Science.gov

Sample records for advanced breast cancers

  1. Palbociclib for Advanced Breast Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    An interim analysis of the PALOMA3 trial shows that women with hormone receptor-positive metastatic breast cancer who received palbociclib plus fulvestrant had longer progression-free survival rates than women who received a placebo plus fulvestrant.

  2. Radiation treatment for breast cancer. Recent advances.

    PubMed Central

    Chow, Edward

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review recent advances in radiation therapy in treatment of breast cancer. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE: MEDLINE and CANCERLIT were searched using the MeSH words breast cancer, ductal carcinoma in situ, sentinel lymph node biopsy, and postmastectomy radiation. Randomized studies have shown the efficacy of radiation treatment for ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) and for invasive breast cancer. MAIN MESSAGE: Lumpectomy followed by radiation is effective treatment for DCIS. In early breast cancer, shorter radiation schedules are as efficacious for local control and short-term cosmetic results as traditional fractionation regimens. Sentinel lymph node biopsy is done in specialized cancer centres; regional radiation is recommended for patients with four or more positive axillary lymph nodes. Postmastectomy radiation has been shown to have survival benefits for high-risk premenopausal patients. Systemic metastases from breast cancer usually respond satisfactorily to radiation. CONCLUSION: Radiation therapy continues to have an important role in treatment of breast cancer. There have been great advances in radiation therapy in the last decade, but they have raised controversy. Further studies are needed to address the controversies. PMID:12113193

  3. Advancing breast cancer survivorship among African-American women.

    PubMed

    Coughlin, Steven S; Yoo, Wonsuk; Whitehead, Mary S; Smith, Selina A

    2015-09-01

    Advances have occurred in breast cancer survivorship but, for many African-American women, challenges and gaps in relevant information remain. This article identifies opportunities to address disparities in breast cancer survival and quality of life, and thereby to increase breast cancer survivorship among African-American women. For breast cancer survivors, common side effects, lasting for long periods after cancer treatment, include fatigue, loss of strength, difficulty sleeping, and sexual dysfunction. For addressing physical and mental health concerns, a variety of interventions have been evaluated, including exercise and weight training, dietary interventions, yoga and mindfulness-based stress reduction, and support groups or group therapy. Obesity has been associated with breast cancer recurrence and poorer survival. Relative to white survivors, African-American breast cancer survivors are more likely to be obese and less likely to engage in physical activity, although exercise improves overall quality of life and cancer-related fatigue. Considerable information exists about the effectiveness of such interventions for alleviating distress and improving quality of life among breast cancer survivors, but few studies have focused specifically on African-American women with a breast cancer diagnosis. Studies have identified a number of personal factors that are associated with resilience, increased quality of life, and positive adaptation to a breast cancer diagnosis. There is a need for a better understanding of breast cancer survivorship among African-American women. Additional evaluations of interventions for improving the quality of life and survival of African-American breast cancer survivors are desirable. PMID:26303657

  4. Advanced imaging techniques for the detection of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Jochelson, Maxine

    2012-01-01

    Mammography is the only breast imaging examination that has been shown to reduce breast cancer mortality. Population-based sensitivity is 75% to 80%, but sensitivity in high-risk women with dense breasts is only in the range of 50%. Breast ultrasound and contrast-enhanced breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have become additional standard modalities used in the diagnosis of breast cancer. In high-risk women, ultrasound is known to detect approximately four additional cancers per 1,000 women. MRI is exquisitely sensitive for the detection of breast cancer. In high-risk women, it finds an additional four to five cancers per 100 women. However, both ultrasound and MRI are also known to lead to a large number of additional benign biopsies and short-term follow-up examinations. Many new breast imaging tools have improved and are being developed to improve on our current ability to diagnose early-stage breast cancer. These can be divided into two groups. The first group is those that are advances in current techniques, which include digital breast tomosynthesis and contrast-enhanced mammography and ultrasound with elastography or microbubbles. The other group includes new breast imaging platforms such as breast computed tomography (CT) scanning and radionuclide breast imaging. These are exciting advances. However, in this era of cost and radiation containment, it is imperative to look at all of them objectively to see which will provide clinically relevant additional information. PMID:24451711

  5. Combination Therapy Shows Promise for Treating Advanced Breast Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    Adding the drug everolimus (Afinitor®) to exemestane helped postmenopausal women whose advanced breast cancer had stopped responding to hormonal therapy live about 4 months longer without the disease progressing than women who received exemestane alone.

  6. Azacitidine and Entinostat in Treating Patients With Advanced Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-26

    Estrogen Receptor Negative; Estrogen Receptor Positive; HER2/Neu Negative; Male Breast Carcinoma; Progesterone Receptor Negative; Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Triple-Negative Breast Carcinoma

  7. Surgical adjuvant treatment of locally advanced breast cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Townsend, C M; Abston, S; Fish, J C

    1985-01-01

    The reported incidence of local recurrence after mastectomy for locally advanced breast cancer (TNM Stage III and IV) is between 30% and 50%. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of radiation therapy (XRT) followed by total mastectomy on the incidence of local recurrence in patients with locally advanced breast cancer. Fifty-three patients who presented with locally advanced breast cancer, without distant metastases, were treated with XRT (4500-5000 R) to the breast, chest wall, and regional lymph nodes. Five weeks after completion of XRT, total mastectomy was performed. There were no operative deaths. The complications that occurred in 22 patients after surgery were flap necrosis, wound infection, and seroma. Patients have been followed from 3 to 134 months. Twenty-five patients are alive (3-134 months), 12 free of disease; 28 patients have died with distant metastases (6-67 months). Isolated local recurrence occurred in only two patients. Four patients had local and distant recurrence (total local recurrence is 6/53). The remaining patients all developed distant metastases. We have devised a treatment strategy which significantly decreases the incidence of local recurrence in patients with locally advanced breast cancer. However, the rapid appearance of distant metastases emphasizes the need for systemically active therapy in patients with locally advanced breast cancer. PMID:3994434

  8. Surgery for Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Next Topic Breast-conserving surgery (lumpectomy) Surgery for breast cancer Most women with breast cancer have some type ... Relieve symptoms of advanced cancer Surgery to remove breast cancer There are two main types of surgery to ...

  9. Advances in Breast Cancer: Pathways to Personalized Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Grushko, Tatyana A.; Nanda, Rita; Huo, Dezheng

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is a complex disease caused by the progressive accumulation of multiple gene mutations combined with epigenetic dysregulation of critical genes and protein pathways. There is substantial interindividual variability in both the age at diagnosis and phenotypic expression of the disease. With an estimated 1,152,161 new breast cancer cases diagnosed worldwide per year, cancer control efforts in the postgenome era should be focused at both population and individual levels to develop novel risk assessment and treatment strategies that will further reduce the morbidity and mortality associated with the disease. The discovery that mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes increase the risk of breast and ovarian cancers has radically transformed our understanding of the genetic basis of breast cancer, leading to improved management of high-risk women. A better understanding of tumor host biology has led to improvements in the multidisciplinary management of breast cancer, and traditional pathologic evaluation is being complemented by more sophisticated genomic approaches. A number of genomic biomarkers have been developed for clinical use, and increasingly, pharmacogenetic end points are being incorporated into clinical trial design. For women diagnosed with breast cancer, prognostic or predictive information is most useful when coupled with targeted therapeutic approaches, very few of which exist for women with triple-negative breast cancer or those with tumors resistant to chemotherapy. The immediate challenge is to learn how to use the molecular characteristics of an individual and their tumor to improve detection and treatment, and ultimately to prevent the development of breast cancer. The five articles in this edition of CCR Focus highlight recent advances and future directions on the pathway to individualized approaches for the early detection, treatment, and prevention of breast cancer. PMID:19088015

  10. Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Breast Cancer What is Breast Cancer? How Tumors Form The body is made up ... tumors form in the breast tissue. Who Gets Breast Cancer? Breast cancer is one of the most common ...

  11. Pertuzumab, Trastuzumab, and Paclitaxel Albumin-Stabilized Nanoparticle Formulation in Treating Patients With HER2-Positive Advanced Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-23

    HER2-positive Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Breast Adenocarcinoma; Inflammatory Breast Carcinoma

  12. Coexistence of malignant phyllodes tumor and her2-positive locally advanced breast cancer in distinct breasts: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Tomoi; Muto, Ichiro; Sakai, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Phyllodes tumor of the breast is a rare biphasic neoplasm, accounting for less than 1% of all breast tumors. Coexistence of phyllodes tumor and breast cancer in distinct breasts is extremely rare. Case presentation A 47-year-old Japanese woman presented with bilateral breast lumps. A HER2-positive, unresectable invasive carcinoma in the right breast and fibroadenoma in the left were diagnosed via core needle biopsy. During chemotherapy with anti-HER2 therapy, the breast cancer shrank quickly, while the left breast lump suddenly enlarged. Under a diagnosis of malignant neoplasm of the breast, left mastectomy was performed. Malignant phyllodes tumor was diagnosed by postoperative histological examination and recurred in multiple areas as early as 2 months after surgery. Discussion Only 10 cases of coexisting phyllodes tumor and breast cancer in distinct breasts have been reported in the English literature. Phyllodes tumor associated with breast cancer in distinct breasts tends to be malignant. This is the first case of phyllodes tumor rapidly enlarging during anti-HER2 chemotherapy for locally advanced HER2-positive breast cancer. Conclusion Even during effective treatment of advanced or recurrent breast cancer, attention should also be paid to the contralateral breast for the possible association of a second malignancy such as phyllodes tumor. PMID:26773878

  13. [Certain aspects of neoadjuvant therapy of locally advanced breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Voznyĭ, E K; Gurov, S N; Dobrovol'skaia, N Iu

    2001-01-01

    The paper presents the results of a complex investigation of patients with locally-advanced breast cancer who received neoadjuvant chemotherapy or chemoradiation at initial stage. The clinical and pathomorphological effects, nature of neoadjuvant therapy and number of courses were followed up for 5- and 10-year periods. A direct correlation was found between number of courses for chemotherapy-sensitive patients, on the one hand, and greater effect, more intensive medicinal pathomorphism and longer recurrence-free survival, particularly, at later stages, on the other. PMID:11826490

  14. Paclitaxel Albumin-Stabilized Nanoparticle Formulation in Treating Older Patients With Locally Advanced or Metastatic Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-09

    Male Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; HER2-positive Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer

  15. Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Breast cancer affects one in eight women during their lives. Breast cancer kills more women in the United States ... cancer. No one knows why some women get breast cancer, but there are a number of risk ...

  16. Advances in the surgical treatment of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Xing, Lei; He, Qiang; Wang, Yuan-Yuan; Li, Hong-Yuan; Ren, Guo-Sheng

    2016-06-01

    Breast cancer has become the top malignant neoplasm in Chinese women with an increasing risk of morbidity and mortality. As a crucial part of comprehensive treatment of breast cancer, breast surgical technique is ceaselessly ameliorating and enriching its features. With the purpose of achieving minimal surgical intervention and satisfactory cosmetic results, the trend of mammary surgery is focusing on minimally invasive treatment and aesthetics in the 21st century. This article gives an overview of the most representative surgical procedures, such as breast conservative surgery, sentinel lymph node dissection, oncoplastic technique and breast reconstructive surgery. PMID:27265302

  17. HSP90 Inhibitor AT13387 and Paclitaxel in Treating Patients With Advanced Triple Negative Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-15

    Estrogen Receptor Negative; HER2/Neu Negative; Progesterone Receptor Negative; Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Triple-Negative Breast Carcinoma

  18. Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... are here Home > Types of Cancer > Breast Cancer Breast Cancer This is Cancer.Net’s Guide to Breast Cancer. Use the menu below to choose the Overview/ ... social workers, and patient advocates. Cancer.Net Guide Breast Cancer Overview Statistics Medical Illustrations Risk Factors Screening Symptoms ...

  19. What Is Breast Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Next Topic Types of breast cancers What is breast cancer? Breast cancer starts when cells in the breast ... breast cancer? ” and Non-cancerous Breast Conditions . How Breast Cancer Spreads Breast cancer can spread through the lymph ...

  20. Advances in Breast Cancer – Looking Back over the Year

    PubMed Central

    Lüftner, D.; Lux, M. P.; Maass, N.; Schütz, F.; Schwidde, I.; Fasching, P. A.; Fehm, T.; Janni, W.; Kümmel, S.; Kolberg, H.-C.

    2012-01-01

    Treatment options as well as the characteristics for therapeutic decisions in patients with primary and advanced breast cancer are increasing in number and variety. New targeted therapies in combination with established chemotherapy schemes are broadening the spectrum, yet not every new, promising combination achieves a better result. New data from the field of pharmacogenomics point to prognostic and predictive factors that take not only the properties of the tumour but also the genetic disposition of the patient into consideration. Current therapeutic decision-making is thus based on a combination of classical clinical and modern molecular biomarkers. Health-economic concerns are also being taken into consideration more frequently, meaning political decisions may also become a factor. This review presents the trends over the past year. PMID:26640285

  1. Breast cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... of targeted therapy. It blocks certain hormones that fuel cancer growth. Cancer treatment can be local or ... breast cancer should not drink alcohol at all) Alternative Names Cancer - breast; Carcinoma - ductal; Carcinoma - lobular; DCIS; ...

  2. [Advances in studies on metabolic syndrome and breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Cao, Li; Yao, Guangyu; Hu, Xiaolei; Chen, Lujia; Ye, Changsheng

    2015-12-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most common malignancies in women. Over these years, the morbidity of metabolic syndrome (MS) has also been increasing in China, probably due to changes in economies and lifestyles. As a result, the association to between these two diseases has at tracted much attention. Results demonstrated the presence of MS was associated with breast cancer risk, and the risk became higher when more MS components were present compared to no components. Moreover, a specific association was indicated between MS and breast cancer recurrence and metastasis to some extent as well. Further, for breast cancer patients, being diagnosed with MS can increase the mortality and lead to poor prognosis. The mechanisms underlying the association is not clear yet, but several factors are speculated to be the possible causes, including the elevated level of insulin, insulin like growth factor-1, leptin and pro-inflammatory cytokines, the decreased level of adiponectin as well as the interaction between DBC1 and SIRT1. The prognosis of patients with breast cancer combined MS can be improved by means of changing diet habits, increasing physical activities and drug-intervention. Although the specific mechanisms underlying the association are still need to be elucidated, better understanding of the association must help us with new strategies for the prevention and treatment of breast cancer. PMID:26850671

  3. Selective Mastectomy in the Management of Locally Advanced Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Ahern, Verity . E-mail: verity.ahern@swahs.healthnsw.gov.au; Boyages, John; Gebski, Val M. Stat; Moon, Dominic; Wilcken, Nicholas

    2007-07-15

    Purpose: To evaluate local control for patients with locally advanced noninflammatory breast cancer (LABC) managed by selective mastectomy. Methods and Materials: Between 1979 and 1996, 176 patients with LABC were prospectively managed by chemotherapy (CT)-irradiation (RT)-CT without routine mastectomy. All surviving patients were followed for a minimum of 5 years. Results: A total of 132 patients (75%) had a T4 tumor and 22 (12.5%) supraclavicular nodal disease. The clinical complete response rate was 91% (160/176), which included 13 patients who underwent mastectomy and 2 an iridium wire implant. The first site of failure was local for 43 patients (breast {+-} axilla for 38); 27 of these patients underwent salvage mastectomy and 11 did not for an overall mastectomy rate of 23% (40/176). If all 176 patients had undergone routine mastectomy (136 extra mastectomies), 11 additional patients may have avoided an unsalvageable first local relapse. The others would have either have not had a local relapse or would have suffered local relapse after distant disease. No tumor or treatment related factor was found to predict local disease at death. Median disease-free and overall survival for all patients was 26 and 52 months, respectively. Conclusions: Selective mastectomy in LABC may not jeopardize local control or survival.

  4. Saracatinib in Treating Patients With Metastatic or Locally Advanced Breast Cancer That Cannot Be Removed By Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-04-02

    Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Male Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

  5. Does Multidisciplinary Care Enhance the Management of Advanced Breast Cancer?: Evaluation of Advanced Breast Cancer Multidisciplinary Team Meetings

    PubMed Central

    Chirgwin, Jacquie; Craike, Melinda; Gray, Christine; Watty, Kathy; Mileshkin, Linda; Livingston, Patricia M.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the contribution of the advanced breast cancer (ABC) multidisciplinary team meetings (MDMs) to patient care and clinical outcomes. Methods: Members of ABC MDMs at two health services completed questionnaires in November 2007. The questionnaire asked about the performance of the MDMs and their contribution to improvement in patient care in five domains: medical management, psychosocial care, palliative care, care in the community, and benefits for team members. A final section covered the perceived value and importance of the MDM in patient management. Descriptive statistics (frequencies, mean, and standard deviation) were used to summarize the performance, improvement, and importance scores. Results: A total of 27 multidisciplinary team members (73%) completed the questionnaire. The MDM performed best in medical management (mean performance score out of 5 [M] = 3.78) and palliative care (M = 3.77). These were also the areas that were most improved through the MDM. Benefits to team members and care in the community (both M = 3.05) ranked lowest by both measures. The MDM provided the most benefit for patient management in the areas of “awareness of services available” (M = 4.32), “efficiency of referrals” (M = 4.27) and “supportive care for patients” (M = 4.27). “Awareness of services available,” “psychological care for patients,” and “continuity of care” were considered the most important (M = 4.64). Conclusion: The study provides evidence that MDMs make an important contribution to the logistical and medical management of patients with advanced breast cancer. PMID:21358959

  6. [Male breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Mattson, Johanna; Vehmanen, Leena

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is rare in men. Diagnosis of the illness may be delayed due to the fact that the doctor and the patient fail to suspect it. Male breast cancer is treated mainly on the same principles as female breast cancer. A man affected with breast cancer should always be directed to genetic testing, as inherited mutations increasing the risk of developing cancer are more common than in female breast cancer. Most breast cancers in men are hormone receptor positive. Among hormone treatments, the antiestrogen tamoxifen exhibits the best efficacy both in early-state and advanced cases. PMID:27188086

  7. 1st International consensus guidelines for advanced breast cancer (ABC 1).

    PubMed

    Cardoso, F; Costa, A; Norton, L; Cameron, D; Cufer, T; Fallowfield, L; Francis, P; Gligorov, J; Kyriakides, S; Lin, N; Pagani, O; Senkus, E; Thomssen, C; Aapro, M; Bergh, J; Di Leo, A; El Saghir, N; Ganz, P A; Gelmon, K; Goldhirsch, A; Harbeck, N; Houssami, N; Hudis, C; Kaufman, B; Leadbeater, M; Mayer, M; Rodger, A; Rugo, H; Sacchini, V; Sledge, G; van't Veer, L; Viale, G; Krop, I; Winer, E

    2012-06-01

    The 1st international Consensus Conference for Advanced Breast Cancer (ABC 1) took place on November 2011, in Lisbon. Consensus guidelines for the management of this disease were developed. This manuscript summarizes these international consensus guidelines. PMID:22425534

  8. Locally Advanced Breast Cancer: Autologous Versus Implant-based Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Prousskaia, Elena; Chow, Whitney; Angelaki, Anna; Cirwan, Cleona; Hamed, Hisham; Farhadi, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Background: Recent papers and guidelines agree that patients with locally advanced breast cancer (LABC) should be offered breast reconstruction. Yet, the type of reconstruction in this group of patients is still a point of controversy. Methods: One hundred fourteen patients, treated for LABC from 2007 to 2013, were divided into 3 groups based on the reconstructive option: no reconstruction (NR), implant-based/expander-based reconstruction (IBR), and autologous tissue reconstruction (ATR). We analyzed demographics and compared delay in adjuvant therapy, length of hospitalization, surgical complications, failure of reconstruction, local recurrence, and disease-free survival. Results: Twenty-six patients had NR, 38 had IBR, and 50 had ATR. No significant difference was found in the percentage of patients who had their adjuvant treatment delayed [16% (NR) vs 22% (IBR) vs 14% (ATR)]. Mean length of hospitalization for the NR, IBR, and ATR groups was 2.7, 6, and 7.5 days, respectively. Complication rates requiring readmission were 36% (NR), 42% (IBR), and 32% (ATR). In the IBR group, 37% of implants were removed because of complications. Failure of reconstruction was 37% and 0% for the IBR and ATR groups, respectively. Local recurrence rates in the NR and Reconstruction (groups IBR and ATR combined) groups were 7% and 2%, respectively. Mean survival times in patients were 18 (NR), 10.3 (IBR), and 12.2 (ATR) months. Conclusions: No significant difference was found in the hospital stay length, adjuvant treatment delay, and complication rates between IBR and ATR. High rates of failed reconstruction suggest that the use of implants should be considered very carefully in patients with LABC. PMID:27014551

  9. Postmastectomy radiotherapy for locally advanced breast cancer receiving neoadjuvant chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Meattini, Icro; Cecchini, Sara; Di Cataldo, Vanessa; Saieva, Calogero; Francolini, Giulio; Scotti, Vieri; Bonomo, Pierluigi; Mangoni, Monica; Greto, Daniela; Nori, Jacopo; Orzalesi, Lorenzo; Casella, Donato; Simoncini, Roberta; Fambrini, Massimiliano; Bianchi, Simonetta; Livi, Lorenzo

    2014-01-01

    Neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) is widely used in locally advanced breast cancer (BC) treatment. The role of postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) after NAC is strongly debated. The aim of our analysis was to identify major prognostic factors in a single-center series, with emphasis on PMRT. From 1997 to 2011, 170 patients were treated with NAC and mastectomy at our center; 98 cases (57.6%) underwent PMRT and 72 cases (42.4%) did not receive radiation. At a median follow-up period of 7.7 years (range 2-16) for the whole cohort, median time to locoregional recurrence (LRR) was 3.3 years (range 0.7-12.4). The 5-year and 10-year actuarial LRR rate were 14.5% and 15.9%, respectively. At the multivariate analysis the factors that significantly correlated with survival outcome were ≥ 4 positive nodes (HR 5.0, 1.51-16.52; P = 0.035), extracapsular extension (HR 2.18, 1.37-3.46; P = 0.009), and estrogen receptor positive disease (HR 0.57, 0.36-0.90; P = 0.003). Concerning LRR according to use of radiation, PMRT reduced LRR for patient with clinical T3 staged disease (P = 0.015). Our experience confirmed the impact of pathological nodal involvement on survival outcome. PMRT was found to improve local control in patients presenting with clinical T3 tumors, regardless of the response to chemotherapy. PMID:25045694

  10. p53 mutations and overexpression in locally advanced breast cancers.

    PubMed Central

    Faille, A.; De Cremoux, P.; Extra, J. M.; Linares, G.; Espie, M.; Bourstyn, E.; De Rocquancourt, A.; Giacchetti, S.; Marty, M.; Calvo, F.

    1994-01-01

    Alterations in the p53 gene were analysed in 39 patients with locally advanced breast cancers (LABCs) (stage III-IV) with inflammatory signs in most cases (UICC stage T4d = 32 patients) by molecular and immunohistochemical (IHC) approaches. All patients were included in the same therapy protocol. Using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and a single-strand conformational polymorphism migration technique (SSCP), the presence of mutations in exons 2-11, covering the entire coding sequence of the p53 gene, was evaluated. Using the mouse specific anti-human p53 monoclonal antibody (PAb 1801), we also looked for overexpression of the p53 protein in tissue sections. In 16 cases shifted bands were reproducibly identified by PCR-SSCP, and all but one (localised to exon 10) were in exons 5-8, the usual mutational hotspots. Fifteen of these 16 samples were sequenced and 14 of the suspected mutations (36%) were confirmed. Most of them (12) were single nucleotide substitutions, and transitions were more frequent (eight cases) than transversions (four cases). Fourteen of the tumour samples were positively stained with the monoclonal antibody PAb 1801, 11 with nuclear staining only, two with mixed cytoplasmic and nuclear staining and one with cytoplasmic staining only. Staining patterns were very heterogeneous in terms of the percentage of positive cells (10-75%) and their distribution in the tissue section (isolated foci or dispersed cells). In 11 of the 14 mutated cases a positive immunostaining was observed. The presence of a p53 mutation was significantly associated with larger tumour diameter (chi 2 = 7.490, P = 0.0062) and the presence of clinical metastases (stage IV) (chi 2 = 10.113, P = 0.0015). A non-statistically significant trend of association was observed between p53 mutation, negative oestrogen receptors and lower response rate to therapy. Our results in this group of patients and the heterogeneity of the staining of tumour cells in tissue sections suggest that p53

  11. Novel therapy for locally advanced triple-negative breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    YAMADA, ATSUKO; OSADA, SHINJI; TANAHASHI, TOSHIYUKI; MATSUI, SATOSHI; SASAKI, YOSHIYUKI; TANAKA, YOSHIHIRO; OKUMURA, NAOKI; MATSUHASHI, NOBUHISA; TAKAHASHI, TAKAO; YAMAGUCHI, KAZUYA; YOSHIDA, KAZUHIRO

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate a novel therapy for triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC), the biological responses to vitamin K3 (VK3) should be considered with the understanding of the features of breast cancer. In human breast cancer cell lines, the effects of VK3 on cell growth inhibition and the cellular signaling pathway were determined by MTT assay and western blotting. In the in vivo study, a subcutaneous tumor model of breast cancer was created, VK3 was injected into the subcutaneous tumors, and tumor size was measured. The IC50 of VK3 for breast cancer cells was calculated to be 11.3–25.1 μM. VK3 induced phosphorylation of whole tyrosine and epidermal growth factor receptor. VK3 mediated phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) for 30 min. ERK but not JNK phosphorylation was maintained for at least 6 h. In contrast, another antioxidant agent, catalase, showed no effect on either ERK phosphorylation or growth inhibition. On built-up tumors under the skin of mice, local treatment with VK3 was effective in a time- and dose-dependent manner, and the experiments for total tumor volume also showed a dose-dependent effect of VK3. The expression of phosphorylated ERK was clearly detected at 10.9 times the control in tumor tissue, whereas ethanol itself showed no effect. In conclusion, ERK plays a critical role in VK3-induced growth inhibition, and it will be the focus of next steps in the development of molecular therapy for TNBC. PMID:26252842

  12. Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... I found something when I did my breast self-exam. What should I do now? How often should I have mammograms? I have breast cancer. What are my treatment options? How often should I do breast self-exams? I have breast cancer. Is my daughter ...

  13. Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Breast cancer affects one in eight women during their lives. No one knows why some women get breast cancer, but there are many risk factors. Risks that ... who have family members with breast or ovarian cancer may wish to be tested for the genes. ...

  14. Postmastectomy Radiotherapy for Locally Advanced Breast Cancer Receiving Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Meattini, Icro; Di Cataldo, Vanessa; Saieva, Calogero; Francolini, Giulio; Scotti, Vieri; Bonomo, Pierluigi; Mangoni, Monica; Greto, Daniela; Nori, Jacopo; Orzalesi, Lorenzo; Casella, Donato; Simoncini, Roberta; Fambrini, Massimiliano; Bianchi, Simonetta; Livi, Lorenzo

    2014-01-01

    Neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) is widely used in locally advanced breast cancer (BC) treatment. The role of postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) after NAC is strongly debated. The aim of our analysis was to identify major prognostic factors in a single-center series, with emphasis on PMRT. From 1997 to 2011, 170 patients were treated with NAC and mastectomy at our center; 98 cases (57.6%) underwent PMRT and 72 cases (42.4%) did not receive radiation. At a median follow-up period of 7.7 years (range 2–16) for the whole cohort, median time to locoregional recurrence (LRR) was 3.3 years (range 0.7–12.4). The 5-year and 10-year actuarial LRR rate were 14.5% and 15.9%, respectively. At the multivariate analysis the factors that significantly correlated with survival outcome were ≥4 positive nodes (HR 5.0, 1.51–16.52; P = 0.035), extracapsular extension (HR 2.18, 1.37–3.46; P = 0.009), and estrogen receptor positive disease (HR 0.57, 0.36–0.90; P = 0.003). Concerning LRR according to use of radiation, PMRT reduced LRR for patient with clinical T3 staged disease (P = 0.015). Our experience confirmed the impact of pathological nodal involvement on survival outcome. PMRT was found to improve local control in patients presenting with clinical T3 tumors, regardless of the response to chemotherapy. PMID:25045694

  15. Breast Cancer Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Breast Cancer Prevention (PDQ®)–Patient Version What is prevention? Go ... to keep cancer from starting. General Information About Breast Cancer Key Points Breast cancer is a disease in ...

  16. [Recent advance in adjuvant therapy for breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Chikako; Watanabe, Toru

    2002-12-01

    Adjuvant systemic therapy has contributed to a significant improvement of disease-free and overall survival in addition to surgery and irradiation to the local disease. The adjuvant therapy to a patient is determined integrating the information on estimated risk of recurrence, benefit and harm of the therapy and the patient's value. In this review, the state of the art of adjuvant therapy is discussed from several aspects, such as interpretation and evaluation of risk, the best available evidences on adjuvant systemic therapy, the future direction of primary therapy for breast cancer, and patient-oriented decision making. PMID:12506467

  17. Types of Breast Cancers

    MedlinePlus

    ... the key statistics about breast cancer? Types of breast cancers Breast cancer can be separated into different types ... than invasive ductal carcinoma. Less common types of breast cancer Inflammatory breast cancer This uncommon type of invasive ...

  18. Second International Consensus Conference on Advanced Breast Cancer (ABC2), Lisbon, 11/09/2013: The German Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Harbeck, Nadia; Marschner, Norbert; Untch, Michael; Decker, Thomas; Hegewisch-Becker, Susanna; Jackisch, Christian; Huober, Jens; Lück, Hans-Joachim; von Minckwitz, Gunter; Scharl, Anton; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Tesch, Hans; Welt, Anja; Wuerstlein, Rachel; Thomssen, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    Summary The Advanced Breast Cancer Second International Consensus Conference (ABC2) on diagnosis and treatment of advanced breast cancer took place in Lisbon, Portugal, on November 7–9, 2013. The focus of the conference was inoperable, locally advanced breast cancer. The diagnosis and treatment of metastatic breast cancer had already been discussed 2 years before at the ABC1 Consensus and were only updated regarding special issues as part of this year's ABC2 Consensus. Like 2 years ago, a working group of German breast cancer experts commented on the voting results of the ABC panelists, with special consideration of the German guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer (German Gynecological Oncology Working Group (AGO) recommendations, S3 Guideline) in order to adapt them for daily clinical practice in Germany. The goal of both the ABC Consensus and the German comments is to facilitate evidence-based therapy decisions. PMID:24803888

  19. Breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Pearce, Lynne

    2016-08-17

    Essential facts Breast cancer is the most common cancer in the UK, with around 60,000 new cases diagnosed each year, according to the charity Breast Cancer Care. Over a lifetime, women have a one in eight risk of developing it. PMID:27533387

  20. Carboplatin, Gemcitabine Hydrochloride, and Mifepristone in Treating Patients With Advanced Breast Cancer or Recurrent or Persistent Ovarian Epithelial, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-31

    Male Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

  1. Current therapeutic strategies of anti-HER2 treatment in advanced breast cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Nowara, Elżbieta

    2016-01-01

    The HER2/neu (ERBB2) oncogene is amplified and/or overexpressed in approximately 20% of breast cancers, and is a strong prognostic factor for relapse and poor overall survival, particularly in node-positive patients. It is also an important predictor for response to trastuzumab, which has established efficacy against breast cancer with overexpression or amplification of the HER2 oncogene. Treatment with the anti-HER2 humanized monoclonal antibody – trastuzumab significantly improves progression-free and overall survival among patients with HER2-positive breast cancer. However, in most patients with HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer, the disease progresses occurred, what cause the need for new targeted therapies for advanced disease. In clinical trials, there are tested new drugs to improve the results of treatment for this group of patients. This paper presents new drugs introduced into clinical practice for treatment of advanced breast cancer, whose molecular target are receptors of the HER2 family. In addition, new therapeutic strategies and drugs that are currently in clinical researches are discussed. PMID:27095932

  2. Chemoprevention of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Files, Julia A; Stan, Daniela L; Allen, Summer V; Pruthi, Sandhya

    2012-11-01

    The development of pharmacologic agents for the prevention of breast cancer is a significant milestone in medical and laboratory research. Despite these advances, the endorsement of preventive options has become challenging and complex, as physicians are expected to counsel and tailor their recommendations using a personalized approach taking into account medical comorbidities, degree of risk and patient preferences. This article provides a comprehensive overview of the major breast cancer prevention trials, review of the pharmacologic options available for breast cancer prevention, and strategies for integrating chemoprevention of breast cancer in high-risk women into clinical practice. PMID:23181529

  3. Breast Cancer Overview

    MedlinePlus

    ... Breast Cancer - Overview Request Permissions Print to PDF Breast Cancer - Overview Approved by the Cancer.Net Editorial Board , ... bean-shaped organs that help fight infection. About breast cancer Cancer begins when healthy cells in the breast ...

  4. Carboplatin and Paclitaxel Albumin-Stabilized Nanoparticle Formulation Before Surgery in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced or Inflammatory Triple Negative Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-14

    Inflammatory Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Estrogen Receptor Negative; Progesterone Receptor Negative; HER2/Neu Negative

  5. Consensus Recommendations for Advancing Breast Cancer: Risk Identification and Screening in Ethnically Diverse Younger Women

    PubMed Central

    Stojadinovic, Alexander; Summers, Thomas A; Eberhardt, John; Cerussi, Albert; Grundfest, Warren; Peterson, Charles M.; Brazaitis, Michael; Krupinski, Elizabeth; Freeman, Harold

    2011-01-01

    A need exists for a breast cancer risk identification paradigm that utilizes relevant demographic, clinical, and other readily obtainable patient-specific data in order to provide individualized cancer risk assessment, direct screening efforts, and detect breast cancer at an early disease stage in historically underserved populations, such as younger women (under age 40) and minority populations, who represent a disproportionate number of military beneficiaries. Recognizing this unique need for military beneficiaries, a consensus panel was convened by the USA TATRC to review available evidence for individualized breast cancer risk assessment and screening in young (< 40), ethnically diverse women with an overall goal of improving care for military beneficiaries. In the process of review and discussion, it was determined to publish our findings as the panel believes that our recommendations have the potential to reduce health disparities in risk assessment, health promotion, disease prevention, and early cancer detection within and in other underserved populations outside of the military. This paper aims to provide clinicians with an overview of the clinical factors, evidence and recommendations that are being used to advance risk assessment and screening for breast cancer in the military. PMID:21509152

  6. Breast cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... chance that you could develop breast cancer: Some risk factors you can control, such as drinking alcohol. Others, such as family history, you cannot control. The more risk factors you have, the more your risk increases. ...

  7. Learning about Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... genetic terms used on this page Learning About Breast Cancer What do we know about heredity and breast ... Cancer What do we know about heredity and breast cancer? Breast cancer is a common disease. Each year, ...

  8. Quantitative ultrasound characterization of locally advanced breast cancer by estimation of its scatterer properties

    SciTech Connect

    Tadayyon, Hadi; Sadeghi-Naini, Ali; Czarnota, Gregory; Wirtzfeld, Lauren; Wright, Frances C.

    2014-01-15

    Purpose: Tumor grading is an important part of breast cancer diagnosis and currently requires biopsy as its standard. Here, the authors investigate quantitative ultrasound parameters in locally advanced breast cancers that can potentially separate tumors from normal breast tissue and differentiate tumor grades. Methods: Ultrasound images and radiofrequency data from 42 locally advanced breast cancer patients were acquired and analyzed. Parameters related to the linear regression of the power spectrum—midband fit, slope, and 0-MHz-intercept—were determined from breast tumors and normal breast tissues. Mean scatterer spacing was estimated from the spectral autocorrelation, and the effective scatterer diameter and effective acoustic concentration were estimated from the Gaussian form factor. Parametric maps of each quantitative ultrasound parameter were constructed from the gated radiofrequency segments in tumor and normal tissue regions of interest. In addition to the mean values of the parametric maps, higher order statistical features, computed from gray-level co-occurrence matrices were also determined and used for characterization. Finally, linear and quadratic discriminant analyses were performed using combinations of quantitative ultrasound parameters to classify breast tissues. Results: Quantitative ultrasound parameters were found to be statistically different between tumor and normal tissue (p < 0.05). The combination of effective acoustic concentration and mean scatterer spacing could separate tumor from normal tissue with 82% accuracy, while the addition of effective scatterer diameter to the combination did not provide significant improvement (83% accuracy). Furthermore, the two advanced parameters, including effective scatterer diameter and mean scatterer spacing, were found to be statistically differentiating among grade I, II, and III tumors (p = 0.014 for scatterer spacing, p = 0.035 for effective scatterer diameter). The separation of the tumor

  9. 6 Common Cancers - Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues 6 Common Cancers - Breast Cancer Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table of Contents For ... her down. Photo: AP Photo/Brett Flashnick Breast Cancer Breast cancer is a malignant (cancerous) growth that ...

  10. 6 Common Cancers - Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Current Issue Past Issues 6 Common Cancers - Breast Cancer Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table of Contents ... slow her down. Photo: AP Photo/Brett Flashnick Breast Cancer Breast cancer is a malignant (cancerous) growth ...

  11. Prophylactic Cranial Irradiation in Advanced Breast Cancer: A Case for Caution

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Fleur; Alrefae, Munir; Langleben, Adrian; Roberge, David

    2009-03-01

    Purpose: Prophylactic cranial irradiation (PCI) has a well-recognized role in the treatment of leukemia and small-cell lung cancer. Clinical utility has yet to be determined for breast cancer, where an emerging group at high risk of brain metastasis has fuelled consideration of PCI. Methods and Materials: In reviewing our experience with PCI as part of a complex protocol for advanced breast cancer, we present descriptive data on late central nervous system outcomes in those receiving PCI. After high-dose anthracycline-based induction chemotherapy, Stage IIIB/IV breast cancer responders underwent tandem autologous marrow transplantation. Those in continued remission were referred for PCI. Whole-brain radiotherapy was delivered by usual means, at 36 Gy in 20 fractions. Results: Twenty-four women, with median age 45 (28-61), were enrolled between 1995 and 1998. Disease was largely metastatic (79%), and 75% were previously exposed to chemotherapy or hormonotherapy. Ten patients received PCI, at a median of 13.4 (11.8-16.5) months from study entry. Six patients developed brain metastases, 2 despite PCI. Striking functional decline was documented in 3 patients (at 9 months, 4 years, and 5 years post-PCI), including one previously high-functioning woman requiring full care for posttreatment dementia. Conclusions: We present a series of advanced breast cancer patients treated prophylactically with whole-brain radiotherapy following an aggressive chemotherapy regimen. Although the therapeutic benefit of PCI is not ascertainable here, we describe brain metastases occurring despite PCI and serious long-term neurobehavioral sequelae in PCI-treated patients. Any further investigation of PCI in high-risk breast cancer will need to be approached with caution.

  12. Religion and spirituality in coping with advanced breast cancer: perspectives from Malaysian Muslim women.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Farizah; Muhammad, Mazanah binti; Abdullah, Amini Amir

    2011-03-01

    This article is part of a larger study on the role of spirituality in coping with breast cancer among Malaysian Muslim women. The study seeks to reveal the meaning of the experience through the stories of three Muslim women surviving advanced breast cancer, to better understand the deep meanings that inform their experiences with spirituality and transformation as they cope with the challenges of breast cancer. Data were gathered using in-depth interview. Qualitative methods were used in identifying two themes--illness as an awakening and hope and freedom comes from surrendering to God. The themes were discussed in the context of two broad areas: (1) what are the new meanings these women discovered in their experiences with cancer; and (2) how did the new meanings change their lives? The study suggests that cancer survivors' experiences with cancer and their learning processes must be understood within the appropriate cultural context. This is especially so for spirituality. The common emphasis of spirituality on relationship with God, self and others, may significantly influence how people learn to live with cancer. PMID:20924683

  13. HER Story: The Next Chapter in HER-2-Directed Therapy for Advanced Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Joy, Anil A.; Rayson, Daniel; McLeod, Deanna; Brezden-Masley, Christine; Boileau, Jean-François; Gelmon, Karen A.

    2013-01-01

    Untreated human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER-2)-positive advanced breast cancer (ABC) is an aggressive disease, associated with a poor prognosis and short overall survival. HER-2-directed therapy prolongs both time to disease progression and overall survival when combined with chemotherapy and has become the standard of care for those with HER-2-positive breast cancer in the early and advanced settings. Despite the remarkable therapeutic impact HER-2-directed therapy has had on disease outcomes, some patients with HER-2-positive disease will have primary resistant disease and others will respond initially but will eventually have progression, underscoring the need for other novel therapeutic options. This article reviews recent phase III trial data and discusses a practical approach to sequencing of HER-2-directed therapy in patients with HER-2-positive ABC. The significant cumulative survival gains seen in these trials are slowly reshaping the landscape of HER-2-positive ABC outcomes. PMID:24212500

  14. HER story: the next chapter in HER-2-directed therapy for advanced breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Verma, Sunil; Joy, Anil A; Rayson, Daniel; McLeod, Deanna; Brezden-Masley, Christine; Boileau, Jean-François; Gelmon, Karen A

    2013-01-01

    Untreated human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER-2)-positive advanced breast cancer (ABC) is an aggressive disease, associated with a poor prognosis and short overall survival. HER-2-directed therapy prolongs both time to disease progression and overall survival when combined with chemotherapy and has become the standard of care for those with HER-2-positive breast cancer in the early and advanced settings. Despite the remarkable therapeutic impact HER-2-directed therapy has had on disease outcomes, some patients with HER-2-positive disease will have primary resistant disease and others will respond initially but will eventually have progression, underscoring the need for other novel therapeutic options. This article reviews recent phase III trial data and discusses a practical approach to sequencing of HER-2-directed therapy in patients with HER-2-positive ABC. The significant cumulative survival gains seen in these trials are slowly reshaping the landscape of HER-2-positive ABC outcomes. PMID:24212500

  15. [Role of induction chemo- and radiotherapy in the treatment of locally advance breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Voznyĭ, E K; Kharchenko, V P; Pan'shin, G A; Gurov, S N; Dobrovol'skaia, N I; Galil-Ogly, G A; Khmelevskiĭ, E V; Alipchenko, L A; Bol'shakova, S A

    2000-01-01

    336 patients with locally-advanced breast cancer underwent neoadjuvant chemotherapy or chemoradiotherapy. Increase in T- and N-indices (change of stage after neoadjuvant chemotherapy) proved an important prognostic factor. Survival rates correlated with clinical effect and dropped as it diminished. This tendency was clear in both groups. There was no relationship between stage and overall and disease-free survival rates at early stages but later they declined as T- and N-indices decreased. PMID:11219950

  16. National consensus in China on diagnosis and treatment of patients with advanced breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xichun; Jiang, Zefei; Li, Huiping; Chen, Jiayi; Cui, Shude; Li, Qing; Liao, Ning; Liu, Donggeng; Liu, Jian; Lu, Jinsong; Shen, Kunwei; Sun, Tao; Teng, Yuee; Tong, Zhongsheng; Wang, Shulian; Wang, Xiang; Wang, Xiaojia; Wang, Yongsheng; Wu, Jiong; Yuan, Peng; Zhang, Pin; Zhang, Qingyuan; Zheng, Hong; Pang, Da; Ren, Guosheng; Shao, Zhimin; Shen, Zhenzhou; Song, Erwei; Song, Santai

    2015-01-01

    The recently available guidelines on the management of advanced breast cancer (ABC) organized by Chinese Anti-Cancer Association, Committee of Breast Cancer Society (CACA-CBCS) do not elucidate ABC in details. To instruct clinicians in treatment of ABC, a Chinese expert consensus meeting on diagnosis and treatment of ABC was held in June 2014 and a consensus is developed. The following consensus provides the level of evidence and supporting documents for each recommendation, and introduces research topics to be urgently addressed. Notably, the consensus on diagnosis and treatment of ABC in China is developed to be applied nationwide. In different areas, multidisciplinary treatment (MDT) tailored to the each patient and the disease itself should be applied based on the basic principles of modern oncology. PMID:26605288

  17. Imaging heterogeneous absorption distribution of advanced breast cancer by optical tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yan; Zhu, Quing

    2010-11-01

    Tumor vascular patterns of advanced breast cancers are complex and heterogeneous. Two typical light absorption patterns of periphery enhancement and posterior shadowing have been observed when imaging these advanced cancers using optical tomography guided by ultrasound. We perform a series simulation and phantom experiments to systemically evaluate the effects of target parameters, target locations, and target optical properties on imaging periphery enhancement absorption distribution using reflection geometry. Large tumors are modeled as concentric semiellipsoidal targets of different outer shell and inner core optical properties. We show that larger targets of more than 3 to 4 cm diameter with outer shell thicknesses less than 1 cm can be resolved at a depth less than 3 cm. A clinical example is given to show the complex vasculature distributions seen from an advanced cancer.

  18. Gamma-secretase/Notch Signalling Pathway Inhibitor RO4929097 in Treating Patients With Advanced, Metastatic, or Recurrent Triple Negative Invasive Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-19

    Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Male Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer

  19. Risks of Breast Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Breast Cancer Screening (PDQ®)–Patient Version What is screening? Go ... cancer screening: Cancer Screening Overview General Information About Breast Cancer Key Points Breast cancer is a disease in ...

  20. Breast conservative surgery: is it appropriate for locally advanced breast cancer following downstaging by neoadjuvant chemotherapy? A pathological assessment.

    PubMed

    Moneer, M; El-Didi, M; Khaled, H

    1999-12-01

    The application of breast conserving surgery to down-staged cases with locally advanced breast cancer (LABC) after neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT) is still a controversial issue with a variable incidence of locoregional failures. In this study, the response of LABC to NACT was assessed pathologically and the eligible candidates for breast conserving surgery were identified retrospectively. The efficacy of preoperative clinical examination and mammography in detecting these pathological changes were also evaluated. The study included 41 LABC cases. They received NACT (FAC) and were then subjected to a mastectomy. The cases were examined clinically and by mammography before starting treatment and immediately before surgery. Residual tumours in the mastectomy specimens were correlated with the pretreatment and preoperative clinical and mammographic findings in order to assess the efficacy of these tools for detection of NACT-induced changes. After 3 cycles of NACT, 78% of women showed an objective response. However, only 25% of them would have been eligible for breast conserving surgery. The remaining responders had an increased incidence of either multifocality and or peritumoural in situ carcinoma. Both clinical examination and mammography were inadequate for detection of these chemotherapy-induced changes and hence for selecting suitable candidates for breast conservation. This study has shown that tumour regression by NACT is probably induced by a process of tumour segmentation and is associated with an increased incidence of ductal in situ lesions in the original tumour bearing area. PMID:14731459

  1. Inflammatory Breast Cancer from Metastatic Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Achariyapota, Vuthinun; Chuangsuwanich, Tuenjai

    2016-01-01

    Metastases to the breast from tumors other than breast carcinomas are extremely rare and represent only 0.2–1.3% of all diagnosed malignant breast tumors. Furthermore, while the most common sites for advanced ovarian cancer metastases are the liver, lung, and pleura, metastasis to the breast from a primary ovarian cancer is uncommon and has only been reported in 0.03–0.6% of all breast cancers. Here we describe a case report of a 50-year-old female patient with a rare case of breast metastases from an advanced ovarian cancer, presenting as inflammatory breast cancer. Our observations emphasize the clinical importance of distinguishing between primary and metastatic breast cancer during diagnosis for the purpose of appropriate prognosis and treatment. PMID:27047697

  2. Exemestane With or Without Entinostat in Treating Patients With Recurrent Hormone Receptor-Positive Breast Cancer That is Locally Advanced or Metastatic

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-15

    Estrogen Receptor Positive; HER2/Neu Negative; Male Breast Carcinoma; Progesterone Receptor Positive; Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

  3. Current status of hormone therapy in patients with hormone receptor positive (HR+) advanced breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Dalmau, Elsa; Armengol-Alonso, Alejandra; Muñoz, Montserrat; Seguí-Palmer, Miguel Ángel

    2014-12-01

    The natural history of HR+ breast cancer tends to be different from hormone receptor-negative disease in terms of time to recurrence, site of recurrence and overall aggressiveness of the disease. The developmental strategies of hormone therapy for the treatment of breast cancer have led to the classes of selective estrogen receptor modulators, selective estrogen receptor downregulators, and aromatase inhibitors. These therapeutic options have improved breast cancer outcomes in the metastatic setting, thereby delaying the need for chemotherapy. However, a subset of hormone receptor-positive breast cancers do not benefit from endocrine therapy (intrinsic resistance), and all HR+ metastatic breast cancers ultimately develop resistance to hormonal therapies (acquired resistance). Considering the multiple pathways involved in the HR network, targeting other components of pathologically activated intracellular signaling in breast cancer may prove to be a new direction in clinical research. This review focuses on current and emerging treatments for HR+ metastatic breast cancer. PMID:25311296

  4. Docetaxel, Carboplatin, Trastuzumab, and Pertuzumab With or Without Estrogen Deprivation in Treating Patients With Hormone Receptor-Positive, HER2-Positive Operable or Locally Advanced Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-15

    Estrogen Receptor Positive; HER2/Neu Positive; Progesterone Receptor Positive; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  5. 6.3 MeV fast neutrons in the treatment of patients with locally advanced and locally recurrent breast cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velikaya, V. V.; Musabaeva, L. I.; Lisin, V. A.; Startseva, Zh. A.

    2016-08-01

    The study included 135 breast cancer patients (70 patients with locally recurrent breast cancer and 65 patients with locally advanced breast cancer with unfavorable prognostic factors) who received the neutron therapy alone or in combination with the photon therapy. The neutron therapy was shown to be effective in multimodality treatment of patients with locally advanced and locally recurrent breast cancer. The 8-year survival rate in patients without repeated breast cancer recurrence was 87.6 ± 8.7% after the neutron and neutron-photon therapy and 54.3 ± 9.2% after the electron beam therapy.

  6. Breast Cancer -- Male

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home > Types of Cancer > Breast Cancer in Men Breast Cancer in Men This is Cancer.Net’s Guide to Breast Cancer in Men. Use the menu below to choose ... social workers, and patient advocates. Cancer.Net Guide Breast Cancer in Men Overview Statistics Risk Factors and Prevention ...

  7. Differential oxidative status and immune characterization of the early and advanced stages of human breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Panis, C; Victorino, V J; Herrera, A C S A; Freitas, L F; De Rossi, T; Campos, F C; Simão, A N Colado; Barbosa, D S; Pinge-Filho, P; Cecchini, R; Cecchini, A L

    2012-06-01

    Breast cancer is the malignant neoplasia with the highest incidence in women worldwide. Chronic oxidative stress and inflammation have been indicated as major mediators during carcinogenesis and cancer progression. Human studies have not considered the complexity of tumor biology during the stages of cancer advance, limiting their clinical application. The purpose of this study was to characterize systemic oxidative stress and immune response parameters in early (ED; TNM I and II) and advanced disease (AD; TNM III and IV) of patients diagnosed with infiltrative ductal carcinoma breast cancer. Oxidative stress parameters were evaluated by plasmatic lipoperoxidation, carbonyl content, thiobarbituric reactive substances (TBARS), nitric oxide levels (NO), total radical antioxidant parameter (TRAP), superoxide dismutase, and catalase activities and GSH levels. Immune evaluation was determined by TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-12, and IL-10 levels and leukocytes oxidative burst evaluation by chemiluminescence. Tissue damage analysis included heart (total CK and CKMB), liver (AST, ALT, GGT), and renal (creatinine, urea, and uric acid) plasmatic markers. C-reactive protein (CRP) and iron metabolism were also evaluated. Analysis of the results verified different oxidative stress statuses occur at distinct cancer stages. ED was characterized by reduction in catalase, 8-isoprostanes, and GSH levels, with enhanced lipid peroxidation and TBARS levels. AD exhibited more pronounced oxidative status, with reduction in catalase activity and TRAP, intense lipid peroxidation and high levels of NO, TBARs, and carbonyl content. ED patients presented a Th2 immune pattern, while AD exhibited Th1 status. CRP levels and ferritin were increased in both stages of disease. Leukocytes burst impairment was observed in both the groups. Plasma iron levels were significantly elevated in AD. The data obtained indicated that oxidative stress enhancement and immune response impairment may be necessary to ensure

  8. Changes in allelic imbalances in locally advanced breast cancers after chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Varna, M; Soliman, H; Feugeas, J-P; Turpin, E; Chapelin, D; Legrès, L; Plassa, L-F; de Roquancourt, A; Espié, M; Misset, J-L; Janin, A; de Thé, H; Bertheau, P

    2007-01-01

    In advanced breast cancers, TP53 mutation is highly predictive of complete response to high-dose epirubicin/cyclophosphamide chemotherapy. In these tumours with an altered control of genomic stability, accumulation of chemotherapy-induced genetic alterations may contribute to cell death and account for complete response. To explore the effects of chemotherapy on stability of the tumour genome, allelic profiles were obtained from microdissected tumour samples before and after chemotherapy in 29 unresponsive breast cancers (9 with TP53 mutation). Ninety-four per cent allelic profiles remained unchanged after treatment. Interestingly, 11 profiles (6%) showed important changes after treatment; allelic imbalances significantly increased (four cases) or decreased (seven cases) after chemotherapy in three distinct experiments, two of which using laser microdissected tumour cells. These genetic changes were not linked to the TP53 status, but one tumour showed complete disappearance of TP53-mutated cells in the residual tumour after treatment. Altogether, these observations carry important implications for the clonal evolution of breast cancers treated with DNA-damaging agents, as they point both to the importance of tumour heterogeneity and chemotherapy-driven selection of subclones. PMID:17876337

  9. Cost-effectiveness analysis review of exemestane in the treatment of primary and advanced breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hashemi-Meshkini, Amir; Keshavarz, Khosro; Gharibnaseri, Zahra; Kheirandish, Mehrnaz; Kebriaeezadeh, Abbas

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Exemestane was approved in 2005 for adjuvant treatment of breast cancer. In this study, we aimed to assess whether it is cost-effective in comparison to available alternatives. Material and methods To evaluate the efficacy of exemestane, a systematic review was conducted by searching electronic databases. The outcomes of interest were “clinical benefit”, “overall response” and “disease-free survival rate”. To evaluate the cost of treatments, costs of both domestic generic and imported brand medicines were taken into account, and the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) was calculated for each comparison. Results Regarding primary breast cancer, based upon available evidence, exemestane could not be considered as a cost-effective medicine either in generic or brand form compared with placebo (ICER: 119,100 and 215,525), with tamoxifen after 2-3 years of therapy (ICER: 35,150 and 82,400) and with sequential treatment by tamoxifen and exemestane (dominated because of lower effectiveness and higher cost). In metastatic breast cancer, exemestane was not considered a cost-effective treatment compared with both anastrozole and megestrol acetate (dominated) and was highly cost-effective compared with tamoxifen (ICERs: 2,208 and 4,326 dollars per one more patient with an overall response for generic and brand medicines) although even in this case it was not cost-effective in terms of the 1-year survival rates (dominated). Conclusions Regarding current evidence and related costs in terms of Iranian pharmaceutical market prices, exemestane could not be considered a cost-effective treatment in primary and advanced breast cancer compared with available alternatives. However, more evidence is still needed for more certain decisions. PMID:23847669

  10. Breast cancer screenings

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000837.htm Breast cancer screenings To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Breast cancer screenings can help find breast cancer early, before ...

  11. Breast Cancer (For Kids)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Got Homework? Here's Help White House Lunch Recipes Breast Cancer KidsHealth > For Kids > Breast Cancer Print A A ... for it when they are older. What Is Breast Cancer? The human body is made of tiny building ...

  12. Male Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Although breast cancer is much more common in women, men can get it too. It happens most often to men between ... 60 and 70. Breast lumps usually aren't cancer. However, most men with breast cancer have lumps. ...

  13. Male Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Although breast cancer is much more common in women, men can get it too. It happens most often to men ... usually aren't cancer. However, most men with breast cancer have lumps. Other breast symptoms can include Dimpled ...

  14. Retrospective Analysis of Locally Advanced Noninflammatory Breast Cancer From Chennai, South India, 1990-1999

    SciTech Connect

    Shanta, Viswanathan Swaminathan, Rajaraman; Rama, Ranganathan M.Sc.; Radhika, Ramachandran M.S.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: This was a retrospective observational study to elicit the outcome of the therapeutic strategy of concurrent neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy protocol for locally advanced breast cancer. Methods and Materials: A large series of 1,117 consecutive cases of locally advanced breast cancer treated at the Cancer Institute (WIA), in Chennai, South India, between 1990 and 1999 and followed through 2004 formed the basis for this study. Disease-free survival was the main outcome, and nodal and tumor downstaging were the intermediate outcome measures studied. Results: Primary tumor downstaging was observed in 45% and nodal downstaging in 57.5%. The disease-free survival rate of nodal downstaged patients at 5, 10, and 15 years was 75%, 65%, and 58%, respectively. The corresponding rates for pre- and postoperative node-negative patients were 70%, 60%, and 59%. The best survival was seen among those who were tumor and node negative postoperatively. Nodal downstaging halved the risk of disease recurrence and death compared with node positivity, irrespective of tumor sterility. Conclusions: A randomized trial using cyclophosphamide, methotrexate, and 5-fluorouracil vs. an anthracycline-based regimen in the setting of concurrent chemoradiotherapy appears indicated. Additional preoperative chemotherapy to maximize nodal and tumor downstaging should be investigated. A change in postoperative chemotherapy according to nodal status could also be explored.

