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Sample records for advanced ckd patients

  1. Phase I Study of CKD-516, a Novel Vascular Disrupting Agent, in Patients with Advanced Solid Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Do-Youn; Kim, Tae-Min; Han, Sae-Won; Shin, Dong-Yeop; Lee, Yun Gyoo; Lee, Keun-Wook; Kim, Jee Hyun; Kim, Tae-You; Jang, In-Jin; Lee, Jong-Seok; Bang, Yung-Jue

    2016-01-01

    Purpose CKD-516 is a newly developed vascular disrupting agent. This phase I dose-escalation study of CKD-516 was conducted to determine maximum-tolerated dose (MTD), safety, pharmacokinetics, and preliminary antitumor efficacy in patients with advanced solid tumors. Materials and Methods Patients received CKD-516 intravenously on D1 and D8 every 3 weeks, in a standard 3+3 design. Safety was evaluated by National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events ver. 4.02 and response was assessed by Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumor ver. 1.1. Results Twenty-three patients were treated with CKD-516 at seven dosing levels: 1 mg/m2/day (n=3), 2 mg/m2/day (n=3), 3.3 mg/m2/day (n=3), 5 mg/m2/day (n=3), 7 mg/m2/day (n=3), 9 mg/m2/day (n=6), and 12 mg/m2/day (n=2). Mean age was 54 and 56.5% of patients were male. Two dose-limiting toxicities, which were both grade 3 hypertension, were observed in two patients at 12 mg/m2/day. The MTD was determined as 12 mg/m2/day. Most common adverse events were gastrointestinal adverse events (diarrhea, 34.8% [30.4% grade 1/2, 13.0% grade 3]; nausea, 21.7% [all grade 1/2]; vomiting, 21.7% [all grade 1/2]), myalgia (17.4%, all grade 1/2), and abdominal pain (21.7% [21.7% grade 1/2, 4.3% grade 3]). The pharmacokinetic study showed the dose-linearity of all dosing levels. Among 23 patients, six patients (26.1%) showed stable disease. Median progression-free survival was 39 days (95% confidence interval, 37 to 41 days). Conclusion This study demonstrates feasibility of CKD-516, novel vascular disrupting agent, in patients with advanced solid tumor. MTD of CKD-516 was defined as 12 mg/m2/day on D1 and D8 every 3 weeks. PMID:25715767

  2. Patient Survival and Costs on Moderately Restricted Low-Protein Diets in Advanced CKD: Equivalent Survival at Lower Costs?

    PubMed Central

    Piccoli, Giorgina Barbara; Nazha, Marta; Capizzi, Irene; Vigotti, Federica Neve; Mongilardi, Elena; Bilocati, Marilisa; Avagnina, Paolo; Versino, Elisabetta

    2016-01-01

    The indications for delaying the start of dialysis have revived interest in low-protein diets (LPDs). In this observational prospective study, we enrolled all patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) who followed a moderately restricted LPD in 2007–2015 in a nephrology unit in Italy: 449 patients, 847 years of observation. At the start of the diet, the median glomerular filtration rate (GFR) was 20 mL/min, the median age was 70, the median Charlson Index was 7. Standardized mortality rates for the “on-diet” population were significantly lower than for patients on dialysis (United States Renal Data System (USRDS): 0.44 (0.36–0.54); Italian Dialysis Registry: 0.73 (0.59–0.88); French Dialysis Registry 0.70 (0.57–0.85)). Considering only the follow-up at low GFR (≤15 mL/min), survival remained significantly higher than in the USRDS, and was equivalent to the Italian and French registries, with an advantage in younger patients. Below the e-GFR of 15 mL/min, 50% of the patients reached a dialysis-free follow-up of ≥2 years; 25% have been dialysis-free for five years. Considering an average yearly cost of about 50,000 Euros for dialysis and 1200 Euros for the diet, and different hypotheses of “spared” dialysis years, treating 100 patients on a moderately restricted LPD would allow saving one to four million Euros. Therefore, our study suggests that in patients with advanced CKD, moderately restricted LPDs may allow prolonging dialysis-free follow-up with comparable survival to dialysis at a lower cost. PMID:27898000

  3. Uremic Toxicity of Advanced Glycation End Products in CKD.

    PubMed

    Stinghen, Andréa E M; Massy, Ziad A; Vlassara, Helen; Striker, Gary E; Boullier, Agnès

    2016-02-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs), a heterogeneous group of compounds formed by nonenzymatic glycation reactions between reducing sugars and amino acids, lipids, or DNA, are formed not only in the presence of hyperglycemia, but also in diseases associated with high levels of oxidative stress, such as CKD. In chronic renal failure, higher circulating AGE levels result from increased formation and decreased renal clearance. Interactions between AGEs and their receptors, including advanced glycation end product-specific receptor (RAGE), trigger various intracellular events, such as oxidative stress and inflammation, leading to cardiovascular complications. Although patients with CKD have a higher burden of cardiovascular disease, the relationship between AGEs and cardiovascular disease in patients with CKD is not fully characterized. In this paper, we review the various deleterious effects of AGEs in CKD that lead to cardiovascular complications and the role of these AGEs in diabetic nephropathy. We also discuss potential pharmacologic approaches to circumvent these deleterious effects by reducing exogenous and endogenous sources of AGEs, increasing the breakdown of existing AGEs, or inhibiting AGE-induced inflammation. Finally, we speculate on preventive and therapeutic strategies that focus on the AGE-RAGE axis to prevent vascular complications in patients with CKD.

  4. Epidemiology of CKD Regression in Patients under Nephrology Care.

    PubMed

    Borrelli, Silvio; Leonardis, Daniela; Minutolo, Roberto; Chiodini, Paolo; De Nicola, Luca; Esposito, Ciro; Mallamaci, Francesca; Zoccali, Carmine; Conte, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) regression is considered as an infrequent renal outcome, limited to early stages, and associated with higher mortality. However, prevalence, prognosis and the clinical correlates of CKD regression remain undefined in the setting of nephrology care. This is a multicenter prospective study in 1418 patients with established CKD (eGFR: 60-15 ml/min/1.73m²) under nephrology care in 47 outpatient clinics in Italy from a least one year. We defined CKD regressors as a ΔGFR ≥0 ml/min/1.73 m2/year. ΔGFR was estimated as the absolute difference between eGFR measured at baseline and at follow up visit after 18-24 months, respectively. Outcomes were End Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) and overall-causes Mortality.391 patients (27.6%) were identified as regressors as they showed an eGFR increase between the baseline visit in the renal clinic and the follow up visit. In multivariate regression analyses the regressor status was not associated with CKD stage. Low proteinuria was the main factor associated with CKD regression, accounting per se for 48% of the likelihood of this outcome. Lower systolic blood pressure, higher BMI and absence of autosomal polycystic disease (PKD) were additional predictors of CKD regression. In regressors, ESRD risk was 72% lower (HR: 0.28; 95% CI 0.14-0.57; p<0.0001) while mortality risk did not differ from that in non-regressors (HR: 1.16; 95% CI 0.73-1.83; p = 0.540). Spline models showed that the reduction of ESRD risk associated with positive ΔGFR was attenuated in advanced CKD stage. CKD regression occurs in about one-fourth patients receiving renal care in nephrology units and correlates with low proteinuria, BP and the absence of PKD. This condition portends better renal prognosis, mostly in earlier CKD stages, with no excess risk for mortality.

  5. Exploring the opinion of CKD patients on dialysis regarding end-of-life and Advance Care Planning.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Tomero, J A; Rodríguez-Jornet, A; Balda, S; Cigarrán, S; Herrero, J C; Maduell, F; Martín, J; Palomar, R

    2011-01-01

    Advance care planning (ACP) and the subsequent advance directive document (ADD), previously known as "living wills", have not been widely used in Spain. The Ethics Group from the Spanish Society of Nephrology has developed a survey in order to investigate the opinion of dialysis patients regarding the ADD and end-of-life care. Patients received documentation explaining ACP and filled out a survey about their familiarity with and approval of the ADD. Seven hospital dialysis centres participated in the study for a total of 416 active dialysis patients. Questionnaires were distributed to 263 patients, 154 of which answered (69.2% completed them without assistance). The rates for ADD implementation (7.9%) and designation of a representative person (6.6%) were very low. Most of the patients clearly expressed their wishes about irreversible coma, vegetative state, dementia and untreatable disease. More than 65% did not want mechanical ventilation, chronic dialysis, tube feeding or resuscitation if cardiorespiratory arrest occurred. They reported that an ADD could be done before starting dialysis but most thought that it should be offered only to those who requested it (65% vs 34%). In conclusion, patients have clear wishes about end-of-life care, although these desires had not been documented due to the very low implementation of the ADD.

  6. Cardiovascular Complications in CKD Patients: Role of Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Gosmanova, Elvira O.; Le, Ngoc-Anh

    2011-01-01

    Starting with the early stages, patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) experience higher burden of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Moreover, CVD complications are the major cause of mortality in CKD patients as compared with complications from chronic kidney failure. While traditional CVD risk factors, including diabetes, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, obesity, physical inactivity, may be more prevalent among CKD patients, these factors seem to underestimate the accelerated cardiovascular disease in the CKD population. Search for additional biomarkers that could explain the enhanced CVD risk in CKD patients has gained increasing importance. Although it is unlikely that any single nontraditional risk factor would fully account for the increased CVD risk in individuals with CKD, oxidative stress appears to play a central role in the development and progression of CVD and its complications. We will review the data that support the contribution of oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of CVD in patients with chronic kidney failure. PMID:21253517

  7. Disease management programs for CKD patients: the potential and pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Rocco, Michael V

    2009-03-01

    Disease management describes the use of a number of approaches to identify and treat patients with chronic health conditions, especially those that are expensive to treat. Disease management programs have grown rapidly in the United States in the past several years. These programs have been established for patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD), but some have been discontinued because of the high cost of the program. Disease management programs for CKD face unique challenges. Identification of patients with CKD is hampered by incomplete use of the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision (ICD-9) codes for CKD by physicians and the less than universal use of estimated glomerular filtration rate from serum creatinine measurements to identify patients with an estimated glomerular filtration rate less than 60 mL/min/1.73 m(2). CKD affects multiple organ systems. Thus, a comprehensive disease management program will need to manage each of these aspects of CKD. These multiple interventions likely will make a CKD disease management program more costly than similar disease management programs designed for patients with diabetes mellitus, congestive heart failure, or other chronic diseases. The lack of data that can be used to develop effective disease management programs in CKD makes it difficult to determine goals for the management of each organ system affected by CKD. Finally, long periods of observation will be needed to determine whether a particular disease management program is effective in not only improving patient outcomes, but also decreasing both resource use and health care dollars. This long-term observation period is contrary to how most disease management contracts are written, which usually are based on meeting goals during a 1- to 3-year period. Until these challenges are resolved, it likely will be difficult to maintain effective disease management programs for CKD.

  8. Symptom Management in Patients with Stage 5 CKD Opting for Conservative Management

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, Sheila

    2016-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) stages 3–5 now affects 8.5% of adults in the United Kingdom; with 4% of patients expected to reach stage 5 CKD. Increasing numbers of older patients are contributing to the growth of demand of kidney services. With the exception of transplantation, dialysis has been the main form of renal replacement therapy (RRT) for advanced CKD. This elderly population is usually too frail and has many other co-existing medical complaints or co morbidities to undergo transplantation. Dialysis is an invasive treatment, and some frail elderly patients can experience many dialysis related symptoms. An alternative option for these patients is to choose conservative management (CM) of their stage 5 CKD. These patients often have complex supportive and palliative care needs. The frequency, severity and distress caused by symptoms related to stage 5 CKD are often under recognized and under treated. There is a need for early identification and management of symptoms as they present in patients with stage 5 CKD being managed conservatively. Symptom assessment should be focused on anticipating, identifying and alleviating any symptoms. This needs to be incorporated into the regular practice of those managing CM patients. PMID:27669324

  9. Symptom Management in Patients with Stage 5 CKD Opting for Conservative Management.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Sheila

    2016-09-22

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) stages 3-5 now affects 8.5% of adults in the United Kingdom; with 4% of patients expected to reach stage 5 CKD. Increasing numbers of older patients are contributing to the growth of demand of kidney services. With the exception of transplantation, dialysis has been the main form of renal replacement therapy (RRT) for advanced CKD. This elderly population is usually too frail and has many other co-existing medical complaints or co morbidities to undergo transplantation. Dialysis is an invasive treatment, and some frail elderly patients can experience many dialysis related symptoms. An alternative option for these patients is to choose conservative management (CM) of their stage 5 CKD. These patients often have complex supportive and palliative care needs. The frequency, severity and distress caused by symptoms related to stage 5 CKD are often under recognized and under treated. There is a need for early identification and management of symptoms as they present in patients with stage 5 CKD being managed conservatively. Symptom assessment should be focused on anticipating, identifying and alleviating any symptoms. This needs to be incorporated into the regular practice of those managing CM patients.

  10. Prognosis of CKD Patients Receiving Outpatient Nephrology Care in Italy

    PubMed Central

    Chiodini, Paolo; Zoccali, Carmine; Borrelli, Silvio; Cianciaruso, Bruno; Di Iorio, Biagio; Santoro, Domenico; Giancaspro, Vincenzo; Abaterusso, Cataldo; Gallo, Ciro; Conte, Giuseppe; Minutolo, Roberto

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background and objectives Prognosis in nondialysis chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients under regular nephrology care is rarely investigated. Design, setting, participants, & measurements We prospectively followed from 2003 to death or June 2010 a cohort of 1248 patients with CKD stages 3 to 5 and previous nephrology care ≥1 year in 25 Italian outpatient nephrology clinics. Cumulative incidence of ESRD or death before ESRD were estimated using the competing-risk approach. Results Estimated rates (per 100 patient-years) of ESRD and death 8.3 (95% confidence interval [CI], 7.4 to 9.2) and 5.9 (95% CI 5.2 to 6.6), respectively. Risk of ESRD and death increased progressively from stages 3 to 5. ESRD was more frequent than death in stage 4 and 5 CKD, whereas the opposite was true in stage 3 CKD. Younger age, lower body mass index, proteinuria, and high phosphate predicted ESRD, whereas older age, diabetes, previous cardiovascular disease, ESRD, proteinuria, high uric acid, and anemia predicted death (P < 0.05 for all). Among modifiable risk factors, proteinuria accounted for the greatest contribution to the model fit for either outcome. Conclusions In patients receiving continuity of care in Italian nephrology clinics, ESRD was a more frequent outcome than death in stage 4 and 5 CKD, but the opposite was true in stage 3. Outcomes were predicted by modifiable risk factors specific to CKD. Proteinuria used in conjunction with estimated GFR refined risk stratification. These findings provide information, specific to CKD patients under regular outpatient nephrology care, for risk stratification that complement recent observations in the general population. PMID:21817127

  11. CKD as an underrecognized threat to patient safety.

    PubMed

    Fink, Jeffrey C; Brown, Jeanine; Hsu, Van Doren; Seliger, Stephen L; Walker, Loreen; Zhan, Min

    2009-04-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is common, but underrecognized, in patients in the health care system, where improving patient safety is a high priority. Poor disease recognition and several other features of CKD make it a high-risk condition for adverse safety events. In this review, we discuss the unique attributes of CKD that make it a high-risk condition for patient safety mishaps. We point out that adverse safety events in this disease have the potential to contribute to disease progression; namely, accelerated loss of kidney function and increased incidence of end-stage renal disease. We also propose a framework in which to consider patient safety in CKD, highlighting the need for disease-specific safety indicators that reflect unsafe practices in the treatment of this disease. Finally, we discuss the hypothesis that increased recognition of CKD will reduce disease-specific safety events and in this way decrease the likelihood of adverse outcomes, including an accelerated rate of kidney function loss and increased incidence of end-stage renal disease.

  12. Bone mass and microarchitecture in CKD patients with fracture.

    PubMed

    Nickolas, Thomas L; Stein, Emily; Cohen, Adi; Thomas, Valerie; Staron, Ronald B; McMahon, Donald J; Leonard, Mary B; Shane, Elizabeth

    2010-08-01

    Patients with predialysis chronic kidney disease (CKD) have increased risk for fracture, but the structural mechanisms underlying this increased skeletal fragility are unknown. We measured areal bone mineral density (aBMD) by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry at the spine, hip, and radius, and we measured volumetric BMD (vBMD), geometry, and microarchitecture by high-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography (HR-pQCT) at the radius and tibia in patients with CKD: 32 with fracture and 59 without fracture. Patients with fracture had lower aBMD at the spine, total hip, femoral neck, and the ultradistal radius, the last having the strongest association with fracture. By HR-pQCT of the radius, patients with fracture had lower cortical area and thickness, total and trabecular vBMD, and trabecular number and greater trabecular separation and network heterogeneity. At the tibia, patients with fracture had significantly lower cortical area, thickness, and total and cortical density. Total vBMD at both radius and tibia most strongly associated with fracture. By receiver operator characteristic curve analysis, patients with longer duration of CKD had area under the curve of >0.75 for aBMD at both hip sites and the ultradistal radius, vBMD and geometry at the radius and tibia, and microarchitecture at the tibia. In summary, patients with predialysis CKD and fractures have lower aBMD by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry and lower vBMD, thinner cortices, and trabecular loss by HR-pQCT. These density and structural differences may underlie the increased susceptibility to fracture among patients with CKD.

  13. Patient-reported and actionable safety events in CKD.

    PubMed

    Ginsberg, Jennifer S; Zhan, Min; Diamantidis, Clarissa J; Woods, Corinne; Chen, Jingjing; Fink, Jeffrey C

    2014-07-01

    Patients with CKD are at high risk for adverse safety events because of the complexity of their care and impaired renal function. Using data from our observational study of predialysis patients with CKD enrolled in the Safe Kidney Care study, we estimated the baseline frequency of adverse safety events and determined to what extent these events co-occur. We examined patient-reported adverse safety incidents (class I) and actionable safety findings (class II), conditioned on participant use of drugs that might cause such an event, and we used association analysis as a data-mining technique to identify co-occurrences of these events. Of 267 participants, 185 (69.3%) had at least one class I or II event, 102 (38.2%) had more than one event, and 48 (18.0%) had at least one event from both classes. The adjusted conditional rates of class I and class II events ranged from 2.9 to 57.6 per 100 patients and from 2.2 to 8.3 per 100 patients, respectively. The most common conditional class I and II events were patient-reported hypoglycemia and hyperkalemia (serum potassium>5.5 mEq/L), respectively. Reporting of hypoglycemia (in patients with diabetes) and falling or severe dizziness (in patients without diabetes) were most frequently paired with other adverse safety events. We conclude that adverse safety events are common and varied in CKD, with frequent association between disparate events. Further work is needed to define the CKD "safety phenotype" and identify patients at highest risk for adverse safety events.

  14. The chronic kidney disease - Mineral bone disorder (CKD-MBD): Advances in pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Hruska, Keith A; Sugatani, Toshifumi; Agapova, Olga; Fang, Yifu

    2017-01-21

    The causes of excess cardiovascular mortality associated with chronic kidney disease (CKD) have been attributed in part to the CKD-mineral bone disorder syndrome (CKD-MBD), wherein, novel cardiovascular risk factors have been identified. New advances in the causes of the CKD-MBD are discussed in this review. They demonstrate that repair and disease processes in the kidneys release factors to the circulation that cause the systemic complications of CKD. The discovery of WNT inhibitors, especially Dickkopf 1 (Dkk1), produced during renal repair as participating in the pathogenesis of the vascular and skeletal components of the CKD-MBD implied that additional pathogenic factors are critical. This lead to the discovery that activin A is a second renal repair factor circulating in increased levels during CKD. Activin A derives from peritubular myofibroblasts of diseased kidneys, wherein it stimulates fibrosis, and decreases tubular klotho expression. Activin A binds to the type 2 activin A receptor, ActRIIA, which is variably affected by CKD in the vasculature. In diabetic/atherosclerotic aortas, specifically in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC), ActRIIA signaling is inhibited and contributes to CKD induced VSMC dedifferentiation, osteogenic transition and neointimal atherosclerotic calcification. In nondiabetic/nonatherosclerotic aortas, CKD increases VSMC ActRIIA signaling, and vascular fibroblast signaling causing the latter to undergo osteogenic transition and stimulate vascular calcification. In both vascular situations, a ligand trap for ActRIIA prevented vascular calcification. In the skeleton, activin A is responsible for CKD stimulation of osteoclastogenesis and bone remodeling increasing bone turnover. These studies demonstrate that circulating renal repair and injury factors are causal of the CKD-MBD and CKD associated cardiovascular disease.

  15. Vascular Calcification in Patients with Nondialysis CKD over 3 Years

    PubMed Central

    Molina, Pablo; Cerverón, M. Jesús; Vila, Rocío; Bover, Jordi; Nieto, Javier; Barril, Guillermina; Martínez-Castelao, Alberto; Fernández, Elvira; Escudero, Verónica; Piñera, Celestino; Adragao, Teresa; Navarro-Gonzalez, Juan F.; Molinero, Luis M.; Castro-Alonso, Cristina; Pallardó, Luis M.; Jamal, Sophie A.

    2015-01-01

    Background and objectives Vascular calcification (VC) is common in CKD, but little is known about its prognostic effect on patients with nondialysis CKD. The prevalence of VC and its ability to predict death, time to hospitalization, and renal progression were assessed. Design, setting, participants, & measurements The Study of Mineral and Bone Disorders in CKD in Spain is a prospective, observational, 3-year follow-up study of 742 patients with nondialysis CKD stages 3–5 from 39 centers in Spain from April to May 2009. VC was assessed using Adragao (AS; x-ray pelvis and hands) and Kauppila (KS; x-ray lateral lumbar spine) scores from 572 and 568 patients, respectively. The primary end point was death. Secondary outcomes were hospital admissions and appearance of a combined renal end point (beginning of dialysis or drop >30% in eGFR). Factors related to VC were assessed by logistic regression analysis. Survival analysis was assessed by Cox proportional models. Results VC was present in 79% of patients and prominent in 47% (AS≥3 or KS>6). Age (odds ratio [OR], 1.05; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 1.02 to 1.07; P<0.001), phosphorous (OR, 1.68; 95% CI, 1.28 to 2.20; P<0.001), and diabetes (OR, 2.11; 95% CI, 1.32 to 3.35; P=0.002) were independently related to AS≥3. After a median follow-up of 35 months (interquartile range=17–36), there were 70 deaths (10%). After multivariate adjustment for age, smoking, diabetes, comorbidity, renal function, and level of phosphorous, AS≥3 but not KS>6 was independently associated with all-cause (hazard ratio [HR], 2.07; 95% CI, 1.07 to 4.01; P=0.03) and cardiovascular (HR, 3.46; 95% CI, 1.27 to 9.45; P=0.02) mortality as well as a shorter hospitalization event–free period (HR, 1.14; 95% CI, 1.06 to 1.22; P<0.001). VC did not predict renal progression. Conclusions VC is highly prevalent in patients with CKD. VC assessment using AS independently predicts death and time to hospitalization. Therefore, it could be a useful

  16. CKD patients: the dilemma of serum PTH levels.

    PubMed

    Pontoriero, Giuseppe; Cozzolino, Mario; Locatelli, Francesco; Brancaccio, Diego

    2010-01-01

    Recent observational studies of patients with stage 3-5 chronic kidney disease (CKD) not undergoing dialysis have shown that even slight increases in parathyroid hormone (PTH) levels are associated with an increased cardiovascular risk, regardless of the serum levels of calcium and phosphorus and vitamin D therapy. These studies suggest paying particular attention to monitoring PTH levels from the early stages of CKD, and preventing any mineral metabolism disorders that may trigger the excessive synthesis and secretion of PTH. However, it is not easy to determine when an appropriate response becomes maladaptive and requires the pharmacological suppression of the parathyroid gland because the gland's adaptive response can vary widely from one person to another. Furthermore, PTH levels are not always a good predictor of bone turnover and current PTH assays have various methodological limitations. Treating the early mineral metabolism abnormalities of CKD may help prevent the cardiovascular complications whose frequency, costs and mortality have a profound effect on society as a whole. For this reason, there is great interest in establishing adequate target ranges for PTH at different stages of CKD, and determining the most appropriate strategies for reaching them.

  17. [Sarcopenia or uremic myopathy in CKD patients].

    PubMed

    Chauveau, Philippe; Moreau, Karine; Lasseur, Catherine; Fouque, Denis; Combe, Christian; Aparicio, Michel

    2016-04-01

    Often underestimated or misunderstood in chronic renal failure (CRF), muscle wasting is nevertheless common and concerns about 50% of dialysis patients. The consequences of this myopathy on quality of life and outcomes of patients are unfavorable, identical to those observed in sarcopenia in elderly subjects with sarcopenia. The similarities between the two situations also concern the symptoms, the underlying muscle damages and the pathogenic mechanisms and may be partly explained by the frequently high age of ESRD patients. Skeletal muscle involvement should be systematically investigated in the IRC patient as in the elderly with sarcopenia to propose as early as possible a treatment of which physical activity and nutritional interventions are the mainstay.

  18. An interdisciplinary approach to dialysis decision-making in the CKD patient with depression.

    PubMed

    Schell, Jane O; Bova-Collis, Renee; Eneanya, Nwamaka D

    2014-07-01

    Depression and depressive symptoms are common in advanced kidney disease and are associated with poor outcomes. For those with CKD not on dialysis, depression may influence how patients cope and prepare for their disease and its management, including decisions about dialysis treatment. Patient self-reported scales exist to better identify depression; how to incorporate these scales into clinical practice and assist with treatment decision-making is less clear. We present a case-based discussion of depressive symptoms in patients with advanced kidney disease not on dialysis. We highlight the contribution of underlying somatic and psychosocial factors in the assessment and management of depression. We further define the role of the interdisciplinary care team, including palliative care and hospice medicine, to assist with symptom management and end-of-life care for CKD patients with depression.

  19. Nurse Practitioner Care Improves Renal Outcome in Patients with CKD

    PubMed Central

    van Zuilen, Arjan D.; van den Brand, Jan A.J.G.; Bots, Michiel L.; van Buren, Marjolijn; ten Dam, Marc A.G.J.; Kaasjager, Karin A.H.; Ligtenberg, Gerry; Sijpkens, Yvo W.J.; Sluiter, Henk E.; van de Ven, Peter J.G.; Vervoort, Gerald; Vleming, Louis-Jean; Blankestijn, Peter J.; Wetzels, Jack F.M.

    2014-01-01

    Treatment goals for patients with CKD are often unrealized for many reasons, but support by nurse practitioners may improve risk factor levels in these patients. Here, we analyzed renal endpoints of the Multifactorial Approach and Superior Treatment Efficacy in Renal Patients with the Aid of Nurse Practitioners (MASTERPLAN) study after extended follow-up to determine whether strict implementation of current CKD guidelines through the aid of nurse practitioners improves renal outcome. In total, 788 patients with moderate to severe CKD were randomized to receive nurse practitioner support added to physician care (intervention group) or physician care alone (control group). Median follow-up was 5.7 years. Renal outcome was a secondary endpoint of the MASTERPLAN study. We used a composite renal endpoint of death, ESRD, and 50% increase in serum creatinine. Event rates were compared with adjustment for baseline serum creatinine concentration and changes in estimated GFR were determined. During the randomized phase, there were small but significant differences between the groups in BP, proteinuria, LDL cholesterol, and use of aspirin, statins, active vitamin D, and antihypertensive medications, in favor of the intervention group. The intervention reduced the incidence of the composite renal endpoint by 20% (hazard ratio, 0.80; 95% confidence interval, 0.66 to 0.98; P=0.03). In the intervention group, the decrease in estimated GFR was 0.45 ml/min per 1.73 m2 per year less than in the control group (P=0.01). In conclusion, additional support by nurse practitioners attenuated the decline of kidney function and improved renal outcome in patients with CKD. PMID:24158983

  20. A Patient with CKD and Poor Nutritional Status

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Summary Protein energy wasting is common in patients with CKD and ESRD and is associated with adverse clinical outcomes, such as increased rates of hospitalization and death, in these patients. A multitude of factors can affect the nutritional and metabolic status of patients with CKD, including decreased dietary nutrient intake, catabolic effects of renal replacement therapy, systemic inflammation, metabolic and hormonal derangements, and comorbid conditions (such as diabetes and depression). Unique aspects of CKD also confound reliable assessment of nutritional status, further complicating management of this comorbid condition. In patients in whom preventive measures and oral dietary intake from regular meals cannot help them maintain adequate nutritional status, nutritional supplementation, administered orally, enterally, or parenterally, is effective in replenishing protein and energy stores. The advantages of oral nutritional supplements include proven efficacy, safety, and compliance. Anabolic steroids and exercise, with nutritional supplementation or alone, improve protein stores and represent potential additional approaches for the treatment of PEW. There are several emerging novel therapies, such as appetite stimulants, anti-inflammatory interventions, and anabolic agents. PMID:23970134

  1. A patient with CKD and poor nutritional status.

    PubMed

    Ikizler, T Alp

    2013-12-01

    Protein energy wasting is common in patients with CKD and ESRD and is associated with adverse clinical outcomes, such as increased rates of hospitalization and death, in these patients. A multitude of factors can affect the nutritional and metabolic status of patients with CKD, including decreased dietary nutrient intake, catabolic effects of renal replacement therapy, systemic inflammation, metabolic and hormonal derangements, and comorbid conditions (such as diabetes and depression). Unique aspects of CKD also confound reliable assessment of nutritional status, further complicating management of this comorbid condition. In patients in whom preventive measures and oral dietary intake from regular meals cannot help them maintain adequate nutritional status, nutritional supplementation, administered orally, enterally, or parenterally, is effective in replenishing protein and energy stores. The advantages of oral nutritional supplements include proven efficacy, safety, and compliance. Anabolic steroids and exercise, with nutritional supplementation or alone, improve protein stores and represent potential additional approaches for the treatment of PEW. There are several emerging novel therapies, such as appetite stimulants, anti-inflammatory interventions, and anabolic agents.

  2. CKD and Its Risk Factors among Patients with Cystinuria

    PubMed Central

    Prot-Bertoye, Caroline; Lebbah, Saïd; Daudon, Michel; Tostivint, Isabelle; Bataille, Pierre; Bridoux, Franck; Brignon, Pierre; Choquenet, Christian; Cochat, Pierre; Combe, Christian; Conort, Pierre; Decramer, Stéphane; Doré, Bertrand; Dussol, Bertrand; Essig, Marie; Gaunez, Nicolas; Joly, Dominique; Le Toquin-Bernard, Sophie; Méjean, Arnaud; Meria, Paul; Morin, Denis; N’Guyen, Hung Viet; Noël, Christian; Normand, Michel; Pietak, Michel; Ronco, Pierre; Saussine, Christian; Tsimaratos, Michel; Friedlander, Gérard; Traxer, Olivier; Knebelmann, Bertrand

    2015-01-01

    Background and objectives Cystinuria is an autosomal recessive disorder affecting renal cystine reabsorption; it causes 1% and 8% of stones in adults and children, respectively. This study aimed to determine epidemiologic and clinical characteristics as well as comorbidities among cystinuric patients, focusing on CKD and high BP. Design, setting, participants, & measurements This retrospective study was conducted in France, and involved 47 adult and pediatric nephrology and urology centers from April 2010 to January 2012. Data were collected from 442 cystinuric patients. Results Median age at onset of symptoms was 16.7 (minimum to maximum, 0.3–72.1) years and median diagnosis delay was 1.3 (0–45.7) years. Urinary alkalinization and cystine-binding thiol were prescribed for 88.8% and 52.2% of patients, respectively, and 81.8% had at least one urological procedure. Five patients (1.1%, n=4 men) had to be treated by dialysis at a median age of 35.0 years (11.8–70.7). Among the 314 patients aged ≥16 years, using the last available plasma creatinine, 22.5% had an eGFR≥90 ml/min per 1.73 m2 (calculated by the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease equation), whereas 50.6%, 15.6%, 7.6%, 2.9%, and 0.6% had an eGFR of 60–89, 45–59, 30–44, 15–29, and <15, respectively. Among these 314 patients, 28.6% had high BP. In multivariate analysis, CKD was associated with age (odds ratio, 1.05 [95% confidence interval, 1.03 to 1.07]; P<0.001), hypertension (3.30 [1.54 to 7.10]; P=0.002), and severe damage of renal parenchyma defined as a past history of partial or total nephrectomy, a solitary congenital kidney, or at least one kidney with a size <10 cm in patients aged ≥16 years (4.39 [2.00 to 9.62]; P<0.001), whereas hypertension was associated with age (1.06 [1.04 to 1.08]; P<0.001), male sex (2.3 [1.3 to 4.1]; P=0.003), and an eGFR<60 ml/min per 1.73 m2 (2.7 [1.5 to 5.1]; P=0.001). Conclusions CKD and high BP occur frequently in patients with cystinuria and

  3. Assessing physical function and physical activity in patients with CKD.

    PubMed

    Painter, Patricia; Marcus, Robin L

    2013-05-01

    Patients with CKD are characterized by low levels of physical functioning, which, along with low physical activity, predict poor outcomes in those treated with dialysis. The hallmark of clinical care in geriatric practice and geriatric research is the orientation to and assessment of physical function and functional limitations. Although there is increasing interest in physical function and physical activity in patients with CKD, the nephrology field has not focused on this aspect of care. This paper provides an in-depth review of the measurement of physical function and physical activity. It focuses on physiologic impairments and physical performance limitations (impaired mobility and functional limitations). The review is based on established frameworks of physical impairment and functional limitations that have guided research in physical function in the aging population. Definitions and measures for physiologic impairments, physical performance limitations, self-reported function, and physical activity are presented. On the basis of the information presented, recommendations for incorporating routine assessment of physical function and encouragement for physical activity in clinical care are provided.

  4. Placental Growth Factor as a Predictor of Cardiovascular Events in Patients with CKD from the NARA-CKD Study.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Masaru; Uemura, Shiro; Takeda, Yukiji; Samejima, Ken-Ichi; Matsumoto, Takaki; Hasegawa, Ayako; Tsushima, Hideo; Hoshino, Ei; Ueda, Tomoya; Morimoto, Katsuhiko; Okamoto, Keisuke; Okada, Sadanori; Onoue, Kenji; Okayama, Satoshi; Kawata, Hiroyuki; Kawakami, Rika; Maruyama, Naoki; Akai, Yasuhiro; Iwano, Masayuki; Shiiki, Hideo; Saito, Yoshihiko

    2015-11-01

    Placental growth factor (PlGF) contributes to atherogenesis through vascular inflammation and plaque destabilization. High levels of PlGF may be associated with mortality and cardiovascular disease, but the relationship between PlGF level and adverse outcomes in patients with CKD is unclear. We conducted a prospective cohort study of 1351 consecutive participants with CKD enrolled in the Novel Assessment of Risk management for Atherosclerotic diseases in CKD (NARA-CKD) study between April 1, 2004, and December 31, 2011. During a median follow-up of 3 years, 199 participants died and 383 had cardiovascular events, defined as atherosclerotic disease or heart failure requiring hospitalization. In adjusted analyses, mortality and cardiovascular risk increased in each successive quartile of serum PlGF level; hazard ratios (HRs) (95% confidence intervals [95% CIs]) for mortality and cardiovascular risk, respectively, were 1.59 (0.83 to 3.16) and 1.55 (0.92 to 2.66) for the second quartile, 2.97 (1.67 to 5.59) and 3.39 (2.20 to 5.41) for the third quartile, and 3.87 (2.24 to 7.08) and 8.42 (5.54 to 13.3) for the fourth quartile. The composite end point of mortality and cardiovascular events occurred during the study period in 76.4% of patients in both the highest PlGF quartile (≥19.6 pg/ml) and the lowest eGFR tertile (<30 ml/min per 1.73 m(2)). The association between PlGF and mortality or cardiovascular events was not attenuated when participants were stratified by age, sex, traditional risk factors, and eGFR. These data suggest elevated PlGF is an independent risk factor for all-cause mortality and cardiovascular events in patients with CKD.

  5. Association of frailty and physical function in patients with non-dialysis CKD: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Frailty is a condition characterized by a decline in physical function and functional capacity. Common symptoms of frailty, such as weakness and exhaustion, are prevalent in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). The increased vulnerability of frail patients with coexisting CKD may place them at a heightened risk of encountering additional health complications. The purpose of this systematic review was to explore the link between frailty, CKD and clinical outcomes. Methods We searched for cross sectional and prospective studies in the general population and in the CKD population indexed in EMBASE, Pubmed, Web of Science, CINAHL, Cochrane and Ageline examining the association between frailty and CKD and those relating frailty in patients with CKD to clinical outcomes. Results We screened 5,066 abstracts and retrieved 108 studies for full text review. We identified 7 studies associating frailty or physical function to CKD. From the 7 studies, we identified only two studies that related frailty in patients with CKD to a clinical outcome. CKD was consistently associated with increasing frailty or reduced physical function [odds ratios (OR) 1.30 to 3.12]. In patients with CKD, frailty was associated with a greater than two-fold higher risk of dialysis and/or death [OR from 2.0 to 5.88]. Conclusions CKD is associated with a higher risk of frailty or diminished physical function. Furthermore, the presence of frailty in patients with CKD may lead to a higher risk of mortality. Further research must be conducted to understand the mechanisms of frailty in CKD and to confirm its association with clinical outcomes. PMID:24148266

  6. Differential impact of peripheral endothelial dysfunction on subsequent cardiovascular events following percutaneous coronary intervention between chronic kidney disease (CKD) and non-CKD patients.

    PubMed

    Tabata, Noriaki; Hokimoto, Seiji; Akasaka, Tomonori; Arima, Yuichiro; Sakamoto, Kenji; Yamamoto, Eiichiro; Tsujita, Kenichi; Izumiya, Yasuhiro; Yamamuro, Megumi; Kojima, Sunao; Kaikita, Koichi; Ogawa, Hisao

    2016-07-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) status might modify the predictive effect of peripheral endothelial dysfunction on cardiovascular events after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). The aim of this study was to examine the differential effect of peripheral endothelial dysfunction on clinical outcome after PCI between CKD and non-CKD patients. We conducted a cohort study of 435 patients following PCI. CKD was defined as estimated glomerular filtration rate <60 mL/min/1.73 m(2). Peripheral endothelial dysfunction was examined using reactive hyperemia-peripheral arterial tonometry index (RHI), and we divided patients into low- and high-natural logarithmic RHI (Ln-RHI) group. The endpoint was a composite of cardiovascular death, nonfatal myocardial infarction, ischemic stroke, hospitalization due to unstable angina pectoris, and coronary revascularization. A total of 56 patients had a cardiovascular event. Patients who suffered a cardiovascular event had significantly lower Ln-RHI than other patients in the non-CKD group (0.46 ± 0.18 versus 0.60 ± 0.25; P = 0.002). Kaplan-Meier analysis demonstrated a significantly higher probability of cardiovascular events in low Ln-RHI patients in the non-CKD group (log-rank test: P = 0.003). Multivariate Cox proportional hazards analysis identified Ln-RHI as an independent and significant predictor of future cardiovascular events in the non-CKD group (HR: 0.096; 95 % CI 0.02-0.47; P = 0.004) but not in the CKD group. There was a differential effect of peripheral endothelial dysfunction on clinical outcome after PCI between CKD and non-CKD patients, and peripheral endothelial dysfunction significantly correlates with subsequent cardiovascular events after PCI in non-CKD patients.

  7. Soluble TWEAK and Major Adverse Cardiovascular Events in Patients with CKD

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Laso, Valvanera; Sastre, Cristina; Valdivielso, Jose M.; Betriu, Angels; Fernández, Elvira; Egido, Jesús; Martín-Ventura, Jose L.

    2016-01-01

    Background and objectives Soluble TNF–like weak inducer of apoptosis (sTWEAK) is a proinflammatory cytokine belonging to the TNF superfamily. sTWEAK concentrations have been associated with the presence of CKD and cardiovascular disease (CVD). We hypothesized that sTWEAK levels may relate to a higher prevalence of atherosclerotic plaques, vascular calcification, and cardiovascular outcomes observed in patients with CKD. Design, setting, participants, & measurements A 4-year prospective, multicenter, longitudinal study was conducted in 1058 patients with CKD stages 3–5D (mean age =58±13 years old; 665 men) but without any history of CVD from the NEFRONA Study (a study design on the prevalence of surrogate markers of CVD). Ankle-brachial index and B-mode ultrasound were performed to detect the presence of carotid and/or femoral atherosclerotic plaques together with biochemical measurements and sTWEAK assessment. Patients were followed for cardiovascular outcomes (follow-up of 3.13±1.15 years). Results Patients with more advanced CKD had lower sTWEAK levels. sTWEAK concentrations were independently and negatively associated with carotid intima-media thickness. sTWEAK levels were lower in patients with carotid atherosclerotic plaques but not in those with femoral plaques. After adjustment by confounders, the odds ratio (OR) for presenting carotid atherosclerotic plaques in patients in the lowest versus highest tertile of sTWEAK was 4.18 (95% confidence interval [95% CI], 2.89 to 6.08; P<0.001). Furthermore, sTWEAK levels were lower in patients with calcified carotid atherosclerotic plaques. The OR for presenting calcified carotid plaques was 1.77 (95% CI, 1.06 to 2.93; P=0.02) after multivariable adjustment. After the follow-up, 41 fatal and 68 nonfatal cardiovascular events occurred. In a Cox model, after controlling for potential confounding factors, patients in the lowest tertile of sTWEAK concentrations had a higher risk of fatal and nonfatal cardiovascular

  8. Association of low potassium diet and folic acid deficiency in patients with CKD

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Kamal

    2015-01-01

    Background Most of the folic acid sources are rich also in potassium. Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) usually receive a low potassium diet. We investigated the possibility of an association between low potassium diet and folic acid deficiency. Methods In total, 128 CKD patients participated in this cross-sectional study. Sixty-four patients with CKD grades 1 and 2 were on an unrestricted potassium diet when enrolled in the study, and 64 patients with CKD grades 3 and 4 had received instructions to restrict their intake of potassium at least 6 months before enrollment in the study. Subjects were evaluated for daily intake of folic acid (DIFA), daily intake of potassium (DIK), and serum folic acid levels (SFA). Results DIFA correlated with the estimated glomerular filtration rate, the DIK, and the SFA (P<0.001). SFA correlated with the estimated glomerular filtration rate (P<0.001). Mean DIFA and mean SFA were lower among patients with CKD grades 3 and 4 than among those with CKD grades 1 and 2 (P<0.001). The mean DIFA in patients with folic acid deficiency was lower than that in those with SFA ≥7.1 nmol/L (P<0.001). There was lower SFA and threefold greater frequency of folic acid deficiency among patients with CKD grades 3 and 4 who had received instructions to restrict their intake of potassium than among patients with CKD grades 1 and 2 who were on an unrestricted potassium diet. Conclusion A potassium-restricted diet offered to patients with CKD grades 3 and 4 may be associated with folic acid deficiency. Serum levels of folic acid should be investigated before starting potassium restriction in patients with CKD grades 3 and 4, in order to identify individuals with folic acid deficiency or with marginal serum levels who should receive folic acid replacement therapy. PMID:26056461

  9. Telehealth Applications to Enhance CKD Knowledge and Awareness Among Patients and Providers.

    PubMed

    Tuot, Delphine S; Boulware, L Ebony

    2017-01-01

    CKD affects 13% of the US adult population, causes excess mortality, and is associated with significant sociodemographic disparities. Optimal CKD management slows progression of disease and reduces cardiovascular-related outcomes. Resources for patients and primary care providers, major stakeholders in preventive CKD care, are critically needed to enhance understanding of the disease and to optimize CKD health, particularly because of the asymptomatic nature of kidney disease. Telehealth is defined as the use of electronic communication and telecommunications technology to support long-distance clinical health care, patient and professional health-related education, and public health and health administration. It provides new opportunities to enhance awareness and understanding among these important stakeholders. This review will examine the role of telehealth within existing educational theories, identify telehealth applications that can enhance CKD knowledge and behavior change among patients and primary care providers, and examine the advantages and disadvantages of telehealth vs usual modalities for education.

  10. Predictors of Subclinical Atheromatosis Progression over 2 Years in Patients with Different Stages of CKD

    PubMed Central

    Gracia, Marta; Betriu, Àngels; Martínez-Alonso, Montserrat; Arroyo, David; Abajo, María; Fernández, Elvira

    2016-01-01

    Background and objectives Ultrasonographic detection of subclinical atheromatosis is a noninvasive method predicting cardiovascular events. Risk factors predicting atheromatosis progression in CKD are unknown. Predictors of atheromatosis progression were evaluated in patients with CKD. Design, setting, participants, & measurements Our multicenter, prospective, observational study included 1553 patients with CKD (2009–2011). Carotid and femoral ultrasounds were performed at baseline and after 24 months. A subgroup of 476 patients with CKD was also randomized to undergo ultrasound examination at 12 months. Progression of atheromatosis was defined as an increase in the number of plaque territories analyzed by multivariate logistic regression. Results Prevalence of atheromatosis was 68.7% and progressed in 59.8% of patients after 24 months. CKD progression was associated with atheromatosis progression, suggesting a close association between pathologies. Variables significantly predicting atheromatosis progression, independent from CKD stages, were diabetes and two interactions of age with ferritin and plaque at baseline. Given that multiple interactions were found between CKD stage and age, phosphate, smoking, dyslipidemia, body mass index, systolic BP (SBP), carotid intima-media thickness, plaque at baseline, uric acid, cholesterol, 25-hydroxy vitamin D (25OH vitamin D), and antiplatelet and phosphate binders use, the analysis was stratified by CKD stages. In stage 3, two interactions (age with phosphate and plaque at baseline) were found, and smoking, diabetes, SBP, low levels of 25OH vitamin D, and no treatment with phosphate binders were positively associated with atheromatosis progression. In stages 4 and 5, three interactions (age with ferritin and plaque and plaque with smoking) were found, and SBP was positively associated with atheromatosis progression. In dialysis, an interaction between body mass index and 25OH vitamin D was found, and age, dyslipidemia

  11. [New Developments in CKD-MBD. Bone quality and fracture in patients with chronic kidney disease].

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, Yoshiko; Yamato, Hideyuki

    2014-12-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients have an extremely increased risk of fragility fractures, but the underling pathophysiological mechanisms remain obscure. Recently, the progresses of analysis technology have revealed the changes of bone quality in CKD condition. In particular, we can observe the characteristic changes of bone microarchitecture and bone chemical compositions in both human bone biopsy samples and experimental animal bones. Here, I will provide a short review on these bone quality factors and discuss on the relationship between bone quality and fracture in CKD patients.

  12. Uremic retention solute indoxyl sulfate level is associated with prolonged QTc interval in early CKD patients.

    PubMed

    Tang, Wei-Hua; Wang, Chao-Ping; Chung, Fu-Mei; Huang, Lynn L H; Yu, Teng-Hung; Hung, Wei-Chin; Lu, Li-Fen; Chen, Po-Yuan; Luo, Ching-Hsing; Lee, Kun-Tai; Lee, Yau-Jiunn; Lai, Wen-Ter

    2015-01-01

    Total mortality and sudden cardiac death is highly prevalent in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). In CKD patients, the protein-bound uremic retention solute indoxyl sulfate (IS) is independently associated with cardiovascular disease. However, the underlying mechanisms of this association have yet to be elucidated. The relationship between IS and cardiac electrocardiographic parameters was investigated in a prospective observational study among early CKD patients. IS arrhythmogenic effect was evaluated by in vitro cardiomyocyte electrophysiological study and mathematical computer simulation. In a cohort of 100 early CKD patients, patients with corrected QT (QTc) prolongation had higher IS levels. Furthermore, serum IS level was independently associated with prolonged QTc interval. In vitro, the delay rectifier potassium current (IK) was found to be significantly decreased after the treatment of IS in a dose-dependent manner. The modulation of IS to the IK was through the regulation of the major potassium ion channel protein Kv 2.1 phosphorylation. In a computer simulation, the decrease of IK by IS could prolong the action potential duration (APD) and induce early afterdepolarization, which is known to be a trigger mechanism of lethal ventricular arrhythmias. In conclusion, serum IS level is independently associated with the prolonged QTc interval in early CKD patients. IS down-regulated IK channel protein phosphorylation and the IK current activity that in turn increased the cardiomyocyte APD and QTc interval in vitro and in the computer ORd model. These findings suggest that IS may play a role in the development of arrhythmogenesis in CKD patients.

  13. Understanding CKD among patients with T2DM: prevalence, temporal trends, and treatment patterns—NHANES 2007–2012

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Bingcao; Bell, Kelly; Stanford, Amy; Kern, David M; Tunceli, Ozgur; Vupputuri, Suma; Kalsekar, Iftekhar; Willey, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    Objective To describe the estimated prevalence and temporal trends of chronic kidney disease (CKD) treatment patterns, and the association between CKD and potential factors for type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in different demographic subgroups. Research design and methods This was a cross-sectional analysis of adults with T2DM based on multiple US National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) datasets developed during 2007–2012. CKD severity was defined according to the Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) 2012 guidelines using the CKD Epidemiology Collaboration (CKD-EPI) equation: mild to moderate=stages 1–3a; moderate to kidney failure=stages 3b–5. Multivariable logistic regression analyses were performed to assess the associations between CKD and potential factors. Results Of the adult individuals with T2DM (n=2006), age-adjusted CKD prevalence was 38.3% during 2007–2012; 77.5% were mild-to-moderate CKD. The overall age-adjusted prevalence of CKD was 40.2% in 2007–2008, 36.9% in 2009–2010, and 37.6% in 2011–2012. The prevalence of CKD in T2DM was 58.7% in patients aged ≥65 years, 25.7% in patients aged <65 years, 43.5% in African-Americans and Mexican-Americans, and 38.7% in non-Hispanic whites. The use of antidiabetes and antihypertensive medications generally followed treatment guideline recommendations. Older age, higher hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), systolic blood pressure (SBP), and having hypertension were significantly associated with CKD presence but not increasing severity of CKD. Conclusions CKD continued to be prevalent in the T2DM population; prevalence remained fairly consistent over time, suggesting that current efforts to prevent CKD could be improved overall, especially by monitoring certain populations more closely. PMID:27110365

  14. Uremic Retention Solute Indoxyl Sulfate Level Is Associated with Prolonged QTc Interval in Early CKD Patients

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Wei-Hua; Wang, Chao-Ping; Chung, Fu-Mei; Huang, Lynn L. H.; Yu, Teng-Hung; Hung, Wei-Chin; Lu, Li-Fen; Chen, Po-Yuan; Luo, Ching-Hsing; Lee, Kun-Tai; Lee, Yau-Jiunn; Lai, Wen-Ter

    2015-01-01

    Total mortality and sudden cardiac death is highly prevalent in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). In CKD patients, the protein-bound uremic retention solute indoxyl sulfate (IS) is independently associated with cardiovascular disease. However, the underlying mechanisms of this association have yet to be elucidated. The relationship between IS and cardiac electrocardiographic parameters was investigated in a prospective observational study among early CKD patients. IS arrhythmogenic effect was evaluated by in vitro cardiomyocyte electrophysiological study and mathematical computer simulation. In a cohort of 100 early CKD patients, patients with corrected QT (QTc) prolongation had higher IS levels. Furthermore, serum IS level was independently associated with prolonged QTc interval. In vitro, the delay rectifier potassium current (IK) was found to be significantly decreased after the treatment of IS in a dose-dependent manner. The modulation of IS to the IK was through the regulation of the major potassium ion channel protein Kv 2.1 phosphorylation. In a computer simulation, the decrease of IK by IS could prolong the action potential duration (APD) and induce early afterdepolarization, which is known to be a trigger mechanism of lethal ventricular arrhythmias. In conclusion, serum IS level is independently associated with the prolonged QTc interval in early CKD patients. IS down-regulated IK channel protein phosphorylation and the IK current activity that in turn increased the cardiomyocyte APD and QTc interval in vitro and in the computer ORd model. These findings suggest that IS may play a role in the development of arrhythmogenesis in CKD patients. PMID:25893644

  15. JS ISH-ISN-2 ROLE OF THE KIDNEY IN RESISTANT HYPERTENSION: WHY SO RESISTANT TO BP CONTROL IN CKD PATIENTS?

    PubMed

    Bakris, George

    2016-09-01

    Resistant hypertension is defined as a blood pressure above 140/90 mmHg despite adherence to a combination of at least three optimally dosed antihypertensive medications, one of which is a diuretic. Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is one of the more common patient comorbidities associated with resistant hypertension. Recommended low-salt diet and triple antihypertensive drug regimens that include a diuretic, should be complemented by the sequential addition of other antihypertensive drugs. CKD is associated with premature vascular ageing, characterized by accelerated arteriosclerosis or atherosclerosis and endothelial dysfunction. Vascular changes appear in the early stages of CKD, although they are most pronounced in advanced stages. Systolic hypertension is the most common form of hypertension in patients with CKD, and raised systolic BP is independently associated with risk of progression to chronic kidney disease. Rigid arterial walls attenuate baroreceptor control of efferent sympathetic activity and vagal activation. Reduced baroreflex sensitivity maintains high sympathetic activity directed to the heart, blood vessels, and kidney, which contributes to high BP. Patients with CKD also have an inadequate vasoconstrictor response to baroreceptor unloading, this contributes to frequent orthostatic hypotension and circulatory instability. Moreover, hypoxemia of renal tissue due to kidney damage activates the CNS via afferent nerves, which also contributes to high sympathetic activity. New therapeutic innovations for resistant hypertension, such as renal denervation and carotid barostimulation are under investigation especially in patients with advanced chronic kidney disease. One of the most common reasons for blood pressure resistance in CKD is volume overload with increased sympathetic activity also being a major contributor. We will focus on the epidemiology as well as pathophysiology and therapeutic approaches to managing resistant hypertension in CKD stages 3

  16. Competitive Interaction Between Fibroblast Growth Factor 23 And Asymmetric Dimethylarginine in Patients With CKD

    PubMed Central

    Tripepi, Giovanni; Kollerits, Barbara; Leonardis, Daniela; Yilmaz, Mahamut Ilker; Postorino, Maurizio; Fliser, Danilo; Mallamaci, Francesca; Kronenberg, Florian

    2015-01-01

    Both fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF-23) and asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) are associated with progression of CKD. We tested the hypothesis that ADMA and FGF23 are interactive factors for CKD progression in a cohort of 758 patients with CKD in Southern Europe (mean eGFR±SD, 36±13 ml/min per 1.73 m2) and in a central European cohort of 173 patients with CKD (MMKD study, mean eGFR, 64±39 ml/min per 1.73 m2). In the first cohort, 214 patients had renal events (decrease in eGFR of >30%, dialysis, or kidney transplantation) during a 3-year follow-up. Both intact FGF-23 and ADMA predicted the incidence rate of renal events in unadjusted and adjusted analyses (P<0.001). There was a strong competitive interaction between FGF-23 and ADMA in the risk of renal events (P<0.01 in adjusted analyses); the risk associated with raised ADMA levels was highest in patients with low FGF-23 levels. These results were confirmed in the MMKD cohort, in which FGF-23 level was again an effect modifier of the relationship between plasma ADMA level and renal events (doubling of baseline serum creatinine, dialysis, or kidney transplantation) in the adjusted analyses (P<0.01). Furthermore, in the MMKD cohort there was a parallel, independent competitive interaction between symmetric dimethylarginine level and c-terminal FGF-23 level for the risk for renal events (P=0.001). These findings indicate that the association of ADMA level with the risk of CKD progression is modified by FGF-23 level and provide further evidence that dysregulation of the nitric oxide system is involved in CKD progression. PMID:25150156

  17. Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) Treatment Burden Among Low-Income Primary Care Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kahn, Linda S.; Vest, Bonnie M.; Madurai, Nethra; Singh, Ranjit; York, Trevor R.M.; Cipparone, Charlotte W.; Reilly, Sarah; Malik, Khalid S.; Fox, Chester H.

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study explored the self-management strategies and treatment burden experienced by low income US primary care patients with chronic kidney disease. Methods Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 34 patients from two primary care practices on Buffalo’s East Side, a low-income community. Qualitative analysis was undertaken using an inductive thematic content analysis approach. We applied Normalization Process Theory (NPT) to the concept of treatment burden to interpret and categorize our findings. Results The sample was predominantly African-American (79%) and female (59%). Most patients (79%) had a diagnosis of Stage 3 CKD. Four major themes were identified corresponding to NPT and treatment burden: (1) Coherence – making sense of CKD; (2) Cognitive participation – enlisting support and organizing personal resources; (3) Collective action – self-management work; and (4) Reflexive monitoring – further refining chronic illness self-care in the context of CKD. For each component we identified barriers hindering patients’ ability to accomplish the necessary tasks. Conclusions Our findings highlight the substantial treatment burden faced by inner-city primary care patients self-managing CKD in combination with other chronic illnesses. Health care providers’ awareness of treatment burden can inform the development of person-centered care plans that can help patients to better manage their chronic illnesses. PMID:25416418

  18. Utility of Traditional Circulating and Imaging-Based Cardiac Biomarkers in Patients with Predialysis CKD

    PubMed Central

    Colbert, Gates; Jain, Nishank; de Lemos, James A.

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac biomarkers, such as cardiac troponin T (cTnT), brain natriuretic peptide (BNP), and N-terminal-pro-BNP (NT-pro-BNP), are commonly used to diagnose acute coronary syndrome and congestive heart failure exacerbation in symptomatic patients. Levels of these biomarkers are frequently chronically elevated in asymptomatic patients with ESRD who are receiving maintenance dialysis. Other imaging biomarkers commonly encountered in nephrologists’ clinical practice, such as coronary artery calcium measured by computed tomography, left ventricular hypertrophy, and carotid intima-media thickness, are also frequently abnormal in asymptomatic patients with ESRD. This article critically reviews the limited observational data on associations between cTnT, BNP, NT-pro-BNP, coronary artery calcium, left ventricular hypertrophy, and carotid intima-media thickness with cardiovascular events and death in non–dialysis-dependent patients with CKD. Although sufficient evidence suggests that these biomarkers may be used for prognostication, the diagnostic utility of cTnT, BNP, and NT-pro-BNP remain challenging in patients with CKD. Decreased renal clearance may affect the plasma levels of these biomarkers, and upper reference limits were originally derived in patients without CKD. Until better data are available, higher cutoffs, or a rise in level compared with previous values, have been proposed to help distinguish acute myocardial infarction from chronic elevations of cTnT in symptomatic patients with CKD. Additionally, it is not known whether these biomarkers are modifiable and amenable to interventions that could change hard clinical outcomes in patients with CKD not yet undergoing long-term dialysis. PMID:25403922

  19. The effect of sodium bicarbonate on cytokine secretion in CKD patients with metabolic acidosis.

    PubMed

    Ori, Yaacov; Zingerman, Boris; Bergman, Michael; Bessler, Hanna; Salman, Hertzel

    2015-04-01

    The incidence of acidosis increases with the progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD). Correction of acidosis by sodium bicarbonate may slow CKD deterioration. Inflammation, which is common in CKD, may be related to acidosis. Whether the slower rate of GFR decline following the correction of acidosis is related to changes in inflammatory markers is unknown. The current study examined whether correcting CKD-acidosis affected inflammatory cytokines secretion. Thirteen patients with CKD 4-5 and acidosis were tested for cytokines secretion from peripheral-blood mononuclear cells at baseline and after one month of oral sodium bicarbonate. Following treatment with sodium bicarbonate there was no change in weight, blood pressure, serum creatinine, albumin, sodium, calcium, phosphate, PTH, hemoglobin and CRP. Serum urea decreased (134±10-116±8 mg/dl, P=0.002), potassium decreased (5.1±0.4-4.8±0.1 mequiv./l, P=0.064), pH increased (7.29±0.01-7.33±0.01, P=0.008), and serum bicarbonate increased (18.6±0.4 mequiv./l to 21.3±0.3 mequiv./l, P=0.001). The secretion of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 decreased (2.75±0.25 ng/ml to 2.29±0.21 ng/ml, P=0.041). There was no significant change in the secretion of the other pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines, including IL-1β, IL-2, IL-6, TNFα, IFNγ, IL-1ra. Thus, correcting acidosis in CKD with bicarbonate decreases IL-10 secretion. Its significance needs to be further investigated.

  20. Association between absolute blood eosinophil count and CKD stages among cardiac patients.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Rui; Fujita, Shu-Ichi; Kizawa, Shun; Sakane, Kazushi; Morita, Hideaki; Ozeki, Michishige; Sohmiya, Koichi; Hoshiga, Masaaki; Ishizaka, Nobukazu

    2016-02-01

    Elevated eosinophil count was shown to be associated with the development of cholesterol embolization syndrome, a potentially life-threatening condition, after catheter-based procedures. We investigated the association between stages of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and the absolute eosinophil count (AEC) among cardiac patients. CKD stages were determined solely on the estimated glomerular filtration rate or requirement for hemodialysis. Eosinophilia is defined as an eosinophil count exceeding 500/μL. A total of 1022 patients were enrolled in the current study, and eosinophil counts (/μL) in the first through fourth eosinophil count quartiles were <88, 88 to 154, 155 to <238, and 238 ≤, respectively, and 29 patients (2.8 %) had eosinophilia. Correlation coefficient between the AEC and age was -0.188 (P = 0.001) in women and -0.042 (n.s.) in men (by Spearman's correlation test). Patients with higher CKD stages had a higher prevalence of the highest AEC quartile or eosinophilia. Logistic regression analysis using severe renal dysfunction (i.e., CKD stage 4 or 5) as the dependent variable, the highest AEC quartile had a significant positive association with an odds ratio of 1.99 (95 % confidence interval, 1.20-3.31, P < 0.01) after adjustment for sex, age, systolic blood pressure, and total white blood cell count. Similarly, after adjustment for the same variables, eosinophilia was associated with severe renal dysfunction with an odds ratio of 2.60 (95 % confidence interval, 1.08-6.26, P < 0.05). Eosinophil count was positively associated with higher CKD stages among cardiology patients, some fraction of which might be related to subclinical cholesterol embolization.

  1. How do We Manage Coronary Artery Disease in Patients with CKD and ESRD?

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Hoon Young; Park, Hyeong Cheon

    2014-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) has been shown to be an independent risk factor for cardiovascular events. In addition, patients with pre-dialysis CKD appear to be more likely to die of heart disease than of kidney disease. CKD accelerates coronary artery atherosclerosis by several mechanisms, notably hypertension and dyslipidemia, both of which are known risk factors for coronary artery disease. In addition, CKD alters calcium and phosphorus homeostasis, resulting in hypercalcemia and vascular calcification, including the coronary arteries. Mortality of patients on long-term dialysis therapy is high, with age-adjusted mortality rates of about 25% annually. Because the majority of deaths are caused by cardiovascular disease, routine cardiac catheterization of new dialysis patients was proposed as a means of improving the identification and treatment of high-risk patients. However, clinicians may be uncomfortable exposing asymptomatic patients to such invasive procedures like cardiac catheterization, thus noninvasive cardiac risk stratification was investigated widely as a more palatable alternative to routine diagnostic catheterization. The effective management of coronary artery disease is of paramount importance in uremic patients. The applicability of diagnostic, preventive, and treatment modalities developed in nonuremic populations to patients with kidney failure cannot necessarily be extrapolated from clinical studies in non-kidney failure populations. Noninvasive diagnostic testing in uremic patients is less accurate than in nonuremic populations. Initial data suggest that dobutamine echocardiography may be the preferred diagnostic method. PCI with stenting is a less favorable alternative to CABG, however, it has a faster recovery time, reduced invasiveness, and no overall mortality difference in nondiabetic and non-CKD patients compared with CABG. CABG is associated with reduced repeat revascularizations, greater relief of angina, and increased long term

  2. Using an electronic self-management tool to support patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD): a CKD clinic self-care model.

    PubMed

    Ong, Stephanie W; Jassal, Sarbjit V; Porter, Eveline; Logan, Alexander G; Miller, Judith A

    2013-01-01

    New healthcare delivery models are needed to enhance the patient experience and improve quality of care for individuals with chronic conditions such as kidney disease. One potential avenue is to implement self-management strategies. There is growing evidence that self-management interventions help optimize various aspects of chronic disease management. With the increasing use of information technology (IT) in health care, chronic disease management programs are incorporating IT solutions to support patient self-management practices. IT solutions have the ability to promote key principles of self-management, namely education, empowerment, and collaboration. Positive clinical outcomes have been demonstrated for a number of chronic conditions when IT solutions were incorporated into self-management programs. There is a paucity of evidence for self-management in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. Furthermore, IT strategies have not been tested in this patient population to the same extent as other chronic conditions (e.g., diabetes, hypertension). Therefore, it is currently unknown if IT strategies will promote self-management behaviors and lead to improvements in overall patient care. We designed and developed an IT solution called My KidneyCare Centre to support self-management strategies for patients with CKD. In this review, we discuss the rationale and vision of incorporating an electronic self-management tool to support the care of patients with CKD.

  3. Usability of a CKD Educational Website Targeted to Patients and Their Family Members

    PubMed Central

    Zuckerman, Marni; Fink, Wanda; Hu, Peter; Yang, Shiming; Fink, Jeffrey C.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background and objectives Web-based technology is critical to the future of healthcare. As part of the Safe Kidney Care cohort study evaluating patient safety in CKD, this study determined how effectively a representative sample of patients with CKD or family members could interpret and use the Safe Kidney Care website (www.safekidneycare.org), an informational website on safety in CKD. Design, setting, participants, & measurements Between November of 2011 and January of 2012, persons with CKD or their family members underwent formal usability testing administered by a single interviewer with a second recording observer. Each participant was independently provided a list of 21 tasks to complete, with each task rated as either easily completed/noncritical error or critical error (user cannot complete the task without significant interviewer intervention). Results Twelve participants completed formal usability testing. Median completion time for all tasks was 17.5 minutes (range=10–44 minutes). In total, 10 participants had greater than or equal to one critical error. There were 55 critical errors in 252 tasks (22%), with the highest proportion of critical errors occurring when participants were asked to find information on treatments that may damage kidneys, find the website on the internet, increase font size, and scroll to the bottom of the webpage. Participants were generally satisfied with the content and usability of the website. Conclusions Web-based educational materials for patients with CKD should target a wide range of computer literacy levels and anticipate variability in competency in use of the computer and internet. PMID:22798537

  4. Relationship between Ambulatory BP and Clinical Outcomes in Patients with Hypertensive CKD

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Mahboob; Hu, Bo; Appel, Lawrence J.; Charleston, Jeanne; Contreras, Gabriel; Faulkner, Marquetta L.; Hiremath, Leena; Jamerson, Kenneth A.; Lea, Janice P.; Lipkowitz, Michael S.; Pogue, Velvie A.; Rostand, Stephen G.; Smogorzewski, Miroslaw J.; Wright, Jackson T.; Greene, Tom; Gassman, Jennifer; Wang, Xuelei; Phillips, Robert A.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background and objectives Abnormal ambulatory BP (ABP) profiles are commonplace in CKD, yet the prognostic value of ABP for renal and cardiovascular outcomes is uncertain. This study assessed the relationship of baseline ABP profiles with CKD progression and subsequent cardiovascular outcomes to determine the prognostic value of ABP beyond that of clinic BP measurements. Design, setting, participants, & measurements Between 2002 and 2003, 617 African Americans with hypertensive CKD treated to a clinic BP goal of <130/80 mmHg were enrolled in this prospective, observational study. Participants were followed for a median of 5 years. Primary renal outcome was a composite of doubling of serum creatinine, ESRD, or death. The primary cardiovascular outcome was a composite of myocardial infarction, hospitalized congestive heart failure, stroke, revascularization procedures, cardiovascular death, and ESRD. Results Multivariable Cox proportional hazard analysis showed that higher 24-hour systolic BP (SBP), daytime, night-time, and clinic SBP were each associated with subsequent renal (hazard ratio, 1.17–1.28; P<0.001) and cardiovascular outcomes (hazard ratio, 1.22–1.32; P<0.001). After controlling for clinic SBP, ABP measures were predictive of renal outcomes in participants with clinic SBP <130 mmHg (P<0.05 for interaction). ABP predicted cardiovascular outcomes with no interaction based on clinic BP control. Conclusions ABP provides additional information beyond that of multiple clinic BP measures in predicting renal and cardiovascular outcomes in African Americans with hypertensive CKD. The primary utility of ABP in these CKD patients was to identify high-risk individuals among those patients with controlled clinic BP. PMID:22935847

  5. "Dietaly": practical issues for the nutritional management of CKD patients in Italy.

    PubMed

    D'Alessandro, Claudia; Piccoli, Giorgina Barbara; Calella, Patrizia; Brunori, Giuliano; Pasticci, Franca; Egidi, Maria Francesca; Capizzi, Irene; Bellizzi, Vincenzo; Cupisti, Adamasco

    2016-07-29

    Evidence exists that nutritional therapy induces favorable metabolic changes, prevents signs and symptoms of renal insufficiency, and is able to delay the need of dialysis. Currently, the main concern of the renal diets has turned from the efficacy to the feasibility in the daily clinical practice.Herewith we describe some different dietary approaches, developed in Italy in the last decades and applied in the actual clinical practice for the nutritional management of CKD patients.A step-wise approach or simplified dietary regimens are usually prescribed while taking into account not only the residual renal function and progression rate but also socio-economic, psychological and functional aspects.The application of the principles of the Mediterranean diet that covers the recommended daily allowances for nutrients and protein (0.8 g/Kg/day) exert a favorable effect at least in the early stages of CKD. Low protein (0.6 g/kg/day) regimens that include vegan diet and very low-protein (0.3-0.4 g/Kg/day) diet supplemented with essential amino acids and ketoacids, represent more opportunities that should be tailored on the single patient's needs.Rather than a structured dietary plan, a list of basic recommendations to improve compliance with a low-sodium diet in CKD may allow patients to reach the desired salt target in the daily eating.Another approach consists of low protein diets as part of an integrated menu, in which patients can choose the "diet" that best suits their preferences and clinical needs.Lastly, in order to allow efficacy and safety, the importance of monitoring and follow up of a proper nutritional treatment in CKD patients is emphasized.

  6. Intravenous Iron Repletion Does Not Significantly Decrease Platelet Counts in CKD Patients with Iron Deficiency Anemia.

    PubMed

    Dossabhoy, Neville R; Gascoyne, Rebecca; Turley, Steven

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. We sought to investigate the effect of IV iron repletion on platelet (PLT) counts in CKD patients with iron deficiency anemia (IDA). Methods. We conducted a retrospective chart review, including all patients with CKD and IDA who were treated with iron dextran total dose infusion (TDI) between 2002 and 2007. Patient demographics were noted, and laboratory values for creatinine, hemoglobin (Hgb), iron stores and PLT were recorded pre- and post-dose. Results. 153 patients received a total of 251 doses of TDI (mean ± SD = 971 ± 175 mg); age 69 ± 12 years and Creatinine 3.3 ± 1.9 mg/dL. All CKD stages were represented (stage 4 commonest). Hgb and Fe stores improved post-TDI (P ≪ 0.001). There was a very mild decrease in PLT (pre-TDI 255 versus post-TDI 244, P = 0.30). The mild reduction in PLT after TDI remained non-significant (P > 0.05) when data was stratified by molecular weight (MW) of iron dextran used (low versus high), as well as by dose administered (<1000 versus ≥1000 mg). Linear regression analysis between pre-dose PLT and Tsat and Fe showed R2 of 0.01 and 0.04, respectively. Conclusion. Correction of iron deficiency did not significantly lower PLT in CKD patients, regardless of MW or dose used. Correlation of PLT to severity of iron deficiency was very weak.

  7. Epidemiology, Diagnosis, and Management of Depression in Patients With CKD

    PubMed Central

    Hedayati, S. Susan; Finkelstein, Fredric O.

    2011-01-01

    CASE PRESENTATION A 58-year-old Hispanic man who has been dialysis dependent for 2 years because of diabetic nephropathy reports depressive symptoms during dialysis rounds. For the past 6 weeks, he has had reduced energy and difficulty sleeping and concentrating. He reports a loss of interest in his usual hobbies and family activities and notes an increasing sense of feeling worthless and guilty. He denies suicidal ideation. Medical history includes diabetic retinopathy and neuropathy, coronary artery disease treated with 4-vessel coronary artery bypass grafting 3 years ago, ischemic cardiomyopathy with an ejection fraction of 30%, and cerebrovascular disease. His wife recently has been given a diagnosis of breast cancer. His medications are aspirin, metoprolol, lisinopril, simvastatin, sevelamer, and epoetin alfa. His blood pressure is 130/75 mm Hg, pulse is 65 beats/min, and cardiac and pulmonary examination results are unremarkable. He is interviewed by the social worker in the dialysis unit, who diagnoses clinical depression by using standard Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (Fourth Edition) (DSM IV) criteria. The patient refuses to discuss his problems with the social worker and declines further psychiatric evaluation. His nephrologist discusses a trial of antidepressant medication, but the patient refuses to use additional medication. During the next month, the patient presents with greater interdialytic weight gains and begins to come late for dialysis sessions. He then presents to a dialysis session reporting dyspnea and orthopnea and is found to have a 10-kg weight gain. On physical examination, blood pressure is 196/96 mm Hg and he has increased jugular venous pressure and bibasilar crackles. He is admitted to the hospital with a diagnosis of congestive heart failure. PMID:19592143

  8. Effects of Uric Acid on Lipid Levels in CKD Patients in a Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Bowden, Rodney G.; Shelmadine, Brian D.; Moreillon, Jennifer J.; Deike, Erika; Griggs, Jackson O.; Wilson, Ronald L.

    2013-01-01

    Background Few studies have been conducted that compared lipid levels and uric acid in CKD or End-Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) patients with most using animal models. The purpose of the study was to explore effects on lipids while controlling uric acid levels in CKD patients. Methods Twenty-four CKD patients (N = 24) volunteered to participate in this study. The study was conducted using a double-blind, randomized, placebo controlled experimental protocol. The experimental group was prescribed 300 mg of allopurinol PO daily by their treating physician and followed prospectively for 8-weeks. The control group consumed a similar pill once a day for 8-weeks. Results ANCOVA revealed significant differences in total cholesterol (P = 0.009) and Apo B (P = 0.006) with lower levels in the allopurinol group. A trend emerged with LDL (P = 0.052) with lower levels in the allopurinol group. No significant differences were discovered in triglycerides (P = 0.403), HDL (P = 0.762) and total Cholesterol/HDL Ratio (P = 0.455). Conclusions After statistically controlling for compliance and inflammation significant differences between groups were observed for total cholesterol and Apo B. In both instances the allopurinol group had lower concentrations than the placebo group. Similarly, a trend was observed in LDL with the allopurinol group having lower concentrations than the placebo group.

