Science.gov

Sample records for advanced bionics ci

  1. Evaluation of Advanced Bionics high resolution mode.

    PubMed

    Buechner, Andreas; Frohne-Buechner, Carolin; Gaertner, Lutz; Lesinski-Schiedat, Anke; Battmer, Rolf-Dieter; Lenarz, Thomas

    2006-07-01

    The objective of this paper is to evaluate the advantages of the Advanced Bionic high resolution mode for speech perception, through a retrospective analysis. Forty-five adult subjects were selected who had a minimum experience of three months' standard mode (mean of 10 months) before switching to high resolution mode. Speech perception was tested in standard mode immediately before fitting with high resolution mode, and again after a maximum of six months high resolution mode usage (mean of two months). A significant improvement was found, between 11 and 17%, depending on the test material. The standard mode preference does not give any indication about the improvement when switching to high resolution. Users who are converted within any study achieve a higher performance improvement than those converted in the clinical routine. This analysis proves the significant benefits of high resolution mode for users, and also indicates the need for guidelines for individual optimization of parameter settings in a high resolution mode program.

  2. Bionic Nanosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sebastian Mannoor, Manu

    Direct multidimensional integration of functional electronics and mechanical elements with viable biological systems could allow for the creation of bionic systems and devices possessing unique and advanced capabilities. For example, the ability to three dimensionally integrate functional electronic and mechanical components with biological cells and tissue could enable the creation of bionic systems that can have tremendous impact in regenerative medicine, prosthetics, and human-machine interfaces. However, as a consequence of the inherent dichotomy in material properties and limitations of conventional fabrication methods, the attainment of truly seamless integration of electronic and/or mechanical components with biological systems has been challenging. Nanomaterials engineering offers a general route for overcoming these dichotomies, primarily due to the existence of a dimensional compatibility between fundamental biological functional units and abiotic nanomaterial building blocks. One area of compelling interest for bionic systems is in the field of biomedical sensing, where the direct interfacing of nanosensors onto biological tissue or the human body could stimulate exciting opportunities such as on-body health quality monitoring and adaptive threat detection. Further, interfacing of antimicrobial peptide based bioselective probes onto the bionic nanosensors could offer abilities to detect pathogenic bacteria with bio-inspired selectivity. Most compellingly, when paired with additive manufacturing techniques such as 3D printing, these characteristics enable three dimensional integration and merging of a variety of functional materials including electronic, structural and biomaterials with viable biological cells, in the precise anatomic geometries of human organs, to form three dimensionally integrated, multi-functional bionic hybrids and cyborg devices with unique capabilities. In this thesis, we illustrate these approaches using three representative

  3. Coming Soon: The Bionic Man

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodard, Colin

    2006-01-01

    This article describes the latest advancement in the development of prosthetic arms. Bionic researchers are making significant advances in creating more agile prosthetics that users can control via their own nervous system. The bionic arm, which is still under development, can not only execute complex, thought-controlled movements, but also can…

  4. Cochlear bionic acoustic metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Fuyin; Wu, Jiu Hui; Huang, Meng; Fu, Gang; Bai, Changan

    2014-11-01

    A design of bionic acoustic metamaterial and acoustic functional devices was proposed by employing the mammalian cochlear as a prototype. First, combined with the experimental data in previous literatures, it is pointed out that the cochlear hair cells and stereocilia cluster are a kind of natural biological acoustic metamaterials with the negative stiffness characteristics. Then, to design the acoustic functional devices conveniently in engineering application, a simplified parametric helical structure was proposed to replace actual irregular cochlea for bionic design, and based on the computational results of such a bionic parametric helical structure, it is suggested that the overall cochlear is a local resonant system with the negative dynamic effective mass characteristics. There are many potential applications in the bandboard energy recovery device, cochlear implant, and acoustic black hole.

  5. Regenerative Engineering and Bionic Limbs

    PubMed Central

    James, Roshan; Laurencin, Cato T.

    2015-01-01

    Amputations of the upper extremity are severely debilitating, current treatments support very basic limb movement, and patients undergo extensive physiotherapy and psychological counselling. There is no prosthesis that allows the amputees near-normal function. With increasing number of amputees due to injuries sustained in accidents, natural calamities and international conflicts, there is a growing requirement for novel strategies and new discoveries. Advances have been made in technological, material and in prosthesis integration where researchers are now exploring artificial prosthesis that integrate with the residual tissues and function based on signal impulses received from the residual nerves. Efforts are focused on challenging experts in different disciplines to integrate ideas and technologies to allow for the regeneration of injured tissues, recording on tissue signals and feed-back to facilitate responsive movements and gradations of muscle force. A fully functional replacement and regenerative or integrated prosthesis will rely on interface of biological process with robotic systems to allow individual control of movement such as at the elbow, forearm, digits and thumb in the upper extremity. Regenerative engineering focused on the regeneration of complex tissue and organ systems will be realized by the cross-fertilization of advances over the past thirty years in the fields of tissue engineering, nanotechnology, stem cell science, and developmental biology. The convergence of toolboxes crated within each discipline will allow interdisciplinary teams from engineering, science, and medicine to realize new strategies, mergers of disparate technologies, such as biophysics, smart bionics, and the healing power of the mind. Tackling the clinical challenges, interfacing the biological process with bionic technologies, engineering biological control of the electronic systems, and feed-back will be the important goals in regenerative engineering over the next

  6. Removal of C.I. Reactive Red 2 by low pressure UV/chlorine advanced oxidation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qianyuan; Li, Yue; Wang, Wenlong; Wang, Ting; Hu, Hongying

    2016-03-01

    Azo dyes are commonly found as pollutants in wastewater from the textile industry, and can cause environmental problems because of their color and toxicity. The removal of a typical azo dye named C.I. Reactive Red 2 (RR2) during low pressure ultraviolet (UV)/chlorine oxidation was investigated in this study. UV irradiation at 254nm and addition of free chlorine provided much higher removal rates of RR2 and color than UV irradiation or chlorination alone. Increasing the free chlorine dose enhanced the removal efficiency of RR2 and color by UV/chlorine oxidation. Experiments performed with nitrobenzene (NB) or benzoic acid (BA) as scavengers showed that radicals (especially OH) formed during UV/chlorine oxidation are important in the RR2 removal. Addition of HCO3(-) and Cl(-) to the RR2 solution did not inhibit the removal of RR2 during UV/chlorine oxidation.

  7. The quest for the bionic arm.

    PubMed

    Hutchinson, Douglas T

    2014-06-01

    The current state of research of upper extremity prosthetic devices is focused on creating a complete prosthesis with full motor and sensory function that will provide amputees with a near-normal human arm. Although advances are being made rapidly, many hurdles remain to be overcome before a functional, so-called bionic arm is a reality. Acquiring signals via nerve or muscle inputs will require either a reliable wireless device or direct wiring through an osseous-integrated implant. The best way to tap into the "knowledge" present in the peripheral nerve is yet to be determined.

  8. [The bionic hand].

    PubMed

    Surke, Carsten; Ducommun Dit Boudry, Pascal; Vögelin, Esther

    2015-08-01

    The loss of the upper extremity implicates a grave insult in the life of the involved person. To compensate for the loss of function different powered prosthetic devices are available. Ever since their first development 70 years ago numerous improvements in terms of size, weight and wearing comfort have been developed, but issues regarding the control of upper extremity prostheses remain. Slow grasping speed, limited grip positions and especially failure to provide a sensory feedback limit the acceptance in patients. Recent developments are aimed to allow a more intuitive control of the prosthetic device and to provide a sensory feedback to the amputee. Targeted reinnervation reassignes existing muscles to different peripheral nerves thereby enabling them to fulfill alternate functions. Implanting electrodes into muscle bellies of the forearm allows a more accurate control of the prosthesis. Promising results are being achieved by implanting nerve electrodes by establishing bilateral communication between patient and prosthesis. The following review summarizes the current developments of bionic prostheses in the upper extremity.

  9. A Bionic Approach to Cardiovascular Regulation: Bionic Arterial Baroreflex System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    micromanometer and by stimulating celiac with the knowledge of system characteristics. succeeded in functionally identifying the native arterial...system was obtained. Similarly we recorded blood pressure while stimulating sympathetic nerves at the celiac ganglia randomly. We A BIONIC APPROACH TO...baroreflex was realized by stimulating the celiac ganglia according to the stimulation command. The stimulation command was calculated by convolving the

  10. Holographic cosmology from BIonic solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sepehri, Alireza; Faizal, Mir; Setare, Mohammad Reza; Ali, Ahmed Farag

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, we will use a BIonic solution for analyzing the holographic cosmology. A BIonic solution is a configuration of a D3-brane and an anti-D3-brane connected by a wormhole, and holographic cosmology is a recent proposal to explain cosmic expansion by using the holographic principle. In our model, a BIonic configuration will be produced by the transition of fundamental black strings. The formation of a BIonic configuration will cause inflation. As the D3-brane moves away from the anti-D3-brane, the wormhole will get annihilated, and the inflation will end with the annihilation of this wormhole. However, it is possible for a D3-brane to collide with an anti-D3-brane. Such a collision will occur if the distance between the D3-brane and the anti-D3-brane reduces, and this will create tachyonic states. We will demonstrate that these tachyonic states will lead to the formation of a new wormhole, and this will cause acceleration of the universe before such a collision.

  11. "Bionic Woman" (2007): Gender, Disability and Cyborgs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quinlan, Margaret M.; Bates, Benjamin R.

    2009-01-01

    This paper explores a representation of overlapping categories of gender, disability and cyborgs in "Bionic Woman" (2007). The television show "Bionic Woman" (2007) is a popular culture representation that uniquely brings together these categories. Three themes emerged from an analysis of blogger discourse surrounding the show. The themes reveal…

  12. Nanobionics: the impact of nanotechnology on implantable medical bionic devices.

    PubMed

    Wallace, G G; Higgins, M J; Moulton, S E; Wang, C

    2012-08-07

    The nexus of any bionic device can be found at the electrode-cellular interface. Overall efficiency is determined by our ability to transfer electronic information across that interface. The nanostructure imparted to electrodes plays a critical role in controlling the cascade of events that determines the composition and structure of that interface. With commonly used conductors: metals, carbon and organic conducting polymers, a number of approaches that promote control over structure in the nanodomain have emerged in recent years with subsequent studies revealing a critical dependency between nanostructure and cellular behaviour. As we continue to develop our understanding of how to create and characterise electromaterials in the nanodomain, this is expected to have a profound effect on the development of next generation bionic devices. In this review, we focus on advances in fabricating nanostructured electrodes that present new opportunities in the field of medical bionics. We also briefly evaluate the interactions of living cells with the nanostructured electromaterials, in addition to highlighting emerging tools used for nanofabrication and nanocharacterisation of the electrode-cellular interface.

  13. 3D Printed Bionic Nanodevices.

    PubMed

    Kong, Yong Lin; Gupta, Maneesh K; Johnson, Blake N; McAlpine, Michael C

    2016-06-01

    The ability to three-dimensionally interweave biological and functional materials could enable the creation of bionic devices possessing unique and compelling geometries, properties, and functionalities. Indeed, interfacing high performance active devices with biology could impact a variety of fields, including regenerative bioelectronic medicines, smart prosthetics, medical robotics, and human-machine interfaces. Biology, from the molecular scale of DNA and proteins, to the macroscopic scale of tissues and organs, is three-dimensional, often soft and stretchable, and temperature sensitive. This renders most biological platforms incompatible with the fabrication and materials processing methods that have been developed and optimized for functional electronics, which are typically planar, rigid and brittle. A number of strategies have been developed to overcome these dichotomies. One particularly novel approach is the use of extrusion-based multi-material 3D printing, which is an additive manufacturing technology that offers a freeform fabrication strategy. This approach addresses the dichotomies presented above by (1) using 3D printing and imaging for customized, hierarchical, and interwoven device architectures; (2) employing nanotechnology as an enabling route for introducing high performance materials, with the potential for exhibiting properties not found in the bulk; and (3) 3D printing a range of soft and nanoscale materials to enable the integration of a diverse palette of high quality functional nanomaterials with biology. Further, 3D printing is a multi-scale platform, allowing for the incorporation of functional nanoscale inks, the printing of microscale features, and ultimately the creation of macroscale devices. This blending of 3D printing, novel nanomaterial properties, and 'living' platforms may enable next-generation bionic systems. In this review, we highlight this synergistic integration of the unique properties of nanomaterials with the

  14. 3D printed bionic ears.

    PubMed

    Mannoor, Manu S; Jiang, Ziwen; James, Teena; Kong, Yong Lin; Malatesta, Karen A; Soboyejo, Winston O; Verma, Naveen; Gracias, David H; McAlpine, Michael C

    2013-06-12

    The ability to three-dimensionally interweave biological tissue with functional electronics could enable the creation of bionic organs possessing enhanced functionalities over their human counterparts. Conventional electronic devices are inherently two-dimensional, preventing seamless multidimensional integration with synthetic biology, as the processes and materials are very different. Here, we present a novel strategy for overcoming these difficulties via additive manufacturing of biological cells with structural and nanoparticle derived electronic elements. As a proof of concept, we generated a bionic ear via 3D printing of a cell-seeded hydrogel matrix in the anatomic geometry of a human ear, along with an intertwined conducting polymer consisting of infused silver nanoparticles. This allowed for in vitro culturing of cartilage tissue around an inductive coil antenna in the ear, which subsequently enables readout of inductively-coupled signals from cochlea-shaped electrodes. The printed ear exhibits enhanced auditory sensing for radio frequency reception, and complementary left and right ears can listen to stereo audio music. Overall, our approach suggests a means to intricately merge biologic and nanoelectronic functionalities via 3D printing.

  15. 3D Printed Bionic Ears

    PubMed Central

    Mannoor, Manu S.; Jiang, Ziwen; James, Teena; Kong, Yong Lin; Malatesta, Karen A.; Soboyejo, Winston O.; Verma, Naveen; Gracias, David H.; McAlpine, Michael C.

    2013-01-01

    The ability to three-dimensionally interweave biological tissue with functional electronics could enable the creation of bionic organs possessing enhanced functionalities over their human counterparts. Conventional electronic devices are inherently two-dimensional, preventing seamless multidimensional integration with synthetic biology, as the processes and materials are very different. Here, we present a novel strategy for overcoming these difficulties via additive manufacturing of biological cells with structural and nanoparticle derived electronic elements. As a proof of concept, we generated a bionic ear via 3D printing of a cell-seeded hydrogel matrix in the precise anatomic geometry of a human ear, along with an intertwined conducting polymer consisting of infused silver nanoparticles. This allowed for in vitro culturing of cartilage tissue around an inductive coil antenna in the ear, which subsequently enables readout of inductively-coupled signals from cochlea-shaped electrodes. The printed ear exhibits enhanced auditory sensing for radio frequency reception, and complementary left and right ears can listen to stereo audio music. Overall, our approach suggests a means to intricately merge biologic and nanoelectronic functionalities via 3D printing. PMID:23635097

  16. Cell-bionics: tools for real-time sensor processing.

    PubMed

    Toumazou, Chris; Cass, Tony

    2007-08-29

    The accurate monitoring of the physiological status of cells, tissues and whole organisms demands a new generation of devices capable of providing accurate data in real time with minimal perturbation of the system being measured. To deliver on the promise of cell-bionics advances over the past decade in miniaturization, analogue signal processing, low-power electronics, materials science and protein engineering need to be brought together. In this paper we summarize recent advances in our research that is moving us in this direction. Two areas in particular are highlighted: the exploitation of the physical properties inherent in semiconductor devices to perform very low power on chip signal processing and the use of gene technology to tailor proteins for sensor applications. In the context of engineered tissues, cell-bionics could offer the ability to monitor the precise physiological state of the construct, both during 'manufacture' and post-implantation. Monitoring during manufacture, particularly by embedded devices, would offer quality assurance of the materials components and the fabrication process. Post-implantation monitoring would reveal changes in the underlying physiology as a result of the tissue construct adapting to its new environment.

  17. Multicentre Evaluation of the Naída CI Q70 Sound Processor: Feedback from Cochlear Implant Users and Professionals.

    PubMed

    Martin, Jeanette; Poncet-Wallet, Christine; Illg, Angelika; Perrin-Webb, Sarah; Henderson, Lise; Noël-Petroff, Nathalie; Auletta, Gennaro; Barezzani, Maria Grazia; Houri, Karim; Group, Indian Research; Bagus, Heike; Hoppe, Ulrich; Humphries, Jane; van Treeck, Wiebke; Briaire, Jeroen J; Brendel, Martina; Mathias, Nathalie

    2016-08-23

    The aim of this survey was to gather data from both implant recipients and professionals on the ease of use of the Naída CI Q70 (Naída CI) sound processor from Advanced Bionics and on the usefulness of the new functions and features available. A secondary objective was to investigate fitting practices with the new processor. A comprehensive user satisfaction survey was conducted in a total of 186 subjects from 24 centres. In parallel, 23 professional questionnaires were collected from 11 centres. Overall, there was high satisfaction with the Naída CI processor from adults, children, experienced and new CI users as well as from professionals. The Naída CI processor was shown as being easy to use by all ages of recipients and by professionals. The majority of experienced CI users rated the Naída CI processor as being similar or better than their previous processor in all areas surveyed. The Naída CI was recommended by the professionals for fitting in all populations. Features like UltraZoom, ZoomControl and DuoPhone would not be fitted to very young children in contrast to adults. Positive ratings were obtained for ease of use, comfort and usefulness of the new functions and features of the Naída CI sound processor. Seventy-seven percent of the experienced CI users rated the new processor as being better than their previous sound processor from a general point of view. The survey also showed that fitting practices were influenced by the age of the user.

  18. Multicentre Evaluation of the Naída CI Q70 Sound Processor: Feedback from Cochlear Implant Users and Professionals

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Jeanette; Poncet-Wallet, Christine; Illg, Angelika; Perrin-Webb, Sarah; Henderson, Lise; Noël-Petroff, Nathalie; Auletta, Gennaro; Barezzani, Maria Grazia; Houri, Karim; Group, Indian Research; Bagus, Heike; Hoppe, Ulrich; Humphries, Jane; van Treeck, Wiebke; Briaire, Jeroen J.; Brendel, Martina; Mathias, Nathalie

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this survey was to gather data from both implant recipients and professionals on the ease of use of the Naída CI Q70 (Naída CI) sound processor from Advanced Bionics and on the usefulness of the new functions and features available. A secondary objective was to investigate fitting practices with the new processor. A comprehensive user satisfaction survey was conducted in a total of 186 subjects from 24 centres. In parallel, 23 professional questionnaires were collected from 11 centres. Overall, there was high satisfaction with the Naída CI processor from adults, children, experienced and new CI users as well as from professionals. The Naída CI processor was shown as being easy to use by all ages of recipients and by professionals. The majority of experienced CI users rated the Naída CI processor as being similar or better than their previous processor in all areas surveyed. The Naída CI was recommended by the professionals for fitting in all populations. Features like UltraZoom, ZoomControl and DuoPhone would not be fitted to very young children in contrast to adults. Positive ratings were obtained for ease of use, comfort and usefulness of the new functions and features of the Naída CI sound processor. Seventy-seven percent of the experienced CI users rated the new processor as being better than their previous sound processor from a general point of view. The survey also showed that fitting practices were influenced by the age of the user. PMID:28217275

  19. Analysis of Advanced CI Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-03-01

    that in practice the compensated imaging system’s operation is adjusted to achieve, to the extent possible, a balance between wavefront fitting...subelen.ent (center-to-center) spacing . r, wi a photodetection quantum. T]. daring a time T there will be N = Vnr2 &T\\i/S . th (35

  20. Speech understanding in noise with the Roger Pen, Naida CI Q70 processor, and integrated Roger 17 receiver in a multi-talker network.

    PubMed

    De Ceulaer, Geert; Bestel, Julie; Mülder, Hans E; Goldbeck, Felix; de Varebeke, Sebastien Pierre Janssens; Govaerts, Paul J

    2016-05-01

    Roger is a digital adaptive multi-channel remote microphone technology that wirelessly transmits a speaker's voice directly to a hearing instrument or cochlear implant sound processor. Frequency hopping between channels, in combination with repeated broadcast, avoids interference issues that have limited earlier generation FM systems. This study evaluated the benefit of the Roger Pen transmitter microphone in a multiple talker network (MTN) for cochlear implant users in a simulated noisy conversation setting. Twelve post-lingually deafened adult Advanced Bionics CII/HiRes 90K recipients were recruited. Subjects used a Naida CI Q70 processor with integrated Roger 17 receiver. The test environment simulated four people having a meal in a noisy restaurant, one the CI user (listener), and three companions (talkers) talking non-simultaneously in a diffuse field of multi-talker babble. Speech reception thresholds (SRTs) were determined without the Roger Pen, with one Roger Pen, and with three Roger Pens in an MTN. Using three Roger Pens in an MTN improved the SRT by 14.8 dB over using no Roger Pen, and by 13.1 dB over using a single Roger Pen (p < 0.0001). The Roger Pen in an MTN provided statistically and clinically significant improvement in speech perception in noise for Advanced Bionics cochlear implant recipients. The integrated Roger 17 receiver made it easy for users of the Naida CI Q70 processor to take advantage of the Roger system. The listening advantage and ease of use should encourage more clinicians to recommend and fit Roger in adult cochlear implant patients.

  1. Bionics and problems of instrument manufacture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manoylov, V. Y.

    1992-03-01

    A conference was organized by the following groups: The Academy of Sciences of the USSR, the Scientific Council for Complex Problem 'Cybernetics', the Ministry of Higher and Secondary Special Education of the USSR, the Ministry of the Radio Industry of the USSR, the Academy of Medical Science, and the All-Union Scientific and Technical Society. The main topic of the conference was instrumentation in the context of bionics.

  2. [Analogies and analogy research in technical biology and bionics].

    PubMed

    Nachtigall, Werner

    2010-01-01

    The procedural approaches of Technical Biology and Bionics are characterized, and analogy research is identified as their common basis. The actual creative aspect in bionical research lies in recognizing and exploiting technically oriented analogies underlying a specific biological prototype to indicate a specific technical application.

  3. Tissue bionics: examples in biomimetic tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Green, David W

    2008-09-01

    Many important lessons can be learnt from the study of biological form and the functional design of organisms as design criteria for the development of tissue engineering products. This merging of biomimetics and regenerative medicine is termed 'tissue bionics'. Clinically useful analogues can be generated by appropriating, modifying and mimicking structures from a diversity of natural biomatrices ranging from marine plankton shells to sea urchin spines. Methods in biomimetic materials chemistry can also be used to fabricate tissue engineering scaffolds with added functional utility that promise human tissues fit for the clinic.

  4. Bionic models for identification of biological systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerget, O. M.

    2017-01-01

    This article proposes a clinical decision support system that processes biomedical data. For this purpose a bionic model has been designed based on neural networks, genetic algorithms and immune systems. The developed system has been tested on data from pregnant women. The paper focuses on the approach to enable selection of control actions that can minimize the risk of adverse outcome. The control actions (hyperparameters of a new type) are further used as an additional input signal. Its values are defined by a hyperparameter optimization method. A software developed with Python is briefly described.

  5. The bionic eye: a review.

    PubMed

    Ong, Jong Min; da Cruz, Lyndon

    2012-01-01

    Visual prostheses including artificial retinal devices are a novel and revolutionary approach to the treatment of profound visual loss. The development of the field of visual prosthesis began with cortical prosthetic devices but since then, a variety of devices which target different sites along the visual pathway have been developed with the retinal prosthesis being the most advanced. We present a review of the history of these devices, an update on the current state of play and future prospects of this field.

  6. Graphite Oxide to Graphene. Biomaterials to Bionics.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Brianna C; Murray, Eoin; Wallace, Gordon G

    2015-12-09

    The advent of implantable biomaterials has revolutionized medical treatment, allowing the development of the fields of tissue engineering and medical bionic devices (e.g., cochlea implants to restore hearing, vagus nerve stimulators to control Parkinson's disease, and cardiac pace makers). Similarly, future materials developments are likely to continue to drive development in treatment of disease and disability, or even enhancing human potential. The material requirements for implantable devices are stringent. In all cases they must be nontoxic and provide appropriate mechanical integrity for the application at hand. In the case of scaffolds for tissue regeneration, biodegradability in an appropriate time frame may be required, and for medical bionics electronic conductivity is essential. The emergence of graphene and graphene-family composites has resulted in materials and structures highly relevant to the expansion of the biomaterials inventory available for implantable medical devices. The rich chemistries available are able to ensure properties uncovered in the nanodomain are conveyed into the world of macroscopic devices. Here, the inherent properties of graphene, along with how graphene or structures containing it interface with living cells and the effect of electrical stimulation on nerves and cells, are reviewed.

  7. On just noticeable difference for bionic eye.

    PubMed

    Li, Yi; McCarthy, Chris; Barnes, Nick

    2012-01-01

    We propose to use Just Noticeable Difference (JND) as the principle in visualizing results for image processing modules for prosthetic vision. Current Bionic Eye hardware implants have limited levels of separately perceivable brightness (i.e., low dynamic range in visualizing images). Therefore, it is important to ensure that the critical contrast must remain perceivable by maintaining of visual differences in downsampled images with reduced dynamic range. JND provides a mathematical framework for these psychophysics events. An increase by 1 in JND space corresponds to the smallest detectable change in visual space (i.e., just noticeable). Combining this principle and the dynamic range constraint, we cast the visualization problem to a linear optimization problem, which enables us to generate optimal visualization images. We demonstrate the usefulness of this principle on visualizing ground-plane segmentation. Experiments show that the proposed principle effectively provides critical visual information at different dynamic ranges, and generates consistent results for image sequences.

  8. A bionic eye actuated by ionic polymer-metal composite (IPMC) artificial muscle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Min; Li, Yuxiu; He, Qingsong; Song, Linlin; Dai, Zhendong

    2011-04-01

    This research was conducted with the aim of developing an energy-efficient, noiseless, movable bionic eye for use in bionic toys. This novel bionic eye is actuated by an ionic polymer-metal composite actuator. The overall size of the eye was 39 mm in length, 45 mm in width, and 45 mm in thickness. The experimental results revealed such a bionic eye design is feasible. This type of bionic eye is appropriate for use in toys and robots to increase their visual impact.

  9. [The design of bionic left ventricular auxiliary pump].

    PubMed

    Jin, Henglin; Hu, Xiaobing; Du, Lei

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports a novel design of bionic left ventricular auxiliary pump, and the characteristic is that elastic diaphragm of pump driven by hydraulic, having smooth, reliable blood supply, can prevent blood clots, can use the flow sensor, pressure sensor detection showing the blood pressure and blood volume at the inlet and outlet of the pump. The pump can go with heart rate synchronization or asynchronous auxiliary by the R wave of human body's ECG. The design goal is realization of bionic throb. Through the animal experiment, the blood pressure waveforms are close to expectations, stable flow can stroke according to the set value, which prove that the pump can meet the requirement for heart disease patients for bionic left ventricular assistant.

  10. Presenting Bionic: Broader Impacts and Outreach Network for Institutional Collaboration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Storm, K.

    2014-12-01

    Broader Impact plans are required of all NSF proposals. In 2011 the National Science Board, which oversees NSF, reconfirmed NSF's commitment to Broader Impacts in its task force report on the merit review system. At many institutions there are professionals that focus their work on supporting the Broader Impact work of researchers. This session will share the Broader Impacts and Outreach Network for Institutional Collaboration (BIONIC) plan to create a professional network of individuals and offices committed to planning and carrying out effective Broader Impact programming. BIONIC is an NSF Research Coordination Network that is recommended for funding through the Biology Directorate. In this session we will share the goals of BIONIC, and the progress to date in reaching those goals (of which one aspect is the curating of effective Broader Impact initiatives).

  11. EDITORIAL: Special issue on medical bionics Special issue on medical bionics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shepherd, Robert K.; D, Ph

    2009-12-01

    This special section of the Journal of Neural Engineering contains eight invited papers presented as part of the inaugural conference `Medical Bionics: A New Paradigm for Human Health' held in the beautiful seaside village of Lorne, Victoria, Australia from 16-19 November 2008. This meeting formed part of the Sir Mark Oliphant International Conference Series (www.oliphant.org.au) and was generously supported by the Department of Innovation, Industry, Science and Research of the Australian Government, the Australian Academy of Science and the Australian Academy of Technological Sciences and Engineering. This meeting was designed to bring experts from a variety of scientific, engineering and clinical disciplines together in a unique environment to discuss current progress in the field of medical bionics and to develop the concepts and techniques required to build the next generation of devices. The field is rapidly expanding, with new engineering solutions for neurological disorders being developed at an astonishing rate. Successful application of emerging engineering technologies into medical bionics devices requires a multidisciplinary research environment in order to deliver clinical solutions that are both safe and effective. Clinical success stories to date include spinal cord stimulators for the management of chronic neurological pain; auditory prostheses that allow the profoundly deaf to hear; and deep brain stimulation to negate movement disorders in Parkinson's disease. Other research programs currently undergoing clinical trials include devices that allow paraplegics to stand and even walk; brain-machine interfaces that provide quadriplegic patients with rudimentary control of a computer but may ultimately provide control of wheel chairs and artificial limbs; devices that detect and suppress epileptic seizures using brief trains of electrical stimulation; and retinal prostheses that will provide vision to the blind. The future for medical bionics is indeed

  12. Bionic Propulsion on Water and Measurement of Propulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, Liu; Si-yuan, Zhao; Shan-chao, Tu; Tian-yu, Zhu; Rong-xiang, Li

    Traditional propulsion fashion on water are propeller propulsion and jet propulsion, but the efficiency relatively low. Used by biological propulsion, after the last million years of evolution, the maximum utilization of its power. Bionic propulsion system designed in this paper consists of two large travel umbrella wing plate in reciprocating linear travel agencies, led by the reciprocating motion along the vertical, in the water under the influence of backward movement of the wing disk automatically open, resulting in the pull forward, the forward movement of the wing disk automatically shut down to reduce water resistance. This paper designs a bionic propulsion and drag model for the static test and measurement test propulsion.

  13. [Theory and practice of bionic cultivation of traditional Chinese medicine].

    PubMed

    Liu, Dahui; Huang, Luqi; Guo, Lanping; Shao, Aijuan; Chen, Meilan

    2009-03-01

    The bionic cultivation of medicinal plant is an ecological cultivation pattern, which is adopting ecological engineering and modern agricultural techniques to simulate the natural ecosystem of wild medicinal plant community, and has been given greater attention on the agriculture of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM). It is also the cross subject that combines Chinese traditional medicine, agronomy, horticulture, ecology, agricultural engineering and management. Moreover, it has significant technology advantages of promoting the sustainable utilization of medicinal plant resources, improving the ecological environment and harmonizing man and nature. So it's important to develop the bionic cultivation of TCM.

  14. Fermentation based carbon nanotube multifunctional bionic composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valentini, Luca; Bon, Silvia Bittolo; Signetti, Stefano; Tripathi, Manoj; Iacob, Erica; Pugno, Nicola M.

    2016-06-01

    The exploitation of the processes used by microorganisms to digest nutrients for their growth can be a viable method for the formation of a wide range of so called biogenic materials that have unique properties that are not produced by abiotic processes. Here we produced living hybrid materials by giving to unicellular organisms the nutrient to grow. Based on bread fermentation, a bionic composite made of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and a single-cell fungi, the Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast extract, was prepared by fermentation of such microorganisms at room temperature. Scanning electron microscopy analysis suggests that the CNTs were internalized by the cell after fermentation bridging the cells. Tensile tests on dried composite films have been rationalized in terms of a CNT cell bridging mechanism where the strongly enhanced strength of the composite is governed by the adhesion energy between the bridging carbon nanotubes and the matrix. The addition of CNTs also significantly improved the electrical conductivity along with a higher photoconductive activity. The proposed process could lead to the development of more complex and interactive structures programmed to self-assemble into specific patterns, such as those on strain or light sensors that could sense damage or convert light stimulus in an electrical signal.

  15. Fermentation based carbon nanotube multifunctional bionic composites

    PubMed Central

    Valentini, Luca; Bon, Silvia Bittolo; Signetti, Stefano; Tripathi, Manoj; Iacob, Erica; Pugno, Nicola M.

    2016-01-01

    The exploitation of the processes used by microorganisms to digest nutrients for their growth can be a viable method for the formation of a wide range of so called biogenic materials that have unique properties that are not produced by abiotic processes. Here we produced living hybrid materials by giving to unicellular organisms the nutrient to grow. Based on bread fermentation, a bionic composite made of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and a single-cell fungi, the Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast extract, was prepared by fermentation of such microorganisms at room temperature. Scanning electron microscopy analysis suggests that the CNTs were internalized by the cell after fermentation bridging the cells. Tensile tests on dried composite films have been rationalized in terms of a CNT cell bridging mechanism where the strongly enhanced strength of the composite is governed by the adhesion energy between the bridging carbon nanotubes and the matrix. The addition of CNTs also significantly improved the electrical conductivity along with a higher photoconductive activity. The proposed process could lead to the development of more complex and interactive structures programmed to self-assemble into specific patterns, such as those on strain or light sensors that could sense damage or convert light stimulus in an electrical signal. PMID:27279425

  16. BIOCONAID System (Bionic Control of Acceleration Induced Dimming). Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Dana B.; And Others

    The system described represents a new technique for enhancing the fidelity of flight simulators during high acceleration maneuvers. This technique forces the simulator pilot into active participation and energy expenditure similar to the aircraft pilot undergoing actual accelerations. The Bionic Control of Acceleration Induced Dimming (BIOCONAID)…

  17. Design and Testing of a Bionic Dancing Prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    Rouse, Elliott J.; Villagaray-Carski, Nathan C.; Emerson, Robert W.; Herr, Hugh M.

    2015-01-01

    Traditionally, prosthetic leg research has focused on improving mobility for activities of daily living. Artistic expression such as dance, however, is not a common research topic and consequently prosthetic technology for dance has been severely limited for the disabled. This work focuses on investigating the ankle joint kinetics and kinematics during a Latin-American dance to provide unique motor options for disabled individuals beyond those of daily living. The objective of this study was to develop a control system for a bionic ankle prosthesis that outperforms conventional prostheses when dancing the rumba. The biomechanics of the ankle joint of a non-amputee, professional dancer were acquired for the development of the bionic control system. Subsequently, a professional dancer who received a traumatic transtibial amputation in April 2013 tested the bionic dance prosthesis and a conventional, passive prosthesis for comparison. The ability to provide similar torque-angle behavior of the biological ankle was assessed to quantify the biological realism of the prostheses. The bionic dancing prosthesis overlapped with 37 ± 6% of the non-amputee ankle torque and ankle angle data, compared to 26 ± 2% for the conventional, passive prosthesis, a statistically greater overlap (p = 0.01). This study lays the foundation for quantifying unique, expressive activity modes currently unavailable to individuals with disabilities. Future work will focus on an expansion of the methods and types of dance investigated in this work. PMID:26285201

  18. Design and Testing of a Bionic Dancing Prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Rouse, Elliott J; Villagaray-Carski, Nathan C; Emerson, Robert W; Herr, Hugh M

    2015-01-01

    Traditionally, prosthetic leg research has focused on improving mobility for activities of daily living. Artistic expression such as dance, however, is not a common research topic and consequently prosthetic technology for dance has been severely limited for the disabled. This work focuses on investigating the ankle joint kinetics and kinematics during a Latin-American dance to provide unique motor options for disabled individuals beyond those of daily living. The objective of this study was to develop a control system for a bionic ankle prosthesis that outperforms conventional prostheses when dancing the rumba. The biomechanics of the ankle joint of a non-amputee, professional dancer were acquired for the development of the bionic control system. Subsequently, a professional dancer who received a traumatic transtibial amputation in April 2013 tested the bionic dance prosthesis and a conventional, passive prosthesis for comparison. The ability to provide similar torque-angle behavior of the biological ankle was assessed to quantify the biological realism of the prostheses. The bionic dancing prosthesis overlapped with 37 ± 6% of the non-amputee ankle torque and ankle angle data, compared to 26 ± 2% for the conventional, passive prosthesis, a statistically greater overlap (p = 0.01). This study lays the foundation for quantifying unique, expressive activity modes currently unavailable to individuals with disabilities. Future work will focus on an expansion of the methods and types of dance investigated in this work.

  19. Advances in implantable bionic devices for blindness: a review.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Philip M; Ayton, Lauren N; Guymer, Robyn H; Lowery, Arthur J; Blamey, Peter J; Allen, Penelope J; Luu, Chi D; Rosenfeld, Jeffrey V

    2016-09-01

    Since the 1950s, vision researchers have been working towards the ambitious goal of restoring a functional level of vision to the blind via electrical stimulation of the visual pathways. Groups based in Australia, USA, Germany, France and Japan report progress in the translation of retinal visual prosthetics from the experimental to clinical domains, with two retinal visual prostheses having recently received regulatory approval for clinical use. Regulatory approval for cortical visual prostheses is yet to be obtained; however, several groups report plans to conduct clinical trials in the near future, building upon the seminal clinical studies of Brindley and Dobelle. In this review, we discuss the general principles of visual prostheses employing electrical stimulation of the visual pathways, focusing on the retina and visual cortex as the two most extensively studied stimulation sites. We also discuss the surgical and functional outcomes reported to date for retinal and cortical prostheses, concluding with a brief discussion of novel developments in this field and an outlook for the future.

  20. [Bionic model for coordinated head-eye motion control].

    PubMed

    Mao, Xiaobo; Chen, Tiejun

    2011-10-01

    The relationships between eye movements and head movements of the primate during gaze shifts are analyzed in detail in the present paper. Applying the mechanisms of neurophysiology to engineering domain, we have improved the robot eye-head coordination. A bionic control strategy of coordinated head-eye motion was proposed. The processes of gaze shifts are composed of an initial fast phase followed by a slow phase. In the fast phase saccade eye movements and slow head movements were combined, which cooperate to bring gaze from an initial resting position toward the new target rapidly, while in the slow phase the gaze stability and target fixation were ensured by the action of the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) where the eyes and head rotate by equal amplitudes in opposite directions. A bionic gaze control model was given. The simulation results confirmed the effectiveness of the model by comparing with the results of neurophysiology experiments.

  1. Kinematic Structures Description of Bionic Hand Based on VF Set

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiancan; Bai, Pengying; Luo, Min; Gao, Meng; Zhan, Qiang

    2017-03-01

    This paper presents a method for describing kinematic structure of bionic hand based on VF (virtual finger) set. At first, a 20 DOFs (degrees of freedom) human hand kinematic model is built, which is expressed by five fingers’ kinematic chains consisting of kinematic pairs and symbols that represent geometric relationships of kinematic pairs’ axes. Based on the concept of VF, the hand fingers are divided into two types: VFAA having adduction/abduction motion and VFFE having flexion/extension motion. The concept of VF set comprising VFAAs and VFFEs is defined, human hand and six basic grasp postures are described by VF set. Then, the structures corresponding VFAA and VFFE are given according to active and passive forms of finger joints, and VFFE Structure-Base comprising 20 conventional structures is built. Based on VF set and the structures of VFAA and VFFE, VF sets and kinematic structures of several classic bionic hands are given.

  2. Drag reduction through self-texturing compliant bionic materials

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Eryong; Li, Longyang; Wang, Gang; Zeng, Zhixiang; Zhao, Wenjie; Xue, Qunji

    2017-01-01

    Compliant fish skin is effectively in reducing drag, thus the design and application of compliant bionic materials may be a good choice for drag reduction. Here we consider the drag reduction of compliant bionic materials. First, ZnO and PDMS mesh modified with n-octadecane were prepared, the drag reduction of self-texturing compliant n-octadecane were studied. The results show that the mesh modified by ZnO and PDMS possess excellent lipophilic and hydrophobic, thus n-octadecane at solid, semisolid and liquid state all have good adhesion with modified mesh. The states of n-octadecane changed with temperature, thus, the surface contact angle and adhesive force all varies obviously at different state. The contact angle decreases with temperature, the adhesive force shows a lower value at semisolid state. Furthermore, the drag testing results show that the compliant n-octadecane film is more effectively in drag reduction than superhydrophobic ZnO/PDMS film, indicating that the drag reduction mechanism of n-octadecane is significantly different with superhydrophobic film. Further research shows that the water flow leads to self-texturing of semisolid state n-octadecane, which is similar with compliant fish skin. Therefore, the compliant bionic materials of semisolid state n-octadecane with regular bulge plays a major role in the drag reduction. PMID:28053309

  3. Erosion resistance of bionic functional surfaces inspired from desert scorpions.

    PubMed

    Zhiwu, Han; Junqiu, Zhang; Chao, Ge; Li, Wen; Ren, Luquan

    2012-02-07

    In this paper, a bionic method is presented to improve the erosion resistance of machine components. Desert scorpion (Androctonus australis) is a typical animal living in sandy deserts, and may face erosive action of blowing sand at a high speed. Based on the idea of bionics and biologic experimental techniques, the mechanisms of the sand erosion resistance of desert scorpion were investigated. Results showed that the desert scorpions used special microtextures such as bumps and grooves to construct the functional surfaces to achieve the erosion resistance. In order to understand the erosion resistance mechanisms of such functional surfaces, the combination of computational and experimental research were carried out in this paper. The Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) method was applied to predict the erosion performance of the bionic functional surfaces. The result demonstrated that the microtextured surfaces exhibited better erosion resistance than the smooth surfaces. The further erosion tests indicated that the groove surfaces exhibited better erosion performance at 30° injection angle. In order to determine the effect of the groove dimensions on the erosion resistance, regression analysis of orthogonal multinomials was also performed under a certain erosion condition, and the regression equation between the erosion rate and groove distance, width, and height was established.

  4. Drag reduction through self-texturing compliant bionic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Eryong; Li, Longyang; Wang, Gang; Zeng, Zhixiang; Zhao, Wenjie; Xue, Qunji

    2017-01-01

    Compliant fish skin is effectively in reducing drag, thus the design and application of compliant bionic materials may be a good choice for drag reduction. Here we consider the drag reduction of compliant bionic materials. First, ZnO and PDMS mesh modified with n-octadecane were prepared, the drag reduction of self-texturing compliant n-octadecane were studied. The results show that the mesh modified by ZnO and PDMS possess excellent lipophilic and hydrophobic, thus n-octadecane at solid, semisolid and liquid state all have good adhesion with modified mesh. The states of n-octadecane changed with temperature, thus, the surface contact angle and adhesive force all varies obviously at different state. The contact angle decreases with temperature, the adhesive force shows a lower value at semisolid state. Furthermore, the drag testing results show that the compliant n-octadecane film is more effectively in drag reduction than superhydrophobic ZnO/PDMS film, indicating that the drag reduction mechanism of n-octadecane is significantly different with superhydrophobic film. Further research shows that the water flow leads to self-texturing of semisolid state n-octadecane, which is similar with compliant fish skin. Therefore, the compliant bionic materials of semisolid state n-octadecane with regular bulge plays a major role in the drag reduction.

  5. Investigation of the Effect of Dimple Bionic Nonsmooth Surface on Tire Antihydroplaning

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Haichao; Wang, Guolin; Ding, Yangmin; Yang, Jian; Zhai, Huihui

    2015-01-01

    Inspired by the idea that bionic nonsmooth surfaces (BNSS) reduce fluid adhesion and resistance, the effect of dimple bionic nonsmooth structure arranged in tire circumferential grooves surface on antihydroplaning performance was investigated by using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD). The physical model of the object (model of dimple bionic nonsmooth surface distribution, hydroplaning model) and SST k − ω turbulence model are established for numerical analysis of tire hydroplaning. By virtue of the orthogonal table L16(45), the parameters of dimple bionic nonsmooth structure design compared to the smooth structure were analyzed, and the priority level of the experimental factors as well as the best combination within the scope of the experiment was obtained. The simulation results show that dimple bionic nonsmooth structure can reduce water flow resistance by disturbing the eddy movement in boundary layers. Then, optimal type of dimple bionic nonsmooth structure is arranged on the bottom of tire circumferential grooves for hydroplaning performance analysis. The results show that the dimple bionic nonsmooth structure effectively decreases the tread hydrodynamic pressure when driving on water film and increases the tire hydroplaning velocity, thus improving tire antihydroplaning performance. PMID:27018311

  6. Regulation of Ci-SCFSlimb binding, Ci proteolysis and Hedgehog pathway activity by Ci phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Smelkinson, Margery G.; Zhou, Qianhe; Kalderon, Daniel

    2007-01-01

    SUMMARY Hedgehog (Hh) proteins signal by inhibiting the proteolytic processing of Ci/Gli family transcription factors and by increasing Ci/Gli specific activity. In the absence of Hh, phosphorylation of Ci/Gli triggers binding to SCF ubiquitin ligase complexes and consequent proteolysis. Here we define the principal SCFSlimb binding site in Ci as an extended variant of a canonical Slimb/β-TRCP binding motif that can be created by PKA-priming of five successive CK1 sites. GSK3 enhances binding primarily through a nearby region of Ci, which may contact an SCF component other than Slimb. Studies of Ci variants with altered CK1 and GSK3 sites suggest that the large number of phosphorylation sites that direct SCFSlimb binding confers a Hh response that is both sensitive and graded, and that in the Drosophila wing disc, morphogenetic responses involve changes in both the level and specific activity of Ci. We also show that when Ci proteolysis is compromised, its specific activity is limited principally by Su(fu) and not by Cos2 cytoplasmic tethering or PKA phosphorylation. PMID:17925225

  7. Simulated effect on the compressive and shear mechanical properties of bionic integrated honeycomb plates.

    PubMed

    He, Chenglin; Chen, Jinxiang; Wu, Zhishen; Xie, Juan; Zu, Qiao; Lu, Yun

    2015-05-01

    Honeycomb plates can be applied in many fields, including furniture manufacturing, mechanical engineering, civil engineering, transportation and aerospace. In the present study, we discuss the simulated effect on the mechanical properties of bionic integrated honeycomb plates by investigating the compressive and shear failure modes and the mechanical properties of trabeculae reinforced by long or short fibers. The results indicate that the simulated effect represents approximately 80% and 70% of the compressive and shear strengths, respectively. Compared with existing bionic samples, the mass-specific strength was significantly improved. Therefore, this integrated honeycomb technology remains the most effective method for the trial manufacturing of bionic integrated honeycomb plates. The simulated effect of the compressive rigidity is approximately 85%. The short-fiber trabeculae have an advantage over the long-fiber trabeculae in terms of shear rigidity, which provides new evidence for the application of integrated bionic honeycomb plates.

  8. Influence of Multiple Bionic Unit Coupling on Sliding Wear of Laser-Processed Gray Cast Iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Haifeng; Zhang, Peng; Sui, Qi; Zhao, Kai; Zhou, Hong; Ren, Luquan

    2017-03-01

    In this study, in effort to improve the sliding wear resistance of gray cast iron under wet lubrication conditions, specimens with different bionic units were manufactured and modified according to bionic theory. Inspired by the structure and appearance of biological wear-resistant skin, two kinds of bionic units were processed by laser on the specimen surfaces. We investigated the wear resistance properties of the samples via indentation method and then observed the wear surface morphology of specimens and the stress distributions. The results indicated that coupling the bionic units enhanced the wear resistance of the cast iron considerably compared to the other samples. We also determined the mechanism of wear resistance improvement according to the results.

  9. Bionic Design of Wind Turbine Blade Based on Long-Eared Owl's Airfoil.

    PubMed

    Tian, Weijun; Yang, Zhen; Zhang, Qi; Wang, Jiyue; Li, Ming; Ma, Yi; Cong, Qian

    2017-01-01

    The main purpose of this paper is to demonstrate a bionic design for the airfoil of wind turbines inspired by the morphology of Long-eared Owl's wings. Glauert Model was adopted to design the standard blade and the bionic blade, respectively. Numerical analysis method was utilized to study the aerodynamic characteristics of the airfoils as well as the blades. Results show that the bionic airfoil inspired by the airfoil at the 50% aspect ratio of the Long-eared Owl's wing gives rise to a superior lift coefficient and stalling performance and thus can be beneficial to improving the performance of the wind turbine blade. Also, the efficiency of the bionic blade in wind turbine blades tests increases by 12% or above (up to 44%) compared to that of the standard blade. The reason lies in the bigger pressure difference between the upper and lower surface which can provide stronger lift.

  10. Bionic Design of Wind Turbine Blade Based on Long-Eared Owl's Airfoil

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ming

    2017-01-01

    The main purpose of this paper is to demonstrate a bionic design for the airfoil of wind turbines inspired by the morphology of Long-eared Owl's wings. Glauert Model was adopted to design the standard blade and the bionic blade, respectively. Numerical analysis method was utilized to study the aerodynamic characteristics of the airfoils as well as the blades. Results show that the bionic airfoil inspired by the airfoil at the 50% aspect ratio of the Long-eared Owl's wing gives rise to a superior lift coefficient and stalling performance and thus can be beneficial to improving the performance of the wind turbine blade. Also, the efficiency of the bionic blade in wind turbine blades tests increases by 12% or above (up to 44%) compared to that of the standard blade. The reason lies in the bigger pressure difference between the upper and lower surface which can provide stronger lift. PMID:28243053

  11. FIRE_CI1_TOVS

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2016-01-27

    ... FIRE_CI1_TOVS Project Title:  FIRE I CIRRUS Discipline:  Clouds Field Campaigns ... Parameters:  Altitude Barometric Altitude Cloud Amount Cloud Top Pressure Cloud Top Temperature Dew/Frost Point ...

  12. The design of an asymmetric bionic branching channel for electronic chips cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Shanglong; Qin, Jie; Guo, Wei; Fang, Kuang

    2013-06-01

    Inspired by the wing vein of Lepidoptera, a designment of asymmetric bionic branching channel for electronic chips cooling is developed. Lepidoptera vein D was chosen to measure the angle of first and second branch level. Based on these regular patterns, an asymmetric bionic branching channel is designed in a 35 mm × 35 mm chip. Comparing with fractal-like branching channel, it provides a stronger heat transfer capability, lower pressure drop and lower flow resistance in the experiment.

  13. Elective amputation and bionic substitution restore functional hand use after critical soft tissue injuries

    PubMed Central

    Aszmann, Oskar C.; Vujaklija, Ivan; Roche, Aidan D.; Salminger, Stefan; Herceg, Malvina; Sturma, Agnes; Hruby, Laura A.; Pittermann, Anna; Hofer, Christian; Amsuess, Sebastian; Farina, Dario

    2016-01-01

    Critical soft tissue injuries may lead to a non-functional and insensate limb. In these cases standard reconstructive techniques will not suffice to provide a useful outcome, and solutions outside the biological arena must be considered and offered to these patients. We propose a concept which, after all reconstructive options have been exhausted, involves an elective amputation along with a bionic substitution, implementing an actuated prosthetic hand via a structured tech-neuro-rehabilitation program. Here, three patients are presented in whom this concept has been successfully applied after mutilating hand injuries. Clinical tests conducted before, during and after the procedure, evaluating both functional and psychometric parameters, document the benefits of this approach. Additionally, in one of the patients, we show the possibility of implementing a highly functional and natural control of an advanced prosthesis providing both proportional and simultaneous movements of the wrist and hand for completing tasks of daily living with substantially less compensatory movements compared to the traditional systems. It is concluded that the proposed procedure is a viable solution for re-gaining highly functional hand use following critical soft tissue injuries when existing surgical measures fail. Our results are clinically applicable and can be extended to institutions with similar resources. PMID:27721419

  14. Bionic intraocular lens with variable focus and integrated structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Dan; Wang, Xuan-Yin; Du, Jia-Wei; Xiang, Ke

    2015-10-01

    This paper proposes a bionic accommodating intraocular lens (IOL) for ophthalmic surgery. The designed lens has a solid-liquid mixed integrated structure, which mainly consists of a support ring, elastic membrane, rigid lens, and optical liquid. The lens focus can be adjusted through the deformation of the lens front surface when compressed. The integrated structure of the IOL is presented, as well as a detailed description of the lens materials and fabrication process. Images under different radial pressures are captured, and the lens deformation process, accommodating range, density, and optical property are analyzed. The designed lens achieves a 14.6 D accommodating range under a radial pressure of 51.4 mN and a 0.24 mm alteration of the lens outer radius. The deformation property of the lens matches well with the characteristic of the eye and shows the potential to help patients fully recover their vision accommodation ability after the cataract surgery.

  15. Medicalization: Current Concept and Future Directions in a Bionic Society

    PubMed Central

    Maturo, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    The article illustrates the main features of the concept of medicalization, starting from its theoretical roots. Although it is the process of extending the medical gaze on human conditions, it appears that medicalization cannot be strictly connected to medical imperialism anymore. Other “engines” of medicalization are influential: consumers, biotechnology and managed care. The growth of research and theoretical reflections on medicalization has led to the proposal of other parallel concepts like pharmaceuticalization, genetization and biomedicalization. These new theoretical tools could be useful in the analysis of human enhancement. Human enhancement can be considered as the use of biomedical technology to improve performance on a human being who is not in need of a cure: a practice that is increasingly spreading in what might be defined as a “bionic society”. PMID:22654387

  16. Ego-motion based on EM for bionic navigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Xiaofeng; Wang, L. J.; Liu, J. G.

    2015-12-01

    Researches have proved that flying insects such as bees can achieve efficient and robust flight control, and biologists have explored some biomimetic principles regarding how they control flight. Based on those basic studies and principles acquired from the flying insects, this paper proposes a different solution of recovering ego-motion for low level navigation. Firstly, a new type of entropy flow is provided to calculate the motion parameters. Secondly, EKF, which has been used for navigation for some years to correct accumulated error, and estimation-Maximization, which is always used to estimate parameters, are put together to determine the ego-motion estimation of aerial vehicles. Numerical simulation on MATLAB has proved that this navigation system provides more accurate position and smaller mean absolute error than pure optical flow navigation. This paper has done pioneering work in bionic mechanism to space navigation.

  17. Psychosocial Impact of the Bionic Pancreas During Summer Camp

    PubMed Central

    Weissberg-Benchell, Jill; Hessler, Danielle; Polonsky, William H.; Fisher, Lawrence

    2016-01-01

    Background: The psychosocial impact of the bionic pancreas (BP) was assessed among children attending diabetes camp. Methods: Nineteen children were randomly assigned for 5 days to the BP condition and 5 days to the control condition in a crossover design. Results: Significant reductions in hypoglycemic fear and regimen burden were found. Children felt less burdened or worried about diabetes and felt freer to do things they enjoyed while using the BP. Children wished the BP responded to out of range numbers faster and expressed annoyance about carrying around the necessary equipment. Conclusions: Children may experience improved psychosocial outcomes following use of BP while expressing key areas of user concern. Future studies in less controlled environments with larger sample sizes can determine if these findings are generalizable to other groups. PMID:26993252

  18. [Design and Preparation of Plant Bionic Materials Based on Optical and Infrared Features Simulation].

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xiao-jun; Lu, Xu-liang; Pan, Jia-liang; Zhang, Shuan-qin

    2015-07-01

    Due to the life characteristics such as physiological structure and transpiration, plants have unique optical and infrared features. In the optical band, because of the common effects of chlorophyll and water, plant leafs show spectral reflectance characteristics change in 550, 680, 1400 and 1900 nm significantly. In the infrared wave band, driven by transpiration, plants could regulate temperature on their own initiative, which make the infrared characteristics of plants different from artificial materials. So palnt bionic materials were proposed to simulate optical and infrared characteristics of plants. By analyzing formation mechanism of optical and infrared features about green plants, the component design and heat-transfer process of plants bionic materials were studied, above these the heat-transfer control formulation was established. Based on water adsorption/release compound, optical pigments and other man-made materials, plant bionic materials preparation methods were designed which could simulate the optical and infrared features of green plants. By chemical casting methods plant bionic material films were prepared, which use polyvinyl alcohol as film forming and water adsorption/release compound, and use optical pigments like chrome green and macromolecule yellow as colouring materials. The research conclusions achieved by testings figured out: water adsorption/release testing showed that the plant bionic materials with a certain thickness could absorb 1.3 kg water per square meter, which could satisfy the water usage of transpiration simulation one day; the optical and infrared simulated effect tests indicated that the plant bionic materials could preferably simulate the spectral reflective performance of green plants in optical wave band (380-2500 nm, expecially in 1400 and 1900 nm which were water absorption wave band of plants), and also it had similar daily infrared radiation variations with green plants, daily average radiation temperature

  19. Effect of bionic coupling units' forms on wear resistance of gray cast iron under dry linear reciprocating sliding condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Zuobo; Zhou, Hong; Xie, Guofeng; Cong, Dalong; Meng, Chao; Ren, Luquan

    2015-07-01

    In order to get close to the wear form of guide rails, the homemade linear reciprocating wear testing machine was used for the wear test. In order to improve the wear-resistance of gray cast iron guide rail, bionic coupling units of different forms were manufactured by a laser. Wear behavior of gray-cast-iron with bionic-coupling units has been studied under dry sliding condition at room temperature using the wear testing machine. The wear resistance was evaluated by means of weight loss measurement and wear morphology. The results indicated that bionic coupling unit could improve the wear resistance of gray cast iron. The wear resistance of gray cast iron with reticulation bionic coupling unit is the best. When the load and speed changed, reticulation bionic coupling unit still has excellent performance in improving the wear resistance of gray cast iron.

  20. Bionic Design for Mars Sampling Scoop Inspired by Himalayan Marmot Claw.

    PubMed

    Xue, Long; Zhang, Rong Rong; Zong, Wei; Song, Jia Feng; Zou, Meng

    2016-01-01

    Cave animals are often adapted to digging and life underground, with claw toes similar in structure and function to a sampling scoop. In this paper, the clawed toes of the Himalayan marmot were selected as a biological prototype for bionic research. Based on geometric parameter optimization of the clawed toes, a bionic sampling scoop for use on Mars was designed. Using a 3D laser scanner, the point cloud data of the second front claw toe was acquired. Parametric equations and contour curves for the claw were then built with cubic polynomial fitting. We obtained 18 characteristic curve equations for the internal and external contours of the claw. A bionic sampling scoop was designed according to the structural parameters of Curiosity's sampling shovel and the contours of the Himalayan marmot's claw. Verifying test results showed that when the penetration angle was 45° and the sampling speed was 0.33 r/min, the bionic sampling scoops' resistance torque was 49.6% less than that of the prototype sampling scoop. When the penetration angle was 60° and the sampling speed was 0.22 r/min, the resistance torque of the bionic sampling scoop was 28.8% lower than that of the prototype sampling scoop.

  1. Bionic Design for Mars Sampling Scoop Inspired by Himalayan Marmot Claw

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Cave animals are often adapted to digging and life underground, with claw toes similar in structure and function to a sampling scoop. In this paper, the clawed toes of the Himalayan marmot were selected as a biological prototype for bionic research. Based on geometric parameter optimization of the clawed toes, a bionic sampling scoop for use on Mars was designed. Using a 3D laser scanner, the point cloud data of the second front claw toe was acquired. Parametric equations and contour curves for the claw were then built with cubic polynomial fitting. We obtained 18 characteristic curve equations for the internal and external contours of the claw. A bionic sampling scoop was designed according to the structural parameters of Curiosity's sampling shovel and the contours of the Himalayan marmot's claw. Verifying test results showed that when the penetration angle was 45° and the sampling speed was 0.33 r/min, the bionic sampling scoops' resistance torque was 49.6% less than that of the prototype sampling scoop. When the penetration angle was 60° and the sampling speed was 0.22 r/min, the resistance torque of the bionic sampling scoop was 28.8% lower than that of the prototype sampling scoop. PMID:28127229

  2. SU-E-T-570: Management of Radiation Oncology Patients with Cochlear Implant and Other Bionic Devices in the Brain and Head and Neck Regions

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, F.Q; Chen, Z; Nath, R

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate the current status of clinical usage of cochlear implant (CI) and other bionic devices (BD) in the brain and head and neck regions (BH and N) and their management in patients during radiotherapy to ensure patient health and safety as well as optimum radiation delivery. Methods: Literature review was performed with both CIs and radiotherapy and their variants as keywords in PubMed, INSPEC and other sources. The focus was on CIs during radiotherapy, but it also included other BDs in BHȦN, such as auditory brainstem implant, bionic retinal implant, and hearing aids, among others. Results: Interactions between CIs and radiation may cause CIs malfunction. The presence of CIs may also cause suboptimum dose distribution if a treatment plan was not well designed. A few studies were performed for the hearing functions of CIs under irradiations of 4 MV and 6 MV x-rays. However, x-rays with higher energies (10 to 18 MV) broadly used in radiotherapy have not been explored. These higher energetic beams are more damaging to electronics due to strong penetrating power and also due to neutrons generated in the treatment process. Modern CIs are designed with more and more complicated integrated circuits, which may be more susceptible to radiation damage and malfunction. Therefore, careful management is important for safety and treatment outcomes. Conclusion: Although AAPM TG-34, TG-63, and TG-203 (update of TG-34, not published yet) reports may be referenced for management of CIs and other BDs in the brain and H and N regions, a site- and device-specified guideline should be developed for CIs and other BDs. Additional evaluation of CI functions under clinically relevant set-ups should also be performed to provide clinicians with better knowledge in clinical decision making.

  3. Bionic Tactile Sensor for Near-Range Search, Localisation and Material Classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dürr, Volker; Krause, André F.; Neitzel, Matthias; Lange, Oliver; Reimann, Bert

    Insects use their antennae (feelers) as near range sensors for orientation, object localisation and communication. Here, we use the stick insect antenna as a paragon for an actively moved tactile sensor. Our bionic sensor uses vibration signals from contact events for obstacle localisation and classification of material properties. It is shown how distance is coded by salient peaks in the frequency spectrum, and how the damping time constants can be exploited to distinguish between eight objects made of a range of materials. Thus, we demonstrate application of bionic principles for non-visual, reliable, near-range object localisation and material classification that is suitable for autonomous exploratory robots.

  4. A bionic camera-based polarization navigation sensor.

    PubMed

    Wang, Daobin; Liang, Huawei; Zhu, Hui; Zhang, Shuai

    2014-07-21

    Navigation and positioning technology is closely related to our routine life activities, from travel to aerospace. Recently it has been found that Cataglyphis (a kind of desert ant) is able to detect the polarization direction of skylight and navigate according to this information. This paper presents a real-time bionic camera-based polarization navigation sensor. This sensor has two work modes: one is a single-point measurement mode and the other is a multi-point measurement mode. An indoor calibration experiment of the sensor has been done under a beam of standard polarized light. The experiment results show that after noise reduction the accuracy of the sensor can reach up to 0.3256°. It is also compared with GPS and INS (Inertial Navigation System) in the single-point measurement mode through an outdoor experiment. Through time compensation and location compensation, the sensor can be a useful alternative to GPS and INS. In addition, the sensor also can measure the polarization distribution pattern when it works in multi-point measurement mode.

