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Sample records for advanced baseline imager

  1. Post Launch Calibration and Testing of the Advanced Baseline Imager on the GOES-R Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lebair, William; Rollins, C.; Kline, John; Todirita, M.; Kronenwetter, J.

    2016-01-01

    The Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite R (GOES-R) series is the planned next generation of operational weather satellites for the United State's National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. The first launch of the GOES-R series is planned for October 2016. The GOES-R series satellites and instruments are being developed by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). One of the key instruments on the GOES-R series is the Advance Baseline Imager (ABI). The ABI is a multi-channel, visible through infrared, passive imaging radiometer. The ABI will provide moderate spatial and spectral resolution at high temporal and radiometric resolution to accurately monitor rapidly changing weather. Initial on-orbit calibration and performance characterization is crucial to establishing baseline used to maintain performance throughout mission life. A series of tests has been planned to establish the post launch performance and establish the parameters needed to process the data in the Ground Processing Algorithm. The large number of detectors for each channel required to provide the needed temporal coverage presents unique challenges for accurately calibrating ABI and minimizing striping. This paper discusses the planned tests to be performed on ABI over the six-month Post Launch Test period and the expected performance as it relates to ground tests.

  2. Post launch calibration and testing of the Advanced Baseline Imager on the GOES-R satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebair, William; Rollins, C.; Kline, John; Todirita, M.; Kronenwetter, J.

    2016-05-01

    The Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite R (GOES-R) series is the planned next generation of operational weather satellites for the United State's National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. The first launch of the GOES-R series is planned for October 2016. The GOES-R series satellites and instruments are being developed by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). One of the key instruments on the GOES-R series is the Advance Baseline Imager (ABI). The ABI is a multi-channel, visible through infrared, passive imaging radiometer. The ABI will provide moderate spatial and spectral resolution at high temporal and radiometric resolution to accurately monitor rapidly changing weather. Initial on-orbit calibration and performance characterization is crucial to establishing baseline used to maintain performance throughout mission life. A series of tests has been planned to establish the post launch performance and establish the parameters needed to process the data in the Ground Processing Algorithm. The large number of detectors for each channel required to provide the needed temporal coverage presents unique challenges for accurately calibrating ABI and minimizing striping. This paper discusses the planned tests to be performed on ABI over the six-month Post Launch Test period and the expected performance as it relates to ground tests.

  3. Advanced Imaging for Glaucoma Study: Design, Baseline Characteristics, and Inter-Site Comparison

    PubMed Central

    Le, Phuc V.; Zhang, Xinbo; Francis, Brian A.; Varma, Rohit; Greenfield, David S.; Schuman, Joel S.; Loewen, Nils; Huang, David

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To report the baseline characteristics of the participants in the Advanced Imaging for Glaucoma Study. To compare the participating sites for variations among subjects and the performance of imaging instruments. Design Multi-center longitudinal observational cohort study Methods A total of 788 participants (1,329 eyes) were enrolled from three academic referral centers. There were 145 participants (289 eyes) in the normal group, 394 participants (663 eyes) in the glaucoma suspect/preperimetric glaucoma group, and 249 participants (377 eyes) in the perimetric glaucoma group. Participants underwent a full clinical exam, standard automated perimetry, and imaging with time-domain and Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography (OCT), scanning laser polarimetry, and confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscopy. Main Outcome Measures The baseline average, population standard deviation, and repeatability of imaging-derived anatomic variables were reported for each technology and center. Results Compared to the normal participants, glaucoma suspect/preperimetric glaucoma and perimetric glaucoma groups had significantly reduced anatomic measurements. Repeatability of nerve fiber layer thickness was best for Fourier-domain OCT (overall coefficient of variation < 2%), followed by time-domain OCT (coefficient of variation 2-2.9%), scanning laser polarimetry (coefficient of variation 2.6-4.5%), and confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscopy rim area (coefficient of variation 4.2-7.6%). A mixed-effects model showed that the differences between sites was less than 25 percent of the variation within groups and less than the differences between the normal and glaucoma suspect/preperimetric glaucoma group. Conclusions Site-to-site variation was smaller than both the variation within groups and the changes due to glaucoma. Therefore pooling of participants between sites is appropriate. PMID:25447111

  4. The GOES-R Advanced Baseline Imager: polarization sensitivity and potential impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearlman, Aaron J.; Cao, Changyong; Wu, Xiangqian

    2015-09-01

    In contrast to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA's) current geostationary imagers for operational weather forecasting, the next generation imager, the Advanced Baseline Imager (ABI) aboard the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite R-Series (GOES-R), will have six reflective solar bands - five more than currently available. These bands will be used for applications such as aerosol retrievals, which are influenced by polarization effects. These effects are determined by two factors: instrument polarization sensitivity and the polarization states of the observations. The former is measured as part of the pre-launch testing program performed by the instrument vendor. We analyzed the results of the pre-launch polarization sensitivity measurements of the 0.47 μm and 0.64 μm channels and used them in conjunction with simulated scene polarization states to estimate potential on-orbit radiometric impacts. The pre-launch test setups involved illuminating the ABI with an integrating sphere through either one or two polarizers. The measurement with one (rotating) polarizer yields the degree of linear polarization of ABI, and the measurements using two polarizers (one rotating and one fixed) characterized the non-ideal properties of the polarizer. To estimate the radiometric performance impacts from the instrument polarization sensitivity, we simulated polarized scenes using a radiative transfer code and accounted for the instrument polarization sensitivity over its field of regard. The results show the variation in the polarization impacts over the day and by regions of the full disk can reach up to 3.2% for the 0.47μm channel and 4.8% for the 0.64μm channel. Geostationary orbiters like the ABI give the unique opportunity to show these impacts throughout the day compared to low earth orbiters, which are more limited to certain times of day. This work may enhance the ability to diagnose anomalies on-orbit.

  5. Validation of spectral radiance assignments to integrating sphere radiance standards for the Advanced Baseline Imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, B. C.; Maxwell, Stephen; Shirley, Eric; Slack, Kim; Graham, Gary D.

    2014-09-01

    The Advanced Baseline Imager (ABI) is the next-generation imaging sensor for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA's) operational meteorological satellites in geostationary orbit. One pathway for traceability to reference standards of the visible and near-infrared radiometric response for ABI is to a 1.65 m diameter integrating sphere source standard of spectral radiance. This source illuminates the full entrance pupil via the ABI Earth-view port, thus determining the absolute spectral radiance responsivity in the visible and shortwave infrared. The spectral radiance values of the large sphere are assigned by Exelis using a double monochromator and a 15.24 cm diameter integrating sphere source standard that is calibrated by NIST. As part of the ABI program, Exelis was required by NASA to have the spectral radiance values assigned by Exelis to the large sphere be validated by NIST. Here we report the results of that activity, which took place in April, 2013. During the week of April 8, Exelis calibrated the 1.65 m diameter sphere at all 24 levels that correspond to the ABI calibration protocol. During the week of April 15, the NIST validation exercise for five selected levels took place. NIST deployed a portable spectral radiance source, a filter radiometer restricted to the visible and near-infrared, and two spectroradiometers that covered from 350 nm to 2500 nm. The NIST sphere source served as the validation standard. The comparison results, which are reported at the ABI bands, agreed to within the combined uncertainties. We describe the methodology, results, and uncertainty estimates related to this effort.

  6. Image Navigation and Registration Performance Assessment Tool Set for the GOES-R Advanced Baseline Imager and Geostationary Lightning Mapper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De Luccia, Frank J.; Houchin, Scott; Porter, Brian C.; Graybill, Justin; Haas, Evan; Johnson, Patrick D.; Isaacson, Peter J.; Reth, Alan D.

    2016-01-01

    The GOES-R Flight Project has developed an Image Navigation and Registration (INR) Performance Assessment Tool Set (IPATS) for measuring Advanced Baseline Imager (ABI) and Geostationary Lightning Mapper (GLM) INR performance metrics in the post-launch period for performance evaluation and long term monitoring. For ABI, these metrics are the 3-sigma errors in navigation (NAV), channel-to-channel registration (CCR), frame-to-frame registration (FFR), swath-to-swath registration (SSR), and within frame registration (WIFR) for the Level 1B image products. For GLM, the single metric of interest is the 3-sigma error in the navigation of background images (GLM NAV) used by the system to navigate lightning strikes. 3-sigma errors are estimates of the 99.73rd percentile of the errors accumulated over a 24-hour data collection period. IPATS utilizes a modular algorithmic design to allow user selection of data processing sequences optimized for generation of each INR metric. This novel modular approach minimizes duplication of common processing elements, thereby maximizing code efficiency and speed. Fast processing is essential given the large number of sub-image registrations required to generate INR metrics for the many images produced over a 24-hour evaluation period. Another aspect of the IPATS design that vastly reduces execution time is the off-line propagation of Landsat based truth images to the fixed grid coordinates system for each of the three GOES-R satellite locations, operational East and West and initial checkout locations. This paper describes the algorithmic design and implementation of IPATS and provides preliminary test results.

  7. Image navigation and registration performance assessment tool set for the GOES-R Advanced Baseline Imager and Geostationary Lightning Mapper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Luccia, Frank J.; Houchin, Scott; Porter, Brian C.; Graybill, Justin; Haas, Evan; Johnson, Patrick D.; Isaacson, Peter J.; Reth, Alan D.

    2016-05-01

    The GOES-R Flight Project has developed an Image Navigation and Registration (INR) Performance Assessment Tool Set (IPATS) for measuring Advanced Baseline Imager (ABI) and Geostationary Lightning Mapper (GLM) INR performance metrics in the post-launch period for performance evaluation and long term monitoring. For ABI, these metrics are the 3-sigma errors in navigation (NAV), channel-to-channel registration (CCR), frame-to-frame registration (FFR), swath-to-swath registration (SSR), and within frame registration (WIFR) for the Level 1B image products. For GLM, the single metric of interest is the 3-sigma error in the navigation of background images (GLM NAV) used by the system to navigate lightning strikes. 3-sigma errors are estimates of the 99. 73rd percentile of the errors accumulated over a 24 hour data collection period. IPATS utilizes a modular algorithmic design to allow user selection of data processing sequences optimized for generation of each INR metric. This novel modular approach minimizes duplication of common processing elements, thereby maximizing code efficiency and speed. Fast processing is essential given the large number of sub-image registrations required to generate INR metrics for the many images produced over a 24 hour evaluation period. Another aspect of the IPATS design that vastly reduces execution time is the off-line propagation of Landsat based truth images to the fixed grid coordinates system for each of the three GOES-R satellite locations, operational East and West and initial checkout locations. This paper describes the algorithmic design and implementation of IPATS and provides preliminary test results.

  8. The GOES-R Advanced Baseline Imager: detector spectral response effects on thermal emissive band calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearlman, Aaron J.; Padula, Francis; Cao, Changyong; Wu, Xiangqian

    2015-10-01

    The Advanced Baseline Imager (ABI) will be aboard the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite R-Series (GOES-R) to supply data needed for operational weather forecasts and long-term climate variability studies, which depend on high quality data. Unlike the heritage operational GOES systems that have two or four detectors per band, ABI has hundreds of detectors per channel requiring calibration coefficients for each one. This increase in number of detectors poses new challenges for next generation sensors as each detector has a unique spectral response function (SRF) even though only one averaged SRF per band is used operationally to calibrate each detector. This simplified processing increases computational efficiency. Using measured system-level SRF data from pre-launch testing, we have the opportunity to characterize the calibration impact using measured SRFs, both per detector and as an average of detector-level SRFs similar to the operational version. We calculated the spectral response impacts for the thermal emissive bands (TEB) theoretically, by simulating the ABI response viewing an ideal blackbody and practically, with the measured ABI response to an external reference blackbody from the pre-launch TEB calibration test. The impacts from the practical case match the theoretical results using an ideal blackbody. The observed brightness temperature trends show structure across the array with magnitudes as large as 0.1 K for and 12 (9.61 µm), and 0.25 K for band 14 (11.2 µm) for a 300 K blackbody. The trends in the raw ABI signal viewing the blackbody support the spectral response measurements results, since they show similar trends in bands 12 (9.61µm), and 14 (11.2 µm), meaning that the spectral effects dominate the response differences between detectors for these bands. We further validated these effects using the radiometric bias calculated between calibrations using the external blackbody and

  9. Studies on the Synergy of TEMPO/GEO-CAPE with GOES-R Advanced Baseline Imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciren, P.; Kondragunta, S.

    2015-12-01

    TEMPO (Tropospheric Emissions: Monitoring of Pollution) is a space-borne UV-spectral radiometer to be flown in a geostationary orbit as part of NASA's Earth Venture program. NASA also is planning a decadal survey mission-The GEOstationary Coastal and Air Pollution Events (GEO-CAPE). However, NASA has initiated scientific studies to determine if TEMPO can meet both its and GEO-CAPE's requirements by synergistically retrieving aerosol properties using TEMPO and GOES-R Advanced Baseline Imager (ABI) measurements. Because TEMPO does not have a cloud camera or needed spectral channels to identify clouds and a Shortwave IR band to characterize the surface that are essential for aerosol retrievals, GOES-R ABI can supplement those measurements. GOES-R aerosol team conducted a study to determine idealistic position of TEMPO and GOES-R (in its both east and west location) for scene overlap and projection of ABI Shortwave IR (2.25 um) reflectance and cloud mask to TEMPO pixels. The BRDF effect was taken into consideration in determining the spatial coverage of pixels ideal for aerosol retrievals using ABI shortwave IR reflectance in TEMPO pixels to extrapolate reflectance at visible spectral bands. Analysis shows that GOES-R (in its west location, 135W) and TEMPO do not overlap over eastern part of the United States (US) and Atlantic Ocean, while GOES-R (in its east location, 75W) overlaps with TEMPO over most part of the United States (US) except for small part of Pacific Ocean. In addition, retrievals in the early morning and late afternoon are not possible due to BRDF effects rendering the surface reflectance too bright. Cloud mask information from GOES-R observations in both its east and west location seems to be sufficient for TEMPO. In summary, GOES-R ABI Shortwave IR radiances and cloud mask information are adequate to be used with TEMPO measurements to retrieve aerosol optical depth product several times during the sunlit portion of the continental US.

  10. GOES-R Advanced Baseline Imager: spectral response functions and radiometric biases with the NPP Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite evaluated for desert calibration sites.

    PubMed

    Pearlman, Aaron; Pogorzala, David; Cao, Changyong

    2013-11-01

    The Advanced Baseline Imager (ABI), which will be launched in late 2015 on the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite R-series satellite, will be evaluated in terms of its data quality postlaunch through comparisons with other satellite sensors such as the recently launched Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) aboard the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership satellite. The ABI has completed much of its prelaunch characterization and its developers have generated and released its channel spectral response functions (response versus wavelength). Using these responses and constraining a radiative transfer model with ground reflectance, aerosol, and water vapor measurements, we simulate observed top of atmosphere (TOA) reflectances for analogous visible and near infrared channels of the VIIRS and ABI sensors at the Sonoran Desert and White Sands National Monument sites and calculate the radiometric biases and their uncertainties. We also calculate sensor TOA reflectances using aircraft hyperspectral data from the Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer to validate the uncertainties in several of the ABI and VIIRS channels and discuss the potential for validating the others. Once on-orbit, calibration scientists can use these biases to ensure ABI data quality and consistency to support the numerical weather prediction community and other data users. They can also use the results for ABI or VIIRS anomaly detection and resolution. PMID:24216671

  11. The Advanced Noise Control Fan Baseline Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McAllister, Joseph; Loew, Raymond A.; Lauer, Joel T.; Stuliff, Daniel L.

    2009-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center s (NASA Glenn) Advanced Noise Control Fan (ANCF) was developed in the early 1990s to provide a convenient test bed to measure and understand fan-generated acoustics, duct propagation, and radiation to the farfield. As part of a complete upgrade, current baseline and acoustic measurements were documented. Extensive in-duct, farfield acoustic, and flow field measurements are reported. This is a follow-on paper to documenting the operating description of the ANCF.

  12. Development of an Advanced Technique for Mapping and Monitoring Sea and Lake Ice in Preparation for GOES-R Advanced Baseline Imager (ABI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazari, R.; Temimi, M.; Khanbilvardi, R.; Romanov, P.

    2008-05-01

    In recent years, the uniqueness of the Earth's ice covered regions and their importance to the world is being increasingly recognized. They are considered vital and valuable for a variety of economic, environmental, and social reasons. Ice information can also improve weather and climate predictions. Observations show that Arctic ice is decreasing in both thickness and extent which will lead to the change in absorption of solar radiation and temperature of the earth. The increasing activity in ice-affected waters has led to a growing requirement for ice information and better mapping systems with improvements in both time and spatial resolution. A variety of Earth Observation sensors are used to map ice covered areas. Visible-Infrared sensors at moderate-resolution from polar orbiting satellites (NOAA-AVHRR, MODIS Aqua/ Terra) have been used extensively because of their easy accessibility. However, clouds, fog and low time resolutions limit the use of this type of sensor to fully meet operational ice mapping requirements, particularly in cloud- and fog ice zones. The primary objective of this research is to explore the potentials of mapping ice with the geostationary satellites which can provide a reasonably good time resolution and satisfactory spatial resolutions. The aim of this ongoing project is to develop an automated ice-mapping algorithm, which would make maximum use of GOES-R ABI's improved observing capabilities and to be the pioneer of creating daily ice maps from a geostationary satellite. Data collected by SEVIRI instrument onboard of Meteosat Second Generation (MSG) satellite have been used as a prototype. The Northern region of the Caspian Sea has been selected for algorithm development and calibration. The approach used in the algorithm development includes daily cloud-clear image compositing as well as pixel-by-pixel image classification using spectral criteria. All available spectral channels (reflectance and temperature) have been tested and used

  13. Camera Trajectory fromWide Baseline Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Havlena, M.; Torii, A.; Pajdla, T.

    2008-09-01

    Camera trajectory estimation, which is closely related to the structure from motion computation, is one of the fundamental tasks in computer vision. Reliable camera trajectory estimation plays an important role in 3D reconstruction, self localization, and object recognition. There are essential issues for a reliable camera trajectory estimation, for instance, choice of the camera and its geometric projection model, camera calibration, image feature detection and description, and robust 3D structure computation. Most of approaches rely on classical perspective cameras because of the simplicity of their projection models and ease of their calibration. However, classical perspective cameras offer only a limited field of view, and thus occlusions and sharp camera turns may cause that consecutive frames look completely different when the baseline becomes longer. This makes the image feature matching very difficult (or impossible) and the camera trajectory estimation fails under such conditions. These problems can be avoided if omnidirectional cameras, e.g. a fish-eye lens convertor, are used. The hardware which we are using in practice is a combination of Nikon FC-E9 mounted via a mechanical adaptor onto a Kyocera Finecam M410R digital camera. Nikon FC-E9 is a megapixel omnidirectional addon convertor with 180° view angle which provides images of photographic quality. Kyocera Finecam M410R delivers 2272×1704 images at 3 frames per second. The resulting combination yields a circular view of diameter 1600 pixels in the image. Since consecutive frames of the omnidirectional camera often share a common region in 3D space, the image feature matching is often feasible. On the other hand, the calibration of these cameras is non-trivial and is crucial for the accuracy of the resulting 3D reconstruction. We calibrate omnidirectional cameras off-line using the state-of-the-art technique and Mičušík's two-parameter model, that links the radius of the image point r to the

  14. Stereo imaging in astronomy with ultralong baseline interfereometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, Alak

    2015-08-01

    Astronomical images recorded on two-dimensional detectors do not give depth information even for extended objects. Three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction of such objects, e.g. supernova remnants (SNRs) is based on Doppler velocity measurements across the image assuming a position-velocity correspondence about the explosion center. Stereo imaging of astronomical objects, when possible, directly yield, independently of this assumption, 3D structures that will advance our understanding of their evolution and origins, and allow comparison with model simulations. The large distance to astronomical objects and the relatively small attainable stereo baselines make two views of the scene (the stereo image pair) differing by a very small angle and require very high-resolution imaging. Interferometry in the radio, mm, and shorter wavelengths will be required with interplanetary baselines to match these requirements. Using the earth's orbital diameter as the stereo base for images constructed six months apart, as in parallax measurements, through very high resolution telescope arrays may achieve these goals. Apart from challenges of space based interferometry and refractive variations of the intervening medium, issues of camera calibration, triangulation in the presence of realistic noise, image texture recognition and enhancement that are commonly faced in the field of Computer Vision have to be successfully addressed for stereo imaging in astronomy.

  15. WIDE-ANGLE, NARROW-ANGLE, AND IMAGING BASELINES OF OPTICAL LONG-BASELINE INTERFEROMETERS

    SciTech Connect

    Woillez, J.; Lacour, S. E-mail: sylvestre.lacour@obspm.fr

    2013-02-10

    For optical interferometers, the baseline is typically defined as the vector joining two perfectly identical telescopes. However, when the telescopes are naturally different or when the requirements on the baseline vector challenge the telescope perfection, the baseline definition depends on how the interferometer is used. This is where the notions of wide-angle, narrow-angle, and imaging baselines come into play. This article explores this variety of baselines, with the purpose of presenting a coherent set of definitions, describing how they relate to each other, and suggesting baseline metrology requirements. Ultimately, this work aims at supporting upcoming long-baseline optical interferometers with narrow-angle astrometry and phase-referenced imaging capabilities at the microarcsecond level.

  16. BASELINE DESIGN/ECONOMICS FOR ADVANCED FISCHER-TROPSCH TECHNOLOGY

    SciTech Connect

    1998-04-01

    Bechtel, along with Amoco as the main subcontractor, developed a Baseline design, two alternative designs, and computer process simulation models for indirect coal liquefaction based on advanced Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) technology for the U. S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Federal Energy Technology Center (FETC).

  17. A moving baseline for evaluation of advanced coal extraction systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bickerton, C. R.; Westerfield, M. D.

    1981-01-01

    Results from the initial effort to establish baseline economic performance comparators for a program whose intent is to define, develop, and demonstrate advanced systems suitable for coal resource extraction beyond the year 2000 are reported. Systems used were selected from contemporary coal mining technology and from conservation conjectures of year 2000 technology. The analysis was also based on a seam thickness of 6 ft. Therefore, the results are specific to the study systems and the selected seam extended to other seam thicknesses.

  18. Removing baseline flame's spectrum by using advanced recovering spectrum techniques.

    PubMed

    Arias, Luis; Sbarbaro, Daniel; Torres, Sergio

    2012-09-01

    In this paper, a novel automated algorithm to estimate and remove the continuous baseline from measured flame spectra is proposed. The algorithm estimates the continuous background based on previous information obtained from a learning database of continuous flame spectra. Then, the discontinuous flame emission is calculated by subtracting the estimated continuous baseline from the measured spectrum. The key issue subtending the learning database is that the continuous flame emissions are predominant in the sooty regions, in absence of discontinuous radiation. The proposed algorithm was tested using natural gas and bio-oil flames spectra at different combustion conditions, and the goodness-of-fit coefficient (GFC) quality metric was used to quantify the performance in the estimation process. Additionally, the commonly used first derivative method (FDM) for baseline removing was applied to the same testing spectra in order to compare and to evaluate the proposed technique. The achieved results show that the proposed method is a very attractive tool for designing advanced combustion monitoring strategies of discontinuous emissions. PMID:22945158

  19. Moving baseline for evaluation of advanced coal-extraction systems

    SciTech Connect

    Bickerton, C.R.; Westerfield, M.D.

    1981-04-15

    This document reports results from the initial effort to establish baseline economic performance comparators for a program whose intent is to define, develop, and demonstrate advanced systems suitable for coal resource extraction beyond the year 2000. Systems used in this study were selected from contemporary coal mining technology and from conservative conjectures of year 2000 technology. The analysis was also based on a seam thickness of 6 ft. Therefore, the results are specific to the study systems and the selected seam thickness. To be more beneficial to the program, the effort should be extended to other seam thicknesses. This document is one of a series which describe systems level requirements for advanced underground coal mining equipment. Five areas of performance are discussed: production cost, miner safety, miner health, environmental impact, and recovery efficiency. The projections for cost and production capability comprise a so-called moving baseline which will be used to assess compliance with the systems requirement for production cost. Separate projections were prepared for room and pillar, longwall, and shortwall technology all operating under comparable sets of mining conditions. This work is part of an effort to define and develop innovative coal extraction systems suitable for the significant resources remaining in the year 2000.

  20. Advanced radiographic imaging techniques.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beal, J. B.; Brown, R. L.

    1973-01-01

    Examination of the nature and operational constraints of conventional X-radiographic and neutron imaging methods, providing a foundation for a discussion of advanced radiographic imaging systems. Two types of solid-state image amplifiers designed to image X rays are described. Operational theory, panel construction, and performance characteristics are discussed. A closed-circuit television system for imaging neutrons is then described and the system design, operational theory, and performance characteristics are outlined. Emphasis is placed on a description of the advantages of these imaging systems over conventional methods.

  1. [Advance in imaging spectropolarimeter].

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin-quan; Xiangli, Bin; Huang, Min; Hu, Liang; Zhou, Jin-song; Jing, Juan-juan

    2011-07-01

    Imaging spectropolarimeter (ISP) is a type of novel photoelectric sensor which integrated the functions of imaging, spectrometry and polarimetry. In the present paper, the concept of the ISP is introduced, and the advances in ISP at home and abroad in recent years is reviewed. The principles of ISPs based on novel devices, such as acousto-optic tunable filter (AOTF) and liquid crystal tunable filter (LCTF), are illustrated. In addition, the principles of ISPs developed by adding polarized components to the dispersing-type imaging spectrometer, spatially modulated Fourier transform imaging spectrometer, and computer tomography imaging spectrometer are introduced. Moreover, the trends of ISP are discussed too. PMID:21942063

  2. Advanced Geosynchronous Imager

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chesters, Dennis

    1999-01-01

    For improved understanding of chaotic processes and the diurnal cycle, an advanced GOES imager must also have the multi-spectral spectral bands used by low earth orbit (LEO) imagers, with on-orbit calibration for all bands. A synergy between GEO and LEO radiometry would enable earth system scientists to fuse the remote sensing data from all the spaceborne platforms. These additional radiometric capabilities are designed to observe important physical processes that vary rapidly and unpredicably: smoke, fires, precipitation, ozone, volcanic ash, cloud phase and height, and surface temperature. We believe the technology now exists to develop an imaging system that can meet future weather reporting and earth system science needs. To meet this need, we propose a design for a comprehensive geosynchronous atmospheric imager. This imager is envisioned to fly on a GOES-N class spacecraft, within the volume, weight and power constraints of a platform similar to GOES-N while delivering 100 times more data and radiometric quality than the GOES-N imager. The higher data rate probably requires its own ground station, which could serve as a systems prototype for NOAA's next generation of operational satellites. For operational compatibility, our proposed advanced GOES imaging system contains the GOES-R requirements as a subset, and the GOES-N imager capabilities (and the sounder's imaging channels) as a further subset.

  3. Advanced imaging system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    This document describes the Advanced Imaging System CCD based camera. The AIS1 camera system was developed at Photometric Ltd. in Tucson, Arizona as part of a Phase 2 SBIR contract No. NAS5-30171 from the NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland. The camera project was undertaken as a part of the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) project. This document is intended to serve as a complete manual for the use and maintenance of the camera system. All the different parts of the camera hardware and software are discussed and complete schematics and source code listings are provided.

  4. PCANet: A Simple Deep Learning Baseline for Image Classification?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Tsung-Han; Jia, Kui; Gao, Shenghua; Lu, Jiwen; Zeng, Zinan; Ma, Yi

    2015-12-01

    In this work, we propose a very simple deep learning network for image classification which comprises only the very basic data processing components: cascaded principal component analysis (PCA), binary hashing, and block-wise histograms. In the proposed architecture, PCA is employed to learn multistage filter banks. It is followed by simple binary hashing and block histograms for indexing and pooling. This architecture is thus named as a PCA network (PCANet) and can be designed and learned extremely easily and efficiently. For comparison and better understanding, we also introduce and study two simple variations to the PCANet, namely the RandNet and LDANet. They share the same topology of PCANet but their cascaded filters are either selected randomly or learned from LDA. We have tested these basic networks extensively on many benchmark visual datasets for different tasks, such as LFW for face verification, MultiPIE, Extended Yale B, AR, FERET datasets for face recognition, as well as MNIST for hand-written digits recognition. Surprisingly, for all tasks, such a seemingly naive PCANet model is on par with the state of the art features, either prefixed, highly hand-crafted or carefully learned (by DNNs). Even more surprisingly, it sets new records for many classification tasks in Extended Yale B, AR, FERET datasets, and MNIST variations. Additional experiments on other public datasets also demonstrate the potential of the PCANet serving as a simple but highly competitive baseline for texture classification and object recognition.

  5. Initial Comparisons between the Advanced Technology Development Gen 2 Baseline Cells and Variant C Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Christophersen, Jon Petter; Motloch, Chester George; Wright, Randy Ben; Murphy, Timothy Collins; Belt, Jeffrey R; Ho, Chinh Dac; Bloom, Ira D.; Jones, S. A.; Battaglia, Vincent S.; Jungst, Rudy G.; Case, Herb L.; Sutula, Raymond A.; Barnes, James A.; Duong, Tien Q.

    2002-06-01

    The Advanced Technology Development Program is testing a second generation of lithium-ion cells, consisting of a baseline and three variant chemistries. The cathode composition of the Variant C chemistry was altered with an increase to the aluminum dopant and a decrease to the cobalt dopant to explore the impact on performance. However, it resulted in a 20% drop in rated capacity. Also, the Variant C average power fade is higher, but capacity fade is higher for the Baseline cell chemistry. Initial results indicate that the Variant C chemistry will reach end of life sooner than the Baseline chemistry.

  6. Advancing biomedical imaging

    PubMed Central

    Weissleder, Ralph; Nahrendorf, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Imaging reveals complex structures and dynamic interactive processes, located deep inside the body, that are otherwise difficult to decipher. Numerous imaging modalities harness every last inch of the energy spectrum. Clinical modalities include magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), X-ray computed tomography (CT), ultrasound, and light-based methods [endoscopy and optical coherence tomography (OCT)]. Research modalities include various light microscopy techniques (confocal, multiphoton, total internal reflection, superresolution fluorescence microscopy), electron microscopy, mass spectrometry imaging, fluorescence tomography, bioluminescence, variations of OCT, and optoacoustic imaging, among a few others. Although clinical imaging and research microscopy are often isolated from one another, we argue that their combination and integration is not only informative but also essential to discovering new biology and interpreting clinical datasets in which signals invariably originate from hundreds to thousands of cells per voxel. PMID:26598657

  7. Advanced image memory architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vercillo, Richard; McNeill, Kevin M.

    1994-05-01

    A workstation for radiographic images, known as the Arizona Viewing Console (AVC), was developed at the University of Arizona Health Sciences Center in the Department of Radiology. This workstation has been in use as a research tool to aid us in investigating how a radiologist interacts with a workstation, to determine which image processing features are required to aid the radiologist, to develop user interfaces and to support psychophysical and clinical studies. Results from these studies have show a need to increase the current image memory's available storage in order to accommodate high resolution images. The current triple-ported image memory can be allocated to store any number of images up to a combined total of 4 million pixels. Over the past couple of years, higher resolution images have become easier to generate with the advent of laser digitizers and computed radiology systems. As part of our research, a larger 32 million pixel image memory for AVC has been designed to replace the existing image memory.

  8. PCANet: A Simple Deep Learning Baseline for Image Classification?

    PubMed

    Chan, Tsung-Han; Jia, Kui; Gao, Shenghua; Lu, Jiwen; Zeng, Zinan; Ma, Yi

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, we propose a very simple deep learning network for image classification that is based on very basic data processing components: 1) cascaded principal component analysis (PCA); 2) binary hashing; and 3) blockwise histograms. In the proposed architecture, the PCA is employed to learn multistage filter banks. This is followed by simple binary hashing and block histograms for indexing and pooling. This architecture is thus called the PCA network (PCANet) and can be extremely easily and efficiently designed and learned. For comparison and to provide a better understanding, we also introduce and study two simple variations of PCANet: 1) RandNet and 2) LDANet. They share the same topology as PCANet, but their cascaded filters are either randomly selected or learned from linear discriminant analysis. We have extensively tested these basic networks on many benchmark visual data sets for different tasks, including Labeled Faces in the Wild (LFW) for face verification; the MultiPIE, Extended Yale B, AR, Facial Recognition Technology (FERET) data sets for face recognition; and MNIST for hand-written digit recognition. Surprisingly, for all tasks, such a seemingly naive PCANet model is on par with the state-of-the-art features either prefixed, highly hand-crafted, or carefully learned [by deep neural networks (DNNs)]. Even more surprisingly, the model sets new records for many classification tasks on the Extended Yale B, AR, and FERET data sets and on MNIST variations. Additional experiments on other public data sets also demonstrate the potential of PCANet to serve as a simple but highly competitive baseline for texture classification and object recognition. PMID:26340772

  9. Modern Imaging Technology: Recent Advances

    SciTech Connect

    Welch, Michael J.; Eckelman, William C.

    2004-06-18

    This 2-day conference is designed to bring scientist working in nuclear medicine, as well as nuclear medicine practitioners together to discuss the advances in four selected areas of imaging: Biochemical Parameters using Small Animal Imaging, Developments in Small Animal PET Imaging, Cell Labeling, and Imaging Angiogenesis Using Multiple Modality. The presentations will be on molecular imaging applications at the forefront of research, up to date on the status of molecular imaging in nuclear medicine as well as in related imaging areas. Experts will discuss the basic science of imaging techniques, and scheduled participants will engage in an exciting program that emphasizes the current status of molecular imaging as well as the role of DOE funded research in this area.

  10. Baseline design/economics for advanced Fischer-Tropsch technology. Quarterly report, October--December 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-31

    Bechtel, with Amoco as the main subcontractor, initiated a study on September 26, 1991, for the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC) to develop a computer model and baseline design for advanced Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) technology. This 24-month study, with an approved budget of $2.3 million, is being performed under DOE Contract Number AC22-91PC90027. (1) Develop a baseline design and two alternative designs for indirect liquefaction using advanced F-T technology. The baseline design uses Illinois No. 6 Eastern Coal and conventional refining. There is an alternative refining case using ZSM-5 treatment of the vapor stream from the slurry F-T reactor and an alternative coal case using Western coal from the Powder River Basin. (2) Prepare the capital and operating costs for the baseline design and the alternatives. Individual plant costs for the alternative cases will be prorated on capacity, wherever possible, from the baseline case. (3) Develop a process flowsheet simulation (PFS) model. The baseline design, the economic analysis and computer model will be major research planning tools that PETC will use to plan, guide and evaluate its ongoing and future research and commercialization programs relating to indirect coal liquefaction for the manufacture of synthetic liquid fuels from coal.

  11. Advanced Land Imager Assessment System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chander, Gyanesh; Choate, Mike; Christopherson, Jon; Hollaren, Doug; Morfitt, Ron; Nelson, Jim; Nelson, Shar; Storey, James; Helder, Dennis; Ruggles, Tim; Kaita, Ed; Levy, Raviv; Ong, Lawrence; Markham, Brian; Schweiss, Robert

    2008-01-01

    The Advanced Land Imager Assessment System (ALIAS) supports radiometric and geometric image processing for the Advanced Land Imager (ALI) instrument onboard NASA s Earth Observing-1 (EO-1) satellite. ALIAS consists of two processing subsystems for radiometric and geometric processing of the ALI s multispectral imagery. The radiometric processing subsystem characterizes and corrects, where possible, radiometric qualities including: coherent, impulse; and random noise; signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs); detector operability; gain; bias; saturation levels; striping and banding; and the stability of detector performance. The geometric processing subsystem and analysis capabilities support sensor alignment calibrations, sensor chip assembly (SCA)-to-SCA alignments and band-to-band alignment; and perform geodetic accuracy assessments, modulation transfer function (MTF) characterizations, and image-to-image characterizations. ALIAS also characterizes and corrects band-toband registration, and performs systematic precision and terrain correction of ALI images. This system can geometrically correct, and automatically mosaic, the SCA image strips into a seamless, map-projected image. This system provides a large database, which enables bulk trending for all ALI image data and significant instrument telemetry. Bulk trending consists of two functions: Housekeeping Processing and Bulk Radiometric Processing. The Housekeeping function pulls telemetry and temperature information from the instrument housekeeping files and writes this information to a database for trending. The Bulk Radiometric Processing function writes statistical information from the dark data acquired before and after the Earth imagery and the lamp data to the database for trending. This allows for multi-scene statistical analyses.

  12. Baseline design/economics for advanced Fischer-Tropsch technology. Quarterly report, April--June 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-10-01

    Effective September 26, 1991, Bechtel, with Amoco as the main subcontractor, initiated a study to develop a computer model and baseline design for advanced Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) technology for the US Department of Energy`s Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC). The objectives of the study are to: Develop a baseline design for indirect liquefaction using advanced F-T technology; prepare the capital and operating costs for the baseline design; and develop a process flow sheet simulation (PI-S) model. The baseline design, the economic analysis, and the computer model win be the major research planning tools that PETC will use to plan, guide, and evaluate its ongoing and future research and commercialization programs relating to indirect coal liquefaction. for the manufacture of synthetic liquid fuels from coal. This report is Bechtel`s third quarterly technical progress report covering the period from March 16, 1992 through June 21, 1992. This report consists of seven sections: Section 1 - introduction; Section 2 - summary; Section 3 - carbon dioxide removal tradeoff study; Section 4 - preliminary plant designs for coal preparation; Section 5 - preliminary design for syngas production; Section 6 - Task 3 - engineering design criteria; and Section 7 - project management.

  13. Preliminary design and implementation of the baseline digital baseband architecture for advanced deep space transponders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, T. M.; Yeh, H.-G.

    1993-01-01

    The baseline design and implementation of the digital baseband architecture for advanced deep space transponders is investigated and identified. Trade studies on the selection of the number of bits for the analog-to-digital converter (ADC) and optimum sampling schemes are presented. In addition, the proposed optimum sampling scheme is analyzed in detail. Descriptions of possible implementations for the digital baseband (or digital front end) and digital phase-locked loop (DPLL) for carrier tracking are also described.

  14. Baseline design/economics for advanced Fischer-Tropsch technology. Quarterly report, July--September 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1994-12-31

    This report is Bechtel`s twelfth quarterly technical progress report and covers the period of July through September, 1994. All major tasks associated with the contract study have essentially been completed. Effort is under way in preparing various topical reports for publication. The objectives of this study are to: Develop a baseline design and two alternative designs for indirect liquefaction using advanced F-T technology. The baseline design uses Illinois No. 6 Eastern Coal and conventional refining. There is an alternative refining case using ZSM-5 treatment of the vapor stream from the slurry F-T reactor and an alternative coal case using Western coal from the Powder River Basin. Prepare the capital and operating costs for the baseline design and the alternatives. Individual plant costs for the alternative cases win be prorated on capacity, wherever possible, from the baseline case. Develop a process flowsheet simulation (PFS) model; establish the baseline design and alternatives; evaluate baseline and alternative economics; develop engineering design criteria; develop a process flowsheet simulation (PFS) model; perform sensitivity studies using the PFS model; document the PFS model and develop a DOE training session on its use; and perform project management, technical coordination and other miscellaneous support functions. Tasks 1, 2, 3 and 5 have essentially been completed. Effort is under way in preparing topical reports for publication. During the current reporting period, work progressed on Tasks 4, 6 and 7. This report covers work done during this period and consists of four sections: Introduction and Summary; Task 4 - Process Flowsheet Simulation (PFS) Model and Conversion to ASPEN PLUS; Task 6 - Document the PFS model and develop a DOE training session on its use; and Project Management and Staffing Report.

  15. Recent imaging advances in neurology.

    PubMed

    Rocchi, Lorenzo; Niccolini, Flavia; Politis, Marios

    2015-09-01

    Over the recent years, the application of neuroimaging techniques such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography (PET) has considerably advanced the understanding of complex neurological disorders. PET is a powerful molecular imaging tool, which investigates the distribution and binding of radiochemicals attached to biologically relevant molecules; as such, this technique is able to give information on biochemistry and metabolism of the brain in health and disease. MRI uses high intensity magnetic fields and radiofrequency pulses to provide structural and functional information on tissues and organs in intact or diseased individuals, including the evaluation of white matter integrity, grey matter thickness and brain perfusion. The aim of this article is to review the most recent advances in neuroimaging research in common neurological disorders such as movement disorders, dementia, epilepsy, traumatic brain injury and multiple sclerosis, and to evaluate their contribution in the diagnosis and management of patients. PMID:25808503

  16. Advances in multimodality molecular imaging

    PubMed Central

    Zaidi, Habib; Prasad, Rameshwar

    2009-01-01

    Multimodality molecular imaging using high resolution positron emission tomography (PET) combined with other modalities is now playing a pivotal role in basic and clinical research. The introduction of combined PET/CT systems in clinical setting has revolutionized the practice of diagnostic imaging. The complementarity between the intrinsically aligned anatomic (CT) and functional or metabolic (PET) information provided in a “one-stop shop” and the possibility to use CT images for attenuation correction of the PET data has been the driving force behind the success of this technology. On the other hand, combining PET with Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) in a single gantry is technically more challenging owing to the strong magnetic fields. Nevertheless, significant progress has been made resulting in the design of few preclinical PET systems and one human prototype dedicated for simultaneous PET/MR brain imaging. This paper discusses recent advances in PET instrumentation and the advantages and challenges of multimodality imaging systems. Future opportunities and the challenges facing the adoption of multimodality imaging instrumentation will also be addressed. PMID:20098557

  17. Baseline data on forest loss and associated uncertainty: advances in national forest monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelletier, Johanne; Goetz, Scott J.

    2015-02-01

    Countries participating in climate change mitigation via the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change reducing emissions from deforestation and forest degradation mechanism are required to establish national forest monitoring systems. The design of national forest monitoring system includes provision of transparent, consistent and accurate estimates of emissions and removals from forests, while also taking into account national circumstances and capabilities. One key component of these systems lies in satellite remote sensing approaches and techniques to determine baseline data on forest loss against which future rates of change can be evaluated. Advances in approaches meeting these criteria for measuring, reporting and verification purposes are therefore of tremendous interest. A robust example advancing such approaches, focused on Peru, is provided in the recent paper of Potapov et al (2014 Environ. Res. Lett. 9 124012).

  18. Recent advances in imaging technologies in dentistry

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Naseem; Bansal, Nikhil; Logani, Ajay

    2014-01-01

    Dentistry has witnessed tremendous advances in all its branches over the past three decades. With these advances, the need for more precise diagnostic tools, specially imaging methods, have become mandatory. From the simple intra-oral periapical X-rays, advanced imaging techniques like computed tomography, cone beam computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasound have also found place in modern dentistry. Changing from analogue to digital radiography has not only made the process simpler and faster but also made image storage, manipulation (brightness/contrast, image cropping, etc.) and retrieval easier. The three-dimensional imaging has made the complex cranio-facial structures more accessible for examination and early and accurate diagnosis of deep seated lesions. This paper is to review current advances in imaging technology and their uses in different disciplines of dentistry. PMID:25349663

  19. Long-baseline optical intensity interferometry. Laboratory demonstration of diffraction-limited imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dravins, Dainis; Lagadec, Tiphaine; Nuñez, Paul D.

    2015-08-01

    Context. A long-held vision has been to realize diffraction-limited optical aperture synthesis over kilometer baselines. This will enable imaging of stellar surfaces and their environments, and reveal interacting gas flows in binary systems. An opportunity is now opening up with the large telescope arrays primarily erected for measuring Cherenkov light in air induced by gamma rays. With suitable software, such telescopes could be electronically connected and also used for intensity interferometry. Second-order spatial coherence of light is obtained by cross correlating intensity fluctuations measured in different pairs of telescopes. With no optical links between them, the error budget is set by the electronic time resolution of a few nanoseconds. Corresponding light-travel distances are approximately one meter, making the method practically immune to atmospheric turbulence or optical imperfections, permitting both very long baselines and observing at short optical wavelengths. Aims: Previous theoretical modeling has shown that full images should be possible to retrieve from observations with such telescope arrays. This project aims at verifying diffraction-limited imaging experimentally with groups of detached and independent optical telescopes. Methods: In a large optics laboratory, artificial stars (single and double, round and elliptic) were observed by an array of small telescopes. Using high-speed photon-counting solid-state detectors and real-time electronics, intensity fluctuations were cross-correlated over up to 180 baselines between pairs of telescopes, producing coherence maps across the interferometric Fourier-transform plane. Results: These interferometric measurements were used to extract parameters about the simulated stars, and to reconstruct their two-dimensional images. As far as we are aware, these are the first diffraction-limited images obtained from an optical array only linked by electronic software, with no optical connections between the

  20. Beyond the Baseline: Proceedings of the Space Station Evolution Symposium. Volume 2, Part 2; Space Station Freedom Advanced Development Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    This report contains the individual presentations delivered at the Space Station Evolution Symposium in League City, Texas on February 6, 7, 8, 1990. Personnel responsible for Advanced Systems Studies and Advanced Development within the Space Station Freedom program reported on the results of their work to date. Systems Studies presentations focused on identifying the baseline design provisions (hooks and scars) necessary to enable evolution of the facility to support changing space policy and anticipated user needs. Also emphasized were evolution configuration and operations concepts including on-orbit processing of space transfer vehicles. Advanced Development task managers discussed transitioning advanced technologies to the baseline program, including those near-term technologies which will enhance the safety and productivity of the crew and the reliability of station systems. Special emphasis was placed on applying advanced automation technology to ground and flight systems. This publication consists of two volumes. Volume 1 contains the results of the advanced system studies with the emphasis on reference evolution configurations, system design requirements and accommodations, and long-range technology projections. Volume 2 reports on advanced development tasks within the Transition Definition Program. Products of these tasks include: engineering fidelity demonstrations and evaluations on Station development testbeds and Shuttle-based flight experiments; detailed requirements and performance specifications which address advanced technology implementation issues; and mature applications and the tools required for the development, implementation, and support of advanced technology within the Space Station Freedom Program.

  1. An Integrated Ransac and Graph Based Mismatch Elimination Approach for Wide-Baseline Image Matching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasheminasab, M.; Ebadi, H.; Sedaghat, A.

    2015-12-01

    In this paper we propose an integrated approach in order to increase the precision of feature point matching. Many different algorithms have been developed as to optimizing the short-baseline image matching while because of illumination differences and viewpoints changes, wide-baseline image matching is so difficult to handle. Fortunately, the recent developments in the automatic extraction of local invariant features make wide-baseline image matching possible. The matching algorithms which are based on local feature similarity principle, using feature descriptor as to establish correspondence between feature point sets. To date, the most remarkable descriptor is the scale-invariant feature transform (SIFT) descriptor , which is invariant to image rotation and scale, and it remains robust across a substantial range of affine distortion, presence of noise, and changes in illumination. The epipolar constraint based on RANSAC (random sample consensus) method is a conventional model for mismatch elimination, particularly in computer vision. Because only the distance from the epipolar line is considered, there are a few false matches in the selected matching results based on epipolar geometry and RANSAC. Aguilariu et al. proposed Graph Transformation Matching (GTM) algorithm to remove outliers which has some difficulties when the mismatched points surrounded by the same local neighbor structure. In this study to overcome these limitations, which mentioned above, a new three step matching scheme is presented where the SIFT algorithm is used to obtain initial corresponding point sets. In the second step, in order to reduce the outliers, RANSAC algorithm is applied. Finally, to remove the remained mismatches, based on the adjacent K-NN graph, the GTM is implemented. Four different close range image datasets with changes in viewpoint are utilized to evaluate the performance of the proposed method and the experimental results indicate its robustness and capability.

  2. Recent Advancements in Microwave Imaging Plasma Diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    H. Park; C.C. Chang; B.H. Deng; C.W. Domier; A.J.H. Donni; K. Kawahata; C. Liang; X.P. Liang; H.J. Lu; N.C. Luhmann, Jr.; A. Mase; H. Matsuura; E. Mazzucato; A. Miura; K. Mizuno; T. Munsat; K. and Y. Nagayama; M.J. van de Pol; J. Wang; Z.G. Xia; W-K. Zhang

    2002-03-26

    Significant advances in microwave and millimeter wave technology over the past decade have enabled the development of a new generation of imaging diagnostics for current and envisioned magnetic fusion devices. Prominent among these are revolutionary microwave electron cyclotron emission imaging (ECEI), microwave phase imaging interferometers, imaging microwave scattering and microwave imaging reflectometer (MIR) systems for imaging electron temperature and electron density fluctuations (both turbulent and coherent) and profiles (including transport barriers) on toroidal devices such as tokamaks, spherical tori, and stellarators. The diagnostic technology is reviewed, and typical diagnostic systems are analyzed. Representative experimental results obtained with these novel diagnostic systems are also presented.

  3. Hepatocellular carcinoma: Advances in diagnostic imaging.

    PubMed

    Sun, Haoran; Song, Tianqiang

    2015-10-01

    Thanks to the growing knowledge on biological behaviors of hepatocellular carcinomas (HCC), as well as continuous improvement in imaging techniques and experienced interpretation of imaging features of the nodules in cirrhotic liver, the detection and characterization of HCC has improved in the past decade. A number of practice guidelines for imaging diagnosis have been developed to reduce interpretation variability and standardize management of HCC, and they are constantly updated with advances in imaging techniques and evidence based data from clinical series. In this article, we strive to review the imaging techniques and the characteristic features of hepatocellular carcinoma associated with cirrhotic liver, with emphasis on the diagnostic value of advanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques and utilization of hepatocyte-specific MRI contrast agents. We also briefly describe the concept of liver imaging reporting and data systems and discuss the consensus and controversy of major practice guidelines. PMID:26632539

  4. Orientation and Dense Reconstruction of Unordered Terrestrial and Aerial Wide Baseline Image Sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartelsen, J.; Mayer, H.; Hirschmüller, H.; Kuhn, A.; Michelini, M.

    2012-07-01

    In this paper we present an approach for detailed and precise automatic dense 3D reconstruction using images from consumer cameras. The major difference between our approach and many others is that we focus on wide-baseline image sets. We have combined and improved several methods, particularly, least squares matching, RANSAC, scale-space maxima and bundle adjustment, for robust matching and parameter estimation. Point correspondences and the five-point algorithm lead to relative orientation. Due to our robust matching method it is possible to orient images under much more unfavorable conditions, for instance concerning illumination changes or scale differences, than for often used operators such as SIFT. For dense reconstruction, we use our orientation as input for Semiglobal Matching (SGM) resulting into dense depth images. The latter can be fused into a 2.5D model for eliminating the redundancy of the highly overlapping depth images. However, some applications require full 3D models. A solution to this problem is part of our current work, for which preliminary results are presented in this paper. With very small unmanned aerial systems (Micro UAS) it is possible to acquire images which have a perspective similar to terrestrial images and can thus be combined with them. Such a combination is useful for an almost complete 3D reconstruction of urban scenes. We have applied our approach to several hundred aerial and terrestrial images and have generated detailed 2.5D and 3D models of urban areas.

  5. Microscopy imaging device with advanced imaging properties

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Kunal; Burns, Laurie; El Gamal, Abbas; Schnitzer, Mark J.; Cocker, Eric; Ho, Tatt Wei

    2015-11-24

    Systems, methods and devices are implemented for microscope imaging solutions. One embodiment of the present disclosure is directed toward an epifluorescence microscope. The microscope includes an image capture circuit including an array of optical sensor. An optical arrangement is configured to direct excitation light of less than about 1 mW to a target object in a field of view of that is at least 0.5 mm.sup.2 and to direct epi-fluorescence emission caused by the excitation light to the array of optical sensors. The optical arrangement and array of optical sensors are each sufficiently close to the target object to provide at least 2.5 .mu.m resolution for an image of the field of view.

  6. [Advances in musculoskeletal MR imaging].

    PubMed

    Ho, Michael; Andreisek, Gustav

    2015-09-01

    Musculoskeletal imaging is a rapidly developing field offering several new techniques. MR neurography provides an additive value with complementary and precise information about peripheral nerves. Hereby, MR neurography not only enables the radiologist to differentiate between a mononeuropathic or a polyneuropathic process, but also helps to find nerve compression syndromes by visualizing the nerve surrounding structures as well. An additional administration of contrast agent enables detection of tumors and inflammation of peripheral nerves. Whole body MRI opens new possibilities for detection and follow-up in oncological disorders, systemic diseases, in pediatric diagnostics and in preventive medicine. Guidelines are useful for an evidence-based application of this technique. MRI is generally considered to be the gold standard in diagnostic imaging of the spine. Continuous technical developments have led to a better image quality. New guidelines for standardized image interpretation and reporting have been published and should be used to avoid loss of information from high resolution imaging to effective treatment. PMID:26331202

  7. Advanced Atmospheric Sounder and Imaging Radiometer (AASIR)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Design information for the Advanced Atmospheric Sounder and Imaging Radiometer is reported, which was developed to determine the configuration of a sensor for IR and visible imaging. The areas of technology reported include: systems design, optics, mechanics, electronics, detectors, radiative cooler, and radiometric calibration.

  8. Advanced Imaging Algorithms for Radiation Imaging Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Marleau, Peter

    2015-10-01

    The intent of the proposed work, in collaboration with University of Michigan, is to develop the algorithms that will bring the analysis from qualitative images to quantitative attributes of objects containing SNM. The first step to achieving this is to develop an indepth understanding of the intrinsic errors associated with the deconvolution and MLEM algorithms. A significant new effort will be undertaken to relate the image data to a posited three-dimensional model of geometric primitives that can be adjusted to get the best fit. In this way, parameters of the model such as sizes, shapes, and masses can be extracted for both radioactive and non-radioactive materials. This model-based algorithm will need the integrated response of a hypothesized configuration of material to be calculated many times. As such, both the MLEM and the model-based algorithm require significant increases in calculation speed in order to converge to solutions in practical amounts of time.

  9. Advanced MR Imaging of the Visual Pathway.

    PubMed

    Yu, Fang; Duong, Timothy; Tantiwongkosi, Bundhit

    2015-08-01

    Vision is one of our most vital senses, deriving from the eyes as well as structures deep within the intracranial compartment. MR imaging, through its wide selection of sequences, offers an array of structural and functional imaging tools to interrogate this intricate system. This review describes several advanced MR imaging sequences and explores their potential clinical applications as well as areas for further development. PMID:26208415

  10. Imaging of the pancreas: Recent advances

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhary, Vikas; Bano, Shahina

    2011-01-01

    A wide spectrum of anomalies of pancreas and the pancreatic duct system are commonly encountered at radiological evaluation. Diagnosing pancreatic lesions generally requires a multimodality approach. This review highlights the new advances in pancreatic imaging and their applications in the diagnosis and management of pancreatic pathologies. The mainstay techniques include computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), endoscopic ultrasound (EUS), radionuclide imaging (RNI) and optical coherence tomography (OCT). PMID:21847450

  11. ITU-T T.851: an enhanced entropy coding design for JPEG baseline images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, Joan L.; Hinds, Arianne T.

    2008-08-01

    The Joint Photographic Experts Group (JPEG) baseline standard remains a popular and pervasive standard for continuous tone, still image coding. The "J" in JPEG acknowledges its two main parent organizations, ISO (International Organization for Standardization) and the ITU-T (International Telecommunications Union - Telecommunication). Notwithstanding their joint efforts, both groups have subsequently (and separately) standardized many improvements for still image coding. Recently, the ITU-T Study Group 16 completed the standardization for a new entropy coder - called the Q15-coder, whose statistical model is from the original JPEG-1 standard. This new standard, ITU-T Rec. T.851, can be used in lieu of the traditional Huffman (a form of variable length coding) entropy coder, and complements the QM arithmetic coder, both originally standardized in JPEG as ITU-T T.81 | ISO/IEC 10918:1. In contrast to Huffman entropy coding, arithmetic coding makes no assumptions about an image's statistics, but rather responds in real time. This paper will present a tutorial on arithmetic coding, provide a history of arithmetic coding in JPEG, share the motivation for T.851, outline its changes, and provide comparison results with both the baseline Huffman and the original QM-coder entropy coders. It will conclude with suggestions for future work.

  12. Advances in optical imaging for pharmacological studies

    PubMed Central

    Arranz, Alicia; Ripoll, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    Imaging approaches are an essential tool for following up over time representative parameters of in vivo models, providing useful information in pharmacological studies. Main advantages of optical imaging approaches compared to other imaging methods are their safety, straight-forward use and cost-effectiveness. A main drawback, however, is having to deal with the presence of high scattering and high absorption in living tissues. Depending on how these issues are addressed, three different modalities can be differentiated: planar imaging (including fluorescence and bioluminescence in vivo imaging), optical tomography, and optoacoustic approaches. In this review we describe the latest advances in optical in vivo imaging with pharmacological applications, with special focus on the development of new optical imaging probes in order to overcome the strong absorption introduced by different tissue components, especially hemoglobin, and the development of multimodal imaging systems in order to overcome the resolution limitations imposed by scattering. PMID:26441646

  13. Advanced noninvasive imaging of spinal vascular malformations

    PubMed Central

    Eddleman, Christopher S.; Jeong, Hyun; Cashen, Ty A.; Walker, Matthew; Bendok, Bernard R.; Batjer, H. Hunt; Carroll, Timothy J.

    2010-01-01

    Spinal vascular malformations (SVMs) are an uncommon, heterogeneous group of vascular anomalies that can render devastating neurological consequences if they are not diagnosed and treated in a timely fashion. Imaging SVMs has always presented a formidable challenge because their clinical and imaging presentations resemble those of neoplasms, demyelination diseases, and infection. Advancements in noninvasive imaging modalities (MR and CT angiography) have increased during the last decade and have improved the ability to accurately diagnose spinal vascular anomalies. In addition, intraoperative imaging techniques have been developed that aid in the intraoperative assessment before, during, and after resection of these lesions with minimal and/or optimal use of spinal digital subtraction angiography. In this report, the authors review recent advancements in the imaging of SVMs that will likely lead to more timely diagnoses and treatment while reducing procedural risk exposure to the patients who harbor these uncommon spinal lesions. PMID:19119895

  14. Recent advances in liver imaging.

    PubMed

    Mutter, D; Soler, L; Marescaux, J

    2010-10-01

    Liver surgery remains a difficult challenge in which preoperative data analysis and strategy definition may play a significant role in the success of the procedure. Medical image processing led to a major improvement of patient care by guiding the surgical gesture. From this initial data, new technologies of virtual reality and augmented reality can increase the potential of such images. The 3D modeling of the liver of patients from their CT scan or MRI thus allows an improved surgical planning. Simulation allows the procedure to be simulated preoperatively and offers the opportunity to train the surgical gesture before carrying it out. These three preoperative steps can be used intraoperatively thanks to the development of augmented reality, which consists of superimposing the preoperative 3D modeling of the patient onto the real intraoperative view of the patient and his/her organs. Augmented reality provides surgeons with a transparent view of the patient. This facilitated the intraoperative identification of the vascular anatomy and the control of the segmental arteries and veins in liver surgery, thus preventing intraoperative bleeding. It can also offer guidance due to the virtual improvement of their real surgical tools, which are tracked in real-time during the procedure. During the surgical procedure, augmented reality, therefore, offers surgeons a transparent view of their patient, which will lead to the automation of the most complex maneuvers. The new ways of processing and analyzing liver images have dramatically changed the approach to liver surgery. PMID:20932146

  15. Chemical Approaches for Advanced Optical Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhixing

    Advances in optical microscopy have been constantly expanding our knowledge of biological systems. The achievements therein are a result of close collaborations between physicists/engineers who build the imaging instruments and chemists/biochemists who design the corresponding probe molecules. In this work I present a number of chemical approaches for the development of advanced optical imaging methods. Chapter 1 provides an overview of the recent advances of novel imaging approaches taking advantage of chemical tag technologies. Chapter 2 describes the second-generation covalent trimethoprim-tag as a viable tool for live cell protein-specific labeling and imaging. In Chapter 3 we present a fluorescence lifetime imaging approach to map protein-specific micro-environment in live cells using TMP-Cy3 as a chemical probe. In Chapter 4, we present a method harnessing photo-activatable fluorophores to extend the fundamental depth limit in multi-photon microscopy. Chapter 5 describes the development of isotopically edited alkyne palette for multi-color live cell vibrational imaging of cellular small molecules. These studies exemplify the impact of modern chemical approaches in the development of advanced optical microscopies.

  16. Tomographic Imaging of a Forested Area By Airborne Multi-Baseline P-Band SAR

    PubMed Central

    Frey, Othmar; Morsdorf, Felix; Meier, Erich

    2008-01-01

    In recent years, various attempts have been undertaken to obtain information about the structure of forested areas from multi-baseline synthetic aperture radar data. Tomographic processing of such data has been demonstrated for airborne L-band data but the quality of the focused tomographic images is limited by several factors. In particular, the common Fourier-based focusing methods are susceptible to irregular and sparse sampling, two problems, that are unavoidable in case of multi-pass, multi-baseline SAR data acquired by an airborne system. In this paper, a tomographic focusing method based on the time-domain back-projection algorithm is proposed, which maintains the geometric relationship between the original sensor positions and the imaged target and is therefore able to cope with irregular sampling without introducing any approximations with respect to the geometry. The tomographic focusing quality is assessed by analysing the impulse response of simulated point targets and an in-scene corner reflector. And, in particular, several tomographic slices of a volume representing a forested area are given. The respective P-band tomographic data set consisting of eleven flight tracks has been acquired by the airborne E-SAR sensor of the German Aerospace Center (DLR).

  17. Advanced Microwave/Millimeter-Wave Imaging Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Zuowei; Yang, Lu; Luhmann, N. C., Jr.; Domier, C. W.; Ito, N.; Kogi, Y.; Liang, Y.; Mase, A.; Park, H.; Sakata, E.; Tsai, W.; Xia, Z. G.; Zhang, P.

    Millimeter wave technology advances have made possible active and passive millimeter wave imaging for a variety of applications including advanced plasma diagnostics, radio astronomy, atmospheric radiometry, concealed weapon detection, all-weather aircraft landing, contraband goods detection, harbor navigation/surveillance in fog, highway traffic monitoring in fog, helicopter and automotive collision avoidance in fog, and environmental remote sensing data associated with weather, pollution, soil moisture, oil spill detection, and monitoring of forest fires, to name but a few. The primary focus of this paper is on technology advances which have made possible advanced imaging and visualization of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) fluctuations and microturbulence in fusion plasmas. Topics of particular emphasis include frequency selective surfaces, planar Schottky diode mixer arrays, electronically controlled beam shaping/steering arrays, and high power millimeter wave local oscillator and probe sources.

  18. Advanced MR Imaging of Gliomas: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Shih-Wei; Chung, Hsiao-Wen; Tsai, Fong Y.; Chen, Cheng-Yu

    2013-01-01

    Recent advances in the treatment of cerebral gliomas have increased the demands on noninvasive neuroimaging for the diagnosis, therapeutic planning, tumor monitoring, and patient outcome prediction. In the meantime, improved magnetic resonance (MR) imaging techniques have shown much potentials in evaluating the key pathological features of the gliomas, including cellularity, invasiveness, mitotic activity, angiogenesis, and necrosis, hence, further shedding light on glioma grading before treatment. In this paper, an update of advanced MR imaging techniques is reviewed, and their potential roles as biomarkers of tumor grading are discussed. PMID:23862163

  19. Advanced Imaging of Chiari 1 Malformations.

    PubMed

    Fakhri, Akbar; Shah, Manish N; Goyal, Manu S

    2015-10-01

    Type I Chiari malformations are congenital deformities involving cerebellar tonsillar herniation downward through the foramen magnum. Structurally, greater than 5 mm of tonsillar descent in adults and more than 6 mm in children is consistent with type I Chiari malformations. However, the radiographic severity of the tonsillar descent does not always correlate well with the clinical symptomatology. Advanced imaging can help clinically correlate imaging to symptoms. Specifically, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow abnormalities are seen in patients with type I Chiari malformation. Advanced MRI involving cardiac-gated and phase-contrast MRI affords a view of such CSF flow abnormalities. PMID:26408061

  20. Advanced fiber information systems seed coat neps baseline response from diverse mediums

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An extensive literature search has revealed that no papers have been published regarding selectivity calculation of the AFIS seed coat neps (SCN) determination over interfering material in cotton. A prerequisite to selectivity measurements is to identify suitable fiber medium(s) that give baseline ...

  1. MODELING VERY LONG BASELINE INTERFEROMETRIC IMAGES WITH THE CROSS-ENTROPY GLOBAL OPTIMIZATION TECHNIQUE

    SciTech Connect

    Caproni, A.; Toffoli, R. T.; Monteiro, H.; Abraham, Z.; Teixeira, D. M.

    2011-07-20

    We present a new technique for obtaining model fittings to very long baseline interferometric images of astrophysical jets. The method minimizes a performance function proportional to the sum of the squared difference between the model and observed images. The model image is constructed by summing N{sub s} elliptical Gaussian sources characterized by six parameters: two-dimensional peak position, peak intensity, eccentricity, amplitude, and orientation angle of the major axis. We present results for the fitting of two main benchmark jets: the first constructed from three individual Gaussian sources, the second formed by five Gaussian sources. Both jets were analyzed by our cross-entropy technique in finite and infinite signal-to-noise regimes, the background noise chosen to mimic that found in interferometric radio maps. Those images were constructed to simulate most of the conditions encountered in interferometric images of active galactic nuclei. We show that the cross-entropy technique is capable of recovering the parameters of the sources with a similar accuracy to that obtained from the very traditional Astronomical Image Processing System Package task IMFIT when the image is relatively simple (e.g., few components). For more complex interferometric maps, our method displays superior performance in recovering the parameters of the jet components. Our methodology is also able to show quantitatively the number of individual components present in an image. An additional application of the cross-entropy technique to a real image of a BL Lac object is shown and discussed. Our results indicate that our cross-entropy model-fitting technique must be used in situations involving the analysis of complex emission regions having more than three sources, even though it is substantially slower than current model-fitting tasks (at least 10,000 times slower for a single processor, depending on the number of sources to be optimized). As in the case of any model fitting

  2. Advances of imaging for hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Choi, Byung Ihn

    2010-07-01

    A variety of imaging modalities, including ultrasound (US), computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), nuclear medicine, and angiography, are currently used in evaluating patients with chronic liver disease and suspected hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Further technological advancement will undoubtedly have a major impact on liver tumor imaging. Increased speed of data acquisition and consequently shorter scan times in CT and MRI show further improvement in resolution by further reducing motion artifacts. Development of new contrast materials for liver tumor imaging in US and MRI improve tumor detection and characterization by increasing the contrast resolution. Currently available advanced US techniques in the evaluation of HCC are various harmonic imaging techniques with contrast agents, volume imaging, and recently, US elastography, that has been developing and might play a role in characterizing liver nodules in the future. The latest advance in CT is the multidetector (MD) CT scanner where a 256- or 320-detector CT was introduced. Recent studies describe the high sensitivity of double arterial phase imaging in hepatic tumor detection and the usefulness of CT angiography by using MD CT in a detailed assessment of hepatic arterial anatomy using a three-dimensional dataset. In addition, perfusion CT imaging is also being developed and can be used for the characterization and treatment monitoring of HCC. Dual-energy CT with new technology is also continuously progressing. Advances in MR technology, including hardware and pulse sequence implementation, allow acquisition times to be reduced to the time frame of one breathhold, providing multiphasic dynamic MRI. Functional MRI including diffusion-weighted MRI, MR elastography, and new MR contrast agent with dual function have been investigated for the clinical utility of detection and characterization of HCCs. Functional MRI has a potential to be a promising technique for assessing HCC. PMID:20616584

  3. Advanced imaging research and development at DARPA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhar, Nibir K.; Dat, Ravi

    2012-06-01

    Advances in imaging technology have huge impact on our daily lives. Innovations in optics, focal plane arrays (FPA), microelectronics and computation have revolutionized camera design. As a result, new approaches to camera design and low cost manufacturing is now possible. These advances are clearly evident in visible wavelength band due to pixel scaling, improvements in silicon material and CMOS technology. CMOS cameras are available in cell phones and many other consumer products. Advances in infrared imaging technology have been slow due to market volume and many technological barriers in detector materials, optics and fundamental limits imposed by the scaling laws of optics. There is of course much room for improvements in both, visible and infrared imaging technology. This paper highlights various technology development projects at DARPA to advance the imaging technology for both, visible and infrared. Challenges and potentials solutions are highlighted in areas related to wide field-of-view camera design, small pitch pixel, broadband and multiband detectors and focal plane arrays.

  4. Uncooled thermal imaging sensor and application advances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norton, Peter W.; Cox, Stephen; Murphy, Bob; Grealish, Kevin; Joswick, Mike; Denley, Brian; Feda, Frank; Elmali, Loriann; Kohin, Margaret

    2006-05-01

    BAE Systems continues to advance the technology and performance of microbolometer-based thermal imaging modules and systems. 640x480 digital uncooled infrared focal plane arrays are in full production, illustrated by recent production line test data for two thousand focal plane arrays. This paper presents a snapshot of microbolometer technology at BAE Systems and an overview of two of the most important thermal imaging sensor programs currently in production: a family of thermal weapons sights for the United States Army and a thermal imager for the remote weapons station on the Stryker vehicle.

