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Sample records for advanced cockpit displays

  1. An advanced cockpit instrumentation system: The coordinated cockpit display

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baty, D. L.; Watkins, M. L.

    1979-01-01

    Cathode Ray Tube (CRT) and computer technologies are described in one approach to the replacement of flight instruments using three separate color CRT's. Each CRT display information pertinent to one of the three orthogonal projections of the aircraft flight situation. Three airline pilot's assessment of the display set is presented. Comments, rankings, and ratings show that the pilots accepted the concept of pictorial flight displays.

  2. Advanced image manipulation controller for cockpit LCD displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramachandran, Gopal

    1998-09-01

    Key features of a family of LSI integrated circuits will be explained. These DSP devices are capable of taking digital inputs of either NTSC/PAL/SECAM video in YCrCb 4:2:2 format, or computer graphics data from a PC in RGB 8:8:8 format, de- interlacing the data (if required), then re-sizing the resolution of the image independently in the horizontal and vertical axes to fit arbitrary display resolutions. The devices use patented digital filter techniques to perform zoom-only or both zoom as well as shrink. The devices also include registers that allow for cropping the active input image, and registers to completely control horizontal and vertical timing parameters for LCD displays. Current members of this family work at clock rates of up to 84 MHz, at resolutions of 1024 X 768, and upcoming members of the family will raise both the target resolution and pixel rates. All these parts generate all timing signals required by the display. Typically, no external memory is required for zooming and shrinking. Cockpit display applications that could benefit from this chip include processing and display of video, FLIR, EFIS/EICAS displays, radar, digital terrain maps, ultrasonic/sonar, computer graphics/symbol generators, etc. The devices are members of the gmZx family of scaling chips, first introduced in April '97.

  3. The Effects of Advanced 'Glass Cockpit' Displayed Flight Instrumentation on In-flight Pilot Decision Making

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steigerwald, John

    The Cognitive Continuum Theory (CCT) was first proposed 25 years ago to explain the relationship between intuition and analytical decision making processes. In order for aircraft pilots to make these analytical and intuitive decisions, they obtain information from various instruments within the cockpit of the aircraft. Advanced instrumentation is used to provide a broad array of information about the aircraft condition and flight situation to aid the flight crew in making effective decisions. The problem addressed is that advanced instrumentation has not improved the pilot decision making in modern aircraft. Because making a decision is dependent upon the information available, this experimental quantitative study sought to determine how well pilots organize and interpret information obtained from various cockpit instrumentation displays when under time pressure. The population for this study was the students, flight instructors, and aviation faculty at the Middle Georgia State College School of Aviation campus in Eastman, Georgia. The sample was comprised of two groups of 90 individuals (45 in each group) in various stages of pilot licensure from student pilot to airline transport pilot (ATP). The ages ranged from 18 to 55 years old. There was a statistically significant relationship at the p < .05 level in the ability of the participants to organize and interpret information between the advanced glass cockpit instrumentation and the traditional cockpit instrumentation. It is recommended that the industry explore technological solutions toward creating cockpit instrumentation that could match the type of information display to the type of decision making scenario in order to aid pilots in making decisions that will result in better organization of information. Understanding the relationship between the intuitive and analytical decisions that pilots make and the information source they use to make those decisions will aid engineers in the design of instrumentation

  4. Multimission helicopter cockpit displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terry, William S.; Terry, Jody K.; Lovelace, Nancy D.

    1996-05-01

    A new operator display subsystem is being incorporated as part of the next generation United States Navy (USN) helicopter avionics system to be integrated into the multi-mission helicopter (MMH) that replaces both the SH-60B and the SH-60F in 2001. This subsystem exploits state-of-the-art technology for the display hardware, the display driver hardware, information presentation methodologies, and software architecture. Both of the existing SH-60 helicopter display systems are based on monochrome CRT technology; a key feature of the MMH cockpit is the integration of color AMLCD multifunction displays. The MMH program is one of the first military programs to use modified commercial AMLCD elements in a tactical aircraft. This paper presents the general configuration of the MMH cockpit and multifunction display subsystem and discusses the approach taken for presenting helicopter flight information to the pilots as well as presentation of mission sensor data for use by the copilot.

  5. Flight investigation of cockpit-displayed traffic information utilizing coded symbology in an advanced operational environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbott, T. S.; Moen, G. C.; Person, L. H., Jr.; Keyser, G. L., Jr.; Yenni, K. R.; Garren, J. F., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    Traffic symbology was encoded to provide additional information concerning the traffic, which was displayed on the pilot's electronic horizontal situation indicators (EHSI). A research airplane representing an advanced operational environment was used to assess the benefit of coded traffic symbology in a realistic work-load environment. Traffic scenarios, involving both conflict-free and conflict situations, were employed. Subjective pilot commentary was obtained through the use of a questionnaire and extensive pilot debriefings. These results grouped conveniently under two categories: display factors and task performance. A major item under the display factor category was the problem of display clutter. The primary contributors to clutter were the use of large map-scale factors, the use of traffic data blocks, and the presentation of more than a few airplanes. In terms of task performance, the cockpit-displayed traffic information was found to provide excellent overall situation awareness. Additionally, mile separation prescribed during these tests.

  6. Flat panel displays in an underwater cockpit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sola, Kenneth E.

    1999-08-01

    This paper reports on a highly unusual application of flat panel displays in a cockpit. The cockpit is found in a mini- submarine of the Advanced SEAL Delivery System (ASDS), a state-of-the-art military platform designed to deliver U.S. Navy SEALs, and other special forces, to their mission locations. For security reasons, the presentation details are intentionally kept minimal.

  7. Flight evaluation of advanced flight control systems and cockpit displays for powered-lift STOL Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Franklin, J. A.; Smith, D. W.; Watson, D. M.; Warner, D. N., Jr.; Innis, R. C.; Hardy, G. H.

    1976-01-01

    A flight research program was conducted to assess the improvements, in longitudinal path control during a STOL approach and landing, that can be achieved with manual and automatic control system concepts and cockpit displays with various degrees of complexity. NASA-Ames powered-lift Augmentor Wing Research Aircraft was used in the research program. Satisfactory flying qualities were demonstrated for selected stabilization and command augmentation systems and flight director combinations. The ability of the pilot to perform precise landings at low touchdown sink rates with a gentle flare maneuver was also achieved. The path-control improvement is considered to be applicable to other powered-lift aircraft configurations.

  8. Hazard alerting and situational awareness in advanced air transport cockpits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansman, R. John; Wanke, Craig; Kuchar, James; Mykityshyn, Mark; Hahn, Edward; Midkiff, Alan

    1993-01-01

    Advances in avionics and display technology have significantly changed the cockpit environment in current 'glass cockpit' aircraft. Recent developments in display technology, on-board processing, data storage, and datalinked communications are likely to further alter the environment in second and third generation 'glass cockpit' aircraft. The interaction of advanced cockpit technology with human cognitive performance has been a major area of activity within the MIT Aeronautical Systems Laboratory. This paper presents an overview of the MIT Advanced Cockpit Simulation Facility. Several recent research projects are briefly reviewed and the most important results are summarized.

  9. Panoramic cockpit displays for tactical military cockpits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fletcher, Mark; Huffman, David

    2010-04-01

    The F-35 Joint Strike Fighter (JSF) incorporates the latest technology for aerial warfighting. To support this aircraft's mission and to provide the pilot with the increased situational awareness needed in today's battlespace, a panoramic AMLCD was developed and is being deployed for the first time. This 20" by 8" display is the largest fielded to date in a tactical fighter. Key system innovations had to be employed to allow this technology to function in this demanding environment. Certain older generation aircraft are now considering incorporating a panoramic display to provide their crews with this level of increased capability. Key design issues that had to be overcome dealt with sunlight readability, vibration resistance, touchscreen operation, and reliability concerns to avoid single-point failures. A completely dual redundant system design had to be employed to ensure that the pilot would always have access to critical mission and flight data.

  10. Cockpit Electronic Display Workshop: A Synopsis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-12-01

    Systems Center to identify human factors issues associated with depicting terminal area operations information on electronic cockpit displays. Two...Thirty-six government, academic, and industry human factors professionals participated in a workship convened at the Volpe National Transportation

  11. Polyplanar optic display for cockpit application

    SciTech Connect

    Veligdan, J.; Biscardi, C.; Brewster, C.; DeSanto, L.; Freibott, W.

    1998-04-01

    The Polyplanar Optical Display (POD) is a high contrast display screen being developed for cockpit applications. This display screen is 2 inches thick and has a matte black face which allows for high contrast images. The prototype being developed is a form, fit and functional replacement display for the B-52 aircraft which uses a monochrome ten-inch display. The new display uses a long lifetime, (10,000 hour), 200 mW green solid-state laser (532 nm) as its optical source. In order to produce real-time video, the laser light is being modulated by a Digital Light Processing (DLP{trademark}) chip manufactured by Texas Instruments, Inc. A variable astigmatic focusing system is used to produce a stigmatic image on the viewing face of the POD. In addition to the optical design and speckle reduction, the authors discuss the electronic interfacing to the DLP{trademark} chip, the opto-mechanical design and viewing angle characteristics.

  12. Cockpit display of hazardous wind shear information

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wanke, Craig; Hansman, R. John, Jr.

    1990-01-01

    Information on cockpit display of wind shear information is given in viewgraph form. Based on the current status of windshear sensors and candidate data dissemination systems, the near-term capabilities for windshear avoidance will most likely include: (1) Ground-based detection: TDWR (Terminal Doppler Weather Radar), LLWAS (Low-Level Windshear Alert System), Automated PIREPS; (2) Ground-Air datalinks: Air traffic control voice channels, Mode-S digital datalink, ACARS alphanumeric datalink. The possible datapaths for integration of these systems are illustrated in a diagram. In the future, airborne windshear detection systems such as lidars, passive IR detectors, or airborne Doppler radars may also become available. Possible future datalinks include satellite downlink and specialized en route weather channels.

  13. A Cockpit Display Designed to Enable Limited Flight Deck Separation Responsibility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Walter W.; Battiste, Vernol; Bochow, Sheila Holland

    2003-01-01

    Cockpit displays need to be substantially improved to serve the goals of situational awareness, conflict detection, and path replanning, in Free Flight. This paper describes the design of such an advanced cockpit display, along with an initial simulation based usability evaluation. Flight crews were particularly enthusiastic about color coding for relative altitude, dynamically pulsing predictors, and the use of 3-D flight plans for alerting and situational awareness.

  14. Advanced Civil Transport Simulator Cockpit View

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The Advanced Civil Transport Simulator (ACTS) is a futuristic aircraft cockpit simulator designed to provide full-mission capabilities for researching issues that will affect future transport aircraft flight stations and crews. The objective is to heighten the pilots situation awareness through improved information availability and ease of interpretation in order to reduce the possibility of misinterpreted data. The simulators five 13-inch Cathode Ray Tubes are designed to display flight information in a logical easy-to-see format. Two color flat panel Control Display Units with touch sensitive screens provide monitoring and modification of aircraft parameters, flight plans, flight computers, and aircraft position. Three collimated visual display units have been installed to provide out-the-window scenes via the Computer Generated Image system. The major research objectives are to examine needs for transfer of information to and from the flight crew; study the use of advanced controls and displays for all-weather flying; explore ideas for using computers to help the crew in decision making; study visual scanning and reach behavior under different conditions with various levels of automation and flight deck-arrangements.

  15. Hazard alerting and situational awareness in advanced air transport cockpits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansman, R. J.; Wanke, Craig; Kuchar, James; Mykityshyn, Mark; Hahn, Edward; Midkiff, Alan

    1992-01-01

    An overview of the Advanced Cockpit Simulation Facility at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology is presented. Though detailed results depend on the specific application, graphical presentation of flight control and alert information has generally been found to be effective for situational awareness and subjectively selected by flight crews. Graphical display is most effective when it is consistent with the pilots cognitive map of the process being displayed or of the situation.

  16. Can a glass cockpit display help (or hinder) performance of novices in simulated flight training?

    PubMed

    Wright, Stephen; O'Hare, David

    2015-03-01

    The analog dials in traditional GA aircraft cockpits are being replaced by integrated electronic displays, commonly referred to as glass cockpits. Pilots may be trained on glass cockpit aircraft or encounter them after training on traditional displays. The effects of glass cockpit displays on initial performance and potential transfer effects between cockpit display configurations have yet to be adequately investigated. Flight-naïve participants were trained on either a simulated traditional display cockpit or a simulated glass display cockpit. Flight performance was measured in a test flight using either the same or different cockpit display. Loss of control events and accuracy in controlling altitude, airspeed and heading, workload, and situational awareness were assessed. Preferences for cockpit display configurations and opinions on ease of use were also measured. The results revealed consistently poorer performance on the test flight for participants using the glass cockpit compared to the traditional cockpit. In contrast the post-flight questionnaire data revealed a strong subjective preference for the glass cockpit over the traditional cockpit displays. There was only a weak effect of prior training. The specific glass cockpit display used in this study was subjectively appealing but yielded poorer flight performance in participants with no previous flight experience than a traditional display. Performance data can contradict opinion data. The design of glass cockpit displays may present some difficulties for pilots in the very early stages of training.

  17. Technical Workshop: Advanced Helicopter Cockpit Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hemingway, J. C. (Editor); Callas, G. P. (Editor)

    1984-01-01

    Information processing demands on both civilian and military aircrews have increased enormously as rotorcraft have come to be used for adverse weather, day/night, and remote area missions. Applied psychology, engineering, or operational research for future helicopter cockpit design criteria were identified. Three areas were addressed: (1) operational requirements, (2) advanced avionics, and (3) man-system integration.

  18. Early flight test experience with Cockpit Displayed Traffic Information (CDTI)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbott, T. S.; Moen, G. C.; Person, L. H., Jr.; Keyser, G. L., Jr.; Yenni, K. R.; Garren, J. F., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    Coded symbology, based on the results of early human factors studies, was displayed on the electronic horizontal situation indicator and flight tested on an advanced research aircraft in order to subject the coded traffic symbology to a realistic flight environment and to assess its value by means of a direct comparison with simple, uncoded traffic symbology. The tests consisted of 28 curved, decelerating approaches, flown by research-pilot flight crews. The traffic scenarios involved both conflict-free and blunder situations. Subjective pilot commentary was obtained through the use of a questionnaire and extensive pilot debriefing sessions. The results of these debriefing sessions group conveniently under either of two categories: display factors or task performance. A major item under the display factor category was the problem of display clutter. The primary contributors to clutter were the use of large map-scale factors, the use of traffic data blocks, and the presentation of more than a few aircraft. In terms of task performance, the cockpit displayed traffic information was found to provide excellent overall situation awareness.

  19. 3-D Imagery Cockpit Display Development

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-08-01

    display. is needed. Good information - (3) Change from pictorial gauges to difficult to interpret. word warnings. Display EGT & OIL indicators at all times...indicator. Popped CBs. Information to be changed : Comments: (5) Nothing needs to be changed . Great format. (2) Standardize colors. Display is good. Use all ...sense? Any suggestions for changes ? 6 Pilots Good. 5 Pilots Great! Don’t change the format. 1 Pilot Stores part great. 1 Pilot Provides all the necessary

  20. Joint Cockpit Office: history and role in defense-wide issues regarding avionics displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connor, John C.; Kraemer, William A.

    2000-08-01

    The charter of the Joint Cockpit Office (JCO) is to plan, coordinate and accelerate the transition of advanced development cockpit/crew station technologies critical to crew effectiveness in current and future air vehicles. The JCO helps assure a single, coordinated, and highly integrated cockpit/crew station Science and Technology (S&T) program within and between the Air Force, the Army, and the Navy. It serves as the primary interface and focal point for issues involving these technologies for organizations within and external to the Services. The Services are at the advent of fielding new technologies such as helmet-mounted displays as a primary flight reference. They will most certainly evaluate the use of windowless cockpits to counter the laser threat and allow for less constraining aerodynamic conditions in future vehicle design. The transition to multi-spectral displays in future military and commercial aircraft is imminent. The JCO is well positioned to assess and focus the research needed to safely exploit these new technologies and meet customer requirements. Presently, the JCO is undertaking three initiatives: creation of a joint-service, Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRDA) with Lockheed Martin to study the thresholds of virtual helmet-mounted display attributes and effects on pilot performance; management of the Spatial Disorientation Countermeasures program, and facilitation of the actions determined by the DoD Executive Agent for Flat Panel Displays.

  1. Cockpit display of hazardous weather information

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansman, R. John, Jr.; Wanke, Craig

    1990-01-01

    Information transfer and display issues associated with the dissemination of hazardous weather warnings are studied in the context of windshear alerts. Operational and developmental windshear detection systems are briefly reviewed. The July 11, 1988 microburst events observed as part of the Denver Terminal Doppler Weather Radar (TDWR) operational evaluation are analyzed in terms of information transfer and the effectiveness of the microburst alerts. Information transfer, message content and display issues associated with microburst alerts generated from ground based sources are evaluated by means of pilot opinion surveys and part task simulator studies.

  2. Cockpit display of hazardous weather information

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansman, R. John, Jr.; Wanke, Craig

    1991-01-01

    Information transfer and display issues associated with the dissemination of hazardous weather warnings are studied in the context of wind shear alerts. Operational and developmental wind shear detection systems are briefly reviewed. The July 11, 1988 microburst events observed as part of the Denver Terminal Doppler Weather Radar (TDWR) operational evaluation are analyzed in terms of information transfer and the effectiveness of the microburst alerts. Information transfer, message content and display issues associated with microburst alerts generated from ground based sources (Doppler Radar, Low Level Wind Shear Alert System, and Pilot Reports) are evaluated by means fo pilot opinion surveys and part task simulator studies.

  3. Advanced cockpit technology for future civil transport aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hatfield, Jack J.; Parrish, Russell V.

    1990-01-01

    A review is presented of advanced cockpit technology for future civil transport aircraft, covering the present state-of-the-art and major technologies, including flat-panel displays, graphics and pictorial displays. Pilot aiding/automation/human-centered design and imaging sensor/flight systems technology (for low-visibility operations) are also presented. NASA Langley Research Center's recent results in pictorial displays and on future developments in large-screen display technologies are discussed. Major characteristics foreseen for the future high-speed civil transport include fault-tolerant digital avionics and controls/displays with extensive human-centered automation, and unusually clean, uncluttered interface with natural crew interaction via touch, voice/tactile means.

  4. Cockpit Displays to Support Hazard Awareness in Free Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wickens, Christopher D.; Carbonari, Ron; Merwin, Dave; Morphew, Ephimia; OBrien, Janelle V.

    1997-01-01

    Three experiments are described which each examine different aspects of the formatting and integration of cockpit displays of traffic information to support pilots in traffic avoidance planning. The first two experiments compared two-dimensional (coplanar) with three-dimensional (perspective) versions of a cockpit display of traffic information. In Experiment 1, 30 certified flight instructors flew a series of traffic conflict detection and avoidance maneuvers around an intruder aircraft, sometimes in the presence of a second intruder. The results revealed an advantage for the coplanar display, particularly when there was vertical intruder behavior. In Experiment 2, 17 instructors flew with the coplanar and perspective formats when weather information was either overlaid or displayed separately. Again performance was best with the coplanar display, particularly when the weather data were overlaid. The results of both experiments are also discussed in ten-ns of the traffic maneuver stereotypes exhibited by the pilots. Experiment 3 examined the benefits of the two different predictor elements used in the coplanar displays of Experiments 1 and 2. The study was carried out in a multitask context. These elements were both found to improve safety (reduce actual and predicted conflicts) and to reduce workload, although the different elements affected workload in different ways. Neither predictor element imposed a cost to concurrent task performance.

