Science.gov

Sample records for advanced cataractous lenses

  1. IOL Implants: Lens Replacement and Cataract Surgery (Intraocular Lenses)

    MedlinePlus

    ... by: Kierstan Boyd Reviewed by: Elizabeth Yeu MD Mar. 01, 2016 Before intraocular lenses (IOLs) were developed, ... Foods Rich in Vitamin C Help Curb Cataracts Mar 28, 2016 Los Alimentos Ricos en Vitamina C ...

  2. High contrast radiography of normal and cataractous canine lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antunes, A.; Hönnicke, M. G.; Cusatis, C.; Morelhão, S. L.

    2005-05-01

    Cataract is a disease that degrades the transparency of crystalline lenses. The crystalline lens is a cellular structure that has a unique shape and protein composition. Cataract is associated with changes in the structure and composition of the lenses. Analyser-based x-ray phase contrast imaging (PCI) is a non-destructive technique that presents images with more contrast and details than the images acquired with conventional synchrotron radiography. Here, an analyser-based x-ray PCI set-up was optimized in the XRD2 beamline at Brazilian Synchrotron Light Laboratory for comparative studies on PCI and conventional synchrotron radiography, for non-cataractous (healthy tissue) and cataractous crystalline (diseased tissue) lenses. Refraction angle and apparent absorption contrast images (diffraction enhanced imaging—DEI) were also obtained. The present PCI and DEI images indicate that the healthy tissue shows enhanced shell structures, while in the diseased tissue these are almost absent. This is associated with the clinical case of total opacity of the cataractous crystalline lenses when it is exposed to visible light.

  3. [The Use of Polymers for Intraocular Lenses in Cataract Surgery].

    PubMed

    Fizia-Orlicz, Anna; Misiuk-Hojło, Marta

    2015-01-01

    According to the World Health Organization, cataract remains the leading cause of the curable visual impairment worldwide. Cataract can only be cured by surgery during which the cloudy lens is replaced with an artificial intraocular lens. It is one of the most common surgeries being performed worldwide. There are age-related, congenital, traumatic and metabolic types of cataract which have been distinguished. Age-related cataract is the most common one and it affects people over 60 with the greatest frequency. In reference to patients whose cornea does not fulfill the requirements for a standard refractive surgery, the number of refractive intraocular lens replacement is increasing. Manufacturers aim to enhance materials in order to minimize surgical complication while increasing the patient’s eyesight. The increase in average lifespan along with patients’ expectations stimulate competition among manufacturers who bring new products and solutions into to the market. There is an augmented demand for premium lenses such as toric, multifocal or accommodating. These lenses bring patients the promise of life without the need for wearing glasses. As far as the main materials used in the production of intraocular lens are concerned, there are hydrophobic, hydrophilic, acrylic and silicone lenses in use. In this paper the author discusses characteristics as well as advantages and disadvantages of the above-mentioned materials. The associated surgical complications and the new areas of development regarding the materials used in lenses manufacturing are also examined. PMID:26994891

  4. Changes in cytoskeletal proteins in childhood cataract lenses

    PubMed

    Matsushima; Mukai; Obara

    2000-03-01

    Purpose: Approximately 50% of congenital and childhood cataracts seen in the clinic is of undetermined origin. Biochemical analysis of the cataracts is rare. This study analyzes lens proteins to determine the mechanism of congenital and childhood cataracts. Method: We analyzed the lens proteins from 10 young patients after cataract operations, using sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), densitometry analysis, and Western immunoblotting.Results: Densitometry of separated proteins showed a decrease in the high molecular protein bands of posterior subcapsular cataract (PSC). Specifically, spectrin (235 kDa), filensin (100 kDa), and vimentin (57 kDa) were absent from the SDS-PAGE of PSC. Increases in filensin and vimentin were observed in a Christmas tree cataract and lamellar cataracts. Western immunoblots confirmed the densitometry of SDS-PAGE.Conclusion: These results suggest that changes in cytoskeletal proteins may contribute to congenital and childhood cataracts.

  5. Comprehensive Analysis of Maillard Protein Modifications in Human Lenses: Effect of Age and Cataract

    PubMed Central

    Smuda, Mareen; Henning, Christian; Raghavan, Cibin T.; Johar, Kaid; Vasavada, Abhay R.; Nagaraj, Ram H.; Glomb, Marcus A.

    2015-01-01

    In human lens proteins, advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs) originate from the reaction of glycating agents, e.g., vitamin C and glucose. AGEs have been considered to play a significant role in lens aging and cataract formation. Although several AGEs have been detected in the human lens, the contribution of individual glycating agents to their formation remains unclear. A highly sensitive liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry multimethod was developed that allowed us to quantitate 21 protein modifications in normal and cataractous lenses, respectively. N6-Carboxymethyl lysine, N6-carboxyethyl lysine, N7-carboxyethyl arginine, methylglyoxal hydroimidazolone 1, and N6-lactoyl lysine were found to be the major Maillard protein modifications among these AGEs. The novel vitamin C specific amide AGEs, N6-xylonyl and N6-lyxonyl lysine, but also AGEs from glyoxal were detected, albeit in minor quantities. Among the 21 modifications, AGEs from the Amadori product (derived from the reaction of glucose and lysine) and methylglyoxal were dominant. PMID:25849437

  6. Elemental distribution in frozen-hydrated rat lenses with galactose cataract

    SciTech Connect

    Koyama-Ito, H. )

    1990-01-01

    The elemental distributions in frozen-hydrated rat lenses with galactose cataract were compared before and after the onset of the nuclear cataract to investigate the possible role of ion levels in the lens opacification due to the phase separation of the lens cytoplasm. The maps of the weight concentrations of the minor elements, S, Cl, K and Ca, on the basis of wet weight in the central plane of lens were obtained by X-ray analysis with the high energy ion microprobe at a resolution of 50 microns. Before the onset of the nuclear cataract, the distributions of Cl and K, were almost normal, except in the lens posterior periphery with high Cl and low K. In the lens with the nuclear opacity, sudden changes were observed. The Cl increased throughout the lens, and K decreased throughout the lens except at lens anterior thin layer. However, the totalized monovalent ion level changed only slightly. The Ca level increased throughout the lens after the onset of the nuclear cataract, suggesting a possible role of Ca in the nuclear opacification of galactose cataract of rats. The distributions of S were similar to the protein density distributions previously known both in the normal and in the cataractous lenses.

  7. Cataracts

    MedlinePlus

    ... has become cloudy, this is called a cataract. Vision problems with cataracts If your vision has become ... regularly for any changes. Cataract surgery for clearer vision When a cataract causes bothersome vision problems that ...

  8. Promoter demethylation of Keap1 gene in human diabetic cataractous lenses

    SciTech Connect

    Palsamy, Periyasamy; Ayaki, Masahiko; Elanchezhian, Rajan; Shinohara, Toshimichi

    2012-07-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We found significant Keap1 promoter demethylation in diabetic cataractous lenses. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Demethylation of Keap1 gene upregulated the expression of Keap1 mRNA and protein. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Elevated levels of Keap1 are known to decrease the levels of Nrf2. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Thereby, the levels of antioxidant enzymes are suppressed by decreased Nrf2 level. -- Abstract: Age-related cataracts (ARCs) are the major cause of visual impairments worldwide, and diabetic adults tend to have an earlier onset of ARCs. Although age is the strongest risk factor for cataracts, little is known how age plays a role in the development of ARCs. It is known that oxidative stress in the lens increases with age and more so in the lenses of diabetics. One of the central adaptive responses against the oxidative stresses is the activation of the nuclear transcriptional factor, NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), which then activates more than 20 different antioxidative enzymes. Kelch-like ECH associated protein 1 (Keap1) targets and binds to Nrf2 for proteosomal degradation. We hypothesized that hyperglycemia will lead to a dysfunction of the Nrf2-dependent antioxidative protection in the lens of diabetics. We studied the methylation status of the CpG islands in 15 clear and 21 diabetic cataractous lenses. Our results showed significant levels of demethylated DNA in the Keap1 promoter in the cataractous lenses from diabetic patients. In contrast, highly methylated DNA was found in the clear lens and tumorized human lens epithelial cell (HLEC) lines (SRA01/04). HLECs treated with a demethylation agent, 5-aza-2 Prime deoxycytidine (5-Aza), had a 10-fold higher levels of Keap1 mRNA, 3-fold increased levels of Keap1 protein, produced higher levels of ROS, and increased cell death. Our results indicated that demethylation of the CpG islands in the Keap1 promoter will activate the expression of Keap1 protein, which

  9. Melatonin Reduces Cataract Formation and Aldose Reductase Activity in Lenses of Streptozotocin-induced Diabetic Rat

    PubMed Central

    Khorsand, Marjan; Akmali, Masoumeh; Sharzad, Sahab; Beheshtitabar, Mojtaba

    2016-01-01

    Background: The relationship between the high activity of aldose reductase (AR) and diabetic cataract formation has been previously investigated. The purpose of the present study was to determine the preventing effect of melatonin on streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic cataract in rats. Methods: 34 adult healthy male Sprague-Dawely rats were divided into four groups. Diabetic control and diabetic+melatonin received a single dose of STZ (50 mg/kg, intraperitoneally), whereas the normal control and normal+melatonin received vehicle. The melatonin groups were gavaged with melatonin (5 mg/kg) daily for a period of 8 weeks, whereas the rats in the normal control and diabetic control groups received only the vehicle. The rats’ eyes were examined every week and cataract formation scores (0-4) were determined by slit-lamp microscope. At the end of the eighth week, the rats were sacrificed and markers of the polyol pathway and antioxidative (Glutathione, GSH) in their lens were determined. The levels of blood glucose, HbA1c and plasma malondialdhyde (MDA), as a marker of lipid peroxidation, were also measured. Results: Melatonin prevented STZ-induced hyperglycemia by decreased blood glucose and HbA1c levels. Slit lamp examination indicated that melatonin delayed cataract progression in diabetic rats. The results revealed that melatonin feeding increased the GSH levels, decreased the activities of AR and sorbitol dehydrogenase (SDH) and sorbitol formation in catractous lenses as well as plasma MDA content. Conclusion: In summary, for the first time we demonstrated that melatonin delayed the formation and progression of cataract in diabetic rat lenses. PMID:27365552

  10. Emerging Technology in Refractive Cataract Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Saraiva, João; Neatrour, Kristin; Waring IV, George O.

    2016-01-01

    Technology in cataract surgery is constantly evolving to meet the goals of both surgeons and patients. Recent major advances in refractive cataract surgery include innovations in preoperative and intraoperative diagnostics, femtosecond laser-assisted cataract surgery (FLACS), and a new generation of intraocular lenses (IOLs). This paper presents the latest technologies in each of these major categories and discusses how these contributions serve to improve cataract surgery outcomes in a safe, effective, and predictable manner. PMID:27433353

  11. Emerging Technology in Refractive Cataract Surgery.

    PubMed

    Saraiva, João; Neatrour, Kristin; Waring Iv, George O

    2016-01-01

    Technology in cataract surgery is constantly evolving to meet the goals of both surgeons and patients. Recent major advances in refractive cataract surgery include innovations in preoperative and intraoperative diagnostics, femtosecond laser-assisted cataract surgery (FLACS), and a new generation of intraocular lenses (IOLs). This paper presents the latest technologies in each of these major categories and discusses how these contributions serve to improve cataract surgery outcomes in a safe, effective, and predictable manner. PMID:27433353

  12. A study of patient satisfaction after cataract surgery with implantation of different types of intraocular lenses

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The implementation of capitated payment has driven medical institutions through developing balance billing for medical services. By exploring the patients’ decision-making factors on different self-pay items, a reference for the pricing and sales strategy for the related products can be formed. The major purposes of this study were to analyze the determinants of preoperative selection and postoperative satisfaction with implantation of different types of intraocular lenses in cataract surgery. Methods This cross-sectional study consisted of 127 patients that were 50 years of age and older, and who had phacoemulsification with intraocular lens implantation in both eyes. Data were collected by using a structured questionnaire. The following parameters were measured: access to medical care, attitude towards receiving medical products at one’s own expense, overall patient satisfaction and postoperative visual clarity. Results The results showed that the patient’s gender, educational level and economic status influenced the type of intraocular lens chosen. Patients in the insurance group cared about access to medical care, and patients in the balance billing group cared about product differentiation. ANOVA results showed no statistically significant differences in the overall satisfaction of the patients among the groups with different types of intraocular lenses. Patients that received cataract surgery with implantation of multifocal intraocular lenses had better vision when trying to view smaller objects and when looking at objects under strong light. Conclusions Manufacturers should increase the number of differences between their products, and health care providers can then recommend the appropriate intraocular lens in accordance with the needs or demands of their patients, and also by keeping in mind the financial constraints of their patients. PMID:23107001

  13. Clinical and experimental advances in congenital and paediatric cataracts

    PubMed Central

    Churchill, Amanda; Graw, Jochen

    2011-01-01

    Cataracts (opacities of the lens) are frequent in the elderly, but rare in paediatric practice. Congenital cataracts (in industrialized countries) are mainly caused by mutations affecting lens development. Much of our knowledge about the underlying mechanisms of cataractogenesis has come from the genetic analysis of affected families: there are contributions from genes coding for transcription factors (such as FoxE3, Maf, Pitx3) and structural proteins such as crystallins or connexins. In addition, there are contributions from enzymes affecting sugar pathways (particularly the galactose pathway) and from a quite unexpected area: axon guidance molecules like ephrins and their receptors. Cataractous mouse lenses can be identified easily by visual inspection, and a remarkable number of mutant lines have now been characterized. Generally, most of the mouse mutants show a similar phenotype to their human counterparts; however, there are some remarkable differences. It should be noted that many mutations affect genes that are expressed not only in the lens, but also in tissues and organs outside the eye. There is increasing evidence for pleiotropic effects of these genes, and increasing consideration that cataracts may act as early and readily detectable biomarkers for a number of systemic syndromes. PMID:21402583

  14. Results of intraocular lens implantation with capsular tension ring in subluxated crystalline or cataractous lenses in children

    PubMed Central

    Das, Pranab; Ram, Jagat; Brar, Gagandeep Singh; Dogra, Mangat R

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the outcome of intraocular lens (IOL) implantation using capsular tension ring (CTR) in subluxated crystalline or cataractous lenses in children. Setting: Tertiary care setting Materials and Methods: We prospectively studied 18 eyes of 15 children with subluxation of crystalline or cataractous lenses between 90° up to 210° after phacoemulsification, CTR and IOL implantation. Each child was examined for IOL centration, zonular dehiscence and posterior capsular opacification (PCO). Results: Age of the patient ranged between five to 15 years. Out of 18 eyes, seven had traumatic and 11 had spontaneous subluxation of crystalline or cataractous lens. Phacoemulsification was successfully performed with CTR implantation in the capsular bag. Intraoperative zonular dialysis occurred in two eyes. Anterior vitrectomy was performed in six eyes to manage vitreous prolapse. IOL implanted was polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) in eight eyes, hydrophobic acrylic in seven and hydrophilic acrylic in three. Follow-up ranged from 24 months to 72 months. Sixteen eyes had a best corrected visual acuity of 20/40 or better. Nine eyes developed significant PCO and were managed with Neodymium Yttrium Aluminum Garnet (Nd:YAG) laser posterior capsulotomy. One eye with acrylic IOL in the capsular bag had IOL dislocation after two years which was managed with vitrectomy and secondary trans-scleral fixation of IOL. Conclusions: Phacoaspiration with CTR implantation makes capsular bag IOL fixation possible in most of the eyes with subluxated crystalline or cataractous lenses. PCO still remains a challenge in children with successful phacoaspiration with CTR implantation PMID:19861744

  15. Cataracts

    MedlinePlus

    ... Quiz: Do You Need a Flu Shot? Got Homework? Here's Help White House Lunch Recipes Cataracts KidsHealth > ... she takes time to help him with his homework. Lately, though, Jake's noticed that Grandma Fran has ...

  16. Cataract

    MedlinePlus

    ... Colors that seem faded Glare - headlights, lamps or sunlight may seem too bright. You may also see ... a hat with a brim to block ultraviolet sunlight may help to delay cataracts. NIH: National Eye ...

  17. Age-related cataract.

    PubMed

    Asbell, Penny A; Dualan, Ivo; Mindel, Joel; Brocks, Dan; Ahmad, Mehdi; Epstein, Seth

    Cataract, opacification of the lens, is one of the commonest causes of loss of useful vision, with an estimated 16 million people worldwide affected. Several risk factors have been identified in addition to increasing age--genetic composition, exposure to ultraviolet light, and diabetes. However, no method to halt the formation of a cataractous lens has been shown to be effective. Nevertheless, advances in surgical removal of cataracts, including small-incision surgery, use of viscoelastics, and the development of intraocular lenses, have made treatment very effective and visual recovery rapid in most cases. Despite these advances, cataract continues to be a leading public-health issue that will grow in importance as the population increases and life expectancy is extended worldwide. PMID:15708105

  18. The Cataract-linked Mutant Connexin50D47A Causes Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress in Mouse Lenses.

    PubMed

    Berthoud, Viviana M; Minogue, Peter J; Lambert, Paul A; Snabb, Joseph I; Beyer, Eric C

    2016-08-19

    Mice expressing connexin50D47A (Cx50D47A) exhibit nuclear cataracts and impaired differentiation. Cx50D47A does not traffic properly, and homozygous mutant lenses show increased levels of the stress-responsive αB-crystallins. Therefore, we assessed whether expression of Cx50D47A led to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in the lens in vivo Although pharmacologic induction of ER stress can be transduced by three different pathways, we found no evidence for activation of the IRE1α or ATF6 pathways in Cx50D47A-expressing lenses. In contrast, heterozygous and homozygous Cx50D47A lenses showed an increase in phosphorylated PERK immunoreactivity and in the ratio of phosphorylated to total EIF2α (2.4- and 3.3-fold, respectively) compared with wild type. Levels of ATF4 were similar in wild type and heterozygous lenses but elevated in homozygotes (391%). In both heterozygotes and homozygotes, levels of calreticulin protein were increased (184 and 262%, respectively), as was Chop mRNA (1.9- and 12.4-fold, respectively). CHOP protein was increased in homozygotes (384%). TUNEL staining was increased in Cx50D47A lenses, especially in homozygous mice. Levels of two factors that may be pro-survival, Irs2 and Trib3, were greatly increased in homozygous lenses. These results suggest that expression of Cx50D47A induces ER stress, triggering activation of the PERK-ATF4 pathway, which potentially contributes to the lens pathology and leads to increased expression of anti-apoptotic factors, allowing cell survival.

  19. Quantitative proteomics analysis with iTRAQ in human lenses with nuclear cataracts of different axial lengths

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Haiyan; Yan, Weijia; Wang, Xinchuan; Ma, Yong; Wang, Jianping

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The goal of this study was to identify and quantify the differentially expressed proteins in human nuclear cataract with different axial lengths. Methods Thirty-six samples of human lens nuclei with hardness grade III or IV were obtained during cataract surgery with extracapsular cataract extraction (ECCE). Six healthy transparent human lens nuclei were obtained from fresh healthy cadaver eyes during corneal transplantation surgery. The lens nuclei were divided into seven groups (six lenses in each group) according to the optic axis: Group A (mean axial length 28.7±1.5 mm; average age 59.8±1.9 years), Group B (mean axial length 23.0±0.4 mm; average age 60.3±2.5 years), Group C (mean axial length 19.9±0.5 mm; average age 55.1±2.5 years), Group D (mean axial length 28.7±1.4 mm; average age 58.0±4.0 years), Group E (mean axial length 23.0±0.3 mm; average age 56.9±4.2 years), and Group F (mean axial length 20.7±0.6 mm; average age 57.6±5.3 years). The six healthy transparent human lenses were included in a younger group with standard optic axes, Group G (mean axial length 23.0±0.5 mm; average age 34.7±4.2 years).Water-soluble, water-insoluble, and water-insoluble–urea-soluble protein fractions were extracted from the samples. The three-part protein fractions from the individual lenses were combined to form the total proteins of each sample. The proteomic profiles of each group were analyzed using 8-plex isobaric tagging for relative and absolute protein quantification (iTRAQ) labeling combined with two-dimensional liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (2D-LC-MS/MS). The data were analyzed with ProteinPilot software for peptide matching, protein identification, and quantification. Differentially expressed proteins were validated with western blotting. Results We employed biological and technical replicates and selected the intersection of the two sets of results, which included 40 proteins. From the 40 proteins identified, six were

  20. Light scattering in normal and cataractous lenses of farmed Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar): a slit lamp and Scheimpflug photographic study.

    PubMed

    Wegener, A; Laser, H; Ahrend, M H; Breck, O; Bjerkås, E; Glöckner, C; Midtlyng, P J; Breipohl, W

    2001-01-01

    To investigate normal light scattering and cataract formation, the anterior eye segments of farmed Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) reared in fresh water and sea water were documented in vivo for the first time with a Topcon SL-45 Scheimpflug camera. A total of 40 fish from the fresh-water-rearing period, obtained from 2 groups of identical age but showing a different growth rate, and 24 fish from the sea-water-rearing period, sampled from 2 groups with identical age but being fed different food brands, were included in this study. The fish were anaesthetized before examination. Due to the naturally wide pupil, no mydriatic compound was applied. All fish were removed from the water for photography, which was performed for each eye in 0 degrees = vertical slit position. Images were recorded on Kodak Tmax 400 black-and-white film. Microdensitometric image analysis of all negatives was performed using a Joyce-Loebl online microdensitometer. In spite of the virtual absence of an anterior chamber gap between cornea and lens and very little light scattering in the normal fish lens, a small number of distinct layers could be reproducibly identified in the lens. While there was little abnormal light scattering which could point to cataract development in young fish from the fresh water period, the evaluation of the lenses from the 2 sea water groups showed the presence of specific forms of cataract especially in the cortical and supranuclear layers. There were significant differences between the groups fed different food brands at the sea water site. In conclusion, Scheimpflug photography proved to be applicable to eye research in fish in vivo. It is suggested that this method should be employed for reproducible documentation as an extension to slit lamp monitoring in experimental research to reveal causative factors for cataracts in farmed fish. PMID:11586059

  1. Refractive index degeneration in older lenses: A potential functional correlate to structural changes that underlie cataract formation.

    PubMed

    Bahrami, Mehdi; Hoshino, Masato; Pierscionek, Barbara; Yagi, Naoto; Regini, Justyn; Uesugi, Kentaro

    2015-11-01

    A major structure/function relationship in the eye lens is that between the constituent proteins, the crystallins and the optical property of refractive index. Structural breakdown that leads to cataract has been investigated in a number of studies; the concomitant changes in the optics, namely increases in light attenuation have also been well documented. Specific changes in the refractive index gradient that cause such attenuation, however, are not well studied because previous methods of measuring refractive index require transparent samples. The X-ray Talbot interferometric method using synchrotron radiation allows for measurement of fine changes in refractive index through lenses with opacities. The findings of this study on older human lenses show disruptions to the refractive index gradient and in the refractive index contours. These disruptions are linked to location in the lens and occur in polar regions, along or close to the equatorial plane or in lamellar-like formations. The disruptions that are seen in the polar regions manifest branching formations that alter with progression through the lens with some similarity to lens sutures. This study shows how the refractive index gradient, which is needed to maintain image quality of the eye, may be disturbed and that this can occur in a number of distinct ways. These findings offer insight into functional changes to a major optical parameter in older lenses. Further studies are needed to elicit how these may be related to structural degenerations reported in the literature. PMID:26297613

  2. Refractive index degeneration in older lenses: A potential functional correlate to structural changes that underlie cataract formation.

    PubMed

    Bahrami, Mehdi; Hoshino, Masato; Pierscionek, Barbara; Yagi, Naoto; Regini, Justyn; Uesugi, Kentaro

    2015-11-01

    A major structure/function relationship in the eye lens is that between the constituent proteins, the crystallins and the optical property of refractive index. Structural breakdown that leads to cataract has been investigated in a number of studies; the concomitant changes in the optics, namely increases in light attenuation have also been well documented. Specific changes in the refractive index gradient that cause such attenuation, however, are not well studied because previous methods of measuring refractive index require transparent samples. The X-ray Talbot interferometric method using synchrotron radiation allows for measurement of fine changes in refractive index through lenses with opacities. The findings of this study on older human lenses show disruptions to the refractive index gradient and in the refractive index contours. These disruptions are linked to location in the lens and occur in polar regions, along or close to the equatorial plane or in lamellar-like formations. The disruptions that are seen in the polar regions manifest branching formations that alter with progression through the lens with some similarity to lens sutures. This study shows how the refractive index gradient, which is needed to maintain image quality of the eye, may be disturbed and that this can occur in a number of distinct ways. These findings offer insight into functional changes to a major optical parameter in older lenses. Further studies are needed to elicit how these may be related to structural degenerations reported in the literature.

  3. Age-related changes in the kinetics of human lenses: prevention of the cataract

    PubMed Central

    Pescosolido, Nicola; Barbato, Andrea; Giannotti, Rossella; Komaiha, Chiara; Lenarduzzi, Fiammetta

    2016-01-01

    The crystalline lens is a transparent, biconvex structure in the eye that, along with the cornea, helps to refract light to be focused on the retina and, by changing shape, it adjusts focal distance (accommodation). The three classes of structural proteins found in the lens are α, β, and γ crystallins. These proteins make up more than 90% of the total dry mass of the eye lens. Other components which can be found are sugars, lipids, water, several antioxidants and low weight molecules. When ageing changes occur in the lens, it causes a gradual reduction in transparency, presbyopia and an increase in the scattering and aberration of light waves as well as a degradation of the optical quality of the eye. The main changes that occur with aging are: 1) reduced diffusion of water from the outside to the inside of the lens and from its cortical to its nuclear zone; 2) crystalline change due to the accumulation of high molecular weight aggregates and insoluble proteins; 3) production of advanced glycation end products (AGEs), lipid accumulation, reduction of reduced glutathione content and destruction of ascorbic acid. Even if effective strategies in preventing cataract onset are not already known, good results have been reached in some cases with oral administration of antioxidant substances such as caffeine, pyruvic acid, epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), α-lipoic acid and ascorbic acid. Furthermore, methionine sulfoxide reductase A (MSRA) over expression could protect lens cells both in presence and in absence of oxidative stress-induced damage. Nevertheless, promising results have been obtained by reducing ultraviolet-induced oxidative damage. PMID:27803872

  4. Foldable vs rigid lenses after phacoemulsification for cataract surgery: a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Hennig, A; Puri, L R; Sharma, H; Evans, J R; Yorston, D

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To compare the outcomes of phacoemulsification with either a 2.5-mm clear corneal incision and a foldable intraocular lens (IOL) or a 5-mm sclerocorneal tunnel incision and a rigid polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) IOL. Methods In a prospective, randomised clinical trial of phacoemulsification cataract surgery, 1200 patients received either a foldable hydrophilic acrylic IOL through a 2.5-mm corneal incision or an inexpensive rigid PMMA IOL via a 5-mm sclerocorneal tunnel. Intra- and post-operative data and visual acuity at discharge, 6 weeks, and 1 year follow-up were analysed. Results At 1 year after surgery, 996 (83.0%) patients were followed up with an uncorrected visual acuity of 6/18 or better in 90.3% of the foldable and 94.3% in the rigid IOL group (risk ratio (RR) 0.96, 95% confidence intervals (CI) 0.92–0.99). Poor outcome (best-corrected acuity 6/60 or worse) occurred in 1.0% and 0.4%, respectively (RR 4.28, 95% CI 0.48–38.18). The surgical cost of consumables and overall surgical time were similar in both groups; however, the cost of the foldable IOL was eight times higher than the PMMA IOL. Posterior capsule opacification was more common in the rigid IOL group at 12 months (36.1% vs 23.3%); however, this did not affect post-operative vision. Conclusion In the hands of experienced cataract surgeons, phacoemulsification with implantation of a foldable or a rigid IOL gives excellent results. Using an inexpensive rigid PMMA IOL will make phacoemulsification more affordable for poor patients in low- and middle-income countries. PMID:24556879

  5. Cataract removal

    MedlinePlus

    ... blocks light from entering your eye. Without enough light, you cannot see as clearly. Cataracts are painless. They are most ... bathing or showering for the first few days. Light activities are best ... If you need new glasses or contact lenses, you can usually ...

  6. [Rotational stability in intraocular lenses with C-loop haptics versus Z haptics in cataract surgery. A prospective randomised comparison].

    PubMed

    Warlo, I; Krummenauer, F; Dick, H B

    2005-10-01

    The aim of the study was to compare the rotational stability of intraocular lenses (IOLs) with C-loop haptics and those with Z haptics. A total of 50 patients with cataracts were prospectively randomised in equal numbers using a design equivalent to IOL MS 612 S (C-loop haptic) and MS 6120 (Z haptic, both HumanOptics, Erlangen). Complete ophthalmological examinations were performed including assessment of the IOL rotation after 1 day, 1 month and 3 months postoperatively. The significances between the groups were evaluated using the Wilcoxon test. The Fisher exact test was used for the primary finding of the study (rotation of at least 10 degrees ). The IOL group with the C-loop haptics showed a median lens rotation of 0 degrees on the first day and 2 degrees clockwise after 1 month and 3 months. In the Z haptic group, there was no median rotation in the IOL group. Moreover, the range of IOL rotation of the C-loop haptics was broader (3 months postoperatively: maximum in the C-loop haptics: 21 degrees with 15.5 degrees in the Z haptics). There was no significant difference at any time. At 3 months postoperatively, 32% of the C-loop haptic IOL and 16% of the Z haptic IOL rotated at least 10 degrees (P=0.32). In 59% of the IOL with C-loop haptics, the direction of the rotation was clockwise. This was 40% for the IOL with Z haptics (P=0.33). At 3 months postoperatively, both IOLs demonstrated good rotational stability with a low mean deviation from the target axis. IOLs with Z haptics showed a tendency to greater rotational stability than C-loop haptics but without any significant difference. There was no significant difference in visual rehabilitation.

  7. HUMAN AND NON-HUMAN PRIMATE LENSES CULTURED WITH IONOPHORE FORM αB-CRYSTALLIN LACKING THE C-TERMINAL LYS, A PROMINENT FEATURE OF SOME HUMAN CATARACTS

    PubMed Central

    Nakajima, Emi; David, Larry L.; Riviere, Michael A.; Azuma, Mitsuyoshi; Shearer, Thomas R.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Elevation of lens calcium occurs in both human and experimental animal cataracts, and opacification may result from calcium-activated proteolysis. The purpose of the present study was to determine if calcium accumulation in cultured human and Macaca mulatta lenses results in proteolysis of crystallins, the major lens proteins. Methods Two-dimensional electrophoresis and mass spectrometry were used to construct detailed maps of human and monkey lens crystallins so that proteolysis following calcium accumulation could be monitored and the altered crystallins identified. Human and macaque lenses cultured in A23187 showed elevated lenticular calcium and superficial cortical opacities. The carboxypeptidase E (CPE) gene is expressed in human lens, and its presence in lens fibers was demonstrated by western blot. To investigate if CPE could cause similar truncation, purified αB-crystallin and CPE were incubated in vitro Results The major change observed in the crystallins of these cultured lenses was the accumulation of αB1-174-crystallin resulting from the loss of a C-terminal lysine. This result was significant, because similar appearance of αB1-174 is a prominent change in some human cataracts. αB-crystallin and CPE incubation result in the formation αB1-174-crystallin. This truncation was specific to αB1-174-crystallin since other crystallins were not proteolyzed. While a weaker activator than zinc, calcium was capable of activating CPE in vitro. Conclusions Since zinc concentrations did not increase during culture in A23187, calcium uptake in lens may be responsible for CPE activation and αB1-174 formation during cataract. PMID:19608539

  8. Pediatric cataracts.

    PubMed

    Wright, K W

    1997-02-01

    Posterior chamber intraocular lenses are a well-accepted treatment of aphakia in children 2 years of age and older, with many now considering them as the treatment of choice. Infants, however, are usually treated with contact lens, rather than intraocular lens implantation, as the infant eye undergoes significant axial elongation. The use of intraocular lenses in children with cataracts associated with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis remains controversial, but a recent article [9] describes good results in these patients, who historically have a poor prognosis. The management of amblyopia associated with unilateral congenital cataracts is evolving. In the 1970s and 1980s, full-time occlusion of the sound eye was advocated for infants with unilateral congenital cataracts. It was also taught that binocular fusion was impossible to obtain, and children with unilateral cataracts inevitably develop strabismus. Recent studies have shown that part-time occlusion may in fact yield better results, allowing the development of binocular vision and stereopsis and reducing the incidence of strabismus. PMID:10168274

  9. [Developments in modern cataract surgery – a critical overview].

    PubMed

    Menapace, Rupert

    2016-01-01

    Cataract surgery has tremendously evolved in recent years. Innovations include micro-incision cataract surgery through incisions smaller than 2mm, high-fluidics phacoaspiration and laser phacoemulsification to minimize or replace the use of ultrasound, the advent of femtolasers for high-precision incisions in the cornea, the lens capsule and the cataractous lens, aspheric intraocular lenses (IOLs) to enhance the quality and contrast of the image, multifocal and enhanced-depth-of-focus IOLs to correct presbyopia, advancements in biometry and IOL power calculation, prevention of secondary capsule opacification by improvements in the design and material of the IOLs and surgical techniques like capsule polishing and posterior capsulorhexis, and pharmacological prophylaxis and possible future treatment of the cataract itself. Finally, cost-effectiveness and future potential of same-session bilateral cataract surgery are discussed.

  10. Cost-Utility Analyses of Cataract Surgery in Advanced Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yingyan; Huang, Jiannan; Zhu, Bijun; Sun, Qian; Miao, Yuyu; Zou, Haidong

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose To explore the cost-utility of cataract surgery in patients with advanced age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Methods Patients who were diagnosed as having and treated for age-related cataract and with a history of advanced AMD at the Department of Ophthalmology, Shanghai General Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, were included in the study. All of the participants underwent successful phacoemulsification with foldable posterior chamber intraocular lens implantation under retrobulbar anesthesia. Best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) and utility value elicited by time trade-off method from patients at 3-month postoperative time were compared with those before surgery. Quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) gained in a lifetime were calculated at a 3% annual discounted rate. Costs per QALY gained were calculated using the bootstrap method, and probabilities of being cost-effective were presented using a cost-effectiveness acceptability curve. Sensitivity analyses were performed to test the robustness of the results. Results Mean logarithm of the minimum angle of resolution BCVA in the operated eye increased from 1.37 ± 0.5 (Snellen, 20/469) to 0.98 ± 0.25 (Snellen, 20/191) (p < 0.001); BCVA in the weighted average from both eyes (=75% better eye + 25% worse eye) was changed from 1.13 ± 0.22 (Snellen, 20/270) to 0.96 ± 0.17 (Snellen, 20/182) (p < 0.001). Utility values from both patients and doctors increased significantly after surgery (p < 0.001 and p = 0.007). Patients gained 1.17 QALYs by cataract surgery in their lifetime. The cost per QALY was 8835 Chinese yuan (CNY) (1400 U.S. dollars [USD]). It is cost-effective at the threshold of 115,062 CNY (18,235 USD) per QALY in China recommended by the World Health Organization. The cost per QALY varied from 7045 CNY (1116 USD) to 94,178 CNY (14,925 USD) in sensitivity analyses. Conclusions Visual acuity and quality of life assessed by utility value improved significantly after surgery

  11. Cataract (image)

    MedlinePlus

    A cataract is a cloudy or opaque area in the lens of the eye. Cataracts usually develop as a person gets older and ... substances can also accelerate the development of a cataract. Cataracts can cause visual problems such as difficulty ...

  12. Congenital cataract

    MedlinePlus

    ... both eyes. Moderate to severe cataracts that affect vision, or a cataract that is in only 1 eye, will need to be treated with cataract removal surgery. In most (noncongenital) cataract surgeries, an artificial intraocular lens (IOL) is inserted into the eye. ...

  13. A rapid, comprehensive liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS)-based survey of the Asp isomers in crystallins from human cataract lenses.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Norihiko; Sakaue, Hiroaki; Sasaki, Hiroshi; Fujii, Noriko

    2012-11-16

    Cataracts are caused by clouding of the eye lens and may lead to partial or total loss of vision. The mechanism of cataract development, however, is not well understood. It is thought that abnormal aggregates of lens proteins form with age, causing loss of lens clarity and development of the cataract. Lens proteins are composed of soluble α-, β-, and γ-crystallins, and as long lived proteins, they undergo post-translational modifications including isomerization, deamidation, and oxidation, which induce insolubilization, aggregation, and loss of function that may lead to cataracts. Therefore, analysis of post-translational modifications of individual amino acid residues in proteins is important. However, detection of the optical isomers of amino acids formed in these proteins is difficult because optical resolution is only achieved using complex methodology. In this study, we describe a new method for the analysis of isomerization of individual Asp residues in proteins using LC-MS and the corresponding synthetic peptides containing the Asp isomers. This makes it possible to analyze isomers of Asp residues in proteins precisely and quickly. We demonstrate that Asp-58, -76, -84, and -151 of αA-crystallin and Asp-62 and -96 of αB-crystallin are highly converted to lβ-, dβ-, and dα-isomers. The amount of isomerization of Asp is greater in the insoluble fraction at all Asp sites in lens proteins, therefore indicating that isomerization of these Asp residues affects the higher order structure of the proteins and contributes to the increase in aggregation, insolubilization, and disruption of function of proteins in the lens, leading to the cataract.

  14. Propolis, a Constituent of Honey, Inhibits the Development of Sugar Cataracts and High-Glucose-Induced Reactive Oxygen Species in Rat Lenses

    PubMed Central

    Shibata, Teppei; Shibata, Shinsuke; Shibata, Naoko; Kiyokawa, Etsuko; Singh, Dhirendra P.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. This study investigated the effects of oral propolis on the progression of galactose-induced sugar cataracts in rats and the in vitro effects of propolis on high-glucose-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) and cell death in cultured rat lens cells (RLECs). Methods. Galactose-fed rats and RLECs cultured in high glucose (55 mM) medium were treated with propolis or vehicle control. Relative lens opacity was assessed by densitometry and changes in lens morphology by histochemical analysis. Intracellular ROS levels and cell viability were measured. Results. Oral administration of propolis significantly inhibited the onset and progression of cataract in 15% and 25% of galactose-fed rats, respectively. RLECs cultured with high glucose showed a significant increase in ROS expression with reduced cell viability. Treatment of these RLECs with 5 and 50 μg/mL propolis cultured significantly reduced ROS levels and increased cell viability, indicating that the antioxidant activity of propolis protected cells against ROS-induced damage. Conclusion. Propolis significantly inhibited the onset and progression of sugar cataract in rats and mitigated high-glucose-induced ROS production and cell death. These effects may be associated with the ability of propolis to inhibit hyperglycemia-evoked oxidative or osmotic stress-induced cellular insults. PMID:27242920

  15. Patient considerations in cataract surgery – the role of combined therapy using phenylephrine and ketorolac

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Salinas, Roberto; Guarnieri, Adriano; Guirao Navarro, María Concepción; Saenz-de-Viteri, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Cataract, a degradation of the optical quality of the crystalline lens, progressive and age-related, is the leading cause of treatable blindness worldwide. Cataract surgery is the most common surgical procedure performed by ophthalmologists and is the only effective treatment for cataracts. Advances in the surgical techniques and better postoperative visual outcomes have progressively changed the primary concern of cataract surgery to become a procedure refined to yield the best possible refractive results. Sufficient mydriasis during cataract removal is critical to a successful surgical outcome. Poor pupil dilation can lead to serious sight-threatening complications that significantly increase the cost of surgery and decrease patients comfort. Mydriasis is obtained using anticholinergic and sympathomimetic drugs. Phenylephrine, an α1-adrenergic receptor agonist, can efficiently dilate the pupil when administered by intracameral injection. Additionally, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) like ketorolac, which inhibit the synthesis of prostaglandins, are used to decrease intraoperative miosis, control pain and inflammation associated with cataract surgery, and to prevent the development of cystoid macular edema following surgery. Recently, a new combination of phenylephrine and ketorolac (Omidria®) has been approved by United States Food and Drug Administration for use during cataract surgery to maintain intraoperative mydriasis, prevent miosis, and reduce postoperative pain and inflammation. Clinical trials have shown that this new combination is effective, combining the positive effects of both drugs with a good safety profile and patient tolerability. Moreover, recent reports suggest that this combination is also effective in patients with high risk of poor pupil dilation. In conclusion, cataract is a global problem that significantly affects patients’ quality of life. However, they can be managed with a safe and minimally invasive surgery

  16. Patient considerations in cataract surgery – the role of combined therapy using phenylephrine and ketorolac

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Salinas, Roberto; Guarnieri, Adriano; Guirao Navarro, María Concepción; Saenz-de-Viteri, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Cataract, a degradation of the optical quality of the crystalline lens, progressive and age-related, is the leading cause of treatable blindness worldwide. Cataract surgery is the most common surgical procedure performed by ophthalmologists and is the only effective treatment for cataracts. Advances in the surgical techniques and better postoperative visual outcomes have progressively changed the primary concern of cataract surgery to become a procedure refined to yield the best possible refractive results. Sufficient mydriasis during cataract removal is critical to a successful surgical outcome. Poor pupil dilation can lead to serious sight-threatening complications that significantly increase the cost of surgery and decrease patients comfort. Mydriasis is obtained using anticholinergic and sympathomimetic drugs. Phenylephrine, an α1-adrenergic receptor agonist, can efficiently dilate the pupil when administered by intracameral injection. Additionally, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) like ketorolac, which inhibit the synthesis of prostaglandins, are used to decrease intraoperative miosis, control pain and inflammation associated with cataract surgery, and to prevent the development of cystoid macular edema following surgery. Recently, a new combination of phenylephrine and ketorolac (Omidria®) has been approved by United States Food and Drug Administration for use during cataract surgery to maintain intraoperative mydriasis, prevent miosis, and reduce postoperative pain and inflammation. Clinical trials have shown that this new combination is effective, combining the positive effects of both drugs with a good safety profile and patient tolerability. Moreover, recent reports suggest that this combination is also effective in patients with high risk of poor pupil dilation. In conclusion, cataract is a global problem that significantly affects patients’ quality of life. However, they can be managed with a safe and minimally invasive surgery

  17. Intraocular lens employed for cataract surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roszkowska, A. M.; Torrisi, L.

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this paper is to illustrate the techniques of cataract surgery with implantation of intraocular lenses and some physical properties of the used materials. The new technology, coupled with extensive experience and the studied cases, permits to increase the standardization and accuracy of the engravings, by reducing the use and handling of surgical instruments inside the eye. At present it is possible to replace the cataract with crystalline lenses based on biopolymers such as PMMA, silicone, acrylic hydrophilic and hydrophobic acrylic. These materials are increasingly able to replace the natural lens and to ensure the fully functional of the eye. The role of femtosecond lasers in cataract surgery, to assist or replace several aspects of the manual cataract surgery, are discussed.

  18. Cataract - adult

    MedlinePlus

    Lens opacity; Age-related cataract ... of the eye. Until a person is around age 45, the shape of the lens is able ... is close or far away. As a person ages, proteins in the lens begin to break down. ...

  19. The Predictability of Preoperative Pilocarpine-Induced Lens Shift on the Outcomes of Accommodating Intraocular Lenses Implanted in Senile Cataract Patients

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jin; Chen, Qi; Lin, Zhibo; Leng, Lin; Huang, Fang

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate the predictability of lens shift induced by pilocarpine (LSPilo) on the outcomes of accommodating intraocular lens (Acc-IOL) implantation. Methods. Twenty-four eyes of 24 senile cataract patients who underwent phacoemulsification and Acc-IOL implantation were enrolled. LSPilo was evaluated with anterior segment optical coherence tomography (AS-OCT). At 3 months postoperatively, the best corrected distance visual acuities (BCDVA), distance-corrected near visual acuities (DCNVA), and subjective and objective accommodations were measured. IOL shifts under accommodation stimulus (IOLSAcc) were evaluated with AS-OCT. Results. The mean LSPilo was 112.29 ± 30.72 µm. LSPilo was not associated with any preoperative parameters. The mean IOLSAcc was 130.46 ± 42.71 µm. The mean subjective and objective accommodation were 1.54 ± 0.39 D and 1.27 ± 0.41 D, respectively. The mean postoperative BCDVA and DCNVA (log MAR value) were 0.22 ± 0.11 and 0.24 ± 0.12, respectively. LSPilo positively correlated with IOLSAcc (r = 0.541; P = 0.006), subjective accommodation (r = 0.412; P = 0.022), and objective accommodation (r = 0.466; P = 0.045), respectively. Conclusion. LSPilo is an independent preoperative parameter associated with the postoperative Acc-IOL mobility and pseudophakic accommodation. It may offer valuable information for ophthalmologists in determining the suitable candidates for Acc-IOL implantation. PMID:27516899

  20. Use of non-subjective analysis of lens transparency in experimental radiation cataract research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Worgul, B. V.; Medvedovsky, C.; Wu, B.

    1995-01-01

    Historically the major impediment to radiation cataract follow-up has been the necessarily subjective nature of assessing the degree of lens transparency. This has spurred the development of instruments which produce video images amenable to digital analysis. One such system, the Zeiss Scheimpflug slit lamp measuring system (SLC), was incorporated into our ongoing studies of radiation cataractogenesis. It was found that the Zeiss SLC measuring system has high resolution and permits the acquisition of reproducible images of the anterior segment of the eye. Our results, based on about 650 images of lenses followed over a period of 91 weeks of radiation cataract development, showed that the changes in the light scatter of the lens correlated well with conventional assessment of radiation cataracts with the added advantages of objectivity, permanent and transportable records and linearity as cataracts become more severe. This continuous data acquisition, commencing with cataract onset, can proceed through more advanced stages. The SLC exhibits much greater sensitivity reflected in a continuously progressive severity thereby avoiding the artifactual plateaus in staging which occur using conventional scoring methods.

  1. Development and testing of new biologically-based polymers as advanced biocompatible contact lenses

    SciTech Connect

    Bertozzi, Carolyn R.

    2000-06-01

    Nature has evolved complex and elegant materials well suited to fulfill a myriad of functions. Lubricants, structural scaffolds and protective sheaths can all be found in nature, and these provide a rich source of inspiration for the rational design of materials for biomedical applications. Many biological materials are based in some fashion on hydrogels, the crosslinked polymers that absorb and hold water. Biological hydrogels contribute to processes as diverse as mineral nucleation during bone growth and protection and hydration of the cell surface. The carbohydrate layer that coats all living cells, often referred to as the glycocalyx, has hydrogel-like properties that keep cell surfaces well hydrated, segregated from neighboring cells, and resistant to non-specific protein deposition. With the molecular details of cell surface carbohydrates now in hand, adaptation of these structural motifs to synthetic materials is an appealing strategy for improving biocompatibility. The goal of this collaborative project between Prof. Bertozzi's research group, the Center for Advanced Materials at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and Sunsoft Corporation was the design, synthesis and characterization of novel hydrogel polymers for improved soft contact lens materials. Our efforts were motivated by the urgent need for improved materials that allow extended wear, and essential feature for those whose occupation requires the use of contact lenses rather than traditional spectacles. Our strategy was to transplant the chemical features of cell surface molecules into contact lens materials so that they more closely resemble the tissue in which they reside. Specifically, we integrated carbohydrate molecules similar to those found on cell surfaces, and sulfoxide materials inspired by the properties of the carbohydrates, into hydrogels composed of biocompatible and manufacturable substrates. The new materials were characterized with respect to surface and bulk hydrophilicity, and

  2. Eye Conditions in Older Adults: Cataracts.

    PubMed

    Iroku-Malize, Tochi; Kirsch, Scott

    2016-06-01

    A clinically significant cataract is defined as an opacification of the eye lens causing a significant decrease in visual acuity or a functional visual impairment. Age-related cataracts are the leading cause of blindness in the world and one of the most common etiologies of visual impairment in the United States. Consequences can include loss of driving privileges, inability to read or watch television, inability to participate in social activities, and an increased risk of falls. In the United States, cataract surgery is the most commonly performed surgical procedure among older patients. There are three main types of cataracts: nuclear, cortical, and subcapsular. Age is the strongest predictor of cataract development. Other major risk factors include a family history of cataracts, diabetes, smoking, obesity, poor nutrition, lower socioeconomic status, and alcohol use. Surgery is the definitive treatment. Phacoemulsification and implantation of a posterior chamber intraocular lens is the most common method used for managing cataracts in the United States. Glasses or contact lenses then are prescribed to correct any residual refractive errors. Cataract surgery is a low-risk procedure and routine preoperative testing typically is not needed. PMID:27348528

  3. Strong-Lensing Analysis of A1689 from Deep Advanced Camera Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broadhurst, Tom; Benítez, Narciso; Coe, Dan; Sharon, Keren; Zekser, Kerry; White, Rick; Ford, Holland; Bouwens, Rychard; Blakeslee, John; Clampin, Marc; Cross, Nick; Franx, Marijn; Frye, Brenda; Hartig, George; Illingworth, Garth; Infante, Leopoldo; Menanteau, Felipe; Meurer, Gerhardt; Postman, Marc; Ardila, D. R.; Bartko, F.; Brown, R. A.; Burrows, C. J.; Cheng, E. S.; Feldman, P. D.; Golimowski, D. A.; Goto, T.; Gronwall, C.; Herranz, D.; Holden, B.; Homeier, N.; Krist, J. E.; Lesser, M. P.; Martel, A. R.; Miley, G. K.; Rosati, P.; Sirianni, M.; Sparks, W. B.; Steindling, S.; Tran, H. D.; Tsvetanov, Z. I.; Zheng, W.

    2005-03-01

    We analyze deep multicolor Advanced Camera images of the largest known gravitational lens, A1689. Radial and tangential arcs delineate the critical curves in unprecedented detail, and many small counterimages are found near the center of mass. We construct a flexible light deflection field to predict the appearance and positions of counterimages. The model is refined as new counterimages are identified and incorporated to improve the model, yielding a total of 106 images of 30 multiply lensed background galaxies, spanning a wide redshift range, 1.0lensing constrains only projected quantities. Regarding cosmology, we clearly detect the purely geometric increase of bend angles with redshift. The dependence on the cosmological parameters is weak owing to the proximity of A1689, z=0.18, constraining the locus, ΩM+ΩΛ<=1.2. This consistency with standard cosmology provides independent support for our model, because the redshift information is not required to derive an accurate mass map. Similarly, the relative fluxes of the multiple images are reproduced well by our best-fitting lens model.

  4. Lanosterol synthase mutations cause cholesterol deficiency-associated cataracts in the Shumiya cataract rat.

    PubMed

    Mori, Masayuki; Li, Guixin; Abe, Ikuro; Nakayama, Jun; Guo, Zhanjun; Sawashita, Jinko; Ugawa, Tohru; Nishizono, Shoko; Serikawa, Tadao; Higuchi, Keiichi; Shumiya, Seigo

    2006-02-01

    The Shumiya cataract rat (SCR) is a hereditary cataractous strain. It is thought that the continuous occurrence of poorly differentiated epithelial cells at the bow area of the lens forms the pathophysiological basis for cataract formation in SCRs. In this study, we attempted to identify the genes associated with cataract formation in SCRs by positional cloning. Genetic linkage analysis revealed the presence of a major cataract locus on chromosome 20 as well as a locus on chromosome 15 that partially suppressed cataract onset. Hypomorphic mutations were identified in genes for lanosterol synthase (Lss) on chromosome 20 and farnesyl diphosphate farnesyl transferase 1 (Fdft1) on chromosome 15, both of which function in the cholesterol biosynthesis pathway. A null mutation for Lss was also identified. Cataract onset was associated with the specific combination of Lss and Fdft1 mutant alleles that decreased cholesterol levels in cataractous lenses to about 57% of normal. Thus, cholesterol insufficiency may underlie the deficient proliferation of lens epithelial cells in SCRs, which results in the loss of homeostatic epithelial cell control of the underlying fiber cells and eventually leads to cataractogenesis. These findings may have some relevance to other types of cataracts, inborn defects of cholesterol synthesis, and the effects of cholesterol-lowering medication. PMID:16440058

  5. Sunlight and Cataracts: Are Athletes at Risk?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cinque, Chris

    1989-01-01

    Reports on a recent study of Chesapeake Bay watermen, which indicates a possible association between long-term exposure of the eyes to ultraviolet B rays and risk of cataract development. Authorities recommend protective lenses for outdoor athletes, especially those involved in winter sports. (SM)

  6. Similarity of the yellow chromophores isolated from human cataracts with those from ascorbic acid-modified calf lens proteins: evidence for ascorbic acid glycation during cataract formation.

    PubMed

    Cheng, R; Lin, B; Lee, K W; Ortwerth, B J

    2001-07-27

    Chromatographic evidence supporting the similarity of the yellow chromophores isolated from aged human and brunescent cataract lenses and calf lens proteins ascorbylated in vitro is presented. The water-insoluble fraction from early stage brunescent cataract lenses was solubilized by sonication (WISS) and digested with a battery of proteolytic enzymes under argon to prevent oxidation. Also, calf lens proteins were incubated with ascorbic acid for 4 weeks in air and submitted to the same digestion. The percent hydrolysis of the proteins to amino acids was approximately 90% in every case. The content of yellow chromophores was 90, 130 and 250 A(330) units/g protein for normal human WISS, cataract WISS and ascorbate-modified bovine lens proteins respectively. Aliquots equivalent to 2.0 g of digested protein were subjected to size-exclusion chromatography on a Bio-Gel P-2 column. Six peaks were obtained for both preparations and pooled. Side by side thin-layer chromatography (TLC) of each peak showed very similar R(f) values for the long wavelength-absorbing fluorophores. Glycation with [U-(14)C]ascorbic acid, followed by digestion and Bio-Gel P-2 chromatography, showed that the incorporated radioactivity co-eluted with the A(330)-absorbing peaks, and that most of the fluorescent bands were labeled after TLC. Peaks 2 and 3 from the P-2 were further fractionated by preparative Prodigy C-18 reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. Two major A(330)-absorbing peaks were seen in peak 2 isolated from human cataract lenses and 5 peaks in fraction 3, all of which eluted at the same retention times as those from ascorbic acid glycated calf lens proteins. HPLC fractionation of P-2 peaks 4, 5 and 6 showed many A(330)-absorbing peaks from the cataract WISS, only some of which were identical to the asorbylated proteins. The major fluorophores, however, were present in both preparations. These data provide new evidence to support the hypothesis that the yellow

  7. Entropic Imaging of Cataract Lens: An In Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Shung, K. Kirk; Tsui, Po-Hsiang; Fang, Jui; Ma, Hsiang-Yang; Wu, Shuicai; Lin, Chung-Chih

    2014-01-01

    Phacoemulsification is a common surgical method for treating advanced cataracts. Determining the optimal phacoemulsification energy depends on the hardness of the lens involved. Previous studies have shown that it is possible to evaluate lens hardness via ultrasound parametric imaging based on statistical models that require data to follow a specific distribution. To make the method more system-adaptive, nonmodel-based imaging approach may be necessary in the visualization of lens hardness. This study investigated the feasibility of applying an information theory derived parameter – Shannon entropy from ultrasound backscatter to quantify lens hardness. To determine the physical significance of entropy, we performed computer simulations to investigate the relationship between the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) based on the Rayleigh distribution and Shannon entropy. Young's modulus was measured in porcine lenses, in which cataracts had been artificially induced by the immersion in formalin solution in vitro. A 35-MHz ultrasound transducer was used to scan the cataract lenses for entropy imaging. The results showed that the entropy is 4.8 when the backscatter data form a Rayleigh distribution corresponding to an SNR of 1.91. The Young's modulus of the lens increased from approximately 8 to 100 kPa when we increased the immersion time from 40 to 160 min (correlation coefficient r = 0.99). Furthermore, the results indicated that entropy imaging seemed to facilitate visualizing different degrees of lens hardening. The mean entropy value increased from 2.7 to 4.0 as the Young's modulus increased from 8 to 100 kPa (r = 0.85), suggesting that entropy imaging may have greater potential than that of conventional statistical parametric imaging in determining the optimal energy to apply during phacoemulsification. PMID:24760103

  8. Radiation cataract.

    PubMed

    Kleiman, N J

    2012-01-01

    Until very recently, ocular exposure guidelines were based on the assumption that radiation cataract is a deterministic event requiring threshold doses generally greater than 2 Gy. This view was, in part, based on older studies which generally had short follow-up periods, failed to take into account increasing latency as dose decreased, had relatively few subjects with doses below a few Gy, and were not designed to detect early lens changes. Newer findings, including those in populations exposed to much lower radiation doses and in subjects as diverse as astronauts, medical workers, atomic bomb survivors, accidentally exposed individuals, and those undergoing diagnostic or radiotherapeutic procedures, strongly suggest dose-related lens opacification at significantly lower doses. These observations resulted in a recent re-evaluation of current lens occupational exposure guidelines, and a proposed lowering of the presumptive radiation cataract threshold to 0.5 Gy/year and the occupational lens exposure limit to 20 mSv/year, regardless of whether received as an acute, protracted, or chronic exposure. Experimental animal studies support these conclusions and suggest a role for genotoxicity in the development of radiation cataract. Recent findings of a low or even zero threshold for radiation-induced lens opacification are likely to influence current research efforts and directions concerning the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying this pathology. Furthermore, new guidelines are likely to have significant implications for occupational and/or accidental exposure, and the need for occupational eye protection (e.g. in fields such as interventional medicine).

  9. Cataract measurement by estimating the ultrasonic statistical parameter using an ultrasound needle transducer: an in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chih-Chung; Zhou, Qifa; Shung, K Kirk

    2011-01-01

    A cataract is a clouding of the crystalline lens that reduces the amount of incoming light and impairs visual perception. Phacoemulsification is the most common surgical method for treating advanced cataracts, and the optimal phacoemulsification energy is determined by the lens hardness. A previous study proposed using the ultrasonic Nakagami image to complement the B-scan for distinguishing different degrees of lens hardening. However, it is difficult to implement the use of an imaging probe to detect the lens during phacoemulsification surgery in a clinical situation. To resolve this problem, this study applied an ultrasonic needle transducer to estimate the Nakagami parameter as an alternative for characterizing the cataract lens. Cataracts of porcine lenses were artificially induced in vitro, and the Young’s modulus, backscattering intensities, and the Nakagami parameters were measured. The results showed that the backscattering intensity was not correlated with Young’s modulus. In contrast, the average Nakagami parameter increased from 0.34 to 0.95 with increasing Young’s modulus of the lens from 1.71 to 101 kPa. The above findings showed that the Nakagami parameter estimated with a needle transducer may be useful in differentiating different degrees of lens hardening, and implied that determining the optimal ultrasonic energy during clinical cataract surgery is possible if the needle transducer can be combined with the phacoemulsification probe to estimate the Nakagami parameter. PMID:21422512

  10. Effects of histone acetylation on superoxide dismutase 1 gene expression in the pathogenesis of senile cataract

    PubMed Central

    Rong, Xianfang; Qiu, Xiaodi; Jiang, Yongxiang; Li, Dan; Xu, Jie; Zhang, Yinglei; Lu, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Histone acetylation plays key roles in gene expression, but its effects on superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) expression in senile cataract remains unknown. To address this problem, the study was to investigate the influence of histone acetylation on SOD1 expression and its effects in the pathogenesis of senile cataract. Senile cataract was classified into three types—nuclear cataract (NC), cortical cataract (CC), and posterior subcapsular cataract (SC)—using the Lens Opacities Classification System III. In senile cataracts, SOD1 expression decreased significantly. Both H3 and H4 were deacetylated at −600 bp of the SOD1 promoter of cataract lenses, and hypoacetylated at −1500, −1200, and −900 bp. In hypoacetylated histones, the hypoacetylation pattern differed among the cataracts. In vitro, anacardic acid (AA) significantly reduced H3 and H4 acetylation at the SOD1 promoter, decreased protein expression, and induced cataract formation in rabbits. AA also inhibited HLEC viability and increased cell apoptosis. In contrast, trichostatin A (TSA) was able to efficaciously stop AA’s effects on both rabbit lenses and HLECs. Decreased histone acetylation at the SOD1 promoter is associated with declined SOD1 expression in senile cataracts. Histone acetylation plays an essential role in the regulation of SOD1 expression and in the pathogenesis of senile cataracts. PMID:27703255

  11. Measuring aniseikonia using scattering filters to simulate cataract

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Jason

    2011-12-01

    The relationship between anisometropia and aniseikonia (ANK) is not well understood. Ametropic cataract patients provide a unique opportunity to study this relationship after undergoing emmetropizing lens extraction. Because light scatter may affect ANK measurement in cataract patients, its effect should also be evaluated. The Basic Aniseikonia Test (BAT) was evaluated using afocal size lenses to produce specific changes in retinal height. Several light scattering devices were then evaluated to determine which produced effects most similar to cataract. Contrast sensitivity and visual acuity (VA) losses were measured with each device and compared to those reported in cataract. After determining the most appropriate light scattering device, twenty healthy patients with normal visual function were recruited to perform the BAT using the filters to simulate cataract. Cataract patients were recruited from Vision America and the University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Optometry. Patients between 20 and 75 years of age with at least 20/80 VA in each eye, ≥ 2D ametropia, and normal binocular function were recruited. Stereopsis and ANK were tested and each patient completed a symptom questionnaire. ANK measurements using afocal size lenses indicated that the BAT underestimates ANK, although the effect was minimal for vertical targets and darkened surroundings, as previously reported. Based on VA and contrast sensitivity loss, Vistech scattering filters produced changes most similar to cataract. Results of the BAT using Vistech filters demonstrated that a moderate cataract but not a mild cataract may affect the ANK measurement. ANK measurements on cataract patients indicated that those with ≥ 2 D ametropia in each eye may suffer from induced ANK after the first cataract extraction. With upcoming healthcare reform, unilateral cataract extraction may be covered, but not necessarily bilateral, depending on patient VA in each eye. However, a questionnaire about symptoms

  12. [Ten most progression of cataract research in China].

    PubMed

    2015-04-01

    Ten researches that may represent the most advanced cataract related studies in China were reviewed, which were recommended and voted by specialists from Chinese Cataract and Intraocular Lens Society. These researches focused on the following fields: the clinical study of the refractive cataract surgery, the clinical study on the premium intraocular lens, location and function study of the disease-associated genes of congenital cataract, the mechanism and prevention of age-related cataract, the mechanism and prevention of oxidative damage of crystalline lens and so on. These studies represented the level of crystalline lens related disease field in China.

  13. Pediatric cataract: challenges and future directions

    PubMed Central

    Medsinge, Anagha; Nischal, Ken K

    2015-01-01

    Cataract is a significant cause of visual disability in the pediatric population worldwide and can significantly impact the neurobiological development of a child. Early diagnosis and prompt surgical intervention is critical to prevent irreversible amblyopia. Thorough ocular evaluation, including the onset, duration, and morphology of a cataract, is essential to determine the timing for surgical intervention. Detailed assessment of the general health of the child, preferably in conjunction with a pediatrician, is helpful to rule out any associated systemic condition. Although pediatric cataracts have a diverse etiology, with the majority being idiopathic, genetic counseling and molecular testing should be undertaken with the help of a genetic counselor and/or geneticist in cases of hereditary cataracts. Advancement in surgical techniques and methods of optical rehabilitation has substantially improved the functional and anatomic outcomes of pediatric cataract surgeries in recent years. However, the phenomenon of refractive growth and the process of emmetropization have continued to puzzle pediatric ophthalmologists and highlight the need for future prospective studies. Posterior capsule opacification and secondary glaucoma are still the major postoperative complications necessitating long-term surveillance in children undergoing cataract surgery early in life. Successful management of pediatric cataracts depends on individualized care and experienced teamwork. We reviewed the etiology, preoperative evaluation including biometry, choice of intraocular lens, surgical techniques, and recent developments in the field of childhood cataract. PMID:25609909

  14. Pediatric cataract: challenges and future directions.

    PubMed

    Medsinge, Anagha; Nischal, Ken K

    2015-01-01

    Cataract is a significant cause of visual disability in the pediatric population worldwide and can significantly impact the neurobiological development of a child. Early diagnosis and prompt surgical intervention is critical to prevent irreversible amblyopia. Thorough ocular evaluation, including the onset, duration, and morphology of a cataract, is essential to determine the timing for surgical intervention. Detailed assessment of the general health of the child, preferably in conjunction with a pediatrician, is helpful to rule out any associated systemic condition. Although pediatric cataracts have a diverse etiology, with the majority being idiopathic, genetic counseling and molecular testing should be undertaken with the help of a genetic counselor and/or geneticist in cases of hereditary cataracts. Advancement in surgical techniques and methods of optical rehabilitation has substantially improved the functional and anatomic outcomes of pediatric cataract surgeries in recent years. However, the phenomenon of refractive growth and the process of emmetropization have continued to puzzle pediatric ophthalmologists and highlight the need for future prospective studies. Posterior capsule opacification and secondary glaucoma are still the major postoperative complications necessitating long-term surveillance in children undergoing cataract surgery early in life. Successful management of pediatric cataracts depends on individualized care and experienced teamwork. We reviewed the etiology, preoperative evaluation including biometry, choice of intraocular lens, surgical techniques, and recent developments in the field of childhood cataract. PMID:25609909

  15. Automatic Cataract Hardness Classification Ex Vivo by Ultrasound Techniques.

    PubMed

    Caixinha, Miguel; Santos, Mário; Santos, Jaime

    2016-04-01

    To demonstrate the feasibility of a new methodology for cataract hardness characterization and automatic classification using ultrasound techniques, different cataract degrees were induced in 210 porcine lenses. A 25-MHz ultrasound transducer was used to obtain acoustical parameters (velocity and attenuation) and backscattering signals. B-Scan and parametric Nakagami images were constructed. Ninety-seven parameters were extracted and subjected to a Principal Component Analysis. Bayes, K-Nearest-Neighbours, Fisher Linear Discriminant and Support Vector Machine (SVM) classifiers were used to automatically classify the different cataract severities. Statistically significant increases with cataract formation were found for velocity, attenuation, mean brightness intensity of the B-Scan images and mean Nakagami m parameter (p < 0.01). The four classifiers showed a good performance for healthy versus cataractous lenses (F-measure ≥ 92.68%), while for initial versus severe cataracts the SVM classifier showed the higher performance (90.62%). The results showed that ultrasound techniques can be used for non-invasive cataract hardness characterization and automatic classification.

  16. Femtosecond And Picosecond Laser Ablation Of Intraocular Lenses: An Advanced Technique For Their Surface Modification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serafetinides, A. A.; Makropoulou, M.; Spyratou, E.; Bacharis, C.; Barberoglou, M.; Englezis, A.; Kalpouzos, C.; Loukakos, P.; Pouli, P.

    2011-09-01

    Ophthalmology is entering a very interesting period with new diffractive multifocals, improved refractive multifocals, and accommodative lenses, all coming out at the same time. A new diffractive-refractive design for providing intermediated vision is apodization. In an apodized pattern, physical diffractive step heights are reduced in height, in an almost continuously varying manner. This study is aimed to investigate the use of ultrashort laser pulses to ablate the surface of intraocular lenses, and thus provide an alternative to conventional techniques. Ablation experiments were performed on hydrophilic and hydrophobic intraocular lenses (IOLs). The samples were irradiated with a Ti:Sapphire laser at λ = 0.785 μm, pulse duration 150 fs, repetition rate 1 kHz and with a Nd:YAG 4ω laser at λ = 0.266 μm, pulse duration 155 ps, repetition rate 10 Hz. We investigated the ablation efficiency and the surface modification with a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). The experimental results and the theoretical assumptions on the relevant ablation mechanism are discussed.

  17. Congenital Cataract Screening

    PubMed Central

    Rajavi, Zhale; Sabbaghi, Hamideh

    2016-01-01

    Congenital cataract is a leading cause of visual deprivation which can damage the developing visual system of a child; therefore early diagnosis, management and long-term follow-up are essential. It is recommended that all neonates be screened by red reflex examination at birth and suspected cases be referred to ophthalmic centers. Early surgery (<6 weeks of age, based on general neonatal health) is important for achieving the best visual outcome particularly in unilateral cases. In bilateral cases, surgery is highly recommended before appearance of strabismus or nystagmus (<10 weeks of age) with no longer than a one-week interval between the fellow eyes. Parents should be informed that surgery is a starting point and not the endpoint of treatment. Appropriate postoperative management including immediate optical correction in the form of aphakic glasses or contact lenses, or intraocular lens (IOL) implantation at the appropriate age (>1 year) is highly recommended. After surgery, amblyopia treatment and periodic follow-up examinations should be started as soon as possible to achieve a satisfactory visual outcome. Practitioners should consider the possibility of posterior capsular opacity, elevated intraocular pressure and amblyopia during follow-up, especially in eyes with microphthalmia and/or associated congenital anomalies. All strabismic children should undergo slit lamp examination prior to strabismus surgery to rule out congenital lens opacities. From a social point of view, equal and fair medical care should be provided to all children regardless of gender. PMID:27621790

  18. Congenital Cataract Screening

    PubMed Central

    Rajavi, Zhale; Sabbaghi, Hamideh

    2016-01-01

    Congenital cataract is a leading cause of visual deprivation which can damage the developing visual system of a child; therefore early diagnosis, management and long-term follow-up are essential. It is recommended that all neonates be screened by red reflex examination at birth and suspected cases be referred to ophthalmic centers. Early surgery (<6 weeks of age, based on general neonatal health) is important for achieving the best visual outcome particularly in unilateral cases. In bilateral cases, surgery is highly recommended before appearance of strabismus or nystagmus (<10 weeks of age) with no longer than a one-week interval between the fellow eyes. Parents should be informed that surgery is a starting point and not the endpoint of treatment. Appropriate postoperative management including immediate optical correction in the form of aphakic glasses or contact lenses, or intraocular lens (IOL) implantation at the appropriate age (>1 year) is highly recommended. After surgery, amblyopia treatment and periodic follow-up examinations should be started as soon as possible to achieve a satisfactory visual outcome. Practitioners should consider the possibility of posterior capsular opacity, elevated intraocular pressure and amblyopia during follow-up, especially in eyes with microphthalmia and/or associated congenital anomalies. All strabismic children should undergo slit lamp examination prior to strabismus surgery to rule out congenital lens opacities. From a social point of view, equal and fair medical care should be provided to all children regardless of gender.

  19. Congenital Cataract Screening.

    PubMed

    Rajavi, Zhale; Sabbaghi, Hamideh

    2016-01-01

    Congenital cataract is a leading cause of visual deprivation which can damage the developing visual system of a child; therefore early diagnosis, management and long-term follow-up are essential. It is recommended that all neonates be screened by red reflex examination at birth and suspected cases be referred to ophthalmic centers. Early surgery (<6 weeks of age, based on general neonatal health) is important for achieving the best visual outcome particularly in unilateral cases. In bilateral cases, surgery is highly recommended before appearance of strabismus or nystagmus (<10 weeks of age) with no longer than a one-week interval between the fellow eyes. Parents should be informed that surgery is a starting point and not the endpoint of treatment. Appropriate postoperative management including immediate optical correction in the form of aphakic glasses or contact lenses, or intraocular lens (IOL) implantation at the appropriate age (>1 year) is highly recommended. After surgery, amblyopia treatment and periodic follow-up examinations should be started as soon as possible to achieve a satisfactory visual outcome. Practitioners should consider the possibility of posterior capsular opacity, elevated intraocular pressure and amblyopia during follow-up, especially in eyes with microphthalmia and/or associated congenital anomalies. All strabismic children should undergo slit lamp examination prior to strabismus surgery to rule out congenital lens opacities. From a social point of view, equal and fair medical care should be provided to all children regardless of gender. PMID:27621790

  20. Ophthalmic halo reduced lenses design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Limon, Ofer; Zalevsky, Zeev

    2015-05-01

    The halo effect is a very problematic visual artifact occurring in extended depth of focus or multi-focal ophthalmic lenses such as e.g. intra-ocular (after cataract surgery) or contact lenses when used in dark illumination conditions. This artifact is generated due to surface structures added on top of those lenses in order to increase their depth of focus or to realize multiple focal lengths. In this paper we present novel solution that can resolve this major problem of ophthalmic lenses. The proposed solution involves modification to the surface structure that realizes the extended depth of focus. Our solution is fabricated and numerically and experimentally validated also in preliminary in-vivo trials.