  15. Breast Cancer Clinical Trials: Past Half Century Moving Forward Advancing Patient Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Kuerer, Henry M; van la Parra, Raquel F D

    2016-10-01

    Clinical trials in breast cancer have contributed immensely to the advancements of modern multimodal breast cancer treatment. Due to improved screening methods and more effective biologic-based tailored systemic therapies, the extent of surgery necessary for local and systemic control of disease is decreasing. Sequential trials for ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) have changed the management of this disease and are culminating in randomized active surveillance studies in an effort potentially to prevent overtreatment of low- and intermediate-grade disease. For patients with initial node-positive disease, clipping and marking of the biopsy-proven nodal metastases before the start of neoadjuvant chemotherapy can allow for selective node dissection based on the axillary response. With the current advances in primary systemic therapy, feasibility trials are beginning to investigate the potential of nonoperative therapy for invasive cancers with percutaneously documented pathologic complete response. This article presents a review and update on landmark clinical trials related to DCIS, the extent of axillary surgery in node-positive disease, and the integration of systemic therapy with local therapy. PMID:27364503

  16. Endocrine therapy for hormone treatment-naïve advanced breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Martin, Miguel; Lopez-Tarruella, Sara; Gilarranz, Yolanda Jerez

    2016-08-01

    A proportion of patients with hormone receptor-positive locally advanced or metastatic breast cancer will not have received prior endocrine therapy. However, there are limited clinical data specifically in these patients. We conducted a review of randomized phase II and III clinical studies of anastrozole, letrozole, exemestane, palbociclib, and fulvestrant to determine the evidence base supporting use of specific endocrine therapies in this patient population. From our findings, there is a paucity of clinical studies in patients with endocrine therapy-naïve disease; however, it appears that first-line treatment effects are consistent between patients who have and have not received prior endocrine treatment. PMID:27326977

  17. Quality of life among advanced breast cancer patients with and without distant metastasis.

    PubMed

    Wyatt, G; Sikorskii, A; Tamkus, D; You, M

    2013-03-01

    This study presents the results of a secondary analysis of data collected during a trial of reflexology that aimed to improve health-related quality of life (HRQOL) among women with advanced breast cancer in treatment. A comparison of HRQOL (functioning, symptoms, spirituality) of those with (n = 298) and without (n = 87) distant metastasis is presented. Following the intake interview, 385 women were randomised to reflexology, lay foot manipulation or conventional care control, and were interviewed again at weeks 5 and 11. Those with distant metastasis were older, had fewer comorbid conditions, and a smaller proportion were employed. Longitudinal analysis of HRQOL at intake, 5 and 11 weeks revealed that those with distant metastasis had lower functioning and more pain; however, no differences were found on fatigue, nausea, shortness of breath, sleep quality, anxiety, depressive symptoms or spirituality. Despite advanced disease, 56% of all women in this study were below the clinical screening cut-off for depressive symptoms. These findings may indicate that patients with advanced breast cancer have adapted emotionally and spiritually; however, the management of physical symptoms remains a priority. PMID:23252474

  18. Recent advances in the use of metformin: can treating diabetes prevent breast cancer?

    PubMed

    Hatoum, Diana; McGowan, Eileen M

    2015-01-01

    There is substantial epidemiological evidence pointing to an increased incidence of breast cancer and morbidity in obese, prediabetic, and diabetic patients. In vitro studies strongly support metformin, a diabetic medication, in breast cancer therapy. Although metformin has been heralded as an exciting new breast cancer treatment, the principal consideration is whether metformin can be used as a generic treatment for all breast cancer types. Importantly, will metformin be useful as an inexpensive therapy for patients with comorbidity of diabetes and breast cancer? In general, meta-analyses of clinical trial data from retrospective studies in which metformin treatment has been used for patients with diabetes and breast cancer have a positive trend; nevertheless, the supporting clinical data outcomes remain inconclusive. The heterogeneity of breast cancer, confounded by comorbidity of disease in the elderly population, makes it difficult to determine the actual benefits of metformin therapy. Despite the questionable evidence available from observational clinical studies and meta-analyses, randomized phases I-III clinical trials are ongoing to test the efficacy of metformin for breast cancer. This special issue review will focus on recent research, highlighting in vitro research and retrospective observational clinical studies and current clinical trials on metformin action in breast cancer. PMID:25866793

  19. Recent Advances in the Use of Metformin: Can Treating Diabetes Prevent Breast Cancer?

    PubMed Central

    McGowan, Eileen M.

    2015-01-01

    There is substantial epidemiological evidence pointing to an increased incidence of breast cancer and morbidity in obese, prediabetic, and diabetic patients. In vitro studies strongly support metformin, a diabetic medication, in breast cancer therapy. Although metformin has been heralded as an exciting new breast cancer treatment, the principal consideration is whether metformin can be used as a generic treatment for all breast cancer types. Importantly, will metformin be useful as an inexpensive therapy for patients with comorbidity of diabetes and breast cancer? In general, meta-analyses of clinical trial data from retrospective studies in which metformin treatment has been used for patients with diabetes and breast cancer have a positive trend; nevertheless, the supporting clinical data outcomes remain inconclusive. The heterogeneity of breast cancer, confounded by comorbidity of disease in the elderly population, makes it difficult to determine the actual benefits of metformin therapy. Despite the questionable evidence available from observational clinical studies and meta-analyses, randomized phases I–III clinical trials are ongoing to test the efficacy of metformin for breast cancer. This special issue review will focus on recent research, highlighting in vitro research and retrospective observational clinical studies and current clinical trials on metformin action in breast cancer. PMID:25866793

  20. Advanced Imaging and Receipt of Guideline Concordant Care in Women with Early Stage Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Loggers, Elizabeth Trice; Buist, Diana S M; Gold, Laura S; Zeliadt, Steven; Hunter Merrill, Rachel; Etzioni, Ruth; Ramsey, Scott D; Sullivan, Sean D; Kessler, Larry

    2016-01-01

    Objective. It is unknown whether advanced imaging (AI) is associated with higher quality breast cancer (BC) care. Materials and Methods. Claims and Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results data were linked for women diagnosed with incident stage I-III BC between 2002 and 2008 in western Washington State. We examined receipt of preoperative breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or AI (defined as computed tomography [CT]/positron emission tomography [PET]/PET/CT) versus mammogram and/or ultrasound (M-US) alone and receipt of guideline concordant care (GCC) using multivariable logistic regression. Results. Of 5247 women, 67% received M-US, 23% MRI, 8% CT, and 3% PET/PET-CT. In 2002, 5% received MRI and 5% AI compared to 45% and 12%, respectively, in 2008. 79% received GCC, but GCC declined over time and was associated with younger age, urban residence, less comorbidity, shorter time from diagnosis to surgery, and earlier year of diagnosis. Breast MRI was associated with GCC for lumpectomy plus radiation therapy (RT) (OR 1.55, 95% CI 1.08-2.26, and p = 0.02) and AI was associated with GCC for adjuvant chemotherapy for estrogen-receptor positive (ER+) BC (OR 1.74, 95% CI 1.17-2.59, and p = 0.01). Conclusion. GCC was associated with prior receipt of breast MRI and AI for lumpectomy plus RT and adjuvant chemotherapy for ER+ BC, respectively. PMID:27525122

  1. Advanced Imaging and Receipt of Guideline Concordant Care in Women with Early Stage Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Buist, Diana S. M.; Gold, Laura S.; Zeliadt, Steven; Hunter Merrill, Rachel; Etzioni, Ruth; Ramsey, Scott D.; Sullivan, Sean D.; Kessler, Larry

    2016-01-01

    Objective. It is unknown whether advanced imaging (AI) is associated with higher quality breast cancer (BC) care. Materials and Methods. Claims and Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results data were linked for women diagnosed with incident stage I-III BC between 2002 and 2008 in western Washington State. We examined receipt of preoperative breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or AI (defined as computed tomography [CT]/positron emission tomography [PET]/PET/CT) versus mammogram and/or ultrasound (M-US) alone and receipt of guideline concordant care (GCC) using multivariable logistic regression. Results. Of 5247 women, 67% received M-US, 23% MRI, 8% CT, and 3% PET/PET-CT. In 2002, 5% received MRI and 5% AI compared to 45% and 12%, respectively, in 2008. 79% received GCC, but GCC declined over time and was associated with younger age, urban residence, less comorbidity, shorter time from diagnosis to surgery, and earlier year of diagnosis. Breast MRI was associated with GCC for lumpectomy plus radiation therapy (RT) (OR 1.55, 95% CI 1.08–2.26, and p = 0.02) and AI was associated with GCC for adjuvant chemotherapy for estrogen-receptor positive (ER+) BC (OR 1.74, 95% CI 1.17–2.59, and p = 0.01). Conclusion. GCC was associated with prior receipt of breast MRI and AI for lumpectomy plus RT and adjuvant chemotherapy for ER+ BC, respectively. PMID:27525122

  2. Adjuvant chemo- and hormonal therapy in locally advanced breast cancer: a randomized clinical study

    SciTech Connect

    Schaake-Koning, C.; van der Linden, E.H.; Hart, G.; Engelsman, E.

    1985-10-01

    Between 1977 and 1980, 118 breast cancer patients with locally advanced disease, T3B-4, any N, M0 or T1-3, tumor positive axillary apex biopsy, were randomized to one of three arms: I: radiotherapy (RT) to the breast and adjacent lymph node areas; II: RT followed by 12 cycles of cyclophosphamide, methotrexate, 5 fluorouracil (CMF) and tamoxifen during the chemotherapy period; III: 2 cycles of adriamycin and vincristine (AV), alternated with 2 cycles of CMF, then RT, followed by another 4 cycles of AV, alternated with 4 CMF; tamoxifen during the entire treatment period. The median follow-up period was 5 1/2 years. The adjuvant chemo- and hormonal therapy did not improve the overall survival; the 5-year survival was 37% for all three treatment arms. There was no statistically significant difference in RFS between the three modalities, nor when arm I was compared to arm II and III together. LR was not statistically different over the three treatment arms. In 18 of the 24 patients with LR, distant metastases appeared within a few months from the local recurrence. The menopausal status did not influence the treatment results. Dose reduction in more than 4 cycles of chemotherapy was accompanied by better results. In conclusion: adjuvant chemo- and hormonal therapy did not improve RFS and overall survival. These findings do not support the routine use of adjuvant chemo- and endocrine therapy for inoperable breast cancer.

  3. Clinically Apparent Internal Mammary Nodal Metastasis in Patients With Advanced Breast Cancer: Incidence and Local Control

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Yujing; Oh, Julia L.; Whitman, Gary J.

    2010-07-15

    Purpose: To investigate the incidence and local control of internal mammary lymph node metastases (IMN+) in patients with clinical N2 or N3 locally advanced breast cancer. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed the records of 809 breast cancer patients diagnosed with advanced nodal disease (clinical N2-3) who received radiation treatment at our institution from January 2000 December 2006. Patients were considered IMN+ on the basis of imaging studies. Results: We identified 112 of 809 patients who presented with IMN+ disease (13.8%) detected on ultrasound, computed tomography (CT), positron emission tomography/CT (PET/CT), and/or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies. All 112 patients with IMN+ disease received anthracycline and taxane-based chemotherapy. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NCT) resulted in a complete response (CR) on imaging studies of IMN disease in 72.1% of patients. Excluding 16 patients with progressive disease, 96 patients received adjuvant radiation to the breast or the chest wall and the regional lymphatics including the IMN chain with a median dose of 60 Gy if the internal mammary lymph nodes normalized after chemotherapy and 66 Gy if they did not. The median follow-up of surviving patients was 41 months (8-118 months). For the 96 patients able to complete curative therapy, the actuarial 5-year IMN control rate, locoregional control, overall survival, and disease-free survival were 89%, 80%, 76%, and 56%. Conclusion: Over ten percent of patients with advanced nodal disease will have IMN metastases on imaging studies. Multimodality therapy including IMN irradiation achieves excellent rates of control in the IMN region and a DFS of more than 50% after curative treatment.

  4. Recombinant leukocyte A interferon in advanced breast cancer. Results of a phase II efficacy trial.

    PubMed

    Sherwin, S A; Mayer, D; Ochs, J J; Abrams, P G; Knost, J A; Foon, K A; Fein, S; Oldham, R K

    1983-05-01

    Nineteen patients with advanced refractory metastatic breast cancer no longer responsive to chemotherapy were treated in the first phase II efficacy trial of recombinant leukocyte A interferon (IFL-rA), a highly purified single molecular species of alpha interferon prepared by recombinant DNA methods. Patients received a previously determined maximum tolerated dose for this agent (50 X 10(6) U/m2 body surface area) by intramuscular injection three times weekly for up to 3 months. The symptoms of toxicity observed in this trial resemble those previously reported for alpha interferons and include fever, chills, fatigue, anorexia, and leukopenia. All patients required dose reductions, most often for reasons of severe fatigue. Of the 17 patients evaluable for tumor response, one patient had stable disease and 16 had evidence of tumor progression. We conclude that IFL-rA is not an active agent in the treatment of advanced, refractory breast cancer when used at a maximum tolerated dose on this treatment schedule. PMID:6342490

  5. General Information about Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Breast Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Breast Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Breast ...

  6. Breast Cancer: Treatment Options

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer - Treatment Options Request Permissions Print to PDF Breast Cancer - Treatment Options Approved by the Cancer.Net Editorial ... recommendations for ovarian ablation . Hormonal therapy for metastatic breast cancer Hormonal therapies are also commonly used to treat ...

  7. Innovative Trials Produce Promising Breast Cancer Drugs

    MedlinePlus

    ... news/fullstory_159762.html Innovative Trials Produce Promising Breast Cancer Drugs Adaptive study design allows researchers to match ... provide a fighting chance for women with advanced breast cancer. The drugs, neratinib and veliparib, both appear effective ...

  8. Breast Cancer Disparities

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2.65 MB] Read the MMWR Science Clips Breast Cancer Black Women Have Higher Death Rates from Breast ... of Page U.S. State Info Number of Additional Breast Cancer Deaths Among Black Women, By State SOURCE: National ...

  9. Impact of body fat distribution on neoadjuvant chemotherapy outcomes in advanced breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Iwase, Toshiaki; Sangai, Takafumi; Nagashima, Takeshi; Sakakibara, Masahiro; Sakakibara, Junta; Hayama, Shouko; Ishigami, Emi; Masuda, Takahito; Miyazaki, Masaru

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is known to decrease the efficacy of neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) against breast cancer; however, the relationship between actual body composition and NAC outcomes remains unknown. Therefore, we determined the effect of body composition on NAC outcomes. A total of 172 advanced breast cancer patients who underwent surgery after NAC were retrospectively analyzed. Body composition parameters including abdominal circumference (AC), subcutaneous fat area (SFA), visceral fat area (VFA), and skeletal muscle area (SMA) were calculated using computed tomography volume-analyzing software. VFA/SFA ratio was used to evaluate visceral obesity. The associations of body composition parameters with pathological complete remission (pCR) and survival were analyzed. AC, SFA, and VFA were significantly correlated with body mass index (BMI) (all P < 0.05; r = 0.82, r = 0.71, and r = 0.78, respectively). AC, SFA, and VFA increased significantly and SMA decreased significantly after menopause (all P < 0.05). VFA/SFA ratio increased significantly after menopause, even though BMI remained unchanged. Body composition parameters were not associated with pCR. Distant disease-free survival (DDFS) was significantly worse in the high VFA group than in the low VFA group (P < 0.05). Furthermore, in the high VFA group, postmenopausal patients had significantly shorter DDFS than premenopausal patients (P < 0.05). VFA was independently associated with DDFS in the multivariate analysis (P < 0.05). High visceral fat is associated with worse NAC outcomes in breast cancer patients, especially postmenopausal patients. Interventions targeting visceral fat accumulation will likely improve NAC outcomes. PMID:26626021

  10. Breast cancer in men

    MedlinePlus

    ... in situ-male; Intraductal carcinoma-male; Inflammatory breast cancer-male; Paget disease of the nipple-male; Breast cancer-male ... The cause of breast cancer is not clear. But there are risk ... breast cancer more likely in men: Exposure to radiation Higher ...

  11. Dynamic Contrast Enhanced MRI in Patients With Advanced Breast or Pancreatic Cancer With Metastases to the Liver or Lung

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-05-28

    Acinar Cell Adenocarcinoma of the Pancreas; Duct Cell Adenocarcinoma of the Pancreas; Liver Metastases; Lung Metastases; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer

  12. Hormone Therapy for Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Hormone Therapy for Breast Cancer On This Page What are hormones? How do ... sensitive breast cancer: Adjuvant therapy for early-stage breast cancer : Research has shown that women treated for early- ...

  13. Predictive value of serum medroxyprogesterone acetate concentration for response in advanced or recurrent breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, R; Nagao, K; Matsuda, M; Baba, K; Matsuoka, Y; Yamashita, H; Fukuda, M; Higuchi, A; Ikeda, K

    1997-08-01

    Medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA) is one of the most commonly prescribed drugs for endocrine therapy of metastatic breast cancer. In this study, the serum MPA concentration was measured by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and evaluated for its usefulness in predicting the response in 79 cases of advanced or recurrent breast cancers. Overall, 29 patients (37%) achieved an objective response. The response rate correlated significantly with the oestrogen receptor (ER) status (P = 0.03), proliferative activity determined by DNA polymerase alpha (P = 0.04), the disease-free interval (DFI) (P = 0.05) and the serum MPA concentration (P < 0.001). Patients with ER-positive tumours, lower proliferative activity, a longer (DFI) or a higher serum MPA concentration responded more frequently. The mean serum MPA concentration in the responders with ER-positive tumours (P = 0.01) or tumours with a lower proliferative activity (P = 0.008) were significantly lower than in cases with ER-negative tumours or tumours with a higher proliferative activity, respectively. Cases with soft tissue metastases showed responses at significantly lower MPA concentrations (P = 0.003) than those with bone or visceral metastases. Furthermore, there was a dramatic decrease in the MPA concentration when a responder with a high concentration became unresponsive to the therapy. Thus, the serum MPA concentration is a determining factor for the response to treatment. PMID:9337682

  14. Benefits of Medroxyprogesterone Acetate (MPA) in Advanced or Recurrent Breast Cancer with Higher Serum Concertration.

    PubMed

    Nishimura; Nagao; Matsuda; Baba; Matsuoka; Yamashita; Fukuda; Higuchi; Saiki

    1995-10-31

    The efficacy of medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA) therapy in controlling progressive measurable metastatic breast cancer was assessed in 61 patients. In addition serum MPA concentrations were measured by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and subjective effects of treatment were monitored. Overall 24 patients (39.3%) achieved an objective response(2 complete responses [ CR ] and 22 partial responses [ PR ]). There was no significant relationships between response to therapy and menopausal status, metastatic sites, previous therapy, histological type, or disease-free interval. Patients with estrogen (ER) and progesterone (PgR) receptor-positive tumors responded more frequently. Significant differences in serum MPA concentrations were seen between responders and non-responders, objective tumor shrinkage being seen in patients with serum levels in excess of 55 ng/ml. There were few cases responding to the therapy with serum MPA concentrations lower than 25 ng/ml. The serum MPA levels significantly correlated with an improvement in the performance status and survival. Patients with serum MPA concentrations lower than 25 ng/ml had significantly poorer survival. There was a significant relationship between MPA level and dose per area of boby surface (mg/ m(2)) in cases with CR or PR or no change (NC). However, the serum levels of patients with progressive disease despite therapy were lower than the expected levels based on the body surface area. This study demonstrated that serum MPA concentration is a determining factor for therapeutic benefit in advanced or recurrent breast cancer. PMID:11091543

  15. Eribulin in the Management of Advanced Breast Cancer: Implications of Current Research Findings.

    PubMed

    Kok, Victor C

    2015-01-01

    The search for cytotoxic agents from marine natural products ultimately led to the production of eribulin, which is a synthetic macrocyclic ketone analog of halichondrin B. Eribulin binds to tubulin to induce mitotic arrest and gained approval in Japan in May 2010; it was approved by the US Food and Drug Administration in November 2010 and the European Medicines Agency in March 2011 and was reimbursed by the Taiwan National Health Insurance in December 2014 for patients with metastatic breast cancer who had received at least one anthracycline and one taxane. The recommended regimen for eribulin mesylate comprises intravenous administration of 1.4 mg/m(2) (equivalent to 1.23 mg/m(2) eribulin) over two to five minutes on days 1 and 8 of a three-week cycle. Since 2011, various clinical investigations of eribulin monotherapy with dose or schedule modifications, combined use with other antineoplastic therapeutics, or head-to-head comparisons with specific agents have been performed in the management of advanced breast cancer. Ethnic-specific data from Japan and Korea indicate higher rates (>85%) of grade 3 or 4 neutropenia. Some anecdotal evidence suggests that eribulin can shrink brain and retinal metastases, which warrants further detailed studies. In this review, current observations of the effects of eribulin monotherapy are summarized and eribulin-backbone combination (bio-) chemotherapy is investigated. PMID:26691012

  16. Eribulin in the Management of Advanced Breast Cancer: Implications of Current Research Findings

    PubMed Central

    Kok, Victor C.

    2015-01-01

    The search for cytotoxic agents from marine natural products ultimately led to the production of eribulin, which is a synthetic macrocyclic ketone analog of halichondrin B. Eribulin binds to tubulin to induce mitotic arrest and gained approval in Japan in May 2010; it was approved by the US Food and Drug Administration in November 2010 and the European Medicines Agency in March 2011 and was reimbursed by the Taiwan National Health Insurance in December 2014 for patients with metastatic breast cancer who had received at least one anthracycline and one taxane. The recommended regimen for eribulin mesylate comprises intravenous administration of 1.4 mg/m2 (equivalent to 1.23 mg/m2 eribulin) over two to five minutes on days 1 and 8 of a three-week cycle. Since 2011, various clinical investigations of eribulin monotherapy with dose or schedule modifications, combined use with other antineoplastic therapeutics, or head-to-head comparisons with specific agents have been performed in the management of advanced breast cancer. Ethnic-specific data from Japan and Korea indicate higher rates (>85%) of grade 3 or 4 neutropenia. Some anecdotal evidence suggests that eribulin can shrink brain and retinal metastases, which warrants further detailed studies. In this review, current observations of the effects of eribulin monotherapy are summarized and eribulin-backbone combination (bio-) chemotherapy is investigated. PMID:26691012

  17. Laser immunotherapy for treatment of patients with advanced breast cancer and melanoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaosong; Hode, Tomas; Guerra, Maria C.; Ferrel, Gabriela L.; Nordquist, Robert E.; Chen, Wei R.

    2011-02-01

    Laser immunotherapy (LIT) was developed for the treatment of metastatic tumors. It combines local selective photothermal interaction and active immunological stimulation to induce a long-term, systemic anti-tumor immunity. During the past sixteen years, LIT has been advanced from bench-top to bedside, with promising outcomes. In our pre-clinical and preliminary clinical studies, LIT has demonstrated the capability in inducing immunological responses, which not only can eradicate the treated primary tumors, but also can eliminate untreated metastases at distant sites. Specifically, LIT has been used to treat advanced melanoma and breast cancer patients during the past five years. LIT was shown to be effective in controlling both primary tumors and distant metastases in late-stage patients, who have failed conventional therapies such as surgery, chemotherapy, radiation, and other more advanced approaches. The methodology and the development of LIT are presented in this paper. The patients' responses to LIT are also reported in this paper. The preliminary results obtained in these studies indicated that LIT could be an effective modality for the treatment of patients with late-stage, metastatic cancers, who are facing severely limited options.

  18. Docetaxel/S-1 Versus Docetaxel/Capecitabine as First-Line Treatment for Advanced Breast Cancer: A Retrospective Study.

    PubMed

    Li, Jinyu; You, Junhao; Si, Wen; Zhu, Yanyun; Chen, Yi; Yang, Bo; Han, Chun; Linghu, Ruixia; Zhang, Xingyang; Jiao, Shunchang; Yang, Junlan

    2015-10-01

    The treatment efficacy of advanced breast cancer is still not promising. This study aimed to compare the efficacy and safety of docetaxel/S-1 (DS1) versus docetaxel/capecitabine (DX) as the first-line treatment for advanced breast cancer.From June 2008 to June 2013, 22 patients with advanced breast cancer were treated with the DS1 regimen. Another 26 age- and disease status-matched patients treated with the DX regimen served as controls. The 2 groups were compared in terms of time to progression (TTP), objective response rate, disease control rate, clinical benefit rate, and safety profiles.Median TTP did not differ significantly between the DS1 group and the DX group (9.04 vs 10.94 months, P = 0.473). There were no significant differences in objective response rate, disease control rate, and clinical benefit rate between the 2 groups. Both the DS1 and the DX regimens showed good tolerability. The 2 regimens showed no significant difference in adverse events except degree III hand-foot syndrome (DS1 0 vs DX 23.1%, P = 0.025).For the first-line treatment of advanced breast cancer, the DS1 and the DX regimens showed similar efficacy and safety. The DS1 regimen had less severe hand-foot syndrome than the DX regimen. PMID:26469889

  19. Advancing research on endocrine disrupting chemicals in breast cancer: Expert panel recommendations.

    PubMed

    Teitelbaum, Susan L; Belpoggi, Fiorella; Reinlib, Les

    2015-07-01

    Breast cancer incidence continues to increase in the US and Europe, a reflection of the growing influence of environment factors that interact with personal genetics. The US Environmental Protection Agency estimates that there are approximately 10,000 endocrine disrupting chemicals among the common daily exposures that could affect the risk of disease. The daunting tasks of identifying, characterizing, and elucidating the mechanisms of endocrine disrupting chemicals in breast cancer need to be addressed to produce a comprehensive model that will facilitate preventive strategies and public policy. An expert panel met to describe and bring attention to needs linking common environmental exposures, critical windows of exposure, and optimal times of assessment in investigating breast cancer risk. The group included investigators with extensive experience in the use of rodent models and in leading population studies and produced a set of recommendations for effective approaches to gaining insights into the environmental origins of breast cancer across the lifespan. PMID:25549947

  20. Platinum-based chemotherapy in triple-negative advanced breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Villarreal-Garza, Cynthia; Khalaf, Daniel; Bouganim, Nathaniel; Clemons, Mark; Peña-Curiel, Omar; Baez-Revueltas, Berenice; Kiss, Alexander; Kassam, Farah; Enright, Katherine; Verma, Sunil; Pritchard, Kathleen; Myers, Jeff; Dent, Rebecca

    2014-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of platinum-based chemotherapy (PBC) versus conventional non-PBC regimens in a metastatic triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) setting. We reviewed the electronic patient records of patients with confirmed metastatic TNBC at four major cancer centres in Canada. All patients were allocated into two groups based on type of chemotherapy received (PBC vs. non-PBC) and line of treatment (first-, second-, or third-line). The primary objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of PBC in metastatic TNBC in terms of median duration of overall survival (OS) from diagnosis of distant metastatic disease and compare it with the efficacy of conventional non-platinum-based chemotherapy in metastatic TNBC after controlling for known prognostic factors. A total of 153 metastatic TNBC patients were identified, 58 treated with PBC and 95 with non-PBC. The median time in first-line PBC versus non-PBC was not different between the two groups (2 vs. 2 months, p = 0.9), the median time on treatment in second and third-line therapy was longer for the PBC group compared to the conventional treated group (4 vs. 1 months, p = 0.004; 4 vs. 0.5 months, p = 0.004, respectively). Patients who received PBC had a longer OS compared to those managed conventionally (14.5 vs. 10 months, p = 0.041). This study evaluates the survival outcomes in a homogenous group of TNBC metastatic patients treated with or without PBC. Our results confirmed our hypothesis of a better OS among PBC-treated TNBC patients compared to conventionally managed TNBC patients. Currently ongoing Phase III trials assessing the benefit of PBC versus other chemotherapeutic regimens in advanced TNBC will help define the role of these agents for the management of this breast cancer subtype. PMID:25001611

  1. Everolimus Plus Exemestane for the Treatment of Advanced Breast Cancer: A Review of Subanalyses from BOLERO-21

    PubMed Central

    Hortobagyi, Gabriel N.

    2015-01-01

    Hormone receptor–positive breast cancer is typically managed with endocrine therapies. However, resistance to endocrine therapy results in disease progression in a large proportion of breast cancers. Through the understanding of the mechanisms of endocrine resistance, identification of implicated pathways and targets has led to the development of novel agents targeting these pathways. Phosphoinositide 3-kinase/protein kinase B/mammalian target of rapamycin (PI3K/AKT/mTOR) pathway aberrations are common in breast cancer, with increased PI3K/AKT/mTOR signaling associated with resistance to endocrine and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)–targeted therapies. The mTOR inhibitor everolimus, in combination with exemestane, has been approved for patients with advanced hormone receptor–positive/HER2-negative breast cancer who progress on prior nonsteroidal aromatase inhibitor therapy based on results reported in the Breast Cancer Trials of Oral Everolimus-2 (BOLERO-2) study. This review will summarize the overall findings from BOLERO-2 and will consider available subanalyses by age, Asian origin, visceral or bone metastases, and prior therapy, with the aim of identifying populations most likely to benefit from everolimus therapy. The review will also summarize safety findings and their management and the effects of everolimus on quality of life. PMID:25810012

  2. Stages of Male Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Male Breast Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information about Male Breast Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Male ...

  3. Cryosurgery of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Liang; Xu, Kecheng

    2012-01-01

    With recent improvements in breast imaging, the ability to identify small breast tumors is markedly improved, prompting significant interest in the use of cryoablation without surgical excision to treat early-stage breast cancer. The cryoablation is often performed using ultrasound-guided tabletop argon-gas-based cryoablation system with a double freeze/thaw cycle. Recent studies have demonstrated that, as a primary therapy for small breast cancer, cryoablation is safe and effective with durable results, and can successfully destroy all cancers <1.0 cm and tumors between 1.0 and 1.5 cm without a significant ductal carcinoma-in-situ (DCIS) component. Presence of noncalcified DCIS is the cause of most cryoablation failures. At this time, cryoablation should be limited to patients with invasive ductal carcinoma <1.5 cm and with <25% DCIS in the core biopsy. For unresectable advanced breast cancer, cryoablation is a palliation modality and may be used as complementary for subsequent resection or other therapies. PMID:25083433

  4. Targeting Breast Cancer Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Suling; Wicha, Max S.

    2010-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that many cancers, including breast cancer, contain populations of cells that display stem-cell properties. These breast cancer stem cells, by virtue of their relative resistance to radiation and cytotoxic chemotherapy, may contribute to treatment resistance and relapse. The elucidation of pathways that regulate these cells has led to the identification of potential therapeutic targets. A number of agents capable of targeting breast cancer stem cells in preclinical models are currently entering clinical trials. Assessment of the efficacy of the agents will require development of innovative clinical trial designs with appropriate biologic and clinical end points. The effective targeting of breast cancer stem cells has the potential to significantly improve outcome for women with both early-stage and advanced breast cancer. PMID:20498387

  5. A structured review of health utility measures and elicitation in advanced/metastatic breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Yanni; Wolfram, Verena; Cook, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    Background Health utilities are increasingly incorporated in health economic evaluations. Different elicitation methods, direct and indirect, have been established in the past. This study examined the evidence on health utility elicitation previously reported in advanced/metastatic breast cancer and aimed to link these results to requirements of reimbursement bodies. Methods Searches were conducted using a detailed search strategy across several electronic databases (MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, and EconLit databases), online sources (Cost-effectiveness Analysis Registry and the Health Economics Research Center), and web sites of health technology assessment (HTA) bodies. Publications were selected based on the search strategy and the overall study objectives. Results A total of 768 publications were identified in the searches, and 26 publications, comprising 18 journal articles and eight submissions to HTA bodies, were included in the evidence review. Most journal articles derived utilities from the European Quality of Life Five-Dimensions questionnaire (EQ-5D). Other utility measures, such as the direct methods standard gamble (SG), time trade-off (TTO), and visual analog scale (VAS), were less frequently used. Several studies described mapping algorithms to generate utilities from disease-specific health-related quality of life (HRQOL) instruments such as European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire – Core 30 (EORTC QLQ-C30), European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire – Breast Cancer 23 (EORTC QLQ-BR23), Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy – General questionnaire (FACT-G), and Utility-Based Questionnaire-Cancer (UBQ-C); most used EQ-5D as the reference. Sociodemographic factors that affect health utilities, such as age, sex, income, and education, as well as disease progression, choice of utility elicitation method, and country settings, were identified

  6. Immunohistochemical prediction of lapatinib efficacy in advanced HER2-positive breast cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Duchnowska, Renata; Wysocki, Piotr J.; Korski, Konstanty; Czartoryska-Arłukowicz, Bogumiła; Niwińska, Anna; Orlikowska, Marlena; Radecka, Barbara; Studziński, Maciej; Demlova, Regina; Ziółkowska, Barbara; Merdalska, Monika; Hajac, Łukasz; Myśliwiec, Paulina; Zuziak, Dorota; Dębska-Szmich, Sylwia; Lang, Istvan; Foszczyńska-Kłoda, Małgorzata; Karczmarek-Borowska, Bożenna; Żawrocki, Anton; Kowalczyk, Anna; Biernat, Wojciech; Jassem, Jacek

    2016-01-01

    Molecular mechanisms of lapatinib resistance in breast cancer are not well understood. The aim of this study was to correlate expression of selected proteins involved in ErbB family signaling pathways with clinical efficacy of lapatinib. Study group included 270 HER2-positive advanced breast cancer patients treated with lapatinib and capecitabine. Immunohistochemical expression of phosphorylated adenosine monophosphate-activated protein (p-AMPK), mitogen-activated protein kinase (p-MAPK), phospho (p)-p70S6K, cyclin E, phosphatase and tensin homolog were analyzed in primary breast cancer samples. The best discriminative value for progression-free survival (PFS) was established for each biomarker and subjected to multivariate analysis. At least one biomarker was determined in 199 patients. Expression of p-p70S6K was independently associated with longer (HR 0.45; 95% CI: 0.25–0.81; p = 0.009), and cyclin E with shorter PFS (HR 1.83; 95% CI: 1.06–3.14; p = 0.029). Expression of p-MAPK (HR 1.61; 95% CI 1.13–2.29; p = 0.009) and cyclin E (HR 2.99; 95% CI: 1.29–6.94; p = 0.011) was correlated with shorter, and expression of estrogen receptor (HR 0.65; 95% CI 0.43–0.98; p = 0.041) with longer overall survival. Expression of p-AMPK negatively impacted response to treatment (HR 3.31; 95% CI 1.48–7.44; p = 0.004) and disease control (HR 3.07; 95% CI 1.25–7.58; p = 0.015). In conclusion: the efficacy of lapatinib seems to be associated with the activity of downstream signaling pathways – AMPK/mTOR and Ras/Raf/MAPK. Further research is warranted to assess the clinical utility of these data and to determine a potential role of combining lapatinib with MAPK pathway inhibitors. PMID:26623720

  7. Role of plasma osteopontin as a biomarker in locally advanced breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Anborgh, Pieter H; Caria, Laura BR; Chambers, Ann F; Tuck, Alan B; Stitt, Larry W; Brackstone, Muriel

    2015-01-01

    Osteopontin (OPN), a malignancy-associated secreted phosphoprotein, is a prognostic plasma biomarker for survival in metastatic breast cancer patients. We evaluated the role of OPN in Locally Advanced Breast Cancer (LABC) patients in predicting response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy and association with survival. Fifty-three patients with non-metastatic LABC were enrolled in this study and monitored serially for plasma OPN levels by ELISA during neoadjuvant chemotherapy prior to surgery. For fifty patients who had baseline OPN levels available for analysis, the median baseline OPN level was 63.6 ng/ml. Median patient follow up was 45 months and thirteen patients died from metastatic disease. Patients with baseline OPN levels ≥ 63.6 ng/ml were significantly more likely to die of their disease than those with baseline OPN < 63.6 ng/mL (Hazard Ratio = 3.4; 95% confidence interval 1.4-11.3; P = 0.011), and overall, baseline OPN level was significantly associated with survival (P = 0.002). There was little support for value of serial OPN determination in monitoring response to therapy in this patient population. Although the percentage of patients with baseline OPN levels < 63.6 ng/ml was higher in patients with pathological complete response than in those with no response, the difference was not statistically significant (64% and 14%, respectively (P = 0.066)). Thus, baseline plasma OPN level is a prognostic biomarker in this group of LABC patients, and could also be helpful in identifying LABC patients who will respond to neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Our results call for validation of our findings in large prospective trial data sets. PMID:26064440

  8. Scintigraphic evaluation of functional hepatic mass in patients with advanced breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Virgolini, I; Kornek, G; Höbart, J; Li, S R; Raolerer, M; Bergmann, H; Scheithauer, W; Pantev, T; Angelberger, P; Sinzinger, H

    1993-09-01

    Recent studies suggest a high specificity of 99mTc-galactosyl neoglycoalbumin (99mTc-NGA) receptor scanning in vivo by providing both morphological and functional diagnosis of liver disease. In 22 patients with advanced breast cancer 99mTc-NGA (150 MBq; 50 nmol) was exclusively trapped by the liver, the images showing 'cold spots' in areas of liver metastases formation. A two-tailed analysis was performed: the time activity curves recorded for the liver and precordial area were subjected to a kinetic receptor-calculating model allowing an estimation of the NGA-receptor concentration of the liver (i.e. hepatic binding protein, HBP) as well as calculation of the residual functional liver volume (RFLV) via the S.P.E.C.T.-study. In breast cancer patients with liver metastases a significantly (P < 0.01) lower HBP-concentration was estimated (0.65 +/- 0.16 vs 0.82 +/- 0.17 mumol l-1) as evidenced by a lower 99mTc-NGA-accumulation in the liver resulting also in a significantly (P < 0.001) lower RFLV (739 +/- 348 vs 1336 +/- 184 ml). In four amonafide-treated patients (800 mg m-2 intravenous infusion over 3 h) approximately one week after one chemotherapy cycle a significant (P < 0.05) increase in HBP-concentration (0.56 +/- 0.10 vs 0.72 +/- 0.06 mumol l-1) of the liver was found corresponding with an increase in RVLF (546 +/- 297 vs 670 +/- 265 ml). These regulatory mechanisms at the HBP level measured in vivo provide further evidence that 99mTc-NGA should have promise as a clinically useful receptor radiopharmaceutical for both quantification of liver function and assessment of liver morphology. PMID:8353045

  9. Ethical issues in autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) in advanced breast cancer: A systematic literature review

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background An effectiveness assessment on ASCT in locally advanced and metastatic breast cancer identified serious ethical issues associated with this intervention. Our objective was to systematically review these aspects by means of a literature analysis. Methods We chose the reflexive Socratic approach as the review method using Hofmann's question list, conducted a comprehensive literature search in biomedical, psychological and ethics bibliographic databases and screened the resulting hits in a 2-step selection process. Relevant arguments were assembled from the included articles, and were assessed and assigned to the question list. Hofmann's questions were addressed by synthesizing these arguments. Results Of the identified 879 documents 102 included arguments related to one or more questions from Hofmann's question list. The most important ethical issues were the implementation of ASCT in clinical practice on the basis of phase-II trials in the 1990s and the publication of falsified data in the first randomized controlled trials (Bezwoda fraud), which caused significant negative effects on recruiting patients for further clinical trials and the doctor-patient relationship. Recent meta-analyses report a marginal effect in prolonging disease-free survival, accompanied by severe harms, including death. ASCT in breast cancer remains a stigmatized technology. Reported health-related-quality-of-life data are often at high risk of bias in favor of the survivors. Furthermore little attention has been paid to those patients who were dying. Conclusions The questions were addressed in different degrees of completeness. All arguments were assignable to the questions. The central ethical dimensions of ASCT could be discussed by reviewing the published literature. PMID:21496244

  10. Natural Products for Chemoprevention of Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Eun-Yi; Moon, Aree

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is the primary cause of cancer death in women. Although current therapies have shown some promise against breast cancer, there is still no effective cure for the majority of patients in the advanced stages of breast cancer. Development of effective agents to slow, reduce, or reverse the incidence of breast cancer in high-risk women is necessary. Chemoprevention of breast cancer by natural products is advantageous, as these compounds have few side effects and low toxicity compared to synthetic compounds. In the present review, we summarize natural products which exert chemopreventive activities against breast cancer, such as curcumin, sauchinone, lycopene, denbinobin, genipin, capsaicin, and ursolic acid. This review examines the current knowledge about natural compounds and their mechanisms that underlie breast cancer chemopreventive activity both in vitro and in vivo. The present review may provide information on the use of these compounds for the prevention of breast cancer. PMID:26734584

  11. Breast cancer staging

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000911.htm Breast cancer staging To use the sharing features on this ... Once your health care team knows you have breast cancer , they will do more tests to stage it. ...

  12. Stages of Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... to treat breast cancer. Internal radiation therapy with strontium-89 (a radionuclide ) is used to relieve bone pain ... breast cancer that has spread to the bones. Strontium-89 is injected into a vein and travels to ...

  13. Breast Cancer Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... to treat breast cancer. Internal radiation therapy with strontium-89 (a radionuclide ) is used to relieve bone pain ... breast cancer that has spread to the bones. Strontium-89 is injected into a vein and travels to ...

  14. Breast cancer in men

    MedlinePlus

    ... Johnson KC, Olsson H, Casagrande JT, et al. Anthropometric and hormonal risk factors for male breast cancer: ... D, Ferlay J, Brinton LA, Cook MB. An international comparison of male and female breast cancer incidence ...

  15. Specific siRNA Targeting Receptor for Advanced Glycation End Products (RAGE) Decreases Proliferation in Human Breast Cancer Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Radia, AL-Madhagi; Yaser, AL-Madhagi; Ma, Xiaoqian; Zhang, Juan; Yang, Cejun; Dong, Qiong; Rong, Pengfei; Ye, Bin; Liu, Sheng; Wang, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Receptor for Advanced Glycation End Products (RAGE) is an oncogenic trans-membranous receptor overexpressed in various human cancers. However, the role of RAGE in breast cancer development and proliferation is still unclear. In this study, we demonstrated that RAGE expression levels are correlated to the degree of severity of breast cancer. Furthermore, there is a decrease in the proliferation of all sub-types of breast cancer, MCF-7, SK-Br-3 and MDA-MB-231, as a result of the effect of RAGE siRNA. RAGE siRNA arrested cells in the G1 phase and inhibited DNA synthesis (p < 0.05). Moreover, qRT-PCR and Western Blot results demonstrated that RAGE siRNA decreases the expression of transcriptional factor NF-κB p65 as well as the expression of cell proliferation markers PCNA and cyclinD1. RAGE and RAGE ligands can thus be considered as possible targets for breast cancer management and therapy. PMID:23579957

  16. Specific siRNA targeting receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) decreases proliferation in human breast cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Radia, Al-Madhagi; Yaser, Al-Madhagi; Ma, Xiaoqian; Zhang, Juan; Yang, Cejun; Dong, Qiong; Rong, Pengfei; Ye, Bin; Liu, Sheng; Wang, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Receptor for Advanced Glycation End Products (RAGE) is an oncogenic trans-membranous receptor overexpressed in various human cancers. However, the role of RAGE in breast cancer development and proliferation is still unclear. In this study, we demonstrated that RAGE expression levels are correlated to the degree of severity of breast cancer. Furthermore, there is a decrease in the proliferation of all sub-types of breast cancer, MCF-7, SK-Br-3 and MDA-MB-231, as a result of the effect of RAGE siRNA. RAGE siRNA arrested cells in the G1 phase and inhibited DNA synthesis (p < 0.05). Moreover, qRT-PCR and Western Blot results demonstrated that RAGE siRNA decreases the expression of transcriptional factor NF-κB p65 as well as the expression of cell proliferation markers PCNA and cyclinD1. RAGE and RAGE ligands can thus be considered as possible targets for breast cancer management and therapy. PMID:23579957

  17. ABC1 Consensus Conference - a German Perspective: First International Consensus Conference on Advanced Breast Cancer (ABC1), Lisbon, November 5, 2011.

    PubMed

    Thomssen, Christoph; Marschner, Norbert; Untch, Michael; Decker, Thomas; Hegewisch-Becker, Susanna; Jackisch, Christian; Janni, Wolfgang; Hans-Joachim, Lück; von Minckwitz, Gunter; Scharl, Anton; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Tesch, Hans; Welt, Anja; Harbeck, Nadia

    2012-02-01

    A group of German breast cancer experts (medical oncologists and gynaecologists) reviewed and commented on the results of the first international 'Advanced Breast Cancer First Consensus Conference' (ABC1) for the diagnosis and treatment of advanced breast cancer. The ABC1 Conference is an initiative of the European School of Oncology (ESO) Metastatic Breast Cancer Task Force in cooperation with the EBCC (European Breast Cancer Conference), ESMO (European Society of Medical Oncology) and the American JNCI (Journal of the National Cancer Institute). The main focus of the ABC1 Conference was metastatic breast cancer (stage IV). The ABC1 consensus is based on the vote of 33 breast cancer experts from different countries and has been specified as a guideline for therapeutic practice by the German expert group. It is the objective of the ABC1 consensus as well as of the German comments to provide an internationally standardized and evidence-based foundation for qualified decision-making in the treatment of metastatic breast cancer. PMID:22553474

  18. Boron neutron capture therapy applied to advanced breast cancers: Engineering simulation and feasibility study of the radiation treatment protocol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sztejnberg Goncalves-Carralves, Manuel Leonardo

    This dissertation describes a novel Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) application for the treatment of human epidermal growth factor receptor type 2 positive (HER2+) breast cancers. The original contribution of the dissertation is the development of the engineering simulation and the feasibility study of the radiation treatment protocol for this novel combination of BNCT and HER2+ breast cancer treatment. This new concept of BNCT, representing a radiation binary targeted treatment, consists of the combination of two approaches never used in a synergism before. This combination may offer realistic hope for relapsed and/or metastasized breast cancers. This treatment assumes that the boronated anti-HER2 monoclonal antibodies (MABs) are administrated to the patient and accumulate preferentially in the tumor. Then the tumor is destroyed when is exposed to neutron irradiation. Since the use of anti-HER2 MABs yields good and promising results, the proposed concept is expected to amplify the known effect and be considered as a possible additional treatment approach to the most severe breast cancers for patients with metastasized cancer for which the current protocol is not successful and for patients refusing to have the standard treatment protocol. This dissertation makes an original contribution with an integral numerical approach and proves feasible the combination of the aforementioned therapy and disease. With these goals, the dissertation describes the theoretical analysis of the proposed concept providing an integral engineering simulation study of the treatment protocol. An extensive analysis of the potential limitations, capabilities and optimization factors are well studied using simplified models, models based on real CT patients' images, cellular models, and Monte Carlo (MCNP5/X) transport codes. One of the outcomes of the integral dosimetry assessment originally developed for the proposed treatment of advanced breast cancers is the implementation of BNCT

  19. How Can Advanced Imaging Be Used to Mitigate Potential Breast Cancer Overdiagnosis?

    PubMed

    Rahbar, Habib; McDonald, Elizabeth S; Lee, Janie M; Partridge, Savannah C; Lee, Christoph I

    2016-06-01

    Radiologists, as administrators and interpreters of screening mammography, are considered by some to be major contributors to the potential harms of screening, including overdiagnosis and overtreatment. In this article, we outline current efforts within the breast imaging community toward mitigating screening harms, including the widespread adoption of tomosynthesis and potentially adjusting screening frequency and thresholds for image-guided breast biopsy. However, the emerging field of breast radiomics may offer the greatest promise for reducing overdiagnosis by identifying imaging-based biomarkers strongly associated with tumor biology, and therefore helping prevent the harms of unnecessary treatment for indolent cancers. PMID:27017136

  20. Recruitment and Early Retention of Women with Advanced Breast Cancer in a Complementary and Alternative Medicine Trial

    PubMed Central

    Sikorskii, Alla; Wyatt, Gwen K.; Siddiqi, Azfar-e-Alam; Tamkus, Deimante

    2011-01-01

    More than 80% of women with breast cancer are now reported to be using complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) therapies during conventional treatment. A randomized clinical trial (RCT) of reflexology with late stage breast cancer patients serves as the data source for this article. The purposes were to investigate: (i) reasons for refusal to participate in a RCT of reflexology; (ii) the differences between those who completed the baseline interview and those who dropped out before baseline; and (iii) the utility of the Palliative Prognostic Score (PPS) as a prognostic screening tool in minimizing early attrition (before baseline) from the trial. Eligible women (N = 400) approached at 12 cancer centers in the Midwest had advanced breast cancer, were on chemotherapy or hormonal therapy, and had a PPS of 11 or less. Comparisons of those who dropped out early (N = 33) to those who stayed in the trial (N = 240) were carried out using Wilcoxon rank, t-, chi-squared and Fisher's exact tests. The reasons of being “too sick” or “overwhelmed” were given by less than 12% of the women who refused to participate. There was a higher early dropout rate among black women compared to other (primarily white) women (P = .01). Cancer recurrence and metastasis, age, and the PPS were not predictive of early retention of women. Specialized techniques may be needed to ensure black women remain in the trial once consented. Women with advanced disease were likely to enter and remain in the trial despite deterioration in health. PMID:19620179

  1. Genomic profiling of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Anjita; Singh, Alok Kumar; Maurya, Sanjeev Kumar; Rai, Rajani; Tewari, Mallika; Kumar, Mohan; Shukla, Hari S

    2009-05-01

    Genome study provides significant changes in the advancement of molecular diagnosis and treatment in Breast cancer. Several recent critical advances and high-throughput techniques identified the genomic trouble and dramatically accelerated the pace of research in preventing and curing this malignancy. Tumor-suppressor genes, proto-oncogenes, DNA-repair genes, carcinogen-metabolism genes are critically involved in progression of breast cancer. We reviewed imperative finding in breast genetics, ongoing work to segregate further susceptible genes, and preliminary studies on molecular profiling. PMID:19235775

  2. Disparities in the Use of Radiation Therapy in Patients With Local-Regionally Advanced Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, Steve R.; Beal, Shannon H.; Chen, Steven L.; Canter, Robert J.; Khatri, Vijay P.; Chen, Allen; Bold, Richard J.

    2010-11-01

    Background: Radiation therapy (RT) is indicated for the treatment of local-regionally advanced breast cancer (BCa). Hypothesis: We hypothesized that black and Hispanic patients with local-regionally advanced BCa would receive lower rates of RT than their white counterparts. Methods: The Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results database was used to identify white, black, Hispanic, and Asian patients with invasive BCa and {>=}10 metastatic lymph nodes diagnosed between 1988 and 2005. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression evaluated the relationship of race/ethnicity with use of RT. Multivariate models stratified for those undergoing mastectomy or lumpectomy. Results: Entry criteria were met by 12,653 patients. Approximately half of the patients did not receive RT. Most patients were white (72%); the remainder were Hispanic (10.4%), black (10.3%), and Asian (7.3%). On univariate analysis, Hispanics (odd ratio [OR] 0.89; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.79-1.00) and blacks (OR 0.79; 95% CI, 0.70-0.89) were less likely to receive RT than whites. On multivariate analysis, blacks (OR 0.76; 95% CI, 0.67-0.86) and Hispanics (OR 0.80; 95% CI, 0.70-0.90) were less likely than whites to receive RT. Disparities persisted for blacks (OR 0.74; 95% CI, 0.64-0.85) and Hispanics (OR 0.77; 95% CI, 0.67-0.89) who received mastectomy, but not for those who received lumpectomy. Conclusions: Many patients with local-regionally advanced BCa do not receive RT. Blacks and Hispanics were less likely than whites to receive RT. This disparity was noted predominately in patients who received mastectomy. Future efforts at improving rates of RT are warranted. Efforts at eliminating racial/ethnic disparities should focus on black and Hispanic candidates for postmastectomy RT.

  3. Breast Cancer Rates by State

    MedlinePlus

    ... Associated Lung Ovarian Prostate Skin Uterine Cancer Home Breast Cancer Rates by State Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend ... from breast cancer each year. Rates of Getting Breast Cancer by State The number of people who get ...

  4. Side effects of bone-targeted therapies in advanced breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Domschke, Christoph; Schuetz, Florian

    2014-10-01

    In up to 75% of cases, advanced breast cancer patients eventually develop bone metastases with often debilitating skeletal-related events (SREs). Osteoclast inhibitors are commonly used as therapeutic mainstay with clinical studies showing superiority of denosumab over bisphosphonates (e.g., zoledronate) for the prevention of SREs. The present review discusses the adverse event profile of these agents, and addresses the prevention and management of untoward side effects. Adverse events associated with osteoclast inhibitors comprise osteonecrosis of the jaw and hypocalcemia. Hypocalcemia is more common with denosumab, particularly in severe renal dysfunction. During therapy, the appropriate prevention of these adverse events includes close attention to dental health, avoidance of invasive dental procedures, supplementation with calcium and vitamin D unless patients are hypercalcemic, and regular monitoring of relevant serum values. Relating to the risk of nephrotoxicity, bisphosphonates but not denosumab have been incriminated. Therefore, serum creatinine levels should be checked prior to each dose of zoledronate, and in severe renal dysfunction (creatinine clearance < 30 ml/min) zoledronate is contraindicated anyway. Acute-phase reactions are particularly linked to bisphosphonates. Consequently, if these adverse events predominate, switching to denosumab is recommended. PMID:25759613

  5. Advancing Social Workers' Responsiveness to Health Disparities: The Case of Breast Cancer Screening

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Altpeter, Mary; Mitchell, James F.; Pennell, Joan

    2005-01-01

    This study provides the basis for customizing culturally responsive social work health promotion programs aimed at eliminating breast cancer screening and mortality disparities between white and African American women. Survey data collected from a random sample of 853 women in rural North Carolina were used to explore the impact of psychosocial…

  6. Recent Advances of Curcumin and its Analogues in Breast Cancer Prevention and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Mock, Charlotta D; Jordan, Brian C; Selvam, Chelliah

    2016-01-01

    More than 230,000 diagnosed cases of invasive breast cancer in women was estimated in 2014 and an expected 40,000 deaths attributed to the aggressive carcinoma. An effective approach to diminish the morbidity and mortality of breast cancer is the development of chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic agents. Nutraceuticals have demonstrated their ability to proficiently halt carcinogenesis. The administration of natural compounds able to effectively serve as chemoprevention and chemotherapeutics without causing harm or adverse effects is imperative. Curcumin derived from the rhizome of Curcuma longa L., is a common spice of India, used for centuries because of its medicinal properties. The main component of curcumin possesses a wide range of biological activities; anti-proliferative, anti-inflammatory, and apoptotic characteristics modulated through the inactivation of pathways such as EGK and Akt/mTOR. In addition, curcumin alters the expression of cytokines, transcription factors, and enzymes involved in cell vitality. The in vivo application of curcumin in breast cancer is hindered by its limited bioavailabiity. The synthesis of curcumin analogues and delivery via nanoparticles has demonstrated enhanced bioavailability of curcumin in the malignancy. This review focuses on recent developments in the use of curcumin, curcumin analogues, and novel delivery systems as a preventive and therapeutic method for breast cancer. PMID:27103993

  7. Chemoendocrine therapy with prolonged estrogen priming in advanced breast cancer: endocrine pharmacokinetics and toxicity.

    PubMed

    Benz, C; Gandara, D; Miller, B; Drakes, T; Monroe, S; Wilbur, B; DeGregorio, M

    1987-03-01

    Recent efforts to improve response rates in advanced breast cancer have used short, alternating courses of antiestrogen therapy followed by estrogen priming to cytokinetically enhance tumor cell sensitivity to antimetabolites. Based on recent in vitro and in vivo studies, we have introduced a chemoendocrine regimen that uses prolonged courses of estrogen priming. The present protocol consists of alternating monthly cycles of tamoxifen (TAM) and estradiol during which sequential (24-hr) methotrexate, 5-fluorouracil, and leucovorin are administered at 2-week intervals. Twenty-five patients with metastatic breast cancer received greater than 80 endocrine cycles and greater than 300 courses of chemotherapy by this protocol; two-thirds of these patients had previously failed other endocrine or chemotherapy regimens. Most patients experienced grade 1 or 2 myelosuppression or gastrointestinal symptoms during at least one treatment cycle; however, overall toxicity was considered to be mild and therapy was very well tolerated. Serum levels of estradiol, estrone, TAM, and TAM metabolites were measured during all phases of the endocrine cycle in five patients on chronic therapy. Concentrations of TAM and its more abundant metabolite, N-desmethyltamoxifen (N-desTAM), rose twofold during antiestrogen therapy and fell during estrogen priming, with mean levels persisting greater than 100 ng/ml throughout the priming interval. Mean estradiol (E2) and estrone (E1) levels rose during priming and were sustained fivefold and tenfold above the basal postmenopausal levels measured during antiestrogen treatment. Calculating the serum molar ratios of [TAM + N-desTAM]/[E2 + E1] during each phase of the treatment cycle confirmed that estrogen priming was achieved pharmacologically by this endocrine schedule. Clinical remissions were observed in this small patient sample with seven of 18 patients achieving either complete (28%) or partial (11%) responses, and an additional 39% obtaining

  8. Role of Taxane and Anthracycline Combination Regimens in the Management of Advanced Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Ruinian; Han, Shuai; Duan, Chongyang; Chen, Kexu; You, Zhijian; Jia, Jun; Lin, Shunhuan; Liang, Liming; Liu, Aixue; Long, Huidong; Wang, Senming

    2015-01-01

    /febrile neutropenia, anorexia, stomatitis/mucosal inflammation, diarrhea, and sensory neuropathy. In contrast, patients receiving taxane-based regimens were at higher RRs for hand–foot syndrome and diarrhea, whereas patients receiving anthracycline-based regimens had higher RRs for nausea and vomiting. A taxane-based treatment regimen may be a better option than a combined taxane/anthracycline regimen for managing patients with advanced breast cancer, as it produces equivalent clinical outcomes and has less toxicity compared to other similar regimens. PMID:25929935

  9. Advanced glycation endproducts increase proliferation, migration and invasion of the breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231.

