7% had not heard of AD, but 60.9% would prefer to make their own AD if legislated after explanation; and for those who did not prefer to have an AD, the predominant concern was the possible change of mind afterward. Adjusted logistic regression suggested that female participants were less willing to make an AD, whereas those with prior knowledge of do-not-attempt-cardiopulmonary-resuscitation significantly increased the chance of making an AD. In terms of life-sustaining treatments, a predominant 87.6% preferred to receive appropriate palliative care that gives comfort rather than to prolong life if being diagnosed to be terminally ill; 43% disagreed that doctors should generally try to keep patients alive for as long as possible; and 86.2% agreed that the patient's own wishes should determine what treatment he/she should receive. Adjusted logistic regression showed that palliative care was more preferred by age groups 50 years or above but was less preferred by those who did not care for their family members

  14. Advanced Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coles, Mike; Nelms, Rick

    1996-01-01

    Describes a study that explores the depth and breadth of scientific facts, principles, and procedures which are required in the Advanced General National Vocational Qualifications (GNVQ) science through comparison with GCE Advanced level. The final report takes account of the updated 1996 version of GNVQ science. (DDR)

  15. Genetic dissection of seed storability using two different populations with a same parent rice cultivar N22

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Qiuyun; Wang, Wenyan; Ren, Yakun; Jiang, Yimei; Sun, Ailing; Qian, Ying; Zhang, Yifei; He, Niqing; Hang, Ngo Thi; Liu, Zhou; Li, Linfang; Liu, Linglong; Jiang, Ling; Wan, Jianmin

    2015-01-01

    Seed storability in rice (Oryza sativa L.) is an important agronomic trait. Two segregating populations with N22 (indica) as a common parent, viz. a set of 122 backcross-inbred lines (BILs) derived from the backcross Nanjing35 (japonica)/N22//Nanjing35 and another population comprising 189 recombinant inbred lines (RILs) from the cross of USSR5 (japonica) and N22, were studied to detect quantitative trait loci (QTL) controlling seed storability. Germination percentage (GP) was used to evaluate seed storability after aging treated under three different conditions, viz. natural, artificial and combined aging treatments. A total of seven QTLs were identified on chromosomes 1, 2, 5, 6 and 9. Among them, a major QTL, qSSn-9, was common in the two populations. In contrast, four QTLs (qSSnj-2-1, qSSn-2-2, qSSn-5 and qSSn-6) were detected in BILs and the QTL qSSn-1 was identified in RILs, which was a new QTL for seed storability. The N22-derived alleles increased the seed storability at all the loci except qSSnj-2-1. We also investigated the effect of QTLs using five selected lines with high storability from BILs and verified qSSn-5 with a near-isogenic line (NIL). These results provide an opportunity for pyramiding or map-based cloning major QTLs for seed storability in rice. PMID:26719744

  16. Fine-Mapping the Wheat Snn1 Locus Conferring Sensitivity to the Parastagonospora nodorum Necrotrophic Effector SnTox1 Using an Eight Founder Multiparent Advanced Generation Inter-Cross Population.

    PubMed

    Cockram, James; Scuderi, Alice; Barber, Toby; Furuki, Eiko; Gardner, Keith A; Gosman, Nick; Kowalczyk, Radoslaw; Phan, Huyen P; Rose, Gemma A; Tan, Kar-Chun; Oliver, Richard P; Mackay, Ian J

    2015-09-28

    The necrotrophic fungus Parastagonospora nodorum is an important pathogen of one of the world's most economically important cereal crops, wheat (Triticum aestivum L.). P. nodorum produces necrotrophic protein effectors that mediate host cell death, providing nutrients for continuation of the infection process. The recent discovery of pathogen effectors has revolutionized disease resistance breeding for necrotrophic diseases in crop species, allowing often complex genetic resistance mechanisms to be broken down into constituent parts. To date, three effectors have been identified in P. nodorum. Here we use the effector, SnTox1, to screen 642 progeny from an eight-parent multiparent advanced generation inter-cross (i.e., MAGIC) population, genotyped with a 90,000-feature single-nucleotide polymorphism array. The MAGIC founders showed a range of sensitivity to SnTox1, with transgressive segregation evident in the progeny. SnTox1 sensitivity showed high heritability, with quantitative trait locus analyses fine-mapping the Snn1 locus to the short arm of chromosome 1B. In addition, a previously undescribed SnTox1 sensitivity locus was identified on the long arm of chromosome 5A, termed here QSnn.niab-5A.1. The peak single-nucleotide polymorphism for the Snn1 locus was converted to the KASP genotyping platform, providing breeders and researchers a simple and cheap diagnostic marker for allelic state at Snn1.

  17. Fine-Mapping the Wheat Snn1 Locus Conferring Sensitivity to the Parastagonospora nodorum Necrotrophic Effector SnTox1 Using an Eight Founder Multiparent Advanced Generation Inter-Cross Population

    PubMed Central

    Cockram, James; Scuderi, Alice; Barber, Toby; Furuki, Eiko; Gardner, Keith A.; Gosman, Nick; Kowalczyk, Radoslaw; Phan, Huyen P.; Rose, Gemma A.; Tan, Kar-Chun; Oliver, Richard P.; Mackay, Ian J.

    2015-01-01

    The necrotrophic fungus Parastagonospora nodorum is an important pathogen of one of the world’s most economically important cereal crops, wheat (Triticum aestivum L.). P. nodorum produces necrotrophic protein effectors that mediate host cell death, providing nutrients for continuation of the infection process. The recent discovery of pathogen effectors has revolutionized disease resistance breeding for necrotrophic diseases in crop species, allowing often complex genetic resistance mechanisms to be broken down into constituent parts. To date, three effectors have been identified in P. nodorum. Here we use the effector, SnTox1, to screen 642 progeny from an eight-parent multiparent advanced generation inter-cross (i.e., MAGIC) population, genotyped with a 90,000-feature single-nucleotide polymorphism array. The MAGIC founders showed a range of sensitivity to SnTox1, with transgressive segregation evident in the progeny. SnTox1 sensitivity showed high heritability, with quantitative trait locus analyses fine-mapping the Snn1 locus to the short arm of chromosome 1B. In addition, a previously undescribed SnTox1 sensitivity locus was identified on the long arm of chromosome 5A, termed here QSnn.niab-5A.1. The peak single-nucleotide polymorphism for the Snn1 locus was converted to the KASP genotyping platform, providing breeders and researchers a simple and cheap diagnostic marker for allelic state at Snn1. PMID:26416667

  18. Advanced Microsensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    This video looks at a spinoff application of the technology from advanced microsensors -- those that monitor and determine conditions of spacecraft like the Space Shuttle. The application featured is concerned with the monitoring of the health of premature babies.

  19. Advanced Microsensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    This video looks at a spinoff application of the technology from advanced microsensors -- those that monitor and determine conditions of spacecraft like the Space Shuttle. The application featured is concerned with the monitoring of the health of premature babies.

  20. After accounting for competing causes of death and more advanced stage, do Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples with cancer still have worse survival? A population-based cohort study in New South Wales.

    PubMed

    Tervonen, Hanna E; Walton, Richard; You, Hui; Baker, Deborah; Roder, David; Currow, David; Aranda, Sanchia

    2017-06-02

    Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples in Australia have been found to have poorer cancer survival than non-Aboriginal people. However, use of conventional relative survival analyses is limited due to a lack of life tables. This cohort study examined whether poorer survival persist after accounting for competing risks of death from other causes and disparities in cancer stage at diagnosis, for all cancers collectively and by cancer site. People diagnosed in 2000-2008 were extracted from the population-based New South Wales Cancer Registry. Aboriginal status was multiply imputed for people with missing information (12.9%). Logistic regression models were used to compute odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for 'advanced stage' at diagnosis (separately for distant and distant/regional stage). Survival was examined using competing risk regression to compute subhazard ratios (SHRs) with 95%CIs. Of the 301,356 cases, 2517 (0.84%) identified as Aboriginal (0.94% after imputation). After adjusting for age, sex, year of diagnosis, socio-economic status, remoteness, and cancer site Aboriginal peoples were more likely to be diagnosed with distant (OR 1.30, 95%CI 1.17-1.44) or distant/regional stage (OR 1.29, 95%CI 1.18-1.40) for all cancers collectively. This applied to cancers of the female breast, uterus, prostate, kidney, others (those not included in other categories) and cervix (when analyses were restricted to cases with known stages/known Aboriginal status). Aboriginal peoples had a higher hazard of death than non-Aboriginal people after accounting for competing risks from other causes of death, socio-demographic factors, stage and cancer site (SHR 1.40, 95%CI 1.31-1.50 for all cancers collectively). Consistent results applied to colorectal, lung, breast, prostate and other cancers. Aboriginal peoples with cancer have an elevated hazard of cancer death compared with non-Aboriginal people, after accounting for more advanced stage and competing

  1. Advanced Beamformers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-09-01

    Advanced Beamformers Stergios Stergiopoulos Defence R&D Canada Technical Report DRDC Toronto TR 2008-101 September 2008 Defence Research and...Development Canada Recherche et développement pour la défense Canada DEFENCE DÉFENSE & Advanced beamformers Stergios Stergiopoulos... beamformers ; and provide suggestions of how modern technology can be applied to the development of current and next generation ultrasound systems and

  2. Homoeologous chromosome pairing in the distant hybrid Alstroemeria aurea x A. inodora and the genome composition of its backcross derivatives determined by fluorescence in situ hybridization with species-specific probes.

    PubMed

    Kamstra, S A; Ramanna, M S; de Jeu, M J; Kuipers, A G; Jacobsen, E

    1999-01-01

    A distant hybrid between two diploid species (2n = 2x = 16), Alstroemeria aurea and A. inodora, was investigated for homoeologous chromosome pairing, crossability with A. inodora and chromosome transmission to its BC1 offspring. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with two species-specific probes, A001-I (A. aurea specific) and D32-13 (A. inodora specific), was used to analyse chromosome pairing in the hybrid and the genome constitution of its BC1 progeny plants. High frequencies of associated chromosomes were observed in both genotypes of the F1 hybrid, A1P2-2 and A1P4. In the former, both univalents and bivalents were found at metaphase I, whereas the latter plant also showed tri- and quadrivalents. Based on the hybridization sites of DNA probes on the chromosomes of both parental species, it was established that hybrid A1P4 contains a reciprocal translocation between the short arm of chromosome 1 and the long arm of chromosome 8 of A. inodora. Despite regular homoeologous chromosome pairing in 30% of the pollen mother cells, both hybrids were highly sterile. They were backcrossed reciprocally with one of the parental species, A. inodora. Two days after pollination, embryo rescue was applied and, eventually, six BC1 progeny plants were obtained. Among these, two were aneuploids (2n = 2x + 1 = 17) and four were triploids (2n = 3x = 24). The aneuploid plants had originated when the interspecific hybrid was used as a female parent, indicating that n eggs were functional in the hybrid. In addition, 2n gametes were also functional in the hybrid, resulting in the four triploid BC1 plants. Of these four plants, three had received 2n pollen grains from the hybrid and one a 2n egg. Using FISH, homoeologous crossing over between the chromosomes of the two parental species in the hybrid was clearly detected in all BC1 plants. The relevance of these results for the process of introgression and the origin of n and 2n gametes are discussed.

  3. Effects of population outcrossing on rotifer fitness

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Outcrossing between populations can exert either positive or negative effects on offspring fitness. Cyclically parthenogenetic rotifers, like other continental zooplankters, show high genetic differentiation despite their high potential for passive dispersal. Within this context, the effects of outcrossing may be relevant in modulating gene flow between populations through selection for or against interpopulation hybrids. Nevertheless, these effects remain practically unexplored in rotifers. Here, the consequences of outcrossing on the rotifer Brachionus plicatilis were investigated. Cross-mating experiments were performed between a reference population and three alternative populations that differed in their genetic distance with regard to the former. Two offspring generations were obtained: F1 and BC ('backcross'). Fitness of the outcrossed offspring was compared with fitness of the offspring of the reference population for both generations and for three different between-population combinations. Four fitness components were measured throughout the rotifer life cycle: the diapausing egg-hatching proportion, clone viability (for the clones originating from diapausing eggs), initial net growth rate R for each viable clone, and the proportion of male-producing clones. Additionally, both the parental fertilisation proportion and a compound fitness measure, integrating the complete life cycle, were estimated. Results In the F1 generation, hybrid vigour was detected for the diapausing egg-hatching proportion, while R was lower in the outcrossed offspring than in the offspring of the reference population. Despite these contrasting results, hybrid vigour was globally observed for the compound measure of fitness. Moreover, there was evidence that this vigour could increase with the genetic differentiation of the outcrossed populations. In the BC generation, the hybrid vigour detected for the egg-hatching proportion in the F1 generation reverted to outbreeding

  4. Advancement Flaps.

    PubMed

    Kruter, Laura; Rohrer, Thomas

    2015-10-01

    Advancement flaps are random-pattern flaps frequently used in the reconstruction of surgical defects on the face after the removal of skin cancer. Proper design and meticulous execution is crucial in achieving reproducible esthetic results. To review the design and execution of advancement flaps in facial reconstruction. A review of the literature on the use of advancement flaps in facial reconstruction was performed and curated with the authors' experience. Many factors come into play when using local flaps to reconstruct surgical defects on the face. Close attention must be given to the tissue surrounding the surgical defect and any free margin in the area. Designing the flap closure lines along cosmetic unit junctions and or relaxed skin tension lines, preserving both the form and function of the surrounding structures, and using excellent surgical techniques during the closure will all together help in providing reproducibly outstanding results.

  5. Recent advances in childhood vitiligo.

    PubMed

    Silverberg, Nanette B

    2014-01-01

    Vitiligo is an autoimmune depigmentation disorder that is estimated to affect about .5% of the worldwide population. Half of all cases begin in childhood. A variety of advances occurred in the past two decades that have enhanced the management of childhood vitiligo. This contribution reviews recent advances in vitiligo, including a better understanding of the pathogenesis and autoimmune comorbidities, description of the psychological comorbidities, a broader range of therapeutic options.

  6. Advancing Reflectrometry

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-05-21

    transmissions, was first demonstrated using Global Navigation Satellite System ( GNSS ) reflections. Recently, reflectometry has been extended to digital... GNSS +R workshop provided an opportunity for engineers and Earth scientists to assess the state of the art, demonstrate new applications, and discuss...18 Eos, Vol. 94, No. 21, 21 May 2013 MEETING -.~ Advancing Reflectometry Workshop on Renectometry Using GNSS and Other Signals of Opportunity

  7. Technological Advancements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennedy, Mike

    2010-01-01

    The influx of technology has brought significant improvements to school facilities. Many of those advancements can be found in classrooms, but when students head down the hall to use the washrooms, they are likely to find a host of technological innovations that have improved conditions in that part of the building. This article describes modern…

  8. Research Advances

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Angela G.

    2004-01-01

    Research advances, a new feature in Journal of Chemical Engineering that brings information about innovations in current areas of research to high school and college science faculty with an intent to provide educators with timely descriptions of latest progress in research that can be integrated into existing courses to update course content and…

  9. Technological Advancements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennedy, Mike

    2010-01-01

    The influx of technology has brought significant improvements to school facilities. Many of those advancements can be found in classrooms, but when students head down the hall to use the washrooms, they are likely to find a host of technological innovations that have improved conditions in that part of the building. This article describes modern…

  10. Advanced Concept

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1997-01-02

    The Advanced Space Transportation Group takes the future of space travel far into the 21st Century. Pictured is an artist's concept of a third generation Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV). Projected for the year 2025, this third generation RLV will introduce an era of space travel not unlike air travel today.

  11. Assessing advance directives in the homebound elderly.

    PubMed

    Golden, Adam G; Corvea, Martha H; Dang, Stuti; Llorente, Maria; Silverman, Michael A

    2009-01-01

    We studied the prevalence of specific barriers that prevent indigent homebound older adults from obtaining advance directives and tested the effectiveness of clinical reminders for lowering the number of clients without advance directives. Case managers interviewed 1569 clients to determine whether they had an advance directive. All 530 clients without advance directives were contacted 3 months later to determine if advance directives had been obtained. Clients who still did not have advance directives were asked to list 1 or more reasons they did not have advance directives. About 57.8% of the barriers identified may reflect reluctance on the part of clients to address their own mortality. Reminders by the case managers were ineffective at lowering the number of homebound older adults without advance directives. Further studies are needed to identify and design strategies for convincing this population of homebound elderly to establish advance directives.

  12. Molecular Population Genetics.

    PubMed

    Casillas, Sònia; Barbadilla, Antonio

    2017-03-01

    Molecular population genetics aims to explain genetic variation and molecular evolution from population genetics principles. The field was born 50 years ago with the first measures of genetic variation in allozyme loci, continued with the nucleotide sequencing era, and is currently in the era of population genomics. During this period, molecular population genetics has been revolutionized by progress in data acquisition and theoretical developments. The conceptual elegance of the neutral theory of molecular evolution or the footprint carved by natural selection on the patterns of genetic variation are two examples of the vast number of inspiring findings of population genetics research. Since the inception of the field, Drosophila has been the prominent model species: molecular variation in populations was first described in Drosophila and most of the population genetics hypotheses were tested in Drosophila species. In this review, we describe the main concepts, methods, and landmarks of molecular population genetics, using the Drosophila model as a reference. We describe the different genetic data sets made available by advances in molecular technologies, and the theoretical developments fostered by these data. Finally, we review the results and new insights provided by the population genomics approach, and conclude by enumerating challenges and new lines of inquiry posed by increasingly large population scale sequence data. Copyright © 2017 Casillas and Barbadilla.

  13. Molecular Population Genetics

    PubMed Central

    Casillas, Sònia; Barbadilla, Antonio

    2017-01-01

    Molecular population genetics aims to explain genetic variation and molecular evolution from population genetics principles. The field was born 50 years ago with the first measures of genetic variation in allozyme loci, continued with the nucleotide sequencing era, and is currently in the era of population genomics. During this period, molecular population genetics has been revolutionized by progress in data acquisition and theoretical developments. The conceptual elegance of the neutral theory of molecular evolution or the footprint carved by natural selection on the patterns of genetic variation are two examples of the vast number of inspiring findings of population genetics research. Since the inception of the field, Drosophila has been the prominent model species: molecular variation in populations was first described in Drosophila and most of the population genetics hypotheses were tested in Drosophila species. In this review, we describe the main concepts, methods, and landmarks of molecular population genetics, using the Drosophila model as a reference. We describe the different genetic data sets made available by advances in molecular technologies, and the theoretical developments fostered by these data. Finally, we review the results and new insights provided by the population genomics approach, and conclude by enumerating challenges and new lines of inquiry posed by increasingly large population scale sequence data. PMID:28270526

  14. Collaborative effects of bystander-initiated cardiopulmonary resuscitation and prehospital advanced cardiac life support by physicians on survival of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest: a nationwide population-based observational study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction There are inconsistent data about the effectiveness of prehospital physician-staffed advanced cardiac life support (ACLS) on the outcomes of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). Furthermore, the relative importance of bystander-initiated cardiopulmonary resuscitation (BCPR) and ACLS and the effectiveness of their combination have not been clearly demonstrated. Methods Using a prospective, nationwide, population-based registry of all OHCA patients in Japan, we enrolled 95,072 patients whose arrests were witnessed by bystanders and 23,127 patients witnessed by emergency medical service providers between 2005 and 2007. We divided the bystander-witnessed arrest patients into Group A (ACLS by emergency life-saving technicians without BCPR), Group B (ACLS by emergency life-saving technicians with BCPR), Group C (ACLS by physicians without BCPR) and Group D (ACLS by physicians with BCPR). The outcome data included 1-month survival and neurological outcomes determined by the cerebral performance category. Results Among the 95,072 bystander-witnessed arrest patients, 7,722 (8.1%) were alive at 1 month, including 2,754 (2.9%) with good performance and 3,171 (3.3%) with vegetative status or worse. BCPR occurred in 42% of bystander-witnessed arrests. In comparison with Group A, the rates of good-performance survival were significantly higher in Group B (odds ratio (OR), 2.23; 95% confidence interval, 2.05 to 2.42; P < 0.01) and Group D (OR, 2.80; 95% confidence interval, 2.28 to 3.43; P < 0.01), while no significant difference was seen for Group C (OR, 1.18; 95% confidence interval, 0.86 to 1.61; P = 0.32). The occurrence of vegetative status or worse at 1 month was highest in Group C (OR, 1.92; 95% confidence interval, 1.55 to 2.37; P < 0.01). Conclusions In this registry-based study, BCPR significantly improved the survival of OHCA with good cerebral outcome. The groups with BCPR and ACLS by physicians had the best outcomes. However, receiving ACLS by

  15. Collaborative effects of bystander-initiated cardiopulmonary resuscitation and prehospital advanced cardiac life support by physicians on survival of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest: a nationwide population-based observational study.

    PubMed

    Yasunaga, Hideo; Horiguchi, Hiromasa; Tanabe, Seizan; Akahane, Manabu; Ogawa, Toshio; Koike, Soichi; Imamura, Tomoaki

    2010-01-01

    There are inconsistent data about the effectiveness of prehospital physician-staffed advanced cardiac life support (ACLS) on the outcomes of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). Furthermore, the relative importance of bystander-initiated cardiopulmonary resuscitation (BCPR) and ACLS and the effectiveness of their combination have not been clearly demonstrated. Using a prospective, nationwide, population-based registry of all OHCA patients in Japan, we enrolled 95,072 patients whose arrests were witnessed by bystanders and 23,127 patients witnessed by emergency medical service providers between 2005 and 2007. We divided the bystander-witnessed arrest patients into Group A (ACLS by emergency life-saving technicians without BCPR), Group B (ACLS by emergency life-saving technicians with BCPR), Group C (ACLS by physicians without BCPR) and Group D (ACLS by physicians with BCPR). The outcome data included 1-month survival and neurological outcomes determined by the cerebral performance category. Among the 95,072 bystander-witnessed arrest patients, 7,722 (8.1%) were alive at 1 month, including 2,754 (2.9%) with good performance and 3,171 (3.3%) with vegetative status or worse. BCPR occurred in 42% of bystander-witnessed arrests. In comparison with Group A, the rates of good-performance survival were significantly higher in Group B (odds ratio (OR), 2.23; 95% confidence interval, 2.05 to 2.42; P < 0.01) and Group D (OR, 2.80; 95% confidence interval, 2.28 to 3.43; P < 0.01), while no significant difference was seen for Group C (OR, 1.18; 95% confidence interval, 0.86 to 1.61; P = 0.32). The occurrence of vegetative status or worse at 1 month was highest in Group C (OR, 1.92; 95% confidence interval, 1.55 to 2.37; P < 0.01). In this registry-based study, BCPR significantly improved the survival of OHCA with good cerebral outcome. The groups with BCPR and ACLS by physicians had the best outcomes. However, receiving ACLS by physicians without preceding BCPR significantly

  16. Survival of Coelaenomenodera lameensis (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) in Relation to the Physical Characteristics of Different Oil Palm (Elaeis sp.) Breeding Populations.