  5. Advanced imaging and visualization in gastrointestinal disorders

    PubMed Central

    Gilja, Odd Helge; Hatlebakk, Jan G; Ødegaard, Svein; Berstad, Arnold; Viola, Ivan; Giertsen, Christopher; Hausken, Trygve; Gregersen, Hans

    2007-01-01

    Advanced medical imaging and visualization has a strong impact on research and clinical decision making in gastroenterology. The aim of this paper is to show how imaging and visualization can disclose structural and functional abnormalities of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Imaging methods such as ultrasonography, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), endoscopy, endosonography, and elastography will be outlined and visualization with Virtual Reality and haptic methods. Ultrasonography is a versatile method that can be used to evaluate antral contractility, gastric emptying, transpyloric flow, gastric configuration, intragastric distribution of meals, gastric accommodation and strain measurement of the gastric wall. Advanced methods for endoscopic ultrasound, three-dimensional (3D) ultrasound, and tissue Doppler (Strain Rate Imaging) provide detailed information of the GI tract. Food hypersensitivity reactions including gastrointestinal reactions due to food allergy can be visualized by ultrasonography and MRI. Development of multi-parametric and multi-modal imaging may increase diagnostic benefits and facilitate fusion of diagnostic and therapeutic imaging in the future. PMID:17457973

  6. Advanced endoscopic imaging to improve adenoma detection

    PubMed Central

    Neumann, Helmut; Nägel, Andreas; Buda, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Advanced endoscopic imaging is revolutionizing our way on how to diagnose and treat colorectal lesions. Within recent years a variety of modern endoscopic imaging techniques was introduced to improve adenoma detection rates. Those include high-definition imaging, dye-less chromoendoscopy techniques and novel, highly flexible endoscopes, some of them equipped with balloons or multiple lenses in order to improve adenoma detection rates. In this review we will focus on the newest developments in the field of colonoscopic imaging to improve adenoma detection rates. Described techniques include high-definition imaging, optical chromoendoscopy techniques, virtual chromoendoscopy techniques, the Third Eye Retroscope and other retroviewing devices, the G-EYE endoscope and the Full Spectrum Endoscopy-system. PMID:25789092

  7. Prognostic Value of Quantitative Metabolic Metrics on Baseline Pre-Sunitinib FDG PET/CT in Advanced Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Minamimoto, Ryogo; Barkhodari, Amir; Harshman, Lauren; Srinivas, Sandy; Quon, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The objective of this study was to prospectively evaluate various quantitative metrics on FDG PET/CT for monitoring sunitinib therapy and predicting prognosis in patients with metastatic renal cell cancer (mRCC). Methods Seventeen patients (mean age: 59.0 ± 11.6) prospectively underwent a baseline FDG PET/CT and interim PET/CT after 2 cycles (12 weeks) of sunitinib therapy. We measured the highest maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) of all identified lesions (highest SUVmax), sum of SUVmax with maximum six lesions (sum of SUVmax), total lesion glycolysis (TLG) and metabolic tumor volume (MTV) from baseline PET/CT and interim PET/CT, and the % decrease in highest SUVmax of lesion (%Δ highest SUVmax), the % decrease in sum of SUVmax, the % decrease in TLG (%ΔTLG) and the % decrease in MTV (%ΔMTV) between baseline and interim PET/CT, and the imaging results were validated by clinical follow-up at 12 months after completion of therapy for progression free survival (PFS). Results At 12 month follow-up, 6/17 (35.3%) patients achieved PFS, while 11/17 (64.7%) patients were deemed to have progression of disease or recurrence within the previous 12 months. At baseline, PET/CT demonstrated metabolically active cancer in all cases. Using baseline PET/CT alone, all of the quantitative imaging metrics were predictive of PFS. Using interim PET/CT, the %Δ highest SUVmax, %Δ sum of SUVmax, and %ΔTLG were also predictive of PFS. Otherwise, interim PET/CT showed no significant difference between the two survival groups regardless of the quantitative metric utilized including MTV and TLG. Conclusions Quantitative metabolic measurements on baseline PET/CT appears to be predictive of PFS at 12 months post-therapy in patients scheduled to undergo sunitinib therapy for mRCC. Change between baseline and interim PET/CT also appeared to have prognostic value but otherwise interim PET/CT after 12 weeks of sunitinib did not appear to be predictive of PFS. PMID:27123976

  8. Advanced technologies for remote sensing imaging applications

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, L.L.

    1993-06-07

    Generating and returning imagery from great distances has been generally associated with national security activities, with emphasis on reliability of system operation. (While the introduction of such capabilities was usually characterized by high levels of innovation, the evolution of such systems has followed the classical track of proliferation of ``standardized items`` expressing ever more incremental technological advances.) Recent focusing of interest on the use of remote imaging systems for commercial and scientific purposes can be expected to induce comparatively rapid advances along the axes of efficiency and technological sophistication, respectively. This paper reviews the most basic reasons for expecting the next decade of advances to dwarf the impressive accomplishments of the past ten years. The impact of these advances clearly will be felt in all major areas of large-scale human endeavor, commercial, military and scientific.

  9. Integrated application of active controls (IAAC) technology to an advanced subsonic transport project. Conventional baseline configuration study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Characteristics of the U.S. domestic fleet were evaluated to determine the mission characteristics that would have the most impact on U. S. transport fuel use in the future. This resulted in selection of a 197-passenger (plus cargo), about 3710-km (2000 nmi) mission. The existing data base was reviewed and additional analysis was conducted as necessary to complete the technical descriptions. The resulting baseline configuration utilizes a double-lobe, but nearly circular, body with seven-abreast seating. External characteristics feature an 8.71 aspect ratio, 31.5-degree sweep wing, a T-tail empennage, and a dual CF6-6D2, wing-mounted engine arrangement. It provides for 22 LD-2 or 11 LD-3 containers plus bulk cargo in the lower lobe. Passenger/cargo loading, servicing provisions, taxi/takeoff speeds, and field length characteristics are all compatible with accepted airline operations and regulatory provisions. The baseline configuration construction uses conventional aluminum structure except for advanced aluminum alloys and a limited amount of graphite epoxy secondary structure. Modern systems are used, including advanced guidance, navigation, and controls which emphasize application of digital electronics and advanced displays.

  10. Advanced laser systems for photoacoustic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klosner, Marc; Sampathkumar, Ashwin; Chan, Gary; Wu, Chunbai; Gross, Daniel; Heller, Donald F.

    2015-03-01

    We describe the ongoing development of laser systems for advanced photoacoustic imaging (PAI). We discuss the characteristics of these laser systems and their particular benefits for soft tissue imaging and next-generation breast cancer diagnostics. We provide an overview of laser performance and compare this with other laser systems that have been used for early-stage development of PAI. These advanced systems feature higher pulse energy output at clinically relevant repetition rates, as well as a novel wavelength-cycling output pulse format. Wavelength cycling provides pulse sequences for which the output repeatedly alternates between two wavelengths that provide differential imaging. This capability improves co-registration of captured differential images. We present imaging results of phantoms obtained with a commercial ultrasound detector system and a wavelength-cycling laser source providing ~500 mJ/pulse at 755 and 797 nm, operating at 25 Hz. The results include photoacoustic images and corresponding pulse-echo data from a tissue mimicking phantom containing inclusions, simulating tumors in the breast. We discuss the application of these systems to the contrast-enhanced detection of various tissue types and tumors.

  11. Foundations of Advanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Bammer, Roland; Skare, Stefan; Newbould, Rexford; Liu, Chunlei; Thijs, Vincent; Ropele, Stefan; Clayton, David B.; Krueger, Gunnar; Moseley, Michael E.; Glover, Gary H.

    2005-01-01

    Summary: During the past decade, major breakthroughs in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) quality were made by means of quantum leaps in scanner hardware and pulse sequences. Some advanced MRI techniques have truly revolutionized the detection of disease states and MRI can now—within a few minutes—acquire important quantitative information noninvasively from an individual in any plane or volume at comparatively high resolution. This article provides an overview of the most common advanced MRI methods including diffusion MRI, perfusion MRI, functional MRI, and the strengths and weaknesses of MRI at high magnetic field strengths. PMID:15897944

  12. Baseline sacroiliac joint magnetic resonance imaging abnormalities and male sex predict the development of radiographic sacroiliitis.

    PubMed

    Akar, Servet; Isik, Sibel; Birlik, Bilge; Solmaz, Dilek; Sari, Ismail; Onen, Fatos; Akkoc, Nurullah

    2013-10-01

    We evaluated the relationship between the baseline sacroiliac joint (SIJ) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings and the development of radiographic sacroiliitis and tested their prognostic significance in cases of ankylosing spondylitis. Patients who had undergone an SIJ MRI at the rheumatology department were identified. Individuals for whom pelvic X-rays were available after at least 1 year of MRI were included in the analysis. All radiographs and MRI examinations were scored by two independent readers. Medical records of the patients were reviewed to obtain potentially relevant demographic and clinical data. We identified 1,069 SIJ MRIs, and 328 fulfilled our inclusion criteria. Reliability analysis revealed moderate to good inter- and intra-observer agreement. On presentation data, 14 cases were excluded because they had unequivocal radiographic sacroiliitis at baseline. After a mean of 34.8 months of follow-up, 24 patients developed radiographic sacroiliitis. The presence of active sacroiliitis (odds ratio (OR) 15.1) and structural lesions on MRI (OR 8.3), male sex (OR 4.7), fulfillment of Calin's inflammatory back pain criteria (P = 0.001), and total MRI activity score (P < 0.001) were found to be related to the development of radiographic sacroiliitis. By regression modeling, the presence of both active inflammatory and structural damage lesions on MRI and male sex were found to be predictive factors for the development of radiographic sacroiliitis. Our present results suggest that the occurrence of both active inflammatory and structural lesions in SIJs revealed by MRI is a significant risk factor for radiographic sacroiliitis, especially in male patients with early inflammatory back pain. PMID:23765093

  13. Terahertz Tools Advance Imaging for Security, Industry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    Picometrix, a wholly owned subsidiary of Advanced Photonix Inc. (API), of Ann Arbor, Michigan, invented the world s first commercial terahertz system. The company improved the portability and capabilities of their systems through Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) agreements with Langley Research Center to provide terahertz imaging capabilities for inspecting the space shuttle external tanks and orbiters. Now API s systems make use of the unique imaging capacity of terahertz radiation on manufacturing floors, for thickness measurements of coatings, pharmaceutical tablet production, and even art conservation.

  14. Baseline MELD Score Predicts Hepatic Decompensation during Antiviral Therapy in Patients with Chronic Hepatitis C and Advanced Cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Dultz, Georg; Seelhof, Martin; Herrmann, Eva; Welker, Martin-Walter; Friedrich-Rust, Mireen; Teuber, Gerlinde; Kronenberger, Bernd; von Wagner, Michael; Vermehren, Johannes; Sarrazin, Christoph; Zeuzem, Stefan; Hofmann, Wolf Peter

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aims In patients with advanced liver cirrhosis due to chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection antiviral therapy with peginterferon and ribavirin is feasible in selected cases only due to potentially life-threatening side effects. However, predictive factors associated with hepatic decompensation during antiviral therapy are poorly defined. Methods In a retrospective cohort study, 68 patients with HCV-associated liver cirrhosis (mean MELD score 9.18±2.72) were treated with peginterferon and ribavirin. Clinical events indicating hepatic decompensation (onset of ascites, hepatic encephalopathy, upper gastrointestinal bleeding, hospitalization) as well as laboratory data were recorded at baseline and during a follow up period of 72 weeks after initiation of antiviral therapy. To monitor long term sequelae of end stage liver disease an extended follow up for HCC development, transplantation and death was applied (240weeks, ±SD 136weeks). Results Eighteen patients (26.5%) achieved a sustained virologic response. During the observational period a hepatic decompensation was observed in 36.8%. Patients with hepatic decompensation had higher MELD scores (10.84 vs. 8.23, p<0.001) and higher mean bilirubin levels (26.74 vs. 14.63 µmol/l, p<0.001), as well as lower serum albumin levels (38.2 vs. 41.1 g/l, p = 0.015), mean platelets (102.64 vs. 138.95/nl, p = 0.014) and mean leukocytes (4.02 vs. 5.68/nl, p = 0.002) at baseline as compared to those without decompensation. In the multivariate analysis the MELD score remained independently associated with hepatic decompensation (OR 1.56, 1.18–2.07; p = 0.002). When the patients were grouped according to their baseline MELD scores, hepatic decompensation occurred in 22%, 59%, and 83% of patients with MELD scores of 6–9, 10–13, and >14, respectively. Baseline MELD score was significantly associated with the risk for transplantation/death (p<0.001). Conclusions Our data suggest that the

  15. Imaging Tumor Hypoxia to Advance Radiation Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chen-Ting; Boss, Mary-Keara

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Most solid tumors contain regions of low oxygenation or hypoxia. Tumor hypoxia has been associated with a poor clinical outcome and plays a critical role in tumor radioresistance. Recent Advances: Two main types of hypoxia exist in the tumor microenvironment: chronic and cycling hypoxia. Chronic hypoxia results from the limited diffusion distance of oxygen, and cycling hypoxia primarily results from the variation in microvessel red blood cell flux and temporary disturbances in perfusion. Chronic hypoxia may cause either tumor progression or regressive effects depending on the tumor model. However, there is a general trend toward the development of a more aggressive phenotype after cycling hypoxia. With advanced hypoxia imaging techniques, spatiotemporal characteristics of tumor hypoxia and the changes to the tumor microenvironment can be analyzed. Critical Issues: In this review, we focus on the biological and clinical consequences of chronic and cycling hypoxia on radiation treatment. We also discuss the advanced non-invasive imaging techniques that have been developed to detect and monitor tumor hypoxia in preclinical and clinical studies. Future Directions: A better understanding of the mechanisms of tumor hypoxia with non-invasive imaging will provide a basis for improved radiation therapeutic practices. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 21, 313–337. PMID:24329000

  16. Image stabilization for SWIR advanced optoelectronic device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiopu, Paul; Manea, Adrian; Cristea, Ionica; Grosu, Neculai; Craciun, Anca-Ileana; Craciun, Alexandru; Granciu, Dana

    2015-02-01

    At long ranges and under low visibility conditions, Advanced Optoelectronic Device provides the signal-to-noise ratio and image quality in the Short-wave Infra-red - SWIR (wavelengths between 1,1 ÷2,5 μm), significantly better than in the near wave infrared - NWIR and visible spectral bands [1,2]. The quality of image is nearly independent of the polarization in the incoming light, but it is influenced by the relative movement between the optical system and the observer (the operators' handshake), and the movement towards the support system (land and air vehicles). All these make it difficult to detect objectives observation in real time. This paper presents some systems enhance which the ability of observation and sighting through the optical systems without the use of the stands, tripods or other means. We have to eliminate the effect of "tremors of the hands" and the vibration in order to allow the use of optical devices by operators on the moving vehicles on land, on aircraft, or on boats, and to provide additional comfort for the user to track the moving object through the optical system, without losing the control in the process of detection and tracking. The practical applications of stabilization image process, in SWIR, are the most advanced part of the optical observation systems available worldwide [3,4,5]. This application has a didactic nature, because it ensures understanding by the students about image stabilization and their participation in research.

  17. THE KINEMATICS OF HH 34 FROM HST IMAGES WITH A NINE-YEAR TIME BASELINE

    SciTech Connect

    Raga, A. C.; Rodriguez-Gonzalez, A.; Noriega-Crespo, A.; Carey, S. J.; Lora, V.; Stapelfeldt, K. R.

    2012-04-01

    We study archival HST [S II] 6716+30 and H{alpha} images of the HH 34 outflow, taken in 1998.71 and in 2007.83. The {approx}9 yr time baseline and the high angular resolution of these observations allow us to carry out a detailed proper-motion study. We determine the proper motions of the substructure of the HH 34S bow shock (from the [S II] and H{alpha} frames) and of the aligned knots within {approx}30'' from the outflow source (only from the [S II] frames). We find that the present-day motions of the knots along the HH 34 jet are approximately ballistic, and that these motions directly imply the formation of a major mass concentration in {approx}900 yr, at a position similar to the one of the present-day HH 34S bow shock. In other words, we find that the knots along the HH 34 jet will merge to form a more massive structure, possibly resembling HH 34S.

  18. Advanced Supersonic Technology concept AST-100 characteristics developed in a baseline-update study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baber, H. T., Jr.; Swanson, E. E.

    1976-01-01

    The advanced supersonic technology configuration, AST-100, is described. The combination of wing thickness reduction, nacelle recontouring for minimum drag at cruise, and the use of the horizontal tail to produce lift during climb and cruise resulted in an increase in maximum lift-to-drag ratio. Lighter engines and lower fuel weight associated with this resizing result in a six percent reduction in takeoff gross weight. The AST-100 takeoff maximum effective perceived noise at the runway centerline and sideline measurement stations was 114.4 decibels. Since 1.5-decibels tradeoff is available from the approach noise, the required engine noise supression is 4.9 decibels. The AST-100 largest maximum overpressure would occur during transonic climb acceleration when the aircraft was at relatively low altitude. Calculated standard +8 C day range of the AST-100, with a 292 passenger payload, is 7348 km (3968 n.mi). Fuel price is the largest contributor to direct operating cost. However, if the AST-100 were flown subsonically (M = 0.9), direct operating costs would increase approximately 50 percent because of time related costs.

  19. Hover performance tests of baseline metal and Advanced Technology Blade (ATB) rotor systems for the XV-15 tilt rotor aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartie, K.; Alexander, H.; Mcveigh, M.; Lamon, S.; Bishop, H.

    1986-01-01

    Rotor hover performance data were obtained for two full-scale rotor systems designed for the XV-15 Tilt Rotor Research Aircraft. One rotor employed the rectangular planform metal blades (rotor solidity = 0.089) which were used on the initial flight configuration of the XV-15. The second rotor configuration examined the nonlinear taper, composite-construction, Advanced Technology Blade (ATB), (rotor solidity = 0.10) designed to replace the metal blades on the XV-15. Variations of the baseline ATB tip and cuff shapes were also tested. A new six-component rotor force and moment balance designed to obtain highly accurate data over a broad range of thrust and torque conditions is described. The test data are presented in nondimensional coefficient form for the performance results, and in dimensional form for the steady and alternating loads. Some wake and acoustic data are also shown.

  20. Advances in Imaging for Atrial Fibrillation Ablation

    PubMed Central

    D'Silva, Andrew; Wright, Matthew

    2011-01-01

    Over the last fifteen years, our understanding of the pathophysiology of atrial fibrillation (AF) has paved the way for ablation to be utilized as an effective treatment option. With the aim of gaining more detailed anatomical representation, advances have been made using various imaging modalities, both before and during the ablation procedure, in planning and execution. Options have flourished from procedural fluoroscopy, electroanatomic mapping systems, preprocedural computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), ultrasound, and combinations of these technologies. Exciting work is underway in an effort to allow the electrophysiologist to assess scar formation in real time. One advantage would be to lessen the learning curve for what are very complex procedures. The hope of these developments is to improve the likelihood of a successful ablation procedure and to allow more patients access to this treatment. PMID:22091384

  1. Advanced imaging systems programs at DARPA MTO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhar, Nibir K.; Elizondo, Lee A.; Dat, Ravi; Elizondo, Shelly L.

    2013-09-01

    In this paper, we review a few selected imaging technology development programs at the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) in the reflective visible to the emissive/thermal long wave infrared (LWIR) spectral bands. For the reflective visible band, results are shown for two different imagers: a gigapixel monocentric multi-scale camera design that solves the scaling issues for a high pixel count, and a wide field of view and a single photon detection camera with a large dynamic range. Also, a camera with broadband capability covering both reflective and thermal bands (0.5 μm to 5.0 μm) with >80% quantum efficiency is discussed. In the emissive/thermal band, data is presented for both uncooled and cryogenically cooled LWIR detectors with pixel pitches approaching the fundamental detection limits. By developing wafer scale manufacturing processes and reducing the pixel size of uncooled thermal imagers, it is shown that an affordable camera on a chip, capable of seeing through obscurants in day or night, is feasible. Also, the fabrication and initial performance of the world's first 5 μm pixel pitch LWIR camera is discussed. Lastly, we use an initial model to evaluate the signal to noise ratio and noise equivalent differential temperature as a function of well capacity to predict the performance for this thermal imager.

  2. Systemic inflammatory status at baseline predicts bevacizumab benefit in advanced non-small cell lung cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Botta, Cirino; Barbieri, Vito; Ciliberto, Domenico; Rossi, Antonio; Rocco, Danilo; Addeo, Raffaele; Staropoli, Nicoletta; Pastina, Pierpaolo; Marvaso, Giulia; Martellucci, Ignazio; Guglielmo, Annamaria; Pirtoli, Luigi; Sperlongano, Pasquale; Gridelli, Cesare; Caraglia, Michele; Tassone, Pierfrancesco; Tagliaferri, Pierosandro; Correale, Pierpaolo

    2013-01-01

    Bevacizumab is a humanized anti-VEGF monoclonal antibody able to produce clinical benefit in advanced non-squamous non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients when combined to chemotherapy. At present, while there is a rising attention to bevacizumab-related adverse events and costs, no clinical or biological markers have been identified and validated for baseline patient selection. Preclinical findings suggest an important role for myeloid-derived inflammatory cells, such as neutrophils and monocytes, in the development of VEGF-independent angiogenesis. We conducted a retrospective analysis to investigate the role of peripheral blood cells count and of an inflammatory index, the neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR), as predictors of clinical outcome in NSCLC patients treated with bevacizumab plus chemotherapy. One hundred twelve NSCLC patients treated with chemotherapy ± bevacizumab were retrospectively evaluated for the predictive value of clinical or laboratory parameters correlated with inflammatory status. Univariate analysis revealed that a high number of circulating neutrophils and monocytes as well as a high NLR were associated with shorter progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) in bevacizumab-treated patients only. We have thus developed a model based on the absence or the presence of at least one of the above-mentioned inflammatory parameters. We found that the absence of all variables strongly correlated with longer PFS and OS (9.0 vs. 7.0 mo, HR: 0.39, p = 0.002; and 20.0 vs. 12.0 mo, HR: 0.29, p < 0.001 respectively) only in NSCLC patients treated with bevacizumab plus chemotherapy. Our results suggest that a baseline systemic inflammatory status is marker of resistance to bevacizumab treatment in NSCLC patients. PMID:23760488

  3. Systemic inflammatory status at baseline predicts bevacizumab benefit in advanced non-small cell lung cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Botta, Cirino; Barbieri, Vito; Ciliberto, Domenico; Rossi, Antonio; Rocco, Danilo; Addeo, Raffaele; Staropoli, Nicoletta; Pastina, Pierpaolo; Marvaso, Giulia; Martellucci, Ignazio; Guglielmo, Annamaria; Pirtoli, Luigi; Sperlongano, Pasquale; Gridelli, Cesare; Caraglia, Michele; Tassone, Pierfrancesco; Tagliaferri, Pierosandro; Correale, Pierpaolo

    2013-06-01

    Bevacizumab is a humanized anti-VEGF monoclonal antibody able to produce clinical benefit in advanced non-squamous non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients when combined to chemotherapy. At present, while there is a rising attention to bevacizumab-related adverse events and costs, no clinical or biological markers have been identified and validated for baseline patient selection. Preclinical findings suggest an important role for myeloid-derived inflammatory cells, such as neutrophils and monocytes, in the development of VEGF-independent angiogenesis. We conducted a retrospective analysis to investigate the role of peripheral blood cells count and of an inflammatory index, the neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR), as predictors of clinical outcome in NSCLC patients treated with bevacizumab plus chemotherapy. One hundred and twelve NSCLC patients treated with chemotherapy ± bevacizumab were retrospectively evaluated for the predictive value of clinical or laboratory parameters correlated with inflammatory status. Univariate analysis revealed that a high number of circulating neutrophils and monocytes as well as a high NLR were associated with shorter progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) in bevacizumab-treated patients only. We have thus developed a model based on the absence or the presence of at least one of the above-mentioned inflammatory parameters. We found that the absence of all variables strongly correlated with longer PFS and OS (9.0 vs. 7.0 mo, HR: 0.39, p = 0.002; and 20.0 vs. 12.0 mo, HR: 0.29, p < 0.001 respectively) only in NSCLC patients treated with bevacizumab plus chemotherapy. Our results suggest that a baseline systemic inflammatory status is marker of resistance to bevacizumab treatment in NSCLC patients. PMID:23760488

  4. Recent advances in imaging subcellular processes

    PubMed Central

    Myers, Kenneth A.; Janetopoulos, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Cell biology came about with the ability to first visualize cells. As microscopy techniques advanced, the early microscopists became the first cell biologists to observe the inner workings and subcellular structures that control life. This ability to see organelles within a cell provided scientists with the first understanding of how cells function. The visualization of the dynamic architecture of subcellular structures now often drives questions as researchers seek to understand the intricacies of the cell. With the advent of fluorescent labeling techniques, better and new optical techniques, and more sensitive and faster cameras, a whole array of questions can now be asked. There has been an explosion of new light microscopic techniques, and the race is on to build better and more powerful imaging systems so that we can further our understanding of the spatial and temporal mechanisms controlling molecular cell biology. PMID:27408708

  5. Recent advances in morphological cell image analysis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shengyong; Zhao, Mingzhu; Wu, Guang; Yao, Chunyan; Zhang, Jianwei

    2012-01-01

    This paper summarizes the recent advances in image processing methods for morphological cell analysis. The topic of morphological analysis has received much attention with the increasing demands in both bioinformatics and biomedical applications. Among many factors that affect the diagnosis of a disease, morphological cell analysis and statistics have made great contributions to results and effects for a doctor. Morphological cell analysis finds the cellar shape, cellar regularity, classification, statistics, diagnosis, and so forth. In the last 20 years, about 1000 publications have reported the use of morphological cell analysis in biomedical research. Relevant solutions encompass a rather wide application area, such as cell clumps segmentation, morphological characteristics extraction, 3D reconstruction, abnormal cells identification, and statistical analysis. These reports are summarized in this paper to enable easy referral to suitable methods for practical solutions. Representative contributions and future research trends are also addressed. PMID:22272215

  6. Recent advances in imaging subcellular processes.

    PubMed

    Myers, Kenneth A; Janetopoulos, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Cell biology came about with the ability to first visualize cells. As microscopy techniques advanced, the early microscopists became the first cell biologists to observe the inner workings and subcellular structures that control life. This ability to see organelles within a cell provided scientists with the first understanding of how cells function. The visualization of the dynamic architecture of subcellular structures now often drives questions as researchers seek to understand the intricacies of the cell. With the advent of fluorescent labeling techniques, better and new optical techniques, and more sensitive and faster cameras, a whole array of questions can now be asked. There has been an explosion of new light microscopic techniques, and the race is on to build better and more powerful imaging systems so that we can further our understanding of the spatial and temporal mechanisms controlling molecular cell biology. PMID:27408708

  7. Recent advances in human viruses imaging studies.

    PubMed

    Florian, Paula Ecaterina; Rouillé, Yves; Ruta, Simona; Nichita, Norica; Roseanu, Anca

    2016-06-01

    Microscopy techniques are often exploited by virologists to investigate molecular details of critical steps in viruses' life cycles such as host cell recognition and entry, genome replication, intracellular trafficking, and release of mature virions. Fluorescence microscopy is the most attractive tool employed to detect intracellular localizations of various stages of the viral infection and monitor the pathogen-host interactions associated with them. Super-resolution microscopy techniques have overcome the technical limitations of conventional microscopy and offered new exciting insights into the formation and trafficking of human viruses. In addition, the development of state-of-the art electron microscopy techniques has become particularly important in studying virus morphogenesis by revealing ground-braking ultrastructural details of this process. This review provides recent advances in human viruses imaging in both, in vitro cell culture systems and in vivo, in the animal models recently developed. The newly available imaging technologies bring a major contribution to our understanding of virus pathogenesis and will become an important tool in early diagnosis of viral infection and the development of novel therapeutics to combat the disease. PMID:27059598

  8. Advances in fluorescence labeling strategies for dynamic cellular imaging

    PubMed Central

    Dean, Kevin M; Palmer, Amy E

    2014-01-01

    Synergistic advances in optical physics, probe design, molecular biology, labeling techniques and computational analysis have propelled fluorescence imaging into new realms of spatiotemporal resolution and sensitivity. This review aims to discuss advances in fluorescent probes and live-cell labeling strategies, two areas that remain pivotal for future advances in imaging technology. Fluorescent protein– and bio-orthogonal–based methods for protein and RNA imaging are discussed as well as emerging bioengineering techniques that enable their expression at specific genomic loci (for example, CRISPR and TALENs). Important attributes that contribute to the success of each technique are emphasized, providing a guideline for future advances in dynamic live-cell imaging. PMID:24937069

  9. Fast wave direct electron heating in advanced inductive and ITER baseline scenario discharges in DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Pinsker, R. I.; Jackson, G. L.; Luce, T. C.; Politzer, P. A.; Austin, M. E.; Diem, S. J.; Kaufman, M. C.; Ryan, P. M.; Doyle, E. J.; Zeng, L.; Grierson, B. A.; Hosea, J. C.; Nagy, A.; Perkins, R.; Solomon, W. M.; Taylor, G.; Maggiora, R.; Milanesio, D.; Porkolab, M.; Turco, F.

    2014-02-12

    Fast Wave (FW) heating and electron cyclotron heating (ECH) are used in the DIII-D tokamak to study plasmas with low applied torque and dominant electron heating characteristic of burning plasmas. FW heating via direct electron damping has reached the 2.5 MW level in high performance ELMy H-mode plasmas. In Advanced Inductive (AI) plasmas, core FW heating was found to be comparable to that of ECH, consistent with the excellent first-pass absorption of FWs predicted by ray-tracing models at high electron beta. FW heating at the ∼2 MW level to ELMy H-mode discharges in the ITER Baseline Scenario (IBS) showed unexpectedly strong absorption of FW power by injected neutral beam (NB) ions, indicated by significant enhancement of the D-D neutron rate, while the intended absorption on core electrons appeared rather weak. The AI and IBS discharges are compared in an effort to identify the causes of the different response to FWs.

  10. Self-calibration approach for optical long-baseline interferometry imaging.

    PubMed

    Meimon, Serge; Mugnier, Laurent M; Le Besnerais, Guy

    2009-01-01

    Current optical interferometers are affected by unknown turbulent phases on each telescope. In the field of radio interferometry, the self-calibration technique is a powerful tool to process interferometric data with missing phase information. This paper intends to revisit the application of self-calibration to optical long-baseline interferometry (OLBI). We cast rigorously the OLBI data processing problem into the self-calibration framework and demonstrate the efficiency of the method on a real astronomical OLBI data set. PMID:19109607

  11. Recent advances in the imaging of hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    You, Myung-Won; Kim, Kyoung Won; Lee, So Jung; Shin, Yong Moon; Kim, Jin Hee; Lee, Moon-Gyu

    2015-01-01

    The role of imaging is crucial for the surveillance, diagnosis, staging and treatment monitoring of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Over the past few years, considerable technical advances were made in imaging of HCCs. New imaging technology, however, has introduced new challenges in our clinical practice. In this article, the current status of clinical imaging techniques for HCC is addressed. The diagnostic performance of imaging techniques in the context of recent clinical guidelines is also presented. PMID:25834808

  12. Advanced x-ray imaging spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Callas, John L. (Inventor); Soli, George A. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    An x-ray spectrometer that also provides images of an x-ray source. Coded aperture imaging techniques are used to provide high resolution images. Imaging position-sensitive x-ray sensors with good energy resolution are utilized to provide excellent spectroscopic performance. The system produces high resolution spectral images of the x-ray source which can be viewed in any one of a number of specific energy bands.

  13. Advance of Molecular Imaging Technology and Targeted Imaging Agent in Imaging and Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhi-Yi; Wang, Yi-Xiang; Lin, Yan; Zhang, Jin-Shan; Yang, Feng; Zhou, Qiu-Lan; Liao, Yang-Ying

    2014-01-01

    Molecular imaging is an emerging field that integrates advanced imaging technology with cellular and molecular biology. It can realize noninvasive and real time visualization, measurement of physiological or pathological process in the living organism at the cellular and molecular level, providing an effective method of information acquiring for diagnosis, therapy, and drug development and evaluating treatment of efficacy. Molecular imaging requires high resolution and high sensitive instruments and specific imaging agents that link the imaging signal with molecular event. Recently, the application of new emerging chemical technology and nanotechnology has stimulated the development of imaging agents. Nanoparticles modified with small molecule, peptide, antibody, and aptamer have been extensively applied for preclinical studies. Therapeutic drug or gene is incorporated into nanoparticles to construct multifunctional imaging agents which allow for theranostic applications. In this review, we will discuss the characteristics of molecular imaging, the novel imaging agent including targeted imaging agent and multifunctional imaging agent, as well as cite some examples of their application in molecular imaging and therapy. PMID:24689058

  14. Joint thresholding and quantizer selection for transform image coding: entropy-constrained analysis and applications to baseline JPEG.

    PubMed

    Crouse, M; Ramchandran, K

    1997-01-01

    Striving to maximize baseline (Joint Photographers Expert Group-JPEG) image quality without compromising compatibility of current JPEG decoders, we develop an image-adaptive JPEG encoding algorithm that jointly optimizes quantizer selection, coefficient "thresholding", and Huffman coding within a rate-distortion (R-D) framework. Practically speaking, our algorithm unifies two previous approaches to image-adaptive JPEG encoding: R-D optimized quantizer selection and R-D optimal thresholding. Conceptually speaking, our algorithm is a logical consequence of entropy-constrained vector quantization (ECVQ) design principles in the severely constrained instance of JPEG-compatible encoding. We explore both viewpoints: the practical, to concretely derive our algorithm, and the conceptual, to justify the claim that our algorithm approaches the best performance that a JPEG encoder can achieve. This performance includes significant objective peak signal-to-noise ratio (PSNR) improvement over previous work and at high rates gives results comparable to state-of-the-art image coders. For example, coding the Lena image at 1.0 b/pixel, our JPEG encoder achieves a PSNR performance of 39.6 dB that slightly exceeds the quoted PSNR results of Shapiro's wavelet-based zero-tree coder. Using a visually based distortion metric, we can achieve noticeable subjective improvement as well. Furthermore, our algorithm may be applied to other systems that use run-length encoding, including intraframe MPEG and subband or wavelet coding. PMID:18282923

  15. Reduction of blocking effects for the JPEG baseline image compression standard

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zweigle, Gregary C.; Bamberger, Roberto H.

    1992-01-01

    Transform coding has been chosen for still image compression in the Joint Photographic Experts Group (JPEG) standard. Although transform coding performs superior to many other image compression methods and has fast algorithms for implementation, it is limited by a blocking effect at low bit rates. The blocking effect is inherent in all nonoverlapping transforms. This paper presents a technique for reducing blocking while remaining compatible with the JPEG standard. Simulations show that the system results in subjective performance improvements, sacrificing only a marginal increase in bit rate.

  16. Advanced imaging in COPD: insights into pulmonary pathophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Milne, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) involves a complex interaction of structural and functional abnormalities. The two have long been studied in isolation. However, advanced imaging techniques allow us to simultaneously assess pathological processes and their physiological consequences. This review gives a comprehensive account of the various advanced imaging modalities used to study COPD, including computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and the nuclear medicine techniques positron emission tomography (PET) and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). Some more recent developments in imaging technology, including micro-CT, synchrotron imaging, optical coherence tomography (OCT) and electrical impedance tomography (EIT), are also described. The authors identify the pathophysiological insights gained from these techniques, and speculate on the future role of advanced imaging in both clinical and research settings. PMID:25478198

  17. Recent Advances in Imaging Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Braskie, Meredith N.; Toga, Arthur W.; Thompson, Paul M.

    2014-01-01

    Advances in brain imaging technology in the past five years have contributed greatly to the understanding of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Here, we review recent research related to amyloid imaging, new methods for magnetic resonance imaging analyses, and statistical methods. We also review research that evaluates AD risk factors and brain imaging, in the context of AD prediction and progression. We selected a variety of illustrative studies, describing how they advanced the field and are leading AD research in promising new directions. PMID:22672880

  18. Tuberculosis, advanced - chest x-rays (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... tissue, and can cause tissue death. These chest x-rays show advanced pulmonary tuberculosis. There are multiple light ... location of cavities within these light areas. The x-ray on the left clearly shows that the opacities ...

  19. Tuberculosis, advanced - chest x-rays (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Tuberculosis is an infectious disease that causes inflammation, the formation of tubercules and other growths within tissue, ... death. These chest x-rays show advanced pulmonary tuberculosis. There are multiple light areas (opacities) of varying ...

  20. Recent advances in ophthalmic molecular imaging.

    PubMed

    Ramos de Carvalho, J Emanuel; Verbraak, Frank D; Aalders, Maurice C; van Noorden, Cornelis J; Schlingemann, Reinier O

    2014-01-01

    The aim of molecular imaging techniques is the visualization of molecular processes and functional changes in living animals and human patients before morphological changes occur at the cellular and tissue level. Ophthalmic molecular imaging is still in its infancy and has mainly been used in small animals for pre-clinical research. The goal of most of these pre-clinical studies is their translation into ophthalmic molecular imaging techniques in clinical care. We discuss various molecular imaging techniques and their applications in ophthalmology. PMID:24529711

  1. Advanced Imaging Optics Utilizing Wavefront Coding.

    SciTech Connect

    Scrymgeour, David; Boye, Robert; Adelsberger, Kathleen

    2015-06-01

    Image processing offers a potential to simplify an optical system by shifting some of the imaging burden from lenses to the more cost effective electronics. Wavefront coding using a cubic phase plate combined with image processing can extend the system's depth of focus, reducing many of the focus-related aberrations as well as material related chromatic aberrations. However, the optimal design process and physical limitations of wavefront coding systems with respect to first-order optical parameters and noise are not well documented. We examined image quality of simulated and experimental wavefront coded images before and after reconstruction in the presence of noise. Challenges in the implementation of cubic phase in an optical system are discussed. In particular, we found that limitations must be placed on system noise, aperture, field of view and bandwidth to develop a robust wavefront coded system.

  2. Advances in hyperspectral LWIR pushbroom imagers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holma, Hannu; Mattila, Antti-Jussi; Hyvärinen, Timo; Weatherbee, Oliver

    2011-06-01

    Two long-wave infrared (LWIR) hyperspectral imagers have been under extensive development. The first one utilizes a microbolometer focal plane array (FPA) and the second one is based on an Mercury Cadmium Telluride (MCT) FPA. Both imagers employ a pushbroom imaging spectrograph with a transmission grating and on-axis optics. The main target has been to develop high performance instruments with good image quality and compact size for various industrial and remote sensing application requirements. A big challenge in realizing these goals without considerable cooling of the whole instrument is to control the instrument radiation. The challenge is much bigger in a hyperspectral instrument than in a broadband camera, because the optical signal from the target is spread spectrally, but the instrument radiation is not dispersed. Without any suppression, the instrument radiation can overwhelm the radiation from the target even by 1000 times. The means to handle the instrument radiation in the MCT imager include precise instrument temperature stabilization (but not cooling), efficient optical background suppression and the use of background-monitoring-on-chip (BMC) method. This approach has made possible the implementation of a high performance, extremely compact spectral imager in the 7.7 to 12.4 μm spectral range. The imager performance with 84 spectral bands and 384 spatial pixels has been experimentally verified and an excellent NESR of 14 mW/(m2srμm) at 10 μm wavelength with a 300 K target has been achieved. This results in SNR of more than 700. The LWIR imager based on a microbolometer detector array, first time introduced in 2009, has been upgraded. The sensitivity of the imager has improved drastically by a factor of 3 and SNR by about 15 %. It provides a rugged hyperspectral camera for chemical imaging applications in reflection mode in laboratory and industry.

  3. Earth Observing-1 Advanced Land Imager: Dark Current and Noise Characterization and Anomalous Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mendenhall, J. A.

    2001-01-01

    The dark current and noise characteristics of the Earth Observing-1 Advanced Land Imager measured during ground calibration at MIT Lincoln Laboratory are presented. Data were collected for the nominal focal plane operating temperature of 220 K as well as supplemental operating temperatures (215 and 225 K). Dark current baseline values are provided, and noise characterization includes the evaluation of white, coherent, low frequency, and high frequency components. Finally, anomalous detectors, characterized by unusual dark current, noise, gain, or cross-talk properties are investigated.

  4. Combining advanced imaging processing and low cost remote imaging capabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohrer, Matthew J.; McQuiddy, Brian

    2008-04-01

    Target images are very important for evaluating the situation when Unattended Ground Sensors (UGS) are deployed. These images add a significant amount of information to determine the difference between hostile and non-hostile activities, the number of targets in an area, the difference between animals and people, the movement dynamics of targets, and when specific activities of interest are taking place. The imaging capabilities of UGS systems need to provide only target activity and not images without targets in the field of view. The current UGS remote imaging systems are not optimized for target processing and are not low cost. McQ describes in this paper an architectural and technologic approach for significantly improving the processing of images to provide target information while reducing the cost of the intelligent remote imaging capability.

  5. Advances in cardiac magnetic resonance imaging of congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Driessen, Mieke M P; Breur, Johannes M P J; Budde, Ricardo P J; van Oorschot, Joep W M; van Kimmenade, Roland R J; Sieswerda, Gertjan Tj; Meijboom, Folkert J; Leiner, Tim

    2015-01-01

    Due to advances in cardiac surgery, survival of patients with congenital heart disease has increased considerably during the past decades. Many of these patients require repeated cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging to assess cardiac anatomy and function. In the past decade, technological advances have enabled faster and more robust cardiovascular magnetic resonance with improved image quality and spatial as well as temporal resolution. This review aims to provide an overview of advances in cardiovascular magnetic resonance hardware and acquisition techniques relevant to both pediatric and adult patients with congenital heart disease and discusses the techniques used to assess function, anatomy, flow and tissue characterization. PMID:25552386

  6. Advances in Small Animal Imaging Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loudos, George K.

    2007-11-01

    The rapid growth in genetics and molecular biology combined with the development of techniques for genetically engineering small animals has led to an increased interest in in vivo laboratory animal imaging during the past few years. For this purpose, new instrumentation, data acquisition strategies, and image processing and reconstruction techniques are being developed, researched and evaluated. The aim of this article is to give a short overview of the state of the art technologies for high resolution and high sensitivity molecular imaging techniques, primarily positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). The basic needs of small animal imaging will be described. The evolution in instrumentation in the past two decades, as well as the commercially available systems will be overviewed. Finally, the new trends in detector technology and preliminary results from challenging applications will be presented. For more details a number of references are provided.

  7. Advances in Small Animal Imaging Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Loudos, George K.

    2007-11-26

    The rapid growth in genetics and molecular biology combined with the development of techniques for genetically engineering small animals has led to an increased interest in in vivo laboratory animal imaging during the past few years. For this purpose, new instrumentation, data acquisition strategies, and image processing and reconstruction techniques are being developed, researched and evaluated. The aim of this article is to give a short overview of the state of the art technologies for high resolution and high sensitivity molecular imaging techniques, primarily positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). The basic needs of small animal imaging will be described. The evolution in instrumentation in the past two decades, as well as the commercially available systems will be overviewed. Finally, the new trends in detector technology and preliminary results from challenging applications will be presented. For more details a number of references are provided.

  8. Advanced Image Search: A Strategy for Creating Presentation Boards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frey, Diane K.; Hines, Jean D.; Swinker, Mary E.

    2008-01-01

    Finding relevant digital images to create presentation boards requires advanced search skills. This article describes a course assignment involving a technique designed to develop students' literacy skills with respect to locating images of desired quality and content from Internet databases. The assignment was applied in a collegiate apparel…

  9. A geometry-based image search engine for advanced RADARSAT-1/2 GIS applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotamraju, Vinay; Rabus, Bernhard; Busler, Jennifer

    2012-06-01

    Space-borne Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) sensors, such as RADARSAT-1 and -2, enable a multitude of defense and security applications owing to their unique capabilities of cloud penetration, day/night imaging and multi-polarization imaging. As a result, advanced SAR image time series exploitation techniques such as Interferometric SAR (InSAR) and Radargrammetry are now routinely used in applications such as underground tunnel monitoring, infrastructure monitoring and DEM generation. Imaging geometry, as determined by the satellite orbit and imaged terrain, plays a critical role in the success of such techniques. This paper describes the architecture and the current status of development of a geometry-based search engine that allows the search and visualization of archived and future RADARSAT-1 and -2 images appropriate for a variety of advanced SAR techniques and applications. Key features of the search engine's scalable architecture include (a) Interactive GIS-based visualization of the search results; (b) A client-server architecture for online access that produces up-to-date searches of the archive images and that can, in future, be extended to acquisition planning; (c) A techniquespecific search mode, wherein an expert user explicitly sets search parameters to find appropriate images for advanced SAR techniques such as InSAR and Radargrammetry; (d) A future application-specific search mode, wherein all search parameters implicitly default to preset values according to the application of choice such as tunnel monitoring, DEM generation and deformation mapping; (f) Accurate baseline calculations for InSAR searches, and, optimum beam configuration for Radargrammetric searches; (g) Simulated quick look images and technique-specific sensitivity maps in the future.

  10. Center for Advanced Signal and Imaging Sciences Workshop 2004

    SciTech Connect

    McClellan, J H; Carrano, C; Poyneer, L; Palmer, D; Baker, K; Chen, D; London, R; Weinert, G; Brase, J; Paglieroni, D; Lopez, A; Grant, C W; Wright, W; Burke, M; Miller, W O; DeTeresa, S; White, D; Toeppen, J; Haugen, P; Kamath, C; Nguyen, T; Manay, S; Newsam, S; Cantu-Paz, E; Pao, H; Chang, J; Chambers, D; Leach, R; Paulson, C; Romero, C E; Spiridon, A; Vigars, M; Welsh, P; Zumstein, J; Romero, K; Oppenheim, A; Harris, D B; Dowla, F; Brown, C G; Clark, G A; Ong, M M; Clance, T J; Kegelmeyer, l M; Benzuijen, M; Bliss, E; Burkhart, S; Conder, A; Daveler, S; Ferguson, W; Glenn, S; Liebman, J; Norton, M; Prasad, R; Salmon, T; Kegelmeyer, L M; Hafiz, O; Cheung, S; Fodor, I; Aufderheide, M B; Bary, A; Martz, Jr., H E; Burke, M W; Benson, S; Fisher, K A; Quarry, M J

    2004-11-15

    Welcome to the Eleventh Annual C.A.S.I.S. Workshop, a yearly event at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, presented by the Center for Advanced Signal & Image Sciences, or CASIS, and sponsored by the LLNL Engineering Directorate. Every November for the last 10 years we have convened a diverse set of engineering and scientific talent to share their work in signal processing, imaging, communications, controls, along with associated fields of mathematics, statistics, and computing sciences. This year is no exception, with sessions in Adaptive Optics, Applied Imaging, Scientific Data Mining, Electromagnetic Image and Signal Processing, Applied Signal Processing, National Ignition Facility (NIF) Imaging, and Nondestructive Characterization.

  11. Advances in Optical Spectroscopy and Imaging of Breast Lesions

    SciTech Connect

    Demos, S; Vogel, A J; Gandjbakhche, A H

    2006-01-03

    A review is presented of recent advances in optical imaging and spectroscopy and the use of light for addressing breast cancer issues. Spectroscopic techniques offer the means to characterize tissue components and obtain functional information in real time. Three-dimensional optical imaging of the breast using various illumination and signal collection schemes in combination with image reconstruction algorithms may provide a new tool for cancer detection and monitoring of treatment.

  12. Advances in noninvasive imaging of melanoma.

    PubMed

    Menge, Tyler D; Pellacani, Giovanni

    2016-03-01

    Melanoma is the most dangerous type of skin cancer and its incidence has risen sharply in recent decades. Early detection of disease is critical for improving patient outcomes. Any pigmented lesion that is clinically concerning must be removed by biopsy for morphologic investigation on histology. However, biopsies are invasive and can cause significant morbidity, and their accuracy in detecting melanoma may be limited by sampling error. The advent of noninvasive imaging devices has allowed for assessment of intact skin, thereby minimizing the need for biopsy; and these technologies are increasingly being used in the diagnosis and management of melanoma. Reflectance confocal microscopy, optical coherence tomography, ultrasonography, and multispectral imaging are noninvasive imaging techniques that have emerged as diagnostic aids to physical exam and/or conventional dermoscopy. This review summarizes the current knowledge about these techniques and discusses their practical applications and limitations. PMID:26963113

  13. Functional knee assessment with advanced imaging.

    PubMed

    Amano, Keiko; Li, Qi; Ma, C Benjamin

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is to restore the native stability of the knee joint and to prevent further injury to meniscus and cartilage, yet studies have suggested that joint laxity remains prevalent in varying degrees after ACL reconstruction. Imaging can provide measurements of translational and rotational motions of the tibiofemoral joint that may be too small to detect in routine physical examinations. Various imaging modalities, including fluoroscopy, computed tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), have emerged as powerful methods in measuring the minute details involved in joint biomechanics. While each technique has its own strengths and limitations, they have all enhanced our understanding of the knee joint under various stresses and movements. Acquiring the knowledge of the complex and dynamic motions of the knee after surgery would help lead to improved surgical techniques and better patient outcomes. PMID:27052009

  14. SHG nanoprobes: advancing harmonic imaging in biology.

    PubMed

    Dempsey, William P; Fraser, Scott E; Pantazis, Periklis

    2012-05-01

    Second harmonic generating (SHG) nanoprobes have recently emerged as versatile and durable labels suitable for in vivo imaging, circumventing many of the inherent drawbacks encountered with classical fluorescent probes. Since their nanocrystalline structure lacks a central point of symmetry, they are capable of generating second harmonic signal under intense illumination - converting two photons into one photon of half the incident wavelength - and can be detected by conventional two-photon microscopy. Because the optical signal of SHG nanoprobes is based on scattering, rather than absorption as in the case of fluorescent probes, they neither bleach nor blink, and the signal does not saturate with increasing illumination intensity. When SHG nanoprobes are used to image live tissue, the SHG signal can be detected with little background signal, and they are physiologically inert, showing excellent long-term photostability. Because of their photophysical properties, SHG nanoprobes provide unique advantages for molecular imaging of living cells and tissues with unmatched sensitivity and temporal resolution. PMID:22392481

  15. Advanced MEMS-based infrared imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ming

    2003-04-01

    Infrared radiation imager is of important for a wide range of applications. IR infrared imagers have not been widely available due to cost and complexity issues. A major cost of IR imager is associated with the requirements of cooling and pixel-level integration with electronic amplifier and read-out circuitry that are often incompatible with the detector materials. Recent research activities have lead to a new class of IR imager based on thermally isolated MEMS (micro-electromechanical systems) arrays whose bending can be directly detected by optical means. This approach eliminates the need for cooling and complex electronic multiplexers, holding the potential to drastically reduce IR imager cost. However, MEMS based IR imaging devices demonstrated to date are less sensitive than the commercially available ones. We have established a comprehensive finite element model (FEM) using Ansys tool. An accurate computer model for the proposed MEME IR detector is critical for the device development and fabrication. The model greatly enhanced our capability to cost effectively optimize the design from concept to fabrication layout. Our model predicts the deformation of this pixel structure under a surface stress for both thermal and photo-induced effects under various conditions. This simulation model provided a design base for new generation of optical MEMS IR sensors that has higher sensitivity and the potential of incorporating passive thermal amplification. Our simple MEMS design incorporates optical read-out, which eliminates the drawback of electronic means that inevitably introduce additional signal loss due to thermal contact made to the detector element. When packaged under vacuum environment, significant sensitivity improvement is anticipated. The deflection of a cantilever as a function of a rise in its temperature is determined by the classical thermomechanical governing equation for a bimaterial cantilever beam. Our finite element model is established using

  16. Advanced Optical Imaging Techniques for Neurodevelopment

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yicong; Christensen, Ryan; Colón-Ramos, Daniel; Shroff, Hari

    2013-01-01

    Over the past decade, developmental neuroscience has been transformed by the widespread application of confocal and two-photon fluorescence microscopy. Even greater progress is imminent, as recent innovations in microscopy now enable imaging with increased depth, speed, and spatial resolution; reduced phototoxicity; and in some cases without external fluorescent probes. We discuss these new techniques and emphasize their dramatic impact on neurobiology, including the ability to image neurons at depths exceeding 1 mm, to observe neurodevelopment noninvasively throughout embryogenesis, and to visualize neuronal processes or structures that were previously too small or too difficult to target with conventional microscopy. PMID:23831260

  17. Advances in Lymphatic Imaging and Drug Delivery

    SciTech Connect

    Nune, Satish K.; Gunda, Padmaja; Majeti, Bharat K.; Thallapally, Praveen K.; Laird, Forrest M.

    2011-09-10

    Cancer remains the second leading cause of death after heart disease in the US. While metastasized cancers such as breast, prostate, and colon are incurable, before their distant spread, these diseases will have invaded the lymphatic system as a first step in their progression. Hence, proper evaluation of the disease state of the lymphatics which drain a tumor site is crucial to staging and the formation of a treatment plan. Current lymphatic imaging modalities with visible dyes and radionucleotide tracers offer limited sensitivity and poor resolution; however, newer tools using nanocarriers, quantum dots, and magnetic resonance imaging promise to vastly improve the staging of lymphatic spread without needless biopsies. Concurrent with the improvement of lymphatic imaging agents, has been the development of drug carriers that can localize chemotherapy to the lymphatic system, thus improving the treatment of localized disease while minimizing the exposure of healthy organs to cytotoxic drugs. This review will focus on polymeric systems that have been developed for imaging and drug delivery to the lymph system, how these new devices improve upon current technologies, and where further improvement is needed.

  18. Advances in image registration and fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steer, Christopher; Rogers, Jeremy; Smith, Moira; Heather, Jamie; Bernhardt, Mark; Hickman, Duncan

    2008-03-01

    Many image fusion systems involving passive sensors require the accurate registration of the sensor data prior to performing fusion. Since depth information is not readily available in such systems, all registration algorithms are intrinsically approximations based upon various assumption about the depth field. Although often overlooked, many registration algorithms can break down in certain situations and this may adversely affect the image fusion performance. In this paper, we discuss a framework for quantifying the accuracy and robustness of image registration algorithms which allows a more precise understanding of their shortcomings. In addition, some novel algorithms have been investigated that overcome some of these limitations. A second aspect of this work has considered the treatment of images from multiple sensors whose angular and spatial separation is large and where conventional registration algorithms break down (typically greater than a few degrees of separation). A range of novel approaches is reported which exploit the use of parallax to estimate depth information and reconstruct a geometrical model of the scene. The imagery can then be combined with this geometrical model to render a variety of useful representations of the data. These techniques (which we term Volume Registration) show great promise as a means of gathering and presenting 3D and 4D scene information for both military and civilian applications.

  19. Multispectral laser imaging for advanced food analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senni, L.; Burrascano, P.; Ricci, M.

    2016-07-01

    A hardware-software apparatus for food inspection capable of realizing multispectral NIR laser imaging at four different wavelengths is herein discussed. The system was designed to operate in a through-transmission configuration to detect the presence of unwanted foreign bodies inside samples, whether packed or unpacked. A modified Lock-In technique was employed to counterbalance the significant signal intensity attenuation due to transmission across the sample and to extract the multispectral information more efficiently. The NIR laser wavelengths used to acquire the multispectral images can be varied to deal with different materials and to focus on specific aspects. In the present work the wavelengths were selected after a preliminary analysis to enhance the image contrast between foreign bodies and food in the sample, thus identifying the location and nature of the defects. Experimental results obtained from several specimens, with and without packaging, are presented and the multispectral image processing as well as the achievable spatial resolution of the system are discussed.

  20. Infrared thermal imaging as a physiological access pathway: a study of the baseline characteristics of facial skin temperatures.

    PubMed

    Nhan, B R; Chau, T

    2009-04-01

    In this study we examine the baseline characteristics of facial skin temperature, as measured by dynamic infrared thermal imaging, to gauge its potential as a physiological access pathway for non-verbal individuals with severe motor impairments. Frontal facial recordings were obtained from 12 asymptomatic adults in a resting state with a high-end infrared thermal imaging system. From the infrared thermal recordings, mean skin temperature time series were generated for regions of interest encompassing the nasal, periorbital and supraorbital areas. A 90% bandwidth for all regions of interest was found to be in the 1 Hz range. Over 70% of the time series were identified as nonstationary (p<0.05), with the nonstationary mean as the greatest contributing source. Correlation coefficients between regions were significant (p<0.05) and ranged from values of 0.30 (between periorbital and supraorbital regions) to 0.75 (between contralateral supraorbital regions). Using information measures, we concluded that the greatest degree of information existed in the nasal and periorbital regions. Mutual information existed across all regions but was especially prominent between the nasal and periorbital regions. Results from this study provide insight into appropriate analysis methods and potential discriminating features for the application of facial skin temperature as a physiological access pathway. PMID:19332894

  1. Potential of Baseline Computed Tomography to Predict Long-Term Survival of Patients With Locally Advanced Esophageal Cancer Treated With Preoperative Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhi-Long; Chen, Ying; Li, Xiao-Ting; Chen, Ke-Neng; Sun, Ying-Shi

    2016-01-01

    Abstract In this study, we evaluated the efficacy of baseline computed tomography (CT) signs and postoperative TN stages on survival of patients with advanced esophageal squamous cell carcinoma with preoperative chemotherapy. Consecutive patients (n = 130) with preoperative chemotherapy and radical esophagectomy from January 2006 to December 2011 were enrolled in this study retrospectively. Pathological T and N stages were confirmed by surgery. Baseline CT signs of tumor length, tumor thickness, outer membrane features, total number of lymph node (tLN), short diameter of the largest lymph node (SDL), and clinical T and N stages were measured. Eight-year overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) were estimated using Kaplan–Meier and Cox proportional hazards regression analyses to determine associations between baseline CT signs and survival outcomes. Kaplan–Meier analysis showed that tLN number, largest LN short axis diameter, pT, and pN stages all correlated with OS significantly. And the total tLN number, SDL and pN stages significantly correlated with DFS. In Cox analyses, total tLN number (>6) and pN stage were significantly associated with OS (hazard ratio [HR]: 1.55 [95% CI, 1.13–2.11, P = 0.006] and HR: 1.49 [95% CI, 1.17–1.90, P = 0.001], respectively). Cox regression analysis showed that OS index was predictive of 1- to 3-year survival. Total number of lymph node in baseline CT provides equal efficiency compared to pN stages in the prediction of 8-year long-term survival outcomes for advanced esophageal squamous cell carcinoma patients with preoperative chemotherapy. PMID:27149488

  2. Potential of Baseline Computed Tomography to Predict Long-Term Survival of Patients With Locally Advanced Esophageal Cancer Treated With Preoperative Chemotherapy: A Retrospective Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhi-Long; Chen, Ying; Li, Xiao-Ting; Chen, Ke-Neng; Sun, Ying-Shi

    2016-05-01

    In this study, we evaluated the efficacy of baseline computed tomography (CT) signs and postoperative TN stages on survival of patients with advanced esophageal squamous cell carcinoma with preoperative chemotherapy. Consecutive patients (n = 130) with preoperative chemotherapy and radical esophagectomy from January 2006 to December 2011 were enrolled in this study retrospectively. Pathological T and N stages were confirmed by surgery. Baseline CT signs of tumor length, tumor thickness, outer membrane features, total number of lymph node (tLN), short diameter of the largest lymph node (SDL), and clinical T and N stages were measured. Eight-year overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) were estimated using Kaplan-Meier and Cox proportional hazards regression analyses to determine associations between baseline CT signs and survival outcomes. Kaplan-Meier analysis showed that tLN number, largest LN short axis diameter, pT, and pN stages all correlated with OS significantly. And the total tLN number, SDL and pN stages significantly correlated with DFS. In Cox analyses, total tLN number (>6) and pN stage were significantly associated with OS (hazard ratio [HR]: 1.55 [95% CI, 1.13-2.11, P = 0.006] and HR: 1.49 [95% CI, 1.17-1.90, P = 0.001], respectively). Cox regression analysis showed that OS index was predictive of 1- to 3-year survival. Total number of lymph node in baseline CT provides equal efficiency compared to pN stages in the prediction of 8-year long-term survival outcomes for advanced esophageal squamous cell carcinoma patients with preoperative chemotherapy. PMID:27149488

  3. Test-retest reliability of UPDRS-III, dyskinesia scales, and timed motor tests in patients with advanced Parkinson's disease: an argument against multiple baseline assessments.

    PubMed

    Metman, Leo Verhagen; Myre, Brian; Verwey, Niek; Hassin-Baer, Sharon; Arzbaecher, Jean; Sierens, Diane; Bakay, Roy

    2004-09-01

    The primary objective of this study was to assess the intra-rater reliability of the motor section of the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS-III) in patients with advanced Parkinson's disease (PD). The secondary objective was to assess the intra-rater reliability of standard timed motor tests and dyskinesia scales to determine the necessity of multiple baseline core evaluations before surgery for PD. We carried out two standardized preoperative core evaluations of patients with advanced PD scheduled to undergo deep brain stimulation. Patients were examined in the defined off and on conditions by the same rater. UPDRS-III, timed tests, and dyskinesia scores from the two evaluations were compared using Wilcoxon Signed Ranks tests and intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC). Differences in UPDRS-III scores for the two visits were clinically and statistically nonsignificant, and the ICC was 0.9. Similarly, there were no significant differences in timed motor tests or dyskinesia scores, with a median ICC of 0.8. The results indicate that previous findings of high test-retest reliability of UPDRS-III in early untreated PD patients can now be extended to those with advanced disease complicated by motor fluctuations. In addition, test-retest reliability of dyskinesia scales and timed motor tests was high. Taken together, these findings challenge the need for multiple baseline assessments as currently stipulated in core assessment protocols for surgical intervention in PD. PMID:15372601

  4. Recent advances in radiology and medical imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Steiner, R.E.; Sherwood, T.

    1986-01-01

    The first chapter, on the radiology of arthritis, is an overview. The second and seventh chapters are on the chest the former, on adult respiratory distress syndrome, is a brief summary, and the latter, on digital radiography of the chest with the prototype slit-scanning technique. The third chapter reviews computed tomography of the lumbar spine. The following two chapters are on MR imaging, one on the central nervous system (covering demyelinating diseases, cardiovascular disease, infections, and tumors), with excellent illustrations; and one on MR imaging of the body. The illustrations are good. The following chapter is on extracardiac digital subtraction angiography (DSA), with an interesting table comparing and contrasting conventional angiography with both intraveneous and intraarterial DSA. The eighth chapter on pediatric imaging fits a world of experience. Chapter 9 is an update on contrast media, while the next chapter is on barium infusion examination of the small intestine. The final three chapters are concerned with the present state of angioplasty, interventional radiology in the urinary tract.

  5. Advanced image analysis for the preservation of cultural heritage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    France, Fenella G.; Christens-Barry, William; Toth, Michael B.; Boydston, Kenneth

    2010-02-01

    The Library of Congress' Preservation Research and Testing Division has established an advanced preservation studies scientific program for research and analysis of the diverse range of cultural heritage objects in its collection. Using this system, the Library is currently developing specialized integrated research methodologies for extending preservation analytical capacities through non-destructive hyperspectral imaging of cultural objects. The research program has revealed key information to support preservation specialists, scholars and other institutions. The approach requires close and ongoing collaboration between a range of scientific and cultural heritage personnel - imaging and preservation scientists, art historians, curators, conservators and technology analysts. A research project of the Pierre L'Enfant Plan of Washington DC, 1791 had been undertaken to implement and advance the image analysis capabilities of the imaging system. Innovative imaging options and analysis techniques allow greater processing and analysis capacities to establish the imaging technique as the first initial non-invasive analysis and documentation step in all cultural heritage analyses. Mapping spectral responses, organic and inorganic data, topography semi-microscopic imaging, and creating full spectrum images have greatly extended this capacity from a simple image capture technique. Linking hyperspectral data with other non-destructive analyses has further enhanced the research potential of this image analysis technique.

  6. Advanced Imaging Among Health Maintenance Organization Enrollees With Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Loggers, Elizabeth T.; Fishman, Paul A.; Peterson, Do; O'Keeffe-Rosetti, Maureen; Greenberg, Caprice; Hornbrook, Mark C.; Kushi, Lawrence H.; Lowry, Sarah; Ramaprasan, Arvind; Wagner, Edward H.; Weeks, Jane C.; Ritzwoller, Debra P.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Fee-for-service (FFS) Medicare expenditures for advanced imaging studies (defined as computed tomography [CT], magnetic resonance imaging [MRI], positron emission tomography [PET] scans, and nuclear medicine studies [NM]) rapidly increased in the past two decades for patients with cancer. Imaging rates are unknown for patients with cancer, whether under or over age 65 years, in health maintenance organizations (HMOs), where incentives may differ. Materials and Methods: Incident cases of breast, colorectal, lung, prostate, leukemia, and non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) cancers diagnosed in 2003 and 2006 from four HMOs in the Cancer Research Network were used to determine 2-year overall mean imaging counts and average total imaging costs per HMO enrollee by cancer type for those under and over age 65. Results: There were 44,446 incident cancer patient cases, with a median age of 75 (interquartile range, 71-81), and 454,029 imaging procedures were performed. The mean number of images per patient increased from 7.4 in 2003 to 12.9 in 2006. Rates of imaging were similar across age groups, with the exception of greater use of echocardiograms and NM studies in younger patients with breast cancer and greater use of PET among younger patients with lung cancer. Advanced imaging accounted for approximately 41% of all imaging, or approximately 85% of the $8.7 million in imaging expenditures. Costs were nearly $2,000 per HMO enrollee; costs for younger patients with NHL, leukemia, and lung cancer were nearly $1,000 more in 2003. Conclusion: Rates of advanced imaging appear comparable among FFS and HMO participants of any age with these six cancers. PMID:24844241

  7. Recent advances in echocardiography: strain and strain rate imaging

    PubMed Central

    Mirea, Oana; Duchenne, Jurgen; Voigt, Jens-Uwe

    2016-01-01

    Deformation imaging by echocardiography is a well-established research tool which has been gaining interest from clinical cardiologists since the introduction of speckle tracking. Post-processing of echo images to analyze deformation has become readily available at the fingertips of the user. New parameters such as global longitudinal strain have been shown to provide added diagnostic value, and ongoing efforts of the imaging societies and industry aimed at harmonizing methods will improve the technique further. This review focuses on recent advances in the field of echocardiographic strain and strain rate imaging, and provides an overview on its current and potential future clinical applications. PMID:27158476

  8. Dyslexia: advances in clinical and imaging studies.

    PubMed

    Koeda, Tatsuya; Seki, Ayumi; Uchiyama, Hitoshi; Sadato, Norihiro

    2011-03-01

    The aim of this report is to describe the characteristics of Japanese dyslexia, and to demonstrate several of our studies about the extraction of these characteristic and their neurophysiological and neuroimaging abnormalities, as well as advanced studies of phonological awareness and the underlying neural substrate. Based on these results, we have proposed a 2-step approach for remedial education (e-learning web site: http://www.dyslexia-koeda.jp/). The first step is decoding, which decreases reading errors, and the second is vocabulary learning, which improves reading fluency. This 2-step approach is designed to serve first grade children. In addition, we propose the RTI (response to intervention) model as a desirable system for remedial education. PMID:21146943

  9. Advanced and Conventional Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Neuropsychiatric Lupus.

    PubMed

    Sarbu, Nicolae; Bargalló, Núria; Cervera, Ricard

    2015-01-01

    Neuropsychiatric lupus is a major diagnostic challenge, and a main cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is, by far, the main tool for assessing the brain in this disease. Conventional and advanced MRI techniques are used to help establishing the diagnosis, to rule out alternative diagnoses, and recently, to monitor the evolution of the disease. This review explores the neuroimaging findings in SLE, including the recent advances in new MRI methods. PMID:26236469

  10. Advanced and Conventional Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Neuropsychiatric Lupus

    PubMed Central

    Sarbu, Nicolae; Bargalló, Núria; Cervera, Ricard

    2015-01-01

    Neuropsychiatric lupus is a major diagnostic challenge, and a main cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is, by far, the main tool for assessing the brain in this disease. Conventional and advanced MRI techniques are used to help establishing the diagnosis, to rule out alternative diagnoses, and recently, to monitor the evolution of the disease. This review explores the neuroimaging findings in SLE, including the recent advances in new MRI methods. PMID:26236469

  11. Effect of Diabetes on Brain Structure: The Action to Control Cardiovascular Risk in Diabetes MR Imaging Baseline Data

    PubMed Central

    Bilello, Michel; Davatzikos, Christos; Lazar, Ronald M.; Murray, Anne; Horowitz, Karen; Lovato, James; Miller, Michael E.; Williamson, Jeff; Launer, Lenore J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the association of characteristics of type 2 diabetes mellitus (duration and biochemical severity of diabetes) to brain structure measured on magnetic resonance (MR) images, specifically testing whether more severity in metrics of diabetes is inversely correlated with brain volumes and positively correlated with ischemic lesion volumes. Materials and Methods This study protocol was approved by the institutional review board of each center and participants provided written informed consent. Baseline severity of diabetes was evaluated by testing fasting plasma glucose levels, hemoglobin A1c levels, and duration of diabetes. MR imaging was performed with fluid-attenuated inversion recovery, proton-density, T2-weighted, and T1-weighted sequences, which were postprocessed with an automated computer algorithm that classified brain tissue as gray or white matter and as normal or ischemic. Separate linear regression models adjusted for potential confounding factors were used to investigate the relationship of the diabetes measures to MR imaging outcomes in 614 participants (mean age, 62 years; mean duration of type 2 diabetes mellitus, 9.9 years). Results The mean volumes of total gray matter (463.9 cm3) and total white matter (463.6 cm3) were similar. The mean volume of abnormal tissue was 2.5 cm3, mostly in the white matter (81% white matter, 5% gray matter, 14% deep gray and white matter). Longer duration of diabetes and higher fasting plasma glucose level were associated with lower normal (β = −0.431 and −0.053, respectively; P < .01) and total gray matter volumes (β = −0.428 and −0.053, respectively; P < .01). Fasting plasma glucose was also inversely correlated with ischemic lesion volume (β = −0.006; P < .04). Hemoglobin A1c level was not associated with any MR imaging measure. Conclusion Longer duration of diabetes is associated with brain volume loss, particularly in the gray matter, possibly reflecting direct neurologic insult

  12. Advances in CT imaging for urolithiasis

    PubMed Central

    Andrabi, Yasir; Patino, Manuel; Das, Chandan J.; Eisner, Brian; Sahani, Dushyant V.; Kambadakone, Avinash

    2015-01-01

    Urolithiasis is a common disease with increasing prevalence worldwide and a lifetime-estimated recurrence risk of over 50%. Imaging plays a critical role in the initial diagnosis, follow-up and urological management of urinary tract stone disease. Unenhanced helical computed tomography (CT) is highly sensitive (>95%) and specific (>96%) in the diagnosis of urolithiasis and is the imaging investigation of choice for the initial assessment of patients with suspected urolithiasis. The emergence of multi-detector CT (MDCT) and technological innovations in CT such as dual-energy CT (DECT) has widened the scope of MDCT in the stone disease management from initial diagnosis to encompass treatment planning and monitoring of treatment success. DECT has been shown to enhance pre-treatment characterization of stone composition in comparison with conventional MDCT and is being increasingly used. Although CT-related radiation dose exposure remains a valid concern, the use of low-dose MDCT protocols and integration of newer iterative reconstruction algorithms into routine CT practice has resulted in a substantial decrease in ionizing radiation exposure. In this review article, our intent is to discuss the role of MDCT in the diagnosis and post-treatment evaluation of urolithiasis and review the impact of emerging CT technologies such as dual energy in clinical practice. PMID:26166961

  13. Satisfaction of search experiments in advanced imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berbaum, Kevin S.

    2012-03-01

    The objective of our research is to understand the perception of multiple abnormalities in an imaging examination and to develop strategies for improved diagnostic. We are one of the few laboratories in the world pursuing the goal of reducing detection errors through a better understanding of the underlying perceptual processes involved. Failure to detect an abnormality is the most common class of error in diagnostic imaging and generally is considered the most serious by the medical community. Many of these errors have been attributed to "satisfaction of search," which occurs when a lesion is not reported because discovery of another abnormality has "satisfied" the goal of the search. We have gained some understanding of the mechanisms of satisfaction of search (SOS) traditional radiographic modalities. Currently, there are few interventions to remedy SOS error. For example, patient history that the prompts specific abnormalities, protects the radiologist from missing them even when other abnormalities are present. The knowledge gained from this programmatic research will lead to reduction of observer error.