  9. Assessed value of high-sensitivity cardiac troponin T for cardiovascular disease among CKD patients.

    PubMed

    Sun, Li; Tan, Xiao; Cao, Xuesen; Zou, Jianzhou

    2016-06-01

    Objective To analyze the relationship between serum high-sensitivity cardiac troponin T (hs-cTnT) and cardiovascular disease (CVD) among non-dialysis chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients, and to further explore its value of evaluating and predicting CVD in this population. Methods Five hundred and fifty-seven non-dialysis CKD patients were involved in this cross-sectional study. The relationship between serum hs-cTnT and CVD was analyzed using comparison between groups and regression analysis, and its value on assessing cardiac structure and function was evaluated by ROC curves. Results Median level of hs-cTnT was 13 (7-29) ng/L, with 1.7% undetectable, 46.4% greater than 99th percentile of the general population. Multivariate analysis suggested that compared with the lowest quartile of hs-cTnT, the highest quartile was approximately six times as likely to develop into LVH (OR, 6.515; 95% CI, 3.478-12.206, p < 0.05) and 18 times as likely to progress to left ventricular diastolic dysfunction(OR, 18.741; 95% CI, 2.422-145.017, p < 0.05). And Ln cTnT level had a more modest association with LVEF (OR, -1.117; 95% CI, -5.839 to -0.594; p < 0.05). When evaluated as a screening test, the area under the curve of ROC curves for hs-cTnT was 0.718, 0.788 and 0.736, respectively (p < 0.05). With a specificity of 90% as a diagnostic criterion, the value of hs-cTnT to evaluate LVH, LVEF < 50%, left ventricular diastolic dysfunction increased across CKD stages, from CKD 1 stage to CKD 5 stage. Conclusions In CKD non-dialysis population, hs-cTnT and NT-proBNP were valuable for evaluating LVH, left ventricular systolic dysfunction and left ventricular diastolic dysfunction.

  10. Cholesterol Metabolism in CKD.

    PubMed

    Reiss, Allison B; Voloshyna, Iryna; De Leon, Joshua; Miyawaki, Nobuyuki; Mattana, Joseph

    2015-12-01

    Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) have a substantial risk of developing coronary artery disease. Traditional cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors such as hypertension and hyperlipidemia do not adequately explain the high prevalence of CVD in CKD. Both CVD and CKD are inflammatory states and inflammation adversely affects lipid balance. Dyslipidemia in CKD is characterized by elevated triglyceride levels and high-density lipoprotein levels that are both decreased and dysfunctional. This dysfunctional high-density lipoprotein becomes proinflammatory and loses its atheroprotective ability to promote cholesterol efflux from cells, including lipid-overloaded macrophages in the arterial wall. Elevated triglyceride levels result primarily from defective clearance. The weak association between low-density lipoprotein cholesterol level and coronary risk in CKD has led to controversy over the usefulness of statin therapy. This review examines disrupted cholesterol transport in CKD, presenting both clinical and preclinical evidence of the effect of the uremic environment on vascular lipid accumulation. Preventative and treatment strategies are explored.

  11. The Management of Diabetic Neuropathy in CKD and Dialysis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Pop-Busui, Rodica; Roberts, Laurel; Pennathur, Subramaniam; Kretzler, Mathias; Brosius, Frank C.; Feldman, Eva L.

    2014-01-01

    Case Presentation A 64-year-old male with a 15-year history of poorly controlled type 2 diabetes and a 10-year history of hypertension and hyperlipidemia had developed multiple diabetes-related complications within the last 5 years. He first developed albuminuria 5 years ago, and over the next several years experienced fairly rapid decline in kidney function, with eGFR of 55 mL/min/1.73m2 noted 2 years ago. He was diagnosed with proliferative retinopathy 5 years ago and underwent laser photocoagulation. Four years ago, he noted symptoms of peripheral neuropathy manifested as shooting pain and numbness with loss of light touch, thermal and vibratory sensation in a stocking distribution. Last year he developed a non-healing ulcer on the plantar aspect of his left foot which was complicated with gangrene and resulted in a below-the-knee amputation of the left leg one year ago. He now reports a new onset of weakness, lightheadedness and dizziness on standing that affects his daily activities. He reports lancinating pain in his right lower extremity, worse in the evening. Medications include: neutral protamine Hagedorn insulin twice daily and regular insulin on a sliding scale, metoprolol 50 mg/d, lisinopril 40 mg/d, atorvastatin 80 mg/d, furosemide 40 mg/d and aspirin 81 mg/d. Blood pressure is 127/69 mm Hg with a pulse rate of 96 bpm while supine and 94/50 mmHg with a pulse rate of 102 bpm while standing. Strength is normal but with a complete loss of all sensory modalities to the knee in his remaining limb and up to the wrists in both upper extremities, and he is areflexic. Today's laboratory evaluations show a serum creatinine of 2.8 mg/dl, an estimated GFR (eGFR) of 24 ml/min/1.73m2, a hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) of 7.9 % and 2.1 g of urine protein per gram of creatinine. What would be the most appropriate management for this patient? PMID:20042258

  12. Long-term efficacy of oral calcium polystyrene sulfonate for hyperkalemia in CKD patients

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Mi-Yeon; Yeo, Jee Hyun; Park, Joon-Sung; Lee, Chang Hwa

    2017-01-01

    Background Calcium polystyrene sulfonate (CPS) has long been used to treat hyperkalemia in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). However, its efficacy and safety profile have not been systematically explored. We investigated the long-term efficacy of oral CPS for treating mild hyperkalemia on an outpatient basis. Methods We performed a retrospective analysis of ambulatory CKD patients who were prescribed CPS for > 1 week because of elevated serum potassium levels > 5.0 mmol/L. Patients were divided into four groups according to the length of time that they took a fixed dosage of CPS (Group 1, < 3 months; Group 2, 3–6 months; Group 3, 6–12 months; and Group 4, > 1 year). Response was defined as a decrease in the serum potassium level (> 0.3 mmol/L) after treatment with CPS. Results We enrolled a total of 247 adult patients with a basal eGFR level of 30 ± 15 mL/min/1.73 m2. All patients took small doses of CPS (8.0 ± 3.6 g/d), and serum potassium decreased in a dose-dependent fashion. Serum potassium of all patients decreased significantly from 5.8 ± 0.3 mmol/L to 4.9 ± 0.7 mmol/L with CPS treatment (P < 0.001). The response rates were 79.9%, 71.4%, 66.7%, and 86.8% in Groups 1, 2, 3, and 4, respectively. No serious adverse effects were reported during CPS administration, though constipation was noted in 19 patients (8%). Conclusion Small doses of oral CPS are effective and safe for controlling mild hyperkalemia in CKD patients over a long period of time. PMID:28328954

  13. The "phosphorus pyramid": a visual tool for dietary phosphate management in dialysis and CKD patients.

    PubMed

    D'Alessandro, Claudia; Piccoli, Giorgina B; Cupisti, Adamasco

    2015-01-20

    Phosphorus retention plays a pivotal role in the onset of mineral and bone disorders (MBD) in chronic kidney disease (CKD). Phosphorus retention commonly occurs as a result of net intestinal absorption exceeding renal excretion or dialysis removal. The dietary phosphorus load is crucial since the early stages of CKD, throughout the whole course of the disease, up to dialysis-dependent end-stage renal disease.Agreement exits regarding the need for dietary phosphate control, but it is quite challenging in the real-life setting. Effective strategies to control dietary phosphorus intake include restricting phosphorus-rich foods, preferring phosphorus sourced from plant origin, boiling as the preferred cooking procedure and avoiding foods with phosphorus-containing additives. Nutritional education is crucial in this regard.Based on the existing literature, we developed the "phosphorus pyramid", namely a novel, visual, user-friendly tool for the nutritional education of patients and health-care professionals. The pyramid consists of six levels in which foods are arranged on the basis of their phosphorus content, phosphorus to protein ratio and phosphorus bioavailability. Each has a colored edge (from green to red) that corresponds to recommended intake frequency, ranging from "unrestricted" to "avoid as much as possible".The aim of the phosphorus pyramid is to support dietary counseling in order to reduce the phosphorus load, a crucial aspect of integrated CKD-MBD management.

  14. Protein Nutrition and Malnutrition in CKD and ESRD

    PubMed Central

    Zha, Yan; Qian, Qi

    2017-01-01

    Elevated protein catabolism and protein malnutrition are common in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and end-stage renal disease (ESRD). The underlying etiology includes, but is not limited to, metabolic acidosis intestinal dysbiosis; systemic inflammation with activation of complements, endothelin-1 and renin-angiotensin-aldosterone (RAAS) axis; anabolic hormone resistance; energy expenditure elevation; and uremic toxin accumulation. All of these derangements can further worsen kidney function, leading to poor patient outcomes. Many of these CKD-related derangements can be prevented and substantially reversed, representing an area of great potential to improve CKD and ESRD care. This review integrates known information and recent advances in the area of protein nutrition and malnutrition in CKD and ESRD. Management recommendations are summarized. Thorough understanding the pathogenesis and etiology of protein malnutrition in CKD and ESRD patients will undoubtedly facilitate the design and development of more effective strategies to optimize protein nutrition and improve outcomes. PMID:28264439

  15. Length polymorphism in heme oxygenase-1 and risk of CKD among patients with coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu-Hsin; Kuo, Ko-Lin; Hung, Szu-Chun; Hsu, Chih-Cheng; Chen, Ying-Hwa; Tarng, Der-Cherng

    2014-11-01

    The length polymorphism of guanosine thymidine dinucleotide repeats in the heme oxygenase-1 gene promoter is associated with cardiovascular events and mortality in high-risk populations. Experimental data suggest that heme oxygenase-1 protects against kidney disease. However, the association between this polymorphism and long-term risk of CKD in high-risk patients is unknown. We analyzed the allelic frequencies of guanosine thymidine dinucleotide repeats in the heme oxygenase-1 gene promoter in 386 patients with coronary artery disease recruited from January 1999 to July 2001 and followed until August 31, 2012. The S allele represents short repeats (<27), and the L allele represents long repeats (≥27). The primary renal end points consisted of sustained serum creatinine doubling and/or ESRD requiring long-term RRT. The secondary end points were major adverse cardiovascular events and mortality. At the end of study, the adjusted hazard ratios (95% confidence intervals) for each L allele in the additive model were 1.99 (1.27 to 3.14; P=0.003) for the renal end points, 1.70 (1.27 to 2.27; P<0.001) for major adverse cardiovascular events, and 1.36 (1.04 to 1.79; P=0.03) for mortality. With cardiac events as time-dependent covariates, the adjusted hazard ratio for each L allele in the additive model was 1.91 (1.20 to 3.06; P=0.01) for the renal end points. In conclusion, a greater number of guanosine thymidine dinucleotide repeats in the heme oxygenase-1 gene promoter is associated with higher risk for CKD, cardiovascular events, and mortality among patients with coronary artery disease.

  16. Epidemiology of hypertension in CKD.

    PubMed

    Horowitz, Bruce; Miskulin, Dana; Zager, Philip

    2015-03-01

    Both hypertension (HTN) and CKD are serious interrelated global public health problems. Nearly 30% and 15% of US adults have HTN and CKD, respectively. Because HTN may cause or result from CKD, HTN prevalence is higher and control more difficult with worse kidney function. Etiology of CKD, presence and degree of albuminuria, and genetic factors all influence HTN severity and prevalence. In addition, socioeconomic and lifestyle factors influence HTN prevalence and control. There are racial and ethnic disparities in the prevalence, treatment, risks, and outcomes of HTN in patients with CKD. Control of blood pressure (BP) in Hispanic and African Americans with CKD is worse than it is whites. There are disparities in the patterns of treatment and rates of progression of CKD in patients with HTN. The presence and severity of CKD increase treatment resistance. HTN is also extremely prevalent in patients receiving hemodialysis, and optimal targets for BP control are being elucidated. Although the awareness, treatment, and control of HTN in CKD patients is improving, control of BP in patients at all stages of CKD remains suboptimal.

  17. Associations of Soluble CD14 and Endotoxin with Mortality, Cardiovascular Disease, and Progression of Kidney Disease among Patients with CKD

    PubMed Central

    Poesen, Ruben; Ramezani, Ali; Claes, Kathleen; Augustijns, Patrick; Kuypers, Dirk; Barrows, Ian R.; Muralidharan, Jagadeesan; Evenepoel, Pieter; Meijers, Björn

    2015-01-01

    Background and objectives CD14 plays a key role in the innate immunity as pattern-recognition receptor of endotoxin. Higher levels of soluble CD14 (sCD14) are associated with overall mortality in hemodialysis patients. The influence of kidney function on plasma sCD14 levels and its relationship with adverse outcomes in patients with CKD not yet on dialysis is unknown. This study examines the associations between plasma levels of sCD14 and endotoxin with adverse outcomes in patients with CKD. Design, setting, participants, & measurements We measured plasma levels of sCD14 and endotoxin in 495 Leuven Mild-to-Moderate CKD Study participants. Mild-to-moderate CKD was defined as presence of kidney damage or eGFR<60 ml/min per 1.73 m2 for ≥3 months, with exclusion of patients on RRT. Study participants were enrolled between November 2005 and September 2006. Results Plasma sCD14 was negatively associated with eGFR (ρ=–0.34, P<0.001). During a median follow-up of 54 (interquartile range, 23–58) months, 53 patients died. Plasma sCD14 was predictive of mortality, even after adjustment for renal function, Framingham risk factors, markers of mineral bone metabolism, and nutritional and inflammatory parameters (hazard ratio [HR] per SD higher of 1.90; 95% confidence interval [95% CI],1.32 to 2.74; P<0.001). After adjustment for the same risk factors, plasma sCD14 was also a predictor of cardiovascular disease (HR, 1.30; 95% CI, 1.00 to 1.69; P=0.05). Although plasma sCD14 was associated with progression of CKD, defined as reaching ESRD or doubling of serum creatinine in models adjusted for CKD-specific risk factors (HR, 1.24; 95% CI, 1.01 to 1.52; P=0.04), significance was lost when adjusted for proteinuria (HR, 1.19; 95% CI, 0.96 to 1.48; P=0.11). There was neither correlation between plasma endotoxin and sCD14 (ρ=–0.06, P=0.20) nor was endotoxin independently associated with adverse outcome during follow-up. Conclusions Plasma sCD14 is elevated in patients with

  18. Assessing Glomerular Filtration Rate in Hospitalized Patients: A Comparison Between CKD-EPI and Four Cystatin C-Based Equations

    PubMed Central

    de la Torre, Judith; Ramos, Natalia; Quiroz, Augusto; Garjau, Maria; Torres, Irina; Azancot, M. Antonia; López, Montserrat; Sobrado, Ana

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background and objectives A specific method is required for estimating glomerular filtration rate GFR in hospitalized patients. Our objective was to validate the Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration (CKD-EPI) equation and four cystatin C (CysC)–based equations in this setting. Design, setting, participants, & measurements This was an epidemiologic, cross-sectional study in a random sample of hospitalized patients (n = 3114). We studied the accuracy of the CKD-EPI and four CysC-based equations—based on (1) CysC alone or (2) adjusted by gender; (3) age, gender, and race; and (4) age, gender, race, and creatinine, respectively—compared with GFR measured by iohexol clearance (mGFR). Clinical, biochemical, and nutritional data were also collected. Results The CysC equation 3 significantly overestimated the GFR (bias of 7.4 ml/min per 1.73 m2). Most of the error in creatinine-based equations was attributable to calculated muscle mass, which depended on patient's nutritional status. In patients without malnutrition or reduced body surface area, the CKD-EPI equation adequately estimated GFR. Equations based on CysC gave more precise mGFR estimates when malnutrition, extensive reduction of body surface area, or loss of muscle mass were present (biases of 1 and 1.3 ml/min per 1.73 m2 for equations 2 and 4, respectively, versus 5.9 ml/min per 1.73 m2 for CKD-EPI). Conclusions These results suggest that the use of equations based on CysC and gender, or CysC, age, gender, and race, is more appropriate in hospitalized patients to estimate GFR, since these equations are much less dependent on patient's nutritional status or muscle mass than the CKD-EPI equation. PMID:21852668

  19. [Causes and characteristics of CKD].

    PubMed

    Moriyama, Toshiki

    2008-09-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is common in Japan and worldwide. The estimated prevalence of CKD in Japanese adults was 10.6% in 2005, based on the survey conducted by the Japanese Society of Nephrology. The most common risk factors for CKD include diabetes, hypertension and cardiovascular disease. Major outcomes of CKD include progression to kidney failure and increased risk for cardiovascular disease. CKD is usually silent until its late stages, thus many patients with CKD are detected only shortly before the onset of symptomatic kidney failure, when there are few opportunities to prevent adverse outcomes. Earlier detection allows for more time for evaluation and treatment but requires explicit testing strategies for asymptomatic individuals at increased risk. Understanding the strengths and limitations of CKD testing and risk factors of CKD is critical for appropriate management of CKD patients. The goal of this paper is to discuss CKD testing and early detection in clinical practice and its application to public health initiatives, with attention to limitations and appropriate interpretation.

  20. Albuminuria Is an Appropriate Therapeutic Target in Patients with CKD: The Pro View

    PubMed Central

    Gansevoort, Ron T.

    2015-01-01

    The presence of elevated levels of albuminuria is associated with an increased risk of progressive renal function loss over time. This association is found in various pathophysiological conditions, including diabetic nephropathy, hypertensive nephropathy, and various primary renal diseases, but also, the general, otherwise healthy population. Emerging data report that elevated albuminuria causes tubulointerstitial damage through activation of proinflammatory mediators, which ultimately leads to a progressive decline in renal function. Nowadays, various drugs are available that decrease the rate of GFR loss in patients with kidney disease. Well known are renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system inhibitors, but there are also other drugs and interventions, like intensive glucose control, anti-inflammatory agents (pentoxifylline), or a low-protein diet. These interventions have an additional effect beyond their original target, namely lowering albuminuria. Analyses from clinical trials show that the reduction in albuminuria observed during the first months of treatment with these drugs correlates with the degree of long-term renal protection: the larger the initial reduction in albuminuria, the lower the risk of ESRD during treatment. In addition, in treated patients, residual albuminuria is again the strongest risk marker for renal disease progression. These observations combined provide a strong argument that albuminuria is an appropriate therapeutic target in patients with CKD. PMID:25887073

  1. Mechanisms of anemia in CKD.

    PubMed

    Babitt, Jodie L; Lin, Herbert Y

    2012-10-01

    Anemia is a common feature of CKD associated with poor outcomes. The current management of patients with anemia in CKD is controversial, with recent clinical trials demonstrating increased morbidity and mortality related to erythropoiesis stimulating agents. Here, we examine recent insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying anemia of CKD. These insights hold promise for the development of new diagnostic tests and therapies that directly target the pathophysiologic processes underlying this form of anemia.

  2. Confounding and control of confounding in nonexperimental studies of medications in patients with CKD.

    PubMed

    Bradbury, Brian D; Gilbertson, David T; Brookhart, M Alan; Kilpatrick, Ryan D

    2012-01-01

    Confounding is an important source of bias in nonexperimental studies, arising when the effect of an exposure on the occurrence of an outcome is distorted by the effect of some other factor. In nonexperimental studies of patients with CKD or who are on chronic dialysis, confounding is a significant concern owing to the high burden of comorbid disease, extent of required clinical management, and high frequency of adverse clinical events in this patient population. Confounding can be addressed in both the design stage (restriction, accurate measurement of confounders) and analysis stage (stratification, multivariable adjustment, propensity scores, marginal structural models, instrumental variable) of a study. Time-dependent confounding and confounding by indication are 2 special cases of confounding that can arise in studies of treatment effects and may require more sophisticated analytic techniques to adequately address. The availability and expanded use of large health care databases have ensured greater precision and have now placed the focus on validity. Addressing the major threats to validity, such as confounding, should be a first-order concern.

  3. Telemedicine to Promote Patient Safety: Use of Phone-Based Interactive Voice-Response System to Reduce Adverse Safety Events in Pre-dialysis CKD.

    PubMed

    Weiner, Shoshana; Fink, Jeffery C

    2017-01-01

    CKD patients have several features conferring on them a high risk of adverse safety events, which are defined as incidents with unintended harm related to processes of care or medications. These characteristics include impaired kidney function, polypharmacy, and frequent health system encounters. The consequences of such events in CKD can include new or prolonged hospitalization, accelerated kidney function loss, acute kidney injury, ESRD, and death. Health information technology administered via telemedicine presents opportunities for CKD patients to remotely communicate safety-related findings to providers for the purpose of improving their care. However, many CKD patients have limitations that hinder their use of telemedicine and access to the broad capabilities of health information technology. In this review, we summarize previous assessments of the pre-dialysis CKD populations' proficiency in using telemedicine modalities and describe the use of interactive voice-response system to gauge the safety phenotype of the CKD patient. We discuss the potential for expanded interactive voice-response system use in CKD to address the safety threats inherent to this population.

  4. Association of FMO3 Variants and Trimethylamine N-Oxide Concentration, Disease Progression, and Mortality in CKD Patients

    PubMed Central

    Robinson-Cohen, Cassianne; Newitt, Richard; Shen, Danny D.; Rettie, Allan E.; Kestenbaum, Bryan R.; Himmelfarb, Jonathan; Yeung, Catherine K.

    2016-01-01

    Elevated levels of circulating pro-atherogenic uremic solutes, particularly trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO), have been implicated in cardiovascular disease development in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). TMAO is generated from trimethylamine (TMA) via metabolism by hepatic flavin-containing monooxygenase isoform 3 (FMO3). We determined the functional effects of three common FMO3 variants at amino acids 158, 308, and 257 on TMAO concentrations in a prospective cohort study and evaluated associations of polymorphisms with CKD progression and mortality. Each additional minor allele at amino acid 158 was associated with a 0.38 μg/mL higher circulating TMAO (p = 0.01) and with faster rates of annualized relative eGFR decline. Participants with 0, 1 and 2 variant alleles averaged an eGFR loss of 8%, 12%, and 14% per year, respectively (p-for trend = 0.05). Compared to participants with the homozygous reference allele, heterozygous and homozygous variant participants had a 2.0-fold (95% CI: 0.85, 4.6) and 2.2-fold (95% CI: 0.89, 5.48) higher risk of mortality, respectively (p-for-trend = 0.04). No associations with clinical outcomes were observed for allelic variants at amino acids 257 or 308. Understanding the contribution of genetic variation of FMO3 to disease progression and all-cause mortality can guide recommendations for diet modification or pharmacotherapy in CKD patients at increased risk of adverse outcomes. PMID:27513517

  5. Chronic Kidney Disease-Mineral Bone Disorder in Korean Patients: a Report from the KoreaN Cohort Study for Outcomes in Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease (KNOW-CKD)

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    This study examined the characteristics of biochemical parameters, bone diseases, and vascular calcification in Korean patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) not yet on dialysis. Serum levels of fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23), intact parathyroid hormone (iPTH), 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 (25D), and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25D); lumbar spine, total hip, and femur neck bone mineral densities; and brachial-to-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV) representing vascular calcification were measured at baseline for 2,238 CKD patients in the KoreaN Cohort Study for Outcomes in Patients With CKD (KNOW-CKD). Increases in serum FGF23 and iPTH preceded changes in serum calcium and phosphate, similar to Western populations. However, the 25D and 1,25D levels decreased earlier than serum FGF23 or iPTH increased, with a decreased estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) in Korean CKD patients. Vitamin D deficiency occurred in 76.7% of patients with CKD stage 1. Bone mineral densities were lowest in CKD stage 5 (lumbar spine, −0.64 ± 1.67; total hip, −0.49 ± 1.21; femur neck, −1.02 ± 1.25). Osteoporosis was more prevalent in patients with higher CKD stages. The mean baPWV, abdominal aortic calcification (AAC), and coronary calcium score also increased, with declined eGFR. In conclusion, a decline in serum vitamin D levels was observed in early CKD stages before significant increases of FGF23 and iPTH in the Korean CKD population compared with that in Western populations. Increased bone disease and vascular calcification occurred in early-stage CKD. PMID:28049234

  6. Chronic Kidney Disease-Mineral Bone Disorder in Korean Patients: a Report from the KoreaN Cohort Study for Outcomes in Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease (KNOW-CKD).

    PubMed

    Kim, Chang Seong; Bae, Eun Hui; Ma, Seong Kwon; Han, Seung Hyeok; Lee, Kyu Beck; Lee, Joongyub; Oh, Kook Hwan; Chae, Dong Wan; Kim, Soo Wan

    2017-02-01

    This study examined the characteristics of biochemical parameters, bone diseases, and vascular calcification in Korean patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) not yet on dialysis. Serum levels of fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23), intact parathyroid hormone (iPTH), 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 (25D), and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25D); lumbar spine, total hip, and femur neck bone mineral densities; and brachial-to-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV) representing vascular calcification were measured at baseline for 2,238 CKD patients in the KoreaN Cohort Study for Outcomes in Patients With CKD (KNOW-CKD). Increases in serum FGF23 and iPTH preceded changes in serum calcium and phosphate, similar to Western populations. However, the 25D and 1,25D levels decreased earlier than serum FGF23 or iPTH increased, with a decreased estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) in Korean CKD patients. Vitamin D deficiency occurred in 76.7% of patients with CKD stage 1. Bone mineral densities were lowest in CKD stage 5 (lumbar spine, -0.64 ± 1.67; total hip, -0.49 ± 1.21; femur neck, -1.02 ± 1.25). Osteoporosis was more prevalent in patients with higher CKD stages. The mean baPWV, abdominal aortic calcification (AAC), and coronary calcium score also increased, with declined eGFR. In conclusion, a decline in serum vitamin D levels was observed in early CKD stages before significant increases of FGF23 and iPTH in the Korean CKD population compared with that in Western populations. Increased bone disease and vascular calcification occurred in early-stage CKD.

  7. Constipation and Incident CKD.

    PubMed

    Sumida, Keiichi; Molnar, Miklos Z; Potukuchi, Praveen K; Thomas, Fridtjof; Lu, Jun Ling; Matsushita, Kunihiro; Yamagata, Kunihiro; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar; Kovesdy, Csaba P

    2017-04-01

    Constipation is one of the most prevalent conditions in primary care settings and increases the risk of cardiovascular disease, potentially through processes mediated by altered gut microbiota. However, little is known about the association of constipation with CKD. In a nationwide cohort of 3,504,732 United States veterans with an eGFR ≥60 ml/min per 1.73 m(2), we examined the association of constipation status and severity (absent, mild, or moderate/severe), defined using diagnostic codes and laxative use, with incident CKD, incident ESRD, and change in eGFR in Cox models (for time-to-event analyses) and multinomial logistic regression models (for change in eGFR). Among patients, the mean (SD) age was 60.0 (14.1) years old; 93.2% of patients were men, and 24.7% were diabetic. After multivariable adjustments, compared with patients without constipation, patients with constipation had higher incidence rates of CKD (hazard ratio, 1.13; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 1.11 to 1.14) and ESRD (hazard ratio, 1.09; 95% CI, 1.01 to 1.18) and faster eGFR decline (multinomial odds ratios for eGFR slope <-10, -10 to <-5, and -5 to <-1 versus -1 to <0 ml/min per 1.73 m(2) per year, 1.17; 95% CI, 1.14 to 1.20; 1.07; 95% CI, 1.04 to 1.09; and 1.01; 95% CI, 1.00 to 1.03, respectively). More severe constipation associated with an incrementally higher risk for each renal outcome. In conclusion, constipation status and severity associate with higher risk of incident CKD and ESRD and with progressive eGFR decline, independent of known risk factors. Further studies should elucidate the underlying mechanisms.

  8. Baseline Cardiovascular Characteristics of Adult Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease from the KoreaN Cohort Study for Outcomes in Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease (KNOW-CKD)

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the most common cause of death in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). We report the baseline cardiovascular characteristics of 2,238 participants by using the data of the KoreaN Cohort Study for Outcomes in Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease (KNOW-CKD) study. The cohort comprises 5 subcohorts according to the cause of CKD: glomerulonephritis (GN), diabetic nephropathy (DN), hypertensive nephropathy (HTN), polycystic kidney disease (PKD), and unclassified. The average estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) was 50.5 ± 30.3 mL/min−1/1.73 m−2 and lowest in the DN subcohort. The overall prevalence of previous CVD was 14.4% in all patients, and was highest in the DN followed by that in the HTN subcohort. The DN subcohort had more adverse cardiovascular risk profiles (higher systolic blood pressure [SBP], and higher levels of cardiac troponin T, left ventricular mass index [LVMI], coronary calcium score, and brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity [baPWV]) than the other subcohorts. The HTN subcohort exhibited less severe cardiovascular risk profiles than the DN subcohort, but had more severe cardiovascular risk features than the GN and PKD subcohorts. All these cardiovascular risk profiles were inversely correlated with eGFR. In conclusion, this study shows that the KNOW-CKD cohort exhibits high cardiovascular burden, as other CKD cohorts in previous studies. Among the subcohorts, the DN subcohort had the highest risk for CVD. The ongoing long-term follow-up study up to 10 years will further delineate cardiovascular characteristics and outcomes of each subcohort exposed to different risk profiles. PMID:28049233

  9. Baseline Cardiovascular Characteristics of Adult Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease from the KoreaN Cohort Study for Outcomes in Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease (KNOW-CKD).

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyoungnae; Yoo, Tae Hyun; Choi, Kyu Hun; Oh, Kook Hwan; Lee, Joongyub; Kim, Soo Wan; Kim, Tae Hee; Sung, Suah; Han, Seung Hyeok

    2017-02-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the most common cause of death in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). We report the baseline cardiovascular characteristics of 2,238 participants by using the data of the KoreaN Cohort Study for Outcomes in Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease (KNOW-CKD) study. The cohort comprises 5 subcohorts according to the cause of CKD: glomerulonephritis (GN), diabetic nephropathy (DN), hypertensive nephropathy (HTN), polycystic kidney disease (PKD), and unclassified. The average estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) was 50.5 ± 30.3 mL/min⁻¹/1.73 m⁻² and lowest in the DN subcohort. The overall prevalence of previous CVD was 14.4% in all patients, and was highest in the DN followed by that in the HTN subcohort. The DN subcohort had more adverse cardiovascular risk profiles (higher systolic blood pressure [SBP], and higher levels of cardiac troponin T, left ventricular mass index [LVMI], coronary calcium score, and brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity [baPWV]) than the other subcohorts. The HTN subcohort exhibited less severe cardiovascular risk profiles than the DN subcohort, but had more severe cardiovascular risk features than the GN and PKD subcohorts. All these cardiovascular risk profiles were inversely correlated with eGFR. In conclusion, this study shows that the KNOW-CKD cohort exhibits high cardiovascular burden, as other CKD cohorts in previous studies. Among the subcohorts, the DN subcohort had the highest risk for CVD. The ongoing long-term follow-up study up to 10 years will further delineate cardiovascular characteristics and outcomes of each subcohort exposed to different risk profiles.

  10. Febuxostat for hyperuricemia in patients with advanced chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Akimoto, Tetsu; Morishita, Yoshiyuki; Ito, Chiharu; Iimura, Osamu; Tsunematsu, Sadao; Watanabe, Yuko; Kusano, Eiji; Nagata, Daisuke

    2014-01-01

    Febuxostat is a nonpurine xanthine oxidase (XO) inhibitor, which recently received marketing approval. However, information regarding the experience with this agent among advanced chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients is limited. In the current study, we investigated the effects of oral febuxostat in patients with advanced CKD with asymptomatic hyperuricemia. We demonstrated, for the first time, that not only the serum levels of uric acid (UA) but also those of 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine, an oxidative stress marker, were significantly reduced after six months of febuxostat treatment, with no adverse events. These results encouraged us to pursue further investigations regarding the clinical impact of lowering the serum UA levels with febuxostat in advanced CKD patients in terms of concomitantly reducing oxidative stress via the blockade of XO. More detailed studies with a larger number of subjects and assessments of the effects of multiple factors affecting hyperuricemia, such as age, sex, and dietary habits, would shed light on the therapeutic challenges of treating asymptomatic hyperuricemia in patients with various stages of CKD.

  11. Decreased Conversion of 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 to 24,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 Following Cholecalciferol Therapy in Patients with CKD

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shiqin; Friedman, Peter A.; Nolin, Thomas D.

    2014-01-01

    Background and objectives Elevated concentrations of fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23) are postulated to promote 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25[OH]D) insufficiency in CKD by stimulating 24-hydroxylation of this metabolite, leading to its subsequent degradation; however, prospective human studies testing this relationship are lacking. Design, setting, participants, & measurements An open-label prospective study was conducted from October 2010 through July 2012 to compare the effect of 8 weeks of oral cholecalciferol therapy (50,000 IU twice weekly) on the production of 24,25(OH)2D3 in vitamin D–insufficient patients with CKD (n=15) and controls with normal kidney function (n=15). Vitamin D metabolites were comprehensively profiled at baseline and after treatment, along with FGF23 and other mineral metabolism parameters. Results Vitamin D3 and 25(OH)D3 concentrations increased equivalently in the CKD and control groups following cholecalciferol treatment (median D3 change, 8.6 ng/ml [interquartile range, 3.9–25.6 ng/ml] for controls versus 12.6 ng/ml [6.9–41.2 ng/ml] for CKD [P=0.15]; 25(OH)D3 change, 39.2 ng/ml [30.9–47.2 ng/ml] for controls versus 39.9 ng/ml [31.5–44.1 ng/ml] for CKD [P=0.58]). Likewise, the absolute increase in 1α,25(OH)2D3 was similar between CKD participants and controls (change, 111.2 pg/ml [64.3–141.6 pg/ml] for controls versus 101.1 pg/ml [74.2–123.1 pg/ml] for CKD; P=0.38). Baseline and post-treatment 24,25(OH)2D3 concentrations were lower in the CKD group; moreover, the absolute increase in 24,25(OH)2D3 after therapy was markedly smaller in patients with CKD (change, 2.8 ng/ml [2.3–3.5 ng/ml] for controls versus 1.2 ng/ml [0.6–1.9 ng/ml] for patients with CKD; P<0.001). Furthermore, higher baseline FGF23 concentrations were associated with smaller increments in 24,25(OH)2D3 for individuals with CKD; this association was negated after adjustment for eGFR by multivariate analysis. Conclusions Patients with CKD exhibit an altered

  12. Association of CKD-MBD Markers with All-Cause Mortality in Prevalent Hemodialysis Patients: A Cohort Study in Beijing

    PubMed Central

    Li, Duo; Zhang, Ling; Zuo, Li; Jin, Cheng Gang; Li, Wen Ge; Chen, Jin-Bor

    2017-01-01

    The relationships between all-cause mortality and serum intact parathyroid hormone (iPTH), calcium, and phosphate are fairly diverse in patients on maintenance hemodialysis according to prior studies. This study evaluated the association of chronic kidney disease-mineral and bone disorder (CKD-MBD) markers with all-cause mortality in prevalent hemodialysis patients from 2007 to 2012 in Beijing, China. A cohort, involving 8530 prevalent hemodialysis patients who had undergone a 6–70 months follow-up program (with median as 40 months) was formed. Related data was recorded from the database in 120 hemodialysis centers of Beijing Health Bureau (2007 to 2012). Information regarding baseline demographics, blood CKD-MBD markers and all-cause mortality was retrospectively reviewed. By using multivariate Cox regression model analysis, patients with a low iPTH level at baseline were found to have greater risk of mortality (<75pg/ml, HR = 1.36, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.16–1.60) than those with a baseline iPTH level within 150–300 pg/ml. Similarly, death risk showed an increase when the baseline serum calcium presented a low level (<2.1mmol/L, HR = 1.54; 95% CI 1.37–1.74). Levels of baseline serum phosphorus were not associated with the risk of death. Similar results appeared through the baseline competing risks regression analysis. Patients with a lower level of serum iPTH or calcium are at a higher risk of all-cause mortality compared with those within the range recommended by Kidney Disease Outcome Quality Initiative (KDOQI) guidelines. PMID:28045985

  13. Baseline General Characteristics of the Korean Chronic Kidney Disease: Report from the KoreaN Cohort Study for Outcomes in Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease (KNOW-CKD)

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    The KoreaN Cohort Study for Outcomes in Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease (KNOW-CKD) was developed to investigate various clinical courses and risk factors for progression of Korean chronic kidney disease (CKD). The KNOW-CKD study consists of nine clinical centers in Korea, and patients aged between 20 and 75 years with CKD from stage 1 to 5 (predialysis) were recruited. At baseline, blood and urine samples were obtained and demographic data including comorbidities, drugs, quality of life, and health behaviors were collected. Estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) was calculated by 4-variable Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD) equation using isotope dilution mass spectrometry (IDMS)-calibrated serum creatinine measured at a central laboratory. As a dynamic cohort, a total of 2,341 patients were enrolled during the enrollment period from 2011 until 2015, among whom 2,238 subjects were finally analyzed for baseline profiles. The mean age of the cohort was 53.7 ± 12.2 year and 61.2% were men. Mean eGFR was 50.5 ± 30.3 mL/min/1.73 m2. The participants with lower eGFR had a tendency to be older, with more comorbidities, to have higher systolic blood pressure (BP) and pulse pressure, with lower income level and education attainment. The patients categorized as glomerulonephritis (GN) were 36.2% followed by diabetic nephropathy (DN, 23.2%), hypertensive nephropathy (HTN, 18.3%), polycystic kidney disease (PKD, 16.3%), and other unclassified disease (6.1%). The KNOW-CKD participants will be longitudinally followed for 10 years. The study will provide better understanding for physicians regarding clinical outcomes, especially renal and cardiovascular outcomes in CKD patients. PMID:28049232

  14. Baseline General Characteristics of the Korean Chronic Kidney Disease: Report from the KoreaN Cohort Study for Outcomes in Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease (KNOW-CKD).

    PubMed

    Kang, Eunjeong; Han, Miyeun; Kim, Hyunsuk; Park, Sue Kyung; Lee, Joongyub; Hyun, Young Youl; Kim, Yong Soo; Chung, Wookyung; Kim, Hyo Jin; Oh, Yun Kyu; Ahn, Curie; Oh, Kook Hwan

    2017-02-01

    The KoreaN Cohort Study for Outcomes in Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease (KNOW-CKD) was developed to investigate various clinical courses and risk factors for progression of Korean chronic kidney disease (CKD). The KNOW-CKD study consists of nine clinical centers in Korea, and patients aged between 20 and 75 years with CKD from stage 1 to 5 (predialysis) were recruited. At baseline, blood and urine samples were obtained and demographic data including comorbidities, drugs, quality of life, and health behaviors were collected. Estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) was calculated by 4-variable Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD) equation using isotope dilution mass spectrometry (IDMS)-calibrated serum creatinine measured at a central laboratory. As a dynamic cohort, a total of 2,341 patients were enrolled during the enrollment period from 2011 until 2015, among whom 2,238 subjects were finally analyzed for baseline profiles. The mean age of the cohort was 53.7 ± 12.2 year and 61.2% were men. Mean eGFR was 50.5 ± 30.3 mL/min/1.73 m². The participants with lower eGFR had a tendency to be older, with more comorbidities, to have higher systolic blood pressure (BP) and pulse pressure, with lower income level and education attainment. The patients categorized as glomerulonephritis (GN) were 36.2% followed by diabetic nephropathy (DN, 23.2%), hypertensive nephropathy (HTN, 18.3%), polycystic kidney disease (PKD, 16.3%), and other unclassified disease (6.1%). The KNOW-CKD participants will be longitudinally followed for 10 years. The study will provide better understanding for physicians regarding clinical outcomes, especially renal and cardiovascular outcomes in CKD patients.

  15. Association of Age and CKD with Prognosis of Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Joon Seok; Kim, Min Jee; Kang, Yong Un; Kim, Chang Seong; Bae, Eun Hui; Ma, Seong Kwon; Ahn, Young-Keun; Jeong, Myung Ho; Kim, Young Jo; Cho, Myeong Chan; Kim, Chong Jin

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background and objectives CKD is a well known poor prognostic factor in myocardial infarction (MI). This study evaluated the prognostic significance of CKD, particularly in association with increasing age, in MI patients. Design, setting, participants, & measurements This study was based on a retrospective cohort, the Korean Acute Myocardial Infarction Registry. Patients with a discharge diagnosis of MI were analyzed to investigate the association of CKD with mortality risk according to age. A total of 11,268 patients (mean age 63.0±12.6 years) were included and followed for 1 year. Results In the full cohort, 26% of patients had CKD (n=2929). The prevalence of CKD was higher with advancing age. Eight hundred sixty-one patients (7.6%) died and the interaction for 1-year mortality between age strata and estimated GFR (eGFR) strata was significant (P<0.001). Within each age category, the absolute 1-year mortality was higher in patients with a low eGFR. However, the adjusted relative mortality risk for a low eGFR was lower with increasing age (adjusted hazard ratio [95% confidence interval] for 1-year mortality at eGFR <30 ml/min per 1.73 m2: 4.84 [1.93−12.15], 4.53 [2.42−8.47], 3.51 [2.42−5.09], and 3.30 [2.41−4.52] for patients aged <55, 55−64, 65−74, and ≥75 years compared with those with eGFR ≥60 ml/min per 1.73 m2, respectively). Conclusions For all age categories, the overall mortality was significantly higher as eGFR declined. The association of a lower eGFR with mortality was weaker with increasing age, indicating that the prognostic significance of CKD in MI patients is age dependent. PMID:23430208

  16. [Updates on Lifestyle-Related Diseases and Bone Metabolism. CKD-related osteoporosis].

    PubMed

    Yamada, Shinsuke; Inaba, Masaaki

    2014-11-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) has a high mortality rate of cardiovascular disease (CVD) . As CKD-mineral and bone disorder (CKD-MBD) is the one of the major risk factors in CVD, it is necessary that CKD patients are controlled CKD-MBD appropriately as early as possible. However, it is difficulty that CKD-MBD condition is exactly diagnosed and controlled, because it presents various conditions according to the difference of patient's background such as having diabetes or stage of CKD. We will give an outline of the mechanism in CKD-MBD according to patient's condition and the association between CKD-MBD and vascular calcification.

  17. Effects of different phosphate lowering strategies in patients with CKD on laboratory outcomes: A systematic review and NMA

    PubMed Central

    Angeliki Veroniki, Argie; Thabane, Lehana; Busse, Jason W.; Akhtar-Danesh, Noori; Iorio, Alfonso; Cruz Lopes, Luciane; Guyatt, Gordon H.

    2017-01-01

    Background Chronic kidney disease-mineral and bone disorder (CKD-MBD), a complication of chronic kidney disease, has been linked to reduced quality and length of life. High serum phosphate levels that result from CKD-MBD require phosphate-lowering agents, also known as phosphate binders. The objective of this systematic review is to compare the effects of available phosphate binders on laboratory outcomes in patients with CKD-MBD. Methods Data sources included MEDLINE and EMBASE from January 1996 to April 2016, and the Cochrane Register of Controlled Trials up to April 2016. Teams of two reviewers, independently and in duplicate, screened titles and abstracts and potentially eligible full text reports to determine eligibility, and subsequently abstracted data and assessed risk of bias in eligible randomized controlled trials (RCTs). Eligible trials enrolled patients with CKD-MBD and randomized them to receive calcium-based phosphate binders (delivered as calcium acetate, calcium citrate or calcium carbonate), non-calcium-based phosphate binders (NCBPB) (sevelamer hydrochloride, sevelamer carbonate, lanthanum carbonate, sucroferric oxyhydroxide and ferric citrate), phosphorus restricted diet (diet), placebo or no treatment and reported effects on serum levels of phosphate, calcium and parathyroid hormone. We performed Bayesian network meta-analyses (NMA) to calculate the effect estimates (mean differences) and 95% credible intervals for serum levels of phosphate, calcium and parathyroid hormone. We calculated direct, indirect and network meta-analysis estimates using random-effects models. We applied the GRADE (Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development and Evaluation) approach to rate the quality of evidence for each pairwise comparison. Results Our search yielded 1108 citations; 71 RCTs were retrieved for full review and 16 proved eligible. Including an additional 13 studies from a previous review, 29 studies that enrolled 8335 participants proved

  18. Mineral metabolism and cardiovascular disease in CKD.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Hideki; Joki, Nobuhiko

    2017-03-01

    The mineral bone disorder of CKD, called Chronic Kidney Disease-Mineral and Bone Disorder (CKD-MBD), has a major role in the etiology and progression of cardiovascular disease in CKD patients. Since the main emphasis in CKD-MBD is on three categories (bone abnormalities, laboratory abnormalities, and vascular calcifications), we have routinely accepted ectopic cardiovascular calcifications as a central risk factor in the pathophysiology of CKD-MBD for cardiac events. However, recent compelling evidence suggests that some CKD-MBD-specific factors other than vascular calcification might contribute to the onset of cardiovascular disease. Most notable is fibroblast growth factor-23 (FGF23), which is thought to be independently associated with cardiac remodeling. Slow progression of cardiac disorders, such as vascular calcification and cardiac remodeling, characterizes cardiac disease due to CKD-MBD. In contrast, fatal arrhythmia may be induced when QT prolongation occurs with CKD-MBD treatment, such as with lower Ca dialysate or the use of calcimimetics. Sudden onset of fatal cardiac events, such as heart failure and sudden cardiac death, due to fatal arrhythmia would be another distinctive phenomenon of CKD-MBD. This may be defined as CKD-MBD-specific cardiac complex syndrome.

  19. [On "2015 Guidelines for Prevention and Treatment of Osteoporosis". CKD and osteoporosis].

    PubMed

    Yamada, Shinsuke; Inaba, Masaaki

    2015-09-01

    Many patients with osteoporosis have complicated with CKD. It was reported that the risk of hip and vertebral fracture is higher in osteoporosis patients with CKD than without CKD. Because the drugs for osteoporosis are excreted by kidney, there are no drugs that the efficacy and safety were established for the CKD patient. I give an outline about the relationship between CKD and osteoporosis, and the note on the medical care of osteoporosis patients with CKD.

  20. Kidney Disease Population Health Management in the Era of Accountable Care: A Conceptual Framework for Optimizing Care Across the CKD Spectrum.

    PubMed

    Mendu, Mallika L; Waikar, Sushrut S; Rao, Sandhya K

    2017-01-23

    Since its passage in 2010, the Affordable Care Act has led to the creation of numerous accountable care organizations that face the challenge of transforming the traditional care delivery model to provide more patient-centered, high-quality, and low-cost care. Complex patients, including those with chronic kidney disease (CKD), present the most challenges and opportunities. CKD is a condition with significant morbidity, mortality, and cost and thought to be partly secondary to known gaps in care delivery. Successful population management for CKD requires consideration of the needs of patients at all phases of the disease. In this article, we offer a comprehensive framework for a population-based approach to CKD and examples of programs we are implementing in each area. These initiatives include the development and implementation of an electronic nephrology consult (e-consult) platform, CKD quality metrics, CKD registry, CKD collaborative care agreement, multidisciplinary care clinic for advanced CKD, end-stage renal disease care coordinator program, shared decision-making tools for renal replacement, CKD education videos, and a tablet-based CKD patient-reported outcome measures tool.

  1. Nutritional Status in Adults with Predialysis Chronic Kidney Disease: KNOW-CKD Study

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Adverse changes in nutrition are prevalent and are strong indicators of adverse outcomes in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). The International Society of Renal Nutrition and Metabolism (ISRNM) proposed a common nomenclature and diagnostic criteria to identify protein-energy wasting (PEW) in CKD patients. We examined the nutritional status in 1,834 adults with predialysis CKD enrolled in the KoreaN cohort study for Outcome in patients With Chronic Kidney Disease (KNOW-CKD) study. As there was a need for further understanding of nutritional status and associated factors in CKD, we evaluated the prevalence and associated factors of PEW in adults with predialysis CKD. The prevalence of PEW was about 9.0% according to ISRNM criteria and tended to increase with advanced stage in predialysis CKD. Those who concurrently had PEW, inflammation, and CVD were a small proportion (0.4%). In multivariate logistic regression model, PEW was independently associated with estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) (odds ratio [OR], 0.98; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.96–0.99), total CO2 (OR, 0.93; 95% CI, 0.87–0.99), physical activity (OR, 0.43; 95% CI, 0.26–0.69), comorbid diabetes (OR, 1.68; 95% CI, 1.09–2.59), and high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) (OR, 1.03; 95% CI, 1.01–1.06). Our study suggests that PEW increases with advanced CKD stage. PEW is independently associated with renal function, low total CO2, low physical activity, comorbid diabetes, and increased hs-CRP in adults with predialysis CKD. PMID:28049236

  2. Patient Education and Support During CKD Transitions: When the Possible Becomes Probable.

    PubMed

    Green, Jamie A; Boulware, L Ebony

    2016-07-01

    Patients transitioning from kidney disease to kidney failure require comprehensive patient-centered education and support. Efforts to prepare patients for this transition often fail to meet patients' needs due to uncertainty about which patients will progress to kidney failure, nonindividualized patient education programs, inadequate psychosocial support, or lack of assistance to guide patients through complex treatment plans. Resources are available to help overcome barriers to providing optimal care during this time, including prognostic tools, educational lesson plans, decision aids, communication skills training, peer support, and patient navigation programs. New models are being studied to comprehensively address patients' needs and improve the lives of kidney patients during this high-risk time.

  3. The FIND-CKD study—a randomized controlled trial of intravenous iron versus oral iron in non-dialysis chronic kidney disease patients: background and rationale

    PubMed Central

    Macdougall, Iain C.; Bock, Andreas; Carrera, Fernando; Eckardt, Kai-Uwe; Gaillard, Carlo; Van Wyck, David; Roubert, Bernard; Cushway, Timothy; Roger, Simon D.

    2014-01-01

    Background Rigorous data are sparse concerning the optimal route of administration and dosing strategy for iron therapy with or without concomitant erythropoiesis-stimulating agent (ESA) therapy for the management of iron deficiency anaemia in patients with non-dialysis dependent chronic kidney disease (ND-CKD). Methods FIND-CKD was a 56-week, open-label, multicentre, prospective, randomized three-arm study (NCT00994318) of 626 patients with ND-CKD and iron deficiency anaemia randomized to (i) intravenous (IV) ferric carboxymaltose (FCM) at an initial dose of 1000 mg iron with subsequent dosing as necessary to target a serum ferritin level of 400–600 µg/L (ii) IV FCM at an initial dose of 200 mg with subsequent dosing as necessary to target serum ferritin 100–200 µg/L or (iii) oral ferrous sulphate 200 mg iron/day. The primary end point was time to initiation of other anaemia management (ESA therapy, iron therapy other than study drug or blood transfusion) or a haemoglobin (Hb) trigger (two consecutive Hb values <10 g/dL without an increase of ≥0.5 g/dL). Results The background, rationale and study design of the trial are presented here. The study has been completed and results are expected in late 2013. Discussion FIND-CKD was the longest randomized trial of IV iron therapy to date. Its findings will address several unanswered questions regarding iron therapy to treat iron deficiency anaemia in patients with ND-CKD. It was also the first randomized trial to utilize both a high and low serum ferritin target range to adjust IV iron dosing, and the first not to employ Hb response as its primary end point. PMID:24170814

  4. Glycemic management in ESRD and earlier stages of CKD.

    PubMed

    Williams, Mark E; Garg, Rajesh

    2014-02-01

    The management of hyperglycemia in patients with kidney failure is complex, and the goals and methods regarding glycemic control in chronic kidney disease (CKD) are not clearly defined. Although aggressive glycemic control seems to be advantageous in early diabetic nephropathy, outcome data supporting tight glycemic control in patients with advanced CKD (including end-stage renal disease [ESRD]) are lacking. Challenges in the management of such patients include therapeutic inertia, monitoring difficulties, and the complexity of available treatments. In this article, we review the alterations in glucose homeostasis that occur in kidney failure, current views on the value of glycemic control and issues with its determination, and more recent approaches to monitor or measure glycemic control. Hypoglycemia and treatment options for patients with diabetes and ESRD or earlier stages of CKD also are addressed, discussing the insulin and noninsulin agents that currently are available, along with their indications and contraindications. The article provides information to help clinicians in decision making in order to provide individualized glycemic goals and appropriate therapy for patients with ESRD or earlier stages of CKD.

  5. Online CKD education for medical students, residents, and fellows: training in a new era.

    PubMed

    Bhasin, Bhavna; Estrella, Michelle M; Choi, Michael J

    2013-07-01

    CKD and its complications are associated with substantial morbidity and mortality. Studies have highlighted significant deficiencies in resident knowledge and awareness of CKD and its complications. There is a need to improve CKD education through medical school and residency. There is also a need to provide alternatives to traditional teaching methods to meet the challenges of learning in the context of work-hour restrictions and increasing workload among residents and fellows. Internet-based learning resources offer various educational tools, including websites, kidney blogs, online modules, and smartphone applications, which could potentially and efficiently advance CKD knowledge among medical trainees. In this review, we describe several online resources for CKD education that could be useful for medical students, residents, and fellows. Increased awareness of these tools and their utilization may significantly influence and hopefully improve the recognition and management of patients with CKD. Future studies may help evaluate the effectiveness of these online learning methods and their effect on CKD patient outcomes. In addition, in light of increased concern about nephrology workforce issues, the potential for these online tools to augment interest in nephrology careers should be investigated.

  6. Effect of high-protein supplemental therapy on subjective global assessment of CKD-5D patients.

    PubMed

    Yuvaraj, Anand; Vijayan, Madhusudan; Alex, Marina; Abraham, Georgi; Nair, Sanjeev

    2016-01-01

    Adequate nutrition in patients on hemodialysis is an important step for improving the quality of life. This prospective study was undertaken to monitor the nutritional status of patients who were given high-protein supplements on malnutrition inflammation score (MIS) and to correlate with biochemical parameters in maintenance hemodialysis (MHD) patients. This prospective study was conducted on 55 chronic kidney disease patients on MHD (37 women, 18 men), aged between 21 and 67 years. Of the 55 patients, 26 patients received high-protein commercial nutritional supplements, whereas 29 patients received high-protein kitchen feeding. Every patient had their MIS, 24-hour dietary recall, hand grip, mid arm circumference, triceps skin-fold thickness at 0, 3, and 6 months. Each of the above parameters was compared between the high-protein commercial nutritional supplement cohort and high-protein kitchen feeding cohort, and the data were analyzed. Of the 55 patients, 82.61% of patients on high-protein kitchen feeding group and 66.67% in high-protein commercial nutritional supplement group were nonvegetarian (P = 0.021). According to the MIS, improvement was observed in malnutrition status from 3- to 6-month period in 38.1% of patients in high-protein commercial supplement group, whereas only in 8.7% in high-protein kitchen feeding group (P = 0.04). Assessment showed improvement in malnutrition status with high-protein commercial nutritional supplement, which was marked in patients with age group >65 years (P = 0.03) and in those in whom serum albumin is <35 g/L (P = 0.02). Both high-protein kitchen feeding and high-protein commercial nutritional supplement cohorts were observed to have improvement in overall nutritional status. Older patients >65 years with lower serum albumin levels (<3.5 g/dL) were observed to have significant improvement in nutritional status with high-protein commercial nutritional supplements.

  7. Pulmonary Hypertension: Epidemiology in Different CKD Stages and Its Association with Cardiovascular Morbidity

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shuangxin; Ye, Zhiming; Chen, Yuanhan; Wang, Wenjian; Li, Ruizhao; Xu, Lixia; Feng, Zhonglin; Shi, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Background Pulmonary hypertension (PH) was recently recognized as a common complication of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) that causes an increased risk of mortality. Epidemiological data for this disorder in earlier stages of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and its association with cardiovascular (CV) morbidity are scarce. Methods We retrospectively analyzed 2,351 Chinese CKD patients with complete clinical records and echocardiography data between Jan 2008 and May 2012. The patients were divided into the following 6 groups: CKD Stages 1–4; Stage 5 for those not on or initiated on hemodialysis for <3 months; and Stage 5D for the patients undergoing hemodialysis for ≥3 months. The prevalence of PH and CV morbidity was investigated, and their association was evaluated with a logistic regression model. Results PH was detected in 426 patients (18.1%). Mild, moderate and severe PH was diagnosed in 12.1%, 4.9% and 1.1% of the patients, respectively. Severe PH was detected in CKD Stages 5 and 5D. CV morbidity was found in 645 patients (27.4%). Compared with the non-PH group, the PH group had a higher risk for cardiac disease but not for cerebrovascular disease risk. PH severity was associated with cardiac morbidity risk [odds ratio (95% CI) for mild PH: 1.79 (1.30–2.47); moderate PH: 2.75 (1.73–4.37); severe PH: 3.90 (1.46–10.42)]. Conclusions Our study showed for the first time the epidemiology profile of PH across the spectrum of CKD. Mild-to-moderate PH occurs with more frequency in advanced CKD, and severe PH is scarce in non-ESRD CKD. PH in CKD is associated with cardiac but not cerebrovascular disease, with increasing cardiac morbidity seen with increasing PH severity. Evidence from prospective studies addressing PH in this population is needed to predict cardiac events. PMID:25525807

  8. Should an Elderly Patient with Stage V CKD and Dementia Be Started on Dialysis?

    PubMed Central

    Ying, Irene; Levitt, Zoe

    2014-01-01

    The burden of cognitive impairment appears to increase with progressive renal disease, such that the prevalence of dementia among those starting dialysis, or those already established on dialysis, is high. The appropriateness of dialysis initiation in this population has been questioned, and current Renal Physician Association guidelines suggest forgoing dialysis in individuals who have dementia and lack awareness of self and environment. Patients are, however, also entitled to equal rights and respect, equal access to health care services, and an opportunity to engage in shared decision-making processes, particularly if there is concern over reversibility of disease. This article discusses, on the basis of principles of beneficence and nonmaleficence, the arguments in favor of and against dialysis use, and the process of determining an appropriate care plan. Factors discussed include the current societal trend toward a technological imperative, premature fatalism, survival benefits, and the implications of providing care to patients who are unable to express their tolerance for symptoms associated with the treatment or lack of treatment. PMID:24235287

  9. The French Chronic Kidney Disease-Renal Epidemiology and Information Network (CKD-REIN) cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Stengel, Bénédicte; Combe, Christian; Jacquelinet, Christian; Briançon, Serge; Fouque, Denis; Laville, Maurice; Frimat, Luc; Pascal, Christophe; Herpe, Yves-Edouard; Deleuze, Jean-François; Schanstra, Joost; Pisoni, Ron L.; Robinson, Bruce M.; Massy, Ziad A.

    2014-01-01

    Background While much has been learned about the epidemiology and treatment of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in the last 30 years, chronic kidney disease (CKD) before the end-stage has been less investigated. Not enough is known about factors associated with CKD progression and complications, as well as its transition to ESRD. We designed the CKD-renal epidemiology and information network (REIN) cohort to provide a research platform to address these key questions and to assess clinical practices and costs in patients with moderate or advanced CKD. Methods A total of 46 clinic sites and 4 renal care networks participate in the cohort. A stratified selection of clinic sites yields a sample that represents a diversity of settings, e.g. geographic region, and public versus for-profit and non-for-profit private clinics. In each site, 60–90 patients with CKD are enrolled at a routine clinic visit during a 12-month enrolment phase: 3600 total, including 1800 with Stage 3 and 1800 with Stage 4 CKD. Follow-up will continue for 5 years, including after initiation of renal replacement therapy. Data will be collected from medical records at inclusion and at yearly intervals, as well as from self-administered patient questionnaires and provider-level questionnaires. Patients will also be interviewed at baseline, and at 1, 3 and 5 years. Healthcare costs will also be determined. Blood and urine samples will be collected and stored for future studies on all patients at enrolment and at study end, and at 1 and 3 years in a subsample of 1200. Conclusions The CKD-REIN cohort will serve to improve our understanding of the biological, clinical and healthcare system determinants associated with CKD progression and adverse outcomes as well as of international variations in collaboration with the CKD Outcome and Practice Pattern Study (CKDopps). It will foster CKD epidemiology and outcomes research and provide evidence to improve the health and quality of life of patients with CKD and

  10. Prenatal risk factors for childhood CKD.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Christine W; Yamamoto, Kalani T; Henry, Rohan K; De Roos, Anneclaire J; Flynn, Joseph T

    2014-09-01

    Development of CKD may be programmed prenatally. We sought to determine the association of childhood CKD with prenatal risk factors, including birth weight, maternal diabetes mellitus (DM), and maternal overweight/obesity. We conducted a population-based, case-control study with 1994 patients with childhood CKD (<21 years of age at diagnosis) and 20,032 controls in Washington state. We linked maternal and infant characteristics in birth records from 1987 to 2008 to hospital discharge data and used logistic regression analysis to assess the association of prenatal risk factors with childhood CKD. The prevalence of CKD was 126.7 cases per 100,000 births. High birth weight and maternal pregestational DM associated nominally with CKD, with respective crude odds ratios (ORs) of 1.17 (95% confidence interval [95% CI], 1.03 to 1.34) and 1.97 (95% CI, 1.15 to 3.37); however, adjustment for maternal confounders attenuated these associations to 0.97 (95% CI, 0.79 to 1.21) and 1.19 (95% CI, 0.51 to 2.81), respectively. The adjusted ORs for CKD associated with other prenatal factors were 2.88 (95% CI, 2.28 to 3.63) for low birth weight, 1.54 (95% CI, 1.13 to 2.09) for maternal gestational DM, 1.24 (95% CI, 1.05 to 1.48) for maternal overweight, and 1.26 (95% CI, 1.05 to 1.52) for maternal obesity. In subgroup analysis by CKD subtype, low birth weight and maternal pregestational DM associated significantly with increased risk of renal dysplasia/aplasia. Low birth weight, maternal gestational DM, and maternal overweight/obesity associated significantly with obstructive uropathy. These data suggest that prenatal factors may impact the risk of CKD. Future studies should aim to determine if modification of these factors could reduce the risk of childhood CKD.

  11. A randomized trial of dietary sodium restriction in CKD.

    PubMed

    McMahon, Emma J; Bauer, Judith D; Hawley, Carmel M; Isbel, Nicole M; Stowasser, Michael; Johnson, David W; Campbell, Katrina L

    2013-12-01

    There is a paucity of quality evidence regarding the effects of sodium restriction in patients with CKD, particularly in patients with pre-end stage CKD, where controlling modifiable risk factors may be especially important for delaying CKD progression and cardiovascular events. We conducted a double-blind placebo-controlled randomized crossover trial assessing the effects of high versus low sodium intake on ambulatory BP, 24-hour protein and albumin excretion, fluid status (body composition monitor), renin and aldosterone levels, and arterial stiffness (pulse wave velocity and augmentation index) in 20 adult patients with hypertensive stage 3-4 CKD as phase 1 of the LowSALT CKD study. Overall, salt restriction resulted in statistically significant and clinically important reductions in BP (mean reduction of systolic/diastolic BP, 10/4 mm Hg; 95% confidence interval, 5 to 15 /1 to 6 mm Hg), extracellular fluid volume, albuminuria, and proteinuria in patients with moderate-to-severe CKD. The magnitude of change was more pronounced than the magnitude reported in patients without CKD, suggesting that patients with CKD are particularly salt sensitive. Although studies with longer intervention times and larger sample sizes are needed to confirm these benefits, this study indicates that sodium restriction should be emphasized in the management of patients with CKD as a means to reduce cardiovascular risk and risk for CKD progression.

  12. CKD and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Targher, Giovanni; Chonchol, Michel B; Byrne, Christopher D

    2014-10-01

    The possible link between nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and chronic kidney disease (CKD) recently has attracted considerable scientific interest. Accumulating clinical evidence indicates that the presence and severity of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease is associated significantly with CKD (defined as decreased estimated glomerular filtration rate and/or proteinuria) and that nonalcoholic fatty liver disease predicts the development and progression of CKD, independently of traditional cardiorenal risk factors. Experimental evidence also suggests that nonalcoholic fatty liver disease itself may exacerbate systemic and hepatic insulin resistance, cause atherogenic dyslipidemia, and release a variety of proinflammatory, procoagulant, pro-oxidant, and profibrogenic mediators that play important roles in the development and progression of CKD. However, despite the growing evidence linking nonalcoholic fatty liver disease with CKD, it has not been definitively established whether a causal association exists. The clinical implication for these findings is that patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease may benefit from more intensive surveillance or early treatment interventions to decrease the risk of CKD. In this review, we discuss the evidence linking nonalcoholic fatty liver disease with CKD and the putative mechanisms by which nonalcoholic fatty liver disease contributes to kidney damage. We also briefly discuss current treatment options for this increasingly prevalent disease that is likely to have an important future impact on the global burden of disease.

  13. Does AKI truly lead to CKD?

    PubMed

    Rifkin, Dena E; Coca, Steven G; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar

    2012-06-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) has been implicated as an independent risk factor for the development of CKD in recent observational studies. The presumption in the nephrology community is that this association represents a causal relationship. However, because of potential problems related to residual confounding (shared risk factors), ascertainment bias (sicker patients have more follow-up assessments), misclassification of exposure (problems with defining baseline kidney function and AKI representing a discrete event versus progression of renal disease), and misclassification of outcome (de novo CKD versus CKD progression), it is difficult to conclude with certainty that AKI is truly causal for CKD. In this review we highlight several of the Hill causality criteria to examine the existing evidence and point out the missing elements that preclude defining AKI as a cause of CKD in the general population. Only well-designed studies with rigorous assessment of kidney function in all participants (AKI and non-AKI) before and after the episode or hospitalization or randomized, controlled trials demonstrating that prevention or treatment of AKI reduces the incidence of subsequent CKD can clarify the causal nature of the AKI-CKD relationship.

  14. [Cardiovascular Disease In Children With Ckd].

    PubMed

    Corrado, Ciro; Pellitteri, Veronica; Alaimo, Annalisa; Galione, Maria Alessandra; Mongiovì, Rosalia; Maringhini, Silvio

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the most important risk factor for morbidity and mortality in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Aim of this study was to evaluate cardiac and vascular geometry in children with CKD stages 2, 3 and 4.Twenty-seven patients (18 males and 9 females) mean age 10.9 +/- 5.4 years with CKD and 30 children (control group) were enrolled with comparable age and sex. Weight, height, systolic and diastolic blood pressure were evaluated. We also analyzed biochemical assessments and proteinuria. We performed echocardiography with Philips iE33 and pulse wave velocity (PWV) with Vicorder PWS system. We documented significantly higher level of left ventricular mass index (LVMI) (30.3 +/- 7.6 g/m2.7) and PWV (4.7 +/- 1.6 m/sec) in CKD patients. Left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) was present in 12 % and concentric remodelling in 36% of our patients. PWV values were significantly correlated with interventricular septal thickness (p<0.01) and with LVMI (p<0.05). In this study we documented the alterations of cardiac and vascular geometry since the early stages of CKD. PWV and echocardiographic measurements must be considered to assess cardiovascular risk in children with CKD stages 2-4.

  15. [Hypertension, CKD and bone metabolism].

    PubMed

    Nakagami, Hironori; Morishita, Ryuichi

    2011-05-01

    The patients with "Hypertension" and "Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) " are accompanied with an osteoporosis. In hypertension patients, excess urinary calcium secretion induces secondary parathyroidsim to increase serum calcium (Ca) level, which may lead to Ca release from bone. In this aspect, there are several reports that anti-hypertensive drugs, especially thiazides, increase bone mineral density and decrease the incidence of bone fracture. In addition, we demonstrated that renin-angiotensin system can be involved in the process of osteoporosis. Angiotensin II significantly induced the expression of RANKL (receptor activator of NF-κB ligand) in osteoblasts, leading to the activation of osteoclasts, while these effects were completely blocked by an Ang II type 1 receptor blockade. As for CKD, excess phosphorus (P) due to renal dysfunction induces secondary parathyroidism to decrease serum P level, which similarly leads to osteoporosis. Moreover, excess P can increase FGF23 expression and decrease activated vitamin D, which also resulted in progression of osteoporosis. Both "Hypertension" and "Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) " are inducible factor to osteoporosis.

  16. Age-dependent parathormone levels and different CKD-MBD treatment practices of dialysis patients in Hungary - results from a nationwide clinical audit

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Achieving target levels of laboratory parameters of bone and mineral metabolism in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients is important but also difficult in those living with end-stage kidney disease. This study aimed to determine if there are age-related differences in chronic kidney disease-mineral and bone disorder (CKD-MBD) characteristics, including treatment practice in Hungarian dialysis patients. Methods Data were collected retrospectively from a large cohort of dialysis patients in Hungary. Patients on hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis were also included. The enrolled patients were allocated into two groups based on their age (<65 years and ≥65 years). Characteristics of the age groups and differences in disease-related (epidemiology, laboratory, and treatment practice) parameters between the groups were analyzed. Results A total of 5008 patients were included in the analysis and the mean age was 63.4±14.2 years. A total of 47.2% of patients were women, 32.8% had diabetes, and 11.4% were on peritoneal dialysis. Diabetes (37.9% vs 27.3%), bone disease (42.9% vs 34.1%), and soft tissue calcification (56.3% vs 44.7%) were more prevalent in the older group than the younger group (p<0.001 for all). We found an inverse relationship between age and parathyroid hormone (PTH) levels (p<0.001). Serum PTH levels were lower in patients with diabetes compared with those without diabetes below 80 years (p<0.001). Diabetes and age were independently associated with serum PTH levels (interaction: diabetes × age groups, p=0.138). Older patients were more likely than younger patients to achieve laboratory target ranges for each parameter (Ca: 66.9% vs 62.1%, p<0.001; PO4: 52.6% vs 49.2%, p<0.05; and PTH: 50.6% vs 46.6%, p<0.01), and for combined parameters (19.8% vs 15.8%, p<0.001). Older patients were less likely to receive related medication than younger patients (66.9% vs 79.7%, p<0.001). Conclusions The achievement of laboratory target ranges for bone

  17. Potential role of endurance training in altering renal sympathetic nerve activity in CKD?

    PubMed

    Howden, Erin J; Lawley, Justin S; Esler, Murray; Levine, Benjamin D

    2017-05-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD), is characterized by a progressive loss of renal function and increase in cardiovascular risk. In this review paper, we discuss the pathophysiology of increased sympathetic nerve activity in CKD patients and raise the possibility of endurance exercise being an effective countermeasure to address this problem. We specifically focus on the potential role of endurance training in altering renal sympathetic nerve activity as increased renal sympathetic nerve activity negatively impacts kidney function as well indirectly effects multiple other systems and organs. Recent technological advances in device based therapy have highlighted the detrimental effect of elevated renal sympathetic nerve activity in CKD patients, with kidney function and blood pressure being improved post renal artery nerve denervation in selected patients. These developments provide optimism for the development of alternative and/or complementary strategies to lower renal sympathetic nerve activity. However, appropriately designed studies are required to confirm preliminary observations, as the widespread use of the renal denervation approach to lower sympathetic activity presently has limited feasibility. Endurance training may be one alternative strategy to reduce renal sympathetic nerve activity. Here we review the role of endurance training as a potential alternative or adjunctive to current therapy in CKD patients. We also provide recommendations for future research to assist in establishing an evidence base for the use of endurance training to lower renal sympathetic activity in CKD patients.

  18. High amylose resistant starch diet ameliorates oxidative stress, inflammation, and progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Patients with advanced CKD exhibit profound changes in the composition and function of the gut microbiome. This is, in part, mediated by: I- heavy influx of urea in the intestinal tract leading to the dominance of urease-possessing bacteria and II- dietary restriction of potassium-rich fruits and ve...

  19. Utility of the advanced chronic kidney disease patient management tools: case studies.

    PubMed

    Patwardhan, Meenal B; Matchar, David B; Samsa, Gregory P; Haley, William E

    2008-01-01

    Appropriate management of advanced chronic kidney disease (CKD) delays or limits its progression. The Advanced CKD Patient Management Toolkit was developed using a process-improvement technique to assist patient management and address CKD-specific management issues. We pilot tested the toolkit in 2 community nephrology practices, assessed the utility of individual tools, and evaluated the impact on conformance to an advanced CKD guideline through patient chart abstraction. Tool use was distinct in the 2 sites and depended on the site champion's involvement, the extent of process reconfiguration demanded by a tool, and its perceived value. Baseline conformance varied across guideline recommendations (averaged 54%). Posttrial conformance increased in all clinical areas (averaged 59%). Valuable features of the toolkit in real-world settings were its ability to: facilitate tool selection, direct implementation efforts in response to a baseline performance audit, and allow selection of tool versions and customizing them. Our results suggest that systematically created, multifaceted, and customizable tools can promote guideline conformance.

  20. New Insights into Dialysis Vascular Access: What Is the Optimal Vascular Access Type and Timing of Access Creation in CKD and Dialysis Patients?

    PubMed

    Woo, Karen; Lok, Charmaine E

    2016-08-08

    Optimal vascular access planning begins when the patient is in the predialysis stages of CKD. The choice of optimal vascular access for an individual patient and determining timing of access creation are dependent on a multitude of factors that can vary widely with each patient, including demographics, comorbidities, anatomy, and personal preferences. It is important to consider every patient's ESRD life plan (hence, their overall dialysis access life plan for every vascular access creation or placement). Optimal access type and timing of access creation are also influenced by factors external to the patient, such as surgeon experience and processes of care. In this review, we will discuss the key determinants in optimal access type and timing of access creation for upper extremity arteriovenous fistulas and grafts.

  1. Combined walking exercise and alkali therapy in patients with CKD4-5 regulates intramuscular free amino acid pools and ubiquitin E3 ligase expression.