  5. A pilot's subjective analysis of a Cockpit Display of Traffic Information (CDTI). [terminal configured vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keyser, G. L., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Both the advent of electronic displays for cockpit applications and the availability of high-capacity data transmission systems, linking aicraft with ATC ground computers, offer the opportunity of expanding the pilots' role in the distributive management process. A critical element in this process is believed to be the presentation to the pilot of his traffic situation. A representative cockpit display of traffic information (CDTI) system is presented as viewed from the pilot in the cockpit, and the research results from flight tests presented. The use of advanced controls and displays allows for presentation to the pilot, large quantities of information that he has not had before. The real challenge in the design of an operational CDTI system will be the satisfaction of needs for information and the presentation of all necessary information, only in a useable format in order to avoid clutter. Even though a reasonably large display was utilized in these tests, display clutter was the primary problem from the standpoint of information assimilation.

  6. Avoidance maneuevers selected while viewing cockpit traffic displays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, J. D.; Ellis, S. R.; Lee, E.

    1982-01-01

    Ten airline pilots rates the collision danger of air traffic presented on cockpit displays of traffic information while they monitored simulated departures from Denver. They selected avoidance maneuvers when necessary for separation. Most evasive maneuvers were turns rather than vertical maneuvers. Evasive maneuvers chosen for encounters with low or moderate collision danger were generally toward the intruding aircraft. This tendency lessened as the perceived threat level increased. In the highest threst situations pilots turned toward the intruder only at chance levels. Intruders coming from positions in front of the pilot's own ship were more frequently avoided by turns toward than when intruders approached laterally or from behind. Some of the implications of the pilots' turning-toward tendencies are discussed with respect to automatic collision avoidance systems and coordination of avoidance maneuvers of conflicting aircraft.

  7. Predictive Features of a Cockpit Traffic Display: A Workload Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wickens, Christopher D.; Morphew, Ephimia

    1997-01-01

    Eighteen pilots flew a series of traffic avoidance maneuvers in an experiment designed to assess the support offered and workload imposed by different levels of traffic display information in a free flight simulation. Three display prototypes were compared which differed in traffic information provided. A BASELINE (BL) display provided current and (2nd order) predicted information regarding ownship and current information of an intruder aircraft, represented on lateral and vertical displays in a coplanar suite. An INTRUDER PREDICTOR (IP) display, augmented the baseline display by providing lateral and vertical prediction of the intruder aircraft. A THREAT VECTOR (TV) display added to the IP display a vector that indicates the direction from ownship to the intruder at the predicted point of closest contact (POCC). The length of the vector corresponds to the radius of the protected zone, and the distance of the intersection of the vector with ownship predictor, corresponds to the time available till POCC or loss of separation. Pilots time shared the traffic avoidance task with a secondary task requiring them to monitor the top of the display for faint targets. This task simulated the visual demands of out-of-cockpit scanning, and hence was used to estimate the head-down time required by the different display formats. The results revealed that both display augmentations improved performance (safety) as assessed by predicted and actual loss of separation (i.e., penetration of the protected zone). Both enhancements also reduced workload, as assessed by the NASA TLX scale. The intruder predictor display produced these benefits with no substantial impact on the qualitative nature of the avoidance maneuvers that were selected. The threat vector produced the safety benefits by inducing a greater degree of (effective) lateral maneuvering, thus partially offsetting the benefits of reduced workload. The three displays did not differ in terms of their effect on performance of

  8. Human factors of advanced technology (glass cockpit) transport aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiener, Earl L.

    1989-01-01

    A three-year study of airline crews at two U.S. airlines who were flying an advanced technology aircraft, the Boeing 757 is discussed. The opinions and experiences of these pilots as they view the advanced, automated features of this aircraft, and contrast them with previous models they have flown are discussed. Training for advanced automation; (2) cockpit errors and error reduction; (3) management of cockpit workload; and (4) general attitudes toward cockpit automation are emphasized. The limitations of the air traffic control (ATC) system on the ability to utilize the advanced features of the new aircraft are discussed. In general the pilots are enthusiastic about flying an advanced technology aircraft, but they express mixed feelings about the impact of automation on workload, crew errors, and ability to manage the flight.

  9. The application of a color, raster scan, programmable display generator in the generation of multiple cockpit display formats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montoya, R. J.; Lane, H. H., Jr.; Turner, T. L.; Hatfield, J. J.

    1983-01-01

    A description is provided of the application of the raster-scan, color programmable display generator (PDG) in the generation of multiple, simultaneous cockpit display formats at medium resolution, and their display on conventional R-G-B monitors and on recently developed thin film electroluminescent (TFEL) panels. The Graphics Display System of the Cockpit Systems Branch is discussed, taking into account hardware and software. Questions of system utilization are explored, giving attention to simultaneous display generation, scan standards, flat panel displays, and display enhancement software. Aspects of system performance are also examined, and an outline of future research plans is provided.

  10. Cockpit weather radar display demonstrator and ground-to-air sferics telemetry system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nickum, J. D.; Mccall, D. L.

    1982-01-01

    The results of two methods of obtaining timely and accurate severe weather presentations in the cockpit are detailed. The first method described is a course up display of uplinked weather radar data. This involves the construction of a demonstrator that will show the feasibility of producing a course up display in the cockpit of the NASA simulator at Langley. A set of software algorithms was designed that could easily be implemented, along with data tapes generated to provide the cockpit simulation. The second method described involves the uplinking of sferic data from a ground based 3M-Ryan Stormscope. The technique involves transfer of the data on the CRT of the Stormscope to a remote CRT. This sferic uplink and display could also be included in an implementation on the NASA cockpit simulator, allowing evaluation of pilot responses based on real Stormscope data.

  11. Flexible daylight memory displays EASL DMD: a new approach toward displays for cockpit and soldier systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holter, Borre; Kamfjord, Thor G.; Fossum, Richard; Fagerberg, Ragnar

    2000-08-01

    The Norwegian based company PolyDisplayR ASA, in collaboration with the Norwegian Army Material Command and SINTEF, has refined, developed and shown with color and black/white technology demonstrators an electrically addressed Smectic A reflective LCD technology featuring: (1) Good contrast, all-round viewing angle and readability under all light conditions (no wash-out in direct sunlight). (2) Infinite memory -- image remains without power -- very low power consumption, no or very low radiation ('silent display') and narrow band updating. (3) Clear, sharp and flicker-free images. (4) Large number of gray tones and colors possible. (5) Simple construction and production -- reduced cost, higher yield, more robust and environmentally friendly. (6) Possibility for lighter, more robust and flexible displays based on plastic substrates. The results and future implementation possibilities for cockpit and soldier-system displays are discussed.

  12. Threat perception while viewing single intruder conflicts on a cockpit display of traffic information

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, S. R.; Palmer, E.

    1982-01-01

    Subjective estimates of the threat posed by a single intruder aircraft were determined by showing pilots photographs of a cockpit display of traffic information. The time the intruder was away from the point of minimum separation was found to be the major determinant of the perception of threat. When asked to choose a maneuver to reduce the conflict, pilots selected maneuvers with a bias toward those that would have kept the intruders in sight had they been visible out the cockpit window.

  13. An evaluation of software tools for the design and development of cockpit displays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, Thomas D., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    The use of all-glass cockpits at the NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) simulation facility has changed the means of design, development, and maintenance of instrument displays. The human-machine interface has evolved from a physical hardware device to a software-generated electronic display system. This has subsequently caused an increased workload at the facility. As computer processing power increases and the glass cockpit becomes predominant in facilities, software tools used in the design and development of cockpit displays are becoming both feasible and necessary for a more productive simulation environment. This paper defines LaRC requirements of a display software development tool and compares two available applications against these requirements. As a part of the software engineering process, these tools reduce development time, provide a common platform for display development, and produce exceptional real-time results.

  14. Brain-wave measures of workload in advanced cockpits: The transition of technology from laboratory to cockpit simulator, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horst, Richard L.; Mahaffey, David L.; Munson, Robert C.

    1989-01-01

    The present Phase 2 small business innovation research study was designed to address issues related to scalp-recorded event-related potential (ERP) indices of mental workload and to transition this technology from the laboratory to cockpit simulator environments for use as a systems engineering tool. The project involved five main tasks: (1) Two laboratory studies confirmed the generality of the ERP indices of workload obtained in the Phase 1 study and revealed two additional ERP components related to workload. (2) A task analysis' of flight scenarios and pilot tasks in the Advanced Concepts Flight Simulator (ACFS) defined cockpit events (i.e., displays, messages, alarms) that would be expected to elicit ERPs related to workload. (3) Software was developed to support ERP data analysis. An existing ARD-proprietary package of ERP data analysis routines was upgraded, new graphics routines were developed to enhance interactive data analysis, and routines were developed to compare alternative single-trial analysis techniques using simulated ERP data. (4) Working in conjunction with NASA Langley research scientists and simulator engineers, preparations were made for an ACFS validation study of ERP measures of workload. (5) A design specification was developed for a general purpose, computerized, workload assessment system that can function in simulators such as the ACFS.

  15. AC thin film electroluminescent display unit for cockpit control display unit application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bridges, Alan L.

    1992-07-01

    A prototype thin film electroluminescent (TFEL) display unit (DU) for a control display unit (CDU) design and development was initiated in FY90. Features of the display include high brightness and contrast, sunlight readability, night vision goggle compatibility, light weight, low power, automatic brightness control based on ambient light conditions, modular design, ease of assembly and test, and high reliability. The display contains an integral switch and lightplate that is night vision goggle compatible. The unit was designed for cockpit CDU applications, but can be easily converted for other display needs. The scope of this task was to design and build an ANVIS-compatible, sunlight-readable TFEL CDU DU engineering evaluation unit to replace an existing cathode ray tube (CRT) DU in the V-22 CDU. In order to accomplish that task it was necessary to learn interface, drive, and improved packaging techniques. The electronics were very straight forward using large scale integration (LSI) components. The CDU is mounted in the instrument panel in standard cockpit avionics mounting rails, utilizing quarter turn captive fasteners. The CDU is cooled by natural convection. The TFEL display unit weighs 4.3 pounds compared to 7.8 pounds for the CRT version. Surface mount was a requirement for the drive card due to size constraints. Elastomeric connectors were used to interface the driver board to the glass. The approach uses as much proven design as possible, but makes use of state-of-the-art display technology to provide a low power display unit with outstanding characteristics. The TFEL CDU DU tasks completed during 1991-92 included design and development of: (1) controller and RS-170 digitizer board, (2) high voltage-switching or pre-driver board, (3) row and column driver circuitry for gray scale (double-sided surface mount using sample Supertex HV38 gray-shade column drivers and TI high-voltage row drivers); (4) high and low voltage power supplies; and bezel and

  16. Rationale and description of a coordinated cockpit display for aircraft flight management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baty, D. L.

    1976-01-01

    The design for aircraft cockpit display systems is discussed in detail. The system consists of a set of three beam penetration color cathode ray tubes (CRT). One of three orthogonal projects of the aircraft's state appears on each CRT which displays different views of the same information. The color feature is included to obtain visual separation of information elements. The colors of red, green and yellow are used to differentiate control, performance and navigation information. Displays are coordinated in information and color.

  17. Jet transport flight operations using cockpit display of traffic information during instrument meteorological conditions: Simulation evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, David H.; Wells, Douglas C.

    1986-01-01

    A simulation study was undertaken to evaluate flight operations using cockpit display of traffic information (CDTI) in a conventional jet transport aircraft. Eight two-person airline flight crews participated as test subjects flying simulated terminal area approach and departure operations under instrument meteorological conditions (IMC). A fixed-base cockpit simulator configured with a full complement of conventional electromechanical instrumentation to permit full workload operations was utilized. Traffic information was displayed on a color cathode-ray tube (CRT) mounted above the throttle quadrant in the typical weather radar location. A transparent touchpanel overlay was utilized for pilot interface with the display. Air traffic control (ATC) simulation included an experienced controller and full partyline radio environment for evaluation of pilot-controlled self-separation and traffic situation monitoring tasks. Results of the study revealed the CDTI to be well received by the test subjects as a useful system which could be incorporated into an existing jet transport cockpit. Crew coordination and consistent operating procedures were identified as important considerations in operational implementation of traffic displays. Cockpit workload was increased with active CDTI tasks. However, all test subjects rated the increase to be acceptable.

  18. Sensitivity and Bias in Searches of Cockpit Display of Traffic Information Utilizing Highlighting/Lowlighting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Walter W.; Jordan, Kevin; Liao, Min-Ju; Granada, Stacy

    2003-01-01

    A previous investigation showed that when bright and dim traffic symbols were mixed together on a cockpit display of traffic information, dim targets required longer search times than bright targets. The current experiment utilized Signal Detection methodology to determine the cause of this effect. Two factors were manipulated, Intensity and Mixture. The Intensity manipulation varied whether targets were bright or dim. The Mixture manipulation varied whether the brightness of all aircraft symbols was the same, or if half were bright and half dim. Participants were given 1.25 s to search a display of eight aircraft and determine whether a target was present or absent (50% of the time a target was present) and then rated their confidence in the accuracy of their decision. A Mixture by Intensity repeated-measures ANOVA on the signal detectability measure, A (a non- parametric variant of d ), revealed that targets presented at the dim intensity in the mixed condition yielded significantly lower sensitivity than either of the pure (homogenous) conditions or the bright targets in the mixed condition. There was not a significant difference in False Alarm rates between any conditions, indicating no change in decision criterion. Findings are discussed in terms of possible masking effects evoked by bright aircraft over the dim aircraft. Funding for this work was provided by the Advanced Air Transportation Technologies Project of NASA s Airspace Operation Systems Program.

  19. Recommendations for a Cockpit Display that Integrates Weather Information with Traffic Information

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Comerford, Doreen A.

    2004-01-01

    This effort was supported by the System-Wide Accident Prevention element of NASA s Aviation Safety Program. This document may serve as a first step toward the goal of integrating traffic, weather, and terrain information; it provides recommendations for a cockpit display that integrates weather information with traffic information. While some of the recommendations are general enough to be used for any type of operations, these recommendations are targeted for Federal Aviation Regulations Part 121 Operations. The document is organized in the following manner. First, weather information is discussed as an independent subject matter, and recommendations are presented for presenting weather in the cockpit. Second, traffic is discussed independently, but this discussion essentially reviews work on the display of traffic in the cockpit. Third, recommendations for the cockpit integration of weather and traffic information are discussed. Fourth, several research groups are recognized for their efforts in developing systems that are relevant to the current discussion. Finally, closing remarks provide suggestions for future efforts.

  20. Advanced helicopter cockpit and control configurations for helicopter combat missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haworth, Loran A.; Atencio, Adolph, Jr.; Bivens, Courtland; Shively, Robert; Delgado, Daniel

    1987-01-01

    Two piloted simulations were conducted by the U.S. Army Aeroflightdynamics Directorate to evaluate workload and helicopter-handling qualities requirements for single pilot operation in a combat Nap-of-the-Earth environment. The single-pilot advanced cockpit engineering simulation (SPACES) investigations were performed on the NASA Ames Vertical Motion Simulator, using the Advanced Digital Optical Control System control laws and an advanced concepts glass cockpit. The first simulation (SPACES I) compared single pilot to dual crewmember operation for the same flight tasks to determine differences between dual and single ratings, and to discover which control laws enabled adequate single-pilot helicopter operation. The SPACES II simulation concentrated on single-pilot operations and use of control laws thought to be viable candidates for single pilot operations workload. Measures detected significant differences between single-pilot task segments. Control system configurations were task dependent, demonstrating a need for inflight reconfigurable control system to match the optimal control system with the required task.

  1. Experimental Studies of Intent Information on Cockpit Traffic Displays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barhydt, Richard; Hansman, R. John, Jr.

    1997-01-01

    Intent information provides knowledge of another aircraft's current and future trajectory states. Prototype traffic displays were designed for four different levels of intent: No Intent, Rate, Commanded State, and Flight Management System (FMS)-Path. The TCAS Display was used as a baseline and represents the No Intent Level. The Rate, Commanded State, and FMS-Path Displays show increasing levels of intent information using TCAS-like symbology in addition to incorporating a conflict probe and profile view display. An experiment was run on the MIT Part Task Flight Simulator in which eight airline pilots flew five traffic scenarios with each of the four displays. Results show that pilots had fewer separation violations and maneuvered earlier with the three intent displays. Separation violations were reduced when pilots maneuvered earlier. A second experiment was run to compare performance between displaying intent information directly and incorporating it into a conflict probe. A different set of eight airline pilots flew four traffic scenarios with the TCAS and Commanded State Displays with and without the conflict probe. Conflict probes with two minute and long range look-ahead times were tested. Displaying conflict bands or showing intent information directly both led to fewer separation violations and earlier avoidance maneuvers than the base TCAS Display. Performance was similar between the two minute and long range look-ahead conflict probes. Pilots preferred all intent displays over the TCAS Display.

  2. Format and basic geometry of a perspective display of air traffic for the cockpit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgreevy, Michael Wallace; Ellis, Stephen R.

    1991-01-01

    The design and implementation of a perspective display of air traffic for the cockpit is discussed. Parameters of the perspective are variable and interactive so that the appearance of the projected image can be widely varied. This approach makes allowances for exploration of perspective parameters and their interactions. The display was initially used to study the cases of horizontal maneuver biases found in experiments involving a plan view air traffic display format. Experiments to determine the effect of perspective geometry on spatial judgements have evolved from the display program. Several scaling techniques and other adjustments to the perspective are used to tailor the geometry for effective presentation of 3-D traffic situations.

  3. Crew workload strategies in advanced cockpits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hart, Sandra G.

    1990-01-01

    Many methods of measuring and predicting operator workload have been developed that provide useful information in the design, evaluation, and operation of complex systems and which aid in developing models of human attention and performance. However, the relationships between such measures, imposed task demands, and measures of performance remain complex and even contradictory. It appears that we have ignored an important factor: people do not passively translate task demands into performance. Rather, they actively manage their time, resources, and effort to achieve an acceptable level of performance while maintaining a comfortable level of workload. While such adaptive, creative, and strategic behaviors are the primary reason that human operators remain an essential component of all advanced man-machine systems, they also result in individual differences in the way people respond to the same task demands and inconsistent relationships among measures. Finally, we are able to measure workload and performance, but interpreting such measures remains difficult; it is still not clear how much workload is too much or too little nor the consequences of suboptimal workload on system performance and the mental, physical, and emotional well-being of the human operators. The rationale and philosophy of a program of research developed to address these issues will be reviewed and contrasted to traditional methods of defining, measuring, and predicting human operator workload. Viewgraphs are given.

  4. Cockpit Interfaces, Displays, and Alerting Messages for the Interval Management Alternative Clearances (IMAC) Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baxley, Brian T.; Palmer, Michael T.; Swieringa, Kurt A.

    2015-01-01

    This document describes the IM cockpit interfaces, displays, and alerting capabilities that were developed for and used in the IMAC experiment, which was conducted at NASA Langley in the summer of 2015. Specifically, this document includes: (1) screen layouts for each page of the interface; (2) step-by-step instructions for data entry, data verification and input error correction; (3) algorithm state messages and error condition alerting messages; (4) aircraft speed guidance and deviation indications; and (5) graphical display of the spatial relationships between the Ownship aircraft and the Target aircraft. The controller displays for IM will be described in a separate document.