  14. Advances in CT imaging for urolithiasis.

    PubMed

    Andrabi, Yasir; Patino, Manuel; Das, Chandan J; Eisner, Brian; Sahani, Dushyant V; Kambadakone, Avinash

    2015-01-01

    Urolithiasis is a common disease with increasing prevalence worldwide and a lifetime-estimated recurrence risk of over 50%. Imaging plays a critical role in the initial diagnosis, follow-up and urological management of urinary tract stone disease. Unenhanced helical computed tomography (CT) is highly sensitive (>95%) and specific (>96%) in the diagnosis of urolithiasis and is the imaging investigation of choice for the initial assessment of patients with suspected urolithiasis. The emergence of multi-detector CT (MDCT) and technological innovations in CT such as dual-energy CT (DECT) has widened the scope of MDCT in the stone disease management from initial diagnosis to encompass treatment planning and monitoring of treatment success. DECT has been shown to enhance pre-treatment characterization of stone composition in comparison with conventional MDCT and is being increasingly used. Although CT-related radiation dose exposure remains a valid concern, the use of low-dose MDCT protocols and integration of newer iterative reconstruction algorithms into routine CT practice has resulted in a substantial decrease in ionizing radiation exposure. In this review article, our intent is to discuss the role of MDCT in the diagnosis and post-treatment evaluation of urolithiasis and review the impact of emerging CT technologies such as dual energy in clinical practice. PMID:26166961

  15. ADVANCES IN MOLECULAR IMAGING OF PANCREATIC BETA CELLS

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Mai; Lubag, Angelo; McGuire, Michael J.; Seliounine, Serguei Y.; Tsyganov, Edward N.; Antich, Peter P.; Sherry, A. Dean; Brown, Kathlynn C.; Sun, Xiankai

    2009-01-01

    The development of non-invasive imaging methods for early diagnosis of the beta cell associated metabolic diseases, including type 1 and type 2 diabetes (T1D and T2D), has recently drawn considerable interest from the molecular imaging community as well as clinical investigators. Due to the challenges imposed by the location of the pancreas, the sparsely dispersed beta cell population within the pancreas, and the poor understanding of the pathogenesis of the diseases, clinical diagnosis of beta cell abnormalities is still limited. Current diagnostic methods are invasive, often inaccurate, and usually performed post-onset of the disease. Advances in imaging techniques for probing beta cell mass and function are needed to address this critical health care problem. A variety of currently available imaging techniques have been tested for the assessment of the pancreatic beta cell islets. Here we discuss the current advances in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), bioluminescence imaging (BLI), and nuclear imaging for the study of beta cell diseases. Spurred by early successes in nuclear imaging techniques for beta cells, especially positron emission tomography (PET), the need for beta cell specific ligands has expanded. Progress in the field for obtaining such ligands is presented. Additionally, we report our preliminary efforts of developing such a peptidic ligand for PET imaging of the pancreatic beta cells. PMID:18508529

  16. Advanced terahertz imaging system performance model for concealed weapon identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murrill, Steven R.; Redman, Brian; Espinola, Richard L.; Franck, Charmaine C.; Petkie, Douglas T.; De Lucia, Frank C.; Jacobs, Eddie L.; Griffin, Steven T.; Halford, Carl E.; Reynolds, Joe

    2007-04-01

    The U.S. Army Night Vision and Electronic Sensors Directorate (NVESD) and the U.S. Army Research Laboratory (ARL) have developed a terahertz-band imaging system performance model for detection and identification of concealed weaponry. The details of this MATLAB-based model which accounts for the effects of all critical sensor and display components, and for the effects of atmospheric attenuation, concealment material attenuation, and active illumination, were reported on at the 2005 SPIE Europe Security and Defence Symposium. The focus of this paper is to report on recent advances to the base model which have been designed to more realistically account for the dramatic impact that target and background orientation can have on target observability as related to specular and Lambertian reflections captured by an active-illumination-based imaging system. The advanced terahertz-band imaging system performance model now also accounts for target and background thermal emission, and has been recast into a user-friendly, Windows-executable tool. This advanced THz model has been developed in support of the Defense Advanced Research Project Agency's (DARPA) Terahertz Imaging Focal-Plane Technology (TIFT) program. This paper will describe the advanced THz model and its new radiometric sub-model in detail, and provide modeling and experimental results on target observability as a function of target and background orientation.

  17. Earth Observing-1 Advanced Land Imager: Radiometric Response Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mendenhall, J. A.; Lencioni, D. E.; Evans, J. B.

    2000-01-01

    The Advanced Land Imager (ALI) is one of three instruments to be flown on the first Earth Observing mission (EO-1) under NASA's New Millennium Program (NMP). ALI contains a number of innovative features, including a wide field of view optical design, compact multispectral focal plane arrays, non-cryogenic HgCdTe detectors for the short wave infrared bands, and silicon carbide optics. This document outlines the techniques adopted during ground calibration of the radiometric response of the Advanced Land Imager. Results from system level measurements of the instrument response, signal-to-noise ratio, saturation radiance, and dynamic range for all detectors of every spectral band are also presented.

  18. [Interventional MR imaging: state of the art and technological advances].

    PubMed

    Viard, R; Rousseau, J

    2008-01-01

    Due to its excellent soft tissue contrast and lack of ionizing radiation, MR imaging is well suited for interventional procedures. MRI is being increasingly used for guidance during percutaneous procedures or surgery. Technical advances in interventional MR imaging are reviewed in this paper. Ergonomical factors with improved access to patients as well as advances in informatics, electronics and robotics largely explain this increasing role. Different elements are discussed from improved access to patients in the scanners to improved acquisition pulse sequences. Selected clinical applications and recent publications will be presented to illustrate the current status of this technique. PMID:18288022

  19. Advanced Imaging Catheter: Final Project Report

    SciTech Connect

    Krulevitch, P; Colston, B; DaSilva, L; Hilken, D; Kluiwstra, J U; Lee, A P; London, R; Miles, R; Schumann, D; Seward, K; Wang, A

    2001-07-20

    Minimally invasive surgery (MIS) is an approach whereby procedures conventionally performed with large and potentially traumatic incisions are replaced by several tiny incisions through which specialized instruments are inserted. Early MIS, often called laparoscopic surgery, used video cameras and laparoscopes to visualize and control the medical devices, which were typically cutting or stapling tools. More recently, catheter-based procedures have become a fast growing sector of all surgeries. In these procedures, small incisions are made into one of the main arteries (e.g. femoral artery in the thigh), and a long thin hollow tube is inserted and positioned near the target area. The key advantage of this technique is that recovery time can be reduced from months to a matter of days. In the United States, over 700,000 catheter procedures are performed annually representing a market of over $350 million. Further growth in this area will require significant improvements in the current catheter technology. In order to effectively navigate a catheter through the tortuous vessels of the body, two capabilities must exist: imaging and positioning. In most cases, catheter procedures rely on radiography for visualization and manual manipulation for positioning of the device. Radiography provides two-dimensional, global images of the vasculature and cannot be used continuously due to radiation exposure to both the patient and physician. Intravascular ultrasound devices are available for continuous local imaging at the catheter tip, but these devices cannot be used simultaneously with therapeutic devices. Catheters are highly compliant devices, and manipulating the catheter is similar to pushing on a string. Often, a guide wire is used to help position the catheter, but this procedure has its own set of problems. Three characteristics are used to describe catheter maneuverability: (1) pushability -- the amount of linear displacement of the distal end (inside body) relative to

  20. Imaging spectrometer technologies for advanced Earth remote sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wellman, J. B.; Breckinridge, J. B.; Kuperfman, P.; Salazar, R. P.; Sigurdson, K. B.

    1982-01-01

    A major requirement of multispectral imaging systems for advanced Earth remote sensing is the provision for greater spectral resolution and more versatile spectral band selection. The imaging spectrometer instrument concept provides this versatility by the combination of pushbroom imaging and spectrally dispersing optics using area array detectors in the focal plane. The shuttle imaging spectrometer concept achieves 10- and 20-meter ground instantaneous fields of view with 20-nanometer spectral resolution from Earth Orbit. Onboard processing allows the selection of spectral bands during flight; this, in turn, permits the sensor parameters to be tailored to the experiment objectives. Advances in optical design, infrared detector arrays, and focal plane cooling indicate the feasibility of the instrument concept and support the practicability of a validation flight experiment for the shuttle in the late 1980s.

  1. Recent Advances in Molecular, Multimodal and Theranostic Ultrasound Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Kiessling, Fabian; Fokong, Stanley; Bzyl, Jessica; Lederle, Wiltrud; Palmowski, Moritz; Lammers, Twan

    2014-01-01

    Ultrasound (US) imaging is an exquisite tool for the non-invasive and real-time diagnosis of many different diseases. In this context, US contrast agents can improve lesion delineation, characterization and therapy response evaluation. US contrast agents are usually micrometer-sized gas bubbles, stabilized with soft or hard shells. By conjugating antibodies to the microbubble (MB) surface, and by incorporating diagnostic agents, drugs or nucleic acids into or onto the MB shell, molecular, multimodal and theranostic MB can be generated. We here summarize recent advances in molecular, multimodal and theranostic US imaging, and introduce concepts how such advanced MB can be generated, applied and imaged. Examples are given for their use to image and treat oncological, cardiovascular and neurological diseases. Furthermore, we discuss for which therapeutic entities incorporation into (or conjugation to) MB is meaningful, and how US-mediated MB destruction can increase their extravasation, penetration, internalization and efficacy. PMID:24316070

  2. Imaging spectrometer technologies for advanced earth remote sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wellman, J. B.; Breckinridge, J. B.; Kupferman, P.; Salazar, R. P.; Sigurdson, K. B.

    1982-01-01

    A major requirement of multispectral imaging systems for advanced earth remote sensing is the provision for greater spectral resolution and more versatile spectral band selection. The imaging spectrometer instrument concept provides this versatility by the combination of pushbroom imaging and spectrally dispersing optics using area array detectors in the focal plane. The shuttle imaging spectrometer concept achieves 10- and 20-meter ground instantaneous fields of view with 20-nanometer spectral resolution from earth orbit. Onboard processing allows the selection of spectral bands during flight; this, in turn, permits the sensor parameters to be tailored to the experiment objectives. Advances in optical design, infrared detector arrays, and focal plane cooling indicate the feasibility of the instrument concept and support the practicability of a validation flight experiment for the shuttle in the late 1980s. Previously announced in STAR as N83-28542

  3. Advanced digital detectors for neutron imaging.

    SciTech Connect

    Doty, F. Patrick

    2003-12-01

    Neutron interrogation provides unique information valuable for Nonproliferation & Materials Control and other important applications including medicine, airport security, protein crystallography, and corrosion detection. Neutrons probe deep inside massive objects to detect small defects and chemical composition, even through high atomic number materials such as lead. However, current detectors are bulky gas-filled tubes or scintillator/PM tubes, which severely limit many applications. Therefore this project was undertaken to develop new semiconductor radiation detection materials to develop the first direct digital imaging detectors for neutrons. The approach relied on new discovery and characterization of new solid-state sensor materials which convert neutrons directly to electronic signals via reactions BlO(n,a)Li7 and Li6(n,a)T.

  4. A mathematical model of hepatitis c virus dynamics in patients with high baseline viral loads or advanced liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Dahari, Harel; Layden-Almer, Jennifer E.; Kallwitz, Eric; Ribeiro, Ruy M.; Cotler, Scott J.; Layden, Thomas J.; Perelson, Alan S.

    2010-01-01

    Background & Aims Patients with baseline hepatitis C virus-RNA levels (bHCV-RNA) >6 log IU/ml or cirrhosis have a reduced probability of a sustained-virological response (SVR). We examined the relationship between bHCV-RNA, cirrhosis and SVR using a mathematical model that includes the critical-drug efficacy (εc; the efficacy required for a drug to clear HCV), the infection-rate constant (β) and the percentage of HCV-infected hepatocytes (π). Methods The relationship between baseline factors and SVR was evaluated in 1,000 in silico HCV-infected patients, generated by randomly assignment of realistic host and viral kinetic parameters. Model predictions were compared with clinical data from 170 non-cirrhotic and 75 cirrhotic patients. Results The ranges chosen for β and the viral production rate (p) resulted in bHCV-RNA levels that were in agreement with the distribution observed in US patients. Using these β and p values, higher bHCV-RNA levels led to higher εc, resulting in lower SVR rates. Alternatively, higher β values resulted in lower bHCV-RNA levels but higher π and εc, predicting lower rates of SVR. Cirrhotic patients had lower bHCV-RNA levels than non-cirrhotic patients (p=0.013) and more had bHCV-RNA levels <6 log IU/ml (p<0.001). Even cirrhotic patients with lower bHCV-RNA levels had lower SVR rates. An increase in β could explain the results observed in cirrhotic patients. Conclusions Our model predicts that higher bHCV-RNA levels lead to higher εc, reducing the chance of achieving SVR; cirrhotic patients have lower SVR rates because of large π values, caused by increased rates of hepatocyte infection. PMID:19208338

  5. Advances in the reconstruction of LBT LINC-NIRVANA images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Camera, A.; Desiderá, G.; Arcidiacono, C.; Boccacci, P.; Bertero, M.

    2007-09-01

    Context: LINC-NIRVANA, the Fizeau interferometer of the Large Binocular Telescope (LBT), will require routine use of image reconstruction methods for data reduction. To this purpose our group has already developed the software package AIRY (Astronomical Image Restoration in interferometrY). Aims: Observations of a target, with different orientations of the baseline of LINC-NIRVANA, will provide images with different orientations with respect to the CCD camera. This rotation effect was not taken into account in our previous work. Therefore in this paper we propose a method able to compensate for the rotation of the field of view. Moreover we investigate acceleration techniques for reducing the computational burden of multiple image deconvolution. Methods: The basic method is a suitable modification of the Richardson-Lucy algorithm, also implementing an approach we proposed for reducing boundary effects. Acceleration techniques, proposed by Biggs & Andrews, are extended and applied to this new algorithm. Finally a method for estimating the unknown point spread function (PSF) by extracting and extrapolating the image of a reference star is developed and implemented. Results: The method introduced for compensating object rotation and reducing boundary effects, as well as its accelerated versions, are tested on simulated LINC-NIRVANA images, using the VLT image of the Crab Nebula as test object. The results are very promising. Moreover the method for PSFs extraction is tested on simulated images, derived from the LBT image of the galaxy NGC 6946 and obtained by convolving this image with PSFs computed by means of the numerical code LOST (Layer Oriented Simulation Tool).

  6. AXIOM: Advanced X-ray imaging of the magnetosheath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sembay, S.; Branduardi-Raymont, G.; Eastwood, J. P.; Sibeck, D. G.; Abbey, A.; Brown, P.; Carter, J. A.; Carr, C. M.; Forsyth, C.; Kataria, D.; Kemble, S.; Milan, S.; Owen, C. J.; Read, A. M.; Peacocke, L.; Arridge, C. S.; Coates, A. J.; Collier, M. R.; Cowley, S. W. H.; Fazakerley, A. N.; Fraser, G.; Jones, G. H.; Lallement, R.; Lester, M.; Porter, F. S.; Yeoman, T.

    2012-04-01

    AXIOM (Advanced X-ray Imaging Of the Magnetosphere) is a concept mission which aims to explain how the Earth's magnetosphere responds to the changing impact of the solar wind using a unique method never attempted before; performing wide-field soft X-ray imaging and spectroscopy of the magnetosheath, magnetopause and bow shock at high spatial and temporal resolution. Global imaging of these regions is possible because of the solar wind charge exchange (SWCX) process which produces elevated soft X-ray emission from the interaction of high charge-state solar wind ions with primarily neutral hydrogen in the Earth's exosphere and near-interplanetary space.

  7. The ADIS advanced data acquisition, imaging, and storage system

    SciTech Connect

    Flaherty, J.W.

    1986-01-01

    The design and development of Automated Ultrasonic Scanning Systems (AUSS) by McDonnell Aircraft Company has provided the background for the development of the ADIS advanced data acquisition, imaging, and storage system. The ADIS provides state-of-the-art ultrasonic data processing and imaging features which can be utilized in both laboratory and production line composite evaluation applications. System features, such as, real-time imaging, instantaneous electronic rescanning, multitasking capability, histograms, and cross-sections, provide the tools necessary to inspect and evaluate composite parts quickly and consistently.

  8. AXIOM: Advanced X-Ray Imaging Of the Magnetosheath

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sembay, S.; Branduardi-Rayrnont, G.; Eastwood, J. P.; Sibeck, D. G.; Abbey, A.; Brown, P.; Carter, J. A.; Carr, C. M.; Forsyth, C; Kataria, D.; Kemble, S.; Milan, S.; Owen, C. J.; Read, A. M.; Peacocke, L.; Arridge, C. S.; Coates, A. J.; Collier, M. R.; Cowley, S. W. H.; Fazakerley, A. N.; Fraser, G.; Jones, G. H.; Lallement, R.; Lester, M.; Porter, F. S.

    2012-01-01

    AXIOM (Advanced X-ray Imaging Of the Magnetosphere) is a concept mission which aims to explain how the Earth's magnetosphere responds to the changing impact of the solar wind using a unique method never attempted before; performing wide-field soft X-ray imaging and spectroscopy of the magnetosheath. magnetopause and bow shock at high spatial and temporal resolution. Global imaging of these regions is possible because of the solar wind charge exchange (SWCX) process which produces elevated soft X-ray emission from the interaction of high charge-state solar wind ions with primarily neutral hydrogen in the Earth's exosphere and near-interplanetary space.

  9. The Advanced Space Plant Culture Device with Live Imaging Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Weibo; Zhang, Tao; Tong, Guanghui

    The live imaging techniques, including the color and fluorescent imags, are very important and useful for space life science. The advanced space plant culture Device (ASPCD) with live imaging Technique, developed for Chinese Spacecraft, would be introduced in this paper. The ASPCD had two plant experimental chambers. Three cameras (two color cameras and one fluorescent camera) were installed in the two chambers. The fluorescent camera could observe flowering genes, which were labeled by GFP. The lighting, nutrient, temperature controling and water recycling were all independent in each chamber. The ASPCD would beed applied to investigate for the growth and development of the high plant under microgravity conditions on board the Chinese Spacecraft.

  10. In-flight performance of the Japanese Advanced Meteorological Imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puschell, Jeffrey J.; Osgood, Roderic; Auchter, Joseph; Hurt, W. Todd; Hitomi, Miyamoto; Sasaki, Masayuki; Tahara, Yoshihiko; Tadros, Alfred; Faller, Ken; Mclaren, Mark; Sheffield, Jonathan; Gaiser, John; Kamel, Ahmed; Gunshor, Mathew

    2006-08-01

    The Japanese Advanced Meteorological Imager (JAMI) was developed by Raytheon and delivered to Space Systems/Loral as the Imager Subsystem for Japan's MTSAT-1R satellite. MTSAT-1R was launched from the Tanegashima Space Center on 2005 February 26 and became formally operational on 2005 June 28. This paper compares in-flight performance of JAMI with predictions made before launch. The performance areas discussed include radiometric sensitivity (NEDT and SNR) versus spectral channel, calibration accuracy versus spectral channel derived from comparisons of JAMI and AIRS measurements and image navigation and registration.

  11. Communities advancing the studies of Tribal nations across their lifespan: Design, methods, and baseline of the CoASTAL cohort

    PubMed Central

    Tracy, Kate; Boushey, Carol; Roberts, Sparkle M.; Morris, J.Glenn; Grattan, Lynn M.

    2015-01-01

    The CoASTAL cohort represents the first community cohort assembled to study a HAB related illness. It is comprised of three Native American tribes in the Pacific NW for the purpose of studying the health impacts of chronic, low level domoic acid (DA) exposure through razor clam consumption. This cohort is at risk of domoic acid (DA) toxicity by virtue of their geographic location (access to beaches with a history of elevated DA levels in razor clams) and the cultural and traditional significance of razor clams in their diet. In this prospective, longitudinal study, Wave 1 of the cohort is comprised of 678 members across the lifespan with both sexes represented within child, adult and geriatric age groups. All participants are followed annually with standard measures of medical and social history; neuropsychological functions, psychological status, and dietary exposure. DA concentration levels are measured at both public and reservation beaches where razor clams are sourced and multiple metrics have been piloted to further determine exposure. Baseline data indicates that all cognitive and psychological functions are within normal limits. In addition there is considerable variability in razor clam exposure. Therefore, the CoASTAL cohort offers a unique opportunity to investigate the potential health effects of chronic, low level exposure to DA over time.

  12. Imaging for understanding speech communication: Advances and challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayanan, Shrikanth

    2005-04-01

    Research in speech communication has relied on a variety of instrumentation methods to illuminate details of speech production and perception. One longstanding challenge has been the ability to examine real-time changes in the shaping of the vocal tract; a goal that has been furthered by imaging techniques such as ultrasound, movement tracking, and magnetic resonance imaging. The spatial and temporal resolution afforded by these techniques, however, has limited the scope of the investigations that could be carried out. In this talk, we focus on some recent advances in magnetic resonance imaging that allow us to perform near real-time investigations on the dynamics of vocal tract shaping during speech. Examples include Demolin et al. (2000) (4-5 images/second, ultra-fast turbo spin echo) and Mady et al. (2001,2002) (8 images/second, T1 fast gradient echo). A recent study by Narayanan et al. (2004) that used a spiral readout scheme to accelerate image acquisition has allowed for image reconstruction rates of 24 images/second. While these developments offer exciting prospects, a number of challenges lie ahead, including: (1) improving image acquisition protocols, hardware for enhancing signal-to-noise ratio, and optimizing spatial sampling; (2) acquiring quality synchronized audio; and (3) analyzing and modeling image data including cross-modality registration. [Work supported by NIH and NSF.

  13. Advanced technology development for image gathering, coding, and processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huck, Friedrich O.

    1990-01-01

    Three overlapping areas of research activities are presented: (1) Information theory and optimal filtering are extended to visual information acquisition and processing. The goal is to provide a comprehensive methodology for quantitatively assessing the end-to-end performance of image gathering, coding, and processing. (2) Focal-plane processing techniques and technology are developed to combine effectively image gathering with coding. The emphasis is on low-level vision processing akin to the retinal processing in human vision. (3) A breadboard adaptive image-coding system is being assembled. This system will be used to develop and evaluate a number of advanced image-coding technologies and techniques as well as research the concept of adaptive image coding.

  14. Clinical value of magnetic resonance imaging and other baseline testing for conjunctival mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Nasser, Qasiem J; Pfeiffer, Margaret L; Romaguera, Jorge; Fowler, Nathan; Debnam, J Matthew; Samaniego, Felipe; El-Sawy, Tarek; McLaughlin, Peter; Bakhoum, Mathieu F; Esmaeli, Bita

    2014-05-01

    Abstract The objective of this study was to assess the value of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the orbit for conjunctival mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma. The yield of other staging tests at baseline were also evaluated. Twenty-one consecutive patients treated for conjunctival MALT lymphoma were retrospectively studied. Lymphoma was staged according to both the Ann Arbor system and the seventh edition of the AJCC [American Joint Committee on Cancer] cancer staging manual. Findings on MRI of the orbit, whole-body positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT), CT of the chest/abdomen/pelvis, bone marrow (BM) biopsy and gastrointestinal (GI) endoscopy were recorded. Seventeen patients had orbital MRI. Fourteen of 17 patients (82%) with obvious conjunctival MALT lymphoma on clinical examination had a negative MRI scan. Only three patients had subtle conjunctival enhancement on orbital MRI. Ann Arbor stage at presentation was as follows: stage IE (15 patients), stage IIE (two patients) and stage IV (four patients). Eighteen of 21 patients had total-body PET/CT; four patients (22%) had hypermetabolic activity evident on PET scan. All 21 patients had bilateral BM biopsies. Fifteen of 21 patients (71%) had GI endoscopy. None of the patients had a positive BM biopsy or findings on GI endoscopy. Our data suggest that orbital MRI has a very low yield for identification of conjunctival MALT lymphoma. Clinical examination is critical in diagnosing and assessing treatment response in conjunctival MALT lymphoma. The yield for GI endoscopy and BM biopsy may also be low in staging of conjunctival MALT lymphoma. PMID:23879202

  15. Prognostic and Predictive Value of Baseline and Posttreatment Molecular Marker Expression in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer Treated With Neoadjuvant Chemoradiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Bertolini, Federica . E-mail: bertolini.federica@policlinico.mo.it; Bengala, Carmelo; Losi, Luisa; Pagano, Maria; Iachetta, Francesco; Dealis, Cristina; Jovic, Gordana; Depenni, Roberta; Zironi, Sandra; Falchi, Anna Maria; Luppi, Gabriele; Conte, Pier Franco

    2007-08-01

    Purpose: To evaluate expression of a panel of molecular markers, including p53, p21, MLH1, MSH2, MIB-1, thymidylate synthase, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), and tissue vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), before and after treatment in patients treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy for locally advanced rectal cancer, to correlate the constitutive profile and dynamics of expression with pathologic response and outcome. Methods and Materials: Expression of biomarkers was evaluated by immunohistochemistry in tumor samples from 91 patients with clinical Stage II and III rectal cancer treated with preoperative pelvic radiotherapy (50 Gy) plus concurrent 5-fluorouracil by continuous intravenous infusion. Results: A pathologic complete remission was observed in 14 patients (15.4%). Patients with MLH1-positive tumors had a higher pathologic complete response rate (24.3% vs. 9.4%; p = 0.055). Low expression of constitutive p21, absence of EGFR expression after chemoradiotherapy, and high Dworak's tumor regression grade (TRG) were significantly associated with improved disease-free survival and overall survival. A high MIB-1 value after chemoradiotherapy was significantly associated with worse overall survival. Multivariate analysis confirmed the prognostic value of constitutive p21 expression as well as EGFR expression and MIB-1 value after chemoradiotherapy among patients not achieving TRG 3-4. Conclusions: In our study, we observed the independent prognostic value of EGFR expression after chemoradiotherapy on disease-free survival. Moreover, our study suggests that a constitutive high p21 expression and a high MIB-1 value after neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy treatment could predict worse outcome in locally advanced rectal cancer.

  16. Establishing advanced practice for medical imaging in New Zealand

    PubMed Central

    Yielder, Jill; Young, Adrienne; Park, Shelley; Coleman, Karen

    2014-01-01

    IntroductionThis article presents the outcome and recommendations following the second stage of a role development project conducted on behalf of the New Zealand Institute of Medical Radiation Technology (NZIMRT). The study sought to support the development of profiles and criteria that may be used to formulate Advanced Scopes of Practice for the profession. It commenced in 2011, following on from initial research that occurred between 2005 and 2008 investigating role development and a possible career structure for medical radiation technologists (MRTs) in New Zealand (NZ). MethodsThe study sought to support the development of profiles and criteria that could be used to develop Advanced Scopes of Practice for the profession through inviting 12 specialist medical imaging groups in NZ to participate in a survey. ResultsFindings showed strong agreement on potential profiles and on generic criteria within them; however, there was less agreement on specific skills criteria within specialist areas. ConclusionsThe authors recommend that one Advanced Scope of Practice be developed for Medical Imaging, with the establishment of generic and specialist criteria. Systems for approval of the overall criteria package for any individual Advanced Practitioner (AP) profile, audit and continuing professional development requirements need to be established by the Medical Radiation Technologists Board (MRTB) to meet the local needs of clinical departments. It is further recommended that the NZIMRT and MRTB promote and support the need for an AP pathway for medical imaging in NZ. PMID:26229631

  17. Establishing advanced practice for medical imaging in New Zealand

    SciTech Connect

    Yielder, Jill; Young, Adrienne; Park, Shelley; Coleman, Karen

    2014-02-15

    Introduction: This article presents the outcome and recommendations following the second stage of a role development project conducted on behalf of the New Zealand Institute of Medical Radiation Technology (NZIMRT). The study sought to support the development of profiles and criteria that may be used to formulate Advanced Scopes of Practice for the profession. It commenced in 2011, following on from initial research that occurred between 2005 and 2008 investigating role development and a possible career structure for medical radiation technologists (MRTs) in New Zealand (NZ). Methods: The study sought to support the development of profiles and criteria that could be used to develop Advanced Scopes of Practice for the profession through inviting 12 specialist medical imaging groups in NZ to participate in a survey. Results: Findings showed strong agreement on potential profiles and on generic criteria within them; however, there was less agreement on specific skills criteria within specialist areas. Conclusions: The authors recommend that one Advanced Scope of Practice be developed for Medical Imaging, with the establishment of generic and specialist criteria. Systems for approval of the overall criteria package for any individual Advanced Practitioner (AP) profile, audit and continuing professional development requirements need to be established by the Medical Radiation Technologists Board (MRTB) to meet the local needs of clinical departments. It is further recommended that the NZIMRT and MRTB promote and support the need for an AP pathway for medical imaging in NZ.

  18. BASELINE ASSESSMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Resource Purpose:The Baseline Assessment is a project to collect data on environmental conditions in Indian country from existing data sources using a geographic enabling system called the Oracle Spatial Data Cartridge.
    Legislation/Enabling Authority:None
    S...

  19. Challenges and recent advances in mass spectrometric imaging of neurotransmitters

    PubMed Central

    Gemperline, Erin; Chen, Bingming; Li, Lingjun

    2014-01-01

    Mass spectrometric imaging (MSI) is a powerful tool that grants the ability to investigate a broad mass range of molecules, from small molecules to large proteins, by creating detailed distribution maps of selected compounds. To date, MSI has demonstrated its versatility in the study of neurotransmitters and neuropeptides of different classes toward investigation of neurobiological functions and diseases. These studies have provided significant insight in neurobiology over the years and current technical advances are facilitating further improvements in this field. neurotransmitters, focusing specifically on the challenges and recent Herein, we advances of MSI of neurotransmitters. PMID:24568355

  20. Recent advances in image-guided targeted prostate biopsy.

    PubMed

    Brown, Anna M; Elbuluk, Osama; Mertan, Francesca; Sankineni, Sandeep; Margolis, Daniel J; Wood, Bradford J; Pinto, Peter A; Choyke, Peter L; Turkbey, Baris

    2015-08-01

    Prostate cancer is a common malignancy in the United States that results in over 30,000 deaths per year. The current state of prostate cancer diagnosis, based on PSA screening and sextant biopsy, has been criticized for both overdiagnosis of low-grade tumors and underdiagnosis of clinically significant prostate cancers (Gleason score ≥7). Recently, image guidance has been added to perform targeted biopsies of lesions detected on multi-parametric magnetic resonance imaging (mpMRI) scans. These methods have improved the ability to detect clinically significant cancer, while reducing the diagnosis of low-grade tumors. Several approaches have been explored to improve the accuracy of image-guided targeted prostate biopsy, including in-bore MRI-guided, cognitive fusion, and MRI/transrectal ultrasound fusion-guided biopsy. This review will examine recent advances in these image-guided targeted prostate biopsy techniques. PMID:25596716

  1. Advances in Magnetic Resonance Imaging Contrast Agents for Biomarker Detection

    PubMed Central

    Sinharay, Sanhita; Pagel, Mark D.

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents have provided new capabilities for biomarker detection through molecular imaging. MRI contrast agents based on the T2 exchange mechanism have more recently expanded the armamentarium of agents for molecular imaging. Compared with T1 and T2* agents, T2 exchange agents have a slower chemical exchange rate, which improves the ability to design these MRI contrast agents with greater specificity for detecting the intended biomarker. MRI contrast agents that are detected through chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) have even slower chemical exchange rates. Another emerging class of MRI contrast agents uses hyperpolarized 13C to detect the agent with outstanding sensitivity. These hyperpolarized 13C agents can be used to track metabolism and monitor characteristics of the tissue microenvironment. Together, these various MRI contrast agents provide excellent opportunities to develop molecular imaging for biomarker detection. PMID:27049630

  2. Advances in Magnetic Resonance Imaging Contrast Agents for Biomarker Detection.

    PubMed

    Sinharay, Sanhita; Pagel, Mark D

    2016-06-12

    Recent advances in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents have provided new capabilities for biomarker detection through molecular imaging. MRI contrast agents based on the T2 exchange mechanism have more recently expanded the armamentarium of agents for molecular imaging. Compared with T1 and T2* agents, T2 exchange agents have a slower chemical exchange rate, which improves the ability to design these MRI contrast agents with greater specificity for detecting the intended biomarker. MRI contrast agents that are detected through chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) have even slower chemical exchange rates. Another emerging class of MRI contrast agents uses hyperpolarized (13)C to detect the agent with outstanding sensitivity. These hyperpolarized (13)C agents can be used to track metabolism and monitor characteristics of the tissue microenvironment. Together, these various MRI contrast agents provide excellent opportunities to develop molecular imaging for biomarker detection. PMID:27049630

  3. Advanced hyperspectral video imaging system using Amici prism.

    PubMed

    Feng, Jiao; Fang, Xiaojing; Cao, Xun; Ma, Chenguang; Dai, Qionghai; Zhu, Hongbo; Wang, Yongjin

    2014-08-11

    In this paper, we propose an advanced hyperspectral video imaging system (AHVIS), which consists of an objective lens, an occlusion mask, a relay lens, an Amici prism and two cameras. An RGB camera is used for spatial reading and a gray scale camera is used for measuring the scene with spectral information. The objective lens collects more light energy from the observed scene and images the scene on an occlusion mask, which subsamples the image of the observed scene. Then, the subsampled image is sent to the gray scale camera through the relay lens and the Amici prism. The Amici prism that is used to realize spectral dispersion along the optical path reduces optical distortions and offers direct view of the scene. The main advantages of the proposed system are improved light throughput and less optical distortion. Furthermore, the presented configuration is more compact, robust and practicable. PMID:25321019

  4. Advances in Magnetic Resonance Imaging Contrast Agents for Biomarker Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinharay, Sanhita; Pagel, Mark D.

    2016-06-01

    Recent advances in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents have provided new capabilities for biomarker detection through molecular imaging. MRI contrast agents based on the T2 exchange mechanism have more recently expanded the armamentarium of agents for molecular imaging. Compared with T1 and T2* agents, T2 exchange agents have a slower chemical exchange rate, which improves the ability to design these MRI contrast agents with greater specificity for detecting the intended biomarker. MRI contrast agents that are detected through chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) have even slower chemical exchange rates. Another emerging class of MRI contrast agents uses hyperpolarized 13C to detect the agent with outstanding sensitivity. These hyperpolarized 13C agents can be used to track metabolism and monitor characteristics of the tissue microenvironment. Together, these various MRI contrast agents provide excellent opportunities to develop molecular imaging for biomarker detection.

  5. Optical design and characterization of an advanced computational imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shepard, R. Hamilton; Fernandez-Cull, Christy; Raskar, Ramesh; Shi, Boxin; Barsi, Christopher; Zhao, Hang

    2014-09-01

    We describe an advanced computational imaging system with an optical architecture that enables simultaneous and dynamic pupil-plane and image-plane coding accommodating several task-specific applications. We assess the optical requirement trades associated with custom and commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) optics and converge on the development of two low-cost and robust COTS testbeds. The first is a coded-aperture programmable pixel imager employing a digital micromirror device (DMD) for image plane per-pixel oversampling and spatial super-resolution experiments. The second is a simultaneous pupil-encoded and time-encoded imager employing a DMD for pupil apodization or a deformable mirror for wavefront coding experiments. These two testbeds are built to leverage two MIT Lincoln Laboratory focal plane arrays - an orthogonal transfer CCD with non-uniform pixel sampling and on-chip dithering and a digital readout integrated circuit (DROIC) with advanced on-chip per-pixel processing capabilities. This paper discusses the derivation of optical component requirements, optical design metrics, and performance analyses for the two testbeds built.

  6. Advanced biologically plausible algorithms for low-level image processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gusakova, Valentina I.; Podladchikova, Lubov N.; Shaposhnikov, Dmitry G.; Markin, Sergey N.; Golovan, Alexander V.; Lee, Seong-Whan

    1999-08-01

    At present, in computer vision, the approach based on modeling the biological vision mechanisms is extensively developed. However, up to now, real world image processing has no effective solution in frameworks of both biologically inspired and conventional approaches. Evidently, new algorithms and system architectures based on advanced biological motivation should be developed for solution of computational problems related to this visual task. Basic problems that should be solved for creation of effective artificial visual system to process real world imags are a search for new algorithms of low-level image processing that, in a great extent, determine system performance. In the present paper, the result of psychophysical experiments and several advanced biologically motivated algorithms for low-level processing are presented. These algorithms are based on local space-variant filter, context encoding visual information presented in the center of input window, and automatic detection of perceptually important image fragments. The core of latter algorithm are using local feature conjunctions such as noncolinear oriented segment and composite feature map formation. Developed algorithms were integrated into foveal active vision model, the MARR. It is supposed that proposed algorithms may significantly improve model performance while real world image processing during memorizing, search, and recognition.

  7. Advanced imaging techniques for the detection of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Jochelson, Maxine

    2012-01-01

    Mammography is the only breast imaging examination that has been shown to reduce breast cancer mortality. Population-based sensitivity is 75% to 80%, but sensitivity in high-risk women with dense breasts is only in the range of 50%. Breast ultrasound and contrast-enhanced breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have become additional standard modalities used in the diagnosis of breast cancer. In high-risk women, ultrasound is known to detect approximately four additional cancers per 1,000 women. MRI is exquisitely sensitive for the detection of breast cancer. In high-risk women, it finds an additional four to five cancers per 100 women. However, both ultrasound and MRI are also known to lead to a large number of additional benign biopsies and short-term follow-up examinations. Many new breast imaging tools have improved and are being developed to improve on our current ability to diagnose early-stage breast cancer. These can be divided into two groups. The first group is those that are advances in current techniques, which include digital breast tomosynthesis and contrast-enhanced mammography and ultrasound with elastography or microbubbles. The other group includes new breast imaging platforms such as breast computed tomography (CT) scanning and radionuclide breast imaging. These are exciting advances. However, in this era of cost and radiation containment, it is imperative to look at all of them objectively to see which will provide clinically relevant additional information. PMID:24451711

  8. Advanced Imaging Modalities in the Detection of Cerebral Vasospasm

    PubMed Central

    Mills, Jena N.; Mehta, Vivek; Russin, Jonathan; Amar, Arun P.; Rajamohan, Anandh; Mack, William J.

    2013-01-01

    The pathophysiology of cerebral vasospasm following aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is complex and is not entirely understood. Mechanistic insights have been gained through advances in the capabilities of diagnostic imaging. Core techniques have focused on the assessment of vessel caliber, tissue metabolism, and/or regional perfusion parameters. Advances in imaging have provided clinicians with a multifaceted approach to assist in the detection of cerebral vasospasm and the diagnosis of delayed ischemic neurologic deficits (DIND). However, a single test or algorithm with broad efficacy remains elusive. This paper examines both anatomical and physiological imaging modalities applicable to post-SAH vasospasm and offers a historical background. We consider cerebral blood flow velocities measured by Transcranial Doppler Ultrasonography (TCD). Structural imaging techniques, including catheter-based Digital Subtraction Angiography (DSA), CT Angiography (CTA), and MR Angiography (MRA), are reviewed. We examine physiologic assessment by PET, HMPAO SPECT, 133Xe Clearance, Xenon-Enhanced CT (Xe/CT), Perfusion CT (PCT), and Diffusion-Weighted/MR Perfusion Imaging. Comparative advantages and limitations are discussed. PMID:23476766

  9. Labeling of virus components for advanced, quantitative imaging analyses.

    PubMed

    Sakin, Volkan; Paci, Giulia; Lemke, Edward A; Müller, Barbara

    2016-07-01

    In recent years, investigation of virus-cell interactions has moved from ensemble measurements to imaging analyses at the single-particle level. Advanced fluorescence microscopy techniques provide single-molecule sensitivity and subdiffraction spatial resolution, allowing observation of subviral details and individual replication events to obtain detailed quantitative information. To exploit the full potential of these techniques, virologists need to employ novel labeling strategies, taking into account specific constraints imposed by viruses, as well as unique requirements of microscopic methods. Here, we compare strengths and limitations of various labeling methods, exemplify virological questions that were successfully addressed, and discuss challenges and future potential of novel approaches in virus imaging. PMID:26987299

  10. Advances in brain imaging: a new ethical challenge.

    PubMed

    Alfano, B; Brunetti, A

    1997-01-01

    Technical advances in the past 25 years permitted substantial advances in the neuroimaging field, expanding the diagnostic and research potentials and significantly reducing the use of old invasive imaging techniques for research purposes. The safer procedures now available allow acquisition of reference data, morphological assessment and functional characterisation from healthy volunteers. However, enrollment of volunteers is still a sensitive ethical issue. Ethical problems related to informed consent, for both research and diagnostic procedures, in patients with neuropsychiatric disorders represent an additional crucial issue. Furthermore, with both functional and structural neuroimaging studies, there is a theoretical risk of violation of individual privacy. Research in the neuroimaging field should tend to increase the amount of information obtained through appropriate post-processing procedures, including multimodality image fusion, and to limit stress and discomfort. PMID:9616958

  11. Advanced Imaging for Biopsy Guidance in Primary Brain Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Tsiouris, Apostolos J; Ramakrishna, Rohan

    2016-01-01

    Accurate glioma sampling is required for diagnosis and establishing eligibility for relevant clinical trials. MR-based perfusion and spectroscopy sequences supplement conventional MR in noninvasively predicting the areas of highest tumor grade for biopsy. We report the case of a patient with gliomatosis cerebri and multifocal patchy enhancement in whom the combination of advanced and conventional imaging attributes successfully guided a diagnostic biopsy. PMID:27014538

  12. Advanced indium antimonide monolithic charge coupled infrared imaging arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koch, T. L.; Merilainen, C. A.; Thom, R. D.

    1981-01-01

    The continued process development of SiO2 insulators for use in advanced InSb monolithic charge coupled infrared imaging arrays is described. Specific investigations into the use of plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposited (PECVD) SiO2 as a gate insulator for InSb charge coupled devices is discussed, as are investigations of other chemical vapor deposited SiO2 materials.

  13. Advances in Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Skull Base

    PubMed Central

    Kirsch, Claudia F.E.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Over the past 20 years, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has advanced due to new techniques involving increased magnetic field strength and developments in coils and pulse sequences. These advances allow increased opportunity to delineate the complex skull base anatomy and may guide the diagnosis and treatment of the myriad of pathologies that can affect the skull base. Objectives The objective of this article is to provide a brief background of the development of MRI and illustrate advances in skull base imaging, including techniques that allow improved conspicuity, characterization, and correlative physiologic assessment of skull base pathologies. Data Synthesis Specific radiographic illustrations of increased skull base conspicuity including the lower cranial nerves, vessels, foramina, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leaks, and effacement of endolymph are provided. In addition, MRIs demonstrating characterization of skull base lesions, such as recurrent cholesteatoma versus granulation tissue or abscess versus tumor, are also provided as well as correlative clinical findings in CSF flow studies in a patient pre- and post-suboccipital decompression for a Chiari I malformation. Conclusions This article illustrates MRI radiographic advances over the past 20 years, which have improved clinicians' ability to diagnose, define, and hopefully improve the treatment and outcomes of patients with underlying skull base pathologies. PMID:25992137

  14. Advances in imaging secondary ion mass spectrometry for biological samples

    SciTech Connect

    Boxer, Steven G.; Kraft, Mary L.; Weber, Peter K.

    2008-12-16

    Imaging mass spectrometry combines the power of mass spectrometry to identify complex molecules based on mass with sample imaging. Recent advances in secondary ion mass spectrometry have improved sensitivity and spatial resolution, so that these methods have the potential to bridge between high-resolution structures obtained by X-ray crystallography and cyro-electron microscopy and ultrastructure visualized by conventional light microscopy. Following background information on the method and instrumentation, we address the key issue of sample preparation. Because mass spectrometry is performed in high vacuum, it is essential to preserve the lateral organization of the sample while removing bulk water, and this has been a major barrier for applications to biological systems. Furthermore, recent applications of imaging mass spectrometry to cell biology, microbial communities, and biosynthetic pathways are summarized briefly, and studies of biological membrane organization are described in greater depth.

  15. Imaging spectroscopic analysis at the Advanced Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    MacDowell, A. A.; Warwick, T.; Anders, S.; Lamble, G.M.; Martin, M.C.; McKinney, W.R.; Padmore, H.A.

    1999-05-12

    One of the major advances at the high brightness third generation synchrotrons is the dramatic improvement of imaging capability. There is a large multi-disciplinary effort underway at the ALS to develop imaging X-ray, UV and Infra-red spectroscopic analysis on a spatial scale from. a few microns to 10nm. These developments make use of light that varies in energy from 6meV to 15KeV. Imaging and spectroscopy are finding applications in surface science, bulk materials analysis, semiconductor structures, particulate contaminants, magnetic thin films, biology and environmental science. This article is an overview and status report from the developers of some of these techniques at the ALS. The following table lists all the currently available microscopes at the. ALS. This article will describe some of the microscopes and some of the early applications.

  16. Advances in imaging secondary ion mass spectrometry for biological samples

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Boxer, Steven G.; Kraft, Mary L.; Weber, Peter K.

    2008-12-16

    Imaging mass spectrometry combines the power of mass spectrometry to identify complex molecules based on mass with sample imaging. Recent advances in secondary ion mass spectrometry have improved sensitivity and spatial resolution, so that these methods have the potential to bridge between high-resolution structures obtained by X-ray crystallography and cyro-electron microscopy and ultrastructure visualized by conventional light microscopy. Following background information on the method and instrumentation, we address the key issue of sample preparation. Because mass spectrometry is performed in high vacuum, it is essential to preserve the lateral organization of the sample while removing bulk water, and this hasmore » been a major barrier for applications to biological systems. Furthermore, recent applications of imaging mass spectrometry to cell biology, microbial communities, and biosynthetic pathways are summarized briefly, and studies of biological membrane organization are described in greater depth.« less

  17. Red Fluorescent Proteins: Advanced Imaging Applications and Future Design

    PubMed Central

    Shcherbakova, Daria M.; Subach, Oksana M.; Verkhusha, Vladislav V.

    2015-01-01

    In the past few years a large series of the advanced red-shifted fluorescent proteins (RFPs) has been developed. These enhanced RFPs provide new possibilities to study biological processes at the levels ranging from single molecules to whole organisms. Herein the relationship between the properties of the RFPs of different phenotypes and their applications to various imaging techniques are described. Existing and emerging imaging approaches are discussed for conventional RFPs, far-red FPs, RFPs with a large Stokes shift, fluorescent timers, irreversibly photoactivatable and reversibly photo-switchable RFPs. Advantages and limitations of specific RFPs for each technique are presented. Recent progress in understanding the chemical transformations of red chromophores allows the future RFP phenotypes and their respective novel imaging applications to be foreseen. PMID:22851529

  18. Advanced gastrointestinal endoscopic imaging for inflammatory bowel diseases

    PubMed Central

    Tontini, Gian Eugenio; Rath, Timo; Neumann, Helmut

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal luminal endoscopy is of paramount importance for diagnosis, monitoring and dysplasia surveillance in patients with both, Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis. Moreover, with the recent recognition that mucosal healing is directly linked to the clinical outcome of patients with inflammatory bowel disorders, a growing demand exists for the precise, timely and detailed endoscopic assessment of superficial mucosal layer. Further, the novel field of molecular imaging has tremendously expanded the clinical utility and applications of modern endoscopy, now encompassing not only diagnosis, surveillance, and treatment but also the prediction of individual therapeutic responses. Within this review, we describe how novel endoscopic approaches and advanced endoscopic imaging methods such as high definition and high magnification endoscopy, dye-based and dye-less chromoendoscopy, confocal laser endomicroscopy, endocytoscopy and molecular imaging now allow for the precise and ultrastructural assessment of mucosal inflammation and describe the potential of these techniques for dysplasia detection. PMID:26811662

  19. Advances in Spectral-Spatial Classification of Hyperspectral Images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fauvel, Mathieu; Tarabalka, Yuliya; Benediktsson, Jon Atli; Chanussot, Jocelyn; Tilton, James C.

    2012-01-01

    Recent advances in spectral-spatial classification of hyperspectral images are presented in this paper. Several techniques are investigated for combining both spatial and spectral information. Spatial information is extracted at the object (set of pixels) level rather than at the conventional pixel level. Mathematical morphology is first used to derive the morphological profile of the image, which includes characteristics about the size, orientation and contrast of the spatial structures present in the image. Then the morphological neighborhood is defined and used to derive additional features for classification. Classification is performed with support vector machines using the available spectral information and the extracted spatial information. Spatial post-processing is next investigated to build more homogeneous and spatially consistent thematic maps. To that end, three presegmentation techniques are applied to define regions that are used to regularize the preliminary pixel-wise thematic map. Finally, a multiple classifier system is defined to produce relevant markers that are exploited to segment the hyperspectral image with the minimum spanning forest algorithm. Experimental results conducted on three real hyperspectral images with different spatial and spectral resolutions and corresponding to various contexts are presented. They highlight the importance of spectral-spatial strategies for the accurate classification of hyperspectral images and validate the proposed methods.

  20. Diagnostic imaging advances in murine models of colitis

    PubMed Central

    Brückner, Markus; Lenz, Philipp; Mücke, Marcus M; Gohar, Faekah; Willeke, Peter; Domagk, Dirk; Bettenworth, Dominik

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) such as Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis are chronic-remittent inflammatory disorders of the gastrointestinal tract still evoking challenging clinical diagnostic and therapeutic situations. Murine models of experimental colitis are a vital component of research into human IBD concerning questions of its complex pathogenesis or the evaluation of potential new drugs. To monitor the course of colitis, to the present day, classical parameters like histological tissue alterations or analysis of mucosal cytokine/chemokine expression often require euthanasia of animals. Recent advances mean revolutionary non-invasive imaging techniques for in vivo murine colitis diagnostics are increasingly available. These novel and emerging imaging techniques not only allow direct visualization of intestinal inflammation, but also enable molecular imaging and targeting of specific alterations of the inflamed murine mucosa. For the first time, in vivo imaging techniques allow for longitudinal examinations and evaluation of intra-individual therapeutic response. This review discusses the latest developments in the different fields of ultrasound, molecularly targeted contrast agent ultrasound, fluorescence endoscopy, confocal laser endomicroscopy as well as tomographic imaging with magnetic resonance imaging, computed tomography and fluorescence-mediated tomography, discussing their individual limitations and potential future diagnostic applications in the management of human patients with IBD. PMID:26811642

  1. Advanced imaging microscope tools applied to microgravity research investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, L.; Samson, J.; Conrad, D.; Clark, K.

    1998-01-01

    The inability to observe and interact with experiments on orbit has been an impediment for both basic research and commercial ventures using the shuttle. In order to open the frontiers of space, the Center for Microgravity Automation Technology has developed a unique and innovative system for conducting experiments at a distance, the ``Remote Scientist.'' The Remote Scientist extends laboratory automation capability to the microgravity environment. While the Remote Scientist conceptually encompasses a broad spectrum of elements and functionalities, the development approach taken is to: • establish a baseline capability that is both flexible and versatile • incrementally augment the baseline with additional functions over time. Since last year, the application of the Remote Scientist has changed from protein crystal growth to tissue culture, specifically, the development of skeletal muscle under varying levels of tension. This system includes a series of bioreactor chambers that allow for three-dimensional growth of muscle tissue on a membrane suspended between the two ends of a programmable force transducer that can provide automated or investigator-initiated tension on the developing tissue. A microscope objective mounted on a translation carriage allows for high-resolution microscopy along a large area of the tissue. These images will be mosaiced on orbit to detect features and structures that span multiple images. The use of fluorescence and pseudo-confocal microscopy will maximize the observational capabilities of this system. A series of ground-based experiments have been performed to validate the bioreactor, the force transducer, the translation carriage and the image acquisition capabilities of the Remote Scientist. • The bioreactor is capable of sustaining three dimensional tissue culture growth over time. • The force transducer can be programmed to provide static tension on cells or to simulate either slow or fast growth of underlying tissues in

  2. Baseline program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Barney B.; Vonputtkamer, Jesco

    1992-01-01

    This assumed program was developed from several sources of information and is extrapolated over future decades using a set of reasonable assumptions based on incremental growth. The assumptions for the NASA baseline program are as follows: balanced emphasis in four domains; a constant level of activity; low to moderate real budget growth; maximum use of commonality; and realistic and practical technology development. The first domain is low Earth Orbit (LEO). Activities there are concentrated on the space station but extend on one side to Earth-pointing sensors for unmanned platforms and on the other to the launch and staging of unmanned solar system exploration missions. The second domain is geosynchronous Earth orbit (GEO) and cislunar space. Activities here include all GEO missions and operations, both unmanned and manned, and all transport of materials and crews between LEO and the vicinity of the Moon. The third domain is the Moon itself. Lunar activities are to include both orbiting and landing missions; the landings may be either unmanned or manned. The last domain is Mars. Missions to Mars will initially be unmanned but they will eventually be manned. Program elements and descriptions are discussed as are critiques of the NASA baseline.

  3. An advanced image analysis tool for the quantification and characterization of breast cancer in microscopy images.

    PubMed

    Goudas, Theodosios; Maglogiannis, Ilias

    2015-03-01

    The paper presents an advanced image analysis tool for the accurate and fast characterization and quantification of cancer and apoptotic cells in microscopy images. The proposed tool utilizes adaptive thresholding and a Support Vector Machines classifier. The segmentation results are enhanced through a Majority Voting and a Watershed technique, while an object labeling algorithm has been developed for the fast and accurate validation of the recognized cells. Expert pathologists evaluated the tool and the reported results are satisfying and reproducible. PMID:25681102

  4. Quantitative Computed Tomography and Image Analysis for Advanced Muscle Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Edmunds, Kyle Joseph; Gíslason, Magnus K.; Arnadottir, Iris D.; Marcante, Andrea; Piccione, Francesco; Gargiulo, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Medical imaging is of particular interest in the field of translational myology, as extant literature describes the utilization of a wide variety of techniques to non-invasively recapitulate and quantity various internal and external tissue morphologies. In the clinical context, medical imaging remains a vital tool for diagnostics and investigative assessment. This review outlines the results from several investigations on the use of computed tomography (CT) and image analysis techniques to assess muscle conditions and degenerative process due to aging or pathological conditions. Herein, we detail the acquisition of spiral CT images and the use of advanced image analysis tools to characterize muscles in 2D and 3D. Results from these studies recapitulate changes in tissue composition within muscles, as visualized by the association of tissue types to specified Hounsfield Unit (HU) values for fat, loose connective tissue or atrophic muscle, and normal muscle, including fascia and tendon. We show how results from these analyses can be presented as both average HU values and compositions with respect to total muscle volumes, demonstrating the reliability of these tools to monitor, assess and characterize muscle degeneration. PMID:27478562

  5. Recent Advances in Molecular Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Liver Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhiming; Sun, Jihong; Yang, Xiaoming

    2015-01-01

    Liver fibrosis is a life-threatening disease with high morbidity and mortality owing to its diverse causes. Liver biopsy, as the current gold standard for diagnosing and staging liver fibrosis, has a number of limitations, including sample variability, relatively high cost, an invasive nature, and the potential of complications. Most importantly, in clinical practice, patients often reject additional liver biopsies after initiating treatment despite their being necessary for long-term follow-up. To resolve these problems, a number of different noninvasive imaging-based methods have been developed for accurate diagnosis of liver fibrosis. However, these techniques only reflect morphological or perfusion-related alterations in the liver, and thus they are generally only useful for the diagnosis of late-stage liver fibrosis (liver cirrhosis), which is already characterized by “irreversible” anatomic and hemodynamic changes. Thus, it is essential that new approaches are developed for accurately diagnosing early-stage liver fibrosis as at this stage the disease may be “reversed” by active treatment. The development of molecular MR imaging technology has potential in this regard, as it facilitates noninvasive, target-specific imaging of liver fibrosis. We provide an overview of recent advances in molecular MR imaging for the diagnosis and staging of liver fibrosis and we compare novel technologies with conventional MR imaging techniques. PMID:25874221

  6. Imaging of the heart: historical perspective and recent advances.

    PubMed

    Lam, W C; Pennell, D J

    2016-02-01

    Correct diagnosis must be made before appropriate treatment can be given. The aim of cardiac imaging is to establish cardiac diagnosis as accurate as possible and to avert unnecessary invasive procedures. There are many different modalities of cardiac imaging and each of them has advanced tremendously throughout the past decades. Echocardiography, as the first-line modality in most clinical circumstances, has progressed from two-dimensional, single-planed M-mode in the 1960s to three-dimensional speckle tracking echocardiography nowadays. Cardiac computed tomography angiogram (CCTA) has revolutionised the management of coronary artery disease as it allows clinicians to visualise the coronary arteries without performing an invasive angiogram. Because of the high negative predictive value, CCTA plays an important reassuring role in acute chest pain management. The greatest strength of cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) is that it provides information in tissue characterization. It is the modality of choice in assessing myocardial viability and myocardial infiltration such as haemochromatosis or amyloidosis. Each of these modalities has its own strengths and limitations. In fact, they are complementing each other in different clinical settings. Cardiac imaging will continue to advance and, not long from now, we will not need invasive procedures to make an accurate cardiac diagnosis. PMID:26647305

  7. Technology in radiology: advances in diagnostic imaging & therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Stern, S M

    1993-01-01

    Nearly 100 years from its birth, radiology continues to grow as though still in adolescence. Although some radiologic technologies have matured more than others, new applications and techniques appear regularly in the literature. Radiology has evolved from purely diagnostic devices to interventional technologies. New contrast agents in MRI, X ray and ultrasound enable physicians to make diagnoses and plan therapies with greater precision than ever before. Techniques are less and less invasive. Advances in computer technology have given supercomputer-like power to high-end nuclear medicine and MRI systems. Imaging systems in most modalities are now designed with upgrades in mind instead of "planned obsolescence." Companies routinely upgrade software and other facets of their products, sometimes at no additional charge to existing customers. Hospitals, radiology groups and imaging centers will face increasing demands to justify what they do according to patient outcomes and management criteria. Did images make the diagnosis or confirm it? Did the images determine optimal treatment strategies or confirm which strategies might be appropriate? Third-party payers, especially the government, will view radiology in those terms. The diagnostic imaging and therapy systems of today require increasingly sophisticated technical support for maintenance and repair. Hospitals, radiology groups and imaging centers will have to determine the most economic and effective ways to guarantee equipment up-time. Borrowing from the automotive industry, some radiology manufacturers have devised transtelephonic software systems to facilitate remote troubleshooting. To ensure their fiscal viability, hospitals continue to acquire new imaging and therapy technologies for competitive and access-to-services reasons.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:10129808

  8. Millimeter-Wave Imaging Technology Advancements for Plasma Diagnostics Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Xiangyu

    To realize fusion plant, the very first step is to understand the fundamental physics of materials under fusion conditions, i.e. to understand fusion plasmas. Our research group, Plasma Diagnostics Group, focuses on developing advanced tools for physicists to extract as much information as possible from fusion plasmas at millions degrees. The Electron Cyclotron Emission Imaging (ECEI) diagnostics is a very useful tool invented in this group to study fusion plasma electron temperature and it fluctuations. This dissertation presents millimeter wave imaging technology advances recently developed in this group to improve the ECEI system. New technologies made it more powerful to image and visualize magneto-hydrodynamics (MHD) activities and micro-turbulence in fusion plasmas. Topics of particular emphasis start from development of miniaturized elliptical substrate lens array. This novel substrate lens array replaces the previous generation substrate lens, hyper-hemispherical substrate lens, in terms of geometry. From the optical performance perspective, this substitution not only significantly simplifies the optical system with improved optical coupling, but also enhances the RF/LO coupling efficiency. By the benefit of the mini lens focusing properties, a wideband dual-dipole antenna array is carefully designed and developed. The new antenna array is optimized simultaneously for receiving both RF and LO, with sharp radiation patterns, low side-lobe levels, and less crosstalk between adjacent antennas. In addition, a high frequency antenna is also developed, which extends the frequency limit from 145 GHz to 220 GHz. This type of antenna will be used on high field operation tokamaks with toroidal fields in excess of 3 Tesla. Another important technology advance is so-called extended bandwidth double down-conversion electronics. This new electronics extends the instantaneous IF coverage from 2 to 9.2 GHz to 2 to 16.4 GHz. From the plasma point of view, it means that the

  9. The Advanced Gamma-ray Imaging System (AGIS) - Simulation Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Maier, G.; Buckley, J.; Bugaev, V.; Fegan, S.; Vassiliev, V. V.; Funk, S.; Konopelko, A.

    2008-12-24

    The Advanced Gamma-ray Imaging System (AGIS) is a US-led concept for a next-generation instrument in ground-based very-high-energy gamma-ray astronomy. The most important design requirement for AGIS is a sensitivity of about 10 times greater than current observatories like Veritas, H.E.S.S or MAGIC. We present results of simulation studies of various possible designs for AGIS. The primary characteristics of the array performance, collecting area, angular resolution, background rejection, and sensitivity are discussed.

  10. The Advanced Gamma-ray Imaging System (AGIS): Simulation studies

    SciTech Connect

    Maier, G.; Buckley, J.; Bugaev, V.; Fegan, S.; Funk, S.; Konopelko, A.; Vassiliev, V.V.; /UCLA

    2011-06-14

    The Advanced Gamma-ray Imaging System (AGIS) is a next-generation ground-based gamma-ray observatory being planned in the U.S. The anticipated sensitivity of AGIS is about one order of magnitude better than the sensitivity of current observatories, allowing it to measure gamma-ray emission from a large number of Galactic and extra-galactic sources. We present here results of simulation studies of various possible designs for AGIS. The primary characteristics of the array performance - collecting area, angular resolution, background rejection, and sensitivity - are discussed.

  11. Advances in imaging ultrastructure yield new insights into presynaptic biology

    PubMed Central

    Bruckner, Joseph J.; Zhan, Hong; O’Connor-Giles, Kate M.

    2015-01-01

    Synapses are the fundamental functional units of neural circuits, and their dysregulation has been implicated in diverse neurological disorders. At presynaptic terminals, neurotransmitter-filled synaptic vesicles are released in response to calcium influx through voltage-gated calcium channels activated by the arrival of an action potential. Decades of electrophysiological, biochemical, and genetic studies have contributed to a growing understanding of presynaptic biology. Imaging studies are yielding new insights into how synapses are organized to carry out their critical functions. The development of techniques for rapid immobilization and preservation of neuronal tissues for electron microscopy (EM) has led to a new renaissance in ultrastructural imaging that is rapidly advancing our understanding of synapse structure and function. PMID:26052269

  12. Glaucoma Diagnosis and Monitoring Using Advanced Imaging Technologies

    PubMed Central

    Sehi, Mitra; Iverson, Shawn M

    2014-01-01

    Advanced ocular imaging technologies facilitate objective and reproducible quantification of change in glaucoma but at the same time, impose new challenges on scientists and clinicians for separating true structural change from imaging noise. This review examines time-domain and spectral-domain optical coherence tomography, confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscopy and scanning laser polarimetry technologies and discusses the diagnostic accuracy and the ability of each technique for evaluation of glaucomatous progression. A broad review of the current literature reveals that objective assessment of retinal nerve fiber layer, ganglion cell complex and optic nerve head topography may improve glaucoma monitoring when used as a complementary tool in conjunction with the clinical judgment of an expert. PMID:24470807

  13. Recent Advances in the Imaging of Frontotemporal Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Whitwell, Jennifer L.; Josephs, Keith A.

    2012-01-01

    Neuroimaging has played an important role in the characterization of the frontotemporal dementia (FTD) syndromes, demonstrating neurodegenerative signatures that can aid in the differentiation of FTD from other neurodegenerative disorders. Recent advances have been driven largely by the refinement of the clinical syndromes that underlie FTD, and by the discovery of new genetic and pathological features associated with FTD. Many new imaging techniques and modalities are also now available that allow the assessment of other aspects of brain structure and function, such as diffusion tensor imaging and resting state functional MRI. Studies have utilized these recent techniques, as well as traditional volumetric MRI, to provide further insight into disease progression across the many clinical, genetic and pathological variants of FTD. Importantly, neuroimaging signatures have been identified that will improve the clinician’s ability to predict underlying genetic and pathological features, and hence ultimately improve patient diagnosis. PMID:23015371

  14. Advanced DTM Generation from Very High Resolution Satellite Stereo Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perko, R.; Raggam, H.; Gutjahr, K. H.; Schardt, M.

    2015-03-01

    This work proposes a simple filtering approach that can be applied to digital surface models in order to extract digital terrain models. The method focusses on robustness and computational efficiency and is in particular tailored to filter DSMs that are extracted from satellite stereo images. It represents an evolution of an existing DTM generation method and includes distinct advancement through the integration of multi-directional processing as well as slope dependent filtering, thus denoted "MSD filtering". The DTM generation workflow is fully automatic and requires no user interaction. Exemplary results are presented for a DSM generated from a Pléiades tri-stereo image data set. Qualitative and quantitative evaluations with respect to highly accurate reference LiDAR data confirm the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm.

  15. Recent advances in live cell imaging of hepatoma cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Live cell imaging enables the study of dynamic processes of living cells in real time by use of suitable reporter proteins and the staining of specific cellular structures and/or organelles. With the availability of advanced optical devices and improved cell culture protocols it has become a rapidly growing research methodology. The success of this technique relies mainly on the selection of suitable reporter proteins, construction of recombinant plasmids possessing cell type specific promoters as well as reliable methods of gene transfer. This review aims to provide an overview of the recent developments in the field of marker proteins (bioluminescence and fluorescent) and methodologies (fluorescent resonance energy transfer, fluorescent recovery after photobleaching and proximity ligation assay) employed as to achieve an improved imaging of biological processes in hepatoma cells. Moreover, different expression systems of marker proteins and the modes of gene transfer are discussed with emphasis on the study of lipid droplet formation in hepatocytes as an example. PMID:25005127

  16. Advances on image interpolation based on ant colony algorithm.

    PubMed

    Rukundo, Olivier; Cao, Hanqiang

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents an advance on image interpolation based on ant colony algorithm (AACA) for high resolution image scaling. The difference between the proposed algorithm and the previously proposed optimization of bilinear interpolation based on ant colony algorithm (OBACA) is that AACA uses global weighting, whereas OBACA uses local weighting scheme. The strength of the proposed global weighting of AACA algorithm depends on employing solely the pheromone matrix information present on any group of four adjacent pixels to decide which case deserves a maximum global weight value or not. Experimental results are further provided to show the higher performance of the proposed AACA algorithm with reference to the algorithms mentioned in this paper. PMID:27047729

  17. Advances and challenges in deformable image registration: From image fusion to complex motion modelling.

    PubMed

    Schnabel, Julia A; Heinrich, Mattias P; Papież, Bartłomiej W; Brady, Sir J Michael

    2016-10-01

    Over the past 20 years, the field of medical image registration has significantly advanced from multi-modal image fusion to highly non-linear, deformable image registration for a wide range of medical applications and imaging modalities, involving the compensation and analysis of physiological organ motion or of tissue changes due to growth or disease patterns. While the original focus of image registration has predominantly been on correcting for rigid-body motion of brain image volumes acquired at different scanning sessions, often with different modalities, the advent of dedicated longitudinal and cross-sectional brain studies soon necessitated the development of more sophisticated methods that are able to detect and measure local structural or functional changes, or group differences. Moving outside of the brain, cine imaging and dynamic imaging required the development of deformable image registration to directly measure or compensate for local tissue motion. Since then, deformable image registration has become a general enabling technology. In this work we will present our own contributions to the state-of-the-art in deformable multi-modal fusion and complex motion modelling, and then discuss remaining challenges and provide future perspectives to the field. PMID:27364430

  18. Advanced 3D imaging lidar concepts for long range sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, K. J.; Hiskett, P. A.; Lamb, R. A.

    2014-06-01

    Recent developments in 3D imaging lidar are presented. Long range 3D imaging using photon counting is now a possibility, offering a low-cost approach to integrated remote sensing with step changing advantages in size, weight and power compared to conventional analogue active imaging technology. We report results using a Geiger-mode array for time-of-flight, single photon counting lidar for depth profiling and determination of the shape and size of tree canopies and distributed surface reflections at a range of 9km, with 4μJ pulses with a frame rate of 100kHz using a low-cost fibre laser operating at a wavelength of λ=1.5 μm. The range resolution is less than 4cm providing very high depth resolution for target identification. This specification opens up several additional functionalities for advanced lidar, for example: absolute rangefinding and depth profiling for long range identification, optical communications, turbulence sensing and time-of-flight spectroscopy. Future concepts for 3D time-of-flight polarimetric and multispectral imaging lidar, with optical communications in a single integrated system are also proposed.

  19. Diagnosis by Endoscopy and Advanced Imaging of Barrett's Neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Swager, Anne-Fré; Curvers, Wouter L; Bergman, Jacques J

    2016-01-01

    Evaluation of patients with Barrett's esophagus (BE) using dye-based chromoendoscopy, optical chromoendoscopy, autofluorescence imaging, or confocal laser endomicroscopy does not significantly increase the number of patients with a diagnosis of early neoplasia compared with high-definition white light endoscopy (HD-WLE) with random biopsy analysis. These newer imaging techniques are not more effective in standard surveillance of patients with BE because the prevalence of early neoplasia is low and HD-WLE with random biopsy analysis detects most cases of neoplasia. The evaluation and treatment of patients with BE and early stage neoplasia should be centralized in tertiary referral centers, where procedures are performed under optimal conditions, by expert endoscopists. Lesions that require resection are almost always detected by HD-WLE, although advanced imaging techniques can detect additional flat lesions. However, these are of limited clinical significance because they are effectively eradicated by ablation therapy. No endoscopic imaging technique can reliably assess submucosal or lymphangio invasion. Endoscopic resection of early stage neoplasia in patients with BE is important for staging and management. Optical chromoendoscopy can also be used to evaluate lesions before endoscopic resection and in follow-up after successful ablation therapy. PMID:27573768

  20. Recent Advances in Techniques for Hyperspectral Image Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plaza, Antonio; Benediktsson, Jon Atli; Boardman, Joseph W.; Brazile, Jason; Bruzzone, Lorenzo; Camps-Valls, Gustavo; Chanussot, Jocelyn; Fauvel, Mathieu; Gamba, Paolo; Gualtieri, Anthony; Marconcini, Mattia; Tilton, James C.; Trianni, Giovanna

    2009-01-01

    Imaging spectroscopy, also known as hyperspectral imaging, has been transformed in less than 30 years from being a sparse research tool into a commodity product available to a broad user community. Currently, there is a need for standardized data processing techniques able to take into account the special properties of hyperspectral data. In this paper, we provide a seminal view on recent advances in techniques for hyperspectral image processing. Our main focus is on the design of techniques able to deal with the highdimensional nature of the data, and to integrate the spatial and spectral information. Performance of the discussed techniques is evaluated in different analysis scenarios. To satisfy time-critical constraints in specific applications, we also develop efficient parallel implementations of some of the discussed algorithms. Combined, these parts provide an excellent snapshot of the state-of-the-art in those areas, and offer a thoughtful perspective on future potentials and emerging challenges in the design of robust hyperspectral imaging algorithms

  1. Nonlinear Dynamic Inversion Baseline Control Law: Flight-Test Results for the Full-scale Advanced Systems Testbed F/A-18 Airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Christopher J.