    PubMed

    Watson, Emma L; Kosmadakis, George C; Smith, Alice C; Viana, Joao L; Brown, Jeremy R; Molyneux, Karen; Pawluczyk, Izabella Z A; Mulheran, Michael; Bishop, Nicolette C; Shirreffs, Susan; Maughan, Ronald J; Owen, Paul J; John, Stephen G; McIntyre, Christopher W; Feehally, John; Bevington, Alan

    2013-08-01

    Muscle-wasting in chronic kidney disease (CKD) arises from several factors including sedentary behaviour and metabolic acidosis. Exercise is potentially beneficial but might worsen acidosis through exercise-induced lactic acidosis. We studied the chronic effects of exercise in CKD stage 4-5 patients (brisk walking, 30 min, 5 times/week), and non-exercising controls; each group receiving standard oral bicarbonate (STD), or additional bicarbonate (XS) (Total n = 26; Exercising + STD n = 9; Exercising +XS n = 6; Control + STD n = 8; Control + XS n = 3). Blood and vastus lateralis biopsies were drawn at baseline and 6 months. The rise in blood lactate in submaximal treadmill tests was suppressed in the Exercising + XS group. After 6 months, intramuscular free amino acids (including the branched chain amino acids) in the Exercising + STD group showed a striking chronic depletion. This did not occur in the Exercising + XS group. The effect in Exercising + XS patients was accompanied by reduced transcription of ubiquitin E3-ligase MuRF1 which activates proteolysis via the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. Other anabolic indicators (Akt activation and suppression of the 14 kDa actin catabolic marker) were unaffected in Exercising + XS patients. Possibly because of this, overall suppression of myofibrillar proteolysis (3-methylhistidine output) was not observed. It is suggested that alkali effects in exercisers arose by countering exercise-induced acidosis. Whether further anabolic effects are attainable on combining alkali with enhanced exercise (e.g. resistance exercise) merits further investigation.

  2. Increased Synthesis of Liver Erythropoietin with CKD.

    PubMed

    de Seigneux, Sophie; Lundby, Anne-Kristine Meinild; Berchtold, Lena; Berg, Anders H; Saudan, Patrick; Lundby, Carsten

    2016-08-01

    Anemia of CKD seems to be related to impaired production of renal erythropoietin (Epo). The glycosylation pattern of Epo depends on the synthesizing cell and thus, can indicate its origin. We hypothesized that synthesis of Epo from nonkidney cells increases to compensate for insufficient renal Epo production during CKD. We determined plasma Epo levels and Epo glycosylation patterns in 33 patients with CKD before undergoing dialysis and nine patients with CKD undergoing dialysis. We compared these values with values obtained in healthy volunteers and other controls. Although patients with CKD before undergoing dialysis had median (interquartile range) Epo levels higher than those of healthy controls (13.8 IU/L; interquartile range, 10.0-20.7 IU/L versus 8.4 IU/L; interquartile range, 7.6-9.0 IU/L; P<0.01), these patients were moderately anemic (mean±SD; hemoglobin =118±17 g/L). Detected as the percentage of migrated isoforms (PMI), Epo glycosylation in patients with CKD before undergoing dialysis (PMI=36.1±11.7%) differed from that in healthy controls (PMI=9.2±3.8%; P<0.01) but not from that in umbilical cord plasma (PMI=53.9±10.6%; P>0.05), which contains mainly liver-derived Epo. Furthermore, glycosylation modification correlated with eGFR loss. These results suggest that patients with CKD maintain persistent Epo synthesis despite declining renal function, and this maintenance may result in part from increased liver Epo synthesis.

  3. Randomized placebo-controlled dose-ranging and pharmacodynamics study of roxadustat (FG-4592) to treat anemia in nondialysis-dependent chronic kidney disease (NDD-CKD) patients

    PubMed Central

    Besarab, Anatole; Provenzano, Robert; Hertel, Joachim; Zabaneh, Raja; Klaus, Stephen J.; Lee, Tyson; Leong, Robert; Hemmerich, Stefan; Yu, Kin-Hung Peony; Neff, Thomas B.

    2015-01-01

    Background Roxadustat (FG-4592) is an oral hypoxia-inducible factor prolyl hydroxylase inhibitor that stimulates erythropoiesis. This Phase 2a study tested efficacy (Hb response) and safety of roxadustat in anemic nondialysis-dependent chronic kidney disease (NDD-CKD) subjects. Methods NDD-CKD subjects with hemoglobin (Hb) ≤11.0 g/dL were sequentially enrolled into four dose cohorts and randomized to roxadustat or placebo two times weekly (BIW) or three times weekly (TIW) for 4 weeks, in an approximate roxadustat:placebo ratio of 3:1. Efficacy was assessed by (i) mean Hb change (ΔHb) from baseline (BL) and (ii) proportion of Hb responders (ΔHb ≥ 1.0 g/dL). Pharmacodynamic evaluation was performed in a subset of subjects. Safety was evaluated by adverse event frequency/severity. Results Of 116 subjects receiving treatment, 104 completed 4 weeks of dosing and 96 were evaluable for efficacy. BL characteristics for roxadustat and placebo groups were comparable. In roxadustat-treated subjects, Hb levels increased from BL in a dose-related manner in the 0.7, 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0 mg/kg groups. Maximum ΔHb within the first 6 weeks was significantly higher in the 1.5 and 2.0 mg/kg groups than in the placebo subjects. Hb responder rates were dose dependent and ranged from 30% in the 0.7 mg/kg BIW group to 100% in the 2.0 mg/kg BIW and TIW groups versus 13% in placebo. Conclusions Roxadustat transiently and moderately increased endogenous erythropoietin and reduced hepcidin. Adverse events were similar in the roxadustat and placebo groups. Roxadustat produced dose-dependent increases in blood Hb among anemic NDD-CKD patients in a placebo-controlled trial. Clinical Trials Registration Clintrials.gov #NCT00761657. PMID:26238121

  4. FIND-CKD: a randomized trial of intravenous ferric carboxymaltose versus oral iron in patients with chronic kidney disease and iron deficiency anaemia

    PubMed Central

    Macdougall, Iain C.; Bock, Andreas H.; Carrera, Fernando; Eckardt, Kai-Uwe; Gaillard, Carlo; Van Wyck, David; Roubert, Bernard; Nolen, Jacqueline G.; Roger, Simon D.

    2014-01-01

    Background The optimal iron therapy regimen in patients with non-dialysis-dependent chronic kidney disease (CKD) is unknown. Methods Ferinject® assessment in patients with Iron deficiency anaemia and Non-Dialysis-dependent Chronic Kidney Disease (FIND-CKD) was a 56-week, open-label, multicentre, prospective and randomized study of 626 patients with non-dialysis-dependent CKD, anaemia and iron deficiency not receiving erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs). Patients were randomized (1:1:2) to intravenous (IV) ferric carboxymaltose (FCM), targeting a higher (400–600 µg/L) or lower (100–200 µg/L) ferritin or oral iron therapy. The primary end point was time to initiation of other anaemia management (ESA, other iron therapy or blood transfusion) or haemoglobin (Hb) trigger of two consecutive values <10 g/dL during Weeks 8–52. Results The primary end point occurred in 36 patients (23.5%), 49 patients (32.2%) and 98 patients (31.8%) in the high-ferritin FCM, low-ferritin FCM and oral iron groups, respectively [hazard ratio (HR): 0.65; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.44–0.95; P = 0.026 for high-ferritin FCM versus oral iron]. The increase in Hb was greater with high-ferritin FCM versus oral iron (P = 0.014) and a greater proportion of patients achieved an Hb increase ≥1 g/dL with high-ferritin FCM versus oral iron (HR: 2.04; 95% CI: 1.52–2.72; P < 0.001). Rates of adverse events and serious adverse events were similar in all groups. Conclusions Compared with oral iron, IV FCM targeting a ferritin of 400–600 µg/L quickly reached and maintained Hb level, and delayed and/or reduced the need for other anaemia management including ESAs. Within the limitations of this trial, no renal toxicity was observed, with no difference in cardiovascular or infectious events. ClinicalTrials.gov number NCT00994318. PMID:24891437

  5. The Prevalence and Management of Anemia in Chronic Kidney Disease Patients: Result from the KoreaN Cohort Study for Outcomes in Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease (KNOW-CKD)

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Anemia is a common and significant complication of chronic kidney disease (CKD). However, its prevalence and current management status has not been studied thoroughly in Korea. We examined the prevalence of anemia, its association with clinical and laboratory factors, and utilization of iron agents and erythropoiesis stimulating agents using the baseline data from the large-scale CKD cohort in Korea. We defined anemia when hemoglobin level was lower than 13.0 g/dL in males and 12.0 g/dL in females, or received by erythropoiesis stimulating agents. Overall prevalence of anemia was 45.0% among 2,198 non-dialysis CKD patients from stage 1 to 5. Diabetic nephropathy (DN) as a cause, CKD stages, body mass index (BMI), smoking, leukocyte count, serum albumin, iron markers, calcium, and phosphorus concentration were identified as independent risk factors for anemia. Considering the current coverage of Korean National Health Insurance System, only 7.9% among applicable patients were managed by intravenous iron agents, and 42.7% were managed by erythropoiesis stimulating agents. PMID:28049235

  6. Antiproteinuric effect of add-on paricalcitol in CKD patients under maximal tolerated inhibition of renin-angiotensin system: a prospective observational study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Whether paricalcitol (PCT) reduces proteinuria in the presence of intensified inhibition of Renin-Angiotensin-System (RAS) is poorly studied. We evaluated the antiproteinuric effect of PCT in non-dialysis chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients with proteinuria greater than 0.5 g/24 h persisting despite anti-RAS therapy titrated to minimize proteinuria in the absence of adverse effects. Methods Forty-eight CKD patients were studied in the first six months of add-on oral PCT (1 mcg/day) and three months after drug withdrawal. Results Males were 87.5%, age 63 ± 14 yrs, systolic/diastolic blood pressure (BP) 143 ± 22/78 ± 11 mmHg, eGFR 29.7 ± 14.5 mL/min/1.73 m2, diabetes 40%, and cardiovascular disease 38%. At referral in the center (28 months prior to study baseline), proteinuria was 2.44 (95% CI 1.80-3.04) g/24 h with 6 patients not receiving any anti-RAS and 42 treated with a single agent, at low dosage in most cases. At study baseline, twenty patients were under 2–3 anti-RAS drugs while twenty-eight received 1 agent at full dose and proteinuria resulted to be reduced versus referral to 1.23 g/24 h (95%CI 1.00-1.51). Six months of add-on PCT significantly decreased proteinuria to 0.61 g/24 h (95%CI 0.40-0.93), with levels less than 0.5 g/24 h achieved in 37.5% patients, in the absence of changes of BP and GFR. Proteinuria recovered to basal value after drug withdrawal. The extent of antiproteinuric response to PCT was positively associated with diabetes, eGFR and daily Na excretion (R2 = 0.459, P < 0.0001). PTH decreased from 201 (IQR 92–273) to 83 (IQR 50–189) pg/mL. Conclusions In CKD patients, add-on PCT induces a significant reduction of proteinuria that is evident despite intensified anti-RAS therapy and larger in the presence of diabetes, higher GFR and unrestricted salt intake. PMID:23167771

  7. Rationale and Approaches to Phosphate and Fibroblast Growth Factor 23 Reduction in CKD.

    PubMed

    Isakova, Tamara; Ix, Joachim H; Sprague, Stuart M; Raphael, Kalani L; Fried, Linda; Gassman, Jennifer J; Raj, Dominic; Cheung, Alfred K; Kusek, John W; Flessner, Michael F; Wolf, Myles; Block, Geoffrey A

    2015-10-01

    Patients with CKD often progress to ESRD and develop cardiovascular disease (CVD), yet available therapies only modestly improve clinical outcomes. Observational studies report independent associations between elevated serum phosphate and fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23) levels and risks of ESRD, CVD, and death. Phosphate excess induces arterial calcification, and although elevated FGF23 helps maintain serum phosphate levels in the normal range in CKD, it may contribute mechanistically to left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH). Consistent epidemiologic and experimental findings suggest the need to test therapeutic approaches that lower phosphate and FGF23 in CKD. Dietary phosphate absorption is one modifiable determinant of serum phosphate and FGF23 levels. Limited data from pilot studies in patients with CKD stages 3-4 suggest that phosphate binders, low phosphate diets, or vitamin B3 derivatives, such as niacin or nicotinamide, may reduce dietary phosphate absorption and serum phosphate and FGF23 levels. This review summarizes current knowledge regarding the deleterious systemic effects of phosphate and FGF23 excess, identifies questions that must be addressed before advancing to a full-scale clinical outcomes trial, and presents a novel therapeutic approach to lower serum phosphate and FGF23 levels that will be tested in the COMBINE Study: The CKD Optimal Management With BInders and NicotinamidE study.

  8. Mid-adulthood risk factor profiles for CKD.

    PubMed

    McMahon, Gearoid M; Preis, Sarah R; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Fox, Caroline S

    2014-11-01

    Early identification of CKD risk factors may allow risk factor modification and prevention of CKD progression. We investigated the hypothesis that risk factors are present ≥30 years before the diagnosis of CKD in a case-control study using data from the Framingham Offspring Study. Patients with incident CKD (eGFR≤60 ml/min per 1.73 m2) at examination cycles 6, 7, and 8 were age- and sex-matched 1:2 to patients without CKD at baseline (examination 5). CKD risk factors were measured at each examination cycle. Logistic regression models, adjusted for age, sex, and time period, were constructed to compare risk factor profiles at each time point between cases and controls. During follow-up, 441 new cases of CKD were identified and matched to 882 controls (mean age 69.2 years, 52.4% women). Those who ultimately developed CKD were more likely to have hypertension (odds ratio [OR], 1.76; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.23 to 2.51), obesity (OR, 1.71; 95% CI, 1.14 to 2.59), and higher triglyceride levels (OR, 1.43; 95% CI, 1.12 to 1.83) 30 years before CKD diagnosis, and were more likely to have hypertension (OR, 1.38; 95% CI, 1.07 to 1.79), higher triglyceride levels (OR, 1.35; 95% CI, 1.11 to 1.64), lower HDLc (OR, 0.89; 95% CI, 0.81 to 0.97), and diabetes (OR, 2.90; 95% CI, 1.59 to 5.29) 20 years before CKD diagnosis. These findings demonstrate that risk factors for CKD are identifiable ≥30 years before diagnosis and suggest the importance of early risk factor identification in patients at risk for CKD.

  9. Uric Acid as a Target of Therapy in CKD

    PubMed Central

    Jalal, Diana I.; Chonchol, Michel; Chen, Wei; Targher, Giovanni

    2012-01-01

    The prevalence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) has risen and will continue to rise in the United States and worldwide. This is alarming considering that CKD remains an irreversible condition and patients who progress to chronic kidney failure suffer reduced quality of life and high mortality rates. As such, it is imperative to identify modifiable risk factors to develop strategies to slow CKD progression. One such factor is hyperuricemia. Recent observational studies have associated hyperuricemia with kidney disease. In addition, hyperuricemia is largely prevalent in patients with CKD. Data from experimental studies have revealed several potential mechanisms by which hyperuricemia may contribute to the development and progression of CKD. In this manuscript we offer a critical review of the experimental evidence linking hyperuricemia to CKD, we highlight the gaps in our knowledge on the topic as it stands today, and we review the observational and interventional studies that have examined the potential nephro-protective effect of lowering uric acid in CKD patients . While uric acid may also be linked to cardiovascular disease and mortality in patients with CKD, this review will focus only on uric acid as a potential therapeutic target to prevent kidney disease onset and progression. PMID:23058478

  10. Urinary Sodium and Potassium Excretion and CKD Progression.

    PubMed

    He, Jiang; Mills, Katherine T; Appel, Lawrence J; Yang, Wei; Chen, Jing; Lee, Belinda T; Rosas, Sylvia E; Porter, Anna; Makos, Gail; Weir, Matthew R; Hamm, L Lee; Kusek, John W

    2016-04-01

    CKD is a major risk factor for ESRD, cardiovascular disease, and premature death. Whether dietary sodium and potassium intake affect CKD progression remains unclear. We prospectively studied the association of urinary sodium and potassium excretion with CKD progression and all-cause mortality among 3939 patients with CKD in the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort Study. Urinary sodium and potassium excretion were measured using three 24-hour urine specimens, and CKD progression was defined as incident ESRD or halving of eGFR. During follow-up, 939 CKD progression events and 540 deaths occurred. Compared with the lowest quartile of urinary sodium excretion (<116.8 mmol/24 h), hazard ratios (95% confidence intervals) for the highest quartile of urinary sodium excretion (≥194.6 mmol/24 h) were 1.54 (1.23 to 1.92) for CKD progression, 1.45 (1.08 to 1.95) for all-cause mortality, and 1.43 (1.18 to 1.73) for the composite outcome of CKD progression and all-cause mortality after adjusting for multiple covariates, including baseline eGFR. Additionally, compared with the lowest quartile of urinary potassium excretion (<39.4 mmol/24 h), hazard ratios for the highest quartile of urinary potassium excretion (≥67.1 mmol/24 h) were 1.59 (1.25 to 2.03) for CKD progression, 0.98 (0.71 to 1.35) for all-cause mortality, and 1.42 (1.15 to 1.74) for the composite outcome. These data indicate that high urinary sodium and potassium excretion are associated with increased risk of CKD progression. Clinical trials are warranted to test the effect of sodium and potassium reduction on CKD progression.

  11. Longitudinal changes of cardiac structure and function in CKD (CASCADE study).

    PubMed

    Cai, Qi-Zhe; Lu, Xiu-Zhang; Lu, Ye; Wang, Angela Yee-Moon

    2014-07-01

    Little is known regarding the natural longitudinal changes in cardiac structure and function in CKD. We hypothesized that baseline CKD stage is associated with progressive worsening in cardiac structure and function. We conducted a prospective longitudinal study, recruiting 300 patients with stages 3-5 CKD from a major regional tertiary center and university teaching hospital in Hong Kong. Baseline CKD stages were studied in relation to natural longitudinal changes in echocardiographic and tissue Doppler imaging-derived parameters. Over 1 year, the prevalence of left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy increased from 40.3% to 48.9%, median left atrial volume index increased 4.8 (interquartile range [IQR], 2.1, 7.7) ml/m(2) (P<0.001), peak systolic mitral annular velocity decreased 0.5 (IQR, -1.5, 0.5) cm/s (P<0.001), early diastolic mitral annular velocity decreased 0.5 (IQR, -1.5, 0.5) cm/s (P<0.001), and eGFR declined 2.0 (IQR, -5.0, 0.0) ml/min per 1.73 m(2). CKD stages 4 and 5 were associated with more baseline abnormalities in cardiac structure and function and predicted greater longitudinal progression in LV mass index (odds ratio [OR], 3.02; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 1.39 to 6.58), volume index (OR, 2.58; 95% CI, 1.18 to 5.62), and left atrial volume index (OR, 2.61; 95% CI, 1.20 to 5.69) and worse diastolic dysfunction grade (OR, 3.17; 95% CI, 1.16 to 8.69) compared with stage 3a in the fully adjusted analysis. In conclusion, more advanced CKD at baseline may be associated with larger longitudinal increases in LV mass and volume and greater deterioration in diastolic function.

  12. Management of hypertension in CKD: beyond the guidelines.

    PubMed

    Judd, Eric; Calhoun, David A

    2015-03-01

    Hypertension (HTN) and CKD are closely associated with an intermingled cause and effect relationship. Blood pressure (BP) typically rises with declines in kidney function, and sustained elevations in BP hasten progression of kidney disease. This review addresses current management issues in HTN in patients with CKD including altered circadian rhythm of BP, timing of antihypertensive medication dosing, BP targets, diagnostic challenges in evaluating secondary forms of HTN, and the role of salt restriction in CKD. HTN in patients with CKD is often accompanied by a decrease in the kidney's ability to remove salt. Addressing this salt sensitivity is critical for the management of HTN in CKD. In addition to the well-established use of an ACEI or angiotensin receptor blocker, dietary salt restriction and appropriate diuretic therapy make up the mainstay of HTN treatment in patients with CKD. Bedtime dosing of antihypertensive medications can restore nocturnal dips in BP, and future clinical practice guidelines may recommend bedtime dosing of 1 or more antihypertensive medications in patients with CKD.

  13. Statins decrease all-cause mortality only in CKD patients not requiring dialysis therapy--a meta-analysis of 11 randomized controlled trials involving 21,295 participants.

    PubMed

    Barylski, Marcin; Nikfar, Shekoufeh; Mikhailidis, Dimitri P; Toth, Peter P; Salari, Pooneh; Ray, Kausik K; Pencina, Michael J; Rizzo, Manfredi; Rysz, Jacek; Abdollahi, Mohammad; Nicholls, Stephen J; Banach, Maciej

    2013-06-01

    The available studies have reported the benefits of statins on all-cause and cardiovascular mortality in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. However studies in end-stage renal disease patients on dialysis yielded conflicting results. Therefore, we performed a meta-analysis and provide the most reliable trial data to date on the impact of statin therapy on cardiovascular events and death from all causes in CKD patients. Data from PubMed, Web of Science, Cochrane Library, and Scopus for the years 1966 to October 2012 were searched. The final meta-analysis included 11 randomized controlled trials involving 21,295 participants with CKD. Among them 6857 were on dialysis. The use of statins in subjects with non-dialysis-dependent CKD resulted in a marked reduction in death from all causes (relative risk [RR]: 0.66; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.55-0.79; p<0.0001), cardiac causes (RR: 0.69; 95%CI: 0.55-0.68; p=0.0012), cardiovascular events (RR: 0.55; 95%CI: 0.4-0.75; p=0.0001) and stroke (RR: 0.66; 95%CI: 0.5-0.88; p=0.0022). The use of statins in dialysis-dependent CKD patients resulted in a non-significant effect on death from all causes (RR: 0.99; 95%CI: 0.88-1.11; p=0.85) and stroke (RR: 1.31; 95%CI: 0.9-1.89; p>0.05), but had the effect of reducing death from cardiac causes (RR: 0.79; 95%CI: 0.64-0.98; p<0.05) and cardiovascular events (RR: 0.81; 95%CI: 0.7-0.94; p<0.05). In conclusion, the use of statins should be indicated in cardiovascular disease prevention especially in patients with non-dialysis-dependent CKD. According to the very limited data the obtained results suggest caution in expecting a reduction in cardiovascular events in patients on dialysis.

  14. Pharmacologic Issues in treating hypertension in CKD.

    PubMed

    Sica, Domenic A

    2011-01-01

    Antihypertensive drugs are prescribed to patients with CKD to slow down the rate of loss of residual kidney function; to reduce proteinuria, when present; and to protect other target organs from damage that is mediated by elevated blood pressure (BP). In most patients, a diuretic and a renin system blocking drug, such as an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor, angiotensin receptor antagonist, or an aldosterone receptor antagonist are used. Often, 3 or more drugs are needed to achieve BP goals. Many drugs are eliminated through the kidney and in some cases dosage reductions are advisable to avoid adverse effects from high levels of medication. This article will review the various classes of antihypertensive drugs used in the management of high BP in patients with CKD, with an emphasis on pitfalls that arise when kidney function is impaired.

  15. Low-Protein Diets in Diabetic Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) Patients: Are They Feasible and Worth the Effort?

    PubMed Central

    Piccoli, Giorgina B.; Ventrella, Federica; Capizzi, Irene; Vigotti, Federica N.; Mongilardi, Elena; Grassi, Giorgio; Loi, Valentina; Cabiddu, Gianfranca; Avagnina, Paolo; Versino, Elisabetta

    2016-01-01

    Low-protein diets (LPDs) are often considered as contraindicated in diabetic patients, and are seldom studied. The aim of this observational study was to provide new data on this issue. It involved 149 diabetic and 300 non-diabetic patients who followed a LPD, with a personalized approach aimed at moderate protein restriction (0.6 g/day). Survival analysis was performed according to Kaplan–Meier, and multivariate analysis with Cox model. Diabetic versus non-diabetic patients were of similar age (median 70 years) and creatinine levels at the start of the diet (2.78 mg/dL vs. 2.80 mg/dL). There was higher prevalence of nephrotic proteinuria in diabetic patients (27.52% vs. 13.67%, p = 0.002) as well as comorbidity (median Charlson index 8 vs. 6 p = 0.002). Patient survival was lower in diabetic patients, but differences levelled off considering only cases with Charlson index > 7, the only relevant covariate in Cox analysis. Dialysis-free survival was superimposable in the setting of good compliance (Mitch formula: 0.47 g/kg/day in both groups): about 50% of the cases remained dialysis-free 2 years after the first finding of e-GFR (estimated glomerular filtration rate) < 15 mL/min, and 1 year after reaching e-GFR < 10 mL/min. In patients with type 2 diabetes, higher proteinuria was associated with mortality and initiation of dialysis. In conclusion, moderately restricted LPDs allow similar results in diabetic and non non-diabetic patients with similar comorbidity. PMID:27775639

  16. Low-Protein Diets in Diabetic Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) Patients: Are They Feasible and Worth the Effort?

    PubMed

    Piccoli, Giorgina B; Ventrella, Federica; Capizzi, Irene; Vigotti, Federica N; Mongilardi, Elena; Grassi, Giorgio; Loi, Valentina; Cabiddu, Gianfranca; Avagnina, Paolo; Versino, Elisabetta

    2016-10-21

    Low-protein diets (LPDs) are often considered as contraindicated in diabetic patients, and are seldom studied. The aim of this observational study was to provide new data on this issue. It involved 149 diabetic and 300 non-diabetic patients who followed a LPD, with a personalized approach aimed at moderate protein restriction (0.6 g/day). Survival analysis was performed according to Kaplan-Meier, and multivariate analysis with Cox model. Diabetic versus non-diabetic patients were of similar age (median 70 years) and creatinine levels at the start of the diet (2.78 mg/dL vs. 2.80 mg/dL). There was higher prevalence of nephrotic proteinuria in diabetic patients (27.52% vs. 13.67%, p = 0.002) as well as comorbidity (median Charlson index 8 vs. 6 p = 0.002). Patient survival was lower in diabetic patients, but differences levelled off considering only cases with Charlson index > 7, the only relevant covariate in Cox analysis. Dialysis-free survival was superimposable in the setting of good compliance (Mitch formula: 0.47 g/kg/day in both groups): about 50% of the cases remained dialysis-free 2 years after the first finding of e-GFR (estimated glomerular filtration rate) < 15 mL/min, and 1 year after reaching e-GFR < 10 mL/min. In patients with type 2 diabetes, higher proteinuria was associated with mortality and initiation of dialysis. In conclusion, moderately restricted LPDs allow similar results in diabetic and non non-diabetic patients with similar comorbidity.

  17. Endothelin 1 gene is not a major modifier of chronic kidney disease advancement among the autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease patients.

    PubMed

    Annapareddy, Shiva Nagendra Reddy; Elumalai, Ramprasad; Lakkakula, Bhaskar V K S; Ramanathan, Gnanasambandan; Periyasamy, Soundararajan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is characterized by the presence of numerous cysts in the kidney and manifest with various renal and extra-renal complications leading to ESRD. Endothelin may contribute to various renal and extra-renal manifestations pointing to genetic and environmental modifying factors that alter the risk of developing chronic kidney disease (CKD) in ADPKD. In the present study we investigated six genes coding for endothelin 1 ( EDN1 ) tagging-single nucleotide polymorphisms (tag-SNPs) to unravel the EDN1 gene modifier effect for renal disease progression in ADPKD. Materials and Methods: The tag-SNPs were genotyped using FRET-based KASPar method in 108 ADPKD patients and 119 healthy subjects. Cochran-Armitage trend test was used to determine the association between ADPKD and EDN1 tag-SNPs. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to assess the effect of tag-SNPs on CKD progression. The relationship between different CKD stages and hypertension and their interaction Mantel-Haenszel stratified analysis was performed. Results: All loci are polymorphic and followed Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. Distribution of EDN1 genotypes and haplotypes in control and ADPKD is not statistically significant. Five SNPs covering 3.4 kb forming single LD block, but the LD was not strong between SNPs. The EDN1 genotypes are not contributing to the CKD advancement among the ADPKD patients. Conclusion: These results suggest that the EDN1 gene is not a major modifier of CKD advancement among ADPKD patients.

  18. Randomized Trial of Bicarbonate or Saline Study for the Prevention of Contrast-Induced Nephropathy in Patients with CKD

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Paul; Manoukian, Steven V.; Abbott, J. Dawn; Kereiakes, Dean J.; Jeremias, Allen; Kim, Michael; Dauerman, Harold L.

    2015-01-01

    Background and objectives Sodium bicarbonate has been proposed for protection of the kidney from contrast-induced AKI (CIAKI). However, the effects of bicarbonate on long-term important clinical outcomes are uncertain. Design, setting, participants, & measurements In a prospective, double-blind, multicenter randomized clinical trial, 391 patients with an eGFR<45 ml/min per 1.73 m2 undergoing elective coronary or peripheral angiography were randomized to an infusion with a high dose of isotonic sodium bicarbonate (target 2.0 mEq/kg) or a similar molar amount of isotonic sodium chloride. The primary outcome was a composite of mortality, dialysis, or a sustained 20% reduction in eGFR at 6 months. Results There were 391 patients enrolled between March 2010 and May 2012. The incidence of the primary outcome was 14.9% in the bicarbonate group and 16.3% in the control group in the intention-to-treat population (P=0.78). There was also no difference in the incidence of CIAKI between the treatment groups (14.5% versus 12.1%, respectively; P=0.20). CIAKI was associated with a higher incidence of sustained loss of kidney function at 6 months compared with those without CIAKI (21.2% versus 7.7%, respectively; P=0.06). Conclusions High-dose sodium bicarbonate infusion in patients with eGFR<45 ml/min per 1.73 m2 undergoing angiography did not demonstrate a difference in incidence of the composite of death, dialysis, or sustained 6-month reduction in eGFR or CIAKI compared with sodium chloride. PMID:26185263

  19. Epidemiology of acute infections among patients with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Dalrymple, Lorien S; Go, Alan S

    2008-09-01

    The objectives of this review were (1) to review recent literature on the rates, risk factors, and outcomes of infections in patients who had chronic kidney disease (CKD) and did or did not require renal replacement therapy; (2) to review literature on the efficacy and use of selected vaccines for patients with CKD; and (3) to outline a research framework for examining key issues regarding infections in patients with CKD. Infection-related hospitalizations contribute substantially to excess morbidity and mortality in patients with ESRD, and infection is the second leading cause of death in this population. Patients who have CKD and do not require renal replacement therapy seem to be at higher risk for infection compared with patients without CKD; however, data about patients who have CKD and do not require dialysis therapy are very limited. Numerous factors potentially predispose patients with CKD to infection: advanced age, presence of coexisting illnesses, vaccine hyporesponsiveness, immunosuppressive therapy, uremia, dialysis access, and the dialysis procedure. Targeted vaccination seems to have variable efficacy in the setting of CKD and is generally underused in this population. In conclusion, infection is a primary issue when caring for patients who receive maintenance dialysis. Very limited data exist about the rates, risk factors, and outcomes of infection in patients who have CKD and do not require dialysis. Future research is needed to delineate accurately the epidemiology of infections in these populations and to develop effective preventive strategies across the spectrum of CKD severity.

  20. Patient safety: honoring advanced directives.

    PubMed

    Tice, Martha A

    2007-02-01

    Healthcare providers typically think of patient safety in the context of preventing iatrogenic injury. Prevention of falls and medication or treatment errors is the typical focus of adverse event analyses. If healthcare providers are committed to honoring the wishes of patients, then perhaps failures to honor advanced directives should be viewed as reportable medical errors.

  1. Management of patients with diabetes and CKD: conclusions from a "Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes" (KDIGO) Controversies Conference.

    PubMed

    Perkovic, Vlado; Agarwal, Rajiv; Fioretto, Paola; Hemmelgarn, Brenda R; Levin, Adeera; Thomas, Merlin C; Wanner, Christoph; Kasiske, Bertram L; Wheeler, David C; Groop, Per-Henrik

    2016-12-01

    The prevalence of diabetes around the world has reached epidemic proportions and is projected to increase to 642 million people by 2040. Diabetes is already the leading cause of end-stage kidney disease (ESKD) in most developed countries, and the growth in the number of people with ESKD around the world parallels the increase in diabetes. The presence of kidney disease is associated with a markedly elevated risk of cardiovascular disease and death in people with diabetes. Several new therapies and novel investigational agents targeting chronic kidney disease patients with diabetes are now under development. This conference was convened to assess our current state of knowledge regarding optimal glycemic control, current antidiabetic agents and their safety, and new therapies being developed to improve kidney function and cardiovascular outcomes for this vulnerable population.

  2. Risk of Adverse Pregnancy Outcomes in Women with CKD.

    PubMed

    Piccoli, Giorgina Barbara; Cabiddu, Gianfranca; Attini, Rossella; Vigotti, Federica Neve; Maxia, Stefania; Lepori, Nicola; Tuveri, Milena; Massidda, Marco; Marchi, Cecilia; Mura, Silvia; Coscia, Alessandra; Biolcati, Marilisa; Gaglioti, Pietro; Nichelatti, Michele; Pibiri, Luciana; Chessa, Giuseppe; Pani, Antonello; Todros, Tullia

    2015-08-01

    CKD is increasingly prevalent in pregnancy. In the Torino-Cagliari Observational Study (TOCOS), we assessed whether the risk for adverse pregnancy outcomes is associated with CKD by comparing pregnancy outcomes of 504 pregnancies in women with CKD to outcomes of 836 low-risk pregnancies in women without CKD. The presence of hypertension, proteinuria (>1 g/d), systemic disease, and CKD stage (at referral) were assessed at baseline. The following outcomes were studied: cesarean section, preterm delivery, and early preterm delivery; small for gestational age (SGA); need for neonatal intensive care unit (NICU); new onset of hypertension; new onset/doubling of proteinuria; CKD stage shift; "general" combined outcome (preterm delivery, NICU, SGA); and "severe" combined outcome (early preterm delivery, NICU, SGA). The risk for adverse outcomes increased across stages (for stage 1 versus stages 4-5: "general" combined outcome, 34.1% versus 90.0%; "severe" combined outcome, 21.4% versus 80.0%; P<0.001). In women with stage 1 CKD, preterm delivery was associated with baseline hypertension (odds ratio [OR], 3.42; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 1.87 to 6.21), systemic disease (OR, 3.13; 95% CI, 1.51 to 6.50), and proteinuria (OR, 3.69; 95% CI, 1.63 to 8.36). However, stage 1 CKD remained associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes (general combined outcome) in women without baseline hypertension, proteinuria, or systemic disease (OR, 1.88; 95% CI, 1.27 to 2.79). The risk of intrauterine death did not differ between patients and controls. Findings from this prospective study suggest a "baseline risk" for adverse pregnancy-related outcomes linked to CKD.

  3. [Kidney Disease and Laboratory Examinations--Opening Remarks: For Better Understanding of CKD].

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Haruyoshi; Wada, Takashi

    2015-02-01

    Chronic kidney diseases (CKD) have been cited as major risk factors not only for endstage renal failure, but also for the development of cardiovascular diseases and death. In the former criteria for CKD diagnosis (NKF K/DOQI, 2002), estimation of the severity of CKD was simply based on GFR, in order for it to be widely and easily understood by general physicians and patients. Therefore, the use of the CKD guideline without information on the causes and grades of albuminuria was limited for estimation of the prognosis. The revised guideline for CKD diagnosis (KDIGO CKD guideline 2012), with the disease category specified for diabetes mellitus and the different scoring system of microalbuminuria, is presently being effectively utilized by nephrologists as well as general physicians. In this symposium, to advice understanding of the causes and evaluation methods of CKD, speakers were invited to discuss topics in kidney pathology, urine sample examination, urinary biomarkers, and GFR.

  4. [Treatment for CKD-MBD(Chronic Kidney Disease-Mineral and Bone Disorder)].

    PubMed

    Iwashita, Yuko; Iwashita, Yu; Ito, Takafumi; Shigematsu, Takashi

    2016-02-01

    CKD is a common disease that is estimated to develop one in eight persons in Japan. The CKD itself is highly risk factor on the cardiac/vascular mortality. In addition,a new concept has been proposed "CKD-MBD". CKD-MBD is composed of a combination of abnormal mineral metabolism, abnormal bone, and extra skeletal calcification with cardiovascular high mortality. Treatment for CKD-MBD is a wide-ranging. We aim to decline cardiovascular event, fracture, and mortality rate of patients with CKD. The main therapeutic target for CKD-MBD becomes the phosphate control. Today, we can use of the VRDA, Calcimimetics and muti-phosphate binders as a lot of pharmacological intervention.

  5. Prevalence of CKD in Northeastern Italy: Results of the INCIPE Study and Comparison with NHANES

    PubMed Central

    Yabarek, Tewoldemedhn; Graziani, Maria Stella; Gemelli, Alessandro; Abaterusso, Cataldo; Frigo, Anna Chiara; Marchionna, Nicola; Citron, Lorenzo; Bonfante, Luciana; Grigoletto, Francesco; Tata, Salvatore; Ferraro, Pietro Manuel; Legnaro, Angelo; Meneghel, Gina; Conz, Piero; Rizzotti, Paolo; D'Angelo, Angela; Lupo, Antonio

    2010-01-01

    Background and objectives: Sufficiently powered studies to investigate the CKD prevalence are few and do not cover southern Europe. Design, setting, participants, & measurements: For the INCIPE study, 6200 Caucasian patients ≥40 years old were randomly selected in northeastern Italy in 2006. Laboratory determinations were centralized. The albumin to creatinine ratio in urine and estimated GFR from calibrated creatinine (SCr) were determined. A comparison with 2001 through 2006 NHANES surveys was performed. Results: Prevalence of CKD was 13.2% in northeastern (NE) Italy (age and gender standardized to the U.S. 2007 Caucasian population). Prevalence of CKD in U.S. Caucasians is higher (20.3%), the major difference being in CKD 3. Risk factors for CKD are more prevalent in the United States than in Italy. With use of CKD 3a and 3b stages, CKD prevalence decreased in NE Italy (8.5%) and in the United States (12.8%). Conclusions: The prevalence of CKD is high in NE Italy, but lower than that in the United States. A large part of the difference in CKD prevalence in NE Italy versus that in the United States is due to the different prevalence of CKD 3. The higher prevalence of a number of renal risk factors in persons from the United States explains in part the different dimensions of the CKD problem in the two populations. PMID:20813860

  6. Genomics in CKD: Is This the Path Forward?

    PubMed

    Nadkarni, Girish N; Horowitz, Carol R

    2016-03-01

    Recent advances in genomics and sequencing technology have led to a better understanding of genetic risk in CKD. Genetics could account in part for racial differences in treatment response for medications including antihypertensives and immunosuppressive medications due to its correlation with ancestry. However, there is still a substantial lag between generation of this knowledge and its adoption in routine clinical care. This review summarizes the recent advances in genomics and CKD, discusses potential reasons for its underutilization, and highlights potential avenues for application of genomic information to improve clinical care and outcomes in this particularly vulnerable population.

  7. Approach to the Treatment of Chronic Metabolic Acidosis in CKD.

    PubMed

    Raphael, Kalani L

    2016-04-01

    Chronic metabolic acidosis is not uncommon in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Clinical practice guidelines suggest that clinicians administer alkali to maintain serum bicarbonate level at a minimum of 22 mEq/L to prevent the effects of acidosis on bone demineralization and protein catabolism. Small interventional studies support the notion that correcting acidosis slows CKD progression as well. Furthermore, alkaline therapy in persons with CKD and normal bicarbonate levels may also preserve kidney function. Observational studies suggest that targeting a serum bicarbonate level near 28 mEq/L may improve clinical outcomes above and beyond targeting a value ≥ 22 mEq/L, yet values > 26 mEq/L have been reported to be associated with incident heart failure and mortality in the CRIC (Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort) Study. Furthermore, correcting acidosis may provoke vascular calcification. This teaching case discusses several uncertainties regarding the management of acidosis in CKD, such as when to initiate alkali treatment, potential side effects of alkali, and the optimum serum bicarbonate level based on current evidence in CKD. Suggestions regarding the maximum sodium bicarbonate dose to administer to patients with CKD to achieve the target serum bicarbonate concentration are offered.

  8. The Central American epidemic of CKD.

    PubMed

    Weiner, Daniel E; McClean, Michael D; Kaufman, James S; Brooks, Daniel R

    2013-03-01

    Recent reports have described an apparent epidemic of CKD along the Pacific coast of Central America, such that CKD is a leading cause of death among working-age men in lower-altitude agricultural communities in this region. Given the limited availability of kidney replacement therapies in this region, CKD often is a terminal diagnosis, lending greater urgency to the identification of a modifiable cause. This article discusses the epidemiology of CKD in this region, reviews the clinical features of this CKD outbreak, discusses potential causes and the evidence supporting these hypotheses, and highlights the wider implications of this epidemic of CKD.

  9. The Impact of Renin-Angiotensin System Blockade on Renal Outcomes and Mortality in Pre-Dialysis Patients with Advanced Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Yun Jung; Kim, Sun Moon; Shin, Byung Chul; Kim, Hyun Lee; Chung, Jong Hoon; Kim, Ae Jin; Ro, Han; Chang, Jae Hyun; Lee, Hyun Hee; Chung, Wookyung; Lee, Chungsik

    2017-01-01

    Renin-angiotensin-system (RAS) blockade is thought to slow renal progression in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). However, it remains uncertain if the habitual use of RAS inhibitors affects renal progression and outcomes in pre-dialysis patients with advanced CKD. In this multicenter retrospective cohort study, we identified 2,076 pre-dialysis patients with advanced CKD (stage 4 or 5) from a total of 33,722 CKD patients. RAS blockade users were paired with non-users for analyses using inverse probability of treatment-weighted (IPTW) and propensity score (PS) matching. The outcomes were renal death, all-cause mortality, hospitalization for hyperkalemia, and interactive factors as composite outcomes. RAS blockade users showed an increased risk of renal death in PS-matched analysis (hazard ratio [HR], 1.381; 95% CI, 1.071–1.781; P = 0.013), which was in agreement with the results of IPTW analysis (HR, 1.298; 95% CI, 1.123–1.500; P < 0.001). The risk of composite outcomes was higher in RAS blockade users in IPTW (HR, 1.154; 95% CI, 1.016–1.310; P = 0.027), but was marginal significance in PS matched analysis (HR, 1.243; 95% CI, 0.996–1.550; P = 0.054). The habitual use of RAS blockades in pre-dialysis patients with advanced CKD may have a detrimental effect on renal outcome without improving all-cause mortality. Further studies are warranted to determine whether withholding RAS blockade may lead to better outcomes in these patients. PMID:28122064

  10. Altered intestinal microbial flora and impaired epithelial barrier structure and function in CKD: the nature, mechanisms, consequences and potential treatment.

    PubMed

    Vaziri, Nosratola D; Zhao, Ying-Yong; Pahl, Madeleine V

    2016-05-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) results in systemic inflammation and oxidative stress which play a central role in CKD progression and its adverse consequences. Although many of the causes and consequences of oxidative stress and inflammation in CKD have been extensively explored, little attention had been paid to the intestine and its microbial flora as a potential source of these problems. Our recent studies have revealed significant disruption of the colonic, ileal, jejunal and gastric epithelial tight junction in different models of CKD in rats. Moreover, the disruption of the epithelial barrier structure and function found in uremic animals was replicated in cultured human colonocytes exposed to uremic human plasma in vitro We have further found significant changes in the composition and function of colonic bacterial flora in humans and animals with advanced CKD. Together, uremia-induced impairment of the intestinal epithelial barrier structure and function and changes in composition of the gut microbiome contribute to the systemic inflammation and uremic toxicity by accommodating the translocation of endotoxin, microbial fragments and other noxious luminal products in the circulation. In addition, colonic bacteria are the main source of several well-known pro-inflammatory uremic toxins such as indoxyl sulfate, p-cresol sulfate, trimethylamine-N-oxide and many as-yet unidentified retained compounds in end-stage renal disease patients. This review is intended to provide an overview of the effects of CKD on the gut microbiome and intestinal epithelial barrier structure and their role in the pathogenesis of systemic inflammation and uremic toxicity. In addition, potential interventions aimed at mitigating these abnormalities are briefly discussed.

  11. [Kidney and bone update : the 5-year history and future of CKD-MBD. Disorders of musculoskeletal system in CKD ; bone fracture and periarticular calcification].

    PubMed

    Yamada, Shunsuke; Taniguchi, Masatomo

    2012-07-01

    Chronic kidney disease-mineral and bone disorder (CKD-MBD) affects life expectancy through vascular calcification, and impairs patient's activity of daily living (ADL) and quality of life (QOL) through bone fracture and periarticular calcification. In CKD patients, vitamin D deficiency and secondary hyperparathyroidism impairs bone strength, and muscle dysfunction related to vitamin D deficiency also causes easy fall, leading to the high risk of bone fracture. Bone fracture not only aggravates ADL and QOL but increases the risk of mortality. Periarticular calcification such as tumoral calcinosis in relation to CKD-MBD causes restricted range of articular motion, leading to the deterioration of patient's ADL and QOL. Because bone fragility and tumoral calcinosis occurs in relation to CKD-MBD, the appropriate management of CKD-MBD is madatory.

  12. Effects of dietary interventions on incidence and progression of CKD.

    PubMed

    Jain, Nishank; Reilly, Robert F

    2014-12-01

    Traditional strategies for management of patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) have not resulted in any change in the growing prevalence of CKD worldwide. A historic belief that eating healthily might ameliorate kidney disease still holds credibility in the 21(st) century. Dietary sodium restriction to <2.3 g daily, a diet rich in fruits and vegetables and increased water consumption corresponding to a urine output of 3-4 l daily might slow the progression of early CKD, polycystic kidney disease or recurrent kidney stones. Current evidence suggests that a reduction in dietary net acid load could be beneficial in patients with CKD, but the supremacy of any particular diet has yet to be established. More trials of dietary interventions are needed, especially in diabetic nephropathy, before evidence-based recommendations can be made. In the meantime, nephrologists should discuss healthy dietary habits with their patients and provide individualized care aimed at maximizing the potential benefits of dietary intervention, reducing the incidence of CKD and delaying its progression to end-stage renal disease. Keeping in mind the lack of data on hard outcomes, dietary recommendations should take into account barriers to adherence and be tailored to different cultures, ethnicities and geographical locations.

  13. Pragmatic Clinical Trials in CKD: Opportunities and Challenges.

    PubMed

    de Boer, Ian H; Kovesdy, Csaba P; Navaneethan, Sankar D; Peralta, Carmen A; Tuot, Delphine S; Vazquez, Miguel A; Crews, Deidra C

    2016-10-01

    Randomized controlled trials in CKD lag in number behind those of other chronic diseases, despite the high morbidity and mortality experienced by patients with kidney disease and the exorbitant costs of their health care. Observational studies of CKD frequently yield seemingly paradoxic associations of traditional risk factors with outcomes, making it difficult to extrapolate the results of trials conducted in people with normal kidney function to patients with CKD. However, many completed trials in CKD have been limited by intermediate outcomes of unclear clinical significance or narrow eligibility criteria that limit external validity, and implementation of proven therapies remains a challenge. It is therefore imperative that the nephrology community capitalize on recent interest in novel approaches to trial design, such as pragmatic clinical trials. These trials are meant to promote research within real world settings to yield clinically relevant results with greater applicability than those of traditional trials, while maintaining many advantages, such as controlling for potential sources of bias. We provide a description of pragmatic clinical trials and a discussion of advantages, disadvantages, and practical challenges inherent to this study design, in the context of specific scientific questions relevant to patients with CKD.

  14. Cause-Specific Deaths in Non-Dialysis-Dependent CKD.

    PubMed

    Navaneethan, Sankar D; Schold, Jesse D; Arrigain, Susana; Jolly, Stacey E; Nally, Joseph V

    2015-10-01

    CKD is associated with higher risk of death, but details regarding differences in cause-specific death in CKD are unclear. We examined the leading causes of death among a non-dialysis-dependent CKD population using an electronic medical record-based CKD registry in a large healthcare system and the Ohio Department of Health mortality files. We included 33,478 white and 5042 black patients with CKD who resided in Ohio between January 2005 and September 2009 and had two measurements of eGFR<60 ml/min per 1.73 m(2) obtained 90 days apart. Causes of death (before ESRD) were classified into cardiovascular, malignancy, and non-cardiovascular/non-malignancy diseases and non-disease-related causes. During a median follow-up of 2.3 years, 6661 of 38,520 patients (17%) with CKD died. Cardiovascular diseases (34.7%) and malignant neoplasms (31.8%) were the leading causes of death, with malignancy-related deaths more common among those with earlier stages of kidney disease. After adjusting for covariates, each 5 ml/min per 1.73 m(2) decline in eGFR was associated with higher risk of death due to cardiovascular disease (hazard ratio [HR], 1.10; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 1.08 to 1.12) and non-cardiovascular/non-malignancy diseases (HR, 1.12; 95% CI, 1.09 to 1.14) but not to malignancy. In the adjusted models, blacks had overall-mortality hazard ratios similar to those of whites but higher hazard ratios for cardiovascular deaths. Further studies to confirm these findings and explain the mechanisms for differences are warranted. In addition to lowering cardiovascular burden in CKD, efforts to target known risk factors for cancer at the population level are needed.

  15. Efficacy and safety of two fixed-dose combinations of S-amlodipine and telmisartan (CKD-828) versus S-amlodipine monotherapy in patients with hypertension inadequately controlled using S-amlodipine monotherapy: an 8-week, multicenter, randomized, double-blind, Phase III clinical study

    PubMed Central

    Ihm, Sang-Hyun; Jeon, Hui-Kyung; Cha, Tae-Joon; Hong, Taek-Jong; Kim, Sang-Hyun; Lee, Nae-Hee; Yoon, Jung Han; Yoon, Namsik; Hwang, Kyung-Kuk; Jo, Sang-Ho; Youn, Ho-Joong

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the blood pressure (BP) lowering efficacy and safety of CKD-828, a fixed-dose combination of S-amlodipine (the more active isomer of amlodipine besylate, which is calcium channel blocker) and telmisartan (long acting angiotensin receptor blocker), in patients with hypertension inadequately controlled with S-amlodipine monotherapy. Patients and methods Eligible patients (N=187) who failed to respond after 4-week S-amlodipine 2.5 mg monotherapy (sitting diastolic blood pressure [sitDBP] ≥90 mmHg) to receive CKD-828 2.5/40 mg (n=63), CKD-828 2.5/80 mg (n=63), or S-amlodipine 2.5 mg (n=61) for 8 weeks. The primary efficacy endpoint, mean sitDBP change from baseline to Week 8, was compared between the combination (CKD-828 2.5/40 mg and CKD-828 2.5/80 mg) and S-amlodipine monotherapy groups. The safety was assessed based on adverse events, vital signs, and physical examination findings. Results After the 8-week treatment, changes in sitDBP/systolic BP (SBP) were −9.67±6.50/−12.89±11.78, −10.72±6.19/−13.79±9.41, and −4.93±7.26/−4.55±11.27 mmHg in the CKD-828 2.5/40 mg (P<0.0001/P<0.0001), CKD-828 2.5/80 mg (P<0.0001/P<0.0001), and S-amlodipine 2.5 mg (P<0.0001/P=0.0027) groups, respectively, which were all significant BP reductions. At Week 8, the CKD-828 2.5/40 mg (sitDBP/SBP: P=0.0002/P<0.0001) and CKD-828 2.5/80 mg (sitDBP/SBP: P=0.0001/P<0.0001) showed superior BP-lowering effects to S-amlodipine 2.5 mg (P<0.001). At Week 4, all groups showed significant antihypertensive effects but both CKD-828 combinations (CKD-828 2.5/40 mg and CKD-828 2.5/80 mg) exhibited superior BP-lowering effects to that of S-amlodipine 2.5 mg (sitDBP/SBP: P=0.0028/P=0.0001 and P<0.0001/P=0.0012, respectively). The adverse event incidence was significantly lower in the CKD-828 2.5/40 mg (9.52%, P=0.0086) than in the S-amlodipine 2.5 mg group (27.87%) and increasing the telmisartan dose induced no unexpected adverse events, suggesting the safety of CKD

  16. CKD screening and management in the Veterans Health Administration: the impact of system organization and an innovative electronic record.

    PubMed

    Patel, Thakor G; Pogach, Leonard M; Barth, Robert H

    2009-03-01

    At the beginning of this decade, Healthy People 2010 issued a series of objectives to "reduce the incidence, morbidity, mortality and health care costs of chronic kidney disease." A necessary feature of any program to reduce the burden of kidney disease in the US population must include mechanisms to screen populations at risk and institute early the aspects of management, such as control of blood pressure, management of diabetes, and, in patients with advanced chronic kidney disease (CKD), preparation for dialysis therapy and proper vascular access management, that can retard CKD progression and improve long-term outcome. The Department of Veterans Affairs and the Veterans Health Administration is a broad-based national health care system that is almost uniquely situated to address these issues and has developed a number of effective approaches using evidence-based clinical practice guidelines, performance measures, innovative use of a robust electronic medical record system, and system oversight during the past decade. In this report, we describe the application of this systems approach to the prevention of CKD in veterans through the treatment of risk factors, identification of CKD in veterans, and oversight of predialysis and dialysis care. The lessons learned and applicability to the private sector are discussed.

  17. Association of Chronic Kidney Disease with Coronary Heart Disease and Stroke Risks in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: An Observational Cross-sectional Study in Hangzhou, China

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xue; He, Jie; Ji, Xiao-Li; Zhao, Yi-Ming; Lou, Han-Yu; Song, Xiao-Xiao; Shan, Li-Zhen; Kang, Ying-Xiu; Zeng, Wen-Heng; Pang, Xiao-Hong; Zhang, Song-Zhao; Ding, Yue; Ren, Yue-Zhong; Shan, Peng-Fei

    2017-01-01

    Background: Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD). However, the association between CKD and CVD risk in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in China has not yet been well investigated. This study aimed to determine the association of CKD with the risks of coronary heart disease (CHD) and stroke in a Chinese population with T2DM. Methods: A total of 1401 inpatients with T2DM at the Second Affiliated Hospital of Zhejiang University School of Medicine between April 2008 and November 2013 were included in this study. The CKD-Epidemiology Collaboration equation for Asians was used to classify CKD. The UK Prospective Diabetes Study risk engine was used to estimate the risks of CHD and stroke. Results: CHD risk was significantly increased with CKD stage (20.1%, 24.8%, and 34.3% in T2DM patients with no CKD, CKD Stage 1–2, and Stage 3–5, respectively; P < 0.001 for all). The stroke risk was also increased with CKD stage (8.6%, 12.7%, and 25.4% in T2DM patients with no CKD, CKD Stage 1–2, and Stage 3–5, respectively; P < 0.001 for all). Compared with no-CKD group, the odds ratios (ORs) for high CHD risk were 1.7 (P < 0.001) in the CKD Stage 1–2 group and 3.5 (P < 0.001) in the CKD Stage 3–5 group. The corresponding ORs for high stroke risk were 1.9 (P < 0.001) and 8.2 (P < 0.001), respectively. Conclusion: In patients with T2DM, advanced CKD stage was associated with the increased risks of CHD and stroke. PMID:28051024

  18. Vitamin D, proteinuria, diabetic nephropathy, and progression of CKD.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Rajiv

    2009-09-01

    Although the endocrine effects of vitamin D are widely recognized, somewhat less appreciated is that vitamin D may serve paracrine functions through local activation by 1-alpha-hydroxylase and thus maintain immunity, vascular function, cardiomyocyte health, and abrogate inflammation and insulin resistance. In the kidney, vitamin D may be important for maintaining podocyte health, preventing epithelial-to-mesenchymal transformation, and suppressing renin gene expression and inflammation. Replacement with pharmacologic dosages of vitamin D receptor agonists (VDRA) in animal models of kidney disease consistently show reduction in albuminuria, abrogation of glomerulosclerosis, glomerulomegaly, and glomerular inflammation, effects that may be independent of BP and parathyroid hormone, but the effects of VDRA in preventing tubulointerstitial fibrosis and preventing the progression of kidney failure in these animal models are less clear. Emerging evidence in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) show that vitamin D can reduce proteinuria or albuminuria even in the presence of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibition. In addition to reducing proteinuria, VDRA may reduce insulin resistance, BP, and inflammation and preserve podocyte loss providing biologic plausibility to the notion that the use of VDRA may be associated with salubrious outcomes in patients with diabetic nephropathy. Patients with CKD have a very high prevalence of deficiency of 25-hydroxyvitamin D. Whether pharmacologic dosages of vitamin D instead of VDRA in patients with CKD can overcome the paracrine and endocrine functions of this vitamin remains unknown. To demonstrate the putative benefits of native vitamin D and VDRA among patients with CKD, randomized, controlled trials are needed.

  19. CKD-MBD: an endless story.

    PubMed

    Brancaccio, Diego; Cozzolino, Mario

    2011-01-01

    Renal failure is a growing problem that involves a large part of the population and has a great social impact, with often incapacitating complications, mainly related to mineral bone disorders (MBD) and cardiovascular diseases. Analysis of the recent scientific literature confirms that a large number of chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients develop an early derangement of the parameters of Ca-P metabolism in which phosphate homeostasis and a reduced endogenous synthesis of calcitriol play a critical role. Recent findings from several large observational studies have also suggested that the benefits of vitamin D receptor activators may extend beyond the traditional parathyroid hormone-lowering effect, and could result in direct cardiovascular and metabolic benefits. Treatment of secondary hyperparathyroidism has become even more complex with the arrival of the calcium-sensing receptor agonist cinacalcet hydrochloride and with the uncovering of novel mechanisms responsible for secondary hyperparathyroidism. The aim of this review is the analysis of some of the recent contributions in the field of CKD-MBD, to update the understanding of the pathogenetic mechanisms and possibly the most appropriate therapeutic approach in this field.

  20. Systematic Review of Structural and Functional Neuroimaging Findings in Children and Adults with CKD

    PubMed Central

    Reiser, Kathryn A.; Detre, John A.; Schultz, Robert T.; Herrington, John D.; Davatzikos, Christos; Doshi, Jimit J.; Erus, Guray; Liu, Hua-Shan; Radcliffe, Jerilynn; Furth, Susan L.; Hooper, Stephen R.

    2013-01-01

    Summary CKD has been linked with cognitive deficits and affective disorders in multiple studies. Analysis of structural and functional neuroimaging in adults and children with kidney disease may provide additional important insights into the pathobiology of this relationship. This paper comprehensively reviews neuroimaging studies in both children and adults. Major databases (PsychLit, MEDLINE, WorldCat, ArticleFirst, PubMed, Ovid MEDLINE) were searched using consistent search terms, and studies published between 1975 and 2012 were included if their samples focused on CKD as the primary disease process. Exclusion criteria included case reports, chapters, and review articles. This systematic process yielded 43 studies for inclusion (30 in adults, 13 in children). Findings from this review identified several clear trends: (1) presence of cerebral atrophy and cerebral density changes in patients with CKD; (2) cerebral vascular disease, including deep white matter hyperintensities, white matter lesions, cerebral microbleeds, silent cerebral infarction, and cortical infarction, in patients with CKD; and (3) similarities in regional cerebral blood flow between patients with CKD and those with affective disorders. These findings document the importance of neuroimaging procedures in understanding the effect of CKD on brain structure, function, and associated behaviors. Results provide a developmental linkage between childhood and adulthood, with respect to the effect of CKD on brain functioning across the lifespan, with strong implications for a cerebrovascular mechanism contributing to this developmental linkage. Use of neuroimaging methods to corroborate manifest neuropsychological deficits or perhaps to indicate preventive actions may prove useful to individuals with CKD. PMID:23723341

  1. Systematic review of structural and functional neuroimaging findings in children and adults with CKD.

    PubMed

    Moodalbail, Divya G; Reiser, Kathryn A; Detre, John A; Schultz, Robert T; Herrington, John D; Davatzikos, Christos; Doshi, Jimit J; Erus, Guray; Liu, Hua-Shan; Radcliffe, Jerilynn; Furth, Susan L; Hooper, Stephen R

    2013-08-01

    CKD has been linked with cognitive deficits and affective disorders in multiple studies. Analysis of structural and functional neuroimaging in adults and children with kidney disease may provide additional important insights into the pathobiology of this relationship. This paper comprehensively reviews neuroimaging studies in both children and adults. Major databases (PsychLit, MEDLINE, WorldCat, ArticleFirst, PubMed, Ovid MEDLINE) were searched using consistent search terms, and studies published between 1975 and 2012 were included if their samples focused on CKD as the primary disease process. Exclusion criteria included case reports, chapters, and review articles. This systematic process yielded 43 studies for inclusion (30 in adults, 13 in children). Findings from this review identified several clear trends: (1) presence of cerebral atrophy and cerebral density changes in patients with CKD; (2) cerebral vascular disease, including deep white matter hyperintensities, white matter lesions, cerebral microbleeds, silent cerebral infarction, and cortical infarction, in patients with CKD; and (3) similarities in regional cerebral blood flow between patients with CKD and those with affective disorders. These findings document the importance of neuroimaging procedures in understanding the effect of CKD on brain structure, function, and associated behaviors. Results provide a developmental linkage between childhood and adulthood, with respect to the effect of CKD on brain functioning across the lifespan, with strong implications for a cerebrovascular mechanism contributing to this developmental linkage. Use of neuroimaging methods to corroborate manifest neuropsychological deficits or perhaps to indicate preventive actions may prove useful to individuals with CKD.

  2. Chronic kidney disease guideline implementation in primary care: a qualitative report from the TRANSLATE CKD study

    PubMed Central

    Vest, Bonnie M.; York, Trevor R.M.; Sand, Jessica; Fox, Chester H.; Kahn, Linda S.

    2016-01-01

    Background Primary care physicians (PCPs) are optimally situated to identify and manage early-stage chronic kidney disease (CKD). Nonetheless, studies have documented suboptimal PCP understanding, awareness, and management of early CKD. The TRANSLATE CKD study is an ongoing national mixed-methods cluster randomized control trial that examines the implementation of evidence-based guidelines for CKD into primary care practice. Methods As part of mixed-methods process evaluation, semi-structured interviews were conducted by phone with 27 providers participating in the study. Interviews were audio-taped and transcribed. Thematic content analysis was used to identify themes. Themes were categorized according to the four domains of Normalization Process Theory (NPT). Results Identified themes illuminated the complex work undertaken in primary care practices to manage CKD. Barriers to guideline implementation were identified in each of the four NPT domains, including: 1) lack of knowledge and understanding around CKD (coherence), 2) difficulties engaging providers and patients in CKD management (cognitive participation), 3) limited time and competing demands (collective action), and 4) challenges obtaining and utilizing data to monitor progress (reflexive monitoring). Conclusions Addressing the barriers to implementation with concrete interventions at the levels at which they occur, informed by NPT, will ultimately improve the quality of CKD patient care. PMID:26355134

  3. The role of bone in CKD-mediated mineral and vascular disease.

    PubMed

    Khouzam, Nadine M; Wesseling-Perry, Katherine; Salusky, Isidro B

    2015-09-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in pediatric patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD), and vascular calcifications start early in the course of CKD. Based on the growing body of evidence that alterations of bone and mineral metabolism and the therapies designed to treat the skeletal consequences of CKD are linked to cardiovascular calcifications, the Kidney Disease, Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) working group redefined renal osteodystrophy as a systemic disorder of mineral and bone metabolism due to CKD, and this newly defined disorder is now known as "chronic kidney disease-mineral bone disorder (CKD-MBD)". Elevated fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23), a bone-derived protein, is the first biochemical abnormality to be associated with CKD-MBD, and high FGF23 levels correlate with increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, suggesting that bone is central to both initiating and perpetuating the abnormal mineral metabolism and vascular disease in CKD. The current standard therapies for CKD-MBD affect FGF23 levels differently; non-calcium-based binders with or without concurrent use of dietary phosphate restriction reduce FGF23 levels, while calcium-based binders seem to either increase or have no effect on FGF23 levels. Active vitamin D sterols increase FGF23 levels, whereas therapy with calcimimetics decreases FGF23 levels. Thus, the appropriate therapy that will minimize the rise in FGF23 and prevent cardiovascular morbidity remains to be defined.

  4. Glycosuria and Renal Outcomes in Patients with Nondiabetic Advanced Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Chi-Chih; Lin, Hugo You-Hsien; Lee, Jia-Jung; Lim, Lee Moay; Chiu, Yi-Wen; Chiang, Heng-Pin; Hwang, Shang-Jyh; Chen, Hung-Chun

    2016-01-01

    Sodium glucose cotransporter 2 inhibitors have shown a potential for renoprotection beyond blood glucose lowering. Glycosuria in nondiabetic patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) is sometimes noted. Whether glycosuria in CKD implies a channelopathy or proximal tubulopathy is not known. The consequence of glycosuria in CKD is also not studied. We performed a cross-sectional study for the association between glycosuria and urine electrolyte excretion in 208 nondiabetic patients. Fractional excretion (FE) of glucose >4% was 3.4%, 6.3% and 62.5% in CKD stage 3, 4 and 5, respectively. These patients with glycosuria had higher FE sodium, FE potassium, FE uric acid, UPCR, and urine NGAL-creatinine ratio. We conducted a longitudinal study for the consequence of glycosuria, defined by dipstick, in 769 nondiabetic patients with stage 4–5 CKD. Glycosuria was associated with a decreased risk for end-stage renal disease (adjusted hazard ratio: 0.77; CI = 0.62–0.97; p = 0.024) and for rapid renal function decline (adjusted odds ratio: 0.63; CI = 0.43–0.95; p = 0.032); but glycosuria was not associated with all-cause mortality or cardiovascular events. The results were consistent in the propensity-score matched cohort. Glycosuria is associated with increased fractional excretion of electrolytes and is related to favorable renal outcomes in nondiabetic patients with stage 5 CKD. PMID:28008953

  5. Tipping the balance from angiogenesis to fibrosis in CKD

    PubMed Central

    Ballermann, Barbara J; Obeidat, Marya

    2014-01-01

    Chronic progressive renal fibrosis leads to end-stage renal failure many patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Loss of the rich peritubular capillary network is a prominent feature, and seems independent of the specific underlying disease. The mechanisms that contribute to peritubular capillary regression include the loss of glomerular perfusion, as flow-dependent shear forces are required to provide the survival signal for endothelial cells. Also, reduced endothelial cell survival signals from sclerotic glomeruli and atrophic or injured tubule epithelial cells contribute to peritubular capillary regression. In response to direct tubular epithelial cell injury, and the inflammatory reaction that ensues, capillary pericytes dissociate from their blood vessels, also reducing endothelial cell survival. In addition, direct inflammatory injury of capillary endothelial cells, for instance in chronic allograft nephropathy, also contributes to capillary dropout. Chronic tissue hypoxia, which ensues from the rarefaction of the peritubular capillary network, can generate both an angiogenic and a fibrogenic response. However, in CKD, the balance is strongly tipped toward fibrogenesis. Understanding the underlying mechanisms for failed angiogenesis in CKD and harnessing endothelial-specific survival and pro-angiogenic mechanisms for therapy should be our goal if we are to reduce the disease burden from CKD. PMID:26312149

  6. Is there a role for ketoacid supplements in the management of CKD?

    PubMed

    Shah, Anuja P; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar; Kopple, Joel D

    2015-05-01

    Ketoacid (KA) analogues of essential amino acids (EAAs) provide several potential advantages for people with advanced chronic kidney disease (CKD). Because KAs lack the amino group bound to the α carbon of an amino acid, they can be converted to their respective amino acids without providing additional nitrogen. It has been well established that a diet with 0.3 to 0.4 g of protein per kilogram per day that is supplemented with KAs and EAAs reduces the generation of potentially toxic metabolic products, as well as the burden of potassium, phosphorus, and possibly sodium, while still providing calcium. These KA/EAA-supplemented very-low-protein diets (VLPDs) can maintain good nutrition, but the appropriate dose of the KA/EAA supplement has not been established. Thus, a KA/EAA dose-response study for good nutrition clearly is needed. Similarly, the composition of the KA/EAA supplement needs to be reexamined; for example, some KA/EAA preparations contain neither the EAA phenylalanine nor its analogue. Indications concerning when to inaugurate a KA/EAA-supplemented VLPD therapy also are unclear. Evidence strongly suggests that these diets can delay the need for maintenance dialysis therapy, but whether they slow the loss of glomerular filtration rate in patients with CKD is less clear, particularly in this era of more vigorous blood pressure control and use of angiotensin/aldosterone blockade. Some clinicians prescribe KA/EAA supplements for patients with CKD or treated with maintenance dialysis, but with diets that have much higher protein levels than the VLPDs in which these supplements have been studied. More research is needed to examine the effectiveness of KA/EAA supplements with higher protein intakes.

  7. Americans’ Use of Dietary Supplements That Are Potentially Harmful in CKD

    PubMed Central

    Grubbs, Vanessa; Plantinga, Laura C.; Tuot, Delphine S.; Hedgeman, Elizabeth; Saran, Rajiv; Saydah, Sharon; Rolka, Deborah; Powe, Neil R.

    2013-01-01

    patients with and at risk for CKD. PMID:23415417

  8. Effect of bicarbonate supplementation on renal function and nutritional indices in predialysis advanced chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Jiwon; Kwon, Soon Kil; Kim, Hye-Young

    2014-12-01

    Current practice guidelines recommend alkali therapy in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and metabolic acidosis to prevent complications. This study aims to investigate the effect of oral sodium bicarbonate supplementation on the progression of renal function and nutritional indices in patients with predialysis advanced CKD. Forty patients with predialysis stage 5 CKD(estimated glomerular filtration rate, eGFR <15mL/min per 1.73m(2)) and 40 patients with stage 4 CKD (eGFR 15 to 30mL/min per 1.73m(2)) who had a total CO2 less than 22mEq/L were assigned into the bicarbonate treatment group or control group for 12 months. In stage 4 CKD, there were significant differences in the changes of eGFR during the study between the treatment group and the control group (-2.30±4.49 versus -6.58±6.32mL/min/1.73m(2), p<0.05). However, in stage 5 CKD, there were no significant differences in the change of eGFR during the study between the two groups (-2.10±2.06 versus -3.23±1.95mL/min/1.73 m(2)).There were no significant differences in the changes of nutritional indices such as albumin, prealbumin, transferrin, total lymphocyte count (TLC), and Ondodera's prognostic nutritional index (OPNI) during the study between the two groups. In stage 5 CKD, there were significant differences in the changes of TLC and OPNI between the two groups. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that bicarbonate supplementation slows the rate of decline of renal function in stage 4 CKD and improves nutritional indices in stage 5 CKD. Alkali therapy in advanced CKD may have beneficial effect on renal function and malnutrition.

  9. Effect of Bicarbonate Supplementation on Renal Function and Nutritional Indices in Predialysis Advanced Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Jiwon; Kwon, Soon Kil

    2014-01-01

    Current practice guidelines recommend alkali therapy in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and metabolic acidosis to prevent complications. This study aims to investigate the effect of oral sodium bicarbonate supplementation on the progression of renal function and nutritional indices in patients with predialysis advanced CKD. Forty patients with predialysis stage 5 CKD(estimated glomerular filtration rate, eGFR <15mL/min per 1.73m2) and 40 patients with stage 4 CKD (eGFR 15 to 30mL/min per 1.73m2) who had a total CO2 less than 22mEq/L were assigned into the bicarbonate treatment group or control group for 12 months. In stage 4 CKD, there were significant differences in the changes of eGFR during the study between the treatment group and the control group (-2.30±4.49 versus -6.58±6.32mL/min/1.73m2, p<0.05). However, in stage 5 CKD, there were no significant differences in the change of eGFR during the study between the two groups (-2.10±2.06 versus -3.23±1.95mL/min/1.73 m2).There were no significant differences in the changes of nutritional indices such as albumin, prealbumin, transferrin, total lymphocyte count (TLC), and Ondodera's prognostic nutritional index (OPNI) during the study between the two groups. In stage 5 CKD, there were significant differences in the changes of TLC and OPNI between the two groups. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that bicarbonate supplementation slows the rate of decline of renal function in stage 4 CKD and improves nutritional indices in stage 5 CKD. Alkali therapy in advanced CKD may have beneficial effect on renal function and malnutrition. PMID:25606047

  10. Frailty and protein-energy wasting in elderly patients with end stage kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jun Chul; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar; Kopple, Joel D

    2013-02-01

    Older people constitute an increasingly greater proportion of patients with advanced CKD, including those patients undergoing maintenance dialysis treatment. Frailty is a biologic syndrome of decreased reserve and resistance to stressors that results from cumulative declines across multiple physiologic systems and causes vulnerability to adverse outcomes. Frailty is common in elderly CKD patients, and it may be associated with protein-energy wasting (PEW), sarcopenia, dynapenia, and other complications of CKD. Causes of frailty with or without PEW in the elderly with CKD can be classified into three categories: causes primarily caused by aging per se, advanced CKD per se, or a combination of both conditions. Frailty and PEW in elderly CKD patients are associated with impaired physical performance, disability, poorer quality of life, and reduced survival. Prevention and treatment of these conditions in the elderly CKD patients often require a multifaceted approach. Here, we examine the causes and consequences of these conditions and examine the interplay between frailty and PEW in elderly CKD patients.

  11. [Sodium Glucose Co-transporter Type 2 (SGLT2) Inhibitors in CKD].

    PubMed

    Insalaco, Monica; Zanoli, Luca; Rastelli, Stefania; Lentini, Paolo; Rapisarda, Francesco; Fatuzzo, Pasquale; Castellino, Pietro; Granata, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Among the new drugs used for the treatment of Diabetes Mellitus type 2, sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors represent a promising therapeutic option. Since their ability to lower glucose is proportional to GFR, their effect is reduced in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). The antidiabetic mechanism of these drugs is insulin-independent and, therefore, complimentary to that of others antihyperglicaemic agents. Moreover, SGLT2 inhibitors are able to reduce glomerular hyperfiltration, systemic and intraglomerular pressure and uric acid levels, with consequent beneficial effects on the progression of kidney disease in non diabetic patients as well. Only few studies have been performed to evaluate the effects of SGLT2 inhibitors in patients with CKD. Therefore, safety and efficacy of SGLT2 inhibitors should be better clarified in the setting of CKD. In this paper, we will review the use of SGLT2 inhibitors in diabetic patients, including those with CKD.

