Science.gov

Sample records for advanced bionics ci

  1. Bionic Nanosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sebastian Mannoor, Manu

    Direct multidimensional integration of functional electronics and mechanical elements with viable biological systems could allow for the creation of bionic systems and devices possessing unique and advanced capabilities. For example, the ability to three dimensionally integrate functional electronic and mechanical components with biological cells and tissue could enable the creation of bionic systems that can have tremendous impact in regenerative medicine, prosthetics, and human-machine interfaces. However, as a consequence of the inherent dichotomy in material properties and limitations of conventional fabrication methods, the attainment of truly seamless integration of electronic and/or mechanical components with biological systems has been challenging. Nanomaterials engineering offers a general route for overcoming these dichotomies, primarily due to the existence of a dimensional compatibility between fundamental biological functional units and abiotic nanomaterial building blocks. One area of compelling interest for bionic systems is in the field of biomedical sensing, where the direct interfacing of nanosensors onto biological tissue or the human body could stimulate exciting opportunities such as on-body health quality monitoring and adaptive threat detection. Further, interfacing of antimicrobial peptide based bioselective probes onto the bionic nanosensors could offer abilities to detect pathogenic bacteria with bio-inspired selectivity. Most compellingly, when paired with additive manufacturing techniques such as 3D printing, these characteristics enable three dimensional integration and merging of a variety of functional materials including electronic, structural and biomaterials with viable biological cells, in the precise anatomic geometries of human organs, to form three dimensionally integrated, multi-functional bionic hybrids and cyborg devices with unique capabilities. In this thesis, we illustrate these approaches using three representative

  2. Optimization of Programming Parameters in Children with the Advanced Bionics Cochlear Implant

    PubMed Central

    Baudhuin, Jacquelyn; Cadieux, Jamie; Firszt, Jill B.; Reeder, Ruth M.; Maxson, Jerrica L.

    2012-01-01

    Background Cochlear implants provide access to soft intensity sounds and therefore improved audibility for children with severe-to-profound hearing loss. Speech processor programming parameters, such as threshold or T-level, Input Dynamic Range (IDR) and microphone sensitivity, contribute to the recipient’s program and influence audibility. When soundfield thresholds obtained through the speech processor are elevated, programming parameters can be modified to improve soft sound detection. Adult recipients show improved detection for low-level sounds when T-levels are set at raised levels, and show better speech understanding in quiet when wider IDRs are used. Little is known about the effects of parameter settings on detection and speech recognition in children using today’s cochlear implant technology. Purpose The overall study aim was to assess optimal T-level, IDR and sensitivity settings in pediatric recipients of the Advanced Bionics cochlear implant. Research Design Two experiments were conducted. Experiment 1 examined the effects of two T-level settings on soundfield thresholds and detection of the Ling 6 Sounds. One program set Ts at 10% of M-levels and another at 10 current units (CUs) below the level judged as “soft”. Experiment 2 examined the effects of IDR and sensitivity settings on speech recognition in quiet and noise. Study Sample Participants were eleven children 7 to 17 years of age (mean 11.3) implanted with the Advanced Bionics High Resolution 90K or CII cochlear implant system and had speech recognition scores of 20% or greater on a monosyllabic word test. Data Collection and Analysis Two T-level programs were compared for detection of the Ling Sounds and frequency modulated (FM) tones. Differing IDR/sensitivity programs (50/0, 50/10, 70/0, 70/10) were compared using Ling and FM-tone detection thresholds, CNC words at 50 dB SPL, and HINT-C sentences at 65 dB SPL in the presence of four talker babble (+8 signal-to-noise ratio). Outcomes

  3. Coming Soon: The Bionic Man

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodard, Colin

    2006-01-01

    This article describes the latest advancement in the development of prosthetic arms. Bionic researchers are making significant advances in creating more agile prosthetics that users can control via their own nervous system. The bionic arm, which is still under development, can not only execute complex, thought-controlled movements, but also can…

  4. Validation of Minimally-Invasive, Image-guided Cochlear Implantation Using Advanced Bionics, Cochlear, and Medel Electrodes in a Cadaver Model

    PubMed Central

    McRackan, Theodore R; Balachandran, Ramya; Blachon, Grégoire S; Mitchell, Jason E; Noble, Jack H; Wright, Charles G; Fitzpatrick, J. Michael; Dawant, Benoit M; Labadie, Robert F

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Validation of a novel minimally-invasive, image-guided approach to implant electrodes from three FDA-approved manufacturers—Medel, Cochlear, and Advanced Bionics—in the cochlea via a linear tunnel from the lateral cranium through the facial recess to the cochlea. Methods Custom microstereotactic frames that mount on bone-implanted fiducial markers and constrain the drill along the desired path were utilized on seven cadaver specimens. A linear tunnel was drilled from the lateral skull to the cochlea followed by a marginal, round-window cochleostomy and insertion of the electrode array into the cochlea through the drilled tunnel. Post-insertion CT scan and histological analysis were used to analyze the results. Results All specimens (N=7) were successfully implanted without visible injury to the facial nerve. The Medel electrodes (N=3) had minimal intracochlear trauma with 8, 8, and 10 (out of 12) electrodes intracochlear. The Cochlear lateral wall electrodes (straight research arrays) (N=2) had minimal trauma with 20 and 21 of 22 electrodes intracochlear. The Advanced Bionics electrodes (N=2) were inserted using their insertion tool; one had minimal insertion trauma and 14 of 16 electrodes intracochlear while the other had violation of the basilar membrane just deep to the cochleostomy following which it remained in scala vestibuli with 13 of 16 electrodes intracochlear. Conclusions Minimally invasive, image-guided cochlear implantation is possible using electrodes from the three FDA-approved manufacturers. Lateral wall electrodes were associated with less intracochlear trauma suggesting that they may be better suited for this surgical technique. PMID:23633113

  5. Cochlear bionic acoustic metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Fuyin; Wu, Jiu Hui; Huang, Meng; Fu, Gang; Bai, Changan

    2014-11-01

    A design of bionic acoustic metamaterial and acoustic functional devices was proposed by employing the mammalian cochlear as a prototype. First, combined with the experimental data in previous literatures, it is pointed out that the cochlear hair cells and stereocilia cluster are a kind of natural biological acoustic metamaterials with the negative stiffness characteristics. Then, to design the acoustic functional devices conveniently in engineering application, a simplified parametric helical structure was proposed to replace actual irregular cochlea for bionic design, and based on the computational results of such a bionic parametric helical structure, it is suggested that the overall cochlear is a local resonant system with the negative dynamic effective mass characteristics. There are many potential applications in the bandboard energy recovery device, cochlear implant, and acoustic black hole.

  6. Regenerative Engineering and Bionic Limbs

    PubMed Central

    James, Roshan; Laurencin, Cato T.

    2015-01-01

    Amputations of the upper extremity are severely debilitating, current treatments support very basic limb movement, and patients undergo extensive physiotherapy and psychological counselling. There is no prosthesis that allows the amputees near-normal function. With increasing number of amputees due to injuries sustained in accidents, natural calamities and international conflicts, there is a growing requirement for novel strategies and new discoveries. Advances have been made in technological, material and in prosthesis integration where researchers are now exploring artificial prosthesis that integrate with the residual tissues and function based on signal impulses received from the residual nerves. Efforts are focused on challenging experts in different disciplines to integrate ideas and technologies to allow for the regeneration of injured tissues, recording on tissue signals and feed-back to facilitate responsive movements and gradations of muscle force. A fully functional replacement and regenerative or integrated prosthesis will rely on interface of biological process with robotic systems to allow individual control of movement such as at the elbow, forearm, digits and thumb in the upper extremity. Regenerative engineering focused on the regeneration of complex tissue and organ systems will be realized by the cross-fertilization of advances over the past thirty years in the fields of tissue engineering, nanotechnology, stem cell science, and developmental biology. The convergence of toolboxes crated within each discipline will allow interdisciplinary teams from engineering, science, and medicine to realize new strategies, mergers of disparate technologies, such as biophysics, smart bionics, and the healing power of the mind. Tackling the clinical challenges, interfacing the biological process with bionic technologies, engineering biological control of the electronic systems, and feed-back will be the important goals in regenerative engineering over the next

  7. Amputee 'Feels' with Bionic Fingertip

    MedlinePlus

    ... bionic fingertip could help speed efforts to develop artificial limbs that provide sensory feedback, according to Silvestro ... the technology could also be used to create artificial touch in robots used in surgery, rescue and ...

  8. Removal of C.I. Reactive Red 2 by low pressure UV/chlorine advanced oxidation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qianyuan; Li, Yue; Wang, Wenlong; Wang, Ting; Hu, Hongying

    2016-03-01

    Azo dyes are commonly found as pollutants in wastewater from the textile industry, and can cause environmental problems because of their color and toxicity. The removal of a typical azo dye named C.I. Reactive Red 2 (RR2) during low pressure ultraviolet (UV)/chlorine oxidation was investigated in this study. UV irradiation at 254nm and addition of free chlorine provided much higher removal rates of RR2 and color than UV irradiation or chlorination alone. Increasing the free chlorine dose enhanced the removal efficiency of RR2 and color by UV/chlorine oxidation. Experiments performed with nitrobenzene (NB) or benzoic acid (BA) as scavengers showed that radicals (especially OH) formed during UV/chlorine oxidation are important in the RR2 removal. Addition of HCO3(-) and Cl(-) to the RR2 solution did not inhibit the removal of RR2 during UV/chlorine oxidation. PMID:26969069

  9. CI-WATER HPC Model: Cyberinfrastructure to Advance High Performance Water Resources Modeling in the Intermountain Western U.S

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogden, F. L.; Lai, W.; Douglas, C. C.; Miller, S. N.; Zhang, Y.

    2012-12-01

    -processing, visualization, and communication of massive amounts of output. The open-source CI-WATER model represents a significant advance in water resources modeling, and will be useful to water managers, planners, resource economists, and the hydrologic research community in general.

  10. "Bionic Woman" (2007): Gender, Disability and Cyborgs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quinlan, Margaret M.; Bates, Benjamin R.

    2009-01-01

    This paper explores a representation of overlapping categories of gender, disability and cyborgs in "Bionic Woman" (2007). The television show "Bionic Woman" (2007) is a popular culture representation that uniquely brings together these categories. Three themes emerged from an analysis of blogger discourse surrounding the show. The themes reveal…

  11. 3D Printed Bionic Ears

    PubMed Central

    Mannoor, Manu S.; Jiang, Ziwen; James, Teena; Kong, Yong Lin; Malatesta, Karen A.; Soboyejo, Winston O.; Verma, Naveen; Gracias, David H.; McAlpine, Michael C.

    2013-01-01

    The ability to three-dimensionally interweave biological tissue with functional electronics could enable the creation of bionic organs possessing enhanced functionalities over their human counterparts. Conventional electronic devices are inherently two-dimensional, preventing seamless multidimensional integration with synthetic biology, as the processes and materials are very different. Here, we present a novel strategy for overcoming these difficulties via additive manufacturing of biological cells with structural and nanoparticle derived electronic elements. As a proof of concept, we generated a bionic ear via 3D printing of a cell-seeded hydrogel matrix in the precise anatomic geometry of a human ear, along with an intertwined conducting polymer consisting of infused silver nanoparticles. This allowed for in vitro culturing of cartilage tissue around an inductive coil antenna in the ear, which subsequently enables readout of inductively-coupled signals from cochlea-shaped electrodes. The printed ear exhibits enhanced auditory sensing for radio frequency reception, and complementary left and right ears can listen to stereo audio music. Overall, our approach suggests a means to intricately merge biologic and nanoelectronic functionalities via 3D printing. PMID:23635097

  12. 3D printed bionic ears.

    PubMed

    Mannoor, Manu S; Jiang, Ziwen; James, Teena; Kong, Yong Lin; Malatesta, Karen A; Soboyejo, Winston O; Verma, Naveen; Gracias, David H; McAlpine, Michael C

    2013-06-12

    The ability to three-dimensionally interweave biological tissue with functional electronics could enable the creation of bionic organs possessing enhanced functionalities over their human counterparts. Conventional electronic devices are inherently two-dimensional, preventing seamless multidimensional integration with synthetic biology, as the processes and materials are very different. Here, we present a novel strategy for overcoming these difficulties via additive manufacturing of biological cells with structural and nanoparticle derived electronic elements. As a proof of concept, we generated a bionic ear via 3D printing of a cell-seeded hydrogel matrix in the anatomic geometry of a human ear, along with an intertwined conducting polymer consisting of infused silver nanoparticles. This allowed for in vitro culturing of cartilage tissue around an inductive coil antenna in the ear, which subsequently enables readout of inductively-coupled signals from cochlea-shaped electrodes. The printed ear exhibits enhanced auditory sensing for radio frequency reception, and complementary left and right ears can listen to stereo audio music. Overall, our approach suggests a means to intricately merge biologic and nanoelectronic functionalities via 3D printing. PMID:23635097

  13. Speech understanding in noise with the Roger Pen, Naida CI Q70 processor, and integrated Roger 17 receiver in a multi-talker network.

    PubMed

    De Ceulaer, Geert; Bestel, Julie; Mülder, Hans E; Goldbeck, Felix; de Varebeke, Sebastien Pierre Janssens; Govaerts, Paul J

    2016-05-01

    Roger is a digital adaptive multi-channel remote microphone technology that wirelessly transmits a speaker's voice directly to a hearing instrument or cochlear implant sound processor. Frequency hopping between channels, in combination with repeated broadcast, avoids interference issues that have limited earlier generation FM systems. This study evaluated the benefit of the Roger Pen transmitter microphone in a multiple talker network (MTN) for cochlear implant users in a simulated noisy conversation setting. Twelve post-lingually deafened adult Advanced Bionics CII/HiRes 90K recipients were recruited. Subjects used a Naida CI Q70 processor with integrated Roger 17 receiver. The test environment simulated four people having a meal in a noisy restaurant, one the CI user (listener), and three companions (talkers) talking non-simultaneously in a diffuse field of multi-talker babble. Speech reception thresholds (SRTs) were determined without the Roger Pen, with one Roger Pen, and with three Roger Pens in an MTN. Using three Roger Pens in an MTN improved the SRT by 14.8 dB over using no Roger Pen, and by 13.1 dB over using a single Roger Pen (p < 0.0001). The Roger Pen in an MTN provided statistically and clinically significant improvement in speech perception in noise for Advanced Bionics cochlear implant recipients. The integrated Roger 17 receiver made it easy for users of the Naida CI Q70 processor to take advantage of the Roger system. The listening advantage and ease of use should encourage more clinicians to recommend and fit Roger in adult cochlear implant patients. PMID:25983309

  14. Bionic Concept Applied to Flow Slab Design of PEMFC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, C. T.; Chang, C. P.

    A character of fuel cell with high potency and low pollution was known well and considered as a new generation of power technology. In this study a novel design of flow slab addressed and originated from bionic concept will be applied to improve the performance of PEMFC. Simulation results executed at Re = 100 show that the bionic flow type will possess a better uniformity of velocity and lower pressure drop. Besides, the integral performance concerned at SDR and PDR will also show the bionic flow type to be an outstanding design. Hence, this novel flow design addressed will be useful to promotion of PEMFC.

  15. EDITORIAL: Special issue on medical bionics Special issue on medical bionics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shepherd, Robert K.; D, Ph

    2009-12-01

    This special section of the Journal of Neural Engineering contains eight invited papers presented as part of the inaugural conference `Medical Bionics: A New Paradigm for Human Health' held in the beautiful seaside village of Lorne, Victoria, Australia from 16-19 November 2008. This meeting formed part of the Sir Mark Oliphant International Conference Series (www.oliphant.org.au) and was generously supported by the Department of Innovation, Industry, Science and Research of the Australian Government, the Australian Academy of Science and the Australian Academy of Technological Sciences and Engineering. This meeting was designed to bring experts from a variety of scientific, engineering and clinical disciplines together in a unique environment to discuss current progress in the field of medical bionics and to develop the concepts and techniques required to build the next generation of devices. The field is rapidly expanding, with new engineering solutions for neurological disorders being developed at an astonishing rate. Successful application of emerging engineering technologies into medical bionics devices requires a multidisciplinary research environment in order to deliver clinical solutions that are both safe and effective. Clinical success stories to date include spinal cord stimulators for the management of chronic neurological pain; auditory prostheses that allow the profoundly deaf to hear; and deep brain stimulation to negate movement disorders in Parkinson's disease. Other research programs currently undergoing clinical trials include devices that allow paraplegics to stand and even walk; brain-machine interfaces that provide quadriplegic patients with rudimentary control of a computer but may ultimately provide control of wheel chairs and artificial limbs; devices that detect and suppress epileptic seizures using brief trains of electrical stimulation; and retinal prostheses that will provide vision to the blind. The future for medical bionics is indeed

  16. EDITORIAL: Special issue on medical bionics Special issue on medical bionics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shepherd, Robert K.; D, Ph

    2009-12-01

    This special section of the Journal of Neural Engineering contains eight invited papers presented as part of the inaugural conference `Medical Bionics: A New Paradigm for Human Health' held in the beautiful seaside village of Lorne, Victoria, Australia from 16-19 November 2008. This meeting formed part of the Sir Mark Oliphant International Conference Series (www.oliphant.org.au) and was generously supported by the Department of Innovation, Industry, Science and Research of the Australian Government, the Australian Academy of Science and the Australian Academy of Technological Sciences and Engineering. This meeting was designed to bring experts from a variety of scientific, engineering and clinical disciplines together in a unique environment to discuss current progress in the field of medical bionics and to develop the concepts and techniques required to build the next generation of devices. The field is rapidly expanding, with new engineering solutions for neurological disorders being developed at an astonishing rate. Successful application of emerging engineering technologies into medical bionics devices requires a multidisciplinary research environment in order to deliver clinical solutions that are both safe and effective. Clinical success stories to date include spinal cord stimulators for the management of chronic neurological pain; auditory prostheses that allow the profoundly deaf to hear; and deep brain stimulation to negate movement disorders in Parkinson's disease. Other research programs currently undergoing clinical trials include devices that allow paraplegics to stand and even walk; brain-machine interfaces that provide quadriplegic patients with rudimentary control of a computer but may ultimately provide control of wheel chairs and artificial limbs; devices that detect and suppress epileptic seizures using brief trains of electrical stimulation; and retinal prostheses that will provide vision to the blind. The future for medical bionics is indeed

  17. Fermentation based carbon nanotube multifunctional bionic composites

    PubMed Central

    Valentini, Luca; Bon, Silvia Bittolo; Signetti, Stefano; Tripathi, Manoj; Iacob, Erica; Pugno, Nicola M.

    2016-01-01

    The exploitation of the processes used by microorganisms to digest nutrients for their growth can be a viable method for the formation of a wide range of so called biogenic materials that have unique properties that are not produced by abiotic processes. Here we produced living hybrid materials by giving to unicellular organisms the nutrient to grow. Based on bread fermentation, a bionic composite made of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and a single-cell fungi, the Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast extract, was prepared by fermentation of such microorganisms at room temperature. Scanning electron microscopy analysis suggests that the CNTs were internalized by the cell after fermentation bridging the cells. Tensile tests on dried composite films have been rationalized in terms of a CNT cell bridging mechanism where the strongly enhanced strength of the composite is governed by the adhesion energy between the bridging carbon nanotubes and the matrix. The addition of CNTs also significantly improved the electrical conductivity along with a higher photoconductive activity. The proposed process could lead to the development of more complex and interactive structures programmed to self-assemble into specific patterns, such as those on strain or light sensors that could sense damage or convert light stimulus in an electrical signal. PMID:27279425

  18. Fermentation based carbon nanotube multifunctional bionic composites.

    PubMed

    Valentini, Luca; Bon, Silvia Bittolo; Signetti, Stefano; Tripathi, Manoj; Iacob, Erica; Pugno, Nicola M

    2016-01-01

    The exploitation of the processes used by microorganisms to digest nutrients for their growth can be a viable method for the formation of a wide range of so called biogenic materials that have unique properties that are not produced by abiotic processes. Here we produced living hybrid materials by giving to unicellular organisms the nutrient to grow. Based on bread fermentation, a bionic composite made of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and a single-cell fungi, the Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast extract, was prepared by fermentation of such microorganisms at room temperature. Scanning electron microscopy analysis suggests that the CNTs were internalized by the cell after fermentation bridging the cells. Tensile tests on dried composite films have been rationalized in terms of a CNT cell bridging mechanism where the strongly enhanced strength of the composite is governed by the adhesion energy between the bridging carbon nanotubes and the matrix. The addition of CNTs also significantly improved the electrical conductivity along with a higher photoconductive activity. The proposed process could lead to the development of more complex and interactive structures programmed to self-assemble into specific patterns, such as those on strain or light sensors that could sense damage or convert light stimulus in an electrical signal. PMID:27279425

  19. Fermentation based carbon nanotube multifunctional bionic composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valentini, Luca; Bon, Silvia Bittolo; Signetti, Stefano; Tripathi, Manoj; Iacob, Erica; Pugno, Nicola M.

    2016-06-01

    The exploitation of the processes used by microorganisms to digest nutrients for their growth can be a viable method for the formation of a wide range of so called biogenic materials that have unique properties that are not produced by abiotic processes. Here we produced living hybrid materials by giving to unicellular organisms the nutrient to grow. Based on bread fermentation, a bionic composite made of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and a single-cell fungi, the Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast extract, was prepared by fermentation of such microorganisms at room temperature. Scanning electron microscopy analysis suggests that the CNTs were internalized by the cell after fermentation bridging the cells. Tensile tests on dried composite films have been rationalized in terms of a CNT cell bridging mechanism where the strongly enhanced strength of the composite is governed by the adhesion energy between the bridging carbon nanotubes and the matrix. The addition of CNTs also significantly improved the electrical conductivity along with a higher photoconductive activity. The proposed process could lead to the development of more complex and interactive structures programmed to self-assemble into specific patterns, such as those on strain or light sensors that could sense damage or convert light stimulus in an electrical signal.

  20. Presenting Bionic: Broader Impacts and Outreach Network for Institutional Collaboration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Storm, K.

    2014-12-01

    Broader Impact plans are required of all NSF proposals. In 2011 the National Science Board, which oversees NSF, reconfirmed NSF's commitment to Broader Impacts in its task force report on the merit review system. At many institutions there are professionals that focus their work on supporting the Broader Impact work of researchers. This session will share the Broader Impacts and Outreach Network for Institutional Collaboration (BIONIC) plan to create a professional network of individuals and offices committed to planning and carrying out effective Broader Impact programming. BIONIC is an NSF Research Coordination Network that is recommended for funding through the Biology Directorate. In this session we will share the goals of BIONIC, and the progress to date in reaching those goals (of which one aspect is the curating of effective Broader Impact initiatives).

  1. A bionic eye actuated by ionic polymer-metal composite (IPMC) artificial muscle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Min; Li, Yuxiu; He, Qingsong; Song, Linlin; Dai, Zhendong

    2011-04-01

    This research was conducted with the aim of developing an energy-efficient, noiseless, movable bionic eye for use in bionic toys. This novel bionic eye is actuated by an ionic polymer-metal composite actuator. The overall size of the eye was 39 mm in length, 45 mm in width, and 45 mm in thickness. The experimental results revealed such a bionic eye design is feasible. This type of bionic eye is appropriate for use in toys and robots to increase their visual impact.

  2. Advances in understanding the cyanobacterial CO2-concentrating-mechanism (CCM): functional components, Ci transporters, diversity, genetic regulation and prospects for engineering into plants.

    PubMed

    Price, G Dean; Badger, Murray R; Woodger, Fiona J; Long, Ben M

    2008-01-01

    Cyanobacteria have evolved a significant environmental adaptation, known as a CO(2)-concentrating-mechanism (CCM), that vastly improves photosynthetic performance and survival under limiting CO(2) concentrations. The CCM functions to transport and accumulate inorganic carbon actively (Ci; HCO(3)(-), and CO(2)) within the cell where the Ci pool is utilized to provide elevated CO(2) concentrations around the primary CO(2)-fixing enzyme, ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase-oxygenase (Rubisco). In cyanobacteria, Rubisco is encapsulated in unique micro-compartments known as carboxysomes. Cyanobacteria can possess up to five distinct transport systems for Ci uptake. Through database analysis of some 33 complete genomic DNA sequences for cyanobacteria it is evident that considerable diversity exists in the composition of transporters employed, although in many species this diversity is yet to be confirmed by comparative phenomics. In addition, two types of carboxysomes are known within the cyanobacteria that have apparently arisen by parallel evolution, and considerable progress has been made towards understanding the proteins responsible for carboxysome assembly and function. Progress has also been made towards identifying the primary signal for the induction of the subset of CCM genes known as CO(2)-responsive genes, and transcriptional regulators CcmR and CmpR have been shown to regulate these genes. Finally, some prospects for introducing cyanobacterial CCM components into higher plants are considered, with the objective of engineering plants that make more efficient use of water and nitrogen. PMID:17578868

  3. Design and Testing of a Bionic Dancing Prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Rouse, Elliott J; Villagaray-Carski, Nathan C; Emerson, Robert W; Herr, Hugh M

    2015-01-01

    Traditionally, prosthetic leg research has focused on improving mobility for activities of daily living. Artistic expression such as dance, however, is not a common research topic and consequently prosthetic technology for dance has been severely limited for the disabled. This work focuses on investigating the ankle joint kinetics and kinematics during a Latin-American dance to provide unique motor options for disabled individuals beyond those of daily living. The objective of this study was to develop a control system for a bionic ankle prosthesis that outperforms conventional prostheses when dancing the rumba. The biomechanics of the ankle joint of a non-amputee, professional dancer were acquired for the development of the bionic control system. Subsequently, a professional dancer who received a traumatic transtibial amputation in April 2013 tested the bionic dance prosthesis and a conventional, passive prosthesis for comparison. The ability to provide similar torque-angle behavior of the biological ankle was assessed to quantify the biological realism of the prostheses. The bionic dancing prosthesis overlapped with 37 ± 6% of the non-amputee ankle torque and ankle angle data, compared to 26 ± 2% for the conventional, passive prosthesis, a statistically greater overlap (p = 0.01). This study lays the foundation for quantifying unique, expressive activity modes currently unavailable to individuals with disabilities. Future work will focus on an expansion of the methods and types of dance investigated in this work. PMID:26285201

  4. Design and Testing of a Bionic Dancing Prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    Rouse, Elliott J.; Villagaray-Carski, Nathan C.; Emerson, Robert W.; Herr, Hugh M.

    2015-01-01

    Traditionally, prosthetic leg research has focused on improving mobility for activities of daily living. Artistic expression such as dance, however, is not a common research topic and consequently prosthetic technology for dance has been severely limited for the disabled. This work focuses on investigating the ankle joint kinetics and kinematics during a Latin-American dance to provide unique motor options for disabled individuals beyond those of daily living. The objective of this study was to develop a control system for a bionic ankle prosthesis that outperforms conventional prostheses when dancing the rumba. The biomechanics of the ankle joint of a non-amputee, professional dancer were acquired for the development of the bionic control system. Subsequently, a professional dancer who received a traumatic transtibial amputation in April 2013 tested the bionic dance prosthesis and a conventional, passive prosthesis for comparison. The ability to provide similar torque-angle behavior of the biological ankle was assessed to quantify the biological realism of the prostheses. The bionic dancing prosthesis overlapped with 37 ± 6% of the non-amputee ankle torque and ankle angle data, compared to 26 ± 2% for the conventional, passive prosthesis, a statistically greater overlap (p = 0.01). This study lays the foundation for quantifying unique, expressive activity modes currently unavailable to individuals with disabilities. Future work will focus on an expansion of the methods and types of dance investigated in this work. PMID:26285201

  5. BIOCONAID System (Bionic Control of Acceleration Induced Dimming). Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Dana B.; And Others

    The system described represents a new technique for enhancing the fidelity of flight simulators during high acceleration maneuvers. This technique forces the simulator pilot into active participation and energy expenditure similar to the aircraft pilot undergoing actual accelerations. The Bionic Control of Acceleration Induced Dimming (BIOCONAID)…

  6. 10 CFR 709.4 - Notification of a CI evaluation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Notification of a CI evaluation. (a) If a polygraph examination is scheduled, DOE must notify the covered..., including a CI-scope polygraph examination. (c) Advance notice will be provided to the affected...

  7. 10 CFR 709.4 - Notification of a CI evaluation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Notification of a CI evaluation. (a) If a polygraph examination is scheduled, DOE must notify the covered..., including a CI-scope polygraph examination. (c) Advance notice will be provided to the affected...

  8. 10 CFR 709.4 - Notification of a CI evaluation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Notification of a CI evaluation. (a) If a polygraph examination is scheduled, DOE must notify the covered..., including a CI-scope polygraph examination. (c) Advance notice will be provided to the affected...

  9. 10 CFR 709.4 - Notification of a CI evaluation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Notification of a CI evaluation. (a) If a polygraph examination is scheduled, DOE must notify the covered..., including a CI-scope polygraph examination. (c) Advance notice will be provided to the affected...

  10. 10 CFR 709.4 - Notification of a CI evaluation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Notification of a CI evaluation. (a) If a polygraph examination is scheduled, DOE must notify the covered..., including a CI-scope polygraph examination. (c) Advance notice will be provided to the affected...

  11. Bionic restorative system: its potential value in caries therapy.

    PubMed

    He, M M Hao; Zheng, M M Ren; Lin, M D Yinghe

    2009-07-01

    Dental defect caused by dental caries is usually restored by fillings, inlays or onlays at the present day. Although the therapeutic effects of these methods have already been confirmed, complications occasionally set in, such as pulp injury, fracture and secondary caries. Bionic dental organic center possesses similar functions of the natural dental organic center. So we put forward a hypothesis that bionic organic center can be transplanted onto the conditioned pulpal walls of the prepared cavity and a specific filling material, which the cavity will be filled with, provides oxygen, nutrition and raw materials for it to regenerate the lost odontal tissue in vivo. The regenerated odontal tissue which has similar properties of the healthy odontal tissue will restore the defect and it will be combined with the residual odontal tissue tightly, not only in physical structure but also in function. Then the teeth suffering from dental caries could live and function like healthy ones. PMID:19264422

  12. Transformative Reality: improving bionic vision with robotic sensing.

    PubMed

    Lui, Wen Lik Dennis; Browne, Damien; Kleeman, Lindsay; Drummond, Tom; Li, Wai Ho

    2012-01-01

    Implanted visual prostheses provide bionic vision with very low spatial and intensity resolution when compared against healthy human vision. Vision processing converts camera video to low resolution imagery for bionic vision with the aim of preserving salient features such as edges. Transformative Reality extends and improves upon traditional vision processing in three ways. Firstly, a combination of visual and non-visual sensors are used to provide multi-modal data of a person's surroundings. This enables the sensing of features that are difficult to sense with only a camera. Secondly, robotic sensing algorithms construct models of the world in real time. This enables the detection of complex features such as navigable empty ground or people. Thirdly, models are visually rendered so that visually complex entities such as people can be effectively represented in low resolution. Preliminary simulated prosthetic vision trials, where a head mounted display is used to constrain a subject's vision to 25×25 binary phosphenes, suggest that Transformative Reality provides functional bionic vision for tasks such as indoor navigation, object manipulation and people detection in scenes where traditional processing is unusable. PMID:23365890

  13. Laser Additive Manufacturing and Bionics: Redefining Lightweight Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emmelmann, C.; Sander, P.; Kranz, J.; Wycisk, E.

    New layer wise manufacturing technologies such as Laser Additive Manufacturing (LAM) allow innovative approaches to product design. Especially for lightweight design in aircraft applications LAM offers new possibilities for load-adapted structures. However, to fully capture lightweight potential of LAM technologies new design guidelines and processes have to be developed. A novel approach to extreme lightweight design is realized by incorporating structural optimization tools, bionic structures and LAM guidelines into one design process. By consequently following this design process designers can achieve lightweight savings in designing new aircraft structures.

  14. Investigation of the Effect of Dimple Bionic Nonsmooth Surface on Tire Antihydroplaning.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Haichao; Wang, Guolin; Ding, Yangmin; Yang, Jian; Zhai, Huihui

    2015-01-01

    Inspired by the idea that bionic nonsmooth surfaces (BNSS) reduce fluid adhesion and resistance, the effect of dimple bionic nonsmooth structure arranged in tire circumferential grooves surface on antihydroplaning performance was investigated by using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD). The physical model of the object (model of dimple bionic nonsmooth surface distribution, hydroplaning model) and SST k - ω turbulence model are established for numerical analysis of tire hydroplaning. By virtue of the orthogonal table L16(4(5)), the parameters of dimple bionic nonsmooth structure design compared to the smooth structure were analyzed, and the priority level of the experimental factors as well as the best combination within the scope of the experiment was obtained. The simulation results show that dimple bionic nonsmooth structure can reduce water flow resistance by disturbing the eddy movement in boundary layers. Then, optimal type of dimple bionic nonsmooth structure is arranged on the bottom of tire circumferential grooves for hydroplaning performance analysis. The results show that the dimple bionic nonsmooth structure effectively decreases the tread hydrodynamic pressure when driving on water film and increases the tire hydroplaning velocity, thus improving tire antihydroplaning performance. PMID:27018311

  15. Investigation of the Effect of Dimple Bionic Nonsmooth Surface on Tire Antihydroplaning

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Haichao; Wang, Guolin; Ding, Yangmin; Yang, Jian; Zhai, Huihui

    2015-01-01

    Inspired by the idea that bionic nonsmooth surfaces (BNSS) reduce fluid adhesion and resistance, the effect of dimple bionic nonsmooth structure arranged in tire circumferential grooves surface on antihydroplaning performance was investigated by using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD). The physical model of the object (model of dimple bionic nonsmooth surface distribution, hydroplaning model) and SST k − ω turbulence model are established for numerical analysis of tire hydroplaning. By virtue of the orthogonal table L16(45), the parameters of dimple bionic nonsmooth structure design compared to the smooth structure were analyzed, and the priority level of the experimental factors as well as the best combination within the scope of the experiment was obtained. The simulation results show that dimple bionic nonsmooth structure can reduce water flow resistance by disturbing the eddy movement in boundary layers. Then, optimal type of dimple bionic nonsmooth structure is arranged on the bottom of tire circumferential grooves for hydroplaning performance analysis. The results show that the dimple bionic nonsmooth structure effectively decreases the tread hydrodynamic pressure when driving on water film and increases the tire hydroplaning velocity, thus improving tire antihydroplaning performance. PMID:27018311

  16. Anaerobic digestion of corn stovers for methane production in a novel bionic reactor.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Meixia; Zhang, Guangming; Zhang, Panyue; Fan, Shiyang; Jin, Shuguang; Wu, Dan; Fang, Wei

    2014-08-01

    To improve the biogas production from corn stovers, a new bionic reactor was designed and constructed. The bionic reactor simulated the rumen digestion of ruminants. The liquid was separated from corn stovers and refluxed into corn stovers again, which simulated the undigested particles separated from completely digested materials and fed back again for further degradation in ruminant stomach. Results showed that the bionic reactor was effective for anaerobic digestion of corn stovers. The liquid amount and its reflux showed an obvious positive correlation with biogas production. The highest biogas production rate was 21.6 ml/gVS-addedd, and the total cumulative biogas production was 256.5 ml/gVS-added. The methane content in biogas ranged from 52.2% to 63.3%. The degradation of corn stovers were greatly enhanced through simulating the animal digestion mechanisms in this bionic reactor. PMID:24923659

  17. Simulated effect on the compressive and shear mechanical properties of bionic integrated honeycomb plates.

    PubMed

    He, Chenglin; Chen, Jinxiang; Wu, Zhishen; Xie, Juan; Zu, Qiao; Lu, Yun

    2015-05-01

    Honeycomb plates can be applied in many fields, including furniture manufacturing, mechanical engineering, civil engineering, transportation and aerospace. In the present study, we discuss the simulated effect on the mechanical properties of bionic integrated honeycomb plates by investigating the compressive and shear failure modes and the mechanical properties of trabeculae reinforced by long or short fibers. The results indicate that the simulated effect represents approximately 80% and 70% of the compressive and shear strengths, respectively. Compared with existing bionic samples, the mass-specific strength was significantly improved. Therefore, this integrated honeycomb technology remains the most effective method for the trial manufacturing of bionic integrated honeycomb plates. The simulated effect of the compressive rigidity is approximately 85%. The short-fiber trabeculae have an advantage over the long-fiber trabeculae in terms of shear rigidity, which provides new evidence for the application of integrated bionic honeycomb plates. PMID:25746272

  18. The design of an asymmetric bionic branching channel for electronic chips cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Shanglong; Qin, Jie; Guo, Wei; Fang, Kuang

    2013-06-01

    Inspired by the wing vein of Lepidoptera, a designment of asymmetric bionic branching channel for electronic chips cooling is developed. Lepidoptera vein D was chosen to measure the angle of first and second branch level. Based on these regular patterns, an asymmetric bionic branching channel is designed in a 35 mm × 35 mm chip. Comparing with fractal-like branching channel, it provides a stronger heat transfer capability, lower pressure drop and lower flow resistance in the experiment.

  19. Medicalization: Current Concept and Future Directions in a Bionic Society

    PubMed Central

    Maturo, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    The article illustrates the main features of the concept of medicalization, starting from its theoretical roots. Although it is the process of extending the medical gaze on human conditions, it appears that medicalization cannot be strictly connected to medical imperialism anymore. Other “engines” of medicalization are influential: consumers, biotechnology and managed care. The growth of research and theoretical reflections on medicalization has led to the proposal of other parallel concepts like pharmaceuticalization, genetization and biomedicalization. These new theoretical tools could be useful in the analysis of human enhancement. Human enhancement can be considered as the use of biomedical technology to improve performance on a human being who is not in need of a cure: a practice that is increasingly spreading in what might be defined as a “bionic society”. PMID:22654387

  20. Ego-motion based on EM for bionic navigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Xiaofeng; Wang, L. J.; Liu, J. G.

    2015-12-01

    Researches have proved that flying insects such as bees can achieve efficient and robust flight control, and biologists have explored some biomimetic principles regarding how they control flight. Based on those basic studies and principles acquired from the flying insects, this paper proposes a different solution of recovering ego-motion for low level navigation. Firstly, a new type of entropy flow is provided to calculate the motion parameters. Secondly, EKF, which has been used for navigation for some years to correct accumulated error, and estimation-Maximization, which is always used to estimate parameters, are put together to determine the ego-motion estimation of aerial vehicles. Numerical simulation on MATLAB has proved that this navigation system provides more accurate position and smaller mean absolute error than pure optical flow navigation. This paper has done pioneering work in bionic mechanism to space navigation.

  1. Medicalization: current concept and future directions in a bionic society.

    PubMed

    Maturo, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    The article illustrates the main features of the concept of medicalization, starting from its theoretical roots. Although it is the process of extending the medical gaze on human conditions, it appears that medicalization cannot be strictly connected to medical imperialism anymore. Other "engines" of medicalization are influential: consumers, biotechnology and managed care. The growth of research and theoretical reflections on medicalization has led to the proposal of other parallel concepts like pharmaceuticalization, genetization and biomedicalization. These new theoretical tools could be useful in the analysis of human enhancement. Human enhancement can be considered as the use of biomedical technology to improve performance on a human being who is not in need of a cure: a practice that is increasingly spreading in what might be defined as a "bionic society". PMID:22654387

  2. Bionic intraocular lens with variable focus and integrated structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Dan; Wang, Xuan-Yin; Du, Jia-Wei; Xiang, Ke

    2015-10-01

    This paper proposes a bionic accommodating intraocular lens (IOL) for ophthalmic surgery. The designed lens has a solid-liquid mixed integrated structure, which mainly consists of a support ring, elastic membrane, rigid lens, and optical liquid. The lens focus can be adjusted through the deformation of the lens front surface when compressed. The integrated structure of the IOL is presented, as well as a detailed description of the lens materials and fabrication process. Images under different radial pressures are captured, and the lens deformation process, accommodating range, density, and optical property are analyzed. The designed lens achieves a 14.6 D accommodating range under a radial pressure of 51.4 mN and a 0.24 mm alteration of the lens outer radius. The deformation property of the lens matches well with the characteristic of the eye and shows the potential to help patients fully recover their vision accommodation ability after the cataract surgery.

  3. [Design and Preparation of Plant Bionic Materials Based on Optical and Infrared Features Simulation].

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xiao-jun; Lu, Xu-liang; Pan, Jia-liang; Zhang, Shuan-qin

    2015-07-01

    Due to the life characteristics such as physiological structure and transpiration, plants have unique optical and infrared features. In the optical band, because of the common effects of chlorophyll and water, plant leafs show spectral reflectance characteristics change in 550, 680, 1400 and 1900 nm significantly. In the infrared wave band, driven by transpiration, plants could regulate temperature on their own initiative, which make the infrared characteristics of plants different from artificial materials. So palnt bionic materials were proposed to simulate optical and infrared characteristics of plants. By analyzing formation mechanism of optical and infrared features about green plants, the component design and heat-transfer process of plants bionic materials were studied, above these the heat-transfer control formulation was established. Based on water adsorption/release compound, optical pigments and other man-made materials, plant bionic materials preparation methods were designed which could simulate the optical and infrared features of green plants. By chemical casting methods plant bionic material films were prepared, which use polyvinyl alcohol as film forming and water adsorption/release compound, and use optical pigments like chrome green and macromolecule yellow as colouring materials. The research conclusions achieved by testings figured out: water adsorption/release testing showed that the plant bionic materials with a certain thickness could absorb 1.3 kg water per square meter, which could satisfy the water usage of transpiration simulation one day; the optical and infrared simulated effect tests indicated that the plant bionic materials could preferably simulate the spectral reflective performance of green plants in optical wave band (380-2500 nm, expecially in 1400 and 1900 nm which were water absorption wave band of plants), and also it had similar daily infrared radiation variations with green plants, daily average radiation temperature

  4. Regulation of Ci-SCFSlimb binding, Ci proteolysis and Hedgehog pathway activity by Ci phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Smelkinson, Margery G.; Zhou, Qianhe; Kalderon, Daniel

    2007-01-01

    SUMMARY Hedgehog (Hh) proteins signal by inhibiting the proteolytic processing of Ci/Gli family transcription factors and by increasing Ci/Gli specific activity. In the absence of Hh, phosphorylation of Ci/Gli triggers binding to SCF ubiquitin ligase complexes and consequent proteolysis. Here we define the principal SCFSlimb binding site in Ci as an extended variant of a canonical Slimb/β-TRCP binding motif that can be created by PKA-priming of five successive CK1 sites. GSK3 enhances binding primarily through a nearby region of Ci, which may contact an SCF component other than Slimb. Studies of Ci variants with altered CK1 and GSK3 sites suggest that the large number of phosphorylation sites that direct SCFSlimb binding confers a Hh response that is both sensitive and graded, and that in the Drosophila wing disc, morphogenetic responses involve changes in both the level and specific activity of Ci. We also show that when Ci proteolysis is compromised, its specific activity is limited principally by Su(fu) and not by Cos2 cytoplasmic tethering or PKA phosphorylation. PMID:17925225

  5. A Bionic Camera-Based Polarization Navigation Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Daobin; Liang, Huawei; Zhu, Hui; Zhang, Shuai

    2014-01-01

    Navigation and positioning technology is closely related to our routine life activities, from travel to aerospace. Recently it has been found that Cataglyphis (a kind of desert ant) is able to detect the polarization direction of skylight and navigate according to this information. This paper presents a real-time bionic camera-based polarization navigation sensor. This sensor has two work modes: one is a single-point measurement mode and the other is a multi-point measurement mode. An indoor calibration experiment of the sensor has been done under a beam of standard polarized light. The experiment results show that after noise reduction the accuracy of the sensor can reach up to 0.3256°. It is also compared with GPS and INS (Inertial Navigation System) in the single-point measurement mode through an outdoor experiment. Through time compensation and location compensation, the sensor can be a useful alternative to GPS and INS. In addition, the sensor also can measure the polarization distribution pattern when it works in multi-point measurement mode. PMID:25051029

  6. A bionic camera-based polarization navigation sensor.

    PubMed

    Wang, Daobin; Liang, Huawei; Zhu, Hui; Zhang, Shuai

    2014-01-01

    Navigation and positioning technology is closely related to our routine life activities, from travel to aerospace. Recently it has been found that Cataglyphis (a kind of desert ant) is able to detect the polarization direction of skylight and navigate according to this information. This paper presents a real-time bionic camera-based polarization navigation sensor. This sensor has two work modes: one is a single-point measurement mode and the other is a multi-point measurement mode. An indoor calibration experiment of the sensor has been done under a beam of standard polarized light. The experiment results show that after noise reduction the accuracy of the sensor can reach up to 0.3256°. It is also compared with GPS and INS (Inertial Navigation System) in the single-point measurement mode through an outdoor experiment. Through time compensation and location compensation, the sensor can be a useful alternative to GPS and INS. In addition, the sensor also can measure the polarization distribution pattern when it works in multi-point measurement mode. PMID:25051029

  7. [The bionic artificial joint capsule study (1)--mechanics simulation].

    PubMed

    Su, Shihu; Zhang, Jianhua; Tao, Dehua

    2007-02-01

    In this paper, a three-dimensional finite element analysis (FEA) model was created for bionic artificial joint with joint capsule. Finite element method (FEM) was used to calculate and simulate mechanics distribution of the joint capsule under different thickness of the joint capsule, different loading, and different angular displacements. The results of the simulation show that the maximum stress is created in the joint area between artificial joint capsule. And the effect of the thickness of the artificial joint capsule on the stress magnitude and distribution is depend on motion model. On standing situation, the maximum stress decreases with the increase of the thickness of joint capsule. However, on walking situation, the maximum stress increases with the increase of the thickness of joint capsule. Whatever conditions simulated, the maximum stress of the artificial joint capsule is not over the limit of the material strength (9.97 megapascals). All the large stress, which gained from the simulation under different situations, locates at the interface between the capsule and the artificial joint. This is because the artificial joint and the capsule transfer loading each other at the interface. At the same time, supporting area of the capsule at the location of the interface is minimum for the whole vesicle. The stress concentration is inevitable at the interface due to the model structure. This result will offer guidance for the optimum joint structure of the capsule and the artificial joint. PMID:17333904

  8. Graphene-Based Bionic Composites with Multifunctional and Repairing Properties.

    PubMed

    Valentini, L; Bittolo Bon, S; Signetti, S; Pugno, N M

    2016-03-30

    In this work, a novel bionic composite inspired by the concept of yeast fermentation has been proposed. It was observed that the addition of graphene nanoplatelets during the fermentation of extract of Saccharomyces cerevisiae fungi allows coupling of the graphene sheets to the yeast cell wall. This process resulted in the formation of a composite film with improved mechanical and electrical properties along with the capability of converting the light stimulus in the electrical signal. The mechanical properties of the prepared composites, namely, the fracture strength and Young's modulus, were studied via numerical simulations and are related to the properties of the constituent phases via rules of mixture. Finally, it was observed that graphene nanoplatelets, added to the nutrient broth, were able to reassemble onto the stressed cell surface and repair the surface cracking, partially restoring the pristine electrical and mechanical properties. The method reported here may find potential application in the development of self-healable bioelectronic devices and microorganism-based strain and chemical biosensors. PMID:26971362

  9. Effect of bionic coupling units' forms on wear resistance of gray cast iron under dry linear reciprocating sliding condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Zuobo; Zhou, Hong; Xie, Guofeng; Cong, Dalong; Meng, Chao; Ren, Luquan

    2015-07-01

    In order to get close to the wear form of guide rails, the homemade linear reciprocating wear testing machine was used for the wear test. In order to improve the wear-resistance of gray cast iron guide rail, bionic coupling units of different forms were manufactured by a laser. Wear behavior of gray-cast-iron with bionic-coupling units has been studied under dry sliding condition at room temperature using the wear testing machine. The wear resistance was evaluated by means of weight loss measurement and wear morphology. The results indicated that bionic coupling unit could improve the wear resistance of gray cast iron. The wear resistance of gray cast iron with reticulation bionic coupling unit is the best. When the load and speed changed, reticulation bionic coupling unit still has excellent performance in improving the wear resistance of gray cast iron.

  10. ARAM-CI Rev. 1

    2008-07-30

    ARAM-CI provides the basic RAM framework process for conducting a security risk analysis (risk assessment and risk management) for different critical infrastructures. The user works through a step-by-step process which includes screening, facility characterization, identification of potential targets, detemine consequences, identify and characterize threat, conduct a vulnerability assessment, and detemining a relative risk. The ARAM-CI tool also allows the user address risk reduction measrues by developing upgrade packages and considering possible impacts.

  11. SU-E-T-570: Management of Radiation Oncology Patients with Cochlear Implant and Other Bionic Devices in the Brain and Head and Neck Regions

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, F.Q; Chen, Z; Nath, R

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate the current status of clinical usage of cochlear implant (CI) and other bionic devices (BD) in the brain and head and neck regions (BH and N) and their management in patients during radiotherapy to ensure patient health and safety as well as optimum radiation delivery. Methods: Literature review was performed with both CIs and radiotherapy and their variants as keywords in PubMed, INSPEC and other sources. The focus was on CIs during radiotherapy, but it also included other BDs in BHȦN, such as auditory brainstem implant, bionic retinal implant, and hearing aids, among others. Results: Interactions between CIs and radiation may cause CIs malfunction. The presence of CIs may also cause suboptimum dose distribution if a treatment plan was not well designed. A few studies were performed for the hearing functions of CIs under irradiations of 4 MV and 6 MV x-rays. However, x-rays with higher energies (10 to 18 MV) broadly used in radiotherapy have not been explored. These higher energetic beams are more damaging to electronics due to strong penetrating power and also due to neutrons generated in the treatment process. Modern CIs are designed with more and more complicated integrated circuits, which may be more susceptible to radiation damage and malfunction. Therefore, careful management is important for safety and treatment outcomes. Conclusion: Although AAPM TG-34, TG-63, and TG-203 (update of TG-34, not published yet) reports may be referenced for management of CIs and other BDs in the brain and H and N regions, a site- and device-specified guideline should be developed for CIs and other BDs. Additional evaluation of CI functions under clinically relevant set-ups should also be performed to provide clinicians with better knowledge in clinical decision making.

  12. Bionic Tactile Sensor for Near-Range Search, Localisation and Material Classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dürr, Volker; Krause, André F.; Neitzel, Matthias; Lange, Oliver; Reimann, Bert

    Insects use their antennae (feelers) as near range sensors for orientation, object localisation and communication. Here, we use the stick insect antenna as a paragon for an actively moved tactile sensor. Our bionic sensor uses vibration signals from contact events for obstacle localisation and classification of material properties. It is shown how distance is coded by salient peaks in the frequency spectrum, and how the damping time constants can be exploited to distinguish between eight objects made of a range of materials. Thus, we demonstrate application of bionic principles for non-visual, reliable, near-range object localisation and material classification that is suitable for autonomous exploratory robots.

  13. Bionic ankle–foot prosthesis normalizes walking gait for persons with leg amputation

    PubMed Central

    Herr, Hugh M.; Grabowski, Alena M.

    2012-01-01

    Over time, leg prostheses have improved in design, but have been incapable of actively adapting to different walking velocities in a manner comparable to a biological limb. People with a leg amputation using such commercially available passive-elastic prostheses require significantly more metabolic energy to walk at the same velocities, prefer to walk slower and have abnormal biomechanics compared with non-amputees. A bionic prosthesis has been developed that emulates the function of a biological ankle during level-ground walking, specifically providing the net positive work required for a range of walking velocities. We compared metabolic energy costs, preferred velocities and biomechanical patterns of seven people with a unilateral transtibial amputation using the bionic prosthesis and using their own passive-elastic prosthesis to those of seven non-amputees during level-ground walking. Compared with using a passive-elastic prosthesis, using the bionic prosthesis decreased metabolic cost by 8 per cent, increased trailing prosthetic leg mechanical work by 57 per cent and decreased the leading biological leg mechanical work by 10 per cent, on average, across walking velocities of 0.75–1.75 m s−1 and increased preferred walking velocity by 23 per cent. Using the bionic prosthesis resulted in metabolic energy costs, preferred walking velocities and biomechanical patterns that were not significantly different from people without an amputation. PMID:21752817

  14. Bionic ankle-foot prosthesis normalizes walking gait for persons with leg amputation.

    PubMed

    Herr, Hugh M; Grabowski, Alena M

    2012-02-01

    Over time, leg prostheses have improved in design, but have been incapable of actively adapting to different walking velocities in a manner comparable to a biological limb. People with a leg amputation using such commercially available passive-elastic prostheses require significantly more metabolic energy to walk at the same velocities, prefer to walk slower and have abnormal biomechanics compared with non-amputees. A bionic prosthesis has been developed that emulates the function of a biological ankle during level-ground walking, specifically providing the net positive work required for a range of walking velocities. We compared metabolic energy costs, preferred velocities and biomechanical patterns of seven people with a unilateral transtibial amputation using the bionic prosthesis and using their own passive-elastic prosthesis to those of seven non-amputees during level-ground walking. Compared with using a passive-elastic prosthesis, using the bionic prosthesis decreased metabolic cost by 8 per cent, increased trailing prosthetic leg mechanical work by 57 per cent and decreased the leading biological leg mechanical work by 10 per cent, on average, across walking velocities of 0.75-1.75 m s(-1) and increased preferred walking velocity by 23 per cent. Using the bionic prosthesis resulted in metabolic energy costs, preferred walking velocities and biomechanical patterns that were not significantly different from people without an amputation. PMID:21752817

  15. Experimental Study of Reciprocating Friction between Rape Stalk and Bionic Nonsmooth Surface Units.

    PubMed

    Ma, Zheng; Li, Yaoming; Xu, Lizhang

    2015-01-01

    Background. China is the largest producer of rape oilseed in the world; however, the mechanization level of rape harvest is relatively low, because rape materials easily adhere to the cleaning screens of combine harvesters, resulting in significant cleaning losses. Previous studies have shown that bionic nonsmooth surface cleaning screens restrain the adhesion of rape materials, but the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Objective. The reciprocating friction between rape stalk and bionic nonsmooth metal surface was examined. Methods. The short-time Fourier transform method was used to discriminate the stable phase of friction signals and the stick-lag distance was defined to analyze the stable reciprocating friction in a phase diagram. Results. The reciprocating friction between rape stalk and metal surface is a typical stick-slip friction, and the bionic nonsmooth metal surfaces with concave or convex units reduced friction force with increasing reciprocating frequency. The results also showed that the stick-lag distance of convex surface increased with reciprocating frequency, which indicated that convex surface reduces friction force more efficiently. Conclusions. We suggest that bionic nonsmooth surface cleaning screens, especially with convex units, restrain the adhesion of rape materials more efficiently compared to the smooth surface cleaning screens. PMID:27034611

  16. Experimental Study of Reciprocating Friction between Rape Stalk and Bionic Nonsmooth Surface Units

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Zheng; Li, Yaoming; Xu, Lizhang

    2015-01-01

    Background. China is the largest producer of rape oilseed in the world; however, the mechanization level of rape harvest is relatively low, because rape materials easily adhere to the cleaning screens of combine harvesters, resulting in significant cleaning losses. Previous studies have shown that bionic nonsmooth surface cleaning screens restrain the adhesion of rape materials, but the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Objective. The reciprocating friction between rape stalk and bionic nonsmooth metal surface was examined. Methods. The short-time Fourier transform method was used to discriminate the stable phase of friction signals and the stick-lag distance was defined to analyze the stable reciprocating friction in a phase diagram. Results. The reciprocating friction between rape stalk and metal surface is a typical stick-slip friction, and the bionic nonsmooth metal surfaces with concave or convex units reduced friction force with increasing reciprocating frequency. The results also showed that the stick-lag distance of convex surface increased with reciprocating frequency, which indicated that convex surface reduces friction force more efficiently. Conclusions. We suggest that bionic nonsmooth surface cleaning screens, especially with convex units, restrain the adhesion of rape materials more efficiently compared to the smooth surface cleaning screens. PMID:27034611

  17. Study on quantitative relation between characteristics of striature bionic coupling unit and wear resistance of gray cast iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Zuobo; Zhou, Hong; Zhang, Peng; Cong, Dalong; Meng, Chao; Wang, Chuanwei; Ren, Luquan

    2015-03-01

    In order to improve the wear resistance of gray cast iron guide rail, striature bionic coupling units of different characteristics were manufactured by laser surface remelting. Wear behavior of gray cast iron with striature bionic coupling units has been studied under dry sliding condition at room temperature using a homemade linear reciprocating wear testing machine. The wear resistance was evaluated by means of weight loss measurement and wear morphology. The results indicated that there is a relationship between weight loss and the area of striature bionic coupling units and α: Δm = Δm0 - 0.0212S × cos α - 0.0241S × sin α.

  18. A bionic approach to mathematical modeling the fold geometry of deployable reflector antennas on satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, C. M.; Liu, T. S.

    2014-10-01

    Inspired from biology, this study presents a method for designing the fold geometry of deployable reflectors. Since the space available inside rockets for transporting satellites with reflector antennas is typically cylindrical in shape, and its cross-sectional area is considerably smaller than the reflector antenna after deployment, the cross-sectional area of the folded reflector must be smaller than the available rocket interior space. Membrane reflectors in aerospace are a type of lightweight structure that can be packaged compactly. To design membrane reflectors from the perspective of deployment processes, bionic applications from morphological changes of plants are investigated. Creating biologically inspired reflectors, this paper deals with fold geometry of reflectors, which imitate flower buds. This study uses mathematical formulation to describe geometric profiles of flower buds. Based on the formulation, new designs for deployable membrane reflectors derived from bionics are proposed. Adjusting parameters in the formulation of these designs leads to decreases in reflector area before deployment.

  19. Dynamic model and performance analysis of landing buffer for bionic locust mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Dian-Sheng; Zhang, Zi-Qiang; Chen, Ke-Wei

    2016-06-01

    The landing buffer is an important problem in the research on bionic locust jumping robots, and the different modes of landing and buffering can affect the dynamic performance of the buffering process significantly. Based on an experimental observation, the different modes of landing and buffering are determined, which include the different numbers of landing legs and different motion modes of legs in the buffering process. Then a bionic locust mechanism is established, and the springs are used to replace the leg muscles to achieve a buffering effect. To reveal the dynamic performance in the buffering process of the bionic locust mechanism, a dynamic model is established with different modes of landing and buffering. In particular, to analyze the buffering process conveniently, an equivalent vibration dynamic model of the bionic locust mechanism is proposed. Given the support forces of the ground to the leg links, which can be obtained from the dynamic model, the spring forces of the legs and the impact resistance of each leg are the important parameters affecting buffering performance, and evaluation principles for buffering performance are proposed according to the aforementioned parameters. Based on the dynamic model and these evaluation principles, the buffering performances are analyzed and compared in different modes of landing and buffering on a horizontal plane and an inclined plane. The results show that the mechanism with the ends of the legs sliding can obtain a better dynamic performance. This study offers primary theories for buffering dynamics and an evaluation of landing buffer performance, and it establishes a theoretical basis for studies and engineering applications.

  20. Dynamic model and performance analysis of landing buffer for bionic locust mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Dian-Sheng; Zhang, Zi-Qiang; Chen, Ke-Wei

    2015-10-01

    The landing buffer is an important problem in the research on bionic locust jumping robots, and the different modes of landing and buffering can affect the dynamic performance of the buffering process significantly. Based on an experimental observation, the different modes of landing and buffering are determined, which include the different numbers of landing legs and different motion modes of legs in the buffering process. Then a bionic locust mechanism is established, and the springs are used to replace the leg muscles to achieve a buffering effect. To reveal the dynamic performance in the buffering process of the bionic locust mechanism, a dynamic model is established with different modes of landing and buffering. In particular, to analyze the buffering process conveniently, an equivalent vibration dynamic model of the bionic locust mechanism is proposed. Given the support forces of the ground to the leg links, which can be obtained from the dynamic model, the spring forces of the legs and the impact resistance of each leg are the important parameters affecting buffering performance, and evaluation principles for buffering performance are proposed according to the aforementioned parameters. Based on the dynamic model and these evaluation principles, the buffering performances are analyzed and compared in different modes of landing and buffering on a horizontal plane and an inclined plane. The results show that the mechanism with the ends of the legs sliding can obtain a better dynamic performance. This study offers primary theories for buffering dynamics and an evaluation of landing buffer performance, and it establishes a theoretical basis for studies and engineering applications.

  1. Design and Analysis of Bionic Cutting Blades Using Finite Element Method

    PubMed Central

    Li, Mo; Yang, Yuwang; Guo, Li; Chen, Donghui; Sun, Hongliang; Tong, Jin

    2015-01-01

    Praying mantis is one of the most efficient predators in insect world, which has a pair of powerful tools, two sharp and strong forelegs. Its femur and tibia are both armed with a double row of strong spines along their posterior edges which can firmly grasp the prey, when the femur and tibia fold on each other in capturing. These spines are so sharp that they can easily and quickly cut into the prey. The geometrical characteristic of the praying mantis's foreleg, especially its tibia, has important reference value for the design of agricultural soil-cutting tools. Learning from the profile and arrangement of these spines, cutting blades with tooth profile were designed in this work. Two different sizes of tooth structure and arrangement were utilized in the design on the cutting edge. A conventional smooth-edge blade was used to compare with the bionic serrate-edge blades. To compare the working efficiency of conventional blade and bionic blades, 3D finite element simulation analysis and experimental measurement were operated in present work. Both the simulation and experimental results indicated that the bionic serrate-edge blades showed better performance in cutting efficiency. PMID:27019583

  2. Design and Analysis of Bionic Cutting Blades Using Finite Element Method.

    PubMed

    Li, Mo; Yang, Yuwang; Guo, Li; Chen, Donghui; Sun, Hongliang; Tong, Jin

    2015-01-01

    Praying mantis is one of the most efficient predators in insect world, which has a pair of powerful tools, two sharp and strong forelegs. Its femur and tibia are both armed with a double row of strong spines along their posterior edges which can firmly grasp the prey, when the femur and tibia fold on each other in capturing. These spines are so sharp that they can easily and quickly cut into the prey. The geometrical characteristic of the praying mantis's foreleg, especially its tibia, has important reference value for the design of agricultural soil-cutting tools. Learning from the profile and arrangement of these spines, cutting blades with tooth profile were designed in this work. Two different sizes of tooth structure and arrangement were utilized in the design on the cutting edge. A conventional smooth-edge blade was used to compare with the bionic serrate-edge blades. To compare the working efficiency of conventional blade and bionic blades, 3D finite element simulation analysis and experimental measurement were operated in present work. Both the simulation and experimental results indicated that the bionic serrate-edge blades showed better performance in cutting efficiency. PMID:27019583

  3. Dynamic bending of bionic flexible body driven by pneumatic artificial muscles(PAMs) for spinning gait of quadruped robot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Jingtao; Yu, Huangying; Wang, Tianmiao

    2016-01-01

    The body of quadruped robot is generally developed with the rigid structure. The mobility of quadruped robot depends on the mechanical properties of the body mechanism. It is difficult for quadruped robot with rigid structure to achieve better mobility walking or running in the unstructured environment. A kind of bionic flexible body mechanism for quadruped robot is proposed, which is composed of one bionic spine and four pneumatic artificial muscles(PAMs). This kind of body imitates the four-legged creatures' kinematical structure and physical properties, which has the characteristic of changeable stiffness, lightweight, flexible and better bionics. The kinematics of body bending is derived, and the coordinated movement between the flexible body and legs is analyzed. The relationship between the body bending angle and the PAM length is obtained. The dynamics of the body bending is derived by the floating coordinate method and Lagrangian method, and the driving force of PAM is determined. The experiment of body bending is conducted, and the dynamic bending characteristic of bionic flexible body is evaluated. Experimental results show that the bending angle of the bionic flexible body can reach 18°. An innovation body mechanism for quadruped robot is proposed, which has the characteristic of flexibility and achieve bending by changing gas pressure of PAMs. The coordinated movement of the body and legs can achieve spinning gait in order to improve the mobility of quadruped robot.