    2011-01-01

    A model reference nonlinear dynamic inversion control law has been developed to provide a baseline controller for research into simple adaptive elements for advanced flight control laws. This controller has been implemented and tested in a hardware-in-the-loop simulation and in flight. The flight results agree well with the simulation predictions and show good handling qualities throughout the tested flight envelope with some noteworthy deficiencies highlighted both by handling qualities metrics and pilot comments. Many design choices and implementation details reflect the requirements placed on the system by the nonlinear flight environment and the desire to keep the system as simple as possible to easily allow the addition of the adaptive elements. The flight-test results and how they compare to the simulation predictions are discussed, along with a discussion about how each element affected pilot opinions. Additionally, aspects of the design that performed better than expected are presented, as well as some simple improvements that will be suggested for follow-on work.

  2. Microwave Imaging for Breast Cancer Detection: Advances in Three–Dimensional Image Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Golnabi, Amir H.; Meaney, Paul M.; Epstein, Neil R.; Paulsen, Keith D.

    2013-01-01

    Microwave imaging is based on the electrical property (permittivity and conductivity) differences in materials. Microwave imaging for biomedical applications is particularly interesting, mainly due to the fact that available range of dielectric properties for different tissues can provide important functional information about their health. Under the assumption that a 3D scattering problem can be reasonably represented as a simplified 2D model, one can take advantage of the simplicity and lower computational cost of 2D models to characterize such 3D phenomenon. Nonetheless, by eliminating excessive model simplifications, 3D microwave imaging provides potentially more valuable information over 2Dtechniques, and as a result, more accurate dielectric property maps may be obtained. In this paper, we present some advances we have made in three–dimensional image reconstruction, and show the results from a 3D breast phantom experiment using our clinical microwave imaging system at Dartmouth Hitchcock Medical Center (DHMC), NH. PMID:22255641

  3. Advances in infrared and imaging fibres for astronomical instrumentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haynes, Roger; McNamara, Pam; Marcel, Jackie; Jovanovic, Nemanja

    2006-06-01

    Optical fibres have already played a huge part in ground based astronomical instrumentation, however, with the revolution in photonics currently taking place new fibre technologies and integrated optical devices are likely to have a profound impact on the way we manipulate light in the future. The Anglo Australian Observatory, along with partners at the Optical Fibre Technology Centre of the University of Sydney, is investigating some of the developing technologies as part of our Astrophotonics programme2. In this paper we discuss the advances that have been made with infrared transmitting fibre, both conventional and microstructured, in particular those based on fluoride glasses. Fluoride glasses have a particularly wide transparent region from the UV through to around 7μm, whereas silica fibres, commonly used in astronomy, only transmit out to about 2μm. We discuss the impact of advances in fibre manufacture that have greatly improved the optical, chemical resistance and physical properties of the fluoride fibres. We also present some encouraging initial test results for a modern imaging fibre bundle and imaging fibre taper.

  4. The Effectiveness of Advance Organizers on the Signification of Poetic Images

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bayat, Nihat

    2007-01-01

    Advance organizers activate the most suitable schema to learn new material. Poetic images are signified in schemata and the elements which are not expressed may be called by advance organizers. The purpose of this investigation is to discern the effectiveness of advance organizers on the signification of poetic images. Pretest-posttest…

  5. Advances in ultrasound imaging for congenital malformations during early gestation

    PubMed Central

    Rayburn, William F.; Jolley, Jennifer A.; Simpson, Lynn L.

    2015-01-01

    With refinement in ultrasound technology, detection of fetal structural abnormalities has improved and there have been detailed reports of the natural history and expected outcomes for many anomalies. The ability to either reassure a high-risk woman with normal intrauterine images or offer comprehensive counseling and offer options in cases of strongly suspected lethal or major malformations has shifted prenatal diagnoses to the earliest possible gestational age. When indicated, scans in early gestation are valuable in accurate gestational dating. Stricter sonographic criteria for early nonviability guard against unnecessary intervention. Most birth defects are without known risk factors, and detection of certain malformations is possible in the late first trimester. The best time for a standard complete fetal and placental scan is 18–20 weeks. In addition, certain soft anatomic markers provide clues to chromosomal aneuploidy risk. Maternal obesity and multifetal pregnancies are now more common and further limit early gestation visibility. Other advanced imaging techniques during early gestation in select cases of suspected malformations include fetal echocardiography and magnetic resonance imaging. PMID:25820190

  6. Advanced Imaging in Femoroacetabular Impingement: Current State and Future Prospects

    PubMed Central

    Bittersohl, Bernd; Hosalkar, Harish S.; Hesper, Tobias; Tiderius, Carl Johan; Zilkens, Christoph; Krauspe, Rüdiger

    2015-01-01

    Symptomatic femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) is now a known precursor of early osteoarthritis (OA) of the hip. In terms of clinical intervention, the decision between joint preservation and joint replacement hinges on the severity of articular cartilage degeneration. The exact threshold during the course of disease progression when the cartilage damage is irreparable remains elusive. The intention behind radiographic imaging is to accurately identify the morphology of osseous structural abnormalities and to accurately characterize the chondrolabral damage as much as possible. However, both plain radiographs and computed tomography (CT) are insensitive for articular cartilage anatomy and pathology. Advanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques include magnetic resonance arthrography and biochemically sensitive techniques of delayed gadolinium-enhanced MRI of cartilage (dGEMRIC), T1rho (T1ρ), T2/T2* mapping, and several others. The diagnostic performance of these techniques to evaluate cartilage degeneration could improve the ability to predict an individual patient-specific outcome with non-surgical and surgical care. This review discusses the facts and current applications of biochemical MRI for hip joint cartilage assessment covering the roles of dGEMRIC, T2/T2*, and T1ρ mapping. The basics of each technique and their specific role in FAI assessment are outlined. Current limitations and potential pitfalls as well as future directions of biochemical imaging are also outlined. PMID:26258129

  7. Advanced Imaging in Femoroacetabular Impingement: Current State and Future Prospects.

    PubMed

    Bittersohl, Bernd; Hosalkar, Harish S; Hesper, Tobias; Tiderius, Carl Johan; Zilkens, Christoph; Krauspe, Rüdiger

    2015-01-01

    Symptomatic femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) is now a known precursor of early osteoarthritis (OA) of the hip. In terms of clinical intervention, the decision between joint preservation and joint replacement hinges on the severity of articular cartilage degeneration. The exact threshold during the course of disease progression when the cartilage damage is irreparable remains elusive. The intention behind radiographic imaging is to accurately identify the morphology of osseous structural abnormalities and to accurately characterize the chondrolabral damage as much as possible. However, both plain radiographs and computed tomography (CT) are insensitive for articular cartilage anatomy and pathology. Advanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques include magnetic resonance arthrography and biochemically sensitive techniques of delayed gadolinium-enhanced MRI of cartilage (dGEMRIC), T1rho (T1ρ), T2/T2* mapping, and several others. The diagnostic performance of these techniques to evaluate cartilage degeneration could improve the ability to predict an individual patient-specific outcome with non-surgical and surgical care. This review discusses the facts and current applications of biochemical MRI for hip joint cartilage assessment covering the roles of dGEMRIC, T2/T2*, and T1ρ mapping. The basics of each technique and their specific role in FAI assessment are outlined. Current limitations and potential pitfalls as well as future directions of biochemical imaging are also outlined. PMID:26258129

  8. AXIOM: advanced X-ray imaging of the magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Branduardi-Raymont, Graziella; Sembay, Steve F.; Eastwood, Jonathan P.; Sibeck, David G.; Abbey, Tony A.; Brown, Patrick; Carter, Jenny A.; Carr, Chris M.; Forsyth, Colin; Kataria, Dhiren; Kemble, Steve; Milan, Steve E.; Owen, Chris J.; Peacocke, Lisa; Read, Andy M.; Coates, Andrew J.; Collier, Michael R.; Cowley, Stan W. H.; Fazakerley, Andrew N.; Fraser, George W.; Jones, Geraint H.; Lallement, Rosine; Lester, Mark; Porter, F. Scott; Yeoman, Tim K.

    2012-04-01

    Planetary plasma and magnetic field environments can be studied in two complementary ways—by in situ measurements, or by remote sensing. While the former provide precise information about plasma behaviour, instabilities and dynamics on local scales, the latter offers the global view necessary to understand the overall interaction of the magnetospheric plasma with the solar wind. Some parts of the Earth's magnetosphere have been remotely sensed, but the majority remains unexplored by this type of measurements. Here we propose a novel and more elegant approach employing remote X-ray imaging techniques, which are now possible thanks to the relatively recent discovery of solar wind charge exchange X-ray emissions in the vicinity of the Earth's magnetosphere. In this article we describe how an appropriately designed and located X-ray telescope, supported by simultaneous in situ measurements of the solar wind, can be used to image the dayside magnetosphere, magnetosheath and bow shock, with a temporal and spatial resolution sufficient to address several key outstanding questions concerning how the solar wind interacts with the Earth's magnetosphere on a global level. Global images of the dayside magnetospheric boundaries require vantage points well outside the magnetosphere. Our studies have led us to propose `AXIOM: Advanced X-ray Imaging of the Magnetosphere', a concept mission using a Vega launcher with a LISA Pathfinder-type Propulsion Module to place the spacecraft in a Lissajous orbit around the Earth-Moon L1 point. The model payload consists of an X-ray Wide Field Imager, capable of both imaging and spectroscopy, and an in situ plasma and magnetic field measurement package. This package comprises a Proton-Alpha Sensor, designed to measure the bulk properties of the solar wind, an Ion Composition Analyser, to characterise the minor ion populations in the solar wind that cause charge exchange emission, and a Magnetometer, designed to measure the strength and

  9. AXIOM: Advanced X-ray Imaging of the Magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Branduardi-Raymont, G.; Sembay, S. F.; Eastwood, J. P.; Sibeck, D. G.; Abbey, A.; Brown, P.; Carter, J. A.; Carr, C. M.; Forsyth, C.; Kataria, D.; Kemble, S.; Milan, S. E.; Owen, C. J.; Peacocke, L.; Read, A. M.; Coates, A. J.; Collier, M. R.; Cowley, S. W. H.; Fazakerley, A. N.; Fraser, G. W.; Jones, G. H.; Lallement, R.; Lester, M.; Porter, F. S.; Yeoman, T. K.

    2012-01-01

    Planetary plasma and magnetic field environments can be studied in two complementary ways - by in situ measurements, or by remote sensing. While the former provide precise information about plasma behaviour, instabilities and dynamics on local scales, the latter offers the global view necessary to understand the overall interaction of the magnetospheric plasma with the solar wind. Some parts of the Earth's magnetosphere have been remotely sensed, but the majority remains unexplored by this type of measurements. Here we propose a novel and more elegant approach employing remote X-ray imaging techniques. which are now possible thanks to the relatively recent discovery of solar wind charge exchange X-ray emissions in the vicinity of the Earth's magnetosphere. In this article we describe how an appropriately designed and located. X-ray telescope, supported by simultaneous in situ measurements of the solar wind, can be used to image the dayside magnetosphere, magnetosheath and bow shock. with a temporal and spatial resolution sufficient to address several key outstanding questions concerning how the solar wind interacts with the Earth's magnetosphere on a global level. Global images of the dayside magnetospheric boundaries require vantage points well outside the magnetosphere. Our studies have led us to propose 'AXIOM: Advanced X-ray Imaging Of the Magnetosphere', a concept mission using a Vega launcher with a LISA Pathfinder-type Propulsion Module to place the spacecraft in a Lissajous orbit around the Earth - Moon Ll point. The model payload consists of an X-ray Wide Field Imager, capable of both imaging and spectroscopy, and an in situ plasma and magnetic field measurement package. This package comprises a Proton-Alpha Sensor, designed to measure the bulk properties of the solar wind, an Ion Composition Analyser, to characterize the minor ion populations in the solar wind that cause charge exchange emission, and a Magnetometer, designed to measure the strength and

  10. AXIOM: Advanced X-Ray Imaging of the Magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Branduardi-Raymont, G.; Sembay, S. F.; Eastwood, J. P.; Sibeck, D. G.; Abbey, A.; Brown, P.; Carter, J. A.; Carr, C. M.; Forsyth, C.; Kataria, D.; Kemble, S.; Milan, S. E.; Owen, C. J.; Peacocke, L.; Read, A. M.; Coates, A. J.; Collier, M. R.; Cowley, S. W. H.; Fazakerley, A. N.; Fraser, G. W.; Jones, G. H.; Lallement, R.; Lester, M.; Porter, F. S.; Yeoman, T. K.

    2011-01-01

    Planetary plasma and magnetic field environments can be studied in two complementary ways by in situ measurements, or by remote sensing. While the former provide precise information about plasma behaviour, instabilities and dynamics on local scales, the latter offers the global view necessary to understand the overall interaction of the magnetospheric plasma with the solar wind. Some parts of the Earth's magnetosphere have been remotely sensed, but the majority remains unexplored by this type of measurements. Here we propose a novel and more elegant approach employing remote X-ray imaging techniques, which are now possible thanks to the relatively recent discovery of solar wind charge exchange X-ray emissions in the vicinity of the Earth's magnetosphere. In this article we describe how an appropriately designed and located X-ray telescope, supported by simultaneous in situ measurements of the solar wind, can be used to image the dayside magnetosphere, magnetosheath and bow shock, with a temporal and spatial resolution sufficient to address several key outstanding questions concerning how the solar wind interacts with the Earth's magnetosphere on a global level. Global images of the dayside magnetospheric boundaries require vantage points well outside the magnetosphere. Our studies have led us to propose AXIOM: Advanced X-ray Imaging Of the Magnetosphere, a concept mission using a Vega launcher with a LISA Pathfinder-type Propulsion Module to place the spacecraft in a Lissajous orbit around the Earth Moon L1 point. The model payload consists of an X-ray Wide Field Imager, capable of both imaging and spectroscopy, and an in situ plasma and magnetic field measurement package. This package comprises a Proton-Alpha Sensor, designed to measure the bulk properties of the solar wind, an Ion Composition Analyser, to characterize the minor ion populations in the solar wind that cause charge exchange emission, and a Magnetometer, designed to measure the strength and direction

  11. VIIRS Nighttime Lights: Advances in Satellite Low-Light Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, F.; Baugh, K.; Elvidge, C.; Zhizhin, M. N.

    2013-12-01

    The Soumi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (SNPP) Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) Day-Night Band (DNB) represents a major advance in low-light imaging over previous data sources. Building on 18 years of experience compositing nighttime data from the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) Operational Linescan System (OLS), NOAA's NGDC Earth Observation Group created the first global VIIRS nighttime lights composite product by adapting their algorithms to process these new data. Compositing nighttime data involves combining only high quality data components over a period of time to improve sensitivity and coverage. Flag image were compiled to describe image quality. The initial flag categories included: daytime, twilight, stray light, non-zero lunar illuminance, noisy edge of scan data, clouds, and no data. High quality data included in the nighttime lights composite is defined as not having any of these attributes present. After the initial adaptation of heritage OLS algorithms, the authors sought to improve the sharpness of lights in the composite by adding additional flag categories. These include a refined VIIRS cloud mask, a mask based on cloud optical thickness, and a ranking of sharpness of light.. The VIIRS cloud mask, which is a JPSS retained intermediate product cloud mask (IICMO) is refined to reject the misclassification of hot sources like gas flares as cloud. Another JPSS retained intermediate product, cloud optical thickness, also provides valuable information about the clarity of atmosphere. The authors also implemented a sharp light detector to further characterize the quality of light for each pixel. Results of compositing multiple months in 2013 using these new flag categories are presented to demonstrate the improvements in nighttime lights composite quality.

  12. Sharpening advanced land imager multispectral data using a sensor model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lemeshewsky, G.P.

    2005-01-01

    The Advanced Land Imager (ALI) instrument on NASA's Earth Observing One (EO-1) satellite provides for nine spectral bands at 30m ground sample distance (GSD) and a 10m GSD panchromatic band. This report describes an image sharpening technique where the higher spatial resolution information of the panchromatic band is used to increase the spatial resolution of ALI multispectral (MS) data. To preserve the spectral characteristics, this technique combines reported deconvolution deblurring methods for the MS data with highpass filter-based fusion methods for the Pan data. The deblurring process uses the point spread function (PSF) model of the ALI sensor. Information includes calculation of the PSF from pre-launch calibration data. Performance was evaluated using simulated ALI MS data generated by degrading the spatial resolution of high resolution IKONOS satellite MS data. A quantitative measure of performance was the error between sharpened MS data and high resolution reference. This report also compares performance with that of a reported method that includes PSF information. Preliminary results indicate improved sharpening with the method reported here.

  13. Aortic Stenosis, a Left Ventricular Disease: Insights from Advanced Imaging.

    PubMed

    Badiani, Sveeta; van Zalen, Jet; Treibel, Thomas A; Bhattacharyya, Sanjeev; Moon, James C; Lloyd, Guy

    2016-08-01

    Aortic stenosis (AS) is the most common primary valve disorder in the elderly with an increasing prevalence. It is increasingly clear that it is also a disease of the left ventricle (LV) rather than purely the aortic valve. The transition from left ventricular hypertrophy to fibrosis results in the eventual adverse effects on systolic and diastolic function. Appropriate selection of patients for aortic valve intervention is crucial, and current guidelines recommend aortic valve replacement in severe AS with symptoms or in asymptomatic patients with left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) <50 %. LVEF is not a sensitive marker and there are other parameters used in multimodality imaging techniques, including longitudinal strain, exercise stress echo and cardiac MRI that may assist in detecting subclinical and subtle LV dysfunction. These findings offer potentially better ways to evaluate patients, time surgery, predict recovery and potentially offer targets for specific therapies. This article outlines the pathophysiology behind the LV response to aortic stenosis and the role of advanced multimodality imaging in describing it. PMID:27384950

  14. Baseline Metabolic Tumor Volume and Total Lesion Glycolysis Are Associated With Survival Outcomes in Patients With Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer Receiving Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Dholakia, Avani S.; Chaudhry, Muhammad; Leal, Jeffrey P.; Chang, Daniel T.; Raman, Siva P.; Hacker-Prietz, Amy; Su, Zheng; Pai, Jonathan; Oteiza, Katharine E.; Griffith, Mary E.; Wahl, Richard L.; Tryggestad, Erik; Pawlik, Timothy; Laheru, Daniel A.; Wolfgang, Christopher L.; Koong, Albert C.; and others

    2014-07-01

    Purpose: Although previous studies have demonstrated the prognostic value of positron emission tomography (PET) parameters in other malignancies, the role of PET in pancreatic cancer has yet to be well established. We analyzed the prognostic utility of PET for patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC) undergoing fractionated stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Materials and Methods: Thirty-two patients with LAPC in a prospective clinical trial received up to 3 doses of gemcitabine, followed by 33 Gy in 5 fractions of 6.6 Gy, using SBRT. All patients received a baseline PET scan prior to SBRT (pre-SBRT PET). Metabolic tumor volume (MTV), total lesion glycolysis (TLG), and maximum and peak standardized uptake values (SUV{sub max} and SUV{sub peak}) on pre-SBRT PET scans were calculated using custom-designed software. Disease was measured at a threshold based on the liver SUV, using the equation Liver{sub mean} + [2 × Liver{sub sd}]. Median values of PET parameters were used as cutoffs when assessing their prognostic potential through Cox regression analyses. Results: Of the 32 patients, the majority were male (n=19, 59%), 65 years or older (n=21, 66%), and had tumors located in the pancreatic head (n=27, 84%). Twenty-seven patients (84%) received induction gemcitabine prior to SBRT. Median overall survival for the entire cohort was 18.8 months (95% confidence interval [CI], 15.7-22.0). An MTV of 26.8 cm{sup 3} or greater (hazard ratio [HR] 4.46, 95% CI 1.64-5.88, P<.003) and TLG of 70.9 or greater (HR 3.08, 95% CI 1.18-8.02, P<.021) on pre-SBRT PET scan were associated with inferior overall survival on univariate analysis. Both pre-SBRT MTV (HR 5.13, 95% CI 1.19-22.21, P=.029) and TLG (HR 3.34, 95% CI 1.07-10.48, P=.038) remained independently associated with overall survival in separate multivariate analyses. Conclusions: Pre-SBRT MTV and TLG are potential predictive factors for overall survival in patients with LAPC and may assist in

  15. Baseline Metabolic Tumor Volume and Total Lesion Glycolysis Are Associated With Survival Outcomes in Patients With Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer Receiving Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Dholakia, Avani S.; Chaudhry, Muhammad; Leal, Jeffrey P.; Chang, Daniel T.; Raman, Siva P.; Hacker-Prietz, Amy; Su, Zheng; Pai, Jonathan; Oteiza, Katharine E.; Griffith, Mary E.; Wahl, Richard L.; Tryggestad, Erik; Pawlik, Timothy; Laheru, Daniel A.; Wolfgang, Christopher L.; Koong, Albert C.; Herman, Joseph M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Although previous studies have demonstrated the prognostic value of positron emission tomography (PET) parameters in other malignancies, the role of PET in pancreatic cancer has yet to be well established. We analyzed the prognostic utility of PET for patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC) undergoing fractionated stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Materials and Methods Thirty-two patients with LAPC in a prospective clinical trial received up to 3 doses of gemcitabine, followed by 33 Gy in 5 fractions of 6.6 Gy, using SBRT. All patients received a baseline PET scan prior to SBRT (pre-SBRT PET). Metabolic tumor volume (MTV), total lesion glycolysis (TLG), and maximum and peak standardized uptake values (SUVmax and SUVpeak) on pre-SBRT PET scans were calculated using custom-designed software. Disease was measured at a threshold based on the liver SUV, using the equation Livermean + [2 × Liversd]. Median values of PET parameters were used as cutoffs when assessing their prognostic potential through Cox regression analyses. Results Of the 32 patients, the majority were male (n = 19, 59%), 65 years or older (n = 21, 66%), and had tumors located in the pancreatic head (n = 27, 84%). Twenty-seven patients (84%) received induction gemcitabine prior to SBRT. Median overall survival for the entire cohort was 18.8months (95% confidence interval [CI], 15.7–22.0). An MTV of 26.8 cm3 or greater (hazard ratio [HR] 4.46, 95% CI 1.64–5.88, P<.003) and TLG of 70.9 or greater (HR3.08,95%CI 1.18–8.02,P<.021) on pre-SBRT PET scan were associated with inferior overall survival on univariate analysis. Both pre-SBRT MTV (HR 5.13, 95% CI 1.19–22.21, P = .029) and TLG (HR 3.34, 95% CI 1.07–10.48, P = .038) remained independently associated with overall survival in separate multivariate analyses. Conclusions Pre-SBRT MTV and TLG are potential predictive factors for overall survival in patients with LAPC and may assist in tailoring therapy. PMID

  16. The Advanced X-ray Spectroscopy and Imaging Observatory (AXSIO)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Nicholas E.; Bookbinder, Jay; Petre, Robert; Smith, Randall; Ptak, Andrew; Tananbaum, Harvey; Garcia, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Following recommendations from the 2010 "New Worlds, New Horizons" (NWNH) report, the Advanced X-ray Spectroscopy and Imaging Observatory (AXSIO) concept streamlines the International X-ray Observatory (IXO) mission to concentrate on the science objectives that are enabled by high-resolution spectroscopic capabilities. AXSIO will trace orbits close to the event horizon of black holes, measure black hole spin for tens of supermassive black holes (SMBH), use spectroscopy to characterize outflows and the environment of AGN during their peak activity, observe 5MBH out to redshift z=6, map bulk motions and turbulence in galaxy clusters, find the missing baryons in the cosmic web using background quasars, and observe the process of cosmic feedback where black holes and supernovae inject energy on galactic and intergalactic scales. These measurements are enabled by a 0.9 sq m collecting area at 1.25 keV, a micro calorimeter array providing high-resolution spectroscopic imaging and a deployable high efficiency grating spectrometer. AXSIO delivers a 30-fold increase in effective area for high resolution spectroscopy. The key simplifications are guided by recommendations in the NWNH panel report include a reduction in focal length from 20m to 10m, eliminating the extendable optical bench, and a reduction in the instrument complement from six to two, avoiding a movable instrument platform. A focus on spectroscopic science allows the spatial resolution requirement to be relaxed to 10 arc sec (with a 5 arc sec goal). These simplifications decrease the total mission cost to under the $2B cost to NASA recommended by NWNH. AXSIO will be available to the entire astronomical community with observing allocations based on peer-review.

  17. The Advanced X-ray Spectroscopy and Imaging Observatory (AXSIO)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Nicholas E.; Bookbinder, Jay; Petre, Robert; Smith, Randall; Ptak, Andrew; Tananbaum, Harvey; Bregman, Joel; Garcia, Michael; Zhang, W.; Kelley, R.; Kilbourne, C.; Bandler, S.

    2012-09-01

    Following recommendations from the 2010 "New Worlds, New Horizons" (NWNH) report, the Advanced X-ray Spectroscopy and Imaging Observatory (AXSIO) concept streamlines the International X-ray Observatory (IXO) mission to concentrate on the science objectives that are enabled by high-resolution spectroscopic capabilities. AXSIO will trace orbits close to the event horizon of black holes, measure black hole spin for tens of supermassive black holes (SMBH), use spectroscopy to characterize outflows and the environment of AGN during their peak activity, observe SMBH out to redshift z=6, map bulk motions and turbulence in galaxy clusters, find the missing baryons in the cosmic web using background quasars, and observe the process of cosmic feedback where black holes and supernovae inject energy on galactic and intergalactic scales. These measurements are enabled by a 0.9 sq m collecting area at 1.25 keV, a microcalorimeter array providing high-resolution spectroscopic imaging and a deployable high efficiency grating spectrometer. AXSIO delivers a 30-fold increase in effective area for high-resolution spectroscopy. The key simplifications are guided by recommendations in the NWNH panel report include a reduction in focal length from 20m to 10m, eliminating the extendable optical bench, and a reduction in the instrument complement from six to two, avoiding a movable instrument platform. A focus on spectroscopic science allows the spatial resolution requirement to be relaxed to 10 arcsec (with a 5 arc sec goal). These simplifications decrease the total mission cost to under the $2B cost to NASA recommended by NWNH. AXSIO will be available to the entire astronomical community with observing allocations based on peer- review.

  18. A collaborative enterprise for multi-stakeholder participation in the advancement of quantitative imaging.

    PubMed

    Buckler, Andrew J; Bresolin, Linda; Dunnick, N Reed; Sullivan, Daniel C

    2011-03-01

    Medical imaging has seen substantial and rapid technical advances during the past decade, including advances in image acquisition devices, processing and analysis software, and agents to enhance specificity. Traditionally, medical imaging has defined anatomy, but increasingly newer, more advanced, imaging technologies provide biochemical and physiologic information based on both static and dynamic modalities. These advanced technologies are important not only for detecting disease but for characterizing and assessing change of disease with time or therapy. Because of the rapidity of these advances, research to determine the utility of quantitative imaging in either clinical research or clinical practice has not had time to mature. Methods to appropriately develop, assess, regulate, and reimburse must be established for these advanced technologies. Efficient and methodical processes that meet the needs of stakeholders in the biomedical research community, therapeutics developers, and health care delivery enterprises will ultimately benefit individual patients. To help address this, the authors formed a collaborative program-the Quantitative Imaging Biomarker Alliance. This program draws from the very successful precedent set by the Integrating the Healthcare Enterprise effort but is adapted to the needs of imaging science. Strategic guidance supporting the development, qualification, and deployment of quantitative imaging biomarkers will lead to improved standardization of imaging tests, proof of imaging test performance, and greater use of imaging to predict the biologic behavior of tissue and monitor therapy response. These, in turn, confer value to corporate stakeholders, providing incentives to bring new and innovative products to market. PMID:21339352

  19. VERY LONG BASELINE ARRAY IMAGING OF PARSEC-SCALE RADIO EMISSIONS IN NEARBY RADIO-QUIET NARROW-LINE SEYFERT 1 GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Doi, Akihiro; Asada, Keiichi; Inoue, Makoto; Fujisawa, Kenta; Nagai, Hiroshi; Hagiwara, Yoshiaki; Wajima, Kiyoaki

    2013-03-01

    We conducted Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) observations of seven nearby narrow-line Seyfert 1 (NLS1) galaxies at 1.7 GHz ({lambda}18 cm) with milliarcsecond resolution. This is the first systematic very long baseline interferometry study focusing on the central parsec-scale regions of radio-quiet NLS1s. Five of the seven were detected at a brightness temperature of {approx}> 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 6} K and contain radio cores with high brightness temperatures of >6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 7} K, indicating a nonthermal process driven by jet-producing central engines as in radio-loud NLS1s and other active galactic nucleus classes. VLBA images of MRK 1239, MRK 705, and MRK 766 exhibit parsec-scale jets with clear linear structures. A large portion of the radio power comes from diffuse emission components that are distributed within the nuclear regions ({approx}< 300 pc), which is a common characteristic throughout the observed NLS1s. Jet kinetic powers limited by the Eddington limit may be insufficient to allow the jets to escape to kiloparsec scales for these radio-quiet NLS1s with low-mass black holes of {approx}< 10{sup 7} M {sub Sun }.

  20. Advanced imaging techniques for the study of plant growth and development

    PubMed Central

    Sozzani, Rosangela; Busch, Wolfgang; Spalding, Edgar P.; Benfey, Philip N.

    2014-01-01

    A variety of imaging methodologies are being used to collect data for quantitative studies of plant growth and development from living plants. Multi-level data, from macroscopic to molecular, and from weeks to seconds, can be acquired. Furthermore, advances in parallelized and automated image acquisition enable the throughput to capture images from large populations of plants under specific growth conditions. Image-processing capabilities allow for 3D or 4D reconstruction of image data and automated quantification of biological features. These advances facilitate the integration of imaging data with genome-wide molecular data to enable systems-level modeling. PMID:24434036

  1. Advanced Reservoir Imaging Using Frequency-Dependent Seismic Attributes

    SciTech Connect

    Fred Hilterman; Tad Patzek; Gennady Goloshubin; Dmitriy Silin; Charlotte Sullivan; Valeri Korneev

    2007-12-31

    Our report concerning advanced imaging and interpretation technology includes the development of theory, the implementation of laboratory experiments and the verification of results using field data. We investigated a reflectivity model for porous fluid-saturated reservoirs and demonstrated that the frequency-dependent component of the reflection coefficient is asymptotically proportional to the reservoir fluid mobility. We also analyzed seismic data using different azimuths and offsets over physical models of fractures filled with air and water. By comparing our physical model synthetics to numerical data we have identified several diagnostic indicators for quantifying the fractures. Finally, we developed reflectivity transforms for predicting pore fluid and lithology using rock-property statistics from 500 reservoirs in both the shelf and deep-water Gulf of Mexico. With these transforms and seismic AVO gathers across the prospect and its down-dip water-equivalent reservoir, fluid saturation can be estimated without a calibration well that ties the seismic. Our research provides the important additional mechanisms to recognize, delineate, and validate new hydrocarbon reserves and assist in the development of producing fields.

  2. Recent Advances in Metabolic Profiling And Imaging of Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Thapar, Roopa; Titus, Mark A

    2015-01-01

    Cancer is a metabolic disease. Cancer cells, being highly proliferative, show significant alterations in metabolic pathways such as glycolysis, respiration, the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, oxidative phosphorylation, lipid metabolism, and amino acid metabolism. Metabolites like peptides, nucleotides, products of glycolysis, the TCA cycle, fatty acids, and steroids can be an important read out of disease when characterized in biological samples such as tissues and body fluids like urine, serum, etc. The cancer metabolome has been studied since the 1960s by analytical techniques such as mass spectrometry (MS) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Current research is focused on the identification and validation of biomarkers in the cancer metabolome that can stratify high-risk patients and distinguish between benign and advanced metastatic forms of the disease. In this review, we discuss the current state of prostate cancer metabolomics, the biomarkers that show promise in distinguishing indolent from aggressive forms of the disease, the strengths and limitations of the analytical techniques being employed, and future applications of metabolomics in diagnostic imaging and personalized medicine of prostate cancer. PMID:25632377

  3. Recent advances in imaging crustal fault zones: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hongfeng

    2015-04-01

    Crustal faults usually have a fault core and surrounding regions of brittle damage, forming a low-velocity zone (LVZ) in the immediate vicinity of the main slip interface. The LVZ may amplify ground motion, influence rupture propagation, and hold important information of earthquake physics. A number of geophysical and geodetic methods have been developed to derive high-resolution structure of the LVZ. Here, I review a few recent approaches, including ambient noise cross-correlation on dense across-fault arrays and GPS recordings of fault-zone trapped waves. Despite the past efforts, many questions concerning the LVZ structure remain unclear, such as the depth extent of the LVZ. High-quality data from larger and denser arrays and new seismic imaging technique using larger portion of recorded waveforms, which are currently under active development, may be able to better resolve the LVZ structure. In addition, effects of the along-strike segmentation and gradational velocity changes across the boundaries between the LVZ and the host rock on rupture propagation should be investigated by conducting comprehensive numerical experiments. Furthermore, high-quality active sources such as recently developed large-volume air-gun arrays provide a powerful tool to continuously monitor temporal changes of fault-zone properties, and thus can advance our understanding of fault zone evolution.

  4. Radiometric calibration of the EO-1 Advanced Land Imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendenhall, Jeffrey A.; Lencioni, Donald E.; Parker, Alexander C.

    1999-09-01

    The radiometric calibration of the Earth Observation 1 Advanced Land Imager (EO-1 ALI) was completed in the Spring of 1999 at Lincoln Laboratory. This calibration was conducted with the ALI as a fully assembled instrument in a thermal vacuum chamber at operation temperatures. The ALI was calibrated radiometrically at the system level from 0 to > 100 percent Earth-equivalent albedo using a combination of internal and external halogen and Xenon lamps attached to a large integrating sphere. Absolute radiometric calibration was achieved by measuring the output of the integrating sphere at each radiance level prior to ALI illumination using a NIST-traceable spectroradiometer. Additional radiometric characterization of this instrument was obtained from data collected using a collimator designed for the spectral calibration of the ALI. In this paper we review the techniques employed during radiometric calibration and present the measured gain, linearity, offset, signal-to- noise ratio and polarization sensitivity of each pixel. The testing result of a novel, in-flight solar calibration technique are also discussed. Finally, the results from a Lincoln Laboratory/Goddard Space Flight Center Landsat transfer radiometric study are presented.

  5. Earth Observing-1 Advanced Land Imager: Imaging Performance On-Orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hearn, D. R.

    2002-01-01

    This report analyzes the on-orbit imaging performance of the Advanced Land Imager (ALI) on the Earth Observing-1 satellite. The pre-flight calibrations are first summarized. The methods used to reconstruct and geometrically correct the image data from this push-broom sensor are described. The method used here does not refer to the position and attitude telemetry from the spacecraft. Rather, it is assumed that the image of the scene moves across the focal plane with a constant velocity, which can be ascertained from the image data itself. Next, an assortment of the images so reconstructed is presented. Color images sharpened with the 10-m panchromatic band data are shown, and the algorithm for producing them from the 30-m multispectral data is described. The approach taken for assessing spatial resolution is to compare the sharpness of features in the on-orbit image data with profiles predicted on the basis of the pre-flight calibrations. A large assortment of bridge profiles is analyzed, and very good fits to the predicted shapes are obtained. Lunar calibration scans are analyzed to examine the sharpness of the edge-spread function at the limb of the moon. The darkness of the space beyond the limb is better for this purpose than anything that could be simulated on the ground. From these scans, we find clear evidence of scattering in the optical system, as well as some weak ghost images. Scans of planets and stars are also analyzed. Stars are useful point sources of light at all wavelengths, and delineate the point-spread functions of the system. From a quarter-speed scan over the Pleiades, we find that the ALI can detect 6th magnitude stars. The quality of the reconstructed images verifies the capability of the ALI to produce Landsat-type multi spectral data. The signal-to-noise and panchromatic spatial resolution are considerably superior to those of the existing Landsat sensors. The spatial resolution is confirmed to be as good as it was designed to be.

  6. Combat-related Mild Traumatic Brain Injury: Association between Baseline Diffusion-Tensor Imaging Findings and Long-term Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Ware, Jeffrey B; Biester, Rosette C; Whipple, Elizabeth; Robinson, Keith M; Ross, Richard J; Nucifora, Paolo G

    2016-07-01

    Purpose To determine whether functional outcomes of veterans who sustained combat-related mild traumatic brain injury (TBI) are associated with scalar metrics derived from diffusion-tensor (DT) imaging at their initial postdeployment evaluation. Materials and Methods This HIPAA-compliant retrospective study was approved by the institutional review board, and the requirement to obtain informed consent was waived. From 2010 to 2013, initial postdeployment evaluation, including clinical assessment and brain magnetic resonance (MR) examination with DT imaging, was performed in combat veterans who sustained mild TBI while deployed. Outcomes from chart review encompassed initial postdeployment clinical assessment as well as later functional status, including evaluation of occupational status and health care utilization. Scalar diffusion metrics from the initial postdeployment evaluation were compared with outcomes by using multivariate analysis. Veterans who did and did not return to work were also compared for differences in clinical variables by using t and χ(2) tests. Results Postdeployment evaluation was performed a mean of 3.8 years after injury (range, 0.5-9 years; standard deviation, 2.5 years). After a mean follow-up of 1.4 years (range, 0.5-2.5 years; standard deviation, 0.8 year), 34 of 57 veterans (60%) had returned to work. Return to work was associated with diffusion metrics in multiple regions of white matter, particularly in the left internal capsule and the left frontal lobe (P = .02-.05). Overall, veterans had a mean of 46 health care visits per year during the follow-up period (range, 3-196 visits per year; standard deviation, 41 visits per year). Cumulative health care visits over time were inversely correlated with diffusion anisotropy of the splenium of the corpus callosum and adjacent parietal white matter (P < .05). Clinical measures obtained during initial postdeployment evaluation were not predictive of later functional status (P = .12

  7. Imaging Multimodalities for Dissecting Alzheimer's Disease: Advanced Technologies of Positron Emission Tomography and Fluorescence Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Shimojo, Masafumi; Higuchi, Makoto; Suhara, Tetsuya; Sahara, Naruhiko

    2015-01-01

    The rapid progress in advanced imaging technologies has expanded our toolbox for monitoring a variety of biological aspects in living subjects including human. In vivo radiological imaging using small chemical tracers, such as with positron emission tomography, represents an especially vital breakthrough in the efforts to improve our understanding of the complicated cascade of neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer's disease (AD), and it has provided the most reliable visible biomarkers for enabling clinical diagnosis. At the same time, in combination with genetically modified animal model systems, the most recent innovation of fluorescence imaging is helping establish diverse applications in basic neuroscience research, from single-molecule analysis to animal behavior manipulation, suggesting the potential utility of fluorescence technology for dissecting the detailed molecular-based consequence of AD pathophysiology. In this review, our primary focus is on a current update of PET radiotracers and fluorescence indicators beneficial for understanding the AD cascade, and discussion of the utility and pitfalls of those imaging modalities for future translational research applications. We will also highlight current cutting-edge genetic approaches and discuss how to integrate individual technologies for further potential innovations. PMID:26733795

  8. Baseline brain perfusion and brain structure in patients with major depression: a multimodal magnetic resonance imaging study

    PubMed Central

    Vasic, Nenad; Wolf, Nadine D.; Grön, Georg; Sosic-Vasic, Zrinka; Connemann, Bernhard J.; Sambataro, Fabio; von Strombeck, Anna; Lang, Dirk; Otte, Stefanie; Dudek, Manuela; Wolf, Robert C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Abnormal regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) and grey matter volume have been frequently reported in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD). However, it is unclear to what extent structural and functional change co-occurs in patients with MDD and whether markers of neural activity, such as rCBF, can be predicted by structural change. Methods Using MRI, we investigated resting-state rCBF and brain structure in patients with MDD and healthy controls between July 2008 and January 2013. We acquired perfusion images obtained with continuous arterial spin labelling, used voxel-based morphometry to assess grey matter volume and integrated biological parametric mapping analyses to investigate the impact of brain atrophy on rCBF. Results We included 43 patients and 29 controls in our study. Frontotemporal grey matter volume was reduced in patients compared with controls. In patients, rCBF was reduced in the anterior cingulate and bilateral parahippocampal areas and increased in frontoparietal and striatal regions. These abnormalities were confirmed by analyses with brain volume as a covariate. In patients with MDD there were significant negative correlations between the extent of depressive symptoms and bilateral parahippocampal rCBF. We found a positive correlation between depressive symptoms and rCBF for right middle frontal cortical blood flow. Limitations Medication use in patients has to be considered as a limitation of our study. Conclusion Our data suggest that while changes of cerebral blood flow and brain volume co-occur in patients with MDD, structural change is not sufficient to explain altered neural activity in patients at rest. Abnormal brain structure and function in patients with MDD appear to reflect distinct levels of neuropathology. PMID:26125119

  9. The Advanced Gamma-Ray Imaging System (AGIS): Science Highlights

    SciTech Connect

    Buckley, J.; Coppi, P.; Digel, S.; Funk, S.; Krawczynski, H.; Krennrich, F.; Pohl, M.; Romani, R.; Vassiliev, V.; /UCLA

    2011-11-21

    The Advanced Gamma-ray Imaging System (AGIS), a future gamma-ray telescope consisting of an array of {approx}50 atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes distributed over an area of {approx}1 km{sup 2}, will provide a powerful new tool for exploring the high-energy universe. The order-of-magnitude increase in sensitivity and improved angular resolution could provide the first detailed images of {gamma}-ray emission from other nearby galaxies or galaxy clusters. The large effective area will provide unprecedented sensitivity to short transients (such as flares from AGNs and GRBs) probing both intrinsic spectral variability (revealing the details of the acceleration mechanism and geometry) as well as constraining the high-energy dispersion in the velocity of light (probing the structure of spacetime and Lorentz invariance). A wide field of view ({approx}4 times that of current instruments) and excellent angular resolution (several times better than current instruments) will allow for an unprecedented survey of the Galactic plane, providing a deep unobscured survey of SNRs, X-ray binaries, pulsar-wind nebulae, molecular cloud complexes and other sources. The differential flux sensitivity of {approx}10{sup -13} erg cm{sup -2} sec{sup -1} will rival the most sensitive X-ray instruments for these extended Galactic sources. The excellent capabilities of AGIS at energies below 100 GeV will provide sensitivity to AGN and GRBs out to cosmological redshifts, increasing the number of AGNs detected at high energies from about 20 to more than 100, permitting population studies that will provide valuable insights into both a unified model for AGN and a detailed measurement of the effects of intergalactic absorption from the diffuse extragalactic background light. A new instrument with fast-slewing wide-field telescopes could provide detections of a number of long-duration GRBs providing important physical constraints from this new spectral component. The new array will also have excellent

  10. Advances in Clinical and Biomedical Applications of Photoacoustic Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Su, Jimmy L.; Wang, Bo; Wilson, Katheryne E.; Bayer, Carolyn L.; Chen, Yun-Sheng; Kim, Seungsoo; Homan, Kimberly A.; Emelianov, Stanislav Y.

    2010-01-01

    Importance of the field Photoacoustic imaging is an imaging modality that derives image contrast from the optical absorption coefficient of the tissue being imaged. The imaging technique is able to differentiate between healthy and diseased tissue with either deeper penetration or higher resolution than other functional imaging modalities currently available. From a clinical standpoint, photoacoustic imaging has demonstrated safety and effectiveness in diagnosing diseased tissue regions using either endogenous tissue contrast or exogenous contrast agents. Furthermore, the potential of photoacoustic imaging has been demonstrated in various therapeutic interventions ranging from drug delivery and release to image-guided therapy and monitoring. Areas covered in this review This article reviews the current state of photoacoustic imaging in biomedicine from a technological perspective, highlights various biomedical and clinical applications of photoacoustic imaging, and gives insights on future directions. What the reader will gain Readers will learn about the various applications of photoacoustic imaging, as well as the various contrast agents that can be used to assist photoacoustic imaging. This review will highlight both pre-clinical and clinical uses for photoacoustic imaging, as well as discuss some of the challenges that must be addressed to move photoacoustic imaging into the clinical realm. Take home message Photoacoustic imaging offers unique advantages over existing imaging modalities. The imaging field is broad with many exciting applications for detecting and diagnosing diseased tissue or processes. Photoacoustics is also used in therapeutic applications to identify and characterize the pathology and then to monitor the treatment. Although the technology is still in its infancy, much work has been done in the pre-clinical arena, and photoacoustic imaging is fast approaching the clinical setting. PMID:21344060

  11. Advanced magneto-optical microscopy: Imaging from picoseconds to centimeters - imaging spin waves and temperature distributions (invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urs, Necdet Onur; Mozooni, Babak; Mazalski, Piotr; Kustov, Mikhail; Hayes, Patrick; Deldar, Shayan; Quandt, Eckhard; McCord, Jeffrey

    2016-05-01

    Recent developments in the observation of magnetic domains and domain walls by wide-field optical microscopy based on the magneto-optical Kerr, Faraday, Voigt, and Gradient effect are reviewed. Emphasis is given to the existence of higher order magneto-optical effects for advanced magnetic imaging. Fundamental concepts and advances in methodology are discussed that allow for imaging of magnetic domains on various length and time scales. Time-resolved imaging of electric field induced domain wall rotation is shown. Visualization of magnetization dynamics down to picosecond temporal resolution for the imaging of spin-waves and magneto-optical multi-effect domain imaging techniques for obtaining vectorial information are demonstrated. Beyond conventional domain imaging, the use of a magneto-optical indicator technique for local temperature sensing is shown.

  12. Recent Advances in Imaging of Small and Large Bowel.

    PubMed

    Das, Chandan J; Manchanda, Smita; Panda, Ananya; Sharma, Anshul; Gupta, Arun K

    2016-01-01

    The diagnosis of bowel pathology is challenging in view of the nonspecific clinical presentation. Currently, there are various imaging modalities available to reach an accurate diagnosis. These modalities include conventional techniques (radiographs, small bowel follow-through, conventional enteroclysis), ultrasonography, and cross-sectional examinations (computed tomography [CT] and MR imaging) as well as functional imaging modalities, such as PET-CT or PET-MR imaging. Each modality has its own advantages and disadvantages and can be used in isolation or combination. This review discusses the role of CT, MR imaging, and PET-CT in the evaluation of small and large bowel diseases. PMID:26590441

  13. Advances in Imaging of the Pediatric Pituitary Gland.

    PubMed

    Bou-Ayache, Jad M; Delman, Bradley N

    2016-06-01

    High-resolution MRI of the pediatric sella can help identity or confirm clinical abnormalities, assess pituitary gland size and structure, and reveal acquired lesions. This article reviews contemporary techniques for imaging of the sella and associated structures in this population. Strengths and weaknesses of conventional imaging are discussed, as are techniques that can enhance yield. Some new and emerging technologies are discussed, including MR elastography, perfusion imaging, spectroscopy, and diffusion-weighted and diffusion-tensor imaging. It is expected that this overview will provide insight as to where pediatric sella imaging is currently and where it may head in the future. PMID:27241974

  14. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance for the advanced imaging of the normal nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses of the koala (Phascolarctos cinereus).

    PubMed

    Bercier, Marjorie; Alexander, Kate; Gorow, April; Pye, Geoffrey W

    2014-12-01

    The objective of this study is to describe computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) for the cross-sectional imaging of the normal anatomy of the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses of the koala (Phascolarctos cinereus), to provide reference figures for gross anatomy with corresponding CT and MR images and to compare the features of the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses of the normal koala with that reported in other domestic species. Advanced imaging can be used to aid in diagnosis, to plan surgical intervention, and to monitor therapeutic responses to diseases of the nasal passages in koalas. One clinically normal koala was anesthetized twice for the separate acquisition of dorsal CT scan images and transverse, dorsal, and sagittal MR images of its nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses. Sagittal and transverse CT planes were reformatted. Three fresh koala skulls were also transected in one of each transverse, sagittal, and dorsal planes and photographed. The CT and MR images obtained were matched with corresponding gross anatomic images and the normal bone, tissues and airway passages were identified. All anatomic structures were readily identifiable on CT, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and gross images. CT and MRI are both valuable diagnostic tools for imaging the nasal cavities and paranasal sinuses of koalas. Images obtained from this project can be used as baseline references for future comparison with diseased koalas to help with diagnosis, surgical intervention, and response to therapy. PMID:25632661

  15. The advancing clinical impact of molecular imaging in CVD.

    PubMed

    Osborn, Eric A; Jaffer, Farouc A

    2013-12-01

    Molecular imaging seeks to unravel critical molecular and cellular events in living subjects by providing complementary biological information to current structural clinical imaging modalities. In recent years, molecular imaging efforts have marched forward into the clinical cardiovascular arena, and are now actively illuminating new biology in a broad range of conditions, including atherosclerosis, myocardial infarction, thrombosis, vasculitis, aneurysm, cardiomyopathy, and valvular disease. Development of novel molecular imaging reporters is occurring for many clinical cardiovascular imaging modalities (positron emission tomography, single-photon emission computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging), as well as in translational platforms such as intravascular fluorescence imaging. The ability to image, track, and quantify molecular biomarkers in organs not routinely amenable to biopsy (e.g., the heart and vasculature) open new clinical opportunities to tailor therapeutics based on a cardiovascular disease molecular profile. In addition, molecular imaging is playing an increasing role in atherosclerosis drug development in phase II clinical trials. Here, we present state-of-the-art clinical cardiovascular molecular imaging strategies, and explore promising translational approaches positioned for clinical testing in the near term. PMID:24332285

  16. Recent Advances in Image Assisted Neurosurgical Procedures: Improved Navigational Accuracy and Patient Safety

    ScienceCinema

    Olivi, Alessandro, M.D.

    2010-09-01

    Neurosurgical procedures require precise planning and intraoperative support. Recent advances in image guided technology have provided neurosurgeons with improved navigational support for more effective and safer procedures. A number of exemplary cases will be presented.

  17. Recent Advances in Image Assisted Neurosurgical Procedures: Improved Navigational Accuracy and Patient Safety

    SciTech Connect

    Olivi, Alessandro, M.D.

    2010-08-28

    Neurosurgical procedures require precise planning and intraoperative support. Recent advances in image guided technology have provided neurosurgeons with improved navigational support for more effective and safer procedures. A number of exemplary cases will be presented.

  18. Carbon nanotubes for biomedical imaging: the recent advances.

    PubMed

    Gong, Hua; Peng, Rui; Liu, Zhuang

    2013-12-01

    This article reviews the latest progresses regarding the applications of carbon nanotubes (CNTs), including single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs), as multifunctional nano-probes for biomedical imaging. Utilizing the intrinsic band-gap fluorescence of semi-conducting single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs), fluorescence imaging in the near infrared II (NIR-II) region with enhanced tissue penetration and spatial resolution has shown great promise in recent years. Raman imaging based on the resonance Raman scattering of SWNTs has also been explored by a number of groups for in vitro and in vivo imaging of biological samples. The strong absorbance of CNTs in the NIR region can be used for photoacoustic imaging, and their photoacoustic signals can be dramatically enhanced by adding organic dyes, or coating with gold shells. Taking advantages of metal nanoparticle impurities attached to nanotubes, CNTs can also serve as a T2-contrast agent in magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. In addition, when labeled with radioactive isotopes, many groups have developed nuclear imaging with functionalized CNTs. Therefore CNTs are unique imaging probes with great potential in biomedical multimodal imaging. PMID:24184130

  19. The Advancing Clinical Impact of Molecular Imaging in Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Osborn, Eric A; Jaffer, Farouc A

    2013-01-01

    Molecular imaging seeks to unravel critical molecular and cellular events in living subjects by providing complementary biological information to current structural clinical imaging modalities. In recent years, molecular imaging efforts have marched forward into the clinical cardiovascular arena, and are now actively illuminating new biology in a broad range of conditions, including atherosclerosis, myocardial infarction, thrombosis, vasculitis, aneurysm, cardiomyopathy, and valvular disease. Development of novel molecular imaging reporters is occurring for many clinical cardiovascular imaging modalities (PET, SPECT, MRI), as well in translational platforms such as intravascular fluorescence imaging. The ability to image, track, and quantify molecular biomarkers in organs not routinely amenable to biopsy (e.g. the heart and vasculature) open new clinical opportunities to tailor therapeutics based on a cardiovascular disease molecular profile. In addition, molecular imaging is playing an increasing role in atherosclerosis drug development in Phase II clinical trials. Here we present state-of-the-art clinical cardiovascular molecular imaging strategies, and explore promising translational approaches positioned for clinical testing in the near term. PMID:24332285

  20. Advances in passive imaging elements with micromirror array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maekawa, Satoshi; Nitta, Kouichi; Matoba, Osamu

    2008-02-01

    We have proposed a new passive imaging optics which consists of a grid array of micro roof mirrors working as dihedral corner reflectors. Although this element forms mirror-like images at opposite side of objects, the images are real. Because the imaging principle of the proposed element is based on accumulation of rays, the design of each light path makes many kinds of devices possible. So, we propose two variations of such a device. One device consists of an array of micro retroreflectors and a half mirror, and it can also form real mirror-like images. The advantage of this device is wide range of view, because the displacement of each retororeflector is not limited on a plane unlike the roof mirror grid array. The other consists of an array of long dihedral corner reflectors. Although this structure has been already known as a roof mirror array, it can be used for imaging. This device forms two heterogeneous images. One is real at the same side of an object, and the other is virtual at the opposite side. This is a conjugate imaging optics of a slit mirror array whose mirror surface is perpendicular to the device surface. The advantage of a roor mirror array is that the real image has horizontal parallax and can be seen in air naturally.

  1. MO-C-BRE-01: The WMIS-AAPM Joint Symposium: Advances in Molecular Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Contag, C; Pogue, B; Lewis, J

    2014-06-15

    This joint symposium of the World Molecular Imaging Society (WMIS) and the AAPM includes three luminary speakers discussing work in new paradigms of molecular imaging in cancer (Contag), applications of optical imaging technologies to radiation therapy (Pogue) and an update on PET imaging as a surrogate biomarker for cancer progression and response to therapy. Learning Objectives: Appreciate the current trends in molecular and systems imaging. Understand how optical imaging technologies, and particularly Cerenkov detectors, can be used in advancing radiation oncology. Stay current on new PET tracers - and targets - of interest in cancer treatment.

  2. A Vision of Quantitative Imaging Technology for Validation of Advanced Flight Technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horvath, Thomas J.; Kerns, Robert V.; Jones, Kenneth M.; Grinstead, Jay H.; Schwartz, Richard J.; Gibson, David M.; Taylor, Jeff C.; Tack, Steve; Dantowitz, Ronald F.

    2011-01-01

    Flight-testing is traditionally an expensive but critical element in the development and ultimate validation and certification of technologies destined for future operational capabilities. Measurements obtained in relevant flight environments also provide unique opportunities to observe flow phenomenon that are often beyond the capabilities of ground testing facilities and computational tools to simulate or duplicate. However, the challenges of minimizing vehicle weight and internal complexity as well as instrumentation bandwidth limitations often restrict the ability to make high-density, in-situ measurements with discrete sensors. Remote imaging offers a potential opportunity to noninvasively obtain such flight data in a complementary fashion. The NASA Hypersonic Thermodynamic Infrared Measurements Project has demonstrated such a capability to obtain calibrated thermal imagery on a hypersonic vehicle in flight. Through the application of existing and accessible technologies, the acreage surface temperature of the Shuttle lower surface was measured during reentry. Future hypersonic cruise vehicles, launcher configurations and reentry vehicles will, however, challenge current remote imaging capability. As NASA embarks on the design and deployment of a new Space Launch System architecture for access beyond earth orbit (and the commercial sector focused on low earth orbit), an opportunity exists to implement an imagery system and its supporting infrastructure that provides sufficient flexibility to incorporate changing technology to address the future needs of the flight test community. A long term vision is offered that supports the application of advanced multi-waveband sensing technology to aid in the development of future aerospace systems and critical technologies to enable highly responsive vehicle operations across the aerospace continuum, spanning launch, reusable space access and global reach. Motivations for development of an Agency level imagery

  3. Wide field imager instrument for the Advanced Telescope for High Energy Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meidinger, Norbert; Nandra, Kirpal; Plattner, Markus; Porro, Matteo; Rau, Arne; Santangelo, Andrea; Tenzer, Chris; Wilms, Jörn

    2015-01-01

    The Advanced Telescope for High Energy Astrophysics (Athena) has been selected for ESA's L2 mission, scheduled for launch in 2028. It will provide the necessary capabilities to achieve the ambitious goals of the science theme "The Hot and Energetic Universe." Athena's x-ray mirrors will be based on silicon pore optics technology with a 12-m focal length. Two complementary focal plane camera systems are foreseen, which can be moved interchangeably to the focus of the mirror system: the actively shielded micro-calorimeter spectrometer X-IFU and the wide field imager (WFI). The WFI camera will provide an unprecedented survey power through its large field of view of 40 arc min with a high count-rate capability (˜1 Crab). It permits a state-of-the-art energy resolution in the energy band of 0.1 to 15 keV during the entire mission lifetime (e.g., full width at half maximum ≤150 eV at 6 keV). This performance is accomplished by a set of depleted P-channel field effect transistor (DEPFET) active pixel sensor matrices with a pixel size well suited to the angular resolution of 5 arc sec (on-axis) of the mirror system. Each DEPFET pixel is a combined detector-amplifier structure with a MOSFET integrated onto a fully depleted 450-μm-thick silicon bulk. This manuscript will summarize the current instrument concept and design, the status of the technology development, and the envisaged baseline performance.

  4. Advances in multimodality molecular imaging of bone structure and function

    PubMed Central

    Lambers, Floor M; Kuhn, Gisela; Müller, Ralph

    2012-01-01

    The skeleton is important to the body as a source of minerals and blood cells and provides a structural framework for strength, mobility and the protection of organs. Bone diseases and disorders can have deteriorating effects on the skeleton, but the biological processes underlying anatomical changes in bone diseases occurring in vivo are not well understood, mostly due to the lack of appropriate analysis techniques. Therefore, there is ongoing research in the development of novel in vivo imaging techniques and molecular markers that might help to gain more knowledge of these pathological pathways in animal models and patients. This perspective provides an overview of the latest developments in molecular imaging applied to bone. It emphasizes that multimodality imaging, the combination of multiple imaging techniques encompassing different image modalities, enhances the interpretability of data, and is imperative for the understanding of the biological processes and the associated changes in bone structure and function relationships in vivo. PMID:27127622

  5. PIFEX: An advanced programmable pipelined-image processor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gennery, D. B.; Wilcox, B.

    1985-01-01

    PIFEX is a pipelined-image processor being built in the JPL Robotics Lab. It will operate on digitized raster-scanned images (at 60 frames per second for images up to about 300 by 400 and at lesser rates for larger images), performing a variety of operations simultaneously under program control. It thus is a powerful, flexible tool for image processing and low-level computer vision. It also has applications in other two-dimensional problems such as route planning for obstacle avoidance and the numerical solution of two-dimensional partial differential equations (although its low numerical precision limits its use in the latter field). The concept and design of PIFEX are described herein, and some examples of its use are given.

  6. 3D Imaging with Structured Illumination for Advanced Security Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Birch, Gabriel Carisle; Dagel, Amber Lynn; Kast, Brian A.; Smith, Collin S.

    2015-09-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) information in a physical security system is a highly useful dis- criminator. The two-dimensional data from an imaging systems fails to provide target dis- tance and three-dimensional motion vector, which can be used to reduce nuisance alarm rates and increase system effectiveness. However, 3D imaging devices designed primarily for use in physical security systems are uncommon. This report discusses an architecture favorable to physical security systems; an inexpensive snapshot 3D imaging system utilizing a simple illumination system. The method of acquiring 3D data, tests to understand illumination de- sign, and software modifications possible to maximize information gathering capability are discussed.

  7. Study of Functional Infrared Imaging for Early Detection of Mucositis in Locally Advanced Head and Neck Cancer Treated With Chemoradiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Ezra E.W.; Ahmed, Omar; Kocherginsky, Masha; Shustakova, Galyna; Kistner-Griffin, Emily; Salama, Joseph K.; Yefremenko, Volodymyr; Novosad, Valentyn

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose Chemoradiotherapy (CRT) has led to improved efficacy in treating locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (LA-SCCHN) but has led to almost universal in-field mucositis. Patients treated with the same regimen often have differences in mucositis occurrence and severity. Mucositis induced via radiation is known to represent an intense inflammatory response histologically. We hypothesized that patients destined to display severe mucocutaneous toxicity would demonstrate greater alterations in thermal intensity early in therapy than identically treated counterparts. This will allow identification of patients that will require more intensive supportive care using thermal imaging technology. Materials and Methods Subjects with LA-SCCHN (oral cavity or oropharynx) being treated with the identical chemoradiotherapy regimen underwent baseline and weekly thermal imaging. Changes in skin temperature caused by mucositis and dermatitis compared with a reference area (T were calculated and correlated to grade of mucositis based on NCI-CTCAE 3.0. Results Thirty-four subjects were enrolled. Grade 3 mucositis and dermatitis was observed in 53% and 21%, respectively. We observed a statistically significant positive association between an early rise in T and mucositis grade (p value=0.03). Conclusions Thermal imaging is able to detect small and early changes in skin surface temperature that may be associated with development of mucositis in patients being treated with chemoradiotherapy. PMID:23988569

  8. Advanced Tracers in PET Imaging of Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wei; Wu, Hua; Liu, Gang

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death worldwide. Molecular imaging with targeted tracers by positron emission tomography (PET) allows for the noninvasive detection and characterization of biological changes at the molecular level, leading to earlier disease detection, objective monitoring of therapies, and better prognostication of cardiovascular diseases progression. Here we review, the current role of PET in cardiovascular disease, with emphasize on tracers developed for PET imaging of cardiovascular diseases. PMID:25389529

  9. Characterization of a Real-time Neutron Imaging Test Station at China Advanced Research Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Linfeng; Han, Songbai; Wang, Hongli; Wei, Guohai; Wang, Yu; Wu, Meimei; Liu, Yuntao; Chen, Dongfeng

    A real-time neutron imaging test station was recently installed at the China Advanced Research Reactor. The objective of this work was to determine its operational characteristics, including neutron beam profile, the spatial resolution and time resolution. The performance of the equipment was demonstrated by a real time neutron imaging test of the water dynamics in a fuel cell.

  10. Advanced Diffusion-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging Techniques of the Human Spinal Cord

    PubMed Central

    Andre, Jalal B.; Bammer, Roland

    2012-01-01

    Unlike those of the brain, advances in diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) of the human spinal cord have been challenged by the more complicated and inhomogeneous anatomy of the spine, the differences in magnetic susceptibility between adjacent air and fluid-filled structures and the surrounding soft tissues, and the inherent limitations of the initially used echo-planar imaging techniques used to image the spine. Interval advances in DWI techniques for imaging the human spinal cord, with the specific aims of improving the diagnostic quality of the images, and the simultaneous reduction in unwanted artifacts have resulted in higher-quality images that are now able to more accurately portray the complicated underlying anatomy and depict pathologic abnormality with improved sensitivity and specificity. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) has benefited from the advances in DWI techniques, as DWI images form the foundation for all tractography and DTI. This review provides a synopsis of the many recent advances in DWI of the human spinal cord, as well as some of the more common clinical uses for these techniques, including DTI and tractography. PMID:22158130

  11. Visualizing Chemistry: The Progess and Promise of Advanced Chemical Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Committee on Revealing Chemistry Through Advanced Chemical Imaging

    2006-09-01

    The field of chemical imaging can provide detailed structural, functional, and applicable information about chemistry and chemical engineering phenomena that have enormous impacts on medicine, materials, and technology. In recognizing the potential for more research development in the field of chemical imaging, the National Academies was asked by the National Science Foundation, Department of Energy, U.S. Army, and National Cancer Institute to complete a study that would review the current state of molecular imaging technology, point to promising future developments and their applications, and suggest a research and educational agenda to enable breakthrough improvements in the ability to image molecular processes simultaneously in multiple physical dimensions as well as time. The study resulted in a consensus report that provides guidance for a focused research and development program in chemical imaging and identifies research needs and possible applications of imaging technologies that can provide the breakthrough knowledge in chemistry, materials science, biology, and engineering for which we should strive. Public release of this report is expected in early October.

  12. Advanced fractal approach for unsupervised classification of SAR images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pant, Triloki; Singh, Dharmendra; Srivastava, Tanuja

    2010-06-01

    Unsupervised classification of Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images is the alternative approach when no or minimum apriori information about the image is available. Therefore, an attempt has been made to develop an unsupervised classification scheme for SAR images based on textural information in present paper. For extraction of textural features two properties are used viz. fractal dimension D and Moran's I. Using these indices an algorithm is proposed for contextual classification of SAR images. The novelty of the algorithm is that it implements the textural information available in SAR image with the help of two texture measures viz. D and I. For estimation of D, the Two Dimensional Variation Method (2DVM) has been revised and implemented whose performance is compared with another method, i.e., Triangular Prism Surface Area Method (TPSAM). It is also necessary to check the classification accuracy for various window sizes and optimize the window size for best classification. This exercise has been carried out to know the effect of window size on classification accuracy. The algorithm is applied on four SAR images of Hardwar region, India and classification accuracy has been computed. A comparison of the proposed algorithm using both fractal dimension estimation methods with the K-Means algorithm is discussed. The maximum overall classification accuracy with K-Means comes to be 53.26% whereas overall classification accuracy with proposed algorithm is 66.16% for TPSAM and 61.26% for 2DVM.

  13. Advances in Hyperspectral and Multispectral Image Fusion and Spectral Unmixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanaras, C.; Baltsavias, E.; Schindler, K.

    2015-08-01

    In this work, we jointly process high spectral and high geometric resolution images and exploit their synergies to (a) generate a fused image of high spectral and geometric resolution; and (b) improve (linear) spectral unmixing of hyperspectral endmembers at subpixel level w.r.t. the pixel size of the hyperspectral image. We assume that the two images are radiometrically corrected and geometrically co-registered. The scientific contributions of this work are (a) a simultaneous approach to image fusion and hyperspectral unmixing, (b) enforcing several physically plausible constraints during unmixing that are all well-known, but typically not used in combination, and (c) the use of efficient, state-of-the-art mathematical optimization tools to implement the processing. The results of our joint fusion and unmixing has the potential to enable more accurate and detailed semantic interpretation of objects and their properties in hyperspectral and multispectral images, with applications in environmental mapping, monitoring and change detection. In our experiments, the proposed method always improves the fusion compared to competing methods, reducing RMSE between 4% and 53%.

  14. White Paper AGA: Advanced Imaging in Barrett's Esophagus.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Prateek; Brill, Joel; Canto, Marcia; DeMarco, Daniel; Fennerty, Brian; Gupta, Neil; Laine, Loren; Lieberman, David; Lightdale, Charles; Montgomery, Elizabeth; Odze, Robert; Tokar, Jeffrey; Kochman, Michael

    2015-12-01

    Enhanced imaging technologies such as narrow band imaging, flexible spectral imaging color enhancement, i-Scan, confocal laser endomicroscopy, and optical coherence tomography are readily available for use by endoscopists in routine clinical practice. In November 2014, the American Gastroenterological Association's Center for GI Innovation and Technology conducted a 2-day workshop to discuss endoscopic image enhancement technologies, focusing on their role in 2 specific clinical conditions (colon polyps and Barrett's esophagus) and on issues relating to training and implementation of these technologies (white papers). Although the majority of the studies that use enhanced imaging technologies have been positive, these techniques ideally need to be validated in larger cohorts and in community centers. As it stands today, detailed endoscopic examination with high-definition white-light endoscopy and random 4-quadrant biopsy remains the standard of care. However, the workshop panelists agreed that in the hands of endoscopists who have met the preservation and incorporation of valuable endoscopic innovation thresholds (diagnostic accuracy) with enhanced imaging techniques (specific technologies), use of the technique in Barrett's esophagus patients is appropriate. PMID:26462567

  15. A prospectively randomized trial carried out by the German Hodgkin Study Group (GHSG) for elderly patients with advanced Hodgkin's disease comparing BEACOPP baseline and COPP-ABVD (study HD9elderly).

    PubMed

    Ballova, V; Rüffer, J-U; Haverkamp, H; Pfistner, B; Müller-Hermelink, H K; Dühmke, E; Worst, P; Wilhelmy, M; Naumann, R; Hentrich, M; Eich, H T; Josting, A; Löffler, M; Diehl, V; Engert, A

    2005-01-01

    In contrast to younger patients, the prognosis of elderly patients with advanced Hodgkin's disease (HD) has not improved substantially over the last 20 years. We thus carried out a prospectively randomized study (HD9(elderly)) to compare the BEACOPP regimen in this setting against standard COPP-ABVD. Between February 1993 and 1998, 75 patients aged 66-75 years with newly diagnosed HD in advanced stages were recruited into the HD9 trial as a separate stratum (HD9(elderly)). Patients were assigned to eight alternating cycles of COPP and ABVD or eight cycles of BEACOPP in baseline doses. Radiotherapy was given to initial bulky or residual disease. In total, 68 of 75 registered patients were assessable: 26 were treated with COPP-ABVD and 42 with BEACOPP baseline. There were no significant differences between COPP-ABVD and BEACOPP in terms of complete remission (76%), overall survival (50%) and freedom from treatment failure (FFTF) (46%) at 5 years. At a median follow-up of 80 months, a total of 37 patients died: 14/26 patients (54%) treated with COPP-ABVD and 23/42 patients (55%) with BEACOPP. Two patients (8%) treated with COPP-ABVD and nine patients (21%) treated with BEACOPP died of acute toxicity. Hodgkin-specific FFTF at 5 years was 55% after COPP-ABVD and 74% after BEACOPP (P=0.13). Thus, there are no differences in survival between these regimens in elderly patients. PMID:15598949

  16. Advances in hyperspectral imaging technologies for multichannel fiber sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakrzewski, Jay; Didona, Kevin

    2009-05-01

    A spectrograph's design, e.g. the opto-mechanical system beginning at the entrance slit, and ending at the back focal plane position, directly impacts system level performance parameters including the height of the useable aperture, spatial and spectral resolving power, optical throughput efficiency, and dynamic range. The efficiency and integrity of both spatial and spectral input image reproduction within the entire back focal plane area is an often overlooked parameter leading to unnecessary acceptance of sacrificed system level performance. Examples of input images include the slit apertured area of a scene captured by a camera lens, a single optical fiber core located within the entrance aperture area, or a linear array of optical fiber cores stacked along the spatial height of the entrance aperture area. This study evaluates the spectral and spatial imaging performance of several aberration corrected high reciprocal dispersion retro-reflective concentric, as well as aberration corrected Offner imaging spectrographs which produce minimal degradation over a large focal plane. Ray trace images and pixilated area maps demonstrating spatial and spectral reproduction accuracy over the entire back focal plane are presented.