    PubMed

    Beaudoin-Ollivier, L; Flori, A; Coffi, A; Cros, D; Glitho, I; Nodichao, L

    2015-01-01

    The edibility of different Elaeis sp. breeding populations present in Benin was tested for the leaf miner Coelaenomenodera lameensis Berti (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae), a major oil palm pest in Africa. Experiments carried out in sleeves revealed the oviposition capacities of females and the mortality rates for the different developmental stages by comparing the populations found on two breeding populations of Elaeis oleifera (HBK) Cortes, four of Elaeis guineensis Jacquin and four (E. guineensis × E. oleifera) × E. guineensis backcrosses. Females laid their eggs similarly on all breeding populations, with a preference for the E. guineensis La Mé origin. The average hatching rate reached 80% for the La Mé origin as opposed to 28% for the Deli origin. The mortality rates for the larval instars were greater on E. oleifera, on certain backcrosses and on the Deli origin of E. guineensis. Development at the second- and third- larval instars was the most affected, with a mortality rate of three to five times greater than that seen on La Mé. Epidermis and cuticle measurements indicated which breeding populations were suitable or unsuitable for the development of C. lameensis. E. guineensis, with its thin epidermis (12 µm) and cuticle (2 µm), proved to be highly susceptible to C. lameensis attacks. On the other hand, E. oleifera, which is very resistant, exhibited a thicker epidermis (17 µm) and cuticle (4 µm). The breeding populations were thus classified according to the positive or negative influence they exerted on the insect's egg laying and feeding. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Entomological Society of America.

  17. Advanced Combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, Gordon R.

    2013-03-11

    The activity reported in this presentation is to provide the mechanical and physical property information needed to allow rational design, development and/or choice of alloys, manufacturing approaches, and environmental exposure and component life models to enable oxy-fuel combustion boilers to operate at Ultra-Supercritical (up to 650{degrees}C & between 22-30 MPa) and/or Advanced Ultra-Supercritical conditions (760{degrees}C & 35 MPa).

  18. Reduction of multiple pregnancies in the advanced maternal age population after implementation of an elective single embryo transfer policy coupled with enhanced embryo selection: pre- and post-intervention study.

    PubMed

    Ubaldi, Filippo Maria; Capalbo, Antonio; Colamaria, Silvia; Ferrero, Susanna; Maggiulli, Roberta; Vajta, Gábor; Sapienza, Fabio; Cimadomo, Danilo; Giuliani, Maddalena; Gravotta, Enrica; Vaiarelli, Alberto; Rienzi, Laura

    2015-09-01

    Is an elective single-embryo transfer (eSET) policy an efficient approach for women aged >35 years when embryo selection is enhanced via blastocyst culture and preimplantation genetic screening (PGS)? Elective SET coupled with enhanced embryo selection using PGS in women older than 35 years reduced the multiple pregnancy rates while maintaining the cumulative success rate of the IVF programme. Multiple pregnancies mean an increased risk of premature birth and perinatal death and occur mainly in older patients when multiple embryos are transferred to increase the chance of pregnancy. A SET policy is usually recommended in cases of good prognosis patients, but no general consensus has been reached for SET application in the advanced maternal age (AMA) population, defined as women older than 35 years. Our objective was to evaluate the results in terms of efficacy, efficiency and safety of an eSET policy coupled with increased application of blastocyst culture and PGS for this population of patients in our IVF programme. In January 2013, a multidisciplinary intervention involving optimization of embryo selection procedure and introduction of an eSET policy in an AMA population of women was implemented. This is a retrospective 4-year (January 2010-December 2013) pre- and post-intervention analysis, including 1161 and 499 patients in the pre- and post-intervention period, respectively. The primary outcome measures were the cumulative delivery rate (DR) per oocyte retrieval cycle and multiple DR. Surplus oocytes and/or embryos were vitrified during the entire study period. In the post-intervention period, all couples with good quality embryos and less than two previous implantation failures were offered eSET. Embryo selection was enhanced by blastocyst culture and PGS (blastocyst stage biopsy and 24-chromosomal screening). Elective SET was also applied in cryopreservation cycles. Patient and cycle characteristics were similar in the pre- and post-intervention groups [mean

  19. Advances in genetics. Volume 23

    SciTech Connect

    Caspari, E.W.; Scandalios, J.G.

    1985-01-01

    This book presents articles on genetics and the advances made in this field. Topics covered include the following: recovery, repair, and mutagenesis in Schizosaccharomyces pombe; gene transfer in fungi; Y chromosome function and spermatogenesis in Drosophila hydei; recent developments in population genetics; and genetics, cytology and evolution of Gossypium.

  20. Population and the World Bank.

    PubMed

    Sankaran, S

    1973-12-01

    The World Bank Group regards excessive population growth as the single greatest obstacle to economic and social advance in the underdeveloped world. Since 1969 the Bank and the International Development Agency have provided countries with technical assistance through education, fact-finding, and analysis and given 65.7 million dollars for population projects. These projects, in India, Indonesia, Iran, Jamaica, and Malaysia provide training centers, population education, research, and evaluation as well as actual construction of clinics and mobile units. Because population planning touches sensitive areas of religion, caste, race, morality, and politics, the involved nation's political commitment to plan population growth is critical to the success of any program.

  1. Advanced LIGO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LIGO Scientific Collaboration; Aasi, J.; Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T.; Abernathy, M. R.; Ackley, K.; Adams, C.; Adams, T.; Addesso, P.; Adhikari, R. X.; Adya, V.; Affeldt, C.; Aggarwal, N.; Aguiar, O. D.; Ain, A.; Ajith, P.; Alemic, A.; Allen, B.; Amariutei, D.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arai, K.; Araya, M. C.; Arceneaux, C.; Areeda, J. S.; Ashton, G.; Ast, S.; Aston, S. M.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Aylott, B. E.; Babak, S.; Baker, P. T.; Ballmer, S. W.; Barayoga, J. C.; Barbet, M.; Barclay, S.; Barish, B. C.; Barker, D.; Barr, B.; Barsotti, L.; Bartlett, J.; Barton, M. A.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Batch, J. C.; Baune, C.; Behnke, B.; Bell, A. S.; Bell, C.; Benacquista, M.; Bergman, J.; Bergmann, G.; Berry, C. P. L.; Betzwieser, J.; Bhagwat, S.; Bhandare, R.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Birch, J.; Biscans, S.; Biwer, C.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blackburn, L.; Blair, C. D.; Blair, D.; Bock, O.; Bodiya, T. P.; Bojtos, P.; Bond, C.; Bork, R.; Born, M.; Bose, Sukanta; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Brau, J. E.; Bridges, D. O.; Brinkmann, M.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, D. A.; Brown, D. D.; Brown, N. M.; Buchman, S.; Buikema, A.; Buonanno, A.; Cadonati, L.; Calderón Bustillo, J.; Camp, J. B.; Cannon, K. C.; Cao, J.; Capano, C. D.; Caride, S.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglià, M.; Cepeda, C.; Chakraborty, R.; Chalermsongsak, T.; Chamberlin, S. J.; Chao, S.; Charlton, P.; Chen, Y.; Cho, H. S.; Cho, M.; Chow, J. H.; Christensen, N.; Chu, Q.; Chung, S.; Ciani, G.; Clara, F.; Clark, J. A.; Collette, C.; Cominsky, L.; Constancio, M., Jr.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T. R.; Cornish, N.; Corsi, A.; Costa, C. A.; Coughlin, M. W.; Countryman, S.; Couvares, P.; Coward, D. M.; Cowart, M. J.; Coyne, D. C.; Coyne, R.; Craig, K.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Creighton, T. D.; Cripe, J.; Crowder, S. G.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, L.; Cutler, C.; Dahl, K.; Dal Canton, T.; Damjanic, M.; Danilishin, S. L.; Danzmann, K.; Dartez, L.; Dave, I.; Daveloza, H.; Davies, G. S.; Daw, E. J.; DeBra, D.; Del Pozzo, W.; Denker, T.; Dent, T.; Dergachev, V.; DeRosa, R. T.; DeSalvo, R.; Dhurandhar, S.; D´ıaz, M.; Di Palma, I.; Dojcinoski, G.; Dominguez, E.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doravari, S.; Douglas, R.; Downes, T. P.; Driggers, J. C.; Du, Z.; Dwyer, S.; Eberle, T.; Edo, T.; Edwards, M.; Edwards, M.; Effler, A.; Eggenstein, H.-B.; Ehrens, P.; Eichholz, J.; Eikenberry, S. S.; Essick, R.; Etzel, T.; Evans, M.; Evans, T.; Factourovich, M.; Fairhurst, S.; Fan, X.; Fang, Q.; Farr, B.; Farr, W. M.; Favata, M.; Fays, M.; Fehrmann, H.; Fejer, M. M.; Feldbaum, D.; Ferreira, E. C.; Fisher, R. P.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Fricke, T. T.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fuentes-Tapia, S.; Fulda, P.; Fyffe, M.; Gair, J. R.; Gaonkar, S.; Gehrels, N.; Gergely, L. Á.; Giaime, J. A.; Giardina, K. D.; Gleason, J.; Goetz, E.; Goetz, R.; Gondan, L.; González, G.; Gordon, N.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Gossan, S.; Goßler, S.; Gräf, C.; Graff, P. B.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.; Greenhalgh, R. J. S.; Gretarsson, A. M.; Grote, H.; Grunewald, S.; Guido, C. J.; Guo, X.; Gushwa, K.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Hacker, J.; Hall, E. D.; Hammond, G.; Hanke, M.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hannam, M. D.; Hanson, J.; Hardwick, T.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Hart, M.; Hartman, M. T.; Haster, C.-J.; Haughian, K.; Hee, S.; Heintze, M.; Heinzel, G.; Hendry, M.; Heng, I. S.; Heptonstall, A. W.; Heurs, M.; Hewitson, M.; Hild, S.; Hoak, D.; Hodge, K. A.; Hollitt, S. E.; Holt, K.; Hopkins, P.; Hosken, D. J.; Hough, J.; Houston, E.; Howell, E. J.; Hu, Y. M.; Huerta, E.; Hughey, B.; Husa, S.; Huttner, S. H.; Huynh, M.; Huynh-Dinh, T.; Idrisy, A.; Indik, N.; Ingram, D. R.; Inta, R.; Islas, G.; Isler, J. C.; Isogai, T.; Iyer, B. R.; Izumi, K.; Jacobson, M.; Jang, H.; Jawahar, S.; Ji, Y.; Jiménez-Forteza, F.; Johnson, W. W.; Jones, D. I.; Jones, R.; Ju, L.; Haris, K.; Kalogera, V.; Kandhasamy, S.; Kang, G.; Kanner, J. B.; Katsavounidis, E.; Katzman, W.; Kaufer, H.; Kaufer, S.; Kaur, T.; Kawabe, K.; Kawazoe, F.; Keiser, G. M.; Keitel, D.; Kelley, D. B.; Kells, W.; Keppel, D. G.; Key, J. S.; Khalaidovski, A.; Khalili, F. Y.; Khazanov, E. A.; Kim, C.; Kim, K.; Kim, N. G.; Kim, N.; Kim, Y.-M.; King, E. J.; King, P. J.; Kinzel, D. L.; Kissel, J. S.; Klimenko, S.; Kline, J.; Koehlenbeck, S.; Kokeyama, K.; Kondrashov, V.; Korobko, M.; Korth, W. Z.; Kozak, D. B.; Kringel, V.; Krishnan, B.; Krueger, C.; Kuehn, G.; Kumar, A.; Kumar, P.; Kuo, L.; Landry, M.; Lantz, B.; Larson, S.; Lasky, P. D.; Lazzarini, A.; Lazzaro, C.; Le, J.; Leaci, P.; Leavey, S.; Lebigot, E. O.; Lee, C. H.; Lee, H. K.; Lee, H. M.; Leong, J. R.; Levin, Y.; Levine, B.; Lewis, J.; Li, T. G. F.; Libbrecht, K.; Libson, A.; Lin, A. C.; Littenberg, T. B.; Lockerbie, N. A.; Lockett, V.; Logue, J.; Lombardi, A. L.; Lormand, M.; Lough, J.; Lubinski, M. J.; Lück, H.; Lundgren, A. P.; Lynch, R.; Ma, Y.; Macarthur, J.; MacDonald, T.; Machenschalk, B.; MacInnis, M.; Macleod, D. M.; Magaña-Sandoval, F.; Magee, R.; Mageswaran, M.; Maglione, C.; Mailand, K.; Mandel, I.; Mandic, V.; Mangano, V.; Mansell, G. L.; Márka, S.; Márka, Z.; Markosyan, A.; Maros, E.; Martin, I. W.; Martin, R. M.; Martynov, D.; Marx, J. N.; Mason, K.; Massinger, T. J.; Matichard, F.; Matone, L.; Mavalvala, N.; Mazumder, N.; Mazzolo, G.; McCarthy, R.; McClelland, D. E.; McCormick, S.; McGuire, S. C.; McIntyre, G.; McIver, J.; McLin, K.; McWilliams, S.; Meadors, G. D.; Meinders, M.; Melatos, A.; Mendell, G.; Mercer, R. A.; Meshkov, S.; Messenger, C.; Meyers, P. M.; Miao, H.; Middleton, H.; Mikhailov, E. E.; Miller, A.; Miller, J.; Millhouse, M.; Ming, J.; Mirshekari, S.; Mishra, C.; Mitra, S.; Mitrofanov, V. P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Mittleman, R.; Moe, B.; Mohanty, S. D.; Mohapatra, S. R. P.; Moore, B.; Moraru, D.; Moreno, G.; Morriss, S. R.; Mossavi, K.; Mow-Lowry, C. M.; Mueller, C. L.; Mueller, G.; Mukherjee, S.; Mullavey, A.; Munch, J.; Murphy, D.; Murray, P. G.; Mytidis, A.; Nash, T.; Nayak, R. K.; Necula, V.; Nedkova, K.; Newton, G.; Nguyen, T.; Nielsen, A. B.; Nissanke, S.; Nitz, A. H.; Nolting, D.; Normandin, M. E. N.; Nuttall, L. K.; Ochsner, E.; O'Dell, J.; Oelker, E.; Ogin, G. H.; Oh, J. J.; Oh, S. H.; Ohme, F.; Oppermann, P.; Oram, R.; O'Reilly, B.; Ortega, W.; O'Shaughnessy, R.; Osthelder, C.; Ott, C. D.; Ottaway, D. J.; Ottens, R. S.; Overmier, H.; Owen, B. J.; Padilla, C.; Pai, A.; Pai, S.; Palashov, O.; Pal-Singh, A.; Pan, H.; Pankow, C.; Pannarale, F.; Pant, B. C.; Papa, M. A.; Paris, H.; Patrick, Z.; Pedraza, M.; Pekowsky, L.; Pele, A.; Penn, S.; Perreca, A.; Phelps, M.; Pierro, V.; Pinto, I. M.; Pitkin, M.; Poeld, J.; Post, A.; Poteomkin, A.; Powell, J.; Prasad, J.; Predoi, V.; Premachandra, S.; Prestegard, T.; Price, L. R.; Principe, M.; Privitera, S.; Prix, R.; Prokhorov, L.; Puncken, O.; Pürrer, M.; Qin, J.; Quetschke, V.; Quintero, E.; Quiroga, G.; Quitzow-James, R.; Raab, F. J.; Rabeling, D. S.; Radkins, H.; Raffai, P.; Raja, S.; Rajalakshmi, G.; Rakhmanov, M.; Ramirez, K.; Raymond, V.; Reed, C. M.; Reid, S.; Reitze, D. H.; Reula, O.; Riles, K.; Robertson, N. A.; Robie, R.; Rollins, J. G.; Roma, V.; Romano, J. D.; Romanov, G.; Romie, J. H.; Rowan, S.; Rüdiger, A.; Ryan, K.; Sachdev, S.; Sadecki, T.; Sadeghian, L.; Saleem, M.; Salemi, F.; Sammut, L.; Sandberg, V.; Sanders, J. R.; Sannibale, V.; Santiago-Prieto, I.; Sathyaprakash, B. S.; Saulson, P. R.; Savage, R.; Sawadsky, A.; Scheuer, J.; Schilling, R.; Schmidt, P.; Schnabel, R.; Schofield, R. M. S.; Schreiber, E.; Schuette, D.; Schutz, B. F.; Scott, J.; Scott, S. M.; Sellers, D.; Sengupta, A. S.; Sergeev, A.; Serna, G.; Sevigny, A.; Shaddock, D. A.; Shahriar, M. S.; Shaltev, M.; Shao, Z.; Shapiro, B.; Shawhan, P.; Shoemaker, D. H.; Sidery, T. L.; Siemens, X.; Sigg, D.; Silva, A. D.; Simakov, D.; Singer, A.; Singer, L.; Singh, R.; Sintes, A. M.; Slagmolen, B. J. J.; Smith, J. R.; Smith, M. R.; Smith, R. J. E.; Smith-Lefebvre, N. D.; Son, E. J.; Sorazu, B.; Souradeep, T.; Staley, A.; Stebbins, J.; Steinke, M.; Steinlechner, J.; Steinlechner, S.; Steinmeyer, D.; Stephens, B. C.; Steplewski, S.; Stevenson, S.; Stone, R.; Strain, K. A.; Strigin, S.; Sturani, R.; Stuver, A. L.; Summerscales, T. Z.; Sutton, P. J.; Szczepanczyk, M.; Szeifert, G.; Talukder, D.; Tanner, D. B.; Tápai, M.; Tarabrin, S. P.; Taracchini, A.; Taylor, R.; Tellez, G.; Theeg, T.; Thirugnanasambandam, M. P.; Thomas, M.; Thomas, P.; Thorne, K. A.; Thorne, K. S.; Thrane, E.; Tiwari, V.; Tomlinson, C.; Torres, C. V.; Torrie, C. I.; Traylor, G.; Tse, M.; Tshilumba, D.; Ugolini, D.; Unnikrishnan, C. S.; Urban, A. L.; Usman, S. A.; Vahlbruch, H.; Vajente, G.; Valdes, G.; Vallisneri, M.; van Veggel, A. A.; Vass, S.; Vaulin, R.; Vecchio, A.; Veitch, J.; Veitch, P. J.; Venkateswara, K.; Vincent-Finley, R.; Vitale, S.; Vo, T.; Vorvick, C.; Vousden, W. D.; Vyatchanin, S. P.; Wade, A. R.; Wade, L.; Wade, M.; Walker, M.; Wallace, L.; Walsh, S.; Wang, H.; Wang, M.; Wang, X.; Ward, R. L.; Warner, J.; Was, M.; Weaver, B.; Weinert, M.; Weinstein, A. J.; Weiss, R.; Welborn, T.; Wen, L.; Wessels, P.; Westphal, T.; Wette, K.; Whelan, J. T.; Whitcomb, S. E.; White, D. J.; Whiting, B. F.; Wilkinson, C.; Williams, L.; Williams, R.; Williamson, A. R.; Willis, J. L.; Willke, B.; Wimmer, M.; Winkler, W.; Wipf, C. C.; Wittel, H.; Woan, G.; Worden, J.; Xie, S.; Yablon, J.; Yakushin, I.; Yam, W.; Yamamoto, H.; Yancey, C. C.; Yang, Q.; Zanolin, M.; Zhang, Fan; Zhang, L.; Zhang, M.; Zhang, Y.; Zhao, C.; Zhou, M.; Zhu, X. J.; Zucker, M. E.; Zuraw, S.; Zweizig, J.

    2015-04-01

    The Advanced LIGO gravitational wave detectors are second-generation instruments designed and built for the two LIGO observatories in Hanford, WA and Livingston, LA, USA. The two instruments are identical in design, and are specialized versions of a Michelson interferometer with 4 km long arms. As in Initial LIGO, Fabry-Perot cavities are used in the arms to increase the interaction time with a gravitational wave, and power recycling is used to increase the effective laser power. Signal recycling has been added in Advanced LIGO to improve the frequency response. In the most sensitive frequency region around 100 Hz, the design strain sensitivity is a factor of 10 better than Initial LIGO. In addition, the low frequency end of the sensitivity band is moved from 40 Hz down to 10 Hz. All interferometer components have been replaced with improved technologies to achieve this sensitivity gain. Much better seismic isolation and test mass suspensions are responsible for the gains at lower frequencies. Higher laser power, larger test masses and improved mirror coatings lead to the improved sensitivity at mid and high frequencies. Data collecting runs with these new instruments are planned to begin in mid-2015.

  2. Variation in Y chromosome segregation in natural populations of Drosophila melanogaster

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, A.G.

    1987-01-01

    Functional variation among Y chromosomes in natural populations of Drosophila melanogaster was assayed by a segregation study. A total of 36 Y chromosomes was extracted and ten generations of replacement backcrossing yielded stocks with Y chromosomes in two different genetic backgrounds. Eleven of the Y chromosomes were from diverse geographic origins, and the remaining 25 were from locally captured flies. Segregation of sexes in adult offspring was scored for the four possible crosses among the two backgrounds with each Y chromosome. Although the design confounds meiotic drive and effects on viability, statistical partitioning of these effects reveals significant variation among lines in Y chromosome segregation. Results are discussed in regards to models of Y-linked segregation and viability effects, which suggest that Y-linked adaptive polymorphism is unlikely.

  3. Variation in Y Chromosome Segregation in Natural Populations of Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Andrew G.

    1987-01-01

    Functional variation among Y chromosomes in natural populations of Drosophila melanogaster was assayed by a segregation study. A total of 36 Y chromosomes was extracted and ten generations of replacement backcrossing yielded stocks with Y chromosomes in two different genetic backgrounds. Eleven of the Y chromosomes were from diverse geographic origins, and the remaining 25 were from locally captured flies. Segregation of sexes in adult offspring was scored for the four possible crosses among the two backgrounds with each Y chromosome. Although the design confounds meiotic drive and effects on viability, statistical partitioning of these effects reveals significant variation among lines in Y chromosome segregation. Results are discussed in regards to models of Y-linked segregation and viability effects, which suggest that Y-linked adaptive polymorphism is unlikely. PMID:3104134

  4. Partnering with Families through Institutional Advancement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McInnis, Dion

    2001-01-01

    Because of limited resources and rising populations, more intentional relationships among university departments are needed to achieve common goals, especially in parent programming. Article focuses on novel partnering opportunities for student affairs and institutional advancement departments. (GCP)

  5. Genetic architecture of population differences in oviposition behaviour of the seed beetle Callosobruchus maculatus.

    PubMed

    Fox, C W; Stillwell, R C; Amarillo-S, A R; Czesak, M E; Messina, F J

    2004-09-01

    Few studies have examined the genetic architecture of population differences in behaviour and its implications for population differentiation and adaptation. Even fewer have examined whether differences in genetic architecture depend on the environment in which organisms are reared or tested. We examined the genetic basis of differences in oviposition preference and egg dispersion between Asian (SI) and African (BF) populations of the seed beetle, Callosobruchus maculatus. We reared and tested females on each of two host legumes (cowpea and mung bean). The two populations differed in mean oviposition preference (BF females preferred cowpea seeds more strongly than did SI females) and egg dispersion (SI females distributed eggs more uniformly among seeds than did BF females). Observations of hybrid and backcross individuals indicated that only the population difference in oviposition preference could be explained by complete additivity, whereas substantial dominance and epistasis contributed to the differences in egg dispersion. Both rearing host and test host affected the relative magnitude of population differences in egg dispersion and the composite genetic effects. Our results thus demonstrate that the relative influence of epistasis and dominance on the behaviour of hybrids depends on the behaviour measured and that different aspects of insect oviposition are under different genetic control. In addition, the observed effect of rearing host and oviposition host on the relative importance of dominance and epistasis indicates that the genetic basis of population differences depends on the environment in which genes are expressed.