  1. Nutritional modulation of cataract

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cataract, or lens opacification, remains a major cause of blindness worldwide. Cataracts reduce vision in over eighty million people, causing blindness in eighteen million people. The number afflicted by cataract will increase dramatically as the proportion of the elderly global population increase...

  2. Progression of sugar cataract in the dog.

    PubMed

    Sato, S; Takahashi, Y; Wyman, M; Kador, P F

    1991-05-01

    Young beagle dogs were fed a 30% galactose diet, with or without the aldose reductase inhibitors sorbinil or M79175. Cataract formation was monitored by indirect ophthalmoscope and hand-held slit-lamp microscopy and documented by retroillumination photography. In these dogs, the first sign of cataract development was an accentuation of the anterior and posterior lens sutures (1 month after feeding), then the appearance of cortical vacuoles (3 months after feeding), and finally, the formation of predominantly equatorial cortical opacities toward the posterior cortices (4-6 months after feeding). After long-term galactose feeding, a progressive, irregular, clear zone formed at the cortical equatorial regions. Light microscopic examination of these lenses shows that the cataracts are osmotic, many of the lens fibers appear to be swollen or ruptured, and vacuoles are seen near the bow region. Moreover, these histologic changes were reduced in a dose-dependent manner in galactose-fed dogs concomitantly treated with the aldose reductase inhibitors sorbinil or M79175. The osmotic nature of these cataracts and the observation that their formation can be reduced in a dose-dependent manner by aldose reductase inhibitors are consistent with the concept that the aldose-reductase catalyzed formation of polar sugar alcohols (polyols) initiates sugar cataract formation in the dog.

  3. Comparison of optical coherence tomography imaging of cataracts with histopathology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DiCarlo, Cheryl D.; Roach, William P.; Gagliano, Donald A.; Boppart, Stephen A.; Hammer, Daniel X.; Cox, Ann B.; Fujimoto, James G.

    1999-10-01

    This paper presents a comparison of in vivo optical coherence tomography (OCT) captured cataract images to subsequent histopathological examination of the lenticular opacities. OCT imaging was performed on anesthetized Rhesus monkeys, known as the delayed effects colony (DEC), with documented cataracts. These monkeys were exposed to several types of radiation during the mid and late 1960s. The radiation and age related cataracts in these animals were closely monitored using a unique grading system developed specifically for the DEC. In addition to this system, a modified version of a common cataract grading scheme for use in humans was applied. Of the original 18 monkeys imaged, lenses were collected at necropsy from seven of these animals, processed, and compared to OCT images. Results showed a direct correlation between the vertical OCT images and the cataractous lesions seen on corresponding histopathological sections of the lenses. Based on the images obtained and their corresponding documented comparison to histopathology, OCT showed tremendous potential to aid identification and characterization of cataracts. There can be artifactual problems with the images related to movement and shadows produced by opacities. However, with the advent of increased speed in imaging and multiplanar imaging, these disadvantages may easily be overcome.

  4. GP-1447, an inhibitor of aldose reductase, prevents the progression of diabetic cataract in rats.

    PubMed

    Kawakubo, Ken; Mori, Asami; Sakamoto, Kenji; Nakahara, Tsutomu; Ishii, Kunio

    2012-01-01

    We examined the effects of GP-1447 (3-[(4,5,7-trifluorobenzothiazol-2-yl)methyl]-5-methylphenyl acetic acid) on existing cataracts and sorbitol content in the lens in rats with streptozotocin-induced diabetes. GP-1447 is an inhibitor of aldose reductase, which is the first enzyme in the polyol pathway. Cataracts in the central region of the lens were observed in 7 of 14 eyes (50%) by the fifth week after induction of diabetes, and development of mature cataracts was observed in most lenses by the ninth week. In diabetic rats that received GP-1447 treatment beginning in the fifth week after induction of diabetes, progression of cataracts was observed for 1 week after initiation of treatment. Thereafter, the severity of cataracts did not change substantially. Sorbitol levels in the lens peaked during the first week of diabetes, and this increase was maintained during the 9-week observation period. Elevated sorbitol levels in the lenses of diabetic rats gradually declined after GP-1447 treatment was started on the fifth week after induction of diabetes. Cataracts and sorbitol elevation were not observed in the lenses of controls or diabetic rats treated with GP-1447 immediately after induction of diabetes. These results suggest that the polyol pathway plays an important role in both the appearance and progression of cataracts in diabetic rats. Inhibition of aldose reductase could significantly prevent progression of existing cataracts. PMID:22687477

  5. Assessing the changes in the biomechanical properties of the crystalline lens induced by cold cataract with air-pulse OCE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, C.; Singh, M.; Liu, C.-H.; Han, Z.; Li, J.; Raghunathan, R.; Larin, K. V.

    2015-11-01

    A cataract is the increase in opacity of the crystalline lens that can pathologically degrade visual acuity. In this study, we utilized a phase-sensitive optical coherence elastography (OCE) system to study the effects of a cold cataract on the biomechanical properties of the porcine crystalline lens in vitro. The cold cataract was induced by placing the whole lens in a low temperature environment until the lens was obviously clouded. Air-pulse OCE measurements were conducted on 6 lenses before and after cold cataract induction. A low amplitude displacement (≤ 10 µm) was induced by a focused air-pulse and the temporal deformation profiles from the surface and within the lenses were analyzed. The results demonstrated that the stiffness of the porcine lens increased after induction of the cold cataract, and it demonstrated the feasibility of OCE to assess the biomechanical changes in the lens due to cataract.

  6. Multilamellar spherical particles as potential sources of excessive light scattering in human age-related nuclear cataracts.

    PubMed

    Costello, M Joseph; Johnsen, Sönke; Metlapally, Sangeetha; Gilliland, Kurt O; Frame, Lesley; Balasubramanian, Dorairajan

    2010-12-01

    The goal of this project was to determine the relative refractive index (RI) of the interior of multilamellar bodies (MLBs) compared to the adjacent cytoplasm within human nuclear fiber cells. MLBs have been characterized previously as 1-4 μm diameter spherical particles covered by multiple lipid bilayers surrounding a cytoplasmic core of variable density. Age-related nuclear cataracts have more MLBs than transparent donor lenses and were predicted to have high forward scattering according to Mie scattering theory, assuming different RIs for the MLB and cytoplasm. In this study quantitative values of relative RI were determined from specific MLBs in electron micrographs of thin sections and used to calculate new Mie scattering plots. Fresh lenses were Vibratome sectioned, immersion fixed and en bloc stained with osmium tetroxide and uranyl acetate, or uranyl acetate alone, prior to dehydration and embedding in epoxy or acrylic resins. Thin sections 70 nm thick were cut on a diamond knife and imaged without grid stains at 60 kV using a CCD camera on a transmission electron microscope (TEM). Integrated intensities in digital electron micrographs were related directly to protein density, which is linearly related to RI for a given substance. The RI of the MLB interior was calculated assuming an RI value of 1.42 for the cytoplasm from the literature. Calculated RI values for MLBs ranged from 1.35 to 1.53. Thus, some MLBs appeared to have interior protein densities similar to or less than the adjacent cytoplasm whereas others had significantly higher densities. The higher density MLBs occurred preferentially in older and more advanced cataracts suggesting a maturation process. The bilayer coats were more often observed in MLBs from transparent donors and early stage cataracts indicating that bilayer loss was part of the MLB maturation, producing large low-density spaces around dense MLB cores. These spaces were frequently observed in advanced cataracts from India as

  7. Accelerated heavy ions and the lens. IV. Biomicroscopic and cytopathological analyses of the lenses of mice irradiated with 600 MeV/amu sup 56 Fe ions

    SciTech Connect

    Worgul, B.V.; Medvedovsky, C.; Powers-Risius, P.; Alpen, E. )

    1989-11-01

    The lenses of mice exposed to 600 MeV/amu iron ions were evaluated by slit-lamp biomicroscopy and cytopathological analyses. The doses ranged from 0.05 to 1.6 Gy, and the lenses were assessed at several intervals postirradiation. Cataract, the development of which is dependent on both time and dose, is significantly more advanced in all of the exposed mice when compared to the unirradiated controls. The great difference between the severity of the cataracts caused by 0.05 Gy (the lowest dose used) and those that developed spontaneously in the control animals is an indication that 0.05 Gy may far exceed the threshold dose for the production of cataracts by accelerated iron ions. Cytopathologically, a similar dose dependence was observed for a number of end points including micronucleation, interphase death, and meridional row disorganization. In addition the exposure to the 56Fe ions produced a long-term effect on the mitotic population and a pronounced focal loss of epithelial cytoarchitecture. The microscopic changes support the view that the mechanism of heavy-ion-induced cataractogenesis is the same as that for cataracts caused by low-LET radiation.

  8. Radiation cataracts: mechanisms involved in their long delayed occurrence but then rapid progression

    PubMed Central

    Pendergrass, William; Singh, Narendra; Schwartz, Jeffrey

    2008-01-01

    Purpose This study was directed to assess the DNA damage and DNA repair response to X-ray inflicted lens oxidative damage and to investigate the subsequent changes in lens epithelial cell (LEC) behavior in vivo that led to long delayed but then rapidly developing cataracts. Methods Two-month-old C57Bl/6 female mice received 11 Grays (Gy) of soft x-irradiation to the head only. The animals’ eyes were examined for cataract status in 30 day intervals by slit lamp over an 11 month period post-irradiation. LEC migration, DNA fragment, free DNA retention, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) presence were established in the living lenses with fluorescent dyes using laser scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM). The extent and removal of initial LEC DNA damage were determined by comet assay. Immunohistochemistry was used to determine the presence of oxidized DNA and the response of a DNA repair protein in the lenses. Results This treatment resulted in advanced cortical cataracts that developed 5–11 months post-irradiation but then appeared suddenly within a 30 day period. The initially incurred DNA strand breaks were repaired within 30 min, but DNA damage remained as shown 72 h post-irradiation by the presence of the DNA adduct, 8-hydroxyguanosine (8-OHG), and a DNA repair protein, XRCC1. This was followed months later by abnormal behavior by LEC descendant cells with abnormal differentiation and migration patterns as seen with LSCM and fluorescent dyes. Conclusions The sudden development of cortical cataracts several months post-irradiation coupled with the above findings suggests an accumulation of damaged descendants from the initially x-irradiated LECs. As these cells migrate abnormally and leave acellular lens surface sites, eventually a crisis point may arrive for lens entry of environmental O2 with resultant ROS formation that overwhelms protection by resident antioxidant enzymes and results in the coagulation of lens proteins. The events seen in this study indicate

  9. Management of cataracts in patients with glaucoma.

    PubMed

    Law, Simon K; Riddle, Jay

    2011-01-01

    The management of the glaucoma patient who has visually significant cataracts is a practical but complex topic. As glaucoma is a chronic, potentially progressive disease that can lead to irreversible blindness, ophthalmologists should develop a treatment approach with emphasis based on the severity of glaucoma rather than on cataract alone. Trabeculectomy remains an effective surgical choice, especially in glaucoma patients with advanced disease who require a low and steady IOP. In planning for cataract surgery, surgeons should be mindful of the alterations of astigmatism in terms of power and axis, axial length fluctuation as a result of trabeculectomy, and the relative position of the IOL after surgery. As glaucoma is a potentially progressive disease, surgeons who treat patients with coexistent glaucoma and cataracts must consider that future glaucoma surgery may be necessary when planning for the cataract surgery. A complete discussion of alternatives would go beyond the limited scope of this study. Regardless of the procedures used, the surgeon should consider the secondary effects of both glaucoma surgery and cataract surgery and their impact on each other when developing an individualized treatment plan. PMID:21633234

  10. Increased Expression of Interleukin-18 in Lenses of Ovariectomized Rats.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Noriaki; Ogata, Fumihiko; Kawasaki, Naohito; Ito, Yoshimasa

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies showed an increased prevalence of cataracts in postmenopausal women. In this study, we investigated changes in the levels of calcium ion (Ca(2+)) and interleukin (IL)-18, which are factors in cataract development, in the lenses of ovariectomized (OVX) rats, a model of postmenopausal woman. Although the Ca(2+) content in the blood of OVX rats increased 1 month after ovariectomy and subsequently decreased, the Ca(2+) content in the lenses was unchanged in OVX rats 1-3 months after ovariectomy. The Ca(2+)-ATPase activity in the lenses of OVX rats peaked 1 month after ovariectomy, and the behavior of Ca(2+)-ATPase activity in lenses of OVX rats was similar to that of the Ca(2+) concentration in the blood. It is possible that hypercalcemia increases the Ca(2+) inflow into the lens; however, the enhanced Ca(2+)-ATPase activity prevents the Ca(2+) level from rising. On the other hand, we found that the levels of both IL-18 and interferon (IFN)-γ in the lenses of OVX rats were significantly increased as compared with the lenses of sham (control) rats during the period 1-3 months after surgery. These results suggest that the expression of IFN-γ via IL-18 in the lenses of OVX rats is induced by ovariectomy, and that excessive IL-18 and IFN-γ production in the lenses may be related to cataract development in postmenopausal women. These findings support those of previous studies that assessed lens opacification in postmenopausal women.

  11. Effect of radioprotective agents on X-ray cataracts

    SciTech Connect

    Reddy, V.N.; Ikebe, H.; Giblin, F.J.; Clark, J.I.; Livesey, J.C. )

    1989-01-01

    The effect of some protective agents on cataract development is briefly reviewed and new evidence is presented on the efficacy of a phosphorothioate compound (Amifostine) in inhibiting the development of X-ray-induced cataract. Morphological studies showed that at the end of 4 months, lenses from X-irradiated rats which had not received any drugs showed liquefaction in the equatorial region and at the posterior pole, as well as a marked swelling of the fibers in the anterior cortex. Animals which received 1.16g/kg of WR77913 showed considerable protection against the development of radiation induced cataracts with morphological changes in the lens being less severe than in animals receiving no drugs. When animals were treated with 0.5g/kg of Amifostine (WR2721) the lenses showed much greater protection against cataract development than with WR77913. Amifostine appears to be more effective than WR77913 in inhibiting X-ray-induced cataract development. 20 refs.

  12. Cataract produced by tyrosinase and tyrosine systems in rabbit lens in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Satish K.; Beutler, Ernest

    1969-01-01

    1. Cataracts were developed by incubating rabbit lenses for 22hr. at 37° in a culture medium containing tyrosine and tyrosinase (EC 1.10.3.1). 2. A 45% diminution in the content of GSH and significant inhibition of glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.49) activity were observed in the cataractous lenses compared with controls. 3. GSSG accumulated in both cataractous and control lenses. Significant amounts of GSSG were transported outward from the cataractous lenses and small amounts from control lenses. 4. Transport of GSSG from rabbit lens incubated in a diffusate of plasma from a naphthalene-fed rabbit was also observed. 5. GSSG was found in the aqueous humour obtained between 2 and 24hr. after feeding of naphthalene to rabbits; subsequently the GSSG in the aqueous humour decreased to almost undetectable amounts in 48hr.; in controls, GSSG was not detectable. 6. A possible mechanism of formation of experimental and senile cataract is briefly discussed. PMID:4979383

  13. Genetics of Congenital Cataract.

    PubMed

    Pichi, Francesco; Lembo, Andrea; Serafino, Massimiliano; Nucci, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Congenital cataract is a type of cataract that presents at birth or during early childhood, and it is one of the most easily treatable causes of visual impairment and blindness during infancy, with an estimated prevalence of 1-6 cases per 10,000 live births. Approximately 50% of all congenital cataract cases may have a genetic cause, and such cases are quite heterogeneous. Although congenital nuclear cataract can be caused by multiple factors, genetic mutation remains the most common cause. All three types of Mendelian inheritance have been reported for cataract; however, autosomal dominant transmission seems to be the most frequent. The transparency and high refractive index of the lens are achieved by the precise architecture of fiber cells and homeostasis of the lens proteins in terms of their concentrations, stabilities, and supramolecular organization. Research on hereditary congenital cataract has led to the identification of several classes of candidate genes that encode proteins such crystallins, lens-specific connexins, aquaporin, cytoskeletal structural proteins, and developmental regulators. In this review, we highlight the identified genetic mutations that account for congenital nuclear cataract.

  14. Cataract Surgery in Uveitis

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Rupesh; Murthy, Somashiela; Ganesh, Sudha K.; Phaik, Chee Soon; Sangwan, Virender; Biswas, Jyotimai

    2012-01-01

    Cataract surgery in uveitic eyes is often challenging and can result in intraoperative and postoperative complications. Most uveitic patients enjoy good vision despite potentially sight-threatening complications, including cataract development. In those patients who develop cataracts, successful surgery stems from educated patient selection, careful surgical technique, and aggressive preoperative and postoperative control of inflammation. With improved understanding of the disease processes, pre- and perioperative control of inflammation, modern surgical techniques, availability of biocompatible intraocular lens material and design, surgical experience in performing complicated cataract surgeries, and efficient management of postoperative complications have led to much better outcome. Preoperative factors include proper patient selection and counseling and preoperative control of inflammation. Meticulous and careful cataract surgery in uveitic cataract is essential in optimizing the postoperative outcome. Management of postoperative complications, especially inflammation and glaucoma, earlier rather than later, has also contributed to improved outcomes. This manuscript is review of the existing literature and highlights the management pearls in tackling complicated cataract based on medline search of literature and experience of the authors. PMID:22518338

  15. Non-destructive analysis of the conformational changes in human lens lipid and protein structures of the immature cataracts associated with glaucoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Shan-Yang; Li, Mei-Jane; Liang, Run-Chu; Lee, Shui-Mei

    1998-09-01

    Previous study has supposed a possible mechanism of exacerbating cataract formation in cataractous human lens capsules induced by hypertension or glaucoma. To clarify the glaucoma-induced cataract formation of the eyes lens, changes in the human lens lipid and protein structures of immature cataractous patients with or without glaucoma were investigated. Two normal lenses, ten immature cataractous lenses without any complication and four immature cataractous lenses with glaucoma were used after surgical operation. Each de-capsulated human lens sample was sliced with a number 15 surgical blade. The intact nuclear lens regions were used for non-destructive analysis. The lens lipid and protein structures, as well as compositions of these lens samples, were determined using a Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) microspectroscopy with second-derivative, de-convolution and curve-fitting methods. The results indicate that the IR spectrum of glaucomatous lenses appeared as a shoulder only at 2853 cm -1, thus the composition of the symmetric CH 2 stretching band at 2853 (2852) cm -1 decreased more significantly in glaucomatous lens to only one half of that in normal and immature cataractous lenses. The composition of the asymmetric CH 3 stretching band at 2965 cm -1 for normal lens decreases markedly from 32 to 20% for immature cataractous lenses with or without glaucoma. The compositional ratio of component at 2965 cm -1 to component at 2928 (2930) cm -1 for normal lenses was about 0.702, and that ratio for cataractous lenses without glaucoma was 0.382 but for glaucomatous lenses was 0.377. The maximum peak position of amide I band for IR spectra of the normal lens, immature cataractous lenses without complications or glaucomatous lenses appeared respectively at 1632, 1630 or 1622 cm -1, assigned to β sheet structure. A marked difference in peak intensity of amide I band for the normal lenses and immature cataractous human lenses with or without glaucoma was observed. The

  16. Cataract Vision Simulator

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Latino-Americans Apr 26, 2016 Vitamin See: Foods Rich in Vitamin C Help Curb Cataracts Mar 28, 2016 Los Alimentos Ricos en ... at the Academy Financial Relationships with Industry Medical Disclaimer Privacy Policy Terms of Service For ...

  17. Cataract Surgery Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    The NASA-McGannon cataract surgery tool is a tiny cutter-pump which liquefies and pumps the cataract lens material from the eye. Inserted through a small incision in the cornea, the tool can be used on the hardest cataract lens. The cutter is driven by a turbine which operates at about 200,000 revolutions per minute. Incorporated in the mechanism are two passages for saline solutions, one to maintain constant pressure within the eye, the other for removal of the fragmented lens material and fluids. Three years of effort have produced a design, now being clinically evaluated, with excellent potential for improved cataract surgery. The use of this tool is expected to reduce the patient's hospital stay and recovery period significantly.

  18. Changes in the distribution of lens calcium during development of x-ray cataract

    SciTech Connect

    Hightower, K.R.; Giblin, F.J.; Reddy, V.N.

    1983-09-01

    The present study was designed to examine the possible role of calcium in the opacification of x-ray-induced cataract in rabbit. The results demonstrate that the concentration of calcium in x-rayed lenses, just prior to lens hydration (7.5 weeks postirradiation), was twice that present in contralateral control lenses. At this stage of immature cataract, the lens nucleus remained transparent and maintained a normal level of calcium, but the lens cortex, containing regions of subcapsular opacification, accumulated a level of calcium that was twice that of the control. In the completely opaque mature cataract, (8-9 weeks post x-ray), both the cortex and nucleus had gained significant amounts of calcium. As the concentration of total calcium increased in the immature x-ray cataract, the amount of the cation bound to membranes and insoluble proteins of the cytosol also increased comparably. However, the relative proportion of calcium in the various fractions remained unaltered in the immature cataract; in both control lenses and immature cataracts, 20% of the total calcium remained in the membrane pellet and 70% was located in the soluble protein fraction. Only in the mature stage of cataract was a shift in the distribution of calcium apparent, as the proportion of calcium in the soluble protein fraction increased to 90%. Although only 7% of the total calcium in a mature cataract was bound to membrane, the amount represented a fivefold increase over the control. The results of this study demonstrate that an elevation in lens calcium accompanies the opacification process in x-ray cataract. The work also suggests that changes in calcium levels are not likely to result from inactivation of Ca-ATPase.

  19. Types of Contact Lenses

    MedlinePlus

    ... Consumer Devices Consumer Products Contact Lenses Types of Contact Lenses Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing ... Orthokeratology (Ortho-K) Decorative (Plano) Contact Lenses Soft Contact Lenses Soft contact lenses are made of soft, ...

  20. Methylphenidate (Ritalin)-associated cataract and glaucoma.

    PubMed

    Lu, Chao-Kung; Kuang, Tung-Mei; Chou, Joe Ching-Kuang

    2006-12-01

    Methylphenidate hydrochloride (Ritalin) is the drug of choice for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). However, an association of Ritalin with glaucoma has been reported. We report a case of Ritalin-associated cataract and glaucoma. A 10-year-old boy was diagnosed with ADHD and had received methylphenidate hydrochloride, 60 mg/day for 2 years. He presented with blurred vision. Best-corrected visual acuity was 6/60 in both eyes. Ocular examinations revealed intraocular pressure (IOP) of 30 mmHg under medication, dense posterior subcapsular opacity of lens, pale disc with advanced cupping, and marked constriction of visual field. Despite maximal anti-glaucomatous medication, IOP still could not be controlled. The patient then received combined cataract and glaucoma surgery. Visual acuity improved and IOP was within normal limits in both eyes postoperatively. Large dose of methylphenidate may cause cataract and glaucoma. The mechanism remains unclear. Doctors should be aware of the possible ocular side effects of methylphenidate.

  1. Cataracts - what to ask your doctor

    MedlinePlus

    What to ask your doctor about cataracts; Lens implants - what to ask your doctor ... What is a cataract? How will cataract surgery help my vision? If I have cataracts in both eyes, can I have surgery on ...

  2. Cataract and latitude.

    PubMed

    Javitt, J C; Taylor, H R

    For many years, it has been suggested that exposure to sunlight, particularly its ultraviolet component, may be associated with an increased risk of senile cataract. This paper addresses 1) the physical and geographic variables that affect the entry of ultraviolet light in the eye; 2) the epidemiologic evidence that associates cataract with ultraviolet light exposure; and 3) the effectiveness of personal barrier protection (i.e. sunglasses and hats) in reducing ocular exposure to ultraviolet light. The epidemiologic evidence is drawn from studies in Australia, China, Tibet, and the United States. The U.S. evidence consists of data from the Maryland Watermen study and analyses of cataract surgery under the Medicare program which provides health insurance for nearly all Americans age 65 and over (30 million) and pays for 85% of the 1.3 million cataract extractions performed annually in the U.S. Analysis of the Medicard data shown that, after controlling for age, sex, and race, and income of the population and also controlling for supply of ophthalmologists, optometrists, price of surgery and local practice costs, the strongest predictor of cataract surgery likelihood in a Medicare beneficiary is the person's latitude of residence. Latitude correlates directly with the UV-B content of sunlight, because the incident angle of the sun determines the atmospheric penetration of ultraviolet radiation. Data suggest that the probability of cataract surgery in the U.S. increases by 3% for each 1 degree decrease (i.e. more Southerly) in latitude. PMID:7634999

  3. [Current status of cataract surgery. Modern methods--internal medicine risk factors and contraindications].

    PubMed

    Knoche, M

    1998-02-10

    Modern cataract surgery is characterized by minimal invasive techniques that have been introduced during the past decade. These include phacoemulsification, capsulorhexis, foldable intraocular lenses and small tunnel incisions. High success rates coupled with low complication rates have resulted in a change in indications--cataract surgery is no longer performed merely to prevent blindness, but also to improve vision in patients whose professional or private visual demands are compromised by the onset of lens opacification. To ensure that their cooperation with the ophthalmic surgeon results in optimal benefit to the patient, it is important for general practitioners and internists to be conversant with the risk factors and contraindications for cataract surgery. PMID:9540259

  4. 1004 cases of traumatic cataract surgery with implantation of an intraocular lens.

    PubMed

    Fyodorov, S N; Egorova, E V; Zubareva, L N

    1981-04-01

    Traumatic cataracts occurring after ocular trauma were removed by phacoemulsification, cryoextraction or extracapsular cataract extraction, depending on the degree of lens absorption. All eyes received sputnik-style iridocapsular lenses. Most cases were complicated by the presence of synechiae and/or the need for iridoplasty. The surgical technique varied with the specific nature of the ocular pathology. Eyes with penetrating injuries has a higher complication rate. Anterior chamber shallowing or collapse was the most frequent intraoperative complication, and was directly related to the incidence of postoperative complications. Most postoperative complications were typical of those associated with cataract surgery in complicated situations. PMID:7263486

  5. Cataract and Cataract Surgery: Nationwide Prevalence and Clinical Determinants

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the prevalence and clinical determinants of cataract and cataract surgery in Korean population. The 2008–2012 Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey was analyzed, which included 20,419 participants aged ≥ 40 years. The survey is a multistage, probability-cluster survey, which can produce nationally representative estimates. Prevalence of cataract and cataract surgery was estimated. Clinical determinants for those were investigated using logistic regression analyses (LRAs). The prevalence of cataract was 42.28% (95% confidence interval [CI], 40.67–43.89); 40.82% (95% CI, 38.97–42.66) for men and 43.62% (95% CI, 41.91–45.33) for women (P = 0.606). The prevalence of cataract surgery was 7.75% (95% CI, 7.30–8.20); 6.38% (95% CI, 5.80–6.96) for men and 9.01% (95% CI, 8.41–9.61) for women (P < 0.001). Cataract was associated with older age (P < 0.001), men (P = 0.032), lower household income (P = 0.031), lower education (P < 0.001), hypertension (P < 0.001), and diabetes mellitus (DM) (P < 0.001). Cataract surgery was consistently associated with older age, occupation, DM, asthma, and anemia in two LRAs, which compared participants with cataract surgery to those without cataract surgery and those having a cataract but without any cataract surgery, respectively. Hypertension, arthritis, and dyslipidemia were associated with cataract surgery at least in one of these LRAs. These results suggest that there are 9.4 million individuals with cataract and 1.7 million individuals with cataract surgery in Korea. Further studies are warranted to reveal the causality and its possible mechanism of developing/exacerbating cataract in novel determinants (i.e., anemia, asthma, and arthritic conditions) as well as well-known determinants. PMID:27247507

  6. Ionizing Radiation-Induced Cataract in Interventional Cardiology Staff

    PubMed Central

    Bitarafan Rajabi, Ahmad; Noohi, Feridoun; Hashemi, Hassan; Haghjoo, Majid; Miraftab, Mohammad; Yaghoobi, Nahid; Rastgou, Fereydon; Malek, Hadi; Faghihi, Hoshang; Firouzabadi, Hassan; Asgari, Soheila; Rezvan, Farhad; Khosravi, Hamidreza; Soroush, Sara; Khabazkhoob, Mehdi

    2015-01-01

    Background: The use of ionizing radiation has led to advances in medical diagnosis and treatment. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to determine the risk of radiation cataractogenesis in the interventionists and staff performing various procedures in different interventional laboratories. Patients and Methods: This cohort study included 81 interventional cardiology staff. According to the working site, they were classified into 5 groups. The control group comprised 14 professional nurses who did not work in the interventional sites. Participants were assigned for lens assessment by two independent trained ophthalmologists blinded to the study. Results: The electrophysiology laboratory staff received higher doses of ionizing radiation (17.2 ± 11.9 mSv; P < 0.001). There was a significant positive correlation between the years of working experience and effective dose in the lens (P < 0.001). In general, our findings showed that the incidence of lens opacity was 79% (95% CI, 69.9-88.1) in participants with exposure (the case group) and our findings showed that the incidence of lenses opacity was 7.1% (95% CI:2.3-22.6) with the relative risk (RR) of 11.06 (P < 0.001). Conclusions: We believe that the risk of radiation-induced cataract in cardiology interventionists and staff depends on their work site. As the radiation dose increases, the prevalence of posterior eye changes increases. PMID:25789258

  7. Ultraviolet radiation cataract: dose dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soderberg, Per G.; Loefgren, Stefan

    1994-07-01

    Current safety limits for cataract development after acute exposure to ultraviolet radiation (UVR) are based on experiments analyzing experimental data with a quantal, effect-no effect, dose-response model. The present study showed that intensity of forward light scattering is better described with a continuous dose-response model. It was found that 3, 30 and 300 kJ/m2UVR300nm induces increased light scattering within 6 h. For all three doses the intensity of forward light scattering was constant after 6 h. The intensity of forward light scattering was proportional to the log dose of UVR300nm. There was a slight increase of the intensity of forward light scattering on the contralateral side in animals that received 300 kJ/m2. Altogether 72 Sprague-Dawley male rats were included. Half of the rats were exposed in vivo on one side to UVR300nm. The other half was kept as a control group, receiving the same treatment as exposed rats but without delivery of UVR300nm to the eye. Subgroups of the rats received either of the three doses. Rats were sacrificed at varying intervals after the exposure. The lenses were extracted and the forward light scattering was estimated. It is concluded that intensity of forward light scattering in the lens after exposure to UVR300nm should be described with a continuous dose-reponse model.

  8. Element concentrations and cataract: an experimental animal model.

    PubMed

    Ciaralli, L; Giordano, R; Costantini, S; Sepe, A; Cruciani, F; Moramarco, A; Antonelli, B; Balacco-Gabrieli, C

    2001-04-01

    The determination of inorganic ions in cataractous human lenses has been the subject of several investigations; nevertheless, few studies have been concerned with trace element contents in lenses, and data are sometimes contradictory. An animal experimental model of induced cataract is here proposed with the aim of evaluating the changes of Ca, Na, K, Cu and Zn concentrations. The cataract was produced by an Nd:YAG Laser treatment of the right eye of sexteen male rabbits. The determination of the elements was performed by atomic absorption spectrometry (both flame and flameless methods) after an acid digestion of samples. Compared with the results obtained in left lenses used as a control (Ca 14.4+/-5.7 mg/kg d.w.; Na 1.3+/-0.5 g/kg d.w.; K 9.9+/-1.1 g/kg d.w.; Cu 0.24+/-0.09 mg/kg d.w.; Zn 24.8+/-2.3 mg/kg d.w.), the mean concentration values of opaque lenses showed some significant changes for Ca, Na, and Cu (Ca 123.7+/-106.6 mg/kg d.w.; Na 4.5+/-4.3 g/kg d.w; Cu 0.43+/-0.21 mg/kg d.w.). Potassium showed a tendency to decrease, and zinc to increase. Positive correlations were found between calcium and sodium both in controls (r=0.73, p<0.001) and in treated lenses (r= 0.87, p<0.0001). An inverse correlation between Ca and K confirmed the tendency of potassium to decrease.

  9. Crosslinkage theory of senile cataracts.

    PubMed

    Bellows, J G; Bellows, R T

    1976-02-01

    The theory of crosslinkage as a cause of aging of all living organic tissues has withstood the test of time. Nearly all the past theories of senile cataract formation contain elements involving a potent crosslinking agent. Therefore crosslinkage may now be recognized as the common denominator in past theories of senile cataracts. This paper proposes that crosslinkage is the mechanism for senile cataract formation.

  10. Liquefaction for cataract extraction.

    PubMed

    Labiris, Georgios; Toli, Aspasia; Polychroni, Damaskini; Gkika, Maria; Angelonias, Dimitrios; Kozobolis, Vassilios P

    2016-01-01

    A systematic review of the recent literature regarding the implementation of the liquefaction in cataract surgery and its short-term and long-term outcomes in various parameters that affect the quality of patients' life, including visual rehabilitation and possible complications was performed based on the PubMed, Medline, Nature and the American Academy of Ophthalmology databases in November 2013 and data from 14 comparative studies were included in this narrative review. Liquefaction is an innovative technology for cataract extraction that uses micropulses of balanced salt solution to liquefy the lens nucleus. Most studies reported that liquefaction is a reliable technology for mild to moderate cataracts, while fragmentation difficulties may be encountered with harder nuclei. PMID:26949656

  11. Liquefaction for cataract extraction.

    PubMed

    Labiris, Georgios; Toli, Aspasia; Polychroni, Damaskini; Gkika, Maria; Angelonias, Dimitrios; Kozobolis, Vassilios P

    2016-01-01

    A systematic review of the recent literature regarding the implementation of the liquefaction in cataract surgery and its short-term and long-term outcomes in various parameters that affect the quality of patients' life, including visual rehabilitation and possible complications was performed based on the PubMed, Medline, Nature and the American Academy of Ophthalmology databases in November 2013 and data from 14 comparative studies were included in this narrative review. Liquefaction is an innovative technology for cataract extraction that uses micropulses of balanced salt solution to liquefy the lens nucleus. Most studies reported that liquefaction is a reliable technology for mild to moderate cataracts, while fragmentation difficulties may be encountered with harder nuclei.

  12. Senile cataracts and myopia

    SciTech Connect

    Belkin, M.; Jacobs, D.R.; Jackson, S.M.; Zwick, H.

    1982-01-01

    A retrospective survey of 32 persons with myopia and 38 persons with emmetropia who had been operated on at two US Army hospitals on the California coast showed that the persons with myopia who had worn eyeglasses for at least 20 years underwent cataract extraction at a significantly (P less than .00005) older age than the persons with emmetropia (median age at the time of the operation was 70 years, compared with 64 years). These results support the theory that some protection against solar ultraviolet radiation is offered the eyes by eye wear worn continuously and that solar ultraviolet radiation may be a contributing factor in the formation of human senile cataracts.

  13. Analysis of release kinetics of ocular therapeutics from drug releasing contact lenses: Best methods and practices to advance the field.

    PubMed

    Tieppo, Arianna; Boggs, Aarika C; Pourjavad, Payam; Byrne, Mark E

    2014-08-01

    Several methods have been proposed to achieve an extended and controlled release of ocular therapeutics via contact lenses; however, the experimental conditions used to study the drug release vary greatly and significantly influence the release kinetics. In this paper, we examine variations in the release conditions and their effect on the release of both hydrophilic and hydrophobic drugs (ketotifen fumarate, diclofenac sodium, timolol maleate and dexamethasone) from conventional hydrogel and silicone hydrogel lenses. Drug release was studied under different conditions, varying volume, mixing rates, and temperature. Volume had the biggest effect on the release profile, which ironically is the least consistent variable throughout the literature. When a small volume (2-30 mL) was used with no forced mixing and solvent exchange every 24 h, equilibrium was reached promptly much earlier than solvent exchange, significantly damping the drug release rate and artificially extending the release duration, leading to false conclusions. Using a large volume (200-400 mL) with a 30 rpm mixing rate and no solvent exchange, the release rate and total mass released was significantly increased. In general, the release performed in small volumes with no force mixing exhibited cumulative mass release amounts of 3-12 times less than the cumulative release amounts in large volumes with mixing. Increases in mixing rate and temperature resulted in relatively small increases of 1.4 and 1.2 times, respectively in fractional mass released. These results strongly demonstrate the necessity of proper and thorough analysis of release data to assure that equilibrium is not affecting release kinetics. This is paramount for comparison of various controlled drug release methods of therapeutic contact lenses, validation of the potential of lenses as an efficient and effective means of drug delivery, as well as increasing the likelihood of only the most promising methods reaching in vivo studies. PMID

  14. Inhibitory Effect of Crocin(s) on Lens α-Crystallin Glycation and Aggregation, Results in the Decrease of the Risk of Diabetic Cataract.

    PubMed

    Bahmani, Fereshteh; Bathaie, Seyedeh Zahra; Aldavood, Seyed Javid; Ghahghaei, Arezou

    2016-01-26

    The current study investigates the inhibitory effect of crocin(s), also known as saffron apocarotenoids, on protein glycation and aggregation in diabetic rats, and α-crystallin glycation. Thus, crocin(s) were administered by intraperitoneal injection to normal and streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. The cataract progression was recorded regularly every two weeks and was classified into four stages. After eight weeks, the animals were sacrificed and the parameters involved in the cataract formation were measured in the animal lenses. Some parameters were also determined in the serum and blood of the rats. In addition, the effect of crocin(s) on the structure and chaperone activity of α-crystallin in the presence of glucose was studied by different methods. Crocin(s) lowered serum glucose levels of diabetic rats and effectively maintained plasma total antioxidants, glutathione levels and catalase activity in the lens of the animals. In the in vitro study, crocin(s) inhibited α-crystallin glycation and aggregation. Advanced glycation end products fluorescence, hydrophobicity and protein cross-links were also decreased in the presence of crocin(s). In addition, the decreased chaperone activity of α-crystallin in the presence of glucose changed and became close to the native value by the addition of crocin(s) in the medium. Crocin(s) thus showed a powerful inhibitory effect on α-crystallin glycation and preserved the structure-function of this protein. Crocin(s) also showed the beneficial effects on prevention of diabetic cataract.

  15. Automatic Cataract Classification based on Ultrasound Technique Using Machine Learning: A comparative Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caxinha, Miguel; Velte, Elena; Santos, Mário; Perdigão, Fernando; Amaro, João; Gomes, Marco; Santos, Jaime

    This paper addresses the use of computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) system for the cataract classification based on ultrasound technique. Ultrasound A-scan signals were acquired in 220 porcine lenses. B-mode and Nakagami images were constructed. Ninety-seven parameters were extracted from acoustical, spectral and image textural analyses and were subjected to feature selection by Principal Component Analysis (PCA). Bayes, K Nearest-Neighbors (KNN), Fisher Linear Discriminant (FLD) and Support Vector Machine (SVM) classifiers were tested. The classification of healthy and cataractous lenses shows a good performance for the four classifiers (F-measure ≥92.68%) with SVM showing the highest performance (90.62%) for initial versus severe cataract classification.

  16. Lensing duct

    DOEpatents

    Beach, Raymond J. , Benett

    1994-01-01

    A lensing duct to condense (intensify) light using a combination of front surface lensing and reflective waveguiding. The duct tapers down from a wide input side to a narrow output side, with the input side being lens-shaped and coated with an antireflective coating for more efficient transmission into the duct. The four side surfaces are uncoated, preventing light from escaping by total internal reflection as it travels along the duct (reflective waveguiding). The duct has various applications for intensifying light, such as in the coupling of diode array pump light to solid state lasing materials, and can be fabricated from inexpensive glass and plastic.

  17. Radioprotection against cataract formation by WR-77913 in gamma-irradiated rats.

    PubMed

    Menard, T W; Osgood, T B; Clark, J I; Spence, A M; Steele, J E; Krohn, K A; Livesey, J C

    1986-08-01

    Protection by WR-77913 against radiation-induced cataract formation in rats was observed following intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration of drug (1160 mg/kg) 15-30 min before exposure to 15.3 Gy of Cs-137 whole head irradiation. Control groups included irradiated, non-protected animals, and sham-irradiated aging controls. Protection was documented photographically and by analysis of eye lens constituents. All non-protected irradiated animals developed dense cataracts throughout the lens between 90-120 days post-irradiation, while WR-77913 protected animals developed minimal lens opacification through 200 days post-irradiation. No opacification in aging controls was seen. Lens protein analysis by Lowry assay and size exclusion HPLC showed radioprotected and aging control animals were similar in protein content, distribution of total and soluble protein, and degree of lens hydration. This contrasted significantly with cataractous lenses of non-protected animals. In cataractous lenses, the soluble protein concentration in the 25-43 K dalton range was approximately 10% of that found in radioprotected or aging control lenses. Hydration was substantially higher in cataractous lens. These results indicate that WR-77913 protects against lens opacification, protein insolubilization, and hydration in lenses of irradiated animals. Biodistribution studies with [S-35]-WR-77913 showed ocular uptake of drug within 15 minutes after i.p. injection, which remained relatively constant through 60 min. The relative order of drug concentration for individual eye components was: globe greater than total eye approximately equal to humor greater than lens. Although the mechanism of radioprotection observed remains to be elucidated, WR-77913 clearly prevents radiation-induced cataracts in rats. The potentially significant clinical use for this radioprotective compound is being investigated further. PMID:3019964

  18. Activation of sorbitol pathway in metabolic syndrome and increased susceptibility to cataract in Wistar-Obese rats

    PubMed Central

    Giridharan, Nappan Veettil

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Obesity is a major public health problem worldwide, and of late, epidemiological studies indicate a preponderance of cataracts under obesity conditions. Although cataract is a multifactorial disorder and various biochemical mechanisms have been proposed, the influence of obesity on cataractogenesis has yet to be investigated. In such a scenario, a suitable animal model that develops cataract following the onset of obesity will be a welcome tool for biomedical research. Therefore, we investigated the molecular and biochemical basis for predisposition to cataract in the obese mutant rat models established in our institute because 15%–20% of these rats develop cataracts spontaneously as they reach 12–15 months of age. Methods We analyzed the major biochemical pathways in the normal lenses of different age groups of our obese mutant rat strains, Wistar/Obese (WNIN/Ob) and WNIN/GR-Ob, the former with euglycemia and the latter with an additional impaired glucose tolerance trait. In addition, sorbitol levels were estimated in the cataractous lenses of the obese rats. Results Except for the polyol pathway, all the principal pathways of the lens remained unaltered. Therefore, sorbitol levels were found to be high in the normal eye lenses of obese rats (WNIN/Ob and WNIN/GR-Ob) compared to their lean controls from three months of age onwards. Between WNIN/Ob and WNIN/GR-Ob, the levels of sorbitol were higher in the latter, suggesting a synergistic effect of impaired glucose tolerance along with obesity in the activation of the sorbitol pathway. Either way, an elevated sorbitol pathway seemed to be the predisposing factor responsible for cataract formation in these mutant rats. Conclusions Activation of the sorbitol pathway indeed enhances the risk of cataract development in conditions such as metabolic syndrome. These rat models thus may be valuable tools for investigating obesity-associated cataract and for developing intervention strategies, based on these

  19. Cataract Surgery: Fraud, Waste, and Abuse. A Report by the Chairman of the Subcommittee on Health and Long-Term Care of the Select Committee on Aging. House of Representatives, Ninety-Ninth Congress, First Session.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Select Committee on Aging.

    This report is a summary of the findings from the Subcommittee on Health and Long-Term Care of the United States House of Representatives Select Committee on Aging investigation of cataract surgery and the use of intraocular lenses (IOL's) in the United States. The document provides background on the definition and treatment of cataracts and…

  20. A simple and stable galactosemic cataract model for rats

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Lixia; Li, Caina; Shen, Ning; Huan, Yi; Liu, Quan; Liu, Shuainan; Shen, Zhufang

    2015-01-01

    Rat galactosemic cataract is commonly used in the investigation of sugar cataract. In current study, 21-day sprague-dawley (SD) rats were randomly divided into two groups (n=42), which were fed by normal water and galactose solution (12.5%-10%) for 18 days respectively. Every 3 days, lens opacity was observed by a slit lamp, and 6 rats of each group were executed for the analysis of aldose reductase (AR) activity, galactitol level and AR mRNA expression. Morphological results showed that small vacuoles initially appeared in the equatorial area before the 6th day, then subsequently extended to the whole anterior capsule, and eventually developed to mature cataract on the 18th day. AR of galactosemic lenses was significantly activated in the first stage and then slowly dropped to the end accompanied by the related changes of galactitol. AR mRNA expression also was upregulated and reached the peak at the 6th day. This study appears to confirm that galactosemic cataract can be induced for 21-day SD rats by only drinking 12.5% to 10% galactose solution, and this model is simple, economical and stable as to meet the research needs. PMID:26550203

  1. A simple and stable galactosemic cataract model for rats.

    PubMed

    Ji, Lixia; Li, Caina; Shen, Ning; Huan, Yi; Liu, Quan; Liu, Shuainan; Shen, Zhufang

    2015-01-01

    Rat galactosemic cataract is commonly used in the investigation of sugar cataract. In current study, 21-day sprague-dawley (SD) rats were randomly divided into two groups (n=42), which were fed by normal water and galactose solution (12.5%-10%) for 18 days respectively. Every 3 days, lens opacity was observed by a slit lamp, and 6 rats of each group were executed for the analysis of aldose reductase (AR) activity, galactitol level and AR mRNA expression. Morphological results showed that small vacuoles initially appeared in the equatorial area before the 6th day, then subsequently extended to the whole anterior capsule, and eventually developed to mature cataract on the 18th day. AR of galactosemic lenses was significantly activated in the first stage and then slowly dropped to the end accompanied by the related changes of galactitol. AR mRNA expression also was upregulated and reached the peak at the 6th day. This study appears to confirm that galactosemic cataract can be induced for 21-day SD rats by only drinking 12.5% to 10% galactose solution, and this model is simple, economical and stable as to meet the research needs.

  2. Gravitational Lensing

    ScienceCinema

    Lincoln, Don

    2016-07-12

    In a long line of intellectual triumphs, Einstein’s theory of general relativity was his greatest and most imaginative. It tells us that what we experience as gravity can be most accurately described as the bending of space itself. This idea leads to consequences, including gravitational lensing, which is caused by light traveling in this curved space. This is works in a way analogous to a lens (and hence the name). In this video, Fermilab’s Dr. Don Lincoln explains a little general relativity, a little gravitational lensing, and tells us how this phenomenon allows us to map out the matter of the entire universe, including the otherwise-invisible dark matter.

  3. Gravitational Lensing

    SciTech Connect

    Lincoln, Don

    2015-06-24

    In a long line of intellectual triumphs, Einstein’s theory of general relativity was his greatest and most imaginative. It tells us that what we experience as gravity can be most accurately described as the bending of space itself. This idea leads to consequences, including gravitational lensing, which is caused by light traveling in this curved space. This is works in a way analogous to a lens (and hence the name). In this video, Fermilab’s Dr. Don Lincoln explains a little general relativity, a little gravitational lensing, and tells us how this phenomenon allows us to map out the matter of the entire universe, including the otherwise-invisible dark matter.

  4. Gravitational Lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, P.; Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Gravity bends light rays in a way analogous to, but quantitatively different from, the way it bends trajectories of passing particles. If light from some bright object passes close enough to some foreground mass, that object's image will be altered. The effect is more like a piece of bathroom glass in the sky than a precision-ground and well-focused lens, but the terms `gravitational lensing' or ...

  5. UVA Light-excited Kynurenines Oxidize Ascorbate and Modify Lens Proteins through the Formation of Advanced Glycation End Products

    PubMed Central

    Linetsky, Mikhail; Raghavan, Cibin T.; Johar, Kaid; Fan, Xingjun; Monnier, Vincent M.; Vasavada, Abhay R.; Nagaraj, Ram H.

    2014-01-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) contribute to lens protein pigmentation and cross-linking during aging and cataract formation. In vitro experiments have shown that ascorbate (ASC) oxidation products can form AGEs in proteins. However, the mechanisms of ASC oxidation and AGE formation in the human lens are poorly understood. Kynurenines are tryptophan oxidation products produced from the indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO)-mediated kynurenine pathway and are present in the human lens. This study investigated the ability of UVA light-excited kynurenines to photooxidize ASC and to form AGEs in lens proteins. UVA light-excited kynurenines in both free and protein-bound forms rapidly oxidized ASC, and such oxidation occurred even in the absence of oxygen. High levels of GSH inhibited but did not completely block ASC oxidation. Upon UVA irradiation, pigmented proteins from human cataractous lenses also oxidized ASC. When exposed to UVA light (320–400 nm, 100 milliwatts/cm2, 45 min to 2 h), young human lenses (20–36 years), which contain high levels of free kynurenines, lost a significant portion of their ASC content and accumulated AGEs. A similar formation of AGEs was observed in UVA-irradiated lenses from human IDO/human sodium-dependent vitamin C transporter-2 mice, which contain high levels of kynurenines and ASC. Our data suggest that kynurenine-mediated ASC oxidation followed by AGE formation may be an important mechanism for lens aging and the development of senile cataracts in humans. PMID:24798334

  6. AKT activation promotes PTEN hamartoma tumor syndrome-associated cataract development.

    PubMed

    Sellitto, Caterina; Li, Leping; Gao, Junyuan; Robinson, Michael L; Lin, Richard Z; Mathias, Richard T; White, Thomas W

    2013-12-01

    Mutations in the human phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) gene cause PTEN hamartoma tumor syndrome (PHTS), which includes cataract development among its diverse clinical pathologies. Currently, it is not known whether cataract formation in PHTS patients is secondary to other systemic problems, or the result of the loss of a critical function of PTEN within the lens. We generated a mouse line with a lens-specific deletion of Pten (PTEN KO) and identified a regulatory function for PTEN in lens ion transport. Specific loss of PTEN in the lens resulted in cataract. PTEN KO lenses exhibited a progressive age-related increase in intracellular hydrostatic pressure, along with, increased intracellular sodium concentrations, and reduced Na+/K+-ATPase activity. Collectively, these defects lead to lens swelling, opacities and ultimately organ rupture. Activation of AKT was highly elevated in PTEN KO lenses compared to WT mice. Additionally, pharmacological inhibition of AKT restored normal Na+/K+-ATPase activity in primary cultured lens cells and reduced lens pressure in intact lenses from PTEN KO animals. These findings identify a direct role for PTEN in the regulation of lens ion transport through an AKT-dependent modulation of Na+/K+-ATPase activity, and provide a new animal model to investigate cataract development in PHTS patients. PMID:24270425

  7. Up-regulation of P-glycoprotein expression by osmotic stress in rat sugar cataract.

    PubMed

    Miyazawa, T; Kubo, E; Takamura, Y; Akagi, Y

    2007-02-01

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp), a plasma membrane protein, is thought to function in the export of cytotoxic drugs and to act as a modulator of chloride channels that regulate cell volume in many cell types. P-gp has been shown to play a role in lens volume regulation and initiation of osmotic cataract. We investigated the lenticular expression levels of P-gp in galactose-fed rats, an experimental model of sugar cataract. P-gp was overexpressed in lenses from galactose-fed rats with cortical sugar cataract, and in rat lens epithelial cells cultured in high-glucose medium. However, application of aldose reductase (AR) inhibitor was able to reverse the changes in P-gp levels in the lenses of galactose-fed rats, confirming the role of AR and involvement of the polyol pathway in cataract formation. Our findings suggest that P-gp may be induced by AR over-expression and/or osmotic stress, thus playing a regulatory role in maintaining lenticular osmotic balance in sugar cataract. PMID:17141219

  8. Diplopia as the Complication of Cataract Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Gawęcki, Maciej; Grzybowski, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    The authors present systematic review of aetiology and treatment of diplopia related to cataract surgery. The problem is set in the modern perspective of changing cataract surgery. Actual incidence is discussed as well as various modalities of therapeutic options. The authors provide the guidance for the contemporary cataract surgeon, when to expect potential problem in ocular motility after cataract surgery. PMID:26998351

  9. X-Ray induced cataract is preceded by LEC loss, and coincident with accumulation of cortical DNA, and ROS; similarities with age-related cataracts

    PubMed Central

    Zitnik, Galynn; Tsai, Ryan; Wolf, Norman

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To compare age-related cataractous (ARC) changes in unirradiated mice lenses to those induced by head-only X-irradiation of 3 month-old mice. Methods lens epithelial cells (LECs) as well as partially degraded cortical DNA were visualized in fixed sections using 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) staining, and in fresh lenses using the vital stain Hoechst 33342. reactive oxygen species (ROS) activity was also visualized directly in fresh lenses using the vital dye Dihydrorhodamine (DHR). In fixed lenses an antibody specific for 8-OH Guanosine (8-OH-G) lesions was used to visualize DNA oxidative adducts from ROS damage. Alpha smooth muscle actin was visualized using specific antibodies to determine if myofibroblasts were present. Fluorescence was quantified using Laser Scanning Confocal Microscopy (LSCM). The degree of lens opacity and cataract formation was determined by slit lamp, or from digitalized images of light reflections taken with a low magnification light microscope. Results Using DNA- and ROS-specific vital fluorescent dyes, and laser scanning confocal microscopy we have previously described 4 changes in the aging rodent lenses: 1) a significantly decreased density of surface LECs in lenses from old compared to younger mice and rats; 2) a very large increase in retained cortical nuclei and DNA fragments in the secondary lens fibers of old rodent lenses; 3) increased cortical ROS in old rodent lenses; 4) increased cataract concomitantly with the cortical DNA and ROS increases. In the current study we report that these same 4 changes also occur in an accelerated fashion in mice given head-only X-irradiation at 3 months of age. In addition to vital staining of fresh lenses, we also examined sections from fixed eyes stained with DAPI or hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) and found the same loss of surface LECs and accumulation of undigested nuclei and debris in secondary lens fibers occur with age or following X-irradiation. In addition sections from fixed

  10. Age and Smoking Related Changes in Metal Ion Levels in Human Lens: Implications for Cataract Formation

    PubMed Central

    Langford-Smith, Alex; Tilakaratna, Viranga; Lythgoe, Paul R.; Clark, Simon J.; Bishop, Paul N.; Day, Anthony J.

    2016-01-01

    Age-related cataract formation is the primary cause of blindness worldwide and although treatable by surgical removal of the lens the majority of sufferers have neither the finances nor access to the medical facilities required. Therefore, a better understanding of the pathogenesis of cataract may identify new therapeutic targets to prevent or slow its progression. Cataract incidence is strongly correlated with age and cigarette smoking, factors that are often associated with accumulation of metal ions in other tissues. Therefore this study evaluated the age-related changes in 14 metal ions in 32 post mortem human lenses without known cataract from donors of 11 to 82 years of age by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry; smoking-related changes in 10 smokers verses 14 non-smokers were also analysed. A significant age-related increase in selenium and decrease in copper ions was observed for the first time in the lens tissue, where cadmium ion levels were also increased as has been seen previously. Aluminium and vanadium ions were found to be increased in smokers compared to non-smokers (an analysis that has only been carried out before in lenses with cataract). These changes in metal ions, i.e. that occur as a consequence of normal ageing and of smoking, could contribute to cataract formation via induction of oxidative stress pathways, modulation of extracellular matrix structure/function and cellular toxicity. Thus, this study has identified novel changes in metal ions in human lens that could potentially drive the pathology of cataract formation. PMID:26794210

  11. Age and Smoking Related Changes in Metal Ion Levels in Human Lens: Implications for Cataract Formation.

    PubMed

    Langford-Smith, Alex; Tilakaratna, Viranga; Lythgoe, Paul R; Clark, Simon J; Bishop, Paul N; Day, Anthony J

    2016-01-01

    Age-related cataract formation is the primary cause of blindness worldwide and although treatable by surgical removal of the lens the majority of sufferers have neither the finances nor access to the medical facilities required. Therefore, a better understanding of the pathogenesis of cataract may identify new therapeutic targets to prevent or slow its progression. Cataract incidence is strongly correlated with age and cigarette smoking, factors that are often associated with accumulation of metal ions in other tissues. Therefore this study evaluated the age-related changes in 14 metal ions in 32 post mortem human lenses without known cataract from donors of 11 to 82 years of age by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry; smoking-related changes in 10 smokers verses 14 non-smokers were also analysed. A significant age-related increase in selenium and decrease in copper ions was observed for the first time in the lens tissue, where cadmium ion levels were also increased as has been seen previously. Aluminium and vanadium ions were found to be increased in smokers compared to non-smokers (an analysis that has only been carried out before in lenses with cataract). These changes in metal ions, i.e. that occur as a consequence of normal ageing and of smoking, could contribute to cataract formation via induction of oxidative stress pathways, modulation of extracellular matrix structure/function and cellular toxicity. Thus, this study has identified novel changes in metal ions in human lens that could potentially drive the pathology of cataract formation.

  12. Proliferative changes of lens epithelial cells in rat and mouse galactose cataracts--examination using whole-mount preparations.

    PubMed

    Terubayashi, H; Tsuji, T; Okamoto, S; Ikebe, H; Akagi, Y

    1993-01-01

    The proliferative activity of the lens epithelium in the early stages of cataract crisis was investigated in rats and mice using the 3H-thymidine autoradiographic method with the whole-mount preparations of total lens epithelial cells. Three-week-old Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were given a diet which included galactose in three different concentrations (15%, 25%, 50%) to produce sugar cataracts of three different degrees. Seven-week-old ICR mice were given a 50% galactose-diet. In the lenses of control rats and mice, 3H-thymidine labeled cells were observed mainly in the germinative zone at the lens equator; a few labeled cells were detected in the anterior subcapsular central zone. In the lenses of the SD rats on the 4th day of the diet, labeled cells increased remarkably in the central zone. However, labeled cells decreased as the cataract progressed. The peak in the number of labeled cells was observed on the 4th day of the diet regardless of the galactose concentrations, and was not proportional to the degree of the cataracts. In the galactose-fed ICR mice, the blood galactose level was high, but there was no increase in the number of labeled cells or the development of galactose cataract. The marked increase of labeled cells in the central zone in the SD rat lenses had probably occurred because of the accumulation of galactitol.

  13. Etiopathogenesis of cataract: An appraisal

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Varun B; Rajagopala, Manjusha; Ravishankar, Basavaiah

    2014-01-01

    Natural eye lens is a crystalline substance to produce a clear passage for light. Cataract is opacity within the clear lens of the eye and is the dominant cause of socio-medical problem i.e., blindness worldwide. The only available treatment of cataract is surgery. However, insufficient surgical facilities in poor and developing countries and post-operative complications inspire researchers to find out other modes of treatment for cataract. In this review, an attempt has been made to appraise various etiological factors of cataract to make their perception clear to build up counterpart treatment. Present study is an assortment of various available literatures and electronic information in view of cataract etiopathogenesis. Various risk factors have been identified in development of cataracts. They can be classified in to genetic factors, ageing (systemic diseases, nutritional and trace metals deficiencies, smoking, oxidative stress etc.), traumatic, complicated (inflammatory and degenerative diseases of eye), metabolic (diabetes, galactosemia etc.), toxic substances including drugs abuses, alcohol etc., radiation (ultraviolet, electromagnetic waves etc.) are implicated as significant risk factors in the development of cataract. PMID:24618482

  14. Increased aquaporin 1 and 5 membrane expression in the lens epithelium of cataract patients.

    PubMed

    Barandika, Olatz; Ezquerra-Inchausti, Maitane; Anasagasti, Ander; Vallejo-Illarramendi, Ainara; Llarena, Irantzu; Bascaran, Lucia; Alberdi, Txomin; De Benedetti, Giacomo; Mendicute, Javier; Ruiz-Ederra, Javier

    2016-10-01

    In this work we have analyzed the expression levels of the main aquaporins (AQPs) expressed in human lens epithelial cells (HLECs) using 112 samples from patients treated with cataract surgery and 36 samples from individuals treated with refractive surgery, with transparent lenses as controls. Aquaporin-1 (AQP1) is the main AQP, representing 64.1% of total AQPs in HLECs, with aquaporin-5 (AQP5) representing 35.9% in controls. A similar proportion of each AQP in cataract was found. Although no differences were found at the mRNA level compared to controls, a significant 1.65-fold increase (p=0.001) in AQP1protein expression was observed in HLECs from cataract patients, with the highest differences being found for nuclear cataracts (2.1-fold increase; p<0.001). A similar trend was found for AQP5 (1.47-fold increase), although the difference was not significant (p=0.161). Moreover we have shown increased membrane AQP5 protein expression in HLECs of patients with cataracts. No association of AQP1 or AQP5 expression levels with age or sex was observed in either group. Our results suggest regulation of AQP1 and AQP5 at the post-translational level and support previous observations on the implication of AQP1 and 5 in maintenance of lens transparency in animal models. Our results likely reflect a compensatory response of the crystalline lens to delay cataract formation by increasing the water removal rate.

  15. Increased aquaporin 1 and 5 membrane expression in the lens epithelium of cataract patients.

    PubMed

    Barandika, Olatz; Ezquerra-Inchausti, Maitane; Anasagasti, Ander; Vallejo-Illarramendi, Ainara; Llarena, Irantzu; Bascaran, Lucia; Alberdi, Txomin; De Benedetti, Giacomo; Mendicute, Javier; Ruiz-Ederra, Javier

    2016-10-01

    In this work we have analyzed the expression levels of the main aquaporins (AQPs) expressed in human lens epithelial cells (HLECs) using 112 samples from patients treated with cataract surgery and 36 samples from individuals treated with refractive surgery, with transparent lenses as controls. Aquaporin-1 (AQP1) is the main AQP, representing 64.1% of total AQPs in HLECs, with aquaporin-5 (AQP5) representing 35.9% in controls. A similar proportion of each AQP in cataract was found. Although no differences were found at the mRNA level compared to controls, a significant 1.65-fold increase (p=0.001) in AQP1protein expression was observed in HLECs from cataract patients, with the highest differences being found for nuclear cataracts (2.1-fold increase; p<0.001). A similar trend was found for AQP5 (1.47-fold increase), although the difference was not significant (p=0.161). Moreover we have shown increased membrane AQP5 protein expression in HLECs of patients with cataracts. No association of AQP1 or AQP5 expression levels with age or sex was observed in either group. Our results suggest regulation of AQP1 and AQP5 at the post-translational level and support previous observations on the implication of AQP1 and 5 in maintenance of lens transparency in animal models. Our results likely reflect a compensatory response of the crystalline lens to delay cataract formation by increasing the water removal rate. PMID:27497833

  16. Lens opacity induced by lipid peroxidation products as a model of cataract associated with retinal disease.

    PubMed

    Babizhayev, M A; Deyev, A I

    1989-07-17

    The cataractous lenses of patients with retinitis pigmentosa have been studied by electron microscopy. The posterior subcapsular opacities showed common ultrastructural features. Large areas of disruption of the lens fibre pattern were observed which showed an increase in the number of fibre membranes per unit area. In many regions an elaborate and regular folding of membranes was noted which produced complex 'figure-of-eight' and 'tramline' patterns, as well as membranous lamellar bodies. Masses of various size globules were also identified. It has been established that injection into the vitreous body of the rabbit eye of a suspension of liposomes prepared from phospholipids containing lipid peroxidation products induces the development of posterior subcapsular cataract. Such modelling of cataract is based on a type of clouding of the crystalline lens similar to that observed in cataract resulting from diffusion of toxic lipid peroxidation products from the retina to the lens through the vitreous body on degeneration of the photoreceptors. Saturated liposomes (prepared from beta-oleoyl-gamma-palmitoyl-L-alpha-phosphatidylcholine) do not cause clouding of the lens, which demonstrates the peroxide mechanism of the genesis of this form of cataract. Clouding of the lens is accompanied by accumulation of fluorescing lipid peroxidation products in the vitreous body, aqueous humor and the lens and also by a fall in the concentration of reduced glutathione in the lens. From the results it is concluded that lipid peroxidation may initiate the development of cataract. PMID:2742866

  17. Connections between connexins, calcium, and cataracts in the lens.

    PubMed

    Gao, Junyuan; Sun, Xiurong; Martinez-Wittinghan, Francisco J; Gong, Xiaohua; White, Thomas W; Mathias, Richard T

    2004-10-01

    There is a good deal of evidence that the lens generates an internal micro circulatory system, which brings metabolites, like glucose, and antioxidants, like ascorbate, into the lens along the extracellular spaces between cells. Calcium also ought to be carried into the lens by this system. If so, the only path for Ca2+ to get out of the lens is to move down its electrochemical gradient into fiber cells, and then move by electrodiffusion from cell to cell through gap junctions to surface cells, where Ca-ATPase activity and Na/Ca exchange can transport it back into the aqueous or vitreous humors. The purpose of the present study was to test this calcium circulation hypothesis by studying calcium homeostasis in connexin (Cx46) knockout and (Cx46 for Cx50) knockin mouse lenses, which have different degrees of gap junction coupling. To measure intracellular calcium, FURA2 was injected into fiber cells, and the gradient in calcium concentration from center to surface was mapped in each type of lens. In wild-type lenses the coupling conductance of the mature fibers was approximately 0.5 S/cm2 of cell to cell contact, and the best fit to the calcium concentration data varied from 700 nM in the center to 300 nM at the surface. In the knockin lenses, the coupling conductance was approximately 1.0 S/cm2 and calcium varied from approximately 500 nM at the center to 300 nM at the surface. Thus, when the coupling conductance doubled, the concentration gradient halved, as predicted by the model. In knockout lenses, the coupling conductance was zero, hence the efflux path was knocked out and calcium accumulated to approximately 2 microM in central fibers. Knockout lenses also had a dense central cataract that extended from the center to about half the radius. Others have previously shown that this cataract involves activation of a calcium-dependent protease, Lp82. We can now expand on this finding to provide a hypothesis on each step that leads to cataract formation: knockout of

  18. Glasses and Contact Lenses

    MedlinePlus

    ... Here's Help White House Lunch Recipes Glasses and Contact Lenses KidsHealth > For Kids > Glasses and Contact Lenses Print A A A Text Size What's ... together the way they should. But eyeglasses or contact lenses, also called corrective lenses, can help most ...

  19. Gravitational lenses

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, E.L.

    1988-07-01

    For several years astronomers have devoted considerable effort to finding and studying a class of celestial phenomena whose very existence depends on rare cosmic accidents. These are gravitational-lens events, which occur when two or more objects at different distances from the earth happen to lie along the same line of sight and so coincide in the sky. The radiation from the more distant object, typically a quasar, is bent by the gravitational field of the foreground object. The bending creates a cosmic mirage: distorted or multiple images of the background object. Such phenomena may reveal many otherwise undetectable features of the image source, of the foreground object and of the space lying between them. Such observations could help to resolve several fundamental questions in cosmology. In the past decade theoretical and observational research on gravitational lenses has grown rapidly and steadily. At this writing at least 17 candidate lens systems have been discussed in the literature. Of the 17 lens candidates reported so far in professional literature, only five are considered to have been reliably established by subsequent observations. Another three are generally regarded as weak or speculative cases with less than 50 percent chance of actually being lens systems. In the remaining nine cases the evidence is mixed or is sparse enough so that the final judgment could swing either way. As might be concluded, little of the scientific promise of gravitational lenses has yet been realized. The work has not yielded a clear value for the proportionality constant or any of the other fundamental cosmological parameter. 7 figs.

  20. Astigmatism following cataract surgery.

    PubMed

    Reading, V M

    1984-02-01

    The changes in corneal curvature were determined at regular intervals over a one-year period following intracapsular cataract extraction by microsurgical techniques. During the first postoperative month photokeratometric measurements showed rapid changes in astigmatism associated with large changes in the direction of the axis. Thereafter astigmatism against-the-rule predominated. Data from the small group of patients who underwent surgery in which the technique of phacoemulsification was used show that the smaller changes in corneal curvature are attributable to the smaller incision size and reduced number of sutures. With patients who underwent intracapsular extraction a comparison has been made between the effects of large and small section sizes, and a procedure is outlined whereby surgically induced astigmatism may be minimised.

  1. Astigmatism in cataract surgery.

    PubMed Central

    Luntz, M. H.; Livingston, D. G.

    1977-01-01

    We report on our investigation into astigmatism in 40 eyes following a corneal cataract incision closed with a continuous 10/0 nylon monofilament suture (Ethilon). Immediately after surgery there was astigmatism caused by the nylon suture (suture-induced astigmatism), its severity depending on the tightness of the suture. It ranged from 1 to 10-5 dioptres, the mean value 4-09 dioptres with a standard deviation of +/-2-5. Removing the nylon suture eliminated this astigmatism and within a few weeks the corneal astigmatism correction in 48% of eyes returned to the preoperative level. In 80% of eyes the difference between the final postoperative corneal astigmatism (4 months after removing the continuous suture) and the preoperative astigmatism was 0-75 dioptres or less and the maximum change was 1-5 dioptres. In 40% of eyes the axis of the cylinder changed from a horizontal to an oblique axis but did not change from a with- to against-the-rule axis. The degree of astigmatism remained constant while the suture was in place and in 50% of eyes was equal to or less than 3 dioptres. The mean of the spherical equivalents was 11-31 dioptres with a standard deviation of +/-1-25. A spectacle correction 14 days after operation prescribed either as the mean spherical equivalent (11-50 dioptres) or according to the patient's refraction will give satisfactory vision until the suture is removed 4 months after operation. The degree of astigmatism following a corneal section and continuous nylon suture compares very favourably with astigmatism following other suturing techniques for cataract. Images PMID:326304

  2. Featured Article: Inhibition of diabetic cataract by glucose tolerance factor extracted from yeast.

    PubMed

    Mirsky, Nitsa; Cohen, Revital; Eliaz, Anat; Dovrat, Ahuva

    2016-04-01

    Diabetes leads to many complications; among them is the development of cataract. Hyperglycemia brings to increased polyol concentration in the lens, to glycation of lens proteins, and to elevated level of ROS (Reactive Oxygen Species) causing oxidative stress. The glucose tolerance factor (GTF) was found by several groups to decrease hyperglycemia and oxidative stress both in diabetic animals and humans. The aim of our study was to explore the damages induced by high glucose to the eye lens and to assess the protective effects of GTF both in vivo and in vitro The in vivo study included control healthy rats, streptozotocin (STZ) diabetic untreated rats, and STZ diabetic rats orally treated with 15 doses of GTF. The diabetic untreated rats developed cataracts, whereas the development of cataract was totally or partially prevented in GTF treated animals. In vitro studies were done on bovine lenses incubated for 14 days. Half of the lenses were incubated in normal glucose conditions, and half in high glucose conditions (450 mg%). To one group of the normal or high glucose condition GTF was added. The optical quality of all the lenses was measured daily by an automated scanning laser system. The control lenses, whether with or without GTF addition, did not show any reduction in their quality. High glucose conditions induced optical damage to the lenses. Addition of GTF to high glucose conditions prevented this damage. High glucose conditions affected the activity of aldose reductase and sodium potassium ATPase in lens epithelial cell. Addition of GTF decreased the destructive changes induced by high glucose conditions. The amount of soluble cortical lens proteins was decreased and structural changes were detected in lenses incubated in high glucose medium. These changes could be prevented when GTF was added to high glucose medium. Our findings demonstrate the anticataractogenic potential of GTF. PMID:26825353

  3. Featured Article: Inhibition of diabetic cataract by glucose tolerance factor extracted from yeast

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Revital; Eliaz, Anat; Dovrat, Ahuva

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes leads to many complications; among them is the development of cataract. Hyperglycemia brings to increased polyol concentration in the lens, to glycation of lens proteins, and to elevated level of ROS (Reactive Oxygen Species) causing oxidative stress. The glucose tolerance factor (GTF) was found by several groups to decrease hyperglycemia and oxidative stress both in diabetic animals and humans. The aim of our study was to explore the damages induced by high glucose to the eye lens and to assess the protective effects of GTF both in vivo and in vitro. The in vivo study included control healthy rats, streptozotocin (STZ) diabetic untreated rats, and STZ diabetic rats orally treated with 15 doses of GTF. The diabetic untreated rats developed cataracts, whereas the development of cataract was totally or partially prevented in GTF treated animals. In vitro studies were done on bovine lenses incubated for 14 days. Half of the lenses were incubated in normal glucose conditions, and half in high glucose conditions (450 mg%). To one group of the normal or high glucose condition GTF was added. The optical quality of all the lenses was measured daily by an automated scanning laser system. The control lenses, whether with or without GTF addition, did not show any reduction in their quality. High glucose conditions induced optical damage to the lenses. Addition of GTF to high glucose conditions prevented this damage. High glucose conditions affected the activity of aldose reductase and sodium potassium ATPase in lens epithelial cell. Addition of GTF decreased the destructive changes induced by high glucose conditions. The amount of soluble cortical lens proteins was decreased and structural changes were detected in lenses incubated in high glucose medium. These changes could be prevented when GTF was added to high glucose medium. Our findings demonstrate the anticataractogenic potential of GTF. PMID:26825353

  4. Cataract surgery in ancient Egypt.

    PubMed

    Blomstedt, Patric

    2014-03-01

    Ophthalmology was one of the most important specialties in Egyptian medicine, and more specialists are known in this field than in any other. This specialization seems, however, to have been of a purely noninvasive nature. Even though it has been claimed that cataract surgery was performed in pharaonic Egypt, careful analysis of the sources does not support the claim. No example of cataract surgery or of any other invasive ophthalmologic procedure can be found in the original sources.