  17. Advances in engineering of high contrast CARS imaging endoscopes

    PubMed Central

    Deladurantaye, Pascal; Paquet, Alex; Paré, Claude; Zheng, Huimin; Doucet, Michel; Gay, David; Poirier, Michel; Cormier, Jean-François; Mermut, Ozzy; Wilson, Brian C.; Seibel, Eric J.

    2014-01-01

    The translation of CARS imaging towards real time, high resolution, chemically selective endoscopic tissue imaging applications is limited by a lack of sensitivity in CARS scanning probes sufficiently small for incorporation into endoscopes. We have developed here a custom double clad fiber (DCF)-based CARS probe which is designed to suppress the contaminant Four-Wave-Mixing (FWM) background generated within the fiber and integrated it into a fiber based scanning probe head of a few millimeters in diameter. The DCF includes a large mode area (LMA) core as a first means of reducing FWM generation by ~3 dB compared to commercially available, step-index single mode fibers. A micro-fabricated miniature optical filter (MOF) was grown on the distal end of the DCF to block the remaining FWM background from reaching the sample. The resulting probe was used to demonstrate high contrast images of polystyrene beads in the forward-CARS configuration with > 10 dB suppression of the FWM background. In epi-CARS geometry, images exhibited lower contrast due to the leakage of MOF-reflected FWM from the fiber core. Improvements concepts for the fiber probe are proposed for high contrast epi-CARS imaging to enable endoscopic implementation in clinical tissue assessment contexts, particularly in the early detection of endoluminal cancers and in tumor margin assessment. PMID:25401538

  18. Prognostic Value of Baseline 18F-FDG PET/CT Functional Parameters in Patients with Advanced Lung Adenocarcinoma Stratified by EGFR Mutation Status

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Dalong; Zhang, Minghui; Gao, Xuan; Yu, Lijuan

    2016-01-01

    The study objective was to retrospectively analyze the metabolic variables derived from 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) as predictors of progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) in advanced lung adenocarcinoma stratified by epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation status. A total of 176 patients (91, EGFR mutation; 85, wild-type EGFR) who underwent 18F-FDG PET/CT before treatment were enrolled. The main 18F-FDG PET/CT-derived variables: primary tumor maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmaxT), primary tumor total lesion glycolysis (TLGT), the maximum SUVmax of all selected lesions in whole body determined using the Response Evaluation Criteria In Solid Tumors (RECIST) 1.1 criteria (SUVmaxWBR), and whole-body total TLG determined using the RECIST 1.1 criteria (TLGWBR) were measured. Survival analysis regarding TLGWBR, and other factors in advanced lung adenocarcinoma patients stratified using EGFR mutation status, were evaluated. The results indicated that high TLGWBR (≥259.85), EGFR wild-type, and high serum LDH were independent predictors of worse PFS and OS in all patients with advanced lung adenocarcinoma. Among patients with wild-type EGFR, only TLGWBR retained significance as an independent predictor of both PFS and OS. Among patients with the EGFR mutation, high serum LDH level was an independent predictor of worse PFS and OS, and high TLGWBR (≥259.85) was an independent predictor of worse PFS but not worse OS. In conclusion, TLGWBR is a promising parameter for prognostic stratification of patients with advanced lung adenocarcinoma and EGFR status; however, it cannot be used to further stratify the risk of worse OS for patients with the EGFR mutation. Further prospective studies are needed to validate our findings. PMID:27336755

  19. The new kid on the block for advanced imaging in Barrett's esophagus: a review of volumetric laser endomicroscopy.

    PubMed

    Trindade, Arvind J; Smith, Michael S; Pleskow, Douglas K

    2016-05-01

    Advanced imaging techniques used in the management of Barrett's esophagus include electronic imaging enhancement (e.g. narrow band imaging, flexible spectral imaging color enhancement, and i-Scan), chromoendoscopy, and confocal laser endomicroscopy. Electronic imaging enhancement is used frequently in daily practice, but use of the other advanced technologies is not routine. High-definition white light endoscopy and random four quadrant biopsy remain the standard of care for evaluation of Barrett's esophagus; this is largely due to the value of advanced imaging technologies not having been validated in large studies or in everyday practice. A new advanced imaging technology called volumetric laser endomicroscopy is commercially available in the United States. Its ease of use and rapid acquisition of high-resolution images make this technology very promising for widespread application. In this article we review the technology and its potential for advanced imaging in Barrett's esophagus. PMID:27134668

  20. The new kid on the block for advanced imaging in Barrett’s esophagus: a review of volumetric laser endomicroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Trindade, Arvind J.; Smith, Michael S.; Pleskow, Douglas K.

    2016-01-01

    Advanced imaging techniques used in the management of Barrett’s esophagus include electronic imaging enhancement (e.g. narrow band imaging, flexible spectral imaging color enhancement, and i-Scan), chromoendoscopy, and confocal laser endomicroscopy. Electronic imaging enhancement is used frequently in daily practice, but use of the other advanced technologies is not routine. High-definition white light endoscopy and random four quadrant biopsy remain the standard of care for evaluation of Barrett’s esophagus; this is largely due to the value of advanced imaging technologies not having been validated in large studies or in everyday practice. A new advanced imaging technology called volumetric laser endomicroscopy is commercially available in the United States. Its ease of use and rapid acquisition of high-resolution images make this technology very promising for widespread application. In this article we review the technology and its potential for advanced imaging in Barrett’s esophagus. PMID:27134668

  1. Recent Advances in Cardiac Computed Tomography: Dual Energy, Spectral and Molecular CT Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Danad, Ibrahim; Fayad, Zahi A.; Willemink, Martin J.; Min, James K.

    2015-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) evolved into a powerful diagnostic tool and it is impossible to imagine current clinical practice without CT imaging. Due to its widespread availability, ease of clinical application, superb sensitivity for detection of CAD, and non-invasive nature, CT has become a valuable tool within the armamentarium of the cardiologist. In the last few years, numerous technological advances in CT have occurred—including dual energy CT (DECT), spectral CT and CT-based molecular imaging. By harnessing the advances in technology, cardiac CT has advanced beyond the mere evaluation of coronary stenosis to an imaging modality tool that permits accurate plaque characterization, assessment of myocardial perfusion and even probing of molecular processes that are involved in coronary atherosclerosis. Novel innovations in CT contrast agents and pre-clinical spectral CT devices have paved the way for CT-based molecular imaging. PMID:26068288

  2. Advances in MR Imaging for Cervical Spondylotic Myelopathy

    PubMed Central

    Ellingson, Benjamin M.; Salamon, Noriko; Holly, Langston T.

    2016-01-01

    Cervical spondylosis is the most common cause of nontraumatic spinal cord injury and is the most common cause of spinal cord dysfunction in the elderly. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is an invaluable tool for the diagnosis and assessment of cervical spondylosis due to its sensitivity to soft tissues; however, standard MR techniques have some limitations in predicting neurological impairment and response to intervention. Therefore, there is great interest in novel MR techniques including diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and MR spectroscopy (MRS) as imaging biomarkers for neurological impairment and tools for understanding spinal cord physiology. This review outlines the pathogenesis of cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM), the correlative abnormalities observed on standard MRI, the biological implications and current status of DTI and MRS as clinical tools, and future directions of MR technology in the management of CSM patients. PMID:23917647

  3. Advanced InSAR imaging for dune mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Havivi, Shiran; August, Yitzhak; Blumberg, Dan G.; Rotman, Stanley R.

    2015-04-01

    Aeolian morphologies are formed in the presence of sufficient wind energy and available particles. These processes occur naturally or are further enhanced or reduced by human intervention. The dimensions of change are dependent primarily on the wind energy and surface properties. Since the 1970's, remote sensing imagery both optical and radar, are used for documentation and interpretation of the geomorphologic changes of sand dunes. Remote sensing studies of Aeolian morphologies is mostly useful to document major changes, yet, subtle changes, occurring in a period of days or months in scales of centimeters, are very difficult to detect in imagery. Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) is an imaging technique for measuring Earth's surface topography and deformation. InSAR images are produced by measuring the radar phase difference between two separated antennas that view the same surface area. Classical InSAR is based on high coherence between two images or more. The output (interferogram) can show subtle changes with an accuracy of several millimeters to centimeters. Very little work has been done on measuring or identifying the changes in dunes using InSAR. The reason is that dunes tend to be less coherent than firm, stable, surfaces. This research aims to demonstrate how interferometric decorrelation, or, coherence change detection, can be used for identifying dune instability. We hypothesize and demonstrate that the loss of radar coherence over time on dunes can be used as an indication of the dune's instability. When SAR images are acquired at sufficiently close intervals one can measure the time it takes to lose coherence and associate this time with geomorphic stability. To achieve our goals, the Nitzanim coastal dunes along the Mediterranean, 40 km south of Tel-Aviv, Israel, were chosen as a case study. The dunes in this area are of varying levels of stability and vegetation cover and have been monitored meteorologically, geomorphologically and

  4. Advancements in MR imaging of the prostate: from diagnosis to interventions.

    PubMed

    Bonekamp, David; Jacobs, Michael A; El-Khouli, Riham; Stoianovici, Dan; Macura, Katarzyna J

    2011-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most frequently diagnosed cancer in males and the second leading cause of cancer-related death in men. Assessment of prostate cancer can be divided into detection, localization, and staging; accurate assessment is a prerequisite for optimal clinical management and therapy selection. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging has been shown to be of particular help in localization and staging of prostate cancer. Traditional prostate MR imaging has been based on morphologic imaging with standard T1-weighted and T2-weighted sequences, which has limited accuracy. Recent advances include additional functional and physiologic MR imaging techniques (diffusion-weighted imaging, MR spectroscopy, and perfusion imaging), which allow extension of the obtainable information beyond anatomic assessment. Multiparametric MR imaging provides the highest accuracy in diagnosis and staging of prostate cancer. In addition, improvements in MR imaging hardware and software (3-T vs 1.5-T imaging) continue to improve spatial and temporal resolution and the signal-to-noise ratio of MR imaging examinations. Another recent advancement in the field is MR imaging guidance for targeted prostate biopsy, which is an alternative to the current standard of transrectal ultrasonography-guided systematic biopsy. PMID:21571651

  5. Advances in photographic X-ray imaging for solar astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moses, J. Daniel; Schueller, R.; Waljeski, K.; Davis, John M.

    1989-01-01

    The technique of obtaining quantitative data from high resolution soft X-ray photographic images produced by grazing incidence optics was successfully developed to a high degree during the Solar Research Sounding Rocket Program and the S-054 X-Ray Spectrographic Telescope Experiment Program on Skylab. Continued use of soft X-ray photographic imaging in sounding rocket flights of the High Resolution Solar Soft X-Ray Imaging Payload has provided opportunities to further develop these techniques. The developments discussed include: (1) The calibration and use of an inexpensive, commercially available microprocessor controlled drum type film processor for photometric film development; (2) The use of Kodak Technical Pan 2415 film and Kodak SO-253 High Speed Holographic film for improved resolution; and (3) The application of a technique described by Cook, Ewing, and Sutton for determining the film characteristics curves from density histograms of the flight film. Although the superior sensitivity, noise level, and linearity of microchannel plate and CCD detectors attracts the development efforts of many groups working in soft X-ray imaging, the high spatial resolution and dynamic range as well as the reliability and ease of application of photographic media assures the continued use of these techniques in solar X-ray astronomy observations.

  6. Advances in photographic X-ray imaging for solar astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moses, D.; Schueller, R.; Waljeski, K.; Davis, J. M.

    1989-01-01

    The technique of obtaining quantitative data from high resolution soft X-ray photographic images produced by grazing incidence optics was successfully developed to a high degree during the AS&E Solar Research Sounding Rocket Program and the S-054 X-Ray Spectrographic Telescope Experiment Program on Skylab. Continued use of soft X-Ray photographic imaging in sounding rocket flights of the AS&E High Resolution Solar Soft X-Ray Imaging Payload has provided opportunities to further develop these techniques. The developments discussed include: (1) the calibration and use of an inexpensive, commercially available microprocessor controlled drum type film processor for photometric film development, (2) the use of Kodak Technical Pan 2415 film and Kodak SO-253 High Speed Holographic film for improved resolution, and (3) the application of a technique described by Cook, Ewing, and Sutton (1988) for determining the film characteristics curves from density histograms of the flight film. Although the superior sensitivity, noise level, and linearity of microchannel plate and CCD detectors attracts the development efforts of many groups working in soft X-ray imaging, the high spatial resolution and dynamic range as well as the reliability and ease of application of photographic media assures the continued use of these techniques in solar X-ray astronomy observations.

  7. Advanced Computer Image Generation Techniques Exploiting Perceptual Characteristics. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stenger, Anthony J.; And Others

    This study suggests and identifies computer image generation (CIG) algorithms for visual simulation that improve the training effectiveness of CIG simulators and identifies areas of basic research in visual perception that are significant for improving CIG technology. The first phase of the project entailed observing three existing CIG simulators.…

  8. Advances in Remote Sensing: Imaging the Earth by Moonlight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solbrig, Jeremy E.; Lee, Thomas E.; Miller, Steven D.

    2013-10-01

    Earth's nighttime environment is being revealed in unprecedented detail by the new satellite-mounted Visible/Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS). VIIRS' Day/Night Band (DNB) is a highly sensitive broadband visible channel capable of detecting light from cities and other terrestrial emission sources.

  9. Advanced scanners and imaging systems for earth observations. [conferences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Assessments of present and future sensors and sensor related technology are reported along with a description of user needs and applications. Five areas are outlined: (1) electromechanical scanners, (2) self-scanned solid state sensors, (3) electron beam imagers, (4) sensor related technology, and (5) user applications. Recommendations, charts, system designs, technical approaches, and bibliographies are included for each area.

  10. Fabry-Perot MEMS Accelerometers for Advanced Seismic Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Chisum, Brad

    2015-05-31

    This report summarizes the technical achievements that occurred over the duration of the project. On November 14th, 2014, Lumedyne Technologies Incorporated was acquired. As a result of the acquisition, the work toward seismic imaging applications was suspended indefinitely. This report captures the progress achieved up to that time.

  11. Perspectives on Imaging: Advanced Applications. Introduction and Overview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynch, Clifford A.; Lunin, Lois F.

    1991-01-01

    Provides an overview of six articles that address relationships between electronic imaging technology and information science. Articles discuss the areas of technology; applications in the fields of visual arts, medicine, and textile history; conceptual foundations; and future visions, including work in virtual reality and cyberspace. (LRW)

  12. Advances in Focal Plane Wavefront Estimation for Directly Imaging Exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eldorado Riggs, A. J.; Kasdin, N. Jeremy; Groff, Tyler Dean

    2015-01-01

    To image cold exoplanets directly in visible light, an instrument on a telescope needs to suppress starlight by about 9 orders of magnitude at small separations from the star. A coronagraph changes the point spread function to create regions of high contrast where exoplanets or disks can be seen. Aberrations on the optics degrade the contrast by several orders of magnitude, so all high-contrast imaging systems incorporate one or more deformable mirrors (DMs) to recover regions of high contrast. With a coronagraphic instrument planned for the WFIRST-AFTA space telescope, there is a pressing need for faster, more robust estimation and control schemes for the DMs. Non-common path aberrations limit conventional phase conjugation schemes to medium star-to-planet contrast ratios of about 1e-6. High-contrast imaging requires estimation and control of both phase and amplitude in the same beam path as the science camera. Field estimation is a challenge since only intensity is measured; the most common approach, including that planned for WFIRST-AFTA, is to use DMs to create diversity, via pairs of small probe shapes, thereby allowing disambiguation of the electric field. Most implementations of DM Diversity require at least five images per electric field estimate and require narrowband measurements. This paper describes our new estimation algorithms that improve the speed (by using fewer images) and bandwidth of focal plane wavefront estimation. For narrowband estimation, we are testing nonlinear, recursive algorithms such as an iterative extended Kalman filter (IEKF) to use three images each iteration and build better, more robust estimates. We are also exploring the use of broadband estimation without the need for narrowband sub-filters and measurements. Here we present simulations of these algorithms with realistic noise and small signals to show how they might perform for WFIRST-AFTA. Once validated in simulations, we will test these algorithms experimentally in

  13. A Review of Significant Advances in Neutron Imaging from Conception to the Present

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brenizer, J. S.

    This review summarizes the history of neutron imaging with a focus on the significant events and technical advancements in neutron imaging methods, from the first radiograph to more recent imaging methods. A timeline is presented to illustrate the key accomplishments that advanced the neutron imaging technique. Only three years after the discovery of the neutron by English physicist James Chadwick in 1932, neutron imaging began with the work of Hartmut Kallmann and Ernst Kuhn in Berlin, Germany, from 1935-1944. Kallmann and Kuhn were awarded a joint US Patent issued in January 1940. Little progress was made until the mid-1950's when Thewlis utilized a neutron beam from the BEPO reactor at Harwell, marking the beginning of the application of neutron imaging to practical applications. As the film method was improved, imaging moved from a qualitative to a quantitative technique, with applications in industry and in nuclear fuels. Standards were developed to aid in the quantification of the neutron images and the facility's capabilities. The introduction of dynamic neutron imaging (initially called real-time neutron radiography and neutron television) in the late 1970's opened the door to new opportunities and new challenges. As the electronic imaging matured, the introduction of the CCD imaging devices and solid-state light intensifiers helped address some of these challenges. Development of improved imaging devices for the medical community has had a major impact on neutron imaging. Additionally, amorphous silicon sensors provided improvements in temporal resolution, while providing a reasonably large imaging area. The development of new neutron imaging sensors and the development of new neutron imaging techniques in the past decade has advanced the technique's ability to provide insight and understanding of problems that other non-destructive techniques could not provide. This rapid increase in capability and application would not have been possible without the

  14. X-ray imaging in advanced studies of ophthalmic diseases

    SciTech Connect

    Antunes, Andrea; Safatle, Angelica M. V.; Barros, Paulo S. M.; Morelhao, Sergio L.

    2006-07-15

    Microscopic characterization of pathological tissues has one major intrinsic limitation, the small sampling areas with respect to the extension of the tissues. Mapping possible changes on vast tissues and correlating them with large ensembles of clinical cases is not a feasible procedure for studying most diseases, as for instance vision loss related diseases and, in particular, the cataract. Although intraocular lens implants are successful treatments, cataract still is a leading public-health issue that grows in importance as the population increases and life expectancy is extended worldwide. In this work we have exploited the radiation-tissue interaction properties of hard x-rays--very low absorption and scattering--to map distinct lesions on entire eye lenses. At the used synchrotron x-ray photon energy of 20 keV (wavelength {lambda}=0.062 nm), scattering and refraction are angular resolved effects. It allows the employed x-ray image technique to efficiently characterize two types of lesions in eye lenses under cataractogenesis: distributions of tiny scattering centers and extended areas of fiber cell compaction. The data collection procedure is relatively fast; allowing dozens of samples to be totally imaged (scattering, refraction, and mass absorption images) in a single day of synchrotron beam time. More than 60 cases of canine cataract, not correlated to specific causes, were investigated in this first application of x-rays to image entire lenses. Cortical opacity cases, or partial opacity, could be related to the presence of calcificated tissues at the cortical areas, clearly visible in the images, whose elemental contents were verified by micro x-ray fluorescence as very rich in calcium. Calcificated tissues were also observed at nuclear areas in some cases of hypermature cataract. Total opacity cases without distinguishable amount of scattering centers consist in 70% of the analyzed cases, where remarkable fissure marks owing to extended areas of fiber

  15. A coming of age: advanced imaging technologies for characterising the developing mouse.

    PubMed

    Norris, Francesca C; Wong, Michael D; Greene, Nicholas D E; Scambler, Peter J; Weaver, Tom; Weninger, Wolfgang J; Mohun, Timothy J; Henkelman, R Mark; Lythgoe, Mark F

    2013-12-01

    The immense challenge of annotating the entire mouse genome has stimulated the development of cutting-edge imaging technologies in a drive for novel information. These techniques promise to improve understanding of the genes involved in embryo development, at least one third of which have been shown to be essential. Aligning advanced imaging technologies with biological needs will be fundamental to maximising the number of phenotypes discovered in the coming years. International efforts are underway to meet this challenge through an integrated and sophisticated approach to embryo phenotyping. We review rapid advances made in the imaging field over the past decade and provide a comprehensive examination of the relative merits of current and emerging techniques. The aim of this review is to provide a guide to state-of-the-art embryo imaging that will enable informed decisions as to which technology to use and fuel conversations between expert imaging laboratories, researchers, and core mouse production facilities. PMID:24035368

  16. Multifunctional nanomaterials for advanced molecular imaging and cancer therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subramaniam, Prasad

    Nanotechnology offers tremendous potential for use in biomedical applications, including cancer and stem cell imaging, disease diagnosis and drug delivery. The development of nanosystems has aided in understanding the molecular mechanisms of many diseases and permitted the controlled nanoscale manipulation of biological phenomena. In recent years, many studies have focused on the use of several kinds of nanomaterials for cancer and stem cell imaging and also for the delivery of anticancer therapeutics to tumor cells. However, the proper diagnosis and treatment of aggressive tumors such as brain and breast cancer requires highly sensitive diagnostic agents, in addition to the ability to deliver multiple therapeutics using a single platform to the target cells. Addressing these challenges, novel multifunctional nanomaterial-based platforms that incorporate multiple therapeutic and diagnostic agents, with superior molecular imaging and targeting capabilities, has been presented in this work. The initial part of this work presents the development of novel nanomaterials with superior optical properties for efficiently delivering soluble cues such as small interfering RNA (siRNA) into brain cancer cells with minimal toxicity. Specifically, this section details the development of non-toxic quantums dots for the imaging and delivery of siRNA into brain cancer and mesenchymal stem cells, with the hope of using these quantum dots as multiplexed imaging and delivery vehicles. The use of these quantum dots could overcome the toxicity issues associated with the use of conventional quantum dots, enabled the imaging of brain cancer and stem cells with high efficiency and allowed for the delivery of siRNA to knockdown the target oncogene in brain cancer cells. The latter part of this thesis details the development of nanomaterial-based drug delivery platforms for the co-delivery of multiple anticancer drugs to brain tumor cells. In particular, this part of the thesis focuses on

  17. Advanced synchronous luminescence imaging for chemical and medical diagnostics

    DOEpatents

    Vo-Dinh, Tuan

    2006-09-05

    A diagnostic method and associated system includes the steps of exposing at least one sample location with excitation radiation through a single optical waveguide or a single optical waveguide bundle, wherein the sample emits emission radiation in response to the excitation radiation. The same single optical waveguide or the single optical waveguide bundle receives at least a portion of the emission radiation from the sample, thus providing co-registration of the excitation radiation and the emission radiation. The wavelength of the excitation radiation and emission radiation is synchronously scanned to produce a spectrum upon which an image can be formed. An increased emission signal is generated by the enhanced overlap of the excitation and emission focal volumes provided by co-registration of the excitation and emission signals thus increasing the sensitivity as well as decreasing the exposure time necessary to obtain an image.

  18. Advances in imaging technologies for planning breast reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Mohan, Anita T.

    2016-01-01

    The role and choice of preoperative imaging for planning in breast reconstruction is still a disputed topic in the reconstructive community, with varying opinion on the necessity, the ideal imaging modality, costs and impact on patient outcomes. Since the advent of perforator flaps their use in microsurgical breast reconstruction has grown. Perforator based flaps afford lower donor morbidity by sparing the underlying muscle provide durable results, superior cosmesis to create a natural looking new breast, and are preferred in the context of radiation therapy. However these surgeries are complex; more technically challenging that implant based reconstruction, and leaves little room for error. The role of imaging in breast reconstruction can assist the surgeon in exploring or confirming flap choices based on donor site characteristics and presence of suitable perforators. Vascular anatomical studies in the lab have provided the surgeon a foundation of knowledge on location and vascular territories of individual perforators to improve our understanding for flap design and safe flap harvest. The creation of a presurgical map in patients can highlight any abnormal or individual anatomical variance to optimize flap design, intraoperative decision-making and execution of flap harvest with greater predictability and efficiency. This article highlights the role and techniques for preoperative planning using the newer technologies that have been adopted in reconstructive clinical practice: computed tomographic angiography (CTA), magnetic resonance angiography (MRA), laser-assisted indocyanine green fluorescence angiography (LA-ICGFA) and dynamic infrared thermography (DIRT). The primary focus of this paper is on the application of CTA and MRA imaging modalities. PMID:27047790

  19. Advances in imaging technologies for planning breast reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Mohan, Anita T; Saint-Cyr, Michel

    2016-04-01

    The role and choice of preoperative imaging for planning in breast reconstruction is still a disputed topic in the reconstructive community, with varying opinion on the necessity, the ideal imaging modality, costs and impact on patient outcomes. Since the advent of perforator flaps their use in microsurgical breast reconstruction has grown. Perforator based flaps afford lower donor morbidity by sparing the underlying muscle provide durable results, superior cosmesis to create a natural looking new breast, and are preferred in the context of radiation therapy. However these surgeries are complex; more technically challenging that implant based reconstruction, and leaves little room for error. The role of imaging in breast reconstruction can assist the surgeon in exploring or confirming flap choices based on donor site characteristics and presence of suitable perforators. Vascular anatomical studies in the lab have provided the surgeon a foundation of knowledge on location and vascular territories of individual perforators to improve our understanding for flap design and safe flap harvest. The creation of a presurgical map in patients can highlight any abnormal or individual anatomical variance to optimize flap design, intraoperative decision-making and execution of flap harvest with greater predictability and efficiency. This article highlights the role and techniques for preoperative planning using the newer technologies that have been adopted in reconstructive clinical practice: computed tomographic angiography (CTA), magnetic resonance angiography (MRA), laser-assisted indocyanine green fluorescence angiography (LA-ICGFA) and dynamic infrared thermography (DIRT). The primary focus of this paper is on the application of CTA and MRA imaging modalities. PMID:27047790

  20. Advanced imaging of the macrostructure and microstructure of bone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Genant, H. K.; Gordon, C.; Jiang, Y.; Link, T. M.; Hans, D.; Majumdar, S.; Lang, T. F.

    2000-01-01

    Noninvasive and/or nondestructive techniques are capable of providing more macro- or microstructural information about bone than standard bone densitometry. Although the latter provides important information about osteoporotic fracture risk, numerous studies indicate that bone strength is only partially explained by bone mineral density. Quantitative assessment of macro- and microstructural features may improve our ability to estimate bone strength. The methods available for quantitatively assessing macrostructure include (besides conventional radiographs) quantitative computed tomography (QCT) and volumetric quantitative computed tomography (vQCT). Methods for assessing microstructure of trabecular bone noninvasively and/or nondestructively include high-resolution computed tomography (hrCT), micro-computed tomography (muCT), high-resolution magnetic resonance (hrMR), and micromagnetic resonance (muMR). vQCT, hrCT and hrMR are generally applicable in vivo; muCT and muMR are principally applicable in vitro. Although considerable progress has been made in the noninvasive and/or nondestructive imaging of the macro- and microstructure of bone, considerable challenges and dilemmas remain. From a technical perspective, the balance between spatial resolution versus sampling size, or between signal-to-noise versus radiation dose or acquisition time, needs further consideration, as do the trade-offs between the complexity and expense of equipment and the availability and accessibility of the methods. The relative merits of in vitro imaging and its ultrahigh resolution but invasiveness versus those of in vivo imaging and its modest resolution but noninvasiveness also deserve careful attention. From a clinical perspective, the challenges for bone imaging include balancing the relative advantages of simple bone densitometry against the more complex architectural features of bone or, similarly, the deeper research requirements against the broader clinical needs. The

  1. Electron Trajectory Reconstruction for Advanced Compton Imaging of Gamma Rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plimley, Brian Christopher

    Gamma-ray imaging is useful for detecting, characterizing, and localizing sources in a variety of fields, including nuclear physics, security, nuclear accident response, nuclear medicine, and astronomy. Compton imaging in particular provides sensitivity to weak sources and good angular resolution in a large field of view. However, the photon origin in a single event sequence is normally only limited to the surface of a cone. If the initial direction of the Compton-scattered electron can be measured, the cone can be reduced to a cone segment with width depending on the uncertainty in the direction measurement, providing a corresponding increase in imaging sensitivity. Measurement of the electron's initial direction in an efficient detection material requires very fine position resolution due to the electron's short range and tortuous path. A thick (650 mum), fully-depleted charge-coupled device (CCD) developed for infrared astronomy has 10.5-mum position resolution in two dimensions, enabling the initial trajectory measurement of electrons of energy as low as 100 keV. This is the first time the initial trajectories of electrons of such low energies have been measured in a solid material. In this work, the CCD's efficacy as a gamma-ray detector is demonstrated experimentally, using a reconstruction algorithm to measure the initial electron direction from the CCD track image. In addition, models of fast electron interaction physics, charge transport and readout were used to generate modeled tracks with known initial direction. These modeled tracks allowed the development and refinement of the reconstruction algorithm. The angular sensitivity of the reconstruction algorithm is evaluated extensively with models for tracks below 480 keV, showing a FWHM as low as 20° in the pixel plane, and 30° RMS sensitivity to the magnitude of the out-of-plane angle. The measurement of the trajectories of electrons with energies as low as 100 keV have the potential to make electron

  2. Advanced Thermal Emission Imaging Systems Definition and Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blasius, Karl; Nava, David (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Santa Barbara Remote Sensing (SBRS), Raytheon Company, is pleased to submit this quarterly progress report of the work performed in the third quarter of Year 2 of the Advanced THEMIS Project, July through September 2002. We review here progress in the proposed tasks. During July through September 2002 progress was made in two major tasks, Spectral Response Characterization and Flight Instrument Definition. Because of staffing problems and technical problems earlier in the program we have refocused the remaining time and budget on the key technical tasks. Current technical problems with a central piece of test equipment has lead us to request a 1 quarter extension to the period of performance. This request is being made through a separate letter independent of this report.

  3. Dawn of Advanced Molecular Medicine: Nanotechnological Advancements in Cancer Imaging and Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kaittanis, Charalambos; Shaffer, Travis M.; Thorek, Daniel L. J.; Grimm, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Nanotechnology plays an increasingly important role not only in our everyday life (with all its benefits and dangers) but also in medicine. Nanoparticles are to date the most intriguing option to deliver high concentrations of agents specifically and directly to cancer cells; therefore, a wide variety of these nanomaterials has been developed and explored. These span the range from simple nanoagents to sophisticated smart devices for drug delivery or imaging. Nanomaterials usually provide a large surface area, allowing for decoration with a large amount of moieties on the surface for either additional functionalities or targeting. Besides using particles solely for imaging purposes, they can also carry as a payload a therapeutic agent. If both are combined within the same particle, a theranostic agent is created. The sophistication of highly developed nanotechnology targeting approaches provides a promising means for many clinical implementations and can provide improved applications for otherwise suboptimal formulations. In this review we will explore nanotechnology both for imaging and therapy to provide a general overview of the field and its impact on cancer imaging and therapy. PMID:25271430

  4. Advanced electron crystallography through model-based imaging.

    PubMed

    Van Aert, Sandra; De Backer, Annick; Martinez, Gerardo T; den Dekker, Arnold J; Van Dyck, Dirk; Bals, Sara; Van Tendeloo, Gustaaf

    2016-01-01

    The increasing need for precise determination of the atomic arrangement of non-periodic structures in materials design and the control of nanostructures explains the growing interest in quantitative transmission electron microscopy. The aim is to extract precise and accurate numbers for unknown structure parameters including atomic positions, chemical concentrations and atomic numbers. For this purpose, statistical parameter estimation theory has been shown to provide reliable results. In this theory, observations are considered purely as data planes, from which structure parameters have to be determined using a parametric model describing the images. As such, the positions of atom columns can be measured with a precision of the order of a few picometres, even though the resolution of the electron microscope is still one or two orders of magnitude larger. Moreover, small differences in average atomic number, which cannot be distinguished visually, can be quantified using high-angle annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy images. In addition, this theory allows one to measure compositional changes at interfaces, to count atoms with single-atom sensitivity, and to reconstruct atomic structures in three dimensions. This feature article brings the reader up to date, summarizing the underlying theory and highlighting some of the recent applications of quantitative model-based transmisson electron microscopy. PMID:26870383

  5. Recent advances in PET imaging for evaluation of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Sioka, Chrissa; Fotopoulos, Andreas; Kyritsis, Athanassios P

    2010-08-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) consists of loss of pigmented dopamine-secreting neurons in the pars compacta of the midbrain substantia nigra. These neurons project to the striatum (putamen and caudate nucleus) and their loss leads to alterations in the activity of the neural circuits that regulate movement. In a simplified model, two dopamine pathways are involved: the direct pathway, which is mediated through facilitation of the D(1) receptors, and the indirect pathway through D(2) receptors (inhibitory). Positron emission tomography (PET) tracers to image the presynaptic sites of the dopaminergic system include 6-[(18)F]FDOPA and 6-[(18)F]FMT, [(11)C]dihydrotetrabenazine, [(11)C]nomifensine and various radiolabelled cocaine derivatives. Postsynaptically, for the dopamine D(1) subtype the most commonly used ligands are [(11)C]SCH 23390 or [(11)C]NNC 112 and for the D(2) subtype [(11)C]raclopride, [(11)C]MNPA and [(18)F]DMFP. PET is a sensitive and specific non-invasive molecular imaging technique that may be helpful for evaluation of PD and its differential diagnosis from other parkinsonian syndromes. PMID:20107789

  6. Technological advances in hybrid imaging and impact on dose.

    PubMed

    Mattsson, Sören; Andersson, Martin; Söderberg, Marcus

    2015-07-01

    New imaging technologies utilising X-rays and radiopharmaceuticals have developed rapidly. Clinical application of computed tomography (CT) has revolutionised medical imaging and plays an enormous role in medical care. Due to technical improvements, spatial, contrast and temporal resolutions have continuously improved. In spite of significant reduction of CT doses during recent years, CT is still a dominating source of radiation exposure to the population. Combinations with single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and positron emission tomography (PET) and especially the use of SPECT/CT and PET/CT, provide important additional information about physiology as well as cellular and molecular events. However, significant dose contributions from SPECT and PET occur, making PET/CT and SPECT/CT truly high dose procedures. More research should be done to find optimal activities of radiopharmaceuticals for various patient groups and investigations. The implementation of simple protocol adjustments, including individually based administration, encouraged hydration, forced diuresis and use of optimised voiding intervals, laxatives, etc., can reduce the radiation exposure to the patients. New data about staff doses to fingers, hands and eye lenses indicate that finger doses could be a problem, but not doses to the eye lenses and to the whole body. PMID:25802466

  7. Advanced electron crystallography through model-based imaging

    PubMed Central

    Van Aert, Sandra; De Backer, Annick; Martinez, Gerardo T.; den Dekker, Arnold J.; Van Dyck, Dirk; Bals, Sara; Van Tendeloo, Gustaaf

    2016-01-01

    The increasing need for precise determination of the atomic arrangement of non-periodic structures in materials design and the control of nanostructures explains the growing interest in quantitative transmission electron microscopy. The aim is to extract precise and accurate numbers for unknown structure parameters including atomic positions, chemical concentrations and atomic numbers. For this purpose, statistical parameter estimation theory has been shown to provide reliable results. In this theory, observations are considered purely as data planes, from which structure parameters have to be determined using a parametric model describing the images. As such, the positions of atom columns can be measured with a precision of the order of a few picometres, even though the resolution of the electron microscope is still one or two orders of magnitude larger. Moreover, small differences in average atomic number, which cannot be distinguished visually, can be quantified using high-angle annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy images. In addition, this theory allows one to measure compositional changes at interfaces, to count atoms with single-atom sensitivity, and to reconstruct atomic structures in three dimensions. This feature article brings the reader up to date, summarizing the underlying theory and highlighting some of the recent applications of quantitative model-based transmisson electron microscopy. PMID:26870383

  8. Crosswell Imaging Technology & Advanced DSR Navigation for Horizontal Directional Drilling

    SciTech Connect

    Larry Stolarczyk

    2008-08-08

    The objective of Phase II is to develop and demonstrate real-time measurement-while-drilling (MWD) for guidance and navigation of drill strings during horizontal drilling operations applicable to both short and long holes. The end product of Phase II is a functional drill-string assembly outfitted with a commercial version of Drill String Radar (DSR). Project Objectives Develop and demonstrate a dual-phase methodology of in-seam drilling, imaging, and structure confirmation. This methodology, illustrated in Figure 1, includes: (1) Using RIM to image between drill holes for seam thickness estimates and in-seam structures detection. Completed, February 2005; and (2) Using DSR for real-time MWD guidance and navigation of drillstrings during horizontal drilling operations. Completed, November 2008. As of November 2008, the Phase II portion of Contract DE-FC26-04NT42085 is about 99% complete, including milestones and tasks original outlined as Phase II work. The one percent deficiency results from MSHA-related approvals which have yet to be granted (at the time of reporting). These approvals are pending and are do not negatively impact the scope of work or project objectives.

  9. Adaptation of commercial microscopes for advanced imaging applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brideau, Craig; Poon, Kelvin; Stys, Peter

    2015-03-01

    Today's commercially available microscopes offer a wide array of options to accommodate common imaging experiments. Occasionally, an experimental goal will require an unusual light source, filter, or even irregular sample that is not compatible with existing equipment. In these situations the ability to modify an existing microscopy platform with custom accessories can greatly extend its utility and allow for experiments not possible with stock equipment. Light source conditioning/manipulation such as polarization, beam diameter or even custom source filtering can easily be added with bulk components. Custom and after-market detectors can be added to external ports using optical construction hardware and adapters. This paper will present various examples of modifications carried out on commercial microscopes to address both atypical imaging modalities and research needs. Violet and near-ultraviolet source adaptation, custom detection filtering, and laser beam conditioning and control modifications will be demonstrated. The availability of basic `building block' parts will be discussed with respect to user safety, construction strategies, and ease of use.

  10. Automated angiogenesis quantification through advanced image processing techniques.

    PubMed

    Doukas, Charlampos N; Maglogiannis, Ilias; Chatziioannou, Aristotle; Papapetropoulos, Andreas

    2006-01-01

    Angiogenesis, the formation of blood vessels in tumors, is an interactive process between tumor, endothelial and stromal cells in order to create a network for oxygen and nutrients supply, necessary for tumor growth. According to this, angiogenic activity is considered a suitable method for both tumor growth or inhibition detection. The angiogenic potential is usually estimated by counting the number of blood vessels in particular sections. One of the most popular assay tissues to study the angiogenesis phenomenon is the developing chick embryo and its chorioallantoic membrane (CAM), which is a highly vascular structure lining the inner surface of the egg shell. The aim of this study was to develop and validate an automated image analysis method that would give an unbiased quantification of the micro-vessel density and growth in angiogenic CAM images. The presented method has been validated by comparing automated results to manual counts over a series of digital chick embryo photos. The results indicate the high accuracy of the tool, which has been thus extensively used for tumor growth detection at different stages of embryonic development. PMID:17946107

  11. Advanced image manipulation controller for cockpit LCD displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramachandran, Gopal

    1998-09-01

    Key features of a family of LSI integrated circuits will be explained. These DSP devices are capable of taking digital inputs of either NTSC/PAL/SECAM video in YCrCb 4:2:2 format, or computer graphics data from a PC in RGB 8:8:8 format, de- interlacing the data (if required), then re-sizing the resolution of the image independently in the horizontal and vertical axes to fit arbitrary display resolutions. The devices use patented digital filter techniques to perform zoom-only or both zoom as well as shrink. The devices also include registers that allow for cropping the active input image, and registers to completely control horizontal and vertical timing parameters for LCD displays. Current members of this family work at clock rates of up to 84 MHz, at resolutions of 1024 X 768, and upcoming members of the family will raise both the target resolution and pixel rates. All these parts generate all timing signals required by the display. Typically, no external memory is required for zooming and shrinking. Cockpit display applications that could benefit from this chip include processing and display of video, FLIR, EFIS/EICAS displays, radar, digital terrain maps, ultrasonic/sonar, computer graphics/symbol generators, etc. The devices are members of the gmZx family of scaling chips, first introduced in April '97.

  12. Advances in PET Imaging of Degenerative, Cerebrovascular, and Traumatic Causes of Dementia.

    PubMed

    Eisenmenger, Laura B; Huo, Eugene J; Hoffman, John M; Minoshima, Satoshi; Matesan, Manuela C; Lewis, David H; Lopresti, Brian J; Mathis, Chester A; Okonkwo, David O; Mountz, James M

    2016-01-01

    In this review we present the most recent advances in nuclear medicine imaging as a diagnostic and management tool for dementia. The clinical diagnosis of dementia syndromes can be challenging for physicians, particularly in the early stages of disease. Given the growing number of individuals affected by dementia, early and accurate diagnosis can lead to improved clinical management of patients. Although tests are available for exclusion of certain causes of cognitive impairment, the results rarely allow the clinician to make a definitive diagnosis. For this reason, information obtained from imaging ("imaging biomarkers") is playing an increasingly important role in the workup of patients with suspected dementia. Imaging biomarkers also provide indispensable tools for clinical and preclinical studies of dementing illnesses to elucidate their pathophysiology and to develop better therapies. A wide range of imaging has been used to diagnose and investigate neurodegenerative disorders including structural, cerebral perfusion, glucose metabolism, neurochemical, and molecular imaging. In the first section, we discuss the imaging methods used in clinical practice to diagnose dementia as well as explore additional experimental modalities that are currently used as research tools. In the second section, a comprehensive review covering the myriad aspects of vascular disease as a cause of dementia is presented and illustrated with MRI- and PET-focused case examples. In the third section, advances in imaging Alzheimer disease pathology are emphasized by reviewing current approaches for PET imaging with β-amyloid imaging agents. We provide an outline for the appropriate use criteria for β-amyloid imaging agents in dementia. In addition, the recognition of the importance of neocortical neurofibrillary tangles as related to Alzheimer disease progression has led to the development of promising tau imaging agents such as [(18)F]T807. The last section provides a history brain

  13. INVITED REVIEW-IMAGE REGISTRATION IN VETERINARY RADIATION ONCOLOGY: INDICATIONS, IMPLICATIONS, AND FUTURE ADVANCES.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yang; Lawrence, Jessica; Cheng, Kun; Montgomery, Dean; Forrest, Lisa; Mclaren, Duncan B; McLaughlin, Stephen; Argyle, David J; Nailon, William H

    2016-03-01

    The field of veterinary radiation therapy (RT) has gained substantial momentum in recent decades with significant advances in conformal treatment planning, image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT), and intensity-modulated (IMRT) techniques. At the root of these advancements lie improvements in tumor imaging, image alignment (registration), target volume delineation, and identification of critical structures. Image registration has been widely used to combine information from multimodality images such as computerized tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and positron emission tomography (PET) to improve the accuracy of radiation delivery and reliably identify tumor-bearing areas. Many different techniques have been applied in image registration. This review provides an overview of medical image registration in RT and its applications in veterinary oncology. A summary of the most commonly used approaches in human and veterinary medicine is presented along with their current use in IGRT and adaptive radiation therapy (ART). It is important to realize that registration does not guarantee that target volumes, such as the gross tumor volume (GTV), are correctly identified on the image being registered, as limitations unique to registration algorithms exist. Research involving novel registration frameworks for automatic segmentation of tumor volumes is ongoing and comparative oncology programs offer a unique opportunity to test the efficacy of proposed algorithms. PMID:26777133

  14. Advances in endoscopic ultrasound imaging of colorectal diseases

    PubMed Central

    Cârțână, Elena Tatiana; Gheonea, Dan Ionuț; Săftoiu, Adrian

    2016-01-01

    The development of endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) has had a significant impact for patients with digestive diseases, enabling enhanced diagnostic and therapeutic procedures, with most of the available evidence focusing on upper gastrointestinal (GI) and pancreatico-biliary diseases. For the lower GI tract the main application of EUS has been in staging rectal cancer, as a complementary technique to other cross-sectional imaging methods. EUS can provide highly accurate in-depth assessments of tumour infiltration, performing best in the diagnosis of early rectal tumours. In the light of recent developments other EUS applications for colorectal diseases have been also envisaged and are currently under investigation, including beyond-rectum tumour staging by means of the newly developed forward-viewing radial array echoendoscope. Due to its high resolution, EUS might be also regarded as an ideal method for the evaluation of subepithelial lesions. Their differential diagnosis is possible by imaging the originating wall layer and the associated echostructure, and cytological and histological confirmation can be obtained through EUS-guided fine needle aspiration or trucut biopsy. However, reports on the use of EUS in colorectal subepithelial lesions are currently limited. EUS allows detailed examination of perirectal and perianal complications in Crohn’s disease and, as a safe and less expensive investigation, can be used to monitor therapeutic response of fistulae, which seems to improve outcomes and reduce the need for additional surgery. Furthermore, EUS image enhancement techniques, such as the use of contrast agents or elastography, have recently been evaluated for colorectal indications as well. Possible applications of contrast enhancement include the assessment of tumour angiogenesis in colorectal cancer, the monitoring of disease activity in inflammatory bowel disease based on quantification of bowel wall vascularization, and differentiating between benign and

  15. Advances in endoscopic ultrasound imaging of colorectal diseases.

    PubMed

    Cârțână, Elena Tatiana; Gheonea, Dan Ionuț; Săftoiu, Adrian

    2016-02-01

    The development of endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) has had a significant impact for patients with digestive diseases, enabling enhanced diagnostic and therapeutic procedures, with most of the available evidence focusing on upper gastrointestinal (GI) and pancreatico-biliary diseases. For the lower GI tract the main application of EUS has been in staging rectal cancer, as a complementary technique to other cross-sectional imaging methods. EUS can provide highly accurate in-depth assessments of tumour infiltration, performing best in the diagnosis of early rectal tumours. In the light of recent developments other EUS applications for colorectal diseases have been also envisaged and are currently under investigation, including beyond-rectum tumour staging by means of the newly developed forward-viewing radial array echoendoscope. Due to its high resolution, EUS might be also regarded as an ideal method for the evaluation of subepithelial lesions. Their differential diagnosis is possible by imaging the originating wall layer and the associated echostructure, and cytological and histological confirmation can be obtained through EUS-guided fine needle aspiration or trucut biopsy. However, reports on the use of EUS in colorectal subepithelial lesions are currently limited. EUS allows detailed examination of perirectal and perianal complications in Crohn's disease and, as a safe and less expensive investigation, can be used to monitor therapeutic response of fistulae, which seems to improve outcomes and reduce the need for additional surgery. Furthermore, EUS image enhancement techniques, such as the use of contrast agents or elastography, have recently been evaluated for colorectal indications as well. Possible applications of contrast enhancement include the assessment of tumour angiogenesis in colorectal cancer, the monitoring of disease activity in inflammatory bowel disease based on quantification of bowel wall vascularization, and differentiating between benign and

  16. Ten years' experience with four cycles of bleomycin, etoposide, doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide, vincristine, prednisone, procarbazine (BEACOPP)-escalated followed by four cycles of baseline-dose BEACOPP in patients with advanced stage Hodgkin lymphoma: a single-center, retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Belada, David; Štěpánková, Pavla; Sýkorová, Alice; Žák, Pavel; Smolej, Lukáš

    2015-07-01

    The HD-9 trial showed that eight cycles of BEACOPP (bleomycin, etoposide, doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide, vincristine, prednisone, procarbazine)-escalated led to significant improvements in response rate, progression-free survival and overall survival over COPP/ABVD (cyclophosphamide, vincristine, prednisone, procarbazine/doxorubicin, bleomycin, vinblastine, dacarbazine) therapy. This monocentric retrospective study was performed to evaluate 10 years of experience with four cycles of BEACOPP-escalated and four cycles of BEACOPP-baseline outside of clinical trials. The outcomes were assessed in 78 patients with newly diagnosed advanced stage Hodgkin lymphoma. A complete response after chemotherapy ± radiotherapy was achieved in 75 patients (96%). At the median follow-up of 74 months, the actuarial 5- and 10-year freedom from treatment failure (FFTF) rates were 91% and 89%, and actuarial 5- and 10-year overall survival rates for the entire group were 93% and 90%, respectively. These results suggest that the combination of escalated and baseline BEACOPP chemotherapy is feasible in routine practice with good efficacy and acceptable toxicity. PMID:25330440

  17. An advanced image fusion algorithm based on wavelet transform: incorporation with PCA and morphological processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Yufeng; Essock, Edward A.; Hansen, Bruce C.

    2004-05-01

    There are numerous applications for image fusion, some of which include medical imaging, remote sensing, nighttime operations and multi-spectral imaging. In general, the discrete wavelet transform (DWT) and various pyramids (such as Laplacian, ratio, contrast, gradient and morphological pyramids) are the most common and effective methods. For quantitative evaluation of the quality of fused imagery, the root mean square error (RMSE) is the most suitable measure of quality if there is a "ground truth" image available; otherwise, the entropy, spatial frequency or image quality index of the input images and the fused images can be calculated and compared. Here, after analyzing the pyramids" performance with the four measures mentioned, an advanced wavelet transform (aDWT) method that incorporates principal component analysis (PCA) and morphological processing into a regular DWT fusion algorithm is presented. Specifically, at each scale of the wavelet transformed images, a principle vector was derived from two input images and then applied to two of the images" approximation coefficients (i.e., they were fused by using the principal eigenvector). For the detail coefficients (i.e., three quarters of the coefficients), the larger absolute values were chosen and subjected to a neighborhood morphological processing procedure which served to verify the selected pixels by using a "filling" and "cleaning" operation (this operation filled or removed isolated pixels in a 3-by-3 local region). The fusion performance of the advanced DWT (aDWT) method proposed here was compared with six other common methods, and, based on the four quantitative measures, was found to perform the best when tested on the four input image types. Since the different image sources used here varied with respect to intensity, contrast, noise, and intrinsic characteristics, the aDWT is a promising image fusion procedure for inhomogeneous imagery.

  18. Seeing and believing: recent advances in imaging cell-cell interactions

    PubMed Central

    Yap, Alpha S.; Michael, Magdalene; Parton, Robert G.

    2015-01-01

    Advances in cell and developmental biology have often been closely linked to advances in our ability to visualize structure and function at many length and time scales. In this review, we discuss how new imaging technologies and new reagents have provided novel insights into the biology of cadherin-based cell-cell junctions. We focus on three developments: the application of super-resolution optical technologies to characterize the nanoscale organization of cadherins at cell-cell contacts, new approaches to interrogate the mechanical forces that act upon junctions, and advances in electron microscopy which have the potential to transform our understanding of cell-cell junctions. PMID:26543555

  19. Advanced astigmatism-corrected Czerny-Turner imaging spectrometer in spectral broadband

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cong, Hai-fang

    2014-12-01

    This paper reports an advanced Czerny-Turner optical structure which is used for the application in imaging spectrometers. To obtain the excellent imaging quality, a cylindrical lens with a wedge angle is used between the focusing mirror and the imaging plane to remove astigmatism in broadband. It makes the advanced optical system presents high resolution over the full bandwidth and decreases the cost. An example of the imaging spectrometer in the waveband of 260nm~520nm has been designed to prove our theory. It yields the excellent modulation transfer functions (MTF) of all fields of view which are more than 0.75 over the broadband under the required Nyquist frequency (20lp/mm).

  20. Advancing the Quality of Solar Occultation Retrievals through Solar Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordley, L. L.; Hervig, M. E.; Marshall, B. T.; Russell, J. E.; Bailey, S. M.; Brown, C. W.; Burton, J. C.; Deaver, L. E.; Magill, B. E.; McHugh, M. J.; Paxton, G. J.; Thompson, R. E.

    2008-12-01

    The quality of retrieved profiles (e.g. mixing ratio, temperature, pressure, and extinction) from solar occultation sensors is strongly dependent on the angular fidelity of the measurements. The SOFIE instrument, launched on-board the AIM (Aeronomy of Ice in the Mesosphere) satellite on April 25, 2007, was designed to provide very high precision broadband measurements for the study of Polar Mesospheric Clouds (PMCs), that appear near 83km, just below the high latitude summer mesopause. The SOFIE instrument achieves an unprecedented angular fidelity by imaging the sun on a 2D detector array and tracking the edges with an uncertainty of <0.1 arc seconds. This makes possible retrieved profiles of vertical high resolution mixing ratios, refraction base temperature and pressure from tropopause to lower mesosphere, and transmission with accuracy sufficient to infer cosmic smoke extinction. Details of the approach and recent results will be presented.

  1. Advances in functional magnetic resonance imaging of the human brainstem.

    PubMed

    Beissner, Florian; Schumann, Andy; Brunn, Franziska; Eisenträger, Daniela; Bär, Karl-Jürgen

    2014-02-01

    The brainstem is of tremendous importance for our daily survival, and yet the functional relationships between various nuclei, their projection targets, and afferent regulatory areas remain poorly characterized. The main reason for this lies in the sub-optimal performance of standard neuroimaging methods in this area. In particular, fMRI signals are much harder to detect in the brainstem region compared to cortical areas. Here we describe and validate a new approach to measure activation of brainstem nuclei in humans using standard fMRI sequences and widely available tools for statistical image processing. By spatially restricting an independent component analysis to an anatomically defined brainstem mask, we excluded those areas from the analysis that were strongly affected by physiological noise. This allowed us to identify for the first time intrinsic connectivity networks in the human brainstem and to map brainstem-cortical connectivity purely based on functionally defined regions of interest. PMID:23933038

  2. Advanced Image Processing for Defect Visualization in Infrared Thermography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plotnikov, Yuri A.; Winfree, William P.

    1997-01-01

    Results of a defect visualization process based on pulse infrared thermography are presented. Algorithms have been developed to reduce the amount of operator participation required in the process of interpreting thermographic images. The algorithms determine the defect's depth and size from the temporal and spatial thermal distributions that exist on the surface of the investigated object following thermal excitation. A comparison of the results from thermal contrast, time derivative, and phase analysis methods for defect visualization are presented. These comparisons are based on three dimensional simulations of a test case representing a plate with multiple delaminations. Comparisons are also based on experimental data obtained from a specimen with flat bottom holes and a composite panel with delaminations.

  3. Safety Assessment of Advanced Imaging Sequences I: Measurements.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Jorgen Arendt; Rasmussen, Morten Fischer; Pihl, Michael Johannes; Holbek, Simon; Hoyos, Carlos Armando Villagómez; Bradway, David P; Stuart, Matthias Bo; Tomov, Borislav Gueorguiev

    2016-01-01

    A method for rapid measurement of intensities (I(spta)), mechanical index (MI), and probe surface temperature for any ultrasound scanning sequence is presented. It uses the scanner's sampling capability to give an accurate measurement of the whole imaging sequence for all emissions to yield the true distributions. The method is several orders of magnitude faster than approaches using an oscilloscope, and it also facilitates validating the emitted pressure field and the scanner's emission sequence software. It has been implemented using the experimental synthetic aperture real-time ultrasound system (SARUS) scanner and the Onda AIMS III intensity measurement system (Onda Corporation, Sunnyvale, CA, USA). Four different sequences have been measured: a fixed focus emission, a duplex sequence containing B-mode and flow emissions, a vector flow sequence with B-mode and flow emissions in 17 directions, and finally a SA duplex flow sequence. A BK8820e (BK Medical, Herlev, Denmark) convex array probe is used for the first three sequences and a BK8670 linear array probe for the SA sequence. The method is shown to give the same intensity values within 0.24% of the AIMS III Soniq 5.0 (Onda Corporation, Sunnyvale, CA, USA) commercial intensity measurement program. The approach can measure and store data for a full imaging sequence in 3.8-8.2 s per spatial position. Based on I(spta), MI, and probe surface temperature, the method gives the ability to determine whether a sequence is within U.S. FDA limits, or alternatively indicate how to scale it to be within limits. PMID:26625411

  4. Advances in photo-thermal infrared imaging microspectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furstenberg, Robert; Kendziora, Chris; Papantonakis, Michael; Nguyen, Viet; McGill, Andrew

    2013-05-01

    There is a growing need for chemical imaging techniques in many fields of science and technology: forensics, materials science, pharmaceutical and chemical industries, just to name a few. While FTIR micro-spectroscopy is commonly used, its practical resolution limit of about 20 microns or more is often insufficient. Raman micro-spectroscopy provides better spatial resolution (~1 micron), but is not always practical because of samples exhibiting fluorescence or low Raman scattering efficiency. We are developing a non-contact and non-destructive technique we call photo-thermal infrared imaging spectroscopy (PT-IRIS). It involves photo-thermal heating of the sample with a tunable quantum cascade laser and measuring the resulting increase in thermal emission with an infrared detector. Photo-thermal emission spectra resemble FTIR absorbance spectra and can be acquired in both stand-off and microscopy configurations. Furthermore, PT-IRIS allows the acquisition of absorbance-like photo-thermal spectra in a reflected geometry, suitable for field applications and for in-situ study of samples on optically IR-opaque substrates (metals, fabrics, paint, glass etc.). Conventional FTIR microscopes in reflection mode measure the reflectance spectra which are different from absorbance spectra and are usually not catalogued in FTIR spectral libraries. In this paper, we continue developing this new technique. We perform a series of numerical simulations of the laser heating of samples during photo-thermal microscopy. We develop parameterized formulas to help the user pick the appropriate laser illumination power. We also examine the influence of sample geometry on spectral signatures. Finally, we measure and compare photo-thermal and reflectance spectra for two test samples.

  5. Approximating tasseled cap values to evaluate brightness, greenness, and wetness for the Advanced Land Imager (ALI)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yamamoto, Kristina H.; Finn, Michael P.

    2012-01-01

    The Tasseled Cap transformation is a method of image band conversion to enhance spectral information. It primarily is used to detect vegetation using the derived brightness, greenness, and wetness bands. An approximation of Tasseled Cap values for the Advanced Land Imager was investigated and compared to the Landsat Thematic Mapper Tasseled Cap values. Despite sharing similar spectral, temporal, and spatial resolution, the two systems are not interchangeable with regard to Tasseled Cap matrices.

  6. Correlation between iodine-131 MIBG imaging and biological markers in advanced neuroblastoma

    SciTech Connect

    Yeh, S.D.; Helson, L.; Benua, R.S.

    1988-01-01

    I-131 metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) imaging was performed in 38 patients with advanced neuroblastoma. Abnormal images were found in patients with elevations of urinary vanillylmandelic acid and dopamine and high serum neuron-specific enolase levels. Normal or minimal elevation of markers was seen in patients with negative images. In follow-up studies after chemotherapy, the disappearance of abnormal uptake was noted in those patients with normal marker values. A persistently abnormal uptake occurred in patients with high marker values. Conversion from a normal image to an abnormal image also occurred in patients whose markers became elevated. I-131 MIBG imaging is sensitive in detecting active foci of a neuroblastoma and is useful in monitoring chemotherapy in these patients.

  7. Completing the Pain Circuit: Recent Advances in Imaging Pain and Inflammation beyond the Central Nervous System.

    PubMed

    Linnman, Clas; Borsook, David

    2013-01-01

    This review describes some of the recent developments in imaging aspects of pain in the periphery. It is now possible to image nerves in the cornea non-invasively, to image receptor level expression and inflammatory processes in injured tissue, to image nerves and alterations in nerve properties, to image astrocyte and glial roles in neuroinflammatory processes, and to image pain conduction functionally in the trigeminal ganglion. These advances will ultimately allow us to describe the pain pathway, from injury site to behavioral consequence, in a quantitative manner. Such a development could lead to diagnostics determining the source of pain (peripheral or central), objective monitoring of treatment progression, and, hopefully, objective biomarkers of pain. PMID:24228169

  8. Completing the Pain Circuit: Recent Advances in Imaging Pain and Inflammation beyond the Central Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Linnman, Clas; Borsook, David

    2013-01-01

    This review describes some of the recent developments in imaging aspects of pain in the periphery. It is now possible to image nerves in the cornea non-invasively, to image receptor level expression and inflammatory processes in injured tissue, to image nerves and alterations in nerve properties, to image astrocyte and glial roles in neuroinflammatory processes, and to image pain conduction functionally in the trigeminal ganglion. These advances will ultimately allow us to describe the pain pathway, from injury site to behavioral consequence, in a quantitative manner. Such a development could lead to diagnostics determining the source of pain (peripheral or central), objective monitoring of treatment progression, and, hopefully, objective biomarkers of pain. PMID:24228169

  9. Recent Advances in Cardiovascular Imaging Relevant to the Management of Patients with Suspected Cardiac Amyloidosis.

    PubMed

    White, James A; Fine, Nowell M

    2016-08-01

    Cardiac amyloidosis is a form of infiltrative cardiomyopathy typically presenting with progressive heart failure. The clinical presentation and morphological findings often overlap with other cardiovascular diseases, and frequently results in misdiagnosis and consequent under-reporting. Cardiovascular imaging is playing an increasingly important diagnostic and prognostic role in this referral population, and is reducing the reliance on endomyocardial biopsy as a confirmatory testing. Advancements across multiple cardiac imaging modalities, including echocardiography, magnetic resonance imaging, nuclear imaging, and computed tomography, are improving diagnostic accuracy and offering novel approaches to sub-type differentiation and prognostication. This review explores recent advancements in cardiac imaging for the diagnosis, typing, and staging of cardiac amyloidosis, with a focus on new and evolving techniques. Emphasis is also placed on the promise of non-invasive cardiac imaging to provide value across the spectrum of this clinical disease, from early disease identification (prior to the development of increased wall thickness) through to markers of advanced disease associated with early mortality. PMID:27319007

  10. A survey of advanced excimer optical imaging and lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Koichi; Suwa, Kyoichi

    1998-11-01

    The first item discussed in this paper is to estimate the future trend regarding minimum geometry and the optical parameters, such as NA and wavelength. Simulations based on aerial images are performed for the estimation. The resolution limit is defined as a minimum feature size which retains practical depth of focus (DOF). Pattern geometry is classified into two categories, which are dense lines and isolated lines. Available wavelengths are assumed to be KrF excimer laser (λ=248 nm), ArF excimer laser (λ=193 nm) and F2 excimer laser (λ=157 nm). Based upon the simulation results, the resolution limit is estimated for each geometry and each wavelength. The second item is to survey ArF optics. At present, the ArF excimer laser is regarded as one of the most promising candidates as a next-generation light source. Discussions are ranging over some critical issues. The lifetime of ArF optics supposedly limited by the radiation compaction of silica glass is estimated in comparison with KrF optics. Availability of calcium fluoride (CaF2) is also discussed. As a designing issue, a comparative study is made about the optical configuration, dioptric or catadioptric. In the end, our resist-based performance is shown.

  11. Advanced imaging systems for diagnostic investigations applied to Cultural Heritage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peccenini, E.; Albertin, F.; Bettuzzi, M.; Brancaccio, R.; Casali, F.; Morigi, M. P.; Petrucci, F.

    2014-12-01

    The diagnostic investigations are an important resource in the studies on Cultural Heritage to enhance the knowledge on execution techniques, materials and conservation status of a work of art. In this field, due to the great historical and artistic value of the objects, preservation is the main concern; for this reason, new technological equipment has been designed and developed in the Physics Departments of the Universities of Ferrara and Bologna to enhance the non-invasive approach to the study of pictorial artworks and other objects of cultural interest. Infrared (IR) reflectography, X-ray radiography and computed tomography (CT), applied to works of art, are joined by the same goal: to get hidden information on execution techniques and inner structure pursuing the non-invasiveness of the methods, although using different setup and physical principles. In this work transportable imaging systems to investigate large objects in museums and galleries are presented. In particular, 2D scanning devices for IR reflectography and X-ray radiography, CT systems and some applications to the Cultural Heritage are described.

  12. Significant advancement of mass spectrometry imaging for food chemistry.

    PubMed

    Yoshimura, Yukihiro; Goto-Inoue, Naoko; Moriyama, Tatsuya; Zaima, Nobuhiro

    2016-11-01

    Food contains various compounds that have an impact on our daily lives. Many technologies have been established to analyze these molecules of interest in foods. However, the analysis of the spatial distribution of these compounds in foods using conventional technology, such as high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry or gas chromatography-mass spectrometry is difficult. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry imaging (MALDI-MSI) is considered an ideal complementary approach. MALDI-MSI is a two-dimensional MALDI-MS technology that can detect compounds in a tissue section without extraction, purification, separation, or labeling. MALDI-MSI can be used to visualize the spatial distribution of chemical compounds or biomolecules in foods. Although the methodology of MALDI-MSI in food science is not yet fully established, the versatility of MALDI-MSI is expected to open a new frontier in food science. Herein, we describe the principles and applications of MALDI-MSI in food science and related fields. PMID:27211639

  13. Use of advanced imaging techniques during visits to emergency departments-implications, costs, patient benefits/risks.

    PubMed

    Dick, Elizabeth A; Varma, Dinesh; Kashef, Elika; Curtis, John

    2016-05-01

    25 years ago, on a Friday evening at 9 pm, the emergency department (ED) was full of patients with a wide range of clinical problems. Their investigations included plain radiographs, but no other imaging was included until the next working day. At present, many patients are receiving advanced imaging such as ultrasound, CT and MRI, often delivered out of hours-an obvious advance for patients or sometimes an unnecessary development? In this article, we will consider how to assess patient benefits and whether increased use of advanced imaging is an overall advance for patients. We will address the general implications for healthcare services which come with greater use of advanced imaging. We will then address the effect of advanced imaging on individual fictional ED patients with a variety of complaints. PMID:26693970

  14. Advanced image placement performance for the current EPL masks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eguchi, Hideyuki; Sugimura, Hiroshi; Koike, Kaoru; Sakaue, Hiroshi; Arimoto, Hiroshi; Ogawa, Kentaro; Susa, Takashi; Kunitani, Shinji; Kurosu, Toshiaki; Yoshii, Takashi; Itoh, Kojiro; Tamura, Akira

    2006-03-01

    We examined two EPL mask fabrication processes to control precisely image placement (IP) on the EPL masks. One is a wafer process using an electrostatic chuck during an e-beam write and another is a membrane process using a mechanical chuck during the e-beam write. In the wafer process, the global IP is corrected during the e-beam write on the basis of the IP data taken with x-y metrology tool. In the membrane process, the global IP is corrected during the e-beam write on the basis of the data taken with the x-y metrology tool and taken in situ with the e-beam writer. The resist and final global IP (3s) of the wafer process is 7.2 nm and 10.6 nm. For the average local IP errors (3s), the local IP of 5.7 nm at the resist step increases to 14.7 nm at the final step due to process-induced distortions. The local IP could be reduced to 6.0 nm by applying the constant scale value to the mask process. In the membrane process, the resist and final global IP (3s) is 15.3 nm and 17.1 nm. With more detectable alignment marks, it would be possible to improve the global IP. For the average local IP errors (3s) of the membrane process, the average resist and final local IP are 6.7 and 7.1 nm which shows no PID. The two approaches proved to control IP more accurately than the conventional one.

  15. A Mechanics Baseline Test.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hestenes, David; Wells, Malcolm

    1992-01-01

    Reports the design of the "Mechanics Baseline Test," an instrument to assess students' understandings about concepts in mechanics. Discusses how comparisons of test results with extensive baseline data can be used to evaluate instruction at all levels. Includes a copy of the instrument. (MDH)

  16. Advancing a New Image of CTE via High-Quality Teacher Preparation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sass, Heather Boggs

    2011-01-01

    There is perhaps no better place to start in advancing a new image of career and technical education (CTE) than by creating the kind of classroom instruction that will prepare students for further learning and the workplace. The quality of teachers and their capacity to construct rich learning experiences for students represents the "front line"…

  17. Imaging heterogeneous absorption distribution of advanced breast cancer by optical tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yan; Zhu, Quing

    2010-11-01

    Tumor vascular patterns of advanced breast cancers are complex and heterogeneous. Two typical light absorption patterns of periphery enhancement and posterior shadowing have been observed when imaging these advanced cancers using optical tomography guided by ultrasound. We perform a series simulation and phantom experiments to systemically evaluate the effects of target parameters, target locations, and target optical properties on imaging periphery enhancement absorption distribution using reflection geometry. Large tumors are modeled as concentric semiellipsoidal targets of different outer shell and inner core optical properties. We show that larger targets of more than 3 to 4 cm diameter with outer shell thicknesses less than 1 cm can be resolved at a depth less than 3 cm. A clinical example is given to show the complex vasculature distributions seen from an advanced cancer.

  18. Recent Advances in CT and MR Imaging for Evaluation of Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jeong Min; Yoon, Jeong-Hee; Joo, Ijin; Woo, Hyun Sik

    2012-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common malignancies worldwide. Accurate diagnosis and assessment of disease extent are crucial for proper management of patients with HCC. Imaging plays a crucial role in early detection, accurate staging, and the planning of management strategies. A variety of imaging modalities are currently used in evaluating patients with suspected HCC; these include ultrasound, computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), nuclear medicine, and angiography. Among these modalities, dynamic MRI and CT are regarded as the best imaging techniques available for the noninvasive diagnosis of HCC. Recent improvements in CT and MRI technology have made noninvasive and reliable diagnostic assessment of hepatocellular nodules possible in the cirrhotic liver, and biopsy is frequently not required prior to treatment. Until now, the major challenge for radiologists in imaging cirrhosis has been the characterization of small cirrhotic nodules smaller than 2 cm in diameter. Further technological advancement will undoubtedly have a major impact on liver tumor imaging. The increased speed of data acquisition in CT and MRI has allowed improvements in both spatial and temporal resolution, which have made possible a more precise evaluation of the hemodynamics of liver nodules. Furthermore, the development of new, tissue-specific contrast agents such as gadoxetic acid has improved HCC detection on MRI. In this review, we discuss the role of CT and MRI in the diagnosis and staging of HCC, recent technological advances, and the strengths and limitations of these imaging modalities. PMID:24159569

  19. Recent advances in MEMS-VCSELs for high performance structural and functional SS-OCT imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayaraman, V.; John, D. D.; Burgner, C.; Robertson, M. E.; Potsaid, B.; Jiang, J. Y.; Tsai, T. H.; Choi, W.; Lu, C. D.; Heim, P. J. S.; Fujimoto, J. G.; Cable, A. E.