  5. GPS 3-D cockpit displays: Sensors, algorithms, and flight testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrows, Andrew Kevin

    Tunnel-in-the-Sky 3-D flight displays have been investigated for several decades as a means of enhancing aircraft safety and utility. However, high costs have prevented commercial development and seriously hindered research into their operational benefits. The rapid development of Differential Global Positioning Systems (DGPS), inexpensive computing power, and ruggedized displays is now changing this situation. A low-cost prototype system was built and flight tested to investigate implementation and operational issues. The display provided an "out the window" 3-D perspective view of the world, letting the pilot see the horizon, runway, and desired flight path even in instrument flight conditions. The flight path was depicted as a tunnel through which the pilot flew the airplane, while predictor symbology provided guidance to minimize path-following errors. Positioning data was supplied, by various DGPS sources including the Stanford Wide Area Augmentation System (WAAS) testbed. A combination of GPS and low-cost inertial sensors provided vehicle heading, pitch, and roll information. Architectural and sensor fusion tradeoffs made during system implementation are discussed. Computational algorithms used to provide guidance on curved paths over the earth geoid are outlined along with display system design issues. It was found that current technology enables low-cost Tunnel-in-the-Sky display systems with a target cost of $20,000 for large-scale commercialization. Extensive testing on Piper Dakota and Beechcraft Queen Air aircraft demonstrated enhanced accuracy and operational flexibility on a variety of complex flight trajectories. These included curved and segmented approaches, traffic patterns flown on instruments, and skywriting by instrument reference. Overlays to existing instrument approaches at airports in California and Alaska were flown and compared with current instrument procedures. These overlays demonstrated improved utility and situational awareness for

  6. CODAC (Cockpit Oriented Display of Aircraft Configurations) version 1.4 user's guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bingel, Bradford D.; Wilson, Erma L.; Hollis, Michelle S.

    1988-01-01

    The Cockpit Oriented Display of Aircraft Configurations (CODAC) package is an interactive FORTRAN 77 graphics program which produces high quality publication grade hidden line images of three dimensional wireframe objects. The term, Cockpit Oriented, is used because CODAC rotates objects relative to the changing aircraft axis system (rather than about a fixed global axis system) and uses the more familiar directions of yaw, roll, and pitch. In addition, CODAC accepts geometry data in a variety of formats (LaWGS, Craidon, Hess, and FVS data check), and automatically selects the appropriate panel driver. Finally, CODAC makes full use of the Precision Visuals' DI-3000 metafile option, allowing users to save, edit, and print images for group presentations or research publications.

  7. Advanced automated glass cockpit certification: Being wary of human factors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amalberti, Rene; Wilbaux, Florence

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents some facets of the French experience with human factors in the process of certification of advanced automated cockpits. Three types of difficulties are described: first, the difficulties concerning the hotly debated concept of human error and its non-linear relationship to risk of accident; a typology of errors to be taken into account in the certification process is put forward to respond to this issue. Next, the difficulties connected to the basically gradual and evolving nature of pilot expertise on a given type of aircraft, which contrasts with the immediate and definitive style of certifying systems. The last difficulties to be considered are those related to the goals of certification itself on these new aircraft and the status of findings from human factor analyses (in particular, what should be done with disappointing results, how much can the changes induced by human factors investigation economically affect aircraft design, how many errors do we need to accumulate before we revise the system, what should be remedied when human factor problems are discovered at the certification stage: the machine? pilot training? the rules? or everything?). The growth of advanced-automated glass cockpits has forced the international aeronautical community to pay more attention to human factors during the design phase, the certification phase and pilot training. The recent creation of a human factor desk at the DGAC-SFACT (Official French services) is a direct consequence of this. The paper is divided into three parts. Part one debates human error and its relationship with system design and accident risk. Part two describes difficulties connected to the basically gradual and evolving nature of pilot expertise on a given type of aircraft, which contrasts with the immediate and definitive style of certifying systems. Part three focuses on concrete outcomes of human factors for certification purposes.

  8. Evaluation of two cockpit display concepts for civil tiltrotor instrument operations on steep approaches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, William A.; Bray, Richard S.; Simmons, Rickey C.; Tucker, George E.

    1993-01-01

    A piloted simulation experiment was conducted using the NASA Ames Research Center Vertical Motion Simulator to evaluate two cockpit display formats designed for manual control on steep instrument approaches for a civil transport tiltrotor aircraft. The first display included a four-cue (pitch, roll, power lever position, and nacelle angle movement prompt) flight director. The second display format provided instantaneous flight path angle information together with other symbols for terminal area guidance. Pilots evaluated these display formats for an instrument approach task which required a level flight conversion from airplane-mode flight to helicopter-mode flight while decelerating to the nominal approach airspeed. Pilots tracked glide slopes of 6, 9, 15 and 25 degrees, terminating in a hover for a vertical landing on a 150 feet square vertipad. Approaches were conducted with low visibility and ceilings and with crosswinds and turbulence, with all aircraft systems functioning normally and were carried through to a landing. Desired approach and tracking performance was achieved with generally satisfactory handling qualities using either display format on glide slopes up through 15 degrees. Evaluations with both display formats for a 25 degree glide slope revealed serious problems with glide slope tracking at low airspeeds in crosswinds and the loss of the intended landing spot from the cockpit field of view.

  9. Night vision goggles, laser eye protection, and cockpit displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinsen, Gary; Havig, Paul; Dykes, James; Kuyk, Thomas; McLin, Leon

    2007-04-01

    The increasing use of lasers on the modern battlefield may necessitate the wear of laser eye protection devices (LEPDs) by warfighters. Unfortunately, LEPDs that protect against visible laser wavelengths often reduce overall light transmittance and a wearer's vision can be degraded, especially in low light conditions. Wearing night vision goggles (NVGs) provides laser eye protection behind the goggles, but NVGs do not block lasers that might enter the eye around the NVGs. Therefore, LEPDs will be worn under NVGs. People wearing NVGs look below the NVGs to read displays and for other near vision tasks. This effort involved determining the effects of wearing variable density filters on vision in low light conditions, with and without the presence of a simulated head-down display (HDD). Each subject's visual acuity was measured under moonlight illumination levels while wearing neutral density filters and LEPDs. Similar measurements of the subjects' visual detection thresholds, both on and off-axis, were made. Finally, the effects of wearing variable density filters on visual acuity on the HDD were determined. Wearing variable density filters in low-light conditions reduces visual acuity and detection. The presence of the HDD reduced acuity slightly through variable density filters but. the HDD had no effect on on-axis detection and actually improved off-axis detection. The reasons for this final finding are unclear.

  10. Just acceptable and desirable luminance levels for fast jet cockpit displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vassie, C. Ken; Christopher, W. Colin

    2000-08-01

    This paper reports on the experiments undertaken by BAE SYSTEMS to determine the 'just acceptable' and 'desirable' luminance levels for graphical displays utilized in fast jet cockpits. The assessments of the displays were performed by BAE SYSTEMS test pilots. The results of the experiments are only fully applicable to displays which have the same reflectivity and black contrast as that of the display used during the assessment. The PJND (Perceived Must Noticeable) method was utilized to extend the results of the experiments to apply to displays with any combination of reflectivity and black contrast. The experiment involved both computer generated imagery and sensor imagery; as would be expected the luminance requirements for sensor imagery is far higher than it is for non-sensor imagery.

  11. Separation Monitoring with Four Types of Predictors on a Cockpit Display of Traffic Information

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jago, S.; Palmer, E.

    1982-01-01

    A clear and concise display format for use in later full mission simulator evaluation of the cockpit display of traffic information (CDTI) concept was studied. This experiment required airline pilots to monitor a CDTI and make perceptual judgments concerning the future position of a single intruder aircraft in relationship to their own aircraft (ownship). The main experimental variable was the type of predictor used to display future position of each aircraft. Predictors were referenced to the ground or to ownship and they either included turn rate information or did not. Other variables were the aircraft's separation distance when the judgment was required and the type of encounter (straight or turning). Results indicate that under these experimental conditions fewer errors were made when the predictor included turn rate information. There was little difference in overall error rate for the curved ground referenced and the ownship referenced predictors.

  12. A 3-Dimensional Cockpit Display with Traffic and Terrain Information for the Small Aircraft Transportation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    UijtdeHaag, Maarten; Thomas, Robert; Rankin, James R.

    2004-01-01

    The report discusses the architecture and the flight test results of a 3-Dimensional Cockpit Display of Traffic and terrain Information (3D-CDTI). The presented 3D-CDTI is a perspective display format that combines existing Synthetic Vision System (SVS) research and Automatic Dependent Surveillance-Broadcast (ADS-B) technology to improve the pilot's situational awareness. The goal of the 3D-CDTI is to contribute to the development of new display concepts for NASA's Small Aircraft Transportation System research program. Papers were presented at the PLANS 2002 meeting and the ION-GPS 2002 meeting. The contents of this report are derived from the results discussed in those papers.

  13. Evaluation of the potential format and content of a cockpit display of traffic information

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hart, S. G.; Loomis, L. L.

    1980-01-01

    The types and formats of information most suitable to be displayed in a cockpit display of traffic information (CDTI) are investigated. Twenty three airline pilots and 13 instrumentated general aviation pilots were asked to select from sets of symbols of various complexities incorporating various levels of information that would contain all information necessary for monitoring the traffic situation, detecting errors, maintaining separation and merging. Display features selected by a significant number of pilots were then evaluated for their capabilities in helping pilots to assess the lateral or vertical separation between their own and another aircraft in a dynamic simulation. It is found that while some of the features initially chosen by the pilots, such as flightpath predictors, aided the pilots in perceiving the traffic situation correctly, others, such as ground speed and climb/descend arrows and relative altitude encoding of symbols for other aircraft, did not contribute to improved performance speed or accuracy.

  14. AMLCD cockpit: promise and payoffs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snow, Michael P.; Jackson, Timothy W.; Meyer, Frederick M.; Reising, John M.; Hopper, Darrel G.

    1999-08-01

    The active matrix liquid crystal display (AMLCD) has become the preferred flight instrument technology in avionics multifunction display applications. Current bubble canopy fighter cockpit applications involve sizes up to 7.8 X 7.8 in. active display. Dual use avionics versions of AMLCD technology are now as large as 6.7 X 6.7 in. active display area in the ARINC D sized color multifunction display (MFD). This is the standard instrument in all new Boeing transport aircraft and is being retrofitted into the C-17A. A special design of the ARINC D instrument is used in the Space Shuttle cockpit upgrade. Larger sizes of AMLCD were desired when decisions were made in the early 1990s for the F-22. Commercial AMLCD technology has now produced monitors at 1280 X 1024 resolution (1.3 megapixels) in sizes of 16 to 21 in. diagonal. Each of these larger AMLCDs has more information carrying capacity than the entire F-22A cockpit instrument panel shipset, comprising six separate smaller AMLCDs (1.2 megapixels total). The larger AMLCDs are being integrated into airborne mission crewstations for use in dim ambient lighting conditions. It is now time to identify and address the technology challenges of upgrading these larger AMLCDs for sunlight readable application and of developing concepts for their integration into advanced bubble canopy fighter cockpits. The overall goals are to significantly increase the informational carrying capacity to bring both sensor and information fusion into the cockpit and, thereby, to enable a significant increase in warfighter situational awareness and effectiveness. A research cockpit was built using specialized versions of the IBM 16.1 in and two smaller 10 in. AMLCDs to examine human factors and display design issues associated with these next-generation AMLCD cockpit displays. This cockpit was later upgraded to allow greater reconfigurability and flexibility in the display hardware used to conduct part- task mission simulations. The objective

  15. The Development of Cockpit Display and Alerting Concepts for Interval Management (IM) in a Near-Term Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baxley, Brian T.; Shay, Richard F.; Swieringa, Kurt A.

    2014-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Langley Research Center (LaRC) Interval Management (IM) research team has conducted a wide spectrum of work in the recent past, ranging from development and testing of the concept, procedures, and algorithm. This document focuses on the research and evaluation of the IM pilot interfaces, cockpit displays, indications, and alerting concepts for conducting IM spacing operations. The research team incorporated knowledge of human factors research, industry standards for cockpit design, and cockpit design philosophies to develop innovative displays for conducting these spacing operations. The research team also conducted a series of human-in-the-loop (HITL) experiments with commercial pilots and air traffic controllers, in as realistic a high-density arrival operation environment as could be simulated, to evaluate the spacing guidance display features and interface requirements needed to conduct spacing operations.

  16. Perception of aircraft separation with pilot-preferred symbology on a cockpit display of traffic information

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oconnor, S.; Jago, S.; Baty, D.; Palmer, E.

    1980-01-01

    The concept of a cockpit display of traffic information (CDTI) was developed for use in later full mission simulator evaluations of the CDTI concept. Pilots chose their preferred method of displaying air traffic information for several variables. Variables included: type of background, update rate, update type, predictor type, and history type. Each pilot designed a display he felt would be most useful in flight operations. After a series of test trials, each pilot was given the opportunity to modify the display for the experimental task. For a second day of testing, they repeated the experimental task using their display as well as displays chosen by other pilots. Results indicated a variety of individual preferences in symbology and differences in the accuracy of judgments. Pilots indicated concern for clutter of the display, relationship of the displayed symbology to physical reality, and a need to perceive the relative motion of the intruder aircraft. Analysis of data indicated that pilots were able to improve their performance with practice.

  17. Development and Demonstration of a Prototype Free Flight Cockpit Display of Traffic Information

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Walter W.; Battiste, Vernol; Delzell, Susanne; Holland, Sheila; Belcher, Sean; Jordan, Kevin

    2003-01-01

    Two versions of a prototype Free Flight cockpit situational display (Basic and Enhanced) were examined in a simulation at the NASA Ames Research Center. Both displays presented a display of traffic out to a range of 120 NM, and an alert when the automation detected a substantial danger of losing separation with another aircraft. The task for the crews was to detect and resolve threats to separation posed by intruder aircraft. An Enhanced version of the display was also examined. It incorporated two additional conflict alerting levels and tools to aid in trajectory prediction and path planning. Ten crews from a major airline participated in the study. Performance analyses and pilot debriefings showed that the Enhanced display was preferred, and that minimal separation between the intruder and the ownship was larger with the Enhanced display. In addition, the additional information on the Enhanced display did not lead crews to engage in more maneuvering. Instead an opposite trend was indicated. Finally, crews using the Enhanced display responded more proactively, tending to resolve alerts earlier.

  18. Effect of display update interval, update type, and background on perception of aircraft separation on a cockpit display on traffic information

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jago, S.; Baty, D.; Oconnor, S.; Palmer, E.

    1981-01-01

    The concept of a cockpit display of traffic information (CDTI) includes the integration of air traffic, navigation, and other pertinent information in a single electronic display in the cockpit. Concise display symbology was developed for use in later full-mission simulator evaluations of the CDTI concept. Experimental variables used included the update interval motion of the aircraft, the update type, (that is, whether the two aircraft were updated at the same update interval or not), the background (grid pattern or no background), and encounter type (straight or curved). Only the type of encounter affected performance.

  19. Effects of Symbol Brightness Cueing on Attention During a Visual Search of a Cockpit Display of Traffic Information

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Walter W.; Liao, Min-Ju; Granada, Stacie

    2003-01-01

    This study investigated visual search performance for target aircraft symbols on a Cockpit Display of Traffic Information (CDTI). Of primary interest was the influence of target brightness (intensity) and highlighting validity (search directions) on the ability to detect a target aircraft among distractor aircraft. Target aircraft were distinguished by an airspace course that conflicted with Ownship (that is, the participant's aircraft). The display could present all (homogeneous) bright aircraft, all (homogeneous) dim aircraft, or mixed bright and dim aircraft, with the target aircraft being either bright or dim. In the mixed intensity condition, participants may or may not have been instructed whether the target was bright or dim. Results indicated that highlighting validity facilitated better detection times. However, instead of bright targets being detected faster, dim targets were found to be detected more slowly in the mixed intensity display than in the homogeneous display. This relative slowness may be due to a delay in confirming the dim aircraft to be a target when it it was among brighter distractor aircraft. This hypothesis will be tested in future research. Funding for this work was provided by the Advanced Air Transportation Technologies Project of NASA's Airspace Operation Systems Program.

  20. Simulation of a cockpit-display concept for executing a wake-vortex avoidance procedure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbott, T. S.

    1984-01-01

    A piloted simulation study has been undertaken to determine the feasibility and potential benefits of utilizing a forward-looking display to provide information that would enable aircraft to reduce their in-trail separation, and hence increase runway capacity, through the application of multiple glide-path approach techniques. This portion of the study was an initial exploration into a concept in which traffic information was added to a head-up display (HUD) format to allow the pilot to monitor the traffic situation and to self-space on a lead aircraft during a single glide-path approach task. The tests were conducted in a motion-base cockpit simulator configured as a current-generation transport aircraft and include the dynamic effects of the vortices generated by the lead aircraft. The information provided on the HUD included typical aircraft-guidance information and the current and past positions of the lead aircraft. Additionally, the displayed information provided self-separation cues which allowed the pilot to maintain separation on the lead aircraft. The results of this study indicate that the display concept could provide sufficient information to the pilot for traffic monitoring and self-separation.

  1. E-2D Advanced Hawkeye: primary flight display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paolillo, Paul W.; Saxena, Ragini; Garruba, Jonathan; Tripathi, Sanjay; Blanchard, Randy

    2006-05-01

    This paper is a response to the challenge of providing a large area avionics display for the E-2D AHE aircraft. The resulting display design provides a pilot with high-resolution visual information content covering an image area of almost three square feet (Active Area of Samsung display = 33.792cm x 27.0336 cm = 13.304" x 10.643" = 141.596 square inches = 0.983 sq. ft x 3 = 2.95 sq. ft). The avionics display application, design and performance being described is the Primary Flight Display for the E-2D Advanced Hawkeye aircraft. This cockpit display has a screen diagonal size of 17 inches. Three displays, with minimum bezel width, just fit within the available instrument panel area. The significant design constraints of supporting an upgrade installation have been addressed. These constraints include a display image size that is larger than the mounting opening in the instrument panel. This, therefore, requires that the Electromagnetic Interference (EMI) window, LCD panel and backlight all fit within the limited available bezel depth. High brightness and a wide dimming range are supported with a dual mode Cold Cathode Fluorescent Tube (CCFT) and LED backlight. Packaging constraints dictated the use of multiple U shaped fluorescent lamps in a direct view backlight design for a maximum display brightness of 300 foot-Lamberts. The low intensity backlight levels are provided by remote LEDs coupled through a fiber optic mesh. This architecture generates luminous uniformity within a minimum backlight depth. Cross-cockpit viewing is supported with ultra-wide field-of-view performance including contrast and the color stability of an advanced LCD cell design supports. Display system design tradeoffs directed a priority to high optical efficiency for minimum power and weight.

  2. Accuracy of System Step Response Roll Magnitude Estimation from Central and Peripheral Visual Displays and Simulator Cockpit Motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hosman, R. J. A. W.; Vandervaart, J. C.