  4. High-sensitive and high-efficient biochemical analysis method using a bionic electronic eye in combination with a smartphone-based colorimetric reader system.

    PubMed

    Kaiqi Su; Quchao Zou; Ning Hu; Ping Wang

    2015-08-01

    Bionic electronic eye (Bionic e-Eye), a developed smartphone-based colorimetric reader system, consists of smartphone or pad (iPhone 4s or iPad 3) as detection instrument and portable accessory as illumination provider, integrating with a wide-angle lens, a piece of lowest-power electro luminescent and a custom-made dark hood. A 96-well microtiter plate (MTP) was positioned on the electro luminescent and Bionic e-Eye captures the detection images by the back camera of smartphone. Being similar to human visual system, the hue, saturation and value (HSV, also called hex cone model) color model was employed in image processing algorithm of Bionic e-Eye. Optimized system dimension was determined by the system steadiness experiment of different photograph distances. Moreover, the commercially available BCA protein assay and CCK8 cell number assay were carried out to evaluate this Bionic e-Eye. Analytical performance of Bionic e-Eye had the better precision, higher sensitivity than microtiter plate reader (MTPR) and previous smartphone-based colorimetric reader for both two assays. Also, Bionic e-Eye using optical image detection had simultaneous and synchronous working mode, while MPTR using machine moving detection had asynchronous working mode in high throughput detection. Therefore, Bionic e-Eye will be an ideal point-of-care (POC) colorimetric detection device in the field of clinical application, industrial quality control, environment monitoring, and food assessment. PMID:26738081

  5. Bionics. 1970-October, 1982 (Citations from the NTIS Data Base)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-11-01

    Recent advances in visual information processing, electronic models of nerve cells, and biological sonar systems are discussed in these citations. Theory and applications are included, along with computerized simulation and signal processing. Electrophysiology and modeling of the central nervous system are also included. (This updated bibliography contains 143 citations, 8 of which are new entries to the previous edition.)

  6. Engineering derivatives from biological systems for advanced aerospace applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winfield, Daniel L.; Hering, Dean H.; Cole, David

    1991-01-01

    The present study consisted of a literature survey, a survey of researchers, and a workshop on bionics. These tasks produced an extensive annotated bibliography of bionics research (282 citations), a directory of bionics researchers, and a workshop report on specific bionics research topics applicable to space technology. These deliverables are included as Appendix A, Appendix B, and Section 5.0, respectively. To provide organization to this highly interdisciplinary field and to serve as a guide for interested researchers, we have also prepared a taxonomy or classification of the various subelements of natural engineering systems. Finally, we have synthesized the results of the various components of this study into a discussion of the most promising opportunities for accelerated research, seeking solutions which apply engineering principles from natural systems to advanced aerospace problems. A discussion of opportunities within the areas of materials, structures, sensors, information processing, robotics, autonomous systems, life support systems, and aeronautics is given. Following the conclusions are six discipline summaries that highlight the potential benefits of research in these areas for NASA's space technology programs.

  7. Effect of the microhardness difference between base metal and bionic coupling unit on wear resistance of gray cast iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Zuobo; Zhou, Hong; Chang, Fang; Zhang, Peng; Cong, Dalong; Meng, Chao; Wang, Chuanwei; Ren, Luquan

    2015-12-01

    In order to improve the wear resistance of gray cast iron guide rail, the samples with different microhardness difference between bionic coupling units and base metal were manufactured by laser surface remelting. Wear behavior of gray cast iron with bionic coupling units has been studied under dry sliding condition at room temperature using a homemade liner reciprocating wear testing machine. The wear resistance was evaluated by means of weight loss measurement and wear morphology. The results indicated that when the microhardness difference is 561 HV0.2, the wear resistance of sample is the best.

  8. Preparation of bionic nanostructures from butterfly wings and their low reflectivity of ultraviolet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Z. W.; Niu, S. C.; Li, W.; Ren, L. Q.

    2013-06-01

    This letter presents a bionic study on Parnassius butterfly wings with a prominent ultraviolet (UV)-selective antireflection effect. An accurate SiO2 inverse replica of the nanostructure with a unique optical function from butterfly wings is prepared in multiscale by combining a sol-gel process and subsequent selective etching. It is found that the original nanostructures of biotemplate are well inherited and the excellent UV-antireflection function could be modulated by tunable parameters such as the replica spacing, width, distribution, and shape as well as formation.

  9. Materials design considerations involved in the fabrication of implantable bionics by metallization of ceramic substrates.

    PubMed

    Patel, Sunil; Guenther, Thomas; Dodds, Christopher W D; Kolke, Sergej; Privat, Karen L; Matteucci, Paul B; Suaning, Gregg J

    2013-01-01

    The Pt metallization of co-fired Al2O3/SiO2 substrates containing Pt feedthroughs was shown to be a suitable means to construct implantable bionics. The use of forge welding to join an electrode to such a metallized feedthrough was demonstrated and subsequently evaluated through the use of metallography and electron microscopy. Metallurgical phenomena involved in forge welding relevant to the fabrication of all types of biomedical implants are discussed within this paper. The affect of thermal profiles used in brazing or welding to build implantable devices from metal components is analysed and the case for considered selection of alloys in implant design is put forward. PMID:24109798

  10. Characterising the CI and CI-like carbonaceous chondrites using thermogravimetric analysis and infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Ashley J.; Solomon, Jake R.; Schofield, Paul F.; Russell, Sara S.

    2015-12-01

    The CI and CI-like chondrites provide a record of aqueous alteration in the early solar system. However, the CI-like chondrites differ in having also experienced a late stage period of thermal metamorphism. In order to constrain the nature and extent of the aqueous and thermal alteration, we have investigated the bulk mineralogy and abundance of H2O in the CI and CI-like chondrites using thermogravimetric analysis and infrared spectroscopy.

  11. Full CI benchmark calculations on CH3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Taylor, Peter R.

    1987-01-01

    Full CI calculations have been performed on the CH3 radical. The full CI results are compared to those obtained using CASSCF/multireference CI and coupled-pair functional methods, both at the equilibrium CH distance and at geometries with the three CH bonds extended. In general, the performance of the approximate methods is similar to that observed in calculations on other molecules in which one or two bonds were stretched.

  12. Multiadaptive Bionic Wavelet Transform: Application to ECG Denoising and Baseline Wandering Reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayadi, Omid; Shamsollahi, Mohammad B.

    2007-12-01

    We present a new modified wavelet transform, called the multiadaptive bionic wavelet transform (MABWT), that can be applied to ECG signals in order to remove noise from them under a wide range of variations for noise. By using the definition of bionic wavelet transform and adaptively determining both the center frequency of each scale together with the[InlineEquation not available: see fulltext.]-function, the problem of desired signal decomposition is solved. Applying a new proposed thresholding rule works successfully in denoising the ECG. Moreover by using the multiadaptation scheme, lowpass noisy interference effects on the baseline of ECG will be removed as a direct task. The method was extensively clinically tested with real and simulated ECG signals which showed high performance of noise reduction, comparable to those of wavelet transform (WT). Quantitative evaluation of the proposed algorithm shows that the average SNR improvement of MABWT is 1.82 dB more than the WT-based results, for the best case. Also the procedure has largely proved advantageous over wavelet-based methods for baseline wandering cancellation, including both DC components and baseline drifts.

  13. Wear properties of compact graphite cast iron with bionic units processed by deep laser cladding WC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Hong; Zhang, Peng; Sun, Na; Wang, Cheng-tao; Lin, Peng-yu; Ren, Lu-quan

    2010-08-01

    By simulating the cuticles of some soil animals, the wear resistance of compact graphite cast iron (CGI) processed by laser remelting gets a conspicuous improvement. In order to get a further anti-wear enhancement of CGI, a new method of deep laser cladding was used to process bionic units. By preplacing grooves then filling with WC powders and laser cladding, the bionic units had a larger dimension in depth and higher microhardness. Fe powder with different proportions from 30% (wt.) to 60% (wt.) was added into WC before laser processing for a good incorporation with CGI substrate. The improved laser cladding units turned out to induce higher wear resistance in comparison with laser remelting ones. The depth of the layer reached up to 1 mm. The results of dry sliding wear tests indicated that the specimen processed by laser cladding has a remarkable improvement than the ones processed by laser remelting. It should be noted that the wear mass loss was essentially dependent on the increase in WC proportion.

  14. [Design of plant leaf bionic camouflage materials based on spectral analysis].

    PubMed

    Yang, Yu-Jie; Liu, Zhi-Ming; Hu, Bi-Ru; Wu, Wen-Jian

    2011-06-01

    The influence of structure parameters and contents of plant leaves on their reflectance spectra was analyzed using the PROSPECT model. The result showed that the bionic camouflage materials should be provided with coarse surface and spongy inner structure, the refractive index of main content must be close to that of plant leaves, the contents of materials should contain chlorophyll and water, and the content of C-H bond must be strictly controlled. Based on the analysis above, a novel camouflage material, which was constituted by coarse transparent waterproof surface, chlorophyll, water and spongy material, was designed. The result of verifiable experiment showed that the reflectance spectra of camouflage material exhibited the same characteristics as those of plant leaves. The similarity coefficient of reflectance spectrum of the camouflage material and camphor leaves was 0.988 1, and the characteristics of camouflage material did not change after sunlight treatment for three months. The bionic camouflage material, who exhibited a high spectral similarity with plant leaves and a good weather resistance, will be an available method for reconnaissance of hyperspectral imaging hopefully. PMID:21847955

  15. Mapping of bionic array electric field focusing in plasmid DNA-based gene electrotransfer

    PubMed Central

    Browne, C J; Pinyon, J L; Housley, D M; Crawford, E N; Lovell, N H; Klugmann, M; Housley, G D

    2016-01-01

    Molecular medicine through gene therapy is challenged to achieve targeted action. This is now possible utilizing bionic electrode arrays for focal delivery of naked (plasmid) DNA via gene electrotransfer. Here, we establish the properties of array-based electroporation affecting targeted gene delivery. An array with eight 300 μm platinum ring electrodes configured as a cochlear implant bionic interface was used to transduce HEK293 cell monolayers with a plasmid-DNA green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter gene construct. Electroporation parameters were pulse intensity, number, duration, separation and electrode configuration. The latter determined the shape of the electric fields, which were mapped using a voltage probe. Electrode array-based electroporation was found to require ~100 × lower applied voltages for cell transduction than conventional electroporation. This was found to be due to compression of the field lines orthogonal to the array. A circular area of GFP-positive cells was created when the electrodes were ganged together as four adjacent anodes and four cathodes, whereas alternating electrode polarity created a linear area of GFP-positive cells. The refinement of gene delivery parameters was validated in vivo in the guinea pig cochlea. These findings have significant clinical ramifications, where spatiotemporal control of gene expression can be predicted by manipulation of the electric field via current steering at a cellular level. PMID:26826485

  16. Numerical Analysis of Hydrodynamics for Bionic Oscillating Hydrofoil Based on Panel Method

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The kinematics model based on the Slender-Body theory is proposed from the bionic movement of real fish. The Panel method is applied to the hydrodynamic performance analysis innovatively, with the Gauss-Seidel method to solve the Navier-Stokes equations additionally, to evaluate the flexible deformation of fish in swimming accurately when satisfying the boundary conditions. A physical prototype to mimic the shape of tuna is developed with the revolutionized technology of rapid prototyping manufacturing. The hydrodynamic performance for rigid oscillating hydrofoil is analyzed with the proposed method, and it shows good coherence with the cases analyzed by the commercial software Fluent and the experimental data from robofish. Furthermore, the hydrodynamic performance of coupled hydrofoil, which consisted of flexible fish body and rigid caudal fin, is analyzed with the proposed method. It shows that the caudal fin has great influence on trailing vortex shedding and the phase angle is the key factor on hydrodynamic performance. It is verified that the shape of trailing vortex is similar to the image of the motion curve at the trailing edge as the assumption of linear vortex plane under the condition of small downwash velocity. The numerical analysis of hydrodynamics for bionic movement based on the Panel method has certain value to reveal the fish swimming mechanism. PMID:27578959

  17. Numerical Analysis of Hydrodynamics for Bionic Oscillating Hydrofoil Based on Panel Method.

    PubMed

    Xue, Gang; Liu, Yanjun; Zhang, Muqun; Ding, Hongpeng

    2016-01-01

    The kinematics model based on the Slender-Body theory is proposed from the bionic movement of real fish. The Panel method is applied to the hydrodynamic performance analysis innovatively, with the Gauss-Seidel method to solve the Navier-Stokes equations additionally, to evaluate the flexible deformation of fish in swimming accurately when satisfying the boundary conditions. A physical prototype to mimic the shape of tuna is developed with the revolutionized technology of rapid prototyping manufacturing. The hydrodynamic performance for rigid oscillating hydrofoil is analyzed with the proposed method, and it shows good coherence with the cases analyzed by the commercial software Fluent and the experimental data from robofish. Furthermore, the hydrodynamic performance of coupled hydrofoil, which consisted of flexible fish body and rigid caudal fin, is analyzed with the proposed method. It shows that the caudal fin has great influence on trailing vortex shedding and the phase angle is the key factor on hydrodynamic performance. It is verified that the shape of trailing vortex is similar to the image of the motion curve at the trailing edge as the assumption of linear vortex plane under the condition of small downwash velocity. The numerical analysis of hydrodynamics for bionic movement based on the Panel method has certain value to reveal the fish swimming mechanism. PMID:27578959

  18. High orientation of long chain branched poly (lactic acid) with enhanced blood compatibility and bionic structure.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhengqiu; Ye, Lin; Zhao, Xiaowen; Coates, Phil; Caton-Rose, Fin; Martyn, Michasel

    2016-05-01

    Highly oriented poly (lactic acid) (PLA) with bionic microgrooves was fabricated through solid hot drawing technology for further improving the mechanical properties and blood biocompatibility of PLA. In order to enhance the melt strength and thus obtain high orientation degree, long chain branched PLA was prepared at first through a two-step ring-opening reaction during processing. Linear viscoelasticity combined with branch-on-branch model was used to predict probable compositions and chain topologies of the products, and it was found that the molecular weight of PLA increased and topological structures with star like chain with three arms and tree-like chain with two generations formed during reactive processing, and consequently draw ratio as high as1200% can be achieved during the subsequent hot stretching. With the increase of draw ratio, the tensile strength and orientation degree of PLA increased dramatically. Long chain branching and orientation could significantly enhance the blood compatibility of PLA by prolonging clotting time and decreasing platelet activation. Microgrooves can be observed on the surface of the oriented PLA which were similar to the intimal layer of blood vessel, and such bionic structure resulted from the formation of the oriented shish kebab-like crystals along the draw direction. PMID:26743130

  19. Mapping of bionic array electric field focusing in plasmid DNA-based gene electrotransfer.

    PubMed

    Browne, C J; Pinyon, J L; Housley, D M; Crawford, E N; Lovell, N H; Klugmann, M; Housley, G D

    2016-04-01

    Molecular medicine through gene therapy is challenged to achieve targeted action. This is now possible utilizing bionic electrode arrays for focal delivery of naked (plasmid) DNA via gene electrotransfer. Here, we establish the properties of array-based electroporation affecting targeted gene delivery. An array with eight 300 μm platinum ring electrodes configured as a cochlear implant bionic interface was used to transduce HEK293 cell monolayers with a plasmid-DNA green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter gene construct. Electroporation parameters were pulse intensity, number, duration, separation and electrode configuration. The latter determined the shape of the electric fields, which were mapped using a voltage probe. Electrode array-based electroporation was found to require ~100 × lower applied voltages for cell transduction than conventional electroporation. This was found to be due to compression of the field lines orthogonal to the array. A circular area of GFP-positive cells was created when the electrodes were ganged together as four adjacent anodes and four cathodes, whereas alternating electrode polarity created a linear area of GFP-positive cells. The refinement of gene delivery parameters was validated in vivo in the guinea pig cochlea. These findings have significant clinical ramifications, where spatiotemporal control of gene expression can be predicted by manipulation of the electric field via current steering at a cellular level. PMID:26826485

  20. Building the Bionic Eye: An Emerging Reality and Opportunity

    PubMed Central

    Merabet, Lotfi B.

    2012-01-01

    Once the topic of folklore and science fiction, the notion of restoring vision to the blind is now approaching a tractable reality. Technological advances have inspired numerous multidisciplinary groups worldwide to develop visual neuroprosthetic devices that could potentially provide useful vision and improve the quality of life of profoundly blind individuals. While a variety of approaches and designs are being pursued, they all share a common principle of creating visual percepts through the stimulation of visual neural elements using appropriate patterns of electrical stimulation. Human clinical trials are now well underway and initial results have been met with a balance of excitement and cautious optimism. As remaining technical and surgical challenges continue to be solved and clinical trials move forward, we now enter a phase of development that requires careful consideration of a new set of issues. Establishing appropriate patient selection criteria, methods of evaluating long-term performance and effectiveness, and strategies to rehabilitate implanted patients will all need to be considered in order to achieve optimal outcomes and establish these devices as viable therapeutic options. PMID:21763515

  1. A parallel Full-CI algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansaloni, Roberto; Bendazzoli, Gian Luigi; Evangelisti, Stefano; Rossi, Elda

    2000-06-01

    A Full Configuration Interaction (Full-CI) algorithm is described. It is an integral-driven approach, with on-the-fly computation of the string-excitation lists that realize the application of the Hamiltonian to the Full-CI vector. The algorithm has been implemented on vector and parallel architectures, both of shared and distributed-memory type. This gave us the possibility of performing large benchmark calculations, with a Full-CI space dimension up to almost ten billion of symmetry-adapted Slater determinants.

  2. CI Controls for Energy and Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biondo, Samuel J.

    1996-01-01

    Computational intelligence (CI) is a rapidly evolving field that utilizes life imitating metaphors for guiding model building including, but not limited to neural networks, fuzzy logic, genetic algorithms, artificial life, and hybrid CI paradigms. Although the boundaries between artificial intelligence (AI) and CI are not distinct, their research communities are separate and distinct. CI researchers tend to focus on processing numerical data from sensors, while the AI community generally relies on symbolic computing to capture human knowledge. In both areas, there is a great deal of interest and activity in hybrid systems that can offset the limitations of individual methods, extend their capabilities, and create new capabilities. Examples of the benefits that can accrue from hybrid systems are contained.

  3. CiTO, the Citation Typing Ontology.

    PubMed

    Shotton, David

    2010-01-01

    CiTO, the Citation Typing Ontology, is an ontology for describing the nature of reference citations in scientific research articles and other scholarly works, both to other such publications and also to Web information resources, and for publishing these descriptions on the Semantic Web. Citation are described in terms of the factual and rhetorical relationships between citing publication and cited publication, the in-text and global citation frequencies of each cited work, and the nature of the cited work itself, including its publication and peer review status. This paper describes CiTO and illustrates its usefulness both for the annotation of bibliographic reference lists and for the visualization of citation networks. The latest version of CiTO, which this paper describes, is CiTO Version 1.6, published on 19 March 2010. CiTO is written in the Web Ontology Language OWL, uses the namespace http://purl.org/net/cito/, and is available from http://purl.org/net/cito/. This site uses content negotiation to deliver to the user an OWLDoc Web version of the ontology if accessed via a Web browser, or the OWL ontology itself if accessed from an ontology management tool such as Protégé 4 (http://protege.stanford.edu/). Collaborative work is currently under way to harmonize CiTO with other ontologies describing bibliographies and the rhetorical structure of scientific discourse. PMID:20626926

  4. The fabrication and property of hydrophilic and hydrophobic double functional bionic chitosan film.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaohong; Xi, Zhen; Liu, Zhongxin; Yang, Liang; Cao, Yang

    2011-11-01

    A new kind of hydrophobic bionic chitosan film was fabricated by simulating the surface structure of lotus leaf. The titanium oxide nanotube array was used as templates. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images show that one side of this films have nano-scale rough surface with spherical protrusions alike the surface of lotus leaf. The diameter of the protrusions is about 100 nm, which is equal to diameter of the titanium oxide nanotube. The water contact angle of chitosan films is up to 120 degrees and it is hydrophobic. The other side of the film is flat and the contact angle is 70 degrees. That indicated that the hydrophilism of natural materials is connected with the surface structures. The double functional chitosan films, one side is hydrophilic, the other is hydrophobic, can be made by an easy method. This method is non-toxic and clean. The double functional chitosan film will improve the application of chitosan films in medicine. PMID:22413283

  5. Super-hydrophobic surfaces from a simple coating method: a bionic nanoengineering approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yuyang; Chen, Xianqiong; Xin, J. H.

    2006-07-01

    Inspired by the self-cleaning behaviour of lotus leaves in nature, we developed a simple coating method that can facilitate the bionic creation of super-hydrophobic surfaces on various substrates, thus providing a feasible way of fabricating super-hydrophobic surfaces for civil and industrial applications. Micro-nanoscale binary structured composite particles of silica/fluoropolymer were prepared using an emulsion-mediated sol-gel process, and then these composite particles were applied to various substrates to mimic the surface microstructures of lotus leaves. Super-hydrophobic surfaces with a water contact angle larger than 150° are obtained, and these super-hydrophobic surfaces are expected to have potential applications for rusting-resistant, anti-fog and self-cleaning treatments.

  6. A bio-inspired test system for bionic above-knee prosthetic knees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dai-Hua; Xu, Lei; Fu, Qiang; Yuan, Gang

    2013-04-01

    Recently, prosthetic knees in the developing stage are usually tested by installing them on amputees' stumps directly or on above-knee prostheses (AKPs) test platforms. Although amputees can fully provide the actual motion state of the thigh, immature prosthetic knees may hurt amputees. For AKPs test platforms, it just can partly simulate the actual motion state of the thigh with limitation of the motion curve of the thigh, the merits or demerits of newly developed bionic above-knee prosthetic knees cannot be accessed thoroughly. Aiming at the defects of two testing methods, this paper presents a bio-inspired AKPs test system for bionic above-knee prosthetic knees. The proposed bio-inspired AKPs test system is composed of a AKPs test platform, a control system, and a bio-inspired system. The AKPs test platform generates the motion of the thigh simulation mechanism (TSM) via two screw pairs with servo motors. The bio-inspired system includes the tester and the bio-inspired sensor wore by the tester. The control system, which is inspired by the bio-inspired system, generates the control command signal to move the TSM of the AKPs test platform. The bio-inspired AKPs test system is developed and experimentally tested with a commercially available prosthetic knee. The research results show that the bio-inspired AKPs test system can not only ensure the safety of the testers, but also track all kinds of the actual motion state of the thigh of the testers in real time.

  7. Feedback analysis and design of RF power links for low-power bionic systems.

    PubMed

    Baker, M W; Sarpeshkar, R

    2007-03-01

    This paper presents a feedback-loop technique for analyzing and designing RF power links for transcutaneous bionic systems, i.e., between an external RF coil and an internal RF coil implanted inside the body. The feedback techniques shed geometric insight into link design and minimize algebraic manipulations. We demonstrate that when the loop transmission of the link's feedback loop is -1, the link is critically coupled, i.e., the magnitude of the voltage transfer function across the link is maximal. We also derive an optimal loading condition that maximizes the energy efficiency of the link and use it as a basis for our link design. We present an example of a bionic implant system designed for load power consumptions in the 1-10-mW range, a low-power regime not significantly explored in prior designs. Such low power levels add to the challenge of link efficiency, because the overhead associated with switching losses in power amplifiers at the link input and with rectifiers at the link output significantly degrade link efficiency. We describe a novel integrated Class-E power amplifier design that uses a simple control strategy to minimize such losses. At 10-mW load power consumption, we measure overall link efficiencies of 74% and 54% at 1- and 10-mm coil separations, respectively, in good agreement with our theoretical predictions of the link's efficiency. At 1-mW load power consumption, we measure link efficiencies of 67% and 51% at 1- and 10-mm coil separations, respectively, also in good accord with our theoretical predictions. In both cases, the link's rectified output dc voltage varied by less than 16% over link distances that ranged from 2 to 10 mm. PMID:23851518

  8. A new time-adaptive discrete bionic wavelet transform for enhancing speech from adverse noise environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palaniswamy, Sumithra; Duraisamy, Prakash; Alam, Mohammad Showkat; Yuan, Xiaohui

    2012-04-01

    Automatic speech processing systems are widely used in everyday life such as mobile communication, speech and speaker recognition, and for assisting the hearing impaired. In speech communication systems, the quality and intelligibility of speech is of utmost importance for ease and accuracy of information exchange. To obtain an intelligible speech signal and one that is more pleasant to listen, noise reduction is essential. In this paper a new Time Adaptive Discrete Bionic Wavelet Thresholding (TADBWT) scheme is proposed. The proposed technique uses Daubechies mother wavelet to achieve better enhancement of speech from additive non- stationary noises which occur in real life such as street noise and factory noise. Due to the integration of human auditory system model into the wavelet transform, bionic wavelet transform (BWT) has great potential for speech enhancement which may lead to a new path in speech processing. In the proposed technique, at first, discrete BWT is applied to noisy speech to derive TADBWT coefficients. Then the adaptive nature of the BWT is captured by introducing a time varying linear factor which updates the coefficients at each scale over time. This approach has shown better performance than the existing algorithms at lower input SNR due to modified soft level dependent thresholding on time adaptive coefficients. The objective and subjective test results confirmed the competency of the TADBWT technique. The effectiveness of the proposed technique is also evaluated for speaker recognition task under noisy environment. The recognition results show that the TADWT technique yields better performance when compared to alternate methods specifically at lower input SNR.

  9. A novel in situ device based on a bionic piezoelectric actuator to study tensile and fatigue properties of bulk materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shupeng; Zhang, Zhihui; Ren, Luquan; Zhao, Hongwei; Liang, Yunhong; Zhu, Bing

    2014-06-01

    In this work, a miniaturized device based on a bionic piezoelectric actuator was developed to investigate the static tensile and dynamic fatigue properties of bulk materials. The device mainly consists of a bionic stepping piezoelectric actuator based on wedge block clamping, a pair of grippers, and a set of precise signal test system. Tensile and fatigue examinations share a set of driving system and a set of signal test system. In situ tensile and fatigue examinations under scanning electron microscope or metallographic microscope could be carried out due to the miniaturized dimensions of the device. The structure and working principle of the device were discussed and the effects of output difference between two piezoelectric stacks on the device were theoretically analyzed. The tensile and fatigue examinations on ordinary copper were carried out using this device and its feasibility was verified through the comparison tests with a commercial tensile examination instrument.

  10. A novel in situ device based on a bionic piezoelectric actuator to study tensile and fatigue properties of bulk materials.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shupeng; Zhang, Zhihui; Ren, Luquan; Zhao, Hongwei; Liang, Yunhong; Zhu, Bing

    2014-06-01

    In this work, a miniaturized device based on a bionic piezoelectric actuator was developed to investigate the static tensile and dynamic fatigue properties of bulk materials. The device mainly consists of a bionic stepping piezoelectric actuator based on wedge block clamping, a pair of grippers, and a set of precise signal test system. Tensile and fatigue examinations share a set of driving system and a set of signal test system. In situ tensile and fatigue examinations under scanning electron microscope or metallographic microscope could be carried out due to the miniaturized dimensions of the device. The structure and working principle of the device were discussed and the effects of output difference between two piezoelectric stacks on the device were theoretically analyzed. The tensile and fatigue examinations on ordinary copper were carried out using this device and its feasibility was verified through the comparison tests with a commercial tensile examination instrument. PMID:24985848

  11. A novel in situ device based on a bionic piezoelectric actuator to study tensile and fatigue properties of bulk materials

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Shupeng; Zhang, Zhihui Ren, Luquan; Liang, Yunhong; Zhao, Hongwei; Zhu, Bing

    2014-06-15

    In this work, a miniaturized device based on a bionic piezoelectric actuator was developed to investigate the static tensile and dynamic fatigue properties of bulk materials. The device mainly consists of a bionic stepping piezoelectric actuator based on wedge block clamping, a pair of grippers, and a set of precise signal test system. Tensile and fatigue examinations share a set of driving system and a set of signal test system. In situ tensile and fatigue examinations under scanning electron microscope or metallographic microscope could be carried out due to the miniaturized dimensions of the device. The structure and working principle of the device were discussed and the effects of output difference between two piezoelectric stacks on the device were theoretically analyzed. The tensile and fatigue examinations on ordinary copper were carried out using this device and its feasibility was verified through the comparison tests with a commercial tensile examination instrument.

  12. FIRE_CI2_ETL_RADAR

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2015-11-25

    FIRE_CI2_ETL_RADAR Project Title:  FIRE II CIRRUS Discipline:  ... Platform:  Ground Station Instrument:  Radar Spatial Coverage:  (37.06, -95.34) Spatial ... Search Guide Documents:  ETL_RADAR Guide Readme Files:  Readme ETL_RADAR (PS) ...

  13. Effects of bionic units on the fatigue wear of gray cast iron surface with different shapes and distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhi-kai; Lu, Shu-chao; Song, Xi-bin; Zhang, Haifeng; Yang, Wan-shi; Zhou, Hong

    2015-03-01

    To improve the fatigue wear resistance of gray cast iron (GCI), GCI samples were modified by a laser to imitate the unique structure of some soil animals alternating between soft and hard phases; the hard phase resists the deformation and the soft phase releases the deformation. Using the self-controlled fatigue wear test method, the fatigue wear behaviors of treated and untreated samples were investigated and compared experimentally. The results show that the bionic non-smooth surface obtains a beneficial effect on improving the fatigue wear resistance of a sample, and the fatigue wear resistance of the bionic sample assembled with reticulate units (60°+0°), whose mass loss was reduced by 62%, was superior to the others. Meanwhile, a finite element (FE) was used to simulate the compression and the distributions of strain and stress on the non-smooth surface was inferred. From these results, we understood that the functions of the bionic unit such as reducing strain and stress, and also obstructing the closure and propagation of cracks were the main reasons for improving the fatigue wear property of GCI.

  14. Modal mineralogy of CI and CI-like chondrites by X-ray diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, A. J.; Schofield, P. F.; Howard, K. T.; Russell, S. S.

    2015-09-01

    The CI chondrites are some of the most hydrated meteorites available to study, making them ideal samples with which to investigate aqueous processes in the early Solar System. Here, we have used position-sensitive-detector X-ray diffraction (PSD-XRD) to quantify the abundance of minerals in bulk samples of the CI chondrite falls Alais, Orgueil and Ivuna, and the Antarctic CI-like chondrites Y-82162 and Y-980115. We find that Alais, Orgueil and Ivuna are dominated by a mixed serpentine/saponite phyllosilicate (81-84 vol%), plus minor magnetite (6-10%), sulphides (4-7%) and carbonates (<3%). This reflects an extended period of aqueous alteration and the near-complete transformation of anhydrous phases into a secondary mineral assemblage. The similarity in total abundance of phyllosilicate suggests that the CI chondrites all experienced the same degree of aqueous alteration on the parent body. In contrast, Y-82162 contains a highly disordered serpentine/saponite phyllosilicate (68 vol%), sulphide (19%), olivine (11%) and magnetite (2%). This mineralogy is distinct from that of the CI chondrites, attesting to both a different starting mineralogy and alteration history. The structure and relatively low abundance of the phyllosilicate, and the high abundance of olivine, are consistent with previous observations that Y-82162 represents CI-like material that following aqueous alteration suffered thermal metamorphism at temperatures >500 °C. Similarly, Y-980115 contains disordered serpentine/saponite (71 vol%), sulphide (19%), olivine (8%) and magnetite (2%), confirming that it too is a thermally metamorphosed CI-like chondrite. We suggest that the CI-like chondrites are derived from a different parent body than the CI chondrites, which underwent short-lived thermal metamorphism due to impacts and/or solar radiation.

  15. Effects of laser parameters on the geometrical characteristics of peg-shaped bionic coupling unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Baoyu; Zhang, Zhihui; Liang, Yunhong; Yan, Qiongqiong; Ren, Luquan

    2014-12-01

    Peg-shaped bionic coupling unit (PBCU) processed by pulse laser is effective in anti-adhesion, anti-drag, anti-wear and anti-fatigue application. To obtain desired structural and morphological characteristics of the PBCU for industrial manufacturing, selection of proper processing parameters gradually becomes a growing important problem. Traditionally, the procedure of parameter selecting is often cost-plus and time-consuming. In this work, a statistical analysis of fabricating PBCU on the surface of medium carbon steel was conducted. The laser processing parameters utilized in the experiment and analysis are peak power 4-8 kW, pulse duration 6-16 ms and defocusing amount 6-10 mm. A series of mathematical models regarding the relationship between geometrical characteristics of PBCU and laser processing parameters were developed and checked. The results indicate that the developed models can be adequately used to control the structural and morphological characteristics of PBCU within the scope of analysis. Based on the models, the formation mechanism of the structural and morphological characteristics under different laser parameters were analyzed and discussed.

  16. Research on the image fusion and target extraction based on bionic compound eye system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shaowei; Hao, Qun; Song, Yong; Wang, Zihan; Zhang, Kaiyu; Zhang, Shiyu

    2015-08-01

    People attach more and more importance to bionic compound eye due to its advantages such as small volume, large field of view and sensitivity to high-speed moving objects. Small field of view and large volume are the disadvantages of traditional image sensor and in order to avoid these defects, this paper intends to build a set of compound eye system based on insect compound eye structure and visual processing mechanism. In the center of this system is the primary sensor which has high resolution ratio. The primary sensor is surrounded by the other six sensors which have low resolution ratio. Based on this system, this paper will study the target image fusion and extraction method by using plane compound eye structure. This paper designs a control module which can combine the distinguishing features of high resolution image with local features of low resolution image so as to conduct target detection, recognition and location. Compared with traditional ways, the way of high resolution in the center and low resolution around makes this system own the advantages of high resolution and large field of view and enables the system to detect the object quickly and recognize the object accurately.

  17. Butterfly scales as bionic templates for complex ordered nanophotonic materials: A pathway to biomimetic plasmonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakšić, Zoran; Pantelić, Dejan; Sarajlić, Milija; Savić-Šević, Svetlana; Matović, Jovan; Jelenković, Branislav; Vasiljević-Radović, Dana; Ćurčić, Srećko; Vuković, Slobodan; Pavlović, Vladimir; Buha, Jelena; Lačković, Vesna; Labudović-Borović, Milica; Ćurčić, Božidar

    2013-08-01

    In this paper we propose a possible use of butterfly scales as templates for ordered 2D or 3D nanophotonic materials, with complexity not easily reproducible by conventional micro/nanofabrication methods. Functionalization through laminar nanocompositing is utilized to impart novel properties to the biological scaffold. An extremely wide variability of butterfly scale forms, shapes, sizes and fine structures is observed in nature, many of them already possessing peculiar optical properties. Their nanophotonic functionalization ensures a large choice of forms and functions, including enhanced light localization, light and plasmon waveguiding and general metamaterial behavior, to mention a few. We show that one is able to achieve a combination of plasmonics and bionics, resulting in functionalities seldom if ever met in nature. As an illustration we have analyzed the photonic properties of the nanostructured scales on the wings of Purple Emperor butterflies Apatura ilia, Apatura iris and Sasakia charonda. Their intricate nanometer-sized structures produce remarkable ultraviolet-blue iridescence, spectrally and directionally narrow. We present our analysis of their plasmonic/nanophotonic functionalization including preliminary calculations and initial experimental results. As a simple example, we used radiofrequent sputtering to produce nanoaperture-based plasmonic structures at a fraction of the cost and necessary engineering efforts compared to the conventional top-down methods. We conclude that the described pathway to biomimetic plasmonics offers potentials for significant expansion of the nanophotonic and nanoplasmonic material toolbox.

  18. Investigation on 3D t wake flow structures of swimming bionic fish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, G.-X.; Tan, G.-K.; Lai, G.-J.

    2012-10-01

    A bionic experimental platform was designed for the purpose of investigating time accurate three-dimensional flow field, using digital particle image velocimetry (DSPIV). The wake behind the flapping trail of a robotic fish model was studied at high spatial resolution. The study was performed in a water channel. A robot fish model was designed and built. The model was fixed onto a rigid support framework using a cable-supporting method, with twelve stretched wires. The entire tail of the model can perform prescribed motions in two degrees of freedom, mainly in carangiform mode, by driving its afterbody and lunate caudal fin respectively. The DSPIV system was set up to operate in a translational manner, measuring velocity field in a series of parallel slices. Phase locked measurements were repeated for a number of runs, allowing reconstruction of phase average flow field. Vortex structures with phase history of the wake were obtained. The study reveals some new and complex three-dimensional flow structures in the wake of the fish, including "reverse hairpin vortex" and "reverse Karman S-H vortex rings", allowing insight into physics of this complex flow.

  19. Bionic optical imaging system with aspheric solid-liquid mixed variable-focus lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Jia-Wei; Wang, Xuan-Yin; Liang, Dan

    2016-02-01

    A bionic optical imaging system with an aspheric solid-liquid mixed variable-focus lens was designed and fabricated. The entire system mainly consisted of a doublet lens, a solid-liquid mixed variable-focus lens, a connecting part, and a CCD imaging device. To mimic the structure of the crystalline lens, the solid-liquid mixed variable-focus lens consisted of a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) lens, a polymethyl methacrylate lens, and the liquid of ethyl silicone oil. By pumping liquid in or out of the cavity using a microinjector, the curvatures of the front and rear surfaces of the PDMS lens were varied, resulting in a change of focal length. The overall structure of the system was presented, as well as a detailed description of the solid-liquid mixed variable-focus lens, material, and fabrication process. Under different injection volumes, the deformation of the PDMS lens was measured and simulated, pictures were captured, and the optical performance was analyzed in simulations and experiments. The focal length of the system ranged from 25.05 to 14.61 mm, and the variation of the diopter was 28.5D, which was larger than that of the human eye.

  20. Unifying inflation with late-time acceleration by a BIonic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sepehri, Alireza; Rahaman, Farook; Setare, Mohammad Reza; Pradhan, Anirudh; Capozziello, Salvatore; Sardar, Iftikar Hossain

    2015-07-01

    We propose a cosmological model that unifies inflation, deceleration and acceleration phases of expansion history by a BIonic system. At the beginning, there are k black fundamental strings that transited to the BIon configuration at a given corresponding point. Here, two coupled universes, brane and antibrane, are created interacting each other through a wormhole and inflate. With decreasing temperature, the energy of this wormhole flows into the universe branes and leads to inflation. After a short time, the wormhole evaporates, the inflation ends and a deceleration epoch starts. By approaching the brane and antibrane universes together, a tachyon is born, grows and causes the creation of a new wormhole. At this time, the brane and antibrane universes result connected again and the late-time acceleration era of the universe begins. We compare our model with previous unified phantom models and observational data obtaining some cosmological parameters like temperature in terms of time. We also find that deceleration parameter is negative during inflation and late-time acceleration epochs, while it is positive during the deceleration era. This means that the model is consistent, in principle, with cosmological observations.

  1. Evolutionary history of CI and CM chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerridge, J. F.; Macdougall, J. D.

    1984-01-01

    It is now clear that several different processes have acted upon various components of carbonaceous chondrites, and that at least some of those processes occurred very early in solar system history. Because these meteorites are breccias, petrographic relationships are seldom informative about the order in which those processes took place. Nonetheless, information about such an evolutionary sequence would be of potential value in defining the nature of the source region for these meteorites. Implantation of solar wind derived noble gases into CI magnetite apparently postdated the period of aqueous activity believed to be responsible for magnetite production. Carbonate crystallization roughly coincided with one or more episodes of impact driven brecciation.

  2. Microfossils in CI and CO Carbonaceous Meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoover, Richard B.; Rozanov, Alexei Y.; Jerman, Gregory; Costen, James

    2003-01-01

    Secondary and backscatter electron images and x-ray spectral data of selected CI (Alais, Orgueil, and Tagish Lake) and CO3 (Rainbow and Dar a1 Gani 749) carbonaceous meteorites have recently been obtained using Field Emission and Environmental Scanning Electron Microscopes These studies indicate the presence of a large assemblage of biomarkers and complex lithified and carbonized remains of bodies that we interpret as indigenous microfossils. We discuss the meteorites, provide images of many of the biogenic forms found embedded in the freshly fractured meteorite surfaces.

  3. Design and development of a ferroelectric micro photo detector for the bionic eye

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Yang

    Driven by no effective therapy for Retinitis Pigmentosa and Age Related Macular Degeneration, artificial vision through the development of an artificial retina that can be implanted into the human eye, is being addressed by the Bionic Eye. This dissertation focuses on the study of a photoferroelectric micro photo detector as an implantable retinal prosthesis for vision restoration in patients with above disorders. This implant uses an electrical signal to trigger the appropriate ocular cells of the vision system without resorting to wiring or electrode implantation. The research work includes fabrication of photoferroelectric thin film micro detectors, characterization of these photoferroelectric micro devices as photovoltaic cells, and Finite Element Method (FEM) modeling of the photoferroelectrics and their device-neuron interface. A ferroelectric micro detector exhibiting the photovoltaic effect (PVE) directly adds electrical potential to the neuron membrane outer wall at the focal adhesion regions. The electrical potential then generates a retinal cell membrane potential deflection through a newly developed Direct-Electric-Field-Coupling (DEFC) model. This model is quite different from the traditional electric current model because instead of current directly working on the cell membrane, the PVE current is used to generate a localized high electric potential in the focal adhesion region by working together with the anisotropic high internal impedance of ferroelectric thin films. General electrodes and silicon photodetectors do not have such anisotropy and high impedance, and thus they cannot generate DEFC. This mechanism investigation is very valuable, because it clearly shows that our artificial retina works in a way that is totally different from the traditional current stimulation methods.

  4. UV eclipse observations of CI Cyg

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michalitsianos, A. G.; Kafatos, M.; Stencel, R. E.; Boiarchuk, A. A.

    1982-01-01

    Low spectral resolution observations were obtained with the IUE during the eclipse phase. Additional data obtained by other IUE groups have been included in the eclipse observations, making it possible to examine the UV spectral properties of CI Cyg over nearly an entire orbit which spans early 1979 through mid 1981. Data obtained over this period suggest an overall decline in UV emission, consistent with the decline of optical emission following the outburst of 1975. The short-wavelength spectrum 1200-2000 A is characterized by numerous intense high-excitation emission lines which become more prominent out of eclipse. The LWR wavelength range 2000-3200 A exhibits a few more additional lines of O III, Mg II, and He II which are superimposed on continuum that rises gradually with increasing wavelength. The observations are consistent with a binary star model which involves mass transfer from the extended cool envelope of the primary to the compact secondary.

  5. CI Cygni since the 1980 eclipse

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stencel, R. E.; Michalitsianos, A. G.; Kafatos, M.

    1982-01-01

    During the 1980 eclipse of the 855 day period symbiotic binary CI Cyg, a data set showing high excitation resonance lines which were largely uneclipsed but brightening on an orbital timescale, and intercombination lines exhibiting pronounced but nontotal eclipses and which were fading on an orbital timescale were obtained. A model invoking a low density dissipating nebula surrounding the hot companion to explain the intercombination lines, and a shock between stellar winds to interpret the resonance lines, is described. Subsequent synoptic observations revealed continuing changes in the UV emission line fluxes consistent with those described above, except for the brightening of Mg II and the emergence of strong, not previously seen Mg V emission. Post-outburst and phase dependent changes must be included in any interpretation of this system as the archetypal symbiotic binary. Observations to be made during the 1982 October eclipse are summarized.

  6. Effect of thermal fatigue on the wear resistance of graphite cast iron with bionic units processed by laser cladding WC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Zhengjun; Zhou, Hong; Zhang, Peng; Wang, Chuanwei; Meng, Chao; Cong, Dalong

    2013-04-01

    Thermal fatigue and wear exist simultaneously during the service life of brake discs. Previous researchers only studied thermal fatigue resistance or abrasion resistance of compact graphite cast iron (CGI), rather than combining them together. In this paper, wear resistance after thermal fatigue of CGI was investigated basing on the principle of bionics, which was close to actual service condition of the brake discs. In the meanwhile, the effect of thermal fatigue on wear resistance was also discussed. Non-smooth bionic units were fabricated by laser cladding WC powder with different proportions (50 wt.%, 60 wt.%, 70 wt.%). Microstructure and microhardness of the units were investigated, and wear mass losses of the samples were also compared. The results indicate that thermal fatigue has a negative effect on the wear resistance. After the same thermal fatigue cycles times, the wear resistance of laser cladding WC samples is superior to that of laser remelting ones and their wear resistance enhances with the increase of WC content.

  7. Wear properties of H13 with micron scale and nano scale grains bionic units processed by laser remelting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Peng; Zhou, Hong; Wang, Cheng-tao; Liu, Yan; Ren, Lu-quan

    2013-12-01

    By simulating the cuticles of some soil animals, a combination of soft part (untreated substrate) and hard part (laser remelting area) structure was designed on metal surface to get an improved performance. Different specimens were prepared which contained units with micro and nano scale grains. The microstructures were observed by environmental field emission scanning electron microscopy. X-ray diffraction was used to identify the phases. The results of these tests indicate that due to the rapid solidification condition in the water, nano scale grains have a high microhardness between 1300 and 1000 HV. Retained austenite was found in it. Some of them transform to martensite in block on ring wear test. Specimens with bionic unit have a better wear resistance. Especially, the units with nano grains bring a further enhancement. The alternate soft and hard in macroscopic (substrate and laser remelting area) and microscopic (austenite and martensite) structure played a key role in improving the H13 wear resistance.

  8. "Bionic Man" Showcases Medical Research | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... For more info, videos, and other resources on biotechnology and medical imaging, visit www.nibib.nih.gov " ... web tool showcasing the latest research advances in biotechnology. It features fourteen technologies being developed by NIBIB- ...

  9. Characteristics and determinants of music appreciation in adult CI users.

    PubMed

    Philips, Birgit; Vinck, Bart; De Vel, Eddy; Maes, Leen; D'Haenens, Wendy; Keppler, Hannah; Dhooge, Ingeborg

    2012-03-01

    The main objective of this study was to assess the associations between self-reported listening habits and perception of music and speech perception outcomes in quiet and noise for both unilateral cochlear implant (CI) users and bimodal (CI in one ear, hearing aid in contra-lateral ear) users. Information concerning music appreciation was gathered by means of a newly developed questionnaire. Moreover, audiological data (pure-tone audiometry, speech tests in noise and quiet) were gathered and the relationship between speech perception and music appreciation is studied. Bimodal users enjoy listening to music more in comparison with unilateral CI users. Also, music training within rehabilitation is still uncommon, while CI recipients believe that music training might be helpful to maximize their potential with current CI technology. Music training should not be exclusively reserved for the good speech performers. Therefore, a music training program (MTP) that consists of different difficulty levels should be developed. Hopefully, early implementation of MTP in rehabilitation programs can enable adult CI users to enjoy and appreciate music and to maximize their potential with commercially available technology. Furthermore, because bimodal users consider the bimodal stimulation to be the most enjoyable way to listen to music, CI users with residual hearing in the contra-lateral ear should be encouraged to continue wearing their hearing aid in that ear. PMID:21847672

  10. QUALITY ASSURANCE GUIDELINES FOR IERL-CI PROJECT OFFICERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The document provides guidelines to Industrial Environmental Research Laboratory-Cincinnati (IERL-Ci) Project Officers for (1) incorporating quality assurance (QA) criteria in contract procurement and grant awards; (2) monitoring quality assurance of extramural projects; and (3) ...

  11. Influence of Orientations of Bionic Unit Fabricated by Laser Remelting on Fatigue Wear Resistance of Gray Cast Iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhi-Kai; Zhou, Ti; Zhang, Hai-feng; Yang, Wan-shi; Zhou, Hong

    2015-06-01

    Fatigue wear resistance improvements were researched by studying experimental samples with gray cast iron fabricated with bionic units in different orientations. Experimental samples were modified by laser surface remelting, including parallel, vertical, and gradient units to the wear direction. The remelting pool was then studied to determine the micro-hardness, microstructure, alteration of phase, and etc. Lab-control fatigue wear test method was applied with the treated and untreated samples tested under the laboratorial conditions. Wear resistance result was considered as the rolling contact fatigue (RCF) resistance and mechanisms of the modified samples were experimentally investigated and discussed. Results suggested that all treated samples demonstrated the beneficial effect on the RCF improvement due to lack of graphite and reinforcement of treated region. Results also indicated the sample with fastigiated units was more effective than that with vertical units or parallel units to the wear direction. Influence of the sample unit's angle which intensely depended on the conditions of actual application, however, was not identified.

  12. ACA [CI] observations of the starburst galaxy NGC 253

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krips, M.; Martín, S.; Sakamoto, K.; Aalto, S.; Bisbas, T. G.; Bolatto, A. D.; Downes, D.; Eckart, A.; Feruglio, Ch.; García-Burillo, S.; Geach, J.; Greve, T. R.; König, S.; Matsushita, S.; Neri, R.; Offner, S.; Peck, A. B.; Viti, S.; Wagg, J.

    2016-07-01

    Context. Carbon monoxide (CO) is widely used as a tracer of the molecular gas in almost all types of environments. However, several shortcomings of CO complicate usaging it as H2 tracer, such as its optical depth effects, the dependence of its abundance on metallicity, or its susceptibility to dissociation in highly irradiated regions. Neutral carbon emission has been proposed to overcome some of these shortcomings and hence to help revealing the limits of CO as a measure of the molecular gas. Aims: We aim to study the general characteristics of the spatially and spectrally resolved carbon line emission in a variety of extragalactic sources and evaluate its potential as complementary H2 tracer to CO. Methods: We used the Atacama Compact Array to map the [CI](3P1-3P0) line emission in the nearby starburst galaxy NGC 253 at unprecedented angular resolution (~3''). This is the first well-resolved interferometric [CI] map of an extragalactic source. Results: We have detected the [CI] line emission at high significance levels along the central disk of NGC 253 and its edges where expanding shells have previously been found in CO. Globally, the distribution of the [CI] line emission strongly resembles that of CO, confirming the results of previous Galactic surveys that [CI] traces the same molecular gas as CO. However, we also identify a significant increase of [CI] line emission with respect to CO in (some of) the outflow or shocked regions of NGC 253, namely the bipolar outflow emerging from the nucleus. A first-order estimate of the [CI] column densities indicates abundances of [CI] that are very similar to the abundance of CO in NGC 253. Interestingly, we find that the [CI] line is marginally optically thick within the disk. Conclusions: The enhancement of the [CI]/CO line ratios (~0.4-0.6) with respect to Galactic values (≤0.1), especially in the shocked regions of NGC 253, clearly indicates that mechanical perturbation such as shocks and the strong radiation

  13. Implications of CI therapy for visual deficit training.

    PubMed

    Taub, Edward; Mark, Victor W; Uswatte, Gitendra

    2014-01-01

    We address here the question of whether the techniques of Constraint Induced (CI) therapy, a family of treatments that has been employed in the rehabilitation of movement and language after brain damage might apply to the rehabilitation of such visual deficits as unilateral spatial neglect and visual field deficits. CI therapy has been used successfully for the upper and lower extremities after chronic stroke, cerebral palsy (CP), multiple sclerosis (MS), other central nervous system (CNS) degenerative conditions, resection of motor areas of the brain, focal hand dystonia, and aphasia. Treatments making use of similar methods have proven efficacious for amblyopia. The CI therapy approach consists of four major components: intensive training, training by shaping, a "transfer package" to facilitate the transfer of gains from the treatment setting to everyday activities, and strong discouragement of compensatory strategies. CI therapy is said to be effective because it overcomes learned nonuse, a learned inhibition of movement that follows injury to the CNS. In addition, CI therapy produces substantial increases in the gray matter of motor areas on both sides of the brain. We propose here that these mechanisms are examples of more general processes: learned nonuse being considered parallel to sensory nonuse following damage to sensory areas of the brain, with both having in common diminished neural connections (DNCs) in the nervous system as an underlying mechanism. CI therapy would achieve its therapeutic effect by strengthening the DNCs. Use-dependent cortical reorganization is considered to be an example of the more general neuroplastic mechanism of brain structure repurposing. If the mechanisms involved in these broader categories are involved in each of the deficits being considered, then it may be the principles underlying efficacious treatment in each case may be similar. The lessons learned during CI therapy research might then prove useful for the treatment

  14. Implications of CI therapy for visual deficit training

    PubMed Central

    Taub, Edward; Mark, Victor W.; Uswatte, Gitendra

    2014-01-01

    We address here the question of whether the techniques of Constraint Induced (CI) therapy, a family of treatments that has been employed in the rehabilitation of movement and language after brain damage might apply to the rehabilitation of such visual deficits as unilateral spatial neglect and visual field deficits. CI therapy has been used successfully for the upper and lower extremities after chronic stroke, cerebral palsy (CP), multiple sclerosis (MS), other central nervous system (CNS) degenerative conditions, resection of motor areas of the brain, focal hand dystonia, and aphasia. Treatments making use of similar methods have proven efficacious for amblyopia. The CI therapy approach consists of four major components: intensive training, training by shaping, a “transfer package” to facilitate the transfer of gains from the treatment setting to everyday activities, and strong discouragement of compensatory strategies. CI therapy is said to be effective because it overcomes learned nonuse, a learned inhibition of movement that follows injury to the CNS. In addition, CI therapy produces substantial increases in the gray matter of motor areas on both sides of the brain. We propose here that these mechanisms are examples of more general processes: learned nonuse being considered parallel to sensory nonuse following damage to sensory areas of the brain, with both having in common diminished neural connections (DNCs) in the nervous system as an underlying mechanism. CI therapy would achieve its therapeutic effect by strengthening the DNCs. Use-dependent cortical reorganization is considered to be an example of the more general neuroplastic mechanism of brain structure repurposing. If the mechanisms involved in these broader categories are involved in each of the deficits being considered, then it may be the principles underlying efficacious treatment in each case may be similar. The lessons learned during CI therapy research might then prove useful for the

  15. [INDO/CI studies on the electronic spectra of tetraphenylporphyrin and its derivatives].

    PubMed

    Li, L; Zheng, S; Meng, L; Chen, R

    1999-06-01

    MNDO calculations and group theory were carried out on tetraphenylporphyrine (TPP) to obtain its optimum molecular geometry. We employed an INDO/CI method to study the electronic structures of tetraphenylporphyrine and its derivatives and identify their main electonic absorption bands. Five-orbital model was advanced to explain the typical characteristics of electronic spectra of H2TPP and its derivatives. The calculated wavelengths were in good agreement with the experimental values. The effects of the substitution of variant group were discussed and some helpful conclusions were drawn. PMID:15819039

  16. Broadband beamforming compensation algorithm in CI front-end acquisition

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background To increase the signal to noise ratio (SNR) and to suppress directional noise in front-end signal acquisition, microphone array technologies are being applied in the cochlear implant (CI). Due to size constraints, the dual microphone-based system is most suitable for actual application. However, direct application of the array technology will result in the low frequency roll-off problem, which can noticeably distort the desired signal. Methods In this paper, we theoretically analyze the roll-off characteristic on the basis of CI parameters and present a new low-complexity compensation algorithm. We obtain the linearized frequency response of the two-microphone array from modeling and analysis for further algorithm realization. Realization and results Linear method was used to approximate the theoretical response with adjustable delay and weight parameters. A CI dual-channel hardware platform is constructed for experimental research. Experimental results show that our algorithm performs well in compensation and realization. Discussions We discuss the effect from environment noise. Actual daily noise with more low-frequency energy will weaken the algorithm performance. A balance between low-frequency distortion and corresponding low-frequency noise need to be considered. Conclusions Our novel compensation algorithm uses linear function to obtain the desired system response, which is a low computational-complexity method for CI real-time processing. Algorithm performance is tested in CI CIS modulation and the influence of experimental distance and environmental noise were further analyzed to evaluate algorithm constraint. PMID:23442782

  17. An interplanetary dust particle with links to CI chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, Lindsay P.; Thomas, Kathie L.; Mckay, David S.

    1992-01-01

    W7013F5 is a chondritic, hydrated interplanetary dust particle whose composition and mineralogy is nearly identical to that found in the CI chondrites. Transmission electron microscope observations show that the phyllosilicates in W7013F5 consist largely of a coherent undergrowth of Mg-Fe serpentine and Fe-bearing saponite on the unitcell scale. This distinctive intergrowth of phyllosilicates has only been observed previously in the CI chondrites. Other secondary minerals in W7013F5 include Mg-Fe carbonates, magnetite, and pentlandite. The mineral assemblage in W7013F5 is generally not as oxidized as that in the CI chondrites. The presence of kamacite in W7013F5 indicates that the particle is extraterrestrial, and a thin amorphous rim surrounding the particle provides evidence that it is not a piece of a meteorite that fragmented during transit through the atmosphere. The apparent lack of hydrated IDPs with CI mineralogy and chemistry may indicate that CI-type dust-producing asteroids are uncommon in the asteroid belt.

  18. Using the Web for Competitive Intelligence (CI) Gathering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rocker, JoAnne; Roncaglia, George

    2002-01-01

    Businesses use the Internet as a way to communicate company information as a way of engaging their customers. As the use of the Web for business transactions and advertising grows, so too, does the amount of useful information for practitioners of competitive intelligence (CI). CI is the legal and ethical practice of information gathering about competitors and the marketplace. Information sources like company webpages, online newspapers and news organizations, electronic journal articles and reports, and Internet search engines allow CI practitioners analyze company strengths and weaknesses for their customers. More company and marketplace information than ever is available on the Internet and a lot of it is free. Companies should view the Web not only as a business tool but also as a source of competitive intelligence. In a highly competitive marketplace can any organization afford to ignore information about the other players and customers in that same marketplace?

  19. Advanced interdisciplinary technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, John L.

    1990-01-01

    The following topics are presented in view graph form: (1) breakthrough trust (space research and technology assessment); (2) bionics (technology derivatives from biological systems); (3) biodynamics (modeling of human biomechanical performance based on anatomical data); and (4) tethered atmospheric research probes.

  20. An insect-inspired bionic sensor for tactile localization and material classification with state-dependent modulation.

    PubMed

    Patanè, Luca; Hellbach, Sven; Krause, André F; Arena, Paolo; Dürr, Volker

    2012-01-01

    INSECTS CARRY A PAIR OF ANTENNAE ON THEIR HEAD: multimodal sensory organs that serve a wide range of sensory-guided behaviors. During locomotion, antennae are involved in near-range orientation, for example in detecting, localizing, probing, and negotiating obstacles. Here we present a bionic, active tactile sensing system inspired by insect antennae. It comprises an actuated elastic rod equipped with a terminal acceleration sensor. The measurement principle is based on the analysis of damped harmonic oscillations registered upon contact with an object. The dominant frequency of the oscillation is extracted to determine the distance of the contact point along the probe and basal angular encoders allow tactile localization in a polar coordinate system. Finally, the damping behavior of the registered signal is exploited to determine the most likely material. The tactile sensor is tested in four approaches with increasing neural plausibility: first, we show that peak extraction from the Fourier spectrum is sufficient for tactile localization with position errors below 1%. Also, the damping property of the extracted frequency is used for material classification. Second, we show that the Fourier spectrum can be analysed by an Artificial Neural Network (ANN) which can be trained to decode contact distance and to classify contact materials. Thirdly, we show how efficiency can be improved by band-pass filtering the Fourier spectrum by application of non-negative matrix factorization. This reduces the input dimension by 95% while reducing classification performance by 8% only. Finally, we replace the FFT by an array of spiking neurons with gradually differing resonance properties, such that their spike rate is a function of the input frequency. We show that this network can be applied to detect tactile contact events of a wheeled robot, and how detrimental effects of robot velocity on antennal dynamics can be suppressed by state-dependent modulation of the input signals

  1. An insect-inspired bionic sensor for tactile localization and material classification with state-dependent modulation

    PubMed Central

    Patanè, Luca; Hellbach, Sven; Krause, André F.; Arena, Paolo; Dürr, Volker

    2012-01-01

    Insects carry a pair of antennae on their head: multimodal sensory organs that serve a wide range of sensory-guided behaviors. During locomotion, antennae are involved in near-range orientation, for example in detecting, localizing, probing, and negotiating obstacles. Here we present a bionic, active tactile sensing system inspired by insect antennae. It comprises an actuated elastic rod equipped with a terminal acceleration sensor. The measurement principle is based on the analysis of damped harmonic oscillations registered upon contact with an object. The dominant frequency of the oscillation is extracted to determine the distance of the contact point along the probe and basal angular encoders allow tactile localization in a polar coordinate system. Finally, the damping behavior of the registered signal is exploited to determine the most likely material. The tactile sensor is tested in four approaches with increasing neural plausibility: first, we show that peak extraction from the Fourier spectrum is sufficient for tactile localization with position errors below 1%. Also, the damping property of the extracted frequency is used for material classification. Second, we show that the Fourier spectrum can be analysed by an Artificial Neural Network (ANN) which can be trained to decode contact distance and to classify contact materials. Thirdly, we show how efficiency can be improved by band-pass filtering the Fourier spectrum by application of non-negative matrix factorization. This reduces the input dimension by 95% while reducing classification performance by 8% only. Finally, we replace the FFT by an array of spiking neurons with gradually differing resonance properties, such that their spike rate is a function of the input frequency. We show that this network can be applied to detect tactile contact events of a wheeled robot, and how detrimental effects of robot velocity on antennal dynamics can be suppressed by state-dependent modulation of the input signals

  2. Restoration of vision in blind individuals using bionic devices: a review with a focus on cortical visual prostheses.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Philip M; Ackland, Helen M; Lowery, Arthur J; Rosenfeld, Jeffrey V

    2015-01-21

    The field of neurobionics offers hope to patients with sensory and motor impairment. Blindness is a common cause of major sensory loss, with an estimated 39 million people worldwide suffering from total blindness in 2010. Potential treatment options include bionic devices employing electrical stimulation of the visual pathways. Retinal stimulation can restore limited visual perception to patients with retinitis pigmentosa, however loss of retinal ganglion cells precludes this approach. The optic nerve, lateral geniculate nucleus and visual cortex provide alternative stimulation targets, with several research groups actively pursuing a cortically-based device capable of driving several hundred stimulating electrodes. While great progress has been made since the earliest works of Brindley and Dobelle in the 1960s and 1970s, significant clinical, surgical, psychophysical, neurophysiological, and engineering challenges remain to be overcome before a commercially-available cortical implant will be realized. Selection of candidate implant recipients will require assessment of their general, psychological and mental health, and likely responses to visual cortex stimulation. Implant functionality, longevity and safety may be enhanced by careful electrode insertion, optimization of electrical stimulation parameters and modification of immune responses to minimize or prevent the host response to the implanted electrodes. Psychophysical assessment will include mapping the positions of potentially several hundred phosphenes, which may require repetition if electrode performance deteriorates over time. Therefore, techniques for rapid psychophysical assessment are required, as are methods for objectively assessing the quality of life improvements obtained from the implant. These measures must take into account individual differences in image processing, phosphene distribution and rehabilitation programs that may be required to optimize implant functionality. In this review, we

  3. Verifying with tests the improved dynamic and passive damping behavior of components: structural optimization based on bionic principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, Johannes; Maier, Martin; Herrmann, Hans-Georg; Steibler, Philipp

    2004-07-01

    In the automotive industry, the need for affordable lightweight structures rises as new fuel consumption regulations tighten and customers demand for performance increases. One way of achieving a cost-effective and weight-optimal design is by means of structural optimization. In 1991, A. Baumgartner, S. Burkhardt and C. Mattheck published their first paper on topology optimization based on bionic principles. Nature is inevitably dependent on the most efficient use of the body's mass. Using a fully-stressed-method, the original SKO-method is able to optimize engineering components with regard to maximum strength and stiffness. For several years now, the SKO-method has been successfully applied and enhanced for complex structural optimization at the Research & Technology Division of DaimlerChrysler AG. The subject presented in this paper was investigated in cooperation with the Institut fur Verbundwerkstoffe GmbH at the Technical University of Kaiserslautern. The aim is to present the new developments concerning the SKO-method. Starting with a short introduction to the original SKO-method, the newly implemented FreedOpt (Frequency and Damping Optimization) module is explained afterwards. FreedOpt can tune natural frequencies to a desired level. In cases were the tuning of frequencies is not sufficient, damping is needed. The new module is able to optimize the utilization of damping material with a new approach based on maximizing the dissipated vibration energy. The main focus of the paper is on the verification of the simulation results with physical tests. Finally, the new tool is applied to automotive parts. Concluding, the authors give an outlook for future work.