  12. Association between the Achievement of Target Range CKD-MBD Markers and Mortality in Prevalent Hemodialysis Patients in Taiwan by Using the Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes Clinical Guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Ben-Chung; Lee, Chih-Hsiung; Chang, Wen-Xiu

    2016-01-01

    Background. This study evaluated the association between achieving target chronic kidney disease-mineral and bone disorder (CKD-MBD) marker levels and mortality in Taiwanese hemodialysis (HD) patients. Target levels were based on the Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) guidelines. Methods. We performed a retrospective medical record review of 1126 HD patients between 2009 and 2013. A logistic regression model was used to evaluate the relationship between achieving target marker levels and the risk for all-cause and cardiovascular (CV) mortality. Reference target ranges were 7.9 ≤ calcium (Ca) ≤ 9.9 mg/dL, 2.4 ≤ phosphate (P) ≤ 4.7 mg/dL, and 144 ≤ intact parathyroid hormone (iPTH) ≤ 648 pg/mL. Results. Achievement of target P levels was associated with a lower risk for all-cause mortality compared to achievement of either target Ca or iPTH levels. Achieving target P + iPTH levels (OR 1.32) was associated with a lower odds ratio for all-cause mortality compared to achieving target Ca + P (OR 1.66) and Ca + iPTH (OR 1.43) levels. Similar trends were observed for CV mortality risk. Conclusions. The present study demonstrated that achieving serum P levels within the KDIGO target range is the most important factor for lowering mortality in HD patients. PMID:28003998

  13. Vascular effects of exercise training in CKD: current evidence and pathophysiological mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Van Craenenbroeck, Amaryllis H; Van Craenenbroeck, Emeline M; Kouidi, Evangelia; Vrints, Christiaan J; Couttenye, Marie M; Conraads, Viviane M

    2014-07-01

    Cardiovascular disease remains the main cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with CKD, an observation that cannot be explained by the coexistence of traditional risk factors alone. Recently, other mechanisms, such as alterations in nitric oxide bioavailability, impaired endothelial repair mechanisms, inflammation, and oxidative stress (all characteristic in CKD), have gained much attention as mediators for the increased cardiovascular risk. Regular physical training is a valuable nonpharmacological intervention for primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease. Likewise, the benefits of exercise training on exercise capacity and quality of life are increasingly recognized in patients with CKD. Furthermore, exercise training could also influence potential reversible mechanisms involved in atherosclerosis and arteriosclerosis. After discussing briefly the general concepts of vascular disease in CKD, this review provides an overview of the current evidence for the effects of exercise training at both clinical and preclinical levels. It concludes with some practical considerations on exercise training in this specific patient group.

  14. Vascular Effects of Exercise Training in CKD: Current Evidence and Pathophysiological Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Van Craenenbroeck, Emeline M.; Kouidi, Evangelia; Vrints, Christiaan J.; Couttenye, Marie M.; Conraads, Viviane M.

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease remains the main cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with CKD, an observation that cannot be explained by the coexistence of traditional risk factors alone. Recently, other mechanisms, such as alterations in nitric oxide bioavailability, impaired endothelial repair mechanisms, inflammation, and oxidative stress (all characteristic in CKD), have gained much attention as mediators for the increased cardiovascular risk. Regular physical training is a valuable nonpharmacological intervention for primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease. Likewise, the benefits of exercise training on exercise capacity and quality of life are increasingly recognized in patients with CKD. Furthermore, exercise training could also influence potential reversible mechanisms involved in atherosclerosis and arteriosclerosis. After discussing briefly the general concepts of vascular disease in CKD, this review provides an overview of the current evidence for the effects of exercise training at both clinical and preclinical levels. It concludes with some practical considerations on exercise training in this specific patient group. PMID:24832091

  15. Skin Sodium Concentration Correlates with Left Ventricular Hypertrophy in CKD.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Markus P; Raff, Ulrike; Kopp, Christoph; Scheppach, Johannes B; Toncar, Sebastian; Wanner, Christoph; Schlieper, Georg; Saritas, Turgay; Floege, Jürgen; Schmid, Matthias; Birukov, Anna; Dahlmann, Anke; Linz, Peter; Janka, Rolf; Uder, Michael; Schmieder, Roland E; Titze, Jens M; Eckardt, Kai-Uwe

    2017-02-02

    The pathogenesis of left ventricular hypertrophy in patients with CKD is incompletely understood. Sodium intake, which is usually assessed by measuring urinary sodium excretion, has been inconsistently linked with left ventricular hypertrophy. However, tissues such as skin and muscle may store sodium. Using (23)sodium-magnetic resonance imaging, a technique recently developed for the assessment of tissue sodium content in humans, we determined skin sodium content at the level of the calf in 99 patients with mild to moderate CKD (42 women; median [range] age, 65 [23-78] years). We also assessed total body overhydration (bioimpedance spectroscopy), 24-hour BP, and left ventricular mass (cardiac magnetic resonance imaging). Skin sodium content, but not total body overhydration, correlated with systolic BP (r=0.33, P=0.002). Moreover, skin sodium content correlated more strongly than total body overhydration did with left ventricular mass (r=0.56, P<0.001 versus r=0.35, P<0.001; P<0.01 between the two correlations). Linear regression analysis demonstrated that skin sodium content is a strong explanatory variable for left ventricular mass, unaffected by BP and total body overhydration. In conclusion, we found skin sodium content to be closely linked to left ventricular mass in patients with CKD. Interventions that reduce skin sodium content might improve cardiovascular outcomes in these patients.

  16. Cross-Disciplinary Biomarkers Research: Lessons Learned by the CKD Biomarkers Consortium.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Chi-Yuan; Ballard, Shawn; Batlle, Daniel; Bonventre, Joseph V; Böttinger, Erwin P; Feldman, Harold I; Klein, Jon B; Coresh, Josef; Eckfeldt, John H; Inker, Lesley A; Kimmel, Paul L; Kusek, John W; Liu, Kathleen D; Mauer, Michael; Mifflin, Theodore E; Molitch, Mark E; Nelsestuen, Gary L; Rebholz, Casey M; Rovin, Brad H; Sabbisetti, Venkata S; Van Eyk, Jennifer E; Vasan, Ramachandran S; Waikar, Sushrut S; Whitehead, Krista M; Nelson, Robert G

    2015-05-07

    Significant advances are needed to improve the diagnosis, prognosis, and management of persons with CKD. Discovery of new biomarkers and improvements in currently available biomarkers for CKD hold great promise to achieve these necessary advances. Interest in identification and evaluation of biomarkers for CKD has increased substantially over the past decade. In 2009, the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases established the CKD Biomarkers Consortium (http://www.ckdbiomarkersconsortium.org/), a multidisciplinary, collaborative study group located at over a dozen academic medical centers. The main objective of the consortium was to evaluate new biomarkers for purposes related to CKD in established prospective cohorts, including those enriched for CKD. During the first 5 years of the consortium, many insights into collaborative biomarker research were gained that may be useful to other investigators involved in biomarkers research. These lessons learned are outlined in this Special Feature and include a wide range of issues related to biospecimen collection, storage, and retrieval, and the internal and external quality assessment of laboratories that performed the assays. The authors propose that investigations involving biomarker discovery and validation are greatly enhanced by establishing and following explicit quality control metrics, including the use of blind replicate and proficiency samples, by carefully considering the conditions under which specimens are collected, handled, and stored, and by conducting pilot and feasibility studies when there are concerns about the condition of the specimens or the accuracy or reproducibility of the assays.

  17. Outcomes in CKD: what we know and what we need to know.

    PubMed

    Clark, Laura E; Khan, Izhar

    2010-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a major public health concern. The high prevalence of reduced estimated glomerular filtration (eGFR) in the elderly has led to speculation as to whether it should really be regarded as a disease in all. Patients with CKD exhibit considerable cardiovascular morbidity and mortality but until recently data regarding the natural history of CKD, particularly in the elderly, has been somewhat lacking. As such the clinical significance of K/DOQI's CKD definition in terms of additional morbidity, mortality and progression to end-stage renal disease (ESRD) remains uncertain. Data have shown that death from cardiovascular disease is far more common than progression to renal replacement therapy in the elderly. Factors which increase the risks of progression to ESRD include younger age, proteinuria and diabetes. Although the elderly have high rates of cardiovascular death, comparatively younger patients with CKD have substantially increased relative risks of death. Specialist renal review should be targeted towards these high-risk patients while the majority of elderly patients can be safely monitored in primary care. It remains doubtful whether labelling all elderly CKD patients with a 'disease' confers any additional benefit.

  18. Filling the gap in CKD: The health care workforce and faculty development.

    PubMed

    Becker, Bryan N

    2011-02-01

    Given limited resources, adding another chronic illness to the panoply of chronic disease care is problematic. Nevertheless, chronic kidney disease (CKD) is increasing in recognition and prevalence across the world, and a management strategy for this growing population is necessary. A diverse group of health care professionals interacts with patients with CKD and their family members, including nurses, nurse practitioners, dieticians, social workers, pharmacists, physicians, physical therapists, physician assistants, and public health workers. All these individuals have the opportunity to reinforce CKD management. This potentially would bring a broader health care workforce to bear on CKD, reducing the impact of the nephrology workforce shortage. To realize such a strategy, it is necessary to bolster CKD awareness and knowledge in the diverse health care workforce. A faculty development program that extends CKD awareness to existing health care workers also has the possibility of migrating into the learner curriculum in health professional schools. This approach would expand CKD education, creating a skilled diverse health care workforce.

  19. Stirring the Pot: Can Dietary Modification Alleviate the Burden of CKD?

    PubMed Central

    Snelson, Matthew; Clarke, Rachel E.; Coughlan, Melinda T.

    2017-01-01

    Diet is one of the largest modifiable risk factors for chronic kidney disease (CKD)-related death and disability. CKD is largely a progressive disease; however, it is increasingly appreciated that hallmarks of chronic kidney disease such as albuminuria can regress over time. The factors driving albuminuria resolution remain elusive. Since albuminuria is a strong risk factor for GFR loss, modifiable lifestyle factors that lead to an improvement in albuminuria would likely reduce the burden of CKD in high-risk individuals, such as patients with diabetes. Dietary therapy such as protein and sodium restriction has historically been used in the management of CKD. Evidence is emerging to indicate that other nutrients may influence kidney health, either through metabolic or haemodynamic pathways or via the modification of gut homeostasis. This review focuses on the role of diet in the pathogenesis and progression of CKD and discusses the latest findings related to the mechanisms of diet-induced kidney disease. It is possible that optimizing diet quality or restricting dietary intake could be harnessed as an adjunct therapy for CKD prevention or progression in susceptible individuals, thereby reducing the burden of CKD. PMID:28287463

  20. CKD and poverty: a growing global challenge.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Mohammed P; Goyder, Elizabeth C; Rigby, Jan E; El Nahas, Meguid

    2009-01-01

    Approximately 1.2 billion individuals worldwide live in extreme poverty (< $1/d), and 2.7 billion live in moderate poverty (< $2/d). Poverty is most prevalent in developing countries, but does not spare richer economies, where huge income discrepancies have been reported. Poverty is a major health care marker affecting a number of chronic, communicable, and noncommunicable diseases. Poverty and social deprivation are known to affect the predisposition, diagnosis, and management of chronic diseases; they directly impact on the prevalence of such conditions as obesity, diabetes, and hypertension. Also, growing evidence links poverty to chronic kidney disease (CKD). This may be caused by a direct impact of poverty on CKD or indirectly through the increased health care burden linked to poverty-associated diabetes and hypertension. Furthermore, data have shown that the poor and socially deprived have a greater prevalence of end-stage renal disease. Access to renal care, dialysis, and transplantation may also be affected by social deprivation. Overall, poverty and social deprivation are emerging as major risk markers for CKD in both developing and developed countries. Their impact on CKD warrants careful analysis because it may confound the interpretation of CKD risk factors within communities. This review therefore aims to look at the evidence linking poverty to CKD and its major risk factors, namely, diabetes and hypertension.

  1. Recent advance in patient monitoring

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Recent advance in technology has developed a lot of new aspects of clinical monitoring. We can monitor sedation levels during anesthesia using various electroencephalographic (EEG) indices, while it is still not useful for anesthesia depth monitoring. Some attempts are made to monitor the changes in sympathetic nerve activity as one of the indicators of stress, pain/analgesia, or anesthesia. To know the balance of sympathetic and parasympathetic activity, heart rate or blood pressure variability is investigated. For trend of cardiac output, low invasive monitors have been investigated. Improvement of ultrasound enables us to see cardiac structure and function continuously and clearer, increases success rate and decreases complication of central venous puncture and various kinds of nerve blocks. Without inserting an arterial catheter, trends of arterial oxygen tension or carbon dioxide tension can be monitored. Indirect visualization of the airway decreases difficult intubation and makes it easier to teach tracheal intubation. The changes in blood volume can be speculated non-invasively. Cerebral perfusion and metabolism are not ordinary monitored yet, but some studies show their usefulness in management of critically ill. This review introduces recent advances in various monitors used in anesthesia and critical care including some studies of the author, especially focused on EEG and cardiac output. However, the most important is that these new monitors are not almighty but should be used adequately in a limited situation where their meaning is confirmed. PMID:20877698

  2. Effect of an Educational Program on Adherence to Therapeutic Regimen among Chronic Kidney Disease Stage5 (CKD5) Patients under Maintenance Hemodialysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deif, Hala I. Abo; Elsawi, Khiria; Selim, Mohga; NasrAllah, Mohamed M.

    2015-01-01

    The burden of chronic disease on health care services worldwide is growing and the increased development of educational interventions which help patients to better manage their conditions is evident internationally. It has been recognized that poor adherence can be a serious risk to the health and wellbeing of patients. Adherence to fluid…

  3. Soluble Flt-1 links microvascular disease with heart failure in CKD.

    PubMed

    Di Marco, Giovana S; Kentrup, Dominik; Reuter, Stefan; Mayer, Anna B; Golle, Lina; Tiemann, Klaus; Fobker, Manfred; Engelbertz, Christiane; Breithardt, Günter; Brand, Eva; Reinecke, Holger; Pavenstädt, Hermann; Brand, Marcus

    2015-05-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is associated with an increased risk of heart failure (HF). Elevated plasma concentrations of soluble Flt-1 (sFlt-1) have been linked to cardiovascular disease in CKD patients, but whether sFlt-1 contributes to HF in CKD is still unknown. To provide evidence that concludes a pathophysiological role of sFlt-1 in CKD-associated HF, we measured plasma sFlt-1 concentrations in 586 patients with angiographically documented coronary artery disease and renal function classified according to estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR). sFlt-1 concentrations correlated negatively with eGFR and were associated with signs of heart failure, based on New York Heart Association functional class and reduced left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF), and early mortality. Additionally, rats treated with recombinant sFlt-1 showed a 15 % reduction in LVEF and a 29 % reduction in cardiac output compared with control rats. High sFlt-1 concentrations were associated with a 15 % reduction in heart capillary density (number of vessels/cardiomyocyte) and a 24 % reduction in myocardial blood volume. Electron microscopy and histological analysis revealed mitochondrial damage and interstitial fibrosis in the hearts of sFlt-1-treated, but not control rats. In 5/6-nephrectomised rats, an animal model of CKD, sFlt-1 antagonism with recombinant VEGF121 preserved heart microvasculature and significantly improved heart function. Overall, these findings suggest that a component of cardiovascular risk in CKD patients could be directly attributed to sFlt-1. Assessment of patients with CKD confirmed that sFlt-1 concentrations were inversely correlated with renal function, while studies in rats suggested that sFlt-1 may link microvascular disease with HF in CKD.

  4. Oxidative stress and inflammation are associated with adiposity in moderate to severe CKD.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Luis F; Shintani, Ayumi; Ikizler, T Alp; Himmelfarb, Jonathan

    2008-03-01

    Adiposity contributes to inflammation and oxidative stress in the general population, but this association has not been examined in the chronic kidney disease (CKD) population. We investigated the relationship between body mass index, body fat percentage, and markers of inflammation (C-reactive protein) and oxidative stress (F(2)-isoprostanes and protein thiols) in 184 patients with stages III to IV CKD and 43 healthy controls. We found that, on average, patients with CKD had 62% higher F(2)-isoprostanes, 7% lower protein thiols (a measure of endogenous anti-oxidant capacity, inversely related to protein oxidation), and 150% higher C-reactive protein levels than healthy controls (all unadjusted P < 0.001). In separate multivariable linear regression models, body mass index and body fat percentage each positively correlated with levels of F(2)-isoprostanes and C-reactive protein and negatively correlated with levels of protein thiols among patients with CKD after adjusting for age, sex, race, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, smoking history, estimated glomerular filtration rate, total cholesterol, serum albumin, and study site. We conclude that increased adiposity may amplify the oxidative stress and inflammation that accompany moderate to severe CKD. Interventions focused on weight loss may decrease the inflammatory and oxidative burden in CKD, which may ultimately attenuate cardiovascular risk in this population.

  5. The effects of vitamin D therapy on left ventricular structure and function - are these the underlying explanations for improved CKD patient survival?

    PubMed

    Covic, Adrian; Voroneanu, Luminita; Goldsmith, David

    2010-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is a major cause of death among patients with chronic kidney disease and vitamin D deficiency is a common problem also among these patients. Abnormalities in left ventricular size and function are frequent, as they are encountered in 70-80% of incident dialysis patients. These alterations develop early in the course of renal disease and their prevalence progresses in parallel with the decline in renal function. This process of left ventricular dilatation with compensatory hypertrophy continues after the institution of dialysis therapy, especially in the first year. The main factors responsible for the progression of left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) are considered to be blood pressure and anemia, and in patients receiving hemodialysis, the arteriovenous fistula, volume overload and abnormalities in mineral metabolism. This additional potential set of factors related to LVH - mineral and bone metabolism - is intriguing and begs an immediate question: by what possible mechanism can these factors be linked to cardiac morphology? Recent observational studies have indeed indicated that vitamin D treatment was associated with a significant reduction of cardiovascular death among dialysis patients, and a reduction in LVH; in contrast, other studies suggested that excess vitamin D contributes to risk of hypercalcemia and vascular calcification, which is associated with reduced survival and morbidity. This review examines the evidence linking vitamin D with cardiac structure and function.

  6. JS ISH-ISN-3 OPTIMAL TARGETS FOR BP CONTROL IN CKD.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, David

    2016-09-01

    Hypertension is the most prevalent complication of chronic kidney disease (CKD). Lowering high blood pressure slows progressive loss of kidney function and may also reduce the associated risk of cardiovascular complications, a common cause of premature death in CKD patients.Current International Guidelines produced by Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) acknowledges that no single BP target is optimal for all CKD patients, and encourages individualization of treatment depending on age, the severity of albuminuria and comorbidities. When published in 2012, the available evidence indicated that in CKD patients without albuminuria, the target BP should be ≤140 mmHg systolic and ≤90 mmHg diastolic. However, in most patients with an albumin excretion rate of ≥30 mg/24 h (i.e., those with both micro- and macroalbuminuria), a lower target of ≤130 mmHg systolic and ≤80 mmHg diastolic was suggested. In achieving BP control, the value of lifestyle changes and the need for multiple pharmacological agents was acknowledged. Use of agents that block the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system was recommended or suggested in all patients with an albumin excretion rate of ≥30 mg/24 h. Recommendations are almost identical in CKD patients with and without diabetes.Recent data from SPRINT (which included CKD patients) and other clinical trials has led nephrologists to ask whether targets lower than those recommend by KDIGO are appropriate and the guidelines are currently undergoing an update. Controversies remain around discontinuation of ACE/ARB in patients with stage 4-5 CKD and dual renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system blockade.

  7. GPs’ views on managing advanced chronic kidney disease in primary care: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Tonkin-Crine, Sarah; Santer, Miriam; Leydon, Geraldine M; Murtagh, Fliss EM; Farrington, Ken; Caskey, Fergus; Rayner, Hugh; Roderick, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Background Chronic kidney disease (CKD) has become a significant part of the GP’s workload since the introduction of the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence guidelines in 2008. Patients with advanced CKD (stages G4 and G5) often have comorbidities, varied disease progression, and are likely to be older. GPs may experience difficulties with management decisions for patients with advanced CKD, including when to refer to nephrology. Aim To explore GPs’ views of managing patients with advanced CKD and referral to secondary care. Design and setting Qualitative study with GPs in four areas of England: London, Bristol, Birmingham, and Stevenage. Method Semi-structured interviews with 19 GPs. Transcribed interviews were thematically analysed. Results GPs had little experience of managing patients with advanced CKD, including those on dialysis or having conservative care (treatment without dialysis or a transplant), and welcomed guidance. Some GPs referred patients based on renal function alone and some used wider criteria including age and multimorbidity. GPs reported a tension between national guidance and local advice, and some had learnt from experience that patients were discharged back to primary care. GPs with more experience of managing CKD referred patients later, or sometimes not at all, if there were no additional problems and if dialysis was seen as not in the patient’s interests. Conclusion GPs want guidance on managing older patients with advanced CKD and comorbidities, which better incorporates agreement between local and national recommendations to clarify referral criteria. GPs are not generally aware of conservative care programmes provided by renal units, however, they appear happy to contribute to such care or alternatively, lead conservative management with input from renal teams. PMID:26120137

  8. [CKD-MBD (Chronic Kidney Disease-Mineral and Bone Disorder). Lanthanum carbonate and new phosphate binders in patients with chronic kidney disease].

    PubMed

    Negi, Shigeo; Shigematsu, Takashi

    2010-07-01

    Hyperphosphatemia is a serious complication which has been linked with an increased risk of cardiovascular mortality in patients with chronic kidney disease. Lanthanum carbonate is a novel non-calcium, non-aluminum phosphate-binding agent, and has approved for clinical use in patients on hemodialysis in Japan on March in 2009. Compared to calcium carbonate and sevelamer hydrochloride, lanthanum carbonate is a powerful phosphate binder. There is no evidence of bone toxicity and neurotoxicity of lanthanum carbonate previously reported for aluminium hydroxide. However, further studies are needed to address the longer term toxic effect on bone and other organs.

  9. Serum levels of ochratoxin A in dogs with chronic kidney disease (CKD): a retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    MEUCCI, Valentina; LUCI, Giacomo; VANNI, Michele; GUIDI, Grazia; PERONDI, Francesca; INTORRE, Luigi

    2016-01-01

    Ochratoxin A (OTA) is a mycotoxin produced by secondary metabolism of several fungi belonging to the genera Aspergillus and Penicillium. OTA is potentially nephrotoxic, neurotoxic, immunotoxic and carcinogenic in several animal species and in humans. This toxin has been detected in several human food and animal feed. The aim of this study was to determine OTA in blood samples of healthy and affected by chronic kidney disease (CKD) dogs. CKD group showed higher incidence of OTA-positivity than healthy dogs (96 vs. 56%) and a significantly higher median value of OTA plasma concentration (0.008 vs. 0.144 ng/ml). No significant correlation was observed between OTA levels and creatinine values in CKD dogs. This is the first study regarding OTA detection in plasma samples of healthy and CKD dogs; the presence of this toxin is higher in nephropatic patients but is not yet clear, if it is correlated with progression of the disease. PMID:27941297

  10. Renal Hypoxia in CKD; Pathophysiology and Detecting Methods

    PubMed Central

    Hirakawa, Yosuke; Tanaka, Tetsuhiro; Nangaku, Masaomi

    2017-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a major public health problem. Accumulating evidence suggests that CKD aggravates renal hypoxia, and in turn, renal hypoxia accelerates CKD progression. To eliminate this vicious cycle, hypoxia-related therapies, such as hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) activation (prolyl hydroxylase domain inhibition) or NF-E2-related factor 2 activation, are currently under investigation. Clinical studies have revealed heterogeneity in renal oxygenation; therefore, the detection of patients with more hypoxic kidneys can be used to identify likely responders to hypoxia-oriented therapies. In this review, we provide a detailed description of current hypoxia detection methods. HIF degradation correlates with the intracellular oxygen concentration; thus, methods that can detect intracellular oxygen tension changes are desirable. The use of a microelectrode is a classical technique that is superior in quantitative performance; however, its high invasiveness and the fact that it reflects the extracellular oxygen tension are disadvantages. Pimonidazole protein adduct immunohistochemistry and HIF activation detection reflect intracellular oxygen tension, but these techniques yield qualitative data. Blood oxygen level-dependent magnetic resonance imaging has the advantage of low invasiveness, high quantitative performance, and application in clinical use, but its biggest disadvantage is that it measures only deoxyhemoglobin concentrations. Phosphorescence lifetime measurement is a relatively novel in vivo oxygen sensing technique that has the advantage of being quantitative; however, it has several disadvantages, such as toxicity of the phosphorescent dye and the inability to assess deeper tissues. Understanding the advantages and disadvantages of these hypoxia detection methods will help researchers precisely assess renal hypoxia and develop new therapeutics against renal hypoxia-associated CKD. PMID:28270773

  11. Molecular Mechanisms of Hepcidin Regulation: Implications for the Anemia of CKD

    PubMed Central

    Babitt, Jodie L.; Lin, Herbert Y.

    2010-01-01

    Anemia is prevalent in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and is associated with a lower quality of life and a higher risk of adverse outcomes including cardiovascular disease and death. Anemia management in CKD patients currently revolves around the use of erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs) and supplemental iron. However, many patients do not respond adequately and/or require high doses of these medications. Furthermore, recent clinical trials have shown that targeting higher hemoglobin levels with conventional therapies leads to increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, particularly when higher doses of ESAs are used, and in patients who are poorly responsive to therapy. One explanation for the poor response to conventional therapies in some patients is that these treatments do not fully address the underlying cause of the anemia. In many CKD patients, like patients with other chronic inflammatory diseases, poor absorption of dietary iron and inability to utilize the body's iron stores contributes to the anemia. Recent research suggests that these abnormalities in iron balance may be caused by elevated levels of the key iron regulatory hormone hepcidin. This article reviews the pathogenesis of anemia in CKD, the role and regulation of hepcidin in systemic iron homeostasis and the anemia of CKD, and the potential diagnostic and therapeutic implications of these findings. PMID:20189278

  12. Plasma Pentosidine and Its Association with Mortality in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jia; Qureshi, Abdul Rashid; Isoyama, Naohito; Leurs, Paul; Anderstam, Björn; Heimburger, Olof; Barany, Peter; Stenvinkel, Peter; Lindholm, Bengt

    2016-01-01

    Background Circulating advanced glycated end-products (AGEs) including pentosidine accumulating in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients due to retention and increased formation are thought to contribute to cardiovascular disease (CVD). Here we evaluated factors linked to increased plasma pentosidine and its association with mortality in patients with different stages of CKD and undergoing different treatments. Methods Plasma pentosidine, biomarkers of inflammation, oxidative stress and nutritional status were investigated in CKD 1–2 (n = 37), CKD 3–4 (n = 54), CKD 5 non-dialyzed (CKD5-ND; n = 386), peritoneal dialysis (PD; n = 74) and hemodialysis (HD; n = 195) patients. Factors predicting plasma pentosidine were analysed by multivariate regression analysis and mortality risk was assessed by GENMOD procedure. Results Plasma pentosidine levels, which were higher in CKD5-ND, PD and HD groups than in CKD 1–2 group, were significantly lower in PD than in HD patients, and not different between PD patients and CKD5-ND patients. Pentosidine associated inversely with glomerular filtration rate (GFR), and additionally in PD with 8-hydroxy-2‘-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG), and interleukin 6 (IL-6); in HD with age, IL-6 and body mass index (BMI); in CKD5-ND with age, 8-OHdG, IL-6, high-sensitive C-reactive protein (hsCRP), and soluble vascular cell adhesion protein-1 (sVCAM-1); in CKD 3–4 with 8-OHdG and sVCAM-1; and in CKD 1–2 with age and sVCAM-1. In multivariate analysis, age (one standard deviation, 1-SD higher), malnutrition (subjective global assessment, SGA), oxidative stress (8-OHdG, 1-SD higher), and belonging to CKD5-ND, HD and PD cohorts associated with 1-SD higher pentosidine. In GENMOD, 1-SD higher pentosidine independently predicted all-cause mortality (relative risk, RR = 1.04; 95% confidence interval, CI, 1.01–1.08, p = 0.01) and CVD mortality (RR = 1.03; 95% CI, 1.01–1.06, p = 0.03) after adjusting for all confounders. Conclusions Plasma

  13. Cancer Screening Among Patients With Advanced Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sima, Camelia S.; Panageas, Katherine S.; Schrag, Deborah

    2013-01-01

    Context Cancer screening has been integrated into routine primary care but does not benefit patients with limited life expectancy. Objective To evaluate the extent to which patients with advanced cancer continue to be screened for new cancers. Design, Setting, and Participants Utilization of cancer screening procedures (mammography, Papanicolaou test, prostate-specific antigen [PSA], and lower gastrointestinal [GI] endoscopy) was assessed in 87 736 fee-for-service Medicare enrollees aged 65 years or older diagnosed with advanced lung, colorectal, pancreatic, gastroesophageal, or breast cancer between 1998 and 2005, and reported to one of the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) tumor registries. Participants were followed up until death or December 31, 2007, whichever came first. A group of 87 307 Medicare enrollees without cancer were individually matched by age, sex, race, and SEER registry to patients with cancer and observed over the same period to evaluate screening rates in context. Demographic and clinical characteristics associated with screening were also investigated. Main Outcome Measure For each cancer screening test, utilization rates were defined as the percentage of patients who were screened following the diagnosis of an incurable cancer. Results Among women following advanced cancer diagnosis compared with controls, at least 1 screening mammogram was received by 8.9% (95% confidence interval [CI], 8.6%-9.1%) vs 22.0% (95% CI, 21.7%-22.5%); Papanicolaou test screening was received by 5.8% (95% CI, 5.6%-6.1%) vs 12.5% (95% CI, 12.2%-12.8%). Among men following advanced cancer diagnosis compared with controls, PSA test was received by 15.0% (95% CI, 14.7%-15.3%) vs 27.2% (95% CI, 26.8%-27.6%). For all patients following advanced diagnosis compared with controls, lower GI endoscopy was received by 1.7% (95% CI, 1.6%-1.8%) vs 4.7% (95% CI, 4.6%-4.9%). Screening was more frequent among patients with a recent history of screening (16.2% [95

  14. Research Priorities in CKD: Report of a National Workshop Conducted in Australia.

    PubMed

    Tong, Allison; Crowe, Sally; Chando, Shingisai; Cass, Alan; Chadban, Steve J; Chapman, Jeremy R; Gallagher, Martin; Hawley, Carmel M; Hill, Sophie; Howard, Kirsten; Johnson, David W; Kerr, Peter G; McKenzie, Anne; Parker, David; Perkovic, Vlado; Polkinghorne, Kevan R; Pollock, Carol; Strippoli, Giovanni F M; Tugwell, Peter; Walker, Rowan G; Webster, Angela C; Wong, Germaine; Craig, Jonathan C

    2015-08-01

    Research aims to improve health outcomes for patients. However, the setting of research priorities is usually performed by clinicians, academics, and funders, with little involvement of patients or caregivers and using processes that lack transparency. A national workshop was convened in Australia to generate and prioritize research questions in chronic kidney disease (CKD) among diverse stakeholder groups. Patients with CKD (n=23), nephrologists/surgeons (n=16), nurses (n=8), caregivers (n=7), and allied health professionals and researchers (n=4) generated and voted on intervention questions across 4 treatment categories: CKD stages 1 to 5 (non-dialysis dependent), peritoneal dialysis, hemodialysis, and kidney transplantation. The 5 highest ranking questions (in descending order) were as follows: How effective are lifestyle programs for preventing deteriorating kidney function in early CKD? What strategies will improve family consent for deceased donor kidney donation, taking different cultural groups into account? What interventions can improve long-term post-transplant outcomes? What are effective interventions for post hemodialysis fatigue? How can we improve and individualize drug therapy to control post-transplant side effects? Priority questions were focused on prevention, lifestyle, quality of life, and long-term impact. These prioritized research questions can inform funding agencies, patient/consumer organizations, policy makers, and researchers in developing a CKD research agenda that is relevant to key stakeholders.

  15. The complex relationship between CKD and ambulatory blood pressure patterns.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Arjun D; Agarwal, Rajiv

    2015-03-01

    Hypertension and CKD frequently coexist, and both are risk factors for cardiovascular events and mortality. Among people with hypertension, the loss of the normal fall in night-time BP, called nondipping, can only be diagnosed by ambulatory BP monitoring (ABPM) and is a risk factor for cardiovascular events. The pathophysiology of nondipping is complex, and CKD is an independent risk factor for nondipping. In fact, nondipping can be seen in as many as 80% of people with CKD. However, the evidence for nondipping as an independent risk factor or causal agent for adverse outcomes in CKD remains mixed. ABPM has been shown to be superior to clinical BP measurement for correlating with end-organ damage and prognosis in CKD. This review covers the evidence for the use of ABPM in CKD, the evidence linking ABPM patterns to outcome in CKD and the evidence for treatment of nondipping in CKD.

  16. Advance Care Planning in Glioblastoma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Fritz, Lara; Dirven, Linda; Reijneveld, Jaap C.; Koekkoek, Johan A. F.; Stiggelbout, Anne M.; Pasman, H. Roeline W.; Taphoorn, Martin J. B.

    2016-01-01

    Despite multimodal treatment with surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy, glioblastoma is an incurable disease with a poor prognosis. During the disease course, glioblastoma patients may experience progressive neurological deficits, symptoms of increased intracranial pressure such as drowsiness and headache, incontinence, seizures and progressive cognitive dysfunction. These patients not only have cancer, but also a progressive brain disease. This may seriously interfere with their ability to make their own decisions regarding treatment. It is therefore warranted to involve glioblastoma patients early in the disease trajectory in treatment decision-making on their future care, including the end of life (EOL) care, which can be achieved with Advance Care Planning (ACP). Although ACP, by definition, aims at timely involvement of patients and proxies in decision-making on future care, the optimal moment to initiate ACP discussions in the disease trajectory of glioblastoma patients remains controversial. Moreover, the disease-specific content of these ACP discussions needs to be established. In this article, we will first describe the history of patient participation in treatment decision-making, including the shift towards ACP. Secondly, we will describe the possible role of ACP for glioblastoma patients, with the specific aim of treatment of disease-specific symptoms such as somnolence and dysphagia, epileptic seizures, headache, and personality changes, agitation and delirium in the EOL phase, and the importance of timing of ACP discussions in this patient population. PMID:27834803

  17. Timing of onset of CKD-related metabolic complications.

    PubMed

    Moranne, Olivier; Froissart, Marc; Rossert, Jerome; Gauci, Cedric; Boffa, Jean-Jacques; Haymann, Jean Philippe; M'rad, Mona Ben; Jacquot, Christian; Houillier, Pascal; Stengel, Benedicte; Fouqueray, Bruno

    2009-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) guidelines recommend evaluating patients with GFR <60 ml/min per 1.73 m(2) for complications, but little evidence supports the use of a single GFR threshold for all metabolic disorders. We used data from the NephroTest cohort, including 1038 adult patients who had stages 2 through 5 CKD and were not on dialysis, to study the occurrence of metabolic complications. GFR was measured using renal clearance of (51)Cr-EDTA (mGFR) and estimated using two equations derived from the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease study. As mGFR decreased from 60 to 90 to <20 ml/min per 1.73 m(2), the prevalence of hyperparathyroidism increased from 17 to 85%, anemia from 8 to 41%, hyperphosphatemia from 1 to 30%, metabolic acidosis from 2 to 39%, and hyperkalemia from 2 to 42%. Factors most strongly associated with metabolic complications, independent of mGFR, were younger age for acidosis and hyperphosphatemia, presence of diabetes for acidosis, diabetic kidney disease for anemia, and both male gender and the use of inhibitors of the renin-angiotensin system for hyperkalemia. mGFR thresholds for detecting complications with 90% sensitivity were 50, 44, 40, 39, and 37 ml/min per 1.73 m(2) for hyperparathyroidism, anemia, acidosis, hyperkalemia, and hyperphosphatemia, respectively. Analysis using estimated GFR produced similar results. In summary, this study describes the onset of CKD-related complications at different levels of GFR; anemia and hyperparathyroidism occur earlier than acidosis, hyperkalemia, and hyperphosphatemia.

  18. Improving management of patients with advanced cancer

    PubMed Central

    Drudge-Coates, Lawrence

    2010-01-01

    Development of bone metastases in patients with advanced cancer is associated with skeletal-related events (SREs) such as pathologic fractures, spinal cord compression, the requirement for surgery or palliative radiotherapy to bone, and hypercalcemia of malignancy. Skeletal morbidity may reduce patient mobility, limit functional independence, and impair quality of life (QOL). Proactive management of new or worsening bone pain or motor impairment is crucial because of the potential for rapid progression of symptoms. Administration of bisphosphonate therapy as a monthly infusion to patients with bone metastases prevents or delays the onset and reduces the frequency of SREs and provides clinically meaningful improvements in bone pain and QOL. In addition to administration of therapy, the monthly infusion visit allows a dedicated team of healthcare professionals to regularly assess SREs, response to therapy, adverse events (AEs), QOL, and adherence to oral medications and supplements. The continuity of care that occurs during the monthly infusion visit provides oncology nurses with an opportunity to educate patients about effective strategies to manage SREs and AEs. In addition, regular interaction provides oncology nurses with an opportunity to recognize and proactively address subtle changes in the patients’ medical condition. Using a multidisciplinary medical team also eliminates barriers between the various healthcare professionals involved in patient management. Consequently, the monthly infusion visit can result in effective patient management and improved clinical outcomes in patients with malignant bone disease. PMID:21206517

  19. Haematuria: the forgotten CKD factor?

    PubMed

    Moreno, Juan Antonio; Martín-Cleary, Catalina; Gutiérrez, Eduardo; Rubio-Navarro, Alfonso; Ortiz, Alberto; Praga, Manuel; Egido, Jesús

    2012-01-01

    Haematuria is a frequent manifestation of glomerular disease. However, nephrologists devote more attention to the monitoring and therapeutic targeting of another key manifestation of glomerular injury, proteinuria. Recent reports have propelled haematuria to the forefront of clinical nephrology. Thus, glomerular macroscopic haematuria is associated with the development of acute kidney injury (AKI) with predominant tubular cell damage and there is increasing evidence for the negative impact of glomerular haematuria-associated AKI on long-term renal function outcome both in the context of IgA nephropathy and in anticoagulated patients. In addition, an epidemiological association between isolated microscopic haematuria in young adults and long-term incidence of end-stage renal disease has been described. Finally, a clearer understanding of how haematuria may cause tubular injury is emerging through detailed histological assessment of human biopsies and experimental models of haemoglobin-mediated nephrotoxicity.

  20. Sialadenosis in Patients with Advanced Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Close, John M.; Eghtesad, Bijan

    2009-01-01

    Sialadenosis (sialosis) has been associated most often with alcoholic liver disease and alcoholic cirrhosis, but a number of nutritional deficiencies, diabetes, and bulimia have also been reported to result in sialadenosis. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of sialadenosis in patients with advanced liver disease. Patients in the study group consisted of 300 candidates for liver transplantation. Types of liver disease in subjects with clinical evidence of sialadenosis were compared with diagnoses in cases who had no manifestations of sialadenosis. The data were analyzed for significant association. Sialadenosis was found in 28 of the 300 subjects (9.3%). Among these 28 cases, 11 (39.3%) had alcoholic cirrhosis. The remaining 17 (60.7%) had eight other types of liver disease. There was no significant association between sialadenosis and alcoholic cirrhosis (P = 0.389). These findings suggest that both alcoholic and non-alcoholic cirrhosis may lead to the development of sialadenosis. Advanced liver disease is accompanied by multiple nutritional deficiencies which may be exacerbated by alcohol. Similar metabolic abnormalities may occur in patients with diabetes or bulimia. Malnutrition has been associated with autonomic neuropathy, the pathogenic mechanism that has been proposed for sialadenosis. PMID:19644542

  1. Sialadenosis in patients with advanced liver disease.

    PubMed

    Guggenheimer, James; Close, John M; Eghtesad, Bijan

    2009-06-01

    Sialadenosis (sialosis) has been associated most often with alcoholic liver disease and alcoholic cirrhosis, but a number of nutritional deficiencies, diabetes, and bulimia have also been reported to result in sialadenosis. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of sialadenosis in patients with advanced liver disease. Patients in the study group consisted of 300 candidates for liver transplantation. Types of liver disease in subjects with clinical evidence of sialadenosis were compared with diagnoses in cases who had no manifestations of sialadenosis. The data were analyzed for significant association. Sialadenosis was found in 28 of the 300 subjects (9.3%). Among these 28 cases, 11 (39.3%) had alcoholic cirrhosis. The remaining 17 (60.7%) had eight other types of liver disease. There was no significant association between sialadenosis and alcoholic cirrhosis (P = 0.389). These findings suggest that both alcoholic and non-alcoholic cirrhosis may lead to the development of sialadenosis. Advanced liver disease is accompanied by multiple nutritional deficiencies which may be exacerbated by alcohol. Similar metabolic abnormalities may occur in patients with diabetes or bulimia. Malnutrition has been associated with autonomic neuropathy, the pathogenic mechanism that has been proposed for sialadenosis.

  2. Medication Adherence and Growth in Children with CKD

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Michael F.; Mulqueen, Lucy; Brooks, Ellen R.; Langman, Craig B.; Greenbaum, Larry A.; Furth, Susan L.; Moxey-Mims, Marva; Warady, Bradley A.; Kaskel, Frederick J.; Skversky, Amy L.

    2014-01-01

    Background and objectives Poor growth is a consequence of CKD, but can often be partially or fully prevented or corrected with the use of a number of medications. The extent of nonadherence with medications used to treat or mitigate growth failure in CKD has not been examined prospectively in children with CKD. Design, setting, participants, & measurements The prevalence of both prescription of and nonadherence to recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH), phosphate binders, alkali, active vitamin D, nutritional vitamin D, iron, and erythrocyte-stimulating agents was summarized over the first seven visits of the Chronic Kidney Disease in Children cohort study. The association between self-reported nonadherence to each medication group and the mean annual change in age- and sex-specific height z score was quantified using seven separate linear regression models with generalized estimating equations. Results Of 834 participants, 597 reported use of at least one of these medication groups and had adherence data available. Nonadherence ranged from 4% over all visits for erythrocyte-stimulating agents to 22% over all visits for nutritional vitamin D. Of the study participants, 451 contributed data to at least one of the analyses of adherence and changes in height z score. Children nonadherent to rhGH had no change in height z score, whereas those adherent to rhGH had a significant improvement of 0.16 SDs (95% confidence interval, 0.05 to 0.27); the effect size was slightly larger and remained significant after adjustment. Among participants with height≤3rd percentile and after adjustment, adherence to rhGH was associated with a 0.33 SD (95% confidence interval, 0.10 to 0.56) greater change in height z score. Nonadherence with other medication groups was not significantly associated with a change in height z score. Conclusions Self-reported nonadherence to rhGH was associated with poorer growth velocity in children with CKD, suggesting an opportunity for intervention and

  3. Retinopathy and Cognitive Impairment in Adults With CKD

    PubMed Central

    Yaffe, Kristine; Ackerson, Lynn; Hoang, Tina D.; Go, Alan S.; Maguire, Maureen G.; Ying, Gui-Shuang; Daniel, Ebenezer; Bazzano, Lydia A.; Coleman, Martha; Cohen, Debbie L.; Kusek, John W.; Ojo, Akinlolu; Seliger, Stephen; Xie, Dawei; Grunwald, Juan E.

    2014-01-01

    associated with poor performance on several cognitive domains including executive function and attention. Evaluation of retinal microvascular abnormalities may be a promising tool for identifying patients with CKD who are at increased risk of cognitive impairment. PMID:23206534

  4. FGF23 signaling impairs neutrophil recruitment and host defense during CKD

    PubMed Central

    Rossaint, Jan; Oehmichen, Jessica; Van Aken, Hugo; Reuter, Stefan; Pavenstädt, Hermann J.; Meersch, Melanie; Unruh, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) has been associated with impaired host response and increased susceptibility to infections. Leukocyte recruitment during inflammation must be tightly regulated to protect the host against pathogens. FGF23 levels are increased in blood during CKD, and levels of this hormone have been associated with a variety of adverse effects in CKD patients. Here, we have shown that CKD impairs leukocyte recruitment into inflamed tissue and host defense in mice and humans. FGF23 neutralization during CKD in murine models restored leukocyte recruitment and host defense. Intravital microscopy of animals with chronic kidney failure showed that FGF23 inhibits chemokine-activated leukocyte arrest on the endothelium, and downregulation of FGF receptor 2 (FGFR2) on PMNs rescued host defense in these mice. In vitro, FGF23 inhibited PMN adhesion, arrest under flow, and transendothelial migration. Mechanistically, FGF23 binding to FGFR2 counteracted selectin- and chemokine-triggered β2 integrin activation on PMNs by activating protein kinase A (PKA) and inhibiting activation of the small GTPase Rap1. Moreover, knockdown of PKA abolished the inhibitory effect of FGF23 on integrin activation. Together, our data reveal that FGF23 acts directly on PMNs and dampens host defense by direct interference with chemokine signaling and integrin activation. PMID:26878171

  5. Genome-Wide Association of CKD Progression: The Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Parsa, Afshin; Kanetsky, Peter A; Xiao, Rui; Gupta, Jayanta; Mitra, Nandita; Limou, Sophie; Xie, Dawei; Xu, Huichun; Anderson, Amanda Hyre; Ojo, Akinlolu; Kusek, John W; Lora, Claudia M; Hamm, L Lee; He, Jiang; Sandholm, Niina; Jeff, Janina; Raj, Dominic E; Böger, Carsten A; Bottinger, Erwin; Salimi, Shabnam; Parekh, Rulan S; Adler, Sharon G; Langefeld, Carl D; Bowden, Donald W; Groop, Per-Henrik; Forsblom, Carol; Freedman, Barry I; Lipkowitz, Michael; Fox, Caroline S; Winkler, Cheryl A; Feldman, Harold I

    2017-03-01

    The rate of decline of renal function varies significantly among individuals with CKD. To understand better the contribution of genetics to CKD progression, we performed a genome-wide association study among participants in the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort Study. Our outcome of interest was CKD progression measured as change in eGFR over time among 1331 blacks and 1476 whites with CKD. We stratified all analyses by race and subsequently, diabetes status. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that surpassed a significance threshold of P<1×10(-6) for association with eGFR slope were selected as candidates for follow-up and secondarily tested for association with proteinuria and time to ESRD. We identified 12 such SNPs among black patients and six such SNPs among white patients. We were able to conduct follow-up analyses of three candidate SNPs in similar (replication) cohorts and eight candidate SNPs in phenotype-related (validation) cohorts. Among blacks without diabetes, rs653747 in LINC00923 replicated in the African American Study of Kidney Disease and Hypertension cohort (discovery P=5.42×10(-7); replication P=0.039; combined P=7.42×10(-9)). This SNP also associated with ESRD (hazard ratio, 2.0 (95% confidence interval, 1.5 to 2.7); P=4.90×10(-6)). Similarly, rs931891 in LINC00923 associated with eGFR decline (P=1.44×10(-4)) in white patients without diabetes. In summary, SNPs in LINC00923, an RNA gene expressed in the kidney, significantly associated with CKD progression in individuals with nondiabetic CKD. However, the lack of equivalent cohorts hampered replication for most discovery loci. Further replication of our findings in comparable study populations is warranted.

  6. High Mobility Group Box Protein-1 correlates with renal function in chronic kidney disease (CKD).

    PubMed

    Bruchfeld, Annette; Qureshi, Abdul Rashid; Lindholm, Bengt; Barany, Peter; Yang, Lihong; Stenvinkel, Peter; Tracey, Kevin J

    2008-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is associated with inflammation and malnutrition and carries a markedly increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). High Mobility Group Box Protein-1 (HMGB-1) is a 30-kDa nuclear and cytosolic protein known as a transcription and growth factor, recently identified as a proinflammatory mediator of tissue injury. Recent data implicates HMGB-1 in endotoxin lethality, rheumatoid arthritis, and atherosclerosis. The aim of this post-hoc, cross-sectional study was to determine whether HMGB-1 serum levels are elevated in CKD patients. The study groups were categorized as follows: 110 patients starting dialysis defined as CKD 5; 67 patients with moderately to severely reduced renal function or CKD 3-4; and 48 healthy controls. High-sensitivity C-reactive-protein (hs-CRP), interleukin-6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor (TNF), serum-albumin (S-albumin), hemoglobin A(1c) (HbA(1c)), hemoglobin, subjective global nutritional assessment (SGA), and glomerular filtration rate (GFR) were analyzed. Kruskal-Wallis test was used to compare groups and Spearman's rank correlation test was used for continuous variables. HMGB-1, measured by Western blot, was significantly (P < 0.001) elevated in CKD 5 (146.7 +/- 58.6 ng/mL) and CKD 3-4 (85.6 +/- 31.8) compared with controls (10.9 +/- 10.5). HMGB-1 levels were correlated positively with TNF (Rho = 0.52; P < 0.001), hs-CRP (Rho = 0.38; P < 0.001), IL-6 (Rho = 0.30; P < 0.001), HbA(1c) (Rho = 0.14; P = 0.02) and SGA (Rho = 0.21; P = 0.002) and negatively correlated with GFR (Rho = -0.69; P = 0.0001), Hb (Rho = -0.60; P < 0.001), S-albumin (Rho = -0.31; P < 0.001). The current study has revealed that HMGB-1 is elevated significantly in CKD patients and correlates with GFR as well as markers of inflammation and malnutrition. Future studies may delineate whether HMGB-1 is also a marker of disease activity and severity as well as a predictor of outcome in CKD.

  7. The Labile Side of Iron Supplementation in CKD

    PubMed Central

    Cabantchik, Zvi Ioav

    2015-01-01

    The practice of intravenous iron supplementation has grown as nephrologists have gradually moved away from the liberal use of erythropoiesis-stimulating agents as the main treatment for the anemia of CKD. This approach, together with the introduction of large-dose iron preparations, raises the future specter of inadvertent iatrogenic iron toxicity. Concerns have been raised in original studies and reviews about cardiac complications and severe infections that result from long-term intravenous iron supplementation. Regarding the iron preparations specifically, even though all the currently available preparations appear to be relatively safe in the short term, little is known regarding their long-term safety. In this review we summarize current knowledge of iron metabolism with an emphasis on the sources and potentially harmful effects of labile iron, highlight the approaches to identifying labile iron in pharmaceutical preparations and body fluids and its potential toxic role as a pathogenic factor in the complications of CKD, and propose methods for its early detection in at-risk patients. PMID:25999405

  8. IκB Kinase Inhibitor Attenuates Sepsis-Induced Cardiac Dysfunction in CKD.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jianmin; Kieswich, Julius E; Chiazza, Fausto; Moyes, Amie J; Gobbetti, Thomas; Purvis, Gareth S D; Salvatori, Daniela C F; Patel, Nimesh S A; Perretti, Mauro; Hobbs, Adrian J; Collino, Massimo; Yaqoob, Muhammad M; Thiemermann, Christoph

    2017-01-01

    Patients with CKD requiring dialysis have a higher risk of sepsis and a 100-fold higher mortality rate than the general population with sepsis. The severity of cardiac dysfunction predicts mortality in patients with sepsis. Here, we investigated the effect of preexisting CKD on cardiac function in mice with sepsis and whether inhibition of IκB kinase (IKK) reduces the cardiac dysfunction in CKD sepsis. Male C57BL/6 mice underwent 5/6 nephrectomy, and 8 weeks later, they were subjected to LPS (2 mg/kg) or sepsis by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP). Compared with sham operation, nephrectomy resulted in significant increases in urea and creatinine levels, a small (P<0.05) reduction in ejection fraction (echocardiography), and increases in the cardiac levels of phosphorylated IκBα, Akt, and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2; nuclear translocation of the NF-κB subunit p65; and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression. When subjected to LPS or CLP, compared with sham-operated controls, CKD mice exhibited exacerbation of cardiac dysfunction and lung inflammation, greater increases in levels of plasma cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, and IL-10), and greater increases in the cardiac levels of phosphorylated IKKα/β and IκBα, nuclear translocation of p65, and iNOS expression. Treatment of CKD mice with an IKK inhibitor (IKK 16; 1 mg/kg) 1 hour after CLP or LPS administration attenuated these effects. Thus, preexisting CKD aggravates the cardiac dysfunction caused by sepsis or endotoxemia in mice; this effect may be caused by increased cardiac NF-κB activation and iNOS expression.

  9. Bedtime Dosing of Antihypertensive Medications Reduces Cardiovascular Risk in CKD

    PubMed Central

    Ayala, Diana E.; Mojón, Artemio; Fernández, José R.

    2011-01-01

    Time of ingestion of hypertension medications can affect circadian patterns of BP, but whether this translates into an effect on clinical outcomes is unknown. Here, in an open-label trial, we randomly assigned 661 patients with CKD either to take all prescribed hypertension medications upon awakening or to take at least one of them at bedtime. We measured 48-hour ambulatory BP at baseline and 3 months after any adjustment in treatment or, at the least, annually. After a median follow-up of 5.4 years, patients who took at least one BP-lowering medication at bedtime had an adjusted risk for total cardiovascular events (a composite of death, myocardial infarction, angina pectoris, revascularization, heart failure, arterial occlusion of lower extremities, occlusion of the retinal artery, and stroke) that was approximately one-third that of patients who took all medications upon awakening (adjusted HR 0.31; 95% CI 0.21 to 0.46; P < 0.001). Bedtime dosing demonstrated a similar significant reduction in risk for a composite outcome of cardiovascular death, myocardial infarction, and stroke (adjusted HR 0.28; 95% CI 0.13 to 0.61; P < 0.001). Furthermore, patients on bedtime treatment had a significantly lower mean sleep-time BP and a greater proportion demonstrated control of their ambulatory BP (56% versus 45%, P = 0.003). Each 5-mmHg decrease in mean sleep-time systolic BP was associated with a 14% reduction in the risk for cardiovascular events during follow-up (P < 0.001). In conclusion, among patients with CKD and hypertension, taking at least one antihypertensive medication at bedtime improves control of BP and reduces the risk for cardiovascular events. PMID:22025630

  10. The National Kidney Disease Education Program: improving understanding, detection, and management of CKD.

    PubMed

    Narva, Andrew S; Briggs, Michael

    2009-03-01

    The National Kidney Disease Education Program (NKDEP), an initiative of the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, works to reduce the morbidity and mortality caused by chronic kidney disease (CKD) and its complications. Established in 2000, the NKDEP initially focused on increasing awareness in at-risk populations and helping the laboratory community recalibrate serum creatinine measurement methods and begin using a revised equation to estimate glomerular filtration rate. Expanding its focus in recent years, the NKDEP now works to improve provider practices by collaborating with health systems, community health centers, and professional associations to encourage testing and treatment of patients. Among its top priorities is to develop such resources as clinical encounter tools, patient education aids, and training programs that help primary care professionals better identify and care for patients with CKD. Other priorities include improving the coordination of federal responses to CKD and addressing the standardization of measurement and reporting of urine albumin. Improving CKD detection and management is an important challenge. To succeed, the NKDEP must work in close partnership with the renal community, public health agencies, professional associations, and voluntary organizations that serve at-risk and patient communities.

  11. CKD-induced wingless/integration1 inhibitors and phosphorus cause the CKD-mineral and bone disorder.

    PubMed

    Fang, Yifu; Ginsberg, Charles; Seifert, Michael; Agapova, Olga; Sugatani, Toshifumi; Register, Thomas C; Freedman, Barry I; Monier-Faugere, Marie-Claude; Malluche, Hartmut; Hruska, Keith A

    2014-08-01

    In chronic kidney disease, vascular calcification, renal osteodystrophy, and phosphate contribute substantially to cardiovascular risk and are components of CKD-mineral and bone disorder (CKD-MBD). The cause of this syndrome is unknown. Additionally, no therapy addresses cardiovascular risk in CKD. In its inception, CKD-MBD is characterized by osteodystrophy, vascular calcification, and stimulation of osteocyte secretion. We tested the hypothesis that increased production of circulating factors by diseased kidneys causes the CKD-MBD in diabetic mice subjected to renal injury to induce stage 2 CKD (CKD-2 mice). Compared with non-CKD diabetic controls, CKD-2 mice showed increased renal production of Wnt inhibitor family members and higher levels of circulating Dickkopf-1 (Dkk1), sclerostin, and secreted klotho. Neutralization of Dkk1 in CKD-2 mice by administration of a monoclonal antibody after renal injury stimulated bone formation rates, corrected the osteodystrophy, and prevented CKD-stimulated vascular calcification. Mechanistically, neutralization of Dkk1 suppressed aortic expression of the osteoblastic transcription factor Runx2, increased expression of vascular smooth muscle protein 22-α, and restored aortic expression of klotho. Neutralization of Dkk1 did not affect the elevated plasma levels of osteocytic fibroblast growth factor 23 but decreased the elevated levels of sclerostin. Phosphate binder therapy restored plasma fibroblast growth factor 23 levels but had no effect on vascular calcification or osteodystrophy. The combination of the Dkk1 antibody and phosphate binder therapy completely treated the CKD-MBD. These results show that circulating Wnt inhibitors are involved in the pathogenesis of CKD-MBD and that the combination of Dkk1 neutralization and phosphate binding may have therapeutic potential for this disorder.

  12. Implementing KDOQI CKD definition and staging guidelines in Southern California Kaiser Permanente.

    PubMed

    Rutkowski, Mark; Mann, Wendy; Derose, Stephen; Selevan, David; Pascual, Noel; Diesto, Jean; Crooks, Peter

    2009-03-01

    We outline the experience of Southern California Kaiser Permanente, a large integrated health maintenance organization, in implementing the chronic kidney disease (CKD) definition and staging guidelines of the Kidney Disease Outcomes Quality Initiative (KDOQI) from 2002 to 2008, including estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) implementation, algorithm for GFR range assignment and reassignment, and practical modifications of CKD staging for population management. We departed from the KDOQI CKD definition and staging as follows: for stages 1 to 2, we required "macroproteinuria" rather than "microalbuminuria" as the marker of kidney damage; for stage 3, we included individuals with macroproteinuria, diabetes mellitus based on diabetic registry, or eGFR + 1/2 age less than 85; and for stage 5, we included only individuals not receiving renal replacement therapy. In an adult population of 2.5 million members, we identified 2.9% (72,005) for CKD population management (0.1%, 0.2%, 1.7%, 0.15%, and 0.01% with stages 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5, respectively). Outpatient visits with a nephrologist in the past 12 months for the prevalent CKD population increased modestly from 2003 to 2008 from 20% to 24%. Nephrologists see a higher risk subset, including 77% of patients with stages 4 to 5, 45% of prevalent patients with CKD stages 1 to 5 with the last urine protein level greater than approximately 1 g, and 21% of patients with stage 3 in the past 12 months, but only 4% of patients with eGFR of 30 to 59 mL/min/1.73 m(2) not meeting our criteria for stage 3. Primary care providers see the majority of patients with stages 1 to 5 in the course of a year (85%) and are aware of kidney disease (79% coded for kidney disease). Other quality indicators during the 12-month window include the following: for patients with prevalent CKD stages 1 to 5, a total of 56% with last blood pressure greater than 129/79 mm Hg, 21% missing qualitative proteinuria, 16% missing angiotensin

  13. Dietary intake of advanced cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Walsh, T D; Bowman, K B; Jackson, G P

    1983-02-01

    A state registered dietitian assessed the voluntary dietary intake of 13 advanced cancer inpatients on one ward of St. Christopher's Hospice for five consecutive days. There were 11 females, two males; median age 74 years (range 56 to 83). Two patients died on the fourth day of the study. A partially individualised weighed technique was used. Standard sized scoops and spoons were used to serve the food in small, medium or large standard portions (depending on appetite) and were weighed as served. Individual plate waste (by weight) was subtracted to give estimated individual intake. Foods provided by visitors was not included. The median and range of individual mean daily intakes (estimated) were: energy 5760 (938-8945) kJ, 1376 (224-2137) kcal; protein 44 (11-86) g; fat 52 (9-93) g; carbohydrate 169 (21-194) g; calcium 748 (268-1457) mg; iron 4.8 (0.5-21.0) mg; dietary fibre 5.0 (0.5-21.0) g. Compared to recommended amounts, energy, iron and dietary fibre intakes were low; calcium intake was high. Nutritional status may affect prognosis and/or subjective well-being in advanced cancer. The value of nutritional supplementation and the role of appetite stimulants in improving nutritional status needs investigation.

  14. Anticoagulation Therapy in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Saheb Sharif-Askari, Fatemeh; Syed Sulaiman, Syed Azhar; Saheb Sharif-Askari, Narjes

    2017-01-01

    Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) are at increased risk for both thrombotic events and bleeding. The early stages of CKD are mainly associated with prothrombotic tendency, whereas in its more advanced stages, beside the prothrombotic state, platelets can become dysfunctional due to uremic-related toxin exposure leading to an increased bleeding tendency. Patients with CKD usually require anticoagulation therapy for treatment or prevention of thromboembolic diseases. However, this benefit could easily be offset by the risk of anticoagulant-induced bleeding. Treatment of patients with CKD should be based on evidence from randomized clinical trials, but usually CKD patients are excluded from these trials. In the past, unfractionated heparins were the anticoagulant of choice for patients with CKD because of its independence of kidney elimination. However, currently low-molecular-weight heparins have largely replaced the use of unfractionated heparins owing to fewer incidences of heparin-induced thrombocytopenia and bleeding. We undertook this review in order to explain the practical considerations for the management of anticoagulation in these high risk population.

  15. Why Current PTH Assays Mislead Clinical Decision Making in Patients with Secondary Hyperparathyroidism.

    PubMed

    Hocher, Berthold; Yin, Lianghong

    2017-02-10

    Preclinical studies in cell culture systems as well as in whole animal chronic kidney disease (CKD) models showed that parathyroid hormone (PTH), oxidized at the 2 methionine residues (positions 8 and 18), caused a loss of function. This was so far not considered in the development of PTH assays used in current clinical practice. Patients with advanced CKD are subject to oxidative stress, and plasma proteins (including PTH) are targets for oxidants. In patients with CKD, a considerable but variable fraction (about 70 to 90%) of measured PTH appears to be oxidized. Oxidized PTH (oxPTH) does not interact with the PTH receptor resulting in loss of biological activity. Currently used intact PTH (iPTH) assays detect both oxidized and non-oxPTH (n-oxPTH). Clinical studies demonstrated that bioactive, n-oxPTH, but not iPTH nor oxPTH, is associated with mortality in CKD patients.

  16. Pregnancy in Women With CKD: A Success Story.

    PubMed

    Hall, Matthew

    2016-10-01

    In women with chronic kidney disease (CKD), pregnancy outcomes have improved over the last 50 years, particularly in the developed world. Maternal mortality is now extremely low, fetal survival has markedly increased (even in women with CKD stages 4-5), and it is now the exception for women with CKD to be advised against embarking on a pregnancy. However, pregnancies are rarely free from complications, and there are unanswered questions about the longer term effects on maternal and infant health. The developments have led to a more optimistic attitude to pregnancy in women with CKD not requiring renal replacement treatment. The remaining problems are described in this World Kidney Forum.

  17. Interferon-free regimens in patients with hepatitis C infection and renal dysfunction or kidney transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Cholongitas, Evangelos; Pipili, Chrysoula; Papatheodoridis, George V

    2017-01-01

    Treatment of patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and chronic hepatitis C (CHC) differs from that used in the general CHC population mostly when glomerular filtration rate (GFR) is below 30 mL/min, as sofosbuvir, the backbone of several current regimens, is officially contraindicated. Given that ribavirin free regimens are preferable in CKD, elbasvir/grazoprevir is offered in CHC patients with genotype 1 or 4 and ombitasvir/paritaprevir and dasabuvir in genotype 1b for 12 wk. Although regimens containing peginterferon with or without ribavirin are officially recommended for patients with CKD and genotype 2, 3, 5, 6, such regimens are rarely used because of their low efficacy and the poor safety and tolerance profile. In this setting, especially in the presence of advanced liver disease, sofosbuvir-based regimens are often used, despite sofosbuvir contraindication. It seems to have good overall safety with only 6% or 3.4% of CKD patients to discontinue therapy or develop serious adverse events without drug discontinuation. In addition, sustained virological response (SVR) rates with sofosbuvir based regimens in CKD patients appear to be comparable with SVR rates in patients with normal renal function. Treatment recommendations for kidney transplant recipients are the same with those for patients with CHC, taking into consideration potential drug-drug interactions and baseline GFR before treatment initiation. This review summarizes recent data on the current management of CHC in CKD patients highlighting their strengths and weaknesses and determining their usefulness in clinical practice. PMID:28217256

  18. Recent Advances in Traditional Chinese Medicine for Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Yifei; Menon, Madhav C; Deng, Yueyi; Chen, Yiping; He, John Cijiang

    2015-09-01

    Because current treatment options for chronic kidney disease (CKD) are limited, many patients seek out alternative therapies such as traditional Chinese medicine. However, there is a lack of evidence from large clinical trials to support the use of traditional medicines in patients with CKD. Many active components of traditional medicine formulas are undetermined and their toxicities are unknown. Therefore, there is a need for research to identify active compounds from traditional medicines and understand the mechanisms of action of these compounds, as well as their potential toxicity, and subsequently perform well-designed, randomized, controlled, clinical trials to study the efficacy and safety of their use in patients with CKD. Significant progress has been made in this field within the last several years. Many active compounds have been identified by applying sophisticated techniques such as mass spectrometry, and more mechanistic studies of these compounds have been performed using both in vitro and in vivo models. In addition, several well-designed, large, randomized, clinical trials have recently been published. We summarize these recent advances in the field of traditional medicines as they apply to CKD. In addition, current barriers for further research are also discussed. Due to the ongoing research in this field, we believe that stronger evidence to support the use of traditional medicines for CKD will emerge in the near future.

  19. Proton Pump Inhibitors and Risk of Incident CKD and Progression to ESRD.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yan; Bowe, Benjamin; Li, Tingting; Xian, Hong; Balasubramanian, Sumitra; Al-Aly, Ziyad

    2016-10-01

    The association between proton pump inhibitors (PPI) use and risk of acute interstitial nephritis has been described. However, whether exposure to PPI associates with incident CKD, CKD progression, or ESRD is not known. We used Department of Veterans Affairs national databases to build a primary cohort of new users of PPI (n=173,321) and new users of histamine H2-receptor antagonists (H2 blockers; n=20,270) and followed these patients over 5 years to ascertain renal outcomes. In adjusted Cox survival models, the PPI group, compared with the H2 blockers group, had an increased risk of incident eGFR<60 ml/min per 1.73 m(2) and of incident CKD (hazard ratio [HR], 1.22; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 1.18 to 1.26; and HR, 1.28; 95% CI, 1.23 to 1.34, respectively). Patients treated with PPI also had a significantly elevated risk of doubling of serum creatinine level (HR, 1.53; 95% CI, 1.42 to 1.65), of eGFR decline >30% (HR, 1.32; 95% CI, 1.28 to 1.37), and of ESRD (HR, 1.96; 95% CI, 1.21 to 3.18). Furthermore, we detected a graded association between duration of PPI exposure and risk of renal outcomes among those exposed to PPI for 31-90, 91-180, 181-360, and 361-720 days compared with those exposed for ≤30 days. Examination of risk of renal outcomes in 1:1 propensity score-matched cohorts of patients taking H2 blockers versus patients taking PPI and patients taking PPI versus controls yielded consistent results. Our results suggest that PPI exposure associates with increased risk of incident CKD, CKD progression, and ESRD.

  20. Role of cytogenetic biomarkers in management of chronic kidney disease patients: A review

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Zeba; Pandey, Manoj; Samartha, Ravindra M

    2016-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is much more common than people recognize, and habitually goes undetected and undiagnosed until the disease is well advanced or when their kidney functions is down to 25% of normal function. Genetic and non-genetic factors contribute to cause CKD. Non-genetic factors include hypertension, High level of DNA damage due to the production of reactive oxygen species and nucleic acid oxidation has been reported in CKD patients. Main genetic factor which causes CKD is diabetic nephropathy. A three- to nine-fold greater risk of End Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) is observed in individuals with a family history of ESRD. This greater risk have led researchers to search for genes linked to diabetic and other forms of nephropathy for the management of CKD. Multicenter consortia are currently recruiting large numbers of multiplex diabetic families with index cases having nephropathy for linkage and association analyses using various cytogenetic techniques. In addition, large-scale screening studies are underway, with the goals of better defining the overall prevalence of chronic kidney disease, as well as educating the population about risk factors for nephropathy, including family history. Cytogenetic biomarkers play an imperative role for the linkage study using G banding and detection of genomic instability in CKD patients. Classical and molecular cytogenetic tools with cytogenetic biomarkers provide remarkable findings in CKD patients. The aim of the present review is to draw outline of classical and molecular cytogenetic findings in CKD patients and their possible role in management to reduce genomic instability in CKD patients. PMID:27833523

  1. Cysteamine modulates oxidative stress and blocks myofibroblast activity in CKD.

    PubMed

    Okamura, Daryl M; Bahrami, Nadia M; Ren, Shuyu; Pasichnyk, Katie; Williams, Juliana M; Gangoiti, Jon A; Lopez-Guisa, Jesus M; Yamaguchi, Ikuyo; Barshop, Bruce A; Duffield, Jeremy S; Eddy, Allison A

    2014-01-01

    Therapy to slow the relentless expansion of interstitial extracellular matrix that leads to renal functional decline in patients with CKD is currently lacking. Because chronic kidney injury increases tissue oxidative stress, we evaluated the antifibrotic efficacy of cysteamine bitartrate, an antioxidant therapy for patients with nephropathic cystinosis, in a mouse model of unilateral ureteral obstruction. Fresh cysteamine (600 mg/kg) was added to drinking water daily beginning on the day of surgery, and outcomes were assessed on days 7, 14, and 21 after surgery. Plasma cysteamine levels showed diurnal variation, with peak levels similar to those observed in patients with cystinosis. In cysteamine-treated mice, fibrosis severity decreased significantly at 14 and 21 days after unilateral ureteral obstruction, and renal oxidized protein levels decreased at each time point, suggesting reduced oxidative stress. Consistent with these results, treatment of cultured macrophages with cysteamine reduced cellular generation of reactive oxygen species. Furthermore, treatment with cysteamine reduced α-smooth muscle actin-positive interstitial myofibroblast proliferation and mRNA levels of extracellular matrix proteins in mice and attenuated myofibroblast differentiation and proliferation in vitro, but did not augment TGF-β signaling. In a study of renal ischemia reperfusion, cysteamine therapy initiated 10 days after injury and continued for 14 days decreased renal fibrosis by 40%. Taken together, these data suggest previously unrecognized antifibrotic actions of cysteamine via TGF-β-independent mechanisms that include oxidative stress reduction and attenuation of the myofibroblast response to kidney injury and support further investigation into the potential benefit of cysteamine therapy in the treatment of CKD.

  2. Shear wave elastography imaging for assessing the chronic pathologic changes in advanced diabetic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Kamal; Loberant, Norman; Abbas, Nur; Fadi, Hassan; Shadia, Hassan; Khazim, Khaled

    2016-01-01

    Objective The assessment of the grade of renal fibrosis in diabetic kidney disease (DKD) requires renal biopsy, which may be associated with certain risks. To assess the severity of chronic pathologic changes in DKD, we performed a quantitative analysis of renal parenchymal stiffness in advanced DKD, using shear wave elastography (SWE) imaging. Patients and methods Twenty-nine diabetic patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) grades 3–4 due to DKD, and 23 healthy subjects were enrolled. Combined conventional ultrasound and SWE imaging were performed on all participants. The length, width, and cortical thickness and stiffness were recorded for each kidney. Results Cortical thickness was lower in patients with DKD than in healthy subjects (13.8±2.2 vs 14.8±1.6 mm; P=0.002) and in DKD patients with CKD grade 4 than in those with grade 3 (13.0±3.5 vs 14.7±2.1 mm; P<0.001). Cortical stiffness was greater in patients with DKD than in healthy subjects (23.72±14.33 vs 9.02±2.42 kPa; P<0.001), in DKD patients with CKD grade 4 than in those with grade 3 (30.4±16.2 vs 14.6±8.1 kPa; P<0.001), and in DKD patients with CKD grade 3b, than in those with CKD grade 3a (15.7±6.7 vs 11.0±4.2 kPa; P=0.03). Daily proteinuria was higher in DKD patients with CKD grade 4 than in those with grade 3 (5.52±0.96 vs 1.13±0.72; P=0.001), and in DKD patients with CKD grade 3b, than in those with CKD grade 3a (1.59±0.59 vs 0.77±0.48; P<0.001). Cortical stiffness was inversely correlated with the estimated glomerular filtration rate (r=−0.65, P<0.001) and with cortical thickness (r=−0.43, P<0.001) in patients with DKD. Conclusions In patients with advanced DKD, SWE imaging may be utilized as a simple and practical method for quantitative evaluation of the chronic morphological changes and for the differentiation between CKD grades. PMID:27853373

  3. Practical approach to the diagnosis and treatment of anemia associated with CKD in elderly.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Anil K

    2006-11-01

    Anemia is a frequent complication of chronic kidney disease (CKD). Inadequate production of erythropoietin by the failing kidneys leads to decreased stimulation of the bone marrow to produce red blood cells (RBCs). Anemia of CKD develops early and worsens with progressive renal insufficiency. Although over 40% of patients with CKD are anemic, anemia in this population is under-recognized and undertreated. Of considerable importance, anemia is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease and is associated with higher rates of hospitalization and mortality. Despite the availability of erythropoiesis-stimulating proteins (ESPs) to stimulate RBC production in CKD patients, approximately three fourths of patients initiating dialysis have a hemoglobin <11 g/dL. The recognition of anemia of CKD begins with an estimation of glomerular filtration rate (GFR), which can be far lower than a normal serum creatinine might suggest, especially in the elderly and in those with poor nutrition and muscle mass. If GFR is <60 mL/min/1.73 m(2), hemoglobin should be checked. The anemia is diagnosed when the hemoglobin is <12 g/dL in a man or a postmenopausal woman, or <11 g/dL in a premenopausal woman. The cause of anemia should be investigated in these individuals; this can range from erythropoietin deficiency due to CKD, to deficiency of vitamin B(12) and/or folate, iron deficiency, blood loss, inflammation, malignancy, and aluminum intoxication. After other causes of anemia have been excluded, CKD is the most likely etiology, and it should be treated with an ESP. Currently, epoetin alfa and darbepoetin alfa are the only 2 ESPs approved for use in the United States. Extended dosing of ESP has potential advantages for the patient and may also improve resource utilization. Consequently, both agents have been tested for dosing at extended intervals. Adequate iron stores--defined as transferrin saturation >20% and ferritin >100 mg--as well as ESP administration are needed to produce an

  4. Bevacizumab improves survival for patients with advanced cervical cancer

    Cancer.gov

    Patients with advanced, recurrent, or persistent cervical cancer that was not curable with standard treatment who received the drug bevacizumab (Avastin) lived 3.7 months longer than patients who did not receive the drug, according to an interim analysis

  5. KDOQI US commentary on the 2013 KDIGO Clinical Practice Guideline for Lipid Management in CKD.

    PubMed

    Sarnak, Mark J; Bloom, Roy; Muntner, Paul; Rahman, Mahboob; Saland, Jeffrey M; Wilson, Peter W F; Fried, Linda

    2015-03-01

    The National Kidney Foundation-Kidney Disease Outcomes Quality Initiative (NKF-KDOQI) guideline for management of dyslipidemia in chronic kidney disease (CKD) was published in 2003. Since then, considerable evidence, including randomized controlled trials of statin therapy in adults with CKD, has helped better define medical treatments for dyslipidemia. In light of the new evidence, KDIGO (Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes) formed a work group for the management of dyslipidemia in patients with CKD. This work group developed a new guideline that contains substantial changes from the prior KDOQI guideline. KDIGO recommends treatment of dyslipidemia in patients with CKD primarily based on risk for coronary heart disease, which is driven in large part by age. The KDIGO guideline does not recommend using low-density lipoprotein cholesterol level as a guide for identifying individuals with CKD to be treated or as treatment targets. Initiation of statin treatment is no longer recommended in dialysis patients. To assist US practitioners in interpreting and applying the KDIGO guideline, NKF-KDOQI convened a work group to write a commentary on this guideline. For the most part, our work group agreed with the recommendations of the KDIGO guideline, although we describe several areas in which we believe the guideline statements are either too strong or need to be more nuanced, areas of uncertainty and inconsistency, as well as additional research recommendations. The target audience for the KDIGO guideline includes nephrologists, primary care practitioners, and non-nephrology specialists such as cardiologists and endocrinologists. As such, we also put the current recommendations into the context of other clinical practice recommendations for cholesterol treatment.