    1984-01-01

    An experiment to investigate visual roll attitude and roll rate perception is described. The experiment was also designed to assess the improvements of perception due to cockpit motion. After the onset of the motion, subjects were to make accurate and quick estimates of the final magnitude of the roll angle step response by pressing the appropriate button of a keyboard device. The differing time-histories of roll angle, roll rate and roll acceleration caused by a step response stimulate the different perception processes related the central visual field, peripheral visual field and vestibular organs in different, yet exactly known ways. Experiments with either of the visual displays or cockpit motion and some combinations of these were run to asses the roles of the different perception processes. Results show that the differences in response time are much more pronounced than the differences in perception accuracy.

  3. Study to Expand Simulation Cockpit Displays of Advanced Sensors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-03-01

    VENNMENT UNDER THE CONDITIONS OF 1.1 ABOVE. T. IS LEGEND . TOGITMER WNI T, I’-)CATION THE PONT INS OP THIS DATA WHICH 4ARE SUBJECT TO SUCH LIMITATIONS... theiv ’ lifetime and lumen efficiency are very poor, thus elininat- ing them from consideration. For camera-model work intensity control of the light...0 0 oil 303 Ic ¢D. a_I w R c UL ’mmm cc 304 C,,, ’p1 z w CC A-j- LL a * 0 3050 4 a jC Iw LAA 306 L~ (~00 I- LJ N I-LL u L~i LJ rs URI M𔃺o -4~~~~~ c

  4. The Effect of Symbology Location and Format on Attentional Deployment within a Cockpit Display of Traffic Information

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Walter W.; Liao, Min-Ju; Tse, Stephen

    2003-01-01

    The present experiment employed target detection tasks to investigate attentional deployment during visual search for target aircraft symbols on a cockpit display of traffic information (CDTI). Targets were defined by either a geometric property (aircraft on a collision course with Ownship) or a textual property (aircraft with associated altitude tags indicating an even altitude level). Effects of target location and target brightness (highlighting) were examined. Target location was systematically related to target detection time, and this interacted with the target's defining property (collision geometry or associated text). Highlighting (which was not linked to whether an aircraft symbol was the target) did not influence target detection time.

  5. Evaluation of Perspective and Coplanar Cockpit Displays of Traffic Information to Support Hazard Awareness in Free Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merwin, David H.; Wickens, Christopher D.

    1996-01-01

    We examined the cockpit display representation of traffic, to support the pilot in tactical planning and conflict avoidance. Such displays may support the "free flight" concept, but can also support greater situation awareness in a non-free flight environment. Two perspective views and a coplanar display were contrasted in scenarios in which pilots needed to navigate around conflicting traffic, either in the absence (low workload) or presence (high workload) of a second intruder aircraft. All three formats were configured with predictive aiding vectors that explicitly represented the predicted point of closest pass, and predicted penetration of an alert zone around ownship. Ten pilots were assigned to each of the display conditions, and each flew a series of 60 conflict maneuvers that varied in their workload and the complexity of the conflict geometry. Results indicated a tendency to choose vertical over lateral maneuvers, a tendency which was amplified with the coplanar display. Vertical maneuvers by the intruder produced an added source of workload. Importantly, the coplanar display supported performance in all measures that was equal to or greater than either of the perspective displays (i.e., fewer predicted and actual conflicts, less extreme maneuvers). Previous studies that have indicated perspective superiority have only contrasted these with UNIplanar displays rather than the coplanar display used here.

  6. Effect of lead-aircraft ground-speed on self-spacing performance using a cockpit display of traffic information

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, J. R.

    1983-01-01

    A simulator investigation was conducted to determine the effect of the lead-aircraft ground-speed quantization level on self-spacing performance using a Cockpit Display of Traffic Information (CDTI). The study utilized a simulator employing cathode-ray tubes for the primary flight and navigation displays and highly augmented flight control modes. The pilot's task was to follow, and self-space on, a lead aircraft which was performing an idle-thrust profile descent to an instrument landing system (ILS) approach and landing. The spacing requirement was specified in terms of both a minimum distance and a time interval. The results indicate that the ground-speed quantization level, lead-aircraft scenario, and pilot technique had a significant effect on self-spacing performance. However, the ground-speed quantization level only had a significant effect on the performance when the lead aircraft flew a fast final approach.

  7. Traffic Alert and Collision Avoidance System (TCAS): Cockpit Display of Traffic Information (CDTI) investigation. Phase 1: Feasibility study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burgess, Malcolm; Davis, Dean; Hollister, Walter; Sorensen, John A.

    1991-01-01

    The possibility of the Threat Alert and Collision Avoidance System (TCAS) traffic sensor and display being used for meaningful Cockpit Display of Traffic Information (CDTI) applications has resulted in the Federal Aviation Administration initiating a project to establish the technical and operational requirements to realize this potential. Phase 1 of the project is presented here. Phase 1 was organized to define specific CDTI applications for the terminal area, to determine what has already been learned about CDTI technology relevant to these applications, and to define the engineering required to supply the remaining TCAS-CDTI technology for capacity benefit realization. The CDTI applications examined have been limited to those appropriate to the final approach and departure phases of flight.

  8. The effect of viewing time, time to encounter, and practice on perception of aircraft separation on a cockpit display of traffic information

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oconnor, S.; Palmer, E. A.; Baty, D.; Jago, S.

    1980-01-01

    The concept of a cockpit display of traffic information (CDTI) includes the integration of air traffic, navigation, and other pertinent information in a single electronic display in the cockpit. Two studies were conducted to develop a clear and concise display format for use in later full-mission simulator evaluations of the CDTI concept. Subjects were required to monitor a CDTI for specified periods of time and to make perceptual judgments concerning the future position of a single intruder aircraft in relationship to their own aircraft. Experimental variables included: type of predictor information displayed on the two aircraft symbols; time to encounter point; length of time subjects viewed the display; amount of practice; and type of encounter (straight or turning). Results show that length of viewing time had little or no effect on performance; time to encounter influenced performance with the straight predictor but did not with the curved predictor; and that learning occurred under all conditions.

  9. A graphical workstation based part-task flight simulator for preliminary rapid evaluation of advanced displays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wanke, Craig; Kuchar, James; Hahn, Edward; Pritchett, Amy; Hansman, R. J.

    1992-01-01

    Advances in avionics and display technology are significantly changing the cockpit environment in current transport aircraft. The MIT Aeronautical Systems Lab (ASL) has developed a part-task flight simulator specifically to study the effects of these new technologies on flight crew situational awareness and performance. The simulator is based on a commercially-available graphics workstation, and can be rapidly reconfigured to meet the varying demands of experimental studies. The simulator has been successfully used to evaluate graphical microburst alerting displays, electronic instrument approach plates, terrain awareness and alerting displays, and ATC routing amendment delivery through digital datalinks.

  10. A graphical workstation based part-task flight simulator for preliminary rapid evaluation of advanced displays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wanke, Craig; Kuchar, James; Hahn, Edward; Pritchett, A.; Hansman, R. John

    1994-01-01

    Advances in avionics and display technology are significantly changing the cockpit environment in current transport aircraft. The MIT Aeronautical Systems Lab (ASL) developed a part-task flight simulator specifically to study the effects of these new technologies on flight crew situational awareness and performance. The simulator is based on a commercially-available graphics workstation, and can be rapidly reconfigured to meet the varying demands of experimental studies. The simulator was successfully used to evaluate graphical microbursts alerting displays, electronic instrument approach plates, terrain awareness and alerting displays, and ATC routing amendment delivery through digital datalinks.

  11. Cockpit Displays for Enhancing Terminal-Area Situational Awareness and Runway Safety

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyer, Paul V.; Otero, Sharon; Jones, Denise R. (Technical Monitor)

    2007-01-01

    HUD and PFD displays have been developed to enhance situational awareness and improve runway safety. These displays were designed to seamlessly transition through all phases of flight providing guidance and information to the pilot. This report describes the background of the Langley Research Center (LaRC) HUD and PFD work, the steps required to integrate the displays with those of other LaRC programs, the display characteristics of the several operational modes and the transitional logic governing the transition between displays.

  12. Collaborative research on V/STOL control system/cockpit display tradeoffs under the NASA/MOD joint aeronautical program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Franklin, J. A.; Nicholas, O. P.

    1992-01-01

    Summarized here are activities that have taken place from 1979 to the present in a collaborative program between NASA Ames Research Center and the Royal Aerospace Establishment (now Defence Research Agency), Bedford on flight control system and cockpit display tradeoffs for low-speed and hover operations of future V/STOL aircraft. This program was created as Task 8A of the Joint Aeronautical Program between NASA in the United States and the Ministry of Defence (Procurement Executive) in the United Kingdom. The program was initiated based on a recognition by both parties of the strengths of the efforts of their counterparts and a desire to participate jointly in future simulation and flight experiments. In the ensuing years, teams of NASA and RAE engineers and pilots have participated in each other's simulation experiments to evaluate control and display concepts and define design requirements for research aircraft. Both organizations possess Harrier airframes that have undergone extensive modification to provide in-flight research capabilities in the subject areas. Both NASA and RAE have profited by exchanges of control/display concepts, design criteria, fabrication techniques, software development and validation, installation details, and ground and flight clearance techniques for their respective aircraft. This collaboration has permitted the two organizations to achieve jointly substantially more during the period than if they had worked independently. The two organizations are now entering the phase of flight research for the collaborative program as currently defined.

  13. A cockpit-display concept for executing a multiple glide-slope approach for wake-vortex avoidance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbott, T. S.

    1984-01-01

    A piloted simulation study was undertaken to determine the feasibility of utilizing a forward-looking display to provide information that would enable aircraft to rredue their in-trail separation interval, and hence increase airport capacity, through the application of multiple glide-path approach techniques. The primary objective of this study was to determine whether information could be satisfactorily provided on a head-up display (HUD) format to permit the pilot to conduct a multiple glide-slope approach while maintaining a prespecified in-trail separation interval. The tests were conducted in a motion-base cockpit simulator configured as a current-generation transport aircraft and included dynamic effects of the vortices generated by the lead aircraft. The information provided on the HUD included typical aircraft guidance information and the current and past positions of the lead aircraft. Additionally, the displayed information provided self-separation cues that allowed the pilot to maintain separation on the lead aircraft. Performance data and pilot subjective ratings and comments were obtained during the tests. The results of this study indicate that multiple glide-slope approaches, procedurally designed for vortex avoidance, are possible while maintaining pilot work load and performance within operationally acceptable limits. In general, it would seem that multiple glide-slope approaches are possible even under reduced in-trail separation conditions if the pilot is provided with adequate situational information.

  14. Hazard evaluation and operational cockpit display of ground-measured windshear data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wanke, Craig; Hansman, R. John, Jr.

    1993-01-01

    Low-altitude windshear is the leading weather-related cause of fatal aviation accidents in the U.S. Since 1964, there have been 26 accidents attributed to windshear resulting in over 500 fatalities. Low-altitude windshear can take several forms, including macroscopic forms such as cold-warm gustfronts down to the small, intense downdrafts known as microbursts. Microbursts are particularly dangerous and difficult to detect due to their small size, short duration, and occurrence under both heavy precipitation and virtually dry conditions. For these reasons, the real-time detection of windshear hazards is a very active field of research. Also, the advent of digital ground-to-air datalinks and electronic flight instrumentation opens up many options for implementation of windshear alerts in the terminal area environment. Study is required to determine the best content, format, timing, and cockpit presentation of windshear alerts in the modern ATC environment to best inform the flight crew without significantly increasing crew workload.

  15. Experimental Studies of the Effect of Intent Information on Cockpit Traffic Displays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barhydt, Richard; Hansman, R. John

    1997-01-01

    Intent information provides knowledge of another aircraft's current and future trajectory states. Prototype traffic displays were designed for four different levels of intent: Position, Rate, Commanded State, and FMS (Flight Management System)-Path. The current TCAS (traffic collision avoidance systems) Display, which shows altitude rate in addition to current position and altitude, was used as a baseline and represents the lowest level of intent. The Rate, Commanded State, and FMS-Path Displays show increasing levels of intent information using TCAS-like symbology in addition to incorporating a conflict probe and profile view display. An initial experiment was run on the MIT (Massachusetts Institute of Technology) Part Task Flight Simulator in which eight airline pilots flew five traffic scenarios with each of the four displays. Results show that pilots had fewer separation violations and maneuvered earlier with the three intent displays. Separation violations were reduced when pilots maneuvered earlier. A second experiment was run to compare performance between displaying intent information directly and incorporating it into a conflict probe. A different set of eight airline pilots flew four traffic scenarios with the TCAS and Commanded State Displays with and without the conflict probe. Conflict probes with two minute and long range look-ahead times were tested. Displaying conflict bands or showing intent information directly both led to fewer separation violations and earlier avoidance maneuvers than the base TCAS Display. Performance was similar between the two minute and long range look-ahead conflict probes. Pilots preferred all intent displays over the TCAS Display.

  16. Integrated cockpit for A-129

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reina, F.; Gracia, J. J.; Koth, B. W.

    1982-01-01

    Weight, size, and mission requirements for the A-129 mandated an integrated system approach for the crew/cockpit interface design. Instead of the usual multitude of cockpit controls, indicators, gauges, and lights, the primary crew interface is a single multifunction keyboard and one or more multifunction CRT display units. This cockpit design approach imposed unusual constraints upon the system architecture to overcome the inherent information access limitations of a data input/output window that was restricted by the available space. The conceptual approach and resulting design of the A-129 cockpit with the intent to enhance the development of cockpit standardization are described.

  17. Lessons learned from the introduction of cockpit automation in advanced technology aircraft

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, W.R.; Byers, J.C.; Haney, L.N.; Ostrom, L.T.; Reece, W.J.

    1995-10-01

    The commercial aviation industry has many years of experience in the application of computer based human support systems, for example the flight management systems installed in today`s advanced technology (``glass cockpit``) aircraft. This experience can be very helpful in the design and implementation of similar systems for nuclear power plants. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) sponsored a study at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) to investigate pilot errors that occur during interaction with automated systems in advanced technology aircraft. In particular, we investigated the causes and potential corrective measures for pilot errors that resulted in altitude deviation incidents (i.e. failure to capture or maintain the altitude assigned by air traffic control). To do this, we analyzed altitude deviation events that have been reported in the Aviation Safety Reporting System (ASRS), NASA`s data base of incidents self-reported by pilots and air traffic controllers. We developed models of the pilot tasks that are performed to capture and maintain altitude. Incidents from the ASRS data base were mapped onto the models, to highlight and categorize the potential causes of the errors. This paper reviews some of the problems that have resulted from the introduction of glass cockpit aircraft, the methodology used to analyze pilot errors, the lessons learned from the study of altitude deviation events, and the application of the results to the introduction of computer-based human support systems in nuclear power plants. In addition, a framework for using reliability engineering tools to incorporate lessons learned from operational experience into the design, construction, and operation of complex systems is briefly described.

  18. Multi-Dimensionality of Synthetic Vision Cockpit Displays: Prevention of Controlled-Flight-Into-Terrain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prinzel, Lawrence J., III; Kramer, Lynda J.; Arthur, Jarvis J.; Bailey, Randall E.

    2006-01-01

    NASA's Synthetic Vision Systems (SVS) project is developing technologies with practical applications that will help to eliminate low visibility conditions as a causal factor to civil aircraft accidents while replicating the operational benefits of clear day flight operations, regardless of the actual outside visibility condition. The paper describes experimental evaluation of a multi-mode 3-D exocentric synthetic vision navigation display concept for commercial aircraft. Experimental results showed the situation awareness benefits of 2-D and 3-D exocentric synthetic vision displays over traditional 2-D co-planar navigation and vertical situation displays. Conclusions and future research directions are discussed.

  19. Flight evaluation of stabilization and command augmentation system concepts and cockpit displays during approach and landing of powered-lift STOL aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Franklin, J. A.; Innis, R. C.; Hardy, G. H.

    1980-01-01

    A flight research program was conducted to assess the effectiveness of manual control concepts and various cockpit displays in improving altitude (pitch, roll, and yaw) and longitudinal path control during short takeoff aircraft approaches and landings. Satisfactory flying qualities were demonstrared to minimum decision heights of 30 m (100 ft) for selected stabilization and command augmentation systems and flight director combinations. Precise landings at low touchdown sink rates were achieved with a gentle flare maneuver.

  20. Advanced Technologies for Future Spacecraft Cockpits and Space-based Control Centers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia-Galan, Carlos; Uckun, Serdar; Gregory, William; Williams, Kerry

    2006-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is embarking on a new era of Space Exploration, aimed at sending crewed spacecraft beyond Low Earth Orbit (LEO), in medium and long duration missions to the Lunar surface, Mars and beyond. The challenges of such missions are significant and will require new technologies and paradigms in vehicle design and mission operations. Current roles and responsibilities of spacecraft systems, crew and the flight control team, for example, may not be sustainable when real-time support is not assured due to distance-induced communication lags, radio blackouts, equipment failures, or other unexpected factors. Therefore, technologies and applications that enable greater Systems and Mission Management capabilities on-board the space-based system will be necessary to reduce the dependency on real-time critical Earth-based support. The focus of this paper is in such technologies that will be required to bring advance Systems and Mission Management capabilities to space-based environments where the crew will be required to manage both the systems performance and mission execution without dependence on the ground. We refer to this concept as autonomy. Environments that require high levels of autonomy include the cockpits of future spacecraft such as the Mars Exploration Vehicle, and space-based control centers such as a Lunar Base Command and Control Center. Furthermore, this paper will evaluate the requirements, available technology, and roadmap to enable full operational implementation of onboard System Health Management, Mission Planning/re-planning, Autonomous Task/Command Execution, and Human Computer Interface applications. The technology topics covered by the paper include enabling technology to perform Intelligent Caution and Warning, where the systems provides directly actionable data for human understanding and response to failures, task automation applications that automate nominal and Off-nominal task execution based

  1. Advanced Aircrew Display Symposium (3rd), 19-20 May.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-01-01

    unique attributes of these displays. We are not at the cross roads where the man, with his tremendous innovative and adaptive capabilities, may be the... accidents , increased training requirements and mission ineffectiveness from the aircrew’s inability to assimilate, evaluate, react to, and judge cockpit...Enhancement of safety c. Minimum for mission accomplishment d. Enhancement of mission, accomplishment B. How it is to be displayed 1. By sensory channel a

  2. Disorienting effects of aircraft catapult launchings: III. Cockpit displays and piloting performance.

    PubMed

    Cohen, M M

    1977-09-01

    Accelerations closely approximating those encountered in catapult launchings of carrier-based aircraft were generated on the Naval Air Development Center's human centrifuge Dynamic Flight Simulator. Flight instruments, controls, and flight dynamics of an A-7 aircraft were provided to four experienced Naval Aviators, who exercised closed-loop control of a simulated climbout immediately after they were exposed to the accelerations. Four experimental conditions were employed for each aviator: 1) no operational flight instruments, 2) conventional flight instruments, 3) a single carrier takeoff director display operating concurrently. Measures of flight parameters, including indicated airspeed, angle of attack, rate of climb, altitude, pitch attitude, and pitch trim adjustment were monitored throughout the simulation. Subjective reactions and piloting performance were examined under each of the four conditions. Results indicate that the carrier takeoff director display significantly reduced pilot workload and enhanced performance during the climbout.

  3. State-of-the-art cockpit design for the HH-65A helicopters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castleberry, D. E.; Mcelreath, M. Y.