    PubMed

    Sharaf, Hana; Matou-Nasri, Sabine; Wang, Qiuyu; Rabhan, Zaki; Al-Eidi, Hamad; Al Abdulrahman, Abdulkareem; Ahmed, Nessar

    2015-03-01

    Diabetic patients have increased likelihood of developing breast cancer. Advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs) underlie the pathogenesis of diabetic complications but their impact on breast cancer cells is not understood. This study aims to determine the effects of methylglyoxal-derived bovine serum albumin AGEs (MG-BSA-AGEs) on the invasive MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell line. By performing cell counting, using wound-healing assay, invasion assay and zymography analysis, we found that MG-BSA-AGEs increased MDA-MB-231 cell proliferation, migration and invasion through Matrigel™ associated with an enhancement of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 activities, in a dose-dependent manner. Using Western blot and flow cytometry analyses, we demonstrated that MG-BSA-AGEs increased expression of the receptor for AGEs (RAGE) and phosphorylation of key signaling protein extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)-1/2. Furthermore, in MG-BSA-AGE-treated cells, phospho-protein micro-array analysis revealed enhancement of phosphorylation of the ribosomal protein 70 serine S6 kinase beta 1 (p70S6K1), which is known to be involved in protein synthesis, the signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT)-3 and the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) p38, which are involved in cell survival. Blockade of MG-BSA-AGE/RAGE interactions using a neutralizing anti-RAGE antibody inhibited MG-BSA-AGE-induced MDA-MB-231 cell processes, including the activation of signaling pathways. Throughout the study, non-modified BSA had a negligible effect. In conclusion, AGEs might contribute to breast cancer development and progression partially through the regulation of MMP-9 activity and RAGE signal activation. The up-regulation of RAGE and the concomitant increased phosphorylation of p70S6K1 induced by AGEs may represent promising targets for drug therapy to treat diabetic patients with breast cancer. PMID:25514746

  10. Learning from social media: utilizing advanced data extraction techniques to understand barriers to breast cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Freedman, Rachel A; Viswanath, Kasisomayajula; Vaz-Luis, Ines; Keating, Nancy L

    2016-07-01

    Past examinations of breast cancer treatment barriers have typically included registry, claims-based, and smaller survey studies. We examined treatment barriers using a novel, comprehensive, social media analysis of online, candid discussions about breast cancer. Using an innovative toolset to search postings on social networks, message boards, patient communities, and topical sites, we performed a large-scale qualitative analysis. We examined the sentiments and barriers expressed about breast cancer treatments by Internet users during 1 year (2/1/14-1/31/15). We categorized posts based on thematic patterns and examined trends in discussions by race/ethnicity (white/black/Hispanic) when this information was available. We identified 1,024,041 unique posts related to breast cancer treatment. Overall, 57 % of posts expressed negative sentiments. Using machine learning software, we assigned treatment barriers for 387,238 posts (38 %). Barriers included emotional (23 % of posts), preferences and spiritual/religious beliefs (21 %), physical (18 %), resource (15 %), healthcare perceptions (9 %), treatment processes/duration (7 %), and relationships (7 %). Black and Hispanic (vs. white) users more frequently reported barriers related to healthcare perceptions, beliefs, and pre-diagnosis/diagnosis organizational challenges and fewer emotional barriers. Using a novel analysis of diverse social media users, we observed numerous breast cancer treatment barriers that differed by race/ethnicity. Social media is a powerful tool, allowing use of real-world data for qualitative research, capitalizing on the rich discussions occurring spontaneously online. Future research should focus on how to further employ and learn from this type of social intelligence research across all medical disciplines. PMID:27339067

  11. Advances in the knowledge of breast cancer stem cells. A review.

    PubMed

    Schwarz-Cruz Y Celis, Angela; Espinosa, Magali; Maldonado, Vilma; Melendez-Zajgla, Jorge

    2016-06-01

    Much effort has been made by researchers to elucidate the complex biology of breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs), a small subset of breast tumor cells that display stem cell properties, drive tumor initiation, and growth. In recent years, it has been suggested that BCSCs could be responsible for the process of metastasis and the development of drug resistance. These findings make the need to find the distinguishing blend of markers that can recognize only BCSCs of the utmost importance in order to be able to design new targeted therapies. This review will summarize BCSCs' main features as well as the cell surface markers that are currently used to identify them. PMID:26715540

  12. Breast Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... the chance of dying from breast cancer. MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) in women with a high risk of breast ... the body. This procedure is also called nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (NMRI). MRI does not use any x-rays. ...

  13. Dyadic Influence of Hope and Optimism on Patient Marital Satisfaction among Couples with Advanced Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rock, Emily E.; Steiner, Jennifer L.; Rand, Kevin L.; Bigatti, Silvia M.

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE An estimated 10–40% of breast cancer (BC) patients report negative changes to their partnered relationships. Literature suggests that for these patients, marital satisfaction is related to depression and other quality of life factors which are associated with survivorship and treatment response. However, existing literature does not provide a clear explanation of the factors that strengthen vs. create strain in couples facing cancer. Given the benefits of a satisfying relationship to patient quality of life, it is important to better understand factors that put patients at greater risk for marital difficulties. This study examined the differential and combined roles of hope and optimism among BC patients and their partners on patient marital satisfaction. METHOD Fifty-six breast cancer patient-partner dyads completed study questionnaires as part of a larger study. Regression analyses were used to examine the main and interaction effects of patient and partner hope and optimism on patient marital satisfaction. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION Higher patient and partner hope predicted greater patient marital satisfaction, whereas optimism did not. These results are divergent from the literature on optimism and well-being, which shows the importance of studying these two traits concurrently. Interaction effects suggest certain combinations of patient and partner hope and optimism are more beneficial than others for patient marital satisfaction and suggest a dyadic approach is important for investigation of well-being in breast cancer. PMID:24687536

  14. [Locally Advanced Breast Cancer Treated with Halsted's Operation Because of Drug-Induced Lung Injury Caused by Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy--A Case Report].

    PubMed

    Moro, Kazuki; Nagahashi, Masayuki; Tsuchida, Junko; Tatsuda, Kumiko; Toshikawa, Chie; Hasegawa, Miki; Ishikawa, Takashi; Shimada, Yoshifumi; Sakata, Jun; Kameyama, Hitoshi; Kobayashi, Takashi; Minagawa, Masahiro; Kosugi, Shin-ichi; Koyama, Yu; Wakai, Toshifumi

    2015-11-01

    A 64-year-old woman discovered a mass in her left breast and visited our hospital. A thorough examination resulted in a diagnosis of left, locally advanced breast cancer (cT4bN3, M0, cStage Ⅲc) with muscle invasion and Level Ⅲ lymph node metastases. Because of drug-induced lung disease following 4 courses of adriamycin and cyclophosphamide, the chemotherapy had to be stopped. Halsted's operation and postoperative radiotherapy (50 Gy) were performed. The patient was alive with no evidence of recurrence 9 months after surgery. Although multidisciplinary therapy is recommended in locally advanced breast cancer, chemotherapy sometimes cannot be performed due to factors such as age and physical status. Halsted's operation could be considered as a treatment of choice in patients with locally advanced breast cancer. It is important to choose the treatment strategy based on the condition of the patient. PMID:26805178

  15. [Breast Care Nurses - nursing experts for breast cancer care. A path to "Advanced Nursing Practice" in Germany?].

    PubMed

    Gerlach, Anja; Wiedemann, Regina

    2010-12-01

    The role of Breast Care Nurses (BCNs) has been discussed since Breast Centres have been opened in Germany. This article introduces the concept of the Breast Care Nurses on a national and an international level in the context of Advanced Nursing Practice (ANP). Within a descriptive study, graduates of a German BCN-education programme were interrogated regarding their current work, their main activities as a BCN, about general conditions in their work environment, experienced barriers, and supporting factors. 122 questionnaires were evaluated. The return rate was 71 % (n = 171). Results showed that 58.1 % (n = 71) of the graduates were employed as a Breast Care Nurse, however only 28.1 % (n = 20) in a full-time and 35.2 % (n = 25) in a part-time position. This first German study about BCN-services showed a lack of basic work conditions, for example regarding a consultation room, access to literature, or templates for documentation. In the discussion part, the situation of the BCNs is reviewed in the German context and in relation to ANP concepts as well as regarding future demands for the position of a BCN. PMID:21154250

  16. Living as a Breast Cancer Survivor

    MedlinePlus

    ... Emotional aspects of breast cancer Living as a breast cancer survivor For many women with breast cancer, treatment ... making some new choices. Follow-up care after breast cancer treatment Even after you have completed breast cancer ...

  17. Breast Cancer Risk in American Women

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Breast Cancer Risk in American Women On This Page What ... risk of developing the disease. Personal history of breast cancer : Women who have had breast cancer are more ...

  18. Genetics Home Reference: breast cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions breast cancer breast cancer Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Breast cancer is a disease in which certain cells in ...

  19. Paraneoplastic hypocalcemia-induced heart failure in advanced breast cancer: A case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    FAROLFI, ALBERTO; FERRARIO, CRISTIANO; AQUILINA, MICHELE; CECCONETTO, LORENZO; TARTAGLIA, ANDREAS; IBRAHIM, TONI; SERRA, LUIGI; OBOLDI, DEVIL; NIZZOLI, MAURIZIO; ROCCA, ANDREA

    2015-01-01

    Hypocalcemia is an uncommon clinical symptom of patients with malignant tumors, and a number of factors may be involved in its development. The present study describes the case of a 67-year-old Caucasian female, presenting with severe refractory hypocalcemia and heart failure. The patient was subsequently diagnosed with breast cancer and bone metastases. The paraneoplastic origin of the syndrome was confirmed by its complete resolution once the tumor responded to specific antineoplastic treatments, comprising weekly paclitaxel and aromatase inhibitor administration. The present case report suggested the need for greater awareness of the possibility of paraneoplastic hypocalcemia in breast cancer patients, and suggested that this condition may also contribute to the occurrence of heart failure. The mechanisms potentially responsible for this event were discussed and a brief review of the literature presented. PMID:26622568

  20. Evolving psychosocial, emotional, functional, and support needs of women with advanced breast cancer: Results from the Count Us, Know Us, Join Us and Here & Now surveys.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Fatima; Harbeck, Nadia; Mertz, Shirley; Fenech, Doris

    2016-08-01

    Although medical advances have marginally improved survival of women with advanced breast cancer, their psychosocial, emotional, and functional needs remain unmet. Two surveys, Count Us, Know Us, Join Us (Count Us) and Here & Now (H&N), were conducted to understand the unique challenges faced by women with advanced breast cancer and to identify ways of addressing these issues. A total of 1577 women with advanced breast cancer (Count Us, N = 1273; H&N, N = 304) participated in the two surveys, which revealed several previously unreported challenges. Nearly half the women felt isolated and worried, and slightly more than half experienced declines in income because of change in employment; 41% of women felt that support from family and friends decreased over time, and many patients believed information about advanced breast cancer was inadequate and difficult to find. Concerted efforts by people who care for and support women with advanced breast cancer are urgently needed to address these issues. PMID:27161410

  1. The Role of Genomic Profiling in Advanced Breast Cancer: The Two Faces of Janus

    PubMed Central

    Eralp, Yesim

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in genomic technology have led to considerable improvement in our understanding of the molecular basis that underpins breast cancer biology. Through the use of comprehensive whole genome genomic profiling by next-generation sequencing, an unprecedented bulk of data on driver mutations, key genomic rearrangements, and mechanisms on tumor evolution has been generated. These developments have marked the beginning of a new era in oncology called “personalized or precision medicine.” Elucidation of biologic mechanisms that underpin carcinogenetic potential and metastatic behavior has led to an inevitable explosion in the development of effective targeted agents, many of which have gained approval over the past decade. Despite energetic efforts and the enormous support gained within the oncology community, there are many obstacles in the clinical implementation of precision medicine. Other than the well-known biologic markers, such as ER and Her-2/neu, no proven predictive marker exists to determine the responsiveness to a certain biologic agent. One of the major issues in this regard is teasing driver mutations among the background noise within the bulk of coexisting passenger mutations. Improving bioinformatics tools through electronic models, enhanced by improved insight into pathway dependency may be the step forward to overcome this problem. Next, is the puzzle on spatial and temporal tumoral heterogeneity, which remains to be solved by ultra-deep sequencing and optimizing liquid biopsy techniques. Finally, there are multiple logistical and financial issues that have to be meticulously tackled in order to optimize the use of “precision medicine” in the real-life setting. PMID:27547031

  2. Response monitoring using quantitative ultrasound methods and supervised dictionary learning in locally advanced breast cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gangeh, Mehrdad J.; Fung, Brandon; Tadayyon, Hadi; Tran, William T.; Czarnota, Gregory J.

    2016-03-01

    A non-invasive computer-aided-theragnosis (CAT) system was developed for the early assessment of responses to neoadjuvant chemotherapy in patients with locally advanced breast cancer. The CAT system was based on quantitative ultrasound spectroscopy methods comprising several modules including feature extraction, a metric to measure the dissimilarity between "pre-" and "mid-treatment" scans, and a supervised learning algorithm for the classification of patients to responders/non-responders. One major requirement for the successful design of a high-performance CAT system is to accurately measure the changes in parametric maps before treatment onset and during the course of treatment. To this end, a unified framework based on Hilbert-Schmidt independence criterion (HSIC) was used for the design of feature extraction from parametric maps and the dissimilarity measure between the "pre-" and "mid-treatment" scans. For the feature extraction, HSIC was used to design a supervised dictionary learning (SDL) method by maximizing the dependency between the scans taken from "pre-" and "mid-treatment" with "dummy labels" given to the scans. For the dissimilarity measure, an HSIC-based metric was employed to effectively measure the changes in parametric maps as an indication of treatment effectiveness. The HSIC-based feature extraction and dissimilarity measure used a kernel function to nonlinearly transform input vectors into a higher dimensional feature space and computed the population means in the new space, where enhanced group separability was ideally obtained. The results of the classification using the developed CAT system indicated an improvement of performance compared to a CAT system with basic features using histogram of intensity.

  3. Phase I Study and Biomarker Analysis of Lapatinib and Concurrent Radiation for Locally Advanced Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Horton, Janet K.; Livasy, Chad A.; Shields, Janiel M.; Lawrence, Julia A.; Chiu, WingKeung M.; Ivanova, Anastasia; Ollila, David W.; Carey, Lisa A.; Halle, Jan S.; Sartor, Carolyn I.; Dees, E. Claire

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. This phase I study assessed the toxicity and safety of combining daily lapatinib with radiation therapy. Sequential tumor biopsies were obtained to evaluate changes in biomarkers, such as epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and human EGFR-2 (HER2) signaling pathways. Methods. Eligibility for this dose-escalation study included unresectable and locally recurrent or chemotherapy-refractory and locally advanced breast cancer, and adequate organ function. Patients underwent three serial biopsies: at baseline, after 1 week of lapatinib alone, and after 1 week of lapatinib and radiation. Endpoints included determination of toxicity, maximum tolerated dose, and analysis of the effect of lapatinib with or without radiation on EGFR and HER2 signaling pathways by immunohistochemistry. Results. Doses of lapatinib up to 1,500 mg/day were well tolerated. Toxicity of grade 3 or more was limited to radiation dermatitis and pain. Out of 19 patients treated, in field responses per Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors criteria were complete in four patients and partial in six patients. Serial biopsies were obtained in 16 patients with no complications. Total Her2 was relatively unchanged while phospho-Her2, phospho-Akt, and phospho-ERK showed variable responses to both lapatinib alone and dual therapy with lapatinib and radiation. Conclusions. The combination of lapatinib and radiation was well tolerated in this patient cohort. Overall local response rates were comparable to those reported in other studies in this patient population. Biopsies were safely performed at all time points. Inhibition of HER2 and downstream signaling pathways was identified, although no strong correlation with response was seen. PMID:23006498

  4. The Role of Genomic Profiling in Advanced Breast Cancer: The Two Faces of Janus.

    PubMed

    Eralp, Yesim

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in genomic technology have led to considerable improvement in our understanding of the molecular basis that underpins breast cancer biology. Through the use of comprehensive whole genome genomic profiling by next-generation sequencing, an unprecedented bulk of data on driver mutations, key genomic rearrangements, and mechanisms on tumor evolution has been generated. These developments have marked the beginning of a new era in oncology called "personalized or precision medicine." Elucidation of biologic mechanisms that underpin carcinogenetic potential and metastatic behavior has led to an inevitable explosion in the development of effective targeted agents, many of which have gained approval over the past decade. Despite energetic efforts and the enormous support gained within the oncology community, there are many obstacles in the clinical implementation of precision medicine. Other than the well-known biologic markers, such as ER and Her-2/neu, no proven predictive marker exists to determine the responsiveness to a certain biologic agent. One of the major issues in this regard is teasing driver mutations among the background noise within the bulk of coexisting passenger mutations. Improving bioinformatics tools through electronic models, enhanced by improved insight into pathway dependency may be the step forward to overcome this problem. Next, is the puzzle on spatial and temporal tumoral heterogeneity, which remains to be solved by ultra-deep sequencing and optimizing liquid biopsy techniques. Finally, there are multiple logistical and financial issues that have to be meticulously tackled in order to optimize the use of "precision medicine" in the real-life setting. PMID:27547031

  5. Randomized phase II trial on mitomycin-C/cisplatin +/- KLT in heavily pretreated advanced breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Guo, H Y; Cai, Y; Yang, X M; Wang, Z H; Wang, J L; Zhao, X M; Li, J; Hu, X C

    2008-01-01

    A randomized phase II study using mitomycin (MMC)/cisplatin (DDP) regimen with or without Kanglaite (KLT, a traditional Chinese medicine) as salvage treatment was conducted to exploit KLT's potential effects on patients with advanced breast cancer (ABC). Triweekly regimen consisted of mitomycin (8 mg/m(2)) administered intravenously on day 1, and cisplatin (25 mg/m(2)) intravenously on days 1 to 3. KLT (100 ml) was given intravenously per day on days 1 to 14 every 3 weeks. Between April 2006 and July 2007, 60 patients with a median age of 48 years were randomized into MMC/DDP with or without KLT treatment. In all, the objective response rate (ORR) was 17.5%. There were no significant differences between experimental and control treatments in terms of ORR (14.3% vs. 20.7%, p = 0.730), clinical benefit rates (24.1% vs. 28.6%, p = 0.468), median time to progression (TTP; 3.63 vs. 4.0, p = 0.872), and overall survival (OS; 7.17 vs. not reached, p = 0.120). The median TTP for patients with complete or partial responses was 6.0 months, but only 2.1 months for patients with stable or progressive disease (SD or PD; p = 0.028). While the median OS for patients who obtained clinical benefit from chemotherapy was not reached, that of patients with SD of no more than 6 months or PD was only 7.17 months (p = 0.004). There is no additional benefit when KLT is added to the MMC/DDP doublet in the management of ABC. Patients who obtained clinical benefit from chemotherapy had a longer TTP and OS. PMID:18711764

  6. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy in the combined modality approach of locally advanced nonmetastatic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Swain, S M; Sorace, R A; Bagley, C S; Danforth, D N; Bader, J; Wesley, M N; Steinberg, S M; Lippman, M E

    1987-07-15

    We have treated 76 patients with locally advanced breast cancer, 31 with stage IIIA, 41 with stage IIIB, and 4 with stage IV disease, with primary induction chemotherapy including an attempted hormonal synchronization in 70 patients. All were treated to maximum objective clinical response before proceeding to any local therapy. Patients achieving a complete response with a negative repeat biopsy generally received radiation therapy while patients with residual disease, partial response (PR) or no change (NC) status received debulking surgery prior to radiation therapy. Regardless of response to induction chemotherapy, patients received at least 6 additional months of chemotherapy following local therapy. Initial doses of combination chemotherapy were escalated to targeted myelosuppression. The objective response rate to induction chemotherapy was 93% with 49% complete response (CR), 44% PR, and 7% NC. The median numbers of cycles of chemotherapy to achieve a CR, PR, or NC were 5, 3, and 5, respectively. Three patients who currently have PRs are still on chemotherapy with continued tumor regression. Of 37 patients achieving a CR to chemotherapy, 35 were assessed by biopsies to determine pathological evidence of response. Twenty-three of the 37 patients (62%) were proven to be complete responders with negative biopsies. Twenty-four patients have relapsed, 6 with stage IIIA, 16 with stage IIIB, and 2 with stage IV. Five patients have had locoregional relapses alone, 4 locoregional and distant, and 15 distant alone. Median time to progression is 35.9 months for stage IIIA and 34.2 months for stage IIIB. Median survival is 35.3 months for stage IIIB and is indeterminate for stage IIIA. This aggressive primary chemotherapy regimen with hormonal synchronization followed by local therapy appears to provide excellent local control and encouraging early results on systemic disease control. PMID:3036348

  7. Entinostat, Nivolumab, and Ipilimumab in Treating Patients With Solid Tumors That Are Metastatic or Cannot Be Removed by Surgery or Locally Advanced or Metastatic HER2-Negative Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-09

    Breast Adenocarcinoma; HER2/Neu Negative; Invasive Breast Carcinoma; Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Solid Neoplasm; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

  8. Evolution of Imaging in Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Evelyn M; Crowley, James; Hagan, Catherine; Atkinson, Lisa L

    2016-06-01

    The following topics are discussed in this article. A historical review of the evolution of breast cancer imaging from thermography through digital breast tomosynthesis, molecular breast imaging, and advanced breast magnetic resonance imaging. Discussion of multiple clinical trials, their strengths, and weaknesses. Historical perspective on the Mammography Quality Standards Act and its relationship with development and implementation of the Breast Imaging-Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS). PMID:27029017

  9. Mechanisms and therapeutic advances in the management of endocrine-resistant breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Meng; Ramaswamy, Bhuvaneswari

    2014-01-01

    The estrogen receptor (ER) pathway plays a critical role in breast cancer development and progression. Endocrine therapy targeting estrogen action is the most important systemic therapy for ER positive breast cancer. However its efficacy is limited by intrinsic and acquired resistance. Mechanisms responsible for endocrine resistance include deregulation of the ER pathway itself, including loss of ER expression, post-translational modification of ER, deregulation of ER co-activators; increased receptor tyrosine kinase signaling leading to activation of various intracellular pathways involved in signal transduction, proliferation and cell survival, including growth factor receptor tyrosine kinases human epidermal growth factor receptor-2, epidermal growth factor receptor, PI3K/AKT/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), Mitogen activated kinase (MAPK)/ERK, fibroblast growth factor receptor, insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor; alterations in cell cycle and apoptotic machinery; Epigenetic modification including dysregulation of DNA methylation, histone modification, and nucleosome remodeling; and altered expression of specific microRNAs. Functional genomics has helped us identify a catalog of genetic and epigenetic alterations that may be exploited as potential therapeutic targets and biomarkers of response. New treatment combinations targeting ER and such oncogenic signaling pathways which block the crosstalk between these pathways have been proven effective in preclinical models. Results of recent clinical studies suggest that subsets of patients benefit from the combination of inhibitor targeting certain oncogenic signaling pathway with endocrine therapy. Especially, inhibition of the mTOR signaling pathway, a key component implicated in mediating multiple signaling cascades, offers a promising approach to restore sensitivity to endocrine therapy in breast cancer. We systematically reviewed important publications cited in PubMed, recent abstracts from ASCO annual

  10. Cytoxan, epirubicin, methotrexate and 5-fluorouracil with hormonal synchronization (tamoxifen/premarin) in advanced breast cancer. Preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Zaniboni, A; Simoncini, E; Marpicati, P; Gorni, F; Cervi, G C; Marini, G

    1986-10-01

    Thirty-three patients with advanced breast cancer were treated with combination chemotherapy and hormonal synchronization in an attempt to increase the overall response rate generally obtained with traditional modalities of treatment. Among the 31 evaluable patients 1 complete (3%), 7 partial (22%), 13 stable disease (42%) and 10 progression of disease (53%) were obtained. Side effects were quite manageable although there were two episodes of life-threatening hematological toxicity. Taking into account the poor prognostic characteristics of our patients (high percentage of dominant visceral disease, 21/31 previously treated patients), our preliminary results with this regimen are interesting and the treatment deserves further evaluation. PMID:3024851

  11. Numerical assessment of radiation binary targeted therapy for HER-2 positive breast cancers: advanced calculations and radiation dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sztejnberg Gonçalves-Carralves, Manuel L.; Jevremovic, Tatjana

    2007-07-01

    In our previous publication (Mundy et al 2006 Phys. Med. Biol. 51 1377) we have described the theoretical assessment of our novel approach in radiation binary targeted therapy for HER-2 positive breast cancers and summarized the future directions in this area of research. In this paper we advanced the numerical analysis to show the detailed radiation dose distribution for various neutron sources in combination with the required boron concentration and allowed radiation skin doses. We once again proved the feasibility of the concept and will use these data and conclusions to start with the experimental verifications.

  12. Carboplatin and Eribulin Mesylate in Triple Negative Breast Cancer Patients

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-30

    Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Male Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer

  13. BREAST CANCER AND EXERCISE

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2008-03-19

    Prevent Osteoporosis and Osteoporotic Fractures; Improve Quality of Life; Improve Weight Control, and Muscular and Cardiovascular Fitness; Help the Patients to Return to Working Life; Reduce the Risk of Breast Cancer Recurrence; Prevent Other Diseases and Reduce All-Cause Mortality in Patients With Primary Breast Cancer.

  14. Breast Cancer in Men

    MedlinePlus

    ... This may result in a delay in diagnosis. Survival is highest when breast cancer is found early. If you notice any of ... chest or nipple, see a doctor right away. Survival rates are similar for men and women when breast cancer is found at the same stage. A man’s ...

  15. Treatment of advanced breast cancer with chinese medicinal herbs of Fei decoction: a case report.

    PubMed

    Lv, G M; Hu, M; Chen, R Z; Zhu, L L; Tao, Ch J; Xia, X D; Gong, Y L; Li, P; Wan, H J

    2014-01-01

    A 46-year-old female underwent surgery for cancer of the right breast mammary (T3N2M0) in Sep 2010. Following post surgery, adjuvant chemotherapy of CAF regimens (cyclophosphamide+adriamycin+fluorouracil) was administered. Two years later, multiple pulmonary and skeletal metastatic lesions had been found by CT (computerized tomography) and ECT (emission computed tomograph) imaging. She received the treatment of second-line chemotherapy regimens of GP (cisplatin + gemcitabine). In the meantime, we administered Chinese traditional herb drugs (Fei Decoction, mixed a variety of effective herbal components) to help her recover from the poor condition. After taking the Chinese herbs for 2 months, the tumour marker (CEA, CA15-3) dramatically decreased, resulting in the normal range. Both lung and bone metastatic sites reduced according to CT and ECT imaging, and the patient felt free from the complaint of pulmonary and cardiac discomfort. Over time, the quality of life has been greatly improved, we have managed to prolong the PFS (progression-free-survival) and TTP (time-to-progression) from the onset to date. CTM (Chinese traditional medicine) considers human body as a dynamic platform in which all organs are correlative and bind each other. Relationship between heart, liver, spleen, lung and kidney is like an interlink between mother and son, and runs in cycle as a circle. In the course of this combined treatment, we showed that Chinese herbal medicine played an important role in the therapy of breast cancer. Chinese herbs might be an additional choice with their better benefits and tolerability in the treatment of recurrent breast cancer. PMID:24725126

  16. Radiosensitization of Chemotherapy-Refractory, Locally Advanced or Locally Recurrent Breast Cancer With Trastuzumab: A Phase II Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Horton, Janet K.; Halle, Jan; Ferraro, Madlyn; Carey, Lisa; Moore, Dominic T.; Ollila, David; Sartor, Carolyn I.

    2010-03-15

    Purpose: Trastuzumab (Herceptin), an anti-human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) antibody, has been shown to be an effective radiosensitizer in preclinical studies. The present Phase II trial evaluated trastuzumab plus radiotherapy in patients with HER2-positive, chemotherapy-refractory, locally advanced or locoregionally recurrent breast cancer. Methods and Materials: Eligible patients had measurable disease, normal cardiac function, and biopsy-confirmed residual HER2-positive disease. Patients received weekly trastuzumab (2 mg/kg intravenously), concurrent with radiotherapy (50 Gy) to the breast and regional lymph nodes for 5 weeks. If feasible, surgery followed radiotherapy. The primary endpoint was safety, and the secondary endpoint was efficacy (pathologic response and interval to symptomatic local progression). Results: Of the 19 patients enrolled, 7 were ineligible and received radiotherapy alone and 12 received therapy per protocol. Of these 12 patients, 11 had a Stage T4 diagnosis. Grade 3 toxicities included skin (n = 2) and lymphopenia (n = 1). One patient experienced delayed wound healing after surgery. No patients developed symptomatic cardiac dysfunction. Of the 7 patients who had undergone mastectomy, 3 (43%) had a substantial pathologic response (complete response or microscopic residual disease), significantly more than a comparison cohort (2 of 38 or 5%, p = .02). The median interval to symptomatic local progression was not reached. The median overall survival was 39 months. Conclusion: This is the first prospective trial providing evidence for a radiosensitizing effect of trastuzumab in breast cancer. The combination of trastuzumab and radiotherapy was well tolerated.

  17. Next-Generation Entrepreneurs Ready to Advance Breast Cancer Research Innovations | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Michele Newton and Thomas Stackhouse, Contributing Writers, and Rosemarie Truman, Guest Writer Editor’s note: In May 2014, the Breast Cancer Start-Up Challenge was named one of six finalists in the HHS Innovates Award Competition. This award celebrates innovations developed by employees of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) to support the mission of HHS. In the final phase of the competition, the public will be invited to help select “The People’s Choice” winner; public voting takes place May 29 through June 6, 2014.

  18. Next-Generation Entrepreneurs Ready to Advance Breast Cancer Research Innovations | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Michele Newton and Thomas Stackhouse, Contributing Writers, and Rosemarie Truman, Guest Writer Editor’s note: In May 2014, the Breast Cancer Start-Up Challenge was named one of six finalists in the HHS Innovates Award Competition. This award celebrates innovations developed by employees of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) to support the mission of HHS. In the final phase of the competition, the public will be invited to help select “The People’s Choice” winner; public voting takes place May 29 through June 6, 2014.        

  19. CDC Vital Signs: Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2.65 MB] Read the MMWR Science Clips Breast Cancer Black Women Have Higher Death Rates from Breast ... of Page U.S. State Info Number of Additional Breast Cancer Deaths Among Black Women, By State SOURCE: National ...

  20. Breast Cancer Startup Challenge winners

    Cancer.gov

    Ten winners of a world-wide competition to bring emerging breast cancer research technologies to market faster were announced today by the Avon Foundation for Women, in partnership with NCI and the Center for Advancing Innovation (CAI). Avon is providing

  1. MYC and Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jinhua; Chen, Yinghua; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.

    2010-01-01

    MYC is a key regulator of cell growth, proliferation, metabolism, differentiation, and apoptosis. MYC deregulation contributes to breast cancer development and progression and is associated with poor outcomes. Multiple mechanisms are involved in MYC deregulation in breast cancer, including gene amplification, transcriptional regulation, and mRNA and protein stabilization, which correlate with loss of tumor suppressors and activation of oncogenic pathways. The heterogeneity in breast cancer is increasingly recognized. Breast cancer has been classified into 5 or more subtypes based on gene expression profiles, and each subtype has distinct biological features and clinical outcomes. Among these subtypes, basal-like tumor is associated with a poor prognosis and has a lack of therapeutic targets. MYC is overexpressed in the basal-like subtype and may serve as a target for this aggressive subtype of breast cancer. Tumor suppressor BRCA1 inhibits MYC’s transcriptional and transforming activity. Loss of BRCA1 with MYC overexpression leads to the development of breast cancer—especially, basal-like breast cancer. As a downstream effector of estrogen receptor and epidermal growth factor receptor family pathways, MYC may contribute to resistance to adjuvant therapy. Targeting MYC-regulated pathways in combination with inhibitors of other oncogenic pathways may provide a promising therapeutic strategy for breast cancer, the basal-like subtype in particular. PMID:21779462

  2. [Systemic therapy of breast cancer: practice guideline].

    PubMed

    Horváth, Zsolt; Boér, Katalin; Dank, Magdolna; Kahán, Zsuzsanna; Kocsis, Judit; Kövér, Erika; Pajkos, Gábor; Pikó, Béla; Rubovszky, Gábor; Eckhardt, Sándor

    2016-09-01

    The article presents the practice guideline of systemic treatment of breast cancer and recommendations of the 3rd Hungarian Breast Cancer Consensus Conference. It reflects the recent international guidelines (ESMO, NCCN, ABC2, St Gallen's) irrespectively of the current financial opportunities. Here we follow the early - locally advanced - locally relapsed - metastatic breast cancer line for didactic considerations and we discuss the different subgroups of breast cancer based on hormone receptor and HER2 receptor status. Diagnosis and treatment options of rare clinical entities are summarised at the end of the paper. PMID:27579723

  3. Breast Cancer and Bone Loss

    MedlinePlus

    ... Balance › Breast Cancer and Bone Loss Fact Sheet Breast Cancer and Bone Loss July, 2010 Download PDFs English ... JoAnn Pinkerton, MD What is the link between breast cancer and bone loss? Certain treatments for breast cancer ...

  4. Tolerability of Therapies Recommended for the Treatment of Hormone Receptor-Positive Locally Advanced or Metastatic Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Ohno, Shinji

    2016-08-01

    For women with hormone receptor-positive advanced breast cancer, endocrine therapies, including the selective estrogen receptor modulator tamoxifen, the aromatase inhibitors anastrozole, letrozole, and exemestane, and the selective estrogen receptor degrader fulvestrant, are recommended in clinical guidelines. The addition of targeted agents such as everolimus or palbociclib to aromatase inhibitors are also recommended as treatment options. Chemotherapy remains an option, although clinical guidelines have recommended these agents be reserved for patients with immediately life-threatening disease or if resistance to endocrine therapy is known or suspected. The present review has consolidated the tolerability profiles of the agents approved for use in the treatment of hormone receptor-positive advanced or metastatic breast cancer based on phase III registration trial data. Endocrine therapies are generally well tolerated, although the addition of targeted therapies to aromatase inhibitors or fulvestrant appears to increase the proportion of patients experiencing adverse events, and palbociclib and chemotherapy appear to be more closely associated with serious adverse events, including neutropenia. PMID:27151773

  5. Phase II Trial of Exemestane in Combination With Fulvestrant in Postmenopausal Women With Advanced, Hormone-Responsive Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mrózek, Ewa; Layman, Rachel; Ramaswamy, Bhuvaneswari; Schaaf, Larry; Li, Xiaobai; Ottman, Susan; Shapiro, Charles L.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Exemestane, the irreversible steroidal aromatase inhibitor, and fulvestrant, the pure estrogen antagonist, are active as single drugs in postmenopausal women with advanced hormone-responsive breast cancer. We designed a phase II study with the purpose of determining whether combining these 2 drugs with different and potentially complementary mechanisms of action will improve the clinical benefit. Patients and Methods Forty postmenopausal women with hormone-responsive advanced breast cancer received intramuscular injection of fulvestrant 250 mg every 28 days in combination with daily exemestane 25 mg until disease progression. We examined the influence of fulvestrant on exemestane pharmacokinetics and the effect of exemestane and fulvestrant on serum IGF-1 (insulin-like growth factor 1) and IGFBP-3 (IGF-binding protein 3) levels. Results The observed proportion of patients free of progressive disease at 6 months after the initiation of treatment with exemestane and fulvestrant was 50%, a rate similar to that achieved with single-agent exemestane or fulvestrant in the first- or second-line setting. Pharmacokinetics parameters showed that coadministration of fulvestrant did not result in clinically relevant changes in exemestane plasma concentrations. A comparison of IGF-1 and IGFBP-3 levels demonstrated the increase of 35% and 12%, respectively, in mean levels from baseline to day 120. Conclusions The combination of exemestane and fulvestrant did not improve clinical benefit. The observed lack of improved efficacy was not related to altered drug exposure. PMID:22444722

  6. Docetaxel versus docetaxel alternating with gemcitabine as treatments of advanced breast cancer: final analysis of a randomised trial

    PubMed Central

    Joensuu, H.; Sailas, L.; Alanko, T.; Sunela, K.; Huuhtanen, R.; Utriainen, M.; Kokko, R.; Bono, P.; Wigren, T.; Pyrhönen, S.; Turpeenniemi-Hujanen, T.; Asola, R.; Leinonen, M.; Hahka-Kemppinen, M.; Kellokumpu-Lehtinen, P.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Alternating administration of docetaxel and gemcitabine might result in improved time-to-treatment failure (TTF) and fewer adverse events compared with single-agent docetaxel as treatment of advanced breast cancer. Patients and methods: Women diagnosed with advanced breast cancer were randomly allocated to receive 3-weekly docetaxel (group D) or 3-weekly docetaxel alternating with 3-weekly gemcitabine (group D/G) until treatment failure as first-line chemotherapy. The primary end point was TTF. Results: Two hundred and thirty-seven subjects were assigned to treatment (group D, 115; group D/G, 122). The median TTF was 5.6 and 6.2 months in groups D and D/G, respectively (hazard ratio 0.85, 95% confidence interval 0.63–1.16; P = 0.31). There was no significant difference in time-to-disease progression, survival, and response rate between the groups. When adverse events were evaluated for the worst toxicity encountered during treatment, there was little difference between the groups, but when they were assessed per cycle, alternating treatment was associated with fewer severe (grade 3 or 4) adverse effects (P = 0.013), and the difference was highly significant for cycles when gemcitabine was administered in group D/G (P < 0.001). Conclusion: The alternating regimen was associated with a similar TTF as single-agent docetaxel but with fewer adverse effects during gemcitabine cycles. PMID:19819914

  7. Abortion, Miscarriage, and Breast Cancer Risk

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Abortion, Miscarriage, and Breast Cancer Risk A woman’s hormone levels normally change throughout ... the development of breast cancer. Important Information about Breast Cancer Risk Factors At present, the factors known to ...

  8. Efficacy of Anastrozole in a Consecutive Series of Advanced Breast Cancer Patients Treated with Multiple Prior Chemotherapies and Endocrine Agents: M. D. Anderson Cancer Center Experience.

    PubMed

    Knoche, A. Jolynn; Michaud, Laura Boehnke; Buzdar, Aman U.

    1999-05-01

    Anastrozole is a highly selective, nonsteroidal aromatase inhibitor approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in January 1996 for the treatment of advanced breast cancer in postmenopausal women with disease progression following tamoxifen therapy. To date, information on anastrozole's use has been limited to breast cancer patients with minimal prior therapy. The purpose of this review was to determine, in clinical practice, the benefits of anastrozole in advanced breast cancer patients treated with multiple prior cytotoxic and endocrine therapies. This was a retrospective review of a consecutive series of 117 patients who received anastrozole after marketing in January 1996. As this was not a prospective study, rigorous response criteria could not be applied. Responses were categorized as improvement in disease (ID), stable disease (SD), or progressive disease (PD). One hundred eight patients were evaluable for response with a median age of 61 years and the number of prior therapies ranging from one to nine. Response, defined as improvement of disease or stable disease >/=8 weeks, was seen in 59% of patients. Patients with three or more prior endocrine therapies demonstrated a 61% response (ID + SD) and patients with ER-negative tumors demonstrated 50% response. Patients with prior aminoglutethamide therapy exhibited similar response rates to the overall group. One male patient received anastrozole without benefit. This data determines the activity of anastrozole even in heavily pretreated patients and suggests that patients who have tumors that are ER-negative may also benefit from anastrozole therapy. PMID:11348281

  9. Women with Disabilities and Breast Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Reasonable Accommodations (RA) Women with Disabilities and Breast Cancer Screening Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Finding Breast Cancer Early Can Save Lives Disabilities & Breast Cancer Screening ...

  10. Early Toxicity in Patients Treated With Postoperative Proton Therapy for Locally Advanced Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cuaron, John J.; Chon, Brian; Tsai, Henry; Goenka, Anuj; DeBlois, David; Ho, Alice; Powell, Simon; Hug, Eugen; Cahlon, Oren

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To report dosimetry and early toxicity data in breast cancer patients treated with postoperative proton radiation therapy. Methods and Materials From March 2013 to April 2014, 30 patients with nonmetastatic breast cancer and no history of prior radiation were treated with proton therapy at a single proton center. Patient characteristics and dosimetry were obtained through chart review. Patients were seen weekly while on treatment, at 1 month after radiation therapy completion, and at 3- to 6-month intervals thereafter. Toxicity was scored using Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 4.0. Frequencies of toxicities were tabulated. Results Median dose delivered was 50.4 Gy (relative biological equivalent [RBE]) in 5 weeks. Target volumes included the breast/chest wall and regional lymph nodes including the internal mammary lymph nodes (in 93%). No patients required a treatment break. Among patients with >3 months of follow-up (n = 28), grade 2 dermatitis occurred in 20 patients (71.4%), with 8 (28.6%) experiencing moist desquamation. Grade 2 esophagitis occurred in 8 patients (28.6%). Grade 3 reconstructive complications occurred in 1 patient. The median planning target volume V95 was 96.43% (range, 79.39%-99.60%). The median mean heart dose was 0.88 Gy (RBE) [range, 0.01–3.20 Gy (RBE)] for all patients, and 1.00 Gy (RBE) among patients with left-sided tumors. The median V20 of the ipsilateral lung was 16.50% (range, 6.1%–30.3%). The median contralateral lung V5 was 0.34% (range, 0%–5.30%). The median maximal point dose to the esophagus was 45.65 Gy (RBE) [range, 0–65.4 Gy (RBE)]. The median contralateral breast mean dose was 0.29 Gy (RBE) [range, 0.03–3.50 Gy (RBE)]. Conclusions Postoperative proton therapy is well tolerated, with acceptable rates of skin toxicity. Proton therapy favorably spares normal tissue without compromising target coverage. Further follow-up is necessary to assess for clinical outcomes and cardiopulmonary

  11. Early Toxicity in Patients Treated With Postoperative Proton Therapy for Locally Advanced Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Cuaron, John J.; Chon, Brian; Tsai, Henry; Goenka, Anuj; DeBlois, David; Ho, Alice; Powell, Simon; Hug, Eugen; Cahlon, Oren

    2015-06-01

    Purpose: To report dosimetry and early toxicity data in breast cancer patients treated with postoperative proton radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: From March 2013 to April 2014, 30 patients with nonmetastatic breast cancer and no history of prior radiation were treated with proton therapy at a single proton center. Patient characteristics and dosimetry were obtained through chart review. Patients were seen weekly while on treatment, at 1 month after radiation therapy completion, and at 3- to 6-month intervals thereafter. Toxicity was scored using Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 4.0. Frequencies of toxicities were tabulated. Results: Median dose delivered was 50.4 Gy (relative biological equivalent [RBE]) in 5 weeks. Target volumes included the breast/chest wall and regional lymph nodes including the internal mammary lymph nodes (in 93%). No patients required a treatment break. Among patients with >3 months of follow-up (n=28), grade 2 dermatitis occurred in 20 patients (71.4%), with 8 (28.6%) experiencing moist desquamation. Grade 2 esophagitis occurred in 8 patients (28.6%). Grade 3 reconstructive complications occurred in 1 patient. The median planning target volume V95 was 96.43% (range, 79.39%-99.60%). The median mean heart dose was 0.88 Gy (RBE) [range, 0.01-3.20 Gy (RBE)] for all patients, and 1.00 Gy (RBE) among patients with left-sided tumors. The median V20 of the ipsilateral lung was 16.50% (range, 6.1%-30.3%). The median contralateral lung V5 was 0.34% (range, 0%-5.30%). The median maximal point dose to the esophagus was 45.65 Gy (RBE) [range, 0-65.4 Gy (RBE)]. The median contralateral breast mean dose was 0.29 Gy (RBE) [range, 0.03-3.50 Gy (RBE)]. Conclusions: Postoperative proton therapy is well tolerated, with acceptable rates of skin toxicity. Proton therapy favorably spares normal tissue without compromising target coverage. Further follow-up is necessary to assess for clinical outcomes and cardiopulmonary

  12. Phase II Trial of Goserelin and Exemestane Combination Therapy in Premenopausal Women With Locally Advanced or Metastatic Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jiayu; Xu, Binghe; Yuan, Peng; Ma, Fei; Li, Qing; Zhang, Pin; Cai, Ruigang; Fan, Ying; Luo, Yang; Li, Qiao

    2015-01-01

    Abstract A promising option as the treatment of choice for premenopausal patients with locally advanced or metastatic breast cancer (MBC) could be the combination of a luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone analog and an aromatase inhibitor. However, no prospective studies on the efficacy of goserelin with exemestane in locally advanced or MBC premenopausal breast cancer patients have been reported. We present the phase II trial of goserelin plus exemestane in a total of 44 premenopausal women with locally advanced or MBC. All patients received a subcutaneous injection of 3.6 mg goserelin every 4 weeks along with 25 mg exemestane daily. The primary end point was progression-free survival (PFS). The second end point included overall survival (OS), objective response rate (ORR), duration of response (DOR), and clinical benefit rate (CBR) based on complete response (CR), partial response (PR), or stable disease (SD) for ≥6 months. The median PFS was 13 months (range: 2–42 months). The median DOR was 8 months (range: 2–40 months). Two patients achieved CR (4.5%), and 15 patients experienced PR (34.1%). Fifteen patients (34.1%) had SD ≥6 months. The ORR was 38.6%, and the CBR was 65.9%. Primary progressive disease occurred in 15 patients (34.1%). Five patients (11.4%) died during the study period. Because a few patients have died, the median OS has not been reached. Drug therapy was well tolerated. The most frequent grade-3 adverse events were arthralgia (18.2%), skin rash (6.8%), and myalgia (4.5%). No participants withdrew from the study due to drug toxicity. This study suggested that goserelin and exemestane might be highly effective and well-tolerated regimens in premenopausal women with hormone-responsive, locally advanced or MBC. PMID:26131799

  13. Pregnancy After Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Gemignani; Petrek

    1999-05-01

    BACKGROUND: The issue of pregnancy following the diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer is important because the incidence of breast cancer is increasing in women of childbearing age. The fact that many women are delaying childbearing, whether for educational, professional, or personal reasons, increases the number of women who will undergo breast cancer treatment before completing childbearing. METHODS: Data on pregnancy in breast cancer survivors are limited and consist only of retrospective data. This paper reviews the published literature on the influence of subsequent pregnancy on breast cancer, including three recent large-scale population-based studies. RESULTS: The survival of women with breast carcinoma who subsequently become pregnant is not reported to be decreased in any of the published series. However, several biases may be present that justify the concern regarding the conclusions. CONCLUSIONS: Further research on the safety of subsequent pregnancy after breast carcinoma treatment is needed. To address these issues, patients are currently being accrued for a large, prospective, multicenter study of young breast carcinoma patients. PMID:10758557

  14. Full dose paclitaxel plus vinorelbine as salvage chemotherapy in anthracycline-resistant advanced breast cancer: a phase II study.

    PubMed

    Polyzos, A; Tsavaris, N; Kosmas, C; Gogas, H; Toufexi, H; Kosmidis, C; Markopoulos, C; Giannopoulos, A; Papadopoulos, O; Stamatiadis, D; Kouraklis, G

    2003-12-01

    This phase II trial studied the efficacy and toxicity of full dose paclitaxel plus vinorelbine, as salvage chemotherapy in patients with metastatic breast cancer resistant to anthracyclines. Patients received vinorelbine (30 mg/m2) followed 1 hour later by full dose paclitaxel (175 mg/m2) every 3 weeks for a maximum of 8 cycles or until disease progression. Because of the heavy pretreatment of the patients, prophylactic granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (5 microg/kg) was administered daily for 5-10 days. To minimize potentially cumulative neurotoxicity due to both agents, amifostine was given prior to chemotherapy. Thirty-four patients: 8 with tumors primary resistant and 26 with tumors recurring within 3-6 months after anthracycline treatment, were evaluable for efficacy and toxicity. Objective responses occurred in 11 patients [32%; 95% confidence interval (CI): 16.3-47.7%), all partial responses. Responses were observed in lung and liver. The median response duration was 4 months (range 3-7), median time to progression was 5 months (range 3-9) and median overall survival was 8 months (range 4-24). Neutropenia was dose limiting (35% grade 3-4 toxicity). The left ventricular ejection fraction, measured and followed in 18 patients, fell less than 20% below baseline level in 9 patients (50%), but only one patient developed congestive cardiac failure. The paclitaxel-vinorelbine regimen was moderately tolerated and moderately effective in poor prognosis breast cancer patients with visceral metastases and tumors resistant to anthracyclines. The combination at these doses and schedules should be considered in the design of regimens for advanced breast cancer. PMID:14998089

  15. Methylxanthines and breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Schairer, C; Brinton, L A; Hoover, R N

    1987-10-15

    We investigated the relationship between methylxanthine consumption and breast cancer using data from a case-control study which included 1,510 cases and 1,882 controls identified through a nation-wide breast cancer screening program. There was no evidence of a positive association between methylxanthine consumption and risk of breast cancer. In fact, there was some suggestion of a negative association, particularly in women diagnosed after age 50. In addition, there was no evidence of increased risk with past or recent methylxanthine consumption, or with the consumption of caffeine or specific beverages, most notably brewed or instant caffeinated coffee and tea. PMID:3117709

  16. Targeting Breast Cancer Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Xin; Mu, Ping

    2015-01-01

    Metastasis is the leading cause of breast cancer-associated deaths. Despite the significant improvement in current therapies in extending patient life, 30–40% of patients may eventually suffer from distant relapse and succumb to the disease. Consequently, a deeper understanding of the metastasis biology is key to developing better treatment strategies and achieving long-lasting therapeutic efficacies against breast cancer. This review covers recent breakthroughs in the discovery of various metastatic traits that contribute to the metastasis cascade of breast cancer, which may provide novel avenues for therapeutic targeting. PMID:26380552

  17. Pathological assessment of the response of locally advanced breast cancer to neoadjuvant chemotherapy and its implications for surgical management.

    PubMed

    El-Didi, M H; Moneer, M M; Khaled, H M; Makarem, S

    2000-01-01

    The effectiveness of breast-conserving surgery for patients with locally advanced breast cancer (LABC) after neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT) is still a controversial issue, and variable incidences of locoregional failures have been reported. The present study was conducted to pathologically assess the response of LABC to NACT, and also to evaluate the efficacy of preoperative clinical examination and mammography in detecting these pathological changes. A total of 38 patients with LABC received NACT in the form of three cycles of fluorouracil/adriamycin/cyclophosphamide and were then subjected to a mastectomy. The residual tumors in the mastectomy specimens were measured, mapped, and compared to the pretreatment and preoperative clinical and mammographic findings for evaluation. An objective response to NACT was observed in 70.4% of the patients; however, only 26.7% of them were suitable candidates for conservative surgery. The rest of the responders showed an increased incidence of multifocality and in situ lesions localized within the original tumor-bearing area. Both clinical examinations and mammography were inadequate for the selection of candidates for breast conservation. Tumor regression by NACT is probably induced by a process of tumor segmentation. It is also associated with an increased incidence of multifocality and in situ lesions. PMID:10752778

  18. Drugs Approved for Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Ask about Your Treatment Research Drugs Approved for Breast Cancer This page lists cancer drugs approved by the ... are not listed here. Drugs Approved to Prevent Breast Cancer Evista (Raloxifene Hydrochloride) Keoxifene (Raloxifene Hydrochloride) Nolvadex (Tamoxifen ...

  19. Breast Cancer in Young Women

    MedlinePlus

    ... Campaign Initiatives Participation in Cancer Moonshot Stay Informed Breast Cancer in Young Women Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Syndicate this page Marleah's family history of breast cancer was her motivation for pursuing a career where ...

  20. Pregnancy and breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sasidharan, R; Harvey, V

    2010-01-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most commonly diagnosed malignancies during pregnancy. Pregnancy-associated breast cancer (PABC) presents a challenging clinical situation. This article reviews the current evidence around the management of PABC and the safety of pregnancy after breast cancer. The trend towards later age at first childbirth has resulted in an increase in the number of breast cancer cases coexistent with pregnancy. The management of breast cancer during pregnancy requires a multidisciplinary team approach. Breast surgery can be safely performed during any trimester of pregnancy. Radiation therapy, if required, must be delayed until after delivery. The majority of patients with PABC require chemotherapy. The timing of delivery in relation to chemotherapy administration should be carefully considered. There is no evidence to date that pregnancy termination influences overall survival for the mother. To date, there is no clear evidence that subsequent pregnancy after breast cancer is associated with worse maternal survival. There is a suggestion that subsequent pregnancy may in fact be associated with an improved survival. However, the available studies are limited by potential biases.

  1. Eribulin for the treatment of advanced or metastatic breast cancer: a NICE single technology appraisal.

    PubMed

    Greenhalgh, Janette; Bagust, Adrian; Boland, Angela; Oyee, James; Trevor, Nicola; Beale, Sophie; Dundar, Yenal; Hockenhull, Juliet; Proudlove, Chris; O'Reilly, Susan

    2015-02-01

    The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) invited the manufacturer of eribulin (Eisai Ltd) to submit evidence for the clinical and cost effectiveness of eribulin as treatment for patients with locally advanced or metastatic breast cancer (LABC/MBC) pre-treated with at least two chemotherapy regimens. This article summarizes the review of evidence by the Evidence Review Group (ERG) and provides a summary of the NICE Appraisal Committee's (AC's) decision. The clinical evidence was derived from a multi-centred, open-label, randomized, phase III study comparing eribulin with treatment of physician's choice (TPC) in 762 patients with LABC/MBC. Clinical effectiveness results were submitted for two populations: the overall intention-to-treat (ITT) population and a subset (n = 488) that included only patients from North America, Western Europe and Australia (Region 1). For the primary endpoint of overall survival (OS), a primary analysis (after 55 % of patients had died) and an updated analysis (after 77 % of patients had died) were conducted. In the ITT population, treatment with eribulin was associated with a significant improvement in median OS compared with TPC in both primary [difference in median OS 2.5 months; hazard ratio (HR) 0.81, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 0.66-0.99] and updated analyses (2.7 months; HR 0.81, 95 % CI 0.67-0.96). A statistically significant improvement in progression-free survival (PFS) was reported for eribulin compared with TPC when assessed by the investigator (difference in median PFS 1.48 months; HR 0.76, 95 % CI 0.64-0.90), but not when assessed by the ERG (1.44 months; HR 0.87, 95 % CI 0.71-1.05). Gains in OS were greater for Region 1 patients than for the ITT population (3.1 vs. 2.7 months). Health-related quality of life (HRQoL) data suggested a benefit for eribulin responders, but was based on phase II studies. In the eribulin arm, serious adverse events included febrile neutropenia (4.2 %) and neutropenia (1

  2. Reversing breast cancer stem cell into breast somatic stem cell.

    PubMed

    Wijaya, L; Agustina, D; Lizandi, A O; Kartawinata, M M; Sandra, F

    2011-02-01

    Stem cells have an important role in cell biology, allowing tissues to be renewed by freshly created cells throughout their lifetime. The specific micro-environment of stem cells is called stem cell niche; this environment influences the development of stem cells from quiescence through stages of differentiation. Recent advance researches have improved the understanding of the cellular and molecular components of the micro-environment--or niche--that regulates stem cells. We point out an important trend to the study of niche activity in breast cancers. Breast cancer has long been known to conserve a heterogeneous population of cells. While the majority of cells that make up tumors are destined to differentiate and eventually stop dividing, only minority populations of cells, termed cancer stem cell, possess extensive self renewal capability. These cancer stem cells possess characteristics of both stem cells and cancer cells. Breast cancer stem cells reversal to breast somatic stem cells offer a new therapy, that not only can stop the spread of breast cancer cells, but also can differentiate breast cancer stem cells into normal breast somatic stem cells. These can replace damaged breast tissue. Nevertheless, the complexity of realizing this therapy approach needs further research. PMID:21044008

  3. [Case report of advanced breast cancer responding to capecitabine and trastuzumab combination therapy].

    PubMed

    Yoshidome, Katsuhide; Imabun, Shigeru; Nakahara, Masaaki; Hiraoka, Kazuya; Yamagami, Yuko; Tsujimoto, Masahiko; Nakao, Kazuyasu

    2006-10-01

    We conducted a concomitant administration of capecitabine (2,400 mg/day for 21 days followed by a 7-day interval) and trastuzumab (2 mg/kg weekly) to a 73-year-old female patient with impaired lower limb function diagnosed with bilateral breast cancer. The patient had a complete response (CR) to pulmonary metastases, and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) level had normalized from 46.4 ng/ml to 0.6 ng/ml. Left mastectomy was performed in order to control bleeding from tumors. No adverse events attributable to medication were observed. The concomitant administration of capecitabine and trastuzumab is a promising therapy with the potential to greatly improve patient quality of life (QOL). PMID:17033236

  4. Docosahexaenoic Acid in Preventing Recurrence in Breast Cancer Survivors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-20

    Benign Breast Neoplasm; Ductal Breast Carcinoma In Situ; Invasive Breast Carcinoma; Lobular Breast Carcinoma In Situ; Paget Disease of the Breast; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  5. An advanced image analysis tool for the quantification and characterization of breast cancer in microscopy images.

    PubMed

    Goudas, Theodosios; Maglogiannis, Ilias

    2015-03-01

    The paper presents an advanced image analysis tool for the accurate and fast characterization and quantification of cancer and apoptotic cells in microscopy images. The proposed tool utilizes adaptive thresholding and a Support Vector Machines classifier. The segmentation results are enhanced through a Majority Voting and a Watershed technique, while an object labeling algorithm has been developed for the fast and accurate validation of the recognized cells. Expert pathologists evaluated the tool and the reported results are satisfying and reproducible. PMID:25681102

  6. Broccoli Sprout Extract in Treating Patients With Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-16

    Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Ductal Breast Carcinoma In Situ; Estrogen Receptor Negative; Estrogen Receptor Positive; Invasive Breast Carcinoma; Lobular Breast Carcinoma; Postmenopausal; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer

  7. Breast cancer and protein biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Gam, Lay-Harn

    2012-01-01

    Breast cancer is a healthcare concern of women worldwide. Despite procedures being available for diagnosis, prognosis and treatment of breast cancer, researchers are working intensively on the disease in order to improve the life quality of breast cancer patients. At present, there is no single treatment known to bring a definite cure for breast cancer. One of the possible solutions for combating breast cancer is through identification of reliable protein biomarkers that can be effectively used for early detection, prognosis and treatments of the cancer. Therefore, the task of identification of biomarkers for breast cancer has become the focus of many researchers worldwide. PMID:24520539

  8. Breast Cancer Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... therapy and targeted therapy. This helps to increase survival. Types of breast cancer surgery There are two main types of breast ... shown lumpectomy plus radiation offers the same overall survival benefit as mastectomy for early ... (almost always followed by radiation): The surgeon ...