  6. Quality of life and outcomes in African Americans with CKD.

    PubMed

    Porter, Anna; Fischer, Michael J; Wang, Xuelei; Brooks, Deborah; Bruce, Marino; Charleston, Jeanne; Cleveland, William H; Dowie, Donna; Faulkner, Marquetta; Gassman, Jennifer; Hiremath, Leena; Kendrick, Cindy; Kusek, John W; Norris, Keith C; Thornley-Brown, Denyse; Greene, Tom; Lash, James P

    2014-08-01

    Low health-related quality of life (HRQOL) has been associated with increased risk for hospitalization and death in ESRD. However, the relationship of HRQOL with outcomes in predialysis CKD is not well understood. We evaluated the association between HRQOL and renal and cardiovascular (CV) outcomes in 1091 African Americans with hypertensive CKD enrolled in the African American Study of Kidney Disease and Hypertension (AASK) trial and cohort studies. Outcomes included CKD progression (doubling of serum creatinine/ESRD), CV events/CV death, and a composite of CKD progression or death from any cause (CKD progression/death). We assessed HRQOL, including mental health composite (MHC) and physical health composite (PHC), using the Short Form-36 survey. Cox regression analyses were used to assess the relationship between outcomes and five-point decrements in MHC and PHC scores using measurements at baseline, at the most recent annual visit (time-varying), or averaged from baseline to the most recent visit (cumulative). During approximately 10 years of follow-up, lower mean PHC score was associated with increased risk of CV events/CV death and CKD progression/death across all analytic approaches, but only time-varying and cumulative decrements were associated with CKD progression. Similarly, lower mean MHC score was associated with increased risk of CV events/CV death regardless of analytic approach, while only time-varying and cumulative decrements in mean MHC score was associated with CKD progression and CKD progression or death. In conclusion, lower HRQOL is associated with a range of adverse outcomes in African Americans with hypertensive CKD.

  7. The community health promotion plan: a CKD prevention and management strategy.

    PubMed

    Sinasac, Lisa

    2012-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is one of the top 10 causes of death. CKD is often caused by diabetes mellitus (DM) and hypertension (HTN). Both DM Type 2 and HTN are treatable and preventable and, yet, the population of individuals diagnosed with these two diseases is increasing. Millions of dollars are spent every year providing dialysis treatments for patients with CKD. This money only accounts for dialysis and does not include the millions spent on complications such as infections, medications, tests and procedures. The burden to society is tremendous and the quality of life for these people is often poor. Health promotion and early detection is a key factor in reducing the risk for and incidence of DM and HTN, thus reducing the incidence of CKD. Three-quarters of health problems are preventable. Educating and providing the community with resources about diet, exercise, regular physical examinations, medication, and smoking cessation can empower the population with the necessary knowledge to help prevent these diseases. Health promotion and access to health promotion activities can, therefore, provide an active and healthier life.

  8. CKD-EPI and cockcroft-gault equations identify similar candidates for neoadjuvant chemotherapy in muscle-invasive bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Pal, Sumanta K; Ruel, Nora; Villegas, Sergio; Chang, Mark; DeWalt, Kara; Wilson, Timothy G; Vogelzang, Nicholas J; Yuh, Bertram E

    2014-01-01

    Clinical guidelines suggest neoadjuvant cisplatin-based chemotherapy prior to cystectomy in the setting of muscle-invasive bladder cancer (MIBC). A creatinine clearance (CrCl) >60 mL/min is frequently used to characterize cisplatin-eligible patients, and use of the CKD-EPI equation to estimate CrCl has been advocated. From a prospectively maintained institutional database, patients with MIBC who received cystectomy were identified and clinicopathologic information was ascertained. CrCl prior to surgery was computed using three equations: (1) Cockcroft-Gault (CG), (2) CKD-EPI, and (3) MDRD. The primary objective was to determine if the CG and CKD-EPI equations identified a different proportion of patients who were cisplatin-eligible, based on an estimated CrCl of >60 mL/min. Cisplatin-eligibility was also assessed in subsets based on age, CCI score and race. Actuarial rates of neoadjuvant cisplatin-based chemotherapy use were also reported. Of 126 patients, 70% and 71% of patients were found to be cisplatin-eligible by the CKD-EPI and CG equations, respectively (P = 0.9). The MDRD did not result in significantly different characterization of cisplatin-eligibility as compared to the CKD-EPI and CG equations. In the subset of patients age >80, the CKD-EPI equation identified a much smaller proportion of cisplatin-eligible patients (25%) as compared to the CG equation (50%) or the MDRD equation (63%). Only 34 patients (27%) received neoadjuvant cisplatin-based chemotherapy. Of the 92 patients who did not receive neoadjuvant chemotherapy, 64% had a CrCl >60 mL/min by CG. In contrast to previous reports, the CKD-EPI equation does not appear to characterize a broader span of patients as cisplatin-eligible. Older patients (age >80) may less frequently be characterized as cisplatin-eligible by CKD-EPI. The discordance between actual rates of neoadjuvant chemotherapy use and rates of cisplatin eligibility suggest that other factors (e.g., patient and physician preference

  9. [Vascular Calcification - Pathological Mechanism and Clinical Application - . Vascular calcification in chronic kidney disease-mineral and bone disorder (CKD-MBD)].

    PubMed

    Omata, Momoyo; Fukagawa, Masafumi; Kakuta, Takatoshi

    2015-05-01

    Chronic kidney disease-mineral and bone disorder (CKD-MBD), is sequential pathophysiology that starts in the very early stages of CKD. Three major aspects of CKD-MBD are laboratory abnormalities, bone abnormalities and vascular calcification. In dialysis patients, the prevalence of death due to cardiovascular disease accounts for more than 40% of all-cause mortality. Therefore, arteriosclerosis with vascular calcification may be an important pathophysiological mechanism in the development of cardiovascular disease. Vascular calcification is known to be an important risk factor influencing mortality in CKD patients. A number of studies have suggested a close association between serum FGF23 concentration and the risks of mortality, cardiovascular disease vascular calcification as well as CKD progression. Renal insufficiency leads to decline in klotho level and impaired phosphate excretion. However serum phosphate levels are maintained in the normal range by up regulation of FGF23 and PTH in early CKD stage. Early treatment intervention is necessary to improve the prognosis of the CKD patient.

  10. Diabetes mellitus increases the prevalence of anemia in patients with chronic kidney disease: A nested case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Loutradis, Charalampos; Skodra, Alexandra; Georgianos, Panagiotis; Tolika, Panagiota; Alexandrou, Dimitris; Avdelidou, Afroditi; Sarafidis, Pantelis A

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To compare anemia prevalence between matched chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients with and without diabetes mellitus (DM) and to assess factors associated with anemia development. METHODS: This is a nested case-control study of 184 type-2 diabetic and 184 non-diabetic CKD patients from a prospectively assembled database of a Nephrology outpatient clinic, matched for gender, age and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR). Prevalence of anemia (hemoglobin: Men: < 13 g/dL, women: < 12 g/dL and/or use of recombinant erythropoietin) was examined in comparison, in the total population and by CKD Stage. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were conducted to identify factors associated with anemia. RESULTS: The total prevalence of anemia was higher in diabetics (47.8% vs 33.2%, P = 0.004). Accordingly, prevalence was higher in diabetics in CKD Stage 3 (53.5% vs 33.1%, P < 0.001) and particularly in Stage 3a (60.4% vs 26.4%, P < 0.001), whereas it was non-significantly higher in Stage 4 (61.3% vs 48.4%; P = 0.307). Serum ferritin was higher in diabetics in total and in CKD stages, while serum iron was similar between groups. In multivariate analyses, DM (OR = 2.206, 95%CI: 1.196-4.069), CKD Stages 3a, 3b, 4 (Stage 4: OR = 12.169, 95%CI: 3.783-39.147) and serum iron (OR = 0.976, 95%CI: 0.968-0.985 per mg/dL increase) were independently associated with anemia. CONCLUSION: Prevalence of anemia progressively increases with advancing stages of CKD and is higher in diabetic than matched non-diabetic CKD patients and diabetes is independently associated with anemia occurrence. Detection and treatment of anemia in diabetic CKD patients should be performed earlier than non-diabetic counterparts. PMID:27458564

  11. Lower Superoxide Dismutase 2 (SOD2) Protein Content in Mononuclear Cells Is Associated with Better Survival in Patients with Hemodialysis Therapy.

    PubMed

    Krueger, Katharina; Shen, Jianlin; Maier, Alexandra; Tepel, Martin; Scholze, Alexandra

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial superoxide dismutase 2 (SOD2) converts superoxide anions to hydrogen peroxide and oxygen. Human data on SOD2 protein content in chronic kidney disease (CKD) are sparse and mortality data are lacking. We investigated SOD2 protein content in monocytes from patients with hemodialysis therapy (n = 81), CKD stage 1-5 (n = 120), and healthy controls (n = 13) using in-cell Western assays. SOD2 protein decreased from CKD stage 1 until stage 4 whereas it increased again in stage 5 with and without hemodialysis. SOD2 gene expression, analyzed by quantitative real-time PCR, was not significantly different between the groups. Elevating cellular superoxide production reduced SOD2 protein content. This effect was abolished by the superoxide dismutase mimetic Tempol. Using gelelectrophoresis and Western blot we did not detect nitrotyrosine modifications of SOD2 in CKD. Finally, in patients with CKD stage 5 with hemodialysis therapy higher than median SOD2 protein content was associated with higher all-cause mortality. In conclusion, SOD2 protein content declined in CKD until stage 4 while SOD2 gene expression did not. Increased cellular superoxide anion production might affect SOD2 protein content. In advanced CKD (stage 5) SOD2 protein content increased again, but higher than median SOD2 protein content in these patients did not confer a survival benefit.

  12. Engagement of Patients With Advanced Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-11-15

    End of Life; Advanced Cancer; Lung Neoplasm; Gastric Cancer; Colon Cancer; Glioblastoma Multiforme; Head and Neck Neoplasms; Rectum Cancer; Melanoma; Kidney Cancer; Prostate Cancer; Testicular Neoplasms; Liver Cancer; Cancer of Unknown Origin

  13. Pedometer-Assessed Physical Activity in Children and Young Adults with CKD

    PubMed Central

    Akber, Aalia; Portale, Anthony A.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background and objectives Data on physical activity are limited in children with CKD. The objectives of this study were to measure the level and correlates of physical activity in children and young adults with CKD and to determine the association of physical activity with physical performance and physical functioning. Design, setting, participants, & measurements Physical activity was measured for 7 days using pedometers; physical performance was measured by the 6-minute walk distance (6MWD) and physical functioning with the PedsQL 4.0. Results Study participants were 44 patients 7–20 years of age who had CKD stage 1–4 (n=12), had ESRD and were undergoing dialysis (n=7), or had undergone kidney transplantation (n=25). Participants were very sedentary; they walked 6218 (interquartile range, 3637, 9829) steps per day, considerably less than recommended. Physical activity did not differ among participants in the CKD stage 1–4, ESRD, and transplant groups. Females were less active than males (P<0.01), and physical activity was 44% lower among young adults (18–20 years) than younger participants (P<0.05). Physical activity was associated positively with maternal education and hemoglobin concentration and inversely with body mass index. Respective 6MWD in males and females was 2 and approximately 4 SDs below expected. Low levels of physical activity were associated with poor physical performance and physical functioning, after adjustment for age, sex, and body mass index. Conclusions In most participants with CKD, physical activity was considerably below recommended levels. Future studies are needed to determine whether increasing physical activity can improve physical performance and physical functioning. PMID:22422539

  14. Prevalence, awareness, and treatment of anemia in Chinese patients with nondialysis chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ya; Shi, Hao; Wang, Wei-Ming; Peng, Ai; Jiang, Geng-Ru; Zhang, Jin-Yuan; Ni, Zhao-Hui; He, Li-Qun; Niu, Jian-Ying; Wang, Nian-Song; Mei, Chang-Lin; Xu, Xu-Dong; Guo, Zhi-Yong; Yuan, Wei-Jie; Yan, Hai-Dong; Deng, Yue-Yi; Yu, Chen; Cen, Jun; Zhang, Yun; Chen, Nan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This was the first multicenter, cross-sectional survey to assess the prevalence of anemia, patient awareness, and treatment status in China. Data of patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD; age, 18–75 years; both out- and inpatients) from 25 hospitals in Shanghai, seeking medical treatment at the nephrology department, were collected between July 1, 2012 and August 31, 2012. The prevalence, awareness, and treatment of anemia in patients with nondialysis CKD (ND-CKD) were assessed. Anemia was defined as serum hemoglobin (Hb) levels ≤12 g/dL in women and ≤13 g/dL in men. A total of 2420 patients with ND-CKD were included. Anemia was established in 1246 (51.5%) patients: 639 (51.3%) men and 607 (48.7%) women. The prevalence of anemia increased with advancing CKD stage (χ2trend = 675.14, P < 0.001). Anemia was more prevalent in patients with diabetic nephropathy (68.0%) than in patients with hypertensive renal damage (56.6%) or chronic glomerulonephritis (46.1%, both P < 0.001). Only 39.8% of the anemic patients received treatment with erythropoietin and 27.1% patients received iron products; furthermore, 22.7% of the patients started receiving treatment when their Hb level reached 7 g/dL. The target-achieving rate (Hb at 11–12 g/dL) was only 8.2%. Of the 1246 anemia patients, only 7.5% received more effective and recommended intravenous supplementation. Anemia is highly prevalent in patients with ND-CKD in China, with a low target-achieving rate and poor treatment patterns. The study highlights the need to improve multiple aspects of CKD management to delay the progression of renal failure. PMID:27310973

  15. Circulating sclerostin and Dickkopf-1 (DKK1) in predialysis chronic kidney disease (CKD): relationship with bone density and arterial stiffness.

    PubMed

    Thambiah, S; Roplekar, R; Manghat, P; Fogelman, I; Fraser, W D; Goldsmith, D; Hampson, Geeta

    2012-06-01

    Abnormalities of bone metabolism and increased vascular calcification are common in chronic kidney disease (CKD) and important causes of morbidity and mortality. The Wnt signaling pathway may play a role in the bone and vascular disturbances seen in CKD, termed collectively "CKD-MBD." The aim of the study was to investigate the possible association of circulating concentrations of the secreted Wnt signaling inhibitors DKK1 and sclerostin with BMD and arterial stiffness in predialysis CKD. Seventy-seven patients (48 M, 29 F), mean age 57 (SD = 14) years with CKD stages 3B (n = 32) and 4 (n = 45) were studied. Sclerostin, DKK1, PTH, and 1,25(OH)(2)D were analyzed. BMD was measured at the lumbar spine (LS), femoral neck (FN), total hip (TH), and forearm (FARM). Arterial stiffness index was determined by contour analysis of digital volume pulse (SI(DVP)). There was a positive correlation between sclerostin and age (r = 0.47, p < 0.000). Sclerostin was higher in men than women (p = 0.013). Following correction for age and gender, there was a negative association between GFR and sclerostin (p = 0.002). We observed a positive association between sclerostin and BMD at the LS (p = 0.0001), FN (p = 0.004), and TH (p = 0.002). In contrast, DKK1 was negatively associated with BMD at the FN (p = 0.038). A negative association was seen between DKK1 and SI(DVP) (p = 0.027). Our data suggest that the Wnt pathway may play a role in CKD-MBD. Prospective studies are required to establish the clinical relevance of sclerostin and DKK1 as serological markers in CKD.

  16. Iron sucrose accelerates early atherogenesis by increasing superoxide production and upregulating adhesion molecules in CKD.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Ko-Lin; Hung, Szu-Chun; Lee, Tzong-Shyuan; Tarng, Der-Cherng

    2014-11-01

    High-dose intravenous iron supplementation is associated with adverse cardiovascular outcomes in patients with CKD, but the underlying mechanism is unknown. Our study investigated the causative role of iron sucrose in leukocyte-endothelium interactions, an index of early atherogenesis, and subsequent atherosclerosis in the mouse remnant kidney model. We found that expression levels of intracellular cell adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) and adhesion of U937 cells increased in iron-treated human aortic endothelial cells through upregulated NADPH oxidase (NOx) and NF-κB signaling. We then measured mononuclear-endothelial adhesion and atherosclerotic lesions of the proximal aorta in male C57BL/6 mice with subtotal nephrectomy, male apolipoprotein E-deficient (ApoE(-/-)) mice with uninephrectomy, and sham-operated mice subjected to saline or parenteral iron loading. Iron sucrose significantly increased tissue superoxide production, expression of tissue cell adhesion molecules, and endothelial adhesiveness in mice with subtotal nephrectomy. Moreover, iron sucrose exacerbated atherosclerosis in the aorta of ApoE(-/-) mice with uninephrectomy. In patients with CKD, intravenous iron sucrose increased circulating mononuclear superoxide production, expression of soluble adhesion molecules, and mononuclear-endothelial adhesion compared with healthy subjects or untreated patients. In summary, iron sucrose aggravated endothelial dysfunction through NOx/NF-κB/CAM signaling, increased mononuclear-endothelial adhesion, and exacerbated atherosclerosis in mice with remnant kidneys. These results suggest a novel causative role for therapeutic iron in cardiovascular complications in patients with CKD.

  17. Rate of change in kidney function and the risk of death: the case for incorporating the rate of kidney function decline into the CKD staging system.

    PubMed

    Al-Aly, Ziyad; Cepeda, Oscar

    2011-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is associated with increased risk of death. A wave of recent studies used longitudinal data to examine the effect of the rate of decline of kidney function on the risk of death. The results from these studies show that there is an independent and graded association between the rate of kidney function decline and the risk of death. There is a need to incorporate the rate of decline in the definition of CKD. This redefinition of CKD will transform a static definition into a dynamic one that more accurately describes the disease state in an individual patient.

  18. Interdisciplinary Management of Patient with Advanced Periodontal Disease.

    PubMed

    Kochar, Gagan Deep; Jayan, B; Chopra, S S; Mechery, Reenesh; Goel, Manish; Verma, Munish

    2016-01-01

    This case report describes the interdisciplinary management of an adult patient with advanced periodontal disease. Treatment involved orthodontic and periodontal management. Good esthetic results and dental relationships were achieved by the treatment.

  19. A Combined Epidemiologic and Metabolomic Approach Improves CKD Prediction

    PubMed Central

    Clish, Clary B.; Ghorbani, Anahita; Larson, Martin G.; Elmariah, Sammy; McCabe, Elizabeth; Yang, Qiong; Cheng, Susan; Pierce, Kerry; Deik, Amy; Souza, Amanda L.; Farrell, Laurie; Domos, Carly; Yeh, Robert W.; Palacios, Igor; Rosenfield, Kenneth; Vasan, Ramachandran S.; Florez, Jose C.; Wang, Thomas J.; Fox, Caroline S.

    2013-01-01

    Metabolomic approaches have begun to catalog the metabolic disturbances that accompany CKD, but whether metabolite alterations can predict future CKD is unknown. We performed liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry–based metabolite profiling on plasma from 1434 participants in the Framingham Heart Study (FHS) who did not have CKD at baseline. During the following 8 years, 123 individuals developed CKD, defined by an estimated GFR of <60 ml/min per 1.73 m2. Numerous metabolites were associated with incident CKD, including 16 that achieved the Bonferroni-adjusted significance threshold of P≤0.00023. To explore how the human kidney modulates these metabolites, we profiled arterial and renal venous plasma from nine individuals. Nine metabolites that predicted CKD in the FHS cohort decreased more than creatinine across the renal circulation, suggesting that they may reflect non–GFR-dependent functions, such as renal metabolism and secretion. Urine isotope dilution studies identified citrulline and choline as markers of renal metabolism and kynurenic acid as a marker of renal secretion. In turn, these analytes remained associated with incident CKD in the FHS cohort, even after adjustment for eGFR, age, sex, diabetes, hypertension, and proteinuria at baseline. Addition of a multimarker metabolite panel to clinical variables significantly increased the c-statistic (0.77–0.83, P<0.0001); net reclassification improvement was 0.78 (95% confidence interval, 0.60 to 0.95; P<0.0001). Thus, the addition of metabolite profiling to clinical data may significantly improve the ability to predict whether an individual will develop CKD by identifying predictors of renal risk that are independent of estimated GFR. PMID:23687356

  20. Mechanisms of vascular calcification in CKD-evidence for premature ageing?

    PubMed

    Shanahan, Catherine M

    2013-11-01

    Ageing is a potent, independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Calcification of the vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) layer of the vessel media is a hallmark of vascular ageing. Young patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) exhibit an extremely high cardiovascular mortality, equivalent to that seen in octogenarians in the general population. Even children on dialysis develop accelerated medial vascular calcification and arterial stiffening, leading to the suggestion that patients with CKD exhibit a 'premature ageing' phenotype. It is now well documented that uraemic toxins, particularly those associated with dysregulated mineral metabolism, can drive VSMC damage and phenotypic changes that promote vascular calcification; epidemiological data suggest that some of these same risk factors associate with cardiovascular mortality in the aged general population. Importantly, emerging evidence suggests that uraemic toxins may promote DNA damage, a key factor driving cellular ageing, and moreover, that these ageing mechanisms may reiterate some of those seen in patients with genetically induced progeric syndromes caused by nuclear lamina disruption. This new knowledge should pave the way for the development of novel therapies that target tissue-specific ageing mechanisms to treat vascular decline in CKD.

  1. Randomized Placebo-Controlled EPPIC Trials of AST-120 in CKD

    PubMed Central

    Berl, Tomas; Beck, Gerald J.; Remuzzi, Giuseppe; Ritz, Eberhard; Arita, Kiyoshi; Kato, Akira; Shimizu, Miho

    2015-01-01

    Reduced GFR in patients with CKD causes systemic accumulation of uremic toxins, which has been correlated with disease progression and increased morbidity. The orally administered spherical carbon adsorbent AST-120 reduces systemic toxin absorption through gastrointestinal sequestration, which may slow disease progression in these patients. The multinational, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled Evaluating Prevention of Progression in CKD (EPPIC)-1 and EPPIC-2 trials evaluated the effects of AST-120 on the progression of CKD when added to standard therapy. We randomly assigned 2035 adults with moderate to severe disease (serum creatinine at screening, 2.0–5.0 mg/dl for men and 1.5–5.0 mg/dl for women) to receive either placebo or AST-120 (9 g/d). The primary end point was a composite of dialysis initiation, kidney transplantation, and serum creatinine doubling. Each trial continued until accrual of 291 primary end points. The time to primary end point was similar between the AST-120 and the placebo groups in both trials (EPPIC-1: hazard ratio, 1.03; 95% confidence interval, 0.84 to 1.27; P=0.78) (EPPIC-2: hazard ratio, 0.91; 95% confidence interval, 0.74 to 1.12; P=0.37); a pooled analysis of both trials showed similar results. The estimated median time to primary end points for the placebo groups was 124 weeks for power calculations, but actual times were 189.0 and 170.3 weeks for EPPIC-1 and EPPIC-2, respectively. Thus, disease progression was more gradual than expected in the trial populations. In conclusion, the benefit of adding AST-120 to standard therapy in patients with moderate to severe CKD is not supported by these data. PMID:25349205

  2. Metabolically Healthy Obesity and Risk of Incident CKD

    PubMed Central

    Hashimoto, Yoshitaka; Tanaka, Muhei; Okada, Hiroshi; Senmaru, Takafumi; Hamaguchi, Masahide; Asano, Mai; Yamazaki, Masahiro; Oda, Yohei; Hasegawa, Goji; Toda, Hitoshi; Nakamura, Naoto

    2015-01-01

    Background and objectives Metabolically healthy obesity (MHO) is a unique obesity phenotype that apparently protects people from the metabolic complications of obesity. The association between MHO phenotype and incident CKD is unclear. Thus, this study investigated the association between MHO phenotype and incident CKD. Design, setting, participants, & measurements A total of 3136 Japanese participants were enrolled in an 8-year follow-up cohort study in 2001. Metabolically healthy status was assessed by common clinical markers: BP, triglycerides, HDL cholesterol, and fasting plasma glucose concentrations. Body mass index ≥25.0 kg/m2 was defined as obesity. CKD was defined by proteinuria or eGFR of <60 ml/min per 1.73 m2. To calculate the odds ratio for incident CKD, logistic regression analyses were performed. Results The crude incidence proportions of CKD were 2.6% (56 of 2122 participants) in participants with the metabolically healthy nonobesity phenotype, 2.6% (8 of 302) in those with the MHO phenotype, 6.7% (30 of 445) in those with the metabolically abnormal nonobesity phenotype, and 10.9% (29 of 267) in those with the metabolically abnormal obesity phenotype. Compared with metabolically healthy nonobesity phenotype, the odds ratios for incident CKD were 0.83 (95% confidence interval [95% CI], 0.36 to 1.72; P=0.64) for MHO, 1.44 (95% CI, 0.80 to 2.57; P=0.22) for metabolically abnormal nonobesity, and 2.80 (95% CI, 1.45 to 5.35; P=0.02) for metabolically abnormal obesity phenotype after adjustment for confounders, including age, sex, smoking statues, alcohol use, creatinine, uric acid, systolic BP, HDL cholesterol, and impaired fasting glucose or diabetes. Conclusion MHO phenotype was not associated with higher risk of incident CKD. PMID:25635035

  3. Myofacial Trigger Points in Advanced Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Hasuo, Hideaki; Ishihara, Tatsuhiko; Kanbara, Kenji; Fukunaga, Mikihiko

    2016-01-01

    Myofascial pain syndrome is started to be recognized as one of important factors of pain in cancer patients. However, no reports on features of myofascial trigger points were found in terminally-ill cancer populations. This time, we encountered 5 patients with myofascial pain syndrome and terminal cancer in whom delirium developed due to increased doses of opioid without a diagnosis of myofascial pain syndrome on initial presentation. The delirium subsided with dose reductions of opioid and treatment of myofascial pain syndrome. The common reason for a delayed diagnosis among the patients included an incomplete palpation of the painful sites, which led to unsuccessful myofascial trigger points identification. The features of myofascial trigger points included single onset in the cancer pain management site with opioid and the contralateral abdominal side muscles of the non-common sites. Withdrawal reflexes associated with cancer pain in the supine position, which are increasingly seen in the terminal cancer patients, were considered to have contributed to this siuation. We consider that careful palpation of the painful site is important, in order to obtain greater knowledge and understanding of the features of myofascial trigger points. PMID:26962285

  4. Advanced Patient Data Replication and Recovery

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-10-01

    after IRB approval. 12 Next Steps: EMC will administer a survey to a wide range of clinicians (nurses, doctors, pharmacists , clinical...local loss. 2. Objectives include: A. Lower the risk of clinical patient data loss to clinical staff B. Support clinicians dependence on EMR data...Information Systems support as well as EMC2 technical staff familiar with the Centera storage platform and the 6. Clinician Survey Completed

  5. AKI transition of care: a potential opportunity to detect and prevent CKD.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Stuart L; Jaber, Bertrand L; Faubel, Sarah; Chawla, Lakhmir S

    2013-03-01

    The incidence rate of AKI is increasing across the spectrum of hospitalized children and adults. Given the increased morbidity and mortality associated with AKI, significant research effort has been appropriately focused on standardizing AKI definitions, identifying risk factors, and discovering and validating novel, earlier structural biomarkers of kidney injury. In addition, a growing body of evidence demonstrates that AKI is a risk factor for the future development or accelerated progression of CKD. Unfortunately, prospective observational studies have not consistently followed survivors of episodes of AKI for longitudinal outcomes after hospital discharge, which could lead to ascertainment bias in terms of over- or underestimation of CKD development. Furthermore, data show that clinical follow-up of AKI survivors is low. This lack of systematic study and clinical follow-up represents a potential missed opportunity to prevent chronic disease after an acute illness and improve outcomes. Therefore, prospective study of transitions of care after episodes of AKI is needed to identify which patients are at risk for CKD development and to optimally target therapeutic interventions.

  6. [Clinicopathological study of chronic kidney diseases (CKD)].

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Haruyoshi

    2012-02-01

    up-to-date information and techniques in clinical nephrology. From this hospital, I published a paper in Kidney International entitled, "Mesangiolytic glomerulopathy in severe congestive heart failure", based on the autopsy cases collected at the Pathology Department. This paper became a milestone in starting to study the role of chronic hypoxia in CKD. In 1999, I was elected as a professor of the Department of Clinical Laboratories, Faculty of Medicine, University of Fukui. In Fukui, I could extend my hypoxia study to cellular levels and diabetic mouse experiments in collaboration with Dr. Kimura, Dr. Li, Dr. Takahashi and many other doctors and technicians. When overviewing my research history, I realize that I was fortunate to be involved at the starting point of every laboratory with energetic mood and that I was supported and helped by many people.

  7. Identifying patients at risk for recurrent or advanced BCC.

    PubMed

    Hamid, Omid; Goldenberg, Gary

    2013-11-01

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is a common skin cancer and its incidence is on the rise worldwide. Clinical presentation and histologic examination are used for diagnosis and to stratify BCCs as either low- or high-risk for recurrence or development of advanced disease. A number of surgical and nonsurgical options are available for BCC. BCC is most often managed with a surgical approach, but not all tumors and patients are suitable for surgery. Vismodegib is a recently approved first-in-class hedgehog pathway inhibitor that has expanded options for patients who have locally advanced or metastatic BCC.

  8. Docetaxel as neoadjuvant chemotherapy in patients with advanced cervical carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Vallejo, Carlos T; Machiavelli, Mario R; Pérez, Juan E; Romero, Alberto O; Bologna, Fabrina; Vicente, Hernán; Lacava, Juan A; Ortiz, Eduardo H; Cubero, Alberto; Focaccia, Guillermo; Suttora, Guillermo; Scenna, Mirna; Boughen, José M; Leone, Bernardo A

    2003-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of docetaxel as single-agent neoadjuvant chemotherapy in locoregionally advanced cervical carcinoma. Between April 1998 and August 2000, 38 untreated patients with International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stages IIB to IVA were entered onto this study. The median age was 44 years (range: 25-66 years). Stages: IIB 22 patients, IIIB 15 patients, and IVA 1 pt. Treatment consisted of docetaxel 100 mg/m2 IV infusion during 1 hour. Standard premedication with dexamethasone, diphenhydramine, and ranitidine was used. Cycles were repeated every 3 weeks for three courses, followed by radical surgery when it was judged appropriate, or definitive radiotherapy. Both staging and response assessment were performed by a multidisciplinary team. 106 cycles of therapy were administered; all patients were evaluable for TX, whereas 35 were evaluable for response (3 patients refused further treatment after the first cycle of therapy). Complete response (CR): 1 patient (3%); partial response: 11 patients (31%), for an overall objective response rate of 34% (95% CI: 15-53%); no change (NC): 16 patients (46%); and progressive disease: 7 patients (20%). Six patients (17%) underwent surgery and a pathologic CR was confirmed in 1 of them. The median time to treatment failure and the median survival have not been reached yet. The limiting toxicity was leukopenia in 25 patients (69%) (G1-G2: 14 patients, G3: 10 patients, and G4: 1 patient). Neutropenia: 28 patients (78%) (G1-G2: 10 patients, G3: 8 and G4: 10). Myalgias: 17 patients (47%) (G1-G2: 15 patients and G3: 2 patients). Emesis: 21 patients (55%) (G1-G2: 19 patients and G3: 2 patients). Alopecia G3: 13 patients (36%); rash cutaneous 26 patients (68%) (G1-G2: 22 patients and G3: 4 patients). There were no hypersensitivity reactions or fluid-retention syndrome. The received dose intensity was 91% of that projected. Docetaxel is an active drug against advanced

  9. Serum Vitamin D levels in patients with chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Rozita, Mohd; Noorul Afidza, Mohamad; Ruslinda, Mustafar; Cader, Rizna; Halim, A. Gafor; Kong, Chiew Tong Norella; Nor Azmi, Kamaruddin; Shah, Shamsul Azhar

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Hypovitaminosis D is reported to be associated with several medical complications. Recent studies have reported a high worldwide prevalence of Vitamin D deficiency in the general population (up to 80 %). This is even higher in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and increases with advancing stages of CKD. Objectives: To determine the difference in serum Vitamin D [25-hydroxyvitamin D, 25(OH) D] levels between CKD patients and normal healthy population. Materials and Methods: A prospective cross-sectional study involving 50 normal volunteers (control) and 50 patients with CKD stages 2-4. Their demographic profiles were recorded and blood samples taken for serum 25(OH) D, intact parathyroid hormone (iPTH) and other routine blood tests. Results: All subjects regardless of renal status had hypovitaminosis D (< 30ng/mL). The mean serum 25(OH) D were comparable in the control and CKD groups (15.3 ± 4.2 ng/mL vs 16.1 ± 6.2 ng/mL, p = NS). However, within the Vitamin D deficient group, the CKD group had lower levels of serum 25(OH) D [12.6(3.7) ng/mL vs 11.2(6.5) ng/mL, p = 0.039]. Female gender [OR 22.553; CI 95 % (2.16-235.48); p = 0.009] and diabetic status [OR 6.456; CI 95 % (1.144-36.433); p = 0.035] were independent predictors for 25(OH) D deficiency. Conclusions: Vitamin D insufficiency and vitamin D deficiency are indeed prevalent and under-recognized. Although the vitamin D levels among the study subjects and their control are equally low, the CKD group had severe degree of vitamin D deficiency. Diabetic status and female gender were independent predictors of low serum 25(OH)D. PMID:26933400

  10. Subclinical atherosclerosis measures for cardiovascular prediction in CKD.

    PubMed

    Matsushita, Kunihiro; Sang, Yingying; Ballew, Shoshana H; Shlipak, Michael; Katz, Ronit; Rosas, Sylvia E; Peralta, Carmen A; Woodward, Mark; Kramer, Holly J; Jacobs, David R; Sarnak, Mark J; Coresh, Josef

    2015-02-01

    Whether inclusion of the coronary artery calcium score improves cardiovascular risk prediction in individuals with CKD, a population with unique calcium-phosphate homeostasis, is unknown. Among 6553 participants ages 45-84 years without prior cardiovascular disease in the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis, coronary artery calcium score was assessed for cardiovascular risk prediction beyond the Framingham predictors in those with (n=1284) and without CKD and contrasted with carotid intima-media thickness and ankle-brachial index (two other measures of subclinical atherosclerosis). During a median follow-up of 8.4 years, 650 cardiovascular events (coronary heart disease, stroke, heart failure, and peripheral artery disease) occurred (236 events in subjects with CKD). In Cox proportional hazards models adjusted for Framingham predictors, each subclinical measure was independently associated with cardiovascular outcomes, with larger adjusted hazard ratios (HRs; per 1 SD) for coronary artery calcium score than carotid intima-media thickness or ankle-brachial index in subjects without and with CKD (HR, 1.69; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 1.45 to 1.97 versus HR, 1.12; 95% CI, 1.00 to 1.25 and HR, 1.20; 95% CI, 1.08 to 1.32, respectively). Compared with inclusion of carotid intima-media thickness or ankle-brachial index, inclusion of the coronary artery calcium score led to greater increases in C statistic for predicting cardiovascular disease and net reclassification improvement. Coronary artery calcium score performed best for the prediction of coronary heart disease and heart failure, regardless of CKD status. In conclusion, each measure improved cardiovascular risk prediction in subjects with CKD, with the greatest improvement observed with coronary artery calcium score.

  11. Sailing between Scylla and Charybdis: oral long-term anticoagulation in dialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Krüger, Thilo; Brandenburg, Vincent; Schlieper, Georg; Marx, Nikolaus; Floege, Jürgen

    2013-03-01

    End-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients exhibit an increased risk of bleeding compared with non-chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients due to uraemic platelet dysfunction, altered vessel architecture and other factors. This renders any long-term oral anticoagulation potentially difficult. While there is little doubt that ESRD patients with recurrent thromboembolism or a mechanical cardiac valve should receive vitamin K antagonists (coumarins), the use of coumarins in ESRD patients with atrial fibrillation is a matter of debate. In non-CKD patients, current guidelines strongly recommend the use of oral anticoagulants for stroke prophylaxis in atrial fibrillation if certain risk factors are present (CHA2DS2-VASc score). This recommendation is often extrapolated to patients with advanced CKD or ESRD but data supporting this practice are weak to absent. Besides an increased bleeding risk in ESRD patients, coumarins will also accelerate cardiovascular calcification and are potent risk factors for the development of calcific uraemic arteriolopathy (calciphylaxis). Novel coumarin alternatives such as direct thrombin inhibitors are promising but none is currently approved for use in ESRD patients. Whether interventional treatment strategies such as atrial appendage occlusion are safe and effective options in advanced CKD is also as yet unresolved. This review attempts to balance the potential risks and benefits of coumarin usage in ESRD patients and to give the best possible recommendations for everyday patient care.

  12. Glycated Hemoglobin Level and Mortality in a Nondiabetic Population with CKD

    PubMed Central

    Metzger, Marie; Haymann, Jean-Philippe; Boffa, Jean-Jacques; Flamant, Martin; Vrtovsnik, François; Houillier, Pascal; Stengel, Benedicte; Thervet, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Background and objectives Glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) is used to diagnose diabetes mellitus (DM) and guide its management. The association between higher HbA1c and progression to ESRD and mortality has been demonstrated in populations with DM. This study examined the association between HbA1c and these end points in a population with CKD and without DM. Design, setting, participants, & measurements In the hospital-based NephroTest cohort study, measured GFR (mGFR) was taken by 51Cr-EDTA renal clearance and HbA1c in 1165 adults with nondialysis CKD stages 1–5 and without DM between January 2000 and December 2010. The median follow-up was 3.48 years (interquartile range, 1.94–5.82) for the competing events of ESRD and pre-ESRD mortality. Time-fixed and time-dependent Cox models were used to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) for ESRD and mortality according to HbA1c, treated continuously or in tertiles. Results At inclusion, the mean mGFR was 42.2±19.9 ml/min per 1.73 m2, and the mean HbA1c value was 5.5%±0.5%. During follow-up, 109 patients died, and 162 patients reached ESRD. Pre-ESRD mortality was significantly associated with HbA1c treated continuously: for every 1% higher HbA1c, the crude HR was 2.16 (95% confidence interval [95% CI], 1.27 to 3.68), and it was 1.85 (95% CI, 1.05 to 3.24) after adjustment for mGFR and other risk factors of death. After excluding incident diabetes over time, the updated mean of HbA1c remained significantly associated with higher mortality risk: adjusted HR for the highest (5.7%–6.4%) versus the lowest tertile (<5.3%) was 2.62 (95% CI, 1.16 to 5.91). There was no association with ESRD risk after adjustment for risk factors of CKD progression. Conclusions In a CKD cohort, HbA1c values in the prediabetes range are associated with mortality. Such values should be therefore included among the risk factors for negative outcomes in CKD populations. PMID:25979978

  13. Effects of Vitamin D Receptor Activation and Dietary Sodium Restriction on Residual Albuminuria in CKD: The ViRTUE-CKD Trial.

    PubMed

    Keyzer, Charlotte A; van Breda, G Fenna; Vervloet, Marc G; de Jong, Maarten A; Laverman, Gozewijn D; Hemmelder, Marc H; Janssen, Wilbert M T; Lambers Heerspink, Hiddo J; Kwakernaak, Arjan J; Bakker, Stephan J L; Navis, Gerjan; de Borst, Martin H

    2017-04-01

    Reduction of residual albuminuria during single-agent renin-angiotensin-aldosterone blockade is accompanied by improved cardiorenal outcomes in CKD. We studied the individual and combined effects of the vitamin D receptor activator paricalcitol (PARI) and dietary sodium restriction on residual albuminuria in CKD. In a multicenter, randomized, placebo (PLAC)-controlled, crossover trial, 45 patients with nondiabetic CKD stages 1-3 and albuminuria >300 mg/24 h despite ramipril at 10 mg/d and BP<140/90 mmHg were treated for four 8-week periods with PARI (2 μg/d) or PLAC, each combined with a low-sodium (LS) or regular sodium (RS) diet. We analyzed the treatment effect by linear mixed effect models for repeated measurements. In the intention-to-treat analysis, albuminuria (geometric mean) was 1060 (95% confidence interval, 778 to 1443) mg/24 h during RS + PLAC and 990 (95% confidence interval, 755 to 1299) mg/24 h during RS + PARI (P=0.20 versus RS + PLAC). LS + PLAC reduced albuminuria to 717 (95% confidence interval, 512 to 1005) mg/24 h (P<0.001 versus RS + PLAC), and LS + PARI reduced albuminuria to 683 (95% confidence interval, 502 to 929) mg/24 h (P<0.001 versus RS + PLAC). The reduction by PARI beyond the effect of LS was nonsignificant (P=0.60). In the per-protocol analysis restricted to participants with ≥95% compliance with study medication, PARI did provide further albuminuria reduction (P=0.04 LS + PARI versus LS + PLAC). Dietary adherence was good as reflected by urinary excretion of 174±64 mmol Na(+) per day in the combined RS groups and 108±61 mmol Na(+) per day in the LS groups (P<0.001). In conclusion, moderate dietary sodium restriction substantially reduced residual albuminuria during fixed dose angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibition. The additional effect of PARI was small and nonsignificant.

  14. Serum Metabolomic Profiling and Incident CKD among African Americans

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Bing; Zheng, Yan; Nettleton, Jennifer A.; Alexander, Danny; Coresh, Josef

    2014-01-01

    Background and objectives Novel biomarkers that more accurately reflect kidney function and predict future CKD are needed. The human metabolome is the product of multiple physiologic or pathophysiologic processes and may provide novel insight into disease etiology and progression. This study investigated whether estimated kidney function would be associated with multiple metabolites and whether selected metabolomic factors would be independent risk factors for incident CKD. Design, setting, participants, & measurements In total, 1921 African Americans free of CKD with a median of 19.6 years follow-up among the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study were included. A total of 204 serum metabolites quantified by untargeted gas chromatography–mass spectrometry and liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry was analyzed by both linear regression for the cross-sectional associations with eGFR (specified by the Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration equation) and Cox proportional hazards model for the longitudinal associations with incident CKD. Results Forty named and 34 unnamed metabolites were found to be associated with eGFR specified by the Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration equation with creatine and 3-indoxyl sulfate showing the strongest positive (2.8 ml/min per 1.73 m2 per +1 SD; 95% confidence interval, 2.1 to 3.5) and negative association (−14.2 ml/min per 1.73 m2 per +1 SD; 95% confidence interval, −17.0 to −11.3), respectively. Two hundred four incident CKD events with a median follow-up time of 19.6 years were included in the survival analyses. Higher levels of 5-oxoproline (hazard ratio, 0.70; 95% confidence interval, 0.60 to 0.82) and 1,5-anhydroglucitol (hazard ratio, 0.68; 95% confidence interval, 0.58 to 0.80) were significantly related to lower risk of incident CKD, and the associations did not appreciably change when mutually adjusted. Conclusions These data identify a large number of metabolites associated with

  15. Prevalence of CKD and Its Relationship to eGFR-Related Genetic Loci and Clinical Risk Factors in the SardiNIA Study Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Bragg-Gresham, Jennifer; Masala, Marco; Piras, Doloretta; Atzeni, Alice; Pilia, Maria G.; Ferreli, Liana; Balaci, Lenuta; Curreli, Nicolò; Delitala, Alessandro; Loi, Francesco; Abecasis, Gonçalo R.; Schlessinger, David; Cucca, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of CKD and of renal failure vary worldwide, yet parallel increases in leading risk factors explain only part of the differential prevalence. We measured CKD prevalence and eGFR, and their relationship with traditional and additional risk factors, in a Sardinian founder population cohort. The eGFR was calculated using equations from the CKD Epidemiology Collaboration and Modification of Diet in Renal Disease studies. With use of the Kidney Disease Improving Global Outcomes guidelines, a cross-sectional analysis of 4842 individuals showed that CKD prevalence was 15.1%, including 3.6% of patients in the high-risk and 0.46% in the very-high-risk categories. Longitudinal analyses performed on 4074 of these individuals who completed three visits with an average follow-up of 7 years revealed that, consistent with other populations, average eGFR slope was −0.79 ml/min per 1.73 m2 per year, but 11.4% of the participants had an eGFR decline >2.3 ml/min per 1.73 m2 per year (fast decline). A genetic score was generated from 13 reported eGFR- and CKD-related loci, and univariable and multivariable analyses were applied to assess the relationship between clinical, ultrasonographic, and genetic variables with three outcomes: CKD, change in eGFR, and fast eGFR decline. Genetic risk score, older age, and female sex independently correlated with each outcome. Diabetes was associated with CKD prevalence, whereas hypertension and hyperuricemia correlated more strongly with fast eGFR decline. Diabetes, hypertension, hyperuricemia, and high baseline eGFR were associated with a decline of eGFR. Along with differential health practices, population variations in this spectrum of risk factors probably contributes to the variable CKD prevalence worldwide. PMID:24511125

  16. Dietary patterns of patients with advanced lung or colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Prado, Carla M M; Lieffers, Jessica R; Bergsten, Gabriella; Mourtzakis, Marina; Baracos, Vickie E; Reiman, Tony; Sawyer, Michael B; McCargar, Linda J

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify dietary patterns among patients with advanced cancer. Differences between cancer groups are described, and food groups contributing higher proportions to overall caloric intake are identified. Patients with advanced cancer (n=51) were recruited from a regional cancer centre and completed a three-day dietary record. Food items were categorized according to macronutrient content. After adjustment for body weight, substantial variation in energy intake was observed (range: 13.7 to 55.4 kcal/kg/day). For 49% of patients, protein intake was below recommendations. Overall, patients consumed the largest proportion of their calories from meat (16%), other foods (11%), dessert (9%), fruit (9%), white bread (7%), and milk (7%). Only 5% of patients consumed meal replacement supplements. The results of this descriptive study provide important insights into the dietary habits of patients with advanced cancer. These insights could be translated into the development of effective recommendations for maintaining or improving health and quality of life.

  17. Preparation of the Dialysis Access in Stages 4 and 5 CKD.

    PubMed

    Moist, Louise M; Al-Jaishi, Ahmed A

    2016-07-01

    Patients with Stages 4 and 5 CKD are optimally managed within a multidisciplinary care setting. This provides an opportunity to create a "patient centered" approach to renal replacement modality options and conservative care. The care team engages with the patient and caregivers to assist with the understanding of their health status, modality and vascular access selection, and overall living with the comorbidity of chronic illness. A systematic approach to provision of education, modality, and access selection, are in part, driven by the patient's expected survival and need for dialysis, the risks and benefits with different modalities, and access and adaptation to their preferences and home situations. Dialysis access education should be included in all education programs so that patients can consider risks and benefits of all modalities. Decision support interventions have been effective in reducing decisional conflict and informed values-based decision-making. For both hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis, timing of the surgical referral and access creation should be individualized based on the rate of CKD progression, risk of complications, and ease of access to surgical services. The health care team should support the patients' decision balancing risks and benefits, as well as their lifestyle, values, beliefs, and preferences.

  18. CE: Improving Outcomes for Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease: Part 2.

    PubMed

    Norton, Jenna M; Newman, Eileen P; Romancito, Gayle; Mahooty, Stephanie; Kuracina, Theresa; Narva, Andrew S

    2017-03-01

    : Coping with chronic kidney disease (CKD) is challenging for many people, since symptoms often don't appear until the disease is advanced and the patient is close to requiring dialysis. This two-part article aims to provide nurses with the basic information necessary to assess and manage patients with CKD. Part 1, which appeared last month, offered an overview of the disease, described identification and etiology, and discussed ways to slow disease progression. Part 2 addresses disease complications and treatment for kidney failure.

  19. Comparison of the Antialbuminuric Effects of Benidipine and Hydrochlorothiazide in Renin-Angiotensin System (RAS) Inhibitor-Treated Hypertensive Patients with Albuminuria: the COSMO-CKD (COmbination Strategy on Renal Function of Benidipine or Diuretics TreatMent with RAS inhibitOrs in a Chronic Kidney Disease Hypertensive Population) Study

    PubMed Central

    Ando, Katsuyuki; Nitta, Kosaku; Rakugi, Hiromi; Nishizawa, Yoshiki; Yokoyama, Hitoshi; Nakanishi, Takeshi; Kashihara, Naoki; Tomita, Kimio; Nangaku, Masaomi; Takahashi, Katsutoshi; Isshiki, Masashi; Shimosawa, Tatsuo; Fujita, Toshiro

    2014-01-01

    Objective: This study evaluated the non-inferiority of renoprotection afforded by benidipine versus hydrochlorothiazide in hypertensive patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Methods: In this prospective, multicenter, open-labeled, randomized trial, the antialbuminuric effects of benidipine and hydrochlorothiazide were examined in renin-angiotensin system (RAS) inhibitor-treated patients with blood pressure (BP) readings of ≥ 130/80 mmHg and ≤ 180/110 mmHg, a urinary albumin to creatinine ratio (UACR) of ≥ 300 mg/g, and an estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) of ≥ 30 ml/min/1.73m2. Patients received benidipine (n = 176, final dose: 4.8 mg/day) or hydrochlorothiazide (n = 170, 8.2 mg/day) for 12 months. Results: Benidipine and hydrochlorothiazide exerted similar BP- and eGFR-decreasing actions. The UACR values for benidipine and hydrochlorothiazide were 930.8 (95% confidence interval: 826.1, 1048.7) and 883.1 (781.7, 997.7) mg/g at baseline, respectively. These values were reduced to 790.0 (668.1, 934.2) and 448.5 (372.9, 539.4) mg/g at last observation carried forward (LOCF) visits. The non-inferiority of benidipine versus hydrochlorothiazide was not demonstrated (benidipine/hydrochlorothiazide ratio of LOCF value adjusted for baseline: 1.67 (1.40, 1.99)). Conclusions: The present study failed to demonstrate the non-inferiority of the antialbuminuric effect of benidipine relative to that of hydrochlorothiazide in RAS inhibitor-treated hypertensive patients with macroalbuminuria. PMID:25013370

  20. Body Mass Index and Mortality in CKD

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    BACKGROUND: Greater body mass index (BMI) is associated with worse survival in the general population, but appears to confer a survival advantage in patients with kidney failure treated by hemodialysis. Data are limited on the relationship of BMI with mortality in patients in the earlier stages of c...

  1. Randomized Clinical Trial of Sodium Polystyrene Sulfonate for the Treatment of Mild Hyperkalemia in CKD

    PubMed Central

    Lepage, Laurence; Dufour, Anne-Claude; Doiron, Jessica; Handfield, Katia; Desforges, Katherine; Bell, Robert; Vallée, Michel; Savoie, Michel; Perreault, Sylvie; Laurin, Louis-Philippe; Pichette, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    Background and objectives Hyperkalemia affects up to 10% of patients with CKD. Sodium polystyrene sulfonate has long been prescribed for this condition, although evidence is lacking on its efficacy for the treatment of mild hyperkalemia over several days. This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of sodium polystyrene sulfonate in the treatment of mild hyperkalemia. Design, setting, participants, & measurements In total, 33 outpatients with CKD and mild hyperkalemia (5.0–5.9 mEq/L) in a single teaching hospital were included in this double–blind randomized clinical trial. We randomly assigned these patients to receive either placebo or sodium polystyrene sulfonate of 30 g orally one time per day for 7 days. The primary outcome was the comparison between study groups of the mean difference of serum potassium levels between the day after the last dose of treatment and baseline. Results The mean duration of treatment was 6.9 days. Sodium polystyrene sulfonate was superior to placebo in the reduction of serum potassium levels (mean difference between groups, −1.04 mEq/L; 95% confidence interval, −1.37 to −0.71). A higher proportion of patients in the sodium polystyrene sulfonate group attained normokalemia at the end of their treatment compared with those in the placebo group, but the difference did not reach statistical significance (73% versus 38%; P=0.07). There was a trend toward higher rates of electrolytic disturbances and an increase in gastrointestinal side effects in the group receiving sodium polystyrene sulfonate. Conclusions Sodium polystyrene sulfonate was superior to placebo in reducing serum potassium over 7 days in patients with mild hyperkalemia and CKD. PMID:26576619

  2. Medication Adherence Behavior and Priorities Among Older Adults With CKD: A Semistructured Interview Study

    PubMed Central

    Rifkin, Dena E.; Laws, M. Barton; Rao, Madhumathi; Balakrishnan, V. S.; Sarnak, Mark J.; Wilson, Ira B.

    2010-01-01

    Background Older adults with chronic kidney disease (CKD) typically take more than five medications and have multiple prescribing physicians. Little however is known about how they prioritize their medical conditions or decide which medications to take. Methods Semistructured interviews (average length 40 minutes) with twenty community-dwelling adults with CKD stages 3-5D, receiving nephrology care at a tertiary referral center. Respondents were asked about medications, prescribing physicians, and medication-taking behaviors. We performed thematic analysis to explain patients’ decisions regarding medication prioritization, understanding, and adherence decisions. Results Participants (age range, 55–84 years; mean, 72) took 5–14 prescribed medications, had 2–9 physicians, and 5–11 comorbid conditions. All had assigned implicit priorities to their medications. While the majority expressed the intention to be adherent, many regularly skipped medications they considered less important. Most identified the prescribing physician and indication for each medication, but there was often substantial discordance between beliefs about medications and conventional medical opinion. Respondents prioritized medications based on the salience of the particular condition, perceived effects of the treatment, and on the barriers (physical, logistic, or financial) to taking the prescribed drug. Side effects of medications were common and anxiety-provoking, but discussions with the prescribing physician were often delayed or unfulfilling for the patient. Conclusions Polypharmacy in CKD patients leads to complex medication choices and adherence behaviors in this population. Most of the patients we interviewed had beliefs or priorities that were non-concordant with conventional medical opinion, but patients rarely discussed these beliefs and priorities, or the resultant poor medication adherence, with their physicians. Further study is needed to provide quantitative data on the

  3. Patient-reported outcomes in clinical trials of CKD-related therapies: report of a symposium sponsored by the national kidney foundation and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

    PubMed

    Perrone, Ronald D; Coons, Stephen Joel; Cavanaugh, Kerri; Finkelstein, Fred; Meyer, Klemens B

    2013-12-01

    The National Kidney Foundation and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) convened a symposium in September 2010, bringing together more than 70 experts, including representatives from the FDA, the National Institutes of Health, the Critical Path Institute, nephrologists, patients, and the pharmaceutical industry to discuss the feasibility and process of developing patient-reported outcome (PRO) measures to access how patients feel or function to be used in clinical trials for regulatory review of treatment benefit. Three disease areas were evaluated for development of end point models in which PRO measures may be useful: anemia secondary to chronic kidney disease, autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD), and nephrotic syndrome. The participants thought it valuable to use observational data to generate hypotheses regarding patient baseline characteristics that are likely to predict clinically important changes in PROs in response to anemia treatment and to design adequately powered blinded randomized controlled trials of anemia treatment using PROs as primary rather than secondary end points. Validated PRO instruments that reflect the patient experience in ADPKD and nephrotic syndrome are essential to incorporate into clinical trials of new therapeutic interventions because glomerular filtration rate decline may occur late in the disease course, at which point therapeutic benefit is less likely. Conference attendees addressed how PRO measures could be used to evaluate, monitor, provide care, and facilitate the introduction of treatments for patients with these challenging conditions.

  4. Effect of paricalcitol on left ventricular mass and function in CKD--the OPERA trial.

    PubMed

    Wang, Angela Yee-Moon; Fang, Fang; Chan, John; Wen, Yue-Yi; Qing, Shang; Chan, Iris Hiu-Shuen; Lo, Gladys; Lai, Kar-Neng; Lo, Wai-Kei; Lam, Christopher Wai-Kei; Yu, Cheuk-Man

    2014-01-01

    Vitamin D seems to protect against cardiovascular disease, but the reported effects of vitamin D on patient outcomes in CKD are controversial. We conducted a prospective, double blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial to determine whether oral activated vitamin D reduces left ventricular (LV) mass in patients with stages 3-5 CKD with LV hypertrophy. Subjects with echocardiographic criteria of LV hypertrophy were randomly assigned to receive either oral paricalcitol (1 μg) one time daily (n=30) or matching placebo (n=30) for 52 weeks. The primary end point was change in LV mass index over 52 weeks, which was measured by cardiac magnetic resonance imaging. Secondary end points included changes in LV volume, echocardiographic measures of systolic and diastolic function, biochemical parameters of mineral bone disease, and measures of renal function. Change in LV mass index did not differ significantly between groups (median [interquartile range], -2.59 [-6.13 to 0.32] g/m(2) with paricalcitol versus -4.85 [-9.89 to 1.10] g/m(2) with placebo). Changes in LV volume, ejection fraction, tissue Doppler-derived measures of early diastolic and systolic mitral annular velocities, and ratio of early mitral inflow velocity to early diastolic mitral annular velocity did not differ between the groups. However, paricalcitol treatment significantly reduced intact parathyroid hormone (P<0.001) and alkaline phosphatase (P=0.001) levels as well as the number of cardiovascular-related hospitalizations compared with placebo. In conclusion, 52 weeks of treatment with oral paricalcitol (1 μg one time daily) significantly improved secondary hyperparathyroidism but did not alter measures of LV structure and function in patients with severe CKD.

  5. Protein-bound uremic toxins: new culprits of cardiovascular events in chronic kidney disease patients.

    PubMed

    Ito, Shunsuke; Yoshida, Masayuki

    2014-02-20

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) has been considered a major risk factor for cardiovascular diseases. Although great advances have recently been made in the pathophysiology and treatment of cardiovascular diseases, CKD remains a major global health problem. Moreover, the occurrence rates of cardiovascular events among CKD patients increase even in cases in which patients undergo hemodialysis, and the mechanisms underlying the so-called "cardiorenal syndrome" are not clearly understood. Recently, small-molecule uremic toxins have been associated with cardiovascular mortality in CKD and/or dialysis patients. These toxins range from small uncharged solutes to large protein-bound structures. In this review, we focused on protein-bound uremic toxins, such as indoxyl sulfate and p-cresyl sulfate, which are poorly removed by current dialysis techniques. Several studies have demonstrated that protein-bound uremic toxins, especially indoxyl sulfate, induce vascular inflammation, endothelial dysfunction, and vascular calcification, which may explain the relatively poor prognosis of CKD and dialysis patients. The aim of this review is to provide novel insights into the effects of indoxyl sulfate and p-cresyl sulfate on the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis.

  6. How I treat patients with advanced systemic mastocytosis.

    PubMed

    Valent, Peter; Sperr, Wolfgang R; Akin, Cem

    2010-12-23

    Advanced systemic mastocytosis (SM) is a rare myeloid neoplasm characterized by uncontrolled accumulation of neoplastic mast cells (MCs) in various organs with consecutive impairment of organ function, drug resistance, and a poor prognosis. Advanced SM may present as smoldering or slowly progressing neoplasm but may also present as rapidly progressing aggressive SM or even as MC leukemia. Approximately half of the patients have an associated hematologic non-MC-lineage disease (SM-AHNMD) or develop an AHNMD over time. Drug resistance may not only result from the KIT mutant D816V that is found in most patients, but also from KIT-independent pro-oncogenic signaling pathways that play a role in disease evolution. In patients with slow progression, advanced SM can often be kept under control for months with interferon-α or 2CdA. By contrast, in rapidly progressing aggressive SM and MC leukemia, even polychemotherapy and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation may fail, which points to the need to develop new drugs and treatment concepts for these patients. In SM-AHNMD, separate treatment plans should be established for the SM component and the AHNMD component of the disease, with recognition that the AHNMD often has to be managed and treated as a secondary and thus a high-risk neoplasm.

  7. Preoperative Chemoradiotherapy in Elderly Patients with Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Musio, Daniela; Izzo, Luciano; Pugliese, Federico; Izzo, Paolo; Bolognese, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate the treatment tolerance and clinical outcomes in patients aged 70 and older with locally advanced rectal carcinoma treated with multimodality approach. Methods and Materials. We retrospectively analysed 20 consecutive elderly patients, with histologically proven rectal adenocarcinoma, staged T3-4, and/or node-positive tumour, who received chemoradiotherapy and proceeded to surgical approach. Performance status score and adult comorbidity evaluation-27 score were calculated, and their influence on treatment tolerance and clinical outcomes was analysed. Results. All patients completed programmed chemoradiotherapy treatment. Gastrointestinal toxicity was the most common acute side effects: proctitis in 70% of patients and diarrhoea in 55%, classified as Grade 3 in 3 patients only. Radiation dermatitis was reported in 7 patients (35%) and it was graded G3 in one patient. There was no haematological toxicity. Eighteen patients out of 20 underwent surgery. Sphincter preservation was assured in 13 patients. Comorbidity index was related to higher severe acute toxicity (P = 0.015) but no influenced treatment outcomes. Conclusion. Treatment tolerance with combined modality is good in elderly patients. Due to age, no dose reduction for radiation therapy and chemotherapy should be considered. PMID:24392453

  8. Routine screening for CKD should be done in asymptomatic adults... selectively.

    PubMed

    Berns, Jeffrey S

    2014-11-07

    CKD is an important public health problem associated with substantial morbidity, impaired quality of life, shortened life expectancy, and excessive health care costs. Given its long preclinical latency, screening of asymptomatic individuals for CKD has been considered as a potentially useful means of early detection, with a goal of reducing CKD progression and its complications. A recent clinical practice guideline from the American College of Physicians that recommended against screening for CKD in asymptomatic adults without risk factors has reignited debate regarding CKD screening. Despite the lack of randomized controlled trial evidence showing benefits of CKD screening, even among individuals at increased risk for CKD, such as those with diabetes or hypertension or who are of certain high-risk racial or ethnic groups, a thoughtful and selective approach to CKD screening seems to be cost-effective and clinically valuable. CKD screening is recommended by several nephrology professional societies and appropriate in at-risk asymptomatic individuals with the intent of identifying and managing CKD, diagnosing the etiology of CKD, limiting or preventing CKD progression and its associated cardiovascular disease risk, and minimizing risk of AKI, inappropriate drug dosing, and nephrotoxic injury.

  9. Heart Rate Variability is a Predictor of Mortality in CKD - A Report from the CRIC Study

    PubMed Central

    Drawz, Paul E; Babineau, Denise C; Brecklin, Carolyn; He, Jiang; Kallem, Radhakrishna R; Soliman, Elsayed Z; Xie, Dawei; Appleby, Dina; Anderson, Amanda H; Rahman, Mahboob

    2014-01-01

    Background/Aims Low heart rate variability (HRV) is a risk factor for adverse outcomes in the general population. We aimed to determine the factors associated with HRV and evaluate the association between low HRV and clinical outcomes in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Methods A 10 second electrocardiogram was obtained at baseline in the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) Study. HRV was measured by the standard deviation of all R-R intervals (SDNN) and the root mean square of successive differences between R-R intervals (RMSSD). Results In 3245 CRIC participants with available baseline SDNN and RMSSD, lower HRV was associated with older age, lack of exercise, heart failure, elevated phosphorus and hemoglobin A1c, and low estimated glomerular filtration rate. After a median follow-up of 4.2 years, in fully adjusted models, lower HRV was not associated with renal (SDNN: HR=0.96 (95% CI 0.88–1.05); RMSSD: HR=0.97 (95% CI 0.88–1.07)) or cardiovascular outcomes (SDNN: HR=1.02 (95% CI 0.92–1.13); RMSSD: HR=1.00 (95% CI 0.90–1.10)). There was a non-linear relationship between RMSSD and all-cause mortality with increased risk with both low and high RMSSD (P=0.04). Conclusions In a large cohort of participants with CKD, multiple risk factors for renal and cardiovascular disease were associated with lower HRV. Lower HRV was not associated with increased risk for renal or cardiovascular outcomes, but both low and high RMSSD were associated with increased risk for all-cause mortality. In conclusion, HRV as measured by RMSSD may be a novel and independent risk factor for mortality in CKD patients. PMID:24356377

  10. BP control and left ventricular hypertrophy regression in children with CKD.

    PubMed

    Kupferman, Juan C; Aronson Friedman, Lisa; Cox, Christopher; Flynn, Joseph; Furth, Susan; Warady, Bradley; Mitsnefes, Mark

    2014-01-01

    In adult patients with CKD, hypertension is linked to the development of left ventricular hypertrophy, but whether this association exists in children with CKD has not been determined conclusively. To assess the relationship between BP and left ventricular hypertrophy, we prospectively analyzed data from the Chronic Kidney Disease in Children cohort. In total, 478 subjects were enrolled, and 435, 321, and 142 subjects remained enrolled at years 1, 3, and 5, respectively. Echocardiograms were obtained 1 year after study entry and then every 2 years; BP was measured annually. A linear mixed model was used to assess the effect of BP on left ventricular mass index, which was measured at three different visits, and a mixed logistic model was used to assess left ventricular hypertrophy. These models were part of a joint longitudinal and survival model to adjust for informative dropout. Predictors of left ventricular mass index included systolic BP, anemia, and use of antihypertensive medications other than angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin receptor blockers. Predictors of left ventricular hypertrophy included systolic BP, female sex, anemia, and use of other antihypertensive medications. Over 4 years, the adjusted prevalence of left ventricular hypertrophy decreased from 15.3% to 12.6% in a systolic BP model and from 15.1% to 12.6% in a diastolic BP model. These results indicate that a decline in BP may predict a decline in left ventricular hypertrophy in children with CKD and suggest additional factors that warrant additional investigation as predictors of left ventricular hypertrophy in these patients.

  11. Abnormal nocturnal heart rate variability response among chronic kidney disease and dialysis patients during wakefulness and sleep

    PubMed Central

    Roumelioti, Maria-Eleni; Ranpuria, Reena; Hall, Martica; Hotchkiss, John R.; Chan, Chris T.; Unruh, Mark L.; Argyropoulos, Christos

    2010-01-01

    Background. Dialysis patients and patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) experience a substantial risk for abnormal autonomic function and abnormal heart rate variability (HRV). It remains unknown whether HRV changes across sleep stages in patients with different severity of CKD or dialysis dependency. We hypothesized that high-frequency (HF) HRV (vagal tone) will be attenuated from wakefulness to non-rapid eye movement (NREM) and then to rapid eye movement (REM) sleep in dialysis patients as compared to patients with CKD. Methods. In-home polysomnography was performed in 95 patients with stages 4–5 CKD or end-stage renal disease (ESRD) on haemodialysis (HD) or peritoneal dialysis (PD). HRV was measured using fast Fourier transform of interbeat intervals during wakefulness and sleep. Low-frequency (LF) and HF intervals were generated. Natural logarithm HF (LNHF) and the logarithm LF/HF ratio (sympathovagal tone) were analysed by multivariable quantile regression and generalized estimating equations. Results. Of the 95 patients, 63.2% (n = 60) was male, 35.8% (n = 34) was African American and 20.4% (n = 19) was diabetic. Average age was 51.6 ± 15.1 (range 19–82). HRV variables were significantly associated with diabetic status, higher periodic limb movement indices and lower bicarbonate levels. Patients with advanced CKD did not differ from dialysis patients in their inability to increase vagal tone during sleep. During wakefulness, female gender (P = 0.05) was associated with the increases in the vagal tone. Conclusions. Patients with CKD/ESRD exhibit dysregulation of the autonomic nervous system tone manifesting as a failure to increase HRV during wakefulness and sleep. Different patient characteristics are associated with changes in HRV at different sleep stages. PMID:20466675

  12. Working with advanced dementia patients in a day care setting.

    PubMed

    Abramowitz, Leah

    2008-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease and most other causes of dementia are regressive by nature. As such one can expect patients with such types of mental impairment to gradually decline in function and ability to participate in day care activities. This paper attempts to show that with the right kind of orientation, staff can "tune into" the more advanced dementia patients, find the key to their personal needs, desires and remaining abilities and design a program that allows them not only to continue to participate in a social and therapeutic framework, but also to gain some meaningful human contact and quality of life despite their cognitive deterioration.

  13. Latent ocular deviations in patients with advanced AIDS.

    PubMed

    España-Gregori, E; Montés-Micó, R; Bueno-Gimeno, I; Díaz-Llopi, M; Menezo-Rozalén, J L

    2001-11-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine horizontal latent ocular deviations in patients with advanced AIDS (CD4+ count <0.050 x 10(9)/l) and to compare with normal values by means of the von Graefe technique. Twenty patients aged between 17 and 44 years with AIDS and aged-matched control groups were submitted to study. The AC/A ratio was also measured in both groups using the Gradient test. The AIDS patients showed a horizontal latent deviation value of 0.28+/-1.07delta exo at near (40 cm.) and 2.12+/-1.37delta eso at distance (6 m). The AC/A ratio obtained was 2.03+/-0.65. Statistically significant differences were obtained in relation to aged-matched control group at near and at distance (p<0.01). The horizontal latent ocular deviation at near and at distance in advanced AIDS patients showed lower values than the expected. The AC/A relationship also was lower. The results obtained in this study indicate that AIDS patients suffer a divergence insufficiency, which could add to other visual complaints such as blurred vision, photophobia, nyctalopia and reading difficulty.

  14. A review of albumin binding in CKD.

    PubMed

    Meijers, Björn K I; Bammens, Bert; Verbeke, Kristin; Evenepoel, Pieter

    2008-05-01

    Hypoalbuminemia is associated with excess mortality in patients with kidney disease. Albumin is an important oxidant scavenger and an abundant carrier protein for numerous endogenous and exogenous compounds. Several specific binding sites for anionic, neutral, and cationic ligands were described. Overall, the extent of binding depends on the ligand and albumin concentration, albumin-binding affinity, and presence of competing ligands. Chronic kidney disease affects all these determinants. This may result in altered pharmacokinetics and increased risk of toxicity. Renal clearance of albumin-bound solutes mainly depends on tubular clearance. Dialytic clearance by means of conventional hemodialysis/hemofiltration and peritoneal dialysis is limited. Other epuration techniques combining hemodialysis with adsorption have been developed. However, the benefit of these techniques remains to be proved.

  15. [Vital prognosis in advanced cancer patients: a systematic literature review].

    PubMed

    Tavares, Teresa; Gonçalves, Edna

    2013-01-01

    Prognostication is a critical medical task for the adequacy of treatment and management of priorities and expectations of patients and families. In 2005, the European Association of Palliative Care (EAPC) published recommendations on the formulation of vital prognosis in advanced cancer patients. The aim of this study is to analyze the literature subsequent to this review and to update the presented recommendations. Using the same strategy of the EAPC group, we performed a systematic literature search in the electronic databases PubMed and Scopus, which included original studies in adults with advanced cancer, without tumor-directed treatment, with a median survival of less than 90 days. The articles were analyzed and classified according to the level of evidence by two independent reviewers. The 41 articles analyzed allowed to keep grade A recommendations for clinical estimation of survival and Palliative Prognostic score and now also for Palliative Prognostic Index, performance status, dyspnea, lymphopenia and lactate dehydrogenase. Recommendations regarding the use of C-reactive protein, leukocytosis, azotemia, hypoalbuminemia and male gender as predictors reached grade B. To formulate the vital prognosis and to communicate it properly to the patient and family are core competencies of physicians, particularly of those who deal with end of life patients. The clinical impression combined with scientific evidence allows us to estimate more accurately the survival, allowing prioritizing and managing more appropriately the existing resources.

  16. Time to target uric acid to retard CKD progression.

    PubMed

    Kumagai, Takanori; Ota, Tatsuru; Tamura, Yoshifuru; Chang, Wen Xiu; Shibata, Shigeru; Uchida, Shunya

    2016-06-23

    Uric acid (UA) remains a possible risk factor of chronic kidney disease (CKD) but its potential role should be elucidated given a fact that multidisciplinary treatments assure a sole strategy to inhibit the progression to end-stage renal disease (ESRD). In clinical setting, most observational studies showed that elevation of serum uric acid (SUA) independently predicts the incidence and the development of CKD. The meta-analysis showed that SUA-lowering therapy with allopurinol may retard the progression of CKD but did not reach conclusive results due to small-sized studies. Larger scale, randomized placebo-controlled trials to assess SUA-lowering therapy are needed. Our recent analysis by propensity score methods has shown that the threshold of SUA should be less than 6.5 mg/dL to abrogate ESRD. In animal models an increase in SUA by the administration of oxonic acid, uricase inhibitor, or nephrectomy can induce glomerular hypertension, arteriolosclerosis including afferent arteriolopathy and tubulointerstitial fibrosis. The ever-growing discoveries of urate transporters prompt us to learn UA metabolism in the kidney and intestine. One example is that the intestinal ABCG2 may play a compensatory role at face of decreased renal clearance of UA in nephrectomized rats, the trigger of which is not a uremic toxin but SUA itself. This review will summarize the recent knowledge on the relationship between SUA and the kidney and try to draw a conclusion when and how to treat asymptomatic hyperuricemia accompanied by CKD. Finally we will address a future perspective on UA study including a Mendelian randomization approach.