  5. Biomimetic approaches to bionic touch through a peripheral nerve interface.

    PubMed

    Saal, Hannes P; Bensmaia, Sliman J

    2015-12-01

    State-of-the-art prosthetic hands nearly match the dexterity of the human hand, and sophisticated approaches have been developed to control them intuitively. However, grasping and dexterously manipulating objects relies heavily on the sense of touch, without which we would struggle to perform even the most basic activities of daily living. Despite the importance of touch, not only in motor control but also in affective communication and embodiment, the restoration of touch through bionic hands is still in its infancy, a shortcoming that severely limits their effectiveness. Here, we focus on approaches to restore the sense of touch through an electrical interface with the peripheral nerve. First, we describe devices that can be chronically implanted in the nerve to electrically activate nerve fibers. Second, we discuss how these interfaces have been used to convey basic somatosensory feedback. Third, we review what is known about how the somatosensory nerve encodes information about grasped objects in intact limbs and discuss how these natural neural codes can be exploited to convey artificial tactile feedback. Finally, we offer a blueprint for how these codes could be implemented in a neuroprosthetic device to deliver rich, natural, and versatile tactile sensations.

  6. A Bionic Camera-Based Polarization Navigation Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Daobin; Liang, Huawei; Zhu, Hui; Zhang, Shuai

    2014-01-01

    Navigation and positioning technology is closely related to our routine life activities, from travel to aerospace. Recently it has been found that Cataglyphis (a kind of desert ant) is able to detect the polarization direction of skylight and navigate according to this information. This paper presents a real-time bionic camera-based polarization navigation sensor. This sensor has two work modes: one is a single-point measurement mode and the other is a multi-point measurement mode. An indoor calibration experiment of the sensor has been done under a beam of standard polarized light. The experiment results show that after noise reduction the accuracy of the sensor can reach up to 0.3256°. It is also compared with GPS and INS (Inertial Navigation System) in the single-point measurement mode through an outdoor experiment. Through time compensation and location compensation, the sensor can be a useful alternative to GPS and INS. In addition, the sensor also can measure the polarization distribution pattern when it works in multi-point measurement mode. PMID:25051029

  7. Study on quantitative relation between characteristics of striature bionic coupling unit and wear resistance of gray cast iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Zuobo; Zhou, Hong; Zhang, Peng; Cong, Dalong; Meng, Chao; Wang, Chuanwei; Ren, Luquan

    2015-03-01

    In order to improve the wear resistance of gray cast iron guide rail, striature bionic coupling units of different characteristics were manufactured by laser surface remelting. Wear behavior of gray cast iron with striature bionic coupling units has been studied under dry sliding condition at room temperature using a homemade linear reciprocating wear testing machine. The wear resistance was evaluated by means of weight loss measurement and wear morphology. The results indicated that there is a relationship between weight loss and the area of striature bionic coupling units and α: Δm = Δm0 - 0.0212S × cos α - 0.0241S × sin α.

  8. Auto-bionics – a new paradigm in Regenerative Medicine and Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Ashrafian, Hutan; Darzi, Ara; Athanasiou, Thanos

    2013-01-01

    Summary The concept of bionics represents the development of engineering and technology based on natural biological systems. Traditional applications of bionics in healthcare include artificial bionic organs which can be used to replace, mimic and even enhance biological function when compared to native organic equivalents (so-called ‘Exo-bionics’). Recently there has been a new wave of bio-inspired treatments that act through the reorganisation of the existing biological organs in an individual to enhance physiology. Here the technology does not replace biological tissue, but augments function by tissue reorganization and modification – so-called ‘Auto-bionics’. Examples include the Ross (Pulmonary Autograft) Procedure, Cardiomyoplasty, Skeletal-Muscle-Ventricles, Graciloplasty and Metabolic Gastric-Bypass (gastrointestinal rearrangement to modulate hormone release and treat diabetes). These procedures will have an increased role in reconstructive strategies and the treatment of obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular disease and cancer. Auto-bionics can enhance physiological function beyond normality in some cases and represents a new era in bio-inspired versatility. PMID:20210587

  9. Bionic ankle-foot prosthesis normalizes walking gait for persons with leg amputation.

    PubMed

    Herr, Hugh M; Grabowski, Alena M

    2012-02-07

    Over time, leg prostheses have improved in design, but have been incapable of actively adapting to different walking velocities in a manner comparable to a biological limb. People with a leg amputation using such commercially available passive-elastic prostheses require significantly more metabolic energy to walk at the same velocities, prefer to walk slower and have abnormal biomechanics compared with non-amputees. A bionic prosthesis has been developed that emulates the function of a biological ankle during level-ground walking, specifically providing the net positive work required for a range of walking velocities. We compared metabolic energy costs, preferred velocities and biomechanical patterns of seven people with a unilateral transtibial amputation using the bionic prosthesis and using their own passive-elastic prosthesis to those of seven non-amputees during level-ground walking. Compared with using a passive-elastic prosthesis, using the bionic prosthesis decreased metabolic cost by 8 per cent, increased trailing prosthetic leg mechanical work by 57 per cent and decreased the leading biological leg mechanical work by 10 per cent, on average, across walking velocities of 0.75-1.75 m s(-1) and increased preferred walking velocity by 23 per cent. Using the bionic prosthesis resulted in metabolic energy costs, preferred walking velocities and biomechanical patterns that were not significantly different from people without an amputation.

  10. Influence of Cycle Temperature on the Wear Resistance of Vermicular Iron Derivatized with Bionic Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sui, Qi; Zhang, Peng; Zhou, Hong; Liu, Yan; Ren, Luquan

    2016-11-01

    Depending on their applications, such as in brake discs, camshafts, etc., the wear behavior of vermicular iron is influenced by the thermal cycling regime. The failure of a working part during its service life is a consequence of both thermal fatigue and wear. Previously, the wear and thermal fatigue resistance properties of vermicular iron were separately investigated by researchers, rather than a study combining these two factors. In the present work, the effect of cycle temperature on the wear resistance of specimens with bionic units processed by laser has been investigated experimentally. The wear behavior pre- and post-thermal cycling has also been investigated, and the influence of different cycle temperatures on the wear resistance is discussed. The results indicate that the thermal cycling regime brought about negative influences with varying degrees, on the material properties, such as the microstructures, micro-hardness, cracks, and oxidation resistance properties. All these factors synergistically reduced the wear resistance of vermicular iron. In particular, the negative influence apparently increased with an increase in cycle temperature. Nevertheless, the post-thermal-cycle wear resistance of the specimens with bionic units was superior to those without bionic units. Hence, the laser bionic process is an effective way to improve the performance of vermicular iron in combined thermal cycling and wear service conditions.

  11. Bionic Modeling of Knowledge-Based Guidance in Automated Underwater Vehicles.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-06-24

    DIFFERENCE TONES While the speed of the owl and other birds has not been adequately documented, Konishi (1973b) reports owl’s flight in captivity ...simulation. There are other bionic forms that are also worth considering in this regard, e.g.,the marine pinnipeds , sharks, etc., who have directional hearing

  12. Experimental Study of Reciprocating Friction between Rape Stalk and Bionic Nonsmooth Surface Units

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Zheng; Li, Yaoming; Xu, Lizhang

    2015-01-01

    Background. China is the largest producer of rape oilseed in the world; however, the mechanization level of rape harvest is relatively low, because rape materials easily adhere to the cleaning screens of combine harvesters, resulting in significant cleaning losses. Previous studies have shown that bionic nonsmooth surface cleaning screens restrain the adhesion of rape materials, but the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Objective. The reciprocating friction between rape stalk and bionic nonsmooth metal surface was examined. Methods. The short-time Fourier transform method was used to discriminate the stable phase of friction signals and the stick-lag distance was defined to analyze the stable reciprocating friction in a phase diagram. Results. The reciprocating friction between rape stalk and metal surface is a typical stick-slip friction, and the bionic nonsmooth metal surfaces with concave or convex units reduced friction force with increasing reciprocating frequency. The results also showed that the stick-lag distance of convex surface increased with reciprocating frequency, which indicated that convex surface reduces friction force more efficiently. Conclusions. We suggest that bionic nonsmooth surface cleaning screens, especially with convex units, restrain the adhesion of rape materials more efficiently compared to the smooth surface cleaning screens. PMID:27034611

  13. Outpatient Glycemic Control with a Bionic Pancreas in Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Manasi; Magyar, Kendra L.; McKeon, Katherine; Goergen, Laura G.; Balliro, Courtney; Hillard, Mallory A.; Nathan, David M.; Damiano, Edward R.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND The safety and effectiveness of automated glycemic management have not been tested in multiday studies under unrestricted outpatient conditions. METHODS In two random-order, crossover studies with similar but distinct designs, we compared glycemic control with a wearable, bihormonal, automated, “bionic” pancreas (bionic-pancreas period) with glycemic control with an insulin pump (control period) for 5 days in 20 adults and 32 adolescents with type 1 diabetes mellitus. The automatically adaptive algorithm of the bionic pancreas received data from a continuous glucose monitor to control subcutaneous delivery of insulin and glucagon. RESULTS Among the adults, the mean plasma glucose level over the 5-day bionic-pancreas period was 138 mg per deciliter (7.7 mmol per liter), and the mean percentage of time with a low glucose level (<70 mg per deciliter [3.9 mmol per liter]) was 4.8%. After 1 day of automatic adaptation by the bionic pancreas, the mean (±SD) glucose level on continuous monitoring was lower than the mean level during the control period (133±13 vs. 159±30 mg per deciliter [7.4±0.7 vs. 8.8±1.7 mmol per liter], P<0.001) and the percentage of time with a low glucose reading was lower (4.1% vs. 7.3%, P = 0.01). Among the adolescents, the mean plasma glucose level was also lower during the bionic-pancreas period than during the control period (138±18 vs. 157±27 mg per deciliter [7.7±1.0 vs. 8.7±1.5 mmol per liter], P = 0.004), but the percentage of time with a low plasma glucose reading was similar during the two periods (6.1% and 7.6%, respectively; P = 0.23). The mean frequency of interventions for hypoglycemia among the adolescents was lower during the bionic-pancreas period than during the control period (one per 1.6 days vs. one per 0.8 days, P<0.001). CONCLUSIONS As compared with an insulin pump, a wearable, automated, bihormonal, bionic pancreas improved mean glycemic levels, with less frequent hypoglycemic episodes, among both

  14. Engineering derivatives from biological systems for advanced aerospace applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winfield, Daniel L.; Hering, Dean H.; Cole, David

    1991-01-01

    The present study consisted of a literature survey, a survey of researchers, and a workshop on bionics. These tasks produced an extensive annotated bibliography of bionics research (282 citations), a directory of bionics researchers, and a workshop report on specific bionics research topics applicable to space technology. These deliverables are included as Appendix A, Appendix B, and Section 5.0, respectively. To provide organization to this highly interdisciplinary field and to serve as a guide for interested researchers, we have also prepared a taxonomy or classification of the various subelements of natural engineering systems. Finally, we have synthesized the results of the various components of this study into a discussion of the most promising opportunities for accelerated research, seeking solutions which apply engineering principles from natural systems to advanced aerospace problems. A discussion of opportunities within the areas of materials, structures, sensors, information processing, robotics, autonomous systems, life support systems, and aeronautics is given. Following the conclusions are six discipline summaries that highlight the potential benefits of research in these areas for NASA's space technology programs.

  15. Towards Extending Forward Kinematic Models on Hyper-Redundant Manipulator to Cooperative Bionic Arms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Inderjeet; Lakhal, Othman; Merzouki, Rochdi

    2017-01-01

    Forward Kinematics is a stepping stone towards finding an inverse solution and subsequently a dynamic model of a robot. Hence a study and comparison of various Forward Kinematic Models (FKMs) is necessary for robot design. This paper deals with comparison of three FKMs on the same hyper-redundant Compact Bionic Handling Assistant (CBHA) manipulator under same conditions. The aim of this study is to project on modeling cooperative bionic manipulators. Two of these methods are quantitative methods, Arc Geometry HTM (Homogeneous Transformation Matrix) Method and Dual Quaternion Method, while the other one is Hybrid Method which uses both quantitative as well as qualitative approach. The methods are compared theoretically and experimental results are discussed to add further insight to the comparison. HTM is the widely used and accepted technique, is taken as reference and trajectory deviation in other techniques are compared with respect to HTM. Which method allows obtaining an accurate kinematic behavior of the CBHA, controlled in the real-time.

  16. Effects of setting angle on performance of fish-bionic wind wheel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, G. S.; Yang, Z. X.; Song, L.; Chen, Q.; Li, Y. B.; Chen, W.

    2016-08-01

    With the energy crisis and the increasing environmental pollutionmore and more efforts have been made about wind power development. In this paper, a new type of vertical axis named the fish-bionic wind wheel was proposed, and the outline of wind wheel was constructed by curve of Fourier fitting and polynomial equations. This paper attempted to research the relationship between the setting angle and the wind turbine characteristics by computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation. The results showed that the setting angle of the fish-bionic wind wheel has some significant effects on the efficiency of the wind turbine, Within the range of wind speed from 13m/s to 15m/s, wind wheel achieves the maximum efficiency when the setting angle is at 37 degree. The conclusion will work as a guideline for the improvement of wind turbine design.

  17. A bionic approach to mathematical modeling the fold geometry of deployable reflector antennas on satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, C. M.; Liu, T. S.

    2014-10-01

    Inspired from biology, this study presents a method for designing the fold geometry of deployable reflectors. Since the space available inside rockets for transporting satellites with reflector antennas is typically cylindrical in shape, and its cross-sectional area is considerably smaller than the reflector antenna after deployment, the cross-sectional area of the folded reflector must be smaller than the available rocket interior space. Membrane reflectors in aerospace are a type of lightweight structure that can be packaged compactly. To design membrane reflectors from the perspective of deployment processes, bionic applications from morphological changes of plants are investigated. Creating biologically inspired reflectors, this paper deals with fold geometry of reflectors, which imitate flower buds. This study uses mathematical formulation to describe geometric profiles of flower buds. Based on the formulation, new designs for deployable membrane reflectors derived from bionics are proposed. Adjusting parameters in the formulation of these designs leads to decreases in reflector area before deployment.

  18. Intelligent fuzzy-neural pattern generation and control of a quadrupedal bionic inspection robot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayfeddine, D.; Bulgakov, A. G.

    2017-02-01

    This paper represents a case study on ‘single leg single step’ pattern generation and control of quadrupedal bionic robot movement using intelligent fuzzy-neural approaches. The aim is to set up a flip-flop mechanical configuration allowing the robot to move one step forward. The same algorithm can be integrated to develop a full trajectory pattern as an interconnected task of global path planning for autonomous quadrupedal robots.

  19. Dynamic model and performance analysis of landing buffer for bionic locust mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Dian-Sheng; Zhang, Zi-Qiang; Chen, Ke-Wei

    2016-06-01

    The landing buffer is an important problem in the research on bionic locust jumping robots, and the different modes of landing and buffering can affect the dynamic performance of the buffering process significantly. Based on an experimental observation, the different modes of landing and buffering are determined, which include the different numbers of landing legs and different motion modes of legs in the buffering process. Then a bionic locust mechanism is established, and the springs are used to replace the leg muscles to achieve a buffering effect. To reveal the dynamic performance in the buffering process of the bionic locust mechanism, a dynamic model is established with different modes of landing and buffering. In particular, to analyze the buffering process conveniently, an equivalent vibration dynamic model of the bionic locust mechanism is proposed. Given the support forces of the ground to the leg links, which can be obtained from the dynamic model, the spring forces of the legs and the impact resistance of each leg are the important parameters affecting buffering performance, and evaluation principles for buffering performance are proposed according to the aforementioned parameters. Based on the dynamic model and these evaluation principles, the buffering performances are analyzed and compared in different modes of landing and buffering on a horizontal plane and an inclined plane. The results show that the mechanism with the ends of the legs sliding can obtain a better dynamic performance. This study offers primary theories for buffering dynamics and an evaluation of landing buffer performance, and it establishes a theoretical basis for studies and engineering applications.

  20. Design and Analysis of Bionic Cutting Blades Using Finite Element Method.

    PubMed

    Li, Mo; Yang, Yuwang; Guo, Li; Chen, Donghui; Sun, Hongliang; Tong, Jin

    2015-01-01

    Praying mantis is one of the most efficient predators in insect world, which has a pair of powerful tools, two sharp and strong forelegs. Its femur and tibia are both armed with a double row of strong spines along their posterior edges which can firmly grasp the prey, when the femur and tibia fold on each other in capturing. These spines are so sharp that they can easily and quickly cut into the prey. The geometrical characteristic of the praying mantis's foreleg, especially its tibia, has important reference value for the design of agricultural soil-cutting tools. Learning from the profile and arrangement of these spines, cutting blades with tooth profile were designed in this work. Two different sizes of tooth structure and arrangement were utilized in the design on the cutting edge. A conventional smooth-edge blade was used to compare with the bionic serrate-edge blades. To compare the working efficiency of conventional blade and bionic blades, 3D finite element simulation analysis and experimental measurement were operated in present work. Both the simulation and experimental results indicated that the bionic serrate-edge blades showed better performance in cutting efficiency.

  1. Bionic cardiology: exploration into a wealth of controllable body parts in the cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Sugimachi, Masaru; Sunagawa, Kenji

    2009-01-01

    Bionic cardiology is the medical science of exploring electronic control of the body, usually via the neural system. Mimicking or modifying biological regulation is a strategy used to combat diseases. Control of ventricular rate during atrial fibrillation by selective vagal stimulation, suppression of ischemia-related ventricular fibrillation by vagal stimulation, and reproduction of neurally commanded heart rate are some examples of bionic treatment for arrhythmia. Implantable radio-frequency-coupled on-demand carotid sinus stimulators succeeded in interrupting or preventing anginal attacks but were replaced later by coronary revascularization. Similar but fixed-intensity carotid sinus stimulators were used for hypertension but were also replaced by drugs. Recently, however, a self-powered implantable device has been reappraised for the treatment of drug-resistant hypertension. Closed-loop spinal cord stimulation has successfully treated severe orthostatic hypotension in a limited number of patients. Vagal nerve stimulation is effective in treating heart failure in animals, and a small-size clinical trial has just started. Simultaneous corrections of multiple hemodynamic abnormalities in an acute decompensated state are accomplished simply by quantifying fundamental cardiovascular parameters and controlling these parameters. Bionic cardiology will continue to promote the development of more sophisticated device-based therapies for otherwise untreatable diseases and will inspire more intricate applications in the twenty-first century.

  2. Design and Analysis of Bionic Cutting Blades Using Finite Element Method

    PubMed Central

    Li, Mo; Yang, Yuwang; Guo, Li; Chen, Donghui; Sun, Hongliang; Tong, Jin

    2015-01-01

    Praying mantis is one of the most efficient predators in insect world, which has a pair of powerful tools, two sharp and strong forelegs. Its femur and tibia are both armed with a double row of strong spines along their posterior edges which can firmly grasp the prey, when the femur and tibia fold on each other in capturing. These spines are so sharp that they can easily and quickly cut into the prey. The geometrical characteristic of the praying mantis's foreleg, especially its tibia, has important reference value for the design of agricultural soil-cutting tools. Learning from the profile and arrangement of these spines, cutting blades with tooth profile were designed in this work. Two different sizes of tooth structure and arrangement were utilized in the design on the cutting edge. A conventional smooth-edge blade was used to compare with the bionic serrate-edge blades. To compare the working efficiency of conventional blade and bionic blades, 3D finite element simulation analysis and experimental measurement were operated in present work. Both the simulation and experimental results indicated that the bionic serrate-edge blades showed better performance in cutting efficiency. PMID:27019583

  3. High-sensitive and high-efficient biochemical analysis method using a bionic electronic eye in combination with a smartphone-based colorimetric reader system.

    PubMed

    Kaiqi Su; Quchao Zou; Ning Hu; Ping Wang

    2015-01-01

    Bionic electronic eye (Bionic e-Eye), a developed smartphone-based colorimetric reader system, consists of smartphone or pad (iPhone 4s or iPad 3) as detection instrument and portable accessory as illumination provider, integrating with a wide-angle lens, a piece of lowest-power electro luminescent and a custom-made dark hood. A 96-well microtiter plate (MTP) was positioned on the electro luminescent and Bionic e-Eye captures the detection images by the back camera of smartphone. Being similar to human visual system, the hue, saturation and value (HSV, also called hex cone model) color model was employed in image processing algorithm of Bionic e-Eye. Optimized system dimension was determined by the system steadiness experiment of different photograph distances. Moreover, the commercially available BCA protein assay and CCK8 cell number assay were carried out to evaluate this Bionic e-Eye. Analytical performance of Bionic e-Eye had the better precision, higher sensitivity than microtiter plate reader (MTPR) and previous smartphone-based colorimetric reader for both two assays. Also, Bionic e-Eye using optical image detection had simultaneous and synchronous working mode, while MPTR using machine moving detection had asynchronous working mode in high throughput detection. Therefore, Bionic e-Eye will be an ideal point-of-care (POC) colorimetric detection device in the field of clinical application, industrial quality control, environment monitoring, and food assessment.

  4. Dynamic bending of bionic flexible body driven by pneumatic artificial muscles(PAMs) for spinning gait of quadruped robot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Jingtao; Yu, Huangying; Wang, Tianmiao

    2016-01-01

    The body of quadruped robot is generally developed with the rigid structure. The mobility of quadruped robot depends on the mechanical properties of the body mechanism. It is difficult for quadruped robot with rigid structure to achieve better mobility walking or running in the unstructured environment. A kind of bionic flexible body mechanism for quadruped robot is proposed, which is composed of one bionic spine and four pneumatic artificial muscles(PAMs). This kind of body imitates the four-legged creatures' kinematical structure and physical properties, which has the characteristic of changeable stiffness, lightweight, flexible and better bionics. The kinematics of body bending is derived, and the coordinated movement between the flexible body and legs is analyzed. The relationship between the body bending angle and the PAM length is obtained. The dynamics of the body bending is derived by the floating coordinate method and Lagrangian method, and the driving force of PAM is determined. The experiment of body bending is conducted, and the dynamic bending characteristic of bionic flexible body is evaluated. Experimental results show that the bending angle of the bionic flexible body can reach 18°. An innovation body mechanism for quadruped robot is proposed, which has the characteristic of flexibility and achieve bending by changing gas pressure of PAMs. The coordinated movement of the body and legs can achieve spinning gait in order to improve the mobility of quadruped robot.

  5. CI Controls for Energy and Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biondo, Samuel J.

    1996-01-01

    Computational intelligence (CI) is a rapidly evolving field that utilizes life imitating metaphors for guiding model building including, but not limited to neural networks, fuzzy logic, genetic algorithms, artificial life, and hybrid CI paradigms. Although the boundaries between artificial intelligence (AI) and CI are not distinct, their research communities are separate and distinct. CI researchers tend to focus on processing numerical data from sensors, while the AI community generally relies on symbolic computing to capture human knowledge. In both areas, there is a great deal of interest and activity in hybrid systems that can offset the limitations of individual methods, extend their capabilities, and create new capabilities. Examples of the benefits that can accrue from hybrid systems are contained.

  6. CiTO, the Citation Typing Ontology

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    CiTO, the Citation Typing Ontology, is an ontology for describing the nature of reference citations in scientific research articles and other scholarly works, both to other such publications and also to Web information resources, and for publishing these descriptions on the Semantic Web. Citation are described in terms of the factual and rhetorical relationships between citing publication and cited publication, the in-text and global citation frequencies of each cited work, and the nature of the cited work itself, including its publication and peer review status. This paper describes CiTO and illustrates its usefulness both for the annotation of bibliographic reference lists and for the visualization of citation networks. The latest version of CiTO, which this paper describes, is CiTO Version 1.6, published on 19 March 2010. CiTO is written in the Web Ontology Language OWL, uses the namespace http://purl.org/net/cito/, and is available from http://purl.org/net/cito/. This site uses content negotiation to deliver to the user an OWLDoc Web version of the ontology if accessed via a Web browser, or the OWL ontology itself if accessed from an ontology management tool such as Protégé 4 (http://protege.stanford.edu/). Collaborative work is currently under way to harmonize CiTO with other ontologies describing bibliographies and the rhetorical structure of scientific discourse. PMID:20626926

  7. Effect of the microhardness difference between base metal and bionic coupling unit on wear resistance of gray cast iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Zuobo; Zhou, Hong; Chang, Fang; Zhang, Peng; Cong, Dalong; Meng, Chao; Wang, Chuanwei; Ren, Luquan

    2015-12-01

    In order to improve the wear resistance of gray cast iron guide rail, the samples with different microhardness difference between bionic coupling units and base metal were manufactured by laser surface remelting. Wear behavior of gray cast iron with bionic coupling units has been studied under dry sliding condition at room temperature using a homemade liner reciprocating wear testing machine. The wear resistance was evaluated by means of weight loss measurement and wear morphology. The results indicated that when the microhardness difference is 561 HV0.2, the wear resistance of sample is the best.

  8. Bionics. 1970-October, 1982 (Citations from the NTIS Data Base)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-11-01

    Recent advances in visual information processing, electronic models of nerve cells, and biological sonar systems are discussed in these citations. Theory and applications are included, along with computerized simulation and signal processing. Electrophysiology and modeling of the central nervous system are also included. (This updated bibliography contains 143 citations, 8 of which are new entries to the previous edition.)

  9. Real-time processing of EMG signals for bionic arm purposes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olid Dominguez, Ferran; Wawrzyniak, Zbigniew M.

    2016-09-01

    This paper is connected with the problem of prostheses, that have always been a necessity for the human being. Bio-physiological signals from muscles, electromyographic signals have been collected, analyzed and processed in order to implement a real-time algorithm which is capable of differentiation of two different states of a bionic hand: open and closed. An algorithm for real-time electromyographic signal processing with almost no false positives is presented and it is explained that in bio-physiological experiments proper signal processing is of great importance.

  10. Materials design considerations involved in the fabrication of implantable bionics by metallization of ceramic substrates.

    PubMed

    Patel, Sunil; Guenther, Thomas; Dodds, Christopher W D; Kolke, Sergej; Privat, Karen L; Matteucci, Paul B; Suaning, Gregg J

    2013-01-01

    The Pt metallization of co-fired Al2O3/SiO2 substrates containing Pt feedthroughs was shown to be a suitable means to construct implantable bionics. The use of forge welding to join an electrode to such a metallized feedthrough was demonstrated and subsequently evaluated through the use of metallography and electron microscopy. Metallurgical phenomena involved in forge welding relevant to the fabrication of all types of biomedical implants are discussed within this paper. The affect of thermal profiles used in brazing or welding to build implantable devices from metal components is analysed and the case for considered selection of alloys in implant design is put forward.

  11. FIRE_CI2_ETL_RADAR

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2015-11-25

    FIRE_CI2_ETL_RADAR Project Title:  FIRE II CIRRUS Discipline:  ... Platform:  Ground Station Instrument:  Radar Spatial Coverage:  (37.06, -95.34) Spatial ... Search Guide Documents:  ETL_RADAR Guide Readme Files:  Readme ETL_RADAR (PS) ...

  12. A salient information processing system for bionic eye with application to obstacle avoidance.

    PubMed

    Stacey, Ashley; Li, Yi; Barnes, Nick

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we present a visual processing system for bionic eye with a focus on obstacle avoidance. Bionic eye aims at restoring the sense of vision to people living with blindness and low vision. However, current hardware implant technology limits the image resolution of the electrical stimulation device to be very low (e.g., 100 electrode arrays, which is approx. 12 × 9 pixels). Therefore, we need a visual processing unit that extracts salient information in an unknown environment for assisting patients in daily tasks such as obstacle avoidance. We implemented a fully portable system that includes a camera for capturing videos, a laptop for processing information using a state-of-the-art saliency detection algorithm, and a head-mounted display to visualize results. The experimental environment consists of a number of objects, such as shoes, boxes, and foot stands, on a textured ground plane. Our results show that the system efficiently processes the images, effectively identifies the obstacles, and eventually provides useful information for obstacle avoidance.

  13. Research of bionic design on tools with rostrum of cyrtotrachelus bugueti guer (coleoptera: curculionidae).

    PubMed

    Xu, Shun; Li, Longhai; Tong, Jin; Li, Mo

    2016-12-09

    To improve the torsional resistance capability of multilayered composite pipes, a bionic design was presented based on the rostrum of Cyrtotrachelus Bugueti Guer. Morphology and mechanical properties of the weevil's rostrum were studied. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) was employed to observe the macro-/microstructure and inner structure. Nanoindentation was carried out to measure the elastic modulus and the hardness of the biological materials. Based on the structure of rostrum, a mathematical model of multilayered biomimetic pipe was established with the statistical methods. Then, the 3D biomimetic cylinder was built and the torsional resistance capability was analyzed using the finite element analysis. From the SEM and nanoindentation, it was found that the rostrum is a cylindrical hollow multilayered structure composed by three materials. In the transverse section of rostrum, the materials' moduli are 3.07, 3.15, and 8.64 GPa, the hardness are 172.71, 125.32, and 278.99 MPa, respectively. In the longitudinal section, the moduli are 3.01, 4.35, and 7.66 GPa, the hardness are157.46, 149.15, and 253.51 MPa, respectively. The results of simulation showed that the distributional type of lamination has a significant effect on the torsional resistance capability of multilayered structure. The biomimetic structure, which imitates the lamination of rostrum, is superior in the aspect of torsional resistance compared with the nonlaminated or uniform laminated structure. Additionally, the bionic method is feasible and efficient.

  14. Close-field electroporation gene delivery using the cochlear implant electrode array enhances the bionic ear.

    PubMed

    Pinyon, Jeremy L; Tadros, Sherif F; Froud, Kristina E; Y Wong, Ann C; Tompson, Isabella T; Crawford, Edward N; Ko, Myungseo; Morris, Renée; Klugmann, Matthias; Housley, Gary D

    2014-04-23

    The cochlear implant is the most successful bionic prosthesis and has transformed the lives of people with profound hearing loss. However, the performance of the "bionic ear" is still largely constrained by the neural interface itself. Current spread inherent to broad monopolar stimulation of the spiral ganglion neuron somata obviates the intrinsic tonotopic mapping of the cochlear nerve. We show in the guinea pig that neurotrophin gene therapy integrated into the cochlear implant improves its performance by stimulating spiral ganglion neurite regeneration. We used the cochlear implant electrode array for novel "close-field" electroporation to transduce mesenchymal cells lining the cochlear perilymphatic canals with a naked complementary DNA gene construct driving expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and a green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter. The focusing of electric fields by particular cochlear implant electrode configurations led to surprisingly efficient gene delivery to adjacent mesenchymal cells. The resulting BDNF expression stimulated regeneration of spiral ganglion neurites, which had atrophied 2 weeks after ototoxic treatment, in a bilateral sensorineural deafness model. In this model, delivery of a control GFP-only vector failed to restore neuron structure, with atrophied neurons indistinguishable from unimplanted cochleae. With BDNF therapy, the regenerated spiral ganglion neurites extended close to the cochlear implant electrodes, with localized ectopic branching. This neural remodeling enabled bipolar stimulation via the cochlear implant array, with low stimulus thresholds and expanded dynamic range of the cochlear nerve, determined via electrically evoked auditory brainstem responses. This development may broadly improve neural interfaces and extend molecular medicine applications.

  15. Mapping of bionic array electric field focusing in plasmid DNA-based gene electrotransfer.

    PubMed

    Browne, C J; Pinyon, J L; Housley, D M; Crawford, E N; Lovell, N H; Klugmann, M; Housley, G D

    2016-04-01

    Molecular medicine through gene therapy is challenged to achieve targeted action. This is now possible utilizing bionic electrode arrays for focal delivery of naked (plasmid) DNA via gene electrotransfer. Here, we establish the properties of array-based electroporation affecting targeted gene delivery. An array with eight 300 μm platinum ring electrodes configured as a cochlear implant bionic interface was used to transduce HEK293 cell monolayers with a plasmid-DNA green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter gene construct. Electroporation parameters were pulse intensity, number, duration, separation and electrode configuration. The latter determined the shape of the electric fields, which were mapped using a voltage probe. Electrode array-based electroporation was found to require ~100 × lower applied voltages for cell transduction than conventional electroporation. This was found to be due to compression of the field lines orthogonal to the array. A circular area of GFP-positive cells was created when the electrodes were ganged together as four adjacent anodes and four cathodes, whereas alternating electrode polarity created a linear area of GFP-positive cells. The refinement of gene delivery parameters was validated in vivo in the guinea pig cochlea. These findings have significant clinical ramifications, where spatiotemporal control of gene expression can be predicted by manipulation of the electric field via current steering at a cellular level.

  16. Numerical Analysis of Hydrodynamics for Bionic Oscillating Hydrofoil Based on Panel Method.

    PubMed

    Xue, Gang; Liu, Yanjun; Zhang, Muqun; Ding, Hongpeng

    2016-01-01

    The kinematics model based on the Slender-Body theory is proposed from the bionic movement of real fish. The Panel method is applied to the hydrodynamic performance analysis innovatively, with the Gauss-Seidel method to solve the Navier-Stokes equations additionally, to evaluate the flexible deformation of fish in swimming accurately when satisfying the boundary conditions. A physical prototype to mimic the shape of tuna is developed with the revolutionized technology of rapid prototyping manufacturing. The hydrodynamic performance for rigid oscillating hydrofoil is analyzed with the proposed method, and it shows good coherence with the cases analyzed by the commercial software Fluent and the experimental data from robofish. Furthermore, the hydrodynamic performance of coupled hydrofoil, which consisted of flexible fish body and rigid caudal fin, is analyzed with the proposed method. It shows that the caudal fin has great influence on trailing vortex shedding and the phase angle is the key factor on hydrodynamic performance. It is verified that the shape of trailing vortex is similar to the image of the motion curve at the trailing edge as the assumption of linear vortex plane under the condition of small downwash velocity. The numerical analysis of hydrodynamics for bionic movement based on the Panel method has certain value to reveal the fish swimming mechanism.

  17. Numerical Analysis of Hydrodynamics for Bionic Oscillating Hydrofoil Based on Panel Method

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The kinematics model based on the Slender-Body theory is proposed from the bionic movement of real fish. The Panel method is applied to the hydrodynamic performance analysis innovatively, with the Gauss-Seidel method to solve the Navier-Stokes equations additionally, to evaluate the flexible deformation of fish in swimming accurately when satisfying the boundary conditions. A physical prototype to mimic the shape of tuna is developed with the revolutionized technology of rapid prototyping manufacturing. The hydrodynamic performance for rigid oscillating hydrofoil is analyzed with the proposed method, and it shows good coherence with the cases analyzed by the commercial software Fluent and the experimental data from robofish. Furthermore, the hydrodynamic performance of coupled hydrofoil, which consisted of flexible fish body and rigid caudal fin, is analyzed with the proposed method. It shows that the caudal fin has great influence on trailing vortex shedding and the phase angle is the key factor on hydrodynamic performance. It is verified that the shape of trailing vortex is similar to the image of the motion curve at the trailing edge as the assumption of linear vortex plane under the condition of small downwash velocity. The numerical analysis of hydrodynamics for bionic movement based on the Panel method has certain value to reveal the fish swimming mechanism. PMID:27578959

  18. [Application of bionic technology to speciation analysis and bioavailability assessment of nickel in transgenic soybean].

    PubMed

    Chen, Li-Hui; Li, Shun-Xing; Mou, Yang; Zheng, Feng-Ying; Li, Yan-Cai; Wang, Hui; Zheng, Na-Yan; Xie, He-Fang

    2013-11-01

    The safety of transgenic food has been paid the most attention to by the public and scientists. Trace metal bioavailability could provide information for safety assessment of transgenic food. The critical functional digestion and absorption in the gastrointestinal tract were simulated by bionic gastrointestinal digestion, metabolism of gut microbiota, and bionic biomembrane adsorption with liposome and then used for the pretreatment of transgenic and general soybeans. Ni speciation in the chyme was defined as affinity-liposome and water soluble Ni. Nickel bioavailability was assessed by the content of affinity-liposome Ni. Water soluble Ni was the main species of nickel complex in the chyme. Nickel bioavailability was 4.1% for transgenic soybean and 3.3% for general soybean, which could be enhanced by gastrointestinal digestion and metabolism of gut microbiota. After transgene, nickel bioavailability was increased 24% but the content of affinity-liposome Ni was 122.3 ng x g(-1) for transgenic soybean, just as 36% as that of general soybean.

  19. Numerical simulations and vorticity dynamics of self-propelled swimming of 3D bionic fish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, ZhiQiang; Wu, ChuiJie

    2012-02-01

    Numerical simulations and the control of self-propelled swimming of three-dimensional bionic fish in a viscous flow and the mechanism of fish swimming are carried out in this study, with a 3D computational fluid dynamics package, which includes the immersed boundary method and the volume of fluid method, the adaptive multi-grid finite volume method, and the control strategy of fish swimming. Firstly, the mechanism of 3D fish swimming was studied and the vorticity dynamics root was traced to the moving body surface by using the boundary vorticity-flux theory. With the change of swimming speed, the contributions of the fish body and caudal fin to thrust are analyzed quantitatively. The relationship between vortex structures of fish swimming and the forces exerted on the fish body are also given in this paper. Finally, the 3D wake structure of self-propelled swimming of 3D bionic fish is presented. The in-depth analysis of the 3D vortex structure in the role of 3D biomimetic fish swimming is also performed.

  20. Investigation into the efficiency of different bionic algorithm combinations for a COBRA meta-heuristic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhmedova, Sh; Semenkin, E.

    2017-02-01

    Previously, a meta-heuristic approach, called Co-Operation of Biology-Related Algorithms or COBRA, for solving real-parameter optimization problems was introduced and described. COBRA’s basic idea consists of a cooperative work of five well-known bionic algorithms such as Particle Swarm Optimization, the Wolf Pack Search, the Firefly Algorithm, the Cuckoo Search Algorithm and the Bat Algorithm, which were chosen due to the similarity of their schemes. The performance of this meta-heuristic was evaluated on a set of test functions and its workability was demonstrated. Thus it was established that the idea of the algorithms’ cooperative work is useful. However, it is unclear which bionic algorithms should be included in this cooperation and how many of them. Therefore, the five above-listed algorithms and additionally the Fish School Search algorithm were used for the development of five different modifications of COBRA by varying the number of component-algorithms. These modifications were tested on the same set of functions and the best of them was found. Ways of further improving the COBRA algorithm are then discussed.

  1. Model of the Recurrent Nova CI Aql

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lederle, C.; Kimeswenger, S.

    CI Aql was observed with the Innsbruck 60cm telescope in VRIC from June to October 2001. To reproduce the resulting light curves, a geometrical model of the double star system was realized in MATLAB-code. Already existing and rather basic routines were used to implement difficult ray-tracing and rendering tasks. For the geometrical model itself an extended rim of the accretion disk and the illumination of the other components by the white dwarf turned out to be very important.

  2. Modal mineralogy of CI and CI-like chondrites by X-ray diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, A. J.; Schofield, P. F.; Howard, K. T.; Russell, S. S.

    2015-09-01

    The CI chondrites are some of the most hydrated meteorites available to study, making them ideal samples with which to investigate aqueous processes in the early Solar System. Here, we have used position-sensitive-detector X-ray diffraction (PSD-XRD) to quantify the abundance of minerals in bulk samples of the CI chondrite falls Alais, Orgueil and Ivuna, and the Antarctic CI-like chondrites Y-82162 and Y-980115. We find that Alais, Orgueil and Ivuna are dominated by a mixed serpentine/saponite phyllosilicate (81-84 vol%), plus minor magnetite (6-10%), sulphides (4-7%) and carbonates (<3%). This reflects an extended period of aqueous alteration and the near-complete transformation of anhydrous phases into a secondary mineral assemblage. The similarity in total abundance of phyllosilicate suggests that the CI chondrites all experienced the same degree of aqueous alteration on the parent body. In contrast, Y-82162 contains a highly disordered serpentine/saponite phyllosilicate (68 vol%), sulphide (19%), olivine (11%) and magnetite (2%). This mineralogy is distinct from that of the CI chondrites, attesting to both a different starting mineralogy and alteration history. The structure and relatively low abundance of the phyllosilicate, and the high abundance of olivine, are consistent with previous observations that Y-82162 represents CI-like material that following aqueous alteration suffered thermal metamorphism at temperatures >500 °C. Similarly, Y-980115 contains disordered serpentine/saponite (71 vol%), sulphide (19%), olivine (8%) and magnetite (2%), confirming that it too is a thermally metamorphosed CI-like chondrite. We suggest that the CI-like chondrites are derived from a different parent body than the CI chondrites, which underwent short-lived thermal metamorphism due to impacts and/or solar radiation.

  3. Building the bionic eye: an emerging reality and opportunity.

    PubMed

    Merabet, Lotfi B

    2011-01-01

    Once the topic of folklore and science fiction, the notion of restoring vision to the blind is now approaching a tractable reality. Technological advances have inspired numerous multidisciplinary groups worldwide to develop visual neuroprosthetic devices that could potentially provide useful vision and improve the quality of life of profoundly blind individuals. While a variety of approaches and designs are being pursued, they all share a common principle of creating visual percepts through the stimulation of visual neural elements using appropriate patterns of electrical stimulation. Human clinical trials are now well underway and initial results have been met with a balance of excitement and cautious optimism. As remaining technical and surgical challenges continue to be solved and clinical trials move forward, we now enter a phase of development that requires careful consideration of a new set of issues. Establishing appropriate patient selection criteria, methods of evaluating long-term performance and effectiveness, and strategies to rehabilitate implanted patients will all need to be considered in order to achieve optimal outcomes and establish these devices as viable therapeutic options.

  4. Microfossils in CI and CO Carbonaceous Meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoover, Richard B.; Rozanov, Alexei Y.; Jerman, Gregory; Costen, James

    2003-01-01

    Secondary and backscatter electron images and x-ray spectral data of selected CI (Alais, Orgueil, and Tagish Lake) and CO3 (Rainbow and Dar a1 Gani 749) carbonaceous meteorites have recently been obtained using Field Emission and Environmental Scanning Electron Microscopes These studies indicate the presence of a large assemblage of biomarkers and complex lithified and carbonized remains of bodies that we interpret as indigenous microfossils. We discuss the meteorites, provide images of many of the biogenic forms found embedded in the freshly fractured meteorite surfaces.

  5. Contact pressure distribution of chemical mechanical polishing based on bionic polishing pad

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jun; Xing, Xue-Ling; Lu, Yu-Shan; Zhang, Liao-Yuan

    2010-12-01

    In order to improve the uniformity of the contact pressure distribution of chemical mechanical polishing, based on the Winkler foundation principle of mechanics and phyllotaxis theory of biology, a kind of stannum fixed abrasive pad with bionic surface texture has been designed, and the contact mechanism and ANSYS model have been established. By the calculating and analysis of contact pressure distribution on polishing wafer, the contact pressure distribution and the effects of the geometrical and physical parameters polishing pad on the contact pressure distributions have been obtained. The results show that the horizontal effect of the polishing pad is very small, the uniformity of contact pressure distribution can be improved, and there are the phyllotactic parameters which make the contact pressure distribution more uniformity.

  6. Hemocompatibility research on the micro-structure surface of a bionic heart valve.

    PubMed

    Ye, Xia; Wang, Ze; Zhang, Xianghua; Zhou, Ming; Cai, Lan

    2014-01-01

    In order to study how the geometric parameters and shape of the micro-structure surface of a bionic heart valve affects hemocompatibility, mastoid micro-structures with different periodic space were fabricated using a femtosecond laser on a polyurethane (PU) surface. The apparent contact angles of droplets on the micro-structure surfaces were measured to characterize their wettability. Then a series of blood compatibility experiments, including platelet adhesion, dynamic coagulation and hemolysis were completed. The experimental results showed that the micro-structure on the biomaterial surface helped improve its hydrophobicity and hemocompatibility. Also, the periodic space affected not only the hydrophobicity but also the hemocompatibility of the biomaterial. With the increasing of the periodic space, the apparent contact angle increased, the number of platelet adhesion decreased, the dynamic clotting time became longer and the hemolysis ratio reduced. In addition, the shape of the micro-structure also affected the hemocompatibility of the biomaterial.

  7. A new time-adaptive discrete bionic wavelet transform for enhancing speech from adverse noise environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palaniswamy, Sumithra; Duraisamy, Prakash; Alam, Mohammad Showkat; Yuan, Xiaohui

    2012-04-01

    Automatic speech processing systems are widely used in everyday life such as mobile communication, speech and speaker recognition, and for assisting the hearing impaired. In speech communication systems, the quality and intelligibility of speech is of utmost importance for ease and accuracy of information exchange. To obtain an intelligible speech signal and one that is more pleasant to listen, noise reduction is essential. In this paper a new Time Adaptive Discrete Bionic Wavelet Thresholding (TADBWT) scheme is proposed. The proposed technique uses Daubechies mother wavelet to achieve better enhancement of speech from additive non- stationary noises which occur in real life such as street noise and factory noise. Due to the integration of human auditory system model into the wavelet transform, bionic wavelet transform (BWT) has great potential for speech enhancement which may lead to a new path in speech processing. In the proposed technique, at first, discrete BWT is applied to noisy speech to derive TADBWT coefficients. Then the adaptive nature of the BWT is captured by introducing a time varying linear factor which updates the coefficients at each scale over time. This approach has shown better performance than the existing algorithms at lower input SNR due to modified soft level dependent thresholding on time adaptive coefficients. The objective and subjective test results confirmed the competency of the TADBWT technique. The effectiveness of the proposed technique is also evaluated for speaker recognition task under noisy environment. The recognition results show that the TADWT technique yields better performance when compared to alternate methods specifically at lower input SNR.

  8. CI Cygni since the 1980 eclipse

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stencel, R. E.; Michalitsianos, A. G.; Kafatos, M.

    1982-01-01

    During the 1980 eclipse of the 855 day period symbiotic binary CI Cyg, a data set showing high excitation resonance lines which were largely uneclipsed but brightening on an orbital timescale, and intercombination lines exhibiting pronounced but nontotal eclipses and which were fading on an orbital timescale were obtained. A model invoking a low density dissipating nebula surrounding the hot companion to explain the intercombination lines, and a shock between stellar winds to interpret the resonance lines, is described. Subsequent synoptic observations revealed continuing changes in the UV emission line fluxes consistent with those described above, except for the brightening of Mg II and the emergence of strong, not previously seen Mg V emission. Post-outburst and phase dependent changes must be included in any interpretation of this system as the archetypal symbiotic binary. Observations to be made during the 1982 October eclipse are summarized.

  9. A novel in situ device based on a bionic piezoelectric actuator to study tensile and fatigue properties of bulk materials.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shupeng; Zhang, Zhihui; Ren, Luquan; Zhao, Hongwei; Liang, Yunhong; Zhu, Bing

    2014-06-01

    In this work, a miniaturized device based on a bionic piezoelectric actuator was developed to investigate the static tensile and dynamic fatigue properties of bulk materials. The device mainly consists of a bionic stepping piezoelectric actuator based on wedge block clamping, a pair of grippers, and a set of precise signal test system. Tensile and fatigue examinations share a set of driving system and a set of signal test system. In situ tensile and fatigue examinations under scanning electron microscope or metallographic microscope could be carried out due to the miniaturized dimensions of the device. The structure and working principle of the device were discussed and the effects of output difference between two piezoelectric stacks on the device were theoretically analyzed. The tensile and fatigue examinations on ordinary copper were carried out using this device and its feasibility was verified through the comparison tests with a commercial tensile examination instrument.

  10. A novel in situ device based on a bionic piezoelectric actuator to study tensile and fatigue properties of bulk materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shupeng; Zhang, Zhihui; Ren, Luquan; Zhao, Hongwei; Liang, Yunhong; Zhu, Bing

    2014-06-01

    In this work, a miniaturized device based on a bionic piezoelectric actuator was developed to investigate the static tensile and dynamic fatigue properties of bulk materials. The device mainly consists of a bionic stepping piezoelectric actuator based on wedge block clamping, a pair of grippers, and a set of precise signal test system. Tensile and fatigue examinations share a set of driving system and a set of signal test system. In situ tensile and fatigue examinations under scanning electron microscope or metallographic microscope could be carried out due to the miniaturized dimensions of the device. The structure and working principle of the device were discussed and the effects of output difference between two piezoelectric stacks on the device were theoretically analyzed. The tensile and fatigue examinations on ordinary copper were carried out using this device and its feasibility was verified through the comparison tests with a commercial tensile examination instrument.

  11. A novel in situ device based on a bionic piezoelectric actuator to study tensile and fatigue properties of bulk materials

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Shupeng; Zhang, Zhihui Ren, Luquan; Liang, Yunhong; Zhao, Hongwei; Zhu, Bing

    2014-06-15

    In this work, a miniaturized device based on a bionic piezoelectric actuator was developed to investigate the static tensile and dynamic fatigue properties of bulk materials. The device mainly consists of a bionic stepping piezoelectric actuator based on wedge block clamping, a pair of grippers, and a set of precise signal test system. Tensile and fatigue examinations share a set of driving system and a set of signal test system. In situ tensile and fatigue examinations under scanning electron microscope or metallographic microscope could be carried out due to the miniaturized dimensions of the device. The structure and working principle of the device were discussed and the effects of output difference between two piezoelectric stacks on the device were theoretically analyzed. The tensile and fatigue examinations on ordinary copper were carried out using this device and its feasibility was verified through the comparison tests with a commercial tensile examination instrument.

  12. Effects of bionic units on the fatigue wear of gray cast iron surface with different shapes and distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhi-kai; Lu, Shu-chao; Song, Xi-bin; Zhang, Haifeng; Yang, Wan-shi; Zhou, Hong

    2015-03-01

    To improve the fatigue wear resistance of gray cast iron (GCI), GCI samples were modified by a laser to imitate the unique structure of some soil animals alternating between soft and hard phases; the hard phase resists the deformation and the soft phase releases the deformation. Using the self-controlled fatigue wear test method, the fatigue wear behaviors of treated and untreated samples were investigated and compared experimentally. The results show that the bionic non-smooth surface obtains a beneficial effect on improving the fatigue wear resistance of a sample, and the fatigue wear resistance of the bionic sample assembled with reticulate units (60°+0°), whose mass loss was reduced by 62%, was superior to the others. Meanwhile, a finite element (FE) was used to simulate the compression and the distributions of strain and stress on the non-smooth surface was inferred. From these results, we understood that the functions of the bionic unit such as reducing strain and stress, and also obstructing the closure and propagation of cracks were the main reasons for improving the fatigue wear property of GCI.

  13. [Study on the acid hydrolysis, fiber remodeling and bionics mineralization of rat tail tendon collagen type Ⅰ].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhan; Zhang, Chun; Guo, Qiaofeng

    2016-05-25

    Objective: To produce bionic bone material that is consistent with human bone in chemical composition and molecular structure using rat tail tendon collagen type Ⅰ. Methods: The type Ⅰcollagen derived from rat tail was extracted by acetic acid to form collagen fibers. The reconstructed collagen fibers were placed in the mineralized solution to mimic bone mineralization for 2-6 days. Bone mineralization was observed by transmission electron microscopy and electron diffraction.Results: Collagen fibers with characteristic D-Band structure were reconstructed by using rat tail tendon collagen type Ⅰ extracted with acid hydrolysis method. Transmission electron microscopy and electron diffraction showed that calcium hydroxyapatite precursor infiltrated into the collagen fibers, and the collagen fibers were partially mineralized after 2 days of mineralization; the collagen fibers were completely mineralized and bionic bone material of typeⅠ collagen/calcium hydroxyapatite was formed after 6 days of mineralization.Conclusion: The collagen type Ⅰ can be extracted from rat tail tendon by acid hydrolysis method, and can be reformed and mineralized to form the bionic bone material which mimics human bone in chemical composition and the molecular structure.

  14. The EvoDevoCI: a concept inventory for gauging students' understanding of evolutionary developmental biology.

    PubMed

    Perez, Kathryn E; Hiatt, Anna; Davis, Gregory K; Trujillo, Caleb; French, Donald P; Terry, Mark; Price, Rebecca M

    2013-01-01

    The American Association for the Advancement of Science 2011 report Vision and Change in Undergraduate Biology Education encourages the teaching of developmental biology as an important part of teaching evolution. Recently, however, we found that biology majors often lack the developmental knowledge needed to understand evolutionary developmental biology, or "evo-devo." To assist in efforts to improve evo-devo instruction among undergraduate biology majors, we designed a concept inventory (CI) for evolutionary developmental biology, the EvoDevoCI. The CI measures student understanding of six core evo-devo concepts using four scenarios and 11 multiple-choice items, all inspired by authentic scientific examples. Distracters were designed to represent the common conceptual difficulties students have with each evo-devo concept. The tool was validated by experts and administered at four institutions to 1191 students during preliminary (n = 652) and final (n = 539) field trials. We used student responses to evaluate the readability, difficulty, discriminability, validity, and reliability of the EvoDevoCI, which included items ranging in difficulty from 0.22-0.55 and in discriminability from 0.19-0.38. Such measures suggest the EvoDevoCI is an effective tool for assessing student understanding of evo-devo concepts and the prevalence of associated common conceptual difficulties among both novice and advanced undergraduate biology majors.

  15. Research on the image fusion and target extraction based on bionic compound eye system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shaowei; Hao, Qun; Song, Yong; Wang, Zihan; Zhang, Kaiyu; Zhang, Shiyu

    2015-08-01

    People attach more and more importance to bionic compound eye due to its advantages such as small volume, large field of view and sensitivity to high-speed moving objects. Small field of view and large volume are the disadvantages of traditional image sensor and in order to avoid these defects, this paper intends to build a set of compound eye system based on insect compound eye structure and visual processing mechanism. In the center of this system is the primary sensor which has high resolution ratio. The primary sensor is surrounded by the other six sensors which have low resolution ratio. Based on this system, this paper will study the target image fusion and extraction method by using plane compound eye structure. This paper designs a control module which can combine the distinguishing features of high resolution image with local features of low resolution image so as to conduct target detection, recognition and location. Compared with traditional ways, the way of high resolution in the center and low resolution around makes this system own the advantages of high resolution and large field of view and enables the system to detect the object quickly and recognize the object accurately.

  16. Bionic optical imaging system with aspheric solid-liquid mixed variable-focus lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Jia-Wei; Wang, Xuan-Yin; Liang, Dan

    2016-02-01

    A bionic optical imaging system with an aspheric solid-liquid mixed variable-focus lens was designed and fabricated. The entire system mainly consisted of a doublet lens, a solid-liquid mixed variable-focus lens, a connecting part, and a CCD imaging device. To mimic the structure of the crystalline lens, the solid-liquid mixed variable-focus lens consisted of a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) lens, a polymethyl methacrylate lens, and the liquid of ethyl silicone oil. By pumping liquid in or out of the cavity using a microinjector, the curvatures of the front and rear surfaces of the PDMS lens were varied, resulting in a change of focal length. The overall structure of the system was presented, as well as a detailed description of the solid-liquid mixed variable-focus lens, material, and fabrication process. Under different injection volumes, the deformation of the PDMS lens was measured and simulated, pictures were captured, and the optical performance was analyzed in simulations and experiments. The focal length of the system ranged from 25.05 to 14.61 mm, and the variation of the diopter was 28.5D, which was larger than that of the human eye.

  17. Unifying inflation with late-time acceleration by a BIonic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sepehri, Alireza; Rahaman, Farook; Setare, Mohammad Reza; Pradhan, Anirudh; Capozziello, Salvatore; Sardar, Iftikar Hossain

    2015-07-01

    We propose a cosmological model that unifies inflation, deceleration and acceleration phases of expansion history by a BIonic system. At the beginning, there are k black fundamental strings that transited to the BIon configuration at a given corresponding point. Here, two coupled universes, brane and antibrane, are created interacting each other through a wormhole and inflate. With decreasing temperature, the energy of this wormhole flows into the universe branes and leads to inflation. After a short time, the wormhole evaporates, the inflation ends and a deceleration epoch starts. By approaching the brane and antibrane universes together, a tachyon is born, grows and causes the creation of a new wormhole. At this time, the brane and antibrane universes result connected again and the late-time acceleration era of the universe begins. We compare our model with previous unified phantom models and observational data obtaining some cosmological parameters like temperature in terms of time. We also find that deceleration parameter is negative during inflation and late-time acceleration epochs, while it is positive during the deceleration era. This means that the model is consistent, in principle, with cosmological observations.

  18. Bionic approach for the prevention of exit-site infections of percutaneous devices.

    PubMed

    Großhauser, Johannes; Reiter, Katja; Große-Siestrup, Christian; Kikhney, Judith; Kertzscher, Ulrich; Affeld, Klaus

    2015-06-01

    Exit-site infections remain one of the main complications for percutaneous devices, such as catheters for peritoneal dialysis or drivelines for ventricular assist devices. Many efforts have been made to create a biological seal, yet without long-term success. This study investigates a new kind of percutaneous device which is coated with an extricable polymeric membrane. The bionic approach applies the naturally outwards directed growth of skin structures to technology: by pulling the protective membrane it slowly grows out of the body and a developing sulcus is exposed to dry air and an infection is avoided. In a feasibility study this kind of device was shown to reduce the rate of infection. To further investigate these devices, they were implanted in the skin of goats and observed for a period of more than 500 days. The membranes were pulled with a force of up to 2 N and the resulting movement was recorded. When being pulled, the membranes moved 0.4-0.9 mm per week, showing that the application of a continuously acting, defined force on the protective membrane causes the desired slow movement.

  19. Effects of laser parameters on the geometrical characteristics of peg-shaped bionic coupling unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Baoyu; Zhang, Zhihui; Liang, Yunhong; Yan, Qiongqiong; Ren, Luquan

    2014-12-01

    Peg-shaped bionic coupling unit (PBCU) processed by pulse laser is effective in anti-adhesion, anti-drag, anti-wear and anti-fatigue application. To obtain desired structural and morphological characteristics of the PBCU for industrial manufacturing, selection of proper processing parameters gradually becomes a growing important problem. Traditionally, the procedure of parameter selecting is often cost-plus and time-consuming. In this work, a statistical analysis of fabricating PBCU on the surface of medium carbon steel was conducted. The laser processing parameters utilized in the experiment and analysis are peak power 4-8 kW, pulse duration 6-16 ms and defocusing amount 6-10 mm. A series of mathematical models regarding the relationship between geometrical characteristics of PBCU and laser processing parameters were developed and checked. The results indicate that the developed models can be adequately used to control the structural and morphological characteristics of PBCU within the scope of analysis. Based on the models, the formation mechanism of the structural and morphological characteristics under different laser parameters were analyzed and discussed.

  20. Butterfly scales as bionic templates for complex ordered nanophotonic materials: A pathway to biomimetic plasmonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakšić, Zoran; Pantelić, Dejan; Sarajlić, Milija; Savić-Šević, Svetlana; Matović, Jovan; Jelenković, Branislav; Vasiljević-Radović, Dana; Ćurčić, Srećko; Vuković, Slobodan; Pavlović, Vladimir; Buha, Jelena; Lačković, Vesna; Labudović-Borović, Milica; Ćurčić, Božidar

    2013-08-01

    In this paper we propose a possible use of butterfly scales as templates for ordered 2D or 3D nanophotonic materials, with complexity not easily reproducible by conventional micro/nanofabrication methods. Functionalization through laminar nanocompositing is utilized to impart novel properties to the biological scaffold. An extremely wide variability of butterfly scale forms, shapes, sizes and fine structures is observed in nature, many of them already possessing peculiar optical properties. Their nanophotonic functionalization ensures a large choice of forms and functions, including enhanced light localization, light and plasmon waveguiding and general metamaterial behavior, to mention a few. We show that one is able to achieve a combination of plasmonics and bionics, resulting in functionalities seldom if ever met in nature. As an illustration we have analyzed the photonic properties of the nanostructured scales on the wings of Purple Emperor butterflies Apatura ilia, Apatura iris and Sasakia charonda. Their intricate nanometer-sized structures produce remarkable ultraviolet-blue iridescence, spectrally and directionally narrow. We present our analysis of their plasmonic/nanophotonic functionalization including preliminary calculations and initial experimental results. As a simple example, we used radiofrequent sputtering to produce nanoaperture-based plasmonic structures at a fraction of the cost and necessary engineering efforts compared to the conventional top-down methods. We conclude that the described pathway to biomimetic plasmonics offers potentials for significant expansion of the nanophotonic and nanoplasmonic material toolbox.

  1. Investigation on 3D t wake flow structures of swimming bionic fish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, G.-X.; Tan, G.-K.; Lai, G.-J.

    2012-10-01

    A bionic experimental platform was designed for the purpose of investigating time accurate three-dimensional flow field, using digital particle image velocimetry (DSPIV). The wake behind the flapping trail of a robotic fish model was studied at high spatial resolution. The study was performed in a water channel. A robot fish model was designed and built. The model was fixed onto a rigid support framework using a cable-supporting method, with twelve stretched wires. The entire tail of the model can perform prescribed motions in two degrees of freedom, mainly in carangiform mode, by driving its afterbody and lunate caudal fin respectively. The DSPIV system was set up to operate in a translational manner, measuring velocity field in a series of parallel slices. Phase locked measurements were repeated for a number of runs, allowing reconstruction of phase average flow field. Vortex structures with phase history of the wake were obtained. The study reveals some new and complex three-dimensional flow structures in the wake of the fish, including "reverse hairpin vortex" and "reverse Karman S-H vortex rings", allowing insight into physics of this complex flow.