  4. CI chondrite-like clasts in the Nilpena polymict ureilite - Implications for aqueous alteration processes in CI chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brearley, Adrian J.; Prinz, Martin

    1992-01-01

    Petrographic studies of Nilpena polymict ureilite have revealed the presence of small quantities of carbonaceous chondrite matrix clasts. Detailed electron microprobe and TEM studies show that the chemistry and fine-scale mineralogy of one of these clasts is consistent with CI carbonaceous chondrite matrix. Compared to Orgeuil, the phyllosilicate, sulfide, and oxide mineralogy suggests that the Nilpena clasts may represent a less altered type of CI matrix. It is suggested that increased oxidation and aqueous alteration of Nilpena-type materials could result in the formation of the type of mineral assemblage observed in Orgueil. Increased alteration produces progressive more Mg-rich phyllosilicates and more Fe(3+)-rich iron oxides, such as ferrihydrite. As a function of increased alteration, Ca is also progressively leached from the matrix material to form carbonate veins. The depletion of Ca in CI chondrite matrices suggests the Ivuna and Alais may be intermediate in their degree of alteration to Nilpena and Orgueil.

  5. Surviving High-temperature Components in CI Chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zolensky, M.; Frank, D.

    2014-01-01

    The CI1 chondrites, while having the most solar-like compo-sition of any astromaterial available for laboratory analysis, have also been considerably altered by asteroidal processes including aqueous alteration. It is of fundamental importance to determine their pre-alteration mineralogy, so that the state of matter in the early Solar System can be better determined. In the course of a re-examination of the compositional range of olivine and low-Ca pyroxene in CI chondrites Orgueil, Ivuna and Alais [1] we found the first reported complete CAI, as already reported [2], with at-tached rock consisting mainly of olivine and low-Ca pyroxene. The range of residual olivine major element compositions we have determined in the CIs (Fig. 1) may now be directly com-pared with those of other astromaterials, including Wild 2 grains. The abundance of olivine and low-Ca pyroxene in CIs is higher than is generally appreciated, and in fact much higher than for some CMs [1]. We also noted numerous rounded objects varying in shape from spheres to oblate spheroids, and ranging up to 100µm in size (Fig. 2), which have been previously noted [3] but have not been well documented or appreciated. We characterized the mineralogy by transmission electron microscopy and found that they consist mainly of rather fine-grained, flaky single phase to intergrown serpentine and saponite. These two materials in fact dominate the bulk of the host CI1 chondrites. With the exception of sparse spinels, the rounded phyllosilicate objects are remarka-bly free of other minerals, suggesting that the precursor from which the phyllosilicates were derived was a homogeneous mate-rial. We suggest that these round phyllosilicates aggregates in CI1 chondrites were cryptocrystalline to glassy microchondrules. If so then CI chondrites cannot be considered chondrule-free. Small though they are, the abundance of these putative microchondrules is the same as that of chondrules in the Tagish Lake meteorite.

  6. A CAI in the Ivuna CI1 Chondrite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frank, David R.; Zolensky, M.; Martinez, J.; Mikouchi, T.; Ohsumi, K.; Hagiya, K.; Satake, W.; Le, L.; Ross, D.; Peslier, A.

    2011-01-01

    We have recently discovered the first well-preserved calcium aluminum-rich inclusion (CAI) in a CI1 chondrite (Ivuna). Previously, all CI1 chondrites were thought to be devoid of preserved CAI and chondrules due to the near total aqueous alteration to which their parent body (bodies) have been subjected. The CAI is roughly spherical, but with a slight teardrop geometry and a maximum diameter of 170 microns (fig. 1). It lacks any Wark-Lovering Rim. Incipient aqueous alteration, and probably shock, have rendered large portions of the CAI poorly crystalline. It is extremely fine-grained, with only a few grains exceeding 10 microns. We have performed electron microprobe analyses (EPMA), FEG-SEM imaging and element mapping, as well as electron back-scattered diffraction (EBSD) and synchrotron X-ray diffraction (SXRD) in order to determine the fundamental characteristics of this apparently unique object.

  7. On the extension of the MCSCF/CI method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, C., Jr.; Nelin, C. J.; Komornicki, A.

    1984-01-01

    Research conducted during this period was focused on two main areas: (1) bonding in transition metal oxides; and (2) adsorption of CO on Al and Ni. In both of these theoretical studies a major interest was to obtain a better understanding of the nature of the bonding in transition metal containing systems. The studies used self consistent field (SCF), multi-configuration self cosistent field (MCSCF) and configuration interaction (CI) methods in the treatment of the transition metal oxides and only the SCF method in the adsorption studies. The reports of three principle investigators who contributed to this work during the tenure of the project are presented along with associated published papers.

  8. Non-CI refractory lithophile abundances in bulk planetary materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dauphas, N.

    2015-12-01

    Refractory inclusions in meteorites show evidence for fractionation of refractory lithophile elements relative to one another. For bulk planetary materials, it is most often assumed that refractory lithophile elements (e.g., Ca, Al, Ti, REEs) are in proportions similar to CI carbonaceous chondrites, which is taken to be a proxy for solar composition. A diagnostic feature of REE patterns in refractory inclusions in meteorites is the presence of thulium anomalies, arising from the fact that this heavy REE is more volatile than the highly refractory HREEs surrounding it (Tm/Tm* is defined relative to either Er-Yb or Er-Lu). Tm anomalies thus represent an excellent diagnostic tool to test the assumption that refractory lithophile elements have uniform relative abundances at a bulk planetary scale. Prior to this work, high precision Tm measurements were lacking because it is mono-isotopic and as such is not amenable to high-precision single spike measurements. We have developed a multi-collector REE abundance measurement technique to measure all REEs at high precision, including the mono-isotopic ones. This technique was used to revise the abundance of CI and PAAS REE abundances (Pourmand et al. 2012) and the CI composition agrees well with an independent study (Barrat et al. 2012). The same technique was applied to measure REE patterns in 41 chondrites as well as terrestrial rocks (Dauphas and Pourmand, 2015). Our results reveal the presence of Tm anomalies of about -4.5 % in terrestrial rocks, enstatite and ordinary chondrites, relative to carbonaceous chondrites including CIs. This demonstrates that the assumption that refractory lithophile elements are in constant proportions among planetary bodies is unwarranted. It also shows that carbonaceous chondrites cannot be a major constituent of the Earth. The presence of Tm anomalies in meteorites and terrestrial rocks suggests that either (i) the material in the inner part of the solar system was formed from a gas

  9. Clues to the origin of sulfide minerals in CI chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerridge, J. F.; Macdougall, J. D.; Marti, K.

    1979-01-01

    The dominant sulfide in CI carbonaceous chondrites is an Fe-deficient pyrrhotite containing about 1% Ni, Alais, Ivuna, and Orgueil also contain minor cubanite, CuFe2S3, and Alais minor pentlandite, (Fe,Ni)9S8. All pyrrhotites contain 39.4 + or - 0.1% S; Ni contents range from 0.7 to 1.3%. The phase diagrams reveal no temperature at which the observed pentlandite-pyrrhotite assemblage is at equilibrium. Similarly, the pyrrhotite composition alone are inconsistent with equilibrium formation from a gas of solar composition. In Xe from high-purity submilligram Orgueil pyrrhotite separates, the ratios Xe-129/Xe-132 are not significantly larger than those in trapped meteoritic Xe. The lack of positive evidence for extinct I-129 in pyrrhotite does not permit any inferences regarding cooling rates in the early solar nebula. It is concluded that sulfides in CI chondrites cannot be nebular condensates formed under equilibrium conditions. Argon isotopic abundances reveal the presence of significant spallation and trapped gas components in Orgueil pyrrhotite. The Orgueil exposure age is calculated to be at least about 10 m.y.

  10. Matrix mineralogy of the orgueil CI carbonaceous chondrite

    SciTech Connect

    Tomeoka, K.; Buseck, P.R. )

    1988-06-01

    A petrographic and transmission electron microscopic study of the Orgueil CI carbonaceous chondrite shows that the matrix consists mainly of Fe-bearing, Mg-rich serpentine and smectite (saponite) as well as a poorly crystallized Fe-rich material that contains minor, variable S and Ni; the Fe-rich material is probably ferrihydrite. The ferrihydrite occurs in small particles, and the S and Ni are probably adsorbed on its surfaces. The serpentine and saponite occur in poorly crystallized, fine crystallites that are intimately associated with the ferrihydrite. Coarsely crystallized phyllosilicates occur in clusters relatively free of ferrihydrite. The ferrihydrite is a major matrix constitutent and probably accounts for most of the Fe{sub 3+} as well as the superparamagnetic fraction in the Orgueil matrix. The textures suggest that the fine phyllosilicates resulted from alteration of the coarse phyllosilicates. The alteration probably involved a substantial amount of water and coincided with the period of sulfate vein formation. During the aqueous alteration magnetite grains, disaggregated from framboids, and Fe-(Ni) sulfides were replaces by ferrihydrite. The matrix mineralogy of the Orgueil chondrite suggests that Orgueil experienced considerably different alteration conditions from the CM chondrites. The mineralogical and petrological differences between CI and CM chondrites can not simply be explained as the result of different degrees of aqueous alteration.

  11. Born-Infeld extension of Lovelock brane gravity in the system of M0-branes and its application for the emergence of Pauli exclusion principle in BIonic superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sepehri, Alireza

    2016-07-01

    Recently, some authors (Cruz and Rojas, 2013 [1]) have constructed a Born-Infeld type action which may be written in terms of the Lovelock brane Lagrangians for a given dimension p. We reconsider their model in M-theory and study the process of birth and growth of nonlinear spinor and bosonic gravity during the construction of Mp-branes. Then, by application of this idea to BIonic system, we construct a BIonic superconductor in the background of nonlinear gravity. In this model, first, M0-branes link to each other and build an M5-brane and an anti-M5-brane connected by an M2-brane. M0-branes are zero dimensional objects that only scalars are attached to them. By constructing higher dimensional branes from M0-branes, gauge fields are produced. Also, if M0-branes don't link to each other completely, the symmetry of system is broken and fermions are created. The curvature produced by fermions has the opposite sign the curvature produced by gauge fields. Fermions on M5-branes and M2 plays the role of bridge between them. By passing time, M2 dissolves in M5's and nonlinear bosonic and spinor gravities are produced. By closing M5-branes towards each other, coupling of two identical fermions on two branes to each other causes that the square mass of their system becomes negative and some tachyonic states are created. For removing these tachyons, M5-branes compact, the sign of gravity between branes reverses, anti-gravity is produced which causes that branes and identical fermions get away from each other. This is the reason for the emergence of Pauli exclusion principle in Bionic system. Also, the spinor gravity vanishes and its energy builds a new M2 between M5-branes. We obtain the resistivity in this system and find that its value decreases by closing M5 branes to each other and shrinks to zero at colliding point of branes. This idea has different applications. For example, in cosmology, universes are located on M5-branes and M2-brane has the role of bridge between

  12. Informed parental consent for cochlear implantation of young deaf children: social and other considerations in the use of the 'bionic ear'.

    PubMed

    Hyde, M; Power, D

    2000-05-01

    This paper examines the social parameters surrounding the management of informed consent procedures for the parents of young deaf children for the surgical fitting of a cochlear implant ('bionic ear') to their child. Although most observers of this remarkable and well publicised medical development only see benefits in its use, the authors examine the nature of the conflict which has emerged between medical and media portrayals of the 'miracle' device and contrasting social, cultural and linguistic views of many Deaf people. The paper analyses the components of parental consent procedures for surgical implantation of their child, covering the risk-benefit analysis and, in particular, the information base that is provided for parents about the social construction of a 'Deaf life' by many Deaf people. PMID:14627014

  13. Rb-Sr studies of CI and CM chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mittlefehldt, D. W.; Wetherill, G. W.

    1979-01-01

    Rb-Sr whole rock analyses have been performed on 2 CI and 3 CM chondrites. Four of these stones (Ivuna, Orgueil, Cold Bokkeveld and Erakot) were previously studied in this laboratory and were shown to be discordant from a 4.6 Gyr isochron. The fifth, Murchison, was not previously studied. The new data support the discordance of the first four stones, and indicate that Murchison is also discordant. Studies of Sr isotope ratios in unspiked Orgueil show that the discordance is not due to inhomogeneities in the Sr-84/Sr-86 ratio caused by incomplete mixing of nucleosynthesis products. In order to gauge the effects of weathering, two leaching experiments were performed on fresh, interior samples of Murchison; one for a period of 1.5 hr and the other for 117 hr. The results indicate that the relative solubility of nonradiogenic Sr is approximately twice that of Rb and radiogenic Sr is more soluble than the nonradiogenic Sr.

  14. The Bionic Library.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Billings, Harold

    1991-01-01

    Discussion of the information crisis focuses on possible new forms of library collections. Topics discussed include the rising quantity and costs of publications; improvements in access through new technologies; vendors' plans using electronic text; information flow; economics factors, including user fees; and the role of the commercial sector.…

  15. The Bionic Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woolf, Neville

    2009-05-01

    Four hundred years after children in a spectacle makers workshop accidentally discovered the telescope, the development of this device has been a continuous replacement of the ``natural'' by the deliberate. The human eye is gone. The lens is gone. The tube is gone. The dome is on the verge of going. The size of the optics are ceasing to be set by transportation limits. Adaptive optics are preferred to stable optics. We deliberately break the Lagrange invariant. We focus on lasers instead of stars, and natural observing environments are being replaced by adaptive environments. The goals for the new ground based telescope encompass the oldest and newest ideas, to find signs of life elsewhere, and to find how all the universe developed.

  16. The Bionic Amoeba.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Emmett L.

    1979-01-01

    A demonstration is described that encourages students to engage in inquiry in biology. Using chemicals and an overhead projector, the instructor can simulate a living organism projected onto a screen. The reaction can aid students in defining the characteristics of life. (SA)

  17. Cyberinfrastructure (CI) for Interactive Ocean Observatories: LOOKING Ahead

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orcutt, J.; Abbott, M.; Bellingham, J.; Chave, A.; Delaney, J.; Johnson, R.; Lazowska, E.; Moline, M.; Smarr, L.

    2004-12-01

    Investments in next-generation facilities to achieve a permanent, interactive telepresence throughout remote or hostile environments can empower a broad spectrum of autonomous sensornet facilities through the NSF Major Research Equipment and Facililties Construction Ocean Observatories Initiative (OOI). These systems must involve powerful suites of generic cyberinfrastructure tools designed to optimize access and benefits to a large academic and public user base. Many future research and educational efforts focused throughout the ocean basins, especially within heavily populated coastal regions, will be empowered by these new systems. Our project LOOKING (Laboratory for the Ocean Observatory Knowledge Integration Grid) is developing prototype CI for the OOI to achieve these goals. In the case of ocean observatory networks, it is essential to establish powerful network infrastructures linking the wet or subsea portion, with a host of shore station facilities. These components in turn must seamlessly communicate with an ensemble of data repositories, and relevant computer and visualization resources designed to serve a widely diverse ocean science community with real time, broadband access to all observatory system data, products, and metadata. This infrastructure must be secure, reliable, and resilient. It must meet the potentially ambitious latency, bandwidth, and performance requirements demanded by a set of evolving autonomous sensor platforms over a period of decades. This Grid environment must seamlessly interconnect all relevant national and international research and education nets accessible through high speed, next generation communication networks. The primary components of LOOKING are remote services that fulfill the CI needs of the ocean observatory community. These services arise from overarching science and education requirements: 1) Instrument Services operate at the sensor end of an ocean observatory, and are dominantly but not exclusively wet. 2

  18. Macrophages promote benzopyrene-induced tumor transformation of human bronchial epithelial cells by activation of NF-κB and STAT3 signaling in a bionic airway chip culture and in animal models

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Zhao; Wang, Lei; Guo, Zhe; Zhao, Yang; Gao, Zhancheng; Wang, Qi

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the role of macrophages in promoting benzopyrene (BaP)-induced malignant transformation of human bronchial epithelial cells using a BaP-induced tumor transformation model with a bionic airway chip in vitro and in animal models. The bionic airway chip culture data showed that macrophages promoted BaP-induced malignant transformation of human bronchial epithelial cells, which was mediated by nuclear factor (NF)-κB and STAT3 pathways to induce cell proliferation, colony formation in chip culture, and tumorigenicity in nude mice. Blockage of interleukin (IL)-6 or tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α signaling or inhibition of NF-κB, STAT3, or cyclinD1 expression abrogated the effect of macrophages on malignant transformation in the bionic airway chip culture. In vivo, macrophages promoted lung tumorigenesis in a carcinogen-induced animal model. Similarly, blockage of NF-κB, STAT3, or cyclinD1 using siRNA transfection decreased the carcinogen-induced tumorigenesis in rats. We demonstrated that macrophages are critical in promoting lung tumorigenesis and that the macrophage-initiated TNF-α/NF-κB/cyclinD1 and IL-6/STAT3/cyclinD1 pathways are primarily responsible for promoting lung tumorigenesis. PMID:25823926

  19. Implications of smart materials in advanced prosthetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenoe, Edward M.; Radicic, William N.; Knapp, Michael S.

    1994-05-01

    This research reviews common implant materials and suggests smart materials that may be used as substitutes. Current prosthetic technology, including artificial limbs, joints, and soft and hard tissue, falls short in comprehensive characterization of the chemo-mechanics and materials relationships of the natural tissues and their prosthetic materials counterparts. Many of these unknown chemo-mechanical properties in natural tissue systems maintain cooperative function that allows for optimum efficiency in performance and healing. Traditional prosthetic devices have not taken into account the naturally occurring electro-chemo-mechanical stress- strain relationships that normally exist in a tissue system. Direct mechanical deformation of tissue and cell membrane as a possible use of smart materials may lead to improved prosthetic devices once the mechanosensory systems in living tissues are identified and understood. Smart materials may aid in avoiding interfacial atrophy which is a common cause of prosthetic failure. Finally, we note that advanced composite materials have not received sufficient attention, they should be more widely used in prosthetics. Their structural efficiency allows design and construction of truly efficient bionic devices.

  20. A model for the CI (609 micron) emission of Orion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Hollenbach, D.

    1985-01-01

    A numerical model energy balance and chemical equilibrium in the photodissociation regions at the edge of molecular clouds is presented. The model is used to calculate the emergent intensities of the following fine-structure lines: OI (at 63, 145 microns); CI (at 609, 370 microns); C II (at 158 microns); and the low-lying rotational transitions of CO. It is shown that column densities in the range 2 x 10 to the 17th to 2 x 10 to the 18th per sq cm can be obtained for the C(+)/C/CO transition region at the edges of molecular clouds. The difference in the column densities is attributed to changes in the charge exchange reactions of C(+) with SiO and S, and to the process of carbon self-healing. It is found that the calculations are in good agreement with the observed conditions in the photodissociation regions behind Orion (1) C Ori, and near the surface of OMC 1.

  1. Photometry and spectroscopy of CI camelpardalis from 1998 2005

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barsukova, E. A.; Borisov, N. V.; Burenkov, A. N.; Goranskii, V. P.; Klochkova, V. G.; Metlova, N. V.

    2006-08-01

    Our long-time monitoring of the B[e] star and transient X-ray source CI Cam during quiescence following the 1998 outburst demonstrates that the complex, stratified circumstellar envelope has tended to stabilize after this structure was perturbed by the passage of a shock wave from the outburst. The star’s U BV R brightness shows slow, possibly cyclic, variations with an amplitude of about 0.2m. We determined the spectral type of the primary, B4III-V, based on the widths of the absorption wings of high-numbered Balmer lines. A Doppler shift of 460 km/s was detected for the Hell λ4686 Å emission line. The shifts in this line yield an orbital period of 19.41 days, which is also manifested itself in the photometric data as a wave with a V amplitude of 0.034m. The orbit is elliptical, with an eccentricity of 0.62. It is most likely that the secondary is a white dwarf surrounded by an accretion disk. The primary’s mass exceeds 12 M ⊙ . The system may be at a late stage of its evolution, after the stage of mass exchange.

  2. 40 CFR 721.2580 - C.I. Disperse Red 152 (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false C.I. Disperse Red 152 (generic). 721... Substances § 721.2580 C.I. Disperse Red 152 (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as C.I. disperse red 152 (PMN...

  3. 40 CFR 721.2580 - C.I. Disperse Red 152 (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false C.I. Disperse Red 152 (generic). 721... Substances § 721.2580 C.I. Disperse Red 152 (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as C.I. disperse red 152 (PMN...

  4. 40 CFR 721.2580 - C.I. Disperse Red 152 (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false C.I. Disperse Red 152 (generic). 721... Substances § 721.2580 C.I. Disperse Red 152 (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as C.I. disperse red 152 (PMN...

  5. 40 CFR 721.2580 - C.I. Disperse Red 152 (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false C.I. Disperse Red 152 (generic). 721... Substances § 721.2580 C.I. Disperse Red 152 (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as C.I. disperse red 152 (PMN...

  6. 40 CFR 721.2580 - C.I. Disperse Red 152 (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false C.I. Disperse Red 152 (generic). 721... Substances § 721.2580 C.I. Disperse Red 152 (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as C.I. disperse red 152 (PMN...

  7. Ciona intestinalis galectin (CiLgals-a and CiLgals-b) genes are differentially expressed in endostyle zones and challenged by LPS.

    PubMed

    Parrinello, Daniela; Sanfratello, Maria Antonietta; Vizzini, Aiti; Parrinello, Nicolò; Cammarata, Matteo

    2015-01-01

    Immunohistochemical and in situ hybridization assays were performed to answer the question whether the endostyle, that is the initial gastro-intestinal trait of Ciona intestinalis pharynx, is involved in galectin (CiLgals-a and CiLgals-b) production during the pharynx inflammatory response to LPS inoculation. Specific anti-CiLgal-a and anti-CiLgals-b antibodies, and oligonucleotide probes, that mark inflammatory hemocytes inside the pharynx vessels and vessel epithelium as shown by a previous paper, were assayed on endostyle histological sections. For the first time, we show that galectins are produced by endostyle zones, and both CiLgals-a and -b genes are upregulated by LPS. CiLgals-a and CiLgals-b are constitutively expressed in the endostyle zone 2 and 3, respectively, both genes are upregulated by LPS in the zone 2, and CiLgals-b in the zone 3 and 4. The antibody-reacting material contained in intracellular and extracellular large vesicles suggest an unexpected vesicle-dependent transporting mechanism of galectins not provided with signal peptide. Differential expression and gene upregulation in not-treated and LPS-treated specimens, support the role of endostyle galectins both in filter feeding and defense responses. PMID:25449708

  8. Outburst-related period changes of recurrent nova CI aquilae

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, R. E.; Honeycutt, R. K. E-mail: rewilson@ufl.edu

    2014-11-01

    Pre-outburst and post-outburst light curves and post-outburst eclipse timings are analyzed to measure any period (P) change related to nova CI Aql's outburst of early 2000 and a mean post-outburst dP/dt, which then lead to estimates of the accreting component's rate of mass (M) change and its overall outburst-related change of mass over roughly a decade of observations. We apply a recently developed procedure for unified analysis of three timing-related data types (light curves, radial velocities, and eclipse timings), although with only light curves and timings in this case. Fits to the data are reasonably good without need for a disk in the light-curve model, although the disk certainly exists and has an important role in our post-outburst mass flow computations. Initial experiments showed that, although there seems to be an accretion hot spot, it has essentially no effect on derived outburst-related ΔP or on post-outburst dP/dt. Use of atomic time (HJED) in place of HJD also has essentially nil effect on ΔP and dP/dt. We find ΔP consistently negative in various types of solutions, although at best only marginally significant statistically in any one experiment. Pre-outburst HJD {sub 0} and P results are given, as are post-outburst HJD {sub 0}, P, and dP/dt, with light curves and eclipse times as joint input, and also with only eclipse time input. Post-outburst dP/dt is negative at about 2.4σ. Explicit formulae for mass transfer rates and epoch-to-epoch mass change are developed and applied. A known offset in the magnitude zero point for 1991-1994 is corrected.

  9. Formation of hierarchical CuO microcabbages as stable bionic superhydrophobic materials via a room-temperature solution-immersion process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jinping; Huang, Xintang; Li, Yuanyuan; Li, Zikun; Chi, Qingbo; Li, Guangyun

    2008-11-01

    A new hierarchical CuO architecture consisting of densely packed nanoplates and nanoribbons was directly fabricated on Cu foils via a room-temperature solution-immersion process. The architectures resembled cabbages both in the shape and structure, and the plates and ribbons served as the leafstalks and leaves of cabbages, respectively. By carefully monitoring the growth stages, it was found that self-assembled CuO nanoplates could be firstly formed on the Cu foils, and then CuO tiny flexible nanoribbons were grown from the edges of fresh plates. The effect of NaOH concentration on the morphology of CuO structures was discussed. Importantly, stable superhydrophobicity (contact angle CA = 155°), independent of pH value of the water droplets, was successfully observed for CuO microcabbages after modification. The wettability of other CuO micro- and nanoscale hierarchical surface structures fabricated using various NaOH concentrations was also presented. The realization of superhydrophobic bionic surfaces with a new hierarchical morphology of CuO will shed new insights in both the synthesis and application fields.

  10. Ter94 ATPase complex targets k11-linked ubiquitinated ci to proteasomes for partial degradation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhao; Lv, Xiangdong; Yin, Wen-chi; Zhang, Xiaoyun; Feng, Jing; Wu, Wenqing; Hui, Chi-chung; Zhang, Lei; Zhao, Yun

    2013-06-24

    The Cubitus interruptus (Ci)/Gli family of transcription factors can be degraded either completely or partially from a full-length form (Ci155/Gli(FL)) to a truncated repressor (Ci75/Gli(R)) by proteasomes to mediate Hedgehog (Hh) signaling. The mechanism by which proteasomes distinguish ubiquitinated Ci/Gli to carry out complete versus partial degradation is not known. Here, we show that Ter94 ATPase and its mammalian counterpart, p97, are involved in processing Ci and Gli3 into Ci75 and Gli3(R), respectively. Ter94 regulates the partial degradation of ubiquitinated Ci by Cul1-Slimb-based E3 ligase through its adaptors Ufd1-like and dNpl4. We demonstrate that Cul1-Slimb-based E3 ligase, but not Cul3-Rdx-based E3 ligase, modifies Ci by efficient addition of K11-linked ubiquitin chains. Ter94(Ufd1-like/dNpl4) complex interacts directly with Cul1-Slimb, and, intriguingly, it prefers K11-linked ubiquitinated Ci. Thus, Ter94 ATPase and K11-linked ubiquitination in Ci contribute to the selectivity by proteasomes for partial degradation. PMID:23747190

  11. Advancing Water Science through Improved Cyberinfrastructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, B. J.; Miles, B.; Rai, A.; Ahalt, S.; Band, L. E.; Minsker, B.; Palmer, M.; Williams, M. R.; Idaszak, R.; Whitton, M. C.

    2012-12-01

    Major scientific advances are needed to help address impacts of climate change and increasing human-mediated environmental modification on the water cycle at global and local scales. However, such advances within the water sciences are limited in part by inadequate information infrastructures. For example, cyberinfrastructure (CI) includes the integrated computer hardware, software, networks, sensors, data, and human capital that enable scientific workflows to be carried out within and among individual research efforts and across varied disciplines. A coordinated transformation of existing CI and development of new CI could accelerate the productivity of water science by enabling greater discovery, access, and interoperability of data and models, and by freeing scientists to do science rather than create and manage technological tools. To elucidate specific ways in which improved CI could advance water science, three challenges confronting the water science community were evaluated: 1) How does ecohydrologic patch structure affect nitrogen transport and fate in watersheds?, 2) How can human-modified environments emulate natural water and nutrient cycling to enhance both human and ecosystem well-being?, 3) How do changes in climate affect water availability to support biodiversity and human needs? We assessed the approaches used by researchers to address components of these challenges, identified barriers imposed by limitations of current CI, and interviewed leaders in various water science subdisciplines to determine the most recent CI tools employed. Our preliminary findings revealed four areas where CI improvements are likely to stimulate scientific advances: 1) sensor networks, 2) data quality assurance/quality control, 3) data and modeling standards, 4) high performance computing. In addition, the full potential of a re-envisioned water science CI cannot be realized without a substantial training component. In light of these findings, we suggest that CI

  12. 21 CFR 73.3112 - C.I. Vat Orange 1.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false C.I. Vat Orange 1. 73.3112 Section 73.3112 Food... COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Medical Devices § 73.3112 C.I. Vat Orange 1. (a) Identity. The color additive is C.I. Vat Orange 1, Colour Index No. 59105. (b) Uses and restrictions. (1)...

  13. 21 CFR 73.3112 - C.I. Vat Orange 1.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false C.I. Vat Orange 1. 73.3112 Section 73.3112 Food... COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Medical Devices § 73.3112 C.I. Vat Orange 1. (a) Identity. The color additive is C.I. Vat Orange 1, Colour Index No. 59105. (b) Uses and restrictions. (1)...

  14. 21 CFR 73.3112 - C.I. Vat Orange 1.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false C.I. Vat Orange 1. 73.3112 Section 73.3112 Food... COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Medical Devices § 73.3112 C.I. Vat Orange 1. (a) Identity. The color additive is C.I. Vat Orange 1, Colour Index No. 59105. (b) Uses and restrictions. (1)...

  15. 21 CFR 73.3112 - C.I. Vat Orange 1.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false C.I. Vat Orange 1. 73.3112 Section 73.3112 Food... COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Medical Devices § 73.3112 C.I. Vat Orange 1. (a) Identity. The color additive is C.I. Vat Orange 1, Colour Index No. 59105. (b) Uses and restrictions. (1)...

  16. 21 CFR 73.3112 - C.I. Vat Orange 1.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false C.I. Vat Orange 1. 73.3112 Section 73.3112 Food... COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Medical Devices § 73.3112 C.I. Vat Orange 1. (a) Identity. The color additive is C.I. Vat Orange 1, Colour Index No. 59105. (b) Uses and restrictions. (1)...

  17. 10 CFR 709.3 - Covered persons subject to a CI evaluation and polygraph.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Covered persons subject to a CI evaluation and polygraph. 709.3 Section 709.3 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY COUNTERINTELLIGENCE EVALUATION PROGRAM General Provisions § 709.3 Covered persons subject to a CI evaluation and polygraph. (a) Mandatory CI evaluation. Except as provided in § 709.5 of this part...

  18. Hedgehog-induced phosphorylation by CK1 sustains the activity of Ci/Gli activator

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Qing; Li, Shuang; Li, Shuangxi; Jiang, Alice; Chen, Yongbin; Jiang, Jin

    2014-01-01

    Hedgehog (Hh) signaling governs many developmental processes by regulating the balance between the repressor (CiR/GliR) and activator (CiA/GliA) forms of Cubitus interruptus (Ci)/glioma-associated oncogene homolog (Gli) transcription factors. Although much is known about how CiR/GliR is controlled, the regulation of CiA/GliA remains poorly understood. Here we demonstrate that Casein kinase 1 (CK1) sustains Hh signaling downstream of Costal2 and Suppressor of fused (Sufu) by protecting CiA from premature degradation. We show that Hh stimulates Ci phosphorylation by CK1 at multiple Ser/Thr-rich degrons to inhibit its recognition by the Hh-induced MATH and BTB domain containing protein (HIB), a substrate receptor for the Cullin 3 family of E3 ubiquitin ligases. In Hh-receiving cells, reduction of CK1 activity accelerated HIB-mediated degradation of CiA, leading to premature loss of pathway activity. We also provide evidence that GliA is regulated by CK1 in a similar fashion and that CK1 acts downstream of Sufu to promote Sonic hedgehog signaling. Taken together, our study not only reveals an unanticipated and conserved mechanism by which phosphorylation of Ci/Gli positively regulates Hh signaling but also provides the first evidence, to our knowledge, that substrate recognition by the Cullin 3 family of E3 ubiquitin ligases is negatively regulated by a kinase. PMID:25512501

  19. Expression patterns and promoter activity of the cold-regulated gene ci21A of potato.

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, A; Salamini, F; Gebhardt, C

    1997-01-01

    Storage of potato (Solanum tuberosum) tubers at 4 degrees C is associated with the accumulation of several transcripts. DNA sequence analysis of cDNA clone CI21, which corresponds to one of the cold-induced transcripts, revealed high homology to transcripts of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) and wild potato (Solanum chacoense) induced by ripening and water stress. Two homologous, nonallelic genes, ci21A and ci21B, were isolated and sequenced. Northern blot analysis showed that CI21 transcripts were present at the highest levels in cold-stored tubers, at lower levels in stems and roots, and at the lowest levels in leaves and tubers stored at room temperature. Treatment with abscisic acid, heat, and a high concentration of salt had no marked effect on CI21 transcript levels in tubers and leaves. Drought was the only stress treatment that induced CI21 transcripts in leaves, but it did not do so in tubers. Western blot analysis detected CI21 protein only in tubers. Chimeric gene constructs between the putative ci21A promoter region and the uidA reporter gene were tested in transgenic potato plants for induction of beta-glucuronidase activity by low temperature. A 2-fold increase of beta-glucuronidase activity in response to tuber storage at 4 degrees C was observed for fragments between 380 and 2000 bp of the ci21A promoter region. PMID:9046587

  20. Transmission electron microscopy of an interplanetary dust particle with links to CI chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, Lindsay P.; Thomas, Kathie L.; Mckay, David S.

    1991-01-01

    The majority of hydrated interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) have compositions that resemble CI and CM chondrites, however, their mineralogies are most similar to the fine grained material in certain altered type-3 carbonaceous and ordinary chondrites. During the transmission electron microscope studies of hydrated IDPs, a unique particle was discovered whose mineralogy is very similar to that reported from CI chondrites. W7013F5 is the first IDP whose mineralogy and chemistry approximates that of CI chondrites. The similarity in mineralogy and mineral chemistry suggests that W7013F5 was altered under conditions similar to those that existed on the CI parent bodies.

  1. Effects of CI-1002 and CI-1017 on spontaneous synaptic activity and on the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor of Torpedo electric organ.

    PubMed

    Ros, E; Aleu, J; Marsal, J; Solsona, C

    2000-02-25

    The effect of azepino[2,1-b]quinazoline 1,3-dichloro-6,7,8,9,10, 12-hexahydro-, mono-hydrochloride (CI-1002), a tacrine derivative, and 1-azabicyclo[2.2.1]heptan-3-one, O-[3-(methoxyphenyl)-2-propynyl]oxime [R-(Z)]-2-butenedioate (CI-1017), a muscarinic M(1) receptor agonist, on spontaneous synaptic activity was investigated by measuring amplitude, rise time, velocity of rising, half-width, and electrical charge of miniature endplate potentials (m.e.p.p.) recorded extracellularly in Torpedo electric organ fragments. The effect of CI-1002 and CI-1017 on the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor was investigated by measuring the current induced by acetylcholine in Xenopus laevis oocytes transplanted with membranes from Torpedo electric organ. CI-1002, at a concentration of 1 microM, altered the m.e.p.p. by increasing the amplitude (from 1.08+/-0.01 to 2.76+/-0.03 mV), rise time (from 0. 700+/-0.006 to 1.02+/-0.01 ms), rising rate (from 1.79+/-0.02 to 3. 45+/-0.05 mV/ms), half-width (from 0.990+/-0.008 to 2.40+/-0.02 ms), and electrical charge (from 304+/-4 to 784+/-11 mV s). CI-1017, at a concentration of 1 microM, altered the m.e.p.p. by decreasing the amplitude (from 1.08+/-0.01 to 0.650+/-0.007 mV), rise time (from 0. 700+/-0.006 to 0.530+/-0.007 ms), rising rate (from 1.79+/-0.02 to 1. 53+/-0.02 mV/ms), half-width (from 0.990+/-0.008 to 0.670+/-0.007 ms), and electrical charge (from 304+/-4 to 75+/-1 mV s). CI-1002 inhibited the acetylcholine-induced current of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors with an IC(50) of 3.4+/-0.3 microM. CI-1017 inhibited the acetylcholine-induced current of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors with an IC(50) of 0.8+/-0.1 microM. These results indicate that, although both drugs interacted negatively with nicotinic acetylcholine receptors, CI-1002 overcame this inhibition by recruiting more acetylcholine to build a quantum. PMID:10708701

  2. Application of the graphical unitary group approach to the energy second derivative for CI wave functions via the coupled perturbed CI equations

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, D.J.

    1983-10-01

    Analytic derivatives of the potential energy for Self-Consistent-Field (SCF) wave functions have been developed in recent years and found to be useful tools. The first derivative for configuration interaction (CI) wave functions is also available. This work details the extension of analytic methods to energy second derivatives for CI wave functions. The principal extension required for second derivatives is evaluation of the first order change in the CI wave function with respect to a nuclear perturbation. The shape driven graphical unitary group approach (SDGUGA) direct CI program was adapted to evaluate this term via the coupled-perturbed CI equations. Several iterative schemes are compared for use in solving these equations. The pilot program makes no use of molecular symmetry but the timing results show that utilization of molecular symmetry is desirable. The principles for defining and solving a set of symmetry adapted equations are discussed. Evaluation of the second derivative also requires the solution of the second order coupled-perturbed Hartree-Fock equations to obtain the correction to the molecular orbitals due to the nuclear perturbation. This process takes a consistently higher percentage of the computation time than for the first order equations alone and a strategy for its reduction is discussed.

  3. Bionics: prcise color tuning by interference in nature and technology-applications in surface-micromachined 1.55μm vertical air-cavity filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillmer, Hartmut; Daleiden, Juergen; Prott, Cornelia; Irmer, Soeren; Roemer, Friedhard; Ataro, Edwin; Tarraf, Amer; Ruehling, H.; Maniak, Markus; Strassner, Martin

    2003-01-01

    Bionics transfers the principles of success of nature into natural science, engineering disciplines and applications. Often generation and detection of different spectral colors play key roles in communication in both, nature and technology. The latter one refers e.g. to dense wavelength division multiplex optical communication systems. This paper shows interesting parallels in tunable spectral light filtering by butterfly wings and by tunable optical filters used in optical communication systems. In both cases light interferes constructively and destructively with nano- and microstructures of appropriate shape, dimensions and materials. In this paper methodology is strongly emphasized. We demonstrate that tailored scaling allows the effectiveness of physical effects to be enhanced in nature and technology. These principles are rigorously applied in micromachined 1.55μm vertical-resonator-based filters, capable of wide, continuous, monotonic and kink-free tuning by a single control parameter. Tuning is achieved by mechanically actuating one or several membranes embedded by air-gaps in a vertical resonator including two ultra-highly reflective DBR mirrors. The layers of mirrors reveal a very strong refractive index contrast. Filters including InP/air-gap DBR's (3.5 periods) using GaInAs sacrificial layers reveal a continuous tuning of >9% of the absolute wavelength. Varying a reverse voltage (U=0 .. -3.2V) between the membranes, a tuning range up to 142nm was obtained due to electrostatic actuation. Appropriate miniaturization is shown to increase the mechanical stability and the effectiveness of spectral tuning by electrostatic actuation since the relative significance of the fundamental physical forces can be shifted considerably by appropriate scaling.

  4. Comment on Mars as the Parent Body of the CI Carbonaceous Chondrites by J. E. Brandenburg

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Treiman, Allan H.

    1996-01-01

    Geological and chemical data refute a martian origin for the CI carbonaceous chondrites. Here, I will first consider Brandenburg's [1996] proposal that the CI's formed as water-deposited sediments on Mars, and that these sediments had limited chemical interactions with their martian environment. Finally, I will address oxygen isotope ratios, the strongest link between the CIs and the martian meteorites.

  5. SLA: A Time for New Initiatives-- CI Division Formed, Fundraising Goal Set, Certification Coming

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiMattia, Susan; Blumenstein, Lynn

    2004-01-01

    Several initiatives were announced at the Special Libraries Association (d.b.a. SLA) conference, June 4-9, at the Gaylord Opryland Hotel in Nashville. A petition drive resulted in formation of a Competitive Intelligence (CI) Division from the former CI Section of the Leadership and Management Division. The board encouraged the member-driven…

  6. Music-based training for pediatric CI recipients: A systematic analysis of published studies.

    PubMed

    Gfeller, K

    2016-06-01

    In recent years, there has been growing interest in the use of music-based training to enhance speech and language development in children with normal hearing and some forms of communication disorders, including pediatric CI users. The use of music training for CI users may initially seem incongruous given that signal processing for CIs presents a degraded version of pitch and timbre, both key elements in music. Furthermore, empirical data of systematic studies of music training, particularly in relation to transfer to speech skills are limited. This study describes the rationale for music training of CI users, describes key features of published studies of music training with CI users, and highlights some developmental and logistical issues that should be taken into account when interpreting or planning studies of music training and speech outcomes with pediatric CI recipients. PMID:27246744

  7. The emerging landscape of circular RNA ciRS-7 in cancer (Review).

    PubMed

    Peng, Li; Yuan, Xiao Qing; Li, Guan Cheng

    2015-06-01

    Circular RNAs (circRNAs) are a novel class of non-coding RNA molecules ubiquitously present in the cytoplasm of eukaryotic cells. CircRNAs are generated from exons or introns via multiple mechanisms. A recently identified circRNA, ciRS-7, can regulate the activities of miRNAs, mRNAs, and RBP to exert specific biological effects. Also, ciRS-7 acts as a natural competing endogenous RNA, a.k.a. 'super sponge' of microRNA-7 (miR-7) that sequesters and competitively inhibits the activity of miR-7. This competition between ciRS-7 and miR-7 may have profound effects on oncogenesis. This review will summarize the origin and functions of ciRS-7 and discuss the relationship among ciRS-7, its target molecules and cancer. PMID:25873049

  8. Music-Based Training for Pediatric CI Recipients: A Systematic Analysis of Published Studies

    PubMed Central

    Gfeller, Kate

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, there has been growing interest in the use of music-based training to enhance speech and language development in children with normal hearing and some forms of communication disorders, including pediatric CI users. The use of music training for CI users may initially seem incongruous given that signal processing for CIs presents a degraded version of pitch and timbre, both key elements in music. Furthermore, empirical data of systematic studies of music training, particularly in relation to transfer to speech skills are limited. This study describes the rationale for music training of CI users, describes key features of published studies of music training with CI users, and highlights some developmental and logistical issues that should be taken into account when interpreting or planning studies of music training and speech outcomes with pediatric CI recipients. PMID:27246744

  9. Different risk factors for advanced colorectal neoplasm in young adults

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ji Yeon; Jung, Yoon Suk; Park, Jung Ho; Kim, Hong Joo; Cho, Yong Kyun; Sohn, Chong Il; Jeon, Woo Kyu; Kim, Byung Ik; Choi, Kyu Yong; Park, Dong Il

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To compare the risk of developing advanced colorectal neoplasm (ACRN) according to age in Koreans. METHODS: A total of 70428 Koreans from an occupational cohort who underwent a colonoscopy between 2003 and 2012 at Kangbuk Samsung Hospital were retrospectively selected. We evaluated and compared odds ratios (OR) for ACRN between the young-adults (YA < 50 years) and in the older-adults (OA ≥ 50 years). ACRN was defined as an adenoma ≥ 10 mm in diameter, adenoma with any component of villous histology, high-grade dysplasia, or invasive cancer. RESULTS: In the YA group, age (OR = 1.08, 95%CI: 1.06-1.09), male sex (OR = 1.26, 95%CI: 1.02-1.55), current smoking (OR = 1.37, 95%CI: 1.15-1.63), family history of colorectal cancer (OR = 1.46, 95%CI: 1.01-2.10), diabetes mellitus related factors (OR = 1.27, 95%CI: 1.06-1.54), obesity (OR = 1.23, 95%CI: 1.03-1.47), CEA (OR = 1.04, 95%CI: 1.01-1.09) and low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (OR = 1.01, 95%CI: 1.01-1.02) were related with an increased risk of ACRN. However, age (OR = 1.08, 95%CI: 1.06-1.09), male sex (OR = 2.12, 95%CI: 1.68-2.68), current smoking (OR = 1.38, 95%CI: 1.12-1.71), obesity (OR = 1.34, 95%CI: 1.09-1.65) and CEA (OR = 1.05, 95%CI: 1.01-1.09) also increased the risk of ACRN in the OA group. CONCLUSION: The risks of ACRN differed based on age group. Different colonoscopic screening strategies are appropriate for particular subjects with risk factors for ACRN, even in subjects younger than 50 years. PMID:27053853

  10. The behavioural properties of CI-988, a selective cholecystokininB receptor antagonist.

    PubMed Central

    Singh, L.; Field, M. J.; Hughes, J.; Menzies, R.; Oles, R. J.; Vass, C. A.; Woodruff, G. N.

    1991-01-01

    1. The behavioural effects of a selective cholecystokininB (CCKB) receptor antagonist CI-988 were investigated in rodents. 2. In three rodent tests of anxiety (rat elevated X-maze, rat social interaction test and mouse light/dark box) CI-988 over the dose range 0.001-10.0 mg kg-1, (i.p.) produced an anxiolytic-like action. The magnitude of this effect was similar to that of chlordiazepoxide (CDP). In contrast, the selective CCKA receptor antagonist, devazepide, was inactive. CI-988 also showed anxiolytic-like action in the rat conflict test but the magnitude of this effect was about 2.5 fold less than that of CDP. 3. Central but not peripheral administration of the selective CCKB receptor agonist, pentagastrin, like FG 7142, produced an anxiogenic-like action. 4. The pentagastrin-induced anxiety was dose-dependently antagonized by CI-988, whereas devazepide was inactive. However, ten times higher doses of CI-988 were required to block a similar action of FG 7142. 5. In contrast to CDP, CI-988 up to 3000 fold higher doses than those inducing anxiolysis was inactive in tests measuring sedation and ataxia. It also failed to antagonize pentylenetetrazol-induced tonic seizures. Furthermore, CI-988 did not interact with alcohol or barbiturates. Thus, CI-988 appears to be an anxioselective compound. 6. The anxiolytic-like action of CDP in the rat elevated X-maze was dose-dependently antagonized by flumazenil. In contrast, the benzodiazepine receptor antagonist failed to block a similar effect of CI-988. 7. Thus, CI-988 shows anxiolytic-like activity in several animal models of anxiety.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1686205

  11. Advance directives

    PubMed Central

    O’Sullivan, Rory; Mailo, Kevin; Angeles, Ricardo; Agarwal, Gina

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective To establish the prevalence of patients with advance directives in a family practice, and to describe patients’ perspectives on a family doctor’s role in initiating discussions about advance directives. Design A self-administered patient questionnaire. Setting A busy urban family medicine teaching clinic in Hamilton, Ont. Participants A convenience sample of adult patients attending the clinic over the course of a typical business week. Main outcome measures The prevalence of advance directives in the patient population was determined, and the patients’ expectations regarding the role of their family doctors were elucidated. Results The survey population consisted of 800 participants (a response rate of 72.5%) well distributed across age groups; 19.7% had written advance directives and 43.8% had previously discussed the topic of advance directives, but only 4.3% of these discussions had occurred with family doctors. In 5.7% of cases, a family physician had raised the issue; 72.3% of respondents believed patients should initiate the discussion. Patients who considered advance directives extremely important were significantly more likely to want their family doctors to start the conversation (odds ratio 3.98; P < .05). Conclusion Advance directives were not routinely addressed in the family practice. Most patients preferred to initiate the discussion of advance directives. However, patients who considered the subject extremely important wanted their family doctors to initiate the discussion. PMID:25873704

  12. Cancer-associated fibroblasts promote non-small cell lung cancer cell invasion by upregulation of glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78) expression in an integrated bionic microfluidic device.

    PubMed

    Yu, Ting; Guo, Zhe; Fan, Hui; Song, Jing; Liu, Yuanbin; Gao, Zhancheng; Wang, Qi

    2016-05-01

    The tumor microenvironment is comprised of cancer cells and various stromal cells and their respective cellular components. Cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs), a major part of the stromal cells, are a key determinant in tumor progression, while glucose-regulated protein (GRP)78 is overexpressed in many human cancers and is involved in tumor invasion and metastasis. This study developed a microfluidic-based three dimension (3D) co-culture device to mimic an in vitro tumor microenvironment in order to investigate tumor cell invasion in real-time. This bionic chip provided significant information regarding the role of GRP78, which may be stimulated by CAFs, to promote non-small cell lung cancer cell invasion in vitro. The data showed that CAF induced migration of NSCLC A549 and SPCA-1 cells in this three-dimensional invasion microdevice, which is confirmed by using the traditional Transwell system. Furthermore, CAF induced GRP78 expression in A549 and SPCA-1 cells to facilitate NSCLC cell migration and invasion, whereas knockdown of GRP78 expression blocked A549 and SPCA-1 cell migration and invasion capacity. In conclusion, these data indicated that CAFs might promote NSCLC cell invasion by up-regulation of GRP78 expression and this bionic chip microdevice is a robust platform to assess the interaction of cancer and stromal cells in tumor environment study. PMID:27016417

  13. A modified CAS-CI approach for an efficient calculation of magnetic exchange coupling constants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fink, Karin; Staemmler, Volker

    2013-09-01

    A modification of the conventional wavefunction-based CAS-CI method for the calculation of magnetic exchange coupling constants J in small molecules and transition metal complexes is presented. In general, CAS-CI approaches yield much too small values for J since the energies of the important charge transfer configurations are calculated with the ground state orbitals and are therefore much too high. In the present approach we improve these energies by accounting for the relaxation of the orbitals in the charge transfer configurations. The necessary relaxation energies R can be obtained in separate calculations using mononuclear or binuclear model systems. The method is applied to a few examples, small molecules, binuclear transition metal complexes, and bulk NiO. It allows to obtaining fairly reliable estimates for J at costs that are not higher than those of conventional CAS-CI calculations. Therefore, extended and very time-consuming perturbation theory (PT2), configuration interaction (CI), or coupled cluster (CC) schemes on top of the CAS-CI calculation can be avoided and the modified CAS-CI (MCAS-CI) approach can be applied to rather large systems.

  14. Mapping intercellular CO2 mole fraction (Ci) in rosa rubiginosa leaves fed with abscisic acid by using chlorophyll fluorescence imaging. Significance Of ci estimated from leaf gas exchange

    PubMed

    Meyer; Genty

    1998-03-01

    Imaging of photochemical yield of photosystem II (PSII) computed from leaf chlorophyll fluorescence images and gas-exchange measurements were performed on Rosa rubiginosa leaflets during abscisic acid (ABA) addition. In air ABA induced a decrease of both the net CO2 assimilation (An) and the stomatal water vapor conductance (gs). After ABA treatment, imaging in transient nonphotorespiratory conditions (0.1% O2) revealed a heterogeneous decrease of PSII photochemical yield. This decline was fully reversed by a transient high CO2 concentration (7400 mol mol-1) in the leaf atmosphere. It was concluded that ABA primarily affected An by decreasing the CO2 supply at ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase. Therefore, the An versus intercellular mole fraction (Ci) relationship was assumed not to be affected by ABA, and images of Ci and gs were constructed from images of PSII photochemical yield under nonphotorespiratory conditions. The distribution of gs remained unimodal following ABA treatment. A comparison of calculations of Ci from images and gas exchange in ABA-treated leaves showed that the overestimation of Ci estimated from gas exchange was only partly due to heterogeneity. This overestimation was also attributed to the cuticular transpiration, which largely affects the calculation of the leaf conductance to CO2, when leaf conductance to water is low. PMID:9501127

  15. Performance of 500kCi Tritium Storage Vessel for WTRF

    SciTech Connect

    Paek, S.; Ahn, D.H.; Kim, K.R.; Chung, H.; Yim, S.P.; Lee, M.

    2005-07-15

    A prototype TSV (Tritide Storage Vessel) has been manufactured for the long-term storage of tritium of the WTRF (Wolsong Tritium Removal Facility). A performance test was carried out to demonstrate that the TSV could hold a minimum of 500kCi of tritium. This experiment was conducted by a batch type hydriding reaction. Hydrogen gas equivalent to 50kCi of tritium was reacted with the titanium sponge in a batch reaction. Experimental results for 10 batches show that the TSV has enough capacity to store 500kCi of tritium.

  16. Advanced Microsensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    This video looks at a spinoff application of the technology from advanced microsensors -- those that monitor and determine conditions of spacecraft like the Space Shuttle. The application featured is concerned with the monitoring of the health of premature babies.

  17. Mars as the Parent Body for the CI Carbonaceous Chondrites: Confirmation of Early Mars Biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandenburg, J. E.

    2003-07-01

    Mounting evidence suggests that CI Carbonaceaous Chondrites belong in the Mars meteorite family. They thus represent samples, like ALH84001, of the Noachian surface environment, and are rich in organic matter, suggesting a living environment.

  18. Interactions of Biogeochemical Cycles in Oncoid Microbialites from Cuatro Ciénegas, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corman, J. R.; Souza, V.; Elser, J. J.

    2010-04-01

    Modern microbialite systems may provide unique opportunities to study the feedbacks that couple or uncouple multiple biogeochemical cycles. Here we present results from a two-week manipulative ecosystem experiment using oncoid microbialites from Cuatro Ciénegas, Mexico.

  19. Communication: CDFT-CI couplings can be unreliable when there is fractional charge transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Mavros, Michael G.; Van Voorhis, Troy

    2015-12-21

    Constrained density functional theory with configuration interaction (CDFT-CI) is a useful, low-cost tool for the computational prediction of electronic couplings between pseudo-diabatic constrained electronic states. Such couplings are of paramount importance in electron transfer theory and transition state theory, among other areas of chemistry. Unfortunately, CDFT-CI occasionally fails significantly, predicting a coupling that does not decay exponentially with distance and/or overestimating the expected coupling by an order of magnitude or more. In this communication, we show that the eigenvalues of the difference density matrix between the two constrained states can be used as an a priori metric to determine when CDFT-CI are likely to be reliable: when the eigenvalues are near 0 or ±1, transfer of a whole electron is occurring, and CDFT-CI can be trusted. We demonstrate the utility of this metric with several illustrative examples.

  20. Communication: CDFT-CI couplings can be unreliable when there is fractional charge transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mavros, Michael G.; Van Voorhis, Troy

    2015-12-01

    Constrained density functional theory with configuration interaction (CDFT-CI) is a useful, low-cost tool for the computational prediction of electronic couplings between pseudo-diabatic constrained electronic states. Such couplings are of paramount importance in electron transfer theory and transition state theory, among other areas of chemistry. Unfortunately, CDFT-CI occasionally fails significantly, predicting a coupling that does not decay exponentially with distance and/or overestimating the expected coupling by an order of magnitude or more. In this communication, we show that the eigenvalues of the difference density matrix between the two constrained states can be used as an a priori metric to determine when CDFT-CI are likely to be reliable: when the eigenvalues are near 0 or ±1, transfer of a whole electron is occurring, and CDFT-CI can be trusted. We demonstrate the utility of this metric with several illustrative examples.

  1. PAT: From Western solid dosage forms to Chinese materia medica preparations using NIR-CI.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Luwei; Xu, Manfei; Wu, Zhisheng; Shi, Xinyuan; Qiao, Yanjiang

    2016-01-01

    Near-infrared chemical imaging (NIR-CI) is an emerging technology that combines traditional near-infrared spectroscopy with chemical imaging. Therefore, NIR-CI can extract spectral information from pharmaceutical products and simultaneously visualize the spatial distribution of chemical components. The rapid and non-destructive features of NIR-CI make it an attractive process analytical technology (PAT) for identifying and monitoring critical control parameters during the pharmaceutical manufacturing process. This review mainly focuses on the pharmaceutical applications of NIR-CI in each unit operation during the manufacturing processes, from the Western solid dosage forms to the Chinese materia medica preparations. Finally, future applications of chemical imaging in the pharmaceutical industry are discussed. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:25877484

  2. Nuclear track and compositional studies of olivines in CI and CM chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goswami, J. N.; Macdougall, J. D.

    1983-01-01

    The CI and CM chondrites, with bulk chemical compositions closely resembling solar values, are important for the study of early solar system processes. Noble gas and particle track studies have revealed that a majority of the CI and CM chondrites contain precompaction solar wind and solar flare irradiation records. A quantitative understanding of these records is important because it would allow constraints to be placed on the environment in which the irradiation occurred, and, therefore, on the mode of evolution of the CI and CM chondrites. The present investigation is concerned primarily with fossil track evidence, taking into account selected specimens of several CI and CM chondrites. In addition, the results are presented of extensive studies of the angular distributions of tracks in irradiated grains from four CM chondrites. The results provide information on the exposure geometry of the grains.

  3. Communication: CDFT-CI couplings can be unreliable when there is fractional charge transfer.

    PubMed

    Mavros, Michael G; Van Voorhis, Troy

    2015-12-21

    Constrained density functional theory with configuration interaction (CDFT-CI) is a useful, low-cost tool for the computational prediction of electronic couplings between pseudo-diabatic constrained electronic states. Such couplings are of paramount importance in electron transfer theory and transition state theory, among other areas of chemistry. Unfortunately, CDFT-CI occasionally fails significantly, predicting a coupling that does not decay exponentially with distance and/or overestimating the expected coupling by an order of magnitude or more. In this communication, we show that the eigenvalues of the difference density matrix between the two constrained states can be used as an a priori metric to determine when CDFT-CI are likely to be reliable: when the eigenvalues are near 0 or ±1, transfer of a whole electron is occurring, and CDFT-CI can be trusted. We demonstrate the utility of this metric with several illustrative examples. PMID:26696039

  4. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Spectra of CO and [CI] in protoplanetary disks (Kama+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kama, M.; Bruderer, S.; Carney, M.; Hogerheijde, M.; van Dishoeck, E. F.; Fedele, D.; Baryshev, A.; Boland, W.; Gusten, R.; Aikutalp, A.; Choi, Y.; Endo, A.; Frieswijk, W.; Karska, A.; Klaassen, P.; Koumpia, E.; Kristensen, L.; Leurini, S.; Nagy, Z.; Perez Beaupuits, J.-P.; Risacher, C.; van der Marel, N.; van Kempen, T. A.; van Weeren, R. J.; Wyrowski, F.; Yildiz, U. A.

    2016-04-01

    APEX CHAMP+ and FLASH spectra of CI 1-0, CI 2-1, and CO 6-5 towards protoplanetary disks. The data was delivered from the telescope in reduced form and is on the Ta (K) scale. Baselines have been subtracted with low-order (order 0,1,2) polynomials. Observations were carried out from 2008 through 2013, with typical on-source exposure times of 10-60 min. (2 data files).

  5. Carbonates and sulfates in CI chondrites - Formation by aqueous activity on the parent body

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fredriksson, Kurt; Kerridge, John F.

    1988-01-01

    Compositions and morphologies of dolomites, breunnerites, Ca-carbonates, Ca-sulfates and Mg, Ni, Na-sulfates, and their petrologic interrelations, in four CI chondrites are consistent with their having been formed by aqueous activity on the CI parent body. Radiochronometric data indicate that this activity took place very early in solar-system history. No evidence for original ('primitive') condensates seems to be present. However, alteration apparently took place without change in bulk meteorite composition.

  6. Music Perception and Appraisal: Cochlear Implant Users and Simulated CI Listening

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Rose; Uchanski, Rosalie M.

    2012-01-01

    Background The inability to hear music well may contribute to decreased quality of life for cochlear implant (CI) users. Researchers have reported recently on the generally poor ability of CI users’ to perceive music, and a few researchers have reported on the enjoyment of music by CI users. However, the relation between music perception skills and music enjoyment is much less explored. Only one study has attempted to predict CI users’ enjoyment and perception of music from the users’ demographic variables and other perceptual skills (Gfeller et al., 2008). Gfeller’s results yielded different predictive relationships for music perception and music enjoyment, and the relationships were weak, at best. Purpose The first goal of this study is to clarify the nature and relationship between music perception skills and musical enjoyment for CI users, by employing a battery of music tests. The second goal is to determine whether normal hearing (NH) subjects, listening with a CI-simulation, can be used as a model to represent actual CI users for either music enjoyment ratings or music perception tasks. Research Design A prospective, cross-sectional observational study. Original music stimuli (unprocessed) were presented to CI users, and music stimuli processed with CI-simulation software were presented to twenty NH listeners (CIsim). As a control, original music stimuli were also presented to five other NH listeners. All listeners appraised twenty-four musical excerpts, performed music perception tests, and filled out a musical background questionnaire. Music perception tests were the Appreciation of Music in Cochlear Implantees (AMICI), Montreal Battery for Evaluation of Amusia (MBEA), Melodic Contour Identification (MCI), and University of Washington Clinical Assessment of Music Perception (UW-CAMP). Study Sample Twenty-five NH adults (22 – 56 years old), recruited from the local and research communities, participated in the study. Ten adult CI users (46 – 80

  7. Octamerization of lambda CI repressor is needed for effective repression of P(RM) and efficient switching from lysogeny.