  6. Advanced Pacemaker

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Synchrony, developed by St. Jude Medical's Cardiac Rhythm Management Division (formerly known as Pacesetter Systems, Inc.) is an advanced state-of-the-art implantable pacemaker that closely matches the natural rhythm of the heart. The companion element of the Synchrony Pacemaker System is the Programmer Analyzer APS-II which allows a doctor to reprogram and fine tune the pacemaker to each user's special requirements without surgery. The two-way communications capability that allows the physician to instruct and query the pacemaker is accomplished by bidirectional telemetry. APS-II features 28 pacing functions and thousands of programming combinations to accommodate diverse lifestyles. Microprocessor unit also records and stores pertinent patient data up to a year.

  7. Allozyme and RAPD analysis of the genetic diversity and geographic variation in wild populations of the American chestnut (Fagaceae).

    PubMed

    Huang, H; Dane, F; Kubisiak, T

    1998-07-01

    Genetic variation among 12 populations of the American chestnut (Castanea dentata) was investigated. Population genetic parameters estimated from allozyme variation suggest that C. dentata at both the population and species level has narrow genetic diversity as compared to other species in the genus. Average expected heterozygosity was relatively low for the population collected in the Black Rock Mountain State Park, Georgia (He = 0.096 +/- 0.035), and high for the population in east central Alabama (He = 0.196 +/- 0.048). Partitioning of the genetic diversity based on 18 isozyme loci showed that ~10% of the allozyme diversity resided among populations. Cluster analysis using unweighted pair-group method using arithmetric averages of Rogers' genetic distance and principal components analysis based on allele frequencies of both isozyme and RAPD loci revealed four groups: the southernmost population, south-central Appalachian populations, north-central Appalachian populations, and northern Appalachian populations. Based on results presented in this study, a conservation strategy and several recommendations related to the backcross breeding aimed at restoring C. dentata are discussed.

  8. Predicting Epileptic Seizures in Advance

    PubMed Central

    Moghim, Negin; Corne, David W.

    2014-01-01

    Epilepsy is the second most common neurological disorder, affecting 0.6–0.8% of the world's population. In this neurological disorder, abnormal activity of the brain causes seizures, the nature of which tend to be sudden. Antiepileptic Drugs (AEDs) are used as long-term therapeutic solutions that control the condition. Of those treated with AEDs, 35% become resistant to medication. The unpredictable nature of seizures poses risks for the individual with epilepsy. It is clearly desirable to find more effective ways of preventing seizures for such patients. The automatic detection of oncoming seizures, before their actual onset, can facilitate timely intervention and hence minimize these risks. In addition, advance prediction of seizures can enrich our understanding of the epileptic brain. In this study, drawing on the body of work behind automatic seizure detection and prediction from digitised Invasive Electroencephalography (EEG) data, a prediction algorithm, ASPPR (Advance Seizure Prediction via Pre-ictal Relabeling), is described. ASPPR facilitates the learning of predictive models targeted at recognizing patterns in EEG activity that are in a specific time window in advance of a seizure. It then exploits advanced machine learning coupled with the design and selection of appropriate features from EEG signals. Results, from evaluating ASPPR independently on 21 different patients, suggest that seizures for many patients can be predicted up to 20 minutes in advance of their onset. Compared to benchmark performance represented by a mean S1-Score (harmonic mean of Sensitivity and Specificity) of 90.6% for predicting seizure onset between 0 and 5 minutes in advance, ASPPR achieves mean S1-Scores of: 96.30% for prediction between 1 and 6 minutes in advance, 96.13% for prediction between 8 and 13 minutes in advance, 94.5% for prediction between 14 and 19 minutes in advance, and 94.2% for prediction between 20 and 25 minutes in advance. PMID:24911316

  9. Advancing the science of Forest Hydrology

    Treesearch

    Devendra M. Amatya; R. Wayne Skaggs; Carl C. Trettin

    2009-01-01

    For more than a century, agricultural and biological engineers have provided major advances in science, engineering, and technology to increase food and fiber production to meet the demands of a rapidly growing global population. The land base for these technological advances has...

  10. Sequence-based introgression mapping identifies candidate white mold tolerance genes in common bean

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    White mold disease, caused by the necrotrophic fungus Sclerotinia sclerotiorum (Lib.) de Bary, is a major pathogen of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.). More than 20 QTL were reported using multiple bi-parental populations. To study the disease in more detail, advanced back-cross populations seg...

  11. [Population statistics].

    PubMed

    1992-01-01

    Population trends in Luxembourg in 1991 are first reviewed, with separate consideration given to nuptiality and divorce, fertility, mortality, and migration. Next, revised estimates of international migration and of the resident population are presented for the period 1987-1991. Finally, three alternative estimates of the population for 1991 are provided.

  12. Understanding Population.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mothner, Ira

    Activities and concerns of Ford Foundation supported population research and training centers are described in this report. The centers are concerned with population growth, consequences of growth for human welfare, forces that determine family planning, interrelations among population variables, economics of contraceptive distribution, and…

  13. Counting Populations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Damonte, Kathleen

    2004-01-01

    Scientists use sampling to get an estimate of things they cannot easily count. A population is made up of all the organisms of one species living together in one place at the same time. All of the people living together in one town are considered a population. All of the grasshoppers living in a field are a population. Scientists keep track of the…

  14. Population Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Inst. of Child Health and Human Development (NIH), Bethesda, MD.

    The scope of population research as carried on by the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) is set forth in this booklet. Population problems of the world, United States, and the individual are considered along with international population policies based on voluntary family planning programs. NICHD goals for biological…

  15. Counting Populations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Damonte, Kathleen

    2004-01-01

    Scientists use sampling to get an estimate of things they cannot easily count. A population is made up of all the organisms of one species living together in one place at the same time. All of the people living together in one town are considered a population. All of the grasshoppers living in a field are a population. Scientists keep track of the…

  16. Stabilizing population.

    PubMed

    Brown, L; Mitchell, J

    1998-04-01

    This article is a reprint of the Worldwatch Institute's "State of the World Report," Chapter 10: "Building a New Economy." 16 countries reached zero population growth by 1997. 33 countries have stabilized population, which amounts to 14% of world population. It is estimated that by 2050 population will include an additional 3.6 billion people beyond the present 6 billion. About 60% of the added population will be in Asia, an increase from 3.4 billion in 1995 to 5.4 billion in 2050. China's current population of 1.2 billion will reach 1.5 billion. India's population is expected to rapidly rise from 930 million to 1.53 billion. Populations in the Middle East and North Africa are expected to double in size. Sub-Saharan population is expected to triple in size. By 2050, Nigeria will have 339 million people, which was the entire population of Africa in 1960. There is a great need to stabilize population in a number of currently unstabilized countries. In 1971, Bangladesh and Pakistan had the same population; however, by 2050, Pakistan, without a strong commitment to reducing population growth, will have 70 million more people than Bangladesh. Population stabilization will depend on removal of physical and social barriers that prevent women from using family planning services and thereby help them control their own unwanted fertility. Stabilization will require poverty alleviation and removal of the need for large families. Family size is reduced with lower infant and child mortality risk, increased education, a higher legal age of marriage, and investment in stabilization programs. Solutions to global population growth cannot wait for health reform and budget deficit reductions.

  17. Advanced stellarators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlüter, Arnulf

    1983-03-01

    Toroidal confinement of a plasma by an external magnetic field is not compatible with axisymmetry, in contrast to confinement by the pinch effect of induced electric currents as in a tokomak or by the reversed field pinch configuration. The existence of magnetic surfaces throughout the region in which grad p ≠ 0 is therefore not guaranteed in such configurations, though it is necessary for MHD-equilibrium when the lines of force possess a finite twist (or "rotational transform"). These twisted equilibria are called stellarators. The other type of external confinement requires all lines of force to be closed upon themselves and p to be function of the well defined quantity Q = φ d l/ B only. The resulting "bumpy" tori are sometimes also referred to as being M + S like. By discussing specific examples it is shown that stellarator configurations exist which retain as much as possible the properties of M + S like configurations, combine these with the magnetic well, and with an approximation to the isodynamic requirement of D. Palumbo. These so-called Advanced Stellarators shown an improvement in predicted particle confinement and beta-limit compared to the classical stellarators. They can also be viewed as forming a system of linked stabilized mirrors of small mirror ratio. These fields can be produced by modular coils. A prototype of such a configuration is being designed by the stellarator division of IPP under the name of Wendelstein VII-AS. Expected physical data and technical details of W VII-AS are given.

  18. Population and geography in India.

    PubMed

    Chandna, R C

    1991-01-01

    The field of population geography was first introduced during the 1960s in India and advanced under the direction of Gosal at the Punjab University. Teaching and research in population geography were introduced by Chandigarh at Punjab University, which today is the main center of research activity. Population geography in India has followed the main tenets of geography in general and is based on spatial perspectives. Deficits are apparent in the paucity of research on socioeconomic implications of spatial distributions, but there is infrastructural feedback to support theory development. Theoretical advances moving from theory to fact or from empirical fact to theory are limited. Comprehensive training in methodology and quantitative techniques is needed for further development of population theory: multivariate analysis, factor analysis, principal component analysis, model building, hypothesis testing, and theory formulation. Methodological sophistication will also help in understanding and interpreting the diverse and complex Indian demographic situation. The analysis of population geography in the Indian spatial, cultural, political, and historical context may be applied to other less developed countries of similar sociocultural background. The Indian Census has contributed over the 100 years of its existence reliable and efficiently produced data on a wide variety of measures at assorted scales down to the village level. Field work among geographers has not achieved a level of development commensurate with population censuses. Recent doctoral research has focused on qualitative studies of local situations. Research topics range from the distribution and structure of population, mortality, fertility, and migration to peripheral issues of social segregation. Popular topics include urbanization, labor force, sex composition, literacy, and population growth. Distribution of population and density studies have amounted to only 2 in 30 years. Population texts are in

  19. Advanced Concept

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-01-01

    An artist's rendering of the air-breathing, hypersonic X-43B, the third and largest of NASA's Hyper-X series flight demonstrators, which could fly later this decade. Revolutionizing the way we gain access to space is NASA's primary goal for the Hypersonic Investment Area, managed for NASA by the Advanced Space Transportation Program at the Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama. The Hypersonic Investment area, which includes leading-edge partners in industry and academia, will support future generation reusable vehicles and improved access to space. These technology demonstrators, intended for flight testing by decade's end, are expected to yield a new generation of vehicles that routinely fly about 100,000 feet above Earth's surface and reach sustained speeds in excess of Mach 5 (3,750 mph), the point at which "supersonic" flight becomes "hypersonic" flight. The flight demonstrators, the Hyper-X series, will be powered by air-breathing rocket or turbine-based engines, and ram/scramjets. Air-breathing engines, known as combined-cycle systems, achieve their efficiency gains over rocket systems by getting their oxygen for combustion from the atmosphere, as opposed to a rocket that must carry its oxygen. Once a hypersonic vehicle has accelerated to more than twice the speed of sound, the turbine or rockets are turned off, and the engine relies solely on oxygen in the atmosphere to burn fuel. When the vehicle has accelerated to more than 10 to 15 times the speed of sound, the engine converts to a conventional rocket-powered system to propel the craft into orbit or sustain it to suborbital flight speed. NASA's series of hypersonic flight demonstrators includes three air-breathing vehicles: the X-43A, X-43B and X-43C.

  20. [Population and food scarcity].

    PubMed

    Castro, E S

    1995-07-01

    Rapid population growth and increasing industrialization threaten to exhaust the world's natural resources, while the air, water, and soil are contaminated by wastes. Efforts to modify processes endangering man's survival are merely local palliatives. World population increased by 2 billion in the past 10 years. El Salvador's population is growing at 2% annually and now exceeds 5 million. These facts are well known, but the average person does not feel personally affected by them, trusting in scientific and technological progress to solve problems. The reality is that 2/3 of the world's people are vulnerable to hunger. Technological advances in agriculture have been outpaced by rapid population growth. Droughts and other climatic disturbances lead to hunger, and lost harvests constitute calamities. El Salvador's ecological situation is critical, with widespread degradation of agricultural lands. Thousands of hectares are lost each year. The high cost of basic foods is due to the collapse of agricultural production, itself a result of poor planning. El Salvador has become an importer of many essential foodstuffs. Experts have predicted that rapid population growth will soon mean that the country is no longer able to produce all the food it needs. Campaigns for responsible parenthood are needed to slow population growth. Couples should decide how many children to have based on their ability to support and educate them. The government should adopt a realistic position and encourage responsible parenthood, with free medical advice and family planning services for those desiring to avoid pregnancy.

  1. Genetic architecture of differences in oviposition preference between ancestral and derived populations of the seed beetle Acanthoscelides obtectus.

    PubMed

    Tucić, N; Seslija, D

    2007-05-01

    We investigated the additive, dominance and epistatic genetic effects underlying differentiation in oviposition preference between two populations of the seed beetle Acanthoscelides obtectus evolved in the laboratory for 102 generations on bean and chickpea seeds. We reared and tested females on each of two host legumes. The populations differed in mean oviposition preference; the preference for chickpea was stronger in population reared on the chickpea (C) than in population maintained on common bean (P). Observations in the parental populations indicated that females tend to prefer ovipositioning their eggs on the seeds they have already experienced. The patterns of the means in each of the parental populations and 12 types of hybrids (two F(1), two F(2) and eight backcrosses) indicated that population differences in oviposition preference from both rearing hosts could be explained by nonadditive genetic effects. Statistically detectable additive and dominance genetic effects were observed in the most parsimonious model only when females were reared on the chickpea. The most parsimonious models on both rearing hosts suggested a contribution of negative additive x additive epistasis to the divergence of oviposition preference between the P and C populations. This indicates a positive effect of epistasis on the performance of the second generations of hybrids.

  2. A first step toward the development of a barley NAM population and its utilization to detect QTLs conferring leaf rust seedling resistance.

    PubMed

    Schnaithmann, Florian; Kopahnke, Doris; Pillen, Klaus

    2014-07-01

    We suggest multi-parental nested association mapping as a valuable innovation in barley genetics, which increases the power to map quantitative trait loci and assists in extending genetic diversity of the elite barley gene pool. Plant genetic resources are a key asset to further improve crop species. The nested association mapping (NAM) approach was introduced to identify favorable genes in multi-parental populations. Here, we report toward the development of the first explorative barley NAM population and demonstrate its usefulness in a study on mapping quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for leaf rust resistance. The NAM population HEB-5 was developed from crossing and backcrossing five exotic barley donors with the elite barley cultivar 'Barke,' resulting in 295 NAM lines in generation BC1S1. HEB-5 was genetically characterized with 1,536 barley SNPs. Across HEB-5 and within the NAM families, no deviation from the expected genotype and allele frequencies was detected. Genetic similarity between 'Barke' and the NAM families ranged from 78.6 to 83.1 %, confirming the backcrossing step during population development. To explore its usefulness, a screen for leaf rust (Puccinia hordei) seedling resistance was conducted. Resistance QTLs were mapped to six barley chromosomes, applying a mixed model genome-wide association study. In total, four leaf rust QTLs were detected across HEB-5 and four QTLs within family HEB-F23. Favorable exotic QTL alleles reduced leaf rust symptoms on two chromosomes by 33.3 and 36.2 %, respectively. The located QTLs may represent new resistance loci or correspond to new alleles of known resistance genes. We conclude that the exploratory population HEB-5 can be applied to mapping and utilizing exotic QTL alleles of agronomic importance. The NAM concept will foster the evaluation of the genetic diversity, which is present in our primary barley gene pool.

  3. Advances in hereditary deafness.

    PubMed

    Tekin, M; Arnos, K S; Pandya, A

    2001-09-29

    Progress in the Human Genome Project, availability of cochlea-specific cDNA libraries, and development of murine models of deafness have resulted in rapid discovery of many loci and corresponding genes for deafness. Up to now, the chromosomal locations of about 70 genes for non-syndromic deafness have been mapped, and the genes of more than 20 loci have been identified and characterised. Mutations in one gene, connexin 26 (CX26GJB2), are responsible for most cases of recessive non-syndromic deafness, accounting for 30-40% of all childhood genetic deafness in some populations (eg, white people of western European descent). We summarise advances in identification of genes for deafness and provide a guide to the clinical approach to diagnosis of patients with hearing loss.

  4. Persistence of sunflower crop traits and fitness in Helianthus petiolaris populations.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez, A; Cantamutto, M; Poverene, M

    2011-09-01

    Transgenic plants have increased interest in the study of crop gene introgression in wild populations. Genes (or transgenes) conferring adaptive advantages persist in introgressed populations, enhancing competitiveness of wild or weedy plants. This represents an ecological risk that could increase problems of weed control. Introgression of cultivar alleles into wild plant populations via crop-wild hybridisations is primarily governed by their fitness effect. To evaluate this, we studied the second generation of seven wild-crop interspecific hybrids between weedy Helianthus petiolaris and cultivated sunflower, H. annuus var. macrocarpus. The second generation comprised open-pollinated progeny and backcrosses to the wild parent, mimicking crosses that occur in natural situations. We compared a number of morphological, life history and fitness traits. Multivariate analysis showed that the parental species H. annuus and H. petiolaris differed in a number of morphological traits, while the second hybrid generation between them was intermediate. Sunflower crop introgression lowered fitness of interspecific hybrids, but fitness parameters tended to recover in the following generation. Relative frequency of wild/weedy and introgressed plants was estimated through four generations, based on male and female parent fitness. In spite of several negative selection coefficients observed in the second generation, introgressed plants could be detected in stands of <100 weedy H. petiolaris populations. The rapid recovery of fecundity parameters leads to prediction that any trait conferring an ecological advantage will diffuse into the wild or weedy population, even if F1 hybrids have low fitness.

  5. Population paradoxes.

    PubMed

    Meyer, P A

    1992-07-01

    The global population growth rate began accelerating rapidly early this century, passed 1% around 1940, and peaked at around 2.1% in the latter half of the 1960s, when the world's population was about 4 billion. Since then, the growth rate has declined slowly to the present estimate of 1.7%, and now the figure is nearly 5.5 billion. The first population paradox is that the annual increments in global population are still increasing, even though the rate of growth has begun to decline. In the late 1960s the annual increment was about 80 million and the 1992 figures equaled 93.5 million. This annual increment will probably begin to decline before the turn of the century, but will still remain above 80 million until about 2020. Most of these added people will be in the developing countries, (80-90 million every year), most of them in poverty. Demographers now believe that humanity will achieve global replacement-level fertility around the year 2040, given current trends. By 2040 the population will be about 9 billion. They expect an ultimate world population sometime late next century of about 11 billion. The less optimistic scenarios have global replacement-level fertility delayed to 2060, yielding an ultimate population of 12.5 billion. Indonesia is a good example of the optimistic category. It will achieve replacement-level fertility perhaps by the year 2005. In the mid 1970s the annual growth rates were still increasing, peaking at over 2.3%. At that time, Indonesia was growing at 3.5 million people per year. The growth rate is now below 1.7% and, with the population at about 180 million, the annual increments are just 3 million. Indonesia began this century with a population of around 40 million, and will end it with a population around 210 million. Indonesia's ultimate population will be well in excess of 300 million, indicating the force of momentum.

  6. Advances in Male Contraception

    PubMed Central

    Page, Stephanie T.; Amory, John K.; Bremner, William J.

    2008-01-01

    Despite significant advances in contraceptive options for women over the last 50 yr, world population continues to grow rapidly. Scientists and activists alike point to the devastating environmental impacts that population pressures have caused, including global warming from the developed world and hunger and disease in less developed areas. Moreover, almost half of all pregnancies are still unwanted or unplanned. Clearly, there is a need for expanded, reversible, contraceptive options. Multicultural surveys demonstrate the willingness of men to participate in contraception and their female partners to trust them to do so. Notwithstanding their paucity of options, male methods including vasectomy and condoms account for almost one third of contraceptive use in the United States and other countries. Recent international clinical research efforts have demonstrated high efficacy rates (90–95%) for hormonally based male contraceptives. Current barriers to expanded use include limited delivery methods and perceived regulatory obstacles, which stymie introduction to the marketplace. However, advances in oral and injectable androgen delivery are cause for optimism that these hurdles may be overcome. Nonhormonal methods, such as compounds that target sperm motility, are attractive in their theoretical promise of specificity for the reproductive tract. Gene and protein array technologies continue to identify potential targets for this approach. Such nonhormonal agents will likely reach clinical trials in the near future. Great strides have been made in understanding male reproductive physiology; the combined efforts of scientists, clinicians, industry and governmental funding agencies could make an effective, reversible, male contraceptive an option for family planning over the next decade. PMID:18436704

  7. Population Blocks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Martin H.

    1992-01-01

    Describes an educational game called "Population Blocks" that is designed to illustrate the concept of exponential growth of the human population and some potential effects of overpopulation. The game material consists of wooden blocks; 18 blocks are painted green (representing land), 7 are painted blue (representing water); and the remaining…

  8. Population Blocks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Martin H.

    1992-01-01

    Describes an educational game called "Population Blocks" that is designed to illustrate the concept of exponential growth of the human population and some potential effects of overpopulation. The game material consists of wooden blocks; 18 blocks are painted green (representing land), 7 are painted blue (representing water); and the remaining…

  9. SCIENCE BRIEF: ADVANCED CONCEPTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Research on advanced concepts will evaluate and demonstrate the application of innovative infrastructure designs, management procedures and operational approaches. Advanced concepts go beyond simple asset management. The infusion of these advanced concepts into established wastew...

  10. SCIENCE BRIEF: ADVANCED CONCEPTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Research on advanced concepts will evaluate and demonstrate the application of innovative infrastructure designs, management procedures and operational approaches. Advanced concepts go beyond simple asset management. The infusion of these advanced concepts into established wastew...