    2014-03-01

    Since the first demonstration of swept source optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT) imaging using widely tunable micro-electromechanical systems vertical cavity surface-emitting lasers (MEMS-VCSELs) in 2011, VCSEL-based SSOCT has advanced in both device and system performance. These advances include extension of MEMS-VCSEL center wavelength to both 1060nm and 1300nm, improved tuning range and tuning speed, new SS-OCT imaging modes, and demonstration of the first electrically pumped devices. Optically pumped devices have demonstrated continuous singlemode tuning range of 150nm at 1300nm and 122nm at 1060nm, representing a fractional tuning range of 11.5%, which is nearly a factor of 3 greater than the best reported MEMS-VCSEL tuning ranges prior to 2011. These tuning ranges have also been achieved with wavelength modulation rates of >500kHz, enabling >1 MHz axial scan rates. In addition, recent electrically pumped devices have exhibited 48.5nm continuous tuning range around 1060nm with 890kHz axial scan rate, representing a factor of two increase in tuning over previously reported electrically pumped MEMS-VCSELs in this wavelength range. New imaging modes enabled by optically pumped devices at 1060nm and 1300nm include full eye length imaging, pulsatile Doppler blood flow imaging, high-speed endoscopic imaging, and hand-held wide-field retinal imaging.

  20. Advanced synthetic image generation models and their application to multi/hyperspectral algorithm development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schott, John R.; Brown, Scott D.; Raqueno, Rolando V.; Gross, Harry N.; Robinson, Gary

    1999-01-01

    The need for robust image data sets for algorithm development and testing has prompted the consideration of synthetic imagery as a supplement to real imagery. The unique ability of synthetic image generation (SIG) tools to supply per-pixel truth allows algorithm writers to test difficult scenarios that would require expensive collection and instrumentation efforts. In addition, SIG data products can supply the user with `actual' truth measurements of the entire image area that are not subject to measurement error thereby allowing the user to more accurately evaluate the performance of their algorithm. Advanced algorithms place a high demand on synthetic imagery to reproduce both the spectro-radiometric and spatial character observed in real imagery. This paper describes a synthetic image generation model that strives to include the radiometric processes that affect spectral image formation and capture. In particular, it addresses recent advances in SIG modeling that attempt to capture the spatial/spectral correlation inherent in real images. The model is capable of simultaneously generating imagery from a wide range of sensors allowing it to generate daylight, low-light-level and thermal image inputs for broadband, multi- and hyper-spectral exploitation algorithms.

  1. MO-C-18A-01: Advances in Model-Based 3D Image Reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, G; Pan, X; Stayman, J; Samei, E

    2014-06-15

    Recent years have seen the emergence of CT image reconstruction techniques that exploit physical models of the imaging system, photon statistics, and even the patient to achieve improved 3D image quality and/or reduction of radiation dose. With numerous advantages in comparison to conventional 3D filtered backprojection, such techniques bring a variety of challenges as well, including: a demanding computational load associated with sophisticated forward models and iterative optimization methods; nonlinearity and nonstationarity in image quality characteristics; a complex dependency on multiple free parameters; and the need to understand how best to incorporate prior information (including patient-specific prior images) within the reconstruction process. The advantages, however, are even greater – for example: improved image quality; reduced dose; robustness to noise and artifacts; task-specific reconstruction protocols; suitability to novel CT imaging platforms and noncircular orbits; and incorporation of known characteristics of the imager and patient that are conventionally discarded. This symposium features experts in 3D image reconstruction, image quality assessment, and the translation of such methods to emerging clinical applications. Dr. Chen will address novel methods for the incorporation of prior information in 3D and 4D CT reconstruction techniques. Dr. Pan will show recent advances in optimization-based reconstruction that enable potential reduction of dose and sampling requirements. Dr. Stayman will describe a “task-based imaging” approach that leverages models of the imaging system and patient in combination with a specification of the imaging task to optimize both the acquisition and reconstruction process. Dr. Samei will describe the development of methods for image quality assessment in such nonlinear reconstruction techniques and the use of these methods to characterize and optimize image quality and dose in a spectrum of clinical

  2. Recent advances in thoracic x-ray computed tomography for pulmonary imaging

    PubMed Central

    Precious, Bruce J; Raju, Rekha; Leipsic, Jonathon

    2014-01-01

    The present article reviews recent advances in pulmonary computed tomography (CT) imaging, focusing on the application of dual-energy CT and the use of iterative reconstruction. Dual-energy CT has proven to be useful in the characterization of pulmonary blood pool in the setting of pulmonary embolism, characterization of diffuse lung parenchymal diseases, evaluation of thoracic malignancies and in imaging of lung ventilation using inhaled xenon. The benefits of iterative reconstruction have been largely derived from reduction of image noise compared with filtered backprojection reconstructions which, in turn, enables the use of lower radiation dose CT acquisition protocols without sacrificing image quality. Potential clinical applications of iterative reconstruction include imaging for pulmonary nodules and high-resolution pulmonary CT. PMID:24791258

  3. ADVANCED MR IMAGING METHODS FOR PLANNING AND MONITORING RADIATION THERAPY IN PATIENTS WITH HIGH GRADE GLIOMA

    PubMed Central

    Lupo, Janine M.; Nelson, Sarah J.

    2016-01-01

    This review explores how the integration of advanced imaging methods with high quality anatomic images significantly improves the characterization, target definition, assessment of response to therapy, and overall management of patients with high-grade glioma. Metrics derived from diffusion, perfusion, and susceptibility weighted MR imaging in conjunction with MR spectroscopic imaging, allows us to characterize regions of edema, hypoxia, increased cellularity, and necrosis within heterogeneous tumor and surrounding brain tissue. Quantification of such measures may provide a more reliable initial representation of tumor delineation and response to therapy than changes in the contrast enhancing or T2 lesion alone and have a significant impact on targeting resection, planning radiation, and assessing treatment effectiveness. In the long-term, implementation of these imaging methodologies can also aid in the identification of recurrent tumor and its differentiation from treatment-related confounds and facilitate the detection of radiation-induced vascular injury in otherwise normal appearing brain tissue. PMID:25219809

  4. Smart image sensors: an emerging key technology for advanced optical measurement and microsystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seitz, Peter

    1996-08-01

    Optical microsystems typically include photosensitive devices, analog preprocessing circuitry and digital signal processing electronics. The advances in semiconductor technology have made it possible today to integrate all photosensitive and electronical devices on one 'smart image sensor' or photo-ASIC (application-specific integrated circuits containing photosensitive elements). It is even possible to provide each 'smart pixel' with additional photoelectronic functionality, without compromising the fill factor substantially. This technological capability is the basis for advanced cameras and optical microsystems showing novel on-chip functionality: Single-chip cameras with on- chip analog-to-digital converters for less than $10 are advertised; image sensors have been developed including novel functionality such as real-time selectable pixel size and shape, the capability of performing arbitrary convolutions simultaneously with the exposure, as well as variable, programmable offset and sensitivity of the pixels leading to image sensors with a dynamic range exceeding 150 dB. Smart image sensors have been demonstrated offering synchronous detection and demodulation capabilities in each pixel (lock-in CCD), and conventional image sensors are combined with an on-chip digital processor for complete, single-chip image acquisition and processing systems. Technological problems of the monolithic integration of smart image sensors include offset non-uniformities, temperature variations of electronic properties, imperfect matching of circuit parameters, etc. These problems can often be overcome either by designing additional compensation circuitry or by providing digital correction routines. Where necessary for technological or economic reasons, smart image sensors can also be combined with or realized as hybrids, making use of commercially available electronic components. It is concluded that the possibilities offered by custom smart image sensors will influence the design

  5. Advances in retinal imaging for diabetic retinopathy and diabetic macular edema.

    PubMed

    Tan, Colin Siang Hui; Chew, Milton Cher Yong; Lim, Louis Wei Yi; Sadda, Srinivas R

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy and diabetic macular edema (DME) are leading causes of blindness throughout the world, and cause significant visual morbidity. Ocular imaging has played a significant role in the management of diabetic eye disease, and the advent of advanced imaging modalities will be of great value as our understanding of diabetic eye diseases increase, and the management options become increasingly varied and complex. Color fundus photography has established roles in screening for diabetic eye disease, early detection of progression, and monitoring of treatment response. Fluorescein angiography (FA) detects areas of capillary nonperfusion, as well as leakage from both microaneurysms and neovascularization. Recent advances in retinal imaging modalities complement traditional fundus photography and provide invaluable new information for clinicians. Ultra-widefield imaging, which can be used to produce both color fundus photographs and FAs, now allows unprecedented views of the posterior pole. The pathologies that are detected in the periphery of the retina have the potential to change the grading of disease severity, and may be of prognostic significance to disease progression. Studies have shown that peripheral ischemia may be related to the presence and severity of DME. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) provides structural detail of the retina, and the quantitative and qualitative features are useful in the monitoring of diabetic eye disease. A relatively recent innovation, OCT angiography, produces images of the fine blood vessels at the macula and optic disc, without the need for contrast agents. This paper will review the roles of each of these imaging modalities for diabetic eye disease. PMID:26953028

  6. Use of Advanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging Techniques in Neuromyelitis Optica Spectrum Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Kremer, Stephane; Renard, Felix; Achard, Sophie; Lana-Peixoto, Marco A.; Palace, Jacqueline; Asgari, Nasrin; Klawiter, Eric C.; Tenembaum, Silvia N.; Banwell, Brenda; Greenberg, Benjamin M.; Bennett, Jeffrey L.; Levy, Michael; Villoslada, Pablo; Saiz, Albert; Fujihara, Kazuo; Chan, Koon Ho; Schippling, Sven; Paul, Friedemann; Kim, Ho Jin; de Seze, Jerome; Wuerfel, Jens T.

    2016-01-01

    Brain parenchymal lesions are frequently observed on conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans of patients with neuromyelitis optica (NMO) spectrum disorder, but the specific morphological and temporal patterns distinguishing them unequivocally from lesions caused by other disorders have not been identified. This literature review summarizes the literature on advanced quantitative imaging measures reported for patients with NMO spectrum disorder, including proton MR spectroscopy, diffusion tensor imaging, magnetization transfer imaging, quantitative MR volumetry, and ultrahigh-field strength MRI. It was undertaken to consider the advanced MRI techniques used for patients with NMO by different specialists in the field. Although quantitative measures such as proton MR spectroscopy or magnetization transfer imaging have not reproducibly revealed diffuse brain injury, preliminary data from diffusion-weighted imaging and brain tissue volumetry indicate greater white matter than gray matter degradation. These findings could be confirmed by ultrahigh-field MRI. The use of nonconventional MRI techniques may further our understanding of the pathogenic processes in NMO spectrum disorders and may help us identify the distinct radiographic features corresponding to specific phenotypic manifestations of this disease. PMID:26010909

  7. Advances in retinal imaging for diabetic retinopathy and diabetic macular edema

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Colin Siang Hui; Chew, Milton Cher Yong; Lim, Louis Wei Yi; Sadda, Srinivas R

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy and diabetic macular edema (DME) are leading causes of blindness throughout the world, and cause significant visual morbidity. Ocular imaging has played a significant role in the management of diabetic eye disease, and the advent of advanced imaging modalities will be of great value as our understanding of diabetic eye diseases increase, and the management options become increasingly varied and complex. Color fundus photography has established roles in screening for diabetic eye disease, early detection of progression, and monitoring of treatment response. Fluorescein angiography (FA) detects areas of capillary nonperfusion, as well as leakage from both microaneurysms and neovascularization. Recent advances in retinal imaging modalities complement traditional fundus photography and provide invaluable new information for clinicians. Ultra-widefield imaging, which can be used to produce both color fundus photographs and FAs, now allows unprecedented views of the posterior pole. The pathologies that are detected in the periphery of the retina have the potential to change the grading of disease severity, and may be of prognostic significance to disease progression. Studies have shown that peripheral ischemia may be related to the presence and severity of DME. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) provides structural detail of the retina, and the quantitative and qualitative features are useful in the monitoring of diabetic eye disease. A relatively recent innovation, OCT angiography, produces images of the fine blood vessels at the macula and optic disc, without the need for contrast agents. This paper will review the roles of each of these imaging modalities for diabetic eye disease. PMID:26953028

  8. Use of Advanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging Techniques in Neuromyelitis Optica Spectrum Disorder.

    PubMed

    Kremer, Stephane; Renard, Felix; Achard, Sophie; Lana-Peixoto, Marco A; Palace, Jacqueline; Asgari, Nasrin; Klawiter, Eric C; Tenembaum, Silvia N; Banwell, Brenda; Greenberg, Benjamin M; Bennett, Jeffrey L; Levy, Michael; Villoslada, Pablo; Saiz, Albert; Fujihara, Kazuo; Chan, Koon Ho; Schippling, Sven; Paul, Friedemann; Kim, Ho Jin; de Seze, Jerome; Wuerfel, Jens T; Cabre, Philippe; Marignier, Romain; Tedder, Thomas; van Pelt, Danielle; Broadley, Simon; Chitnis, Tanuja; Wingerchuk, Dean; Pandit, Lekha; Leite, Maria Isabel; Apiwattanakul, Metha; Kleiter, Ingo; Prayoonwiwat, Naraporn; Han, May; Hellwig, Kerstin; van Herle, Katja; John, Gareth; Hooper, D Craig; Nakashima, Ichiro; Sato, Douglas; Yeaman, Michael R; Waubant, Emmanuelle; Zamvil, Scott; Stüve, Olaf; Aktas, Orhan; Smith, Terry J; Jacob, Anu; O'Connor, Kevin

    2015-07-01

    Brain parenchymal lesions are frequently observed on conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans of patients with neuromyelitis optica (NMO) spectrum disorder, but the specific morphological and temporal patterns distinguishing them unequivocally from lesions caused by other disorders have not been identified. This literature review summarizes the literature on advanced quantitative imaging measures reported for patients with NMO spectrum disorder, including proton MR spectroscopy, diffusion tensor imaging, magnetization transfer imaging, quantitative MR volumetry, and ultrahigh-field strength MRI. It was undertaken to consider the advanced MRI techniques used for patients with NMO by different specialists in the field. Although quantitative measures such as proton MR spectroscopy or magnetization transfer imaging have not reproducibly revealed diffuse brain injury, preliminary data from diffusion-weighted imaging and brain tissue volumetry indicate greater white matter than gray matter degradation. These findings could be confirmed by ultrahigh-field MRI. The use of nonconventional MRI techniques may further our understanding of the pathogenic processes in NMO spectrum disorders and may help us identify the distinct radiographic features corresponding to specific phenotypic manifestations of this disease. PMID:26010909

  9. Advancing multiscale structural mapping of the brain through fluorescence imaging and analysis across length scales.

    PubMed

    Hogstrom, L J; Guo, S M; Murugadoss, K; Bathe, M

    2016-02-01

    Brain function emerges from hierarchical neuronal structure that spans orders of magnitude in length scale, from the nanometre-scale organization of synaptic proteins to the macroscopic wiring of neuronal circuits. Because the synaptic electrochemical signal transmission that drives brain function ultimately relies on the organization of neuronal circuits, understanding brain function requires an understanding of the principles that determine hierarchical neuronal structure in living or intact organisms. Recent advances in fluorescence imaging now enable quantitative characterization of neuronal structure across length scales, ranging from single-molecule localization using super-resolution imaging to whole-brain imaging using light-sheet microscopy on cleared samples. These tools, together with correlative electron microscopy and magnetic resonance imaging at the nanoscopic and macroscopic scales, respectively, now facilitate our ability to probe brain structure across its full range of length scales with cellular and molecular specificity. As these imaging datasets become increasingly accessible to researchers, novel statistical and computational frameworks will play an increasing role in efforts to relate hierarchical brain structure to its function. In this perspective, we discuss several prominent experimental advances that are ushering in a new era of quantitative fluorescence-based imaging in neuroscience along with novel computational and statistical strategies that are helping to distil our understanding of complex brain structure. PMID:26855758

  10. Advances in Image Processing Techniques for Drusens Detection and Quantification in Fundus Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mora, André; Vieira, Pedro; Fonseca, José

    Age-Related Macular Degeneration (ARMD) is considered the leading cause of irreversible blindness in developed countries. One of its risk factors is the presence of drusens, which are retina abnormalities appearing as yellowish spots in fundus images.

  11. Prostate Radiotherapy in the Era of Advanced Imaging and Precision Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Dulaney, Caleb R.; Osula, Daniel O.; Yang, Eddy S.; Rais-Bahrami, Soroush

    2016-01-01

    Tremendous technological advancements in prostate radiotherapy have decreased treatment toxicity and improved clinical outcomes for men with prostate cancer. While these advances have allowed for significant treatment volume reduction and whole-organ dose escalation, further improvement in prostate radiotherapy has been limited by classic techniques for diagnosis and risk stratification. Developments in prostate imaging, image-guided targeted biopsy, next-generation gene expression profiling, and targeted molecular therapies now provide information to stratify patients and select treatments based on tumor biology. Image-guided targeted biopsy improves detection of clinically significant cases of prostate cancer and provides important information about the biological behavior of intraprostatic lesions which can further guide treatment decisions. We review the evolution of prostate magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and MRI-ultrasound fusion-guided prostate biopsy. Recent advancements in radiation therapy including dose escalation, moderate and extreme hypofractionation, partial prostate radiation therapy, and finally dose escalation by simultaneous integrated boost are discussed. We also review next-generation sequencing and discuss developments in targeted molecular therapies. Last, we review ongoing clinical trials and future treatment paradigms that integrate targeted biopsy, molecular profiling and therapy, and prostate radiotherapy. PMID:27022486

  12. Can Imaging Put the “Advanced” Back in Advanced Wound Care?

    PubMed Central

    DaCosta, Ralph S.; Ottolino-Perry, Kathryn; Banerjee, Jaideep

    2016-01-01

    An effective, scientifically validated, diagnostic tool helps clinicians make better, timely, and more objective medical decisions in the care of their patients. Today, the need for such tools is especially urgent in the field of wound care where patient-centric care is the goal, under ever tightening clinical budget constraints. In an era of countless “innovative” treatment options, that is, advanced dressings, negative pressure devices, and various debridement instruments available to the wound care clinical team, one area that has arguably languished in the past decade has been innovation in wound diagnostics. Whereas medical imaging is a mainstay in the diagnostic toolkit across many other medical fields (oncology, neurology, gastroenterology, orthopedics, etc.), the field of wound care has yet to realize the full potential that advances in imaging technologies have to offer the clinician. In this issue, the first of a series in wound imaging and diagnostics, four articles have been assembled, highlighting some of the recent advances in wound imaging technologies. PMID:27602251

  13. Advances in molecular imaging: targeted optical contrast agents for cancer diagnostics

    PubMed Central

    Hellebust, Anne; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    2012-01-01

    Over the last three decades, our understanding of the molecular changes associated with cancer development and progression has advanced greatly. This has led to new cancer therapeutics targeted against specific molecular pathways; such therapies show great promise to reduce mortality, in part by enabling physicians to tailor therapy for patients based on a molecular profile of their tumor. Unfortunately, the tools for definitive cancer diagnosis – light microscopic examination of biopsied tissue stained with nonspecific dyes – remain focused on the analysis of tissue ex vivo. There is an important need for new clinical tools to support the molecular diagnosis of cancer. Optical molecular imaging is emerging as a technique to help meet this need. Targeted, optically active contrast agents can specifically label extra-and intracellular biomarkers of cancer. Optical images can be acquired in real time with high spatial resolution to image-specific molecular targets, while still providing morphologic context. This article reviews recent advances in optical molecular imaging, highlighting the advances in technology required to improve early cancer detection, guide selection of targeted therapy and rapidly evaluate therapeutic efficacy. PMID:22385200

  14. Prostate Radiotherapy in the Era of Advanced Imaging and Precision Medicine.

    PubMed

    Dulaney, Caleb R; Osula, Daniel O; Yang, Eddy S; Rais-Bahrami, Soroush

    2016-01-01

    Tremendous technological advancements in prostate radiotherapy have decreased treatment toxicity and improved clinical outcomes for men with prostate cancer. While these advances have allowed for significant treatment volume reduction and whole-organ dose escalation, further improvement in prostate radiotherapy has been limited by classic techniques for diagnosis and risk stratification. Developments in prostate imaging, image-guided targeted biopsy, next-generation gene expression profiling, and targeted molecular therapies now provide information to stratify patients and select treatments based on tumor biology. Image-guided targeted biopsy improves detection of clinically significant cases of prostate cancer and provides important information about the biological behavior of intraprostatic lesions which can further guide treatment decisions. We review the evolution of prostate magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and MRI-ultrasound fusion-guided prostate biopsy. Recent advancements in radiation therapy including dose escalation, moderate and extreme hypofractionation, partial prostate radiation therapy, and finally dose escalation by simultaneous integrated boost are discussed. We also review next-generation sequencing and discuss developments in targeted molecular therapies. Last, we review ongoing clinical trials and future treatment paradigms that integrate targeted biopsy, molecular profiling and therapy, and prostate radiotherapy. PMID:27022486

  15. Single virus detection by means of atomic force microscopy in combination with advanced image analysis.

    PubMed

    Bocklitz, Thomas; Kämmer, Evelyn; Stöckel, Stephan; Cialla-May, Dana; Weber, Karina; Zell, Roland; Deckert, Volker; Popp, Jürgen

    2014-10-01

    In the present contribution virions of five different virus species, namely Varicella-zoster virus, Porcine teschovirus, Tobacco mosaic virus, Coliphage M13 and Enterobacteria phage PsP3, are investigated using atomic force microscopy (AFM). From the resulting height images quantitative features like maximal height, area and volume of the viruses could be extracted and compared to reference values. Subsequently, these features were accompanied by image moments, which quantify the morphology of the virions. Both types of features could be utilized for an automatic discrimination of the five virus species. The accuracy of this classification model was 96.8%. Thus, a virus detection on a single-particle level using AFM images is possible. Due to the application of advanced image analysis the morphology could be quantified and used for further analysis. Here, an automatic recognition by means of a classification model could be achieved in a reliable and objective manner. PMID:25196422

  16. ADVANCED IMAGING. Extended-resolution structured illumination imaging of endocytic and cytoskeletal dynamics.

    PubMed

    Li, Dong; Shao, Lin; Chen, Bi-Chang; Zhang, Xi; Zhang, Mingshu; Moses, Brian; Milkie, Daniel E; Beach, Jordan R; Hammer, John A; Pasham, Mithun; Kirchhausen, Tomas; Baird, Michelle A; Davidson, Michael W; Xu, Pingyong; Betzig, Eric

    2015-08-28

    Super-resolution fluorescence microscopy is distinct among nanoscale imaging tools in its ability to image protein dynamics in living cells. Structured illumination microscopy (SIM) stands out in this regard because of its high speed and low illumination intensities, but typically offers only a twofold resolution gain. We extended the resolution of live-cell SIM through two approaches: ultrahigh numerical aperture SIM at 84-nanometer lateral resolution for more than 100 multicolor frames, and nonlinear SIM with patterned activation at 45- to 62-nanometer resolution for approximately 20 to 40 frames. We applied these approaches to image dynamics near the plasma membrane of spatially resolved assemblies of clathrin and caveolin, Rab5a in early endosomes, and α-actinin, often in relationship to cortical actin. In addition, we examined mitochondria, actin, and the Golgi apparatus dynamics in three dimensions. PMID:26315442

  17. Advances in Immuno–Positron Emission Tomography: Antibodies for Molecular Imaging in Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Knowles, Scott M.; Wu, Anna M.

    2012-01-01

    Identification of cancer cell–surface biomarkers and advances in antibody engineering have led to a sharp increase in the development of therapeutic antibodies. These same advances have led to a new generation of radiolabeled antibodies and antibody fragments that can be used as cancer-specific imaging agents, allowing quantitative imaging of cell-surface protein expression in vivo. Immuno–positron emission tomography (immunoPET) imaging with intact antibodies has shown success clinically in diagnosing and staging cancer. Engineered antibody fragments, such as diabodies, minibodies, and single-chain Fv (scFv) –Fc, have been successfully employed for immunoPET imaging of cancer cell–surface biomarkers in preclinical models and are poised to bring same-day imaging into clinical development. ImmunoPET can potentially provide a noninvasive approach for obtaining target-specific information useful for titrating doses for radioimmunotherapy, for patient risk stratification and selection of targeted therapies, for evaluating response to therapy, and for predicting adverse effects, thus contributing to the ongoing development of personalized cancer treatment. PMID:22987087

  18. Recent Advances in Image-Guided Radiotherapy for Head and Neck Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Nath, Sameer K.; Simpson, Daniel R.; Rose, Brent S.; Sandhu, Ajay P.

    2009-01-01

    Radiotherapy has a well-established role in the management of head and neck cancers. Over the past decade, a variety of new imaging modalities have been incorporated into the radiotherapy planning and delivery process. These technologies are collectively referred to as image-guided radiotherapy and may lead to significant gains in tumor control and radiation side effect profiles. In the following review, these techniques as they are applied to head and neck cancer patients are described, and clinical studies analyzing their use in target delineation, patient positioning, and adaptive radiotherapy are highlighted. Finally, we conclude with a brief discussion of potential areas of further radiotherapy advancement. PMID:19644564

  19. Advanced Remote-Sensing Imaging Emission Spectrometer (ARIES): AIRS Spectral Resolution with MODIS Spatial Resolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pagano, Thomas S.; Chahine, Moustafa T.; Aumann, Hartmut H.; OCallaghan, Fred

    2006-01-01

    The Advanced Remote-sensing Imaging Emission Spectrometer (ARIES) will measure a wide range of earth quantities fundamental to the study of global climate change. It will build upon the success of the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instruments currently flying on the EOS Aqua Spacecraft. Both instruments are facility instruments for NASA providing data to thousands of scientists investigating land, ocean and atmospheric Earth System processes. ARIES will meet all the requirements of AIRS and MODIS in a single compact instrument, while providing the next-generation capability of improved spatial resolution for AIRS and improved spectral resolution for MODIS.

  20. Advanced imaging and arthroscopic management of shoulder contracture after birth palsy.

    PubMed

    Kozin, Scott H; Zlotolow, Dan A

    2012-11-01

    Modern imaging techniques applied to the pediatric glenohumeral joint have advanced understanding of the anatomic changes that occur secondary to muscular imbalance after brachial plexus birth palsy. A better understanding of the progression and timing of glenohumeral dysplasia has also increased awareness and vigilance of this problem. Early detection of glenohumeral joint subluxation is now possible, allowing for prompt treatment with closed, arthroscopic, or open joint reduction with and without tendon transfers. Dynamic ultrasound imaging, Botox, and arthroscopic techniques have expanded treatment options, providing minimally invasive methods to successfully manage glenohumeral joint dysplasia. PMID:23101604

  1. Uncovering brain–heart information through advanced signal and image processing

    PubMed Central

    Toschi, Nicola; Barbieri, Riccardo

    2016-01-01

    Through their dynamical interplay, the brain and the heart ensure fundamental homeostasis and mediate a number of physiological functions as well as their disease-related aberrations. Although a vast number of ad hoc analytical and computational tools have been recently applied to the non-invasive characterization of brain and heart dynamic functioning, little attention has been devoted to combining information to unveil the interactions between these two physiological systems. This theme issue collects contributions from leading experts dealing with the development of advanced analytical and computational tools in the field of biomedical signal and image processing. It includes perspectives on recent advances in 7 T magnetic resonance imaging as well as electroencephalogram, electrocardiogram and cerebrovascular flow processing, with the specific aim of elucidating methods to uncover novel biological and physiological correlates of brain–heart physiology and physiopathology. PMID:27044995

  2. Uncovering brain-heart information through advanced signal and image processing.

    PubMed

    Valenza, Gaetano; Toschi, Nicola; Barbieri, Riccardo

    2016-05-13

    Through their dynamical interplay, the brain and the heart ensure fundamental homeostasis and mediate a number of physiological functions as well as their disease-related aberrations. Although a vast number of ad hoc analytical and computational tools have been recently applied to the non-invasive characterization of brain and heart dynamic functioning, little attention has been devoted to combining information to unveil the interactions between these two physiological systems. This theme issue collects contributions from leading experts dealing with the development of advanced analytical and computational tools in the field of biomedical signal and image processing. It includes perspectives on recent advances in 7 T magnetic resonance imaging as well as electroencephalogram, electrocardiogram and cerebrovascular flow processing, with the specific aim of elucidating methods to uncover novel biological and physiological correlates of brain-heart physiology and physiopathology. PMID:27044995

  3. 37 CFR 201.22 - Advance notices of potential infringement of works consisting of sounds, images, or both.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... infringement of works consisting of sounds, images, or both. 201.22 Section 201.22 Patents, Trademarks, and... § 201.22 Advance notices of potential infringement of works consisting of sounds, images, or both. (a... after the first fixation of a work consisting of sounds, images, or both that is first...

  4. 37 CFR 201.22 - Advance notices of potential infringement of works consisting of sounds, images, or both.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... infringement of works consisting of sounds, images, or both. 201.22 Section 201.22 Patents, Trademarks, and... Advance notices of potential infringement of works consisting of sounds, images, or both. (a) Definitions... after the first fixation of a work consisting of sounds, images, or both that is first...

  5. 37 CFR 201.22 - Advance notices of potential infringement of works consisting of sounds, images, or both.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... infringement of works consisting of sounds, images, or both. 201.22 Section 201.22 Patents, Trademarks, and... Advance notices of potential infringement of works consisting of sounds, images, or both. (a) Definitions... after the first fixation of a work consisting of sounds, images, or both that is first...

  6. 37 CFR 201.22 - Advance notices of potential infringement of works consisting of sounds, images, or both.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... infringement of works consisting of sounds, images, or both. 201.22 Section 201.22 Patents, Trademarks, and... Advance notices of potential infringement of works consisting of sounds, images, or both. (a) Definitions... after the first fixation of a work consisting of sounds, images, or both that is first...

  7. 37 CFR 201.22 - Advance notices of potential infringement of works consisting of sounds, images, or both.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... infringement of works consisting of sounds, images, or both. 201.22 Section 201.22 Patents, Trademarks, and... Advance notices of potential infringement of works consisting of sounds, images, or both. (a) Definitions... after the first fixation of a work consisting of sounds, images, or both that is first...

  8. Feasibility of intensity-modulated and image-guided radiotherapy for locally advanced esophageal cancer

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In this study the feasibility of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and tomotherapy-based image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) for locally advanced esophageal cancer was assessed. Methods A retrospective study of ten patients with locally advanced esophageal cancer who underwent concurrent chemotherapy with IMRT (1) and IGRT (9) was conducted. The gross tumor volume was treated to a median dose of 70 Gy (62.4-75 Gy). Results At a median follow-up of 14 months (1-39 months), three patients developed local failures, six patients developed distant metastases, and complications occurred in two patients (1 tracheoesophageal fistula, 1 esophageal stricture requiring repeated dilatations). No patients developed grade 3-4 pneumonitis or cardiac complications. Conclusions IMRT and IGRT may be effective for the treatment of locally advanced esophageal cancer with acceptable complications. PMID:24742268

  9. Recent advances in MRI technology: Implications for image quality and patient safety

    PubMed Central

    Sobol, Wlad T.

    2012-01-01

    Recent advances in MRI technology are presented, with emphasis on how this new technology impacts clinical operations (better image quality, faster exam times, and improved throughput). In addition, implications for patient safety are discussed with emphasis on the risk of patient injury due to either high local specific absorption rate (SAR) or large cumulative energy doses delivered during long exam times. Patient comfort issues are examined as well. PMID:23961024

  10. Recent Advances in 19Fluorine Magnetic Resonance Imaging with Perfluorocarbon Emulsions

    PubMed Central

    Schmieder, Anne H.; Caruthers, Shelton D.; Keupp, Jochen; Wickline, Samuel A.; Lanza, Gregory M.

    2016-01-01

    The research roots of 19fluorine (19F) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) date back over 35 years. Over that time span, 1H imaging flourished and was adopted worldwide with an endless array of applications and imaging approaches, making magnetic resonance an indispensable pillar of biomedical diagnostic imaging. For many years during this timeframe, 19F imaging research continued at a slow pace as the various attributes of the technique were explored. However, over the last decade and particularly the last several years, the pace and clinical relevance of 19F imaging has exploded. In part, this is due to advances in MRI instrumentation, 19F/1H coil designs, and ultrafast pulse sequence development for both preclinical and clinical scanners. These achievements, coupled with interest in the molecular imaging of anatomy and physiology, and combined with a cadre of innovative agents, have brought the concept of 19F into early clinical evaluation. In this review, we attempt to provide a slice of this rich history of research and development, with a particular focus on liquid perfluorocarbon compound-based agents. PMID:27110430

  11. A Novel Murine Model for Localized Radiation Necrosis and its Characterization Using Advanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Jost, Sarah C.; Hope, Andrew; Kiehl, Erich; Perry, Arie; Travers, Sarah; Garbow, Joel R.

    2009-10-01

    Purpose: To develop a murine model of radiation necrosis using fractionated, subtotal cranial irradiation; and to investigate the imaging signature of radiation-induced tissue damage using advanced magnetic resonance imaging techniques. Methods and Materials: Twenty-four mice each received 60 Gy of hemispheric (left) irradiation in 10 equal fractions. Magnetic resonance images at 4.7 T were subsequently collected using T1-, T2-, and diffusion sequences at selected time points after irradiation. After imaging, animals were killed and their brains fixed for correlative histologic analysis. Results: Contrast-enhanced T1- and T2-weighted magnetic resonance images at months 2, 3, and 4 showed changes consistent with progressive radiation necrosis. Quantitatively, mean diffusivity was significantly higher (mean = 0.86, 1.13, and 1.24 {mu}m{sup 2}/ms at 2, 3, and 4 months, respectively) in radiated brain, compared with contralateral untreated brain tissue (mean = 0.78, 0.82, and 0.83 {mu}m{sup 2}/ms) (p < 0.0001). Histology reflected changes typically seen in radiation necrosis. Conclusions: This murine model of radiation necrosis will facilitate investigation of imaging biomarkers that distinguish between radiation necrosis and tumor recurrence. In addition, this preclinical study supports clinical data suggesting that diffusion-weighted imaging may be helpful in answering this diagnostic question in clinical settings.

  12. Advancing Patient-centered Outcomes in Emergency Diagnostic Imaging: A Research Agenda.

    PubMed

    Kanzaria, Hemal K; McCabe, Aileen M; Meisel, Zachary M; LeBlanc, Annie; Schaffer, Jason T; Bellolio, M Fernanda; Vaughan, William; Merck, Lisa H; Applegate, Kimberly E; Hollander, Judd E; Grudzen, Corita R; Mills, Angela M; Carpenter, Christopher R; Hess, Erik P

    2015-12-01

    Diagnostic imaging is integral to the evaluation of many emergency department (ED) patients. However, relatively little effort has been devoted to patient-centered outcomes research (PCOR) in emergency diagnostic imaging. This article provides background on this topic and the conclusions of the 2015 Academic Emergency Medicine consensus conference PCOR work group regarding "Diagnostic Imaging in the Emergency Department: A Research Agenda to Optimize Utilization." The goal was to determine a prioritized research agenda to establish which outcomes related to emergency diagnostic imaging are most important to patients, caregivers, and other key stakeholders and which methods will most optimally engage patients in the decision to undergo imaging. Case vignettes are used to emphasize these concepts as they relate to a patient's decision to seek care at an ED and the care received there. The authors discuss applicable research methods and approaches such as shared decision-making that could facilitate better integration of patient-centered outcomes and patient-reported outcomes into decisions regarding emergency diagnostic imaging. Finally, based on a modified Delphi process involving members of the PCOR work group, prioritized research questions are proposed to advance the science of patient-centered outcomes in ED diagnostic imaging. PMID:26574729

  13. Important advances in technology and unique applications related to cardiac magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Ghosn, Mohamad G; Shah, Dipan J

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac magnetic resonance has become a well-established imaging modality and is considered the gold standard for myocardial tissue viability assessment and ventricular volumes quantification. Recent technological hardware and software advancements in magnetic resonance imaging technology have allowed the development of new methods that can improve clinical cardiovascular diagnosis and prognosis. The advent of a new generation of higher magnetic field scanners can be beneficial to various clinical applications. Also, the development of faster acquisition techniques have allowed mapping of the magnetic relaxation properties T1, T2, and T2* in the myocardium that can be used to quantify myocardial diffuse fibrosis, determine the presence of edema or inflammation, and measure iron within the myocardium, respectively. Another recent major advancement in CMR has been the introduction of three-dimension (3D) phase contrast imaging, also known as 4D flow. The following review discusses key advances in cardiac magnetic resonance technology and their potential to improve clinical cardiovascular diagnosis and outcomes. PMID:25574343

  14. Three-Dimensional Imaging and Image Displays: Surgical Application of Advanced Technologies.

    PubMed

    Satava

    1996-09-01

    One of the cornerstones of modern technology that was ushered in by laparoscopic surgery is the use of the video image. The importance of this "virtual representation" of the patient goes well beyond the application to laparoscopic surgery, and lies at the very heart of the revolution of surgery into the Information Age. Real objects, organs and patients can be represented as 2 and 3-dimensional computer generated images and viewed upon displays beyond the simple video monitor which permit a level of clinical practice not possible on the actual patients. These fundamental concepts that form the foundation of the revolution in surgery are placed in a framework for the future of surgery, and illustrate how their implementation can dramatically improve patient care. PMID:10401122

  15. A standard data set for performance analysis of advanced IR image processing techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiß, A. Robert; Adomeit, Uwe; Chevalier, Philippe; Landeau, Stéphane; Bijl, Piet; Champagnat, Frédéric; Dijk, Judith; Göhler, Benjamin; Landini, Stefano; Reynolds, Joseph P.; Smith, Leslie N.

    2012-06-01

    Modern IR cameras are increasingly equipped with built-in advanced (often non-linear) image and signal processing algorithms (like fusion, super-resolution, dynamic range compression etc.) which can tremendously influence performance characteristics. Traditional approaches to range performance modeling are of limited use for these types of equipment. Several groups have tried to overcome this problem by producing a variety of imagery to assess the impact of advanced signal and image processing. Mostly, this data was taken from classified targets and/ or using classified imager and is thus not suitable for comparison studies between different groups from government, industry and universities. To ameliorate this situation, NATO SET-140 has undertaken a systematic measurement campaign at the DGA technical proving ground in Angers, France, to produce an openly distributable data set suitable for the assessment of fusion, super-resolution, local contrast enhancement, dynamic range compression and image-based NUC algorithm performance. The imagery was recorded for different target / background settings, camera and/or object movements and temperature contrasts. MWIR, LWIR and Dual-band cameras were used for recording and were also thoroughly characterized in the lab. We present a selection of the data set together with examples of their use in the assessment of super-resolution and contrast enhancement algorithms.

  16. Comparison of two imaging programs in predicting the soft tissue changes with mandibular advancement surgery.

    PubMed

    Ravindranath, Sneha; Krishnaswamy, Nathamuni Rengarajan; Sundaram, Venkateswaran

    2011-01-01

    Establishing common objectives and expectations concerning the outcome of proposed surgical orthodontic therapy is a crucial part of the treatment planning process, which has been greatly simplified by imaging software. The purpose of this study was to investigate the reliability of two surgical imaging programs--Dolphin Imaging 10 and Vistadent OC--in simulating the actual outcome of mandibular advancement surgery by using a visual analog scale (VAS) judged by a panel of orthodontists, oral surgeons, and laypersons. The predictions were also analyzed with soft tissue cephalometric evaluation. The results of the study showed that in predicting the surgical outcome evaluated by the VAS, both programs received a mean rating of fair. One was marginally superior for the overall assessment among all three panelist groups. Region-wise, rating indicated the lower lip region to be the least accurate, and the submental region received the highest scores. The soft tissue cephalometric parameters showed minimal differences except for the lower lip parameters. Thus, Dolphin Imaging 10 and Vistadent OC are reliable in predicting mandibular advancement surgical outcomes with inaccuracies chiefly in the lower lip region. PMID:22299108

  17. Advanced image processing package for FPGA-based re-programmable miniature electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ovod, Vladimir I.; Baxter, Christopher R.; Massie, Mark A.; McCarley, Paul L.

    2005-05-01

    Nova Sensors produces miniature electronics for a variety of real-time digital video camera systems, including foveal sensors based on Nova's Variable Acuity Superpixel Imager (VASITM) technology. An advanced image-processing package has been designed at Nova Sensors to re-configure the FPGA-based co-processor board for numerous applications including motion detection, optical, background velocimetry and target tracking. Currently, the processing package consists of 14 processing operations that cover a broad range of point- and area-applied algorithms. Flexible FPGA designs of these operations and re-programmability of the processing board allows for easy updates of the VASITM sensors, and for low-cost customization of VASITM sensors taking into account specific customer requirements. This paper describes the image processing algorithms implemented and verified in Xilinx FPGAs and provides the major technical performances with figures illustrating practical applications of the processing package.

  18. A review of breast tomosynthesis. Part II. Image reconstruction, processing and analysis, and advanced applications.

    PubMed

    Sechopoulos, Ioannis

    2013-01-01

    Many important post-acquisition aspects of breast tomosynthesis imaging can impact its clinical performance. Chief among them is the reconstruction algorithm that generates the representation of the three-dimensional breast volume from the acquired projections. But even after reconstruction, additional processes, such as artifact reduction algorithms, computer aided detection and diagnosis, among others, can also impact the performance of breast tomosynthesis in the clinical realm. In this two part paper, a review of breast tomosynthesis research is performed, with an emphasis on its medical physics aspects. In the companion paper, the first part of this review, the research performed relevant to the image acquisition process is examined. This second part will review the research on the post-acquisition aspects, including reconstruction, image processing, and analysis, as well as the advanced applications being investigated for breast tomosynthesis. PMID:23298127

  19. A review of breast tomosynthesis. Part II. Image reconstruction, processing and analysis, and advanced applications

    PubMed Central

    Sechopoulos, Ioannis

    2013-01-01

    Many important post-acquisition aspects of breast tomosynthesis imaging can impact its clinical performance. Chief among them is the reconstruction algorithm that generates the representation of the three-dimensional breast volume from the acquired projections. But even after reconstruction, additional processes, such as artifact reduction algorithms, computer aided detection and diagnosis, among others, can also impact the performance of breast tomosynthesis in the clinical realm. In this two part paper, a review of breast tomosynthesis research is performed, with an emphasis on its medical physics aspects. In the companion paper, the first part of this review, the research performed relevant to the image acquisition process is examined. This second part will review the research on the post-acquisition aspects, including reconstruction, image processing, and analysis, as well as the advanced applications being investigated for breast tomosynthesis. PMID:23298127

  20. Recent advancements in structured-illumination microscopy toward live-cell imaging.

    PubMed

    Hirano, Yasuhiro; Matsuda, Atsushi; Hiraoka, Yasushi

    2015-08-01

    Fluorescence microscopy allows us to observe fluorescently labeled molecules in diverse biological processes and organelle structures within living cells. However, the diffraction limit restricts its spatial resolution to about half of its wavelength, limiting the capability of biological observation at the molecular level. Structured-illumination microscopy (SIM), a type of super-resolution microscopy, doubles the spatial resolution in all three dimensions by illuminating the sample with a patterned excitation light, followed by computer reconstruction. SIM uses a relatively low illumination power compared with other methods of super-resolution microscopy and is easily available for multicolor imaging. SIM has great potential for meeting the requirements of live-cell imaging. Recent developments in diverse types of SIM have achieved higher spatial (∼50 nm lateral) and temporal (∼100 Hz) resolutions. Here, we review recent advancements in SIM and discuss its application in noninvasive live-cell imaging. PMID:26133185

  1. Recent Advances in the Diagnosis and Management of Cirrhosis-Associated Cardiomyopathy in Liver Transplant Candidates: Advanced Echo Imaging, Cardiac Biomarkers, and Advanced Heart Failure Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Farr, Maryjane; Schulze, Paul Christian

    2014-01-01

    Patients with end-stage liver disease in need of liver transplantation increasingly are older with a greater burden of cardiac disease and other co-morbidities, which may increase perioperative risk and adversely affect long-term prognosis. Cirrhosis of any etiology manifests hemodynamically as a state of low systemic vascular resistance, with high peripheral, but low central blood volume, leading to a state of neurohormonal activation and high cardiac output, which may adversely affect cardiac reserve under extreme perioperative stress, aptly termed cirrhosis-associated or cirrhotic cardiomyopathy. Evidence of asymptomatic cirrhotic cardiomyopathy may be found in subtle electrocardiographic and echocardiographic changes, but may progress to severe heart failure under the demands of bleeding and transfusions, vasopressors, rebounding peripheral vascular resistance, withdrawal of cardioprotective beta-blockers and mineralocorticoid antagonists, exacerbated by sepsis or systemic inflammatory response syndrome. This review will add to the current body of literature on cirrhotic cardiomyopathy by focusing on the role of advanced echocardiographic imaging techniques, cardiac biomarkers, and advanced heart failure therapies available to manage patients with cirrhotic cardiomyopathy while waiting for liver transplant and during the perioperative period. PMID:25657603

  2. Advanced imaging techniques in the therapeutic response of transarterial chemoembolization for hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ke; Zhang, Xiao-Ming; Yang, Lin; Xu, Hao; Peng, Juan

    2016-05-28

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the major causes of morbidity and mortality in patients with chronic liver disease. Transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) can significantly improve the survival rate of patients with HCC and is the first treatment choice for patients who are not suitable for surgical resections. The evaluation of the response to TACE treatment affects not only the assessment of the therapy efficacy but also the development of the next step in the treatment plan. The use of imaging to examine changes in tumor volume to assess the response of solid tumors to treatment has been controversial. In recent years, the emergence of new imaging technology has made it possible to observe the response of tumors to treatment prior to any morphological changes. In this article, the advances in studies reporting the use of computed tomography perfusion imaging, diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), intravoxel incoherent motion, diffusion kurtosis imaging, magnetic resonance spectroscopy, magnetic resonance perfusion-weighted imaging, blood oxygen level-dependent MRI, positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography and PET/MRI to assess the TACE treatment response are reviewed. PMID:27239110

  3. Advanced imaging techniques in the therapeutic response of transarterial chemoembolization for hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ke; Zhang, Xiao-Ming; Yang, Lin; Xu, Hao; Peng, Juan

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the major causes of morbidity and mortality in patients with chronic liver disease. Transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) can significantly improve the survival rate of patients with HCC and is the first treatment choice for patients who are not suitable for surgical resections. The evaluation of the response to TACE treatment affects not only the assessment of the therapy efficacy but also the development of the next step in the treatment plan. The use of imaging to examine changes in tumor volume to assess the response of solid tumors to treatment has been controversial. In recent years, the emergence of new imaging technology has made it possible to observe the response of tumors to treatment prior to any morphological changes. In this article, the advances in studies reporting the use of computed tomography perfusion imaging, diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), intravoxel incoherent motion, diffusion kurtosis imaging, magnetic resonance spectroscopy, magnetic resonance perfusion-weighted imaging, blood oxygen level-dependent MRI, positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography and PET/MRI to assess the TACE treatment response are reviewed. PMID:27239110

  4. Recent Advances in the Imaging Diagnosis of Hepatocellular Carcinoma: Value of Gadoxetic Acid-Enhanced MRI

    PubMed Central

    Joo, Ijin; Lee, Jeong Min

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using gadolinium ethoxybenzyl diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (Gd-EOB-DPTA), or gadoxetic acid for short, is a hepatocyte-specific contrast agent which is now increasingly used for the detection and characterization of focal hepatic lesions, particularly in patients at high-risk of developing hepatocellular carcinomas (HCC). In fact, several recent guidelines now recognize gadoxetic acid-enhanced MRI (Gd-EOB-MRI) as the primary diagnostic imaging modality for the noninvasive diagnosis of HCC, although it must be noted that several major guidelines still include only extracellular contrast media-enhanced computed tomography and MRI. The primary merits of Gd-EOB-MRI lie in the fact that it can provide not only dynamic imaging, but also hepatobiliary phase (HBP) imaging which can lead to high lesion-to-liver contrast and give additional information regarding hepatocyte uptake via organic anion transporting polypeptides. This, in turn, allows higher sensitivity in detecting small HCCs and helps provide additional information regarding the multistep process of hepatocarcinogenesis. Indeed, many recent studies have investigated the diagnostic value of Gd-EOB-MRI for early HCCs as well as its role as a potential imaging biomarker in predicting outcome. We herein review the recent advances in the imaging diagnosis of HCCs focusing on the applications of Gd-EOB-MRI and the challenging issues that remain. PMID:26989660

  5. Recent Advances in the Imaging Diagnosis of Hepatocellular Carcinoma: Value of Gadoxetic Acid-Enhanced MRI.

    PubMed

    Joo, Ijin; Lee, Jeong Min

    2016-02-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using gadolinium ethoxybenzyl diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (Gd-EOB-DPTA), or gadoxetic acid for short, is a hepatocyte-specific contrast agent which is now increasingly used for the detection and characterization of focal hepatic lesions, particularly in patients at high-risk of developing hepatocellular carcinomas (HCC). In fact, several recent guidelines now recognize gadoxetic acid-enhanced MRI (Gd-EOB-MRI) as the primary diagnostic imaging modality for the noninvasive diagnosis of HCC, although it must be noted that several major guidelines still include only extracellular contrast media-enhanced computed tomography and MRI. The primary merits of Gd-EOB-MRI lie in the fact that it can provide not only dynamic imaging, but also hepatobiliary phase (HBP) imaging which can lead to high lesion-to-liver contrast and give additional information regarding hepatocyte uptake via organic anion transporting polypeptides. This, in turn, allows higher sensitivity in detecting small HCCs and helps provide additional information regarding the multistep process of hepatocarcinogenesis. Indeed, many recent studies have investigated the diagnostic value of Gd-EOB-MRI for early HCCs as well as its role as a potential imaging biomarker in predicting outcome. We herein review the recent advances in the imaging diagnosis of HCCs focusing on the applications of Gd-EOB-MRI and the challenging issues that remain. PMID:26989660

  6. Integration of patient specific modeling and advanced image processing techniques for image-guided neurosurgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Archip, Neculai; Fedorov, Andriy; Lloyd, Bryn; Chrisochoides, Nikos; Golby, Alexandra; Black, Peter M.; Warfield, Simon K.

    2006-03-01

    A major challenge in neurosurgery oncology is to achieve maximal tumor removal while avoiding postoperative neurological deficits. Therefore, estimation of the brain deformation during the image guided tumor resection process is necessary. While anatomic MRI is highly sensitive for intracranial pathology, its specificity is limited. Different pathologies may have a very similar appearance on anatomic MRI. Moreover, since fMRI and diffusion tensor imaging are not currently available during the surgery, non-rigid registration of preoperative MR with intra-operative MR is necessary. This article presents a translational research effort that aims to integrate a number of state-of-the-art technologies for MRI-guided neurosurgery at the Brigham and Women's Hospital (BWH). Our ultimate goal is to routinely provide the neurosurgeons with accurate information about brain deformation during the surgery. The current system is tested during the weekly neurosurgeries in the open magnet at the BWH. The preoperative data is processed, prior to the surgery, while both rigid and non-rigid registration algorithms are run in the vicinity of the operating room. The system is tested on 9 image datasets from 3 neurosurgery cases. A method based on edge detection is used to quantitatively validate the results. 95% Hausdorff distance between points of the edges is used to estimate the accuracy of the registration. Overall, the minimum error is 1.4 mm, the mean error 2.23 mm, and the maximum error 3.1 mm. The mean ratio between brain deformation estimation and rigid alignment is 2.07. It demonstrates that our results can be 2.07 times more precise then the current technology. The major contribution of the presented work is the rigid and non-rigid alignment of the pre-operative fMRI with intra-operative 0.5T MRI achieved during the neurosurgery.

  7. Transportation Baseline Schedule

    SciTech Connect

    Fawcett, Ricky Lee; John, Mark Earl

    2000-01-01

    The “1999 National Transportation Program - Transportation Baseline Report” presents data that form a baseline to enable analysis and planning for future Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Management (EM) waste/material transportation. The companion “1999 Transportation ‘Barriers’ Analysis” analyzes the data and identifies existing and potential problems that may prevent or delay transportation activities based on the data presented. The “1999 Transportation Baseline Schedule” (this report) uses the same data to provide an overview of the transportation activities of DOE EM waste/materials. This report can be used to identify areas where stakeholder interface is needed, and to communicate to stakeholders the quantity/schedule of shipments going through their area. Potential bottlenecks in the transportation system can be identified; the number of packages needed, and the capacity needed at receiving facilities can be planned. This report offers a visualization of baseline DOE EM transportation activities for the 11 major sites and the “Geologic Repository Disposal” site (GRD).

  8. First Grade Baseline Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Innovation in Assessment (NJ1), 2013

    2013-01-01

    The First Grade Baseline Evaluation is an optional tool that can be used at the beginning of the school year to help teachers get to know the reading and language skills of each student. The evaluation is composed of seven screenings. Teachers may use the entire evaluation or choose to use those individual screenings that they find most beneficial…

  9. NOTE: An innovative phantom for quantitative and qualitative investigation of advanced x-ray imaging technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiarot, C. B.; Siewerdsen, J. H.; Haycocks, T.; Moseley, D. J.; Jaffray, D. A.

    2005-11-01

    Development, characterization, and quality assurance of advanced x-ray imaging technologies require phantoms that are quantitative and well suited to such modalities. This note reports on the design, construction, and use of an innovative phantom developed for advanced imaging technologies (e.g., multi-detector CT and the numerous applications of flat-panel detectors in dual-energy imaging, tomosynthesis, and cone-beam CT) in diagnostic and image-guided procedures. The design addresses shortcomings of existing phantoms by incorporating criteria satisfied by no other single phantom: (1) inserts are fully 3D—spherically symmetric rather than cylindrical; (2) modules are quantitative, presenting objects of known size and contrast for quality assurance and image quality investigation; (3) features are incorporated in ideal and semi-realistic (anthropomorphic) contexts; and (4) the phantom allows devices to be inserted and manipulated in an accessible module (right lung). The phantom consists of five primary modules: (1) head, featuring contrast-detail spheres approximate to brain lesions; (2) left lung, featuring contrast-detail spheres approximate to lung modules; (3) right lung, an accessible hull in which devices may be placed and manipulated; (4) liver, featuring conrast-detail spheres approximate to metastases; and (5) abdomen/pelvis, featuring simulated kidneys, colon, rectum, bladder, and prostate. The phantom represents a two-fold evolution in design philosophy—from 2D (cylindrically symmetric) to fully 3D, and from exclusively qualitative or quantitative to a design accommodating quantitative study within an anatomical context. It has proven a valuable tool in investigations throughout our institution, including low-dose CT, dual-energy radiography, and cone-beam CT for image-guided radiation therapy and surgery.

  10. An innovative phantom for quantitative and qualitative investigation of advanced x-ray imaging technologies.

    PubMed

    Chiarot, C B; Siewerdsen, J H; Haycocks, T; Moseley, D J; Jaffray, D A

    2005-11-01

    Development, characterization, and quality assurance of advanced x-ray imaging technologies require phantoms that are quantitative and well suited to such modalities. This note reports on the design, construction, and use of an innovative phantom developed for advanced imaging technologies (e.g., multi-detector CT and the numerous applications of flat-panel detectors in dual-energy imaging, tomosynthesis, and cone-beam CT) in diagnostic and image-guided procedures. The design addresses shortcomings of existing phantoms by incorporating criteria satisfied by no other single phantom: (1) inserts are fully 3D--spherically symmetric rather than cylindrical; (2) modules are quantitative, presenting objects of known size and contrast for quality assurance and image quality investigation; (3) features are incorporated in ideal and semi-realistic (anthropomorphic) contexts; and (4) the phantom allows devices to be inserted and manipulated in an accessible module (right lung). The phantom consists of five primary modules: (1) head, featuring contrast-detail spheres approximate to brain lesions; (2) left lung, featuring contrast-detail spheres approximate to lung modules; (3) right lung, an accessible hull in which devices may be placed and manipulated; (4) liver, featuring contrast-detail spheres approximate to metastases; and (5) abdomen/pelvis, featuring simulated kidneys, colon, rectum, bladder, and prostate. The phantom represents a two-fold evolution in design philosophy--from 2D (cylindrically symmetric) to fully 3D, and from exclusively qualitative or quantitative to a design accommodating quantitative study within an anatomical context. It has proven a valuable tool in investigations throughout our institution, including low-dose CT, dual-energy radiography, and cone-beam CT for image-guided radiation therapy and surgery. PMID:16237228

  11. Efficient Wide Baseline Structure from Motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michelini, Mario; Mayer, Helmut

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents a Structure from Motion approach for complex unorganized image sets. To achieve high accuracy and robustness, image triplets are employed and (an approximate) camera calibration is assumed to be known. The focus lies on a complete linking of images even in case of large image distortions, e.g., caused by wide baselines, as well as weak baselines. A method for embedding image descriptors into Hamming space is proposed for fast image similarity ranking. The later is employed to limit the number of pairs to be matched by a wide baseline method. An iterative graph-based approach is proposed formulating image linking as the search for a terminal Steiner minimum tree in a line graph. Finally, additional links are determined and employed to improve the accuracy of the pose estimation. By this means, loops in long image sequences are implicitly closed. The potential of the proposed approach is demonstrated by results for several complex image sets also in comparison with VisualSFM.

  12. THE LONDON LOW EMISSION ZONE BASELINE STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The investigators hope that the LEZ baseline study will present a creative effort to lay the groundwork for studying spatial and temporal changes in air pollutant concentrations and health outcomes in advance of a major regulatory intervention. It is hope that the study wil...

  13. Facing "the Curse of Dimensionality": Image Fusion and Nonlinear Dimensionality Reduction for Advanced Data Mining and Visualization of Astronomical Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pesenson, Meyer; Pesenson, I. Z.; McCollum, B.

    2009-05-01

    The complexity of multitemporal/multispectral astronomical data sets together with the approaching petascale of such datasets and large astronomical surveys require automated or semi-automated methods for knowledge discovery. Traditional statistical methods of analysis may break down not only because of the amount of data, but mostly because of the increase of the dimensionality of data. Image fusion (combining information from multiple sensors in order to create a composite enhanced image) and dimension reduction (finding lower-dimensional representation of high-dimensional data) are effective approaches to "the curse of dimensionality,” thus facilitating automated feature selection, classification and data segmentation. Dimension reduction methods greatly increase computational efficiency of machine learning algorithms, improve statistical inference and together with image fusion enable effective scientific visualization (as opposed to mere illustrative visualization). The main approach of this work utilizes recent advances in multidimensional image processing, as well as representation of essential structure of a data set in terms of its fundamental eigenfunctions, which are used as an orthonormal basis for the data visualization and analysis. We consider multidimensional data sets and images as manifolds or combinatorial graphs and construct variational splines that minimize certain Sobolev norms. These splines allow us to reconstruct the eigenfunctions of the combinatorial Laplace operator by using only a small portion of the graph. We use the first two or three eigenfunctions for embedding large data sets into two- or three-dimensional Euclidean space. Such reduced data sets allow efficient data organization, retrieval, analysis and visualization. We demonstrate applications of the algorithms to test cases from the Spitzer Space Telescope. This work was carried out with funding from the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency University Research Initiative

  14. Advances in functional and structural imaging of the human lung using proton MRI.

    PubMed

    Miller, G Wilson; Mugler, John P; Sá, Rui C; Altes, Talissa A; Prisk, G Kim; Hopkins, Susan R

    2014-12-01

    The field of proton lung MRI is advancing on a variety of fronts. In the realm of functional imaging, it is now possible to use arterial spin labeling (ASL) and oxygen-enhanced imaging techniques to quantify regional perfusion and ventilation, respectively, in standard units of measurement. By combining these techniques into a single scan, it is also possible to quantify the local ventilation-perfusion ratio, which is the most important determinant of gas-exchange efficiency in the lung. To demonstrate potential for accurate and meaningful measurements of lung function, this technique was used to study gravitational gradients of ventilation, perfusion, and ventilation-perfusion ratio in healthy subjects, yielding quantitative results consistent with expected regional variations. Such techniques can also be applied in the time domain, providing new tools for studying temporal dynamics of lung function. Temporal ASL measurements showed increased spatial-temporal heterogeneity of pulmonary blood flow in healthy subjects exposed to hypoxia, suggesting sensitivity to active control mechanisms such as hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction, and illustrating that to fully examine the factors that govern lung function it is necessary to consider temporal as well as spatial variability. Further development to increase spatial coverage and improve robustness would enhance the clinical applicability of these new functional imaging tools. In the realm of structural imaging, pulse sequence techniques such as ultrashort echo-time radial k-space acquisition, ultrafast steady-state free precession, and imaging-based diaphragm triggering can be combined to overcome the significant challenges associated with proton MRI in the lung, enabling high-quality three-dimensional imaging of the whole lung in a clinically reasonable scan time. Images of healthy and cystic fibrosis subjects using these techniques demonstrate substantial promise for non-contrast pulmonary angiography and detailed

  15. Performance of the Aspect Camera Assembly for the Advanced X-Ray Astrophysics Facility: Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michaels, Dan

    1998-01-01

    The Aspect Camera Assembly (ACA) is a "state-of-the-art" star tracker that provides real-time attitude information to the Advanced X-Ray Astrophysics Facility - Imaging (AXAF-I), and provides imaging data for "post-facto" ground processing. The ACA consists of a telescope with a CCD focal plane, associated focal plane read-out electronics, and an on-board processor that processes the focal plane data to produce star image location reports. On-board star image locations are resolved to 0.8 arcsec, and post-facto algorithms yield 0.2 arcsec star location accuracies (at end of life). The protoflight ACA has been built, along with a high accuracy vacuum test facility. Image position determination has been verified to < 0.2 arcsec accuracies. This paper is a follow-on paper to one presented by the author at the AeroSense '95 conference. This paper presents the "as built" configuration, the tested performance, and the test facility's design and demonstrated accuracy. The ACA has been delivered in anticipation of a August, 1998 shuttle launch.

  16. Advanced spatio-temporal filtering techniques for photogrammetric image sequence analysis in civil engineering material testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liebold, F.; Maas, H.-G.

    2016-01-01

    The paper shows advanced spatial, temporal and spatio-temporal filtering techniques which may be used to reduce noise effects in photogrammetric image sequence analysis tasks and tools. As a practical example, the techniques are validated in a photogrammetric spatio-temporal crack detection and analysis tool applied in load tests in civil engineering material testing. The load test technique is based on monocular image sequences of a test object under varying load conditions. The first image of a sequence is defined as a reference image under zero load, wherein interest points are determined and connected in a triangular irregular network structure. For each epoch, these triangles are compared to the reference image triangles to search for deformations. The result of the feature point tracking and triangle comparison process is a spatio-temporally resolved strain value field, wherein cracks can be detected, located and measured via local discrepancies. The strains can be visualized as a color-coded map. In order to improve the measuring system and to reduce noise, the strain values of each triangle must be treated in a filtering process. The paper shows the results of various filter techniques in the spatial and in the temporal domain as well as spatio-temporal filtering techniques applied to these data. The best results were obtained by a bilateral filter in the spatial domain and by a spatio-temporal EOF (empirical orthogonal function) filtering technique.

  17. Updates in advanced diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging techniques in the evaluation of prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Vargas, Hebert Alberto; Lawrence, Edward Malnor; Mazaheri, Yousef; Sala, Evis

    2015-01-01

    Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW-MRI) is considered part of the standard imaging protocol for the evaluation of patients with prostate cancer. It has been proven valuable as a functional tool for qualitative and quantitative analysis of prostate cancer beyond anatomical MRI sequences such as T2-weighted imaging. This review discusses ongoing controversies in DW-MRI acquisition, including the optimal number of b-values to be used for prostate DWI, and summarizes the current literature on the use of advanced DW-MRI techniques. These include intravoxel incoherent motion imaging, which better accounts for the non-mono-exponential behavior of the apparent diffusion coefficient as a function of b-value and the influence of perfusion at low b-values. Another technique is diffusion kurtosis imaging (DKI). Metrics from DKI reflect excess kurtosis of tissues, representing its deviation from Gaussian diffusion behavior. Preliminary results suggest that DKI findings may have more value than findings from conventional DW-MRI for the assessment of prostate cancer. PMID:26339460

  18. X-ray phase-contrast imaging of the breast—advances towards clinical implementation

    PubMed Central

    Herzen, J; Willner, M; Grandl, S; Scherer, K; Bamberg, F; Reiser, M F; Pfeiffer, F; Hellerhoff, K

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer constitutes about one-quarter of all cancers and is the leading cause of cancer death in women. To reduce breast cancer mortality, mammographic screening programmes have been implemented in many Western countries. However, these programmes remain controversial because of the associated radiation exposure and the need for improvement in terms of diagnostic accuracy. Phase-contrast imaging is a new X-ray-based technology that has been shown to provide enhanced soft-tissue contrast and improved visualization of cancerous structures. Furthermore, there is some indication that these improvements of image quality can be maintained at reduced radiation doses. Thus, X-ray phase-contrast mammography may significantly contribute to advancements in early breast cancer diagnosis. Feasibility studies of X-ray phase-contrast breast CT have provided images that allow resolution of the fine structure of tissue that can otherwise only be obtained by histology. This implies that X-ray phase-contrast imaging may also lead to the development of entirely new (micro-) radiological applications. This review provides a brief overview of the physical characteristics of this new technology and describes recent developments towards clinical implementation of X-ray phase-contrast imaging of the breast. PMID:24452106

  19. Advanced Nurse Practitioner Educational Needs for Safe and Efficient Radiological Imaging.

    PubMed

    Logsdon, Roberta; Gleason, Robyn

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated perceived knowledge and educational preparedness of advanced practice nurses (APNs) in the area of radiological imaging, including awareness and utilization of the American College of Radiology Appropriateness Criteria (ACR-AC). Previous studies have found a need for further education in radiological imaging for medical students, residents, and hospitalists; however, little to no research has been done to assess such knowledge and educational preparedness among APNs. An e-mail link to a researcher-developed questionnaire was sent to Florida licensed APNs. Statistical analysis used descriptive, parametric, and nonparametric methods including frequencies, percentages, and Mann-Whitney U statistics. Florida licensed APNs (n = 905) from 175 educational programs and 10 specialty areas responded to the questionnaire; 75.9% (n = 681) had never heard of the ACR-AC. Years of experience and training in acute care specialties increased perceived competency in ordering radiological tests. Results among APNs were similar to those reported from physician studies, and 92.3% of respondents (n = 829) stated that additional APN imaging education would be beneficial. These findings highlight the importance of incorporating more radiological imaging information into APN education, which could lead to a reduction in overall costs and improvement in perceived competence and knowledge of appropriate imaging utilization. PMID:26218489

  20. Advances in MR image-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound therapy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young-sun

    2015-05-01

    The clinical role of magnetic resonance image-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound (MR-HIFU) is rapidly expanding due to its merit of non-invasiveness. MR thermometry based on a proton resonance frequency shift technique is able to accurately measure HIFU-induced temperature changes, which provides considerable advantages over ultrasonography-guided HIFU in terms of safety and therapeutic efficacy. Recent studies and the resulting technological advances in MR-HIFU such as MR thermometry for moving organs, MR-acoustic radiation force imaging, and a volumetric mild hyperthermia technique further will expand its clinical roles from mere ablation therapy to targeted drug delivery and chemo- or radio-sensitisation for cancer treatment. In this article, MR-HIFU therapy is comprehensively reviewed with an emphasis on the roles of MR imaging in HIFU therapy, techniques of MR monitoring, recent advances in clinical MR-HIFU systems, and potential future applications of MR-HIFU therapy. In addition, the pros and cons of MR-HIFU when compared with ultrasonography-guided HIFU are discussed. PMID:25373687

  1. Transportation Baseline Report

    SciTech Connect

    Fawcett, Ricky Lee; Kramer, George Leroy Jr.

    1999-12-01

    The National Transportation Program 1999 Transportation Baseline Report presents data that form a baseline to enable analysis and planning for future Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Management (EM) waste and materials transportation. In addition, this Report provides a summary overview of DOE’s projected quantities of waste and materials for transportation. Data presented in this report were gathered as a part of the IPABS Spring 1999 update of the EM Corporate Database and are current as of July 30, 1999. These data were input and compiled using the Analysis and Visualization System (AVS) which is used to update all stream-level components of the EM Corporate Database, as well as TSD System and programmatic risk (disposition barrier) information. Project (PBS) and site-level IPABS data are being collected through the Interim Data Management System (IDMS). The data are presented in appendices to this report.

  2. Screening for Body Image Dissatisfaction in Patients with Advanced Cancer: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Rhondali, Wadih; Chisholm, Gary B.; Filbet, Marilene; Kang, Duck-Hee; Hui, David; Cororve Fingeret, Michelle

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background Cancer and its treatment can significantly affect appearance and body integrity. A number of studies have explored the impact of cancer and its treatment on body image, primarily in head and neck and breast cancer. The aim of this pilot study was to examine the construct of body image dissatisfaction and its measurement using a single question in patients with advanced cancer. Methods Outpatients with advanced cancer were recruited (n=81). Assessments included Body Image Scale (BIS), Appearance Schema Inventory (ASI-R), Edmonton Symptom Assessment System (ESAS) with a total symptom distress score (TSDS) and two subscales scores (physical distress [PHS] and psychological distress [PSS]), Hospital Anxiety Depression Scale (HADS), and one question assessing the overall appearance satisfaction from the Multidimensional Body-Self Relations Questionnaire (MBSRQ). We also asked patients to rate the body image changes importance compared with five symptoms (pain, fatigue, depression, insomnia, lack of appetite). Results Forty-seven (58%) patients had a BIS score >10 (body image dissatisfaction) with a median of 11 (first–third quartiles, Q1–Q3; 5–16) and a median ASI-R of 3.1 (Q1–Q3; 2.8–3.5). Sensitivity and specificity of ≤3 for body image dissatisfaction in the single overall appearance question using the BIS as a standard was 0.70 and 0.71, respectively. BIS score was significantly correlated with ASI-R (r=0.248; p=0.025), age (r=−0.225; p=0.043), HADS-A (r=0.522, p<0.001), HADS-D (r=0.422, p<0.001), PSS score (r=0.371, p=0.001), PHS score (r=0.356, p=0.001), TSDS score (r=0.416, p<0.001), and the overall appearance question (MBSRQ; r=−0.449, p<0.001). Conclusion Body image dissatisfaction was frequent and associated with symptom burden. A single item ≤3 has a sensitivity of 70% for body image satisfaction screening. PMID:25188590

  3. Wide baseline stereo matching based on double topological relationship consistency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Xiaohong; Liu, Bin; Song, Xiaoxue; Liu, Yang

    2009-07-01

    Stereo matching is one of the most important branches in computer vision. In this paper, an algorithm is proposed for wide-baseline stereo vision matching. Here, a novel scheme is presented called double topological relationship consistency (DCTR). The combination of double topological configuration includes the consistency of first topological relationship (CFTR) and the consistency of second topological relationship (CSTR). It not only sets up a more advanced model on matching, but discards mismatches by iteratively computing the fitness of the feature matches and overcomes many problems of traditional methods depending on the powerful invariance to changes in the scale, rotation or illumination across large view changes and even occlusions. Experimental examples are shown where the two cameras have been located in very different orientations. Also, epipolar geometry can be recovered using RANSAC by far the most widely method adopted possibly. By the method, we can obtain correspondences with high precision on wide baseline matching problems. Finally, the effectiveness and reliability of this method are demonstrated in wide-baseline experiments on the image pairs.