  5. Cataract surgery in pseudoexfoliation syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sangal, Neha; Chen, Teresa C

    2014-01-01

    Pseudoexfoliation (PXF) syndrome is characterized by the deposition of distinctive fibrillar material in the anterior segment of the eye. It is an age-related process that is associated with open and narrow angle glaucomas and the formation of cataracts. Not only is PXF associated with the formation of dense nuclear cataracts, it is also well known that those presenting with PXF are at a higher risk of developing complications during, and even after, cataract surgery. Complications associated with cataract surgery in PXF can occur from poor pupillary dilation, zonular weakness leading to intraoperative or postoperative lens dislocation and vitreous loss, postoperative intraocular pressure (IOP) spikes potentiating glaucomatous damage, capsular phimosis, prolonged inflammation, and postoperative corneal decompensation. The surgeon should be prepared to encounter the various potential intraoperative and postoperative complications in eyes with pseudoexfoliation syndrome during cataract surgery. In this way, the surgeon can plan his/her surgical technique to help avoid surprises during cataract surgery and be prepared to manage the potential postoperative complications that can occur in pseudoexfoliation eyes. PMID:25325866

  6. Sutureless cataract incision closure using laser-activated tissue glues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eaton, Alexander M.; Bass, Lawrence S.; Libutti, Steven K.; Schubert, Herman D.; Treat, Michael R.

    1991-06-01

    With the advent of phacoemulsification and foldable intraocular lenses, there is renewed interest in sutureless cataract wound. We report the use of laser activated tissue glues for the closure of scleral tunnel cataract incisions. Two glue mixtures were tested in enucleated porcine eyes. Glue A was composed of hyaluronic acid, human albumin, and indocyanine green dye. Glue B contained hyaluronic acid, chondroitin sulfate, human albumin, and indocyanine green dye. A Spectra Physics diode laser (808 nm) with a power density of 7-1 1 watts/cm2 was used for glue activation. Wound bursting pressures, as determined by the presence of fluid at the wound margin, was significantly higher with both glue combinations than without the glue (Pcataract incisions.

  7. Mensuration data in infant eyes with unilateral congenital cataracts.

    PubMed

    Moore, B D

    1987-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the size and shape of infant eyes having a unilateral congenital cataract. Fourteen infants presenting consecutively with a unilateral congenital cataract were studied. Ages ranged from 1.3 to 6 months (mean 3.7 months). Corneal curvature ranged from 43.00 to 49.50 D (mean 45.6 D). Refractive error at the corneal plane ranged from +23.50 to +34.00 D (mean +28.07 D). The axial length ranged from 16.49 to 20.09 mm (mean 18.41 mm). Microcornea was found in eight infants. There was rapid growth in eye size from normal neonatal dimensions. No significant relation was found among the following: corneal curvature and age; refractive error and age; axial length and age or presence of microcornea; and corneal curvature and refractive error. Corneal vault may be an important factor in fitting contact lenses to aphakic infants. Contact lenses for infants should be designed based on the dimensions of the infant eye.

  8. Symbolic algebra approach to the calculation of intraocular lens power following cataract surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hjelmstad, David P.; Sayegh, Samir I.

    2013-03-01

    We present a symbolic approach based on matrix methods that allows for the analysis and computation of intraocular lens power following cataract surgery. We extend the basic matrix approach corresponding to paraxial optics to include astigmatism and other aberrations. The symbolic approach allows for a refined analysis of the potential sources of errors ("refractive surprises"). We demonstrate the computation of lens powers including toric lenses that correct for both defocus (myopia, hyperopia) and astigmatism. A specific implementation in Mathematica allows an elegant and powerful method for the design and analysis of these intraocular lenses.

  9. Iris-supported lens implantation v. simple cataract extraction. An analysis of data.

    PubMed

    Galin, M A; Obstbaum, S A; Boniuk, V; Galin, A; Silverstone, D

    1977-04-01

    In a study of a selected age (greater than 60) and ocularly matched population requiring cataract extraction, a perfectly executed intracapsular cataract extraction followed by the introduction of a Fyodorov Type II ("Sputnik") lens did not lead to irreversible anterior or posterior segment changes different from those seen in a group followed for from 5 to 9 years. It did lead to an incidence of implant support dislocation and to membrane formation in about 10% of cases, reducible to about 2% with correctly made lenses and the appropriate use of postoperative drugs. The incidence of corneal degeneration (0), retinal detachment (2%), and intraretinal cystic maculopathy (3%) was equal in each group. Visual acuity levels were also equal. In appropriate cases, if the surgery is carried out with sufficient skill, the reward to risk ratio of implantation not only justifies but indicates the use of such lenses. PMID:271407

  10. Cosmology with weak lensing surveys.

    PubMed

    Munshi, Dipak; Valageas, Patrick

    2005-12-15

    Weak gravitational lensing is responsible for the shearing and magnification of the images of high-redshift sources due to the presence of intervening mass. Since the lensing effects arise from deflections of the light rays due to fluctuations of the gravitational potential, they can be directly related to the underlying density field of the large-scale structures. Weak gravitational surveys are complementary to both galaxy surveys and cosmic microwave background observations as they probe unbiased nonlinear matter power spectra at medium redshift. Ongoing CMBR experiments such as WMAP and a future Planck satellite mission will measure the standard cosmological parameters with unprecedented accuracy. The focus of attention will then shift to understanding the nature of dark matter and vacuum energy: several recent studies suggest that lensing is the best method for constraining the dark energy equation of state. During the next 5 year period, ongoing and future weak lensing surveys such as the Joint Dark Energy Mission (JDEM; e.g. SNAP) or the Large-aperture Synoptic Survey Telescope will play a major role in advancing our understanding of the universe in this direction. In this review article, we describe various aspects of probing the matter power spectrum and the bi-spectrum and other related statistics with weak lensing surveys. This can be used to probe the background dynamics of the universe as well as the nature of dark matter and dark energy.

  11. Cosmology with weak lensing surveys.

    PubMed

    Munshi, Dipak; Valageas, Patrick

    2005-12-15

    Weak gravitational lensing is responsible for the shearing and magnification of the images of high-redshift sources due to the presence of intervening mass. Since the lensing effects arise from deflections of the light rays due to fluctuations of the gravitational potential, they can be directly related to the underlying density field of the large-scale structures. Weak gravitational surveys are complementary to both galaxy surveys and cosmic microwave background observations as they probe unbiased nonlinear matter power spectra at medium redshift. Ongoing CMBR experiments such as WMAP and a future Planck satellite mission will measure the standard cosmological parameters with unprecedented accuracy. The focus of attention will then shift to understanding the nature of dark matter and vacuum energy: several recent studies suggest that lensing is the best method for constraining the dark energy equation of state. During the next 5 year period, ongoing and future weak lensing surveys such as the Joint Dark Energy Mission (JDEM; e.g. SNAP) or the Large-aperture Synoptic Survey Telescope will play a major role in advancing our understanding of the universe in this direction. In this review article, we describe various aspects of probing the matter power spectrum and the bi-spectrum and other related statistics with weak lensing surveys. This can be used to probe the background dynamics of the universe as well as the nature of dark matter and dark energy. PMID:16286284

  12. Two cases of Z syndrome with the Crystalens after uneventful cataract surgery.

    PubMed

    Yuen, Leonard; Trattler, William; Boxer Wachler, Brian S

    2008-11-01

    We report 2 cases of Z syndrome with the Crystalens AT50SE and AT52SE intraocular lenses (Eyeonics, Inc.) after uneventful cataract surgery. Both patients had subsequent neodymium:YAG laser capsulotomy treatment that remedied the complication. To our knowledge, these are the first reported cases of Z syndrome with the Crystalens AT50SE and AT52SE, a unique complication with this type of hinged accommodating intraocular lens. PMID:19006749

  13. Extraction, purification and characterization of the crystallin protein of cataractous eye lens nucleus.

    PubMed

    Sher, Muhammad; Hameed, Ayesha; Noreen, Sobia; Fayyaz-ur-Rehman, Muhammad; Hussain, Muhammad Ajaz; Bukhari, Syed Nasir Abbas

    2015-09-21

    The purpose of this study is to separate and identify the crystallin protein present in the nucleus of a human cataractous eye lens. Cataractous lenses were collected from different eye hospitals from patients of different etiologies with ages between 40 and 80 years. Lens nucleus proteins were extracted into four fractions on the basis of their solubility in different media by applying a reported method. These fractions were buffer-soluble proteins (PS), urea-soluble proteins (PU), yellow fraction proteins (PY) and insoluble proteins (PI). All three soluble fractions were subjected to HPLC and GPC analysis. Both HPLC and GPC analysis showed that each fraction contains α-, β- and γ-crystallins, a major class of protein present in the lenses of vertebrates. Various chromatographic parameters including precision, accuracy and linearity have been evaluated. Studies of water-insoluble crystallins using sodium dodecylsulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) have demonstrated extreme homogeneity with evidence of major components with molecular masses of 18-70 kDa, similar to the crystallin of the water-soluble portion. The method was found to be suitable for the analysis of various isomers of crystallin protein present in human cataractous eye lens nuclei. The detailed results of the GPC are discussed. This study provides the first HPLC and GPC analysis of a human cataractous eye lens nucleus.

  14. Pulfrich's phenomenon in unilateral cataract

    PubMed Central

    Scotcher, S.; Laidlaw, D; Canning, C.; Weal, M.; Harrad, R.

    1997-01-01

    AIMS—To determine whether unilateral cataract causes a pathological Pulfrich's phenomenon.
METHODS—29 subjects with unilateral cataract and contralateral pseudophakia were assessed on their ability to perceive the Pulfrich phenomenon. Using a computer generated pendulum image, and graded neutral density filters, a series of forced choice trials were performed in which the subject was required to describe the direction of any apparent pendulum rotation. A pathological Pulfrich effect was said to occur when apparent rotation was perceived in the presence of a zero strength neutral density filter. The size of any pathological Pulfrich effect which was present was quantified by neutralising the perceived pendulum rotation with neutral density filters of varying strength placed before the better seeing eye.
RESULTS—20 out of 29 subjects were able to perceive apparent pendulum rotation when uniocular filtering was performed. In the group (n=12) which was tested both before and after cataract extraction with intraocular lens implantation, a statistically significant pathological Pulfrich effect was demonstrated preoperatively, compared with a group of normal control subjects. This effect was abolished after cataract extraction (p=0.009). The median size of the effect was equivalent to a 0.25 log unit neutral density filter over the non-cataractous eye. The subjects who were unable to perceive the Pulfrich phenomenon at all had a significantly greater difference in the visual acuity of each eye (p=0.045) and significantly worse stereoacuity than those who were able to perceive the effect (p=0.002).
CONCLUSIONS—Unilateral cataract can cause a pathological Pulfrich phenomenon. This finding may explain why some patients with unilateral cataract complain of visual symptoms that are not easily accounted for in terms of visual acuity, contrast sensitivity, or stereoacuity.

 PMID:9497463

  15. Aldose reductase expression as a risk factor for cataract.

    PubMed

    Snow, Anson; Shieh, Biehuoy; Chang, Kun-Che; Pal, Arttatrana; Lenhart, Patricia; Ammar, David; Ruzycki, Philip; Palla, Suryanarayana; Reddy, G Bhanuprakesh; Petrash, J Mark

    2015-06-01

    Aldose reductase (AR) is thought to play a role in the pathogenesis of diabetic eye diseases, including cataract and retinopathy. However, not all diabetics develop ocular complications. Paradoxically, some diabetics with poor metabolic control appear to be protected against retinopathy, while others with a history of excellent metabolic control develop severe complications. These observations indicate that one or more risk factors may influence the likelihood that an individual with diabetes will develop cataracts and/or retinopathy. We hypothesize that an elevated level of AR gene expression could confer higher risk for development of diabetic eye disease. To investigate this hypothesis, we examined the onset and severity of diabetes-induced cataract in transgenic mice, designated AR-TG, that were either heterozygous or homozygous for the human AR (AKR1B1) transgene construct. AR-TG mice homozygous for the transgene demonstrated a conditional cataract phenotype, whereby they developed lens vacuoles and cataract-associated structural changes only after induction of experimental diabetes; no such changes were observed in AR-TG heterozygotes or nontransgenic mice with or without experimental diabetes induction. We observed that nondiabetic AR-TG mice did not show lens structural changes even though they had lenticular sorbitol levels almost as high as the diabetic AR-TG lenses that showed early signs of cataract. Over-expression of AR led to increases in the ratio of activated to total levels of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2) and c-Jun N-terminal (JNK1/2), which are known to be involved in cell growth and apoptosis, respectively. After diabetes induction, AR-TG but not WT controls had decreased levels of phosphorylated as well as total ERK1/2 and JNK1/2 compared to their nondiabetic counterparts. These results indicate that high AR expression in the context of hyperglycemia and insulin deficiency may constitute a risk factor that could predispose the

  16. Aldose reductase expression as a risk factor for cataract.

    PubMed

    Snow, Anson; Shieh, Biehuoy; Chang, Kun-Che; Pal, Arttatrana; Lenhart, Patricia; Ammar, David; Ruzycki, Philip; Palla, Suryanarayana; Reddy, G Bhanuprakesh; Petrash, J Mark

    2015-06-01

    Aldose reductase (AR) is thought to play a role in the pathogenesis of diabetic eye diseases, including cataract and retinopathy. However, not all diabetics develop ocular complications. Paradoxically, some diabetics with poor metabolic control appear to be protected against retinopathy, while others with a history of excellent metabolic control develop severe complications. These observations indicate that one or more risk factors may influence the likelihood that an individual with diabetes will develop cataracts and/or retinopathy. We hypothesize that an elevated level of AR gene expression could confer higher risk for development of diabetic eye disease. To investigate this hypothesis, we examined the onset and severity of diabetes-induced cataract in transgenic mice, designated AR-TG, that were either heterozygous or homozygous for the human AR (AKR1B1) transgene construct. AR-TG mice homozygous for the transgene demonstrated a conditional cataract phenotype, whereby they developed lens vacuoles and cataract-associated structural changes only after induction of experimental diabetes; no such changes were observed in AR-TG heterozygotes or nontransgenic mice with or without experimental diabetes induction. We observed that nondiabetic AR-TG mice did not show lens structural changes even though they had lenticular sorbitol levels almost as high as the diabetic AR-TG lenses that showed early signs of cataract. Over-expression of AR led to increases in the ratio of activated to total levels of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2) and c-Jun N-terminal (JNK1/2), which are known to be involved in cell growth and apoptosis, respectively. After diabetes induction, AR-TG but not WT controls had decreased levels of phosphorylated as well as total ERK1/2 and JNK1/2 compared to their nondiabetic counterparts. These results indicate that high AR expression in the context of hyperglycemia and insulin deficiency may constitute a risk factor that could predispose the

  17. Aldose reductase expression as a risk factor for cataract

    PubMed Central

    Snow, Anson; Shieh, Biehuoy; Chang, Kun-Che; Pal, Arttatrana; Lenhart, Patricia; Ammar, David; Ruzycki, Philip; Palla, Suryanarayana; Reddy, G. Bhanuprakesh; Petrash, J. Mark

    2015-01-01

    Aldose reductase (AR) is thought to play a role in the pathogenesis of diabetic eye diseases, including cataract and retinopathy. However, not all diabetics develop ocular complications. Paradoxically, some diabetics with poor metabolic control appear to be protected against retinopathy, while others with a history of excellent metabolic control develop severe complications. These observations indicate that one or more risk factors may influence the likelihood that an individual with diabetes will develop cataracts and/or retinopathy. We hypothesize that an elevated level of AR gene expression could confer higher risk for development of diabetic eye disease. To investigate this hypothesis, we examined the onset and severity of diabetes-induced cataract in transgenic mice, designated AR-TG, that were either heterozygous or homozygous for the human AR (AKR1B1) transgene construct. AR-TG mice homozygous for the transgene demonstrated a conditional cataract phenotype, whereby they developed lens vacuoles and cataract-associated structural changes only after induction of experimental diabetes; no such changes were observed in AR-TG heterozygotes or nontransgenic mice with or without experimental diabetes induction. We observed that nondiabetic AR-TG mice did not show lens structural changes even though they had lenticular sorbitol levels almost as high as the diabetic AR-TG lenses that showed early signs of cataract. Over-expression of AR led to increases in the ratio of activated to total levels of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2) and c-Jun N-terminal (JNK1/2), which are known to be involved in cell growth and apoptosis respectively. After diabetes induction, AR-TG but not WT controls had decreased levels of phosphorylated as well as total ERK1/2 and JNK1/2 compared to their nondiabetic counterparts. These results indicate that high AR expression in the context of hyperglycemia and insulin deficiency may constitute a risk factor that could predispose the

  18. Cataract Surgery in the Glaucoma Patient

    PubMed Central

    Kung, Jennifer S.; Choi, Daniel Y.; Cheema, Anjum S.; Singh, Kuldev

    2015-01-01

    To summarize the role of cataract surgery in the glaucoma patient, in terms of the effect on intraocular pressure (IOP) as well as diagnostic and therapeutic considerations for those with both conditions. Recent evidence suggests that cataract extraction may produce a significant and sustained IOP reduction in individuals with open-angle glaucoma, ocular hypertension, and angle-closure glaucoma. Cataract removal may improve the practitioner's ability to interpret perimetric testing, and re-establishing perimetric and optic nerve imaging baselines is recommended after cataract surgery. The sequence of cataract surgery relative to glaucoma surgery impacts the likelihood of complications and surgical success. There are multiple benefits to perform cataract surgery prior to glaucoma surgery while cataract surgery after trabeculectomy increases the risk of subsequent filtration failure. As “minimally invasive glaucoma surgeries” continue to improve in terms of efficacy, there is an evolving role for combined cataract and glaucoma surgery in patients with early to moderate stages of glaucoma. PMID:25624668

  19. [Keratoplasty combined with cataract surgery].

    PubMed

    Muraine, M; Gueudry, J; Retout, A; Genevois, O

    2012-09-01

    Corneal pathologies leading to keratoplasty are often associated with cataract and combined surgery is therefore mandatory. Triple procedure with penetrating keratoplasty and concurrent cataract extraction followed by intra ocular lens (IOL) implantation is usually the preferential choice because visual rehabilitation is theoretically more rapid. Surgeons have to be aware of surgical conditions during open-sky surgery because vitreous pressure is not counterbalanced by anterior chamber pressure. Today, many surgeons prefer non-simultaneous procedures with cataract surgery performed months after grafting because of the improvement in spherical refractive error. More recently, new triple procedures, Descemet's stripping automated keratoplasty and concurrent cataract surgery have gained popularity, especially in patients with Fuchs dystrophy associated with cataract. Surgery starts with phacoemulsification, followed by endothelium exchange through a 3 to 5 mm incision. Advantages against classic triple procedure are quick visual rehabilitation, fewer induced refractive errors, minimal postoperative discomfort and corneal integrity. Surgeons have to consider an eventual postoperative hyperopic shift secondary to corneal lenticule shape when choosing adequate intraocular lens. PMID:22921023

  20. [Keratoplasty combined with cataract surgery].

    PubMed

    Muraine, M; Gueudry, J; Retout, A; Genevois, O

    2012-09-01

    Corneal pathologies leading to keratoplasty are often associated with cataract and combined surgery is therefore mandatory. Triple procedure with penetrating keratoplasty and concurrent cataract extraction followed by intra ocular lens (IOL) implantation is usually the preferential choice because visual rehabilitation is theoretically more rapid. Surgeons have to be aware of surgical conditions during open-sky surgery because vitreous pressure is not counterbalanced by anterior chamber pressure. Today, many surgeons prefer non-simultaneous procedures with cataract surgery performed months after grafting because of the improvement in spherical refractive error. More recently, new triple procedures, Descemet's stripping automated keratoplasty and concurrent cataract surgery have gained popularity, especially in patients with Fuchs dystrophy associated with cataract. Surgery starts with phacoemulsification, followed by endothelium exchange through a 3 to 5 mm incision. Advantages against classic triple procedure are quick visual rehabilitation, fewer induced refractive errors, minimal postoperative discomfort and corneal integrity. Surgeons have to consider an eventual postoperative hyperopic shift secondary to corneal lenticule shape when choosing adequate intraocular lens.

  1. Falls and postural control in older adults with cataracts

    PubMed Central

    Nodehi Moghadam, Afsun; Goudarzian, Maryam; Azadi, Farhad; Hosseini, Seide Masume; Mosallanezhad, Zahra; Karimi, Nouraddin; Larne, Yassin; Habibi, Maryam; Yaghmaei, Poorya

    2015-01-01

    Background: There is increasing evidence that visual impairment contribute to falling. The aim of this study was to determine the influence of vision impairment of old adult patients with cataract on the occurrence of falls and postural control. Methods: According to the results of screening ophthalmic examination, 48 cataract patients (mean±SD aged 68.5 ± 6.08 yrs.) and 50 individuals without any obvious eye disorders (mean age ± SD 70.7 ± 5.97 yrs.) were enrolled in this study. The postural control was determined using the clinical test of Sensory Interaction and Balance (CTSIB) and Timed up and Go (TUG) test. Results: The results of this study revealed that 18% (n = 9) of the normal individuals and 22.9% (n =11) of the cataract patients had at least two falls in the past 12 months. However, the result of chisquare test did not show any differences between the two groups (p= 0.36). The mean ± SD TUG times in cataract and control groups in our study were15.17 ± 3.58 and13.77 ± 4.90, respectively. However, no significant differences were found between the two groups (p= 0.12).The results of CTSIB test showed no significant differences between the two groups on standing on the floor with eyes open and eyes closed (p= 0.61, p= 0.89) and on standing on the foam with eyes open and eyes closed (p= 0.32, p= 0.74 ). Conclusion: According to the results of CTSIB and TUG tests, vision impairment of old adult patients with cataract is not associated with falls and balance disorders. Further work including assessment of postural control with advanced devices and considering other falls risk factors are also required to identify predictors of falls in cataract patients. PMID:26913274

  2. Update and clinical utility of the LenSx femtosecond laser in cataract surgery

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Timothy V; Lawless, Michael; Sutton, Gerard; Hodge, Chris

    2016-01-01

    The introduction of femtosecond lasers to cataract surgery has been the major disruptive technology introduced into ophthalmic surgery in the last decade. Femtosecond laser cataract surgery (FLACS) integrates high-resolution anterior segment imaging with a femtosecond laser allowing key steps of cataract surgery to be performed with computer-guided laser accuracy, precision, and reproducibility. Since the introduction of FLACS, there have been significant advances in laser software and hardware as well as surgeon experience, with over 250 articles published in the peer-reviewed literature. This review examines the published evidence relating to the LenSx platform and discusses surgical techniques, indications, safety, and clinical results. PMID:27799728

  3. Early detection of cataract and response to pantethine therapy with non-invasive static and dynamic light scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansari, Rafat R.; King, James F.; Seeberger, Teri; Clark, John I.

    2003-07-01

    Cataractogenesis is a risk factor for space travelers. Here on earth, half of all blindness is due to cataracts. At this time, the only known treatment is surgical removal of the lens. In this paper, we present static and dynamic light scattering (DLS) measurements of early onset of cataract before it has any effect on vision and to test the effectiveness of pantethine as an anticataract agent in reversing cataracts. In this preliminary study, experiments were conducted on 12 rodents. Static measurements were performed by scanning the animal eye (cornea to retina) at a laser power of 80 microwatts to collect photons or scattered intensity in steps of 10 microns. The rodents studied were control, selenite injected, and selenite plus pantethine injected. Selenite was used to induce cataracts. Static and dynamic changes (increase in light scatter and crystalline size) in the lenses are quantitatively measured as early as 1 day post selenite injections. Scattering intensity and DLS measurements from lenses of animals administered pantethine resembled controls. These subtle molecular changes are not noticeable when the animals are examined with conventional ophthalmic instruments because their lenses remain transparent. Acknowledgements: Technical support from C.Ganders, University of Washington, Seattle, NEI research grant EY04542 (JIC) and support under a NASA-NEI/NIH interagency agreement (RRA) are greatly appreciated. JFK works for QSS Inc. at NASA GRC.

  4. Inhibitory Effect of Crocin(s) on Lens α-Crystallin Glycation and Aggregation, Results in the Decrease of the Risk of Diabetic Cataract.

    PubMed

    Bahmani, Fereshteh; Bathaie, Seyedeh Zahra; Aldavood, Seyed Javid; Ghahghaei, Arezou

    2016-01-01

    The current study investigates the inhibitory effect of crocin(s), also known as saffron apocarotenoids, on protein glycation and aggregation in diabetic rats, and α-crystallin glycation. Thus, crocin(s) were administered by intraperitoneal injection to normal and streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. The cataract progression was recorded regularly every two weeks and was classified into four stages. After eight weeks, the animals were sacrificed and the parameters involved in the cataract formation were measured in the animal lenses. Some parameters were also determined in the serum and blood of the rats. In addition, the effect of crocin(s) on the structure and chaperone activity of α-crystallin in the presence of glucose was studied by different methods. Crocin(s) lowered serum glucose levels of diabetic rats and effectively maintained plasma total antioxidants, glutathione levels and catalase activity in the lens of the animals. In the in vitro study, crocin(s) inhibited α-crystallin glycation and aggregation. Advanced glycation end products fluorescence, hydrophobicity and protein cross-links were also decreased in the presence of crocin(s). In addition, the decreased chaperone activity of α-crystallin in the presence of glucose changed and became close to the native value by the addition of crocin(s) in the medium. Crocin(s) thus showed a powerful inhibitory effect on α-crystallin glycation and preserved the structure-function of this protein. Crocin(s) also showed the beneficial effects on prevention of diabetic cataract. PMID:26821002

  5. Complex Cases in Pediatric Cataract.

    PubMed

    Patil-Chhablani, Preeti; Kekunnaya, Ramesh; Nischal, Kanwall Ken

    2016-01-01

    This chapter describes the techniques and pitfalls that the reader may come across when dealing with complex pediatric cataract cases. Each eye in these circumstances is unique, and the examples and general advice shared are intended to help the reader develop a plan for surgery and a road map to avoid potential problems. As in all types of surgery, careful planning is essential. The old saying 'Fail to prepare, then you prepare to fail' is no more true than when dealing with children who have complex cataract. In this chapter, the following circumstances where pediatric cataract may be seen are discussed: retinoblastoma, retinopathy of prematurity, lenticonus, congenital rubella syndrome, trauma, microcornea, pediatric uveitis, Hallermann-Streiff syndrome, Stickler syndrome, Lowe syndrome, subluxated lens, and after previous intraocular surgery (glaucoma, keratoplasty).

  6. Gradient Refractive Index Lenses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morton, N.

    1984-01-01

    Describes the nature of gradient refractive index (GRIN) lenses, focusing on refraction in these materials, focal length of a thin Wood lens, and on manufacturing of such lenses. Indicates that GRIN lenses of small cross section are in limited production with applications suggested for optical communication and photocopying fields. (JN)

  7. Thermal cataract formation in rabbits

    SciTech Connect

    Kramar, P.; Harris, C.; Guy, A.W.

    1987-01-01

    Intraocularly circulating hot water was used to produce cataracts in nine eyes of seven rabbits by maintaining their retrolental temperatures between 43 degrees C and 45 degrees C. A rapid rate of heating (1.3 degrees C/min) plus a sharp temperature gradient across the eye may have been contributing factors in the consistent production of cataracts at these temperatures. Biomicroscopy and light microscopy showed lens changes similar to those associated with acute exposure to microwave radiation. These findings support the assumption that microwave cataractogenesis is due to the local production of elevated temperatures.

  8. Abnormal fiber end migration in Royal College of Surgeons rats during posterior subcapsular cataract formation

    PubMed Central

    Joy, Anita; Al-Ghoul, Kristin J.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Prior structural studies of posterior subcapsular cataract (PSC) development in Royal College of Surgeons (RCS) rats suggest that migration of basal fiber ends was disrupted, ultimately resulting in a PSC. Therefore the goal of this study was to assess the overall migration patterns as well as changes to the structure and cytoskeleton of basal fiber ends during PSC development. Methods Lenses from 48 RCS dystrophic rats (RCS/Lav) and 24 genetically matched control animals (RCS-rdy+/Lav) from 2 to 8 weeks old were examined. Equatorial diameters were measured and suture patterns were photographed immediately following enucleation/dissection. Right eye lenses were fixed and processed to visualize the actin cytoskeleton via laser scanning confocal microcopy (LSCM), left eye lenses were decapsulated, fixed and processed for scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Scaled 3D-computer assisted drawings (CADs) and animations were constructed from the data to depict the changes in suture patterns and fiber end architecture. Results At 2 weeks, dystrophic lenses displayed an inverted Y suture on the posterior, and by 3 weeks most lenses had at least one sub-branch. Additional sub-branches were observed with time, opacities being visible as early as 4 weeks and progressing into PSC plaques by 6 weeks. Control lenses displayed inverted Y sutures at all ages and were transparent. SEM of dystrophic lenses revealed fiber ends with normal size, shape, arrangement, and filopodia at 2 weeks; scattered areas of dome-shaped fiber ends and small filopodia were present at 3 weeks. At 4 weeks the irregularly arranged domed fiber ends had extremely long filopodia with ‘boutons’ at their tips. By 6 weeks all fiber ends within plaques displayed rounded or domed basal membranes and lacked filopodial extensions. Control lenses at all time points had comparable ultrastructure to the 2 week old dystrophic lenses. F-actin arrangement within the basal membrane complex (BMC) of control

  9. Influence of Corticosteroids and Vitamin E Deficiency on Onset and Cytopathology of Radiation-Induced Cataract

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Junk, A. K.; Worgul, B. V.

    Cataracts characteristic of those arising from radiation exposure have been reported among the astronaut and cosmonaut corps. This being the case it is critical to appreciate how radiogenic cataracts relate to those arising from other exogenous causes such as therapeutics, which may, one day, have to be administered on an extended mission. Because they produce precisely the same clinical picture, corticosteroids are examples of a class of drugs that potentially can exacerbate damage to the lens from radiation. On the other hand, Vitamin E, a free radical scavenger, has been shown to ameliorate oxidative damage as caused by ionizing radiation and evidence is accumulating that it may constitute protection from radiogenic damage. An experimental study was conducted to understand if corticosteroids with and in the absence of Vitamin E deficiency modulate the onset of cataract induced by ionizing radiation. The right eyes of 72 28-day-old Brown-Norway rats were irradiated with 6 Gy of 240 kV X-rays, the shielded left eyes served as controls. Half of the animals were maintained on a Vitamin E free diet after irradiation, the others were kept on regular chow. In each nutritional group 18 rats additionally received dexamethasone. The initial daily dose of 10 mg/kg body weight injected subcutaneously was reduced to 0.5 mg/kg over the course of 6 months. Cataract onset and development were followed by weekly slit-lamp exam. After 6 month the lenses were harvested for microscopic analyses. Irradiated eyes in all treatment subgroups showed early cataract onset [5 wks versus 11 wks in controls (p<0.0001)]. Corticosteroids accounted for accelerated cataract development in both irradiated (p<0.0005) and non-irradiated eyes (p<0.0001) relative to respective control eyes. Vitamin E deficiency did not affect cataract incidence in combination with radiation or steroids alone. Unexpectedly, when compared to irradiated controls, cataract development was inhibited in the group that

  10. Influence of corticosteroids and vitamin E deficiency on onset of radiation-induced cataract

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Junk, A. K.; Worgul, B. W.

    Cataracts characteristic of those arising from radiation exposure have been reported among the astronaut and cosmonaut corps. This being the case it is critical to appreciate how radiogenic cataracts relate to those arising from other exogenous causes such as therapeutics, which may, one day, have to be administered on an extended mission. Because they produce precisely the same clinical picture, corticosteroids are examples of a class of drugs that potentially can exacerbate damage to the lens from radiation. On the other hand, Vitamin E, a free radical scavenger, has been shown to ameliorate oxidative damage as caused by ionizing radiation and evidence is accumulating that it may constitute protection from radiogenic damage. An experimental study was conducted to understand if corticosteroids with, and in the absence of Vitamin E deficiency modulate the onset of cataract induced by ionizing radiation. The right eyes of seventy-two 28-day-old Brown-Norway rats were irradiated with 6 Gy of 240 kV X-rays, the shielded left eyes served as controls. Half of the animals were maintained on a Vitamin E free diet after irradiation, the others were kept on standard chow. Fifty per cent of the animals in each nutritional group received dexamethasone. The initial daily dose of 10 mg/kg body weight injected subcutaneously was reduced to 0.5 mg/kg over the course of six months. Cataract onset and development were followed by weekly slit-lamp exam. After six month the lenses were harvested for microscopic analyses. Irradiated eyes in all treatment subgroups showed early cataract onset [5 wks vs. 11 wks in controls ( p < 0.0001)]. Corticosteroids accounted for accelerated cataract development in both irradiated ( p < 0.0005) and non-irradiated eyes ( p < 0.0001) relative to respective control eyes. Vitamin E deficiency did not affect cataract incidence in combination with radiation or steroids alone. Unexpectedly, when compared to irradiated controls, cataract development was

  11. Lenses for JWST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebeling, Harald; Richard, Johan; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Repp, Andrew; Atek, Hakim; Egami, Eiichi; Windhorst, Rogier; Edge, Alastair

    2016-08-01

    JWST will dramatically advance our knowledge and understanding of the first generations of galaxies at z>10, their role in the re-ionization of the Universe, and the evolutionary processes that gave rise to the complexity and diversity of galaxies at the current epoch. As demonstrated by HST legacy projects like CLASH and the Hubble Frontier Fields, gravitational amplification by massive galaxy clusters can significantly extend the depth of the required observations. However, for JWST, reducing any diffuse background light will be just as crucial. We here propose Spitzer/IRAC observations of six massive cluster lenses, specifically selected as candidates for observation with JWST. By (a) quantifying the amount of intra-cluster light and (b) enabling us to improve our current lens models, the data resulting from the requested observations will be instrumental for the final selection of cluster targets that maximize the scientific returns of deep JWST observations.

  12. Cataracts and microphthalmia caused by a Gja8 mutation in extracellular loop 2.

    PubMed

    Xia, Chun-Hong; Chang, Bo; Derosa, Adam M; Cheng, Catherine; White, Thomas W; Gong, Xiaohua

    2012-01-01

    The mouse semi-dominant Nm2249 mutation displays variable cataracts in heterozygous mice and smaller lenses with severe cataracts in homozygous mice. This mutation is caused by a Gja8(R205G) point mutation in the second extracellular loop of the Cx50 (or α8 connexin) protein. Immunohistological data reveal that Cx50-R205G mutant proteins and endogenous wild-type Cx46 (or α3 connexin) proteins form diffuse tiny spots rather than typical punctate signals of normal gap junctions in the lens. The level of phosphorylated Cx46 proteins is decreased in Gja8(R205G/R205G) mutant lenses. Genetic analysis reveals that the Cx50-R205G mutation needs the presence of wild-type Cx46 to disrupt lens peripheral fibers and epithelial cells. Electrophysiological data in Xenopus oocytes reveal that Cx50-R205G mutant proteins block channel function of gap junctions composed of wild-type Cx50, but only affect the gating of wild-type Cx46 channels. Both genetic and electrophysiological results suggest that Cx50-R205G mutant proteins alone are unable to form functional channels. These findings imply that the Gja8(R205G) mutation differentially impairs the functions of Cx50 and Cx46 to cause cataracts, small lenses and microphthalmia. The Gja8(R205G) mutation occurs at the same conserved residue as the human GJA8(R198W) mutation. This work provides molecular insights to understand the cataract and microphthalmia/microcornea phenotype caused by Gja8 mutations in mice and humans.

  13. EDITORIAL: Focus on Gravitational Lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Bhuvnesh

    2007-11-01

    Gravitational lensing emerged as an observational field following the 1979 discovery of a doubly imaged quasar lensed by a foreground galaxy. In the 1980s and '90s dozens of other multiply imaged systems were observed, as well as time delay measurements, weak and strong lensing by galaxies and galaxy clusters, and the discovery of microlensing in our galaxy. The rapid pace of advances has continued into the new century. Lensing is currently one of best techniques for finding and mapping dark matter over a wide range of scales, and also addresses broader cosmological questions such as understanding the nature of dark energy. This focus issue of New Journal of Physics presents a snapshot of current research in some of the exciting areas of lensing. It provides an occasion to look back at the advances of the last decade and ahead to the potential of the coming years. Just about a decade ago, microlensing was discovered through the magnification of stars in our galaxy by invisible objects with masses between that of Jupiter and a tenth the mass of the Sun. Thus a new component of the mass of our galaxy, dubbed MACHOs, was established (though a diffuse, cold dark matter-like component is still needed to make up most of the galaxy mass). More recently, microlensing led to another exciting discovery—of extra-solar planets with masses ranging from about five times that of Earth to that of Neptune. We can expect many more planets to be discovered through ongoing surveys. Microlensing is the best technique for finding Earth mass planets, though it is not as productive overall as other methods and does not allow for follow up observations. Beyond planet hunting, microlensing has enabled us to observe previously inaccessible systems, ranging from the surfaces of other stars to the accretion disks around the black holes powering distant quasars. Galaxies and galaxy clusters at cosmological distances can produce dramatic lensing effects: multiple images of background galaxies

  14. Hydrogen saline prevents selenite-induced cataract in rats

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chun-xiao; Ding, Tian-bing

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to investigate the potential antioxidative effect and mechanism for the protective effects of hydrogen saline on selenite-induced cataract in rats. Methods Sprague-Dawley rat pups were divided into the following groups: control (Group A), selenite induced (Group B), and selenite plus hydrogen saline treated (Group C). Rat pups in Groups B and C received a single subcutaneous injection of sodium selenite (25 μmol/kg bodyweight) on postnatal day 12. Group C also received an intraperitoneal injection of H2 saline (5 ml/kg bodyweight) daily from postnatal day 8 to postnatal day 17. The development of cataract was assessed weekly by slit-lamp examination for 2 weeks. After sacrifice, extricated lenses were analyzed for activities of superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase, and glutathione S-transferase, levels of malondialdehyde, reduced glutathione (GSH), and total sulfhydryl contents. Results The magnitude of lens opacification in Group B was significantly higher than in Group A (p<0.05), while Group C had less opacification than Group B (p<0.05). Compared with Group B, the mean activities of the antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase, and glutathione S-transferase, levels of GSH, and total sulfhydryl contents were higher, whereas the level of malondialdehyde was lower following treatment with hydrogen saline(p<0.05). Conclusions This is an initial report showing that hydrogen saline can prevent selenite-induced cataract in rats. It acts via maintaining antioxidant enzymes and GSH, protecting the sulfhydryl group, and inhibiting lipid peroxidation. PMID:23922487

  15. A Fiber Optic Probe for the Detection of Cataracts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansari, Rafat R.; Dhadwal, Harbans S.

    1993-01-01

    A compact fiber optic probe developed for on-orbit science experiments was used to detect the onset of cataracts, a capability that could eliminate physicians' guesswork and result in new drugs to 'dissolve' or slow down the cataract formation before surgery is necessary. The probe is based upon dynamic light scattering (DLS) principles. It has no moving parts, no apertures, and requires no optical alignment. It is flexible and easy to use. Results are presented for excised but intact human eye lenses. In a clinical setting, the device can be easily incorporated into a slit-lamp apparatus (ophthalmoscope) for complete eye diagnostics. In this set-up, the integrated fiber optic probe, the size of a pencil, delivers a low power cone of laser light into the eye of a patient and guides the light which is backscattered by the protein molecules of the lens through a receiving optical fiber to a photo detector. The non-invasive DLS measurements provide rapid determination of protein crystalline size and its size distribution in the eye lens.

  16. Modern cataract surgery: unfinished business and unanswered questions.

    PubMed

    Apple, David J; Escobar-Gomez, Marcela; Zaugg, Brian; Kleinmann, Guy; Borkenstein, Andreas F

    2011-01-01

    We summarize information, based on clinicopathologic studies over the past decade, on various cataract intraocular lens (IOL) procedures and modern "specialized" IOLs, that will help surgeons continuously improve long-term results for cataract patients. Although most operations do initially provide excellent refractive correction and visual rehabilitation, late complications occur. These sometimes are missed because they are outside of the routine period of follow-up care. We have tried to determine if the various techniques and IOLs truly deliver the long-term results that we desire. Most safety and efficacy information is derived from the manufacturer and is passed through the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). This is often based on limited, relatively short-term observations made by the manufacturer. After a lens receives FDA approval, there are few means to assess the outcome of each procedure and lens years later. We rarely hear of a 10- or 20-year follow-up study. We have found that one of the best means to assess long-term results is pathologic analyses. We discuss recently studied aspects of pathologic reactions, such as posterior capsule opacification, intracapsular fibrosis, glistenings, intralenticular opacification, and other issues with the various IOL platforms; we then present a clinicopathological overview of tissues and IOLs from our database. These include hydrophobic and hydrophilic acrylic designs, plate lenses, and a dual optic lens.

  17. Characterization of Cat-2t, a radiation-induced dominant cataract mutation in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Graw, J.; Bors, W.; Gopinath, P.M.; Merkle, S.; Michel, C.; Reitmeir, P.; Schaeffer, E.S.; Summer, K.H.; Wulff, A. )

    1990-07-01

    A dominant cataract mutation was detected recently among the offspring of x-ray-irradiated male mice. The mutation, which causes total lens opacity, has provisionally been designated by the gene symbol Cat-2t. In the lenses of heterozygous and homozygous Cat-2t mutants, the epithelial and fiber cells were swollen and the lens capsule was ruptured. The histologic analysis demonstrated a complete destruction of the cellular organization of the lens, which might be caused by its altered developmental processes. The data derived from biochemical investigations indicate that biochemistry of the cataractous Cat-2t lenses is affected: the osmotic state as indicated by the increased water content and increased Na(+)-K(+)-adenosinetriphosphatase (ATPase) activity; the energy state as indicated by the decreased adenosine triphosphate (ATP) concentration; and the redox state as indicated by the enhanced content of oxidized glutathione. Additionally, the lenticular protein composition is altered because of the presence of vimentin in the water-soluble fraction. This cannot be explained by the enhanced crosslinking activity of transglutaminase. The changes of the osmotic, energy, and redox states are considered to be secondary in relation to the altered lenticular development. In contrast, the variations concerning vimentin and transglutaminase might be a biochemical indication of the changed development. Possible similarities to other dominantly expressed murine cataract mutants are discussed.

  18. Lens and cataract: clastogenic responses in epithelial cells of the organ-cultured rat lens

    SciTech Connect

    Geard, C.R.; Worgul, B.V.

    1987-01-01

    The epithelial cells of the vertebrate lens have an unique character and a probable involvement in cataract formation, which could be initiated by exogenous stimuli. Individual rat lenses were organ-cultured, and the effects of mitomycin C and gamma rays on sister chromatid exchanges (SCE), chromosomal aberrations, and cellular kinetics assessed in cells from the epithelial monolayer. SCE showed about a 5.5-fold increase over the mitomycin C dose range (0, 17, 83, 170 nM), while chromosomal aberrations increased 38-fold. In cells from untreated lenses, SCE were 1600 times more frequent than aberrations and at a level consistent with in vivo assessments in other cell types. Gamma rays (up to 4 Gy) had a greater inhibiting effect on cellular progression, while 17 nM mitomycin C and 1 Gy induced similar clastogenic responses. This first demonstration of such changes in lens epithelial cells expands on the cell types available for monitoring potential mutagen-carcinogens. Additionally chromosomal changes resulting from lens cellular challenge could be the basis of later cytopathological changes in the lens, of which cataract is the primary concern to humans. Potential cataractogens warrant monitoring, and the study outlined may aid in this endeavor, as well as contributing to an understanding of cataract etiology.

  19. The Morgagnian and Brunescens cataract morphology studied with with SEM and TEM.

    PubMed

    Jongebloed, W L; Kalicharan, D; Los, L I; Worst, J G

    1993-01-01

    The Morgagnian cataract lenses--pre-fixed with GA for SEM & TEM and post-fixed with tannic-acid-arginine-OsO4 for SEM and OsO4/K4Fe(CN)6 for TEM after staining with Ur-acetate/Pb-citrate--showed areas in the cortex with radial instead of concentric running lens fibres, degeneration of lens fibres with vacuoles and defected "ball & socket" connections. The presence of oval/spherical bodies of 0.5-20 microns was acknowledged, the largest of them having a golf-ball appearance and originating from the cytoplasm of the degenerating lens fibres; the smallest of them with an approximate size of 0.2-0.5 micron seemed to be formed by budding off from the microvilli of the furrowed lens epithelium. The Brunescens cataract lenses showed at low magnification no difference between lens fibres from the cortical area and the nucleus. The disintegration process of the lens fibres was observable as degradation of the ball & socket system and the existence of holes in the lens fibre body and emerging of spherical bodies from the cytoplasm. The globular structures seemed to be covered with a thin coating and were partly filled with a low density membranous-like material. In TEM-sections of the cataractous lens aterial vacuoles were visible consisting of a large number of smaller globules with a contents of low contrast low density membranous-like material, comparable with the globular structures seen in SEM.

  20. Mechanical properties of intra-ocular lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehrmann, Klaus; Kim, Eon; Parel, Jean-Marie

    2008-02-01

    Cataract surgery usually involves the replacement of the natural crystalline lens with a rigid or foldable intraocular lens to restore clear vision for the patient. While great efforts have been placed on optimising the shape and optical characteristics of IOLs, little is know about the mechanical properties of these devices and how they interact with the capsular bag once implanted. Mechanical properties measurements were performed on 8 of the most commonly implanted IOLs using a custom build micro tensometer. Measurement data will be presented for the stiffness of the haptic elements, the buckling resistance of foldable IOLs, the dynamic behaviour of the different lens materials and the axial compressibility. The biggest difference between the lens types was found between one-piece and 3-piece lenses with respect to the flexibility of the haptic elements

  1. Cataracts in systemic diseases and syndromes.

    PubMed

    Bariciak, M D; Nichols, B D

    1995-02-01

    A comprehensive review of the ophthalmic literature on cataracts during the past year is presented. Topics covered include new epidemiologic associations, diabetic cataracts, and syndromes involving cataracts. Data from the Beaver Dam Eye Study suggest the presence of a recessive gene for nuclear sclerosis. Estrogen exposure may decrease the risk of nuclear sclerosis. The effects of amiodarone, propranolol, and lovastatin on the lens are discussed. Electron microscopy studies have furthered our understanding of diabetic cataracts and the rare Christmas tree cataract. Two new studies support the adverse effect of extracapsular cataract extraction on diabetic retinopathy. New associations between neurofibromatosis 2 and the lens will aid in the diagnosis of this condition. Other ocular and systemic syndromes are discussed.

  2. DETAIL OF NORTHEAST CUT STONE ABUTMENT FROM SOUTHWEST. Cataract ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL OF NORTHEAST CUT STONE ABUTMENT FROM SOUTHWEST. - Cataract Falls Bridge, Spanning Mill Creek, bypassed section of CR 279 (Cataract Falls Unit of Leiber State Recreation Area), Cataract, Owen County, IN

  3. [Anophthalmia and congenital cataract: case report].

    PubMed

    Santana, Alessandro; Koller, Karine; Waiswol, Mauro

    2005-01-01

    The authors report a case of anophthalmia, congenital cataract and systemic malformations. Male patient, 6 months old, left anophthalmia and congenital posterior polar cataract in the right eye. The patient was treated with manual aspiration of the crystalline lens, with no intraocular lens implantation with primary posterior capsulorhexis and anterior vitrectomy through a small incision. The association of anophthalmia and congenital cataract is rare. The early diagnosis and management in these cases is very important for the best visual rehabilitation.

  4. Vitrectomy as a Risk Factor for Complicated Cataract Surgery.

    PubMed

    Fenberg, Moss J; Hainsworth, Kenneth J; Rieger, Frank G; Hainsworth, Dean P

    2016-01-01

    A retrospective review of 98 cases of complicated cataract surgery and/or delayed intraocular lens (IOL) dislocation examined the relationship between vitrectomy and cataract surgery complications. Nine (9.2%) of the 98 patients had a history of vitrectomy, before or after cataract surgery, and each had complicated cataract surgery. Six patients who underwent vitrectomy before cataract surgery experienced intraoperative complications. Three patients in whom vitrectomy was performed after uneventful cataract surgery subsequently had delayed IOL dislocation.

  5. Contact Lenses for Vision Correction

    MedlinePlus

    ... Contact Lenses Colored Contact Lenses Contact Lenses for Vision Correction Written by: Kierstan Boyd Reviewed by: Brenda ... on the surface of the eye. They correct vision like eyeglasses do and are safe when used ...

  6. Patient satisfaction with cataract surgery

    PubMed Central

    Wasfi, Ehab I; Pai, P; Abd-Elsayed, Alaa A

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Measuring the patient satisfaction is a very important issue that will help very much in improving the service provided to patients and improve the level of satisfaction. Aim To evaluate patient satisfaction with the cataract surgery service and identify any areas for improvement, determination of patient satisfaction with referral, out-patient consultation, pre-assessment clinic, surgery and post-operative care, also to report patients' comments relating to improvement in service provision. Methodology A retrospective study was undertaken for 150 patients underwent cataract surgery at Barrow General Hospital, UK, the survey sample was by postal questionnaires. We collected our data from the theatre lists for a period of 4 month. Results This study included 150 patients; the response rate was (72%) 108 patients, Most patients were referred from their general practitioner 86.1%, 93 (86.1%) patients were happy with the time interval from seeing their GP to eye clinic. In the eye out patient department many factors significantly affected the level of patient satisfaction, in general the more information provided for the patient the more the satisfaction. Conclusion Patient satisfaction is on important health outcome old understanding both the domains of satisfaction as well as their relative importance to patients is necessary to improve the overall quality of patient care. Meeting the doctor, presenting all relevant information and giving printed information are very important factors in improving the patient's satisfaction with cataract surgery. PMID:18950523

  7. Effects of ELL-associated factor 2 on ultraviolet radiation-induced cataract formation in mice.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yanhua; Fu, Rongrong; Zhao, Jiangyue; Wu, Di; Qiao, Guang; Li, Ruoxi; Zhang, Jinsong

    2015-11-01

    ELL-associated factor 2 (Eaf2) has an important role in crystalline lens development and maturation; however, its role in ultraviolet radiation (UV)-induced cataract formation has remained elusive. The present study compared UV-induced cell apoptosis, activation of caspase-3 and caspase-9 and changes in protein expression levels of B-cell lymphoma 2 (bcl-2), bcl-2-associated X protein (bax) and phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase in wild-type and Eaf2-knockout mice. The results showed that Eaf2 knockout can reduce UV-induced apoptosis in crystalline lenses and mitigate the formation of cataracts. Further functional studies indicated that Eaf2 can induce the activation of caspase-3 and caspase-9, increase the protein expression of the pro-apoptotic protein bax and inhibit the expression of the anti-apoptotic protein bcl-2; thereby, Eaf2 promotes cell apoptosis and is implicated in the formation and development of cataracts. The present study laid a theoretical foundation for the development of drugs for cataract treatment.

  8. Cosmological test using strong gravitational lensing systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, C. C.; Wang, F. Y.

    2015-09-01

    As one of the probes of universe, strong gravitational lensing systems allow us to compare different cosmological models and constrain vital cosmological parameters. This purpose can be reached from the dynamic and geometry properties of strong gravitational lensing systems, for instance, time-delay Δτ of images, the velocity dispersion σ of the lensing galaxies and the combination of these two effects, Δτ/σ2. In this paper, in order to carry out one-on-one comparisons between ΛCDM universe and Rh = ct universe, we use a sample containing 36 strong lensing systems with the measurement of velocity dispersion from the Sloan Lens Advanced Camera for Surveys (SLACS) and Lens Structure and Dynamic survey (LSD) survey. Concerning the time-delay effect, 12 two-image lensing systems with Δτ are also used. In addition, Monte Carlo simulations are used to compare the efficiency of the three methods as mentioned above. From simulations, we estimate the number of lenses required to rule out one model at the 99.7 per cent confidence level. Comparing with constraints from Δτ and the velocity dispersion σ, we find that using Δτ/σ2 can improve the discrimination between cosmological models. Despite the independence tests of these methods reveal a correlation between Δτ/σ2 and σ, Δτ/σ2 could be considered as an improved method of σ if more data samples are available.

  9. Modelling cortical cataractogenesis. XVIII. In vitro diabetic cataract reduction by venoruton. A flavonoid which prevents lens opacification.

    PubMed

    Kilic, F; Bhardwaj, R; Trevithick, J R

    1996-08-01

    The effect of a novel flavonoid, venoruton (a mixture of mono-, di-, tri- and tetrahydroxyethylrutosides) has been investigated in healthy rat lenses and compared with diabetic cataract modelled in vitro. One mM venoruton was added to medium simulating healthy and diabetic conditions for the incubated lenses; damage was followed by either stereoscopic photography of the lenses under a Cooperative Cataract Research Group operating microscope or with our recently developed method: the leakage of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) into the lens culture media. The increased LDH activity in the medium and observable development of the opacity were correlated with cell damage, which has been found to be associated with globular degeneration and cataract formation. The extent of opacification and LDH release is reduced if 1 mM venoruton is included in the medium. The protective effect may be related to antioxidant activity against reactive oxygen species: decreased luminol luminescence was shown after venoruton addition to either superoxide-generating hypoxanthine plus xanthine oxidase, or hydrogen peroxide.

  10. Lens ER-stress response during cataract development in Mip-mutant mice.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yuefang; Bennett, Thomas M; Shiels, Alan

    2016-08-01

    Major intrinsic protein (MIP) is a functional water-channel (AQP0) that also plays a key role in establishing lens fiber cell architecture. Genetic variants of MIP have been associated with inherited and age-related forms of cataract; however, the underlying pathogenic mechanisms are unclear. Here we have used lens transcriptome profiling by microarray-hybridization and qPCR to identify pathogenic changes during cataract development in Mip-mutant (Lop/+) mice. In postnatal Lop/+ lenses (P7) 99 genes were up-regulated and 75 were down-regulated (>2-fold, p=<0.05) when compared with wild-type. A pathway analysis of up-regulated genes in the Lop/+ lens (P7) was consistent with endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-stress and activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR). The most up-regulated UPR genes (>4-fold) in the Lop/+ lens included Chac1>Ddit3>Atf3>Trib3>Xbp1 and the most down-regulated genes (>5-fold) included two anti-oxidant genes, Hspb1 and Hmox1. Lop/+ lenses were further characterized by abundant TUNEL-positive nuclei within central degenerating fiber cells, glutathione depletion, free-radical overproduction, and calpain hyper-activation. These data suggest that Lop/+ lenses undergo proteotoxic ER-stress induced cell-death resulting from prolonged activation of the Eif2ak3/Perk-Atf4-Ddit3-Chac1 branch of the UPR coupled with severe oxidative-stress.

  11. Cosmology with Doppler lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacon, David J.; Andrianomena, Sambatra; Clarkson, Chris; Bolejko, Krzysztof; Maartens, Roy

    2014-09-01

    Doppler lensing is the apparent change in object size and magnitude due to peculiar velocities. Objects falling into an overdensity appear larger on its near side, and smaller on its far side, than typical objects at the same redshifts. This effect dominates over the usual gravitational lensing magnification at low redshift. Doppler lensing is a promising new probe of cosmology, and we explore in detail how to utilize the effect with forthcoming surveys. We present cosmological simulations of the Doppler and gravitational lensing effects based on the Millennium simulation. We show that Doppler lensing can be detected around stacked voids or unvirialized overdensities. New power spectra and correlation functions are proposed which are designed to be sensitive to Doppler lensing. We consider the impact of gravitational lensing and intrinsic size correlations on these quantities. We compute the correlation functions and forecast the errors for realistic forthcoming surveys, providing predictions for constraints on cosmological parameters. Finally, we demonstrate how we can make 3D potential maps of large volumes of the Universe using Doppler lensing.

  12. Learning through Different Lenses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jeweler, Sue; Barnes-Robinson, Linda

    2015-01-01

    When parents and teachers help gifted kids use the metaphor "learning through different lenses," amazing things happen: Horizons open up. Ideas are focused. Thoughts are magnified and clarified. They see the big picture. Metaphoric thinking offers new and exciting ways to see the world. Viewing the world through different lenses provides…

  13. One Episode, Two Lenses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drijvers, Paul; Godino, Juan D.; Font, Vicenc; Trouche, Luc

    2013-01-01

    A deep understanding of students' learning processes is one of the core challenges of research in mathematics education. To achieve this, different theoretical lenses are available. The question is how these different lenses compare and contrast, and how they can be coordinated and combined to provide a more comprehensive view on the topic of…

  14. A VidEo-Based Intelligent Recognition and Decision System for the Phacoemulsification Cataract Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Xu-Cheng; Wang, Zhi-Bin; Zhou, Fang; Hao, Hong-Wei

    2015-01-01

    The phacoemulsification surgery is one of the most advanced surgeries to treat cataract. However, the conventional surgeries are always with low automatic level of operation and over reliance on the ability of surgeons. Alternatively, one imaginative scene is to use video processing and pattern recognition technologies to automatically detect the cataract grade and intelligently control the release of the ultrasonic energy while operating. Unlike cataract grading in the diagnosis system with static images, complicated background, unexpected noise, and varied information are always introduced in dynamic videos of the surgery. Here we develop a Video-Based Intelligent Recognitionand Decision (VeBIRD) system, which breaks new ground by providing a generic framework for automatically tracking the operation process and classifying the cataract grade in microscope videos of the phacoemulsification cataract surgery. VeBIRD comprises a robust eye (iris) detector with randomized Hough transform to precisely locate the eye in the noise background, an effective probe tracker with Tracking-Learning-Detection to thereafter track the operation probe in the dynamic process, and an intelligent decider with discriminative learning to finally recognize the cataract grade in the complicated video. Experiments with a variety of real microscope videos of phacoemulsification verify VeBIRD's effectiveness. PMID:26693249

  15. A VidEo-Based Intelligent Recognition and Decision System for the Phacoemulsification Cataract Surgery.

    PubMed

    Tian, Shu; Yin, Xu-Cheng; Wang, Zhi-Bin; Zhou, Fang; Hao, Hong-Wei

    2015-01-01

    The phacoemulsification surgery is one of the most advanced surgeries to treat cataract. However, the conventional surgeries are always with low automatic level of operation and over reliance on the ability of surgeons. Alternatively, one imaginative scene is to use video processing and pattern recognition technologies to automatically detect the cataract grade and intelligently control the release of the ultrasonic energy while operating. Unlike cataract grading in the diagnosis system with static images, complicated background, unexpected noise, and varied information are always introduced in dynamic videos of the surgery. Here we develop a Video-Based Intelligent Recognitionand Decision (VeBIRD) system, which breaks new ground by providing a generic framework for automatically tracking the operation process and classifying the cataract grade in microscope videos of the phacoemulsification cataract surgery. VeBIRD comprises a robust eye (iris) detector with randomized Hough transform to precisely locate the eye in the noise background, an effective probe tracker with Tracking-Learning-Detection to thereafter track the operation probe in the dynamic process, and an intelligent decider with discriminative learning to finally recognize the cataract grade in the complicated video. Experiments with a variety of real microscope videos of phacoemulsification verify VeBIRD's effectiveness. PMID:26693249

  16. Optical performance test & analysis of intraocular lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Junoh

    Cataract is a condition in the eye that if left untreated, could lead to blindness. One of the effective ways to treat cataract is the removal of the cataractous natural crystalline lens and implantation of an artificial lens called an intraocular lens(IOL). The designs of the IOLs have shown improvements over the years to further imitate natural human vision. A need for an objective testing and analysis tool for the latest IOLs grow with the advancements of the IOLs. In this dissertation, I present a system capable of objective test and analysis of the advanced IOLs. The system consists of (1) Model eye into which an IOL can be inserted to mimic conditions of the human eye. (2) Modulation Transfer Function measurement setup capable of through-focus test for depth of field studies and polychromatic test for study of effects of chromatization. (3) Use of Defocus Transfer Function to simulate depth of field characteristic of rotationally symmetric multifocal designs and extension of the function to polychromatic conditions. (4) Several target imaging experiments for comparison of stray light artifacts and simulation using a non-sequential ray trace package.

  17. [A rare from of congenital cataract].

    PubMed

    Doden, W; Schnaudigel, O E

    1983-01-01

    In 1943 a 3 year-old-girl with hard star-like nuclear cataracts in both eyes underwent surgery. The white star-like nuclear remnants remained unchanged in the anterior chamber for more than 20 years. The son of this patient had the same rare cataract; surgery was performed on both eyes with practically the same results.

  18. Psychophysical Vision Simulation of Diffractive Bifocal and Trifocal Intraocular Lenses

    PubMed Central

    Brezna, Wolfgang; Lux, Kirsten; Dragostinoff, Nikolaus; Krutzler, Christian; Plank, Nicole; Tobisch, Rainer; Boltz, Agnes; Garhöfer, Gerhard; Told, Reinhard; Witkowska, Katarzyna; Schmetterer, Leopold

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The visual performance of monofocal, bifocal, and trifocal intraocular lenses was evaluated by human individuals using a vision simulator device. This allowed investigation of the visual impression after cataract surgery, without the need actually to implant the lenses. Methods The randomized, double-masked, three-way cross-over study was conducted on 60 healthy male and female subjects aged between 18 and 35 years. Visual acuity (Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study; ETDRS) and contrast sensitivity tests (Pelli-Robson) under different lighting conditions (luminosities from 0.14–55 cd/m2, mesopic to photopic) were performed at different distances. Results Visual acuity tests showed no difference for corrected distance visual acuity data of bi- and trifocal lens prototypes (P = 0.851), but better results for the trifocal than for the bifocal lenses at distance corrected intermediate (P = 0.021) and distance corrected near visual acuity (P = 0.044). Contrast sensitivity showed no differences between bifocal and trifocal lenses at the distant (P = 0.984) and at the near position (P = 0.925), but better results for the trifocal lens at the intermediate position (P = 0.043). Visual acuity and contrast sensitivity showed a strong dependence on luminosity (P < 0.001). Conclusions At all investigated distances and all lighting conditions, the trifocal lens prototype often performed better, but never worse than the bifocal lens prototype. Translational Relevance The vision simulator can fill the gap between preclinical lens development and implantation studies by providing information of the perceived vision quality after cataract surgery without implantation. This can reduce implantation risks and promotes the development of new lens concepts due to the cost effective test procedure. PMID:27777828

  19. Stress-Detection Lenses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    An Ames Research Center scientist invented an infrared lens used in sunglasses to filter out ultraviolet rays. This product finds its origins in research for military enemy detection. Through a Space Act Agreement, Optical Sales Corporation introduced the Hawkeye Lenses not only as sunglasses but as plant stress detection lenses. The lenses enhance the stressed part of the leaf, which has less chlorophyll than healthy leaves, through dyes that filter out certain wavelengths of light. Plant stress is visible earlier, at a stage when something can be done to save the plants.

  20. Inverting Gravitational Lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newbury, P. R.; Spiteri, R. J.

    2002-02-01

    Gravitational lensing provides a powerful tool to study a number of fundamental questions in astrophysics. Fortuitously, one can begin to explore some non-trivial issues associated with this phenomenon without a lot of very sophisticated mathematics, making an elementary treatment of this topic tractable even to senior undergraduates. In this paper, we give a relatively self-contained outline of the basic concepts and mathematics behind gravitational lensing as a recent and exciting topic for courses in mathematical modeling or scientific computing. To this end, we have designed and made available some interactive software to aid in the simulation and inversion of gravitational lenses in a classroom setting.

  1. Characterization of molecular mechanisms of in vivo UVR induced cataract.

    PubMed

    Galichanin, Konstantin; Talebizadeh, Nooshin; Söderberg, Per

    2012-01-01

    Cataract is the leading cause of blindness in the world (1). The World Health Organization defines cataract as a clouding of the lens of the eye which impedes the transfer of light. Cataract is a multi-factorial disease associated with diabetes, smoking, ultraviolet radiation (UVR), alcohol, ionizing radiation, steroids and hypertension. There is strong experimental (2-4) and epidemiological evidence (5,6) that UVR causes cataract. We developed an animal model for UVR B induced cataract in both anesthetized (7) and non-anesthetized animals (8). The only cure for cataract is surgery but this treatment is not accessible to all. It has been estimated that a delay of onset of cataract for 10 years could reduce the need for cataract surgery by 50% (9). To delay the incidence of cataract, it is needed to understand the mechanisms of cataract formation and find effective prevention strategies. Among the mechanisms for cataract development, apoptosis plays a crucial role in initiation of cataract in humans and animals (10). Our focus has recently been apoptosis in the lens as the mechanism for cataract development (8,11,12). It is anticipated that a better understanding of the effect of UVR on the apoptosis pathway will provide possibilities for discovery of new pharmaceuticals to prevent cataract. In this article, we describe how cataract can be experimentally induced by in vivo exposure to UVR-B. Further RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry are presented as tools to study molecular mechanisms of UVR-B induced cataract. PMID:23222480

  2. Study of factors for unsuitability of DSAEK in cases of corneal decompensation following cataract surgery.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Namrata; Sachdev, Ritika; Pandey, Ravindra M; Titiyal, Jeewan S; Sinha, Rajesh; Tandon, Radhika; Vajpayee, Rasik B

    2012-08-01

    To evaluate suitability of Descemet's stripping automated endothelial keratoplasty (DSAEK) in cases of corneal decompensation following cataract surgery. In this cross-sectional case series, 90 eyes of 90 patients were evaluated at a tertiary eye care centre. Cases with central corneal scarring or vascularisation, complicated aphakia with significant iris tissue defects and extensive synechaie or posterior segment pathology precluding visual recovery were classified as unsuitable for DSAEK. Of 90 eyes, 42 (46.67%) were unsuitable for DSAEK. Multivariate logistic regression analysis, revealed that patients presenting more than a year after cataract surgery had 7.5-fold odds of being unsuitable for DSAEK as compared with those who presented earlier(OR 7.5; CI 2.0-29.1). Patients with BCVA poorer than 0.06 at initial presentation had 5.0 times odds of being unsuitable for DSAEK (OR 5.0; CI 1.0-24.2). Patients who had prior non-phacoemulsification cataract surgery were 5.5 times less likely to be candidates for DSAEK as compared to those who had prior phacoemulsification (OR 5.5; CI 1.5-19.9) and those with anterior chamber IOL or aphakia were 5.0 times less likely suitable for DSAEK, in contrast to posterior chamber intraocular lenses (OR 5.0; CI 1.3-18.7). The type of cataract surgery, time to presentation and initial visual acuity play a role in determining the suitability of performing DSAEK in patients with corneal decompensation after cataract surgery.

  3. Applications of gravitational lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalal, Neal

    I derive the basic principles of gravitational lensing, and proceed to describe several astrophysical applications. First, invariants in gravitational lensing magnification are derived using techniques of multidimensional residue calculus, and illustrated with example calculations. Then I discuss how these invariant quantities may be useful for measuring the properties of lenses. Next, I discuss the use of astrometric microlensing for studying extrasolar planets. Finally, the use of lensing for the study of substructure in dark matter halos is presented, along with ramifications for the small-scale power spectrum of matter fluctuations. The strongest bounds to date are placed on the mass of the dark matter particle, as well as bounds on the neutrino mass and slope of the primordial power spectrum.

  4. NMR analyses of the cold cataract. III. /sup 13/C acrylamide studies

    SciTech Connect

    Lerman, S.; Megaw, J.M.; Moran, M.N.

    1985-10-01

    /sup 13/C-enriched acrylamide was employed to further delineate the action of this compound in preventing the cold cataract phenomenon when it is incorporated (in vitro) into young human and rabbit lenses. The extent of acrylamide incorporation, in the dark and with concurrent UV exposure, was monitored by /sup 13/C NMR spectroscopy. These studies provide further evidence that UV exposure causes permanent acrylamide photobinding within the lens. In such lenses, the gamma crystallin fraction of the soluble lens proteins is affected to the greatest extent. It appears to become aggregated and/or combined with the alpha and beta fractions resulting in an apparent loss of most of the gamma monomers. There is also an age-related effect with respect to the amount of acrylamide that can be incorporated into the lens. The decrease in acrylamide incorporation with age directly parallels the age-related decline in gamma crystallin levels.

  5. Targeted deletion of the murine Lgr4 gene decreases lens epithelial cell resistance to oxidative stress and induces age-related cataract formation.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jun; Hou, Qiang; Dong, Xiang Da; Wang, Zhenlian; Chen, Xiaoyan; Zheng, Dandan; Zhou, Linglin; He, Chao; Liu, Mingyao; Tu, LiLi; Qu, Jia

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress contributes to the formation of cataracts. The leucine rich repeat containing G protein-coupled receptor 4 (LGR4, also known as GPR48), is important in many developmental processes. Since deletion of Lgr4 has previously been shown to lead to cataract formation in mice, we sought to determine the specific role that Lgr4 plays in the formation of cataracts. Initially, the lens opacities of Lgr4(-/-) mice at different ages without ocular anterior segment dysgenesis (ASD) were evaluated with slit-lamp biomicroscopy. Lenses from both Lgr4(-/-) and wild-type mice were subjected to oxidation induced protein denaturation to assess the ability of the lens to withstand oxidation. The expression of antioxidant enzymes was evaluated with real-time quantitative PCR. Phenotypically, Lgr4(-/-) mice showed earlier onset of lens opacification and higher incidence of cataract formation compared with wild-type mice of similar age. In addition, Lgr4(-/-) mice demonstrated increased sensitivity to environmental oxidative damage, as evidenced by altered protein expression. Real-time quantitative PCR showed that two prominent antioxidant defense enzymes, catalase (CAT) and superoxidase dismutase-1 (SOD1), were significantly decreased in the lens epithelial cells of Lgr4(-/-) mice. Our results suggest that the deletion of Lgr4 can lead to premature cataract formation, as well as progressive deterioration with aging. Oxidative stress and altered expression of several antioxidant defense enzymes contribute to the formation of cataracts. PMID:25811370

  6. Understanding Cataract Risk in Aerospace Flight Crew And Review of Mechanisms of Cataract Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jeffrey A.; McCarten, M.; Manuel, K.; Djojonegoro, B.; Murray, J.; Cucinotta, F.; Feiversen, A.; Wear, M.

    2006-01-01

    Induction of cataracts by occupational exposure in flight crew has been an important topic of interest in aerospace medicine in the past five years, in association with numerous reports of flight-associated disease incidences. Due to numerous confounding variables, it has been difficult to determine if there is increased cataract risk directly caused by interaction with the flight environment, specifically associated with added radiation exposure during flight. Military aviator records from the United States Air Force (USAF) and Navy (USN) and US astronauts at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center (JSC) were evaluated for the presence, location and age of diagnosis of cataracts. Military aviators were found to have a statistically significant younger average age of onset of their cataracts compared with astronauts, however the incidence density of cataracts was found to be statistically higher in astronauts than in military aviators. USAF and USN aviator s cataracts were most commonly located in the posterior subcapsular region of the lens while astronauts cataracts were most likely to originate generally in the cortical zone. A prospective clinical trial which controls for confounding variables in examination technique, cataract classification, diet, exposure, and pharmacological intervention is needed to determine what percentage of the risk for cataracts are due to radiation, and how to best develop countermeasures to protect flight crews from radiation bioeffects in the future.