    PubMed

    Dodd, I B; Perkins, A J; Tsemitsidis, D; Egan, J B

    2001-11-15

    The CI repressor of bacteriophage lambda is a model for the role of cooperativity in the efficient functioning of genetic switches. Pairs of CI dimers interact to cooperatively occupy adjacent operator sites at O(R) and at O(L). These CI tetramers repress the lytic promoters and activate transcription of the cI gene from P(RM). CI is also able to octamerize, forming a large DNA loop between O(R) and O(L), but the physiological role of this is unclear. Another puzzle is that, although a dimer of CI is able to repress P(RM) by binding to the third operator at O(R), O(R)3, this binding seems too weak to affect CI production in the lysogenic state. Here we show that repression of P(RM) at lysogenic CI concentrations is absolutely dependent on O(L), in this case 3.8 kb away. A mutant defective in this CI negative autoregulation forms a lysogen with elevated CI levels that cannot efficiently switch from lysogeny to lytic development. Our results invalidate previous evidence that Cro binding to O(R)3 is important in prophage induction. We propose the octameric CI:O(R)-O(L) complex increases the affinity of CI for O(R)3 by allowing a CI tetramer to link O(R)3 and the third operator at O(L), O(L)3. PMID:11711436

  8. FIB-TEM Investigations of Fe-NI-Sulfides in the CI Chondrites Alais and Orgueil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berger, Eve L.; Lauretta, D. S.; Zega, T. J.; Keller, L. P.

    2013-01-01

    The CI chondrites are primitive meteorites with bulk compositions matching the solar photosphere for all but the lightest elements. They have been extensively aqueously altered, and are composed primarily of fine-grained phyllosilicate matrix material which is host to carbonates, sulfates, sulfides, and minor amounts of olivine and pyroxene. The alteration, while extensive, is heterogeneous. For example, CI-chondrite cubanite and carbonate grains differ on mm to sub-mm scales, demonstrating multiple aqueous episodes. CI-chondrite variability is also evidenced by degree of brecciation, abundance and size of coarse-grained phyllosilicates, olivine and pyroxene abundance, as well as Ni-content and size of sulfide grains. Our previous work revealed Orgueil sulfide grains with variable Ni-contents, metal:S ratios, crystal structures and textures. We continue to explore the variability of CI-chondrite pyrrhotite (Po, (FeNi)1-xS) and pentlandite (Pn, (Fe,Ni)9S8) grains. We investigate the microstructure of sulfides within and among CI-chondrite meteorites in order to place constraints on the conditions under which they formed.

  9. [CI] and CO in local galaxies from the Beyond the Peak Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crocker, Alison F.; Pellegrini, E. W.; Smith, J. T.; Beyond The Peak Team

    2014-01-01

    From simple plane-parallel photodissociation region (PDR) models, neutral carbon ([CI]) is predicted to exist in a thin layer between C+ and CO on the surface of molecular clouds (e.g. (Hollenbach & Tielens 1999, Kaufman et al. 1999). However, observations of the Milky Way and the Magellanic Clouds indicate that [CI] may instead be a better tracer of the entire cold gas reservoir, often very well correlated with emission from 12CO(1-0) or 13CO(1-0) (e.g. Keene et al. 1996, Bolatto et al. 2000, Shimajiri et al. 2013). Here, we present the observed [CI] fluxes from the Beyond the Peak sample of 22 nearby galaxies observed with the Herschel FTS spectrometer. We first attempt to model all CO transitions and the [CI] lines as a single plane-parallel PDR, but this fails in all cases. Instead, a two-component PDR model is able to fit the CO SLED of nearly all galaxies. We investigate correlations of the [CI] fluxes and line ratio with properties of the cooler component determined from the PDR fits.

  10. The Relation between Nonverbal IQ and Postoperative CI Outcomes in Cochlear Implant Users: Preliminary Result.

    PubMed

    Park, Mina; Song, Jae-Jin; Oh, Seo Jin; Shin, Min-Sup; Lee, Jun Ho; Oh, Seung Ha

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. This study assessed the correlation between performance intelligence and the postoperative cochlear implant (CI) outcome in Korean-speaking children. In addition, the relationship between the performance intelligence subscales and the post-CI speech outcome was evaluated. Materials and Methods. Thirteen pediatric CI users (five males, eight females; median age at implantation 6.2 (range 1.3-14.2) years; median age at intelligence test 9.3 (range 5-16) years) who were tested using the Korean Educational Development Institute-Wechsler Intelligence Scale for children were studied. The correlations between the intelligence scores and 1-2 years postoperative Categories of Auditory Performance (CAP) scores and between subscales of performance and 1-2 years postoperative CAP scores were analyzed. Results. There was no correlation between the categories of verbal intelligence quotient (IQ) and performance IQ for "mentally retarded" and "average," respectively (Spearman's rho = 0.42, P = 0.15). There was a strong correlation between performance IQ and the postoperative CAP scale (Spearman's rho = 0.8977, P = 0.0008). "Picture arrangement" and "picture completion," reflecting social cognition, were strongly correlated with the postoperative CAP scales. Conclusion. Performance intelligence, especially social cognition, was strongly related to the postoperative CI outcome of cochlear implant users. Therefore, auditory rehabilitation, including social rehabilitation, should maximize the postoperative CI outcomes. PMID:26236723

  11. The Relation between Nonverbal IQ and Postoperative CI Outcomes in Cochlear Implant Users: Preliminary Result

    PubMed Central

    Park, Mina; Song, Jae-Jin; Oh, Seo Jin; Shin, Min-Sup; Lee, Jun Ho; Oh, Seung Ha

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. This study assessed the correlation between performance intelligence and the postoperative cochlear implant (CI) outcome in Korean-speaking children. In addition, the relationship between the performance intelligence subscales and the post-CI speech outcome was evaluated. Materials and Methods. Thirteen pediatric CI users (five males, eight females; median age at implantation 6.2 (range 1.3–14.2) years; median age at intelligence test 9.3 (range 5–16) years) who were tested using the Korean Educational Development Institute-Wechsler Intelligence Scale for children were studied. The correlations between the intelligence scores and 1-2 years postoperative Categories of Auditory Performance (CAP) scores and between subscales of performance and 1-2 years postoperative CAP scores were analyzed. Results. There was no correlation between the categories of verbal intelligence quotient (IQ) and performance IQ for “mentally retarded” and “average,” respectively (Spearman's rho = 0.42, P = 0.15). There was a strong correlation between performance IQ and the postoperative CAP scale (Spearman's rho = 0.8977, P = 0.0008). “Picture arrangement” and “picture completion,” reflecting social cognition, were strongly correlated with the postoperative CAP scales. Conclusion. Performance intelligence, especially social cognition, was strongly related to the postoperative CI outcome of cochlear implant users. Therefore, auditory rehabilitation, including social rehabilitation, should maximize the postoperative CI outcomes. PMID:26236723

  12. Technological Advancements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennedy, Mike

    2010-01-01

    The influx of technology has brought significant improvements to school facilities. Many of those advancements can be found in classrooms, but when students head down the hall to use the washrooms, they are likely to find a host of technological innovations that have improved conditions in that part of the building. This article describes modern…

  13. Research Advances

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Angela G.

    2004-01-01

    Research advances, a new feature in Journal of Chemical Engineering that brings information about innovations in current areas of research to high school and college science faculty with an intent to provide educators with timely descriptions of latest progress in research that can be integrated into existing courses to update course content and…

  14. 40 CFR 60.4210 - What are my compliance requirements if I am a stationary CI internal combustion engine manufacturer?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... certified to the standards in 40 CFR part 1039. (b) Stationary CI internal combustion engine manufacturers... certified to the emission standards in 40 CFR part 1039. Stationary CI internal combustion engine... labeled according to 40 CFR 1039.20. (2) Stationary CI internal combustion engines manufactured from......

  15. 40 CFR 60.4210 - What are my compliance requirements if I am a stationary CI internal combustion engine manufacturer?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... certified to the standards in 40 CFR part 1039. (b) Stationary CI internal combustion engine manufacturers... certified to the emission standards in 40 CFR part 1039. Stationary CI internal combustion engine... labeled according to 40 CFR 1039.20. (2) Stationary CI internal combustion engines manufactured from......

  16. An efficient implementation of the full-CI method using an ( n-2)-electron projection space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, Robert J.; Zarrabian, Sohrab

    1989-06-01

    The determinant full-CI algorithm of Zarrabian, Sarma and Paldus (Chem. Phys. Letters 158 (1989) 183) has been implemented for efficient operation on parallel vector computers. For few electrons ( n) in many orbitals ( m) and nCI determinants, the floating point operation count is O ( nCIm2n2), dominated by matrix multiplication. Timings reported include 5.6×10 7 and 7.7×10 7 determinant calculations on oxygen and its anion in 5s4p3d2f1g and 4s3p2d1f+spd basis sets respectively. Consideration is given to exact manipulation of CI expansions much larger than those used here.

  17. The Addition of EI/CI Capability to the Mattauch-herzog Spectrograph with EOID

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fergusson, G. J.; Koslin, M. E.

    1979-01-01

    A modification was made to the Mattauch-Herzog Spectrograph with an electro-optical ion detector (EOID) previously designed and constructed, so that it would be capable of operating not only in the electron-impact (EI) mode of ionization, but also in the chemical ionization (CI) mode. This modification necessitated an effort in three specific design areas: (1) sample inlet; (2) ion source and analyzer regions; and (3) the pumping system. In addition, an appropriate electronics package had to be designed to control and operate the combined EI/CI source.

  18. Modulation of volatile organic compound formation in the Mycodiesel-producing endophyte Hypoxylon sp. CI-4.

    PubMed

    Ul-Hassan, Syed Riyaz; Strobel, Gary A; Booth, Eric; Knighton, Berk; Floerchinger, Cody; Sears, Joe

    2012-02-01

    An endophytic Hypoxylon sp. (strain CI-4) producing a wide spectrum of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), including 1,8-cineole, 1-methyl-1,4-cyclohexadiene and cyclohexane, 1,2,4-tris(methylene), was selected as a candidate for the modulation of VOC production. This was done in order to learn if the production of these and other VOCs can be affected by using agents that may modulate the epigenetics of the fungus. Many of the VOCs made by this organism are of interest because of their high energy densities and thus the potential they might have as Mycodiesel fuels. Strain CI-4 was exposed to the epigenetic modulators suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA, a histone deacetylase) and 5-azacytidine (AZA, a DNA methyltransferase inhibitor). After these treatments the organism displayed striking cultural changes, including variations in pigmentation, growth rates and odour, in addition to significant differences in the bioactivities of the VOCs. The resulting variants were designated CI4-B, CI4-AZA and CI4-SAHA. GC/MS analyses of the VOCs produced by the variants showed considerable variation, with the emergence of several compounds not previously observed in the wild-type, particularly an array of tentatively identified terpenes such as α-thujene, sabinene, γ-terpinene, α-terpinolene and β-selinene, in addition to several primary and secondary alkanes, alkenes, organic acids and derivatives of benzene. Proton transfer reaction mass spectroscopic analyses showed a marked increase in the ratio of ethanol (mass 47) to the total mass of all other ionizable VOCs, from ~0.6 in the untreated strain CI-4 to ~0.8 in CI-4 grown in the presence of AZA. Strain CI4-B was created by exposure of the fungus to 100 µM SAHA; upon removal of the epigenetic modulator from the culture medium, it did not revert to the wild-type phenotype. Results of this study have implications for understanding why there may be a wide range of VOCs found in various isolates of this fungus in nature

  19. Full CI benchmark calculations for several states of the same symmetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Taylor, Peter R.

    1987-01-01

    Full CI (FCI) wave functions are used to compute energies for several electronic states of the same symmetry for SiH2, CH2, and CH2(+). It is found that CASSCF/multireference CI wave functions yield results very similar to FCI, irrespective of whether the CASSCF MOs are optimized independently for each state or using an average of the CASSCF energies for all desired states. The ionization potentials and excitation energies obtained from the FCI calculations should help calibrate methods (such as Green's function approaches, equations of motion and propagator methods, and cluster expansions) in which energy differences are computed directly.

  20. Advanced Combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, Gordon R.

    2013-03-11

    The activity reported in this presentation is to provide the mechanical and physical property information needed to allow rational design, development and/or choice of alloys, manufacturing approaches, and environmental exposure and component life models to enable oxy-fuel combustion boilers to operate at Ultra-Supercritical (up to 650{degrees}C & between 22-30 MPa) and/or Advanced Ultra-Supercritical conditions (760{degrees}C & 35 MPa).

  1. Advanced computing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Advanced concepts in hardware, software and algorithms are being pursued for application in next generation space computers and for ground based analysis of space data. The research program focuses on massively parallel computation and neural networks, as well as optical processing and optical networking which are discussed under photonics. Also included are theoretical programs in neural and nonlinear science, and device development for magnetic and ferroelectric memories.

  2. Advanced Nanoemulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fryd, Michael M.; Mason, Thomas G.

    2012-05-01

    Recent advances in the growing field of nanoemulsions are opening up new applications in many areas such as pharmaceuticals, foods, and cosmetics. Moreover, highly controlled nanoemulsions can also serve as excellent model systems for investigating basic scientific questions about soft matter. Here, we highlight some of the most recent developments in nanoemulsions, focusing on methods of formation, surface modification, material properties, and characterization. These developments provide insight into the substantial advantages that nanoemulsions can offer over their microscale emulsion counterparts.

  3. The complete nucleotide sequence and genomic organization of Citrus Leprosis associated Virus, Cytoplasmatic type (CiLV-C).

    PubMed

    Pascon, Renata C; Kitajima, João Paulo; Breton, Michèle C; Assumpção, Laura; Greggio, Christian; Zanca, Almir S; Okura, Vagner Katsumi; Alegria, Marcos C; Camargo, Maria E; Silva, Giovana G C; Cardozo, Jussara C; Vallim, Marcelo A; Franco, Sulamita F; Silva, Vitor H; Jordão, Hamilton; Oliveira, Fernanda; Giachetto, Poliana F; Ferrari, Fernanda; Aguilar-Vildoso, Carlos I; Franchiscini, Fabrício J B; Silva, José M F; Arruda, Paulo; Ferro, Jesus A; Reinach, Fernando; da Silva, Ana Cláudia Rasera

    2006-06-01

    The Citrus leprosis disease (CiL) is associated to a virus (CiLV) transmitted by Brevipalpus spp. mites (Acari: Tenuipalpidae). CiL is endemic in Brazil and its recently spreading to Central America represents a threat to citrus industry in the USA. Electron microscopy images show two forms of CiLV: a rare nuclear form, characterized by rod-shaped naked particle (CiLV-N) and a common cytoplasmic form (CiLV-C) associated with bacilliform-enveloped particle and cytoplasmic viroplasm. Due to this morphological feature, CiLV-C has been treated as Rhabdovirus-like. In this paper we present the complete nucleotide sequence and genomic organization of CiLV-C. It is a bipartite virus with sequence similarity to ssRNA positive plant virus. RNA1 encodes a putative replicase polyprotein and an ORF with no known function. RNA2 encodes 4 ORFs. pl5, p24 and p61 have no significant similarity to any known proteins and p32 encodes a protein with similarity to a viral movement protein. The CiLV-C sequences are associated with typical symptoms of CiL by RT-PCR. Phylogenetic analysis suggests that CiLV-C is probably a member of a new family of plant virus evolutionarily related to Tobamovirus. PMID:16732481

  4. Doric, Ionic, Bionic and Printmaking.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hammond, Mary Alice

    1981-01-01

    Describes a combined local history/printmaking project conducted by students in grades one through nine at Armitage Academy in Kenosha, Wisconsin. Students studied and drew local buildings and printed the results as a calendar. (SJL)

  5. The Size, Scale, and Structure Concept Inventory (S3CI) for Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gingrich, E. C.; Ladd, E. F.; Nottis, K. E. K.; Udomprasert, P.; Goodman, A. A.

    2015-11-01

    We present a concept inventory to evaluate student understanding of size, scale, and structure concepts in the astronomical context. Students harbor misconceptions regarding these concepts, and these misconceptions often persist even after instruction. Evaluation of these concepts prior to as well as after instruction can ensure misconceptions are addressed. Currently, no concept inventories focus exclusively on these geometrical ideas, so we have developed the Size, Scale and Structure Concept Inventory (S3CI). In fall 2013, we piloted a 24-item version of the S3CI in an introductory astronomy course at a small private university. We performed an item analysis and estimated the internal consistency reliability for the instrument. Based on these analyses, problematic questions were revised for a second version. We discuss the results from the pilot phase and preview our updated test in this work. A valid and reliable concept inventory has the potential to accurately evaluate undergraduates' understanding of size, scale, and structure concepts in the astronomical context, as well as assess conceptual change after targeted instruction. Lessons learned in the evaluation of the initial version of the S3CI can guide future development of this and other astronomical concept inventories. Instructors interested in participating in the ongoing development of the S3CI should contact the authors.

  6. Deubiquitination of Ci/Gli by Usp7/HAUSP Regulates Hedgehog Signaling.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zizhang; Yao, Xia; Li, Shuang; Xiong, Yue; Dong, Xiaohua; Zhao, Yun; Jiang, Jin; Zhang, Qing

    2015-07-01

    Hedgehog (Hh) signaling plays essential roles in animal development and tissue homeostasis, and its misregulation causes congenital diseases and cancers. Regulation of the ubiquitin/proteasome-mediated proteolysis of Ci/Gli transcription factors is central to Hh signaling, but whether deubiquitinase is involved in this process remains unknown. Here, we show that Hh stimulates the binding of a ubiquitin-specific protease Usp7 to Ci, which positively regulates Hh signaling activity through inhibiting Ci ubiquitination and degradation mediated by both Slimb-Cul1 and Hib-Cul3 E3 ligases. Furthermore, we find that Usp7 forms a complex with GMP-synthetase (GMPS) to promote Hh pathway activity. Finally, we show that the mammalian counterpart of Usp7, HAUSP, positively regulates Hh signaling by modulating Gli ubiquitination and stability. Our findings reveal a conserved mechanism by which Ci/Gli is stabilized by a deubiquitination enzyme and identify Usp7/HUASP as a critical regulator of Hh signaling and potential therapeutic target for Hh-related cancers. PMID:26120032

  7. Cuatro Ciénegas, a Desert Oasis with Active Stromatolites: An Astrobiological Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souza, V.; Breitbart, M.; Hollander, D.; Elser, J.; Meadows, V.; Siefert, J.

    2010-04-01

    Cuatro Ciénegas Bolson is a desert valley, ringed by mountains, fed by a deep underground aquifer. The resultant pozas support active stromatolitic growth. We report on the field site as a proxy for earlier earth dominated microbial systems.

  8. 40 CFR 721.6045 - Phosphinothioic acid, bis(2,4,4-trimethylpentyl)- (9CI).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Phosphinothioic acid, bis(2,4,4-trimethylpentyl)- (9CI). 721.6045 Section 721.6045 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances...

  9. 40 CFR 721.6045 - Phosphinothioic acid, bis(2,4,4-trimethylpentyl)- (9CI).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Phosphinothioic acid, bis(2,4,4-trimethylpentyl)- (9CI). 721.6045 Section 721.6045 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances...

  10. The Role of Journals in Building up Communities: The Experience of "Ciência em Tela"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martins, Isabel; de Souza Barros, Susana

    2015-01-01

    "Ciência em Tela" is an open access Brazilian science teacher education online journal that has been published twice a year since 2008 and which encourages the participation of professionals with different backgrounds and the submission of a variety of textual genres, besides research papers. Another feature is that the journal includes…

  11. Collaborative efforts for managing Melaleuca in the Ciénega de Zapata, Cuba

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Ciénega de Zapata Biosphere Reserve is the largest protected area not only in Cuba but also throughout the Caribbean. This swamp ecosystem is characterized by a high biodiversity that comprises several endemic birds, reptiles and invertebrates and is visited by 65 species of birds during their a...

  12. 10 CFR 709.17 - Final disposition of CI evaluation findings and recommendations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... recommendations. 709.17 Section 709.17 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY COUNTERINTELLIGENCE EVALUATION PROGRAM CI... Intelligence and Counterintelligence must recommend, in writing, to the appropriate Program Manager that the... recommendation of the Director, Office of Intelligence and Counterintelligence, the matter is referred to...

  13. 10 CFR 709.17 - Final disposition of CI evaluation findings and recommendations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... recommendations. 709.17 Section 709.17 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY COUNTERINTELLIGENCE EVALUATION PROGRAM CI... Intelligence and Counterintelligence must recommend, in writing, to the appropriate Program Manager that the... recommendation of the Director, Office of Intelligence and Counterintelligence, the matter is referred to...

  14. 10 CFR 709.16 - Application of Counterintelligence Evaluation Review Boards in reaching conclusions regarding CI...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Application of Counterintelligence Evaluation Review... ENERGY COUNTERINTELLIGENCE EVALUATION PROGRAM CI Evaluation Protocols and Protection of National Security § 709.16 Application of Counterintelligence Evaluation Review Boards in reaching conclusions...

  15. 10 CFR 709.17 - Final disposition of CI evaluation findings and recommendations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... recommendations. 709.17 Section 709.17 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY COUNTERINTELLIGENCE EVALUATION PROGRAM CI... Intelligence and Counterintelligence must recommend, in writing, to the appropriate Program Manager that the... recommendation of the Director, Office of Intelligence and Counterintelligence, the matter is referred to...

  16. 10 CFR 709.16 - Application of Counterintelligence Evaluation Review Boards in reaching conclusions regarding CI...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Application of Counterintelligence Evaluation Review... ENERGY COUNTERINTELLIGENCE EVALUATION PROGRAM CI Evaluation Protocols and Protection of National Security § 709.16 Application of Counterintelligence Evaluation Review Boards in reaching conclusions...

  17. 10 CFR 709.16 - Application of Counterintelligence Evaluation Review Boards in reaching conclusions regarding CI...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Application of Counterintelligence Evaluation Review... ENERGY COUNTERINTELLIGENCE EVALUATION PROGRAM CI Evaluation Protocols and Protection of National Security § 709.16 Application of Counterintelligence Evaluation Review Boards in reaching conclusions...

  18. 10 CFR 709.16 - Application of Counterintelligence Evaluation Review Boards in reaching conclusions regarding CI...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Application of Counterintelligence Evaluation Review... ENERGY COUNTERINTELLIGENCE EVALUATION PROGRAM CI Evaluation Protocols and Protection of National Security § 709.16 Application of Counterintelligence Evaluation Review Boards in reaching conclusions...

  19. 10 CFR 709.16 - Application of Counterintelligence Evaluation Review Boards in reaching conclusions regarding CI...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Application of Counterintelligence Evaluation Review... ENERGY COUNTERINTELLIGENCE EVALUATION PROGRAM CI Evaluation Protocols and Protection of National Security § 709.16 Application of Counterintelligence Evaluation Review Boards in reaching conclusions...

  20. 10 CFR 709.17 - Final disposition of CI evaluation findings and recommendations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... recommendations. 709.17 Section 709.17 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY COUNTERINTELLIGENCE EVALUATION PROGRAM CI... Intelligence and Counterintelligence must recommend, in writing, to the appropriate Program Manager that the... recommendation of the Director, Office of Intelligence and Counterintelligence, the matter is referred to...

  1. 10 CFR 709.17 - Final disposition of CI evaluation findings and recommendations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... recommendations. 709.17 Section 709.17 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY COUNTERINTELLIGENCE EVALUATION PROGRAM CI... Intelligence and Counterintelligence must recommend, in writing, to the appropriate Program Manager that the covered person's access be approved or retained, or denied or revoked. (b) If the Program Manager...

  2. Enhancer-like long-range transcriptional activation by λ CI-mediated DNA looping

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Lun; Murchland, Iain; Shearwin, Keith E.; Dodd, Ian B.

    2013-01-01

    How distant enhancer elements regulate the assembly of a transcription complex at a promoter remains poorly understood. Here, we use long-range gene regulation by the bacteriophage λ CI protein as a powerful system to examine this process in vivo. A 2.3-kb DNA loop, formed by CI bridging its binding sites at OR and OL, is known already to enhance repression at the lysogenic promoter PRM, located at OR. Here, we show that CI looping also activates PRM by allowing the C-terminal domain of the α subunit of the RNA polymerase bound at PRM to contact a DNA site adjacent to the distal CI sites at OL. Our results establish OL as a multifaceted enhancer element, able to activate transcription from long distances independently of orientation and position. We develop a physicochemical model of our in vivo data and use it to show that the observed activation is consistent with a simple recruitment mechanism, where the α–C-terminal domain to DNA contact need only provide ∼2.7 kcal/mol of additional binding energy for RNA polymerase. Structural modeling of this complete enhancer–promoter complex reveals how the contact is achieved and regulated, and suggests that distal enhancer elements, once appropriately positioned at the promoter, can function in essentially the same way as proximal promoter elements. PMID:23382214

  3. A rational reduction of CI expansions: combining localized molecular orbitals and selected charge excitations.

    PubMed

    Krah, Tim; Ben Amor, Nadia; Maynau, Daniel; Berger, J A; Robert, Vincent

    2014-07-01

    Based on localized molecular orbitals, the proposed method reduces large configuration interaction (CI) spaces while maintaining agreement with reference values. Our strategy concentrates the numerical effort on physically pertinent CI-contributions and is to be considered as a tool to tackle large systems including numerous open-shells. To show the efficiency of our method we consider two 4-electron parent systems. First, we illustrate our approach by describing the van der Waals interactions in the (H2)2 system. By systematically including local correlation, dispersion and charge transfer mechanisms, we show that 90% of the reference full CI dissociation energy of the H2 dimer is reproduced using only 3% of the full CI space. Second, the conformational cis/trans rotation barrier of the butadiene molecule is remarkably reproduced (97% of the reference value) with less than 1% of the reference space. This work paves the way to numerical strategies which afford the electronic structure determination of large open-shell systems avoiding the exponential limitation. At the same time, a physical analysis of the contents of the wave function is offered. PMID:24935105

  4. A full CI treatment of Ne atom - A benchmark calculation performed on the NAS CRAY 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, C. W., Jr.; Langhoff, S. R.; Partridge, H.; Taylor, P. R.

    1986-01-01

    Full CI calculations are performed for Ne atom using Gaussian basis sets of up to triple-zeta plus double polarization quality. The total valence correlation energy through double, triple, quadruple and octuple excitations is compared for eight different basis sets. These results are expected to be an important benchmark for calibrating methods for estimating the importance of higher excitations.

  5. 40 CFR 721.9840 - Tungstate (W12(OH)2O386-) hexasodium (9CI).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Tungstate (W12(OH)2O386-) hexasodium... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9840 Tungstate (W12(OH)2O386-) hexasodium (9CI). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as tungstate...

  6. 40 CFR 721.9840 - Tungstate (W12(OH)2O386-) hexasodium (9CI).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Tungstate (W12(OH)2O386-) hexasodium... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9840 Tungstate (W12(OH)2O386-) hexasodium (9CI). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as tungstate...

  7. AEROBIC AND ANAEROBIC TREATMENT OF C.I. DISPERSE BLUE 79 - VOLUME I

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study was conducted to determine the fate of C.I. Disperse Blue 79, one of the largest production volume dyes, and select biodegradation products in a conventionally operated activated sludge process and an anaerobic sludge digestion system. To achieve this objective, a pilo...

  8. AEROBIC AND ANAEROBIC TREATMENT OF C.I. DISPERSE BLUE 79 - VOLUME II, APPENDICES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study was conducted to determine the fate of C.I. Disperse Blue 79, one of the largest production volume dyes, and select biodegradation products in a conventionally operated activated sludge process and an anaerobic sludge digestion system. To achieve this objective, a pilo...

  9. Genetics of Leaf Rust Resistance in the Winter Wheat Line CI13227

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The winter wheat line CI13227 with slow rusting resistance to leaf rust was crossed and backcrossed to Thatcher (Tc) wheat. Backcross (BC) F2 families were tested for seedling resistance and segregated in a 1:1 ratio for families that segregated for resistance and families that were homozygous susce...

  10. Magnetite in CI carbonaceous meteorites - Origin by aqueous activity on a planetesimal surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerridge, J. F.; Mackay, A. L.; Boynton, W. V.

    1979-01-01

    The composition and morphology of magnetite in CI carbonaceous meteorites appear incompatible with a nebular origin. Mineralization on the meteorite parent body is a more plausible mode of formation. The iodine-xenon age of this material therefore dates an episode of secondary mineralization on a planetesimal rather than the epoch of condensation in the primitive solar nebula.

  11. Enhancer-like long-range transcriptional activation by λ CI-mediated DNA looping.

    PubMed

    Cui, Lun; Murchland, Iain; Shearwin, Keith E; Dodd, Ian B

    2013-02-19

    How distant enhancer elements regulate the assembly of a transcription complex at a promoter remains poorly understood. Here, we use long-range gene regulation by the bacteriophage λ CI protein as a powerful system to examine this process in vivo. A 2.3-kb DNA loop, formed by CI bridging its binding sites at OR and OL, is known already to enhance repression at the lysogenic promoter PRM, located at OR. Here, we show that CI looping also activates PRM by allowing the C-terminal domain of the α subunit of the RNA polymerase bound at PRM to contact a DNA site adjacent to the distal CI sites at OL. Our results establish OL as a multifaceted enhancer element, able to activate transcription from long distances independently of orientation and position. We develop a physicochemical model of our in vivo data and use it to show that the observed activation is consistent with a simple recruitment mechanism, where the α-C-terminal domain to DNA contact need only provide ∼2.7 kcal/mol of additional binding energy for RNA polymerase. Structural modeling of this complete enhancer-promoter complex reveals how the contact is achieved and regulated, and suggests that distal enhancer elements, once appropriately positioned at the promoter, can function in essentially the same way as proximal promoter elements. PMID:23382214

  12. HST - GHRS observations of CO and CI fill in the beta -Pictoris circumstellar disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jolly, A.; McPhate, J. B.; Lecavelier, A.; Lagrange, A. M.; Lemaire, J. L.; Feldman, P. D.; Vidal Madjar, A.; Ferlet, R.; Malmasson, D.; Rostas, F.

    1998-01-01

    GHRS-EchA and G160M spectra of beta -Pictoris have been obtained in the 1400-1600 Angstroms range. A detailed analysis of the CO A-X (0-0, 1-0, 2-0) bands and of the CI lambda 1561 Angstroms multiplet is presented. A column density of the order of 2 10(15) cm(-2) is found for both species. For CO, the rotational temperature is found close to 20 K and the turbulent Doppler width is b=0.8 km.s(-1) . Including the (13) CO lines in the fit allows an estimate of the (13) CO abundance: R=(12) CO/(13) CO=20. This anomalous ratio is tentatively interpreted as being due to chemical fractionation. For the CI triplet, the absorption profile is best fitted by a combination of four velocity components matching those observed independently at the same moment from ground in the CaII H and K lines. The most intense component corresponds to zero relative velocity while the others are shifted by 3 to 10 km s(-1) . The large turbulent width of the components (4.2 km s(-1) ), the statistical population of the ground state fine structure levels and the similar column densities of CI and CO are interpreted as indicating that CI is formed by photodissociation of CO and destroyed by photoionization. The velocity structure would then indicate that part of CI is formed at large distance (S{sc im100 AU) from CO evaporating from cometary bodies while another part originates closer to the star from fast moving cometary bodies with high excentricity. Based on observations with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy Inc., under NASA Contract NAS5-26555.

  13. Observational Approach to Molecular Cloud Evolutation with the Submillimeter-Wave CI Lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oka, T.; Yamamoto, S.

    Neutral carbon atoms (CI) play important roles both in chemistry and cooling processes of interstellar molecular clouds. It is thus crucial to explore its large area distribution to obtain information on formation processes and thermal balance of molecular clouds. However, observations of the submillimeter-wave CI lines have been limited to small areas around some representative objects. We have constructed a 1.2 m submillimeter-wave telescope at the summit of Mt.Fuji. The telescope was designed for the exclusive use of surveying molecular clouds in two submillimeter-wave CI lines, 3 P1 -3 P0 (492GHz) and 3 P2 -3 P1 (809 GHz), of atomic carbon. A superconductor-insulator-superconductor (SIS) mixer receiver was equipped on the Nasmyth focus of the telescope. The receiver noise temperatures [Trx(DSB)] are 300 K and 1000 K for the 492 GHz and the 809 GHz mixers, respectively. The intermediate frequency is centered at 2 GHz, having a 700 MHz bandwidth. An acousto-optical spectrometer (AOS) with 1024 channel outputs is used as a receiver backend. The telescope was installed at Nishi-yasugawara (alt. 3725 m), which is 200 m north of the highest peak, Kengamine (3776 m), in July 1998. It has b en operatede successfully during 4 observing seasons in a remote way from the Hongo campus of the University of Tokyo. We have already observed more than 40 square degrees of the sky with the CI 492 GHz line. The distribution of CI emission is found to be different from those of the 13 CO or C1 8 O emission in some clouds. These differences are discussed in relation to formation processes of molecular clouds.

  14. Alteration on asteroids: Insights from CM/CI meteorite mineralogy and midwave-infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McAdam, M.; Sunshine, J.; Kelley, M.; Howard, K.; McCoy, T.

    2014-07-01

    Introduction: Primitive, dark asteroids have few spectral features in the visible and near-infrared (NIR) in the 0.5--2.5 μ m region. Traditional classification of these asteroids has relied mainly on the presence of a 0.7 μ m charge-transfer band and the slope of the spectrum in the NIR. While the 0.7 μ m charge-transfer band has been attributed to phyllosilicates, the presence of this band is uncorrelated to total amount of phyllosilicates in well studied CM/CI meteorites. It is, therefore, not possible to identify specific compositions or water content of asteroids using this wavelength region. The work presented here seeks to augment the understanding of the composition of dark asteroids by studying CM/CI meteorites in the mid-infrared (MIR, 8 to 25 μ m). Observed compositional trends as a function of alteration in the MIR spectra of well-studied CM/CI meteorites are used as a basis for interpreting MIR spectra of asteroids. MIR Studies of CM/CI meteorites: CM and CI meteorites have well understood mineralogical variations. These meteorites underwent a water-rock reaction (aqueous alteration) on their parent bodies. This reaction converted their initially anhydrous silicates into hydrated phyllosilicates. In many meteorites, this process is incomplete. As such, the meteorites are complex mixtures of phyllosilicates, anhydrous silicates, and accessory phases. The MIR spectra of the CM/CI meteorites reflect this complexity. Our studies indicate that features in the 10--13 μ m region are combination features of Mg-rich phyllosilicate absorptions and anhydrous olivine. The position of this feature is directly correlated to total abundance of phyllosilicates and therefore can be used remotely to determine the amount of alteration an asteroid has experienced. Preliminary Studies of Dark Asteroids: Preliminary studies of dark asteroids using archived Spitzer Space Telescope Infrared Spectrograph data show that some dark asteroids have features that are similar to

  15. Are CI Chondrites Cometary Samples? A Search for Olivine and Use as a Discrimination Index.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Gac, Y.; Kearsley, A. T.; Bland, P. A.; Russell, S. S.

    2009-04-01

    CI chondrites are among the most unusual type of carbonaceous chondrites. There are only five CI1 meteorite falls. They are heavily altered (BULLOCK et al., 2005), yet show a similar bulk composition to the solar photosphere (ANDERS and GREVESSE, 1989; LODDERS, 2003). There still remains uncertainties about the origin and formation of the parent bodies for such meteorites. One theory is that CI chondrites derive from cometary nuclei, based on evidence from textural and mineralogical arguments (CAMPINS and SWINDLE, 1998) and orbital parameters (GOUNELLE et al., 2006). We now have known cometary material to compare to CI chondrites. The NASA sample return mission Stardust returned to Earth on January 2006. This mission collected cometary dust particles by flying through the coma of comet 81P/Wild 2. The Preliminary Examination (Science, 314, 2006) and subsequent studies (MaPS, 43, 2008), showed that expected hydrated minerals seem to be absent. This may in part be because finer-grained hydrated minerals are less likely to survive the collection process (ISHII et al., 2008) although experimental studies (BURCHELL et al., 2006; NOGUCHI et al., 2007) have shown that coarser (> m) phyllosilicates can survive capture under conditions analogous to the Stardust encounter. To determine the relationship between CIs and returned cometary material, we may therefore have to focus on the distinctive composition of anhydrous minerals, which are rare in CI meteorites. Olivine is a common mineral in the solar system, and has been reported in diverse compositions within Stardust samples, especially with distinctive levels of Fe, Cr and Mn. In cold cometary bodies it is unlikely that the chemical composition of olivine will have been affected by parent body processing, so olivines are likely to be unaltered and could provide evidence for any primary genetic link between CIs and cometary material. In this study we present an optimised analytical technique to detect micrometer

  16. Advanced LIGO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LIGO Scientific Collaboration; Aasi, J.; Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T.; Abernathy, M. R.; Ackley, K.; Adams, C.; Adams, T.; Addesso, P.; Adhikari, R. X.; Adya, V.; Affeldt, C.; Aggarwal, N.; Aguiar, O. D.; Ain, A.; Ajith, P.; Alemic, A.; Allen, B.; Amariutei, D.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arai, K.; Araya, M. C.; Arceneaux, C.; Areeda, J. S.; Ashton, G.; Ast, S.; Aston, S. M.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Aylott, B. E.; Babak, S.; Baker, P. T.; Ballmer, S. W.; Barayoga, J. C.; Barbet, M.; Barclay, S.; Barish, B. C.; Barker, D.; Barr, B.; Barsotti, L.; Bartlett, J.; Barton, M. A.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Batch, J. C.; Baune, C.; Behnke, B.; Bell, A. S.; Bell, C.; Benacquista, M.; Bergman, J.; Bergmann, G.; Berry, C. P. L.; Betzwieser, J.; Bhagwat, S.; Bhandare, R.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Birch, J.; Biscans, S.; Biwer, C.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blackburn, L.; Blair, C. D.; Blair, D.; Bock, O.; Bodiya, T. P.; Bojtos, P.; Bond, C.; Bork, R.; Born, M.; Bose, Sukanta; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Brau, J. E.; Bridges, D. O.; Brinkmann, M.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, D. A.; Brown, D. D.; Brown, N. M.; Buchman, S.; Buikema, A.; Buonanno, A.; Cadonati, L.; Calderón Bustillo, J.; Camp, J. B.; Cannon, K. C.; Cao, J.; Capano, C. D.; Caride, S.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglià, M.; Cepeda, C.; Chakraborty, R.; Chalermsongsak, T.; Chamberlin, S. J.; Chao, S.; Charlton, P.; Chen, Y.; Cho, H. S.; Cho, M.; Chow, J. H.; Christensen, N.; Chu, Q.; Chung, S.; Ciani, G.; Clara, F.; Clark, J. A.; Collette, C.; Cominsky, L.; Constancio, M., Jr.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T. R.; Cornish, N.; Corsi, A.; Costa, C. A.; Coughlin, M. W.; Countryman, S.; Couvares, P.; Coward, D. M.; Cowart, M. J.; Coyne, D. C.; Coyne, R.; Craig, K.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Creighton, T. D.; Cripe, J.; Crowder, S. G.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, L.; Cutler, C.; Dahl, K.; Dal Canton, T.; Damjanic, M.; Danilishin, S. L.; Danzmann, K.; Dartez, L.; Dave, I.; Daveloza, H.; Davies, G. S.; Daw, E. J.; DeBra, D.; Del Pozzo, W.; Denker, T.; Dent, T.; Dergachev, V.; DeRosa, R. T.; DeSalvo, R.; Dhurandhar, S.; D´ıaz, M.; Di Palma, I.; Dojcinoski, G.; Dominguez, E.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doravari, S.; Douglas, R.; Downes, T. P.; Driggers, J. C.; Du, Z.; Dwyer, S.; Eberle, T.; Edo, T.; Edwards, M.; Edwards, M.; Effler, A.; Eggenstein, H.-B.; Ehrens, P.; Eichholz, J.; Eikenberry, S. S.; Essick, R.; Etzel, T.; Evans, M.; Evans, T.; Factourovich, M.; Fairhurst, S.; Fan, X.; Fang, Q.; Farr, B.; Farr, W. M.; Favata, M.; Fays, M.; Fehrmann, H.; Fejer, M. M.; Feldbaum, D.; Ferreira, E. C.; Fisher, R. P.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Fricke, T. T.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fuentes-Tapia, S.; Fulda, P.; Fyffe, M.; Gair, J. R.; Gaonkar, S.; Gehrels, N.; Gergely, L. Á.; Giaime, J. A.; Giardina, K. D.; Gleason, J.; Goetz, E.; Goetz, R.; Gondan, L.; González, G.; Gordon, N.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Gossan, S.; Goßler, S.; Gräf, C.; Graff, P. B.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.; Greenhalgh, R. J. S.; Gretarsson, A. M.; Grote, H.; Grunewald, S.; Guido, C. J.; Guo, X.; Gushwa, K.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Hacker, J.; Hall, E. D.; Hammond, G.; Hanke, M.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hannam, M. D.; Hanson, J.; Hardwick, T.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Hart, M.; Hartman, M. T.; Haster, C.-J.; Haughian, K.; Hee, S.; Heintze, M.; Heinzel, G.; Hendry, M.; Heng, I. S.; Heptonstall, A. W.; Heurs, M.; Hewitson, M.; Hild, S.; Hoak, D.; Hodge, K. A.; Hollitt, S. E.; Holt, K.; Hopkins, P.; Hosken, D. J.; Hough, J.; Houston, E.; Howell, E. J.; Hu, Y. M.; Huerta, E.; Hughey, B.; Husa, S.; Huttner, S. H.; Huynh, M.; Huynh-Dinh, T.; Idrisy, A.; Indik, N.; Ingram, D. R.; Inta, R.; Islas, G.; Isler, J. C.; Isogai, T.; Iyer, B. R.; Izumi, K.; Jacobson, M.; Jang, H.; Jawahar, S.; Ji, Y.; Jiménez-Forteza, F.; Johnson, W. W.; Jones, D. I.; Jones, R.; Ju, L.; Haris, K.; Kalogera, V.; Kandhasamy, S.; Kang, G.; Kanner, J. B.; Katsavounidis, E.; Katzman, W.; Kaufer, H.; Kaufer, S.; Kaur, T.; Kawabe, K.; Kawazoe, F.; Keiser, G. M.; Keitel, D.; Kelley, D. B.; Kells, W.; Keppel, D. G.; Key, J. S.; Khalaidovski, A.; Khalili, F. Y.; Khazanov, E. A.; Kim, C.; Kim, K.; Kim, N. G.; Kim, N.; Kim, Y.-M.; King, E. J.; King, P. J.; Kinzel, D. L.; Kissel, J. S.; Klimenko, S.; Kline, J.; Koehlenbeck, S.; Kokeyama, K.; Kondrashov, V.; Korobko, M.; Korth, W. Z.; Kozak, D. B.; Kringel, V.; Krishnan, B.; Krueger, C.; Kuehn, G.; Kumar, A.; Kumar, P.; Kuo, L.; Landry, M.; Lantz, B.; Larson, S.; Lasky, P. D.; Lazzarini, A.; Lazzaro, C.; Le, J.; Leaci, P.; Leavey, S.; Lebigot, E. O.; Lee, C. H.; Lee, H. K.; Lee, H. M.; Leong, J. R.; Levin, Y.; Levine, B.; Lewis, J.; Li, T. G. F.; Libbrecht, K.; Libson, A.; Lin, A. C.; Littenberg, T. B.; Lockerbie, N. A.; Lockett, V.; Logue, J.; Lombardi, A. L.; Lormand, M.; Lough, J.; Lubinski, M. J.; Lück, H.; Lundgren, A. P.; Lynch, R.; Ma, Y.; Macarthur, J.; MacDonald, T.; Machenschalk, B.; MacInnis, M.; Macleod, D. M.; Magaña-Sandoval, F.; Magee, R.; Mageswaran, M.; Maglione, C.; Mailand, K.; Mandel, I.; Mandic, V.; Mangano, V.; Mansell, G. L.; Márka, S.; Márka, Z.; Markosyan, A.; Maros, E.; Martin, I. W.; Martin, R. M.; Martynov, D.; Marx, J. N.; Mason, K.; Massinger, T. J.; Matichard, F.; Matone, L.; Mavalvala, N.; Mazumder, N.; Mazzolo, G.; McCarthy, R.; McClelland, D. E.; McCormick, S.; McGuire, S. C.; McIntyre, G.; McIver, J.; McLin, K.; McWilliams, S.; Meadors, G. D.; Meinders, M.; Melatos, A.; Mendell, G.; Mercer, R. A.; Meshkov, S.; Messenger, C.; Meyers, P. M.; Miao, H.; Middleton, H.; Mikhailov, E. E.; Miller, A.; Miller, J.; Millhouse, M.; Ming, J.; Mirshekari, S.; Mishra, C.; Mitra, S.; Mitrofanov, V. P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Mittleman, R.; Moe, B.; Mohanty, S. D.; Mohapatra, S. R. P.; Moore, B.; Moraru, D.; Moreno, G.; Morriss, S. R.; Mossavi, K.; Mow-Lowry, C. M.; Mueller, C. L.; Mueller, G.; Mukherjee, S.; Mullavey, A.; Munch, J.; Murphy, D.; Murray, P. G.; Mytidis, A.; Nash, T.; Nayak, R. K.; Necula, V.; Nedkova, K.; Newton, G.; Nguyen, T.; Nielsen, A. B.; Nissanke, S.; Nitz, A. H.; Nolting, D.; Normandin, M. E. N.; Nuttall, L. K.; Ochsner, E.; O'Dell, J.; Oelker, E.; Ogin, G. H.; Oh, J. J.; Oh, S. H.; Ohme, F.; Oppermann, P.; Oram, R.; O'Reilly, B.; Ortega, W.; O'Shaughnessy, R.; Osthelder, C.; Ott, C. D.; Ottaway, D. J.; Ottens, R. S.; Overmier, H.; Owen, B. J.; Padilla, C.; Pai, A.; Pai, S.; Palashov, O.; Pal-Singh, A.; Pan, H.; Pankow, C.; Pannarale, F.; Pant, B. C.; Papa, M. A.; Paris, H.; Patrick, Z.; Pedraza, M.; Pekowsky, L.; Pele, A.; Penn, S.; Perreca, A.; Phelps, M.; Pierro, V.; Pinto, I. M.; Pitkin, M.; Poeld, J.; Post, A.; Poteomkin, A.; Powell, J.; Prasad, J.; Predoi, V.; Premachandra, S.; Prestegard, T.; Price, L. R.; Principe, M.; Privitera, S.; Prix, R.; Prokhorov, L.; Puncken, O.; Pürrer, M.; Qin, J.; Quetschke, V.; Quintero, E.; Quiroga, G.; Quitzow-James, R.; Raab, F. J.; Rabeling, D. S.; Radkins, H.; Raffai, P.; Raja, S.; Rajalakshmi, G.; Rakhmanov, M.; Ramirez, K.; Raymond, V.; Reed, C. M.; Reid, S.; Reitze, D. H.; Reula, O.; Riles, K.; Robertson, N. A.; Robie, R.; Rollins, J. G.; Roma, V.; Romano, J. D.; Romanov, G.; Romie, J. H.; Rowan, S.; Rüdiger, A.; Ryan, K.; Sachdev, S.; Sadecki, T.; Sadeghian, L.; Saleem, M.; Salemi, F.; Sammut, L.; Sandberg, V.; Sanders, J. R.; Sannibale, V.; Santiago-Prieto, I.; Sathyaprakash, B. S.; Saulson, P. R.; Savage, R.; Sawadsky, A.; Scheuer, J.; Schilling, R.; Schmidt, P.; Schnabel, R.; Schofield, R. M. S.; Schreiber, E.; Schuette, D.; Schutz, B. F.; Scott, J.; Scott, S. M.; Sellers, D.; Sengupta, A. S.; Sergeev, A.; Serna, G.; Sevigny, A.; Shaddock, D. A.; Shahriar, M. S.; Shaltev, M.; Shao, Z.; Shapiro, B.; Shawhan, P.; Shoemaker, D. H.; Sidery, T. L.; Siemens, X.; Sigg, D.; Silva, A. D.; Simakov, D.; Singer, A.; Singer, L.; Singh, R.; Sintes, A. M.; Slagmolen, B. J. J.; Smith, J. R.; Smith, M. R.; Smith, R. J. E.; Smith-Lefebvre, N. D.; Son, E. J.; Sorazu, B.; Souradeep, T.; Staley, A.; Stebbins, J.; Steinke, M.; Steinlechner, J.; Steinlechner, S.; Steinmeyer, D.; Stephens, B. C.; Steplewski, S.; Stevenson, S.; Stone, R.; Strain, K. A.; Strigin, S.; Sturani, R.; Stuver, A. L.; Summerscales, T. Z.; Sutton, P. J.; Szczepanczyk, M.; Szeifert, G.; Talukder, D.; Tanner, D. B.; Tápai, M.; Tarabrin, S. P.; Taracchini, A.; Taylor, R.; Tellez, G.; Theeg, T.; Thirugnanasambandam, M. P.; Thomas, M.; Thomas, P.; Thorne, K. A.; Thorne, K. S.; Thrane, E.; Tiwari, V.; Tomlinson, C.; Torres, C. V.; Torrie, C. I.; Traylor, G.; Tse, M.; Tshilumba, D.; Ugolini, D.; Unnikrishnan, C. S.; Urban, A. L.; Usman, S. A.; Vahlbruch, H.; Vajente, G.; Valdes, G.; Vallisneri, M.; van Veggel, A. A.; Vass, S.; Vaulin, R.; Vecchio, A.; Veitch, J.; Veitch, P. J.; Venkateswara, K.; Vincent-Finley, R.; Vitale, S.; Vo, T.; Vorvick, C.; Vousden, W. D.; Vyatchanin, S. P.; Wade, A. R.; Wade, L.; Wade, M.; Walker, M.; Wallace, L.; Walsh, S.; Wang, H.; Wang, M.; Wang, X.; Ward, R. L.; Warner, J.; Was, M.; Weaver, B.; Weinert, M.; Weinstein, A. J.; Weiss, R.; Welborn, T.; Wen, L.; Wessels, P.; Westphal, T.; Wette, K.; Whelan, J. T.; Whitcomb, S. E.; White, D. J.; Whiting, B. F.; Wilkinson, C.; Williams, L.; Williams, R.; Williamson, A. R.; Willis, J. L.; Willke, B.; Wimmer, M.; Winkler, W.; Wipf, C. C.; Wittel, H.; Woan, G.; Worden, J.; Xie, S.; Yablon, J.; Yakushin, I.; Yam, W.; Yamamoto, H.; Yancey, C. C.; Yang, Q.; Zanolin, M.; Zhang, Fan; Zhang, L.; Zhang, M.; Zhang, Y.; Zhao, C.; Zhou, M.; Zhu, X. J.; Zucker, M. E.; Zuraw, S.; Zweizig, J.

    2015-04-01

    The Advanced LIGO gravitational wave detectors are second-generation instruments designed and built for the two LIGO observatories in Hanford, WA and Livingston, LA, USA. The two instruments are identical in design, and are specialized versions of a Michelson interferometer with 4 km long arms. As in Initial LIGO, Fabry-Perot cavities are used in the arms to increase the interaction time with a gravitational wave, and power recycling is used to increase the effective laser power. Signal recycling has been added in Advanced LIGO to improve the frequency response. In the most sensitive frequency region around 100 Hz, the design strain sensitivity is a factor of 10 better than Initial LIGO. In addition, the low frequency end of the sensitivity band is moved from 40 Hz down to 10 Hz. All interferometer components have been replaced with improved technologies to achieve this sensitivity gain. Much better seismic isolation and test mass suspensions are responsible for the gains at lower frequencies. Higher laser power, larger test masses and improved mirror coatings lead to the improved sensitivity at mid and high frequencies. Data collecting runs with these new instruments are planned to begin in mid-2015.

  17. Fossils of Cyanobacteria in CI1 Carbonaceous Meteorites: Implications to Life on Comets, Europa and Enceladus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoover, Richard B.

    2011-10-01

    Environmental (ESEM) and Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM) investigations of the internal surfaces of the CI1 Carbonaceous Meteorites have yielded images of large complex filaments. The filaments have been observed to be embedded in freshly fractured internal surfaces of the stones. They exhibit recognizable features (e.g., the size and size ranges of the internal cells and their location and arrangement within sheaths) that are diagnostic of known genera and species of filamentous trichomic cyanobacteria and other trichomic prokaryotes (such as filamentous sulfur bacteria). ESEM and FESEM studies of living and fossil cyanobacteria show features similar to the filaments found in the meteorites -- uniseriate and multiseriate, branched or unbranched, isodiametric or tapered, polarized or unpolarized filaments with trichomes encased within thin or thick external sheaths. Some of the filaments found in the CI1 meteorites also exhibit specialized cells and structures used by cyanobacteria for reproduction (baeocytes, akinetes and hormogonia), nitrogen fixation (basal, intercalary or apical heterocysts), attachment (pili or fimbriae) or indicative of oscillatoria type locomotion (escaped or coiling hormogonia and flattened and coiled empty sheaths). Energy dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDS) studies indicate that the Orgueil meteorite filaments are typically carbon-rich sheaths infilled with magnesium sulfate and other minerals characteristic of the CI1 carbonaceous meteorites. However, the size, structure, detailed morphological characteristics and chemical compositions of the meteorite filaments are not consistent with known species of abiotic minerals. The nitrogen content of the meteorite filaments are almost always below the detection limit of the EDS detector. EDS analysis of living and dead biological materials (e.g., filamentous cyanobacteria; bacteria, mummy and mammoth hair and tissues, and fossils of cyanobacteria, trilobites and insects in

  18. Fossils of Cyanobacteria in CI1 Carbonaceous Meteorites: Implications to Life on Comets, Europa, and Enceladus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoover, Richard B.

    Environmental (ESEM) and Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM) investigations of the internal surfaces of the CI1 Carbonaceous Meteorites have yielded images of large complex filaments. The filaments have been observed to be embedded in freshly fractured internal surfaces of the stones. They exhibit features (e.g., the size and size ranges of the internal cells and their location and arrangement within sheaths) that are diagnostic of known genera and species of trichomic cyanobacteria and other trichomic prokaryotes such as the filamentous sulfur bacteria. ESEM and FESEM studies of living and fossil cyanobacteria show similar features in uniseriate and multiseriate, branched or unbranched, isodiametric or tapered, polarized or unpolarized filaments with trichomes encased within thin or thick external sheaths. Filaments found in the CI1 meteorites have also been detected that exhibit structures consistent with the specialized cells and structures used by cyanobacteria for reproduction (baeocytes, akinetes and hormogonia), nitrogen fixation (basal, intercalary or apical heterocysts) and attachment or motility (fimbriae). Energy dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDS) studies indicate that the meteorite filaments are typically carbon rich sheaths infilled with magnesium sulfate and other minerals characteristic of the CI1 carbonaceous meteorites. The size, structure, detailed morphological characteristics and chemical compositions of the meteorite filaments are not consistent with known species of minerals. The nitrogen content of the meteorite filaments are almost always below the detection limit of the EDS detector. EDS analysis of terrestrial minerals and biological materials (e.g., fibrous epsomite, filamentous cyanobacteria; mummy and mammoth hair/tissues, and fossils of cyanobacteria, trilobites, insects in amber) indicate that nitrogen remains detectable in biological materials for thousands of years but is undetectable in the ancient fossils. These

  19. Reconnaissance isotopic and hydrochemical study of Cuatro Ciénegas groundwater, Coahuila, México

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johannesson, Karen H.; Cortés, Alejandra; Kilroy, Kathryn C.

    2004-10-01

    The springs of the Cuatro Ciénegas bolson (Four Marshes basin), Coahuila, México, support more than 70 endemic species of biota. The specifics of the groundwater flow regime, however, remain a mystery. Water samples were collected from a series of springs and pools and one canal in the Cuatro Ciénegas bolson and analyzed for field parameters (temperature, pH, conductivity, alkalinity) and stable oxygen and hydrogen isotopes in an attempt to begin a systematic study of the hydrogeology of the region. Groundwaters discharging directly along a fault-controlled spring line in Cretaceous carbonate rocks of the Cupido-Aurora aquifer are the most dilute (lowest conductivities) and warmest of those sampled. Cuatro Ciénegas waters are characterized by circumneutral pH (6.9-7.7) and reasonably low alkalinity (160-215 mg/kg as HCO 3). The δ18O values of Cuatro Ciénegas waters range from -8.2 to -5.7‰, with a mean of -6.5±0.82‰, whereas δD ranges from -52 to -43‰, with a mean of -46.6±3.2‰. The majority of the water samples plot subparallel and beneath the local meteoric water line; those samples collected farthest from the spring line exhibit the most enriched δ18O and δD values. The stable isotope data indicate that isotopic enrichment of groundwaters by evaporation following discharge and subsequent surface flow is an important process within the Cuatro Ciénegas bolson. The isotope data also suggest that a fraction of Cuatro Ciénegas groundwater originates with local recharge in mountains surrounding the bolson. Those springs that issue from the western base of the Sierra de San Marcos mountain range are recharged in part in these mountains, whereas groundwaters discharging from Laguna Anteojo in the northern part of the bolson are more likely recharged in the higher San de la Madera mountain range. An estimate of the water balance suggests that interbasin flow also may contribute to the considerable groundwater discharge.

  20. The aging retarding effect of 'Long-Life CiLi'.

    PubMed

    Ma, Y X; Zhu, Y; Wang, C F; Wang, Z S; Chen, S Y; Shen, M H; Gan, J M; Zhang, J G; Gu, Q; He, L

    1997-06-01

    'Long-Life CiLi' ('CiLi') oral liquid, is composed of superoxide dismutase (SOD), polysacchairide, vitamin C, vitamin E and trace elements which were all extracted from a natural plant fruit Cili (Rosa roxburghii Tratt) in Guizhou, China. A set of indices were evaluated after administration of 'CiLi' 10 ml Bid, for two months in 50-75 years old healthy people, the mean value of NK cell activity (22.4 +/- 10.8-->27.5 +/- 12.9%, P < 0.05), SOD (453.0 +/- 24.2-->468.6 +/- 21.3 micrograms/gHb, P < 0.001), Catalase (15.5 +/- 1.7-->17.4 +/- 3.0 U/mgHb, P < 0.001) and GSH content (2.3 +/- 0.3-->2.6 +/- 0.5 mg/gHb, P < 0.001) in erythrocytes and 'delta CO, CI, SV, SI, LVET, LVETI and AC' values increased significantly, while the serum LPO level (4.20 +/- 0.78-->3.78 +/- 0.50 nmol/ml, P < 0.001), total microcirculation weighed value (1.87 +/- 1.0-->0.92 +/- 0.5, P < 0.001), delta PVR (-241.7 +/- 733.2-->187.9 +/- 938.2, P < 0.05) and the light reaction time (Simple RT, red light: 383 +/- 128-->332 +/- 68.9 ms, P < 0.05; selective RT: red light 709 +/- 287-->566 +/- 119 ms, P < 0.05; green light 639 +/- 162-->536 +/- 80 ms, P < 0.01) decreased significantly. There were no significant differences in the control group. The mean life span of fruit flies were significantly elongated for low, medium and high concentrations 'CiLi' treatment groups than in the control group (Female: 57.6 +/- 11.3-->62.1 +/- 12.8; 69.6 +/- 14.7; 62.6 +/- 12 days; P < 0.05 approximately 0.001. Male: 56.3 +/- 9.6-->64.9 +/- 12.4; 64.5 +/- 14.5; 64.8 +/- 14.1 days, P < 0.001). It is suggested that 'CiLi' has an aging retarding and geroprotection effect. PMID:9223119

  1. Multireference CI study of the potential curves and properties of positronic complexes of alkali hydrides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buenker, Robert J.; Liebermann, Heinz-Peter; Tachikawa, Masanori; Pichl, Lukáš; Kimura, Mineo

    2006-06-01

    Ab initio multireference single- and double-excitation configuration interaction (MRD-CI) calculations have been carried out to study the manner in which the electronic structure of the series of neutral alkali hydride molecules is affected by the interaction of a lone positron. Four systems have been treated: LiH, NaH, KH and RbH. A new computer program has been constructed for this purpose that makes use of the Table-Direct-CI method for molecular calculations within the Born-Oppenheimer approximation. The main emphasis in the present work is on internuclear geometries with relatively large bond distances near the dissociation limit. Molecular charge density contour diagrams are presented to illustrate the bonding mechanism in each case. Trends in a variety of quantities such as positron affinities at both equilibrium molecular and separated atomic geometries, dissociation energies and positronium formation energies are computed and analyzed as the atomic number of the alkali atom is increased.