  4. Advanced MR Imaging of the Placenta: Exploring the in utero placenta-brain connection

    PubMed Central

    Andescavage, Nickie Niforatos; DuPlessis, Adre; Limperopoulos, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    The placenta is a vital organ necessary for the healthy neurodevelopment of the fetus. Despite the known associations between placental dysfunction and neurologic impairment, there is a paucity of tools available to reliably assess in vivo placental health and function. Existing clinical tools for placental assessment remain insensitive in predicting and assessing placental well-being. Advanced MRI techniques hold significant promise for the dynamic, non-invasive, real-time assessment of placental health and identification of early placental-based disorders. In this review, we summarize the available clinical tools for placental assessment including ultrasound, Doppler, and conventional MRI. We then explore the emerging role of advanced placental MR imaging techniques for supporting the developing fetus, appraise the strengths and limitations of quantitative MRI in identifying early markers of placental dysfunction for improved pregnancy monitoring and fetal outcomes. PMID:25765905

  5. A Novel Murine Model for Localized Radiation Necrosis and its Characterization using Advanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Jost, Sarah C.; Hope, Andrew; Kiehl, Erich; Perry, Arie; Travers, Sarah; Garbow, Joel R.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Magnetic resonance (MR) images following external beam radiotherapy for brain tumors often display signal changes characteristic of either tumor progression and/or radiation injury. No non-invasive diagnostic biomarkers have been identified that clearly distinguish between these two disease processes. This study’s objective was to develop a murine model of radiation necrosis using fractionated, sub-total cranial irradiation and to investigate the imaging signature of radiation-induced tissue damage using advanced MR imaging techniques. Methods Twenty four mice each received 60 Gy of hemispheric (left) irradiation in ten equal fractions. MR images at 4.7 T were subsequently collected using T1-, T2- and diffusion-sequences at selected time points following irradiation or implantation. Following imaging, animals were euthanized and their brains were fixed for correlative histology. Results Contrast-enhanced T1- and T2-weighted MR images at months 2, 3, and 4 showed changes consistent with progressive radiation necrosis. Quantitatively, mean diffusivity was significantly higher (mean = 0.86, 1.13, and 1.24 μm2/ms at 2, 3, and 4 months, respectively) in radiated brain, compared with contralateral untreated brain tissue (mean = 0.78, 0.82, and 0.83 μm2/ms) (p<0.0001). Histology reflected changes typically seen in radiation necrosis. Conclusions This murine model of radiation necrosis will facilitate investigation of imaging biomarkers that distinguish between radiation necrosis and tumor recurrence. In addition, this preclinical study supports clinical data suggesting that DWI may be helpful in answering this diagnostic question in clinical settings. PMID:19735877

  6. Advances in Tumor Screening, Imaging, and Avatar Technologies for High-Grade Serous Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ohman, Anders W.; Hasan, Noor; Dinulescu, Daniela M.

    2014-01-01

    The majority of high-grade serous ovarian carcinoma cases are detected in advanced stages when treatment options are limited. Surgery is less effective at eradicating the disease when it is widespread, resulting in high rates of disease relapse and chemoresistance. Current screening techniques are ineffective for early tumor detection and consequently, BRCA mutations carriers, with an increased risk for developing high-grade serous ovarian cancer, elect to undergo risk-reducing surgery. While prophylactic surgery is associated with a significant reduction in the risk of cancer development, it also results in surgical menopause and significant adverse side effects. The development of efficient early-stage screening protocols and imaging technologies is critical to improving the outcome and quality of life for current patients and women at increased risk. In addition, more accurate animal models are necessary in order to provide relevant in vivo testing systems and advance our understanding of the disease origin and progression. Moreover, both genetically engineered and tumor xenograft animal models enable the preclinical testing of novel imaging techniques and molecularly targeted therapies as they become available. Recent advances in xenograft technologies have made possible the creation of avatar mice, personalized tumorgrafts, which can be used as therapy testing surrogates for individual patients prior to or during treatment. High-grade serous ovarian cancer may be an ideal candidate for use with avatar models based on key characteristics of the tumorgraft platform. This review explores multiple strategies, including novel imaging and screening technologies in both patients and animal models, aimed at detecting cancer in the early-stages and improving the disease prognosis. PMID:25478323

  7. SU-E-QI-20: A Review of Advanced PET and CT Image Features for the Evaluation of Tumor Response

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, W

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To review the literature in using quantitative PET and CT image features for the evaluation of tumor response. Methods: We reviewed and summarized more than fifty papers that use advanced, quantitative PET/CT image features for the evaluation of tumor response. We also discussed future works on extracting disease-specific features, combining multiple and complementary features in response modeling, delineating tumor in multimodality images, and exploring biological explanations of these advanced features. Results: Advanced PET image features considering spatial information, such as tumor volume, tumor shape, total glycolytic volume, histogram distance, and texture features (characterizing spatial distribution of FDG uptake) have been found more informative than the traditional SUVmax for the prediction of tumor response. Advanced CT features, including volumetric, attenuation, morphologic, structure, and texture descriptors, have also been found advantage over the traditional RECIST and WHO criteria in certain tumor types. Conclusions: Advanced, quantitative FDG PET/CT image features have been shown promising for the evaluation of tumor response. With the emerging multi-modality imaging performed at multiple time points for each patient, it becomes more important to analyze the serial images quantitatively, select and combine both complementary and contradictory information from various sources, for accurate and personalized evaluation of tumor response to therapy.

  8. What advances in microscopy are required for combined MRI and optical functional brain imaging? (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleinfeld, David

    2016-03-01

    This overview talk will focus on forward-looking scientific needs and physical limits to images of neuronal processes. The challenge in nervous systems is that the basic unit for "switching" events in the nervous system occurs on the one micrometer scale of synaptic spines, while computations involve communication between individual neurons across the full expanse of cortex, which is ten millimeters for mouse cortex. I will address hoped-for advances in optical microscopy, within the context of existing and proposed contrast mechanisms of neuronal function, that span the four orders of magnitude of length scales for neuronal processing

  9. High-speed image transmission via the Advanced Communication Technology Satellite (ACTS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazzill, Todd M.; Huang, H. K.; Thoma, George R.; Long, L. Rodney; Gill, Michael J.

    1996-05-01

    We are developing a wide area test bed network using the Advanced Communication Technology Satellite (ACTS) from NASA for high speed medical image transmission. The two test sites are the University of California, San Francisco, and the National Library of Medicine. The first phase of the test bed runs over a T1 link (1.544 Mbits/sec) using a Very Small Aperture Terminal. The second phase involves the High Data Rate Terminal via an ATM OC 3C (155 Mbits/sec) connection. This paper describes the experimental set up and some preliminary results from phase 1.

  10. Satellite Detection in AdvancedCamera for Surveys/Wide Field Channel Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borncamp, D.; Lim, Pey-Lian

    2016-01-01

    This document explains the process by which satellite trails can be found within individual chips of an Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) Wide Field Channel (WFC) image. Since satellites are transient and sporadic events, we used the Hubble Frontier Fields (HFF) dataset which is manually checked for satellite trails has been used as a truth set to verify that the method in this document does a complete job without a high false positive rate. This document also details the process of producing a mask that will update data quality information to inform users where the trail traverses the image and properly account for the affected pixels. Along with this document, the Python source code used to detect and mask satellite trails will be released to users with as a stand-alone product within the STSDAS acstools package.

  11. Recent advances in chemical imaging technology for the detection of contaminants for food safety and security

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Priore, Ryan J.; Olkhovyk, Oksana; Drauch, Amy; Treado, Patrick; Kim, Moon; Chao, Kaunglin

    2009-05-01

    The need for routine, non-destructive chemical screening of agricultural products is increasing due to the health hazards to animals and humans associated with intentional and unintentional contamination of foods. Melamine, an industrial additive used to increase flame retardation in the resin industry, has recently been used to increase the apparent protein content of animal feed, of infant formula, as well as powdered and liquid milk in the dairy industry. Such contaminants, even at regulated levels, pose serious health risks. Chemical imaging technology provides the ability to evaluate large volumes of agricultural products before reaching the consumer. In this presentation, recent advances in chemical imaging technology that exploit Raman, fluorescence and near-infrared (NIR) are presented for the detection of contaminants in agricultural products.

  12. Advanced magnetic resonance imaging techniques in the preterm brain: methods and applications.

    PubMed

    Tao, Joshua D; Neil, Jeffrey J

    2014-01-01

    Brain development and brain injury in preterm infants are areas of active research. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), a non-invasive tool applicable to both animal models and human infants, provides a wealth of information on this process by bridging the gap between histology (available from animal studies) and developmental outcome (available from clinical studies). Moreover, MRI also offers information regarding diagnosis and prognosis in the clinical setting. Recent advances in MR methods - diffusion tensor imaging, volumetric segmentation, surface based analysis, functional MRI, and quantitative metrics - further increase the sophistication of information available regarding both brain structure and function. In this review, we discuss the basics of these newer methods as well as their application to the study of premature infants. PMID:25055864

  13. Advanced data visualization and sensor fusion: Conversion of techniques from medical imaging to Earth science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savage, Richard C.; Chen, Chin-Tu; Pelizzari, Charles; Ramanathan, Veerabhadran

    1993-01-01

    Hughes Aircraft Company and the University of Chicago propose to transfer existing medical imaging registration algorithms to the area of multi-sensor data fusion. The University of Chicago's algorithms have been successfully demonstrated to provide pixel by pixel comparison capability for medical sensors with different characteristics. The research will attempt to fuse GOES (Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite), AVHRR (Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer), and SSM/I (Special Sensor Microwave Imager) sensor data which will benefit a wide range of researchers. The algorithms will utilize data visualization and algorithm development tools created by Hughes in its EOSDIS (Earth Observation SystemData/Information System) prototyping. This will maximize the work on the fusion algorithms since support software (e.g. input/output routines) will already exist. The research will produce a portable software library with documentation for use by other researchers.

  14. A geometric performance assessment of the EO-1 advanced land imager

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Storey, J.C.; Choate, M.J.; Meyer, D.J.

    2004-01-01

    The Earth Observing 1 (EO-1) Advanced Land Imager (ALI) demonstrates technology applicable to a successor system to the Landsat Thematic Mapper series. A study of the geometric performance characteristics of the ALI was conducted under the auspices of the EO-1 Science Validation Team. This study evaluated ALI performance with respect to absolute pointing knowledge, focal plane sensor chip assembly alignment, and band-to-band registration for purposes of comparing this new technology to the heritage Landsat systems. On-orbit geometric calibration procedures were developed that allowed the generation of ALI geometrically corrected products that compare favorably with their Landsat 7 counterparts with respect to absolute geodetic accuracy, internal image geometry, and band registration.

  15. [Advances in the research of laser Doppler perfusion imaging in burn wounds].

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing; Xu, Longshun; Hu, Dahai; Qu, Yi; Wang, Guodong; Wang, Hongtao

    2014-04-01

    Laser Doppler perfusion imaging (LDPI) works through the Doppler effect of light wave, and it could depict the blood flow value of the entire wound in two-dimensional image without contacting the detection site directly. In resent years, LDPI has been proved to be effective to evaluate healing potential of a wound, and to predict burn depth and scar formation. The accuracy of LDPI is higher than other traditional methods and technique. However, there are still many influencing factors for the clinical application of LDPI scanning. This paper presents a comprehensive overview of advances in the research of LDPI for clinical application in the care of burn wounds and influencing factors for accurate scanning. PMID:24989665

  16. Advances in Light-based Imaging of Three-Dimensional Cellular Ultrastructure

    PubMed Central

    Kanchanawong, Pakorn; Waterman, Clare M.

    2012-01-01

    Visualization methods are key to gaining insights into cellular structure and function. Since diffraction has long confined optical microscopes to a resolution no better than hundreds of nanometers, the observation of ultrastructural features has traditionally been the domain of electron microscopes (EM). In the past decade, however, advances in super-resolution fluorescence microscopy have considerably expanded the capability of light-based imaging techniques. Advantages of fluorescent labeling such as high sensitivity, specificity, and multichannel capability, can now be exploited to dissect ultrastructural features of cells. With recent methods capable of imaging specific proteins with a resolution on the order of a few tens of nanometers in 3-dimensions, this has made it possible to elucidate the molecular organization of many complex cellular structures. PMID:22209239

  17. Malignant gliomas: current perspectives in diagnosis, treatment, and early response assessment using advanced quantitative imaging methods

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Rafay; Oborski, Matthew J; Hwang, Misun; Lieberman, Frank S; Mountz, James M

    2014-01-01

    Malignant gliomas consist of glioblastomas, anaplastic astrocytomas, anaplastic oligodendrogliomas and anaplastic oligoastrocytomas, and some less common tumors such as anaplastic ependymomas and anaplastic gangliogliomas. Malignant gliomas have high morbidity and mortality. Even with optimal treatment, median survival is only 12–15 months for glioblastomas and 2–5 years for anaplastic gliomas. However, recent advances in imaging and quantitative analysis of image data have led to earlier diagnosis of tumors and tumor response to therapy, providing oncologists with a greater time window for therapy management. In addition, improved understanding of tumor biology, genetics, and resistance mechanisms has enhanced surgical techniques, chemotherapy methods, and radiotherapy administration. After proper diagnosis and institution of appropriate therapy, there is now a vital need for quantitative methods that can sensitively detect malignant glioma response to therapy at early follow-up times, when changes in management of nonresponders can have its greatest effect. Currently, response is largely evaluated by measuring magnetic resonance contrast and size change, but this approach does not take into account the key biologic steps that precede tumor size reduction. Molecular imaging is ideally suited to measuring early response by quantifying cellular metabolism, proliferation, and apoptosis, activities altered early in treatment. We expect that successful integration of quantitative imaging biomarker assessment into the early phase of clinical trials could provide a novel approach for testing new therapies, and importantly, for facilitating patient management, sparing patients from weeks or months of toxicity and ineffective treatment. This review will present an overview of epidemiology, molecular pathogenesis and current advances in diagnoses, and management of malignant gliomas. PMID:24711712

  18. Advancements in Transmitters and Sensors for Biological Tissue Imaging in Magnetic Induction Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Zakaria, Zulkarnay; Rahim, Ruzairi Abdul; Mansor, Muhammad Saiful Badri; Yaacob, Sazali; Ayub, Nor Muzakkir Nor; Muji, Siti Zarina Mohd.; Rahiman, Mohd Hafiz Fazalul; Aman, Syed Mustafa Kamal Syed

    2012-01-01

    Magnetic Induction Tomography (MIT), which is also known as Electromagnetic Tomography (EMT) or Mutual Inductance Tomography, is among the imaging modalities of interest to many researchers around the world. This noninvasive modality applies an electromagnetic field and is sensitive to all three passive electromagnetic properties of a material that are conductivity, permittivity and permeability. MIT is categorized under the passive imaging family with an electrodeless technique through the use of excitation coils to induce an electromagnetic field in the material, which is then measured at the receiving side by sensors. The aim of this review is to discuss the challenges of the MIT technique and summarize the recent advancements in the transmitters and sensors, with a focus on applications in biological tissue imaging. It is hoped that this review will provide some valuable information on the MIT for those who have interest in this modality. The need of this knowledge may speed up the process of adopted of MIT as a medical imaging technology. PMID:22969341

  19. Baseline automotive gas turbine engine development program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, C. E. (Editor); Pampreen, R. C. (Editor)

    1979-01-01

    Tests results on a baseline engine are presented to document the automotive gas turbine state-of-the-art at the start of the program. The performance characteristics of the engine and of a vehicle powered by this engine are defined. Component improvement concepts in the baseline engine were evaluated on engine dynamometer tests in the complete vehicle on a chassis dynamometer and on road tests. The concepts included advanced combustors, ceramic regenerators, an integrated control system, low cost turbine material, a continuously variable transmission, power-turbine-driven accessories, power augmentation, and linerless insulation in the engine housing.

  20. I-SPINE: a software package for advances in image-guided and minimally invasive spine procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jae Jeong; Cleary, Kevin R.; Zeng, Jianchao; Gary, Kevin A.; Freedman, Matthew T.; Watson, Vance; Lindisch, David; Mun, Seong K.

    2000-05-01

    While image guidance is now routinely used in the brain in the form of frameless stereotaxy, it is beginning to be more widely used in other clinical areas such as the spine. At Georgetown University Medical Center, we are developing a program to provide advanced visualization and image guidance for minimally invasive spine procedures. This is a collaboration between an engineering-based research group and physicians from the radiology, neurosurgery, and orthopaedics departments. A major component of this work is the ISIS Center Spine Procedures Imaging and Navigation Engine, which is a software package under development as the base platform for technical advances.

  1. Advanced high resolution seismic imaging, material properties estimation and full wavefield inversion for the shallow subsurface. 1998 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Levander, A.; Zelt, C.A.; Symes, W.W.

    1998-06-01

    'The authors are developing advanced seismic data processing, imaging, and inversion methods for high resolution seismic reflection/refraction imaging and material property estimation of the shallow subsurface. The imaging methods are being developed to map the structural and material properties of aquifers and aquitards. This report summarizes work completed in the first seven months of a three year project which began in November 1997. The research is proceeding along three lines: data acquisition, data processing, and algorithm development.'

  2. In vivo molecular imaging of chemokine receptor CXCR4 expression in patients with advanced multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Philipp-Abbrederis, Kathrin; Herrmann, Ken; Knop, Stefan; Schottelius, Margret; Eiber, Matthias; Lückerath, Katharina; Pietschmann, Elke; Habringer, Stefan; Gerngroß, Carlos; Franke, Katharina; Rudelius, Martina; Schirbel, Andreas; Lapa, Constantin; Schwamborn, Kristina; Steidle, Sabine; Hartmann, Elena; Rosenwald, Andreas; Kropf, Saskia; Beer, Ambros J; Peschel, Christian; Einsele, Hermann; Buck, Andreas K; Schwaiger, Markus; Götze, Katharina; Wester, Hans-Jürgen; Keller, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    CXCR4 is a G-protein-coupled receptor that mediates recruitment of blood cells toward its ligand SDF-1. In cancer, high CXCR4 expression is frequently associated with tumor dissemination and poor prognosis. We evaluated the novel CXCR4 probe [68Ga]Pentixafor for in vivo mapping of CXCR4 expression density in mice xenografted with human CXCR4-positive MM cell lines and patients with advanced MM by means of positron emission tomography (PET). [68Ga]Pentixafor PET provided images with excellent specificity and contrast. In 10 of 14 patients with advanced MM [68Ga]Pentixafor PET/CT scans revealed MM manifestations, whereas only nine of 14 standard [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose PET/CT scans were rated visually positive. Assessment of blood counts and standard CD34+ flow cytometry did not reveal significant blood count changes associated with tracer application. Based on these highly encouraging data on clinical PET imaging of CXCR4 expression in a cohort of MM patients, we conclude that [68Ga]Pentixafor PET opens a broad field for clinical investigations on CXCR4 expression and for CXCR4-directed therapeutic approaches in MM and other diseases. PMID:25736399

  3. Comparison of the EO-1 Advanced Land Imager Performance With the Landsat Data Continuity Mission Specification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mendenhall, J. A.; Hearn, D. R.; Lencioni, D. E.

    2002-01-01

    The performance requirements for the Advanced Land Imager were developed under NASA's New Millennium Program and were intended to facilitate the validation of new sensor technologies and architectures for potential application in future remote sensing missions. The Advanced Land Imager (ALI) was designed and flown well before the Landsat Data Continuity Mission (LDCM) specifications were developed. Nevertheless, the science focus of the ALI technology validation was Landsat data continuity. Therefore, although exact compliance by ALI is not expected, the performance should demonstrate a path to a compliant sensor system. The performance of the ALI, as determined from preflight and flight data, is compared to the LDCM specification. Twenty-one noncompliances have been identified: four data collection, four spectral, six spatial, and seven radiometric (Table I). All but six of these are considered minor. The six major noncompliances are the result of stray light, leaky detectors, and contamination. Appendix A replicates the LDCM specification and contains ALI compliance notes where appropriate. Details of the ALI stray light, contamination, and leaky detectors are provided in Appendix B, C, and D respectively. Additional information pertaining to the calculation of the ALI edge response and coherent noise is presented in Appendix E and F. A list of ALI related publications is provided in Appendix G.

  4. Advanced multi-contrast Jones matrix optical coherence tomography for Doppler and polarization sensitive imaging.

    PubMed

    Ju, Myeong Jin; Hong, Young-Joo; Makita, Shuichi; Lim, Yiheng; Kurokawa, Kazuhiro; Duan, Lian; Miura, Masahiro; Tang, Shuo; Yasuno, Yoshiaki

    2013-08-12

    An advanced version of Jones matrix optical coherence tomography (JMT) is demonstrated for Doppler and polarization sensitive imaging of the posterior eye. JMT is capable of providing localized flow tomography by Doppler detection and investigating the birefringence property of tissue through a three-dimensional (3-D) Jones matrix measurement. Owing to an incident polarization multiplexing scheme based on passive optical components, this system is stable, safe in a clinical environment, and cost effective. Since the properties of this version of JMT provide intrinsic compensation for system imperfection, the system is easy to calibrate. Compared with the previous version of JMT, this advanced JMT achieves a sufficiently long depth measurement range for clinical cases of posterior eye disease. Furthermore, a fine spectral shift compensation method based on the cross-correlation of calibration signals was devised for stabilizing the phase of OCT, which enables a high sensitivity Doppler OCT measurement. In addition, a new theory of JMT which integrates the Jones matrix measurement, Doppler measurement, and scattering measurement is presented. This theory enables a sensitivity-enhanced scattering OCT and high-sensitivity Doppler OCT. These new features enable the application of this system to clinical cases. A healthy subject and a geographic atrophy patient were measured in vivo, and simultaneous imaging of choroidal vasculature and birefringence structures are demonstrated. PMID:23938857

  5. SU-F-BRF-11: Dose Rearrangement in High Dose Locally Advanced Lung Patients Based On Perfusion Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Matrosic, C; Jarema, D; Kong, F; McShan, D; Stenmark, M; Owen, D; Ten Haken, R; Matuszak, M

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: The use of mean lung dose (MLD) limits allows individualization of lung patient tumor doses at safe levels. However, MLD does not account for local lung function differences between patients, leading to toxicity variability at the same MLD. We investigated dose rearrangement to minimize dose to functional lung, as measured by perfusion SPECT, while maintaining target coverage and conventional MLD limits. Methods: Retrospective plans were optimized for 15 locally advanced NSCLC patients enrolled in a prospective imaging trial. A priority-based optimization system was used. The baseline priorities were (1) meet OAR dose constraints, (2) maximize target gEUD, and (3) minimize physical MLD. As a final step, normal tissue doses were minimized. To determine the benefit of rearranging dose using perfusion SPECT, plans were reoptimized to minimize functional lung gEUD as the 4th priority. Results: When only minimizing physical MLD, the functional lung gEUD was 10.8+/−5.0 Gy (4.3–19.8 Gy). Only 3/15 cases showed a decrease in functional lung gEUD of ≥4% when rearranging dose to minimize functional gEUD in the cost function (10.5+/−5.0 Gy range 4.3−19.7). Although OAR constraints were respected, the dose rearrangement resulted in ≥10% increases in gEUD to an OAR in 4/15 cases. Only slight reductions in functional lung gEUD were noted when omitting the minimization of physical MLD, suggesting that constraining the target gEUD minimizes the potential to redistribute dose. Conclusion: Prioritydriven optimization permits the generation of plans that respect traditional OAR limits and target coverage, but with the ability to rearrange dose based on functional imaging. The latter appears to be limited due to the decreased solution space when constraining target coverage. Since dose rearrangement may increase dose to other OARs, it is also worthwhile to investigate global biomarkers of lung toxicity to further individualize treatment in this population

  6. Pushing CT and MR Imaging to the Molecular Level for Studying the “Omics”: Current Challenges and Advancements

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Hsuan-Ming; Shih, Yi-Yu

    2014-01-01

    During the past decade, medical imaging has made the transition from anatomical imaging to functional and even molecular imaging. Such transition provides a great opportunity to begin the integration of imaging data and various levels of biological data. In particular, the integration of imaging data and multiomics data such as genomics, metabolomics, proteomics, and pharmacogenomics may open new avenues for predictive, preventive, and personalized medicine. However, to promote imaging-omics integration, the practical challenge of imaging techniques should be addressed. In this paper, we describe key challenges in two imaging techniques: computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and then review existing technological advancements. Despite the fact that CT and MRI have different principles of image formation, both imaging techniques can provide high-resolution anatomical images while playing a more and more important role in providing molecular information. Such imaging techniques that enable single modality to image both the detailed anatomy and function of tissues and organs of the body will be beneficial in the imaging-omics field. PMID:24738056

  7. Advances in Bio-Optical Imaging for the Diagnosis of Early Oral Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Olivo, Malini; Bhuvaneswari, Ramaswamy; Keogh, Ivan

    2011-01-01

    Oral cancer is among the most common malignancies worldwide, therefore early detection and treatment is imperative. The 5-year survival rate has remained at a dismal 50% for the past several decades. The main reason for the poor survival rate is the fact that most of the oral cancers, despite the general accessibility of the oral cavity, are not diagnosed until the advanced stage. Early detection of the oral tumors and its precursor lesions may be the most effective means to improve clinical outcome and cure most patients. One of the emerging technologies is the use of non-invasive in vivo tissue imaging to capture the molecular changes at high-resolution to improve the detection capability of early stage disease. This review will discuss the use of optical probes and highlight the role of optical imaging such as autofluorescence, fluorescence diagnosis (FD), laser confocal endomicroscopy (LCE), surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS), optical coherence tomography (OCT) and confocal reflectance microscopy (CRM) in early oral cancer detection. FD is a promising method to differentiate cancerous lesions from benign, thus helping in the determination of adequate resolution of surgical resection margin. LCE offers in vivo cellular imaging of tissue structures from surface to subsurface layers and has demonstrated the potential to be used as a minimally invasive optical biopsy technique for early diagnosis of oral cancer lesions. SERS was able to differentiate between normal and oral cancer patients based on the spectra acquired from saliva of patients. OCT has been used to visualize the detailed histological features of the oral lesions with an imaging depth down to 2–3 mm. CRM is an optical tool to noninvasively image tissue with near histological resolution. These comprehensive diagnostic modalities can also be used to define surgical margin and to provide a direct assessment of the therapeutic effectiveness. PMID:24310585

  8. Advances in bio-optical imaging for the diagnosis of early oral cancer.

    PubMed

    Olivo, Malini; Bhuvaneswari, Ramaswamy; Keogh, Ivan

    2011-01-01

    Oral cancer is among the most common malignancies worldwide, therefore early detection and treatment is imperative. The 5-year survival rate has remained at a dismal 50% for the past several decades. The main reason for the poor survival rate is the fact that most of the oral cancers, despite the general accessibility of the oral cavity, are not diagnosed until the advanced stage. Early detection of the oral tumors and its precursor lesions may be the most effective means to improve clinical outcome and cure most patients. One of the emerging technologies is the use of non-invasive in vivo tissue imaging to capture the molecular changes at high-resolution to improve the detection capability of early stage disease. This review will discuss the use of optical probes and highlight the role of optical imaging such as autofluorescence, fluorescence diagnosis (FD), laser confocal endomicroscopy (LCE), surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS), optical coherence tomography (OCT) and confocal reflectance microscopy (CRM) in early oral cancer detection. FD is a promising method to differentiate cancerous lesions from benign, thus helping in the determination of adequate resolution of surgical resection margin. LCE offers in vivo cellular imaging of tissue structures from surface to subsurface layers and has demonstrated the potential to be used as a minimally invasive optical biopsy technique for early diagnosis of oral cancer lesions. SERS was able to differentiate between normal and oral cancer patients based on the spectra acquired from saliva of patients. OCT has been used to visualize the detailed histological features of the oral lesions with an imaging depth down to 2-3 mm. CRM is an optical tool to noninvasively image tissue with near histological resolution. These comprehensive diagnostic modalities can also be used to define surgical margin and to provide a direct assessment of the therapeutic effectiveness. PMID:24310585

  9. Advances of molecular imaging probes for the diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ming; Wang, Xiaobo; Liu, Zhiguo; Yu, Lun; Hu, Shuo; Chen, Lizhang; Zeng, Wenbin

    2014-03-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by progressive decline in multiple cognitive domains and it becomes the most common cause of dementia in the elderly. There is an urgent need for the early diagnosis and treatment of AD to ease caregiver burden and medical costs, as well as improve patients' living activities associated with the dramatic increasing number of affected individuals. Molecular imaging with target-specific probes is contributing to identify the underlying biology in AD, which benefits to the early diagnosis of AD and the evaluation of anti-AD therapy. Molecular imaging probes, such as (11)C-PIB, (11)C-MP4A, (18)F-AV-45, and (11)F-FDG, can selectively bind to special bimolecular of AD or accurately accumulate at the location of damage areas, thus become an edge tool for a better management of the diseases in the clinical practice and new drug development. In the past decades, a large variety of probes is being developed and tested to be useful for the early and accurate diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease, patient selection for disease-modifying therapeutic trials and monitoring the effect of anti-amyloid therapy. Since imaging probes may also help to guide physicians to identify those patients that could best benefit from a given therapeutic regimen, dose, or duration of drug, this paper is to present a perspective of the available imaging probes for AD, classified on different modalities. Meanwhile, recent advances of those probes that have been selected for clinical trials and are at the different stages of the US Food and Drugs Administration (FDA) approval are outlined. Additionally, future directions and specific application of imaging strategies designed for both diagnosis and treatment for AD are discussed. PMID:24484277

  10. Recent advances in rapid and non-destructive assessment of meat quality using hyperspectral imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Feifei; Ngadi, Michael

    2016-05-01

    Meat is an important food item in human diet. Its production and consumption has greatly increased in the last decades with the development of economies and improvement of peoples' living standards. However, most of the traditional methods for evaluation of meat quality are time-consuming, laborious, inconsistent and destructive to samples, which make them not appropriate for a fast-paced production and processing environment. Development of innovative and non-destructive optical sensing techniques to facilitate simple, fast, and accurate evaluation of quality are attracting increasing attention in the food industry. Hyperspectral imaging is one of the promising techniques. It integrates the combined merits of imaging and spectroscopic techniques. This paper provides a comprehensive review on recent advances in evaluation of the important quality attributes of meat including color, marbling, tenderness, pH, water holding capacity, and also chemical composition attributes such as moisture content, protein content and fat content in pork, beef and lamb. In addition, the future potential applications and trends of hyperspectral imaging are also discussed in this paper.

  11. Wild-Type Transthyretin Cardiac Amyloidosis: Novel Insights From Advanced Imaging.

    PubMed

    Narotsky, David L; Castano, Adam; Weinsaft, Jonathan W; Bokhari, Sabahat; Maurer, Mathew S

    2016-09-01

    Amyloidosis is caused by extracellular deposition of abnormal protein fibrils, resulting in destruction of tissue architecture and impairment of organ function. The most common forms of systemic amyloidosis are light-chain and transthyretin-related (ATTR). ATTR can result from an autosomal dominant hereditary transmission of mutated genes in the transthyretin or from a wild-type form of disease (ATTRwt), previously known as senile cardiac amyloidosis. With the aging of the worldwide population, ATTRwt will emerge as the most common type of cardiac amyloidosis that clinicians encounter. Diagnosis of systemic amyloidosis is often delayed, either because of the false assumption that it is a rare disease, or because of misdiagnosis as a result of mistaking it with other conditions. Clinicians must integrate clinical clues from history, physical examination, and common diagnostic tests to raise suspicion for ATTRwt. The historical gold standard for diagnosis of cardiac amyloid is endomyocardial biopsy analysis with pathological distinction of precursor protein type, but this method often results in delayed diagnosis because of the limited availability of expertise to perform and interpret the endomyocardial biopsy specimen. Emerging noninvasive imaging modalities provide easier, accurate screening for ATTRwt. These modalities include advanced echocardiography, using strain imaging and the myocardial contraction fraction; nuclear scintigraphy, which can differentiate between ATTR and light-chain cardiac amyloid; and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging, using extracellular volume measurement, late gadolinium enhancement, and distinct T1 mapping. These novel approaches reveal insights into the prevalence, clinical course, morphological effects, and prognosis of ATTRwt. PMID:27568874

  12. Advanced camera image data acquisition system for Pi-of-the-Sky

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwiatkowski, Maciej; Kasprowicz, Grzegorz; Pozniak, Krzysztof; Romaniuk, Ryszard; Wrochna, Grzegorz

    2008-11-01

    The paper describes a new generation of high performance, remote control, CCD cameras designed for astronomical applications. A completely new camera PCB was designed, manufactured, tested and commissioned. The CCD chip was positioned in a different way than previously resulting in better performance of the astronomical video data acquisition system. The camera was built using a low-noise, 4Mpixel CCD circuit by STA. The electronic circuit of the camera is highly parameterized and reconfigurable, as well as modular in comparison with the solution of first generation, due to application of open software solutions and FPGA circuit, Altera Cyclone EP1C6. New algorithms were implemented into the FPGA chip. There were used the following advanced electronic circuit in the camera system: microcontroller CY7C68013a (core 8051) by Cypress, image processor AD9826 by Analog Devices, GigEth interface RTL8169s by Realtec, memory SDRAM AT45DB642 by Atmel, CPU typr microprocessor ARM926EJ-S AT91SAM9260 by ARM and Atmel. Software solutions for the camera and its remote control, as well as image data acquisition are based only on the open source platform. There were used the following image interfaces ISI and API V4L2, data bus AMBA, AHB, INDI protocol. The camera will be replicated in 20 pieces and is designed for continuous on-line, wide angle observations of the sky in the research program Pi-of-the-Sky.

  13. Body image in Brazil: recent advances in the state of knowledge and methodological issues

    PubMed Central

    Laus, Maria Fernanda; Kakeshita, Idalina Shiraishi; Costa, Telma Maria Braga; Ferreira, Maria Elisa Caputo; Fortes, Leonardo de Sousa; Almeida, Sebastião Sousa

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To analyze Brazilian literature on body image and the theoretical and methodological advances that have been made. METHODS A detailed review was undertaken of the Brazilian literature on body image, selecting published articles, dissertations and theses from the SciELO, SCOPUS, LILACS and PubMed databases and the CAPES thesis database. Google Scholar was also used. There was no start date for the search, which used the following search terms: “body image” AND “Brazil” AND “scale(s)”; “body image” AND “Brazil” AND “questionnaire(s)”; “body image” AND “Brazil” AND “instrument(s)”; “body image” limited to Brazil and “body image”. RESULTS The majority of measures available were intended to be used in college students, with half of them evaluating satisfaction/dissatisfaction with the body. Females and adolescents of both sexes were the most studied population. There has been a significant increase in the number of available instruments. Nevertheless, numerous published studies have used non-validated instruments, with much confusion in the use of the appropriate terms (e.g., perception, dissatisfaction, distortion). CONCLUSIONS Much more is needed to understand body image within the Brazilian population, especially in terms of evaluating different age groups and diversifying the components/dimensions assessed. However, interest in this theme is increasing, and important steps have been taken in a short space of time. PMID:24897056

  14. Assessment of geometric errors of Advanced Himawari-8 Imager (AHI) over one year operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeuchi, Wataru

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents an approach to check a geometric performance of Advanced Himawari-8 imager (AHI) and demonstrate and evaluate a new approach to ensure more geometric accurately focusing on visible imagery in 500 meters. A series of processing is supplemented by ground control points of shore lines, land mark locations and digital elevation model. Firstly, a template matching technique is conducted to find a best matching point by simply moving the center of AHI sub-image over each point in a reference image of shore lines and calculating the sum of products between the coefficients and the corresponding neighbourhood pixels in the area spanned by the filter mask. Secondly, ortho-rectification processing is carried out to compensate for the geodetical distortions with respect to the acquisition condition including viewing geometry and so on. As a result, an average of root mean square sum of residual errors with system correction and that of precise geometric correction are shown. Overall geometric accuracy is about 1 to 1.5 pixels from 2015 March to July and it also gradually decreased down to 0.2 to 0.8 from 2015 September to 2016 February. AHI is officially open to public for operational use as of July 1, 2015 and after that operation date geometric errors are reasonably satisfied within one pixels of errors.

  15. Applications of Gas Imaging Micro-Well Detectors to an Advanced Compton Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloser, P. F.; Hunter, S. D.; Ryan, J. M.; McConnell, M. L.; Miller, R. S.; Jackson, T. N.; Bai, B.; Jung, S.

    2003-01-01

    We present a concept for an Advanced Compton Telescope (ACT) based on the use of pixelized gas micro-well detectors to form a three-dimensional electron track imager. A micro-well detector consists of an array of individual micro-patterned proportional counters opposite a planar drift electrode. When combined with thin film transistor array readouts, large gas volumes may be imaged with very good spatial and energy resolution at reasonable cost. The third dimension is determined by timing the drift of the ionization electrons. The primary advantage of this approach is the excellent tracking of the Compton recoil electron that is possible in a gas volume. Such good electron tracking allows us to reduce the point spread function of a single incident photon dramatically, greatly improving the imaging capability and sensitivity. The polarization sensitivity, which relies on events with large Compton scattering angles, is particularly enhanced. We describe a possible ACT implementation of this technique, in which the gas tracking volume is surrounded by a CsI calorimeter, and present our plans to build and test a small prototype over the next three years.

  16. Imaging-Genetics in Autism Spectrum Disorder: Advances, Translational Impact, and Future Directions

    PubMed Central

    Ameis, Stephanie H.; Szatmari, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) refers to a group of heterogeneous neurodevelopmental disorders that are unified by impairments in reciprocal social communication and a pattern of inflexible behaviors. Recent genetic advances have resolved some of the complexity of the genetic architecture underlying ASD by identifying several genetic variants that contribute to the disorder. Different etiological pathways associated with ASD may converge through effects on common molecular mechanisms, such as synaptogenesis, neuronal motility, and axonal guidance. Recently, with more sophisticated techniques, neuroimaging, and neuropathological studies have provided some consistency of evidence that altered structure, activity, and connectivity within complex neural networks is present in ASD, compared to typically developing children. The imaging-genetics approach promises to help bridge the gap between genetic variation, resultant biological effects on the brain, and production of complex neuropsychiatric symptoms. Here, we review recent findings from the developing field of imaging-genetics applied to ASD. Studies to date have indicated that relevant risk genes are associated with alterations in circuits that mediate socio-emotional, visuo-spatial, and language processing. Longitudinal studies ideally focused on early development, in conjunction with investigation for gene–gene, and gene–environment interactions may move the promise of imaging-genetics in ASD closer to the clinical domain. PMID:22615702

  17. Intravoxel Incoherent Motion-Magnetic Resonance Imaging as an Early Predictor of Treatment Response to Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy in Locoregionally Advanced Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Youping; Pan, Jianji; Chen, Yunbin; Chen, Ying; He, Zhuangzhen; Zheng, Xiang

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The aim of the study was to prospectively evaluate the clinical value of intravoxel incoherent motion (IVIM)-magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in early predicting the treatment response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) for nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Forty-eight patients with locoregionally advanced NPC were imaged with IVIM-MRI (14 b-factors, 0 – 1000 s/mm2) on a 3.0-T Magnetic resonance system, at the baseline, and repeatedly at the third and 21st day after NAC started. The IVIM-derived parameters (D, pure diffusion coefficient; f, perfusion fraction; and D∗, pseudodiffusion coefficient) were calculated with the Interactive Data Language version 6.3 software. The baseline parameters and their corresponding changes (Δparameter(day)) during NAC were compared using the Student t test or Mann-Whitney U test. Variation analyses of IVIM-derived parameters were tested with intraclass correlation coefficient. Receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was conducted to estimate the best diagnostic accuracy. Statistical analyses were performed on the SPSS 18.0 software, with a 2-tailed probability value, P < 0.05 was considered significant. Among recruited patients, 37 cases were categorized as responders and 11 cases as nonresponders after NAC completed. The intra- and interobserver intraclass correlation coefficient of IVIM-derived parameters were excellent, which ranged from 0.858 to 0.971. Compared with the baseline value, at the third and 21st day, the D value was significantly higher and the D∗ value significantly lower (P < 0.05, P < 0.001, respectively). In contrast, f parameter only changed slightly (P > 0.05). Compared with nonresponders, responders presented a notably lower baseline D value and higher ΔD3, ΔD21, ΔD3∗, ΔD21∗, and Δf21 (P < 0.05), but no significant change in Δf3 was observed (P > 0.1). The receiver-operating characteristic curve analyses indicated that the threshold of

  18. Baseline Graphite Characterization: First Billet

    SciTech Connect

    Mark C. Carroll; Joe Lords; David Rohrbaugh

    2010-09-01

    The Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project Graphite Research and Development program is currently establishing the safe operating envelope of graphite core components for a very high temperature reactor design. To meet this goal, the program is generating the extensive amount of quantitative data necessary for predicting the behavior and operating performance of the available nuclear graphite grades. In order determine the in-service behavior of the graphite for the latest proposed designs, two main programs are underway. The first, the Advanced Graphite Creep (AGC) program, is a set of experiments that are designed to evaluate the irradiated properties and behavior of nuclear grade graphite over a large spectrum of temperatures, neutron fluences, and compressive loads. Despite the aggressive experimental matrix that comprises the set of AGC test runs, a limited amount of data can be generated based upon the availability of space within the Advanced Test Reactor and the geometric constraints placed on the AGC specimens that will be inserted. In order to supplement the AGC data set, the Baseline Graphite Characterization program will endeavor to provide supplemental data that will characterize the inherent property variability in nuclear-grade graphite without the testing constraints of the AGC program. This variability in properties is a natural artifact of graphite due to the geologic raw materials that are utilized in its production. This variability will be quantified not only within a single billet of as-produced graphite, but also from billets within a single lot, billets from different lots of the same grade, and across different billets of the numerous grades of nuclear graphite that are presently available. The thorough understanding of this variability will provide added detail to the irradiated property data, and provide a more thorough understanding of the behavior of graphite that will be used in reactor design and licensing. This report covers the

  19. Reverse-Contrast Imaging and Targeted Radiation Therapy of Advanced Pancreatic Cancer Models

    SciTech Connect

    Thorek, Daniel L.J.; Kramer, Robin M.; Chen, Qing; Jeong, Jeho; Lupu, Mihaela E.; Lee, Alycia M.; Moynahan, Mary E.; Lowery, Maeve; Ulmert, David; Zanzonico, Pat; Deasy, Joseph O.; Humm, John L.; Russell, James

    2015-10-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility of delivering experimental radiation therapy to tumors in the mouse pancreas. Imaging and treatment were performed using combined CT (computed tomography)/orthovoltage treatment with a rotating gantry. Methods and Materials: After intraperitoneal administration of radiopaque iodinated contrast, abdominal organ delineation was performed by x-ray CT. With this technique we delineated the pancreas and both orthotopic xenografts and genetically engineered disease. Computed tomographic imaging was validated by comparison with magnetic resonance imaging. Therapeutic radiation was delivered via a 1-cm diameter field. Selective x-ray radiation therapy of the noninvasively defined orthotopic mass was confirmed using γH2AX staining. Mice could tolerate a dose of 15 Gy when the field was centered on the pancreas tail, and treatment was delivered as a continuous 360° arc. This strategy was then used for radiation therapy planning for selective delivery of therapeutic x-ray radiation therapy to orthotopic tumors. Results: Tumor growth delay after 15 Gy was monitored, using CT and ultrasound to determine the tumor volume at various times after treatment. Our strategy enables the use of clinical radiation oncology approaches to treat experimental tumors in the pancreas of small animals for the first time. We demonstrate that delivery of 15 Gy from a rotating gantry minimizes background healthy tissue damage and significantly retards tumor growth. Conclusions: This advance permits evaluation of radiation planning and dosing parameters. Accurate noninvasive longitudinal imaging and monitoring of tumor progression and therapeutic response in preclinical models is now possible and can be expected to more effectively evaluate pancreatic cancer disease and therapeutic response.

  20. Advanced High-Speed Framing Camera Development for Fast, Visible Imaging Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Amy Lewis, Stuart Baker, Brian Cox, Abel Diaz, David Glass, Matthew Martin

    2011-05-11

    The advances in high-voltage switching developed in this project allow a camera user to rapidly vary the number of output frames from 1 to 25. A high-voltage, variable-amplitude pulse train shifts the deflection location to the new frame location during the interlude between frames, making multiple frame counts and locations possible. The final deflection circuit deflects to five different frame positions per axis, including the center position, making for a total of 25 frames. To create the preset voltages, electronically adjustable {+-}500 V power supplies were chosen. Digital-to-analog converters provide digital control of the supplies. The power supplies are clamped to {+-}400 V so as not to exceed the voltage ratings of the transistors. A field-programmable gated array (FPGA) receives the trigger signal and calculates the combination of plate voltages for each frame. The interframe time and number of frames are specified by the user, but are limited by the camera electronics. The variable-frame circuit shifts the plate voltages of the first frame to those of the second frame during the user-specified interframe time. Designed around an electrostatic image tube, a framing camera images the light present during each frame (at the photocathode) onto the tube’s phosphor. The phosphor persistence allows the camera to display multiple frames on the phosphor at one time. During this persistence, a CCD camera is triggered and the analog image is collected digitally. The tube functions by converting photons to electrons at the negatively charged photocathode. The electrons move quickly toward the more positive charge of the phosphor. Two sets of deflection plates skew the electron’s path in horizontal and vertical (x axis and y axis, respectively) directions. Hence, each frame’s electrons bombard the phosphor surface at a controlled location defined by the voltages on the deflection plates. To prevent the phosphor from being exposed between frames, the image tube

  1. Imaging receptor for advanced glycation end product expression in mouse model of hind limb ischemia

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study is to image the effect of diabetes on expression of receptor for advanced glycation endproducts (RAGE) in limb ischemia in live animals. Methods Male wild-type C57BL/6 mice were either made diabetic or left as control. Two months later, diabetic and non-diabetic mice underwent left femoral artery ligation. The right leg served as lesion control. Five days later, mice were injected with 15.1 ± 4.4 MBq 99mTc-anti-RAGE F(ab’)2 and 4 to 5 h later (blood pool clearance) underwent SPECT/CT imaging. At the completion of imaging, mice were euthanized, hind limbs counted and sectioned, and scans reconstructed. Regions of interest were drawn on serial transverse sections comprising the hind limbs and activity in millicuries summed and divided by the injected dose (ID). Quantitative histology was performed for RAGE staining and angiogenesis. Results Uptake of 99mTc-anti-RAGE F(ab')2 as %ID × 10−3 was higher in the left (ischemic) limbs for the diabetic mice (n = 8) compared to non-diabetic mice (n = 8) (1.20 ± 0.44% vs. 0.49 ± 0.40%; P = 0.0007) and corresponded to less angiogenesis in the diabetic mice. Uptake was also higher in the right limbs of diabetic compared to non-diabetic animals (0.82 ± 0.33% vs. 0.40 ± 0.14%; P = 0.0004). Conclusions These data show the feasibility of imaging and quantifying the effect of diabetes on RAGE expression in limb ischemia. PMID:23663412

  2. Advanced Tie Feature Matching for the Registration of Mobile Mapping Imaging Data and Aerial Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jende, P.; Peter, M.; Gerke, M.; Vosselman, G.

    2016-06-01

    Mobile Mapping's ability to acquire high-resolution ground data is opposing unreliable localisation capabilities of satellite-based positioning systems in urban areas. Buildings shape canyons impeding a direct line-of-sight to navigation satellites resulting in a deficiency to accurately estimate the mobile platform's position. Consequently, acquired data products' positioning quality is considerably diminished. This issue has been widely addressed in the literature and research projects. However, a consistent compliance of sub-decimetre accuracy as well as a correction of errors in height remain unsolved. We propose a novel approach to enhance Mobile Mapping (MM) image orientation based on the utilisation of highly accurate orientation parameters derived from aerial imagery. In addition to that, the diminished exterior orientation parameters of the MM platform will be utilised as they enable the application of accurate matching techniques needed to derive reliable tie information. This tie information will then be used within an adjustment solution to correct affected MM data. This paper presents an advanced feature matching procedure as a prerequisite to the aforementioned orientation update. MM data is ortho-projected to gain a higher resemblance to aerial nadir data simplifying the images' geometry for matching. By utilising MM exterior orientation parameters, search windows may be used in conjunction with a selective keypoint detection and template matching. Originating from different sensor systems, however, difficulties arise with respect to changes in illumination, radiometry and a different original perspective. To respond to these challenges for feature detection, the procedure relies on detecting keypoints in only one image. Initial tests indicate a considerable improvement in comparison to classic detector/descriptor approaches in this particular matching scenario. This method leads to a significant reduction of outliers due to the limited availability

  3. A Large State Medicaid Outpatient Advanced Imaging Utilization Management Program: Substantial Savings Without the Need for Denials.

    PubMed

    Rapoport, Robert J; Parker, Laurence; Levin, David C; Hiatt, Mark D

    2016-06-01

    A decade of rapidly rising outpatient advanced imaging utilization ended toward the end of the past decade, with slow growth since. This has been attributed to repetitive reimbursement cuts, medical radiation exposure concerns, increasing deductibles and patient copayments, and the influence of radiology benefit management companies. State Medicaid programs have been reluctant to institute radiology benefit management preauthorization programs since the time burden for obtaining test approval could cause providers to drop out. Also, these patients may lack the knowledge to appeal denials, and medically necessary tests could be denied with adverse outcomes. Little data exist demonstrating the efficacy of such programs in decreasing utilization and cost. We report a 2-year experience with an outpatient advanced imaging prior notification program for a large state Medicaid fee-for-service population. The program did not allow any denials, but nevertheless the data reveal a large, durable decrease in advanced imaging utilization and cost. PMID:26416792

  4. Exploring Atmospheric Aerosol Chemistry with Advanced High-Resolution Mass Spectrometry and Particle Imaging Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nizkorodov, S.

    2014-12-01

    Physical and chemical complexity of atmospheric aerosols presents significant challenges both to experimentalists working on aerosol characterization and to modelers trying to parameterize critical aerosol properties. Multi-modal approaches that combine state-of-the-art experimental, theoretical, and modeling methods are becoming increasingly important in aerosol research. This presentation will discuss recent applications of unique high-resolution mass spectrometry and particle imaging tools developed at two Department of Energy's user facilities, the Environmental Molecular Science Laboratory (EMSL) and Advanced Light Source (ALS), to studies of molecular composition, photochemical aging, and properties of laboratory-generated and field aerosols. Specifically, this presentation will attempt to address the following questions: (a) how do NO2, SO2, and NH3 affect molecular level composition of anthropogenic aerosols?; (b) what factors determine viscosity/surface tension of organic aerosol particles?; (c) how does photolysis affect molecular composition and optical properties of organic aerosols?

  5. Advanced Imaging and Tissue Engineering of the Human Limbal Epithelial Stem Cell Niche

    PubMed Central

    Massie, Isobel; Dziasko, Marc; Kureshi, Alvena; Levis, Hannah J.; Morgan, Louise; Neale, Michael; Sheth, Radhika; Tovell, Victoria E.; Vernon, Amanda J.; Funderburgh, James L.; Daniels, Julie T.

    2015-01-01

    The limbal epithelial stem cell niche provides a unique, physically protective environment in which limbal epithelial stem cells reside in close proximity with accessory cell types and their secreted factors. The use of advanced imaging techniques is described to visualize the niche in three dimensions in native human corneal tissue. In addition, a protocol is provided for the isolation and culture of three different cell types, including human limbal epithelial stem cells from the limbal niche of human donor tissue. Finally, the process of incorporating these cells within plastic compressed collagen constructs to form a tissue-engineered corneal limbus is described and how immunohistochemical techniques may be applied to characterize cell phenotype therein. PMID:25388395

  6. Mission science value-cost savings from the Advanced Imaging Communication System (AICS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rice, R. F.

    1984-01-01

    An Advanced Imaging Communication System (AICS) was proposed in the mid-1970s as an alternative to the Voyager data/communication system architecture. The AICS achieved virtually error free communication with little loss in the downlink data rate by concatenating a powerful Reed-Solomon block code with the Voyager convolutionally coded, Viterbi decoded downlink channel. The clean channel allowed AICS sophisticated adaptive data compression techniques. Both Voyager and the Galileo mission have implemented AICS components, and the concatenated channel itself is heading for international standardization. An analysis that assigns a dollar value/cost savings to AICS mission performance gains is presented. A conservative value or savings of $3 million for Voyager, $4.5 million for Galileo, and as much as $7 to 9.5 million per mission for future projects such as the proposed Mariner Mar 2 series is shown.

  7. Telescope performance near local midnight for the Japanese Advanced Meteorological Imager (JAMI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlov, Milutin M.; Bell, James L., Jr.; Hurt, W. Todd; Jacoby, Michael; Shreckengost, Belinda; Ravela, Russ; Schwarz, Mark A.

    2005-01-01

    Raytheon's Santa Barbara Remote Sensing (SBRS) division designed and built the MTSAT-1R Japanese Advanced Meteorological Imager for the Japanese Ministry of Transport between March, 1999 and July, 2002. In order to meet the stressing requirements of a geosynchronous orbit, a combination of structural, thermal, and optical (STOP) analyses were used to design and optimize the beryllium three-mirror anastigmat (TMA) telescope. This modeling approach was used to characterize and minimize the thermal distortion around local midnight. On-orbit temperatures and structural deformations were predicted using thermal Desktop/SINDA and PATRAN/NASTRAN software, respectively. The resulting optical performance was evaluated using Raytheon developed HEXAGON software. The telescope design was successfully optimized to attain specified visible channel performance for most of the 24 hour orbit.

  8. Advanced Numerical Imaging Procedure Accounting for Non-Ideal Effects in GPR Scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comite, Davide; Galli, Alessandro; Catapano, Ilaria; Soldovieri, Francesco

    2015-04-01

    The capability to provide fast and reliable imaging of targets and interfaces in non-accessible probed scenarios is a topic of great scientific interest, and many investigations have shown that Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) can provide an efficient technique to conduct this kind of analysis in various applications of geophysical nature and civil engineering. In these cases, the development of an efficient and accurate imaging procedure is strongly dependent on the capability of accounting for the incident field that activates the scattering phenomenon. In this frame, based on a suitable implementation of an electromagnetic (EM) CAD tool (CST Microwave Studio), it has been possible to accurately and efficiently model the radiation pattern of real antennas in environments typically considered in GPR surveys [1]. A typical scenario of our interest is constituted by targets hidden in a ground medium, described by certain EM parameters and probed by a movable GPR using interfacial antennas [2]. The transmitting and receiving antennas considered here are Vivaldi ones, but a wide variety of other antennas can be modeled and designed, similar to those ones available in commercial GPR systems. Hence, an advanced version of a well-known microwave tomography approach (MTA) [3] has been implemented, both in the canonical 2D scalar case and in the more realistic 3D vectorial one. Such an approach is able to account for the real distribution of the radiated and scattered EM fields. Comparisons of results obtained by means of a 'conventional' implementation of the MTA, where the antennas are modeled as ideal line sources, and by means of our 'advanced' approach, which instead takes into account the radiation features of the chosen antenna type, have been carried out and discussed. Since the antenna radiation patterns are modified by the probed environment, whose EM features and the possible stratified structure usually are not exactly known, the imaging capabilities of the MTA

  9. Classification of leafy spurge with earth observing-1 advanced land imager

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stitt, S.; Root, R.; Brown, K.; Hager, S.; Mladinich, C.; Anderson, G.L.; Dudek, K.; Bustos, M.R.; Kokaly, R.

    2006-01-01

    Leafy spurge (Euphorbia esula L.) is an invasive exotic plant that can completely displace native plant communities. Automated techniques for monitoring the location and extent of leafy spurge, especially if available on a seasonal basis, could add greatly to the effectiveness of control measures. As part of a larger study including multiple sensors, this study examines the utility of mapping the location and extent of leafy spurge in Theodore Roosevelt National Park using Earth Observing-1 satellite Advanced Land Imager (ALI) scanner data. An unsupervised classification methodology was used producing accuracies in the range of 59% to 66%. Existing field studies, with their associated limitations, were used for identifying class membership and accuracy assessment. This sensor could be useful for broad landscape scale mapping of leafy spurge, from which control measures could be based.

  10. Advanced image processing for optical coherence tomographic angiography of macular diseases

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Miao; Wang, Jie; Pechauer, Alex D.; Hwang, Thomas S.; Gao, Simon S.; Liu, Liang; Liu, Li; Bailey, Steven T.; Wilson, David J.; Huang, David; Jia, Yali

    2015-01-01

    This article provides an overview of advanced image processing for three dimensional (3D) optical coherence tomographic (OCT) angiography of macular diseases, including age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and diabetic retinopathy (DR). A fast automated retinal layers segmentation algorithm using directional graph search was introduced to separates 3D flow data into different layers in the presence of pathologies. Intelligent manual correction methods are also systematically addressed which can be done rapidly on a single frame and then automatically propagated to full 3D volume with accuracy better than 1 pixel. Methods to visualize and analyze the abnormalities including retinal and choroidal neovascularization, retinal ischemia, and macular edema were presented to facilitate the clinical use of OCT angiography. PMID:26713185

  11. MALDI mass spectrometric imaging meets "omics": recent advances in the fruitful marriage.

    PubMed

    Crecelius, A C; Schubert, U S; von Eggeling, F

    2015-09-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometric imaging (MALDI MSI) is a method that allows the investigation of the molecular content of surfaces, in particular, tissues, within its morphological context. The applications of MALDI MSI in the field of large-scale mass spectrometric studies, which are typically denoted by the suffix "omics", are steadily increasing. This is because, on the one hand, technical advances regarding sample collection and preparation, matrix application, instrumentation, and data processing have enhanced the molecular specificity and sensitivity of MALDI MSI; on the other hand, the focus of the "omics" community has moved from establishing an inventory of certain compound classes to exploring their spatial distribution to gain novel insights. Thus, the aim of this mini-review is twofold, to display the state-of-the-art in terms of technical aspects in MALDI MSI and to highlight selected applications in the last two years, which either have significantly advanced a certain "omics" field or have introduced a new one through pioneering efforts. PMID:26161715

  12. Advances in Echocardiographic Imaging in Heart Failure With Reduced and Preserved Ejection Fraction.

    PubMed

    Omar, Alaa Mabrouk Salem; Bansal, Manish; Sengupta, Partho P

    2016-07-01

    Echocardiography, given its safety, easy availability, and the ability to permit a comprehensive assessment of cardiac structure and function, is an indispensable tool in the evaluation and management of patients with heart failure (HF). From initial phenotyping and risk stratification to providing vital data for guiding therapeutic decision-making and monitoring, echocardiography plays a pivotal role in the care of HF patients. The recent advent of multiparametric approaches for myocardial deformation imaging has provided valuable insights in the pathogenesis of HF, elucidating distinct patterns of myocardial dysfunction and events that are associated with progression from subclinical stage to overt HF. At the same time, miniaturization of echocardiography has further expanded clinical application of echocardiography, with the use of pocket cardiac ultrasound as an adjunct to physical examination demonstrated to improve diagnostic accuracy and risk stratification. Furthermore, ongoing advances in the field of big data analytics promise to create an exciting opportunity to operationalize precision medicine as the new approach to healthcare delivery that aims to individualize patient care by integrating data extracted from clinical, laboratory, echocardiographic, and genetic assessments. The present review summarizes the recent advances in the field of echocardiography, with emphasis on their role in HF phenotyping, risk stratification, and optimizing clinical outcomes. PMID:27390337

  13. Recent Advances in Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles for Cellular Imaging and Targeted Therapy Research

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yi-Xiang J.; Xuan, Shouhu; Port, Marc; Idee, Jean-Marc

    2013-01-01

    Advances of nanotechnology have led to the development of nanomaterials with both potential diagnostic and therapeutic applications. Among them, superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticles have received particular attention. Over the past decade, various SPIOs with unique physicochemical and biological properties have been designed by modifying the particle structure, size and coating. This article reviews the recent advances in preparing SPIOs with novel properties, the way these physicochemical properties of SPIOs influence their interaction with cells, and the development of SPIOs in liver and lymph nodes magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast. Cellular uptake of SPIO can be exploited in a variety of potential clinical applications, including stem cell and inflammation cell tracking and intra-cellular drug delivery to cancerous cells which offers higher intra-cellular concentration. When SPIOs are used as carrier vehicle, additional advantages can be achieved including magnetic targeting and hyperthermia options, as well as monitoring with MRI. Other potential applications of SPIO include magnetofection and gene delivery, targeted retention of labeled stem cells, sentinel lymph nodes mapping, and magnetic force targeting and cell orientation for tissue engineering. PMID:23621536

  14. Advanced computational sensors technology: testing and evaluation in visible, SWIR, and LWIR imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizk, Charbel G.; Wilson, John P.; Pouliquen, Philippe

    2015-05-01

    The Advanced Computational Sensors Team at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory and the Johns Hopkins University Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering has been developing advanced readout integrated circuit (ROIC) technology for more than 10 years with a particular focus on the key challenges of dynamic range, sampling rate, system interface and bandwidth, and detector materials or band dependencies. Because the pixel array offers parallel sampling by default, the team successfully demonstrated that adding smarts in the pixel and the chip can increase performance significantly. Each pixel becomes a smart sensor and can operate independently in collecting, processing, and sharing data. In addition, building on the digital circuit revolution, the effective well size can be increased by orders of magnitude within the same pixel pitch over analog designs. This research has yielded an innovative class of a system-on-chip concept: the Flexible Readout and Integration Sensor (FRIS) architecture. All key parameters are programmable and/or can be adjusted dynamically, and this architecture can potentially be sensor and application agnostic. This paper reports on the testing and evaluation of one prototype that can support either detector polarity and includes sample results with visible, short-wavelength infrared (SWIR), and long-wavelength infrared (LWIR) imaging.

  15. A baseline lunar mine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gertsch, Richard E.

    1992-01-01

    A models lunar mining method is proposed that illustrates the problems to be expected in lunar mining and how they might be solved. While the method is quite feasible, it is, more importantly, a useful baseline system against which to test other, possible better, methods. Our study group proposed the slusher to stimulate discussion of how a lunar mining operation might be successfully accomplished. Critics of the slusher system were invited to propose better methods. The group noted that while nonterrestrial mining has been a vital part of past space manufacturing proposals, no one has proposed a lunar mining system in any real detail. The group considered it essential that the design of actual, workable, and specific lunar mining methods begin immediately. Based on an earlier proposal, the method is a three-drum slusher, also known as a cable-operated drag scraper. Its terrestrial application is quite limited, as it is relatively inefficient and inflexible. The method usually finds use in underwater mining from the shore and in moving small amounts of ore underground. When lunar mining scales up, the lunarized slusher will be replaced by more efficient, high-volume methods. Other aspects of lunar mining are discussed.

  16. Long Baseline Neutrino Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mezzetto, Mauro

    2016-05-01

    Following the discovery of neutrino oscillations by the Super-Kamiokande collaboration, recently awarded with the Nobel Prize, two generations of long baseline experiments had been setup to further study neutrino oscillations. The first generation experiments, K2K in Japan, Minos in the States and Opera in Europe, focused in confirming the Super-Kamiokande result, improving the precision with which oscillation parameters had been measured and demonstrating the ντ appearance process. Second generation experiments, T2K in Japan and very recently NOνA in the States, went further, being optimized to look for genuine three neutrino phenomena like non-zero values of θ13 and first glimpses to leptonic CP violation (LCPV) and neutrino mass ordering (NMO). The discovery of leptonic CP violation will require third generation setups, at the moment two strong proposals are ongoing, Dune in the States and Hyper-Kamiokande in Japan. This review will focus a little more in these future initiatives.

  17. Advanced prism-grating-prism imaging spectrograph in online industrial applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaarala, Tapio; Aikio, Mauri; Keraenen, Heimo

    1997-08-01

    Imaging spectrographs have traditionally been utilized in aerial and remote sensing applications. A novel, compact and inexpensive imaging spectrograph developed by VTT Electronics is now available. It contains a multichannel fiber optic sensor head, a dispersive prism-grating-prism (PGP) component and digital CCD matrix camera capable of area integration. In rolled steel manufacturing, a protective oil film is applied on steel to resist corrosion while in transport and storage. The main problems in the oiling machine are film thickness control and jet failures. In this application, the spectrum of fluorescence of an oil film was measured simultaneously with parallel fibers. A relatively simple calibration and analysis procedure was used to calculate the oil film thickness. On-line color control for color reproduction is essential in both consumer and industrial products. The instrument was tested and analyzed for measuring differences in color by multivariate analysis of the spectra and by color space coordinate estimation. In general, a continuous spectrum is not absolute requirement. In these two examples, filter-based measurement would probably cost less thana PGP spectrograph solution. On the other hand, by measuring the spectrum and using an advanced signal processing algorithm one production version will cover all installations in both applications. In practice, only the fiber sensor mechanics need to be modified.

  18. A Combined Method for Segmentation and Registration for an Advanced and Progressive Evaluation of Thermal Images

    PubMed Central

    Barcelos, Emilio Z.; Caminhas, Walmir M.; Ribeiro, Eraldo; Pimenta, Eduardo M.; Palhares, Reinaldo M.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, a method that combines image analysis techniques, such as segmentation and registration, is proposed for an advanced and progressive evaluation of thermograms. The method is applied for the prevention of muscle injury in high-performance athletes, in collaboration with a Brazilian professional soccer club. The goal is to produce information on spatio-temporal variations of thermograms favoring the investigation of the athletes' conditions along the competition. The proposed method improves on current practice by providing a means for automatically detecting adaptive body-shaped regions of interest, instead of the manual selection of simple shapes. Specifically, our approach combines the optimization features in Otsu's method with a correction factor and post-processing techniques, enhancing thermal-image segmentation when compared to other methods. Additional contributions resulting from the combination of the segmentation and registration steps of our approach are the progressive analyses of thermograms in a unique spatial coordinate system and the accurate extraction of measurements and isotherms. PMID:25414972

  19. System performance advances of 18-mm and 16-mm subminiature image intensifier sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Nils I.

    2000-11-01

    Night vision system design has been centered aroudn the An/AVS-6 and AN/PVS-7 night vision goggle systems for the past 20 years. Goggle performance has improved during this time through increased performance of the image intensifier sensor, primarily the Omni IV sensor from ITT Industries Night Vision. Most of this improvement has been at the optimal light level (1E-3 fc scene illumination). Recent advances in image sensor performance from the filmless Generation (Gen) IV sensors has increased the low light level performance of night vision devices from 0.3 cy/mr to 0.7 cy/mr. In addition, sensor packaging design requirements have forced night vision sensor manufactures to design light weight, small volume sensors. ITT recently has designed such a sensor in a 16-mm format. This sensor if 50% lighter, up to 50% shorter, and has design features that simplify the objective lens design. New night vision goggles have been, and are being, designed which reduce the perceived head-supported weight. This paper presents signal-to-noise ratio, halo, and other film-less sensor data and similar 16-mm subminiature sensor data. The resulting system performance data will be described. Finally, the system design improvements and relationships with the subminiature 16-mm subminiature sensor will be given.

  20. AXIS: an instrument for imaging Compton radiographs using the Advanced Radiography Capability on the NIF.

    PubMed

    Hall, G N; Izumi, N; Tommasini, R; Carpenter, A C; Palmer, N E; Zacharias, R; Felker, B; Holder, J P; Allen, F V; Bell, P M; Bradley, D; Montesanti, R; Landen, O L

    2014-11-01

    Compton radiography is an important diagnostic for Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF), as it provides a means to measure the density and asymmetries of the DT fuel in an ICF capsule near the time of peak compression. The AXIS instrument (ARC (Advanced Radiography Capability) X-ray Imaging System) is a gated detector in development for the National Ignition Facility (NIF), and will initially be capable of recording two Compton radiographs during a single NIF shot. The principal reason for the development of AXIS is the requirement for significantly improved detection quantum efficiency (DQE) at high x-ray energies. AXIS will be the detector for Compton radiography driven by the ARC laser, which will be used to produce Bremsstrahlung X-ray backlighter sources over the range of 50 keV-200 keV for this purpose. It is expected that AXIS will be capable of recording these high-energy x-rays with a DQE several times greater than other X-ray cameras at NIF, as well as providing a much larger field of view of the imploded capsule. AXIS will therefore provide an image with larger signal-to-noise that will allow the density and distribution of the compressed DT fuel to be measured with significantly greater accuracy as ICF experiments are tuned for ignition. PMID:25430200

  1. Utilization of optical image data from the Advanced Test Accelerator (ATA)

    SciTech Connect

    Chambers, F.W.; Kallman, J.S.; Slominski, M.E.; Chong, Y.P.; Donnelly, D.; Cornish, J.P.

    1987-01-01

    Extensive use is made of optical diagnostics to obtain information on the 50-MeV, 10-kA, 70-ns pulsed-electron beam produced by the Advanced Test Accelerator (ATA). Light is generated by the beam striking a foil inserted in the beamline or through excitation of the gas when the beamline is filled with air. The emitted light is collected and digitized. Two-dimensional images are recorded by either a gated framing camera or a streak camera. Extraction of relevant beam parameters, such as current density, current, and beam size, requires an understanding of the physics of the light-generation mechanism and an ability to handle and properly exploit a large digital database of image data. We will present a brief overview of the present understanding of the light-generation mechanisms in foil and gas, with emphasis on experimental observations and trends. We will review our data management and analysis techniques and indicate successful approaches for extracting beam parameters.

  2. Radiometric calibration stability of the EO-1 advanced land imager: 5 years on-orbit

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Markham, B.L.; Ong, L.; Barsi, J.A.; Mendenhall, J.A.; Lencioni, D.E.; Helder, D.L.; Hollaren, D.M.; Morfitt, R.