  9. Microwave Imaging for Breast Cancer Detection: Advances in Three–Dimensional Image Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Golnabi, Amir H.; Meaney, Paul M.; Epstein, Neil R.; Paulsen, Keith D.

    2013-01-01

    Microwave imaging is based on the electrical property (permittivity and conductivity) differences in materials. Microwave imaging for biomedical applications is particularly interesting, mainly due to the fact that available range of dielectric properties for different tissues can provide important functional information about their health. Under the assumption that a 3D scattering problem can be reasonably represented as a simplified 2D model, one can take advantage of the simplicity and lower computational cost of 2D models to characterize such 3D phenomenon. Nonetheless, by eliminating excessive model simplifications, 3D microwave imaging provides potentially more valuable information over 2Dtechniques, and as a result, more accurate dielectric property maps may be obtained. In this paper, we present some advances we have made in three–dimensional image reconstruction, and show the results from a 3D breast phantom experiment using our clinical microwave imaging system at Dartmouth Hitchcock Medical Center (DHMC), NH. PMID:22255641

  10. General Information about Male Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Male Breast Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information about Male Breast Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Male ...

  11. What Is Breast Cancer in Men?

    MedlinePlus

    ... statistics about breast cancer in men? What is breast cancer in men? A breast cancer is a malignant ... women but are very rare in men. General breast cancer terms Here are some of the key words ...

  12. General Information about Breast Cancer and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Breast Cancer Treatment and Pregnancy (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information about Breast Cancer and Pregnancy Go to Health Professional Version Key ...

  13. Treatment Options for Male Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Male Breast Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information about Male Breast Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Male ...

  14. Treatment Option Overview (Male Breast Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Male Breast Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information about Male Breast Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Male ...

  15. PET/CT in Evaluating Response to Chemotherapy in Patients With Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-06

    HER2-positive Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

  16. A phase I/II study of neoadjuvant liposomal doxorubicin, paclitaxel, and hyperthermia in locally advanced breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Vujaskovic, Zeljko; Kim, Dong W.; Jones, Ellen; Lan, Lan; McCall, Linda; Dewhirst, Mark W.; Craciunescu, Oana; Stauffer, Paul; Liotcheva, Vlayka; Betof, Allison; Blackwell, Kimberly

    2010-01-01

    Purpose The prognosis for locally advanced breast cancer (LABC) patients continues to be poor, with an estimated five-year survival of only 50–60%. Preclinical data demonstrates enhanced therapeutic efficacy with liposomal encapsulation of doxorubicin combined with hyperthermia (HT). Therefore this phase I/II study was designed to evaluate the safety and efficacy of a novel neoadjuvant combination treatment of paclitaxel, liposomal doxorubicin, and hyperthermia. Materials and methods Eligible patients received four cycles of neoadjuvant liposomal doxorubicin (30–75 mg/m2), paclitaxel (100–175 mg/m2), and hyperthermia. They subsequently underwent either a modified radical mastectomy or lumpectomy with axillary node dissection followed by radiation therapy and then eight cycles of CMF (cyclophosphamide, methotrexate, 5-fluorouracil) chemotherapy. Results Forty-seven patients with stage IIB-III LABC were enrolled and 43 patients were evaluable. Fourteen patients (33%) had inflammatory breast cancer. Combined (partial + complete) clinical response rate was 72% and combined pathological response rate was 60%. Four patients achieved a pathologically complete response. Sixteen patients were eligible for breast-conserving surgery. The cumulative equivalent minutes (CEM 43) at T90 (tenth percentile of temperature distribution) was significantly greater for those with a pathological response. Four-year disease-free survival was 63% (95% CI, 46%–76%) and the four-year overall survival was 75% (95% CI, 58–86%). Conclusions Neoadjuvant therapy using paclitaxel, liposomal doxorubicin and hyperthermia is a feasible and well tolerated treatment strategy in patients with LABC. The thermal dose parameter CEM 43 T90 was significantly correlated with attaining a pathological response. PMID:20377362

  17. Tibolone and breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Erel, C Tamer; Senturk, Levent M; Kaleli, Semih

    2006-01-01

    Tibolone is a relatively new drug for postmenopausal women, which is structurally related to 19‐nortestosterone derivatives and exhibits weak oestrogenic, progestogenic and androgenic activities. The effect of tibolone on breast tissue is still obscure. In vitro studies have shown conflicting results regarding the effects of tibolone on breast cells. On the other hand, although epidemiological studies show an increase in the risk of breast cancer among women treated with tibolone, accumulation of data obtained from radiological studies presents promising results. However, the safety of tibolone with regard to breast tissue needs to be investigated further, especially through well‐designed, large‐scale, randomised‐controlled trials. PMID:17068276

  18. Predictors of Surgery Types after Neoadjuvant Therapy for Advanced Stage Breast Cancer: Analysis from Florida Population-Based Cancer Registry (1996–2009)

    PubMed Central

    Al-Azhri, Jamila; Koru-Sengul, Tulay; Miao, Feng; Saclarides, Constantine; Byrne, Margaret M.; Avisar, Eli

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE Despite the established guidelines for breast cancer treatment, there is still variability in surgical treatment after neoadjuvant therapy (NT) for women with large breast tumors. Our objective was to identify predictors of the type of surgical treatment: mastectomy versus breast-conserving surgery (BCS) in women with T3/T4 breast cancer who received NT. METHODS Population-based Florida Cancer Data System Registry, Florida’s Agency for Health Care Administration, and US census from 1996 to 2009 were linked for women diagnosed with T3/T4 breast cancer and received NT followed by either BCS or mastectomy. Analysis of multiple variables, such as sociodemographic characteristics (race, ethnicity, socioeconomic status, age, marital status, and urban/rural residency), tumor’s characteristics (estrogen/progesterone receptor status, histology, grade, SEER stage, and regional nodes positivity), treatment facilities (hospital volume and teaching status), patients’ comorbidities, and type of NT, was performed. RESULTS Of 1,056 patients treated with NT for T3/T4 breast cancer, 107 (10%) had BCS and 949 (90%) had mastectomy. After adjusting with extensive covariables, Hispanic patients (adjusted odds ratio (aOR) = [3.50], 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.38–8.84, P = 0.008) were more likely to have mastectomy than BCS. Compared to localized SEER stage, regional stage with direct extension (aOR = [3.24], 95% CI: 1.60–6.54, P = 0.001), regional stage with direct extension and nodes (aOR = [4.35], 95% CI: 1.72–11.03, P = 0.002), and distant stage (aOR = [4.44], 95% CI: 1.81–10.88, P = 0.001) were significantly more likely to have mastectomy than BCS. Compared to patients who received both chemotherapy and hormonal therapy, patients who received hormonal NT only (aOR = [0.29], 95% CI: 0.12–0.68, P = 0.004) were less likely to receive mastectomy. CONCLUSION Our study suggests that Hispanic ethnicity, advanced SEER stage, and type of NT are significant

  19. Synchronous Bilateral Breast Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Subramanyan, Annapurneswari; Radhakrishna, Selvi

    2015-01-01

    Background Bilateral breast cancer (BBC) is not an uncommon entity in contemporary breast clinics. Improved life expectancy after breast cancer treatment and routine use of contra-lateral breast mammography has led to increased incidence of BBC. Our study objective was to define the epidemiological and tumour characteristics of BBC in India. Materials and Methods A total of 1251 breast cancer patients were treated during the period January 2007 to March 2015 and 30 patients were found to have BBC who constituted the study population (60 tumour samples). Synchronous bilateral breast cancers (SBC) was defined as two tumours diagnosed within an interval of 6 months and a second cancer diagnosed after 6 months was labelled as metachronous breast cancer (MBC). Analyses of patient and tumour characteristics were done in this prospective data base of BBC patients. Results Median patient age was 66 years (range 39-85). Majority of the patients had SBC (n=28) and in 12 patients the second tumour was clinically occult and detected only by mammography of the contra-lateral breast. The second tumour was found at lower tumour size compared to the first in 73% of cases and was negative for axillary metastasis in 80% of cases (24/30). Infiltrating ductal carcinoma was the commonest histological type (n=51) and majority of the tumours were ER/PR positive (50/60). Her2 was overexpressed in 13 tumours (21%). Over 70% (22/30) of patients had similar histology in both breasts and amongst them grade concordance was present in about 69% (15/22) of patients. Concordance rates of ER, PR and Her2 statuses were 83%, 80% and 90% respectively. Bilateral mastectomy was the commonest surgery performed in 80% of the patients followed by bilateral breast conservation in 13%. At the end of study period, 26 patients were alive and disease free. Median survival was 29 months (range 3-86 months). Conclusion In most patients with BBC, the second tumour is identified at an early stage than index

  20. New targeted therapies for breast cancer: A focus on tumor microenvironmental signals and chemoresistant breast cancers

    PubMed Central

    Kamdje, Armel Hervé Nwabo; Etet, Paul Faustin Seke; Vecchio, Lorella; Tagne, Richard Simo; Amvene, Jeremie Mbo; Muller, Jean-Marc; Krampera, Mauro; Lukong, Kiven Erique

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most frequent female malignancy worldwide. Current strategies in breast cancer therapy, including classical chemotherapy, hormone therapy, and targeted therapies, are usually associated with chemoresistance and serious adverse effects. Advances in our understanding of changes affecting the interactome in advanced and chemoresistant breast tumors have provided novel therapeutic targets, including, cyclin dependent kinases, mammalian target of rapamycin, Notch, Wnt and Shh. Inhibitors of these molecules recently entered clinical trials in mono- and combination therapy in metastatic and chemo-resistant breast cancers. Anticancer epigenetic drugs, mainly histone deacetylase inhibitors and DNA methyltransferase inhibitors, also entered clinical trials. Because of the complexity and heterogeneity of breast cancer, the future in therapy lies in the application of individualized tailored regimens. Emerging therapeutic targets and the implications for personalized-based therapy development in breast cancer are herein discussed. PMID:25516852

  1. Human Breast Cancer Histoid

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Pavinder; Ward, Brenda; Saha, Baisakhi; Young, Lillian; Groshen, Susan; Techy, Geza; Lu, Yani; Atkinson, Roscoe; Taylor, Clive R.; Ingram, Marylou

    2011-01-01

    Progress in our understanding of heterotypic cellular interaction in the tumor microenvironment, which is recognized to play major roles in cancer progression, has been hampered due to unavailability of an appropriate in vitro co-culture model. The aim of this study was to generate an in vitro 3-dimensional human breast cancer model, which consists of cancer cells and fibroblasts. Breast cancer cells (UACC-893) and fibroblasts at various densities were co-cultured in a rotating suspension culture system to establish co-culture parameters. Subsequently, UACC-893, BT.20, or MDA.MB.453 were co-cultured with fibroblasts for 9 days. Co-cultures resulted in the generation of breast cancer histoid (BCH) with cancer cells showing the invasion of fibroblast spheroids, which were visualized by immunohistochemical (IHC) staining of sections (4 µm thick) of BCH. A reproducible quantitative expression of C-erbB.2 was detected in UACC-893 cancer cells in BCH sections by IHC staining and the Automated Cellular Imaging System. BCH sections also consistently exhibited qualitative expression of pancytokeratins, p53, Ki-67, or E-cadherin in cancer cells and that of vimentin or GSTPi in fibroblasts, fibronectin in the basement membrane and collagen IV in the extracellular matrix. The expression of the protein analytes and cellular architecture of BCH were markedly similar to those of breast cancer tissue. PMID:22034518

  2. [THE EFFECT OF PREGNANCY ON BREAST CANCER].

    PubMed

    Matalon, Shelly Tartakover; Shochet, Gali Epstein; Drucker, Liat; Lishner, Michael

    2015-08-01

    Cancer and pregnancy coincide in about one in 1,000 pregnancies. One of the most common malignancies associated with pregnancy is breast cancer. Women with pregnancy-associated breast cancer (PABC) have a higher likelihood of being diagnosed with metastatic disease and estrogen receptor (ER) negative tumors than do non-pregnant women. Controversies exist regarding the effect of pregnancy on breast cancer prognosis. Some researchers suggest that pregnancy does not affect breast cancer prognosis, whereas others claim the opposite. Although PABC is usually discovered in an advanced stage, breast cancer metastasis on the placenta is a rare event. During cancer progression, the surrounding microenvironment co-evolves into an activated state through continuous communication with the malignant cells, thereby promoting tumor growth. The effect of pregnancy and placental environment on breast cancer biology is the issue of this review. Placental and cancer cells implantation processes share similar molecular pathways. This suggests that placental factors may affect breast cancer cells biology. Previously, we analyzed the effect of first trimester human placenta on breast cancer cells. Breast cancer cells were co-cultured with placental explants during their implantation on matrigel substrate. We found that the placenta reduced ER expression on the cancer cells and induced their migration and invasion abilities. As a result of it, breast cancer cells migrated away from the placental implantation sites. Hormonal pathways were involved in these phenomena. These results may explain the high incidence of metastases during pregnancy in on the one hand and the rarity of metastases on the placenta on the other hand. PMID:26480621

  3. Treatment challenges for community oncologists treating postmenopausal women with endocrine-resistant, hormone receptor-positive, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-negative advanced breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Gradishar, William J

    2016-01-01

    Community-based oncologists are faced with challenges and opportunities when delivering quality patient care, including high patient volumes and diminished resources; however, there may be the potential to deliver increased patient education and subsequently improve outcomes. This review discusses the treatment of postmenopausal women with endocrine-resistant, hormone receptor-positive, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2- negative advanced breast cancer in order to illustrate considerations in the provision of pertinent quality education in the treatment of these patients and the management of therapy-related adverse events. An overview of endocrine-resistant breast cancer and subsequent treatment challenges is also provided. Approved treatment options for endocrine-resistant breast cancer include hormonal therapies and mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors. Compounds under clinical investigation are also discussed. PMID:27468248

  4. Treatment challenges for community oncologists treating postmenopausal women with endocrine-resistant, hormone receptor-positive, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-negative advanced breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gradishar, William J

    2016-01-01

    Community-based oncologists are faced with challenges and opportunities when delivering quality patient care, including high patient volumes and diminished resources; however, there may be the potential to deliver increased patient education and subsequently improve outcomes. This review discusses the treatment of postmenopausal women with endocrine-resistant, hormone receptor-positive, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2- negative advanced breast cancer in order to illustrate considerations in the provision of pertinent quality education in the treatment of these patients and the management of therapy-related adverse events. An overview of endocrine-resistant breast cancer and subsequent treatment challenges is also provided. Approved treatment options for endocrine-resistant breast cancer include hormonal therapies and mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors. Compounds under clinical investigation are also discussed. PMID:27468248

  5. Viruses and Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lawson, James S.; Heng, Benjamin

    2010-01-01

    Viruses are the accepted cause of many important cancers including cancers of the cervix and anogenital area, the liver, some lymphomas, head and neck cancers and indirectly human immunodeficiency virus associated cancers. For over 50 years, there have been serious attempts to identify viruses which may have a role in breast cancer. Despite these efforts, the establishment of conclusive evidence for such a role has been elusive. However, the development of extremely sophisticated new experimental techniques has allowed the recent development of evidence that human papilloma virus, Epstein-Barr virus, mouse mammary tumor virus and bovine leukemia virus may each have a role in the causation of human breast cancers. This is potentially good news as effective vaccines are already available to prevent infections from carcinogenic strains of human papilloma virus, which causes cancer of the uterine cervix. PMID:24281093

  6. Akt Inhibitor MK2206, Lapatinib Ditosylate, and Trastuzumab in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced or Metastatic HER2-Positive Breast , Gastric, or Gastroesophageal Cancer That Cannot Be Removed By Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-09-27

    Adenocarcinoma of the Gastroesophageal Junction; HER2-positive Breast Cancer; Male Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Recurrent Esophageal Cancer; Recurrent Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Esophageal Cancer; Stage IIIC Gastric Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Stage IV Esophageal Cancer; Stage IV Gastric Cancer

  7. Breast Cancer Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The BioScan System was developed by OmniCorder Technologies, Inc. at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. The system is able to locate cancerous lesions by detecting the cancer's ability to recruit a new blood supply. A digital sensor detects infrared energy emitted from the body and identifies the minute differences accompanying the blood flow changes associated with cancerous cells. It also has potential use as a monitoring device during cancer treatment. This technology will reduce the time taken to detect cancerous cells and allow for earlier intervention, therefore increasing the overall survival rates of breast cancer patients.

  8. Stereotactic Image-Guided Navigation During Breast Reconstruction in Patients With Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-08-27

    Ductal Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Lobular Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

  9. Cellular iron metabolism in prognosis and therapy of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Torti, Suzy V; Torti, Frank M

    2013-01-01

    Despite many recent advances, breast cancer remains a clinical challenge. Current issues include improving prognostic evaluation and increasing therapeutic options for women whose tumors are refractory to current frontline therapies. Iron metabolism is frequently disrupted in breast cancer, and may offer an opportunity to address these challenges. Iron enhances breast tumor initiation, growth and metastases. Iron may contribute to breast tumor initiation by promoting redox cycling of estrogen metabolites. Up-regulation of iron import and down-regulation of iron export may enable breast cancer cells to acquire and retain excess iron. Alterations in iron metabolism in macrophages and other cells of the tumor microenvironment may also foster breast tumor growth. Expression of iron metabolic genes in breast tumors is predictive of breast cancer prognosis. Iron chelators and other strategies designed to limit iron may have therapeutic value in breast cancer. The dependence of breast cancer on iron presents rich opportunities for improved prognostic evaluation and therapeutic intervention. PMID:23879588

  10. Breast Cancer Screening.

    PubMed

    Euhus, David; Di Carlo, Philip A; Khouri, Nagi F

    2015-10-01

    Breast cancer screening has become a controversial topic. Understanding the points of contention requires an appreciation of the conceptual framework underpinning cancer screening in general, knowledge of the strengths and limitations of available screening modalities, and familiarity with published clinical trial data. This review is data intense with the intention of presenting enough information to permit the reader to enter into the discussion with an ample knowledge base. The focus throughout is striking a balance between the benefits and harms of breast cancer screening. PMID:26315519

  11. Preventing Breast Cancer: Making Progress

    MedlinePlus

    Skip Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Preventing Breast Cancer: Making Progress Past Issues / Fall 2006 Table of ... inhibitor, can do an even better job of preventing breast cancer than the SERMs. Aromatase inhibitors stop an enzyme ...

  12. Treatment Option Overview (Breast Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... to treat breast cancer. Internal radiation therapy with strontium-89 (a radionuclide ) is used to relieve bone pain ... breast cancer that has spread to the bones. Strontium-89 is injected into a vein and travels to ...

  13. 'Ppl, I Have Breast Cancer'

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/news/fullstory_160134.html 'Ppl, I Have Breast Cancer' Many women found online support after their diagnosis, ... Women who communicated via social media after a breast cancer diagnosis and received information and/or support about ...

  14. Life After Breast Cancer Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    FACTS FOR LIFE Life After Breast Cancer Treatment Once breast cancer treatment ends, you may face a new set of issues and concerns. ... fear. If fear starts to disrupt your daily life, talk to your doctor. Getting the support and ...

  15. A new surgical strategy for breast conservation in locally advanced breast cancer that achieves a good locoregional control rate: preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Moneer, M; Ismael, S; Khaled, H; El-Gantery, M; Zaghloul, M S; El-Didi, M

    2001-06-01

    The scope of breast conserving surgery has recently expanded to include locally advanced breast cancer (LABC) patients who are downstaged following neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT). However, the efficacy of this approach in achieving adequate locoregional control of disease is in doubt. Some reports have attributed the failure to the association of NACT-induced tumour downstaging which can leave multifocal in situ and invasive lesions around the main tumour mass. In the present study, in order to eradicate all possible tumour satellites, a very wide local excision that included the whole original tumour-bearing area was performed regardless of the expected wide defect. This defect was then immediately reconstructed by an ipsilateral pedicled latissimus dorsi myocutaneous (LDM) flap. The study included 26 patients with LABC without evidence of primary tumour-multicentricity. Tumours were downstaged following NACT. The early cosmetic outcome was good in the majority of cases. Early complications were minimal. Twenty-two patients had a mean follow up period of 30.2 (range 7-50) months. In those evaluable cases, locoregional control of the disease was excellent (100%) but distant metastases occurred in seven cases (31.8%). PMID:14965588

  16. Immunotherapy in Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Marmé, Frederik

    2016-01-01

    The importance of the tumor microenvironment including immune cell infiltrates in breast cancer has long been recognized. Tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes are prognostic and predictive; however, their prevalence as well as their prognostic and predictive power are subtype-dependent and appear most prominent in aggressive subtypes like triple-negative and HER2-positive disease. The immune responses observed in many cancers are attracted by tumor-associated antigens and, as suggested by recent research, by neoantigens - immunogenic antigens encoded for by non-synonymous mutations. The appealing promise of cancer vaccines has been pursued in breast cancer for over 2 decades; however, despite much effort having been put into vaccine trials, their clinical benefit, with the exception of some encouraging preliminary results, remains disappointing. The main hurdles compromising the efficacy of these vaccination strategies are the difficulties to generate broad and robust immune responses as well as to overcome immune escape mechanisms. The remarkable efficacy of immune checkpoint inhibitors in melanoma and lung cancer has set the ground for a race in the clinical development of numerous agents targeting these immune escape mechanisms in many tumor entities. Early clinical data in metastatic breast cancer suggests at least some clinical activity. This review discusses the current status and future perspectives of immunotherapy in breast cancer. PMID:27260697

  17. Minimally Invasive Treatments for Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... SIR login) Interventional Radiology Minimally Invasive Treatments for Breast Cancer Interventional Radiology Treatments Offer New Options and Hope ... have in the fight against breast cancer. About Breast Cancer When breast tissue divides and grows at an ...

  18. Computerized Cognitive Retraining in Improving Cognitive Function in Breast Cancer Survivors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-26

    Cancer Survivor; Stage 0 Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  19. Constitutive gene expression profile segregates toxicity in locally advanced breast cancer patients treated with high-dose hyperfractionated radical radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Henríquez Hernández, Luis Alberto; Lara, Pedro Carlos; Pinar, Beatriz; Bordón, Elisa; Gallego, Carlos Rodríguez; Bilbao, Cristina; Pérez, Leandro Fernández; Morales, Amílcar Flores

    2009-01-01

    Breast cancer patients show a wide variation in normal tissue reactions after radiotherapy. The individual sensitivity to x-rays limits the efficiency of the therapy. Prediction of individual sensitivity to radiotherapy could help to select the radiation protocol and to improve treatment results. The aim of this study was to assess the relationship between gene expression profiles of ex vivo un-irradiated and irradiated lymphocytes and the development of toxicity due to high-dose hyperfractionated radiotherapy in patients with locally advanced breast cancer. Raw data from microarray experiments were uploaded to the Gene Expression Omnibus Database (GEO accession GSE15341). We obtained a small group of 81 genes significantly regulated by radiotherapy, lumped in 50 relevant pathways. Using ANOVA and t-test statistical tools we found 20 and 26 constitutive genes (0 Gy) that segregate patients with and without acute and late toxicity, respectively. Non-supervised hierarchical clustering was used for the visualization of results. Six and 9 pathways were significantly regulated respectively. Concerning to irradiated lymphocytes (2 Gy), we founded 29 genes that separate patients with acute toxicity and without it. Those genes were gathered in 4 significant pathways. We could not identify a set of genes that segregates patients with and without late toxicity. In conclusion, we have found an association between the constitutive gene expression profile of peripheral blood lymphocytes and the development of acute and late toxicity in consecutive, unselected patients. These observations suggest the possibility of predicting normal tissue response to irradiation in high-dose non-conventional radiation therapy regimens. Prospective studies with higher number of patients are needed to validate these preliminary results. PMID:19497124

  20. From technological advances to biological understanding: The main steps toward high-precision RT in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Leonardi, Maria Cristina; Ricotti, Rosalinda; Dicuonzo, Samantha; Cattani, Federica; Morra, Anna; Dell'Acqua, Veronica; Orecchia, Roberto; Jereczek-Fossa, Barbara Alicja

    2016-10-01

    Radiotherapy improves local control in breast cancer (BC) patients which increases overall survival in the long term. Improvements in treatment planning and delivery and a greater understanding of BC behaviour have laid the groundwork for high-precision radiotherapy, which is bound to further improve the therapeutic index. Precise identification of target volumes, better coverage and dose homogeneity have had a positive impact on toxicity and local control. The conformity of treatment dose due to three-dimensional radiotherapy and new techniques such as intensity modulated radiotherapy makes it possible to spare surrounding normal tissue. The widespread use of dose-volume constraints and histograms have increased awareness of toxicity. Real time image guidance has improved geometric precision and accuracy, together with the implementation of quality assurance programs. Advances in the precision of radiotherapy is also based on the choice of the appropriate fractionation and approach. Adaptive radiotherapy is not only a technical concept, but is also a biological concept based on the knowledge that different types of BC have distinctive patterns of locoregional spread. A greater understanding of cancer biology helps in choosing the treatment best suited to a particular situation. Biomarkers predictive of response play a crucial role. The combination of radiotherapy with molecular targeted therapies may enhance radiosensitivity, thus increasing the cytotoxic effects and improving treatment response. The appropriateness of an alternative fractionation, partial breast irradiation, dose escalating/de-escalating approaches, the extent of nodal irradiation have been examined for all the BC subtypes. The broadened concept of adaptive radiotherapy is vital to high-precision treatments. PMID:27542556

  1. Nanotechnology for breast cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Takemi; Decuzzi, Paolo; Cristofanilli, Massimo; Sakamoto, Jason H; Tasciotti, Ennio; Robertson, Fredika M; Ferrari, Mauro

    2009-02-01

    Breast cancer is the field of medicine with the greatest presence of nanotechnological therapeutic agents in the clinic. A pegylated form of liposomally encapsulated doxorubicin is routinely used for treatment against metastatic cancer, and albumin nanoparticulate chaperones of paclitaxel were approved for locally recurrent and metastatic disease in 2005. These drugs have yielded substantial clinical benefit, and are steadily gathering greater beneficial impact. Clinical trials currently employing these drugs in combination with chemo and biological therapeutics exceed 150 worldwide. Despite these advancements, breast cancer morbidity and mortality is unacceptably high. Nanotechnology offers potential solutions to the historical challenge that has rendered breast cancer so difficult to contain and eradicate: the extreme biological diversity of the disease presentation in the patient population and in the evolutionary changes of any individual disease, the multiple pathways that drive disease progression, the onset of 'resistance' to established therapeutic cocktails, and the gravity of the side effects to treatment, which result from generally very poor distribution of the injected therapeutic agents in the body. A fundamental requirement for success in the development of new therapeutic strategies is that breast cancer specialists-in the clinic, the pharmaceutical and the basic biological laboratory-and nanotechnologists-engineers, physicists, chemists and mathematicians-optimize their ability to work in close collaboration. This further requires a mutual openness across cultural and language barriers, academic reward systems, and many other 'environmental' divides. This paper is respectfully submitted to the community to help foster the mutual interactions of the breast cancer world with micro- and nano-technology, and in particular to encourage the latter community to direct ever increasing attention to breast cancer, where an extraordinary beneficial impact may

  2. In the End What Matters Most? A Review of Clinical Endpoints in Advanced Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    McLeod, Deanna; Batist, Gerald; Robidoux, André; Martins, Ilídio R. S.; Mackey, John R.

    2011-01-01

    Many agents are being studied for the treatment of metastatic breast cancer (MBC), yet few studies have demonstrated longer overall survival (OS), the primary measure of clinical benefit in MBC. This paper examines the key endpoints in clinical trials and U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approvals of drugs for MBC. PubMed was searched (1980 to October 2009) for reports of phase III trials investigating chemotherapy and/or targeted therapy agents in MBC. FDA approval histories (1996–2009) for cytotoxic and biological agents indicated for MBC were reviewed. Of the 73 phase III MBC trials reviewed, a strikingly small proportion of trials demonstrated a gain in OS duration (12%, n = 9). OS gains were less frequently noted in first-line trials (8%) than in trials of second-line plus other lines of therapy (22%). Few trials were designed with the capacity to detect OS effects. Among 37 phase III trials conducted in the last 15 years, only three systemic therapies were approved for first-line use and nine were approved for use as second-line or other lines of therapy. Of these, only four were supported by results showing longer survival times. There is substantial discordance among the design and conduct of clinical trials, FDA drug approval, and the current view of OS as the ultimate measure of clinical benefit. There is an urgent need to reassess standards for clinical benefit in MBC and to establish guidelines for study design and conduct and drug approval. In the end, what matters most is ensuring rapid access to safe and effective oncology treatments. PMID:21212428

  3. Prognostic role of clinical, pathological and biological characteristics in patients with locally advanced breast cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Honkoop, A. H.; van Diest, P. J.; de Jong, J. S.; Linn, S. C.; Giaccone, G.; Hoekman, K.; Wagstaff, J.; Pinedo, H. M.

    1998-01-01

    Forty-two patients with clinical stage IIIA or IIIB breast cancer were treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by mastectomy and radiotherapy. The median follow-up was 32 months (range 10-72 months) and the median time to progression was 17 months (range 10-30 months). A multivariate analysis showed that a longer disease-free survival (DFS) was related to more chemotherapy cycles given (P = 0.003), a better pathological response to chemotherapy (P = 0.04) and fewer positive axillary lymph nodes (P = 0.05). A better overall survival (OS) was related to more chemotherapy cycles given (P = 0.03) and better pathological response to chemotherapy (P = 0.04). In patients with residual tumour after neoadjuvant chemotherapy, high levels of staining for Ki-67 was correlated with a worse DFS (P = 0.008). Other biological characteristics, including oestrogen receptor status, microvessel density (CD31 staining), P-glycoprotein (P-gp) staining and nuclear accumulation of p53, were not independent prognostic factors for either DFS or OS. If both P-gp and p53 were expressed, DFS and OS were worse in the uni- and multivariate analysis. The preliminary results of this phase II study suggest that coexpression of P-gp/p53 and a high level of staining for Ki-67 after chemotherapy are associated with a worse prognosis, and that prolonged neoadjuvant chemotherapy and the attainment of a pathological complete remission are important factors in determining outcome for patients with this disease. PMID:9484820

  4. Diet and breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Bradlow, H Leon; Sepkovic, Daniel W

    2002-06-01

    The preponderance of evidence suggests a role for fat and alcohol as risk factors for breast cancer. The role of milk is more controversial with some studies suggesting that milk is a risk factor and others that consumption of milk is protective against breast cancer. No other major nutrient appears to play a significant role in increasing breast cancer risk. On the other hand, there is increasing evidence that a variety of micronutrients and hormones appear to have significant anticancer activity. These range from steroids such as dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and its analysis to indoles, isothiocyanates, and isoflavone derivatives. These compounds act directly by interfering with cyclins and promoting apoptosis as well as indirectly by altering estrogen metabolism in a favorable direction. These effects are not merely theoretical actions in cell culture and tissue explants; they have been demonstrated in human patients as a range of studies have demonstrated. PMID:12095951

  5. Integrated Molecular Profiling in Advanced Cancers Trial

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-19

    Breast Cancer; Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Colorectal Cancer; Genitourinary Cancer; Pancreatobiliary Gastrointestinal Cancer; Upper Aerodigestive Tract Cancer; Gynecological Cancers; Melanoma Cancers; Rare Cancers; Unknown Primary Cancers

  6. Surgery for breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Dooley, W C

    1998-11-01

    Women with breast cancer today have many more therapeutic options available to them for their surgical therapy. Almost all patients with breast cancer have some options for breast conservation. Active patient involvement in analyzing and understanding the pros and cons of each of these options seems extremely important to the long-term emotional and psychological outcome of their breast cancer therapy. Several reports this year have reintroduced the issue of adequate local control. The common philosophy a decade ago was that because systematic therapy (adjuvant chemotherapy) was improving, local therapy would become of lesser importance. Several studies this year have indicated the extreme importance of local control in maximizing survival advantage because of the relationship of increasing local failure and deteriorating survival from systemic disease. Despite significant improvements in treatment, our screening and diagnostic approaches have still failed to identify the majority of lesions prior to the patient's own palpation of the tumor. Using new diagnostic modalities that do not involve surgery, the biopsy of lower probability lesions with great accuracy is expected to improve the efficacy of the current screening measures. Despite all the improvements, the most important therapeutic step in the management of breast cancer remains earlier diagnosis and earlier extirpation of the initial invasive focus of malignancy. PMID:9818228

  7. Radiation induced apoptosis and initial DNA damage are inversely related in locally advanced breast cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background DNA-damage assays, quantifying the initial number of DNA double-strand breaks induced by radiation, have been proposed as a predictive test for radiation-induced toxicity. Determination of radiation-induced apoptosis in peripheral blood lymphocytes by flow cytometry analysis has also been proposed as an approach for predicting normal tissue responses following radiotherapy. The aim of the present study was to explore the association between initial DNA damage, estimated by the number of double-strand breaks induced by a given radiation dose, and the radio-induced apoptosis rates observed. Methods Peripheral blood lymphocytes were taken from 26 consecutive patients with locally advanced breast carcinoma. Radiosensitivity of lymphocytes was quantified as the initial number of DNA double-strand breaks induced per Gy and per DNA unit (200 Mbp). Radio-induced apoptosis at 1, 2 and 8 Gy was measured by flow cytometry using annexin V/propidium iodide. Results Radiation-induced apoptosis increased in order to radiation dose and data fitted to a semi logarithmic mathematical model. A positive correlation was found among radio-induced apoptosis values at different radiation doses: 1, 2 and 8 Gy (p < 0.0001 in all cases). Mean DSB/Gy/DNA unit obtained was 1.70 ± 0.83 (range 0.63-4.08; median, 1.46). A statistically significant inverse correlation was found between initial damage to DNA and radio-induced apoptosis at 1 Gy (p = 0.034). A trend toward 2 Gy (p = 0.057) and 8 Gy (p = 0.067) was observed after 24 hours of incubation. Conclusions An inverse association was observed for the first time between these variables, both considered as predictive factors to radiation toxicity. PMID:20868468

  8. Omega-3 Fatty Acid in Treating Patients With Stage I-III Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-17

    Ductal Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Lobular Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Male Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  9. Breast cancer in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Crivellari, Diana; Aapro, Matti; Leonard, Robert; von Minckwitz, Gunter; Brain, Etienne; Goldhirsch, Aron; Veronesi, Andrea; Muss, Hyman

    2007-05-10

    Screening and adjuvant postoperative therapies have increased survival among women with breast cancer. These tools are seldom applied in elderly patients, although the usually reported incidence of breast cancer is close to 50% in women 65 years or older, reaching 47% after 70 years in the updated Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database. Elderly breast cancer patients, even if in good medical health, were frequently excluded from adjuvant clinical trials. Women age 70 years who are fit actually have a median life expectancy of 15.5 years, ie, half of them will live much longer and will remain exposed for enough time to the potentially preventable risks of a relapse and specific death. In the last few years, a new concern about this issue has developed. Treatment now faces two major end points, as in younger women: to improve disease-free survival in the early stages, and to palliate symptoms in advanced disease. However, in both settings, the absolute benefit of treatment is critical because protecting quality of life and all its related aspects (especially functional status and independence), is crucial in older persons who have more limited life expectancy. Furthermore, the new hormonal compounds (aromatase inhibitors) and chemotherapeutic drugs (capecitabine, liposomal doxorubicin), are potentially less toxic than and equally as effective as older more established therapies. These new treatments bring new challenges including higher cost, and defining their benefit in elderly breast cancer must include an analysis of the cost/benefit ratio. These issues emphasize the urgent need to develop and support clinical trials for this older population of breast cancer patients both in the adjuvant and metastatic settings, a move that will take us from a prejudiced, age-based medicine to an evidence-based medicine. PMID:17488987

  10. Comparison of prone versus supine 18F-FDG-PET of locally advanced breast cancer: Phantom and preliminary clinical studies

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Jason M.; Rani, Sudheer D.; Li, Xia; Whisenant, Jennifer G.; Abramson, Richard G.; Arlinghaus, Lori R.; Lee, Tzu-Cheng; MacDonald, Lawrence R.; Partridge, Savannah C.; Kang, Hakmook; Linden, Hannah M.; Kinahan, Paul E.; Yankeelov, Thomas E.

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: Previous studies have demonstrated how imaging of the breast with patients lying prone using a supportive positioning device markedly facilitates longitudinal and/or multimodal image registration. In this contribution, the authors’ primary objective was to determine if there are differences in the standardized uptake value (SUV) derived from [{sup 18}F]fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) in breast tumors imaged in the standard supine position and in the prone position using a specialized positioning device. Methods: A custom positioning device was constructed to allow for breast scanning in the prone position. Rigid and nonrigid phantom studies evaluated differences in prone and supine PET. Clinical studies comprised 18F-FDG-PET of 34 patients with locally advanced breast cancer imaged in the prone position (with the custom support) followed by imaging in the supine position (without the support). Mean and maximum values (SUV{sub peak} and SUV{sub max}, respectively) were obtained from tumor regions-of-interest for both positions. Prone and supine SUV were linearly corrected to account for the differences in 18F-FDG uptake time. Correlation, Bland–Altman, and nonparametric analyses were performed on uptake time-corrected and uncorrected data. Results: SUV from the rigid PET breast phantom imaged in the prone position with the support device was 1.9% lower than without the support device. In the nonrigid PET breast phantom, prone SUV with the support device was 5.0% lower than supine SUV without the support device. In patients, the median (range) difference in uptake time between prone and supine scans was 16.4 min (13.4–30.9 min), which was significantly—but not completely—reduced by the linear correction method. SUV{sub peak} and SUV{sub max} from prone versus supine scans were highly correlated, with concordance correlation coefficients of 0.91 and 0.90, respectively. Prone SUV{sub peak} and SUV{sub max} were

  11. Observed and Predicted Risk of Breast Cancer Death in Randomized Trials on Breast Cancer Screening

    PubMed Central

    Autier, Philippe; Sullivan, Richard; Boyle, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Background The role of breast screening in breast cancer mortality declines is debated. Screening impacts cancer mortality through decreasing the number of advanced cancers with poor diagnosis, while cancer treatment works through decreasing the case-fatality rate. Hence, reductions in cancer death rates thanks to screening should directly reflect reductions in advanced cancer rates. We verified whether in breast screening trials, the observed reductions in the risk of breast cancer death could be predicted from reductions of advanced breast cancer rates. Patients and Methods The Greater New York Health Insurance Plan trial (HIP) is the only breast screening trial that reported stage-specific cancer fatality for the screening and for the control group separately. The Swedish Two-County trial (TCT)) reported size-specific fatalities for cancer patients in both screening and control groups. We computed predicted numbers of breast cancer deaths, from which we calculated predicted relative risks (RR) and (95% confidence intervals). The Age trial in England performed its own calculations of predicted relative risk. Results The observed and predicted RR of breast cancer death were 0.72 (0.56–0.94) and 0.98 (0.77–1.24) in the HIP trial, and 0.79 (0.78–1.01) and 0.90 (0.80–1.01) in the Age trial. In the TCT, the observed RR was 0.73 (0.62–0.87), while the predicted RR was 0.89 (0.75–1.05) if overdiagnosis was assumed to be negligible and 0.83 (0.70–0.97) if extra cancers were excluded. Conclusions In breast screening trials, factors other than screening have contributed to reductions in the risk of breast cancer death most probably by reducing the fatality of advanced cancers in screening groups. These factors were the better management of breast cancer patients and the underreporting of breast cancer as the underlying cause of death. Breast screening trials should publish stage-specific fatalities observed in each group. PMID:27100174

  12. Estimation of natural history parameters of breast cancer based on non-randomized organized screening data: subsidiary analysis of effects of inter-screening interval, sensitivity, and attendance rate on reduction of advanced cancer.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jenny Chia-Yun; Hakama, Matti; Anttila, Ahti; Yen, Amy Ming-Fang; Malila, Nea; Sarkeala, Tytti; Auvinen, Anssi; Chiu, Sherry Yueh-Hsia; Chen, Hsiu-Hsi

    2010-07-01

    Estimating the natural history parameters of breast cancer not only elucidates the disease progression but also make contributions to assessing the impact of inter-screening interval, sensitivity, and attendance rate on reducing advanced breast cancer. We applied three-state and five-state Markov models to data on a two-yearly routine mammography screening in Finland between 1988 and 2000. The mean sojourn time (MST) was computed from estimated transition parameters. Computer simulation was implemented to examine the effect of inter-screening interval, sensitivity, and attendance rate on reducing advanced breast cancers. In three-state model, the MST was 2.02 years, and the sensitivity for detecting preclinical breast cancer was 84.83%. In five-state model, the MST was 2.21 years for localized tumor and 0.82 year for non-localized tumor. Annual, biennial, and triennial screening programs can reduce 53, 37, and 28% of advanced cancer. The effectiveness of intensive screening with poor attendance is the same as that of infrequent screening with high attendance rate. We demonstrated how to estimate the natural history parameters using a service screening program and applied these parameters to assess the impact of inter-screening interval, sensitivity, and attendance rate on reducing advanced cancer. The proposed method makes contribution to further cost-effectiveness analysis. However, these findings had better be validated by using a further long-term follow-up data. PMID:20054645

  13. Vitamin D and Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Paula; Grossbard, Michael L.

    2012-01-01

    In addition to its role in calcium homeostasis and bone health, vitamin D has also been reported to have anticancer activities against many cancer types, including breast cancer. The discovery that breast epithelial cells possess the same enzymatic system as the kidney, allowing local manufacture of active vitamin D from circulating precursors, makes the effect of vitamin D in breast cancer biologically plausible. Preclinical and ecologic studies have suggested a role for vitamin D in breast cancer prevention. Inverse associations have also been shown between serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D level (25(OH)D) and breast cancer development, risk for breast cancer recurrence, and mortality in women with early-stage breast cancer. Clinical trials of vitamin D supplementation, however, have yielded inconsistent results. Regardless of whether or not vitamin D helps prevent breast cancer or its recurrence, vitamin D deficiency in the U.S. population is very common, and the adverse impact on bone health, a particular concern for breast cancer survivors, makes it important to understand vitamin D physiology and to recognize and treat vitamin D deficiency. In this review, we discuss vitamin D metabolism and its mechanism of action. We summarize the current evidence of the relationship between vitamin D and breast cancer, highlight ongoing research in this area, and discuss optimal dosing of vitamin D for breast cancer prevention. PMID:22234628

  14. The use of neoadjuvant platinum-based chemotherapy in locally advanced breast cancer that is triple negative: retrospective analysis of 144 patients.

    PubMed

    Hurley, Judith; Reis, Isildinha M; Rodgers, Steven E; Gomez-Fernandez, Carmen; Wright, Jean; Leone, Jose Pablo; Larrieu, Rene; Pegram, Mark D

    2013-04-01

    Triple-negative breast cancers comprise about 20 % of breast cancers. They have poor prognosis and have no standard therapy. The aim of this study was to evaluate pathologic complete response (pCR), progression-free survival (PFS), and overall survival (OS) in patients with TNBC treated with neoadjuvant platinum-based chemotherapy. This is a retrospective study of one hundred and forty-four women with TNBC treated with neoadjuvant platinum-containing chemotherapy for locally advanced breast cancer at the University of Miami between January 1, 1999, and January 1, 2011. The medical record was reviewed to obtain data on clinical characteristics, including ethnicity, race, age, clinical stage, treatment regimen, and vital status. This study was approved by the University of Miami IRB. All patients had locally advanced breast cancer with at least one of the following features at presentation: T3, T4, N2, and N3. The mean tumor size by palpation was 9.4 cm. The clinical T-stage at presentation was 1.4 % T1, 8.3 % T2, 52.8 % T3, and 37.5 % T4 (19.4 % T4d). The nodal status by physical exam at presentation was 23 % N0, 37.5 % N1, 34 % N2, and 5.5 % N3. pCR in breast and axilla was seen in 31 %. PFS and OS were 55 and 59 %, respectively, at 7 years. Cisplatin offered a survival advantage over carboplatin in both PFS (P = 0.007) and OS (P = 0.018). Node positivity was the most important predictor of survival. Cisplatin/docetaxel neoadjuvant therapy was well tolerated and an effective therapy in locally advanced TNB. PMID:23542956

  15. Virtual Weight Loss Program in Maintaining Weight in African American Breast Cancer Survivors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-01

    Cancer Survivor; Invasive Breast Carcinoma; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  16. [Breast cancer imaging].

    PubMed

    Canale, Sandra; Balleyguier, Corinne; Dromain, Clarisse

    2013-12-01

    Imaging of breast cancer is multimodal. Mammography uses X-rays, the development of digital mammography has improved its quality and enabled implementations of new technologies such astomosynthesis (3D mammography) or contrast-enhanced digital mammography. Ultrasound is added to mammography when there is need to improve detection in high-density breast, to characterize an image, or guide apuncture or biopsy. Breast MRI is the most sensitive imaging modality. It detects a possible tumor angiogenesis by highlighting an early and intense contrast uptake. This method has an excellent negative predictive value, but its lack of specificity (false positives) can be problematic, thus it has to be prescribed according to published standards. An imaging breast screening report must be concluded by the BI-RADS lexicon classification of the ACR and recommendations about monitoring or histological verification. PMID:24579332

  17. Pregnancy-associated breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Keinan-Boker, Lital; Lerner-Geva, Liat; Kaufman, Bella; Meirow, Dror

    2008-10-01

    The frequency of pregnancy-associated breast cancer, a rare but serious occurrence, may increase in light of the secular trends for lower parity in general and for older age at first full-term delivery in particular Data on PABC in individuals who are at high risk for breast cancer are limited. A computerized search of Pubmed showed that the reported incidence of PABC is 1:3000 pregnancies; it is often diagnosed at an advanced stage and its prognosis is inferior compared to non-PABC Carriers of mutations in the genes BRCA1/2 may present a specific high risk group for PABC especially at younger ages. Women treated with fertility treatment drugs may be at a higher risk for PABC as well. PMID:19009954

  18. A phase I study of the vitamin D analogue EB 1089 in patients with advanced breast and colorectal cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Gulliford, T.; English, J.; Colston, K. W.; Menday, P.; Moller, S.; Coombes, R. C.

    1998-01-01

    Preclinical studies have shown that the vitamin D analogue EB 1089 has significantly less calcaemic activity than its parent compound 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (1,25(OH)2D3) and significant anti-tumour activity. This phase I trial was designed to evaluate the calcaemic effect of the drug in patients with advanced cancer. EB 1089 was given to 36 patients with advanced breast and colorectal cancer in doses of between 0.15 and 17.0 microg m(-2) day(-1). Serial serum and urine calcium, urine creatinine and serum parathyroid hormone (PTH) were monitored. Hypercalcaemia was seen in all patients receiving 17.0 microg m(-2) day(-1). Hypercalcaemia attributable to EB 1089 was reversible by discontinuing or reducing EB 1089 therapy. During the first 5 days of treatment, urine calcium (P = 0.0001) and serum-corrected calcium (P = 0.027) were related to EB 1089 dose, whereas serum parathyroid hormone (P = 0.0001) showed an inverse relationship. Twenty-one patients received compassionate treatment for between 10 and 234 days. No complete or partial responses were seen. Six patients on treatment for more than 90 days showed stabilization of disease. EB 1089 was well tolerated and adverse events considered to be caused by EB 1089 were limited to dose-dependent effects on calcium metabolism. The dose estimated to be tolerable for most patients from this study is around 7 microg m(-2) day(1). These data support previous work that has demonstrated EB 1089 to be significantly less calcaemic than 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3. PMID:9662243

  19. Accelerated Radiation Therapy After Surgery in Treating Patients With Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-16

    Inflammatory Breast Cancer; Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Invasive Lobular Breast Carcinoma; Mucinous Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Papillary Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Tubular Ductal Breast Carcinoma

  20. Prostate cancer is not breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Venniyoor, Ajit

    2016-01-01

    Cancers of the prostate and breast are hormone dependent cancers. There is a tendency to equate them and apply same algorithms for treatment. It is pointed out that metastatic prostate cancer with bone-only disease is a potentially fatal condition with a much poorer prognosis than metastatic breast cancer and needs a more aggressive approach. PMID:27051149

  1. Progestins and breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Pasqualini, Jorge R

    2007-10-01

    Progestins exert their progestational activity by binding to the progesterone receptor (form A, the most active and form B, the less active) and may also interact with other steroid receptors (androgen, glucocorticoid, mineralocorticoid, estrogen). They can have important effects in other tissues besides the endometrium, including the breast, liver, bone and brain. The biological responses of progestins cover a very large domain: lipids, carbohydrates, proteins, water and electrolyte regulation, hemostasis, fibrinolysis, and cardiovascular and immunological systems. At present, more than 200 progestin compounds have been synthesized, but the biological response could be different from one to another depending on their structure, metabolism, receptor affinity, experimental conditions, target tissue or cell line, as well as the biological response considered. There is substantial evidence that mammary cancer tissue contains all the enzymes responsible for the local biosynthesis of estradiol (E(2)) from circulating precursors. Two principal pathways are implicated in the final steps of E(2) formation in breast cancer tissue: the 'aromatase pathway', which transforms androgens into estrogens, and the 'sulfatase pathway', which converts estrone sulfate (E(1)S) into estrone (E(1)) via estrone sulfatase. The final step is the conversion of weak E(1) to the potent biologically active E(2) via reductive 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 activity. It is also well established that steroid sulfotransferases, which convert estrogens into their sulfates, are present in breast cancer tissues. It has been demonstrated that various progestins (e.g. nomegestrol acetate, medrogestone, promegestone) as well as tibolone and their metabolites can block the enzymes involved in E(2) bioformation (sulfatase, 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase) in breast cancer cells. These substances can also stimulate the sulfotransferase activity which converts estrogens into the biologically

  2. [Correlation of clinical effect, pathological response of tumor cells and the end results of combined treatment of locally advanced breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Kharchenko, V P; Voznyĭ, E K; Galil-Ogly, G A; Gurov, S N; Dobrovol'skaia, N I; Alinchenko, L A; Bol'shakova, S A

    2000-01-01

    A correlation was established between the end-results of neoadjuvant chemotherapy for locally-advanced breast cancer and pathological response of tumor cells. Also, the end-results correlated with CR or PR and pathological response. Only a small proportion of patients with tumor progression were registered as stage III or IV of pathological response (0.6 and 0.8%, respectively). PMID:11219951

  3. Surveying Breast Cancer's Genomic Landscape.

    PubMed

    2016-07-01

    An in-depth analysis has produced the most comprehensive portrait to date of the myriad genomic alterations involved in breast cancer. In sequencing the whole genomes of 560 breast cancers and combining this information with published data from another 772 breast tumors, the research team uncovered several new genes and mutational signatures that potentially influence this disease. PMID:27225883

  4. Breast Cancer Research at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Dr. Harry Mahtani analyzes the gas content of nutrient media from Bioreactor used in research on human breast cancer. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunourous tissues.

  5. Efficacy and safety of capecitabine-based first-line chemotherapy in advanced or metastatic breast cancer: a meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Gang; Huang, Li; Gao, Shegan; Feng, Xiaoshan

    2015-01-01

    We sought to evaluate the efficacy and safety of capecitabine-based therapy as first-line chemotherapy in advanced breast cancer. Randomised controlled trials of capecitabine monotherapy or combined treatment were included in the meta-analysis. PubMed, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library database and important meeting summaries were searched systematically. Outcomes were progression-free survival (PFS), overall survival (OS), overall response rate (ORR) and grades 3–4 drug-related adverse events. Nine trials with 1798 patients were included. The results indicated a significant improvement with capecitabine-based chemotherapy compared with capecitabine-free chemotherapy in ORR (relative risk [RR] 1.14, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.03 to 1.26, P = 0.013) and PFS (hazard ratio [HR] 0.77, 95% CI 0.69 to 0.87, P < 0.0001). Overall survival favoured capecitabine-based chemotherapy, but this was not significant. There were more incidences of neutropenia and neutropenic fever in the capecitabine-free chemotherapy group and more vomiting, diarrhoea and hand–foot syndrome in the capecitabine-based chemotherapy group. There were no significant differences in nausea, fatigue, cardiotoxicity or mucositis/stomatitis between the two treatment regimens. Capecitabine-based chemotherapy significantly improves ORR and PFS in patients with advanced breast cancer, but has no demonstrable impact on OS. Capecitabine-based regimens are suitable as first-line treatment for patients with advanced breast cancer. PMID:26420815

  6. Efficacy and safety of capecitabine-based first-line chemotherapy in advanced or metastatic breast cancer: a meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Yin, Weijiao; Pei, Guangsheng; Liu, Gang; Huang, Li; Gao, Shegan; Feng, Xiaoshan

    2015-11-17

    We sought to evaluate the efficacy and safety of capecitabine-based therapy as first-line chemotherapy in advanced breast cancer. Randomised controlled trials of capecitabine monotherapy or combined treatment were included in the meta-analysis. PubMed, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library database and important meeting summaries were searched systematically. Outcomes were progression-free survival (PFS), overall survival (OS), overall response rate (ORR) and grades 3-4 drug-related adverse events.Nine trials with 1798 patients were included. The results indicated a significant improvement with capecitabine-based chemotherapy compared with capecitabine-free chemotherapy in ORR (relative risk [RR] 1.14, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.03 to 1.26, P = 0.013) and PFS (hazard ratio [HR] 0.77, 95% CI 0.69 to 0.87, P < 0.0001). Overall survival favoured capecitabine-based chemotherapy, but this was not significant. There were more incidences of neutropenia and neutropenic fever in the capecitabine-free chemotherapy group and more vomiting, diarrhoea and hand-foot syndrome in the capecitabine-based chemotherapy group. There were no significant differences in nausea, fatigue, cardiotoxicity or mucositis/stomatitis between the two treatment regimens.Capecitabine-based chemotherapy significantly improves ORR and PFS in patients with advanced breast cancer, but has no demonstrable impact on OS. Capecitabine-based regimens are suitable as first-line treatment for patients with advanced breast cancer. PMID:26420815

  7. Breast cancer surveillance.

    PubMed

    Rachetta, Eleonora; Osano, Silvia; Astegiano, Francesco; Martincich, Laura

    2016-10-01

    Since several studies have demonstrated the inadequate diagnostic performance of mammography in high risk women, over the past two decades, different breast imaging tests have been evaluated as additional diagnostic methods to mammography, and the most relevant ones are the techniques that do not imply the use of X-rays, considering the young age of these patients and the higher radio-sensitivity. Breast dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) has risen growing interest not only because of the absence of use of X-rays, but also because it provides morpho-functional features, which may depict biological characteristics of breast tissues, including invasive and in situ cancers. Different multicenter non-randomized prospective studies aimed to evaluate breast DCE-MRI as an integral part of surveillance programs, agreed about the evidence that in high risk women screening with DCE-MRI is more effective than either mammography and/or ultrasound. Moreover, this modality leads to the identifications of cancers at a more favorable stage, allowing a real advantage in terms of tumor size and nodal involvement. The medical community is evaluating to suggest DCE-MRI alone as screening modality in high-risk women, as it was reported that in these cases the sensitivity of MRI plus conventional imaging was not significantly higher than that of MRI alone. Breast MRI is now recommended as part of screening program for high risk women by both European and American guidelines. PMID:26924173

  8. Your Body After Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... from a trained breast cancer survivor. Cancer Survivors Network : An online community of people with cancer and their loved ones that provides peer support through discussion boards, chat rooms and other ...

  9. Reproduction after breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Zervoudis, Stefanos; Iatrakis, George; Navrozoglou, Iordanis

    2010-02-01

    Breast cancer is the most frequently occurring cancer in women of developed countries, and as a result of new developments in breast cancer treatment, more women are cured after being diagnosed with this disease. It is important that fertility preservation strategies are addressed before chemotherapy, because chemotherapy may induce premature ovarian failure (depending on the woman's age, the drugs used, the dosage and duration of treatment). Among possible solutions are embryos or oocytes cryopreservation, ovarian tissue cryopreservation-freezing with a subsequent orthotopic and heterotopic autotransplantation, whole ovary cryopreservation, ovarian suppression with gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) analogues, which inhibit ovarian follicular depletion induced by chemotherapeutic agents and in vitro fertilisation (IVF) after ovulation induction with aromatase inhibitors or tamoxifen. PMID:20170848

  10. Fertility preservation for breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Oktem, Ozgur; Oktay, Kutluk

    2009-11-01

    Breast cancer is the most common neoplasm in women and accounts for 26% (182,460) of all new cancer cases among women. With the use of screening mammography and advancement in other diagnostic modalities, many cases of breast cancer now can be diagnosed and treated at early stages of the disease. Unfortunately, adjuvant chemotherapy regimens commonly used in the treatment of breast cancer may cause premature ovarian failure due to their cytotoxic effects on the germ cells in the ovary. Therefore preservation of fertility in breast cancer survivors at reproductive age has become an important quality of life issue. Fertility preservation is a recently emerged field of reproductive medicine that may help protect the reproductive capability of the cancer survivors and allow them to have children in the future. Embryo freezing is the most established fertility preservation strategy. But conventional ovarian stimulation protocols are contraindicated in breast cancer patients because of the rise of estrogen and its metabolites to supraphysiological levels. Recently developed ovarian stimulation protocols with aromatase inhibitor letrozole and tamoxifen appear to provide a safe stimulation with endogenous estrogen levels comparable with those achieved in the natural cycle. Oocyte freezing can be considered in single women and in those who do not wish donor sperm. Ovarian tissue freezing could also be an option in breast cancer patients who do not wish or have a time for an in vitro fertilization cycle, which requires 10 to 14 days of ovarian stimulation. PMID:19806518

  11. Bringing Breast Cancer Technologies to Market | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    CCR research is recognized in novel competition to encourage the commercialization of breast cancer inventions. Editor’s note: This article was originally published in CCR Connections (Volume 8, No. 1). The Breast Cancer Startup Challenge was named one of six finalists in the HHS Innovates Award Competition, and was one of three finalists recognized by HHS Secretary Sylvia Mathews Burwell and Deputy Secretary Bill Corr. For more information on the Challenge, see previous article on the Poster website. Start-up companies are instrumental in bringing the fruits of scientific research to market. Recognizing an opportunity to bring entrepreneurial minds to bear on the diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer, the Avon Foundation for Women partnered with NCI and the Center for Advancing Innovation to launch the Breast Cancer Startup Challenge.