  11. Advancing advanced practice - clarifying the conceptual confusion.

    PubMed

    Stasa, Helen; Cashin, Andrew; Buckley, Thomas; Donoghue, Judith

    2014-03-01

    In recent years, there has been a substantial increase in the number of nurses holding advanced practice nursing positions. However, the lack of clarity regarding key terms such as 'advanced practice nursing', 'advanced nursing practice', 'scope of practice' and 'extended practice', and international variability in how these terms are used has created significant confusion. This lack of clarity is problematic for nurses, other health professionals, health service consumers, educators and policy makers, particularly given the global mobility of the nursing workforce. 1) To highlight the significant international variability in how advanced practice nursing, and associated terms such as extended and expanded practice, are defined and regulated across a variety of different English speaking countries, including the US, UK, New Zealand, Canada and Australia. 2) To propose innovative formulations for how the nursing profession may attempt to ensure greater precision and agreement around advanced practice terminology. Discursive paper. It was found that there is a considerable lack of clarity regarding the precise definitions of key terms surrounding the discussion of advanced practice. Additionally, there are large disparities in how the five chosen countries regulate advanced practice nursing, and roles such as that of the nurse practitioner. It is suggested that the confusion regarding advanced practice terminology can be reduced definitionally by minimising the use of the term 'expanded practice'; defining advanced practice nursing to refer to the type of practice in defined and regulated advanced practice nursing scopes; and defining advanced nursing practice as expert practice within a regulated nursing scope. © 2013.

  12. Population Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Juliano, Steven A.

    2007-01-01

    This chapter reviews aspects of population dynamics that may be conceptually important for biological control of mosquitoes. Density dependent population regulation among immature stages has important implications for biological control of mosquito populations, primarily because it can lead to compensatory or overcompensatory mortality due to additions of a biological control agent. This can result in control efforts leading to no change in the target population, or actual increases in the target population, respectively. Density dependent effects, and compensatory or overcompensatory mortality, appear to be most common in mosquitoes from container or highly ephemeral habitats. In permanent ground water habitats generalist predators appear to limit mosquito populations and so render mortality additive. Thus, biological control in permanent ground water habitats seems to have the highest likelihood of producing a satisfactory result. A central premise of classical biological control is that pest populations are reduced by enemies to stable equilibrium levels that are both below the pre-control equilibrium level, and well below the level producing detrimental effects. This premise results in predictions that successful biological control is likely to involve specialist enemies (usually parasitoids), with short generation times relative to the victim, high rates of successful search, rapid rates of increase, and needing only a few victims to complete their life cycle. These predictions largely fail for mosquito systems, in which successful biological control seems to be associated with generalist enemies that can kill a large portion of the target population, often causing local extinction, and can persist in the absence of the target organism. Biological control of mosquitoes appears to be inherently unstable, thus contrasting sharply with classical biological control. This review suggests a need for better data on density dependent regulation of mosquito populations

  13. Population policy.

    PubMed

    1987-03-01

    Participants in the Seminar on Population Policies for Top-level Policy Makers and Program Managers, meeting in Thailand during January 1987, examined the challenges now facing them regarding the implementation of fertility regulation programs in their respective countries -- Bangladesh, China, India, Indonesia, Malaysia, Nepal, Pakistan, the Philippines, the Republic of Korea, and Thailand. This Seminar was organized to coincide with the completion of an Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific (ESCAP) study investigating the impact and efficiency of family planning programs in the region. Country studies were reviewed at the Seminar along with policy issues about the status of women, incentive and disincentive programs, and socioeconomic factors affecting fertility. In Bangladesh the government recognizes population growth as its top priority problem related to the socioeconomic development of the country and is working to promote a reorientation strategy from the previous clinic-oriented to a multidimensional family welfare program. China's family planning program seeks to postpone marraige, space the births of children between 3-5 years, and promote the 1-child family. Its goal is to reduce the rate of natural increase from 12/1000 in 1978 to 5/1000 by 1985 and 0 by 2000. India's 7th Five-Year-Plan (1986-90) calls for establishing a 2-child family norm by 2000. In Indonesia the government's population policy includes reducing the rate of population growth, achieving a redistribution of the population, adjusting economic factors, and creating prosperous families. The government of Indonesia reversed its policy to reduce the population growth rate in 1984 and announced its goal of achieving a population of 70 million by 2100 in order to support mass consumption industries. It has created an income tax deduction system favoring large families and maternity benefits for women who have up to 5 children as incentives. Nepal's official policy is to

  14. A population geographer's population pyramid.

    PubMed

    Sternstein, L

    1989-07-01

    A population geographer cannot depend on the standard population profile because it does not reflect spatial distribution of the desired characteristics. A more revealing approach is the modified box-and- whisker plot with the vertical lines of the box placed at the 1st and 3rd quartiles and the whiskers defining the variance. The geography of the age-sex structure variability in Thailand was examined using this method and by mapping and classifying all the age-sex structures. Classification of these structures includes comparing adjacent age-sex group differences, determining population profiles at each significance level, and spatially portraying each population structure. If the profile includes a 10th or more of the districts, it is called a uniform population profile. One should not generalize over a wide grouping of data because data is not normally regular. Geographical mapping given a usable description of the findings only when appropriate subdivisions of the data are utilized.

  15. Nutrition, Development, and Population Growth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berg, Alan

    1973-01-01

    Focuses on the problem of malnutrition in developing countries through a description of its interrelationships with human development, national economies, economic growth and income, agricultural advances, the crisis in infant feeding practices, new foods, and the population dilemma. Outlines possible future policy directions to significantly…

  16. Nutrition, Development, and Population Growth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berg, Alan

    1973-01-01

    Focuses on the problem of malnutrition in developing countries through a description of its interrelationships with human development, national economies, economic growth and income, agricultural advances, the crisis in infant feeding practices, new foods, and the population dilemma. Outlines possible future policy directions to significantly…

  17. [Population education].

    PubMed

    Niang, M

    1992-12-01

    Africa has the highest population growth rate in the world (3%). It has 650 million people (about 900 million in 2000). Rapid population growth has serious consequences which, if not addressed, will be disastrous. This worrisome situation has led some governments to adopt demographic policies to slow down population growth. The UN Economic, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) recommends that schools provide population education. Various population conferences have popularized population education in schools among African countries. UNESCO began its regional program on population education in Africa in 1969. National family life and population education (FL/PE) projects have increased from 4 in 1970 to 32 in 1990 (17 in French- and Portuguese-speaking Africa and 5 in English-speaking Africa). These projects teach students about the links between demographic problems and socioeconomic factors and contemporary culture. They aim for total development of the individual and improvement of the quality of life for the individual, family, and community. Topics covered in FL/PE are birth rate; fertility; health; and maternal, infant, and child mortality; unwanted pregnancy; illegal abortion; sexually transmitted diseases; rural-urban migration; and urbanization. Benin introduced FL/PE at all levels of its education system while Senegal, Guinea, Mauritania, and Zaire introduced it to only the primary and secondary school levels. Some countries teach FL/PE as one discipline while most countries (e.g., Senegal) have integrated it into other disciplines (e.g., geography). FL/PE should begin in primary schools because they have the most students and prepare students for middle schools, which provide FL/PE. Elementary education in Senegal is being overhauled to introduce current major problems bit by bit. Senegal also wants to incorporate FL/PE into literacy and adult education programs. Integration of FL/PE into other disciplines should be encouraged.

  18. Dissecting the genetic diversity in African rice

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    African cultivated rice, Oryza glaberrima, and its progenitor, O. barthii are excellent sources of important genes for rice improvement because they exhibit tolerance to several abiotic and biotic stresses. Development of advance backcross (ABC) populations between an unadapted donor parent and ada...

  19. Exploring the power of rice (O. sativa x O. rufipogon) chromosome segment substitution line libraries

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Transgressive variation was reported as an increase in grain yield for several rice (Oryza sativa x O. rufipogon) advanced backcross mapping populations. The objective of this study was to develop chromosome segment substitution line (CSSL) libraries to further dissect the reported transgressive var...

  20. Why develop O. sativa x O. rufipogon chromosome segment substitution line libraries?

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Transgressive variation has been observed in rice (Oryza sativa) as an increase in grain yield in advanced backcross mapping populations derived from crosses between several adapted O. sativa varieties and a single accession (IRGC105491) of the ancestral parent, O. rufipogon. The phenomena of hybrid...

  1. Enhancement of Yield Using Chromosomal Introgressions from Oryza rufipogon

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Over the past decade, the McCouch lab has developed a network of collaborators to explore the gene space of the wild ancestral species, O. rufipogon, by crossing it with an array of elite O. sativa international cultivars. Advanced backcross populations were constructed in which transgressive variat...

  2. Population growth.

    PubMed

    1984-01-01

    Despite efforts to reduce population growth, the World Bank projects a world population of 10 billion by 2050, with 7 billion living in developing countries. From October 1979 to September 1984, the US Agency for International Development (AID) funded the Research Triangle Institute's (RTI) Integrated Population and Development Planning (IPDP) project to assess rapid population growth effects in 25 developing countries. In October 1984, US AID extended funding for the program, nicknamed INPLAN, for 3 years, at a cost of $6.3 million. Up to 50% of people in developing countries are under age 15, a fact that guarantees large population increases for the next 50-75 years. Also, many regions have been slow to correlate high fertility with socioeconomic development, and in some areas, fertility is actually increasing. INPLAN aims to make governments more aware of population dynamics and to provide training and tools for effective development planning. 40% of INPLAN's work will be done in Africa, 25% in Latin America, and 20% in Asia, with some activity in the Near East. One project in Egypt, involving the use of model generation by microcomputer, was developed by RTI to show rural to urban migration and rapid population growth affects on the educational system. INPLAN expects to develop several other planning sector models on labor force and employment, health and family planning, food supply, housing, and urban development, and apply them to 20-25 countries. Another project provided 9 microcomputer systems and training to Nigerian government agencies. IMPLAN will purchase and distribute 60 such systems in the future.

  3. [Population and development].

    PubMed

    Trias, M

    1987-01-01

    Human reproduction and development are contrasted; they are intimately linked despite the fact that they may be considered antitheses of each other from many points of view. Presently technological development and the advance of humans into every available corner of living space threaten to place the whole world environment in danger. The Green revolution of the 1960s addressed problems of underproduction of food for the world's population, without providing for the effective distribution of the new surpluses, and without addressing the problem of the ecological impact. 2 trends which are regarded by some with alarm: the migration of populations to the cities and the aging of the population with the connected burden on health care systems, are inevitable, and it is not clear that they are completely negative trends. Addressing these issues will have positive effects in the long run: congestion in the cities, the result of mechanization of rural industry which also results in a greater abundance of agricultural products necessary to society, should force serious consideration of problems such as solid waste management. Coming to terms with the costs of intervention to save lives among the very frail elderly and the prematurely born will have the effect of bringing controversial topics such as euthenasia and eugenics to discussion. The important role played by economic development in the braking of population expansion is underlined.

  4. Population and development.

    PubMed

    Pavlik, Z

    1995-01-01

    During the Paleolithic period, 10,000-100,000 people lived on the earth; their number exceeded 1 million at the beginning of the Neolithic period, reached 10 million during the Bronze Age, 100 million at the beginning of the Iron Age, 1 billion at the beginning of the 19th century, and 5.7 billion in 1995. The estimated global population will be 10 billion by the middle of the 21st century and is expected to stabilize at around 10-12 billion subsequently. Increased agricultural production helped bring about greater numbers of humanity and the advancement of society with a developing social hierarchy, although life expectancy was low at 22-28 years. In Europe, the Renaissance gradually evolved into the Industrial Revolution, and a demographic revolution accompanied this process. In some countries, population size increased more than five times. Eventually, mortality and fertility levels decreased and life expectancy increased. In Western civilization, increased individualism, secularization, compulsory school attendance, decreased agricultural population, emancipation of women, increased costs of raising children, and social and economic progress ensued. All this was preceded by 18th century conditions, when, in England, capital accumulation led to wealth on the one side and destitution on the other, giving rise to Malthus's famous theory. However, during the 19th century these social inequalities gradually evened out. After World War II, the question arose of whether the populations of other civilizations (Confucian, Japanese, Islamic, Hindu, Slavic-Orthodox, Latin American, and African) would also undergo a demographic transition and how soon. At any rate, developed country population size, as a percentage of global population, will drop from 22% to 13%, and that of Africa will increase from 12% to 26%, during the 21st century.

  5. Population dynamics of arterial cells during atherogenesis. XIII. Mitogenic and cytotoxic effects of a hyperlipidemic (HL) diet on cells in advanced lesions in the abdominal aortas of swine fed an HL diet for 270-345 days.

    PubMed

    Thomas, W A; Kim, D N; Lee, K T; Reiner, J M; Schmee, J

    1983-12-01

    that in this particular model of advanced atherosclerosis the balloon-injury stimulus to proliferation and the HL-diet stimulus are neither additive nor synergistic.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS)

  6. Heterosis and outbreeding depression in crosses between natural populations of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Oakley, C G; Ågren, J; Schemske, D W

    2015-07-01

    Understanding the causes and architecture of genetic differentiation between natural populations is of central importance in evolutionary biology. Crosses between natural populations can result in heterosis if recessive or nearly recessive deleterious mutations have become fixed within populations because of genetic drift. Divergence between populations can also result in outbreeding depression because of genetic incompatibilities. The net fitness consequences of between-population crosses will be a balance between heterosis and outbreeding depression. We estimated the magnitude of heterosis and outbreeding depression in the highly selfing model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, by crossing replicate line pairs from two sets of natural populations (C↔R, B↔S) separated by similar geographic distances (Italy↔Sweden). We examined the contribution of different modes of gene action to overall differences in estimates of lifetime fitness and fitness components using joint scaling tests with parental, reciprocal F1 and F2, and backcross lines. One of these population pairs (C↔R) was previously demonstrated to be locally adapted, but locally maladaptive quantitative trait loci were also found, suggesting a role for genetic drift in shaping adaptive variation. We found markedly different genetic architectures for fitness and fitness components in the two sets of populations. In one (C↔R), there were consistently positive effects of dominance, indicating the masking of recessive or nearly recessive deleterious mutations that had become fixed by genetic drift. The other set (B↔S) exhibited outbreeding depression because of negative dominance effects. Additional studies are needed to explore the molecular genetic basis of heterosis and outbreeding depression, and how their magnitudes vary across environments.

  7. Maladapted gene complexes within populations of the intertidal copepod Tigriopus californicus?

    PubMed

    Edmands, Suzanne; Northrup, Sara L; Hwang, Annmarie S

    2009-08-01

    The prevalence of F2 hybrid breakdown in interpopulation crosses of the marine copepod Tigriopus californicus can be explained by disruption of coadapted gene complexes. This study further dissects the nature of hybrid gene interactions, revealing that parental populations may also harbor maladapted gene complexes. Diagnostic molecular markers (14) were assayed in reciprocal F2 hybrids to test for gene interactions affecting viability. Results showed some evidence of nuclear-nuclear coadaptation. Although there were no significant examples of pairwise linkage disequilibrium between physically unlinked loci, one of the two reciprocal crosses did show an overall excess of parental double homozygotes and an overall dearth of nonparental double homozygotes. In contrast, the nuclear-cytoplasmic data showed a stronger tendency toward maladaptation within the specific inbred lines used in this study. For three out of four loci with significant frequency differences between reciprocal F2, homozygotes were favored on the wrong cytoplasmic background. A separate study of reciprocal backcross hybrids between the same two populations (but different inbred lines) revealed faster development time when the full haploid nuclear genome did not match the cytoplasm. The occurrence of such suboptimal gene complexes may be attributable to effects of genetic drift in small, isolated populations.

  8. Inner magnetosphere coupling: Recent advances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usanova, M. E.; Shprits, Y. Y.

    2017-01-01

    The dynamics of the inner magnetosphere is strongly governed by the interactions between different plasma populations that are coupled through large-scale electric and magnetic fields, currents, and wave-particle interactions. Inner magnetospheric plasma undergoes self-consistent interactions with global electric and magnetic fields. Waves excited in the inner magnetosphere from unstable particle distributions can provide energy exchange between different particle populations in the inner magnetosphere and affect the ring current and radiation belt dynamics. The ionosphere serves as an energy sink and feeds the magnetosphere back through the cold plasma outflow. The precipitating inner magnetospheric particles influence the ionosphere and upper atmospheric chemistry and affect climate. Satellite measurements and theoretical studies have advanced our understanding of the dynamics of various plasma populations in the inner magnetosphere. However, our knowledge of the coupling processes among the plasmasphere, ring current, radiation belts, global magnetic and electric fields, and plasma waves generated within these systems is still incomplete. This special issue incorporates extended papers presented at the Inner Magnetosphere Coupling III conference held 23-27 March 2015 in Los Angeles, California, USA, and includes modeling and observational contributions addressing interactions within different plasma populations in the inner magnetosphere (plasmasphere, ring current, and radiation belts), coupling between fields and plasma populations, as well as effects of the inner magnetosphere on the ionosphere and atmosphere.

  9. Microsatellite data analysis for population genetics.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyung Seok; Sappington, Thomas W

    2013-01-01

    Theories and analytical tools of population genetics have been widely applied for addressing various questions in the fields of ecological genetics, conservation biology, and any context where the role of dispersal or gene flow is important. Underlying much of population genetics is the analysis of variation at selectively neutral marker loci, and microsatellites continue to be a popular choice of marker. In recent decades, software programs to estimate population genetics parameters have been developed at an increasing pace as computational science and theoretical knowledge advance. Numerous population genetics software programs are presently available to analyze microsatellite genotype data, but only a handful are commonly employed for calculating parameters such as genetic variation, genetic structure, patterns of spatial and temporal gene flow, population demography, individual population assignment, and genetic relationships within and between populations. In this chapter, we introduce statistical analyses and relevant population genetic software programs that are commonly employed in the field of population genetics and molecular ecology.

  10. Advanced hydrologic prediction system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connelly, Brian A.; Braatz, Dean T.; Halquist, John B.; Deweese, Michael M.; Larson, Lee; Ingram, John J.

    1999-08-01

    As our Nation's population and infrastructure grow, natural disasters are becoming a greater threat to our society's stability. In an average year, inland flooding claims 133 lives and resulting property losses exceed 4.0 billion. Last year, 1997, these losses totaled 8.7 billion. Because of this blossoming threat, the National Weather Service (NWS) has requested funding within its 2000 budget to begin national implementation of the Advanced Hydrologic Prediction System (AHPS). With this system in place the NWS will be able to utilize precipitation and climate predictions to provide extended probabilistic river forecasts for risk-based decisions. In addition to flood and drought mitigation benefits, extended river forecasts will benefit water resource managers in decision making regarding water supply, agriculture, navigation, hydropower, and ecosystems. It's estimated that AHPS, if implemented nationwide, would save lives and provide $677 million per year in economic benefits. AHPS is used currently on the Des Moines River basin in Iowa and will be implemented soon on the Minnesota River basin in Minnesota. Experience gained from user interaction is leading to refined and enhanced product formats and displays. This discussion will elaborate on the technical requirements associated with AHPS implementation, its enhanced products and informational displays, and further refinements based on customer feedback.

  11. NexGen PVAs: Incorporating Eco-Evolutionary Processes into Population Viability Models

    EPA Science Inventory

    We examine how the integration of evolutionary and ecological processes in population dynamics – an emerging framework in ecology – could be incorporated into population viability analysis (PVA). Driven by parallel, complementary advances in population genomics and computational ...

  12. NexGen PVAs: Incorporating Eco-Evolutionary Processes into Population Viability Models

    EPA Science Inventory

    We examine how the integration of evolutionary and ecological processes in population dynamics – an emerging framework in ecology – could be incorporated into population viability analysis (PVA). Driven by parallel, complementary advances in population genomics and computational ...

  13. ADVANCED MANUFACTURING TEAM

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-01-16

    ZACK JONES AND JIM LYDON OF MSFC’S ADVANCED MANUFACTURING TEAM, WITH MSFC’S M2 SELECTIVE LASER MELTING SYSTEM. THE M2 IS CURRENTLY DEDICATED TO ADVANCED COPPER MATERIAL DEVELOPMENT FOR THE LOW COST UPPER STAGE PROGRAM.

  14. Population aging.

    PubMed

    1999-04-01

    This paper focuses on the impact of population aging in China, the most densely populated country in the world. Statistics indicate that by the end of 1998, 83.75 million out of the 1.248 billion Chinese people will be over 65 years old. According to the UN standards, China will soon become an aging society. The aging population poses several challenges to the country with the greatest challenge being the increasing social responsibility to care for the aged. With the undeveloped legislative framework to protect the interests of the aged and the serious drawbacks in the pension system to cater only to the income part and not the service part of the aged, China is not yet ready for the advent of aging. Violation of the rights of senior citizens is still very rampant despite enactment of the law on Protection of the Rights of the Elderly in 1996. Moreover, China is not economically ready to become an aging society. China faces this challenge by adopting a three-pronged approach to solve the problem namely: family support, establishment of nursing homes, and creating a social security framework that addresses the needs of the society suited to the Chinese condition. It is believed that with the growing economy of the country and the rising income of its people, a comprehensive social security net will be created to take care of the aged.

  15. Kampuchea: population.

    PubMed

    The United Nations High Commission for Refugees (UNHCR) recently reported that Kampuchea has an estimated population of 6 million. The count was made to determine future United Nations aid to Kampuchea. The count, made by administrators in Kampuchea's 19 provinces, reached a total of 6.4 million versus the 5.75 million estimated by the central government in Phnom Penh. The population estimate made by the Kampuchea provincial administrators surprised observers of the country, including UN representatives, in view of the country's decade of experience with war and destruction, which took a heavy toll on the population; the fatalities in the Vietnamese invasion of 1979, and the ensuing famine of that year. The 1979 vital statistics of Kampuchea are presented in Table 1. Kampuchean refugees at the Thai border camps were reported to be reluctant to go back to their country in spite of reports of good foodgrain harvests and improved prospects for living. The refugees' main concern was their fear and hate of both the Vietnamese troops and the Khmer Rouge.

  16. Advances in forefoot trauma.

    PubMed

    Clements, J Randolph; Schopf, Robert

    2013-07-01

    Forefoot traumas, particularly involving the metatarsals, are commonly occurring injuries. There have been several advances in management of these injuries. These advances include updates in operative technique, internal fixation options, plating constructs, and external fixation. In addition, the advances of soft tissue management have improved outcomes. This article outlines these injuries and provides an update on techniques, principles, and understanding of managing forefoot trauma.

  17. Advanced planetary studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Results of planetary advanced studies and planning support are summarized. The scope of analyses includes cost estimation research, planetary mission performance, penetrator advanced studies, Mercury mission transport requirements, definition of super solar electric propulsion/solar sail mission discriminators, and advanced planning activities.

  18. Genetics of schizophrenia: recent advances.

    PubMed

    Eisener, Amy; Pato, Michele T; Medeiros, Helena; Carvalho, Celia; Pato, Carlos N

    2007-01-01

    Genetic studies of schizophrenia have been fraught with challenges, yet molecular genetic and genomic methods remain essential to the discovery of the underlying biological mechanisms. Candidate genes and genome scan studies have played a significant role in the search for susceptibility loci. Studies in genetic isolates appear to be providing some of the most consistent results. These populations are characterized by a greater degree of homogeneity, which is hoped to be advantageous in the identification of genes contributing to the disease phenotype. The following review highlights some recent advances in schizophrenia research, with a focus on disease etiology, candidate genes, genome scan studies, and molecular genetic approaches.

  19. More U.S. Women Living Longer with Advanced Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... html More U.S. Women Living Longer With Advanced Breast Cancer Better treatments, aging population may explain promising trend, ... women living with the most advanced stage of breast cancer has been rising since the 1990s, a new ...