    1982-01-01

    In the design of a HH-65A helicopter cockpit, advanced integrated electronics systems technology was employed to achieve several important goals for this multimission aircraft. They were: (1) integrated systems operation with consistent and simplified cockpit procedures; (2) mission-task-related cockpit displays and controls, and (3) reduced pilot instrument scan effort with excellent outside visibility. The integrated avionics system was implemented to depend heavily upon distributed but complementary processing, multiplex digital bus technology, and multifunction CRT controls and displays. This avionics system was completely flight tested and will soon enter operational service with the Coast Guard.

  4. Routing and advanced display technologies within STOMPM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mittu, Ranjeev; Uhlmann, Jeffrey K.; McCune, Justin

    1998-08-01

    This paper will discuss research conducted at the Naval Research Laboratory in the area of automated routing, advanced 3D displays and novel interface techniques for interacting with those displays. This research has culminated in the development of the strike optimized mission planing module (STOMPM). The STOMPM testbed incorporates new technologies/results in the aforementioned areas to address the deficiencies in current systems and advance the state of the art in military planing systems.

  5. The Effect of NEXRAD Image Looping and National Convective Weather Forecast Product on Pilot Decision Making in the Use of a Cockpit Weather Information Display

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burgess, Malcolm A.; Thomas, Rickey P.

    2004-01-01

    This experiment investigated improvements to cockpit weather displays to better support the hazardous weather avoidance decision-making of general aviation pilots. Forty-eight general aviation pilots were divided into three equal groups and presented with a simulated flight scenario involving embedded convective activity. The control group had access to conventional sources of pre-flight and in-flight weather products. The two treatment groups were provided with a weather display that presented NEXRAD mosaic images, graphic depiction of METARs, and text METARs. One treatment group used a NEXRAD image looping feature and the second group used the National Convective Weather Forecast (NCWF) product overlaid on the NEXRAD display. Both of the treatment displays provided a significant increase in situation awareness but, they provided incomplete information required to deal with hazardous convective weather conditions, and would require substantial pilot training to permit their safe and effective use.

  6. Advanced Simulation in Undergraduate Pilot Training: Visual Display Development

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-12-01

    transmission efficiency pancake window birefringent package dodecahedron structure pentagonal channels 20. STRACT (Continue on reverse aide If necessary...display system was based on the cockpit size of the T-37B and centered on the geometry of the regular dodecahedron , a solid having 12 equal regular...pentagonal faces. The field of view requirements could be met by mosaicking 7 of the 12 sides of a dodecahedron with infinity optics, or pancake windows. The

  7. Effects of curved approach paths and advanced displays on pilot scan patterns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, R. L., Sr.; Mixon, R. W.

    1981-01-01

    The effect on pilot scan behavior of both advanced cockpit and advanced manuevers was assessed. A series of straight-in and curved landing approaches were performed in the Terminal Configured Vehicle (TCV) simulator. Two comparisons of pilot scan behavior were made: (1) pilot scan behavior for straight-in approaches compared with scan behavior previously obtained in a conventionally equipped simulator, and (2) pilot scan behavior for straight-in approaches compared with scan behavior for curved approaches. The results indicate very similar scanning patterns during the straight-in approaches in the conventional and advanced cockpits. However, for the curved approaches pilot attention shifted to the electronic horizontal situation display (moving map), and a new eye scan path appeared between the map and the airspeed indicator. The very high dwell percentage and dwell times on the electronic displays in the TCV simulator during the final portions of the approaches suggest that the electronic attitude direction indicator was well designed for these landing approaches.

  8. Advanced Terrain Displays for Transport Category Aircraft.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-02-01

    Map Displays, Terrain Displays, DOCUMENT IS AVAILABLE TO THE PUBLIC THROUGH Pilo t Performance, THE NATIONAL TECHNICAL INFORMATION SERVICE , Cockp •t...DOT/FAA/RD-9214 Advanced Terran Wigays DOT-VNTSC-FAA-92-4 frTaaotCta Research and Development Servic fo rasor atgr Washington, DC 20591 Aircraft...U.S. Department of Transportation Final Report Federal Aviation Administration January 1991-Sept. 1991 Research and Development Service Washington, DC

  9. Advance in phage display technology for bioanalysis.

    PubMed

    Tan, Yuyu; Tian, Tian; Liu, Wenli; Zhu, Zhi; J Yang, Chaoyong

    2016-06-01

    Phage display technology has emerged as a powerful tool for target gene expression and target-specific ligand selection. It is widely used to screen peptides, proteins and antibodies with the advantages of simplicity, high efficiency and low cost. A variety of targets, including ions, small molecules, inorganic materials, natural and biological polymers, nanostructures, cells, bacteria, and even tissues, have been demonstrated to generate specific binding ligands by phage display. Phages and target-specific ligands screened by phage display have been widely used as affinity reagents in therapeutics, diagnostics and biosensors. In this review, comparisons of different types of phage display systems are first presented. Particularly, microfluidic-based phage display, which enables screening with high throughput, high efficiency and integration, is highlighted. More importantly, we emphasize the advances in biosensors based on phages or phage-derived probes, including nonlytic phages, lytic phages, peptides or proteins screened by phage display, phage assemblies and phage-nanomaterial complexes. However, more efficient and higher throughput phage display methods are still needed to meet an explosion in demand for bioanalysis. Furthermore, screening of cyclic peptides and functional peptides will be the hotspot in bioanalysis.

  10. Simulating Visual Attention Allocation of Pilots in an Advanced Cockpit Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frische, F.; Osterloh, J.-P.; Luedtke, A.

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the results of experiments conducted with human line pilots and a cognitive pilot model during interaction with a new 40 Flight Management System (FMS). The aim of these experiments was to gather human pilot behavior data in order to calibrate the behavior of the model. Human behavior is mainly triggered by visual perception. Thus, the main aspect was to setup a profile of human pilots' visual attention allocation in a cockpit environment containing the new FMS. We first performed statistical analyses of eye tracker data and then compared our results to common results of familiar analyses in standard cockpit environments. The comparison has shown a significant influence of the new system on the visual performance of human pilots. Further on, analyses of the pilot models' visual performance have been performed. A comparison to human pilots' visual performance revealed important improvement potentials.

  11. Automated cockpits special report, part 2.

    PubMed

    1995-02-06

    Part two of this report includes the following articles: Studies Highlight Automation 'Surprises'; Pilots Union Presses for Improved Displays; United Training Stresses Cockpit Discipline; Former NASA Ames Experts Hold Key Airline Posts; Aiding Mode Awareness; Military Cockpits Keep Autopilot Interface Simple; Gulfstream Using Vertical Profile Display; and, Data Recorders Crucial to State-of-art Crash Probes.

  12. Cockpit weather information needs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scanlon, Charles H.

    1992-01-01

    The primary objective is to develop an advanced pilot weather interface for the flight deck and to measure its utilization and effectiveness in pilot reroute decision processes, weather situation awareness, and weather monitoring. Identical graphical weather displays for the dispatcher, air traffic control (ATC), and pilot crew should also enhance the dialogue capabilities for reroute decisions. By utilizing a broadcast data link for surface observations, forecasts, radar summaries, lightning strikes, and weather alerts, onboard weather computing facilities construct graphical displays, historical weather displays, color textual displays, and other tools to assist the pilot crew. Since the weather data is continually being received and stored by the airborne system, the pilot crew has instantaneous access to the latest information. This information is color coded to distinguish degrees of category for surface observations, ceiling and visibilities, and ground radar summaries. Automatic weather monitoring and pilot crew alerting is accomplished by the airborne computing facilities. When a new weather information is received, the displays are instantaneously changed to reflect the new information. Also, when a new surface or special observation for the intended destination is received, the pilot crew is informed so that information can be studied at the pilot's discretion. The pilot crew is also immediately alerted when a severe weather notice, AIRMET or SIGMET, is received. The cockpit weather display shares a multicolor eight inch cathode ray tube and overlaid touch panel with a pilot crew data link interface. Touch sensitive buttons and areas are used for pilot selection of graphical and data link displays. Time critical ATC messages are presented in a small window that overlays other displays so that immediate pilot alerting and action can be taken. Predeparture and reroute clearances are displayed on the graphical weather system so pilot review of weather along

  13. Design, development and testing of an ambient lighting simulator for external illumination of a transport simulator cockpit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batson, Vernon M.; Gupton, Lawrence E.

    1990-01-01

    Researchers at the NASA-Langley Research Center several years ago began to examine concepts for a facility which could simulate the full range of lighting conditions encountered in flight. The purpose of this facility was to evaluate advanced technology display devices in a cockpit environment. The Aircraft Cockpit Ambient Lighting Simulation System (ACALSS) has been developed to meet that need. The ACALSS surrounds a wide-body part-task simulator cockpit, the Advanced Display Evaluation Cockpit, and interfaces with a VAX 11/780 computer, which is used to host both a math model of a modern transport aircraft and a solar motion model (which animates a servoed sun simulator). Several concepts were evaluated and an efficient design using an ellipsoid reflector and Fresnel luminaires was selected for implementation.

  14. Display content in advanced NVG and HMD systems: a pilot/flight surgeon's concerns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonio, Joseph C.

    2008-04-01

    Night vision goggles have been in use for many years and limitations in their use have been well studied through training research and flight experience. However, advances in technology have led to improvements in NVG display capabilities and in some cases helmet mounted display (HMD) technology has begun replacing NVG systems. These advances have led to an increase in the complexity of imaged scene content, thus requiring a greater level of cognitive effort for interpretation, especially when compared to the images provided by current NVG systems. In some cases the complexity of visual imagery has resulted in systems not being classified as operationally suitable. This presentation will focus on a few of the problems noted while testing some of these advanced systems. Topics will include: added complexity of imagery in wide-field-of-view (WFOV) NVG systems, effects due to imagery created by sensors displaced from the normal eye position (increased interocular separation), effects due to imagery projected onto seethrough visor designs, and effects resulting from cockpit design/geometry (e.g., location and design of large-format head-down displays, and the position of structures such as window frames). Training concerns and potential mitigation strategies for HMD design concepts will also be covered. The issues discussed are important for manufacturers to understand during the early design phase, and for testers to understand during developmental or operational testing.

  15. An assessment of advanced displays and controls technology applicable to future space transportation systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hatfield, Jack J.; Villarreal, Diana

    1990-01-01

    The topic of advanced display and control technology is addressed along with the major objectives of this technology, the current state of the art, major accomplishments, research programs and facilities, future trends, technology issues, space transportation systems applications and projected technology readiness for those applications. The holes that may exist between the technology needs of the transportation systems versus the research that is currently under way are addressed, and cultural changes that might facilitate the incorporation of these advanced technologies into future space transportation systems are recommended. Some of the objectives are to reduce life cycle costs, improve reliability and fault tolerance, use of standards for the incorporation of advancing technology, and reduction of weight, volume and power. Pilot workload can be reduced and the pilot's situational awareness can be improved, which would result in improved flight safety and operating efficiency. This could be accomplished through the use of integrated, electronic pictorial displays, consolidated controls, artificial intelligence, and human centered automation tools. The Orbiter Glass Cockpit Display is an example examined.

  16. Cockpit Readiness For Night Vision Goggles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholl, Marija S.; Scholl, James W.

    1987-09-01

    The introduction of night vision goggles into the cockpit environment may produce incompatibility with existing cockpit optoelectronic instrumentation. The methodology used to identify the origin of the spurious signal is demonstrated with the example of an electronic display. The amount of radiation emitted by a gray body in the wavelength region of goggle sensitivity is calculated. A simple procedure for preflight testing of cockpit instrumentation using a commercially available infrared camera is recommended. Other recommendations include the specification of cockpit instrumentation for compatibility with night vision devices.

  17. Methods and apparatus for integrating, organizing, and accessing flight planning and other data on multifunction cockpit displays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibbs, Michael J. (Inventor); Van Omen, Debi (Inventor); Adams, Michael B. (Inventor); Chase, Karl L. (Inventor); Lewis, Daniel E. (Inventor); McCrobie, Daniel E. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A method and system for displaying a flight plan such that an entire flight plan is viewable through the use of scrolling devices is disclosed. The flight plan display may also include a method and system for collapsing and expanding a flight plan display, have provisions for the conspicuous marking of changes to a flight plan, the use of tabs to switch between various displays of data, and access to a navigation database that allows a user to view information about various navigational aids. The database may also the access to the information about the navigational aids to be prioritized based on proximity to the current position of the aircraft.

  18. An alternative to radiance limits for vision enhancement device cockpit integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marasco, Peter L.

    2008-04-01

    With the introduction of the night-vision goggle (NVG) into vehicle cockpits, the transfer of visual information to the observer became more complex. The problem emanated from the image intensifier tube photocathode spectral response. NVGs were capable of sensing and amplifying visible cockpit light, making observation of the scene outside of the cockpit, the primary use for NVGs, difficult. Over the years, several documents were published outlining night vision imaging system (NVIS) compatible lighting performance. These documents limited the permissible amount of light visible to image intensifier tubes that cockpit displays could emit, enhancing pilot visual performance. Recent advances in short wave infrared (SWIR) sensor technology make it a possible alternative to image intensifiers for night imaging application. However, while popular SWIR cameras are not particularly sensitive to visible light, they may be sensitive to other display emissions not attenuated by state-of-the-art NVIS filters. This paper examines the possibility of expanding the traditional treatment of vehicle cockpit compatibility to include new, novel vision enhancement devices yet to be designed and vehicle cockpit geometry.

  19. Beyond the cockpit: The visual world as a flight instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W. W.; Kaiser, M. K.; Foyle, D. C.

    1992-01-01

    The use of cockpit instruments to guide flight control is not always an option (e.g., low level rotorcraft flight). Under such circumstances the pilot must use out-the-window information for control and navigation. Thus it is important to determine the basis of visually guided flight for several reasons: (1) to guide the design and construction of the visual displays used in training simulators; (2) to allow modeling of visibility restrictions brought about by weather, cockpit constraints, or distortions introduced by sensor systems; and (3) to aid in the development of displays that augment the cockpit window scene and are compatible with the pilot's visual extraction of information from the visual scene. The authors are actively pursuing these questions. We have on-going studies using both low-cost, lower fidelity flight simulators, and state-of-the-art helicopter simulation research facilities. Research results will be presented on: (1) the important visual scene information used in altitude and speed control; (2) the utility of monocular, stereo, and hyperstereo cues for the control of flight; (3) perceptual effects due to the differences between normal unaided daylight vision, and that made available by various night vision devices (e.g., light intensifying goggles and infra-red sensor displays); and (4) the utility of advanced contact displays in which instrument information is made part of the visual scene, as on a 'scene linked' head-up display (e.g., displaying altimeter information on a virtual billboard located on the ground).

  20. Simulator comparison of thumball, thumb switch, and touch screen input concepts for interaction with a large screen cockpit display format

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Denise R.; Parrish, Russell V.

    1990-01-01

    A piloted simulation study was conducted comparing three different input methods for interfacing to a large screen, multiwindow, whole flight deck display for management of transport aircraft systems. The thumball concept utilized a miniature trackball embedded in a conventional side arm controller. The multifunction control throttle and stick (MCTAS) concept employed a thumb switch located in the throttle handle. The touch screen concept provided data entry through a capacitive touch screen installed on the display surface. The objective and subjective results obtained indicate that, with present implementations, the thumball concept was the most appropriate for interfacing with aircraft systems/subsystems presented on a large screen display. Not unexpectedly, the completion time differences between the three concepts varied with the task being performed, although the thumball implementation consistently outperformed the other two concepts. However, pilot suggestions for improved implementations of the MCTAS and touch screen concepts could reduce some of these differences.

  1. Advanced and tendencies in the development of display technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kompanets, I. N.

    2006-06-01

    Advances and key display applications are discussed. Computer, compact mobile, TV and collective large screen displays are mentioned. Flat panel displays step on CRT devices to leave them behind in 2007. Materials, active matricies and applications of bright radiative field emission and organic LED displays are developing successively and pressing other technologies to be used in photo-cameras, cellular phones, auto-cars and avionics. Progress in flexible screens can substantially extend the display design and application soon. 3D display systems are under intensive development, and laser is an important unit in some vaiants of holographic and volumetric 3D displays. Value forecast of different display markets is presented.

  2. Cockpit napping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graeber, R. Curtis; Rosekind, Mark R.; Connell, Linda J.; Dinges, David F.

    1990-01-01

    The results of a NASA-sponsored study examining the effectiveness of a brief, preplanned cockpit rest period to improve pilot alertness and performance in nonaugmented long-haul flight operations are discussed. Four regularly scheduled trans-Pacific flight legs were studied. The shortest flight legs were about 7 h and the longest about 9.5 h, with duty periods averaging about 11 h and layovers about 25 h. Three-person B747 crews were divided randomly into two volunteer pilot groups. These crews were nonaugmented, and therefore no relief pilots were available. The rest group, consisting of four crews, was allowed a 40 min opportunity to rest during the overwater cruise portion of the flight. On a preplanned, rotating basis, individual crew members were allowed to nap. It is concluded that a preplanned cockpit nap is associated with significantly better behavioral performance and higher levels of physiological alertness and that this can be accomplished without disrupting normal flight operations or compromising safety.

  3. Three input concepts for flight crew interaction with information presented on a large-screen electronic cockpit display

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Denise R.

    1990-01-01

    A piloted simulation study was conducted comparing three different input methods for interfacing to a large-screen, multiwindow, whole-flight-deck display for management of transport aircraft systems. The thumball concept utilized a miniature trackball embedded in a conventional side-arm controller. The touch screen concept provided data entry through a capacitive touch screen. The voice concept utilized a speech recognition system with input through a head-worn microphone. No single input concept emerged as the most desirable method of interacting with the display. Subjective results, however, indicate that the voice concept was the most preferred method of data entry and had the most potential for future applications. The objective results indicate that, overall, the touch screen concept was the most effective input method. There was also significant differences between the time required to perform specific tasks and the input concept employed, with each concept providing better performance relative to a specific task. These results suggest that a system combining all three input concepts might provide the most effective method of interaction.

  4. Advanced manufacturing technologies on color plasma displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betsui, Keiichi

    2000-06-01

    The mass production of the color plasma display started from 1996. However, since the price of the panel is still expensive, PDPs are not in widespread use at home. It is necessary to develop the new and low-cost manufacturing technologies to reduce the price of the panel. This paper describes some of the features of new fabrication technologies of PDPs.

  5. Advanced Displays and Intelligent Interfaces (ADII)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-07-01

    displays, human-computer interaction, laser pointer interaction 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 19a. NAME OF RESPONSIBLE PERSON Peter A. Jedrysik a...21 3.2.3.2 Testing and Results................................................................22 3.2.4 Laser Pointer Interaction...19 Figure 14 AFRL/IF’s Custom Laser Pointer Tracking Subsystem Architecture

  6. Advanced Three-Dimensional Display System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geng, Jason

    2005-01-01

    A desktop-scale, computer-controlled display system, initially developed for NASA and now known as the VolumeViewer(TradeMark), generates three-dimensional (3D) images of 3D objects in a display volume. This system differs fundamentally from stereoscopic and holographic display systems: The images generated by this system are truly 3D in that they can be viewed from almost any angle, without the aid of special eyeglasses. It is possible to walk around the system while gazing at its display volume to see a displayed object from a changing perspective, and multiple observers standing at different positions around the display can view the object simultaneously from their individual perspectives, as though the displayed object were a real 3D object. At the time of writing this article, only partial information on the design and principle of operation of the system was available. It is known that the system includes a high-speed, silicon-backplane, ferroelectric-liquid-crystal spatial light modulator (SLM), multiple high-power lasers for projecting images in multiple colors, a rotating helix that serves as a moving screen for displaying voxels [volume cells or volume elements, in analogy to pixels (picture cells or picture elements) in two-dimensional (2D) images], and a host computer. The rotating helix and its motor drive are the only moving parts. Under control by the host computer, a stream of 2D image patterns is generated on the SLM and projected through optics onto the surface of the rotating helix. The system utilizes a parallel pixel/voxel-addressing scheme: All the pixels of the 2D pattern on the SLM are addressed simultaneously by laser beams. This parallel addressing scheme overcomes the difficulty of achieving both high resolution and a high frame rate in a raster scanning or serial addressing scheme. It has been reported that the structure of the system is simple and easy to build, that the optical design and alignment are not difficult, and that the

  7. Cockpit readiness for night vision goggles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scholl, Marija S.; Scholl, James W.