  2. Debra-mediated Ci degradation controls tissue homeostasis in Drosophila adult midgut.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhouhua; Guo, Yueqin; Han, Lili; Zhang, Yan; Shi, Lai; Huang, Xudong; Lin, Xinhua

    2014-02-11

    Adult tissue homeostasis is maintained by resident stem cells and their progeny. However, the underlying mechanisms that control tissue homeostasis are not fully understood. Here, we demonstrate that Debra-mediated Ci degradation is important for intestinal stem cell (ISC) proliferation in Drosophila adult midgut. Debra inhibition leads to increased ISC activity and tissue homeostasis loss, phenocopying defects observed in aging flies. These defects can be suppressed by depleting Ci, suggesting that increased Hedgehog (Hh) signaling contributes to ISC proliferation and tissue homeostasis loss. Consistently, Hh signaling activation causes the same defects, whereas depletion of Hh signaling suppresses these defects. Furthermore, the Hh ligand from multiple sources is involved in ISC proliferation and tissue homeostasis. Finally, we show that the JNK pathway acts downstream of Hh signaling to regulate ISC proliferation. Together, our results provide insights into the mechanisms of stem cell proliferation and tissue homeostasis control. PMID:24527387

  3. Debra-Mediated Ci Degradation Controls Tissue Homeostasis in Drosophila Adult Midgut

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhouhua; Guo, Yueqin; Han, Lili; Zhang, Yan; Shi, Lai; Huang, Xudong; Lin, Xinhua

    2014-01-01

    Summary Adult tissue homeostasis is maintained by resident stem cells and their progeny. However, the underlying mechanisms that control tissue homeostasis are not fully understood. Here, we demonstrate that Debra-mediated Ci degradation is important for intestinal stem cell (ISC) proliferation in Drosophila adult midgut. Debra inhibition leads to increased ISC activity and tissue homeostasis loss, phenocopying defects observed in aging flies. These defects can be suppressed by depleting Ci, suggesting that increased Hedgehog (Hh) signaling contributes to ISC proliferation and tissue homeostasis loss. Consistently, Hh signaling activation causes the same defects, whereas depletion of Hh signaling suppresses these defects. Furthermore, the Hh ligand from multiple sources is involved in ISC proliferation and tissue homeostasis. Finally, we show that the JNK pathway acts downstream of Hh signaling to regulate ISC proliferation. Together, our results provide insights into the mechanisms of stem cell proliferation and tissue homeostasis control. PMID:24527387

  4. Advanced Pacemaker

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Synchrony, developed by St. Jude Medical's Cardiac Rhythm Management Division (formerly known as Pacesetter Systems, Inc.) is an advanced state-of-the-art implantable pacemaker that closely matches the natural rhythm of the heart. The companion element of the Synchrony Pacemaker System is the Programmer Analyzer APS-II which allows a doctor to reprogram and fine tune the pacemaker to each user's special requirements without surgery. The two-way communications capability that allows the physician to instruct and query the pacemaker is accomplished by bidirectional telemetry. APS-II features 28 pacing functions and thousands of programming combinations to accommodate diverse lifestyles. Microprocessor unit also records and stores pertinent patient data up to a year.

  5. Transition-Metal Additives For Long-Life Na/NiCI(2) Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bugga, Ratnakumar V.; Surampudi, Subbarao; Halpert, Gerald

    1995-01-01

    Transition-metal additives in cathodes of Na/NiCI(2) high-temperature, rechargeable electrochemical cells found to slow premature fading of charge/discharge capacity. Decline in capacity of cell attributed to agglomeration of Ni particles at cathode: this agglomeration reduces electrochemical area of cathode. Depending on choice of transition-metal additive for particular cell, additive might even participate in desired electrochemical reactions in cell, contributing to specific energy of cell.

  6. New records of bee flies (Diptera, Bombyliidae) from Cuatro Ciénegas, Coahuila, Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Ávalos-Hernández, Omar; Kits, Joel; Trujano-Ortega, Marysol; García-Vázquez, Uri Omar; Cano-Santana, Zenón

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Forty one new records of species of Bombyliidae are reported for Coahuila in northeastern Mexico. Nine of these species are reported for the first time for the country. The specimens were collected in the Cuatro Ciénegas Basin and Sierra La Madera mountains during 2007–2013. The modified distributions of species are discussed. The gaps in the distribution of many species suggest an undersampling of this group of insects in the north of Mexico. PMID:25061389

  7. New records of bee flies (Diptera, Bombyliidae) from Cuatro Ciénegas, Coahuila, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Avalos-Hernández, Omar; Kits, Joel; Trujano-Ortega, Marysol; García-Vázquez, Uri Omar; Cano-Santana, Zenón

    2014-01-01

    Forty one new records of species of Bombyliidae are reported for Coahuila in northeastern Mexico. Nine of these species are reported for the first time for the country. The specimens were collected in the Cuatro Ciénegas Basin and Sierra La Madera mountains during 2007-2013. The modified distributions of species are discussed. The gaps in the distribution of many species suggest an undersampling of this group of insects in the north of Mexico. PMID:25061389

  8. A complete active space SCF method (CASSCF) using a density matrix formulated super-CI approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roos, Björn O.; Taylor, Peter R.; Si≐gbahn, Per E. M.

    1980-05-01

    A density matrix formulation of the super-CI MCSCF method is presented. The MC expansion is assumed to be complete in an active subset of the orbital space, and the corresponding CI secular problem is solved by a direct scheme using the unitary group approach. With a density matrix formulation the orbital optimization step becomes independent of the size of the CI expansion. It is possible to formulate the super-CI in terms of density matrices defined only in the small active subspace; the doubly occupied orbitals (the inactive subspace) do not enter. Further, in the unitary group formalism it is straightforward and simple to obtain the necessary density matrices from the symbolic formula list. It then becomes possible to treat very long MC expansions, the largest so far comprising 726 configurations. The method is demonstrated in a calculation of the potential curves for the three lowest states ( 1Σ +g, 3Σ +u and 3Π g) of the N 2 molecule, using a medium-sized gaussian basis set. Seven active orbitals were used yielding the following results: De: 8.76 (9.90), 2.43 (3.68) and 3.39 (4.90) eV; re: 1.108 (1.098), 1.309 (1.287) and 1.230 (1.213) Å; ω e: 2333 (2359), 1385 (1461) and 1680 (1733) cm -1, for the three states (experimental values within parentheses). The results of these calculations indicate that it is important to consider not only the dissociation limit but also the united atom limit in partitioning the occupied orbital space into an active and an inactive part.

  9. Identification of Apolipoprotein C-I as a Potential Wilms’ Tumor Marker after Excluding Inflammatory Factors

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Junjie; Guo, Fei; Wang, Lei; Zhao, Wei; Zhang, Da; Yang, Heying; Yu, Jiekai; Niu, Lili; Yang, Fuquan; Zheng, Shu; Wang, Jiaxiang

    2014-01-01

    Wilms’ tumor is one of the most common malignant tumors observed in children, and its early diagnosis is important for late-stage treatment and prognosis. We previously screened and identified protein markers for Wilms’ tumor; however, these markers lacked specificity, and some were associated with inflammation. In the current study, serum samples from children with Wilms’ tumors were compared with those of healthy controls and patients with systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS). After exclusion of factors associated with inflammation, specific protein markers for Wilms’ tumors were identified. After comparing the protein peak values obtained from all three groups, a protein with a m/z of 6438 Da was specified. Purification and identification of the target protein using high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) and two-dimensional liquid chromatography-linearion trap mass spectrometry(2D-LC-LTQ-MS) mass spectrometry, respectively, revealed that it was apolipoprotein C-I (APO C-I). Thus, APO C-I is a specific protein marker for Wilms’ tumor. PMID:25222555

  10. Endothelin-1 receptors in rat tissues: characterization by bosentan, ambrisentan and CI-1020.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Yoshinari; Osano, Ayaka; Hayashi, Hideki; Itoh, Kunihiko; Okura, Takashi; Deguchi, Yoshiharu; Ito, Yoshihiko; Yamada, Shizuo

    2014-01-01

    The present study aimed to characterize comparatively endothelin-1 (ET-1) receptors in rat tissues by radioligand binding assay using [(125)I]ET-1 and to examine receptor binding after oral administration of bosentan. Significant amount of specific [(125)I]ET-1 binding was detected in the lung, heart, kidney, bladder and cerebral cortex of rats. ET-1, bosentan, ambrisentan, and CI-1020 inhibited specific [(125)I]ET-1 binding in these tissues in a concentration-dependent manner. The Hill coefficients of each agent in the rat lung and cerebral cortex and those of bosentan and ET-1 in the heart, kidney and bladder were close to unity, while the Hill coefficients of ambrisentan and CI-1020 in the heart, kidney and bladder were less than one. The nonlinear least squares regression analysis revealed the presence of high- and low-affinity ET-1 receptor sites in these tissues for ambrisentan and CI-1020. Oral administration of bosentan caused a dose-dependent decrease in specific [(125)I]ET-1 binding in the rat lung, kidney and bladder, suggesting significant binding of the tissue ET-1 receptors in vivo. In conclusion, it has been shown that a significant amount of pharmacologically relevant ET-1 receptors may exist in rat tissues and that ET-1 receptor antagonists such as bosentan at pharmacological doses may exert some pharmacological effects by binding these ET-1 receptors. PMID:24583865

  11. Geochemistry of CI chondrites: Major and trace elements, and Cu and Zn Isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrat, J. A.; Zanda, B.; Moynier, F.; Bollinger, C.; Liorzou, C.; Bayon, G.

    2012-04-01

    In order to check the heterogeneity of the CI chondrites and determine the average composition of this group of meteorites, we analyzed a series of six large chips (weighing between 0.6 and 1.2 g) of Orgueil prepared from five different stones. In addition, one sample from each of Ivuna and Alais was analyzed. Although the sizes of the chips used in this study were “large”, our results show evidence for minor chemical heterogeneity in Orgueil, particularly for alkali elements and U. After removal of one outlier sample, the spread of the results is considerably reduced. For most of the 46 elements analyzed in this study, the average composition calculated for Orgueil is in very good agreement with previous CI estimates. This average, obtained with a “large” mass of samples, is analytically homogeneous and is suitable for normalization purposes. Finally, the Cu and Zn isotopic ratios are homogeneously distributed within the CI parent body with a spread of less than 100 ppm per atomic mass unit (amu).

  12. Carbonate compositions in CM and CI chondrites, and implications for aqueous alteration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Craig A.; Prinz, Martin

    1993-01-01

    Carbonate minerals in fourteen CM chondrites and two CI chondrites have been analyzed by electron microprobe to provide a better understanding of the aqueous processes that affected carbonaceous chondrite parent bodies. Calcites in CM chondrites and dolomites and magnesites in CI chondrites display the compositions expected of stable phases formed at low temperatures. Dolomites in CM chondrites, identified here for the first time in five members of the group, have small amounts of excess Ca which may reflect metastable growth. The distribution of Fe between dolomite and coexisting serpentine differs in the two chondrite groups. If the distributions reflect an approach to chemical equilibrium, then the difference implies higher alteration temperatures for the CI group than the CM group in agreement with the results of previously published oxygen isotope thermometry and mineral solubility modeling of the alteration process. Dolomite Fe contents are relatively uniform in the two chondrite groups. Dolomite Mn contents, by contrast, vary widely. The variations may reflect transport-controlled coprecipitation of Mn resulting from a heterogeneous distribution of the element in the anhydrous precursor material. If this interpretation is correct, then the altering fluids were essentially immobile white hydration reactions proceeded on the meteorite parent bodies. The near closed-system character of the alteration process, long known from bulk chemical analyses of the meteorites, is a direct consequence of the limited mobility of dissolved species.

  13. Purification, characterization and cloning of a chymotrypsin inhibitor (CI-9) from the hemolymph of the silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ping; Xia, Qingyou; Li, Juan; Fujii, Hiroshi; Banno, Yutaka; Xiang, Zhonghuai

    2007-08-01

    Hemolymph chymotrypsin inhibitor 9 (CI-9) from the hemolymph of the silkworm, Bombyx mori, was purified by ammonium sulfate precipitation, Butyl Toyopearl hydrophobic chromatography, gel filtration through Sephadex C-50 and chymotrypsin-sepharose 4B affinity chromatography. Checked by Native PAGE and SDS-PAGE in combination with silver staining, the final preparation appeared homogeneous. In tricine SDS-PAGE, CI-9 displayed a molecular weight of 7.5 kD, which was determined to be 7167 Da with the Voyager TOFMass analyser. The pI value for CI-9, revealed by 2D-PAGE (two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis), was 4.3. CI-9 exhibited inhibitory activity at a temperature as high as 100 degrees C and a stability against a wide range of pH (1-12). In N-terminal amino-acid analysis of CI-9, 40 amino acid residues were obtained. The C-terminal 22 amino acid residues were deduced by subsequently cloned cDNA and genomic fragments. MW and pI of CI-9 were predicted to be 7170.98 Da and 4.61, respectively, on the website. Its low molecular weight, high stability, conserved active site and Kunitz domain showed that CI-9 is a Kunitz-type CI. The difference of sequence and pI between CI-9 and other Kunitz type CIs indicated that it is a novel chymotrypsin inhibitor. PMID:17503165

  14. Cast iron (CI) based soft magnetic BMG Ci88.3Al2Ga1P4.35B4.35

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kane, S. N.; Lee, H. J.; Jeong, Y. H.; Varga, L. K.

    2009-01-01

    Thermal stability, structure, and magnetic properties of bulk type Ci88.3Al2Ga1P4.35B4.35 alloy in ribbon form have been studied using differential thermal analysis, x-ray diffraction and magnetic measurements. Results reveal that crystallization peak temperature (Tx) and Curie temperature (Tc) of the as-cast alloy are respectively 513 and 370 °C. Crystallization of the specimen starts after annealing at 460 °C and α-Fe is precipitated out. Annealing at temperatures higher than 515 °C, produces apart from α-Fe, hard magnetic precipitants (Fe2B, Fe3B), which deteriorate the soft magnetic properties. Lowest coercive field - 9.8 A/m, highest saturation of induction - 1.55 Tesla and best losses - 0.42 W/kg (at 50 Hz and 0.4 kA/m) were obtained for as-cast specimen. Observed good soft magnetic properties of these low cost cast-iron based alloys suggest perspective applications of these soft magnetic alloys as an alternative to the conventional Fe-Si electrical steel and Mn-Zn ferrites.

  15. Advanced capacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, R. D.; Buritz, R. S.; Taylor, A. R.; Bullwinkel, E. P.

    1982-11-01

    An experimental development program was conducted to develop and test advanced dielectric materials for capacitors for airborne power systems. High rep rate and low rate capacitors for use in pulse-forming networks, high voltage filter capacitors, and high frequency ac capacitors for series resonant inverters were considered. The initial goal was to develop an improved polysulfone film. Initially, low breakdown strength was thought to be related to inclusions of conductive particles. The effect of filtration of the casting solution was investigated. These experiments showed that more filtration was not the entire solution to low breakdown. The film samples were found to contain dissolved ionic impurities that move through the dielectric when voltage is applied and cause enhancement of the electric field. These contaminants enter the film via the resin and solvent, and can be partially removed. However, these treatments did not significantly improve the breakdown characteristics. A new material, Ultem, was proposed for use in high energy density capacitors. This new polyetherimide resin has properties similar to polysulfone and polyimide, with improvement in breakdown characteristics and temperature capability. The technique of casting films on a roughened drum was demonstrated, and found useful in preparing textured films. this is the first step toward a replacement for kraft paper.

  16. Advanced capacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ennis, J. B.; Buritz, R. S.

    1984-10-01

    This report describes an experimental program to develop and test advanced dielectric materials for capacitors for airborne power systems. Five classes of capacitors were considered: high rep rate and low rep rate pulse capacitors for use in pulse-forming networks, high voltage filter capacitors, high frequency AC capacitors for series resonant inverters, and AC filter capacitors. To meet these requirements, existing dielectric materials were modified, and new materials were developed. The initial goal was to develop an improved polysulfone film with fewer imperfections that could operate at significantly higher electrical stresses. It was shown that contaminants enter the film via the resin and solvent, and that they can be partially removed. As far as developed, however, these treatments did not significantly improved the breakdown characteristics. The technique of casting films on a roughened drum was demonstrated, and found useful in preparing textured films -- the first step toward a replacement for Kraft paper. A new material, Ultem, was proposed for use in high energy density capacitors. This new polyetherimide resin has properties similar to polysulfone and polyimide, with improvement in breakdown characteristics and temperature capability. This material was selected for further study in model capacitor designs.

  17. Future advances.

    PubMed

    Celesia, Gastone G; Hickok, Gregory

    2015-01-01

    Future advances in the auditory systems are difficult to predict, and only educated guesses are possible. It is expected that innovative technologies in the field of neuroscience will be applied to the auditory system. Optogenetics, Brainbow, and CLARITY will improve our knowledge of the working of neural auditory networks and the relationship between sound and language, providing a dynamic picture of the brain in action. CLARITY makes brain tissue transparent and offers a three-dimensional view of neural networks, which, combined with genetically labeling neurons with multiple, distinct colors (Optogenetics), will provide detailed information of the complex brain system. Molecular functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) will allow the study of neurotransmitters detectable by MRI and their function in the auditory pathways. The Human Connectome project will study the patterns of distributed brain activity that underlie virtually all aspects of cognition and behavior and determine if abnormalities in the distributed patterns of activity may result in hearing and behavior disorders. Similarly, the programs of Big Brain and ENIGMA will improve our understanding of auditory disorders. New stem-cell therapy and gene therapies therapy may bring about a partial restoration of hearing for impaired patients by inducing regeneration of cochlear hair cells. PMID:25726297

  18. 40 CFR 60.4210 - What are my compliance requirements if I am a stationary CI internal combustion engine manufacturer?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... certified to the standards in 40 CFR part 1039. (b) Stationary CI internal combustion engine manufacturers... engines as specified in 40 CFR part 94. (c) Stationary CI internal combustion engine manufacturers must... internal combustion engine manufacturers must meet the corresponding provisions of 40......

  19. 40 CFR 60.4210 - What are my compliance requirements if I am a stationary CI internal combustion engine manufacturer?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... certified to the standards in 40 CFR part 1039. (b) Stationary CI internal combustion engine manufacturers... engines as specified in 40 CFR part 94. (c) Stationary CI internal combustion engine manufacturers must... internal combustion engine manufacturers must meet the corresponding provisions of 40......

  20. 10 CFR 709.26 - Protection of confidentiality of CI evaluation records to include polygraph examination records...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... include polygraph examination records and other pertinent documentation. 709.26 Section 709.26 Energy... Protection of confidentiality of CI evaluation records to include polygraph examination records and other pertinent documentation. (a) DOE owns all CI evaluation records, including polygraph examination records...

  1. 10 CFR 709.26 - Protection of confidentiality of CI evaluation records to include polygraph examination records...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... include polygraph examination records and other pertinent documentation. 709.26 Section 709.26 Energy... Protection of confidentiality of CI evaluation records to include polygraph examination records and other pertinent documentation. (a) DOE owns all CI evaluation records, including polygraph examination records...

  2. 10 CFR 709.26 - Protection of confidentiality of CI evaluation records to include polygraph examination records...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... include polygraph examination records and other pertinent documentation. 709.26 Section 709.26 Energy... Protection of confidentiality of CI evaluation records to include polygraph examination records and other pertinent documentation. (a) DOE owns all CI evaluation records, including polygraph examination records...

  3. 10 CFR 709.26 - Protection of confidentiality of CI evaluation records to include polygraph examination records...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... include polygraph examination records and other pertinent documentation. 709.26 Section 709.26 Energy... Protection of confidentiality of CI evaluation records to include polygraph examination records and other pertinent documentation. (a) DOE owns all CI evaluation records, including polygraph examination records...

  4. Single molecule analysis of DNA wrapping and looping by a circular 14mer wheel of the bacteriophage 186 CI repressor.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haowei; Dodd, Ian B; Dunlap, David D; Shearwin, Keith E; Finzi, Laura

    2013-06-01

    The lytic-lysogenic decision in bacteriophage 186 is governed by the 186 CI repressor protein in a unique way. The 186 CI is proposed to form a wheel-like oligomer that can mediate either wrapped or looped nucleoprotein complexes to provide the cooperative and competitive interactions needed for regulation. Although consistent with structural, biochemical and gene expression data, many aspects of this model are based on inference. Here, we use atomic force microscopy (AFM) to reveal the various predicted wrapped and looped species, and new ones, for CI regulation of lytic and lysogenic transcription. Automated AFM analysis showed CI particles of the predicted dimensions on the DNA, with CI multimerization favoured by DNA binding. Measurement of the length of the wrapped DNA segments indicated that CI may move on the DNA, wrapping or releasing DNA on either side of the wheel. Tethered particle motion experiments were consistent with wrapping and looping of DNA by CI in solution, where in contrast to λ repressor, the looped species were exceptionally stable. The CI regulatory system provides an intriguing comparison with that of nucleosomes, which share the ability to wrap and release similar sized segments of DNA. PMID:23620280

  5. Pediatric CI therapy for stroke-induced hemiparesis in young children.

    PubMed

    Taub, Edward; Griffin, Angi; Nick, Jennifer; Gammons, Kristin; Uswatte, Gitendra; Law, Charles R

    2007-01-01

    In this laboratory we have developed a set of techniques that randomized controlled studies and a multisite randomized controlled trial have shown can substantially reduce the motor deficit of adult patients with mild to severe chronic strokes. Equivalent results have been obtained with adult patients after traumatic brain injury and brain resection. The basic technique, termed Constraint-Induced Movement therapy or CI therapy was derived directly from basic research with monkeys with mature motor systems and with monkeys given surgical intervention either on their day of birth or prenatally by intrauterine surgical procedures. We report here the results of two randomized controlled trials of CI therapy with young children with asymmetric upper extremity motor deficits of varied etiologies from 8 months to 8 years of age in one study and with children with hemiparesis consequent to prenatal, perinatal, or early antenatal stroke from 2 to 6 years old in a second study. The procedures used with children are very similar to those used with adults and diverge simply to make the basic techniques age-appropriate. All forms of CI therapy for the upper extremity to date involve 3 main elements: (1) intensive training of the more affected extremity, (2) prolonged restraint of the less affected extremity, (3) a 'transfer package' of techniques to induce transfer of therapeutic gains achieved in the laboratory to the life situation. The results in children with cerebral palsy are considerably better than those obtained in adults. Marked changes were observed in the quality of movement in the laboratory scored by masked observers from videotape; actual amount of use of the more affected arm in the life situation; active range of motion; and emergence of new classes of behaviour never performed before, such as in individual cases, fine thumb-forefinger grasp, supination, and use of the more affected extremity in crawling with palmar placement and rhythmic alteration. In the

  6. Full CI studies of the collinear transition state for the reaction F + H2 yields HF + H

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Taylor, Peter R.

    1987-01-01

    Full CI calculations on the collinear transition state for the reaction F + H2 yields HF + H are reported. The full CI results are compared with those obtained from single-reference and multireference CI calculations and from single-reference CPF calculations. In general, only those methods which attempt to account for the effects of higher excitations, such as CPF or CI plus the Davidson correction, yield a transition-state location and barrier height in good agreement with the full CI. In an extended basis, the effect of higher excitations is estimated to lower the barrier by as much as 1.5 kcal/mol; such an effect would essentially eliminate the present discrepancy between theory and experiment.

  7. Spacecraft COst REduction Team (SCORE): TQM/CI on a massive scale

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bullard, Jerry D.

    1992-01-01

    The business of building satellites and space systems has matured. Few missions require, or can afford, excellent performance at any price. The new paradigm is doing more with less, providing quality systems at lower cost--in other words, doing our job 'Faster-Better-Cheaper.' The TRW Spacecraft COst REduction (SCORE) initiative was launched in 1990 by Daniel S. Goldin, then general manager of TRW's Space & Technology Group. The SCORE mission is to apply continuous improvement (CI) techniques to effect major reductions in the cost (our primary goal) and span time (as a corollary) required for the production of spacecraft. SCORE is a multi-year initiative that is having a profound effect on both the procedural and the cultural aspects of how we do business. The objectives of this initiative are being realized. The focus of this paper is not on the results of SCORE per se, but rather on the things we have leaned about how to do continuous improvement on a massive scale, with multilevel (hierarchical) CI teams. The following sections summarize the chronology of the SCORE initiative, from team formation to development of the year-end report for 1991. Lessons learned, the core of this presentation, are discussed--with particular focus on the unique aspects of SCORE. The SCORE initiative is continuing and, as a part of our evolving culture, will never end. It has resulted in profound insights into the way we do work and (the topic at hand) how to do CI for large and complex multidisciplinary development activities.

  8. Spacecraft COst REduction Team (SCORE): TQM/CI on a massive scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bullard, Jerry D.

    The business of building satellites and space systems has matured. Few missions require, or can afford, excellent performance at any price. The new paradigm is doing more with less, providing quality systems at lower cost--in other words, doing our job 'Faster-Better-Cheaper.' The TRW Spacecraft COst REduction (SCORE) initiative was launched in 1990 by Daniel S. Goldin, then general manager of TRW's Space & Technology Group. The SCORE mission is to apply continuous improvement (CI) techniques to effect major reductions in the cost (our primary goal) and span time (as a corollary) required for the production of spacecraft. SCORE is a multi-year initiative that is having a profound effect on both the procedural and the cultural aspects of how we do business. The objectives of this initiative are being realized. The focus of this paper is not on the results of SCORE per se, but rather on the things we have leaned about how to do continuous improvement on a massive scale, with multilevel (hierarchical) CI teams. The following sections summarize the chronology of the SCORE initiative, from team formation to development of the year-end report for 1991. Lessons learned, the core of this presentation, are discussed--with particular focus on the unique aspects of SCORE. The SCORE initiative is continuing and, as a part of our evolving culture, will never end. It has resulted in profound insights into the way we do work and (the topic at hand) how to do CI for large and complex multidisciplinary development activities.

  9. Numerical investigation on the effects of EGR on CI engine characteristics using soyabean biodiesel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datta, Ambarish; Mandal, Bijan Kumar

    2016-07-01

    In this work an attempt has been made to numerically investigate the effect of soyabean biodiesels on an unmodified CI engine and then to study and reduce the NOx emission by the introduction of exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) technique at the rates of 10% and 20%. Compared to no EGR condition for the neat biodiesel, the NOx emission is reduced by 44% and 70% with 10% and 20% EGR respectively. But the increase in the EGR rate deteriorates the engine performance and increases the emissions, other than NOx. Thus, EGR helps in reducing NOx emission but its rate of introduction has to be bounded by a limit.

  10. A biotechnological project with a gamma radiation source of 100,000 Ci

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lombardo, J. H.; Smolko, E. E.

    A project for the production of radiovaccines and other bio-medical products is presented which includes a radiation facility provided with a gamma ray source equivalent to 100,000 Ci of Co-60. The whole process incorporates novel basic features in virus production and inactivation steps. The former is carried out in animals previously subjected to immunodepression through electromagnetic radiation. The later is obtained at low temperatures by using either electromagnetic or particle radiations. A vaccine manufacture process is shown to illustrate the utilization of ionizing radiations to obtain a foot and mouth disease virus (FMDV) vaccine with good antigenic quality and low cost.

  11. CI Cygni 2010 Outburst and Eclipse: An Amateur Spectroscopic Survey - First Results From Low Resolution Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teyssier, F.

    2011-06-01

    The aim of this document is to present the amateur spectroscopic survey of the 2010 outburst of symbiotic star CI Cygni by Christian Buil, Thierry Garrel, Benjamin Mauclaire, François Teyssier, Eric Sarrazin, and Pierre Dubreuil (ARAS - Astronomical Ring for Access to Spectroscopy). This outburst coincides with an eclipse of the hot component by the late-type giant star. After a brief review of the current knowledge of this system, the campaign is presented. The first results obtained from low-resolution spectra are described: main emission lines (equivalent width and absolute flux) and continuum evolution in comparison with the CCD V light curve obtained by AAVSO observers.

  12. A full CI treatment of the 1A1-3B1 separation in methylene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Taylor, Peter R.

    1986-01-01

    The accuracy of recent theoretical computations of the total energies and the adiabatic separation of the 1A1 and 3B1 states of CH2 is investigated on the basis of complete CI calculations using the double-zeta basis sets of Dunning (1970). The results are presented in a table and characterized in detail. The errors in the separation values are found to range from less than 0.01 kcal/mol for a CASSCF/MRSDCI calculation, to 0.38 kcal/mol for a Davidson-corrected SCF/SDCI calculation, to 14.17 kcal/mol for an uncorrected SCF calculation.

  13. Specific Inhibition of the transcription factor Ci by a Cobalt(III)-Schiff base-DNA conjugate

    PubMed Central

    Hurtado, Ryan R.; Harney, Allison S.; Heffern, Marie C.; Holbrook, Robert J.; Holmgren, Robert A.; Meade, Thomas J.

    2012-01-01

    We describe the use of Co(III) Schiff base-DNA conjugates, a versatile class of research tools that target C2H2 transcription factors, to inhibit the Hedgehog (Hh) pathway. In developing mammalian embryos, Hh signaling is critical for the formation and development of many tissues and organs. Inappropriate activation of the Hedgehog (Hh) pathway has been implicated in a variety of cancers including medulloblastomas and basal cell carcinomas. It is well known that Hh regulates the activity of the Gli family of C2H2 zinc finger transcription factors in mammals. In Drosophila the function of the Gli proteins is performed by a single transcription factor with an identical DNA binding consensus sequence, Cubitus Interruptus (Ci). We have demonstrated previously that conjugation of a specific 17 base-pair oligonucleotide to a Co(III) Schiff base complex results in a targeted inhibitor of the Snail family C2H2 zinc finger transcription factors. Modification of the oligonucleotide sequence in the Co(III) Schiff base-DNA conjugate to that of Ci’s consensus sequence (Co(III)-Ci) generates an equally selective inhibitor of Ci. Co(III)-Ci irreversibly binds the Ci zinc finger domain and prevents it from binding DNA in vitro. In a Ci responsive tissue culture reporter gene assay, Co(III)-Ci reduces the transcriptional activity of Ci in a concentration dependent manner. In addition, injection of wild-type Drosophila embryos with Co(III)-Ci phenocopies a Ci loss of function phenotype, demonstrating effectiveness in vivo. This study provides evidence that Co(III) Schiff base-DNA conjugates are a versatile class of specific and potent tools for studying zinc finger domain proteins and have potential applications as customizable anti-cancer therapeutics. PMID:22214326

  14. A voltage-sensing phosphatase, Ci-VSP, which shares sequence identity with PTEN, dephosphorylates phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate.

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, Hirohide; Murata, Yoshimichi; Kim, Youngjun; Hossain, Md Israil; Worby, Carolyn A; Dixon, Jack E; McCormack, Thomas; Sasaki, Takehiko; Okamura, Yasushi

    2008-06-10

    Phosphatidylinositol lipids play diverse physiological roles, and their concentrations are tightly regulated by various kinases and phosphatases. The enzymatic activity of Ciona intestinalis voltage sensor-containing phosphatase (Ci-VSP), recently identified as a member of the PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10) family of phosphatidylinositol phosphatases, is regulated by its own voltage-sensor domain in a voltage-dependent manner. However, a detailed mechanism of Ci-VSP regulation and its substrate specificity remain unknown. Here we determined the in vitro substrate specificity of Ci-VSP by measuring the phosphoinositide phosphatase activity of the Ci-VSP cytoplasmic phosphatase domain. Despite the high degree of identity shared between the active sites of PTEN and Ci-VSP, Ci-VSP dephosphorylates not only the PTEN substrate, phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate [PI(3,4,5)P3], but also, unlike PTEN, phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate [PI(4,5)P2]. Enzymatic action on PI(4,5)P2 removes the phosphate at position 5 of the inositol ring, resulting in the production of phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate [PI(4)P]. The active site Cys-X(5)-Arg (CX(5)R) sequence of Ci-VSP differs with that of PTEN only at amino acid 365 where a glycine residue in Ci-VSP is replaced by an alanine in PTEN. Ci-VSP with a G365A mutation no longer dephosphorylates PI(4,5)P2 and is not capable of inducing depolarization-dependent rundown of a PI(4,5)P2-dependent potassium channel. These results indicate that Ci-VSP is a PI(3,4,5)P3/PI(4,5)P2 phosphatase that uniquely functions in the voltage-dependent regulation of ion channels through regulation of PI(4,5)P2 levels. PMID:18524949

  15. Identification and characterization of a constitutively expressed Ctenopharyngodon idella ADAR1 splicing isoform (CiADAR1a).

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiancheng; Huang, Keyi; Hou, Qunhao; Sun, Zhicheng; Wang, Binhua; Lin, Gang; Li, Dongming; Liu, Yong; Xu, Xiaowen; Hu, Chengyu

    2016-10-01

    As one member of ADAR family, ADAR1 (adenosine deaminase acting on RNA 1) can convert adenosine to inosine within dsRNA. There are many ADAR1 splicing isoforms in mammals, including an interferon (IFN) inducible ∼150 kD protein (ADAR1-p150) and a constitutively expressed ∼110 kD protein (ADAR1-p110). The structural diversity of ADAR1 splicing isoforms may reflect their multiple functions. ADAR1 splicing isoforms were also found in fish. In our previous study, we have cloned and identified two different grass carp ADAR1 splicing isoforms, i.e. CiADAR1 and CiADAR1-like, both of them are IFN-inducible proteins. In this paper, we identified a novel CiADAR1 splicing isoform gene (named CiADAR1a). CiADAR1a gene contains 15 exons and 14 introns. Its full-length cDNA is comprised of a 5' UTR (359 bp), a 3' UTR (229 bp) and a 2952 bp ORF encoding a polypeptide of 983 amino acids with one Z-DNA binding domain, three dsRNA binding motifs and a highly conserved hydrolytic deamination domain. CiADAR1a was constitutively expressed in Ctenopharyngodon idella kidney (CIK) cells regardless of Poly I:C stimulation by Western blot assay. In normal condition, CiADAR1a was found to be present mainly in the nucleus. After treatment with Poly I:C, it gradually shifted to cytoplasm. To further investigate the mechanism of transcriptional regulation of CiADAR1a, we cloned and identified its promoter sequence. The transcriptional start site of CiADAR1a is mapped within the truncated exon 2. CiADAR1a promoter is 1303 bp in length containing 4 IRF-Es. In the present study, we constructed pcDNA3.1 eukaryotic expression vectors with IRF1 and IRF3 and co-transfected them with pGL3-CiADAR1a promoter into CIK cells. The results showed that neither the over-expression of IRF1 or IRF3 nor Poly I:C stimulation significantly impacted CiADAR1a promoter activity in CIK cells. Together, according to the molecular and expression characteristics, subcellular localization and transcriptional

  16. Hydrochemical Investigation of Groundwaters of The Cuatro CiÉnegas Bolson, Coahuila, MÉxico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cortes, Alejandra; Johannessona, Kevin H.; Kilroy, Kathryn C.; Barron, Luis E.

    Water samples were collected from a series of springs, pools, and canals within the Cuatro Ciénegas Bolson, Coahuila, México and analyzed for stable oxygen and hydrogen isotopes. The ?oxigen-18 values of these waters ranged from a low of -8.2 up to -5.7 , with a mean (+/- standard deviation) of -6.5 +/- 0.82 , whereas ?deuterium ranged from -52 to -43 , with a mean (+/- standard deviation) of - 46.6 +/- 3.2 . The majority of the water samples plot sub-parallel and beneath the local meteoric water line, with those sample collected furthest from spring-line exhibiting the most enriched ?oxigen-18 values. The stable isotope data indicate isotopic enrichment of groundwaters by evaporation following discharge and subsequent surface flow. The isotope data suggests that a considerable fraction of Cuatro Ciénegas groundwaters originate via local recharge. Those springs that issue from the western base of the Sierra de San Marcos mountain range are chiefly recharged within these mountains, whereas groundwaters discharging from Laguna Anteojo in the northern part of the bolson are more likely recharged within the higher San de la Madera mountain range. A preliminary water balance estimate, however, that interbas in flow must also contributes to the considerable groundwater discharge within the bolson.

  17. Structural insight into the mutual recognition and regulation between Suppressor of Fused and Gli/Ci

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yan; Fu, Lin; Qi, Xiaolong; Zhang, Zhenyi; Xia, Yuanxin; Jia, Jianhang; Jiang, Jin; Zhao, Yun; Wu, Geng

    2013-11-01

    Hedgehog (Hh) signalling regulates embryonic development and adult tissue homoeostasis. Mutations of its pathway components including Suppressor of Fused (Sufu) and Gli/Ci predispose to cancers and congenital anomalies. The Sufu-Gli protein complex occupies a central position in the vertebrate Hh signalling pathway, especially in mammals. Here structures of full-length human and Drosophila Sufu, the human Sufu-Gli complex, along with normal mode analysis and FRET measurement results, reveal that Sufu alternates between ‘open’ and ‘closed’ conformations. The ‘closed’ form of Sufu is stabilized by Gli binding and inhibited by Hh treatment, whereas the ‘open’ state of Sufu is promoted by Gli-dissociation and Hh signalling. Mutations of critical interface residues disrupt the Sufu-Gli complex and prevent Sufu from repressing Gli-mediated transcription, tethering Gli in the cytoplasm and protecting Gli from the 26S proteasome-mediated degradation. Our study thus provides mechanistic insight into the mutual recognition and regulation between Sufu and Gli/Ci.

  18. Aqueous alteration on asteroids: Linking the mineralogy and spectroscopy of CM and CI chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McAdam, M. M.; Sunshine, J. M.; Howard, K. T.; McCoy, T. M.

    2015-01-01

    CM/CI meteorites range in degree of aqueous alteration suggesting differences in initially accreted materials including water ice and possible spatial heterogeneities within their parent bodies. As alteration progresses, the total abundance and magnesium content of phyllosilicates increases. In this paper we present the results of a coordinated spectral-mineralogical study of a well-characterized suite of CM/CI meteorites that range from 60 to 90% alteration. By acquiring spectra the same meteorite powders as Howard et al. (Howard, K.T., Benedix, G.K., Bland, P.A., Cressey, G. [2009]. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 73, 4576-4589; Howard, K.T., Benedix, G.K., Bland, P.A., Cressey, G. [2011]. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 75, 2735-2751) and Bland et al. (Bland, P.A., Cressey, G., Menzies, O.N. [2004]. Meteorit. Planet. Sci. 39(1), 3-16), we are able for the first time to directly correlate mineralogy with features in reflectance spectra. At visible/near-infrared wavelength, the presence of a 0.7-μm charge transfer band is indicative of aqueous alteration. However, not all altered CM/CI meteorites exhibit this feature; thus the lack of a 0.7 μm absorption band in asteroids does not necessarily signify a lack of aqueous alteration. Furthermore, the position and depth of 0.7-μm charge transfer band shows no correlation with the mineralogical changes associated with aqueous alteration. Similarly, the near-infrared slope, which is not directly related to the mineralogic progression associated with increasing alteration, is not unambiguously related to degree of alteration in the CM/CI meteorites studied. However, the mid-infrared reflectance spectra of CM/CI meteorites contain a broad absorption feature in the 10-13-μm region, which is a convolution of vibrational features due to Mg-rich phyllosilicates and unaltered olivine. The overall feature continuously changes with total phyllosilicate abundance from a shorter wavenumber/longer wavelength peak (815 cm-1, 12.3-μm) for less

  19. Mars as the parent body of the CI carbonaceous chondrites and implications for Mars biological and climatic history

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandenburg, John E.

    1997-07-01

    The hypothesis that CI meteorites have an origin on Mars is presented along with supporting data and implications. A Martian origin for the CI will support Martian biogenesis and effect assessments of Martian histories, suggesting Mars and Earth evolved in parallel in both biologic and geologic realms for a long period. The CI containing a Martian pattern of oxygen isotopes and mineralogy indicative of deposition by liquid water. The CI contain no evidence of hypervelocity impact, but contain space-exposed olivine grains and are thus regolith material, indicating their formation under a planetary atmosphere. They contain organic matter similar to that found in Martian meteorites, ALH84001 and EETA79001. A scenario of formation of CI meteorites as being water altered late planetary accretion material is proposed. The 4.5 Gyr age of the CI, matching ALH84001, and their high concentration of organic matter, including possible fossil bacteria, strongly supports the hypothesis of early Martian biogenesis. With CI plus ALH84001 being old, and the SNCs being young, the Martian crustal age dichotomy is now well reflected in Martian meteorite ages. This suggests Mars has a strongly bimodal pattern of crustal ages, either very old or very young with liquid water moving on the planets surface until late in the planets history.

  20. Role of cis-Acting Sites in Stimulation of the Phage λ PRM Promoter by CI-Mediated Looping

    PubMed Central

    Michalowski, Christine B.

    2013-01-01

    The lysogenic state of phage λ is maintained by the CI repressor. CI binds to three operators each in the right operator (OR) and left operator (OL) regions, which lie 2.4 kb apart. At moderate CI levels, the predominant binding pattern is two dimers of CI bound cooperatively at each regulatory region. The resulting tetramers can then interact, forming an octamer and a loop of the intervening DNA. CI is expressed from the PRM promoter, which lies in the OR region and is subjected to multiple regulatory controls. Of these, the most recently discovered is stimulation by loop formation. In this work, we have investigated the mechanism by which looping stimulates PRM. We find that two cis-acting sites lying in the OL region are involved. One site, an UP element, is required for stimulation. Based on the behavior of other promoters with UP elements located upstream of the −35 region, we suggest that a subunit of RNA polymerase (RNAP) bound at PRM binds to the UP element located in the OL region. In addition, adjacent to the UP element lies a binding site for integration host factor (IHF); this site plays a less critical role but is required for stimulation of the weak prm240 allele. A loop with CI at the OL2 and OL3 operators does not stimulate PRM, while one with CI only at OL2 provides some stimulation. We discuss possible mechanisms for stimulation. PMID:23708136

  1. SCIENCE BRIEF: ADVANCED CONCEPTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Research on advanced concepts will evaluate and demonstrate the application of innovative infrastructure designs, management procedures and operational approaches. Advanced concepts go beyond simple asset management. The infusion of these advanced concepts into established wastew...

  2. Patients Presenting with Advanced Human Immunodeficiency Virus Disease: Epidemiological Features by Age Group

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    We explored factors influencing presentation with advanced human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) disease by age group. Data were derived from a city-wide cross-sectional survey of 759 HIV-infected adults living in Seoul, Korea. The significance of each observed factor was assessed via multivariate logistic regression. Of subjects aged 20-34 years, lower educational level had a positive influence on presentation with advanced HIV disease (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 2.43; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.36-4.34); those recently diagnosed with HIV were more likely to be presented with advanced HIV disease (aOR, 3.17; 95% CI, 0.99-10.2). Of the subjects aged 35-49 years, those w ith advanced HIV disease were more likely to have been diagnosed during health check-ups (aOR, 2.91; 95% CI, 1.15-7.32) or via clinical manifestations (aOR, 3.61; 95% CI, 1.39-9.36). Of the subjects aged ≥ 50 years, presentation with advanced HIV disease was significantly more common in older subjects (aOR per increment of 5 years, 2.06; 95% CI, 1.32-3.23) and less common among individuals diagnosed with HIV in 2000-2006 (aOR, 0.18; 95% CI, 0.04-0.83). In conclusion, a lower educational level in younger subjects and more advanced age in older subjects positively influence the presentation of advanced HIV disease. PMID:26839469

  3. Ornithodoros moubata complement inhibitor (OmCI) is an equally effective C5 inhibitor in pig and human1

    PubMed Central

    Barratt-Due, Andreas; Thorgersen, Ebbe Billman; Lindstad, Julie Katrine; Pharo, Anne; Lissina, Olga; Lambris, John D.; Nunn, Miles A.; Mollnes, Tom Eirik

    2011-01-01

    Experimental evidence suggests that C inhibition and more particularly combined inhibition of C and the TLR co-receptor CD14 may be of therapeutic benefit in sepsis and other inflammatory conditions. A barrier to the testing and further development of many inhibitors is that their activity is species specific. Pig is a relevant species for experimental models of human disease, and this study undertakes a comprehensive comparison of the inhibitory efficacy of the C5 inhibitor Ornithodoros moubata C inhibitor (OmCI) in human and porcine whole blood ex vivo models of Escherichia coli-induced sepsis. The effect of OmCI on complement activity in pigs undergoing E. coli sepsis was also examined. Porcine and human serum, and whole blood anticoagulated with lepirudin, was incubated with E. coli and the effect of OmCI investigated. The ex vivo results were virtually identical in pig and human. OmCI completely ablated the activity of all three C pathways at 0.64 μM. E. coli-induced C activation and expression of CD11b (wCD11R3 in the pig), was abolished ex vivo at 0.32 μM OmCI. Combining anti-CD14 and OmCI reduced the formation of IL-8 and TNF-α more potently than the single inhibitors. OmCI also efficiently bound E. coli-induced LTB4 in pig and human plasma. In support of our ex vivo findings, in vivo the activity of all C pathways was inhibited at 0.6 mg OmCI/kg pig. In conclusion, OmCI efficiently inhibited pig and human C activation, has accompanying anti-inflammatory effects, and is a promising candidate inhibitor for further in vivo studies of sepsis. PMID:21964028

  4. Identification and Validation of Novel Hedgehog-Responsive Enhancers Predicted by Computational Analysis of Ci/Gli Binding Site Density

    PubMed Central

    Richards, Neil; Parker, David S.; Johnson, Lisa A.; Allen, Benjamin L.; Barolo, Scott; Gumucio, Deborah L.

    2015-01-01

    The Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway directs a multitude of cellular responses during embryogenesis and adult tissue homeostasis. Stimulation of the pathway results in activation of Hh target genes by the transcription factor Ci/Gli, which binds to specific motifs in genomic enhancers. In Drosophila, only a few enhancers (patched, decapentaplegic, wingless, stripe, knot, hairy, orthodenticle) have been shown by in vivo functional assays to depend on direct Ci/Gli regulation. All but one (orthodenticle) contain more than one Ci/Gli site, prompting us to directly test whether homotypic clustering of Ci/Gli binding sites is sufficient to define a Hh-regulated enhancer. We therefore developed a computational algorithm to identify Ci/Gli clusters that are enriched over random expectation, within a given region of the genome. Candidate genomic regions containing Ci/Gli clusters were functionally tested in chicken neural tube electroporation assays and in transgenic flies. Of the 22 Ci/Gli clusters tested, seven novel enhancers (and the previously known patched enhancer) were identified as Hh-responsive and Ci/Gli-dependent in one or both of these assays, including: Cuticular protein 100A (Cpr100A); invected (inv), which encodes an engrailed-related transcription factor expressed at the anterior/posterior wing disc boundary; roadkill (rdx), the fly homolog of vertebrate Spop; the segment polarity gene gooseberry (gsb); and two previously untested regions of the Hh receptor-encoding patched (ptc) gene. We conclude that homotypic Ci/Gli clustering is not sufficient information to ensure Hh-responsiveness; however, it can provide a clue for enhancer recognition within putative Hedgehog target gene loci. PMID:26710299

  5. Musical Sound Quality Impairments in Cochlear Implant (CI) Users as a Function of Limited High-Frequency Perception

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Alexis T.; Jiradejvong, Patpong; Carver, Courtney

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to (a) apply the musical sound quality assessment method, Cochlear Implant-MUltiple Stimulus with Hidden Reference and Anchor (CI-MUSHRA), to quantify musical sound quality deficits in CI (cochlear implant) users with respect to high-frequency loss, and (b) assess possible correlations between CI-MUSHRA performance and self-reported musical sound quality, as assessed by more traditional rating scales. Five versions of real-world musical stimuli were created: 8-,4-, and 2-kHz low-pass-filtered (LPF) versions with increasing high-frequency removal, a composite stimulus containing a 1-kHz LPF-filtered version and white noise (“anchor”), and an unaltered version (“hidden reference”). Using the CI-MUSHRA methodology, these versions were simultaneously presented to participants in addition to a labeled reference. Participants listened to all versions and provided ratings based on a 100-point scale that reflected perceived sound quality difference among the versions. A total of 25 musical stimuli were tested. As comparison measures, participants completed four Visual Analogue Scales (VAS) to assess musical sound quality. Overall, compared to normal hearing (NH) listeners, CI users demonstrated an impaired ability to discriminate between unaltered and altered musical stimuli with variable amounts of high-frequency information removed. Performance using CI-MUSHRA to evaluate this parameter did not correlate to measurements of musical sound quality, as assessed by VAS. This study identified high-frequency loss as one acoustic parameter contributing to overall CI-mediated musical sound quality limitations. CI-MUSHRA provided a quantitative assessment of musical sound quality. This method offers the potential to quantify CI impairments of many different acoustic parameters related to musical sound quality in the future. PMID:23172009

  6. The U.K. Pushes the Boundaries of Bionics: Researchers and Engineers Are Making Great Strides Toward Advanced Prosthetics' Ultimate Goal-Mimicking the Functionality of a Real Limb.

    PubMed

    Banks, Jim

    2016-01-01

    Using state-of-the-art technology, athletes at the Paralympic Games achieve great feats of physical prowess, but for most people using assistive and rehabilitative technologies (ART), even simple tasks can present huge challenges. Many do not make full use of the technology available to them because it is unreliable, uncomfortable, and nonintuitive, so researchers are pushing the envelope to create practical solutions that function like real limbs. PMID:27187534

  7. Full-CI calculations of alternant cyclic polyenes (CH) N, N=2, 4, 6, ƒ 18, in the PPP approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bendazzoli, G. L.; Evangelisti, S.

    1991-10-01

    Full-CI calculations are performed on the PPP model of alternant cyclic polyenes using a recently developed direct full-CI algorithm based on an expansion in Slater determinants. By exploiting the cyclic symmetry and a partial spin adaptation, we have been able to compute a full-CI wavefunction and energy up to N = 18 on the CRAY YMP 8/432 of the Italian University Computing Centre CINECA. The wavefunctions and energies for the series N = 4ν and N = 4ν + 2 are discussed and their behaviour as functions of N is analyzed.

  8. Detection of CI line emission from the detached CO shell of the AGB star R Sculptoris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olofsson, H.; Bergman, P.; Lindqvist, M.

    2015-10-01

    Context. Stars on the asymptotic giant branch (AGB) lose substantial amounts of matter, to the extent that they are important for the chemical evolution of, and dust production in, the Universe. The mass loss is believed to increase gradually with age on the AGB, but it may also occur in the form of bursts, possibly related to the thermal pulsing phenomenon. Detached, geometrically thin, CO shells around carbon stars are good signposts of brief and intense mass ejection. Aims: We aim to put further constraints on the physical properties of detached CO shells around AGB stars. Methods: The photodissociation of CO and other carbon-bearing species in the shells leads to the possibility of detecting lines from neutral carbon. We have therefore searched for the CI(3P1-3P0) line at 492 GHz towards two carbon stars, S Sct and R Scl, with detached CO shells of different ages, ≈8000 and 2300 years, respectively. Results: The CI(3P1-3P0) line was detected towards R Scl. The line intensity is dominated by emission from the detached shell. The detection is at a level consistent with the neutral carbon coming from the full photodissociation of all species except CO, and with only limited photoionisation of carbon. The best fit to the observed 12CO and 13CO line intensities, assuming a homogeneous shell, is obtained for a shell mass of ≈0.002 M⊙, a temperature of ≈100 K, and a CO abundance with respect to H2 of 10-3. The estimated CI/CO abundance ratio is ≈0.3 for the best-fit model. However, a number of arguments point in the direction of a clumpy medium, and a viable interpretation of the data within such a context is provided. Based on observations with the Atacama Pathfinder EXperiment (APEX) telescope. APEX is a collaboration between the Max-Planck-Institut für Radioastronomie, the European Southern Observatory, and the Onsala Space Observatory.

  9. Interactions between C.I. Basic Blue 41 and aluminosilicate sorbents.

    PubMed

    Roulia, Maria; Vassiliadis, Alexandros A

    2005-11-01

    Four aluminosilicate sorbents (montmorillonite, bentonite, raw perlite, and expanded perlite) were employed for retention of the cationic dye C.I. Basic Blue 41. Interactions between the clay and the dyestuff were investigated at several temperatures and clay:dye ratios. The mechanism behind the adsorption involves the formation of H-aggregates of the dye on both clays, followed by dye migration into the interlayer in the case of montmorillonite. Time-dependent absorbance spectra revealed the presence of various dye species in montmorillonite. Introduction of the dye molecules into the interlamellar space occurs more rapidly in bentonite than in montmorillonite. The dye molecules inserted between the clay leaves adopt different orientations and, eventually, stack in layers at increased dye loadings for both montmorillonite and bentonite. Higher dye aggregates are then present as suggested by diffuse reflectance spectroscopy. Dye sorption on both raw and expanded perlite proceeds via H-aggregate formation as well. PMID:15990108

  10. Emission of CO, CI, and CII in the spiral arms of M83 and M51

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramer, C.; Mookerjea, B.; Garcia-Burillo, S.; Bayet, E.; Gerin, M.; Israel, F.; Stutzki, J.; Wouterloot, J.

    2005-01-01

    We present a detailed study of photon dominated regions at several spiral arm positions and the centers of the nearby spiral galaxies M51 and M83. For this, we combine all important cooling lines: [CI] 609μm taken at the JCMT with 12CO and 13CO 1-0 and 2-1 lines taken at the IRAM 30m MRT. These transitions are combined with data taken from the literature: ISO/LWS [CII] 158μm, [OI] 63μm, 146μm, and [NII] (122μm) data (Brauher, J., et al. 2004) and mid-J CO lines from (Bayet, E., et al., Dumke, M., et al. 2003, Israel, F., Baas, F., 2002).

  11. Environmental variation, hybridization, and phenotypic diversification in Cuatro Ciénegas pupfishes.

    PubMed

    Tobler, M; Carson, E W

    2010-07-01

    Hybridization can generate novel phenotypes, and in combination with divergent selection along environmental gradients, can play a driving role in phenotypic diversification. This study examined the influence of introgressive hybridization and environmental variation on the phenotypic diversity of two pupfish species (Cyprinodon atrorus and Cyprinodon bifasciatus) endemic to the Cuatro Ciénegas basin, Mexico. These species occupy opposite environmental extremes and are comprised of multiple, intraspecifically isolated populations. However, interspecific hybridization occurs to various degrees within connecting, intermediate environments. Using geometric morphometric analysis, extensive variation of body shape was observed between and within species, and phenotypic variation was strongly correlated with environmental conditions. Furthermore, some introgressed populations exhibited unique phenotypes not found in either of the parents, and overall morphospace occupation was significantly higher in introgressed populations when compared to the parentals. Overall, we find environmental variation and transgressive segregation both appear to have been important in shaping phenotypic variation in this system. PMID:20524951

  12. ICRF Heating with {omega}<{omega}{sub ci} in Alcator C-Mod

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, C. K.; Hosea, J. C.; Valeo, E. J.; Wilson, J. R.; Bonoli, P. T.; Lin, Y.; Porkolab, M.; Wright, J. C.; Wukitch, S. J.

    2007-09-28

    The TORIC 2D full wave simulation code has been used to study the dynamics of waves with {omega}<{omega}{sub ci} everywhere for all ions in the Alcator C-Mod tokamak. This potential heating regime can be accessed uniquely on C-Mod, because of its high magnetic field capability, B{sub T}{<=}8 T, and variable ICRF source frequency, 40-80 MHz. The simulations indicate that the launched fast waves can mode convert to a short wavelength slow wave on the high field side of the discharge that damps primarily on electrons. The degree to which the mode converted wave penetrates into the core of the plasma is found to depend on the equilibrium density profile.

  13. Kinetic-energy matrix elements for atomic Hylleraas-CI wave functions.

    PubMed

    Harris, Frank E

    2016-05-28

    Hylleraas-CI is a superposition-of-configurations method in which each configuration is constructed from a Slater-type orbital (STO) product to which is appended (linearly) at most one interelectron distance rij. Computations of the kinetic energy for atoms by this method have been difficult due to the lack of formulas expressing these matrix elements for general angular momentum in terms of overlap and potential-energy integrals. It is shown here that a strategic application of angular-momentum theory, including the use of vector spherical harmonics, enables the reduction of all atomic kinetic-energy integrals to overlap and potential-energy matrix elements. The new formulas are validated by showing that they yield correct results for a large number of integrals published by other investigators. PMID:27250282

  14. Extraterrestrial Amino Acids in Orgueil and Ivuna: Tracing the Parent Body of CI Type Carbonaceous Chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, Michael (Technical Monitor); Ehrenfreund, Pascale; Glavin, Daniel P.; Bota, Oliver; Cooper, George; Bada, Jeffrey

    2001-01-01

    Amino acid analyses using HPLC of pristine interior pieces of the CI carbonaceous chondrites Orgueil and Ivuna have found that beta-alanine, glycine, and gamma-amino-n-butyric acid (ABA) are the most abundant amino acids in these two meteorites, with concentrations ranging from approx. 600 to 2,000 parts per billion (ppb). Other alpha-amino acids such as alanine, alpha-ABA, alpha-aminoisobutyric acid (AIB), and isovaline are present only in trace amounts (less than 200 ppb). Carbon isotopic measurements of beta-alanine and glycine and the presence of racemic (D/L 1) alanine and beta-ABA in Orgueil suggest that these amino acids are extraterrestrial in origin. In comparison to the CM carbonaceous chondrites Murchison and Murray, the amino acid composition of the CIs is strikingly distinct, suggesting that these meteorites came from a different type of parent body, possibly an extinct comet, than did the CM carbonaceous chondrites.

  15. Evidence for Impact Shock Melting in CM and CI Chondrite Regolith Samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zolensky, Michael; Mikouchi, Takashi; Hagiya, Kenji; Ohsumi, Kazumasa; Komatsu, Mutsumi; Le, Loan

    2014-01-01

    C class asteroids frequently exhibit reflectance spectra consistent with thermally metamorphosed carbonaceous chondrites, or a mixture of phyllosilicate-rich material along with regions where they are absent. One particularly important example appears to be near-Earth asteroid 1999 JU3, the target of the Hayabusa II sample return mission [1], although not all spectra indicate this. In fact most spectra of 1999 JU3 are featureless, suggesting a heterogeneous regolith. Here we explore an alternative cause of dehydration of regolith of C class asteroids - impact shock melting. Impact shock melting has been proposed to explain some mineralogical characteristics of CB chondrites, but has not been considered a major process for hydrous carbonaceous chondrites. What evidence is there for significant shock melting in the very abundant CMs, or less abundant but still important CI chondrites?

  16. Cabin safety and emergency evacuation: passenger experience of flight CI-120 accident.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yu-Hern; Yang, Hui-Hua

    2011-05-01

    Aircraft evacuation effectiveness is a critical but challenging issue in the civil aviation industry. This paper explores the cabin safety perceptions of passengers from their emergency evacuation experiences in an actual aviation accident. A questionnaire survey and in-depth interviews were conducted with China Airlines flight CI-120 passengers. The qualitative and quantitative results provide insights into passengers' views of cabin safety. The in-depth interview results show that passenger safety education requires more instructions about the use of emergency equipment. The data from the passenger perception questionnaire were analyzed using the factor analysis method; the findings indicate that crew assistance and emergency procedures are the most important factors. The results are likely to be of value to the aviation industry when taking into account passenger perceptions in implementing safety programs. PMID:21376900

  17. Kinetic-energy matrix elements for atomic Hylleraas-CI wave functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Frank E.

    2016-05-01

    Hylleraas-CI is a superposition-of-configurations method in which each configuration is constructed from a Slater-type orbital (STO) product to which is appended (linearly) at most one interelectron distance rij. Computations of the kinetic energy for atoms by this method have been difficult due to the lack of formulas expressing these matrix elements for general angular momentum in terms of overlap and potential-energy integrals. It is shown here that a strategic application of angular-momentum theory, including the use of vector spherical harmonics, enables the reduction of all atomic kinetic-energy integrals to overlap and potential-energy matrix elements. The new formulas are validated by showing that they yield correct results for a large number of integrals published by other investigators.

  18. A Computational Intelligence (CI) Approach to the Precision Mars Lander Problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birge, Brian; Walberg, Gerald

    2002-01-01

    A Mars precision landing requires a landed footprint of no more than 100 meters. Obstacles to reducing the landed footprint include trajectory dispersions due to initial atmospheric entry conditions such as entry angle, parachute deployment height, environment parameters such as wind, atmospheric density, parachute deployment dynamics, unavoidable injection error or propagated error from launch, etc. Computational Intelligence (CI) techniques such as Artificial Neural Nets and Particle Swarm Optimization have been shown to have great success with other control problems. The research period extended previous work on investigating applicability of the computational intelligent approaches. The focus of this investigation was on Particle Swarm Optimization and basic Neural Net architectures. The research investigating these issues was performed for the grant cycle from 5/15/01 to 5/15/02. Matlab 5.1 and 6.0 along with NASA's POST were the primary computational tools.

  19. The smallest comet 81P/Wild 2 dust dances around the CI composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rietmeijer, Frans J. M.

    2015-10-01

    The bulbous Stardust track #80 (C2092,3,80,0,0) is a huge cavity. Allocations C2092,2,80,46,1 nearest the entry hole and C2092,2,80,47,6 about 0.8 mm beneath the entry hole provide evidence of highly chaotic conditions during capture. They are dominated by nonvesicular low-Mg silica glass instead of highly vesicular glass found deeper into this track which is consistent with the escape of magnesiosilica vapors generated from the smallest comet grains. The survival of delicate (Mg,Al,Ca)-bearing silica glass structures is unique to the entry hole. Both allocations show a dearth of surviving comet dust except for a small enstatite, a low-Ca hypersthene grain, and a Ti-oxide fragment. Finding scattered TiO2 fragments in the silica glass could support, but not prove, TiO2 grain fragmentation during hypervelocity capture. The here reported dearth in mineral species is in marked contrast to the wealth of surviving silicate and oxide minerals deeper into the bulb. Both allocations show Fe-Ni-S nanograins dispersed throughout the low-Mg silica glass matrix. It is noted that neither comet Halley nor Wild 2 had a CI bulk composition for the smallest grains. Using the analogs of interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) and cluster IDPs it is argued that a CI chondritic composition requires the mixing of nonchondritic components in the appropriate proportions. So far, the fine-grained Wild 2 dust is biased toward nonchondritic ferromagnesiosilica materials and lacking contributions of nonchondritic components with Mg-Fe-Ni-S[Si-O] compositions. To be specific, "Where are the GEMS"? The GEMS look-alike found in this study suggests that evidence of GEMS in comet Wild 2 may still be found in the Stardust glass.

  20. The functional significance of cortical reorganization and the parallel development of CI therapy.

    PubMed

    Taub, Edward; Uswatte, Gitendra; Mark, Victor W

    2014-01-01

    For the nineteenth and the better part of the twentieth centuries two correlative beliefs were strongly held by almost all neuroscientists and practitioners in the field of neurorehabilitation. The first was that after maturity the adult CNS was hardwired and fixed, and second that in the chronic phase after CNS injury no substantial recovery of function could take place no matter what intervention was employed. However, in the last part of the twentieth century evidence began to accumulate that neither belief was correct. First, in the 1960s and 1970s, in research with primates given a surgical abolition of somatic sensation from a single forelimb, which rendered the extremity useless, it was found that behavioral techniques could convert the limb into an extremity that could be used extensively. Beginning in the late 1980s, the techniques employed with deafferented monkeys were translated into a rehabilitation treatment, termed Constraint Induced Movement therapy or CI therapy, for substantially improving the motor deficit in humans of the upper and lower extremities in the chronic phase after stroke. CI therapy has been applied successfully to other types of damage to the CNS such as traumatic brain injury, cerebral palsy, multiple sclerosis, and spinal cord injury, and it has also been used to improve function in focal hand dystonia and for aphasia after stroke. As this work was proceeding, it was being shown during the 1980s and 1990s that sustained modulation of afferent input could alter the structure of the CNS and that this topographic reorganization could have relevance to the function of the individual. The alteration in these once fundamental beliefs has given rise to important recent developments in neuroscience and neurorehabilitation and holds promise for further increasing our understanding of CNS function and extending the boundaries of what is possible in neurorehabilitation. PMID:25018720

  1. Volatiles in interplanetary dust particles: A comparison with CI and CM chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bustin, Roberta

    1992-01-01

    In an effort to classify and determine the origin of interplanetary dust particles (IDPs), 14 of these particles were studied using a laser microprobe/mass spectrometer. The mass spectra for these particles varied dramatically. Some particles released hydroxide or water which probably originated in hydroxide-bearing minerals or hydrates. Others produced spectra which included a number of hydrocarbons and resembled meteorite spectra. However, none of the individual IDPs gave spectra which could be matched identically with a particular meteorite type such as a CI or CM carbonaceous chondrite. We believe this was due to the fact that 10-20 micron size IDPs are too small to be representative of the parent body. To verify that the diversity was due primarily to the small particle sizes, small grains of approximately the same size range as the IDPs were obtained from two primitive meteorites, Murchison and Orgueil, and these small meteorite particles were treated exactly like the IDPs. Considerable diversity was observed among individual grains, but a composite spectrum of all the grains from one meteorite closely resembled the spectrum obtained from a much larger sample of that meteorite. A composite spectrum of the 14 IDPs also resembled the spectra of the CM and CI meteorites, pointing to a possible link between IDPs and carbonaceous chondrites. This also illustrates that despite the inherent diversity in particles as small as 10-20 micron, conclusions can be drawn about the possible origin and overall composition of such particles by looking not only at results from individual particles but also by including many particles in a study and basing conclusions on some kind of composite data.