  17. Genetic African Ancestry and Markers of Mineral Metabolism in CKD

    PubMed Central

    Parsa, Afshin; Isakova, Tamara; Scialla, Julia J.; Chen, Jing; Flack, John M.; Nessel, Lisa C.; Gupta, Jayanta; Bellovich, Keith A.; Steigerwalt, Susan; Sondheimer, James H.; Wright, Jackson T.; Feldman, Harold I.; Kusek, John W.; Lash, James P.; Wolf, Myles

    2016-01-01

    Background and objectives Disorders of mineral metabolism are more common in African Americans with CKD than in European Americans with CKD. Previous studies have focused on the differences in mineral metabolism by self-reported race, making it difficult to delineate the importance of environmental compared with biologic factors. Design, setting, participants, & measurements In a cross-sectional analysis of 3013 participants of the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort study with complete data, we compared markers of mineral metabolism (phosphorus, calcium, alkaline phosphatase, parathyroid hormone, fibroblast growth factor 23, and urine calcium and phosphorus excretion) in European Americans versus African Americans and separately, across quartiles of genetic African ancestry in African Americans (n=1490). Results Compared with European Americans, African Americans had higher blood concentrations of phosphorus, alkaline phosphatase, fibroblast growth factor 23, and parathyroid hormone, lower 24-hour urinary excretion of calcium and phosphorus, and lower urinary fractional excretion of calcium and phosphorus at baseline (P<0.001 for all). Among African Americans, a higher percentage of African ancestry was associated with lower 24-hour urinary excretion of phosphorus (Ptrend<0.01) in unadjusted analyses. In linear regression models adjusted for socio-demographic characteristics, kidney function, serum phosphorus, and dietary phosphorus intake, higher percentage of African ancestry was significantly associated with lower 24-hour urinary phosphorus excretion (each 10% higher African ancestry was associated with 39.6 mg lower 24-hour urinary phosphorus, P<0.001) and fractional excretion of phosphorus (each 10% higher African ancestry was associated with an absolute 1.1% lower fractional excretion of phosphorus, P=0.01). Conclusions A higher percentage of African ancestry was independently associated with lower 24-hour urinary phosphorus excretion and lower fractional

  18. Molecular risk stratification in advanced heart failure patients

    PubMed Central

    Lamirault, Guillaume; Meur, Nolwenn Le; Roussel, Jean-Christian; Cunff, Marie-France Le; Baron, Daniel; Bihouée, Audrey; Guisle, Isabelle; Raharijaona, Mahatsangy; Ramstein, Gérard; Teusan, Raluca; Chevalier, Catherine; Gueffet, Jean-Pierre; Trochu, Jean-Noël; Léger, Jean J; Houlgatte, Rémi; Steenman, Marja

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Risk stratification in advanced heart failure (HF) is crucial for the individualization of therapeutic strategy, in particular for heart transplantation and ventricular assist device implantation. We tested the hypothesis that cardiac gene expression profiling can distinguish between HF patients with different disease severity. We obtained tissue samples from both left (LV) and right (RV) ventricle of explanted hearts of 44 patients undergoing cardiac transplantation or ventricular assist device placement. Gene expression profiles were obtained using an in-house microarray containing 4217 muscular organ-relevant genes. Based on their clinical status, patients were classified into three HF-severity groups: deteriorating (n= 12), intermediate (n= 19) and stable (n= 13). Two-class statistical analysis of gene expression profiles of deteriorating and stable patients identified a 170-gene and a 129-gene predictor for LV and RV samples, respectively. The LV molecular predictor identified patients with stable and deteriorating status with a sensitivity of 88% and 92%, and a specificity of 100% and 96%, respectively. The RV molecular predictor identified patients with stable and deteriorating status with a sensitivity of 100% and 96%, and a specificity of 100% and 100%, respectively. The molecular prediction was reproducible across biological replicates in LV and RV samples. Gene expression profiling has the potential to reproducibly detect HF patients with highest HF severity with high sensitivity and specificity. In addition, not only LV but also RV samples could be used for molecular risk stratification with similar predictive power. PMID:19793385

  19. Retinopathy and Progression of CKD: The CRIC Study

    PubMed Central

    Pistilli, Maxwell; Ying, Gui-Shuang; Daniel, Ebenezer; Maguire, Maureen G.; Xie, Dawei; Whittock-Martin, Revell; Parker Ostroff, Candace; Lo, Joan C.; Townsend, Raymond R.; Gadegbeku, Crystal A.; Lash, James P.; Fink, Jeffrey C.; Rahman, Mahboob; Feldman, Harold I.; Kusek, John W.

    2014-01-01

    Background and objectives Retinal abnormalities may be associated with changes in the renal vasculature. This study assessed the association between retinopathy and progression of kidney disease in participants of the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) study. Design, setting, participants, & measurements This was a prospective study in which patients with CKD enrolled in CRIC had nonmydriatic fundus photographs of both eyes. All CRIC participants in six clinical sites in which fundus cameras were deployed were offered participation. Photographs were reviewed at a reading center. The presence and severity of retinopathy and vessel calibers were assessed using standard protocols by graders masked to clinical information. The associations of retinal features with changes in eGFR and the need for RRT (ESRD) were assessed. Results Retinal images and renal progression outcomes were obtained from 1852 of the 2605 participants (71.1%) approached. During follow-up (median 2.3 years), 152 participants (8.2%) developed ESRD. Presence and severity of retinopathy at baseline were strongly associated with the risk of subsequent progression to ESRD and reductions in eGFR in unadjusted analyses. For example, participants with retinopathy were 4.4 times (95% confidence interval [95% CI], 3.12 to 6.31) more likely to develop ESRD than those without retinopathy (P<0.001). However, this association was not statistically significant after adjustment for initial eGFR and 24-hour proteinuria. Venular and arteriolar diameter calibers were not associated with ESRD or eGFR decline. The results showed a nonlinear relationship between mean ratio of arteriole/vein calibers and the risk of progression to ESRD; participants within the fourth arteriole/vein ratio quartile were 3.11 times (95% CI, 1.51 to 6.40) more likely to develop ESRD than those in the first quartile (P<0.001). Conclusions The presence and severity of retinopathy were not associated with ESRD and decline in eGFR after

  20. Premature T Cell Senescence in Pediatric CKD.

    PubMed

    George, Roshan P; Mehta, Aneesh K; Perez, Sebastian D; Winterberg, Pamela; Cheeseman, Jennifer; Johnson, Brandi; Kwun, Jean; Monday, Stephanie; Stempora, Linda; Warshaw, Barry; Kirk, Allan D

    2017-01-01

    An individual's immune function, susceptibility to infection, and response to immunosuppressive therapy are influenced in part by his/her T cell maturation state. Although childhood is the most dynamic period of immune maturation, scant information regarding the variability of T cell maturation in children with renal disease is available. In this study, we compared the T cell phenotype in children with renal failure (n=80) with that in healthy children (n=20) using multiparameter flow cytometry to detect markers of T cell maturation, exhaustion, and senescence known to influence immune function. We correlated data with the degree of renal failure (dialysis or nondialysis), prior immunosuppression use, and markers of inflammation (C-reactive protein and inflammatory cytokines) to assess the influence of these factors on T cell phenotype. Children with renal disease had highly variable and often markedly skewed maturation phenotypes, including CD4/CD8 ratio reversal, increased terminal effector differentiation in CD8(+) T cells, reduction in the proportion of naïve T cells, evidence of T cell exhaustion and senescence, and variable loss of T cell CD28 expression. These findings were most significant in patients who had experienced major immune insults, particularly prior immunosuppressive drug exposure. In conclusion, children with renal disease have exceptional heterogeneity in the T cell repertoire. Cognizance of this heterogeneity might inform risk stratification with regard to the balance between infectious risk and response to immunosuppressive therapy, such as that required for autoimmune disease and transplantation.

  1. Influence of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) gene rs4362 polymorphism on the progression of kidney failure in patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD)

    PubMed Central

    Ramanathan, Gnanasambandan; Ghosh, Santu; Elumalai, Ramprasad; Periyasamy, Soundararajan; Lakkakula, Bhaskar V.K.S.

    2016-01-01

    Background & objectives: Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is an inherited systemic disorder, characterized by the fluid filled cysts in the kidneys leading to end stage renal failure in later years of life. Hypertension is one of the major factors independently contributing to the chronic kidney disease (CKD) progression. The renin-angiotensin aldosterone system (RAAS) genes have been extensively studied as hypertension candidate genes. The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of angiotensin converting enzyme tagging - single nucleotide polymorphisms (ACE tag-SNPs) in progression of CKD in patients with ADPKD. Methods: In the present study six ACE tagSNPs (angiotensin converting enzyme tag single nucleotide polymorphisms) and insertion/deletion (I/D) in 102 ADPKD patients and 106 control subjects were investigated. The tagSNPs were genotyped using FRET-based KASPar method and ACE ID by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and electrophoresis. Genotypes and haplotypes were compared between ADPKD patients and controls. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed to assess the effect of genotypes and hypertension on CKD advancement. Mantel-Haenszel (M-H) stratified analysis was performed to study the relationship between different CKD stages and hypertension and their interaction. Results: All loci were polymorphic and except rs4293 SNP the remaining loci followed Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. Distribution of ACE genotypes and haplotypes in controls and ADPKD patients was not significant. A significant linkage disequilibrium (LD) was observed between SNPs forming two LD blocks. The univariate analysis revealed that the age, hypertension, family history of diabetes and ACE rs4362 contributed to the advancement of CKD. Interpretation & conclusions: The results suggest that the ACE genotypes are effect modifiers of the relationship between hypertension and CKD advancement among the ADPKD patients. PMID:27748299

  2. An integrated psychological strategy for advanced colorectal cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Pugliese, Patrizia; Perrone, Maria; Nisi, Enrica; Garufi, Carlo; Giannarelli, Diana; Bottomley, Andrew; Terzoli, Edmondo

    2006-01-01

    Background There is evidence regarding the usefulness of psychosocial intervention to improve health related quality of life (HRQOL) in adult cancer patients. The aim of this report is to describe an integrated approach and to evaluate its feasibility in routine clinical practice in 98 advanced colorectal cancer (ACC) patients during chronomodulated chemotherapy. Methods A prospective non-randomised design was developed and applied in a cancer out-patient setting. The intervention consisted of an integrated approach, whereby the psycho-oncologist had an active role in the health care team with the physician and routinely included psychological understanding in the medical treatment program. The psychological evaluation assessed: a) adaptation, awareness, psychopathological disorders through a psychodynamic interview; b) anxiety and depression using the HAD scale; c) subjective perception of care quality through a structured interview and d) HRQOL evaluation assessment with the EORTC QLQ C30. Outcomes data were collected before and after 18 weeks of chemotherapy. Results After 18 weeks of chemotherapy a significant improvement of adaptation and awareness was observed. The HADs results showed a significant decrease in anxiety when compared to pre-treatment. The structured interview showed a significant increase of patients who positively experienced the impact of medical treatment on HRQOL, anxiety, depression, interpersonal relationships, free-time and who positively experienced the care quality. Indeed, a majority of patients positively experienced the team relationship modality during the whole treatment. All scales on the EORTC questionnaire remained unchanged during the entire treatment. Conclusion Our results suggest that it is feasible to carry out an integrated approach during chemotherapy. These results seem to support the integrated approach as a tool in aiding advanced colorectal cancer patients' ability to cope with their diagnosis and treatment although

  3. [Satisfaction with immunotherapy in patients with advanced cancer].

    PubMed

    Moriyama, Yoshiaki; Fujisawa, Fumika; Kotani, Junko; Ohnishi, Masayuki; Watanabe, Toru

    2015-04-01

    Patient satisfaction with cancer immunotherapy, which is not covered by health insurance in Japan, was evaluated among 65 patients with advanced cancer who had received immunotherapy in our hospital for 2 years. Satisfaction measures were based on patients' expectations for medical care, cost, and staff services, and involved a questionnaire consisting of 25 items. Results of the questionnaire analysis showed that most patients, who expected much of antigen-specific vaccination such as dendritic cells (DC) pulsed tumor-associated antigens, were dissatisfied with the high cost of private immunotherapy(i. e., not covered by medical insurance), and were unable to perceive the effectiveness of the treatment because there was no quantitative analysis of killer T cells induced by immunotherapy. Therefore, it is critically important for us to confirm the safety and efficiency of cancer immunotherapy, before introducing medical insurance for cancer patients in Japan. In addition, the quantitative measurement of killer T cells induced by DC peptide vaccines should be considered, to meet patients' expectations.

  4. Risk Prediction for Early CKD in Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Peggy; Lee, Shun Fu; Heinze, Georg; Clase, Catherine M.; Tobe, Sheldon; Teo, Koon K.; Gerstein, Hertzel; Mann, Johannes F.E.

    2015-01-01

    Background and objectives Quantitative data for prediction of incidence and progression of early CKD are scarce in individuals with type 2 diabetes. Therefore, two risk prediction models were developed for incidence and progression of CKD after 5.5 years and the relative effect of predictors were ascertained. Design, setting, participants, & measurements Baseline and prospective follow-up data of two randomized clinical trials, ONgoing Telmisartan Alone and in combination with Ramipril Global Endpoint Trial (ONTARGET) and Outcome Reduction with Initial Glargine Intervention (ORIGIN), were used as development and independent validation cohorts, respectively. Individuals aged ≥55 years with type 2 diabetes and normo- or microalbuminuria at baseline were included. Incidence or progression of CKD after 5.5 years was defined as new micro- or macroalbuminuria, doubling of creatinine, or ESRD. The competing risk of death was considered as an additional outcome state in the multinomial logistic models. Results Of the 6766 ONTARGET participants with diabetes, 1079 (15.9%) experienced incidence or progression of CKD, and 1032 (15.3%) died. The well calibrated, parsimonious laboratory prediction model incorporating only baseline albuminuria, eGFR, sex, and age exhibited an externally validated c-statistic of 0.68 and an R2 value of 10.6%. Albuminuria, modeled to depict the difference between baseline urinary albumin/creatinine ratio and the threshold for micro- or macroalbuminuria, was mostly responsible for the predictive performance. Inclusion of clinical predictors, such as glucose control, diabetes duration, number of prescribed antihypertensive drugs, previous vascular events, or vascular comorbidities, increased the externally validated c-statistic and R2 value only to 0.69 and 12.1%, respectively. Explained variation was largely driven by renal and not clinical predictors. Conclusions Albuminuria and eGFR were the most important factors to predict onset and

  5. Pulmonary Rehabilitation in Advanced Lung Cancer Patients During Chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Jastrzębski, D; Maksymiak, M; Kostorz, S; Bezubka, B; Osmanska, I; Młynczak, T; Rutkowska, A; Baczek, Z; Ziora, D; Kozielski, J

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the utility of pulmonary rehabilitation for improving of exercises efficiency, dyspnea, and quality of life of patients with lung cancer during chemotherapy. After the enrollment selection, the study included 20 patients with newly diagnosed advanced lung cancer and performance status 0-2. There were 12 patients randomly allocated to the pulmonary rehabilitation group and another 8 constituted the control group that did not undergo physical rehabilitation. Both groups of patients had continual cycles of chemotherapy. Data were analyzed before and after 8 weeks of physical rehabilitation, and before and after 8 weeks of observation without rehabilitation in controls. The inpatient rehabilitation program was based on exercise training with ski poles and respiratory muscle training. We found a tendency for enhanced mobility (6 Minute Walk Test: 527.3 ± 107.4 vs. 563.9 ±64.6 m; p > 0.05) and a significant increase in forced expired volume in 1 s (66.9 ± 13.2 vs. 78.4 ± 17.7 %predicted; p = 0.016), less dyspnea (p = 0.05), and a tendency for improvement in the general quality of life questionnaire after completion of pulmonary rehabilitation as compared with the control group. This report suggests that pulmonary rehabilitation in advanced lung cancer patients during chemotherapy is a beneficial intervention to reduce dyspnea and enhance the quality of life and mobility.

  6. Advanced Hemodynamic Management in Patients with Septic Shock

    PubMed Central

    Huber, Wolfgang; Nierhaus, Axel; Kluge, Stefan; Reuter, Daniel A.; Wagner, Julia Y.

    2016-01-01

    In patients with sepsis and septic shock, the hemodynamic management in both early and later phases of these “organ dysfunction syndromes” is a key therapeutic component. It needs, however, to be differentiated between “early goal-directed therapy” (EGDT) as proposed for the first 6 hours of emergency department treatment by Rivers et al. in 2001 and “hemodynamic management” using advanced hemodynamic monitoring in the intensive care unit (ICU). Recent large trials demonstrated that nowadays protocolized EGDT does not seem to be superior to “usual care” in terms of a reduction in mortality in emergency department patients with early identified septic shock who promptly receive antibiotic therapy and fluid resuscitation. “Hemodynamic management” comprises (a) making the diagnosis of septic shock as one differential diagnosis of circulatory shock, (b) assessing the hemodynamic status including the identification of therapeutic conflicts, and (c) guiding therapeutic interventions. We propose two algorithms for hemodynamic management using transpulmonary thermodilution-derived variables aiming to optimize the cardiocirculatory and pulmonary status in adult ICU patients with septic shock. The complexity and heterogeneity of patients with septic shock implies that individualized approaches for hemodynamic management are mandatory. Defining individual hemodynamic target values for patients with septic shock in different phases of the disease must be the focus of future studies. PMID:27703980

  7. Satellite cell dysfunction and impaired IGF-1 signaling cause CKD-induced muscle atrophy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liping; Wang, Xiaonan H; Wang, Huiling; Du, Jie; Mitch, William E

    2010-03-01

    Muscle wasting in chronic kidney disease (CKD) begins with impaired insulin/IGF-1 signaling, causing abnormal protein metabolism. In certain models of muscle atrophy, reduced satellite cell function contributes to atrophy, but how CKD affects satellite cell function is unknown. Here, we found that isolated satellite cells from mice with CKD had less MyoD, the master switch of satellite cell activation, and suppressed myotube formation compared with control mice. In vivo, CKD delayed the regeneration of injured muscle and decreased MyoD and myogenin expression, suggesting that CKD impairs proliferation and differentiation of satellite cells. In isolated satellite cells from control mice, IGF-1 increased the expression of myogenic genes through an Akt-dependent pathway. CKD impaired Akt phosphorylation in satellite cells after muscle injury. To test whether impaired IGF-1 signaling could be responsible for decreased satellite cell function in CKD, we created an inducible IGF-1 receptor knockout mouse and found impaired satellite cell function and muscle regeneration. In addition, both CKD and IGF-1 receptor knockout mice developed fibrosis in regenerating muscles. Taken together, impaired IGF-1 signaling in CKD not only leads to abnormal protein metabolism in muscle but also impairs satellite cell function and promotes fibrosis in regenerating muscle. These signaling pathways may hold potential therapeutic targets to reduce CKD-related muscle wasting.

  8. [Pregnancy, CKD and solitary kidney: kidney donation between clinical logic and taboos].

    PubMed

    Piccoli, Giorgina

    2015-01-01

    On the occasion of the Congress of the American Society of Nephrology, the yearly issue of the NEJM introduces a selection of articles of interest for Nephrology, drawing attention to the incidence of hypertensive disorders of pregnancy in kidney donors. The article reconsiders this issue five years after two studies that described an increase in risk for adverse pregnancy outcomes after kidney donation. It disproves a previous assumption of "non-interference" between kidney donation and pregnancy outcomes. Meanwhile,CKD has been recognized as a risk factor for pregnancy, regardless of the presence of reduced renal function, hypertension and proteinuria, although these factors modulate the risk. In the discussion, the authors help to dispel the taboos that donor women are substantially different from women born with a solitary kidney or were so as an effect of a disease. Beside the issue of transplantation,the study indicates that we have to pay attention to all patients with CKD in pregnancy, giving us a very interesting clue for counselling. The risk of complications is greater in the donor population compared to a "low risk" population, but it is roughly equal to that of the general population, if the latter is not subject to a careful clinical work-up. Control and follow-up offset the risk: in a time when economic cuts to health care are almost killing the prevention programs, this is probably the most important message.

  9. CKD hotspots around the world: where, why and what the lessons are. A CKJ review series.

    PubMed

    Martín-Cleary, Catalina; Ortiz, Alberto

    2014-12-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is one of the three causes of death that has had the highest increase in the last 20 years. The increasing CKD burden occurs in the context of lack of access of most of the world population to adequate healthcare and an incomplete understanding of the pathogenesis of CKD. However, CKD is not homogeneously distributed. CKD hotspots are defined as countries, region, communities or ethnicities with higher than average incidence of CKD. Analysis of CKD hotspots has the potential to provide valuable insights into the pathogenesis of kidney disease and to improve the life expectancy of the affected communities. Examples include ethnicities such as African Americans in the USA or Aboriginals in Australia, regions such as certain Balkan valleys or Central America and even groups of people sharing common activities or interests such as young women trying to lose weight in Belgium. The study of these CKD hotspots has identified underlying genetic factors, such as ApoL1 gene variants, environmental toxins, such as aristolochic acid and socioeconomic factors leading to nutritional deprivation and inflammation/infection. The CKD hotspots series of CKJ reviews will explore the epidemiology and causes in CKD hotspots, beginning with Australian Aboriginals in this issue. An online map of CKD hotspots around the world will feature the reviewed hotspots, highlighting known or suspected causes as well as ongoing projects to unravel the cause and providing a directory of public health officials, physicians and basic scientists involved in these efforts. Since the high prevalence of CKD in a particular region or population may only be known to local physicians, we encourage readers to propose further CKD hotspots to be reviewed.

  10. CKD hotspots around the world: where, why and what the lessons are. A CKJ review series

    PubMed Central

    Martín-Cleary, Catalina; Ortiz, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is one of the three causes of death that has had the highest increase in the last 20 years. The increasing CKD burden occurs in the context of lack of access of most of the world population to adequate healthcare and an incomplete understanding of the pathogenesis of CKD. However, CKD is not homogeneously distributed. CKD hotspots are defined as countries, region, communities or ethnicities with higher than average incidence of CKD. Analysis of CKD hotspots has the potential to provide valuable insights into the pathogenesis of kidney disease and to improve the life expectancy of the affected communities. Examples include ethnicities such as African Americans in the USA or Aboriginals in Australia, regions such as certain Balkan valleys or Central America and even groups of people sharing common activities or interests such as young women trying to lose weight in Belgium. The study of these CKD hotspots has identified underlying genetic factors, such as ApoL1 gene variants, environmental toxins, such as aristolochic acid and socioeconomic factors leading to nutritional deprivation and inflammation/infection. The CKD hotspots series of CKJ reviews will explore the epidemiology and causes in CKD hotspots, beginning with Australian Aboriginals in this issue. An online map of CKD hotspots around the world will feature the reviewed hotspots, highlighting known or suspected causes as well as ongoing projects to unravel the cause and providing a directory of public health officials, physicians and basic scientists involved in these efforts. Since the high prevalence of CKD in a particular region or population may only be known to local physicians, we encourage readers to propose further CKD hotspots to be reviewed. PMID:25859368

  11. Ambulatory pulmonary artery pressure monitoring in advanced heart failure patients

    PubMed Central

    Yandrapalli, Srikanth; Raza, Anoshia; Tariq, Sohaib; Aronow, Wilbert S

    2017-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) is an emerging epidemic associate with significant morbidity, mortality, and health care expenditure. Although there were major advances in pharmacologic and device based therapies for the management of HF, mortality of this condition remains high. Accurate monitoring of HF patients for exacerbations is very important to reduce recurrent hospitalizations and its associated complications. With the failure of clinical signs, tele-monitoring, and laboratory bio-markers to function as early markers of HF exacerbations, more sophisticated techniques were sought to accurately predict the circulatory status in HF patients in order to execute timely pharmacological intervention to reduce frequent hospitalizations. CardioMEMSTM (St. Jude Medical, Inc., Saint Paul, Minnesota) is an implantable, wireless pulmonary arterial pressure (PAP) monitoring system which transmits the patient’s continuous PAPs to the treating health care provider in the ambulatory setting. PAP-guided medical therapy modification has been shown to significantly reduce HF-related hospitalization and overall mortality. In advanced stages of HF, wireless access to hemodynamic information correlated with earlier left ventricular assist device implantation and shorter time to heart transplantation. PMID:28163833

  12. Enzymatic creatinine assays allow estimation of glomerular filtration rate in stages 1 and 2 chronic kidney disease using CKD-EPI equation.

    PubMed

    Kuster, Nils; Cristol, Jean-Paul; Cavalier, Etienne; Bargnoux, Anne-Sophie; Halimi, Jean-Michel; Froissart, Marc; Piéroni, Laurence; Delanaye, Pierre

    2014-01-20

    The National Kidney Disease Education Program group demonstrated that MDRD equation is sensitive to creatinine measurement error, particularly at higher glomerular filtration rates. Thus, MDRD-based eGFR above 60 mL/min/1.73 m² should not be reported numerically. However, little is known about the impact of analytical error on CKD-EPI-based estimates. This study aimed at assessing the impact of analytical characteristics (bias and imprecision) of 12 enzymatic and 4 compensated Jaffe previously characterized creatinine assays on MDRD and CKD-EPI eGFR. In a simulation study, the impact of analytical error was assessed on a hospital population of 24084 patients. Ability using each assay to correctly classify patients according to chronic kidney disease (CKD) stages was evaluated. For eGFR between 60 and 90 mL/min/1.73 m², both equations were sensitive to analytical error. Compensated Jaffe assays displayed high bias in this range and led to poorer sensitivity/specificity for classification according to CKD stages than enzymatic assays. As compared to MDRD equation, CKD-EPI equation decreases impact of analytical error in creatinine measurement above 90 mL/min/1.73 m². Compensated Jaffe creatinine assays lead to important errors in eGFR and should be avoided. Accurate enzymatic assays allow estimation of eGFR until 90 mL/min/1.73 m² with MDRD and 120 mL/min/1.73 m² with CKD-EPI equation.

  13. [Characteristics and aims of patient advance directive laws].

    PubMed

    Kletecka-Pulker, Maria

    2008-01-01

    The advanced directive law (PatVG), which regulates the conditions and effectiveness of living wills, has been in force since 1 June 2006. A living will is a declaration of will with which a patient refuses certain medical treatment for the case that he is no longer able to understand the situation, make ajudgement or to express himself. In contrast to the non-anticipatory rejection of treatment, the legislator demands, in the case of anticipatory rejection, the fulfilment of certain conditions. The law provides for two forms of living will 1. the non-binding living will and 2. the binding living will. In the case of a binding will, if the patient is no longer able to understand the situation or to make a judgement and/or is unable to express himself, the doctor has to respect the living will and under no circumstances is allowed to carry out the measures which the patient has refused. If one conditions for a binding living will is not fulfilled, the will is then non-binding. However, the greater the number of conditions which are fulfilled, the more likely it is that a doctor will consider it binding. In all cases, the binding living will serves as an aid for the doctor to indicate the will of the patient.

  14. Engaging Patients with Advance Directives using an Information Visualization Approach

    PubMed Central

    Woollen, Janet; Bakken, Suzanne

    2016-01-01

    Despite the benefits of advance directives (AD) to both patients and care providers, they are often not completed due to lack of patient awareness. The purpose of this paper is to advocate for creation and use of an innovative information visualization (infovisual) as a health communication tool aimed at improving AD dissemination and engagement. The infovisual would promote AD awareness by engaging patients to learn about their options and inspire contemplation and conversation regarding patients’ end-of-life (EOL) journey. An infovisual may be able to communicate insights that are often communicated in words, but are much more powerfully communicated by example. Furthermore, an infovisual could facilitate vivid understanding of options and inspire the beginning of often-difficult conversations between care providers, patients and loved ones. It may also save clinicians’ time, as care providers may be able to spend less time explaining details of EOL care options. Use of an infovisual could assist in ensuring a well-planned EOL. PMID:26273950

  15. Integrative biology identifies shared transcriptional networks in CKD.

    PubMed

    Martini, Sebastian; Nair, Viji; Keller, Benjamin J; Eichinger, Felix; Hawkins, Jennifer J; Randolph, Ann; Böger, Carsten A; Gadegbeku, Crystal A; Fox, Caroline S; Cohen, Clemens D; Kretzler, Matthias

    2014-11-01

    A previous meta-analysis of genome-wide association data by the Cohorts for Heart and Aging Research in Genomic Epidemiology and CKDGen consortia identified 16 loci associated with eGFR. To define how each of these single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) could affect renal function, we integrated GFR-associated loci with regulatory pathways, producing a molecular map of CKD. In kidney biopsy specimens from 157 European subjects representing nine different CKDs, renal transcript levels for 18 genes in proximity to the SNPs significantly correlated with GFR. These 18 genes were mapped into their biologic context by testing coregulated transcripts for enriched pathways. A network of 97 pathways linked by shared genes was constructed and characterized. Of these pathways, 56 pathways were reported previously to be associated with CKD; 41 pathways without prior association with CKD were ranked on the basis of the number of candidate genes connected to the respective pathways. All pathways aggregated into a network of two main clusters comprising inflammation- and metabolism-related pathways, with the NRF2-mediated oxidative stress response pathway serving as the hub between the two clusters. In all, 78 pathways and 95% of the connections among those pathways were verified in an independent North American biopsy cohort. Disease-specific analyses showed that most pathways are shared between sets of three diseases, with closest interconnection between lupus nephritis, IgA nephritis, and diabetic nephropathy. Taken together, the network integrates candidate genes from genome-wide association studies into their functional context, revealing interactions and defining established and novel biologic mechanisms of renal impairment in renal diseases.

  16. Integrative Biology Identifies Shared Transcriptional Networks in CKD

    PubMed Central

    Martini, Sebastian; Nair, Viji; Keller, Benjamin J.; Eichinger, Felix; Hawkins, Jennifer J.; Randolph, Ann; Böger, Carsten A.; Gadegbeku, Crystal A.; Fox, Caroline S.; Cohen, Clemens D.

    2014-01-01

    A previous meta-analysis of genome-wide association data by the Cohorts for Heart and Aging Research in Genomic Epidemiology and CKDGen consortia identified 16 loci associated with eGFR. To define how each of these single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) could affect renal function, we integrated GFR-associated loci with regulatory pathways, producing a molecular map of CKD. In kidney biopsy specimens from 157 European subjects representing nine different CKDs, renal transcript levels for 18 genes in proximity to the SNPs significantly correlated with GFR. These 18 genes were mapped into their biologic context by testing coregulated transcripts for enriched pathways. A network of 97 pathways linked by shared genes was constructed and characterized. Of these pathways, 56 pathways were reported previously to be associated with CKD; 41 pathways without prior association with CKD were ranked on the basis of the number of candidate genes connected to the respective pathways. All pathways aggregated into a network of two main clusters comprising inflammation- and metabolism-related pathways, with the NRF2-mediated oxidative stress response pathway serving as the hub between the two clusters. In all, 78 pathways and 95% of the connections among those pathways were verified in an independent North American biopsy cohort. Disease-specific analyses showed that most pathways are shared between sets of three diseases, with closest interconnection between lupus nephritis, IgA nephritis, and diabetic nephropathy. Taken together, the network integrates candidate genes from genome-wide association studies into their functional context, revealing interactions and defining established and novel biologic mechanisms of renal impairment in renal diseases. PMID:24925724

  17. Mineral metabolites and CKD progression in African Americans.

    PubMed

    Scialla, Julia J; Astor, Brad C; Isakova, Tamara; Xie, Huiliang; Appel, Lawrence J; Wolf, Myles

    2013-01-01

    CKD progresses more rapidly to ESRD among African Americans compared with Caucasians. Disordered mineral metabolism is more severe among African Americans with CKD, which might partially explain the accelerated progression of their kidney disease. Here, using data from the African American Study of Kidney Disease and Hypertension, we evaluated longitudinal changes in serum levels of fibroblast growth factor-23 (FGF23), parathyroid hormone (PTH), phosphate, and 25-hydroxyvitamin D in a subset of 420 participants followed for a median of 4 years. We also examined the association of baseline levels of mineral metabolites with risk for ESRD or death in 809 participants. FGF23, PTH, and phosphate levels rose over time; participants with faster rates of decline in measured GFR had the greatest increases in these parameters (P<0.01 for each). Higher baseline levels of FGF23, PTH, and phosphate each associated with increased risk for ESRD or death independent of GFR. FGF23 exhibited a dose-response relationship with outcomes (HR=1.30 per doubling, 95% CI=1.15-1.47; HR=2.24 for highest compared with lowest quartile, 95% CI=1.39-3.60), whereas PTH and phosphate showed nonlinear relationships. Vitamin D insufficiency (<30 ng/ml) was present in 95% of participants, but lower levels did not independently associate with outcomes. Using death-censored ESRD as the outcome produced qualitatively similar results. In conclusion, abnormalities of mineral metabolism worsen with progressive CKD and associate with higher risk for ESRD among African Americans with hypertensive nephrosclerosis.

  18. High Dietary Acid Load Predicts ESRD among Adults with CKD

    PubMed Central

    Crews, Deidra C.; Wesson, Donald E.; Tilea, Anca M.; Saran, Rajiv; Ríos-Burrows, Nilka; Williams, Desmond E.; Powe, Neil R.

    2015-01-01

    Small clinical trials have shown that a reduction in dietary acid load (DAL) improves kidney injury and slows kidney function decline; however, the relationship between DAL and risk of ESRD in a population-based cohort with CKD remains unexamined. We examined the association between DAL, quantified by net acid excretion (NAEes), and progression to ESRD in a nationally representative sample of adults in the United States. Among 1486 adults with CKD age≥20 years enrolled in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey III, DAL was determined by 24-h dietary recall questionnaire. The development of ESRD was ascertained over a median 14.2 years of follow-up through linkage with the Medicare ESRD Registry. We used the Fine–Gray competing risks method to estimate the association of high, medium, and low DAL with ESRD after adjusting for demographics, nutritional factors, clinical factors, and kidney function/damage markers and accounting for intervening mortality events. In total, 311 (20.9%) participants developed ESRD. Higher levels of DAL were associated with increased risk of ESRD; relative hazards (95% confidence interval) were 3.04 (1.58 to 5.86) for the highest tertile and 1.81 (0.89 to 3.68) for the middle tertile compared with the lowest tertile in the fully adjusted model. The risk of ESRD associated with DAL tertiles increased as eGFR decreased (P trend=0.001). Among participants with albuminuria, high DAL was strongly associated with ESRD risk (P trend=0.03). In conclusion, high DAL in persons with CKD is independently associated with increased risk of ESRD in a nationally representative population. PMID:25677388

  19. High Dietary Acid Load Predicts ESRD among Adults with CKD.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Tanushree; Crews, Deidra C; Wesson, Donald E; Tilea, Anca M; Saran, Rajiv; Ríos-Burrows, Nilka; Williams, Desmond E; Powe, Neil R

    2015-07-01

    Small clinical trials have shown that a reduction in dietary acid load (DAL) improves kidney injury and slows kidney function decline; however, the relationship between DAL and risk of ESRD in a population-based cohort with CKD remains unexamined. We examined the association between DAL, quantified by net acid excretion (NAEes), and progression to ESRD in a nationally representative sample of adults in the United States. Among 1486 adults with CKD age≥20 years enrolled in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey III, DAL was determined by 24-h dietary recall questionnaire. The development of ESRD was ascertained over a median 14.2 years of follow-up through linkage with the Medicare ESRD Registry. We used the Fine-Gray competing risks method to estimate the association of high, medium, and low DAL with ESRD after adjusting for demographics, nutritional factors, clinical factors, and kidney function/damage markers and accounting for intervening mortality events. In total, 311 (20.9%) participants developed ESRD. Higher levels of DAL were associated with increased risk of ESRD; relative hazards (95% confidence interval) were 3.04 (1.58 to 5.86) for the highest tertile and 1.81 (0.89 to 3.68) for the middle tertile compared with the lowest tertile in the fully adjusted model. The risk of ESRD associated with DAL tertiles increased as eGFR decreased (P trend=0.001). Among participants with albuminuria, high DAL was strongly associated with ESRD risk (P trend=0.03). In conclusion, high DAL in persons with CKD is independently associated with increased risk of ESRD in a nationally representative population.

  20. Brain metastasis reirradiation in patients with advanced breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Zhou; Sun, Bing; Shen, Ge; Cha, Lei; Meng, Xiangying; Wang, Junliang; Zhou, Zhenshan; Wu, Shikai

    2017-01-01

    The outcome of recurrent brain metastasis is dismal. This study aims to assess the clinical outcomes and toxicity of reirradiation as a salvage treatment for progressive brain metastasis in patients with advanced breast cancer. Between July 2005 and September 2014, the medical records of 56 patients with brain metastasis from breast cancer were retrospectively reviewed. Of these patients, 39 received whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT) followed by stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) reirradiation (Group 1), and 17 received SRS followed by WBRT reirradiation (Group 2). Overall survival (OS) and brain progression-free survival rates/times were calculated using the Kaplan–Meier method. Prognostic factors were evaluated using the Cox proportional hazards model. Change in neurologic function was also assessed. The median OS was 10.8 months (range, 1.3–56.8 months). In Group 1, the median PFS time (PFS-1) was 6.5 months and the OS time was 11.4 months. Multivariate analysis revealed that longer OS was significantly associated with a high Karnofsky performance score (KPS) (P = 0.004), controlled extracranial metastasis (P = 0.001) and a good response to reirradiation (P = 0.034). In Group 2, the median PFS time (PFS-2) after reirradiation was 8.5 months and the OS time was 10.8 months. Multivariate analysis revealed that longer OS was significantly associated with a high KPS (P = 0.018). The majority of the patients had improved or stable neurological function. Reirradiation is an effective and a safe treatment for patients with brain metastases from breast cancer. It might delay the progression of intracranial disease and improve neurological function. A suitable patient selection for reirradiation was suggested. PMID:27707842

  1. Outcomes of Elderly Patients after Predialysis Vascular Access Creation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Timmy; Thamer, Mae; Zhang, Yi; Zhang, Qian; Allon, Michael

    2015-12-01

    Uniform vascular access guidelines for elderly patients may be inappropriate because of the competing risk of death, high rate of arteriovenous fistula (AVF) maturation failure, and poor vascular access outcomes in this population. However, the outcomes in elderly patients with advanced CKD who receive permanent vascular access before dialysis initiation are unclear. We identified a large nationally representative cohort of 3418 elderly patients (aged ≥ 70 years) with CKD undergoing predialysis AVF or arteriovenous graft (AVG) creation from 2004 to 2009, and assessed the frequencies of dialysis initiation, death before dialysis initiation, and dialysis-free survival for 2 years after vascular access creation. In all, 67% of patients with predialysis AVF and 71% of patients with predialysis AVG creation initiated dialysis within 2 years of access placement, but the overall risk of dialysis initiation was modified by patient age and race. Only one half of patients initiated dialysis with a functioning AVF or AVG; 46.8% of AVFs were created <90 days before dialysis initiation. Catheter dependence at dialysis initiation was more common in patients receiving predialysis AVF than in patients receiving AVG (46.0% versus 28.5%; P<0.001). In conclusion, most elderly patients with advanced CKD who received predialysis vascular access creation initiated dialysis within 2 years. As a consequence of late predialysis placement or maturation failure, almost one half of patients receiving AVFs initiated dialysis with a catheter. Insertion of an AVG closer to dialysis initiation may serve as a "catheter-sparing" approach and allow delay of permanent access placement in selected elderly patients with CKD.

  2. Outcomes of Elderly Patients after Predialysis Vascular Access Creation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Timmy; Thamer, Mae; Zhang, Yi; Zhang, Qian

    2015-01-01

    Uniform vascular access guidelines for elderly patients may be inappropriate because of the competing risk of death, high rate of arteriovenous fistula (AVF) maturation failure, and poor vascular access outcomes in this population. However, the outcomes in elderly patients with advanced CKD who receive permanent vascular access before dialysis initiation are unclear. We identified a large nationally representative cohort of 3418 elderly patients (aged ≥70 years) with CKD undergoing predialysis AVF or arteriovenous graft (AVG) creation from 2004 to 2009, and assessed the frequencies of dialysis initiation, death before dialysis initiation, and dialysis-free survival for 2 years after vascular access creation. In all, 67% of patients with predialysis AVF and 71% of patients with predialysis AVG creation initiated dialysis within 2 years of access placement, but the overall risk of dialysis initiation was modified by patient age and race. Only one half of patients initiated dialysis with a functioning AVF or AVG; 46.8% of AVFs were created <90 days before dialysis initiation. Catheter dependence at dialysis initiation was more common in patients receiving predialysis AVF than in patients receiving AVG (46.0% versus 28.5%; P<0.001). In conclusion, most elderly patients with advanced CKD who received predialysis vascular access creation initiated dialysis within 2 years. As a consequence of late predialysis placement or maturation failure, almost one half of patients receiving AVFs initiated dialysis with a catheter. Insertion of an AVG closer to dialysis initiation may serve as a “catheter-sparing” approach and allow delay of permanent access placement in selected elderly patients with CKD. PMID:25855782

  3. Sexual Advances by Patients in Dental Practice: Implications for the Dental and Dental Hygiene Curricula.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chiodo, Gary T.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    A survey of Oregon dentists (n=248) and dental hygienists (n=235) investigated frequency of patient-initiated sexual advances and methods of dealing with them. Up to 44 percent experienced 1 or more patient verbal advances, and 23 percent experienced physical advances during a 5-year period. Inclusion of related issues in professional curricula is…

  4. Gastrointestinal Inhibition of Sodium-Hydrogen Exchanger 3 Reduces Phosphorus Absorption and Protects against Vascular Calcification in CKD.

    PubMed

    Labonté, Eric D; Carreras, Christopher W; Leadbetter, Michael R; Kozuka, Kenji; Kohler, Jill; Koo-McCoy, Samantha; He, Limin; Dy, Edward; Black, Deborah; Zhong, Ziyang; Langsetmo, Ingrid; Spencer, Andrew G; Bell, Noah; Deshpande, Desiree; Navre, Marc; Lewis, Jason G; Jacobs, Jeffrey W; Charmot, Dominique

    2015-05-01

    In CKD, phosphate retention arising from diminished GFR is a key early step in a pathologic cascade leading to hyperthyroidism, metabolic bone disease, vascular calcification, and cardiovascular mortality. Tenapanor, a minimally systemically available inhibitor of the intestinal sodium-hydrogen exchanger 3, is being evaluated in clinical trials for its potential to (1) lower gastrointestinal sodium absorption, (2) improve fluid overload-related symptoms, such as hypertension and proteinuria, in patients with CKD, and (3) reduce interdialytic weight gain and intradialytic hypotension in ESRD. Here, we report the effects of tenapanor on dietary phosphorous absorption. Oral administration of tenapanor or other intestinal sodium-hydrogen exchanger 3 inhibitors increased fecal phosphorus, decreased urine phosphorus excretion, and reduced [(33)P]orthophosphate uptake in rats. In a rat model of CKD and vascular calcification, tenapanor reduced sodium and phosphorus absorption and significantly decreased ectopic calcification, serum creatinine and serum phosphorus levels, circulating phosphaturic hormone fibroblast growth factor-23 levels, and heart mass. These results indicate that tenapanor is an effective inhibitor of dietary phosphorus absorption and suggest a new approach to phosphate management in renal disease and associated mineral disorders.

  5. Audit-based education lowers systolic blood pressure in chronic kidney disease: the Quality Improvement in CKD (QICKD) trial results

    PubMed Central

    de Lusignana, Simon; Gallagher, Hugh; Jones, Simon; Chan, Tom; van Vlymen, Jeremy; Tahir, Aumran; Thomas, Nicola; Jain, Neerja; Dmitrieva, Olga; Rafi, Imran; McGovern, Andrew; Harris, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    Strict control of systolic blood pressure is known to slow progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD). Here we compared audit-based education (ABE) to guidelines and prompts or usual practice in lowering systolic blood pressure in people with CKD. This 2-year cluster randomized trial included 93 volunteer general practices randomized into three arms with 30 ABE practices, 32 with guidelines and prompts, and 31 usual practices. An intervention effect on the primary outcome, systolic blood pressure, was calculated using a multilevel model to predict changes after the intervention. The prevalence of CKD was 7.29% (41,183 of 565,016 patients) with all cardiovascular comorbidities more common in those with CKD. Our models showed that the systolic blood pressure was significantly lowered by 2.41 mm Hg (CI 0.59–4.29 mm Hg), in the ABE practices with an odds ratio of achieving at least a 5 mm Hg reduction in systolic blood pressure of 1.24 (CI 1.05–1.45). Practices exposed to guidelines and prompts produced no significant change compared to usual practice. Male gender, ABE, ischemic heart disease, and congestive heart failure were independently associated with a greater lowering of systolic blood pressure but the converse applied to hypertension and age over 75 years. There were no reports of harm. Thus, individuals receiving ABE are more likely to achieve a lower blood pressure than those receiving only usual practice. The findings should be interpreted with caution due to the wide confidence intervals. PMID:23536132

  6. Why does the treatment of anaemia not improve cardiac outcomes in CKD?

    PubMed

    Parfrey, Patrick S

    2013-01-01

    Anaemia is an independent predictor of adverse outcomes in chronic kidney disease (CKD). Randomized trials using erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs) in patients with severe anaemia (baseline haemoglobin level <100 g/l) have been small, and the hypothesis that partial correction of severe anaemia may prevent cardiovascular events is tenable but unproven. Results from randomized trials of moderate anaemia correction with ESAs do not support the hypothesis that moderate anaemia is a cardiovascular risk factor. This Perspectives article discusses the idea that this finding may have been a result of the inadequate design of trials, co-intervention with high doses of ESAs or intravenous iron hiding a beneficial effect. Another idea is also discussed-that moderate anaemia is a marker of the degree of renal impairment and that its association with cardiovascular disease merely signifies that other factors are present that are pathogenic to the heart and associated with both kidney impairment and anaemia.

  7. Immunotherapy for patients with advanced pancreatic carcinoma: a promising treatment

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jing; Lian, Zhouyang; Liang, Long; Chen, Wenbo; Luo, Xiaoning; Pei, Shufang; Mo, Xiaokai; Zhang, Lu; Huang, Wenhui; Ouyang, Fusheng; Guo, Baoliang; Liang, Changhong; Zhang, Shuixing

    2017-01-01

    There are limited data on the safety and efficacy of immunotherapy for patients with advanced pancreatic cancer (APC). A meta-analysis of single-arm trials is proposed to assess the efficacy and safety of immunotherapy for APC. Eighteen relevant studies involving 527 patients were identified. The pooled disease control rate (DCR), overall survival (OS), progression free survival (PFS), and 1-year survival rate were estimated as 59.32%, 7.90 months, 4.25 months, and 30.12%, respectively. Subgroup analysis showed that the pooled OS, PFS, and 1-year survival rate were significantly higher for autologous activated lymphocyte therapy compared with peptide-based vaccine therapy (OS: 8.28 months vs. 7.40 months; PFS: 6.04 months vs. 3.86 months; 1-year survival rate: 37.17% vs. 19.74%). Another subgroup analysis demonstrated that the pooled endpoints were estimated as obviously higher for immunotherapy plus chemotherapy compared with immunotherapy alone (DCR: 62.51% vs. 47.63%; OS: 8.67 months vs. 4.91 months; PFS: 4.91 months vs. 3.34 months; 1-year survival rate: 32.32% vs. 21.43%). Of the included trials, seven trials reported no treatment related adverse events , five trials reported (16.6 3.9) % grade 3 adverse events and no grade 4 adverse events. In conclusion, immunotherapy is safe and effective in the treatment of APC. PMID:27992378

  8. The changing hope trajectory in patients with advanced-stage cancer: a nursing perspective.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Judith Brown; Seda, Julie S; Kardinal, Carl G

    2012-06-01

    As patients with advanced-stage cancer move from the initial diagnosis through treatment, remission, recurrence, and advanced-stage disease, the hope trajectory undergoes a dynamic transformation. By identifying the hope trajectory, nurses can help patients focus on obtainable hope objects while balancing the need to present a realistic prognosis. This, in turn, may help patients find meaning and purpose in advanced-stage cancer and facilitate realistic hope when faced with a life-threatening illness.

  9. Association of Cardiac Troponin T With Left Ventricular Structure and Function in CKD

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Rakesh K.; Li, Yongmei; DeFilippi, Christopher; Fischer, Michael J.; Yang, Wei; Keane, Martin; Chen, Jing; He, Jiang; Kallem, Radhakrishna; Horwitz, Ed; Rafey, Mohammad; Raj, Dominic S.; Go, Alan S.; Shlipak, Michael G.

    2013-01-01

    Background Serum cardiac troponin T (cTnT) is associated with increased risk of heart failure and cardiovascular death in several population settings. We evaluated associations of cTnT with cardiac structural and functional abnormalities in a cohort of chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients without heart failure. Study Design Cross-sectional. Setting & Participants Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC; N= 3,243) Predictor The primary predictor was cTnT. Secondary predictors included demographic and clinical characteristics, hemoglobin level, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, and estimated glomerular filtration rate using cystatin C. Outcomes Echocardiography was used to determine left ventricular (LV) mass and LV systolic and diastolic function. Measurements Circulating cTnT was measured in stored sera using the highly sensitive assay. Logistic and linear regression models were used to examine associations of cTnT with each echocardiographic outcome. Results cTnT was detectable in 2,735 (84%) persons; the median was 13.3 (IQR, 7.7–23.8) pg/mL. Compared with undetectable cTnT (<3.0 pg/mL), the highest quartile (23.9 – 738.7 pg/mL) was associated with approximately two times as likely to experience LV hypertrophy (OR, 2.43; 95% CI, 1.44–4.09) in the fully adjusted model. cTnT had a more modest association with LV systolic dysfunction; as a log-linear variable, a significant association was present in the fully adjusted model (OR of 1.4 [95% CI, 1.1–1.7] per 1-log unit; p<0.01). There was no significant independent association between cTnT and LV diastolic dysfunction. When evaluated as a screening test, cTnT functioned only modestly for LV hypertrophy and concentric hypertrophy detection (area under the curve, 0.64 for both) with weaker areas under the curve for the other outcomes. Limitations The presence of coronary artery disease was not formally assessed using either noninvasive or angiographic techniques in this study. Conclusions In this large CKD

  10. Antiplatelet agents and anticoagulants in patients with chronic kidney disease - from pathophysiology to clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Lutz, Jens; Jurk, Kerstin

    2016-12-05

    Progressive impairment of renal function can lead to uremia, which is associated with thus increasing the risk of bleeding as well as thrombosis. Furthermore, many patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) have an indication for an anticoagulation or antiplatelet therapy due to atrial fibrillation, coronary artery disease, thromboembolic disease, or peripheral artery disease. The treatment usually includes vitamin-K antagonists (VKAs) and/or platelet aggregation inhibitors. The direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) inhibiting factor Xa or thrombin activity represent an alternative for heparins and VKAs. However, DOACs can further aggravate the bleeding risk in CKD patients. This is related to a combination of an accumulation of the substance due to the reduced renal clearance, an inhibition of thrombin-mediated platelet activation, and uremia associated factors such as impaired coagulation, platelet function, and platelet-vessel wall. Furthermore, platelet aggregation inhibitors can also influence the bleeding risk, particularly if they are administered in combination with anticoagulants in patients with advanced CKD. In this review we discuss the different mechanisms leading to the increased risk of bleeding and thrombosis as well as the different options and problems related to an antiplatelet or anticoagulation therapy in CKD patients.

  11. Sevelamer Versus Calcium-Based Binders for Treatment of Hyperphosphatemia in CKD: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Leena; Bernard, Lisa M.

    2016-01-01

    Background and objectives People with CKD stages 3–5 and on dialysis (5D) have dramatically increased mortality, which has been associated with hyperphosphatemia in many studies. Oral phosphate binders are commonly prescribed to lower serum phosphate. We conducted an updated meta-analysis of the noncalcium–based binder (non-CBB) sevelamer versus CBBs in CKD stages 3–5D. Design, setting, participants, & measurements Randomized, controlled trials comparing sevelamer with CBBs were identified through MEDLINE and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials. Patient-level outcomes included all-cause mortality, cardiovascular events and mortality, hospitalization, and adverse effects. Intermediate outcomes included vascular calcification and bone changes. Biochemical outcomes included serum phosphate, calcium, parathyroid hormone, lipids, and hypercalcemia. We conducted and reported this review according to Cochrane guidelines. Results We included 25 studies to March 31, 2015 with 4770 participants (88% on hemodialysis). Patients receiving sevelamer had lower all–cause mortality (risk ratio [RR], 0.54; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 0.32 to 0.93), no statistically significant difference in cardiovascular mortality (n=2712; RR, 0.33; 95% CI, 0.07 to 1.64), and an increase in combined gastrointestinal events of borderline statistical significance (n=384; RR, 1.42; 95% CI, 0.97 to 2.08). For biochemical outcomes, patients receiving sevelamer had lower total serum cholesterol (mean difference [MD], −20.2 mg/dl; 95% CI, −25.9 to −14.5 mg/dl), LDL-cholesterol (MD, −21.6 mg/dl; 95% CI, −27.9 to −15.4 mg/dl), and calcium (MD, −0.4 mg/dl; 95% CI, −0.6 to −0.2 mg/dl) and a reduced risk of hypercalcemia (RR, 0.30; 95% CI, 0.19 to 0.48). End of treatment intact parathyroid hormone was significantly higher for sevelamer (MD, 32.9 pg/ml; 95% CI, 0.1 to 65.7 pg/ml). Serum phosphate values showed no significant differences. Conclusions Patients with

  12. Clinical and Practical Use of Calcimimetics in Dialysis Patients With Secondary Hyperparathyroidism

    PubMed Central

    Ureña, Pablo; Ruiz-García, César; daSilva, Iara; Lescano, Patricia; del Carpio, Jacqueline; Ballarín, José; Cozzolino, Mario

    2016-01-01

    CKD and CKD-related mineral and bone disorders (CKD-MBDs) are associated with high cardiovascular and mortality risks. In randomized clinical trials (RCTs), no single drug intervention has been shown to reduce the high mortality risk in dialysis patients, but several robust secondary analyses point toward important potential beneficial effects of controlling CKD-MBD–related factors and secondary hyperparathyroidism. The advent of cinacalcet, which has a unique mode of action at the calcium-sensing receptor, represented an important step forward in controlling CKD-MBD. In addition, new RCTs have conclusively shown that cinacalcet improves achievement of target levels for all of the metabolic abnormalities associated with CKD-MBD and may also attenuate the progression of vascular and valvular calcifications in dialysis patients. However, a final conclusion on the effect of cinacalcet on hard outcomes remains elusive. Tolerance of cinacalcet is limited by frequent secondary side effects such as nausea, vomiting, hypocalcemia and oversuppression of parathyroid hormone, which may cause some management difficulties, especially for those lacking experience with the drug. Against this background, this review aims to summarize the results of studies on cinacalcet, up to and including the publication of the recent ADVANCE and EVOLVE RCTs, as well as recent post hoc analyses, and to offer practical guidance on how to improve the clinical management of the most frequent adverse events associated with cinacalcet, based on both currently available information and personal experience. In addition, attention is drawn to less common secondary effects of cinacalcet treatment and advisable precautions. PMID:26224878

  13. Distinguishing Symptoms of Grief and Depression in a Cohort of Advanced Cancer Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobsen, Juliet C.; Zhang, Baohui; Block, Susan D.; Maciejewski, Paul K.; Prigerson, Holly G.

    2010-01-01

    Several studies have shown that the symptoms of grief are different from symptoms of depression among bereaved family members. This study is an attempt to replicate this finding among advanced cancer patients and examine clinical correlates of patient grief and depression. Analyses were conducted on data from interviews with 123 advanced cancer…

  14. Evaluation of Instrumental Activities of Daily Living in Greek Patients with Advanced Cancer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mystakidou, Kyriaki; Parpa, Efi; Tsilika, Eleni; Panagiotoua, Irene; Roumeliotou, Anna; Symeonidi, Matina; Galanos, Antonis; Kouvaris, Ioannis

    2013-01-01

    Translation of the instrumental activities of daily living (IADL) was carried out and its psychometric properties were assessed in a Greek sample of patients with advanced cancer. The scale was translated with the forward-backward procedure into the Greek language. It was initially administered to 136 advanced cancer patients. To assess…

  15. Report on the Workshop and Regular Meeting of the Imode-CKD and Bcmolmed Marie Curie Training and Research Programs.

    PubMed

    Krochmal, Magdalena; Cisek, Katryna; Markoska, Katerina; Spasovski, Goce; Vlahou, Antonia

    2015-01-01

    A Workshop and Regular Meeting of the Marie Curie Training and Research Programs iMODECKD (Identification of the Molecular Determinants of established Chronic Kidney Disease) and BCMolMed (Molecular Medicine for Bladder Cancer) was held from 20-22 March at the Macedonian Academy of Science and Arts (MASA). The meeting was hosted by the participating center University of Skopje (SKO) - Goce Spasovski and MASA - Momir Polenakovic (R. Macedonia). The representative from MASA proteomic research center - Katerina Davalieva (R. Macedonia) had presentation on proteomic research in prostate cancer (PCa). 40 researchers from 13 different countries participated at the meeting. The Workshop was devoted on "Chronic Kidney Disease: Clinical Management issues", and consisted of 15 oral presentations given by nephrologists and experts in the field of CKD. Raymond Vanholder (Belgium) - past president of ERA-EDTA had a keynote lecture on "CKD: Questions that need to be answered and are not (or at least not entirely)". The workshop continued in four sessions with lectures from Alberto Ortiz (Spain), Olivera Stojceva-Taneva (R. Macedonia), Dimitrios Goumenos (Greece), Joachim Beige (Germany), Marian Klinger (Poland), Goce Spasovski (R. Macedonia), Joachim Jankowski (Germany), Adalbert Schiller (Romania), Robert Johnson (USA), Franco Ferrario (Italy), Ivan Rychlik (Czech Republic), Fulvio Magni (Italy) and Giovambattista Capasso (Italy), all covering a training theme. Within the meeting there were two lectures on complimentary skills for ethics in science and career advancement from two principal investigators - Goce Spasovski (R. Macedonia) and Joost Schanstra (France). During the Regular Meeting, 13 PhD students i.e. Early Stage Researchers and one Experienced Researcher from both Programs presented their work and progress within iMODE-CKD and BCMolMed projects. This meeting was a great opportunity to exchange experience and ideas in the field of systems biology approaches and

  16. Caring for older cancer patients: practical decision-making guidelines with a focus on advance directives.

    PubMed

    Sachs, G A

    1992-02-01

    There are no simple solutions to difficult ethical problems. Advance directives, however, offer a way to help prevent ethical dilemmas from occurring in the care of older cancer patients. Studies show that there is overwhelming support from both older patients and physicians for advance treatment planning through the use of living wills, durable powers of attorney for health care, and less formal means. Despite this support, few physicians and patients discuss advance directives. This paper discusses potential barriers to this dialogue and suggests specific ways to incorporate advance directive into routine cancer care of older patients. The Patient Self-Determination Act of 1990 represents additional pressure from society on the medical profession to carry out advance directive discussions.

  17. Phosphate May Promote CKD Progression and Attenuate Renoprotective Effect of ACE Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Ruggenenti, Piero; Perna, Annalisa; Leonardis, Daniela; Tripepi, Rocco; Tripepi, Giovanni; Mallamaci, Francesca; Remuzzi, Giuseppe

    2011-01-01

    Phosphate may promote the onset and progression of chronic nephropathies. Here we evaluated the relationships between baseline serum phosphate levels, disease progression, and response to ACE inhibition in 331 patients with proteinuric nephropathies in the prospective Ramipril Efficacy In Nephropathy (REIN) trial. Independent of treatment, patients with phosphate levels in the highest two quartiles progressed significantly faster either to ESRD or to a composite endpoint of doubling of serum creatinine or ESRD compared with patients with phosphate levels below the median (P < 0.001). Results were similar when we analyzed phosphate as a continuous variable (P ≤ 0.004). The renoprotective effect of ramipril decreased as serum phosphate increased (P ≤ 0.008 for interaction); this modification of the treatment effect by phosphate persisted despite adjusting for potential confounders such as GFR and urinary protein. In summary, these data suggest that phosphate is an independent risk factor for progression of renal disease among patients with proteinuric CKD, and high levels of phosphate may even attenuate the renoprotective effect of ACE inhibitors. Future trials should test whether reducing serum phosphate improves renal outcomes and optimizes the renoprotective effect of ACE inhibition. PMID:21852581

  18. The Ontario Prehospital Advanced Life Support (OPALS) Study: rationale and methodology for cardiac arrest patients.

    PubMed

    Stiell, I G; Wells, G A; Spaite, D W; Lyver, M B; Munkley, D P; Field, B J; Dagnone, E; Maloney, J P; Jones, G R; Luinstra, L G; Jermyn, B D; Ward, R; DeMaio, V J

    1998-08-01

    The Ontario Prehospital Advanced Life Support Study represents the largest prehospital study yet conducted, worldwide. This study will involve more than 25,000 cardiac arrest, trauma, and critically ill patients over an 8-year period. The study will evaluate the incremental benefit of rapid defibrillation and prehospital Advanced Cardiac Life Support measures for cardiac arrest survival and the benefit of Advanced Life Support for patients with traumatic injuries and other critically ill prehospital patients. This article describes the OPALS study with regard to the rationale and methodology for cardiac arrest patients.

  19. SSA 02-4 DISPARITIES IN HYPERTENSION MANAGEMENT OF CKD IN SOUTH ASIA.

    PubMed

    Jafar, Tazeen

    2016-09-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) defined as reduced estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) or presence of albuminuria, progresses to end stage renal disease (ESRD), needing dialysis or kidney transplant to sustain life, and is associated with increased risks of premature cardiovascular disease (CVD) and mortality. CKD ranked 18 leading (and most rapidly rising cause of mortality by the Global Burden of Disease Study 2010. The social and economic consequences of CKD are far worse in low and middle income countries (LMICs) including India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, and Sri Lanka.Accoriding to successive estimates of the World Health Organization, countries in South Asia have been experiencing a progressive rise in the burden of non-communicable diseases (NCD) one facet of which is CKD. About 1 in 5 adults older aged 30 years suffer from CKD South Asia. Although national level estimates are not available, a recent meta-analysis indicated prevalence of CKD is 7.7% in South Asia based on eGFR <60 ml/min/1.73 m. However, evidence to inform CKD prevention and management programs is scarce.Hypertension and diabetes are the most important risk factors for CKD in South Asia: 1 in 3 adults has hypertension. In addition, more than 70 million people had diabetes in 2010, and this number is expected to rise to 100 million by 2030. Both high blood pressure and diabetes are common even during chilldhood. The age of onset of CKD is also younger in South Asians than noted in studies in Western populations. This is unsurprising as low birth weight and prematurity, both in part due to maternal malnutrition are common in India, and predispose to insulin resistance and CKD. Rates of progression of CKD to ESRD have been shown to be faster in people of South Asian origin than white counterparts. However, less than 10% with ESRD are able to afford RRT (annual cost US $5000) in India. The impact of lives lost due to ESRD or premature CVD are far more grave in India where majority of the

  20. Natural history and clinical characteristics of CKD in type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Sally M

    2014-05-01

    The nature of CKD in diabetes is changing. Diabetic glomerulosclerosis remains the cause of CKD in most type 1 diabetic individuals. However, the rate of progression of diabetic nephropathy has slowed because of improving glucose and blood pressure control. Most individuals with type 2 diabetes and 5% to 30% of those with type 1 diabetes with progressive CKD have normal urine albumin excretion or low-level microalbuminuria (albumin-to-creatinine ratio approximately <100 mg/g), which does not progress despite the decline in glomerular filtration. People with progressive CKD but normal albuminuria have predominantly interstitial or vascular changes with much less glomerular changes. It seems likely that these histological abnormalities relate to blood pressure, aging, obesity, and intrarenal vascular disease. Initial studies suggested that 85% to 100% of diabetic individuals with microalbuminuria (Kidney Disease Improving Global Outcomes [KDIGO] CKD albuminuria A2) progressed to proteinuria (KDIGO CKD albuminuria A3). Recent data demonstrate that even after 2 to 3 years of persistent microalbuminuria, most will revert to normal albumin excretion (KDIGO CKD albuminuria A1). Regression is more likely at lower levels of microalbuminuria and with improved glucose, blood pressure, and lipid control. Thus, low levels of microalbuminuria cannot be considered as established diabetic nephropathy.

  1. Pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics and safety of CKD-519, a CETP inhibitor, in healthy subjects

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Choon Ok; Oh, Eun Sil; Choi, Chungam; Kim, Yeonjoo; Lee, Sera; Kim, Semi; Park, Min Soo

    2016-01-01

    CKD-519 is a selective and potent cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) inhibitor being developed for the treatment of dyslipidemia to raise high-density lipoprotein cholesterol. We investigated the safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics of single doses of CKD-519 in healthy adult subjects. A randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled, single ascending dose study was performed. Eight healthy subjects were enrolled in each CKD-519 dose group (25, 50, 100, 200, or 400 mg) and randomized to CKD-519 (n=6) or matching placebo (n=2). CKD-519 reached the maximum plasma concentration (Cmax) at 5–6 h post-dose, and had a long terminal half-life ranging between 40–70 h. The area under the plasma concentration–time curve (AUC) and Cmax increased with the dose, however, Cmax and AUC normalized by dose decreased with each incremental dose. CETP activity decreased with dose, and the maximum decrease (63%–83%) was observed at 6–8 h post-dose. A sigmoid Emax model best described the relationship between CKD-519 plasma concentrations and CETP activity with an EC50 of 17.3 ng/mL. Overall, 11 adverse events (AEs) were observed. All AEs were mild or moderate in intensity, and resolved without any complications. There were no clinically significant effects on blood pressure. In conclusion, single doses of CKD-519 up to 400 mg were well tolerated and showed potent inhibition of CETP activity. PMID:27895466

  2. Patient education for phosphorus management in chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: This review explores the challenges and solutions in educating patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) to lower serum phosphorus while avoiding protein insufficiency and hypercalcemia. Methods: A literature search including terms “hyperphosphatemia,” “patient education,” “food fatigue,” “hypercalcemia,” and “phosphorus–protein ratio” was undertaken using PubMed. Results: Hyperphosphatemia is a strong predictor of mortality in advanced CKD and is remediated via diet, phosphorus binders, and dialysis. Dietary counseling should encourage the consumption of foods with the least amount of inorganic or absorbable phosphorus, low phosphorus-to-protein ratios, and adequate protein content, and discourage excessive calcium intake in high-risk patients. Emerging educational initiatives include food labeling using a “traffic light” scheme, motivational interviewing techniques, and the Phosphate Education Program – whereby patients no longer have to memorize the phosphorus content of each individual food component, but only a “phosphorus unit” value for a limited number of food groups. Phosphorus binders are associated with a clear survival advantage in CKD patients, overcome the limitations associated with dietary phosphorus restriction, and permit a more flexible approach to achieving normalization of phosphorus levels. Conclusion: Patient education on phosphorus and calcium management can improve concordance and adherence and empower patients to collaborate actively for optimal control of mineral metabolism. PMID:23667310

  3. An analysis of media coverage on the prevention and early detection of CKD in Australia.

    PubMed

    Tong, Allison; Chapman, Simon; Sainsbury, Peter; Craig, Jonathan C

    2008-07-01

    News media raise public awareness about health and can influence public policy agenda. Recently, nephrologists have sought to make prevention and early detection of chronic kidney disease (CKD) a health care priority. We assessed the extent and manner in which Australian television news and newspapers cover CKD prevention or early detection. Electronic news databases for print media and television programs were searched (May 2005 to March 2007) for items referring to CKD prevention or early detection. We analyzed all relevant items for spokespeople, main news frame, focus of responsibility, proposed solutions, and trigger/reason for publication. Of 2,439 newspaper articles and 10,430 television broadcasts retrieved, only 214 articles (8.77%) and 7 broadcasts (0.06%) were eligible. Kidney transplantation dominated CKD-related news. Lay person or high-profile advocates were virtually absent. Risks of cardiovascular disease and mortality conferred by CKD were not emphasized by news reports; instead, CKD received peripheral mention as a secondary consequence of diabetes or obesity. Few reports cited the economic consequences of CKD. The media focused on lifestyle causes and solutions, whereas nonlifestyle causes and screening and prevention strategies were rarely mentioned. Kidney health professionals need to actively engage with the media in efforts to amplify desired messages on CKD prevention or early detection. Medical journals, research institutions, universities, hospitals, and advocacy groups should issue press releases that highlight newsworthy aspects of this topic. Extending news media coverage can help exert an influence on health policies and agenda setting and increase public awareness to improve prevention and early detection of CKD.

  4. Quality nursing care for hospitalized patients with advanced illness: concept development.

    PubMed

    Izumi, Shigeko; Baggs, Judith G; Knafl, Kathleen A

    2010-08-01

    The quality of nursing care as perceived by hospitalized patients with advanced illness has not been examined. A concept of quality nursing care for this population was developed by integrating the literature on constructs defining quality nursing care with empirical findings from interviews of 16 patients with advanced illness. Quality nursing care was characterized as competence and personal caring supported by professionalism and delivered with an appropriate demeanor. Although the attributes of competence, caring, professionalism, and demeanor were identified as common components of quality care across various patient populations, the caring domain increased in importance when patients with advanced illness perceived themselves as vulnerable. Assessment of quality nursing care for patients with advanced illness needs to include measures of patient perceptions of vulnerability.

  5. A quality improvement project to improve the effectiveness and patient-centredness of management of people with mild-to-moderate kidney disease in primary care.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Nicola; Gallagher, Hugh; Jain, Neerja

    2014-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) stages 3 to 5, affects 6-7% of the adult population and is an important risk factor for both advanced kidney disease and cardiovascular disease. This paper describes a quality improvement project that aimed to establish consistent implementation of best practice in people with stage 3-5 kidney disease who were managed in primary care. The intervention was a Care Bundle for CKD. The bundle included three evidence-based, high impact interventions based on National Institute for Care Excellence (NICE, 2008) guidance, with an additional and novel self-management element. 29 GP Practices in England and Wales began the study. They undertook training in clinical management of CKD and in facilitation of self-management, with the self-management content designed and led by patients. Practices were asked to report baseline and then monthly outcome data extracted from practice computer systems. The project team provided implementation and ongoing quality improvement support for participating Practices. Ten Practices dropped out of the study following the training. Data submissions were incomplete in six Practices who continued to apply the care bundle. At the project end, a decision was taken by the study team to perform the final analysis on those thirteen Practices which completed the project and submitted at least six sets of monthly Practice-level outcome data. In these Practices the Care Bundle was applied to under 20% of the registered CKD stage 3 to 5 population in 5 Practices, 20-29% in 3 Practices, 30-49% in 2 Practices and ≥50% in 3 Practices (998 patients in total). Of these, 671 patients (75%) agreed to the self-management component of the intervention. The reliability (at project end) in those who received the Bundle was 100%. The Bundle was applied to an additional 315 patients in the six Practices who completed the project but did not submit regular practice-level monthly data. In the thirteen remaining Practices, the achievement

  6. Face Transplant in an Advanced Neurofibromatosis Type 1 Patient.

    PubMed

    Krakowczyk, Łukasz; Maciejewski, Adam; Szymczyk, Cezary; Oleś, Krzysztof; Półtorak, Stanisław

    2017-01-31

    BACKGROUND The human face is a one-of-a-kind structure with unique morphology, complexity, and function, in which different subunits are not even similar to other parts of the body. Therefore, extended complex deficits of the face are usually difficult to reconstruct, and autologous tissue restoration is generally not able to give a satisfactory aesthetic and functional outcome. The main goal of face allotransplantation is to restore symmetry, contour, and appearance as well as function of the face, especially control of orbicularis oculi and oris muscle physiology. We present the case of a total face transplant in an advanced neurofibromatosis type 1 patient - the second face transplant in Poland. CASE REPORT The recipient was a 28-year-old female with neurofibromatosis type I limited to the head region. During 24 years she underwent more than 35 surgical procedures, but for the last 3 years a significant decrease of her functionality and appearance was observed, including serious problems with speech, eating, and vision. In December 2013 she was qualified for a face transplant procedure. When the donor was found, she was matched on several clinical and biochemical characteristics including negative T and B cell cross-matching. Similarly, the transplantation procedure was done using two connected operating rooms; in the first, the donor's face was harvested, and in the second, the recipient's face was prepared - the tumor mass was resected and vascular and nervous structures were prepared. Due to the extension and complexity of the potential defect, more than 75% of head soft tissues were harvested including both auriculae, left and right eyelids, and scalp down to the occipital lower line. CONCLUSIONS Our case showed that neurofibromatosis is a real indication for a face transplantation procedure. Also, the results of rehabilitation, quality of life, motor and sensory recovery, and physiological status were comparable, showing that face transplantation based on

  7. Nutrition for Advanced Chronic Kidney Disease in Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... peanut oil canola oil Why is knowing about sodium important for someone with advanced CKD? Too much ... who have high blood pressure. High- and Low-sodium Foods High-sodium Foods Low-sodium Alternatives Salt ...

  8. Antiangiogenic Agents in Combination with Chemotherapy in Patients with Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ulahannan, Susanna V; Brahmer, Julie R

    2011-01-01

    Most patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) present with advanced disease requiring systemic chemotherapy. Treatment with the antiangiogenic agent bevacizumab in combination with standard platinum-based doublet chemotherapy has been shown to improve outcomes in patients with advanced NSCLC. Several multitargeted antiangiogenic tyrosine kinase inhibitors (e.g., sorafenib, sunitinib, cediranib, vandetanib, BIBF 1120, pazopanib, and axitinib) are also being evaluated in combination with standard chemotherapy. Here we review current clinical data with combination therapy involving antiangiogenic agents and cytotoxic chemotherapy in patients with advanced NSCLC. PMID:21469981

  9. Habitual dietary phosphorus intake and urinary excretion in chronic kidney disease patients: a 3-day observational study.