    2006-01-01

    The Advanced Land Imager (ALI) was developed as a prototype sensor for follow on missions to Landsat-7. It was launched in November 2000 on the Earth Observing One (EO-1) satellite as a nominal one-year technology demonstration mission. As of this writing, the sensor has continued to operate in excess of 5 years. Six of the ALl's nine multi-spectral (MS) bands and the panchromatic band have similar spectral coverage as those on the Landsat-7 ETM+. In addition to on-board lamps, which have been significantly more stable than the lamps on ETM+, the ALI has a solar diffuser and has imaged the moon monthly since launch. This combined calibration dataset allows understanding of the radiometric stability of the ALI system, its calibrators and some differentiation of the sources of the changes with time. The solar dataset is limited as the mechanism controlling the aperture to the solar diffuser failed approximately 18 months after launch. Results over 5 years indicate that: the shortest wavelength band (443 nm) has degraded in response about 2%; the 482 nm and 565 nm bands decreased in response about 1%; the 660 nm, 790 nm and 868 nm bands each degraded about 5%; the 1250 nm and 1650 nm bands did not change significantly and the 2215 nm band increased in response about 2%.

  3. Computational inspection applied to a mask inspection system with advanced aerial imaging capability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Linyong; Peng, Danping; He, Lin; Chen, Dongxue; Dam, Thuc; Tolani, Vikram; Tam, Aviram; Staud, Wolf

    2010-03-01

    At the most advanced technology nodes, such as 32nm and 22nm, aggressive OPC and Sub-Resolution Assist Features (SRAFs) are required. However, their use results in significantly increased mask complexity, challenging mask defect dispositioning more than ever. To address these challenges in mask inspection and defect dispositioning, new mask inspection technologies have been developed that not only provide high resolution masks imaged at the same wavelength as the scanner, but that also provide aerial images by using both: software simulation and hardware emulation. The original mask patterns stored by the optics of mask inspection systems can be recovered using a patented algorithm based on the Level Set Method. More accurate lithography simulation models can be used to further evaluate defects on simulated resist patterns using the recovered mask pattern in high resolution and aerial mode. An automated defect classification based on lithography significance and local CD changes is also developed to disposition tens of thousands of potential defects in minutes, so that inspection throughput is not impacted.

  4. Terahertz pulsed imaging as an advanced characterisation tool for film coatings--a review.

    PubMed

    Haaser, Miriam; Gordon, Keith C; Strachan, Clare J; Rades, Thomas

    2013-12-01

    Solid dosage forms are the pharmaceutical drug delivery systems of choice for oral drug delivery. These solid dosage forms are often coated to modify the physico-chemical properties of the active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs), in particular to alter release kinetics. Since the product performance of coated dosage forms is a function of their critical coating attributes, including coating thickness, uniformity, and density, more advanced quality control techniques than weight gain are required. A recently introduced non-destructive method to quantitatively characterise coating quality is terahertz pulsed imaging (TPI). The ability of terahertz radiation to penetrate many pharmaceutical materials enables structural features of coated solid dosage forms to be probed at depth, which is not readily achievable with other established imaging techniques, e.g. near-infrared (NIR) and Raman spectroscopy. In this review TPI is introduced and various applications of the technique in pharmaceutical coating analysis are discussed. These include evaluation of coating thickness, uniformity, surface morphology, density, defects and buried structures as well as correlation between TPI measurements and drug release performance, coating process monitoring and scale up. Furthermore, challenges and limitations of the technique are discussed. PMID:23570960

  5. ABrIL - Advanced Brain Imaging Lab : a cloud based computation environment for cooperative neuroimaging projects.

    PubMed

    Neves Tafula, Sérgio M; Moreira da Silva, Nádia; Rozanski, Verena E; Silva Cunha, João Paulo

    2014-01-01

    Neuroscience is an increasingly multidisciplinary and highly cooperative field where neuroimaging plays an important role. Neuroimaging rapid evolution is demanding for a growing number of computing resources and skills that need to be put in place at every lab. Typically each group tries to setup their own servers and workstations to support their neuroimaging needs, having to learn from Operating System management to specific neuroscience software tools details before any results can be obtained from each setup. This setup and learning process is replicated in every lab, even if a strong collaboration among several groups is going on. In this paper we present a new cloud service model - Brain Imaging Application as a Service (BiAaaS) - and one of its implementation - Advanced Brain Imaging Lab (ABrIL) - in the form of an ubiquitous virtual desktop remote infrastructure that offers a set of neuroimaging computational services in an interactive neuroscientist-friendly graphical user interface (GUI). This remote desktop has been used for several multi-institution cooperative projects with different neuroscience objectives that already achieved important results, such as the contribution to a high impact paper published in the January issue of the Neuroimage journal. The ABrIL system has shown its applicability in several neuroscience projects with a relatively low-cost, promoting truly collaborative actions and speeding up project results and their clinical applicability. PMID:25570014

  6. New dual gas puff imaging system with up-down symmetry on experimental advanced superconducting tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, S. C.; Shao, L. M.; Zweben, S. J.; Xu, G. S.; Guo, H. Y.; Cao, B.; Wang, H. Q.; Wang, L.; Yan, N.; Xia, S. B.; Zhang, W.; Chen, R.; Chen, L.; Ding, S. Y.; Xiong, H.; Zhao, Y.; Wan, B. N.; Gong, X. Z.; Gao, X.

    2012-12-01

    Gas puff imaging (GPI) offers a direct and effective diagnostic to measure the edge turbulence structure and velocity in the edge plasma, which closely relates to edge transport and instability in tokamaks. A dual GPI diagnostic system has been installed on the low field side on experimental advanced superconducting tokamak (EAST). The two views are up-down symmetric about the midplane and separated by a toroidal angle of 66.6°. A linear manifold with 16 holes apart by 10 mm is used to form helium gas cloud at the 130×130 mm (radial versus poloidal) objective plane. A fast camera is used to capture the light emission from the image plane with a speed up to 390 804 frames/s with 64×64 pixels and an exposure time of 2.156 μs. The spatial resolution of the system is 2 mm at the objective plane. A total amount of 200 Pa.L helium gas is puffed into the plasma edge for each GPI viewing region for about 250 ms. The new GPI diagnostic has been applied on EAST for the first time during the recent experimental campaign under various plasma conditions, including ohmic, L-mode, and type-I, and type-III ELMy H-modes. Some of these initial experimental results are also presented.

  7. Advancing Cardiovascular, Neurovascular, and Renal Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Small Rodents Using Cryogenic Radiofrequency Coil Technology

    PubMed Central

    Niendorf, Thoralf; Pohlmann, Andreas; Reimann, Henning M.; Waiczies, Helmar; Peper, Eva; Huelnhagen, Till; Seeliger, Erdmann; Schreiber, Adrian; Kettritz, Ralph; Strobel, Klaus; Ku, Min-Chi; Waiczies, Sonia

    2015-01-01

    Research in pathologies of the brain, heart and kidney have gained immensely from the plethora of studies that have helped shape new methods in magnetic resonance (MR) for characterizing preclinical disease models. Methodical probing into preclinical animal models by MR is invaluable since it allows a careful interpretation and extrapolation of data derived from these models to human disease. In this review we will focus on the applications of cryogenic radiofrequency (RF) coils in small animal MR as a means of boosting image quality (e.g., by supporting MR microscopy) and making data acquisition more efficient (e.g., by reducing measuring time); both being important constituents for thorough investigational studies on animal models of disease. This review attempts to make the (bio)medical imaging, molecular medicine, and pharmaceutical communities aware of this productive ferment and its outstanding significance for anatomical and functional MR in small rodents. The goal is to inspire a more intense interdisciplinary collaboration across the fields to further advance and progress non-invasive MR methods that ultimately support thorough (patho)physiological characterization of animal disease models. In this review, current and potential future applications for the RF coil technology in cardiovascular, neurovascular, and renal disease will be discussed. PMID:26617515

  8. Fire service and first responder thermal imaging camera (TIC) advances and standards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konsin, Lawrence S.; Nixdorff, Stuart

    2007-04-01

    Fire Service and First Responder Thermal Imaging Camera (TIC) applications are growing, saving lives and preventing injury and property damage. Firefighters face a wide range of serious hazards. TICs help mitigate the risks by protecting Firefighters and preventing injury, while reducing time spent fighting the fire and resources needed to do so. Most fire safety equipment is covered by performance standards. Fire TICs, however, are not covered by such standards and are also subject to inadequate operational performance and insufficient user training. Meanwhile, advancements in Fire TICs and lower costs are driving product demand. The need for a Fire TIC Standard was spurred in late 2004 through a Government sponsored Workshop where experts from the First Responder community, component manufacturers, firefighter training, and those doing research on TICs discussed strategies, technologies, procedures, best practices and R&D that could improve Fire TICs. The workshop identified pressing image quality, performance metrics, and standards issues. Durability and ruggedness metrics and standard testing methods were also seen as important, as was TIC training and certification of end-users. A progress report on several efforts in these areas and their impact on the IR sensor industry will be given. This paper is a follow up to the SPIE Orlando 2004 paper on Fire TIC usage (entitled Emergency Responders' Critical Infrared) which explored the technological development of this IR industry segment from the viewpoint of the end user, in light of the studies and reports that had established TICs as a mission critical tool for firefighters.

  9. Advanced Imaging and Receipt of Guideline Concordant Care in Women with Early Stage Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Loggers, Elizabeth Trice; Buist, Diana S M; Gold, Laura S; Zeliadt, Steven; Hunter Merrill, Rachel; Etzioni, Ruth; Ramsey, Scott D; Sullivan, Sean D; Kessler, Larry

    2016-01-01

    Objective. It is unknown whether advanced imaging (AI) is associated with higher quality breast cancer (BC) care. Materials and Methods. Claims and Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results data were linked for women diagnosed with incident stage I-III BC between 2002 and 2008 in western Washington State. We examined receipt of preoperative breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or AI (defined as computed tomography [CT]/positron emission tomography [PET]/PET/CT) versus mammogram and/or ultrasound (M-US) alone and receipt of guideline concordant care (GCC) using multivariable logistic regression. Results. Of 5247 women, 67% received M-US, 23% MRI, 8% CT, and 3% PET/PET-CT. In 2002, 5% received MRI and 5% AI compared to 45% and 12%, respectively, in 2008. 79% received GCC, but GCC declined over time and was associated with younger age, urban residence, less comorbidity, shorter time from diagnosis to surgery, and earlier year of diagnosis. Breast MRI was associated with GCC for lumpectomy plus radiation therapy (RT) (OR 1.55, 95% CI 1.08-2.26, and p = 0.02) and AI was associated with GCC for adjuvant chemotherapy for estrogen-receptor positive (ER+) BC (OR 1.74, 95% CI 1.17-2.59, and p = 0.01). Conclusion. GCC was associated with prior receipt of breast MRI and AI for lumpectomy plus RT and adjuvant chemotherapy for ER+ BC, respectively. PMID:27525122

  10. AXIS: An instrument for imaging Compton radiographs using the Advanced Radiography Capability on the NIF

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, G. N. Izumi, N.; Tommasini, R.; Carpenter, A. C.; Palmer, N. E.; Zacharias, R.; Felker, B.; Holder, J. P.; Allen, F. V.; Bell, P. M.; Bradley, D.; Montesanti, R.; Landen, O. L.

    2014-11-15

    Compton radiography is an important diagnostic for Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF), as it provides a means to measure the density and asymmetries of the DT fuel in an ICF capsule near the time of peak compression. The AXIS instrument (ARC (Advanced Radiography Capability) X-ray Imaging System) is a gated detector in development for the National Ignition Facility (NIF), and will initially be capable of recording two Compton radiographs during a single NIF shot. The principal reason for the development of AXIS is the requirement for significantly improved detection quantum efficiency (DQE) at high x-ray energies. AXIS will be the detector for Compton radiography driven by the ARC laser, which will be used to produce Bremsstrahlung X-ray backlighter sources over the range of 50 keV–200 keV for this purpose. It is expected that AXIS will be capable of recording these high-energy x-rays with a DQE several times greater than other X-ray cameras at NIF, as well as providing a much larger field of view of the imploded capsule. AXIS will therefore provide an image with larger signal-to-noise that will allow the density and distribution of the compressed DT fuel to be measured with significantly greater accuracy as ICF experiments are tuned for ignition.

  11. Advanced Imaging and Receipt of Guideline Concordant Care in Women with Early Stage Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Buist, Diana S. M.; Gold, Laura S.; Zeliadt, Steven; Hunter Merrill, Rachel; Etzioni, Ruth; Ramsey, Scott D.; Sullivan, Sean D.; Kessler, Larry

    2016-01-01

    Objective. It is unknown whether advanced imaging (AI) is associated with higher quality breast cancer (BC) care. Materials and Methods. Claims and Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results data were linked for women diagnosed with incident stage I-III BC between 2002 and 2008 in western Washington State. We examined receipt of preoperative breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or AI (defined as computed tomography [CT]/positron emission tomography [PET]/PET/CT) versus mammogram and/or ultrasound (M-US) alone and receipt of guideline concordant care (GCC) using multivariable logistic regression. Results. Of 5247 women, 67% received M-US, 23% MRI, 8% CT, and 3% PET/PET-CT. In 2002, 5% received MRI and 5% AI compared to 45% and 12%, respectively, in 2008. 79% received GCC, but GCC declined over time and was associated with younger age, urban residence, less comorbidity, shorter time from diagnosis to surgery, and earlier year of diagnosis. Breast MRI was associated with GCC for lumpectomy plus radiation therapy (RT) (OR 1.55, 95% CI 1.08–2.26, and p = 0.02) and AI was associated with GCC for adjuvant chemotherapy for estrogen-receptor positive (ER+) BC (OR 1.74, 95% CI 1.17–2.59, and p = 0.01). Conclusion. GCC was associated with prior receipt of breast MRI and AI for lumpectomy plus RT and adjuvant chemotherapy for ER+ BC, respectively. PMID:27525122

  12. Carbon-Based Nanostructures as Advanced Contrast Agents for Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ananta Narayanan, Jeyarama S.

    2011-12-01

    Superparamagnetic carbon-based nanostructures are presented as contrast agents (CAs) for advanced imaging applications such as cellular and molecular imaging using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Gadolinium-loaded, ultra-short single-walled carbon nanotubes (gadonanotubes; GNTs) are shown to have extremely high r1 relaxivities (contrast enhancement efficacy), especially at low-magnetic field strengths. The inherent lipophilicity of GNTs provides them the ability to image cells at low magnetic field strength. A carboxylated dextran-coated GNT (GadoDex) has been synthesized and proposed as a new biocompatible high-performance MRI CA. The r1 relaxivity is ca. 20 times greater than for other paramagnetic Gd-based CAs. This enhanced relaxivity for GadoDex is due to the synergistic effects of an increased molecular tumbling time (tauR) and a faster proton exchange rate (taum). GNTs also exhibit very large transverse relaxivities (r2) at high magnetic fields (≥ 3 T). The dependence of the transverse relaxation rates (especially R2*) of labeled cells on GNT concentration offers the possibility to quantify cell population in vivo using R2* mapping. The cell-labeling efficiency and high transverse relaxivities of GNTs has enabled the first non-iron oxide-based single-cell imaging using MRI. The residual metal catalyst particles of SWNT materials also have transverse relaxation properties. All of the SWNT materials exhibit superior transverse relaxation properties. However, purified SWNTs and US-tubes with less residual metal content exhibit better transverse relaxivities (r2), demonstrating the importance of the SWNT structure for enhanced MRI CA performance. A strategy to improve the r1 relaxivity of Gd-CAs by geometrically confining them within porous silicon particles (SiMPs) has been investigated. The enhancement in relaxivity is attributed to the slow diffusion of water molecules through the pores and the increase in the molecular tumbling time of the nanoconstruct

  13. Imaging of Receptors for Advanced Glycation End Products in Experimental Myocardial Ischemia and Reperfusion Injury

    PubMed Central

    Tekabe, Yared; Luma, Joane; Li, Qing; Schmidt, Ann Marie; Ramasamy, Ravichandran; Johnson, Lynne L.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES The aim of this study was to image expression of receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) in a mouse model of myocardial reperfusion injury. BACKGROUND RAGE and its ligands are implicated in the pathogenesis of ischemia/reperfusion injury and infarction. We hypothesized that RAGE-directed quantitative imaging of myocardial uptake of technetium-99m (99mTc)-anti-RAGE F(ab′)2 in a mouse model of myocardial ischemic injury can detect RAGE expression and show quantitative differences between early (18 to 20 h) and later times (48 h) after reperfusion. METHODS Twenty-five wild-type (WT) mice underwent left anterior descending coronary artery occlusion for 30 min. Mice were injected with 19.98 ± 1.78 MBq of 99mTc anti-RAGE F(ab′)2 at 2 time points after reperfusion (at 18 to 20 h [n = 8] and at 48 h [n = 12]) and 5 h later with 6.14 ± 2.0 MBq of thallium-201 (201Tl). Five WT mice were injected with nonspecific F(ab′)2 and 201Tl 18 to 20 h after reperfusion. Six WT mice underwent sham operation without coronary intervention. After injection with 201Tl, all mice immediately underwent dual isotope single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography. At completion of imaging, hearts were counted and sectioned. RESULTS The uptake of 99mTc-anti-RAGE F(ab′)2 in the ischemic zone from the scans as mean percentage injected dose was significantly greater at 18 to 20 h (5.7 ± 2.1 × 10−3%) as compared with at 48 h (1.4 ± 1.1 × 10−3%; p < 0.001) after reperfusion. Disease and antibody controls showed no focal uptake in the infarct. Gamma well counting of the myocardium supported the quantitative scan data. By immunohistochemical staining there was greater caspase-3 and RAGE staining at 18 to 20 h versus at 48 h (p = 0.04 and p = 0.01, respectively). On dual immunofluorescence, RAGE colocalized mainly with injured cardiomyocytes undergoing apoptosis. CONCLUSIONS RAGE expression in myocardial ischemic injury can be imaged in vivo using

  14. Effect of Advanced Imaging Technology on How Biopsies Are Done and Who Does Them1

    PubMed Central

    Bhargavan, Mythreyi; Kerlan, Robert K.; Sunshine, Jonathan H.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To assess national levels and trends in utilization of biopsy procedures during the past decade and investigate the relative roles of biopsy approaches (open, endoscopic, and percutaneous) and physician specialties. Materials and Methods: Institutional review board approval was not necessary because only public domain data were used. Aggregated Medicare claims data were used to determine utilization of biopsies performed in 10 anatomic regions from 1997 to 2008. Utilization levels according to biopsy approach and anatomic region were calculated. Trends in the relative utilization of percutaneous needle biopsy (PNB) and imaging-guided percutaneous biopsy (IGPB) were assessed. The relative roles of radiologists and nonradiologists in the performance of all biopsies, PNBs, and IGPBs were evaluated. Results: Biopsy procedures with all approaches increased from 1380 to 1945 biopsies per 100 000 Medicare enrollees between 1997 and 2008, which represents a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 3%. Utilization of non-PNBs fell, while the absolute level and relative share of PNBs increased. In 2008, 67% of all biopsies were performed by using a percutaneous route. IGPB as a percentage of all PNBs increased over time in the regions for which data were available. Radiology was the leading specialty providing biopsy services. The total number of biopsies performed by radiologists increased at a CAGR of 8%, and radiologists’ share of all biopsies increased from 35% to 56%. Conclusion: During the past decade, there was continuing substitution away from invasive approaches and non–imaging-guided percutaneous approaches in favor of PNBs and IGPBs, likely related to increasing use of advanced imaging modalities for biopsy guidance. Consequently, radiologists are performing an increasing share of biopsies across all anatomic regions. © RSNA, 2010 Supplemental material:http://radiology.rsna.org/lookup/suppl/doi:10.1148/radiol.10092130/-/DC1 PMID:20587643

  15. Recent Advances in Molecular Imaging of Premalignant Gastrointestinal Lesions and Future Application for Early Detection of Barrett Esophagus

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Kwang Hyun; Han, Na Young; Kwon, Chang Il; Lee, Hoo Keun; Park, Jong Min; Kim, Eun Hee

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in optical molecular imaging allow identification of morphologic and biochemical changes in tissues associated with gastrointestinal (GI) premalignant lesions earlier and in real-time. This focused review series introduces high-resolution imaging modalities that are being evaluated preclinically and clinically for the detection of early GI cancers, especially Barrett esophagus and esophageal adenocarcinoma. Although narrow band imaging, autofluorescence imaging, and chromoendoscopy are currently applied for this purpose in the clinic, further adoptions of probe-based confocal laser endomicroscopy, high-resolution microendoscopy, optical coherence tomography, and metabolomic imaging, as well as imaging mass spectrometry, will lead to detection at the earliest and will guide predictions of the clinical course in the near future in a manner that is beyond current advancements in optical imaging. In this review article, the readers will be introduced to sufficient information regarding this matter with which to enjoy this new era of high technology and to confront science in the field of molecular medical imaging. PMID:24570878

  16. Integrated homeland security system with passive thermal imaging and advanced video analytics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francisco, Glen; Tillman, Jennifer; Hanna, Keith; Heubusch, Jeff; Ayers, Robert

    2007-04-01

    A complete detection, management, and control security system is absolutely essential to preempting criminal and terrorist assaults on key assets and critical infrastructure. According to Tom Ridge, former Secretary of the US Department of Homeland Security, "Voluntary efforts alone are not sufficient to provide the level of assurance Americans deserve and they must take steps to improve security." Further, it is expected that Congress will mandate private sector investment of over $20 billion in infrastructure protection between 2007 and 2015, which is incremental to funds currently being allocated to key sites by the department of Homeland Security. Nearly 500,000 individual sites have been identified by the US Department of Homeland Security as critical infrastructure sites that would suffer severe and extensive damage if a security breach should occur. In fact, one major breach in any of 7,000 critical infrastructure facilities threatens more than 10,000 people. And one major breach in any of 123 facilities-identified as "most critical" among the 500,000-threatens more than 1,000,000 people. Current visible, nightvision or near infrared imaging technology alone has limited foul-weather viewing capability, poor nighttime performance, and limited nighttime range. And many systems today yield excessive false alarms, are managed by fatigued operators, are unable to manage the voluminous data captured, or lack the ability to pinpoint where an intrusion occurred. In our 2006 paper, "Critical Infrastructure Security Confidence Through Automated Thermal Imaging", we showed how a highly effective security solution can be developed by integrating what are now available "next-generation technologies" which include: Thermal imaging for the highly effective detection of intruders in the dark of night and in challenging weather conditions at the sensor imaging level - we refer to this as the passive thermal sensor level detection building block Automated software detection

  17. Developing Advanced Seismic Imaging Methods For Characterizing the Fault Zone Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Haijiang

    2015-04-01

    Here I present a series of recent developments on seismic imaging of fault zone structure. The goals of these advanced methods are to better determine the physical properties (including seismic velocity, attenuation, and anisotropy) around the fault zone and its boundaries. In order to accurately determine the seismic velocity structure of the fault zone, we have recently developed a wavelet-based double-difference seismic tomography method, in which the wavelet coefficients of the velocity model, rather than the model itself, are solved using both the absolute and differential arrival times. This method takes advantage of the multiscale nature of the velocity model and the multiscale wavelet representation property. Because of the velocity model is sparse in the wavelet domain, a sparsity constraint is applied to tomographic inversion. Compared to conventional tomography methods, the new method is both data- and model-adaptive, and thus can better resolve the fault zone structure. In addition to seismic velocity property of the fault zone, seismic anisotropy and attenuation properties are also important to characterize the fault zone structure. For this reason, we developed the seismic anisotropy tomography method to image the three-dimensional anisotropy strength model of the fault zone using shear wave splitting delay times between fast and slow shear waves. The applications to the San Andreas fault around Parkfield, California and north Anatolian fault in Turkey will be shown. To better constrain the seismic attenuation structure, we developed a new seismic attenuation tomography method using measured t* values for first arrival body waves, in which the structures of attenuation and velocity models are similar through the cross-gradient constraint. Seismic tomography can, however, only resolve the smooth variations in elastic properties in Earth's interior. To image structure at length scales smaller than what can be resolved tomographically, including

  18. Novel genotype-phenotype associations in human cancers enabled by advanced molecular platforms and computational analysis of whole slide images

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Lee A.D.; Kong, Jun; Gutman, David A.; Dunn, William D.; Nalisnik, Michael; Brat, Daniel J.

    2014-01-01

    Technological advances in computing, imaging and genomics have created new opportunities for exploring relationships between histology, molecular events and clinical outcomes using quantitative methods. Slide scanning devices are now capable of rapidly producing massive digital image archives that capture histological details in high-resolution. Commensurate advances in computing and image analysis algorithms enable mining of archives to extract descriptions of histology, ranging from basic human annotations to automatic and precisely quantitative morphometric characterization of hundreds of millions of cells. These imaging capabilities represent a new dimension in tissue-based studies, and when combined with genomic and clinical endpoints, can be used to explore biologic characteristics of the tumor microenvironment and to discover new morphologic biomarkers of genetic alterations and patient outcomes. In this paper we review developments in quantitative imaging technology and illustrate how image features can be integrated with clinical and genomic data to investigate fundamental problems in cancer. Using motivating examples from the study of glioblastomas (GBMs), we demonstrate how public data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) can serve as an open platform to conduct in silico tissue based studies that integrate existing data resources. We show how these approaches can be used to explore the relation of the tumor microenvironment to genomic alterations and gene expression patterns and to define nuclear morphometric features that are predictive of genetic alterations and clinical outcomes. Challenges, limitations and emerging opportunities in the area of quantitative imaging and integrative analyses are also discussed. PMID:25599536

  19. EPS in Environmental Microbial Biofilms as Examined by Advanced Imaging Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neu, T. R.; Lawrence, J. R.

    2006-12-01

    Biofilm communities are highly structured associations of cellular and polymeric components which are involved in biogenic and geogenic environmental processes. Furthermore, biofilms are also important in medical (infection), industrial (biofouling) and technological (biofilm engineering) processes. The interfacial microbial communities in a specific habitat are highly dynamic and change according to the environmental parameters affecting not only the cellular but also the polymeric constituents of the system. Through their EPS biofilms interact with dissolved, colloidal and particulate compounds from the bulk water phase. For a long time the focus in biofilm research was on the cellular constituents in biofilms and the polymer matrix in biofilms has been rather neglected. The polymer matrix is produced not only by different bacteria and archaea but also by eukaryotic micro-organisms such as algae and fungi. The mostly unidentified mixture of EPS compounds is responsible for many biofilm properties and is involved in biofilm functionality. The chemistry of the EPS matrix represents a mixture of polymers including polysaccharides, proteins, nucleic acids, neutral polymers, charged polymers, amphiphilic polymers and refractory microbial polymers. The analysis of the EPS may be done destructively by means of extraction and subsequent chemical analysis or in situ by means of specific probes in combination with advanced imaging. In the last 15 years laser scanning microscopy (LSM) has been established as an indispensable technique for studying microbial communities. LSM with 1-photon and 2-photon excitation in combination with fluorescence techniques allows 3-dimensional investigation of fully hydrated, living biofilm systems. This approach is able to reveal data on biofilm structural features as well as biofilm processes and interactions. The fluorescent probes available allow the quantitative assessment of cellular as well as polymer distribution. For this purpose

  20. Advanced digital subtraction angiography and MR fusion imaging protocol applied to accurate placement of flow diverter device.

    PubMed

    Faragò, Giuseppe; Caldiera, Valentina; Tempra, Giovanni; Ciceri, Elisa

    2016-02-01

    In recent years there has been a progressive increase in interventional neuroradiology procedures, partially due to improvements in devices, but also to the simultaneous development of technologies and radiological images. Cone beam CT (Dyna-CT; Siemens) is a method recently used to obtain pseudo CT images from digital subtraction angiography (DSA) with a flat panel detector. Using dedicated software, it is then possible to merge Dyna-CT images with images from a different source. We report here the usefulness of advanced DSA techniques (Syngo-Dyna CT, three-dimensional DSA iPilot) for the treatment of an intracranial aneurysm with a flow diverter device. Merging MR and Dyna-CT images at the end of the procedure proved to be a simple and rapid additional method of verifying the success of the intervention. PMID:25589548

  1. Advances in molecular imaging of atherosclerosis and myocardial infarction: shedding new light on in vivo cardiovascular biology

    PubMed Central

    Andia, Marcelo E.; Shah, Ajay M.; Botnar, René M.

    2012-01-01

    Molecular imaging of the cardiovascular system heavily relies on the development of new imaging probes and technologies to facilitate visualization of biological processes underlying or preceding disease. Molecular imaging is a highly active research discipline that has seen tremendous growth over the past decade. It has broadened our understanding of oncologic, neurologic, and cardiovascular diseases by providing new insights into the in vivo biology of disease progression and therapeutic interventions. As it allows for the longitudinal evaluation of biological processes, it is ideally suited for monitoring treatment response. In this review, we will concentrate on the major accomplishments and advances in the field of molecular imaging of atherosclerosis and myocardial infarction with a special focus on magnetic resonance imaging. PMID:23064836

  2. Characterization of a linear device developed for research on advanced plasma imaging and dynamics.

    PubMed

    Chung, J; Lee, K D; Seo, D C; Nam, Y U; Choi, M C

    2010-10-01

    Within the scope of long term research on imaging diagnostics for steady-state plasmas and understanding of edge plasma physics through diagnostics with conventional spectroscopic methods, we have constructed a linear electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma device named Research on Advanced Plasma Imaging and Dynamics (RAPID). It has a variety of axial magnetic field profiles provided by eight water-cooled magnetic coils and two dc power supplies. The positions of the magnetic coils are freely adjustable along the axial direction and the power supplies can be operated with many combinations of electrical wiring to the coils. Here, a 6 kW 2.45 GHz magnetron is used to produce steady-state hydrogen, helium, and argon plasmas with central magnetic fields of 875 and/or 437.5 G (second harmonic). In order to achieve the highest possible plasma performance within the limited input parameters, wall conditioning experiments were carried out. Chamber bake-out was achieved with heating coils that were wound covering the vessel, and long-pulse electron cyclotron heating discharge cleaning was also followed after 4 days of bake-out. A uniform bake-out temperature (150 °C) was achieved by wrapping the vessel in high temperature thermal insulation textile and by controlling the heating coil current using a digital control system. The partial pressure changes were observed using a residual gas analyzer, and a total system pressure of 5×10(-8) Torr was finally reached. Diagnostic systems including a millimeter-wave interferometer, a high resolution survey spectrometer, a Langmuir probe, and an ultrasoft x-ray detector were used to provide the evidence that the plasma performance was improved as we desired. In this work, we present characterization of the RAPID device for various system conditions and configurations. PMID:21033972

  3. Assessment of the Utility of the Advanced Himawari Imager to Detect Active Fire Over Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hally, B.; Wallace, L.; Reinke, K.; Jones, S.

    2016-06-01

    Wildfire detection and attribution is an issue of importance due to the socio-economic impact of fires in Australia. Early detection of fires allows emergency response agencies to make informed decisions in order to minimise loss of life and protect strategic resources in threatened areas. Until recently, the ability of land management authorities to accurately assess fire through satellite observations of Australia was limited to those made by polar orbiting satellites. The launch of the Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA) Himawari-8 satellite, with the 16-band Advanced Himawari Imager (AHI-8) onboard, in October 2014 presents a significant opportunity to improve the timeliness of satellite fire detection across Australia. The near real-time availability of images, at a ten minute frequency, may also provide contextual information (background temperature) leading to improvements in the assessment of fire characteristics. This paper investigates the application of the high frequency observation data supplied by this sensor for fire detection and attribution. As AHI-8 is a new sensor we have performed an analysis of the noise characteristics of the two spectral bands used for fire attribution across various land use types which occur in Australia. Using this information we have adapted existing algorithms, based upon least squares error minimisation and Kalman filtering, which utilise high frequency observations of surface temperature to detect and attribute fire. The fire detection and attribution information provided by these algorithms is then compared to existing satellite based fire products as well as in-situ information provided by land management agencies. These comparisons were made Australia-wide for an entire fire season - including many significant fire events (wildfires and prescribed burns). Preliminary detection results suggest that these methods for fire detection perform comparably to existing fire products and fire incident reporting from relevant

  4. On-chip polarizer on image sensor using advanced CMOS technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasagawa, Kiyotaka; Wakama, Norimitsu; Noda, Toshihiko; Tokuda, Takashi; Kakiuchi, Kiyomi; Ohta, Jun

    2014-03-01

    The structures in advanced complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) integrated circuit technology are in the range of deep-submicron. It allows designing and integrating nano-photonic structures for the visible to near infrared region on a chip. In this work, we designed and fabricated an image sensor with on-pixel metal wire grid polarizers by using a 65-nm standard CMOS technology. It is known that the extinction ratio of a metal wire grid polarizer is increased with decrease in the grid pitch. With the metal wire layers of the 65-nm technology, the grid pitch sufficiently smaller than the wavelengths of visible light can be realized. The extinction ratio of approximately 20 dB has been successfully achieved at a wavelength of 750 nm. In the CMOS technologies, it is usual to include multiple metal layers. This feature is also useful to increase the extinction ratio of polarizers. We designed dual layer polarizers. Each layer partially reflects incident light. Thus, the layers form a cavity and its transmission spectrum depends on the layer position. The extinction ratio of 19.2 dB at 780 nm was achieved with the grid pitch greater than the single layer polarizer. The high extinction ratio is obtained only red to near infrared region because the fine metal layers of deepsubmicron standard CMOS process is usually composed of Cu. Thus, it should be applied for measurement or observation where wide spectrum is not required such as optical rotation measurement of optically active materials or electro-optic imaging of RF/THz wave.

  5. Characterization of a linear device developed for research on advanced plasma imaging and dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, J.; Lee, K. D.; Seo, D. C.; Nam, Y. U.; Choi, M. C.

    2010-10-15

    Within the scope of long term research on imaging diagnostics for steady-state plasmas and understanding of edge plasma physics through diagnostics with conventional spectroscopic methods, we have constructed a linear electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma device named Research on Advanced Plasma Imaging and Dynamics (RAPID). It has a variety of axial magnetic field profiles provided by eight water-cooled magnetic coils and two dc power supplies. The positions of the magnetic coils are freely adjustable along the axial direction and the power supplies can be operated with many combinations of electrical wiring to the coils. Here, a 6 kW 2.45 GHz magnetron is used to produce steady-state hydrogen, helium, and argon plasmas with central magnetic fields of 875 and/or 437.5 G (second harmonic). In order to achieve the highest possible plasma performance within the limited input parameters, wall conditioning experiments were carried out. Chamber bake-out was achieved with heating coils that were wound covering the vessel, and long-pulse electron cyclotron heating discharge cleaning was also followed after 4 days of bake-out. A uniform bake-out temperature (150 deg. C) was achieved by wrapping the vessel in high temperature thermal insulation textile and by controlling the heating coil current using a digital control system. The partial pressure changes were observed using a residual gas analyzer, and a total system pressure of 5x10{sup -8} Torr was finally reached. Diagnostic systems including a millimeter-wave interferometer, a high resolution survey spectrometer, a Langmuir probe, and an ultrasoft x-ray detector were used to provide the evidence that the plasma performance was improved as we desired. In this work, we present characterization of the RAPID device for various system conditions and configurations.

  6. Baseline Familiarity in Lie Detection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feeley, Thomas H.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Reports on a study in which subjects judged the veracity of truthful and deceptive communicators after viewing no, one, two, or four case-relevant baseline exposures (familiarity) of truthful communication. Finds a positive linear relationship between detection accuracy and amount of baseline familiarity. (SR)

  7. 89Zr-cetuximab PET imaging in patients with advanced colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Huisman, Marc C.; Vugts, Danielle J.; Roth, Chantal; Luik, Anne Marije; Mulder, Emma R.; Schuit, Robert C.; Boellaard, Ronald; Hoekstra, Otto S.; van Dongen, Guus AMS; Verheul, Henk M.W.

    2015-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) are used in the treatment of advanced colorectal cancer (mCRC). Approximately 50% of patients benefit despite patient selection for RAS wild type (wt) tumors. Based on the hypothesis that tumor targeting is required for clinical benefit of anti-EGFR treatment, biodistribution and tumor uptake of 89Zr-cetuximab by Positron Emission Tomography (PET), combining the sensitivity of PET with the specificity of cetuximab for EGFR was evaluated. Ten patients with wt K-RAS mCRC received 37 ± 1 MBq 89Zr-cetuximab directly (<2 h) after the first therapeutic dose of cetuximab. PET-scans were performed from 1 hour to 10 days post injection (p.i.). Biodistribution was determined for blood and organs. Uptake in tumor lesions was quantified by Standardized Uptake Value (SUV) and related to response. In 6 of 10 patients 89Zr-cetuximab uptake in tumor lesions was detected. Four of 6 patients with 89Zr-cetuximab uptake had clinical benefit, while progressive disease was observed in 3 of 4 patients without 89Zr-cetuximab uptake. Taken together, tumor uptake of 89Zr-cetuximab can be visualized by PET imaging. The strong relation between uptake and response warrants further clinical validation as an innovative selection method for cetuximab treatment in patients with wt RAS mCRC. PMID:26309164

  8. Advanced Imaging Technologies for the Detection of Dysplasia and Early Cancer in Barrett Esophagus

    PubMed Central

    Espino, Alberto; Cirocco, Maria; DaCosta, Ralph

    2014-01-01

    Advanced esophageal adenocarcinomas arising from Barrett esophagus (BE) are tumors with an increasing incidence and poor prognosis. The aim of endoscopic surveillance of BE is to detect dysplasia, particularly high-grade dysplasia and intramucosal cancers that can subsequently be treated endoscopically before progression to invasive cancer with lymph node metastases. Current surveillance practice standards require the collection of random 4-quadrant biopsy specimens over every 1 to 2 cm of BE (Seattle protocol) to detect dysplasia with the assistance of white light endoscopy, in addition to performing targeted biopsies of recognizable lesions. This approach is labor-intensive but should currently be considered state of the art. Chromoendoscopy, virtual chromoendoscopy (e.g., narrow band imaging), and confocal laser endomicroscopy, in addition to high-definition standard endoscopy, might increase the diagnostic yield for the detection of dysplastic lesions. Until these modalities have been demonstrated to enhance efficiency or cost effectiveness, the standard protocol will remain careful examination using conventional off the shelf high-resolution endoscopes, combined with as longer inspection time which is associated with increased detection of dysplasia. PMID:24570883

  9. Big heart data: advancing health informatics through data sharing in cardiovascular imaging.

    PubMed

    Suinesiaputra, Avan; Medrano-Gracia, Pau; Cowan, Brett R; Young, Alistair A

    2015-07-01

    The burden of heart disease is rapidly worsening due to the increasing prevalence of obesity and diabetes. Data sharing and open database resources for heart health informatics are important for advancing our understanding of cardiovascular function, disease progression and therapeutics. Data sharing enables valuable information, often obtained at considerable expense and effort, to be reused beyond the specific objectives of the original study. Many government funding agencies and journal publishers are requiring data reuse, and are providing mechanisms for data curation and archival. Tools and infrastructure are available to archive anonymous data from a wide range of studies, from descriptive epidemiological data to gigabytes of imaging data. Meta-analyses can be performed to combine raw data from disparate studies to obtain unique comparisons or to enhance statistical power. Open benchmark datasets are invaluable for validating data analysis algorithms and objectively comparing results. This review provides a rationale for increased data sharing and surveys recent progress in the cardiovascular domain. We also highlight the potential of recent large cardiovascular epidemiological studies enabling collaborative efforts to facilitate data sharing, algorithms benchmarking, disease modeling and statistical atlases. PMID:25415993

  10. Focal Plane Detectors for the Advanced Gamma-Ray Imaging System (AGIS)

    SciTech Connect

    Otte, A. N.; Williams, D. A.; Byrum, K.; Drake, G.; Horan, D.; Smith, A.; Wagner, R. G.; Falcone, A.; Funk, S.; Tajima, H.; Mukherjee, R.

    2008-12-24

    The Advanced Gamma-Ray Imaging System (AGIS) is a concept for the next generation observatory in ground-based very high energy gamma-ray astronomy. Design goals are ten times better sensitivity, higher angular resolution, and a lower energy threshold than existing Cherenkov telescopes. Simulations show that a substantial improvement in angular resolution may be achieved if the pixel diameter is reduced to the order of 0.05 deg, i.e. two to three times smaller than the pixel diameter of current Cherenkov telescope cameras. At these dimensions, photon detectors with smaller physical dimensions can be attractive alternatives to the classical photomultiplier tube (PMT). Furthermore, the operation of an experiment with the size of AGIS requires photon detectors that are among other things more reliable, more durable, and possibly higher efficiency photon detectors. Alternative photon detectors we are considering for AGIS include both silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs) and multi-anode photomultipliers (MAPMTs). Here we present results from laboratory testing of MAPMTs and SiPMs along with results from the first incorporation of these devices into cameras on test bed Cherenkov telescopes.

  11. Big Heart Data: Advancing Health Informatics through Data Sharing in Cardiovascular Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Suinesiaputra, Avan; Medrano-Gracia, Pau; Cowan, Brett R.; Young, Alistair A.

    2015-01-01

    The burden of heart disease is rapidly worsening due to increasing prevalence of obesity and diabetes. Data sharing and open database resources for heart health informatics are important for advancing our understanding of cardiovascular function, disease progression and therapeutics. Data sharing enables valuable information, often obtained at considerable expense and effort, to be re-used beyond the specific objectives of the original study. Many government funding agencies and journal publishers are requiring data re-use, and are providing mechanisms for data curation and archival. Tools and infrastructure are available to archive anonymous data from a wide range of studies, from descriptive epidemiological data to gigabytes of imaging data. Meta-analyses can be performed to combine raw data from disparate studies to obtain unique comparisons or to enhance statistical power. Open benchmark datasets are invaluable for validating data analysis algorithms and objectively comparing results. This review provides a rationale for increased data sharing and surveys recent progress in the cardiovascular domain. We also highlight the potential of recent large cardiovascular epidemiological studies enabling collaborative efforts to facilitate data sharing, algorithms benchmarking, disease modeling and statistical atlases. PMID:25415993

  12. Radiometric calibration of Advanced Land Imager using reflectance-based results between 2001 and 2005

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCorkel, J.; Thome, K.; Biggar, S.; Kuester, M.

    2006-08-01

    The Landsat series of sensors have supplied the remote sensing community with a continuous data set dating to the early 1970s. An important aspect of retaining the continuity of these data is that a Landsat follow-on as well as current Landsat instruments must be understood radiometrically throughout their mission. The Advanced Land Imager (ALI), for example, was developed as a prototype for the next generation of Landsat Instruments, and as such there was a significant effort to understand its radiometric characteristics as well as how it compares with previous Landsat sensors. The Remote Sensing Group at the University of Arizona has been part of this effort since the late 2000 launch of ALI through the use of the reflectance-based method of vicarious calibration. The reflectance-based approach consists of ground-based measurements of atmospheric conditions and surface reflectance at the time of satellite overpass to predict the at-sensor radiance seen by the sensor under study. The work compares results from the reflectance-based approach obtained from well-characterized test sites such as Railroad Valley Playa in Nevada and Ivanpah Playa in California as applied to ALI, Landsat-5 TM, and Landsat-7 EMT+. The results from the comparison use a total of 14 ALI dates spanning in time from 2001 to late 2005 and show that ALI agrees with the current radiometric results from TM and ETM+ to within 5%.

  13. Advanced 3D-Sonographic Imaging as a Precise Technique to Evaluate Tumor Volume

    PubMed Central

    Pflanzer, R.; Hofmann, M.; Shelke, A.; Habib, A.; Derwich, W.; Schmitz-Rixen, T.; Bernd, A.; Kaufmann, R.; Bereiter-Hahn, J.

    2014-01-01

    Determination of tumor volume in subcutaneously inoculated xenograft models is a standard procedure for clinical and preclinical evaluation of tumor response to treatment. Practitioners frequently use a hands-on caliper method in conjunction with a simplified formula to assess tumor volume. Non-invasive and more precise techniques as investigation by MR or (μ)CT exist but come with various adverse effects in terms of radiation, complex setup or elevated cost of investigations. Therefore, we propose an advanced three-dimensional sonographic imaging technique to determine small tumor volumes in xenografts with high precision and minimized observer variability. We present a study on xenograft carcinoma tumors from which volumes and shapes were calculated with the standard caliper method as well as with a clinically available three-dimensional ultrasound scanner and subsequent processing software. Statistical analysis reveals the suitability of this non-invasive approach for the purpose of a quick and precise calculation of tumor volume in small rodents. PMID:25500076

  14. Plutonium Immobilization Project Baseline Formulation

    SciTech Connect

    Ebbinghaus, B.

    1999-02-01

    A key milestone for the Immobilization Project (AOP Milestone 3.2a) in Fiscal Year 1998 (FY98) is the definition of the baseline composition or formulation for the plutonium ceramic form. The baseline formulation for the plutonium ceramic product must be finalized before the repository- and plant-related process specifications can be determined. The baseline formulation that is currently specified is given in Table 1.1. In addition to the baseline formulation specification, this report provides specifications for two alternative formulations, related compositional specifications (e.g., precursor compositions and mixing recipes), and other preliminary form and process specifications that are linked to the baseline formulation. The preliminary specifications, when finalized, are not expected to vary tremendously from the preliminary values given.

  15. Recent advances in magnetic nanoparticle-based multi-modal imaging.

    PubMed

    Shin, Tae-Hyun; Choi, Youngseon; Kim, Soojin; Cheon, Jinwoo

    2015-07-21

    Magnetic nanoparticles have been extensively explored as a versatile platform for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents due to their strong contrast enhancement effects together with the platform capability for multiple imaging modalities. In this tutorial review, we focus on recent progress in the use of magnetic nanoparticles for MRI contrast agents and multi-mode imaging agents such as T1-T2 MRI, MRI-optical, and MRI-radioisotopes. This review also highlights emerging magnetic imaging techniques such as magnetic particle imaging (MPI), magneto-motive ultrasound imaging (MMUS), and magneto-photoacoustic imaging (MPA). PMID:25652670

  16. The Advanced Gamma-ray Imaging System (AGIS)--Science Highlights

    SciTech Connect

    Buckley, J.; Krawczynski, H.; Coppi, P.; Digel, S.; Funk, S.; Krennrich, F.; Pohl, M.; Romani, R.; Vassiliev, V.

    2008-12-24

    The Advanced Gamma-ray Imaging System (AGIS), a future gamma-ray telescope consisting of an array of {approx}50 atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes distributed over an area of {approx}1 km{sup 2}, will provide a powerful new tool for exploring the high-energy universe. The order-of-magnitude increase in sensitivity and improved angular resolution could provide the first detailed images of {gamma}-ray emission from other nearby galaxies or galaxy clusters. The large effective area will provide unprecedented sensitivity to short transients (such as flares from AGNs and GRBs) probing both intrinsic spectral variability (revealing the details of the acceleration mechanism and geometry) as well as constraining the high-energy dispersion in the velocity of light (probing the structure of spacetime and Lorentz invariance). A wide field of view ({approx}4 times that of current instruments) and excellent angular resolution (several times better than current instruments) will allow for an unprecedented survey of the Galactic plane, providing a deep unobscured survey of SNRs, X-ray binaries, pulsar-wind nebulae, molecular cloud complexes and other sources. The differential flux sensitivity of {approx}10{sup -13} erg cm{sup -2} sec{sup -1} will rival the most sensitive X-ray instruments for these extended Galactic sources. The excellent capabilities of AGIS at energies below 100 GeV will provide sensitivity to AGN and GRBs out to cosmological redshifts, increasing the number of AGNs detected at high energies from about 20 to more than 100, permitting population studies that will provide valuable insights into both a unified model for AGN and a detailed measurement of the effects of intergalactic absorption from the diffuse extragalactic background light. A new instrument with fast-slewing wide-field telescopes could provide detections of a number of long-duration GRBs providing important physical constraints from this new spectral component. The new array will also have excellent

  17. Imaging evidence for Hubbard Glacier advances and retreats since the last glacial maximum in Yakutat and Disenchantment Bays, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zurbuchen, Julie M.; Gulick, Sean P. S.; Walton, Maureen A. L.; Goff, John A.

    2015-06-01

    High-resolution 2-D multichannel seismic data, collected during the 2012 UTIG-USGS National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program survey of Disenchantment and Yakutat Bays in southeast Alaska, provide insight into their glacial history. These data show evidence of two unconformities, appearing in the form of channels, and are interpreted to be advance pathways for Hubbard Glacier. The youngest observable channel, thought to have culminated near the main phase of the Little Ice Age (LIA), is imaged in Disenchantment Bay and ends at a terminal moraine near Blizhni Point. An older channel, thought to be from an advance that culminated in the early phase of the LIA, extends from Disenchantment Bay into the northeastern edge of Yakutat Bay, turning southward at Knight Island and terminating on the southeastern edge of Yakutat Bay. Our interpretation is that Hubbard Glacier has repeatedly advanced around the east side of Yakutat Bay in Knight Island Channel, possibly due to the presence of Malaspina Glacier cutting off access to central Yakutat Bay during times of mutual advance. We observe two distinct erosional surfaces and retreat sequences of Hubbard Glacier in Yakutat Bay, supporting the hypothesis that minor glacial advances in fjords do not erode all prior sediment accumulations. Interpretation of chaotic seismic facies between these two unconformities suggests that Hubbard Glacier exhibits rapid retreats and that Disenchantment Bay is subject to numerous episodes of outburst flooding and morainal bank collapse. These findings also suggest that tidewater glaciers preferentially reoccupy the same channels in bay and marine settings during advances.

  18. High-resolution imaging of rain systems with the advanced microwave precipitation radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spencer, Roy W.; Hood, Robbie E.; Lafontaine, Frank J.; Smith, Eric A.; Platt, Robert; Galliano, Joe; Griffin, Vanessa L.; Lobl, Elena

    1994-01-01

    An advanced Microwave Precipitation Radiometer (AMPR) has been developed and flown in the NASA ER-2-high-altitude aircraft for imaging various atmospheric and surface processes, primarily the internal structure of rain clouds. The AMPR is a scanning four-frequency total power microwave radiometer that is externally calibrated with high-emissivity warm and cold loads. Separate antenna systems allow the sampling of the 10.7- and 19.35-GHz channels at the same spatial resolution, while the 37.1- and 85.5-GHz channels utilize the same multifrequency feedhorn as the 19.35-GHz channel. Spatial resolutions from an aircraft altitude of 20-km range from 0.6 km at 85.5 GHz to 2.8 km at 19.35 and 10.7 GHz. All channels are sampled every 0.6 km in both along-track and cross-track directions, leading to a contiguous sampling pattern of the 85.5-GHz 3-dB beamwidth footprints, 2.3X oversampling of the 37.1-GHz data, and 4.4X oversampling of the 19.35- and 10.7-GHz data. Radiometer temperature sensitivities range from 0.2 to 0.5 C. Details of the system are described, including two different calibration systems and their effect on the data collected. Examples of oceanic rain systems are presented from Florida and the tropical west Pacific that illustrate the wide variety of cloud water, rainwater, and precipitation-size ice combinations that are observable from aircraft altitudes.

  19. Automated hotspot analysis with aerial image CD metrology for advanced logic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buttgereit, Ute; Trautzsch, Thomas; Kim, Min-ho; Seo, Jung-Uk; Yoon, Young-Keun; Han, Hak-Seung; Chung, Dong Hoon; Jeon, Chan-Uk; Meyers, Gary

    2014-09-01

    Continuously shrinking designs by further extension of 193nm technology lead to a much higher probability of hotspots especially for the manufacturing of advanced logic devices. The CD of these potential hotspots needs to be precisely controlled and measured on the mask. On top of that, the feature complexity increases due to high OPC load in the logic mask design which is an additional challenge for CD metrology. Therefore the hotspot measurements have been performed on WLCD from ZEISS, which provides the benefit of reduced complexity by measuring the CD in the aerial image and qualifying the printing relevant CD. This is especially of advantage for complex 2D feature measurements. Additionally, the data preparation for CD measurement becomes more critical due to the larger amount of CD measurements and the increasing feature diversity. For the data preparation this means to identify these hotspots and mark them automatically with the correct marker required to make the feature specific CD measurement successful. Currently available methods can address generic pattern but cannot deal with the pattern diversity of the hotspots. The paper will explore a method how to overcome those limitations and to enhance the time-to-result in the marking process dramatically. For the marking process the Synopsys WLCD Output Module was utilized, which is an interface between the CATS mask data prep software and the WLCD metrology tool. It translates the CATS marking directly into an executable WLCD measurement job including CD analysis. The paper will describe the utilized method and flow for the hotspot measurement. Additionally, the achieved results on hotspot measurements utilizing this method will be presented.

  20. Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT): 180 MW demonstration of advanced tangentially-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from coal-fired boilers. Phase 1, Baseline tests

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    The primary objective of the project is to investigate the long-term effects of commercially available tangentially-fired low NO{sub x} combustion technologies on NOx emissions and boiler performance on Unit 2 at Gulf Power Company`s Plant Lansing Smith located near Lynn Haven, Florida. The project will characterize emissions and performance of a tangentially-fired boiler operating in the following configurations: Baseline ``as-found`` configuration: Phase 1; retrofitted low NO{sub x} concentric firing system (LNCFS) Level 2 and simulated low NO{sub x} bulk furnace staging (LNBFS): Phase 2; retrofitted low NO{sub x} concentric firing system (LNCFS) Level 3, Phase 3a and simulated LNCFS Level 1, Phase 3b.

  1. 324 Building Baseline Radiological Characterization

    SciTech Connect

    R.J. Reeder, J.C. Cooper

    2010-06-24

    This report documents the analysis of radiological data collected as part of the characterization study performed in 1998. The study was performed to create a baseline of the radiological conditions in the 324 Building.

  2. Data acquisition system for an advanced x-ray imaging crystal spectrometer using a segmented position-sensitive detector.

    PubMed

    Nam, U W; Lee, S G; Bak, J G; Moon, M K; Cheon, J K; Lee, C H

    2007-10-01

    A versatile time-to-digital converter based data acquisition system for a segmented position-sensitive detector has been developed. This data acquisition system was successfully demonstrated to a two-segment position-sensitive detector. The data acquisition system will be developed further to support multisegmented position-sensitive detector to improve the photon count rate capability of the advanced x-ray imaging crystal spectrometer system. PMID:17979416

  3. Advanced machine vision inspection of x-ray images for improved productivity

    SciTech Connect

    Novini, A.

    1995-12-31

    The imaging media has been, for the most part, x-ray sensitive photographic film or film coupled to scintillation screens. Electronic means of imaging through television technology has provided a cost effective, alternative method in many applications for the past three to four decades. Typically, film provides higher resolution and higher interscene dynamic range and mechanical flexibility suitable to image complex shape objects. However, this is offset by a labor intensive task of x-ray photography and processing which eliminate the ability to image in real time. The electronic means are typically achieved through an x-ray source, x-ray to visible light converter, and a television (TV) camera. The images can be displayed on a TV monitor for operator viewing or go to a computer system for capture, image processing, and automatic analysis. Although the present state of the art for electronic x-ray imaging does not quite produce the quality possible through film, it provides a level of flexibility and overall improved productivity not achievable through film. Further, electronic imaging means are improving in image quality as time goes on, and it is expected they will match or surpass film in the next decade. For many industrial applications, the present state of the art in electronic imaging provides more than adequate results. This type of imaging also allows for automatic analysis when practical. The first step in the automatic analysis chain is to obtain the best possible image. This requires an in-depth understanding of the x-ray imaging physics and techniques by the system designer. As previously mentioned, these images may go through some enhancement steps to further improve the detectability of defects. Almost always, image spatial resolution of 512 {times} 512 or greater is used with gray level information content of 8 bits (256 gray levels) or more for preservation of image quality. There are many methods available for analyzing the images.

  4. Advanced multimodality imaging of inflammatory bowel disease in 2015: An update.

    PubMed

    Stanley, Emma; Moriarty, Heather K; Cronin, Carmel G

    2016-06-28

    The diagnosis and effective management of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) requires a combination clinical, endoscopic, histological, biological, and imaging data. While endoscopy and biopsy remains the gold standard for diagnosis of IBD, imaging plays a central role in the assessment of extra mural disease, in disease surveillance and in the assessment of response to medical treatments, which are often expensive. Imaging is also vital in the detection and diagnosis of disease related complications, both acute and chronic. In this review, we will describe, with illustrative images, the imaging features of IBD in adults, with emphasis on up-to-date imaging techniques focusing predominantly on cross sectional imaging and new magnetic resonance imaging techniques. PMID:27358684

  5. Advanced multimodality imaging of inflammatory bowel disease in 2015: An update

    PubMed Central

    Stanley, Emma; Moriarty, Heather K; Cronin, Carmel G

    2016-01-01

    The diagnosis and effective management of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) requires a combination clinical, endoscopic, histological, biological, and imaging data. While endoscopy and biopsy remains the gold standard for diagnosis of IBD, imaging plays a central role in the assessment of extra mural disease, in disease surveillance and in the assessment of response to medical treatments, which are often expensive. Imaging is also vital in the detection and diagnosis of disease related complications, both acute and chronic. In this review, we will describe, with illustrative images, the imaging features of IBD in adults, with emphasis on up-to-date imaging techniques focusing predominantly on cross sectional imaging and new magnetic resonance imaging techniques. PMID:27358684

  6. Advanced imaging techniques II: using a compound microscope for photographing point-mount specimens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Digital imaging technology has revolutionized the practice photographing insects for scientific study. Herein described are lighting and mounting techniques designed for imaging micro Hymenoptera. Techniques described here are applicable to all small insects, as well as other invertebrates. The ke...

  7. Transpersonal Psychology: Guiding Image for the Advancement of International Adult Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boucouvalas, Marcie

    1984-01-01

    The importance of guiding images is examined, along with analyses of the images of humankind and worldviews previously offered by psychology and adopted by society-at-large. The article focuses on the contribution of transpersonal psychology, the discipline's fourth force, which integrates and extends prior guiding images. (CT)

  8. Multi-baseline bootstrapping at the Navy precision optical interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armstrong, J. T.; Schmitt, H. R.; Mozurkewich, D.; Jorgensen, A. M.; Muterspaugh, M. W.; Baines, E. K.; Benson, J. A.; Zavala, Robert T.; Hutter, D. J.

    2014-07-01

    The Navy Precision Optical Interferometer (NPOI) was designed from the beginning to support baseline boot- strapping with equally-spaced array elements. The motivation was the desire to image the surfaces of resolved stars with the maximum resolution possible with a six-element array. Bootstrapping two baselines together to track fringes on a third baseline has been used at the NPOI for many years, but the capabilities of the fringe tracking software did not permit us to bootstrap three or more baselines together. Recently, both a new backend (VISION; Tennessee State Univ.) and new hardware and firmware (AZ Embedded Systems and New Mexico Tech, respectively) for the current hybrid backend have made multi-baseline bootstrapping possible.

  9. A prospective study of the efficacy of magnetic resonance spectroscopy imaging for predicting locally advanced prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Razi, Ali; Parizi, Mehdi Kardoust; Kazemeini, Seid Mohammad; Abedi, Akbar

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the efficacy of magnetic resonance spectroscopy imaging (MRSI) for predicting locally advanced prostate cancer (PC). Materials and methods: Between April 2009 and July 2012, 80 consecutive patients with clinically localized PC had undergone endorectal MRSI before radical retropubic prostatectomy. Clinicopathological parameters, including age, preoperative prostate-specific antigen (PSA), Gleason score (GS) at biopsy, perinural invasion at biopsy, prostate weight at surgery, GS of surgical specimen, and pathological staging were recorded. The MRSI findings were compared with the histopathological findings of the radical prostatectomy. The diagnostic accuracy measures consisting of sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV) of MRSI, and other variables in the diagnosis of locally advanced PC (Pathology Stages pT3a, pT3b, or pT4) were evaluated. Results: Sensitivity, specificity, PPV, and NPV of MRSI in detecting locally advanced PC is 42.4%, 93.6%, 82.3%, and 69.8%, respectively [area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve=0.658, p value <0.0001]. MRSI, cancer-positive core percentage at biopsy, and GS at biopsy are more accurate factors among all the predictive variables in predicting locally advanced PC. Conclusion: MRSI may be considered as a complementary diagnostic modality with high specificity and moderate sensitivity in predicting locally advanced PC. Combination of this modality with other predictive factors helps the surgeon and patient to select an appropriate treatment strategy. PMID:26328204

  10. Advances in three-dimensional integral imaging: sensing, display, and applications [Invited].

    PubMed

    Xiao, Xiao; Javidi, Bahram; Martinez-Corral, Manuel; Stern, Adrian

    2013-02-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) sensing and imaging technologies have been extensively researched for many applications in the fields of entertainment, medicine, robotics, manufacturing, industrial inspection, security, surveillance, and defense due to their diverse and significant benefits. Integral imaging is a passive multiperspective imaging technique, which records multiple two-dimensional images of a scene from different perspectives. Unlike holography, it can capture a scene such as outdoor events with incoherent or ambient light. Integral imaging can display a true 3D color image with full parallax and continuous viewing angles by incoherent light; thus it does not suffer from speckle degradation. Because of its unique properties, integral imaging has been revived over the past decade or so as a promising approach for massive 3D commercialization. A series of key articles on this topic have appeared in the OSA journals, including Applied Optics. Thus, it is fitting that this Commemorative Review presents an overview of literature on physical principles and applications of integral imaging. Several data capture configurations, reconstruction, and display methods are overviewed. In addition, applications including 3D underwater imaging, 3D imaging in photon-starved environments, 3D tracking of occluded objects, 3D optical microscopy, and 3D polarimetric imaging are reviewed. PMID:23385893

  11. The Slope Imaging Multi-polarization Photon-counting Lidar: an Advanced Technology Airborne Laser Altimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dabney, P.; Harding, D. J.; Huss, T.; Valett, S.; Yu, A. W.; Zheng, Y.

    2009-12-01

    The Slope Imaging Multi-polarization Photon-counting Lidar (SIMPL) is an airborne laser altimeter developed through the NASA Earth Science Technology Office Instrument Incubator Program with a focus on cryopshere remote sensing. The SIMPL instrument incorporates a variety of advanced technologies in order to demonstrate measurement approaches of potential benefit for improved airborne laser swath mapping and spaceflight laser altimeter missions. SIMPL incorporates beam splitting, single-photon ranging and polarimetry technologies at green and near-infrared wavelengths in order to achieve simultaneous sampling of surface elevation, slope, roughness and scattering properties, the latter used to differentiate surface types. The transmitter is a 1 nsec pulse width, 11 kHz, 1064 nm microchip laser, frequency doubled to 532 nm and split into four plane-polarized beams using birefringent calcite crystal in order to maintain co-alignment of the two colors. The 16 channel receiver splits the received energy for each beam into the two colors and each color is split into energy parallel and perpendicular to the transmit polarization plane thereby proving a measure of backscatter depolarization. The depolarization ratio is sensitive to the proportions of specular reflection and surface and volume scattering, and is a function of wavelength. The ratio can differentiate, for example, water, young translucent ice, older granular ice and snow. The solar background count rate is controlled by spatial filtering using a pinhole array and by spectral filtering using temperature-controlled narrow bandwidth filters. The receiver is fiber coupled to 16 Single Photon Counting Modules (SPCMs). To avoid range biases due to the long dead time of these detectors the probability of detection per laser fire on each channel is controlled to be below 30%, using mechanical irises and flight altitude. Event timers with 0.1 nsec resolution in combination the narrow transmit pulse yields single

  12. Combining high-performance computing and networking for advanced 3-D cardiac imaging.

    PubMed

    Santarelli, M F; Positano, V; Landini, L

    2000-03-01

    This paper deals with the integration of a powerful parallel computer-based image analysis and visualization system for cardiology into a hospital information system. Further services are remote access to the hospital Web server through an internet network. The visualization system includes dynamic three-dimensional representation of two types of medical images (e.g., magnetic resonance and nuclear medicine) as well as two images in the same modality (e.g., basal versus stress images). A series of software tools for quantitative image analysis developed for supporting diagnosis of cardiac disease are also available, including automated image segmentation and quantitative time evaluation of left ventricular volumes and related indices during cardiac cycle, myocardial mass, and myocardial perfusion indices. The system has been tested both at a specialized cardiologic center and for remote consultation in diagnosis of cardiac disease by using anatomical and perfusion magnetic resonance images. PMID:10761775

  13. Fusion of a Variable Baseline System and a Range Finder

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Aceituno, Javier; Acosta, Leopoldo; Arnay, Rafael

    2012-01-01

    One of the greatest difficulties in stereo vision is the appearance of ambiguities when matching similar points from different images. In this article we analyze the effectiveness of using a fusion of multiple baselines and a range finder from a theoretical point of view, focusing on the results of using both prismatic and rotational articulations for baseline generation, and offer a practical case to prove its efficiency on an autonomous vehicle. PMID:22368469

  14. Fusion of a variable baseline system and a range finder.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Aceituno, Javier; Acosta, Leopoldo; Arnay, Rafael

    2012-01-01

    One of the greatest difficulties in stereo vision is the appearance of ambiguities when matching similar points from different images. In this article we analyze the effectiveness of using a fusion of multiple baselines and a range finder from a theoretical point of view, focusing on the results of using both prismatic and rotational articulations for baseline generation, and offer a practical case to prove its efficiency on an autonomous vehicle. PMID:22368469

  15. Advances in biomedical image analysis--past, present and future challenges.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, T M; Meinzer, H P; Tolxdorff, T

    2004-01-01

    Starting from raw data files coding eight bits of gray values per image pixel and identified with no more than eight characters to refer to the patient, the study, and technical parameters of the imaging modality, biomedical imaging has undergone manifold and rapid developments. Today, rather complex protocols such as Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) are used to handle medical images. Most restrictions to image formation, visualization, storage and transfer have basically been solved and image interpretation now sets the focus of research. Currently, a method-driven modeling approach dominates the field of biomedical image processing, as algorithms for registration, segmentation, classification and measurements are developed on a methodological level. However, a further metamorphosis of paradigms has already started. The future of medical image processing is seen in task-oriented solutions integrated into diagnosis, intervention planning, therapy and follow-up studies. This alteration of paradigms is also reflected in the literature. As German activities are strongly tied to the international research, this change of paradigm is demonstrated by selected papers from the German annual workshop on medical image processing collected in this special issue. PMID:15472739

  16. Treating patients with advanced rectal cancer and lateral pelvic lymph nodes with preoperative chemoradiotherapy based on pretreatment imaging

    PubMed Central

    Otowa, Yasunori; Yamashita, Kimihiro; Kanemitsu, Kiyonori; Sumi, Yasuo; Yamamoto, Masashi; Kanaji, Shingo; Imanishi, Tatsuya; Nakamura, Tetsu; Suzuki, Satoshi; Tanaka, Kenichi; Kakeji, Yoshihiro

    2015-01-01

    Preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) and lateral pelvic lymph node (LPLN) dissection (LPLD) based on pretreatment imaging are performed to improve oncological outcomes at our institution. However, the advantage of LPLD following preoperative CRT in advanced rectal cancer remains unclear. The objective of the present study was to assess the validity of this approach. Thirty-two patients with advanced rectal cancer were included in the study. All patients were treated with preoperative CRT and curative operation. Of these, 16 patients who were treated between August 2005 and June 2008 underwent LPLD on both sides (LPLD group). Sixteen patients who were treated between July 2008 and January 2013 underwent LPLD only on the side with suspected LPLN metastasis determined by pretreatment imaging; in cases without LPLN metastasis, only total mesorectal excision was performed (limited-LPLD group). The overall survival and relapse-free survival between the LPLD and the limited-LPLD groups were compared. Preoperative CRT was able to lower clinical lymph node status in 50% of the cases. In addition, pathological lymph node status did not exceed the pretreatment clinical lymph node status stage in the LPLD group. There were no differences in the overall survival and relapse-free survival between the two groups (P=0.729 and P=0.874, respectively). We conclude that multi-imaging studies have a very low risk of overlooking pathologically positive LPLN metastases. Therefore, limited LPLD is a feasible strategy for patients with advanced rectal cancer and suspicious LPLN metastases based on pretreatment imaging. PMID:26604786

  17. Integrated Baseline Review (IBR) Handbook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2013-01-01

    An Integrated Baseline Review (IBR) is a review of a supplier?s Performance Measurement Baseline (PMB). It is conducted by Program/Project Managers and their technical staffs on contracts and in-house work requiring compliance with NASA Earned Value Management System (EVMS) policy as defined in program/project policy, NPR 7120.5, or in NASA Federal Acquisition Regulations. The IBR Handbook may also be of use to those responsible for preparing the Terms of Reference for internal project reviews. While risks may be identified and actions tracked as a result of the IBR, it is important to note that an IBR cannot be failed.

  18. Positron Emission Tomography: Current Challenges and Opportunities for Technological Advances in Clinical and Preclinical Imaging Systems.

    PubMed

    Vaquero, Juan José; Kinahan, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging is based on detecting two time-coincident high-energy photons from the emission of a positron-emitting radioisotope. The physics of the emission, and the detection of the coincident photons, give PET imaging unique capabilities for both very high sensitivity and accurate estimation of the in vivo concentration of the radiotracer. PET imaging has been widely adopted as an important clinical modality for oncological, cardiovascular, and neurological applications. PET imaging has also become an important tool in preclinical studies, particularly for investigating murine models of disease and other small-animal models. However, there are several challenges to using PET imaging systems. These include the fundamental trade-offs between resolution and noise, the quantitative accuracy of the measurements, and integration with X-ray computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. In this article, we review how researchers and industry are addressing these challenges. PMID:26643024

  19. Advanced photoacoustic and thermoacoustic sensing and imaging beyond pulsed absorption contrast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Fei; Feng, Xiaohua; Zheng, Yuanjin

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we review the recent progress in the photoacoustic (PA) and thermoacoustic (TA) imaging domain. Going beyond the conventional investigation of optical/microwave absorption contrast, this review will focus more on the new developments of PA and TA imaging towards multi-contrast mechanisms, such as multimodal PA/TA imaging, viscosity imaging, temperature monitoring, Doppler detection of flow speed, etc. In addition, several interesting techniques utilizing PA/TA will be reviewed, including photoacoustic-guided optical focusing, electrical circuit modeling of PA/TA effect, TA imaging with coherent continuous-wave (CW) magnetic and radio-frequency (RF) excitations, as well as its nonlinear effect. Finally, some prospects about the further improvement of PA/TA imaging techniques are suggested, followed by the conclusion.

  20. Advances in whole-embryo imaging: a quantitative transition is underway.

    PubMed

    Pantazis, Periklis; Supatto, Willy

    2014-05-01

    With the advent of imaging probes and live microscopy, developmental biologists have markedly extended our understanding of the molecular and cellular details of embryonic development. To fully comprehend the complex mechanistic framework that forms the developing organism, quantitative studies with high fidelity in space and time are now required. We discuss how integrating established, newly introduced and future imaging tools with quantitative analysis will ensure that imaging can fulfil its promise to elucidate how new life begins. PMID:24739741