  12. Treatment strategies for advanced hormone receptor-positive and human epidermal growth factor 2-negative breast cancer: the role of treatment order.

    PubMed

    Perez, Edith A

    2016-01-01

    Although survival rates among patients with breast cancer have improved in recent years, those diagnosed with advanced disease with distant metastasis face a 5-year survival rate of less than 25%, making the management of these patients an area still in significant need of continued research. Selecting the optimal treatment order from among the variety of currently available therapy options presents a relevant challenge for medical oncologists. With the understanding that the majority of patients with breast cancer and those who succumb to this disease have HR-positive disease, this review will focus on treatment options and treatment order in patients with HR-positive advanced breast cancer. While endocrine therapy is considered the preferred treatment for first-line therapy in HR-positive/HER2-negative breast cancer, selection of the specific agent depends on the menopausal status of the patient. Palbociclib, a cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) 4/6 inhibitor, is also recommended as first-line treatment in patients with ER-positive/HER2-negative disease. In patients with endocrine therapy-resistant disease, specific strategies include sequencing of other antiestrogen receptor agents, or agents that target other molecular pathways. Future treatment strategies for patients with primary or secondary resistance to endocrine therapy for advanced disease are discussed. These strategies include first-line therapy with high-dose fulvestrant or everolimus (in combination with exemestane or letrozole or with other endocrine therapies), use of the PI3K inhibitors (e.g., buparlisib, alpelisib, pictilisib, taselisib), entinostat, CDK 4/6 inhibitors (e.g., palbociclib, ribociclib, abemaciclib), and novel selective estrogen receptor degradation agents that may enhance the targeting of acquired mutations in the ESR1 gene. PMID:26830312

  13. [A Case of Locally Advanced Breast Cancer Treated with Modified Radical Mastectomy with Immediate Reconstruction Using a Tissue Expander after Endocrine Therapy].

    PubMed

    Aomatsu, Naoki; Tei, Seika; Haraoka, Goichi; Hosoi, Kosuke; Fujii, Naho; Tsujio, Gen; Hiramatsu, Soichiro; Wang, En; Iwauchi, Takehiko; Morimoto, Junya; Nishii, Takafumi; Kosaka, Kinshi; Uchima, Yasutake; Takeuchi, Kazuhiro

    2015-11-01

    We experienced a case of locally advanced breast cancer treated with modified radical mastectomy with immediate reconstruction using a tissue expander after endocrine therapy. A 64-year-old postmenopausal woman had a 50 mm tumor in her right breast with extensive reddening of the skin. She had axillary lymph node metastasis. Core needle biopsy showed invasive ductal carcinoma with positive hormone receptor (ER+, PgR+) and negative HER2 status. The patient was diagnosed with locally-advanced breast cancer (cT4bN1M0, stage ⅢB). She was treated with anastrozole at a dose of 1 mg per day. The tumor decreased in size gradually and became operable after 7 months of anastrozole monotherapy. She underwent modified radical mastectomy with immediate reconstruction using a tissue expander. The resected specimen was a 30 mm tumor; adverse effects due to endocrine therapy were of Grade 1a severity. Seven months after adjuvant chemotherapy (FEC→DTX), the tissue expander was removed, and the right breast was reconstructed using an implant. No complications were noted, and the patient was treated with radiation therapy. Ten months have passed since surgery, and no local recurrence or distant metastasis has been noted. PMID:26805181

  14. Breast Cancer 2012 - New Aspects.

    PubMed

    Kolberg, H-C; Lüftner, D; Lux, M P; Maass, N; Schütz, F; Fasching, P A; Fehm, T; Janni, W; Kümmel, S

    2012-07-01

    Treatment options as well as the characteristics for therapeutic decisions in patients with primary and advanced breast cancer are increasing in number and variety. New targeted therapies in combination with established chemotherapy schemes are broadening the spectrum, however potentially promising combinations do not always achieve a better result. New data from the field of pharmacogenomics point to prognostic and predictive factors that take not only the properties of the tumour but also inherited genetic properties of the patient into consideration. Current therapeutic decision-making is thus based on a combination of classical clinical and modern molecular biomarkers. Also health-economic aspects are more frequently being taken into consideration so that health-economic considerations may also play a part. This review is based on information from the recent annual congresses. The latest of these are the 34th San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium 2011 and the ASCO Annual Meeting 2012. Among their highlights are the clinically significant results from the CLEOPATRA, BOLERO-2, EMILIA and SWOG S0226 trials on the therapy for metastatic breast cancer as well as further state-of-the-art data on the adjuvant use of bisphosphonates within the framework of the ABCSG-12, ZO-FAST, NSABP-B34 and GAIN trials. PMID:25324576

  15. Azacitidine in Treating Patients With Triple Negative Stage I-IV Invasive Breast Cancer That Can Be Removed By Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-02-05

    Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer

  16. What's New in Breast Cancer Research and Treatment?

    MedlinePlus

    ... References: Breast cancer detailed guide What`s new in breast cancer research and treatment? Researchers around the world are ... for breast cancer Breast cancer treatment Causes of breast cancer Studies continue to uncover lifestyle factors and habits, ...

  17. Pharmacokinetically Guided Everolimus in Patients With Breast Cancer, Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors, or Kidney Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-01-12

    Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Gastrinoma; Glucagonoma; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Insulinoma; Mucositis; Oral Complications; Pancreatic Polypeptide Tumor; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Recurrent Islet Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Renal Cell Cancer; Somatostatinoma; Stage III Renal Cell Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Stage IV Renal Cell Cancer

  18. You, Your Teenage Daughter and Breast Cancer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brateman, Libby

    1991-01-01

    Discusses breast cancer and teenagers, focusing on how parents can introduce the subject and encourage breast self-examination. The article provides information on breast cancer statistics, mammography, and American Cancer Society services. (SM)

  19. Surgery for Breast Cancer in Men

    MedlinePlus

    ... therapy for breast cancer in men Surgery for breast cancer in men The thought of surgery can be ... 2 to 3 hours. What to expect after breast cancer surgery: After your surgery, you will be taken ...

  20. Reproduction and Breast Cancer Risk

    PubMed Central

    Hanf, Volker; Hanf, Dorothea

    2014-01-01

    Summary Reproduction is doubtlessly one of the main biological meanings of life. It is therefore not surprising that various aspects of reproduction impact on breast cancer risk. Various developmental levels may become targets of breast tumorigenesis. This review follows the chronologic sequence of events in the life of a female at risk, starting with the intrauterine development. Furthermore, the influence of both contraceptive measures and fertility treatment on breast cancer development is dealt with, as well as various pregnancy-associated factors, events, and perinatal outcomes. Finally, the contribution of breast feeding to a reduced breast cancer risk is discussed. PMID:25759622

  1. Chemoprevention for breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Bozovic-Spasojevic, I; Azambuja, E; McCaskill-Stevens, Worta; Dinh, P; Cardoso, F

    2012-08-01

    Despite the progress that has been made in breast cancer diagnosis and treatment, this disease is still a major health problem, being the most frequently diagnosed cancer and the first leading cause of cancer death among women both in developed and economically developing countries. In some developed countries incidence rate start to decrease from the end of last millennium and this can be explained, at least in part, by the decrease in hormone replacement therapy use by post-menopausal women. Chemoprevention has the potential to be an approach of utmost importance to reduce cancer burden at least among high-risk populations. Tamoxifen and raloxifene are both indicated for the prevention of breast cancer in women at high risk for the development of the disease, although raloxifene may have a more favorable adverse-effect profile, causing fewer uterine cancers and thromboembolic events. Aromatase inhibitors will most probably become an additional prevention treatment option in the near future, in view of the promising results observed in adjuvant trials and the interesting results of the very recently published first chemoprevention trial using an aromatase inhibitor.(2) Despite impressive results in most clinical trials performed to date, chemoprevention is still not widely used. Urgently needed are better molecular risk models to accurately identify high-risk subjects, new agents with a better risk/benefit ratio and validated biomarkers. PMID:21856081

  2. Breast-Conserving Surgery Followed by Radiation Therapy With MRI-Detected Stage I or Stage II Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2011-12-07

    Ductal Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; HER2-positive Breast Cancer; Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Invasive Lobular Breast Carcinoma; Male Breast Cancer; Medullary Ductal Breast Carcinoma With Lymphocytic Infiltrate; Mucinous Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Papillary Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Stage I Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Tubular Ductal Breast Carcinoma

  3. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy shows similar response in patients with inflammatory or locally advanced breast cancer when compared with operable breast cancer: a secondary analysis of the GeparTrio trial data.

    PubMed

    Costa, Serban Dan; Loibl, Sibylle; Kaufmann, Manfred; Zahm, Dirk-Michael; Hilfrich, Jörn; Huober, Jens; Eidtmann, Holger; du Bois, Andreas; Blohmer, Jens-Uwe; Ataseven, Beyhan; Weiss, Erich; Tesch, Hans; Gerber, Bernd; Baumann, Klaus H; Thomssen, Christoph; Breitbach, Georg Peter; Ibishi, Shaip; Jackisch, Christian; Mehta, Keyur; von Minckwitz, Gunter

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE Neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by mastectomy is the treatment of choice in patients with inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) or locally advanced breast cancer (LABC), but it is considered less effective in these diseases than in operable breast cancer (OBC). We report a prospective comparison of the GeparTrio trial of patients with IBC (cT4 days) or LABC (cT4a-c or cN3; stage IIIB or IIIC) and patients with OBC (cT2-3). PATIENTS AND METHODS Participants were stratified by stage and were randomly assigned to six or eight cycles of docetaxel/doxorubicin/cyclophosphamide (TAC) or to two cycles of TAC followed by four cycles of vinorelbine/capecitabine. We present results of a secondary aim of the study, which was to compare pathologic complete response (pCR; ie, no remaining invasive/noninvasive tumor in breast and lymph nodes) in different stage groups. Results A total of 287 patients with IBC (n = 93) or LABC (n = 194) and 1,777 patients with OBC were entered onto the trial. At baseline, parameters were as follows for the three types of cancer, respectively: median tumor sizes: 8.0 cm, 7.0 cm, and 4.0 cm (P < .001); multiple lesions: 31.2%, 27.3%, and 19.6% (P < .001); nodal involvement: 86.6%, 71.2%, and 51.6% (P < .001); grade 3: 44.4%, 30.4%, and 39.9% (P = .178); lobular-invasive type: 7.5%, 17.5%, and 13.3% (P = .673); negative hormone receptor status: 38.0%, 20.0%, and 36.4% (P = .008); and positive human growth factor receptor 2 status: 45.1%, 38.9%, and 35.7% (P = .158). Response rates for IBC, LABC, and OBC, respectively, were 8.6%, 11.3%, and 17.7% for pCR (P = .002); 71.0%, 69.6%, and 83.4% for overall response by physical or sonographic examination (P < .001); and 12.9%, 33.0%, and 69.9% for breast conservation (P < .001). All P values were for IBC and LABC versus OBC. However, tumor stage itself was not an independent predictor for pCR in multivariable analysis (odds ratio, 1.51; 95% CI, 0.88 to 2.59; P = .13). CONCLUSION No evidence of a

  4. Managing Breast Cancer in the Older Patient

    PubMed Central

    O’Connor, Tracey; Shinde, Arvind; Doan, Caroline; Katheria, Vani; Hurria, Arti

    2013-01-01

    Breast cancer is a disease associated with aging, with almost one-half of all new breast cancer cases diagnosed annually in the United States occurring in women age 65 and older. Recent data suggest that although breast cancer outcomes in younger women have shown substantial improvement as a result of advances in treatment and screening, the benefits in older women have been less pronounced. Although older adults have been under-represented on cancer clinical trials there is an emerging body of literature to help guide treatment decisions. For early stage breast cancer, the discussion regarding treatment options involves balancing the reduction in risk of recurrence gained by specific therapies with the potential for increased treatment-related toxicity potentially exacerbated by physiological decline or comorbidities that often co-exist in the older population. A key component of care of the older adult is the recognition that chronologic age alone cannot guide the management of an older individual with breast cancer; rather, treatment decisions must also take into account an individual’s functional status, estimated life expectancy, the risks and benefits of the therapy, potential barriers to treatment, and patient preference. This article reviews the available evidence for therapeutic management of early-stage breast cancer in older adults, and highlights data from geriatric oncology literature that provides a basis on which to facilitate evidence-based treatment. PMID:24472802

  5. DNA Repair and Personalized Breast Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shu-Xia; Sjolund, Ashley; Harris, Lyndsay; Sweasy, Joann B.

    2010-01-01

    Personalized cancer therapy is likely to be one of the next big advances in our search for a cure for cancer. To be able to treat people in an individualized manner, researchers need to know a great deal about their genetic constitution and the DNA repair status of their tumors. Specific knowledge is required regarding the polymorphisms individuals carry and how these polymorphisms influence responses to therapy. Researchers are actively engaged in biomarker discovery and validation for this purpose. In addition, the design of clinical trials must be reassessed to include new information on biomarkers and drug responses. In this review, we focus on personalized breast cancer therapy. The hypothesis we focus upon in this review is that there is connection between the DNA repair profile of individuals, their breast tumor subtypes, and their responses to cancer therapy. We first briefly review cellular DNA repair pathways that are likely to be impacted by breast cancer therapies. Next, we review the phenotypes of breast tumor subtypes with an emphasis on how a DNA repair deficiency might result in tumorigenesis itself and lead to the chemotherapeutic responses that are observed. Specific examples of breast tumor subtypes and their responses to cancer therapy are given, and we discuss possible DNA repair mechanisms that underlie the responses of tumors to various chemotherapeutic agents. Much is known about breast cancer subtypes and the way each of these subtypes responds to chemotherapy. In addition, we discuss novel design of clinical trials that incorporates rapidly emerging information on biomarkers. PMID:20872853

  6. Breast Cancer Research at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Dr. Robert Richmond extracts breast cell tissue from one of two liquid nitrogen dewars. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunourous tissues.

  7. Breast Cancer Research at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Breast tissue specimens in traditional sample dishes. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunourous tissues.

  8. Male breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Jepson, A S; Fentiman, I S

    1998-01-01

    Male breast cancer is a rare disease, often with a late presentation and poor prognosis. The mainstay of treatment is modified radical mastectomy, with axillary node dissection to assess stage, prognosis and the need for adjuvant treatment. When matched for age, tumour size, grade and axillary nodal status, the prognosis is similar for males and females. Concerted efforts must be made to educate both the public and health professionals, in order to make earlier diagnoses and thereby improve prognosis. PMID:10622057

  9. Eribulin mesylate in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Verdaguer, Helena; Morilla, Idoia; Urruticoechea, Ander

    2013-11-01

    Eribulin mesylate is a synthetic analog of halichondrin B (a polyether macrolide isolated from a marine sponge). It is a nontaxane microtubule dynamics inhibitor with a novel mechanism of action. It is the first drug that has demonstrated an improvement in overall survival as a single agent compared with the physician's choice of currently available treatments in locally advanced or metastatic breast cancer, previously treated with anthracyclines and taxanes. It has shown a good manageable tolerability profile. This drug has been approved by the US FDA and by the EMA for patients with locally advanced or metastatic breast cancer who have received at least two chemotherapeutic regimens for advanced/metastatic disease. Prior therapy should have included an anthracycline and a taxane in either the adjuvant or metastatic setting unless patients were not suitable for these treatments. The aim of this article is to describe the mechanism of action, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics and the most relevant clinical trials in the development of this drug. PMID:24161305

  10. Breast Cancer Research at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    High magnification view of human primary breast tumor cells after 56 days of culture in a NASA Bioreactor. The arrow points to bead surface indicating breast cancer cells (as noted by the staining of tumor cell intermediate filaments). NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cell (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunorous tissue. Credit: Dr. Jearne Becker, University of South Florida

  11. Radiation therapy for breast cancer: Literature review.

    PubMed

    Balaji, Karunakaran; Subramanian, Balaji; Yadav, Poonam; Anu Radha, Chandrasekaran; Ramasubramanian, Velayudham

    2016-01-01

    Concave shape with variable size target volume makes treatment planning for the breast/chest wall a challenge. Conventional techniques used for the breast/chest wall cancer treatment provided better sparing of organs at risk (OARs), with poor conformity and uniformity to the target volume. Advanced technologies such as intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) improve the target coverage at the cost of higher low dose volumes to OARs. Novel hybrid techniques present promising results in breast/chest wall irradiation in terms of target coverage as well as OARs sparing. Several published data compared these technologies for the benefit of the breast/chest wall with or without nodal volumes. The aim of this article is to review relevant data and identify the scope for further research in developing optimal treatment plan for breast/chest wall cancer treatment. PMID:27545009

  12. Breast cancer risk factors

    PubMed Central

    Ciszewski, Tomasz; Łopacka-Szatan, Karolina; Miotła, Paweł; Starosławska, Elżbieta

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most frequently diagnosed neoplastic disease in women around menopause often leading to a significant reduction of these women's ability to function normally in everyday life. The increased breast cancer incidence observed in epidemiological studies in a group of women actively participating in social and professional life implicates the necessity of conducting multidirectional studies in order to identify risk factors associated with the occurrence of this type of neoplasm. Taking the possibility of influencing the neoplastic transformation process in individuals as a criterion, all the risk factors initiating the process can be divided into two groups. The first group would include inherent factors such as age, sex, race, genetic makeup promoting familial occurrence of the neoplastic disease or the occurrence of benign proliferative lesions of the mammary gland. They all constitute independent parameters and do not undergo simple modification in the course of an individual's life. The second group would include extrinsic factors conditioned by lifestyle, diet or long-term medical intervention such as using oral hormonal contraceptives or hormonal replacement therapy and their influence on the neoplastic process may be modified to a certain degree. Identification of modifiable factors may contribute to development of prevention strategies decreasing breast cancer incidence. PMID:26528110

  13. Nanoparticle albumin-bound paclitaxel in a patient with locally advanced breast cancer and taxane-induced skin toxicity: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Taxanes have demonstrated effectiveness in the treatment of breast cancer, the most common type of cancer in women. The toxicity profile of taxanes (including skin toxicities) induces dose adjustment, delay, or discontinuation, which prevents a sufficient dose intensity to achieve a response. Nanoparticle albumin-bound paclitaxel, a solvent-free form of paclitaxel, prevents toxicities and reduces the pharmacokinetic interferences between paclitaxel and other drugs. Case presentation We describe the case of a 55-year-old Caucasian woman with locally advanced breast cancer treated with neoadjuvant therapy who developed secondary skin toxicity due to delayed hypersensitivity to taxanes. She received Adriamycin® (doxorubicin), cyclophosphamide and docetaxel and developed toxicity that promoted treatment delay and a switch to weekly paclitaxel. After the third and fourth weeks of treatment, paclitaxel toxicities also induced treatment delay and paclitaxel was switched to nanoparticle albumin-bound paclitaxel. She completed the five planned nanoparticle albumin-bound paclitaxel cycles with acceptable tolerability (including persistent grade 2 neuropathy) and without dose delay or adjustments. Clinical response was achieved although pathological response was not good. Conclusions Nanoparticle albumin-bound paclitaxel treatment is a good option for patients with breast cancer with taxanes-related skin toxicity. This drug allows the treatment to be completed with acceptable tolerance in our case. PMID:24386978

  14. Creating chemotherapeutic-resistant breast cancer cell lines: advances and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Steding, Catherine E

    2016-06-01

    The development of resistance remains the most significant impediment to generating effective treatments for cancer. In the modern age of personalized medicine, it is of critical importance to understand the principles of both innate and acquired resistance to achieve the most effective therapeutic outcomes. Significant differences exist between cancer cells that exhibit innate resistance verses those that acquire resistance over time. Studying the acquisition of resistance is essential to obtaining a complete understanding of how treatments contribute to disease recurrence and progression. This review will evaluate the current understanding of chemotherapeutic resistance and its role in personalized medicine. This review will also explore how generating resistant cells in culture is essential to the development of improved cancer therapeutics. PMID:27063568

  15. Endothelial CXCR7 Regulates Breast Cancer Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Stacer, Amanda C.; Fenner, Joseph; Cavnar, Stephen P.; Xiao, Annie; Zhao, Shuang; Chang, S. Laura; Salomonnson, Anna; Luker, Kathryn E.; Luker, Gary D.

    2015-01-01

    Atypical chemokine receptor CXCR7 (ACKR3) functions as a scavenger receptor for chemokine CXCL12, a molecule that promotes multiple steps in tumor growth and metastasis in breast cancer and multiple other malignancies. While normal vascular endothelium expresses low levels of CXCR7, marked upregulation of CXCR7 occurs in tumor vasculature in breast cancer and other tumors. To investigate effects of endothelial CXCR7 in breast cancer, we conditionally deleted this receptor from vascular endothelium of adult mice, generating CXCR7ΔEND/ΔEND animals. CXCR7ΔEND/ΔEND mice appeared phenotypically normal, although these animals exhibited a modest 35 ± 3% increase in plasma CXCL12 as compared with control. Using two different syngeneic, orthotopic tumor implant models of breast cancer, we discovered that CXCR7ΔEND/ΔEND mice had significantly greater local recurrence of cancer following resection, elevated numbers of circulating tumor cells, and more spontaneous metastases. CXCR7ΔEND/ΔEND mice also showed greater experimental metastases following intracardiac injection of cancer cells. These results establish that endothelial CXCR7 limits breast cancer metastasis at multiple steps in the metastatic cascade, advancing understanding of CXCL12 pathways in tumor environments and informing ongoing drug development targeting CXCR7 in cancer. PMID:26119946

  16. Tomosynthesis for breast cancer screening.

    PubMed

    Cole, Elodia B; Pisano, Etta D

    2016-01-01

    Breast tomosynthesis, a three-dimensional x-ray based breast imaging technology, has been available for clinical use in the United States since 2011. In this paper we review the literature on breast cancer screening with this new technology including where gaps in knowledge remain. PMID:26472036

  17. National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project Study of Tamoxifen and Raloxifene trial: Advancing the science of recruitment and breast cancer risk assessment in minority communities

    PubMed Central

    McCaskill-Stevens, Worta; Wilson, John W; Cook, Elise D; Edwards, Cora L; Gibson, Regina V; McElwain, Diane L; Figueroa-Moseley, Colmar D; Paskett, Electra D; Roberson, Noma L; Wickerham, D Lawrence; Wolmark, Norman

    2014-01-01

    Background One of the first chemoprevention trials conducted in the western hemisphere, the National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project’s (NSABP) Breast Cancer Prevention Trial (BCPT), demonstrated the need to evaluate all aspects of recruitment in real time and to implement strategies to enroll racial and ethnic minority women. Purpose The purpose of this report is to review various patient recruitment efforts the NSABP developed to enhance the participation of racial and ethnic minority women in the Study of Tamoxifen and Raloxifene (STAR) trial and to describe the role that the recruitment process played in the implementation and understanding of breast cancer risk assessment in minority communities. Methods The NSABP STAR trial was a randomized, double-blinded study comparing the use of tamoxifen 20 mg/day to raloxifene 60 mg/day, for a 5-year period, to reduce the risk of developing invasive breast cancer. Eligible postmenopausal women were required to have a 5-year predicted breast cancer risk of 1.66% based on the modified Gail Model. For the current report, eligibility and enrollment data were tabulated by race/ethnicity for women who submitted STAR risk assessment forms (RAFs). Results A total of 184,460 RAFs were received, 145,550 (78.9%) from white women and 38,910 (21.1%) from minority women. Of the latter group, 21,444 (11.6%) were from African Americans/blacks, 7913 (4.5%) from Hispanics/Latinas, and 9553 (5.2%) from other racial or ethnic groups. The percentages of risk-eligible women among African Americans, Hispanics/Latinas, others, and whites were 14.2%, 23.3%, 13.7%, and 57.4%, respectively. Programs targeting minority enrollment submitted large numbers of RAFs, but the eligibility rates of the women referred from those groups tended to be lower than the rates among women referred outside of those programs. The average number of completed risk assessments increased among minority women over the course of the recruitment period compared

  18. The timing of breast and axillary surgery after neoadjuvant chemotherapy for breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Al-Hilli, Zahraa; Boughey, Judy C

    2016-06-01

    Neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) has traditionally been used in locally advanced and inflammatory breast cancer, allowing for a reduction in disease volume and therefore optimizing surgical resection of disease in the breast. NAC impacts both the tumor in the breast and the lymph nodes and may allow for the option of breast-conserving surgery and avoiding an axillary dissection. The aim of this review is to discuss the considerations and timing of surgical treatment of the breast and the axilla following NAC in patients with breast cancer. PMID:27164853

  19. Sequential alternate administration of tamoxifen and medroxyprogesterone acetate in advanced breast cancer: clinical-biological randomized study.

    PubMed

    De Lena, M; Tommasi, S; Schittulli, F; Lorusso, V; Paradiso, A

    1990-04-30

    From January 1985 to September 1988, 60 women with advanced breast cancer were randomized in two arms to receive: A) tamoxifen (TAM) (20 mg/die) until progression or B) TAM (20 mg/die for 14 days) then medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA) (1500 mg/die p.o. for 14 days) followed by 7 days of wash-out before repeating the TAM/MPA treatment. All patients were post-menopausal, previously untreated with hormone therapy, and with tumor receptor status determined immediately before randomization; all had objectively evaluable lesions. In order to verify hormone receptor variations due to the antiestrogen, when possible a second biopsy was performed after the initial 14 day cycle of TAM. Thirty-one and 29 patients were included respectively in arms A and B. Objective regression (CR + PR) was observed in 58% of group A and 75% of group B, with CR in 11% and 23%, respectively. Differences were not statistically significant. Median time to progression was 12 months for group A and 9 for group B. Overall survival has not yet been reached in group A while it was 34 months for patients of group B. Metrorrhagia was observed in two cases of group A and in 6 of group B, and thrombophlebitis in 1 and 3 cases, respectively. The second biopsy confirmed a clear increase of PgR content in 8/11 cases (75%). Plasma level variations of TAM, N-desmethyl TAM and MPA were checked at various intervals on 3 patients of group B, and confirmed that our schedule is able to produce a drug wash-out period for tumor cells. In conclusion, our study demonstrated that while the manipulation of hormone receptors seems possible, results indicating better overall survival and time to progression were not obtained with alternate sequential TAM-MPA therapy. PMID:2139523

  20. Phase III randomized trial of sunitinib versus capecitabine in patients with previously treated HER2-negative advanced breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Mei-Ching; Lee, Soo Chin; Vanlemmens, Laurence; Ferrero, Jean-Marc; Tabei, Toshio; Pivot, Xavier; Iwata, Hiroji; Aogi, Kenjiro; Lugo-Quintana, Roberto; Harbeck, Nadia; Brickman, Marla J.; Zhang, Ke; Kern, Kenneth A.; Martin, Miguel

    2010-01-01

    This multicenter, randomized, open-label phase III trial (planned enrollment: 700 patients) was conducted to test the hypothesis that single-agent sunitinib improves progression-free survival (PFS) compared with capecitabine as treatment for advanced breast cancer (ABC). Patients with HER2-negative ABC that recurred after anthracycline and taxane therapy were randomized (1:1) to sunitinib 37.5 mg/day or capecitabine 1,250 mg/m2 (1,000 mg/m2 in patients >65 years) BID on days 1–14 q3w. The independent data-monitoring committee (DMC) determined during the first interim analysis (238 patients randomized to sunitinib, 244 to capecitabine) that the trial be terminated due to futility in reaching the primary endpoint. No statistical evidence supported the hypothesis that sunitinib improved PFS compared with capecitabine (one-sided P = 0.999). The data indicated that PFS was shorter with sunitinib than capecitabine (median 2.8 vs. 4.2 months, respectively; HR, 1.47; 95% CI, 1.16–1.87; two-sided P = 0.002). Median overall survival (15.3 vs. 24.6 months; HR, 1.17; two-sided P = 0.350) and objective response rates (11 vs. 16%; odds ratio, 0.65; P = 0.109) were numerically inferior with sunitinib versus capecitabine. While no new or unexpected safety findings were reported, sunitinib treatment was associated with higher frequencies and greater severities of many common adverse events (AEs) compared with capecitabine, resulting in more temporary discontinuations due to AEs with sunitinib (66 vs. 51%). The relative dose intensity was lower with sunitinib than capecitabine (73 vs. 95%). Based on these efficacy and safety results, sunitinib should not be used as monotherapy for patients with ABC. PMID:20339913

  1. Multiparametric monitoring of chemotherapy treatment response in locally advanced breast cancer using quantitative ultrasound and diffuse optical spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Tran, William T.; Childs, Charmaine; Chin, Lee; Slodkowska, Elzbieta; Sannachi, Lakshmanan; Tadayyon, Hadi; Watkins, Elyse; Wong, Sharon Lemon; Curpen, Belinda; Kaffas, Ahmed El; Al-Mahrouki, Azza; Sadeghi-Naini, Ali; Czarnota, Gregory J.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study evaluated pathological response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy using quantitative ultrasound (QUS) and diffuse optical spectroscopy imaging (DOSI) biomarkers in locally advanced breast cancer (LABC). Materials and Methods The institution's ethics review board approved this study. Subjects (n = 22) gave written informed consent prior to participating. US and DOSI data were acquired, relative to the start of neoadjuvant chemotherapy, at weeks 0, 1, 4, 8 and preoperatively. QUS parameters including the mid-band fit (MBF), 0-MHz intercept (SI), and the spectral slope (SS) were determined from tumor ultrasound data using spectral analysis. In the same patients, DOSI was used to measure parameters relating to tumor hemoglobin and composition. Discriminant analysis and receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was used to classify clinical and pathological response during treatment and to estimate the area under the curve (AUC). Additionally, multivariate analysis was carried out for pairwise QUS/DOSI parameter combinations using a logistic regression model. Results Individual QUS and DOSI parameters, including the (SI), oxy-hemoglobin (HbO2), and total hemoglobin (HbT) were significant markers for response after one week of treatment (p < 0.01). Multivariate (pairwise) combinations increased the sensitivity, specificity and AUC at this time; the SI + HbO2 showed a sensitivity/specificity of 100%, and an AUC of 1.0. Conclusions QUS and DOSI demonstrated potential as coincident markers for treatment response and may potentially facilitate response-guided therapies. Multivariate QUS and DOSI parameters increased the sensitivity and specificity of classifying LABC patients as early as one week after treatment. PMID:26942698

  2. Angiogenic response of locally advanced breast cancer to neoadjuvant chemotherapy evaluated with parametric histogram from dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Yeun-Chung; Huang, Chiun-Sheng; Liu, Yi-Jui; Chen, Jyh-Horng; Lu, Yen-Shen; Tseng, Wen-Yih I.

    2004-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate angiogenic compositions and tumour response in the course of neoadjuvant chemotherapy in patients with locally advanced breast cancer (LABC) using dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI. Thirteen patients with LABC underwent serial DCE MRI during the course of chemotherapy. DCE MRI was quantified using a two-compartment model on a pixel-by-pixel basis. Analysis of parametric histograms of amplitude, exchange rate kout and peak enhancement over the whole tumour was performed. The distribution patterns of histograms were correlated with the tumour response. Initial kurtosis and standard deviation of amplitude before chemotherapy correlated with tumour response, r = 0.63 and r = 0.61, respectively. Comparing the initial values with the values after the first course of chemotherapy, tumour response was associated with a decrease in standard deviation of amplitude (r = 0.79), and an increase in kurtosis and a decrease in standard deviation of kout (r = 0.57 and 0.57, respectively). Comparing the initial values with the values after completing the chemotherapy, tumours with better response were associated with an increase in kurtosis (r = 0.62), a decrease in mean (r = 0.84) and standard deviation (r = 0.77) of amplitude, and a decrease in mean of peak enhancement (r = 0.71). Our results suggested that tumours with better response tended to alter their internal compositions from heterogeneous to homogeneous distributions and a decrease in peak enhancement after chemotherapy. Serial analyses of parametric histograms of DCE MRI-derived angiogenic parameters are potentially useful to monitor the response of angiogenic compositions of a tumour throughout the course of chemotherapy, and might predict tumour response early in the course.

  3. Advances in breast reconstruction after mastectomy.

    PubMed

    Edlich, Richard F; Winters, Kathryne L; Faulkner, Brent C; Bill, Timothy J; Lin, Kant Y

    2005-01-01

    Over the past 40 years, surgical reconstruction of the breast following mastectomy has become an important aspect of the cancer patient's rehabilitation process. While the surgical emphasis remains on a cure for the cancer, experience with breast reconstruction has not demonstrated any increased rate of cancer recurrence, even when reconstruction is performed immediately following tumor resection. Advances in surgical technique and biotechnology have made post-mastectomy reconstruction possible. The development of silicone gel and saline-filled implants as well as tissue expanders has revolutionized breast reconstruction. The elucidation of musculocutaneous flaps now provides the surgeon with the ability to transfer adequate quantities of vascularized tissue to reconstruct the surgical defects. The advent of microsurgical techniques has provided an additional reconstructive option, with free tissue transfer allowing the plastic surgeon to move musculocutaneous flaps from remote or distant sites to reconstruct the defect. The option of having the reconstruction immediately following the mastectomy procedure is now available to the patient. When reviewing the anatomy of the breast region, the surgeon must consider the mammary gland, its vascular supply, and its lymphatic system. The surgical techniques involved in reconstruction after mastectomy include the use of breast implants and tissue expansion, as well as reconstruction with autogenous tissues. Reconstruction with autogenous tissues includes the use of latissimus dorsi musculocutaneous flap, transverse rectus abdominus musculocutaneous flap, free flap transfer, as well as nipple-areola reconstruction. Breast reconstruction after mastectomy should be undertaken by a plastic and reconstructive surgeon with considerable training and experience with these diversified procedures. PMID:15777171

  4. Drugs Approved for Breast Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for breast cancer. The list includes generic names, brand names, and common drug combinations, which are shown in capital letters.

  5. [A comparative study between low-dose and high-dose medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA) in the treatment of advanced and recurrent breast cancer--in relation to dose, serum concentration and response. Osaka Breast Cancer Research Group].

    PubMed

    Furukawa, J; Yayoi, E; Takatsuka, Y; Aikawa, T; Maeura, Y; Kobayashi, T; Miyauchi, K; Kotsuma, Y

    1997-05-01

    A prospective randomized study was carried out to evaluate the effectiveness of MPA in the treatment of breast cancer by comparing low dose (600 mg/day) with high dose (1,200 mg/day) of MPA. In 35 evaluable cases, the response rate to treatment was 40.0% (8/20) with low dose MPA and 26.7% (4/15) with high dose MPA. There was no significant difference between the two groups. The serum MPA concentration measured by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) assay was 23.2 +/- 17.6 ng/ml in the low-dose group and 89.5 +/- 56.7 ng/ml in the high-dose group. Intrapatient variability in serum MPA concentration was relatively stable, but interpatient variability was large. No correlation was found between the response rate and serum MPA concentration. The above results indicate that a low dose of MPA (600 mg/day) is a useful treatment with high effectiveness and safety in advanced and recurrent breast cancer patients. Though no exact data on the optimal serum concentration could not be obtained, it was obvious that a successful response cannot be expected from a serum MPA concentration of less than 17 ng/ml, which was the average serum concentration in NC and PD patients of the low-dose group. PMID:9170519

  6. Circadian clocks and breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Blakeman, Victoria; Williams, Jack L; Meng, Qing-Jun; Streuli, Charles H

    2016-01-01

    Circadian clocks respond to environmental time cues to coordinate 24-hour oscillations in almost every tissue of the body. In the breast, circadian clocks regulate the rhythmic expression of numerous genes. Disrupted expression of circadian genes can alter breast biology and may promote cancer. Here we overview circadian mechanisms, and the connection between the molecular clock and breast biology. We describe how disruption of circadian genes contributes to cancer via multiple mechanisms, and link this to increased tumour risk in women who work irregular shift patterns. Understanding the influence of circadian rhythms on breast cancer could lead to more efficacious therapies, reformed public health policy and improved patient outcome. PMID:27590298

  7. Vascular and Cognitive Assessments in Patients With Breast Cancer Undergoing Chemotherapy After Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-07-27

    Cognitive/Functional Effects; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  8. Understanding your breast cancer risk

    MedlinePlus

    ... what you can do to help prevent breast cancer. Risk Factors You Cannot Control Risk factors you cannot control ... risk. Race . White women are diagnosed with breast cancer more often than African American/black, ... Can Control Risk factors you can control ...

  9. Breast and Colon Cancer Family Registries

    Cancer.gov

    The Breast Cancer Family Registry and the Colon Cancer Family Registry were established by the National Cancer Institute as a resource for investigators to use in conducting studies on the genetics and molecular epidemiology of breast and colon cancer.

  10. Emergence of constitutively active estrogen receptor-α mutations in pretreated advanced estrogen receptor positive breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Meric-Bernstam, Funda; Gonzalez-Angulo, Ana Maria; Ferrer-Lozano, Jaime; Perez-Fidalgo, Jose A.; Cristofanilli, Massimo; Gómez, Henry; Arteaga, Carlos L.; Giltnane, Jennifer; Balko, Justin M.; Cronin, Maureen T; Jarosz, Mirna; Sun, James; Hawryluk, Matthew; Lipson, Doron; Otto, Geoff; Ross, Jeffrey S; Dvir, Addie; Soussan-Gutman, Lior; Wolf, Ido; Rubinek, Tamar; Gilmore, Lauren; Schnitt, Stuart; Come, Steven E.; Pusztai, Lajos; Stephens, Philip; Brown, Myles; Miller, Vincent A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose We undertook this study to determine the prevalence of estrogen receptor (ER) α (ESR1) mutations throughout the natural history of hormone dependent breast cancer and to delineate the functional roles of the most commonly detected alterations. Experimental Design We studied a total of 249 tumor specimens from 208 patients. The specimens include 134 ER positive (ER+/HER2–) and, as controls, 115 ER negative (ER−) tumors. The ER+ samples consist of 58 primary breast cancers and 76 metastatic samples. All tumors were sequenced to high unique coverage using next generation sequencing targeting the coding sequence of the estrogen receptor and an additional 182 cancer-related genes. Results Recurring somatic mutations in codons 537 and 538 within the ligand-binding domain of ER were detected in ER+ metastatic disease. Overall, the frequency of these mutations was 12% (9/76, 95% CI 6%-21%) in metastatic tumors and in a subgroup of patients who received an average of 7 lines of treatment the frequency was 20% (5/25, 95% CI 7%-41%). These mutations were not detected in primary or treatment naïve ER+ cancer or in any stage of ER− disease. Functional studies in cell line models demonstrate that these mutations render estrogen receptor constitutive activity and confer partial resistance to currently available endocrine treatments. Conclusions In this study we show evidence for the temporal selection of functional ESR1 mutations as potential drivers of endocrine resistance during the progression of ER positive breast cancer. PMID:24398047

  11. Neoadjuvant dose-dense chemotherapy for locally advanced breast cancer: a meta-analysis of published studies.

    PubMed

    Petrelli, Fausto; Coinu, Andrea; Lonati, Veronica; Cabiddu, Mary; Ghilardi, Mara; Borgonovo, Karen; Barni, Sandro

    2016-08-01

    Large operable or locally advanced breast cancers (BCs) are usually treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy (CT) before surgery. However, there is no evidence to support an improvement in efficacy with dose-dense (DD) CT in this setting. We, therefore, carried out a meta-analysis to investigate whether DD-CT was more effective than the reference (every 3 weeks anthracyclines±taxanes) standard-dose CT as neoadjuvant treatment for BC. We searched Pubmed, SCOPUS, EMBASE, the Web of Science, CINAHL, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials for randomized trials comparing conventional versus DD neoadjuvant CT for BC. Odds ratios (ORs) for pathologic complete responses (ypT0N0M0: pCR) and hazard ratios (HRs) of death and recurrence [overall survival (OS), and disease-free survival (DFS)] were estimated and pooled. A QUADAS-2 report for all studies included in the final analysis was tabulated for the risk of bias and applicability. A total of six randomized trials fulfilled the inclusion criteria. The pooled rates of the pCR were 13.5 and 9.2% in the experimental and control arms. A significant increase in the pCR [OR=1.55, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.18-2.02, P=0.001] was noted with neoadjuvant DD-CT. However, the patients who received DD-CT did not have significantly better DFS and OS rates (DFS: HR=0.88, 95% CI 0.76-1.01, P=0.06; OS: HR=0.89, 95% CI 0.78-1.02, P=0.08). Even with the limitation of a relatively short follow-up period, this meta-analysis shows that DD neoadjuvant CT, despite not leading to a significant increase in survival, increases by 46.7% the possibility of achieving a pCR in operable and locally advanced BC. This treatment should thus be considered one of the backbone treatments of choice when neoadjuvant therapy is planned. PMID:27058707

  12. Green Tea and Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Anna H; Butler, Lesley M

    2014-01-01

    The identification of modifiable lifestyle factors that could reduce the risk of breast cancer is a research priority. Despite the enormous chemo preventive potential of green tea and compelling evidence from animal studies, its role in breast cancer development in humans is still unclear. Part of the uncertainty is related to the relatively small number of epidemiological studies on green tea and breast cancer and that the overall results from case-control studies and prospective cohort studies are discordant. In addition, the mechanisms by which green tea intake may influence risk of breast cancer in humans remains not well studied. We review the human studies that have evaluated the relationship between green tea intake and four biomarkers (sex steroid hormones, mammographic density, insulin-like growth factor, adiponectin) that are believed to be important in breast cancer development. Results from these biomarker studies are also inconclusive. Limitations of human studies and areas of further investigations are discussed. PMID:21538855

  13. Combined treatment with everolimus and fulvestrant reversed anti-HER2 resistance in a patient with refractory advanced breast cancer: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Bing; Ding, Lijuan; Wu, Shikai; Meng, Xiangying; Song, Santai

    2016-01-01

    Background Everolimus, an inhibitor of the mammalian target of rapamycin, shows promising antitumor activity when combined with trastuzumab and chemotherapy for human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER2)-positive breast cancer or when combined with endocrine agents for hormone receptor (HR)-positive tumors. However, data are limited regarding the effect of everolimus in combination with endocrine drugs in HER2-positive advanced breast cancer regardless of the HR status. Case presentation A 44-year-old female was diagnosed with recurrent HER2-positive breast cancer. The primary tumor was HR positive; however, the metastatic tumor was HR negative. The patient was resistant to classical chemotherapeutic agents and anti-HER2 treatment. Thus, the combination of everolimus and fulvestrant, a selective estrogen receptor downregulator, was chosen to reverse the resistance to anti-HER2 therapy. Indeed, the patient experienced long-term disease stabilization. Adverse events associated with the treatment were manageable by dose adjustments. We performed genetic testing of the metastatic tumor, which harbored a PIK3CA gene mutation but was positive for phosphatase and tensin homologue expression, which might result in resistance to the mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitor. Conclusion This case study indicates that combined treatment with everolimus and fulvestrant might be a viable option for the treatment of metastatic breast cancer patients who are HER2 positive and carry a PIK3CA gene mutation but are resistant to anti-HER2 therapy and classical chemotherapeutic agents. Further prospective randomized trials are needed to confirm this finding. PMID:27445490

  14. Advances in Optical Spectroscopy and Imaging of Breast Lesions

    SciTech Connect

    Demos, S; Vogel, A J; Gandjbakhche, A H

    2006-01-03

    A review is presented of recent advances in optical imaging and spectroscopy and the use of light for addressing breast cancer issues. Spectroscopic techniques offer the means to characterize tissue components and obtain functional information in real time. Three-dimensional optical imaging of the breast using various illumination and signal collection schemes in combination with image reconstruction algorithms may provide a new tool for cancer detection and monitoring of treatment.

  15. Prospective assessment of the prognostic value of circulating tumor cells and their clusters in patients with advanced-stage breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Mu, Zhaomei; Wang, Chun; Ye, Zhong; Austin, Laura; Civan, Jesse; Hyslop, Terry; Palazzo, Juan P; Jaslow, Rebecca; Li, Bingshan; Myers, Ronald E; Jiang, Juntao; Xing, Jinliang; Yang, Hushan; Cristofanilli, Massimo

    2015-12-01

    The enumeration of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) provides important prognostic values in patients with metastatic breast cancer. Recent studies indicate that individual CTCs form clusters and these CTC-clusters play an important role in tumor metastasis. We aimed to assess whether quantification of CTC-clusters provides additional prognostic value over quantification of individual CTCs alone. In 115 prospectively enrolled advanced-stage (III and IV) breast cancer patients, CTCs and CTC-clusters were counted in 7.5 ml whole blood using the CellSearch system at baseline before first-line therapy. The individual and joint effects of CTC and CTC cluster counts on patients' progression-free survival (PFS) were analyzed using Cox proportional hazards modeling. Of the 115 patients, 36 (31.3 %) had elevated baseline CTCs (≥5 CTCs/7.5 ml) and 20 (17.4 %) had CTC-clusters (≥2 CTCs/7.5 ml). Patients with elevated CTCs and CTC-clusters both had worse PFS with a hazard ratio (HR) of 2.76 [95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.57-4.86, P log-rank = 0.0005] and 2.83 (1.48-5.39, P log-rank = 0.001), respectively. In joint analysis, compared with patients with <5 CTCs and without CTC-clusters, patients with elevated CTCs but without clusters, and patients with elevated CTCs and with clusters, had an increasing trend of progression risk, with an HR of 2.21 (1.02-4.78) and 3.32 (1.68-6.55), respectively (P log-rank = 0.0006, P trend = 0.0002). The additional prognostic value of CTC-clusters appeared to be more pronounced in patients with inflammatory breast cancer (IBC), the most aggressive form of breast cancer with the poorest survival. Baseline counts of both individual CTCs and CTC-clusters were associated with PFS in advanced-stage breast cancer patients. CTC-clusters might provide additional prognostic value compared with CTC enumeration alone, in patients with elevated CTCs. PMID:26573830

  16. Fulvestrant and/or Anastrozole in Treating Postmenopausal Patients With Stage II-III Breast Cancer Undergoing Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-15

    Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Invasive Lobular Breast Carcinoma; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  17. Genetic susceptibility to breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Bradbury, Angela R; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I

    2007-09-01

    Deleterious mutations in two breast and ovarian cancer susceptibility genes, BRCA1 and BRCA2 have been identified in breast and ovarian cancer families. Women with a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation are candidates for additional risk reduction measures such as intensive screening, prophylactic surgery or chemoprevention. Additional susceptibility genes have been identified, including PTEN, ATM, TP53, CHEK2, CASP8, PBRL and BRIP1. Yet, many women with a personal or family history suggestive of a hereditary susceptibility to breast cancer undergo genetic testing and no significant genetic alteration is found. Thus, there are other susceptibility genes that have not been identified, and it is likely that the remaining familial contribution to breast cancer will be explained by the presence of multiple low penetrance alleles that coexist to confer high penetrance risks (a polygenic model). The American Cancer Society has identified cancer prevention as a key component of cancer management and there is interest in developing individualized cancer prevention focused on identifying high risk individuals who are most likely to benefit from more aggressive risk reduction measures. Breast cancer risk assessment and genetic counseling are currently provided by genetic counselors, oncology nurse specialist, geneticists, medical and surgical oncologists, gynecologists and other health care professionals, often working within a multidisciplinary clinical setting. Current methods for risk assessment and predictive genetic testing have limitations and improvements in molecular testing and risk assessment tools is necessary to maximize individual breast cancer risk assessment and to fulfill the promise of cancer prevention. PMID:17508290

  18. Curing Metastatic Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Sledge, George W

    2016-01-01

    Metastatic breast cancer is generally considered incurable, and this colors doctor-patient interactions for patients with metastatic disease. Although true for most patients, there appear to be important exceptions, instances where long-term disease-free survival occurs. Although these instances are few in number, they suggest the possibility of cure. How will we move toward cure for a much larger population of patients with metastatic disease? This article outlines a potential research agenda that might move us toward that distant goal. PMID:26759458

  19. Safety and Efficacy of Trastuzumab Emtansine in Advanced Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2-Positive Breast Cancer: a Meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Shen, Kai; Ma, Xuelei; Zhu, Chenjing; Wu, Xin; Jia, Hongyuan

    2016-01-01

    Advanced or metastatic breast cancer is an incurable disease with high mortality rate worldwide and about 20% of breast cancers overexpress and amplify the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2). Achievements in targeted therapy have benefited people during the past decades. Trastuzumab emtansine (T-DM1), a novel antibody-drug conjugate playing a powerful role in anti-tumor activity, not only blocks the HER2 signaling pathways, but also disturbs the microtubule dynamics. To access the efficacy and safety of T-DM1, we analyzed 9 clinical trials on T-DM1. Results showed that fatigue (0.604, 95% CI 0.551, 0.654), nausea (0.450, 95% CI 0.365, 0.537), increased transaminases (0.425, 95% CI 0.353, 0.500) and thrombocytopenia (0.383, 95% CI 0.322, 0.448) occurred more frequently in participants with single T-DM1. In controlled trials, increased transaminases (OR = 4.040, 95% CI 1.429, 11.427), thrombocytopenia (OR = 8.500, 95% CI 3.964, 18.226) and fatigue (OR = 1.288, 95% CI 1.041, 1.593) were statistically significant. Only thrombocytopenia appeared as severe adverse event (grade ≥ 3) in single-arm and control-arm studies. Meanwhile, T-DM1 stabilized cancer and prolonged life with notable improved progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS). In conclusion, it is a safe and effective agent in advanced or metastatic breast cancer, but should be carefully applied on patients with severe hepatic and neurological disease. PMID:26979925

  20. Safety and Efficacy of Trastuzumab Emtansine in Advanced Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2–Positive Breast Cancer: a Meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Kai; Ma, Xuelei; Zhu, Chenjing; Wu, Xin; Jia, Hongyuan

    2016-01-01

    Advanced or metastatic breast cancer is an incurable disease with high mortality rate worldwide and about 20% of breast cancers overexpress and amplify the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2). Achievements in targeted therapy have benefited people during the past decades. Trastuzumab emtansine (T-DM1), a novel antibody-drug conjugate playing a powerful role in anti-tumor activity, not only blocks the HER2 signaling pathways, but also disturbs the microtubule dynamics. To access the efficacy and safety of T-DM1, we analyzed 9 clinical trials on T-DM1. Results showed that fatigue (0.604, 95% CI 0.551, 0.654), nausea (0.450, 95% CI 0.365, 0.537), increased transaminases (0.425, 95% CI 0.353, 0.500) and thrombocytopenia (0.383, 95% CI 0.322, 0.448) occurred more frequently in participants with single T-DM1. In controlled trials, increased transaminases (OR = 4.040, 95% CI 1.429, 11.427), thrombocytopenia (OR = 8.500, 95% CI 3.964, 18.226) and fatigue (OR = 1.288, 95% CI 1.041, 1.593) were statistically significant. Only thrombocytopenia appeared as severe adverse event (grade ≥ 3) in single-arm and control-arm studies. Meanwhile, T-DM1 stabilized cancer and prolonged life with notable improved progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS). In conclusion, it is a safe and effective agent in advanced or metastatic breast cancer, but should be carefully applied on patients with severe hepatic and neurological disease. PMID:26979925

  1. The AURORA initiative for metastatic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Zardavas, D; Maetens, M; Irrthum, A; Goulioti, T; Engelen, K; Fumagalli, D; Salgado, R; Aftimos, P; Saini, K S; Sotiriou, C; Campbell, P; Dinh, P; von Minckwitz, G; Gelber, R D; Dowsett, M; Di Leo, A; Cameron, D; Baselga, J; Gnant, M; Goldhirsch, A; Norton, L; Piccart, M

    2014-11-11

    Metastatic breast cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer-related mortality among women in the Western world. To date most research efforts have focused on the molecular analysis of the primary tumour to dissect the genotypes of the disease. However, accumulating evidence supports a molecular evolution of breast cancer during its life cycle, with metastatic lesions acquiring new molecular aberrations. Recognising this critical gap of knowledge, the Breast International Group is launching AURORA, a large, multinational, collaborative metastatic breast cancer molecular screening programme. Approximately 1300 patients with metastatic breast cancer who have received no more than one line of systemic treatment for advanced disease will, after giving informed consent, donate archived primary tumour tissue, as well as will donate tissue collected prospectively from the biopsy of metastatic lesions and blood. Both tumour tissue types, together with a blood sample, will then be subjected to next generation sequencing for a panel of cancer-related genes. The patients will be treated at the discretion of their treating physicians per standard local practice, and they will be followed for clinical outcome for 10 years. Alternatively, depending on the molecular profiles found, patients will be directed to innovative clinical trials assessing molecularly targeted agents. Samples of outlier patients considered as 'exceptional responders' or as 'rapid progressors' based on the clinical follow-up will be subjected to deeper molecular characterisation in order to identify new prognostic and predictive biomarkers. AURORA, through its innovative design, will shed light onto some of the unknown areas of metastatic breast cancer, helping to improve the clinical outcome of breast cancer patients. PMID:25225904

  2. The AURORA initiative for metastatic breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zardavas, D; Maetens, M; Irrthum, A; Goulioti, T; Engelen, K; Fumagalli, D; Salgado, R; Aftimos, P; Saini, K S; Sotiriou, C; Campbell, P; Dinh, P; von Minckwitz, G; Gelber, R D; Dowsett, M; Di Leo, A; Cameron, D; Baselga, J; Gnant, M; Goldhirsch, A; Norton, L; Piccart, M

    2014-01-01

    Metastatic breast cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer-related mortality among women in the Western world. To date most research efforts have focused on the molecular analysis of the primary tumour to dissect the genotypes of the disease. However, accumulating evidence supports a molecular evolution of breast cancer during its life cycle, with metastatic lesions acquiring new molecular aberrations. Recognising this critical gap of knowledge, the Breast International Group is launching AURORA, a large, multinational, collaborative metastatic breast cancer molecular screening programme. Approximately 1300 patients with metastatic breast cancer who have received no more than one line of systemic treatment for advanced disease will, after giving informed consent, donate archived primary tumour tissue, as well as will donate tissue collected prospectively from the biopsy of metastatic lesions and blood. Both tumour tissue types, together with a blood sample, will then be subjected to next generation sequencing for a panel of cancer-related genes. The patients will be treated at the discretion of their treating physicians per standard local practice, and they will be followed for clinical outcome for 10 years. Alternatively, depending on the molecular profiles found, patients will be directed to innovative clinical trials assessing molecularly targeted agents. Samples of outlier patients considered as ‘exceptional responders' or as ‘rapid progressors' based on the clinical follow-up will be subjected to deeper molecular characterisation in order to identify new prognostic and predictive biomarkers. AURORA, through its innovative design, will shed light onto some of the unknown areas of metastatic breast cancer, helping to improve the clinical outcome of breast cancer patients. PMID:25225904

  3. Optimal breast cancer pathology manifesto.

    PubMed

    Tot, T; Viale, G; Rutgers, E; Bergsten-Nordström, E; Costa, A

    2015-11-01

    This manifesto was prepared by a European Breast Cancer (EBC) Council working group and launched at the European Breast Cancer Conference in Glasgow on 20 March 2014. It sets out optimal technical and organisational requirements for a breast cancer pathology service, in the light of concerns about variability and lack of patient-centred focus. It is not a guideline about how pathology services should be performed. It is a call for all in the cancer community--pathologists, oncologists, patient advocates, health administrators and policymakers--to check that services are available that serve the needs of patients in a high quality, timely way. PMID:26283037

  4. Treating Male Breast Cancer by Stage

    MedlinePlus

    ... men treated? Surgery for breast cancer in men Radiation therapy for breast cancer in men Chemotherapy for breast cancer in men ... these may be used after surgery and/or radiation therapy. Regional recurrence: When breast cancer comes back in nearby lymph nodes (such as ...

  5. Steroid hormones, steroid receptors, and breast cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Finlay-Schultz, Jessica; Sartorius, Carol A

    2015-06-01

    The ovarian hormones progesterone and estrogen play important roles in breast cancer etiology, proliferation, and treatment. Androgens may also contribute to breast cancer risk and progression. In recent years, significant advances have been made in defining the roles of these steroid hormones in stem cell homeostasis in the breast. Stem cells are potential origins of breast cancer and may dictate tumor phenotype. At least a portion of breast cancers are proposed to be driven by cancer stem cells (CSCs), cells that mimic the self-renewing and repopulating properties of normal stem cells, and can confer drug resistance. Progesterone has been identified as the critical hormone regulating normal murine mammary stem cell (MaSC) populations and normal human breast stem cells. Synthetic progestins increase human breast cancer risk; one theory speculates that this occurs through increased stem cells. Progesterone treatment also increases breast CSCs in established breast cancer cell lines. This is mediated in part through progesterone regulation of transcription factors, signal transduction pathways, and microRNAs. There is also emerging evidence that estrogens and androgens can regulate breast CSC numbers. The evolving concept that a breast CSC phenotype is dynamic and can be influenced by cell signaling and external cues emphasizes that steroid hormones could be crucial players in controlling CSC number and function. Here we review recent studies on steroid hormone regulation of breast CSCs, and discuss mechanisms by which this occurs. PMID:26265122

  6. Results of a conservative treatment combining induction (neoadjuvant) and consolidation chemotherapy, hormonotherapy, and external and interstitial irradiation in 98 patients with locally advanced breast cancer (IIIA-IIIB)

    SciTech Connect

    Jacquillat, C.; Baillet, F.; Weil, M.; Auclerc, G.; Housset, M.; Auclerc, M.; Sellami, M.; Jindani, A.; Thill, L.; Soubrane, C.