    PubMed

    Salomo, L; Kamper, A-L; Poulsen, G M; Poulsen, S K; Astrup, A; Rix, M

    2016-12-14

    Hyperphosphatemia in chronic kidney disease (CKD) is associated with vascular calcification, cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. The aim of this study was to estimate the daily dietary phosphorus intake compared with recommendations in CKD patients and to evaluate the reproducibility of the 24-h urinary phosphorus excretion. Twenty CKD patients stage 3-4 from the outpatient clinic, collected 24-h urine and kept dietary records for 3 consecutive days. The mean daily phosphorus intake was 1367±499, 1642±815 and 1426±706 mg/day, respectively (P=0.57). The mean urinary phosphorus excretion was 914±465, 954±414 and 994±479 mg/day, respectively (P=0.21). In this population of CKD patients stage 3-4 the daily phosphorus intake was above the recommended. Twenty-four-hour urinary phosphorus excretion was reproducible and the data indicate that a single 24-h urine collection is sufficient to estimate the individual phosphorus excretion.European Journal of Clinical Nutrition advance online publication, 14 December 2016; doi:10.1038/ejcn.2016.247.

  10. Honey in the Prevention and Treatment of Infection in the CKD Population: A Narrative Review

    PubMed Central

    Francis, Anna; Cho, Yeoungjee; Johnson, David W.

    2015-01-01

    Infection is a major cause of morbidity and mortality at all stages of chronic kidney disease (CKD). Multiresistant organisms are becoming increasingly common, particularly in the CKD population. Unfortunately, the rapid evolution of antibiotic resistance has not been mirrored by innovation in new antibiotic agents. Novel treatments are therefore urgently needed. Honey has garnered much interest due to its broad-spectrum antibacterial properties based on extensive experimental data. Unlike conventional antibiotics, honey has an added advantage as it appears to avoid inducing antimicrobial resistance in bacteria. This review discusses the potential mechanisms of action and role of honey in infection management in the general population, epidemiology and special challenges of infections in CKD populations, and the clinical trial evidence pertaining to the safety and efficacy of honey for the prevention and treatment of infections in CKD population. PMID:26167189

  11. Pneumocystis jiroveci pneumonia and colonization in patients with advanced lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    TOGASHI, YOSUKE; MASAGO, KATSUHIRO; ITO, YUTAKA; SAKAMORI, YUICHI; OKUDA, CHIYUKI; FUKUHARA, AKIKO; NAGAI, HIROKI; KIM, YOUNG HAK; MISHIMA, MICHIAKI

    2013-01-01

    Pneumocystis jiroveci pneumonia (PCP) has long been recognized as a cause of mortality in immuno-compromised populations, including those with advanced lung cancer. Although Pneumocystis colonization has only recently been described due to the development of more sensitive molecular techniques, including polymerase chain reaction (PCR), it is unknown whether Pneumocystis colonization leads to the development of PCP. In the present study, we aimed to determine the prevalence of Pneumocystis colonization in advanced lung cancer patients. Furthermore, the association between PCP and Pneumocystis colonization was also investigated. Advanced lung cancer patients with no indication of PCP were evaluated to determine the prevalence of Pneumocystis colonization. We analyzed their oral wash (OW) samples and retrospectively evaluated advanced lung cancer patients with PCP by analyzing their sections of formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded lung tissues obtained following a diagnosis of lung cancer. Pneumocystis colonization was determined by a PCR test for Pneumocystis jiroveci (P. jiroveci). No P. jiroveci was detected by PCR in the OW samples of 47 advanced lung cancer patients with no indication of PCP, or in the lung tissues of four advanced lung cancer patients with PCP. These results indicate that PCP is not associated with Pneumocystis colonization in advanced lung cancer patients, although this study is limited since this was a cross-sectional and retrospective study. PMID:23420670

  12. Early change in proteinuria as a surrogate outcome in kidney disease progression: a systematic review of previous analyses and creation of a patient-level pooled dataset

    PubMed Central

    Stoycheff, Nicholas; Pandya, Kruti; Okparavero, Aghogho; Schiff, Abigail; Levey, Andrew S.; Greene, Tom; Stevens, Lesley A.

    2011-01-01

    Background. Proteinuria is a candidate surrogate end point for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) in chronic kidney disease (CKD). There is a reasonably sound biological basis for this hypothesis, but only preliminary empirical evidence currently exists. Methods. A systematic review and creation of a patient-level dataset of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) in CKD that reported changes in proteinuria and assessed progression of kidney disease as defined by dialysis, transplantation, death, or changes in GFR or creatinine were performed. Results. Systematic review. Seventy RCTs met the eligibility criteria; 17 eligible RCTs contained analyses of proteinuria as a predictor of outcomes; 15 RCTs concluded that greater proteinuria was associated with adverse outcomes. A majority were studies of diabetic or hypertensive kidney disease and tested renin–angiotensin system blockade. Definitions of predictor and outcome variables were too variable to conduct a meta-analysis of group data. Database creation. Over 4 years was required to create the patient-level dataset. The final dataset included 34 studies and > 9000 patients with a variety of CKD types and interventions. Conclusions. There are a relatively small number of RCTs designed to rigorously test therapies for kidney disease progression. Current analyses of change in proteinuria as a predictor of CKD progression are heterogeneous and incomplete, indicating further evaluation in a pooled individual patient-level database is necessary to advance knowledge in this field. PMID:20817671

  13. A multi-marker approach to predict incident CKD and microalbuminuria.

    PubMed

    Fox, Caroline S; Gona, Philimon; Larson, Martin G; Selhub, Jacob; Tofler, Geoffrey; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Meigs, James B; Levy, Daniel; Wang, Thomas J; Jacques, Paul F; Benjamin, Emelia J; Vasan, Ramachandran S

    2010-12-01

    Traditional risk factors do not adequately identify individuals at risk for CKD. We related a multi-marker panel consisting of the following seven circulating biomarkers to the incidence of CKD and microalbuminuria (MA) in 2345 participants who attended the sixth Framingham Offspring Study examination (1995 to 1998): C-reactive protein, aldosterone, renin, B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP), plasminogen-activator inhibitor type 1, fibrinogen, and homocysteine. We defined CKD at follow-up (2005 to 2008) as estimated GFR (eGFR) <60 ml/min per 1.73 m²; we defined MA as urine albumin-to-creatinine ratio ≥25 (women) or 17 (men) mg/g on spot urine samples. We identified a parsimonious set of markers related to outcomes adjusting for standard risk factors and baseline renal function, and we assessed their incremental predictive utility. During a mean 9.5-year follow-up, 213 participants developed CKD and 186 developed MA. In multivariable logistic regression models, the multi-marker panel was associated with incident CKD (P < 0.001) and MA (P = 0.003). Serum homocysteine and aldosterone both were significantly associated with CKD incidence, and log-transformed aldosterone, BNP, and homocysteine were significantly associated with incident MA. Biomarkers improved risk prediction as measured by improvements in the c-statistics for both CKD and MA and by a 7% increase in net risk reclassification. In conclusion, circulating homocysteine, aldosterone, and BNP provide incremental information regarding risk for incident CKD and MA beyond traditional risk factors.

  14. Intraperitoneal radiolabeled OC 125 in patients with advanced ovarian cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Finkler, N.J.; Muto, M.G.; Kassis, A.I.; Weadock, K.; Tumeh, S.S.; Zurawski, V.R. Jr.; Knapp, R.C. )

    1989-09-01

    Twenty patients with recurrent or persistent epithelial ovarian cancer failing conventional therapies were treated with a single intraperitoneal injection of iodine-131-labeled OC 125 monoclonal antibody. Rare acute side effects were nausea and mild diarrhea. At doses up to 120 mCi of iodine-131, median white blood cell and platelet count nadirs were 3.6k/microliters and 187k/microliters, respectively. Two patients acquired thyroid toxicities despite thyroid blockage with cold iodine. One patient had transient TSH elevation while remaining clinically euthyroid, and 1 patient developed activation of a thyroid nodule and clinical hyperthyroidism. Dose-limiting toxicity has not yet been observed. Twelve of 20 patients are alive 3 to 17 months following therapy. Tumor progression was noted in the majority of patients, although 3 patients had documented decreases in tumor burden of short duration. We conclude that, at the doses examined, iodine-131 OC 125 can be safely administered intraperitoneally.

  15. The roles of the skeleton and phosphorus in the CKD mineral bone disorder.

    PubMed

    Hruska, Keith A; Mathew, Suresh

    2011-03-01

    The CKD mineral bone disorder is a new term coined to describe the multiorgan system failure that is a major component of the excess cardiovascular mortality and morbidity complicating decreased kidney function. This syndrome embodies new discoveries of organ-to-organ communication including the skeletal hormone fibroblast growth factor-23 (FGF-23), which signals the status of skeletal mineral deposition to the kidney. The CKD mineral bone disorder begins with mild decreases in kidney function (stage 2 CKD) affecting the skeleton, as marked by increased FGF-23 secretion. At this stage, the stimulation of cardiovascular risk has begun and the increases in FGF-23 levels are strongly predictive of cardiovascular events. Later in CKD, hyperphosphatemia ensues when FGF-23 and hyperparathyroidism are no longer sufficient to maintain phosphate excretion. Hyperphosphatemia has been shown to be a direct stimulus to several cell types including vascular smooth muscle cells migrating to the neointima of atherosclerotic plaques. Phosphorus stimulates FGF-23 secretion by osteocytes and expression of the osteoblastic transcriptome, thereby increasing extracellular matrix mineralization in atherosclerotic plaques, hypertrophic cartilage, and skeletal osteoblast surfaces. In CKD, the skeleton positively contributes to hyperphosphatemia through excess bone resorption and inhibition of matrix mineralization. Thus, through the action of phosphorus, FGF-23, and other newly discovered skeletal hormones, such as osteocalcin, the skeleton plays an important role in the occurrence of cardiovascular morbidity in CKD.

  16. Future care planning: a first step to palliative care for all patients with advanced heart disease.

    PubMed

    Denvir, M A; Murray, S A; Boyd, K J

    2015-07-01

    Palliative care is recommended for patients with end-stage heart failure with several recent, randomised trials showing improvements in symptoms and quality of life and more studies underway. Future care planning provides a framework for discussing a range of palliative care problems with patients and their families. This approach can be introduced at any time during the patient's journey of care and ideally well in advance of end-of-life care. Future care planning is applicable to a wide range of patients with advanced heart disease and could be delivered systematically by cardiology teams at the time of an unplanned hospital admission, akin to cardiac rehabilitation for myocardial infarction. Integrating cardiology care and palliative care can benefit many patients with advanced heart disease at increased risk of death or hospitalisation. Larger, randomised trials are needed to assess the impact on patient outcomes and experiences.

  17. Emerging therapies for patients with advanced chronic lymphocytic leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Delgado, Julio; Briones, Javier; Sierra, Jorge

    2009-09-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukaemia is a common lymphoid malignancy with a variable clinical course. While some patients never require treatment or can be managed effectively with palliative chemotherapy, others experience early disease progression and death. The development of new prognostic markers has helped in the identification of patients with high risk disease, even among those diagnosed at early stage. Recent prospective trials have established chemo-immunotherapy combinations as the new standard of care for CLL patients requiring therapy. Unfortunately, patients whose tumour cells have certain genomic aberrations, such as a chromosome 17 deletion, have a disease that is frequently refractory to conventional therapy and should have their treatment tailored accordingly. Younger patients with high risk disease should be referred for allogeneic haematopoietic cell transplantation if they have an appropriate donor. For the remaining high risk patients, a number of new compounds are emerging, which could lead to further improvement in their outcome.

  18. Survival among patients with advanced renal cell carcinoma in the pretargeted versus targeted therapy eras.

    PubMed

    Li, Pengxiang; Wong, Yu-Ning; Armstrong, Katrina; Haas, Naomi; Subedi, Prasun; Davis-Cerone, Margaret; Doshi, Jalpa A

    2016-02-01

    Between December 2005 and October 2009, FDA approved six targeted therapies shown to significantly extend survival for advanced renal cell carcinoma (RCC) patients in clinical trials. This study aimed to examine changes in survival between the pretargeted and targeted therapy periods in advanced RCC patients in a real-world setting. Utilizing the 2000-2010 SEER Research files, a pre-post study design with a contemporaneous comparison group was employed to examine differences in survival outcomes for patients diagnosed with advanced RCC (study group) or advanced prostate cancer (comparison group, for whom no significant treatment innovations happened during this period) across the pretargeted therapy era (2000-2005) and the targeted therapy era (2006-2010). RCC patients diagnosed in the targeted therapy era (N = 6439) showed improved survival compared to those diagnosed in the pretargeted therapy era (N = 7231, hazard ratio (HR) for all-cause death: 0.86, P < 0.01), while the change between the pre-post periods was not significant for advanced prostate cancer patients (HR: 0.97, P = 0.08). Advanced RCC patients had significantly larger improvements in overall survival compared to advanced prostate cancer patients (z = 4.31; P < 0.01). More detailed year-to-year analysis revealed greater survival improvements for RCC in the later years of the posttargeted period. Similar results were seen for cause-specific survival. Subgroup analyses by nephrectomy status, age, and gender showed consistent findings. Patients diagnosed with advanced RCC during the targeted therapy era had better survival outcomes than those diagnosed during the pretargeted therapy era. Future studies should examine the real-world survival improvements directly associated with targeted therapies.

  19. A Cooperative Communication System for the Advancement of Safe, Effective, and Efficient Patient Care

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-01

    Award Number: W81XWH-12-C-0126 TITLE: A Cooperative Communication System for the Advancement of Safe, Effective, and Efficient Patient Care...DATES COVERED 15Aug2014 – 14Aug2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE A Cooperative Communication System for the Advancement of Safe, Effective, and Efficient ...J. (2015, January). Developing a Cooperative Communication System for Safe, Effective, and Efficient Patient Care. Society of Critical Care Medicine

  20. Rib Fracture Protocol Advancing the Care of the Elderly Patient.

    PubMed

    Leininger, Susan

    This article discusses unique factors associated with rib fractures in the elderly patient population and explains the process used in one facility to develop a revised protocol for the management of elderly patients with a rib fracture. The goals were to eliminate gaps in early trauma care management and employ a care routine that would improve outcomes for this vulnerable group of patients with fracture.

  1. [Audit: medical record documentation among advanced cancer patients].

    PubMed

    Perceau, Elise; Chirac, Anne; Rhondali, Wadih; Ruer, Murielle; Chabloz, Claire; Filbet, Marilène

    2014-02-01

    Medical record documentation of cancer inpatients is a core component of continuity of care. The main goal of the study was an assessment of medical record documentation in a palliative care unit (PCU) using a targeted clinical audit based on deceased inpatients' charts. Stage 1 (2010): a clinical audit of medical record documentation assessed by a list of items (diagnosis, prognosis, treatment, power of attorney directive, advance directives). Stage 2 (2011): corrective measures. Stage 3 (2012): re-assessment with the same items' list after six month. Forty cases were investigated during stage 1 and 3. After the corrective measures, inpatient's medical record documentation was significantly improved, including for diagnosis (P = 0.01), diseases extension and treatment (P < 0.001). Our results highlighted the persistence of a weak rate of medical record documentation for advanced directives (P = 0.145).

  2. Arterial aging and arterial disease: interplay between central hemodynamics, cardiac work, and organ flow—implications for CKD and cardiovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    London, Gerard; Covic, Adrian; Goldsmith, David; Wiecek, Andrzej; Suleymanlar, Gultekin; Ortiz, Alberto; Massy, Ziad; Lindholm, Bengt; Martinez-Castelao, Alberto; Fliser, Danilo; Agarwal, Rajiv; Jager, Kitty J; Dekker, Friedo W; Blankestijn, Peter J; Zoccali, Carmine

    2011-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and end-stage renal disease (ESRD). All epidemiological studies have clearly shown that accelerated arterial and cardiac aging is characteristic of these populations. Arterial premature aging is heterogeneous. It principally involves the aorta and central capacitive arteries, and is characterized by preferential aortic stiffening and disappearance of stiffness/impedance gradients between the central and peripheral arteries. These changes have a double impact: on the heart, upstream, with left ventricular hypertrophy and decreased coronary perfusion; and, downstream, on renal and brain microcirculation (decrease in glomerular filtration and cognitive functions). Multifactorial at origin, the pathophysiology of aortic ‘progeria' and microvascular disorders in CKD/ESRD is not well understood and should be the focus of interest in future studies. PMID:25018896

  3. [Chronic kidney disease in the elderly patient].

    PubMed

    Mora-Gutiérrez, José María; Slon Roblero, María Fernanda; Castaño Bilbao, Itziar; Izquierdo Bautista, Diana; Arteaga Coloma, Jesús; Martínez Velilla, Nicolás

    2016-05-06

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is widely prevalent worldwide, with a special impact on elderly population. Around half of people aged over 75 meet diagnostic criteria for CKD according to the recent 'Kidney disease improving global outcomes' (KDIGO) 2012 clinical practice guideline on the evaluation and management of CKD. However, geriatric patients have characteristics that may not be addressed by general guidelines. Therefore, it is important to know the natural history of the disease, symptoms, and 'red-flags' that could help in the management of these patients. In this review, a complete approach is presented on the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment of CKD in the geriatric population.

  4. Comparison of patients' and health care professionals' attitudes towards advance directives.

    PubMed Central

    Blondeau, D; Valois, P; Keyserlingk, E W; Hébert, M; Lavoie, M

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study was designed to identify and compare the attitudes of patients and health care professionals towards advance directives. Advance directives promote recognition of the patient's autonomy, letting the individual exercise a certain measure of control over life-sustaining care and treatment in the eventuality of becoming incompetent. DESIGN: Attitudes to advance directives were evaluated using a 44-item self-reported questionnaire. It yields an overall score as well as five factor scores: autonomy, beneficence, justice, external norms, and the affective dimension. SETTING: Health care institutions in the province of Québec, Canada. Survey sample: The sampling consisted of 921 subjects: 123 patients, 167 physicians, 340 nurses and 291 administrators of health care institutions. RESULTS: Although the general attitude of each population was favourable to the expression of autonomy, multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) indicated that physicians attached less importance to this subscale than did other populations (p < .001). Above all, they favoured legal external norms and beneficence. Physicians and administrators also attached less importance to the affective dimension than did patients and nurses. Specifically, physicians' attitudes towards advance directives were shown to be less positive than patients' attitudes. CONCLUSION: More attention should be given to the importance of adequately informing patients about advance directives because they may not represent an adequate means for patients to assert their autonomy. PMID:9800589

  5. The effect of locoregional therapies in patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma treated with sorafenib

    PubMed Central

    Sarpel, Umut; Spivack, John H.; Berger, Yaniv; Heskel, Marina; Aycart, Samantha N.; Sweeney, Robert; Edwards, Martin P.; Labow, Daniel M.; Kim, Edward

    2016-01-01

    Background & aims It is unknown whether the addition of locoregional therapies (LRTx) to sorafenib improves prognosis over sorafenib alone in patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The aim of this study was to assess the effect of LRTx in this population. Methods A retrospective analysis was performed of patients with advanced HCC as defined by extrahepatic metastasis, lymphadenopathy >2 cm, or gross vascular invasion. Sorafenib therapy was required for inclusion. Survival of patients who received LRTx after progression to advanced stage was compared to those who did not receive LRTx. Results Using an intention to treat analysis of 312 eligible patients, a propensity weighted proportional hazards model demonstrated LRTx as a predictor of survival (HR = 0.505, 95% CI: 0.407–0.628; P < 0.001). The greatest benefit was seen in patients with the largest tumor burden (HR = 0.305, 95% CI: 0.236–0.393; P < 0.01). Median survival in the sorafenib arm was 143 days (95% CI: 118–161) vs. 247 days (95% CI: 220–289) in the sorafenib plus LRTx arm (P < 0.001). Conclusions These results demonstrate a survival benefit with the addition of LRTx to sorafenib for patients with advanced HCC. These findings should prompt a prospective clinical trial to further assess the role of LRTx in patients with advanced HCC. PMID:27154804

  6. Clinical practice guidelines for the prevention, diagnosis, evaluation and treatment of mineral and bone disorders in chronic kidney disease (CKD-MBD) in adults.

    PubMed

    Bellorin-Font, Ezequiel; Ambrosoni, Pablo; Carlini, Raúl G; Carvalho, Aluizio B; Correa-Rotter, Ricardo; Cueto-Manzano, Alfonso; Jara, Aquiles; Jorgetti, Vanda; Negri, Armando L; Negri, Armando; Olaizola, Inés; Salusky, Isidro; Slatopolsky, Eduardo; Weisinger, José R

    2013-01-01

    The clinical practice guidelines for the prevention, diagnosis, evaluation and treatment of chronic kidney disease mineral and bone disorders (CKD-BMD) in adults, of the Latin American Society of Nephrology and Hypertension (SLANH) comprise a set of recommendations developed to support the doctor in the management of these abnormalities in adult patients with stages 3-5 kidney disease. This excludes changes associated with renal transplantation. The topics covered in the guidelines are divided into four chapters: 1) Evaluation of biochemical changes, 2) Evaluation of bone changes, 3) Evaluation of vascular calcifications, and 4) Treatment of CKD-MBD. The guidelines are based on the recommendations proposed and published by the Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) for the prevention, diagnosis, evaluation and treatment of CKD-MBD (KDIGO Clinical practice guidelines for the diagnosis, evaluation, prevention and treatment of Chronic Kidney Disease Mineral and Bone Disorder [CKD-MBD]), adapted to the conditions of patients, institutions and resources available in Latin America, with the support of KDIGO. In some cases, the guidelines correspond to management recommendations directly defined by the working group for their implementation in our region, based on the evidence available in the literature. Each chapter contains guidelines and their rationale, supported by numerous updated references. Unfortunately, there are few controlled studies with statistically sufficient weight in Latin America to support specific recommendations for the region, and as such, most of the references used correspond to studies carried out in other regions. This highlights the need to plan research studies designed to establish the current status of mineral and bone metabolism disorders in Latin America as well as defining the best treatment options for our population.

  7. How does uncertainty shape patient experience in advanced illness? A secondary analysis of qualitative data

    PubMed Central

    Etkind, Simon Noah; Bristowe, Katherine; Bailey, Katharine; Selman, Lucy Ellen; Murtagh, Fliss EM

    2016-01-01

    Background: Uncertainty is common in advanced illness but is infrequently studied in this context. If poorly addressed, uncertainty can lead to adverse patient outcomes. Aim: We aimed to understand patient experiences of uncertainty in advanced illness and develop a typology of patients’ responses and preferences to inform practice. Design: Secondary analysis of qualitative interview transcripts. Studies were assessed for inclusion and interviews were sampled using maximum-variation sampling. Analysis used a thematic approach with 10% of coding cross-checked to enhance reliability. Setting/participants: Qualitative interviews from six studies including patients with heart failure, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, renal disease, cancer and liver failure. Results: A total of 30 transcripts were analysed. Median age was 75 (range, 43–95), 12 patients were women. The impact of uncertainty was frequently discussed: the main related themes were engagement with illness, information needs, patient priorities and the period of time that patients mainly focused their attention on (temporal focus). A typology of patient responses to uncertainty was developed from these themes. Conclusion: Uncertainty influences patient experience in advanced illness through affecting patients’ information needs, preferences and future priorities for care. Our typology aids understanding of how patients with advanced illness respond to uncertainty. Assessment of these three factors may be a useful starting point to guide clinical assessment and shared decision making. PMID:27129679

  8. Mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress in patients with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Gamboa, Jorge L; Billings, Frederic T; Bojanowski, Matthew T; Gilliam, Laura A; Yu, Chang; Roshanravan, Baback; Roberts, L Jackson; Himmelfarb, Jonathan; Ikizler, T Alp; Brown, Nancy J

    2016-05-01

    Mitochondria abnormalities in skeletal muscle may contribute to frailty and sarcopenia, commonly present in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Dysfunctional mitochondria are also a major source of oxidative stress and may contribute to cardiovascular disease in CKD We tested the hypothesis that mitochondrial structure and function worsens with the severity of CKD Mitochondrial volume density, mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) copy number, BNIP3, and PGC1α protein expression were evaluated in skeletal muscle biopsies obtained from 27 subjects (17 controls and 10 with CKD stage 5 on hemodialysis). We also measured mtDNA copy number in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), plasma isofurans, and plasma F2-isoprostanes in 208 subjects divided into three groups: non-CKD (eGFR>60 mL/min), CKD stage 3-4 (eGFR 60-15 mL/min), and CKD stage 5 (on hemodialysis). Muscle biopsies from patients with CKD stage 5 revealed lower mitochondrial volume density, lower mtDNA copy number, and higher BNIP3 content than controls. mtDNA copy number in PBMCs was decreased with increasing severity of CKD: non-CKD (6.48, 95% CI 4.49-8.46), CKD stage 3-4 (3.30, 95% CI 0.85-5.75, P = 0.048 vs. non-CKD), and CKD stage 5 (1.93, 95% CI 0.27-3.59, P = 0.001 vs. non-CKD). Isofurans were higher in patients with CKD stage 5 (median 59.21 pg/mL, IQR 41.76-95.36) compared to patients with non-CKD (median 49.95 pg/mL, IQR 27.88-83.46, P = 0.001), whereas F2-isoprostanes did not differ among groups. Severity of CKD is associated with mitochondrial dysfunction and markers of oxidative stress. Mitochondrial abnormalities, which are common in skeletal muscle from patients with CKD stage 5, may explain the muscle dysfunction associated with frailty and sarcopenia in CKD Further studies are required to evaluate mitochondrial function in vivo in patients with different CKD stages.

  9. Chemotherapy Regimen Extends Survival in Advanced Pancreatic Cancer Patients

    Cancer.gov

    A four-drug chemotherapy regimen has produced the longest improvement in survival ever seen in a phase III clinical trial of patients with metastatic pancreatic cancer, one of the deadliest types of cancer.

  10. Heading perception in patients with advanced retinitis pigmentosa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Li; Peli, Eli; Warren, William H.

    2002-01-01

    PURPOSE: We investigated whether retinis pigmentosa (RP) patients with residual visual field of < 100 degrees could perceive heading from optic flow. METHODS: Four RP patients and four age-matched normally sighted control subjects viewed displays simulating an observer walking over a ground. In experiment 1, subjects viewed either the entire display with free fixation (full-field condition) or through an aperture with a fixation point at the center (aperture condition). In experiment 2, patients viewed displays of different durations. RESULTS: RP patients' performance was comparable to that of the age-matched control subjects: heading judgment was better in the full-field condition than in the aperture condition. Increasing display duration from 0.5 s to 1 s improved patients' heading performance, but giving them more time (3 s) to gather more visual information did not consistently further improve their performance. CONCLUSIONS: RP patients use active scanning eye movements to compensate for their visual field loss in heading perception; they might be able to gather sufficient optic flow information for heading perception in about 1 s.

  11. Lenvatinib and Capecitabine in Patients With Advanced Malignancies

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-23

    Advanced Cancer; Malignant Neoplasm of Breast; Malignant Neoplasms of Bone and Articular Cartilage; Malignant Neoplasms of Digestive Organs; Malignant Neoplasms of Eye Brain and Other Parts of Central Nervous System; Malignant Neoplasms of Female Genital Organs; Malignant Neoplasms of Ill-defined Secondary and Unspecified Sites; Malignant Neoplasms of Independent (Primary) Multiple Sites; Malignant Neoplasms of Lip Oral Cavity and Pharynx; Malignant Neoplasms of Male Genital Organs; Malignant Neoplasms of Mesothelial and Soft Tissue; Malignant Neoplasms of Respiratory and Intrathoracic Organs; Malignant Neoplasms of Thyroid and Other Endocrine Glands; Malignant Neoplasms of Urinary Tract

  12. Technology advances in hospital practices: robotics in treatment of patients.

    PubMed

    Rosiek, Anna; Leksowski, Krzysztof

    2015-06-01

    Laparoscopic cholecystectomy is widely considered as the treatment of choice for acute cholecystitis. The safety of the procedure and its minimal invasiveness made it a valid treatment option for a patient not responding to antibiotic therapy. Our research shows that patients positively assess this treatment method, but the world's tendency is to turn to a more sophisticated method utilizing robot-assisted surgery as a gold standard. Providing patient with minimally invasive surgical procedures that utilize the state-of-the-art equipment like the da Vinci Robotic Surgical System underscores the commitment to high-quality patient care while enhancing patient safety. The advantages include minimal invasive scarring, less pain and bleeding, faster recovery time, and shorter hospital stay. The move toward less invasive and less morbid procedures and a need to re-create the true open surgical experience have paved the way for the development and application of robotic and computer-assisted systems in surgery in Poland as well as the rest of the world.

  13. Morbid obesity in a young woman affected by advanced chronic kidney disease: an exceptional case report. Does a high dose of essential amino acids play a key role in therapeutic success?

    PubMed Central

    Caria, S; Murtas, S; Loria, G; Dioguardi, F S; Secci, R; Bolasco, P

    2016-01-01

    A 38-year-old woman, obese (219 kg), diabetic, hypertensive, chronic kidney disease (CKD) stage 4, with low plasma albumin level (2.9 g dl−1) and marked proteinuria (22 g per day) was studied. Given the advanced-stage CKD with nephrotic proteinuria, we supplemented low-protein diet with high doses of a tailored essential amino acid mixture (AAs: 44 g per day) to improve weight reduction in the patient. After 20 months of conservative therapy, the patient lost 43 kg; despite two episodes of infection, albumin plasma levels increased up to 3.7 g per day. After a further 20 months of dialysis, the patient maintained a diet of 1800 kcal supplemented with 32 g of AAs and lost 47 kg, whereas both albumin (3.89±0.12 g dl−1) and C reactive protein returned to normal. During the follow-up period, anemia improved, erythropoietin was thus discontinued and insulin requirement decreased to 105 IU. This therapeutic option may be beneficial in advanced CKD patients with obesity and diabetes resulting from malnutrition. PMID:26926587

  14. Eligibility of patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer for phase III chemotherapy trials

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Evidence that chemotherapy improves survival and quality of life in patients with stage IIIB & IV non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is based on large randomized controlled trials. The purpose of this study was to determine eligibility of patients with advanced NSCLC for major chemotherapy trials. Methods Physicians treating stage IIIB/IV NSCLC at Sydney Cancer Centre assessed patient eligibility for the E1594, SWOG9509 and TAX326 trials for patients presenting from October 2001 to December 2002. A review of the centre's registry was used to obtain missing data. Results 199 patients with advanced NSCLC were registered during the 14-month period. Characteristics of 100 patients were defined prospectively, 85 retrospectively: 77% males, median age 68 (range 32–88), 64% stage IV disease. Only 35% met trial eligibility for E1594 and 28% for SWOG9509 and TAX326. Common reasons for ineligibility were: co-morbidities 75(40%); ECOG Performance Status ≥2 72(39%); symptomatic brain metastasis 15(8%); and previous cancers 21(11%). Many patients were ineligible by more than one criterion. Conclusion The majority of patients with advanced NSCLC were ineligible for the large chemotherapy trials. The applicability of trial results to advanced lung cancer populations may be limited. Future trials should be conducted in a more representative population. PMID:19402889

  15. Effectiveness of the Mindfulness Art Therapy Short Version for Japanese Patients with Advanced Cancer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ando, Michiyo; Kira, Haruko; Hayashida, Shigeru; Ito, Sayoko

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the feasibility of the Mindfulness Art Therapy Short Version for Japanese patients with advanced cancer. Patients learned mindfulness practices and then made art to express their feelings in the first session. After receiving instruction on practicing mindfulness 2 weeks later, they participated in a second…

  16. Fostering innovation, advancing patient safety: the kidney health initiative.

    PubMed

    Archdeacon, Patrick; Shaffer, Rachel N; Winkelmayer, Wolfgang C; Falk, Ronald J; Roy-Chaudhury, Prabir

    2013-09-01

    To respond to the serious and underrecognized epidemic of kidney disease in the United States, the US Food and Drug Administration and the American Society of Nephrology have founded the Kidney Health Initiative-a public-private partnership designed to create a collaborative environment in which the US Food and Drug Administration and the greater kidney community can interact to optimize the evaluation of drugs, devices, biologics, and food products. The Kidney Health Initiative will bring together all the necessary stakeholders, including patients, regulators, industry, health care providers, academics, and other governmental agencies, to improve patient safety and foster innovation. This initiative is intended to enable the kidney community as a whole to provide the right drug, device, or biologic for administration to the right patient at the right time by fostering partnerships that will facilitate development and delivery of those products and addressing challenges that currently impede these goals.

  17. Allergen immunotherapy for birch pollen-allergic patients: recent advances.

    PubMed

    Moingeon, Philippe; Floch, Véronique Bordas-Le; Airouche, Sabi; Baron-Bodo, Véronique; Nony, Emmanuel; Mascarell, Laurent

    2016-05-01

    As of today, allergen immunotherapy is performed with aqueous natural allergen extracts. Recombinant allergen vaccines are not yet commercially available, although they could provide patients with well-defined and highly consistent drug substances. As Bet v 1 is the major allergen involved in birch pollen allergy, with more than 95% of patients sensitized to this allergen, pharmaceutical-grade recombinant Bet v 1-based vaccines were produced and clinically tested. Herein, we compare the clinical results and modes of action of treatments based on either a birch pollen extract or recombinant Bet v 1 expressed as hypoallergenic or natural-like molecules. We also discuss the future of allergen immunotherapy with improved drugs intended for birch pollen-allergic patients suffering from rhinoconjunctivitis.

  18. Increased trefoil factor 2 levels in patients with chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Lebherz-Eichinger, Diana; Tudor, Bianca; Ankersmit, Hendrik J.; Reiter, Thomas; Haas, Martin; Einwallner, Elisa; Roth-Walter, Franziska; Krenn, Claus G.; Roth, Georg A.

    2017-01-01

    In chronically damaged tissue, trefoil factor family (TFF) peptides ensure epithelial protection and restitution. In chronic kidney disease (CKD), TFF1 and TFF2 are reported to be upregulated. Especially in the early phase, CKD is associated with silently ongoing renal damage and inflammation. Moreover, many patients are diagnosed late during disease progression. We therefore sought to investigate the potential of TFF2 as biomarker for CKD. We followed 118 patients suffering from predialysis CKD and 23 healthy volunteers. TFF2 concentrations were measured using ELISA. Our results showed, that median TFF2 serum levels were significantly higher in patients with later CKD stages as compared to healthy controls (p < 0.001) or early stages (p < 0.001). In patients with mid CKD stages TFF2 serum levels were significantly higher than in healthy controls (p = 0.002). Patients with early or mid CKD stages had significantly higher TFF2 urine concentrations than later CKD stages (p < 0.001 and p = 0.009, respectively). Fractional TFF2 excretion differed significantly between early CKD stages and healthy controls (p = 0.01). ROC curve showed that TFF2 levels can predict different CKD stages (AUC > 0.75). In conclusion, urine and serum TFF2 levels of CKD patients show a different profile dependent on CKD stages. Whereas TFF2 urine levels continuously decreased with disease progression, TFF2 serum concentrations progressively increased from the early to later CKD stages, indicating changes in renal function and offering the potential to examine the course of CKD. PMID:28355260

  19. Megestrol acetate for the palliation of anorexia in advanced, incurable cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Mateen, Farrah; Jatoi, Aminah

    2006-10-01

    Anorexia, or loss of appetite, is a troubling symptom for many patients with advanced cancer. The early observation that breast cancer patients, who were prescribed megestrol acetate as a cancer treatment, went on to increase their appetite and gain weight has given rise to a large number of clinical trials that have tested this progestational drug as a palliative agent for the cancer anorexia/weight loss syndrome. This review focuses on these trials, summarizing their findings and providing a practical approach for prescribing megestrol acetate to advanced cancer patients who suffer from the cancer anorexia/weight loss syndrome.

  20. Hospitalists caring for patients with advanced cancer: An experience-based guide

    PubMed Central

    Koo, Douglas J.; Tonorezos, Emily S.; Kumar, Chhavi B.; Goring, Tabitha N.; Salvit, Cori; Egan, Barbara C.

    2016-01-01

    Every year, nearly five million adults with cancer are hospitalized. Limited evidence suggests that hospitalization of the cancer patient is associated with adverse morbidity and mortality. Hospitalization of the patient with advanced cancer allows for an intense examination of health status in the face of terminal illness and an opportunity for defining goals of care. This experience-based guide reports what is currently known about the topic and outlines a systematic approach to maximizing opportunities, improving quality, and enhancing the well-being of the hospitalized patient with advanced cancer. PMID:26588430

  1. Clinical impact of extensive molecular profiling in advanced cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Cousin, Sophie; Grellety, Thomas; Toulmonde, Maud; Auzanneau, Céline; Khalifa, Emmanuel; Laizet, Yec'han; Tran, Kevin; Le Moulec, Sylvestre; Floquet, Anne; Garbay, Delphine; Robert, Jacques; Hostein, Isabelle; Soubeyran, Isabelle; Italiano, Antoine

    2017-02-08

    Previous precision medicine studies have investigated conventional molecular techniques and/or limited sets of gene alterations. The aim of this study was to describe the impact of the next-generation sequencing of the largest panel of genes used to date in tumour tissue and blood in the context of institutional molecular screening programmes. DNA analysis was performed by next-generation sequencing using a panel of 426 cancer-related genes and by comparative genomic hybridization from formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded archived tumour samples when available or from fresh tumour samples. Five hundred sixty-eight patients were enrolled. The median number of prior lines of treatment was 2 (range 0-9). The most common primary tumour types were lung (16.9%), colorectal (14.4%), breast (10.6%), ovarian (10.2%) and sarcoma (10.2%). The median patient age was 63 years (range 19-88). A total of 292 patients (51.4%) presented with at least one actionable genetic alteration. The 20 genes most frequently altered were TP53, CDKN2A, KRAS, PTEN, PI3KCA, RB1, APC, ERBB2, MYC, EGFR, CDKN2B, ARID1A, SMAD4, FGFR1, MDM2, BRAF, ATM, CCNE1, FGFR3 and FRS2. One hundred fifty-nine patients (28%) were included in early phase trials. The treatment was matched with a tumour profile in 86 cases (15%). The two main reasons for non-inclusion were non-progressive disease (31.5%) and general status deterioration (25%). Twenty-eight percent of patients presented with a growth modulation index (time to progression under the early phase trial treatment/time to progression of the previous line of treatment) >1.3.Extensive molecular profiling using high-throughput techniques allows for the identification of actionable mutations in the majority of cases and is associated with substantial clinical benefit in up to one in four patients.

  2. [Health-related quality of life among patients with advanced cancer: an integrative review].

    PubMed

    Freire, Maria Eliane Moreira; Sawada, Namie Okino; de França, Inácia Sátiro Xavier; da Costa, Solange Fátima Geraldo; Oliveira, Cecília Danielle Bezerra

    2014-04-01

    This integrative literature review aimed to characterize scientific articles on health-related quality of life - HRQoL - among patients with advanced cancer from national and international literature, and summarize those factors evidenced in the literature that contributed to the improvement or worsening of HRQoL among patients with advanced cancer. The search for materials was conducted in the following databases: CINAHL, EMBASE, PubMed, SciELO and LILACS. Among the 21 articles in the sample, 13 showed an improvement of HRQoL among patients with advanced cancer related to the development of physical, emotional and spiritual interventions. In eight studies, we identified predictive symptoms of low HRQoL, such as pain, fatigue, sleep disorders, depression, nutritional changes, and others. The results showed that clinical manifestations, which many times were inherent in cancer, such as factors that can lower patients' HRQoL, while physical, psychological and spiritual benefits resulting from therapeutic interventions may promote its improvement.

  3. Management of locally advanced and metastatic colon cancer in elderly patients.

    PubMed

    Kurniali, Peter C; Hrinczenko, Borys; Al-Janadi, Anas

    2014-02-28

    Colon cancer is the second leading cause of cancer mortality in the United States with a median age at diagnosis of 69 years. Sixty percent are diagnosed over the age of 65 years and 36% are 75 years or older. At diagnosis, approximately 58% of patients will have locally advanced and metastatic disease, for which systemic chemotherapy has been shown to improve survival. Treatment of cancer in elderly patients is more challenging due to multiple factors, including disabling co-morbidities as well as a decline in organ function. Cancer treatment of elderly patients is often associated with more toxicities that may lead to frequent hospitalizations. In locally advanced disease, fewer older patients receive adjuvant chemotherapy despite survival benefit and similar toxicity when compared to their younger counterparts. A survival benefit is also observed in the palliative chemotherapy setting for elderly patients with metastatic disease. When treating elderly patients with colon cancer, one has to consider drug pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics. Since chronological age is a poor marker of a patient's functional status, several methods of functional assessment including performance status and activities of daily living (ADL) or instrumental ADL, or even a comprehensive geriatric assessment, may be used. There is no ideal chemotherapy regimen that fits all elderly patients and so a regimen needs to be tailored for each individual. Important considerations when treating elderly patients include convenience and tolerability. This review will discuss approaches to the management of elderly patients with locally advanced and metastatic colon cancer.

  4. Expressed wishes and incidence of euthanasia in advanced lung cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Pardon, Koen; Deschepper, Reginald; Vander Stichele, Robert; Bernheim, Jan L; Mortier, Freddy; Schallier, Denis; Germonpré, Paul; Galdermans, Daniella; Van Kerckhoven, Willem; Deliens, Luc

    2012-10-01

    This study explores expressed wishes and requests for euthanasia (i.e. administration of lethal drugs at the explicit request of the patient), and incidence of end-of-life decisions with possible life-shortening effects (ELDs) in advanced lung cancer patients in Flanders, Belgium. We performed a prospective, longitudinal, observational study of a consecutive sample of advanced lung cancer patients and selected those who died within 18 months of diagnosis. Immediately after death, the pulmonologist/oncologist and general practitioner (GP) of the patient filled in a questionnaire. Information was available for 105 out of 115 deaths. According to the specialist or GP, one in five patients had expressed a wish for euthanasia; and three in four of these had made an explicit and repeated request. One in two of these received euthanasia. Of the patients who had expressed a wish for euthanasia but had not made an explicit and repeated request, none received euthanasia. Patients with a palliative treatment goal at inclusion were more likely to receive euthanasia. Death was preceded by an ELD in 62.9% of patients. To conclude, advanced lung cancer patients who expressed a euthanasia wish were often determined. Euthanasia was performed significantly more among patients whose treatment goal after diagnosis was exclusively palliative.

  5. What would you like to eat, Mr CKD Microbiota? A Mediterranean Diet, please!

    PubMed

    Montemurno, Eustacchio; Cosola, Carmela; Dalfino, Giuseppe; Daidone, Giuseppe; De Angelis, Maria; Gobbetti, Marco; Gesualdo, Loreto

    2014-01-01

    In this review we elucidate the role of gut microbiota as the plausible missing link between food and health, focusing on chronic kidney disease (CKD). Microbiota, the microbial community harboured in the large intestine, is considered a symbiotic "supplementary organ". It contributes to digestion, mainly through two catabolic pathways: saccharolytic (fermentation) or proteolytic (putrefaction). It also interacts with host influencing immunity, metabolism, and health status. It is believed that a balanced healthy microbiota is primarily saccharolytic and diet has a deep effect on its composition. Mediterranean Diet, UNESCO "Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity", prevents cardiovascular and metabolic systemic diseases, thanks to the high supply of fibres and antioxidants. Mediterranean Diet also favours the prevalence of saccharolytic species, while Western Diet promotes the shift towards a proteolytic profile (dysbiosis). Emerging evidences highlight the association between a wide range of diseases and dysbiosis. In CKD a vicious circle exists, in which proteolytic-derived microbial metabolites (p-cresol and indoxyl sulphate), represent the main circulating uremic toxins: their accumulation worsens dysbiosis and promotes CKD progression. Gut microbiota shaping through non-pharmacologic nutritional treatments, based on Mediterranean Diet, represents an innovative approach in CKD, potentially restoring microbiota balance, ameliorating CKD conditions and slowing down disease progression.

  6. Anxiety and depression in patients with advanced macular degeneration: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Cimarolli, Verena R; Casten, Robin J; Rovner, Barry W; Heyl, Vera; Sörensen, Silvia; Horowitz, Amy

    2016-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) – despite advances in prevention and medical treatment options – remains prevalent among older adults, often resulting in functional losses that negatively affect the mental health of older adults. In particular, the prevalence of both anxiety and depression in patients with AMD is high. Along with medical treatment options, low vision rehabilitation and AMD-specific behavioral and self-management programs have been developed and have demonstrated effectiveness in improving the mental health of AMD patients. This article reviews the prevalence of anxiety and depression in patients with advanced AMD, discusses potential mechanisms accounting for the development of depression and anxiety in AMD patients, presents the state-of the-art of available interventions for addressing anxiety and depression in AMD patients, and delineates recommendations for eye care professionals regarding how to screen for these two prevalent mental health problems and how to facilitate appropriate treatment for patients with AMD. PMID:26766899

  7. Dying tax free: the modern advance directive and patients' financial values.

    PubMed

    Kirk, Timothy W; Luck, George R

    2010-03-01

    Advance directives are often used to help patients articulate their end-of-life treatment preferences and guide proxy decision makers in making health care decisions when patients cannot. This case study and commentary puts forth a situation in which a palliative care consultation team encountered a patient with an advance directive that instructed her proxy decision maker to consider estate tax implications when making end-of-life decisions. Following presentation of the case, the authors focus on two ethical issues: 1) the appropriateness of considering patients' financial goals and values in medical decision making and 2) whether certain kinds of patient values should be considered more or less relevant than others as reasons for expressed treatment preferences. Clinicians are encouraged to accept a wide range of patient values as relevant to the clinical decision-making process and to balance the influence of those values with more traditional notions of clinical harm and benefit.

  8. Efficacy of chemotherapy combined with targeted arterial infusion of verapamil in patients with advanced gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Ning, Zhongliang; Chen, Dong; Liu, Aiguo; Fan, Pingsheng; Duan, Qiaohong; Zhang, Tengyue; Fan, Gaofei

    2014-01-01

    The present study evaluated the efficacy of chemotherapy combined with targeted arterial infusion of verapamil in patients with advanced gastric cancer. Forty patients were enrolled. Targeted arterial infusion of verapamil was done once a month, 3-5 times per patient, along with chemotherapy. After 2 bouts of combined treatment, the efficacy was evaluated. Primary gastric tumor was confirmed in 38/40 patients, and unconfirmed in 2/40 patients due to adhesion of tumors to surrounding tissue. Combined treatment was administered in 38 patients with defined tumors. Complete response to the treatment was in 5/38 (13.1 %) patients, partial response in 27/38 (71.1 %) patients, stable disease in 4/38 (10.5 %) patients, and progressive disease in 2/38 (5.26 %) patients. The effective rate (i.e., complete + partial response) comprised 84.2 %. There were 31 patients with liver metastases; 10/31 (32.3 %) patients showed complete response, 16/31 (51.6 %) patients showed partial response, 3/31 (9.7 %) patients had stable disease, and 2/31 (6.5 %) patients had progressive disease. The effective rate in these patients was 83.8 %. Thirty-seven patients were followed up, and 27/37 (73.0 %) patients were alive for 6 months or longer, 19/37 (51.3 %) for 12 months, 8 (35.1 %) for 18 months, and 8/37 (21.6 %) for 24 months. In conclusion, in patients with advanced gastric cancer, chemotherapy is more effective when combined with targeted arterial infusion of verapamil, leading to extended patients' survival and improved quality of life.

  9. Phosphate binders, Vitamin D and Calcimimetics in the Management of Chronic Kidney Disease-Mineral Bone Disorders (CKD-MBD) in Children

    PubMed Central

    Wesseling-Perry, Katherine; Salusky, Isidro B.

    2013-01-01

    In order to minimize complications on the skeleton and to prevent extraskeletal calcifications, the specific aims of the management of Chronic Kidney Disease Mineral and Bone Disorder (CKD-MBD) are to maintain blood levels of serum calcium and phosphorus as close to the normal range as possible, thereby maintaining serum PTH at levels appropriate for stage of CKD, preventing hyperplasia of the parathyroid glands, avoiding the development of extra-skeletal calcifications, and preventing or reversing the accumulation of toxic substances such as aluminum and β2-microglobulin. In order to limit cardiovascular calcification, daily intake of elemental calcium, including from dietary sources and from phosphate binders, should not exceed twice the daily recommended intake for age and should not exceed 2.5 g/day. Calcium-free phosphate binders such as sevelamer hydrochloride and sevelamer carbonate are safe and effective alternatives to calcium-based binders and their use widens the margin of safety for active vitamin D sterol therapy. Vitamin D deficiency is highly prevalent across the spectrum of CKD and replacement therapy is recommended in vitamin D deficient and insufficient individuals. Therapy with active vitamin D sterols is recommended after correction of vitamin D deficiency state and should be titrated based on target PTH levels across the spectrum of CKD. Although the use of calcimimetics drugs have proven to effectively control the biochemical features of secondary hyperparathyroidism, there is very limited experience with the use of such agent in pediatric patients and mainly during the first years of life. Studies are needed to further define the role of such agents in the treatment of pediatric CKDMBD. PMID:23381010

  10. Impact of Treatment for Depression on Desire for Hastened Death in Patients With Advanced AIDS

    PubMed Central

    Breitbart, William; Rosenfeld, Barry; Gibson, Christopher; Kramer, Michael; Li, Yuelin; Tomarken, Alexis; Nelson, Christian; Pessin, Hayley; Esch, Julie; Galietta, Michele; Garcia, Nerina; Brechtl, John; Schuster, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Background Despite the development of multi-drug regimens for HIV, palliative care and quality-of-life issues in patients with advanced AIDS remain important areas of clinical investigation. Objective Authors assessed the impact of treatment for depression on desire for hastened death in patients with advanced AIDS. Method Patients with advanced AIDS (N=372) were interviewed shortly after admission to a palliative-care facility, and were reinterviewed monthly for the next 2 months. Patients diagnosed with a major depressive syndrome were provided with antidepressant treatment and reinterviewed weekly. Desire for hastened death was assessed with two questionnaire measures. Results Desire for death was highly associated with depression, and it decreased dramatically in patients who responded to antidepressant treatment. Little change in desire for hastened death was observed in patients whose depression did not improve. Although improved depression was not significantly associated with the use of antidepressant medication, those individuals prescribed antidepressant medication showed the largest decreases in desire for hastened death. Discussion Successful treatment for depression appears to substantially decrease desire for hastened death in patients with advanced AIDS. The authors discuss implications of these findings for palliative-care treatment and the physician-assisted suicide debate. PMID:20332284

  11. Implications for Advanced Nursing Practice in the Patient with Heat Stress

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-05-01

    systemic vascular resistance), while elderly patients are hypodynamic (increased heart rate, decreased cardiac output and decreased systemic vascular...resistance). By the time elderly patients are seen, massive volume deficits may exist, requiring hemodynamic monitoring to differentiate pump...TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5. FUNDING NUMBERS Implications for Advanced Nursing Practice in the Patient with Heat Stress 6. AUTHOR(S) Patricia A Skelton S 7

  12. Use of Beta-Blockers and Aspirin in Acute Coronary Syndromes by Patient Renal Function in the Military Healthcare Systems, National Capital Area

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-10-01

    common cause of chronic kidney disease in the United Statesi or factors unique to renal insufficiency is currently controversial. vii Despite their high...relying on coding alone. Patients with advanced CKD truly are high-risk for complications from standard of care therapy, and while as a group they...Stark PC, MacLeod B, Griffith JL, Salem DN, Levey AS, Samak MJ. Chronic kidney disease as a risk factor for cardiovascular disease and all- cause

  13. Special Issues Involving Periprosthetic Infection in Immunodeficiency Patients

    PubMed Central

    Tornero, Eduard; Riba, Josep; Garcia-Ramiro, Sebastian

    2013-01-01

    Chronic systemic illnesses such as diabetes mellitus, chronic kidney disease (CKD), liver cirrhosis, neoplasia, etc. have been clearly associated with high rates of SWI. However, the exact mechanisms underlying these observations are still under investigation. Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a growing problem in our society. Many of these patients will require an arthroplasty and it appears that the prosthetic infection risk for these types of patients is much higher than in the normal population. The risk of complications due to infection seems to be lower in patients with kidney transplants than in patients undergoing haemodialysis. Both prophylaxis and treatment of infection in patients with CKD should be carried out with a strict monitoring of potentially nephrotoxic antibiotics. The literature on the prognosis and risk of infection in patients with haematopoietic stem cell transplant is scarce and occasionally contradictory. The optimal time for the surgery should be determined by taking into account the immunological state of the patient and should be avoided, as much as possible, during the first year after the HSCT. Child’s classification system is the most widely used method of stratifying the surgical risk for patients with cirrhosis; the infection appeared to be associated in a statistically significant way with advanced age and a Child B pre-operative classification. The prevention of prosthetic joint infections in HIV-infected patients should not be significantly different from the prevention for any other patient. Those patients that receive adequate antiretroviral treatment and periodic laboratory control show infection rates and periprosthetic complications that are similar to those for patients not affected by HIV. Therefore, the patient’s level of immunodeficiency is the most important prognostic factor for prosthetic infection. The particular immunological condition of these patients can lead to infections due to particular microorganisms

  14. Sustained uremic toxin control improves renal and cardiovascular outcomes in patients with advanced renal dysfunction: post-hoc analysis of the Kremezin Study against renal disease progression in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Cha, Ran-hui; Kang, Shin Wook; Park, Cheol Whee; Cha, Dae Ryong; Na, Ki Young; Kim, Sung Gyun; Yoon, Sun Ae; Kim, Sejoong; Han, Sang Youb; Park, Jung Hwan; Chang, Jae Hyun; Lim, Chun Soo; Kim, Yon Su

    2017-01-01

    Background We investigated the long-term effect of AST-120, which has been proposed as a therapeutic option against renal disease progression, in patients with advanced chronic kidney disease (CKD). Methods We performed post-hoc analysis with a per-protocol group of the K-STAR study (Kremezin study against renal disease progression in Korea) that randomized participants into an AST-120 and a control arm. Patients in the AST-120 arm were given 6 g of AST-120 in three divided doses, and those in both arms received standard conventional treatment. Results The two arms did not differ significantly in the occurrence of composite primary outcomes (log-rank P = 0.41). For AST-120 patients with higher compliance, there were fewer composite primary outcomes: intermediate tertile hazard ratio (HR) 0.62, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.38 to 1.01, P = 0.05; highest tertile HR 0.436, 95% CI 0.25 to 0.76, P = 0.003. The estimated glomerular filtration rate level was more stable in the AST-120 arm, especially in diabetic patients. At one year, the AST-120-induced decrease in the serum indoxyl sulfate concentration inversely correlated with the occurrence of composite primary outcomes: second tertile HR 1.59, 95% CI 0.82 to 3.07, P = 0.17; third tertile HR 2.11, 95% CI 1.07 to 4.17, P = 0.031. Furthermore, AST-120 showed a protective effect against the major cardiovascular adverse events (HR 0.51, 95% CI 0.26 to 0.99, P = 0.046). Conclusion Long-term use of AST-120 has potential for renal protection, especially in diabetic patients, as well as cardiovascular benefits. Reduction of the serum indoxyl sulfate level may be used to identify patients who would benefit from AST-120 administration. PMID:28392999

  15. ABVD as the treatment option in advanced Hodgkin's lymphoma patients older than 45 years.

    PubMed

    Andjelic, Bosko M; Mihaljevic, Biljana S; Jakovic, Ljubomir R

    2012-07-01

    Advanced age is considered an unfavourable prognostic factor for Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL). The optimal treatment for these patients is not yet defined, especially for the advanced stages. We analysed the outcome and prognostic relevance of patient and disease characteristics in 46 advanced stage HL patients who were older than 45 years, treated with ABVD. Elderly patients (>60 year) had a significantly higher rate of comorbidities (p < 0.05). The complete remission rate was significantly lower in elderly patients and in patients with an IPS ≥ 3 (p < 0.05, p < 0.05, respectively). Elderly patients had significantly shorter event-free survival (p < 0.01) and overall survival (p < 0.01) compared to patients of 45-60 year. Extranodal disease, an IPS ≥ 3, bulky disease, an ESR > 50 and the presence of a large mediastinal tumour mass didn't have an influence on survival (p > 0.05). The multivariate Cox regression analysis identified the age of >60 year as an independent prognostic factor. The prospective clinical trials seem to be needed for defining the optimal therapeutic approach in elderly patients.

  16. Neutrophil CD64 expression: a reliable diagnostic marker of infection in advanced cancer patients?

    PubMed

    Comolli, Giuditta; Torchio, Martina; Lenta, Elisa; Franceschetti, Benvenuto; Chiesa, Antonella; Calarota, Sandra A; Baldanti, Fausto; Scudeller, Luigia; Marone, Piero; Danova, Marco; Marco, Danova

    2015-07-01

    Infection and sepsis are major health problems in cancer patients. There is a need for the identification and validation of biomarkers to improve their early diagnosis and treatment. Emerging evidence showed that neutrophil CD64 is a highly sensitive and specific marker for systemic infection and sepsis in critically ill patients with various diseases but data on patients bearing solid tumors are still lacking. Using a dedicated flow cytometric assay we evaluated neutrophil CD64 expression in patients with advanced cancer without active infections to verify if it could be utilized as a reliable biomarker of early infections also in oncologic patients.

  17. Advanced Colorectal Adenomas in Patients Under 45 Years of Age Are Mostly Sporadic

    PubMed Central

    Nalbantoglu, ILKe; Watson, Rao; Goodwin, Jonathan; Safar, Elyas; Chokshi, Reena V.; Azar, Riad R.; Davidson, Nicholas O.

    2014-01-01

    Background The presence of advanced adenomas in younger individuals is a criterion for Lynch syndrome (LS). However, the utility of screening advanced adenomas for loss of mismatch repair (MMR) protein expression to identify suspected LS remains unclear. Aims Determine the prevalence of MMR defects to understand whether these patients harbor a defined genetic risk for CRC. Methods The study cohort included adult patients ≤45 years of age with advanced adenomas (villous histology, ≥1 cm in diameter, ≥3 polyps of any size) endoscopically removed between 2001 and 2011. Clinical records were reviewed along with detailed pathological review and immunohistochemical MMR analysis. Results A total of 76 (40.1 % male, age 40.6 ± 5.4 years) patients met inclusion and exclusion criteria. Indications for colonoscopy were gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding 39 (51.3 %), CRC in a first-degree relative 17 (22.4 %) and somatic GI symptoms 20 (26.3 %). Index colonoscopy revealed a median of 1 adenoma (range 1–4), mean diameter of 12.9 ±7.1 mm, 40 (52.6 %) with villous histology. The mean follow-up duration was 3.3 ± 2 years. Recurrent adenomas developed in 24 (31.6 %), of which 8 (10.5 %) were advanced adenomas; none of these patients developed CRC. One of 66 (1.5 %) adenomas available for immunohistochemical (IHC) testing revealed loss of MLH1 and PMS2. Conclusions IHC screening of advanced adenomas from patients younger than 45 years of age identified potential LS in one of 64 patients. The low yield of IHC screening in this population suggests that universal IHC screening of advanced adenomas from patients younger than 45 years of age for MMR defects is not an efficient strategy for identifying LS subjects. PMID:24925148

  18. Durable left ventricular assist device therapy in advanced heart failure: Patient selection and clinical outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Sachin P.; Mehra, Mandeep R.

    2016-01-01

    The increasing adoption of left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) into clinical practice is related to a combination of engineering advances in pump technology and improvements in understanding the appropriate clinical use of these devices in the management of patients with advanced heart failure. This review intends to assist the clinician in identifying candidates for LVAD implantation, to examine long-term outcomes and provide an overview of the common complications related to use of these devices. PMID:27056652

  19. Moderator's view: Vitamin D deficiency treatment in advanced chronic kidney disease: a close look at the emperor's clothes.

    PubMed

    Zoccali, Carmine; Mallamaci, Francesca

    2016-05-01

    Two recent vitamin D supplementation (ergocalciferol) trials in stage G5D CKD patients with vitamin D insufficiency showed that this sterol effectively increases serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] but fails to modify serum PTH and other clinical outcomes. The Pro side of this polar view emphasizes that the duration of these studies was too short to allow sensible analyses based on a clinical endpoint. Furthermore, he notes that in the second study, the use of active forms of vitamin D, phosphate binders and cinacalcet could have hindered appreciation of the effect of ergocalciferol supplementation per se The Con side produces an updated meta-analysis showing that inactive vitamin D forms largely fail to reduce serum PTH and affect various relevant endpoints, including muscle strength, functional capacity, quality of life and hospitalization. Studies suggesting an effect of inactive vitamin D forms in advanced CKD are either very small and mainly based on sequential, uncontrolled observations or inherently weak, simple pre/post studies. No biological or clinical evidence exists that 25(OH)D may exert meaningful effects in CKD patients who are being treated with active forms of vitamin D. Careful a etiologic studies based on the omics sciences, i.e. precise pathophysiological profiling of individual CKD patients followed by consequential, well-targeted intervention(s) in the precision medicine scenario, will likely provide a definitive answer to the lingering question of whether inactive vitamin D forms may have biological effects beyond those produced by their proximate metabolite 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3.

  20. Microbiological investigation of retrodiscal tissues from patients with advanced internal derangement of the temporomandibular joint.

    PubMed

    McIntosh, M; Dimitroulis, G

    2012-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the presence of bacteria in samples of retrodiscal tissues taken from patients suffering from advanced internal derangement of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). 12 fresh retrodiscal tissue samples were taken from 12 consecutive patients who underwent unilateral TMJ discectomy for advanced TMJ internal derangement (Wilkes stage IV). The retrodiscal tissue samples were stained and cultured for the presence of micro-organisms in microbiology laboratories. No evidence of bacteria or other micro-organisms was found in any of the tissue specimens procured from the TMJ. This study failed to identify the presence of bacteria or other micro-organisms in fresh retrodiscal tissue specimens of the TMJ in patients with advanced TMJ internal derangement.

  1. Managing patients receiving sorafenib for advanced hepatocellular carcinoma: a case study.

    PubMed

    Hull, Diana; Armstrong, Ceri

    2010-05-01

    Despite improvements in cytotoxic chemotherapy agents over the last 50 years, the outlook for patients with many of the most common solid tumours has remained poor. However, in recent years a number of targeted therapies have been licensed in the European Union for use in these cancer types. One such therapy, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor (sorafenib) is now used to treat patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and metastatic renal cell carcinoma. This article will explore the role of the oncology nurse in managing patients receiving sorafenib for advanced HCC. A brief overview of sorafenib as a current treatment approved for advanced HCC in the palliative setting is presented. This is followed by a case study-based discussion with particular reference to some of the key care coordination challenges facing the oncology nurse. The management of treatment-related adverse events and the importance of using a multidisciplinary team approach is also reviewed.

  2. Recent advances in the management of peritoneal dialysis patients

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Peritoneal dialysis is a form of kidney dialysis that is used to remove accumulated metabolic waste products and water in patients with end stage kidney disease. Long-term exposure to high concentrations of glucose and its by-products, both found in peritoneal dialysis fluid, has been implicated in contributing to peritoneal damage over time, in turn limiting long-term use of the technique. Newer peritoneal dialysis solutions have been developed in the hope of reducing the unfavorable effects of peritoneal dialysis solutions. In vitro and in vivo studies have suggested that newer peritoneal dialysis fluids have salutary effects on the peritoneal membrane. Short-term clinical studies have also found some metabolic benefits of glucose-sparing regimens in chronic peritoneal dialysis. Mixed results have been found in studies examining whether newer peritoneal dialysis fluids reduce peritonitis rates. Long-term studies are needed to investigate whether newer peritoneal dialysis fluids provide better peritoneal dialysis technique and/or patient survival, compared to standard glucose-based peritoneal dialysis fluids. PMID:26097730

  3. The desire to die: making treatment decisions for suicidal patients who have an advance directive.

    PubMed

    Salter, Erica K

    2014-01-01

    This article enumerates and critically examines the potential grounds on which we might treat the case of a patient with an advance directive who attempted suicide, differently from one whose injuries were the result of an accident. Grounds for differentiation are distilled into two potential justifications. The first addresses the concern that withholding or withdrawing care from a patient with self-inflicted injuries would be aiding and abetting suicide.The second examines concerns about the patient's decisionmaking capacity. Ultimately, it is argued that while there might be legitimate reasons to hold the advance directive of a suicidal patient to a different standard of scrutiny, the fact that the patient's medical state was self-inflicted should not, in and of itself, necessarily invalidate the guidance of the directive. Finally, four practical recommendations are offered for negotiating similar cases.

  4. Molecular-targeted therapy for elderly patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    ANTONELLI, GIOVANNA; LIBRA, MASSIMO; PANEBIANCO, VINCENZO; RUSSO, ALESSIA ERIKA; VITALE, FELICE VITO; COLINA, PAOLO; D'ANGELO, ALESSANDRO; ROSSELLO, ROSALBA; FERRAÙ, FRANCESCO

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is the most common cause of cancer-related mortality in men and women. Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) represents close to 90% of all lung cancers. When diagnosed, >50% of patients are >65 years old. Through an improved understanding of the molecular mechanisms involved in lung oncogenesis, molecular-targeted approaches have become an essential element for the treatment of patients with NSCLC. As the toxicity profiles of the techniques are definitely more favorable compared with chemotherapy, they are particularly attractive for use in elderly patients, who are potentially more susceptible to the toxicity of systemic oncological therapies. However, studies on the activity of molecular-targeted agents in this aged patient setting are much more limited compared with those in their younger counterparts. In the present review, the literature on molecular-targeted therapy for elderly patients with advanced NSCLC is discussed. It is concluded that bevacizumab should be reserved only for highly select elderly patients with advanced NSCLC when the clinician deems it useful in the face of acceptable toxicities. In elderly patients with advanced epidermal growth factor receptor mutation-positive NSCLC, erlotinib and gefitinib appear to repeat the same favorable performance as that documented on a larger scale in the overall population of patients with activating mutations. A good toxicity profile is also confirmed for active molecules on different pathways, such as crizotinib. PMID:26870160

  5. Phase II study of capecitabine and irinotecan combination chemotherapy in patients with advanced gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Baek, J H; Kim, J G; Jeon, S B; Chae, Y S; Kim, D H; Sohn, S K; Lee, K B; Choi, Y J; Shin, H J; Chung, J S; Cho, G J; Jung, H Y; Yu, W

    2006-01-01

    The present study was conducted to evaluate the efficacy and safety of a combination regimen of capecitabine plus irinotecan in patients with advanced gastric cancer. Patients with previously untreated metastatic or recurrent, measurable gastric cancer received oral capecitabine 1000 mg m−2 twice daily from day 1 to 14 and intravenous irinotecan 100 mg m−2 on days 1 and 8, based on a 3-week cycle. Forty-one patients were enrolled in the current study, among whom 38 were assessable for efficacy and 40 assessable for toxicity. Three complete responses and 16 partial responses were confirmed, giving an overall response rate of 46.3%. At a median follow-up of 269 days, the median time to progression and overall survival were 5.1 and 8.6 months, respectively. Grade 3/4 neutropenia occurred in four patients and grade 3 febrile neutropenia was observed in two patients. Grade 3 diarrhoea and grade 2 hand–foot syndrome occurred in six patients and eight patients, respectively. The combination of capecitabine and irinotecan was found to be well tolerated and effective in patients with advanced gastric cancer. Accordingly, this regimen can be regarded as one of first-line treatment options for advanced gastric cancer. PMID:16641916

  6. Molecular-targeted therapy for elderly patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Antonelli, Giovanna; Libra, Massimo; Panebianco, Vincenzo; Russo, Alessia Erika; Vitale, Felice Vito; Colina, Paolo; D'Angelo, Alessandro; Rossello, Rosalba; Ferraù, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is the most common cause of cancer-related mortality in men and women. Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) represents close to 90% of all lung cancers. When diagnosed, >50% of patients are >65 years old. Through an improved understanding of the molecular mechanisms involved in lung oncogenesis, molecular-targeted approaches have become an essential element for the treatment of patients with NSCLC. As the toxicity profiles of the techniques are definitely more favorable compared with chemotherapy, they are particularly attractive for use in elderly patients, who are potentially more susceptible to the toxicity of systemic oncological therapies. However, studies on the activity of molecular-targeted agents in this aged patient setting are much more limited compared with those in their younger counterparts. In the present review, the literature on molecular-targeted therapy for elderly patients with advanced NSCLC is discussed. It is concluded that bevacizumab should be reserved only for highly select elderly patients with advanced NSCLC when the clinician deems it useful in the face of acceptable toxicities. In elderly patients with advanced epidermal growth factor receptor mutation-positive NSCLC, erlotinib and gefitinib appear to repeat the same favorable performance as that documented on a larger scale in the overall population of patients with activating mutations. A good toxicity profile is also confirmed for active molecules on different pathways, such as crizotinib.

  7. Evaluation of Salivary Leptin Levels in Healthy Subjects and Patients with Advanced Periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Khorsand, Afshin; Bayani, Mojtaba; Torabi, Sepehr; Kharrazifard, Mohammad Javad; Mohammadnejhad, Fatemeh

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Leptin is a hormone-like protein produced by the adipose tissue. It plays an important role in protection of host against inflammation and infection. Some studies have reported changes in leptin levels in the gingival crevicular fluid (GCF), saliva and blood serum of patients with periodontal disease compared to healthy individuals. The aim of the present study was to compare the salivary leptin levels in patients with advanced periodontitis and healthy individuals. Materials and Methods: In this case-control study, the salivary samples of healthy individuals and patients with advanced periodontitis with clinical attachment loss >5mm were obtained using a standardized method and the leptin levels were measured in the salivary samples by means of ELISA. The effects of the periodontal status and sex on the salivary leptin levels of both groups were statistically analyzed by two-way ANOVA. Results: The means ± standard deviation (SD) of salivary leptin levels in healthy subjects and patients with advanced periodontitis were 34.27±6.88 and 17.87±5.89 pg/mL, respectively. Statistical analysis showed that the effect of sex on the salivary leptin levels was not significant (P=0.91), while the effect of advanced periodontitis on the salivary leptin levels was significant compared to healthy individuals (P<0.0001). Conclusions: In patients with advanced periodontitis, the salivary leptin levels were significantly lower compared to healthy individuals. Thus, assessment of salivary leptin can be done as a non-invasive and simple method to determine the susceptibility of patients to advanced periodontitis. PMID:27536322

  8. Validation of actigraphy to assess circadian organization and sleep quality in patients with advanced lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Many cancer patients report poor sleep quality, despite having adequate time and opportunity for sleep. Satisfying sleep is dependent on a healthy circadian time structure and the circadian patterns among cancer patients are quite abnormal. Wrist actigraphy has been validated with concurrent polysomnography as a reliable tool to objectively measure many standard sleep parameters, as well as daily activity. Actigraphic and subjective sleep data are in agreement when determining activity-sleep patterns and sleep quality/quantity, each of which are severely affected in cancer patients. We investigated the relationship between actigraphic measurement of circadian organization and self-reported subjective sleep quality among patients with advanced lung cancer. Methods This cross-sectional and case control study was conducted in 84 patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer in a hospital setting for the patients at Midwestern Regional Medical Center (MRMC), Zion, IL, USA and home setting for the patients at WJB Dorn Veterans Affairs Medical Center (VAMC), Columbia, SC, USA. Prior to chemotherapy treatment, each patient's sleep-activity cycle was measured by actigraphy over a 4-7 day period and sleep quality was assessed using the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) questionnaire. Results The mean age of our patients was 62 years. 65 patients were males while 19 were females. 31 patients had failed prior treatment while 52 were newly diagnosed. Actigraphy and PSQI scores showed significantly disturbed daily sleep-activity cycles and poorer sleep quality in lung cancer patients compared to healthy controls. Nearly all actigraphic parameters strongly correlated with PSQI self-reported sleep quality of inpatients and outpatients. Conclusions The correlation of daily activity/sleep time with PSQI-documented sleep indicates that actigraphy can be used as an objective tool and/or to complement subjective assessments of sleep quality in patients with advanced

  9. Dietary sodium: a therapeutic target in the treatment of hypertension and CKD.

    PubMed

    Sanghavi, Sarah; Vassalotti, Joseph A

    2013-05-01

    Interventional trials of dietary sodium reduction have demonstrated improvements in blood pressure, cardiovascular events, and chronic kidney disease (CKD). Furthermore, public health initiatives to reduce population sodium intake in Finland and Japan have shown similar benefit in blood pressure and stroke reduction. Recent follow-up data from large cohort trials that suggest increased mortality among individuals with lower urinary sodium excretion have generated controversy regarding the optimal sodium intake. This paper reviews the evidence for the reduction of dietary sodium to prevent and manage chronic diseases, including hypertension, cardiovascular disease, and CKD.

  10. Setting priorities for reducing risk and advancing patient safety.

    PubMed

    Gaffey, Ann D

    2016-04-01

    We set priorities every day in both our personal and professional lives. Some decisions are easy, while others require much more thought, participation, and resources. The difficult or less appealing priorities may not be popular, may receive push-back, and may be resource intensive. Whether personal or professional, the urgency that accompanies true priorities becomes a driving force. It is that urgency to ensure our patients' safety that brings many of us to work each day. This is not easy work. It requires us to be knowledgeable about the enterprise we are working in and to have the professional skills and competence to facilitate setting the priorities that allow our organizations to minimize risk and maximize value.

  11. Research advances in traditional Chinese medicine syndromes in cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Ji, Qing; Luo, Yun-quan; Wang, Wen-hai; Liu, Xuan; Li, Qi; Su, Shi-bing

    2016-01-01

    Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) syndrome, also known as TCM ZHENG or TCM pattern, is an integral and essential part of TCM theory that helps to guide the design of individualized treatments. A TCM syndrome, in essence, is a characteristic profile of all clinical manifestations in one patient that can be readily identified by a TCM practitioner. In this article, the authors reviewed the presentations of TCM syndromes in seven common malignancies (liver, lung, gastric, breast, colorectal, pancreatic and esophageal cancers), the objectivity and the standardization of TCM syndrome differentiation, the evaluation of TCM syndrome modeling in cancer research, and syndrome differentiation-guided TCM treatment of cancers. A better understanding of TCM syndrome theory, as well as its potential biological basis, may contribute greatly to the clinical TCM diagnosis and the treatment of cancer.