  7. Weak Gravitational Lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pires, Sandrine; Starck, Jean-Luc; Leonard, Adrienne; Réfrégier, Alexandre

    2012-03-01

    This chapter reviews the data mining methods recently developed to solve standard data problems in weak gravitational lensing. We detail the different steps of the weak lensing data analysis along with the different techniques dedicated to these applications. An overview of the different techniques currently used will be given along with future prospects. Until about 30 years ago, astronomers thought that the Universe was composed almost entirely of ordinary matter: protons, neutrons, electrons, and atoms. The field of weak lensing has been motivated by the observations made in the last decades showing that visible matter represents only about 4-5% of the Universe (see Figure 14.1). Currently, the majority of the Universe is thought to be dark, that is, does not emit electromagnetic radiation. The Universe is thought to be mostly composed of an invisible, pressure less matter - potentially relic from higher energy theories - called "dark matter" (20-21%) and by an even more mysterious term, described in Einstein equations as a vacuum energy density, called "dark energy" (70%). This "dark" Universe is not well described or even understood; its presence is inferred indirectly from its gravitational effects, both on the motions of astronomical objects and on light propagation. So this point could be the next breakthrough in cosmology. Today's cosmology is based on a cosmological model that contains various parameters that need to be determined precisely, such as the matter density parameter Omega_m or the dark energy density parameter Omega_lambda. Weak gravitational lensing is believed to be the most promising tool to understand the nature of dark matter and to constrain the cosmological parameters used to describe the Universe because it provides a method to directly map the distribution of dark matter (see [1,6,60,63,70]). From this dark matter distribution, the nature of dark matter can be better understood and better constraints can be placed on dark energy

  8. The role of lens epithelium in sugar cataract formation.

    PubMed

    Robison, W G; Houlder, N; Kinoshita, J H

    1990-06-01

    Previous evidence has shown clearly that sugar cataract formation results from unusually high intracellular levels of polyol. Documentation of polyol-related histological changes in the cortical fiber cells of the equatorial zone has been extensive. However, little attention has been given to the early changes in the lens epithelial cells, in spite of the fact that the highest level of aldose reductase is found in this layer of the lens. Also, cultured lens epithelial cells exposed to high sugar levels exhibit rapid accumulation of polyol and show ultrastructural alterations. Therefore, a study was designed to evaluate the role of the lens epithelium in sugar cataract formation. Specifically, an attempt was made to localize the earliest fine structural lesions in intact lenses of galactose-fed rats and to test their relation to aldose reductase. Rats were fed either a normal diet or a 50% galactose diet with or without sorbinil, an aldose reductase inhibitor. Rats were killed at varying periods of time ranging from 6 to 96 hr, and the eyes were processed for light and electron microscopy. The first detectable abnormalities occurred after 36 hr of galactose feeding, and were limited to the central lens epithelium. Cell edema, apparent dilution of cytoplasm, rounding of nuclei, aberrant intracellular vacuoles, and loss of normal tortuosity of cell boundaries were the salient lesions. No changes were detectable in the equatorial zone until 48 hr, and no deviation from the control structure was found in any of the rats treated with an aldose reductase inhibitor.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  9. CMB Lensing Cross Correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bleem, Lindsey

    2014-03-01

    A new generation of experiments designed to conduct high-resolution, low-noise observations of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB)--including ACTpol, Planck, POLARBEAR and SPTpol--are producing exquisite measurements of the gravitational lensing of the CMB. Such measurements, covering large fractions of the sky, provide detailed maps of the projected mass distribution extending to the surface of the CMB's last scattering. Concurrently, a large number of deep, wide-area imaging and spectroscopic surveys (e.g., the Dark Energy Survey (DES),WISE all-sky survey, Subaru HyperSuprimeCam Survey, LSST, MS-DESI, BigBoss, etc.) are, or will soon be, providing maps of the distribution of galaxies in the Universe. Correlations of such tracer populations with lensing data allows new probes of where and how galaxies form in the dark matter skeleton of the Universe. Recent correlations of maps of galaxy and quasar densities with lensing convergence maps have produced significant measurements of galaxy bias. The near-term prospect for improvements in such measurements is notable as more precise lensing data from CMB polarization experiments will help to break cosmological and astrophysical parameter degeneracies. Work by the Planck, SPT, and POLARBEAR collaborations has also focused on the correlation of the Cosmic Infrared Background (CIB) with CMB lensing convergence maps. This correlation is particularly strong as the redshifts of the CIB and CMB lensing kernel are well matched. Such correlations probe high-redshift structure, constraining models of star-formation and the characteristic mass scale for halos hosting CIB galaxies and have also been used to demonstrate the first detection of CMB B-mode polarization--an important milestone in CMB observations. Finally, combining galaxy number density, cosmic shear and CMB lensing maps has the potential to provide valuable systematic tests for upcoming cosmological results from large optical surveys such as LSST.

  10. Wound infection after cataract surgery.

    PubMed

    Valenton, M

    1996-01-01

    Nineteen patients were treated for bacterial and fungal infection of the sclerocorneal incision following cataract extraction during a 19-year period. The infections were caused by Staphylococcus aureus (2), Staphylococcus epidermis (2), Streptococcus pneumoniae (3), Streptococcus viridans (1), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (1), Mycobacterium fortuitum (3), Aspergillus flavus (6), and Candida tropicalis (1). The predisposing factors involved were an obstructed nasolacrimal duct (S. pneumoniae, S. viridans), airborne contamination of the wound by fungal spores (A. flavus), and defective sterilization of instruments (M. fortuitum). Ten of the 19 infections resulted in complete loss of the eye from endophthalmitis. Early recognition of wound infection by frequent meticulous examination of the sclerocorneal incision for infectious infiltration is of utmost importance so that specific therapy can be instituted immediately to prevent the development of endophthalmitis. PMID:8988437

  11. Space radiation and cataracts in astronauts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, F. A.; Manuel, F. K.; Jones, J.; Iszard, G.; Murrey, J.; Djojonegro, B.; Wear, M.

    2001-01-01

    For over 30 years, astronauts in Earth orbit or on missions to the moon have been exposed to space radiation comprised of high-energy protons and heavy ions and secondary particles produced in collisions with spacecraft and tissue. Large uncertainties exist in the projection of risks of late effects from space radiation such as cancer and cataracts due to the paucity [corrected] of epidemiological data. Here we present epidemiological [corrected] data linking an increased risk of cataracts for astronauts with higher lens doses (>8 mSv) of space radiation relative to other astronauts with lower lens doses (<8 mSv). Our study uses historical data for cataract incidence in the 295 astronauts participating in NASA's Longitudinal Study of Astronaut Health (LSAH) and individual occupational radiation exposure data. These results, while preliminary because of the use of subjective scoring methods, suggest that relatively low doses of space radiation may predispose crew to [corrected] an increased incidence and early appearance of cataracts.

  12. Cataract Surgery in Anterior Megalophthalmos: A Review

    PubMed Central

    GALVIS, Virgilio; TELLO, Alejandro; M. RANGEL, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Anterior megalophthalmos is characterized by megalocornea associated with a very broad anterior chamber and ciliary ring elongation. It is also called X-linked megalocornea. It is accompanied by early development of cataracts, zonular anomalies, and, rarely, vitreoretinal disorders. Subluxation of a cataract can occur in cataract surgery because of zonular weakness. In addition, in most patients, standard intraocular lens (IOL) decentration is a risk because of the enlarged sulcus and capsular bag. These unique circumstances make cataract surgery challenging. To date, several approaches have been developed. Implantation of a retropupillary iris-claw aphakic intraocular lens may be a good option because it is easier than suturing the IOL and can have better and more stable anatomic and visual outcomes, compared to other techniques. PMID:27350950

  13. Space radiation and cataracts in astronauts.

    PubMed

    Cucinotta, F A; Manuel, F K; Jones, J; Iszard, G; Murrey, J; Djojonegro, B; Wear, M

    2001-11-01

    For over 30 years, astronauts in Earth orbit or on missions to the moon have been exposed to space radiation comprised of high-energy protons and heavy ions and secondary particles produced in collisions with spacecraft and tissue. Large uncertainties exist in the projection of risks of late effects from space radiation such as cancer and cataracts due to the paucity [corrected] of epidemiological data. Here we present epidemiological [corrected] data linking an increased risk of cataracts for astronauts with higher lens doses (>8 mSv) of space radiation relative to other astronauts with lower lens doses (<8 mSv). Our study uses historical data for cataract incidence in the 295 astronauts participating in NASA's Longitudinal Study of Astronaut Health (LSAH) and individual occupational radiation exposure data. These results, while preliminary because of the use of subjective scoring methods, suggest that relatively low doses of space radiation may predispose crew to [corrected] an increased incidence and early appearance of cataracts.

  14. CT appearance of a traumatic cataract.

    PubMed

    Segev, Y; Goldstein, M; Lazar, M; Reider-Groswasser, I

    1995-05-01

    We describe a case of a traumatic cataract that presented on CT as a hypodense lens with a hyderdense rim. The finding reflects the pathogenesis of this entity: a capsular tear and consequent entry of fluid into the lens.

  15. Non-subjective cataract analysis and its application in space radiation risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Wu, B; Medvedovsky, C; Worgul, B V

    1994-01-01

    Experimental animal studies and human observations suggest that the question is not whether or not prolonged space missions will cause cataracts to appear prematurely in the astronauts, but when and to what degree. Historically the major impediment to radiation cataract follow-up has been the necessarily subjective nature of assessing the degree of lens transparency. This has spurred the development of instruments which produce video images amenable to digital analysis. One such system, the Zeiss Scheimpflug slit lamp measuring system (SLC), was incorporated into our ongoing studies of radiation cataractogenesis. It was found that the Zeiss SLC measuring system has high resolution and permits the acquisition of reproducible images of the anterior segment of the eye. Our results, based on about 650 images of the rats lens, and followed over a period of 91 weeks of radiation cataract development, showed that the integrated optical density (IOD) of the lens correlated well with conventional assessment with the added advantages of objectivity, permanent and transportable records and linearity as cataracts become more severe. This continuous data acquisition, commencing with cataract onset, can proceed through more advanced stages. The SLC exhibits much greater sensitivity reflected in a continuously progressive severity despite the artifactual plateaus in staging which occur using conventional scoring methods. Systems such as the Zeiss SLC should be used to monitor astronauts frequent visits to low earth orbit to obtain a longitudinal data-base on the influence of this activity on the lens. PMID:11538030

  16. Non-subjective cataract analysis and its application in space radiation risk assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, B.; Medvedovsky, C.; Worgul, B. V.

    1994-01-01

    Experimental animal studies and human observations suggest that the question is not whether or not prolonged space missions will cause cataracts to appear prematurely in the astronauts, but when and to what degree. Historically the major impediment to radiation cataract follow-up has been the necessarily subjective nature of assessing the degree of lens transparency. This has spurred the development of instruments which produce video images amenable to digital analysis. One such system, the Zeiss Scheimpflug slit lamp measuring system (SLC), was incorporated into our ongoing studies of radiation cataractogenesis. It was found that the Zeiss SLC measuring system has high resolution and permits the acquisition of reproducible images of the anterior segment of the eye. Our results, based on about 650 images of the rats lens, and followed over a period of 91 weeks of radiation cataract development, showed that the Integrated Optical Density (IOD) of the lens correlated well with conventional assessment with the added advantages of objectivity, permanent and transportable records and linearity as cataracts become more severe. This continuous data acquisition, commencing with cataract onset, can proceed through more advanced stages. The SLC exhibits much greater sensitivity reflected in a continuously progressive severity despite the artifactual plateaus in staging which occur using conventional scoring methods. Systems such as the Zeiss SLC should be used to monitor astronauts frequent visits to low earth orbit to obtain a longitudinal data-base on the influence of this activity on the lens.

  17. [Effect of cataract surgery on contrast sensitivity].

    PubMed

    Skorkovská, S; Masková, Z; Synek, S

    2001-03-01

    The authors examined in a group of patients with cataract the visual acuity on Snellen's optotypes and contrast sensitivity using Pelli-Robson's test before cataract surgery and after cataract extraction and implantation of an intraocular lens. A VF-7 questionnaire was used for subjective evaluation of the result of surgery. The values of contrast sensitivity of the pseudophakic eyes were compared with the contrast sensitivity of eyes of a age-matched control group with a natural lens. After cataract surgery and lens implantation highly significant improvement of visual acuity of the operated eye was recorded. There was also significant improvement of binocular contrast sensitivity in the study group. The authors did not detect a significant difference of the contrast sensitivity of eyes with a PMMA lens and eyes with a silicone lens. There was no significant difference in the contrast sensitivity of pseudophakic eyes and phakic eyes of the control group. The CF-7 questionnaire revealed that cataract surgery led to significant improvement of the investigated visual activities, as apparent from the subjective evaluation by the patients. However, no significant correlation was found between objective (contrast sensitivity) and subjective (VF-7 questionnaire) evaluation of cataract surgery. Only one question in the questionnaire correlated significantly with contrast sensitivity. The authors found a significant reduction of contrast sensitivity caused by an altered transparency of the lens. The decline of contrast sensitivity in eyes with cataract and relatively good vision on Snellen's optotypes is the cause of some subjective complaints of the patients and may be an important factor in indication of cataract surgery of eyes with a relatively good visual acuity.

  18. Cosmic Radiation and Cataracts in Airline Pilots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafnsson, V.; Olafsdottir, E.; Hrafnkelsson, J.; de Angelis, G.; Sasaki, H.; Arnarson, A.; Jonasson, F.

    Nuclear cataracts have been associated with ionising radiation exposure in previous studies. A population based case-control study on airline pilots has been performed to investigate whether employment as a commercial pilot and consequent exposure to cosmic radiation were associated to lens opacification, when adjusted for known risk factors for cataracts. Cases of opacification of the ocular lens were found in surveys among pilots and a random sample of the Icelandic population. Altogether 445 male subjects underwent a detailed eye examination and answered a questionnaire. Information from the airline company on the 79 pilots employment time, annual hours flown per aircraft type, the timetables and the flight profiles made calculation of individual cumulated radiation dose (mSv) possible. Lens opacification were classified and graded according to WHO simplified cataracts grading system using slit lamp. The odds ratio from logistic regression of nuclear cataracts risk among cases and controls was 3.02 (95% CI 1.44 to 6.35) for pilots compared with non-pilots, adjusted for age, smoking and sunbathing habits, whereas that of cortical cataracts risk among cases and controls was lower than unity (non significant) for pilots compared with non-pilots in a logistic regression analysis adjusted for same factors. Length of employment as a pilot and cumulated radiation dose (mSv) were significantly related to the risk of nuclear cataracts. So the association between radiation exposure of pilots and the risk of nuclear cataracts, adjusted for age, smoking and sunbathing habits, indicates that cosmic radiation may be cause of nuclear cataract among commercial pilots.

  19. [Surgical indications in coexisting cataracts and glaucoma].

    PubMed

    Collignon-Brach, J D; Ravet, O; Robe-Collignon, N

    2000-01-01

    Cataract surgery in glaucoma patients remains a controversial subjects. Indication of surgery depends on a lot of clinical parameters: diagnosis, state, evolution of glaucoma as well as compliance with medical treatment--surgical procedures of cataract and glaucoma--sites of the surgery--use of antifibrosis agents and surgeon's experience. As cataract extraction alone decreases the intraocular pressure in open angle glaucoma and mainly in uncomplicated closed angle glaucoma and trabeculectomy alone reduces the intraocular pressure more than combined surgery with less complications we recommended the following surgical options: Cataract extraction alone in patients with controlled open angle glaucoma and in patients with closed angle glaucoma. A two step procedure: filtering surgery followed by cataract extraction in patients with poorly controlled open angle glaucoma or mixed closed angle glaucoma. Ambulatory surgery and topical anesthesia permit a two stages surgery with less inconveniences. A combined procedure in patients with a chronic closed angle glaucoma where filtering procedure alone is associated with important complications. Actually, the best surgical cataract procedure is phacoemulsification with a small supero-corneal incision and implantation of a foldable intraocular lens. The best filtering procedure remains trabeculectomy, or the new non penetrating trabecular surgery for experimented surgeons, in the superior quadrant. In the future new surgical procedures and new safe and non toxic pharmacologic drugs which modulate wound healing could be found in order to increase the efficacity and indications of combined surgery. PMID:11262885

  20. Preventive effect of Zea mays L. (purple waxy corn) on experimental diabetic cataract.

    PubMed

    Thiraphatthanavong, Paphaphat; Wattanathorn, Jintanaporn; Muchimapura, Supaporn; Wipawee, Thukham-mee; Wannanon, Panakaporn; Terdthai, Tong-un; Suriharn, Bhalang; Lertrat, Kamol

    2014-01-01

    Recently, substances possessing antioxidant can prevent cataractogenesis of diabetic cataract. Therefore, this study was carried out to determine the anticataract effect of Zea mays L. (purple waxy corn), a flavonoids rich plant, in experimental diabetic cataract. Enucleated rat lenses were incubated in artificial aqueous humor containing 55 mM glucose with various concentrations of Zea mays L. (purple waxy corn) ranging between 2, 10, and 50 mg/mL at room temperature for 72 h. At the end of the incubation period, the evaluation of lens opacification, MDA level, and the activities of SOD, CAT, GPx, and AR in lens were performed. The results showed that both medium and high doses of extract decreased lens opacity together with the decreased MDA level. In addition, medium dose of extract increased GPx activity while the high dose decreased AR activity. No other significant changes were observed. The purple waxy corn seeds extract is the potential candidate to protect against diabetic cataract. The mechanism of action may occur via the decreased oxidative stress and the suppression of AR. However, further research in vivo is still essential.

  1. Preventive effect of Zea mays L. (purple waxy corn) on experimental diabetic cataract.

    PubMed

    Thiraphatthanavong, Paphaphat; Wattanathorn, Jintanaporn; Muchimapura, Supaporn; Wipawee, Thukham-mee; Wannanon, Panakaporn; Terdthai, Tong-un; Suriharn, Bhalang; Lertrat, Kamol

    2014-01-01

    Recently, substances possessing antioxidant can prevent cataractogenesis of diabetic cataract. Therefore, this study was carried out to determine the anticataract effect of Zea mays L. (purple waxy corn), a flavonoids rich plant, in experimental diabetic cataract. Enucleated rat lenses were incubated in artificial aqueous humor containing 55 mM glucose with various concentrations of Zea mays L. (purple waxy corn) ranging between 2, 10, and 50 mg/mL at room temperature for 72 h. At the end of the incubation period, the evaluation of lens opacification, MDA level, and the activities of SOD, CAT, GPx, and AR in lens were performed. The results showed that both medium and high doses of extract decreased lens opacity together with the decreased MDA level. In addition, medium dose of extract increased GPx activity while the high dose decreased AR activity. No other significant changes were observed. The purple waxy corn seeds extract is the potential candidate to protect against diabetic cataract. The mechanism of action may occur via the decreased oxidative stress and the suppression of AR. However, further research in vivo is still essential. PMID:24527449

  2. Clinical Detection of Pre-Cataractous Lens Protein Changes using Dynamic Light Scattering

    PubMed Central

    Datiles, Manuel B.; Ansari, Rafat R.; Suh, Kwang I.; Vitale, Susan; Reed, George F.; Zigler, J. Samuel; Ferris., Frederick L.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose To use Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS) to clinically assess early pre-cataractous lens protein changes. Methods We performed a cross sectional study in 380 eyes of 235 subjects aged 7–86 years with AREDS clinical lens nuclear grades ranging from 0–3.8. A DLS device was used to assess α-crystallin, a molecular chaperone protein shown to bind other damaged lens proteins, preventing their aggregation. The outcome measure was the α-crystallin index (ACI), a measure of unbound α-crystallin in each lens. The association of ACI with increasing nuclear opacity and aging was determined. Results There was a significant decrease in ACI associated with increasing grades of lens nuclear opacity (p<0.0001). There are significant losses of α-crystallin even in clinically clear lenses associated with aging (p<0.0001). The standard error of measurement was 3%. Conclusions DLS clinically detects loss of α-crystallin proteins even in clinically clear lenses. ACI measurements may be useful in identifying patients at high risk for developing cataract, and as an outcome variable in clinical lens studies. Clinical Relevance Our studies suggest that the ACI may be a useful measure of the protective α-crystallin molecular chaperone reserve present in a lens, analogous to creatinine clearance in estimating renal function reserve. PMID:19064850

  3. Contact Lenses in the Laboratory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kingston, David W.

    1981-01-01

    Summarizes results of a three-item questionnaire returned by 43 Michigan institutions expressing views on wearing contact lenses in chemical laboratories. Questions focused on eye protection, type of protection, and use of contact lenses. (SK)

  4. Radiation Blocking Lenses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    Biomedical Optical Company of America's (BOCA) suntiger lenses, similar in principle to natural filters in the eyes of hawks and eagles, bar 99 percent of potentially harmful wavelengths, while allowing visually useful colors of light (red, orange, green) to pass through. They also improve visual acuity, night vision and haze or fog visibility. The lenses evolved from work done by James B. Stephens and Dr. Charles G. Miller of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. They developed a formula and produced a commercial welding curtain that absorbs, filters, and scatters light. This research led to protective glasses now used by dentists, workers in hazardous environments, CRT operators and skiers.

  5. Looking the Cow in the Eye: Deletion in the NID1 Gene Is Associated with Recessive Inherited Cataract in Romagnola Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Murgiano, Leonardo; Jagannathan, Vidhya; Calderoni, Valerio; Joechler, Monika; Gentile, Arcangelo; Drögemüller, Cord

    2014-01-01

    Cataract is a known condition leading to opacification of the eye lens causing partial or total blindness. Mutations are known to cause autosomal dominant or recessive inherited forms of cataracts in humans, mice, rats, guinea pigs and dogs. The use of large-sized animal models instead of those using mice for the study of this condition has been discussed due to the small size of rodent lenses. Four juvenile-onset cases of bilateral incomplete immature nuclear cataract were recently observed in Romagnola cattle. Pedigree analysis suggested a monogenic autosomal recessive inheritance. In addition to the cataract, one of the cases displayed abnormal head movements. Genome-wide association and homozygosity mapping and subsequent whole genome sequencing of a single case identified two perfectly associated sequence variants in a critical interval of 7.2 Mb on cattle chromosome 28: a missense point mutation located in an uncharacterized locus and an 855 bp deletion across the exon 19/intron 19 border of the bovine nidogen 1 (NID1) gene (c.3579_3604+829del). RT-PCR showed that NID1 is expressed in bovine lenses while the transcript of the second locus was absent. The NID1 deletion leads to the skipping of exon 19 during transcription and is therefore predicted to cause a frameshift and premature stop codon (p.1164fs27X). The truncated protein lacks a C-terminal domain essential for binding with matrix assembly complexes. Nidogen 1 deficient mice show neurological abnormalities and highly irregular crystal lens alterations. This study adds NID1 to the list of candidate genes for inherited cataract in humans and is the first report of a naturally occurring mutation leading to non-syndromic catarct in cattle provides a potential large animal model for human cataract. PMID:25347398

  6. The carbon footprint of cataract surgery

    PubMed Central

    Morris, D S; Wright, T; Somner, J E A; Connor, A

    2013-01-01

    Background Climate change is predicted to be one of the largest global health threats of the 21st century. Health care itself is a large contributor to carbon emissions. Determining the carbon footprint of specific health care activities such as cataract surgery allows the assessment of associated emissions and identifies opportunities for reduction. Aim To assess the carbon footprint of a cataract pathway in a British teaching hospital. Methods This was a component analysis study for one patient having first eye cataract surgery in the University Hospital of Wales, Cardiff. Activity data was collected from three sectors, building and energy use, travel and procurement. Published emissions factors were applied to this data to provide figures in carbon dioxide equivalents (CO2eq). Results The carbon footprint for one cataract operation was 181.8 kg CO2eq. On the basis that 2230 patients were treated for cataracts during 2011 in Cardiff, this has an associated carbon footprint of 405.4 tonnes CO2eq. Building and energy use was estimated to account for 36.1% of overall emissions, travel 10.1% and procurement 53.8%, with medical equipment accounting for the most emissions at 32.6%. Conclusions This is the first published carbon footprint of cataract surgery and acts as a benchmark for other studies as well as identifying areas for emissions reduction. Within the procurement sector, dialogue with industry is important to reduce the overall carbon footprint. Sustainability should be considered when cataract pathways are designed as there is potential for reduction in all sectors with the possible side effects of saving costs and improving patient care. PMID:23429413

  7. The results of cataract nigra cases operated with the mini-nuc technique.

    PubMed

    Yuzbasioglu, Erdal; Helvacioglu, Firat; Tugcu, Betul; Terzi, Nazire; Keskinbora, Kadircan

    2009-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of the mini-nuc technique for the removal of brunescent and black cataracts. A prospective study was carried out in 33 eyes of 33 patients with cataract nigra operated with the mini-nuc technique between April 2002 and June 2003. Slit-lamp examinations, intraocular pressure (IOP) measurements, and best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) were assessed pre- and postoperatively. Accompanying systemic diseases were noted. Intraoperative and postoperative complications were evaluated. Unilateral eyes of 33 patients (18 male [54.5%], 15 female [45.5%]) aged between 65 and 90 years (mean 72 years) were operated with the mini-nuc technique. Preoperative BCVA values varied between light perception and 0.2 in the Snellen chart. Intraocular lenses (IOL) were implanted into all of the patients (27 in-the-bag [81.8%], four to sulcus [12.1%], and two with scleral fixation [6.1%]). During the surgery, five patients (15.15%) had zonular dialysis and two (6.1%) had posterior capsule rupture and vitreous loss. Postoperatively, three (9.1%) rises in IOP, two (6.1%) hyphema, and one (3%) IOL subluxation were observed. At the first day visit, the mean of the uncorrected visual acuities (UCVA) was 0.5 in the Snellen chart. At the third month visit, the mean BCVA was observed to be 0.8. The residual mean astigmatism was 0.75 D against the rule. The mini-nuc technique was effective in removing brunescent and black cataracts with a low rate of serious complications. The mini-nuc technique, which is also performed with a small incision and without sutures, might be an alternative to phacoemulsification in cases of cataract nigra.

  8. Fresnel's Lighthouse Lenses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenslade, Thomas B., Jr.

    2007-01-01

    One of the rewards of walking up the scores of steps winding around the inside of the shaft of a lighthouse is turning inward and examining the glass optical system. This arrangement of prisms, lenses, and reflectors is used to project the light from a relatively small source in a beam that can be seen far at sea.

  9. A γA-Crystallin Mouse Mutant Secc with Small Eye, Cataract and Closed Eyelid

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Man Hei; Tam, Chung Nga; Choy, Kwong Wai; Tsang, Wai Hung; Tsang, Sze Lan; Pang, Chi Pui; Song, You Qiang; Sham, Mai Har

    2016-01-01

    Cataract is the most common cause of visual loss in humans. A spontaneously occurred, autosomal dominant mouse mutant Secc, which displayed combined features of small eye, cataract and closed eyelid was discovered in our laboratory. In this study, we identified the mutation and characterized the cataract phenotype of this novel Secc mutant. The Secc mutant mice have eyelids that remain half-closed throughout their life. The mutant lens has a significant reduction in size and with opaque spots clustered in the centre. Histological analysis showed that in the core region of the mutant lens, the fiber cells were disorganized and clefts and vacuoles were observed. The cataract phenotype was evident from new born stage. We identified the Secc mutation by linkage analysis using whole genome microsatellite markers and SNP markers. The Secc locus was mapped at chromosome 1 flanked by SNPs rs3158129 and rs13475900. Based on the chromosomal position, the candidate cataract locus γ-crystallin gene cluster (Cryg) was investigated by sequencing. A single base deletion (299delG) in exon 3 of Cryga which led to a frame-shift of amino acid sequence from position 91 was identified. As a result of this mutation, the sequences of the 3rd and 4th Greek-key motifs of the γA-crystallin are replaced with an unrelated C-terminal peptide of 75 residues long. Coincidentally, the point mutation generated a HindIII restriction site, allowing the identification of the CrygaSecc mutant allele by RFLP. Western blot analysis of 3-week old lenses showed that the expression of γ-crystallins was reduced in the CrygaSecc mutant. Furthermore, in cell transfection assays using CrygaSecc mutant cDNA expression constructs in 293T, COS-7 and human lens epithelial B3 cell lines, the mutant γA-crystallins were enriched in the insoluble fractions and appeared as insoluble aggregates in the transfected cells. In conclusion, we have demonstrated that the Secc mutation leads to the generation of Cryga

  10. A γA-Crystallin Mouse Mutant Secc with Small Eye, Cataract and Closed Eyelid.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Man Hei; Tam, Chung Nga; Choy, Kwong Wai; Tsang, Wai Hung; Tsang, Sze Lan; Pang, Chi Pui; Song, You Qiang; Sham, Mai Har

    2016-01-01

    Cataract is the most common cause of visual loss in humans. A spontaneously occurred, autosomal dominant mouse mutant Secc, which displayed combined features of small eye, cataract and closed eyelid was discovered in our laboratory. In this study, we identified the mutation and characterized the cataract phenotype of this novel Secc mutant. The Secc mutant mice have eyelids that remain half-closed throughout their life. The mutant lens has a significant reduction in size and with opaque spots clustered in the centre. Histological analysis showed that in the core region of the mutant lens, the fiber cells were disorganized and clefts and vacuoles were observed. The cataract phenotype was evident from new born stage. We identified the Secc mutation by linkage analysis using whole genome microsatellite markers and SNP markers. The Secc locus was mapped at chromosome 1 flanked by SNPs rs3158129 and rs13475900. Based on the chromosomal position, the candidate cataract locus γ-crystallin gene cluster (Cryg) was investigated by sequencing. A single base deletion (299delG) in exon 3 of Cryga which led to a frame-shift of amino acid sequence from position 91 was identified. As a result of this mutation, the sequences of the 3rd and 4th Greek-key motifs of the γA-crystallin are replaced with an unrelated C-terminal peptide of 75 residues long. Coincidentally, the point mutation generated a HindIII restriction site, allowing the identification of the CrygaSecc mutant allele by RFLP. Western blot analysis of 3-week old lenses showed that the expression of γ-crystallins was reduced in the CrygaSecc mutant. Furthermore, in cell transfection assays using CrygaSecc mutant cDNA expression constructs in 293T, COS-7 and human lens epithelial B3 cell lines, the mutant γA-crystallins were enriched in the insoluble fractions and appeared as insoluble aggregates in the transfected cells. In conclusion, we have demonstrated that the Secc mutation leads to the generation of Cryga

  11. Osmotic Stress, not Aldose Reductase Activity, Directly induces Growth Factors and MAPK Signaling changes during Sugar Cataract Formation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Peng; Xing, Kuiyi; Randazzo, James; Blessing, Karen; Lou, Marjorie F.; Kador, Peter F.

    2012-01-01

    In sugar cataract formation in rats, aldose reductase (AR) actitvity is not only linked to lenticular sorbitol (diabetic) or galactitol (galactosemic) formation but also to signal transduction changes, cytotoxic signals and activation of apoptosis. Using both in vitro and in vivo techniques, the interrelationship between AR activity, polyol (sorbitol and galactitol) formation, osmotic stress, growth factor induction, and cell signaling changes have been investigated. For in vitro studies, lenses from Sprague Dawley rats were cultured for up to 48 hrs in TC-199-bicarbonate media containing either 30 mM fructose (control), or 30 mM glucose or galctose with/without the aldose reductase inhibitors AL1576 or tolrestat, the sorbitol dehydrogenase inhibitor (SDI) CP-470,711, or 15 mM mannitol (osmotic-compensated media). For in vivo studies, lenses were obtained from streptozotocin-induced diabetic Sprague Dawley rats fed diet with/without the ARIs AL1576 or tolrestat for 10 weeks. As expected, lenses cultured in high glucose / galactose media or from untreated diabetic rats all showed a decrease in the GSH pool that was lessened by ARI treatment. Lenses either from diabetic rats or from glucose/galactose culture conditions showed increased expression of basic-FGF, TGF-β, and increased signaling through P-Akt, P-ERK1/2 and P-SAPK/JNK which were also normalized by ARIs to the expression levels observed in non-diabetic controls. Culturing rat lenses in osomotically compensated media containing 30 mM glucose or galactose did not lead to increased growth factor expression or altered signaling. These studies indicate that it is the biophysical response of the lens to osmotic stress that results in an increased intralenticular production of basic-FGF and TGF-β and the altered cytotoxic signaling that is observed during sugar cataract formation. PMID:22710095

  12. Congenital cataracts following total parenteral nutrition (TPN) use during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Heerasing, N; Dowling, D

    2014-08-01

    We describe a case of congenital cataracts in a newborn whose mother received total parenteral nutrition (TPN) throughout her pregnancy. We discuss the potential mechanisms by which TPN may have been causally linked to cataract formation.

  13. The first cataract surgeons in Latin America: 1611–1830

    PubMed Central

    Leffler, Christopher T; Wainsztein, Ricardo D

    2016-01-01

    We strove to identify the earliest cataract surgeons in Latin America. Probably by 1611, the Genovese oculist Francisco Drago was couching cataracts in Mexico City. The surgeon Melchor Vásquez de Valenzuela probably performed cataract couching in Lima by 1697. Juan Peré of France demonstrated cataract couching in Veracruz and Mexico City between 1779 and 1784. Juan Ablanedo of Spain performed couching in Veracruz in 1791. Cataract extraction might have been performed in Havana and Caracas by 1793 and in Mexico by 1797. The earliest contemporaneously documented cataract extractions in Latin America were performed in Guatemala City by Narciso Esparragosa in 1797. In addition to Esparragosa, surgeons born in the New World who established the academic teaching of cataract surgery included José Miguel Muñoz in Mexico and José María Vargas in Caracas. Although cataract surgery came quite early to Latin America, its availability was initially inconsistent and limited. PMID:27143845

  14. Obituary--rigid contact lenses.

    PubMed

    Efron, Nathan

    2010-10-01

    Scleral and corneal rigid lenses represented 100 per cent of the contact lens market immediately prior to the invention of soft lenses in the mid-1960s. In the United Kingdom today, rigid lenses comprise 2 per cent of all new lens fits. Low rates of rigid lens fitting are also apparent in 27 other countries which have recently been surveyed. Thus, the 1998 prediction of the author that rigid lenses--also referred to as 'rigid gas permeable' (RGP) lenses or 'gas permeable' (GP) lenses--would be obsolete by the year 2010 has essentially turned out to be correct. In this obituary, the author offers 10 reasons for the demise of rigid lens fitting: initial rigid lens discomfort; intractable rigid lens-induced corneal and lid pathology; extensive soft lens advertising; superior soft lens fitting logistics; lack of rigid lens training opportunities; redundancy of the rigid lens 'problem solver' function; improved soft toric and bifocal/varifocal lenses; limited uptake of orthokeratology; lack of investment in rigid lenses; and the emergence of aberration control soft lenses. Rigid lenses are now being fitted by a minority of practitioners with specialist skills/training. Certainly, rigid lenses can no longer be considered as a mainstream form of contact lens correction. May their dear souls (bulk properties) rest in peace. PMID:20674469

  15. Cataracts Heavy Ions and Individual Susceptibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, E.; Worgul, B.; Brenner, D.; Smilenov, L.

    Ocular cataracts represents one of the few legacies of space flight evident in a significant proportion of astronauts X-rays are known to induce cataracts Heavy ions are known to be much more effective per unit dose than gamma -rays The object of this present study was to identify genes that confer individual susceptibility and to estimate RBE values Wild type mice were compared with animals heterozygous for Atm Mrad9 or BRCA1 or animals that were double heterozygotes for pairs of genes Mice were irradiated with x-rays at Columbia University in New York City or with heavy ions 1GeV amu 56 Fe ions at Brookhaven National Laboratory Haploinsufficiency for either Atm or mRAD9 resulted in cataracts appearing earlier than in wild type animals whether exposed to gamma -rays or heavy ions Double heterozygotes were more radiosensitive than animals haploinsufficient for either gene alone Heavy ions were much more effective than x-rays in inducing cataracts of all grades in animals of all genotypes A detailed analysis suggest that the RBE varies to some extent with the genotype of the animal and the cataract grade

  16. NMR studies in chemistry. I. Organometallic tin and geramanium compounds. II. The sorbitol pathway in intact lenses

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, W.F.

    1985-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy has been utilized in the study of two very different chemical problems. The bonding and structure of various cyclopropyl derivatives of tin and germanium has been investigated by means of Sn-119, Ge-73, C-13, and H-1 NMR spectroscopy. Intact rabbit lenses have also been studied using NMR spectroscopy with regard to diabetic cataract formation. C-13 and P-31 NMR spectroscopies have been utilized in the study of the sorbitol pathway and aldose reductase inhibition.

  17. Increased risk of ischemic heart disease among subjects with cataracts

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Wei-Syun; Lin, Cheng-Li; Chang, Shih-Sheng; Chen, Ming-Fong; Chang, Kuan-Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Association between cataract and the risk of ischemic heart disease (IHD) development is not completely clear. Purpose: The primary aim of the study was to evaluate the association between cataract and the risk of incident IHD. The secondary aim was to investigate the subsequent IHD risk of patients with cataracts undergoing cataract surgery. Methods: Retrospective data from the Longitudinal Health Insurance Database 2000 (LHID2000) was analyzed. Study participants were composed of patients with cataracts (International Classification of Diseases, 9th Revision, Clinical Modification [ICD-9-CM] code 366) (n = 32,456), and a comparison cohort without the cataracts (n = 32,456) from 2000 to 2010. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to address the hazard ratio (HR) of IHD associated with cataract. Results: Within 12 years of follow up, the overall incidence rates of IHD were 24.2 per 1000 person-years in the cataract cohort and 18.2 per 1000 person-years in the noncataract cohort with an adjusted hazard ratio (aHR) of 1.35 (95% CI = 1.29–1.41; P < 0.001). Furthermore, the cataract patients undergoing cataract surgery were associated with a higher risk of IHD compared with those cataract patients without surgery (aHR = 1.07, 95% CI: 1.01–1.14; P < 0.05). Conclusions: Our finding suggested that patients with cataracts are at an increased risk of subsequent IHD development. PMID:27428198

  18. Triangular congenital cataract morphology associated with prenatal methamphetamine exposure.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Michael E; Schloff, Susan; Bothun, Erick D

    2009-08-01

    Bilateral congenital cataracts are often characterized by morphology, etiology, and related conditions. We report a case of unique congenital cataracts with triangular morphology and associated prenatal methamphetamine exposure. Although this association is likely coincidental, the cataract's morphology in light of the specific timing of prenatal drug use deserves reporting.

  19. Weak lensing by voids in modified lensing potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Barreira, Alexandre; Cautun, Marius; Li, Baojiu; Baugh, Carlton M.; Pascoli, Silvia E-mail: m.c.cautun@durham.ac.uk E-mail: c.m.baugh@durham.ac.uk

    2015-08-01

    We study lensing by voids in Cubic Galileon and Nonlocal gravity cosmologies, which are examples of theories of gravity that modify the lensing potential. We find voids in the dark matter and halo density fields of N-body simulations and compute their lensing signal analytically from the void density profiles, which we show are well fit by a simple analytical formula. In the Cubic Galileon model, the modifications to gravity inside voids are not screened and they approximately double the size of the lensing effects compared to GR. The difference is largely determined by the direct effects of the fifth force on lensing and less so by the modified density profiles. For this model, we also discuss the subtle impact on the force and lensing calculations caused by the screening effects of haloes that exist in and around voids. In the Nonlocal model, the impact of the modified density profiles and the direct modifications to lensing are comparable, but they boost the lensing signal by only ≈ 10%, compared with that of GR. Overall, our results suggest that lensing by voids is a promising tool to test models of gravity that modify lensing.

  20. The gene of an early onset progressive cataract (cerulean cataract) maps to 17q24

    SciTech Connect

    Armitage, M.M.; Ferrell, R.E.; Kivlin, J.D.

    1994-09-01

    Cerulean cataract is an autosomal dominant, fully penetrant, early onset, progressive cataract characterized by blue or white opacifications in the nucleus and cortex of the lens. A five generation family with 44 available affected members in three generations allowed exclusion of linkage of the cerulean cataract phenotype to lens structural protein genes and to all of the chromosomal regions to which autosomal dominant cataract phenotypes have previously been mapped. Exclusion of the plausible candidate instigated a genome-wide search utilizing short tandem repeat polymorphims. The genome search localized the cerulean cataract disease gene to chromosomal region 17q24. The three markers closest to the disease gene are D17S802 [Z({theta})=9.20 at ({theta})=0.086], D17S836 [Z({theta})=4.22 at ({theta})=0.061], and AFMa238yb5 [Z({theta})=7.11 at ({theta})=0.032]. Multipoint analysis yielded a maximum lod score of Z({theta})=11.4 between D17S802 and D17S836 at recombination rates of 0.048 and 0.013 respectively. Three genes that map near the 17q24 chromosomal region and are known to contain highly polymorphic microsatellites were tested for linkage. The genes, DHP-sensitive calcium channel gamma subunit (CACNLG), human somatastatin receptor (SSTR2), and the skeletal muscle sodium channel alpha subunit (SCN4A), were all excluded [Z({theta})=-{infinity} at ({theta})=0] as the gene causing cerulean cataract. The galactokinase (GK1) gene has not been cloned, but its map location is 17q23-q25. Galactokinase deficiency is characterized by a recessive, progressive, early onset cataract. Because of the map location of galactokinase, the age-at-onset, and progressive nature of cataracts associated with galactokinase deficiency, galactokinase is being investigated as a candidate gene for the cerulean cataract phenotype.

  1. Effects of Long-Term Treatment with Ranirestat, a Potent Aldose Reductase Inhibitor, on Diabetic Cataract and Neuropathy in Spontaneously Diabetic Torii Rats

    PubMed Central

    Ota, Ayumi; Kakehashi, Akihiro; Toyoda, Fumihiko; Kinoshita, Nozomi; Shinmura, Machiko; Takano, Hiroko; Obata, Hiroto; Matsumoto, Takafumi; Tsuji, Junichi; Dobashi, Yoh; Fujimoto, Wilfred Y.; Kawakami, Masanobu; Kanazawa, Yasunori

    2013-01-01

    We evaluated ranirestat, an aldose reductase inhibitor, in diabetic cataract and neuropathy (DN) in spontaneously diabetic Torii (SDT) rats compared with epalrestat, the positive control. Animals were divided into groups and treated once daily with oral ranirestat (0.1, 1.0, 10 mg/kg) or epalrestat (100 mg/kg) for 40 weeks, normal Sprague-Dawley rats, and untreated SDT rats. Lens opacification was scored from 0 (normal) to 3 (mature cataract). The combined scores (0–6) from both lenses represented the total for each animal. DN was assessed by measuring the motor nerve conduction velocity (MNCV) in the sciatic nerve. Sorbitol and fructose levels were measured in the lens and sciatic nerve 40 weeks after diabetes onset. Cataracts developed more in untreated rats than normal rats (P < 0.01). Ranirestat significantly (P < 0.01) inhibited rapid cataract development; epalrestat did not. Ranirestat significantly reversed the MNCV decrease (40.7 ± 0.6 m/s) in SDT rats dose-dependently (P < 0.01). Epalrestat also reversed the prevented MNCV decrease (P < 0.05). Sorbitol levels in the sciatic nerve increased significantly in SDT rats (2.05 ± 0.10 nmol/g), which ranirestat significantly suppressed dose-dependently, (P < 0.05, <0.01, and <0.01); epalrestat did not. Ranirestat prevents DN and cataract; epalrestat prevents DN only. PMID:23671855

  2. Clear Corneal Incision in Cataract Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Al Mahmood, Ammar M.; Al-Swailem, Samar A.; Behrens, Ashley

    2014-01-01

    Since the introduction of sutureless clear corneal cataract incisions, the procedure has gained increasing popularity worldwide because it offers several advantages over the traditional sutured scleral tunnels and limbal incisions. Some of these benefits include lack of conjunctival trauma, less discomfort and bleeding, absence of suture-induced astigmatism, and faster visual rehabilitation. However, an increasing incidence of postoperative endophthalmitis after clear corneal cataract surgery has been reported. Different authors have shown a significant increase up to 15-fold in the incidence of endophthalmitis following clear corneal incision compared to scleral tunnels. The aim of this report is to review the advantages and disadvantages of clear corneal incisions in cataract surgery, emphasizing on wound construction recommendations based on published literature. PMID:24669142

  3. Learning unit: Thin lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nita, L.-S.

    2012-04-01

    Learning unit: Thin lenses "Why objects seen through lenses are sometimes upright and sometimes reversed" Nita Laura Simona National College of Arts and Crafts "Constantin Brancusi", Craiova, Romania 1. GEOMETRIC OPTICS. 13 hours Introduction (models, axioms, principles, conventions) 1. Thin lenses (Types of lenses. Defining elements. Path of light rays through lenses. Image formation. Required physical quantities. Lens formulas). 2. Lens systems (Non-collated lenses. Focalless systems). 3. Human eye (Functioning as an optical system. Sight defects and their corrections). 4. Optical instruments (Characteristics exemplified by a magnifying glass. Paths of light rays through a simplified photo camera. Path of light rays through a classical microscope) (Physics curriculum for the IXth grade/ 2011). This scenario exposes a learning unit based on experimental sequences (defining specific competencies), as a succession of lessons started by noticing a problem whose solution assumes the setup of an experiment under laboratory conditions. Progressive learning of theme objectives are realised with sequential experimental steps. The central cognitive process is the induction or the generalization (development of new knowledge based on observation of examples or counterexamples of the concept to be learnt). Pupil interest in theme objectives is triggered by problem-situations, for example: "In order to better see small objects I need a magnifying glass. But when using a magnifier, small object images are sometimes seen upright and sometimes seen reversed!" Along the way, pupils' reasoning will converge to the idea: "The image of an object through a lens depends on the relative distances among object, lens, and observer". Associated learning model: EXPERIMENT Specific competencies: derived from the experiment model, in agreement with the following learning unit steps I. Evoking - Anticipation: Size of the problem, formulation of hypotheses and planning of experiment. II

  4. Cataracts induced by microwave and ionizing radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Lipman, R.M.; Tripathi, B.J.; Tripathi, R.C.

    1988-11-01

    Microwaves most commonly cause anterior and/or posterior subcapsular lenticular opacities in experimental animals and, as shown in epidemiologic studies and case reports, in human subjects. The formation of cataracts seems to be related directly to the power of the microwave and the duration of exposure. The mechanism of cataractogenesis includes deformation of heat-labile enzymes, such as glutathione peroxide, that ordinarily protect lens cell proteins and membrane lipids from oxidative damage. Oxidation of protein sulfhydryl groups and the formation of high-molecular-weight aggregates cause local variations in the orderly structure of the lens cells. An alternative mechanism is thermoelastic expansion through which pressure waves in the aqueous humor cause direct physical damage to the lens cells. Cataracts induced by ionizing radiation (e.g., X-rays and gamma rays) usually are observed in the posterior region of the lens, often in the form of a posterior subcapsular cataract. Increasing the dose of ionizing radiation causes increasing opacification of the lens, which appears after a decreasing latency period. Like cataract formation by microwaves, cataractogenesis induced by ionizing radiation is associated with damage to the lens cell membrane. Another possible mechanism is damage to lens cell DNA, with decreases in the production of protective enzymes and in sulfur-sulfur bond formation, and with altered protein concentrations. Until further definitive conclusions about the mechanisms of microwaves and ionizing radiation induced cataracts are reached, and alternative protective measures are found, one can only recommend mechanical shielding from these radiations to minimize the possibility of development of radiation-induced cataracts. 74 references.

  5. Hyaluronidase and sodium hyaluronate in cataract surgery.

    PubMed Central

    Calder, I. G.; Smith, V. H.

    1986-01-01

    The use of sodium hyaluronate in cataract surgery and intraocular lens implantation is often followed by a postoperative rise of intraocular pressure. A trial is described in which 10 patients underwent bilateral cataract extraction and Binkhorst intraocular lens implantation with the use of sodium hyaluronate. The enzyme hyaluronidase was instilled into the anterior chamber of the right eye only, to aid removal of sodium hyaluronate, and resulted in a statistically significant lowering of postoperative intraocular pressure in right eyes compared with left. Other uses of the enzyme are discussed. PMID:3718904

  6. Cataract - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... إعتام عدسة العين - العربية Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Chinese - Simplified (简体中文) Cataract English 白内障 - 简体中文 (Chinese - ... 白内障 - 简体中文 (Chinese - Simplified) Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Chinese - Traditional (繁體中文) Cataract English 白內障 - 繁體中文 (Chinese - ...

  7. Quasars and gravitational lenses.

    PubMed

    Turner, E L

    1984-03-23

    Despite the expenditure of large amounts of telescope time and other resources, most of the fundamental questions concerning quasi-stellar objects (quasars) remain unanswered. A complex phenomenology of radio, infrared, optical, and x-ray properties has accumulated but has not yielded even a satisfactory classification system. The large red shifts (distances) of quasars make them very valuable tools for studying cosmology and the properties of intervening matter in the Universe through observations of absorption lines and gravitational lenses.

  8. Ethanol extract of Moringa oliefera prevents in vitro glucose induced cataract on isolated goat eye lens

    PubMed Central

    Kurmi, Raghvendra; Ganeshpurkar, Aditya; Bansal, Divya; Agnihotri, Abhishek; Dubey, Nazneen

    2014-01-01

    Aim of Study: The aim of current work was to evaluate in vitro anticataract potential of Moringa oliefera extract. Materials and Methods: Goat eye lenses were divided into 4 groups; Group served as control, Group II as toxic control, Group III and Group IV were incubated in extract (250 μg/ml and 500 μg/ml of extract of M. oliefera) Group II, III and IV were incubated in 55 mM glucose in artificial aqueous humor to induce lens opacification. Estimation of total, water soluble protein, catalase, glutathione and malondialdehyde along with photographic evaluation of lens was done. Results: Group II (toxic control) lenses showed high amount of MDA (Malondialdehyde), soluble, insoluble protein, decreased catalase and glutathione levels, while lenses treated with Moringa oliefera extract (Group III and Group IV) showed significant (* P < 0.05) reduction in MDA and increased level of catalase, glutathione, total and soluble protein. Conclusion: Results of present findings suggest protective effect of Moringa oliefera in prevention of in vitro glucose induced cataract. PMID:24008789

  9. Can Naturoptics Vision Improvement Methods Help Clear Cataracts, as Claimed by the Member of the Naturopathic Physicians Association of Massachusetts who Stabilized and/ or Improved Vision in all the Retinitis Pigmentosa, RP, Patients Treated by him?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDougall, Jean; McLeod, Roger

    2006-03-01

    Mac Dougall was advised against having a single crystalline lens with a slight cataract surgically removed; it would impact her ability to reengage vision's self-correcting feedback mechanisms. Her Florida ophthalmologist removed both lenses. A Massachusetts ophthalmologist was recently de-licensed for improperly performing just those services. An optometrist says reputed vision repair can easily be tracked and evaluated; we posit that Naturoptics effects on cataracts can be similarly assessed. ``Cures'' are detectable. Naturoptics users may show glaucoma reversal. EDWARD R. ELLIS, Jr., N.D. (The Chelmsford Clinic, Massachusetts), stabilizes RP, preventing blindness.

  10. Lupeol, a pentacyclic triterpenoid isolated from Vernonia cinerea attenuate selenite induced cataract formation in Sprague Dawley rat pups.

    PubMed

    Asha, Radha; Gayathri Devi, V; Abraham, Annie

    2016-02-01

    This study investigated the inhibitory effects of active component isolated from flavonoid fraction of Vernonia cinerea (FVC), lupeol on selenite induced cataract formation. Previous reports suggest that phytochemicals or natural plant products retard the process of cataractogenesis by scavenging free oxygen radicals. Hence, the present study sought to assess the potential of lupeol on in vivo selenite induced cataract models. Lupeol, a pentacyclic triterpenoid, was isolated from the ethyl acetate fraction of methanolic extract of Vernonia cinerea, follows standard chromatographic techniques. Structural elucidation of the compound was carried out using (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR, Mass spectrometry together with other complementary techniques (UV and IR). From these, the isolated compound was identified as Lupeol (3'-hydroxylup-20(29)-ene). The antioxidant activity was comparatively studied using DPPH radical scavenging and FRAP assay. Lupeol exhibited higher DPPH radical scavenging activity as well as reducing power assay. In this study, cataract was induced by a single subcutaneous injection of sodium selenite (4 μg/g body weight) on rat pups. Lupeol was administered orally from 8th day upto 21st day at a concentration 25 μg/g body weight. Cataract was visualized on 16th day with the help of an ophthalmoscope and later on with the naked eye. On the 30th day, rats were euthanized by sodium pentothal injection, lenses were excised and the biochemical parameters such as activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), Glutathione peroxidase (GPx), Glutathione reductase (GR), Glutathione-S-transferase (GST), Ca(2+) ATPase, glutathione content (GSH), reactive oxygen species (ROS), lipid peroxidation products (malondialdehyde) were estimated and found effective in the treatment of cataract by lupeol.

  11. Lupeol, a pentacyclic triterpenoid isolated from Vernonia cinerea attenuate selenite induced cataract formation in Sprague Dawley rat pups.

    PubMed

    Asha, Radha; Gayathri Devi, V; Abraham, Annie

    2016-02-01

    This study investigated the inhibitory effects of active component isolated from flavonoid fraction of Vernonia cinerea (FVC), lupeol on selenite induced cataract formation. Previous reports suggest that phytochemicals or natural plant products retard the process of cataractogenesis by scavenging free oxygen radicals. Hence, the present study sought to assess the potential of lupeol on in vivo selenite induced cataract models. Lupeol, a pentacyclic triterpenoid, was isolated from the ethyl acetate fraction of methanolic extract of Vernonia cinerea, follows standard chromatographic techniques. Structural elucidation of the compound was carried out using (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR, Mass spectrometry together with other complementary techniques (UV and IR). From these, the isolated compound was identified as Lupeol (3'-hydroxylup-20(29)-ene). The antioxidant activity was comparatively studied using DPPH radical scavenging and FRAP assay. Lupeol exhibited higher DPPH radical scavenging activity as well as reducing power assay. In this study, cataract was induced by a single subcutaneous injection of sodium selenite (4 μg/g body weight) on rat pups. Lupeol was administered orally from 8th day upto 21st day at a concentration 25 μg/g body weight. Cataract was visualized on 16th day with the help of an ophthalmoscope and later on with the naked eye. On the 30th day, rats were euthanized by sodium pentothal injection, lenses were excised and the biochemical parameters such as activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), Glutathione peroxidase (GPx), Glutathione reductase (GR), Glutathione-S-transferase (GST), Ca(2+) ATPase, glutathione content (GSH), reactive oxygen species (ROS), lipid peroxidation products (malondialdehyde) were estimated and found effective in the treatment of cataract by lupeol. PMID:26697995

  12. Cataract formation mechanisms and risk in aviation and space crews.

    PubMed

    Jones, Jeffrey A; McCarten, Michael; Manuel, Keith; Djojonegoro, Baby; Murray, Jocelyn; Feiversen, Al; Wear, Mary

    2007-04-01

    Induction of cataracts by occupational exposure in flight crew has been an important topic of interest in aerospace medicine over the past 5 yr, in association with numerous reports of flight-associated disease incidences. Due to numerous confounding variables, it has been difficult to determine whether there is increased cataract risk directly caused by interaction with the flight environment, specifically associated with added radiation exposure during flight. Military aviator records from the U.S. Air Force (USAF) and U.S. Navy (USN) and U.S. astronauts at NASA's Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center were evaluated for the presence, location, and age of diagnosis of cataracts. Military aviators with cataracts were found to have a younger average age at onset of their cataracts compared with astronauts with cataracts, however the prevalence of cataracts was found to be higher in astronauts than in military aviators. U.S. Air Force and U.S. Navy aviators' cataracts were most commonly located in the posterior subcapsular region of the lens while astronauts' cataracts were most likely to originate in the cortical zone. A prospective clinical trial which controls for confounding variables in examination technique, cataract classification, diet, exposure, and pharmacological intervention is needed to determine what percentage of the risk for cataracts is due to radiation, and how to best develop countermeasures to protect flight crews from radiation bioeffects in the future.

  13. Thermal lensing in optical fibers.

    PubMed

    Dong, Liang

    2016-08-22

    Average powers from fiber lasers have reached the point that a quantitative understanding of thermal lensing and its impact on transverse mode instability is becoming critical. Although thermal lensing is well known qualitatively, there is a general lack of a simple method for quantitative analysis. In this work, we first conduct a study of thermal lensing in optical fibers based on a perturbation technique. The perturbation technique becomes increasingly inaccurate as thermal lensing gets stronger. It, however, provides a basis for determining a normalization factor to use in a more accurate numerical study. A simple thermal lensing threshold condition is developed. The impact of thermal lensing on transverse mode instability is also studied. PMID:27557260

  14. [Objective evaluation the application of femtosecond laser in cataract surgery].

    PubMed

    Liu, Y Z

    2016-02-01

    Femtosecond laser-assisted cataract surgery (FLACS) is a novel technology and the biggest revolution in the field of cataract in the latest several years. However, increasing large-scale population randomized controlled trials (RCT) have demonstrated that FLACS does not provide significant advantages over conventional phacoemulsification cataract surgery (CPCS) for common cataract patients. Furthermore, the cost and space requirement of the femtosecond equipment are another two limitations for the universal application of FSL in cataract surgery. However, FLACS may be beneficial for complex cataract situations, such as lens dislocation, zonular laxity, traumatic cataract, low preoperative endothelial cell values, and significant corneal astigmatism. With the progress of science and technology, FLACS can be expected to achieve integration with phacoemulsification systems, and equipment costs can be reduced, making it more widely used in clinical practice in the future. PMID:26906700

  15. Cat-Map: putting cataract on the map

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Thomas M.; Hejtmancik, J. Fielding

    2010-01-01

    Lens opacities, or cataract(s), may be inherited as a classic Mendelian disorder usually with early-onset or, more commonly, acquired with age as a multi-factorial or complex trait. Many genetic forms of cataract have been described in mice and other animal models. Considerable progress has been made in mapping and identifying the genes and mutations responsible for inherited forms of cataract, and genetic determinants of age-related cataract are beginning to be discovered. To provide a convenient and accurate summary of current information focused on the increasing genetic complexity of Mendelian and age-related cataract we have created an online chromosome map and reference database for cataract in humans and mice (Cat-Map). PMID:21042563

  16. Astrophysical observations: lensing and eclipsing Einstein's theories.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Charles L

    2005-02-11

    Albert Einstein postulated the equivalence of energy and mass, developed the theory of special relativity, explained the photoelectric effect, and described Brownian motion in five papers, all published in 1905, 100 years ago. With these papers, Einstein provided the framework for understanding modern astrophysical phenomena. Conversely, astrophysical observations provide one of the most effective means for testing Einstein's theories. Here, I review astrophysical advances precipitated by Einstein's insights, including gravitational redshifts, gravitational lensing, gravitational waves, the Lense-Thirring effect, and modern cosmology. A complete understanding of cosmology, from the earliest moments to the ultimate fate of the universe, will require developments in physics beyond Einstein, to a unified theory of gravity and quantum physics. PMID:15705841

  17. Astrophysical Observations: Lensing and Eclipsing Einstein's Theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, Charles L.

    2005-02-01

    Albert Einstein postulated the equivalence of energy and mass, developed the theory of special relativity, explained the photoelectric effect, and described Brownian motion in five papers, all published in 1905, 100 years ago. With these papers, Einstein provided the framework for understanding modern astrophysical phenomena. Conversely, astrophysical observations provide one of the most effective means for testing Einstein's theories. Here, I review astrophysical advances precipitated by Einstein's insights, including gravitational redshifts, gravitational lensing, gravitational waves, the Lense-Thirring effect, and modern cosmology. A complete understanding of cosmology, from the earliest moments to the ultimate fate of the universe, will require developments in physics beyond Einstein, to a unified theory of gravity and quantum physics.

  18. [To guard against mistakes in selection of intraocular lenses].

    PubMed

    He, Shou-zhi

    2008-04-01

    Development of different kinds of new intraocular lenses (IOL) provide more selections to meet various clinical requirements, which may plays an active role in making cataract surgery more perfectible. But there are many misunderstandings about how to select the proper IOL. For example, "the expensive one is the best one", "new product is absolutely perfect", and so on. Some surgeons prefer more practice and ignore the summary of the experiences. Someone unilaterally exaggerates some special function of IOL When selecting the IOL, it is a common challenge for us to fully consider the patients needs, and properly manage the relationship between the basic need and special need, and to avoid fanaticism, and provide the best benefits to the patients. PMID:18844010

  19. Radiation Blocking Lenses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    The Biomedical Optical Company of America's Eagle 475 lens absorbs 100 percent of all photowavelengths considered hazardous to eye tissue, including ultraviolet and blue light, which are considered contributors to cataract and age-related macular degeneration. The lens absorbs hazardous wavelengths, but allows a higher percentage of visually useful areas of the spectrum to pass through. Polarization blocks out irritating glint and glare and heightens visual acuity. The Eagle 475 sunglasses are the latest in a series of spinoffs that originated at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory where two scientists developed a protective, welding curtain that filtered out harmful irradiance. The result was a commercial curtain that absorbs filters and scatters light, providing protection for personnel in welding areas. Further research focused on protective industrial glasses and later on consumer products.

  20. Visual outcome following extracapsular cataract extraction in mature cataracts with pseudoexfoliation syndrome: A retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Al-Mujaini, Abdullah; Wali, Upender K.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: To report the best corrected visual acuity, at the end of one year, in 33 patients (35 eyes), who underwent extracapsular cataract extraction (ECCE) with posterior chamber intraocular lens implantation (PC-IOL) for mature and hypermature cataracts, with pseudoexfoliation (PEX). Design: Retrospective, non-comparative, single-institutional (Sultan Qaboos University Hospital) study. Participants: Thirty-three patients with mature and hypermature cataracts, with PEX operated upon between January 2007 and December 2008, by one surgeon (AM). Materials and Methods: Retrospective study of thirty-three patients (35 eyes) with mature and hypermature cataracts, with ocular PEX, evaluating the visual outcome at the end of 12 months following ECCE with PC-IOL. Results: Thirty eyes (85.71%) showed improvement in the best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) ranging from 0.2 to 1.0 Snellen lines. Four eyes (11.43%) had unchanged BCVA from the baseline. There were no intraoperative complications in any patient. One eye (2.86%) that did not improve developed retinal detachment at three months follow-up, and was referred to the Vireoretinal Unit and follow-up has been lost. Conclusion: Extracapsular cataract extraction is a safe and effective technique in eyes with mature and hypermature cataracts with PEX. PMID:23772121

  1. Posterior subcapsular cataract and inhaled corticosteroid therapy.

    PubMed Central

    Abuekteish, F.; Kirkpatrick, J. N.; Russell, G.

    1995-01-01

    BACKGROUND--Although posterior subcapsular cataract complicates both systemic and topical corticosteroid therapy, the literature on the effects of inhaled corticosteroids is conflicting. METHODS--One hundred and forty children and young adults on inhaled corticosteroids were examined by slit lamp ophthalmoscopy after pupillary dilatation; 103 had received one or more short courses (< or = 7 days) of oral corticosteroids in the management of acute asthmatic attacks and four had also received one or more prolonged courses (> or = 4 weeks) of alternate day oral corticosteroid therapy. RESULTS--Bilateral posterior subcapsular cataract was identified in one girl who had received several prolonged courses of oral corticosteroids, but was not identified in any other patient. CONCLUSIONS--There is no evidence to support the contention that inhaled corticosteroid therapy on its own, or in association with short courses of oral corticosteroid therapy, might cause cataracts. Although children receiving long term systemic corticosteroid therapy should be screened for cataracts, this is unnecessary in children on inhaled corticosteroids alone. PMID:7638813

  2. Vision. Realignment of cones after cataract removal.

    PubMed

    Smallman, H S; MacLeod, D I; Doyle, P

    2001-08-01

    Through unique observations of an adult case of bilateral congenital cataract removal, we have found evidence that retinal photoreceptors will swiftly realign towards the brightest regions in the pupils of the eye. Cones may be phototropic, actively orientating themselves towards light like sunflowers in a field.

  3. Space radiation and cataracts in astronauts.

    PubMed

    Cucinotta, F A; Manuel, F K; Jones, J; Iszard, G; Murrey, J; Djojonegro, B; Wear, M

    2001-11-01

    For over 30 years, astronauts in Earth orbit or on missions to the moon have been exposed to space radiation comprised of high-energy protons and heavy ions and secondary particles produced in collisions with spacecraft and tissue. Large uncertainties exist in the projection of risks of late effects from space radiation such as cancer and cataracts due to the paucity [corrected] of epidemiological data. Here we present epidemiological [corrected] data linking an increased risk of cataracts for astronauts with higher lens doses (>8 mSv) of space radiation relative to other astronauts with lower lens doses (<8 mSv). Our study uses historical data for cataract incidence in the 295 astronauts participating in NASA's Longitudinal Study of Astronaut Health (LSAH) and individual occupational radiation exposure data. These results, while preliminary because of the use of subjective scoring methods, suggest that relatively low doses of space radiation may predispose crew to [corrected] an increased incidence and early appearance of cataracts. PMID:11604058

  4. Ultraviolet absorption by contact lenses and the significance on the ocular anterior segment.

    PubMed

    Chandler, Heather

    2011-07-01

    It is well established that both acute and chronic ultraviolet (UV) exposure can lead to various ophthalmic pathologic conditions in the anterior segment. Several scientific studies have demonstrated that after UV exposure, the unprotected cornea is vulnerable to damage in the epithelial, stromal, and endothelial cellular layers. DNA damage, apoptosis, and altered protease expression are all examples of harmful changes that can occur within the cornea after irradiation. Beyond the cornea, damage associated with UV exposure, such as decreased antioxidant levels and increased reactive oxygen species production, has been noted in the aqueous humor and crystalline lens. Ultraviolet-blocking contact lenses have the potential to provide protection against such exposure to harmful UV radiation. Experimental use of UV-absorbing contact lenses prevented detrimental cellular changes to the cornea and maintained corneal clarity after UV exposure. Additionally, studies suggest that shielding the aqueous humor and crystalline lens from irradiation with UV-absorbing contact lenses aids in protection against precataractous changes. Despite ongoing research, to date, neither chronic nor clinical studies have been performed in humans to demonstrate that wearing UV-blocking contact lenses reduces the risk of developing cataracts or other ocular disorders within the anterior segment. This article will discuss the impact of UV exposure on ocular tissue and the need for adequate UV protection, with particular emphasis on UV-blocking contact lenses.

  5. First report of congenital or infantile cataract in deranged proteoglycan metabolism with released xylose

    PubMed Central

    Sulochana, K; Ramakrishnan, S; Vasanthi, S; Madhavan, H; Arunagiri, K; Punitham, R

    1997-01-01

    AIM—To investigate the chemical pathology in the blood and lens, in cases of congenital or infantile cataract in children excreting predominantly non-reducing carbohydrates in urine.
METHODS—Urine samples from children with congenital or infantile cataract, and age and sex-matched controls, were analysed for (i) inherited errors of metabolism, (ii) paper chromatography of sugars, (iii) spectrophotometric assay of glycosaminoglycans (GAG), (iv) cetyl trimethyl ammonium bromide test, (v) electrophoresis using Alcian blue, (vi) ion exchange chromatography with IR 120 resin, and (vii) HPLC for xylose. Blood and lens material were also tested for GAG fragments and xylose. β Glucuronidase was assayed in lymphocytes and urine.
RESULTS—Of 220 children of both sexes below 12 years of age, with congenital or infantile cataract treated in Sankara Nethralaya, Madras, India, during a period of 2 years, 145 excreted fragments of GAG (heparan and chondroitin sulphates) in their urine. There was no such excretion among the control group of 50 children. The same was found accumulated in the blood and lenses of affected children. In addition, xylose was present in small amounts in the urine and blood and xylitol was present in the lens. There was a significant elevation in the activity of β glucuronidase in lymphocytes and urine, when compared with normals. All the above findings suggest deranged proteoglycan metabolism. As the urine contained mostly GAG fragments and very little xylose, Benedict's reagent was not reduced. This ruled out galactosaemia.
CONCLUSION—An increase of β glucuronidase activity might have caused extensive fragmentation of GAG with resultant accumulation in the blood and lens and excretion in urine. Small amounts of xylose may have come from xylose links between GAG and core protein of proteoglycans. Owing to their polyanionic nature, GAG fragments in the lens might abstract sodium, and with it water, thereby increasing the hydration

  6. A Common Ancestral Mutation in CRYBB3 Identified in Multiple Consanguineous Families with Congenital Cataracts

    PubMed Central

    Irum, Bushra; Khan, Arif O.; Wang, Qiwei; Li, David; Khan, Asma A.; Husnain, Tayyab; Akram, Javed; Riazuddin, Sheikh

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study was performed to investigate the genetic determinants of autosomal recessive congenital cataracts in large consanguineous families. Methods Affected individuals underwent a detailed ophthalmological examination and slit-lamp photographs of the cataractous lenses were obtained. An aliquot of blood was collected from all participating family members and genomic DNA was extracted from white blood cells. Initially, a genome-wide scan was performed with genomic DNAs of family PKCC025 followed by exclusion analysis of our familial cohort of congenital cataracts. Protein-coding exons of CRYBB1, CRYBB2, CRYBB3, and CRYBA4 were sequenced bidirectionally. A haplotype was constructed with SNPs flanking the causal mutation for affected individuals in all four families, while the probability that the four familial cases have a common founder was estimated using EM and CHM-based algorithms. The expression of Crybb3 in the developing murine lens was investigated using TaqMan assays. Results The clinical and ophthalmological examinations suggested that all affected individuals had nuclear cataracts. Genome-wide linkage analysis localized the causal phenotype in family PKCC025 to chromosome 22q with statistically significant two-point logarithm of odds (LOD) scores. Subsequently, we localized three additional families, PKCC063, PKCC131, and PKCC168 to chromosome 22q. Bidirectional Sanger sequencing identified a missense variation: c.493G>C (p.Gly165Arg) in CRYBB3 that segregated with the disease phenotype in all four familial cases. This variation was not found in ethnically matched control chromosomes, the NHLBI exome variant server, or the 1000 Genomes or dbSNP databases. Interestingly, all four families harbor a unique disease haplotype that strongly suggests a common founder of the causal mutation (p<1.64E-10). We observed expression of Crybb3 in the mouse lens as early as embryonic day 15 (E15), and expression remained relatively steady throughout

  7. [Reliable UV-light protection in intraocular lenses--scientific rationale and quality requirements].

    PubMed

    Augustin, A J

    2014-09-01

    Since the late 1980s implantation of UV-blocker intraocular lenses during cataract surgery has become an internationally accepted standard. Last year the Kassenärztliche Vereinigung Bayern (KVB) and statutory health insurance organisations proposed for the first time quality criteria for intraocular lenses (IOL), thereby including exact parameters for the amount of UV light transmission (≤10% at 400 nm). Since then, the discussion has been raised again as to what extent IOLs should filter or block UV light. In this article, exact definitions of spectral subbands within the optical radiation band are given. Today, 400 nm is the internationally accepted standard to distinguish UV light and visible light. Moreover, exposure of the eye to UV radiation is described as well as mechanisms of photooxidative damage to the retina. Comprehensive laboratory and animal experimental studies show that light of short wave lengths, i.e., above all UV light but also blue light, may induce photochemical damage to the retina. Primary sites of such damage are both the outer segments of the photoreceptors and the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). Physiological protective mechanisms of the eye, such as filtering properties of different ocular media are described in detail. Cornea, aqueous and vitreous absorb UV radiation below 300 nm, while the natural adult lens absorbs UV radiation between 300 and 400 nm. This protection is lost when the lens is removed by cataract surgery and thus should be restored. UV light does not contribute to vision but damages retinal structures. Therefore, UV-blocking intraocular lenses with a 10% cut-off near 400 nm should be implanted during cataract surgery. This ensures sufficient retinal protection after surgery. These theoretical considerations are supported by results from animal and clinical studies.

  8. Hollow lensing duct

    DOEpatents

    Beach, Raymond J.; Honea, Eric C.; Bibeau, Camille; Mitchell, Scott; Lang, John; Maderas, Dennis; Speth, Joel; Payne, Stephen A.