    1988-05-15

    Ninety-eight patients with locally advanced breast cancer (Stage IIIA-IIIB) were entered into a pilot study combining intensive induction (neoadjuvant) chemotherapy (VTMFAP) with or without hormonochemotherapy, external and interstitial radiotherapy, and consolidation chemotherapy with or without hormonochemotherapy. Tumor regression over 50% was observed in 91% patients after chemotherapy, and complete clinical remission occurred in 100% patients after irradiation. The rate of local relapse is 13%. The 3-year disease-free survival is 62% and 3-year global survival is 77%. Initial chemotherapeutic tumor regression greater than 75% is the main predictive factor for disease-free survival.

  7. Efficacy and safety of trastuzumab combined with chemotherapy for first-line treatment and beyond progression of HER2-overexpressing advanced breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Bin; Yan,, Yin; Song, Guohong; Liu, Xiaoran; Wang, Jing; Liang, Xu

    2016-01-01

    Objective To observe the efficacy and safety of trastuzumab combined with chemotherapy in patients with human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-overexpressing advanced breast cancer. Methods A total of 90 patients with HER2-overexpressing advanced breast cancer were enrolled in this study. All patients were diagnosed with ductal invasive breast cancer by pathological analysis, and were aged between 31–73 years with a median of 51 years. HER2-positivity was defined as 3(+) staining in immunochemistry or amplification of fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH, ratio ≥2.0). Trastuzumab was administered in combination with chemotherapy as first-line treatment and beyond progression as a secondline, third-line, and above treatment in 90, 34, 14, and 6 patients, respectively. The chemotherapy regimen was given according to normal clinical practice. The response rate was evaluated every two cycles, and the primary endpoints were progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS). Survival curves were estimated by using Kaplan-Meier graphs and were compared by using log-rank test statistics. Multivariate analysis was done using Cox’s proportional hazards regression model, and the level of significance was P<0.05. Results All 90 patients received at least one dose of trastuzumab, and efficacy could be evaluated in 85 patients. The median follow-up was 50 months. In total, 72 (80.00%) patients had visceral metastasis, and 43 (47.78%) patients had progressed after one or more extensive chemotherapy regimens for metastatic diseases. The median PFS for first-line trastuzumab was 10 months (range, 2–59 months), and the median OS after metastasis or initially local advanced disease was 22 months (range, 2–116 months). Conclusions Trastuzumab combined with chemotherapy was active and well-tolerated as a first-line treatment and even beyond progression in HER2-overexpressing advanced breast cancer as a second-line or third-line treatment. However, its

  8. Subgroup Analyses from a Phase 3, Open-Label, Randomized Study of Eribulin Mesylate Versus Capecitabine in Pretreated Patients with Advanced or Metastatic Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Twelves, Chris; Awada, Ahmad; Cortes, Javier; Yelle, Louise; Velikova, Galina; Olivo, Martin S.; Song, James; Dutcus, Corina E.; Kaufman, Peter A.

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE AND METHODS Our secondary analyses compared survival with eribulin versus capecitabine in various patient subgroups from a phase 3, open-label, randomized study. Eligible women aged ≥18 years with advanced/metastatic breast cancer and ≤3 prior chemotherapies (≤2 for advanced/metastatic disease), including an anthracycline and taxane, were randomized 1:1 to intravenous eribulin mesylate 1.4 mg/m2 on days 1 and 8 or twice-daily oral capecitabine 1250 mg/m2 on days 1–14 (21-day cycles). RESULTS In the intent-to-treat population (eribulin 554 and capecitabine 548), overall survival appeared longer with eribulin than capecitabine in various subgroups, including patients with human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-negative (15.9 versus 13.5 months, respectively), estrogen receptor-negative (14.4 versus 10.5 months, respectively), and triple-negative (14.4 versus 9.4 months, respectively) disease. Progression-free survival was similar between the treatment arms. CONCLUSIONS Patients with advanced/metastatic breast cancer and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-, estrogen receptor-, or triple-negative disease may gain particular benefit from eribulin as first-, second-, and third-line chemotherapies. TRIAL REGISTRATION (PRIMARY STUDY) This study reports the subgroup analyses of eribulin versus capecitabine from a phase 3, open-label, randomized study (www.clinicaltrials.gov; ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00337103). PMID:27398025

  9. Delaying Chemotherapy in the Treatment of Hormone Receptor–Positive, Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2–Negative Advanced Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Brufsky, Adam M.

    2015-01-01

    Global guidelines for the management of locally advanced or metastatic hormone receptor–positive (HR-positive), human epidermal growth factor 2–negative (HER2-negative) breast cancer recommend endocrine therapy as first-line treatment for all patients, regardless of age or postmenopausal status. However, current practice patterns in the United States and Europe suggest that these modes of therapy are not being used as recommended, and many patients with advanced HR-positive, HER2-negative disease are being treated first-line with chemotherapy or switched to chemotherapy after a single endocrine therapy. Given that chemotherapy is associated with increased toxicity and reduced quality of life (QOL) compared with endocrine therapy, prolonging the duration of response obtained with endocrine therapy may help delay chemotherapy and its attendant toxicities. Several strategies to delay or overcome endocrine resistance and thereby postpone chemotherapy have been explored, including the use of second-line endocrine agents with different mechanisms of action, adding targeted agents that inhibit specific resistance pathways, and adding agents that act in complementary or synergistic ways to inhibit tumor cell proliferation. This review analyzes the different therapy options available to HR-positive, HER2-negative patients with advanced breast cancer that can be used to delay chemotherapy and enhance QOL. PMID:26793013

  10. Aluminium, antiperspirants and breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Darbre, P D

    2005-09-01

    Aluminium salts are used as the active antiperspirant agent in underarm cosmetics, but the effects of widespread, long term and increasing use remain unknown, especially in relation to the breast, which is a local area of application. Clinical studies showing a disproportionately high incidence of breast cancer in the upper outer quadrant of the breast together with reports of genomic instability in outer quadrants of the breast provide supporting evidence for a role for locally applied cosmetic chemicals in the development of breast cancer. Aluminium is known to have a genotoxic profile, capable of causing both DNA alterations and epigenetic effects, and this would be consistent with a potential role in breast cancer if such effects occurred in breast cells. Oestrogen is a well established influence in breast cancer and its action, dependent on intracellular receptors which function as ligand-activated zinc finger transcription factors, suggests one possible point of interference from aluminium. Results reported here demonstrate that aluminium in the form of aluminium chloride or aluminium chlorhydrate can interfere with the function of oestrogen receptors of MCF7 human breast cancer cells both in terms of ligand binding and in terms of oestrogen-regulated reporter gene expression. This adds aluminium to the increasing list of metals capable of interfering with oestrogen action and termed metalloestrogens. Further studies are now needed to identify the molecular basis of this action, the longer term effects of aluminium exposure and whether aluminium can cause aberrations to other signalling pathways in breast cells. Given the wide exposure of the human population to antiperspirants, it will be important to establish dermal absorption in the local area of the breast and whether long term low level absorption could play a role in the increasing incidence of breast cancer. PMID:16045991

  11. NASA SMART Probe: Breast Cancer Application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mah, Robert W.; Norvig, Peter (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    There is evidence in breast cancer and other malignancies that the physiologic environment within a tumor correlates with clinical outcome. We are developing a unique percutaneous Smart Probe to be used at the time of needle biopsy of the breast. The Smart Probe will simultaneously measure multiple physiologic parameters within a breast tumor. Direct and indirect measurements of tissue oxygen levels, blood flow, pH, and tissue fluid pressure will be analyzed in real-time. These parameters will be interpreted individually and collectively by innovative neural network techniques using advanced intelligent software. The goals are 1) develop a pecutaneous Smart Probe with multiple sensor modalities and applying advanced Information Technologies to provide real time diagnostic information of the tissue at tip of the probe, 2) test the percutaneous Smart Probe in women with benign and malignant breast masses who will be undergoing surgical biopsy, 3) correlate probe sensor data with benign and malignant status of breast masses, 4) determine whether the probe can detect physiologic differences within a breast tumor, and its margins, and in adjacent normal breast tissue, 5) correlate probe sensor data with known prognostic factors for breast caner, including tumor size, tumor grade, axillary lymph node metastases, estrogen receptor and progesterone receptor status.

  12. Breast Cancer Research at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Time-lapse exposure depicts Bioreactor rotation. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunourous tissues.

  13. Carboplatin and Combination Chemotherapy With or Without Veliparib in Treating Patients With Stage IIB-IIIC Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-10-12

    Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer

  14. Addition of Carboplatin to Neoadjuvant Therapy for Triple-negative and HER2-positive Early Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-12

    Tubular Breast Cancer Stage II; Mucinous Breast Cancer Stage II; Breast Cancer Female NOS; Invasive Ductal Breast Cancer; Tubular Breast Cancer Stage III; HER-2 Positive Breast Cancer; Inflammatory Breast Cancer Stage IV; Inflammatory Breast Cancer

  15. Targeting metabolism in breast cancer: How far we can go?

    PubMed Central

    Long, Jing-Pei; Li, Xiao-Na; Zhang, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Adjuvant therapies for breast cancer have achieved great success in recent years and early breast cancer is now a curable or chronic disease. Targeted therapies, including endocrine therapy and human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 targeted therapy, marked a new era of breast cancer treatment. However, except for chemotherapy, an efficient drug treatment to improve the overall survival of breast cancer patients is still lacking for triple negative breast cancer. Furthermore, a certain proportion of breast cancer patients present with resistance to drug therapy, making it much more difficult to control the deterioration of the disease. Recently, altered energy metabolism has become one of the hallmarks of cancer, including breast cancer, and it may be linked to drug resistance. Targeting cellular metabolism is becoming a promising strategy to overcome drug resistance in cancer therapy. This review discusses metabolic reprogramming in breast cancer and the possible complex mechanism of modulation. We also summarize the recent advances in metabolic therapy targeted glycolysis, glutaminolysis and fatty acids synthesis in breast cancer. PMID:26862496

  16. Targeting metabolism in breast cancer: How far we can go?

    PubMed

    Long, Jing-Pei; Li, Xiao-Na; Zhang, Feng

    2016-02-10

    Adjuvant therapies for breast cancer have achieved great success in recent years and early breast cancer is now a curable or chronic disease. Targeted therapies, including endocrine therapy and human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 targeted therapy, marked a new era of breast cancer treatment. However, except for chemotherapy, an efficient drug treatment to improve the overall survival of breast cancer patients is still lacking for triple negative breast cancer. Furthermore, a certain proportion of breast cancer patients present with resistance to drug therapy, making it much more difficult to control the deterioration of the disease. Recently, altered energy metabolism has become one of the hallmarks of cancer, including breast cancer, and it may be linked to drug resistance. Targeting cellular metabolism is becoming a promising strategy to overcome drug resistance in cancer therapy. This review discusses metabolic reprogramming in breast cancer and the possible complex mechanism of modulation. We also summarize the recent advances in metabolic therapy targeted glycolysis, glutaminolysis and fatty acids synthesis in breast cancer. PMID:26862496

  17. Male breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Ottini, Laura; Palli, Domenico; Rizzo, Sergio; Federico, Mario; Bazan, Viviana; Russo, Antonio

    2010-02-01

    Male breast cancer (MaleBC) is a rare disease, accounting for <1% of all male tumors. During the last few years, there has been an increase in the incidence of this disease, along with the increase in female breast cancer (FBC). Little is known about the etiology of MaleBC: hormonal, environmental and genetic factors have been reported to be involved in its pathogenesis. Major risk factors include clinical disorders carrying hormonal imbalances, radiation exposure and, in particular, a positive family history (FH) for BC, the latter suggestive of genetic susceptibility. Rare mutations in high-penetrance genes (BRCA1 and BRCA2) confer a high risk of BC development; low-penetrance gene mutations (i.e. CHEK-2) are more common but involve a lower risk increase. About 90% of all male breast tumors have proved to be invasive ductal carcinomas, expressing high levels of hormone receptors with evident therapeutic returns. The most common clinical sign of BC onset in men is a painless palpable retroareolar lump, which should be evaluated by means of mammography, ultrasonography and core biopsy or fine needle aspiration (FNA). To date, there are no published data from prospective randomized trials supporting a specific therapeutic approach in MaleBC. Tumor size together with the number of axillary nodes involved are the main prognostic factors and should guide the treatment choice. Locoregional approaches include surgery and radiotherapy (RT), depending upon the initial clinical presentation. When systemic treatment (adjuvant, neoadjuvant and metastatic) is delivered, the choice between hormonal and or chemotherapy (CT) should depend upon the clinical and biological features, according to the FBC management guidelines. However great caution is required because of high rates of age-related comorbidities. PMID:19427229

  18. Neo-adjuvant Therapy With Anastrozole Plus Pazopanib in Stage II and III ER+ Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-24

    Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Human Epidermal Growth Factor 2 Negative Carcinoma of Breast; Male Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer

  19. Biomarkers in Tissue Samples From Patients With Newly Diagnosed Breast Cancer Treated With Zoledronic Acid

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-12

    Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer

  20. Lymphovascular space invasion and lack of downstaging after neoadjuvant chemotherapy are strong predictors of adverse outcome in young women with locally advanced breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Khwaja, Shariq S; Ivanovich, Jennifer; DeWees, Todd A; Ochoa, Laura; Mullen, Daniel F; Thomas, Maria; Margenthaler, Julie A; Cyr, Amy; Naughton, Michael; Sanati, Souzan; Eberlein, Timothy J; Gillanders, William E; Aft, Rebecca L; Zoberi, Jacqueline E; Zoberi, Imran

    2016-02-01

    Younger age diagnosis of breast cancer is a predictor of adverse outcome. Here, we evaluate prognostic factors in young women with locally advanced breast cancer (LABC). We present a retrospective review of 104 patients younger than 40 years with LABC treated with surgery, radiotherapy (RT), and chemotherapy from 2003 to 2014. Patient-, tumor-, and treatment-related factors important for overall survival (OS), local/regional recurrence (LRR), distant metastasis (DM), and recurrence-free survival (RFS) were evaluated. Mean age at diagnosis was 34 years (23-39 years) with a median follow-up of 47 months (8-138 months). Breast-conserving surgery was performed in 27%. Axillary lymph node dissection was performed in 85%. Sixty percent of patients received neoadjuvant chemotherapy with 19% achieving pathologic complete response (pCR), and 61% downstaged. Lymph node positivity was present in 91% and lymphovascular space invasion (LVSI) in 35%. Thirty-two percent of patients had triple negative tumors (TN, ER-/PR-/HER2 nonamplified). Four-year OS and RFS was 84% and 71%, respectively. Factors associated with worse OS on multivariate analysis include TN status, LVSI, and number of positive lymph nodes. LVSI was also associated with DM and LRR, as well as worse RFS. Downstaging was associated with improved 4 year RFS in patients receiving neoadjuvant chemotherapy (74% vs. 38%, P = 0.002). With high risks of recurrence and inferior OS compared to older women, breast cancer in young women can be difficult to treat. Among additional factors, presence of LVSI and lack of downstaging portends a particularly worse prognosis. PMID:26687192

  1. Symptom Management in Metastatic Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Irvin, William; Muss, Hyman B.

    2011-01-01

    Approximately 40,000 women die as a result of breast cancer each year and many more live with advanced disease. When breast cancer recurs, the goals of treatment often shift from one of cure to controlling the disease for as long as possible while palliating symptoms interfering with the patient's functional status and quality of life. This requires ongoing discussions with the patient and family about the goals of care. Many symptoms depend on the site of metastasis, with bone being the most frequent, and commonly occur with fatigue, depression, insomnia, and pain. The purpose of this paper is to identify and provide an overview of the management of the most common symptoms in patients with breast cancer metastases. PMID:21880861

  2. Breast Cancer Research at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Human primary breast tumor cells after 56 days of culture in a NASA Bioreactor. A cross-section of a construct, grown from surgical specimens of brease cancer, stained for microscopic examination, reveals areas of tumor cells dispersed throughout the non-epithelial cell background. The arrow denotes the foci of breast cancer cells. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cell (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunorous tissue. Credit: Dr. Jearne Becker, University of South Florida

  3. Tissue and Serum miRNA Profile in Locally Advanced Breast Cancer (LABC) in Response to Neo-Adjuvant Chemotherapy (NAC) Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Al-Khanbashi, Manal; Caramuta, Stefano; Alajmi, Adil M.; Al-Haddabi, Ibrahim; Al-Riyami, Marwa; Lui, Weng-Onn; Al-Moundhri, Mansour S.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNA that plays a vital role in cancer progression. Neo-adjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) has become the standard of care for locally advanced breast cancer. The aim of this study was to evaluate miRNA alterations during NAC using multiple samples of tissue and serum to correlate miRNA expression with clinico-pathological features and patient outcomes. Methods Tissue and serum samples were collected from patients with locally advanced breast cancer undergoing NAC at four time points: time of diagnosis, after the first and fourth cycle of doxorubicin/cyclophosphamide treatment, and after the fourth cycle of docetaxel administration. First, we evaluated the miRNA expression profiles in tissue and correlated expression with clinico-pathological features. Then, a panel of four miRNAs (miR-451, miR-3200, miR-21, and miR-205) in serum samples was further validated using quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR). The alterations in serum levels of miRNA, associations with clinical and pathological responses, correlation with clinico-pathological features, and survival outcomes were studied using Friedman, Mann-Whitney U, and Spearman, Wilcoxon signed-ranks tests. P≤0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results We analyzed 72 tissue samples and 108 serum samples from 9 patients and 27 patients, respectively. MicroRNA expression profiling of tumor versus normal tissue revealed more than 100 differentially expressed miRNAs. Serum miR-451 levels were significantly decreased during treatment, and higher serum levels were associated with improved clinical and pathological responses and disease-free survival. This is one of the early reports on miR-3200 in response to treatment in breast cancer, as serum levels of miR-3200 found to decline during NAC, and higher serum levels were associated with lower residual breast cancer burden and relapse rates at time of diagnosis. Conclusion Variations in

  4. Understanding Lymphedema (For Cancers Other Than Breast Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... My ACS » Understanding Lymphedema: For Cancers Other Than Breast Cancer Download Printable Version [PDF] » Lymphedema can be caused ... News About Cancer Expert Voices Blog Programs & Services Breast Cancer Support TLC Hair Loss & Mastectomy Products Hope Lodge® ...

  5. Breast Cancer Research at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Human primary breast tumor cells after 49 days of growth in a NASA Bioreactor. Tumor cells aggregate on microcarrier beads (indicated by arrow). NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cell (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunorous tissue. Credit: Dr. Jearne Becker, University of South Florida

  6. Breast Cancer Research at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    High magnification of view of tumor cells aggregate on microcarrier beads, illustrting breast cells with intercellular boundaires on bead surface and aggregates of cells achieving 3-deminstional growth outward from bead after 56 days of culture in a NASA Bioreactor. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cell (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunorous tissue. Credit: Dr. Jearne Becker, University of South Florida.

  7. Breast Cancer In Women Infographic

    Cancer.gov

    This infographic shows the Breast Cancer Subtypes in Women. It’s important for guiding treatment and predicting survival. Know the Science: HR = Hormone receptor. HR+ means tumor cells have receptors for the hormones estrogen or progesterone, which can promote the growth of HR+ tumors. Hormone therapies like tamoxifen can be used to treat HR+ tumors. HER2 = Human epidermal growth Factor receptor, HER2+ means tumor cells overexpress (make high levels of) a protein, called HE2/neu, which has been shown to be associated with certain aggressive types of breast cancer. Trastuzumab and some other therapies can target cells that overexpress HER2. HR+/HER2, aka “LuminalA”. 73% of all breast cancer cases: best prognosis, most common subtype for every race, age, and poverty level. HR-/HER2, aka “Triple Negative”: 13% of all breast cancer cases, Worst prognosis, Non-Hispanic blacks have the highest rate of this subtype at every age and poverty level. HR+/HER2+, aka “Luminal B”, 10% of all breast cancer cases, little geographic variation by state. HR-/HER2+, aka”HER2-enriched”, 5% of all breast cancer cases, lowest rates for all races and ethnicities. www.cancer.gov Source: Special section of the Annual Report to the Nation on the Status of Cancer, 1975-2011.

  8. Breast Cancer Chemotherapy and Your Heart

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the American Heart Association Cardiology Patient Page Breast Cancer Chemotherapy and Your Heart Christine Unitt , Kamaneh Montazeri , ... Disclosures Footnotes Figures & Tables Info & Metrics eLetters Introduction Breast cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer in women. ...

  9. Pathologic Evaluation of Breast Cancer after Neoadjuvant Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Park, Cheol Keun; Jung, Woo-Hee; Koo, Ja Seung

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer, one of the most common cancers in women, has various treatment modalities. Neoadjuvant therapy (NAT) has been used in many clinical trials because it is easy to evaluate the treatment response to therapeutic agents in a short time period; consequently, NAT is currently a standard treatment modality for large-sized and locally advanced breast cancers, and its use in early-stage breast cancer is becoming more common. Thus, chances to encounter breast tissue from patients treated with NAT is increasing. However, systems for handling and evaluating such specimens have not been established. Several evaluation systems emphasize a multidisciplinary approach to increase the accuracy of breast cancer assessment. Thus, detailed and systematic evaluation of clinical, radiologic, and pathologic findings is important. In this review, we compare the major problems of each evaluation system and discuss important points for handling and evaluating NAT-treated breast specimens. PMID:27068026

  10. Trastuzumab use during pregnancy: long-term survival after locally advanced breast cancer and long-term infant follow-up.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Jurandyr M de; Brito, Luiz G O; Moises, Elaine C D; Amorim, Andréa C; Rapatoni, Liane; Carrara, Hélio H A; Tiezzi, Daniel G

    2016-04-01

    Here, we describe the case of a patient diagnosed with locally advanced breast cancer 8 years ago. Her treatment course was neoadjuvant chemotherapy, followed by mastectomy and then adjuvant radiotherapy and trastuzumab (TTZ). During the use of adjuvant targeted therapy, an incidental pregnancy was diagnosed. Four years later, she developed bone and cerebral metastases, and since then, she has received courses of TTZ, capecitabine, lapatinib, and radiotherapy with intermittent control of the disease. Her 7-year-old son presents a normal physical and long-term neurological developmental curve according to specialized evaluation. This case is unique for several reasons: the patient received the highest dose of TTZ yet described during pregnancy (4400 mg); there has been a long period of disease-free survival after treatment for locally advanced breast cancer and long overall survival despite successive disease progressions during the metastatic phase of the disease (97 months), and there was a monitored pediatric follow-up period (7 years). PMID:26825868

  11. Understanding your breast cancer risk

    MedlinePlus

    ... the chance that you could get cancer. Some risk factors you can control, such as drinking alcohol. Others, such as family ... Risk factors you cannot control includes: Age . Your risk for breast cancer increases as you age. Most cancers are found in ...

  12. Breast cancer cell lines: friend or foe?

    PubMed Central

    Burdall, Sarah E; Hanby, Andrew M; Lansdown, Mark RJ; Speirs, Valerie

    2003-01-01

    The majority of breast cancer research is conducted using established breast cancer cell lines as in vitro models. An alternative is to use cultures established from primary breast tumours. Here, we discuss the pros and cons of using both of these models in translational breast cancer research. PMID:12631387

  13. Consumer Health Education. Breast Cancer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arkansas Univ., Fayetteville, Cooperative Extension Service.

    This short booklet is designed to be used by health educators when teaching women about breast cancer and its early detection and the procedure for breast self-examination. It includes the following: (1) A one-page teaching plan consisting of objectives, subject matter, methods (including titles of films and printed materials), target audience,…

  14. Metals and Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Byrne, Celia; Divekar, Shailaja D.; Storchan, Geoffrey B.; Parodi, Daniela A.; Martin, Mary Beth

    2014-01-01

    Metalloestrogens are metals that activate the estrogen receptor in the absence of estradiol. The metalloestrogens fall into two subclasses: metal/metalloid anions and bivalent cationic metals. The metal/metalloid anions include compounds such as arsenite, nitrite, selenite, and vanadate while the bivalent cations include metals such as cadmium, calcium, cobalt, copper, nickel, chromium, lead, mercury, and tin. The best studied metalloestrogen is cadmium. It is a heavy metal and a prevalent environmental contaminant with no known physiological function. This review addresses our current understanding of the mechanism by which cadmium and the bivalent cationic metals activate estrogen receptor-α. The review also summarizes the in vitro and in vivo evidence that cadmium functions as an estrogen and the potential role of cadmium in breast cancer. PMID:23338949

  15. Association of breast cancer risk loci with breast cancer survival.

    PubMed

    Barrdahl, Myrto; Canzian, Federico; Lindström, Sara; Shui, Irene; Black, Amanda; Hoover, Robert N; Ziegler, Regina G; Buring, Julie E; Chanock, Stephen J; Diver, W Ryan; Gapstur, Susan M; Gaudet, Mia M; Giles, Graham G; Haiman, Christopher; Henderson, Brian E; Hankinson, Susan; Hunter, David J; Joshi, Amit D; Kraft, Peter; Lee, I-Min; Le Marchand, Loic; Milne, Roger L; Southey, Melissa C; Willett, Walter; Gunter, Marc; Panico, Salvatore; Sund, Malin; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Sánchez, María-José; Overvad, Kim; Dossus, Laure; Peeters, Petra H; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Kaaks, Rudolf; Campa, Daniele

    2015-12-15

    The survival of breast cancer patients is largely influenced by tumor characteristics, such as TNM stage, tumor grade and hormone receptor status. However, there is growing evidence that inherited genetic variation might affect the disease prognosis and response to treatment. Several lines of evidence suggest that alleles influencing breast cancer risk might also be associated with breast cancer survival. We examined the associations between 35 breast cancer susceptibility loci and the disease over-all survival (OS) in 10,255 breast cancer patients from the National Cancer Institute Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium (BPC3) of which 1,379 died, including 754 of breast cancer. We also conducted a meta-analysis of almost 35,000 patients and 5,000 deaths, combining results from BPC3 and the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC) and performed in silico analyses of SNPs with significant associations. In BPC3, the C allele of LSP1-rs3817198 was significantly associated with improved OS (HRper-allele =0.70; 95% CI: 0.58-0.85; ptrend  = 2.84 × 10(-4) ; HRheterozygotes  = 0.71; 95% CI: 0.55-0.92; HRhomozygotes  = 0.48; 95% CI: 0.31-0.76; p2DF  = 1.45 × 10(-3) ). In silico, the C allele of LSP1-rs3817198 was predicted to increase expression of the tumor suppressor cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1C (CDKN1C). In the meta-analysis, TNRC9-rs3803662 was significantly associated with increased death hazard (HRMETA =1.09; 95% CI: 1.04-1.15; ptrend  = 6.6 × 10(-4) ; HRheterozygotes  = 0.96 95% CI: 0.90-1.03; HRhomozygotes  = 1.21; 95% CI: 1.09-1.35; p2DF =1.25 × 10(-4) ). In conclusion, we show that there is little overlap between the breast cancer risk single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) identified so far and the SNPs associated with breast cancer prognosis, with the possible exceptions of LSP1-rs3817198 and TNRC9-rs3803662. PMID:25611573

  16. Cholesterol and Breast Cancer Pathophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Erik R.; Chang, Ching-yi; McDonnell, Donald P.

    2014-01-01

    Cholesterol is a risk factor for breast cancer although the mechanisms by which this occurs are not well understood. One hypothesis is that dyslipidemia results in increased cholesterol content in cell membranes thus impacting membrane fluidity and subsequent signaling. Additionally, studies demonstrate that the metabolite, 27-hydroxycholesterol (27HC), can function as an estrogen, increasing the proliferation of estrogen receptor positive breast cancer cells. This was unexpected as 27HC and other oxysterols activate the liver X receptors resulting in the reduction of intracellular cholesterol. Resolution of this paradox will require a dissection of the molecular mechanisms by which ER and LXR converge in breast cancer cells. Regardless, the observation that 27HC influences breast cancer provides rationale for strategies that target cholesterol metabolism. PMID:25458418

  17. Preventing Breast Cancer: Making Progress

    MedlinePlus

    ... medical literature, the Study of Tamoxifen and Raloxifene (STAR) trial was started in 1998. That study enrolled ... in the BCPT. Studies, such as BCPT and STAR, involve women who have not had breast cancer, ...

  18. [Maternity after breast cancer treatment].

    PubMed

    Boratyn-Nowicka, Agnieszka; Sodowski, Krzysztof; Ulman-Włodarz, Izabela

    2015-01-01

    Recent years have seen a notable increase in the number of breast cancer diagnoses among women who have not fulfilled their maternity plans before the disease. Cytotoxic drugs (chemotherapy), used in the treatment of breast cancer patients, cause varying degrees of damage to the ovaries. The expected favorable effect of gonadoliberin analogues on the preservation of fertility has not been confirmed in clinical trials, and these drugs are currently not recommended for therapy. It is only the development of cryobiology and assisted reproduction techniques that make it possible to preserve the reproductive potential. The safety of the mother and the baby after breast cancer treatment is a separate issue. The available data indicate that both, pregnancy and breast-feeding are safe for the mother and the baby. However, the majority of findings come from retrospective studies covering small sample size and excluding the heterogeneity of both, cancer cells and patient clinical data. PMID:25775879

  19. Ixabepilone and Liposomal Doxorubicin in Advanced Ovarian Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-11

    Fallopian Tube Cancer; Female Reproductive Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage III Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer

  20. Multimodal therapy in locally advanced breast carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez, M.J.; Andriole, D.P.; Kraybill, W.G.; Khojasteh, A. )

    1990-12-01

    Among 879 patients treated for breast cancer between 1975 and 1984, advanced disease was found in 125 (14%). A subgroup of 34 (4%) presented with untreated locally advanced disease without demonstrable distant metastases at the time of diagnosis (stage IIIB = T4abed, NX-2,MO). During the first 5 years (1975 through 1979), 17 patients were treated primarily with sequential radiotherapy and chemotherapy (Group A). From 1980 to 1984 (Group B), the management consisted of four courses of induction multi-drug chemotherapy followed primarily by mastectomy and additional chemotherapy. The mean follow-up for the most recent group (Group B) is 48 months. Follow-up was complete. While the local disease control rate was the same for both groups (76%), the survival was remarkably different. Group A patients experienced a median survival of 15 months, and only one survived 5 years. In Group B, the median survival was 56 months with nine patients (53%) alive between 40 and 76 months, seven (41%) of whom are 5-year survivors. While the overall mortality of patients with inflammatory breast cancer was greater in both groups when compared with the group with noninflammatory disease, the survival of patients in Group B was better than in Group A for both inflammatory and noninflammatory cancers (p less than 0.01). Estrogen receptor, nodal, and menopausal status did not influence survival. These data suggest that neoadjuvant chemotherapy improves survival for patients with stage IIIB breast carcinoma and delays the establishment or progression of distant metastases. Mastectomy is an important component in the treatment of this disease.

  1. Doxorubicin Hydrochloride, Cyclophosphamide, and Filgrastim Followed By Paclitaxel Albumin-Stabilized Nanoparticle Formulation With or Without Trastuzumab in Treating Patients With Breast Cancer Previously Treated With Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-05-07

    Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; HER2-positive Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

  2. Lipofilling in breast cancer surgery

    PubMed Central

    Lohsiriwat, Visnu; Rietjens, Mario

    2013-01-01

    Recently, lipofilling is being performed either as a part of oncoplastic technique or alone by itself for correction of defects and asymmetry after oncologic breast cancer surgery. Its efficacy, safety and technical procedures are varying among institutions and individual surgeon’s experiences. We provide a literature review and view point focus on this novel technique which emphasize on the application on breast cancer reconstruction. PMID:25083450

  3. Soy Isoflavones Supplementation in Treating Women at High Risk For or With Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-06

    BRCA1 Mutation Carrier; BRCA2 Mutation Carrier; Ductal Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Lobular Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer

  4. Targeting autophagy in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Maycotte, Paola; Thorburn, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Macroautophagy (referred to as autophagy here) is an intracellular degradation pathway enhanced in response to a variety of stresses and in response to nutrient deprivation. This process provides the cell with nutrients and energy by degrading aggregated and damaged proteins as well as compromised organelles. Since autophagy has been linked to diverse diseases including cancer, it has recently become a very interesting target in breast cancer treatment. Indeed, current clinical trials are trying to use chloroquine or hydroxychloroquine, alone or in combination with other drugs to inhibit autophagy during breast cancer therapy since chemotherapy and radiation, regimens that are used to treat breast cancer, are known to induce autophagy in cancer cells. Importantly, in breast cancer, autophagy has been involved in the development of resistance to chemotherapy and to anti-estrogens. Moreover, a close relationship has recently been described between autophagy and the HER2 receptor. Here, we discuss some of the recent findings relating autophagy and cancer with a particular focus on breast cancer therapy. PMID:25114840

  5. BREAST CANCER, DERMATOFIBROMAS AND ARSENIC

    PubMed Central

    Dantzig, Paul I

    2009-01-01

    Background: Dermatofibromas are common benign tumors in women, and breast cancer is the most common malignancy in women. The aim of this study is to determine if there is any relationship between the two conditions. Materials and Methods: Five patients with dermatofibromas and 10 control patients (two groups) had their skin biopsies measured for arsenic by inductively coupled mass spectrometry. Fifty randomly selected patients with breast cancer and 50 control patients were examined for the presence of dermatofibromas. Results: The dermatofibromas were found to have an arsenic concentration of 0.171 micrograms/gram, compared with 0.06 and 0.07 micrograms/gram of the two control groups. Forty-three out of 50 patients with breast cancer had dermatofibromas and 32/50 patients with breast cancer had multiple dermatofibromas, compared to 10/50 control patients with dermatofibromas and only 1/50 with multiple dermatofibromas. Conclusions: Arsenic is important in the development of dermatofibromas and dermatofibromas represent a reservoir and important sign of chronic arsenic exposure. Dermatofibromas represent an important sign for women at risk for breast cancer, and arsenic may represent the cause of the majority of cases of breast cancer. PMID:20049264

  6. Navigating the Needs of Rural Women with Breast Cancer: A Breast Care Program

    PubMed Central

    Depke, Jill L.; Boreen, Amanda; Onitilo, Adedayo A.

    2015-01-01

    We describe the development and establishment of a breast care program (BCP) with service for rural breast cancer patients. Our program is a comprehensive program serving rural communities in Wisconsin. Our BCP is committed to breast health throughout the continuum from breast cancer risk assessment and prevention, advanced diagnostics, and screening tools to genetic testing and state-of-the-art surgical techniques. To provide the highest level of care, we coordinate a breast care team involving collaboration of multidisciplinary healthcare professionals. Experts from various departments, including radiologists, pathologists, breast surgeons, medical and radiation oncologists, genetic counselors, clinical trial specialists, and our breast care navigator, all work together to provide cutting edge cancer treatment and management. Our distinctive BCP allows patients to see multiple providers without having to make multiple appointments and promotes discussion of treatment recommendations and creation of a personalized treatment plan for each patient by a team of specialists. PMID:26056376

  7. Survivorship Care Plan in Promoting Physical Activity in Breast or Colorectal Cancer Survivors in Wisconsin

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-19

    Cancer Survivor; Healthy Subject; Stage I Colorectal Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIC Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Colorectal Cancer

  8. Fulvestrant 500 mg Versus Anastrozole 1 mg for the First-Line Treatment of Advanced Breast Cancer: Overall Survival Analysis From the Phase II FIRST Study

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, Matthew J.; Llombart-Cussac, Antonio; Feltl, David; Dewar, John A.; Jasiówka, Marek; Hewson, Nicola; Rukazenkov, Yuri; Robertson, John F.R.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To compare overall survival (OS) for fulvestrant 500 mg versus anastrozole as first-line endocrine therapy for advanced breast cancer. Patients and Methods The Fulvestrant First-Line Study Comparing Endocrine Treatments (FIRST) was a phase II, randomized, open-label, multicenter trial. Postmenopausal women with estrogen receptor–positive, locally advanced/metastatic breast cancer who had no previous therapy for advanced disease received either fulvestrant 500 mg (days 0, 14, 28, and every 28 days thereafter) or anastrozole 1 mg (daily). The primary end point (clinical benefit rate [72.5% and 67.0%]) and a follow-up analysis (median time to progression [23.4 months and 13.1 months]) have been reported previously for fulvestrant 500 mg and anastrozole, respectively. Subsequently, the protocol was amended to assess OS by unadjusted log-rank test after approximately 65% of patients had died. Treatment effect on OS across several subgroups was examined. Tolerability was evaluated by adverse event monitoring. Results In total, 205 patients were randomly assigned (fulvestrant 500 mg, n = 102; anastrozole, n = 103). At data cutoff, 61.8% (fulvestrant 500 mg, n = 63) and 71.8% (anastrozole, n = 74) had died. The hazard ratio (95% CI) for OS with fulvestrant 500 mg versus anastrozole was 0.70 (0.50 to 0.98; P = .04; median OS, 54.1 months v 48.4 months). Treatment effects seemed generally consistent across the subgroups analyzed. No new safety issues were observed. Conclusion There are several limitations of this OS analysis, including that it was not planned in the original protocol but instead was added after time-to-progression results were analyzed, and that not all patients participated in additional OS follow-up. However, the present results suggest fulvestrant 500 mg extends OS versus anastrozole. This finding now awaits prospective confirmation in the larger phase III FALCON (Fulvestrant and Anastrozole Compared in Hormonal Therapy Naïve Advanced Breast

  9. Breast Cancer: The Perspective of Northern Nigerian Women

    PubMed Central

    Azubuike, Samuel O.; Celestina, U Onuoha

    2015-01-01

    Background: The rising incidence of breast cancer is complicated by late presentation, which marks breast cancer diagnosis in Nigeria with about 70% of cases presenting at advanced stages of the disease. The aim of this study is to determine the general level of awareness of breast cancer, breast cancer risk factors, signs/symptoms as well as preventive measures nothern Nigerian women. It also aimed at determining their attitudes toward breast cancer cure, prevention and cause. Finally, it aims to determine their practices toward breast cancer and its associated factors. Methods: A cross-sectional community survey was used to study 230 women aged 15–60 years in Chikun Local Government Area. The subjects were selected based on nonprobability sampling. Data collected using self-administered questionnaire were analyzed using Statistical Package for Social Science students (version 16). Test of associations employed Chi-square statistical tool with the level of significance taken at 0.05. Results: About 75.2% knew about breast cancer with health facility (29.13%) being the greatest source of information. An average of 29.35% had knowledge of the risk factors tested. Mean knowledge of the signs and symptoms was 50.1% Average knowledge of breast cancer screening methods was 34.26% with breast self-examination (BSE) (46.1%) being the most recognized. In relation to perception, about 21.7% strongly agreed with the fact that breast cancer is treatable following early detection while 18.3% strongly agreed that screening is effective in detecting breast cancer. Concerning practice, an average of 10.2% practiced any of the screening methods, with BSE (17.4%) being the most practiced. Strongest reasons for nonpractice was ignorance (17.4%). An association was established between knowledge and practice of all the screening methods (P = 0.001 respectively). Conclusions: There is insufficient knowledge, as well as poor practices in relation to important factors associated with

  10. Inflammatory Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Partners & Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & ... Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists NCI Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & ...

  11. Circulating Tumor Cells in Breast Cancer Patients.

    PubMed

    Hall, Carolyn; Valad, Lily; Lucci, Anthony

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer among women, resulting in an estimated 40,000 deaths in 2014.1 Metastasis, a complex, multi-step process, remains the primary cause of death for these patients. Although the mechanisms involved in metastasis have not been fully elucidated, considerable evidence suggests that metastatic spread is mediated by rare cells within the heterogeneous primary tumor that acquire the ability to invade into the bloodstream. In the bloodstream, they can travel to distant sites, sometimes remaining undetected and in a quiescent state for an extended period of time before they establish distant metastases in the bone, lung, liver, or brain. These occult micrometastatic cells (circulating tumor cells, CTCs) are rare, yet their prognostic significance has been demonstrated in both metastatic and non-metastatic breast cancer patients. Because repeated tumor tissue collection is typically not feasible and peripheral blood draws are minimally invasive, serial CTC enumeration might provide "real-time liquid biopsy" snapshots that could be used to identify early-stage breast cancer patients with micrometastatic disease who are at risk for disease progression and monitor treatment response in patients with advanced disease. In addition, characterizing CTCs might aid in the development of novel, personalized therapies aimed at eliminating micrometastases. This review describes current CTC isolation, detection, and characterization strategies in operable breast cancer. PMID:27481009

  12. Cell Polarity Proteins in Breast Cancer Progression.

    PubMed

    Rejon, Carlis; Al-Masri, Maia; McCaffrey, Luke

    2016-10-01

    Breast cancer, one of the leading causes of cancer related death in women worldwide, is a heterogeneous disease with diverse subtypes that have different properties and prognoses. The developing mammary gland is a highly proliferative and invasive tissue, and some of the developmental programs may be aberrantly activated to promote breast cancer progression. In the breast, luminal epithelial cells exhibit apical-basal polarity, and the failure to maintain this organizational structure, due to disruption of polarity complexes, is implicated in promoting hyperplasia and tumors. Therefore, understanding the mechanisms underlying loss of polarity will contribute to our knowledge of the early stages leading to the pathogenesis of the disease. In this review, we will discuss recent findings that support the idea that loss of apical-basal cell polarity is a crucial step in the acquisition of the malignant phenotype. Oncogene induced loss of tissue organization shares a conserved cellular mechanism with developmental process, we will further describe the role of the individual polarity complexes, the Par, Crumbs, and Scribble, to couple cell division orientation and cell growth. We will examine symmetric or asymmetric cell divisions in mammary stem cell and their contribution to the development of breast cancer subtypes and cancer stem cells. Finally, we will highlight some of the recent advances in our understanding of the molecular mechanisms by which changes in epithelial polarity programs promote invasion and metastasis through single cell and collective cell modes. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 2215-2223, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27362918

  13. Biological effects of progestins in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Pasqualini, J R; Ebert, C

    1999-06-01

    Developments in the synthesis of different progestins have opened up new possibilities for the biological effects and therapeutic uses of these compounds. The actions of progestins are a function of their structure, affinity to the progesterone receptor or to other steroid receptors, the target tissue considered, the biological response, the experimental conditions, dose, and metabolic transformation. Data on the action of progestins in breast cancer patients are very limited. A positive response with the progestins medroxyprogesterone acetate and megestrol acetate has been obtained in postmenopausal patients with advanced breast cancer. However, extensive information on the effect of progestins was obtained in in vitro studies using hormone-dependent and hormone-independent human mammary cancer cell lines. It was demonstrated that in hormone-dependent breast cancer cells, various progestins (nomegestrol acetate, medrogestone, promegestone) as well as tibolone, are potent sulfatase-inhibitory agents. Progestins may also be involved in the inhibition of the mRNA of this enzyme. In another series of studies, it was also demonstrated that various progestins are very active in inhibiting the 17 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase for the conversion of estrone to estradiol. More recently, it has been observed that promegestone or medrogestone stimulates the sulfotransferase for the formation of estrogen sulfates. Clinical trials of these enzymatic effects on the formation and transformation of estradiol in breast cancer patients could be the next step to investigate new therapeutic possibilities for this disease. PMID:12227897

  14. Utility of PET in Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Avril, Norbert; Schelling, Marcus; Dose, Jorg; Weber, Wolfgang A.; Schwaiger, Markus

    1999-10-01

    Breast cancer represents the most frequent malignant disease in women and the second leading cause of cancer death in western countries. Current available treatment includes surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, and hormonal therapy. The disease is often curable when detected in early stages. Mammography is the most important screening modality; however, limitations of available procedures for the diagnosis and accurate staging of breast cancer has increased the application of metabolic imaging by positron emission tomography (PET). PET using the radiolabeled glucose analogue, F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG), enables visualization of increased glucose metabolism of malignant tissue. PET has been used successfully in an increasing number of oncological applications. It is an excellent clinical method to detect breast cancer over 1 cm in diameter and to accurately identify the extent of axillary lymph node metastases in patients with locally advanced disease. Recent reports have shown the high accuracy of FDG-PET imaging for staging of breast cancer patient by using whole-body PET imaging. The metabolic signal of tumor tissue allows for monitoring the effect of chemotherapy. FDG-PET can differentiate between responder and nonresponder early in the course of therapy. By identifying nonresponding patients, PET can help to avoid ineffective therapy and therefore, reduce toxic side effects in these patients. PMID:14516650

  15. Breast cancer and autism.

    PubMed

    Radcliff, Lisa

    2013-03-01

    Case Study Amy is a 44-year-old woman with severe autism. She lives with her sister Susan, who is her caregiver and guardian. Amy is ambulatory and able to dress and feed herself. She is a healthy individual with no other significant comorbidities. She walks daily and enjoys her sister's company. Amy's life expectancy is greater than 10 years. However, she is difficult to care for medically, as she will not allow a physical examination and strikes out when strangers try to touch her. She is nonverbal and unable to participate in decision-making. INITIAL DIAGNOSIS Amy has a history of breast cancer diagnosed 2 years ago, originally presenting as a stage I lesion (T2N0) that was palpated by her caregiver while bathing. She underwent right simple mastectomy with sentinel lymph node resection. Susan recalls that the mastectomy was a very challenging ordeal, as Amy kept pulling out IV lines, drains, and dressings. Susan felt that Amy withdrew from her after the procedure as she most likely associated Susan with the cause of the pain, making her role as caregiver more difficult. Pathology confirmed an invasive ductal carcinoma, moderately differentiated, 2.4 cm, estrogen/progesterone receptor negative, HER2/neu negative, with negative surgical margins. Two right axillary sentinel lymph nodes were negative for disease. The standard of care for a patient with these tumor features is surgery plus adjuvant chemotherapy (National Comprehensive Cancer Network [NCCN], 2012). According to the Adjuvant Online! database (2012), Amy's risk for relapse was approximately 40% without adjuvant treatment; her risk for mortality was approximately 29%. After meeting with a medical oncologist, Amy did not receive adjuvant chemotherapy. According to Susan, she was not offered the choice, and the decision was not explained to them. She was simply told that it was not necessary. Aside from pathology, previous records were unavailable for review. Medical assessment of Amy's level of autism

  16. A Vasculature-Targeting Regimen of Pre-Operative Docetaxel with or without Bevacizumab for Locally Advanced Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Baar, Joseph; Silverman, Paula; Lyons, Janice; Fu, Pingfu; Abdul-Karim, Fadi; Ziats, Nicholas; Wasman, Jay; Hartman, Paul; Jesberger, John; Dumadag, Leda; Hohler, Erin; Leeming, Rosemary; Shenk, Robert; Chen, Helen; McCrae, Keith; Dowlati, Afshin; Remick, Scot C.; Overmoyer, Beth

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Taxanes have effects on angiogenesis causing difficulties in separating biologic effects of chemotherapy from those due to angiogenesis inhibitors. This randomized phase II trial was designed to evaluate the additional biomarker effect on angiogenesis when bevacizumab is added to docetaxel. Experimental Design Patients with inoperable breast cancer were randomized to either 2 cycles of preoperative docetaxel (D) 35 mg/m2 IV weekly for 6 weeks, followed by a 2 week break; or docetaxel with bevacizumab 10 mg/kg IV every other week for a total of 16 weeks (DB). Plasma and serum markers of endothelial damage, DCE-MRI and tumor microvessel density were assessed prior to treatment and at the end of each preoperative cycle. Results 49 patients were randomized (DB = 24; D = 25). There was no difference in overall clinical response, progression-free survival or overall survival. VEGF increased during treatment; more so with DB (P < 0.0001). VCAM-1 also increased (P < 0.0001); more so with DB (P = 0.069). ICAM increased (P = 0.018) and E-selectin decreased (P = 0.006) overall. Baseline levels of VCAM-1 and E-selectin correlated with clinical response by univariate analysis. DCE-MRI demonstrated a greater fall in tumor perfusion calculated by IAUC90 in DB (P = 0.024). DCE-MRI also demonstrated an overall decrease in tumor volume (P=0.012). Conclusion Bevacizumab plus docetaxel caused a greater increase in VEGF and VCAM-1, and a greater reduction in tumor perfusion by DCE-MRI compared with docetaxel. Clinical outcomes of inoperable breast cancer were predicted by changes in VCAM-1 and E-selectin. PMID:19417018

  17. Environmental pollutants and breast cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Brody, Julia Green; Rudel, Ruthann A

    2003-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women and the leading cause of cancer death among women 35-54 years of age. Rising incidence, increased risk among migrants to higher risk regions, and poor prediction of individual risk have prompted a search for additional modifiable factors. Risk factors for breast cancer include reproductive characteristics associated with estrogen and other hormones, pharmaceutical hormones, and activities such as alcohol use and lack of exercise that affect hormone levels. As a result, investigation of hormonally active compounds in commercial products and pollution is a priority. Compounds that cause mammary tumors in animals are additional priorities. Animal models provide insight into possible mechanisms for effects of environmental pollutants on breast cancer and identify chemical exposures to target in epidemiologic studies. Although few epidemiologic studies have been conducted for chemical exposures, occupational studies show associations between breast cancer and exposure to certain organic solvents and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Population-based studies have been limited to a few organochlorine compounds and PAHs and have been mostly negative. A variety of challenges in studies of breast cancer and the environment may have contributed to negative findings. Lack of exposure assessment tools and few hypothesis-generating toxicologic studies limit the scope of epidemiologic studies. Issues of timing with respect to latency and periods of breast vulnerability, and individual differences in susceptibility pose other challenges. Substantial work is needed in exposure assessment, toxicology, and susceptibility before we can expect a pay-off from large epidemiologic studies of breast cancer and environment. PMID:12826474

  18. Southeastern Cancer Study Group: breast cancer studies

    SciTech Connect

    Smalley, R.V.; Bartolucci, A.A.; Moore, M.

    1983-12-01

    During the past 10 years, the Southeastern Cancer Study Group (SECSG) has been engaged in one major adjuvant study and three major advanced disease studies for patients with adenocarcinoma of the breast. The adjuvant study is demonstrating that six months of adjuvant CMF is the therapeutic equivalent of 12 months and that post-operative irradiation is of no added therapeutic benefit. In patients with advanced disease, a low dose 5 drug combination of CMFVP induces more objective responses than single agent 5FU, but improves survival only for those patients with liver metastases when compared to the sequential use of the same 5 single agents. The three drug combination, CAF, utilizing doxorubicin, induces more objective responses than low dose CMFVP, but it does not improve overall survival. The addition of a phase active combination, CAMELEON, (i.e., sequentially alternating therapy) of CAF has not improved the duration of disease control and survival for patients with liver metastases, lymphangitic and nodular lung metastases compared to CAF. Aggressive combination chemotherapeutic approaches to patients with advanced disease provide better and longer disease and tumor control but only marginal improvements in overall survival. Adding additional agents to a maximally tolerable regimen has not improved the therapeutic outcome.

  19. Evaluation of targeted therapies in advanced breast cancer: the need for large-scale molecular screening and transformative clinical trial designs.

    PubMed

    Fadoukhair, Z; Zardavas, D; Chad, M A; Goulioti, T; Aftimos, P; Piccart, M

    2016-04-01

    Breast cancer (BC) has been classified into four intrinsic subtypes through seminal studies employing gene expression profiling analysis of primary tumours, namely the luminal A and B subtypes, the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-like subtype and the basal-like subtype. More recently, the emergence of high-throughput genomic sequencing techniques, such as next-generation or massive parallel sequencing has expanded our understanding of the complex genomic landscapes of BC, with marked intertumour heterogeneity seen among different patients. In addition, increasing evidence indicates intratumour heterogeneity, with molecular differences observed within one patient, both spatially and longitudinally. These phenomena have an impact on the clinical development of molecularly targeted agents, with the classical paradigm of population-based clinical trials being no longer efficient. In the era of genomically driven oncology, three complementary tools can accelerate the clinical development of targeted agents for advanced BC as follows: (i) the implementation of molecular profiling of metastatic tumour lesions, as exemplified by the AURORA (Aiming to Understand the Molecular Aberrations in Metastatic Breast Cancer) programme; (ii) serial assessments of circulating tumour DNA, allowing a more thorough molecular interrogation of metastatic tumour burden; and (iii) new innovative clinical trial designs able to address the challenges of the increasing molecular fragmentation of BC. PMID:26119941

  20. Preoperative bevacizumab combined with letrozole and chemotherapy in locally advanced ER- and/or PgR-positive breast cancer: clinical and biological activity

    PubMed Central

    Torrisi, R; Bagnardi, V; Cardillo, A; Bertolini, F; Scarano, E; Orlando, L; Mancuso, P; Luini, A; Calleri, A; Viale, G; Goldhirsch, A; Colleoni, M

    2008-01-01

    The antiangiogenic agent bevacizumab showed synergistic effects when combined with chemotherapy in advanced breast cancer. We presently investigated the activity of bevacizumab in combination with chemotherapy, including capecitabine and vinorelbine, and endocrine therapy, including letrozole (+triptorelin in premenopausal women), as primary therapy for patients with ER and/or PgR ⩾10% T2–T4a-c, N0–N2, M0 breast cancer. Biological end point included the proliferative activity (Ki67), whereas clinical end points were clinical response rate, pathological complete response (pCR) and tolerability. Circulating endothelial cells (CECs) and their progenitors, as surrogate markers of antiangiogenic activity, were measured at baseline and at surgery.Thirty-six women are evaluable. A clinical response rate of 86% (95% CI, 70–95) and no pCR were observed; Ki67 was significantly decreased by 71% (interquartile range, −82%, −62%). Toxicity was manageable: two grade 3 hypertension, four grade 3 deep venous thrombosis and no grade >2 proteinuria were observed. Treatment significantly decreased the percentage of viable CECs and prevented the chemotherapy-induced mobilisation of circulating progenitors. Basal circulating progenitors were positively associated with clinical response. In conclusion, bevacizumab is feasible and active in association with primary chemoendocrine therapy for ER-positive tumours in terms of proliferation inhibition, clinical response and antiangiogenic activity. PMID:18941458

  1. Initial clinical evaluation of radiolabeled MX-DTPA humanized BrE-3 antibody in patients with advanced breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Kramer, E L; Liebes, L; Wasserheit, C; Noz, M E; Blank, E W; Zabalegui, A; Melamed, J; Furmanski, P; Peterson, J A; Ceriani, R L

    1998-07-01

    To evaluate radiometal-labeled humanized BrE-3 (huBrE-3) monoclonal antibody as a radioimmunolocalization and therapeutic agent in breast cancer patients, tumor localization, pharmacokinetics, radiation dosimetry, and immunogenicity of (111)In-labeled combined 1-p-isothiocyanatobenzyl 3-methyl- and 1-p-isothiocyanatobenzyl 4-methyldiethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (MX-DTPA) huBrE-3 were studied. Seven women with BrE-3 antigen-positive, metastatic breast carcinoma underwent (111)In huBrE-3 infusion (5 mCi; 50 mg), followed by serial gamma camera imaging and plasma sampling. Region of interest analysis of images was used to make radiation absorbed dose estimates for (111)In huBrE-3. Data were extrapolated to 90Y huBrE-3. Human anti-human antibody (HAHA) response was measured in serum samples obtained up to 3 months after infusion. Patients tolerated infusions well. Seventy-six percent of 105 known sites of disease were identified on planar and single-photon emission computed tomography scans. For six of seven patients, a biexponential model fit the plasma time-activity curve best with an average T1/2alpha=10.6+/-8.5 (SD) h and average T1/2beta=114.2+/-39.2 h. Radiation absorbed dose estimates for (111)In huBrE-3 for whole body averaged 0.53+/-.08 rads/mCi. Dose estimates for 90Y huBrE-3 for marrow averaged 8.4+/-11.9 rads/mCi, and for tumors, 70+/-31.5 rads/mCi. Liver radioactivity uptake averaged 19.7+/-8.8% injected dose at 24 h after infusion, translating into an average radiation absorbed dose 21.1+/-12 rads/90Y mCi administered. Only one of seven patients demonstrated a low level of HAHA response. Although the plasma half-lives are longer and marrow dose higher for radiolabeled huBrE-3 compared with the murine construct, the excellent tumor localization, good tumor dosimetry, and low immunogenicity support the use of 90Y-huBrE-3 antibody for radioimmunotherapy of breast cancer. PMID:9676842

  2. Randomized Phase III Placebo-Controlled Trial of Letrozole Plus Oral Temsirolimus As First-Line Endocrine Therapy in Postmenopausal Women With Locally Advanced or Metastatic Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wolff, Antonio C.; Lazar, Ann A.; Bondarenko, Igor; Garin, August M.; Brincat, Stephen; Chow, Louis; Sun, Yan; Neskovic-Konstantinovic, Zora; Guimaraes, Rodrigo C.; Fumoleau, Pierre; Chan, Arlene; Hachemi, Soulef; Strahs, Andrew; Cincotta, Maria; Berkenblit, Anna; Krygowski, Mizue; Kang, Lih Lisa; Moore, Laurence; Hayes, Daniel F.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Recent data showed improvement in progression-free survival (PFS) when adding everolimus to exemestane in patients with advanced breast cancer experiencing recurrence/progression after nonsteroidal aromatase inhibitor (AI) therapy. Here, we report clinical outcomes of combining the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitor temsirolimus with letrozole in AI-naive patients. Patients and Methods This phase III randomized placebo-controlled study tested efficacy/safety of first-line oral letrozole 2.5 mg daily/temsirolimus 30 mg daily (5 days every 2 weeks) versus letrozole/placebo in 1,112 patients with AI-naive, hormone receptor–positive advanced disease. An independent data monitoring committee recommended study termination for futility at the second preplanned interim analysis (382 PFS events). Results Patients were balanced (median age, 63 years; 10% stage III, 40% had received adjuvant endocrine therapy). Those on letrozole/temsirolimus experienced more grade 3 to 4 events (37% v 24%). There was no overall improvement in primary end point PFS (median, 9 months; hazard ratio [HR], 0.90; 95% CI, 0.76 to 1.07; P = .25) nor in the 40% patient subset with prior adjuvant endocrine therapy. An exploratory analysis showed improved PFS favoring letrozole/temsirolimus in patients ≤ age 65 years (9.0 v 5.6 months; HR, 0.75; 95% CI, 0.60 to 0.93; P = .009), which was separately examined by an exploratory analysis of 5-month PFS using subpopulation treatment effect pattern plot methodology (P = .003). Conclusion Adding temsirolimus to letrozole did not improve PFS as first-line therapy in patients with AI-naive advanced breast cancer. Exploratory analyses of benefit in younger postmenopausal patients require external confirmation. PMID:23233719

  3. 99mTc-Sestamibi Using a Direct Conversion Molecular Breast Imaging System to Assess Tumor Response to Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy in Women With Locally Advanced Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, David; Hruska, Carrie B.; Boughey, Judy C.; Wahner-Roedler, Dietlind L.; Jones, Katie N.; Tortorelli, Cindy; Conners, Amy Lynn; O’Connor, Michael K.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The objective of this study was to determine the ability of breast imaging with 99mTc-sestamibi and a direct conversion–molecular breast imaging (MBI) system to predict early response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC). Methods Patients undergoing NAC for breast cancer were imaged with a direct conversion–MBI system before (baseline), at 3 to 5 weeks after onset, and after completion of NAC. Tumor size and tumor-to-background (T/B) uptake ratio measured from MBI images were compared with extent of residual disease at surgery using the residual cancer burden. Results Nineteen patients completed imaging and proceeded to surgical resection after NAC. Mean reduction in T/B ratio from baseline to 3 to 5 weeks for patients classified as RCB-0 (no residual disease), RCB-1 and RCB-2 combined, and RCB-3 (extensive residual disease) was 56% (SD, 0.20), 28% (SD, 0.20), and 4% (SD, 0.15), respectively. The reduction in the RCB-0 group was significantly greater than in RCB-1/2 (P = 0.036) and RCB-3 (P = 0.001) groups. The area under the receiver operator characteristic curve for determining the presence or absence of residual disease was 0.88. Using a threshold of 50% reduction in T/B ratio at 3 to 5 weeks, MBI predicted presence of residual disease at surgery with a diagnostic accuracy of 89.5% (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.64%–0.99%), sensitivity of 92.3% (95% CI, 0.74%–0.99%), and specificity of 83.3% (95% CI, 0.44%–0.99%). The reduction in tumor size at 3 to 5 weeks was not statistically different between RCB groups. Conclusions Changes in T/B ratio on MBI images performed at 3 to 5 weeks following initiation of NAC were accurate at predicting the presence or absence of residual disease at NAC completion. PMID:24152645

  4. Biomarkers to Target Heterogeneous Breast Cancer Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hwang-Verslues, Wendy W.; Lee, Wen-Hwa; Lee, Eva Y.-H.P.