    1987-01-01

    The introduction of night vision goggles into the cockpit environment may produce incompatibility with existing cockpit optoelectronic instrumentation. The methodology used to identify the origin of the spurious signal is demonstrated with the example of an electronic display. The amount of radiation emitted by a gray body in the wavelength region of goggle sensitivity is calculated. A simple procedure for preflight testing of cockpit instrumentation using a commercially available infrared camera is recommended. Other recommendations include the specification of cocklpit instrumentation for compatibility with night vision devices.

  8. Recent advances and product enhancements in reflective cholesteric displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Asad; Schneider, Tod; Miller, Nick; Marhefka, Duane; Ernst, Todd; Nicholson, Forrest; Doane, Joseph W.

    2005-04-01

    Bistable reflective cholesteric displays are a liquid crystal display technology developed to fill a market need for very low power displays on a low-cost, high resolution passive matrix. Their unique look, high reflectivity, bistability, and simple structure make them an ideal flat panel display choice for handheld or other portable devices where small lightweight batteries with long lifetimes are important. We discuss recent advances in cholesteric display technology at Kent Displays such as progress towards single layer black and white displays, standard products, lower cost display modules, and various interface options for cholesteric display applications. It will be shown that inclusion of radio frequency (rf) control options and serial peripheral interface (spi) can greatly enhance the cholesteric display module market penetration by enabling quick integration into end devices. Finally, some discussion will be on the progress of the development of flexible reflective cholesteric displays. These flexible displays can dramatically change industrial design methods by enabling curved surfaces with displays integrated in them. Additional discussion in the paper will include applications of various display modes including signs, hand held instrumentation, and the electronic book and reader.

  9. Evaluation of advanced displays for engine monitoring and control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Summers, L. G.

    1993-01-01

    The relative effectiveness of two advanced display concepts for monitoring engine performance for commercial transport aircraft was studied. The concepts were the Engine Monitoring and Control System (EMACS) display developed by NASA Langley and a display by exception design. Both of these concepts were based on the philosophy of providing information that is directly related to the pilot's task. Both concepts used a normalized thrust display. In addition, EMACS used column deviation indicators; i.e., the difference between the actual parameter value and the value predicted by an engine model, for engine health monitoring; while the Display by Exception displayed the engine parameters if the automated system detected a difference between the actual and the predicted values. The results showed that the advanced display concepts had shorter detection and response times. There were no differences in any of the results between manual and auto throttles. There were no effects upon perceived workload or performance on the primary flight task. The majority of pilots preferred the advanced displays and thought they were operationally acceptable. Certification of these concepts depends on the validation of the engine model. Recommendations are made to improve both the EMACS and the display by exception display formats.

  10. Advanced Technology Display House. Volume 1: Project Summary and Procedures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maund, D. H.

    1981-01-01

    The Advanced Technology Display House (ATDH) project is described. Tasks are defined in the areas of energy demand, water demand, sewage treatment, electric power, plumbing, lighting, heating, and air conditioning. Energy, water, and sewage systems are defined.

  11. Advanced Technology Display House. Volume 2: Energy system design concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maund, D. H.

    1981-01-01

    The preliminary design concept for the energy systems in the Advanced Technology Display House is analyzed. Residential energy demand, energy conservation, and energy concepts are included. Photovoltaic arrays and REDOX (reduction oxidation) sizes are discussed.

  12. Generic experimental cockpit for evaluating pilot assistance systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toebben, Helmut H.; Doehler, Hans-Ullrich; Hecker, Peter

    2002-07-01

    The workload of aircraft crews, especially during taxiing, take-off, approach and landing under adverse weather conditions has heavily increased due to the continuous growth of air traffic. New pilot assistance systems can improve the situational awareness of the aircrew and consequently increase the safety and reduce the workload. For demonstration and human factor evaluation of such new systems the DLR has built a Generic Experimental Cockpit Simulator equipped with a modern glass-cockpit collimated display. The Primary Flight Display (PFD), the human machine interface for an Advanced Flight Management System (AFMS), a Taxi Guidance System called Taxi and Ramp Management and Control (TARMAC) and an Enhanced Vision System (EVS) based on real time simulation of MMWR and FLIR sensors are integrated into the cockpit on high resolution TFT touch screens. The situational awareness is further enhanced by the integration of a raster/stroke capable Head-Up Display (HUD). It prevents the pilot's eye from permanent accommodation between the Head-Down Displays and the outside view. This contribution describes the technical implementation of the PFD, the Taxi Guidance System and the EVS onto the HUD. The HUD is driven by a normal PC, which provides the Arinc data for the stroke generator and the video signal for the raster image. The PFD uses the built-in stroke generator and is working under all operations. During taxi operations the cleared taxi route and the positions of other aircraft are displayed via raster. The images of the real time simulation of the MMWR and FLIR Sensors are presented via raster on demand. During approach and landing a runway symbol or a 3D wire frame database is shown which exactly matches the outside view and obstacles on the runway are highlighted. The runway position is automatically calculated from the MMWR Sensor as reported in previous contributions.

  13. Advanced Displays and Natural User Interfaces to Support Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin-SanJose, Juan-Fernando; Juan, M. -Carmen; Mollá, Ramón; Vivó, Roberto

    2017-01-01

    Advanced displays and natural user interfaces (NUI) are a very suitable combination for developing systems to provide an enhanced and richer user experience. This combination can be appropriate in several fields and has not been extensively exploited. One of the fields that this combination is especially suitable for is education. Nowadays,…

  14. Short wave infrared imager cockpit interface issues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marasco, Peter L.

    2007-04-01

    With the introduction of the night-vision goggle (NVG) into vehicle cockpits, the transfer of visual information to the observer became more complex. This problem stems primarily from the fact that the image intensifier tube photocathode was sensitive to much of the visible spectrum. NVGs were capable of sensing and amplifying visible cockpit light, making the observation of the scene outside of the cockpit, the primary use for NVGs, difficult if not impossible. One solution was to establish mutually exclusive spectral bands; a band of shorter wavelengths reserved for transmission of visible information from the cockpit instrumentation to the observer and a longer wavelength region left to the night vision goggle for imaging the night environment. Several documents have been published outlining the night vision imaging system (NVIS) compatible lighting performance enabling this approach, seen as necessary for military and civilian aviation. Recent advances in short wave infrared (SWIR) sensor technology make it a possible alternative to the image intensifiers for night imaging application. However, application-specific integration issues surrounding the new sensor type must still be thoroughly investigated. This paper examines the impact of the SWIR spectral sensitivity on several categories of lighting found in vehicle cockpits and explores cockpit integration issues that may arise from the SWIR spectral sensitivity.

  15. Evaluating the Effects of Dimensionality in Advanced Avionic Display Concepts for Synthetic Vision Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, Amy L.; Prinzel, Lawrence J., III; Wickens, Christopher D.; Kramer, Lynda J.; Arthur, Jarvis J.; Bailey, Randall E.

    2007-01-01

    Synthetic vision systems provide an in-cockpit view of terrain and other hazards via a computer-generated display representation. Two experiments examined several display concepts for synthetic vision and evaluated how such displays modulate pilot performance. Experiment 1 (24 general aviation pilots) compared three navigational display (ND) concepts: 2D coplanar, 3D, and split-screen. Experiment 2 (12 commercial airline pilots) evaluated baseline 'blue sky/brown ground' or synthetic vision-enabled primary flight displays (PFDs) and three ND concepts: 2D coplanar with and without synthetic vision and a dynamic multi-mode rotatable exocentric format. In general, the results pointed to an overall advantage for a split-screen format, whether it be stand-alone (Experiment 1) or available via rotatable viewpoints (Experiment 2). Furthermore, Experiment 2 revealed benefits associated with utilizing synthetic vision in both the PFD and ND representations and the value of combined ego- and exocentric presentations.

  16. Advanced Transport Operating System (ATOPS) control display unit software description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slominski, Christopher J.; Parks, Mark A.; Debure, Kelly R.; Heaphy, William J.

    1992-01-01

    The software created for the Control Display Units (CDUs), used for the Advanced Transport Operating Systems (ATOPS) project, on the Transport Systems Research Vehicle (TSRV) is described. Module descriptions are presented in a standardized format which contains module purpose, calling sequence, a detailed description, and global references. The global reference section includes subroutines, functions, and common variables referenced by a particular module. The CDUs, one for the pilot and one for the copilot, are used for flight management purposes. Operations performed with the CDU affects the aircraft's guidance, navigation, and display software.

  17. Display-based communications for advanced transport aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Alfred T.

    1989-01-01

    The next generation of civil transport aircraft will depend increasingly upon ground-air-ground and satellite data link for information critical to safe and efficient air transportation. Previous studies which examined the concept of display-based communications in addition to, or in lieu of, conventional voice transmissions are reviewed. A full-mission flight simulation comparing voice and display-based communication modes in an advanced transport aircraft is also described. The results indicate that a display-based mode of information transfer does not result in significantly increased aircrew workload, but does result in substantially increased message acknowledgment times when compared to conventional voice transmissions. User acceptance of the display-based communication system was generally high, replicating the findings of previous studies. However, most pilots tested expressed concern over the potential loss of information available from frequency monitoring which might result from the introduction of discrete address communications. Concern was expressed by some pilots for the reduced time available to search for conflicting traffic when using the communications display system. The implications of the findings for the design of display-based communications are discussed.

  18. Synthesis of an integrated cockpit management system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dasaro, J. A.; Elliott, C. T.

    1982-01-01

    The process used in the synthesis of an integrated cockpit management system was discussed. Areas covered included flight displays, subsystem management, checklists, and procedures (both normal and emergency). The process of evolving from the unintegrated conventional system to the integrated system is examined and a brief description of the results presented.

  19. Using Visualization in Cockpit Decision Support Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Aragon, Cecilia R.

    2005-07-01

    In order to safely operate their aircraft, pilots must makerapid decisions based on integrating and processing large amounts ofheterogeneous information. Visual displays are often the most efficientmethod of presenting safety-critical data to pilots in real time.However, care must be taken to ensure the pilot is provided with theappropriate amount of information to make effective decisions and notbecome cognitively overloaded. The results of two usability studies of aprototype airflow hazard visualization cockpit decision support systemare summarized. The studies demonstrate that such a system significantlyimproves the performance of helicopter pilots landing under turbulentconditions. Based on these results, design principles and implicationsfor cockpit decision support systems using visualization arepresented.

  20. Human performance in the modern cockpit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dismukes, R. K.; Cohen, M. M.

    1992-01-01

    This panel was organized by the Aerospace Human Factors Committee to illustrate behavioral research on the perceptual, cognitive, and group processes that determine crew effectiveness in modern cockpits. Crew reactions to the introduction of highly automated systems in the cockpit will be reported on. Automation can improve operational capabilities and efficiency and can reduce some types of human error, but may also introduce entirely new opportunities for error. The problem solving and decision making strategies used by crews led by captains with various personality profiles will be discussed. Also presented will be computational approaches to modeling the cognitive demands of cockpit operations and the cognitive capabilities and limitations of crew members. Factors contributing to aircrew deviations from standard operating procedures and misuse of checklist, often leading to violations, incidents, or accidents will be examined. The mechanisms of visual perception pilots use in aircraft control and the implications of these mechanisms for effective design of visual displays will be discussed.

  1. Advanced interactive displays for deployable command and control centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jedrysik, Peter A.; Parada, Francisco E.; Stedman, Terrance A.; Zhang, Jingyuan

    2003-09-01

    Command and control in today's battlefield environment requires efficient and effective control of massive amounts of constantly changing information from a variety of databases and real-time sensors. Using advanced information technology for presentation and interactive control enables more extensive data fusion and correlation to present an accurate picture of the battlespace to commanders and their staffs. The Interactive DataWall being developed by the Advanced Displays and Intelligent Interfaces (ADII) technology team of the Air Force Research Laboratory's Information Directorate (AFRL/IF) is a strong contender for solving the information management problems facing the 21st century military commander. It provides an ultra high-resolution large screen display with multi-modal, wireless interaction. Commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) technology has been combined with specialized hardware and software developed in-house to provide a unique capability for multimedia data display and control. The technology once isolated to a laboratory environment has been packaged into deployable systems that have been successfully transitioned to support the warfighter in the field.

  2. Cockpit resource management training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yocum, M.; Foushee, C.

    1984-01-01

    Cockpit resource management which is a multifaceted concept is outlined. The system involves the effective coordination of many resources: aircraft systems, company, air traffic control, equipment, navigational aids, documents, and manuals. The main concept, however, is group interaction. Problems which arise from lack of coordination, decision making, and lack of communication are pointed out. Implementation by the regional airline industry of cockpit resource management, designed to deal with human interactions problems in the most cost effective manner, is discussed.

  3. Cockpit management attitudes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helmreich, R. L.

    1984-01-01

    Distinctions are drawn between personality traits and attitudes. The stability of the personality and the malleability of attitudes are stressed. These concepts are related to pilot performance, especially in the areas of crew coordination and cockpit resource management. Airline pilots were administered a Cockpit Management Attitudes questionnaire; empirical data from that survey are reported and implications of the data for training in crew coordination are discussed.

  4. Modern cockpit complexity challenges pilot interfaces.

    PubMed

    Dornheim, M A

    1995-01-30

    Advances in the use of automated cockpits are examined. Crashes at Nagoya and Toulouse in 1994 and incidents at Manchester, England, and Paris Orly are used as examples of cockpit automation versus manual operation of aircraft. Human factors researchers conclude that flight management systems (FMS) should have fewer modes and less authority. Reducing complexity and authority override systems of FMS can provide pilots with greater flexibility during crises. Aircraft discussed include Boeing 737-300 and 757-200, Airbus A300-600 and A310, McDonnell Douglas MD-11, and Tarom A310-300.

  5. Human factors of the high technology cockpit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiener, Earl L.

    1990-01-01

    The rapid advance of cockpit automation in the last decade has outstripped the ability of the human factors profession to understand the changes in human functions required. High technology cockpits require less physical (observable) workload, but are highly demanding of cognitive functions such as planning, alternative selection, and monitoring. Furthermore, automation creates opportunity for new and more serious forms of human error, and many pilots are concerned about the possibility of complacency affecting their performance. On the positive side, the equipment works as advertized with high reliability, offering highly efficient, computer-based flight. These findings from the cockpit studies probably apply equally to other industries, such as nuclear power production, other modes of transportation, medicine, and manufacturing, all of which traditionally have looked to aviation for technological leadership. The challenge to the human factors profession is to aid designers, operators, and training departments in exploiting the positive side of automation, while seeking solutions to the negative side. Viewgraphs are given.

  6. Time-based self-spacing techniques using cockpit display of traffic information during approach to landing in a terminal area vectoring environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, D. H.

    1983-01-01

    A simulation study was undertaken to evaluate two time-based self-spacing techniques for in-trail following during terminal area approach. An electronic traffic display was provided in the weather radarscope location. The displayed self-spacing cues allowed the simulated aircraft to follow and to maintain spacing on another aircraft which was being vectored by air traffic control (ATC) for landing in a high-density terminal area. Separation performance data indicate the information provided on the traffic display was adequate for the test subjects to accurately follow the approach path of another aircraft without the assistance of ATC. The time-based technique with a constant-delay spacing criterion produced the most satisfactory spacing performance. Pilot comments indicate the workload associated with the self-separation task was very high and that additional spacing command information and/or aircraft autopilot functions would be desirable for operational implementational of the self-spacing task.

  7. The Effect of Ownship Information and NexRad Resolution on Pilot Decision Making in the Use of a Cockpit Weather Information Display

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Novacek, Paul F.; Burgess, Malcolm A.; Heck, Michael L.; Stokes, Alan F.; Stough, H. Paul, III (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A two-phase experiment was conducted to explore the effects of data-link weather displays upon pilot decision performance. The experiment was conducted with 49 instrument rated pilots who were divided into four groups and placed in a simulator with a realistic flight scenario involving weather containing convective activity. The inflight weather display depicted NEXRAD images, with graphical and textual METARs over a moving map display. The experiment explored the effect of weather information, ownship position symbology and NEXRAD cell size resolution. The phase-two experiment compared two groups using the data-linked weather display with ownship position symbology. These groups were compared to the phase-one group that did not have ownship position symbology. The phase-two pilots were presented with either large NEXRAD cell size (8 km) or small cell size (4 km). Observations noted that the introduction of ownship symbology did not appear to significantly impact the decision making process, however, the introduction of ownship did reduce workload. Additionally, NEXRAD cell size resolution did appear to influence the tactical decision making process.

  8. Predictions of Cockpit Simulator Experimental Outcome Using System Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sorensen, J. A.; Goka, T.

    1984-01-01

    This study involved predicting the outcome of a cockpit simulator experiment where pilots used cockpit displays of traffic information (CDTI) to establish and maintain in-trail spacing behind a lead aircraft during approach. The experiments were run on the NASA Ames Research Center multicab cockpit simulator facility. Prior to the experiments, a mathematical model of the pilot/aircraft/CDTI flight system was developed which included relative in-trail and vertical dynamics between aircraft in the approach string. This model was used to construct a digital simulation of the string dynamics including response to initial position errors. The model was then used to predict the outcome of the in-trail following cockpit simulator experiments. Outcome included performance and sensitivity to different separation criteria. The experimental results were then used to evaluate the model and its prediction accuracy. Lessons learned in this modeling and prediction study are noted.

  9. An Investigation of General Aviation Problems and Issues: An Integration of Pilot-Cockpit Interface Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bortolussi, Michael R.

    1997-01-01

    The General Aviation (GA) industry has suffered a ten-year decline in the number of airplanes sold. This decline is due mainly to the increase cost associated with purchasing, insuring, maintaining, operating, and pilot training a GA airplane. In response to this decline the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) developed a program (Advanced General Aviation Transport Experiments - AGATE) to address these issues. The purpose of AGATE focused within this report is to reduce the costs to acquire and maintain instrument-flight-proficiency. The AGATE program defined four elements necessary to accomplish these goals: (1) new and intuitive cockpit displays and controls, (2) situation technologies for weather, traffic, and navigation, (3) expert systems for system monitoring, and (4) reduced cost training methods. One recognized need for the GA pilot and airplane is to provide cockpit displays and systems already available to transport category airplane. These displays such as Electronic Flight and Instrument System (EFIS), graphic weather and traffic displays, and flight management systems. The goal of this grant was to develop the AGATE GA Display Evaluation Workstation as a tool to test these existing and emerging technologies in the GA environment.