  2. The functional significance of cortical reorganization and the parallel development of CI therapy

    PubMed Central

    Taub, Edward; Uswatte, Gitendra; Mark, Victor W.

    2014-01-01

    For the nineteenth and the better part of the twentieth centuries two correlative beliefs were strongly held by almost all neuroscientists and practitioners in the field of neurorehabilitation. The first was that after maturity the adult CNS was hardwired and fixed, and second that in the chronic phase after CNS injury no substantial recovery of function could take place no matter what intervention was employed. However, in the last part of the twentieth century evidence began to accumulate that neither belief was correct. First, in the 1960s and 1970s, in research with primates given a surgical abolition of somatic sensation from a single forelimb, which rendered the extremity useless, it was found that behavioral techniques could convert the limb into an extremity that could be used extensively. Beginning in the late 1980s, the techniques employed with deafferented monkeys were translated into a rehabilitation treatment, termed Constraint Induced Movement therapy or CI therapy, for substantially improving the motor deficit in humans of the upper and lower extremities in the chronic phase after stroke. CI therapy has been applied successfully to other types of damage to the CNS such as traumatic brain injury, cerebral palsy, multiple sclerosis, and spinal cord injury, and it has also been used to improve function in focal hand dystonia and for aphasia after stroke. As this work was proceeding, it was being shown during the 1980s and 1990s that sustained modulation of afferent input could alter the structure of the CNS and that this topographic reorganization could have relevance to the function of the individual. The alteration in these once fundamental beliefs has given rise to important recent developments in neuroscience and neurorehabilitation and holds promise for further increasing our understanding of CNS function and extending the boundaries of what is possible in neurorehabilitation. PMID:25018720

  3. A Candidate Young Massive Planet in Orbit around the Classical T Tauri Star CI Tau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johns-Krull, Christopher M.; McLane, Jacob N.; Prato, L.; Crockett, Christopher J.; Jaffe, Daniel T.; Hartigan, Patrick M.; Beichman, Charles A.; Mahmud, Naved I.; Chen, Wei; Skiff, B. A.; Cauley, P. Wilson; Jones, Joshua A.; Mace, G. N.

    2016-08-01

    The ∼2 Myr old classical T Tauri star CI Tau shows periodic variability in its radial velocity (RV) variations measured at infrared (IR) and optical wavelengths. We find that these observations are consistent with a massive planet in a ∼9 day period orbit. These results are based on 71 IR RV measurements of this system obtained over five years, and on 26 optical RV measurements obtained over nine years. CI Tau was also observed photometrically in the optical on 34 nights over ∼one month in 2012. The optical RV data alone are inadequate to identify an orbital period, likely the result of star spot and activity-induced noise for this relatively small data set. The infrared RV measurements reveal significant periodicity at ∼9 days. In addition, the full set of optical and IR RV measurements taken together phase coherently and with equal amplitudes to the ∼9 day period. Periodic RV signals can in principle be produced by cool spots, hotspots, and reflection of the stellar spectrum off the inner disk, in addition to resulting from a planetary companion. We have considered each of these and find the planet hypothesis most consistent with the data. The RV amplitude yields an M\\sin i of ∼8.1 M Jup; in conjunction with a 1.3 mm continuum emission measurement of the circumstellar disk inclination from the literature, we find a planet mass of ∼11.3 M Jup, assuming alignment of the planetary orbit with the disk. This paper includes data taken at The McDonald Observatory of The University of Texas at Austin.

  4. A Candidate Young Massive Planet in Orbit around the Classical T Tauri Star CI Tau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johns-Krull, Christopher M.; McLane, Jacob N.; Prato, L.; Crockett, Christopher J.; Jaffe, Daniel T.; Hartigan, Patrick M.; Beichman, Charles A.; Mahmud, Naved I.; Chen, Wei; Skiff, B. A.; Cauley, P. Wilson; Jones, Joshua A.; Mace, G. N.

    2016-08-01

    The ˜2 Myr old classical T Tauri star CI Tau shows periodic variability in its radial velocity (RV) variations measured at infrared (IR) and optical wavelengths. We find that these observations are consistent with a massive planet in a ˜9 day period orbit. These results are based on 71 IR RV measurements of this system obtained over five years, and on 26 optical RV measurements obtained over nine years. CI Tau was also observed photometrically in the optical on 34 nights over ˜one month in 2012. The optical RV data alone are inadequate to identify an orbital period, likely the result of star spot and activity-induced noise for this relatively small data set. The infrared RV measurements reveal significant periodicity at ˜9 days. In addition, the full set of optical and IR RV measurements taken together phase coherently and with equal amplitudes to the ˜9 day period. Periodic RV signals can in principle be produced by cool spots, hotspots, and reflection of the stellar spectrum off the inner disk, in addition to resulting from a planetary companion. We have considered each of these and find the planet hypothesis most consistent with the data. The RV amplitude yields an M\\sin i of ˜8.1 M Jup; in conjunction with a 1.3 mm continuum emission measurement of the circumstellar disk inclination from the literature, we find a planet mass of ˜11.3 M Jup, assuming alignment of the planetary orbit with the disk. This paper includes data taken at The McDonald Observatory of The University of Texas at Austin.

  5. Getting the Weights of Lewis Structures out of Huckel Theory: Huckel-Lewis Configuration Interaction (HL-CI)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Humbel, Stephane

    2007-01-01

    A simple method is proposed based on energies obtained with the Huckel theory to compute the weights of the structures. The Huckel-Lewis CI technique extends to the Huckel theory the field of the resonance between Lewis structures.

  6. Electronic and vibrational spectroscopic studies of jet-cooled 5-cyanoindole and its water clusters, 5CI-(H2O)n, (n = 0-2)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, Ahreum; Moon, Cheol Joo; Ahn, Ahreum; Lee, Ji Hoon; Kim, Seong Keun; Choi, Myong Yong

    2016-08-01

    Mass-selected resonant two-photon ionization (R2PI) and UV-UV hole-burning, and infrared-dip spectra of 5-cyanoindole (5CI) and its water clusters, 5CI-(H2O)n (n = 1 and 2) were measured. Although, the structures of 5CI-(H2O)1-2 are similar to those of 3CI-(H2O)1-2, the photofragmentation behaviors of the two systems are quite different due to the La-Lb state energy lowering and higher binding energies of 5CI-(H2O)1-2 compared to those of 3CI-(H2O)1-2. Especially for the case of 5CI-(H2O)2 cluster, shortening excited-state lifetime of 5CI-(H2O)2 causes the broad background in the R2PI spectrum of 5CI-(H2O)2.

  7. Use of Medications of Questionable Benefit in Advanced Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Tjia, Jennifer; Briesacher, Becky A.; Peterson, Daniel; Liu, Qin; Andrade, Susan E.; Mitchell, Susan L.

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Advanced dementia is characterized by severe cognitive impairment and complete functional dependence. Patients’ goals of care should guide the prescribing of medication during such terminal illness. Medications that do not promote the primary goal of care should be minimized. OBJECTIVES To estimate the prevalence of medications with questionable benefit used by nursing home residents with advanced dementia, identify resident- and facility-level characteristics associated with such use, and estimate associated medication expenditures. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Cross-sectional study of medication use by nursing home residents with advanced dementia using a nationwide long-term care pharmacy database linked to the Minimum Data Set (460 facilities) between October 1, 2009, and September 30, 2010. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Use of medication deemed of questionable benefit in advanced dementia based on previously published criteria and mean 90-day expenditures attributable to these medications per resident. Generalized estimating equations using the logit link function were used to identify resident- and facility-related factors independently associated with the likelihood of receiving medications of questionable benefit after accounting for clustering within nursing homes. RESULTS Of 5406 nursing home residents with advanced dementia, 2911 (53.9%) received at least 1 medication with questionable benefit (range, 44.7% in the Mid-Atlantic census region to 65.0% in the West South Central census region). Cholinesterase inhibitors (36.4%), memantine hydrochloride (25.2%), and lipid-lowering agents (22.4%) were the most commonly prescribed. In adjusted analyses, having eating problems (adjusted odds ratio [AOR], 0.68; 95% CI, 0.59–0.78), a feeding tube (AOR, 0.58; 95% CI, 0.48–0.70), or a do-not-resuscitate order (AOR, 0.65; 95% CI, 0.57–0.75), and enrolling in hospice (AOR, 0.69; 95% CI, 0.58–0.82) lowered the likelihood of receiving these

  8. Reactivity of stabilized Criegee intermediates (sCI) from isoprene and monoterpene ozonolysis toward SO2 and organic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sipilä, M.; Jokinen, T.; Berndt, T.; Richters, S.; Makkonen, R.; Donahue, N. M.; Mauldin, R. L., III; Kurten, T.; Paasonen, P.; Sarnela, N.; Ehn, M.; Junninen, H.; Rissanen, M. P.; Thornton, J.; Stratmann, F.; Herrmann, H.; Worsnop, D. R.; Kulmala, M.; Kerminen, V.-M.; Petäjä, T.

    2014-01-01

    Oxidation processes in Earth's atmosphere are tightly connected to many environmental and human health issues and are essential drivers for biogeochemistry. Until the recent discovery of the atmospheric relevance of stabilized Criegee intermediates (sCI), atmospheric oxidation processes were thought to be dominated by few main oxidants: ozone, hydroxyl radicals (OH), nitrate radicals and, e.g. over oceans, halogen atoms such as chlorine. Here, we report results from laboratory experiments at 293 K and atmospheric pressure focusing on sCI formation from the ozonolysis of isoprene and the most abundant monoterpenes (α-pinene and limonene), and subsequent reactions of the resulting sCIs with SO2 producing sulphuric acid (H2SO4). The measured sCI yields were (0.15 ± 0.07), (0.27 ± 0.12) and (0.58 ± 0.26) for the ozonolysis of α-pinene, limonene and isoprene, respectively. The ratio between the rate coefficient for the sCI loss (including thermal decomposition and the reaction with water vapour) and the rate coefficient for the reaction of sCI with SO2, k(loss) / k(sCI + SO2), was determined at relative humidities of 10% and 50%. Observed values represent the average reactivity of all sCIs produced from the individual alkene used in the ozonolysis. For the monoterpene derived sCIs, the relative rate coefficients k(loss) / k(sCI + SO2) were in the range (2.0-2.4) × 1012 molecule cm-3 and nearly independent on the relative humidity. This fact points to a minor importance of the sCI + H2O reaction in the case of the sCI arising from α-pinene and limonene. For the isoprene sCIs, however, the ratio k(loss) / k(sCI + SO2) was strongly dependent on the relative humidity. To explore whether sCIs could have a more general role in atmospheric oxidation, we investigated as an example the reactivity of acetone oxide (sCI from the ozonolysis of 2,3-dimethyl-2-butene) toward small organic acids, i.e. formic and acetic acid. Acetone oxide was found to react faster with the

  9. Oxidative addition of the C-I bond on aluminum nanoclusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sengupta, Turbasu; Das, Susanta; Pal, Sourav

    2015-07-01

    Energetics and the in-depth reaction mechanism of the oxidative addition step of the cross-coupling reaction are studied in the framework of density functional theory (DFT) on aluminum nanoclusters. Aluminum metal in its bulk state is totally inactive towards carbon-halogen bond dissociation but selected Al nanoclusters (size ranging from 3 to 20 atoms) have shown a significantly lower activation barrier towards the oxidative addition reaction. The calculated energy barriers are lower than the gold clusters and within a comparable range with the conventional and most versatile Pd catalyst. Further investigations reveal that the activation energies and other reaction parameters are highly sensitive to the geometrical shapes and electronic structures of the clusters rather than their size, imposing the fact that comprehensive studies on aluminum clusters can be beneficial for nanoscience and nanotechnology. To understand the possible reaction mechanism in detail, the reaction pathway is investigated with the ab initio Born Oppenheimer Molecular Dynamics (BOMD) simulation and the Natural Bond Orbital (NBO) analysis. In short, our theoretical study highlights the thermodynamic and kinetic details of C-I bond dissociation on aluminum clusters for future endeavors in cluster chemistry.Energetics and the in-depth reaction mechanism of the oxidative addition step of the cross-coupling reaction are studied in the framework of density functional theory (DFT) on aluminum nanoclusters. Aluminum metal in its bulk state is totally inactive towards carbon-halogen bond dissociation but selected Al nanoclusters (size ranging from 3 to 20 atoms) have shown a significantly lower activation barrier towards the oxidative addition reaction. The calculated energy barriers are lower than the gold clusters and within a comparable range with the conventional and most versatile Pd catalyst. Further investigations reveal that the activation energies and other reaction parameters are highly

  10. Comets as Parent Bodies of CI1 Carbonaceous Meteorites and Possible Habitats of Ice-Microbiota

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wickramasinghe, N. Chandra; Wallis, Daryl H.; Rozanov, Alexei Yu.; Hoover, Richard B.

    2011-01-01

    Recent studies of comets and cometary dust have confirmed the presence of biologically relevant organic molecules along with clay minerals and water ice. It is also now well established by deuterium/hydrogen ratios that the CI1 carbonaceous meteorites contain indigenous extraterrestrial water. The evidence of extensive aqueous alteration of the minerals in these meteorites led to the hypothesis that water-bearing asteroids or comets represent the parent bodies of the CI1 (and perhaps CM2) carbonaceous meteorites. These meteorites have also been shown to possess a diverse array of complex organics and chiral and morphological biomarkers. Stable isotope studies by numerous independent investigators have conclusively established that the complex organics found in these meteorites are both indigenous and extraterrestrial in nature. Although the origin of these organics is still unknown, some researchers have suggested that they originated by unknown abiotic mechanisms and may have played a role in the delivery of chiral biomolecules and the origin of life on Early Earth. In this paper we review these results and investigate the thermal history of comets. We show that permanent as well as transient domains of liquid water can be maintained on a comet under a plausible set of assumptions. With each perihelion passage of a comet volatiles are preferentially released, and during millions of such passages the comet could shed crustal debris that may survive transit through the Earth s atmosphere as a carbonaceous meteorite. We review the current state of knowledge of comets and carbonaceous meteorites. We also present the results of recent studies on the long-term viability of terrestrial ice-microbiota encased in ancient glacial ice and permafrost. We suggest that the conditions which have been observed to prevail on many comets do not preclude either survivability (or even the active metabolism and growth) of many types of eukaryotic and prokaryotic microbial

  11. Viable Biomass Sensor integration in the MELiSSA CI and CIII compartments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duatis Juarez, Jordi; Peiro, Enrique; Bragos, Ramon

    Traditionally, the biomass quantity and quality in complex substrate reactor (e.g. activated sludge, high density, fixed bed,..) is determined off-line in laboratories. Within this study, the VIAMASS Sensor System, which uses Electrical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) techniques, has been tested for MELiSSA compartment CI and C III, the liquefying and the nitrifying compartment respectively. This sensor is able to measure viable cells on basis of an impedance spectroscopy measurement. The fact that viable biomass can be detected, distinguishes the sensor from classical biomass sensors used in wastewater treatment plants. Detection of viable biomass and composition of the biomass can be very useful for calibration and validation of biological models. The sensor can be used to detect toxicity in system leading to die-off of organisms. The technology developed initially for space applications has been adapted and will be also able to give overall information on the population distribution of cells, distinguishing what type of biomass is dominant (for example, bacteria or protozoa).

  12. Degradation of C.I. Reactive Red 2 through photocatalysis coupled with water jet cavitation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoning; Jia, Jinping; Wang, Yalin

    2011-01-15

    The decolorization of an azo dye, C.I. Reactive Red 2 was investigated using TiO(2) photocatalysis coupled with water jet cavitation. Experiments were performed in a 4.0 L solution under ultraviolet power of 9 W. The effects of TiO(2) loading, initial dye concentration, solution pH, geometry of cavitation tube, and the addition of anions on the degradation of the dye were evaluated. Degradation of the dye followed a pseudo-first order reaction. The photocatalysis coupled with water jet cavitation elevated degradation of the dye by about 136%, showing a synergistic effect compared to the individual photocatalysis and water jet cavitation. The enhancement of photocatalysis by water jet cavitation could be due to the deagglomeration of catalyst particles as well as the better contact between the catalyst surfaces and the reactants. Venturi tube with smaller diameter and shorter length of throat tube favored the dye decolorization. The degradation efficiency was found to increase with decreasing initial concentration and pH. The presence of NO(3)(-) and SO(4)(2-) enhanced the degradation of RR2, while Cl(-), and especially HCO(3)(-) significantly reduced dye decolorization. The results of this study indicated that the coupled photocatalysis and water jet cavitation is effective in degrading dye in wastewater and provides a promising alternative for treatment of dye wastewater at a large scale. PMID:20940086

  13. Identification of Chromomoric Acid C-I as an Nrf2 Activator in Chromolaena odorata

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Activation of nuclear factor-erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) contributes to several beneficial bioactivities of natural products, including induction of an increased cellular stress resistance and prevention or resolution of inflammation. In this study, the potential of a crude leaf extract of Chromolaena odorata, traditionally used against inflammation and skin lesions, was examined for Nrf2 activation. Guided by an Nrf2-dependent luciferase reporter gene assay, the phytoprostane chromomoric acid C-I (1) was identified as a potent Nrf2 activator from C. odorata with a CD (concentration doubling the response of vehicle-treated cells) of 5.2 μM. When tested at 1–10 μM, 1 was able to induce the endogenous Nrf2 target gene heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) in fibroblasts. Between 2 and 5 μM, compound 1 induced HO-1 in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) and inhibited their proliferation in a HO-1-dependent manner, without eliciting signs of cytotoxicity. PMID:24476568

  14. Identification of chromomoric acid C-I as an Nrf2 activator in Chromolaena odorata.

    PubMed

    Heiss, Elke H; Tran, Thi Van Anh; Zimmermann, Kristin; Schwaiger, Stefan; Vouk, Corina; Mayerhofer, Barbara; Malainer, Clemens; Atanasov, Atanas G; Stuppner, Hermann; Dirsch, Verena M

    2014-03-28

    Activation of nuclear factor-erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) contributes to several beneficial bioactivities of natural products, including induction of an increased cellular stress resistance and prevention or resolution of inflammation. In this study, the potential of a crude leaf extract of Chromolaena odorata, traditionally used against inflammation and skin lesions, was examined for Nrf2 activation. Guided by an Nrf2-dependent luciferase reporter gene assay, the phytoprostane chromomoric acid C-I (1) was identified as a potent Nrf2 activator from C. odorata with a CD (concentration doubling the response of vehicle-treated cells) of 5.2 μM. When tested at 1-10 μM, 1 was able to induce the endogenous Nrf2 target gene heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) in fibroblasts. Between 2 and 5 μM, compound 1 induced HO-1 in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) and inhibited their proliferation in a HO-1-dependent manner, without eliciting signs of cytotoxicity. PMID:24476568

  15. The Cuatro Ciénegas Basin in Coahuila, Mexico: an astrobiological Precambrian Park.

    PubMed

    Souza, Valeria; Siefert, Janet L; Escalante, Ana E; Elser, James J; Eguiarte, Luis E

    2012-07-01

    The Cuatro Ciénegas Basin (CCB) is a rare oasis in the Chihuahuan Desert in the state of Coahuila, Mexico. It has a biological endemism similar to that of the Galapagos Islands, and its spring-fed ecosystems have very low nutrient content (nitrogen or phosphorous) and are dominated by diverse microbialites. Thus, it has proven to be a distinctive opportunity for the field of astrobiology, as the CCB can be seen as a proxy for an earlier time in Earth's history, in particular the late Precambrian, the biological frontier when prokaryotic life yielded at least partial dominance to eukaryotes and multicellular life. It is a kind of ecological time machine that provides abundant opportunities for collaborative investigations by geochemists, geologists, ecologists, and population biologists in the study of the evolutionary processes that structured Earth-based life, especially in the microbial realm. The CCB is an object of investigation for the identification of biosignatures of past and present biota that can be used in our search for extraterrestrial life. In this review, we summarize CCB research efforts that began with microbial ecology and population biology projects and have since been expanded into broader efforts that involve biogeochemistry, comparative genomics, and assessments of biosignatures. We also propose that, in the future, the CCB is sanctioned as a "Precambrian Park" for astrobiology. PMID:22920514

  16. Metagenomic and stable isotopic analyses of modern freshwater microbialites in Cuatro Ciénegas, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Breitbart, Mya; Hoare, Ana; Nitti, Anthony; Siefert, Janet; Haynes, Matthew; Dinsdale, Elizabeth; Edwards, Robert; Souza, Valeria; Rohwer, Forest; Hollander, David

    2009-01-01

    Ancient biologically mediated sedimentary carbonate deposits, including stromatolites and other microbialites, provide insight into environmental conditions on early Earth. The primary limitation to interpreting these records is our lack of understanding regarding microbial processes and the preservation of geochemical signatures in contemporary microbialite systems. Using a combination of metagenomic sequencing and isotopic analyses, this study describes the identity, metabolic potential and chemical processes of microbial communities from living microbialites from Cuatro Ciénegas, Mexico. Metagenomic sequencing revealed a diverse, redox-dependent microbial community associated with the microbialites. The microbialite community is distinct from other marine and freshwater microbial communities, and demonstrates extensive environmental adaptation. The microbialite metagenomes contain a large number of genes involved in the production of exopolymeric substances and the formation of biofilms, creating a complex, spatially structured environment. In addition to the spatial complexity of the biofilm, microbial activity is tightly controlled by sensory and regulatory systems, which allow for coordination of autotrophic and heterotrophic processes. Isotopic measurements of the intracrystalline organic matter demonstrate the importance of heterotrophic respiration of photoautotrophic biomass in the precipitation of calcium carbonate. The genomic and stable isotopic data presented here significantly enhance our evolving knowledge of contemporary biomineralization processes, and are directly applicable to studies of ancient microbialites. PMID:18764874

  17. Combined CASSCF and MR-CI study on photoinduced dissociation and isomerization of acryloyl chloride.

    PubMed

    Cui, Gang-Long; Li, Qian-Song; Zhang, Feng; Fang, Wei-Hai; Yu, Jian-Guo

    2006-10-26

    The potential energy surfaces of isomerization and dissociation reactions for CH2CHCOCl in the S0, T1, T2, and S1 states have been mapped with DFT, CASSCF, MP2, and MR-CI calculations. Rate constants for adiabatic and nonadiabatic processes have been calculated with the RRKM rate theory, in conjugation with the vibronic interaction method. Mechanistic photochemistry of CH2CHCOCl at 230-310 nm has been characterized through the computed potential energy surfaces and rate constants. Upon photoexcitation of CH2CHCOCl at 310 nm, the S1-->T1 intersystem crossing is the dominant primary process, which is followed by the 1,3-Cl migration along the T1 pathway. Meanwhile, the S1-->S0 internal conversion occurs with considerable probability and the subsequent trans-cis isomerization proceeds in the ground state. The C-Cl bond cleavage is an exclusive primary channel upon photoexcitation of gaseous CH2CHCOCl at 230 nm. The direct C-Cl bond cleavage is partially blocked by effects of the matrix, and the internal conversion from S1 to S0 becomes an important process for the excited molecule to deactivate in the condensed phase. The present calculations not only provide a reasonable explanation of the experimental findings, but also give new insight into the mechanistic photochemistry of CH2CHCOCl. PMID:17048815

  18. Structure and Bonding of Carbon in Clays from CI Carbonaceous Chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garview, Laurence a. J.; Buseck, Peter R.

    2005-01-01

    Carbonaceous chondrites (CC) contain a diverse suite of C-rich materials. Acid dissolution of these meteorites leaves a C-rich residue with chemical and structural affinities to kerogen. This material has primarily been analyzed in bulk, and much information has been provided regarding functional groups and elemental and isotopic compositions. However, comparatively little work has been done on C in unprocessed meteorites. Studies of CCs suggest a spatial relationship of some C-rich materials with products of aqueous alteration. Recent studies revealed discrete submicronsized, C-rich particles in Tagish Lake and a range of CM2 meteorites. A challenge is to correlate the findings from the bulk acid-residue studies with those of high-spatial resolution-mineralogical and spectroscopic observations of unprocessed meteorites. Hence, the relationship between the C-rich materials in the acid residues and its form and locations in the unprocessed meteorite remains unclear. Here we provide information on the structure and bonding of C associated with clays in CI carbonaceous chondrites. Additional information is included in the original extended abstract.

  19. The role of journals in building up communities: the experience of Ciência em Tela

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, Isabel; de Souza Barros, Susana

    2015-12-01

    Ciência em Tela is an open access Brazilian science teacher education online journal that has been published twice a year since 2008 and which encourages the participation of professionals with different backgrounds and the submission of a variety of textual genres, besides research papers. Another feature is that the journal includes practicing schoolteachers not only as authors but also as reviewers, which not only provides those who submit contributions to the journal with an early feedback from their target audience but also helps empower schoolteachers by placing them in a discursive situation in which they are producers, as opposed to consumers, of discourses about science education. In this paper we describe the background to and main aspects of the journal's innovative editorial policy, which seeks to bridge gaps between communities and institutions linked to science education, as well as to discuss the challenges that arise from it, in particular, issues concerning internationalisation and funding, as well as the role of journals in times of colonisation and commodification of knowledge and of discourses.

  20. Certification procedures for sirius red F3B (CI 35780, Direct red 80).

    PubMed

    Dapson, R W; Fagan, C; Kiernan, J A; Wickersham, T W

    2011-06-01

    Sirius red F3B (CI 35780, Direct red 80) is a polyazo dye used principally in staining methods for collagen and amyloid. For certification by the Biological Stain Commission, a sample of the dye must exhibit an absorption spectrum of characteristic shape with a maximum at 528-529 nm, a small shoulder near 500 nm and narrow peaks at 372, 281-282 and 230-235 nm. Spot tests (color changes with addition of concentrated H(2)SO(4) or HCl and subsequent dilution or neutralization) also are applied. The dye must perform satisfactorily in the picro-sirius red method for collagen by providing red staining of all types of collagen with yellow and green birefringence of fibers. Llewellyn's alkaline sirius red method applied to tissue known to contain amyloid must show red coloration of the products with green birefringence. Dye content, which does not influence significantly the staining properties of sirius red F3B, is not assayed. PMID:21417582

  1. INDO/SCF-CI calculations and structural spectroscopic studies of some complexes of 4-hydroxyacetanilide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Shahawy, A. S.; Ahmed, S. M.; Sayed, N. Kh.

    2007-01-01

    The electronic energies among different possible structures of 4-hydroxyacetanilide (paracetamol) (PA) molecule, were calculated using INDO method and it has been concluded that its structure has C s point group symmetry of the cis-form. The ionization potential, electron affinity, dipole moment and binding energy have been calculated. The calculated electronic transitions of the cis-form of PA using SCF-CI method have good coincidence with the electronic absorption spectrum. The temperature effect on the electronic spectrum of PA confirms the presence of one conformer only. The electronic spectra of PA compound were studied in different polar- and non-polar solvents and the hydrogen bonding as well as the orientation energies of the polar solvents were determined from the mixed solvents studies. Complexes of PA with various metal ions such as, Cu(II), Zn(II) or Fe(II) ions of ratio 2:1, respectively, have been prepared and their structure has been confirmed by elemental analysis, atomic absorption spectra, IR spectra and 1H NMR spectra and finally it can be concluded that the structure of the complexes has C 2h point group symmetry in which two PA molecules are chelated to any one of the metal ions, Cu(II), Zn(II) and Fe(II) ions.

  2. The Cuatro Ciénegas Basin in Coahuila, Mexico: An Astrobiological Precambrian Park

    PubMed Central

    Siefert, Janet L.; Escalante, Ana E.; Elser, James J.; Eguiarte, Luis E.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The Cuatro Ciénegas Basin (CCB) is a rare oasis in the Chihuahuan Desert in the state of Coahuila, Mexico. It has a biological endemism similar to that of the Galapagos Islands, and its spring-fed ecosystems have very low nutrient content (nitrogen or phosphorous) and are dominated by diverse microbialites. Thus, it has proven to be a distinctive opportunity for the field of astrobiology, as the CCB can be seen as a proxy for an earlier time in Earth's history, in particular the late Precambrian, the biological frontier when prokaryotic life yielded at least partial dominance to eukaryotes and multicellular life. It is a kind of ecological time machine that provides abundant opportunities for collaborative investigations by geochemists, geologists, ecologists, and population biologists in the study of the evolutionary processes that structured Earth-based life, especially in the microbial realm. The CCB is an object of investigation for the identification of biosignatures of past and present biota that can be used in our search for extraterrestrial life. In this review, we summarize CCB research efforts that began with microbial ecology and population biology projects and have since been expanded into broader efforts that involve biogeochemistry, comparative genomics, and assessments of biosignatures. We also propose that, in the future, the CCB is sanctioned as a “Precambrian Park” for astrobiology. Key Words: Microbial mats—Stromatolites—Early Earth—Extremophilic microorganisms—Microbial ecology. Astrobiology 12, 641–647. PMID:22920514

  3. Characterization of neutron calibration fields at the TINT's 50 Ci americium-241/beryllium neutron irradiator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liamsuwan, T.; Channuie, J.; Ratanatongchai, W.

    2015-05-01

    Reliable measurement of neutron radiation is important for monitoring and protection in workplace where neutrons are present. Although Thailand has been familiar with applications of neutron sources and neutron beams for many decades, there is no calibration facility dedicated to neutron measuring devices available in the country. Recently, Thailand Institute of Nuclear Technology (TINT) has set up a multi-purpose irradiation facility equipped with a 50 Ci americium-241/beryllium neutron irradiator. The facility is planned to be used for research, nuclear analytical techniques and, among other applications, calibration of neutron measuring devices. In this work, the neutron calibration fields were investigated in terms of neutron energy spectra and dose equivalent rates using Monte Carlo simulations, an in-house developed neutron spectrometer and commercial survey meters. The characterized neutron fields can generate neutron dose equivalent rates ranging from 156 μSv/h to 3.5 mSv/h with nearly 100% of dose contributed by neutrons of energies larger than 0.01 MeV. The gamma contamination was less than 4.2-7.5% depending on the irradiation configuration. It is possible to use the described neutron fields for calibration test and routine quality assurance of neutron dose rate meters and passive dosemeters commonly used in radiation protection dosimetry.

  4. Biodegradation of C.I. Reactive Red 195 by Enterococcus faecalis strain YZ66.

    PubMed

    Mate, Madhuri Sahasrabudhe; Pathade, Girish

    2012-03-01

    Synthetic dyes are extensively used in textile dyeing, paper, printing, colour photography, pharmaceutics, cosmetics and other industries. Among these, azodyes represents the largest and most versatile class of synthetic dyes. As high as 50% of the dyes are released into the environment during manufacture and usage. Traditional methods of treatment are found to be expensive and have operational problems. Biological decolourization has been investigated as a method to transform, degrade or mineralize azo dyes. In the present studies bacteria from soil from dye waste area, dye waste, sewage and dung were subjected to acclimatization with C.I. Reactive Red 195 an azo dye, in the basal nutrient media. The most promising bacterial isolate was used for further dye degradation studies. The 16s rRNA gene sequencing and biochemical characteristics revealed the isolated organism as Enterococcus faecalis strain YZ66. The strain showed 99.5% decolourization of the selected dye (Reactive Red 195-50 mg/l) within one and half hour in static anoxic condition. The optimum pH and temperature for the decolourization was 5.0 and 40°C respectively. The biodegradation was monitored by UV-Vis, FTIR, TLC and HPLC. The final products were characterized by Gas chromatography and Mass Spectrophotometry. Toxicity study demonstrated no toxicity of the biodegradation product. The results suggest that the isolated organism E. faecalis strain YZ 66 can be used as a useful tool to treat waste water containing reactive dyes. PMID:22805800

  5. Metabolic disposition of CI-924, a new lipid regulating agent, in laboratory animals

    SciTech Connect

    Mertz, N.; Windsor, B.; Chang, T.

    1986-03-05

    The disposition of carbon-14 labeled CI-924 (I), 5,5'-(1,1-biphenyl)-2,5 diyl-bis(oxy)-bis-2,2'-dimethylpentanoic acid, was studied in beagle dogs and rats following single 10 mg/kg po doses. Serial plasma, urine and fecal samples were collected up to 168 hr and analyzed for total radioactivity. Peak /sup 14/C plasma concentrations of 31 mcg/ml (dogs) and 66 mcg/ml (rats) were attained within 0.5 and 1.0 hr after dosing. The concentrations declined thereafter with estimated half life of 11 and 5 hr in rats and dogs, respectively. TLC radiochromatography revealed that I was the only component in circulating blood. Tissue distribution study in rats showed that the highest /sup 14/C concentrations were found in plasma and liver with decreasing concentrations in lung, heart, kidney, skin, gonads, spleen, fat, muscle, adrenals, and brain. All tissue concentrations declined in parallel with plasma levels with half lives of 14-22 hr. Urinary and fecal excretion accounted for 1-3% and 92-96% of the dose, respectively. Balance study in bile duct cannulated rats showed that 90%, 1%, and 1% of the dose was excreted in bile, urine, and feces. Unchanged drug and varying amounts of its conjugate were the only products present in bile, urine or feces. These results indicate that I was completely absorbed and eliminated primarily by biliary excretion in the form of unchanged drug and its conjugate.

  6. The Careful Puppet Master: Reducing risk and fortifying acceptance testing with Jenkins CI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Jason A.; Richman, Gabriel; DeStefano, John; Pryor, James; Rao, Tejas; Strecker-Kellogg, William; Wong, Tony

    2015-12-01

    Centralized configuration management, including the use of automation tools such as Puppet, can greatly increase provisioning speed and efficiency when configuring new systems or making changes to existing systems, reduce duplication of work, and improve automated processes. However, centralized management also brings with it a level of inherent risk: a single change in just one file can quickly be pushed out to thousands of computers and, if that change is not properly and thoroughly tested and contains an error, could result in catastrophic damage to many services, potentially bringing an entire computer facility offline. Change management procedures can—and should—be formalized in order to prevent such accidents. However, like the configuration management process itself, if such procedures are not automated, they can be difficult to enforce strictly. Therefore, to reduce the risk of merging potentially harmful changes into our production Puppet environment, we have created an automated testing system, which includes the Jenkins CI tool, to manage our Puppet testing process. This system includes the proposed changes and runs Puppet on a pool of dozens of RedHat Enterprise Virtualization (RHEV) virtual machines (VMs) that replicate most of our important production services for the purpose of testing. This paper describes our automated test system and how it hooks into our production approval process for automatic acceptance testing. All pending changes that have been pushed to production must pass this validation process before they can be approved and merged into production.

  7. On the Nature of XTE J0421+560/CI Cam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belloni, T.; vandenAncker, M.; Dieters, S.; Fender, R.; Fox, D. W.; Kommers, J. M.; Lewin, W. H. G.; VanParadijs, J.

    1999-01-01

    We present the results of the analysis of RXTE, BATSE and optical/IR data of the 1998 outburst of the x-ray transient system XTE J0421+650. The x-ray outburst shows a very fast decay initial e-folding time approximately 0.5 days, slowing down to about 2.3 days). The X ray spectrum in the 2-25 keV band is thermal, softening considerably during decay. Intrinsic absorption is observed, also strongly variable. A strong iron line at around 6.7 keV is observed. No fast time variability is observed (<0.1 rms in the 1-4906 Hz band at peak). The analysis of optical/IR data suggest that the secondary is a b[e] star and place the system at a distance of about 2 kpc. At this distance the 2-25 keV luminosity is about 5 x 10(exp 37) erg/seconds. We compare the properties of this system with those of the Be/NS LMC transient A 0538-66 and suggest that CI cam is of a similar nature. The presence of strong radio emission during outburst indicates that the compact object could be a black hole.

  8. Flagellar antigen based CI-ELISA for sero-surveillance of surra.

    PubMed

    Ligi, M; Sengupta, P P; Rudramurthy, G R; Rahman, H

    2016-03-30

    Trypanosoma evansi causes a disease known as 'surra' in wide range of domesticated and wild animals including cattle, buffaloes, horses, camels etc. The disease is transmitted through the bites of haematophagous tabanid flies and is characterized by undulating fever, chronic progressive weakness, and hypoglycemia leading to low productivity in animals. In the present study, monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) have been produced (IgG3 sub-type) against purified flagellar (FLA) protein of T. evansi and its immunoreactivity was evaluated by serological tests. MAb and purified protein were then exploited in the development of CI-ELISA and the diagnostic potentiality of the new ELISA test has been evaluated using 1230 sera samples from field animals including cattle, buffaloes, camels, horses and donkeys. The statistical analysis of the data showed optimum combination of sensitivity and specificity at 95.8 and 94.4, respectively. The positive-negative cut off percentage inhibition (PI) value was found to be >55, with a Cohen's Kappa value of 0.83. The study showed that the new assay has potential for application in sero-diagnosis as well as sero-surveillance of surra. PMID:26921034

  9. The effect of locoregional therapies in patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma treated with sorafenib

    PubMed Central

    Sarpel, Umut; Spivack, John H.; Berger, Yaniv; Heskel, Marina; Aycart, Samantha N.; Sweeney, Robert; Edwards, Martin P.; Labow, Daniel M.; Kim, Edward

    2016-01-01

    Background & aims It is unknown whether the addition of locoregional therapies (LRTx) to sorafenib improves prognosis over sorafenib alone in patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The aim of this study was to assess the effect of LRTx in this population. Methods A retrospective analysis was performed of patients with advanced HCC as defined by extrahepatic metastasis, lymphadenopathy >2 cm, or gross vascular invasion. Sorafenib therapy was required for inclusion. Survival of patients who received LRTx after progression to advanced stage was compared to those who did not receive LRTx. Results Using an intention to treat analysis of 312 eligible patients, a propensity weighted proportional hazards model demonstrated LRTx as a predictor of survival (HR = 0.505, 95% CI: 0.407–0.628; P < 0.001). The greatest benefit was seen in patients with the largest tumor burden (HR = 0.305, 95% CI: 0.236–0.393; P < 0.01). Median survival in the sorafenib arm was 143 days (95% CI: 118–161) vs. 247 days (95% CI: 220–289) in the sorafenib plus LRTx arm (P < 0.001). Conclusions These results demonstrate a survival benefit with the addition of LRTx to sorafenib for patients with advanced HCC. These findings should prompt a prospective clinical trial to further assess the role of LRTx in patients with advanced HCC. PMID:27154804

  10. Redundancy control in pathway databases (ReCiPa): an application for improving gene-set enrichment analysis in Omics studies and "Big data" biology.

    PubMed

    Vivar, Juan C; Pemu, Priscilla; McPherson, Ruth; Ghosh, Sujoy

    2013-08-01

    Abstract Unparalleled technological advances have fueled an explosive growth in the scope and scale of biological data and have propelled life sciences into the realm of "Big Data" that cannot be managed or analyzed by conventional approaches. Big Data in the life sciences are driven primarily via a diverse collection of 'omics'-based technologies, including genomics, proteomics, metabolomics, transcriptomics, metagenomics, and lipidomics. Gene-set enrichment analysis is a powerful approach for interrogating large 'omics' datasets, leading to the identification of biological mechanisms associated with observed outcomes. While several factors influence the results from such analysis, the impact from the contents of pathway databases is often under-appreciated. Pathway databases often contain variously named pathways that overlap with one another to varying degrees. Ignoring such redundancies during pathway analysis can lead to the designation of several pathways as being significant due to high content-similarity, rather than truly independent biological mechanisms. Statistically, such dependencies also result in correlated p values and overdispersion, leading to biased results. We investigated the level of redundancies in multiple pathway databases and observed large discrepancies in the nature and extent of pathway overlap. This prompted us to develop the application, ReCiPa (Redundancy Control in Pathway Databases), to control redundancies in pathway databases based on user-defined thresholds. Analysis of genomic and genetic datasets, using ReCiPa-generated overlap-controlled versions of KEGG and Reactome pathways, led to a reduction in redundancy among the top-scoring gene-sets and allowed for the inclusion of additional gene-sets representing possibly novel biological mechanisms. Using obesity as an example, bioinformatic analysis further demonstrated that gene-sets identified from overlap-controlled pathway databases show stronger evidence of prior association

  11. Infrared studies of the evolution of the CiOi(SiI) defect in irradiated Si upon isothermal anneals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angeletos, T.; Chroneos, A.; Londos, C. A.

    2016-03-01

    Carbon-oxygen-self-interstitial complexes were investigated in silicon by means of Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Upon irradiation, the CiOi defect (C3) forms which for high doses attract self-interstitials (SiIs) leading to the formation of the CiOi(SiI) defect (C4) with two well-known related bands at 939.6 and 1024 cm-1. The bands are detectable in the spectra both in room temperature (RT) and liquid helium (LH) temperature. Upon annealing at 150 °C, these bands were transformed to three bands at 725, 952, and 973 cm-1, detectable only at LH temperatures. Upon annealing at 220 °C, these bands were transformed to three bands at 951, 969.5, and 977 cm-1, detectable both at RT and LH temperatures. Annealing at 280 °C resulted in the transformation of these bands to two new bands at 973 and 1024 cm-1. The latter bands disappear from the spectra upon annealing at 315 °C without the emergence of other bands in the spectra. Considering reaction kinetics and defect metastability, we developed a model to describe the experimental results. Annealing at 150 °C triggers the capturing of SiIs by the C4 defect leading to the formation of the CiOi(SiI)2 complex. The latter structure appears to be bistable: measuring at LH, the defect is in configuration CiOi(SiI)2 giving rise to the bands at 725, 952, and 973 cm-1, whereas on measurements at RT, the defect converts to another configuration CiOi(SiI)2* without detectable bands in the spectra. Possible structures of the two CiOi(SiI)2 configurations are considered and discussed. Upon annealing at 220 °C, additional SiIs are captured by the CiOi(SiI)2 defect leading to the formation of the CiOi(SiI)3 complex, which in turn on annealing at 280 °C converts to the CiOi(SiI)4 complex. The latter defect anneals out at 315 °C, without being accompanied in the spectra by the growth of new bands.

  12. Drought × CO2 interactions in trees: a test of the low-intercellular CO2 concentration (Ci ) mechanism.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Jeff W G; Duursma, Remko A; Atwell, Brian J; Tissue, David T; Medlyn, Belinda E

    2016-03-01

    Models of tree responses to climate typically project that elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration (eCa ) will reduce drought impacts on forests. We tested one of the mechanisms underlying this interaction, the 'low Ci effect', in which stomatal closure in drought conditions reduces the intercellular CO2 concentration (Ci ), resulting in a larger relative enhancement of photosynthesis with eCa , and, consequently, a larger relative biomass response. We grew two Eucalyptus species of contrasting drought tolerance at ambient and elevated Ca for 6-9 months in large pots maintained at 50% (drought) and 100% field capacity. Droughted plants did not have significantly lower Ci than well-watered plants, which we attributed to long-term changes in leaf area. Hence, there should not have been an interaction between eCa and water availability on biomass, and we did not detect one. The xeric species did have higher Ci than the mesic species, indicating lower water-use efficiency, but both species exhibited similar responses of photosynthesis and biomass to eCa , owing to compensatory differences in the photosynthetic response to Ci . Our results demonstrate that long-term acclimation to drought, and coordination among species traits may be important for predicting plant responses to eCa under low water availability. PMID:26526873

  13. 40 CFR 63.6604 - What fuel requirements must I meet if I own or operate an existing stationary CI RICE?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... I own or operate an existing stationary CI RICE? 63.6604 Section 63.6604 Protection of Environment....6604 What fuel requirements must I meet if I own or operate an existing stationary CI RICE? If you own or operate an existing non-emergency CI stationary RICE with a site rating of more than 300 brake...

  14. 40 CFR 63.6604 - What fuel requirements must I meet if I own or operate an existing stationary CI RICE?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... I own or operate an existing stationary CI RICE? 63.6604 Section 63.6604 Protection of Environment....6604 What fuel requirements must I meet if I own or operate an existing stationary CI RICE? If you own or operate an existing non-emergency, non-black start CI stationary RICE with a site rating of...

  15. 40 CFR 63.6602 - What emission limitations must I meet if I own or operate an existing stationary CI RICE with a...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... if I own or operate an existing stationary CI RICE with a site rating of equal to or less than 500....6602 What emission limitations must I meet if I own or operate an existing stationary CI RICE with a... own or operate an existing stationary CI RICE with a site rating of equal to or less than 500 brake...

  16. 40 CFR 60.4208 - What is the deadline for importing or installing stationary CI ICE produced in the previous model...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... installing stationary CI ICE produced in the previous model year? 60.4208 Section 60.4208 Protection of... or installing stationary CI ICE produced in the previous model year? (a) After December 31, 2008, owners and operators may not install stationary CI ICE (excluding fire pump engines) that do not meet...

  17. 40 CFR 60.4202 - What emission standards must I meet for emergency engines if I am a stationary CI internal...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... emergency engines if I am a stationary CI internal combustion engine manufacturer? 60.4202 Section 60.4202... emergency engines if I am a stationary CI internal combustion engine manufacturer? (a) Stationary CI internal combustion engine manufacturers must certify their 2007 model year and later emergency......

  18. 40 CFR 60.4211 - What are my compliance requirements if I am an owner or operator of a stationary CI internal...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... I am an owner or operator of a stationary CI internal combustion engine? 60.4211 Section 60.4211... operator of a stationary CI internal combustion engine? (a) If you are an owner or operator and must comply... operator of a pre-2007 model year stationary CI internal combustion engine and must comply with...

  19. 40 CFR 60.4202 - What emission standards must I meet for emergency engines if I am a stationary CI internal...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... emergency engines if I am a stationary CI internal combustion engine manufacturer? 60.4202 Section 60.4202... emergency engines if I am a stationary CI internal combustion engine manufacturer? (a) Stationary CI internal combustion engine manufacturers must certify their 2007 model year and later emergency......

  20. 40 CFR 60.4209 - What are the monitoring requirements if I am an owner or operator of a stationary CI internal...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... I am an owner or operator of a stationary CI internal combustion engine? 60.4209 Section 60.4209... if I am an owner or operator of a stationary CI internal combustion engine? If you are an owner or... stationary CI internal combustion engine, you must install a non-resettable hour meter prior to startup...

  1. 40 CFR 60.4211 - What are my compliance requirements if I am an owner or operator of a stationary CI internal...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... I am an owner or operator of a stationary CI internal combustion engine? 60.4211 Section 60.4211... operator of a stationary CI internal combustion engine? (a) If you are an owner or operator and must comply... operator of a pre-2007 model year stationary CI internal combustion engine and must comply with...

  2. 40 CFR 60.4202 - What emission standards must I meet for emergency engines if I am a stationary CI internal...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... emergency engines if I am a stationary CI internal combustion engine manufacturer? 60.4202 Section 60.4202... emergency engines if I am a stationary CI internal combustion engine manufacturer? (a) Stationary CI internal combustion engine manufacturers must certify their 2007 model year and later emergency......

  3. 40 CFR 60.4209 - What are the monitoring requirements if I am an owner or operator of a stationary CI internal...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... I am an owner or operator of a stationary CI internal combustion engine? 60.4209 Section 60.4209... if I am an owner or operator of a stationary CI internal combustion engine? If you are an owner or... stationary CI internal combustion engine that does not meet the standards applicable to non-emergency...

  4. 40 CFR 60.4209 - What are the monitoring requirements if I am an owner or operator of a stationary CI internal...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... I am an owner or operator of a stationary CI internal combustion engine? 60.4209 Section 60.4209... if I am an owner or operator of a stationary CI internal combustion engine? If you are an owner or... stationary CI internal combustion engine, you must install a non-resettable hour meter prior to startup...

  5. 40 CFR 60.4202 - What emission standards must I meet for emergency engines if I am a stationary CI internal...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... emergency engines if I am a stationary CI internal combustion engine manufacturer? 60.4202 Section 60.4202... emergency engines if I am a stationary CI internal combustion engine manufacturer? (a) Stationary CI internal combustion engine manufacturers must certify their 2007 model year and later emergency......

  6. 40 CFR 60.4209 - What are the monitoring requirements if I am an owner or operator of a stationary CI internal...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... I am an owner or operator of a stationary CI internal combustion engine? 60.4209 Section 60.4209... if I am an owner or operator of a stationary CI internal combustion engine? If you are an owner or... stationary CI internal combustion engine that does not meet the standards applicable to non-emergency...

  7. 40 CFR 60.4203 - How long must my engines meet the emission standards if I am a stationary CI internal combustion...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... emission standards if I am a stationary CI internal combustion engine manufacturer? 60.4203 Section 60.4203... standards if I am a stationary CI internal combustion engine manufacturer? Engines manufactured by stationary CI internal combustion engine manufacturers must meet the emission standards as required in §§...

  8. 40 CFR 60.4203 - How long must my engines meet the emission standards if I am a stationary CI internal combustion...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... emission standards if I am a stationary CI internal combustion engine manufacturer? 60.4203 Section 60.4203... standards if I am a stationary CI internal combustion engine manufacturer? Engines manufactured by stationary CI internal combustion engine manufacturers must meet the emission standards as required in §§...

  9. Full CI benchmark calculations on N2, NO, and O2 - A comparison of methods for describing multiple bonds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Langhoff, Stephen R.

    1987-01-01

    Full configuration interaction (CI) calculations on the ground states of N2, NO, and O2 using a DZP Gaussian basis are compared with single-reference SDCI and coupled pair approaches (CPF), as well as with CASSCF multireference CI approaches. The CASSCF/MRCI technique is found to describe multiple bonds as well as single bonds. Although the coupled pair functional approach gave chemical accuracy (1 kcal/mol) for bonds involving hydrogen, larger errors occur in the CPF approach for the multiple bonded systems considered here. CI studies on the 1Sigma(g +) state of N2, including all single, double, triple, and quadruple excitations show that triple excitations are very important for the multiple bond case, and accounts for most of the deficiency in the coupled pair functional methods.

  10. Advance Care Planning

    MedlinePlus

    ... Division of Geriatrics and Clinical Gerontology Division of Neuroscience FAQs Funding Opportunities Intramural Research Program Office of ... Is Advance Care Planning? Advance care planning involves learning about the types of decisions that might need ...

  11. The QWeCI Project: seamlessly linking climate science to society

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morse, A. P.; Caminade, C.; Jones, A. E.; MacLeod, D.; Heath, A. E.

    2012-04-01

    The EU FP7 QWeCI project Quantifying Weather and Climate Impacts on health in developing countries (www.liv.ac.uk/qweci) has 13 partners with 7 of these in Africa. The geographical focus of the project is in Senegal, Ghana and Malawi. In all three countries the project has a strong scientific dissemination outlook as well as having field based surveillance programmes in Ghana and Senegal to understand more about the local parameters controlling the transmission of malaria and in Senegal of Rift Valley fever. The project has a strong and active climate science activity in using hindcasts of the new System 4 seasonal forecasting system at ECMWF; to further develop the use of monthly to seasonal forecasts from ensemble prediction systems; within project downscaling development; the assessment of decadal ensemble prediction systems; and the development and testing of vector borne disease models for malaria and Rift Valley fever. In parallel with the science programme the project has a large outreach activity involving regular communication and bi-lateral exchanges, science and decision maker focused workshops. In Malawi a long range WiFi network has been established for the dissemination of data. In Senegal where they is a concentration of partners and stakeholders the project is gaining a role as a catalyst for wider health and climate related activity within government departments and national research bodies along with the support and involvement of local communities. Within these wider community discussions we have interactive inputs from African and European scientists who are partners in the project. This paper will show highlights of the work completed so far and give an outline to future development and to encourage a wider user interaction from outside of the current project team and their direct collaborators.

  12. Reforms of a real estate cadastre in Poland / Reformy katastru nieruchomości w Polsce

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietrzak, Ludmiła; Hopfer, Andrzej; Cegielski, Stanisław

    2012-11-01

    On May 7, 2010 the act dated March 4, 2010 on the spatial information infrastructure was published which transposes the European Parliament and the European Council Directive No 2007/2/WE dated March 14, 2007 established the spatial information infrastructure (INSPIRE) in the European Community. This act introduced basic changes to the binding Act, i.e. the Law of Geodesy and Cartography and, as the consequence, the demand to develop various administrative decrees occurred. The authors of the paper present the analysis of the existing conditions of the cadastre, the task of governmental and public government administration, related to demands concerning the cadastral reforms, following the act on the spatial information infrastructure and they discuss possibilities to perform such reforms at the local and national scales. W dniu 7 maja 2010 r. weszła w życie ustawa a dnia 4 marca 2012 r. o infrastrukturze informacji przestrzennej dokonująca transpozycji dyrektywy Parlamentu Europejskiego i Rady nr 2007/3/WE ustanawiającej infrastrukturę informacji przestrzennej w Europie. Ustawa to wprowadziła zasadnicze zmiany do obowiązującej ustawy prawo geodezyjne i kartograficzne, i w konsekwencji powstała konieczność opracowania nowych rozporządzeń wykonawczych. W chwili obecnej większość rozporządzeń jest już opracowana, część jest jeszcze konsultowana z organizacjami zawodowymi geodetów. W artykule autorzy dokonują analizy stanu istniejącego, zadań administracji rządowej i samorządowej związanych z koniecznością modernizacji katastru oraz podają zakres koniecznych do przeprowadzenie reform w skali kraju oraz w skali lokalnej.

  13. Divergence and phylogeny of Firmicutes from the Cuatro Ciénegas Basin, Mexico: a window to an ancient ocean.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Letelier, Alejandra; Olmedo-Alvarez, Gabriela; Eguiarte, Luis E; Souza, Valeria

    2012-07-01

    The Cuatro Ciénegas Basin (CCB) has been identified as a center of endemism for many life-forms. Nearly half the bacterial species found in the spring systems have their closest relatives in the ocean. This raises the question of whether the high diversity observed today is the product of an adaptive radiation similar to that of the Galapagos Islands or whether the bacterial groups are "survivors" of an ancient sea, which would be of interest for astrobiology. To help answer this question, we focused on Firmicutes from Cuatro Ciénegas (mainly Bacillus and Exiguobacterium). We reconstructed the phylogenetic relationships of Firmicutes with 28 housekeeping genes and dated the resulting tree using geological events as calibration points. Our results show that marine Bacillus diverged from other Bacillus strains 838 Ma, while Bacillus from Cuatro Ciénegas have divergence dates that range from 770 to 202 Ma. The members of Exiguobacterium from the CCB conform to a much younger group that diverged from the Andes strain 60 Ma and from the one in Yellowstone 183 Ma. Therefore, the diversity of Firmicutes in Cuatro Ciénegas is not the product of a recent radiation but the product of the isolation of lineages from an ancient ocean. Hence, Cuatro Ciénegas is not a Galapagos Archipelago for bacteria but is more like an astrobiological "time machine" in which bacterial lineages survived in an oligotrophic environment that may be very similar to that of the Precambrian. Key Words: Firmicutes-Cuatro Ciénegas-Precambrian-Molecular dating-Western Interior Seaway. PMID:22920517

  14. Divergence and Phylogeny of Firmicutes from the Cuatro Ciénegas Basin, Mexico: A Window to an Ancient Ocean

    PubMed Central

    Moreno-Letelier, Alejandra; Olmedo-Alvarez, Gabriela; Eguiarte, Luis E.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The Cuatro Ciénegas Basin (CCB) has been identified as a center of endemism for many life-forms. Nearly half the bacterial species found in the spring systems have their closest relatives in the ocean. This raises the question of whether the high diversity observed today is the product of an adaptive radiation similar to that of the Galapagos Islands or whether the bacterial groups are “survivors” of an ancient sea, which would be of interest for astrobiology. To help answer this question, we focused on Firmicutes from Cuatro Ciénegas (mainly Bacillus and Exiguobacterium). We reconstructed the phylogenetic relationships of Firmicutes with 28 housekeeping genes and dated the resulting tree using geological events as calibration points. Our results show that marine Bacillus diverged from other Bacillus strains 838 Ma, while Bacillus from Cuatro Ciénegas have divergence dates that range from 770 to 202 Ma. The members of Exiguobacterium from the CCB conform to a much younger group that diverged from the Andes strain 60 Ma and from the one in Yellowstone 183 Ma. Therefore, the diversity of Firmicutes in Cuatro Ciénegas is not the product of a recent radiation but the product of the isolation of lineages from an ancient ocean. Hence, Cuatro Ciénegas is not a Galapagos Archipelago for bacteria but is more like an astrobiological “time machine” in which bacterial lineages survived in an oligotrophic environment that may be very similar to that of the Precambrian. Key Words: Firmicutes—Cuatro Ciénegas—Precambrian—Molecular dating—Western Interior Seaway. Astrobiology 12, 674–684. PMID:22920517

  15. The multicolour optical monitoring of the High Mass X-ray Binary CI Cam/XTE J0421+560

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konstsntinova, T.; Larionov, V.; Kopatskaya, E.; Larionova, E.; Efimova, N.

    2014-07-01

    We analyse the photometric behaviour of the high-mass X-ray binary system CI Cam/XTE J0421+560. Our observations cover the time interval 1999-2014. The source was monitored with 70-cm AZT-8 (CrAO, Ukraine) and 0.4-m LX-200 (St.Petersburg, Russia) telescopes. During the monitoring period, CI Cam displayed two significant increases of brightness in the optical photometric bands. The first one follows the X-ray outburst that occurred in 1998 March. The second one started in 2013 and lasts until January - February of 2014.

  16. Advanced planetary studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Results of planetary advanced studies and planning support are summarized. The scope of analyses includes cost estimation research, planetary mission performance, penetrator advanced studies, Mercury mission transport requirements, definition of super solar electric propulsion/solar sail mission discriminators, and advanced planning activities.

  17. Advanced midwifery practice or advancing midwifery practice?

    PubMed

    Smith, Rachel; Leap, Nicky; Homer, Caroline

    2010-09-01

    Advanced midwifery practice is a controversial notion in midwifery, particularly at present in Australia. The proposed changes in legislation around access to the publicly funded Medical Benefits Scheme (MBS) and the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme (PBS) in 2009-2010 have meant that the issue of advanced midwifery practice has again taken prominence. Linking midwifery access to MBS and PBS to a safety and quality framework that includes an 'advanced midwifery credentialling framework' is particularly challenging. The Haxton and Fahy paper in the December 2009 edition of Women and Birth is timely as it enables a reflection upon these issues and encourages debate and discussion about exactly what is midwifery, what are we educating our students for and is working to the full scope of practice practising at advanced level? This paper seeks to address some of these questions and open up the topic for further debate. PMID:20018582

  18. Advanced information society (12)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komatsuzaki, Seisuke

    In this paper, the original Japanese idea of "advanced information society" was reviewed at the first step. Thus, advancement of information/communication technology, advancement of information/communication needs and tendency of industrialization of information" were examined. Next, by comparing studies on advanced information society in various countries, the Japanese characteristics of consensus building was reviewed. Finally, in pursuit of prospect and tasks for the society, advancement of innovation and convergence information/communication technology, information/communication needs, institutional environment for utilization of information/communication and countermeasures against information pollution. Matching of information/communication technology and needs, besides with countermeasures against information pollution were discussed.

  19. Individuals with inherited chromosomally integrated human herpes virus 6 (ciHHV-6) have functionally active HHV-6 specific T-cell immunity.

    PubMed

    Strenger, V; Kayser, S; Witte, K-E; Lassner, D; Schwinger, W; Jahn, G; Urban, C; Feuchtinger, T

    2016-02-01

    To evaluate the human herpes virus 6 (HHV-6) -specific immune response in individuals with chromosomally integrated HHV-6 (ciHHV-6), we measured HHV-6-antigen-specific cytokine responses (interferon-γ, interleukin-2, tumour necrosis factor-α) in T cells by flow cytometry in 12 and 16 individuals with and without ciHHV-6, respectively. All individuals with ciHHV-6 showed HHV-6-specific T cells with higher frequencies of HHV-6-specific CD8(+) cells (0.03-14.93, median 2.15% of CD8(+) cells) compared with non-ciHHV-6 (0.0-10.67, median 0.36%, p 0.026). The observed increased HHV-6-specific functionally active responses in individuals with ciHHV-6 clearly disprove speculations on immune tolerance in ciHHV-6 and indicate clinical and immunological implications of ciHHV-6. PMID:26482270

  20. The apolipoprotein E/CI/CII gene cluster and late-onset Alzheimer disease

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Chang-En; Nemens, E.; Olson, J.M.; Goddard, K.A.B.; Kukull, W.A.; Payami, H.; Boehnke, M.; Wijsman, E.M.; Orr, H.T.; White, J.A.

    1994-04-01

    The chromosome 19 apolipoprotein E/CI/CII gene cluster was examined for evidence of linkage to a familial Alzheimer disease (FAD) locus. The family groups studied were Volga German (VG), early-onset non-VG (ENVG; mean age at onset <60 years), and late-onset families. A genetic association was observed between apolipoprotein E (ApoE) allele E4 and FAD in late-onset families; the E4 allele frequency was .51 in affected subjects, .37 in at-risk subjects, .11 in spouses, and .19 in unrelated controls. The differences between the E4 frequencies in affected subjects versus controls and in at-risk subjects versus controls were highly significant. No association between the E4 allele and FAD was observed in the ENVG or VG groups. A statistically significant allelic association between E4 and AD was also observed in a group of unrelated subjects; the E4 frequency was .26 in affected subjects, versus .19 in controls (Z[sub SND] = 2.20, P < .03). Evidence of linkage of ApoE and ApoCII to FAD was examined by maximum-likelihood methods, using three models and assuming autosomal dominant inheritance: (1) age-dependent penetrance, (2) extremely low (1%) penetrance, and (3) age-dependent penetrance corrected for sporadic Alzheimer disease (AD). For ApoCII in late-onset families, results for close linkage were negative, and only small positive lod-score-statistic (Z) values were obtained. For ApoE in late-onset kindreds, positive Z values were obtained when either allele frequencies from controls or allele frequencies from the families were used. When linkage disequilibrium was incorporated into the analysis, the Z values increased. For the ENVG group, results for ApoE and ApoCII were uniformly negative. Affected-pedigree-member analysis gave significant results for the late-onset kindreds, for ApoE, when control allele frequencies were used but not when allele frequencies were derived from the families. 58 refs., 6 tabs.