  2. Electron Attachment to Halomethanes at High Temperature: CH2CI2, CF2CI2, CH3CI, and CF3CI Attachment Rate Constants up to 1100 K

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-08-01

    49 meV for hydrogen- containing molecules. Thus, on the basis of G3 calculations, Eq. (2) cannot be said to be definitely exothermic . However, the...reaction is exothermic . Fabrikant and Hotop gave an analysis of Arrhenius plots for dissociative electron attachment. For our sole endothermic case...CH2CI2, CF3CI, and CF2C12. Two of these cases, as with CH,CI, are exothermic toward electron attachment. e" + CF3CI-+CF3 + CP - 143 meV. (4) e

  3. Design and development of a ferroelectric micro photo detector for the bionic eye

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Yang

    Driven by no effective therapy for Retinitis Pigmentosa and Age Related Macular Degeneration, artificial vision through the development of an artificial retina that can be implanted into the human eye, is being addressed by the Bionic Eye. This dissertation focuses on the study of a photoferroelectric micro photo detector as an implantable retinal prosthesis for vision restoration in patients with above disorders. This implant uses an electrical signal to trigger the appropriate ocular cells of the vision system without resorting to wiring or electrode implantation. The research work includes fabrication of photoferroelectric thin film micro detectors, characterization of these photoferroelectric micro devices as photovoltaic cells, and Finite Element Method (FEM) modeling of the photoferroelectrics and their device-neuron interface. A ferroelectric micro detector exhibiting the photovoltaic effect (PVE) directly adds electrical potential to the neuron membrane outer wall at the focal adhesion regions. The electrical potential then generates a retinal cell membrane potential deflection through a newly developed Direct-Electric-Field-Coupling (DEFC) model. This model is quite different from the traditional electric current model because instead of current directly working on the cell membrane, the PVE current is used to generate a localized high electric potential in the focal adhesion region by working together with the anisotropic high internal impedance of ferroelectric thin films. General electrodes and silicon photodetectors do not have such anisotropy and high impedance, and thus they cannot generate DEFC. This mechanism investigation is very valuable, because it clearly shows that our artificial retina works in a way that is totally different from the traditional current stimulation methods.

  4. Estimation of the age and amount of brown rice plant hoppers based on bionic electronic nose use.

    PubMed

    Xu, Sai; Zhou, Zhiyan; Lu, Huazhong; Luo, Xiwen; Lan, Yubin; Zhang, Yang; Li, Yanfang

    2014-09-29

    The brown rice plant hopper (BRPH), Nilaparvata lugens (Stal), is one of the most important insect pests affecting rice and causes serious damage to the yield and quality of rice plants in Asia. This study used bionic electronic nose technology to sample BRPH volatiles, which vary in age and amount. Principal component analysis (PCA), linear discrimination analysis (LDA), probabilistic neural network (PNN), BP neural network (BPNN) and loading analysis (Loadings) techniques were used to analyze the sampling data. The results indicate that the PCA and LDA classification ability is poor, but the LDA classification displays superior performance relative to PCA. When a PNN was used to evaluate the BRPH age and amount, the classification rates of the training set were 100% and 96.67%, respectively, and the classification rates of the test set were 90.67% and 64.67%, respectively. When BPNN was used for the evaluation of the BRPH age and amount, the classification accuracies of the training set were 100% and 48.93%, respectively, and the classification accuracies of the test set were 96.67% and 47.33%, respectively. Loadings for BRPH volatiles indicate that the main elements of BRPHs' volatiles are sulfur-containing organics, aromatics, sulfur-and chlorine-containing organics and nitrogen oxides, which provide a reference for sensors chosen when exploited in specialized BRPH identification devices. This research proves the feasibility and broad application prospects of bionic electronic noses for BRPH recognition.

  5. Day and night glycaemic control with a bionic pancreas versus conventional insulin pump therapy in preadolescent children with type 1 diabetes: a randomised crossover trial

    PubMed Central

    Russell, Steven J; Hillard, Mallory A; Balliro, Courtney; Magyar, Kendra L; Selagamsetty, Rajendranath; Sinha, Manasi; Grennan, Kerry; Mondesir, Debbie; Ehklaspour, Laya; Zheng, Hui; Damiano, Edward R; El-Khatib, Firas H

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background The safety and efficacy of continuous, multiday, automated glycaemic management has not been tested in outpatient studies of preadolescent children with type 1 diabetes. We aimed to compare the safety and efficacy of a bihormonal bionic pancreas versus conventional insulin pump therapy in this population of patients in an outpatient setting. Methods In this randomised, open-label, crossover study, we enrolled preadolescent children (aged 6–11 years) with type 1 diabetes (diagnosed for ≥1 year) who were on insulin pump therapy, from two diabetes camps in the USA. With the use of sealed envelopes, participants were randomly assigned in blocks of two to either 5 days with the bionic pancreas or conventional insulin pump therapy (control) as the first intervention, followed by a 3 day washout period and then 5 days with the other intervention. Study allocation was not masked. The autonomously adaptive algorithm of the bionic pancreas received data from a continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) device to control subcutaneous delivery of insulin and glucagon. Conventional insulin pump therapy was administered by the camp physicians and other clinical staff in accordance with their established protocols; participants also wore a CGM device during the control period. The coprimary outcomes, analysed by intention to treat, were mean CGM-measured glucose concentration and the proportion of time with a CGM-measured glucose concentration below 3·3 mmol/L, on days 2–5. This study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT02105324. Findings Between July 20, and Aug 19, 2014, 19 children with a mean age of 9·8 years (SD 1·6) participated in and completed the study. The bionic pancreas period was associated with a lower mean CGM-measured glucose concentration on days 2–5 than was the control period (7·6 mmol/L [SD 0·6] vs 9·3 mmol/L [1·7]; p=0·00037) and a lower proportion of time with a CGM-measured glucose concentration below 3·3 mmol/L on

  6. Implications of CI therapy for visual deficit training

    PubMed Central

    Taub, Edward; Mark, Victor W.; Uswatte, Gitendra

    2014-01-01

    We address here the question of whether the techniques of Constraint Induced (CI) therapy, a family of treatments that has been employed in the rehabilitation of movement and language after brain damage might apply to the rehabilitation of such visual deficits as unilateral spatial neglect and visual field deficits. CI therapy has been used successfully for the upper and lower extremities after chronic stroke, cerebral palsy (CP), multiple sclerosis (MS), other central nervous system (CNS) degenerative conditions, resection of motor areas of the brain, focal hand dystonia, and aphasia. Treatments making use of similar methods have proven efficacious for amblyopia. The CI therapy approach consists of four major components: intensive training, training by shaping, a “transfer package” to facilitate the transfer of gains from the treatment setting to everyday activities, and strong discouragement of compensatory strategies. CI therapy is said to be effective because it overcomes learned nonuse, a learned inhibition of movement that follows injury to the CNS. In addition, CI therapy produces substantial increases in the gray matter of motor areas on both sides of the brain. We propose here that these mechanisms are examples of more general processes: learned nonuse being considered parallel to sensory nonuse following damage to sensory areas of the brain, with both having in common diminished neural connections (DNCs) in the nervous system as an underlying mechanism. CI therapy would achieve its therapeutic effect by strengthening the DNCs. Use-dependent cortical reorganization is considered to be an example of the more general neuroplastic mechanism of brain structure repurposing. If the mechanisms involved in these broader categories are involved in each of the deficits being considered, then it may be the principles underlying efficacious treatment in each case may be similar. The lessons learned during CI therapy research might then prove useful for the

  7. In Situ Data Processing With Workflow-based Embedded Cyberinfrastructure (emCI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehta, G.; Silva, F.; Graham, E. A.; Vahi, K.; Deelman, E.; Rundel, P.

    2011-12-01

    The decreasing cost of sensors and sensor networks has led to the wide scale adoption of this technology by large numbers of scientists for the collection of data in the field. At the same time, advances in both hardware and software have resulted in increased processing power at the sensor, enabling sensors in the field to do more than just data collection. With an increase in the number of sensors and deployments, scientists need tools for the configuration, operation, and debugging problems on their sensor networks. Furthermore, as the amount of data increases, scientists need a way to quickly and easily tag, process, archive, and share their datasets. Without proper tools, it is common for data processing to happen weeks or sometimes months after it is collected. This leads to important events being missed and makes real-time data analysis impossible. Additionally, because data is often manually processed through a series of repetitive steps, the analysis is susceptible to errors that are hard to track after data is combined and shared among researchers. Our emCI (embedded cyberinfrastructure) toolkit enables researchers to easily collect, analyze, and share their data. emCI provides a web-portal with upload/download capabilities that accept data in a number of different formats and ultimately can be used to archive data and share datasets among scientists. emCI uses an embedded general-purpose computer in the field for interfacing with sensors, coordinating data collection, and providing reliable data transfer to the emCI web portal. emCI relies on workflow technologies to automate data processing pipelines and to provide provenance information. In particular, emCI uses the Pegasus Workflow Management System as a core component, adapting it to the embedded computation environment. emCI allows scientists to distribute tasks among sensors in field and servers in the lab. In-situ processing using embedded workflows enable data reduction and validation in the

  8. Using the Web for Competitive Intelligence (CI) Gathering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rocker, JoAnne; Roncaglia, George

    2002-01-01

    Businesses use the Internet as a way to communicate company information as a way of engaging their customers. As the use of the Web for business transactions and advertising grows, so too, does the amount of useful information for practitioners of competitive intelligence (CI). CI is the legal and ethical practice of information gathering about competitors and the marketplace. Information sources like company webpages, online newspapers and news organizations, electronic journal articles and reports, and Internet search engines allow CI practitioners analyze company strengths and weaknesses for their customers. More company and marketplace information than ever is available on the Internet and a lot of it is free. Companies should view the Web not only as a business tool but also as a source of competitive intelligence. In a highly competitive marketplace can any organization afford to ignore information about the other players and customers in that same marketplace?

  9. Advanced interdisciplinary technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, John L.

    1990-01-01

    The following topics are presented in view graph form: (1) breakthrough trust (space research and technology assessment); (2) bionics (technology derivatives from biological systems); (3) biodynamics (modeling of human biomechanical performance based on anatomical data); and (4) tethered atmospheric research probes.

  10. C.I. Disperse Blue; Testing Consent Order

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This notice announces that EPA has signed an enforceable Testing Consent Order with eight companies who have agreed to perform certain health and environmental effects tests with C.I. Disperse Blue 79:1(1)8-79:1)(CAS No. 3618-72-2.

  11. Surviving High-temperature Components in CI Chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zolensky, M.; Frank, D.

    2014-01-01

    The CI1 chondrites, while having the most solar-like compo-sition of any astromaterial available for laboratory analysis, have also been considerably altered by asteroidal processes including aqueous alteration. It is of fundamental importance to determine their pre-alteration mineralogy, so that the state of matter in the early Solar System can be better determined. In the course of a re-examination of the compositional range of olivine and low-Ca pyroxene in CI chondrites Orgueil, Ivuna and Alais [1] we found the first reported complete CAI, as already reported [2], with at-tached rock consisting mainly of olivine and low-Ca pyroxene. The range of residual olivine major element compositions we have determined in the CIs (Fig. 1) may now be directly com-pared with those of other astromaterials, including Wild 2 grains. The abundance of olivine and low-Ca pyroxene in CIs is higher than is generally appreciated, and in fact much higher than for some CMs [1]. We also noted numerous rounded objects varying in shape from spheres to oblate spheroids, and ranging up to 100µm in size (Fig. 2), which have been previously noted [3] but have not been well documented or appreciated. We characterized the mineralogy by transmission electron microscopy and found that they consist mainly of rather fine-grained, flaky single phase to intergrown serpentine and saponite. These two materials in fact dominate the bulk of the host CI1 chondrites. With the exception of sparse spinels, the rounded phyllosilicate objects are remarka-bly free of other minerals, suggesting that the precursor from which the phyllosilicates were derived was a homogeneous mate-rial. We suggest that these round phyllosilicates aggregates in CI1 chondrites were cryptocrystalline to glassy microchondrules. If so then CI chondrites cannot be considered chondrule-free. Small though they are, the abundance of these putative microchondrules is the same as that of chondrules in the Tagish Lake meteorite.

  12. A CAI in the Ivuna CI1 Chondrite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frank, David R.; Zolensky, M.; Martinez, J.; Mikouchi, T.; Ohsumi, K.; Hagiya, K.; Satake, W.; Le, L.; Ross, D.; Peslier, A.

    2011-01-01

    We have recently discovered the first well-preserved calcium aluminum-rich inclusion (CAI) in a CI1 chondrite (Ivuna). Previously, all CI1 chondrites were thought to be devoid of preserved CAI and chondrules due to the near total aqueous alteration to which their parent body (bodies) have been subjected. The CAI is roughly spherical, but with a slight teardrop geometry and a maximum diameter of 170 microns (fig. 1). It lacks any Wark-Lovering Rim. Incipient aqueous alteration, and probably shock, have rendered large portions of the CAI poorly crystalline. It is extremely fine-grained, with only a few grains exceeding 10 microns. We have performed electron microprobe analyses (EPMA), FEG-SEM imaging and element mapping, as well as electron back-scattered diffraction (EBSD) and synchrotron X-ray diffraction (SXRD) in order to determine the fundamental characteristics of this apparently unique object.

  13. CiSE and Computational Physics: Undergraduate Physics Challenge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donnelly, Denis

    2008-04-01

    The role of Computing in Science and Engineering (CiSE) in support of computational physics is discussed with emphasis on CiSE's computational physics challenge. Winners awards are 1500, 1000, and 500. Each winner also receives a copy of Mathematica plus modest travel support. The challenge was for undergraduates at any accredited educational institution. Applicants were to select a physically and computationally interesting problem of their own choosing. Awards are presented at this session. Student winners discuss their work in papers that follow. First prize winner is Yevgeny Binder, of Loyola University in Chicago -``PartonKit: A C Program for Fast Parton Evolution with the Rossi Method.'' Second prize winner is John Barrett, of the University of Massachusetts, Amherst - ``Analysis of Photon Transport in 3 Polarized Scintillating Target Proto-types.'' Third prize winner is Steven Anton, of the University of Delaware - ``Electron Wave Packet Propagation in Graphene Nanoribbons.''

  14. [Deliberation on the pronunciation and meaning of Miu Ci].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Cui-Hong; Zhang, Chao

    2011-07-01

    As one of the acupuncture approaches mentioned in the Nei Jing, Miu Ci has been widely used in clinical practice, but diverse opinions on Miu's pronunciation and meaning limit its application. Ancient and modern literature has shown that the meanings of 'Miu' include 'difference', 'wrong' and 'cross', and it has mainly two different pronunciations, i.e. 'miü' and 'jiü'. However, 'Miu' always means 'difference' in the Nei Jing, e.g. 'Miu Chu', 'Miu Ci', 'Qi Miu', and in this case, its pronunciation should be 'miü'. Scholars such as YANG Shang-shan, WANG Bing, MA Shi, ZHANG Jie-bin and DANBO YuanJian all held this point of view. We can see that there was no disagreement over Miu's pronunciation and meaning in ancient times. It is a controversy generated in modern times. Therefore, the original written form and pronunciation of 'Miu' should be highly valued.

  15. Excited states of Ne isoelectronic ions: SAC-CI study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, A. K.; Ehara, M.; Nakatsuji, H.

    2001-01-01

    Excited states of the s, p, and d symmetries up to principal quantum number n = 4 are studied for the first eight members of Ne isoelectronic sequence (Ne to Cl7+) by the SAC-CI (symmetry-adapted-cluster configuration-interaction) method. The valence STO basis sets of Clementi et al. and the optimized excited STO are used by the STO-6G expansion method. The calculated transition energies agree well with the experimental values wherever available.

  16. Influence of Orientations of Bionic Unit Fabricated by Laser Remelting on Fatigue Wear Resistance of Gray Cast Iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhi-Kai; Zhou, Ti; Zhang, Hai-feng; Yang, Wan-shi; Zhou, Hong

    2015-06-01

    Fatigue wear resistance improvements were researched by studying experimental samples with gray cast iron fabricated with bionic units in different orientations. Experimental samples were modified by laser surface remelting, including parallel, vertical, and gradient units to the wear direction. The remelting pool was then studied to determine the micro-hardness, microstructure, alteration of phase, and etc. Lab-control fatigue wear test method was applied with the treated and untreated samples tested under the laboratorial conditions. Wear resistance result was considered as the rolling contact fatigue (RCF) resistance and mechanisms of the modified samples were experimentally investigated and discussed. Results suggested that all treated samples demonstrated the beneficial effect on the RCF improvement due to lack of graphite and reinforcement of treated region. Results also indicated the sample with fastigiated units was more effective than that with vertical units or parallel units to the wear direction. Influence of the sample unit's angle which intensely depended on the conditions of actual application, however, was not identified.

  17. On the extension of the MCSCF/CI method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, C., Jr.; Nelin, C. J.; Komornicki, A.

    1984-01-01

    Research conducted during this period was focused on two main areas: (1) bonding in transition metal oxides; and (2) adsorption of CO on Al and Ni. In both of these theoretical studies a major interest was to obtain a better understanding of the nature of the bonding in transition metal containing systems. The studies used self consistent field (SCF), multi-configuration self cosistent field (MCSCF) and configuration interaction (CI) methods in the treatment of the transition metal oxides and only the SCF method in the adsorption studies. The reports of three principle investigators who contributed to this work during the tenure of the project are presented along with associated published papers.

  18. The radiation shielding potential of CI and CM chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pohl, Leos; Britt, Daniel T.

    2017-03-01

    Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCRs) and Solar Energetic Particles (SEPs) pose a serious limit on the duration of deep space human missions. A shield composed of a bulk mass of material in which the incident particles deposit their energy is the simplest way to attenuate the radiation. The cost of bringing the sufficient mass from the Earth's surface is prohibitive. The shielding properties of asteroidal material, which is readily available in space, are investigated. Solution of Bethe's equation is implemented for incident protons and the application in composite materials and the significance of various correction terms are discussed; the density correction is implemented. The solution is benchmarked and shows good agreement with the results in literature which implement more correction terms within the energy ranges considered. The shielding properties of CI and CM asteroidal taxonomy groups and major asteroidal minerals are presented in terms of stopping force. The results show that CI and CM chondrites have better stopping properties than Aluminium. Beneficiation is discussed and is shown to have a significant effect on the stopping power.

  19. The rapid A-Ci response: photosynthesis in the phenomic era.

    PubMed

    Stinziano, Joseph R; Morgan, Patrick B; Lynch, Douglas J; Saathoff, Aaron J; McDermitt, Dayle K; Hanson, David T

    2017-03-01

    Phenotyping for photosynthetic gas exchange parameters is limiting our ability to select plants for enhanced photosynthetic carbon gain and to assess plant function in current and future natural environments. This is due, in part, to the time required to generate estimates of the maximum rate of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase oxygenase (Rubisco) carboxylation (Vc,max ) and the maximal rate of electron transport (Jmax ) from the response of photosynthesis (A) to the CO2 concentration inside leaf air spaces (Ci ). To relieve this bottleneck, we developed a method for rapid photosynthetic carbon assimilation CO2 responses [rapid A-Ci response (RACiR)] utilizing non-steady-state measurements of gas exchange. Using high temporal resolution measurements under rapidly changing CO2 concentrations, we show that RACiR techniques can obtain measures of Vc,max and Jmax in ~5 min, and possibly even faster. This is a small fraction of the time required for even the most advanced gas exchange instrumentation. The RACiR technique, owing to its increased throughput, will allow for more rapid screening of crops, mutants and populations of plants in natural environments, bringing gas exchange into the phenomic era.

  20. An insect-inspired bionic sensor for tactile localization and material classification with state-dependent modulation.

    PubMed

    Patanè, Luca; Hellbach, Sven; Krause, André F; Arena, Paolo; Dürr, Volker

    2012-01-01

    INSECTS CARRY A PAIR OF ANTENNAE ON THEIR HEAD: multimodal sensory organs that serve a wide range of sensory-guided behaviors. During locomotion, antennae are involved in near-range orientation, for example in detecting, localizing, probing, and negotiating obstacles. Here we present a bionic, active tactile sensing system inspired by insect antennae. It comprises an actuated elastic rod equipped with a terminal acceleration sensor. The measurement principle is based on the analysis of damped harmonic oscillations registered upon contact with an object. The dominant frequency of the oscillation is extracted to determine the distance of the contact point along the probe and basal angular encoders allow tactile localization in a polar coordinate system. Finally, the damping behavior of the registered signal is exploited to determine the most likely material. The tactile sensor is tested in four approaches with increasing neural plausibility: first, we show that peak extraction from the Fourier spectrum is sufficient for tactile localization with position errors below 1%. Also, the damping property of the extracted frequency is used for material classification. Second, we show that the Fourier spectrum can be analysed by an Artificial Neural Network (ANN) which can be trained to decode contact distance and to classify contact materials. Thirdly, we show how efficiency can be improved by band-pass filtering the Fourier spectrum by application of non-negative matrix factorization. This reduces the input dimension by 95% while reducing classification performance by 8% only. Finally, we replace the FFT by an array of spiking neurons with gradually differing resonance properties, such that their spike rate is a function of the input frequency. We show that this network can be applied to detect tactile contact events of a wheeled robot, and how detrimental effects of robot velocity on antennal dynamics can be suppressed by state-dependent modulation of the input signals.

  1. An insect-inspired bionic sensor for tactile localization and material classification with state-dependent modulation

    PubMed Central

    Patanè, Luca; Hellbach, Sven; Krause, André F.; Arena, Paolo; Dürr, Volker

    2012-01-01

    Insects carry a pair of antennae on their head: multimodal sensory organs that serve a wide range of sensory-guided behaviors. During locomotion, antennae are involved in near-range orientation, for example in detecting, localizing, probing, and negotiating obstacles. Here we present a bionic, active tactile sensing system inspired by insect antennae. It comprises an actuated elastic rod equipped with a terminal acceleration sensor. The measurement principle is based on the analysis of damped harmonic oscillations registered upon contact with an object. The dominant frequency of the oscillation is extracted to determine the distance of the contact point along the probe and basal angular encoders allow tactile localization in a polar coordinate system. Finally, the damping behavior of the registered signal is exploited to determine the most likely material. The tactile sensor is tested in four approaches with increasing neural plausibility: first, we show that peak extraction from the Fourier spectrum is sufficient for tactile localization with position errors below 1%. Also, the damping property of the extracted frequency is used for material classification. Second, we show that the Fourier spectrum can be analysed by an Artificial Neural Network (ANN) which can be trained to decode contact distance and to classify contact materials. Thirdly, we show how efficiency can be improved by band-pass filtering the Fourier spectrum by application of non-negative matrix factorization. This reduces the input dimension by 95% while reducing classification performance by 8% only. Finally, we replace the FFT by an array of spiking neurons with gradually differing resonance properties, such that their spike rate is a function of the input frequency. We show that this network can be applied to detect tactile contact events of a wheeled robot, and how detrimental effects of robot velocity on antennal dynamics can be suppressed by state-dependent modulation of the input signals

  2. Restoration of vision in blind individuals using bionic devices: a review with a focus on cortical visual prostheses.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Philip M; Ackland, Helen M; Lowery, Arthur J; Rosenfeld, Jeffrey V

    2015-01-21

    The field of neurobionics offers hope to patients with sensory and motor impairment. Blindness is a common cause of major sensory loss, with an estimated 39 million people worldwide suffering from total blindness in 2010. Potential treatment options include bionic devices employing electrical stimulation of the visual pathways. Retinal stimulation can restore limited visual perception to patients with retinitis pigmentosa, however loss of retinal ganglion cells precludes this approach. The optic nerve, lateral geniculate nucleus and visual cortex provide alternative stimulation targets, with several research groups actively pursuing a cortically-based device capable of driving several hundred stimulating electrodes. While great progress has been made since the earliest works of Brindley and Dobelle in the 1960s and 1970s, significant clinical, surgical, psychophysical, neurophysiological, and engineering challenges remain to be overcome before a commercially-available cortical implant will be realized. Selection of candidate implant recipients will require assessment of their general, psychological and mental health, and likely responses to visual cortex stimulation. Implant functionality, longevity and safety may be enhanced by careful electrode insertion, optimization of electrical stimulation parameters and modification of immune responses to minimize or prevent the host response to the implanted electrodes. Psychophysical assessment will include mapping the positions of potentially several hundred phosphenes, which may require repetition if electrode performance deteriorates over time. Therefore, techniques for rapid psychophysical assessment are required, as are methods for objectively assessing the quality of life improvements obtained from the implant. These measures must take into account individual differences in image processing, phosphene distribution and rehabilitation programs that may be required to optimize implant functionality. In this review, we

  3. Cyberinfrastructure (CI) for Interactive Ocean Observatories: LOOKING Ahead

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orcutt, J.; Abbott, M.; Bellingham, J.; Chave, A.; Delaney, J.; Johnson, R.; Lazowska, E.; Moline, M.; Smarr, L.

    2004-12-01

    Investments in next-generation facilities to achieve a permanent, interactive telepresence throughout remote or hostile environments can empower a broad spectrum of autonomous sensornet facilities through the NSF Major Research Equipment and Facililties Construction Ocean Observatories Initiative (OOI). These systems must involve powerful suites of generic cyberinfrastructure tools designed to optimize access and benefits to a large academic and public user base. Many future research and educational efforts focused throughout the ocean basins, especially within heavily populated coastal regions, will be empowered by these new systems. Our project LOOKING (Laboratory for the Ocean Observatory Knowledge Integration Grid) is developing prototype CI for the OOI to achieve these goals. In the case of ocean observatory networks, it is essential to establish powerful network infrastructures linking the wet or subsea portion, with a host of shore station facilities. These components in turn must seamlessly communicate with an ensemble of data repositories, and relevant computer and visualization resources designed to serve a widely diverse ocean science community with real time, broadband access to all observatory system data, products, and metadata. This infrastructure must be secure, reliable, and resilient. It must meet the potentially ambitious latency, bandwidth, and performance requirements demanded by a set of evolving autonomous sensor platforms over a period of decades. This Grid environment must seamlessly interconnect all relevant national and international research and education nets accessible through high speed, next generation communication networks. The primary components of LOOKING are remote services that fulfill the CI needs of the ocean observatory community. These services arise from overarching science and education requirements: 1) Instrument Services operate at the sensor end of an ocean observatory, and are dominantly but not exclusively wet. 2

  4. Cancer Screening Among Patients With Advanced Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sima, Camelia S.; Panageas, Katherine S.; Schrag, Deborah

    2013-01-01

    Context Cancer screening has been integrated into routine primary care but does not benefit patients with limited life expectancy. Objective To evaluate the extent to which patients with advanced cancer continue to be screened for new cancers. Design, Setting, and Participants Utilization of cancer screening procedures (mammography, Papanicolaou test, prostate-specific antigen [PSA], and lower gastrointestinal [GI] endoscopy) was assessed in 87 736 fee-for-service Medicare enrollees aged 65 years or older diagnosed with advanced lung, colorectal, pancreatic, gastroesophageal, or breast cancer between 1998 and 2005, and reported to one of the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) tumor registries. Participants were followed up until death or December 31, 2007, whichever came first. A group of 87 307 Medicare enrollees without cancer were individually matched by age, sex, race, and SEER registry to patients with cancer and observed over the same period to evaluate screening rates in context. Demographic and clinical characteristics associated with screening were also investigated. Main Outcome Measure For each cancer screening test, utilization rates were defined as the percentage of patients who were screened following the diagnosis of an incurable cancer. Results Among women following advanced cancer diagnosis compared with controls, at least 1 screening mammogram was received by 8.9% (95% confidence interval [CI], 8.6%-9.1%) vs 22.0% (95% CI, 21.7%-22.5%); Papanicolaou test screening was received by 5.8% (95% CI, 5.6%-6.1%) vs 12.5% (95% CI, 12.2%-12.8%). Among men following advanced cancer diagnosis compared with controls, PSA test was received by 15.0% (95% CI, 14.7%-15.3%) vs 27.2% (95% CI, 26.8%-27.6%). For all patients following advanced diagnosis compared with controls, lower GI endoscopy was received by 1.7% (95% CI, 1.6%-1.8%) vs 4.7% (95% CI, 4.6%-4.9%). Screening was more frequent among patients with a recent history of screening (16.2% [95

  5. Theoretical CI study of the vertical electronic spectrum of ethane

    SciTech Connect

    Chantranupong, L.; Hirsch, G.; Buenker, R.J.; Dillon, M.A.

    1994-06-01

    Ab initio multireference single- and double-excitation configuration interaction (MRD-CI) calculations are reported for the ground and 32 excited electronic states of ethane, as well as its two lowest ionic states, {sup 2}E{sub g} and {sup 2}A{sub 1g}. The transition energy results indicate that the 3a{sub 1g} molecular orbital is 0.3--0.6 eV more stable than the 1e{sub g} LUMO for the ethane D{sub 3d} equilibrium conformation. The strongest transition is computed to occur for the 3a{sub 1g} {yields} 3p{sigma} {sup 1}A{sub 2u}--{sup 1}A{sub 1g} excitation at 9.933 eV, with an optical f value of 0.1152. The n = 4 Rydberg transitions are also calculated and are found to occur with roughly 40% of their n = 3 counterparts. The observed broadness of the ethane UV spectrum is believed to be caused primarily by the high density of Rydberg upper states, as well as significant relaxation effects which occur upon excitation from the ethane electronic ground state.

  6. B[e] Star CI Cam: Eighteen Years of Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goranskij, V. P.; Barsukova, E. A.; Bjorkman, K. S.; Burenkov, A. N.; Klochkova, V. G.; Manset, N.; Metlova, N. V.; Miroshnichenko, A. S.; Panchuk, V. E.; Yushkin, M. V.; Zharikov, S. V.

    2017-02-01

    We present the results of extensive spectroscopic and photometric observations of CI Cam performed after its outburst in April 1998. The outburst was interpreted as a thermonuclear runaway of hydrogen on the surface of a white dwarf (WD). We detected variations of both the brightness and the He II 4686 Å line radial velocity with a period of 19d.400±0d.015 due to orbital motion of the WD. The rapid brightness variations on a timescale of hours is explained by pulsations of a B4 III-V[e] star. In 2012, the system entered an active state with the stronger He II line and with the brightness increased by 0.4 mag. We observed a slow low-amplitude drift in the velocity of Fe II and [N II] emission lines which we explained by the orbital motion of the B[e] star + WD system along with all its gaseous environment around a third companion invisible in the spectra. The active phase of the B[e] star might have been initiated by a close approach of the binary and the third companion in 2007.

  7. Implications of smart materials in advanced prosthetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenoe, Edward M.; Radicic, William N.; Knapp, Michael S.

    1994-05-01

    This research reviews common implant materials and suggests smart materials that may be used as substitutes. Current prosthetic technology, including artificial limbs, joints, and soft and hard tissue, falls short in comprehensive characterization of the chemo-mechanics and materials relationships of the natural tissues and their prosthetic materials counterparts. Many of these unknown chemo-mechanical properties in natural tissue systems maintain cooperative function that allows for optimum efficiency in performance and healing. Traditional prosthetic devices have not taken into account the naturally occurring electro-chemo-mechanical stress- strain relationships that normally exist in a tissue system. Direct mechanical deformation of tissue and cell membrane as a possible use of smart materials may lead to improved prosthetic devices once the mechanosensory systems in living tissues are identified and understood. Smart materials may aid in avoiding interfacial atrophy which is a common cause of prosthetic failure. Finally, we note that advanced composite materials have not received sufficient attention, they should be more widely used in prosthetics. Their structural efficiency allows design and construction of truly efficient bionic devices.

  8. Outburst-related period changes of recurrent nova CI aquilae

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, R. E.; Honeycutt, R. K. E-mail: rewilson@ufl.edu

    2014-11-01

    Pre-outburst and post-outburst light curves and post-outburst eclipse timings are analyzed to measure any period (P) change related to nova CI Aql's outburst of early 2000 and a mean post-outburst dP/dt, which then lead to estimates of the accreting component's rate of mass (M) change and its overall outburst-related change of mass over roughly a decade of observations. We apply a recently developed procedure for unified analysis of three timing-related data types (light curves, radial velocities, and eclipse timings), although with only light curves and timings in this case. Fits to the data are reasonably good without need for a disk in the light-curve model, although the disk certainly exists and has an important role in our post-outburst mass flow computations. Initial experiments showed that, although there seems to be an accretion hot spot, it has essentially no effect on derived outburst-related ΔP or on post-outburst dP/dt. Use of atomic time (HJED) in place of HJD also has essentially nil effect on ΔP and dP/dt. We find ΔP consistently negative in various types of solutions, although at best only marginally significant statistically in any one experiment. Pre-outburst HJD {sub 0} and P results are given, as are post-outburst HJD {sub 0}, P, and dP/dt, with light curves and eclipse times as joint input, and also with only eclipse time input. Post-outburst dP/dt is negative at about 2.4σ. Explicit formulae for mass transfer rates and epoch-to-epoch mass change are developed and applied. A known offset in the magnitude zero point for 1991-1994 is corrected.

  9. Ciona intestinalis galectin (CiLgals-a and CiLgals-b) genes are differentially expressed in endostyle zones and challenged by LPS.

    PubMed

    Parrinello, Daniela; Sanfratello, Maria Antonietta; Vizzini, Aiti; Parrinello, Nicolò; Cammarata, Matteo

    2015-01-01

    Immunohistochemical and in situ hybridization assays were performed to answer the question whether the endostyle, that is the initial gastro-intestinal trait of Ciona intestinalis pharynx, is involved in galectin (CiLgals-a and CiLgals-b) production during the pharynx inflammatory response to LPS inoculation. Specific anti-CiLgal-a and anti-CiLgals-b antibodies, and oligonucleotide probes, that mark inflammatory hemocytes inside the pharynx vessels and vessel epithelium as shown by a previous paper, were assayed on endostyle histological sections. For the first time, we show that galectins are produced by endostyle zones, and both CiLgals-a and -b genes are upregulated by LPS. CiLgals-a and CiLgals-b are constitutively expressed in the endostyle zone 2 and 3, respectively, both genes are upregulated by LPS in the zone 2, and CiLgals-b in the zone 3 and 4. The antibody-reacting material contained in intracellular and extracellular large vesicles suggest an unexpected vesicle-dependent transporting mechanism of galectins not provided with signal peptide. Differential expression and gene upregulation in not-treated and LPS-treated specimens, support the role of endostyle galectins both in filter feeding and defense responses.

  10. Born-Infeld extension of Lovelock brane gravity in the system of M0-branes and its application for the emergence of Pauli exclusion principle in BIonic superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sepehri, Alireza

    2016-07-01

    Recently, some authors (Cruz and Rojas, 2013 [1]) have constructed a Born-Infeld type action which may be written in terms of the Lovelock brane Lagrangians for a given dimension p. We reconsider their model in M-theory and study the process of birth and growth of nonlinear spinor and bosonic gravity during the construction of Mp-branes. Then, by application of this idea to BIonic system, we construct a BIonic superconductor in the background of nonlinear gravity. In this model, first, M0-branes link to each other and build an M5-brane and an anti-M5-brane connected by an M2-brane. M0-branes are zero dimensional objects that only scalars are attached to them. By constructing higher dimensional branes from M0-branes, gauge fields are produced. Also, if M0-branes don't link to each other completely, the symmetry of system is broken and fermions are created. The curvature produced by fermions has the opposite sign the curvature produced by gauge fields. Fermions on M5-branes and M2 plays the role of bridge between them. By passing time, M2 dissolves in M5's and nonlinear bosonic and spinor gravities are produced. By closing M5-branes towards each other, coupling of two identical fermions on two branes to each other causes that the square mass of their system becomes negative and some tachyonic states are created. For removing these tachyons, M5-branes compact, the sign of gravity between branes reverses, anti-gravity is produced which causes that branes and identical fermions get away from each other. This is the reason for the emergence of Pauli exclusion principle in Bionic system. Also, the spinor gravity vanishes and its energy builds a new M2 between M5-branes. We obtain the resistivity in this system and find that its value decreases by closing M5 branes to each other and shrinks to zero at colliding point of branes. This idea has different applications. For example, in cosmology, universes are located on M5-branes and M2-brane has the role of bridge between

  11. Multisite interaction with Sufu regulates Ci/Gli activity through distinct mechanisms in Hh signal transduction.

    PubMed

    Han, Yuhong; Shi, Qing; Jiang, Jin

    2015-05-19

    The tumor suppressor protein Suppressor of fused (Sufu) plays a conserved role in the Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway by inhibiting Cubitus interruptus (Ci)/Glioma-associated oncogene homolog (Gli) transcription factors, but the molecular mechanism by which Sufu inhibits Ci/Gli activity remains poorly understood. Here we show that Sufu can bind Ci/Gli through a C-terminal Sufu-interacting site (SIC) in addition to a previously identified N-terminal site (SIN), and that both SIC and SIN are required for optimal inhibition of Ci/Gli by Sufu. We show that Sufu can sequester Ci/Gli in the cytoplasm through binding to SIN while inhibiting Ci/Gli activity in the nucleus depending on SIC. We also find that binding of Sufu to SIC and the middle region of Ci can impede recruitment of the transcriptional coactivator CBP by masking its binding site in the C-terminal region of Ci. Indeed, moving the CBP-binding site to an "exposed" location can render Ci resistant to Sufu-mediated inhibition in the nucleus. Hence, our study identifies a previously unidentified and conserved Sufu-binding motif in the C-terminal region of Ci/Gli and provides mechanistic insight into how Sufu inhibits Ci/Gli activity in the nucleus.

  12. CI2 for creating and comparing confidence-intervals for time-series bivariate plots.

    PubMed

    Mullineaux, David R

    2017-02-01

    Currently no method exists for calculating and comparing the confidence-intervals (CI) for the time-series of a bivariate plot. The study's aim was to develop 'CI2' as a method to calculate the CI on time-series bivariate plots, and to identify if the CI between two bivariate time-series overlap. The test data were the knee and ankle angles from 10 healthy participants running on a motorised standard-treadmill and non-motorised curved-treadmill. For a recommended 10+ trials, CI2 involved calculating 95% confidence-ellipses at each time-point, then taking as the CI the points on the ellipses that were perpendicular to the direction vector between the means of two adjacent time-points. Consecutive pairs of CI created convex quadrilaterals, and any overlap of these quadrilaterals at the same time or ±1 frame as a time-lag calculated using cross-correlations, indicated where the two time-series differed. CI2 showed no group differences between left and right legs on both treadmills, but the same legs between treadmills for all participants showed differences of less knee extension on the curved-treadmill before heel-strike. To improve and standardise the use of CI2 it is recommended to remove outlier time-series, use 95% confidence-ellipses, and scale the ellipse by the fixed Chi-square value as opposed to the sample-size dependent F-value. For practical use, and to aid in standardisation or future development of CI2, Matlab code is provided. CI2 provides an effective method to quantify the CI of bivariate plots, and to explore the differences in CI between two bivariate time-series.

  13. Macrophages promote benzopyrene-induced tumor transformation of human bronchial epithelial cells by activation of NF-κB and STAT3 signaling in a bionic airway chip culture and in animal models.

    PubMed

    Li, Encheng; Xu, Zhiyun; Zhao, Hui; Sun, Zhao; Wang, Lei; Guo, Zhe; Zhao, Yang; Gao, Zhancheng; Wang, Qi

    2015-04-20

    We investigated the role of macrophages in promoting benzopyrene (BaP)-induced malignant transformation of human bronchial epithelial cells using a BaP-induced tumor transformation model with a bionic airway chip in vitro and in animal models. The bionic airway chip culture data showed that macrophages promoted BaP-induced malignant transformation of human bronchial epithelial cells, which was mediated by nuclear factor (NF)-κB and STAT3 pathways to induce cell proliferation, colony formation in chip culture, and tumorigenicity in nude mice. Blockage of interleukin (IL)-6 or tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α signaling or inhibition of NF-κB, STAT3, or cyclinD1 expression abrogated the effect of macrophages on malignant transformation in the bionic airway chip culture. In vivo, macrophages promoted lung tumorigenesis in a carcinogen-induced animal model. Similarly, blockage of NF-κB, STAT3, or cyclinD1 using siRNA transfection decreased the carcinogen-induced tumorigenesis in rats. We demonstrated that macrophages are critical in promoting lung tumorigenesis and that the macrophage-initiated TNF-α/NF-κB/cyclinD1 and IL-6/STAT3/cyclinD1 pathways are primarily responsible for promoting lung tumorigenesis.

  14. Macrophages promote benzopyrene-induced tumor transformation of human bronchial epithelial cells by activation of NF-κB and STAT3 signaling in a bionic airway chip culture and in animal models

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Zhao; Wang, Lei; Guo, Zhe; Zhao, Yang; Gao, Zhancheng; Wang, Qi

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the role of macrophages in promoting benzopyrene (BaP)-induced malignant transformation of human bronchial epithelial cells using a BaP-induced tumor transformation model with a bionic airway chip in vitro and in animal models. The bionic airway chip culture data showed that macrophages promoted BaP-induced malignant transformation of human bronchial epithelial cells, which was mediated by nuclear factor (NF)-κB and STAT3 pathways to induce cell proliferation, colony formation in chip culture, and tumorigenicity in nude mice. Blockage of interleukin (IL)-6 or tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α signaling or inhibition of NF-κB, STAT3, or cyclinD1 expression abrogated the effect of macrophages on malignant transformation in the bionic airway chip culture. In vivo, macrophages promoted lung tumorigenesis in a carcinogen-induced animal model. Similarly, blockage of NF-κB, STAT3, or cyclinD1 using siRNA transfection decreased the carcinogen-induced tumorigenesis in rats. We demonstrated that macrophages are critical in promoting lung tumorigenesis and that the macrophage-initiated TNF-α/NF-κB/cyclinD1 and IL-6/STAT3/cyclinD1 pathways are primarily responsible for promoting lung tumorigenesis. PMID:25823926

  15. 21 CFR 73.3112 - C.I. Vat Orange 1.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false C.I. Vat Orange 1. 73.3112 Section 73.3112 Food... COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Medical Devices § 73.3112 C.I. Vat Orange 1. (a) Identity. The color additive is C.I. Vat Orange 1, Colour Index No. 59105. (b) Uses and restrictions. (1)...

  16. 21 CFR 73.3112 - C.I. Vat Orange 1.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false C.I. Vat Orange 1. 73.3112 Section 73.3112 Food... COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Medical Devices § 73.3112 C.I. Vat Orange 1. (a) Identity. The color additive is C.I. Vat Orange 1, Colour Index No. 59105. (b) Uses and restrictions. (1)...

  17. 21 CFR 73.3112 - C.I. Vat Orange 1.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false C.I. Vat Orange 1. 73.3112 Section 73.3112 Food... COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Medical Devices § 73.3112 C.I. Vat Orange 1. (a) Identity. The color additive is C.I. Vat Orange 1, Colour Index No. 59105. (b) Uses and restrictions. (1)...

  18. Transmission electron microscopy of an interplanetary dust particle with links to CI chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, Lindsay P.; Thomas, Kathie L.; Mckay, David S.

    1991-01-01

    The majority of hydrated interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) have compositions that resemble CI and CM chondrites, however, their mineralogies are most similar to the fine grained material in certain altered type-3 carbonaceous and ordinary chondrites. During the transmission electron microscope studies of hydrated IDPs, a unique particle was discovered whose mineralogy is very similar to that reported from CI chondrites. W7013F5 is the first IDP whose mineralogy and chemistry approximates that of CI chondrites. The similarity in mineralogy and mineral chemistry suggests that W7013F5 was altered under conditions similar to those that existed on the CI parent bodies.

  19. The Bionic Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woolf, Neville

    2009-05-01

    Four hundred years after children in a spectacle makers workshop accidentally discovered the telescope, the development of this device has been a continuous replacement of the ``natural'' by the deliberate. The human eye is gone. The lens is gone. The tube is gone. The dome is on the verge of going. The size of the optics are ceasing to be set by transportation limits. Adaptive optics are preferred to stable optics. We deliberately break the Lagrange invariant. We focus on lasers instead of stars, and natural observing environments are being replaced by adaptive environments. The goals for the new ground based telescope encompass the oldest and newest ideas, to find signs of life elsewhere, and to find how all the universe developed.

  20. A bionics chemical synapse.

    PubMed

    Thanapitak, Surachoke; Toumazou, Christofer

    2013-06-01

    Implementation of the current mode CMOS circuit for chemical synapses (AMPA and NMDA receptors) with dynamic change of glutamate as the neurotransmitter input is presented in this paper. Additionally, circuit realisation for receptor GABA(A) and GABA(B) with an electrical signal which symbolises γ-Aminobutyric Acid (GABA) perturbation is introduced. The chemical sensor for glutamate sensing is the modified ISFET with enzyme (glutamate oxidase) immobilisation. The measured results from these biomimetics chemical synapse circuits closely match with the simulation result from the mathematical model. The total power consumption of the whole chip (four chemical synapse circuits and all auxiliary circuits) is 168.3 μW. The total chip area is 3 mm(2) in 0.35-μm AMS CMOS technology.

  1. The Bionic Amoeba.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Emmett L.

    1979-01-01

    A demonstration is described that encourages students to engage in inquiry in biology. Using chemicals and an overhead projector, the instructor can simulate a living organism projected onto a screen. The reaction can aid students in defining the characteristics of life. (SA)

  2. The Bionic Library.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Billings, Harold

    1991-01-01

    Discussion of the information crisis focuses on possible new forms of library collections. Topics discussed include the rising quantity and costs of publications; improvements in access through new technologies; vendors' plans using electronic text; information flow; economics factors, including user fees; and the role of the commercial sector.…

  3. Advancing Water Science through Improved Cyberinfrastructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, B. J.; Miles, B.; Rai, A.; Ahalt, S.; Band, L. E.; Minsker, B.; Palmer, M.; Williams, M. R.; Idaszak, R.; Whitton, M. C.

    2012-12-01

    Major scientific advances are needed to help address impacts of climate change and increasing human-mediated environmental modification on the water cycle at global and local scales. However, such advances within the water sciences are limited in part by inadequate information infrastructures. For example, cyberinfrastructure (CI) includes the integrated computer hardware, software, networks, sensors, data, and human capital that enable scientific workflows to be carried out within and among individual research efforts and across varied disciplines. A coordinated transformation of existing CI and development of new CI could accelerate the productivity of water science by enabling greater discovery, access, and interoperability of data and models, and by freeing scientists to do science rather than create and manage technological tools. To elucidate specific ways in which improved CI could advance water science, three challenges confronting the water science community were evaluated: 1) How does ecohydrologic patch structure affect nitrogen transport and fate in watersheds?, 2) How can human-modified environments emulate natural water and nutrient cycling to enhance both human and ecosystem well-being?, 3) How do changes in climate affect water availability to support biodiversity and human needs? We assessed the approaches used by researchers to address components of these challenges, identified barriers imposed by limitations of current CI, and interviewed leaders in various water science subdisciplines to determine the most recent CI tools employed. Our preliminary findings revealed four areas where CI improvements are likely to stimulate scientific advances: 1) sensor networks, 2) data quality assurance/quality control, 3) data and modeling standards, 4) high performance computing. In addition, the full potential of a re-envisioned water science CI cannot be realized without a substantial training component. In light of these findings, we suggest that CI

  4. SLA: A Time for New Initiatives-- CI Division Formed, Fundraising Goal Set, Certification Coming

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiMattia, Susan; Blumenstein, Lynn

    2004-01-01

    Several initiatives were announced at the Special Libraries Association (d.b.a. SLA) conference, June 4-9, at the Gaylord Opryland Hotel in Nashville. A petition drive resulted in formation of a Competitive Intelligence (CI) Division from the former CI Section of the Leadership and Management Division. The board encouraged the member-driven…

  5. Comment on Mars as the Parent Body of the CI Carbonaceous Chondrites by J. E. Brandenburg

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Treiman, Allan H.

    1996-01-01

    Geological and chemical data refute a martian origin for the CI carbonaceous chondrites. Here, I will first consider Brandenburg's [1996] proposal that the CI's formed as water-deposited sediments on Mars, and that these sediments had limited chemical interactions with their martian environment. Finally, I will address oxygen isotope ratios, the strongest link between the CIs and the martian meteorites.

  6. Music-Based Training for Pediatric CI Recipients: A Systematic Analysis of Published Studies

    PubMed Central

    Gfeller, Kate

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, there has been growing interest in the use of music-based training to enhance speech and language development in children with normal hearing and some forms of communication disorders, including pediatric CI users. The use of music training for CI users may initially seem incongruous given that signal processing for CIs presents a degraded version of pitch and timbre, both key elements in music. Furthermore, empirical data of systematic studies of music training, particularly in relation to transfer to speech skills are limited. This study describes the rationale for music training of CI users, describes key features of published studies of music training with CI users, and highlights some developmental and logistical issues that should be taken into account when interpreting or planning studies of music training and speech outcomes with pediatric CI recipients. PMID:27246744

  7. Advanced Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coles, Mike; Nelms, Rick

    1996-01-01

    Describes a study that explores the depth and breadth of scientific facts, principles, and procedures which are required in the Advanced General National Vocational Qualifications (GNVQ) science through comparison with GCE Advanced level. The final report takes account of the updated 1996 version of GNVQ science. (DDR)

  8. 40 CFR 60.4210 - What are my compliance requirements if I am a stationary CI internal combustion engine manufacturer?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... I am a stationary CI internal combustion engine manufacturer? 60.4210 Section 60.4210 Protection of... CI internal combustion engine manufacturer? (a) Stationary CI internal combustion engine... certified to the standards in 40 CFR part 1039. (b) Stationary CI internal combustion engine...

  9. A mode of action of RNase CI toward the various RNAs.

    PubMed

    Uchida, T; Suzuki, K

    1982-01-01

    A mode of action of RNase CI toward the various native RNAs was examined. The mixture of tRNA from Thermus thermophilus HB8 were exhaustively cleaved by RNase CI to produce 90% of acid-soluble fraction. Among the minor nucleotides s2T were recognized by this enzyme. RNase CI generates a linear viroid molecule by introducing one single nick into viroid circular molecule. Double stranded RNA from RNA virus, such as Cytoplasmic polyhedrosis virus (CPV) from silk worm, was cleaved at some specific sites to produce more than ten of the discrete bands electrophoretically.

  10. Performance of 500kCi Tritium Storage Vessel for WTRF

    SciTech Connect

    Paek, S.; Ahn, D.H.; Kim, K.R.; Chung, H.; Yim, S.P.; Lee, M.

    2005-07-15

    A prototype TSV (Tritide Storage Vessel) has been manufactured for the long-term storage of tritium of the WTRF (Wolsong Tritium Removal Facility). A performance test was carried out to demonstrate that the TSV could hold a minimum of 500kCi of tritium. This experiment was conducted by a batch type hydriding reaction. Hydrogen gas equivalent to 50kCi of tritium was reacted with the titanium sponge in a batch reaction. Experimental results for 10 batches show that the TSV has enough capacity to store 500kCi of tritium.

  11. Decolorization and mineralization of a phthalocyanine dye C.I. Direct Blue 199 using UV/H2O2 process.

    PubMed

    Shu, Hung-Yee; Chang, Ming-Chin

    2005-10-17

    In this study, the successful decolorization and mineralization of phthalocyanine dye (C.I. Direct Blue 199, DB 199) by an advanced oxidation process (AOP), UV/H2O2, were observed while the experimental variables such as hydrogen peroxide dosage, UV dosage, initial dye concentration and pH were evaluated. The operating conditions for 90% decolorization of C.I. DB 199 and 74% removal of total organic carbon (TOC) were obtained for initial dye concentration of 20 mgl(-1), hydrogen peroxide dosage of 116.32 mM, UV dosage of 560 W and pH of 8.9 in 30 min. The pseudo-first order rate constant is a linear function of reverse of initial dye concentration. They linearly increased by incrementing UV dosage, yet were non-linear enhancement by increasing the hydrogen peroxide concentration. A higher pseudo-first order rate constant about 0.15 min(-1) was observed while hydrogen peroxide concentration within 5.82-116.32 mM. Moreover, the decolorization of C.I. DB 199 was observed to be more difficult than that of an azo dye, C.I. Acid Black 1, under the same operating conditions.

  12. Effect of the cp4-epsps gene on metal bioavailability in maize and soybean using bionic gastrointestinal tracts and ICP-MS determination.

    PubMed

    Li, Shun-Xing; Chen, Li-Hui; Zheng, Feng-Ying; Li, Yan-Cai

    2013-02-20

    The transformation and metabolism of dietary compounds are affected significantly by gut microbiota. Hence, gut microbiota are used to improve bionic gastrointestinal tracts. The effect of the cp4-epsps gene on metal bioavailability was proved by the comparison of the affinity-liposome metal content ratio (AMCR) in transgenic and conventional crops. The bioavailability of V, Mn, Co, Ga, Ag, Ba, and Pb in roundup ready soybean decreased significantly because the ratio of AMCR (R(AMCR)) in the transgenic crop and its corresponding conventional type ranged from 0.36 to 0.69. In roundup ready maize, metal bioavailability decreased for Li and Cr (i.e., R(AMCR) was 0.26 and 0.39, respectively) but increased for V, Co, and Pb (i.e., R(AMCR) was 1.48, 2.07, and 2.12, respectively). Compared with conventional crops, safe dosage and maximum consumption of roundup ready crops were 1.59 times for soybean and 0.78 times for maize.

  13. Interactions of Biogeochemical Cycles in Oncoid Microbialites from Cuatro Ciénegas, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corman, J. R.; Souza, V.; Elser, J. J.

    2010-04-01

    Modern microbialite systems may provide unique opportunities to study the feedbacks that couple or uncouple multiple biogeochemical cycles. Here we present results from a two-week manipulative ecosystem experiment using oncoid microbialites from Cuatro Ciénegas, Mexico.

  14. PAT: From Western solid dosage forms to Chinese materia medica preparations using NIR-CI.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Luwei; Xu, Manfei; Wu, Zhisheng; Shi, Xinyuan; Qiao, Yanjiang

    2016-01-01

    Near-infrared chemical imaging (NIR-CI) is an emerging technology that combines traditional near-infrared spectroscopy with chemical imaging. Therefore, NIR-CI can extract spectral information from pharmaceutical products and simultaneously visualize the spatial distribution of chemical components. The rapid and non-destructive features of NIR-CI make it an attractive process analytical technology (PAT) for identifying and monitoring critical control parameters during the pharmaceutical manufacturing process. This review mainly focuses on the pharmaceutical applications of NIR-CI in each unit operation during the manufacturing processes, from the Western solid dosage forms to the Chinese materia medica preparations. Finally, future applications of chemical imaging in the pharmaceutical industry are discussed.

  15. 10 CFR 709.16 - Application of Counterintelligence Evaluation Review Boards in reaching conclusions regarding CI...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... ENERGY COUNTERINTELLIGENCE EVALUATION PROGRAM CI Evaluation Protocols and Protection of National Security... covered person, the DOE Office of Health, Safety and Security and security directors for the DOE or...

  16. Synergistic effect in treatment of C.I. Acid Red 2 by electrocoagulation and electrooxidation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, X D; Hao, J D; Li, W S; Jin, H J; Yang, J; Huang, Q M; Lu, D S; Xu, H K

    2009-10-30

    An aqueous C.I. Acid Red 2 solution was decolorized by electrolysis using iron as anode. The decolorization mechanism was investigated through experimental observations on the electrochemical behavior of C.I. Acid Red 2 on Pt rotating disk electrode, UV-visible spectra of the solution and IR spectra of the coagulated mixtures. It is found that the decolorization efficiency is high, over 98.0% after 40 min, and this high decolorization efficiency can be ascribed to the synergistic effect of electrocoagulation and electrooxidation. The electrocoagulation results from the electrogenerated iron hydroxide and the electrooxidation results from electrogenerated ferric ions. The results obtained from IR spectra shows that the decolorization of C.I. Acid Red 2 by electrooxidation is due to the partial or complete cleavage of C-N bonds in C.I. Acid Red 2.

  17. Communication: CDFT-CI couplings can be unreliable when there is fractional charge transfer.

    PubMed

    Mavros, Michael G; Van Voorhis, Troy

    2015-12-21

    Constrained density functional theory with configuration interaction (CDFT-CI) is a useful, low-cost tool for the computational prediction of electronic couplings between pseudo-diabatic constrained electronic states. Such couplings are of paramount importance in electron transfer theory and transition state theory, among other areas of chemistry. Unfortunately, CDFT-CI occasionally fails significantly, predicting a coupling that does not decay exponentially with distance and/or overestimating the expected coupling by an order of magnitude or more. In this communication, we show that the eigenvalues of the difference density matrix between the two constrained states can be used as an a priori metric to determine when CDFT-CI are likely to be reliable: when the eigenvalues are near 0 or ±1, transfer of a whole electron is occurring, and CDFT-CI can be trusted. We demonstrate the utility of this metric with several illustrative examples.

  18. Communication: CDFT-CI couplings can be unreliable when there is fractional charge transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Mavros, Michael G.; Van Voorhis, Troy

    2015-12-21

    Constrained density functional theory with configuration interaction (CDFT-CI) is a useful, low-cost tool for the computational prediction of electronic couplings between pseudo-diabatic constrained electronic states. Such couplings are of paramount importance in electron transfer theory and transition state theory, among other areas of chemistry. Unfortunately, CDFT-CI occasionally fails significantly, predicting a coupling that does not decay exponentially with distance and/or overestimating the expected coupling by an order of magnitude or more. In this communication, we show that the eigenvalues of the difference density matrix between the two constrained states can be used as an a priori metric to determine when CDFT-CI are likely to be reliable: when the eigenvalues are near 0 or ±1, transfer of a whole electron is occurring, and CDFT-CI can be trusted. We demonstrate the utility of this metric with several illustrative examples.

  19. Advanced Microsensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    This video looks at a spinoff application of the technology from advanced microsensors -- those that monitor and determine conditions of spacecraft like the Space Shuttle. The application featured is concerned with the monitoring of the health of premature babies.

  20. Draft Genome Sequence of Flavobacterium johnsoniae CI04, an Isolate from the Soybean Rhizosphere

    PubMed Central

    Bravo, Juan I.; Lozano, Gabriel L.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Flavobacterium johnsoniae CI04 was coisolated with Bacillus cereus from a root of a field-grown soybean plant in Arlington, WI, and selected as a model for studying commensalism between members of the Cytophaga-Flavobacterium-Bacteroides group and B. cereus. Here we report the draft genome sequence of F. johnsoniae CI04 obtained by Illumina sequencing. PMID:28126949

  1. Carbonates and sulfates in CI chondrites - Formation by aqueous activity on the parent body

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fredriksson, Kurt; Kerridge, John F.

    1988-01-01

    Compositions and morphologies of dolomites, breunnerites, Ca-carbonates, Ca-sulfates and Mg, Ni, Na-sulfates, and their petrologic interrelations, in four CI chondrites are consistent with their having been formed by aqueous activity on the CI parent body. Radiochronometric data indicate that this activity took place very early in solar-system history. No evidence for original ('primitive') condensates seems to be present. However, alteration apparently took place without change in bulk meteorite composition.

  2. The Ciona intestinalis immune-related galectin genes (CiLgals-a and CiLgals-b) are expressed by the gastric epithelium.

    PubMed

    Parrinello, Daniela; Sanfratello, Maria Antonietta; Vizzini, Aiti; Testasecca, Lelia; Parrinello, Nicolò; Cammarata, Matteo

    2017-03-01

    The transcription of two Ciona intestinalis galectin genes (CiLgals-a and CiLgals-b) is uparegulated by LPS in the pharynxis (hemocytes, vessel epithelium, endostilar zones) which is retained the main organ of the immunity. In this ascidian, for the first time we show, by immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization methods, that these two immune-related genes are expressed in the gastric epithelium of naïve ascidians, whereas the galectins appear to be only contained in the intestine columnar epithelium. In addition, according to previous results on the pharynx, the genes are also expressed and galectins produced by hemocytes scattered in the connective tissue surrounding the gut. The genes expression and galectin localization in several tissues, including the previous findings on the transcription upregulation, the constitutive expression of these genes by endostylar zones and by the gastric epithelium suggest a potential multifunctional role of these galectins. In this respect, it is of interest to define where the CiLgals are normally found as related to the tissue functions. Such an approach should be a starting point for further investigations.

  3. The maternal genes Ci-p53/p73-a and Ci-p53/p73-b regulate zygotic ZicL expression and notochord differentiation in Ciona intestinalis embryos.

    PubMed

    Noda, Takeshi

    2011-12-01

    I isolated a Ciona intestinalis homolog of p53, Ci-p53/p73-a, in a microarray screen of rapidly degraded maternal mRNA by comparing the transcriptomes of unfertilized eggs and 32-cell stage embryos. Higher expression of the gene in eggs and lower expression in later embryonic stages were confirmed by whole-mount in situ hybridization (WISH) and quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (qRT-PCR); expression was ubiquitous in eggs and early embryos. Knockdown of Ci-p53/p73-a by injection of antisense morpholino oligonucleotides (MOs) severely perturbed gastrulation cell movements and expression of notochord marker genes. A key regulator of notochord differentiation in Ciona embryos is Brachyury (Ci-Bra), which is directly activated by a zic-like gene (Ci-ZicL). The expression of Ci-ZicL and Ci-Bra in A-line notochord precursors was downregulated in Ci-p53/p73-a knockdown embryos. Maternal expression of Ci-p53/p73-b, a homolog of Ci-p53/p73-a, was also detected. In Ci-p53/p73-b knockdown embryos, gastrulation cell movements, expression of Ci-ZicL and Ci-Bra in A-line notochord precursors, and expression of notochord marker gene at later stages were perturbed. The upstream region of Ci-ZicL contains putative p53-binding sites. Cis-regulatory analysis of Ci-ZicL showed that these sites are involved in expression of Ci-ZicL in A-line notochord precursors at the 32-cell and early gastrula stages. These results suggest that p53 genes are maternal factors that play a crucial role in A-line notochord differentiation in C. intestinalis embryos by regulating Ci-ZicL expression.

  4. FIB-TEM Investigations of Fe-NI-Sulfides in the CI Chondrites Alais and Orgueil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berger, Eve L.; Lauretta, D. S.; Zega, T. J.; Keller, L. P.

    2013-01-01

    The CI chondrites are primitive meteorites with bulk compositions matching the solar photosphere for all but the lightest elements. They have been extensively aqueously altered, and are composed primarily of fine-grained phyllosilicate matrix material which is host to carbonates, sulfates, sulfides, and minor amounts of olivine and pyroxene. The alteration, while extensive, is heterogeneous. For example, CI-chondrite cubanite and carbonate grains differ on mm to sub-mm scales, demonstrating multiple aqueous episodes. CI-chondrite variability is also evidenced by degree of brecciation, abundance and size of coarse-grained phyllosilicates, olivine and pyroxene abundance, as well as Ni-content and size of sulfide grains. Our previous work revealed Orgueil sulfide grains with variable Ni-contents, metal:S ratios, crystal structures and textures. We continue to explore the variability of CI-chondrite pyrrhotite (Po, (FeNi)1-xS) and pentlandite (Pn, (Fe,Ni)9S8) grains. We investigate the microstructure of sulfides within and among CI-chondrite meteorites in order to place constraints on the conditions under which they formed.