    2000-01-01

    A hollow lensing duct to condense (intensify) light using a combination of focusing using a spherical or cylindrical lens followed by reflective waveguiding. The hollow duct tapers down from a wide input side to a narrow output side, with the input side consisting of a lens that may be coated with an antireflective coating for more efficient transmission into the duct. The inside surfaces of the hollow lens duct are appropriately coated to be reflective, preventing light from escaping by reflection as it travels along the duct (reflective waveguiding). The hollow duct has various applications for intensifying light, such as in the coupling of diode array pump light to solid state lasing materials.

  9. Galaxies as gravitational lenses.

    PubMed

    Barnothy, J; Barnothy, M F

    1968-10-18

    Of all the galaxies in the visible part of the universe, 500 million are seen through intervening galaxies. In some instances the foreground galaxy will act as a gravitational lens and produce distorted and (in brightness) greatly amplified images of the galaxy behind it; such images may simulate starlike superluminous objects such as quasars (quasi-stellar objects). The number of gravitational lenses is several times greater than the number of quasars yet observed. In other instances the superposition of the image upon a visible foreground galaxy may simulate morphological configurations resembling N-type, dumbbell, spiral, or barred-spiral galaxies. PMID:17836654

  10. RHIC electron lenses upgrades

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, X.; Altinbas, Z.; Bruno, D.; Binello, S.; Costanzo, M.; Drees, A.; Fischer, W.; Gassner, D. M.; Hock, J.; Hock, K.; Harvey, M.; Luo, Y.; Marusic, A.; Mi, C.; Mernick, K.; Minty, M.; Michnoff, R.; Miller, T. A.; Pikin, A. I.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Samms, T.; Shrey, T. C.; Schoefer, V.; Tan, Y.; Than, R.; Thieberger, P.; White, S. M.

    2015-05-03

    In the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) 100 GeV polarized proton run in 2015, two electron lenses were used to partially compensate for the head-on beam-beam effect for the first time. Here, we describe the design of the current electron lens, detailing the hardware modifications made after the 2014 commissioning run with heavy ions. A new electron gun with 15-mm diameter cathode is characterized. The electron beam transverse profile was measured using a YAG screen and fitted with a Gaussian distribution. During operation, the overlap of the electron and proton beams was achieved using the electron backscattering detector in conjunction with an automated orbit control program.

  11. Contact lenses in aviation: the Marine Corps experience.

    PubMed

    Mittelman, M H; Siegel, B; Still, D L

    1993-06-01

    In an attempt to limit safety and health risks, Naval Aeromedical Policy has historically prohibited the use of contact lenses in the Navy and Marine Corps Class 1 Aviation Personnel (pilots), approximately 18% of whom require spectacles. Recent technological advancements have rendered spectacles functionally incompatible with some mission-essential masks, goggles, and imaging devices, thus forcing a re-examination of existing policy. Recent U.S. Army and U.S. Air Force aviation studies favorably compare the performance of contact lenses to spectacles. In order to test the application of contact lenses in the unique U.S. Marine Corps aviation environment, encompassing shipboard, land-based, and forwardly-deployed units, 90 aviation personnel assigned to several deploying squadrons were evaluated for contact lenses; flex-wear disposable lenses were the primary modality of choice. Of the subjects, 68 (73%) were successfully fit and continued contact lens wear for a period of 16 months. Safety and health were not compromised, and job performance was favorably affected. No cases of ulcerative keratitis or vision loss were reported. The first U.S. Marine Corps aviation contact lens study supports the growing belief that contact lenses can be safely and effectively applied in the critical and hazardous aviation environment. PMID:8338502

  12. An eye on nutrition: The role of vitamins, essential fatty acids, and antioxidants in age-related macular degeneration, dry eye syndrome, and cataract.

    PubMed

    McCusker, Meagen M; Durrani, Khayyam; Payette, Michael J; Suchecki, Jeanine

    2016-01-01

    Visual impairment is a global epidemic. In developing countries, nutritional deficiency and cataracts continue to be the leading cause of blindness, whereas age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and cataracts are the leading causes in developed nations. The World Health Organization has instituted VISION 2020: "The Right to Sight" as a global mission to put an end to worldwide blindness. In industrialized societies, patients, physicians, researchers, nutritionists, and biochemists have been looking toward vitamins and nutrients to prevent AMD, cataracts, and dry eye syndrome (DES). Nutrients from the AREDS2 study (lutein, zeaxanthin, vitamin C, vitamin E, zinc, copper, eicosapentanoic acid [EPA], and docosahexanoic acid [DHA]) set forth by the National Institutes of Health remain the most proven nutritional therapy for reducing the rate of advanced AMD. Omega-3 fatty acids, especially DHA, have been found to improve DES in randomized clinical trials. Conflicting results have been seen with regard to multivitamin supplementation on the prevention of cataract. PMID:26903189

  13. Comparison of retinal image quality with spherical and customized aspheric intraocular lenses

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Huanqing; Goncharov, Alexander V.; Dainty, Chris

    2012-01-01

    We hypothesize that an intraocular lens (IOL) with higher-order aspheric surfaces customized for an individual eye provides improved retinal image quality, despite the misalignments that accompany cataract surgery. To test this hypothesis, ray-tracing eye models were used to investigate 10 designs of mono-focal single lens IOLs with rotationally symmetric spherical, aspheric, and customized surfaces. Retinal image quality of pseudo-phakic eyes using these IOLs together with individual variations in ocular and IOL parameters, are evaluated using a Monte Carlo analysis. We conclude that customized lenses should give improved retinal image quality despite the random errors resulting from IOL insertion. PMID:22574257

  14. Laminated Fresnel lenses

    SciTech Connect

    Jebens, R.W.

    1980-04-01

    A fabrication method for making plastic-on-glass laminated Fresnel lenses is discussed. These Fresnel lenses are for application in an RCA solar photovoltaic concentrator array now in the prototype stage of development. This laminated Fresnel lens fabrication method consists of making a Dow Corning J RTV silastic rubber mold of a master lens array. This mold is used to vacuum cast only the lens facets onto a low-iron tempered-glass substrate with an epoxy resin such as Hysol 0S 1000, a bisphenol-A resin with a flexibilizer that is anhydride cured. Cast acrylic Fresnel lens arrays commercialy available have potential cleaning and abrasion problems, have very large thermal expansion, and have dimensional uncertainties in their manufacture. The laminated lens is dimensionally stable with low thermal expansion, has good cleaning characteristics, and is very inexpensive in materials cost. The measured transmission of such a lens on low-iron glass is 80.4% compared with 85.1% for a cast acrylic lens, and the optical quality is good enough for application in the 100X to 200X concentration range. An approach to making large lens arrays (3 by 6 ft) on a commercial scale is explored.

  15. Hydrophilic Acrylic versus PMMA Intraocular Lens Implantation in Pediatric Cataract Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Panahi-Bazaz, Mahmoud-Reza; Zamani, Mitra; Abazar, Bijan

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To compare primary implantation of foldable hydrophilic acrylic with polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) intraocular lenses (IOLs) in pediatric cataract surgery in terms of short-term complications and visual outcomes. Methods This randomized clinical trial included 40 eyes of 31 consecutive pediatric patients aged 1 to 6 years with unilateral or bilateral congenital cataracts undergoing cataract surgery with primary IOL implantation. Two types of IOLs including foldable hydrophilic acrylic and rigid PMMA were randomly implanted in the capsular bag during surgery. Primary posterior capsulotomy and anterior vitrectomy were performed in all eyes. Patients were followed for at least 1 year. Intra- and postoperative complications, visual outcomes and refractive errors were compared between the study groups. Results Mean age was 3.2±1.8 years in the hydrophilic acrylic group and 3.7±1.3 years in the PMMA group. Mean follow-up period was 19.6±5 (12–29) months. No intraoperative complication occurred in any group. Postoperative uveitis was seen in 2 (10%) eyes in the acrylic group versus 5 (25%) eyes in the PMMA group (P=0.40). Other postoperative complications including pigment deposition (30%), iridocorneal adhesions (10%) and posterior synechiae formation (10%), were seen only in the PMMA group. The visual axis remained completely clear and visual outcomes were generally favorable and comparable in the study groups. Conclusion In pediatric eyes undergoing lensectomy with primary posterior capsulotomy and anterior vitrectomy, hydrophilic acrylic IOLs are comparable to PMMA IOLs in terms of biocompatibility and visual axis clarity, and seem to entail less frequent postoperative complications. PMID:23198075

  16. Cataract production in mice by heavy charged argon, neon, and carbon particles

    SciTech Connect

    Jose, J.G.; Ainsworth, E.J.

    1983-06-01

    The cataractogenic potential in mice of heavy charged particles from the Bevalac was examined in relation to dose, linear energy transfer (LET), and time following exposure. BALB/c x C57/bl/sub 6/(CB/sub 6/F/sub 1/) mice were exposed to graded single doses (0.05 to 0.9 Gy) of 570-MeV /sup 40/Ar, 425-MeV /sup 20/Ne, or 400-MeV /sup 12/C particles in the plateau portion of the Bragg curve. Lenses were examined by slit lamp biomicroscopy over a 21-month period. The cataract severity was scored subjectively on a scale of 0 to 4 and compared to the opacities induced by 225-kVp X rays. Both the onset and density of the lens opacities were related to dose, and opacification progressed throughout the entire period of observation. In terms of degree of opacification and rates of onset and progression, the cataractogenic response to /sup 40/Ar particles was greater than to either /sup 20/Ne or /sup 12/C particles. Discrimination between the effects of /sup 20/Ne and /sup 12/C was possible only at the higher doses employed (0.6 and 0.9 Gy) and only at some observation times. Based on average cataract density at the several observation times, the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of /sup 40/Ar particles is estimated to be 3 to 5 over a cataract score range of about 1.5 to 3.0 (0.15 to 0.9 Gy). The RBE for /sup 20/Ne and /sup 12/C particles is probably somewhat greater than 1.0. The consistency of replicate lens examinations and challenges of the subjective scoring system are discussed.

  17. Lens transcriptome profile during cataract development in Mip-null mice.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Thomas M; Zhou, Yuefang; Shiels, Alan

    2016-09-16

    Major intrinsic protein or aquaporin-0 (MIP/AQP0) functions as a water channel and a cell-junction molecule in the vertebrate eye lens. Loss of MIP function in the lens leads to degraded optical quality and cataract formation by pathogenic mechanisms that are unclear. Here we have used microarray-hybridization analysis to detect lens transcriptome changes during cataract formation in mice that are functionally null for MIP (Mip-/-). In newborn Mip-/- lenses (P1) 11 genes were up-regulated and 18 were down-regulated (>2-fold, p=<0.05) and a similar number of genes was differentially regulated at P7. The most up-regulated genes (>6-fold) in the Mip-/- lens at P1 included those coding for a mitochondrial translocase (Timmdc1), a matrix metallopeptidase (Mmp2), a Rho GTPase-interacting protein (Ubxn11) and a transcription factor (Twist2). Apart from Mip, the most down-regulated genes (>4-fold) in the Mip-/- lens at P1 included those coding for a proteasome sub-unit (Psmd8), a ribonuclease (Pop4), and a heat-shock protein (Hspb1). Lens fiber cell degeneration in the Mip-/- lens was associated with increased numbers of TUNEL-positive cell nuclei and dramatically elevated levels of calpain-mediated proteolysis of αII-spectrin. However red-ox status, measured by glutathione and free-radical levels, was similar to that of wild-type. These data suggest that while relatively few genes (∼1.5% of the transcriptome) were differentially regulated >2-fold in the Mip-/- lens, calpain hyper-activation acts as a terminal pathogenic event during lens fiber cell death and cataract formation. PMID:27524245

  18. Lens transcriptome profile during cataract development in Mip-null mice.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Thomas M; Zhou, Yuefang; Shiels, Alan

    2016-09-16

    Major intrinsic protein or aquaporin-0 (MIP/AQP0) functions as a water channel and a cell-junction molecule in the vertebrate eye lens. Loss of MIP function in the lens leads to degraded optical quality and cataract formation by pathogenic mechanisms that are unclear. Here we have used microarray-hybridization analysis to detect lens transcriptome changes during cataract formation in mice that are functionally null for MIP (Mip-/-). In newborn Mip-/- lenses (P1) 11 genes were up-regulated and 18 were down-regulated (>2-fold, p=<0.05) and a similar number of genes was differentially regulated at P7. The most up-regulated genes (>6-fold) in the Mip-/- lens at P1 included those coding for a mitochondrial translocase (Timmdc1), a matrix metallopeptidase (Mmp2), a Rho GTPase-interacting protein (Ubxn11) and a transcription factor (Twist2). Apart from Mip, the most down-regulated genes (>4-fold) in the Mip-/- lens at P1 included those coding for a proteasome sub-unit (Psmd8), a ribonuclease (Pop4), and a heat-shock protein (Hspb1). Lens fiber cell degeneration in the Mip-/- lens was associated with increased numbers of TUNEL-positive cell nuclei and dramatically elevated levels of calpain-mediated proteolysis of αII-spectrin. However red-ox status, measured by glutathione and free-radical levels, was similar to that of wild-type. These data suggest that while relatively few genes (∼1.5% of the transcriptome) were differentially regulated >2-fold in the Mip-/- lens, calpain hyper-activation acts as a terminal pathogenic event during lens fiber cell death and cataract formation.

  19. Risk Factors for Acute Endophthalmitis following Cataract Surgery: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Liping; Lo, SingKai

    2013-01-01

    Background Acute endophthalmitis is one of the most serious complications of cataract surgery and often results in severe visual impairment. Several risk factors for acute postoperative endophthalmitis (POE) following cataract surgery have been reported but the level of evidence and strength of association is varied. The purpose of this study was to critically appraise published reports on and to summarize clinical risk factors associated with acute POE which could be easily assessed by ophthalmologists for the introduction and implementation of preventive measure. Methods A systematic review and meta-analysis of observational studies was performed. Six databases were searched with no limits on the year or language of publication. Study-specific odds ratios (Ors) or relative risk (RR) of each risk factor were pooled using a random effect model. Results A total of 6 686 169 participants with 8 963 endophthalmitis in 42 studies were analyzed. Of the nine risk factors identified in our systematic review and meta-analysis, extra- or intracapsular cataract extraction, a clear corneal incision, without intracameral cefazolin (1 mg in 0.1 ml solution), without intracameral cefuroxime (1 mg in 0.1 ml solution), post capsular rupture, silicone intraocular lenses and intraoperative complications were found strongly associated with acute endophthalmitis. Other significant factors with a lower strength of association (risk estimates generally 1.5 or less) were male gender and old age (85 years and older). Conclusions Our study provides summary data on the risk factors for acute POE. Identifying patients at high risk of this sight-threatening eye disease is important from both the public health and clinical perspectives as this would facilitate detection of disease before the onset of irreversible visual loss enabling earlier intervention. PMID:23990980

  20. Prevention of cataracts in pink-eyed RCS rats by dark rearing.

    PubMed

    O'Keefe, T L; Hess, H H; Zigler, J S; Kuwabara, T; Knapka, J J

    1990-11-01

    Royal College of Surgeons rats have hereditary retinal degeneration and associated posterior subcapsular opacities (PSO) of the lens, detectable by slitlamp at 7-8 postnatal weeks in both pink- and black-eyed rats. The retinal degeneration is intensified by light, especially in pink-eyed rats. A fourth of pink-eyed rats developed mature cataracts by 9-12 months of age, but black-eyed rats whose retinas are protected from light by pigmented irises and pigment epithelium rarely have mature cataracts (3% or less), indicating light may be a factor in cataractogenesis. Prior work had shown that dark rearing reduced the rate of retinal degeneration in pink- but not black-eyed rats, but cataracts were not studied. In the present work, pregnant pink-eyed females were placed in a darkroom 1 week before parturition. Pups were removed over intervals at 20-85 postnatal days for: (a) microscopic study of fresh lenses and of fixed, stained retina and lens, and (b) counts of cells mm-2 of the web-like vitreous cortex after it had been dissected free. The macrophage-like cells are a quantitative index of immune reaction to retinal damage. At 50-53 postnatal days, in pink-eyed cyclic light reared RCS, the mean number of macrophages was 4.6-fold that in congenic controls, but in those that were dark reared it was only 1.4-fold. This was less than the increase in cyclic light reared black-eyed RCS (2.3-fold that in congenic black-eyed controls). Total absence of light reduced retinal degeneration and the number of macrophages, and prevented PSO detectable microscopically.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  1. Prevention of cataracts in pink-eyed RCS rats by dark rearing.

    PubMed

    O'Keefe, T L; Hess, H H; Zigler, J S; Kuwabara, T; Knapka, J J

    1990-11-01

    Royal College of Surgeons rats have hereditary retinal degeneration and associated posterior subcapsular opacities (PSO) of the lens, detectable by slitlamp at 7-8 postnatal weeks in both pink- and black-eyed rats. The retinal degeneration is intensified by light, especially in pink-eyed rats. A fourth of pink-eyed rats developed mature cataracts by 9-12 months of age, but black-eyed rats whose retinas are protected from light by pigmented irises and pigment epithelium rarely have mature cataracts (3% or less), indicating light may be a factor in cataractogenesis. Prior work had shown that dark rearing reduced the rate of retinal degeneration in pink- but not black-eyed rats, but cataracts were not studied. In the present work, pregnant pink-eyed females were placed in a darkroom 1 week before parturition. Pups were removed over intervals at 20-85 postnatal days for: (a) microscopic study of fresh lenses and of fixed, stained retina and lens, and (b) counts of cells mm-2 of the web-like vitreous cortex after it had been dissected free. The macrophage-like cells are a quantitative index of immune reaction to retinal damage. At 50-53 postnatal days, in pink-eyed cyclic light reared RCS, the mean number of macrophages was 4.6-fold that in congenic controls, but in those that were dark reared it was only 1.4-fold. This was less than the increase in cyclic light reared black-eyed RCS (2.3-fold that in congenic black-eyed controls). Total absence of light reduced retinal degeneration and the number of macrophages, and prevented PSO detectable microscopically.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2249726

  2. Ultraviolet radiation as a risk factor for cataract and macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Joan E

    2011-07-01

    The human eye is constantly exposed to sunlight and artificial lighting. Light transmission through the eye is fundamental to its unique biological functions of directing vision and circadian rhythm, and therefore, light absorbed by the eye must be benign. However, exposure to the intense ambient radiation can pose a hazard particularly if the recipient is over 40 years of age. This radiation exposure can lead to impaired vision and transient or permanent blindness.Both ultraviolet-A (UV-A) and UV-B induce cataract formation and are not necessary for sight. Ultraviolet radiation is also a risk factor for damage to the retinas of children. The removal of these wavelengths from ocular exposure will greatly reduce the risk of early cataract and retinal damage. One way this may be easily done is by wearing sunglasses that block wavelengths below 400 nm (marked 400 on the glasses). However, because of the geometry of the eye, these glasses must be wraparound sunglasses to prevent reflective UV radiation from reaching the eye. Additional protection may be offered by contact lenses that absorb significant amounts of UV radiation.In addition to UV radiation, short blue visible light (400-440 nm) is a risk factor for the adult human retina. This wavelength of light is not essential for sight and not necessary for a circadian rhythm response. For those over 50 years old, it would be of value to remove these wavelengths of light with specially designed sunglasses or contact lenses to reduce the risk of age-related macular degeneration.

  3. Probing gravity at large scales through CMB lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pullen, Anthony R.; Alam, Shadab; Ho, Shirley

    2015-06-01

    We describe a methodology to probe gravity with the cosmic microwave background (CMB) lensing convergence κ, specifically by measuring EG, the ratio of the Laplacian of the gravitational scalar potential difference to the velocity divergence. Using CMB lensing instead of galaxy-galaxy lensing avoids intrinsic alignments while also lacking a hard limit on the lens redshift and significant uncertainties in the source plane. We model EG for general relativity and modified gravity, finding that EG for f(R) gravity should be scale dependent due to the scale dependence of the growth rate f. Next, we construct an estimator for EG in terms of the galaxy-CMB lensing and galaxy clustering angular power spectra, along with the redshift-space distortion parameter β. We also forecast statistical errors for EG from the current Planck CMB lensing map and the spectroscopic galaxy and quasar samples from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 11, being 9 per cent with galaxies and 8 per cent when quasars are included. We also find that upcoming spectroscopic and photometric surveys, combined with the final Planck lensing map, can measure precisely the redshift- and scale dependence of EG out to redshifts z = 2 and higher, with photometric surveys having an advantage due to their high number densities. Advanced ACTPol's lensing map will increase the EG sensitivity even further. Finally, we find that Advanced ACTPol cross-correlated with spectroscopic (photometric) surveys can differentiate between general relativity and f(R) gravity at the level of 3σ (13σ). Performing a <1 per cent measurement of EG requires a 10 per cent precision in β from Euclid or Large Synoptic Survey Telescope, currently achievable with a spectroscopic survey but difficult with only a photometric survey.

  4. Roulettes: a weak lensing formalism for strong lensing: I. Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarkson, Chris

    2016-08-01

    We present a new perspective on gravitational lensing. We describe a new extension of the weak lensing formalism capable of describing strongly lensed images. By integrating the nonlinear geodesic deviation equation, the amplification matrix of weak lensing is generalised to a sum over independent amplification tensors of increasing rank. We show how an image distorted by a generic lens may be constructed as a sum over ‘roulettes’, which are the natural curves associated with the independent spin modes of the amplification tensors. Highly distorted images can be constructed even for large sources observed near or within the Einstein radius of a lens where the shear and convergence are large. The amplitude of each roulette is formed from a sum over appropriate derivatives of the lensing potential. Consequently, measuring these individual roulettes for images around a lens gives a new way to reconstruct a strong lens mass distribution without requiring a lens model. This formalism generalises the convergence, shear and flexion of weak lensing to arbitrary order, and provides a unified bridge between the strong and weak lensing regimes. This overview paper is accompanied by a much more detailed paper II, arXiv:1603.04652.

  5. LENSED: a code for the forward reconstruction of lenses and sources from strong lensing observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tessore, Nicolas; Bellagamba, Fabio; Metcalf, R. Benton

    2016-09-01

    Robust modelling of strong lensing systems is fundamental to exploit the information they contain about the distribution of matter in galaxies and clusters. In this work, we present LENSED, a new code which performs forward parametric modelling of strong lenses. LENSED takes advantage of a massively parallel ray-tracing kernel to perform the necessary calculations on a modern graphics processing unit (GPU). This makes the precise rendering of the background lensed sources much faster, and allows the simultaneous optimisation of tens of parameters for the selected model. With a single run, the code is able to obtain the full posterior probability distribution for the lens light, the mass distribution and the background source at the same time. LENSED is first tested on mock images which reproduce realistic space-based observations of lensing systems. In this way, we show that it is able to recover unbiased estimates of the lens parameters, even when the sources do not follow exactly the assumed model. Then, we apply it to a subsample of the SLACS lenses, in order to demonstrate its use on real data. The results generally agree with the literature, and highlight the flexibility and robustness of the algorithm.

  6. Subaru Weak Lensing Measurements of Four Strong Lensing Clusters: Are Lensing Clusters Over-Concentrated?

    SciTech Connect

    Oguri, Masamune; Hennawi, Joseph F.; Gladders, Michael D.; Dahle, Haakon; Natarajan, Priyamvada; Dalal, Neal; Koester, Benjamin P.; Sharon, Keren; Bayliss, Matthew

    2009-01-29

    We derive radial mass profiles of four strong lensing selected clusters which show prominent giant arcs (Abell 1703, SDSS J1446+3032, SDSS J1531+3414, and SDSS J2111-0115), by combining detailed strong lens modeling with weak lensing shear measured from deep Subaru Suprime-cam images. Weak lensing signals are detected at high significance for all four clusters, whose redshifts range from z = 0.28 to 0.64. We demonstrate that adding strong lensing information with known arc redshifts significantly improves constraints on the mass density profile, compared to those obtained from weak lensing alone. While the mass profiles are well fitted by the universal form predicted in N-body simulations of the {Lambda}-dominated cold dark matter model, all four clusters appear to be slightly more centrally concentrated (the concentration parameters c{sub vir} {approx} 8) than theoretical predictions, even after accounting for the bias toward higher concentrations inherent in lensing selected samples. Our results are consistent with previous studies which similarly detected a concentration excess, and increases the total number of clusters studied with the combined strong and weak lensing technique to ten. Combining our sample with previous work, we find that clusters with larger Einstein radii are more anomalously concentrated. We also present a detailed model of the lensing cluster Abell 1703 with constraints from multiple image families, and find the dark matter inner density profile to be cuspy with the slope consistent with -1, in agreement with expectations.

  7. Surface Modification of Intraocular Lenses

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Qi; Cheng, George Pak-Man; Chiu, Kin; Wang, Gui-Qin

    2016-01-01

    Objective: This paper aimed to review the current literature on the surface modification of intraocular lenses (IOLs). Data Sources: All articles about surface modification of IOLs published up to 2015 were identified through a literature search on both PubMed and ScienceDirect. Study Selection: The articles on the surface modification of IOLs were included, but those on design modification and surface coating were excluded. Results: Technology of surface modification included plasma, ion beam, layer-by-layer self-assembly, ultraviolet radiation, and ozone. The main molecules introduced into IOLs surface were poly (ethylene glycol), polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane, 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine, TiO2, heparin, F-heparin, titanium, titanium nitride, vinyl pyrrolidone, and inhibitors of cytokines. The surface modification either resulted in a more hydrophobic lens, a more hydrophilic lens, or a lens with a hydrophilic anterior and hydrophobic posterior surface. Advances in research regarding surface modification of IOLs had led to a better biocompatibility in both in vitro and animal experiments. Conclusion: The surface modification is an efficient, convenient, economic and promising method to improve the biocompatibility of IOLs. PMID:26830993

  8. Elevated Frequency of Cataracts in Birds from Chernobyl

    PubMed Central

    Mousseau, Timothy Alexander; Møller, Anders Pape

    2013-01-01

    Background Radiation cataracts develop as a consequence of the effects of ionizing radiation on the development of the lens of the eye with an opaque lens reducing or eliminating the ability to see. Therefore, we would expect cataracts to be associated with reduced fitness in free-living animals. Methodology/Principal Findings We investigated the incidence of lens opacities typical of cataracts in more than 1100 free-living birds in the Chernobyl region in relation to background radiation. The incidence of cataracts increased with level of background radiation both in analyses based on a dichotomous score and in analyses of continuous scores of intensity of cataracts. The odds ratio per unit change in the regressor was 0.722 (95% CI 0.648, 0.804), which was less than odds ratios from investigations of radiation cataracts in humans. The relatively small odds ratio may be due to increased mortality in birds with cataracts. We found a stronger negative relationship between bird abundance and background radiation when the frequency of cataracts was higher, but also a direct effect of radiation on abundance, suggesting that radiation indirectly affects abundance negatively through an increase in the frequency of cataracts in bird populations, but also through direct effects of radiation on other diseases, food abundance and interactions with other species. There was no increase in incidence of cataracts with increasing age, suggesting that yearlings and older individuals were similarly affected as is typical of radiation cataract. Conclusions/Significance These findings suggest that cataracts are an under-estimated cause of morbidity in free-living birds and, by inference, other vertebrates in areas contaminated with radioactive materials. PMID:23935827

  9. Cataract influence on iris recognition performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trokielewicz, Mateusz; Czajka, Adam; Maciejewicz, Piotr

    2014-11-01

    This paper presents the experimental study revealing weaker performance of the automatic iris recognition methods for cataract-affected eyes when compared to healthy eyes. There is little research on the topic, mostly incorporating scarce databases that are often deficient in images representing more than one illness. We built our own database, acquiring 1288 eye images of 37 patients of the Medical University of Warsaw. Those images represent several common ocular diseases, such as cataract, along with less ordinary conditions, such as iris pattern alterations derived from illness or eye trauma. Images were captured in near-infrared light (used in biometrics) and for selected cases also in visible light (used in ophthalmological diagnosis). Since cataract is a disorder that is most populated by samples in the database, in this paper we focus solely on this illness. To assess the extent of the performance deterioration we use three iris recognition methodologies (commercial and academic solutions) to calculate genuine match scores for healthy eyes and those influenced by cataract. Results show a significant degradation in iris recognition reliability manifesting by worsening the genuine scores in all three matchers used in this study (12% of genuine score increase for an academic matcher, up to 175% of genuine score increase obtained for an example commercial matcher). This increase in genuine scores affected the final false non-match rate in two matchers. To our best knowledge this is the only study of such kind that employs more than one iris matcher, and analyzes the iris image segmentation as a potential source of decreased reliability

  10. The Zeiss surgical keratometer in cataract surgery.

    PubMed

    Cornic, J C

    1987-01-01

    The Zeiss keratometer is easy to use with simple and fast reading. The preoperative keratometry principle is satisfactory by allowing theorically a better control of surgical factors of postoperative astigmatism after cataract surgery. Its major interest appears in surgical training, when one wants to compensate a preoperative astigmatism or when one wishes to avoid secondary suture removal. However, its interest is very variable according to surgical experience.

  11. Combined surgery versus cataract surgery alone for eyes with cataract and glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Mingjuan Lisa; Hirunyachote, Phenpan; Jampel, Henry

    2016-01-01

    Background Cataract and glaucoma are leading causes of blindness worldwide, and their co-existence is common in elderly people. Glaucoma surgery can accelerate cataract progression, and performing both surgeries may increase the rate of postoperative complications and compromise the success of either surgery. However, cataract surgery may independently lower intraocular pressure (IOP), which may allow for greater IOP control among patients with co-existing cataract and glaucoma. The decision between undergoing combined glaucoma and cataract surgery versus cataract surgery alone is complex. Therefore, it is important to compare the effectiveness of these two interventions to aid clinicians and patients in choosing the better treatment approach. Objectives To assess the relative effectiveness and safety of combined surgery versus cataract surgery (phacoemulsification) alone for co-existing cataract and glaucoma. The secondary objectives include cost analyses for different surgical techniques for co-existing cataract and glaucoma. Search methods We searched CENTRAL (which contains the Cochrane Eyes and Vision Group Trials Register) (2014, Issue 10), Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid MEDLINE In-Process and Other Non-Indexed Citations, Ovid MEDLINE Daily, Ovid OLDMEDLINE (January 1946 to October 2014), EMBASE (January 1980 to October 2014), PubMed (January 1948 to October 2014), Latin American and Caribbean Health Sciences Literature Database (LILACS) (January 1982 to October 2014), the metaRegister of Controlled Trials (mRCT) (www.controlled-trials.com), ClinicalTrials.gov (www.clinicaltrials.gov), and the World Health Organization (WHO) International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) (www.who.int/ictrp/search/en). We did not use any date or language restrictions in the electronic searches for trials. We last searched the electronic databases on 3 October 2014. We checked the reference lists of the included trials to identify further relevant trials. We used the Science

  12. Hollow needle cataract aspiration in antiquity.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Cambrodí, Rafael J; Ascaso, Francisco J; Diab, Fathi; Alzamora-Rodríguez, Antonio; Grzybowski, Andrzej

    2015-12-01

    The dislocation of the crystalline lens or couching technique was the predominant procedure to surgically remove cataracts until the 18th century A.D. However, in the Middle Ages, some Arab physicians tried to aspirate the opaque lens by means of a glass tube following a paracentesis. Some literary sources attributed the origins of this technique to Antyllus of Alexandria, a Greek surgeon who lived in the 2nd century A.D. in the Roman Empire. Nevertheless, this statement remains unclear and is probably the consequence of posterior interpretations or incorrect translations of the manuscripts. In recent years, the discovery of the hollow needles from Montbellet (France) and Viladamat (Spain), in archaeological settlements dated between the 1st century and 3rd century A.D., has reopened the possibility of cataract extraction as an option in the surgical management of soft cataracts in the antiquity. In any case, these findings are exceptional, and thus, probably this technique was not widely practised and very likely disparaged by the medical community. PMID:26385516

  13. Hollow needle cataract aspiration in antiquity.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Cambrodí, Rafael J; Ascaso, Francisco J; Diab, Fathi; Alzamora-Rodríguez, Antonio; Grzybowski, Andrzej

    2015-12-01

    The dislocation of the crystalline lens or couching technique was the predominant procedure to surgically remove cataracts until the 18th century A.D. However, in the Middle Ages, some Arab physicians tried to aspirate the opaque lens by means of a glass tube following a paracentesis. Some literary sources attributed the origins of this technique to Antyllus of Alexandria, a Greek surgeon who lived in the 2nd century A.D. in the Roman Empire. Nevertheless, this statement remains unclear and is probably the consequence of posterior interpretations or incorrect translations of the manuscripts. In recent years, the discovery of the hollow needles from Montbellet (France) and Viladamat (Spain), in archaeological settlements dated between the 1st century and 3rd century A.D., has reopened the possibility of cataract extraction as an option in the surgical management of soft cataracts in the antiquity. In any case, these findings are exceptional, and thus, probably this technique was not widely practised and very likely disparaged by the medical community.

  14. Assessing the elasticity change of cataract lens with OCE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chen; Liu, Chih-Hao; Raghunathan, Raksha; Singh, Manmohan; Li, Jiasong; Han, Zhaolong; Larin, Kirill V.

    2016-03-01

    Cataract is one of the most common degenerative diseases that causes blindness. Careful quantification of lens biomechanical properties can greatly assist in early detection of the disease as well as personalization of treatment procedures. In this study, we utilize a phase-sensitive optical coherence elastography (OCE) system to assess the effects of the cold cataract on the biomechanical properties of porcine crystalline lens in vitro. Relaxation rates of air puff induced elastic waves were measured on the same crystalline lens with and without cold cataract. Results demonstrate that the relaxation rate and, thus, associated elasticity of the porcine lens, increased due to the presence of cold cataract.

  15. Cataracts. Lifting the clouds on an age-old problem.

    PubMed

    Trudo, E W; Stark, W J

    1998-05-01

    Cataracts are the most common treatable form of reduced vision in older adults. Although the incidence of cataracts is high after age 65, careful history taking and clinical examination are essential to establish the diagnosis. Cataract surgery is medically indicated when the view to the retina is obscured or lens-induced disorders place the eye at risk for further damage. However, even when patients have no specific associated medical problem, other than decreased visual acuity, cataract extraction offers an important means for maintaining independence and improving quality of life.

  16. Global Challenges in the Management of Congenital Cataract

    PubMed Central

    Lenhart, Phoebe D.; Courtright, Paul; Wilson, M. Edward; Taylor, David Samuel; Lewallen, Susan; Ventura, Marcelo C.; Bowman, Richard; Woodward, Lee; Ditta, Lauren C.; Kruger, Stacey; Haddad, Danny; El Shakankiri, Nihal; Rai, Salma KC; Bailey, Tehara; Lambert, Scott R.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Childhood cataracts have become a leading cause of preventable childhood blindness in many areas of the world. Here we summarize regional focus group discussions from the 4th Annual International Congenital Cataract Symposium on the current situation, challenges, and recommendations for the management of congenital cataracts in sub-Saharan Africa, the Middle East and North Africa, South Asia, Central America, South America, and developed nations. Strategies for managing congenital cataracts must be adapted and developed according to regional conditions. A basic framework for acceptable outcomes must focus on developing systems to address the critical components of education, access, quality care, and good follow-up. PMID:25892047

  17. Gravitational lensing by gravastars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubo, Tomohiro; Sakai, Nobuyuki

    2016-04-01

    As a possible method to detect gravastars (gravitational-vacuum-star), which was originally proposed by Mazur and Mottola, we study their gravitational lensing effects. Specifically, we adopt a spherical thin-shell model of a gravastar developed by Visser and Wiltshire, which connects interior de Sitter geometry and exterior Schwarzschild geometry, and assume that its surface is optically transparent. We calculate the image of a companion which rotates around the gravastar; we find that some characteristic images appear, depending on whether the gravastar possess unstable circular orbits of photons (Model 1) or not (Model 2). For Model 2, we calculate the total luminosity change, which is called microlensing effects; the maximal luminosity could be considerably larger than the black hole with the same mass.

  18. DL-3-n-butylphthalide delays the onset and progression of diabetic cataract by inhibiting oxidative stress in rat diabetic model.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fuxu; Ma, Jia; Han, Fei; Guo, Xiujin; Meng, Li; Sun, Yufeng; Jin, Cheng; Duan, Huijun; Li, Hang; Peng, Ying

    2016-01-01

    DL-3-n-butylphthalide (NBP) is a therapeutic drug used for ischemic stroke treatment. Here, we investigated the impact of NBP on the development of rat diabetic cataract induced by intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin (STZ). NBP was then administrated by oral gavage for nine weeks. Cataract development was monitored through ophthalmoscope inspections. The levels of blood glucose and serum reactive oxygen species (ROS), malondialdehyde (MDA) and 8-Hydroxydeovexyguanosine (8-OHdG) were measured. Total and soluble protein and oxidative stress parameters, such as 2, 4- dinitrophenylhydrazone (DNP), 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE) and MDA in the lenses were determined by Western blot and thiobarbituric acid analyses. The expressions of NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) and its downstream antioxidant enzymes, thioredoxin (TRX), Catalase and nuclear accumulation of Nrf2 were determined by Western blot and immunohistochemistry analyses. We showed that NBP treatment significantly improved the cataract scores, the levels of DNP, 4-HNE, and MDA in the lens compared to the non-treated groups. NBP also enhanced the expressions of Nrf2, TRX and catalase in the lens of diabetic rats. In addition, NBP treatment also decreased levels of blood glucose, serum MDA and 8-OHdG. These results suggested that NBP treatment significantly delayed the onset and progression of diabetic cataract by inhibiting the oxidative stresses. PMID:26759189

  19. DL-3-n-butylphthalide delays the onset and progression of diabetic cataract by inhibiting oxidative stress in rat diabetic model

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fuxu; Ma, Jia; Han, Fei; Guo, Xiujin; Meng, Li; Sun, Yufeng; Jin, Cheng; Duan, Huijun; Li, Hang; Peng, Ying

    2016-01-01

    DL-3-n-butylphthalide (NBP) is a therapeutic drug used for ischemic stroke treatment. Here, we investigated the impact of NBP on the development of rat diabetic cataract induced by intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin (STZ). NBP was then administrated by oral gavage for nine weeks. Cataract development was monitored through ophthalmoscope inspections. The levels of blood glucose and serum reactive oxygen species (ROS), malondialdehyde (MDA) and 8-Hydroxydeovexyguanosine (8-OHdG) were measured. Total and soluble protein and oxidative stress parameters, such as 2, 4- dinitrophenylhydrazone (DNP), 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE) and MDA in the lenses were determined by Western blot and thiobarbituric acid analyses. The expressions of NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) and its downstream antioxidant enzymes, thioredoxin (TRX), Catalase and nuclear accumulation of Nrf2 were determined by Western blot and immunohistochemistry analyses. We showed that NBP treatment significantly improved the cataract scores, the levels of DNP, 4-HNE, and MDA in the lens compared to the non-treated groups. NBP also enhanced the expressions of Nrf2, TRX and catalase in the lens of diabetic rats. In addition, NBP treatment also decreased levels of blood glucose, serum MDA and 8-OHdG. These results suggested that NBP treatment significantly delayed the onset and progression of diabetic cataract by inhibiting the oxidative stresses. PMID:26759189

  20. Pulsar lensing geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Siqi; Pen, Ue-Li; Macquart, J.-P.; Brisken, Walter; Deller, Adam

    2016-05-01

    We test the inclined sheet pulsar scintillation model (Pen & Levin) against archival very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) data on PSR 0834+06 and show that its scintillation properties can be precisely reproduced by a model in which refraction occurs on two distinct lens planes. These data strongly favour a model in which grazing-incidence refraction instead of diffraction off turbulent structures is the primary source of pulsar scattering. This model can reproduce the parameters of the observed diffractive scintillation with an accuracy at the percent level. Comparison with new VLBI proper motion results in a direct measure of the ionized interstellar medium (ISM) screen transverse velocity. The results are consistent with ISM velocities local to the PSR 0834+06 sight-line (through the Galaxy). The simple 1-D structure of the lenses opens up the possibility of using interstellar lenses as precision probes for pulsar lens mapping, precision transverse motions in the ISM, and new opportunities for removing scattering to improve pulsar timing. We describe the parameters and observables of this double screen system. While relative screen distances can in principle be accurately determined, a global conformal distance degeneracy exists that allows a rescaling of the absolute distance scale. For PSR B0834+06, we present VLBI astrometry results that provide (for the first time) a direct measurement of the distance of the pulsar. For most of the recycled millisecond pulsars that are the targets of precision timing observations, the targets where independent distance measurements are not available. The degeneracy presented in the lens modelling could be broken if the pulsar resides in a binary system.

  1. Lens Position Parameters as Predictors of Intraocular Pressure Reduction After Cataract Surgery in Nonglaucomatous Patients With Open Angles

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Chi-Hsin; Kakigi, Caitlin L.; Lin, Shuai-Chun; Wang, Yuan-Hung; Porco, Travis; Lin, Shan C.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the relationship between lens position parameters and intraocular pressure (IOP) reduction after cataract surgery in nonglaucomatous eyes with open angles. Methods The main outcome of the prospective study was percentage of IOP change, which was calculated using the preoperative IOP and the IOP 4 months after cataract surgery in nonglaucomatous eyes with open angles. Lens position (LP), defined as anterior chamber depth (ACD) + 1/2 lens thickness (LT), was assessed preoperatively using parameters from optical biometry. Preoperative IOP, central corneal thickness, ACD, LT, axial length (AXL), and the ratio of preoperative IOP to ACD (PD ratio) were also evaluated as potential predictors of percentage of IOP change. The predictive values of the parameters we found to be associated with the primary outcome were compared. Results Four months after cataract surgery, the average IOP reduction was 2.03 ± 2.42 mm Hg, a 12.74% reduction from the preoperative mean of 14.5 ± 3.05 mm Hg. Lens position was correlated with IOP reduction percentage after adjusting for confounders (P = 0.002). Higher preoperative IOP, shallower ACD, shorter AXL, and thicker LT were significantly associated with percentage of IOP decrease. Although not statistically significant, LP was a better predictor of percentage of IOP change compared to PD ratio, preoperative IOP, and ACD. Conclusions The percentage of IOP reduction after cataract surgery in nonglaucomatous eyes with open angles is greater in more anteriorly positioned lenses. Lens position, which is convenient to compute by basic ocular biometric data, is an accessible predictor with considerable predictive value for postoperative IOP change. PMID:26650901

  2. Galaxy cluster lensing masses in modified lensing potentials

    DOE PAGES

    Barreira, Alexandre; Li, Baojiu; Jennings, Elise; Merten, Julian; King, Lindsay; Baugh, Carlton M.; Pascoli, Silvia

    2015-10-28

    In this study, we determine the concentration–mass relation of 19 X-ray selected galaxy clusters from the Cluster Lensing and Supernova Survey with Hubble survey in theories of gravity that directly modify the lensing potential. We model the clusters as Navarro–Frenk–White haloes and fit their lensing signal, in the Cubic Galileon and Nonlocal gravity models, to the lensing convergence profiles of the clusters. We discuss a number of important issues that need to be taken into account, associated with the use of non-parametric and parametric lensing methods, as well as assumptions about the background cosmology. Our results show that the concentrationmore » and mass estimates in the modified gravity models are, within the error bars, the same as in Λ cold dark matter. This result demonstrates that, for the Nonlocal model, the modifications to gravity are too weak at the cluster redshifts, and for the Galileon model, the screening mechanism is very efficient inside the cluster radius. However, at distances ~ [2–20] Mpc/h from the cluster centre, we find that the surrounding force profiles are enhanced by ~ 20–40% in the Cubic Galileon model. This has an impact on dynamical mass estimates, which means that tests of gravity based on comparisons between lensing and dynamical masses can also be applied to the Cubic Galileon model.« less

  3. Galaxy cluster lensing masses in modified lensing potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Barreira, Alexandre; Li, Baojiu; Jennings, Elise; Merten, Julian; King, Lindsay; Baugh, Carlton M.; Pascoli, Silvia

    2015-10-28

    In this study, we determine the concentration–mass relation of 19 X-ray selected galaxy clusters from the Cluster Lensing and Supernova Survey with Hubble survey in theories of gravity that directly modify the lensing potential. We model the clusters as Navarro–Frenk–White haloes and fit their lensing signal, in the Cubic Galileon and Nonlocal gravity models, to the lensing convergence profiles of the clusters. We discuss a number of important issues that need to be taken into account, associated with the use of non-parametric and parametric lensing methods, as well as assumptions about the background cosmology. Our results show that the concentration and mass estimates in the modified gravity models are, within the error bars, the same as in Λ cold dark matter. This result demonstrates that, for the Nonlocal model, the modifications to gravity are too weak at the cluster redshifts, and for the Galileon model, the screening mechanism is very efficient inside the cluster radius. However, at distances ~ [2–20] Mpc/h from the cluster centre, we find that the surrounding force profiles are enhanced by ~ 20–40% in the Cubic Galileon model. This has an impact on dynamical mass estimates, which means that tests of gravity based on comparisons between lensing and dynamical masses can also be applied to the Cubic Galileon model.

  4. Hypertension and Risk of Cataract: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xiaoning; Lyu, Danni; Dong, Xinran; He, Jiliang; Yao, Ke

    2014-01-01

    Background Cataract is the major cause of blindness across the world. Many epidemiologic studies indicated that hypertension might play an important role in the development of cataract, while others not. We therefore conducted this meta-analysis to determine the relationship between risk of cataract and hypertension. Methods Retrieved studies on the association of hypertension with cataract risk were collected from PubMed, Web of Science and the Cochrane Library during June 2014 and were included into the final analysis according to the definite inclusion criteria. Odds ratio (OR) or risk ratio (RR) were pooled with 95% confidence interval (CI) to evaluate the relationship between hypertension and cataract risk. Subgroup analyses were carried out on the basis of cataract type, race and whether studies were adjusted for main components of metabolic syndrome (MS). Results The final meta-analysis included 25 studies (9 cohort, 5 case-control and 11 cross-sectional) from 23 articles. The pooled results showed that cataract risk in populations with hypertension significantly increased among cohort studies (RR 1.08; 95% CI: 1.05–1.12) and case-control or cross-sectional studies (OR 1.28; 95% CI: 1.12–1.45). This association was proved to be true among both Mongolians and Caucasians, and the significance was not altered by the adjustment of main components of MS. Subgroup analysis on cataract types indicated that an increased incidence of posterior subcapsular cataract (PSC) resulted among cohort studies (RR 1.22; 95% CI: 1.03–1.46) and cross-sectional/case-control studies (OR 1.23; 95% CI: 1.09–1.39). No association of hypertension with risk of nuclear cataract was found. Conclusions The present meta-analysis suggests that hypertension increases the risk of cataract, especially PSC. Further efforts should be made to explore the potential biological mechanisms. PMID:25474403

  5. Hyperacuity test to evaluate vision through dense cataracts: research preliminary to a clinical study in India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enoch, Jay M.; Giraldez, Maria J.; Huang, Doahua; Hirose, Hiroshi; Knowles, Richard A.; Namperumalsamy, P.; LaBree, Lauri; Azen, Stanley P.

    1995-03-01

    Using high luminance point-of-light stimuli, Vernier judgments can be made in the presence of markedly degraded retinal imagery. Without coaching, observers perform center-of-gravity assessments of relative locations of degraded point images. We seek to defined, presurgery, individuals who will derive the most benefit from advanced cataract removal (a form of triage), and to determine which of two cataractous eyes has the better postsurgical visual prognosis. There are incredible and growing backlogs of patients with severe cataracts (and other dense media opacities) in the developing world, and generally, limited resources are available for provision of health care. Postcataract surgical failure rates for good visual function are often high, and only one eye is operated on in over 95% of indigent patients treated. Prior to initiating advanced studies in the developing world, at Berkeley we conducted preliminary research on Vernier acuity test techniques on normal adult subjects. We sought to determine the number of repeat trials necessary; to compare a two-point and a three-point Vernier display; to determine the shape of the measured response function at large gap separations between test points (required when testing advanced cataract patients); to assess the effect(s) of a broad range of uncorrected refractive errors on outcomes; and to consider means to minimize refraction-based errors. From these and prior data and analyses, we defined a protocol for use in the developing world. Using a newly designed and rugged precision instrument, these tests were repeated on an advanced cataract population at Aravind Eye Hospital in Madurai, India. Although we had much prior experience in India, the initial protocol required major revision on site. Necessary changes in test methods and analytical approaches were made, and next stages in this program were planned. And a new and simple gap `visual acuity' (gap `VA') test was added to the protocol, which greatly facilitated

  6. KINOFORM LENSES - TOWARD NANOMETER RESOLUTION.

    SciTech Connect

    STEIN, A.; EVANS-LUTTERODT, K.; TAYLOR, A.

    2004-10-23

    While hard x-rays have wavelengths in the nanometer and sub-nanometer range, the ability to focus them is limited by the quality of sources and optics, and not by the wavelength. A few options, including reflective (mirrors), diffractive (zone plates) and refractive (CRL's) are available, each with their own limitations. Here we present our work with kinoform lenses which are refractive lenses with all material causing redundant 2{pi} phase shifts removed to reduce the absorption problems inherently limiting the resolution of refractive lenses. By stacking kinoform lenses together, the effective numerical aperture, and thus the focusing resolution, can be increased. The present status of kinoform lens fabrication and testing at Brookhaven is presented as well as future plans toward achieving nanometer resolution.

  7. Gravitational lenses and particle properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, Edwin L.

    1986-01-01

    The potential of observations of gravitational lens systems for the determination of cosmological constants and for tests of the nature and distribution of dark matter is illustrated. The advantages and disadvantages of gravitational lenses as cosmological probes are evaluated.

  8. HIGH-z Lensed Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pello, R.

    2006-08-01

    This talk reviews the main results recently obtained on the identification and study of very high-z galaxies using lensing clusters as natural gravitational telescopes. We present the last results of a deep near-IR survey of lensing clusters aimed at constraining the abundance of star-forming galaxies at z~6-12. Photometric selection criteria of optical-dropouts were specifically tuned to target star-forming galaxies in this redshift domain. These data were used to constrain the luminosity function of z>6 photometric candidates, and to derive an upper limit for the UV SFR density. The results obtained in lensing fields will be discussed and compared to deep blank-field findings. We also summarize the present state of the spectroscopic follow-up of photometric candidates in lensing clusters using VLT ISAAC and FORS, and the future observations planned with EMIR/GTC.

  9. Laser ablation and high precision patterning of biomaterials and intraocular lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serafetinides, A. A.; Spyratou, E.; Makropoulou, M.

    2010-10-01

    The use of intraocular lenses (IOL) is the most promising method for restoring excellent vision in cataract surgery. In addition, multifocal intraocular lenses for good distant and near vision are investigated. Several new materials, techniques and patterns are studied for the formation and etching of intraocular lenses in order to improve their optical properties and reduce the diffractive aberrations. As pulsed laser ablation is well established as a universal tool for surface processing of organic polymer materials, this study was focused in using laser ablation with short and ultra short laser pulses for surface modification of PMMA and intraocular lenses, instead of using other conventional techniques. The main advantage of using very short laser pulses, e.g. of ns, ps or fs duration, is that heat diffusion into the polymer material is negligible. As a result high precision patterning of the sample, without thermal damage of the surroundings, becomes possible. In this study, laser ablation was performed using commercially available hydrophobic acrylic IOLs, hydrophilic acrylic IOLs, and PMMA IOLs, with various diopters. We investigated the ablation efficiency and the phenomenology of the etched patterns by testing the ablation rate, versus laser energy fluence, at several wavelengths and the surface modification with atomic force microscopy (AFM), or scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The irradiated polymers have different optical properties, at the applied wavelengths, and therefore, present different ablation behaviour and morphology of the laser ablated crater walls and surrounding surfaces. The experimental results, some theoretical assumptions for mathematical modeling of the relevant ablation mechanisms are discussed.

  10. HUBBLE'S TOP TEN GRAVITATIONAL LENSES

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The NASA Hubble Space Telescope serendipitous survey of the sky has uncovered exotic patterns, rings, arcs and crosses that are all optical mirages produced by a gravitational lens, nature's equivalent of having giant magnifying glass in space. Shown are the top 10 lens candidates uncovered in the deepest 100 Hubble fields. Hubble's sensitivity and high resolution allow it to see faint and distant lenses that cannot be detected with ground-based telescopes whose images are blurred by Earth's atmosphere. [Top Left] - HST 01248+0351 is a lensed pair on either side of the edge-on disk lensing galaxy. [Top Center] - HST 01247+0352 is another pair of bluer lensed source images around the red spherical elliptical lensing galaxy. Two much fainter images can be seen near the detection limit which might make this a quadruple system. [Top Right] - HST 15433+5352 is a very good lens candidate with a bluer lensed source in the form of an extended arc about the redder elliptical lensing galaxy. [Middle Far Left] - HST 16302+8230 could be an 'Einstein ring' and the most intriguing lens candidate. It has been nicknamed the 'the London Underground' since it resembles that logo. [Middle Near Left] - HST 14176+5226 is the first, and brightest lens system discovered in 1995 with the Hubble telescope. This lens candidate has now been confirmed spectroscopically using large ground-based telescopes. The elliptical lensing galaxy is located 7 billion light-years away, and the lensed quasar is about 11 billion light-years distant. [Middle Near Right] - HST 12531-2914 is the second quadruple lens candidate discovered with Hubble. It is similar to the first, but appears smaller and fainter. [Middle Far Right] - HST 14164+5215 is a pair of bluish lensed images symmetrically placed around a brighter, redder galaxy. [Bottom Left] - HST 16309+8230 is an edge-on disk-like galaxy (blue arc) which has been significantly distorted by the redder lensing elliptical galaxy. [Bottom Center] - HST 12368

  11. Effects of Cataract Surgery on Endothelium in Transplanted Corneal Grafts: Comparison of Extracapsular Cataract Extraction and Phacoemulsification for Complicated Cataract after Penetrating Keratoplasty

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Hong-Wei; Xie, Li-Xin

    2016-01-01

    Background: The endothelium should be carefully evaluated when choosing a surgical technique for cataract removal. Therefore, we aimed to study the effects of different cataract surgery techniques on endothelial cell loss in transplanted corneal grafts. Methods: A total of 54 patients who received complicated cataract surgery in post-penetrating keratoplasty (PKP) eyes at the Shandong Eye Institute between February 2001 and June 2014 were included, and clinical records were reviewed. Baseline demographic details, clinical characteristics, endothelial cell density (ECD), and best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) were recorded. Wilcoxon rank-sum test and Wilcoxon signed-rank test were used to test the equality of medians. A regression model was constructed to compare the reduced rate of ECD. Results: Of the 54 eyes included in this study, extracapsular cataract extraction (ECCE) was performed in 34 eyes of 33 patients (ECCE group) whereas phacoemulsification was performed in 20 eyes of 20 patients (phacoemulsification group). There was no significant difference in the median age (P = 0.081) or preoperative ECD (P = 0.585) between the two groups. At 6 months after cataract surgery, ECD in ECCE group was significantly higher than that in phacoemulsification group (P = 0.043). In addition, the endothelial cell loss rate in ECCE group was significantly lower than that in phacoemulsification group at 2 months (P = 0.018), 4 months (P < 0.001), and 6 months (P < 0.001) after cataract surgery. Endothelial cell loss rate after cataract surgery increased over the 6-month study duration in both ECCE group (P < 0.001) and phacoemulsification group (P < 0.001), but phacoemulsification resulted in a greater reduction in ECD than that of ECCE in transplanted corneal grafts (P < 0.001). There was no significant difference in postoperative BCVA between the two groups (P = 0.065). Conclusion: ECCE is more suitable than phacoemulsification in cataract surgery in complicated cataract

  12. Cataract induction by protons and HZE particles is suppressed by dietary supplements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ware, Jeffrey; Kennedy, Ann; Davis, James

    The present study was undertaken to investigate the ability of dietary supplements to reduce the formation and severity of cataracts in mice irradiated with protons or iron ions, which are important components of the radiation encountered by astronauts during spaceflight. The mice were exposed to proton or iron ion radiation and fed with control diet or diets supplemented with an antioxidant formulation or with Bowman-Birk Inhibitor Concentrate (BBIC) both before and after the radiation exposure. The antioxidant formulation contained L-selenomethionine, N-acetyl cysteine, ascorbic acid, co-enzyme Q10, alpha-lipoic acid and vitamin E succinate. This mixture is highly effective at reducing space radiation induced oxidative stress in both in vivo and in vitro systems, space radiation induced cytotoxicity and malignant transformation in vitro. BBIC is a soybean extract with high levels of the Bowman-Birk Inhibitor, an 8-KD soybean-derived protease inhibitor with anticarcinogenic, anti-inflammatory and radioprotection properties. At approximately two years after the radiation exposure, the animals were killed and lenses were harvested post-mortem and characterized using an established classifi- cation system that assigns discrete scores based on the severity of the lens opacifications. The results showed that exposure to 1-GeV/n proton (300 cGy) or iron ion (50 cGy) radiation significantly increased the cataract prevalence and severity in CBA/J mice to levels above the baseline levels of age-induced cataract formation in this mouse strain. Treatment with BBIC or the antioxidant formulation significantly reduced the prevalence and severity of the lens opaci- fications in the mice exposed to iron ion radiation. Treatment with BBIC or the antioxidant formulation also decreased the severity of the lens opacifications in the mice exposed to proton radiation; however, the decrease did not reach statistical significance. These results indicate that BBIC and the antioxidant

  13. The Thirring-Lense Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Embacher, Franz

    The Thirring-Lense effect is the phenomenon that an observer near a rotating mass, being in a state which is non-rotating with respect to the rest of the universe, experiences extra inertial forces, i.e. becomes dizzy. The first anticipation of the effect goes back to Ernst Mach; its first quantitative prediction on the basis of general relativity was given by Hans Thirring and Joseph Lense. Almost ninety years later, the effect seems to be experimentally verified.

  14. Exploiting ensemble learning for automatic cataract detection and grading.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ji-Jiang; Li, Jianqiang; Shen, Ruifang; Zeng, Yang; He, Jian; Bi, Jing; Li, Yong; Zhang, Qinyan; Peng, Lihui; Wang, Qing

    2016-02-01

    Cataract is defined as a lenticular opacity presenting usually with poor visual acuity. It is one of the most common causes of visual impairment worldwide. Early diagnosis demands the expertise of trained healthcare professionals, which may present a barrier to early intervention due to underlying costs. To date, studies reported in the literature utilize a single learning model for retinal image classification in grading cataract severity. We present an ensemble learning based approach as a means to improving diagnostic accuracy. Three independent feature sets, i.e., wavelet-, sketch-, and texture-based features, are extracted from each fundus image. For each feature set, two base learning models, i.e., Support Vector Machine and Back Propagation Neural Network, are built. Then, the ensemble methods, majority voting and stacking, are investigated to combine the multiple base learning models for final fundus image classification. Empirical experiments are conducted for cataract detection (two-class task, i.e., cataract or non-cataractous) and cataract grading (four-class task, i.e., non-cataractous, mild, moderate or severe) tasks. The best performance of the ensemble classifier is 93.2% and 84.5% in terms of the correct classification rates for cataract detection and grading tasks, respectively. The results demonstrate that the ensemble classifier outperforms the single learning model significantly, which also illustrates the effectiveness of the proposed approach.

  15. Barriers to Cataract Surgery in Africa: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Aboobaker, Shaheer; Courtright, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Cataract remains the leading cause of blindness in Africa. We performed a systematic literature search of articles reporting barriers to cataract surgery in Africa. PubMed and Google Scholar databases were searched with the terms “barriers, cataract, Africa, cataract surgery, cataract surgical coverage (CSC), and rapid assessment of avoidable blindness (RAAB).” The review covered from 1999 to 2014. In RAAB studies, barriers related to awareness and access were more commonly reported than acceptance. Other type of studies reported cost as the most common barrier. Some qualitative studies tended to report community and family dynamics as barriers to cataract surgery. CSC was lower in females in 88.2% of the studies. The variability in outcomes of studies of barriers to cataract surgery could be due to context and the type of data collection. It is likely that qualitative data will provide a deeper understanding of the complex social, family, community, financial and gender issues relating to barriers to uptake of cataract surgery in Africa. PMID:26957856

  16. Application of femtotechnologies and terahertz spectroscopy methods in cataract diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakhnov, S. N.; Leksutkina, E. V.; Smolyanskaya, O. A.; Usov, A. V.; Parakhuda, S. E.; Grachev, Ya. V.; Kozlov, S. A.

    2011-08-01

    We study the destructive action of femtosecond pulses (200 fs) on the human cataractous crystalline lens and the transmission of the cataractous lens in the terahertz spectral range of electromagnetic oscillations (0.2-1 THz) in relation to the density of the nucleus of the lens.

  17. Two-photon absorption induced drug delivery from polymeric intraocular lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hampp, Norbert A.; Kim, Hee-Cheol; Kreiling, Stefan; Hesse, Lutz; Greiner, Andreas

    2003-10-01

    Secondary cataracts are quite often observed after implantation of polymeric intraocular lenses. The reason for this complication is that lens epithelial cells remain in the capsular bag when the natural lens is removed. They begin proliferation and cause secondary cataracts. It is not desireable to add cell toxic agents at the time of the implantation because wound healing is negatively affected. We have developed polymeric intraocular lenses which are equipped with a drug depot which may be released non-invasively through photochemical treatment. In the example presented the drug is 5-fluoruracil (5FU) which is covalently bound to the polymer. Deliberation of 5FU from the polymer is done photochemically. Since light is transmitted permanently through the artificial intraocular lens and wearing of special glasses by the patient should be omitted conventional photochemistry is not a suitable tool for the drug release. The polymer-5FU linkage is designed in a way that it has a high two-photon absorption cross-section. Two-photon absorption is used to selectively release 5FU from the lens. The one-photon reaction is blocked since the cornea does absorb UV light. The principle shown here is not limited to 5FU but may be applied to other drugs also.

  18. Cataract extraction after brachytherapy for malignant melanoma of the choroid

    SciTech Connect

    Fish, G.E.; Jost, B.F.; Snyder, W.I.; Fuller, D.G.; Birch, D.G. )

    1991-05-01

    Thirteen eyes of 55 consecutive patients treated with brachytherapy for malignant melanoma of the choroid developed postirradiation cataracts. Cataract development was more common in older patients and in patients with larger and more anterior tumors. Eleven eyes had extracapsular cataract extraction and intraocular lens implantation. Initial visual improvement occurred in 91% of eyes, with an average improvement of 5.5 lines. Visual acuity was maintained at 20/60 or better in 55% of the eyes over an average period of follow-up of 24 months (range, 6 to 40 months). These data suggest that, visually, cataract extraction can be helpful in selected patients who develop a cataract after brachytherapy for malignant melanoma of the choroid.

  19. Cataracts in retired actinide-exposed radiation workers.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Baruch S

    2005-01-01

    Radiation-induced cataracts are predominantly of the posterior sub-capsular (PSC) type, whereas about 90% of age-related cataracts are of other types. Retired workers, likely to have transuranic body burdens, from three DOE-supported installations were questioned regarding their eye-care history and asked for permission to contact their eye-care providers regarding any cataracts. In 97 cases with lifetime exposure records 20 cases (20.6%) were reported to have PSC cataracts. However, of 24 individuals with recorded lifetime doses of 200-600 mSv, nine (37.5%) had PSC cataracts, compared with 15.1% of 73 cases with doses of less than 200 mSv. This difference is statistically significant at the 5% level.

  20. Micro-optofluidic Lenses: A review

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Nam-Trung

    2010-01-01

    This review presents a systematic perspective on the development of micro-optofluidic lenses. The progress on the development of micro-optofluidic lenses are illustrated by example from recent literature. The advantage of micro-optofluidic lenses over solid lens systems is their tunability without the use of large actuators such as servo motors. Depending on the relative orientation of light path and the substrate surface, micro-optofluidic lenses can be categorized as in-plane or out-of-plane lenses. However, this review will focus on the tunability of the lenses and categorizes them according to the concept of tunability. Micro-optofluidic lenses can be either tuned by the liquid in use or by the shape of the lens. Micro-optofluidic lenses with tunable shape are categorized according to the actuation schemes. Typical parameters of micro-optofluidic lenses reported recently are compared and discussed. Finally, perspectives are given for future works in this field. PMID:20714369

  1. Integrating the Advanced Human Eye Model (AHEM) and optical instrument models to model complete visual optical systems inclusive of the typical or atypical eye

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donnelly, William J., III

    2012-06-01

    PURPOSE: To present a commercially available optical modeling software tool to assist the development of optical instrumentation and systems that utilize and/or integrate with the human eye. METHODS: A commercially available flexible eye modeling system is presented, the Advanced Human Eye Model (AHEM). AHEM is a module that the engineer can use to perform rapid development and test scenarios on systems that integrate with the eye. Methods include merging modeled systems initially developed outside of AHEM and performing a series of wizard-type operations that relieve the user from requiring an optometric or ophthalmic background to produce a complete eye inclusive system. Scenarios consist of retinal imaging of targets and sources through integrated systems. Uses include, but are not limited to, optimization, telescopes, microscopes, spectacles, contact and intraocular lenses, ocular aberrations, cataract simulation and scattering, and twin eye model (binocular) systems. RESULTS: Metrics, graphical data, and exportable CAD geometry are generated from the various modeling scenarios.

  2. Internal wave structures in abyssal cataract flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makarenko, Nikolay; Liapidevskii, Valery; Morozov, Eugene; Tarakanov, Roman

    2014-05-01

    We discuss some theoretical approaches, experimental results and field data concerning wave phenomena in ocean near-bottom stratified flows. Such strong flows of cold water form everywhere in the Atlantic abyssal channels, and these currents play significant role in the global water exchange. Most interesting wave structures arise in a powerful cataract flows near orographic obstacles which disturb gravity currents by forced lee waves, attached hydraulic jumps, mixing layers etc. All these effects were observed by the authors in the Romanche and Chain fracture zones of Atlantic Ocean during recent cruises of the R/V Akademik Ioffe and R/V Akademik Sergei Vavilov (Morozov et al., Dokl. Earth Sci., 2012, 446(2)). In a general way, deep-water cataract flows down the slope are similar to the stratified flows examined in laboratory experiments. Strong mixing in the sill region leads to the splitting of the gravity current into the layers having the fluids with different densities. Another peculiarity is the presence of critical layers in shear flows sustained over the sill. In the case under consideration, this critical level separates the flow of near-bottom cold water from opposite overflow. In accordance with known theoretical models and laboratory measurements, the critical layer can absorb and reflect internal waves generated by the topography, so the upward propagation of these perturbations is blocked from above. High velocity gradients were registered downstream in the vicinity of cataract and it indicates the existence of developed wave structures beyond the sill formed by intense internal waves. This work was supported by RFBR (grants No 12-01-00671-a, 12-08-10001-k and 13-08-10001-k).

  3. Sunflower cataract: do not forget Wilson's disease.

    PubMed

    Litwin, Tomasz; Langwińska-Wośko, Ewa; Dzieżyc, Karolina; Członkowska, Anna

    2015-10-01

    A 41-year-old man with liver cirrhosis of unknown aetiology for 6 years was admitted to our department to confirm the diagnosis of Wilson's disease. He consulted an ophthalmologist who suspected the presence of a sunflower cataract and Kayser-Fleischer ring. At admission, his liver function tests were modestly impaired (Child-Pugh C, 10 pts). Neurological examination was normal, but cognitive functions were mildly impaired. Based on the copper metabolism abnormalities and clinical manifestation, we diagnosed Wilson's disease (Ferenci score, 6 pts) and started treatment with d-penicillamine. Presenting the case we would like to emphasise the significance of the ophthalmological examination in Wilson's disease diagnosis.

  4. Cannon Prize: Weak lensing - Revealing the Dark Side of the Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandelbaum, Rachel

    2012-01-01

    Weak gravitational lensing, the deflection of light from distant galaxies due to all intervening mass along the line of sight, is one of the most direct ways to observe dark matter. As a result, in the past decade, weak lensing has become a very important tool both for constraining cosmological parameters and for revealing the connection between galaxies and dark matter. I will begin by reviewing some of the most significant recent observational advances that were made possible by weak lensing. Next, I will outline some of the challenges and opportunities facing the lensing community in existing and upcoming imaging surveys. I will conclude with some perspective on how these challenges will be addressed to do ground-breaking work in the fields of cosmology, galaxy formation, and galaxy cluster formation and evolution with weak lensing observations in the next decade.

  5. Single flash electroretinograms of mature cataractous and fellow eyes

    PubMed Central

    Yamauchi, Yasuyuki; Mochizuki, Jun-ichi; Hirakata, Akito; Uda, Shigekazu

    2016-01-01

    Background It is generally stated that opacities of the ocular media, including senile cataract, have little effect on the electrical responses of the retina. However, lower amplitudes and longer implicit times are sometimes observed in electroretinograms (ERGs) of patients with mature cataract. Methods Single flash ERGs of mature cataractous eyes with decimal visual acuity less than 0.1 were compared with those of the fellow eyes with decimal visual acuity better than 0.5, in 105 senile cataract patients. Results The mean amplitudes and implicit times of ERG a-waves were, respectively, 323.6±95.8 μV and 14.7±3.5 ms in the cataractous eyes and 352.3±96.6 μV and 12.0±1.5 ms in the fellow eyes. The mean amplitudes and implicit times of ERG b-waves were, respectively, 390.1±108.7 μV and 63.4±27.9 ms in the cataractous eyes and 415.3±119.1 μV and 59.0±9.3 ms in the fellow eyes. The mean amplitudes of the a- and b-waves were significantly lower and the mean implicit times of the a- and b-wave were significantly longer in the cataractous eyes as compared to those of the fellow eyes. Postoperative visual acuity was similar in cataractous and fellow eyes. Conclusion Even though single flash ERG was influenced due to mature cataract, eyes revealed good postoperative visual acuity. Single flash ERG does not always reflect the foveal function and the visual pathway; nevertheless, it remains a reliable guide to evaluate visual prognosis before cataract surgery. PMID:27799729

  6. Comparison of serum sodium and potassium levels in patients with senile cataract and age-matched individuals without cataract

    PubMed Central

    Mathur, Gaurav; Pai, Vijaya

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The study was to analyze mean serum sodium and potassium levels in cataract patients and age-matched individuals without cataract. Methods and Materials: It was a prospective case-control study. Individuals more than 50 years of age who attended our ophthalmic center in the year 2007-2010 were grouped into those having cataract and those without cataract. Mean serum sodium and potassium levels in the cataract groups were calculated and compared with the control group. Statistical software SPSS14 was used for statistical analysis. Results: Mean serum sodium levels in cataract group was 135.1 meqv/l and 133 meqv/l in the control group. Mean potassium was 3.96 meqv/l in the case study group and 3.97 meqv/l in controls. Mean sodium levels among cases were significantly higher than control group. No difference was seen in the PSC group and control. The difference in mean potassium among the two groups was statistically insignificant. Conclusion: Diets with high sodium contents are a risk factor for senile cataract formation and dietary modifications can possibly reduce the rate of progression cataract. PMID:23552357

  7. Comparison of Perioperative Ranibizumab Injections for Diabetic Macular Edema in Patients Undergoing Cataract Surgery

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To compare the efficacy of perioperative ranibizumab injections on diabetic macular edema (DME) in patients undergoing cataract surgery. Methods. This study included 59 eyes of 59 patients. All patients had advanced cataract with DME and underwent an uneventful phacoemulsification surgery. There were 3 subgroups. The first group received intravitreal ranibizumab injection 2 weeks preoperatively, the second group received intraoperatively, and the third group received 2 weeks postoperatively. Follow-up examinations were performed at 1 week as well as at 1 and 3 months. Results. Baseline visual acuity showed a significant increase in all groups at 1 month. In group 1, compared to baseline value, foveal thickness (FT) increased significantly at 1 month and showed a significant decrease up to month 3. In group 2, FT increased at month 1 and this continued up to month 3. In group 3, FT increased at month 1 and was almost stable up to month 3. There were not any significant differences for visual acuity and FT between the groups. Conclusions. Although intrapostoperative ranibizumab injection for DME seems to be more effective than preoperative injections in patients undergoing cataract surgery, the treatment still needs to be continued following surgery. PMID:27493795

  8. Evidence of Highly Conserved β-Crystallin Disulfidome that Can be Mimicked by In Vitro Oxidation in Age-related Human Cataract and Glutathione Depleted Mouse Lens.