    2012-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer and the second leading cause of death in U.S. women. Due to early detection and advanced treatment, the breast cancer death rate has been declining since 1990. However, disease recurrence is still the major obstacle in moving from therapy to truly curative treatments. Recent evidence has indicated that breast cancer recurrence is often caused by a subpopulation of breast cancer cells. This subset of cancer cells, usually referred to as breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs), exhibits stem cell phenotypes. They can self-renew and asymmetrically divide to more differentiated cancer cells. These cells are also highly resistant to conventional therapeutic reagents. Therefore, identifying and characterizing these BCSC subpopulations within the larger population of breast cancer cells is essential for developing new strategies to treat breast cancer and prevent recurrence. In this review article, we discuss the current proposed model for the origin of tumor heterogeneity, summarize the recent findings of cell surface and cytoplasmic markers for BCSC identification, review the regulatory mechanisms by which BCSCs maintain or non-cancer stem cells acquire BCSC characteristics, describe the proposed strategies to eliminate BCSCs, and highlight the current limitations and challenges to translate basic BCSC research to clinical application including establishment of clinical biomarkers and therapeutic treatments specifically targeting BCSCs. PMID:24977105

  5. Sunitinib Plus Paclitaxel Versus Bevacizumab Plus Paclitaxel for First-Line Treatment of Patients With Advanced Breast Cancer: A Phase III, Randomized, Open-Label Trial

    PubMed Central

    Robert, Nicholas J.; Saleh, Mansoor N.; Paul, Devchand; Generali, Daniele; Gressot, Laurent; Copur, Mehmet S.; Brufsky, Adam M.; Minton, Susan E.; Giguere, Jeffrey K.; Smith, John W.; Richards, Paul D.; Gernhardt, Diana; Huang, Xin; Liau, Katherine F.; Kern, Kenneth A.; Davis, John

    2015-01-01

    Introduction A multicenter, open-label phase III study was conducted to test whether sunitinib plus paclitaxel prolongs progression-free survival (PFS) compared with bevacizumab plus paclitaxel as first-line treatment for patients with HER2− advanced breast cancer. Patients and Methods Patients with HER2− advanced breast cancer who were disease free for ≥ 12 months after adjuvant taxane treatment were randomized (1:1; planned enrollment 740 patients) to receive intravenous (I.V.) paclitaxel 90 mg/m2 every week for 3 weeks in 4-week cycles plus either sunitinib 25 to 37.5 mg every day or bevacizumab 10 mg/kg I.V. every 2 weeks. Results The trial was terminated early because of futility in reaching the primary endpoint as determined by the independent data monitoring committee during an interim futility analysis. At data cutoff, 242 patients had been randomized to sunitinib-paclitaxel and 243 patients to bevacizumab-paclitaxel. Median PFS was shorter with sunitinib-paclitaxel (7.4 vs. 9.2 months; hazard ratio [HR] 1.63 [95% confidence interval (CI), 1.18–2.25]; 1-sided P = .999). At a median follow-up of 8.1 months, with 79% of sunitinib-paclitaxel and 87% of bevacizumab-paclitaxel patients alive, overall survival analysis favored bevacizumab-paclitaxel (HR 1.82 [95% CI, 1.16–2.86]; 1-sided P = .996). The objective response rate was 32% in both arms, but median duration of response was shorter with sunitinib-paclitaxel (6.3 vs. 14.8 months). Bevacizumab-paclitaxel was better tolerated than sunitinib-paclitaxel. This was primarily due to a high frequency of grade 3/4, treatment-related neutropenia with sunitinib-paclitaxel (52%) precluding delivery of the prescribed doses of both drugs. Conclusion The sunitinib-paclitaxel regimen evaluated in this study was clinically inferior to the bevacizumab-paclitaxel regimen and is not a recommended treatment option for patients with advanced breast cancer. PMID:21569994

  6. A different immunologic profile characterizes patients with HER-2-overexpressing and HER-2-negative locally advanced breast cancer: implications for immune-based therapies

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction The clinical efficacy of trastuzumab and taxanes is at least partly related to their ability to mediate or promote antitumor immune responses. On these grounds, a careful analysis of basal immune profile may be capital to dissect the heterogeneity of clinical responses to these drugs in patients with locally advanced breast cancer undergoing neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Methods Blood samples were collected from 61 locally advanced breast cancers (36 HER2- and 25 HER2+) at diagnosis and from 23 healthy women. Immunophenotypic profiling of circulating and intratumor immune cells, including regulatory T (Treg) cells, was assessed by flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry, respectively. Serum levels of 10 different cytokines were assessed by multiplex immunoassays. CD8+ T cell responses to multiple tumor-associated antigens (TAA) were evaluated by IFN-γ-enzyme-linked immunosorbent spot (ELISPOT). The Student's t test for two tailed distributions and the Wilcoxon two-sample test were used for the statistical analysis of the data. Results The proportion of circulating immune effectors was similar in HER2+ patients and healthy donors, whereas higher percentages of natural killer and Treg cells and a lower CD4+/CD8+ T cell ratio (with a prevalence of naïve and central memory CD8+ T cells) were observed in HER2- cases. Higher numbers of circulating CD8+ T cells specific for several HLA-A*0201-restricted TAA-derived peptides were observed in HER2+ cases, together with a higher prevalence of intratumor CD8+ T cells. Serum cytokine profile of HER2+ patients was similar to that of controls, whereas HER2- cases showed significantly lower cytokine amounts compared to healthy women (IL-2, IL-8, IL-6) and HER2+ cases (IL-2, IL-1β, IL-8, IL-6, IL-10). Conclusions Compared to HER2- cases, patients with HER2-overexpressing locally advanced breast cancer show a more limited tumor-related immune suppression. This may account for the clinical benefit achieved in this subset

  7. [Immunotherapy opportunities in breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Pusztai, Lajos; Ladányi, Andrea; Székely, Borbála; Dank, Magdolna

    2016-03-01

    The prognostic value of tumor infiltrating lymphocytes in breast cancer has long been recognized by histopathologists. These observations were reaffirmed by recent immunohistochemistry and gene expression profiling studies that also revealed an association between greater chemotherapy sensitivity and extensive lymphocytic infiltration in early stage breast cancers treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy. These results suggest that local anti-tumor immune response can at least partially control cancer growth and may mediate the antitumor effects of chemotherapy. However, until recently, there was no direct clinical evidence to demonstrate that enhancing anti-tumor immune response could lead to clinical benefit in breast cancer patients. The recent development of clinically effective immune checkpoint inhibitors made it possible to test the therapeutic impact of augmenting the local anti-tumor immune response. Two Phase I clinical trials using single agent anti-PD-1 (MK-3475, pembrolizumab) and anti-PD-L1 (MPDL3280A, atezolizumab) antibodies demonstrated close to 20% tumor response rates in heavily pretreated, metastatic, triple negative breast cancers. The most remarkable feature of the responses was their long duration. Several patients had disease control close to a year, or longer, which has not previously been seen with chemotherapy regimens in this patient population. A large number of clinical trials are currently underway with these and similar drugs in the neoadjuvant, adjuvant and metastatic settings to define the role of this new treatment modality in breast cancer. PMID:26934349

  8. Breast Cancer Risk Prediction Models

    Cancer.gov

    Developing statistical models that estimate the probability of developing breast cancer over a defined period of time will help clinicians identify individuals at higher risk of specific cancers, allowing for earlier or more frequent screening and counseling of behavioral changes to decrease risk.

  9. Lipid biology of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Baumann, Jan; Sevinsky, Christopher; Conklin, Douglas S.

    2014-01-01

    Alterations in lipid metabolism have been reported in many types of cancer. Lipids have been implicated in the regulation of proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, inflammation, autophagy, motility and membrane homeostasis. It is required that their biosynthesis is tightly regulated to ensure homeostasis and to prevent unnecessary energy expenditure. This review focuses on the emerging understanding of the role of lipids and lipogenic pathway regulation in breast cancer, including parallels drawn from the study of metabolic disease models, and suggestions on how these findings can potentially be exploited to promote gains in HER2/neu-positive breast cancer research. PMID:23562840

  10. Medical Prevention of Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Stubert, Johannes; Dieterich, Max; Gerber, Bernd

    2014-01-01

    Summary Breast cancer is the most common cancer of women in Western Europe and North America. Effective strategies of medical prevention could reduce the burden of breast cancer mortality. The best evidence for a risk reduction exists for hormonal agents such as tamoxifen and raloxifene (22–72%) or aromatase inhibitors (50–65%). However, the severity of side effects and the lack of evidence for an improved survival compromise the risk/benefit balance. In this review the results of chemoprevention studies, including new treatment approaches, are summarized with critical discussion of their use in clinical practice. PMID:25759621

  11. Mouse Models of Breast Cancer: Platforms for Discovering Precision Imaging Diagnostics and Future Cancer Medicine.

    PubMed

    Manning, H Charles; Buck, Jason R; Cook, Rebecca S

    2016-02-01

    Representing an enormous health care and socioeconomic challenge, breast cancer is the second most common cancer in the world and the second most common cause of cancer-related death. Although many of the challenges associated with preventing, treating, and ultimately curing breast cancer are addressable in the laboratory, successful translation of groundbreaking research to clinical populations remains an important barrier. Particularly when compared with research on other types of solid tumors, breast cancer research is hampered by a lack of tractable in vivo model systems that accurately recapitulate the relevant clinical features of the disease. A primary objective of this article was to provide a generalizable overview of the types of in vivo model systems, with an emphasis primarily on murine models, that are widely deployed in preclinical breast cancer research. Major opportunities to advance precision cancer medicine facilitated by molecular imaging of preclinical breast cancer models are discussed. PMID:26834104

  12. Breast Cancer Research at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Isolation of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Isolate of long-term growth human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) from outgrowth of duct element; cells shown soon after isolation and early in culture in a dish. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cell (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunorous tissue. Credit: Dr. Robert Tichmond, NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC).

  13. Breast Cancer Research at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Isolation of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Outgrowth of cells from duct element in upper right corner cultured in a standard dish; most cells spontaneously die during early cell divisions, but a few will establish long-term growth. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cell (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunorous tissue. Credit: Dr. Robert Tichmond, NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC).

  14. Breast Cancer Research at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Isolation of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Same long-term growth human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC), but after 3 weeks in concinuous culture. Note attempts to reform duct elements, but this time in two dimensions in a dish rather that in three demensions in tissue. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cell (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunorous tissue. Credit: Dr. Robert Tichmond, NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC).

  15. A global economic model to assess the cost-effectiveness of new treatments for advanced breast cancer in Canada.

    PubMed

    Beauchemin, C; Letarte, N; Mathurin, K; Yelle, L; Lachaine, J

    2016-06-01

    Objective Considering the increasing number of treatment options for metastatic breast cancer (MBC), it is important to develop high-quality methods to assess the cost-effectiveness of new anti-cancer drugs. This study aims to develop a global economic model that could be used as a benchmark for the economic evaluation of new therapies for MBC. Methods The Global Pharmacoeconomics of Metastatic Breast Cancer (GPMBC) model is a Markov model that was constructed to estimate the incremental cost per quality-adjusted life years (QALY) of new treatments for MBC from a Canadian healthcare system perspective over a lifetime horizon. Specific parameters included in the model are cost of drug treatment, survival outcomes, and incidence of treatment-related adverse events (AEs). Global parameters are patient characteristics, health states utilities, disutilities, and costs associated with treatment-related AEs, as well as costs associated with drug administration, medical follow-up, and end-of-life care. The GPMBC model was tested and validated in a specific context, by assessing the cost-effectiveness of lapatinib plus letrozole compared with other widely used first-line therapies for post-menopausal women with hormone receptor-positive (HR+) and epidermal growth factor receptor 2-positive (HER2+) MBC. Results When tested, the GPMBC model led to incremental cost-utility ratios of CA$131 811 per QALY, CA$56 211 per QALY, and CA$102 477 per QALY for the comparison of lapatinib plus letrozole vs letrozole alone, trastuzumab plus anastrozole, and anastrozole alone, respectively. Results of the model testing were quite similar to those obtained by Delea et al., who also assessed the cost-effectiveness of lapatinib in combination with letrozole in HR+/HER2 + MBC in Canada, thus suggesting that the GPMBC model can replicate results of well-conducted economic evaluations. Conclusions The GPMBC model can be very valuable as it allows a quick and valid assessment of the cost

  16. Correlation of polymorphism C3435T of the MDR-1 gene and the response of primary chemotherapy in women with locally advanced breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, F F O; Santos, R E; Melo, M B; Silva, M A L G; Oliveira, A L; Rozenowicz, R L; Ulson, L B; Aoki, T

    2008-01-01

    Primary chemotherapy is a useful strategy for the treatment of locally advanced breast cancer and therefore allows in vivo evaluation of the action of cytotoxic drugs and the possibility of accomplishing conservative breast surgeries, as well as the early treatment of metastasis. Mechanisms of resistance to the drugs include the action of protein associated with the efflux of drugs from the intracellular environment hindering their activity; one of the most studied proteins is P-glycoprotein codified by the MDR-1 gene. The presence of polymorphisms can determine different physiological actions of these proteins, intervening with the response of the drug's action. We evaluated the presence of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) C3435T of the MDR-1 gene and its correlation with the response to primary chemotherapy using the RECIST criteria. Forty-one Brazilian women with stages II and III breast cancer using the PCR-RFLP analysis were evaluated. Thirty-three patients with the SNP genotype (TT and CT) and eight patients with the wild genotype (CC) were found; there was no statistically significant correlation between the diverse genotypes and the clinical and pathological responses according to the Cramer correlation coefficient (V = 0.14). The parameters: nuclear and histological degree, and estrogens, progesterone and c-erb B2 receptors did not demonstrate a statistical correlation with the SNP C3435T. Patients with complete pathological response (12.5%) showed only the polymorphic genotype and not the wild genotype. The characteristics of miscegenation in our population could explain the absence of the characterization of a sub-group of individuals where the presence of the polymorphic genotype influenced the response to the primary chemotherapy. PMID:18393221

  17. Honoring Pioneers in Breast Cancer Research

    MedlinePlus

    ... Current Issue Past Issues Honoring Pioneers in Breast Cancer Research Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table of Contents For ... Distinguished Medical Service Award for their pioneering breast cancer research. Photo courtesy of Bill Branson, NIH In this ...

  18. Screening for Breast Cancer: Detection and Diagnosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Screening For Breast Cancer Detection and Diagnosis Past Issues / Summer 2014 Table ... States Preventive Services Task Force updated recommendations on breast cancer screening, suggesting that women ages 50 to 74 ...

  19. Breast Cancer Prevention and Early Detection

    MedlinePlus

    ... saved articles window. My Saved Articles » My ACS » Breast Cancer Prevention and Early Detection Download Printable Version [PDF] » ( ... the factors that may affect your risk for breast cancer, and find out what you can do to ...

  20. Antiperspirants/Deodorants and Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Overview–for health professionals Research Antiperspirants/Deodorants and Breast Cancer On This Page Can antiperspirants or deodorants cause breast cancer? What do scientists know about the ingredients in ...

  1. Screening for Breast Cancer: Staging and Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Screening For Breast Cancer Staging and Treatment Past Issues / Summer 2014 Table of Contents Staging The extent (stage) of breast cancer needs to be determined to help choose the ...

  2. Reproductive History and Breast Cancer Risk

    MedlinePlus

    ... Overview–for health professionals Research Reproductive History and Breast Cancer Risk On This Page Is there a relationship between pregnancy and breast cancer risk? Are any pregnancy-related factors associated with ...

  3. Breast Cancer: Match of Her Life

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Breast Cancer The Match of Her Life Past Issues / Spring - ... Martina Navratilova stays strong in her battle against breast cancer and her work to help Americans live healthier, ...

  4. Treatment of Breast Cancer during Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2016 Back to top » Guide Topics What Is Breast Cancer? Causes, Risk Factors, and Prevention Early Detection, Diagnosis, and Staging Treating Breast Cancer Talking With Your Doctor After Treatment What`s New ...

  5. Why Breast Cancer Survivors Should Exercise

    MedlinePlus

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_159781.html Why Breast Cancer Survivors Should Exercise Moderate physical activity can ease ... Excessive stress can lead to memory problems among breast cancer survivors, but exercise can help, according to new ...

  6. Honoring Pioneers in Breast Cancer Research

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Current Issue Past Issues Honoring Pioneers in Breast Cancer Research Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table of Contents ... the Distinguished Medical Service Award for their pioneering breast cancer research. Photo courtesy of Bill Branson, NIH In ...

  7. Breast Cancer and Estrogen-Alone Update

    MedlinePlus

    ... Current Issue Past Issues Research News From NIH Breast Cancer and Estrogen-Alone Update Past Issues / Summer 2006 ... hormone therapy does not increase the risk of breast cancer in postmenopausal women, according to an updated analysis ...

  8. Breast Cancer and the Environment Research Program

    Cancer.gov

    The Breast Cancer and the Environment Research Program supports a multidisciplinary network of scientists, clinicians, and community partners to examine the effects of environmental exposures that may predispose a woman to breast cancer throughout her life.

  9. Breast Cancer Gene Might Lower Women's Fertility

    MedlinePlus

    ... nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_158409.html Breast Cancer Gene Might Lower Women's Fertility: Study The BRCA1 ... that is linked to a greater risk of breast cancer may also be tied to potential fertility problems, ...

  10. Breast Cancer Gene Might Lower Women's Fertility

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_158409.html Breast Cancer Gene Might Lower Women's Fertility: Study The BRCA1 ... that is linked to a greater risk of breast cancer may also be tied to potential fertility problems, ...

  11. IOERT as anticipated tumor bed boost during breast-conserving surgery after neoadjuvant chemotherapy in locally advanced breast cancer--results of a case series after 5-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Fastner, Gerd; Reitsamer, Roland; Ziegler, Ingrid; Zehentmayr, Franz; Fussl, Christoph; Kopp, Peter; Peintinger, Florentia; Greil, Richard; Fischer, Thorsten; Deutschmann, Heinrich; Sedlmayer, Felix

    2015-03-01

    To evaluate retrospectively rates of local (LCR) and locoregional tumor control (LRCR) in patients with locally advanced breast cancer (LABC) who were treated with preoperative chemotherapy (primary systemic treatment, PST) followed by breast-conserving surgery (BCS) and either intraoperative radiotherapy with electrons (IOERT) preceding whole-breast irradiation (WBI) (Group 1) or with WBI followed by an external tumor bed boost (electrons or photons) instead of IOERT (Group 2). From 2002 to 2007, 83 patients with clinical Stage II or III breast cancer were enrolled in Group 1 and 26 in Group 2. All patients received PST followed by BCS and axillary lymph node dissection. IOERT boosts were applied by single doses of 9 Gy (90% reference isodose) versus external boosts of 12 Gy (median dose range, 6-16) in 2 Gy/fraction (ICRU). WBI in both groups was performed up to total doses of 51-57 Gy (1.7-1.8 Gy/fraction). The respective median follow-up times for Groups 1 and 2 amount 59 months (range, 3-115) and 67.5 months (range, 13-120). Corresponding 6-year rates for LCR, LRCR, metastasis-free survival, disease-specific survival and overall survival were 98.5, 97.2, 84.7, 89.2 and 86.4% for Group 1 and 88.1, 88.1, 74, 92 and 92% for Group 2, respectively, without any statistical significances. IOERT as boost modality during BCS in LABC after PST shows a trend to be superior in terms of LCR and LRCR in comparison with conventional boosts. PMID:24995409

  12. Physicians’ influence on breast cancer patient compliance

    PubMed Central

    Kostev, Karel; Waehlert, Lilia; Jockwig, Achim; Jockwig, Barbara; Hadji, Peyman

    2014-01-01

    In recent years there have been major advances in the treatment of breast cancer. However, taking the prescribed medication for a sufficient period of time is crucial to the success of any therapy. Thus far, no database-based studies have been published in German-speaking countries empirically examining the influence of the physician on the compliance of patients. The aim of this study is to investigate, quantify, and critically discuss the effect treating physicians have on the compliance of their breast cancer patients. Patients with a confirmed breast cancer diagnosis who started therapy (tamoxifen or aromatase inhibitors) between January 2001 and December 2011 were selected from the representative IMS Disease Analyzer database and analyzed with regard to their compliance. Practices were grouped into two categories concerning the compliance of all treated patients. A regression model showed that a breast cancer patient who is treated in a practice with a trend toward poor compliance has a nearly 60% higher risk for treatment discontinuation than would be the case in a practice with good compliance. It shows how important it is to motivate physicians to strive toward good compliance rates. PMID:24454275

  13. Fertility Issues of Breast Cancer Survivors

    PubMed Central

    McClellan Misiewicz, Hollis

    2012-01-01

    In the United States, more women are diagnosed with breast cancer than any other type of cancer. More than 11,000 of these women will be younger than 40, and many of these women will want to have children in the future. A significant number of these young breast cancer patients will require treatment that can cause ovarian failure or premature menopause. Several options do exist for fertility preservation, both standard and investigational. Embryo cryopreservation is the most established intervention. Investigational interventions include oocyte cryopreservation, ovarian tissue transplantation, ovarian suppression with a gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist, and harvesting of immature follicles with in vitro maturation and cryopreservation. Although pregnancy during cancer treatment is not recommended, pregnancies occurring after completion of therapy have not been linked to increased cancer recurrence. Young women diagnosed with breast cancer need evidence-based information presented in a timely manner in order to make decisions regarding fertility preservation prior to the initiation of treatment. The oncology advanced practitioner must be knowledgeable about fertility preservation options available to these women as well as comfortable with ethical and financial concerns that can arise. The informed practitioner can effectively counsel patients and refer to fertility specialists when appropriate. PMID:25031958

  14. Study of Efficacy and Safety of LEE011 in Men and Postmenopausal Women With Advanced Breast Cancer.

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-31

    Breast Neoplasms; Breast Diseases; Neoplasms; Neoplasms by Site; Fulvestrant; Antineoplastic Agents; Antineoplastic Agents, Hormonal; Estrogen Receptor Antagonists; Hormone Antagonists; Hormones, Hormone Substitutes, and Hormone Antagonists; Molecular Mechanisms of Pharmacological Action; Pharmacologic Actions; Therapeutic Use

  15. Multicenter Breast Cancer Collaborative Registry

    PubMed Central

    Sherman, Simon; Shats, Oleg; Fleissner, Elizabeth; Bascom, George; Yiee, Kevin; Copur, Mehmet; Crow, Kate; Rooney, James; Mateen, Zubeena; Ketcham, Marsha A.; Feng, Jianmin; Sherman, Alexander; Gleason, Michael; Kinarsky, Leo; Silva-Lopez, Edibaldo; Edney, James; Reed, Elizabeth; Berger, Ann; Cowan, Kenneth

    2011-01-01

    The Breast Cancer Collaborative Registry (BCCR) is a multicenter web-based system that efficiently collects and manages a variety of data on breast cancer (BC) patients and BC survivors. This registry is designed as a multi-tier web application that utilizes Java Servlet/JSP technology and has an Oracle 11g database as a back-end. The BCCR questionnaire has accommodated standards accepted in breast cancer research and healthcare. By harmonizing the controlled vocabulary with the NCI Thesaurus (NCIt) or Systematized Nomenclature of Medicine-Clinical Terms (SNOMED-CT), the BCCR provides a standardized approach to data collection and reporting. The BCCR has been recently certified by the National Cancer Institute’s Center for Biomedical Informatics and Information Technology (NCI CBIIT) as a cancer Biomedical Informatics Grid (caBIG®) Bronze Compatible product. The BCCR is aimed at facilitating rapid and uniform collection of critical information and biological samples to be used in developing diagnostic, prevention, treatment, and survivorship strategies against breast cancer. Currently, seven cancer institutions are participating in the BCCR that contains data on almost 900 subjects (BC patients and survivors, as well as individuals at high risk of getting BC). PMID:21918596

  16. Multicenter breast cancer collaborative registry.

    PubMed

    Sherman, Simon; Shats, Oleg; Fleissner, Elizabeth; Bascom, George; Yiee, Kevin; Copur, Mehmet; Crow, Kate; Rooney, James; Mateen, Zubeena; Ketcham, Marsha A; Feng, Jianmin; Sherman, Alexander; Gleason, Michael; Kinarsky, Leo; Silva-Lopez, Edibaldo; Edney, James; Reed, Elizabeth; Berger, Ann; Cowan, Kenneth

    2011-01-01

    The Breast Cancer Collaborative Registry (BCCR) is a multicenter web-based system that efficiently collects and manages a variety of data on breast cancer (BC) patients and BC survivors. This registry is designed as a multi-tier web application that utilizes Java Servlet/JSP technology and has an Oracle 11g database as a back-end. The BCCR questionnaire has accommodated standards accepted in breast cancer research and healthcare. By harmonizing the controlled vocabulary with the NCI Thesaurus (NCIt) or Systematized Nomenclature of Medicine-Clinical Terms (SNOMED-CT), the BCCR provides a standardized approach to data collection and reporting. The BCCR has been recently certified by the National Cancer Institute's Center for Biomedical Informatics and Information Technology (NCI CBIIT) as a cancer Biomedical Informatics Grid (caBIG(®)) Bronze Compatible product.The BCCR is aimed at facilitating rapid and uniform collection of critical information and biological samples to be used in developing diagnostic, prevention, treatment, and survivorship strategies against breast cancer. Currently, seven cancer institutions are participating in the BCCR that contains data on almost 900 subjects (BC patients and survivors, as well as individuals at high risk of getting BC). PMID:21918596

  17. Veliparib, Cisplatin, and Vinorelbine Ditartrate in Treating Patients With Recurrent and/or Metastatic Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-01

    Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Hereditary Breast/Ovarian Cancer - BRCA1; Hereditary Breast/Ovarian Cancer - BRCA2; Male Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer

  18. Exemestane Reduces Breast Cancer Risk in High-Risk Postmenopausal Women

    Cancer.gov

    Clinical trial results presented at the 2011 ASCO annual meeting showed that the aromatase inhibitor exemestane—used to treat early and advanced breast cancer—substantially reduced the risk of invasive breast cancer in high-risk postmenopausal women.

  19. Incidence of primary breast cancer in Iran: Ten-year national cancer registry data report.

    PubMed

    Jazayeri, Seyed Behzad; Saadat, Soheil; Ramezani, Rashid; Kaviani, Ahmad

    2015-08-01

    Breast cancer is the leading type of malignancy and the leading cause of cancer-related deaths in women worldwide. The screening programs and advances in the treatment of patients with breast cancer have led to an increase in overall survival. Cancer registry systems play an important role in providing basic data for research and the monitoring of the cancer status. In this study, the results of the 10-year national cancer registry (NCR) of Iran in breast cancer are reviewed. NCR database records were searched for primary breast cancer records according to ICD-O-3 coding and the cases were reviewed. A total of 52,068 cases were found with the coding of primary breast cancer. Females constituted 97.1% of the cases. Breast cancer was the leading type of cancer in Iranian females, accounting for 24.6% of all cancers. The mean age of the women with breast cancer was 49.6 years (95%CI 49.5-49.6). Most of the cases (95.7%) were registered as having invasive pathologies (behavior code 3). The most common morphology of primary breast cancer was invasive ductal carcinoma (ICD-O 8500/3) followed by invasive lobular carcinoma (ICD-O 8520/3) with relative frequencies of 77.8% and 5.2%, respectively. The average annual crude incidence of primary breast cancer in females was 22.6 (95%CI 22.1-23.1) per 100,000 females, with an age-standardized rate (ASR) of 27.4 (95%CI 22.5-35.9). There were no data on survival, staging or immunohistochemical marker(s) of the breast-cancer-registered cases. The incidence of breast cancer in Iran is lower than in low-middle-income neighboring countries. The NCR data registry of breast cancer is not accurate in monitoring the effect of screening programs or determining the current status of breast cancer in Iran. Screening programs of breast cancer in Iran have failed to enhance the detection of the patients with in situ lesion detection. A quality breast cancer registry and a screening program for breast cancer are both needed. PMID:26070507

  20. Fulvestrant and Palbociclib in Treating Older Patients With Hormone Responsive Breast Cancer That Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-20

    Estrogen Receptor and/or Progesterone Receptor Positive; HER2/Neu Negative; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  1. Minocycline Hydrochloride in Reducing Chemotherapy Induced Depression and Anxiety in Patients With Stage I-III Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-07

    Anxiety Disorder; Depression; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  2. Heavy Metal Exposure in Predicting Peripheral Neuropathy in Patients With Stage I-III Breast Cancer Undergoing Chemotherapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-05-01

    Male Breast Cancer; Neurotoxicity; Peripheral Neuropathy; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  3. Internet Use and Breast Cancer Survivors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muhamad, Mazanah; Afshari, Mojgan; Mohamed, Nor Aini

    2011-01-01

    A survey was administered to 400 breast cancer survivors at hospitals and support group meetings in Peninsular Malaysia to explore their level of Internet use and factors related to the Internet use by breast cancer survivors. Findings of this study indicated that about 22.5% of breast cancer survivors used Internet to get information about breast…

  4. Breast Cancer, Version 3.2013

    PubMed Central

    Theriault, Richard L.; Carlson, Robert W.; Allred, Craig; Anderson, Benjamin O.; Burstein, Harold J.; Edge, Stephen B.; Farrar, William B.; Forero, Andres; Giordano, Sharon Hermes; Goldstein, Lori J.; Gradishar, William J.; Hayes, Daniel F.; Hudis, Clifford A.; Isakoff, Steven J.; Ljung, Britt-Marie E.; Mankoff, David A.; Marcom, P. Kelly; Mayer, Ingrid A.; McCormick, Beryl; Pierce, Lori J.; Reed, Elizabeth C.; Schwartzberg, Lee S.; Smith, Mary Lou; Soliman, Hatem; Somlo, George; Ward, John H.; Wolff, Antonio C.; Zellars, Richard; Shead, Dorothy A.; Kumar, Rashmi

    2014-01-01

    These NCCN Guidelines Insights highlight the important updates specific to the management of HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer in the 2013 version of the NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology for Breast Cancer. These include new first-line and subsequent therapy options for patients with HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer. PMID:23847214

  5. Efficacy and Cardiotoxicity of Liposomal Doxorubicin-Based Chemotherapy in Advanced Breast Cancer: A Meta-Analysis of Ten Randomized Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Meiyuan; Yan, Feifei; Yu, Sufen; Shen, Peng

    2015-01-01

    Background Various trials have compared the efficacy and toxicity of liposomal doxorubicin-based chemotherapy with the conventional formulation of doxorubicin although arriving at inconsistent conclusions. To derive a conclusive assessment of the efficacy and cardiotoxicity associated with chemotherapy, we performed a meta-analysis by combining data from all eligible randomized controlled trials. Methods We used the PubMed database to identify relevant studies published through December 28, 2014. Eligible studies included randomized controlled trials directly comparing the efficacy and cardiotoxicity of liposomal doxorubicin-based chemotherapy with conventional doxorubicin in advanced breast cancer with adequate data. Odds ratios (ORs) or hazard ratios (HRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were used to assess the efficacy and cardiotoxicity in a fixed-effects or random-effects model. Results Ten randomized controlled trials containing efficacy and data from a total of 2,889 advanced breast cancer patients were included in this report. Liposomal doxorubicin-based chemotherapy was associated with a significant reduction in the risk of cardiotoxicity (OR = 0.46, 95% CI 0.23 to 0.92, p = 0.03) and a significant improvement in the overall response rate (ORR) (OR = 1.25, 95% CI 1.02 to 1.52, p=0.03) compared with conventional doxorubicin. An apparent improvement in progression-free survival (PFS) for patients treated with liposomal doxorubicin-based chemotherapy was noted; however, this difference was not significant (HR = 1.14, 95% CI 0.96 to 1.34, p = 0.12). In terms of overall survival (OS), no significant difference between the two chemotherapy regimens was noted (HR = 1.00, 95% CI 0.91 to 1.10, p = 0.93). Conclusion The results of this meta-analysis suggest that liposomal doxorubicin-based chemotherapy is associated with a significant improvement in the ORR and a significant reduction in the risk of cardiotoxicity. PMID:26204517

  6. Pharmacokinetics, pharmacological and anti-tumour effects of the specific anti-oestrogen ICI 182780 in women with advanced breast cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Howell, A.; DeFriend, D. J.; Robertson, J. F.; Blamey, R. W.; Anderson, L.; Anderson, E.; Sutcliffe, F. A.; Walton, P.

    1996-01-01

    We have assessed the pharmacokinetics, pharmacological and anti-tumour effects of the specific steroidal anti-oestrogen ICI 182780 in 19 patients with advanced breast cancer resistant to tamoxifen. The agent was administered as a monthly depot intramuscular injection. Peak levels of ICI 182780 occurred a median of 8-9 days after dosing and then declined but were above the projected therapeutic threshold at day 28. Cmax during the first month was 10.5 ng/ml-1 and during the sixth month was 12.6 ng ml-1. The AUCs were 140.5 and 206.8 ng day ml-1 on the first and sixth month of dosing respectively, suggesting some drug accumulation. Luteinising hormone (LH) and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) levels rose after withdrawal of tamoxifen and then plateaued, suggesting no effect of ICI 182780 on the pituitary-hypothalamic axis. There were no significant changes in serum levels of prolactin, sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) or lipids. Side-effects were infrequent. Hot-flushes and sweats were not induced and there was no apparent effect of treatment upon the endometrium or vagina. Thirteen (69%) patients responded (seven had partial responses and six showed "no change' responses) to ICI 182780, after progression on tamoxifen, for a median duration of 25 months. Thus ICI 182780, given by monthly depot injection, and at the drug levels described, is an active second-line anti-oestrogen without apparent negative effects on the liver, brain or genital tract and warrants further evaluation in patients with advanced breast cancer. PMID:8688341

  7. Can We Prevent Breast Cancer?

    PubMed Central

    Saadat, Sabiha

    2008-01-01

    Breast cancer is the second most common cancer in the world and the most common cancer in females accounting to 23% of all cases. Between January 1998 and December 2004–2004, 6,882 cases were reported from all GCC states accounting to 11.8% from all cancers and 22.7% from cancers in females. An ASR/100,000 woman was 46.4 from Bahrain, 44.3 from Kuwait, 35.5 from Qatar, 19.2 from UAE, 14.2 from Oman and 12.9 from KSA. Breast cancer is the most frequent cancer in Arab women constituting 14–42% of all women cancers. Breast cancer in Arab countries presents almost 10 yrs younger than in USA and Europe. Median age at presentation is 48–52 and 50% of all cases are below the age of 50 where as only 25% of cases in industrialized nations are below the age of 50 yrs. What we need to fight this deadly disease is opening of screening centers with trained physicians equipped with ultrasound, x-ray unit, a pathology lab and most of all a system where a patient is seen urgently on referral to a secondary level care. Health education campaigns should be organized, female medical students should be encouraged to be general surgeons in a community where social customs still have value. PMID:21475500

  8. [Cancer in ectopic breast tissue].

    PubMed

    Røikjer, Johan; Lindmark, Ida; Knudsen, Thor

    2015-06-15

    Two different forms of ectopic breast tissue exist in human beings: supernumerary and aberrant. Both forms are usually seen alongside the milk lines, which extend from the upper limbs to the inguinal region where they give rise to mammary glands, areolas and nipples. Although ectopic- and orthotopic breast tissue are placed in different areas of the body, they still share the same ability to undergo pathological degeneration. The focus of this case report is to shed light on this unusual form of breast cancer, and raise the level of awareness in cases with lumps located in the milk lines. PMID:26101129

  9. Evaluate Risk/Benefit of Nab Paclitaxel in Combination With Gemcitabine and Carboplatin Compared to Gemcitabine and Carboplatin in Triple Negative Metastatic Breast Cancer (or Metastatic Triple Negative Breast Cancer)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-12

    Breast Tumor; Breast Cancer; Cancer of the Breast; Estrogen Receptor- Negative Breast Cancer; HER2- Negative Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor- Negative Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Metastatic Breast Cancer; Metastatic Breast Cancer

  10. Breast Cancer Research at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunourous tissues. Here, two High-Aspect Ratio Vessels turn at about 12 rmp to keep breast tissue constructs suspended inside the culture media. Syringes allow scientists to pull for analysis during growth sequences. The tube in the center is a water bubbler that dehumidifies the air to prevent evaporation of the media and thus the appearance of destructive bubbles in the bioreactor.

  11. Tamoxifen for breast cancer prevention

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, V.C.

    1995-02-01

    The case for tamoxifen to be tested as a preventive for breast cancer has merit. Animal studies demonstrate that tamoxifen prevents mammary carcinogenesis and clinical studies now confirm that adjuvant tamoxifen therapy is the only systemic treatment that will prevent contralateral breast cancer. Developing clinical studies confirm the laboratory data that tamoxifen will maintain post-menopausal bone density in the lumbar spine and the neck of the femur; two important skeletal sites for the ultimate prevention of osteoporosis. However, a most important target site-specific effect of tamoxifen is the decrease in low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels in postmenopausal women. This positive property of tamoxifen may be responsible for the recorded decreases in hospital visits for the treatment of cardiac conditions and the significant decrease in fatal myocardial infarction for women treated with 5 years of adjuvant tamoxifen. These data provide the scientific basis to undertake randomized, placebocontrolled clinical trials to test the worth of tamoxifen to prevent breast cancer.

  12. Denosumab in breast cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Drooger, Jan C; van der Padt, Annemieke; Sleijfer, Stefan; Jager, Agnes

    2013-10-01

    The bone is the most common site to which breast cancer metastasises. Recently, denosumab, a fully human monoclonal antibody that binds to receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL) has been developed as a new targeted bone therapy. In a large randomized phase III study with a head-to-head comparison of denosumab to zoledronic acid in patients with bone metastases of breast cancer, denosumab significantly delayed the time to first skeletal related event. In the adjuvant setting denosumab significantly increased bone mineral density compared to placebo in a phase III study in patients treated with aromatase inhibitors. Preclinical data suggest an effect of denosumab on tumour growth and even on carcinogenesis. This review describes the current indications for denosumab in the various settings of breast cancer treatment, with special attention for efficacy, short and long term toxicity and other relevant issues for clinical practice. Furthermore possible and necessary future research questions are proposed. PMID:23545361

  13. Breast and gastrointestinal cancer updates from ASCO 2015

    PubMed Central

    Dawood, Shaheenah

    2015-01-01

    This review focuses on the updates presented at the ASCO 2015 symposium in breast and gastrointestinal malignancies. Some were practice changing while others gave us an exciting glimpse into what's to come in the very near future. Immunotherapy was the buzz word this year with data presented on every tumor site. Data on the efficacy of anti PD-1 agents in colorectal, hepatocellular and gastric cancer were presented. In breast cancer we saw data on a new and exciting therapeutic target in the form of androgen receptor among triple receptor negative breast tumors presented. Positive results of the PALOMA 3 trial were presented that has given women with hormone receptor positive metastatic breast cancer another therapeutic option. Furthermore data on strategies to further improve anti her2 therapy, optimizing of chemotherapy in the early and advanced stage and various strategies to improve endocrine therapy among patients with breast cancer were presented. PMID:26855529

  14. Breast and gastrointestinal cancer updates from ASCO 2015.

    PubMed

    Dawood, Shaheenah

    2015-01-01

    This review focuses on the updates presented at the ASCO 2015 symposium in breast and gastrointestinal malignancies. Some were practice changing while others gave us an exciting glimpse into what's to come in the very near future. Immunotherapy was the buzz word this year with data presented on every tumor site. Data on the efficacy of anti PD-1 agents in colorectal, hepatocellular and gastric cancer were presented. In breast cancer we saw data on a new and exciting therapeutic target in the form of androgen receptor among triple receptor negative breast tumors presented. Positive results of the PALOMA 3 trial were presented that has given women with hormone receptor positive metastatic breast cancer another therapeutic option. Furthermore data on strategies to further improve anti her2 therapy, optimizing of chemotherapy in the early and advanced stage and various strategies to improve endocrine therapy among patients with breast cancer were presented. PMID:26855529

  15. Diffuse Optical Monitoring of the Neoadjuvant Breast Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Choe, Regine; Durduran, Turgut

    2012-01-01

    Recent advances in the use of diffuse optical techniques for monitoring the hemodynamic, metabolic and physiological signatures of the neoadjuvant breast cancer therapy effectiveness is critically reviewed. An extensive discussion of the state-of-theart diffuse optical mammography is presented alongside a discussion of the current approaches to breast cancer therapies. Overall, the diffuse optics field is growing rapidly with a great deal of promise to fill an important niche in the current approaches to monitor, predict and personalize neoadjuvant breast cancer therapies. PMID:23243386

  16. Spontaneous regression of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Lewison, E F

    1976-11-01

    The dramatic but rare regression of a verified case of breast cancer in the absence of adequate, accepted, or conventional treatment has been observed and documented by clinicians over the course of many years. In my practice limited to diseases of the breast, over the past 25 years I have observed 12 patients with a unique and unusual clinical course valid enough to be regarded as spontaneous regression of breast cancer. These 12 patients, with clinically confirmed breast cancer, had temporary arrest or partial remission of their disease in the absence of complete or adequate treatment. In most of these cases, spontaneous regression could not be equated ultimately with permanent cure. Three of these case histories are summarized, and patient characteristics of pertinent clinical interest in the remaining case histories are presented and discussed. Despite widespread doubt and skepticism, there is ample clinical evidence to confirm the fact that spontaneous regression of breast cancer is a rare phenomenon but is real and does occur. PMID:799758

  17. An exploration of rural and urban Kenyan women's knowledge and attitudes regarding breast cancer and breast cancer early detection measures.

    PubMed

    Muthoni, Ann; Miller, Ann Neville

    2010-09-01

    Many women in Kenya with breast cancer symptoms do not seek medical attention until their cancer is very advanced, leading to high mortality rates and a heavy cancer burden on the nation. In this study we employed eight focus groups with low- and middle-income rural and urban Kenyan women to explore their knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors concerning breast cancer and its early detection measures. Topics for discussion were derived from the components of the Health Belief Model (HBM). Findings revealed a huge divide between urban middle-income women and all other groups with respect to knowledge of breast cancer and early detection measures. In addition, women viewed breast cancer as a highly severe disease. Perceived benefits of early detection measures centered around preparing themselves for what was assumed to be inevitable death. PMID:20677038

  18. Estrogen Metabolism and Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Samavat, Hamed; Kurzer, Mindy S

    2015-01-01

    There is currently accumulating evidence that endogenous estrogens play a critical role in the development of breast cancer. Estrogens and their metabolites have been studied in both pre- and postmenopausal women with more consistent results shown in the latter population, in part because of large hormonal variations during the menstrual cycle and far fewer studies having been performed in premenopausal women. In this review we describe in detail estrogen metabolism and associated genetic variations, and provide a critical review of the current literature regarding the role of estrogens and their metabolites in breast cancer risk. PMID:24784887

  19. Breast cancer. Selected legal issues.

    PubMed

    Wynstra, N A

    1994-07-01

    Several legal and ethical issues may arise during the course of screening for and diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer. Among the most active legal areas are reimbursement for therapies deemed experimental by certain insurance companies, such as high dose chemotherapy/autologous bone marrow transplantation (HDCT/ABMT) and off-label drug use; these reimbursement issues are discussed. Legal issues in mammography screening and insurance coverage and legal issues relative to informed consent in breast cancer treatment also are discussed. PMID:8004625

  20. Intensity Modulated Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation Before Surgery in Treating Older Patients With Hormone Responsive Stage 0-I Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-04

    Ductal Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma With Predominant Intraductal Component; Lobular Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Medullary Ductal Breast Carcinoma With Lymphocytic Infiltrate; Mucinous Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Papillary Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Tubular Ductal Breast Carcinoma

  1. Occupational exposure and risk of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    FENGA, CONCETTINA

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is a multifactorial disease and the most commonly diagnosed cancer in women. Traditional risk factors for breast cancer include reproductive status, genetic mutations, family history and lifestyle. However, increasing evidence has identified an association between breast cancer and occupational factors, including environmental stimuli. Epidemiological and experimental studies demonstrated that ionizing and non-ionizing radiation exposure, night-shift work, pesticides, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and metals are defined environmental factors for breast cancer, particularly at young ages. However, the mechanisms by which occupational factors can promote breast cancer initiation and progression remains to be elucidated. Furthermore, the evaluation of occupational factors for breast cancer, particularly in the workplace, also remains to be explained. The present review summarizes the occupational risk factors and the associated mechanisms involved in breast cancer development, in order to highlight new environmental exposures that could be correlated to breast cancer and to provide new insights for breast cancer prevention in the occupational settings. Furthermore, this review suggests that there is a requirement to include, through multidisciplinary approaches, different occupational exposure risks among those associated with breast cancer development. Finally, the design of new epigenetic biomarkers may be useful to identify the workers that are more susceptible to develop breast cancer. PMID:26998264

  2. Positron Emission Tomography in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Vercher-Conejero, Jose Luis; Pelegrí-Martinez, Laura; Lopez-Aznar, Diego; Cózar-Santiago, María del Puig

    2015-01-01

    Gradually, FDG-PET/CT has been strengthening within the diagnostic algorithms of oncological diseases. In many of these, PET/CT has shown to be useful at different stages of the disease: diagnosis, staging or re-staging, treatment response assessment, and recurrence. Some of the advantages of this imaging modality versus CT, MRI, bone scan, mammography, or ultrasound, are based on its great diagnostic capacity since, according to the radiopharmaceutical used, it reflects metabolic changes that often occur before morphological changes and therefore allows us to stage at diagnosis. Moreover, another advantage of this technique is that it allows us to evaluate the whole body so it can be very useful for the detection of distant disease. With regard to breast cancer, FDG-PET/CT has proven to be important when recurrence is suspected or in the evaluation of treatment response. The technological advancement of PET equipment through the development of new detectors and equipment designed specifically for breast imaging, and the development of more specific radiopharmaceuticals for the study of the different biological processes of breast cancer, will allow progress not only in making the diagnosis of the disease at an early stage but also in enabling personalized therapy for patients with breast cancer. PMID:26854143

  3. Skeletal Manifestations of Treatment of Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Choksi, Palak; Williams, Margaret; Clark, Patricia M.; Van Poznak, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer and osteoporosis are common diagnoses in women. Breast cancer survival has improved due to earlier detection and improved treatments. As most breast cancers are estrogen receptor positive, treatment is often aimed at altering the hormonal environment. Both pre and postmenopausal women undergoing these therapies are at risk for bone loss. The patient's health care team ought to have an awareness of the potential for breast cancer treatments to accelerate bone loss. Women with early stage breast cancer are treated with curative intent and, therefore, maintaining bone health is important and is part of the survivorship care to ensure an optimal quality of life. PMID:24132726

  4. Breast cancer epidemiology and risk factors.

    PubMed

    Broeders, M J; Verbeek, A L

    1997-09-01

    Breast cancer is the most common malignancy among women in the Western society. Over the past decades it has become apparent that breast cancer incidence rates are increasing steadily, whereas the mortality rates for breast cancer have remained relatively constant. Information through the media on this rising number of cases has increased breast health awareness but has also introduced anxiety in the female population. This combination of factors has made the need for prevention of breast cancer an urgent matter. Breast cancer does not seem to be a single disease entity. A specific etiologic factor may therefore have more influence on one form of breast cancer than another. So far though, as shown in our summary of current knowledge on established and dubious risk factors, no risk factors have been identified that can explain a major part of the incidence. Efforts to identify other ways for primary prevention have also been discouraging, even though breast cancer is one of the most investigated tumours world-wide. Thus, at this point in time, the most important strategy to reduce breast cancer mortality is early detection through individual counselling and organised breast screening programs. The recent isolation of breast cancer susceptibility genes may introduce new ways to reduce the risk of breast cancer in a small subset of women. PMID:9274126

  5. Mechanisms of oestrogen receptor (ER) gene regulation in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Carroll, J S

    2016-07-01

    Most breast cancers are driven by a transcription factor called oestrogen receptor (ER). Understanding the mechanisms of ER activity in breast cancer has been a major research interest and recent genomic advances have revealed extraordinary insights into how ER mediates gene transcription and what occurs during endocrine resistance. This review discusses our current understanding on ER activity, with an emphasis on several evolving, but important areas of ER biology. PMID:26884552

  6. PCNA immunostaining in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Cummings, M C; Furnival, C M; Parsons, P G; Townsend, E

    1993-08-01

    Expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) has been shown to be of prognostic value in patients with certain types of cancer. The aim of this study was to determine if the abundance of PCNA is inversely correlated with survival of patients with breast cancer. Paraffin blocks were available from 68 patients, all of whom had been followed clinically for at least 5 years. Sections from 20 patients showed no reactivity to PCNA and were excluded from the study because it was not possible to distinguish between true negatives and false negatives (those due to poor fixation of the original specimens). The PCNA index (the number of stained cancer cells as a percentage of the total number of cancer cells present) was calculated for the remaining 48 patients. Results were analysed by Wilcoxon's rank sum test (two tailed) and Pearson's correlation coefficient. There was no statistical difference between the PCNA indices of those patients dead from their disease within 5 years of diagnosis compared with those alive and without signs of breast cancer at 5 years. There was also no correlation between PCNA index and size of the cancer, involvement of axillary lymph nodes, time to recurrence or time to death. There was, however, a significant correlation between PCNA index and histological grade (P = 0.029). It appears that PCNA staining of stored paraffin sections is of little prognostic value in patients with breast cancer. PMID:8101708

  7. What Breast Cancer Survivors Need to Know about Osteoporosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... browser. Home Osteoporosis Osteoporosis and Other Conditions What Breast Cancer Survivors Need to Know About Osteoporosis Publication available ... Print-Friendly Page April 2016 The Impact of Breast Cancer Other than skin cancer, breast cancer is the ...

  8. Breast Cancer Death Rates Down 34% Since 1990

    MedlinePlus

    ... News » Filed under: Breast Cancer Report: Breast Cancer Death Rates Down 34% Since 1990 Article date: October ... report from the American Cancer Society finds that death rates from breast cancer in the United States ...

  9. Breast cancer intra-tumor heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    In recent years it has become clear that cancer cells within a single tumor can display striking morphological, genetic and behavioral variability. Burgeoning genetic, epigenetic and phenomenological data support the existence of intra-tumor genetic heterogeneity in breast cancers; however, its basis is yet to be fully defined. Two of the most widely evoked concepts to explain the origin of heterogeneity within tumors are the cancer stem cell hypothesis and the clonal evolution model. Although the cancer stem cell model appeared to provide an explanation for the variability among the neoplastic cells within a given cancer, advances in massively parallel sequencing have provided several lines of evidence to suggest that intra-tumor genetic heterogeneity likely plays a fundamental role in the phenotypic heterogeneity observed in cancers. Many challenges remain, however, in the interpretation of the next generation sequencing results obtained so far. Here we review the models that explain tumor heterogeneity, the causes of intra-tumor genetic diversity and their impact on our understanding and management of breast cancer, methods to study intra-tumor heterogeneity and the assessment of intra-tumor genetic heterogeneity in the clinic. PMID:25928070

  10. Common breast cancer susceptibility loci are associated with triple negative breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, Kristen N.; Vachon, Celine M.; Lee, Adam M.; Slager, Susan; Lesnick, Timothy; Olswold, Curtis; Fasching, Peter A.; Miron, Penelope; Eccles, Diana; Carpenter, Jane E.; Godwin, Andrew K.; Ambrosone, Christine; Winqvist, Robert; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S.; Sawyer, Elinor; Hartmann, Arndt; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Schulz-Wendtland, Rüdiger; Ekici, Arif B.; Tapper, William J; Gerty, Susan M; Durcan, Lorraine; Graham, Nikki; Hein, Rebecca; Nickels, Stephan; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Heinz, Judith; Sinn, Hans-Peter; Konstantopoulou, Irene; Fostira, Florentia; Pectasides, Dimitrios; Dimopoulos, Athanasios M.; Fountzilas, George; Clarke, Christine L.; Balleine, Rosemary; Olson, Janet E.; Fredericksen, Zachary; Diasio, Robert B.; Pathak, Harsh; Ross, Eric; Weaver, JoEllen; Rüdiger, Thomas; Försti, Asta; Dünnebier, Thomas; Ademuyiwa, Foluso; Kulkarni, Swati; Pylkäs, Katri; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Van Limbergen, Erik; Janssen, Hilde; Peto, Julian; Fletcher, Olivia; Giles, Graham G.; Baglietto, Laura; Verhoef, Senno; Tomlinson, Ian; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Beesley, Jonathan; Greco, Dario; Blomqvist, Carl; Irwanto, Astrid; Liu, Jianjun; Blows, Fiona M.; Dawson, Sarah-Jane; Margolin, Sara; Mannermaa, Arto; Martin, Nicholas G.; Montgomery, Grant W; Lambrechts, Diether; dos Santos Silva, Isabel; Severi, Gianluca; Hamann, Ute; Pharoah, Paul; Easton, Douglas F.; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Nevanlinna, Heli; Wang, Xianshu; Couch, Fergus J.

    2012-01-01

    Triple negative breast cancers are an aggressive subtype of breast cancer with poor survival, but there remains little known about the etiological factors which promote its initiation and development. Commonly inherited breast cancer risk factors identified through genome wide association studies (GWAS) display heterogeneity of effect among breast cancer subtypes as defined by estrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PR) status. In the Triple Negative Breast Cancer Consortium (TNBCC), 22 common breast cancer susceptibility variants were investigated in 2,980 Caucasian women with triple negative breast cancer and 4,978 healthy controls. We identified six single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) significantly associated with risk of triple negative breast cancer, including rs2046210 (ESR1), rs12662670 (ESR1), rs3803662 (TOX3), rs999737 (RAD51L1), rs8170 (19p13.11) and rs8100241 (19p13.11). Together, our results provide convincing evidence of genetic susceptibility for triple negative breast cancer. PMID:21844186

  11. Breast and Gynecologic Cancer | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    This group conducts and fosters the development of research on the prevention and early detection of breast cancer, cervix and human papillomavirus (HPV | Prevention and early detection of breast, cervix, endometrial and ovarian cancers and their precursors.