  5. The Relation between Nonverbal IQ and Postoperative CI Outcomes in Cochlear Implant Users: Preliminary Result

    PubMed Central

    Park, Mina; Song, Jae-Jin; Oh, Seo Jin; Shin, Min-Sup; Lee, Jun Ho; Oh, Seung Ha

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. This study assessed the correlation between performance intelligence and the postoperative cochlear implant (CI) outcome in Korean-speaking children. In addition, the relationship between the performance intelligence subscales and the post-CI speech outcome was evaluated. Materials and Methods. Thirteen pediatric CI users (five males, eight females; median age at implantation 6.2 (range 1.3–14.2) years; median age at intelligence test 9.3 (range 5–16) years) who were tested using the Korean Educational Development Institute-Wechsler Intelligence Scale for children were studied. The correlations between the intelligence scores and 1-2 years postoperative Categories of Auditory Performance (CAP) scores and between subscales of performance and 1-2 years postoperative CAP scores were analyzed. Results. There was no correlation between the categories of verbal intelligence quotient (IQ) and performance IQ for “mentally retarded” and “average,” respectively (Spearman's rho = 0.42, P = 0.15). There was a strong correlation between performance IQ and the postoperative CAP scale (Spearman's rho = 0.8977, P = 0.0008). “Picture arrangement” and “picture completion,” reflecting social cognition, were strongly correlated with the postoperative CAP scales. Conclusion. Performance intelligence, especially social cognition, was strongly related to the postoperative CI outcome of cochlear implant users. Therefore, auditory rehabilitation, including social rehabilitation, should maximize the postoperative CI outcomes. PMID:26236723

  6. The Relation between Nonverbal IQ and Postoperative CI Outcomes in Cochlear Implant Users: Preliminary Result.

    PubMed

    Park, Mina; Song, Jae-Jin; Oh, Seo Jin; Shin, Min-Sup; Lee, Jun Ho; Oh, Seung Ha

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. This study assessed the correlation between performance intelligence and the postoperative cochlear implant (CI) outcome in Korean-speaking children. In addition, the relationship between the performance intelligence subscales and the post-CI speech outcome was evaluated. Materials and Methods. Thirteen pediatric CI users (five males, eight females; median age at implantation 6.2 (range 1.3-14.2) years; median age at intelligence test 9.3 (range 5-16) years) who were tested using the Korean Educational Development Institute-Wechsler Intelligence Scale for children were studied. The correlations between the intelligence scores and 1-2 years postoperative Categories of Auditory Performance (CAP) scores and between subscales of performance and 1-2 years postoperative CAP scores were analyzed. Results. There was no correlation between the categories of verbal intelligence quotient (IQ) and performance IQ for "mentally retarded" and "average," respectively (Spearman's rho = 0.42, P = 0.15). There was a strong correlation between performance IQ and the postoperative CAP scale (Spearman's rho = 0.8977, P = 0.0008). "Picture arrangement" and "picture completion," reflecting social cognition, were strongly correlated with the postoperative CAP scales. Conclusion. Performance intelligence, especially social cognition, was strongly related to the postoperative CI outcome of cochlear implant users. Therefore, auditory rehabilitation, including social rehabilitation, should maximize the postoperative CI outcomes.

  7. Mechanism of inhibition of human neutrophil activation by the allergic mediator release inhibitor, CI-922

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, M.D.; Wright, C.D.

    1986-03-05

    The allergic mediator release inhibitor CI-922 (3,7-dimethoxy-4-phenyl-N-1H-tetrazol-5-yl-4H-furo(3,2-b)indole-2-carboxamide) is a potent inhibitor of human neutrophil (PMN) respiratory and secretory responses in vitro. At concentrations from 1 to 100 micromolar, CI-922 inhibits activation of PMNs by agents which stimulate phospholipase C-dependent phosphoinositide hydrolysis to generate the second messengers inositol 1,4,5 trisphosphate and diacylglycerol, including: the plasma membrane receptor-specific ligands fMet-Leu-Phe and C5a; concanavalin A; and the guanine nucleotide regulatory protein-specific stimulus GTPgammaS. In contrast, CI-922 does not inhibit PMN responses to protein kinase C-specific stimuli such as phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) or sn-1,2-dioctanoyl-glycerol. CI-922 is also unable to inhibit the synergistic activation of PMNs by suboptimal concentrations of PMA and calcium ionophore A23187. These results suggest that CI-922 inhibits PMN activation at a site distal to signal transduction through the guanine nucleotide regulatory protein required for second messenger generation but proximal cophosphorylation reactions mediated by protein kinase C and calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinases.

  8. One-electron properties using a CI method based on multiple Hartree-Fock solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malbouisson, L. A. C.; Martins, M. G. R.; Makiuchi, N.

    A multi-reference configuration interaction (CI) method based on multiple Hartree-Fock (HF) solutions is applied to study the permanent dipole moment of the LiH, BH, FH, and H2O systems with the minimal atomic basis. The LiH was also calculated with the double-zeta atomic basis. This method uses several HF solutions as references to expand the state functions. For each one of the systems studied, several HF solutions were obtained in the appropriate point and spin symmetry classes, i.e., 1?+ and 1A1. With each of these solutions is generated a distinct basis of the same full CI space. The set of these bases is a system of generators of the full CI space and the multi-reference HF (MRHF) bases are built mixing configuration state functions (CSFs) originated from distinct HF solutions.

  9. Advancing Reflectrometry

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-05-21

    transmissions, was first demonstrated using Global Navigation Satellite System ( GNSS ) reflections. Recently, reflectometry has been extended to digital... GNSS +R workshop provided an opportunity for engineers and Earth scientists to assess the state of the art, demonstrate new applications, and discuss...18 Eos, Vol. 94, No. 21, 21 May 2013 MEETING -.~ Advancing Reflectometry Workshop on Renectometry Using GNSS and Other Signals of Opportunity

  10. Technological Advancements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennedy, Mike

    2010-01-01

    The influx of technology has brought significant improvements to school facilities. Many of those advancements can be found in classrooms, but when students head down the hall to use the washrooms, they are likely to find a host of technological innovations that have improved conditions in that part of the building. This article describes modern…

  11. Research Advances

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Angela G.

    2004-01-01

    Research advances, a new feature in Journal of Chemical Engineering that brings information about innovations in current areas of research to high school and college science faculty with an intent to provide educators with timely descriptions of latest progress in research that can be integrated into existing courses to update course content and…

  12. Advanced oxidation processes in azo dye wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Papić, Sanja; Koprivanac, Natalija; Bozić, Ana Loncarić; Vujević, Dinko; Dragicević, Savka Kusar; Kusić, Hrvoje; Peternel, Igor

    2006-06-01

    The chemical degradation of synthetic azo dyes color index (C.I.) Acid Orange 7, C.I. Direct Orange 39, and C.I. Mordant Yellow 10 has been studied by the following advanced oxidation processes: Fenton, Fenton-like, ozonation, peroxone without or with addition of solid particles, zeolites HY, and NH4ZSM5. Spectrophotometric (UV/visible light spectrum) and total organic carbon measurements were used for determination of process efficiency and reaction kinetics. The degradation rates are evaluated by determining their rate constants. The different hydroxyl radical generation processes were comparatively studied, and the most efficient experimental conditions for the degradation of organic azo dyes solutions were determined.

  13. Full CI benchmark calculations for several states of the same symmetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Taylor, Peter R.

    1987-01-01

    Full CI (FCI) wave functions are used to compute energies for several electronic states of the same symmetry for SiH2, CH2, and CH2(+). It is found that CASSCF/multireference CI wave functions yield results very similar to FCI, irrespective of whether the CASSCF MOs are optimized independently for each state or using an average of the CASSCF energies for all desired states. The ionization potentials and excitation energies obtained from the FCI calculations should help calibrate methods (such as Green's function approaches, equations of motion and propagator methods, and cluster expansions) in which energy differences are computed directly.

  14. 40 CFR 63.6604 - What fuel requirements must I meet if I own or operate a stationary CI RICE?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... I own or operate a stationary CI RICE? 63.6604 Section 63.6604 Protection of Environment....6604 What fuel requirements must I meet if I own or operate a stationary CI RICE? (a) If you own or operate an existing non-emergency, non-black start CI stationary RICE with a site rating of more than...

  15. 40 CFR 63.6604 - What fuel requirements must I meet if I own or operate a stationary CI RICE?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... I own or operate a stationary CI RICE? 63.6604 Section 63.6604 Protection of Environment....6604 What fuel requirements must I meet if I own or operate a stationary CI RICE? (a) If you own or operate an existing non-emergency, non-black start CI stationary RICE with a site rating of more than...

  16. Advanced Combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, Gordon R.

    2013-03-11

    The activity reported in this presentation is to provide the mechanical and physical property information needed to allow rational design, development and/or choice of alloys, manufacturing approaches, and environmental exposure and component life models to enable oxy-fuel combustion boilers to operate at Ultra-Supercritical (up to 650{degrees}C & between 22-30 MPa) and/or Advanced Ultra-Supercritical conditions (760{degrees}C & 35 MPa).

  17. The Size, Scale, and Structure Concept Inventory (S3CI) for Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gingrich, E. C.; Ladd, E. F.; Nottis, K. E. K.; Udomprasert, P.; Goodman, A. A.

    2015-11-01

    We present a concept inventory to evaluate student understanding of size, scale, and structure concepts in the astronomical context. Students harbor misconceptions regarding these concepts, and these misconceptions often persist even after instruction. Evaluation of these concepts prior to as well as after instruction can ensure misconceptions are addressed. Currently, no concept inventories focus exclusively on these geometrical ideas, so we have developed the Size, Scale and Structure Concept Inventory (S3CI). In fall 2013, we piloted a 24-item version of the S3CI in an introductory astronomy course at a small private university. We performed an item analysis and estimated the internal consistency reliability for the instrument. Based on these analyses, problematic questions were revised for a second version. We discuss the results from the pilot phase and preview our updated test in this work. A valid and reliable concept inventory has the potential to accurately evaluate undergraduates' understanding of size, scale, and structure concepts in the astronomical context, as well as assess conceptual change after targeted instruction. Lessons learned in the evaluation of the initial version of the S3CI can guide future development of this and other astronomical concept inventories. Instructors interested in participating in the ongoing development of the S3CI should contact the authors.

  18. Zebrafish CiA interneurons are late-born primary neurons.

    PubMed

    Yeo, Sang-Yeob

    2009-12-11

    Pax2 is a neural-related transcription factor downstream of Notch signaling and is expressed in the developing spinal cord of zebrafish, including in CiA interneurons. However, the characteristics of pax2-positive neurons are largely unknown. The goal of this study was to characterize Pax2-positive neurons by examining their expression in embryos in which Notch function had been knocked down by mutation or injection of a morpholino or mRNA. I found that Pax2-positive CiA interneurons were late-differentiating primary neurons. pax2.1 was expressed in CoPA commissural neurons and CiA interneurons at 26 hpf. The number of pax2.1-positive cells increased in mind bomb mutant embryos or embryos injected with Su(H)1-MO, but not in cells injected with Xenopus Delta or Delta(stu) mRNA. These observations imply that Notch signaling plays a role in regulating the number of CiA neurons by preventing uncommitted precursors from acquiring a neuronal fate during vertebrate development.

  19. 10 CFR 709.16 - Application of Counterintelligence Evaluation Review Boards in reaching conclusions regarding CI...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Application of Counterintelligence Evaluation Review Boards in reaching conclusions regarding CI evaluations. 709.16 Section 709.16 Energy DEPARTMENT OF... § 709.16 Application of Counterintelligence Evaluation Review Boards in reaching conclusions...

  20. 10 CFR 709.16 - Application of Counterintelligence Evaluation Review Boards in reaching conclusions regarding CI...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Application of Counterintelligence Evaluation Review Boards in reaching conclusions regarding CI evaluations. 709.16 Section 709.16 Energy DEPARTMENT OF... § 709.16 Application of Counterintelligence Evaluation Review Boards in reaching conclusions...

  1. 10 CFR 709.16 - Application of Counterintelligence Evaluation Review Boards in reaching conclusions regarding CI...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Application of Counterintelligence Evaluation Review Boards in reaching conclusions regarding CI evaluations. 709.16 Section 709.16 Energy DEPARTMENT OF... § 709.16 Application of Counterintelligence Evaluation Review Boards in reaching conclusions...

  2. 10 CFR 709.16 - Application of Counterintelligence Evaluation Review Boards in reaching conclusions regarding CI...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Application of Counterintelligence Evaluation Review Boards in reaching conclusions regarding CI evaluations. 709.16 Section 709.16 Energy DEPARTMENT OF... § 709.16 Application of Counterintelligence Evaluation Review Boards in reaching conclusions...

  3. The Role of Journals in Building up Communities: The Experience of "Ciência em Tela"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martins, Isabel; de Souza Barros, Susana

    2015-01-01

    "Ciência em Tela" is an open access Brazilian science teacher education online journal that has been published twice a year since 2008 and which encourages the participation of professionals with different backgrounds and the submission of a variety of textual genres, besides research papers. Another feature is that the journal includes…

  4. Cuatro Ciénegas, a Desert Oasis with Active Stromatolites: An Astrobiological Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souza, V.; Breitbart, M.; Hollander, D.; Elser, J.; Meadows, V.; Siefert, J.

    2010-04-01

    Cuatro Ciénegas Bolson is a desert valley, ringed by mountains, fed by a deep underground aquifer. The resultant pozas support active stromatolitic growth. We report on the field site as a proxy for earlier earth dominated microbial systems.

  5. A rational reduction of CI expansions: combining localized molecular orbitals and selected charge excitations.

    PubMed

    Krah, Tim; Ben Amor, Nadia; Maynau, Daniel; Berger, J A; Robert, Vincent

    2014-07-01

    Based on localized molecular orbitals, the proposed method reduces large configuration interaction (CI) spaces while maintaining agreement with reference values. Our strategy concentrates the numerical effort on physically pertinent CI-contributions and is to be considered as a tool to tackle large systems including numerous open-shells. To show the efficiency of our method we consider two 4-electron parent systems. First, we illustrate our approach by describing the van der Waals interactions in the (H2)2 system. By systematically including local correlation, dispersion and charge transfer mechanisms, we show that 90% of the reference full CI dissociation energy of the H2 dimer is reproduced using only 3% of the full CI space. Second, the conformational cis/trans rotation barrier of the butadiene molecule is remarkably reproduced (97% of the reference value) with less than 1% of the reference space. This work paves the way to numerical strategies which afford the electronic structure determination of large open-shell systems avoiding the exponential limitation. At the same time, a physical analysis of the contents of the wave function is offered.

  6. Estimation of CI-based soil compaction status from soil apparent electrical conductivity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Regionalization of soil properties is very important for successful site-specific field management. Soil compaction is a critical issue to be detected and managed due to its effects on crop growth. Soil compaction has been conventionally quantified as cone index (CI) measured by an ASABE-standard co...

  7. 21 CFR 73.3112 - C.I. Vat Orange 1.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false C.I. Vat Orange 1. 73.3112 Section 73.3112 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL LISTING OF... amounts not to exceed the minimum reasonably required to accomplish the intended coloring effect....

  8. 21 CFR 73.3112 - C.I. Vat Orange 1.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false C.I. Vat Orange 1. 73.3112 Section 73.3112 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL LISTING OF... amounts not to exceed the minimum reasonably required to accomplish the intended coloring effect....

  9. A rapidly convergent CI expansion based on several reference configurations, using optimized correlating orbitals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Peter R.

    1981-01-01

    A method is presented for obtaining CI expansions, comprising all single and double excitations from an arbitrary set of reference configurations, in a rapidly convergent form. This rapid convergence results from the use of mutually nonorthogonal sets of correlating orbitals, and the method thus represents a generalization of the PNO-CI scheme. A computational implementation requires the following steps: generation of a configuration list and symbolic Hamiltonian matrix elements between configurations, optimization of correlating orbitals, transformation of required integrals, the construction of a numerical Hamiltonian matrix from these data, and the extraction of one or more roots from this matrix. Each of these steps is discussed in terms of the algorithm used in the present application. The results of illustrative calculations on the methylene and lithium monoxide molecules are given, together with observed computation times, and it is concluded that the present scheme should prove as useful for CI expansions based on several reference configurations as has the PNO-CI method for the simpler case of a single reference configuration.

  10. Collaborative efforts for managing Melaleuca in the Ciénega de Zapata, Cuba

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Ciénega de Zapata Biosphere Reserve is the largest protected area not only in Cuba but also throughout the Caribbean. This swamp ecosystem is characterized by a high biodiversity that comprises several endemic birds, reptiles and invertebrates and is visited by 65 species of birds during their a...

  11. AEROBIC AND ANAEROBIC TREATMENT OF C.I. DISPERSE BLUE 79 - VOLUME II, APPENDICES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study was conducted to determine the fate of C.I. Disperse Blue 79, one of the largest production volume dyes, and select biodegradation products in a conventionally operated activated sludge process and an anaerobic sludge digestion system. To achieve this objective, a pilo...

  12. AEROBIC AND ANAEROBIC TREATMENT OF C.I. DISPERSE BLUE 79 - VOLUME I

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study was conducted to determine the fate of C.I. Disperse Blue 79, one of the largest production volume dyes, and select biodegradation products in a conventionally operated activated sludge process and an anaerobic sludge digestion system. To achieve this objective, a pilo...

  13. Aqueous stability and solubility of CI-988, a novel "dipeptoid" cholecystokinin-B receptor antagonist.

    PubMed

    Kearney, A S; Mehta, S C; Radebaugh, G W

    1992-08-01

    The aqueous solubility and solution stability of the N-methylglucamine and sodium salts of CI-988 (CI-988 NMG and CI-988 Na) were evaluated to aid in the development of a parenteral formulation for preclinical and clinical testing. CI-988 ([R-(R*,R*)]-4-[[2-[[3-(1H-indol-3-yl)-2-methyl-1-oxo-2- [[(tricyclo[3.3.1.1(3,7)]dec-2-yloxy)- carbonyl]amino]propyl]amino]-1-phenylethyl]amino]-4-oxobutanoic acid) is a selective "dipeptoid" cholecystokinin-B receptor antagonist. The shape of the pH-solubility profile, generated at 30 degrees C, is consistent with the ionization of the terminal carboxyl group (pKa of 4.34). The pH-rate profile is independent of the salt form and is well described by two reaction pathways: spontaneous or water-catalyzed degradation of the nonionized form and specific base-catalyzed catalyzed degradation of the ionized form. The primary mechanism of degradation from the former pathway is consistent with intramolecular, carboxyl-assisted, amide-bond cleavage, whereas the primary mechanism of degradation from the latter pathway appears to be intramolecular cyclization to a hydantoin product with expulsion of 2-adamantanol. The pH dependencies of the solubility and stability show that a simple aqueous buffered solution of CI-988 has a predicted t90 of 2.1 years and a solubility of 0.94 mg/ml at pH 6.5, the theoretical pH of maximum stability, and 30 degrees C.

  14. Are CI Chondrites Cometary Samples? A Search for Olivine and Use as a Discrimination Index.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Gac, Y.; Kearsley, A. T.; Bland, P. A.; Russell, S. S.

    2009-04-01

    CI chondrites are among the most unusual type of carbonaceous chondrites. There are only five CI1 meteorite falls. They are heavily altered (BULLOCK et al., 2005), yet show a similar bulk composition to the solar photosphere (ANDERS and GREVESSE, 1989; LODDERS, 2003). There still remains uncertainties about the origin and formation of the parent bodies for such meteorites. One theory is that CI chondrites derive from cometary nuclei, based on evidence from textural and mineralogical arguments (CAMPINS and SWINDLE, 1998) and orbital parameters (GOUNELLE et al., 2006). We now have known cometary material to compare to CI chondrites. The NASA sample return mission Stardust returned to Earth on January 2006. This mission collected cometary dust particles by flying through the coma of comet 81P/Wild 2. The Preliminary Examination (Science, 314, 2006) and subsequent studies (MaPS, 43, 2008), showed that expected hydrated minerals seem to be absent. This may in part be because finer-grained hydrated minerals are less likely to survive the collection process (ISHII et al., 2008) although experimental studies (BURCHELL et al., 2006; NOGUCHI et al., 2007) have shown that coarser (> m) phyllosilicates can survive capture under conditions analogous to the Stardust encounter. To determine the relationship between CIs and returned cometary material, we may therefore have to focus on the distinctive composition of anhydrous minerals, which are rare in CI meteorites. Olivine is a common mineral in the solar system, and has been reported in diverse compositions within Stardust samples, especially with distinctive levels of Fe, Cr and Mn. In cold cometary bodies it is unlikely that the chemical composition of olivine will have been affected by parent body processing, so olivines are likely to be unaltered and could provide evidence for any primary genetic link between CIs and cometary material. In this study we present an optimised analytical technique to detect micrometer

  15. Reconnaissance isotopic and hydrochemical study of Cuatro Ciénegas groundwater, Coahuila, México

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johannesson, Karen H.; Cortés, Alejandra; Kilroy, Kathryn C.

    2004-10-01

    The springs of the Cuatro Ciénegas bolson (Four Marshes basin), Coahuila, México, support more than 70 endemic species of biota. The specifics of the groundwater flow regime, however, remain a mystery. Water samples were collected from a series of springs and pools and one canal in the Cuatro Ciénegas bolson and analyzed for field parameters (temperature, pH, conductivity, alkalinity) and stable oxygen and hydrogen isotopes in an attempt to begin a systematic study of the hydrogeology of the region. Groundwaters discharging directly along a fault-controlled spring line in Cretaceous carbonate rocks of the Cupido-Aurora aquifer are the most dilute (lowest conductivities) and warmest of those sampled. Cuatro Ciénegas waters are characterized by circumneutral pH (6.9-7.7) and reasonably low alkalinity (160-215 mg/kg as HCO 3). The δ18O values of Cuatro Ciénegas waters range from -8.2 to -5.7‰, with a mean of -6.5±0.82‰, whereas δD ranges from -52 to -43‰, with a mean of -46.6±3.2‰. The majority of the water samples plot subparallel and beneath the local meteoric water line; those samples collected farthest from the spring line exhibit the most enriched δ18O and δD values. The stable isotope data indicate that isotopic enrichment of groundwaters by evaporation following discharge and subsequent surface flow is an important process within the Cuatro Ciénegas bolson. The isotope data also suggest that a fraction of Cuatro Ciénegas groundwater originates with local recharge in mountains surrounding the bolson. Those springs that issue from the western base of the Sierra de San Marcos mountain range are recharged in part in these mountains, whereas groundwaters discharging from Laguna Anteojo in the northern part of the bolson are more likely recharged in the higher San de la Madera mountain range. An estimate of the water balance suggests that interbasin flow also may contribute to the considerable groundwater discharge.

  16. Fossils of Cyanobacteria in CI1 Carbonaceous Meteorites: Implications to Life on Comets, Europa and Enceladus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoover, Richard B.

    2011-10-01

    Environmental (ESEM) and Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM) investigations of the internal surfaces of the CI1 Carbonaceous Meteorites have yielded images of large complex filaments. The filaments have been observed to be embedded in freshly fractured internal surfaces of the stones. They exhibit recognizable features (e.g., the size and size ranges of the internal cells and their location and arrangement within sheaths) that are diagnostic of known genera and species of filamentous trichomic cyanobacteria and other trichomic prokaryotes (such as filamentous sulfur bacteria). ESEM and FESEM studies of living and fossil cyanobacteria show features similar to the filaments found in the meteorites -- uniseriate and multiseriate, branched or unbranched, isodiametric or tapered, polarized or unpolarized filaments with trichomes encased within thin or thick external sheaths. Some of the filaments found in the CI1 meteorites also exhibit specialized cells and structures used by cyanobacteria for reproduction (baeocytes, akinetes and hormogonia), nitrogen fixation (basal, intercalary or apical heterocysts), attachment (pili or fimbriae) or indicative of oscillatoria type locomotion (escaped or coiling hormogonia and flattened and coiled empty sheaths). Energy dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDS) studies indicate that the Orgueil meteorite filaments are typically carbon-rich sheaths infilled with magnesium sulfate and other minerals characteristic of the CI1 carbonaceous meteorites. However, the size, structure, detailed morphological characteristics and chemical compositions of the meteorite filaments are not consistent with known species of abiotic minerals. The nitrogen content of the meteorite filaments are almost always below the detection limit of the EDS detector. EDS analysis of living and dead biological materials (e.g., filamentous cyanobacteria; bacteria, mummy and mammoth hair and tissues, and fossils of cyanobacteria, trilobites and insects in

  17. Fossils of Cyanobacteria in CI1 Carbonaceous Meteorites: Implications to Life on Comets, Europa, and Enceladus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoover, Richard B.

    Environmental (ESEM) and Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM) investigations of the internal surfaces of the CI1 Carbonaceous Meteorites have yielded images of large complex filaments. The filaments have been observed to be embedded in freshly fractured internal surfaces of the stones. They exhibit features (e.g., the size and size ranges of the internal cells and their location and arrangement within sheaths) that are diagnostic of known genera and species of trichomic cyanobacteria and other trichomic prokaryotes such as the filamentous sulfur bacteria. ESEM and FESEM studies of living and fossil cyanobacteria show similar features in uniseriate and multiseriate, branched or unbranched, isodiametric or tapered, polarized or unpolarized filaments with trichomes encased within thin or thick external sheaths. Filaments found in the CI1 meteorites have also been detected that exhibit structures consistent with the specialized cells and structures used by cyanobacteria for reproduction (baeocytes, akinetes and hormogonia), nitrogen fixation (basal, intercalary or apical heterocysts) and attachment or motility (fimbriae). Energy dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDS) studies indicate that the meteorite filaments are typically carbon rich sheaths infilled with magnesium sulfate and other minerals characteristic of the CI1 carbonaceous meteorites. The size, structure, detailed morphological characteristics and chemical compositions of the meteorite filaments are not consistent with known species of minerals. The nitrogen content of the meteorite filaments are almost always below the detection limit of the EDS detector. EDS analysis of terrestrial minerals and biological materials (e.g., fibrous epsomite, filamentous cyanobacteria; mummy and mammoth hair/tissues, and fossils of cyanobacteria, trilobites, insects in amber) indicate that nitrogen remains detectable in biological materials for thousands of years but is undetectable in the ancient fossils. These

  18. Advanced LIGO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LIGO Scientific Collaboration; Aasi, J.; Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T.; Abernathy, M. R.; Ackley, K.; Adams, C.; Adams, T.; Addesso, P.; Adhikari, R. X.; Adya, V.; Affeldt, C.; Aggarwal, N.; Aguiar, O. D.; Ain, A.; Ajith, P.; Alemic, A.; Allen, B.; Amariutei, D.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arai, K.; Araya, M. C.; Arceneaux, C.; Areeda, J. S.; Ashton, G.; Ast, S.; Aston, S. M.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Aylott, B. E.; Babak, S.; Baker, P. T.; Ballmer, S. W.; Barayoga, J. C.; Barbet, M.; Barclay, S.; Barish, B. C.; Barker, D.; Barr, B.; Barsotti, L.; Bartlett, J.; Barton, M. A.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Batch, J. C.; Baune, C.; Behnke, B.; Bell, A. S.; Bell, C.; Benacquista, M.; Bergman, J.; Bergmann, G.; Berry, C. P. L.; Betzwieser, J.; Bhagwat, S.; Bhandare, R.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Birch, J.; Biscans, S.; Biwer, C.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blackburn, L.; Blair, C. D.; Blair, D.; Bock, O.; Bodiya, T. P.; Bojtos, P.; Bond, C.; Bork, R.; Born, M.; Bose, Sukanta; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Brau, J. E.; Bridges, D. O.; Brinkmann, M.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, D. A.; Brown, D. D.; Brown, N. M.; Buchman, S.; Buikema, A.; Buonanno, A.; Cadonati, L.; Calderón Bustillo, J.; Camp, J. B.; Cannon, K. C.; Cao, J.; Capano, C. D.; Caride, S.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglià, M.; Cepeda, C.; Chakraborty, R.; Chalermsongsak, T.; Chamberlin, S. J.; Chao, S.; Charlton, P.; Chen, Y.; Cho, H. S.; Cho, M.; Chow, J. H.; Christensen, N.; Chu, Q.; Chung, S.; Ciani, G.; Clara, F.; Clark, J. A.; Collette, C.; Cominsky, L.; Constancio, M., Jr.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T. R.; Cornish, N.; Corsi, A.; Costa, C. A.; Coughlin, M. W.; Countryman, S.; Couvares, P.; Coward, D. M.; Cowart, M. J.; Coyne, D. C.; Coyne, R.; Craig, K.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Creighton, T. D.; Cripe, J.; Crowder, S. G.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, L.; Cutler, C.; Dahl, K.; Dal Canton, T.; Damjanic, M.; Danilishin, S. L.; Danzmann, K.; Dartez, L.; Dave, I.; Daveloza, H.; Davies, G. S.; Daw, E. J.; DeBra, D.; Del Pozzo, W.; Denker, T.; Dent, T.; Dergachev, V.; DeRosa, R. T.; DeSalvo, R.; Dhurandhar, S.; D´ıaz, M.; Di Palma, I.; Dojcinoski, G.; Dominguez, E.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doravari, S.; Douglas, R.; Downes, T. P.; Driggers, J. C.; Du, Z.; Dwyer, S.; Eberle, T.; Edo, T.; Edwards, M.; Edwards, M.; Effler, A.; Eggenstein, H.-B.; Ehrens, P.; Eichholz, J.; Eikenberry, S. S.; Essick, R.; Etzel, T.; Evans, M.; Evans, T.; Factourovich, M.; Fairhurst, S.; Fan, X.; Fang, Q.; Farr, B.; Farr, W. M.; Favata, M.; Fays, M.; Fehrmann, H.; Fejer, M. M.; Feldbaum, D.; Ferreira, E. C.; Fisher, R. P.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Fricke, T. T.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fuentes-Tapia, S.; Fulda, P.; Fyffe, M.; Gair, J. R.; Gaonkar, S.; Gehrels, N.; Gergely, L. Á.; Giaime, J. A.; Giardina, K. D.; Gleason, J.; Goetz, E.; Goetz, R.; Gondan, L.; González, G.; Gordon, N.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Gossan, S.; Goßler, S.; Gräf, C.; Graff, P. B.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.; Greenhalgh, R. J. S.; Gretarsson, A. M.; Grote, H.; Grunewald, S.; Guido, C. J.; Guo, X.; Gushwa, K.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Hacker, J.; Hall, E. D.; Hammond, G.; Hanke, M.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hannam, M. D.; Hanson, J.; Hardwick, T.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Hart, M.; Hartman, M. T.; Haster, C.-J.; Haughian, K.; Hee, S.; Heintze, M.; Heinzel, G.; Hendry, M.; Heng, I. S.; Heptonstall, A. W.; Heurs, M.; Hewitson, M.; Hild, S.; Hoak, D.; Hodge, K. A.; Hollitt, S. E.; Holt, K.; Hopkins, P.; Hosken, D. J.; Hough, J.; Houston, E.; Howell, E. J.; Hu, Y. M.; Huerta, E.; Hughey, B.; Husa, S.; Huttner, S. H.; Huynh, M.; Huynh-Dinh, T.; Idrisy, A.; Indik, N.; Ingram, D. R.; Inta, R.; Islas, G.; Isler, J. C.; Isogai, T.; Iyer, B. R.; Izumi, K.; Jacobson, M.; Jang, H.; Jawahar, S.; Ji, Y.; Jiménez-Forteza, F.; Johnson, W. W.; Jones, D. I.; Jones, R.; Ju, L.; Haris, K.; Kalogera, V.; Kandhasamy, S.; Kang, G.; Kanner, J. B.; Katsavounidis, E.; Katzman, W.; Kaufer, H.; Kaufer, S.; Kaur, T.; Kawabe, K.; Kawazoe, F.; Keiser, G. M.; Keitel, D.; Kelley, D. B.; Kells, W.; Keppel, D. G.; Key, J. S.; Khalaidovski, A.; Khalili, F. Y.; Khazanov, E. A.; Kim, C.; Kim, K.; Kim, N. G.; Kim, N.; Kim, Y.-M.; King, E. J.; King, P. J.; Kinzel, D. L.; Kissel, J. S.; Klimenko, S.; Kline, J.; Koehlenbeck, S.; Kokeyama, K.; Kondrashov, V.; Korobko, M.; Korth, W. Z.; Kozak, D. B.; Kringel, V.; Krishnan, B.; Krueger, C.; Kuehn, G.; Kumar, A.; Kumar, P.; Kuo, L.; Landry, M.; Lantz, B.; Larson, S.; Lasky, P. D.; Lazzarini, A.; Lazzaro, C.; Le, J.; Leaci, P.; Leavey, S.; Lebigot, E. O.; Lee, C. H.; Lee, H. K.; Lee, H. M.; Leong, J. R.; Levin, Y.; Levine, B.; Lewis, J.; Li, T. G. F.; Libbrecht, K.; Libson, A.; Lin, A. C.; Littenberg, T. B.; Lockerbie, N. A.; Lockett, V.; Logue, J.; Lombardi, A. L.; Lormand, M.; Lough, J.; Lubinski, M. J.; Lück, H.; Lundgren, A. P.; Lynch, R.; Ma, Y.; Macarthur, J.; MacDonald, T.; Machenschalk, B.; MacInnis, M.; Macleod, D. M.; Magaña-Sandoval, F.; Magee, R.; Mageswaran, M.; Maglione, C.; Mailand, K.; Mandel, I.; Mandic, V.; Mangano, V.; Mansell, G. L.; Márka, S.; Márka, Z.; Markosyan, A.; Maros, E.; Martin, I. W.; Martin, R. M.; Martynov, D.; Marx, J. N.; Mason, K.; Massinger, T. J.; Matichard, F.; Matone, L.; Mavalvala, N.; Mazumder, N.; Mazzolo, G.; McCarthy, R.; McClelland, D. E.; McCormick, S.; McGuire, S. C.; McIntyre, G.; McIver, J.; McLin, K.; McWilliams, S.; Meadors, G. D.; Meinders, M.; Melatos, A.; Mendell, G.; Mercer, R. A.; Meshkov, S.; Messenger, C.; Meyers, P. M.; Miao, H.; Middleton, H.; Mikhailov, E. E.; Miller, A.; Miller, J.; Millhouse, M.; Ming, J.; Mirshekari, S.; Mishra, C.; Mitra, S.; Mitrofanov, V. P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Mittleman, R.; Moe, B.; Mohanty, S. D.; Mohapatra, S. R. P.; Moore, B.; Moraru, D.; Moreno, G.; Morriss, S. R.; Mossavi, K.; Mow-Lowry, C. M.; Mueller, C. L.; Mueller, G.; Mukherjee, S.; Mullavey, A.; Munch, J.; Murphy, D.; Murray, P. G.; Mytidis, A.; Nash, T.; Nayak, R. K.; Necula, V.; Nedkova, K.; Newton, G.; Nguyen, T.; Nielsen, A. B.; Nissanke, S.; Nitz, A. H.; Nolting, D.; Normandin, M. E. N.; Nuttall, L. K.; Ochsner, E.; O'Dell, J.; Oelker, E.; Ogin, G. H.; Oh, J. J.; Oh, S. H.; Ohme, F.; Oppermann, P.; Oram, R.; O'Reilly, B.; Ortega, W.; O'Shaughnessy, R.; Osthelder, C.; Ott, C. D.; Ottaway, D. J.; Ottens, R. S.; Overmier, H.; Owen, B. J.; Padilla, C.; Pai, A.; Pai, S.; Palashov, O.; Pal-Singh, A.; Pan, H.; Pankow, C.; Pannarale, F.; Pant, B. C.; Papa, M. A.; Paris, H.; Patrick, Z.; Pedraza, M.; Pekowsky, L.; Pele, A.; Penn, S.; Perreca, A.; Phelps, M.; Pierro, V.; Pinto, I. M.; Pitkin, M.; Poeld, J.; Post, A.; Poteomkin, A.; Powell, J.; Prasad, J.; Predoi, V.; Premachandra, S.; Prestegard, T.; Price, L. R.; Principe, M.; Privitera, S.; Prix, R.; Prokhorov, L.; Puncken, O.; Pürrer, M.; Qin, J.; Quetschke, V.; Quintero, E.; Quiroga, G.; Quitzow-James, R.; Raab, F. J.; Rabeling, D. S.; Radkins, H.; Raffai, P.; Raja, S.; Rajalakshmi, G.; Rakhmanov, M.; Ramirez, K.; Raymond, V.; Reed, C. M.; Reid, S.; Reitze, D. H.; Reula, O.; Riles, K.; Robertson, N. A.; Robie, R.; Rollins, J. G.; Roma, V.; Romano, J. D.; Romanov, G.; Romie, J. H.; Rowan, S.; Rüdiger, A.; Ryan, K.; Sachdev, S.; Sadecki, T.; Sadeghian, L.; Saleem, M.; Salemi, F.; Sammut, L.; Sandberg, V.; Sanders, J. R.; Sannibale, V.; Santiago-Prieto, I.; Sathyaprakash, B. S.; Saulson, P. R.; Savage, R.; Sawadsky, A.; Scheuer, J.; Schilling, R.; Schmidt, P.; Schnabel, R.; Schofield, R. M. S.; Schreiber, E.; Schuette, D.; Schutz, B. F.; Scott, J.; Scott, S. M.; Sellers, D.; Sengupta, A. S.; Sergeev, A.; Serna, G.; Sevigny, A.; Shaddock, D. A.; Shahriar, M. S.; Shaltev, M.; Shao, Z.; Shapiro, B.; Shawhan, P.; Shoemaker, D. H.; Sidery, T. L.; Siemens, X.; Sigg, D.; Silva, A. D.; Simakov, D.; Singer, A.; Singer, L.; Singh, R.; Sintes, A. M.; Slagmolen, B. J. J.; Smith, J. R.; Smith, M. R.; Smith, R. J. E.; Smith-Lefebvre, N. D.; Son, E. J.; Sorazu, B.; Souradeep, T.; Staley, A.; Stebbins, J.; Steinke, M.; Steinlechner, J.; Steinlechner, S.; Steinmeyer, D.; Stephens, B. C.; Steplewski, S.; Stevenson, S.; Stone, R.; Strain, K. A.; Strigin, S.; Sturani, R.; Stuver, A. L.; Summerscales, T. Z.; Sutton, P. J.; Szczepanczyk, M.; Szeifert, G.; Talukder, D.; Tanner, D. B.; Tápai, M.; Tarabrin, S. P.; Taracchini, A.; Taylor, R.; Tellez, G.; Theeg, T.; Thirugnanasambandam, M. P.; Thomas, M.; Thomas, P.; Thorne, K. A.; Thorne, K. S.; Thrane, E.; Tiwari, V.; Tomlinson, C.; Torres, C. V.; Torrie, C. I.; Traylor, G.; Tse, M.; Tshilumba, D.; Ugolini, D.; Unnikrishnan, C. S.; Urban, A. L.; Usman, S. A.; Vahlbruch, H.; Vajente, G.; Valdes, G.; Vallisneri, M.; van Veggel, A. A.; Vass, S.; Vaulin, R.; Vecchio, A.; Veitch, J.; Veitch, P. J.; Venkateswara, K.; Vincent-Finley, R.; Vitale, S.; Vo, T.; Vorvick, C.; Vousden, W. D.; Vyatchanin, S. P.; Wade, A. R.; Wade, L.; Wade, M.; Walker, M.; Wallace, L.; Walsh, S.; Wang, H.; Wang, M.; Wang, X.; Ward, R. L.; Warner, J.; Was, M.; Weaver, B.; Weinert, M.; Weinstein, A. J.; Weiss, R.; Welborn, T.; Wen, L.; Wessels, P.; Westphal, T.; Wette, K.; Whelan, J. T.; Whitcomb, S. E.; White, D. J.; Whiting, B. F.; Wilkinson, C.; Williams, L.; Williams, R.; Williamson, A. R.; Willis, J. L.; Willke, B.; Wimmer, M.; Winkler, W.; Wipf, C. C.; Wittel, H.; Woan, G.; Worden, J.; Xie, S.; Yablon, J.; Yakushin, I.; Yam, W.; Yamamoto, H.; Yancey, C. C.; Yang, Q.; Zanolin, M.; Zhang, Fan; Zhang, L.; Zhang, M.; Zhang, Y.; Zhao, C.; Zhou, M.; Zhu, X. J.; Zucker, M. E.; Zuraw, S.; Zweizig, J.

    2015-04-01

    The Advanced LIGO gravitational wave detectors are second-generation instruments designed and built for the two LIGO observatories in Hanford, WA and Livingston, LA, USA. The two instruments are identical in design, and are specialized versions of a Michelson interferometer with 4 km long arms. As in Initial LIGO, Fabry-Perot cavities are used in the arms to increase the interaction time with a gravitational wave, and power recycling is used to increase the effective laser power. Signal recycling has been added in Advanced LIGO to improve the frequency response. In the most sensitive frequency region around 100 Hz, the design strain sensitivity is a factor of 10 better than Initial LIGO. In addition, the low frequency end of the sensitivity band is moved from 40 Hz down to 10 Hz. All interferometer components have been replaced with improved technologies to achieve this sensitivity gain. Much better seismic isolation and test mass suspensions are responsible for the gains at lower frequencies. Higher laser power, larger test masses and improved mirror coatings lead to the improved sensitivity at mid and high frequencies. Data collecting runs with these new instruments are planned to begin in mid-2015.

  19. Debra-mediated Ci degradation controls tissue homeostasis in Drosophila adult midgut.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhouhua; Guo, Yueqin; Han, Lili; Zhang, Yan; Shi, Lai; Huang, Xudong; Lin, Xinhua

    2014-02-11

    Adult tissue homeostasis is maintained by resident stem cells and their progeny. However, the underlying mechanisms that control tissue homeostasis are not fully understood. Here, we demonstrate that Debra-mediated Ci degradation is important for intestinal stem cell (ISC) proliferation in Drosophila adult midgut. Debra inhibition leads to increased ISC activity and tissue homeostasis loss, phenocopying defects observed in aging flies. These defects can be suppressed by depleting Ci, suggesting that increased Hedgehog (Hh) signaling contributes to ISC proliferation and tissue homeostasis loss. Consistently, Hh signaling activation causes the same defects, whereas depletion of Hh signaling suppresses these defects. Furthermore, the Hh ligand from multiple sources is involved in ISC proliferation and tissue homeostasis. Finally, we show that the JNK pathway acts downstream of Hh signaling to regulate ISC proliferation. Together, our results provide insights into the mechanisms of stem cell proliferation and tissue homeostasis control.

  20. Ciênsação: gaining a feeling for sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abreu de Oliveira, Marcos Henrique; Fischer, Robert

    2017-03-01

    Ciênsação, an open online repository for hands-on experiments, has been developed to convince teachers in Latin America that science is best experienced first hand. Permitting students to experiment autonomously in small groups can be a challenging endeavour for educators in these countries. We analyse the reasons that cause hesitation of teachers appling hands-on experiments in class, and discuss how Ciênsação was implemented to overcome these obstacles. The resulting student research activities are specifically designed to be easily integrated in formal science education at school, to foster research skills and, most importantly, to let young people get to know science as an engaging creative activity.

  1. The interaction of C.I. acid red 27 with human hemoglobin in solution.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan-Qing; Zhang, Hong-Mei; Tang, Bo-Ping

    2010-08-02

    The nature of the interaction between human hemoglobin and C.I. acid red 27 was investigated systematically by ultraviolet-vis absorbance, circular dichroism, fluorescence, synchronous fluorescence, and three-dimensional fluorescence spectra techniques at pH 7.40. The quenching mechanism, binding constants, and the number of binding sites were determined by the quenching of human hemoglobin fluorescence in presence of C.I. acid red 27. The results showed that the nature of the quenching was of static type and the process of binding acid red 27 on human hemoglobin was a spontaneous molecular interaction procedure. The electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions played a major role in stabilizing the complex; The distance r between donor and acceptor was obtained to be 4.40 nm according to Förster's theory; The effect of acid red 27 on the conformation of human hemoglobin was analyzed using synchronous fluorescence, circular dichroism and three-dimensional fluorescence spectra.

  2. New records of bee flies (Diptera, Bombyliidae) from Cuatro Ciénegas, Coahuila, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Avalos-Hernández, Omar; Kits, Joel; Trujano-Ortega, Marysol; García-Vázquez, Uri Omar; Cano-Santana, Zenón

    2014-01-01

    Forty one new records of species of Bombyliidae are reported for Coahuila in northeastern Mexico. Nine of these species are reported for the first time for the country. The specimens were collected in the Cuatro Ciénegas Basin and Sierra La Madera mountains during 2007-2013. The modified distributions of species are discussed. The gaps in the distribution of many species suggest an undersampling of this group of insects in the north of Mexico.

  3. New records of bee flies (Diptera, Bombyliidae) from Cuatro Ciénegas, Coahuila, Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Ávalos-Hernández, Omar; Kits, Joel; Trujano-Ortega, Marysol; García-Vázquez, Uri Omar; Cano-Santana, Zenón

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Forty one new records of species of Bombyliidae are reported for Coahuila in northeastern Mexico. Nine of these species are reported for the first time for the country. The specimens were collected in the Cuatro Ciénegas Basin and Sierra La Madera mountains during 2007–2013. The modified distributions of species are discussed. The gaps in the distribution of many species suggest an undersampling of this group of insects in the north of Mexico. PMID:25061389

  4. Transition-Metal Additives For Long-Life Na/NiCI(2) Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bugga, Ratnakumar V.; Surampudi, Subbarao; Halpert, Gerald

    1995-01-01

    Transition-metal additives in cathodes of Na/NiCI(2) high-temperature, rechargeable electrochemical cells found to slow premature fading of charge/discharge capacity. Decline in capacity of cell attributed to agglomeration of Ni particles at cathode: this agglomeration reduces electrochemical area of cathode. Depending on choice of transition-metal additive for particular cell, additive might even participate in desired electrochemical reactions in cell, contributing to specific energy of cell.

  5. Endothelin-1 receptors in rat tissues: characterization by bosentan, ambrisentan and CI-1020.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Yoshinari; Osano, Ayaka; Hayashi, Hideki; Itoh, Kunihiko; Okura, Takashi; Deguchi, Yoshiharu; Ito, Yoshihiko; Yamada, Shizuo

    2014-01-01

    The present study aimed to characterize comparatively endothelin-1 (ET-1) receptors in rat tissues by radioligand binding assay using [(125)I]ET-1 and to examine receptor binding after oral administration of bosentan. Significant amount of specific [(125)I]ET-1 binding was detected in the lung, heart, kidney, bladder and cerebral cortex of rats. ET-1, bosentan, ambrisentan, and CI-1020 inhibited specific [(125)I]ET-1 binding in these tissues in a concentration-dependent manner. The Hill coefficients of each agent in the rat lung and cerebral cortex and those of bosentan and ET-1 in the heart, kidney and bladder were close to unity, while the Hill coefficients of ambrisentan and CI-1020 in the heart, kidney and bladder were less than one. The nonlinear least squares regression analysis revealed the presence of high- and low-affinity ET-1 receptor sites in these tissues for ambrisentan and CI-1020. Oral administration of bosentan caused a dose-dependent decrease in specific [(125)I]ET-1 binding in the rat lung, kidney and bladder, suggesting significant binding of the tissue ET-1 receptors in vivo. In conclusion, it has been shown that a significant amount of pharmacologically relevant ET-1 receptors may exist in rat tissues and that ET-1 receptor antagonists such as bosentan at pharmacological doses may exert some pharmacological effects by binding these ET-1 receptors.

  6. Carbonate compositions in CM and CI chondrites, and implications for aqueous alteration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Craig A.; Prinz, Martin

    1993-01-01

    Carbonate minerals in fourteen CM chondrites and two CI chondrites have been analyzed by electron microprobe to provide a better understanding of the aqueous processes that affected carbonaceous chondrite parent bodies. Calcites in CM chondrites and dolomites and magnesites in CI chondrites display the compositions expected of stable phases formed at low temperatures. Dolomites in CM chondrites, identified here for the first time in five members of the group, have small amounts of excess Ca which may reflect metastable growth. The distribution of Fe between dolomite and coexisting serpentine differs in the two chondrite groups. If the distributions reflect an approach to chemical equilibrium, then the difference implies higher alteration temperatures for the CI group than the CM group in agreement with the results of previously published oxygen isotope thermometry and mineral solubility modeling of the alteration process. Dolomite Fe contents are relatively uniform in the two chondrite groups. Dolomite Mn contents, by contrast, vary widely. The variations may reflect transport-controlled coprecipitation of Mn resulting from a heterogeneous distribution of the element in the anhydrous precursor material. If this interpretation is correct, then the altering fluids were essentially immobile white hydration reactions proceeded on the meteorite parent bodies. The near closed-system character of the alteration process, long known from bulk chemical analyses of the meteorites, is a direct consequence of the limited mobility of dissolved species.

  7. Advanced Pacemaker

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Synchrony, developed by St. Jude Medical's Cardiac Rhythm Management Division (formerly known as Pacesetter Systems, Inc.) is an advanced state-of-the-art implantable pacemaker that closely matches the natural rhythm of the heart. The companion element of the Synchrony Pacemaker System is the Programmer Analyzer APS-II which allows a doctor to reprogram and fine tune the pacemaker to each user's special requirements without surgery. The two-way communications capability that allows the physician to instruct and query the pacemaker is accomplished by bidirectional telemetry. APS-II features 28 pacing functions and thousands of programming combinations to accommodate diverse lifestyles. Microprocessor unit also records and stores pertinent patient data up to a year.

  8. Pediatric CI therapy for stroke-induced hemiparesis in young children.

    PubMed

    Taub, Edward; Griffin, Angi; Nick, Jennifer; Gammons, Kristin; Uswatte, Gitendra; Law, Charles R

    2007-01-01

    In this laboratory we have developed a set of techniques that randomized controlled studies and a multisite randomized controlled trial have shown can substantially reduce the motor deficit of adult patients with mild to severe chronic strokes. Equivalent results have been obtained with adult patients after traumatic brain injury and brain resection. The basic technique, termed Constraint-Induced Movement therapy or CI therapy was derived directly from basic research with monkeys with mature motor systems and with monkeys given surgical intervention either on their day of birth or prenatally by intrauterine surgical procedures. We report here the results of two randomized controlled trials of CI therapy with young children with asymmetric upper extremity motor deficits of varied etiologies from 8 months to 8 years of age in one study and with children with hemiparesis consequent to prenatal, perinatal, or early antenatal stroke from 2 to 6 years old in a second study. The procedures used with children are very similar to those used with adults and diverge simply to make the basic techniques age-appropriate. All forms of CI therapy for the upper extremity to date involve 3 main elements: (1) intensive training of the more affected extremity, (2) prolonged restraint of the less affected extremity, (3) a 'transfer package' of techniques to induce transfer of therapeutic gains achieved in the laboratory to the life situation. The results in children with cerebral palsy are considerably better than those obtained in adults. Marked changes were observed in the quality of movement in the laboratory scored by masked observers from videotape; actual amount of use of the more affected arm in the life situation; active range of motion; and emergence of new classes of behaviour never performed before, such as in individual cases, fine thumb-forefinger grasp, supination, and use of the more affected extremity in crawling with palmar placement and rhythmic alteration. In the

  9. Advanced stellarators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlüter, Arnulf

    1983-03-01

    Toroidal confinement of a plasma by an external magnetic field is not compatible with axisymmetry, in contrast to confinement by the pinch effect of induced electric currents as in a tokomak or by the reversed field pinch configuration. The existence of magnetic surfaces throughout the region in which grad p ≠ 0 is therefore not guaranteed in such configurations, though it is necessary for MHD-equilibrium when the lines of force possess a finite twist (or "rotational transform"). These twisted equilibria are called stellarators. The other type of external confinement requires all lines of force to be closed upon themselves and p to be function of the well defined quantity Q = φ d l/ B only. The resulting "bumpy" tori are sometimes also referred to as being M + S like. By discussing specific examples it is shown that stellarator configurations exist which retain as much as possible the properties of M + S like configurations, combine these with the magnetic well, and with an approximation to the isodynamic requirement of D. Palumbo. These so-called Advanced Stellarators shown an improvement in predicted particle confinement and beta-limit compared to the classical stellarators. They can also be viewed as forming a system of linked stabilized mirrors of small mirror ratio. These fields can be produced by modular coils. A prototype of such a configuration is being designed by the stellarator division of IPP under the name of Wendelstein VII-AS. Expected physical data and technical details of W VII-AS are given.

  10. Near-infrared chemical imaging (NIR-CI) of 3D printed pharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Khorasani, Milad; Edinger, Magnus; Raijada, Dhara; Bøtker, Johan; Aho, Johanna; Rantanen, Jukka

    2016-12-30

    Hot-melt extrusion and 3D printing are enabling manufacturing approaches for patient-centred medicinal products. Hot-melt extrusion is a flexible and continuously operating technique which is a crucial part of a typical processing cycle of printed medicines. In this work we use hot-melt extrusion for manufacturing of medicinal films containing indomethacin (IND) and polycaprolactone (PCL), extruded strands with nitrofurantoin monohydrate (NFMH) and poly (ethylene oxide) (PEO), and feedstocks for 3D printed dosage forms with nitrofurantoin anhydrate (NFAH), hydroxyapatite (HA) and poly (lactic acid) (PLA). These feedstocks were printed into a prototype solid dosage form using a desktop 3D printer. These model formulations were characterized using near-infrared chemical imaging (NIR-CI) and, more specifically, the image analytical data were analysed using multivariate curve resolution-alternating least squares (MCR-ALS). The MCR-ALS algorithm predicted the spatial distribution of IND and PCL in the films with reasonable accuracy. In the extruded strands both the chemical mapping of the components in the formulation as well as the solid form of the active compound could be visualized. Based on the image information the total nitrofurantoin and PEO contents could be estimated., The dehydration of NFMH to NFAH, a process-induced solid form change, could be visualized as well. It was observed that the level of dehydration increased with increasing processing time (recirculation during the mixing phase of molten PEO and nitrofurantoin). Similar results were achieved in the 3D printed solid dosage forms produced from the extruded feedstocks. The results presented in this work clearly demonstrate that NIR-CI in combination with MCR-ALS can be used for chemical mapping of both active compound and excipients, as well as for visualization of solid form variation in the final product. The suggested NIR-CI approach is a promising process control tool for characterization of

  11. Spacecraft COst REduction Team (SCORE): TQM/CI on a massive scale

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bullard, Jerry D.

    1992-01-01

    The business of building satellites and space systems has matured. Few missions require, or can afford, excellent performance at any price. The new paradigm is doing more with less, providing quality systems at lower cost--in other words, doing our job 'Faster-Better-Cheaper.' The TRW Spacecraft COst REduction (SCORE) initiative was launched in 1990 by Daniel S. Goldin, then general manager of TRW's Space & Technology Group. The SCORE mission is to apply continuous improvement (CI) techniques to effect major reductions in the cost (our primary goal) and span time (as a corollary) required for the production of spacecraft. SCORE is a multi-year initiative that is having a profound effect on both the procedural and the cultural aspects of how we do business. The objectives of this initiative are being realized. The focus of this paper is not on the results of SCORE per se, but rather on the things we have leaned about how to do continuous improvement on a massive scale, with multilevel (hierarchical) CI teams. The following sections summarize the chronology of the SCORE initiative, from team formation to development of the year-end report for 1991. Lessons learned, the core of this presentation, are discussed--with particular focus on the unique aspects of SCORE. The SCORE initiative is continuing and, as a part of our evolving culture, will never end. It has resulted in profound insights into the way we do work and (the topic at hand) how to do CI for large and complex multidisciplinary development activities.

  12. A biotechnological project with a gamma radiation source of 100,000 Ci

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lombardo, J. H.; Smolko, E. E.

    A project for the production of radiovaccines and other bio-medical products is presented which includes a radiation facility provided with a gamma ray source equivalent to 100,000 Ci of Co-60. The whole process incorporates novel basic features in virus production and inactivation steps. The former is carried out in animals previously subjected to immunodepression through electromagnetic radiation. The later is obtained at low temperatures by using either electromagnetic or particle radiations. A vaccine manufacture process is shown to illustrate the utilization of ionizing radiations to obtain a foot and mouth disease virus (FMDV) vaccine with good antigenic quality and low cost.

  13. Discovery of Pulsations of the B[e] Component in the CI Cam System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barsukova, E. A.; Goranskij, V. P.

    2010-02-01

    We review the studies of rapid variability of the B[e] star CI Cam based on extensive CCD monitoring in two seasons of 2006 and 2008. We found that this variability is caused by pulsations of the B4 III-V component. In the composite frequency spectrum, two pulsation components dominate with periods of 0.416° and 0.266°. In the high resolution BTA/NES spectra taken simultaneously with the photometry, the absorption components in the emission profiles of weak HeI lines temporarily appear. This is typical of pulsating stars.

  14. Sulphuric acid and neutral cluster measerements with CI-APi-TOF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jokinen, T.; Sipilä, M.; Junninen, H.; Ehn, M.; Hakala, J.; Lönn, G.; Petäjä, T.; Kulmala, M.; Worsnop, D. R.

    2012-04-01

    Sulphuric acid is a key compound in atmospheric nucleation (Sipilä et al., 2010) and in the atmosphere it is mainly produced photochemically via reaction of OH with SO2. The concentration of sulphuric acid is typically very low and rarely exceeds 108 molecules cm-3. The low concentrations set requirements for the detector used for quantitative measurements. A sensitive method measuring gas phase sulphuric acid was developed by Eisele and Tanner (1993). They used chemical ionization with nitrate ion, NO3-, and its clusters with HNO3, to selectively ionize sulphuric acid and detected it with a quadrupole mass spectrometer. We present a technique in which the atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (CI) inlet, with geometry similar to Eisele and Tanner (1993), is coupled with a high resolution atmospheric pressure interface time-of-flight mass spectrometer (APi-TOF, Tofwerk Ag., Junninen et al., 2010). In the present setup the high resolution and mass range of the TOF allows separation and summing of different clusters. The advantage of this method is that it allows one to find neutral sulphuric acid containing clusters formed by nucleation in the atmosphere (Kuang et al., 2008) or in laboratory systems (Sipilä et al., 2010). The first ambient measurements using the CI-APi-TOF for sulphuric acid and neutral cluster detection are also presented. We found the CI-APi-TOF a highly stable and sensitive tool for molecular sulphuric acid detection. The limit of detection for sulphuric acid was 3•104 molecules cm-3 for two hour averaging. Signals from sulphuric acid clusters up to the tetramer were obtained but were found to result from naturally charged clusters formed by ion induced clustering in the atmosphere. Opposite to earlier studies with cluster mass spectrometers, we had no indication of neutral clusters. The reason is either less efficient charging of clusters in comparison to molecular sulphuric acid, or in low concentration of neutral clusters at our

  15. Numerical investigation on the effects of EGR on CI engine characteristics using soyabean biodiesel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datta, Ambarish; Mandal, Bijan Kumar

    2016-07-01

    In this work an attempt has been made to numerically investigate the effect of soyabean biodiesels on an unmodified CI engine and then to study and reduce the NOx emission by the introduction of exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) technique at the rates of 10% and 20%. Compared to no EGR condition for the neat biodiesel, the NOx emission is reduced by 44% and 70% with 10% and 20% EGR respectively. But the increase in the EGR rate deteriorates the engine performance and increases the emissions, other than NOx. Thus, EGR helps in reducing NOx emission but its rate of introduction has to be bounded by a limit.

  16. 10 CFR 709.14 - Consequences of a refusal to complete a CI evaluation including a polygraph examination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Consequences of a refusal to complete a CI evaluation including a polygraph examination. 709.14 Section 709.14 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY COUNTERINTELLIGENCE EVALUATION PROGRAM CI Evaluation Protocols and Protection of National Security § 709.14 Consequences of...

  17. 10 CFR 709.14 - Consequences of a refusal to complete a CI evaluation including a polygraph examination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Consequences of a refusal to complete a CI evaluation including a polygraph examination. 709.14 Section 709.14 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY COUNTERINTELLIGENCE EVALUATION PROGRAM CI Evaluation Protocols and Protection of National Security § 709.14 Consequences of...

  18. 10 CFR 709.26 - Protection of confidentiality of CI evaluation records to include polygraph examination records...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Protection of confidentiality of CI evaluation records to include polygraph examination records and other pertinent documentation. 709.26 Section 709.26 Energy... Protection of confidentiality of CI evaluation records to include polygraph examination records and...

  19. 75 FR 5566 - NOAA Cooperative Institutes (CIs): (1) A CI To Support NOAA Research Facilities in the Pacific...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-03

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration NOAA Cooperative Institutes (CIs): (1) A CI To Support NOAA... Oceanic and Atmospheric Research, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Department of... three new NOAA cooperative institutes (CIs): (1) A CI To Support NOAA Research Facilities in the...

  20. Structural insight into the mutual recognition and regulation between Suppressor of Fused and Gli/Ci

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yan; Fu, Lin; Qi, Xiaolong; Zhang, Zhenyi; Xia, Yuanxin; Jia, Jianhang; Jiang, Jin; Zhao, Yun; Wu, Geng

    2013-11-01

    Hedgehog (Hh) signalling regulates embryonic development and adult tissue homoeostasis. Mutations of its pathway components including Suppressor of Fused (Sufu) and Gli/Ci predispose to cancers and congenital anomalies. The Sufu-Gli protein complex occupies a central position in the vertebrate Hh signalling pathway, especially in mammals. Here structures of full-length human and Drosophila Sufu, the human Sufu-Gli complex, along with normal mode analysis and FRET measurement results, reveal that Sufu alternates between ‘open’ and ‘closed’ conformations. The ‘closed’ form of Sufu is stabilized by Gli binding and inhibited by Hh treatment, whereas the ‘open’ state of Sufu is promoted by Gli-dissociation and Hh signalling. Mutations of critical interface residues disrupt the Sufu-Gli complex and prevent Sufu from repressing Gli-mediated transcription, tethering Gli in the cytoplasm and protecting Gli from the 26S proteasome-mediated degradation. Our study thus provides mechanistic insight into the mutual recognition and regulation between Sufu and Gli/Ci.

  1. Hydrochemical Investigation of Groundwaters of The Cuatro CiÉnegas Bolson, Coahuila, MÉxico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cortes, Alejandra; Johannessona, Kevin H.; Kilroy, Kathryn C.; Barron, Luis E.

    Water samples were collected from a series of springs, pools, and canals within the Cuatro Ciénegas Bolson, Coahuila, México and analyzed for stable oxygen and hydrogen isotopes. The ?oxigen-18 values of these waters ranged from a low of -8.2 up to -5.7 , with a mean (+/- standard deviation) of -6.5 +/- 0.82 , whereas ?deuterium ranged from -52 to -43 , with a mean (+/- standard deviation) of - 46.6 +/- 3.2 . The majority of the water samples plot sub-parallel and beneath the local meteoric water line, with those sample collected furthest from spring-line exhibiting the most enriched ?oxigen-18 values. The stable isotope data indicate isotopic enrichment of groundwaters by evaporation following discharge and subsequent surface flow. The isotope data suggests that a considerable fraction of Cuatro Ciénegas groundwaters originate via local recharge. Those springs that issue from the western base of the Sierra de San Marcos mountain range are chiefly recharged within these mountains, whereas groundwaters discharging from Laguna Anteojo in the northern part of the bolson are more likely recharged within the higher San de la Madera mountain range. A preliminary water balance estimate, however, that interbas in flow must also contributes to the considerable groundwater discharge within the bolson.