  12. Management of patients with advanced prostate cancer: recommendations of the St Gallen Advanced Prostate Cancer Consensus Conference (APCCC) 2015

    PubMed Central

    Gillessen, S.; Omlin, A.; Attard, G.; de Bono, J. S.; Efstathiou, E.; Fizazi, K.; Halabi, S.; Nelson, P. S.; Sartor, O.; Smith, M. R.; Soule, H. R.; Akaza, H.; Beer, T. M.; Beltran, H.; Chinnaiyan, A. M.; Daugaard, G.; Davis, I. D.; De Santis, M.; Drake, C. G.; Eeles, R. A.; Fanti, S.; Gleave, M. E.; Heidenreich, A.; Hussain, M.; James, N. D.; Lecouvet, F. E.; Logothetis, C. J.; Mastris, K.; Nilsson, S.; Oh, W. K.; Olmos, D.; Padhani, A. R.; Parker, C.; Rubin, M. A.; Schalken, J. A.; Scher, H. I.; Sella, A.; Shore, N. D.; Small, E. J.; Sternberg, C. N.; Suzuki, H.; Sweeney, C. J.; Tannock, I. F.; Tombal, B.

    2015-01-01

    The first St Gallen Advanced Prostate Cancer Consensus Conference (APCCC) Expert Panel identified and reviewed the available evidence for the ten most important areas of controversy in advanced prostate cancer (APC) management. The successful registration of several drugs for castration-resistant prostate cancer and the recent studies of chemo-hormonal therapy in men with castration-naïve prostate cancer have led to considerable uncertainty as to the best treatment choices, sequence of treatment options and appropriate patient selection. Management recommendations based on expert opinion, and not based on a critical review of the available evidence, are presented. The various recommendations carried differing degrees of support, as reflected in the wording of the article text and in the detailed voting results recorded in supplementary Material, available at Annals of Oncology online. Detailed decisions on treatment as always will involve consideration of disease extent and location, prior treatments, host factors, patient preferences as well as logistical and economic constraints. Inclusion of men with APC in clinical trials should be encouraged. PMID:26041764

  13. Three-dimensional nasal changes following maxillary advancement in cleft patients.

    PubMed

    Stewart, A; McCance, A M; James, D R; Moss, J P

    1996-06-01

    Three-dimensional laser surface scanning of the face was performed before and after Le Fort I maxillary advancement in 24 patients with replaced clefts of the lip and palate. The surgery resulted in advancement of the upper lip and para-alar tissues and an increase in the relative prominence of the nose within the face. These changes were produced at the expense of an increase in nasal width and a reduction in nasal tip protrusion. The changes in nasal morphology showed significant variation among patients.

  14. Advance care planning uptake among patients with severe lung disease: a randomised patient preference trial of a nurse-led, facilitated advance care planning intervention

    PubMed Central

    Sinclair, Craig; Auret, Kirsten Anne; Evans, Sharon Frances; Williamson, Fiona; Dormer, Siobhan; Greeve, Kim; Koay, Audrey; Price, Dot; Brims, Fraser

    2017-01-01

    Objective Advance care planning (ACP) clarifies goals for future care if a patient becomes unable to communicate their own preferences. However, ACP uptake is low, with discussions often occurring late. This study assessed whether a systematic nurse-led ACP intervention increases ACP in patients with advanced respiratory disease. Design A multicentre open-label randomised controlled trial with preference arm. Setting Metropolitan teaching hospital and a rural healthcare network. Participants 149 participants with respiratory malignancy, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease or interstitial lung disease. Intervention Nurse facilitators offered facilitated ACP discussions, prompted further discussions with doctors and loved ones, and assisted participants to appoint a substitute medical decision-maker (SDM) and complete an advance directive (AD). Outcome measures The primary measure was formal (AD or SDM) or informal (discussion with doctor) ACP uptake assessed by self-report (6 months) and medical notes audit. Secondary measures were the factors predicting baseline readiness to undertake ACP, and factors predicting postintervention ACP uptake in the intervention arm. Results At 6 months, formal ACP uptake was significantly higher (p<0.001) in the intervention arm (54/106, 51%), compared with usual care (6/43, 14%). ACP discussions with doctors were also significantly higher (p<0.005) in the intervention arm (76/106, 72%) compared with usual care (20/43, 47%). Those with a strong preference for the intervention were more likely to complete formal ACP documents than those randomly allocated. Increased symptom burden and preference for the intervention predicted later ACP uptake. Social support was positively associated with ACP discussion with loved ones, but negatively associated with discussion with doctors. Conclusions Nurse-led facilitated ACP is acceptable to patients with advanced respiratory disease and effective in increasing ACP discussions and completion

  15. Coping Well with Advanced Cancer: A Serial Qualitative Interview Study with Patients and Family Carers

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Diane; Appleton, Lynda; Calman, Lynn; Large, Paul; Lloyd-Williams, Mari; Grande, Gunn

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To understand successful strategies used by people to cope well when living with advanced cancer; to explore how professionals can support effective coping strategies; to understand how to support development of effective coping strategies for patients and family carers. Design Qualitative serial (4–12 week intervals) interview study with people with advanced cancer and their informal carers followed by focus groups. The iterative design had a novel focus on positive coping strategies. Interview analysis focused on patients and carers as individuals and pairs, exploring multiple dimensions of their coping experiences. Focus group analysis explored strategies for intervention development. Participants 26 people with advanced (stage 3–4) breast, prostate, lung or colorectal cancer, or in receipt of palliative care, and 24 paired nominated informal/family carers. Setting Participants recruited through outpatient clinics at two tertiary cancer centres in Merseyside and Manchester, UK, between June 2012 and July 2013. Results 45 patient and 41 carer interviews were conducted plus 4 focus groups (16 participants). People with advanced cancer and their informal/family carers develop coping strategies which enable effective management of psychological wellbeing. People draw from pre-diagnosis coping strategies, but these develop through responding to the experience of living with advanced cancer. Strategies include being realistic, indulgence, support, and learning from others, which enabled participants to regain a sense of wellbeing after emotional challenge. Learning from peers emerged as particularly important in promoting psychological wellbeing through the development of effective ‘everyday’, non-clinical coping strategies. Conclusions Our findings challenge current models of providing psychological support for those with advanced cancer which focus on professional intervention. It is important to recognise, enable and support peoples’ own

  16. Antiplatelet therapy for preventing stroke in patients with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Kim, Suk Jae; Bang, Oh Young

    2013-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD), defined as reduced glomerular filtration rate and/or proteinuria, is a serious worldwide health problem. The incidence and prevalence of CKD are increasing with age, and patients with CKD are a population at very high risk for developing stroke. CKD may increase the risk for incident stroke independent of conventional stroke risk factors. A common pathological process including anemia, homocysteine, nitric oxide, oxidative stress, inflammation, and conditions promoting coagulation may be related to the development of stroke in the course of CKD. CKD can also serve as a marker of brain injury, because the cerebral microvascular system has similar hemodynamic features with the vascular beds of the kidney. CKD has been linked with markers of cerebral small artery disease including white matter lesions, lacunar infarctions, and cerebral microbleeds. CKD has been implicated with neurological deterioration during hospitalization, poor functional outcome, and hemorrhagic transformation in patients with acute stroke. Recurrence of stroke may also be higher in CKD patients compared with those having normal kidney function. However, there have been no specific recommendations for antiplatelet therapy in patients with ischemic stroke plus CKD. As CKD patients have distinct characteristics including high bleeding complications and poor response to antiplatelet agents, selecting and adjusting platelet aggregation inhibitors should be individualized. In addition, it should be noted that aspirin may aggravate renal dysfunction. Phosphodiesterase inhibitors restore endothelial dysfunction and may serve as a target for preventing stroke in CKD patients. Aside from antiplatelet therapy, other treatments including lipid control, blood pressure lowering, and renal transplantation are also important. Further studies are warranted for optimal treatment in stroke prevention in CKD patients.

  17. Scoring of Prognostic Parameters in Patients with Unresectable Advanced or Recurrent Colorectal Cancer Undergoing Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Ikeguchi, Masahide; Shimoda, Ryugo; Yamamoto, Manabu; Maeta, Yoshihiko; Ashida, Keigo; Saito, Hiroaki

    2013-01-01

    Background Suitable chemotherapy is needed to prolong the survival of patients with unresectable advanced or recurrent colorectal cancer. We scored the periodical changes of several prognostic markers during chemotherapy in patients with this type of cancer to discern the effectiveness of chemotherapy. Methods Twenty consecutive patients with unresectable advanced or recurrent colorectal cancer were enrolled. All patients underwent combination chemotherapy with oxaliplatin or irinotecan plus 5-fluorouracil/leucovorin. Neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio (NLR), serum C-reactive protein (CRP), serum carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and serum albumin (ALB) were compared between the two periods (before chemotherapy and 3 months after it was started) in each patient. The scoring system was as follows: points are added when a patient shows a decrease of NLR, CRP and CEA and an increase of ALB at 3 months after the start of chemotherapy with a possible final score of +4. On the other hand, points are reduced if a patient shows an elevation of NLR, CRP and CEA and a decrease of ALB at 3 months after the start of chemotherapy with a possible final score of −4. Results At 3 months after the start of first line chemotherapy, 13 patients showed positive scores but 7 patients showed zero or minus scores. According to our scoring system, we found the mean survival time (MST) of the 13 patients with plus scores was 34 months and this was significantly better than that of the 7 patients who showed zero or minus scores (P = 0.0008). Conclusion Our new scoring system is useful but when we find that first line chemotherapy is ineffective, we need to change it to second line chemotherapy as soon as possible. That may be the best treatment for patients with unresectable advanced or recurrent colorectal cancer. PMID:24179314

  18. Frequency of Elevated Hepatocellular Carcinoma (HCC) Biomarkers in Patients with Advanced Hepatitis C

    PubMed Central

    Sterling, Richard K.; Wright, Elizabeth C.; Morgan, Timothy R.; Seeff, Leonard B.; Hoefs, John C.; Di Bisceglie, Adrian M.; Dienstag, Jules L.; Lok, Anna S.

    2013-01-01

    Background Prospective studies of serum HCC biomarkers in patients with advanced hepatitis C are lacking. Aims To determine frequencies and performance of elevated alpha-fetoprotein (AFP), AFP-L3, and des-gamma-carboxy prothrombin (DCP) levels as HCC biomarkers in advanced hepatitis C. Methods Patients in the HALT-C Trial were tested every 3 months for 42 months. Screening ultrasound was performed every 12 months. Levels of biomarkers were compared in patients in whom HCC did or did not develop. Results 855 patients were evaluated; HCC developed in 46. Among patients without HCC, 73.2% had AFP consistently <20, 24.5% had at least one AFP between 20-199, while 2.3% had at least one AFP value ≥200 ng/mL; 73.7% had DCP consistently <90, 11.6% had at least one DCP between 90-149, and 14.7% had at least one DCP value ≥150 mAU/mL. AFP-L3 ≥10% was present at least once in 9.0% and in 17.1% of those with AFP >20 ng/mL. Among all patients with elevated biomarkers, a diagnosis of HCC was made in 0-31.6% (depending on the biomarker and cutoff) during the subsequent 24 months. AFP ≥200 ng/mL had the highest specificity (99%), but sensitivity was ≤20%. DCP ≥40 mAU/mL had the highest sensitivity (76%), but specificity was ≤58%. Independent predictors of elevated AFP were gender (female), race (Black), more advanced disease, and HCC. Elevated DCP was associated with more advanced disease and HCC. Conclusions Mild-moderate elevations in total AFP and DCP but not AFP-L3 occur frequently in patients with chronic hepatitis C and advanced fibrosis, are related to factors other than HCC, and are poor predictors of HCC. PMID:21931376

  19. Plasma and neutrophil fatty acid composition in advanced cancer patients and response to fish oil supplementation.

    PubMed

    Pratt, V C; Watanabe, S; Bruera, E; Mackey, J; Clandinin, M T; Baracos, V E; Field, C J

    2002-12-02

    Metabolic demand and altered supply of essential nutrients is poorly characterised in patients with advanced cancer. A possible imbalance or deficiency of essential fatty acids is suggested by reported beneficial effects of fish oil supplementation. To assess fatty acid status (composition of plasma and neutrophil phospholipids) in advanced cancer patients before and after 14 days of supplementation (12+/-1 g day(-1)) with fish (eicosapentaenoic acid, and docosahexaenoic acid) or placebo (olive) oil. Blood was drawn from cancer patients experiencing weight loss of >5% body weight (n=23). Fatty acid composition of plasma phospholipids and the major phospholipid classes of isolated neutrophils were determined using gas liquid chromatography. At baseline, patients with advanced cancer exhibited low levels (<30% of normal values) of plasma phospholipids and constituent fatty acids and elevated 20 : 4 n-6 content in neutrophil phospholipids. High n-6/n-3 fatty acid ratios in neutrophil and plasma phospholipids were inversely related to body mass index. Fish oil supplementation raised eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid content in plasma but not neutrophil phospholipids. 20 : 4 n-6 content was reduced in neutrophil PI following supplementation with fish oil. Change in body weight during the supplementation period related directly to increases in eicosapentaenoic acid in plasma. Advanced cancer patients have alterations in lipid metabolism potentially due to nutritional status and/or chemotherapy. Potential obstacles in fatty acid utilisation must be addressed in future trials aiming to improve outcomes using nutritional intervention with fish oils.

  20. Outcomes with the Use of Recombinant Human Erythropoietin in Critically Ill Burn Patients

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-01

    human erythropoietin (rhEPO) has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for use in anemic patient with chronic kidney disease ( CKD ).7...January 1, 2007 to December 31, 2008). Patients treated with rhEPO who also had any other indication for erythropoiesis before BICU to in- clude CKD ...17 In addition, mechanisms that lead to benefit in anemic patient with CKD may be at play in AK1. 18 Whether there may be a mortality benefit

  1. Pain sensitivity profiles in patients with advanced knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Frey-Law, Laura A; Bohr, Nicole L; Sluka, Kathleen A; Herr, Keela; Clark, Charles R; Noiseux, Nicolas O; Callaghan, John J; Zimmerman, M Bridget; Rakel, Barbara A

    2016-09-01

    The development of patient profiles to subgroup individuals on a variety of variables has gained attention as a potential means to better inform clinical decision making. Patterns of pain sensitivity response specific to quantitative sensory testing (QST) modality have been demonstrated in healthy subjects. It has not been determined whether these patterns persist in a knee osteoarthritis population. In a sample of 218 participants, 19 QST measures along with pain, psychological factors, self-reported function, and quality of life were assessed before total knee arthroplasty. Component analysis was used to identify commonalities across the 19 QST assessments to produce standardized pain sensitivity factors. Cluster analysis then grouped individuals who exhibited similar patterns of standardized pain sensitivity component scores. The QST resulted in 4 pain sensitivity components: heat, punctate, temporal summation, and pressure. Cluster analysis resulted in 5 pain sensitivity profiles: a "low pressure pain" group, an "average pain" group, and 3 "high pain" sensitivity groups who were sensitive to different modalities (punctate, heat, and temporal summation). Pain and function differed between pain sensitivity profiles, along with sex distribution; however, no differences in osteoarthritis grade, medication use, or psychological traits were found. Residualizing QST data by age and sex resulted in similar components and pain sensitivity profiles. Furthermore, these profiles are surprisingly similar to those reported in healthy populations, which suggests that individual differences in pain sensitivity are a robust finding even in an older population with significant disease.

  2. Safety and efficacy of sorafenib in patients with Child-Pugh B advanced hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    DA Fonseca, Leonardo Gomes; Barroso-Sousa, Romualdo; Bento, Afonso DA Silva Alves; Blanco, Bruna Paccola; Valente, Gabriel Luis; Pfiffer, Tulio Eduardo Flesch; Hoff, Paulo Marcelo; Sabbaga, Jorge

    2015-07-01

    Sorafenib demonstrated a survival benefit in the treatment of advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in phase III trials. However, almost all the patients included in those trials exhibited well-preserved liver function (Child-Pugh A). The aim of this study was to describe our experience with sorafenib in Child-Pugh B HCC patients. A database of patients with advanced HCC treated with sorafenib was retrospectively evaluated. The median overall survival of Child-Pugh B patients (n=20) was 2.53 months [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.33-5.92 months] and of Child-Pugh A patients (n=100) 9.71 months (95% CI: 6.22-13.04). Child-Pugh B patients had a significantly poorer survival compared to Child-Pugh A patients (P=0.002). The toxicities were similar between the two groups. Metastasis, vascular invasion and α-fetoprotein level >1,030 ng/ml were not associated with survival among Child-Pugh B patients (P=0.281, 0.189 and 0.996, respectively). Although the survival outcomes were worse in Child-Pugh B patients treated with sorafenib, the toxicity profile was manageable. Therefore, there remains the question of whether to treat this subgroup of patients and more data are required to define the role of sorafenib in the context of liver dysfunction.

  3. Survival and failure outcomes in locally advanced esthesioneuroblastoma: a single centre experience of 15 patients.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ritesh; Ghoshal, Sushmita; Khosla, Divya; Bharti, Shreekant; Das, Ashim; Kumar, Narendra; Kapoor, Rakesh; Sharma, Suresh Chander

    2013-05-01

    Esthesioneuroblastoma (ENB) constitutes 3 % of all malignant intranasal tumors. As the tumor is very rare, the number of patients of ENB treated in individual departments is small. We present our institute's experience in combined modality management of 15 successive patients of ENB treated from 2006 to 2010. Clinical characteristics and treatment modality in form of surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy were noted. Kadish stage C was the most common stage (12 patients) followed by stage B (3 patients). Fourteen patients underwent primary surgery, of which nine had total excision and five had subtotal excision. One patient was treated with combination of chemotherapy (CT) and radiotherapy (RT). Median RT dose delivered was 54 Gy. Twelve patients received CT with cisplatin and etoposide. Overall, eight patients had complete response, five had partial response, while one had static disease and progressive disease each. Two patients had distant metastases. Four-year loco-regional control (LRC) was 25 % and 4-year overall survival (OS) was 45 %. Most common presentation in our series was locally advanced tumors. Most of these patients require adjuvant RT, which helps in significant LRC. Systemic CT benefits in inoperable, advanced and high risk tumors. Risk-adapted and multimodality approach is the need of hour to achieve good control rates while minimizing treatment related toxicity.

  4. Angiogenic inhibitors for older patients with advanced colorectal cancer: Does the age hold the stage?

    PubMed Central

    Aprile, Giuseppe; Fontanella, Caterina; Lutrino, Eufemia Stefania; Ferrari, Laura; Casagrande, Mariaelena; Cardellino, Giovanni Gerardo; Rosati, Gerardo; Fasola, Gianpiero

    2013-01-01

    Although major progress has been achieved in the treatment of advanced colorectal cancer (CRC) with the employment of antiangiogenic agents, several questions remain on the use of these drugs in older patients. Since cardiovascular, renal and other comorbidities are common in the elderly, an accurate assessment of the patients’ conditions should be performed before a treatment decision is made. Since most CRC patients enrolled in clinical trials testing antiangiogenic drugs were aged < 65 years, the efficacy and tolerability of these agents in elderly patients has not been adequately explored. Data suggest that patients with advanced CRC derive similar benefit from bevacizumab treatment regardless of age, but the advantage of other antiangiogenic drugs in the same class of patients appears more blurred. Literature data suggest that specific antiangiogenic-related toxicities such as hypertension or arterial thromboembolic events may be higher in the elderly than in the younger patients. In addition, it should be emphasized that the patients included in the clinical studies discussed herein were selected and therefore may not be representative of the usual elderly population. Advanced age alone should not discourage the use of bevacizumab. However, a careful patients’ selection and watchful monitoring of toxicities are required to optimize the use of antiangiogenics in this population. PMID:23847406

  5. The role of neoadjuvant chemotherapy in patients with advanced (stage IIIC) epithelial ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Škof, Erik; Merlo, Sebastjan; Pilko, Gasper

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background Primary treatment of patients with advanced epithelial ovarian cancer consists of chemotherapy either before (neoadjuvant chemotherapy, NACT) or after primary surgery (adjuvant chemotherapy). The goal of primary treatment is no residual disease after surgery (R0 resection) what is associated with an improvement in survival of patients. There is, however, no evidence of survival benefits in patients with R0 resections after prior NACT. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the records of patients who were treated with diagnosis of epithelial ovarian cancer at Institute of Oncology Ljubljana in the years 2005–2007. The differences in the rates of R0 resections, progression free survival (PFS), overall survival (OS) and in five-year and eight-year survival rates between patients treated with NACT and patients who had primary surgery were compared. Results Overall 160 patients had stage IIIC epithelial ovarian cancer. Eighty patients had NACT and eighty patients had primary surgery. Patients in NACT group had higher rates of R0 resection (42% vs. 20%; p = 0.011) than patients after primary surgery. PFS was 14.1 months in NACT group and 17.7 months after primary surgery (p = 0.213). OS was 24.8 months in NACT group and 31.6 months after primary surgery (p = 0.012). In patients with R0 resections five-year and eight-year survival rates were 20.6% and 17.6% in NACT group compared to 62.5% and 62.5% after primary surgery (p < 0.0001), respectively. Conclusions Despite higher rates of R0 resections achieved by NACT, survival of patients treated with NACT was inferior to survival of patients who underwent primary surgery. NACT should only be offered to patients with advanced epithelial cancer who are not candidates for primary surgery. PMID:27679552

  6. Clinically Apparent Internal Mammary Nodal Metastasis in Patients With Advanced Breast Cancer: Incidence and Local Control

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Yujing; Oh, Julia L.; Whitman, Gary J.

    2010-07-15

    Purpose: To investigate the incidence and local control of internal mammary lymph node metastases (IMN+) in patients with clinical N2 or N3 locally advanced breast cancer. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed the records of 809 breast cancer patients diagnosed with advanced nodal disease (clinical N2-3) who received radiation treatment at our institution from January 2000 December 2006. Patients were considered IMN+ on the basis of imaging studies. Results: We identified 112 of 809 patients who presented with IMN+ disease (13.8%) detected on ultrasound, computed tomography (CT), positron emission tomography/CT (PET/CT), and/or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies. All 112 patients with IMN+ disease received anthracycline and taxane-based chemotherapy. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NCT) resulted in a complete response (CR) on imaging studies of IMN disease in 72.1% of patients. Excluding 16 patients with progressive disease, 96 patients received adjuvant radiation to the breast or the chest wall and the regional lymphatics including the IMN chain with a median dose of 60 Gy if the internal mammary lymph nodes normalized after chemotherapy and 66 Gy if they did not. The median follow-up of surviving patients was 41 months (8-118 months). For the 96 patients able to complete curative therapy, the actuarial 5-year IMN control rate, locoregional control, overall survival, and disease-free survival were 89%, 80%, 76%, and 56%. Conclusion: Over ten percent of patients with advanced nodal disease will have IMN metastases on imaging studies. Multimodality therapy including IMN irradiation achieves excellent rates of control in the IMN region and a DFS of more than 50% after curative treatment.

  7. Nephron Number, Hypertension, and CKD: Physiological and Genetic Insight from Humans and Animal Models.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xuexiang; Garrett, Michael R

    2017-01-27

    The kidneys play a vital role in the excretion of waste products and the regulation of electrolytes, maintenance of acid-base balance, regulation of blood pressure, and production of several hormones. Any alteration in the structure of the nephron (basic functional unit of the kidney) can have a major impact on the kidney's ability to work efficiently. Progressive decline in kidney function can lead to serious illness and ultimately death if not treated by dialysis or transplantation. While there have been numerous studies that implicate lower nephron numbers as being an important factor in influencing susceptibility to develop hypertension and chronic kidney disease, a direct association has been difficult to establish because of three main limitations: (1) the large variation in nephron number observed in the human population; (2) no established reliable non-invasive methods to determine nephron complement; and (3) to-date, nephron measurements have been done after death which doesn't adequately account for potential loss of nephrons with age or disease. In this review, we will provide an overview of kidney structure/function, discuss the current literature for both humans and other species linking nephron deficiency and cardio-renal complications, as well as, describe the major molecular signaling factors involved in nephrogenesis that modulate variation in nephron number. As more detailed knowledge about the molecular determinants of nephron development and the role of nephron endowment in the cardio-renal system is obtained, it will hopefully provide clinicians the ability to accurately identify people at risk to develop CKD/hypertension and lead to a shift in patient care from disease treatment to prevention.

  8. [Advance notice of contents of treatment influences patients' stress during dental treatment].

    PubMed

    Ozaki, Takashi

    2010-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to clarify the effect of advance notice of contents of treatment on the patients' physiological stress during dental treatment The subjects of our study comprised 34 non-dental professionals (22 female and 12 male). In simulated dental treatment, the subjects were exposed to predetermined stimulations comprised of blowing air on the molars, percussion on the premolar and usage of an air turbine next to the molar in randomized order, with/without advance notice. The skin potential level (SPL) of the subjects was measured as a physiological stress index during such simulated dental treatment As a psychological profile, the stress-coping style of each subject was examined using Lazarus Type Stress Coping Inventory (SCI). The number of decayed, missing, filled teeth (DMF). and the experience of teeth extraction in the past of each subject was also recorded. The correlation among advance notice, order and kind of stimulation, factors of SCI, DMF, gender of the subject, the experience of teeth extraction, and the subjects' stress (SPL change) was statistically analyzed using the generalized estimating equation. As a result, the effect of advance notice on the subjects' stress was opposite when the stress-coping style differed; therefore, dentists must pay attention to the patients' psychological characteristics when using advance notice for the purpose of relieving the patients' stress during dental treatment.

  9. The management of anorexia by patients with advanced cancer: a critical review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Shragge, Jeremy E; Wismer, Wendy V; Olson, Karin L; Baracos, Vickie E

    2006-09-01

    This report presents the results of a critical review of the literature on the experience of anorexia (loss of appetite) by patients with advanced cancer. Although several studies have investigated this experience, the adaptive strategies used by patients to compensate for appetite loss remain poorly elucidated. Based on the small body of extant research, it was concluded that, in many instances, a gap exists between the ability of patients and caregivers to come to terms and deal realistically with the emotional and social consequences of patient anorexia. Patients generally appear to suffer greater discord as a result of this disparity, than from the direct psychological impact of anorexia. A greater understanding of the management of anorexia by patients is essential for the development of dietary and psychosocial interventions that would aid both patients and caregivers to cope with this common symptom.

  10. An observational study of insomnia and nightmare treated with trazodone in patients with advanced cancer.

    PubMed

    Tanimukai, Hitoshi; Murai, Tasuku; Okazaki, Namiko; Matsuda, Yoichi; Okamoto, Yoshiaki; Kabeshita, Yasunobu; Ohno, Yumiko; Tsuneto, Satoru

    2013-06-01

    Patients with cancer often experience insomnia. Nightmares are also a strong factor that interferes with the maintenance of comfortable and satisfying sleep. However, the prevalence and standard treatment of nightmares in patients with cancer have not been established yet. We aimed to treat insomnia and nightmares with trazodone. From 2008 to 2011, trazodone was prescribed to 30 patients with cancer who reported experiencing insomnia with or without nightmares to the palliative care team in Osaka University Hospital. Effective treatment was seen in 15 patients (50%). Four patients with cancer reported having severe nightmares and 2 patients had beneficial effects, with frightening dreams transformed into acceptable ones. Trazodone may be an effective drug for the treatment of insomnia and nightmares in patients with advanced cancer.

  11. Improvements in Augmentation Index and Urinary Albumin Excretion With Benidipine in Hypertensive Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Takayama, Tadateru; Yoda, Shunichi; Yajima, Yoshiharu; Kasamaki, Yuji; Kunimoto, Satoshi; Kanai, Takashi; Hirayama, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    Although calcium channel blockers (CCB) are expected to improve the augmentation index (AI) in CKD patients, the potential effect of benidipine on AI has been poorly studied.The present study aimed to compare the effect of benidipine and amlodipine in the treatment of CKD patients as measured through AI and urinary albumin excretion (UAE). Eligible patients with CKD were randomized to either the benidipine group or amlodipine group. Changes in UAE and AI were compared with target blood pressure level set at < 130/80 mmHg. A total of 108 patients were enrolled; 88 patients who were followed up were included in the analysis. Although no significant change in renal function was noted in either group, there was a significant improvement in AI only in the benidipine group (85.7 ± 13.3% to 81.4 ± 15.2%; P = 0.021) A subgroup analysis of 64 patients who achieved SBP < 140 mmHg at the end of follow-up (31 on amlodipine and 33 on benidipine) was carried out. Significant improvement in AI was noted only in the benidipine group (84.5 ± 13.6% to 79.5 ± 15.2%; P = 0.0138). In another subgroup of patients with UAE ≥ 300 mg/g Cr, a significant improvement in UAE in the benidipine group was found compared with the amlodipine group (-25 ± 46, 51 ± 60%, P = 0.031, respectively).These results suggest that benidipine might reduce significantly AI and might have potentially greater improvements in UAE than amlodipine in advanced CKD patients receiving RAS inhibitors.

  12. The evolving role of health educators in advancing patient safety: forging partnerships and leading change.

    PubMed

    Mercurio, Annette

    2007-04-01

    At least 1.5 million preventable injuries because of adverse drug events occur in the United States each year, according to an Institute of Medicine report. IOM and other organizations at the forefront of health care improvement emphasize that stronger partnerships between patients, their families, and health care providers are necessary to make health care safer. Health educators possess a skill set and an ethical framework that effectively equip them to advance patient and family-centered care and contribute in other significant ways to a safer health care system. Health educators in clinical settings are playing varied and significant roles in advancing patient safety. They are removing barriers to clear communication and forging partnerships between patients, their families, and staff. Health educators are leading patient safety culture change within their institutions and contributing to the shift from provider-centric to patient-centric systems. To expand their impact in improving patient safety, health educators in clinical settings are participating in public awareness campaigns. In seeking to enhance patient safety, health educators face a number of challenges. To successfully manage those, health educators must expand their knowledge, broaden connections, and engage patients and families in meaningful ways.

  13. Impact of Advanced Health Care Directives on Treatment Decisions by Physicians in Patients with Acute Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Qureshi, Adnan I; Chaudhry, Saqib A.; Connelly, Bo; Abott, Emily; Janjua, Tariq; Kim, Stanley H.; Miley, Jefferson T.; Rodriguez, Gustavo J.; Uzun, Guven; Watanabe, Masaki

    2012-01-01

    Background The implementation of advance health care directives, prepared by almost half of the adult population in United States remains relatively under studied. We determined the impact of advance health care directives on treatment decisions by multiple physicians in stroke patients. Methods A de-identified summary of clinical and radiological records of 28 patients with stroke was given to six stroke physicians who were not involved in the care of the patients. Each physician independently rated 28 treatment decisions per patient in the presence or absence of advance health care directives 1 month apart to allow memory washout. The percentage agreement to treat/intervene per patient and proportion of treatment withheld as a group were estimated for each of the 28 treatment decision items. We also determined the interobserver reliability between the two raters (attorneys) in interpretation of 6 items characterizing the adequacy of documentation within the 28 advance health care directives. Results The percentage agreement among physician raters for treatment decisions in 28 stroke patients was highest for treatment of hyperpyrexia (100%, 100%) and lowest for intensive care unit monitoring duration based on family-physician considerations outside of accepted criteria within institution (68%, 69%) in presence and absence of advance care health directives. The physician rater agreement in choosing “yes” was highest for “routine complexity” treatment decisions and lowest for “moderate complexity” treatment decisions. The choice of withholding treatment in routine complexity,” “moderate complexity,” or “high complexity” treatment decisions was remarkably similar among raters in presence or absence of advance care health directives. The only treatment decision that showed an impact of advance care health directives was intensive care unit monitoring withheld in 32% of treatment decisions in presence of directives (compared with 8% in the absence

  14. Phase 1 Study of Erlotinib Plus Radiation Therapy in Patients With Advanced Cutaneous Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Heath, C. Hope; Deep, Nicholas L.; Nabell, Lisle; Carroll, William R.; Desmond, Renee; Clemons, Lisa; Spencer, Sharon; Magnuson, J. Scott; Rosenthal, Eben L.

    2013-04-01

    Purpose: To assess the toxicity profile of erlotinib therapy combined with postoperative adjuvant radiation therapy in patients with advanced cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma. Methods and Materials: This was a single-arm, prospective, phase 1 open-label study of erlotinib with radiation therapy to treat 15 patients with advanced cutaneous head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma. Toxicity data were summarized, and survival was analyzed with the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: The majority of patients were male (87%) and presented with T4 disease (93%). The most common toxicity attributed to erlotinib was a grade 2-3 dermatologic reaction occurring in 100% of the patients, followed by mucositis (87%). Diarrhea occurred in 20% of the patients. The 2-year recurrence rate was 26.7%, and mean time to cancer recurrence was 10.5 months. Two-year overall survival was 65%, and disease-free survival was 60%. Conclusions: Erlotinib and radiation therapy had an acceptable toxicity profile in patients with advanced cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma. The disease-free survival in this cohort was comparable to that in historical controls.

  15. Modification of mandibular advancement osteotomy in a patient with Hanhart syndrome.

    PubMed

    Uğurlu, Kemal; Sevim, Kamuran Zeynep; Akcal, Arzu; Karsidag, Semra

    2013-11-01

    The oromandibular limb hypogenesis syndrome is a group of anomalies affecting the mandible, tongue, and maxilla with or without reductive limb anomalies. It was first described by Hanhart in 1950. In severe syndromic cases of mandibular hypoplasia, a number of techniques have been described for mandibular advancement including sagittal split osteotomies, segmental osteotomies, or distraction osteogenesis just to name a few. A 25-year-old male patient presented to our clinic with symptoms including difficulty in speech and eating, disability in opening the mouth, together with hand and foot abnormalities; we want to describe a modification in the technique of mandibular advancement and the patient's late postoperative results. The design of the step osteotomy is modified by softening the angles of the steps and elongating the horizontal segment of the step to approximately 25 mm to allow for a more efficient advancement of the mandible. The postoperative period was uneventful, with no signs of inferior alveolar nerve disturbance. The patient showed an increase of the mouth opening distance immediately after surgery. We believe that this tongue-in-groove-like modified mandibular step osteotomy technique is a good alternative in patients where advancement greater than 15 mm is required, preserving the nerve and achieving solid bony intact surfaces.

  16. Effect of pravastatin on the survival of patients with advanced gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bujanda, Luis; Rodríguez-González, Araceli; Sarasqueta, Cristina; Eizaguirre, Emma; Hijona, Elizabeth; Marín, José J.G.; Perugorria, María J.; Banales, Jesús M.; Cosme, Angel

    2016-01-01

    Objectives A fluoropyrimidine plus cisplatin combined with surgery is standard first-line treatment for advanced gastric cancer. We evaluated the effect of pravastatin on overall survival in patients with advanced gastric cancer in a prospective cohort study. Methods At the time of surgery, we assigned 60 patients with advanced gastric cancer (stage III or IV) to receive standard first-line treatment (control group) or standard first-line treatment plus pravastatin at a dose of 40 mg once daily (pravastatin group). The minimum follow-up period was 4 years and the maximum of 6 years. Results The mean of age was 66 years and the TNM stage was III and IV in 65% and 35% of patients, respectively. There was no significant difference between the two groups (control vs pravastatin) in median overall survival (15 vs 14 months; P = 0.8). Predictors of survival were the stage (hazard ratio of death stage IV (III stage as reference): 4.4; 95% CI: 2–9.7; p < 0.05) and older age (hazard ratio of death ≥ 65 years (< 65 years as reference): 2.8; 95% CI: 1.3–6; p < 0.05). Conclusions Pravastatin did not improve outcome in patients with advanced gastric cancer. PMID:26735890

  17. Functional Genomic Annotation of Genetic Risk Loci Highlights Inflammation and Epithelial Biology Networks in CKD

    PubMed Central

    Ledo, Nora; Ko, Yi-An; Park, Ae-Seo Deok; Kang, Hyun-Mi; Han, Sang-Youb; Choi, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have identified multiple loci associated with the risk of CKD. Almost all risk variants are localized to the noncoding region of the genome; therefore, the role of these variants in CKD development is largely unknown. We hypothesized that polymorphisms alter transcription factor binding, thereby influencing the expression of nearby genes. Here, we examined the regulation of transcripts in the vicinity of CKD-associated polymorphisms in control and diseased human kidney samples and used systems biology approaches to identify potentially causal genes for prioritization. We interrogated the expression and regulation of 226 transcripts in the vicinity of 44 single nucleotide polymorphisms using RNA sequencing and gene expression arrays from 95 microdissected control and diseased tubule samples and 51 glomerular samples. Gene expression analysis from 41 tubule samples served for external validation. 92 transcripts in the tubule compartment and 34 transcripts in glomeruli showed statistically significant correlation with eGFR. Many novel genes, including ACSM2A/2B, FAM47E, and PLXDC1, were identified. We observed that the expression of multiple genes in the vicinity of any single CKD risk allele correlated with renal function, potentially indicating that genetic variants influence multiple transcripts. Network analysis of GFR-correlating transcripts highlighted two major clusters; a positive correlation with epithelial and vascular functions and an inverse correlation with inflammatory gene cluster. In summary, our functional genomics analysis highlighted novel genes and critical pathways associated with kidney function for future analysis. PMID:25231882

  18. A resistant starch fiber diet ameliorates oxidative stress, inflammation, and progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Inflammation is a constant feature and a major mediator of CKD progression. It is, in part, driven by altered gut microbiome and disruption of intestinal epithelial barrier, events which are primarily caused by: 1- urea influx in the intestine resulting in dominance of urease-possessing bacteria; 2-...

  19. Ethical issues in the geriatric patient with advanced cancer 'living to the end'.

    PubMed

    Daher, M

    2013-10-01

    Cancer incidence will increase as the population ages; there will be a 50% increase in new cancer cases over the next 20 years, and the biggest rates of increase will occur in the developing world. Owing to technical advances in the care of critical illness, as it is the case in elderly people with advanced cancer, physicians, patients and families are often confronted with ambiguous circumstances in which medical advances may inadvertently prolong suffering and the dying process rather than bring healing and recovery. In this review of the ethical issues confronting physicians who care for patients with advanced life-limiting illnesses like cancer, a philosophical debate continues in the medical community regarding the rightness or wrongness of certain actions (e.g. physician-assisted death, euthanasia), while at the same time there is a strong desire to find a common ground for moral discourse that could guide medical decision-making in this difficult period in the lives of our patients. We will discuss how a good palliative care can be an alternative to these ethical dilemmas. Although some issues (e.g. the role of physician-assisted death in addressing suffering) remain very controversial, there is much common ground based on the application of the four major principles of medical ethics, no malfeasance, beneficence, autonomy and justice. Thus, the physician's primary commitment must always be the patient's welfare and best interests, whether the physician is treating illness or helping patients to cope with illness, disability and death. A key skill here is the communication of bad news and to negotiate a treatment plan that is acceptable to the patient, the family and the healthcare team. Attention to psychosocial issues demands involvement of the patients and their families as partners. Physicians should be sensitive to the range of psychosocial distress and social disruption common to dying patients and their families. Spiritual issues often come to the

  20. Ozone therapy ameliorates tubulointerstitial inflammation by regulating TLR4 in adenine-induced CKD rats.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhiyuan; Liu, Xiuheng; Yu, Gang; Chen, Hui; Wang, Lei; Wang, Zhishun; Qiu, Tao; Weng, Xiaodong

    2016-06-01

    Tubulointerstitium inflammation is a common pathway aggravating chronic kidney disease (CKD) progression and the mechanism is partly associated with excessive activation of toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) in tubulointerstitium. Ozone therapy is demonstrated to alleviate inflammation in some experiments. The aim of this study is to examine whether ozone therapy could ameliorate chronic tubulointerstitium inflammation by suppressing TLR4 in adenine-induced CKD rats. Sprague-Dawley rats were fed with 0.75% adenine-containing diet to induce CKD and tubulointerstitium inflammation injury. Ozone therapy (1.1 mg/kg) was simultaneously administrated by rectal insufflations (i.r.). After 4 weeks, serum and kidney samples were collected for detection. Renal function and systemic electrolyte were detected. Renal pathological changes were assessed by hematoxylin-eosin (H&E) staining and Masson trichrome (MT) staining. Immunohistochemistry, Western blot and Real-time PCR were applied to evaluate tubulointerstitium inflammation as well as the expression of TLR4 and phosphorylated nuclear factor kappa B P65 (p-NF-κB P65) in rats. The results showed ozone therapy improved serious renal insufficiency, systemic electrolyte disorder and tubulointerstitium morphology damages in adenine-induced CKD rats. In addition, ozone therapy suppressed excessive activation of TLR4 and p-NF-κB P65 in the tubulointerstitium of adenine-induced CKD rats, accompanied by the reduction of inflammation-related cytokines including monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and interleukin-6 (IL-6). The protein expression of TLR4 was positively correlated with the protein expression levels of MCP-1 (r = 0.7863, p < 0.01) and TNF-α (r = 0.7547, p < 0.01) in CKD rats. These findings indicated ozone therapy could attenuate tubulointerstitium inflammation injury in adenine-induced CKD rats and the mechanism might associate with the

  1. Qualitative research in CKD: an overview of methods and applications.

    PubMed

    Tong, Allison; Winkelmayer, Wolfgang C; Craig, Jonathan C

    2014-09-01

    There recently has been a paradigm shift in health care policies and research toward greater patient centeredness. A core tenet of patient-centered care is that patients' needs, values, and preferences are respected in clinical decision making. Qualitative research methods are designed to generate insights about patients' priorities, values, and beliefs. However, in the past 5 years (2008-2013), only 23 (0.4%) of the 6,043 original articles published in the top 5 nephrology journals (assessed by impact factor) were qualitative studies. Given this observation, it seems important to promote awareness and better understanding within the nephrology community about qualitative research and how the findings can contribute to improving the quality and outcomes of care for patients with chronic kidney disease. This article outlines examples of how qualitative research can generate insight into the values and preferences of patients with chronic kidney disease, provides an overview of qualitative health research methods, and discusses practical applications for research, practice, and policy.

  2. Involved-field radiotherapy for patients in partial remission after chemotherapy for advanced Hodgkin's lymphoma

    SciTech Connect

    Aleman, Berthe M.P. . E-mail: b.aleman@nki.nl; Raemaekers, John M.M.; Tomisic, Radka; Baaijens, Margreet H.A.; Bortolus, Roberto; Lybeert, Marnix L.M.; Maazen, Richard W.M. van der; Girinsky, Theodore; Demeestere, Geertrui; Lugtenburg, Pieternella; Lievens, Yolande; Jong, Daphne de; Pinna, Antonella; Henry-Amar, Michel

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The use of radiotherapy in patients with advanced Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL) is controversial. The purpose of this study was to describe the role of radiotherapy in patients with advanced HL who were in partial remission (PR) after chemotherapy. Methods: In a prospective randomized trial, patients <70 years old with previously untreated Stage III-IV HL were treated with six to eight cycles of mechlorethamine, vincristine, procarbazine, prednisone/doxorubicin, bleomycine, vinblastine hybrid chemotherapy. Patients in complete remission (CR) after chemotherapy were randomized between no further treatment and involved-field radiotherapy (IF-RT). Those in PR after six cycles received IF-RT (30 Gy to originally involved nodal areas and 18-24 Gy to extranodal sites with or without a boost). Results: Of 739 enrolled patients, 57% were in CR and 33% in PR after chemotherapy. The median follow-up was 7.8 years. Patients in PR had bulky mediastinal involvement significantly more often than did those in CR after chemotherapy. The 8-year event-free survival and overall survival rate for the 227 patients in PR who received IF-RT was 76% and 84%, respectively. These rates were not significantly different from those for CR patients who received IF-RT (73% and 78%) or for those in CR who did not receive IF-RT (77% and 85%). The incidence of second malignancies in patients in PR who were treated with IF-RT was similar to that in nonirradiated patients. Conclusion: Patients in PR after six cycles of mechlorethamine, vincristine, procarbazine, prednisone/doxorubicine, bleomycine, vinblastine treated with IF-RT had 8-year event-free survival and overall survival rates similar to those of patients in CR, suggesting a definite role for RT in these patients.

  3. Home-based functional walking program for advanced cancer patients receiving palliative care: a case series

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Although meta-analyses have demonstrated that physical activity can positively impact quality of life outcomes in early stage cancer patients, it is not yet known whether these benefits can be extended to patients with advanced cancer. In a previous pilot survey of patients with advanced cancer with a median survival of 104 days, participants felt willing and able to participate in a physical activity intervention, and reported a strong preference for walking and home-based programming. Here, we report on the initial development and feasibility of a home-based functional walking program in patients with advanced cancer receiving palliative care. Methods Nine adult patients were recruited from outpatient palliative care clinics and palliative home care. A pilot intervention trial was conducted over a 6-week period. The McGill Quality of Life Questionnaire (MQOL), Late Life Function and Disability Instrument (LLFDI), Edmonton Symptom Assessment System (ESAS), Seniors Fitness Test, four-test balance scale, and grip strength, were performed pre- and post-intervention. Participants wore activPAL™ accelerometers to monitor ambulatory activity levels. Results Of the nine recruited participants, three participants dropped out prior to baseline testing due to hospital admission and feeling overwhelmed, and three participants dropped out during the intervention due to severe symptoms. Only three participants completed the intervention program, pre- and post-intervention assessments: two reported improvements in total MQOL scores, yet all three shared an overall trend towards worsening symptom and total fatigue scores post-intervention. Two participants passed away within 90 days of completing the intervention. Conclusions This case series demonstrates the challenges of a physical activity intervention in patients with advanced cancer receiving palliative care. Further feasibility research is required in this patient population. Trial registration This study is

  4. Advanced Nursing Experience Is Beneficial for Lowering the Peritonitis Rate in Patients on Peritoneal Dialysis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhikai; Xu, Rong; Zhuo, Min; Dong, Jie

    2012-01-01

    ♦ Objectives: We explored the relationship between the experience level of nurses and the peritonitis risk in peritoneal dialysis (PD) patients. ♦ Methods: Our observational cohort study followed 305 incident PD patients until a first episode of peritonitis, death, or censoring. Patients were divided into 3 groups according to the work experience in general medicine of their nurses—that is, least experience (<10 years), moderate experience (10 to <15 years), and advanced experience (≥15 years). Demographic characteristics, baseline biochemistry, and residual renal function were also recorded. Multivariate Cox regression was used to analyze the association of risks for all-cause and gram-positive peritonitis with patient training provided by nurses at different experience levels. ♦ Results: Of the 305 patients, 91 were trained at the initiation of PD by nurses with advanced experience, 100 by nurses with moderate experience, and 114 by nurses with the least experience. Demographic and clinical variables did not vary significantly between the groups. During 13 582 patient–months of follow-up, 129 first episodes of peritonitis were observed, with 48 episodes being attributed to gram-positive organisms. Kaplan–Meier analysis showed that training by nurses with advanced experience predicted the longest period free of first-episode gram-positive peritonitis. After adjustment for some recognized confounders, the advanced experience group was still associated with the lowest risk for first-episode gram-positive peritonitis. The level of nursing experience was not significantly correlated with all-cause peritonitis risk. ♦ Conclusions: The experience in general medicine of nurses might help to lower the risk of gram-positive peritonitis among PD patients. These data are the first to indicate that nursing experience in areas other than PD practice can be vital in the training of PD patients. PMID:21719682

  5. Limitation to Advanced Life Support in patients admitted to intensive care unit with integrated palliative care

    PubMed Central

    Mazutti, Sandra Regina Gonzaga; Nascimento, Andréia de Fátima; Fumis, Renata Rego Lins

    2016-01-01

    Objective To estimate the incidence of limitations to Advanced Life Support in critically ill patients admitted to an intensive care unit with integrated palliative care. Methods This retrospective cohort study included patients in the palliative care program of the intensive care unit of Hospital Paulistano over 18 years of age from May 1, 2011, to January 31, 2014. The limitations to Advanced Life Support that were analyzed included do-not-resuscitate orders, mechanical ventilation, dialysis and vasoactive drugs. Central tendency measures were calculated for quantitative variables. The chi-squared test was used to compare the characteristics of patients with or without limits to Advanced Life Support, and the Wilcoxon test was used to compare length of stay after Advanced Life Support. Confidence intervals reflecting p ≤ 0.05 were considered for statistical significance. Results A total of 3,487 patients were admitted to the intensive care unit, of whom 342 were included in the palliative care program. It was observed that after entering the palliative care program, it took a median of 2 (1 - 4) days for death to occur in the intensive care unit and 4 (2 - 11) days for hospital death to occur. Many of the limitations to Advanced Life Support (42.7%) took place on the first day of hospitalization. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (96.8%) and ventilatory support (73.6%) were the most adopted limitations. Conclusion The contribution of palliative care integrated into the intensive care unit was important for the practice of orthothanasia, i.e., the non-extension of the life of a critically ill patient by artificial means. PMID:27626949

  6. The patient perspective: Quality of life in advanced heart failure with frequent hospitalisations.

    PubMed

    Nieminen, Markku S; Dickstein, Kenneth; Fonseca, Cândida; Serrano, Jose Magaña; Parissis, John; Fedele, Francesco; Wikström, Gerhard; Agostoni, Piergiuseppe; Atar, Shaul; Baholli, Loant; Brito, Dulce; Colet, Josep Comín; Édes, István; Gómez Mesa, Juan E; Gorjup, Vojka; Garza, Eduardo Herrera; González Juanatey, José R; Karanovic, Nenad; Karavidas, Apostolos; Katsytadze, Igor; Kivikko, Matti; Matskeplishvili, Simon; Merkely, Béla; Morandi, Fabrizio; Novoa, Angel; Oliva, Fabrizio; Ostadal, Petr; Pereira-Barretto, Antonio; Pollesello, Piero; Rudiger, Alain; Schwinger, Robert H G; Wieser, Manfred; Yavelov, Igor; Zymliński, Robert

    2015-07-15

    End of life is an unfortunate but inevitable phase of the heart failure patients' journey. It is often preceded by a stage in the progression of heart failure defined as advanced heart failure, and characterised by poor quality of life and frequent hospitalisations. In clinical practice, the efficacy of treatments for advanced heart failure is often assessed by parameters such as clinical status, haemodynamics, neurohormonal status, and echo/MRI indices. From the patients' perspective, however, quality-of-life-related parameters, such as functional capacity, exercise performance, psychological status, and frequency of re-hospitalisations, are more significant. The effects of therapies and interventions on these parameters are, however, underrepresented in clinical trials targeted to assess advanced heart failure treatment efficacy, and data are overall scarce. This is possibly due to a non-universal definition of the quality-of-life-related endpoints, and to the difficult standardisation of the data collection. These uncertainties also lead to difficulties in handling trade-off decisions between quality of life and survival by patients, families and healthcare providers. A panel of 34 experts in the field of cardiology and intensive cardiac care from 21 countries around the world convened for reviewing the existing data on quality-of-life in patients with advanced heart failure, discussing and reaching a consensus on the validity and significance of quality-of-life assessment methods. Gaps in routine care and research, which should be addressed, were identified. Finally, published data on the effects of current i.v. vasoactive therapies such as inotropes, inodilators, and vasodilators on quality-of-life in advanced heart failure patients were analysed.

  7. Predictors of Health-Related Quality of Life in Patients with Co-Morbid Diabetes and Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Clement; Ranasinha, Sanjeeva; Gallagher, Martin; Fulcher, Gregory; Kerr, Peter G.; Russell, Grant; Teede, Helena; Usherwood, Tim; Walker, Rowan; Zoungas, Sophia

    2016-01-01

    Background People living with diabetes and chronic kidney disease (CKD) experience compromised quality of life. Consequently, it is critical to identify and understand factors influencing their health-related quality of life (HRQoL). This study examined factors associated with HRQoL among patients with diabetes and CKD. Methods A cross sectional study among adults with comorbid diabetes and CKD (eGFR <60 mL/min/1.73m2) recruited from renal and diabetes clinics of four large tertiary referral hospitals in Australia was performed. Each participant completed the Kidney Disease Quality of Life (KDQoL ™ -36) questionnaire, which is comprised of two composite measures of physical and mental health and 3 kidney disease specific subscales with possible scores ranging from 0 to 100 with higher values indicating better HRQoL. Demographic and clinical data were also collected. Regression analyses were performed to determine the relationship between HRQoL and potential predictor factors. Results A total of 308 patients were studied with a mean age of 66.9 (SD = 11.0) years and 70% were males. Mean scores for the physical composite summary, mental composite summary, symptom/problem list, effects of kidney disease and burden of kidney disease scales were 35.2, 47.0, 73.8, 72.5 and 59.8 respectively. Younger age was associated with lower scores in all subscales except for the physical composite summary. Female gender, obese or normal weight rather than overweight, and smoking were all associated with lower scores in one or more subscales. Scores were progressively lower with more advanced stage of CKD (p<0.05) in all subscales except for the mental composite summary. Conclusion In patients with diabetes and CKD, younger age was associated with lower scores in all HRQoL subscales except the physical composite summary and female gender, obese or normal weight and more advanced stages of CKD were associated with lower scores in one or more subscales. Identifying these factors will

  8. What we learned from difficult hepatectomies in patients with advanced hepatic malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Bo Hyun; Lee, Jae Hoon; Lee, Sang Yeup; Song, Dae Keun; Hwang, Ji Woong; Hwang, Dae Wook; Lee, Young-Joo

    2011-01-01

    Backgrounds/Aims By reviewing difficult resections for advanced hepatic malignancies, we discuss the effectiveness and extended indications for hepatectomy in such patients. Methods We reviewed 7 patients who underwent extensive surgery between July 2008 and March 2011 for advanced hepatic malignancies. They had stage IV disease, except for in one case that was a stage IIIC (T4N0M0) hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Results Patient 1 with intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (IHCC) underwent right hemihepatectomy and resection of the bile duct and left portal vein. At 39 months after surgery, she had no recurrence or metastasis. Patient 2 with HCC underwent palliative right trisectionectomy. At 38 months after surgery, he is alive despite residual pulmonary metastases. Patient 3 with HCC invading the hepatic vein and diaphragm underwent right trisectionectomy and caval venoplasty. At 12 months after surgery, he had no recurrence or metastasis. Patient 4, who had 2 large HCCs and pulmonary thromboembolism, underwent a right trisectionectomy. At 7 months after surgery, he had no evidence of recurred HCC. Patient 5, who had IHCC invading her inferior vena cava and main portal vein, underwent preoperative radiotherapy, left hemihepatectomy, and caval resection. At 20 months after surgery, she is well despite a caval thrombus. Patient 6 and 7 underwent repeated surgery due to a recurred IHCC and metastatic colon cancer, respectively. In addition, they are alive during each 20 and 17 months after surgery. Conclusions Despite macroscopic extrahepatic metastases or major vessel involvement, extensive surgery for advanced hepatic malignancy may result in relatively favorable outcomes and be important modality for improving of survival in such patients. PMID:26421042

  9. Evaluation of overall tumor cellularity after neoadjuvant chemotherapy in patient with locally advanced hypopharyngeal cancer.

    PubMed

    Chitose, Shun-ichi; Chijiwa, Hideki; Maeda, Akiteru; Umeno, Hirohito; Nakashima, Tadashi; Kiyokawa, Kensuke; Hayabuchi, Naofumi; Fujita, Hiromasa

    2012-11-01

    The aim of this study is to clarify the prognostic value of the pathological overall tumor cellularity after neoadjuvant chemotherapy for locally advanced hypopharyngeal cancer. In consecutive series of 45 operable patients with locally advanced hypopharyngeal cancer, neoadjuvant chemotherapy by cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil was administered. Pathological image analysis was performed in 30 patients using the large cross-section specimen after total resection to evaluate the overall tumor cellularity. The chemotherapeutic responses were classified according to the pathological grading scale by dividing into four categories; more than 70% overall tumor cellularity in Grade 1, between an estimated 10 and 70% in Grade 2, less than 10% in Grade 3, and no identifiable malignant tumor cells in Grade 4. The pathological grades were taken into account for analysis of the survival. In 30 available patients, 40% had Grade 1 pathological response, 30% had Grade 2, and 30% had Grade 3. There was no Grade 4 patient. The overall 5-year survival rate for these 30 patients was 53.33%. The survival rate (61.66%) for patients with Grade 2 and 3 responses was significantly higher than that (27.78%) for patients with Grade 1 response (p = 0.009). Cox regression analysis revealed that the increasing pathological grade was an independent predictor of a better survival in patients undergoing neoadjuvant chemotherapy. We have shown that the prognosis of patients with locally advanced hypopharyngeal cancer, who had been treated by neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by total resection, can be predicted by evaluation of pathological overall tumor cellularity from the large section specimen.

  10. Predictors of psychological distress in advanced cancer patients under palliative treatments.

    PubMed

    Diaz-Frutos, D; Baca-Garcia, E; García-Foncillas, J; López-Castroman, J

    2016-07-01

    This work aims to investigate the factors associated with psychological distress in advanced cancer patients under palliative treatment. We comprehensively assessed the demographic, psychosocial and health factors of 158 advanced cancer patients. Patients with high and low distress, according to the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, were compared. A regression analysis was built to identify the best predictors of distress. Patients with high psychological distress (81%) were more likely to have lung cancer, suicidal ideation, hopelessness, low quality of life and poor body image than those without. In the multivariate model, only poor emotional functioning (OR = .89; 95% CI = .83-.95; p ≤ .001), hopelessness (OR = .86; 95% CI = .78-.94; p ≤ .001) and body image distortions (OR = .77; 95% CI = .68-.85; p = .005) were retained. High levels of hopelessness, impaired emotional functioning and body image distortions are the main factors associated with psychological distress in patients with advanced cancer. Potential interventions to modify these factors in palliative units are discussed.

  11. Immune inflammation indicators and implication for immune modulation strategies in advanced hepatocellular carcinoma patients receiving sorafenib

    PubMed Central

    Gardini, Andrea Casadei; Scarpi, Emanuela; Faloppi, Luca; Scartozzi, Mario; Silvestris, Nicola; Santini, Daniele; de Stefano, Giorgio; Marisi, Giorgia; Negri, Francesca V.; Foschi, Francesco Giuseppe; Valgiusti, Martina; Ercolani, Giorgio; Frassineti, Giovanni Luca

    2016-01-01

    We evalueted a systemic immune-inflammation index (SII), neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR) and platelet-lymphocyte ratio (PLR) with the aim to explored their prognostic value in patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) treated with sorafenib. 56 advanced HCC patients receiving sorafenib were available for our analysis. Lymphocyte, neutrophil and platelet were measured before beginning of treatment and after one month. Patient with SII ≥ 360 showed lower median PFS (2.6 vs. 3.9 months, P < 0.026) and OS (5.6 vs. 13.9 months, P = 0.027) with respect to patients with SII < 360. NLR ≥ 3 had a lower median PFS (2.6 vs. 3.3 months, P < 0.049) but not OS (5.6 vs. 13.9 months, P = 0.062) than those with NLR < 3. After adjusting for clinical covariates SII and NLR remained an independent prognostic factor for OS. The SII and NLR represent potential prognostic indicator in patients with advanced HCC treated with sorafenib. PMID:27613839

  12. [Immunomodulator Intensification of Etioropic Therapy in Patients with Advanced Pulmonary Tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Kolomiets, V M; Abramov, A V; Rachina, N V; Rubleva, N V

    2015-01-01

    The study was aimed at possible increase of the therapy efficacy in patients with advanced tuberculosis by including immunomodulators to the treatment schemes. The data concerning 6034 patients with advanced tuberculosis, mainly fibrocavernous tuberculosis of the lungs, were analysed. Four groups of the patients were randomized. In group 1 the management of the patients included etiotropic therapy and some treatment and rehabilitation measures with the use of Cycloferon. The group 2 patients in addition to the etiotropic therapy and some treatment and rehabilitation measures were given Omega-3. In group 3 the management included the etiotropic therapy and some treatment and rehabilitation measures. In group 4 the etioropic therapy was used alone. The analysis showed that 3419 patients had primary pulmonary tuberculosis, 340 patients had relapsing tuberculosis and 2275 patients had long-term process. The etiotropic therapy efficacy was estimated after an intensive phase of not more than 3 months. In the cases with Mycobacterium tuberculosis drug resistance and some other unfavourable factors it was estimated after a 5-month intensive phase. The results confirmed that inclusion of immunomodulators to the treatment schemes allowed to increase the therapy efficacy and the patients' adherence to the treatment, as well as to shorten the period of the bacteria carriage. Thus, the use of Cycloferon in the schemes of the treatment of the patients with fibrocavernous pulmonary tuberculosis allowed to shorten the period of the pathogen carriage (as well as the drug resistant forms) in 94.1 ± 3.33% of the patients in spite of concomitant diseases. The effect of Cycloferon in such cases was likely due to both its direct immunoprotective action and the improvement of the general state of the patients and their higher adherence to the treatment.

  13. Proteinuria as a Therapeutic Target in Advanced Chronic Kidney Disease: a Retrospective Multicenter Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chang-Hsu; Wu, Hon-Yen; Wang, Chieh-Li; Yang, Feng-Jung; Wu, Pei-Chen; Hung, Szu-Chun; Kan, Wei-Chih; Yang, Chung-Wei; Chiang, Chih-Kang; Huang, Jenq-Wen; Hung, Kuan-Yu

    2016-01-01

    Current evidence of proteinuria reduction as a surrogate target in advanced chronic kidney disease (CKD) is incomplete due to lack of patient-pooled database. We retrospectively studied a multicenter cohort of 1891 patients who were enrolled in the nationwide multidisciplinary pre-end stage renal disease care program with a baseline glomerular filtration rate (GFR) <45 mL/min/1.73 m2 and followed longitudinally to investigate the effect of the change in proteinuria on renal death (defined as composite of dialysis and death occurring before initiation of dialysis). The group with a change in proteinuria ≤0.30 g/g (n = 1261) had lower cumulative probabilities of renal death (p < 0.001). In a linear regression model, a higher baseline proteinuria and a greater increase in proteinuria were associated with faster annual GFR decline. Cox’s analysis showed that every 1 unit increase in natural log(baseline proteinuria, 10 g/g) and every 0.1 g/g increase in the change in proteinuria resulted in 67% (HR = 1.67, 95% CI: 1.46–1.91) and 1% (HR = 1.01, 95% CI: 1.01–1.01) greater risk of renal death respectively after adjusting for the effects of the other covariates. Our study provided a patient-based evidence to support proteinuria as a therapeutic target in advanced CKD. PMID:27198863

  14. Clinical and radiographic evaluation of maxillary central incisors exposure in patients undergoing maxillary advancement

    PubMed Central

    Trento, Guilherme dos Santos; Bernabé, Felipe Bueno Rosettti; da Costa, Delson João; Rebellato, Nelson Luis Barbosa; Klüppel, Leandro Eduardo; Scariot, Rafaela

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Patients with dentofacial deformities may undergo orthodontic or orthodontic-surgical treatment. Both modalities can affect esthetics. Objective: This study aims to evaluate clinical and radiographic changes in exposure of maxillary central incisors occurring after orthognathic surgery for maxillary advancement. Methods: A total of 17 patients who underwent orthognathic surgery for maxillary advancement between September, 2010 and July, 2011 were selected. Exposure of maxillary central incisors was evaluated clinically and by lateral cephalograms. Measurements were taken one week before and three months after surgery. Data were paired in terms of sex, age, nasolabial angle, height and thickness of the upper lip, the amount of maxillary advancement, clinical exposure and inclination of maxillary central incisor by statistical tests (CI 95%). Results: After maxillary advancement, incisor clinical exposure had increased even with relaxed lips and under forced smile. Moreover, there was a mean increase of 23.33% revealed by lateral cephalograms. There was an inverse correlation between upper lip thickness and incisors postsurgical exposure revealed by radiographic images (p = 0.002). Conclusions: Significant changes in the exposure of maxillary central incisors occur after maxillary advancement, under the influence of some factors, especially lip thickness. PMID:26691970

  15. Clinical activity of sunitinib in patients with advanced desmoplastic round cell tumor: a case series.

    PubMed

    Italiano, Antoine; Kind, Michèle; Cioffi, Angela; Maki, Robert G; Bui, Binh

    2013-09-01

    Desmoplastic small round cell tumor (DSRCT) is a rare and aggressive malignancy with poor outcome occurring in adolescents and young adults. Therapeutic options for patients with advanced disease are limited. Preclinical studies have shown that VEGFR-2 and VEGFA are overexpressed in DSRCT and that DSRCT xenografts were highly responsive to anti-VEGF agents such as bevacizumab. We report here the clinical activity of sunitinib in eight patients with DSCRT. Our data suggest that sunitinib may be associated with clinical benefit even in heavily pretreated patients.

  16. Documentation of advance directives among home health and hospice patients: United States, 2007.

    PubMed

    Resnick, Helaine E; Hickman, Susan; Foster, Gregory L

    2012-02-01

    This report provides nationally representative data on documentation of advance directives (ADs) among home health (HH) and hospice patients. Advance directives were recorded for 29% of HH patients and 90% of hospice discharges. Among HH patients, increasing age and use of assistive devices were associated with greater odds of having an AD, while being Hispanic or black (relative to white) and enrolled in Medicaid decreased the odds of having ADs. Among hospice discharges, being enrolled in Medicare and having 4 or 5 activities of daily living (ADL) limitations were associated with higher odds of ADs while depression, use of emergency services, and being black (relative to White) were associated with lower odds. Even after adjustment for potentially confounding factors, racial differences persist in AD documentation in both care settings.

  17. Surgical management of maxillomandibular advancement in sleep apnea patients: specific technical considerations.

    PubMed

    Gilon, Y; Raskin, S; Heymans, O; Poirrier, R

    2001-01-01

    Maxillomandibular advancement is an integral part of the surgical treatment of patients suffering from obstructive sleep apnea. A number of publications report its efficacy and have attempted to define predictive success criteria. However, few authors have shown an interest in the surgical specificity of this intervention and in the difficulties that can be encountered, which differ from those seen in conventional orthognathic surgery. In this article, a series of patients treated with maxillomandibular osteotomy to correct obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (n = 17) are compared with patients who underwent surgery for the correction of dentofacial disharmonies (n = 33). Observations emphasized the importance of respecting a strict surgical and postsurgical protocol to avoid any technical traps linked to maxillomandibular advancement, both in preoperative simulations and during and after surgery. Results concerning sleep parameters will be the subject of a future publication.

  18. Mobile patient applications within diabetes - from few and easy to advanced functionalities.

    PubMed

    Årsand, Eirik; Skrøvseth, Stein Olav; Hejlesen, Ole; Horsch, Alexander; Godtliebsen, Fred; Grøttland, Astrid; Hartvigsen, Gunnar

    2013-01-01

    Patient diaries as apps on mobile phones are becoming increasingly common, and can be a good support tool for patients who need to organize information relevant for their disease. Self-management is important to achieving diabetes treatment goals and can be a tool for lifestyle changes for patients with Type 2 diabetes. The autoimmune disease Type 1 diabetes requires a more intensive management than Type 2 - thus more advanced functionalities is desirable for users. Both simple and easy-to-use and more advanced diaries have their respective benefits, depending on the target user group and intervention. In this poster we summarize main findings and experience from more than a decade of research and development in the diabetes area. Several versions of the mobile health research platform-the Few Touch Application (FTA) are presented to illustrate the different approaches and results.

  19. Heart Transplant and Mechanical Circulatory Support in Patients With Advanced Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Enrique, Cristina; Jorde, Ulrich P; González-Costello, José

    2017-02-07

    Patients with advanced heart failure have a poor prognosis and heart transplant is still the best treatment option. However, the scarcity of donors, long waiting times, and an increasing number of unstable patients have favored the development of mechanical circulatory support. This review summarizes the indications for heart transplant, candidate evaluation, current immunosuppression strategies, the evaluation and treatment of rejection, infectious prophylaxis, and short and long-term outcomes. Regarding mechanical circulatory support, we distinguish between short- and long-term support and the distinct strategies that can be used: bridge to decision, recovery, candidacy, transplant, and destination therapy. We then discuss indications, risk assessment, management of complications, especially with long-term support, and outcomes. Finally, we discuss future challenges and how the widespread use of long-term support for patients with advanced heart failure will only be viable if their complications and costs are reduced.

  20. Updated management of chronic kidney disease in patients with diabetes.

    PubMed

    Hass, Virginia McCoy

    2014-06-01

    Chronic diseases, including chronic kidney disease (CKD), are the primary threat to global public health in the 21st century. Recently updated guidelines from the National Kidney Foundation's Kidney Disease Outcomes Quality Initiative provide patient care benchmarks that physician assistants can use when caring for patients with diabetes and CKD and developing clinical performance improvement plans.

  1. Iron Treatment Strategies in Dialysis-Dependent CKD.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Richa; Daloul, Reem; Coyne, Daniel W

    2016-03-01

    Iron deficiency is common in patients on chronic dialysis, and most require iron-replacement therapy. In addition to absolute iron deficiency, many patients have functional iron deficiency as shown by a suboptimal response to the use of erythropoietin-stimulating agents. Both absolute and functional iron-deficiency anemia have been shown to respond to intravenous (IV) iron replacement. Although parenteral iron is an efficacious method and superior to standard doses of oral iron in patients on hemodialysis, there are ongoing safety concerns about repeated exposure potentially enhancing infection risk and cardiovascular disease. Each IV iron product is composed of an iron core with a carbohydrate shell. The avidity of iron binding and the type of carbohydrate shell play roles in the safe maximal dose and the frequency and severity of acute infusion reactions. All IV iron products are taken up into the reticuloendothelial system where the shell is metabolized and the iron is stored within tissue ferritin or exported to circulating transferrin. IV iron can be given as large intermittent doses (loading therapy) or in smaller doses at frequent intervals (maintenance dosing regimen). Limited trial data and observational data suggest that a maintenance dosing regimen is more efficacious and possibly safer than loading therapy. There is no consensus regarding the preferred method of iron repletion in patients on peritoneal dialysis, although small studies comparing oral and parenteral iron regimens in these patients have shown the latter to be more efficacious. Use of IV iron in virtually all hemodialysis and many peritoneal dialysis patients remains the standard of care.

  2. Caring for Patients with Advanced Breast Cancer: The Experiences of Zambian Nurses

    PubMed Central

    Maree, Johanna Elizabeth; Mulonda, Jennipher Kombe

    2017-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to describe the experiences of Zambian nurses caring for women with advanced breast cancer. Methods: We used a qualitative descriptive design and purposive sampling. Seventeen in-depth interviews were conducted with registered nurses practicing in the Cancer Diseases Hospital and the University Teaching Hospital, Lusaka, Zambia, and analyzed using thematic analyses. Results: Two themes emerged from the data - caring for women with advanced breast cancer is challenging and the good outweighs the bad. The majority of the participants agreed that caring for women with advanced breast cancer and witnessing their suffering were challenging. Not having formal education and training in oncology nursing was disempowering, and one of the various frustrations participants experienced. The work environment, learning opportunities, positive patient outcomes, and the opportunity to establish good nurse–patient experiences were positive experiences. Conclusions: Although negative experiences seemed to be overwhelming, participants reported some meaningful experiences while caring for women with advanced breast cancer. The lack of formal oncology nursing education and training was a major factor contributing to their negative experiences and perceived as the key to rendering the quality of care patients deserved. Ways to fulfill the educational needs of nurses should be explored and instituted, and nurses should be remunerated according to their levels of practice. PMID:28217726

  3. [HER2/neu expression in Venezuelan patients with locally advanced breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Morales, Luisa; Reigosa, Aldo; Caleiras, Eduardo; Mora, Richard; Marrero, Nuria; Payares, Eliécer; Molina, Karla; Sucre, Luis

    2008-03-01

    To know the prognosis of a patient with cancer allows choosing the most appropriate therapeutic. The expression of the oncogen HER2/neu has been related to an unfavourable prognosis in patients with infiltrating breast carcinoma, for this reason, the purpose of this work was to analyze its predictive and prognostic value in patients with locally advanced breast cancer, treated in the Oncological Institute "Dr Miguel Perez Carreño". Information about personal data of 58 patients was compiled, as well as the received treatment, clinical response data of the biopsy report, histological grade, nuclear grade, node status and evolution of the patient. The determination of the HER2/neu expression was made by inmunohistochemistry, using the avidina-estreptavidin-peroxidasa technique. For the interpretation of the HER2/neu, an agreed score from 0 to 3+ was assigned, using the guidelines of interpretation of the Hercep-Test (DAKO). 37.9% of the cases displayed expression of the HER2/neu in the membrane of the tumour cells. The node state and the hormonal receptors state turned out to be significant to predict the disease-free interval. Patients with strong oncoprotein expression seem to have a quimioresistant tendency to the FAC (5-fluorouracil, doxorubicin and cyclophosphamide) regime. The expression of the HER2/neu receptor is related to a reduction of the disease-free interval and global survival in patients with infiltrating ductal breast carcinoma locally advanced, confirming, in this work, to be a good prognostic factor.

  4. Exercise and relaxation intervention for patients with advanced lung cancer: a qualitative feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Adamsen, L; Stage, M; Laursen, J; Rørth, M; Quist, M

    2012-12-01

    Lung cancer patients experience loss of physical capacity, dyspnea, pain, reduced energy and psychological distress. The aim of this study was to explore feasibility, health benefits and barriers of exercise in former sedentary patients with advanced stage lung cancer, non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) (III-IV) and small cell lung cancer (SCLC) (ED), undergoing chemotherapy. The intervention consisted of a hospital-based, supervised, group exercise and relaxation program comprising resistance-, cardiovascular- and relaxation training 4 h weekly, 6 weeks, and a concurrent unsupervised home-based exercise program. An explorative study using individual semi-structured interviews (n=15) and one focus group interview (n=8) was conducted among the participants. Throughout the intervention the patients experienced increased muscle strength, improvement in wellbeing, breathlessness and energy. The group exercise and relaxation intervention showed an adherence rate of 76%, whereas the patients failed to comply with the home-based exercise. The hospital-based intervention initiated at time of diagnosis encouraged former sedentary lung cancer patients to participation and was undertaken safely by cancer patients with advanced stages of disease, during treatment. The patients experienced physical, functional and emotional benefits. This study confirmed that supervised training in peer-groups was beneficial, even in a cancer population