  20. Session: CSP Advanced Systems -- Advanced Overview (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Mehos, M.

    2008-04-01

    The project description is: (1) it supports crosscutting activities, e.g. advanced optical materials, that aren't tied to a single CSP technology and (2) it supports the 'incubation' of new concepts in preliminary stages of investigation.

  1. Advancing paternal age and autism.

    PubMed

    Reichenberg, Abraham; Gross, Raz; Weiser, Mark; Bresnahan, Michealine; Silverman, Jeremy; Harlap, Susan; Rabinowitz, Jonathan; Shulman, Cory; Malaspina, Dolores; Lubin, Gad; Knobler, Haim Y; Davidson, Michael; Susser, Ezra

    2006-09-01

    Maternal and paternal ages are associated with neurodevelopmental disorders. To examine the relationship between advancing paternal age at birth of offspring and their risk of autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Historical population-based cohort study. Identification of ASD cases from the Israeli draft board medical registry. We conducted a study of Jewish persons born in Israel during 6 consecutive years. Virtually all men and about three quarters of women in this cohort underwent draft board assessment at age 17 years. Paternal age at birth was obtained for most of the cohort; maternal age was obtained for a smaller subset. We used the smaller subset (n = 132 271) with data on both paternal and maternal age for the primary analysis and the larger subset (n = 318 506) with data on paternal but not maternal age for sensitivity analyses. Information on persons coded as having International Classification of Diseases, 10th Revision ASD was obtained from the registry. The registry identified 110 cases of ASD (incidence, 8.3 cases per 10 000 persons), mainly autism, in the smaller subset with complete parental age data. There was a significant monotonic association between advancing paternal age and risk of ASD. Offspring of men 40 years or older were 5.75 times (95% confidence interval, 2.65-12.46; P<.001) more likely to have ASD compared with offspring of men younger than 30 years, after controlling for year of birth, socioeconomic status, and maternal age. Advancing maternal age showed no association with ASD after adjusting for paternal age. Sensitivity analyses indicated that these findings were not the result of bias due to missing data on maternal age. Advanced paternal age was associated with increased risk of ASD. Possible biological mechanisms include de novo mutations associated with advancing age or alterations in genetic imprinting.

  2. [Advanced chronic kidney disease].

    PubMed

    Alcázar Arroyo, R; Orte Martínez, L; Otero González, A

    2008-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD), like other chronic diseases, is a serious public health problem because of both its high incidence and prevalence and its significant morbidity and mortality and socioeconomic cost. Advanced chronic kidney disease (ACKD) includes stages 4 and 5 of the CKD classification. It is defined as chronic kidney disease in which there is a severe reduction in glomerular filtration rate (GFR < 30 ml/min). The treatment goals are to reduce and treat the complications associated with chronic kidney failure and to prepare the patient adequately and sufficiently in advance for kidney replacement therapy. The prevalence of ACKD is 0.2-0.6% of the adult population. This prevalence increases with age and in Spain is 1.6% in persons older than 64 years. - CKD is easily detected in clinical practice with simple tests (GFR estimated by equations based on serum creatinine, albuminuria and urine sediment) (Strength of Recommendation B). - It is recommended to detect the presence of CKD in all persons older than 60 years or with hypertension, diabetes or cardiovascular disease (Strength of Recommendation B). - Early detection and appropriate referral to the nephrology of patients with ACKD improves long-term morbidity and reduces costs for both the patient and the health care system (Strength of Recommendation B). Adequate communication and coordination between the primary care and nephrology is essential for this early detection: - Referral to nephrology should be made based on the stage of CKD, age of the patient, rate of progression of kidney failure, degree of albuminuria and presence or appearance of early warning signs.All patients with CKD stages 4-5 should be referred to nephrology (Strength of Recommendation C). - A protocol should be established in each health area for joint follow-up between primary care and nephrology (Strength of Recommendation C). - The creation of multidisciplinary ACKD units including a nephrologist, nephrology nurse

  3. Measuring up: Advances in How We Assess Reading Ability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sabatini, John; Albro, Elizabeth; O'Reilly, Tenaha

    2012-01-01

    In recent decades, the science of reading acquisition, processes, and individual differences in general and special populations has been continuously advancing through interdisciplinary research in cognitive, psycholinguistic, developmental, genetic, neuroscience, cross-language studies, and experimental comparison studies of effective…

  4. Measuring up: Advances in How We Assess Reading Ability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sabatini, John; Albro, Elizabeth; O'Reilly, Tenaha

    2012-01-01

    In recent decades, the science of reading acquisition, processes, and individual differences in general and special populations has been continuously advancing through interdisciplinary research in cognitive, psycholinguistic, developmental, genetic, neuroscience, cross-language studies, and experimental comparison studies of effective…

  5. Induction and transmission of tolerance to the synthetic pesticide emamectin benzoate in field and laboratory populations of diamondback moth.

    PubMed

    Rahman, M M; Baker, G; Powis, K J; Roush, R T; Schmidt, O

    2010-08-01

    Field surveys of pest insect pest populations in agroecosystems reveal low but significant levels of tolerance to synthetic and biological pesticides but fail to uncover resistance alleles in test crosses. To study the potential of inducible mechanisms to generate tolerance to synthetic pesticides, we performed baseline susceptibility studies in field and laboratory populations of diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella (L.), to commercial formulations of emamectin benzoate. Pesticide exposure in the field caused elevated levels of tolerance, which decreased in field-collected populations after maintaining insects with pesticide-free diet in the laboratory. Because no significant resistance alleles were identified in back-crossed individuals, the observed increase in tolerance was probably not based on preexisting recessive resistance mechanisms in the population. Instead, the genetic analysis after five and 12 generations is compatible with a transient up-regulation of an immune and metabolic status in tolerant insects that can be transmitted to offspring by a maternal effect. Although the epigenetic effects contributed to incremental increases in tolerance in the first five generations, other resistance mechanisms that are transmitted genetically predominate after 12 generations of increased exposure to the pesticide.

  6. Population alterations of L-arginase- and inducible nitric oxide synthase-expressed CD11b+/CD14⁻/CD15+/CD33+ myeloid-derived suppressor cells and CD8+ T lymphocytes in patients with advanced-stage non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chien-Ying; Wang, Yu-Min; Wang, Chih-Liang; Feng, Po-Hao; Ko, How-Wen; Liu, Yun-Hen; Wu, Yi-Cheng; Chu, Yen; Chung, Fu-Tsai; Kuo, Chih-Hsi; Lee, Kang-Yun; Lin, Shu-Min; Lin, Horng-Chyuan; Wang, Chun-Hua; Yu, Chih-Teng; Kuo, Han-Pin

    2010-01-01

    Immune aberrations have been demonstrated in tumorogenesis, and myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) have shown to play a pivotal role in mediating immune suppression in animal models of human tumors. In the present study, we explored the clinical relevance of CD11b+/CD14⁻/CD15+/CD33+ MDSCs and the association of MDSCs with CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The population of CD11b+/CD14⁻ cells in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMNC) was determined in 173 patients with NSCLC and 42 control subjects. The expression of CD15, CD33, IL-4R, INF-γR, iNOS and L-arginase were analyzed. Cocultures with CD8+ T lymphocytes and Jurkat cells were developed to determine the impact of MDSCs on the expression of CD3ζ of CD8+ T lymphocytes. Patients with treatment-naïve, advanced-stage NSCLC (n = 87) had an increased subpopulation of CD11b+/CD14⁻/CD15+/CD33+ cells in the PBMNCs with characteristics of MDSCs (P < 0.0001). The CD11b+/CD14⁻ cells in PBMNC also express IL-4R and INF-γR and can suppress CD3ζ expression in CD8+ T lymphocytes. The subpopulation of CD11b+/CD14⁻ cells in PBMNC was decreased in the advanced-stage NSCLC patients who had responsiveness to chemotherapy (n = 41, P < 0.0001) and in the early-stage NSCLC patients after removal of tumor (n = 8, P = 0.0391). Notably, a negative association existed between the population of CD11b+/CD14⁻ cells in PBMNC and the frequency of CD8+ T lymphocytes (n = 48, r = -0.3141, P = 0.0297). Our study provided evidence of an increased pool of CD11b+/CD14⁻/CD15+/CD33+ MDSCs in the peripheral blood of NSCLC patients. For the suppressive effect of the cells on CD8+ T lymphocytes, these findings suggest the important role of the CD11b+/CD14⁻/CD15+/CD33+ MDSCs in mediating immunosuppression in NSCLC.

  7. Recent advances in echocardiography for valvular heart disease.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Rebecca

    2015-01-01

    Echocardiography is the imaging modality of choice for the assessment of patients with valvular heart disease. Echocardiographic advancements may have particular impact on the assessment and management of patients with valvular heart disease. This review will summarize the current literature on advancements, such as three-dimensional echocardiography, strain imaging, intracardiac echocardiography, and fusion imaging, in this patient population.

  8. Population strategy.

    PubMed

    Kunii, C

    1989-12-01

    In this article, Chojiro Kunii, chairman and executive director of the Japanese Organization for International Cooperation in Family Planning (JOICFP), briefly describes the evolution of the INtegrated Family Planning, Nutrition, and Parasite Control Project (IP). The IP project began in Japan during the post-war period, when midwives and public health nurses introduced family planning alongside maternal and child health care services to make it more acceptable to people. Based on Japan's experience, JOICFP formed an international cooperation project based on parasite control, family planning, and nutrition. Introduced in several Asian countries in the mid-1970s, the project was quickly transported to Central and South America. And in 1983, Africa witnesses its first IP project. This took place in the Masama district of Tanzania, where the results of deworming quickly captures the attention of the population, making it easier for family planning workers to spread their message. In the 2 regions where the IP project was introduced, contraceptive prevalence among women has increased from 9.3% to 33%, and from 27% to 60%. Tanzania is now considering incorporating the IP project in its next 5-year development plan. Other African countries have followed suit. Kunii explains that JOICFP's Ip project enjoys support from both IPPF and UNFPA. He adds that, for its 2nd stage of development, the IP project hopes to become a union of family planning and preventive health. This new phase can already be observed in Asian countries. In developing its population strategy, JOICFP learned from the experience' of Japan, which demonstrated the importance of balancing quantity and quality.

  9. Pembrolizumab for the treatment of advanced melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Burns, Michael C; O’Donnell, Aidan; Puzanov, Igor

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Since 2010 multiple targeted therapies and immunotherapies have been approved for the treatment of advanced melanoma. Pembrolizumab, a humanized monoclonal antibody directed against programed death receptor 1 has shown significant activity in advanced melanoma resulting in its approval first as post-ipilimumab and subsequently as frontline treatment. Areas Covered This article reviews the approved agents for the treatment of advanced melanoma with a focus on the preclinical and clinical evidence for the use of pembrolizumab in this setting. Primary emphasis is given to the clinical development of pembrolizumab, including phase I-III trials. Finally, we explore the role of pembrolizumab in combination with other therapies and ongoing investigations into its effectiveness in expanded patient populations. Expert Opinion Pembrolizumab provides durable responses and represents a major advancement in the treatment options for patients with advanced melanoma. Early studies of pembrolizumab in combination with other therapeutic agents have generated significant interest and further investigations including advanced clinical trials are warranted to evaluate safety and potential improved outcomes. Pembrolizumab and other immune checkpoint inhibitors are likely to play an expanded role in the treatment of advanced melanoma and other solid tumors over the next decade. PMID:27597930

  10. Advance Care Planning.

    PubMed

    Stallworthy, Elizabeth J

    2013-04-16

    Advance care planning should be available to all patients with chronic kidney disease, including end-stage kidney disease on renal replacement therapy. Advance care planning is a process of patient-centred discussion, ideally involving family/significant others, to assist the patient to understand how their illness might affect them, identify their goals and establish how medical treatment might help them to achieve these. An Advance Care Plan is only one useful outcome from the Advance Care Planning process, the education of patient and family around prognosis and treatment options is likely to be beneficial whether or not a plan is written or the individual loses decision making capacity at the end of life. Facilitating Advance Care Planning discussions requires an understanding of their purpose and communication skills which need to be taught. Advance Care Planning needs to be supported by effective systems to enable the discussions and any resulting Plans to be used to aid subsequent decision making.

  11. Population Genetics with Fluctuating Population Sizes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chotibut, Thiparat; Nelson, David R.

    2017-05-01

    Standard neutral population genetics theory with a strictly fixed population size has important limitations. An alternative model that allows independently fluctuating population sizes and reproduces the standard neutral evolution is reviewed. We then study a situation such that the competing species are neutral at the equilibrium population size but population size fluctuations nevertheless favor fixation of one species over the other. In this case, a separation of timescales emerges naturally and allows adiabatic elimination of a fast population size variable to deduce the fluctuation-induced selection dynamics near the equilibrium population size. The results highlight the incompleteness of the standard population genetics with a strictly fixed population size.

  12. Population Genetics with Fluctuating Population Sizes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chotibut, Thiparat; Nelson, David R.

    2017-02-01

    Standard neutral population genetics theory with a strictly fixed population size has important limitations. An alternative model that allows independently fluctuating population sizes and reproduces the standard neutral evolution is reviewed. We then study a situation such that the competing species are neutral at the equilibrium population size but population size fluctuations nevertheless favor fixation of one species over the other. In this case, a separation of timescales emerges naturally and allows adiabatic elimination of a fast population size variable to deduce the fluctuation-induced selection dynamics near the equilibrium population size. The results highlight the incompleteness of the standard population genetics with a strictly fixed population size.

  13. Advances in pediatric anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Burns, L S

    1997-03-01

    Advances in many aspects of pediatric anesthesia have resulted in a significant reduction in morbidity and mortality in children. Research and development have created vast improvements in pharmacology. Sophisticated monitoring and improvements in equipment evolved from advances made in scientific technology. Recognition of the psychological needs of children of all ages likely has reduced the incidence of lasting psychological effects after hospitalization. Finally, these important advances have made pediatric anesthesia a safer and more compassionate specialty.

  14. Advanced echocardiographic techniques

    PubMed Central

    Perry, Rebecca

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Echocardiography has advanced significantly since its first clinical use. The move towards more accurate imaging and quantification has driven this advancement. In this review, we will briefly focus on three distinct but important recent advances, three‐dimensional (3D) echocardiography, contrast echocardiography and myocardial tissue imaging. The basic principles of these techniques will be discussed as well as current and future clinical applications. PMID:28191159

  15. Hydromechanical Advanced Coal Excavator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Estus, Jay M.; Summers, David

    1990-01-01

    Water-jet cutting reduces coal dust and its hazards. Advanced mining system utilizes full-face, hydromechanical, continuous miner. Coal excavator uses high-pressure water-jet lances, one in each of cutting heads and one in movable lance, to make cuts across top, bottom and middle height, respectively, of coal face. Wedge-shaped cutting heads advance into lower and upper cuts in turn, thereby breaking coal toward middle cut. Thrust cylinders and walking pads advance excavator toward coal face.

  16. Advancing the educational agenda.

    PubMed

    Baker, Cynthia

    2010-12-01

    This timely paper provides a thought-provoking analysis of current advanced practice nursing education in Canada. It comes at a critical juncture in the evolution of Canadian healthcare services and the redefinition of nursing roles. Increasingly, multiple sectors of society are calling for more nurses with advanced practice preparation and for a wider range of advanced practice nursing specialties. Advanced practice nurses (APNs) are being proposed as a solution to a financially overburdened national healthcare system, the increasing complexity of healthcare services, and a crisis in access to primary healthcare. Thus, governments seeking greater fiscal efficiency, medical specialists needing sophisticated collaborative support, and healthcare consumers see APNs as the way forward.

  17. Advanced Technologies for Acoustic Monitoring of Bird Populations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-04-01

    implement a new storage format for XBAT event logs as SQLite databases. Using a database representation would enable fast access to arbitrarily large...phase, MATLAB was extended via the MEX interface to support read-write access to SQLite database files. In the second phase, a database schema for

  18. Advancing the Pain Agenda in the Veteran Population.

    PubMed

    Gallagher, Rollin M

    2016-06-01

    The Veterans Health Administration (VHA) provides medical care for Veterans after leaving the military. The combination of multiple deployments and battlefield exposures to physical and psychological trauma results in a higher prevalence and complexity of chronic pain in Veterans than in the general public. The VHA and the Department of Defense work together to develop a single standard of stepped pain management appropriate for all settings from moment of injury or disease onset. This article describes the education, academic detailing, and clinical programs and policies that are transforming pain care in the VHA. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. Population problems and population research in a market economy.

    PubMed

    Tian, X

    1994-01-01

    A market driven economy has many effects on population growth. The laws of social production were explicated by Marx and Engels, and Comrade Deng Xiaoping presents his views on China's socialist market economy and population problems in this article. Modern market economies have changed greatly over time. Before the 1960s, the focus of the interaction between population and economic change was in macro control. Since the 1960s, the focus shifted to micro control. Theories on maximum growth and neomodern population theory provide only a few useful elements. Cost-benefit analysis of child production functions, despite limitations, has universal appeal. Western theories with sound scientific evidence and Marxist theories should be examined and integrated within the Chinese experience. Two areas of concern in China are the spatial imbalance between population and economic development and an appropriate time period for any research activity. Scientific research in China will be advanced by careful integration of theory and practice, careful study of the Chinese experience, in-depth analysis, and bold, practical approaches which incorporate existing research results from the West. There are three dominant views of economic reforms. 1) Economic development plans should include a market economy. 2) Chinese population control would depend upon administrative means rather than market forces. 3) There are indirect ways in which the market affects population production. The last position is favored. The conclusions are made that family planning has been and continues to be a driving force in declining birth rates and that a focus on government population control does not discount the importance of the influence of economic factors on changes in the birth rate. Market forces are beginning to show their impact on people's choice in reproduction, and the impact is increasing. Reforms must be made appropriate to both the position and the negative influence of the market economy on

  20. Routine mapping of Fusarium wilt resistance in BC1 populations of Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Susceptibility to Fusarium wilt disease varies among wild accessions of Arabidopsis thaliana. Six RESISTANCE TO FUSARIUM OXYSPORUM (RFO) quantitative trait loci (QTLs) controlling the resistance of accession Columbia-0 (Col-0) and susceptibility of Taynuilt-0 to Fusarium oxysporum forma specialis matthioli (FOM) are detected in a recombinant population derived from a single backcross of the F1 hybrid (BC1). In particular, the RFO1 QTL appears to interact with three other loci, RFO2, RFO4 and RFO6, and is attributed to the gene At1g79670. Results When resistance to FOM was mapped in a new BC1 population, in which the loss-of-function mutant of At1g79670 replaced wild type as the Col-0 parent, RFO1’s major effect and RFO1’s interaction with RFO2, RFO4 and RFO6 were absent, showing that At1g79670 alone accounts for the RFO1 QTL. Resistance of two QTLs, RFO3 and RFO5, was independent of RFO1 and was reproduced in the new BC1 population. In analysis of a third BC1 population, resistance to a second pathogen, F. oxysporum forma specialis conglutinans race 1 (FOC1), was mapped and the major effect locus RFO7 was identified. Conclusions Natural quantitative resistance to F. oxysporum is largely specific to the infecting forma specialis because different RFO loci were responsible for resistance to FOM and FOC1. The mapping of quantitative disease resistance traits in BC1 populations, generated from crosses between sequenced Arabidopsis accessions, can be a routine procedure when genome-wide genotyping is efficient, economical and accessible. PMID:24172069

  1. Genetic architecture of differences between populations of cowpea weevil (Callosobruchus maculatus) evolved in the same environment.

    PubMed

    Bieri, Jonas; Kawecki, Tadeusz J

    2003-02-01

    We investigated the genetic architecture underlying differentiation in fitness-related traits between two pairs of populations of the seed beetle Callosobruchus maculatus (Coleoptera: Bruchidae). These populations had geographically distant (> 2000 km) origins but evolved in a uniform laboratory environment for 120 generations. For each pair of populations (Nigeria x Yemen and Cameroon x Uganda) we estimated the means of five fitness-related characters and a measure of fitness (net reproductive rate R0) in each of the parental populations and 12 types of hybrids (two F1 and two F2 lines and eight backcrosses). Models containing up to nine composite genetic parameters were fitted to the means of the 14 lines. The patterns of line means for all traits in the Nigeria x Yemen cross and for four traits (larval survival, developmental rate, female body weight, and fecundity) in the Cameroon x Uganda cross were best explained by models including additive, dominance, and maternal effects, but excluding epistasis. We did not find any evidence for outbreeding depression for any trait. An epistatic component of divergence was detected for egg hatching success and R0 in the Cameroon x Uganda cross, but its sign was opposite to that expected under outbreeding depression, that is, additive x additive epistasis had a positive effect on the performance of F2 hybrids. All traits except fecundity showed a pattern of heterosis. A large difference of egg-hatching success between the two reciprocal F1 lines in that cross was best explained as fertilization incompatibility between Cameroon females and sperm carrying Uganda genes. The results suggest that these populations have not converged to the same life-history phenotype and genetic architecture, despite 120 generations of uniform natural selection. However, the absence of outbreeding depression implies that they did not evolve toward different adaptive peaks.

  2. Advanced Manufacturing Technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fikes, John

    2016-01-01

    Advanced Manufacturing Technologies (AMT) is developing and maturing innovative and advanced manufacturing technologies that will enable more capable and lower-cost spacecraft, launch vehicles and infrastructure to enable exploration missions. The technologies will utilize cutting edge materials and emerging capabilities including metallic processes, additive manufacturing, composites, and digital manufacturing. The AMT project supports the National Manufacturing Initiative involving collaboration with other government agencies.

  3. Kansas Advanced Semiconductor Project

    SciTech Connect

    Baringer, P.; Bean, A.; Bolton, T.; Horton-Smith, G.; Maravin, Y.; Ratra, B.; Stanton, N.; von Toerne, E.; Wilson, G.

    2007-09-21

    KASP (Kansas Advanced Semiconductor Project) completed the new Layer 0 upgrade for D0, assumed key electronics projects for the US CMS project, finished important new physics measurements with the D0 experiment at Fermilab, made substantial contributions to detector studies for the proposed e+e- international linear collider (ILC), and advanced key initiatives in non-accelerator-based neutrino physics.

  4. Advanced planetary studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Results of planetary advanced studies and planning support are summarized. The scope of analyses includes cost estimation research, planetary mission performance, penetrator mission concepts for airless planets/satellites, geology orbiter payload adaptability, lunar mission performance, and advanced planning activities. Study reports and related publications are included in a bibliography section.

  5. Advanced Network Security Project

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-12-01

    network. The network observed was the Abilene network of the University Consortium for Advanced Internet Development (UCAID), often known as “ Internet2 ...for Advanced Internet Development (UCAID), often known as “ Internet2 .” This contract was heavily operational in nature, as opposed to a contract

  6. Advanced Life Support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chambliss, Joe

    2004-01-01

    Viewgraphs on Advanced Life Support (ALS) Systems are presented. The topics include: 1) Fundamental Need for Advanced Life Support; 2) ALS organization; 3) Requirements and Rationale; 4) Past Integrated tests; 5) The need for improvements in life support systems; 6) ALS approach to meet exploration goals; 7) ALS Projects showing promise to meet exploration goals; and 9) GRC involvement in ALS.