  2. The origin of the eccentricity of the hot Jupiter in CI Tau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosotti, G. P.; Booth, R. A.; Clarke, C. J.; Teyssandier, J.; Facchini, S.; Mustill, A. J.

    2017-01-01

    Following the recent discovery of the first radial velocity planet in a star still possessing a protoplanetary disc (CI Tau), we examine the origin of the planet's eccentricity (e ˜0.3). We show through long time-scale (105 orbits) simulations that the planetary eccentricity can be pumped by the disc, even when its local surface density is well below the threshold previously derived from short time-scale integrations. We show that the disc may be able to excite the planet's orbital eccentricity in <1 Myr for the system parameters of CI Tau. We also perform two-planet scattering experiments and show that alternatively the observed planet may plausibly have acquired its eccentricity through dynamical scattering of a migrating lower mass planet, which has either been ejected from the system or swallowed by the central star. In the latter case the present location and eccentricity of the observed planet can be recovered if it was previously stalled within the disc's magnetospheric cavity.

  3. The linker pivot in Ci-VSP: the key to unlock catalysis.

    PubMed

    Hobiger, Kirstin; Utesch, Tillmann; Mroginski, Maria Andrea; Seebohm, Guiscard; Friedrich, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    In the voltage-sensitive phosphatase Ci-VSP, conformational changes in the transmembrane voltage sensor domain (VSD) are transduced to the intracellular catalytic domain (CD) leading to its dephosphorylation activity against membrane-embedded phosphoinositides. The linker between both domains is proposed to be crucial for the VSD-CD coupling. With a combined approach of electrophysiological measurements on Xenopus oocytes and molecular dynamics simulations of a Ci-VSP model embedded in a lipid bilayer, we analyzed how conformational changes in the linker mediate the interaction between the CD and the activated VSD. In this way, we identified specific residues in the linker that interact with well-defined amino acids in one of the three loops forming the active site of the protein, named TI loop. With our results, we shed light into the early steps of the coupling process between the VSD and the CD, which are based on fine-tuned electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions between the linker, the membrane and the CD.

  4. Electronic spectra and trans—cis isomerism of streptopolymethine cyanines. A CS INDO CI study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Momicchioli, Fabio; Baraldi, Ivan; Ponterini, Glauco; Berthier, Gaston

    The understanding of the role played by cyanine dyes in various fields of application calls for a thorough knowledge of the excited state properties of their parent chromophores, i.e. cationic streptopolymethyne cyanines. For this aim we performed a detailed CS INDO CI investigation on the electronic spectra of tri-, penta- and heptamethine cyanines, both unsubstituted (TC, PC, HC) and terminally substituted by methyl groups (BMTC, BMPC, BMHC). The study comprised S0 Sn, and S0 Tn transitions of the trans and all mono- cis isomers. CI expansions involved solely π orbitals of the polymethine chains and pseudo-π orbitals of the substituents and included all singly-excited and the most important doubly- and triply-excited configurations. The spectroscopic effects of methyl substitution are fairly well described and are shown to be especially important in the upper excited states. The identification of the photochemically formed stereoisomers is attempted in terms of mono- cis isomers. For BMPC, in particular, we report the absorption spectrum of the phototropic form and show that the photoisomer is identifiable as the 3-4 cis form.

  5. Bioinformatic analysis of the distribution of inorganic carbon transporters and prospective targets for bioengineering to increase Ci uptake by cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Gaudana, Sandeep B; Zarzycki, Jan; Moparthi, Vamsi K; Kerfeld, Cheryl A

    2015-10-01

    Cyanobacteria have evolved a carbon-concentrating mechanism (CCM) which has enabled them to inhabit diverse environments encompassing a range of inorganic carbon (Ci: [Formula: see text] and CO2) concentrations. Several uptake systems facilitate inorganic carbon accumulation in the cell, which can in turn be fixed by ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase. Here we survey the distribution of genes encoding known Ci uptake systems in cyanobacterial genomes and, using a pfam- and gene context-based approach, identify in the marine (alpha) cyanobacteria a heretofore unrecognized number of putative counterparts to the well-known Ci transporters of beta cyanobacteria. In addition, our analysis shows that there is a huge repertoire of transport systems in cyanobacteria of unknown function, many with homology to characterized Ci transporters. These can be viewed as prospective targets for conversion into ancillary Ci transporters through bioengineering. Increasing intracellular Ci concentration coupled with efforts to increase carbon fixation will be beneficial for the downstream conversion of fixed carbon into value-added products including biofuels. In addition to CCM transporter homologs, we also survey the occurrence of rhodopsin homologs in cyanobacteria, including bacteriorhodopsin, a class of retinal-binding, light-activated proton pumps. Because they are light driven and because of the apparent ease of altering their ion selectivity, we use this as an example of re-purposing an endogenous transporter for the augmentation of Ci uptake by cyanobacteria and potentially chloroplasts.

  6. Exploration of binding of C.I. Food Red 9 with pepsin by optical spectroscopic and molecular docking methods.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan-Qing; Zhang, Hong-Mei

    2015-01-01

    A comprehensive study of the effects of C.I. Food Red 9 on the conformation and activity of pepsin was performed using multi-spectral methods and molecular docking technique. Fluorescence and circular dichroism spectral analyzes showed that C.I. Food Red 9 binding induced the changes of secondary and tertiary structure of pepsin. The activity experimental results indicated that the activity of pepsin decreased remarkably with the increasing concentration of C.I. Food Red 9. Multi non-covalent interactions including hydrogen bonds, hydrophobic, and electrostatic forces played important roles in the complex formation between C.I. Food Red 9 and pepsin. The binding constants of pepsin with C.I. Food Red 9 were (1.21±0.036)×10(4) L mol(-1) (298 K) and (1.05±0.043)×10(4) L mol(-1) (310 K). Moreover, the putative binding site of C.I. Food Red 9 on pepsin was near to activity pocket. This study demonstrates that C.I. Food Red 9 could cause some negative effects on pepsin.

  7. SCIENCE BRIEF: ADVANCED CONCEPTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Research on advanced concepts will evaluate and demonstrate the application of innovative infrastructure designs, management procedures and operational approaches. Advanced concepts go beyond simple asset management. The infusion of these advanced concepts into established wastew...

  8. Identification and Validation of Novel Hedgehog-Responsive Enhancers Predicted by Computational Analysis of Ci/Gli Binding Site Density

    PubMed Central

    Richards, Neil; Parker, David S.; Johnson, Lisa A.; Allen, Benjamin L.; Barolo, Scott; Gumucio, Deborah L.

    2015-01-01

    The Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway directs a multitude of cellular responses during embryogenesis and adult tissue homeostasis. Stimulation of the pathway results in activation of Hh target genes by the transcription factor Ci/Gli, which binds to specific motifs in genomic enhancers. In Drosophila, only a few enhancers (patched, decapentaplegic, wingless, stripe, knot, hairy, orthodenticle) have been shown by in vivo functional assays to depend on direct Ci/Gli regulation. All but one (orthodenticle) contain more than one Ci/Gli site, prompting us to directly test whether homotypic clustering of Ci/Gli binding sites is sufficient to define a Hh-regulated enhancer. We therefore developed a computational algorithm to identify Ci/Gli clusters that are enriched over random expectation, within a given region of the genome. Candidate genomic regions containing Ci/Gli clusters were functionally tested in chicken neural tube electroporation assays and in transgenic flies. Of the 22 Ci/Gli clusters tested, seven novel enhancers (and the previously known patched enhancer) were identified as Hh-responsive and Ci/Gli-dependent in one or both of these assays, including: Cuticular protein 100A (Cpr100A); invected (inv), which encodes an engrailed-related transcription factor expressed at the anterior/posterior wing disc boundary; roadkill (rdx), the fly homolog of vertebrate Spop; the segment polarity gene gooseberry (gsb); and two previously untested regions of the Hh receptor-encoding patched (ptc) gene. We conclude that homotypic Ci/Gli clustering is not sufficient information to ensure Hh-responsiveness; however, it can provide a clue for enhancer recognition within putative Hedgehog target gene loci. PMID:26710299

  9. Musical Sound Quality Impairments in Cochlear Implant (CI) Users as a Function of Limited High-Frequency Perception

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Alexis T.; Jiradejvong, Patpong; Carver, Courtney

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to (a) apply the musical sound quality assessment method, Cochlear Implant-MUltiple Stimulus with Hidden Reference and Anchor (CI-MUSHRA), to quantify musical sound quality deficits in CI (cochlear implant) users with respect to high-frequency loss, and (b) assess possible correlations between CI-MUSHRA performance and self-reported musical sound quality, as assessed by more traditional rating scales. Five versions of real-world musical stimuli were created: 8-,4-, and 2-kHz low-pass-filtered (LPF) versions with increasing high-frequency removal, a composite stimulus containing a 1-kHz LPF-filtered version and white noise (“anchor”), and an unaltered version (“hidden reference”). Using the CI-MUSHRA methodology, these versions were simultaneously presented to participants in addition to a labeled reference. Participants listened to all versions and provided ratings based on a 100-point scale that reflected perceived sound quality difference among the versions. A total of 25 musical stimuli were tested. As comparison measures, participants completed four Visual Analogue Scales (VAS) to assess musical sound quality. Overall, compared to normal hearing (NH) listeners, CI users demonstrated an impaired ability to discriminate between unaltered and altered musical stimuli with variable amounts of high-frequency information removed. Performance using CI-MUSHRA to evaluate this parameter did not correlate to measurements of musical sound quality, as assessed by VAS. This study identified high-frequency loss as one acoustic parameter contributing to overall CI-mediated musical sound quality limitations. CI-MUSHRA provided a quantitative assessment of musical sound quality. This method offers the potential to quantify CI impairments of many different acoustic parameters related to musical sound quality in the future. PMID:23172009

  10. A Novel Method (CiMON) for Continuous Intra-Abdominal Pressure Monitoring: Pilot Test in a Pig Model.

    PubMed

    Wauters, Joost; Spincemaille, Liesbeth; Dieudonne, Anne-Sophie; Van Zwam, Kenny; Wilmer, Alexander; Malbrain, Manu L N G

    2012-01-01

    Background. Intravesical pressure (IAP(ivp)) measurement is considered to be the gold standard for assessment of intra-abdominal pressure (IAP). This study evaluated a new minimally invasive IAP monitoring device (CiMON) against three other devices in a wide range of clinically relevant IAP and in different body positions in healthy pigs. Methods. The CiMON catheter (IAP(CiM)) and another balloon-tipped catheter (IAP(spie)) were positioned into the stomach. Fluid-filled catheters were used for direct intraperitoneal (IAP(dir)) and IAP(ivp) measurement. Both in supine and 25° head-of-bed positions, IAP was increased from baseline to 30 mmHg. At every IAP level, 4 IAP measurements were recorded simultaneously. Mean differences and the limits of agreement were calculated. Results. Bias between IAP(CiM) and IAP(spie) was nearly zero with very good agreement, both in supine and 25° position. In supine position, IAP(CiM) slightly overestimated IAP(ivp) and IAP(dir) by 1.5 and 2.1 mmHg with reasonable agreement. In 25° position, IAP(CiM) underestimated IAP(ivp) and IAP(dir) by 1.0 and 0.5 mmHg, again with reasonable agreement. Conclusions. Agreement between IAP(CiM) and IAP(spie) was very good, while good-to-moderate agreement exists between IAP(CiM) and IAP(dir) or IAP(ivp). Simplicity, continuous monitoring, and the combination with a feeding tube should lead to further clinical studies, evaluating this new CiMON device.

  11. The EvoDevoCI: A Concept Inventory for Gauging Students' Understanding of Evolutionary Developmental Biology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perez, Kathryn E.; Hiatt, Anna; Davis, Gregory K.; Trujillo, Caleb; French, Donald P.; Terry, Mark; Price, Rebecca M.

    2013-01-01

    The American Association for the Advancement of Science 2011 report "Vision and Change in Undergraduate Biology Education" encourages the teaching of developmental biology as an important part of teaching evolution. Recently, however, we found that biology majors often lack the developmental knowledge needed to understand evolutionary…

  12. An Extended INDO-CI Study on Protonated Retinal Schiff-Base

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugimoto, Tohru; Kishi, Yoshio; Ito, Etsuro; Suzuki, Hideo

    1990-10-01

    The bond lengths, bond orders, electron densities and optical absorption of the ground state of retinal forming a protonated Schiff-base linkage with a lysine residue (PRSB-Lys) are calculated using the extended INDO-CI molecular orbital method, and the result is compared with the previous one obtained by the π-electron approximation. It is, thus, shown that the π-electron system of PRSB-Lys is appreciably polarized, and that the σ-π interaction in PRSB-Lys is too large to be neglected when a C-C bond in its polyene chain is twisted. It is also shown that the negative counter point-charge exerts influence on the π-electron distribution in a similar way to that shown by the π-electron approximation.

  13. Environmental variation, hybridization, and phenotypic diversification in Cuatro Ciénegas pupfishes.

    PubMed

    Tobler, M; Carson, E W

    2010-07-01

    Hybridization can generate novel phenotypes, and in combination with divergent selection along environmental gradients, can play a driving role in phenotypic diversification. This study examined the influence of introgressive hybridization and environmental variation on the phenotypic diversity of two pupfish species (Cyprinodon atrorus and Cyprinodon bifasciatus) endemic to the Cuatro Ciénegas basin, Mexico. These species occupy opposite environmental extremes and are comprised of multiple, intraspecifically isolated populations. However, interspecific hybridization occurs to various degrees within connecting, intermediate environments. Using geometric morphometric analysis, extensive variation of body shape was observed between and within species, and phenotypic variation was strongly correlated with environmental conditions. Furthermore, some introgressed populations exhibited unique phenotypes not found in either of the parents, and overall morphospace occupation was significantly higher in introgressed populations when compared to the parentals. Overall, we find environmental variation and transgressive segregation both appear to have been important in shaping phenotypic variation in this system.

  14. Kinetic-energy matrix elements for atomic Hylleraas-CI wave functions.

    PubMed

    Harris, Frank E

    2016-05-28

    Hylleraas-CI is a superposition-of-configurations method in which each configuration is constructed from a Slater-type orbital (STO) product to which is appended (linearly) at most one interelectron distance rij. Computations of the kinetic energy for atoms by this method have been difficult due to the lack of formulas expressing these matrix elements for general angular momentum in terms of overlap and potential-energy integrals. It is shown here that a strategic application of angular-momentum theory, including the use of vector spherical harmonics, enables the reduction of all atomic kinetic-energy integrals to overlap and potential-energy matrix elements. The new formulas are validated by showing that they yield correct results for a large number of integrals published by other investigators.

  15. Extraterrestrial Amino Acids in Orgueil and Ivuna: Tracing the Parent Body of CI Type Carbonaceous Chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, Michael (Technical Monitor); Ehrenfreund, Pascale; Glavin, Daniel P.; Bota, Oliver; Cooper, George; Bada, Jeffrey

    2001-01-01

    Amino acid analyses using HPLC of pristine interior pieces of the CI carbonaceous chondrites Orgueil and Ivuna have found that beta-alanine, glycine, and gamma-amino-n-butyric acid (ABA) are the most abundant amino acids in these two meteorites, with concentrations ranging from approx. 600 to 2,000 parts per billion (ppb). Other alpha-amino acids such as alanine, alpha-ABA, alpha-aminoisobutyric acid (AIB), and isovaline are present only in trace amounts (less than 200 ppb). Carbon isotopic measurements of beta-alanine and glycine and the presence of racemic (D/L 1) alanine and beta-ABA in Orgueil suggest that these amino acids are extraterrestrial in origin. In comparison to the CM carbonaceous chondrites Murchison and Murray, the amino acid composition of the CIs is strikingly distinct, suggesting that these meteorites came from a different type of parent body, possibly an extinct comet, than did the CM carbonaceous chondrites.

  16. Evidence for Impact Shock Melting in CM and CI Chondrite Regolith Samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zolensky, Michael; Mikouchi, Takashi; Hagiya, Kenji; Ohsumi, Kazumasa; Komatsu, Mutsumi; Le, Loan

    2014-01-01

    C class asteroids frequently exhibit reflectance spectra consistent with thermally metamorphosed carbonaceous chondrites, or a mixture of phyllosilicate-rich material along with regions where they are absent. One particularly important example appears to be near-Earth asteroid 1999 JU3, the target of the Hayabusa II sample return mission [1], although not all spectra indicate this. In fact most spectra of 1999 JU3 are featureless, suggesting a heterogeneous regolith. Here we explore an alternative cause of dehydration of regolith of C class asteroids - impact shock melting. Impact shock melting has been proposed to explain some mineralogical characteristics of CB chondrites, but has not been considered a major process for hydrous carbonaceous chondrites. What evidence is there for significant shock melting in the very abundant CMs, or less abundant but still important CI chondrites?

  17. Identification by CI-mass spectrometry of an unexpected benzodiazepine degradation product

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buret, D.; Breton, D.; Clair, P.; Lafosse, M.

    2006-01-01

    The French Military Health Service (SSA) has developed an innovative drug product, as a treatment against neurotoxic organophosphate poisoning (NOP). It contains three drug substances: an anticholinergic, an anticonvulsant and a cholinesterase reactivator. Testing stability study, in normal conditions, over 18 months, for this speciality, has given unexpected results. Indeed, one of the drug substances, avizafone (pro-drug of diazepam), breaks down partially into a compound which migrates into the plastic container where this degradation product is demethylated after absorption. Mass spectrometry with negative chemical ionisation (negative CI-MS) was used, to monitor decomposition of the drug substance. This method first showed migration of the degradation product and has been used to monitor its evolution during the stability testing study. The demethylation seems to be due to an additive product present in the plastic. The degradation products remain trapped in the container holding the pharmaceutical formulation.

  18. A Computational Intelligence (CI) Approach to the Precision Mars Lander Problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birge, Brian; Walberg, Gerald

    2002-01-01

    A Mars precision landing requires a landed footprint of no more than 100 meters. Obstacles to reducing the landed footprint include trajectory dispersions due to initial atmospheric entry conditions such as entry angle, parachute deployment height, environment parameters such as wind, atmospheric density, parachute deployment dynamics, unavoidable injection error or propagated error from launch, etc. Computational Intelligence (CI) techniques such as Artificial Neural Nets and Particle Swarm Optimization have been shown to have great success with other control problems. The research period extended previous work on investigating applicability of the computational intelligent approaches. The focus of this investigation was on Particle Swarm Optimization and basic Neural Net architectures. The research investigating these issues was performed for the grant cycle from 5/15/01 to 5/15/02. Matlab 5.1 and 6.0 along with NASA's POST were the primary computational tools.

  19. Extraterrestrial amino acids in Orgueil and Ivuna: Tracing the parent body of CI type carbonaceous chondrites

    PubMed Central

    Ehrenfreund, Pascale; Glavin, Daniel P.; Botta, Oliver; Cooper, George; Bada, Jeffrey L.

    2001-01-01

    Amino acid analyses using HPLC of pristine interior pieces of the CI carbonaceous chondrites Orgueil and Ivuna have found that β-alanine, glycine, and γ-amino-n-butyric acid (ABA) are the most abundant amino acids in these two meteorites, with concentrations ranging from ≈600 to 2,000 parts per billion (ppb). Other α-amino acids such as alanine, α-ABA, α-aminoisobutyric acid (AIB), and isovaline are present only in trace amounts (<200 ppb). Carbon isotopic measurements of β-alanine and glycine and the presence of racemic (D/L ≈ 1) alanine and β-ABA in Orgueil suggest that these amino acids are extraterrestrial in origin. In comparison to the CM carbonaceous chondrites Murchison and Murray, the amino acid composition of the CIs is strikingly distinct, suggesting that these meteorites came from a different type of parent body, possibly an extinct comet, than did the CM carbonaceous chondrites. PMID:11226205

  20. Preferential interactions in pigmented, polymer blends - C.I. Pigment Blue 15:4 and C.I. Pigment Red 122 - as used in a poly(carbonate)-poly(butylene terephthalate) polymer blend.

    PubMed

    Fagelman, K E; Guthrie, J T

    2005-11-18

    Some important characteristics of selected pigments have been evaluated, using the inverse gas chromatography (IGC) technique, that indicate the occurrence of preferential interactions in pigmented polymer blends. Attention has been given to copper phthalocyanine pigments and to quinacridone pigments incorporated in polycarbonate-poly(butylene terephthalate) blends. Selected supporting techniques were used to provide supplementary information concerning the pigments of interest, C.I. Pigment Blue 15:4 and C.I. Pigment Red 122. For C.I. Pigment Red 122 and for C.I. Pigment Blue, the dispersive component of the surface free energy decreases as the temperature increases, indicating the relative ease with which the molecules can be removed from the surface.

  1. The smallest comet 81P/Wild 2 dust dances around the CI composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rietmeijer, Frans J. M.

    2015-10-01

    The bulbous Stardust track #80 (C2092,3,80,0,0) is a huge cavity. Allocations C2092,2,80,46,1 nearest the entry hole and C2092,2,80,47,6 about 0.8 mm beneath the entry hole provide evidence of highly chaotic conditions during capture. They are dominated by nonvesicular low-Mg silica glass instead of highly vesicular glass found deeper into this track which is consistent with the escape of magnesiosilica vapors generated from the smallest comet grains. The survival of delicate (Mg,Al,Ca)-bearing silica glass structures is unique to the entry hole. Both allocations show a dearth of surviving comet dust except for a small enstatite, a low-Ca hypersthene grain, and a Ti-oxide fragment. Finding scattered TiO2 fragments in the silica glass could support, but not prove, TiO2 grain fragmentation during hypervelocity capture. The here reported dearth in mineral species is in marked contrast to the wealth of surviving silicate and oxide minerals deeper into the bulb. Both allocations show Fe-Ni-S nanograins dispersed throughout the low-Mg silica glass matrix. It is noted that neither comet Halley nor Wild 2 had a CI bulk composition for the smallest grains. Using the analogs of interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) and cluster IDPs it is argued that a CI chondritic composition requires the mixing of nonchondritic components in the appropriate proportions. So far, the fine-grained Wild 2 dust is biased toward nonchondritic ferromagnesiosilica materials and lacking contributions of nonchondritic components with Mg-Fe-Ni-S[Si-O] compositions. To be specific, "Where are the GEMS"? The GEMS look-alike found in this study suggests that evidence of GEMS in comet Wild 2 may still be found in the Stardust glass.

  2. A Candidate Young Massive Planet in Orbit around the Classical T Tauri Star CI Tau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johns-Krull, Christopher M.; McLane, Jacob N.; Prato, L.; Crockett, Christopher J.; Jaffe, Daniel T.; Hartigan, Patrick M.; Beichman, Charles A.; Mahmud, Naved I.; Chen, Wei; Skiff, B. A.; Cauley, P. Wilson; Jones, Joshua A.; Mace, G. N.

    2016-08-01

    The ˜2 Myr old classical T Tauri star CI Tau shows periodic variability in its radial velocity (RV) variations measured at infrared (IR) and optical wavelengths. We find that these observations are consistent with a massive planet in a ˜9 day period orbit. These results are based on 71 IR RV measurements of this system obtained over five years, and on 26 optical RV measurements obtained over nine years. CI Tau was also observed photometrically in the optical on 34 nights over ˜one month in 2012. The optical RV data alone are inadequate to identify an orbital period, likely the result of star spot and activity-induced noise for this relatively small data set. The infrared RV measurements reveal significant periodicity at ˜9 days. In addition, the full set of optical and IR RV measurements taken together phase coherently and with equal amplitudes to the ˜9 day period. Periodic RV signals can in principle be produced by cool spots, hotspots, and reflection of the stellar spectrum off the inner disk, in addition to resulting from a planetary companion. We have considered each of these and find the planet hypothesis most consistent with the data. The RV amplitude yields an M\\sin i of ˜8.1 M Jup; in conjunction with a 1.3 mm continuum emission measurement of the circumstellar disk inclination from the literature, we find a planet mass of ˜11.3 M Jup, assuming alignment of the planetary orbit with the disk. This paper includes data taken at The McDonald Observatory of The University of Texas at Austin.

  3. The functional significance of cortical reorganization and the parallel development of CI therapy

    PubMed Central

    Taub, Edward; Uswatte, Gitendra; Mark, Victor W.

    2014-01-01

    For the nineteenth and the better part of the twentieth centuries two correlative beliefs were strongly held by almost all neuroscientists and practitioners in the field of neurorehabilitation. The first was that after maturity the adult CNS was hardwired and fixed, and second that in the chronic phase after CNS injury no substantial recovery of function could take place no matter what intervention was employed. However, in the last part of the twentieth century evidence began to accumulate that neither belief was correct. First, in the 1960s and 1970s, in research with primates given a surgical abolition of somatic sensation from a single forelimb, which rendered the extremity useless, it was found that behavioral techniques could convert the limb into an extremity that could be used extensively. Beginning in the late 1980s, the techniques employed with deafferented monkeys were translated into a rehabilitation treatment, termed Constraint Induced Movement therapy or CI therapy, for substantially improving the motor deficit in humans of the upper and lower extremities in the chronic phase after stroke. CI therapy has been applied successfully to other types of damage to the CNS such as traumatic brain injury, cerebral palsy, multiple sclerosis, and spinal cord injury, and it has also been used to improve function in focal hand dystonia and for aphasia after stroke. As this work was proceeding, it was being shown during the 1980s and 1990s that sustained modulation of afferent input could alter the structure of the CNS and that this topographic reorganization could have relevance to the function of the individual. The alteration in these once fundamental beliefs has given rise to important recent developments in neuroscience and neurorehabilitation and holds promise for further increasing our understanding of CNS function and extending the boundaries of what is possible in neurorehabilitation. PMID:25018720

  4. Doric, Ionic, Bionic and Printmaking.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hammond, Mary Alice

    1981-01-01

    Describes a combined local history/printmaking project conducted by students in grades one through nine at Armitage Academy in Kenosha, Wisconsin. Students studied and drew local buildings and printed the results as a calendar. (SJL)

  5. Hydro-Bionics Serves Fleet

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-03-18

    nekton animals (predominantly cetaceous and cephalopods ), since it is long ago established that their relative power expenditures for achievement of...depend on mode of life, and in connection with this and from speed of motion. Nature in the process of evolution optimized the DOC - 91123900 PAGE 5...thoracic and caudal fins participate in heat exchange. Cephalopods - marine mollusks (squids, octopi, cuttles) have body, in form close to body of

  6. Spectral characteristics of iron-bearing phyllosilicates: Comparison to Orgueil (CI1), Murchison and Murray (CM2)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Calvin, W.M.; King, T.V.V.

    1997-01-01

    Phyllosilicate alteration minerals are commonly found in low petrologic types of carbonaceous chondrites. Previous spectral studies have examined Mg-bearing phyllosilicates with limited success in matching the spectral properties of CM and CI chondrites. Transmission electron microscope and other analytical techniques suggest that Fe-bearing clays are more abundant in CI and CM chondrites than magnesian varieties. Here, we present the results of an examination of the reflectance spectra of Fe-phyllosilicates, including serpentines and berthierines, of which the latter were formerly known as septechlorites. We have measured the diffuse reflectance spectra of powdered samples from 0.3 to 25 ??m. We find that these minerals provide a better spectral match to many of the features seen in CI and CM chondrites, and simple linear combinations of the spectra of both Fe- and Mg-phyllosilicates closely approximate the spectra of CM and CI chondrites.

  7. Magnetorheological properties of sodium sulphonate capped electrolytic iron based MR fluid: a comparison with CI based MR fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinod, Sithara; John, Reji; Philip, John

    2017-02-01

    Magnetorheological fluids have numerous engineering applications due to their interesting field assisted rheological behavior. Most commonly used dispersed phase in MR fluids is carbonyl iron (CI). The relatively high cost of CI warrants the need to develop cheaper alternatives to CI, without compromising rheological properties. With the above goal in mind, we have synthesized sodium sulphonate capped electrolytic iron based MR fluid and studied their magnetorheological properties. The results are compared with that of CI based MR fluid. EI and CI particles of average particle size of ∼10 μm with fumed silica particles additives are used in the present study. The dynamic yield stress for EI and CI based MR fluid were found to vary with field strength with an exponent of roughly 1.2 and 1.24, respectively. The slightly lower static and dynamic yield stress values of EI based MR fluid is attributed to the lower magnetization and polydispersity values. The dynamic yield stress showed a decrease of 18.73% and 61.8% for field strengths of 177 mT and 531 mT, respectively as the temperature was increased from 293 to 323 K. The optorheological studies showed a peak in the loss moduli, close to the crossover point of the storage and loss moduli, due to freely moving large sized aggregates along the shear direction that are dislodged from the rheometer plates at higher strains. Our results suggests that EI based MR fluids have magnetorheological behavior comparable to that of CI based MR fluids. As EI is much cheaper than CI, our findings will have important commercial implications in producing cost effective EI based MR fluids.

  8. Full CI calibration of model hamiltonian, large basis set studies of the H 2-H 2 van der Waals interaction.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burton, P. G.

    1983-08-01

    The non-variational CEPA2 PNO ansatz, recently employed in detailed studies of the H 2-H 2 van der Waals interaction by Burton and Senff and the full CI extrapolation studies on the same system by Burton are discussed in relation to the explicit full CI study of Harrison and Handy for the planar T configuration of H 2-H 2 ( R = 6.5 ao) in a basis of 80 functions.

  9. Jenkins-CI, an Open-Source Continuous Integration System, as a Scientific Data and Image-Processing Platform.

    PubMed

    Moutsatsos, Ioannis K; Hossain, Imtiaz; Agarinis, Claudia; Harbinski, Fred; Abraham, Yann; Dobler, Luc; Zhang, Xian; Wilson, Christopher J; Jenkins, Jeremy L; Holway, Nicholas; Tallarico, John; Parker, Christian N

    2017-03-01

    High-throughput screening generates large volumes of heterogeneous data that require a diverse set of computational tools for management, processing, and analysis. Building integrated, scalable, and robust computational workflows for such applications is challenging but highly valuable. Scientific data integration and pipelining facilitate standardized data processing, collaboration, and reuse of best practices. We describe how Jenkins-CI, an "off-the-shelf," open-source, continuous integration system, is used to build pipelines for processing images and associated data from high-content screening (HCS). Jenkins-CI provides numerous plugins for standard compute tasks, and its design allows the quick integration of external scientific applications. Using Jenkins-CI, we integrated CellProfiler, an open-source image-processing platform, with various HCS utilities and a high-performance Linux cluster. The platform is web-accessible, facilitates access and sharing of high-performance compute resources, and automates previously cumbersome data and image-processing tasks. Imaging pipelines developed using the desktop CellProfiler client can be managed and shared through a centralized Jenkins-CI repository. Pipelines and managed data are annotated to facilitate collaboration and reuse. Limitations with Jenkins-CI (primarily around the user interface) were addressed through the selection of helper plugins from the Jenkins-CI community.

  10. Jenkins-CI, an Open-Source Continuous Integration System, as a Scientific Data and Image-Processing Platform

    PubMed Central

    Moutsatsos, Ioannis K.; Hossain, Imtiaz; Agarinis, Claudia; Harbinski, Fred; Abraham, Yann; Dobler, Luc; Zhang, Xian; Wilson, Christopher J.; Jenkins, Jeremy L.; Holway, Nicholas; Tallarico, John; Parker, Christian N.

    2016-01-01

    High-throughput screening generates large volumes of heterogeneous data that require a diverse set of computational tools for management, processing, and analysis. Building integrated, scalable, and robust computational workflows for such applications is challenging but highly valuable. Scientific data integration and pipelining facilitate standardized data processing, collaboration, and reuse of best practices. We describe how Jenkins-CI, an “off-the-shelf,” open-source, continuous integration system, is used to build pipelines for processing images and associated data from high-content screening (HCS). Jenkins-CI provides numerous plugins for standard compute tasks, and its design allows the quick integration of external scientific applications. Using Jenkins-CI, we integrated CellProfiler, an open-source image-processing platform, with various HCS utilities and a high-performance Linux cluster. The platform is web-accessible, facilitates access and sharing of high-performance compute resources, and automates previously cumbersome data and image-processing tasks. Imaging pipelines developed using the desktop CellProfiler client can be managed and shared through a centralized Jenkins-CI repository. Pipelines and managed data are annotated to facilitate collaboration and reuse. Limitations with Jenkins-CI (primarily around the user interface) were addressed through the selection of helper plugins from the Jenkins-CI community. PMID:27899692

  11. Reactivity of stabilized Criegee intermediates (sCI) from isoprene and monoterpene ozonolysis toward SO2 and organic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sipilä, M.; Jokinen, T.; Berndt, T.; Richters, S.; Makkonen, R.; Donahue, N. M.; Mauldin, R. L., III; Kurten, T.; Paasonen, P.; Sarnela, N.; Ehn, M.; Junninen, H.; Rissanen, M. P.; Thornton, J.; Stratmann, F.; Herrmann, H.; Worsnop, D. R.; Kulmala, M.; Kerminen, V.-M.; Petäjä, T.

    2014-01-01

    Oxidation processes in Earth's atmosphere are tightly connected to many environmental and human health issues and are essential drivers for biogeochemistry. Until the recent discovery of the atmospheric relevance of stabilized Criegee intermediates (sCI), atmospheric oxidation processes were thought to be dominated by few main oxidants: ozone, hydroxyl radicals (OH), nitrate radicals and, e.g. over oceans, halogen atoms such as chlorine. Here, we report results from laboratory experiments at 293 K and atmospheric pressure focusing on sCI formation from the ozonolysis of isoprene and the most abundant monoterpenes (α-pinene and limonene), and subsequent reactions of the resulting sCIs with SO2 producing sulphuric acid (H2SO4). The measured sCI yields were (0.15 ± 0.07), (0.27 ± 0.12) and (0.58 ± 0.26) for the ozonolysis of α-pinene, limonene and isoprene, respectively. The ratio between the rate coefficient for the sCI loss (including thermal decomposition and the reaction with water vapour) and the rate coefficient for the reaction of sCI with SO2, k(loss) / k(sCI + SO2), was determined at relative humidities of 10% and 50%. Observed values represent the average reactivity of all sCIs produced from the individual alkene used in the ozonolysis. For the monoterpene derived sCIs, the relative rate coefficients k(loss) / k(sCI + SO2) were in the range (2.0-2.4) × 1012 molecule cm-3 and nearly independent on the relative humidity. This fact points to a minor importance of the sCI + H2O reaction in the case of the sCI arising from α-pinene and limonene. For the isoprene sCIs, however, the ratio k(loss) / k(sCI + SO2) was strongly dependent on the relative humidity. To explore whether sCIs could have a more general role in atmospheric oxidation, we investigated as an example the reactivity of acetone oxide (sCI from the ozonolysis of 2,3-dimethyl-2-butene) toward small organic acids, i.e. formic and acetic acid. Acetone oxide was found to react faster with the

  12. Comets as Parent Bodies of CI1 Carbonaceous Meteorites and Possible Habitats of Ice-Microbiota

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wickramasinghe, N. Chandra; Wallis, Daryl H.; Rozanov, Alexei Yu.; Hoover, Richard B.

    2011-01-01

    Recent studies of comets and cometary dust have confirmed the presence of biologically relevant organic molecules along with clay minerals and water ice. It is also now well established by deuterium/hydrogen ratios that the CI1 carbonaceous meteorites contain indigenous extraterrestrial water. The evidence of extensive aqueous alteration of the minerals in these meteorites led to the hypothesis that water-bearing asteroids or comets represent the parent bodies of the CI1 (and perhaps CM2) carbonaceous meteorites. These meteorites have also been shown to possess a diverse array of complex organics and chiral and morphological biomarkers. Stable isotope studies by numerous independent investigators have conclusively established that the complex organics found in these meteorites are both indigenous and extraterrestrial in nature. Although the origin of these organics is still unknown, some researchers have suggested that they originated by unknown abiotic mechanisms and may have played a role in the delivery of chiral biomolecules and the origin of life on Early Earth. In this paper we review these results and investigate the thermal history of comets. We show that permanent as well as transient domains of liquid water can be maintained on a comet under a plausible set of assumptions. With each perihelion passage of a comet volatiles are preferentially released, and during millions of such passages the comet could shed crustal debris that may survive transit through the Earth s atmosphere as a carbonaceous meteorite. We review the current state of knowledge of comets and carbonaceous meteorites. We also present the results of recent studies on the long-term viability of terrestrial ice-microbiota encased in ancient glacial ice and permafrost. We suggest that the conditions which have been observed to prevail on many comets do not preclude either survivability (or even the active metabolism and growth) of many types of eukaryotic and prokaryotic microbial

  13. Oxidative addition of the C-I bond on aluminum nanoclusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sengupta, Turbasu; Das, Susanta; Pal, Sourav

    2015-07-01

    Energetics and the in-depth reaction mechanism of the oxidative addition step of the cross-coupling reaction are studied in the framework of density functional theory (DFT) on aluminum nanoclusters. Aluminum metal in its bulk state is totally inactive towards carbon-halogen bond dissociation but selected Al nanoclusters (size ranging from 3 to 20 atoms) have shown a significantly lower activation barrier towards the oxidative addition reaction. The calculated energy barriers are lower than the gold clusters and within a comparable range with the conventional and most versatile Pd catalyst. Further investigations reveal that the activation energies and other reaction parameters are highly sensitive to the geometrical shapes and electronic structures of the clusters rather than their size, imposing the fact that comprehensive studies on aluminum clusters can be beneficial for nanoscience and nanotechnology. To understand the possible reaction mechanism in detail, the reaction pathway is investigated with the ab initio Born Oppenheimer Molecular Dynamics (BOMD) simulation and the Natural Bond Orbital (NBO) analysis. In short, our theoretical study highlights the thermodynamic and kinetic details of C-I bond dissociation on aluminum clusters for future endeavors in cluster chemistry.Energetics and the in-depth reaction mechanism of the oxidative addition step of the cross-coupling reaction are studied in the framework of density functional theory (DFT) on aluminum nanoclusters. Aluminum metal in its bulk state is totally inactive towards carbon-halogen bond dissociation but selected Al nanoclusters (size ranging from 3 to 20 atoms) have shown a significantly lower activation barrier towards the oxidative addition reaction. The calculated energy barriers are lower than the gold clusters and within a comparable range with the conventional and most versatile Pd catalyst. Further investigations reveal that the activation energies and other reaction parameters are highly

  14. Comets as parent bodies of CI1 carbonaceous meteorites and possible habitats of ice-microbes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wickramasinghe, N. Chandra; Wickramasinghe, Janaki T.; Wallis, Jamie; Hoover, Richard B.; Rozanov, Alexei Y.

    2011-10-01

    Recent studies of comets and cometary dust have confirmed the presence of biologically relevant organic molecules along with clay minerals and water ice. It is also now well established by deuterium/hydrogen ratios that the CI1 carbonaceous meteorites contain indigenous extraterrestrial water. The evidence of extensive aqueous alteration of the minerals in these meteorites led to the hypothesis that water-bearing asteroids or comets represent the parent bodies of the CI1 (and perhaps CM2) carbonaceous meteorites. These meteorites have also been shown to possess a diverse array of complex organics and chiral and morphological biomarkers. Stable isotope studies by numerous independent investigators have conclusively established that the complex organics found in these meteorites are both indigenous and extraterrestrial in nature. Although the origin of these organics is still unknown, some researchers have suggested that they originated by unknown abiotic mechanisms and may have played a role in the delivery of chiral biomolecules and the origin of life on Early Earth. In this paper we review these results and investigate the thermal history of comets. We show that permanent as well as transient domains of liquid water can be maintained on a comet under a plausible set of assumptions. With each perihelion passage of a comet volatiles are preferentially released, and during millions of such passages the comet could shed crustal debris that may survive transit through the Earth's atmosphere as a carbonaceous meteorite. We review the current state of knowledge of comets and carbonaceous meteorites. We also present the results of recent studies on the long-term viability of terrestrial ice-microbiota encased in ancient glacial ice and permafrost. We suggest that the conditions which have been observed to prevail on many comets do not preclude either survivability (or even the active metabolism and growth) of many types of eukaryotic and prokaryotic microbial

  15. Electronic and vibrational spectroscopic studies of jet-cooled 5-cyanoindole and its water clusters, 5CI-(H2O)n, (n = 0-2)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, Ahreum; Moon, Cheol Joo; Ahn, Ahreum; Lee, Ji Hoon; Kim, Seong Keun; Choi, Myong Yong

    2016-08-01

    Mass-selected resonant two-photon ionization (R2PI) and UV-UV hole-burning, and infrared-dip spectra of 5-cyanoindole (5CI) and its water clusters, 5CI-(H2O)n (n = 1 and 2) were measured. Although, the structures of 5CI-(H2O)1-2 are similar to those of 3CI-(H2O)1-2, the photofragmentation behaviors of the two systems are quite different due to the La-Lb state energy lowering and higher binding energies of 5CI-(H2O)1-2 compared to those of 3CI-(H2O)1-2. Especially for the case of 5CI-(H2O)2 cluster, shortening excited-state lifetime of 5CI-(H2O)2 causes the broad background in the R2PI spectrum of 5CI-(H2O)2.

  16. Trans-arterial radioembolization in intermediate-advanced hepatocellular carcinoma: systematic review and meta-analyses

    PubMed Central

    Rognoni, Carla; Ciani, Oriana; Sommariva, Silvia; Facciorusso, Antonio; Tarricone, Rosanna; Bhoori, Sherrie; Mazzaferro, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    Trans-arterial radioembolization (TARE) is a recognized, although not explicitly recommended, experimental therapy for unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). A systematic literature review was performed to identify published studies on the use of TARE in intermediate and advanced stages HCC exploring the efficacy and safety of this innovative treatment. Twenty-one studies reporting data on overall survival (OS) and time to progression (TTP), were included in a meta-analysis. The pooled post-TARE OS was 63% (95% CI: 56-70%) and 27% (95% CI: 21-33%) at 1- and 3-years respectively in intermediate stage HCC, whereas OS was 37% (95% CI: 26-50%) and 13% (95% CI: 9-18%) at the same time intervals in patients with sufficient liver function (Child-Pugh A-B7) but with an advanced HCC because of the presence of portal vein thrombosis. When an intermediate and advanced case-mix was considered, OS was 58% (95% CI: 48-67%) and 17% (95% CI: 12-23%) at 1- and 3-years respectively. As for TTP, only four studies reported data: the observed progression probability was 56% (95% CI: 41-70%) and 73% (95% CI: 56-87%) at 1 and 2 years respectively. The safety analysis, focused on the risk of liver decompensation after TARE, revealed a great variability, from 0-1% to more than 36% events, influenced by the number of procedures, patient Child-Pugh stage and treatment duration. Evidence supporting the use of radioembolization in HCC is mainly based on retrospective and prospective cohort studies. Based on this evidence, until the results of the ongoing randomized trials become available, radioembolization appears to be a viable treatment option for intermediate-advanced stage HCC. PMID:27579537

  17. Electronic structure and optical properties of conjugated molecules: SAC-CI study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehara, Masahiro; Saha, Biswajit; Poolmee, Potjaman; Promkatkaew, Malinee; Hannongbua, Supa; Lu, Yun-peng; Nakatsuji, Hiroshi

    2012-12-01

    Electronic structure and optical properties of some organic conjugated molecules, that is the oligomers for organic-light emitting diodes (OLED), chelating hetero-atomic conjugated ligands, and UVB blocking molecules, have been investigated by the SAC-CI method. The absorption and emission spectra of these molecules were reproduced accurately. For OLED molecules, chain length dependence of the excitation and emission energies was evaluated for poly para-phenylene vinylene and poly para-phenylene. Thermal effect on the electronic spectra of fluorene-thiophene and its derivatives was examined with taking accounts the Boltzmann distribution. The photophysical properties of the chelating hetero-atomic molecules including pyridine-, benxazole-, and benzothiazole derivatives which are useful for electroluminescent metal complex were systematically calculated. The UVB blocking function of the methoxy substituted cinnamates was investigated with regard to the substitution position. The excited-state geometry relaxation of these molecules was interpreted based on the electrostatic force theory. The present work provides a useful basis for the theoretical design predicting the optical properties of the photo-functional molecules.

  18. Viable Biomass Sensor integration in the MELiSSA CI and CIII compartments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duatis Juarez, Jordi; Peiro, Enrique; Bragos, Ramon

    Traditionally, the biomass quantity and quality in complex substrate reactor (e.g. activated sludge, high density, fixed bed,..) is determined off-line in laboratories. Within this study, the VIAMASS Sensor System, which uses Electrical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) techniques, has been tested for MELiSSA compartment CI and C III, the liquefying and the nitrifying compartment respectively. This sensor is able to measure viable cells on basis of an impedance spectroscopy measurement. The fact that viable biomass can be detected, distinguishes the sensor from classical biomass sensors used in wastewater treatment plants. Detection of viable biomass and composition of the biomass can be very useful for calibration and validation of biological models. The sensor can be used to detect toxicity in system leading to die-off of organisms. The technology developed initially for space applications has been adapted and will be also able to give overall information on the population distribution of cells, distinguishing what type of biomass is dominant (for example, bacteria or protozoa).

  19. Characterization of neutron calibration fields at the TINT's 50 Ci americium-241/beryllium neutron irradiator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liamsuwan, T.; Channuie, J.; Ratanatongchai, W.

    2015-05-01

    Reliable measurement of neutron radiation is important for monitoring and protection in workplace where neutrons are present. Although Thailand has been familiar with applications of neutron sources and neutron beams for many decades, there is no calibration facility dedicated to neutron measuring devices available in the country. Recently, Thailand Institute of Nuclear Technology (TINT) has set up a multi-purpose irradiation facility equipped with a 50 Ci americium-241/beryllium neutron irradiator. The facility is planned to be used for research, nuclear analytical techniques and, among other applications, calibration of neutron measuring devices. In this work, the neutron calibration fields were investigated in terms of neutron energy spectra and dose equivalent rates using Monte Carlo simulations, an in-house developed neutron spectrometer and commercial survey meters. The characterized neutron fields can generate neutron dose equivalent rates ranging from 156 μSv/h to 3.5 mSv/h with nearly 100% of dose contributed by neutrons of energies larger than 0.01 MeV. The gamma contamination was less than 4.2-7.5% depending on the irradiation configuration. It is possible to use the described neutron fields for calibration test and routine quality assurance of neutron dose rate meters and passive dosemeters commonly used in radiation protection dosimetry.

  20. The Careful Puppet Master: Reducing risk and fortifying acceptance testing with Jenkins CI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Jason A.; Richman, Gabriel; DeStefano, John; Pryor, James; Rao, Tejas; Strecker-Kellogg, William; Wong, Tony

    2015-12-01

    Centralized configuration management, including the use of automation tools such as Puppet, can greatly increase provisioning speed and efficiency when configuring new systems or making changes to existing systems, reduce duplication of work, and improve automated processes. However, centralized management also brings with it a level of inherent risk: a single change in just one file can quickly be pushed out to thousands of computers and, if that change is not properly and thoroughly tested and contains an error, could result in catastrophic damage to many services, potentially bringing an entire computer facility offline. Change management procedures can—and should—be formalized in order to prevent such accidents. However, like the configuration management process itself, if such procedures are not automated, they can be difficult to enforce strictly. Therefore, to reduce the risk of merging potentially harmful changes into our production Puppet environment, we have created an automated testing system, which includes the Jenkins CI tool, to manage our Puppet testing process. This system includes the proposed changes and runs Puppet on a pool of dozens of RedHat Enterprise Virtualization (RHEV) virtual machines (VMs) that replicate most of our important production services for the purpose of testing. This paper describes our automated test system and how it hooks into our production approval process for automatic acceptance testing. All pending changes that have been pushed to production must pass this validation process before they can be approved and merged into production.

  1. The Cuatro Ciénegas Basin in Coahuila, Mexico: An Astrobiological Precambrian Park

    PubMed Central

    Siefert, Janet L.; Escalante, Ana E.; Elser, James J.; Eguiarte, Luis E.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The Cuatro Ciénegas Basin (CCB) is a rare oasis in the Chihuahuan Desert in the state of Coahuila, Mexico. It has a biological endemism similar to that of the Galapagos Islands, and its spring-fed ecosystems have very low nutrient content (nitrogen or phosphorous) and are dominated by diverse microbialites. Thus, it has proven to be a distinctive opportunity for the field of astrobiology, as the CCB can be seen as a proxy for an earlier time in Earth's history, in particular the late Precambrian, the biological frontier when prokaryotic life yielded at least partial dominance to eukaryotes and multicellular life. It is a kind of ecological time machine that provides abundant opportunities for collaborative investigations by geochemists, geologists, ecologists, and population biologists in the study of the evolutionary processes that structured Earth-based life, especially in the microbial realm. The CCB is an object of investigation for the identification of biosignatures of past and present biota that can be used in our search for extraterrestrial life. In this review, we summarize CCB research efforts that began with microbial ecology and population biology projects and have since been expanded into broader efforts that involve biogeochemistry, comparative genomics, and assessments of biosignatures. We also propose that, in the future, the CCB is sanctioned as a “Precambrian Park” for astrobiology. Key Words: Microbial mats—Stromatolites—Early Earth—Extremophilic microorganisms—Microbial ecology. Astrobiology 12, 641–647. PMID:22920514

  2. Diversity and Resource Use Patterns of Anthophile Insects in Cuatro Ciénegas, Coahuila, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Ávalos-Hernández, Omar; Cano-Santana, Zenón; Trujano-Ortega, Marysol; García-Vázquez, Uri Omar

    2016-12-01

    Bees and flies are the main pollinators responsible for the maintenance of plant diversity and crop production. Studies of pollinator communities have focused on bees; however, community structures may vary among groups of pollinators. We describe and compare the diversity and resource use patterns of six Apoidea and two Diptera anthophile families in Cuatro Ciénegas in the northeast of Mexico. We sampled insects in two distinct geographic units (valley and mountains) and two seasons (rainy and dry). Spatial and temporal patterns in species composition and abundance of these families were identified and the diversity in each family compared. The spatial and temporal patterns in species composition, diversity, and resource use were different for each family. Overall, diversity was higher during the rainy season. Only fly families and the Andrenidae presented season-specific differences in species composition, in contrast with the other Apoidea. Two bee families visited more plant species per insect species during the rainy season, whereas flies visited the same number of plant species in both seasons. Apidae, Megachilidae, and Bombyliidae visited more plant species in the mountains, while the other families exhibited no differences between the mountains and the valley. The variation in the community structures of each group may reflect distinct life histories, resources needs during larval stages, and foraging behaviors. These differences are relevant in management and conservation programs that could benefit one group of pollinators while harming others with different characteristics. The traits of some families indicate their potential value as pollinators.

  3. Diversity and Resource Use Patterns of Anthophile Insects in Cuatro Ciénegas, Coahuila, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Ávalos-Hernández, Omar; Cano-Santana, Zenón; Trujano-Ortega, Marysol; García-Vázquez, Uri Omar

    2016-09-15

    Bees and flies are the main pollinators responsible for the maintenance of plant diversity and crop production. Studies of pollinator communities have focused on bees; however, community structures may vary among groups of pollinators. We describe and compare the diversity and resource use patterns of six Apoidea and two Diptera anthophile families in Cuatro Ciénegas in the northeast of Mexico. We sampled insects in two distinct geographic units (valley and mountains) and two seasons (rainy and dry). Spatial and temporal patterns in species composition and abundance of these families were identified and the diversity in each family compared. The spatial and temporal patterns in species composition, diversity, and resource use were different for each family. Overall, diversity was higher during the rainy season. Only fly families and the Andrenidae presented season-specific differences in species composition, in contrast with the other Apoidea. Two bee families visited more plant species per insect species during the rainy season, whereas flies visited the same number of plant species in both seasons. Apidae, Megachilidae, and Bombyliidae visited more plant species in the mountains, while the other families exhibited no differences between the mountains and the valley. The variation in the community structures of each group may reflect distinct life histories, resources needs during larval stages, and foraging behaviors. These differences are relevant in management and conservation programs that could benefit one group of pollinators while harming others with different characteristics. The traits of some families indicate their potential value as pollinators.

  4. Metagenomic and stable isotopic analyses of modern freshwater microbialites in Cuatro Ciénegas, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Breitbart, Mya; Hoare, Ana; Nitti, Anthony; Siefert, Janet; Haynes, Matthew; Dinsdale, Elizabeth; Edwards, Robert; Souza, Valeria; Rohwer, Forest; Hollander, David

    2009-01-01

    Ancient biologically mediated sedimentary carbonate deposits, including stromatolites and other microbialites, provide insight into environmental conditions on early Earth. The primary limitation to interpreting these records is our lack of understanding regarding microbial processes and the preservation of geochemical signatures in contemporary microbialite systems. Using a combination of metagenomic sequencing and isotopic analyses, this study describes the identity, metabolic potential and chemical processes of microbial communities from living microbialites from Cuatro Ciénegas, Mexico. Metagenomic sequencing revealed a diverse, redox-dependent microbial community associated with the microbialites. The microbialite community is distinct from other marine and freshwater microbial communities, and demonstrates extensive environmental adaptation. The microbialite metagenomes contain a large number of genes involved in the production of exopolymeric substances and the formation of biofilms, creating a complex, spatially structured environment. In addition to the spatial complexity of the biofilm, microbial activity is tightly controlled by sensory and regulatory systems, which allow for coordination of autotrophic and heterotrophic processes. Isotopic measurements of the intracrystalline organic matter demonstrate the importance of heterotrophic respiration of photoautotrophic biomass in the precipitation of calcium carbonate. The genomic and stable isotopic data presented here significantly enhance our evolving knowledge of contemporary biomineralization processes, and are directly applicable to studies of ancient microbialites.

  5. Ciência & Saúde Coletiva: scientific production analysis and collaborative research networks.

    PubMed

    Conner, Norma; Provedel, Attilio; Maciel, Ethel Leonor Noia

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of this metric and descriptive study was to identify the most productive authors and their collaborative research networks from articles published in Ciência & Saúde Coletiva between, 2005, and 2014. Authors meeting the cutoff criteria of at least 10 articles were considered the most productive authors. VOSviewer and Network Workbench technologies were applied for visual representations of collaborative research networks involving the most productive authors in the period. Initial analysis recovered 2511 distinct articles, with 8920 total authors with an average of 3.55 authors per article. Author analysis revealed 6288 distinct authors, 24 of these authors were identified as the most productive. These 24 authors generated 287 articles with an average of 4.31 authors per article, and represented 8 separate collaborative partnerships, the largest of which had 14 authors, indicating a significant degree of collaboration among these authors. This analysis provides a visual representation of networks of knowledge development in public health and demonstrates the usefulness of VOSviewer and Network Workbench technologies in future research.

  6. The slow decline of the Galactic recurrent novae T Pyxidis, IM Normae, and CI Aquilae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caleo, Andrea; Shore, Steven N.

    2015-05-01

    A distinguishing trait of the three known Galactic recurrent novae with the shortest orbital periods, T Pyx, IM Nor, and CI Aql, is that their optical decline time-scales are significantly longer than those of the other recurrent systems. On the other hand, some estimates of the mass of the ejecta, the velocity of the ejecta, and the duration of the soft X-rays emission of these systems are of the order of those of the other recurrent systems and the fast classical novae. We put forth a tentative explanation of this phenomenon. We propose that in these systems part of the material transferred from the companion during the first few days of the eruption remains within the Roche lobe of the white dwarf, preventing the radiation from ionizing the ejecta of the system and increasing the optical decline time-scale. We explain why this phenomenon is more likely in systems with a high mass transfer rate and a short orbital period. Finally, we present a schematic model that shows that the material transferred from the companion is sufficient to absorb the radiation from the white dwarf in these systems, ultimately supporting this scenario as quantitatively realistic.

  7. The Cuatro Ciénegas Basin in Coahuila, Mexico: an astrobiological Precambrian Park.

    PubMed

    Souza, Valeria; Siefert, Janet L; Escalante, Ana E; Elser, James J; Eguiarte, Luis E

    2012-07-01

    The Cuatro Ciénegas Basin (CCB) is a rare oasis in the Chihuahuan Desert in the state of Coahuila, Mexico. It has a biological endemism similar to that of the Galapagos Islands, and its spring-fed ecosystems have very low nutrient content (nitrogen or phosphorous) and are dominated by diverse microbialites. Thus, it has proven to be a distinctive opportunity for the field of astrobiology, as the CCB can be seen as a proxy for an earlier time in Earth's history, in particular the late Precambrian, the biological frontier when prokaryotic life yielded at least partial dominance to eukaryotes and multicellular life. It is a kind of ecological time machine that provides abundant opportunities for collaborative investigations by geochemists, geologists, ecologists, and population biologists in the study of the evolutionary processes that structured Earth-based life, especially in the microbial realm. The CCB is an object of investigation for the identification of biosignatures of past and present biota that can be used in our search for extraterrestrial life. In this review, we summarize CCB research efforts that began with microbial ecology and population biology projects and have since been expanded into broader efforts that involve biogeochemistry, comparative genomics, and assessments of biosignatures. We also propose that, in the future, the CCB is sanctioned as a "Precambrian Park" for astrobiology.

  8. Identification of Chromomoric Acid C-I as an Nrf2 Activator in Chromolaena odorata

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Activation of nuclear factor-erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) contributes to several beneficial bioactivities of natural products, including induction of an increased cellular stress resistance and prevention or resolution of inflammation. In this study, the potential of a crude leaf extract of Chromolaena odorata, traditionally used against inflammation and skin lesions, was examined for Nrf2 activation. Guided by an Nrf2-dependent luciferase reporter gene assay, the phytoprostane chromomoric acid C-I (1) was identified as a potent Nrf2 activator from C. odorata with a CD (concentration doubling the response of vehicle-treated cells) of 5.2 μM. When tested at 1–10 μM, 1 was able to induce the endogenous Nrf2 target gene heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) in fibroblasts. Between 2 and 5 μM, compound 1 induced HO-1 in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) and inhibited their proliferation in a HO-1-dependent manner, without eliciting signs of cytotoxicity. PMID:24476568

  9. On the Nature of XTE J0421+560/CI Cam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belloni, T.; vandenAncker, M.; Dieters, S.; Fender, R.; Fox, D. W.; Kommers, J. M.; Lewin, W. H. G.; VanParadijs, J.

    1999-01-01

    We present the results of the analysis of RXTE, BATSE and optical/IR data of the 1998 outburst of the x-ray transient system XTE J0421+650. The x-ray outburst shows a very fast decay initial e-folding time approximately 0.5 days, slowing down to about 2.3 days). The X ray spectrum in the 2-25 keV band is thermal, softening considerably during decay. Intrinsic absorption is observed, also strongly variable. A strong iron line at around 6.7 keV is observed. No fast time variability is observed (<0.1 rms in the 1-4906 Hz band at peak). The analysis of optical/IR data suggest that the secondary is a b[e] star and place the system at a distance of about 2 kpc. At this distance the 2-25 keV luminosity is about 5 x 10(exp 37) erg/seconds. We compare the properties of this system with those of the Be/NS LMC transient A 0538-66 and suggest that CI cam is of a similar nature. The presence of strong radio emission during outburst indicates that the compact object could be a black hole.

  10. Structure and Bonding of Carbon in Clays from CI Carbonaceous Chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garview, Laurence a. J.; Buseck, Peter R.

    2005-01-01

    Carbonaceous chondrites (CC) contain a diverse suite of C-rich materials. Acid dissolution of these meteorites leaves a C-rich residue with chemical and structural affinities to kerogen. This material has primarily been analyzed in bulk, and much information has been provided regarding functional groups and elemental and isotopic compositions. However, comparatively little work has been done on C in unprocessed meteorites. Studies of CCs suggest a spatial relationship of some C-rich materials with products of aqueous alteration. Recent studies revealed discrete submicronsized, C-rich particles in Tagish Lake and a range of CM2 meteorites. A challenge is to correlate the findings from the bulk acid-residue studies with those of high-spatial resolution-mineralogical and spectroscopic observations of unprocessed meteorites. Hence, the relationship between the C-rich materials in the acid residues and its form and locations in the unprocessed meteorite remains unclear. Here we provide information on the structure and bonding of C associated with clays in CI carbonaceous chondrites. Additional information is included in the original extended abstract.

  11. CASSCF/CI calculations of low-lying states and potential energy surfaces of Au3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balasubramanian, K.; Liao, M. Z.

    1987-05-01

    Complete active space MCSCF (CASSCF) and second-order configuration interaction (SOCI) calculations of low-lying electronic states [2B2,2A1] of Au3 as well as the 1Σ+g state of Au2 are carried out. The bending potential energy surfaces of 2A1 and 2B2 states are also presented. A barrier is found in the potential energy surface of the 2A1 state in moving from the linear to bent structure. Two nearly-degenerate structures are found for the ground state. The 2Σ+u state arising from the linear structure with an Au-Au bond length of 2.66 Å is only 3.2 kcal/mol below the 2A1 bent state. The equilibrium geometry of the 2A1 state is an isosceles triangle with an apex angle of 54°. The Au3 cluster is found to be more stable than the gold dimer. The effect of d correlation is studied on Au2 by carrying out MRSDCI (multireference singles and doubles CI) calculations on the 1Σ+g state of Au2 which include excitations from the d orbitals.

  12. The role of journals in building up communities: the experience of Ciência em Tela

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, Isabel; de Souza Barros, Susana

    2015-12-01

    Ciência em Tela is an open access Brazilian science teacher education online journal that has been published twice a year since 2008 and which encourages the participation of professionals with different backgrounds and the submission of a variety of textual genres, besides research papers. Another feature is that the journal includes practicing schoolteachers not only as authors but also as reviewers, which not only provides those who submit contributions to the journal with an early feedback from their target audience but also helps empower schoolteachers by placing them in a discursive situation in which they are producers, as opposed to consumers, of discourses about science education. In this paper we describe the background to and main aspects of the journal's innovative editorial policy, which seeks to bridge gaps between communities and institutions linked to science education, as well as to discuss the challenges that arise from it, in particular, issues concerning internationalisation and funding, as well as the role of journals in times of colonisation and commodification of knowledge and of discourses.

  13. Infrared studies of the evolution of the CiOi(SiI) defect in irradiated Si upon isothermal anneals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angeletos, T.; Chroneos, A.; Londos, C. A.