  1. 40 CFR Table 2 to Subpart IIIi of... - Emission Standards for 2008 Model Year and Later Emergency Stationary CI ICE

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... and Later Emergency Stationary CI ICE 2 Table 2 to Subpart IIII of Part 60 Protection of Environment... SOURCES Standards of Performance for Stationary Compression Ignition Internal Combustion Engines Pt. 60, Subpt. IIII, Table 2 Table 2 to Subpart IIII of Part 60—Emission Standards for 2008 Model Year and...

  2. 40 CFR Table 2 to Subpart IIIi of... - Emission Standards for 2008 Model Year and Later Emergency Stationary CI ICE

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... and Later Emergency Stationary CI ICE 2 Table 2 to Subpart IIII of Part 60 Protection of Environment... SOURCES Standards of Performance for Stationary Compression Ignition Internal Combustion Engines Pt. 60, Subpt. IIII, Table 2 Table 2 to Subpart IIII of Part 60—Emission Standards for 2008 Model Year and...

  3. 40 CFR Table 2 to Subpart IIIi of... - Emission Standards for 2008 Model Year and Later Emergency Stationary CI ICE

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... and Later Emergency Stationary CI ICE 2 Table 2 to Subpart IIII of Part 60 Protection of Environment... SOURCES Standards of Performance for Stationary Compression Ignition Internal Combustion Engines Part 60, Subpt. IIII, Table 2 Table 2 to Subpart IIII of Part 60—Emission Standards for 2008 Model Year and...

  4. 40 CFR Table 2 to Subpart IIIi of... - Emission Standards for 2008 Model Year and Later Emergency Stationary CI ICE

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... and Later Emergency Stationary CI ICE 2 Table 2 to Subpart IIII of Part 60 Protection of Environment... SOURCES Standards of Performance for Stationary Compression Ignition Internal Combustion Engines Part 60, Subpt. IIII, Table 2 Table 2 to Subpart IIII of Part 60—Emission Standards for 2008 Model Year and...

  5. 40 CFR Table 2 to Subpart IIIi of... - Emission Standards for 2008 Model Year and Later Emergency Stationary CI ICE

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... and Later Emergency Stationary CI ICE 2 Table 2 to Subpart IIII of Part 60 Protection of Environment... SOURCES Standards of Performance for Stationary Compression Ignition Internal Combustion Engines Pt. 60, Subpt. IIII, Table 2 Table 2 to Subpart IIII of Part 60—Emission Standards for 2008 Model Year and...

  6. Relationship of proteomic variation and toxin synthesis in the dinoflagellate Alexandrium tamarense CI01 under phosphorus and inorganic nitrogen limitation.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xi-Wen; Wang, Jing; Gao, Yue; Chan, Leo Lai; Lam, Paul Kwan Sing; Gu, Ji-Dong

    2015-10-01

    Paralytic shellfish toxins (PSTs) are originated from cyanobacteria and dinoflagellates, including Alexandrium tamarense, the common dinoflagellate species. In this study, a toxic dinoflagellate strain of A. tamarense CI01 was selected for studying the PSTs' concentration and the related protein variation during the whole cell cycle under different nutrient conditions. High-performance liquid chromatography, 2-D DIGE and Western blotting were used collectively for protein profiling and identification. Results showed that the toxin content was suppressed under nitrogen limiting condition, but enhanced in phosphorous limiting medium. Based on the results of proteomics analysis, 7 proteins were discovered to be related to the PSTs biosynthesis of A. tamarense CI01, including S-adenosylhomocysteine hydrolase, ornithine cyclodeaminase, argininosuccinate synthase, methyluridine methyltransferase cystine ABC transporter, phosphoserine phosphatase, argininosuccinate synthase and acyl-CoA dehydrogenase, which corresponds to the metabolism of the methionine, cysteine, ornithine, arginine and proline. Moreover, some photosynthesis relating proteins also increased their expression during PST synthesis period in A. tamarense CI01, such as phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase, chloroplast phosphoglycerate kinase, peridinin-chlorophyll α-binding protein, Mg(2+) transporter protein and chloroplast phosphoglycerate kinase. The above findings are in support of our hypothesis that these proteins are involved in toxin biosynthesis of A. tamarense CI01, but cause-and-effect mechanisms need to be investigated in further studies. PMID:26239440

  7. Modeling of the genetic switch of bacteriophage TP901-1: A heteromer of CI and MOR ensures robust bistability.

    PubMed

    Nakanishi, Hiizu; Pedersen, Margit; Alsing, Anne K; Sneppen, Kim

    2009-11-20

    The lytic-lysogenic switch of the temperate lactococcal phage TP901-1 is fundamentally different from that of phage lambda. In phage TP901-1, the lytic promoter P(L) is repressed by CI, whereas repression of the lysogenic promoter P(R) requires the presence of both of the antagonistic regulator proteins, MOR and CI. We model the central part of the switch and compare the two cases for P(R) repression: the one where the two regulators interact only on the DNA and the other where the two regulators form a heteromer complex in the cytoplasm prior to DNA binding. The models are analyzed for bistability, and the predicted promoter repression folds are compared to experimental data. We conclude that the experimental data are best reproduced the latter case, where a heteromer complex forms in solution. We further find that CI sequestration by the formation of MOR:CI complexes in cytoplasm makes the genetic switch robust. PMID:19747486

  8. 78 FR 37792 - Mario Julian Martinez-Bernache, Inmate Number #95749-279, CI Big Spring, Corrections Institution...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-24

    ... Bureau of Industry and Security Mario Julian Martinez-Bernache, Inmate Number 95749-279, CI Big Spring... 15, 2012, in the U.S. District Court, Southern District of Texas, Mario Julian Martinez-Bernache (``Martinez-Bernache'') was convicted of violating Section 38 of the Arms Export Control Act (22 U.S.C....

  9. Relativistic CI+all-order calculations of U III energies, g-factors, transition rates and lifetimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savukov, Igor; Safronova, Ulyana; Safronova, Marianna

    2016-05-01

    Excitation energies, term designations, g-factors, transition rates and lifetimes of U2+ are determined using a relativistic configuration interaction (CI) + all-order (linearized coupled-cluster, LCC) approach. The all-order energies are compared with CI+many-body-perturbation-theory (MBPT) and available experimental energies. Close agreement has been found with experiment, within hundreds of cm-1. In addition, lifetimes of higher levels have been calculated for comparison with three experimentally measured lifetimes, and close agreement was found within t he experimental error. CI-LCC calculations constitute a benchmark test of the CI+all-order method in complex relativistic systems such as actinides and their ions with many valence electrons. The theory yields many energy levels, g-factors, transition rates, and lifetimes of U2+ that are not available from experiment. The theory can be applied to other multi-valence atoms and ions, which would be of interest to many applications. The work of I. Savukov has been performed under the auspices of the U.S. DOE by LANL under Contract No. DE-AC52-06NA25396.M.S.S. acknowledges support from the Gordon Godfrey Fellowship program, UNSW and U.S. NSF Grant No. PHY-1404156.

  10. The Music Experiences and Attitudes Of A First Cohort of Prelingually-Deaf Adolescents and Young Adults CI Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Gfeller, Kate; Driscoll, Virginia; Smith, Rachel See; Scheperle, Christina

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the musical engagement (participation and attitude) of pediatric CI recipients who were implanted during early childhood and who have reached age 15 or older. A questionnaire was administered to a group of 31 prelingually deaf CI users who receive annual follow up services and assessment in a clinical research center. The questionnaire was used to examine involvement in and attitudes toward music in school, the community, and in the home; social affiliation (hearing, Deaf, both) and mode of communication (oral, manual, both) were also examined. Despite the technical limitations of cochlear implants in transmitting pitch, melody, and tone quality, over two thirds of this sample described music as being important or very important in their lives. A high level of past and present familial involvement in music was associated with higher levels of current involvement and importance of music in the lives of adolescent and young adult CI users. Comparisons were noted with data from prior studies of persons with hearing loss who were non-CI users. PMID:23565029

  11. Head Shadow, Squelch, and Summation Effects with an Energetic or Informational Masker in Bilateral and Bimodal CI Users

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pyschny, Verena; Landwehr, Markus; Hahn, Moritz; Lang-Roth, Ruth; Walger, Martin; Meister, Hartmut

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The objective of the study was to investigate the influence of noise (energetic) and speech (energetic plus informational) maskers on the head shadow (HS), squelch (SQ), and binaural summation (SU) effect in bilateral and bimodal cochlear implant (CI) users. Method: Speech recognition was measured in the presence of either a competing…

  12. CI-KNOW: Cyberinfrastructure Knowledge Networks on the Web. A Social Network Enabled Recommender System for Locating Resources in Cyberinfrastructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, H. D.; Contractor, N. S.; Yao, Y.

    2006-12-01

    A knowledge network is a multi-dimensional network created from the interactions and interconnections among the scientists, documents, data, analytic tools, and interactive collaboration spaces (like forums and wikis) associated with a collaborative environment. CI-KNOW is a suite of software tools that leverages automated data collection, social network theories, analysis techniques and algorithms to infer an individual's interests and expertise based on their interactions and activities within a knowledge network. The CI-KNOW recommender system mines the knowledge network associated with a scientific community's use of cyberinfrastructure tools and uses relational metadata to record connections among entities in the knowledge network. Recent developments in social network theories and methods provide the backbone for a modular system that creates recommendations from relational metadata. A network navigation portlet allows users to locate colleagues, documents, data or analytic tools in the knowledge network and to explore their networks through a visual, step-wise process. An internal auditing portlet offers administrators diagnostics to assess the growth and health of the entire knowledge network. The first instantiation of the prototype CI-KNOW system is part of the Environmental Cyberinfrastructure Demonstration project at the National Center for Supercomputing Applications, which supports the activities of hydrologic and environmental science communities (CLEANER and CUAHSI) under the umbrella of the WATERS network environmental observatory planning activities (http://cleaner.ncsa.uiuc.edu). This poster summarizes the key aspects of the CI-KNOW system, highlighting the key inputs, calculation mechanisms, and output modalities.

  13. A Comprehensive Evaluation of H2SO4 formation from OH and sCI pathways in high BVOC environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, S.; Seco, R.; Park, J. H.; Guenther, A. B.; Smith, J. N.; Kuang, C.; Bustillos, J. O. V.; Tota, J.; Souza, R. A. F. D.

    2014-12-01

    The recently highlighted importance of stabilized Criegee intermediates (sCI) as an oxidant for atmospheric SO2 triggered a number of studies to assess the atmospheric implications of H2SO4 formation from the sCI reaction pathway. In addition, it has not been clear why new particle formation events are not observed in the Amazon rain forest. The mostly widely speculated reason has been a very low H2SO4 level. We will present quantitative assessments of SO2 oxidation by sCI leading to the H2SO4 production using a comprehensive observational dataset from a tropical rainforest study during the GOAmazon field campaign at the T3 site in Manacapuru, Amazonas, Brazil. To our best knowledge, this is the first observation of H2SO4 and OH in Amazon and is unique for all tropical sites due to the accompanying comprehensive gas and aerosol observations such as CO, NOX, SO2, VOCs, and physical and chemical characteristics of aerosols. We will discuss observed H2SO4 levels during the GOAmazon field campaigns to demonstrate 1) H2SO4 formation potential from OH and sCI oxidation pathways by contrasting extremely clean and relatively polluted air masses and 2) the Implications of the observed H2SO4 levels in new particle formation and particle growth events.

  14. 75 FR 5566 - NOAA Cooperative Institutes (CIs): (1) A CI To Support NOAA Research Facilities in the Pacific...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-03

    ... published in the Federal Register on November 13, 2009 (74 FR 58603-58607). The date when applications must... notice of February 11, 2008 (73 FR 7696) are applicable to this solicitation. Limitation of Liability... Research Facilities in the Pacific Northwest, (2) A CI for Southwestern U.S. Marine Ecosystems, Climate...

  15. 40 CFR 60.4210 - What are my compliance requirements if I am a stationary CI internal combustion engine manufacturer?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false What are my compliance requirements if I am a stationary CI internal combustion engine manufacturer? 60.4210 Section 60.4210 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) STANDARDS OF PERFORMANCE FOR NEW STATIONARY SOURCES Standards...

  16. 10 CFR 709.14 - Consequences of a refusal to complete a CI evaluation including a polygraph examination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... administrative review of access authorization under 10 CFR part 710. If the covered person is a DOE employee, DOE... including a polygraph examination. 709.14 Section 709.14 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY COUNTERINTELLIGENCE... refusal to complete a CI evaluation including a polygraph examination. (a) If a covered person is...

  17. 10 CFR 709.14 - Consequences of a refusal to complete a CI evaluation including a polygraph examination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... administrative review of access authorization under 10 CFR part 710. If the covered person is a DOE employee, DOE... including a polygraph examination. 709.14 Section 709.14 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY COUNTERINTELLIGENCE... refusal to complete a CI evaluation including a polygraph examination. (a) If a covered person is...

  18. 10 CFR 709.14 - Consequences of a refusal to complete a CI evaluation including a polygraph examination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... administrative review of access authorization under 10 CFR part 710. If the covered person is a DOE employee, DOE... including a polygraph examination. 709.14 Section 709.14 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY COUNTERINTELLIGENCE... refusal to complete a CI evaluation including a polygraph examination. (a) If a covered person is...

  19. 10 CFR 709.14 - Consequences of a refusal to complete a CI evaluation including a polygraph examination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... administrative review of access authorization under 10 CFR part 710. If the covered person is a DOE employee, DOE... including a polygraph examination. 709.14 Section 709.14 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY COUNTERINTELLIGENCE... refusal to complete a CI evaluation including a polygraph examination. (a) If a covered person is...

  20. 10 CFR 709.14 - Consequences of a refusal to complete a CI evaluation including a polygraph examination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... administrative review of access authorization under 10 CFR part 710. If the covered person is a DOE employee, DOE... including a polygraph examination. 709.14 Section 709.14 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY COUNTERINTELLIGENCE... refusal to complete a CI evaluation including a polygraph examination. (a) If a covered person is...

  1. 78 FR 37793 - In the Matter of: Jose Arturo Ramon-Herrada, Inmate Number #90903-279, CI Willacy County...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-24

    ... Bureau of Industry and Security In the Matter of: Jose Arturo Ramon-Herrada, Inmate Number 90903-279, CI..., 794 or 798; section 4(b) of the Internal Security Act of 1950 (50 U.S.C. 783(b)), or section 38 of the...). In addition, Section 750.8 of the Regulations states that the Bureau of Industry and...

  2. MUTAGENICITY EVALUATION OF THE COMMERCIAL PRODUCT CI DISPERSE BLUE 291 USING DIFFERENT PROTOCOLS OF THE SALMONELLA ASSAY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Textile dyes can enter the water ecosystem through wastewater discharges potentially exposing humans through the consumption of water and food. The commercial disperse dye product C.I. Disperse Blue 291 containing the aminoazobenzene 2-[(2-bromo-4,6-dinitrophenyl)azo]-5(diethylam...

  3. Serum Matrix Metalloproteinase-7 is an independent prognostic biomarker in advanced bladder cancer

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Urine markers have been studied extensively but there is a lack of blood prognostic markers in bladder cancer. MMP-7 is produced by stromal cells and by tumor cells and is overexpressed in a variety of epithelial and mesenchymal tumors. In this study, we assessed with an immunoassay we developed, the prognostic value of serum MMP-7 in a series of patients with advanced bladder cancer. Methods Serum samples were collected from 56 patients with advanced bladder cancer who were treated at the Montpellier Cancer Institute between March 2003 and December 2004. MMP-7 was quantified in serum samples by using a homogeneous sandwich fluoroimmunoassay we developed based on the time resolved amplified cryptate emission (TRACE) technology. Results The median overall survival of the study population was 2.2 years (95% CI, 1.4 to 3.0) with 1- and 5-year survival rates of 73% (95% CI, 59% to 82%) and 25% (95% CI, 14% to 37%), respectively. High MMP-7 serum levels were associated with poor survival. Using a cut-off value of 11.5 ng/mL, the median overall survival was 3.0 years (95% CI, 1.5 to 5.1) for patients with MMP-7 serum level <11.5 ng/mL and 1.3 years (95% CI, 0.8 to 2.5) for patients with serum level ?11.5 ng/mL. Multivariate analysis identified high MMP-7 serum concentration as an independent prognostic factor for survival in patients with advanced bladder cancer (R?=?2.1, 95% CI, 1.1 to 4.4). Conclusions Our results show that the MMP-7 serum concentration is an independent prognostic factor in patients with locally advanced and or metastatic bladder cancer. PMID:25984271

  4. Gabapentin and the neurokinin(1) receptor antagonist CI-1021 act synergistically in two rat models of neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Field, Mark J; Gonzalez, M Isabel; Tallarida, Ronald J; Singh, Lakhbir

    2002-11-01

    The present study examines the effect of combinations of gabapentin (Neurontin) and a selective neurokinin (NK)(1) receptor antagonist, 1-(1H-indol-3-ylmethyl)-1-methyl-2-oxo-2-[(1-phenylethyl)amino]ethyl]-2-benzofuranylmethyl ester (CI-1021), in two models of neuropathic pain. Dose responses to both gabapentin and CI-1021 were performed against static allodynia induced in the streptozocin and chronic constriction injury (CCI) models. Theoretical additive lines were calculated from these data. Dose responses to various fixed dose ratios of a gabapentin/CI-1021 combination were then examined in both models. In the streptozocin model, administration of gabapentin/CI-1021 combinations at fixed dose ratios of 1:1 and 60:1 resulted in an additive effect with dose response similar to the theoretical additive line. However, a synergistic interaction was seen after fixed dose ratios of 10:1, 20:1, and 40:1 with static allodynia completely blocked and the dose responses shifted approximately 8-, 30-, and 10-fold leftward, respectively, from the theoretical additive values. In the CCI model, after fixed dose ratios of 5:1 and 20:1, combinations of gabapentin and CI-1021 produced an additive response. At the fixed dose ratio of 10:1 static allodynia was completely blocked with an approximate 10-fold leftward shift of the dose response from the theoretical additive value, indicating synergy. The combination of gabapentin with a structurally unrelated NK(1) receptor antagonist, (2S,3S)-3-(2-methoxybenzylamino)-2-phenylpiperidine (CP-99,994), also produced synergy, at a fixed dose ratio of 20:1. This ratio completely blocked streptozocin-induced static allodynia and was approximately shifted leftward 5-fold from the theoretical additive value. These data suggest a synergistic interaction between gabapentin and NK(1) receptor antagonists in animal models of neuropathic pain. PMID:12388658

  5. Cyberknife treatment for advanced or terminal stage hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Hiroyuki; Yoshida, Hideo; Taniguch, Hiroyoshi; Nomura, Ryutaro; Sato, Kengo; Suzuki, Ichiro; Nakata, Ryo

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the safety and efficacy of the Cyberknife treatment for patients with advanced or terminal stage hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). METHODS: Patients with HCC with extrahepatic metastasis or vascular or bile duct invasion were enrolled between May 2011 and June 2015. The Cyberknife was used to treat each lesion. Treatment response scores were based on Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors v1.1. The trends of tumor markers, including alpha fetoprotein (AFP) and proteins induced by vitamin K absence II (PIVKA II) were assessed. Prognostic factors for tumor response and tumor markers were evaluated with Fisher’s exact test and a logistic regression model. Survival was evaluated with the Kaplan-Meier method and multivariate analysis was performed using the Cox proportional hazards model. RESULTS: Sixty-five patients with 95 lesions were enrolled. Based on the Barcelona Clinic Liver Cancer classification, all patients were either in the advanced or terminal stage of the disease. The target lesions were as follows: 52 were bone metastasis; 9, lung metastasis; 7, brain metastasis; 9, portal vein invasion; 4, hepatic vein invasion; 4, bile duct invasion; and 10 other lesion types. The response rate and disease control rate were 34% and 53%, respectively. None of the clinical factors correlated significantly with tumor response. Fiducial marker implantation was associated with better control of both AFP (HR = 0.152; 95%CI: 0.026-0.887; P = 0.036) and PIVKA II (HR = 0.035; 95%CI: 0.003-0.342; P = 0.004). The median survival time was 9 mo (95%CI: 5-15 mo). Terminal stage disease (HR = 9.809; 95%CI: 2.589-37.17, P < 0.001) and an AFP of more than 400 ng/mL (HR = 2.548; 95%CI: 1.070-6.068, P = 0.035) were associated with worse survival. A radiation dose higher than 30 Gy (HR = 0.274; 95%CI: 0.093-0.7541, P = 0.012) was associated with better survival. In the 52 cases of bone metastasis, 36 patients (69%) achieved pain relief. One patient had cerebral

  6. Measurement of Small Values of Hydrostatic Pressure with the Compensation of Atmospheric Pressure Influence / Pomiar Małych Wartości Ciśnienia Hydrostatycznego Z Kompensacją Wpływu Ciśnienia Atmosferycznego

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broda, Krzysztof; Filipek, Wiktor

    2013-09-01

    structure has been simplified and the measurement accuracy has increased. Znajomość rozkładu ciśnienia (lub różnicy ciśnień) determinuje opis przepływu płynu przez ośrodek porowaty. W przypadku dużych liczb Reynoldsa nie nastręcza to większych trudności, lecz dla przepływów laminarnych (tj. dla liczb Re (Bear, 1988; Duckworth, 1983; Troskolański, 1957) z zakresu 0.01 do 3) jest to praktycznie niemożliwe w oparciu o dostępne na rynku przyrządy. Przyczyny powodujące taką sytuację zostały omówione w poprzednim opracowaniu (Broda i Filipek, 2012), w którym zwrócono uwagę na trudności pomiarów związane z napięciem powierzchniowym czy włoskowatością (Adamson, 1997). Zaproponowano (Broda i Filipek, 2012) nową, autorską metodę pomiaru bardzo małych różnic ciśnień oraz skonstruowano odpowiednie stanowisko składające się z dwóch oddzielnych zbiorników pomiarowych oraz przeprowadzono pomiary. Z przeprowadzonych badań (Broda i Filipek, 2012) wynikała konieczność zastosowania stabilizacji temperatury urządzenia oraz kompensacji wpływu ciśnienia atmosferycznego na proces pomiarowy. Niniejsza publikacja przedstawia wyniki kontynuacji badań nad metodami i aparaturą do pomiaru bardzo małych różnic ciśnień z uwzględnieniem zdobytych doświadczeń, w oparciu o nowe stanowisko pomiarowe, którego zasadę działania i budowę przedstawiono na rys. 1-5, kolejno przedstawiając koncepcję wykonania pomiaru małych wartości ciśnienia hydrodynamicznego z kompensacją wpływu ciśnienia atmosferycznego rys. 1; ilustrację obrazującą stan odpowiadający przypadkowi braku przepływu płynu przez badany obiekt rys. 2; omawiając stan odpowiadający przypadkowi przepływu płynu przez badany obiekt rys. 3. Kolejno omówiono stan odpowiadający pomiarowi spadku ciśnienia na badanym obiekcie rys. 4 oraz przedstawiono metodykę pomiaru (zależności (1) - (20)). Zdjęcie stanowiska badawczego oraz jego elementów ilustruje rys. 5. W

  7. Spatial and temporal variability of spring ecosystems in Cuatro Ciénegas, MX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corman, J. R.; Ramos, J.; Childers, D. L.; Elser, J. J.

    2013-12-01

    Springs in desert ecosystems provide vital water resources and are often hotspots of biodiversity. Indeed, the Cuatro Ciénegas (CC) Valley, México, which hosts >300 springs, lakes, streams, and ponds, has the highest rate of endemism in North America. This region of the Chihuahuan Desert and its aquatic ecosystems are thought to be supported by both precipitation events and local and regional aquifers, however, the hydrologic influence and connectivity of the springs are not well understood. We have been monitoring the physicochemical characteristics of this system since 1998 and yearly since 2011. Our basin-wide study of 15 different aquatic features provides an opportunity to (1) characterize the physicochemical and nutrient landscape of the aquatic ecosystems and (2) test the assumptions of hypothesized hydrologic dynamics. The aquatic ecosystems of CC have an impressive spatial diversity in their physicochemical properties and support a locally-connected hydrologic model of the valley. Aqueous specific conductivity spanned 1.1 - 9.6 mS/cm2, with the highest values found in the eastern lobe and lowest values in the southeastern and northern regions. Dissolved organic carbon concentrations ranged over two orders of magnitude (max: 5.3 mM), with a similar spatial variability as specific conductivity. Nutrient data also showed geographic trends, however patterns differed for nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P). While total dissolved N and P were highest in the eastern lobe, the highest values of each were not found at the same sites. Rancho las Pozas had the highest N (>500 uM N), while Los Hundidos had the highest P concentrations (as high as 10.8 uM P). Atomic N:P ratios ranged from 7 - 997 across CC, with a mean of 139. Both the highest (>500) and lowest (<20) N:P ratios were found in the eastern lobe suggesting that organisms living in nearby aquatic features are experiencing different nutrient constraints. Because our temporal dataset windows the passage of

  8. Advance Care Planning.

    PubMed

    Stallworthy, Elizabeth J

    2013-04-16

    Advance care planning should be available to all patients with chronic kidney disease, including end-stage kidney disease on renal replacement therapy. Advance care planning is a process of patient-centred discussion, ideally involving family/significant others, to assist the patient to understand how their illness might affect them, identify their goals and establish how medical treatment might help them to achieve these. An Advance Care Plan is only one useful outcome from the Advance Care Planning process, the education of patient and family around prognosis and treatment options is likely to be beneficial whether or not a plan is written or the individual loses decision making capacity at the end of life. Facilitating Advance Care Planning discussions requires an understanding of their purpose and communication skills which need to be taught. Advance Care Planning needs to be supported by effective systems to enable the discussions and any resulting Plans to be used to aid subsequent decision making. PMID:23586906

  9. A Real Importância de Sobral na Ciência Moderna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soares, Domingos S. L.

    2006-06-01

    The Brazilian Association for the Advancement of Science (SBPC) annual meeting was held in Ceará State, and the city of Sobral was the inspiration for a number of events. The reason of this was obviously the 1919 British astronomical expedition to observe the solar eclipse, on May, 29th. The goal was to confront observations with the General Relativity predictions concerning the gravitational bending of light. It was several times repeated, in many press reports, that ``... the famous experience during the 1919 solar eclipse proved that the theory of General Relativity was right''. It is recognized nowadays that this statement is not true. Technical and instrumental conditions at the time did not allow such conclusion. I present here arguments from published sources that confirm this view of the solar eclipse observations. Of course, this alternative view on Sobral's events does not diminish, in no way, its importance in the general context of the history of contemporary science. Sobral's events will always be remembered as a milestone in it, and the reason of proud to all of us, Brazilian scientists. In its correspondent perspective, of course.

  10. Hydromechanical Advanced Coal Excavator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Estus, Jay M.; Summers, David

    1990-01-01

    Water-jet cutting reduces coal dust and its hazards. Advanced mining system utilizes full-face, hydromechanical, continuous miner. Coal excavator uses high-pressure water-jet lances, one in each of cutting heads and one in movable lance, to make cuts across top, bottom and middle height, respectively, of coal face. Wedge-shaped cutting heads advance into lower and upper cuts in turn, thereby breaking coal toward middle cut. Thrust cylinders and walking pads advance excavator toward coal face.

  11. High-Dispersion Spectroscopy of the X-Ray Transient RXTE J0421+560 (=CI Camelopardalis) during Outburst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Edward L.; Ivans, Inese I.; Welsh, William F.

    2002-02-01

    We obtained high-dispersion spectroscopy of CI Cam, the optical counterpart of XTE J0421+560, 2 weeks after the peak of its short outburst in 1998 April. The optical counterpart is a supergiant B[e] star that is emitting a two-component wind, a cool, low-velocity wind and a hot, high-velocity wind. The cool wind, which is the source of narrow emission lines of neutral and ionized metals, has a velocity of 32 km s-1 and a temperature near 8000 K. It is dense, roughly spherical, fills the space around the sgB[e] star, and, based on the size of an infrared-emitting dust shell around the system, extends to a radius between 13 and 50 AU. It carries away mass at a high rate, M>10-6Msolaryr-1. The hot wind has a velocity in excess of 2500 km s-1 and a temperature of 1.7+/-0.3×104 K. From an ultraviolet spectrogram of CI Cam obtained in 2000 March with Hubble Space Telescope, we derive a differential extinction E(B-V)=0.85+/-0.05. We show that the distance to CI Cam is greater than 5 kpc. Based on this revised distance, the X-ray luminosity at the peak of the outburst was L(2-25 keV)>3.0×1038 ergs s-1, making CI Cam one of the most luminous X-ray transients. The ratio of quiescent luminosity to peak luminosity in the 2-25 keV band is Lq/Lp<1.7×10-6. The compact star in CI Cam is immersed in the dense circumstellar wind from the sgB[e] star and burrows through the wind, producing little X-ray emission except for rare transient outbursts. This picture, a compact star traveling in a wide orbit through the dense circumstellar envelope of a sgB[e] star, occasionally producing transient X-ray outbursts, makes CI Cam unique among the known X-ray binaries. There is strong circumstantial evidence that the compact object is a black hole, not a neutron star. We speculate that the X-ray outburst was short because the accretion disk around the compact star is fed from a stellar wind and is smaller than disks fed by Roche lobe overflow. Based on observations made with the NASA

  12. Advantages of estimating parameters of photosynthesis model by fitting A-Ci curves at multiple subsaturating light intensities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, W.; Gu, L.; Hoffman, F. M.

    2013-12-01

    The photosynthesis model of Farquhar, von Caemmerer & Berry (1980) is an important tool for predicting the response of plants to climate change. So far, the critical parameters required by the model have been obtained from the leaf-level measurements of gas exchange, namely the net assimilation of CO2 against intercellular CO2 concentration (A-Ci) curves, made at saturating light conditions. With such measurements, most points are likely in the Rubisco-limited state for which the model is structurally overparameterized (the model is also overparameterized in the TPU-limited state). In order to reliably estimate photosynthetic parameters, there must be sufficient number of points in the RuBP regeneration-limited state, which has no structural over-parameterization. To improve the accuracy of A-Ci data analysis, we investigate the potential of using multiple A-Ci curves at subsaturating light intensities to generate some important parameter estimates more accurately. Using subsaturating light intensities allow more RuBp regeneration-limited points to be obtained. In this study, simulated examples are used to demonstrate how this method can eliminate the errors of conventional A-Ci curve fitting methods. Some fitted parameters like the photocompensation point and day respiration impose a significant limitation on modeling leaf CO2 exchange. The multiple A-Ci curves fitting can also improve over the so-called Laisk (1977) method, which was shown by some recent publication to produce incorrect estimates of photocompensation point and day respiration. We also test the approach with actual measurements, along with suggested measurement conditions to constrain measured A-Ci points to maximize the occurrence of RuBP regeneration-limited photosynthesis. Finally, we use our measured gas exchange datasets to quantify the magnitude of resistance of chloroplast and cell wall-plasmalemma and explore the effect of variable mesophyll conductance. The variable mesophyll conductance

  13. Time-resolved spectroscopy of CI and CII line emissions from an ultrafast laser induced solid graphite plasma

    SciTech Connect

    N, Smijesh; K, Chandrasekharan; Philip, Reji

    2014-10-15

    We present an experimental characterization of the evolution dynamics of CI and CII lines in an ultrafast laser produced graphite plasma under various ambient conditions. Fast and slow components are observed in the temporal evolution of CI transition at 658.7 nm (3p{sup 1}P - 4d{sup 1}P{sup 0}) and CII transition at 426.7 nm (3d {sup 2}D - 4f {sup 2}F{sup 0}). Fast peak is due to the recombination of fast ions species with electrons, found to have an increase in velocity upon increasing the ambient pressure. Whereas the slow peaks in both cases can be the results of slow ions or slow neutrals in the plume.

  14. The Kto-Skd complex can regulate ptc expression by interacting with Cubitus interruptus (Ci) in the Hedgehog signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Mao, Feifei; Yang, Xiaofeng; Fu, Lin; Lv, Xiangdong; Zhang, Zhao; Wu, Wenqing; Yang, Siqi; Zhou, Zhaocai; Zhang, Lei; Zhao, Yun

    2014-08-01

    The hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway plays a very important role in metazoan development by controlling pattern formation. Drosophila imaginal discs are subdivided into anterior and posterior compartments that derive from adjacent cell populations. The anterior/posterior (A/P) boundaries, which are critical to maintaining the position of organizers, are established by a complex mechanism involving Hh signaling. Here, we uncover the regulation of ptc in the Hh signaling pathway by two subunits of mediator complex, Kto and Skd, which can also regulate boundary location. Collectively, we provide further evidence that Kto-Skd affects the A/P-axial development of the whole wing disc. Kto can interact with Cubitus interruptus (Ci), bind to the Ci-binding region on ptc promoter, which are both regulated by Hh signals to down-regulate ptc expression. PMID:24962581

  15. The Kto-Skd Complex Can Regulate ptc Expression by Interacting with Cubitus interruptus (Ci) in the Hedgehog Signaling Pathway*

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Feifei; Yang, Xiaofeng; Fu, Lin; Lv, Xiangdong; Zhang, Zhao; Wu, Wenqing; Yang, Siqi; Zhou, Zhaocai; Zhang, Lei; Zhao, Yun

    2014-01-01

    The hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway plays a very important role in metazoan development by controlling pattern formation. Drosophila imaginal discs are subdivided into anterior and posterior compartments that derive from adjacent cell populations. The anterior/posterior (A/P) boundaries, which are critical to maintaining the position of organizers, are established by a complex mechanism involving Hh signaling. Here, we uncover the regulation of ptc in the Hh signaling pathway by two subunits of mediator complex, Kto and Skd, which can also regulate boundary location. Collectively, we provide further evidence that Kto-Skd affects the A/P-axial development of the whole wing disc. Kto can interact with Cubitus interruptus (Ci), bind to the Ci-binding region on ptc promoter, which are both regulated by Hh signals to down-regulate ptc expression. PMID:24962581

  16. [Ci](1-0) observations in M33 A study of CO dark H2 gas in M33

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glück, C.; Mookerjea, B.; Okada, Y.; Buchbender, C.; Röllig, M.; Stutzki, J.

    2016-05-01

    Based on [Ci] (1-0) observations and complementary Hi, 12/13CO (1-0), 12CO (2-1) and [Cii] data we estimated the column density and fraction of molecular hydrogen in GMCs along the major axis of the galaxy M33. We found that on average 75%± 14% of the hydrogen is in molecular form. Roughly 40-45% of the H2 is both traced by [Cii] and CO, while ˜ 15% by the [Ci] lines. The found CO-dark H2 gas fractions are within the predictions by Wolfire et al. (2010) for a half solar metallicity, Z = 0.5 Z⊙, as in M33.

  17. Petrologic study of the Belgica 7904 carbonaceous chondrite - Hydrous alteration, oxygen isotopes, and relationship to CM and CI chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ikeda, Y.; Prinz, M.

    1993-01-01

    The genetic relationships between the petrology, hydration reactions, and isotopic oxygen composition in the Belgica 7904 (B7904) carbonaceous chondrite, and the relationship between B7904 and the CM and CI chondrites were investigated by characterizing seven components separated from B7904. The seven specimens included two partially altered chondrules, two phylosilicate clasts, two olivine fragments, and one matrix sample. The results of the analyses and thermodynamic calculations suggest that CI chondrites may have been produced in a two-stage alteration process from materials similar to that of the B7904 matrix, by reactions with liquid water in their parent body. The common CM chondrites may have undergone aqueous alteration in the parent body, in addition to hydration in the nebula, resulting in two-stage alterations; the parent body may have been different from that of B7904.

  18. Visualization and prediction of porosity in roller compacted ribbons with near-infrared chemical imaging (NIR-CI).

    PubMed

    Khorasani, M; Amigo, J M; Sonnergaard, J; Olsen, P; Bertelsen, P; Rantanen, J

    2015-05-10

    The porosity of roller compacted ribbon is recognized as an important critical quality attribute which has a huge impact on the final product quality. The purpose of this study was to investigate the use of near-infrared chemical imaging (NIR-CI) for porosity estimation of ribbons produced at different roll pressures. Two off-line methods were utilized as reference methods. The relatively fast method (oil absorption) was comparable with the more time-consuming mercury intrusion method (R(2)=0.98). Therefore, the oil method was selected as the reference off line method. It was confirmed by both reference methods that ribbons compressed at a higher pressure resulted in a lower mean porosity. Using NIR-CI in combination with multivariate data analysis it was possible to visualize and predict the porosity distribution of the ribbons. This approach is considered important for process monitoring and control of continuously operating roller compaction line. PMID:25746502

  19. Time-resolved spectroscopy of CI and CII line emissions from an ultrafast laser induced solid graphite plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    N, Smijesh; K, Chandrasekharan; Philip, Reji

    2014-10-01

    We present an experimental characterization of the evolution dynamics of CI and CII lines in an ultrafast laser produced graphite plasma under various ambient conditions. Fast and slow components are observed in the temporal evolution of CI transition at 658.7 nm (3p1P - 4d1P0) and CII transition at 426.7 nm (3d 2D - 4f 2F0). Fast peak is due to the recombination of fast ions species with electrons, found to have an increase in velocity upon increasing the ambient pressure. Whereas the slow peaks in both cases can be the results of slow ions or slow neutrals in the plume.

  20. The Effects of Thermal Metamorphism on the Amino Acid Content of the CI-Like Chondrite Y-86029

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burton, A. S.; Grunsfeld, S.; Glavin, D. P.; Dworkin, J. P.

    2014-01-01

    Carbonaceous chondrites con-tain a diverse suite of amino acids that varies in abundance and structural diversity depending on the degree of aqueous alteration and thermal histo-ry that the parent body experienced [1 - 3]. We recently determined the amino acid contents of several fragments of the Sutter's Mill CM2 chon-drite [4]. In contrast with most other CM2 chon-drites, the Sutter's Mill meteorites showed minimal evidence for the presence of indigenous amino acids. A notable difference between the Sutter's Mill meteorites and other CM2 chondrites are that the Sutter's Mill stones were heated to tempera-tures of 150 - 400 C [4], whereas most other CM2 chondrites do not show evidence for thermal met-amorphism [5]. Because empirical studies have shown that amino acids rapidly degrade in aqueous solutions above 150 C and the presence of miner-als accelerates this degradation [6], a plausible explanation for the lack of amino acids observed in the Sutter's Mill meteorites is that they were destroyed during metamorphic alteration. Fewer CI chondrites have been analyzed for amino acids because only a small number of these meteorites have been recovered. Nevertheless, indigenous amino acids have been reported in the CI chondrites Ivuna and Orgueil [7]. Here we report on the amino acid analysis of the CI-like chondrite, Yamato 86029 (Y-86029; sample size of 110 mg). Just as the Sutter's Mill meteorites were thermally metamporphosed CM2 chondrites, Y-86029 has experienced thermal metamorphism at higher temperatures than Orgueil and Ivuna (normal CI chondrites) experienced, possibly up to 600 C [8].

  1. Advanced Airspace Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erzberger, Heinz

    2002-01-01

    A general overview of the Advanced Airspace Concept (AAC) is presented. The topics include: 1) Limitations of the existing system; 2) The Advanced Airspace Concept; 3) Candidate architecture for the AAC; 4) Separation assurance and conflict avoidance system (TSAFE); and 5) Ground-Air Interactions. This paper is in viewgraph form.

  2. Kansas Advanced Semiconductor Project

    SciTech Connect

    Baringer, P.; Bean, A.; Bolton, T.; Horton-Smith, G.; Maravin, Y.; Ratra, B.; Stanton, N.; von Toerne, E.; Wilson, G.

    2007-09-21

    KASP (Kansas Advanced Semiconductor Project) completed the new Layer 0 upgrade for D0, assumed key electronics projects for the US CMS project, finished important new physics measurements with the D0 experiment at Fermilab, made substantial contributions to detector studies for the proposed e+e- international linear collider (ILC), and advanced key initiatives in non-accelerator-based neutrino physics.

  3. Advanced Engineering Fibers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edie, Dan D.; Dunham, Michael G.

    1987-01-01

    Describes Clemson University's Advanced Engineered Fibers Laboratory, which was established to provide national leadership and expertise in developing the processing equipment and advance fibers necessary for the chemical, fiber, and textile industries to enter the composite materials market. Discusses some of the laboratory's activities in…

  4. Advanced Manufacturing Technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fikes, John

    2016-01-01

    Advanced Manufacturing Technologies (AMT) is developing and maturing innovative and advanced manufacturing technologies that will enable more capable and lower-cost spacecraft, launch vehicles and infrastructure to enable exploration missions. The technologies will utilize cutting edge materials and emerging capabilities including metallic processes, additive manufacturing, composites, and digital manufacturing. The AMT project supports the National Manufacturing Initiative involving collaboration with other government agencies.

  5. Advanced Life Support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chambliss, Joe

    2004-01-01

    Viewgraphs on Advanced Life Support (ALS) Systems are presented. The topics include: 1) Fundamental Need for Advanced Life Support; 2) ALS organization; 3) Requirements and Rationale; 4) Past Integrated tests; 5) The need for improvements in life support systems; 6) ALS approach to meet exploration goals; 7) ALS Projects showing promise to meet exploration goals; and 9) GRC involvement in ALS.

  6. Drilling at Advanced Levels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Case, Doug

    1977-01-01

    Instances where drilling is useful for advanced language are discussed. Several types of drills are recommended, with the philosophy that advanced level drills should have a lighter style and be regarded as a useful, occasional means of practicing individual new items. (CHK)

  7. Structural and dynamics studies of a truncated variant of CI repressor from bacteriophage TP901-1

    PubMed Central

    Rasmussen, Kim Krighaar; Frandsen, Kristian E. H.; Boeri Erba, Elisabetta; Pedersen, Margit; Varming, Anders K.; Hammer, Karin; Kilstrup, Mogens; Thulstrup, Peter W.; Blackledge, Martin; Jensen, Malene Ringkjøbing; Lo Leggio, Leila

    2016-01-01

    The CI repressor from the temperate bacteriophage TP901-1 consists of two folded domains, an N-terminal helix-turn-helix DNA-binding domain (NTD) and a C-terminal oligomerization domain (CTD), which we here suggest to be further divided into CTD1 and CTD2. Full-length CI is a hexameric protein, whereas a truncated version, CI∆58, forms dimers. We identify the dimerization region of CI∆58 as CTD1 and determine its secondary structure to be helical both within the context of CI∆58 and in isolation. To our knowledge this is the first time that a helical dimerization domain has been found in a phage repressor. We also precisely determine the length of the flexible linker connecting the NTD to the CTD. Using electrophoretic mobility shift assays and native mass spectrometry, we show that CI∆58 interacts with the OL operator site as one dimer bound to both half-sites, and with much higher affinity than the isolated NTD domain thus demonstrating cooperativity between the two DNA binding domains. Finally, using small angle X-ray scattering data and state-of-the-art ensemble selection techniques, we delineate the conformational space sampled by CI∆58 in solution, and we discuss the possible role that the dynamics play in CI-repressor function. PMID:27403839

  8. Phylogeography and Conservation Genetics of a Distinct Lineage of Sunfish in the Cuatro Ciénegas Valley of Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Coghill, Lyndon M.; Hulsey, C. Darrin; Chaves-Campos, Johel; García de Leon, Francisco J.; Johnson, Steven G.

    2013-01-01

    The valley of Cuatro Ciénegas, an aquatic oasis located in the Mexican Chihuahuan Desert, exhibits the highest level of endemism in North America and is a Mexican National Protected Area. However, little is known about the evolutionary distinctiveness of several vertebrate species present in the Cuatro Ciénegas valley. We conducted a phylogeographic study using mitochondrial haplotypes from the centrarchid fish Lepomis megalotis to determine if the populations found within the valley were evolutionarily distinct from populations outside the valley. We also examined if there was evidence of unique haplotypes of this sunfish within the valley. Genetic divergence of L. megalotis suggests populations within the valley are evolutionarily unique when compared to L. megalotis outside the valley. Significant mitochondrial sequence divergence was also discovered between L. megalotis populations on either side of the Sierra de San Marcos that bisects the valley. Our results reinforce previous studies that suggest the organisms occupying aquatic habitats not only within Cuatro Ciénegas but also in each of the two lobes of the valley generally deserve independent consideration during management decisions. PMID:24130826

  9. A Comparison of Ci/Gli Activity as Regulated by Sufu in Drosophila and Mammalian Hedgehog Response

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chi; Guo, Yurong; Beachy, Philip A.

    2015-01-01

    Suppressor of fused (Su(fu)/Sufu), one of the most conserved components of the Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway, binds Ci/Gli transcription factors and impedes activation of target gene expression. In Drosophila, the Su(fu) mutation has a minimal phenotype, and we show here that Ci transcriptional activity in large part is regulated independently of Su(fu) by other pathway components. Mutant mice lacking Sufu in contrast show excessive pathway activity and die as embryos with patterning defects. Here we show that in cultured cells Hh stimulation can augment transcriptional activity of a Gli2 variant lacking Sufu interaction and, surprisingly, that regulation of Hh pathway targets is nearly normal in the neural tube of Sufu-/- mutant embryos that also lack Gli1 function. Some degree of Hh-induced transcriptional activation of Ci/Gli thus can occur independently of Sufu in both flies and mammals. We further note that Sufu loss can also reduce Hh induction of high-threshold neural tube fates, such as floor plate, suggesting a possible positive pathway role for Sufu. PMID:26271100

  10. Quantum entanglement of helium-like systems with varying-Z: compact state-of-the-art CI wave functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-Rosa, S.; Esquivel, R. O.; Plastino, A. R.; Dehesa, J. S.

    2015-09-01

    In this work we have performed state-of-the-art configuration-interaction (CI) calculations to determine the linear and von Neumann entanglement entropies for the helium-like systems with varying nuclear charge Z in the range 1≤slant Z≤slant 10. The focus of the work resides on determining accurate entanglement values for 2-electron systems with the lowest computational cost through compact CI-wave functions. Our entanglement results for the helium atom fully agree with the results obtained with higher quality wave functions of the Kinoshita type (Dehesa [5]). We find that the correlation energy is linearly related to the entanglement measures associated with the linear and von Neumann entropies of the single-particle reduced density matrizes, which sheds new light on the physical implications of entanglement in helium-like systems. Moreover, we report CI-wave-function-based benchmark results for the entanglement values for all members of the helium isoelectronic series with an accuracy similar to that of Kinoshita-type wave functions. Finally, we give parametric expressions of the linear and von Neumann entanglement measures for two-electron systems as Z varies from 1 to 10.

  11. A comparison between coherent and noncoherent mobile systems in large Doppler shift, delay spread, and C/I environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feher, Kamilo

    1993-01-01

    The performance and implementation complexity of coherent and of noncoherent QPSK and GMSK modulation/demodulation techniques in a complex mobile satellite systems environment, including large Doppler shift, delay spread, and low C/I, are compared. We demonstrate that for large f(sub d)T(sub b) products, where f(sub d) is the Doppler shift and T(sub b) is the bit duration, noncoherent (discriminator detector or differential demodulation) systems have a lower BER floor than their coherent counterparts. For significant delay spreads, e.g., tau(sub rms) greater than 0.4 T(sub b), and low C/I, coherent systems outperform noncoherent systems. However, the synchronization time of coherent systems is longer than that of noncoherent systems. Spectral efficiency, overall capacity, and related hardware complexity issues of these systems are also analyzed. We demonstrate that coherent systems have a simpler overall architecture (IF filter implementation-cost versus carrier recovery) and are more robust in an RF frequency drift environment. Additionally, the prediction tools, computer simulations, and analysis of coherent systems is simpler. The threshold or capture effect in low C/I interference environment is critical for noncoherent discriminator based systems. We conclude with a comparison of hardware architectures of coherent and of noncoherent systems, including recent trends in commercial VLSI technology and direct baseband to RF transmit, RF to baseband (0-IF) receiver implementation strategies.

  12. Structural and dynamics studies of a truncated variant of CI repressor from bacteriophage TP901-1.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, Kim Krighaar; Frandsen, Kristian E H; Boeri Erba, Elisabetta; Pedersen, Margit; Varming, Anders K; Hammer, Karin; Kilstrup, Mogens; Thulstrup, Peter W; Blackledge, Martin; Jensen, Malene Ringkjøbing; Lo Leggio, Leila

    2016-01-01

    The CI repressor from the temperate bacteriophage TP901-1 consists of two folded domains, an N-terminal helix-turn-helix DNA-binding domain (NTD) and a C-terminal oligomerization domain (CTD), which we here suggest to be further divided into CTD1 and CTD2. Full-length CI is a hexameric protein, whereas a truncated version, CI∆58, forms dimers. We identify the dimerization region of CI∆58 as CTD1 and determine its secondary structure to be helical both within the context of CI∆58 and in isolation. To our knowledge this is the first time that a helical dimerization domain has been found in a phage repressor. We also precisely determine the length of the flexible linker connecting the NTD to the CTD. Using electrophoretic mobility shift assays and native mass spectrometry, we show that CI∆58 interacts with the OL operator site as one dimer bound to both half-sites, and with much higher affinity than the isolated NTD domain thus demonstrating cooperativity between the two DNA binding domains. Finally, using small angle X-ray scattering data and state-of-the-art ensemble selection techniques, we delineate the conformational space sampled by CI∆58 in solution, and we discuss the possible role that the dynamics play in CI-repressor function. PMID:27403839

  13. Phylogeography and conservation genetics of a distinct lineage of sunfish in the Cuatro Ciénegas valley of Mexico.

    PubMed

    Coghill, Lyndon M; Hulsey, C Darrin; Chaves-Campos, Johel; García de Leon, Francisco J; Johnson, Steven G

    2013-01-01

    The valley of Cuatro Ciénegas, an aquatic oasis located in the Mexican Chihuahuan Desert, exhibits the highest level of endemism in North America and is a Mexican National Protected Area. However, little is known about the evolutionary distinctiveness of several vertebrate species present in the Cuatro Ciénegas valley. We conducted a phylogeographic study using mitochondrial haplotypes from the centrarchid fish Lepomis megalotis to determine if the populations found within the valley were evolutionarily distinct from populations outside the valley. We also examined if there was evidence of unique haplotypes of this sunfish within the valley. Genetic divergence of L. megalotis suggests populations within the valley are evolutionarily unique when compared to L. megalotis outside the valley. Significant mitochondrial sequence divergence was also discovered between L. megalotis populations on either side of the Sierra de San Marcos that bisects the valley. Our results reinforce previous studies that suggest the organisms occupying aquatic habitats not only within Cuatro Ciénegas but also in each of the two lobes of the valley generally deserve independent consideration during management decisions. PMID:24130826

  14. Advanced Chemical Propulsion Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodcock, Gordon; Byers, Dave; Alexander, Leslie A.; Krebsbach, Al

    2004-01-01

    A study was performed of advanced chemical propulsion technology application to space science (Code S) missions. The purpose was to begin the process of selecting chemical propulsion technology advancement activities that would provide greatest benefits to Code S missions. Several missions were selected from Code S planning data, and a range of advanced chemical propulsion options was analyzed to assess capabilities and benefits re these missions. Selected beneficial applications were found for higher-performing bipropellants, gelled propellants, and cryogenic propellants. Technology advancement recommendations included cryocoolers and small turbopump engines for cryogenic propellants; space storable propellants such as LOX-hydrazine; and advanced monopropellants. It was noted that fluorine-bearing oxidizers offer performance gains over more benign oxidizers. Potential benefits were observed for gelled propellants that could be allowed to freeze, then thawed for use.

  15. Advanced Beamformers for Cochlear Implant Users: Acute Measurement of Speech Perception in Challenging Listening Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Buechner, Andreas; Dyballa, Karl-Heinz; Hehrmann, Phillipp; Fredelake, Stefan; Lenarz, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the performance of monaural and binaural beamforming technology with an additional noise reduction algorithm, in cochlear implant recipients. Method This experimental study was conducted as a single subject repeated measures design within a large German cochlear implant centre. Twelve experienced users of an Advanced Bionics HiRes90K or CII implant with a Harmony speech processor were enrolled. The cochlear implant processor of each subject was connected to one of two bilaterally placed state-of-the-art hearing aids (Phonak Ambra) providing three alternative directional processing options: an omnidirectional setting, an adaptive monaural beamformer, and a binaural beamformer. A further noise reduction algorithm (ClearVoice) was applied to the signal on the cochlear implant processor itself. The speech signal was presented from 0° and speech shaped noise presented from loudspeakers placed at ±70°, ±135° and 180°. The Oldenburg sentence test was used to determine the signal-to-noise ratio at which subjects scored 50% correct. Results Both the adaptive and binaural beamformer were significantly better than the omnidirectional condition (5.3 dB±1.2 dB and 7.1 dB±1.6 dB (p<0.001) respectively). The best score was achieved with the binaural beamformer in combination with the ClearVoice noise reduction algorithm, with a significant improvement in SRT of 7.9 dB±2.4 dB (p<0.001) over the omnidirectional alone condition. Conclusions The study showed that the binaural beamformer implemented in the Phonak Ambra hearing aid could be used in conjunction with a Harmony speech processor to produce substantial average improvements in SRT of 7.1 dB. The monaural, adaptive beamformer provided an averaged SRT improvement of 5.3 dB. PMID:24755864

  16. Disparities in the Use of Radiation Therapy in Patients With Local-Regionally Advanced Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, Steve R.; Beal, Shannon H.; Chen, Steven L.; Canter, Robert J.; Khatri, Vijay P.; Chen, Allen; Bold, Richard J.

    2010-11-01

    Background: Radiation therapy (RT) is indicated for the treatment of local-regionally advanced breast cancer (BCa). Hypothesis: We hypothesized that black and Hispanic patients with local-regionally advanced BCa would receive lower rates of RT than their white counterparts. Methods: The Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results database was used to identify white, black, Hispanic, and Asian patients with invasive BCa and {>=}10 metastatic lymph nodes diagnosed between 1988 and 2005. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression evaluated the relationship of race/ethnicity with use of RT. Multivariate models stratified for those undergoing mastectomy or lumpectomy. Results: Entry criteria were met by 12,653 patients. Approximately half of the patients did not receive RT. Most patients were white (72%); the remainder were Hispanic (10.4%), black (10.3%), and Asian (7.3%). On univariate analysis, Hispanics (odd ratio [OR] 0.89; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.79-1.00) and blacks (OR 0.79; 95% CI, 0.70-0.89) were less likely to receive RT than whites. On multivariate analysis, blacks (OR 0.76; 95% CI, 0.67-0.86) and Hispanics (OR 0.80; 95% CI, 0.70-0.90) were less likely than whites to receive RT. Disparities persisted for blacks (OR 0.74; 95% CI, 0.64-0.85) and Hispanics (OR 0.77; 95% CI, 0.67-0.89) who received mastectomy, but not for those who received lumpectomy. Conclusions: Many patients with local-regionally advanced BCa do not receive RT. Blacks and Hispanics were less likely than whites to receive RT. This disparity was noted predominately in patients who received mastectomy. Future efforts at improving rates of RT are warranted. Efforts at eliminating racial/ethnic disparities should focus on black and Hispanic candidates for postmastectomy RT.

  17. THE CHANGE OF THE ORBITAL PERIODS ACROSS ERUPTIONS AND THE EJECTED MASS FOR RECURRENT NOVAE CI AQUILAE AND U SCORPII

    SciTech Connect

    Schaefer, Bradley E.

    2011-12-01

    I report on the cumulative results from a program started 24 years ago designed to measure the orbital period change of recurrent novae (RNe) across an eruption. The goal is to use the orbital period change to measure the mass ejected during each eruption as the key part of trying to measure whether the RNe white dwarfs are gaining or losing mass over an entire eruption cycle, and hence whether they can be progenitors for Type Ia supernovae. This program has now been completed for two eclipsing RNe: CI Aquilae (CI Aql) across its eruption in 2000 and U Scorpii (U Sco) across its eruption in 1999. For CI Aql, I present 78 eclipse times from 1991 to 2009 (including four during the tail of the 2000 eruption) plus two eclipses from 1926 and 1935. For U Sco, I present 67 eclipse times, including 46 times during quiescence from 1989 to 2009, plus 21 eclipse times in the tails of the 1945, 1999, and 2010 eruptions. The eclipse times during the tails of eruptions are systematically and substantially shifted with respect to the ephemerides from the eclipses in quiescence, with this being caused by shifts of the center of light during the eruption. These eclipse times are plotted on an O - C diagram and fitted to models with a steady period change ( P-dot ) between eruptions (caused by, for example, conservative mass transfer) plus an abrupt period change ({Delta}P) at the time of eruption. The primary uncertainty arises from the correlation between {Delta}P with P-dot , such that a more negative P-dot makes for a more positive {Delta}P. For CI Aql, the best fit is {Delta}P = -3.7{sup +9.2}{sub -7.3} Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -7}. For U Sco, the best fit is {Delta}P = (+ 43 {+-} 69) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -7} days. These period changes can directly give a dynamical measure of the mass ejected (M{sub ejecta}) during each eruption with negligible sensitivity to the stellar masses and no uncertainty from distances. For CI Aql, the 1{sigma} upper limit is M{sub ejecta} < 10

  18. Healthcare Proxy Awareness of Suspected Infections Among Nursing Home Residents with Advanced Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Givens, Jane L.; Spinella, Sara; Ankuda, Claire K.; D’Agata, Erika; Shaffer, Michele L.; Habtemariam, Daniel; Mitchell, Susan L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Infections are common in advanced dementia. Little is known about healthcare proxy involvement in decision making regarding infections. Design Prospective cohort study Setting/Participants 362 nursing home (NH) residents with advanced dementia and their proxies in 35 Boston-area facilities. Measurements Charts were abstracted monthly (up to 12 months) for documentation of suspected infections and provider/proxy discussions for each episode. Proxies were interviewed within 8 weeks of the infection to determine their awareness and decision-making involvement. Factors associated with proxy awareness and discussion documentation were identified. Results There were 496 suspected infections; proxies were reached for interview for 395 (80%). Proxy/provider discussions were documented for 207/395 episodes (52%), yet proxies were aware of only 156/395 (39%). Proxies participated in decision-making for 89/156 (57%) episodes of which they were aware. Proxy awareness was associated with antimicrobial use (adjusted odds ratio (AOR) 3.43, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.94–6.05), hospital transfer (AOR 3.00, 95% CI 1.19–7.53), infection occurrence within 30 days of death (AOR 3.32, 95% CI 1.54–7.18) and fewer days between infection and study interview (AOR 2.71, 95% CI 1.63–4.51). Discussion documentation was associated with the resident residing in a dementia special care unit (AOR 1.71, 95% CI 1.04–2.80), not on hospice (AOR 3.25, 95% CI 1.31–8.02), more provider visits (AOR 1.71, 95% CI 1.07–2.75), proxy visits > 7 hours/week (AOR 1.93, 95% CI 1.02–3.67), and episode within 30 days of death (AOR 3.99, 95% CI 1.98–8.02). Conclusion Proxies are unaware of and do not participate in decision-making for most suspected infections experienced by NH residents with advanced dementia. Proxy awareness of episodes and documentation of provider/proxy discussions are not congruent. PMID:26031905

  19. The ADvanced SEParation (ADSEP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    The ADvanced SEParation (ADSEP) commercial payload is making use of major advances in separation technology: The Phase Partitioning Experiment (PPE); the Micorencapsulation experiment; and the Hemoglobin Separation Experiment (HSE). Using ADSEP, commercial researchers will attempt to determine the partition coefficients for model particles in a two-phase system. With this information, researchers can develop a higher resolution, more effective cell isolation procedure that can be used for many different types of research and for improved health care. The advanced separation technology is already being made available for use in ground-based laboratories.

  20. Advanced information society(7)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiba, Toshihiro

    Various threats are hiding in advanced informationalized society. As we see car accident problems in motorization society light aspects necessarily accompy shady ones. Under the changing circumstances of advanced informationalization added values of information has become much higher. It causes computer crime, hacker, computer virus to come to the surface. In addition it can be said that infringement of intellectual property and privacy are threats brought by advanced information. Against these threats legal, institutional and insurance measures have been progressed, and newly security industry has been established. However, they are not adequate individually or totally. The future vision should be clarified, and countermeasures according to the visions have to be considered.

  1. Bionics: A Step toward Artificial Intelligence Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dutton, Robert E.

    1970-01-01

    Recent developments and future prospects in the borrowing of biological principles to build problem solving relationships between human intelligence and the information storage and manipulation capacities of computers. Twenty-one references. (LY)

  2. Bionic ommatidia based on microlens array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Liu; Sihai, Chen; Shan, Dong; Xinjian, Yi

    2009-06-01

    A simple method is reported to manufacture a planar compound eye using a microlens array. The compound eye, inspired by insects, consists of a microlens array and a waveguide coupled with it. A microlens array with lenses of 50 μm in diameter is fabricated by melting AZ1500 photoresist and then transferring it onto SU-8. With the self-focus method applied, a waveguide array is formed, and each is exactly coupled to a lens. The formation of the waveguide is simulated using finite difference time domain (FDTD) arithmetic, resembling the ommatidia produced in our experiment. The ommatidia is also testified to astrict beam, just as the natural compound eyes do.

  3. BOWOOSS: bionic optimized wood shells with sustainability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pohl, Göran

    2011-04-01

    In architecture, shell construction is used for the most efficient, large spatial structures. Until now the use of wood rather played a marginal role, implementing those examples of architecture, although this material offers manifold advantages, especially against the background of accelerating shortage of resources and increasing requirements concerning the energy balance. Regarding the implementation of shells, nature offers a wide range of suggestions. The focus of the examinations is on the shells of marine plankton, especially of diatoms, whose richness in species promises the discovery of entirely new construction principles. The project is targeting at transferring advantageous features of these organisms on industrial produced, modular wood shell structures. Currently a transfer of these structures in CAD - models is taking place, helping to perform stress analysis by computational methods. Micro as well as macro structures are the subject of diverse consideration, allowing to draw the necessary conclusions for an architectural design. The insights of these tests are the basis for the development of physical models on different scales, which are used to verify the different approaches. Another important aim which is promoted in the project is to enhance the competitiveness of timber construction. Downsizing of the prefabricated structural elements leads to considerable lower transportation costs as abnormal loads can be avoided as far as possible and means of transportation can be loaded with higher efficiency so that an important contribution to the sustainability in the field of architecture can also be made.