    PubMed

    Fan, Xingjun; Zhou, Sheng; Wang, Benlian; Hom, Grant; Guo, Minfei; Li, Binbin; Yang, Jing; Vaysburg, Dennis; Monnier, Vincent M

    2015-12-01

    Low glutathione levels are associated with crystallin oxidation in age-related nuclear cataract. To understand the role of cysteine residue oxidation, we used the novel approach of comparing human cataracts with glutathione-depleted LEGSKO mouse lenses for intra- versus intermolecular disulfide crosslinks using 2D-PAGE and proteomics, and then systematically identified in vivo and in vitro all disulfide forming sites using ICAT labeling method coupled with proteomics. Crystallins rich in intramolecular disulfides were abundant at young age in human and WT mouse lens but shifted to multimeric intermolecular disulfides at older age. The shift was ∼4x accelerated in LEGSKO lens. Most cysteine disulfides in β-crystallins (except βA4 in human) were highly conserved in mouse and human and could be generated by oxidation with H(2)O(2), whereas γ-crystallin oxidation selectively affected γC23/42/79/80/154, γD42/33, and γS83/115/130 in human cataracts, and γB79/80/110, γD19/109, γF19/79, γE19, γS83/130, and γN26/128 in mouse. Analysis based on available crystal structure suggests that conformational changes are needed to expose Cys42, Cys79/80, Cys154 in γC; Cys42, Cys33 in γD, and Cys83, Cys115, and Cys130 in γS. In conclusion, the β-crystallin disulfidome is highly conserved in age-related nuclear cataract and LEGSKO mouse, and reproducible by in vitro oxidation, whereas some of the disulfide formation sites in γ-crystallins necessitate prior conformational changes. Overall, the LEGSKO mouse model is closely reminiscent of age-related nuclear cataract.

  9. Noise in Strong Lensing Cosmography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalal, Neal; Hennawi, Joseph F.; Bode, Paul

    2005-03-01

    Giant arcs in strong lensing galaxy clusters can provide a purely geometric determination of cosmological parameters, such as the dark energy density and equation of state. We investigate sources of noise in cosmography with giant arcs, focusing in particular on errors induced by density fluctuations along the line of sight and errors caused by modeling uncertainties. We estimate parameter errors in two independent ways, first by developing a Fisher matrix formalism for strong lensing parameters and next by directly ray-tracing through N-body simulations using a multiplane lensing code. We show that for reasonable power spectra, density fluctuations from large-scale structures produce >100% errors in cosmological parameters derived from any single sight line, precluding the use of individual clusters or ``golden lenses'' to derive accurate cosmological constraints. Modeling uncertainties can similarly lead to large errors, and we show that the use of parameterized mass models in fitting strong lensing clusters can significantly bias the inferred cosmological parameters. We lastly speculate on the means by which these errors may be corrected.

  10. Ultraviolet disinfection of contact lenses.

    PubMed

    Harris, M G; Fluss, L; Lem, A; Leong, H

    1993-10-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of ultraviolet (UV) radiation as a method of disinfecting contact lenses and their storage solutions, we contaminated soft lenses (Bausch & Lomb Optima 38), rigid gas permeable (RGP) lenses (Oxyflow F-30), and their storage solutions with three common bacteria. Escherichia coli (E.c.), Staphylococcus epidermis (S.e.), and Serratia marcescens (S.m.). The storage solutions used were saline solution and RGP conditioning solution. We determined the exposure times to 253.7-nm wavelength UV radiation necessary to disinfect the contact lenses and solutions. The decimal reduction values (D values) found for UV radiation were 10 to 200 hundred times shorter than reported for currently available disinfection systems. For E.c., sterilization was attained after 100 s of exposure. For S.e. and S.m., sterilization occurred after 300 s of exposure. Different contact lens solutions transmit UV radiation to various degrees, with saline solution passing more than 90% of the UV radiation. Thus, our results indicate that UV radiation is an effective and rapid method of disinfecting contact lenses and their storage solutions. PMID:8247487

  11. Ultraviolet disinfection of contact lenses.

    PubMed

    Harris, M G; Fluss, L; Lem, A; Leong, H

    1993-10-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of ultraviolet (UV) radiation as a method of disinfecting contact lenses and their storage solutions, we contaminated soft lenses (Bausch & Lomb Optima 38), rigid gas permeable (RGP) lenses (Oxyflow F-30), and their storage solutions with three common bacteria. Escherichia coli (E.c.), Staphylococcus epidermis (S.e.), and Serratia marcescens (S.m.). The storage solutions used were saline solution and RGP conditioning solution. We determined the exposure times to 253.7-nm wavelength UV radiation necessary to disinfect the contact lenses and solutions. The decimal reduction values (D values) found for UV radiation were 10 to 200 hundred times shorter than reported for currently available disinfection systems. For E.c., sterilization was attained after 100 s of exposure. For S.e. and S.m., sterilization occurred after 300 s of exposure. Different contact lens solutions transmit UV radiation to various degrees, with saline solution passing more than 90% of the UV radiation. Thus, our results indicate that UV radiation is an effective and rapid method of disinfecting contact lenses and their storage solutions.

  12. Surface gravity-wave lensing.

    PubMed

    Elandt, Ryan B; Shakeri, Mostafa; Alam, Mohammad-Reza

    2014-02-01

    Here we show that a nonlinear resonance between oceanic surface waves caused by small seabed features (the so-called Bragg resonance) can be utilized to create the equivalent of lenses and curved mirrors for surface gravity waves. Such gravity wave lenses, which are merely small changes to the seafloor topography and therefore are surface noninvasive, can focus or defocus the energy of incident waves toward or away from any desired focal point. We further show that for a broadband incident wave spectrum (i.e., a wave group composed of a multitude of different-frequency waves), a polychromatic topography (occupying no more than the area required for a monochromatic lens) can achieve a broadband lensing effect. Gravity wave lenses can be utilized to create localized high-energy wave zones (e.g., for wave energy harvesting or creating artificial surf zones) as well as to disperse waves in order to create protected areas (e.g., harbors or areas near important offshore facilities). In reverse, lensing of oceanic waves may be caused by natural seabed features and may explain the frequent appearance of very high amplitude waves in certain bodies of water. PMID:25353576

  13. Weak lensing and cosmological investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acquaviva, Viviana

    2005-03-01

    In the last few years the scientific community has been dealing with the challenging issue of identifying the dark energy component. We regard weak gravitational lensing as a brand new, and extremely important, tool for cosmological investigation in this field. In fact, the features imprinted on the Cosmic Microwave Background radiation by the lensing from the intervening distribution of matter represent a pretty unbiased estimator, and can thus be used for putting constraints on different dark energy models. This is true in particular for the magnetic-type B-modes of CMB polarization, whose unlensed spectrum at large multipoles (l ~= 1000) is very small even in presence of an amount of gravitational waves as large as currently allowed by the experiments: therefore, on these scales the lensing phenomenon is the only responsible for the observed power, and this signal turns out to be a faithful tracer of the dark energy dynamics. We first recall the formal apparatus of the weak lensing in extended theories of gravity, introducing the physical observables suitable to cast the bridge between lensing and cosmology, and then evaluate the amplitude of the expected effect in the particular case of a Non-Minimally-Coupled model, featuring a quadratic coupling between quintessence and Ricci scalar.

  14. Surface gravity-wave lensing.

    PubMed

    Elandt, Ryan B; Shakeri, Mostafa; Alam, Mohammad-Reza

    2014-02-01

    Here we show that a nonlinear resonance between oceanic surface waves caused by small seabed features (the so-called Bragg resonance) can be utilized to create the equivalent of lenses and curved mirrors for surface gravity waves. Such gravity wave lenses, which are merely small changes to the seafloor topography and therefore are surface noninvasive, can focus or defocus the energy of incident waves toward or away from any desired focal point. We further show that for a broadband incident wave spectrum (i.e., a wave group composed of a multitude of different-frequency waves), a polychromatic topography (occupying no more than the area required for a monochromatic lens) can achieve a broadband lensing effect. Gravity wave lenses can be utilized to create localized high-energy wave zones (e.g., for wave energy harvesting or creating artificial surf zones) as well as to disperse waves in order to create protected areas (e.g., harbors or areas near important offshore facilities). In reverse, lensing of oceanic waves may be caused by natural seabed features and may explain the frequent appearance of very high amplitude waves in certain bodies of water.

  15. CMB temperature lensing power reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, Duncan; Efstathiou, George; Challinor, Anthony; Bielewicz, Pawel

    2011-02-15

    We study the reconstruction of the lensing potential power spectrum from CMB temperature data, with an eye to the Planck experiment. We work with the optimal quadratic estimator of Okamoto and Hu, which we characterize thoroughly in an application to the reconstruction of the lensing power spectrum. We find that at multipoles L<250, our current understanding of this estimator is biased at the 15% level by beyond-gradient terms in the Taylor expansion of lensing effects. We present the full lensed trispectrum to fourth order in the lensing potential to explain this effect. We show that the low-L bias, as well as a previously known bias at high L, is relevant to the determination of cosmology and must be corrected for in order to avoid significant parameter errors. We also investigate the covariance of the reconstructed power, finding broad correlations of {approx_equal}0.1%. Finally, we discuss several small improvements which may be made to the optimal estimator to mitigate these problems.

  16. The M31 pixel lensing plan campaign: MACHO lensing and self-lensing signals

    SciTech Connect

    Calchi Novati, S.; Scarpetta, G.; Bozza, V.; Bruni, I.; Gualandi, R.; Dall'Ora, M.; De Paolis, F.; Ingrosso, G.; Nucita, A.; Strafella, F.; Dominik, M.; Jetzer, Ph.; Mancini, L.; Safonova, M.; Subramaniam, A.; Sereno, M.; Gould, A.; Collaboration: PLAN Collaboration

    2014-03-10

    We present the final analysis of the observational campaign carried out by the PLAN (Pixel Lensing Andromeda) collaboration to detect a dark matter signal in form of MACHOs through the microlensing effect. The campaign consists of about 1 month/year observations carried out over 4 years (2007-2010) at the 1.5 m Cassini telescope in Loiano (Astronomical Observatory of BOLOGNA, OAB) plus 10 days of data taken in 2010 at the 2 m Himalayan Chandra Telescope monitoring the central part of M31 (two fields of about 13' × 12.'6). We establish a fully automated pipeline for the search and the characterization of microlensing flux variations. As a result, we detect three microlensing candidates. We evaluate the expected signal through a full Monte Carlo simulation of the experiment completed by an analysis of the detection efficiency of our pipeline. We consider both 'self lensing' and 'MACHO lensing' lens populations, given by M31 stars and dark matter halo MACHOs, in M31 and the Milky Way, respectively. The total number of events is consistent with the expected self-lensing rate. Specifically, we evaluate an expected signal of about two self-lensing events. As for MACHO lensing, for full 0.5(10{sup –2}) M {sub ☉} MACHO halos, our prediction is for about four (seven) events. The comparatively small number of expected MACHO versus self-lensing events, together with the small number statistics at our disposal, do not enable us to put strong constraints on that population. Rather, the hypothesis, suggested by a previous analysis, on the MACHO nature of OAB-07-N2, one of the microlensing candidates, translates into a sizeable lower limit for the halo mass fraction in form of the would-be MACHO population, f, of about 15% for 0.5 M {sub ☉} MACHOs.

  17. [Research progress in relative crystallin genes of congenital cataract].

    PubMed

    Wang, D D; Yang, H J; Yi, J L

    2016-02-01

    Congenital cataract is the common cause of visual disability in children. Nearly one third of congenital cataract cases may have a related genetic mutation. With the development of molecular genetics, especially gentechnik, more and more genes, such as crystallin genes, membrane protein genes, eytoskeletal protein genes and regulatory protein genes have been confirmed to participate in the process of congenital cataract. Furthermore, crystallin genes account for most of these genes and the crystallin has the highest amount of the whole protein in lens.It has been found that nearly one hundred mutations in crystallin genes are associated with the onset of congenital cataract. Researchers are exploring how these mutations further affect the function of cellular biology and eventually lead to cataract. Although more and more research results gradually reveal the pathogenesis of congenital cataract from the level of gene and protein, the specific pathogenesis is still unclear. The recent progression about inherited congenital cataract related with crysallin genes is summarized in this review.

  18. Posterior Corneal Characteristics of Cataract Patients with High Myopia

    PubMed Central

    Jing, Qinghe; Tang, Yating; Qian, Dongjin; Lu, Yi; Jiang, Yongxiang

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the characteristics of the posterior corneal surface in patients with high myopia before cataract surgery. Methods We performed a cross-sectional study at the Eye and ENT Hospital of Fudan University, Shanghai, China. Corneal astigmatism and axial length were measured with a rotating Scheimpflug camera (Pentacam) and partial coherence interferometry (IOLMaster) in a high-myopia study group of 167 eyes (axial length ≥ 26 mm) and a control group of 150 eyes (axial length > 20 mm and < 25 mm). Results Total corneal astigmatism and anterior corneal astigmatism values were higher in the high-myopia group than in the control group. There was no significant difference in posterior corneal astigmatism between the high-myopia study group and the control group. In the study group, the mean posterior corneal astigmatism (range 0 – −0.9 diopters) was –0.29 diopters (D) ± 0.17 standard deviations (SD). The steep corneal meridian was aligned vertically (60°–120°) in 87.43% of eyes for the posterior corneal surface, and did not change with increasing age. There was a significant correlation (r = 0.235, p = 0.002) between posterior corneal astigmatism and anterior corneal astigmatism, especially when the anterior corneal surface showed with-the-rule (WTR) astigmatism (r = 0.452, p = 0.000). There was a weak negative correlation between posterior corneal astigmatism and age (r = –0.15, p = 0.053) in the high-myopia group. Compared with total corneal astigmatism values, the anterior corneal measurements alone overestimated WTR astigmatism by a mean of 0.27 ± 0.18 D in 68.75% of eyes, underestimated against-the-rule (ATR) astigmatism by a mean of 0.41 ± 0.28 D in 88.89% of eyes, and underestimated oblique astigmatism by a mean of 0.24 ± 0.13 D in 63.64% of eyes. Conclusions Posterior corneal astigmatism decreased with age and remained as ATR astigmatism in most cases of high myopia. There was a significant correlation between posterior corneal

  19. Femtosecond laser-assisted keratoplasty combined with cataract extraction in a patient with keratoconus and oculocutaneous albinism

    PubMed Central

    Pásztor, Dorottya; Kolozsvári, Bence Lajos; Losonczy, Gergely; Fodor, Mariann

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we present a case of a 58-year-old male patient with oculocutaneous albinism, keratoconus, total cataract, and glaucoma originating from father-daughter incest. He underwent femtosecond laser-assisted keratoplasty with “open-sky” cataract extraction and posterior chamber intraocular lens implantation. One week after surgery his uncorrected visual acuity improved from hand motion to 20/200. Six months later corneal K values were 49.1 D in the flat and 50.0 D in the steep meridian. The graft had a central corneal thickness of 488 µm and was well fitted. The patient's quality of life improved substantially due to the surgery. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on the association of albinism with advanced keratoconus, total cataract, and glaucoma. Moreover, no previous report on femtosecond laser-assisted keratoplasty using VisuMax femtosecond laser system with “open-sky” cataract extraction is available in the literature. The VisuMax femtosecond laser-assisted keratoplasty ensures fast patient rehabilitation in such challenging cases. PMID:27146942

  20. Femtosecond laser-assisted keratoplasty combined with cataract extraction in a patient with keratoconus and oculocutaneous albinism.

    PubMed

    Pásztor, Dorottya; Kolozsvári, Bence Lajos; Losonczy, Gergely; Fodor, Mariann

    2016-03-01

    In this study, we present a case of a 58-year-old male patient with oculocutaneous albinism, keratoconus, total cataract, and glaucoma originating from father-daughter incest. He underwent femtosecond laser-assisted keratoplasty with "open-sky" cataract extraction and posterior chamber intraocular lens implantation. One week after surgery his uncorrected visual acuity improved from hand motion to 20/200. Six months later corneal K values were 49.1 D in the flat and 50.0 D in the steep meridian. The graft had a central corneal thickness of 488 µm and was well fitted. The patient's quality of life improved substantially due to the surgery. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on the association of albinism with advanced keratoconus, total cataract, and glaucoma. Moreover, no previous report on femtosecond laser-assisted keratoplasty using VisuMax femtosecond laser system with "open-sky" cataract extraction is available in the literature. The VisuMax femtosecond laser-assisted keratoplasty ensures fast patient rehabilitation in such challenging cases. PMID:27146942

  1. Strong Gravitational Lensing with SNAP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blandford, R. D.; Koopmans, L. V. E.

    2001-12-01

    As currently configured, SNAP should cover an area of sky to sufficient depth to observe tens of thousands of strong (ie multiple-imaging) gravitational lenses. This could provide an unprecedented database for performing cosmography, studies of large scale structure and galactic structure.and should complement the weak lensing program which will concentrate on larger scales. The challenge will be to recognize multiple imaging efficiently in an unbiased way and to organize effective follow up so as to obtain spectroscopic redshifts and monitor variable sources, when appropriate. Experience with the CLASS radio survey and the CASTLES program will be invaluable as we transition from the detailed study of a few tens of strong lenses through the ACS ultra-deep, deep and wide surveys (which should yield hundreds of examples of multiple imaging) to the larger samples envisaged from SNAP. New approaches to data analysis will be needed and coordinated planning with other proposed large survey instruments, like SKA, will be essential.

  2. Global prevalence of childhood cataract: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Sheeladevi, S; Lawrenson, J G; Fielder, A R; Suttle, C M

    2016-09-01

    Childhood cataract is an avoidable cause of visual disability worldwide and is a priority for VISION 2020: The Right to Sight. There is a paucity of information about the burden of cataract in children and the aim of this review is to assess the global prevalence of childhood cataract. The methodology for the review followed the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines. We performed a literature search for studies reporting estimates of prevalence or incidence of cataract among children (aged<18 years) at any global location using the Cochrane Library, Medline and Embase up to January 2015. No restrictions were imposed based on language or year of publication. Study quality was assessed using a critical appraisal tool designed for systematic reviews of prevalence. Twenty prevalence and four incidence studies of childhood cataract from five different geographical regions were included. The overall prevalence of childhood cataract and congenital cataract was in the range from 0.32 to 22.9/10000 children (median=1.03) and 0.63 to 9.74/10000 (median=1.71), respectively. The incidence ranged from 1.8 to 3.6/10000 per year. The prevalence of childhood cataract in low-income economies was found to be 0.42 to 2.05 compared with 0.63 to 13.6/10000 in high-income economies. There was no difference in the prevalence based on laterality or gender. This review highlights substantial gaps in the epidemiological knowledge of childhood cataract worldwide, particularly from low and lower middle-income economies. More studies are needed using standard definitions and case ascertainment methods with large enough sample sizes. PMID:27518543

  3. Increasing incidence of cataract surgery: Population-based study

    PubMed Central

    Gollogly, Heidrun E.; Hodge, David O.; St. Sauver, Jennifer L.; Erie, Jay C.

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE To estimate the incidence of cataract surgery in a defined population and to determine longitudinal cataract surgery patterns. SETTING Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, USA. DESIGN Cohort study. METHODS Rochester Epidemiology Project (REP) databases were used to identify all incident cataract surgeries in Olmsted County, Minnesota, between January 1, 2005, and December 31, 2011. Age-specific and sex-specific incidence rates were calculated and adjusted to the 2010 United States white population. Data were merged with previous REP data (1980 to 2004) to assess temporal trends in cataract surgery. Change in the incidence over time was assessed by fitting generalized linear models assuming a Poisson error structure. The probability of second-eye cataract surgery was calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. RESULTS Included were 8012 cataract surgeries from 2005 through 2011. During this time, incident cataract surgery significantly increased (P < .001), peaking in 2011 with a rate of 1100 per 100 000 (95% confidence interval, 1050–1160). The probability of second-eye surgery 3, 12, and 24 months after first-eye surgery was 60%, 76%, and 86%, respectively, a significant increase compared with the same intervals in the previous 7 years (1998 to 2004) (P < .001). When merged with 1980 to 2004 REP data, incident cataract surgery steadily increased over the past 3 decades (P < .001). CONCLUSION Incident cataract surgery steadily increased over the past 32 years and has not leveled off, as reported in Swedish population-based series. Second-eye surgery was performed sooner and more frequently, with 60% of residents having second-eye surgery within 3-months of first-eye surgery. PMID:23820302

  4. Ocular safety limits for 1030nm femtosecond laser cataract surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jenny; Sramek, Christopher; Paulus, Yannis M.; Lavinsky, Daniel; Schuele, Georg; Anderson, Dan; Dewey, David; Palanker, Daniel V.

    2013-03-01

    Application of femtosecond lasers to cataract surgery has added unprecedented precision and reproducibility but ocular safety limits for the procedure are not well-quantified. We present an analysis of safety during laser cataract surgery considering scanned patterns, reduced blood perfusion, and light scattering on residual bubbles formed during laser cutting. Experimental results for continuous-wave 1030 nm irradiation of the retina in rabbits are used to calibrate damage threshold temperatures and perfusion rate for our computational model of ocular heating. Using conservative estimates for each safety factor, we compute the limits of the laser settings for cataract surgery that optimize procedure speed within the limits of retinal safety.

  5. Effect of coffee (caffeine) against human cataract blindness

    PubMed Central

    Varma, Shambhu D

    2016-01-01

    Previous biochemical and morphological studies with animal experiments have demonstrated that caffeine given topically or orally to certain experimental animal models has significant inhibitory effect on cataract formation. The present studies were undertaken to examine if there is a correlation between coffee drinking and incidence of cataract blindness in human beings. That has been found to be the case. Incidence of cataract blindness was found to be significantly lower in groups consuming higher amounts of coffee in comparison to the groups with lower coffee intake. Mechanistically, the caffeine effect could be multifactorial, involving its antioxidant as well as its bioenergetic effects on the lens. PMID:26869755

  6. Femtosecond laser cataract surgery: technology and clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Timothy V; Lawless, Michael; Chan, Colin Ck; Jacobs, Mark; Ng, David; Bali, Shveta J; Hodge, Chris; Sutton, Gerard

    2013-03-01

    The recent introduction of femtosecond lasers to cataract surgery has generated much interest among ophthalmologists around the world. Laser cataract surgery integrates high-resolution anterior segment imaging systems with a femtosecond laser, allowing key steps of the procedure, including the primary and side-port corneal incisions, the anterior capsulotomy and fragmentation of the lens nucleus, to be performed with computer-guided laser precision. There is emerging evidence of reduced phacoemulsification time, better wound architecture and a more stable refractive result with femtosecond cataract surgery, as well as reports documenting an initial learning curve. This article will review the current state of technology and discuss our clinical experience.

  7. Centration and coverage of hydrogel contact lenses.

    PubMed

    Wake, E; Tienda, J B; Uyekawa, P M; Mandell, R B

    1981-04-01

    Decentration of the AOsoft lenses and Bausch & Lomb Soflens occurs during wear. The extent of the decentration of 14 lenses on 36 eyes of 18 subjects was studied by means of a biomicroscope with a reticle mounted in the ocular. Unexpectedly, for the AOsoft vault IV lens greater decentration occurred than for flatter lenses. Corneal toricity showed no correlation with lens decentration. PMID:7282855

  8. The Capsular Complications of Cataract Extraction

    PubMed Central

    Goulden, Charles

    1948-01-01

    The author considered the following important points: (1) Anterior capsular synechia to a corneal incision (made by a keratome) after the evacuation of a traumatic cataract. This might be detached early by the use of a blunt-ended knife following a perforation of the cornea with a sharp-pointed knife, much like a tenotome. (2) The involuntary prolapse of capsule with a cataract incision. (a) The danger of this was demonstrated as the cause of glaucoma, especially if it be found necessary to divide opaque capsular membrane after the extraction. (b) The danger of sympathetic ophthalmia. Prolapse might be prevented: (a) By intracapsular extraction. (b) By extracting the lens through an intact pupil, after the use of capsule forceps, followed either by a partial or total iridectomy. (3) The treatment of opaque after-cataract. Various types of opaque capsule membrane were described. (a) Opaque lens fibres imprisoned between anterior and posterior remains of capsule. (b) Grey membrane made of new lens fibres from proliferating subcapsular cells. (c) Elschnig's cells. (d) Much thickened capsular membrane following an extensive hæmorrhage into the anterior chamber occurring about the fifth day after extraction. (e) A thick membrane formed of fibrous tissue following the invasion of the coloboma of the iris after infection at the time of operation. The fibrous tissue comes from the undersurface of the conjunctival flap and causes an updrawn coloboma which is also made narrower by its contraction. When performing a capsulotomy thickened bands should be avoided and an incision made in thin capsule, parallel to thick bands. If the membrane is very thick and shows signs of being torn from its peripheral attachment when a single needle is used, then (1) Two needles may be used after the method of Bowman; (2) A Wheeler operation may be performed (Wheeler, 1939, Collected Papers, New York, 197); (3) Thick capsule may be divided by means of a Ziegler knife, as described by the

  9. Sequential intrastromal corneal ring implantation and cataract surgery in a severe keratoconus patient with cataract.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung Jae; Kwon, Hyun Suk; Koh, Il Hwan

    2012-06-01

    A 49-year-old man with an uncorrected visual acuity (UCVA) of 20 / 1000, a best spectacle-corrected visual acuity (BSCVA) of 20 / 400, keratometric readings of K1 = 59.88 × 82° / K2 = 45.88 × 172°, and an inferior steepening that was consistent with keratoconus in his left eye was treated with clear-cornea phacoemulsification and an intraocular lens (IOL) implantation after insertion of keraring intrastromal corneal ring segments for severe keratoconus and cataract. An asymmetrical pair of kerarings was implanted with the assistance of a femtosecond laser in September 2008; the one segment was 250 µm and the other was 150 µm and both were placed at 70°. Three months after the kerarings were implanted, clear-cornea phacoemulsification and IOL implantation were performed on the left eye. After surgery, both the UCVA and the BSCVA of the left eye improved by eight lines. Postoperative central keratometry showed a decrease of 7.35 diopters in the left eye. Both the postoperative refraction (-0.75 -0.75 × 60°) and the keratometric reading (K1 = 50.05 × 93° / K2 = 48.83 × 3°) remained stable one month following the procedures. Thus, the sequential order of intrastromal corneal rings implantation and cataract surgery can be considered as a treatment option in patients with severe keratoconus and cataract.

  10. N-body lensed CMB maps: lensing extraction and characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antolini, Claudia; Fantaye, Yabebal; Martinelli, Matteo; Carbone, Carmelita; Baccigalupi, Carlo

    2014-02-01

    We reconstruct shear maps and angular power spectra from simulated weakly lensed total intensity (TT) and polarised (EB) maps of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) anisotropies, obtained using Born approximated ray-tracing through the N-body simulated Cold Dark Matter (CDM) structures in the Millennium Simulations (MS). We compare the recovered signal with the ΛCDM prediction, on the whole interval of angular scales which is allowed by the finite box size, extending from the degree scale to the arcminute, by applying a quadratic estimator in the flat sky limit; we consider PRISM-like instrumental specification for future generation CMB satellites, corresponding to arcminute angular resolution of 3.2' and sensitivity of 2.43 μK-arcmin. The noise contribution in the simulations closely follows the estimator prediction, becoming dominated by limits in the angular resolution for the EB signal, at l simeq 1500. The recovered signal shows no visible departure from predictions of the weak lensing power within uncertainties, when considering TT and EB data singularly. In particular, the reconstruction precision reaches the level of a few percent in bins with Δl simeq 100 in the angular multiple interval 1000lesssimllesssim2000 for T, and about 10% for EB. Within the adopted specifications, polarisation data do represent a significant contribution to the lensing shear, which appear to faithfully trace the underlying N-body structure down to the smallest angular scales achievable with the present setup, validating at the same time the latter with respect to semi-analytical predictions from ΛCDM cosmology at the level of CMB lensing statistics. This work demonstrates the feasibility of CMB lensing studies based on large scale simulations of cosmological structure formation in the context of the current and future high resolution and sensitivity CMB experiment.

  11. N-body lensed CMB maps: lensing extraction and characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Antolini, Claudia; Martinelli, Matteo; Baccigalupi, Carlo; Fantaye, Yabebal; Carbone, Carmelita E-mail: y.t.fantaye@astro.uio.no E-mail: carmelita.carbone@brera.inaf.it

    2014-02-01

    We reconstruct shear maps and angular power spectra from simulated weakly lensed total intensity (TT) and polarised (EB) maps of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) anisotropies, obtained using Born approximated ray-tracing through the N-body simulated Cold Dark Matter (CDM) structures in the Millennium Simulations (MS). We compare the recovered signal with the ΛCDM prediction, on the whole interval of angular scales which is allowed by the finite box size, extending from the degree scale to the arcminute, by applying a quadratic estimator in the flat sky limit; we consider PRISM-like instrumental specification for future generation CMB satellites, corresponding to arcminute angular resolution of 3.2' and sensitivity of 2.43 μK-arcmin. The noise contribution in the simulations closely follows the estimator prediction, becoming dominated by limits in the angular resolution for the EB signal, at ℓ ≅ 1500. The recovered signal shows no visible departure from predictions of the weak lensing power within uncertainties, when considering TT and EB data singularly. In particular, the reconstruction precision reaches the level of a few percent in bins with Δℓ ≅ 100 in the angular multiple interval 1000∼<ℓ∼<2000 for T, and about 10% for EB. Within the adopted specifications, polarisation data do represent a significant contribution to the lensing shear, which appear to faithfully trace the underlying N-body structure down to the smallest angular scales achievable with the present setup, validating at the same time the latter with respect to semi-analytical predictions from ΛCDM cosmology at the level of CMB lensing statistics. This work demonstrates the feasibility of CMB lensing studies based on large scale simulations of cosmological structure formation in the context of the current and future high resolution and sensitivity CMB experiment.

  12. [Amblyopia treatment of unilateral and bilateral cataract with visual acuity result].

    PubMed

    Péchereau, A; Paire, V; Raffin, L; Tessier, H; Lebranchu, P

    2011-03-01

    Treatment strategies of congenital cataract provide evidence of recent improvement in the visual prognosis. This trend is likely to be accounted for by a combination of improved management of amblyopia occurring in parallel with advances in surgical techniques, instrumentation, and materials. Compliance with occlusion is the factor most strongly associated with visual outcome: to support, to encourage, to comfort, to explain, to require (demand) to put in front of the responsibilities, here are the other missions of the therapist which are not less important than the surgical gesture. Progress, in this "educational" care of the visual function remains to make but the way is drawn. PMID:21377759

  13. [Correlation of the grade of nuclear and cortical cataract, visual acuity, and contrast sensitivity].

    PubMed

    Yuge, T; Ozasa, K; Yamade, S

    1993-05-01

    A correlative investigation of 125 eyes with senile cataractous lenses was conducted to determine the relationships between cortical (CC) and nuclear cataracts (NC), corrected visual acuity (VA), and contrast sensitivity (CS). The CS for the spatial frequency of 1.5 cycles/degree (c/d) and 12.0 c/d was analyzed in particular detail. The results were as follows: (1) CC and CS for both 1.5 and 12.0 c/d showed statistically significant negative correlations with a coefficient (CE) of -0.250 and -0.288 respectively. No correlation was found between CC and VA. (2) NC and VA showed a significant negative correlation with CE of -2.29. No correlation was found between NC and CS for at 1.5 and 12.0 c/d. (3) VA and CS showed a significant positive correlation with a CE of +0.436 at 1.5 c/d and +0.270 at 12.0 c/d. The CS at 1.5 and the CS at 12.0 c/d also showed a significant negative correlation with a CE of +0.477. (4) NC and CC showed a significantly negative correlation (r = -0.224, p < 0.01), suggesting that scattered light from the nucleus may be interfered with by cortical opacities during slitlamp examinations. (5) In 29 cases of no cortical opacity, nuclear opacity showed significant negative correlation with VA (r = 0.556 p < 0.01) but no significant correlation with CS of both 1.5 and 12 c/d. (6) In 30 cases with less than 0.085 of nuclear opacity, cortical opacity showed significant negative correlation with CS at 12.0 c/d (r = 0.364 p < 0.01) but showed no significant correlation with VA and CS at 1.5 c/d. PMID:8337967

  14. Corneal toxic changes after cataract extraction.

    PubMed

    Zabel, R W; Mintsioulis, G; MacDonald, I M; Valberg, J; Tuft, S J

    1989-12-01

    Over an 18-month period 10 patients (12 eyes) presented with severe corneal toxic changes after cataract extraction. Defined stages in the keratopathy included punctate epithelial keratopathy, pseudodendrite, central epithelial ulcer and central stromal ulcer. Periods of up to 13 months were required for resolution of the defects. Axial scarring and nonhealing epithelial defects resulted in a final visual acuity of counting fingers and hand movement in two patients. We believe that exposure during the postoperative period to benzalkonium chloride contained in ophthalmic medications represents the most likely cause of the toxic changes and that no single ophthalmic medication can be held responsible. The past ocular histories of the patients included chronic open-angle glaucoma, dry eye syndrome and anterior membrane dystrophy. Prior exposure to benzalkonium-containing antiglaucoma medications, tear film deficiencies or abnormalities of epithelial adhesion may have predisposed the corneas in these patients to the development of benzalkonium-related toxic changes.

  15. Comparative evaluation of femtosecond laser-assisted cataract surgery and conventional phacoemulsification in white cataract

    PubMed Central

    Titiyal, Jeewan S; Kaur, Manpreet; Singh, Archita; Arora, Tarun; Sharma, Namrata

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To compare femtosecond laser-assisted capsulotomy with conventional manual capsulorhexis in cases of white cataract. Patients and methods The prospective comparative study enrolled 80 eyes (80 patients) with white cataract that underwent either femtosecond laser-assisted cataract surgery (Group I, n=40) or conventional manual phacoemulsification (Group II, n=40) at a tertiary care ophthalmic institution. The groups were divided based on the patient’s choice and affordability of the procedure. Capsulotomy/capsulorhexis was evaluated in terms of size, circularity index (4Π [area/perimeter2]), intraocular lens coverage, and continuity. Each group was further subdivided based on the release of white milky fluid on initiation of the capsulotomy/capsulorhexis, and the “fluid” cases were compared with the “no-fluid” cases. The primary outcome measure was capsulotomy/capsulorhexis characteristics in the two groups. The secondary outcome measures were intraoperative phacoemulsification parameters, intraoperative complications, and postoperative visual acuity. Results The size of the capsulotomy/capsulorhexis was 4.9±0.1 mm in Group I and 5.3±0.4 mm in Group II (P<0.001). Mean circularity index was 0.996±0.003 and 0.909±0.047 in Groups I and II, respectively (P<0.001). In Group I, free-floating circular capsulotomies were obtained in 52.5% (21/40) eyes; 37.5% (15/40) eyes had microadhesions; and 10% (4/40) eyes had incomplete capsulotomy in 1–2 clock hours. The incidence of residual adhesions was more in cases with release of white milky fluid (P=0.003). In Group II, a multistep capsulorhexis was performed in 70% (28/40) of the eyes. There was no difference in terms of visual outcomes and intraoperative complications. Conclusion Femtosecond laser-assisted cataract surgery has the advantage of creating a circular and optimally sized capsulotomy in cases of white cataract. The release of white milky fluid during femtosecond laser delivery is the most

  16. Gravitational Lenses in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ros, Rosa M.

    2008-01-01

    It is not common to introduce current astronomy in school lessons. This article presents a set of experiments about gravitational lenses. It is normal to simulate them by means of computers, but it is very simple to simulate similar effects using a drinking glass full of liquid or using only the glass base. These are, of course, cheap and easy…

  17. Contour mapping of spectacle lenses.

    PubMed

    Liu, L

    1994-04-01

    The measurement of spectacle lenses by conventional focimeters and automated focimeters assesses only a small region of the lens, and only the power and related data at that point are indicated. In this paper, two methods based on optical Fourier filtering and optical correlation are suggested for contour-mapping the deviations of a spectacle lens over its whole aperture. The fringe pattern appearing on the lens image depicts vividly the characteristics of the tested lens. All the related data are qualitatively seen at a glance and can be calculated from the fringe distribution. Furthermore, the optical processing of the fringes by defocusing is described; thus, the fringes can be continuously changed by shifting the illuminating point source or mask. The shift indicates the spherical power needed to decrease or increase the lens fringes. In addition, a fringe-reading technique is suggested by counting the number of the fringes within a reticle ring. Therefore, the sphere power, cylinder power, cylinder axis, prism power, and prism orientation can be obtained from the reading of the fringes, the shift position, or their combination with a high accuracy. The methods are suitable not only to sphere, spherocylinder, and prism lenses but also to multifocus and progressive power lenses. The suggestion provides a practical way to measure spectacle lenses over the whole aperture. PMID:8047340

  18. Optics Demonstrations Using Cylindrical Lenses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ivanov, Dragia; Nikolov, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we consider the main properties of cylindrical lenses and propose several demonstrational experiments that can be performed with them. Specifically we use simple glasses full of water to demonstrate some basic geometrical optics principles and phenomena. We also present some less standard experiments that can be performed with such…

  19. Towards noiseless gravitational lensing simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angulo, Raul E.; Chen, Ruizhu; Hilbert, Stefan; Abel, Tom

    2014-11-01

    The microphysical properties of the dark matter (DM) particle can, in principle, be constrained by the properties and abundance of substructures in galaxy clusters, as measured through strong gravitational lensing. Unfortunately, there is a lack of accurate theoretical predictions for the lensing signal of these substructures, mainly because of the discreteness noise inherent to N-body simulations. Here, we present a method, dubbed as Recursive-TCM, that is able to provide lensing predictions with an arbitrarily low discreteness noise. This solution is based on a novel way of interpreting the results of N-body simulations, where particles simply trace the evolution and distortion of Lagrangian phase-space volume elements. We discuss the advantages and limitations of this method compared to the widely used density estimators based on cloud-in-cells and adaptive-kernel smoothing. Applying the new method to a cluster-sized DM halo simulated in warm and cold DM scenarios, we show how the expected differences in their substructure population translate into differences in convergence and magnification maps. We anticipate that our method will provide the high-precision theoretical predictions required to interpret and fully exploit strong gravitational lensing observations.

  20. Gravitational Lensing of Supernova Neutrinos

    SciTech Connect

    Mena, Olga; Mocioiu, Irina; Quigg, Chris; /Fermilab

    2006-10-01

    The black hole at the center of the galaxy is a powerful lens for supernova neutrinos. In the very special circumstance of a supernova near the extended line of sight from Earth to the galactic center, lensing could dramatically enhance the neutrino flux at Earth and stretch the neutrino pulse.

  1. Irlen Lenses and Reading Difficulties.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoyt, Creig S.

    1990-01-01

    The article reviews three studies (EC 600 064-066) evaluating the effectiveness of using Irlen tinted lenses with reading-disabled persons. The studies are individually critiqued, and recommendations are offered concerning the methodology of further research. Stressed is the need to determine whether a specific syndrome of scotopic sensitivity…

  2. 3. COPY OF A PHOTOGRAPH OF THE CATARACT MILLS, NEWBURGH, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. COPY OF A PHOTOGRAPH OF THE CATARACT MILLS, NEWBURGH, OHIO. Date unknown. Photographer: Berni Rich, Score Photographers, September 1986 - Alexander's Grist Mill, Lock 37 on Ohio & Erie Canal, South of Cleveland, Valley View, Cuyahoga County, OH

  3. Intracameral cefuroxime: prophylaxis of postoperative endophthalmitis after cataract surgery.

    PubMed

    Keating, Gillian M

    2013-02-01

    Results of the landmark European Society of Cataract and Refractive Surgeons trial and additional prospective and retrospective studies support the use of intracameral cefuroxime in the prophylaxis of endophthalmitis following cataract surgery. Prophylaxis with intracameral cefuroxime at the recommended dose appears to be well tolerated in patients undergoing cataract surgery. However, off-label use of intracameral cefuroxime usually requires a two-step dilution process with the potential for dilution errors, and there are also concerns regarding the risk of contamination. Aprokam® (intracameral cefuroxime) has been approved in the EU for the prophylaxis of postoperative endophthalmitis after cataract surgery. After reconstitution of Aprokam®, no further dilution is required and each vial is only indicated for single-patient use; this has the potential to reduce the risk of both dilution errors and contamination.

  4. Detection of TORCH pathogens in children with congenital cataracts

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Bin; Yang, Yabo

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the correlation between infection rates with TORCH pathogens including toxoplasma, rubella virus, cytomegalovirus, and herpes simplex virus (HSV) I and II and congenital cataracts. In total, the data from 69 children with congenital cataract treated at the Children's Hospital of the Zhejiang University School of Medicine between May 2006 and September 2013 were examined, including the complete serum test results for immunoglobulin (Ig)G and IgM that target TORCH pathogenic antibodies. These results were compared with the antibody levels of 5,914 children in a control group. Using SPSS 19.0 software, variance equation Levene tests, mean equation t tests, and completely randomized design of four tables χ2 tests were applied. The HSV II IgG positivity rates significantly differed between the cataract and control groups. These results suggested that HSV may be one of the pathogenic viruses that leads to congenital cataracts. PMID:27446337

  5. Presumptive electric cataracts in a Great Horned owl (Bubo virginianus).

    PubMed

    Dees, D Dustin; MacLaren, Nicole E

    2013-01-01

    This case report describes suspected electrocution in a juvenile female Great Horned owl (Bubo virginianus) with subsequent bilateral cataract formation. The bird flew into a high-voltage power line and was immediately rescued. Burn wounds of the head and ataxia with apparent blindness were noted. Initial ophthalmic examination 5 days after the incident revealed bilaterally symmetrical anterior subcapsular vacuolar cataracts with absence of intraocular inflammation and a predominantly clear view to the normal appearing fundus. The bird appeared to be nonvisual. No ophthalmic medications were prescribed at initial examination. Subsequent recheck examination at 8 weeks revealed moderate resolution of the cataracts and improved vision. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first published report of suspected electric cataracts in an avian species. PMID:22432797

  6. Magnified Weak Lensing Cross Correlation Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Ulmer, Melville P., Clowe, Douglas I.

    2010-11-30

    This project carried out a weak lensing tomography (WLT) measurement around rich clusters of galaxies. This project used ground based photometric redshift data combined with HST archived cluster images that provide the WLT and cluster mass modeling. The technique has already produced interesting results (Guennou et al, 2010,Astronomy & Astrophysics Vol 523, page 21, and Clowe et al, 2011 to be submitted). Guennou et al have validated that the necessary accuracy can be achieved with photometric redshifts for our purposes. Clowe et al titled "The DAFT/FADA survey. II. Tomographic weak lensing signal from 10 high redshift clusters," have shown that for the **first time** via this purely geometrical technique, which does not assume a standard rod or candle, that a cosmological constant is **required** for flat cosmologies. The intent of this project is not to produce the best constraint on the value of the dark energy equation of state, w. Rather, this project is to carry out a sustained effort of weak lensing tomography that will naturally feed into the near term Dark Energy Survey (DES) and to provide invaluable mass calibration for that project. These results will greatly advance a key cosmological method which will be applied to the top-rated ground-based project in the Astro2020 decadal survey, LSST. Weak lensing tomography is one of the key science drivers behind LSST. CO-I Clowe is on the weak lensing LSST committee, and senior scientist on this project, at FNAL James Annis, plays a leading role in the DES. This project has built on successful proposals to obtain ground-based imaging for the cluster sample. By 1 Jan, it is anticipated the project will have accumulated complete 5-color photometry on 30 (or about 1/3) of the targeted cluster sample (public webpage for the survey is available at http://cencos.oamp.fr/DAFT/ and has a current summary of the observational status of various clusters). In all, the project has now been awarded the equivalent of over 60

  7. 3D printed diffractive terahertz lenses.

    PubMed

    Furlan, Walter D; Ferrando, Vicente; Monsoriu, Juan A; Zagrajek, Przemysław; Czerwińska, Elżbieta; Szustakowski, Mieczysław

    2016-04-15

    A 3D printer was used to realize custom-made diffractive THz lenses. After testing several materials, phase binary lenses with periodic and aperiodic radial profiles were designed and constructed in polyamide material to work at 0.625 THz. The nonconventional focusing properties of such lenses were assessed by computing and measuring their axial point spread function (PSF). Our results demonstrate that inexpensive 3D printed THz diffractive lenses can be reliably used in focusing and imaging THz systems. Diffractive THz lenses with unprecedented features, such as extended depth of focus or bifocalization, have been demonstrated. PMID:27082335

  8. Gravitational lenses, cosmology, and galaxy structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winn, J.

    2002-05-01

    Gravitational lenses can be used to study dark matter in galaxies and to measure the Hubble constant. The statistics of lensing can be used to measure the cosmological constant. I have been conducting a survey of the southern sky for new lenses at radio wavelengths, which has resulted in 4 confirmed lenses and 3 strong candidates that require further follow-up. I will describe the survey and the scientific results that have been obtained from the new lenses. I will also describe my other life as a science journalist.

  9. The fate of eyes with anterior chamber intra-ocular lenses.

    PubMed

    David, R; Yagev, R; Schneck, M; Briscoe, D; Gilad, E; Yassur, Y

    1993-01-01

    A total of 143 anterior chamber (AC) intra-ocular lenses (IOL) of various designs were implanted in a five-year period and followed for 18 to 76 months. The lenses were inserted as a secondary implant after extracapsular cataract extraction (ECCE) complicated by vitrectomy, or after primary intra-capsular extraction. The complications (corneal edema, uveitis/glaucoma, extrusion/imbedding, cystoid macular edema), the final visual acuity and the need for removal of the IOL were analyzed. Only small differences were found between the different lenses but some association was found between complicated surgery (ECCE + vitrectomy) and a higher rate of complication, poorer visual outcome and more frequent need for IOL removal. Cystoid macular edema was encountered only in cases with complicated ECCE. A high percentage of other ocular pathologies was found among the cases, possibly implying that diseased eyes are more prone to surgical complications. An alternative to the AC-IOL in cases with a ruptured posterior capsule is the suture-supported posterior chamber IOL, but the flexible-loop AC-IOL may not yet be obsolete.

  10. [Cataract: based on A-bomb survivor studies].

    PubMed

    Neriishi, Kazuo

    2012-03-01

    Until now, the radiation protection community had assumed that only high doses of 2 Gy or more cause cataracts. However, new data from the atomic-bomb (A-bomb) survivors suggest that the dose threshold for both minor opacities and vision limiting cataracts may be below 1 Gy. Other studies have shown similar results in recent years. In 2011, the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) revised their guidelines for permissible occupational and medical exposures to the eye.

  11. Reducing Older Driver Motor Vehicle Collisions via Earlier Cataract Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Mennemeyer, Stephen T.; Owsley, Cynthia; McGwin, Gerald

    2013-01-01

    Older adults who undergo cataract extraction have roughly half the rate of motor vehicle collision (MVC) involvement per mile driven compared to cataract patients who do not elect cataract surgery. Currently in the U.S., most insurers do not allow payment for cataract surgery based upon the findings of a vision exam unless accompanied by an individual’s complaint of visual difficulties that seriously interfere with driving or other daily activities and individuals themselves may be slow or reluctant to complain and seek relief. As a consequence, surgery tends to occur after significant vision problems have emerged. We hypothesize that a proactive policy encouraging cataract surgery earlier for a lesser level of complaint would significantly reduce MVCs among older drivers. We used a Monte Carlo model to simulate the MVC experience of the U.S. population from age 60 to 89 under alternative protocols for the timing of cataract surgery which we call “Current Practice” (CP) and “Earlier Surgery” (ES). Our base model finds, from a societal perspective with undiscounted 2010 dollars, that switching to ES from CP reduces by about 21% the average number of MVCs, fatalities, and MVC cost per person. The net effect on total cost – all MVC costs plus cataract surgery expenditures -- is a reduction of about 16%. Quality Adjusted Life Years would increase by about 5%. From the perspective of payers for healthcare, the switch would increase cataract surgery expenditure for ages 65+ by about 8% and for ages 60 to 64 by about 47% but these expenditures are substantially offset after age 65 by reductions in the medical and emergency services component of MVC cost. Similar results occur with discounting at 3% and with various sensitivity analyses. We conclude that a policy of ES would significantly reduce MVCs and their associated consequences. PMID:23369786

  12. Outcome of Capsular Tension Ring (CTR) Implant in Complicated Cataracts

    PubMed Central

    Sahai, Anshu; Kumar, Pukhrambam Ratan

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Surgery in the presence of zonular weakness or subluxated lens was a great surgical challenge and included intracapsular cataract extraction with anterior chamber IOL implantation or pars plana lensectomy and vitrectomy with a sutured (IOL). Modern surgical approache involves placement of endocapsular flexible PMMA ring that prevents iatrogenic loss of zonular support, minimizing vitreous loss and enables placement of in the bag IOL. Aim To evaluate frequency and indications of capsular tension ring (CTR) implant and analyse the visual and anatomical outcome in various complicated cataract surgeries. Materials and Methods Retrospective screening of database of 6000 consecutive cataract surgeries was done. BCVA, complete ocular examination with SLEx, intraocular pressure, direct ophthalmoscope, fundus examination with +78/+90D were noted. CTR was implanted in cases where Zonular dialysis of > 3 clock hours was present or capsular bag instability was detected during capsulorhexis or subsequent intraoperative maneuvers. In cases with capsulorrhexis extension, CTR was not implanted. Records were analysed for indication of CTR implant and clinical outcome on Day 1, 1 month and 6 month follow up. Results In this series CTR implant was done in 45 cases. The indications were hypermature senile cataract in 9 cases, hypermature senile cataract with lens induced glaucoma in 9 cases, pseudoexfoliation syndrome in 9 cases, post blunt injury traumatic cataract in 6 cases, iridochoroidal coloboma in 6 cases, hypermature cataract with pseudoexfoliation and marfan syndrome in 3 cases respectively. Decision of CTR implant was intraoperative in 42 patients. At 6 month follow up, 39 patients had best corrected visual acuity ≥6/12. IOL decentration was detected in only 3 cases, but without any subjective visual complaints. Conclusion As per the results CTR was used very infrequently (0.75%) but remains useful in cataract surgeries with difficult pre and intraoperative

  13. Cataract surgery without anaesthesia: two descriptions by Arthur Jacob.

    PubMed

    Haridas, R P

    2009-07-01

    Dr Arthur Jacob (1790-1874), of Dublin, Ireland, was one of the leading ophthalmologists of his time. He was the first to describe the membrane that contains the rods and cones in the eye (membrana Jacobi) and basal cell carcinoma (Jacob's ulcer). He made a curved needle for cataract surgery from a sewing needle (Jacob's needle). Two descriptions of cataract surgery without anaesthesia are presented. PMID:19705632

  14. [Cataract: based on A-bomb survivor studies].

    PubMed

    Neriishi, Kazuo

    2012-03-01

    Until now, the radiation protection community had assumed that only high doses of 2 Gy or more cause cataracts. However, new data from the atomic-bomb (A-bomb) survivors suggest that the dose threshold for both minor opacities and vision limiting cataracts may be below 1 Gy. Other studies have shown similar results in recent years. In 2011, the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) revised their guidelines for permissible occupational and medical exposures to the eye. PMID:22514923

  15. The use of Saturn II lenses in keratoconus.

    PubMed

    Maguen, E; Martinez, M; Rosner, I R; Caroline, P; Macy, J; Nesburn, A B

    1991-01-01

    We studied Saturn II contact lenses in keratoconus patients who were intolerant to other available contact lenses. A total of 24 patients, who were followed for up to 15 months, participated in the study. Visual acuities improved significantly following fitting with the Saturn II contact lens; whereas only one eye in the series was correctable to 20/20 before fitting, eight eyes were corrected to 20/20 following fitting. A great number of lenses had to be replaced during the study because of deposit formation and tearing at the interface (rate of replacement: 0.52 lenses per eye per month). A variety of complications occurred during lens wear, resulting in only six eyes wearing the Saturn II lens at the close of the study (out of 46 eyes that had started wearing the lens). Discomfort due to tightness of the peripheral segment was the most common cause of lens discontinuation. We conclude that the Saturn II lens was inadequate for fitting patients with advanced keratoconus.

  16. Atm heterozygous mice are more sensitive to radiation-induced cataracts than are their wild-type counterparts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Worgul, Basil V.; Smilenov, Lubomir; Brenner, David J.; Junk, Anna; Zhou, Wei; Hall, Eric J.

    2002-01-01

    It is important to know whether the human population includes genetically predisposed radiosensitive subsets. In vitro studies have shown that cells from individuals homozygous for ataxia telangiectasia (A-T) are much more radiosensitive than cells from unaffected individuals. Although cells heterozygous for the ATM gene (ATM(+/-)) may be slightly more radiosensitive in vitro, it remained to be determined whether the greater susceptibility of ATM(+/-) cells translates into an increased sensitivity for late effects in vivo, though there is a suggestion that radiotherapy patients that are heterozygous for the ATM gene may be more at risk of developing late normal tissue damage. We chose cataractogenesis in the lens as a means to assay for the effects of ATM deficiency in a late-responding tissue. One eye of wild-type, Atm heterozygous and homozygous knockout mice was exposed to 0.5-, 1.0-, 2.0-, or 4.0-Gy x rays. The animals were followed weekly for cataract development by conventional slit-lamp biomicroscopy. Cataract development in the animals of all three groups was strongly dependent on dose. The lenses of homozygous mice were the first to opacify at any given dose. Most important in the present context is that cataracts appeared earlier in the heterozygous versus wild-type animals. The data suggest that ATM heterozygotes in the human population may also be radiosensitive. This may influence the choice of individuals destined to be exposed to higher than normal doses of radiation, such as astronauts, and may also suggest that radiotherapy patients who are ATM heterozygotes could be predisposed to increased late normal tissue damage.

  17. Dynamic and differential regulation in the microRNA expression in the developing and mature cataractous rat lens

    PubMed Central

    Kubo, Eri; Hasanova, Nailia; Sasaki, Hiroshi; Singh, Dhirendra P

    2013-01-01

    Recent evidence supports a role for microRNAs (miRNAs) in regulating gene expression, and alterations in gene expression are known to affect cells involved in the development of ageing disorders. Using developing rat lens epithelial cells (LECs), we profiled the expression of miRNAs by a microarray-based approach. Few gene expression changes known to be involved in pathogenesis or cytoprotection were uniquely influenced by miRNA expression. Most miRNAs increased or decreased in abundance (let 7b, let 7c, miR29a, miR29c, miR126 and miR551b) in LECs/lenses during late embryonic and post-natal development and in cataract. Among them, miR29a, miR29c and miR126 were dramatically decreased in cataractous LECs from Shumiya Cataract Rats (SCRs). Specifically, the cytoskeleton remodelling genes tropomyosin (Tm) 1α and 2β, which have been implicated in the initiation of pathophysiology, were targets of miR29c and were over-stimulated as demonstrated by inhibitor experiments. In transfection experiments, increasing the level of miR29c caused a corresponding decrease in the expression of Tm1α and 2β, suggesting that miR29c may regulate the translation of Tm1α and 2β. 3′UTR luciferase activity of Tm1α, not 2β, was significantly decreased in miR29c-transfected mouse LECs. These findings demonstrate changes in miRNAs expression, and target molecules have potential as diagnostic indicators of ageing and as a foundation of miR-based therapeutics for age-related diseases. PMID:23844765

  18. Rate of intraoperative complications during cataract surgery following intravitreal injections.

    PubMed

    Hahn, P; Jiramongkolchai, K; Stinnett, S; Daluvoy, M; Kim, T

    2016-08-01

    PurposeTo investigate the effect of prior intravitreal injections on intraoperative and postoperative complication rates associated with cataract surgery.MethodsA retrospective cohort analysis reviewed 10 105 cataract surgery procedures performed by experienced surgeons at the Duke Eye Center from 1 January 2005 to 10 December 2012. A group of 197 eyes with prior intravitreal injections was compared with an equal number of matched control eyes without prior injection using the Fisher's exact test of difference in proportions and the Wilcoxon rank-sum test of difference in means. Outcomes analyzed included baseline demographic information, preoperative clinical characteristics, prevalence of intraoperative complications, and postoperative intraocular pressure, glaucoma surgery, and glaucoma medication requirement through 1 year following cataract surgery.ResultsAn increased rate of intraoperative complications was identified during cataract surgery in eyes with prior intravitreal injections compared with control eyes (3 vs 0%, P=0.030). Injection eyes required more glaucoma medications at 1 year, but no difference was identified if steroid injections were excluded. No difference in postoperative IOP or glaucoma surgery was identified. No cases of endophthalmitis were reported.ConclusionsA history of intravitreal injections may be a risk factor for cataract surgery-related intraoperative complications. We hypothesize this may be due to unidentified iatrogenic lens trauma during intravitreal injections. Particular attention to the posterior capsule during preoperative assessment and intraoperatively is recommended in eyes undergoing cataract surgery with a prior history of intravitreal injections.

  19. Cataract blindness--challenges for the 21st century.

    PubMed Central

    Brian, G.; Taylor, H.

    2001-01-01

    Cataract prevalence increases with age. As the world's population ages, cataract-induced visual dysfunction and blindness is on the increase. This is a significant global problem. The challenges are to prevent or delay cataract formation, and treat that which does occur. Genetic and environmental factors contribute to cataract formation. However, reducing ocular exposure to UV-B radiation and stopping smoking are the only interventions that can reduce factors that affect the risk of cataract. The cure for cataract is surgery, but this is not equally available to all, and the surgery which is available does not produce equal outcomes. Readily available surgical services capable of delivering good vision rehabilitation must be acceptable and accessible to all in need, no matter what their circumstances. To establish and sustain these services requires comprehensive strategies that go beyond a narrow focus on surgical technique. There must be changes in government priorities, population education, and an integrated approach to surgical and management training. This approach must include supply of start-up capital equipment, establishment of surgical audit, resupply of consumables, and cost-recovery mechanisms. Considerable innovation is required. Nowhere is this more evident than in the pursuit of secure funding for ongoing services. PMID:11285671

  20. Unfolded-protein response-associated stabilization of p27(Cdkn1b) interferes with lens fiber cell denucleation, leading to cataract.

    PubMed

    Lyu, Lei; Whitcomb, Elizabeth A; Jiang, Shuhong; Chang, Min-Lee; Gu, Yumei; Duncan, Melinda K; Cvekl, Ales; Wang, Wei-Lin; Limi, Saima; Reneker, Lixing W; Shang, Fu; Du, Linfang; Taylor, Allen

    2016-03-01

    Failure of lens fiber cell denucleation (LFCD) is associated with congenital cataracts, but the pathobiology awaits elucidation. Recent work has suggested that mechanisms that direct the unidirectional process of LFCD are analogous to the cyclic processes associated with mitosis. We found that lens-specific mutations that elicit an unfolded-protein response (UPR) in vivo accumulate p27(Cdkn1b), show cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk)-1 inhibition, retain their LFC nuclei, and are cataractous. Although a UPR was not detected in lenses expressing K6W-Ub, they also accumulated p27 and showed failed LFCD. Induction of a UPR in human lens epithelial cells (HLECs) also induced accumulation of p27 associated with decreased levels of S-phase kinase-associated protein (Skp)-2, a ubiquitin ligase that regulates mitosis. These cells also showed decreased lamin A/C phosphorylation and metaphase arrest. The suppression of lamin A/C phosphorylation and metaphase transition induced by the UPR was rescued by knockdown of p27. Taken together, these data indicate that accumulation of p27, whether related to the UPR or not, prevents the phosphorylation of lamin A/C and LFCD in maturing LFCs in vivo, as well as in dividing HLECs. The former leads to cataract and the latter to metaphase arrest. These results suggest that accumulation of p27 is a common mechanism underlying retention of LFC nuclei. PMID:26590164

  1. A clinical study of radiation cataract formation in adult life following γ irradiation of the lens in early childhood

    PubMed Central

    Wilde, G.; Sjostrand, J.

    1997-01-01

    AIMS—To analyse long term effects on the lens of radium irradiation during infancy.
METHODS—An infant cohort (n = 20, median age 6 months) treated for skin haemangioma with one or two radium-226 needles located at or within the orbital rim was examined 30 to 45 years after γ radiation. Detailed information about the treatment procedure was available for all cases. Subcapsular opacities were graded semiquantitatively according to a scale based on extent and density of the opacities.
RESULTS—A high prevalence of light to moderate posterior, subcapsular, and cortical cataract formation was found in the lenses on the treated side irradiated with a mean dose ranging from approximately 1 to 8 Gy. The cataract formation increased as a function of dose. The presence of subcapsular punctate opacities and vacuoles in the lenses on the untreated side receiving irradiation of an estimated dose varying around 0.1 Gy indicates a higher sensitivity than expected.
CONCLUSION—The growing lens during infancy is sensitive to radium irradiation at doses lower than those previously stated. The eye lens seems suitable for studies of effects of low dose radiation since damaged cells are retained in the lens for a lifetime.

 PMID:9215051

  2. CMB lensing bispectrum from nonlinear growth of the large scale structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Namikawa, Toshiya

    2016-06-01

    We discuss detectability of the nonlinear growth of the large-scale structure in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) lensing. The lensing signals involved in the CMB fluctuations have been measured from multiple CMB experiments, such as Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT), Planck, POLARBEAR, and South Pole Telescope (SPT). The reconstructed CMB lensing signals are useful to constrain cosmology via their angular power spectrum, while detectability and cosmological application of their bispectrum induced by the nonlinear evolution are not well studied. Extending the analytic estimate of the galaxy lensing bispectrum presented by Takada and Jain (2004) to the CMB case, we show that even near term CMB experiments such as Advanced ACT, Simons Array and SPT3G could detect the CMB lensing bispectrum induced by the nonlinear growth of the large-scale structure. In the case of the CMB Stage-IV, we find that the lensing bispectrum is detectable at ≳50 σ statistical significance. This precisely measured lensing bispectrum has rich cosmological information, and could be used to constrain cosmology, e.g., the sum of the neutrino masses and the dark-energy properties.

  3. Overview of the current attempts toward the medical treatment of cataract

    SciTech Connect

    Kador, P.F.

    1983-04-01

    A variety of agents are currently available that claim to either prevent, delay, or reverse cataracts associated with aging (senile cataracts), radiation, or diabetes and galactosemia (sugar cataracts). Senile cataract therapy includes formulation containing inorganic salts, nutritional supplements, natural product extracts, sulfhydryl, and sulfonic acid containing compounds and miscellaneous redox and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory compounds. Agents associated with the treatment of radiation cataracts include antioxidants and free radial scavengers. Aldose reductase inhibitors have been effective in the prevention of sugar cataracts. A summary of these agents and their potential ocular effects are presented.

  4. Temperature-controlled in vivo ocular exposure to 1090-nm radiation suggests that near-infrared radiation cataract is thermally induced

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Zhaohua; Schulmeister, Karl; Talebizadeh, Nooshin; Kronschläger, Martin; Söderberg, Per

    2015-01-01

    The damage mechanism for near-infrared radiation (IRR) induced cataract is unclear. Both a photochemical and a thermal mechanism were suggested. The current paper aims to elucidate a photochemical effect based on investigation of irradiance-exposure time reciprocity. Groups of 20 rats were unilaterally exposed to 96-W/cm2 IRR at 1090 nm within the dilated pupil accumulating 57, 103, 198, and 344 kJ/cm2, respectively. Temperature was recorded at the limbus of the exposed eye. Seven days after exposure, the lenses were macroscopically imaged and light scattering was quantitatively measured. The average maximum temperature increases for exposure times of 10, 18, 33, and 60 min were expressed as 7.0±1.1, 6.8±1.1, 7.6±1.3, and 7.4±1.1°C [CI (0.95)] at the limbus of the exposed eye. The difference of light scattering in the lenses between exposed and contralateral not-exposed eyes was 0.00±0.02, 0.01±0.03, -0.01±0.02, and -0.01±0.03 transformed equivalent diazepam concentration (tEDC), respectively, and no apparent morphological changes in the lens were observed. An exposure to 96-W/cm2 1090-nm IRR projected on the cornea within the dilated pupil accumulating radiant exposures up to 344 kJ/cm2 does not induce cataract if the temperature rise at the limbus is <8°C. This is consistent with a thermal damage mechanism for IRR-induced cataract.

  5. Temperature-controlled in vivo ocular exposure to 1090-nm radiation suggests that near-infrared radiation cataract is thermally induced.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zhaohua; Schulmeister, Karl; Talebizadeh, Nooshin; Kronschläger, Martin; Söderberg, Per

    2015-01-01

    The damage mechanism for near-infrared radiation (IRR) induced cataract is unclear. Both a photochemical and a thermal mechanism were suggested. The current paper aims to elucidate a photochemical effect based on investigation of irradiance-exposure time reciprocity. Groups of 20 rats were unilaterally exposed to 96-W/cm(2) IRR at 1090 nm within the dilated pupil accumulating 57, 103, 198, and 344 kJ/cm(2), respectively. Temperature was recorded at the limbus of the exposed eye. Seven days after exposure, the lenses were macroscopically imaged and light scattering was quantitatively measured. The average maximum temperature increases for exposure times of 10, 18, 33, and 60 min were expressed as 7.0 ± 1.1, 6.8 ± 1.1, 7.6 ± 1.3, and 7.4 ± 1.1 °C [CI (0.95)] at the limbus of the exposed eye. The difference of light scattering in the lenses between exposed and contralateral not-exposed eyes was 0.00 ± 0.02, 0.01 ± 0.03, -0.01 ± 0.02, and -0.01 ± 0.03 transformed equivalent diazepam concentration (tEDC), respectively, and no apparent morphological changes in the lens were observed. An exposure to 96-W/cm(2) 1090-nm IRR projected on the cornea within the dilated pupil accumulating radiant exposures up to 344 kJ/cm(2) does not induce cataract if the temperature rise at the limbus is <8 °C. This is consistent with a thermal damage mechanism for IRR-induced cataract.

  6. Optimizing SNAP for Weak Lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    High, F. W.; Ellis, R. S.; Massey, R. J.; Rhodes, J. D.; Lamoureux, J. I.; SNAP Collaboration

    2004-12-01

    The Supernova/Acceleration Probe (SNAP) satellite proposes to measure weak gravitational lensing in addition to type Ia supernovae. Its pixel scale has been set to 0.10 arcsec per pixel as established by the needs of supernova observations. To find the optimal pixel scale for accurate weak lensing measurements we conduct a tradeoff study in which, via simulations, we fix the suvey size in total pixels and vary the pixel scale. Our preliminary results show that with a smaller scale of about 0.08 arcsec per pixel we can minimize the contribution of intrinsic shear variance to the error on the power spectrum of mass density distortion. Currently we are testing the robustness of this figure as well as determining whether dithering yields analogous results.

  7. Clinicians' perspectives on the use of drug-eluting contact lenses for the treatment of glaucoma.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Elise V; Kalout, Patricia; Pasquale, Louis R; Kohane, Daniel S; Ciolino, Joseph B

    2014-10-01

    Glaucoma is the leading cause of irreversible blindness worldwide. The perspective of clinicians who treat the disease is important and may ultimately dictate the adoption of new treatment modalities, such as drug-eluting contact lenses. Recent advances have enabled contact lenses to serve as a sustained-release drug-delivery platform capable of treating glaucoma. This review covers the medical treatment of glaucoma, suboptimal adherence rates to treatment, and factors that may influence the clinical applicability of drug-eluting contact lenses. Ophthalmologists who treat glaucoma were surveyed to determine their perspective on treatment adherence, bandage contact lens use and the use of a drug-eluting contact lens to treat glaucoma. Given the challenge of treating glaucoma and the clinical need for improved drug delivery, drug-eluting contact lenses appear to be a promising treatment option.

  8. Parabolic single-crystal diamond lenses for coherent x-ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terentyev, Sergey; Blank, Vladimir; Polyakov, Sergey; Zholudev, Sergey; Snigirev, Anatoly; Polikarpov, Maxim; Kolodziej, Tomasz; Qian, Jun; Zhou, Hua; Shvyd'ko, Yuri

    2015-09-01

    We demonstrate parabolic single-crystal diamond compound refractive lenses designed for coherent x-ray imaging resilient to extreme thermal and radiation loading expected from next generation light sources. To ensure the preservation of coherence and resilience, the lenses are manufactured from the highest-quality single-crystalline synthetic diamond material grown by a high-pressure high-temperature technique. Picosecond laser milling is applied to machine lenses to parabolic shapes with a ≃ 1 μ m precision and surface roughness. A compound refractive lens comprised of six lenses with a radius of curvature R = 200 μ m at the vertex of the parabola and a geometrical aperture A = 900 μ m focuses 10 keV x-ray photons from an undulator source at the Advanced Photon Source facility to a focal spot size of ≃ 20 × 90 μ m 2 with a gain factor of ≃ 50 - 100 .

  9. Scattered light in photolithographic lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirk, Joseph P.

    1994-05-01

    Scattered light, flare, is present in the images formed by all photolithography lenses and it reduces lithographic process tolerances. It varies from lens to lens and with time, but is easily measured by observation of images of opaque objects formed in positive photoresist. The scattered light halo of a lens is modeled and the model used to estimate the flare for any reticle used with that lens.

  10. Biomass Stoves and Lens Opacity and Cataract in Nepalese Women

    PubMed Central

    Pokhrel, Amod K.; Bates, Michael N.; Shrestha, Sachet P.; Bailey, Ian L.; DiMartino, Robert B.; Smith, Kirk R.; Joshi, N. D.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Cataract is the most prevalent cause of blindness in Nepal. Several epidemiologic studies have associated cataracts with use of biomass cookstoves. These studies, however, have had limitations, including potential control selection bias and limited adjustment for possible confounding. This study, in Pokhara city, in an area of Nepal where biomass cookstoves are widely used without direct venting of the smoke to the outdoors, focuses on pre-clinical measures of opacity, while avoiding selection bias and taking into account comprehensive data on potential confounding factors Methods Using a cross-sectional study design, severity of lenticular damage, judged on the LOCS III scales, was investigated in females (n=143), aged 20-65 years, without previously diagnosed cataract. Linear and logistic regression analyses were used to examine the relationships with stove type and length of use. Clinically significant cataract, used in the logistic regression models, was defined as a LOCS III score > 2. Results Using gas cookstoves as the reference group, logistic regression analysis for nuclear cataract showed the evidence of relationships with stove type: for biomass stoves, the odds ratio (OR) was 2.58 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.22-5.46) and, for kerosene stoves, the OR was 5.18 (95% CI: 0.88-30.38). Similar results were found for nuclear color (LOCS III score > 2), but no association was found with cortical cataracts. Supporting a relationship between biomass stoves and nuclear cataract was a trend with years of exposure to biomass cookstoves (p=0.01). Linear regression analyses did not show clear evidence of an association between lenticular damage and stove types. Biomass fuel used for heating was not associated with any form of opacity. Conclusions This study provides support for associations of biomass and kerosene cookstoves with nuclear opacity and change in nuclear color. The novel associations with kerosene cookstove use deserve further investigation

  11. Gravitational lensing in plasmic medium

    SciTech Connect

    Bisnovatyi-Kogan, G. S. Tsupko, O. Yu.

    2015-07-15

    The influence of plasma on different effects of gravitational lensing is reviewed. Using the Hamiltonian approach for geometrical optics in a medium in the presence of gravity, an exact formula for the photon deflection angle by a black hole (or another body with a Schwarzschild metric) embedded in plasma with a spherically symmetric density distribution is derived. The deflection angle in this case is determined by the mutual combination of different factors: gravity, dispersion, and refraction. While the effects of deflection by the gravity in vacuum and the refractive deflection in a nonhomogeneous medium are well known, the new effect is that, in the case of a homogeneous plasma, in the absence of refractive deflection, the gravitational deflection differs from the vacuum deflection and depends on the photon frequency. In the presence of a plasma nonhomogeneity, the chromatic refractive deflection also occurs, so the presence of plasma always makes gravitational lensing chromatic. In particular, the presence of plasma leads to different angular positions of the same image if it is observed at different wavelengths. It is discussed in detail how to apply the presented formulas for the calculation of the deflection angle in different situations. Gravitational lensing in plasma beyond the weak deflection approximation is also considered.

  12. Gravitational lensing in plasmic medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisnovatyi-Kogan, G. S.; Tsupko, O. Yu.