    2016-03-01

    Carbon-oxygen-self-interstitial complexes were investigated in silicon by means of Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Upon irradiation, the CiOi defect (C3) forms which for high doses attract self-interstitials (SiIs) leading to the formation of the CiOi(SiI) defect (C4) with two well-known related bands at 939.6 and 1024 cm-1. The bands are detectable in the spectra both in room temperature (RT) and liquid helium (LH) temperature. Upon annealing at 150 °C, these bands were transformed to three bands at 725, 952, and 973 cm-1, detectable only at LH temperatures. Upon annealing at 220 °C, these bands were transformed to three bands at 951, 969.5, and 977 cm-1, detectable both at RT and LH temperatures. Annealing at 280 °C resulted in the transformation of these bands to two new bands at 973 and 1024 cm-1. The latter bands disappear from the spectra upon annealing at 315 °C without the emergence of other bands in the spectra. Considering reaction kinetics and defect metastability, we developed a model to describe the experimental results. Annealing at 150 °C triggers the capturing of SiIs by the C4 defect leading to the formation of the CiOi(SiI)2 complex. The latter structure appears to be bistable: measuring at LH, the defect is in configuration CiOi(SiI)2 giving rise to the bands at 725, 952, and 973 cm-1, whereas on measurements at RT, the defect converts to another configuration CiOi(SiI)2* without detectable bands in the spectra. Possible structures of the two CiOi(SiI)2 configurations are considered and discussed. Upon annealing at 220 °C, additional SiIs are captured by the CiOi(SiI)2 defect leading to the formation of the CiOi(SiI)3 complex, which in turn on annealing at 280 °C converts to the CiOi(SiI)4 complex. The latter defect anneals out at 315 °C, without being accompanied in the spectra by the growth of new bands.

  14. CI-988 Inhibits EGFR Transactivation and Proliferation Caused by Addition of CCK/Gastrin to Lung Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Moody, Terry W; Nuche-Berenguer, Bernardo; Moreno, Paola; Jensen, Robert T

    2015-07-01

    Cholecystokinin (CCK) receptors are G-protein coupled receptors (GPCR) which are present on lung cancer cells. CCK-8 stimulates the proliferation of lung cancer cells, whereas the CCK2R receptor antagonist CI-988 inhibits proliferation. GPCR for some gastrointestinal hormones/neurotransmitters mediate lung cancer growth by causing epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) transactivation. Here, the role of CCK/gastrin and CI-988 on EGFR transactivation and lung cancer proliferation was investigated. Addition of CCK-8 or gastrin-17 (100 nM) to NCI-H727 human lung cancer cells increased EGFR Tyr(1068) phosphorylation after 2 min. The ability of CCK-8 to cause EGFR tyrosine phosphorylation was blocked by CI-988, gefitinib (EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor), PP2 (Src inhibitor), GM6001 (matrix metalloprotease inhibitor), and tiron (superoxide scavenger). CCK-8 nonsulfated and gastrin-17 caused EGFR transactivation and bound with high affinity to NCI-H727 cells, suggesting that the CCK2R is present. CI-988 inhibited the ability of CCK-8 to cause ERK phosphorylation and elevate cytosolic Ca(2+). CI-988 or gefitinib inhibited the basal growth of NCI-H727 cells or that stimulated by CCK-8. The results indicate that CCK/gastrin may increase lung cancer proliferation in an EGFR-dependent manner.

  15. Spectral enhancement of proteins: biological incorporation and fluorescence characterization of 5-hydroxytryptophan in bacteriophage lambda cI repressor.

    PubMed Central

    Ross, J B; Senear, D F; Waxman, E; Kombo, B B; Rusinova, E; Huang, Y T; Laws, W R; Hasselbacher, C A

    1992-01-01

    We have used a tryptophan-requiring Escherichia coli auxotroph to replace the three tryptophan residues of lambda cI repressor with 5-hydroxy-L-tryptophan (5-OHTrp). By using a nonleaky promoter, we have achieved > 95% replacement of tryptophan in the repressor. We show that the absorbance and fluorescence properties of 5-OHTrp-lambda cI are clearly distinct from lambda cI repressor and that the fluorescence of 5-OHTrp-lambda cI repressor can be observed selectively in the presence of exogenous tryptophan. We also show that the 5-OHTrp-lambda cI repressor functional properties, as assessed by measurement of binding constants for self-association and for association to operator DNA, and structural properties, as assessed by fluorescence, are indistinguishable from the native repressor. Based on these results, we anticipate that the availability of spectrally enhanced proteins will significantly enhance the utility of both fluorescence and phosphorescence spectroscopies to study protein structure and function in complex interacting systems. PMID:1465434

  16. Mineralogy, Degree of Brecciation, and Aqueous Alteration of CI Chondrites Orgueil, Ivuna, and Alais

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endress, M.; Bischoff, A.

    1993-07-01

    The textural and mineralogical properties of the CI-chondrites Orgueil, Ivuna, and Alais were studied by electron microscopy in order to obtain new insights into the history and evolution of the CI parent body. Degree of Brecciation. The electron optical investigation of Orgueil, Ivuna, and Alais revealed that the three samples experienced different degrees of brecciation: (1) Orgueil is highly brecciated. It consists of abundant clastic matrix (clasts usually <10 micrometers) surrounding fragments of variable sizes (10-700 micrometers). (2) Alais is much less brecciated than Orgueil and in this manner more closely related to Ivuna (see below); fragments (100-500 micrometers in size) are embedded in clastic matrix. (3) Ivuna shows the lowest degree of brecciation and contains only small areas of clastic matrix. The major part of the sections studied consists of huge fragments (up to 1 x 3 mm in their largest dimension) representing at least three distinct lithologies: The first lithology can be characterized by a high modal abundance of carbonates (up to 10 vol%) and a lack of sulfates; the second is enriched in sulfates, but contains no carbonates, and the third lithology can be characterized by its high abundance of coarse-grained phyllosilicate fragments. Mineralogy. As phases >5 micrometers in size we observed magnetite, sulfides, carbonates, Ca-phosphate, olivine (Fa<5 14 grains), pyroxene (Fs<1 6 grains), sulfates, phyllosilicates, and as accessory phases Mn-rich chromite (15 wt% MnO), Mn-rich ilmenite (11 wt% MnO), Fe,Ni-metal grains in olivine relics and a yet unidentified Na,K-rich silicate (7 wt% Na2O; 6 wt% K2O; only in Ivuna). Magnetites (pure Fe3O4) occur as platelets, framboids, and spherules. As sulfides pyrrhotite, pentlandite (partly exsolved in pyrrhotite) and cubanite were observed. Carbonates (dolomite, breunnerite, calcite) either occur as single grains (usually <40 micrometers) or as big polycrystalline chunks (up to 300 micrometers in size

  17. On the evaluation of nonadiabatic coupling matrix elements for MCSCF/CI wave functions. IV. Second derivative terms using analytic gradient methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saxe, Paul; Yarkony, David R.

    1987-01-01

    A recently proposed methodology for determining second derivative nonadiabatic coupling matrix elements h(J,I,Rα,R) ≡<ΨJ(r;R)‖(∂2/∂R2α )ΨI(r;R)>r based on analytic gradient methods is implemented and discussed. Here r denotes the electronic coordinates, R the nuclear coordinates, and the ΨJ (r;R) are eigenfunctions of the nonrelativistic Born-Oppenheimer Hamiltonian at the state averaged MCSCF/CI level. The region of a conical intersection of the 1,2 2A' potential energy surfaces of the Li-H2 system is considered in order to illustrate the potential of this approach. The relation between h(J,I,Rα,R) and the first derivative matrix elements g(J,I,Rα,R) ≡<ΨJ(r;R)‖(∂/∂Rα)ΨI (r;R)>r is considered and the role of symmetry discussed. The h(J,I,Rα,R) are analyzed in terms of contributions from molecular orbital and CI coefficient derivatives and the importance of the various nuclear degree of freedom, Rα, is considered. It is concluded that for the case considered a flexible multiconfiguration wave function is desirable for characterizing h(J,I,Rα,R). This methodology complements recent advances in treating nonadiabatic processes for diatomic and triatomic systems starting with adiabatic states, including the work of Mead, Truhlar, and co-workers on conical (Jahn-Teller) intersections in X3 systems, by providing an essential computational step for the ab initio characterization the relevant electronic structure parameters.

  18. Redundancy control in pathway databases (ReCiPa): an application for improving gene-set enrichment analysis in Omics studies and "Big data" biology.

    PubMed

    Vivar, Juan C; Pemu, Priscilla; McPherson, Ruth; Ghosh, Sujoy

    2013-08-01

    Abstract Unparalleled technological advances have fueled an explosive growth in the scope and scale of biological data and have propelled life sciences into the realm of "Big Data" that cannot be managed or analyzed by conventional approaches. Big Data in the life sciences are driven primarily via a diverse collection of 'omics'-based technologies, including genomics, proteomics, metabolomics, transcriptomics, metagenomics, and lipidomics. Gene-set enrichment analysis is a powerful approach for interrogating large 'omics' datasets, leading to the identification of biological mechanisms associated with observed outcomes. While several factors influence the results from such analysis, the impact from the contents of pathway databases is often under-appreciated. Pathway databases often contain variously named pathways that overlap with one another to varying degrees. Ignoring such redundancies during pathway analysis can lead to the designation of several pathways as being significant due to high content-similarity, rather than truly independent biological mechanisms. Statistically, such dependencies also result in correlated p values and overdispersion, leading to biased results. We investigated the level of redundancies in multiple pathway databases and observed large discrepancies in the nature and extent of pathway overlap. This prompted us to develop the application, ReCiPa (Redundancy Control in Pathway Databases), to control redundancies in pathway databases based on user-defined thresholds. Analysis of genomic and genetic datasets, using ReCiPa-generated overlap-controlled versions of KEGG and Reactome pathways, led to a reduction in redundancy among the top-scoring gene-sets and allowed for the inclusion of additional gene-sets representing possibly novel biological mechanisms. Using obesity as an example, bioinformatic analysis further demonstrated that gene-sets identified from overlap-controlled pathway databases show stronger evidence of prior association

  19. Observation of CI FUV emissions from the Venus thermosphere using Cassini-UVIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubert, B. A.; Gerard, J. M.; Bisikalo, D. V.; Shematovich, V. I.; Gladstone, R.

    2011-12-01

    The Cassini spacecraft was launched on 15 October 1997. On its long journey to Saturn, the spacecraft took a gravitational assist to gain energy from Venus on 24 June 1999. The UVIS instrument on board Cassini obtained a series of FUV spectra during this flyby, while the solar F10.7 index was larger than 200 at Earth orbit. The UVIS instrument obtained ultraviolet spectra of Venus with a still unmatched spectral resolution of ~0.37 nm. We developed a least squares fit method able to extract the intensity of most of the emissions present in the instrument passband, that has already been used to quantify the CO Fourth Positive spectral system and oxygen emissions, among others. We identify several emissions of the carbon atom in the UVIS spectra, and estimate their intensity. In particular, we extract the intensity of the CI - 126.1, 156.1 and 165.7 nm multiplets, for every dayglow spectra recorded by UVIS along the Cassini track. These intensities are compared with a full radiative transfer modeling of these emissions, that includes the known photochemical sources of photons and resonant scattering of sunlight. The carbon density profile of the Venus thermosphere has never been directly measured and is taken from a photochemical model. We find a serious disagreement between observation and modeling that can be accounted for by applying a correction factor to the carbon column. This needed correction factor is found to increase monotonically as the solar zenith angle decreases, suggesting a possible photochemical origin to the disagreement, possibly involving the photochemistry of molecular oxygen to which the carbon density is highly sensitive.

  20. The QWeCI Project: seamlessly linking climate science to society

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morse, A. P.; Caminade, C.; Jones, A. E.; MacLeod, D.; Heath, A. E.

    2012-04-01

    The EU FP7 QWeCI project Quantifying Weather and Climate Impacts on health in developing countries (www.liv.ac.uk/qweci) has 13 partners with 7 of these in Africa. The geographical focus of the project is in Senegal, Ghana and Malawi. In all three countries the project has a strong scientific dissemination outlook as well as having field based surveillance programmes in Ghana and Senegal to understand more about the local parameters controlling the transmission of malaria and in Senegal of Rift Valley fever. The project has a strong and active climate science activity in using hindcasts of the new System 4 seasonal forecasting system at ECMWF; to further develop the use of monthly to seasonal forecasts from ensemble prediction systems; within project downscaling development; the assessment of decadal ensemble prediction systems; and the development and testing of vector borne disease models for malaria and Rift Valley fever. In parallel with the science programme the project has a large outreach activity involving regular communication and bi-lateral exchanges, science and decision maker focused workshops. In Malawi a long range WiFi network has been established for the dissemination of data. In Senegal where they is a concentration of partners and stakeholders the project is gaining a role as a catalyst for wider health and climate related activity within government departments and national research bodies along with the support and involvement of local communities. Within these wider community discussions we have interactive inputs from African and European scientists who are partners in the project. This paper will show highlights of the work completed so far and give an outline to future development and to encourage a wider user interaction from outside of the current project team and their direct collaborators.

  1. Reforms of a real estate cadastre in Poland / Reformy katastru nieruchomości w Polsce

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietrzak, Ludmiła; Hopfer, Andrzej; Cegielski, Stanisław

    2012-11-01

    On May 7, 2010 the act dated March 4, 2010 on the spatial information infrastructure was published which transposes the European Parliament and the European Council Directive No 2007/2/WE dated March 14, 2007 established the spatial information infrastructure (INSPIRE) in the European Community. This act introduced basic changes to the binding Act, i.e. the Law of Geodesy and Cartography and, as the consequence, the demand to develop various administrative decrees occurred. The authors of the paper present the analysis of the existing conditions of the cadastre, the task of governmental and public government administration, related to demands concerning the cadastral reforms, following the act on the spatial information infrastructure and they discuss possibilities to perform such reforms at the local and national scales. W dniu 7 maja 2010 r. weszła w życie ustawa a dnia 4 marca 2012 r. o infrastrukturze informacji przestrzennej dokonująca transpozycji dyrektywy Parlamentu Europejskiego i Rady nr 2007/3/WE ustanawiającej infrastrukturę informacji przestrzennej w Europie. Ustawa to wprowadziła zasadnicze zmiany do obowiązującej ustawy prawo geodezyjne i kartograficzne, i w konsekwencji powstała konieczność opracowania nowych rozporządzeń wykonawczych. W chwili obecnej większość rozporządzeń jest już opracowana, część jest jeszcze konsultowana z organizacjami zawodowymi geodetów. W artykule autorzy dokonują analizy stanu istniejącego, zadań administracji rządowej i samorządowej związanych z koniecznością modernizacji katastru oraz podają zakres koniecznych do przeprowadzenie reform w skali kraju oraz w skali lokalnej.

  2. High-level multireference methods in the quantum-chemistry program system COLUMBUS : analytic MR-CISD and MR-AQCC gradients and MR-AQCC-LRT for excited states, GUGA spin-orbit CI, and parallel CI density.

    SciTech Connect

    Lischka, H.; Shepard, R.; Pitzer, R. M.; Shavitt, I.; Dallos, M.; Muller, T.; Szalay, P. G.; Seth, M.; Kedziora, G. S.; Yabushita, S.; Zhang, Z.; Chemistry; Univ. of Vienna; Ohio State Univ.; Univ. of Illinois; Eotvos Lorand Univ.; Univ. of Calgary; Northwestern Univ.; Keio Univ.; PNNL

    2001-01-01

    Development of several new computational approaches within the framework of multi-reference ab initio molecular electronic structure methodology and their implementation in the COLUMBUS program system are reported. These new features are: calculation of the analytical MR-CI gradient for excited states based on state-averaged MCSCF orbitals, the extension of the MR-ACPF/AQCC methods to excited states in the framework of linear-response theory, spin-orbit CI for molecules containing heavy atoms and the development of a massively-parallel code for the computation of the one- and two-particle density matrix elements. Illustrative examples are given for each of these cases.

  3. Jamming of fingers: an experimental study to determine force and deflection in participants and human cadaver specimens for development of a new bionic test device for validation of power-operated motor vehicle side door windows.

    PubMed

    Hohendorff, Bernd; Weidermann, Christian; Pollinger, Philipp; Burkhart, Klaus J; Müller, Lars Peter

    2013-02-01

    The deformability of human fingers is central to addressing the real-life hazard of finger jamming between the window and seal entry of a power-operated motor vehicle side door window. The index and little fingers of the left hand of 109 participants and of 20 cadaver specimens were placed in a measurement setup. Participants progressively jammed their fingers at five different dorsal-palmar jam positions up to the maximum tolerable pain threshold, whereas the cadaver specimens were jammed up to the maximum possible deflection. Force-deflection curves were calculated corresponding to increasing deflection of the compressed tissue layers of the fingers. The average maximum force applied by the participants was 42 N to the index finger and 35 N to the little finger. In the cadaver fingers, the average of the maximum force applied was 1886 N for the index finger and 1833 N for the little finger. In 200 jam positions, 25 fractures were observed on radiographs; fractures occurred at an average force of 1485 N. These data assisted the development of a prototype of a bionic test device for more realistic validation of power-operated motor vehicle windows.

  4. Chemically intuitive indices for charge-transfer excitation based on SAC-CI and TD-DFT calculations.

    PubMed

    Ehara, Masahiro; Fukuda, Ryoichi; Adamo, Carlo; Ciofini, Ilaria

    2013-11-05

    A recently proposed charge-transfer (CT) index and some related quantities aimed to the description of CT excitations in push-pull donor-acceptor model systems were computed in vacuum and in ethanol by the direct symmetry-adapted cluster-configuration interaction (SAC-CI) method including solvent effects by means of the nonequilibrium state-specific approach. The effects of both solvation and electron correlations on these quantities were found to be significant. The present results are also in line with previous time-dependent (TD) density functional theory calculations and they demonstrate that SAC-CI provides a description of the excitation character close to that of TD-PBE0. Indeed, CT indices evaluated by the SAC-CI and TD-PBE0 would be useful in the field of materials chemistry, for the design and development of novel molecular materials.

  5. Full CI benchmark calculations on N2, NO, and O2 - A comparison of methods for describing multiple bonds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Langhoff, Stephen R.

    1987-01-01

    Full configuration interaction (CI) calculations on the ground states of N2, NO, and O2 using a DZP Gaussian basis are compared with single-reference SDCI and coupled pair approaches (CPF), as well as with CASSCF multireference CI approaches. The CASSCF/MRCI technique is found to describe multiple bonds as well as single bonds. Although the coupled pair functional approach gave chemical accuracy (1 kcal/mol) for bonds involving hydrogen, larger errors occur in the CPF approach for the multiple bonded systems considered here. CI studies on the 1Sigma(g +) state of N2, including all single, double, triple, and quadruple excitations show that triple excitations are very important for the multiple bond case, and accounts for most of the deficiency in the coupled pair functional methods.

  6. Drosophila ciD encodes a hybrid Pangolin/Cubitus interruptus protein that diverts the Wingless into the Hedgehog signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Schweizer, L; Basler, K

    1998-11-01

    The Hedgehog (Hh) and Wingless (Wg) signaling pathways play important roles in animal development. The activities of the two pathways depend on each other during Drosophila embryogenesis. In the embryonic segment, Wg is required in anterior cells to sustain Hh secretion in adjacent posterior cells. Hh input in turn is necessary for anterior cells to maintain wg expression. The Hh and Wg pathways are mediated by the transcription factors Cubitus interruptus (Ci) and Pangolin/TCF (Pan), respectively. Coincidentally, pan and ci are adjacent genes on the fourth chromosome in a head-to-head orientation. Our genetic and in situ hybridization data indicate that ciD is a mutation affecting both ci and pan. Molecular analysis revealed that the ciD allele is caused by an inversion event that swapped the promoter regions and the first exons of the two genes. The ci gene in ciD is controlled by the ubiquitous pan promoter and encodes a hybrid Ci protein that carries the N-terminal region of Pan. This domain has previously been shown to bind to the b-catenin homolog Armadillo (Arm), raising the possibility that Wg input, in addition to Hh input, modulates the activity of the hybrid CiD protein. Indeed, we found that Wg signaling induces the expression of the Hh target gene patched (ptc) in ciD animals. We provide evidence that this effect depends on the ability of the CiD protein to bind Arm. Genetic and molecular data indicate that wild-type Pan and CiD compete for binding to Arm, leading to a compromised transduction of the Wg signal in heterozygous ciD/+ animals and to a dramatic enhancement of the gain-of-function activity of CiD in homozygous mutants. Thus, the Hh and the Wg pathways are affected by the ciD mutation, and the CiD fusion protein integrates the activities of both.

  7. Divergence and phylogeny of Firmicutes from the Cuatro Ciénegas Basin, Mexico: a window to an ancient ocean.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Letelier, Alejandra; Olmedo-Alvarez, Gabriela; Eguiarte, Luis E; Souza, Valeria

    2012-07-01

    The Cuatro Ciénegas Basin (CCB) has been identified as a center of endemism for many life-forms. Nearly half the bacterial species found in the spring systems have their closest relatives in the ocean. This raises the question of whether the high diversity observed today is the product of an adaptive radiation similar to that of the Galapagos Islands or whether the bacterial groups are "survivors" of an ancient sea, which would be of interest for astrobiology. To help answer this question, we focused on Firmicutes from Cuatro Ciénegas (mainly Bacillus and Exiguobacterium). We reconstructed the phylogenetic relationships of Firmicutes with 28 housekeeping genes and dated the resulting tree using geological events as calibration points. Our results show that marine Bacillus diverged from other Bacillus strains 838 Ma, while Bacillus from Cuatro Ciénegas have divergence dates that range from 770 to 202 Ma. The members of Exiguobacterium from the CCB conform to a much younger group that diverged from the Andes strain 60 Ma and from the one in Yellowstone 183 Ma. Therefore, the diversity of Firmicutes in Cuatro Ciénegas is not the product of a recent radiation but the product of the isolation of lineages from an ancient ocean. Hence, Cuatro Ciénegas is not a Galapagos Archipelago for bacteria but is more like an astrobiological "time machine" in which bacterial lineages survived in an oligotrophic environment that may be very similar to that of the Precambrian. Key Words: Firmicutes-Cuatro Ciénegas-Precambrian-Molecular dating-Western Interior Seaway.

  8. Divergence and Phylogeny of Firmicutes from the Cuatro Ciénegas Basin, Mexico: A Window to an Ancient Ocean

    PubMed Central

    Moreno-Letelier, Alejandra; Olmedo-Alvarez, Gabriela; Eguiarte, Luis E.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The Cuatro Ciénegas Basin (CCB) has been identified as a center of endemism for many life-forms. Nearly half the bacterial species found in the spring systems have their closest relatives in the ocean. This raises the question of whether the high diversity observed today is the product of an adaptive radiation similar to that of the Galapagos Islands or whether the bacterial groups are “survivors” of an ancient sea, which would be of interest for astrobiology. To help answer this question, we focused on Firmicutes from Cuatro Ciénegas (mainly Bacillus and Exiguobacterium). We reconstructed the phylogenetic relationships of Firmicutes with 28 housekeeping genes and dated the resulting tree using geological events as calibration points. Our results show that marine Bacillus diverged from other Bacillus strains 838 Ma, while Bacillus from Cuatro Ciénegas have divergence dates that range from 770 to 202 Ma. The members of Exiguobacterium from the CCB conform to a much younger group that diverged from the Andes strain 60 Ma and from the one in Yellowstone 183 Ma. Therefore, the diversity of Firmicutes in Cuatro Ciénegas is not the product of a recent radiation but the product of the isolation of lineages from an ancient ocean. Hence, Cuatro Ciénegas is not a Galapagos Archipelago for bacteria but is more like an astrobiological “time machine” in which bacterial lineages survived in an oligotrophic environment that may be very similar to that of the Precambrian. Key Words: Firmicutes—Cuatro Ciénegas—Precambrian—Molecular dating—Western Interior Seaway. Astrobiology 12, 674–684. PMID:22920517

  9. Sensor-Operated Headset Selection for Virginia Class Submarine Consoles (3CI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russotti, Joseph S.; Schwaller, Derek W.

    2001-10-01

    The current research evaluated various headsets for use on C3I (Command, Control, Communication and Intelligence workstation) consoles installed in Virginia Class submarine. Of particular importance is their intended application in accurately presenting not only communications but also passive acoustic sonar data and other future advanced auditory displays that may use spatial coding. Of these applications accurate representation of broadband sonar data becomes the most challenging immediate task. Headset evaluation of commercial off-the-shelf products confirmed our decision to press for development of high fidelity ANC sensor operator headsets. This study reports evaluation of a prototype ANC high fidelity headset developed to our specification for use in critical listening in a moderately noisy environment.

  10. Evolution of alpha-pinene oxidation products in the presence of varying oxidizers: CI-APi-TOF point of view

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rissanen, Matti P.; Jokinen, Tuija; Schobesberger, Siegfried; Praplan, Arnaud P.; Sipilä, Mikko; Sarnela, Nina; Junninen, Heikki; Duplissy, Jonathan; Kangasluoma, Juha; Hakala, Jani; Wimmer, Daniela; Adamov, Alexey; Lehtipalo, Katrianne; Nieminen, Tuomo; Kulmala, Markku; Worsnop, Douglas R.; Cloud Collaboration

    2013-05-01

    Alpha-pinene oxidation was studied in the CERN CLOUD chamber under near atmospheric conditions using varying levels of different oxidizers (i.e., O3, HOx and NOx with differing gas mixture compositions) in the presence and absence of UV-radiation, SO2 and additional organic traces; ammonia (NH3) and dimethylamine (DMA). The oxidation products and their evolution due to aging in the chamber were studied using a novel CI-APi-TOF technique, with the nitrate ion (NO3-) based chemical ionization (CI) scheme. We aimed to the results that would indicate how different oxidizing pathways lead to different product distributions in the product clusters detected.

  11. 40 CFR 63.6604 - What fuel requirements must I meet if I own or operate an existing stationary CI RICE?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... I own or operate an existing stationary CI RICE? 63.6604 Section 63.6604 Protection of Environment....6604 What fuel requirements must I meet if I own or operate an existing stationary CI RICE? If you own or operate an existing non-emergency, non-black start CI stationary RICE with a site rating of...

  12. 40 CFR 63.6602 - What emission limitations must I meet if I own or operate an existing stationary CI RICE with a...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... if I own or operate an existing stationary CI RICE with a site rating of equal to or less than 500....6602 What emission limitations must I meet if I own or operate an existing stationary CI RICE with a... own or operate an existing stationary CI RICE with a site rating of equal to or less than 500 brake...

  13. 40 CFR 63.6604 - What fuel requirements must I meet if I own or operate an existing stationary CI RICE?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... I own or operate an existing stationary CI RICE? 63.6604 Section 63.6604 Protection of Environment....6604 What fuel requirements must I meet if I own or operate an existing stationary CI RICE? If you own or operate an existing non-emergency CI stationary RICE with a site rating of more than 300 brake...

  14. 40 CFR 63.6604 - What fuel requirements must I meet if I own or operate an existing stationary CI RICE?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... own or operate an existing stationary CI RICE? 63.6604 Section 63.6604 Protection of Environment....6604 What fuel requirements must I meet if I own or operate an existing stationary CI RICE? If you own or operate an existing non-emergency, non-black start CI stationary RICE with a site rating of...

  15. 40 CFR 60.4209 - What are the monitoring requirements if I am an owner or operator of a stationary CI internal...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... I am an owner or operator of a stationary CI internal combustion engine? 60.4209 Section 60.4209... if I am an owner or operator of a stationary CI internal combustion engine? If you are an owner or... stationary CI internal combustion engine, you must install a non-resettable hour meter prior to startup...

  16. 40 CFR 60.4202 - What emission standards must I meet for emergency engines if I am a stationary CI internal...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... emergency engines if I am a stationary CI internal combustion engine manufacturer? 60.4202 Section 60.4202... emergency engines if I am a stationary CI internal combustion engine manufacturer? (a) Stationary CI internal combustion engine manufacturers must certify their 2007 model year and later emergency......

  17. 40 CFR 60.4213 - What test methods and other procedures must I use if I am an owner or operator of a stationary CI...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... must I use if I am an owner or operator of a stationary CI internal combustion engine with a... procedures must I use if I am an owner or operator of a stationary CI internal combustion engine with a... or operator of a stationary CI internal combustion engine with a displacement of greater than...

  18. 40 CFR 60.4202 - What emission standards must I meet for emergency engines if I am a stationary CI internal...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... emergency engines if I am a stationary CI internal combustion engine manufacturer? 60.4202 Section 60.4202... emergency engines if I am a stationary CI internal combustion engine manufacturer? (a) Stationary CI internal combustion engine manufacturers must certify their 2007 model year and later emergency......

  19. 40 CFR 60.4209 - What are the monitoring requirements if I am an owner or operator of a stationary CI internal...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... I am an owner or operator of a stationary CI internal combustion engine? 60.4209 Section 60.4209... if I am an owner or operator of a stationary CI internal combustion engine? If you are an owner or... stationary CI internal combustion engine, you must install a non-resettable hour meter prior to startup...

  20. 40 CFR 60.4203 - How long must my engines meet the emission standards if I am a stationary CI internal combustion...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... emission standards if I am a stationary CI internal combustion engine manufacturer? 60.4203 Section 60.4203... standards if I am a stationary CI internal combustion engine manufacturer? Engines manufactured by stationary CI internal combustion engine manufacturers must meet the emission standards as required in §§...

  1. 40 CFR 60.4203 - How long must my engines meet the emission standards if I am a stationary CI internal combustion...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... emission standards if I am a stationary CI internal combustion engine manufacturer? 60.4203 Section 60.4203... standards if I am a stationary CI internal combustion engine manufacturer? Engines manufactured by stationary CI internal combustion engine manufacturers must meet the emission standards as required in §§...

  2. 40 CFR 60.4209 - What are the monitoring requirements if I am an owner or operator of a stationary CI internal...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... I am an owner or operator of a stationary CI internal combustion engine? 60.4209 Section 60.4209... if I am an owner or operator of a stationary CI internal combustion engine? If you are an owner or... stationary CI internal combustion engine that does not meet the standards applicable to non-emergency...

  3. 40 CFR 60.4202 - What emission standards must I meet for emergency engines if I am a stationary CI internal...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... emergency engines if I am a stationary CI internal combustion engine manufacturer? 60.4202 Section 60.4202... emergency engines if I am a stationary CI internal combustion engine manufacturer? (a) Stationary CI internal combustion engine manufacturers must certify their 2007 model year and later emergency......

  4. 40 CFR 60.4209 - What are the monitoring requirements if I am an owner or operator of a stationary CI internal...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... I am an owner or operator of a stationary CI internal combustion engine? 60.4209 Section 60.4209... if I am an owner or operator of a stationary CI internal combustion engine? If you are an owner or... stationary CI internal combustion engine that does not meet the standards applicable to non-emergency...

  5. 40 CFR 60.4209 - What are the monitoring requirements if I am an owner or operator of a stationary CI internal...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... I am an owner or operator of a stationary CI internal combustion engine? 60.4209 Section 60.4209... if I am an owner or operator of a stationary CI internal combustion engine? If you are an owner or... stationary CI internal combustion engine that does not meet the standards applicable to non-emergency...

  6. 40 CFR 60.4202 - What emission standards must I meet for emergency engines if I am a stationary CI internal...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... emergency engines if I am a stationary CI internal combustion engine manufacturer? 60.4202 Section 60.4202... emergency engines if I am a stationary CI internal combustion engine manufacturer? (a) Stationary CI internal combustion engine manufacturers must certify their 2007 model year and later emergency......

  7. 40 CFR 60.4202 - What emission standards must I meet for emergency engines if I am a stationary CI internal...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... emergency engines if I am a stationary CI internal combustion engine manufacturer? 60.4202 Section 60.4202... emergency engines if I am a stationary CI internal combustion engine manufacturer? (a) Stationary CI internal combustion engine manufacturers must certify their 2007 model year and later emergency......

  8. Aqueous fluid composition in CI chondritic materials: Chemical equilibrium assessments in closed systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zolotov, Mikhail Yu.

    2012-08-01

    Solids of nearly solar composition have interacted with aqueous fluids on carbonaceous asteroids, icy moons, and trans-neptunian objects. These processes altered mineralogy of accreted materials together with compositions of aqueous and gaseous phases. We evaluated chemistry of aqueous solutions coexisted with CI-type chondritic solids through calculations of chemical equilibria in closed water-rock-gas systems at different compositions of initial fluids, water/rock mass ratios (0.1-1000), temperatures (<350 °C), and pressures (<2 kbars). The calculations show that fluid compositions are mainly affected by solubilities of solids, the speciation of chlorine in initial water-rock mixtures, and the occurrence of Na-bearing secondary minerals such as saponite. The major species in modeled alkaline solutions are Na+, Cl-, CO32-,HCO3-, K+, OH-, H2, and CO2. Aqueous species of Mg, Fe, Ca, Mn, Al, Ni, Cr, S, and P are not abundant in these fluids owing to low solubility of corresponding solids. Typical NaCl type alkaline fluids coexist with saponite-bearing mineralogy that usually present in aqueously altered chondrites. A common occurrence of these fluids is consistent with the composition of grains emitted from Enceladus. Na-rich fluids with abundant CO32-,HCO3-, and OH- anions coexist with secondary mineralogy depleted in Na. The Na2CO3 and NaHCO3 type fluids could form via accretion of cometary ices. NaOH type fluids form in reduced environments and may locally occur on parent bodies of CR carbonaceous chondrites. Supposed melting of accreted HCl-bearing ices leads to early acidic fluids enriched in Mg, Fe and other metals, consistent with signs of low-pH alteration in chondrites. Neutralization of these solutions leads to alkaline Na-rich fluids. Sulfate species have negligible concentrations in closed systems, which remain reduced, especially at elevated pressures created by forming H2 gas. Hydrogen, CO2, and H2O dominate in the gaseous phase, though the abundance

  9. The apolipoprotein E/CI/CII gene cluster and late-onset Alzheimer disease

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Chang-En; Nemens, E.; Olson, J.M.; Goddard, K.A.B.; Kukull, W.A.; Payami, H.; Boehnke, M.; Wijsman, E.M.; Orr, H.T.; White, J.A.

    1994-04-01

    The chromosome 19 apolipoprotein E/CI/CII gene cluster was examined for evidence of linkage to a familial Alzheimer disease (FAD) locus. The family groups studied were Volga German (VG), early-onset non-VG (ENVG; mean age at onset <60 years), and late-onset families. A genetic association was observed between apolipoprotein E (ApoE) allele E4 and FAD in late-onset families; the E4 allele frequency was .51 in affected subjects, .37 in at-risk subjects, .11 in spouses, and .19 in unrelated controls. The differences between the E4 frequencies in affected subjects versus controls and in at-risk subjects versus controls were highly significant. No association between the E4 allele and FAD was observed in the ENVG or VG groups. A statistically significant allelic association between E4 and AD was also observed in a group of unrelated subjects; the E4 frequency was .26 in affected subjects, versus .19 in controls (Z[sub SND] = 2.20, P < .03). Evidence of linkage of ApoE and ApoCII to FAD was examined by maximum-likelihood methods, using three models and assuming autosomal dominant inheritance: (1) age-dependent penetrance, (2) extremely low (1%) penetrance, and (3) age-dependent penetrance corrected for sporadic Alzheimer disease (AD). For ApoCII in late-onset families, results for close linkage were negative, and only small positive lod-score-statistic (Z) values were obtained. For ApoE in late-onset kindreds, positive Z values were obtained when either allele frequencies from controls or allele frequencies from the families were used. When linkage disequilibrium was incorporated into the analysis, the Z values increased. For the ENVG group, results for ApoE and ApoCII were uniformly negative. Affected-pedigree-member analysis gave significant results for the late-onset kindreds, for ApoE, when control allele frequencies were used but not when allele frequencies were derived from the families. 58 refs., 6 tabs.

  10. The Apolipoprotein E/CI/CII Gene Cluster and Late-Onset Alzheimer Disease

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Chang-En; Payami, Haydeh; Olson, Jane M.; Boehnke, Michael; Wijsman, Ellen M.; Orr, Harry T.; Kukull, Walter A.; Goddard, Katrina A. B.; Nemens, Ellen; White, June A.; Alonso, M. Elisa; Taylor, Todd D.; Ball, Melvyn J.; Kaye, Jeffrey; Morris, John; Chui, Helena; Sadovnick, Adele D.; Martin, George M.; Larson, Eric B.; Heston, Leonard L.; Bird, Thomas D.; Schellenberg, Gerard D.

    1994-01-01

    The chromosome 19 apolipoprotein E/CI/CII gene cluster was examined for evidence of linkage to a familial Alzheimer disease (FAD) locus. The family groups studied were Volga German (VG), early-onset non-VG (ENVG; mean age at onset <60 years), and late-onset families. A genetic association was observed between apolipoprotein E (ApoE) allele ε4 and FAD in late-onset families; the ε4 allele frequency was .51 in affected subjects, .37 in at-risk subjects, .11 in spouses, and .19 in unrelated controls. The differences between the ε4 frequencies in affected subjects versus controls and in at-risk subjects versus controls were highly significant (standard normal deviate [ZSND]) = 7.37, P < 10−9; and ZSND = 4.07, P < .00005, respectively). No association between the ε4 allele and FAD was observed in the ENVG or VG groups. A statistically significant allelic association between ε4 and AD was also observed in a group of unrelated subjects; the ε4 frequency was .26 in affected subjects, versus .19 in controls (ZSND = 2.20, P < .03). Evidence of linkage of ApoE and ApoCII to FAD was examined by maximum-likelihood methods, using three models and assuming autosomal dominant inheritance: (1) age-dependent penetrance, (2) extremely low (1%) penetrance, and (3) age-dependent penetrance corrected for sporadic Alzheimer disease (AD). For ApoCII in late-onset families, results for close linkage were negative, and only small positive lod-score-statistic (Z) values were obtained (model 1, maximum Z [Zmax] = 0.61, recombination fraction [θ] = .30; model 2, Zmax = 0.47, θ = .20). For ApoE in late-onset kindreds, positive Z values were obtained when either allele frequencies from controls (model 1, Zmax = 2.02, θ = .15; model 2, Zmax = 3.42, θ = .05) or allele frequencies from the families (model 1, Zmax = 1.43, θ = .15; model 2, Zmax = 1.70, θ = .05) were used. When linkage disequilibrium was incorporated into the analysis, the Z values increased (model 1, Zmax = 3.17,

  11. Advanced planetary studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Results of planetary advanced studies and planning support are summarized. The scope of analyses includes cost estimation research, planetary mission performance, penetrator advanced studies, Mercury mission transport requirements, definition of super solar electric propulsion/solar sail mission discriminators, and advanced planning activities.

  12. Advances in forefoot trauma.

    PubMed

    Clements, J Randolph; Schopf, Robert

    2013-07-01

    Forefoot traumas, particularly involving the metatarsals, are commonly occurring injuries. There have been several advances in management of these injuries. These advances include updates in operative technique, internal fixation options, plating constructs, and external fixation. In addition, the advances of soft tissue management have improved outcomes. This article outlines these injuries and provides an update on techniques, principles, and understanding of managing forefoot trauma.

  13. Incidence and Predictors of Advanced Liver Fibrosis by a Validated Serum Biomarker in Liver Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Rollet-Kurhajec, Kathleen C.; Bhat, Aparna; Farag, Amanda; Deschenes, Marc; Wong, Philip; Sebastiani, Giada

    2017-01-01

    Background and Aims. Serum fibrosis biomarkers have shown good accuracy in the liver transplant (LT) population. We employed a simple serum biomarker to elucidate incidence and predictors of advanced fibrosis after LT over a long follow-up period. Methods. We included 440 consecutive patients who underwent LT between 1991 and 2013. Advanced liver fibrosis was defined as FIB-4 > 3.25 beyond 12 months after LT. Results. Over 2030.5 person-years (PY) of follow-up, 189 (43%) developed FIB-4 > 3.25, accounting for an incidence of 9.3/100 PY (95% confidence interval [CI], 8.1–10.7). Advanced fibrosis was predicted by chronic HCV infection (adjusted hazard ratio (aHR) = 3.96, 95% CI 2.92–5.36, p < 0.001), hypoalbuminemia (aHR = 2.31, 95% CI 1.72–3.09; p < 0.001), and hyponatremia (aHR = 1.48, 95% CI 1.09–2.01; p = 0.01). LT recipients with more than 1 predictor had a higher incidence of advanced fibrosis, the highest being when all 3 predictors coexisted (log-rank: p < 0.001). Conclusions. Chronic HCV infection, hypoalbuminemia, and hyponatremia predict progression to advanced liver fibrosis following LT. Patients with these risk factors should be serially monitored using noninvasive fibrosis biomarkers and prioritized for interventions.

  14. The effect of locoregional therapies in patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma treated with sorafenib

    PubMed Central

    Sarpel, Umut; Spivack, John H.; Berger, Yaniv; Heskel, Marina; Aycart, Samantha N.; Sweeney, Robert; Edwards, Martin P.; Labow, Daniel M.; Kim, Edward

    2016-01-01

    Background & aims It is unknown whether the addition of locoregional therapies (LRTx) to sorafenib improves prognosis over sorafenib alone in patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The aim of this study was to assess the effect of LRTx in this population. Methods A retrospective analysis was performed of patients with advanced HCC as defined by extrahepatic metastasis, lymphadenopathy >2 cm, or gross vascular invasion. Sorafenib therapy was required for inclusion. Survival of patients who received LRTx after progression to advanced stage was compared to those who did not receive LRTx. Results Using an intention to treat analysis of 312 eligible patients, a propensity weighted proportional hazards model demonstrated LRTx as a predictor of survival (HR = 0.505, 95% CI: 0.407–0.628; P < 0.001). The greatest benefit was seen in patients with the largest tumor burden (HR = 0.305, 95% CI: 0.236–0.393; P < 0.01). Median survival in the sorafenib arm was 143 days (95% CI: 118–161) vs. 247 days (95% CI: 220–289) in the sorafenib plus LRTx arm (P < 0.001). Conclusions These results demonstrate a survival benefit with the addition of LRTx to sorafenib for patients with advanced HCC. These findings should prompt a prospective clinical trial to further assess the role of LRTx in patients with advanced HCC. PMID:27154804

  15. Session: CSP Advanced Systems -- Advanced Overview (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Mehos, M.

    2008-04-01

    The project description is: (1) it supports crosscutting activities, e.g. advanced optical materials, that aren't tied to a single CSP technology and (2) it supports the 'incubation' of new concepts in preliminary stages of investigation.

  16. The U.K. Pushes the Boundaries of Bionics: Researchers and Engineers Are Making Great Strides Toward Advanced Prosthetics' Ultimate Goal-Mimicking the Functionality of a Real Limb.

    PubMed

    Banks, Jim

    2016-01-01

    Using state-of-the-art technology, athletes at the Paralympic Games achieve great feats of physical prowess, but for most people using assistive and rehabilitative technologies (ART), even simple tasks can present huge challenges. Many do not make full use of the technology available to them because it is unreliable, uncomfortable, and nonintuitive, so researchers are pushing the envelope to create practical solutions that function like real limbs.

  17. Head Shadow, Squelch, and Summation Effects with an Energetic or Informational Masker in Bilateral and Bimodal CI Users

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pyschny, Verena; Landwehr, Markus; Hahn, Moritz; Lang-Roth, Ruth; Walger, Martin; Meister, Hartmut

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The objective of the study was to investigate the influence of noise (energetic) and speech (energetic plus informational) maskers on the head shadow (HS), squelch (SQ), and binaural summation (SU) effect in bilateral and bimodal cochlear implant (CI) users. Method: Speech recognition was measured in the presence of either a competing…

  18. A Comprehensive Evaluation of H2SO4 formation from OH and sCI pathways in high BVOC environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, S.; Seco, R.; Park, J. H.; Guenther, A. B.; Smith, J. N.; Kuang, C.; Bustillos, J. O. V.; Tota, J.; Souza, R. A. F. D.

    2014-12-01

    The recently highlighted importance of stabilized Criegee intermediates (sCI) as an oxidant for atmospheric SO2 triggered a number of studies to assess the atmospheric implications of H2SO4 formation from the sCI reaction pathway. In addition, it has not been clear why new particle formation events are not observed in the Amazon rain forest. The mostly widely speculated reason has been a very low H2SO4 level. We will present quantitative assessments of SO2 oxidation by sCI leading to the H2SO4 production using a comprehensive observational dataset from a tropical rainforest study during the GOAmazon field campaign at the T3 site in Manacapuru, Amazonas, Brazil. To our best knowledge, this is the first observation of H2SO4 and OH in Amazon and is unique for all tropical sites due to the accompanying comprehensive gas and aerosol observations such as CO, NOX, SO2, VOCs, and physical and chemical characteristics of aerosols. We will discuss observed H2SO4 levels during the GOAmazon field campaigns to demonstrate 1) H2SO4 formation potential from OH and sCI oxidation pathways by contrasting extremely clean and relatively polluted air masses and 2) the Implications of the observed H2SO4 levels in new particle formation and particle growth events.

  19. CI-KNOW: Cyberinfrastructure Knowledge Networks on the Web. A Social Network Enabled Recommender System for Locating Resources in Cyberinfrastructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, H. D.; Contractor, N. S.; Yao, Y.

    2006-12-01

    A knowledge network is a multi-dimensional network created from the interactions and interconnections among the scientists, documents, data, analytic tools, and interactive collaboration spaces (like forums and wikis) associated with a collaborative environment. CI-KNOW is a suite of software tools that leverages automated data collection, social network theories, analysis techniques and algorithms to infer an individual's interests and expertise based on their interactions and activities within a knowledge network. The CI-KNOW recommender system mines the knowledge network associated with a scientific community's use of cyberinfrastructure tools and uses relational metadata to record connections among entities in the knowledge network. Recent developments in social network theories and methods provide the backbone for a modular system that creates recommendations from relational metadata. A network navigation portlet allows users to locate colleagues, documents, data or analytic tools in the knowledge network and to explore their networks through a visual, step-wise process. An internal auditing portlet offers administrators diagnostics to assess the growth and health of the entire knowledge network. The first instantiation of the prototype CI-KNOW system is part of the Environmental Cyberinfrastructure Demonstration project at the National Center for Supercomputing Applications, which supports the activities of hydrologic and environmental science communities (CLEANER and CUAHSI) under the umbrella of the WATERS network environmental observatory planning activities (http://cleaner.ncsa.uiuc.edu). This poster summarizes the key aspects of the CI-KNOW system, highlighting the key inputs, calculation mechanisms, and output modalities.

  20. RNA helicase activity of the plum pox potyvirus CI protein expressed in Escherichia coli. Mapping of an RNA binding domain.

    PubMed Central

    Fernández, A; Laín, S; García, J A

    1995-01-01

    The plum pox potyvirus (PPV) cylindrical inclusion (CI) protein fused to the maltose binding protein (MBP) has been synthesized in Escherichia coli and purified by affinity chromatography in amylose resin. In the absence of any other viral factors, the fusion product had NTPase, RNA binding and RNA helicase activities. These in vitro activities were not affected by removal of the last 103 amino acids of the CI protein. However, other deletions in the C-terminal part of the protein, although leaving intact all the region conserved in RNA helicases, drastically impaired the ability to unwind dsRNA and to hydrolyze NTPs. A mutant protein lacking the last 225 residues retained the competence to interact with RNA. Further deletions mapped boundaries of the RNA binding domain within residues 350 and 402 of the PPV CI protein. This region includes the arginine-rich motif VI, the most carboxy terminal conserved domain of RNA helicases of the superfamily SF2. These results indicate that NTP hydrolysis is not an essential component for RNA binding of the PPV CI protein. Images PMID:7538661

  1. 78 FR 37792 - Mario Julian Martinez-Bernache, Inmate Number #95749-279, CI Big Spring, Corrections Institution...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-24

    ... Bureau of Industry and Security Mario Julian Martinez-Bernache, Inmate Number 95749-279, CI Big Spring... 15, 2012, in the U.S. District Court, Southern District of Texas, Mario Julian Martinez-Bernache (``Martinez-Bernache'') was convicted of violating Section 38 of the Arms Export Control Act (22 U.S.C....

  2. MUTAGENICITY EVALUATION OF THE COMMERCIAL PRODUCT CI DISPERSE BLUE 291 USING DIFFERENT PROTOCOLS OF THE SALMONELLA ASSAY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Textile dyes can enter the water ecosystem through wastewater discharges potentially exposing humans through the consumption of water and food. The commercial disperse dye product C.I. Disperse Blue 291 containing the aminoazobenzene 2-[(2-bromo-4,6-dinitrophenyl)azo]-5(diethylam...

  3. The Music Experiences and Attitudes Of A First Cohort of Prelingually-Deaf Adolescents and Young Adults CI Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Gfeller, Kate; Driscoll, Virginia; Smith, Rachel See; Scheperle, Christina

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the musical engagement (participation and attitude) of pediatric CI recipients who were implanted during early childhood and who have reached age 15 or older. A questionnaire was administered to a group of 31 prelingually deaf CI users who receive annual follow up services and assessment in a clinical research center. The questionnaire was used to examine involvement in and attitudes toward music in school, the community, and in the home; social affiliation (hearing, Deaf, both) and mode of communication (oral, manual, both) were also examined. Despite the technical limitations of cochlear implants in transmitting pitch, melody, and tone quality, over two thirds of this sample described music as being important or very important in their lives. A high level of past and present familial involvement in music was associated with higher levels of current involvement and importance of music in the lives of adolescent and young adult CI users. Comparisons were noted with data from prior studies of persons with hearing loss who were non-CI users. PMID:23565029

  4. Evaluation of selective NK(1) receptor antagonist CI-1021 in animal models of inflammatory and neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, M I; Field, M J; Hughes, J; Singh, L

    2000-08-01

    CI-1021 ([(2-benzofuran)-CH(2)OCO]-(R)-alpha-MeTrp-(S)-NHCH(CH (3))Ph) is a selective and competitive neurokinin-1 (NK(1)) receptor antagonist. This study examines its activity in animal models of inflammatory and neuropathic pain. In mice, CI-1021 (1-30 mg/kg, s.c.) dose dependently blocked the development of the late phase of the formalin response with a minimum effective dose (MED) of 3 mg/kg. Two chemically unrelated NK(1) receptor antagonists, CP-99,994 (3-30 mg/kg) and SR 140333 (1-100 mg/kg), also dose dependently blocked the late phase, with respective MEDs of 3 and 10 mg/kg. PD 156982, a NK(1) receptor antagonist with poor central nervous system penetration, failed to have any effect. However, when administered i. c.v., it selectively blocked the late phase of the formalin response. Chronic constrictive injury (CCI) to a sciatic nerve in the rat induced spontaneous pain, thermal and mechanical hyperalgesia, and cold, dynamic, and static allodynia. CI-1021 (10-100 mg/kg) and morphine (3 mg/kg) blocked all the responses except dynamic allodynia. Carbamazepine (100 mg/kg) was weakly effective against all the responses. Once daily administration of morphine (3 mg/kg, s. c.) in CCI rats led to the development of tolerance within 6 days. Similar administration of CI-1021 (100 mg/kg, s.c.) for up to 10 days did not induce tolerance. Moreover, the morphine tolerance failed to cross-generalize to CI-1021. CI-1021 blocked the CCI-induced hypersensitivity in the guinea pig, with a MED of 0.1 mg/kg, p.o. CI-1021 (10-100 mg/kg, s.c.) did not show sedative/ataxic action in the rat rota-rod test. It is suggested that NK(1) receptor antagonists possess a superior side effect profile to carbamazepine and morphine and may have a therapeutic use for the treatment of inflammatory and neuropathic pain.

  5. Spatial and temporal variability of spring ecosystems in Cuatro Ciénegas, MX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corman, J. R.; Ramos, J.; Childers, D. L.; Elser, J. J.

    2013-12-01

    Springs in desert ecosystems provide vital water resources and are often hotspots of biodiversity. Indeed, the Cuatro Ciénegas (CC) Valley, México, which hosts >300 springs, lakes, streams, and ponds, has the highest rate of endemism in North America. This region of the Chihuahuan Desert and its aquatic ecosystems are thought to be supported by both precipitation events and local and regional aquifers, however, the hydrologic influence and connectivity of the springs are not well understood. We have been monitoring the physicochemical characteristics of this system since 1998 and yearly since 2011. Our basin-wide study of 15 different aquatic features provides an opportunity to (1) characterize the physicochemical and nutrient landscape of the aquatic ecosystems and (2) test the assumptions of hypothesized hydrologic dynamics. The aquatic ecosystems of CC have an impressive spatial diversity in their physicochemical properties and support a locally-connected hydrologic model of the valley. Aqueous specific conductivity spanned 1.1 - 9.6 mS/cm2, with the highest values found in the eastern lobe and lowest values in the southeastern and northern regions. Dissolved organic carbon concentrations ranged over two orders of magnitude (max: 5.3 mM), with a similar spatial variability as specific conductivity. Nutrient data also showed geographic trends, however patterns differed for nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P). While total dissolved N and P were highest in the eastern lobe, the highest values of each were not found at the same sites. Rancho las Pozas had the highest N (>500 uM N), while Los Hundidos had the highest P concentrations (as high as 10.8 uM P). Atomic N:P ratios ranged from 7 - 997 across CC, with a mean of 139. Both the highest (>500) and lowest (<20) N:P ratios were found in the eastern lobe suggesting that organisms living in nearby aquatic features are experiencing different nutrient constraints. Because our temporal dataset windows the passage of

  6. Individuals with inherited chromosomally integrated human herpes virus 6 (ciHHV-6) have functionally active HHV-6 specific T-cell immunity.

    PubMed

    Strenger, V; Kayser, S; Witte, K-E; Lassner, D; Schwinger, W; Jahn, G; Urban, C; Feuchtinger, T

    2016-02-01

    To evaluate the human herpes virus 6 (HHV-6) -specific immune response in individuals with chromosomally integrated HHV-6 (ciHHV-6), we measured HHV-6-antigen-specific cytokine responses (interferon-γ, interleukin-2, tumour necrosis factor-α) in T cells by flow cytometry in 12 and 16 individuals with and without ciHHV-6, respectively. All individuals with ciHHV-6 showed HHV-6-specific T cells with higher frequencies of HHV-6-specific CD8(+) cells (0.03-14.93, median 2.15% of CD8(+) cells) compared with non-ciHHV-6 (0.0-10.67, median 0.36%, p 0.026). The observed increased HHV-6-specific functionally active responses in individuals with ciHHV-6 clearly disprove speculations on immune tolerance in ciHHV-6 and indicate clinical and immunological implications of ciHHV-6.

  7. Realisation of voicing by French-speaking CI children after long-term implant use: An acoustic study.

    PubMed

    Grandon, Bénédicte; Vilain, Anne; Lœvenbruck, Hélène; Schmerber, Sébastien; Truy, Eric

    2017-03-31

    Studies of speech production in French-speaking cochlear-implanted (CI) children are very scarce. Yet, difficulties in speech production have been shown to impact the intelligibility of these children. The goal of this study is to understand the effect of long-term use of cochlear implant on speech production, and more precisely on the coordination of laryngeal-oral gestures in stop production. The participants were all monolingual French children: 13 6;6- to 10;7-year-old CI children and 20 age-matched normally hearing (NH) children. We compared /p/, /t/, /k/, /b/, /d/ and /g/ in word-initial consonant-vowel sequences, produced in isolation in two different tasks, and we studied the effects of CI use, vowel context, task and age factors (i.e. chronological age, age at implantation and duration of implant use). Statistical analyses show a difference in voicing production between groups for voiceless consonants (shorter Voice Onset Times for CI children), with significance reached only for /k/, but no difference for voiced consonants. Our study indicates that in the long run, use of CI seems to have limited effects on the acquisition of oro-laryngeal coordination needed to produce voicing, except for specific difficulties located on velars. In a follow-up study, further acoustic analyses on vowel and fricative production by the same children reveal more difficulties, which suggest that cochlear implantation impacts frequency-based features (second formant of vowels and spectral moments of fricatives) more than durational cues (voicing).

  8. Patient age, remission status and HCT-CI in a combined score are prognostic for patients with AML undergoing allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation in CR1 and CR2.

    PubMed

    Michelis, F V; Messner, H A; Atenafu, E G; McGillis, L; Lambie, A; Uhm, J; Alam, N; Seftel, M D; Gupta, V; Kuruvilla, J; Lipton, J H; Kim, D D

    2015-11-01

    For AML, older age, advanced disease and increased hematopoietic cell transplant comorbidity index (HCT-CI) are associated with worse prognosis following allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). This single-center retrospective study investigated the influence of pre-transplant characteristics on outcomes of 387 patients undergoing allogeneic HCT for AML in CR1 and CR2. The multivariable analysis model for overall survival (OS) included age (hazard ratio (HR)=2.24 for ages 31-64 years and HR=3.23 for age ⩾65 years compared with age ⩽30 years, P=0.003), remission status (HR=1.49 for CR2 compared with CR1, P=0.005) and HCT-CI score (HR=1.47 for ⩾3 compared with <3, P=0.005). Transplant year was significantly associated with OS (P=0.001) but this did not influence the model. A weighted score was developed with age ⩽30, CR1 and HCT-CI score <3 receiving 0 points each, and CR2 and HCT-CI score ⩾3 receiving 1 point each. Ages 31-64 received 2 points, age ⩾65 received 3 points. Scores were grouped as follows: scores 0-1 (low risk, n=36), score 2 (intermediate-low risk, n=147), score 3 (intermediate-high risk, n=141) and scores 4-5 (high risk, n=63) with 3-year OS of 71%, 55%, 42% and 29% for scores 0-1, 2, 3 and 4-5, respectively (P<0.0001). The score predicted nonrelapse mortality (P=0.03) but not cumulative incidence of relapse (P=0.18). This model should be validated for the pre-HCT assessment of AML patients in CR1 and CR2.

  9. Measurement of Small Values of Hydrostatic Pressure with the Compensation of Atmospheric Pressure Influence / Pomiar Małych Wartości Ciśnienia Hydrostatycznego Z Kompensacją Wpływu Ciśnienia Atmosferycznego

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broda, Krzysztof; Filipek, Wiktor

    2013-09-01

    structure has been simplified and the measurement accuracy has increased. Znajomość rozkładu ciśnienia (lub różnicy ciśnień) determinuje opis przepływu płynu przez ośrodek porowaty. W przypadku dużych liczb Reynoldsa nie nastręcza to większych trudności, lecz dla przepływów laminarnych (tj. dla liczb Re (Bear, 1988; Duckworth, 1983; Troskolański, 1957) z zakresu 0.01 do 3) jest to praktycznie niemożliwe w oparciu o dostępne na rynku przyrządy. Przyczyny powodujące taką sytuację zostały omówione w poprzednim opracowaniu (Broda i Filipek, 2012), w którym zwrócono uwagę na trudności pomiarów związane z napięciem powierzchniowym czy włoskowatością (Adamson, 1997). Zaproponowano (Broda i Filipek, 2012) nową, autorską metodę pomiaru bardzo małych różnic ciśnień oraz skonstruowano odpowiednie stanowisko składające się z dwóch oddzielnych zbiorników pomiarowych oraz przeprowadzono pomiary. Z przeprowadzonych badań (Broda i Filipek, 2012) wynikała konieczność zastosowania stabilizacji temperatury urządzenia oraz kompensacji wpływu ciśnienia atmosferycznego na proces pomiarowy. Niniejsza publikacja przedstawia wyniki kontynuacji badań nad metodami i aparaturą do pomiaru bardzo małych różnic ciśnień z uwzględnieniem zdobytych doświadczeń, w oparciu o nowe stanowisko pomiarowe, którego zasadę działania i budowę przedstawiono na rys. 1-5, kolejno przedstawiając koncepcję wykonania pomiaru małych wartości ciśnienia hydrodynamicznego z kompensacją wpływu ciśnienia atmosferycznego rys. 1; ilustrację obrazującą stan odpowiadający przypadkowi braku przepływu płynu przez badany obiekt rys. 2; omawiając stan odpowiadający przypadkowi przepływu płynu przez badany obiekt rys. 3. Kolejno omówiono stan odpowiadający pomiarowi spadku ciśnienia na badanym obiekcie rys. 4 oraz przedstawiono metodykę pomiaru (zależności (1) - (20)). Zdjęcie stanowiska badawczego oraz jego elementów ilustruje rys. 5. W

  10. Advance Care Planning.

    PubMed

    Stallworthy, Elizabeth J

    2013-04-16

    Advance care planning should be available to all patients with chronic kidney disease, including end-stage kidney disease on renal replacement therapy. Advance care planning is a process of patient-centred discussion, ideally involving family/significant others, to assist the patient to understand how their illness might affect them, identify their goals and establish how medical treatment might help them to achieve these. An Advance Care Plan is only one useful outcome from the Advance Care Planning process, the education of patient and family around prognosis and treatment options is likely to be beneficial whether or not a plan is written or the individual loses decision making capacity at the end of life. Facilitating Advance Care Planning discussions requires an understanding of their purpose and communication skills which need to be taught. Advance Care Planning needs to be supported by effective systems to enable the discussions and any resulting Plans to be used to aid subsequent decision making.

  11. Advantages of estimating parameters of photosynthesis model by fitting A-Ci curves at multiple subsaturating light intensities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, W.; Gu, L.; Hoffman, F. M.

    2013-12-01

    The photosynthesis model of Farquhar, von Caemmerer & Berry (1980) is an important tool for predicting the response of plants to climate change. So far, the critical parameters required by the model have been obtained from the leaf-level measurements of gas exchange, namely the net assimilation of CO2 against intercellular CO2 concentration (A-Ci) curves, made at saturating light conditions. With such measurements, most points are likely in the Rubisco-limited state for which the model is structurally overparameterized (the model is also overparameterized in the TPU-limited state). In order to reliably estimate photosynthetic parameters, there must be sufficient number of points in the RuBP regeneration-limited state, which has no structural over-parameterization. To improve the accuracy of A-Ci data analysis, we investigate the potential of using multiple A-Ci curves at subsaturating light intensities to generate some important parameter estimates more accurately. Using subsaturating light intensities allow more RuBp regeneration-limited points to be obtained. In this study, simulated examples are used to demonstrate how this method can eliminate the errors of conventional A-Ci curve fitting methods. Some fitted parameters like the photocompensation point and day respiration impose a significant limitation on modeling leaf CO2 exchange. The multiple A-Ci curves fitting can also improve over the so-called Laisk (1977) method, which was shown by some recent publication to produce incorrect estimates of photocompensation point and day respiration. We also test the approach with actual measurements, along with suggested measurement conditions to constrain measured A-Ci points to maximize the occurrence of RuBP regeneration-limited photosynthesis. Finally, we use our measured gas exchange datasets to quantify the magnitude of resistance of chloroplast and cell wall-plasmalemma and explore the effect of variable mesophyll conductance. The variable mesophyll conductance

  12. Advancing Ethical Neuroscience Research.

    PubMed

    Borah, B Rashmi; Strand, Nicolle K; Chillag, Kata L

    2016-12-01

    As neuroscience research advances, researchers, clinicians, and other stakeholders will face a host of ethical challenges. The Presidential Commission for the Study of Bioethical Issues (Bioethics Commission) has published two reports that provide recommendations on how to advance research endeavors ethically. The commission addressed, among other issues, how to prioritize different types of neuroscience research and how to include research participants who have impaired consent capacity. The Bioethics Commission's recommendations provide a foundation for ethical guidelines as neuroscience research advances and progresses.