  10. F-18 cockpit and instrument panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center's F/A-18 chase and support aircraft retains the basic fighter plane cockpit controls with some exceptions. The pilot's center control stick is relatively typical of a modern fighter aircraft. This F-18 has no weapons delivery capability. The primary cockpit displays include a left- and right-side cathode-ray tube display, referred to as the DDIs, and the heads-up display (HUD). The DDIs and HUD are generally used to display primary flight condition information such as airspeed, altitude, altitude rate, attitude, heading, etc. Other flight conditions displayed include angle of attack (AOA), Mach number, and load factor. The HUD also provides primary flight condition information to the pilot without having to refer to the DDIs. Select flight controls information also can be presented on the HUD. The twenty pushbuttons located on the periphery of each DDI are used to select a variety of displays for pilot interrogation of F-18 systems. These displays are pilot selectable and menu driven.

  11. Improving Multitalker Speech Communication with Advanced Audio Displays

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-04-01

    that use either dichotic or binaural processing to spatially separate the apparent locations of multiple simultaneous channels of speech. Finally, we...all obvious that spatialized displays will provide a compelling benefit over dichotic speech displays that provide the listener with the option of... dichotic , and spatialized speech displays in a seven-talker CRM listening task where each talker was 50% likely to be active on any given trial and

  12. Advanced Binaural Sonar Display Using Spatial Vernier Beamforming

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    mathematically removed to expose the target. As a result SVBF processes are amenable to real-time digital signal extraction for 3-D audio displays which are...removed to expose the target. As a result SVBF processes are amenable to real-time digital signal extraction for presentation in 3-D audio displays...amenable to real-time digital signal extraction for presentation in 3-D audio displays which are ideal for situational awareness. Following positive

  13. Advanced methods for displays and remote control of robots.

    PubMed

    Eliav, Ami; Lavie, Talia; Parmet, Yisrael; Stern, Helman; Edan, Yael

    2011-11-01

    An in-depth evaluation of the usability and situation awareness performance of different displays and destination controls of robots are presented. In two experiments we evaluate the way information is presented to the operator and assess different means for controlling the robot. Our study compares three types of displays: a "blocks" display, a HUD (head-up display), and a radar display, and two types of controls: touch screen and hand gestures. The HUD demonstrated better performance when compared to the blocks display and was perceived to have greater usability compared to the radar display. The HUD was also found to be more useful when the operation of the robot was more difficult, i.e., when using the hand-gesture method. The experiments also pointed to the importance of using a wide viewing angle to minimize distortion and for easier coping with the difficulties of locating objects in the field of view margins. The touch screen was found to be superior in terms of both objective performance and its perceived usability. No differences were found between the displays and the controllers in terms of situation awareness. This research sheds light on the preferred display type and controlling method for operating robots from a distance, making it easier to cope with the challenges of operating such systems.

  14. Using Visualization in Cockpit Decision Support Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aragon, Cecilia R.

    2005-01-01

    In order to safely operate their aircraft, pilots must make rapid decisions based on integrating and processing large amounts of heterogeneous information. Visual displays are often the most efficient method of presenting safety-critical data to pilots in real time. However, care must be taken to ensure the pilot is provided with the appropriate amount of information to make effective decisions and not become cognitively overloaded. The results of two usability studies of a prototype airflow hazard visualization cockpit decision support system are summarized. The studies demonstrate that such a system significantly improves the performance of helicopter pilots landing under turbulent conditions. Based on these results, design principles and implications for cockpit decision support systems using visualization are presented.

  15. 14 CFR 25.777 - Cockpit controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Cockpit controls. 25.777 Section 25.777... Cockpit controls. (a) Each cockpit control must be located to provide convenient operation and to prevent confusion and inadvertent operation. (b) The direction of movement of cockpit controls must meet...

  16. 14 CFR 27.777 - Cockpit controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Cockpit controls. 27.777 Section 27.777... Cockpit controls. Cockpit controls must be— (a) Located to provide convenient operation and to prevent... there is full and unrestricted movement of each control without interference from the cockpit...

  17. 14 CFR 25.777 - Cockpit controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Cockpit controls. 25.777 Section 25.777... Cockpit controls. (a) Each cockpit control must be located to provide convenient operation and to prevent confusion and inadvertent operation. (b) The direction of movement of cockpit controls must meet...

  18. 14 CFR 29.777 - Cockpit controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Cockpit controls. 29.777 Section 29.777... Cockpit controls. Cockpit controls must be— (a) Located to provide convenient operation and to prevent... there is full and unrestricted movement of each control without interference from the cockpit...

  19. Advances in rotary-wing helmet-mounted displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hewlett, David; Cameron, Alexander A.

    2000-06-01

    BAE SYSTEMS are developing a high performance Helmet Mounted Display system for the US Marine corps AH-1Z attack helicopter. This paper presents an overview of the design solution, as well as details of the rational behind the design and some of the lesson learnt. Finally, it gives some indicators as to future growth.

  20. Space Shuttle Cockpit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Want to sit in the cockpit of the Space Shuttle and watch astronauts work in outer space? At StenniSphere, you can do that and much more. StenniSphere, the visitor center at John C. Stennis space Center in Hancock County, Miss., presents 14,000-square-feet of interactive exhibits that depict America's race for space as well as a glimpse of the future. Stennisphere is open free of charge from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily.

  1. Space Shuttle Cockpit exhibit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Want to sit in the cockpit of the Space Shuttle and watch astronauts work in outer space? At StenniSphere, you can do that and much more. StenniSphere, the visitor center at John C. Stennis Space Center in Hancock County, Miss., presents 14,000-square-feet of interactive exhibits that depict America's race for space as well as a glimpse of the future. StenniSphere is open free of charge from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily.

  2. Cockpit control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lesnewski, David; Snow, Russ M.; Paufler, Dave; Schnieder, George; Athousake, Roxanne; Combs, Lisa

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this project is to provide a detail design for the cockpit control system of the Viper PFT. The statement of work for this project requires provisions for control of the ailerons, elevator, rudder, and elevator trim. The system should provide adjustment for pilot stature, rigging, and maintenance. MIL-STD-1472 is used as a model for human factors criterion. The system is designed to the pilot limit loading outlined in FAR part 23.397. The general philosophy behind this design is to provide a simple, reliable control system which will withstand the daily abuse that is experienced in the training environment without excessive cost or weight penalties.

  3. Advanced Interactive Display Formats for Terminal Area Traffic Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grunwald, Arthur J.; Shaviv, G. E.

    1999-01-01

    This research project deals with an on-line dynamic method for automated viewing parameter management in perspective displays. Perspective images are optimized such that a human observer will perceive relevant spatial geometrical features with minimal errors. In order to compute the errors at which observers reconstruct spatial features from perspective images, a visual spatial-perception model was formulated. The model was employed as the basis of an optimization scheme aimed at seeking the optimal projection parameter setting. These ideas are implemented in the context of an air traffic control (ATC) application. A concept, referred to as an active display system, was developed. This system uses heuristic rules to identify relevant geometrical features of the three-dimensional air traffic situation. Agile, on-line optimization was achieved by a specially developed and custom-tailored genetic algorithm (GA), which was to deal with the multi-modal characteristics of the objective function and exploit its time-evolving nature.

  4. General Aviation Cockpit Weather Information System Simulation Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McAdaragh, Ray; Novacek, Paul

    2003-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation provides information on two experiments on the effectiveness of a cockpit weather information system on a simulated general aviation flight. The presentation covers the simulation hardware configuration, the display device screen layout, a mission scenario, conclusions, and recommendations. The second experiment, with its own scenario and conclusions, is a follow-on experiment.

  5. Display Techniques for Advanced Crew Stations (DTACS). Phase 1. Display Techniques Study.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-03-01

    HYBRID LIQUID CRYSTAL MATRIX MODULE . 0 P R E V I O U S L I Q U I D C R Y S T A L M A T R I C E S 0 .’.z A POSSIBLE ;’UURE LI QUID CRYSTAL w J800 xL ...These transmissions can be sustained in a pipeline mode of operation. Analog Input/Output Analog Input The analog input unit must be capable of...with respect to the axis maintaining focus across the image. Up to 50% keystone correction will be required. The minimum 99 R display brightness

  6. Evaluating cockpit resource management training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helmreich, Robert L.; Wilhelm, John A.

    1987-01-01

    The determinants of effective or ineffective cockpit resurce management and the difficulties these multiple factors pose for validation of the effectiveness of cockpit resource management (CRM) training are discussed. A model of an evaluation design that may be applied to this type of training is presented. Concept validation is discussed as well as criteria for judging crew proficiency. Attention is given to accidents and proficiency checks, incidents and repeated maneuvers, attitude measuremet, and self-report evauation of training.

  7. Advanced interactive display formats for terminal area traffic control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grunwald, Arthur J.

    1995-01-01

    The basic design considerations for perspective Air Traffic Control displays are described. A software framework has been developed for manual viewing parameter setting (MVPS) in preparation for continued, ongoing developments on automated viewing parameter setting (AVPS) schemes. The MVPS system is based on indirect manipulation of the viewing parameters. Requests for changes in viewing parameter setting are entered manually by the operator by moving viewing parameter manipulation pointers on the screen. The motion of these pointers, which are an integral part of the 3-D scene, is limited to the boundaries of screen. This arrangement has been chosen, in order to preserve the correspondence between the new and the old viewing parameter setting, a feature which contributes to preventing spatial disorientation of the operator. For all viewing operations, e.g. rotation, translation and ranging, the actual change is executed automatically by the system, through gradual transitions with an exponentially damped, sinusoidal velocity profile, in this work referred to as 'slewing' motions. The slewing functions, which eliminate discontinuities in the viewing parameter changes, are designed primarily for enhancing the operator's impression that he, or she, is dealing with an actually existing physical system, rather than an abstract computer generated scene. Current, ongoing efforts deal with the development of automated viewing parameter setting schemes. These schemes employ an optimization strategy, aimed at identifying the best possible vantage point, from which the Air Traffic Control scene can be viewed, for a given traffic situation.

  8. Advanced Transport Operating System (ATOPS) color displays software description microprocessor system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slominski, Christopher J.; Plyler, Valerie E.; Dickson, Richard W.

    1992-01-01

    This document describes the software created for the Sperry Microprocessor Color Display System used for the Advanced Transport Operating Systems (ATOPS) project on the Transport Systems Research Vehicle (TSRV). The software delivery known as the 'baseline display system', is the one described in this document. Throughout this publication, module descriptions are presented in a standardized format which contains module purpose, calling sequence, detailed description, and global references. The global reference section includes procedures and common variables referenced by a particular module. The system described supports the Research Flight Deck (RFD) of the TSRV. The RFD contains eight cathode ray tubes (CRTs) which depict a Primary Flight Display, Navigation Display, System Warning Display, Takeoff Performance Monitoring System Display, and Engine Display.

  9. Advanced Transport Operating System (ATOPS) color displays software description: MicroVAX system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slominski, Christopher J.; Plyler, Valerie E.; Dickson, Richard W.

    1992-01-01

    This document describes the software created for the Display MicroVAX computer used for the Advanced Transport Operating Systems (ATOPS) project on the Transport Systems Research Vehicle (TSRV). The software delivery of February 27, 1991, known as the 'baseline display system', is the one described in this document. Throughout this publication, module descriptions are presented in a standardized format which contains module purpose, calling sequence, detailed description, and global references. The global references section includes subroutines, functions, and common variables referenced by a particular module. The system described supports the Research Flight Deck (RFD) of the TSRV. The RFD contains eight Cathode Ray Tubes (CRTs) which depict a Primary Flight Display, Navigation Display, System Warning Display, Takeoff Performance Monitoring System Display, and Engine Display.

  10. Advanced interactive display formats for terminal area traffic control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grunwald, Arthur J.

    1996-01-01

    This report describes the basic design considerations for perspective air traffic control displays. A software framework has been developed for manual viewing parameter setting (MVPS) in preparation for continued, ongoing developments on automated viewing parameter setting (AVPS) schemes. Two distinct modes of MVPS operations are considered, both of which utilize manipulation pointers imbedded in the three-dimensional scene: (1) direct manipulation of the viewing parameters -- in this mode the manipulation pointers act like the control-input device, through which the viewing parameter changes are made. Part of the parameters are rate controlled, and part of them position controlled. This mode is intended for making fast, iterative small changes in the parameters. (2) Indirect manipulation of the viewing parameters -- this mode is intended primarily for introducing large, predetermined changes in the parameters. Requests for changes in viewing parameter setting are entered manually by the operator by moving viewing parameter manipulation pointers on the screen. The motion of these pointers, which are an integral part of the 3-D scene, is limited to the boundaries of the screen. This arrangement has been chosen in order to preserve the correspondence between the spatial lay-outs of the new and the old viewing parameter setting, a feature which contributes to preventing spatial disorientation of the operator. For all viewing operations, e.g. rotation, translation and ranging, the actual change is executed automatically by the system, through gradual transitions with an exponentially damped, sinusoidal velocity profile, in this work referred to as 'slewing' motions. The slewing functions, which eliminate discontinuities in the viewing parameter changes, are designed primarily for enhancing the operator's impression that he, or she, is dealing with an actually existing physical system, rather than an abstract computer-generated scene. The proposed, continued research

  11. Comparison of Pilots' Situational Awareness While Monitoring Autoland Approaches Using Conventional and Advanced Flight Display Formats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kramer, Lynda J.; Busquets, Anthony M.

    2000-01-01

    A simulation experiment was performed to assess situation awareness (SA) and workload of pilots while monitoring simulated autoland operations in Instrument Meteorological Conditions with three advanced display concepts: two enhanced electronic flight information system (EFIS)-type display concepts and one totally synthetic, integrated pictorial display concept. Each concept incorporated sensor-derived wireframe runway and iconic depictions of sensor-detected traffic in different locations on the display media. Various scenarios, involving conflicting traffic situation assessments, main display failures, and navigation/autopilot system errors, were used to assess the pilots' SA and workload during autoland approaches with the display concepts. From the results, for each scenario, the integrated pictorial display concept provided the pilots with statistically equivalent or substantially improved SA over the other display concepts. In addition to increased SA, subjective rankings indicated that the pictorial concept offered reductions in overall pilot workload (in both mean ranking and spread) over the two enhanced EFIS-type display concepts. Out of the display concepts flown, the pilots ranked the pictorial concept as the display that was easiest to use to maintain situational awareness, to monitor an autoland approach, to interpret information from the runway and obstacle detecting sensor systems, and to make the decision to go around.

  12. Advancement and applications of peptide phage display technology in biomedical science.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chien-Hsun; Liu, I-Ju; Lu, Ruei-Min; Wu, Han-Chung

    2016-01-19

    Combinatorial phage library is a powerful research tool for high-throughput screening of protein interactions. Of all available molecular display techniques, phage display has proven to be the most popular approach. Screening phage-displayed random peptide libraries is an effective means of identifying peptides that can bind target molecules and regulate their function. Phage-displayed peptide libraries can be used for (i) B-cell and T-cell epitope mapping, (ii) selection of bioactive peptides bound to receptors or proteins, disease-specific antigen mimics, peptides bound to non-protein targets, cell-specific peptides, or organ-specific peptides, and (iii) development of peptide-mediated drug delivery systems and other applications. Targeting peptides identified using phage display technology may be useful for basic research and translational medicine. In this review article, we summarize the latest technological advancements in the application of phage-displayed peptide libraries to applied biomedical sciences.

  13. Visually Coupled Systems (VCS): The Virtual Panoramic Display (VPD) System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kocian, Dean F.

    1992-01-01

    The development and impact is described of new visually coupled system (VCS) equipment designed to support engineering and human factors research in the military aircraft cockpit environment. VCS represents an advanced man-machine interface (MMI). Its potential to improve aircrew situational awareness seems enormous, but its superiority over the conventional cockpit MMI has not been established in a conclusive and rigorous fashion. What has been missing is a 'systems' approach to technology advancement that is comprehensive enough to produce conclusive results concerning the operational viability of the VCS concept and verify any risk factors that might be involved with its general use in the cockpit. The advanced VCS configuration described here, was ruggedized for use in military aircraft environments and was dubbed the Virtual Panoramic Display (VPD). It was designed to answer the VCS portion of the systems problem, and is implemented as a modular system whose performance can be tailored to specific application requirements. The overall system concept and the design of the two most important electronic subsystems that support the helmet mounted parts, a new militarized version of the magnetic helmet mounted sight and correspondingly similar helmet display electronics, are discussed in detail. Significant emphasis is given to illustrating how particular design features in the hardware improve overall system performance and support research activities.

  14. 14 CFR 23.777 - Cockpit controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Cockpit controls. 23.777 Section 23.777... Cargo Accommodations § 23.777 Cockpit controls. (a) Each cockpit control must be located and (except... inadvertent operation. (b) The controls must be located and arranged so that the pilot, when seated, has...

  15. Cockpit weather graphics using mobile satellite communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seth, Shashi

    1993-01-01

    Many new companies are pushing state-of-the-art technology to bring a revolution in the cockpits of General Aviation (GA) aircraft. The vision, according to Dr. Bruce Holmes - the Assistant Director for Aeronautics at National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Langley Research Center, is to provide such an advanced flight control system that the motor and cognitive skills you use to drive a car would be very similar to the ones you would use to fly an airplane. We at ViGYAN, Inc., are currently developing a system called the Pilot Weather Advisor (PWxA), which would be a part of such an advanced technology flight management system. The PWxA provides graphical depictions of weather information in the cockpit of aircraft in near real-time, through the use of broadcast satellite communications. The purpose of this system is to improve the safety and utility of GA aircraft operations. Considerable effort is being extended for research in the design of graphical weather systems, notably the works of Scanlon and Dash. The concept of providing pilots with graphical depictions of weather conditions, overlaid on geographical and navigational maps, is extremely powerful.

  16. Optimum culture in the cockpit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamamori, Hisaaki

    1987-01-01

    Even with the same program and objectives, if the culture is different, there will be different approaches to the goal of flight safety. However, the cockpit environment is culture-free so it is not as important to think of a person's cultural background as it is to think of the approach to the goal of ultimate safety. Crew members can look at their individual safety goals and compare them to their own performance to see if their behavior matches their own safety goals. The cockpit environment must be culture-free in order to obtain the ultimate safety goal. One must first realize how their culture affects their behavior before they can begin to change their attitude and actions in the cockpit.

  17. An advanced programmable/reconfigurable color graphics display system for crew station technology research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montoya, R. J.; England, J. N.; Hatfield, J. J.; Rajala, S. A.

    1981-01-01

    The hardware configuration, software organization, and applications software for the NASA IKONAS color graphics display system are described. The systems were created at the Langley Research Center Display Device Laboratory to develop, evaluate, and demonstrate advanced generic concepts, technology, and systems integration techniques for electronic crew station systems of future civil aircraft. A minicomputer with 64K core memory acts as a host for a raster scan graphics display generator. The architectures of the hardware system and the graphics display system are provided. The applications software features a FORTRAN-based model of an aircraft, a display system, and the utility program for real-time communications. The model accepts inputs from a two-dimensional joystick and outputs a set of aircraft states. Ongoing and planned work for image segmentation/generation, specialized graphics procedures, and higher level language user interface are discussed.