    2015-07-01

    The influence of plasma on different effects of gravitational lensing is reviewed. Using the Hamiltonian approach for geometrical optics in a medium in the presence of gravity, an exact formula for the photon deflection angle by a black hole (or another body with a Schwarzschild metric) embedded in plasma with a spherically symmetric density distribution is derived. The deflection angle in this case is determined by the mutual combination of different factors: gravity, dispersion, and refraction. While the effects of deflection by the gravity in vacuum and the refractive deflection in a nonhomogeneous medium are well known, the new effect is that, in the case of a homogeneous plasma, in the absence of refractive deflection, the gravitational deflection differs from the vacuum deflection and depends on the photon frequency. In the presence of a plasma nonhomogeneity, the chromatic refractive deflection also occurs, so the presence of plasma always makes gravitational lensing chromatic. In particular, the presence of plasma leads to different angular positions of the same image if it is observed at different wavelengths. It is discussed in detail how to apply the presented formulas for the calculation of the deflection angle in different situations. Gravitational lensing in plasma beyond the weak deflection approximation is also considered.

  13. Gravitational Lensing: Einstein's unfinished symphony

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treu, Tommaso; Ellis, Richard S.

    2015-01-01

    Gravitational lensing - the deflection of light rays by gravitating matter - has become a major tool in the armoury of the modern cosmologist. Proposed nearly a hundred years ago as a key feature of Einstein's theory of general relativity, we trace the historical development since its verification at a solar eclipse in 1919. Einstein was apparently cautious about its practical utility and the subject lay dormant observationally for nearly 60 years. Nonetheless there has been rapid progress over the past twenty years. The technique allows astronomers to chart the distribution of dark matter on large and small scales thereby testing predictions of the standard cosmological model which assumes dark matter comprises a massive weakly-interacting particle. By measuring the distances and tracing the growth of dark matter structure over cosmic time, gravitational lensing also holds great promise in determining whether the dark energy, postulated to explain the accelerated cosmic expansion, is a vacuum energy density or a failure of general relativity on large scales. We illustrate the wide range of applications which harness the power of gravitational lensing, from searches for the earliest galaxies magnified by massive clusters to those for extrasolar planets which temporarily brighten a background star. We summarise the future prospects with dedicated ground and space-based facilities designed to exploit this remarkable physical phenomenon.

  14. Multimodal characterization of contact lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcus, Michael A.; Compertore, David; Gibson, Donald S.; Herbrand, Matthew E.; Ignatovich, Filipp V.

    2015-10-01

    A table top instrument has been designed, constructed and tested to characterize all of the primary optical and physical properties of contact lenses. Measured optical properties include base power, cylinder power, cylindrical axis, prism, refractive index and wavefront aberrations. Measured physical properties include center thickness, lens diameter and lens sagittal depth. The instrument combines a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor (SHWS), a machine vision sensor, and a low coherence light interferometer (LCI) all coaxially aligned into a single tabletop unit. The unit includes a cuvette, mounted in a translatable sample chamber for holding the contact lens under test, and it can be configured to measure wet or dry contact lenses. During operation, the vision sensor measures the diameter of the lens, and locates the center of the lens. The lens is then aligned for other measurements. The vision sensor can also measure various alignment marks on the lens, as well as identify any alpha numerical features, which can be used to associate the lens orientation with the measured aberrations. The LCI measures the center thickness, sagittal depth and index of refraction of the contact lens. The base radius of curvature is then calculated using these measured parameters. The SHWS measures the lenses prescription power, including spherical, cylinder, prism, and higher order wavefront aberrations. NIST traceable calibration artifacts are used to calibrate the SHWS, machine vision and LCI modalities. Repeatability measurements on a contact lens in a saline solution are presented.

  15. αA-crystallin R49Cneo mutation influences the architecture of lens fiber cell membranes and causes posterior and nuclear cataracts in mice

    PubMed Central

    Andley, Usha P

    2009-01-01

    Background αA-crystallin (CRYAA/HSPB4), a major component of all vertebrate eye lenses, is a small heat shock protein responsible for maintaining lens transparency. The R49C mutation in the αA-crystallin protein is linked with non-syndromic, hereditary human cataracts in a four-generation Caucasian family. Methods This study describes a mouse cataract model generated by insertion of a neomycin-resistant (neor) gene into an intron of the gene encoding mutant R49C αA-crystallin. Mice carrying the neor gene and wild-type Cryaa were also generated as controls. Heterozygous knock-in mice containing one wild type gene and one mutated gene for αA-crystallin (WT/R49Cneo) and homozygous knock-in mice containing two mutated genes (R49Cneo/R49Cneo) were compared. Results By 3 weeks, WT/R49Cneo mice exhibited large vacuoles in the cortical region 100 μm from the lens surface, and by 3 months posterior and nuclear cataracts had developed. WT/R49Cneo mice demonstrated severe posterior cataracts at 9 months of age, with considerable posterior nuclear migration evident in histological sections. R49Cneo/R49Cneo mice demonstrated nearly complete lens opacities by 5 months of age. In contrast, R49C mice in which the neor gene was deleted by breeding with CreEIIa mice developed lens abnormalities at birth, suggesting that the neor gene may suppress expression of mutant R49C αA-crystallin protein. Conclusion It is apparent that modification of membrane and cell-cell interactions occurs in the presence of the αA-crystallin mutation and rapidly leads to lens cell pathology in vivo. PMID:19619312

  16. 30 CFR 18.30 - Windows and lenses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Windows and lenses. 18.30 Section 18.30 Mineral... § 18.30 Windows and lenses. (a) MSHA may waive testing of materials for windows or lenses except headlight lenses. When tested, material for windows or lenses shall meet the test requirements prescribed...

  17. 30 CFR 18.30 - Windows and lenses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Windows and lenses. 18.30 Section 18.30 Mineral... § 18.30 Windows and lenses. (a) MSHA may waive testing of materials for windows or lenses except headlight lenses. When tested, material for windows or lenses shall meet the test requirements prescribed...

  18. Gravitational lenses and dark matter - Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gott, J. Richard, III

    1987-01-01

    Theoretical models are presented for guiding the application of gravitational lenses to probe the characteristics of dark matter in the universe. Analytical techniques are defined for quantifying the mass associated with lensing galaxies (in terms of the image separation), determining the quantity of dark mass of the lensing bodies, and estimating the mass density of the lenses. The possibility that heavy halos are made of low mass stars is considered, along with the swallowing of central images of black holes or cusps in galactic nuclei and the effects produced on a lensed quasar image by nonbaryonic halos. The observable effects of dense groups and clusters and the characteristics of dark matter strings are discussed, and various types of images which are possible due to lensing phenomena and position are described.

  19. [Contact lenses permeable to gas. Literature review].

    PubMed

    Livshiys, V S; Popova, T A; Zaikov, G E; Kuś, H

    1989-01-01

    Some medical-technical requirements concerning ophthalmic contact lenses were formulated. A whole series of scientific descriptions of contact lenses was analysed. A short characterization of lenses was given on the basis of PMMA (polymethacrylate of methyl), silicon rubber, poly-2-methacrylic cellulose and cellulose acetate-butyrate; the properties of contact lenses made of materials achieved through a modification of the above-mentioned ones as well as made of new materials were also examined. The problems of transmission of gases of contact lenses were described and the calculations necessary for a minimum of the gas transmittance were mentioned, starting from partial oxygen to the eye cornea. Some ways of solving the problems concerning the insertion of therapeutic substances into contact lenses are described together with prevention of the accumulation of lacrimation fluid protein on their surfaces. PMID:2682577

  20. Regulatory effect of chrysin on expression of lenticular calcium transporters, calpains, and apoptotic-cascade components in selenite-induced cataract

    PubMed Central

    Sundararajan, Mahalingam; Thomas, Philip A.; Teresa, P. Archana; Anbukkarasi, Muniyandi

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Selenite-induced cataract is associated with oxidative stress, loss of calcium homeostasis, activation of calpain enzymes, and apoptotic cell death in the lens. An evaluation of naturally occurring antioxidants that also restrict calcium influx into the lens and calpain activation and thus prevent lenticular cell death may lead to the development of safe and effective anticataractogenic drugs. This study focuses on a naturally occurring flavone, chrysin, and its efficacy in preventing cataractogenic changes in in vitro cultured Wistar rat lenses. Methods Lenses from Wistar rats incubated for 24 h at 37 °C in Dulbecco’s modified Eagle’s medium (DMEM) were categorized into four main groups: Group I (control, incubated in DMEM alone); Group II (selenite-challenged and untreated, incubated in DMEM that contained 100 µM/ml of sodium selenite only); Group III (selenite-challenged and chrysin-treated, incubated in DMEM that contained sodium selenite [100 µM/ml of DMEM] and chrysin [200 µM/ml of DMEM]); and Group IV (chrysin-treated, incubated in DMEM that contained chrysin [200 µM/ml of DMEM] only). The Group III (selenite-challenged and chrysin-treated) lenses were further categorized into five sub-groups: Group IIIa (incubated for 24 h in DMEM that contained sodium selenite and chrysin added simultaneously), Group IIIb (first incubated for 2 h in DMEM that contained chrysin only and then for up to 24 h in fresh DMEM that contained sodium selenite only), Group IIIc (first incubated for 30 min in DMEM that contained sodium selenite only and subsequently for up to 24 h in DMEM that contained chrysin only), and Groups IIId and IIIe (first incubated for 1 h and 2 h, respectively, in DMEM that contained sodium selenite only and subsequently for up to 24 h in DMEM that contained chrysin only). Results Gross morphological assessment revealed dense opacification (Grade +++) in the selenite-challenged, untreated lenses (Group II); however, seven of the eight

  1. UV laser ionization and electron beam diagnostics for plasma lenses

    SciTech Connect

    Govil, R.; Volfbeyn, P.; Leemans, W.

    1995-04-01

    A comprehensive study of focusing of relativistic electron beams with overdense and underdense plasma lenses requires careful control of plasma density and scale lengths. Plasma lens experiments are planned at the Beam Test Facility of the LBL Center for Beam Physics, using the 50 MeV electron beam delivered by the linac injector from the Advanced Light Source. Here we present results from an interferometric study of plasmas produced in tri-propylamine vapor with a frequency quadrupled Nd:YAG laser at 266 nm. To study temporal dynamics of plasma lenses we have developed an electron beam diagnostic using optical transition radiation to time resolve beam size and divergence. Electron beam ionization of the plasma has also been investigated.

  2. The effect of simulated cataract light scatter on retinal vessel oximetry.

    PubMed

    Patel, Sunni R; Hudson, Chris; Flanagan, John G; Heitmar, Rebekka

    2013-11-01

    To assess the impact of light scatter, similar to that introduced by cataract on retinal vessel blood oxygen saturation measurements using poly-bead solutions of varying concentrations. Eight healthy, young, non-smoking individuals were enrolled for this study. All subjects underwent digital blood pressure measurements, assessment of non-contact intraocular pressure, pupil dilation and retinal vessel oximetry using dual wavelength photography (Oximetry Module, Imedos Systems, Germany). To simulate light scatter, cells comprising a plastic collar and two plano lenses were filled with solutions of differing concentrations (0.001, 0.002 and 0.004%) of polystyrene microspheres (Polysciences Inc., USA). The adopted light scatter model showed an artifactual increase in venous optical density ratio (p = 0.036), with the 0.004% condition producing significantly higher venous optical density ratio values when compared to images without a cell in place. Spectrophotometric analysis, and thus retinal vessel oximetry of the retinal vessels, is altered by artificial light scatter.

  3. The effect of lens aging and cataract surgery on circadian rhythm.

    PubMed

    Yan, Shen-Shen; Wang, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Many organisms have evolved an approximately 24-hour circadian rhythm that allows them to achieve internal physiological homeostasis with external environment. Suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) is the central pacemaker of circadian rhythm, and its activity is entrained to the external light-dark cycle. The SCN controls circadian rhythm through regulating the synthesis of melatonin by pineal gland via a multisynaptic pathway. Light, especially short-wavelength blue light, is the most potent environmental time cue in circadian photoentrainment. Recently, the discovery of a novel type of retinal photoreceptors, intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells, sheds light on the mechanism of circadian photoentrainment and raises concerns about the effect of ocular diseases on circadian system. With age, light transmittance is significantly decreased due to the aging of crystalline lens, thus possibly resulting in progressive loss of circadian photoreception. In the current review, we summarize the circadian physiology, highlight the important role of light in circadian rhythm regulation, discuss about the correlation between age-related cataract and sleep disorders, and compare the effect of blue light- filtering intraocular lenses (IOLs) and ultraviolet only filtering IOLs on circadian rhythm.

  4. The effect of lens aging and cataract surgery on circadian rhythm.

    PubMed

    Yan, Shen-Shen; Wang, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Many organisms have evolved an approximately 24-hour circadian rhythm that allows them to achieve internal physiological homeostasis with external environment. Suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) is the central pacemaker of circadian rhythm, and its activity is entrained to the external light-dark cycle. The SCN controls circadian rhythm through regulating the synthesis of melatonin by pineal gland via a multisynaptic pathway. Light, especially short-wavelength blue light, is the most potent environmental time cue in circadian photoentrainment. Recently, the discovery of a novel type of retinal photoreceptors, intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells, sheds light on the mechanism of circadian photoentrainment and raises concerns about the effect of ocular diseases on circadian system. With age, light transmittance is significantly decreased due to the aging of crystalline lens, thus possibly resulting in progressive loss of circadian photoreception. In the current review, we summarize the circadian physiology, highlight the important role of light in circadian rhythm regulation, discuss about the correlation between age-related cataract and sleep disorders, and compare the effect of blue light- filtering intraocular lenses (IOLs) and ultraviolet only filtering IOLs on circadian rhythm. PMID:27500118

  5. Switching to instant black coffee modulates sodium selenite-induced cataract in rats.

    PubMed

    El Okda, E A; Mohamed, M M; Shaheed, E B; Abdel-Moemin, A R

    2016-01-01

    The influence of daily consumption of some common beverages on the development of cataract in rats was investigated. Total phenol content was determined in the beverages and an oral standardized dose of total phenols from each beverage was given to the treated rats. Weaned male albino rats were used and divided into five groups (n=7). Rats were fed Ain 93G and administered the standardized dose of instant coffee, black tea and hibiscus beverages for 30 days. On day 14 all rats were injected with a single dose of sodium selenite (Na2SeO3) 15 µmol/kg bodyweight, except the control groups NC (negative control, did not receive Na2SeO3) and PC (positive control, was already injected on day 1 of the study). The rats were continued on Ain 93G and the standardized dose for another 16 days. Positive control rats were used. Total phenols were 210, 40, and 44 mg/g dry weight gallic acid equivalent in black coffee, black tea, and hibiscus, respectively. Decreased levels (statistically significant P<0.05) of malondialdehyde, total nitric oxide, Ca-ATPase, tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β, superoxide dismutase, and conversely, increased levels (statistically significant P<0.05) of total protein, reduced glutathione, catalase were found in the lenses of the coffee group compared to PC. There are co-phenol substances in the instant black coffee that promoted coffee to be the most effective beverage. PMID:27158251

  6. Development of cataract and corneal opacity in mice due to radon exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelkawi, S. A.; Abo-Elmagd, M.; Soliman, H. A.

    This work investigates the radiation damage on the eye of albino mice exposed to effective radon doses ranging from 20.92 to 83.68 mSv. These doses were taken over 2-8 weeks using a radon chamber constructed by the National Institute for Standard (Egypt). The guidance on the quality assurance program for radon measurements was followed. Therefore, the estimated doses received by the laboratory animals meet the requirements of national standardE The refractive index(RI) and protein concentration were measured for soluble proteins of both corneas and lenses. In addition, the sodium dodecyle sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDSPAGE) technique was used. The results show increasing of the RI of both cornea and lens proteins and decreasing in total protein concentration of exposed animals. These results were accompanied with changes in the SDSPAGE profile for both cornea and lens. Therefore, radon exposure produces substantial hazards to the cornea and lens of experimental animals and has a crucial role in the development of cataract and corneal opacity.

  7. The effect of lens aging and cataract surgery on circadian rhythm

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Shen-Shen; Wang, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Many organisms have evolved an approximately 24-hour circadian rhythm that allows them to achieve internal physiological homeostasis with external environment. Suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) is the central pacemaker of circadian rhythm, and its activity is entrained to the external light-dark cycle. The SCN controls circadian rhythm through regulating the synthesis of melatonin by pineal gland via a multisynaptic pathway. Light, especially short-wavelength blue light, is the most potent environmental time cue in circadian photoentrainment. Recently, the discovery of a novel type of retinal photoreceptors, intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells, sheds light on the mechanism of circadian photoentrainment and raises concerns about the effect of ocular diseases on circadian system. With age, light transmittance is significantly decreased due to the aging of crystalline lens, thus possibly resulting in progressive loss of circadian photoreception. In the current review, we summarize the circadian physiology, highlight the important role of light in circadian rhythm regulation, discuss about the correlation between age-related cataract and sleep disorders, and compare the effect of blue light- filtering intraocular lenses (IOLs) and ultraviolet only filtering IOLs on circadian rhythm. PMID:27500118

  8. Switching to instant black coffee modulates sodium selenite-induced cataract in rats

    PubMed Central

    El Okda, E. A.; Mohamed, M. M.; Shaheed, E. B.; Abdel-Moemin, A. R.

    2016-01-01

    The influence of daily consumption of some common beverages on the development of cataract in rats was investigated. Total phenol content was determined in the beverages and an oral standardized dose of total phenols from each beverage was given to the treated rats. Weaned male albino rats were used and divided into five groups (n=7). Rats were fed Ain 93G and administered the standardized dose of instant coffee, black tea and hibiscus beverages for 30 days. On day 14 all rats were injected with a single dose of sodium selenite (Na2SeO3) 15 µmol/kg bodyweight, except the control groups NC (negative control, did not receive Na2SeO3) and PC (positive control, was already injected on day 1 of the study). The rats were continued on Ain 93G and the standardized dose for another 16 days. Positive control rats were used. Total phenols were 210, 40, and 44 mg/g dry weight gallic acid equivalent in black coffee, black tea, and hibiscus, respectively. Decreased levels (statistically significant P<0.05) of malondialdehyde, total nitric oxide, Ca-ATPase, tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β, superoxide dismutase, and conversely, increased levels (statistically significant P<0.05) of total protein, reduced glutathione, catalase were found in the lenses of the coffee group compared to PC. There are co-phenol substances in the instant black coffee that promoted coffee to be the most effective beverage. PMID:27158251

  9. Characterization of sand lenses embedded in tills

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kessler, T. C.; Klint, K. E. S.; Nilsson, B.; Bjerg, P. L.

    2012-10-01

    Tills dominate large parts of the superficial sediments on the Northern hemisphere. These glacial diamictons are extremely heterogeneous and riddled with fractures and lenses of sand or gravel. The frequency and geometry of sand lenses within tills are strongly linked to glaciodynamic processes occurring in various glacial environments. This study specifically focuses on the appearance and spatial distribution of sand lenses in tills. It introduces a methodology on how to measure and characterize sand lenses in the field with regard to size, shape and degree of deformation. A set of geometric parameters is defined to allow characterization of sand lenses. The proposed classification scheme uses a stringent terminology to distinguish several types of sand lenses based on the geometry. It includes sand layers, sand sheets, sand bodies, sand pockets and sand stringers. The methodology has been applied at the Kallerup field site in the Eastern part of Denmark. The site offers exposures in a number of till types that underwent different levels of glaciotectonic deformation. Sand lenses show high spatial variability and only weak uniformity in terms of extent and shape. Secondly, the genesis of the various types of sand lenses is discussed, primarily in relation to the depositional and glaciotectonic processes they underwent. Detailed characterization of sand lenses facilitates such interpretations. Finally, the observations are linked to a more general overview of the distribution of sand lenses in various glacial environments. Due to the complex and mutable appearance of sand lenses, geometric descriptions can reveal the deformation history and even give indications on the palaeo-glaciological conditions during the deposition of the surrounding tills. This information can support the understanding of till genesis and further inform till classifications. In this regard, structural heterogeneity such as sand lenses can supplement traditional directional element analysis

  10. Instrumental systematics and weak gravitational lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandelbaum, R.

    2015-05-01

    We present a pedagogical review of the weak gravitational lensing measurement process and its connection to major scientific questions such as dark matter and dark energy. Then we describe common ways of parametrizing systematic errors and understanding how they affect weak lensing measurements. Finally, we discuss several instrumental systematics and how they fit into this context, and conclude with some future perspective on how progress can be made in understanding the impact of instrumental systematics on weak lensing measurements.

  11. Aberrations of sphero-cylindrical ophthalmic lenses.

    PubMed

    Malacara, Z; Malacara, D

    1990-04-01

    The authors have presented in two previous articles the graphic solutions resembling Tscherning ellipses, for spherical as well as for aspherical ophthalmic lenses free of astigmatism or power error. These solutions were exact, inasmuch as they were based on exact ray tracing, and not third-order theory as frequently done. In this paper sphero-cylindrical lenses are now analyzed, also using exact ray tracing. The functional dependence of the astigmatism and the power error for these lenses is described extensively.

  12. Measurement of Lens Protein Aggregation in Vivo Using Dynamic Light Scattering in a Guinea Pig/UVA Model for Nuclear Cataract

    PubMed Central

    Simpanya, M. Francis; Ansari, Rafat R.; Leverenz, Victor; Giblin, Frank J.

    2009-01-01

    The role of UVA radiation in the formation of human nuclear cataract is not well understood. We have previously shown that exposing guinea pigs for 5 months to a chronic low level of UVA light produces increased lens nuclear light scattering and elevated levels of protein disulfide. Here we have used the technique of dynamic light scattering (DLS) to investigate lens protein aggregation in vivo in the guinea pig/UVA model. DLS size distribution analysis conducted at the same location in the lens nucleus of control and UVA-irradiated animals showed a 28% reduction in intensity of small diameter proteins in experimental lenses compared with controls (P < 0.05). In addition, large diameter proteins in UVA-exposed lens nuclei increased five-fold in intensity compared to controls (P < 0.05). The UVA-induced increase in apparent size of lens nuclear small diameter proteins was three-fold (P < 0.01), and the size of large diameter aggregates was more than four-fold in experimental lenses compared with controls. The diameter of crystallin aggregates in the UVA-irradiated lens nucleus was estimated to be 350 nm, a size able to scatter light. No significant changes in protein size were detected in the anterior cortex of UVA-irradiated lenses. It is presumed that the presence of a UVA chromophore in the guinea pig lens (NADPH bound to zeta crystallin), as well as traces of oxygen, contributed to UVA-induced crystallin aggregation. The results indicate a potentially harmful role for UVA light in the lens nucleus. A similar process of UVA-irradiated protein aggregation may take place in the older human lens nucleus, accelerating the formation of human nuclear cataract. PMID:18627516

  13. The first cataract surgeons in Anglo-America.

    PubMed

    Leffler, Christopher T; Schwartz, Stephen G; Grzybowski, Andrzej; Braich, Puneet S

    2015-01-01

    We tried to identify the earliest cataract surgeons in the English-speaking areas of America. In 1751, couching was performed on the Caribbean island of Montserrat by John Morphy. William Stork of England, who couched cataracts, practiced in Jamaica in 1760 and then in cities from Annapolis to Boston between 1761 and 1764. Frederick William Jericho of Germany, upon completion of his training at Utrecht, published his 1767 treatise on his preferred surgical technique of extracapsular cataract extraction. Jericho had practiced in the Leeward Islands by 1776 and then in cities from Charleston to Boston between 1783 and 1785. The French surgeon Lewis Leprilete was the first to advertise cataract extraction in the United States in 1782 and probably passed on the skill to his protégé, Nathaniel Miller of Massachusetts. Leprilete was also the first to publicize Benjamin Franklin's invention of bifocals. These pioneers exposed American doctors and the public to cataract surgery. Shortly after their arrival, evidence emerges of other surgeons performing these procedures in America.

  14. The first cataract surgeons in Anglo-America.

    PubMed

    Leffler, Christopher T; Schwartz, Stephen G; Grzybowski, Andrzej; Braich, Puneet S

    2015-01-01

    We tried to identify the earliest cataract surgeons in the English-speaking areas of America. In 1751, couching was performed on the Caribbean island of Montserrat by John Morphy. William Stork of England, who couched cataracts, practiced in Jamaica in 1760 and then in cities from Annapolis to Boston between 1761 and 1764. Frederick William Jericho of Germany, upon completion of his training at Utrecht, published his 1767 treatise on his preferred surgical technique of extracapsular cataract extraction. Jericho had practiced in the Leeward Islands by 1776 and then in cities from Charleston to Boston between 1783 and 1785. The French surgeon Lewis Leprilete was the first to advertise cataract extraction in the United States in 1782 and probably passed on the skill to his protégé, Nathaniel Miller of Massachusetts. Leprilete was also the first to publicize Benjamin Franklin's invention of bifocals. These pioneers exposed American doctors and the public to cataract surgery. Shortly after their arrival, evidence emerges of other surgeons performing these procedures in America. PMID:25444521

  15. Prognostic Factors for Visual Outcome in Traumatic Cataract Patients

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yan F.; Zhu, Yu; Wan, Ming G.; Du, Shan S.; Yue, Zhen Z.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To investigate the prognostic factors for visual outcome in traumatic cataract patients. Methods. The demographic features of traumatic cataract patients in Central China were studied. The factors that might influence the visual outcome were analyzed. The sensitivity and specificity of OTS (ocular trauma score) in predicting VA were calculated. Results. The study enrolled 480 cases. 65.5% of patients achieved VA at >20/60. The factors associated with the final VA were initial VA, injury type, wound location, the way of cataract removal, and IOL implantation. The sensitivities of OTS in predicting the VA at NLP (nonlight perception), LP/HM (light perception/hand motion), and ≥20/40 were 100%. The specificity of OTS to predict the final VA at 1/200-19/200 and 20/200-20/50 was 100%. Conclusion. The prognostic factors were initial VA, injury type, wound location, cataract removal procedure, and the way of IOL implantation. The OTS has good sensitivity and specificity in predicting visual outcome in traumatic cataract patients in long follow-up.

  16. Prognostic Factors for Visual Outcome in Traumatic Cataract Patients.

    PubMed

    Qi, Ying; Zhang, Yan F; Zhu, Yu; Wan, Ming G; Du, Shan S; Yue, Zhen Z

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To investigate the prognostic factors for visual outcome in traumatic cataract patients. Methods. The demographic features of traumatic cataract patients in Central China were studied. The factors that might influence the visual outcome were analyzed. The sensitivity and specificity of OTS (ocular trauma score) in predicting VA were calculated. Results. The study enrolled 480 cases. 65.5% of patients achieved VA at >20/60. The factors associated with the final VA were initial VA, injury type, wound location, the way of cataract removal, and IOL implantation. The sensitivities of OTS in predicting the VA at NLP (nonlight perception), LP/HM (light perception/hand motion), and ≥20/40 were 100%. The specificity of OTS to predict the final VA at 1/200-19/200 and 20/200-20/50 was 100%. Conclusion. The prognostic factors were initial VA, injury type, wound location, cataract removal procedure, and the way of IOL implantation. The OTS has good sensitivity and specificity in predicting visual outcome in traumatic cataract patients in long follow-up. PMID:27595014

  17. Prognostic Factors for Visual Outcome in Traumatic Cataract Patients

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yan F.; Zhu, Yu; Wan, Ming G.; Du, Shan S.; Yue, Zhen Z.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To investigate the prognostic factors for visual outcome in traumatic cataract patients. Methods. The demographic features of traumatic cataract patients in Central China were studied. The factors that might influence the visual outcome were analyzed. The sensitivity and specificity of OTS (ocular trauma score) in predicting VA were calculated. Results. The study enrolled 480 cases. 65.5% of patients achieved VA at >20/60. The factors associated with the final VA were initial VA, injury type, wound location, the way of cataract removal, and IOL implantation. The sensitivities of OTS in predicting the VA at NLP (nonlight perception), LP/HM (light perception/hand motion), and ≥20/40 were 100%. The specificity of OTS to predict the final VA at 1/200-19/200 and 20/200-20/50 was 100%. Conclusion. The prognostic factors were initial VA, injury type, wound location, cataract removal procedure, and the way of IOL implantation. The OTS has good sensitivity and specificity in predicting visual outcome in traumatic cataract patients in long follow-up. PMID:27595014

  18. The First Cataract Surgeons in Anglo-America

    PubMed Central

    Leffler, Christopher T.; Schwartz, Stephen G.; Grzybowski, Andrzej; Braich, Puneet S.

    2014-01-01

    We tried to identify the earliest cataract surgeons in the English-speaking areas of America. In 1751, couching was performed on the Caribbean island of Montserrat by John Morphy. William Stork of England, who couched cataracts, practiced in Jamaica in 1760 and then in cities from Annapolis to Boston between 1761 and 1764. Frederick William Jericho of Germany, upon completion of his training at Utrecht, published his 1767 treatise on his preferred surgical technique of extracapsular cataract extraction. Jericho had practiced in the Leeward Islands by 1776 and then in cities from Charleston to Boston between 1783 and 1785. The French surgeon Lewis Leprilete was the first to advertise cataract extraction in the United States in 1782 and probably passed on the skill to his protégé, Nathaniel Miller of Massachusetts. Leprilete was also the first to publicize Benjamin Franklin's invention of bifocals.. These pioneers exposed American doctors and the public to cataract surgery. Shortly after their arrival, evidence emerges of other surgeons performing these procedures in America. PMID:25444521

  19. The effect of high and very low fluorescent light exposure levels on age-related cataract in a pigmented mouse strain.

    PubMed

    Wolf, N S; Penn, P E

    2001-07-01

    This study examined the effect of fluorescent light on the timing and severity of age-related cataracts in a fully pigmented mouse strain, the (C57BL/6 x C3H)F1, that normally develops slowly progressing age-related cataracts only beyond middle age. Two groups of 56 animals each were exposed, respectively, either to a daily range of 66-222 foot candles (FC) or to 1 FC of standard fluorescent lighting for a period beginning at 5 weeks of age and ending at 33.5 months (by which time approximately 65% of the colony had died). Contrary to previous reports involving albino rats or mice and a strain of pigmented but cataract-prone transgenic mice, the two groups of animals in this experiment did not differ for cataract development in time of first occurrence, rate of advancement, or degree of severity. It was concluded that genetic predisposition, based on levels of oxidative free radical production vs antioxidant enzyme and repair enzyme protection in the lens, was probably the major factor governing the rate and degree of age-related cataract development in these animals. The effect of relatively intense life-long fluorescent light exposure was so minimal as not to be manifested in this strain of mice under the conditions of this experiment. Remarkably, maintaining the one group of mice in semi-darkness from 5 weeks of age to beyond their mean lifespans did nothing to delay or reduce the incidence or severity of their age-related cataracts. PMID:11428861

  20. Design of spherical symmetric gradient index lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miñano, Juan C.; Grabovičkić, Dejan; Benítez, Pablo; González, Juan C.; Santamaría, Asunción

    2012-10-01

    Spherical symmetric refractive index distributions also known as Gradient Index lenses such as the Maxwell-Fish-Eye (MFE), the Luneburg or the Eaton lenses have always played an important role in Optics. The recent development of the technique called Transformation Optics has renewed the interest in these gradient index lenses. For instance, Perfect Imaging within the Wave Optics framework has recently been proved using the MFE distribution. We review here the design problem of these lenses, classify them in two groups (Luneburg moveable-limits and fixed-limits type), and establish a new design techniques for each type of problem.

  1. The Alvarez and Lohmann refractive lenses revisited.

    PubMed

    Barbero, Sergio

    2009-05-25

    Alvarez and Lohmann lenses are variable focus optical devices based on lateral shifts of two lenses with cubic-type surfaces. I analyzed the optical performance of these types of lenses computing the first order optical properties (applying wavefront refraction and propagation) without the restriction of the thin lens approximation, and the spot diagram using a ray tracing algorithm. I proposed an analytic and numerical method to select the most optimum coefficients and the specific configuration of these lenses. The results show that Lohmann composite lens is slightly superior to Alvarez one because the overall thickness and optical aberrations are smaller.

  2. Gravitational lenses and dark matter - Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, Edwin L.

    1987-01-01

    Following a few general comments on gravitational lenses from an observer's perspective, the currently available observations of the six known gravitational lenses are summarized. Attention is called to some regularities and peculiarities of the properties of the known lenses and to how they might be interpreted. The most important conclusions, relevant to the dark matter problem, which can be obtained from current observations are that the distributions of mass and light appear to be quite different in at least some of the lensing objects and that objects with projected mass/brightness values about 10 times larger than those ordinarily associated with galaxies exist and are not too rare.

  3. cluster-lensing: Tools for calculating properties and weak lensing profiles of galaxy clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, Jes

    2016-05-01

    The cluster-lensing package calculates properties and weak lensing profiles of galaxy clusters. Implemented in Python, it includes cluster mass-richness and mass-concentration scaling relations, and NFW halo profiles for weak lensing shear, the differential surface mass density ΔΣ(r), and for magnification, Σ(r). Optionally the calculation will include the effects of cluster miscentering offsets.

  4. The use of vitamin supplements and the risk of cataract among US male physicians.

    PubMed Central

    Seddon, J M; Christen, W G; Manson, J E; LaMotte, F S; Glynn, R J; Buring, J E; Hennekens, C H

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVES. The purpose of this study was to examine prospectively the association between reported use of vitamin supplements and risk of cataract and cataract extraction. METHODS. The study population consisted of 17,744 participants in the Physicians' Health Study, a randomized trial of aspirin therapy and beta-carotene among US male physicians 40 to 84 years of age in 1982 who did not report cataract at baseline and provided complete information about vitamin supplementation and other risk factors for cataract. Self-reports of cataract and cataract extraction were confirmed by medical record review. RESULTS. During 60 months of follow-up, there were 370 incident cataracts and 109 cataract extractions. In comparison with physicians who did not use any supplements, those who took only multivitamins had a relative risk of cataract of 0.73 after adjustment for other risk factors. For cataract extraction, the corresponding relative risk was 0.79. Use of vitamin C and/or E supplements alone was not associated with a reduced risk of cataract, but the size of this subgroup was small. CONCLUSIONS. These data suggest that men who took multivitamin supplements tended to experience a decreased risk of cataract and support the need for rigorous testing of this hypothesis in large-scale randomized trials in men and women. PMID:8179050

  5. Visual and Refractive Outcomes of Phacoemulsification with Implantation of Accommodating versus Standard Monofocal Intraocular Lenses

    PubMed Central

    Sadoughi, Mohammad Mehdi; Einollahi, Bahram; Roshandel, Danial; Sarimohammadli, Mohammad; Feizi, Sepehr

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To compare distant and near visual function after cataract surgery with implantation of Crystalens HD or Tek-Clear as accommodating intraocular lenses (IOLs), versus SA60AT as a standard IOL. Methods: The study included 62 eyes of 58 patients divided into three groups using three different IOLs: Crystalens HD (Bausch and Lomb, NY, USA), Tek-Clear (Tekia, CA, USA) and SA60AT (Alcon, TX, USA) were implanted in 23, 14 and 25 eyes, respectively. Corrected distant visual acuity (CDVA), uncorrected and distance corrected near visual acuities (UCNVA and DCNVA), near point of accommodation (NPA), spectacle freedom and patient satisfaction were assessed six months postoperatively and compared between the three groups. Results: After 6 months, all patients showed significant improvement in CDVA with no significant difference among the study groups. However, UCNVA and DCNVA were significantly better in patients implanted with accommodating IOLs. NPA was closest in the Crystalens HD group, followed by Tek-Clear and monofocal SA60AT (P < 0.001). Patients with accommodating IOLs were more likely to become spectacle free and satisfied with their near vision as compared to subjects receiving a monofocal IOL. Conclusions: Accommodating IOLs (Crystalens HD and Tek-Clear) effectively reduce the necessity for spectacles after cataract surgery. PMID:27051480

  6. Irradiation system for two-photon induced activation of agents in novel intraocular lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klämpfl, Florian; Roth, Stephan; Schmidt, Michael

    This paper presents a newly designed irradiation system for the photochemically triggered two-photon activation of an agent loaded in novel intraocular lenses. After activation, this agent suppresses the formation of after-cataract, a very common disease after the treatment of an eye cataract by implanting an intraocular lens. For this application, intrinsic safety is also important: the laser radiation is applied to one of the most light-sensitive organs: the eye. This has to be taken into account during development of the system. Moreover, the activation uses a two-photon process so a relatively small laser focus is required. To address these issues in combination with economic requirements, a mirror based objective was designed and built, specifically tailored to these needs. Besides the laser beam guidance elements, the irradiation system consists of a camera based monitoring module and an illumination unit. While the first part of the paper shows the design of the system, the second part presents the results of the characterization of the system. The paper closes with a conclusion and an outlook discussing what further development is needed to prepare the system for treatments of human eyes.

  7. Toric intraocular lenses for correction of astigmatism in keratoconus and after corneal surgery

    PubMed Central

    Mol, Ilse EMA; Van Dooren, Bart TH

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To describe the results of cataract extraction with toric intraocular lens (IOL) implantation in patients with preexisting astigmatism from three corneal conditions (keratoconus, postkeratoplasty, and postpterygium surgery). Methods Cataract patients with topographically stable, fairly regular (although sometimes very high) corneal astigmatism underwent phacoemulsification with implantation of a toric IOL (Zeiss AT TORBI 709, Alcon Acrysof IQ toric SN6AT, AMO Tecnis ZCT). Postoperative astigmatism and refractive outcomes, as well as visual acuities, vector reduction, and complications were recorded for all eyes. Results This study evaluated 17 eyes of 16 patients with a mean age of 60 years at the time of surgery. Mean follow-up in this study was 12 months. The corrected distance Snellen visual acuity (with spectacles or contact lenses) 12 months postoperatively was 20/32 or better in 82% of eyes. The mean corneal astigmatism was 6.7 diopters (D) preoperatively, and 1.5 D of refractive cylinder at 1-year follow-up. No vision-compromising intra- or postoperative complications occurred and decentration or off-axis alignment of toric IOLs were not observed. Conclusion Phacoemulsification with toric IOL implantation was a safe and effective procedure in the three mentioned corneal conditions. Patient selection, counseling, and IOL placement with optimal astigmatism correction are crucial. PMID:27382249

  8. Two new cataract loci, Ccw and To3, and further mapping of the Npp and Opj cataracts in the mouse

    SciTech Connect

    Kerscher, S.; Glenister, P.H.; Lyon, M.F.; Favor, J.

    1996-08-15

    Many types of inherited early onset cataract are known in both human and mouse. Here we describe the mapping of two novel dominant cataract loci in the mouse genome. Cataract and curly whiskers, Ccw, maps to Chromosome 4, 3.1 {+-} 1.1 cM distal to the b (brown) locus. Total opacity 3, To3, maps to Chromosome 7, 7.1 {+-} 1.8 cM proximal top (pink-eyed dilution). The map positions of two other dominant cataract mutants have now been refined by three-point crosses. Nuclear and posterior polar cataract, Npp, maps to the central part of Chromosome 5,1.4 {+-} 0.5 cM distal to W{sup e} (dominant spotting-extreme, an allele at the Kit locus), and Opaque secondary fiber cell junctions, Opj, maps to the proximal region of Chromosome 16, 9.1 {+-} 1.5 cM distal to the marker md (mahoganoid). While there are no obvious candidate genes in the vicinity of the Ccw, Npp, and Opj mutations, To3 lies remarkably close to the recently mapped Lim2 locus, which encodes lens intrinsic membrane protein 2. also called MP19. 24 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  9. A novel MIP mutation in familial congenital nuclear cataracts.

    PubMed

    Qin, Litao; Guo, Liangjie; Wang, Hongdan; Li, Tao; Lou, Guiyu; Guo, Qiannan; Hou, Qiaofang; Liu, Hongyan; Liao, Shixiu; Liu, Zhe

    2016-09-01

    We screened 60 known genes which are involved in inherited cataract in a pregnant woman with a four-generation family history of autosomal dominant congenital nuclear cataract through next-generation sequencing (NGS) and identified a heterozygous mutation, c.508dupC (p.L170fs), in the major intrinsic protein (MIP) gene. This mutation results in a frame-shift in MIP and has not been previously reported. The correlation of the mutation with disease was validated by Sanger sequencing of DNA from the other affected or unaffected members of the family. Therefore, our data expand the mutation spectrum of MIP mutation, and suggest that NGS is an accurate, rapid, and cost-effective method in the genetic diagnosis of congenital nuclear cataract.

  10. State of the Art in Pediatric Cataract Surgery.

    PubMed

    Nischal, Kanwal Ken

    2016-01-01

    Pediatric cataract surgery has evolved dramatically in the past 10 years. Our understanding of the child's eye both in terms of tissue mechanics, neurobiological plasticity and physiological growth has allowed better and better surgical outcomes. The fact remains that the younger the child - infants especially - the more difficult the surgery. It is also true to say that not only is a child's eye not a small adult eye, but also that the child him- or herself is not a small adult. The importance of this statement is evident when we discuss the effects of anesthesia and fluid input in infants during infant cataract surgery. This chapter discusses the factors that should help give a child the best possible outcome after cataract surgery including timing of surgery, type of operation, biometry, the size and type of intraocular lens material , postoperative refraction, operative considerations, wound size and type, capsule management, anterior vitrectomy technique, wound closure and viscoelastic removal and perioperative medications. PMID:27043389

  11. Congenital cataracts in an Ayrshire herd: a herd case report

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    An Ayrshire dairy herd was investigated for occurrence of ocular abnormalities in new-born calves. Ophthalmic examinations were performed on all the animals in the herd and 26% of them were diagnosed with bilateral cataracts. Cataracts varied in extent and severity but the majority were restricted to the lens nucleus. Epidemiological analysis showed the prevalence was higher in male animals and lower in animals born to heifers. A family tree was designed but no genetic impact of dam lines was evident. Sire data was incomplete and could therefore not be included. Based on the information provided by the farmer there was no obvious environmental or nutritional cause of these cataracts. However, data records were incomplete and further investigation/monitoring of the herd would be needed to establish a cause and enable a better insight into the aetiology of this disease in cattle. PMID:24460638

  12. Cataract production in mice by heavy charged particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ainsworth, E. J.; Jose, U.; Yang, V. V.; Barker, M. E.

    1981-01-01

    The cataractogenic effects of heavy charged particles are evaluated in mice in relation to dose and ionization density. The relative biological effectiveness in relation to linear energy transfer for various particles is considered. Results indicated that low single doses (5 to 20 rad) of Fe 56 or Ar 40 particles are cataractogenic at 11 to 18 months after irradiation; onset and density of the opacification are dose related and cataract density (grade) at 9, 11, 13, and 16 months after irradiation shows partial linear energy transfer dependence. The severity of cataracts is reduced significantly when 417 rad of Co 60 gamma radiation is given in 24 weekly 17 rad fractions compared to giving this radiation as a single dose, but cataract severity is not reduced by fractionation of C12 doses over 24 weeks.

  13. Predicting the Incidence of Human Cataract through Retinal Imaging Technology.

    PubMed

    Horng, Chi-Ting; Sun, Han-Ying; Liu, Hsiang-Jui; Lue, Jiann-Hwa; Yeh, Shang-Min

    2015-11-01

    With the progress of science, technology and medicine, the proportion of elderly people in society has gradually increased over the years. Thus, the medical care and health issues of this population have drawn increasing attention. In particular, among the common medical problems of the elderly, the occurrence of cataracts has been widely observed. In this study, we developed retinal imaging technology by establishing a human eye module with ray tracing. Periodic hole arrays with different degrees were constructed on the anterior surface of the lens to emulate the eyesight decline caused by cataracts. Then, we successfully predicted the incidence of cataracts among people with myopia ranging from -3.0 D to -9.0 D. Results show that periodic hole arrays cause severe eyesight decline when they are centralized in the visual center. However, the wide distribution of these arrays on the anterior surface of the lens would not significantly affect one's eyesight. PMID:26610533

  14. Gender and cataract--the role of estrogen.

    PubMed

    Zetterberg, Madeleine; Celojevic, Dragana

    2015-02-01

    There is evidence from epidemiologic data that cataract is more common in women than men. This is not solely due to a higher rate of cataract extraction in women, as is the case in the western world, but several population-based studies show that females have a higher prevalence of lens opacities, especially cortical. There is no firm evidence that lifestyle-related factors are the cause of this gender discrepancy. Focus has therefore been directed towards the role of estrogen in cataract formation. Although data on endogenous and exogenous estrogen involvement in cataractogenesis are conflicting, some studies have indicated that hormone therapy may decrease the risk of cataract and thus be protective. It has been hypothesized that the decrease in estrogen at menopause cause increased risk of cataract in women, i.e. not strictly the concentration of estrogen, but more the withdrawal effect. Estrogens are known to exert several anti-aging effects that may explain the longer lifespan in women, including metabolically beneficial effects, neuroprotection, preservation of telomeres and anti-oxidative properties. Since oxidative stress is considered important in cataractogenesis, studies have investigated the effects of estrogens on lens epithelial cells in culture or in animal models. Several investigators have found protection by physiological concentrations of 17β-estradiol against oxidative stress induced by H2O2 in cultured lens epithelial cells. Although both main types of estrogen receptors, ERα and ERβ, have been demonstrated in lens epithelium, most studies so far indicate that the estrogen-mediated protection in the lens is exerted through non-genomic, i.e. receptor-independent mechanisms, possibly through phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/ERK2), a member of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)-signaling pathway. Further studies are needed, both epidemiologic as to the role of hormone therapies, and laboratory studies

  15. Natural therapies for ocular disorders, part two: cataracts and glaucoma.

    PubMed

    Head, K A

    2001-04-01

    Pathophysiological mechanisms of cataract formation include deficient glutathione levels contributing to a faulty antioxidant defense system within the lens of the eye. Nutrients to increase glutathione levels and activity include lipoic acid, vitamins E and C, and selenium. Cataract patients also tend to be deficient in vitamin A and the carotenes, lutein and zeaxanthin. The B vitamin riboflavin appears to play an essential role as a precursor to flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD), a co-factor for glutathione reductase activity. Other nutrients and botanicals, which may benefit cataract patients or help prevent cataracts, include pantethine, folic acid, melatonin, and bilberry. Diabetic cataracts are caused by an elevation of polyols within the lens of the eye catalyzed by the enzyme aldose reductase. Flavonoids, particularly quercetin and its derivatives, are potent inhibitors of aldose reductase. Glaucoma is characterized by increased intraocular pressure (IOP) in some but not all cases. Some patients with glaucoma have normal IOP but poor circulation, resulting in damage to the optic nerve. Faulty glycosaminoglycan (GAG) synthesis or breakdown in the trabecular meshwork associated with aqueous outflow has also been implicated. Similar to patients with cataracts, those with glaucoma typically have compromised antioxidant defense systems as well. Nutrients that can impact GAGs such as vitamin C and glucosamine sulfate may hold promise for glaucoma treatment. Vitamin C in high doses has been found to lower IOP via its osmotic effect. Other nutrients holding some potential benefit for glaucoma include lipoic acid, vitamin B12, magnesium, and melatonin. Botanicals may offer some therapeutic potential. Ginkgo biloba increases circulation to the optic nerve; forskolin (an extract from Coleus forskohlii) has been used successfully as a topical agent to lower IOP; and intramuscular injections of Salvia miltiorrhiza have shown benefit in improving visual acuity and

  16. Low-Dose Radiation Cataract and Genetic Determinants of Radiosensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Kleiman, Norman Jay

    2013-11-30

    The lens of the eye is one of the most radiosensitive tissues in the body. Ocular ionizing radiation exposure results in characteristic, dose related, progressive lens changes leading to cataract formation. While initial, early stages of lens opacification may not cause visual disability, the severity of such changes progressively increases with dose until vision is impaired and cataract extraction surgery may be required. Because of the transparency of the eye, radiation induced lens changes can easily be followed non-invasively over time. Thus, the lens provides a unique model system in which to study the effects of low dose ionizing radiation exposure in a complex, highly organized tissue. Despite this observation, considerable uncertainties remain surrounding the relationship between dose and risk of developing radiation cataract. For example, a growing number of human epidemiological findings suggest significant risk among various groups of occupationally and accidentally exposed individuals and confidence intervals that include zero dose. Nevertheless, questions remain concerning the relationship between lens opacities, visual disability, clinical cataract, threshold dose and/or the role of genetics in determining radiosensitivity. Experimentally, the response of the rodent eye to radiation is quite similar to that in humans and thus animal studies are well suited to examine the relationship between radiation exposure, genetic determinants of radiosensitivity and cataractogenesis. The current work has expanded our knowledge of the low-dose effects of X-irradiation or high-LET heavy ion exposure on timing and progression of radiation cataract and has provided new information on the genetic, molecular, biochemical and cell biological features which contribute to this pathology. Furthermore, findings have indicated that single and/or multiple haploinsufficiency for various genes involved in DNA repair and cell cycle checkpoint control, such as Atm, Brca1 or Rad9

  17. Lensectomy-vitrectomy indications and techniques in cataract surgery.

    PubMed

    Sourdille, P

    1997-02-01

    Lensectomy-vitrectomy is the removal of the crystalline lens through a transscleral retrociliary incision (usually the pars plana) under clinical conditions in which the vitreous gel has to be partially or totally removed. It was designed in the early 1970s at the onset of modern vitreous surgery. The vitreous cutter was used to remove the lens and the vitreous (lensectomy as vitrectomy). With the development of small incision cataract surgery, foldable IOL, the term lensectomy-vitrectomy also applies to separate incisions in one procedure combining lens and vitreous surgery. With this in mind, it covers several very different situations from neonatal congenital cataracts to adult or senile-associated diseases. This type of surgery is widely accepted, and the main controversy is about the consequences of neonatal surgery and the age of IOL implantation in uni- or bilateral congenital cataracts. My personal work with laser flare and cellmetry demonstrates that pars plana vitrectomy alone creates very little trauma to the blood-aqueous barrier, as can be checked by the anterior chamber level of proteins (ie, flare). The postoperative flare in pars plana vitrectomy alone is very close to the preoperative level. Therefore, the association of pars plana vitrectomy and lens surgery should not be more traumatizing to the eye than lens surgery alone. This review will first report the consequences of neonatal lensectomy-vitrectomy to the eye. Subsequent indications for surgery and implantation will be discussed as well as special indications and complications in congenital cataracts, dislocated nucleus in cataract operation, cataract and associated vitreoretinal disorders in diabetes, and giant retinal tears and removal of the lens during vitrectomy. PMID:10168275

  18. Coated with nanomaterials intraocular lenses, ophthalmic and human body implantable devices with high catalytic antioxidant activities: a new nanotechnology strategy of peroxidase cellular enzyme mimics increasing the biocompatibility and therapeutic deployment of the medical prosthetic device.

    PubMed

    Babizhayev, Mark A

    2013-04-01

    While cataract surgery is generally recognized as being one of the safest operations, there is still a significant complication rate. From 30 to 50% of all patients in the United States having cataract extraction develop opacification of the posterior lens capsule within two years and require laser treatment with its own significant risk of complications. Of the patients having cataract surgery, 0.8% develop retinal detachments, from 0.6% to 1.3% were rehospitalized for corneal edema or required corneal transplantation and about 0.1% presented with endophthalmitis . Thus, aside from secondary cataract, about 2% of 1.3 million people, or 26,000 individuals in the United States annually develop serious complications as a result of cataract surgery. The aim of this investigation was to increase the safety and effectiveness of an individual intraocular lens (IOL) preventing an impairment in peroxide metabolism of the mature human cataractous lenses compared to normal lenses employing the specific nanotechnology coating which substitutes the inhibitory effect of the implantable device towards the active species of oxygen and the ability of IOL to regulate the H2O2 and lipid hydroperoxides levels in the surrounding medium. The implantation of IOLs with metabolic activity improves the capability of the surrounding ocular tissues to withstand oxidative stress induced in ocular humors by the photochemical and other metabolic reactions. The coated implantable medical device with thin film of platinum applied with magnetron sputtering, reacts as a body enzyme with deleterious peroxide compounds and free radical oxygen species in body fluids and tissue when said device is implanted into human body. The IOL having haptics coated with thin film of platinum, catalyzes the reduction of peroxide compounds to decrease their levels within the aqueous humor. Further, the coatings also scavenge toxic free radicals of oxygen, thus preventing cellular dysfunction resulting from oxidative

  19. Gravitational Lensing Extends SETI Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Factor, Richard

    Microwave SETI (The Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence) focuses on two primary strategies, the "Targeted Search" and the "All-Sky Survey." Although the goal of both strategies is the unequivocal discovery of a signal transmitted by intelligent species outside our solar system, they pursue the strategies in very different manners and have vastly different requirements. This chapter introduces Gravitational Lensing SETI (GL-SETI), a third strategy. Its goal is the unequivocal discovery of an extraterrestrial signal, with equipment and data processing requirements that are substantially different from the commonly-used strategies. This strategy is particularly suitable for use with smaller radio telescopes and has budgetary requirements suitable for individual researchers.

  20. Weak lensing by galaxy troughs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruen, Daniel

    2016-06-01

    Galaxy troughs, i.e. underdensities in the projected galaxy field, are a weak lensing probe of the low density Universe with high signal-to-noise ratio. I present measurements of the radial distortion of background galaxy images and the de-magnification of the CMB by troughs constructed from Dark Energy Survey and Sloan Digital Sky Survey galaxy catalogs. With high statistical significance and a relatively robust modeling, these probe gravity in regimes of density and scale difficult to access for conventional statistics.

  1. Development of cataract caused by diabetes mellitus: Raman study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furić, Krešimir; Mohaček-Grošev, Vlasta; Hadžija, Mirko

    2005-06-01

    Diabetes mellitus succeeded by diabetic cataract was induced to experimental animals (Wistar rats) by applying an Alloxan injection. Eye properties deterioration were monitored from clinical standpoint and using Raman and infrared spectroscopies. All cases of developed cataract were followed by important changes in vibrational spectra, but Raman spectroscopy proved to be more useful because of larger number of resolved bands. Each kth Raman spectrum of diseased lens (in our notation k denotes disease age and cataract degree as described in chapter Alloxan diabetes) can be expressed as a sum of the Raman spectrum of healthy lens, I R, multiplied by a suitable constant ck, and the fluorescent background spectrum, I FB. We introduce the ratio of integrated intensities IFB and ck* IR as a physical parameter called fluorescent background index F FB. It turns out that FFB grows as cataract progresses and has its maximum at approx. 4, whence it decreases. FFB values are larger for 200-1800 cm -1 spectral interval than for 2500-4000 cm -1 interval. In the same manner another quantity called water band index FW is defined for each Raman spectrum of diseased lens in the 2800-3730 cm -1 interval. It is the ratio of the integrated intensity from 3100 to 3730 cm -1 (water band interval) divided by the integrated intensity of the 2800-3100 cm -1 interval (C-H stretching region). FW increases monotonously with cataract progression with maximum at the end of monitored period (5 months). These two indices helped us to formulate a model describing disease development from the earliest molecular changes to its macroscopic manifestation. As glucose and other small saccharide molecules enter the lens tissue, they bind to crystallin and other proteins via O- and S-glycosidic linkages which occur probably at tyrosine and cystein sites. In Raman spectrum this corresponds to broad bands at 540 and 1100 cm -1 which grow together with the fluorescent background, because both contributions

  2. Comparison of spectacle classical progressive and office progressive lenses.

    PubMed

    Kozlík, Marek; Knollová, Libuse Nováková

    2013-04-01

    This paper elaborates on analysis of progressive spectacle lenses, to correct presbyopia, which are nowadays offered at the market. The paper describes different types of progressive lenses, their parameters, length and width of their progressive segments. It also describes degressive spectacles lenses--progressive lenses on middle and near distance. The main part of the paper is a comparison of functional differences among different types of progressive spectacles lenses. The paper also addresses correctness of choice of progressive lenses for different works and professions. Lastly, it elaborates on differences of centration of different types of progressive lenses and parameters for correct choice of glasses frame for progressive spectacles lenses. PMID:23837232

  3. Evaluation of the Ex-PRESS® P-50 implant under scleral flap in combined cataract and glaucoma surgery

    PubMed Central

    Huerva, Valentín; Soldevila, Jordi; Ascaso, Francisco J.; Lavilla, Laura; Muniesa, M. Jesús; Sánchez, M. Carmen

    2016-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the efficacy and safety of glaucoma drainage device Ex-PRESS® P-50 for combined cataract surgery and glaucoma. METHODS Patients having cataract and open angle glaucoma or patients with open advanced glaucoma which needed two or more antiglaucoma medications were included. Combined cataract surgery and glaucoma with Ex-PRESS® P-50 model placed under scleral flap was performed. RESULTS Out of 40 eyes of 40 patients (55% male and 45% female) completed the study during one-year follow-up. The mean of age was 76.6±11.02y. The intraocular pressure (IOP) decreased significantly during the 12-month follow-up from 23.5 mm Hg to 16.8 mm Hg (Wilcoxon signed ranks test, P<0.001). A 59.5% of patients did not need any topical treatment, 10.8% of them needed one active principle, 27% needed two active principles, and 2.7% of them needed three active principles for successful IOP control (<21 mm Hg). CONCLUSION Combined surgery of phacoemulsification with ExPRESS® P-50 lowers IOP from the preoperative baseline and reduces significantly the number of antiglaucoma active principles for IOP control after the operation. PMID:27162726

  4. Combined cataract phacoemulsification and aniridia endocapsular rings implantation in a patient with bilateral congenital aniridia and cataract: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Salinas, Roberto; Pena-Guani, Fabiola

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this article was to determine the long-term outcome of surgical treatment in a patient with bilateral congenital aniridia and congenital cataracts. The patient was treated by cataract removal and implantation of a single piece IOL in both eyes. Two aniridia rings were also implanted in the capsular bag. The best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA), intraocular pressure (IOP), stability of the intraocular lens (IOL) and subjective glare reduction were measured for two years after the surgery. After 10 months, the IOP in the left eye had increased to 26 mmHg despite the fact that anti-glaucoma medication was added. Therefore, the patient was scheduled for an Ahmed valve implantation. These results suggest that good visual outcomes can be achieved in patients with bilateral congenital aniridia and cataracts. Nevertheless, the IOPs must be continuously monitored, and glaucoma screening performed to prevent further complications. PMID:26949363

  5. Spontaneous dislocation of lens bag with acrylic lens after uneventful cataract surgery – unusual complication of cataract surgery

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Mehul A.; Shah, Shreya M.; Mehta, Ruchir; Shah, Prerna

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Spontaneous dislocation of intraocular lens with bag is rare. Methods: We report a case of a 56-year-old male who presented with spontaneous anterior dislocation of an in-the-bag intraocular lens 3 years after manual small incision cataract surgery. He had undergone manual small incision cataract surgery with foldable acrylic intraocular lens implantation, and 18 months after cataract surgery ND: YAG capsulotomy with uneventful post capsulotomy follow-up. 17 months after capsulotomy, the patient presented with sudden decrease of vision. On anterior segment examination, the intraocular lens with bag was dislocated into the anterior chamber. Result: It was managed with intraocular lens explantation with bag, anterior vitrectomy and sclera fixated intraocular lens. Conclusion: Spontaneous intraocular lens dislocation with bag is possible after 1.5 years of uneventful surgery which may be managed using different techniques. PMID:27625955

  6. ["Cataract of metallurgists" in workers of the oxygen-converter production].

    PubMed

    Dorozhkin, A V

    2003-01-01

    The condition of the lens was studied in 1210 workers of steel industry: in 455 workers of an open-hearth shop (OHS) and in 755 workers of oxygen-converter shops (OCS). The intensity of infra-red irradiation was measured at working places in both shops by non-selective radiometer ARGUS-03. A higher level of automation and more advanced technological processes in the OCS ensure a better protection of the organ of vision of the OCS workers from the impact of infrared irradiation. Thus, the OCS workers had a lower occurrence of cataract development and a less intensity in changes of the lens as compared to the similar parameters registered in the OHS workers. The cataract development was proven to be directly dependant on a labor record length: changes in the posterior capsule and opacifications of the lens posterior cortical segments (stages I and II) were observed in those, whose labor record ranged from 10 to 15 years; brown changes in the nucleus and dystrophic changes in the anterior capsule (degree III) were found in those, whose labor record exceeded 15 years.

  7. Lenses and Perception: Investigations with Light

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akcay, Hakan

    2005-01-01

    The main goals of these activities are to help students learn how a convex lens can serve as a magnifying lens and how light travels and creates images. These explorations will introduce middle school students to different types of lenses and how they work. Students will observe and describe how lenses bend light that passes through them and how…

  8. A symplectic framework for multiplane gravitational lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izumiya, S.; Janeczko, S.

    2003-05-01

    We construct a new framework for the study of multiplane gravitational lensing from the view point of symplectic geometry. Symplectic relations are used to compose the systems and weaker Lagrangian equivalence is applied for classifying the caustics of multiplane gravitational lensing.

  9. Initial experience using a femtosecond laser cataract surgery system at a UK National Health Service cataract surgery day care centre

    PubMed Central

    Dhallu, Sandeep K; Maurino, Vincenzo; Wilkins, Mark R

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To describe the initial outcomes following installation of a cataract surgery laser system. Setting National Health Service cataract surgery day care unit in North London, UK. Participants 158 eyes of 150 patients undergoing laser-assisted cataract surgery. Interventions Laser cataract surgery using the AMO Catalys femtosecond laser platform. Primary and secondary outcome measures Primary outcome measure: intraoperative complications including anterior and posterior capsule tears. Secondary outcome measures: docking to the laser platform, successful treatment delivery, postoperative visual acuities. Results Mean case age was 67.7±10.8 years (range 29–88 years). Docking was successful in 94% (148/158 cases), and in 4% (6/148 cases) of these, the laser delivery was aborted part way during delivery due to patient movement. A total of 32 surgeons, of grades from junior trainee to consultant, performed the surgeries. Median case number per surgeon was 3 (range from 1–20). The anterior capsulotomy was complete in 99.3% of cases, there were no anterior capsule tears (0%). There were 3 cases with posterior capsule rupture requiring anterior vitrectomy, and 1 with zonular dialysis requiring anterior vitrectomy (4/148 eyes, 2.7%). These 4 cases were performed by trainee surgeons, and were either their first laser cataract surgery (2 surgeons) or their first and second laser cataract surgeries (1 surgeon). Conclusions Despite the learning curve, docking and laser delivery were successfully performed in almost all cases, and surgical complication rates and visual outcomes were similar to those expected based on national data. Complications were predominately confined to trainee surgeons, and with the exception of intraoperative pupil constriction appeared unrelated to the laser-performed steps. PMID:27466243

  10. Contact Lenses Wettability In Vitro: Effect of Surface-Active Ingredients

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Meng C.; Svitova, Tatyana F.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the release of surface-active agents (surfactants) from unworn soft contact lenses and their influence on the lens surface wettability in vitro. Methods Surface tension (ST) of blister pack solutions was measured by pendant-drop technique. STs at the air-aqueous interface and contact angles (CAs) of four conventional and seven silicone hydrogel (SiH) soft contact lenses (SCLs) were evaluated in a dynamic-cycling regime using a modified captive-bubble tensiometer-goniometer. Measurements were performed immediately after removal from blister packs, and after soaking in a glass vial filled with a surfactant-free solution, which was replaced daily for one week. Lens surface wettability was expressed as adhesion energy (AE) according to Young’s equation. Results STs of all blister pack solutions were lower than the reference ST of pure water (72.5 mN/m), indicating the presence of surfactants. When lenses were depleted of surfactants by soaking, the STs of all studied lenses and advancing CAs of selected lenses increased (p < 0.001). Receding CAs of all studied lenses were 12° ± 5° and were not affected by the presence of surfactants. For most of the conventional lenses, the surface wettability was largely dependent on surfactants, and reduced significantly after surfactant depletion. In contrast, most SiH lenses exhibited stable and self-sustained surface wettability in vitro. Conclusions The manufacturer-added surfactants affected wetting properties of all studied SCLs, although to different degrees. PMID:20400924

  11. Galactic Internet made possible by star gravitational lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maccone, Claudio

    2013-02-01

    In this paper we study how to create a radio bridge between the Sun and any other star made up by both the gravitational lenses of the Sun and that star. The alignment for this radio bridge to work is very strict, but the power-saving is enormous, due to the huge contributions of the two stars' lenses to the overall antenna gain of the system. In particular, we study in detail: The Sun-Alpha Centauri A radio bridge. The Sun-Barnard's star radio bridge. The Sun-Sirius A radio bridge. The radio bridge between the Sun and any Sun-like star located in the Galactic Bulge. The radio bridge between the Sun and a similar Sun-like star located inside the Andromeda galaxy (M31). Finally, we find the information channel capacity for each of the above radio bridges, putting thus a physical constraint to the maximum information transfer that will be enabled even by exploiting the stars as gravitational lenses. The conclusion is that a Galactic Internet is indeed physically possible. May be the Galactic Internet already is in existence, and was created long ago by civilizations more advanced than ours. But the potential for creating such a system has only recently been realized by Humans.

  12. Time delay in Swiss cheese gravitational lensing

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, B.; Kantowski, R.; Dai, X.

    2010-08-15

    We compute time delays for gravitational lensing in a flat {Lambda} dominated cold dark matter Swiss cheese universe. We assume a primary and secondary pair of light rays are deflected by a single point mass condensation described by a Kottler metric (Schwarzschild with {Lambda}) embedded in an otherwise homogeneous cosmology. We find that the cosmological constant's effect on the difference in arrival times is nonlinear and at most around 0.002% for a large cluster lens; however, we find differences from time delays predicted by conventional linear lensing theory that can reach {approx}4% for these large lenses. The differences in predicted delay times are due to the failure of conventional lensing to incorporate the lensing mass into the mean mass density of the universe.

  13. Time delay in Swiss cheese gravitational lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, B.; Kantowski, R.; Dai, X.

    2010-08-01

    We compute time delays for gravitational lensing in a flat Λ dominated cold dark matter Swiss cheese universe. We assume a primary and secondary pair of light rays are deflected by a single point mass condensation described by a Kottler metric (Schwarzschild with Λ) embedded in an otherwise homogeneous cosmology. We find that the cosmological constant’s effect on the difference in arrival times is nonlinear and at most around 0.002% for a large cluster lens; however, we find differences from time delays predicted by conventional linear lensing theory that can reach ˜4% for these large lenses. The differences in predicted delay times are due to the failure of conventional lensing to incorporate the lensing mass into the mean mass density of the universe.

  14. Spherical aberration in electrically thin flat lenses.

    PubMed

    Ruphuy, Miguel; Ramahi, Omar M

    2016-08-01

    We analyze the spherical aberration of a new generation of lenses made of flat electrically thin inhomogeneous media. For such lenses, spherical aberration is analyzed quantitatively and qualitatively, and comparison is made to the classical gradient index rod. Both flat thin and thick lenses are made of gradient index materials, but the physical mechanisms and design equations are different. Using full-wave three-dimensional numerical simulation, we evaluate the spherical aberrations using the Maréchal criterion and show that the thin lens gives significantly better performance than the thick lens (rod). Additionally, based on ray tracing formulation, third-order analysis for longitudinal aberration and optical path difference are presented, showing strong overall performance of thin lenses in comparison to classical rod lenses. PMID:27505651

  15. Optical plasticity in fish lenses.

    PubMed

    Kröger, Ronald H H

    2013-05-01

    In a typical fish eye, the crystalline lens is the only refractive element. It is spherical in shape and has high refractive power. Most fish species have elaborate color vision and spectral sensitivity may range from the near-infrared to the near-ultraviolet. Longitudinal chromatic aberration exceeds depth of focus and chromatic blur is compensated for by species-specific multifocality of the lens. The complex optical properties of fish lenses are subject to accurate regulation, including circadian reversible adjustments and irreversible developmental tuning. The mechanisms optimize the transfer of visual information to the retina in diverse and variable environments, and allow for rapid evolutionary changes in color vision. Active optical tuning of the lens is achieved by changes in the refractive index gradient and involves layers of mature, denucleated lens fiber cells. First steps have been taken toward unraveling the signaling systems controlling lens optical plasticity. Multifocal lenses compensating for chromatic blur are common in all major groups of vertebrates, including birds and mammals. Furthermore, the optical quality of a monofocal lens, such as in the human eye, is equally sensitive to the exact shape of the refractive index profile. Optical plasticity in the crystalline lens may thus be present in vertebrates in general.

  16. Ray optics of generalized lenses.

    PubMed

    Chaplain, Gregory J; Macauley, Gavin; Bělín, Jakub; Tyc, Tomáš; Cowie, Euan N; Courtial, Johannes

    2016-05-01

    We study the ray optics of generalized lenses (glenses), which are ideal thin lenses generalized to have different object- and image-sided focal lengths, and the most general light-ray-direction-changing surfaces that stigmatically image any point in object space to a corresponding point in image space. Gabor superlenses [UK patent541,753 (1940); J. Opt. A1, 94 (1999)JOAOF81464-425810.1088/1464-4258/1/1/013] can be seen as pixelated realizations of glenses. Our analysis is centered on the nodal point. Whereas the nodal point of a thin lens always resides in the lens plane, that of a glens can reside anywhere on the optical axis. Utilizing the nodal point, we derive simple equations that describe the mapping between object and image space and the light-ray-direction change. We demonstrate our findings with the help of ray-tracing simulations. Glenses allow novel optical instruments to be realized, at least theoretically, and our results facilitate the design and analysis of such devices. PMID:27140894

  17. Planck 2015 results. XV. Gravitational lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Planck Collaboration; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartlett, J. G.; Bartolo, N.; Basak, S.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoît, A.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernard, J.-P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bock, J. J.; Bonaldi, A.; Bonavera, L.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Boulanger, F.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R. C.; Calabrese, E.; Cardoso, J.-F.; Catalano, A.; Challinor, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chiang, H. C.; Christensen, P. R.; Church, S.; Clements, D. L.; Colombi, S.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Combet, C.; Couchot, F.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B. P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Danese, L.; Davies, R. D.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Désert, F.-X.; Diego, J. M.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Ducout, A.; Dunkley, J.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Elsner, F.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Fergusson, J.; Finelli, F.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Fraisse, A. A.; Franceschi, E.; Frejsel, A.; Galeotta, S.; Galli, S.; Ganga, K.; Giard, M.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; Gjerløw, E.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gratton, S.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Gudmundsson, J. E.; Hansen, F. K.; Hanson, D.; Harrison, D. L.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W. A.; Hornstrup, A.; Hovest, W.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Hurier, G.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jaffe, T. R.; Jones, W. C.; Juvela, M.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T. S.; Kneissl, R.; Knoche, J.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Lamarre, J.-M.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Lawrence, C. R.; Leonardi, R.; Lesgourgues, J.; Levrier, F.; Lewis, A.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maggio, G.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Mangilli, A.; Maris, M.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Matarrese, S.; McGehee, P.; Meinhold, P. R.; Melchiorri, A.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschênes, M.-A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Moss, A.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J. A.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Netterfield, C. B.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Oxborrow, C. A.; Paci, F.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paoletti, D.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrotta, F.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Pietrobon, D.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Popa, L.; Pratt, G. W.; Prézeau, G.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J.-L.; Rachen, J. P.; Reach, W. T.; Rebolo, R.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Renzi, A.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Rossetti, M.; Roudier, G.; Rowan-Robinson, M.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Rusholme, B.; Sandri, M.; Santos, D.; Savelainen, M.; Savini, G.; Scott, D.; Seiffert, M. D.; Shellard, E. P. S.; Spencer, L. D.; Stolyarov, V.; Stompor, R.; Sudiwala, R.; Sunyaev, R.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A.-S.; Sygnet, J.-F.; Tauber, J. A.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Tucci, M.; Tuovinen, J.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; Wehus, I. K.; White, M.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.

    2016-09-01

    We present the most significant measurement of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) lensing potential to date (at a level of 40σ), using temperature and polarization data from the Planck 2015 full-mission release. Using a polarization-only estimator, we detect lensing at a significance of 5σ. We cross-check the accuracy of our measurement using the wide frequency coverage and complementarity of the temperature and polarization measurements. Public products based on this measurement include an estimate of the lensing potential over approximately 70% of the sky, an estimate of the lensing potential power spectrum in bandpowers for the multipole range 40 ≤ L ≤ 400, and an associated likelihood for cosmological parameter constraints. We find good agreement between our measurement of the lensing potential power spectrum and that found in the ΛCDM model that best fits the Planck temperature and polarization power spectra. Using the lensing likelihood alone we obtain a percent-level measurement of the parameter combination σ8Ω0.25m = 0.591 ± 0.021. We combine our determination of the lensing potential with the E-mode polarization, also measured by Planck, to generate an estimate of the lensing B-mode. We show that this lensing B-mode estimate is correlated with the B-modes observed directly by Planck at the expected level and with a statistical significance of 10σ, confirming Planck's sensitivity to this known sky signal. We also correlate our lensing potential estimate with the large-scale temperature anisotropies, detecting a cross-correlation at the 3σ level, as expected because of dark energy in the concordance ΛCDM model.