  13. Hydromechanical Advanced Coal Excavator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Estus, Jay M.; Summers, David

    1990-01-01

    Water-jet cutting reduces coal dust and its hazards. Advanced mining system utilizes full-face, hydromechanical, continuous miner. Coal excavator uses high-pressure water-jet lances, one in each of cutting heads and one in movable lance, to make cuts across top, bottom and middle height, respectively, of coal face. Wedge-shaped cutting heads advance into lower and upper cuts in turn, thereby breaking coal toward middle cut. Thrust cylinders and walking pads advance excavator toward coal face.

  14. Advanced echocardiographic techniques

    PubMed Central

    Perry, Rebecca

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Echocardiography has advanced significantly since its first clinical use. The move towards more accurate imaging and quantification has driven this advancement. In this review, we will briefly focus on three distinct but important recent advances, three‐dimensional (3D) echocardiography, contrast echocardiography and myocardial tissue imaging. The basic principles of these techniques will be discussed as well as current and future clinical applications. PMID:28191159

  15. Palbociclib and Letrozole in Advanced Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Finn, Richard S; Martin, Miguel; Rugo, Hope S; Jones, Stephen; Im, Seock-Ah; Gelmon, Karen; Harbeck, Nadia; Lipatov, Oleg N; Walshe, Janice M; Moulder, Stacy; Gauthier, Eric; Lu, Dongrui R; Randolph, Sophia; Diéras, Véronique; Slamon, Dennis J

    2016-11-17

    Background A phase 2 study showed that progression-free survival was longer with palbociclib plus letrozole than with letrozole alone in the initial treatment of postmenopausal women with estrogen-receptor (ER)-positive, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-negative advanced breast cancer. We performed a phase 3 study that was designed to confirm and expand the efficacy and safety data for palbociclib plus letrozole for this indication. Methods In this double-blind study, we randomly assigned, in a 2:1 ratio, 666 postmenopausal women with ER-positive, HER2-negative breast cancer, who had not had prior treatment for advanced disease, to receive palbociclib plus letrozole or placebo plus letrozole. The primary end point was progression-free survival, as assessed by the investigators; secondary end points were overall survival, objective response, clinical benefit response, patient-reported outcomes, pharmacokinetic effects, and safety. Results The median progression-free survival was 24.8 months (95% confidence interval [CI], 22.1 to not estimable) in the palbociclib-letrozole group, as compared with 14.5 months (95% CI, 12.9 to 17.1) in the placebo-letrozole group (hazard ratio for disease progression or death, 0.58; 95% CI, 0.46 to 0.72; P<0.001). The most common grade 3 or 4 adverse events were neutropenia (occurring in 66.4% of the patients in the palbociclib-letrozole group vs. 1.4% in the placebo-letrozole group), leukopenia (24.8% vs. 0%), anemia (5.4% vs. 1.8%), and fatigue (1.8% vs. 0.5%). Febrile neutropenia was reported in 1.8% of patients in the palbociclib-letrozole group and in none of the patients in the placebo-letrozole group. Permanent discontinuation of any study treatment as a result of adverse events occurred in 43 patients (9.7%) in the palbociclib-letrozole group and in 13 patients (5.9%) in the placebo-letrozole group. Conclusions Among patients with previously untreated ER-positive, HER2-negative advanced breast cancer, palbociclib

  16. Advancing the educational agenda.

    PubMed

    Baker, Cynthia

    2010-12-01

    This timely paper provides a thought-provoking analysis of current advanced practice nursing education in Canada. It comes at a critical juncture in the evolution of Canadian healthcare services and the redefinition of nursing roles. Increasingly, multiple sectors of society are calling for more nurses with advanced practice preparation and for a wider range of advanced practice nursing specialties. Advanced practice nurses (APNs) are being proposed as a solution to a financially overburdened national healthcare system, the increasing complexity of healthcare services, and a crisis in access to primary healthcare. Thus, governments seeking greater fiscal efficiency, medical specialists needing sophisticated collaborative support, and healthcare consumers see APNs as the way forward.

  17. The Validity and Reliability of Turkish Version of the Chemotherapy-induced Taste Alteration Scale (CiTAS).

    PubMed

    Sozeri, Elif; Kutluturkan, Sevinc

    2016-08-11

    The study was aimed to assess the validity and reliability of the Turkish version of the Chemotherapy-induced Taste Alteration Scale (CiTAS), and was conducted on adult patients receiving chemotherapy (N = 184) in the Chemotherapy Unit and Hematology Clinic (Outpatient) of a university hospital between December 2013 and May 2014. The results showed that the Cronbach's alpha coefficient (.869) was satisfactory. The alpha value was .89 for the Decline in Basic Taste subscale, .70 for Discomfort subscale, .82 for Phantogeusia and Parageusia subscale, and .72 for General Taste Alterations subscale. The coefficients of the relationship between test-retest reliability results were significantly high (r = .939, n = 28). The Turkish version of the CiTAS was a sufficient and suitable tool in evaluating the taste alterations associated with chemotherapy.

  18. On the systematic improvement of fixed-node diffusion quantum Monte Carlo energies using pair natural orbital CI guide functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lüchow, Arne; Fink, Reinhold F.

    2000-11-01

    While the diffusion quantum Monte Carlo method (DQMC) is capable, in principle, of calculating exact ground state energies, in practice the fixed-node (FN) approximation leads to node location errors which make FN-DQMC energies upper bounds. It is shown that the node location error can be reduced systematically and without prohibitive increase of computer time requirements by using nodes derived from pair natural orbital CI wave functions (PNO-CI). The reduction is demonstrated for the N atom and the molecules N2 and H2O. With the DQMC/PNOCI method, we obtain a variational energy of -109.520(3) H for the N2 molecule and -76.429(1) H for the ground state of the water molecule which is only 22 and 9 mH above the estimated nonrelativistic ground state energy, respectively.

  19. Enrichment of the amino acid L-isovaline by aqueous alteration on CI and CM meteorite parent bodies.

    PubMed

    Glavin, Daniel P; Dworkin, Jason P

    2009-04-07

    The distribution and enantiomeric composition of the 5-carbon (C(5)) amino acids found in CI-, CM-, and CR-type carbonaceous meteorites were investigated by using liquid chromatography fluorescence detection/TOF-MS coupled with o-phthaldialdehyde/N-acetyl-L-cysteine derivatization. A large L-enantiomeric excess (ee) of the alpha-methyl amino acid isovaline was found in the CM meteorite Murchison (L(ee) = 18.5 +/- 2.6%) and the CI meteorite Orgueil (L(ee) = 15.2 +/- 4.0%). The measured value for Murchison is the largest enantiomeric excess in any meteorite reported to date, and the Orgueil measurement of an isovaline excess has not been reported previously for this or any CI meteorite. The L-isovaline enrichments in these two carbonaceous meteorites cannot be the result of interference from other C(5) amino acid isomers present in the samples, analytical biases, or terrestrial amino acid contamination. We observed no L-isovaline enrichment for the most primitive unaltered Antarctic CR meteorites EET 92042 and QUE 99177. These results are inconsistent with UV circularly polarized light as the primary mechanism for L-isovaline enrichment and indicate that amplification of a small initial isovaline asymmetry in Murchison and Orgueil occurred during an extended aqueous alteration phase on the meteorite parent bodies. The large asymmetry in isovaline and other alpha-dialkyl amino acids found in altered CI and CM meteorites suggests that amino acids delivered by asteroids, comets, and their fragments would have biased the Earth's prebiotic organic inventory with left-handed molecules before the origin of life.

  20. Simultaneous Determination of Cyanide and Thiocyanate in Plasma by Chemical Ionization Gas Chromatography Mass-Spectrometry (CI-GC-MS)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-04

    ORIGINAL PAPER Simultaneous determination of cyanide and thiocyanate in plasma by chemical ionization gas chromatography mass-spectrometry (CI-GC-MS...chemical ioniza- tion gas chromatography-mass spectrometry was developed for the simultaneous determination of cyanide and thiocya- nate in plasma...Sample preparation for this analysis required essentially one-step by combining the reaction of cyanide and thiocyanate with pentafluorobenzyl bromide

  1. The Effects of Thermal Metamorphism on the Amino Acid Content of the CI-Like Chondrite Y-86029

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burton, A. S.; Grunsfeld, S.; Glavin, D. P.; Dworkin, J. P.

    2014-01-01

    Carbonaceous chondrites con-tain a diverse suite of amino acids that varies in abundance and structural diversity depending on the degree of aqueous alteration and thermal histo-ry that the parent body experienced [1 - 3]. We recently determined the amino acid contents of several fragments of the Sutter's Mill CM2 chon-drite [4]. In contrast with most other CM2 chon-drites, the Sutter's Mill meteorites showed minimal evidence for the presence of indigenous amino acids. A notable difference between the Sutter's Mill meteorites and other CM2 chondrites are that the Sutter's Mill stones were heated to tempera-tures of 150 - 400 C [4], whereas most other CM2 chondrites do not show evidence for thermal met-amorphism [5]. Because empirical studies have shown that amino acids rapidly degrade in aqueous solutions above 150 C and the presence of miner-als accelerates this degradation [6], a plausible explanation for the lack of amino acids observed in the Sutter's Mill meteorites is that they were destroyed during metamorphic alteration. Fewer CI chondrites have been analyzed for amino acids because only a small number of these meteorites have been recovered. Nevertheless, indigenous amino acids have been reported in the CI chondrites Ivuna and Orgueil [7]. Here we report on the amino acid analysis of the CI-like chondrite, Yamato 86029 (Y-86029; sample size of 110 mg). Just as the Sutter's Mill meteorites were thermally metamporphosed CM2 chondrites, Y-86029 has experienced thermal metamorphism at higher temperatures than Orgueil and Ivuna (normal CI chondrites) experienced, possibly up to 600 C [8].

  2. Transforming growth factor β (CiTGF-β) gene expression is induced in the inflammatory reaction of Ciona intestinalis.

    PubMed

    Vizzini, Aiti; Di Falco, Felicia; Parrinello, Daniela; Sanfratello, Maria Antonietta; Cammarata, Matteo

    2016-02-01

    Transforming growth factor (TGF-β) is a well-known component of a regulatory cytokines superfamily that has pleiotropic functions in a broad range of cell types and is involved, in vertebrates, in numerous physiological and pathological processes. In the current study, we report on Ciona intestinalis molecular characterisation and expression of a transforming growth factor β homologue (CiTGF-β). The gene organisation, phylogenetic tree and modelling supported the close relationship with the mammalian TGF suggesting that the C. intestinalis TGF-β gene shares a common ancestor in the chordate lineages. Functionally, real-time PCR analysis showed that CiTGF-β was transcriptionally upregulated in the inflammatory process induced by LPS inoculation, suggesting that is involved in the first phase and significant in the secondary phase of the inflammatory response in which cell differentiation occurs. In situ hybridisation assays revealed that the genes transcription was upregulated in the pharynx, the main organ of the ascidian immune system, and expressed by cluster of hemocytes inside the pharynx vessels. These data supported the view that CiTGF-β is a potential molecule in immune defence systems against bacterial infection.

  3. Ci antagonizes Hippo signaling in the somatic cells of the ovary to drive germline stem cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Li, Chaoyi; Kan, Lijuan; Chen, Yan; Zheng, Xiudeng; Li, Weini; Zhang, Wenxin; Cao, Lei; Lin, Xiaohui; Ji, Shanming; Huang, Shoujun; Zhang, Guoqiang; Liu, Xiaohui; Tao, Yi; Wu, Shian; Chen, Dahua

    2015-10-01

    Many stem cell populations are tightly regulated by their local microenvironment (niche), which comprises distinct types of stromal cells. However, little is known about mechanisms by which niche subgroups coordinately determine the stem cell fate. Here we identify that Yki, the key Hippo pathway component, is essential for escort cell (EC) function in promoting germline differentiation in Drosophila ovary. We found that Hedgehog (Hh) signals emanating primarily from cap cells support the function of ECs, where Cubitus interruptus (Ci), the Hh signaling effector, acts to inhibit Hippo kinase cascade activity. Mechanistically, we found that Ci competitively interacts with Hpo and impairs the Hpo-Wts signaling complex formation, thereby promoting Yki nuclear localization. The actions of Ci ensure effective Yki signaling to antagonize Sd/Tgi/Vg-mediated default repression in ECs. This study uncovers a mechanism explaining how subgroups of niche cells coordinate to determine the stem cell fate via Hh-Hippo signaling crosstalk, and enhances our understanding of mechanistic regulations of the oncogenic Yki/YAP signaling.

  4. Quantum entanglement of helium-like systems with varying-Z: compact state-of-the-art CI wave functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-Rosa, S.; Esquivel, R. O.; Plastino, A. R.; Dehesa, J. S.

    2015-09-01

    In this work we have performed state-of-the-art configuration-interaction (CI) calculations to determine the linear and von Neumann entanglement entropies for the helium-like systems with varying nuclear charge Z in the range 1≤slant Z≤slant 10. The focus of the work resides on determining accurate entanglement values for 2-electron systems with the lowest computational cost through compact CI-wave functions. Our entanglement results for the helium atom fully agree with the results obtained with higher quality wave functions of the Kinoshita type (Dehesa [5]). We find that the correlation energy is linearly related to the entanglement measures associated with the linear and von Neumann entropies of the single-particle reduced density matrizes, which sheds new light on the physical implications of entanglement in helium-like systems. Moreover, we report CI-wave-function-based benchmark results for the entanglement values for all members of the helium isoelectronic series with an accuracy similar to that of Kinoshita-type wave functions. Finally, we give parametric expressions of the linear and von Neumann entanglement measures for two-electron systems as Z varies from 1 to 10.

  5. Phylogeography and conservation genetics of a distinct lineage of sunfish in the Cuatro Ciénegas valley of Mexico.

    PubMed

    Coghill, Lyndon M; Hulsey, C Darrin; Chaves-Campos, Johel; García de Leon, Francisco J; Johnson, Steven G

    2013-01-01

    The valley of Cuatro Ciénegas, an aquatic oasis located in the Mexican Chihuahuan Desert, exhibits the highest level of endemism in North America and is a Mexican National Protected Area. However, little is known about the evolutionary distinctiveness of several vertebrate species present in the Cuatro Ciénegas valley. We conducted a phylogeographic study using mitochondrial haplotypes from the centrarchid fish Lepomis megalotis to determine if the populations found within the valley were evolutionarily distinct from populations outside the valley. We also examined if there was evidence of unique haplotypes of this sunfish within the valley. Genetic divergence of L. megalotis suggests populations within the valley are evolutionarily unique when compared to L. megalotis outside the valley. Significant mitochondrial sequence divergence was also discovered between L. megalotis populations on either side of the Sierra de San Marcos that bisects the valley. Our results reinforce previous studies that suggest the organisms occupying aquatic habitats not only within Cuatro Ciénegas but also in each of the two lobes of the valley generally deserve independent consideration during management decisions.

  6. A comparison between coherent and noncoherent mobile systems in large Doppler shift, delay spread, and C/I environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feher, Kamilo

    1993-01-01

    The performance and implementation complexity of coherent and of noncoherent QPSK and GMSK modulation/demodulation techniques in a complex mobile satellite systems environment, including large Doppler shift, delay spread, and low C/I, are compared. We demonstrate that for large f(sub d)T(sub b) products, where f(sub d) is the Doppler shift and T(sub b) is the bit duration, noncoherent (discriminator detector or differential demodulation) systems have a lower BER floor than their coherent counterparts. For significant delay spreads, e.g., tau(sub rms) greater than 0.4 T(sub b), and low C/I, coherent systems outperform noncoherent systems. However, the synchronization time of coherent systems is longer than that of noncoherent systems. Spectral efficiency, overall capacity, and related hardware complexity issues of these systems are also analyzed. We demonstrate that coherent systems have a simpler overall architecture (IF filter implementation-cost versus carrier recovery) and are more robust in an RF frequency drift environment. Additionally, the prediction tools, computer simulations, and analysis of coherent systems is simpler. The threshold or capture effect in low C/I interference environment is critical for noncoherent discriminator based systems. We conclude with a comparison of hardware architectures of coherent and of noncoherent systems, including recent trends in commercial VLSI technology and direct baseband to RF transmit, RF to baseband (0-IF) receiver implementation strategies.

  7. A Comparison of Ci/Gli Activity as Regulated by Sufu in Drosophila and Mammalian Hedgehog Response

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chi; Guo, Yurong; Beachy, Philip A.

    2015-01-01

    Suppressor of fused (Su(fu)/Sufu), one of the most conserved components of the Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway, binds Ci/Gli transcription factors and impedes activation of target gene expression. In Drosophila, the Su(fu) mutation has a minimal phenotype, and we show here that Ci transcriptional activity in large part is regulated independently of Su(fu) by other pathway components. Mutant mice lacking Sufu in contrast show excessive pathway activity and die as embryos with patterning defects. Here we show that in cultured cells Hh stimulation can augment transcriptional activity of a Gli2 variant lacking Sufu interaction and, surprisingly, that regulation of Hh pathway targets is nearly normal in the neural tube of Sufu-/- mutant embryos that also lack Gli1 function. Some degree of Hh-induced transcriptional activation of Ci/Gli thus can occur independently of Sufu in both flies and mammals. We further note that Sufu loss can also reduce Hh induction of high-threshold neural tube fates, such as floor plate, suggesting a possible positive pathway role for Sufu. PMID:26271100

  8. Structural and dynamics studies of a truncated variant of CI repressor from bacteriophage TP901-1

    PubMed Central

    Rasmussen, Kim Krighaar; Frandsen, Kristian E. H.; Boeri Erba, Elisabetta; Pedersen, Margit; Varming, Anders K.; Hammer, Karin; Kilstrup, Mogens; Thulstrup, Peter W.; Blackledge, Martin; Jensen, Malene Ringkjøbing; Lo Leggio, Leila

    2016-01-01

    The CI repressor from the temperate bacteriophage TP901-1 consists of two folded domains, an N-terminal helix-turn-helix DNA-binding domain (NTD) and a C-terminal oligomerization domain (CTD), which we here suggest to be further divided into CTD1 and CTD2. Full-length CI is a hexameric protein, whereas a truncated version, CI∆58, forms dimers. We identify the dimerization region of CI∆58 as CTD1 and determine its secondary structure to be helical both within the context of CI∆58 and in isolation. To our knowledge this is the first time that a helical dimerization domain has been found in a phage repressor. We also precisely determine the length of the flexible linker connecting the NTD to the CTD. Using electrophoretic mobility shift assays and native mass spectrometry, we show that CI∆58 interacts with the OL operator site as one dimer bound to both half-sites, and with much higher affinity than the isolated NTD domain thus demonstrating cooperativity between the two DNA binding domains. Finally, using small angle X-ray scattering data and state-of-the-art ensemble selection techniques, we delineate the conformational space sampled by CI∆58 in solution, and we discuss the possible role that the dynamics play in CI-repressor function. PMID:27403839

  9. [Research on NIR-CI parameters optimization of chlorpheniramine maleate tablets based on binary image and statistical measurement].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Lu-Wei; Wu, Zhi-Sheng; Shi, Xin-Yuan; Xu, Man-Fei; Zhang, Qiao; Qiao, Yan-Jiang

    2014-10-01

    The optimization method was established to investigate the effect of near infrared chemical imaging (NIR-CI) detection parameters on hyperspectral data quality. In order to optimize the detection parameters, chlorpheniramine maleate (CPM) tablets were chosen as examples and the L9(3(4)) orthogonal-test design was adopted to research the effects of spectral resolution, spatial resolution, scan times and scan height. Binary image coupled with statistical measurement was proposed to quantitatively analyze hyperspectral data and determine the content of CPM on the tablet surface. High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) was used as reference method for accurate CPM determination. The absolute value of the difference between CPM con- tents obtained from NIR-CI and HPLC was chosen as index. The result demonstrated that the optimum parameters for acquiring hyperspectral data were: 25 μm x 25 μm (spatial resolution), 5340 (scan height, the value of Z, precise focus), 16 cm(-1) (spectral resolution) and 16 (scan times). The influence of scan height on hyperspectral data was firstly investigated. The optimized parameters could be applied to CPM tablets and other drugs for NIR-CI data acquisition and methodology establishment.

  10. Transfer of Kv3.1 voltage sensor features to the isolated Ci-VSP voltage-sensing domain.

    PubMed

    Mishina, Yukiko; Mutoh, Hiroki; Knöpfel, Thomas

    2012-08-22

    Membrane proteins that respond to changes in transmembrane voltage are critical in regulating the function of living cells. The voltage-sensing domains (VSDs) of voltage-gated ion channels are extensively studied to elucidate voltage-sensing mechanisms, and yet many aspects of their structure-function relationship remain elusive. Here, we transplanted homologous amino acid motifs from the tetrameric voltage-activated potassium channel Kv3.1 to the monomeric VSD of Ciona intestinalis voltage-sensitive phosphatase (Ci-VSP) to explore which portions of Kv3.1 subunits depend on the tetrameric structure of Kv channels and which properties of Kv3.1 can be transferred to the monomeric Ci-VSP scaffold. By attaching fluorescent proteins to these chimeric VSDs, we obtained an optical readout to establish membrane trafficking and kinetics of voltage-dependent structural rearrangements. We found that motifs extending from 10 to roughly 100 amino acids can be readily transplanted from Kv3.1 into Ci-VSP to form engineered VSDs that efficiently incorporate into the plasma membrane and sense voltage. Some of the functional features of these engineered VSDs are reminiscent of Kv3.1 channels, indicating that these properties do not require interactions between Kv subunits or between the voltage sensing and the pore domains of Kv channels.

  11. Low-lying π∗ resonances associated with cyano groups: A CAP/SAC-CI study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehara, Masahiro; Kanazawa, Yuki; Sommerfeld, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    The complex absorbing potential (CAP)/symmetry-adapted cluster-configuration interaction (SAC-CI) method is applied to low-lying π∗ resonance states of molecules containing one or two cyano (CN) groups. Benchmark calculations are carried out comparing the non-variational and approximate variational approach of SAC-CI and studying the selection threshold of operators. Experimental resonance positions from electron transmission spectroscopy (ETS) are reproduced provided the anticipated deviations due to vibronic effects are taken into account. Moreover, the calculated positions and widths agree well with those obtained in previous electron scattering calculations for HCN, CH3CN and their isonitriles. Based on our results, we suggest a reassignment of the experimental ETS of fumaronitrile and malononitrile. Our present results demonstrate again that the CAP/SAC-CI method reliably predicts low-lying π∗ resonances, and regarding the total numbers of molecules and resonances investigated, it is fair to say that it is presently the most extensively used high-level method in the temporary anion field.

  12. The effects of parent-body hydrothermal heating on amino acid abundances in CI-like chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burton, Aaron S.; Grunsfeld, Sarah; Elsila, Jamie E.; Glavin, Daniel P.; Dworkin, Jason P.

    2014-09-01

    We determined the amino acid abundances and enantiomeric compositions of the Antarctic CI1 carbonaceous chondrites Yamato (Y)-86029 and Y-980115, as well as the Ivuna and Orgueil CI1 carbonaceous chondrites by liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection and time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Y-86029 and Y-980115 both show evidence of parent-body heating (500-600 °C) in addition to aqueous alteration, while Ivuna and Orgueil only show evidence for aqueous alteration. In contrast to Ivuna and Orgueil, which each contain ˜70 nmol/g of amino acids in acid-hydrolyzed, water extracts, both heated Yamato CI meteorites contain only low levels of amino acids that were primarily L-enantiomers of proteinogenic amino acids, indicating that they are likely to be terrestrial in origin. Because indigenous amino acids have been found in meteorites that have experienced metamorphic temperatures of >1000 °C with only minimal aqueous alteration, heating alone is not sufficient to explain the lack of amino acids in Y-86029 and Y-980115. Rather, our data suggest that the combination of heating and aqueous alteration has a profound destructive effect on amino acids in meteorites. This finding has implications for the origins of amino acids and other molecules in the early evolution of our solar system.

  13. Cyberknife treatment for advanced or terminal stage hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Hiroyuki; Yoshida, Hideo; Taniguch, Hiroyoshi; Nomura, Ryutaro; Sato, Kengo; Suzuki, Ichiro; Nakata, Ryo

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the safety and efficacy of the Cyberknife treatment for patients with advanced or terminal stage hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). METHODS: Patients with HCC with extrahepatic metastasis or vascular or bile duct invasion were enrolled between May 2011 and June 2015. The Cyberknife was used to treat each lesion. Treatment response scores were based on Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors v1.1. The trends of tumor markers, including alpha fetoprotein (AFP) and proteins induced by vitamin K absence II (PIVKA II) were assessed. Prognostic factors for tumor response and tumor markers were evaluated with Fisher’s exact test and a logistic regression model. Survival was evaluated with the Kaplan-Meier method and multivariate analysis was performed using the Cox proportional hazards model. RESULTS: Sixty-five patients with 95 lesions were enrolled. Based on the Barcelona Clinic Liver Cancer classification, all patients were either in the advanced or terminal stage of the disease. The target lesions were as follows: 52 were bone metastasis; 9, lung metastasis; 7, brain metastasis; 9, portal vein invasion; 4, hepatic vein invasion; 4, bile duct invasion; and 10 other lesion types. The response rate and disease control rate were 34% and 53%, respectively. None of the clinical factors correlated significantly with tumor response. Fiducial marker implantation was associated with better control of both AFP (HR = 0.152; 95%CI: 0.026-0.887; P = 0.036) and PIVKA II (HR = 0.035; 95%CI: 0.003-0.342; P = 0.004). The median survival time was 9 mo (95%CI: 5-15 mo). Terminal stage disease (HR = 9.809; 95%CI: 2.589-37.17, P < 0.001) and an AFP of more than 400 ng/mL (HR = 2.548; 95%CI: 1.070-6.068, P = 0.035) were associated with worse survival. A radiation dose higher than 30 Gy (HR = 0.274; 95%CI: 0.093-0.7541, P = 0.012) was associated with better survival. In the 52 cases of bone metastasis, 36 patients (69%) achieved pain relief. One patient had cerebral

  14. Kansas Advanced Semiconductor Project

    SciTech Connect

    Baringer, P.; Bean, A.; Bolton, T.; Horton-Smith, G.; Maravin, Y.; Ratra, B.; Stanton, N.; von Toerne, E.; Wilson, G.

    2007-09-21

    KASP (Kansas Advanced Semiconductor Project) completed the new Layer 0 upgrade for D0, assumed key electronics projects for the US CMS project, finished important new physics measurements with the D0 experiment at Fermilab, made substantial contributions to detector studies for the proposed e+e- international linear collider (ILC), and advanced key initiatives in non-accelerator-based neutrino physics.

  15. Drilling at Advanced Levels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Case, Doug

    1977-01-01

    Instances where drilling is useful for advanced language are discussed. Several types of drills are recommended, with the philosophy that advanced level drills should have a lighter style and be regarded as a useful, occasional means of practicing individual new items. (CHK)

  16. Advanced Engineering Fibers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edie, Dan D.; Dunham, Michael G.

    1987-01-01

    Describes Clemson University's Advanced Engineered Fibers Laboratory, which was established to provide national leadership and expertise in developing the processing equipment and advance fibers necessary for the chemical, fiber, and textile industries to enter the composite materials market. Discusses some of the laboratory's activities in…

  17. Advanced Ceramic Armor Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-05-11

    materials, toughened alumina, fiber -reinforced glass matrix composites, and multilayer-gradient materials for ballistic testing. Fabrication and...material systems: Multilayer advanced armor materials consisting of a hard ceramic faceplate bonded to a graphite fiber -reinforced glass matrix...toughened alumina, and fiber - applied studies of advanced reinforced ceramic matrix glass and glass -ceramic composites for ballistic testing. technologies

  18. Advances in Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Vacanti, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Nearly 30 years ago, we reported on a concept now known as Tissue Engineering. Here, we report on some of the advances in this now thriving area of research. In particular, significant advances in tissue engineering of skin, liver, spinal cord, blood vessels, and other areas are discussed. PMID:26711689

  19. Advanced Manufacturing Technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fikes, John

    2016-01-01

    Advanced Manufacturing Technologies (AMT) is developing and maturing innovative and advanced manufacturing technologies that will enable more capable and lower-cost spacecraft, launch vehicles and infrastructure to enable exploration missions. The technologies will utilize cutting edge materials and emerging capabilities including metallic processes, additive manufacturing, composites, and digital manufacturing. The AMT project supports the National Manufacturing Initiative involving collaboration with other government agencies.

  20. Advanced Network Security Project

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-12-01

    network. The network observed was the Abilene network of the University Consortium for Advanced Internet Development (UCAID), often known as “ Internet2 ...for Advanced Internet Development (UCAID), often known as “ Internet2 .” This contract was heavily operational in nature, as opposed to a contract

  1. Advances in dental materials.

    PubMed

    Fleming, Garry J P

    2014-05-01

    The dental market is replete with new resorative materials marketed on the basis of novel technological advances in materials chemistry, bonding capability or reduced operator time and/or technique sensitivity. This paper aims to consider advances in current materials, with an emphasis on their role in supporting contemporary clinical practice.

  2. Advanced Life Support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chambliss, Joe

    2004-01-01

    Viewgraphs on Advanced Life Support (ALS) Systems are presented. The topics include: 1) Fundamental Need for Advanced Life Support; 2) ALS organization; 3) Requirements and Rationale; 4) Past Integrated tests; 5) The need for improvements in life support systems; 6) ALS approach to meet exploration goals; 7) ALS Projects showing promise to meet exploration goals; and 9) GRC involvement in ALS.

  3. THE CHANGE OF THE ORBITAL PERIODS ACROSS ERUPTIONS AND THE EJECTED MASS FOR RECURRENT NOVAE CI AQUILAE AND U SCORPII

    SciTech Connect

    Schaefer, Bradley E.

    2011-12-01

    I report on the cumulative results from a program started 24 years ago designed to measure the orbital period change of recurrent novae (RNe) across an eruption. The goal is to use the orbital period change to measure the mass ejected during each eruption as the key part of trying to measure whether the RNe white dwarfs are gaining or losing mass over an entire eruption cycle, and hence whether they can be progenitors for Type Ia supernovae. This program has now been completed for two eclipsing RNe: CI Aquilae (CI Aql) across its eruption in 2000 and U Scorpii (U Sco) across its eruption in 1999. For CI Aql, I present 78 eclipse times from 1991 to 2009 (including four during the tail of the 2000 eruption) plus two eclipses from 1926 and 1935. For U Sco, I present 67 eclipse times, including 46 times during quiescence from 1989 to 2009, plus 21 eclipse times in the tails of the 1945, 1999, and 2010 eruptions. The eclipse times during the tails of eruptions are systematically and substantially shifted with respect to the ephemerides from the eclipses in quiescence, with this being caused by shifts of the center of light during the eruption. These eclipse times are plotted on an O - C diagram and fitted to models with a steady period change ( P-dot ) between eruptions (caused by, for example, conservative mass transfer) plus an abrupt period change ({Delta}P) at the time of eruption. The primary uncertainty arises from the correlation between {Delta}P with P-dot , such that a more negative P-dot makes for a more positive {Delta}P. For CI Aql, the best fit is {Delta}P = -3.7{sup +9.2}{sub -7.3} Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -7}. For U Sco, the best fit is {Delta}P = (+ 43 {+-} 69) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -7} days. These period changes can directly give a dynamical measure of the mass ejected (M{sub ejecta}) during each eruption with negligible sensitivity to the stellar masses and no uncertainty from distances. For CI Aql, the 1{sigma} upper limit is M{sub ejecta} < 10

  4. Advanced Chemical Propulsion Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodcock, Gordon; Byers, Dave; Alexander, Leslie A.; Krebsbach, Al

    2004-01-01

    A study was performed of advanced chemical propulsion technology application to space science (Code S) missions. The purpose was to begin the process of selecting chemical propulsion technology advancement activities that would provide greatest benefits to Code S missions. Several missions were selected from Code S planning data, and a range of advanced chemical propulsion options was analyzed to assess capabilities and benefits re these missions. Selected beneficial applications were found for higher-performing bipropellants, gelled propellants, and cryogenic propellants. Technology advancement recommendations included cryocoolers and small turbopump engines for cryogenic propellants; space storable propellants such as LOX-hydrazine; and advanced monopropellants. It was noted that fluorine-bearing oxidizers offer performance gains over more benign oxidizers. Potential benefits were observed for gelled propellants that could be allowed to freeze, then thawed for use.

  5. [Technical advancements in cochlear implants : State of the art].

    PubMed

    Büchner, A; Gärtner, L

    2017-03-16

    Twenty years ago, cochlear implants (CI) were indicated only in cases of profound hearing loss or complete deafness. While from today's perspective the technology was clumsy and provided patients with only limited speech comprehension in quiet scenarios, successive advances in CI technology and the consequent substantial hearing improvements over time have since then resulted in continuous relaxation of indication criteria toward residual hearing. While achievements in implant and processor electronics have been one key factor for the ever-improving hearing performance, development of electro-acoustic CI systems-together with atraumatic implantation concepts-has led to enormous improvements in patients with low-frequency residual hearing. Manufactures have designed special processors with integrated hearing aid components for this patient group, which are capable of conveying acoustic and electric stimulation. A further milestone in improvement of hearing in challenging listening environments was the adoption of signal enhancement algorithms and assistive listening devices from the hearing aid industry. This article gives an overview of the current state of the art in the abovementioned areas of CI technology.

  6. Recent advances in oesophageal diseases.

    PubMed

    Al Dulaimi, David

    2014-01-01

    Dong Y, Qi B, Feng XY, Jiang CM. Meta-analysis of Barrett's esophagus in China. World J Gastroenterol 2013;19(46):8770-8779 The disease pattern of Barrett's esophagus (BE) in China is poorly characterised particularly in comparison with other developed countries. This meta-analysis of 3873 cases of BE collated from 69 clinical studies conducted in 25 provinces between 2000 and 2011 investigated the epidemiology and characteristics of BE in China compared to Western countries. The total endoscopic detection rate of BE was 1.0% (95%CI: 0.1%-1.8%) with an average patient age of 49.07 ± 5.09 years, lower than many Western countries.The authors postulate this may be attributed to environmental risk factor variation, distinct genetics and different medical practice including diagnostic criteria for BE and expertise in endoscopy. This study identified a 1.781 male predominancefor BE in China, consistent with Western reports. Short-segment BE accounted for 80.3% of cases with island type and cardiac type the most common endoscopic (44.8%) and histological (40.0%) manifestations respectively. Of the 1283 BE cases followed up for three to 36 months the incidence of esophageal cancer was 1.418 per 1000 person-years, lower than the incidence reported in Western countries. Lee HS, Jeon SW. Barrett esophagus in Asia: same disease with different pattern. ClinEndosc 2014;47(1):15-22 Barrett's esophagus (BE) is a common, pre-cancerous condition characterised by intestinal metaplasia of squamous esophageal epithelium usually attributed to chronic gastric acid exposure. This review article explores important differences in the disease pattern of BE between Asian and the Western countries. Overall the prevalence of BE is lower in Asia compared to the West with a greater proportion of short-segment type. The authors identify great variability in the endoscopic and pathologic diagnostic criteria for BE. Many of the studies in Asian countries did not use a standardised four

  7. Advanced electron microscopy for advanced materials.

    PubMed

    Van Tendeloo, Gustaaf; Bals, Sara; Van Aert, Sandra; Verbeeck, Jo; Van Dyck, Dirk

    2012-11-08

    The idea of this Review is to introduce newly developed possibilities of advanced electron microscopy to the materials science community. Over the last decade, electron microscopy has evolved into a full analytical tool, able to provide atomic scale information on the position, nature, and even the valency atoms. This information is classically obtained in two dimensions (2D), but can now also be obtained in 3D. We show examples of applications in the field of nanoparticles and interfaces.

  8. The circular RNA ciRS-7 promotes APP and BACE1 degradation in an NF-κB-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Shi, Zhemin; Chen, Ting; Yao, Qingbin; Zheng, Lina; Zhang, Zhen; Wang, Jingzhao; Hu, Zhimei; Cui, Hongmei; Han, Yawei; Han, Xiaohui; Zhang, Kun; Hong, Wei

    2017-04-01

    The aberrant accumulation of β-amyloid peptide (Aβ) in the brain is a key feature of Alzheimer's disease (AD), and enhanced cleavage of β-amyloid precursor protein (APP) by β-site APP-cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1) has a major causative role in AD. Despite their prominence in AD pathogenesis, the regulation of BACE1 and APP is incompletely understood. In this study, we report that the circular RNA circular RNA sponge for miR-7 (ciRS-7) has an important role in regulating BACE1 and APP protein levels. Previous studies have shown that ciRS-7, which is highly expressed in the human brain, is down-regulated in the brain of people with AD but the relevance of this finding was not clear. We have found that ciRS-7 is not involved in the regulation of APP and BACE1 gene expression, but instead reduces the protein levels of APP and BACE1 by promoting their degradation via the proteasome and lysosome. Consequently, overexpression of ciRS-7 reduces the generation of Aβ, indicating a potential neuroprotective role of ciRS-7. Our data also suggest that ciRS-7 modulates APP and BACE1 levels in a nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB)-dependent manner: ciRS-7 expression inhibits translation of NF-κB and induces its cytoplasmic localization, thus derepressing expression of UCHL1, which promotes APP and BACE1 degradation. Additionally, we demonstrated that APP reduces the level of ciRS-7, revealing a mutual regulation of ciRS-7 and APP. Taken together, our data provide a molecular mechanism implicating reduced ciRS-7 expression in AD, suggesting that ciRS-7 may represent a useful target in the development of therapeutic strategies for AD.

  9. Advanced biostack experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buecker, H.

    1981-01-01

    The Advanced Biostack Experiment is described. The objectives are: (1) to confirm, complement, and enlarge the information obtained from the previous experiments by applying improved and advanced methods of localization and physical and biological evaluation, performing advanced experiments based on these data, and including additional biological specimens and additional radiation detectors; (2) to determine the biological importance of nuclear disintegration stars; (3) to determine the interference of HZE particle induced effects with those of other space flight factors (e.g., weightlessness); and (4) to determine the distribution of HZE particles and of disintegration stars at different locations inside the module and on the pallet.

  10. Advanced Computer Typography.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-12-01

    ADVANCED COMPUTER TYPOGRAPHY .(U) DEC 81 A V HERSHEY UNCLASSIFIED NPS012-81-005 M MEEEIEEEII IIUJIL15I.4 MICROCQP RE SO.JjI ON ft R NPS012-81-005...NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL 0Monterey, California DTIC SELECTEWA APR 5 1982 B ADVANCED COMPUTER TYPOGRAPHY by A. V. HERSHEY December 1981 OApproved for...Subtitle) S. TYPE Or REPORT & PERIOD COVERED Final ADVANCED COMPUTER TYPOGRAPHY Dec 1979 - Dec 1981 S. PERFORMING ORG. REPORT NUMBER 7. AUTHOR(s) S CONTRACT

  11. Advanced Electronic Technology.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-11-15

    It AD AObS 062 MASSACHUSETTS INST OF TECH LEXINGTON LINCOLN LAB F/S 9/S ADVANCED ELECTRONIC TECHNOLOGY .(U) NOV 78 A J MCLAUGHLIN. A L MCWHORTER...T I T U T E OF T E C H N O L O G Y L I N C O L N L A B O R A T O R Y ADVANCED ELECTRONIC TECHNOLOGY QUARTERLY TECKNICAL SUMMAR Y REPORT TO THE AIR...Division 8 (Solid State) on the Advanced Electronic Technology Program. Hi

  12. Advanced information society(7)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiba, Toshihiro

    Various threats are hiding in advanced informationalized society. As we see car accident problems in motorization society light aspects necessarily accompy shady ones. Under the changing circumstances of advanced informationalization added values of information has become much higher. It causes computer crime, hacker, computer virus to come to the surface. In addition it can be said that infringement of intellectual property and privacy are threats brought by advanced information. Against these threats legal, institutional and insurance measures have been progressed, and newly security industry has been established. However, they are not adequate individually or totally. The future vision should be clarified, and countermeasures according to the visions have to be considered.

  13. The ADvanced SEParation (ADSEP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    The ADvanced SEParation (ADSEP) commercial payload is making use of major advances in separation technology: The Phase Partitioning Experiment (PPE); the Micorencapsulation experiment; and the Hemoglobin Separation Experiment (HSE). Using ADSEP, commercial researchers will attempt to determine the partition coefficients for model particles in a two-phase system. With this information, researchers can develop a higher resolution, more effective cell isolation procedure that can be used for many different types of research and for improved health care. The advanced separation technology is already being made available for use in ground-based laboratories.

  14. Evolution of Ciona intestinalis Tumor necrosis factor alpha (CiTNFα): Polymorphism, tissues expression, and 3D modeling.

    PubMed

    Vizzini, Aiti; Giovanna, Parisi Maria; Cardinale, Laura; Testasecca, Lelia; Cammarata, Matteo

    2017-02-01

    Although the Tumor necrosis factor gene superfamily seems to be very conserved in vertebrates, phylogeny, tissue expression, genomic and gene organization, protein domains and polymorphism analyses showed that a strong change has happened mostly in invertebrates in which protochordates were a constraint during the immune-molecules history and evolution. RT PCR was used to investigate differential gene expression in different tissues. The expression shown was greater in the pharynx. Single-nucleotide polymorphism has been investigated in Ciona intestinalis Tumor necrosis factor alpha (CiTNFα) mRNA isolated from the pharynx of 30 ascidians collected from Licata, Sicily (Italy), by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). For this analysis, CiTNFα nucleotide sequence was separated into two fragments, TNF-1 and -2, respectively, of 630 and 540 bp. We defined 23 individual DGGE patterns (named 1 to 10 for TNF-1 and 1 to 13 for TNF-2). Five patterns for TNF-1 accounted for <10% of the individuals, whereas the pattern 13 of TNF-2 accounted for >20% of the individuals. All the patterns were verified by direct sequencing. Single base-pair mutations were observed mainly within COOH-terminus, leading to 30 nucleotide sequence variants and 30 different coding sequences segregating in two main different clusters. Although most of the base mutations were silent, four propeptide variants were detected and six amino acid replacements occurred within COOH-terminus. Statistical tests for neutrality indicated negative selection pressure on signal and mature peptide domains, but possible positive selection pressure on COOH-terminus domain. Lastly we displayed the in silico 3D structure analysis including the CiTNFα variable region.

  15. Near-infrared chemical imaging (NIR-CI) on pharmaceutical solid dosage forms-comparing common calibration approaches.

    PubMed

    Ravn, Carsten; Skibsted, Erik; Bro, Rasmus

    2008-11-04

    Near-infrared chemical imaging (NIR-CI) is the fusion of near-infrared spectroscopy and image analysis. It can be used to visualize the spatial distribution of the chemical compounds in a sample (providing a chemical image). Each sample measurement generates a hyperspectral data cube containing thousands of spectra. An important part of a NIR-CI analysis is the data processing of the hyperspectral data cube. The aim of this study was to compare the ability of different commonly used calibration methods to generate accurate chemical images. Three common calibration approaches were compared: (1) using single wavenumber, (2) using classical least squares regression (CLS) and (3) using partial least squares regression (PLS1). Each method was evaluated using two different preprocessing methods. A calibration data set of tablets with five constituents was used for analysis. Chemical images of the active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) and the two major excipients cellulose and lactose in the formulation were made. The accuracy of the generated chemical images was evaluated by the concentration prediction ability. The most accurate predictions for all three compounds were generated by PLS1. The drawback of PLS1 is that it requires a calibration data set and CLS, which does not require a calibration data set, therefore proved to be an excellent alternative. CLS also generated accurate predictions and only requires the pure compound spectrum of each constituent in the sample. All three calibration approaches were found applicable for hyperspectral image analysis but their relevance of use depends on the purpose of analysis and type of data set. As expected, the single wavenumber method was primarily found useful for compounds with a distinct spectral band that was not overlapped by bands of other constituents. This paper also provides guidance for hyperspectral image (or NIR-CI) analysis describing each of the typical steps involved.

  16. Allergic contact dermatitis from a perinone-type dye C.I. Solvent Orange 60 in spectacle frames.

    PubMed

    Shono, M; Kaniwa, M A

    1999-10-01

    This is the 1st case report of allergic contact dermatitis from a perinone-type plastic dye, C.I. Solvent Orange 60, used in the earpieces of spectacle frames. Sensitization of this dye was confirmed by patch tests and chemical analysis of the causative earpieces and coloring agents. Solvent Orange 60 is suspected of being the contact allergen in at least 2 other Japanese cases of spectacle earpiece dermatitis, and provoked strong reactions on sensitized individuals. Its use in products that are applied on human skin for a prolonged period of time, such as spectacle frames or hearing aids, would best be avoided.

  17. Ciência & Saúde coletiva Journal at the national and international context of scientific communication.

    PubMed

    Minayo, Maria Cecília de Souza; Gomes, Romeu

    2015-07-01

    The article discusses the role of the Ciência & Saúde Coletiva Journal in the dissemination of knowledge in Brazil and in the international scientific community, its new challenges and role in the consolidation of the national public health field. Its history is outlined, positioning it as a scientific journal and the themes approached in it are analyzed. Among the findings, it is emphasized that the journal features a structured space by the habitus of public health, and creates its own habitus that contributes to structure this field. In addition, the journal contributes to the development of critical mass in the area and is committed to the Brazilian Public Health System.

  18. CI-Miner: A Semantic Methodology to Integrate Scientists, Data and Documents through the Use of Cyber-Infrastructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinheiro da Silva, P.; CyberShARE Center of Excellence

    2011-12-01

    Scientists today face the challenge of rethinking the manner in which they document and make available their processes and data in an international cyber-infrastructure of shared resources. Some relevant examples of new scientific practices in the realm of computational and data extraction sciences include: large scale data discovery; data integration; data sharing across distinct scientific domains, systematic management of trust and uncertainty; and comprehensive support for explaining processes and results. This talk introduces CI-Miner - an innovative hands-on, open-source, community-driven methodology to integrate these new scientific practices. It has been developed in collaboration with scientists, with the purpose of capturing, storing and retrieving knowledge about scientific processes and their products, thereby further supporting a new generation of science techniques based on data exploration. CI-Miner uses semantic annotations in the form of W3C Ontology Web Language-based ontologies and Proof Markup Language (PML)-based provenance to represent knowledge. This methodology specializes in general-purpose ontologies, projected into workflow-driven ontologies(WDOs) and into semantic abstract workflows (SAWs). Provenance in PML is CI-Miner's integrative component, which allows scientists to retrieve and reason with the knowledge represented in these new semantic documents. It serves additionally as a platform to share such collected knowledge with the scientific community participating in the international cyber-infrastructure. The integrated semantic documents that are tailored for the use of human epistemic agents may also be utilized by machine epistemic agents, since the documents are based on W3C Resource Description Framework (RDF) notation. This talk is grounded upon interdisciplinary lessons learned through the use of CI-Miner in support of government-funded national and international cyber-infrastructure initiatives in the areas of geo

  19. Survival Analysis of Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Patients Treated by Using Wheel Balance Cancer Therapy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jongmin; Cho, Chong-Kwan; Yoo, Hwa-Seung

    2016-12-01

    Objective To investigate the clinical effect and the overall survival (OS) rate of patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who have undergone Wheel Balance Cancer Therapy (WBCT). Methods The cases of 33 patients with advanced NSCLC who were treated with WBCT at the East West Cancer Center (EWCC) between October 4, 2004, and October 3, 2013, without undergoing concurrent conventional treatment were analyzed. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to estimate the OS of the cases, and the median OS was calculated according to age, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group Performance Status (ECOG PS), conventional-treatment history, WBCT treatment duration, and histological tumor type. Results The median OS of all patients was 31.1 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 3.5-58.7) months; the OS rates were 63.6% and 24.2% at years 1 and 2, respectively. The median OS rates of patients under and over 65 years were 45.2 (95% CI = 13.5-76.9) and 19.5 (95% CI = 7.1-31.8) months, respectively (P = .189). The median OS rates of patients who received WBCT for >14 days but <28 days and those who received WBCT for ≥28 days were 16.2 (95% CI = 13.3-19.2) and 45.2 (95% CI = 14.4-76.0) months, respectively (P = .437). The median OS rates of patients who had undergone prior conventional treatment and those who had not were 45.2 (95% CI = 9.1-81.3) and 3.9 (95% CI = unable to calculate) months, respectively (P = .000). The median OS rates of patients with squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and non-SCC lung cancer were 5.6 (95% CI = unable to calculate) and 45.2 (95% CI = 9.1-81.3) months, respectively (P = .262). The median OS rate of patients with ECOG PS ≥3 was 14.3 (95% CI = 8.8-19.8) months; that of patients ECOG PS <3 could not be calculated. However, the mean OS rates of patients with ECOG PS <3 and with ECOG PS ≥3 were 85.7 (95% CI = 58.4-113.0) and 12.7 (95% CI = 8.5-16.9) months, respectively (P = .000). No severe adverse events were encountered. Conclusions Our study

  20. Advances in cell culture

    SciTech Connect

    Maramorosch, K. )

    1987-01-01

    This book presents papers on advances in cell culture. Topics covered include: Genetic changes in the influenza viruses during growth in cultured cells; The biochemistry and genetics of mosquito cells in culture; and Tree tissue culture applications.

  1. Advanced information society(2)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masuyama, Keiichi

    Our modern life is full of information and information infiltrates into our daily life. Networking of the telecommunication is extended to society, company, and individual level. Although we have just entered the advanced information society, business world and our daily life have been steadily transformed by the advancement of information network. This advancement of information brings a big influence on economy, and will play they the main role in the expansion of domestic demands. This paper tries to view the image of coming advanced information society, focusing on the transforming businessman's life and the situation of our daily life, which became wealthy by the spread of daily life information and the visual information by satellite system, in the development of the intelligent city.

  2. Advanced Electrochemical Waste Forms

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, Brian J.; Crum, Jarrod V.; McCloy, John S.; Matyas, Josef

    2011-12-01

    This is a brief description of PNNL's efforts in FY2011 towards developing advanced electrochemical waste forms. This is a short section that will become part of a larger document being put together by INL.

  3. Advanced care directives

    MedlinePlus

    ... you want no matter how ill you are. Writing an advance care directive may be hard. You ... wishes usually replace those you made previously in writing. Additional Information Write your living will or health ...

  4. Advance Control Measures & Programs

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    As areas develop their path forward or action plan, they should consider a variety of voluntary and mandatory measures and programs. The resources on this page can help, and participants are also encouraged to talk with their EPA Advance contact

  5. Living with Advanced MS

    MedlinePlus

    ... more progressive disease course. Taking these factors into account can help you and your family plan more effectively for the future. Identifying options The key message to anyone living with advanced MS is ...

  6. Advanced Welding Concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ding, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    Four advanced welding techniques and their use in NASA are briefly reviewed in this poster presentation. The welding techniques reviewed are: Solid State Welding, Friction Stir Welding (FSW), Thermal Stir Welding (TSW) and Ultrasonic Stir Welding.

  7. Advances in Process Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrison, David L.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Advances in electronics and computer science have enabled industries (pulp/paper, iron/steel, petroleum/chemical) to attain better control of their processes with resulting increases in quality, productivity, profitability, and compliance with government regulations. (JN)

  8. Advanced urology nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Crowe, Helen

    2014-03-01

    Urology nursing has developed as a specialty over the past few decades in response to several factors, workload demands being a prime reason. Nurses are taking on additional roles and activities including procedures such as cystoscopy and prostate biopsy, and running nurse-led clinics for a variety of urological conditions. Audits of advanced urological nursing practice have shown this care to be of a high standard and investigative procedures performed by these nurses match the diagnostic quality of existing services. Professional urological nursing organizations support the professional needs of these nurses, but the provision of education and training for advanced practice activities remains an unaddressed need. A range of confusing advanced urology nursing titles exists, and uncertainty regarding the roles and scope of practice for these nurses remains a concern. Acceptance and support from medical colleagues is required for the success of advanced urological nursing practice, but opinions on these roles remain divided.

  9. 40 CFR 60.4203 - How long must my engines meet the emission standards if I am a manufacturer of stationary CI...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... emission standards if I am a manufacturer of stationary CI internal combustion engines? 60.4203 Section 60... Ignition Internal Combustion Engines Emission Standards for Manufacturers § 60.4203 How long must my engines meet the emission standards if I am a manufacturer of stationary CI internal combustion...

  10. 40 CFR 60.4206 - How long must I meet the emission standards if I am an owner or operator of a stationary CI...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... standards if I am an owner or operator of a stationary CI internal combustion engine? 60.4206 Section 60... Ignition Internal Combustion Engines Emission Standards for Owners and Operators § 60.4206 How long must I meet the emission standards if I am an owner or operator of a stationary CI internal combustion...

  11. 40 CFR Table 7 to Subpart IIIi of... - Requirements for Performance Tests for Stationary CI ICE With a Displacement of ≥30 Liters per...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... following requirements 1. Stationary CI internal combustion engine with a displacement of ≥ 30 liters per...-hour or longer runs. b. Limit the concentration of NOX in the stationary CI internal combustion engine... stationary internal combustion engine; (a) For NOX, O2, and moisture measurement, ducts ≤6 inches in...

  12. 40 CFR 60.4206 - How long must I meet the emission standards if I am an owner or operator of a stationary CI...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... standards if I am an owner or operator of a stationary CI internal combustion engine? 60.4206 Section 60... Ignition Internal Combustion Engines Emission Standards for Owners and Operators § 60.4206 How long must I meet the emission standards if I am an owner or operator of a stationary CI internal combustion...

  13. 40 CFR 60.4201 - What emission standards must I meet for non-emergency engines if I am a stationary CI internal...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... non-emergency engines if I am a stationary CI internal combustion engine manufacturer? 60.4201 Section... Ignition Internal Combustion Engines Emission Standards for Manufacturers § 60.4201 What emission standards must I meet for non-emergency engines if I am a stationary CI internal combustion engine...

  14. 40 CFR 60.4207 - What fuel requirements must I meet if I am an owner or operator of a stationary CI internal...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... am an owner or operator of a stationary CI internal combustion engine subject to this subpart? 60... Compression Ignition Internal Combustion Engines Fuel Requirements for Owners and Operators § 60.4207 What... a stationary CI internal combustion engine subject to this subpart? (b) Beginning October 1,...

  15. 40 CFR 60.4206 - How long must I meet the emission standards if I am an owner or operator of a stationary CI...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... standards if I am an owner or operator of a stationary CI internal combustion engine? 60.4206 Section 60... Ignition Internal Combustion Engines Emission Standards for Owners and Operators § 60.4206 How long must I meet the emission standards if I am an owner or operator of a stationary CI internal combustion...

  16. 40 CFR 60.4207 - What fuel requirements must I meet if I am an owner or operator of a stationary CI internal...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... am an owner or operator of a stationary CI internal combustion engine subject to this subpart? 60... Compression Ignition Internal Combustion Engines Fuel Requirements for Owners and Operators § 60.4207 What fuel requirements must I meet if I am an owner or operator of a stationary CI internal...

  17. 40 CFR 60.4203 - How long must my engines meet the emission standards if I am a manufacturer of stationary CI...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... emission standards if I am a manufacturer of stationary CI internal combustion engines? 60.4203 Section 60... Ignition Internal Combustion Engines Emission Standards for Manufacturers § 60.4203 How long must my engines meet the emission standards if I am a manufacturer of stationary CI internal combustion...

  18. 40 CFR 60.4213 - What test methods and other procedures must I use if I am an owner or operator of a stationary CI...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... must I use if I am an owner or operator of a stationary CI internal combustion engine with a... Combustion Engines Testing Requirements for Owners and Operators § 60.4213 What test methods and other procedures must I use if I am an owner or operator of a stationary CI internal combustion engine with...

  19. 40 CFR 60.4201 - What emission standards must I meet for non-emergency engines if I am a stationary CI internal...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... non-emergency engines if I am a stationary CI internal combustion engine manufacturer? 60.4201 Section... Ignition Internal Combustion Engines Emission Standards for Manufacturers § 60.4201 What emission standards must I meet for non-emergency engines if I am a stationary CI internal combustion engine...

  20. 40 CFR 60.4212 - What test methods and other procedures must I use if I am an owner or operator of a stationary CI...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... must I use if I am an owner or operator of a stationary CI internal combustion engine with a... SOURCES Standards of Performance for Stationary Compression Ignition Internal Combustion Engines Testing... owner or operator of a stationary CI internal combustion engine with a displacement of less than...

  1. 40 CFR 60.4201 - What emission standards must I meet for non-emergency engines if I am a stationary CI internal...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... non-emergency engines if I am a stationary CI internal combustion engine manufacturer? 60.4201 Section... Ignition Internal Combustion Engines Emission Standards for Manufacturers § 60.4201 What emission standards must I meet for non-emergency engines if I am a stationary CI internal combustion engine...

  2. 40 CFR 60.4213 - What test methods and other procedures must I use if I am an owner or operator of a stationary CI...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... must I use if I am an owner or operator of a stationary CI internal combustion engine with a... Combustion Engines Testing Requirements for Owners and Operators § 60.4213 What test methods and other procedures must I use if I am an owner or operator of a stationary CI internal combustion engine with...

  3. 40 CFR 60.4203 - How long must my engines meet the emission standards if I am a manufacturer of stationary CI...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... emission standards if I am a manufacturer of stationary CI internal combustion engines? 60.4203 Section 60... Ignition Internal Combustion Engines Emission Standards for Manufacturers § 60.4203 How long must my engines meet the emission standards if I am a manufacturer of stationary CI internal combustion...

  4. 40 CFR 60.4206 - How long must I meet the emission standards if I am an owner or operator of a stationary CI...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... standards if I am an owner or operator of a stationary CI internal combustion engine? 60.4206 Section 60... Ignition Internal Combustion Engines Emission Standards for Owners and Operators § 60.4206 How long must I meet the emission standards if I am an owner or operator of a stationary CI internal combustion...

  5. 40 CFR 60.4212 - What test methods and other procedures must I use if I am an owner or operator of a stationary CI...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... must I use if I am an owner or operator of a stationary CI internal combustion engine with a... SOURCES Standards of Performance for Stationary Compression Ignition Internal Combustion Engines Testing... owner or operator of a stationary CI internal combustion engine with a displacement of less than...

  6. 40 CFR 60.4207 - What fuel requirements must I meet if I am an owner or operator of a stationary CI internal...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... am an owner or operator of a stationary CI internal combustion engine subject to this subpart? 60... Compression Ignition Internal Combustion Engines Fuel Requirements for Owners and Operators § 60.4207 What fuel requirements must I meet if I am an owner or operator of a stationary CI internal...

  7. 40 CFR 60.4201 - What emission standards must I meet for non-emergency engines if I am a stationary CI internal...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... non-emergency engines if I am a stationary CI internal combustion engine manufacturer? 60.4201 Section... Ignition Internal Combustion Engines Emission Standards for Manufacturers § 60.4201 What emission standards must I meet for non-emergency engines if I am a stationary CI internal combustion engine...

  8. 40 CFR 60.4211 - What are my compliance requirements if I am an owner or operator of a stationary CI internal...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... I am an owner or operator of a stationary CI internal combustion engine? 60.4211 Section 60.4211... operator of a stationary CI internal combustion engine? (a) If you are an owner or operator and must comply... internal combustion engine and control device according to the manufacturer's written instructions...

  9. 40 CFR 60.4207 - What fuel requirements must I meet if I am an owner or operator of a stationary CI internal...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... am an owner or operator of a stationary CI internal combustion engine subject to this subpart? 60... Compression Ignition Internal Combustion Engines Fuel Requirements for Owners and Operators § 60.4207 What fuel requirements must I meet if I am an owner or operator of a stationary CI internal...

  10. 40 CFR 60.4212 - What test methods and other procedures must I use if I am an owner or operator of a stationary CI...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... must I use if I am an owner or operator of a stationary CI internal combustion engine with a... SOURCES Standards of Performance for Stationary Compression Ignition Internal Combustion Engines Testing... owner or operator of a stationary CI internal combustion engine with a displacement of less than...

  11. 40 CFR 60.4212 - What test methods and other procedures must I use if I am an owner or operator of a stationary CI...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... must I use if I am an owner or operator of a stationary CI internal combustion engine with a... SOURCES Standards of Performance for Stationary Compression Ignition Internal Combustion Engines Testing... owner or operator of a stationary CI internal combustion engine with a displacement of less than...

  12. 40 CFR 60.4201 - What emission standards must I meet for non-emergency engines if I am a stationary CI internal...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... non-emergency engines if I am a stationary CI internal combustion engine manufacturer? 60.4201 Section... Ignition Internal Combustion Engines Emission Standards for Manufacturers § 60.4201 What emission standards must I meet for non-emergency engines if I am a stationary CI internal combustion engine...

  13. 40 CFR 60.4213 - What test methods and other procedures must I use if I am an owner or operator of a stationary CI...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... must I use if I am an owner or operator of a stationary CI internal combustion engine with a... Combustion Engines Testing Requirements for Owners and Operators § 60.4213 What test methods and other procedures must I use if I am an owner or operator of a stationary CI internal combustion engine with...

  14. 40 CFR 60.4213 - What test methods and other procedures must I use if I am an owner or operator of a stationary CI...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... must I use if I am an owner or operator of a stationary CI internal combustion engine with a... Combustion Engines Testing Requirements for Owners and Operators § 60.4213 What test methods and other procedures must I use if I am an owner or operator of a stationary CI internal combustion engine with...

  15. 40 CFR 60.4206 - How long must I meet the emission standards if I am an owner or operator of a stationary CI...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... standards if I am an owner or operator of a stationary CI internal combustion engine? 60.4206 Section 60... Ignition Internal Combustion Engines Emission Standards for Owners and Operators § 60.4206 How long must I meet the emission standards if I am an owner or operator of a stationary CI internal combustion...