  12. Nanoparticle Albumin-Bound Rapamycin in Treating Patients With Advanced Cancer With mTOR Mutations

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-18

    Advanced Malignant Neoplasm; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Endometrial Carcinoma; Malignant Uterine Neoplasm; Recurrent Bladder Carcinoma; Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Recurrent Cervical Carcinoma; Recurrent Head and Neck Carcinoma; Recurrent Malignant Neoplasm; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Recurrent Prostate Carcinoma; Recurrent Renal Cell Carcinoma; Solid Neoplasm; Stage III Bladder Cancer; Stage III Prostate Cancer; Stage III Renal Cell Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Prostate Cancer; Stage IV Renal Cell Cancer; Stage IVA Bladder Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer; Stage IVB Bladder Cancer; Stage IVB Cervical Cancer

  13. Nanoparticle-based Paclitaxel vs Solvent-based Paclitaxel as Part of Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy for Early Breast Cancer (GeparSepto)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-09

    Tubular Breast Cancer Stage II; Mucinous Breast Cancer Stage II; Breast Cancer Female NOS; Invasive Ductal Breast Cancer; Tubular Breast Cancer Stage III; HER-2 Positive Breast Cancer; Inflammatory Breast Cancer Stage IV; Inflammatory Breast Cancer

  14. Combination Chemotherapy and Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant Followed By Aldesleukin and Sargramostim in Treating Patients With Inflammatory Stage IIIB or Metastatic Stage IV Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2011-07-08

    Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Inflammatory Breast Cancer; Male Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

  15. Interactive Gentle Yoga in Improving Quality of Life in Patients With Stage I-III Breast Cancer Undergoing Radiation Therapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-02-03

    Anxiety Disorder; Depression; Ductal Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Fatigue; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  16. Recent advances in the research for the homolog of breast cancer associated gene AtROW1 in higher plants.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Yue; Zhang, Yuzhou; Zhu, Yu-Xian

    2016-08-01

    BARD1 (BRCA1 associated RING domain protein 1), as an important animal tumor suppressor gene associated with many kinds of cancers, has been intensively studied for decades. Surprisingly, homolog of BARD1 was found in plants and it was renamed AtROW1 (repressor of Wuschel-1) according to its extremely important function with regard to plant stem cell homeostasis. Although great advances have been made in human BARD1, the function of this animal tumor-suppressor like gene in plant is not well studied and need to be further elucidated. Here, we review and summarize past and present work regarding this protein. Apart from its previously proposed role in DNA repair, recently it is found essential for shoot and root stem cell development and differentiation in plants. The study of AtROW1 in plant may provide an ideal model for further elucidating the functional mechanism of BARD1 in mammals. PMID:27502904

  17. [A case of advanced breast cancer with multiple bone metastases responding to docetaxel and high-dose toremifene as fourth-line chemo-endocrine therapy].

    PubMed

    Minamoto, Kanji; Ikeda, Toshio

    2009-12-01

    A 55-year old woman, who underwent left mastectomy (Bt+Ax), was revealed to have sternum metastasis by postoperative 99mTc bone scanning(T1bN1M1). She received daily aromatase inhibitor (anastrozole), as a primary systemic endocrine therapy, and biweekly pamidronate for metastatic breast cancer. However, she depended on folk medicine a year later, at which time the primary treatment was discontinued. Another year later, the bone metastases developed with increased serum levels of tumor markers (CEA, CA19-9, and NCC-ST-439). Then, she underwent three different regimens of systemic chemo-endocrine therapy over the following three years, including CAF+MPA as the first-line, paclitaxel (PTX) + anastrozole as the second-line, and S-1+anastrozole as the third-line regimen. She recently completed 10 courses of the fourth-line regimen[tri-weekly docetaxel (DOC) and high-dose toremifene (TOR 120 mg/day)], which reduced levels of 99mTc accumulation in the multiple bone metastases and levels of the serum tumor markers to the normal range. No severe adverse events occurred except peripheral thrombovasculitis (grade 2) in her left anterior arm during the fourth regimen. She recently maintains the current status by taking a regular dose (40 mg/day) of toremifene for 5 months. Combination treatment with DOC and high-dose TOR can be one of the worthwhile regimens as systemic chemo-endocrine therapy for patients with advanced breast cancer who develop bone metastases. PMID:20009468

  18. Lapatinib Plus Capecitabine in Women with HER-2–Positive Advanced Breast Cancer: Final Survival Analysis of a Phase III Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Casey, Michelle; Oliva, Cristina; Newstat, Beth; Imwalle, Bradley; Geyer, Charles E.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives. A planned interim analysis of study EGF100151 prompted early termination of enrollment based on a longer time to progression with lapatinib and capecitabine than with capecitabine alone in patients with human epidermal growth factor receptor (HER)-2+ previously treated advanced breast cancer or metastatic breast cancer (MBC). Here, we report final analyses of overall survival. Patients and Methods. Women with HER-2+ MBC who progressed after regimens that included, but were not limited to, anthracyclines, taxanes, and trastuzumab, were randomized to lapatinib (1,250 mg/day) plus capecitabine (2,000 mg/m2) or capecitabine monotherapy (2,500 mg/m2) on days 1–14 of a 21-day cycle. Results. At enrollment termination, 399 patients were randomized, and nine were being screened and were offered combination treatment. In total, 207 and 201 patients were enrolled to combination therapy and monotherapy, respectively. Thirty-six patients receiving monotherapy crossed over to combination therapy following enrollment termination. The median overall survival times were 75.0 weeks for the combination arm and 64.7 weeks for the monotherapy arm (hazard ratio [HR], 0.87; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.71–1.08; p = .210). A Cox regression analysis considering crossover as a time-dependent covariate suggested a 20% lower risk for death for patients treated with combination therapy (HR, 0.80; 95% CI, 0.64–0.99; p = .043). The low incidence of serious adverse events was consistent with previously reported rates. Conclusions. Although premature enrollment termination and subsequent crossover resulted in insufficient power to detect differences in overall survival, exploratory analyses demonstrate a trend toward a survival advantage with lapatinib plus capecitabine. These data continue to support the efficacy of lapatinib in patients with HER-2+ MBC. PMID:20736298

  19. Inhibition of BET proteins impair estrogen mediated growth and transcription in breast cancers by pausing RNA polymerase advancement

    PubMed Central

    Sengupta, Surojeet; Biarnes, Michael C; Clarke, Robert; Jordan, V. Craig

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Estrogen (E2)-induced transcription requires coordinated recruitment of estrogen-receptor α (ER) and multiple factors at the promoter of activated genes. However, the precise mechanism by which this complex stimulates the RNA polymerase-II activity required to execute transcription is largely unresolved. We investigated the role of bromodomain (BRD) containing bromodomain and extra-terminal (BET) proteins, in E2-induced growth and gene activation. Methods JQ1, a specific BET protein inhibitor, was used to block BET protein function in two different ER-positive breast cancer cell lines (MCF7 and T47D). Real-time PCR and ChIP assays were used to measure RNA expression and to detect recruitment of various factors on the genes, respectively. Protein levels were measured by western blotting. Results JQ1 suppressed E2-induced growth and transcription in both MCF7 and T47D cells. The combination of E2 and JQ1 down-regulated the levels of ER protein in MCF7 cells but the loss of ER was not responsible for JQ1 mediated inhibition of E2 signaling. JQ1 did not disrupt E2-induced recruitment of ER and co-activator (SRC3) at the E2-responsive DNA elements. The E2-induced increase in histone acetylation was also not altered by JQ1. However, JQ1 blocked the E2-induced transition of RNA polymerase-II from initiation to elongation by stalling it at the promoter region of the responsive genes upstream of the transcription start site. Conclusions This study establishes BET proteins as the key mediators of E2-induced transcriptional activation. This adds another layer of complexity to the regulation of estrogen-induced gene activation that can potentially be targeted for therapeutic intervention. PMID:25721606

  20. Breast density and breast cancer risk: a practical review.

    PubMed

    Wang, Amy T; Vachon, Celine M; Brandt, Kathleen R; Ghosh, Karthik

    2014-04-01

    New legislation in several states requiring breast density notification in all mammogram reports has increased awareness of breast density. Estimates indicate that up to 50% of women undergoing mammography will have high breast density; thus, with increased attention and high prevalence of increased breast density, it is crucial that primary care clinicians understand the implications of dense breasts and are able to provide appropriate counseling. This review provides an overview of breast density, specifically by defining breast density, exploring the association between breast density and breast cancer risk, both from masking and as an independent risk factor, and reviewing supplemental screening options as part of a larger framework for counseling patients with dense breasts. PMID:24684876

  1. Breast Cancer Research at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Isolation of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue; A: Duct element recovered from breast tissue digest. B: Outgrowth of cells from duct element in upper right corner cultured in a standard dish; most cells spontaneousely die during early cell divisions, but a few will establish long-term growth. C: Isolate of long-term frowth HMEC from outgrowth of duct element; cells shown soon after isolation and in early full-cell contact growth in culture in a dish. D: same long-term growth HMEC, but after 3 weeks in late full-cell contact growth in a continuous culture in a dish. Note attempts to reform duct elements but this in two demensions in a dish rather than in three dimensions in tissue. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cell (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunorous tissue. Credit: Dr. Robert Richmond, NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC).

  2. Caloric Restriction in Treating Patients With Stage 0-I Breast Cancer Undergoing Surgery and Radiation Therapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-11

    Ductal Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Invasive Lobular Breast Carcinoma; Lobular Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer

  3. Breast cancer with inguinal node recurrence.

    PubMed

    Goyal, Shikha; Puri, Tarun; Julka, Pramod K

    2015-03-01

    Surgery and irradiation for breast cancer may interfere with conventional pathways of spread, leading to bizarre patterns of dissemination through lymphatics or through hematogenous route. Lymphoscintigraphic studies may help identify nodal involvement. Other possible reasons could be occurrence of primary breast cancer in accessory breast tissue retained in the vulva following involution of milk line. We describe a case of triple negative breast cancer, who developed contralateral breast cancer during treatment. Three years later, she developed isolated inguinal nodal metastases, which responded to local radiotherapy and chemotherapy. However, the patient relapsed after 2 years and could not be salvaged thereafter. PMID:25455282

  4. What You Need to Know about Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Publications Reports What You Need To Know About™ Breast Cancer This booklet is about breast cancer. Learning about your cancer can help you take ... This booklet covers: Basics about breast anatomy and breast cancer Treatments for breast cancer, including taking part in ...

  5. Risk of Subclinical Micrometastatic Disease in the Supraclavicular Nodal Bed According to the Anatomic Distribution in Patients With Advanced Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, Valerie K.; Cavalcanti, Jose L.; Strom, Eric A.; Perkins, George H.; Oh, Julia L.; Tereffe, Welela; Yu, T.-K.; Yeung, Henry; Whitman, Gary J.; Bedrosian, Isabelle; Macapinlac, Homer A.; Buchholz, Thomas A.; Woodward, Wendy A.

    2008-06-01

    Purpose: To determine the anatomic distribution of gross supraclavicular nodes within the supraclavicular fossa using 2-deoxy-2-[F-18] fluoro-d-glucose (FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) scans, and to evaluate likely coverage of specific regions of the supraclavicular fossa using standard radiation fields. Methods and Materials: We identified 33 patients with advanced or metastatic breast cancer who had a PET/CT scan demonstrating hypermetabolic supraclavicular lymph nodes in 2005. The locations of the involved lymph nodes were mapped onto a single CT set of images of the supraclavicular fossa. These lymph nodes were also mapped onto the treatment-planning CT dataset of 4 patients treated in our institution (2 patients with biopsy-proven supraclavicular nodes and 2 patients with clinically negative supraclavicular nodes). Results: We were able to determine the distribution of 52 supraclavicular lymph nodes in 32 patients. Of 32 patients, 28 (87%) had a history of metastatic disease, and 2 patients had isolated nodal recurrences. Five patients had supraclavicular nodes posterior to the vertebral body transverse process, and several lymph nodes were in close proximity to the medial field border, raising the possibility of geographic miss in these areas. Conclusions: In patients with locally advanced disease, increased coverage of the supraclavicular fossa medially and posteriorly may be warranted.

  6. Needles in a haystack: finding recurrent genomic changes in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Significant advances over the past decade have enabled scientists to obtain increasingly detailed molecular profiles of breast cancer. The recent analysis by The Cancer Genome Atlas published in the September 2012 issue of Nature is the most comprehensive description of breast cancer 'omics' to date. This study is impressive in its scope and scale, with the findings reconfirming the heterogeneity of breast cancer and highlighting the future challenges in translating these findings for clinical benefit. PMID:23425423

  7. Breast metastasis from vaginal cancer.

    PubMed

    Chandrasekaran, Neeraja; Scharifker, Daniel; Varsegi, George; Almeida, Zoyla

    2016-01-01

    Vaginal cancer is a rare malignancy accounting for 1-2% of all pelvic neoplasms. Dissemination usually occurs through local invasion and rarely metastasises to distal locations. Metastasis of vaginal cancer to the breast is extremely infrequent and unique. A 66-year-old Asian woman presented with vaginal bleeding and was found to have a vaginal mass and a left breast mass. Pathological assessment of the biopsies revealed identical squamous cell characteristics of both masses. We describe a very rare and novel case of a distally located vaginal carcinoma with metastasis to the breast Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stage IV (FIGO IVB). Robot-assisted extrafascial total hysterectomy with local vaginal mass excision and partial mastectomy of the left breast were performed. After surgery, the patient underwent adjuvant chemotherapy followed by breast and pelvic radiotherapy, with maintained complete remission after 3 years of follow-up. This combination of findings and treatment is very distinct with a unique and favourable response. PMID:27444140

  8. Do We Know What Causes Breast Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... cells become cancerous because of changes (mutations) in DNA. Some DNA mutations are inherited. This means the mutations are ... cancers that run in some families. But most DNA changes related to breast cancer are acquired in ...

  9. Coping with a Breast Cancer Diagnosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... cancer.org Handling treatment The goal of any breast cancer treatment is to get rid of the cancer and offer the best possible chance of survival. But even the best treatments have side effects. ...

  10. Profile of palbociclib in the treatment of metastatic breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ehab, Moataz; Elbaz, Mohamad

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer diagnosed in women. Each year, thousands die either because of disease progression or failure of treatment. Breast cancer is classified into different subtypes based on the molecular expression of estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor, and/or human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2). These receptors represent important therapeutic targets either through monoclonal antibodies or through small-molecule inhibitors directed toward them. However, up to 40% of patients develop either a primary or a secondary resistance to the current treatments. Therefore, there is an urgent need for investigating new targets in order to overcome the resistance and/or enhance the current therapies. Cell cycle is altered in many human cancers, especially in breast cancer. Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs), especially CDK4 and CDK6, play a pivotal role in cell cycle progression that makes them potential targets for new promising therapies. CDK inhibition has shown strong antitumor activities, ranging from cytostatic antiproliferative effects to synergistic effects in combination with other antitumor drugs. In order to overcome the drawbacks of the first-generation CDK inhibitors, recently, new CDK inhibitors have emerged that are more selective to CDK4 and CDK6 such as palbociclib, which is the most advanced CDK4/6 inhibitor in trials. In preclinical studies, palbociclib has shown a very promising antitumor activity, especially against ERα+ breast cancer subtype. Palbociclib has gained world attention, and US the Food and Drug Administration has accelerated its approval for first-line treatment in combination with letrozole for the first-line systematic treatment of postmenopausal women with ERα+/HER2− locally advanced or metastatic breast cancer. In this review, we discuss the potential role of CDK inhibition in breast cancer treatment, and focus on palbociclib progress from preclinical studies to clinical trials with mentioning the

  11. Paclitaxel and Cyclophosphamide With or Without Trastuzumab Before Surgery in Treating Patients With Previously Untreated Stage I-III Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2012-12-12

    Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; HER2-positive Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer

  12. Expression of cell cycle markers is predictive of the response to primary systemic therapy of locally advanced breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Tőkés, Tímea; Tőkés, Anna-Mária; Szentmártoni, Gyöngyvér; Kiszner, Gergő; Madaras, Lilla; Kulka, Janina; Krenács, Tibor; Dank, Magdolna

    2016-06-01

    We aimed to analyze to what extent expression of four cell cycle regulation markers-minichromosome maintenance protein (MCM2), Ki-67, cyclin A, and phosphohistone-H3 (PHH3)-predict response to primary systemic therapy in terms of pathological complete remission (pCR). In search of an accurate and reproducible scoring method, we compared computer-assisted (CA) and routine visual assessment (VA) of immunoreactivity. We included 57 patients with breast cancer in the study. The cell cycle markers were detected using immunohistochemistry on pre-therapy core biopsy samples. Parallel CA (validated by manual labeling) and standard VA were performed and compared for diagnostic agreement and predictive value for pCR. CA and VA results were dichotomized based on receiver operating characteristic analysis defined optimal cut-off values. "High" was defined by staining scores above the optimal cut-off, while "low" had staining scores below the optimal cut-off. The CA method resulted in significantly lower values for Ki-67 and MCM2 compared to VA (mean difference, -3.939 and -4.323). Diagnostic agreement was highest for cyclin A and PHH3 (-0.586 and -0.666, respectively). Regardless of the method (CA/VA) used, all tested markers were predictive of pCR. Optimal cut-off-based dichotomization improved diagnostic agreement between the CA and VA methods for every marker, in particular for MCM2 (κ = 1, p < 0.000). Cyclin A displayed excellent agreement (κ = 0.925; p < 0.000), while Ki-67 and PHH3 showed good agreement (κ = 0.789, p < 0.000 and κ = 0.794, p < 0.000, respectively). We found all cell cycle markers (Ki-67, MCM2, cyclin A, and PHH3) predictive of pCR. Diagnostic agreement between CA and VA was better at lower staining scores but improved after optimal cut-off-based dichotomization. PMID:27026269

  13. Triple-negative breast cancer: epidemiological considerations and recommendations.

    PubMed

    Boyle, P

    2012-08-01

    Breast cancer is a major problem for global public health. Breast Cancer is the most common incident form of cancer in women around the world. The incidence is increasing while mortality is declining in many high-income countries. The last decade has seen a revolution in the understanding of breast cancer, with new classifications proposed that have significant prognostic value and provide guides to treatment options. Breast cancers that demonstrate the absence of oestrogen receptor and progesterone receptor and no overexpression of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) are referred to as triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC). There is now evidence emerging from epidemiological studies regarding important characteristics of this group of tumours that carry a relatively poorer prognosis than the major breast cancer sub-types. From this review of available data and information, there are some consistent findings that emerge. Women with TNBC experience the peak risk of recurrence within 3 years of diagnosis, and the mortality rates appear to be increased for 5 years after diagnosis. TNBC represents 10%-20% of invasive breast cancers and has been associated with African-American race, deprivation status, younger age at diagnosis, more advanced disease stage, higher grade, high mitotic indices, family history of breast cancer and BRCA1 mutations. TNBC is regularly reported to be three times more common in women of African descent and in pre-menopausal women, and carries a poorer prognosis than other forms of breast cancer. Although prospects for prevention of non-hormone-dependent breast cancer are currently poor, it is still important to understand the aetiology of such tumours. There remains a great deal of work to be done to arrive at a comprehensive picture of the aetiology of breast cancer. Key recommendations are that there is a clear and urgent need to have more epidemiological studies of the breast cancer sub-types to integrate aetiological and

  14. Recent technological advancements in breast ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Eisenbrey, John R; Dave, Jaydev K; Forsberg, Flemming

    2016-08-01

    Ultrasound is becoming increasingly common as an imaging tool for the detection and characterization of breast tumors. This paper provides an overview of recent technological advancements, especially those that may have an impact in clinical applications in the field of breast ultrasound in the near future. These advancements include close to 100% fractional bandwidth high frequency (5-18MHz) 2D and 3D arrays, automated breast imaging systems to minimize the operator dependence and advanced processing techniques, such as those used for detection of microcalcifications. In addition, elastography and contrast-enhanced ultrasound examinations that are expected to further enhance the clinical importance of ultrasound based breast tumor screening are briefly reviewed. These techniques have shown initial promise in clinical trials and may translate to more comprehensive clinical adoption in the future. PMID:27179143

  15. FLT PET in Measuring Treatment Response in Patients With Newly Diagnosed Estrogen Receptor-Positive, HER2-Negative Stage I-III Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-02

    Estrogen Receptor Positive; HER2/Neu Negative; Male Breast Carcinoma; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  16. Treatment options for patients with triple-negative breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Breast cancer is a heterogeneous disease composed of different subtypes, characterized by their different clinicopathological characteristics, prognoses and responses to treatment. In the past decade, significant advances have been made in the treatment of breast cancer sensitive to hormonal treatments, as well as in patients whose malignant cells overexpress or amplify HER2. In contrast, mainly due to the lack of molecular targets, little progress has been made in the treatment of patients with triple-negative breast cancer. Recent improved understanding of the natural history, pathophysiology, and molecular features of triple-negative breast cancers have provided new insights into management and therapeutic strategies for women affected with this entity. Ongoing and planned translational clinical trials are likely to optimize and improve treatment of women with this disease. PMID:20979652

  17. Targeting oncogenes to improve breast cancer chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Laura A; Finch, Rick A; Booker, Adam J; Vasquez, Karen M

    2006-04-15

    Despite recent advances in treatment, breast cancer remains a serious health threat for women. Traditional chemotherapies are limited by a lack of specificity for tumor cells and the cell cycle dependence of many chemotherapeutic agents. Here we report a novel strategy to help overcome these limitations. Using triplex-forming oligonucleotides (TFOs) to direct DNA damage site-specifically to oncogenes overexpressed in human breast cancer cells, we show that the effectiveness of the anticancer nucleoside analogue gemcitabine can be improved significantly. TFOs targeted to the promoter region of c-myc directly inhibited gene expression by approximately 40%. When used in combination, specific TFOs increased the incorporation of gemcitabine at the targeted site approximately 4-fold, presumably due to induction of replication-independent DNA synthesis. Cells treated with TFOs and gemcitabine in combination showed a reduction in both cell survival and capacity for anchorage-independent growth (approximately 19% of untreated cells). This combination affected the tumorigenic potential of these cancer cells to a significantly greater extent than either treatment alone. This novel strategy may be used to increase the range of effectiveness of antitumor nucleosides in any tumor which overexpresses a targetable oncogene. Multifaceted chemotherapeutic approaches such as this, coupled with triplex-directed gene targeting, may lead to more than incremental improvements in nonsurgical treatment of breast tumors. PMID:16618728

  18. Aerospace technology transfer to breast cancer imaging.

    PubMed

    Winfield, D L

    1997-01-01

    In the United States in 1996, an estimated 44,560 women died of breast cancer, and 184,300 new cases were diagnosed. Advances in space technology are now making significant improvements in the imaging technologies used in managing this important foe. The first of these spinoffs, a digital spot mammography system used to perform stereotactic fine-needle breast biopsy, uses a backside-thinned CCD developed originally for the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrometer. This paper describes several successful biomedical applications which have resulted from collaborative technology transfer programs between the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the National Cancer Institute (NCI), and the U.S. Dept. of Health and Human Services Office on Women's Health (OWH). These programs have accelerated the introduction of direct digital mammography by two years. In follow-on work, RTI is now assisting the HHS Office on Women's Health to identify additional opportunities for transfer of aerospace, defense, and intelligence technologies to image-guided detection, diagnosis, and treatment of breast cancer. The technology identification and evaluation effort culminated in a May 1997 workshop, and the formative technology development partnerships are discussed. PMID:11541150

  19. Toremifene in the treatment of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mustonen, Mika VJ; Pyrhönen, Seppo; Kellokumpu-Lehtinen, Pirkko-Liisa

    2014-01-01

    Although more widespread screening and routine adjuvant therapy has improved the outcome for breast cancer patients in recent years, there remains considerable scope for improving the efficacy, safety and tolerability of adjuvant therapy in the early stage disease and the treatment of advanced disease. Toremifene is a selective estrogen receptor modifier (SERM) that has been widely used for decades in hormone receptor positive breast cancer both in early and late stage disease. Its efficacy has been well established in nine prospective randomized phase III trials compared to tamoxifen involving more than 5500 patients, as well as in several large uncontrolled and non-randomized studies. Although most studies show therapeutic equivalence between the two SERMs, some show an advantage for toremifene. Several meta-analyses have also confirmed that the efficacy of toremifene is at least as good as that of tamoxifen. In terms of safety and tolerability toremifene is broadly similar to tamoxifen although there is some evidence that toremifene is less likely to cause uterine neoplasms, serious vascular events and it has a more positive effect on serum lipids than does tamoxifen. Toremifene is therefore effective and safe in the treatment of breast cancer. It provides not only a useful therapeutic alternative to tamoxifen, but may bring specific benefits. PMID:25114854

  20. Fertility after breast cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Kasum, Miro; Beketić-Orešković, Lidija; Peddi, Parvin F; Orešković, Slavko; Johnson, Rebecca H

    2014-02-01

    In many countries of the developed world, there is an increasing trend toward delay in childbearing from 30 to 40 years of age for various reasons. This is unfortunately concordant with an increasing incidence of breast cancer in women who have not yet completed their family. The current choice for premenopausal women with breast cancer is adjuvant therapy which includes cytotoxic chemotherapy, ovarian ablation (by surgery, irradiation, or chemical ovarian suppression), anti-estrogen therapy, or any combination of these. Although the use of adjuvant therapies with cytotoxic drugs can significantly reduce mortality, it raises issues of the long-term toxicity, such as induction of an early menopause and fertility impairment. The risk of infertility is a potential hardship to be faced by the patients following treatment of breast cancer. The offspring of patients who became pregnant after completion of chemotherapy have shown no adverse effects and congenital anomalies from the treatment, but sometimes high rates of abortion (29%) and premature deliveries with low birth weight (40%) have been demonstrated. Therefore, the issue of recent cytotoxic treatment remains controversial and further research is required to define a "safety period" between cessation of treatment and pregnancy. Preservation of fertility in breast cancer survivors of reproductive age has become an important issue regarding the quality of life. Currently, there are several potential options, including all available assisted technologies, such as in vitro fertilization and embryo transfer, in vitro maturation, oocyte and embryo cryopreservation, and cryopreservation of ovarian tissue. Because increased estrogen levels are thought to be potentially risky in breast cancer patients, recently developed ovarian stimulation protocols with the aromatase inhibitor letrozole and tamoxifen appear to provide safe stimulation with endogenous estrogen. Embryo cryopreservation seems to be the most established

  1. Triciribine Phosphate, Paclitaxel, Doxorubicin Hydrochloride, and Cyclophosphamide in Treating Patients With Stage IIB-IV Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-01-13

    Breast Adenocarcinoma; Estrogen Receptor Positive; HER2/Neu Negative; Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

  2. Doxorubicin Hydrochloride and Cyclophosphamide Followed by Paclitaxel With or Without Carboplatin in Treating Patients With Triple-Negative Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-06

    Breast Adenocarcinoma; Estrogen Receptor Negative; HER2/Neu Negative; Progesterone Receptor Negative; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Triple-Negative Breast Carcinoma

  3. Noncoding RNAs in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Lo, Pang-Kuo; Wolfson, Benjamin; Zhou, Xipeng; Duru, Nadire; Gernapudi, Ramkishore; Zhou, Qun

    2016-05-01

    The mammalian transcriptome has recently been revealed to encompass a large number of noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) that play a variety of important regulatory roles in gene expression and other biological processes. MicroRNAs (miRNAs), the best studied of the short noncoding RNAs (sncRNAs), have been extensively characterized with regard to their biogenesis, function and importance in tumorigenesis. Another class of sncRNAs called piwi-interacting RNAs (piRNAs) has also gained attention recently in cancer research owing to their critical role in stem cell regulation. Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) of >200 nucleotides in length have recently emerged as key regulators of developmental processes, including mammary gland development. lncRNA dysregulation has also been implicated in the development of various cancers, including breast cancer. In this review, we describe and discuss the roles of sncRNAs (including miRNAs and piRNAs) and lncRNAs in the initiation and progression of breast tumorigenesis, with a focus on outlining the molecular mechanisms of oncogenic and tumor-suppressor ncRNAs. Moreover, the current and potential future applications of ncRNAs to clinical breast cancer research are also discussed, with an emphasis on ncRNA-based diagnosis, prognosis and future therapeutics. PMID:26685283

  4. Impact of Pretreatment Combined {sup 18}F-Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography Staging on Radiation Therapy Treatment Decisions in Locally Advanced Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, Sweet Ping; David, Steven; Alamgeer, Muhammad; Ganju, Vinod

    2015-09-01

    Purpose: To assess the diagnostic performance of pretreatment {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography ({sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT) and its impact on radiation therapy treatment decisions in patients with locally advanced breast cancer (LABC). Methods and Materials: Patients with LABC with Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status <2 and no contraindication to neoadjuvant chemotherapy, surgery, and adjuvant radiation therapy were enrolled on a prospective trial. All patients had pretreatment conventional imaging (CI) performed, including bilateral breast mammography and ultrasound, bone scan, and CT chest, abdomen, and pelvis scans performed. Informed consent was obtained before enrolment. Pretreatment whole-body {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT scans were performed on all patients, and results were compared with CI findings. Results: A total of 154 patients with LABC with no clinical or radiologic evidence of distant metastases on CI were enrolled. Median age was 49 years (range, 26-70 years). Imaging with PET/CT detected distant metastatic disease and/or locoregional disease not visualized on CI in 32 patients (20.8%). Distant metastatic disease was detected in 17 patients (11.0%): 6 had bony metastases, 5 had intrathoracic metastases (pulmonary/mediastinal), 2 had distant nodal metastases, 2 had liver metastases, 1 had pulmonary and bony metastases, and 1 had mediastinal and distant nodal metastases. Of the remaining 139 patients, nodal disease outside conventional radiation therapy fields was detected on PET/CT in 15 patients (10.8%), with involvement of ipsilateral internal mammary nodes in 13 and ipsilateral level 5 cervical nodes in 2. Conclusions: Imaging with PET/CT provides superior diagnostic and staging information in patients with LABC compared with CI, which has significant therapeutic implications with respect to radiation therapy management. Imaging with PET/CT should be considered in all patients undergoing primary

  5. What Are the Risk Factors for Breast Cancer in Men?

    MedlinePlus

    ... in men? What are the risk factors for breast cancer in men? A risk factor is anything that ... old when they are diagnosed. Family history of breast cancer Breast cancer risk is increased if other members ...

  6. Early-Stage Breast Cancer Treatment Fact Sheet

    MedlinePlus

    ... breast cancer treatment fact sheet ePublications Early-stage breast cancer treatment fact sheet Print this fact sheet Early-stage breast cancer treatment fact sheet (PDF, 943 KB) Related information ...

  7. Can Breast Cancer in Men Be Found Early?

    MedlinePlus

    ... and symptoms of breast cancer in men Can breast cancer in men be found early? Early detection improves ... be treated successfully. Differences affecting early detection of breast cancers in men and women There are many similarities ...

  8. Ten Years of Tamoxifen Reduces Breast Cancer Recurrences, Improves Survival

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer Screening Research Ten Years of Tamoxifen Reduces Breast Cancer Recurrences, Improves Survival For some women with breast ... took it for 5 years. (See the table.) Breast Cancer Recurrence and Death 5 to 14 Years after ...

  9. NIH study confirms risk factors for male breast cancer

    Cancer.gov

    Pooled data from studies of about 2,400 men with breast cancer and 52,000 men without breast cancer confirmed that risk factors for male breast cancer include obesity, a rare genetic condition called Klinefelter syndrome, and gynecomastia.

  10. Electric power, melatonin, and breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, R.G.

    1987-08-01

    In this paper, the epidemiology of breast cancer will be discussed, followed by a brief description of the effect of electric fields on melatonin and the relation of melatonin to mammary cancer in rats. Finally, there will be a consideration of factors such as alcohol that affect melatonin and their relation to breast cancer risk. 55 refs.

  11. Bioengineering Models for Breast Cancer Research

    PubMed Central

    Guiro, Khadidiatou; Arinzeh, Treena L.

    2015-01-01

    Despite substantial advances in early diagnosis, breast cancer (BC) still remains a clinical challenge. Most BC models use complex in vivo models and two-dimensional monolayer cultures that do not fully mimic the tumor microenvironment. The integration of cancer biology and engineering can lead to the development of novel in vitro approaches to study BC behavior and quantitatively assess different features of the tumor microenvironment that may influence cell behavior. In this review, we present tissue engineering approaches to model BC in vitro. Recent advances in the use of three-dimensional cell culture models to study various aspects of BC disease in vitro are described. The emerging area of studying BC dormancy using these models is also reviewed. PMID:26792996

  12. Selected National Cancer Institute Breast Cancer Research Topics | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Sciences are jointly funding three Breast Cancer and Environment Research Centers (BCERCs) to conduct interdisciplinary research on the effects of early environmental exposures on breast development and breast cancer risk. The Breast Cancer Surveillance ...

  13. Environmental cadmium and breast cancer risk

    PubMed Central

    Gallagher, Carolyn M.; Chen, John J.; Kovach, John S.

    2010-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most prevalent women's cancer, with an age-adjusted incidence of 122.9 per 100,000 US women. Cadmium, a ubiquitous carcinogenic pollutant with multiple biological effects, has been reported to be associated with breast cancer in one US regional case-control study. We examined the association of breast cancer with urinary cadmium (UCd), in a case-control sample of women living on Long Island (LI), NY (100 with breast cancer and 98 without), a region with an especially high rate of breast cancer (142.7 per 100,000 in Suffolk County) and in a representative sample of US women (NHANES 1999-2008, 92 with breast cancer and 2,884 without). In a multivariable logistic model, both samples showed a significant trend for increased odds of breast cancer across increasing UCd quartiles (NHANES, p=0.039 and LI, p=0.023). Compared to those in the lowest quartile, LI women in the highest quartile had increased risk for breast cancer (OR=2.69; 95% CI=1.07, 6.78) and US women in the two highest quartiles had increased risk (OR=2.50; 95% CI=1.11, 5.63 and OR=2.22; 95% CI=.89, 5.52, respectively). Further research is warranted on the impact of environmental cadmium on breast cancer risk in specific populations and on identifying the underlying molecular mechanisms. PMID:21071816

  14. Diet and risk of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Diet may play a role in both promoting and inhibiting human breast cancer development. In this review, nutritional risk factors such as consumption of dietary fat, meat, fiber, and alcohol, and intake of phytoestrogen, vitamin D, iron, and folate associated with breast cancer are reviewed. These nutritional factors have a variety of associations with breast cancer risk. Type of fat consumed has different effects on risk of breast cancer: consumption of meat is associated with heterocyclic amine (HCA) exposure; different types of plant fiber have various effects on breast cancer risk; alcohol consumption may increase the risk of breast cancer by producing acetaldehyde and reactive oxygen species (ROS); intake of phytoestrogen may reduce risk of breast cancer through genomic and non-genomic action; vitamin D can reduce the risk of breast cancer by inhibiting the process of cancer invasion and metastasis; intake of dietary iron may lead to oxidative stress, DNA damage, and lipid peroxidation; and lower intake of folate may be linked to a higher risk of breast cancer. PMID:27095934

  15. Diet and risk of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Kotepui, Manas

    2016-01-01

    Diet may play a role in both promoting and inhibiting human breast cancer development. In this review, nutritional risk factors such as consumption of dietary fat, meat, fiber, and alcohol, and intake of phytoestrogen, vitamin D, iron, and folate associated with breast cancer are reviewed. These nutritional factors have a variety of associations with breast cancer risk. Type of fat consumed has different effects on risk of breast cancer: consumption of meat is associated with heterocyclic amine (HCA) exposure; different types of plant fiber have various effects on breast cancer risk; alcohol consumption may increase the risk of breast cancer by producing acetaldehyde and reactive oxygen species (ROS); intake of phytoestrogen may reduce risk of breast cancer through genomic and non-genomic action; vitamin D can reduce the risk of breast cancer by inhibiting the process of cancer invasion and metastasis; intake of dietary iron may lead to oxidative stress, DNA damage, and lipid peroxidation; and lower intake of folate may be linked to a higher risk of breast cancer. PMID:27095934

  16. What Are the Key Statistics about Breast Cancer in Men?

    MedlinePlus

    ... breast cancer in men? What are the key statistics about breast cancer in men? The American Cancer ... 30 years. Visit the American Cancer Society’s Cancer Statistics Center for more key statistics. Last Medical Review: ...

  17. Special Issues in Older Women with Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Hurria, Arti; Muss, Hy

    2015-01-01

    The true face of breast cancer is more commonly that of an older woman. The rapid aging of the US population is contributing to an increasing number of breast cancer cases in older adults today, as well as an increase in the number of breast cancer survivors who carry the long-term side effects of breast cancer treatment. The number one problem facing older women with breast cancer today is that they are not receiving the same benefits from treatment advances as younger women. This disparity in outcomes highlights the great need for studies that specially include older women with breast cancer in order to guide informed decisions regarding the most efficacious treatment options. Novel study designs are needed to fill these gaps in knowledge which include metrics that provide a detailed understanding of the individual beyond chronologic age, and which identify areas of vulnerability for which targeted interventions can be employed. In studying cancer therapeutics in older adults, metrics of success, beyond disease-free and overall survival should be included, such as the feasibility of delivering the therapy, as well as the impact of treatment on functional independence and cognition. Ultimately, this framework will lead to evidence-based "personalized" medicine for the older adult. PMID:26059927

  18. Skp2 is over-expressed in breast cancer and promotes breast cancer cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenwen; Cao, Lulu; Sun, Zijia; Xu, Jing; Tang, Lin; Chen, Weiwei; Luo, Jiayan; Yang, Fang; Wang, Yucai; Guan, Xiaoxiang

    2016-05-18

    The F box protein Skp2 is oncogenic. Skp2 and Skp2B, an isoform of Skp2 are overexpressed in breast cancer. However, little is known regarding the mechanism by which Skp2B promotes the occurrence and development of breast cancer. Here, we determined the expression and clinical outcomes of Skp2 in breast cancer samples and cell lines using breast cancer database, and investigated the role of Skp2 and Skp2B in breast cancer cell growth, apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. We obtained Skp2 is significantly overexpressed in breast cancer samples and cell lines, and high Skp2 expression positively correlated with poor prognosis of breast cancer. Both Skp2 and Skp2B could promote breast cancer cell proliferation, inhibit cell apoptosis, change the cell cycle distribution and induce the increased S phase cells and therefore induce cell proliferation in breast cancer cells. Moreover, the 2 isoforms could both suppress PIG3 expression via independent pathways in the breast cancer cells. Skp2 suppressed p53 and inhibited PIG3-induced apoptosis, while Skp2B attenuated the function of PIG3 by inhibiting PHB. Our results indicate that Skp2 and Skp2B induce breast cancer cell development and progression, making Skp2 and Skp2B potential molecular targets for breast cancer therapy. PMID:27111245

  19. MK2206 in Treating Patients With Stage I, Stage II, or Stage III Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-03-16

    Estrogen Receptor Negative; Estrogen Receptor Positive; HER2/Neu Negative; HER2/Neu Positive; Progesterone Receptor Negative; Progesterone Receptor Positive; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Triple-Negative Breast Carcinoma

  20. Educational Counseling in Improving Communication and Quality of Life in Spouses and Breast Cancer Patients

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-29

    Anxiety Disorder; Depression; Ductal Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Lobular Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Psychosocial Effects of Cancer and Its Treatment; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  1. [Treatment of disseminated breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Mattson, Johanna; Huovinen, Riikka

    2015-01-01

    Although several effective drugs have in recent years been introduced for the treatment of disseminated breast cancer, it is still an incurable illness. Many patients live a fairly normal life with their illness for a long time, and some of them are able to continue working in spite of the therapies. Factors considered in tailoring the treatment include tumor subtype, extent of the disease, symptoms, previous treatments and the achieved treatment outcome, and adverse effects of the treatments. PMID:26245064

  2. Using hair to screen for breast cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, Veronica; Kearsley, John; Irving, Tom; Amemiya, Yoshiyuki; Cookson, David

    1999-03-01

    We have studied hair using fibre X-ray diffraction studies with synchrotron radiation and find that hair from breast-cancer patients has a different intermolecular structure to hair from healthy subjects. These changes are seen in all samples of scalp and pubic hair taken from women diagnosed with breast cancer. All the hair samples from women who tested positive for a mutation of the BRCA1 gene, which is associated with a higher risk of breast cancer, also show these changes. Because our results are so consistent, we propose that such hair analyses may be used as a simple, non-invasive screening method for breast cancer.

  3. Breast cancer and the consumption of coffee.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, L; Miller, D R; Helmrich, S P; Kaufman, D W; Schottenfeld, D; Stolley, P D; Shapiro, S

    1985-09-01

    The hypothesis has been raised that coffee consumption may increase the incidence of breast cancer, based on the report that fibrocystic breast disease, a risk factor for breast cancer, regresses after abstention from coffee and other methylxanthines. The relation between recent coffee consumption and the risk of breast cancer was evaluated in a case-control study, based on interviews conducted 1975-1982 at several mainly eastern US teaching and community hospitals. The responses of 2,651 women with newly diagnosed breast cancer were compared with those of 1,501 controls with nonmalignant conditions and 385 controls with cancers at other sites. The relative risk estimates for levels of coffee drinking up to seven or more cups daily, relative to none, approximated 1.0 with narrow 95% confidence intervals. After allowance for confounding, the relative risk estimate for drinking at least five cups a day was 1.2 (95% confidence interval, 0.9-1.6) using the noncancer controls and 1.1 (0.7-1.6) using the cancer controls. Coffee consumption was not associated with an increase in the risk of breast cancer among women with a history of fibrocystic breast disease, nor were tea or decaffeinated coffee associated with an increase in the risk of breast cancer. The results suggest that the recent consumption of coffee does not influence the incidence of breast cancer. PMID:4025289

  4. Breast Cancer Research at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Epithelial and fibroblast cell coculture: Long-term growth human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) admixed in coculture with fibroblast from the same initial breast tissue grown as 3-dimenstional constructions in the presence of attachment beads in the NASA Bioreactor. A: A typical constrct about 2.0 mm in diameter without beads on the surface. The center of these constrcts is hollow, and beads are organized about the irner surface. Although the coculture provides smaller constructs than the monoculture, the metabolic of the organized cells is about the same. B, C, D: Closer views of cells showing that the shape of cells and cell-to-cell interactions apprear different in the coculture than in the monoculture constructs. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cell (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunorous tissue. Credit: Dr. Robert Richmond, NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC).

  5. Intractable pain with breast cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Watson, C. P.; Evans, R. J.

    1982-01-01

    This study examines retrospectively the cause, clinical features, natural history and results of treatment of intractable pain associated with breast cancer in 210 patients. The three chief types of pain were that due to skeletal metastases or brachial plexus neuropathy and pain of psychogenic origin. Onset at the time of cancer diagnosis characterized the psychogenic pain, whereas pain from metastases first occurred after a median latency of 3.7 years. Treatment was custom-tailored to the specific patient and pain problem, with several factors taken into account. The onset of intractable pain due to metastatic disease indicated a short survival (median, 9 months). PMID:6277445

  6. Clinical utility of exemestane in the treatment of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zucchini, Giorgia; Geuna, Elena; Milani, Andrea; Aversa, Caterina; Martinello, Rossella; Montemurro, Filippo

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most prevalent cancer in women, causing a significant mortality worldwide. Different endocrine strategies are available for the treatment of hormone-sensitive breast cancer, including antiestrogen tamoxifen and fulvestrant, as well as third-generation aromatase inhibitors (AIs), such as letrozole, anastrozole, and exemestane. In this review, we will focus on exemestane, its clinical use, and its side effects. Exemestane is a steroidal third-generation AI now used in all treatment settings for breast cancer. In the metastatic disease, it has been extensively investigated as the first-, second-, and further-line treatment and it is now registered for the treatment of postmenopausal women with advanced estrogen-receptor-positive breast cancer whose disease has progressed following antiestrogen therapy. A potential lack of cross-resistance with nonsteroidal AIs has been described, giving additional therapeutic opportunities in sequences of endocrine agents. Exemestane is also approved for the adjuvant treatment of postmenopausal early breast cancer, either as upfront monotherapy for 5 years, as a switch following 2–3 years of tamoxifen, or as extended therapy beyond 5 years of adjuvant treatment. New promising data also showed a beneficial effect in young premenopausal early breast cancer patients, when administered together with ovarian suppression. Interesting results have also emerged when exemestane has been investigated as neodjuvant treatment as well as preventive agent in healthy women at high risk for breast cancer. Exemestane is generally well tolerated, with a side effect profile similar to that of other AIs, including menopausal symptoms, arthralgia, and bone loss. In conclusion, exemestane can be considered an effective and well-tolerated endocrine treatment option for all stages of breast cancer. PMID:26064072

  7. Clinical utility of exemestane in the treatment of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Zucchini, Giorgia; Geuna, Elena; Milani, Andrea; Aversa, Caterina; Martinello, Rossella; Montemurro, Filippo

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most prevalent cancer in women, causing a significant mortality worldwide. Different endocrine strategies are available for the treatment of hormone-sensitive breast cancer, including antiestrogen tamoxifen and fulvestrant, as well as third-generation aromatase inhibitors (AIs), such as letrozole, anastrozole, and exemestane. In this review, we will focus on exemestane, its clinical use, and its side effects. Exemestane is a steroidal third-generation AI now used in all treatment settings for breast cancer. In the metastatic disease, it has been extensively investigated as the first-, second-, and further-line treatment and it is now registered for the treatment of postmenopausal women with advanced estrogen-receptor-positive breast cancer whose disease has progressed following antiestrogen therapy. A potential lack of cross-resistance with nonsteroidal AIs has been described, giving additional therapeutic opportunities in sequences of endocrine agents. Exemestane is also approved for the adjuvant treatment of postmenopausal early breast cancer, either as upfront monotherapy for 5 years, as a switch following 2-3 years of tamoxifen, or as extended therapy beyond 5 years of adjuvant treatment. New promising data also showed a beneficial effect in young premenopausal early breast cancer patients, when administered together with ovarian suppression. Interesting results have also emerged when exemestane has been investigated as neodjuvant treatment as well as preventive agent in healthy women at high risk for breast cancer. Exemestane is generally well tolerated, with a side effect profile similar to that of other AIs, including menopausal symptoms, arthralgia, and bone loss. In conclusion, exemestane can be considered an effective and well-tolerated endocrine treatment option for all stages of breast cancer. PMID:26064072

  8. A phase I trial of docetaxel and 5-day continuous infusion of 5-fluorouracil in patients with advanced or recurrent breast cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Ando, M.; Watanabe, T.; Sasaki, Y.; Ying, D. F.; Omuro, Y.; Katsumata, N.; Narabayashi, M.; Tokue, Y.; Fujii, H.; Igarashi, T.; Wakita, H.; Ohtsu, T.; Itoh, K.; Adachi, I.; Taguchi, T.

    1998-01-01

    To determine the maximum-tolerated doses (MTDs), the dose-limiting toxicities (DLTs) and the recommended doses for further trials of docetaxel in combination with a 5-day continuous infusion of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) in advanced or recurrent breast cancer patients who had been treated previously with at least one chemotherapeutic regimen, patients were treated with docetaxel as a 1-h infusion on day 1 followed by 5-FU as a continuous infusion on days 1 through 5 every 3-4 weeks. Three or six patients were assessed at the following escalating dose levels of docetaxel/5-FU per day: 40/150, 40/300, 50/300, 50/500 and 60/500 mg m(-2). Nineteen patients entered this trial, of whom 18 could be assessed for adverse event and therapeutic efficacy. The DLTs were neutropenia and diarrhoea. The MTDs were 60 mg m(-2) of docetaxel on day 1 and 500 mg m(-2) per day of 5-day continuous infusion of 5-FU. One of 18 patients achieved a complete response and eight achieved partial response (over all response rate: 50%). The recommended doses of docetaxel and 5-day continuous infusion of 5-FU for a phase II trial are 50 mg m(-2) and 500 mg m(-2) per day every 3 or 4 weeks. PMID:9667671

  9. Typhoid Vaccine in Testing Response to Immune Stress in Patients With Stage I-IIIA Breast Cancer Who Received Chemotherapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-15

    Cognitive Side Effects of Cancer Therapy; Depression; Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer

  10. Adolescent meat intake and breast cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Farvid, Maryam S; Cho, Eunyoung; Chen, Wendy Y; Eliassen, A Heather; Willett, Walter C

    2015-04-15

    The breast is particularly vulnerable to carcinogenic influences during adolescence due to rapid proliferation of mammary cells and lack of terminal differentiation. We investigated consumption of adolescent red meat and other protein sources in relation to breast cancer risk in the Nurses' Health Study II cohort. We followed prospectively 44,231 women aged 33-52 years who, in 1998, completed a detailed questionnaire about diet during adolescence. Relative risks (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (95%CI) were estimated using Cox proportional hazard regression. We documented 1132 breast cancer cases during 13-year follow-up. In multivariable Cox regression models with major breast cancer risk factors adjustment, greater consumption of total red meat in adolescence was significantly associated with higher premenopausal breast cancer risk (highest vs. lowest quintiles, RR, 1.43; 95%CI, 1.05-1.94; Ptrend  = 0.007), but not postmenopausal breast cancer. Adolescent intake of poultry was associated with lower risk of breast cancer overall (RR, 0.76; 95%CI, 0.60-0.97; for each serving/day). Adolescent intakes of iron, heme iron, fish, eggs, legumes and nuts were not associated with breast cancer. Replacement of one serving/day of total red meat with one serving of combination of poultry, fish, legumes, and nuts was associated with a 15% lower risk of breast cancer overall (RR, 0.85; 95%CI, 0.74-0.96) and a 23% lower risk of premenopausal breast cancer (RR, 0.77; 95%CI, 0.64-0.92). In conclusion, higher consumption of red meat during adolescence was associated with premenopausal breast cancer. Substituting other dietary protein sources for red meat in adolescent diet may decrease premenopausal breast cancer risk. PMID:25220168

  11. Breast cancer in sub-Saharan African women.

    PubMed

    Anim, J T

    1993-03-01

    The literature on breast cancer in sub-Saharan women is reviewed. In general, breast cancer is the second most common malignancy of women in the region, after cancer of the uterine cervix. Available reports indicate that data on the disease are incomplete and mostly, of epidemiological or clinical nature. Breast cancer is less common in sub-Saharan Africa compared to the Western countries (USA or Europe), occurs in younger individuals with peak incidences about a decade younger and the majority present late, with advanced, sometimes terminal disease. Absence of health educational programmes on cancer as well as lack of screening facilities in nearly all countries in the region are contributory factors to the late presentation of the cases. The need for more in-depth studies of the disease in the black African population has been highlighted. PMID:7839882

  12. Pattern of Breast Cancer Distribution in Ghana: A Survey to Enhance Early Detection, Diagnosis, and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Debrah, Samuel

    2016-01-01

    Background. Nearly 70% of women diagnosed with breast cancer in Ghana are in advanced stages of the disease due especially to low awareness, resulting in limited treatment success and high death rate. With limited epidemiological studies on breast cancer in Ghana, the aim of this study is to assess and understand the pattern of breast cancer distribution for enhancing early detection and treatment. Methods. We randomly selected and screened 3000 women for clinical palpable breast lumps and used univariate and bivariate analysis for description and exploration of variables, respectively, in relation to incidence of breast cancer. Results. We diagnosed 23 (0.76%) breast cancer cases out of 194 (6.46%) participants with clinically palpable breast lumps. Seventeen out of these 23 (0.56%) were premenopausal (<46.6 years) with 7 (0.23%) being below 35 years. With an overall breast cancer incidence of 0.76% in this study, our observation that about 30% of these cancer cases were below 35 years may indicate a relative possible shift of cancer burden to women in their early thirties in Ghana, compared to Western countries. Conclusion. These results suggest an age adjustment for breast cancer screening to early twenties for Ghanaian women and the need for a nationwide breast cancer screening to understand completely the pattern of breast cancer distribution in Ghana.

  13. Gene Tied to Breast Cancer Raises Uterine Cancer Risk Too

    MedlinePlus

    ... news/fullstory_159652.html Gene Tied to Breast Cancer Raises Uterine Cancer Risk Too Women with BRCA1 may want to ... increased risk for a deadly form of uterine cancer, a new study finds. The BRCA1 gene mutation ...

  14. Phase II study of weekly vinorelbine and 24-h infusion of high-dose 5-fluorouracil plus leucovorin as first-line treatment of advanced breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, K H; Lu, Y S; Hsu, C H; Lin, J F; Chao, H J; Huang, T C; Chung, C Y; Chang, C S; Yang, C H; Cheng, A L

    2005-01-01

    We prospectively investigated the efficacy and safety of combining weekly vinorelbine (VNB) with weekly 24-h infusion of high-dose 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and leucovorin (LV) in the treatment of patients with advanced breast cancer (ABC). Vinorelbine 25 mg m−2 30-min intravenous infusion, and high-dose 5-FU 2600 mg m−2 plus LV 300 mg m−2 24-h intravenous infusion (HDFL regimen) were given on days 1 and 8 every 3 weeks. Between June 1999 and April 2003, 40 patients with histologically confirmed recurrent or metastatic breast cancer were enrolled with a median age of 49 years (range: 36–68). A total of 25 patients had recurrent ABC, and 15 patients had primary metastatic diseases. The overall response rate for the intent-to-treat group was 70.0% (95% CI: 54–84%) with eight complete responses and 20 partial responses. All 40 patients were evaluated for survival and toxicities. Among a total of 316 cycles of VNB–HDFL given (average: 7.9: range: 4–14 cycles per patient), the main toxicity was Gr3/4 leucopenia and Gr3/4 neutropenia in 57 (18.0%) and 120 (38.0%) cycles, respectively. Gr1/2 infection and Gr1/2 stomatitis were noted in five (1.6%) and 59 (18.7%) cycles, respectively. None of the patients developed Gr3/4 stomatitis or Gr3/4 infection. Gr2/3 and Gr1 hand–foot syndrome was noted in two (5.0%) and 23 (57.5%) patients, respectively. Gr1 sensory neuropathy developed in three patients. The median time to progression was 8.0 months (range: 3–25.5 months), and the median overall survival was 25.0 months with a follow-up of 5.5 to 45+ months. This VNB–HDFL regimen is a highly active yet well-tolerated first-line treatment for ABC. PMID:15770209

  15. Radiation Therapy in Treating Post-Menopausal Women With Early Stage Breast Cancer Undergoing Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-09-02

    Ductal Breast Carcinoma In Situ; Estrogen Receptor Negative; Estrogen Receptor Positive; HER2/Neu Negative; Invasive Cribriform Breast Carcinoma; Invasive Ductal Carcinoma, Not Otherwise Specified; Lobular Breast Carcinoma In Situ; Mucinous Breast Carcinoma; Papillary Breast Carcinoma; Progesterone Receptor Positive; Stage I Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Tubular Breast Carcinoma

  16. Intraoperative radiotherapy for breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Norman R.; Pigott, Katharine H.; Brew-Graves, Chris

    2014-01-01

    Intra-operative radiotherapy (IORT) as a treatment for breast cancer is a relatively new technique that is designed to be a replacement for whole breast external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) in selected women suitable for breast-conserving therapy. This article reviews twelve reasons for the use of the technique, with a particular emphasis on targeted intra-operative radiotherapy (TARGIT) which uses X-rays generated from a portable device within the operating theatre immediately after the breast tumour (and surrounding margin of healthy tissue) has been removed. The delivery of a single fraction of radiotherapy directly to the tumour bed at the time of surgery, with the capability of adding EBRT at a later date if required (risk-adaptive technique) is discussed in light of recent results from a large multinational randomised controlled trial comparing TARGIT with EBRT. The technique avoids irradiation of normal tissues such as skin, heart, lungs, ribs and spine, and has been shown to improve cosmetic outcome when compared with EBRT. Beneficial aspects to both institutional and societal economics are discussed, together with evidence demonstrating excellent patient satisfaction and quality of life. There is a discussion of the published evidence regarding the use of IORT twice in the same breast (for new primary cancers) and in patients who would never be considered for EBRT because of their special circumstances (such as the frail, the elderly, or those with collagen vascular disease). Finally, there is a discussion of the role of the TARGIT Academy in developing and sustaining high standards in the use of the technique. PMID:25083504

  17. Hereditary breast cancer: ever more pieces to the polygenic puzzle.

    PubMed

    Bogdanova, Natalia; Helbig, Sonja; Dörk, Thilo

    2013-01-01

    Several susceptibility genes differentially impact on the lifetime risk for breast cancer. Technological advances over the past years have enabled the detection of genetic risk factors through high-throughput screening of large breast cancer case-control series. High- to intermediate penetrance alleles have now been identified in more than 20 genes involved in DNA damage signalling and repair, and more than 70 low-penetrance loci have been discovered through recent genome-wide association studies. In addition to classical germ-line mutation and single-nucleotide polymorphism, copy number variation and somatic mosaicism have been proposed as potential predisposing mechanisms. Many of the identified loci also appear to influence breast tumour characteristics such as estrogen receptor status. In this review, we briefly summarize present knowledge about breast cancer susceptibility genes and discuss their implications for risk prediction and clinical practice. PMID:24025454

  18. Hereditary breast cancer: ever more pieces to the polygenic puzzle

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Several susceptibility genes differentially impact on the lifetime risk for breast cancer. Technological advances over the past years have enabled the detection of genetic risk factors through high-throughput screening of large breast cancer case–control series. High- to intermediate penetrance alleles have now been identified in more than 20 genes involved in DNA damage signalling and repair, and more than 70 low-penetrance loci have been discovered through recent genome-wide association studies. In addition to classical germ-line mutation and single-nucleotide polymorphism, copy number variation and somatic mosaicism have been proposed as potential predisposing mechanisms. Many of the identified loci also appear to influence breast tumour characteristics such as estrogen receptor status. In this review, we briefly summarize present knowledge about breast cancer susceptibility genes and discuss their implications for risk prediction and clinical practice. PMID:24025454

  19. Revealing the Complexity of Breast Cancer by Next Generation Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Verigos, John; Magklara, Angeliki

    2015-01-01

    Over the last few years the increasing usage of “-omic” platforms, supported by next-generation sequencing, in the analysis of breast cancer samples has tremendously advanced our understanding of the disease. New driver and passenger mutations, rare chromosomal rearrangements and other genomic aberrations identified by whole genome and exome sequencing are providing missing pieces of the genomic architecture of breast cancer. High resolution maps of breast cancer methylomes and sequencing of the miRNA microworld are beginning to paint the epigenomic landscape of the disease. Transcriptomic profiling is giving us a glimpse into the gene regulatory networks that govern the fate of the breast cancer cell. At the same time, integrative analysis of sequencing data confirms an extensive intertumor and intratumor heterogeneity and plasticity in breast cancer arguing for a new approach to the problem. In this review, we report on the latest findings on the molecular characterization of breast cancer using NGS technologies, and we discuss their potential implications for the improvement of existing therapies. PMID:26561834

  20. Women with Breast Cancer Micrometastases in Their Sentinel Lymph Nodes May Not Need Axillary Dissection

    MedlinePlus

    ... and data sets for researchers Research by Cancer Type Find research about a specific cancer type Progress Annual Report ... Laws Careers Visitor Information Search Search Home Cancer Types Breast Cancer Research Breast Cancer Patient Breast Cancer Treatment Male Breast ...