  7. ADVANCED MANUFACTURING TEAM

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-01-16

    QUINCY BEAN, JIM LYDON, AND ZACK JONES OF MSFC’S ADVANCED MANUFACTURING TEAM, WITH MSFC’S M2 SELECTIVE LASER MELTING SYSTEM. THE M2 IS CURRENTLY DEDICATED TO ADVANCED COPPER MATERIAL DEVELOPMENT FOR THE LOW COST UPPER STAGE PROGRAM.

  8. Advances in dental materials.

    PubMed

    Fleming, Garry J P

    2014-05-01

    The dental market is replete with new resorative materials marketed on the basis of novel technological advances in materials chemistry, bonding capability or reduced operator time and/or technique sensitivity. This paper aims to consider advances in current materials, with an emphasis on their role in supporting contemporary clinical practice.

  9. Advanced Ceramic Armor Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-05-11

    materials, toughened alumina, fiber -reinforced glass matrix composites, and multilayer-gradient materials for ballistic testing. Fabrication and...material systems: Multilayer advanced armor materials consisting of a hard ceramic faceplate bonded to a graphite fiber -reinforced glass matrix...toughened alumina, and fiber - applied studies of advanced reinforced ceramic matrix glass and glass -ceramic composites for ballistic testing. technologies

  10. Advanced Engineering Fibers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edie, Dan D.; Dunham, Michael G.

    1987-01-01

    Describes Clemson University's Advanced Engineered Fibers Laboratory, which was established to provide national leadership and expertise in developing the processing equipment and advance fibers necessary for the chemical, fiber, and textile industries to enter the composite materials market. Discusses some of the laboratory's activities in…

  11. Advances in tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Langer, Robert; Vacanti, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Nearly 30 years ago, we reported on a concept now known as Tissue Engineering. Here, we report on some of the advances in this now thriving area of research. In particular, significant advances in tissue engineering of skin, liver, spinal cord, blood vessels, and other areas are discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Advances in Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Vacanti, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Nearly 30 years ago, we reported on a concept now known as Tissue Engineering. Here, we report on some of the advances in this now thriving area of research. In particular, significant advances in tissue engineering of skin, liver, spinal cord, blood vessels, and other areas are discussed. PMID:26711689

  13. Advanced Engineering Fibers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edie, Dan D.; Dunham, Michael G.

    1987-01-01

    Describes Clemson University's Advanced Engineered Fibers Laboratory, which was established to provide national leadership and expertise in developing the processing equipment and advance fibers necessary for the chemical, fiber, and textile industries to enter the composite materials market. Discusses some of the laboratory's activities in…

  14. Drilling at Advanced Levels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Case, Doug

    1977-01-01

    Instances where drilling is useful for advanced language are discussed. Several types of drills are recommended, with the philosophy that advanced level drills should have a lighter style and be regarded as a useful, occasional means of practicing individual new items. (CHK)

  15. Advanced Chemical Propulsion Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodcock, Gordon; Byers, Dave; Alexander, Leslie A.; Krebsbach, Al

    2004-01-01

    A study was performed of advanced chemical propulsion technology application to space science (Code S) missions. The purpose was to begin the process of selecting chemical propulsion technology advancement activities that would provide greatest benefits to Code S missions. Several missions were selected from Code S planning data, and a range of advanced chemical propulsion options was analyzed to assess capabilities and benefits re these missions. Selected beneficial applications were found for higher-performing bipropellants, gelled propellants, and cryogenic propellants. Technology advancement recommendations included cryocoolers and small turbopump engines for cryogenic propellants; space storable propellants such as LOX-hydrazine; and advanced monopropellants. It was noted that fluorine-bearing oxidizers offer performance gains over more benign oxidizers. Potential benefits were observed for gelled propellants that could be allowed to freeze, then thawed for use.

  16. Evolutionary dynamics in structured populations

    PubMed Central

    Nowak, Martin A.; Tarnita, Corina E.; Antal, Tibor

    2010-01-01

    Evolutionary dynamics shape the living world around us. At the centre of every evolutionary process is a population of reproducing individuals. The structure of that population affects evolutionary dynamics. The individuals can be molecules, cells, viruses, multicellular organisms or humans. Whenever the fitness of individuals depends on the relative abundance of phenotypes in the population, we are in the realm of evolutionary game theory. Evolutionary game theory is a general approach that can describe the competition of species in an ecosystem, the interaction between hosts and parasites, between viruses and cells, and also the spread of ideas and behaviours in the human population. In this perspective, we review the recent advances in evolutionary game dynamics with a particular emphasis on stochastic approaches in finite sized and structured populations. We give simple, fundamental laws that determine how natural selection chooses between competing strategies. We study the well-mixed population, evolutionary graph theory, games in phenotype space and evolutionary set theory. We apply these results to the evolution of cooperation. The mechanism that leads to the evolution of cooperation in these settings could be called ‘spatial selection’: cooperators prevail against defectors by clustering in physical or other spaces. PMID:20008382

  17. A new interspecific, Gossypium hirsutum x G. barbadense, RIL population: towards a unified consensus linkage map of tetraploid cotton.

    PubMed

    Lacape, Jean-Marc; Jacobs, J; Arioli, T; Derijcker, R; Forestier-Chiron, N; Llewellyn, D; Jean, J; Thomas, E; Viot, C

    2009-07-01

    We report the development of a new interspecific cotton recombinant inbred line (RIL) population of 140 lines deriving from an interspecific cross between Gossypium hirsutum (Gh) and G. barbadense (Gb), using the same two parents that have served for the construction of a BC(1) map and for the marker-assisted backcross selection program underway at CIRAD. Two marker systems, microsatellites and AFLPs, were used. An important feature of the RIL population was its marked segregation distortion with a genome-wide bias to Gh alleles (parental genome ratio is 71/29). The RIL map displays an excellent colinearity with the BC(1) map, although it is severely contracted in terms of map size. Existence of 255 loci in common (between 6 and 14 per chromosome) allowed the integration of the two data sets. A consensus BC(1)-RIL map based upon 215 individuals (75 BC1 + 140 RIL) was built. It consisted of 1,745 loci, spanned 3,637 cM, intermediate between the sizes of the two component maps, and constituted a solid framework to cross align cotton maps using common markers. The new RIL population will be further exploited for fiber property QTL mapping and eQTL mapping.

  18. Comparative Analysis of Qtls Affecting Plant Height and Maturity across the Poaceae, in Reference to an Interspecific Sorghum Population

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Y. R.; Schertz, K. F.; Paterson, A. H.

    1995-01-01

    Correspondence among QTLs affecting height and/or flowering was investigated across the five races of sorghum, an interspecific sorghum F(2) population, and 32 previously published sorghum, maize, rice, wheat, and barley populations revealing 185 QTLs or discrete mutants. Among nine QTLs mapped in the interspecific sorghum population (six affecting height and three affecting flowering), at least seven (78%) are associated with ``conversion,'' backcross-introgression of alleles imparting reduced height or earlier flowering from cultivated sorghums into one or more exotic Sorghum bicolor races. One chromosomal region was ``converted'' in all S. bicolor races--in the interspecific F(2), this region explined 54.8% of height variation (putatively the Dw2 gene) and 85.7% of flowering time variation (putatively Ma1). Comparative data suggest that Ma1 and Dw2 orthologs influence height and flowering of other Poaceae taxa and support classical dogma that the sorghum phenotypes attributed to Ma1 and Dw2 (respectively) are due to different genetic loci. Other sorghum QTLs also showed correspondence with those in other Poaceae, more frequently than would be expected by chance. Possible homoeologous QTLs were found within both the maize and sorghum genomes. Comparative QTL mapping provides a means to unify, and thereby simplify, molecular analysis of complex phenotypes. PMID:8536986

  19. Cold hardiness increases with age in juvenile Rhododendron populations

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Chon-Chong; Krebs, Stephen L.; Arora, Rajeev

    2014-01-01

    Winter survival in woody plants is controlled by environmental and genetic factors that affect the plant’s ability to cold acclimate. Because woody perennials are long-lived and often have a prolonged juvenile (pre-flowering) phase, it is conceivable that both chronological and physiological age factors influence adaptive traits such as stress tolerance. This study investigated annual cold hardiness (CH) changes in several hybrid Rhododendron populations based on Tmax, an estimate of the maximum rate of freezing injury (ion leakage) in cold-acclimated leaves from juvenile progeny. Data from F2 and backcross populations derived from R. catawbiense and R. fortunei parents indicated significant annual increases in Tmax ranging from 3.7 to 6.4°C as the seedlings aged from 3 to 5 years old. A similar yearly increase (6.7°C) was observed in comparisons of 1- and 2-year-old F1 progenies from a R. catawbiense × R. dichroanthum cross. In contrast, CH of the mature parent plants (>10 years old) did not change significantly over the same evaluation period. In leaf samples from a natural population of R. maximum, CH evaluations over 2 years resulted in an average Tmax value for juvenile 2- to 3-year-old plants that was 9.2°C lower than the average for mature (~30 years old) plants. A reduction in CH was also observed in three hybrid rhododendron cultivars clonally propagated by rooted cuttings (ramets)—Tmax of 4-year-old ramets was significantly lower than the Tmax estimates for the 30- to 40-year-old source plants (ortets). In both the wild R. maximum population and the hybrid cultivar group, higher accumulation of a cold-acclimation responsive 25 kDa leaf dehydrin was associated with older plants and higher CH. The feasibility of identifying hardy phenotypes at juvenile period and research implications of age-dependent changes in CH are discussed. PMID:25360138

  20. Global Population Profile: 2002. International Population Reports

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christenson, Matthew; McDevitt, Thomas; Stanecki, Karen

    2004-01-01

    Global Population Profile: 2002 summarizes the most important trends in global population at the dawn of the 21st century. The presentation is organized around four themes: (1) Global Population; (2) Growth, Global Population; (3) Composition, Contraceptive Prevalence in the Developing World; and (4) the AIDS Pandemic in the 21st Century. This…

  1. Advancing Ethical Neuroscience Research.

    PubMed

    Borah, B Rashmi; Strand, Nicolle K; Chillag, Kata L

    2016-12-01

    As neuroscience research advances, researchers, clinicians, and other stakeholders will face a host of ethical challenges. The Presidential Commission for the Study of Bioethical Issues (Bioethics Commission) has published two reports that provide recommendations on how to advance research endeavors ethically. The commission addressed, among other issues, how to prioritize different types of neuroscience research and how to include research participants who have impaired consent capacity. The Bioethics Commission's recommendations provide a foundation for ethical guidelines as neuroscience research advances and progresses. © 2016 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.

  2. Advanced information society(7)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiba, Toshihiro

    Various threats are hiding in advanced informationalized society. As we see car accident problems in motorization society light aspects necessarily accompy shady ones. Under the changing circumstances of advanced informationalization added values of information has become much higher. It causes computer crime, hacker, computer virus to come to the surface. In addition it can be said that infringement of intellectual property and privacy are threats brought by advanced information. Against these threats legal, institutional and insurance measures have been progressed, and newly security industry has been established. However, they are not adequate individually or totally. The future vision should be clarified, and countermeasures according to the visions have to be considered.

  3. The ADvanced SEParation (ADSEP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    The ADvanced SEParation (ADSEP) commercial payload is making use of major advances in separation technology: The Phase Partitioning Experiment (PPE); the Micorencapsulation experiment; and the Hemoglobin Separation Experiment (HSE). Using ADSEP, commercial researchers will attempt to determine the partition coefficients for model particles in a two-phase system. With this information, researchers can develop a higher resolution, more effective cell isolation procedure that can be used for many different types of research and for improved health care. The advanced separation technology is already being made available for use in ground-based laboratories.

  4. Advanced biostack experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buecker, H.

    1981-01-01

    The Advanced Biostack Experiment is described. The objectives are: (1) to confirm, complement, and enlarge the information obtained from the previous experiments by applying improved and advanced methods of localization and physical and biological evaluation, performing advanced experiments based on these data, and including additional biological specimens and additional radiation detectors; (2) to determine the biological importance of nuclear disintegration stars; (3) to determine the interference of HZE particle induced effects with those of other space flight factors (e.g., weightlessness); and (4) to determine the distribution of HZE particles and of disintegration stars at different locations inside the module and on the pallet.

  5. Advanced biostack experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Buecker, H.

    1981-11-01

    The Advanced Biostack Experiment is described. The objectives are: (1) to confirm, complement, and enlarge the information obtained from the previous experiments by applying improved and advanced methods of localization and physical and biological evaluation, performing advanced experiments based on these data, and including additional biological specimens and additional radiation detectors (2) to determine the biological importance of nuclear disintegration stars (3) to determine the interference of HZE particle induced effects with those of other space flight factors (e.g., weightlessness) and (4) to determine the distribution of HZE particles and of disintegration stars at different locations inside the module and on the pallet.

  6. Advanced houses guide

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-31

    Section 1 of this report describes the R-2000 and Advanced Houses programs, and reviews the technical requirements of Advanced Houses with regard to purchased energy, environmental features, and indoor comfort/health. Subsequent sections describe design considerations, construction issues, existing installations, and alternate approaches used in the following components of Advanced Houses: Foundation systems, wall systems, windows and exterior doors, interior finishes and indoor air quality, environmental materials, mechanical systems, home automation, lights and appliances, renewable energy and heat recovery systems, and environmental management.

  7. Advanced Computer Typography.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-12-01

    ADVANCED COMPUTER TYPOGRAPHY .(U) DEC 81 A V HERSHEY UNCLASSIFIED NPS012-81-005 M MEEEIEEEII IIUJIL15I.4 MICROCQP RE SO.JjI ON ft R NPS012-81-005...NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL 0Monterey, California DTIC SELECTEWA APR 5 1982 B ADVANCED COMPUTER TYPOGRAPHY by A. V. HERSHEY December 1981 OApproved for...Subtitle) S. TYPE Or REPORT & PERIOD COVERED Final ADVANCED COMPUTER TYPOGRAPHY Dec 1979 - Dec 1981 S. PERFORMING ORG. REPORT NUMBER 7. AUTHOR(s) S CONTRACT

  8. Advanced Electronic Technology.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-11-15

    It AD AObS 062 MASSACHUSETTS INST OF TECH LEXINGTON LINCOLN LAB F/S 9/S ADVANCED ELECTRONIC TECHNOLOGY .(U) NOV 78 A J MCLAUGHLIN. A L MCWHORTER...T I T U T E OF T E C H N O L O G Y L I N C O L N L A B O R A T O R Y ADVANCED ELECTRONIC TECHNOLOGY QUARTERLY TECKNICAL SUMMAR Y REPORT TO THE AIR...Division 8 (Solid State) on the Advanced Electronic Technology Program. Hi

  9. The ADvanced SEParation (ADSEP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    The ADvanced SEParation (ADSEP) commercial payload is making use of major advances in separation technology: The Phase Partitioning Experiment (PPE); the Micorencapsulation experiment; and the Hemoglobin Separation Experiment (HSE). Using ADSEP, commercial researchers will attempt to determine the partition coefficients for model particles in a two-phase system. With this information, researchers can develop a higher resolution, more effective cell isolation procedure that can be used for many different types of research and for improved health care. The advanced separation technology is already being made available for use in ground-based laboratories.

  10. Advanced biostack experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buecker, H.

    1981-01-01

    The Advanced Biostack Experiment is described. The objectives are: (1) to confirm, complement, and enlarge the information obtained from the previous experiments by applying improved and advanced methods of localization and physical and biological evaluation, performing advanced experiments based on these data, and including additional biological specimens and additional radiation detectors; (2) to determine the biological importance of nuclear disintegration stars; (3) to determine the interference of HZE particle induced effects with those of other space flight factors (e.g., weightlessness); and (4) to determine the distribution of HZE particles and of disintegration stars at different locations inside the module and on the pallet.

  11. Recent advances in shoulder research.

    PubMed

    Killian, Megan L; Cavinatto, Leonardo; Galatz, Leesa M; Thomopoulos, Stavros

    2012-06-15

    Shoulder pathology is a growing concern for the aging population, athletes, and laborers. Shoulder osteoarthritis and rotator cuff disease represent the two most common disorders of the shoulder leading to pain, disability, and degeneration. While research in cartilage regeneration has not yet been translated clinically, the field of shoulder arthroplasty has advanced to the point that joint replacement is an excellent and viable option for a number of pathologic conditions in the shoulder. Rotator cuff disease has been a significant focus of research activity in recent years, as clinicians face the challenge of poor tendon healing and irreversible changes associated with rotator cuff arthropathy. Future treatment modalities involving biologics and tissue engineering hold further promise to improve outcomes for patients suffering from shoulder pathologies.

  12. Recent advances in Japanese encephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Basu, Anirban; Dutta, Kallol

    2017-01-01

    Japanese encephalitis is a flaviviral disease that is endemic to the South, Southeast Asia, and Asia Oceania regions. Given that about 60% of the world’s population (about 7.4 billion) resides in this region (about 4.4 billion), this disease poses a significant threat to global health. Active vaccination campaigns conducted in endemic countries have led to a decrease in the number of reported cases over the years. In this article, we strive to briefly highlight recent advances in understanding the role of microRNAs in disease pathology, focus on providing brief summaries of recent clinical trials in the field of Japanese encephalitis therapeutics, and review the current prophylactic strategies. PMID:28357054

  13. Advances in lens implant technology

    PubMed Central

    Kampik, Anselm; Dexl, Alois K.; Zimmermann, Nicole; Glasser, Adrian; Baumeister, Martin; Kohnen, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Cataract surgery is one of the oldest and the most frequent outpatient clinic operations in medicine performed worldwide. The clouded human crystalline lens is replaced by an artificial intraocular lens implanted into the capsular bag. During the last six decades, cataract surgery has undergone rapid development from a traumatic, manual surgical procedure with implantation of a simple lens to a minimally invasive intervention increasingly assisted by high technology and a broad variety of implants customized for each patient’s individual requirements. This review discusses the major advances in this field and focuses on the main challenge remaining – the treatment of presbyopia. The demand for correction of presbyopia is increasing, reflecting the global growth of the ageing population. Pearls and pitfalls of currently applied methods to correct presbyopia and different approaches under investigation, both in lens implant technology and in surgical technology, are discussed. PMID:23413369

  14. Recent Advances in Epidural Analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Maria; George, John E.; Seif, John; Farag, Ehab

    2012-01-01

    Neuraxial anesthesia is a term that denotes all forms of central blocks, involving the spinal, epidural, and caudal spaces. Epidural anesthesia is a versatile technique widely used in anesthetic practice. Its potential to decrease postoperative morbidity and mortality has been demonstrated by numerous studies. To maximize its perioperative benefits while minimizing potential adverse outcomes, the knowledge of factors affecting successful block placement is essential. This paper will provide an overview of the pertinent anatomical, pharmacological, immunological, and technical aspects of epidural anesthesia in both adult and pediatric populations and will discuss the recent advances, the related rare but potentially devastating complications, and the current recommendations for the use of anticoagulants in the setting of neuraxial block placement. PMID:22174708

  15. Recent advances in shoulder research

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Shoulder pathology is a growing concern for the aging population, athletes, and laborers. Shoulder osteoarthritis and rotator cuff disease represent the two most common disorders of the shoulder leading to pain, disability, and degeneration. While research in cartilage regeneration has not yet been translated clinically, the field of shoulder arthroplasty has advanced to the point that joint replacement is an excellent and viable option for a number of pathologic conditions in the shoulder. Rotator cuff disease has been a significant focus of research activity in recent years, as clinicians face the challenge of poor tendon healing and irreversible changes associated with rotator cuff arthropathy. Future treatment modalities involving biologics and tissue engineering hold further promise to improve outcomes for patients suffering from shoulder pathologies. PMID:22709417

  16. Health requirements for advanced coal extraction systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerman, W. F.

    1980-01-01

    Health requirements were developed as long range goals for future advanced coal extraction systems which would be introduced into the market in the year 2000. The goal of the requirements is that underground coal miners work in an environment that is as close as possible to the working conditions of the general population, that they do not exceed mortality and morbidity rates resulting from lung diseases that are comparable to those of the general population, and that their working conditions comply as closely as possible to those of other industries as specified by OSHA regulations. A brief technique for evaluating whether proposed advanced systems meet these safety requirements is presented, as well as a discussion of the costs of respiratory disability compensation.

  17. Expanding Advanced Civilizations in the Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gros, C.

    The 1950 lunch-table remark by Enrico Fermi `Where is everybody' has started intensive scientific and philosophical discussions about what we call nowadays the `Fermi paradox': If there had been ever a single advanced civilization in the cosmological history of our galaxy, dedicated to expansion, it would have had plenty of time to colonize the entire galaxy via exponential growth. No evidence of present or past alien visits to earth are known to us, leading to the standard conclusion that no advanced expanding civilization has ever existed in the milky-way. This conclusion rest fundamentally on the ad-hoc assumption, that any alien civilizations dedicated to expansion at one time would remain dedicated to expansions forever. Considering our limited knowledge about alien civilizations we need however to relax this basic assumption. Here we show that a substantial and stable population of expanding advanced civilization might consequently exist in our galaxy.

  18. Dyspnea during Advanced Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... important in planning treatment. Treatment may be to control signs and symptoms of pleural effusion and improve quality of life. A malignant pleural effusion often occurs in cancer that is advanced , cannot be removed by surgery , or continues to ...

  19. Advanced care directives

    MedlinePlus

    ... you want no matter how ill you are. Writing an advance care directive may be hard. You ... wishes usually replace those you made previously in writing. Additional Information Write your living will or health ...

  20. Advances in Process Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrison, David L.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Advances in electronics and computer science have enabled industries (pulp/paper, iron/steel, petroleum/chemical) to attain better control of their processes with resulting increases in quality, productivity, profitability, and compliance with government regulations. (JN)

  1. Advanced Welding Concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ding, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    Four advanced welding techniques and their use in NASA are briefly reviewed in this poster presentation. The welding techniques reviewed are: Solid State Welding, Friction Stir Welding (FSW), Thermal Stir Welding (TSW) and Ultrasonic Stir Welding.

  2. Advanced information society(2)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masuyama, Keiichi

    Our modern life is full of information and information infiltrates into our daily life. Networking of the telecommunication is extended to society, company, and individual level. Although we have just entered the advanced information society, business world and our daily life have been steadily transformed by the advancement of information network. This advancement of information brings a big influence on economy, and will play they the main role in the expansion of domestic demands. This paper tries to view the image of coming advanced information society, focusing on the transforming businessman's life and the situation of our daily life, which became wealthy by the spread of daily life information and the visual information by satellite system, in the development of the intelligent city.