  16. 40 CFR 60.4207 - What fuel requirements must I meet if I am an owner or operator of a stationary CI internal...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... am an owner or operator of a stationary CI internal combustion engine subject to this subpart? 60... Compression Ignition Internal Combustion Engines Fuel Requirements for Owners and Operators § 60.4207 What fuel requirements must I meet if I am an owner or operator of a stationary CI internal...

  17. 40 CFR 60.4212 - What test methods and other procedures must I use if I am an owner or operator of a stationary CI...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... must I use if I am an owner or operator of a stationary CI internal combustion engine with a... SOURCES Standards of Performance for Stationary Compression Ignition Internal Combustion Engines Testing... owner or operator of a stationary CI internal combustion engine with a displacement of less than...

  18. 40 CFR 60.4211 - What are my compliance requirements if I am an owner or operator of a stationary CI internal...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... a CI fire pump engine that is manufactured prior to the model years in table 3 to this subpart and... are an owner or operator of a CI fire pump engine that is manufactured during or after the model year that applies to your fire pump engine power rating in table 3 to this subpart and must comply with...

  19. Advanced Welding Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ding, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    Some of the applications of advanced welding techniques are shown in this poster presentation. Included are brief explanations of the use on the Ares I and Ares V launch vehicle and on the Space Shuttle Launch vehicle. Also included are microstructural views from four advanced welding techniques: Variable Polarity Plasma Arc (VPPA) weld (fusion), self-reacting friction stir welding (SR-FSW), conventional FSW, and Tube Socket Weld (TSW) on aluminum.

  20. Advanced planetary studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Results of planetary advanced studies and planning support provided by Science Applications, Inc. staff members to Earth and Planetary Exploration Division, OSSA/NASA, for the period 1 February 1981 to 30 April 1982 are summarized. The scope of analyses includes cost estimation, planetary missions performance, solar system exploration committee support, Mars program planning, Galilean satellite mission concepts, and advanced propulsion data base. The work covers 80 man-months of research. Study reports and related publications are included in a bibliography section.

  1. Advanced Usability Evaluation Methods

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-04-01

    tracking in usability evaluation : A practitioner’s guide. In J. Hyönä, R. Radach, & H. Deubel. (Eds.), The mind’s eye: Cognitive and applied...Advanced Usability Evaluation Methods Terence S. Andre, Lt Col, USAF Margaret Schurig, Human Factors Design Specialist, The Boeing Co...TITLE AND SUBTITLE Advanced Usability Evaluation Methods 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT

  2. A hedgehog-responsive region in the Drosophila wing disc is defined by debra-mediated ubiquitination and lysosomal degradation of Ci.

    PubMed

    Dai, Ping; Akimaru, Hiroshi; Ishii, Shunsuke

    2003-06-01

    Transcription factor Ci mediates Hedgehog (Hh) signaling to determine the anterior/posterior (A/P) compartment of Drosophila wing disc. While Hh-inducible genes are expressed in A compartment cells abutting the A/P border, it is unclear how the boundaries of this region are established. Here, we have identified a Ci binding protein, Debra, that is expressed at relatively high levels in the band abutting the border of the Hh-responsive A compartment region. Debra mediates the polyubiquitination of full-length Ci, which then leads to its lysosomal degradation. Debra is localized in the multivesicular body, suggesting that the polyubiquitination of Ci directs its sorting into lysosome. Thus, Debra defines the border of the Hh-responsive region in the A compartment by inducing the lysosomal degradation of Ci.

  3. Disparities in the Use of Radiation Therapy in Patients With Local-Regionally Advanced Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, Steve R.; Beal, Shannon H.; Chen, Steven L.; Canter, Robert J.; Khatri, Vijay P.; Chen, Allen; Bold, Richard J.

    2010-11-01

    Background: Radiation therapy (RT) is indicated for the treatment of local-regionally advanced breast cancer (BCa). Hypothesis: We hypothesized that black and Hispanic patients with local-regionally advanced BCa would receive lower rates of RT than their white counterparts. Methods: The Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results database was used to identify white, black, Hispanic, and Asian patients with invasive BCa and {>=}10 metastatic lymph nodes diagnosed between 1988 and 2005. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression evaluated the relationship of race/ethnicity with use of RT. Multivariate models stratified for those undergoing mastectomy or lumpectomy. Results: Entry criteria were met by 12,653 patients. Approximately half of the patients did not receive RT. Most patients were white (72%); the remainder were Hispanic (10.4%), black (10.3%), and Asian (7.3%). On univariate analysis, Hispanics (odd ratio [OR] 0.89; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.79-1.00) and blacks (OR 0.79; 95% CI, 0.70-0.89) were less likely to receive RT than whites. On multivariate analysis, blacks (OR 0.76; 95% CI, 0.67-0.86) and Hispanics (OR 0.80; 95% CI, 0.70-0.90) were less likely than whites to receive RT. Disparities persisted for blacks (OR 0.74; 95% CI, 0.64-0.85) and Hispanics (OR 0.77; 95% CI, 0.67-0.89) who received mastectomy, but not for those who received lumpectomy. Conclusions: Many patients with local-regionally advanced BCa do not receive RT. Blacks and Hispanics were less likely than whites to receive RT. This disparity was noted predominately in patients who received mastectomy. Future efforts at improving rates of RT are warranted. Efforts at eliminating racial/ethnic disparities should focus on black and Hispanic candidates for postmastectomy RT.

  4. Psychiatric Advance Directives: Getting Started

    MedlinePlus

    ... More... Home Getting Started National Resource Center on Psychiatric Advance Directives - Getting Started Getting Started Psychiatric advance directives (PADs) are relatively new legal instruments ...

  5. A mutation in Myo15 leads to Usher-like symptoms in LEW/Ztm-ci2 rats.

    PubMed

    Held, Nadine; Smits, Bart M G; Gockeln, Roland; Schubert, Stephanie; Nave, Heike; Northrup, Emily; Cuppen, Edwin; Hedrich, Hans J; Wedekind, Dirk

    2011-03-29

    The LEW/Ztm-ci2 rat is an animal model for syndromal deafness that arose from a spontaneous mutation. Homozygous animals show locomotor abnormalities like lateralized circling behavior. Additionally, an impaired vision can be observed in some animals through behavioral studies. Syndromal deafness as well as retinal degeneration are features of the Usher syndrome in humans. In the present study, the mutation was identified as a base substitution (T->C) in exon 56 of Myo15, leading to an amino acid exchange from leucine (Leu) to proline (Pro) within the carboxy-terminal MyTH4 domain in the proteins' tail region. Myo15 mRNA was expressed in the retina as demonstrated for the first time with the help of in-situ hybridization and PCR. To characterize the visual phenotype, rats were examined by scotopic and photopic electroretinography and, additionally, histological analyses of the retinas were conducted. The complete loss of sight was detected along with a severe degeneration of photoreceptor cells. Interestingly, the manifestation of the disease does not solely depend on the mutation, but also on environmental factors. Since the LEW/Ztm-ci2 rat features the entire range of symptoms of the human Usher syndrome we think that this strain is an appropriate model for this disease. Our findings display that mutations in binding domains of myosin XV do not only cause non-syndromic hearing loss but can also lead to syndromic disorders including retinal dysfunction.

  6. Estimation of insertion depth angle based on cochlea diameter and linear insertion depth: a prediction tool for the CI422.

    PubMed

    Franke-Trieger, Annett; Mürbe, Dirk

    2015-11-01

    Beside the cochlear size, the linear insertion depth (LID) influences the insertion depth angle of cochlear implant electrode arrays. For the specific implant CI422 the recommended LID is not fixed but can vary continuously between 20 and 25 mm. In the current study, the influence of cochlea size and LID on the final insertion depth angle was investigated to develop a prediction tool for the insertion depth angle by means of cochlea diameter and LID. Preoperative estimation of insertion depth angles might help surgeons avoid exceeding an intended insertion depth, especially with respect to low-frequency residual hearing preservation. Postoperative, high-resolution 3D-radiographs provided by Flat Panel Computed Volume Tomography (FPCT) were used to investigate the insertion depth angle in 37 CI422 recipients. Furthermore, the FPCT images were used to measure linear insertion depth and diameter of the basal turn of the cochlea. A considerable variation of measured insertion depth angles ranging from 306° to 579° was identified. The measured linear insertion depth ranged from -18.6 to 26.2 mm and correlated positively with the insertion depth angle. The cochlea diameter ranged from 8.11 to 10.42 mm and correlated negatively with the insertion depth angle. The results suggest that preoperatively measured cochlea diameter combined with the option of different array positions by means of LID may act as predictors for the final insertion depth angle.

  7. Study of the electrochemical oxidation and reduction of C.I. Reactive Orange 4 in sodium sulphate alkaline solutions.

    PubMed

    del Río, A I; Molina, J; Bonastre, J; Cases, F

    2009-12-15

    Synthetic solutions of hydrolysed C.I. Reactive Orange 4, a monoazo textile dye commercially named Procion Orange MX-2R (PMX2R) and colour index number C.I. 18260, was exposed to electrochemical treatment under galvanostatic conditions and Na2SO4 as electrolyte. The influence of the electrochemical process as well as the applied current density was evaluated. Ti/SnO2-Sb-Pt and stainless steel electrodes were used as anode and cathode, respectively, and the intermediates generated on the cathode during electrochemical reduction were investigated. Aliquots of the solutions treated were analysed by UV-visible and FTIR-ATR spectroscopy confirming the presence of aromatic structures in solution when an electro-reduction was carried out. Electro-oxidation degraded both the azo group and aromatic structures. HPLC measures revealed that all processes followed pseudo-first order kinetics and decolourisation rates showed a considerable dependency on the applied current density. CV experiments and XPS analyses were carried out to study the behaviour of both PMX2R and intermediates and to analyse the state of the cathode after the electrochemical reduction, respectively. It was observed the presence of a main intermediate in solution after an electrochemical reduction whose chemical structure is similar to 2-amino-1,5-naphthalenedisulphonic acid. Moreover, the analysis of the cathode surface after electrochemical reduction reveals the presence of a coating layer with organic nature.

  8. Functional and crystallographic characterization of Salmonella typhimurium Cu,Zn superoxide dismutase coded by the sodCI virulence gene.

    PubMed

    Pesce, A; Battistoni, A; Stroppolo, M E; Polizio, F; Nardini, M; Kroll, J S; Langford, P R; O'Neill, P; Sette, M; Desideri, A; Bolognesi, M

    2000-09-15

    The functional and three-dimensional structural features of Cu,Zn superoxide dismutase coded by the Salmonella typhimurium sodCI gene, have been characterized. Measurements of the catalytic rate indicate that this enzyme is the most efficient superoxide dismutase analyzed so far, a feature that may be related to the exclusive association of the sodCI gene with the most pathogenic Salmonella serotypes. The enzyme active-site copper ion is highly accessible to external probes, as indicated by quenching of the water proton relaxation rate upon addition of iodide. The shape of the electron paramagnetic resonance spectrum is dependent on the frozen or liquid state of the enzyme solution, suggesting relative flexibility of the copper ion environment. The crystal structure (R-factor 22.6%, at 2.3 A resolution) indicates that the dimeric enzyme adopts the quaternary assembly typical of prokaryotic Cu,Zn superoxide dismutases. However, when compared to the structures of the homologous enzymes from Photobacterium leiognathi and Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae, the subunit interface of Salmonella Cu,Zn superoxide dismutase shows substitution of 11 out of 19 interface residues. As a consequence, the network of structural water molecules that fill the dimer interface cavity is structured differently from the other dimeric bacterial enzymes. The crystallographic and functional characterization of this Salmonella Cu,Zn superoxide dismutase indicates that structural variability and catalytic efficiency are higher in prokaryotic than in the eukaryotic homologous enzymes.

  9. Metamorphosed CM and CI Carbonaceous Chondrites Could Be from the Breakup of the Same Earth-crossing Asteroid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zolensky, Michael; Abell, Paul; Tonui, Eric

    2005-01-01

    Far from being the relatively unprocessed materials they were once believed to be, we now know that a significant number of carbonaceous chondrites were thermally metamorphosed on their parent asteroid(s). Numerous studies indicate that 7 "CM" and 2 "CI" chondrites have been naturally heated, variously, at from 400 to over 700 C on their parent asteroid(s). Petrographic textures reveal that this thermal metamorphism occurred after the dominant aqueous alteration phase, although some meteorites show evidence of a heating event between two aqueous alteration episodes, i.e. pro- and retrograde aqueous alteration. Aside from the issues of the identification of the transient heat source, timing of metamorphism, and the relation of these materials (if any) to conventional CM and CI chondrites, there is also a mystery related to their recovery. All of these meteorites have been recovered from the Antarctic; none are falls or finds from anyplace else. Indeed, the majority have been collected by the Japanese NIPR field parties in the Yamato Mountains. In fact, one estimate is that these meteorites account for approx. 64 wt% of the CM carbonaceous chondrites at the NIPR. The reasons for this are unclear and might be due in part to simple sampling bias. However we suggest that this recovery difference is related to the particular age of the Yamato Mountains meteorite recovery surfaces, and differences in meteoroid fluxes between the Yamato meteorites and recent falls and substantially older Antarctic meteorites. Additional information is included in the original extended abstract.

  10. Optimisation for enhanced decolourization and degradation of Reactive Red BS C.I. 111 by Pseudomonas aeruginosa NGKCTS.

    PubMed

    Sheth, N T; Dave, S R

    2009-11-01

    Soil samples collected from dye contaminated sites of Vatva, Gujarat, India were studied for the screening and isolation of organisms capable of decolourizing textile dyes. The most efficient isolate, which showed decolourization zone of 48 mm on 300 ppm Reactive Red BS (C.I.111) containing plate, was identified as Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Reactive Red BS (C.I.111) was used as a model dye for the study. The isolated culture exhibited 91% decolourization of 300 ppm dye within 5.5 h over a wide pH range from 5.0 to 10.5 and temperature ranging from 30 to 40 degrees C. The culture was able to decolourize more than 91% of Reactive Red BS under static conditions in presence of either glucose, peptone or yeast extract. Addition of 300 ppm of Reactive Red BS, in each step, in ongoing dye decolourization flask, gave more than 90% decolourization within 2 h corresponding to 136 mg l(-1) h(-1) dye removal rate. The isolate had the ability to decolourize six different reactive dyes tested as well as the actual dye manufacturing industry's effluent. The degradation of the dye was confirmed by HPTLC.

  11. An observational, prospective study to evaluate the preoperative planning tool "CI-Wizard" for cochlear implant surgery.

    PubMed

    Pirlich, Markus; Tittmann, Mary; Franz, Daniela; Dietz, Andreas; Hofer, Mathias

    2017-02-01

    "CI-Wizard" is a new, three-dimensional software planning tool for cochlear implant surgery with manual and semi-automatic algorithms to visualize anatomical risk structures of the lateral skull base preoperatively. Primary endpoints of the study represented the evaluation of the CI-Wizards usability, accuracy, subjectively perceived and objectively measured time in clinical practice. In a period from January 2014 to March 2015, n = 36 participants were included in this study. These members were divided into three groups of equal number (n = 12), but different level of experience. Senior doctors and consultants (group 1), residents (group 2) and medical students (group 3) segmented 12 different CT-scan data sets of the CI-Wizard (four per participant). In total, n = 144 data sets were collected. The usability of the CI-Wizard was measured by the given questionnaire with an interval rating scale. The Jaccard coefficient (JT) was used to evaluate the accuracy of the anatomical structures segmented. The subjectively perceived time was measured with an interval rating scale in the questionnaire and was compared with the objectively mean measured time (time interact). Across all three groups, the usability of the CI-Wizard has been assessed between 1 ("very good") and 2 ("with small defects"). Subjectively, the time was stated as "appropriate" by questionnaire. Objective measurements of the required duration revealed averages of t = 9.8 min for creating a target view. Concerning the accuracy, semi-automatic anatomical structures such as the external acoustic canal (JT = 0.90), the tympanic cavity (JT = 0.87), the ossicles (JT = 0.63), the cochlea (JT = 0.66), and the semicircular canals (JT = 0.61) reached high Jaccard values, which describes a great match of the segmented structures between the partcipants and the gold standard. Facial nerve (JT = 0.39) and round window (JT = 0.37) reached lower Jaccard values. Very little overlap tendency was

  12. Pre-ozonation coupled with UV/H2O2 process for the decolorization and mineralization of cotton dyeing effluent and synthesized C.I. Direct Black 22 wastewater.

    PubMed

    Shu, Hung-Yee; Chang, Ming-Chin

    2005-05-20

    The decolorization and mineralization of cotton dyeing effluent containing C.I. Acid Black 22 as well as synthesized C.I. Acid Black 22 wastewater by means of advanced oxidation processes (AOPs), such as UV/H2O2, O3 and pre-ozonation coupled with UV/H2O2 processes, were evaluated in this study. It was observed that the UV/H2O2 process took longer retention time than ozonation for color removal of dye bath effluent. Reversely, the total organic carbon (TOC) removal showed different phenomena that ozonation and UV/H2O2 process obtained 33 and 90% of removal efficiency for 160 min of retention time, respectively. Additionally, laboratory synthesized dye wastewater was substantially more efficient in the decolorization process than dye bath effluent. Therefore, in this work, pre-ozonation coupled with UV/H2O2 process was employed to enhance the reduction of both color and TOC in dye bath effluent at the same time. At the same time, the retention time demand was reduced to less than 115 min for 90% removal of TOC and color by this combined process.

  13. 13C-derived water use efficiency in Mediterranean pines across a precipitation gradient are related to differential moisture-dependant Ci-regulation responses.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maseyk, Kadmiel; Hemming, Debbie; Angert, Alon; Leavitt, Steven; Yakir, Dan

    2010-05-01

    Persistent predictions of warming and drying in the entire Mediterranean and other regions motivate investigation of terrestrial ecosystem responses to such change. We have used 30 year (1974-2003) records of tree-ring derived growth measures (basal area increment, BAI) and cellulose 13C isotopic composition from three sites across a geographical rainfall gradient to explore the temporal behaviour and physiological responses to variations in climatic (rainfall, temperature) and atmospheric ([CO2], Ca) drivers in Pinus halepensis trees. Potential juvenile effects on the cellulose 13C record were negligible in the two even-aged low density stands and excluded from the mixed-aged natural stand. Agreement between estimates of intrinsic water use efficiency (Wi) from cellulose 13C values and leaf-scale gas exchange measurements, consistency across the sites in the Wi response to soil water content and an observed insensitivity to known thinning events at the dry site give us confidence that leaf-level physiological responses, and not age and density effects, dominate the 13C isotopic record in these trees. Site-level differences and inter-annual variations in the earlywood (EW, associated with the wet and productive period) 13C-derived estimates of Wi were related to annual precipitation in a common, site-independent manner, with reduced sensitivity to annual rainfall above ~600mm. Rainfall was also the predominant driver in inter-annual variations in BAI. While there were no trends in rainfall amount over this period, there were clear trends of increasing Wi in both the EW and latewood (LW) that ranged between ca. 5 and 20% increase over the study period. These trends were better correlated with the increase in Ca than a temperature increase (~0.04°C y-1)that was also observed across the sites. The different sensitivities of Wi to Ca (dWi/dCa of 0.1 to 0.5 umol mol-1 ppm-1) represented shifting Ci-regulation (Ci, leaf internal CO2 concentration) responses associated

  14. Recruit and ADVANCE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosser, Sue V.

    2007-04-01

    Beginning in 2001, the National Science Foundation launched the ADVANCE Initiative, which has now awarded more than 70 million to some thirty institutions for transformations to advance women. Results of studies on how to attract and retain women students and faculty underpinned our ADVANCE Institutional Transformation grant funded by the NSF for 3.7 million for five years, beginning in 2001. As co-principal investigator on this grant, I insured that this research informed the five major threads of the grant: 1) Four termed ADVANCE professors to mentor junior women faculty in each college; 2) Collection of MIT-Report-like data indicators to assess whether advancement of women really occurs during and after the institutional transformation undertaken through ADVANCE; 3) Family-friendly policies and practices to stop the tenure clock and provide active service, modified duties, lactation stations and day care; 4) Mini-retreats to facilitate access for tenure-track women faculty to male decision-makers and administrators for informal conversations and discussion on topics important to women faculty; 5) Removal of subtle gender, racial, and other biases in promotion and tenure. The dynamic changes resulting from the grant in quality of mentoring, new understanding of promotion and tenure, numbers of women retained and given endowed chairs, and emergence of new family friendly policies gave me hope for genuine diversification of leadership in science and technology. As the grant funding ends, the absence of NSF prestige and monitoring, coupled with a change in academic leadership at the top, provide new challenges for institutionalization, recruitment, and advancement of women into leadership positions in science and engineering.

  15. Do Advance Directives Direct?

    PubMed

    Shapiro, Susan P

    2015-06-01

    Resolution of long-standing debates about the role and impact of advance directives - living wills and powers of attorney for health care - has been hampered by a dearth of appropriate data, in particular data that compare the process and outcomes of end-of-life decision making on behalf of patients with and without advance directives. Drawing on a large ethnographic study of patients in two intensive care units in a large urban teaching hospital, this article compares aspects of the medical decision-making process and outcomes by advance-directive status. Controlling for demographic characteristics and severity of illness, the study finds few significant differences between patients without advance directives and those who claim to have them. Surprisingly, these few differences hold only for those whose directives are in their hospital chart. There are no significant differences between those with no directive and those claiming to have a copy at home or elsewhere. The article considers the implications if directives seemingly must be in hand to show even modest effects. Do advance directives direct? The intensive care unit data provide far more support for the growing body of literature that casts doubt on their impact than studies that promote the use of them.

  16. Usina de ciências: um espaço pedagógico para aprendizagens múltiplas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, V. A. F.; Poppe, P. C. R.; Orrico, A. C. P.; Pereira, M. G.

    2003-08-01

    Entendemos que o Ensino de Astronomia é especialmente apropriado para motivar os alunos e aprofundar conteúdos em diversas áreas do conhecimento, pois envolve temas ligados à Física, Matemática, Química, Computação, Tratamento de Imagens e Instrumentação de Alta Precisão, além daqueles pertinentes as áreas de Geografia, História e Antropologia. Contudo, apesar do caráter interdisciplinar que esta ciência possui, a realidade atual é que a maioria dos professores em sala de aula não foram devidamente capacitados, durante o período de formação acadêmica, para ministrar conteúdos de Astronomia nos atuais Ensinos Fundamental e Médio. Neste trabalho, discutiremos de maneira ampla, num primeiro momento, a realidade do atual ensino de ciências praticado no Estado da Bahia, apontando por dependência administrativa, o crescimento e a redução do número de escolas, da taxa de analfabetismo por faixa etária, da escolarização, do atendimento, da aprovação, reprovação e abandono, de equipamentos e laboratórios e o grau de formação dos nossos atuais professores em pleno exercício de atividade docente. Num segundo momento, discutiremos o papel do Observatório Astronômico Antares/UEFS dentro desse contexto, ou seja, suas ações implementadas ao longo dos últimos anos e em particular, o recente projeto de extensão Ensino e Difusão de Astronomia, financiado pela Fundação Vitae, que procura traduzir no lúdico, no brincar de ciências, um espaço pedagógico para aprendizagens múltiplas. Neste, o papel do professor multiplicador associado ao laboratório de kits didáticos, de fácil construção e manipulação (alguns dos quais serão mostrados), perfazem os principais veículos para o desenvolvimento de conhecimentos, atitudes, habilidades e valores que preparam os nossos alunos para a carreira técnico-científica e para sua participação crítica e criativa na Sociedade.

  17. Physical conditions of molecular gas in the Circinus galaxy Multi-J CO and Ci 3PP0 observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhi-Yu; Henkel, Christian; Gao, Yu; Güsten, Rolf; Menten, Karl M.; Papadopoulos, Padelis P.; Zhao, Yinghe; Ao, Yiping; Kaminski, Tomasz

    2014-08-01

    We report mapping observations of the 12CO J = 3 → 2, 4 → 3, 6 → 5, and 7 → 6 transitions and the Ci 3PP0 (Ci) 492GHz transition toward the central 40'' × 40'' region of the Circinus galaxy, using the Atacama Pathfinder EXperiment (APEX) telescope. We also detected 13COJ = 3 → 2 at the central position of Circinus. These observations are to date the highest CO transitions reported in Circinus. With large velocity gradient (LVG) modeling and likelihood analysis we try to obtain density, temperature, and column density of the molecular gas in three regions: the nuclear region (D < 18''~ 360 pc), the entire central 45'' (D < 45''~ 900 pc) region, and the star-forming (S-F) ring (18'' < D < 45''). In the nuclear region, we can fit the CO excitation with a single excitation component, yielding an average condition of nH2~103.2 cm-3, Tkin~ 200 K, and dν/dr~3 km s-1 pc-1. In the entire 45'' region, which covers both the nucleus and the S-F ring, two excitation components are needed with nH2~ 104.2 cm-3 and 103.0 cm-3, Tkin~ 60 K and 30 K, and MH2~2.3 × 107 M⊙ and 6.6 × 107 M⊙, respectively. The gas excitation in the S-F ring can also be fitted with two LVG components, after subtracting the CO fluxes in the 18'' nuclear region. The S-F ring region contributes 80% of the molecular mass in the 45'' region. For the entire 45'' region, we find a standard conversion factor of N(H2) /ICO 1 → 0 = 0.37 × 1020cm-2(K km s-1)-1, about 1/5 of the Galactic disk value. The luminosity ratios of Ci and 12COJ = 3 → 2 (RCI/CO 3 → 2) in Circinus basically follow a linear trend, similar to that obtained in high-redshift galaxies. The average RCI/CO J = 3 → 2 in Circinus is found to be ~0.2, lying at an intermediate value between non-AGN nuclear regions and high-redshift galaxies. Appendices are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  18. Correspondence between neurophysiological and clinical measurements of chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy: secondary analysis of data from the CI-PeriNoms study

    PubMed Central

    Griffith, Kathleen A.; Dorsey, Susan G.; Renn, Cynthia L.; Zhu, Shijun; Johantgen, Mary E.; Cornblath, David R.; Argyriou, Andreas A.; Cavaletti, Guido; Merkies, Ingemar S. J.; Alberti, Paola; Postma, Tjeerd J.; Rossi, Emanuela; Frigeni, Barbara; Bruna, Jordi; Velasco, Roser; Kalofonos, Haralabos P.; Psimaras, Dimitri; Ricard, Damien; Pace, Andrea; Galie, Edvina; Briani, Chiara; Torre, Chiara Dalla; Faber, Catharina G.; Lalisang, Roy I.; Boogerd, Willem; Brandsma, Dieta; Koeppen, Susanne; Hense, Joerg; Storey, Dawn J.; Kerrigan, Simon; Schenone, Angelo; Fabbri, Sabrina; Valsecchi, Maria Grazia

    2014-01-01

    Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) lacks standardized clinical measurement. The objective of the current secondary analysis was to examine data from the CIPN Outcomes Standardization (CI-PeriNomS) study for associations between clinical examinations and neurophysiological abnormalities. Logistic regression estimated the strength of associations of vibration, pin, and monofilament examinations with lower limb sensory and motor amplitudes. Examinations were classified as normal (0), moderately abnormal (1), or severely abnormal (2). Among 218 participants, those with class 1 upper extremity (UE) and class 1 or 2 lower extremity (LE) monofilament abnormality were 2.79 (95%CI: 1.28-6.07), 3.49 (95%CI: 1.61-7.55) and 4.42 (95%CI: 1.35-14.46) times more likely to have abnormal sural nerve amplitudes, respectively, compared to individuals with normal examinations. Likewise, those with class 2 UE and class 1 or 2 LE vibration abnormality were 8.65 (95%CI: 1.81-41.42), 2.54 (95%CI: 1.19-5.41) and 7.47 (95%CI: 2.49-22.40) times more likely to have abnormal sural nerve amplitudes, respectively, compared to participants with normal examinations. Abnormalities in vibration and monofilament examinations are associated with abnormal sural nerve amplitudes and are useful in identifying CIPN. PMID:24814100

  19. Neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) fails as an early predictor of contrast induced nephropathy in chronic kidney disease (ANTI-CI-AKI study)

    PubMed Central

    Ribitsch, Werner; Schilcher, Gernot; Quehenberger, Franz; Pilz, Stefan; Portugaller, Rupert H.; Truschnig-Wilders, Martini; Zweiker, Robert; Brodmann, Marianne; Stiegler, Philipp; Rosenkranz, Alexander R.; Pickering, John W.; Horina, Joerg H.

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of urinary neutrophil gelatinase- associated lipocalin (uNGAL) in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) as an early biomarker for contrast induced acute kidney injury (CI-AKI) and to investigate whether patients with an uNGAL increase might benefit from an additional intravenous volume expansion with regard to CI-AKI-incidence. We performed a prospective randomized controlled trial in 617 CKD-patients undergoing intra-arterial angiography. Urinary NGAL was measured the day before and 4–6hrs after angiography. In the event of a significant rise of uNGAL patients were randomized either into Group A, who received intravenous saline post procedure or Group B, who did not receive post-procedural i.v. fluids. Ten patients (1.62%) exhibited a significant rise of uNGAL after angiography and were randomized of whom one developed a CI-AKI. In the entire cohort the incidence of CI-AKI was 9.4% (58 patients) resulting in a specificity of 98.4% (95% CI: 97.0–99.3%) and a sensitivity of 1.72% (95% CI: 0.044–9.2%) of uNGAL for the diagnosis of CI-AKI. In this study uNGAL failed to predict CI-AKI and was an inadequate triage tool to guide an early intervention strategy to prevent CI-AKI. Clinical Trial Registration: URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT01292317. PMID:28128223

  20. Advanced transmission studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coy, John J.; Bill, Robert C.

    1988-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center and the U.S. Army Aviation Systems Command share an interest in advancing the technology for helicopter propulsion systems. In particular, this paper presents highlights from that portion of the program in drive train technology and the related mechanical components. The major goals of the program are to increase the life, reliability, and maintainability; reduce the weight, noise, and vibration; and maintain the relatively high mechanical efficiency of the gear train. The current activity emphasizes noise reduction technology and analytical code development followed by experimental verification. Selected significant advances in technology for transmissions are reviewed, including advanced configurations and new analytical tools. Finally, the plan for future transmission research is presented.

  1. Advanced servomanipulator development

    SciTech Connect

    Kuban, D.P.

    1985-01-01

    The Advanced Servomanipulator (ASM) System consists of three major components: the ASM slave, the dual arm master controller (DAMC) or master, and the control system. The ASM is remotely maintainable force-reflecting servomanipulator developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) as part of the Consolidated Fuel Reprocessing Program. This new manipulator addresses requirements of advanced nuclear fuel reprocessing with emphasis on force reflection, remote maintainability, reliability, radiation tolerance, and corrosion resistance. The advanced servomanipulator is uniquely subdivided into remotely replaceable modules which will permit in situ manipulator repair by spare module replacement. Manipulator modularization and increased reliability are accomplished through a force transmission system that uses gears and torque tubes. Digital control algorithms and mechanical precision are used to offset the increased backlash, friction, and inertia resulting from the gear drives. This results in the first remotely maintainable force-reflecting servomanipulator in the world.

  2. Advanced thermionic energy conversion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Britt, E. J.; Fitzpatrick, G. D.; Hansen, L. K.; Rasor, N. S.

    1974-01-01

    Basic analytical and experimental exploration was conducted on several types of advanced thermionic energy converters, and preliminary analysis was performed on systems utilizing advanced converter performance. The Pt--Nb cylindrical diode which exhibited a suppressed arc drop, as described in the preceding report, was reassembled and the existence of the postulated hydrid mode of operation was tentatively confirmed. Initial data obtained on ignited and unignited triode operation in the demountable cesium vapor system essentially confirmed the design principles developed in earlier work, with a few exceptions. Three specific advanced converter concepts were selected as candidates for concentrated basic study and for practical evaluation in fixed-configuration converters. Test vehicles and test stands for these converters and a unique controlled-atmosphere station for converter assembly and processing were designed, and procurement was initiated.

  3. Advanced Aerodynamic Control Effectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Richard M.; Bauer, Steven X. S.

    1999-01-01

    A 1990 research program that focused on the development of advanced aerodynamic control effectors (AACE) for military aircraft has been reviewed and summarized. Data are presented for advanced planform, flow control, and surface contouring technologies. The data show significant increases in lift, reductions in drag, and increased control power, compared to typical aerodynamic designs. The results presented also highlighted the importance of planform selection in the design of a control effector suite. Planform data showed that dramatic increases in lift (greater than 25%) can be achieved with multiple wings and a sawtooth forebody. Passive porosity and micro drag generator control effector data showed control power levels exceeding that available from typical effectors (moving surfaces). Application of an advanced planform to a tailless concept showed benefits of similar magnitude as those observed in the generic studies.

  4. [Advanced Composites Technology Initiatives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Julian, Mark R.

    2002-01-01

    This final report closes out the W02 NASA Grant #NCC5-646. The FY02 grant for advanced technology initiatives through the Advanced Composites Technology Institute in Bridgeport, WV, at the Robert C. Byrd Institute (RCBI) Bridgeport Manufacturing Technology Center, is complete; all funding has been expended. RCBI continued to expand access to technology; develop and implement a workforce-training curriculum; improve material development; and provide prototyping and demonstrations of new and advanced composites technologies for West Virginia composites firms. The FY 02 efforts supported workforce development, technical training and the HST development effort of a super-lightweight composite carrier prototype and expanded the existing technical capabilities of the growing aerospace industry across West Virginia to provide additional support for NASA missions. Additionally, the Composites Technology and Training Center was awarded IS0 9001 - 2000 certification and Cleanroom Class 1000 certification during this report period.

  5. Advanced ramjet concepts program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leingang, J. L.

    1992-01-01

    Uniquely advantageous features, on both the performance and weight sides of the ledger, can be achieved through synergistic design integration of airbreathing and rocket technologies in the development of advanced orbital space transport propulsion systems of the combined cycle type. In the context of well understood advanced airbreathing and liquid rocket propulsion principles and practices, this precept of synergism is advanced mainly through six rather specific examples. These range from the detailed component level to the overall vehicle system level as follows: using jet compression; achieving a high area ratio rocket nozzle; ameliorating gas generator cycle rocket system deficiencies; using the in-duct special rocket thrust chamber assembly as the principal scramjet fuel injection operation; using the unstowed, covered fan as a duct closure for effecting high area ratio rocket mode operation; and creating a unique airbreathing rocket system via the onboard, cryogenic hydrogen induced air liquefaction process.

  6. Advances in diagnostic radiology.

    PubMed

    Runge, Val M

    2010-12-01

    Recent advances in diagnostic radiology are discussed on the basis of current publications in Investigative Radiology. Publications in the journal during 2009 and 2010 are reviewed, evaluating developments by modality and anatomic region. Technological advances continue to play a major role in the evolution and clinical practice of diagnostic radiology, and as such constitute a major publication focus. In the past 2 years, this includes advances in both magnetic resonance and computed tomography (in particular, the advent of dual energy computed tomography). An additional major focus of publications concerns contrast media, and in particular continuing research involving nephrogenic systemic fibrosis, its etiology, and differentiation of the gadolinium chelates on the basis of in vivo stability.

  7. Advanced rocket propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Obrien, Charles J.

    1993-01-01

    Existing NASA research contracts are supporting development of advanced reinforced polymer and metal matrix composites for use in liquid rocket engines of the future. Advanced rocket propulsion concepts, such as modular platelet engines, dual-fuel dual-expander engines, and variable mixture ratio engines, require advanced materials and structures to reduce overall vehicle weight as well as address specific propulsion system problems related to elevated operating temperatures, new engine components, and unique operating processes. High performance propulsion systems with improved manufacturability and maintainability are needed for single stage to orbit vehicles and other high performance mission applications. One way to satisfy these needs is to develop a small engine which can be clustered in modules to provide required levels of total thrust. This approach should reduce development schedule and cost requirements by lowering hardware lead times and permitting the use of existing test facilities. Modular engines should also reduce operational costs associated with maintenance and parts inventories.

  8. Advanced Hydrogen Turbine Development

    SciTech Connect

    Marra, John

    2015-09-30

    Under the sponsorship of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratories, Siemens has completed the Advanced Hydrogen Turbine Development Program to develop an advanced gas turbine for incorporation into future coal-based Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) plants. All the scheduled DOE Milestones were completed and significant technical progress was made in the development of new technologies and concepts. Advanced computer simulations and modeling, as well as subscale, full scale laboratory, rig and engine testing were utilized to evaluate and select concepts for further development. Program Requirements of: A 3 to 5 percentage point improvement in overall plant combined cycle efficiency when compared to the reference baseline plant; 20 to 30 percent reduction in overall plant capital cost when compared to the reference baseline plant; and NOx emissions of 2 PPM out of the stack. were all met. The program was completed on schedule and within the allotted budget

  9. Advanced fuel chemistry for advanced engines.

    SciTech Connect

    Taatjes, Craig A.; Jusinski, Leonard E.; Zador, Judit; Fernandes, Ravi X.; Miller, James A.

    2009-09-01

    Autoignition chemistry is central to predictive modeling of many advanced engine designs that combine high efficiency and low inherent pollutant emissions. This chemistry, and especially its pressure dependence, is poorly known for fuels derived from heavy petroleum and for biofuels, both of which are becoming increasingly prominent in the nation's fuel stream. We have investigated the pressure dependence of key ignition reactions for a series of molecules representative of non-traditional and alternative fuels. These investigations combined experimental characterization of hydroxyl radical production in well-controlled photolytically initiated oxidation and a hybrid modeling strategy that linked detailed quantum chemistry and computational kinetics of critical reactions with rate-equation models of the global chemical system. Comprehensive mechanisms for autoignition generally ignore the pressure dependence of branching fractions in the important alkyl + O{sub 2} reaction systems; however we have demonstrated that pressure-dependent 'formally direct' pathways persist at in-cylinder pressures.

  10. Advanced solar dynamic technology program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calogeras, James

    1990-01-01

    Viewgraphs and discussion on Advanced Solar Dynamic Technology Program are presented. Topics covered include: advanced solar dynamic technology program; advanced concentrators; advanced heat receivers; power conversion systems; dished all metal honeycomb sandwich panels; Stirling cavity heat pipe receiver; Brayton solar receiver; and thermal energy storage technology.

  11. Mixed valence character of anionic linear beryllium chains: a CAS-SCF and MR-CI study.

    PubMed

    Pastore, Mariachiara; Monari, Antonio; Evangelisti, Stefano; Leininger, Thierry

    2009-12-31

    A theoretical investigation on the mixed valence behavior, or bistability, of a series of anionic linear chains composed of beryllium atoms is presented. Calculations on Be(N)- (with N = 7, ..., 13) were performed at CAS-SCF and MR-CI levels by using an ANO basis set containing 6s4p3d2f contracted orbitals for each atom. Our results show a consistent gradual shift between different classes of mixed valence compounds as the number of beryllium atoms increases, from strong coupling (class III) toward valence-trapped (class II). Indeed, in the largest cases (N > 10), the anionic chains were found to become asymptotically closer to class I, where the coupling vanishes. The intramolecular electron-transfer parameters V(ab), E(barr), and E(opt) were calculated for each atomic chain. It is shown that the decrease of V(ab) with increasing N follows an exponential pattern.

  12. [História, Ciências, Saúde--Manguinhos: examining 12 years of regular circulation].

    PubMed

    Benchimol, Jaime L; Cerqueira Roberta, Cardoso; Martins, Ruth B; Mendonça, Amanda

    2007-01-01

    The article analyzes the trajectory of História, Ciências, Saúde--Manguinhos since it was first released in 1994. This multidisciplinary journal opens its pages to unpublished, peer-reviewed articles, images, documents, interviews, and other material that address issues and important figures in the history of medicine, public health, and the life sciences. Approaching from the perspectives of health and of historiography, the article explores the context in which the journal was born and discusses the daily workings of a scientific editorial office. Tables and graphs illustrate variations in the topics submitted for publication, acceptance and rejection rates for articles, the geographical origin of authors, and how the profiles of contributors and readers of the print and online versions differ in terms of their areas of interest.

  13. Research on the influence of ozone dissolved in the fuel-water emulsion on the parameters of the CI engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wojs, M. K.; Orliński, P.; Kamela, W.; Kruczyński, P.

    2016-09-01

    The article presents the results of empirical research on the impact of ozone dissolved in fuel-water emulsion on combustion process and concentration of toxic substances in CI engine. The effect of ozone presence in the emulsion and its influence on main engine characteristics (power, torque, fuel consumption) and selected parameters that characterize combustion process (levels of pressures and temperatures in combustion chamber, period of combustion delay, heat release rate, fuel burnt rate) is shown. The change in concentration of toxic components in exhausts gases when engine is fueled with ozonized emulsion was also identified. The empirical research and their analysis showed significant differences in the combustion process when fuel-water emulsion containing ozone was used. These differences include: increased power and efficiency of the engine that are accompanied by reduction in time of combustion delay and beneficial effects of ozone on HC, PM, CO and NOX emissions.

  14. An inhibitory RNA aptamer against the lambda cI repressor shows transcriptional activator activity in vivo.

    PubMed

    Ohuchi, Shoji; Suess, Beatrix

    2017-04-13

    An RNA aptamer is one of the promising components for constructing artificial genetic circuits. In this study, we developed a transcriptional activator based on an RNA aptamer against one of the most frequently applied repressor proteins, lambda phage cI. In vitro selection (SELEX), followed by in vivo screening identified an RNA aptamer with the intended transcriptional activator activity from an RNA pool containing a 40-nucleotide long random region. Quantitative analysis showed 35-fold elevation of reporter expression upon aptamer expression. These results suggest that the diversity of artificial transcriptional activators can be extended by employing RNA aptamers against repressor proteins to broaden the tools available for constructing genetic circuits. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  15. ENSO and salinity changes in the Ciénaga Grande de Santa Marta coastal lagoon system, Colombian Caribbean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanco, J. A.; Viloria, E. A.; Narváez B., J. C.

    2006-01-01

    Salinity changes in the Ciénaga Grande de Santa Marta and Pajarales Complex coastal lagoon system in northern Colombia, and their relation with local rainfall, tributaries' streamflow and ENSO, are analyzed. Being markedly low (<1321 mm yr -1), local rainfall is assumed to be insignificant for mean salinity changes. The non-linear model proposed explains the variations in salinity and tributaries' streamflow with ENSO intensity, measured as Southern Oscillation Index (SOI) anomaly. Streamflows are directly and salinity inversely correlated with SOI. Model analysis allowed to discriminate between natural and hydraulic management situations and also how the occurrence of different environmental scenarios reflected on salinity changes. The link between global climate variability and local conditions becomes clearer and worthy to be brought into account in management and decision making processes dealing with continental as well as other marine and coastal aquatic environments in the Caribbean region.

  16. Advancing cardiovascular tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Truskey, George A.

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular tissue engineering offers the promise of biologically based repair of injured and damaged blood vessels, valves, and cardiac tissue. Major advances in cardiovascular tissue engineering over the past few years involve improved methods to promote the establishment and differentiation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), scaffolds from decellularized tissue that may produce more highly differentiated tissues and advance clinical translation, improved methods to promote vascularization, and novel in vitro microphysiological systems to model normal and diseased tissue function. iPSC technology holds great promise, but robust methods are needed to further promote differentiation. Differentiation can be further enhanced with chemical, electrical, or mechanical stimuli. PMID:27303643

  17. Advances in periodontology.

    PubMed

    Tonetti, M S

    2000-10-01

    Advances in periodontal science and practice over the last decade have radically changed the understanding of periodontal diseases and have opened new, exciting prospects for both medical and surgical therapy of periodontal diseases. Establishment of the aetiology and pathogenesis of periodontitis, understanding of the unique genetic and environmental susceptibility profile of affected subjects, and recognition of the systemic implications of periodontal infections are the key research findings. The use of randomised, controlled, clinical trials has allowed the development of evidence-based periodontology. Adjunctive antimicrobial therapy, regenerative periodontal surgery, periodontal plastic surgery, bone regeneration surgery in the light of implant treatment, and advanced soft tissue management at implant sites have radically changed practice.

  18. Advancing cytometry for immunology.

    PubMed

    Cossarizza, Andrea; Nolan, John; Radbruch, Andreas; Tárnok, Attila

    2012-12-01

    Cytometry is a key technology for immunology. It allows researchers to scrutinize the cells of the immune system in molecular detail, and to assess phenotype and function at the level of individual cells, no matter how rare these cells may be. The International Society for the Advancement of Cytometry, ISAC, by way of its meetings, online resources and publications (e.g. Cytometry Part A and Current Protocols in Cytometry, which are all published by Wiley) track the ever advancing developments regarding cytometry instrumentation and reagents, and the analysis of complex data sets. In June this year in Leipzig, Germany, ISAC held its annual conference "CYTO 2012", a marketplace of innovation in cytometry.

  19. Advanced sensors technology survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, Tommy G.; Costello, David J.; Davis, Jerry G.; Horst, Richard L.; Lessard, Charles S.; Peel, H. Herbert; Tolliver, Robert

    1992-01-01

    This project assesses the state-of-the-art in advanced or 'smart' sensors technology for NASA Life Sciences research applications with an emphasis on those sensors with potential applications on the space station freedom (SSF). The objectives are: (1) to conduct literature reviews on relevant advanced sensor technology; (2) to interview various scientists and engineers in industry, academia, and government who are knowledgeable on this topic; (3) to provide viewpoints and opinions regarding the potential applications of this technology on the SSF; and (4) to provide summary charts of relevant technologies and centers where these technologies are being developed.

  20. Advanced concepts for acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Keefe, D.

    1986-07-01

    Selected examples of advanced accelerator concepts are reviewed. Such plasma accelerators as plasma beat wave accelerator, plasma wake field accelerator, and plasma grating accelerator are discussed particularly as examples of concepts for accelerating relativistic electrons or positrons. Also covered are the pulsed electron-beam, pulsed laser accelerator, inverse Cherenkov accelerator, inverse free-electron laser, switched radial-line accelerators, and two-beam accelerator. Advanced concepts for ion acceleration discussed include the electron ring accelerator, excitation of waves on intense electron beams, and two-wave combinations. (LEW)

  1. Advanced engine study program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masters, A. I.; Galler, D. E.; Denman, T. F.; Shied, R. A.; Black, J. R.; Fierstein, A. R.; Clark, G. L.; Branstrom, B. R.

    1993-01-01

    A design and analysis study was conducted to provide advanced engine descriptions and parametric data for space transfer vehicles. The study was based on an advanced oxygen/hydrogen engine in the 7,500 to 50,000 lbf thrust range. Emphasis was placed on defining requirements for high-performance engines capable of achieving reliable and versatile operation in a space environment. Four variations on the expander cycle were compared, and the advantages and disadvantages of each were assessed. Parametric weight, envelope, and performance data were generated over a range of 7,500 to 50,000 lb thrust and a wide range of chamber pressure and nozzle expansion ratio.

  2. Advanced Solar Power Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atkinson, J. H.; Hobgood, J. M.

    1984-01-01

    The Advanced Solar Power System (ASPS) concentrator uses a technically sophisticated design and extensive tooling to produce very efficient (80 to 90%) and versatile energy supply equipment which is inexpensive to manufacture and requires little maintenance. The advanced optical design has two 10th order, generalized aspheric surfaces in a Cassegrainian configuration which gives outstanding performance and is relatively insensitive to temperature changes and wind loading. Manufacturing tolerances also have been achieved. The key to the ASPS is the direct absorption of concentrated sunlight in the working fluid by radiative transfers in a black body cavity. The basic ASPS design concepts, efficiency, optical system, and tracking and focusing controls are described.

  3. Advanced Monitoring systems initiative

    SciTech Connect

    R.J. Venedam; E.O. Hohman; C.F. Lohrstorfer; S.J. Weeks; J.B. Jones; W.J. Haas

    2004-09-30

    The Advanced Monitoring Systems Initiative (AMSI) actively searches for promising technologies and aggressively moves them from the research bench into DOE/NNSA end-user applications. There is a large unfulfilled need for an active element that reaches out to identify and recruit emerging sensor technologies into the test and evaluation function. Sensor research is ubiquitous, with the seeds of many novel concepts originating in the university systems, but at present these novel concepts do not move quickly and efficiently into real test environments. AMSI is a widely recognized, self-sustaining ''business'' accelerating the selection, development, testing, evaluation, and deployment of advanced monitoring systems and components.

  4. Advanced flight software reconfiguraton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porcher, Bryan

    1991-01-01

    Information is given in viewgraph form on advanced flight software reconfiguration. Reconfiguration is defined as identifying mission and configuration specific requirements, controlling mission and configuration specific data, binding this information to the flight software code to perform specific missions, and the release and distribution of the flight software. The objectives are to develop, demonstrate, and validate advanced software reconfiguration tools and techniques; to demonstrate reconfiguration approaches on Space Station Freedom (SSF) onboard systems displays; and to interactively test onboard systems displays, flight software, and flight data.

  5. MR Neurography: Advances

    PubMed Central

    Chhabra, Avneesh; Zhao, Lianxin; Carrino, John A.; Trueblood, Eo; Koceski, Saso; Shteriev, Filip; Lenkinski, Lionel; Sinclair, Christopher D. J.; Andreisek, Gustav

    2013-01-01

    High resolution and high field magnetic resonance neurography (MR neurography, MRN) is shown to have excellent anatomic capability. There have been considerable advances in the technology in the last few years leading to various feasibility studies using different structural and functional imaging approaches in both clinical and research settings. This paper is intended to be a useful seminar for readers who want to gain knowledge of the advancements in the MRN pulse sequences currently used in clinical practice as well as learn about the other techniques on the horizon aimed at better depiction of nerve anatomy, pathology, and potential noninvasive evaluation of nerve degeneration or regeneration. PMID:23589774

  6. Advanced Neuroimaging of Tinnitus.

    PubMed

    Raghavan, Prashant; Steven, Andrew; Rath, Tanya; Gandhi, Dheeraj

    2016-05-01

    Although tinnitus may originate in damage to the peripheral auditory apparatus, its perception and distressing symptomatology are consequences of alterations to auditory, sensory, and limbic neural networks. This has been described in several studies, some using advanced structural MR imaging techniques such as diffusion tensor imaging. An understanding of these complex changes could enable development of targeted treatment. New MR imaging techniques enabling detailed depiction of the labyrinth may be useful when diagnosis of Meniere disease is equivocal. Advances in computed tomography and MR imaging have enabled noninvasive diagnosis of dural arteriovenous fistulae.

  7. Advanced Containment System

    DOEpatents

    Kostelnik, Kevin M.; Kawamura, Hideki; Richardson, John G.; Noda, Masaru

    2005-02-08

    An advanced containment system for containing buried waste and associated leachate. The advanced containment system comprises a plurality of casing sections with each casing section interlocked to an adjacent casing section. Each casing section includes a complementary interlocking structure that interlocks with the complementary interlocking structure on an adjacent casing section. A barrier filler substantially fills the casing sections and may substantially fill the spaces of the complementary interlocking structure to form a substantially impermeable barrier. Some of the casing sections may include sensors so that the casing sections and the zone of interest may be remotely monitored after the casing sections are emplaced in the ground.

  8. Advanced Imaging Tracker

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-06-01

    document requires that it 1e returncd: ADVANCED IMACINGC TRACKER Dr . L. E. Schmutz Contractor: Adaptive Optics Associates, Inc. Contt-ict Number: F30602-80...Code Number: IE20 Period of Worl: Covered: jun 80 - D’:c 81 Principal Investigator: Dr . Larry Schmut~z Phone: 617 547-2786 Project Engineer: Captaia...yaJPODCVR~ ADVANCED IMAGING TRACKER 10Jun 80 - ’,’ Dec 81 𔄃 PiRFORMiNO7 01G. REPORT NUMBER 7 ATII~(. ONTPA OR GRANTY NUMDERf.) Dr . 1L. E. Schiiut

  9. Depression and Advanced Complications of Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Elizabeth H.B.; Rutter, Carolyn M.; Katon, Wayne; Heckbert, Susan R.; Ciechanowski, Paul; Oliver, Malia M.; Ludman, Evette J.; Young, Bessie A.; Williams, Lisa H.; McCulloch, David K.; Von Korff, Michael

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To prospectively examine the association of depression with risks for advanced macrovascular and microvascular complications among patients with type 2 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS A longitudinal cohort of 4,623 primary care patients with type 2 diabetes was enrolled in 2000–2002 and followed through 2005–2007. Advanced microvascular complications included blindness, end-stage renal disease, amputations, and renal failure deaths. Advanced macrovascular complications included myocardial infarction, stroke, cardiovascular procedures, and deaths. Medical record review, ICD-9 diagnostic and procedural codes, and death certificate data were used to ascertain outcomes in the 5-year follow-up. Proportional hazard models analyzed the association between baseline depression and risks of adverse outcomes. RESULTS After adjustment for prior complications and demographic, clinical, and diabetes self-care variables, major depression was associated with significantly higher risks of adverse microvascular outcomes (hazard ratio 1.36 [95% CI 1.05–1.75]) and adverse macrovascular outcomes (1.24 [1.0–1.54]). CONCLUSIONS Among people with type 2 diabetes, major depression is associated with an increased risk of clinically significant microvascular and macrovascular complications over the ensuing 5 years, even after adjusting for diabetes severity and self-care activities. Clinical and public health significance of these findings rises as the incidence of type 2 diabetes soars. Further research is needed to clarify the underlying mechanisms for this association and to test interventions to reduce the risk of diabetes complications among patients with comorbid depression. PMID:19933989

  10. Modified Stability Charts for Rock Slopes Based on the Hoek-Brown Failure Criterion / Zmodyfikowane Diagramy Stabilności Skalistych Zboczy Otrzymane W Oparciu O Warunek Wytrzymałości Hoeka-Browna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nekouei, Mahdi; Ahangari, Kaveh

    2013-09-01

    Only an article rendered by Lia et al. in 2008 has represented charts based on Hoek-Brown criterion for rock slopes, however, these charts are not precise and efficient. Because of this problem, a modification is suggested for the mentioned charts in this study. The new charts are calculated according to four methods. Among the methods, one relates to finite element method using Phase2 software. The other three methods are Janbu, Bishop and Fellenius that belong to limit equilibrium method by using Slide software. For each slope angle, the method having high correlation coefficient is selected as the best one. Then, final charts are rendered according to the selected method and its specific equations. Among forty equations, twenty-five ones or 62.5% relate to numerical method and Phase2 software, six ones or 15% belong to Fellenius limit equilibrium, six ones or 15% relate to Bishop limit equilibrium, and three ones or 7.5% belong to Janbu limit equilibrium. In order to validate new charts, slope stability analysis is carried out for several sections of Chadormalu iron ore open pit mine, Iran. The error percentage of new charts in limit equilibrium method using Slide software and in Bishop method for slopes of Chadormalu iron ore mine are rendered and compared. The charts on a basis of Hoek-Brown failure criterion for rock slopes show less than ±4% error. This indicates that these charts are appropriate tools and their safety factor is optimal for rock slopes. Diagramy stabilności skalistych zboczy otrzymane w oparciu o warunek wytrzymałości Hoeka- Browna znaleźć można jedynie w pracy Lia et al. (2008), choć wykresy te nie są absolutnie dokładne i jasne. Dlatego też w niniejszym artykule zaproponowano pewną modyfikację diagramów. Nowe wykresu sporządzono w oparciu o cztery metody. Jedna z metod opiera się na metodzie elementów skończonych i wykorzystuje oprogramowanie Phase2. Pozostałe trzy podejścia to metody Janbu, Bishopa i Felleniusa bazuj

  11. Helicobacter pylori Infection with Atrophic Gastritis Is an Independent Risk Factor for Advanced Colonic Neoplasm

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ji Young; Park, Hye Won; Choi, Ji Young; Lee, Jong-Soo; Koo, Ja Eun; Chung, Eun Ju; Chang, Hye-Sook; Choe, Jaewon; Yang, Dong-Hoon; Myung, Seung-Jae; Jung, Hwoon-Yong; Yang, Suk-Kyun; Byeon, Jeong-Sik

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims Helicobacter pylori is a major risk factor for atrophic gastritis (AG) and gastric cancer. The correlation between H. pylori, AG and colorectal neoplasm (CRN) has only been examined in a limited number of studies, and findings have been inconclusive. We aimed to investigate the association between H. pylori infection status, AG and advanced CRN. Methods This cross-sectional study investigated the relationship between the presence of serum anti-H. pylori IgG antibodies, AG, and advanced CRN in 6,351 consecutive asymptomatic subjects who underwent a screening colonoscopy. Results A total of 316 participants (5.0%) had advanced CRN. H. pylori seropositivity was 61.3%. In a univariate analysis, the presence of H. pylori infection was associated with advanced CRN (odds ratio [OR], 1.49; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.17 to 1.91; p=0.001). H. pylori infection was associated with an increased risk of advanced CRN after adjusting for clinically relevant confounders (OR, 1.34; 95% CI, 1.04 to 1.72; p=0.023). H. pylori-related AG was significantly associated with the risk of advanced CRN (OR, 1.40; 95% CI, 1.03 to 1.91; p=0.030), whereas H. pylori infection without AG was not. Conclusions H. pylori infection increased the risk of advanced CRN, especially when it was combined with AG. Strict colonoscopy screening and surveillance may be warranted in those with H. pylori-positive AG. PMID:27458180

  12. Advanced Distribution Management System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avazov, Artur R.; Sobinova, Liubov A.

    2016-02-01

    This article describes the advisability of using advanced distribution management systems in the electricity distribution networks area and considers premises of implementing ADMS within the Smart Grid era. Also, it gives the big picture of ADMS and discusses the ADMS advantages and functionalities.

  13. Rewriting in Advanced Composition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stone, William B.

    A college English instructor made an informal comparison of rewriting habits of students in a freshman composition course and two advanced composition courses. Notes kept on student rewriting focused on this central question: given peer and instructor response to their papers and a choice as to what and how to rewrite, what will students decide to…

  14. Advanced Learning Environments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hubal, Robert C.; Helms, Robert F.; Triplett, Suzanne E.

    Leading-edge technologies, integrated with emerging educational methodologies, make the Advanced Learning Environment (ALE) model cost effective and efficient for learning. The ALE integrates virtual reality and other enabling technologies such as natural language processing, animation, video, courseware, sound, projection, CD-ROM, and distance…

  15. Advanced Chemical Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, Leslie, Jr.

    2006-01-01

    Advanced Chemical Propulsion (ACP) provides near-term incremental improvements in propulsion system performance and/or cost. It is an evolutionary approach to technology development that produces useful products along the way to meet increasingly more demanding mission requirements while focusing on improving payload mass fraction to yield greater science capability. Current activities are focused on two areas: chemical propulsion component, subsystem, and manufacturing technologies that offer measurable system level benefits; and the evaluation of high-energy storable propellants with enhanced performance for in-space application. To prioritize candidate propulsion technology alternatives, a variety of propulsion/mission analyses and trades have been conducted for SMD missions to yield sufficient data for investment planning. They include: the Advanced Chemical Propulsion Assessment; an Advanced Chemical Propulsion System Model; a LOx-LH2 small pumps conceptual design; a space storables propellant study; a spacecraft cryogenic propulsion study; an advanced pressurization and mixture ratio control study; and a pump-fed vs. pressure-fed study.

  16. Advanced Gas Turbine (AGT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    The development and progress of the Advanced Gas Turbine engine program is examined. An analysis of the role of ceramics in the design and major engine components is included. Projected fuel economy, emissions and performance standards, and versatility in fuel use are also discussed.

  17. Cartoons as Advance Organizers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kovalik, Cindy L.; Williams, Matthew A.

    2011-01-01

    This exploratory study investigated student reaction to the use of cartoons as advance organizers for online discussions in an online course. A convenience sample of 15 students participated in the study by contributing cartoons, participating in online discussions, and completing a survey. Overall, survey results indicated student reaction to the…

  18. Advanced turbine systems program

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkes, C.; Mukavetz, D.W.; Knickerbocker, T.K.; Ali, S.A.

    1992-12-31

    In accordance with the goals of the DOE program, improvements in the gas turbine are the primary focus of Allison activity during Phase I. To this end Allison conducted a survey of potentially applicable gas turbine cycles and selected the advanced combined cycle as reference system. Extensive analysis of two versions of the advanced combined cycle was performed against the requirement for a 60% thermal efficiency (LHV) utility-sized, natural gas fired system. This analysis resulted in technology requirements for this system. Additional analysis determined emissions potential for the system, established a coal-fueled derivative system and a commercialization plan. This report deals with the technical requirements for a system that meets the thermal efficiency goal. Allison initially investigated four basic thermodynamic cycles: Humid air turbine, intercalate-recuperated systems, advanced combined cycle, chemically recuperated cycle. Our survey and cycle analysis indicated that au had the potential of reaching 60% thermal efficiency. We also concluded that engine hot section technology would be a critical technology regardless of which cycle was chosen. Based on this result Allison chose to concentrate on the advanced combined cycle. This cycle is well known and understood by the utility turbine user community and is therefore likely to be acceptable to users.

  19. Advanced turbine systems program

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkes, C.; Mukavetz, D.W.; Knickerbocker, T.K.; Ali, S.A.

    1992-01-01

    In accordance with the goals of the DOE program, improvements in the gas turbine are the primary focus of Allison activity during Phase I. To this end Allison conducted a survey of potentially applicable gas turbine cycles and selected the advanced combined cycle as reference system. Extensive analysis of two versions of the advanced combined cycle was performed against the requirement for a 60% thermal efficiency (LHV) utility-sized, natural gas fired system. This analysis resulted in technology requirements for this system. Additional analysis determined emissions potential for the system, established a coal-fueled derivative system and a commercialization plan. This report deals with the technical requirements for a system that meets the thermal efficiency goal. Allison initially investigated four basic thermodynamic cycles: Humid air turbine, intercalate-recuperated systems, advanced combined cycle, chemically recuperated cycle. Our survey and cycle analysis indicated that au had the potential of reaching 60% thermal efficiency. We also concluded that engine hot section technology would be a critical technology regardless of which cycle was chosen. Based on this result Allison chose to concentrate on the advanced combined cycle. This cycle is well known and understood by the utility turbine user community and is therefore likely to be acceptable to users.

  20. Oklahoma's Advanced School Funding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Gary

    A new means of funding school operations known as advanced school funding allows Oklahoma schools financing during the temporary cash shortfalls. The program consists of the Oklahoma Development Authority issuing revenue bonds purchased by E. F. Hutton and Company, Inc., which then sells the tax free bonds to investors throughout the country. A…