  4. Bionic robot arm with compliant actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moehl, Bernhard

    2000-10-01

    Traditional robotics uses non-compliant materials for all components involved in the production of movement. Elasticity is avoided as far as possible, because it leads to hazardous oscillations and makes control of precise movements very difficult. Due to this deliberate stiffness, robots are typically heavy and clumsy structures in comparison to their living counterparts (i.e. man and animals). Yet, moving systems in nature cope not only with the difficulties introduced by compliant materials, they also take advantage of the elasticity in muscles and tendons to produce smooth and even rapid movements. It is understood, that elasticity in a multi-jointed moving system requires sophisticated control mechanisms- as provided by a nervous system or a suitably programmed computer. In this contribution I shall describe a two-jointed robot with purpose-built elasticity in its actuators. This is accomplished by spiral springs places in series with a conventional electric motor and a tendon to the arm. It is shown that, with sufficiently soft elasticity, oscillations can be avoided by active oscillation damping. (Such active oscillation damping presumably also governs movement control in man and animals.) Furthermore, once the major problem has been overcome, elasticity is found to offer a wide spectrum of valuable advantages, as far as the most serious problems in traditional robotics are concerned. They are summarized by terms such as less dangerous, position tolerant, lightweight construction, controlled forces, and ballistic movements. These will be explained in detail and presented for discussion.

  5. 40 CFR 60.4212 - What test methods and other procedures must I use if I am an owner or operator of a stationary CI...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... must I use if I am an owner or operator of a stationary CI internal combustion engine with a... SOURCES Standards of Performance for Stationary Compression Ignition Internal Combustion Engines Testing... owner or operator of a stationary CI internal combustion engine with a displacement of less than...

  6. 40 CFR 60.4206 - How long must I meet the emission standards if I am an owner or operator of a stationary CI...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... standards if I am an owner or operator of a stationary CI internal combustion engine? 60.4206 Section 60... Ignition Internal Combustion Engines Emission Standards for Owners and Operators § 60.4206 How long must I meet the emission standards if I am an owner or operator of a stationary CI internal combustion...

  7. 40 CFR 60.4201 - What emission standards must I meet for non-emergency engines if I am a stationary CI internal...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... non-emergency engines if I am a stationary CI internal combustion engine manufacturer? 60.4201 Section... Ignition Internal Combustion Engines Emission Standards for Manufacturers § 60.4201 What emission standards must I meet for non-emergency engines if I am a stationary CI internal combustion engine...

  8. 40 CFR 60.4212 - What test methods and other procedures must I use if I am an owner or operator of a stationary CI...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... must I use if I am an owner or operator of a stationary CI internal combustion engine with a... SOURCES Standards of Performance for Stationary Compression Ignition Internal Combustion Engines Testing... owner or operator of a stationary CI internal combustion engine with a displacement of less than...

  9. 40 CFR 60.4201 - What emission standards must I meet for non-emergency engines if I am a stationary CI internal...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... non-emergency engines if I am a stationary CI internal combustion engine manufacturer? 60.4201 Section... Ignition Internal Combustion Engines Emission Standards for Manufacturers § 60.4201 What emission standards must I meet for non-emergency engines if I am a stationary CI internal combustion engine...

  10. 40 CFR 60.4211 - What are my compliance requirements if I am an owner or operator of a stationary CI internal...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... I am an owner or operator of a stationary CI internal combustion engine? 60.4211 Section 60.4211... operator of a stationary CI internal combustion engine? (a) If you are an owner or operator and must comply... internal combustion engine and control device according to the manufacturer's written instructions...

  11. 40 CFR 60.4207 - What fuel requirements must I meet if I am an owner or operator of a stationary CI internal...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... am an owner or operator of a stationary CI internal combustion engine subject to this subpart? 60... Compression Ignition Internal Combustion Engines Fuel Requirements for Owners and Operators § 60.4207 What fuel requirements must I meet if I am an owner or operator of a stationary CI internal...

  12. 40 CFR 60.4206 - How long must I meet the emission standards if I am an owner or operator of a stationary CI...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... standards if I am an owner or operator of a stationary CI internal combustion engine? 60.4206 Section 60... Ignition Internal Combustion Engines Emission Standards for Owners and Operators § 60.4206 How long must I meet the emission standards if I am an owner or operator of a stationary CI internal combustion...

  13. 40 CFR 60.4211 - What are my compliance requirements if I am an owner or operator of a stationary CI internal...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... I am an owner or operator of a stationary CI internal combustion engine? 60.4211 Section 60.4211... operator of a stationary CI internal combustion engine? (a) If you are an owner or operator and must comply... internal combustion engine and control device according to the manufacturer's written instructions...

  14. 40 CFR 60.4203 - How long must my engines meet the emission standards if I am a manufacturer of stationary CI...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... emission standards if I am a manufacturer of stationary CI internal combustion engines? 60.4203 Section 60... Ignition Internal Combustion Engines Emission Standards for Manufacturers § 60.4203 How long must my engines meet the emission standards if I am a manufacturer of stationary CI internal combustion...

  15. 40 CFR 60.4203 - How long must my engines meet the emission standards if I am a manufacturer of stationary CI...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... emission standards if I am a manufacturer of stationary CI internal combustion engines? 60.4203 Section 60... Ignition Internal Combustion Engines Emission Standards for Manufacturers § 60.4203 How long must my engines meet the emission standards if I am a manufacturer of stationary CI internal combustion...

  16. 40 CFR 60.4201 - What emission standards must I meet for non-emergency engines if I am a stationary CI internal...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... non-emergency engines if I am a stationary CI internal combustion engine manufacturer? 60.4201 Section... Ignition Internal Combustion Engines Emission Standards for Manufacturers § 60.4201 What emission standards must I meet for non-emergency engines if I am a stationary CI internal combustion engine...

  17. 40 CFR 60.4212 - What test methods and other procedures must I use if I am an owner or operator of a stationary CI...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... must I use if I am an owner or operator of a stationary CI internal combustion engine with a... SOURCES Standards of Performance for Stationary Compression Ignition Internal Combustion Engines Testing... owner or operator of a stationary CI internal combustion engine with a displacement of less than...

  18. 40 CFR 60.4212 - What test methods and other procedures must I use if I am an owner or operator of a stationary CI...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... must I use if I am an owner or operator of a stationary CI internal combustion engine with a... SOURCES Standards of Performance for Stationary Compression Ignition Internal Combustion Engines Testing... owner or operator of a stationary CI internal combustion engine with a displacement of less than...

  19. 40 CFR 60.4207 - What fuel requirements must I meet if I am an owner or operator of a stationary CI internal...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... am an owner or operator of a stationary CI internal combustion engine subject to this subpart? 60... Compression Ignition Internal Combustion Engines Fuel Requirements for Owners and Operators § 60.4207 What fuel requirements must I meet if I am an owner or operator of a stationary CI internal...

  20. 40 CFR 60.4206 - How long must I meet the emission standards if I am an owner or operator of a stationary CI...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... standards if I am an owner or operator of a stationary CI internal combustion engine? 60.4206 Section 60... Ignition Internal Combustion Engines Emission Standards for Owners and Operators § 60.4206 How long must I meet the emission standards if I am an owner or operator of a stationary CI internal combustion...

  1. 40 CFR 60.4207 - What fuel requirements must I meet if I am an owner or operator of a stationary CI internal...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... am an owner or operator of a stationary CI internal combustion engine subject to this subpart? 60... Compression Ignition Internal Combustion Engines Fuel Requirements for Owners and Operators § 60.4207 What... a stationary CI internal combustion engine subject to this subpart? (b) Beginning October 1,...

  2. 40 CFR 60.4201 - What emission standards must I meet for non-emergency engines if I am a stationary CI internal...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... non-emergency engines if I am a stationary CI internal combustion engine manufacturer? 60.4201 Section... Ignition Internal Combustion Engines Emission Standards for Manufacturers § 60.4201 What emission standards must I meet for non-emergency engines if I am a stationary CI internal combustion engine...

  3. 40 CFR 60.4207 - What fuel requirements must I meet if I am an owner or operator of a stationary CI internal...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... am an owner or operator of a stationary CI internal combustion engine subject to this subpart? 60... Compression Ignition Internal Combustion Engines Fuel Requirements for Owners and Operators § 60.4207 What fuel requirements must I meet if I am an owner or operator of a stationary CI internal...

  4. 40 CFR 60.4206 - How long must I meet the emission standards if I am an owner or operator of a stationary CI...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... standards if I am an owner or operator of a stationary CI internal combustion engine? 60.4206 Section 60... Ignition Internal Combustion Engines Emission Standards for Owners and Operators § 60.4206 How long must I meet the emission standards if I am an owner or operator of a stationary CI internal combustion...

  5. 40 CFR Table 7 to Subpart IIIi of... - Requirements for Performance Tests for Stationary CI ICE With a Displacement of ≥30 Liters per...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... internal combustion engine. (4) Method 5 of 40 CFR part 60, appendix A-3 (d) PM concentration must be at 15... following requirements 1. Stationary CI internal combustion engine with a displacement of ≥ 30 liters per...-hour or longer runs. b. Limit the concentration of NOX in the stationary CI internal combustion...

  6. Advanced information society(2)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masuyama, Keiichi

    Our modern life is full of information and information infiltrates into our daily life. Networking of the telecommunication is extended to society, company, and individual level. Although we have just entered the advanced information society, business world and our daily life have been steadily transformed by the advancement of information network. This advancement of information brings a big influence on economy, and will play they the main role in the expansion of domestic demands. This paper tries to view the image of coming advanced information society, focusing on the transforming businessman's life and the situation of our daily life, which became wealthy by the spread of daily life information and the visual information by satellite system, in the development of the intelligent city.

  7. Advanced launch system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monk, Jan C.

    1991-01-01

    The Advanced Launch System (ALS) is presented. The costs, reliability, capabilities, infrastructure are briefly described. Quality approach, failure modes, structural design, technology benefits, and key facilities are outlined. This presentation is represented by viewgraphs.

  8. Advanced camera for surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clampin, Mark; Ford, Holland C.; Bartko, Frank; Bely, Pierre Y.; Broadhurst, Tom; Burrows, Christopher J.; Cheng, Edward S.; Crocker, James H.; Franx, Marijn; Feldman, Paul D.; Golimowski, David A.; Hartig, George F.; Illingworth, Garth; Kimble, Randy A.; Lesser, Michael P.; Miley, George H.; Postman, Marc; Rafal, Marc D.; Rosati, Piero; Sparks, William B.; Tsvetanov, Zlatan; White, Richard L.; Sullivan, Pamela; Volmer, Paul; LaJeunesse, Tom

    2000-07-01

    The Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) is a third generation instrument for the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). It is currently planned for installation in HST during the fourth servicing mission in Summer 2001. The ACS will have three cameras.

  9. The Advanced Energy Initiative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milliken, JoAnn; Joseck, Fred; Wang, Michael; Yuzugullu, Elvin

    The President's Advanced Energy Initiative (AEI), launched in 2006, addresses the challenges of energy supply and demand facing our Nation by supporting research and development of advanced technologies for transportation and stationary power generation. The AEI portfolio includes clean coal, nuclear and renewable energy technologies (solar and wind) for stationary power generation and advanced battery technologies, cellulosic ethanol as a fuel and hydrogen fuel cells for transportation. These research and development programs are underpinned by comprehensive life-cycle analysis efforts using models such as Hydrogen Analysis (H2A) and Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions and Energy Use in Transportation (GREET) to enable a better understanding of the characteristics and trade-offs associated with advanced energy options and to help decision makers choose viable pathways for clean, reliable and affordable energy.

  10. Advances in Process Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrison, David L.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Advances in electronics and computer science have enabled industries (pulp/paper, iron/steel, petroleum/chemical) to attain better control of their processes with resulting increases in quality, productivity, profitability, and compliance with government regulations. (JN)

  11. Advanced Welding Concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ding, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    Four advanced welding techniques and their use in NASA are briefly reviewed in this poster presentation. The welding techniques reviewed are: Solid State Welding, Friction Stir Welding (FSW), Thermal Stir Welding (TSW) and Ultrasonic Stir Welding.

  12. Advances in cell culture

    SciTech Connect

    Maramorosch, K. )

    1987-01-01

    This book presents papers on advances in cell culture. Topics covered include: Genetic changes in the influenza viruses during growth in cultured cells; The biochemistry and genetics of mosquito cells in culture; and Tree tissue culture applications.

  13. Advanced Lab Consortium ``Conspiracy''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichert, Jonathan F.

    2006-03-01

    Advanced Laboratory instruction is a time-honored and essential element of an undergraduate physics education. But, from my vantage point, it has been neglected by the two major professional societies, APS and AAPT. At some schools, it has been replaced by ``research experiences,'' but I contend that very few of these experiences in the research lab, particularly in the junior year, deliver what they promise. It is time to focus the attention of APS, AAPT, and the NSF on the advanced lab. We need to create an Advanced Lab Consortium (ALC) of faculty and staff to share experiments, suppliers, materials, pedagogy, ideas, in short to build a professional network for those committed to advanced lab instruction. The AAPT is currently in serious discussions on this topic and my company stands ready with both financial and personnel resources to support the effort. This talk is a plea for co-conspirators.

  14. Descendants and advance directives.

    PubMed

    Buford, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Some of the concerns that have been raised in connection to the use of advance directives are of the epistemic variety. Such concerns highlight the possibility that adhering to an advance directive may conflict with what the author of the directive actually wants (or would want) at the time of treatment. However, at least one objection to the employment of advance directives is metaphysical in nature. The objection to be discussed here, first formulated by Rebecca Dresser and labeled by Allen Buchanan as the slavery argument and David DeGrazia the someone else problem, aims to undermine the legitimacy of certain uses of advance directives by concluding that such uses rest upon an incorrect assumption about the identity over time of those ostensibly governed by the directives. There have been numerous attempts to respond to this objection. This paper aims to assess two strategies that have been pursued to cope with the problem. PMID:25743056

  15. Advanced space propulsion concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lapointe, Michael R.

    1993-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center has been actively involved in the evaluation and development of advanced spacecraft propulsion. Recent program elements have included high energy density propellants, electrode less plasma thruster concepts, and low power laser propulsion technology. A robust advanced technology program is necessary to develop new, cost-effective methods of spacecraft propulsion, and to continue to push the boundaries of human knowledge and technology.

  16. Advanced planetary studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Results of planetary advanced studies and planning support provided by Science Applications, Inc. staff members to Earth and Planetary Exploration Division, OSSA/NASA, for the period 1 February 1981 to 30 April 1982 are summarized. The scope of analyses includes cost estimation, planetary missions performance, solar system exploration committee support, Mars program planning, Galilean satellite mission concepts, and advanced propulsion data base. The work covers 80 man-months of research. Study reports and related publications are included in a bibliography section.

  17. Advanced Welding Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ding, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    Some of the applications of advanced welding techniques are shown in this poster presentation. Included are brief explanations of the use on the Ares I and Ares V launch vehicle and on the Space Shuttle Launch vehicle. Also included are microstructural views from four advanced welding techniques: Variable Polarity Plasma Arc (VPPA) weld (fusion), self-reacting friction stir welding (SR-FSW), conventional FSW, and Tube Socket Weld (TSW) on aluminum.

  18. Advanced drilling systems study

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, K.G.; Livesay, B.J.

    1995-03-01

    This work was initiated as part of the National Advanced Drilling and Excavation Technologies (NADET) Program. It is being performed through joint finding from the Department of Energy Geothermal Division and the Natural Gas Technology Branch, Morgantown Energy Technology Center. Interest in advanced drilling systems is high. The Geothermal Division of the Department of Energy has initiated a multi-year effort in the development of advanced drilling systems; the National Research Council completed a study of drilling and excavation technologies last year; and the MIT Energy Laboratory recently submitted a proposal for a national initiative in advanced drilling and excavation research. The primary reasons for this interest are financial. Worldwide expenditures on oil and gas drilling approach $75 billion per year. Also, drilling and well completion account for 25% to 50% of the cost of producing electricity from geothermal energy. There is incentive to search for methods to reduce the cost of drilling. Work on ideas to improve or replace rotary drilling technology dates back at least to the 1930`s. There was a significant amount of work in this area in the 1960`s and 1970`s; and there has been some continued effort through the 1980`s. Undoubtedly there are concepts for advanced drilling systems that have yet to be studied; however, it is almost certain that new efforts to initiate work on advanced drilling systems will build on an idea or a variation of an idea that has already been investigated. Therefore, a review of previous efforts coupled with a characterization of viable advanced drilling systems and the current state of technology as it applies to those systems provide the basis for the current study of advanced drilling.

  19. Evidence from Tm anomalies for non-CI refractory lithophile element proportions in terrestrial planets and achondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrat, J. A.; Dauphas, N.; Gillet, P.; Bollinger, C.; Etoubleau, J.; Bischoff, A.; Yamaguchi, A.

    2016-03-01

    Thulium is a heavy rare earth element (REE) whose geochemical behavior is intermediate between Er and Yb, and that is not expected to be decoupled from these elements during accretion of planetary bodies and geological processes. However, irregularities in REE volatilities at higher temperature could have decoupled the REEs relative to one another during the early stages of condensation of the solar nebula. Indeed, positive Tm anomalies are found in some refractory inclusions from carbonaceous chondrites, and it is possible that large scale nebular reservoirs displaying positive or negative Tm anomalies were formed during the early history of the solar system. We analyzed a series of meteorites and terrestrial rocks in order to evaluate the existence of Tm anomalies in planetary materials. Relative to CIs (Ivuna-type carbonaceous chondrites), carbonaceous chondrites display unresolved or positive Tm anomalies, while most of the noncarbonaceous chondrites show slightly negative Tm anomalies. Quantification of these anomalies in terrestrial samples is complicated when samples display fractionated heavy REE patterns. Taking this effect into account, we show that the Earth, Mars, Vesta, the aubrite and ureilite parent bodies display small negative anomalies (Tm/Tm∗ ≈ 0.975), very similar to those found in ordinary and enstatite chondrites. We suggest that a slight negative Tm anomaly relative to CI is a widespread feature of the materials from the inner solar system. This finding suggests that CI chondrites may not be appropriate for normalizing REE abundances of most planetary materials as they may be enriched in a high-temperature refractory component with non-solar composition. The presence of Tm anomalies at a bulk planetary scale is, to this day, the strongest piece of evidence that refractory lithophile elements are not present in constant CI proportions in planetary bodies.

  20. OT1_jpineda_1: Characterizing the life cycle of interstellar matter in the Magellanic Clouds with CII and CI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pineda, J.

    2010-07-01

    The understanding of the processes governing the formation of interstellar clouds and subsequent star formation is key for our understanding of how galaxies evolve in our Universe. Special interest is given to the study of low-metallicity interstellar matter as it is thought to be representative of the environment where stars formed at earlier cosmological time. Unique targets for this study are the Large and Small Magellanic clouds, which are the closest low-metallicity star forming systems. We propose deep, velocity--resolved observations of the [CII] 158 um, [CI] 609um, and [CI] 370um lines towards 54 representative positions in the Large and Small Magellanic clouds with the HIFI instrument on board of Herschel. These will be combined with our MAGMA CO data to obtain a complete inventory of carbon in the Magellanic clouds. We selected positions to represent different ISM environments, based on whether they show: a) HI peaks with little or no 160um dust emission and no CO, b) HI and 160um peaks but still no CO, and c) CO peaks. We also include a sample of lines-of--sight observed by FUSE which have known H2 column densities, which will allow us to calibrate our use of [CII] as a tracer of HI and H2 column densities. Our sample therefore includes clouds in different stages of evolution going from diffuse atomic to diffuse molecular and to dense molecular clouds. We will use an excitation/radiative transfer code and a PDR model to derive the physical conditions of the line-emitting gas. Our observations have the potential to discover large quantities of dark H2 gas traced by [CII] and perhaps [CI] emission, as recently observed in [CII] emission in the galactic plane (Langer et al. 2010 and Velusamy et al. 2010).

  1. CI-Miner: A Semantic Methodology to Integrate Scientists, Data and Documents through the Use of Cyber-Infrastructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinheiro da Silva, P.; CyberShARE Center of Excellence

    2011-12-01

    Scientists today face the challenge of rethinking the manner in which they document and make available their processes and data in an international cyber-infrastructure of shared resources. Some relevant examples of new scientific practices in the realm of computational and data extraction sciences include: large scale data discovery; data integration; data sharing across distinct scientific domains, systematic management of trust and uncertainty; and comprehensive support for explaining processes and results. This talk introduces CI-Miner - an innovative hands-on, open-source, community-driven methodology to integrate these new scientific practices. It has been developed in collaboration with scientists, with the purpose of capturing, storing and retrieving knowledge about scientific processes and their products, thereby further supporting a new generation of science techniques based on data exploration. CI-Miner uses semantic annotations in the form of W3C Ontology Web Language-based ontologies and Proof Markup Language (PML)-based provenance to represent knowledge. This methodology specializes in general-purpose ontologies, projected into workflow-driven ontologies(WDOs) and into semantic abstract workflows (SAWs). Provenance in PML is CI-Miner's integrative component, which allows scientists to retrieve and reason with the knowledge represented in these new semantic documents. It serves additionally as a platform to share such collected knowledge with the scientific community participating in the international cyber-infrastructure. The integrated semantic documents that are tailored for the use of human epistemic agents may also be utilized by machine epistemic agents, since the documents are based on W3C Resource Description Framework (RDF) notation. This talk is grounded upon interdisciplinary lessons learned through the use of CI-Miner in support of government-funded national and international cyber-infrastructure initiatives in the areas of geo

  2. Fine regulation of cI857-controlled gene expression in continuous culture of recombinant Escherichia coli by temperature.

    PubMed Central

    Villaverde, A; Benito, A; Viaplana, E; Cubarsi, R

    1993-01-01

    The expression at different temperatures of the lacZ gene, which is controlled by the lambda pL and pR tandem promoters and the cI857 temperature-sensitive repressor, was studied in Escherichia coli continuous cultures. At temperatures between 30 and 42 degrees C, beta-galactosidase activity behaved according to an exponential equation. By inducing a culture at a temperature within this range, predefined, nearly constant submaximal levels of gene expression and recombinant product yield can be obtained. PMID:8250569

  3. Analysis of Aftercavity Interaction in European ITER Gyrotrons and in the Compact Sub-THz Gyrotron FU CW-CI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumbrajs, Olgierd; Idehara, Toshitaka

    2012-12-01

    Possibilities of arising of aftercavity interaction are analyzed in the ITER 170 GHz 2 MW coaxial cavity gyrotron and the 170 GHz 1 MW cylindrical cavity gyrotron, as well as in the compact 394.5 GHz low power gyrotron FU CW-CI. Also, the simulations for the gyrotron efficiency in the presence of aftercavity interaction are performed in the cold cavity approximation. Results of the analysis illustrate the subtle interplay between the geometry of the output taper and the profile of the magnetic field.

  4. Possible Involvement of Locus-Specific Methylation on Expression Regulation of LEAFY Homologous Gene (CiLFY) during Precocious Trifoliate Orange Phase Change Process

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Rong; Khan, Muhammad Rehman Gul; Hu, Chun-Gen

    2014-01-01

    DNA methylation plays an essential role in regulating plant development. Here, we described an early flowering trifoliate orange (precocious trifoliate orange, Poncirus trifoliata L. Raf) was treated with 5-azacytidine and displayed a number of phenotypic and developmental abnormalities. These observations suggested that DNA methylation might play an important role in regulating many developmental pathways including early flowering trait, and then the expression level of five key or integrated citrus flowering genes were analyzed. Our results showed that FLOWERING LOCUS T (CiFT) relative expression level was increased with the increasing concentrations of 5-AzaC. However, LEAFY (CiLFY), APETELA1 (CiAP1), TERMINAL FLOWER1 (CiTFL1), and FLOWERING LOCUS C (CiFLC) showed highest relative expression levels at 250 µΜ treatment, while decreased sharply at higher concentrations. In order to further confirm DNA methylation affects the expression of these genes, their full-length sequences were isolated by genome-walker method, and then was analyzed by using bioinformatics tools. However, only one locus-specific methylation site was observed in CiLFY sequence. Therefore, DNA methylation level of the CiLFY was investigated both at juvenile and adult stages of precocious trifoliate orange by bisulfate sequencing PCR; it has been shown that the level of DNA methylation was altered during phase change. In addition, spatial and temporal expression patterns of CiLFY promoter and a series of 5′ deletions were investigated by driving the expression of a β-glucuronidase reporter gene in Arabidopsis. Exogenous GA3 treatment on transgenic Arabidopsis revealed that GA3 might be involved in the developmental regulation of CiLFY during flowering process of precocious trifoliate orange. These results provided insights into the molecular regulation of CiLFY gene expression, which would be helpful for studying citrus flowering. PMID:24523915

  5. Chemotherapy plus Erlotinib versus Chemotherapy Alone for Treating Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Xu, J. L.; Jin, B.; Ren, Z. H.; Lou, Y. Q.; Zhou, Z. R.; Yang, Q. Z.; Han, B. H.

    2015-01-01

    Background Whether a combination of chemotherapy and erlotinib is beneficial for advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) remains controversial. This study aimed to summarize the currently available evidence and compare the efficacy and safety of chemotherapy plus erlotinib versus chemotherapy alone for treating advanced NSCLC. Methods EMBASE, PubMed, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials were searched for relevant studies. Our protocol was registered in PROSPERO (CRD42014015015). Results Nine randomized controlled trials with a total of 3599 patients were included. Compared to chemotherapy alone, chemotherapy plus erlotinib was superior in PFS (HR = 0.76 [95% CI 0.62, 0.92], P = 0.006), and no statistically significant difference was observed in OS (HR = 0.94 [95% CI 0.86, 1.03], P = 0.16). Intercalated erlotinib plus chemotherapy demonstrated improvements in PFS (HR = 0.67 [95% CI 0.50, 0.91], P = 0.009) and OS (HR = 0.82 [95% CI 0.69, 0.98], P = 0.03). Continuous erlotinib plus chemotherapy treatment failed to demonstrate improvements in PFS (HR = 0.91 [95% CI 0.80, 1.04], P = 0.16) and OS (HR = 0.98 [95% CI 0.89, 1.09], P = 0.75). The association of chemotherapy plus erlotinib with improvement in PFS was significant in never smoking patients (HR = 0.46 [95% CI 0.37, 0.56], P<0.00001) but not in smoking patients (HR = 0.70 [95% CI 0.49, 1.00], P = 0.05). Among patients with EGFR mutant tumors, chemotherapy plus erlotinib demonstrated significant improvements in PFS (HR = 0.31 [95% CI 0.17, 0.58], P = 0.0002) and OS (HR = 0.52 [95% CI 0.30, 0.88], P = 0.01). Among patients with EGFR wild-type tumors, no statistically significant difference was observed with respect to PFS (HR = 0.87 [95% CI 0.70, 1.08], P = 0.21) and OS (HR = 0.78 [95% CI 0.59, 1.01], P = 0.06). Conclusion Combination of chemotherapy and erlotinib is a viable treatment option for patients with NSCLC, especially for patients who never smoked and patients with EGFR mutation

  6. Pre-ozonation coupled with UV/H2O2 process for the decolorization and mineralization of cotton dyeing effluent and synthesized C.I. Direct Black 22 wastewater.

    PubMed

    Shu, Hung-Yee; Chang, Ming-Chin

    2005-05-20

    The decolorization and mineralization of cotton dyeing effluent containing C.I. Acid Black 22 as well as synthesized C.I. Acid Black 22 wastewater by means of advanced oxidation processes (AOPs), such as UV/H2O2, O3 and pre-ozonation coupled with UV/H2O2 processes, were evaluated in this study. It was observed that the UV/H2O2 process took longer retention time than ozonation for color removal of dye bath effluent. Reversely, the total organic carbon (TOC) removal showed different phenomena that ozonation and UV/H2O2 process obtained 33 and 90% of removal efficiency for 160 min of retention time, respectively. Additionally, laboratory synthesized dye wastewater was substantially more efficient in the decolorization process than dye bath effluent. Therefore, in this work, pre-ozonation coupled with UV/H2O2 process was employed to enhance the reduction of both color and TOC in dye bath effluent at the same time. At the same time, the retention time demand was reduced to less than 115 min for 90% removal of TOC and color by this combined process. PMID:15885413

  7. Advance treatment directives for people with severe mental illness

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Leslie Anne; Kisely, Steve R

    2014-01-01

    Background An advance directive is a document specifying a person’s preferences for treatment, should he or she lose capacity to make such decisions in the future. They have been used in end-of-life settings to direct care but should be well suited to the mental health setting. Objectives To examine the effects of advance treatment directives for people with severe mental illness. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Schizophrenia Group’s Register (February 2008), the Cochrane Library (Issue 1 2008), BIOSIS (1985 to February 2008), CINAHL (1982 to February 2008), EMBASE (1980 to February 2008), MEDLINE (1966 to February 2008), PsycINFO (1872 to February 2008), as well as SCISEARCH and Google - Internet search engine (February 2008). We inspected relevant references and contacted first authors of included studies. We updated this search on 17 May 2012 and added the results to the awaiting classification section of the review. Selection criteria We included all randomised controlled trials (RCTs), involving adults with severe mental illness, comparing any form of advance directive with standard care for health service and clinical outcomes. Data collection and analysis We extracted data independently. For homogenous dichotomous data we calculated fixed-effect relative risk (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) on an intention-to-treat basis. For continuous data, we calculated weighted mean differences (WMD) and their 95% confidence interval again using a fixed-effect model. Main results We were able to include two trials involving 321 people with severe mental illnesses. There was no significant difference in hospital admission (n=160, 1 RCT, RR 0.69 0.5 to 1.0), or number of psychiatric outpatient attendances between participants given advanced treatment directives or usual care. Similarly, no significant differences were found for compliance with treatment, self harm or number of arrests. Participants given advanced treatment directives needed less use of

  8. A direct advance on advance directives.

    PubMed

    Shaw, David

    2012-06-01

    Advance directives (ADs), which are also sometimes referred to as 'living wills', are statements made by a person that indicate what treatment she should not be given in the event that she is not competent to consent or refuse at the future moment in question. As such, ADs provide a way for patients to make decisions in advance about what treatments they do not want to receive, without doctors having to find proxy decision-makers or having recourse to the doctrine of necessity. While patients can request particular treatments in an AD, only refusals are binding. This paper will examine whether ADs safeguard the autonomy and best interests of the incompetent patient, and whether legislating for the use of ADs is justified, using the specific context of the legal situation in the United Kingdom to illustrate the debate. The issue of whether the law should permit ADs is itself dependent on the issue of whether ADs are ethically justified; thus we must answer a normative question in order to answer the legislative one. It emerges that ADs suffer from two major problems, one related to autonomy and one to consent. First, ADs' emphasis on precedent autonomy effectively sentences some people who want to live to death. Second, many ADs might not meet the standard criteria for informed refusal of treatment, because they fail on the crucial criterion of sufficient information. Ultimately, it transpires that ADs are typically only appropriate for patients who temporarily lose physical or mental capacity. PMID:21133977

  9. Recruit and ADVANCE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosser, Sue V.

    2007-04-01

    Beginning in 2001, the National Science Foundation launched the ADVANCE Initiative, which has now awarded more than 70 million to some thirty institutions for transformations to advance women. Results of studies on how to attract and retain women students and faculty underpinned our ADVANCE Institutional Transformation grant funded by the NSF for 3.7 million for five years, beginning in 2001. As co-principal investigator on this grant, I insured that this research informed the five major threads of the grant: 1) Four termed ADVANCE professors to mentor junior women faculty in each college; 2) Collection of MIT-Report-like data indicators to assess whether advancement of women really occurs during and after the institutional transformation undertaken through ADVANCE; 3) Family-friendly policies and practices to stop the tenure clock and provide active service, modified duties, lactation stations and day care; 4) Mini-retreats to facilitate access for tenure-track women faculty to male decision-makers and administrators for informal conversations and discussion on topics important to women faculty; 5) Removal of subtle gender, racial, and other biases in promotion and tenure. The dynamic changes resulting from the grant in quality of mentoring, new understanding of promotion and tenure, numbers of women retained and given endowed chairs, and emergence of new family friendly policies gave me hope for genuine diversification of leadership in science and technology. As the grant funding ends, the absence of NSF prestige and monitoring, coupled with a change in academic leadership at the top, provide new challenges for institutionalization, recruitment, and advancement of women into leadership positions in science and engineering.

  10. Molecular study of insoluble organic matter in Kainsaz CO3 carbonaceous chondrite: Comparison with CI and CM IOM .

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remusat, L.; Le Guillou, C.; Rouzaud, J.-N.; Binet, L.; Derenne, S.; Robert, F.

    2008-10-01

    Kainsaz CO3 insoluble organic matter (IOM) was studied using Curie point pyrolysis, electronic paramagnetic resonance (EPR), and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) to determine the effect of thermal metamorphism on molecular chondritic fingerprints. Pyrolysis released a very low amount of products that consist of one- and two-ring aromatic units with methyl, dimethyl, and ethyl substituents. Moreover, Kainsaz IOM contains two orders of magnitude fewer radicals than Orgueil, Murchison, and Tagish Lake IOM. In addition, no diradicaloids were found in Kainsaz, although they are thought to constitute a specific signature for weakly organized extraterrestrial organic compounds in contrast to terrestrial ones. HRTEM reveals a very heterogeneous structure, with microporous disordered carbon, mesoporous graphitic carbons and graphite. Graphitization likely occurs and explains the differences between Kainsaz and CI or CM IOM. Heating stress experienced by Kainsaz IOM, on the parent body and/or prior its accretion, is likely responsible for the differences in molecular and structural organizations compared with those of CI and CM IOM.

  11. Study of the electrochemical oxidation and reduction of C.I. Reactive Orange 4 in sodium sulphate alkaline solutions.

    PubMed

    del Río, A I; Molina, J; Bonastre, J; Cases, F

    2009-12-15

    Synthetic solutions of hydrolysed C.I. Reactive Orange 4, a monoazo textile dye commercially named Procion Orange MX-2R (PMX2R) and colour index number C.I. 18260, was exposed to electrochemical treatment under galvanostatic conditions and Na2SO4 as electrolyte. The influence of the electrochemical process as well as the applied current density was evaluated. Ti/SnO2-Sb-Pt and stainless steel electrodes were used as anode and cathode, respectively, and the intermediates generated on the cathode during electrochemical reduction were investigated. Aliquots of the solutions treated were analysed by UV-visible and FTIR-ATR spectroscopy confirming the presence of aromatic structures in solution when an electro-reduction was carried out. Electro-oxidation degraded both the azo group and aromatic structures. HPLC measures revealed that all processes followed pseudo-first order kinetics and decolourisation rates showed a considerable dependency on the applied current density. CV experiments and XPS analyses were carried out to study the behaviour of both PMX2R and intermediates and to analyse the state of the cathode after the electrochemical reduction, respectively. It was observed the presence of a main intermediate in solution after an electrochemical reduction whose chemical structure is similar to 2-amino-1,5-naphthalenedisulphonic acid. Moreover, the analysis of the cathode surface after electrochemical reduction reveals the presence of a coating layer with organic nature. PMID:19647934

  12. Metamorphosed CM and CI Carbonaceous Chondrites Could Be from the Breakup of the Same Earth-crossing Asteroid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zolensky, Michael; Abell, Paul; Tonui, Eric

    2005-01-01

    Far from being the relatively unprocessed materials they were once believed to be, we now know that a significant number of carbonaceous chondrites were thermally metamorphosed on their parent asteroid(s). Numerous studies indicate that 7 "CM" and 2 "CI" chondrites have been naturally heated, variously, at from 400 to over 700 C on their parent asteroid(s). Petrographic textures reveal that this thermal metamorphism occurred after the dominant aqueous alteration phase, although some meteorites show evidence of a heating event between two aqueous alteration episodes, i.e. pro- and retrograde aqueous alteration. Aside from the issues of the identification of the transient heat source, timing of metamorphism, and the relation of these materials (if any) to conventional CM and CI chondrites, there is also a mystery related to their recovery. All of these meteorites have been recovered from the Antarctic; none are falls or finds from anyplace else. Indeed, the majority have been collected by the Japanese NIPR field parties in the Yamato Mountains. In fact, one estimate is that these meteorites account for approx. 64 wt% of the CM carbonaceous chondrites at the NIPR. The reasons for this are unclear and might be due in part to simple sampling bias. However we suggest that this recovery difference is related to the particular age of the Yamato Mountains meteorite recovery surfaces, and differences in meteoroid fluxes between the Yamato meteorites and recent falls and substantially older Antarctic meteorites. Additional information is included in the original extended abstract.

  13. The CAM/IMPACT/CoCiP Coupled Climate Model: Radiative forcing by aircraft in large-scale clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penner, J. E.; Schumann, U.; Chen, Y.; Zhou, C.; Graf, K.

    2013-12-01

    Radiative forcing by aircraft soot in large-scale clouds has been estimated to be both positive and negative, while forcing by contrails and contrail cirrus (i.e. spreading contrails) is positive. Here we use an improved model to estimate the forcing in large-scale clouds and evaluate the effects of coupling the hydrological cycle within CAM with the CoCiP contrail model. The large-scale cloud effects assume that the fraction of soot particles that have been processed through contrails are good heterogeneous ice nuclei (IN), in agreement with laboratory data. We explore the effect of sulfate deposition on soot in decreasing the ability of contrail-processed soot to act as IN. The calculated total all-sky radiative climate forcing with and without coupling of CoCiP to the hydrological cycle within CAM and its range is reported. We compare results with observations and discuss what is needed to narrow the range of forcing.

  14. CiMT-1, an unusual chordate metallothionein gene in Ciona intestinalis genome: structure and expression studies.

    PubMed

    Franchi, Nicola; Boldrin, Francesco; Ballarin, Loriano; Piccinni, Ester

    2011-02-01

    The present article reports on the characterization of the urochordate metallothionein (MT) gene, CiMT-1, from the solitary ascidian Ciona intestinalis. The predicted protein is shorter than other known deuterostome MTs, having only 39 amino acids. The gene has the same tripartite structure as vertebrate MTs, with some features resembling those of echinoderm MTs. The promoter region shows the canonical cis-acting elements recognized by transcription factors that respond to metal, ROS, and cytokines. Unusual sequences, described in fish and echinoderms, are also present. In situ hybridization suggests that only a population of hemocytes involved in immune responses, i.e. granular amebocytes, express CiMT-1 mRNA. These observations support the idea that urochordates perform detoxification through hemocytes, and that MTs may play important roles in inflammatory humoral responses in tunicates. The reported data offer new clues for better understanding the evolution of these multivalent proteins from non-vertebrate to vertebrate chordates and reinforce their functions in detoxification and immunity. PMID:21328559

  15. A Microscopic Capacitor Model of Voltage Coupling in Membrane Proteins: Gating Charge Fluctuations in Ci-VSD.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ilsoo; Warshel, Arieh

    2016-01-28

    The voltage sensitivity of membrane proteins is reflected in the response of the voltage sensing domains (VSDs) to the changes in membrane potential. This response is implicated in the displacement of positively charged residues, associated with the conformational changes of VSDs. The displaced charges generate nonlinear (i.e., voltage-dependent) capacitance current called the gating current (and its corresponding gating charge), which is a key experimental quantity that characterizes voltage activation in VSMP. However, the relevant theoretical/computational approaches, aimed to correlate the structural information on VSMP to electrophysiological measurements, have been rather limited, posing a broad challenge in computer simulations of VSMP. Concomitant with the development of our coarse-graining (CG) model of voltage coupling, we apply our theoretical framework for the treatments of voltage effects in membrane proteins to modeling the VSMP activation, taking the VSDs (Ci-VSD) derived from the Ciona intestinalis voltage sensitive phosphatase (Ci-VSP) as a model system. Our CG model reproduces the observed gating charge of Ci-VSD activation in several different perspectives. In particular, a new closed-form expression of the gating charge is evaluated in both nonequilibrium and equilibrium ways, while considering the fluctuation-dissipation relation that connects a nonequilibrium measurement of the gating charge to an equilibrium measurement of charge fluctuations (i.e., the voltage-independent linear component of membrane capacitance). In turn, the expression uncovers a novel link that connects an equilibrium measurement of the voltage-independent linear capacitance to a nonequilibrium measurement of the voltage-dependent nonlinear capacitance (whose integral over voltage is equal to the gating charge). In addition, our CG model yields capacitor-like voltage dependent free energy parabolas, resulting in the free energy difference and the free energy barrier for

  16. Advanced access appointments

    PubMed Central

    Hudec, John C.; MacDougall, Steven; Rankin, Elaine

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To examine the effects of advanced access (same-day physician appointments) on patient and provider satisfaction and to determine its association with other variables such as physician income and patient emergency department use. DESIGN Patient satisfaction survey and semistructured interviews with physicians and support staff; analysis of physician medical insurance billings and patient emergency department visits. SETTING Cape Breton, NS. PARTICIPANTS Patients, physicians, and support staff of 3 comparable family physician practices that had not implemented advanced access and an established advanced access practice. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Self-reported provider and patient satisfaction, physician office income, and patients’ emergency department use. RESULTS The key benefits of implementation of advanced access were an increase in provider and patient satisfaction levels, same or greater physician office income, and fewer less urgent (triage level 4) and nonurgent (triage level 5) emergency department visits by patients. CONCLUSION Currently within the Central Cape Breton Region, 33% of patients wait 4 or more days for urgent appointments. Findings from this study can be used to enhance primary care physician practice redesign. This research supports many benefits of transitioning to an advanced access model of patient booking. PMID:20944024

  17. Correspondence between neurophysiological and clinical measurements of chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy: secondary analysis of data from the CI-PeriNoms study

    PubMed Central

    Griffith, Kathleen A.; Dorsey, Susan G.; Renn, Cynthia L.; Zhu, Shijun; Johantgen, Mary E.; Cornblath, David R.; Argyriou, Andreas A.; Cavaletti, Guido; Merkies, Ingemar S. J.; Alberti, Paola; Postma, Tjeerd J.; Rossi, Emanuela; Frigeni, Barbara; Bruna, Jordi; Velasco, Roser; Kalofonos, Haralabos P.; Psimaras, Dimitri; Ricard, Damien; Pace, Andrea; Galie, Edvina; Briani, Chiara; Torre, Chiara Dalla; Faber, Catharina G.; Lalisang, Roy I.; Boogerd, Willem; Brandsma, Dieta; Koeppen, Susanne; Hense, Joerg; Storey, Dawn J.; Kerrigan, Simon; Schenone, Angelo; Fabbri, Sabrina; Valsecchi, Maria Grazia

    2014-01-01

    Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) lacks standardized clinical measurement. The objective of the current secondary analysis was to examine data from the CIPN Outcomes Standardization (CI-PeriNomS) study for associations between clinical examinations and neurophysiological abnormalities. Logistic regression estimated the strength of associations of vibration, pin, and monofilament examinations with lower limb sensory and motor amplitudes. Examinations were classified as normal (0), moderately abnormal (1), or severely abnormal (2). Among 218 participants, those with class 1 upper extremity (UE) and class 1 or 2 lower extremity (LE) monofilament abnormality were 2.79 (95%CI: 1.28-6.07), 3.49 (95%CI: 1.61-7.55) and 4.42 (95%CI: 1.35-14.46) times more likely to have abnormal sural nerve amplitudes, respectively, compared to individuals with normal examinations. Likewise, those with class 2 UE and class 1 or 2 LE vibration abnormality were 8.65 (95%CI: 1.81-41.42), 2.54 (95%CI: 1.19-5.41) and 7.47 (95%CI: 2.49-22.40) times more likely to have abnormal sural nerve amplitudes, respectively, compared to participants with normal examinations. Abnormalities in vibration and monofilament examinations are associated with abnormal sural nerve amplitudes and are useful in identifying CIPN. PMID:24814100

  18. Correspondence between neurophysiological and clinical measurements of chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy: secondary analysis of data from the CI-PeriNomS study.

    PubMed

    Griffith, Kathleen A; Dorsey, Susan G; Renn, Cynthia L; Zhu, Shijun; Johantgen, Mary E; Cornblath, David R; Argyriou, Andreas A; Cavaletti, Guido; Merkies, Ingemar S J; Alberti, Paola; Postma, Tjeerd J; Rossi, Emanuela; Frigeni, Barbara; Bruna, Jordi; Velasco, Roser; Kalofonos, Haralabos P; Psimaras, Dimitri; Ricard, Damien; Pace, Andrea; Galie, Edvina; Briani, Chiara; Dalla Torre, Chiara; Faber, Catharina G; Lalisang, Roy I; Boogerd, Willem; Brandsma, Dieta; Koeppen, Susanne; Hense, Joerg; Storey, Dawn J; Kerrigan, Simon; Schenone, Angelo; Fabbri, Sabrina; Valsecchi, Maria Grazia

    2014-06-01

    Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) lacks standardized clinical measurement. The objective of the current secondary analysis was to examine data from the CIPN Outcomes Standardization (CI-PeriNomS) study for associations between clinical examinations and neurophysiological abnormalities. Logistic regression estimated the strength of associations of vibration, pin, and monofilament examinations with lower limb sensory and motor amplitudes. Examinations were classified as normal (0), moderately abnormal (1), or severely abnormal (2). Among 218 participants, those with class 1 upper extremity (UE) and classes 1 or 2 lower extremity (LE) monofilament abnormality were 2.79 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.28-6.07), 3.49 (95%CI: 1.61-7.55), and 4.42 (95%CI: 1.35-14.46) times more likely to have abnormal sural nerve amplitudes, respectively, compared to individuals with normal examinations. Likewise, those with class 2 UE and classes 1 or 2 LE vibration abnormality were 8.65 (95%CI: 1.81-41.42), 2.54 (95%CI: 1.19-5.41), and 7.47 (95%CI: 2.49-22.40) times more likely to have abnormal sural nerve amplitudes, respectively, compared to participants with normal examinations. Abnormalities in vibration and monofilament examinations are associated with abnormal sural nerve amplitudes and are useful in identifying CIPN. PMID:24814100

  19. Advanced Hydrogen Turbine Development

    SciTech Connect

    Marra, John

    2015-09-30

    Under the sponsorship of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratories, Siemens has completed the Advanced Hydrogen Turbine Development Program to develop an advanced gas turbine for incorporation into future coal-based Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) plants. All the scheduled DOE Milestones were completed and significant technical progress was made in the development of new technologies and concepts. Advanced computer simulations and modeling, as well as subscale, full scale laboratory, rig and engine testing were utilized to evaluate and select concepts for further development. Program Requirements of: A 3 to 5 percentage point improvement in overall plant combined cycle efficiency when compared to the reference baseline plant; 20 to 30 percent reduction in overall plant capital cost when compared to the reference baseline plant; and NOx emissions of 2 PPM out of the stack. were all met. The program was completed on schedule and within the allotted budget

  20. Advanced thermionic energy conversion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Britt, E. J.; Fitzpatrick, G. D.; Hansen, L. K.; Rasor, N. S.

    1974-01-01

    Basic analytical and experimental exploration was conducted on several types of advanced thermionic energy converters, and preliminary analysis was performed on systems utilizing advanced converter performance. The Pt--Nb cylindrical diode which exhibited a suppressed arc drop, as described in the preceding report, was reassembled and the existence of the postulated hydrid mode of operation was tentatively confirmed. Initial data obtained on ignited and unignited triode operation in the demountable cesium vapor system essentially confirmed the design principles developed in earlier work, with a few exceptions. Three specific advanced converter concepts were selected as candidates for concentrated basic study and for practical evaluation in fixed-configuration converters. Test vehicles and test stands for these converters and a unique controlled-atmosphere station for converter assembly and processing were designed, and procurement was initiated.

  1. Advanced transmission studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coy, John J.; Bill, Robert C.

    1988-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center and the U.S. Army Aviation Systems Command share an interest in advancing the technology for helicopter propulsion systems. In particular, this paper presents highlights from that portion of the program in drive train technology and the related mechanical components. The major goals of the program are to increase the life, reliability, and maintainability; reduce the weight, noise, and vibration; and maintain the relatively high mechanical efficiency of the gear train. The current activity emphasizes noise reduction technology and analytical code development followed by experimental verification. Selected significant advances in technology for transmissions are reviewed, including advanced configurations and new analytical tools. Finally, the plan for future transmission research is presented.

  2. Advanced rocket propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Obrien, Charles J.

    1993-01-01

    Existing NASA research contracts are supporting development of advanced reinforced polymer and metal matrix composites for use in liquid rocket engines of the future. Advanced rocket propulsion concepts, such as modular platelet engines, dual-fuel dual-expander engines, and variable mixture ratio engines, require advanced materials and structures to reduce overall vehicle weight as well as address specific propulsion system problems related to elevated operating temperatures, new engine components, and unique operating processes. High performance propulsion systems with improved manufacturability and maintainability are needed for single stage to orbit vehicles and other high performance mission applications. One way to satisfy these needs is to develop a small engine which can be clustered in modules to provide required levels of total thrust. This approach should reduce development schedule and cost requirements by lowering hardware lead times and permitting the use of existing test facilities. Modular engines should also reduce operational costs associated with maintenance and parts inventories.

  3. Advanced Aerodynamic Control Effectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Richard M.; Bauer, Steven X. S.

    1999-01-01

    A 1990 research program that focused on the development of advanced aerodynamic control effectors (AACE) for military aircraft has been reviewed and summarized. Data are presented for advanced planform, flow control, and surface contouring technologies. The data show significant increases in lift, reductions in drag, and increased control power, compared to typical aerodynamic designs. The results presented also highlighted the importance of planform selection in the design of a control effector suite. Planform data showed that dramatic increases in lift (greater than 25%) can be achieved with multiple wings and a sawtooth forebody. Passive porosity and micro drag generator control effector data showed control power levels exceeding that available from typical effectors (moving surfaces). Application of an advanced planform to a tailless concept showed benefits of similar magnitude as those observed in the generic studies.

  4. Advanced rocket propulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obrien, Charles J.

    1993-02-01

    Existing NASA research contracts are supporting development of advanced reinforced polymer and metal matrix composites for use in liquid rocket engines of the future. Advanced rocket propulsion concepts, such as modular platelet engines, dual-fuel dual-expander engines, and variable mixture ratio engines, require advanced materials and structures to reduce overall vehicle weight as well as address specific propulsion system problems related to elevated operating temperatures, new engine components, and unique operating processes. High performance propulsion systems with improved manufacturability and maintainability are needed for single stage to orbit vehicles and other high performance mission applications. One way to satisfy these needs is to develop a small engine which can be clustered in modules to provide required levels of total thrust. This approach should reduce development schedule and cost requirements by lowering hardware lead times and permitting the use of existing test facilities. Modular engines should also reduce operational costs associated with maintenance and parts inventories.

  5. Cascaded humidified advanced turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Nakhamkin, M.; Swenson, E.C.; Cohn, A.; Bradshaw, D.; Taylor, R.; Wilson, J.M.; Gaul, G.; Jahnke, F.; Polsky, M.

    1995-05-01

    This article describes how, by combining the best features of simple- and combined-cycle gas turbine power plants, the CHAT cycle concept offers power producers a clean, more efficient and less expensive alternative to both. The patented cascaded advanced turbine and its cascaded humidified advanced turbine (CHAT) derivative offer utilities and other power producers a practical advanced gas turbine power plant by combining commercially-available gas turbine and industrial compressor technologies in a unique way. Compared to combined-cycle plants, a CHAT power plant has lower emissions and specific capital costs-approximately 20 percent lower than what is presently available. Further, CHAT`s operating characteristics are especially well-suited to load following quick start-up scenarios and they are less susceptible to power degradation from higher ambient air temperature conditions.

  6. Advanced Worker Protection System

    SciTech Connect

    1996-04-01

    The Advanced Worker Protection System (AWPS) is a liquid-air-based, self-contained breathing and cooling system with a duration of 2 hrs. AWPS employs a patented system developed by Oceaneering Space Systems (OSS), and was demonstrated at their facility in Houston, TX as well as at Kansas State University, Manhattan. The heart of the system is the life-support backpack that uses liquid air to provide cooling as well as breathing gas to the worker. The backpack is combined with advanced protective garments, an advanced liquid cooling garment (LCG), a respirator, and communications and support equipment. The prototype unit development and testing under Phase 1 has demonstrated that AWPS has the ability to meet performance criteria. These criteria were developed with an understanding of both the AWPS capabilities and the DOE decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) activities protection needs.

  7. Advanced ramjet concepts program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leingang, J. L.

    1992-01-01

    Uniquely advantageous features, on both the performance and weight sides of the ledger, can be achieved through synergistic design integration of airbreathing and rocket technologies in the development of advanced orbital space transport propulsion systems of the combined cycle type. In the context of well understood advanced airbreathing and liquid rocket propulsion principles and practices, this precept of synergism is advanced mainly through six rather specific examples. These range from the detailed component level to the overall vehicle system level as follows: using jet compression; achieving a high area ratio rocket nozzle; ameliorating gas generator cycle rocket system deficiencies; using the in-duct special rocket thrust chamber assembly as the principal scramjet fuel injection operation; using the unstowed, covered fan as a duct closure for effecting high area ratio rocket mode operation; and creating a unique airbreathing rocket system via the onboard, cryogenic hydrogen induced air liquefaction process.

  8. Commercialization of advanced batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Mader, J.

    1996-11-01

    Mader and Associates has been working as a contractor for the South Coast Air Quality Management District (District) for the past several years. During this period it has performed various assessments of advanced battery technology as well as established the Advanced Battery Task Force. The following paper is Mader`s view of the status of battery technologies that are competing for the electric vehicle (EV) market being established by the California Air Resources Board`s Zero Emission Vehicle (ZEV) Mandate. The ZEV market is being competed for by various advanced battery technologies. And, given the likelihood of modifications to the Mandate, the most promising technologies should capture the following market share during the initial 10 years: Lead-Acid--8.4%, Nickel Metal Hydride--50.8%, Sodium Sulfur--7.8%, Lithium Ion 33.0%.

  9. The Advanced LIGO Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritschel, Peter

    2016-03-01

    After decades of development, the Advanced LIGO gravitational wave detectors are now operating, and they completed their first observational run in early 2016. Advanced LIGO consists of two 4-km scale interferometric detectors located at separate sites in the US. The first year of detector commissioning that led to the first observation run produced instruments that have several times better sensitivity to gravitational-wave strain than previous instruments. At their final design sensitivity, the detectors will be another factor of 2-3x more sensitive than current performance. This talk will cover the design of Advanced LIGO, explain how the sensitivity improvements have been achieved, and lay out the path to reaching final design sensitivity.

  10. [Advanced Composites Technology Initiatives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Julian, Mark R.

    2002-01-01

    This final report closes out the W02 NASA Grant #NCC5-646. The FY02 grant for advanced technology initiatives through the Advanced Composites Technology Institute in Bridgeport, WV, at the Robert C. Byrd Institute (RCBI) Bridgeport Manufacturing Technology Center, is complete; all funding has been expended. RCBI continued to expand access to technology; develop and implement a workforce-training curriculum; improve material development; and provide prototyping and demonstrations of new and advanced composites technologies for West Virginia composites firms. The FY 02 efforts supported workforce development, technical training and the HST development effort of a super-lightweight composite carrier prototype and expanded the existing technical capabilities of the growing aerospace industry across West Virginia to provide additional support for NASA missions. Additionally, the Composites Technology and Training Center was awarded IS0 9001 - 2000 certification and Cleanroom Class 1000 certification during this report period.

  11. Advanced fuel chemistry for advanced engines.

    SciTech Connect

    Taatjes, Craig A.; Jusinski, Leonard E.; Zador, Judit; Fernandes, Ravi X.; Miller, James A.

    2009-09-01

    Autoignition chemistry is central to predictive modeling of many advanced engine designs that combine high efficiency and low inherent pollutant emissions. This chemistry, and especially its pressure dependence, is poorly known for fuels derived from heavy petroleum and for biofuels, both of which are becoming increasingly prominent in the nation's fuel stream. We have investigated the pressure dependence of key ignition reactions for a series of molecules representative of non-traditional and alternative fuels. These investigations combined experimental characterization of hydroxyl radical production in well-controlled photolytically initiated oxidation and a hybrid modeling strategy that linked detailed quantum chemistry and computational kinetics of critical reactions with rate-equation models of the global chemical system. Comprehensive mechanisms for autoignition generally ignore the pressure dependence of branching fractions in the important alkyl + O{sub 2} reaction systems; however we have demonstrated that pressure-dependent 'formally direct' pathways persist at in-cylinder pressures.

  12. Structures and vibration spectra of the Ci and C2 conformers of gauche,Trans,trans,Trans, gauche-octa-1,3,5,7-tetraene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panchenko, Yurii N.; Abramenkov, Alexander V.

    2016-03-01

    The recent vibrational analysis of the experimental IR spectra of the non-planar gauche,Trans,trans,Trans,gauche possible rotational isomers of octa-1,3,5,7-tetraene (Ci and C2) is reconsidered. Calculations of the vibrational frequencies of the non-planar Ci and C2 conformers of C8H10 and C8D10 are performed. Some of the calculated vibrational frequencies of the non-planar Ci conformer are reassigned. Comparison of the IR experimental frequencies with the calculated frequencies for the two non-planar conformers suggests that all experimental bands belong to the non-planar C2 conformer.

  13. Advanced Solar Power Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atkinson, J. H.; Hobgood, J. M.

    1984-01-01

    The Advanced Solar Power System (ASPS) concentrator uses a technically sophisticated design and extensive tooling to produce very efficient (80 to 90%) and versatile energy supply equipment which is inexpensive to manufacture and requires little maintenance. The advanced optical design has two 10th order, generalized aspheric surfaces in a Cassegrainian configuration which gives outstanding performance and is relatively insensitive to temperature changes and wind loading. Manufacturing tolerances also have been achieved. The key to the ASPS is the direct absorption of concentrated sunlight in the working fluid by radiative transfers in a black body cavity. The basic ASPS design concepts, efficiency, optical system, and tracking and focusing controls are described.

  14. Advanced Containment System

    DOEpatents

    Kostelnik, Kevin M.; Kawamura, Hideki; Richardson, John G.; Noda, Masaru

    2005-02-08

    An advanced containment system for containing buried waste and associated leachate. The advanced containment system comprises a plurality of casing sections with each casing section interlocked to an adjacent casing section. Each casing section includes a complementary interlocking structure that interlocks with the complementary interlocking structure on an adjacent casing section. A barrier filler substantially fills the casing sections and may substantially fill the spaces of the complementary interlocking structure to form a substantially impermeable barrier. Some of the casing sections may include sensors so that the casing sections and the zone of interest may be remotely monitored after the casing sections are emplaced in the ground.

  15. MR Neurography: Advances

    PubMed Central

    Chhabra, Avneesh; Zhao, Lianxin; Carrino, John A.; Trueblood, Eo; Koceski, Saso; Shteriev, Filip; Lenkinski, Lionel; Sinclair, Christopher D. J.; Andreisek, Gustav

    2013-01-01

    High resolution and high field magnetic resonance neurography (MR neurography, MRN) is shown to have excellent anatomic capability. There have been considerable advances in the technology in the last few years leading to various feasibility studies using different structural and functional imaging approaches in both clinical and research settings. This paper is intended to be a useful seminar for readers who want to gain knowledge of the advancements in the MRN pulse sequences currently used in clinical practice as well as learn about the other techniques on the horizon aimed at better depiction of nerve anatomy, pathology, and potential noninvasive evaluation of nerve degeneration or regeneration. PMID:23589774

  16. Advanced engine study program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masters, A. I.; Galler, D. E.; Denman, T. F.; Shied, R. A.; Black, J. R.; Fierstein, A. R.; Clark, G. L.; Branstrom, B. R.

    1993-01-01

    A design and analysis study was conducted to provide advanced engine descriptions and parametric data for space transfer vehicles. The study was based on an advanced oxygen/hydrogen engine in the 7,500 to 50,000 lbf thrust range. Emphasis was placed on defining requirements for high-performance engines capable of achieving reliable and versatile operation in a space environment. Four variations on the expander cycle were compared, and the advantages and disadvantages of each were assessed. Parametric weight, envelope, and performance data were generated over a range of 7,500 to 50,000 lb thrust and a wide range of chamber pressure and nozzle expansion ratio.

  17. Advanced concepts for acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Keefe, D.

    1986-07-01

    Selected examples of advanced accelerator concepts are reviewed. Such plasma accelerators as plasma beat wave accelerator, plasma wake field accelerator, and plasma grating accelerator are discussed particularly as examples of concepts for accelerating relativistic electrons or positrons. Also covered are the pulsed electron-beam, pulsed laser accelerator, inverse Cherenkov accelerator, inverse free-electron laser, switched radial-line accelerators, and two-beam accelerator. Advanced concepts for ion acceleration discussed include the electron ring accelerator, excitation of waves on intense electron beams, and two-wave combinations. (LEW)

  18. Avionics advanced development strategy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyer, D.

    1990-01-01

    Discussed here is the problem of how to put together an integrated, phased, and affordable avionics advanced development program that links and applies to operational, evolving, and developing programs/vehicles, as well as those in the planning phases. Collecting technology needs from individual programs/vehicles and proposed technology items from individual developers usually results in a mismatch and something that is unaffordable. A strategy to address this problem is outlined with task definitions which will lead to avionics advanced development items that will fit within an overall framework, prioritized to support budgeting, and support the scope of NASA space transportations needs.

  19. Advances in attosecond science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calegari, Francesca; Sansone, Giuseppe; Stagira, Salvatore; Vozzi, Caterina; Nisoli, Mauro

    2016-03-01

    Attosecond science offers formidable tools for the investigation of electronic processes at the heart of important physical processes in atomic, molecular and solid-state physics. In the last 15 years impressive advances have been obtained from both the experimental and theoretical points of view. Attosecond pulses, in the form of isolated pulses or of trains of pulses, are now routinely available in various laboratories. In this review recent advances in attosecond science are reported and important applications are discussed. After a brief presentation of various techniques that can be employed for the generation and diagnosis of sub-femtosecond pulses, various applications are reported in atomic, molecular and condensed-matter physics.

  20. Technological advances in teleradiology.

    PubMed

    Orphanoudakis, S C; Kaldoudi, E; Tsiknakis, M

    1996-06-01

    Teleradiology consists of a set of added-value telematic services, implemented over an advanced telecommunications infrastructure and supported by different information technologies and related applications. The main goal of teleradiology is to provide different levels of support for remote diagnostic imaging procedures. This paper considers technological advances in this important area, including a discussion of the various added-value telematic services, applications supporting these services, and the required information technology and telecommunications infrastructure. Teleradiology is also considered in the general context of an integrated regional health telematics network, emphasizing its role and its interaction with other information and networking services. PMID:8832235