  3. Advanced Lab Consortium ``Conspiracy''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichert, Jonathan F.

    2006-03-01

    Advanced Laboratory instruction is a time-honored and essential element of an undergraduate physics education. But, from my vantage point, it has been neglected by the two major professional societies, APS and AAPT. At some schools, it has been replaced by ``research experiences,'' but I contend that very few of these experiences in the research lab, particularly in the junior year, deliver what they promise. It is time to focus the attention of APS, AAPT, and the NSF on the advanced lab. We need to create an Advanced Lab Consortium (ALC) of faculty and staff to share experiments, suppliers, materials, pedagogy, ideas, in short to build a professional network for those committed to advanced lab instruction. The AAPT is currently in serious discussions on this topic and my company stands ready with both financial and personnel resources to support the effort. This talk is a plea for co-conspirators.

  4. Advance Identification (ADID)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Advance identification of disposal areas (ADID), a planning process used to identify wetlands and other waters that are generally suitable or unsuitable for the discharge of dredged and fill material.

  5. Advanced Electron Linacs

    SciTech Connect

    Siemann, R.

    2005-02-14

    The research into advanced acceleration concepts for electron linear accelerators being pursued at SLAC is reviewed. This research includes experiments in laser acceleration, plasma wakefield acceleration, and mmwavelength RF driven accelerators.

  6. Advanced Electrochemical Waste Forms

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, Brian J.; Crum, Jarrod V.; McCloy, John S.; Matyas, Josef

    2011-12-01

    This is a brief description of PNNL's efforts in FY2011 towards developing advanced electrochemical waste forms. This is a short section that will become part of a larger document being put together by INL.

  7. Advance Control Measures & Programs

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    As areas develop their path forward or action plan, they should consider a variety of voluntary and mandatory measures and programs. The resources on this page can help, and participants are also encouraged to talk with their EPA Advance contact

  8. Advance Directives - Multiple Languages

    MedlinePlus

    ... Supplements Videos & Tools You Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Advance Directives URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/languages/advancedirectives.html Other topics A-Z Expand Section ...

  9. Advances in Process Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrison, David L.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Advances in electronics and computer science have enabled industries (pulp/paper, iron/steel, petroleum/chemical) to attain better control of their processes with resulting increases in quality, productivity, profitability, and compliance with government regulations. (JN)

  10. Advanced Heart Failure

    MedlinePlus

    ... doctors, making good decisions requires teamwork. Through shared decision making, doctors and patients consider both the options and ... care you want to receive. What is shared decision making? When heart failure progresses to an advanced stage, ...

  11. Advances in cell culture

    SciTech Connect

    Maramorosch, K. )

    1987-01-01

    This book presents papers on advances in cell culture. Topics covered include: Genetic changes in the influenza viruses during growth in cultured cells; The biochemistry and genetics of mosquito cells in culture; and Tree tissue culture applications.

  12. Advanced urology nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Crowe, Helen

    2014-03-01

    Urology nursing has developed as a specialty over the past few decades in response to several factors, workload demands being a prime reason. Nurses are taking on additional roles and activities including procedures such as cystoscopy and prostate biopsy, and running nurse-led clinics for a variety of urological conditions. Audits of advanced urological nursing practice have shown this care to be of a high standard and investigative procedures performed by these nurses match the diagnostic quality of existing services. Professional urological nursing organizations support the professional needs of these nurses, but the provision of education and training for advanced practice activities remains an unaddressed need. A range of confusing advanced urology nursing titles exists, and uncertainty regarding the roles and scope of practice for these nurses remains a concern. Acceptance and support from medical colleagues is required for the success of advanced urological nursing practice, but opinions on these roles remain divided.

  13. New approaches to disease mapping in admixed populations

    PubMed Central

    Seldin, Michael F.; Pasaniuc, Bogdan; Price, Alkes L.

    2011-01-01

    Admixed populations such as African Americans and Hispanic Americans are often medically underserved and bear a disproportionately high burden of disease. Owing to the diversity of their genomes, these populations have both advantages and disadvantages for genetic studies of complex phenotypes. Advances in statistical methodologies that can infer genetic contributions from ancestral populations may yield new insights into the aetiology of disease and may contribute to the applicability of genomic medicine to these admixed population groups. PMID:21709689

  14. Advanced planetary studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Results of planetary advanced studies and planning support provided by Science Applications, Inc. staff members to Earth and Planetary Exploration Division, OSSA/NASA, for the period 1 February 1981 to 30 April 1982 are summarized. The scope of analyses includes cost estimation, planetary missions performance, solar system exploration committee support, Mars program planning, Galilean satellite mission concepts, and advanced propulsion data base. The work covers 80 man-months of research. Study reports and related publications are included in a bibliography section.

  15. Advanced Welding Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ding, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    Some of the applications of advanced welding techniques are shown in this poster presentation. Included are brief explanations of the use on the Ares I and Ares V launch vehicle and on the Space Shuttle Launch vehicle. Also included are microstructural views from four advanced welding techniques: Variable Polarity Plasma Arc (VPPA) weld (fusion), self-reacting friction stir welding (SR-FSW), conventional FSW, and Tube Socket Weld (TSW) on aluminum.

  16. Advanced Usability Evaluation Methods

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-04-01

    tracking in usability evaluation : A practitioner’s guide. In J. Hyönä, R. Radach, & H. Deubel. (Eds.), The mind’s eye: Cognitive and applied...Advanced Usability Evaluation Methods Terence S. Andre, Lt Col, USAF Margaret Schurig, Human Factors Design Specialist, The Boeing Co...TITLE AND SUBTITLE Advanced Usability Evaluation Methods 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT

  17. Microbial populations in contaminant plumes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haack, S.K.; Bekins, B.A.

    2000-01-01

    Efficient biodegradation of subsurface contaminants requires two elements: (1) microbial populations with the necessary degradative capabilities, and (2) favorable subsurface geochemical and hydrological conditions. Practical constraints on experimental design and interpretation in both the hydrogeological and microbiological sciences have resulted in limited knowledge of the interaction between hydrogeological and microbiological features of subsurface environments. These practical constraints include: (1) inconsistencies between the scales of investigation in the hydrogeological and microbiological sciences, and (2) practical limitations on the ability to accurately define microbial populations in environmental samples. However, advances in application of small-scale sampling methods and interdisciplinary approaches to site investigations are beginning to significantly improve understanding of hydrogeological and microbiological interactions. Likewise, culture-based and molecular analyses of microbial populations in subsurface contaminant plumes have revealed significant adaptation of microbial populations to plume environmental conditions. Results of recent studies suggest that variability in subsurface geochemical and hydrological conditions significantly influences subsurface microbial-community structure. Combined investigations of site conditions and microbial-community structure provide the knowledge needed to understand interactions between subsurface microbial populations, plume geochemistry, and contaminant biodegradation.

  18. Effective population size of korean populations.

    PubMed

    Park, Leeyoung

    2014-12-01

    Recently, new methods have been developed for estimating the current and recent changes in effective population sizes. Based on the methods, the effective population sizes of Korean populations were estimated using data from the Korean Association Resource (KARE) project. The overall changes in the population sizes of the total populations were similar to CHB (Han Chinese in Beijing, China) and JPT (Japanese in Tokyo, Japan) of the HapMap project. There were no differences in past changes in population sizes with a comparison between an urban area and a rural area. Age-dependent current and recent effective population sizes represent the modern history of Korean populations, including the effects of World War II, the Korean War, and urbanization. The oldest age group showed that the population growth of Koreans had already been substantial at least since the end of the 19th century.

  19. Pregnant & Lactating Populations Research - NCS Dietary Assessment Literature Review

    Cancer.gov

    Identifying and studying additional biomarkers of energy and nutrient intake will advance validation efforts and lead to a better understanding of the biases and sources of measurement error in dietary assessment instruments in pregnant or lactating populations.

  20. Assessing the "Agedness" of a Population

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jayaraj, D.; Subramanian, S.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper we follow a lead provided by Basu and Basu ["The Greying of Populations: Concepts and Measurement," Demography India 16, pp. 79-89], in order to advance a class of "agedness" indices which, because they have been motivated by analogous considerations in the poverty measurement literature, can find application in…

  1. Estimating population diversity with CatchAll

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The massive quantity of data produced by next-generation sequencing has created a pressing need for advanced statistical tools, in particular for analysis of bacterial and phage communities. Here we address estimating the total diversity in a population – the species richness. This is an important s...

  2. Psychiatric Advance Directives: Getting Started

    MedlinePlus

    ... More... Home Getting Started National Resource Center on Psychiatric Advance Directives - Getting Started Getting Started Psychiatric advance directives (PADs) are relatively new legal instruments ...

  3. Different lines of evidence used to delimit species in ticks: A study of the South American populations of Amblyomma parvum (Acari: Ixodidae).

    PubMed

    Nava, Santiago; Gerardi, Monize; Szabó, Matias P J; Mastropaolo, Mariano; Martins, Thiago F; Labruna, Marcelo B; Beati, Lorenza; Estrada-Peña, Agustín; Guglielmone, Alberto A

    2016-10-01

    The goal of this work was to combine different lines of evidence besides that of molecular markers to delimit species in ticks when the molecular data are not totally congruent. Two groups (Argentina, Brazil) of South American populations of Amblyomma parvum were compared to test whether the splitting of these two lineages suggested by genetic analyses is complete. Comparative studies of reproductive compatibility, morphological analyses of fixed characters, and comparison of population distributions in spatially defined ecological niches were performed.The morphological comparisons of both discrete and morphometric characters showed no differences among A. parvum ticks from Argentina and Brazil. The intercrosses and backcrosses showed evidence of pre- and post-zygotic compatibility between the two groups. No significant differences in environmental traits were found which would justify the separation of the records of A. parvum in distinct groups. Although the gene flow between the two groups of populations is limited, the absence of reproductive barriers, the lack of significant morphological differences, and the absence of significant differences in the niche preferences indicate that populations of A. parvum from Argentina and Brazil should be treated as a single species. The speciation conjectures suggested by some analyses of mitochondrial DNA sequences were not supported when different lines of evidences were compared.

  4. Recruit and ADVANCE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosser, Sue V.

    2007-04-01

    Beginning in 2001, the National Science Foundation launched the ADVANCE Initiative, which has now awarded more than 70 million to some thirty institutions for transformations to advance women. Results of studies on how to attract and retain women students and faculty underpinned our ADVANCE Institutional Transformation grant funded by the NSF for 3.7 million for five years, beginning in 2001. As co-principal investigator on this grant, I insured that this research informed the five major threads of the grant: 1) Four termed ADVANCE professors to mentor junior women faculty in each college; 2) Collection of MIT-Report-like data indicators to assess whether advancement of women really occurs during and after the institutional transformation undertaken through ADVANCE; 3) Family-friendly policies and practices to stop the tenure clock and provide active service, modified duties, lactation stations and day care; 4) Mini-retreats to facilitate access for tenure-track women faculty to male decision-makers and administrators for informal conversations and discussion on topics important to women faculty; 5) Removal of subtle gender, racial, and other biases in promotion and tenure. The dynamic changes resulting from the grant in quality of mentoring, new understanding of promotion and tenure, numbers of women retained and given endowed chairs, and emergence of new family friendly policies gave me hope for genuine diversification of leadership in science and technology. As the grant funding ends, the absence of NSF prestige and monitoring, coupled with a change in academic leadership at the top, provide new challenges for institutionalization, recruitment, and advancement of women into leadership positions in science and engineering.

  5. MC1R genotype and plumage colouration in the zebra finch (Taeniopygia guttata): population structure generates artefactual associations.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Joseph I; Krause, E Tobias; Lehmann, Katrin; Krüger, Oliver

    2014-01-01

    Polymorphisms at the melanocortin-1 receptor (MC1R) gene have been linked to coloration in many vertebrate species. However, the potentially confounding influence of population structure has rarely been controlled for. We explored the role of the MC1R in a model avian system by sequencing the coding region in 162 zebra finches comprising 79 wild type and 83 white individuals from five stocks. Allelic counts differed significantly between the two plumage morphs at multiple segregating sites, but these were mostly synonymous. To provide a control, the birds were genotyped at eight microsatellites and subjected to Bayesian cluster analysis, revealing two distinct groups. We therefore crossed wild type with white individuals and backcrossed the F1s with white birds. No significant associations were detected in the resulting offspring, suggesting that our original findings were a byproduct of genome-wide divergence. Our results are consistent with a previous study that found no association between MC1R polymorphism and plumage coloration in leaf warblers. They also contribute towards a growing body of evidence suggesting that care should be taken to quantify, and where necessary control for, population structure in association studies.

  6. The ADVANCE project: Insights and achievments

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-31

    ADVANCE [Advanced Driver and Vehicle Advisory Navigation ConcEpt] was a public/private partnership conceived and developed by four founding parties. The founding parties include the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), the Illinois Department of Transportation (IDOT), the University of Illinois at Chicago and Northwestern University operating together under the auspices of the Illinois Universities Transportation Research Consortium (IUTRC), and Motorola, Inc. The major responsibilities of each party are fully described in the Project agreement. Subsequently, these four were joined on the Steering Committee by the American Automobile Association (AAA). This unique blending of public sector, private sector and university interests, augmented by more than two dozen other private sector participants, provided a strong set of resources for ADVANCE. The ADVANCE test area covered over 300 square miles including portions of the City of Chicago and 40 northwest suburban communities. The Project encompasses the high growth areas adjacent to O`Hare International Airport, the Schaumburg/Hoffman Estates office and retail complexes, and the Lake-Cook Road development corridor. It also includes major sports and entertainment complexes such as the Arlington International Racecourse and the Rosemont Horizon. The population in the area is more than 750,000. The Insights and Perspectives Compendium is intended to provide useful information to project managers, system developers, and system integrators of future similar ITS implementations. It is intended for those that are technically interested in the ADVANCE Project and have a basic understanding of the project.

  7. Sepsis in vulnerable populations.

    PubMed

    Bhagwanjee, Satish; Ugarte, Sebastian

    2014-09-01

    Despite the acquisition of a large body of evidence, there are many unanswered questions about sepsis. The definition of this disease is plagued by the lack of a simple pathophysiological description linking cause to effect and the activation of host immune responses that hinders disease progression at the same time producing multiorgan dysfunction. A plethora of inconsistent clinical features has served to obfuscate rather than illuminate. The Surviving Sepsis Guidelines (SSG) are a major advance because it comprehensively interrogates all aspects of care for the critically ill. For vulnerable populations living in low- and middle-income countries, this guideline is ineffectual because of the lack of region-specific data, differences in etiology of sepsis and burden of disease, limited human capacity and infrastructure, as well as socioeconomic realities. Appropriate care must be guided by common sense guidelines that are sensitive to local realities and adapted as relevant data are acquired. Copyright © 2014 World Heart Federation (Geneva). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Do Advance Directives Direct?

    PubMed

    Shapiro, Susan P

    2015-06-01

    Resolution of long-standing debates about the role and impact of advance directives - living wills and powers of attorney for health care - has been hampered by a dearth of appropriate data, in particular data that compare the process and outcomes of end-of-life decision making on behalf of patients with and without advance directives. Drawing on a large ethnographic study of patients in two intensive care units in a large urban teaching hospital, this article compares aspects of the medical decision-making process and outcomes by advance-directive status. Controlling for demographic characteristics and severity of illness, the study finds few significant differences between patients without advance directives and those who claim to have them. Surprisingly, these few differences hold only for those whose directives are in their hospital chart. There are no significant differences between those with no directive and those claiming to have a copy at home or elsewhere. The article considers the implications if directives seemingly must be in hand to show even modest effects. Do advance directives direct? The intensive care unit data provide far more support for the growing body of literature that casts doubt on their impact than studies that promote the use of them.

  9. Advanced access appointments

    PubMed Central

    Hudec, John C.; MacDougall, Steven; Rankin, Elaine

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To examine the effects of advanced access (same-day physician appointments) on patient and provider satisfaction and to determine its association with other variables such as physician income and patient emergency department use. DESIGN Patient satisfaction survey and semistructured interviews with physicians and support staff; analysis of physician medical insurance billings and patient emergency department visits. SETTING Cape Breton, NS. PARTICIPANTS Patients, physicians, and support staff of 3 comparable family physician practices that had not implemented advanced access and an established advanced access practice. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Self-reported provider and patient satisfaction, physician office income, and patients’ emergency department use. RESULTS The key benefits of implementation of advanced access were an increase in provider and patient satisfaction levels, same or greater physician office income, and fewer less urgent (triage level 4) and nonurgent (triage level 5) emergency department visits by patients. CONCLUSION Currently within the Central Cape Breton Region, 33% of patients wait 4 or more days for urgent appointments. Findings from this study can be used to enhance primary care physician practice redesign. This research supports many benefits of transitioning to an advanced access model of patient booking. PMID:20944024

  10. Advanced Microturbine Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Rosfjord, T; Tredway, W; Chen, A; Mulugeta, J; Bhatia, T

    2008-12-31

    In July 2000, the United Technologies Research Center (UTRC) was one of five recipients of a US Department of Energy contract under the Advanced Microturbine System (AMS) program managed by the Office of Distributed Energy (DE). The AMS program resulted from several government-industry workshops that recognized that microturbine systems could play an important role in improving customer choice and value for electrical power. That is, the group believed that electrical power could be delivered to customers more efficiently and reliably than the grid if an effective distributed energy strategy was followed. Further, the production of this distributed power would be accomplished with less undesirable pollutants of nitric oxides (NOx) unburned hydrocarbons (UHC), and carbon monoxide (CO). In 2000, the electrical grid delivered energy to US customers at a national average of approximately 32% efficiency. This value reflects a wide range of powerplants, but is dominated by older, coal burning stations that provide approximately 50% of US electrical power. The grid efficiency is also affected by transmission and distribution (T&D) line losses that can be significant during peak power usage. In some locations this loss is estimated to be 15%. Load pockets can also be so constrained that sufficient power cannot be transmitted without requiring the installation of new wires. New T&D can be very expensive and challenging as it is often required in populated regions that do not want above ground wires. While historically grid reliability has satisfied most customers, increasing electronic transactions and the computer-controlled processes of the 'digital economy' demand higher reliability. For them, power outages can be very costly because of transaction, work-in-progress, or perishable commodity losses. Powerplants that produce the grid electrical power emit significant levels of undesirable NOx, UHC, and CO pollutants. The level of emission is quoted as either a technology

  11. Advanced transmission studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coy, John J.; Bill, Robert C.

    1988-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center and the U.S. Army Aviation Systems Command share an interest in advancing the technology for helicopter propulsion systems. In particular, this paper presents highlights from that portion of the program in drive train technology and the related mechanical components. The major goals of the program are to increase the life, reliability, and maintainability; reduce the weight, noise, and vibration; and maintain the relatively high mechanical efficiency of the gear train. The current activity emphasizes noise reduction technology and analytical code development followed by experimental verification. Selected significant advances in technology for transmissions are reviewed, including advanced configurations and new analytical tools. Finally, the plan for future transmission research is presented.

  12. Advanced Hydrogen Turbine Development

    SciTech Connect

    Marra, John

    2015-09-30

    Under the sponsorship of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratories, Siemens has completed the Advanced Hydrogen Turbine Development Program to develop an advanced gas turbine for incorporation into future coal-based Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) plants. All the scheduled DOE Milestones were completed and significant technical progress was made in the development of new technologies and concepts. Advanced computer simulations and modeling, as well as subscale, full scale laboratory, rig and engine testing were utilized to evaluate and select concepts for further development. Program Requirements of: A 3 to 5 percentage point improvement in overall plant combined cycle efficiency when compared to the reference baseline plant; 20 to 30 percent reduction in overall plant capital cost when compared to the reference baseline plant; and NOx emissions of 2 PPM out of the stack. were all met. The program was completed on schedule and within the allotted budget

  13. Advanced thermionic energy conversion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Britt, E. J.; Fitzpatrick, G. D.; Hansen, L. K.; Rasor, N. S.

    1974-01-01

    Basic analytical and experimental exploration was conducted on several types of advanced thermionic energy converters, and preliminary analysis was performed on systems utilizing advanced converter performance. The Pt--Nb cylindrical diode which exhibited a suppressed arc drop, as described in the preceding report, was reassembled and the existence of the postulated hydrid mode of operation was tentatively confirmed. Initial data obtained on ignited and unignited triode operation in the demountable cesium vapor system essentially confirmed the design principles developed in earlier work, with a few exceptions. Three specific advanced converter concepts were selected as candidates for concentrated basic study and for practical evaluation in fixed-configuration converters. Test vehicles and test stands for these converters and a unique controlled-atmosphere station for converter assembly and processing were designed, and procurement was initiated.

  14. Advanced rocket propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Obrien, Charles J.

    1993-01-01

    Existing NASA research contracts are supporting development of advanced reinforced polymer and metal matrix composites for use in liquid rocket engines of the future. Advanced rocket propulsion concepts, such as modular platelet engines, dual-fuel dual-expander engines, and variable mixture ratio engines, require advanced materials and structures to reduce overall vehicle weight as well as address specific propulsion system problems related to elevated operating temperatures, new engine components, and unique operating processes. High performance propulsion systems with improved manufacturability and maintainability are needed for single stage to orbit vehicles and other high performance mission applications. One way to satisfy these needs is to develop a small engine which can be clustered in modules to provide required levels of total thrust. This approach should reduce development schedule and cost requirements by lowering hardware lead times and permitting the use of existing test facilities. Modular engines should also reduce operational costs associated with maintenance and parts inventories.

  15. Advanced Worker Protection System

    SciTech Connect

    1996-04-01

    The Advanced Worker Protection System (AWPS) is a liquid-air-based, self-contained breathing and cooling system with a duration of 2 hrs. AWPS employs a patented system developed by Oceaneering Space Systems (OSS), and was demonstrated at their facility in Houston, TX as well as at Kansas State University, Manhattan. The heart of the system is the life-support backpack that uses liquid air to provide cooling as well as breathing gas to the worker. The backpack is combined with advanced protective garments, an advanced liquid cooling garment (LCG), a respirator, and communications and support equipment. The prototype unit development and testing under Phase 1 has demonstrated that AWPS has the ability to meet performance criteria. These criteria were developed with an understanding of both the AWPS capabilities and the DOE decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) activities protection needs.

  16. [Advanced Composites Technology Initiatives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Julian, Mark R.

    2002-01-01

    This final report closes out the W02 NASA Grant #NCC5-646. The FY02 grant for advanced technology initiatives through the Advanced Composites Technology Institute in Bridgeport, WV, at the Robert C. Byrd Institute (RCBI) Bridgeport Manufacturing Technology Center, is complete; all funding has been expended. RCBI continued to expand access to technology; develop and implement a workforce-training curriculum; improve material development; and provide prototyping and demonstrations of new and advanced composites technologies for West Virginia composites firms. The FY 02 efforts supported workforce development, technical training and the HST development effort of a super-lightweight composite carrier prototype and expanded the existing technical capabilities of the growing aerospace industry across West Virginia to provide additional support for NASA missions. Additionally, the Composites Technology and Training Center was awarded IS0 9001 - 2000 certification and Cleanroom Class 1000 certification during this report period.