  18. Mimicking cataract-induced visual dysfunction by means of protein denaturation in egg albumen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandracchia, B.; Finizio, A.; Ferraro, P.

    2016-03-01

    As the world's population ages, cataract-induced visual dysfunction and blindness is on the increase. This is a significant global problem. The most common symptoms of cataracts are glared and blurred vision. Usually, people with cataract have trouble seeing and reading at distance or in low light and also their color perception is altered. Furthermore, cataract is a sneaky disease as it is usually a very slow but progressive process, which creates adaptation so that patients find it difficult to recognize. All this can be very difficult to explain, so we built and tested an optical device to help doctors giving comprehensive answers to the patients' symptoms. This device allows visualizing how cataract impairs vision mimicking the optical degradation of the crystalline related cataracts. This can be a valuable optical tool for medical education as well as to provide a method to illustrate the patients how cataract progression process will affect their vision.

  19. Strong gravitational lensing of gravitational waves from double compact binaries—perspectives for the Einstein Telescope

    SciTech Connect

    Biesiada, Marek; Ding, Xuheng; Zhu, Zong-Hong; Piórkowska, Aleksandra E-mail: dingxuheng@mail.bnu.edu.cn E-mail: zhuzh@bnu.edu.cn

    2014-10-01

    Gravitational wave (GW) experiments are entering their advanced stage which should soon open a new observational window on the Universe. Looking into this future, the Einstein Telescope (ET) was designed to have a fantastic sensitivity improving significantly over the advanced GW detectors. One of the most important astrophysical GW sources supposed to be detected by the ET in large numbers are double compact objects (DCO) and some of such events should be gravitationally lensed by intervening galaxies. We explore the prospects of observing gravitationally lensed inspiral DCO events in the ET. This analysis is a significant extension of our previous paper [1]. We are using the intrinsic merger rates of the whole class of DCO (NS-NS,BH-NS,BH-BH) located at different redshifts as calculated by [2] by using StarTrack population synthesis evolutionary code. We discuss in details predictions from each evolutionary scenario. Our general conclusion is that ET would register about 50–100 strongly lensed inspiral events per year. Only the scenario in which nascent BHs receive strong kick gives the predictions of a few events per year. Such lensed events would be dominated by the BH-BH merging binary systems. Our results suggest that during a few years of successful operation ET will provide a considerable catalog of strongly lensed events.

  20. Next-generation analysis of cataracts: determining knowledge driven gene-gene interactions using biofilter, and gene-environment interactions using the Phenx Toolkit*.

    PubMed

    Pendergrass, Sarah A; Verma, Shefali S; Hall, Molly A; Holzinger, Emily R; Moore, Carrie B; Wallace, John R; Dudek, Scott M; Huggins, Wayne; Kitchner, Terrie; Waudby, Carol; Berg, Richard; Mccarty, Catherine A; Ritchie, Marylyn D

    2015-01-01

    status. Our results show these approaches enable advanced searches for epistasis and gene-environment interactions beyond GWAS, and that the EHR based approach provides an additional source of data for seeking these advanced explanatory models of the etiology of complex disease/outcome such as cataracts.

  1. Altitude Adaptation: A Glimpse Through Various Lenses

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Simonson, Tatum S. Altitude adaptation: A glimpse through various lenses. High Alt Med Biol 16:125–137, 2015.—Recent availability of genome-wide data from highland populations has enabled the identification of adaptive genomic signals. Some of the genomic signals reported thus far among Tibetan, Andean, and Ethiopian are the same, while others appear unique to each population. These genomic findings parallel observations conveyed by decades of physiological research: different continental populations, resident at high altitude for hundreds of generations, exhibit a distinct composite of traits at altitude. The most commonly reported signatures of selection emanate from genomic segments containing hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) pathway genes. Corroborative evidence for adaptive significance stems from associations between putatively adaptive gene copies and sea-level ranges of hemoglobin concentration in Tibetan and Amhara Ethiopians, birth weights and metabolic factors in Andeans and Tibetans, maternal uterine artery diameter in Andeans, and protection from chronic mountain sickness in Andean males at altitude. While limited reports provide mechanistic insights thus far, efforts to identify and link precise genetic variants to molecular, physiological, and developmental functions are underway, and progress on the genomics front continues to provide unprecedented movement towards these goals. This combination of multiple perspectives is necessary to maximize our understanding of orchestrated biological and evolutionary processes in native highland populations, which will advance our understanding of both adaptive and non-adaptive responses to hypoxia. PMID:26070057

  2. Altitude Adaptation: A Glimpse Through Various Lenses.

    PubMed

    Simonson, Tatum S

    2015-06-01

    Simonson, Tatum S. Altitude adaptation: A glimpse through various lenses. High Alt Med Biol 16:125-137, 2015.--Recent availability of genome-wide data from highland populations has enabled the identification of adaptive genomic signals. Some of the genomic signals reported thus far among Tibetan, Andean, and Ethiopian are the same, while others appear unique to each population. These genomic findings parallel observations conveyed by decades of physiological research: different continental populations, resident at high altitude for hundreds of generations, exhibit a distinct composite of traits at altitude. The most commonly reported signatures of selection emanate from genomic segments containing hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) pathway genes. Corroborative evidence for adaptive significance stems from associations between putatively adaptive gene copies and sea-level ranges of hemoglobin concentration in Tibetan and Amhara Ethiopians, birth weights and metabolic factors in Andeans and Tibetans, maternal uterine artery diameter in Andeans, and protection from chronic mountain sickness in Andean males at altitude. While limited reports provide mechanistic insights thus far, efforts to identify and link precise genetic variants to molecular, physiological, and developmental functions are underway, and progress on the genomics front continues to provide unprecedented movement towards these goals. This combination of multiple perspectives is necessary to maximize our understanding of orchestrated biological and evolutionary processes in native highland populations, which will advance our understanding of both adaptive and non-adaptive responses to hypoxia.

  3. Two-element lenses for military applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bigwood, Chris; Wood, Andrew

    2011-12-01

    To meet today's demanding requirements for increased performance, reduced size, lower mass, and cost, simple lenses containing multiple aspheric surfaces are required. It is now common for the number of aspheric surfaces used in an infrared lens to exceed the actual number of lens elements. Multiple aspheric and diffractive surfaces provide additional degrees of freedom in the lens design. This is required to achieve increased levels of imaging performance demanded by reduced pitch detectors. Aspheric surfaces also enable a greater diversity of materials to be used such that athermal solutions can be realized without the need for additional lens elements. More recent advances in detector technology will demand multispectral operation, but the requirements for simple, inexpensive optics will remain. Innovative use of aspheric components can also create very simple multispectral optics to fulfil this emerging need. This paper will review the range of applications that can be satisfied using no more than two optical components, highlighting the specific benefits that aspheric and diffractive surfaces provide. Consideration will also be given to future developments where enhanced functionality can be achieved using computational imaging techniques. Examples will be given for several military applications including weapon sights, driver's vision enhancement and remote weapon stations.

  4. Nutritional antioxidants and age-related cataract and maculopathy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Loss of vision is the second greatest, next to death, fear among the elderly. Age-related cataract (ARC) and maculopathy (ARM) are two major causes of blindness worldwide. There are several important reasons to study relationships between risk for ARC/ARM and nutrition: (1) because it is likely that...

  5. Cataract production in mice by heavy charged particles

    SciTech Connect

    Ainsworth, E.H.; Jose, J.; Yang, V.V.; Barker, M.E.

    1981-03-01

    The cataractogenic effects of heavy charged particles have been evaluated in mice in relation to dose and ionization density (LET/sub infinity/). The study was undertaken due to the high potential for eye exposures to HZE particles among SPS personnel working in outer space. This has made it imperative that the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) in relation to LET/sub infinity/ for various particles be defined so that appropriate quality factors (Q) could be assigned for estimation of risk. Although mice and men differ in susceptibility to radiation-induced cataracts, the results from this project should assist in defining appropriate quality factors in relation to LET/sub infinity/, particle mass, charge, or velocity. Evaluation of results indicated that : (1) low single doses (5 to 20 rad) of iron (/sup 56/Fe) or argon (/sup 40/Ar) particles are cataractogenic at 11 to 18 months after irradiation; (2) onset and density of the opacification are dose related; (3) cataract density (grade) at 9, 11, 13, and 16 months after irradiation shows partial LET/sub infinity/-dependence; and (4) the severity of cataracts is reduced significantly when 417 rad of /sup 60/Co gamma radiation is given in 24 weekly 17 rad fractions compared to giving this radiation as a single dose, but cataract severity is not reduced by fractionation of /sup 12/C doses over 24 weeks.

  6. Posterior Iris Fixated Intraocular Lens for Pediatric Traumatic Cataract

    PubMed Central

    Kavitha, V.; Balasubramanian, Preethi; Heralgi, Mallikarjun M.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the postoperative visual outcomes and complications of posterior iris fixated intraocular lens (IFIOL) implantation for pediatric traumatic cataract. Methods: A retrospective clinical audit was performed of all the pediatric traumatic cataract patients who underwent lens removal and iris fixated lens implantation due to inadequate capsular support with or without corneal tear repair between January 2009 and December 2013. Data were collected and analyzed on the preoperative and postoperative visual outcomes and complications. Results: Twenty-five children (25 eyes; 21 males and 4 females) were enrolled with the mean age of 11 ± 4.0 years. There were 72% of eyes that underwent primary cataract removal with IFIOL implantation. Twenty-eight percent of eyes underwent corneal tear repair prior to intraocular lens (IOL) implantation. Preoperative best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) was hand motion in 32% eyes, counting fingers in 24%, and perception of light in 44%. Postoperative BCVA of 0-0.2 logarithm of minimum angle of resolution was reported in the 64% of eyes. One eye developed secondary glaucoma, one eye underwent re-enclavation, and none developed retinal complications. Conclusion: Posterior IFIOL implantation resulted in an improved visual outcome, low incidence of postoperative complications, and is a good alternative to other IOL, in the cases of pediatric traumatic cataract without adequate capsular support. PMID:27162456

  7. [Laser phacoemulsification--a method of cataract surgery].

    PubMed

    Filip, M; Măgureanu, M; Barbu, C; Manga, C; Gregorian, F

    2001-01-01

    Today, ultrasound phacoemulsification is the most used method of cataract surgery. Because the side effects (injury of corneal endothelium and other nearly tissues), was tried to find alternative energy forms. Erbium laser was proven to be the most effective method among all of these. PMID:11519335

  8. Emerging issues in radiogenic cataracts and cardiovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Hamada, Nobuyuki; Fujimichi, Yuki; Iwasaki, Toshiyasu; Fujii, Noriko; Furuhashi, Masato; Kubo, Eri; Minamino, Tohru; Nomura, Takaharu; Sato, Hitoshi

    2014-01-01

    In 2011, the International Commission on Radiological Protection issued a statement on tissue reactions (formerly termed non-stochastic or deterministic effects) to recommend lowering the threshold for cataracts and the occupational equivalent dose limit for the crystalline lens of the eye. Furthermore, this statement was the first to list circulatory disease (cardiovascular and cerebrovascular disease) as a health hazard of radiation exposure and to assign its threshold for the heart and brain. These changes have stimulated various discussions and may have impacts on some radiation workers, such as those in the medical sector. This paper considers emerging issues associated with cataracts and cardiovascular disease. For cataracts, topics dealt with herein include (i) the progressive nature, stochastic nature, target cells and trigger events of lens opacification, (ii) roles of lens protein denaturation, oxidative stress, calcium ions, tumor suppressors and DNA repair factors in cataractogenesis, (iii) dose rate effect, radiation weighting factor, and classification systems for cataracts, and (iv) estimation of the lens dose in clinical settings. Topics for cardiovascular disease include experimental animal models, relevant surrogate markers, latency period, target tissues, and roles of inflammation and cellular senescence. Future research needs are also discussed. PMID:24824673

  9. Monitoring visual outcome of cataract surgery in India.

    PubMed Central

    Limburg, H.; Foster, A.; Vaidyanathan, K.; Murthy, G. V.

    1999-01-01

    Two simple methods of assessing visual outcome following cataract surgery were evaluated in India. The first used data obtained from standardized patient records of cataract surgery. The second used data from population-based rapid epidemiological assessments. Analysis of 4168 hospital and eye camp records showed that, with the available standard correction, a good outcome (visual acuity > or = 6/18) was achieved in 37.8%, a borderline outcome (visual acuity 6/246-6/60) in 45.6% and a poor outcome (visual acuity 6/60) in 16.6% of instances. Of 2401 aphakic/pseudophakic eyes examined in a cross-sectional population-based study, outcome was good in 43.5% and poor in 26.4%. For 776 eyes examined in a similar study in a different state, outcome was good in 49.9% and poor in 23.9%. These assessments indicate that outcome with available correction was poor in 15-25% of eyes following cataract surgery. Visual outcome is likely to improve when better correction for aphakia can be provided. Further assessment of the causes of poor visual outcome is needed. The visual outcome following cataract surgery could be monitored on a regular basis by ophthalmologists, using either of the methods evaluated, an exercise which in itself is likely to improve the outcome of surgery. When the proportion of poor outcomes is high (> 10%) further investigation into the causes is warranted. PMID:10427929

  10. Cataract Section Across Temporary Stainless-Steel Sutures

    PubMed Central

    MacDonald, R. Keith

    1965-01-01

    The purpose of the technique described was to combine the advantages of a cleanedged Graefe-knife incision with those of safety and near-perfect apposition offered by preplaced sutures: a preliminary to cataract extraction. Uncuttable preplaced 2-mm. stainless steel sutures were finally replaced after completion of the incision by attached braided silk for closure purposes. PMID:14291461

  11. Cataract Surgical Rate between 2006 and 2010 in Tehran Province

    PubMed Central

    HASHEMI, Hassan; KHABAZKHOOB, Mehdi; REZVAN, Farhad; ETEMAD, Koroush; GILASI, Hamidreza; ASGARI, Soheila; MAHDAVI, Alireza; SOROUSH, Sara; YEKTA, Abbasali; FOTOUHI, Akbar

    2015-01-01

    Background: Considering population aging in Iran and the importance of cataract surgery in the old age, this study was performed to show the cataract surgical rate (CSR) between 2006 and 2010 in Tehran Province. Methods: Eighteen centers were randomly selected from cataract surgery centers in Tehran. In each center, one week in every season was randomly selected and the number of cataract surgeries in the week was calculated. In total, 20 weeks were selected in each center in five years. Results: The CSR increased linearly from 8011 cases per 1,000,000 population in 2006 to 12465 cases per 1,000,000 population in 2010. As for patients below 40 years of age, the percentage of the male patients was more while after the age of 40 years, the percentage of the female patients was more in all age groups. At least 96.2% of the surgeries in each year were performed using the phacoemulsification method. From 2006 to 2010, the percentage of outpatient surgery increased from 48.7% to 72.5%. On the other hand, hospitalization for one night or more had a decreasing trend from 2006 to 2010. Conclusion: During 2006–2010, the CSR was acceptable in Tehran in comparison with other studies. However, attention should be paid to the increase in the population of the elderly people. Although more than 95% of the surgeries in the Province of Tehran are performed using the phacoemulsification method, the rate should increase to 100% in the eligible cases. PMID:26587494

  12. [Laser phacoemulsification--a method of cataract surgery].

    PubMed

    Filip, M; Măgureanu, M; Barbu, C; Manga, C; Gregorian, F

    2001-01-01

    Today, ultrasound phacoemulsification is the most used method of cataract surgery. Because the side effects (injury of corneal endothelium and other nearly tissues), was tried to find alternative energy forms. Erbium laser was proven to be the most effective method among all of these.

  13. Professor Peter Choyce: an early pioneer of intraocular lenses and corneal/refractive surgery.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Suresh K; Apple, David J

    2005-06-01

    Professor Peter Choyce, FRCS, DOMS, MS, was one of the pioneers of intraocular lens implant surgery. He developed an interest in artificial lens implantation following cataract surgery, a procedure that was widely criticized by the ophthalmic establishment in the UK, Europe, North America and other countries. Owing to the opposition to the intraocular lenses, Peter Choyce together with Sir Harold Ridley co-founded the International Intraocular Implant Club in 1966, which was responsible for the gradual acceptance of artificial lens implantation. Peter Choyce developed several models of intraocular lens, but did not patent the majority of them. The Choyce Mark IX, manufactured by Rayner Intraocular Lenses, became the first US Food and Drug Administration-approved intraocular lens in 1981. A review of Peter Choyce's record confirms a significant number of original innovations in the field of anterior segment surgery, including many procedures taken for granted today, but not associated with his name. These include early work on both kerato- and intraocular lens-refractive procedures, keratoprosthesis, pioneering paediatric implant procedures and others. Unfortunately his tenacious adherence to anterior chamber lens technology, while in general clinically sound, caused many to question his influence and hence he remained poorly understood even until after his death. He passed away on 8 August 2001 after a long fight with colon cancer. In this article, we provide evidence and elaborate Peter Choyce's accomplishments, which places him as one of the most innovative ophthalmologist in his surgical field in the twentieth century.

  14. Evaluation of Different Power of Near Addition in Two Different Multifocal Intraocular Lenses

    PubMed Central

    Unsal, Ugur; Baser, Gonen

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To compare near, intermediate, and distance vision and quality of vision, when refractive rotational multifocal intraocular lenses with 3.0 diopters or diffractive multifocal intraocular lenses with 2.5 diopters near addition are implanted. Methods. 41 eyes of 41 patients in whom rotational +3.0 diopters near addition IOLs were implanted and 30 eyes of 30 patients in whom diffractive +2.5 diopters near addition IOLs were implanted after cataract surgery were reviewed. Uncorrected and corrected distance visual acuity, intermediate visual acuity, near visual acuity, and patient satisfaction were evaluated 6 months later. Results. The corrected and uncorrected distance visual acuity were the same between both groups (p = 0.50 and p = 0.509, resp.). The uncorrected intermediate and corrected intermediate and near vision acuities were better in the +2.5 near vision added intraocular lens implanted group (p = 0.049, p = 0.005, and p = 0.001, resp.) and the uncorrected near vision acuity was better in the +3.0 near vision added intraocular lens implanted group (p = 0.001). The patient satisfactions of both groups were similar. Conclusion. The +2.5 diopters near addition could be a better choice in younger patients with more distance and intermediate visual requirements (driving, outdoor activities), whereas the + 3.0 diopters should be considered for patients with more near vision correction (reading). PMID:27340560

  15. X-ray imaging in advanced studies of ophthalmic diseases

    SciTech Connect

    Antunes, Andrea; Safatle, Angelica M. V.; Barros, Paulo S. M.; Morelhao, Sergio L.

    2006-07-15

    Microscopic characterization of pathological tissues has one major intrinsic limitation, the small sampling areas with respect to the extension of the tissues. Mapping possible changes on vast tissues and correlating them with large ensembles of clinical cases is not a feasible procedure for studying most diseases, as for instance vision loss related diseases and, in particular, the cataract. Although intraocular lens implants are successful treatments, cataract still is a leading public-health issue that grows in importance as the population increases and life expectancy is extended worldwide. In this work we have exploited the radiation-tissue interaction properties of hard x-rays--very low absorption and scattering--to map distinct lesions on entire eye lenses. At the used synchrotron x-ray photon energy of 20 keV (wavelength {lambda}=0.062 nm), scattering and refraction are angular resolved effects. It allows the employed x-ray image technique to efficiently characterize two types of lesions in eye lenses under cataractogenesis: distributions of tiny scattering centers and extended areas of fiber cell compaction. The data collection procedure is relatively fast; allowing dozens of samples to be totally imaged (scattering, refraction, and mass absorption images) in a single day of synchrotron beam time. More than 60 cases of canine cataract, not correlated to specific causes, were investigated in this first application of x-rays to image entire lenses. Cortical opacity cases, or partial opacity, could be related to the presence of calcificated tissues at the cortical areas, clearly visible in the images, whose elemental contents were verified by micro x-ray fluorescence as very rich in calcium. Calcificated tissues were also observed at nuclear areas in some cases of hypermature cataract. Total opacity cases without distinguishable amount of scattering centers consist in 70% of the analyzed cases, where remarkable fissure marks owing to extended areas of fiber

  16. X-ray imaging in advanced studies of ophthalmic diseases.

    PubMed

    Antunes, Andrea; Safatle, Angélica M V; Barros, Paulo S M; Morelhão, Sérgio L

    2006-07-01

    Microscopic characterization of pathological tissues has one major intrinsic limitation, the small sampling areas with respect to the extension of the tissues. Mapping possible changes on vast tissues and correlating them with large ensembles of clinical cases is not a feasible procedure for studying most diseases, as for instance vision loss related diseases and, in particular, the cataract. Although intraocular lens implants are successful treatments, cataract still is a leading public-health issue that grows in importance as the population increases and life expectancy is extended worldwide. In this work we have exploited the radiation-tissue interaction properties of hard x-rays--very low absorption and scattering--to map distinct lesions on entire eye lenses. At the used synchrotron x-ray photon energy of 20 keV (wavelength lambda=0.062 nm), scattering and refraction are angular resolved effects. It allows the employed x-ray image technique to efficiently characterize two types of lesions in eye lenses under cataractogenesis: distributions of tiny scattering centers and extended areas of fiber cell compaction. The data collection procedure is relatively fast; allowing dozens of samples to be totally imaged (scattering, refraction, and mass absorption images) in a single day of synchrotron beam time. More than 60 cases of canine cataract, not correlated to specific causes, were investigated in this first application of x-rays to image entire lenses. Cortical opacity cases, or partial opacity, could be related to the presence of calcificated tissues at the cortical areas, clearly visible in the images, whose elemental contents were verified by micro x-ray fluorescence as very rich in calcium. Calcificated tissues were also observed at nuclear areas in some cases of hypermature cataract. Total opacity cases without distinguishable amount of scattering centers consist in 70% of the analyzed cases, where remarkable fissure marks owing to extended areas of fiber

  17. Scanning Miniature Microscopes without Lenses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Yu

    2009-01-01

    The figure schematically depicts some alternative designs of proposed compact, lightweight optoelectronic microscopes that would contain no lenses and would generate magnified video images of specimens. Microscopes of this type were described previously in Miniature Microscope Without Lenses (NPO - 20218), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 22, No. 8 (August 1998), page 43 and Reflective Variants of Miniature Microscope Without Lenses (NPO 20610), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 26, No. 9 (September 1999), page 6a. To recapitulate: In the design and construction of a microscope of this type, the focusing optics of a conventional microscope are replaced by a combination of a microchannel filter and a charge-coupled-device (CCD) image detector. Elimination of focusing optics reduces the size and weight of the instrument and eliminates the need for the time-consuming focusing operation. The microscopes described in the cited prior articles contained two-dimensional CCDs registered with two-dimensional arrays of microchannels and, as such, were designed to produce full two-dimensional images, without need for scanning. The microscopes of the present proposal would contain one-dimensional (line image) CCDs registered with linear arrays of microchannels. In the operation of such a microscope, one would scan a specimen along a line perpendicular to the array axis (in other words, one would scan in pushbroom fashion). One could then synthesize a full two-dimensional image of the specimen from the line-image data acquired at one-pixel increments of position along the scan. In one of the proposed microscopes, a beam of unpolarized light for illuminating the specimen would enter from the side. This light would be reflected down onto the specimen by a nonpolarizing beam splitter attached to the microchannels at their lower ends. A portion of the light incident on the specimen would be reflected upward, through the beam splitter and along the microchannels, to form an image on the CCD. If the

  18. Observation of Influence of Cataract Surgery on the Ocular Surface

    PubMed Central

    Park, Yuli; Hwang, Hyung Bin; Kim, Hyun Seung

    2016-01-01

    Introduction To evaluate meibomian gland function, changes of lacrimal tears and ocular surface parameters and tear inflammatory mediators following cataract surgery. Methods 48 eyes of 34 patients who underwent uncomplicated phacoemulsification were involved and divided into 2 groups with those who had preexisting dry-eye before cataract surgery and those who did not. Ocular symptom score, Schirmer I test, tear film break-up time (TBUT), corneal sensitivity threshold, corneal staining, inflammatory cytokine activities, lid margin abnormalities, meibum expressibility, meibum quality and meibomian gland imaging were evaluated preoperatively, at 1 day, 1 and 2 months postoperatively. Results Ocular symptom scores were worse at 1 and 2 months postoperatively but, TBUT, corneal staining score and corneal sensitivity threshold showed gradual improvements at 1 month and 2 months postoperatively (p<0.05, respectively). Interestingly there were statistically significant improvements in TBUT, corneal staining score and corneal sensitivity threshold at 1 month postoperatively when topical eye drops were used compared to the period without topical therapy which is the months 2 postoperatively. There were statistically significant decreases in IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, MCP-1, TNF-α and IFN-γ concentrations at 1 and 2 months postoperatively. Lid margin abnormalities, meibum quality and expressibility scores increased significantly (p < 0.05, respectively) at postoperative period. Compared with the no dry eye group, dry eye group revealed significantly higher ocular symptom scores, lower TBUT, higher lid margin abnormalities, meibum quality and expressibility scores after cataract surgery. There were significant correlations between IL-6 and parameters of dry eye, and between MGD parameters and ocular symptom scores. Conclusions Our study revealed that meibomian gland function is influenced after cataract surgery accompanying structural changes and these were correlated with

  19. Effects of magnesium taurate on the onset and progression of galactose-induced experimental cataract: in vivo and in vitro evaluation.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Renu; Iezhitsa, Igor; Awaludin, Nur Adilah; Ahmad Fisol, Nur Farhana; Bakar, Nor Salmah; Agarwal, Puneet; Abdul Rahman, Thuhairah Hasrah; Spasov, Alexander; Ozerov, Alexander; Mohamed Ahmed Salama, Mohamed Salama; Mohd Ismail, Nafeeza

    2013-05-01

    Cataract, a leading cause of blindness, is characterized by lenticular opacities resulting from denaturation of lens proteins due to activation of calcium-dependent enzyme, calpain. Magnesium (Mg(2+)) plays an important role not only in maintaining a low lenticular calcium (Ca(2+)) and sodium concentration but also in preserving the lens redox status. Taurine has also been shown to reduce lenticular oxidative stress. Present study evaluated the anticataract effects of magnesium taurate in vivo and in vitro. Among the five groups of 9 Sprague Dawley rats each, two groups received 30% galactose diet with topical (GDMT) or oral treatment (GDMO) with magnesium taurate. Two groups received 30% galactose diet with topical (GDT) or oral vehicle (GDO). Remaining 1 group received normal diet (ND). Weekly slit lamp examination was done during 21 days experimental period and then all rats were sacrificed; Ca/Mg ratio and antioxidant parameters including reduced glutathione (GSH), catalase and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activities were measured in the isolated lenses using ELISA. In the in vitro study, 2 groups of 10 normal rat lenses were incubated in Dulbecco's Modified Eagle's Medium (DMEM) with galactose while 1 similar group was incubated in DMEM without galactose. In one of the groups, galactose containing medium was supplemented with magnesium taurate. After 48 h of incubation, lenses were photographed and Ca(2+)/Mg(2+) ratio and antioxidant parameters were measured as for in vivo study. The in vivo study, at the end of experimental period, demonstrated delay in the development of cataract with a mean opacity index of 0.53 ± 0.04 and 0.51 ± 0.03 in GDMO (p < 0.05 versus GDO) and GDMT (p < 0.01 versus GDT) respectively. Histopathological grading showed a lower mean value in treated groups, however, the differences from corresponding controls were not significant. Lenticular Ca(2+)/Mg(2+) ratio with a mean value of 1.20 ± 0.26 and 1.05 ± 0.26 in GDMO and GDMT was

  20. Constraining Source Redshift Distributions with Gravitational Lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wittman, D.; Dawson, W. A.

    2012-09-01

    We introduce a new method for constraining the redshift distribution of a set of galaxies, using weak gravitational lensing shear. Instead of using observed shears and redshifts to constrain cosmological parameters, we ask how well the shears around clusters can constrain the redshifts, assuming fixed cosmological parameters. This provides a check on photometric redshifts, independent of source spectral energy distribution properties and therefore free of confounding factors such as misidentification of spectral breaks. We find that ~40 massive (σ v = 1200 km s-1) cluster lenses are sufficient to determine the fraction of sources in each of six coarse redshift bins to ~11%, given weak (20%) priors on the masses of the highest-redshift lenses, tight (5%) priors on the masses of the lowest-redshift lenses, and only modest (20%-50%) priors on calibration and evolution effects. Additional massive lenses drive down uncertainties as N_lens^{-{1\\over 2}}, but the improvement slows as one is forced to use lenses further down the mass function. Future large surveys contain enough clusters to reach 1% precision in the bin fractions if the tight lens-mass priors can be maintained for large samples of lenses. In practice this will be difficult to achieve, but the method may be valuable as a complement to other more precise methods because it is based on different physics and therefore has different systematic errors.

  1. Adherence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to contact lenses

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, M.J.

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to examined the interactions of P. aeruginosa with hydrogel contact lenses and other substrata, and characterize adherence to lenses under various physiological and physicochemical conditions. Isolates adhered to polystyrene, glass, and hydrogel lenses. With certain lens types, radiolabeled cells showed decreased adherence with increasing water content of the lenses, however, this correlation with not found for all lenses. Adherence to rigid gas permeable lenses was markedly greater than adherence to hydrogels. Best adherence occurred near pH 7 and at a sodium chloride concentration of 50 mM. Passive adhesion of heat-killed cells to hydrogels was lower than the adherence obtained of viable cells. Adherence to hydrogels was enhanced by mucin, lactoferrin, lysozyme, IgA, bovine serum albumin, and a mixture of these macromolecules. Adherence to coated and uncoated lenses was greater with a daily-wear hydrogel when compared with an extended-wear hydrogel of similar polymer composition. Greater adherence was attributed to a higher concentration of adsorbed macromolecules on the 45% water-content lens in comparison to the 55% water-content lens.

  2. Investigations of Galaxy Clusters Using Gravitational Lensing

    SciTech Connect

    Wiesner, Matthew P.

    2014-08-01

    In this dissertation, we discuss the properties of galaxy clusters that have been determined using strong and weak gravitational lensing. A galaxy cluster is a collection of galaxies that are bound together by the force of gravity, while gravitational lensing is the bending of light by gravity. Strong lensing is the formation of arcs or rings of light surrounding clusters and weak lensing is a change in the apparent shapes of many galaxies. In this work we examine the properties of several samples of galaxy clusters using gravitational lensing. In Chapter 1 we introduce astrophysical theory of galaxy clusters and gravitational lensing. In Chapter 2 we examine evidence from our data that galaxy clusters are more concentrated than cosmology would predict. In Chapter 3 we investigate whether our assumptions about the number of galaxies in our clusters was valid by examining new data. In Chapter 4 we describe a determination of a relationship between mass and number of galaxies in a cluster at higher redshift than has been found before. In Chapter 5 we describe a model of the mass distribution in one of the ten lensing systems discovered by our group at Fermilab. Finally in Chapter 6 we summarize our conclusions.

  3. Strong Gravitational Lensing: Relativity in Action

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wambsganss, Joachim

    2009-05-01

    Deflection of light by gravity was predicted by Einstein's Theory of General Relativity and observationally confirmed in 1919. In the following decades, various aspects of the gravitational lens effect were explored theoretically, among them measuring the Hubble constant from multiple images of a background source, making use of the magnifying effect as a gravitational telescope, or the possibility of a "relativistic eclipse" as a perfect test of GR. Only in 1979, gravitational lensing became an observational science when the first doubly imaged quasar was discovered. Today lensing is a booming part of astrophysics and cosmology. A whole suite of strong lensing phenomena have been investigated since: multiple quasars, giant luminous arcs, Einstein rings, quasar microlensing, and galactic microlensing. The most recent lensing application is the detection of extrasolar planets. Lensing has contributed significant new results in areas as different as the cosmological distance scale, mass determination of galaxy clusters, physics of quasars, searches for dark matter in galaxy halos, structure of the Milky Way, stellar atmospheres and exoplanets. A guided tour through some of these applications -- with both photometric and astrometric signatures of lensing being discussed -- will illustrate how gravitational lensing has established itself as a very useful universal astrophysical tool.

  4. HST Observations of New Class Gravitational Lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Neal

    1995-07-01

    We propose to examine a few of the very best lens candidates from a new gravitational lens survey, the Cosmic Lens All-Sky Survey (CLASS) made with the VLA. We are virtually certain that we have one new lens system (1600+434) and another (1609+655) has a radio configuration which almost invariably indicates gravitational lensing. The other cases are systems which have a high probability of being lenses (statistically we would expect at least 5 of the 10 objects should be lensed, since we have imaged >3000 radio sources and experience shows that 1 in 500 are lensed). All have separations which make them difficult to study from the ground and therefore uniquely suited to the capabilities of the HST. In this investigation we will study 1600+434 and 1609+655 and attempt to image the lensing galaxy. We will image the remainder in an attempt to confirm their lens status (which requires 0.1" resolution imaging typically) and search for lensing galaxies and/or clusters in those found to be lensed systems.

  5. Effect of high sugar levels on miRNA expression. Studies with galactosemic mice lenses

    PubMed Central

    Kovtun, Svitlana; Hegde, Kavita; Yin, Jing; Ramnath, Jamuna

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Development of cataract is associated with apoptotic death of the lens epithelial cells. The purpose of this investigation was to examine whether this could be explained by enhancement in the expression of certain pro-apoptotic microRNAs (miRs), known to induce apoptosis by hybridizing with target mRNAs, with the consequence of gene silencing. In addition, it was intended to investigate if such expression could be antagonized by reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavengers. Methods CD-1 mice weighing about 20 g were divided into three groups and fed diets, respectively, as follows: Control diet, 25% galactose diet, and 25% galactose diet containing 1% sodium pyruvate. After eight days of such a regimen, the mice were euthanized, their lenses promptly isolated and frozen in liquid nitrogen, and RNAs isolated by extraction with standard methods and converted to cDNAs. The miR-specific cDNAs were then quantified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using a 96-well microRNA array cassette using an ABI 7900 HT PCR machine. The results were then analyzed using Bioscience software. Results The lens samples were positive for all of the 84 miRs expected, on the basis of the specific sequences used for amplification. However, as would be apparent from the microarray plot for the normal and galactosemic lenses, expression of at least 24 apoptotic miRs was upregulated. Six apoptotic miRs were downregulated. In the lenses of animals where the galactose diet was fortified with sodium pyruvate, the expression of 12 miRs was completely prevented. The upregulation observed in the other 14 miRs was also significantly downregulated. A comparison of the galactose and galactose plus pyruvate group clearly indicated that pyruvate inhibits the transcription of apoptotic miRS. Conclusions The prevention of galactose-induced enhancement in the expression of apoptotic miRs by pyruvate, a compound well known to scavenge reactive oxygen species as well as to inhibit their formation

  6. On the delights of being an ex-cataract patient: Visual experiences before and after cataract operations; what they indicate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Nes, Floris L.

    2014-02-01

    This paper is about changes in the author's visual perception over most of his lifetime, but in particular in the period before and after cataract operations. The author was myopic (-3D) until the operations, and emmetropic afterwards - with mild astigmatic aberrations that can be compensated with cylindrical spectacles, but in his case rarely are, because of the convenience of not needing to wear distance glasses in daily life anymore. The perceptual changes concern color vision, stereopsis and visual acuity. The post-cataract changes were partly expected, for example less yellow and more blue images, but partly wholly unexpected, and accompanied by feelings of excitement and pleasure; even delight. These unexpected changes were a sudden, strongly increased depth vision and the sensation of seeing suddenly sharper than ever before, mainly at intermediate viewing distances. The visual acuity changes occur after, exceptionally, his distance glasses are put on. All these sensations lasted or last only for a short time. Those concerning stereopsis were dubbed 'super depth', and were confined to the first two months after the second cataract operation. Those concerning acuity were termed 'super-sharpness impression'; SSI. These can be elicited more or less at will, by putting on the spectacles described; but will then disappear again, although the spectacles are kept on. Ten other ex-cataract patients have been interviewed on their post-operation experiences. The 'super-depth' and SSI experiences may be linked to assumed neurophysiological mechanisms such as the concept of Bayesian reweighting of perceptual criteria.

  7. Three Gravitational Lenses for the Price of One: Enhanced Strong Lensing Through Galaxy Clustering

    SciTech Connect

    Fassnacht, Chris D.; McKean, J.P.; Koopmans, L.V.E.; Treu, T.; Blandford, R.D.; Auger, M.W.; Jeltema, T.E.; Lubin, L.M.; Margoniner, V.E.; Wittman, D.; /UC, Davis /Kapteyn Astron. Inst., Groningen /UC, Santa Barbara /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Carnegie Inst. Observ.

    2006-04-03

    We report the serendipitous discovery of two strong gravitational lens candidates (ACS J160919+6532 and ACS J160910+6532) in deep images obtained with the Advanced Camera for Surveys on the Hubble Space Telescope, each less than 40'' from the previously known gravitational lens system CLASS B1608+656. The redshifts of both lens galaxies have been measured with Keck and Gemini: one is a member of a small galaxy group at z {approx} 0.63, which also includes the lensing galaxy in the B1608+656 system, and the second is a member of a foreground group at z {approx} 0.43. By measuring the effective radii and surface brightnesses of the two lens galaxies, we infer their velocity dispersions based on the passively evolving Fundamental Plane (FP) relation. Elliptical isothermal lens mass models are able to explain their image configurations within the lens hypothesis, with a velocity dispersion compatible with that estimated from the FP for a reasonable source-redshift range. Based on the large number of massive early-type galaxies in the field and the number-density of faint blue galaxies, the presence of two additional lens systems around CLASS B1608+656 is not unlikely in hindsight. Gravitational lens galaxies are predominantly early-type galaxies, which are clustered, and the lensed quasar host galaxies are also clustered. Therefore, obtaining deep high-resolution images of the fields around known strong lens systems is an excellent method of enhancing the probability of finding additional strong gravitational lens systems.

  8. Tevatron Electron Lenses: Design and Operation

    SciTech Connect

    Shiltsev, Vladimir; Bishofberger, Kip; Kamerdzhiev, Vsevolod; Kozub, Sergei; Kufer, Matthew; Kuznetsov, Gennady; Martinez, Alexander; Olson, Marvin; Pfeffer, Howard; Saewert, Greg; Scarpine, Vic; /Fermilab /SLAC /Fermilab /Serpukhov, IHEP /Novosibirsk, IYF /Serpukhov, IHEP /Fermilab

    2008-08-01

    The beam-beam effects have been the dominating sources of beam loss and lifetime limitations in the Tevatron proton-antiproton collider [1]. Electron lenses were originally proposed for compensation of electromagnetic long-range and head-on beam-beam interactions of proton and antiproton beams [2]. Results of successful employment of two electron lenses built and installed in the Tevatron are reported in [3,4,5]. In this paper we present design features of the Tevatron electron lenses (TELs), discuss the generation of electron beams, describe different modes of operation and outline the technical parameters of various subsystems.

  9. Wettability and silicone hydrogel lenses: a review.

    PubMed

    Keir, Nancy; Jones, Lyndon

    2013-01-01

    One of the major breakthroughs in the development of silicone hydrogel contact lenses has related to the ability of manufacturers to overcome the surface hydrophobicity that occurred with silicone elastomer lenses. However, the wettability of silicone hydrogel lenses continues to be of interest as a potential link between in vivo lens performance and contact lens-related comfort. This article will review some of the knowledge we have gained in the area of contact lens wettability over the past decade and will discuss some of the challenges related to its measurement. PMID:23274760

  10. Edge shape and comfort of rigid lenses.

    PubMed

    La Hood, D

    1988-08-01

    One of the main factors determining the comfort of a rigid contact lens is the shape of the edge. The comfort of four different contact lens edge shapes was assessed with four unadapted subjects in a randomized masked trial. Lenses with well rounded anterior edge profiles were found to be significantly more comfortable than lenses with square anterior edges. There was no significant difference in subjective comfort between a rounded and square posterior edge profile. The results suggest that the interaction of the edge with the eyelid is more important in determining comfort than edge effects on the cornea, when lenses are fitted according to a corneal alignment philosophy. PMID:3177585

  11. Twin axial vortices generated by Fibonacci lenses.

    PubMed

    Calatayud, Arnau; Ferrando, Vicente; Remón, Laura; Furlan, Walter D; Monsoriu, Juan A

    2013-04-22

    Optical vortex beams, generated by Diffractive Optical Elements (DOEs), are capable of creating optical traps and other multi-functional micromanipulators for very specific tasks in the microscopic scale. Using the Fibonacci sequence, we have discovered a new family of DOEs that inherently behave as bifocal vortex lenses, and where the ratio of the two focal distances approaches the golden mean. The disctintive optical properties of these Fibonacci vortex lenses are experimentally demonstrated. We believe that the versatility and potential scalability of these lenses may allow for new applications in micro and nanophotonics. PMID:23609732

  12. Congenital Cataract: Progress in Surgical Treatment and Postoperative Recovery of Visual Function.

    PubMed

    Wang, Mingyue; Xiao, Wei

    2015-03-01

    Congenital cataract is a common cause of childhood low vision or blindness worldwide. Early surgery should be performed in sensitive vision development period to avoid vision deprivation in cases of strabismus and nystagmus development. Postoperative recovery of visual function is of great significance for these patients and should include proper postoperative aphakia correction by the application of a contact lens and secondary implantation of an intraocular lens (IOL). Patients should receive amblyopic training after surgery to improve their postoperative visual acuity. Although recent advances in surgery techniques and materials have brought better postoperative visual acuity and less complications, a few postoperative complications can still hamper vision condition and vision development, including posterior capsule opacification and secondary glaucoma. Surgery in early infancy are risk factors for these two complications. Life-long follow-up is essential for these patients. Further study will continue to address the surgery timing issue and methods that prevent postoperative complications. PMID:26390798

  13. Citric acid inhibits development of cataracts, proteinuria and ketosis in streptozotocin (type 1) diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Ryoji; Nagai, Mime; Shimasaki, Satoko; Baynes, John W; Fujiwara, Yukio

    2010-02-26

    Although many fruits such as lemon and orange contain citric acid, little is known about beneficial effects of citric acid on health. Here we measured the effect of citric acid on the pathogenesis of diabetic complications in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. Although oral administration of citric acid to diabetic rats did not affect blood glucose concentration, it delayed the development of cataracts, inhibited accumulation of advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) such as N(epsilon)-(carboxyethyl)lysine (CEL) and N(epsilon)-(carboxymethyl)lysine (CML) in lens proteins, and protected against albuminuria and ketosis. We also show that incubation of protein with acetol, a metabolite formed from acetone by acetone monooxygenase, generate CEL, suggesting that inhibition of ketosis by citric acid may lead to the decrease in CEL in lens proteins. These results demonstrate that the oral administration of citric acid ameliorates ketosis and protects against the development of diabetic complications in an animal model of type 1 diabetes.

  14. A comparison of patient pain and visual outcome using topical anesthesia versus regional anesthesia during cataract surgery

    PubMed Central

    Hosoda, Yoshikatsu; Kuriyama, Shoji; Jingami, Yoko; Hattori, Hidetsugu; Hayashi, Hisako; Matsumoto, Miho

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to compare the level of patient pain during the phacoemulsification and implantation of foldable intraocular lenses while under topical, intracameral, or sub-Tenon lidocaine. Patients and methods This was a retrospective study. Three hundred and one eyes subjected to cataract surgery were included in this study. All eyes underwent phacoemulsification surgery and intraocular lens implantation using topical, sub-Tenon, or intracameral anesthesia. The topical group received 4% lidocaine drops, and the intracameral group received a 0.1–0.2 cc infusion of 1% preservative-free lidocaine into the anterior chamber through the side port combined with topical drops of lidocaine. The sub-Tenon group received 2% lidocaine. Best-corrected visual acuity, corneal endothelial cell loss, and intraoperative pain level were evaluated. Pain level was assessed on a visual analog scale (range 0–2). Results There were no significant differences in visual outcome and corneal endothelial cell loss between the three groups. The mean pain score in the sub-Tenon group was significantly lower than that in the topical and intracameral groups (P=0.0009 and P=0.0055, respectively). In 250 eyes without high myopia (< −6D), there were no significant differences in mean pain score between the sub-Tenon and intracameral groups (P=0.1417). No additional anesthesia was required in all groups. Conclusion Intracameral lidocaine provides sufficient pain suppressive effects in eyes without high myopia, while sub-Tenon anesthesia is better for cataract surgery in eyes with high myopia. PMID:27382247

  15. Degeneracy between Lensing and Occultation in the Analysis of Self-lensing Phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Cheongho

    2016-03-01

    More than 40 years after the first discussion, the detection of a self-lensing phenomenon within a binary system where the brightness of a background star is magnified by its foreground companion was recently reported. It is expected that the number of self-lensing binary detections will be increased by a wealth of data from current and future survey experiments. In this paper, we introduce a degeneracy in the interpretation of self-lensing light curves. The degeneracy is intrinsic to self-lensing binaries for which both magnification by lensing and de-magnification by occultation occur simultaneously and are caused by the difficulty in separating the contribution of the lensing-induced magnification from the observed light curve. We demonstrate the severity of this degeneracy by presenting examples of self-lensing light curves that suffer from it. We also present the relation between the lensing parameters of the degenerate solutions. This degeneracy is an important obstacle in accurately determining self-lensing parameters and thus characterizing binaries.

  16. A 7 deg2 survey for galaxy-scale gravitational lenses with the HST imaging archive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pawase, R. S.; Courbin, F.; Faure, C.; Kokotanekova, R.; Meylan, G.

    2014-04-01

    We present the results of a visual search for galaxy-scale gravitational lenses in ˜7 deg2 of Hubble Space Telescope (HST) images. The data set comprises the whole imaging data ever taken with the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) in the filter F814W (I-band) up to 2011 August 31, i.e. 6.03 deg2 excluding the field of the Cosmic Evolution Survey which has been the subject of a separate visual search. In addition, we have searched for lenses in the whole Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) near-IR imaging data set in all filters (1.01 deg2) up to the same date. Our primary goal is to provide a sample of lenses with a broad range of different morphologies and lens-source brightness contrast in order to estimate a lower limit to the number of galaxy-scale strong lenses in the future Euclid survey in its VIS band. Our criteria to select lenses are purely morphological as we do not use any colour or redshift information. The final candidate selection is very conservative hence leading to a nearly pure but incomplete sample. We find 49 new lens candidates: 40 in the ACS images and 9 in the WFC3 images. Out of these, 16 candidates are secure lenses owing to their striking morphology, 21 more are very good candidates and 12 more have morphologies compatible with gravitational lensing but also compatible with other astrophysical objects such as ring and chain galaxies or mergers. Interestingly, some lens galaxies include low surface brightness galaxies, compact groups and mergers. The imaging data set is heterogeneous in depth and spans a broad range of galactic latitudes. It is therefore insensitive to cosmic variance and allows us to estimate the number of galaxy-scale strong lenses on the sky for a putative survey depth, which is the main result of this work. Because of the incompleteness of the sample, the estimated lensing rates should be taken as lower limits. Using these, we anticipate that a 15 000 deg2 space survey such as Euclid will find at least 60 000 galaxy

  17. Gravitational lensing of active galactic nuclei.

    PubMed Central

    Hewitt, J N

    1995-01-01

    Most of the known cases of strong gravitational lensing involve multiple imaging of an active galactic nucleus. The properties of lensed active galactic nuclei make them promising systems for astrophysical applications of gravitational lensing; in particular, they show structure on scales of milliseconds of arc to tens of seconds of arc, they are variable, and they are polarized. More than 20 cases of strong gravitational lenses are now known, and about half of them are radio sources. High-resolution radio imaging is making possible the development of well-constrained lens models. Variability studies at radio and optical wavelengths are beginning to yield results of astrophysical interest, such as an independent measure of the distance scale and limits on source sizes. PMID:11607613

  18. Nanofocusing Parabolic Refractive X-Ray Lenses

    SciTech Connect

    Schroer, C.G.; Kuhlmann, M.; Hunger, U.T.; Guenzler, T.F.; Kurapova, O.; Feste, S.; Lengeler, B.; Drakopoulos, M.; Somogyi, A.; Simionovici, A. S.; Snigirev, A.; Snigireva, I.

    2004-05-12

    Parabolic refractive x-ray lenses with short focal distance can generate intensive hard x-ray microbeams with lateral extensions in the 100nm range even at short distance from a synchrotron radiation source. We have fabricated planar parabolic lenses made of silicon that have a focal distance in the range of a few millimeters at hard x-ray energies. In a crossed geometry, two lenses were used to generate a microbeam with a lateral size of 330nm by 110nm at 25keV in a distance of 41.8m from the synchrotron radiation source. First microdiffraction and fluorescence microtomography experiments were carried out with these lenses. Using diamond as lens material, microbeams with lateral size down to 20nm and below are conceivable in the energy range from 10 to 100keV.

  19. Contact lenses and the work environment.

    PubMed

    Mäkitie, J

    1984-01-01

    Controversial opinions have been presented about the use of contact lenses in industrial environments. Work environments contain few obstacles to the use of contact lenses, but many occupations are associated with the risk of excessive difficulties, spoilation , irritation, or complications. From the radiant energy the shorter (280 nm) ultraviolet (UV) wavelengths and the longer (1300 nm) infra-red (IR) wavelengths are absorbed by contact lenses, the absorption increases their temperature and may cause corneal complications. Protective glasses, however, absorb more than 99.5% of the UV and IR energy and thus provide sufficient protection for contact lens wearers exposed to UV or IR radiation. The advantages and risks of contact lenses in industrial work are discussed. PMID:6328841

  20. Tear exchange and contact lenses: a review.

    PubMed

    Muntz, Alex; Subbaraman, Lakshman N; Sorbara, Luigina; Jones, Lyndon

    2015-01-01

    Tear exchange beneath a contact lens facilitates ongoing fluid replenishment between the ocular surface and the lens. This exchange is considerably lower during the wear of soft lenses compared with rigid lenses. As a result, the accumulation of tear film debris and metabolic by-products between the cornea and a soft contact lens increases, potentially leading to complications. Lens design innovations have been proposed, but no substantial improvement in soft lens tear exchange has been reported. Researchers have determined post-lens tear exchange using several methods, notably fluorophotometry. However, due to technological limitations, little remains known about tear hydrodynamics around the lens and, to-date, true tear exchange with contact lenses has not been shown. Further knowledge regarding tear exchange could be vital in aiding better contact lens design, with the prospect of alleviating certain adverse ocular responses. This article reviews the literature to-date on the significance, implications and measurement of tear exchange with contact lenses.

  1. Tangential Velocity of the Dark Matter in the Bullet Cluster from Precise Lensed Image Redshifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molnar, Sandor M.; Broadhurst, Tom; Umetsu, Keiichi; Zitrin, Adi; Rephaeli, Yoel; Shimon, Meir

    2013-09-01

    We show that the fast-moving component of the "Bullet Cluster" (1E0657-56) can induce potentially resolvable redshift differences between multiply lensed images of background galaxies. This moving cluster effect, due to the tangential peculiar velocity of the lens, can be expressed as the scalar product of the lensing deflection angle with the tangential velocity of the mass components; the effect is maximal for clusters colliding in the plane of the sky with velocities boosted by their mutual gravity. The Bullet Cluster is likely to be the best candidate for the first measurement of this effect due to the large collision velocity and because the lensing deflection and the cluster fields can be calculated in advance. We derive the deflection field using multiply lensed background galaxies detected with the Hubble Space Telescope. The velocity field is modeled using self-consistent N-body/hydrodynamical simulations constrained by the observed X-ray and gravitational lensing features of this system. We predict that the triply lensed images of systems "G" and "H" straddling the critical curve of the bullet component will show the largest frequency shifts up to ~0.5 km s-1. These shifts are within the range of the Atacama Large Millimeter/Submillimeter Array for molecular emission, and are near the resolution limit of the new generation high-throughput optical-IR spectrographs. The detection of this effect measures the tangential motion of the subclusters directly, thereby clarifying the tension with ΛCDM, which is inferred from the gas motion less directly. This method may be extended to smaller redshift differences using the Lyα forest toward QSOs lensed by more typical clusters of galaxies. More generally, the tangential component of the peculiar velocities of clusters derived by our method complements the radial component determined by the kinematic Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect, providing a full three-dimensional description of velocities.

  2. TANGENTIAL VELOCITY OF THE DARK MATTER IN THE BULLET CLUSTER FROM PRECISE LENSED IMAGE REDSHIFTS

    SciTech Connect

    Molnar, Sandor M.; Broadhurst, Tom; Zitrin, Adi; Rephaeli, Yoel; Shimon, Meir

    2013-09-01

    We show that the fast-moving component of the ''Bullet Cluster'' (1E0657-56) can induce potentially resolvable redshift differences between multiply lensed images of background galaxies. This moving cluster effect, due to the tangential peculiar velocity of the lens, can be expressed as the scalar product of the lensing deflection angle with the tangential velocity of the mass components; the effect is maximal for clusters colliding in the plane of the sky with velocities boosted by their mutual gravity. The Bullet Cluster is likely to be the best candidate for the first measurement of this effect due to the large collision velocity and because the lensing deflection and the cluster fields can be calculated in advance. We derive the deflection field using multiply lensed background galaxies detected with the Hubble Space Telescope. The velocity field is modeled using self-consistent N-body/hydrodynamical simulations constrained by the observed X-ray and gravitational lensing features of this system. We predict that the triply lensed images of systems ''G'' and ''H'' straddling the critical curve of the bullet component will show the largest frequency shifts up to {approx}0.5 km s{sup -1}. These shifts are within the range of the Atacama Large Millimeter/Submillimeter Array for molecular emission, and are near the resolution limit of the new generation high-throughput optical-IR spectrographs. The detection of this effect measures the tangential motion of the subclusters directly, thereby clarifying the tension with {Lambda}CDM, which is inferred from the gas motion less directly. This method may be extended to smaller redshift differences using the Ly{alpha} forest toward QSOs lensed by more typical clusters of galaxies. More generally, the tangential component of the peculiar velocities of clusters derived by our method complements the radial component determined by the kinematic Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect, providing a full three-dimensional description of

  3. δ-Catenin Is Genetically and Biologically Associated with Cortical Cataract and Future Alzheimer-Related Structural and Functional Brain Changes

    PubMed Central

    Jun, Gyungah; Moncaster, Juliet A.; Koutras, Carolina; Seshadri, Sudha; Buros, Jacqueline; McKee, Ann C.; Levesque, Georges; Wolf, Philip A.; St. George-Hyslop, Peter; Goldstein, Lee E.; Farrer, Lindsay A.

    2012-01-01

    Multiple lines of evidence suggest that specific subtypes of age-related cataract (ARC) and Alzheimer disease (AD) are related etiologically. To identify shared genetic factors for ARC and AD, we estimated co-heritability of quantitative measures of cataract subtypes with AD-related brain MRI traits among 1,249 members of the Framingham Eye Study who had a brain MRI scan approximately ten years after the eye exam. Cortical cataract (CC) was found to be co-heritable with future development of AD and with several MRI traits, especially temporal horn volume (THV, ρ = 0.24, P<10−4). A genome-wide association study using 187,657 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) for the bivariate outcome of CC and THV identified genome-wide significant association with CTNND2 SNPs rs17183619, rs13155993 and rs13170756 (P<2.6×10−7). These SNPs were also significantly associated with bivariate outcomes of CC and scores on several highly heritable neuropsychological tests (5.7×10−9≤P<3.7×10−6). Statistical interaction was demonstrated between rs17183619 and APP SNP rs2096488 on CC (P = 0.0015) and CC-THV (P = 0.038). A rare CTNND2 missense mutation (G810R) 249 base pairs from rs17183619 altered δ-catenin localization and increased secreted amyloid-β1–42 in neuronal cell culture. Immunohistopathological analysis of lens tissue obtained from two autopsy-confirmed AD subjects and two non-AD controls revealed elevated expression of δ-catenin in epithelial and cortical regions of lenses from AD subjects compared to controls. Our findings suggest that genetic variation in delta catenin may underlie both cortical lens opacities in mid-life and subsequent MRI and cognitive changes that presage the development of AD. PMID:22984439

  4. Revised Unfilling Procedure for Solid Lithium Lenses

    SciTech Connect

    Leveling, A.; /Fermilab

    2003-06-03

    A procedure for unfilling used lithium lenses to has been described in Pbar Note 664. To date, the procedure has been used to disassemble lenses 20, 21, 17, 18, and 16. As a result of this work, some parts of the original procedure were found to be time consuming and ineffective. Modifications to the original procedure have been made to streamline the process and are discussed in this note. The revised procedure is included in this note.

  5. Measuring neutrino masses with weak lensing

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Yvonne Y. Y.

    2006-11-17

    Weak gravitational lensing of distant galaxies by large scale structure (LSS) provides an unbiased way to map the matter distribution in the low redshift universe. This technique, based on the measurement of small distortions in the images of the source galaxies induced by the intervening LSS, is expected to become a key cosmological probe in the future. We discuss how future lensing surveys can probe the sum of the neutrino masses at the 0 05 eV level.

  6. Adherence of Staphylococcus epidermidis to intraocular lenses.

    PubMed Central

    Griffiths, P. G.; Elliot, T. S.; McTaggart, L.

    1989-01-01

    We have demonstrated, with an in vitro model, that Staphylococcus epidermidis is able to colonise intraocular lenses. Adherent organisms were quantitated by light microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and viable counting. Bacterial adherence was associated with production of a polysaccharide glycocalyx. Organisms which were attached to the lenses were resistant to apparently bactericidal concentrations of antibiotics, as determined by conventional testing. We speculate on the role of colonisation in the pathogenesis of endophthalmitis. Images PMID:2751971

  7. Electron lenses for particle collimation in LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Shiltsev, v.; /Fermilab

    2007-12-01

    Electron Lenses built and installed in Tevatron have proven themselves as safe and very reliable instruments which can be effectively used in hadron collider operation for a number of applications, including compensation of beam-beam effects [1], DC beam removal from abort gaps [2], as a diagnostic tool. In this presentation we - following original proposal [3] - consider in more detail a possibility of using electron lenses with hollow electron beam for ion and proton collimation in LHC.

  8. Partitioned-field uniaxial holographic lenses.

    PubMed

    López, Ana M; Atencia, Jesús; Tornos, José; Quintanilla, Manuel

    2002-04-01

    The efficiency and aberration of partitioned-field uniaxial volume holographic compound lenses are theoretically and experimentally studied. These systems increase the image fields of holographic volume lenses, limited by the angular selectivity that is typical of these elements. At the same time, working with uniaxial systems has led to a decrease in aberration because two recording points (that behave as aberration-free points) are used. The extension of the image field is experimentally proved.

  9. The structural alteration and aggregation propensity of glycated lens crystallins in the presence of calcium: Importance of lens calcium homeostasis in development of diabetic cataracts.

    PubMed

    Zm, Sara Zafaranchi; Khoshaman, Kazem; Masoudi, Raheleh; Hemmateenejad, Bahram; Yousefi, Reza

    2017-01-01

    The imbalance of the calcium homeostasis in the lenticular tissues of diabetic patients is an important risk factor for development of cataract diseases. In the current study, the impact of elevated levels of calcium ions were investigated on structure and aggregation propensity of glycated lens crystallins using gel electrophoresis and spectroscopic assessments. The glycated proteins indicated significant resistance against calcium-induced structural insults and aggregation. While, glycated crystallins revealed an increased conformational stability; a slight instability was observed for these proteins upon interaction with calcium ions. Also, in the presence of calcium, the proteolytic pattern of native crystallins was altered and that of glycated protein counterparts remained almost unchanged. According to results of this study it is suggested that the structural alteration of lens crystallins upon glycation may significantly reduce their calcium buffering capacity in eye lenses. Therefore, under chronic hyperglycemia accumulation of this cataractogenic metal ion in the lenticular tissues may subsequently culminate in activation of different pathogenic pathways, leading to development of lens opacity and cataract diseases. PMID:27434877

  10. Factors influencing bacterial adhesion to contact lenses

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Debarun; Willcox, Mark

    2012-01-01

    The process of any contact lens related keratitis generally starts with the adhesion of opportunistic pathogens to contact lens surface. This article focuses on identifying the factors which have been reported to affect bacterial adhesion to contact lenses. Adhesion to lenses differs between various genera/species/strains of bacteria. Pseudomonas aeruginosa, which is the predominant causative organism, adheres in the highest numbers to both hydrogel and silicone hydrogel lenses in vitro. The adhesion of this strain reaches maximum numbers within 1h in most in vitro studies and a biofilm has generally formed within 24 h of cells adhering to the lens surface. Physical and chemical properties of contact lens material affect bacterial adhesion. The water content of hydroxyethylmethacrylate (HEMA)-based lenses and their iconicity affect the ability of bacteria to adhere. The higher hydrophobicity of silicone hydrogel lenses compared to HEMA-based lenses has been implicated in the higher numbers of bacteria that can adhere to their surfaces. Lens wear has different effects on bacterial adhesion, partly due to differences between wearers, responses of bacterial strains and the ability of certain tear film proteins when bound to a lens surface to kill certain types of bacteria. PMID:22259220

  11. Strong gravitational lensing: relativity in action

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wambsganss, Joachim

    2010-01-01

    Deflection of light by gravity was predicted by Einstein's Theory of General Relativity and observationally confirmed in 1919. In the following decades, various aspects of the gravitational lens effect were explored theoretically, among them measuring the Hubble constant from multiple images of a background source, making use of the magnifying effect as a gravitational telescope, or the possibility of a “relativistic eclipse” as a perfect test of GR. Only in 1979, gravitational lensing became an observational science when the first doubly imaged quasar was discovered. Today lensing is a booming part of astrophysics and cosmology. A whole suite of strong lensing phenomena have been investigated: multiple quasars, giant luminous arcs, Einstein rings, quasar microlensing, and galactic microlensing. The most recent lensing application is the detection of extrasolar planets. Lensing has contributed significant new results in areas as different as the cosmological distance scale, mass determination of galaxy clusters, physics of quasars, searches for dark matter in galaxy halos, structure of the Milky Way, stellar atmospheres and exoplanets. A guided tour through some of these applications will illustrate how gravitational lensing has established itself as a very useful universal astrophysical tool.

  12. Statistics of gravitational lenses - The uncertainties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mao, Shude

    1991-01-01

    The assumptions in the analysis of gravitational lensing statistics are examined. Special emphasis is given to the uncertainties in the theoretical predictions. It is shown that a simple redshift cutoff model, which may result from galaxy evolution, can significantly reduce the lensing probability and explain the large mean separation of images in observed gravitational lenses. This effect may affect the constraint on the contribution of the cosmological constant to producing a flat universe from the number counts of the observed lenses. For the Omega(0) = 1 (filled beam) model, the lensing probability of early-type galaxies with finite core radii is reduced roughly by a factor of 2 for high-redshift quasars as compared with the corresponding singular isothermal sphere model. The finite core radius effect is about 20 percent for a lambda-dominated flat universe. It is also shown that the most recent galaxy luminosity function gives lensing probabilities that are smaller than previously estimated roughly by a factor of 3.

  13. Locus for a human hereditary cataract is closely linked to the. gamma. -crystallin gene family

    SciTech Connect

    Lubsen, N.H.; Renwick, J.H.; Tsui, L.C.; Breitman, M.L.; Schoenmakers, J.G.G.

    1987-01-01

    Within the human ..gamma..-crystallin gene cluster polymorphic Taq I sites are present. These give rise to three sets of allelic fragments from the ..gamma..-crystallin genes. Together these restriction fragment length polymorphisms define eight possible haplotypes, three of which (Q, R, and S) were found in the Dutch and English population. A fourth haplotype (P) was detected within a family in which a hereditary Coppock-like cataract of the embryonic lens nucleus occurs in heterozygotes. Haplotype P was found only in family members who suffered from cataract, and all family members who suffered from cataract had haplotype P. The absolute correlation between the presence of haplotype P and cataract within this family shows that the ..gamma..-crystallin gene cluster and the locus for the Coppock-like cataract are closely linked. This linkage provides genetic evidence that the primary cause of a cataract in humans could possibly be a lesion in a crystallin gene.

  14. Craniofacial Microsomia: Goldenhar Syndrome in Association with Bilateral Congenital Cataract

    PubMed Central

    Shrestha, U. D.; Adhikari, S.

    2015-01-01

    Craniofacial microsomia (CFM) includes a spectrum of malformations primarily involving structures derived from the first and second branchial arches. Patients with hemifacial microsomia and epibulbar dermoids are said to have Goldenhar syndrome (GHS). Four-month-old boy with whitish pupillary reflex presented with the features of GHS in pediatric ophthalmology clinic. The child had ocular and auricular manifestations. There were no vertebral anomalies, but he had bilateral congenital cataract. The peculiarity of this case is the presence of the bilateral total congenital cataract, in association with CFM. There is absence of epibulbar dermoid or lipodermoid in the eyes, although the child had features of GHS. In addition to it, anesthetic intubation was smooth in this case. Any case diagnosed with CFM and/or GHS needs treatment through multidisciplinary approach, consultation in ophthalmology department is one of them. PMID:26635984

  15. Relationship between cataracts and epilation in atomic bomb survivors

    SciTech Connect

    Neriishi, Kazuo; Otake, Masanori; Kodama, Kazunori

    1995-10-01

    Among 1713 atomic bomb survivors who underwent ophthalmological examinations from 1963-1964, the risk of cataract formation per unit dose of radiation was significantly greater for those who reported hair loss of 67% or more after exposure (the epilation group) than for those who reported less or no hair loss (the no-epilation group) (P,0.01). Such an epilation effect has also been associated with leukemia mortality and the frequency of chromosome aberrations. Although this might be interpreted as indicating differential sensitivity to radiation between the epilation group and the no-epilation group, it could also be explained by imprecision in dose estimates. We have calculated that a 48% random error in DS86 dose estimates could be in accordance with the dose-response relationship for the prevalence of cataracts in the epilation group or the no-epilation group. Possible mechanisms for variations in radiosensitivity are discussed. 37 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  16. [Perspectives on Benito Perez Galdós' cataracts].

    PubMed

    Hernández, Manuel Herrera

    2007-01-01

    Galdós started with sight troubles before he was 40 years old. Later, he suffered an iritis and he had more marked cataract in his left eye. When he was 62 years old he suffered a transitory hemiplegia. In 1911 and in 1912 he was operated on for cataracts by the Dr. M. Márquez. At the same time, he presented joint pain, lightning pain especially in their lower extremities, ataxic gait, Romberg's sign, complete blindness and the impossibility of standing up, as a result he had to stay in the bed until his death. I think that Galdós suffered from tertiary syphilis (late) manifested by tabetic neurolues and ocular syphilis, which was the cause of his blindness, and besides arterioloesclerosis and hypertension.

  17. Growth and survival of stocked lake trout with nuclear cataracts in Lake Ontario

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kincaid, Harold L.; Elrod, Joseph H.

    1991-01-01

    Four strains of yearling lake trout Salvelinus namaycush from the 1985 and 1986 year-classes at the Allegheny National Fish Hatchery were evaluated for nuclear cataracts prior to stocking in Lake Ontario in June 1986 and 1987. Lake trout recaptured by bottom trawling from April to August 1987 and 1988 were examined for cataracts. Cataract frequencies in three strains of yearling lake trout at stocking in 1986 and after 14 and 26 months in the lake were: Seneca Lake–35, 24, and 29%; Lake Ontario–32,24, and 42%; and Lake Superior–7,4, and 6%. Cataract frequencies for yearlings at stocking in 1987 and after 2 and 14 months were: Seneca Lake–51, 37, and 51 %; Lake Superior–7,12, and 12%; and Jenny Lake–46,13, and 36%. Cataract frequency was lower (P < 0.05) at capture in three of the six groups recaptured in 1987 and in two of the six groups in 1988. Fish with cataracts in the 1987 recovery had survival ratios of 17–186% after 2 months in the lake and 48–67% after 14 months, compared with normal-eyed fish of the same strain. Nuclear cataract frequency was relatively stable after the first year of lake residency, when equilibrium was achieved between the increased mortality of cataract phenotypes and the rate of cataract development in normal-eyed phenotypes. Within groups, weight and length were not different between healthy fish and fish with cataracts. The absence of growth depression in fish with cataracts and the reduced survival rate suggested that faster growing fish were more susceptible to cataract formation.

  18. Geriatric vision loss due to cataracts, macular degeneration, and glaucoma.

    PubMed

    Eichenbaum, Joseph W

    2012-01-01

    The major causes of impaired vision in the elderly population of the United States are cataracts, macular degeneration, and open-angle glaucoma. Cataracts and macular degeneration usually reduce central vision, especially reading and near activities, whereas chronic glaucoma characteristically attacks peripheral vision in a silent way, impacting balance, walking, and driving. Untreated, these visual problems lead to issues with regard to taking medications, keeping track of finances and personal information, walking, watching television, and attending the theater, and often create social isolation. Thus, visually impaired individuals enter nursing homes 3 years earlier, have twice the risk of falling, and have 4× the risk of hip fracture. Consequently, many elderly with low vision exercise greater demands on community services. With the prospect of little improvement and sustained visual loss, in the face of poor tolerance of low-vision services and not accepting magnification as the only way to read, clinical depression is common. In many instances, however, early and accurate diagnosis can result in timely treatment and can preserve quality of life. This review will look at current diagnostic and therapeutic considerations. Currently, about 20.5 million people in the United States have cataracts. The number will reach 30 million by 2020. About 1.75 million Americans currently have some form of macular degeneration, and the number is estimated to increase to 2.95 million in 2020. Approximately 2.2 million Americans have glaucoma, and by 2020 that number is estimated to be close to 3.4 million people. It is projected that by 2030 there will be 72.1 million seniors. With some overlap of the above 3 groups conservatively estimated (if you add the 2030 cataract group to the macular degeneration and glaucoma groups), then about 1 in 2 senior individuals by 2030 may have some significant ocular disease, which could account for about 50% of the healthcare budget for the

  19. Cataract surgery and methods of wound closure: a review

    PubMed Central

    Matossian, Cynthia; Makari, Sarah; Potvin, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Clear corneal incisions are routinely used in cataract surgery, but watertight wound closure may not always be achieved, which can increase the risk for anterior chamber fluid egress or ocular surface fluid ingress. A new US Food and Drug Administration-approved ocular sealant appears to have good efficacy in sealing clear corneal incisions; its use may be indicated when wound integrity is in question. PMID:26045656

  20. Long-term renormalization of chromatic mechanisms following cataract surgery

    PubMed Central

    Delahunt, Peter B.; Webster, Michael A.; Ma, Lei; Werner, John S.

    2008-01-01

    The optical density of the human crystalline lens progressively increases with age, the greatest increase in the visible spectrum being at short wavelengths. This produces a gradual shift in the spectral distribution of the light reaching the retina, yet color appearance remains relatively stable across the life span, implying that the visual system adapts to compensate for changes in spectral sensitivity. We explored properties of this adaptive renormalization by measuring changes in color appearance following cataract surgery. When the lens is removed, cataract patients often report a large perceptual shift in color appearance that can last for months. This change in color appearance was quantified for four cataract patients (63–84 years) by determining the chromaticity of stimuli that appeared achromatic before surgery, and at various intervals after surgery for up to 1 year. Stimuli were presented on a calibrated CRT as 9.5-deg spots, with 3-s duration and 3-s interstimulus intervals (ISIs). Chromaticity was adjusted by the subjects in CIE L*a*b* color space with luminance fixed at 32 cd/m2, on a dark background. We also estimated the optical density of the cataractous lens by comparing absolute scotopic thresholds from 410 nm to 600 nm before and after surgery. The results demonstrated that immediately following surgery there is a large increase in the short-wave light reaching the retina, mainly below 500 nm. The achromatic settings generally showed an initial large shift in the “yellow” direction after surgery that gradually (but never fully) returned to the original achromatic point before surgery. The shifts in the achromatic point occur over a number of months and appear to occur independently of the fellow eye. PMID:15518204