  17. Advances in diagnostic radiology.

    PubMed

    Runge, Val M

    2010-12-01

    Recent advances in diagnostic radiology are discussed on the basis of current publications in Investigative Radiology. Publications in the journal during 2009 and 2010 are reviewed, evaluating developments by modality and anatomic region. Technological advances continue to play a major role in the evolution and clinical practice of diagnostic radiology, and as such constitute a major publication focus. In the past 2 years, this includes advances in both magnetic resonance and computed tomography (in particular, the advent of dual energy computed tomography). An additional major focus of publications concerns contrast media, and in particular continuing research involving nephrogenic systemic fibrosis, its etiology, and differentiation of the gadolinium chelates on the basis of in vivo stability.

  18. Advanced servomanipulator development

    SciTech Connect

    Kuban, D.P.

    1985-01-01

    The Advanced Servomanipulator (ASM) System consists of three major components: the ASM slave, the dual arm master controller (DAMC) or master, and the control system. The ASM is remotely maintainable force-reflecting servomanipulator developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) as part of the Consolidated Fuel Reprocessing Program. This new manipulator addresses requirements of advanced nuclear fuel reprocessing with emphasis on force reflection, remote maintainability, reliability, radiation tolerance, and corrosion resistance. The advanced servomanipulator is uniquely subdivided into remotely replaceable modules which will permit in situ manipulator repair by spare module replacement. Manipulator modularization and increased reliability are accomplished through a force transmission system that uses gears and torque tubes. Digital control algorithms and mechanical precision are used to offset the increased backlash, friction, and inertia resulting from the gear drives. This results in the first remotely maintainable force-reflecting servomanipulator in the world.

  19. Advanced ramjet concepts program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leingang, J. L.

    1992-01-01

    Uniquely advantageous features, on both the performance and weight sides of the ledger, can be achieved through synergistic design integration of airbreathing and rocket technologies in the development of advanced orbital space transport propulsion systems of the combined cycle type. In the context of well understood advanced airbreathing and liquid rocket propulsion principles and practices, this precept of synergism is advanced mainly through six rather specific examples. These range from the detailed component level to the overall vehicle system level as follows: using jet compression; achieving a high area ratio rocket nozzle; ameliorating gas generator cycle rocket system deficiencies; using the in-duct special rocket thrust chamber assembly as the principal scramjet fuel injection operation; using the unstowed, covered fan as a duct closure for effecting high area ratio rocket mode operation; and creating a unique airbreathing rocket system via the onboard, cryogenic hydrogen induced air liquefaction process.

  20. Advanced Aerodynamic Control Effectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Richard M.; Bauer, Steven X. S.

    1999-01-01

    A 1990 research program that focused on the development of advanced aerodynamic control effectors (AACE) for military aircraft has been reviewed and summarized. Data are presented for advanced planform, flow control, and surface contouring technologies. The data show significant increases in lift, reductions in drag, and increased control power, compared to typical aerodynamic designs. The results presented also highlighted the importance of planform selection in the design of a control effector suite. Planform data showed that dramatic increases in lift (greater than 25%) can be achieved with multiple wings and a sawtooth forebody. Passive porosity and micro drag generator control effector data showed control power levels exceeding that available from typical effectors (moving surfaces). Application of an advanced planform to a tailless concept showed benefits of similar magnitude as those observed in the generic studies.

  1. Advanced fuel chemistry for advanced engines.

    SciTech Connect

    Taatjes, Craig A.; Jusinski, Leonard E.; Zador, Judit; Fernandes, Ravi X.; Miller, James A.

    2009-09-01

    Autoignition chemistry is central to predictive modeling of many advanced engine designs that combine high efficiency and low inherent pollutant emissions. This chemistry, and especially its pressure dependence, is poorly known for fuels derived from heavy petroleum and for biofuels, both of which are becoming increasingly prominent in the nation's fuel stream. We have investigated the pressure dependence of key ignition reactions for a series of molecules representative of non-traditional and alternative fuels. These investigations combined experimental characterization of hydroxyl radical production in well-controlled photolytically initiated oxidation and a hybrid modeling strategy that linked detailed quantum chemistry and computational kinetics of critical reactions with rate-equation models of the global chemical system. Comprehensive mechanisms for autoignition generally ignore the pressure dependence of branching fractions in the important alkyl + O{sub 2} reaction systems; however we have demonstrated that pressure-dependent 'formally direct' pathways persist at in-cylinder pressures.

  2. Survival of Coelaenomenodera lameensis (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) in Relation to the Physical Characteristics of Different Oil Palm (Elaeis sp.) Breeding Populations

    PubMed Central

    Beaudoin-Ollivier, L.; Flori, A.; Coffi, A.; Cros, D.; Glitho, I.; Nodichao, L.

    2015-01-01

    The edibility of different Elaeis sp. breeding populations present in Benin was tested for the leaf miner Coelaenomenodera lameensis Berti (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae), a major oil palm pest in Africa. Experiments carried out in sleeves revealed the oviposition capacities of females and the mortality rates for the different developmental stages by comparing the populations found on two breeding populations of Elaeis oleifera (HBK) Cortes, four of Elaeis guineensis Jacquin and four (E. guineensis × E. oleifera) × E. guineensis backcrosses. Females laid their eggs similarly on all breeding populations, with a preference for the E. guineensis La Mé origin. The average hatching rate reached 80% for the La Mé origin as opposed to 28% for the Deli origin. The mortality rates for the larval instars were greater on E. oleifera, on certain backcrosses and on the Deli origin of E. guineensis. Development at the second- and third- larval instars was the most affected, with a mortality rate of three to five times greater than that seen on La Mé. Epidermis and cuticle measurements indicated which breeding populations were suitable or unsuitable for the development of C. lameensis. E. guineensis, with its thin epidermis (12 µm) and cuticle (2 µm), proved to be highly susceptible to C. lameensis attacks. On the other hand, E. oleifera, which is very resistant, exhibited a thicker epidermis (17 µm) and cuticle (4 µm). The breeding populations were thus classified according to the positive or negative influence they exerted on the insect’s egg laying and feeding. RÉSUMÉ. La comestibilité de différents matériels végétaux d’Elaeis sp. présents au Bénin est testée pour Coelaenomenodera lameensis Berti (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae), important ravageur du palmier à huile en Afrique. Des expérimentations en manchons ont permis de déterminer les capacités d’oviposition des femelles et les taux de mortalité des différents stades de d

  3. Education in advanced disease.

    PubMed

    Flemming, Kate; Closs, S José; Foy, Robbie; Bennett, Michael I

    2012-05-01

    In advanced disease, the management of symptoms and lifestyle are essential for the maintenance of patients' quality of life. Appropriate education by health professionals can help patients to better manage their disease. Although the provision of education by health professionals for patients with advanced cancer is reasonably well documented, much less is known about how health professionals facilitate education with patients with other advanced progressive diseases. The aim of this review was to synthesize qualitative research examining health professionals' knowledge of, attitudes toward, and ability to deliver educational interventions for symptom and disease management to patients with advanced progressive diseases other than cancer. The synthesis was conducted using meta-ethnography. Systematic searching of five electronic databases (CINAHL, Medline, PsycInfo, Web of Science Social Science Citation Index, and EMBASE) was performed. Included studies were data extracted and assessed for quality. Systematic searching of four electronic databases identified 911 records; 17 studies met review inclusion criteria and underwent data extraction and quality appraisal. Three key factors were identified that influenced the delivery of education by health professionals to patients with advanced disease: capacity (to educate and aid decision making), context (of educational delivery), and timing (of education). Health professionals identify and acknowledge a range of factors that influence their ability to deliver education to patients with advanced disease. The types of circumstantial factors identified in this review can influence the successful delivery of educational interventions and need to be considered when such interventions are being developed. Copyright © 2012 U.S. Cancer Pain Relief Committee. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Advanced sensors technology survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, Tommy G.; Costello, David J.; Davis, Jerry G.; Horst, Richard L.; Lessard, Charles S.; Peel, H. Herbert; Tolliver, Robert

    1992-01-01

    This project assesses the state-of-the-art in advanced or 'smart' sensors technology for NASA Life Sciences research applications with an emphasis on those sensors with potential applications on the space station freedom (SSF). The objectives are: (1) to conduct literature reviews on relevant advanced sensor technology; (2) to interview various scientists and engineers in industry, academia, and government who are knowledgeable on this topic; (3) to provide viewpoints and opinions regarding the potential applications of this technology on the SSF; and (4) to provide summary charts of relevant technologies and centers where these technologies are being developed.

  5. Advanced flight software reconfiguraton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porcher, Bryan

    1991-01-01

    Information is given in viewgraph form on advanced flight software reconfiguration. Reconfiguration is defined as identifying mission and configuration specific requirements, controlling mission and configuration specific data, binding this information to the flight software code to perform specific missions, and the release and distribution of the flight software. The objectives are to develop, demonstrate, and validate advanced software reconfiguration tools and techniques; to demonstrate reconfiguration approaches on Space Station Freedom (SSF) onboard systems displays; and to interactively test onboard systems displays, flight software, and flight data.

  6. Advanced Solar Power Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atkinson, J. H.; Hobgood, J. M.

    1984-01-01

    The Advanced Solar Power System (ASPS) concentrator uses a technically sophisticated design and extensive tooling to produce very efficient (80 to 90%) and versatile energy supply equipment which is inexpensive to manufacture and requires little maintenance. The advanced optical design has two 10th order, generalized aspheric surfaces in a Cassegrainian configuration which gives outstanding performance and is relatively insensitive to temperature changes and wind loading. Manufacturing tolerances also have been achieved. The key to the ASPS is the direct absorption of concentrated sunlight in the working fluid by radiative transfers in a black body cavity. The basic ASPS design concepts, efficiency, optical system, and tracking and focusing controls are described.

  7. Advanced Monitoring systems initiative

    SciTech Connect

    R.J. Venedam; E.O. Hohman; C.F. Lohrstorfer; S.J. Weeks; J.B. Jones; W.J. Haas

    2004-09-30

    The Advanced Monitoring Systems Initiative (AMSI) actively searches for promising technologies and aggressively moves them from the research bench into DOE/NNSA end-user applications. There is a large unfulfilled need for an active element that reaches out to identify and recruit emerging sensor technologies into the test and evaluation function. Sensor research is ubiquitous, with the seeds of many novel concepts originating in the university systems, but at present these novel concepts do not move quickly and efficiently into real test environments. AMSI is a widely recognized, self-sustaining ''business'' accelerating the selection, development, testing, evaluation, and deployment of advanced monitoring systems and components.

  8. MR Neurography: Advances

    PubMed Central

    Chhabra, Avneesh; Zhao, Lianxin; Carrino, John A.; Trueblood, Eo; Koceski, Saso; Shteriev, Filip; Lenkinski, Lionel; Sinclair, Christopher D. J.; Andreisek, Gustav

    2013-01-01

    High resolution and high field magnetic resonance neurography (MR neurography, MRN) is shown to have excellent anatomic capability. There have been considerable advances in the technology in the last few years leading to various feasibility studies using different structural and functional imaging approaches in both clinical and research settings. This paper is intended to be a useful seminar for readers who want to gain knowledge of the advancements in the MRN pulse sequences currently used in clinical practice as well as learn about the other techniques on the horizon aimed at better depiction of nerve anatomy, pathology, and potential noninvasive evaluation of nerve degeneration or regeneration. PMID:23589774

  9. Advanced Neuroimaging of Tinnitus.

    PubMed

    Raghavan, Prashant; Steven, Andrew; Rath, Tanya; Gandhi, Dheeraj

    2016-05-01

    Although tinnitus may originate in damage to the peripheral auditory apparatus, its perception and distressing symptomatology are consequences of alterations to auditory, sensory, and limbic neural networks. This has been described in several studies, some using advanced structural MR imaging techniques such as diffusion tensor imaging. An understanding of these complex changes could enable development of targeted treatment. New MR imaging techniques enabling detailed depiction of the labyrinth may be useful when diagnosis of Meniere disease is equivocal. Advances in computed tomography and MR imaging have enabled noninvasive diagnosis of dural arteriovenous fistulae.

  10. Advanced concepts for acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Keefe, D.

    1986-07-01

    Selected examples of advanced accelerator concepts are reviewed. Such plasma accelerators as plasma beat wave accelerator, plasma wake field accelerator, and plasma grating accelerator are discussed particularly as examples of concepts for accelerating relativistic electrons or positrons. Also covered are the pulsed electron-beam, pulsed laser accelerator, inverse Cherenkov accelerator, inverse free-electron laser, switched radial-line accelerators, and two-beam accelerator. Advanced concepts for ion acceleration discussed include the electron ring accelerator, excitation of waves on intense electron beams, and two-wave combinations. (LEW)

  11. Advanced Containment System

    DOEpatents

    Kostelnik, Kevin M.; Kawamura, Hideki; Richardson, John G.; Noda, Masaru

    2005-02-08

    An advanced containment system for containing buried waste and associated leachate. The advanced containment system comprises a plurality of casing sections with each casing section interlocked to an adjacent casing section. Each casing section includes a complementary interlocking structure that interlocks with the complementary interlocking structure on an adjacent casing section. A barrier filler substantially fills the casing sections and may substantially fill the spaces of the complementary interlocking structure to form a substantially impermeable barrier. Some of the casing sections may include sensors so that the casing sections and the zone of interest may be remotely monitored after the casing sections are emplaced in the ground.

  12. Advanced Imaging Tracker

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-06-01

    document requires that it 1e returncd: ADVANCED IMACINGC TRACKER Dr . L. E. Schmutz Contractor: Adaptive Optics Associates, Inc. Contt-ict Number: F30602-80...Code Number: IE20 Period of Worl: Covered: jun 80 - D’:c 81 Principal Investigator: Dr . Larry Schmut~z Phone: 617 547-2786 Project Engineer: Captaia...yaJPODCVR~ ADVANCED IMAGING TRACKER 10Jun 80 - ’,’ Dec 81 𔄃 PiRFORMiNO7 01G. REPORT NUMBER 7 ATII~(. ONTPA OR GRANTY NUMDERf.) Dr . 1L. E. Schiiut

  13. Advancing cardiovascular tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Truskey, George A.

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular tissue engineering offers the promise of biologically based repair of injured and damaged blood vessels, valves, and cardiac tissue. Major advances in cardiovascular tissue engineering over the past few years involve improved methods to promote the establishment and differentiation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), scaffolds from decellularized tissue that may produce more highly differentiated tissues and advance clinical translation, improved methods to promote vascularization, and novel in vitro microphysiological systems to model normal and diseased tissue function. iPSC technology holds great promise, but robust methods are needed to further promote differentiation. Differentiation can be further enhanced with chemical, electrical, or mechanical stimuli. PMID:27303643

  14. Advancing cytometry for immunology.

    PubMed

    Cossarizza, Andrea; Nolan, John; Radbruch, Andreas; Tárnok, Attila

    2012-12-01

    Cytometry is a key technology for immunology. It allows researchers to scrutinize the cells of the immune system in molecular detail, and to assess phenotype and function at the level of individual cells, no matter how rare these cells may be. The International Society for the Advancement of Cytometry, ISAC, by way of its meetings, online resources and publications (e.g. Cytometry Part A and Current Protocols in Cytometry, which are all published by Wiley) track the ever advancing developments regarding cytometry instrumentation and reagents, and the analysis of complex data sets. In June this year in Leipzig, Germany, ISAC held its annual conference "CYTO 2012", a marketplace of innovation in cytometry.

  15. Avionics advanced development strategy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyer, D.

    1990-01-01

    Discussed here is the problem of how to put together an integrated, phased, and affordable avionics advanced development program that links and applies to operational, evolving, and developing programs/vehicles, as well as those in the planning phases. Collecting technology needs from individual programs/vehicles and proposed technology items from individual developers usually results in a mismatch and something that is unaffordable. A strategy to address this problem is outlined with task definitions which will lead to avionics advanced development items that will fit within an overall framework, prioritized to support budgeting, and support the scope of NASA space transportations needs.

  16. Advances in attosecond science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calegari, Francesca; Sansone, Giuseppe; Stagira, Salvatore; Vozzi, Caterina; Nisoli, Mauro

    2016-03-01

    Attosecond science offers formidable tools for the investigation of electronic processes at the heart of important physical processes in atomic, molecular and solid-state physics. In the last 15 years impressive advances have been obtained from both the experimental and theoretical points of view. Attosecond pulses, in the form of isolated pulses or of trains of pulses, are now routinely available in various laboratories. In this review recent advances in attosecond science are reported and important applications are discussed. After a brief presentation of various techniques that can be employed for the generation and diagnosis of sub-femtosecond pulses, various applications are reported in atomic, molecular and condensed-matter physics.

  17. Advances in periodontology.

    PubMed

    Tonetti, M S

    2000-10-01

    Advances in periodontal science and practice over the last decade have radically changed the understanding of periodontal diseases and have opened new, exciting prospects for both medical and surgical therapy of periodontal diseases. Establishment of the aetiology and pathogenesis of periodontitis, understanding of the unique genetic and environmental susceptibility profile of affected subjects, and recognition of the systemic implications of periodontal infections are the key research findings. The use of randomised, controlled, clinical trials has allowed the development of evidence-based periodontology. Adjunctive antimicrobial therapy, regenerative periodontal surgery, periodontal plastic surgery, bone regeneration surgery in the light of implant treatment, and advanced soft tissue management at implant sites have radically changed practice.

  18. Advanced engine study program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masters, A. I.; Galler, D. E.; Denman, T. F.; Shied, R. A.; Black, J. R.; Fierstein, A. R.; Clark, G. L.; Branstrom, B. R.

    1993-01-01

    A design and analysis study was conducted to provide advanced engine descriptions and parametric data for space transfer vehicles. The study was based on an advanced oxygen/hydrogen engine in the 7,500 to 50,000 lbf thrust range. Emphasis was placed on defining requirements for high-performance engines capable of achieving reliable and versatile operation in a space environment. Four variations on the expander cycle were compared, and the advantages and disadvantages of each were assessed. Parametric weight, envelope, and performance data were generated over a range of 7,500 to 50,000 lb thrust and a wide range of chamber pressure and nozzle expansion ratio.

  19. Retroauricular cutaneous advancement flap.

    PubMed

    Kim, Peter; Lee, Kwan Stephen

    2012-08-01

    Excisional surgery of the ear, such as that following a skin cancer excision, often produces a smaller ear postoperatively. This article describes the various uses of a retroauricular cutaneous advancement flap to repair surgical defects of the ear following a skin cancer excision, without miniaturising the ear. A retroauricular cutaneous advancement flap is an option for patients who require cosmetically satisfying reconstruction of the ear post skin cancer excision. The technique can avoid the miniaturisation of the ear that may occur with other techniques.

  20. The Advanced Virgo detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acernese, F.; Adams, T.; Agathos, M.; Agatsuma, K.; Allocca, A.; Astone, P.; Ballardin, G.; Barone, F.; Barsuglia, M.; Basti, A.; Bauer, Th S.; Bavigadda, V.; Bejger, M.; Belczynski, C.; Bersanetti, D.; Bertolini, A.; Bitossi, M.; Bizouard, M. A.; Bloemen, S.; Boer, M.; Bogaert, G.; Bondu, F.; Bonelli, L.; Bonnand, R.; Boschi, V.; Bosi, L.; Bradaschia, C.; Branchesi, M.; Briant, T.; Brillet, A.; Brisson, V.; Bulik, T.; Bulten, H. J.; Buskulic, D.; Buy, C.; Cagnoli, G.; Calloni, E.; Carbognani, F.; Cavalier, F.; Cavalieri, R.; Cella, G.; Cesarini, E.; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Chincarini, A.; Chiummo, A.; Chua, S.; Cleva, F.; Coccia, E.; Cohadon, P.-F.; Colla, A.; Colombini, M.; Conte, A.; Coulon, J.-P.; Cuoco, E.; D'Antonio, S.; Dattilo, V.; Davier, M.; Day, R.; Debreczeni, G.; Degallaix, J.; De Laurentis, M.; Deléglise, S.; Del Pozzo, W.; Dereli, H.; De Rosa, R.; Di Fiore, L.; Di Lieto, A.; Di Virgilio, A.; Dolique, V.; Drago, M.; Ducrot, M.; Endrőczi, G.; Fafone, V.; Farinon, S.; Ferrante, I.; Ferrini, F.; Fidecaro, F.; Fiori, I.; Flaminio, R.; Fournier, J.-D.; Franco, S.; Frasca, S.; Frasconi, F.; Gammaitoni, L.; Garufi, F.; Gatto, A.; Gemme, G.; Gendre, B.; Genin, E.; Gennai, A.; Ghosh, S.; Giazotto, A.; Gouaty, R.; Granata, M.; Greco, G.; Groot, P.; Guidi, G. M.; Harms, J.; Heidmann, A.; Heitmann, H.; Hello, P.; Hemming, G.; Hofman, D.; Jonker, R. J. G.; Kasprzack, M.; Kéfélian, F.; Królak, A.; Kutynia, A.; Lazzaro, C.; Lebigot, E.; Leonardi, M.; Leroy, N.; Letendre, N.; Lorenzini, M.; Loriette, V.; Losurdo, G.; Majorana, E.; Maksimovic, I.; Malvezzi, V.; Man, N.; Mangano, V.; Mantovani, M.; Marchesoni, F.; Marion, F.; Marque, J.; Martelli, F.; Martinelli, L.; Masserot, A.; Meacher, D.; Meidam, J.; Mezzani, F.; Michel, C.; Milano, L.; Minenkov, Y.; Moggi, A.; Mohan, M.; Mours, B.; Nagy, M. F.; Nardecchia, I.; Naticchioni, L.; Nelemans, G.; Neri, I.; Neri, M.; Nocera, F.; Palomba, C.; Paoletti, F.; Pasqualetti, A.; Passaquieti, R.; Passuello, D.; Pichot, M.; Piergiovanni, F.; Pillant, G.; Pinard, L.; Poggiani, R.; Prijatelj, M.; Prodi, G. A.; Punturo, M.; Puppo, P.; Rabeling, D. S.; Rácz, I.; Rapagnani, P.; Razzano, M.; Re, V.; Regimbau, T.; Ricci, F.; Robinet, F.; Rocchi, A.; Rolland, L.; Romano, R.; Ruggi, P.; Sassolas, B.; Sentenac, D.; Sequino, V.; Shah, S.; Siellez, K.; Straniero, N.; Swinkels, B.; Tacca, M.; Tonelli, M.; Travasso, F.; Vajente, G.; van Bakel, N.; van Beuzekom, M.; van den Brand, J. F. J.; Van Den Broeck, C.; van der Sluys, M. V.; van Heijningen, J.; Vasúth, M.; Vedovato, G.; Veitch, J.; Verkindt, D.; Vetrano, F.; Viceré, A.; Vinet, J.-Y.; Vocca, H.; Wei, L.-W.; Yvert, M.; Zadrożny, A.; Zendri, J.-P.

    2015-05-01

    The Advanced Virgo interferometer is the upgraded version of the Virgo detector having the goal to extend by a factor 10 the observation horizon in the universe and consequently increase the detection rate by three orders of magnitude. Its installation is in progress and is expected to be completed in late 2015. In this proceeding we will present the scheme and the main challenging technical features of the detector and we will give an outline of the installation status and the foreseen time schedule which will bring Advanced Virgo to its full operation.