  18. Advanced concepts flight simulation facility.

    PubMed

    Chappell, S L; Sexton, G A

    1986-12-01

    The cockpit environment is changing rapidly. New technology allows airborne computerised information, flight automation and data transfer with the ground. By 1995, not only will the pilot's task have changed, but also the tools for doing that task. To provide knowledge and direction for these changes, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the Lockheed-Georgia Company have completed three identical Advanced Concepts Flight Simulation Facilities. Many advanced features have been incorporated into the simulators - e g, cathode ray tube (CRT) displays of flight and systems information operated via touch-screen or voice, print-outs of clearances, cockpit traffic displays, current databases containing navigational charts, weather and flight plan information, and fuel-efficient autopilot control from take-off to touchdown. More importantly, this cockpit is a versatile test bed for studying displays, controls, procedures and crew management in a full-mission context. The facility also has an air traffic control simulation, with radio and data communications, and an outside visual scene with variable weather conditions. These provide a veridical flight environment to evaluate accurately advanced concepts in flight stations.

  19. Optimal 3D Viewing with Adaptive Stereo Displays for Advanced Telemanipulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, S.; Lakshmanan, S.; Ro, S.; Park, J.; Lee, C.

    1996-01-01

    A method of optimal 3D viewing based on adaptive displays of stereo images is presented for advanced telemanipulation. The method provides the viewer with the capability of accurately observing a virtual 3D object or local scene of his/her choice with minimum distortion.

  20. Open control/display system for a telerobotics work station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keslowitz, Saul

    1987-01-01

    A working Advanced Space Cockpit was developed that integrated advanced control and display devices into a state-of-the-art multimicroprocessor hardware configuration, using window graphics and running under an object-oriented, multitasking real-time operating system environment. This Open Control/Display System supports the idea that the operator should be able to interactively monitor, select, control, and display information about many payloads aboard the Space Station using sets of I/O devices with a single, software-reconfigurable workstation. This is done while maintaining system consistency, yet the system is completely open to accept new additions and advances in hardware and software. The Advanced Space Cockpit, linked to Grumman's Hybrid Computing Facility and Large Amplitude Space Simulator (LASS), was used to test the Open Control/Display System via full-scale simulation of the following tasks: telerobotic truss assembly, RCS and thermal bus servicing, CMG changeout, RMS constrained motion and space constructible radiator assembly, HPA coordinated control, and OMV docking and tumbling satellite retrieval. The proposed man-machine interface standard discussed has evolved through many iterations of the tasks, and is based on feedback from NASA and Air Force personnel who performed those tasks in the LASS.

  1. Three-Dimensional Stereographic Pictorial Visual Interfaces And Display Systems In Flight Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bridges, Alan L.; Reising, John M.

    1987-06-01

    By combining stereoscopic aspects of vision with other optical clues, the pilot of a flight simulator is able to perceive true three-dimensional representations of pictorial display formats or simulated visual scenes. Three-dimensional (3-D) stereographic pictorial formats and their corresponding display systems are being developed and evaluated in order to determine the payoffs of the 3-D computer-generated display formats in the cockpit. The objectives of this research in true three-dimensional cockpit imagery are 1) to determine whether a pilot can better interpret complex pictorial display formats or visual scenes when the third dimension is added and 2) to determine how motion and depth cues can be used to tightly couple the human responses of the pilot to the aircraft control systems. This paper reviews current research, development, and evaluation of easily modifiable 3-D stereo-graphic pictorial display systems being used at the Advanced Cockpit Display Laboratory (ACDL), Lockheed-Georgia Company and at the Flight Dynamics Laboratory, Wright-Patterson AFB. This research includes the analysis and development of true 3-D pictorial formats representing the entire 3-D flight profile; e.g., displays for terrain following/terrain avoidance/threat avoidance and air-to-air and air-to-surface weapon delivery. Electro-optical shuttering systems; e.g., active and passive liquid crystal shutters (LCSs), stereographic display systems, and high-performance pseudo 3-D computer graphics workstations (Silicon Graphics IRIS), are being used to generate stereo pairs. Sidestick and throttle controllers are used to fly through the visual database. These near real-time simulations will be performed in realistic fighter and transport cockpit shells, which may evolve into 1995 designs.

  2. A Laboratory Glass-Cockpit Flight Simulator for Automation and Communications Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pisanich, Gregory M.; Heers, Susan T.; Shafto, Michael G. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    A laboratory glass-cockpit flight simulator supporting research on advanced commercial flight deck and Air Traffic Control (ATC) automation and communication interfaces has been developed at the Aviation Operations Branch at the NASA Ames Research Center. This system provides independent and integrated flight and ATC simulator stations, party line voice and datalink communications, along with video and audio monitoring and recording capabilities. Over the last several years, it has been used to support the investigation of flight human factors research issues involving: communication modality; message content and length; graphical versus textual presentation of information, and human accountability for automation. This paper updates the status of this simulator, describing new functionality in the areas of flight management system, EICAS display, and electronic checklist integration. It also provides an overview of several experiments performed using this simulator, including their application areas and results. Finally future enhancements to its ATC (integration of CTAS software) and flight deck (full crew operations) functionality are described.

  3. Advances in Proteomics Data Analysis and Display Using an Accurate Mass and Time Tag Approach

    PubMed Central

    Zimmer, Jennifer S.D.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Qian, Wei-Jun; Smith, Richard D.

    2007-01-01

    Proteomics has recently demonstrated utility in understanding cellular processes on the molecular level as a component of systems biology approaches and for identifying potential biomarkers of various disease states. The large amount of data generated by utilizing high efficiency (e.g., chromatographic) separations coupled to high mass accuracy mass spectrometry for high-throughput proteomics analyses presents challenges related to data processing, analysis, and display. This review focuses on recent advances in nanoLC-FTICR-MS-based proteomics approaches and the accompanying data processing tools that have been developed to display and interpret the large volumes of data being produced. PMID:16429408

  4. Projection display technology for avionics applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalmanash, Michael H.; Tompkins, Richard D.

    2000-08-01

    Avionics displays often require custom image sources tailored to demanding program needs. Flat panel devices are attractive for cockpit installations, however recent history has shown that it is not possible to sustain a business manufacturing custom flat panels in small volume specialty runs. As the number of suppliers willing to undertake this effort shrinks, avionics programs unable to utilize commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) flat panels are placed in serious jeopardy. Rear projection technology offers a new paradigm, enabling compact systems to be tailored to specific platform needs while using a complement of COTS components. Projection displays enable improved performance, lower cost and shorter development cycles based on inter-program commonality and the wide use of commercial components. This paper reviews the promise and challenges of projection technology and provides an overview of Kaiser Electronics' efforts in developing advanced avionics displays using this approach.

  5. Generic voice interface for cockpit application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williamson, David T.; Feitshans, Gregory L.

    A voice technology interface is proposed that would allow both novice and expert users of voice input and output devices to quickly interface them to their applications while maintaining optimum performance. The objective of this generic voice interface (GVI) is to provide a device-independent interface to existing voice systems. The system will be designed so that any application, not just cockpit applications, can be used with the GVI. Once it has been successfully integrated into a few key applications, the same techniques can be transitioned to other areas. The system will initially be targeted for the rapidly reconfigurable crew-station (RRC) program, which will provide a rapid prototyping environment for advanced crew-station design.

  6. Cockpit weather information system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tu, Jeffrey Chen-Yu (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    Weather information, periodically collected from throughout a global region, is periodically assimilated and compiled at a central source and sent via a high speed data link to a satellite communication service, such as COMSAT. That communication service converts the compiled weather information to GSDB format, and transmits the GSDB encoded information to an orbiting broadcast satellite, INMARSAT, transmitting the information at a data rate of no less than 10.5 kilobits per second. The INMARSAT satellite receives that data over its P-channel and rebroadcasts the GDSB encoded weather information, in the microwave L-band, throughout the global region at a rate of no less than 10.5 KB/S. The transmission is received aboard an aircraft by means of an onboard SATCOM receiver and the output is furnished to a weather information processor. A touch sensitive liquid crystal panel display allows the pilot to select the weather function by touching a predefined icon overlain on the display's surface and in response a color graphic display of the weather is displayed for the pilot.

  7. F-8 Iron Bird Cockpit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The F-8 DFBW (Digital-Fly-By-Wire) simulator used an 'Iron-Bird' for its cockpit. It was used from 1971 to 1986. The F-8 DFBW simulator was used in the development, testing, and validation of an all digital flight-control system installed in the F-8 aircraft that replaced the normal mechanical/hydraulic controls. Many military and commercial aircraft have digital flight control systems based on the technologies developed at NASA Dryden.

  8. Man-machine interface requirements - advanced technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Remington, R. W.; Wiener, E. L.

    1984-01-01

    Research issues and areas are identified where increased understanding of the human operator and the interaction between the operator and the avionics could lead to improvements in the performance of current and proposed helicopters. Both current and advanced helicopter systems and avionics are considered. Areas critical to man-machine interface requirements include: (1) artificial intelligence; (2) visual displays; (3) voice technology; (4) cockpit integration; and (5) pilot work loads and performance.

  9. Cockpit integration from a pilot's point of view

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, D. L.

    1982-01-01

    Extensive experience in both operational and engineering test flight was used to suggest straightforward changes to helicopter cockpit and control system design that would improve pilot performance in marginal and instrument flight conditions. Needed control system improvements considered include: (1) separation of yaw from cyclic force trim; (2) pedal force proportional to displacement rate; and (3) integration of engine controls in collective stick. Display improvements needed include: (1) natural cuing of yaw rate in attitude indicator; (2) collective position indication and radar altimeter placed within primary scan; and (3) omnidirectional display of full range airspeed data.

  10. Military display performance parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desjardins, Daniel D.; Meyer, Frederick

    2012-06-01

    The military display market is analyzed in terms of four of its segments: avionics, vetronics, dismounted soldier, and command and control. Requirements are summarized for a number of technology-driving parameters, to include luminance, night vision imaging system compatibility, gray levels, resolution, dimming range, viewing angle, video capability, altitude, temperature, shock and vibration, etc., for direct-view and virtual-view displays in cockpits and crew stations. Technical specifications are discussed for selected programs.

  11. "Virtual Cockpit Window" for a Windowless Aerospacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abernathy, Michael F.

    2003-01-01

    A software system processes navigational and sensory information in real time to generate a three-dimensional-appearing image of the external environment for viewing by crewmembers of a windowless aerospacecraft. The design of the particular aerospacecraft (the X-38) is such that the addition of a real transparent cockpit window to the airframe would have resulted in unacceptably large increases in weight and cost. When exerting manual control, an aircrew needs to see terrain, obstructions, and other features around the aircraft in order to land safely. The X-38 is capable of automated landing, but even when this capability is utilized, the crew still needs to view the external environment: From the very beginning of the United States space program, crews have expressed profound dislike for windowless vehicles. The wellbeing of an aircrew is considerably promoted by a three-dimensional view of terrain and obstructions. The present software system was developed to satisfy the need for such a view. In conjunction with a computer and display equipment that weigh less than would a real transparent window, this software system thus provides a virtual cockpit window. The key problem in the development of this software system was to create a realistic three-dimensional perspective view that is updated in real time. The problem was solved by building upon a pre-existing commercial program LandForm C3 that combines the speed of flight-simulator software with the power of geographic-information-system software to generate real-time, three-dimensional-appearing displays of terrain and other features of flight environments. In the development of the present software, the pre-existing program was modified to enable it to utilize real-time information on the position and attitude of the aerospacecraft to generate a view of the external world as it would appear to a person looking out through a window in the aerospacecraft. The development included innovations in realistic

  12. Displaying Composite and Archived Soundings in the Advanced Weather Interactive Processing System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrett, Joe H., III; Volkmer, Matthew R.; Blottman, Peter F.; Sharp, David W.

    2008-01-01

    This presentation describes work done by the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) to add composite soundings to the Advanced Weather Interactive Processing System (AWIPS). This allows National Weather Service (NWS) forecasters to compare the current atmospheric state with climatology. In a previous task, the AMU created composite soundings for four rawinsonde observation stations in Florida, for each of eight flow regimes. The composite soundings were delivered to the NWS Melbourne (MLB) office for display using the NSHARP software program. NWS MLB requested that the AMU make the composite soundings available for display in AWIPS. The AMU first created a procedure to customize AWIPS so composite soundings could be displayed. A unique four-character identifier was created for each of the 32 composite soundings. The AMIU wrote a Tool Command Language/Tool Kit (TclITk) software program to convert the composite soundings from NSHARP to Network Common Data Form (NetCDF) format. The NetCDF files were then displayable by AWIPS.

  13. Advanced Pathway Guidance Evaluations on a Synthetic Vision Head-Up Display

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kramer, Lynda J.; Prinzel, Lawrence J., III; Arthur, Jarvis J., III; Bailey, Randall E.

    2005-01-01

    NASA's Synthetic Vision Systems (SVS) project is developing technologies with practical applications to potentially eliminate low visibility conditions as a causal factor to civil aircraft accidents while replicating the operational benefits of clear day flight operations, regardless of the actual outside visibility condition. A major thrust of the SVS project involves the development/demonstration of affordable, certifiable display configurations that provide intuitive out-the-window terrain and obstacle information with advanced guidance for commercial and business aircraft. This experiment evaluated the influence of different pathway and guidance display concepts upon pilot situation awareness (SA), mental workload, and flight path tracking performance for Synthetic Vision display concepts using a Head-Up Display (HUD). Two pathway formats (dynamic and minimal tunnel presentations) were evaluated against a baseline condition (no tunnel) during simulated instrument meteorological conditions approaches to Reno-Tahoe International airport. Two guidance cues (tadpole, follow-me aircraft) were also evaluated to assess their influence. Results indicated that the presence of a tunnel on an SVS HUD had no effect on flight path performance but that it did have significant effects on pilot SA and mental workload. The dynamic tunnel concept with the follow-me aircraft guidance symbol produced the lowest workload and provided the highest SA among the tunnel concepts evaluated.

  14. Automated cockpits special report, part 1.

    PubMed

    1995-01-30

    Part one of this report includes the following articles: Accidents Direct Focus on Cockpit Automation; Modern Cockpit Complexity Challenges Pilot Interfaces; Airbus Seeks to Keep Pilot, New Technology in harmony; NTSB: Mode Confusion Poses Safety Threat; and, Certification Officials grapple with Flight Deck Complexity.

  15. 14 CFR 23.777 - Cockpit controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Cargo Accommodations § 23.777 Cockpit controls. Link to an amendment published at 76 FR 75757, December... each control without interference from either his clothing or the cockpit structure. (c) Powerplant... red. Effective Date Note: By Amdt. 23-62, 76 FR 75757, Dec. 2, 2011, § 23.777 was amended by...

  16. A survey of new technology for cockpit application to 1990's transport aircraft simulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holt, A. P., Jr.; Noneaker, D. O.; Walthour, L.

    1980-01-01

    Two problems were investigated: inter-equipment data transfer, both on board the aircraft and between air and ground; and crew equipment communication via the cockpit displays and controls. Inter-equipment data transfer is discussed in terms of data bus and data link requirements. Crew equipment communication is discussed regarding the availability of CRT display systems for use in research simulators to represent flat panel displays of the future, and of software controllable touch panels.

  17. Anthropometric accommodation in USAF cockpits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zehner, Gregory F.

    1994-01-01

    Over the past three years, a new set of methodologies has been developed to specify and evaluate anthropometric accommodation in USAF crewstation designs. These techniques are used to improve the ability of the pilot to reach controls, to safely escape the aircraft, to achieve adequate mobility and comfort, and to assure full access to the visual field both inside and outside the aircraft. This paper summarized commonly encountered aircraft accommodation problems, explains the failure of the traditional 'percentile man' design concept to resolve these difficulties, and suggests an alternative approach for improving cockpit design to better accommodate today's more heterogeneous flying population.

  18. Case Study of the Space Shuttle Cockpit Avionics Upgrade Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferguson, Roscoe C.; Thompson, Hiram C.

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of the Space Shuttle Cockpit Avionics Upgrade project was to reduce crew workload and improve situational awareness. The upgrade was to augment the Shuttle avionics system with new hardware and software. An early version of this system was used to gather human factor statistics in the Space Shuttle Motion Simulator of the Johnson Space Center for one month by multiple teams of astronauts. The results were compiled by NASA Ames Research Center and it was was determined that the system provided a better than expected increase in situational awareness and reduction in crew workload. Even with all of the benefits nf the system, NASA cancelled the project towards the end of the development cycle. A major success of this project was the validation of the hardware architecture and software design. This was significant because the project incorporated new technology and approaches for the development of human rated space software. This paper serves as a case study to document knowledge gained and techniques that can be applied for future space avionics development efforts. The major technological advances were the use of reflective memory concepts for data acquisition and the incorporation of Commercial off the Shelf (COTS) products in a human rated space avionics system. The infused COTS products included a real time operating system, a resident linker and loader, a display generation tool set, and a network data manager. Some of the successful design concepts were the engineering of identical outputs in multiple avionics boxes using an event driven approach and inter-computer communication, a reconfigurable data acquisition engine, the use of a dynamic bus bandwidth allocation algorithm. Other significant experiences captured were the use of prototyping to reduce risk, and the correct balance between Object Oriented and Functional based programming.

  19. Stereoscopic displays and applications; Proceedings of the Meeting, Santa Clara, CA, Feb. 12-14, 1990

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merritt, John O. (Editor); Fisher, Scott S. (Editor)

    1990-01-01

    The present conference discusses topics in the fields of stereoscopic displays' user interfaces, three-dimensional (TD) visualization, novel TD displays, and applications of stereoscopic displays. Attention is given to TD cockpit displays, novel computational control techniques for stereo TD displays, characterization of higher-dimensional presentation techniques, volume visualization on a stereoscopic display, and stereoscopic displays for terrain-data base visualization. Also discussed are the experimental design of cyberspaces, a volumetric environment for interactive design of three-dimensional objects, videotape recording of TD TV images, remote manipulator tasks rendered possible by stereo TV, TD endoscopy based on alternating-frame technology, and advancements in computer-generated barrier-strip autostereography.

  20. Cockpit data management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groce, J. L.; Boucek, G. P.

    1988-01-01

    This study is a continuation of an FAA effort to alleviate the growing problems of assimilating and managing the flow of data and flight related information in the air transport flight deck. The nature and extent of known pilot interface problems arising from new NAS data management programs were determined by a comparative timeline analysis of crew tasking requirements. A baseline of crew tasking requirements was established for conventional and advanced flight decks operating in the current NAS environment and then compared to the requirements for operation in a future NAS environment emphasizing Mode-S data link and TCAS. Results showed that a CDU-based pilot interface for Mode-S data link substantially increased crew visual activity as compared to the baseline. It was concluded that alternative means of crew interface should be available during high visual workload phases of flight. Results for TCAS implementation showed substantial visual and motor tasking increases, and that there was little available time between crew tasks during a TCAS encounter. It was concluded that additional research should be undertaken to address issues of ATC coordination and the relative benefit of high workload TCAS features.

  1. Cockpit Ocular Recording System (CORS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothenheber, Edward; Stokes, James; Lagrossa, Charles; Arnold, William; Dick, A. O.

    1990-01-01

    The overall goal was the development of a Cockpit Ocular Recording System (CORS). Four tasks were used: (1) the development of the system; (2) the experimentation and improvement of the system; (3) demonstrations of the working system; and (4) system documentation. Overall, the prototype represents a workable and flexibly designed CORS system. For the most part, the hardware use for the prototype system is off-the-shelf. All of the following software was developed specifically: (1) setup software that the user specifies the cockpit configuration and identifies possible areas in which the pilot will look; (2) sensing software which integrates the 60 Hz data from the oculometer and heat orientation sensing unit; (3) processing software which applies a spatiotemporal filter to the lookpoint data to determine fixation/dwell positions; (4) data recording output routines; and (5) playback software which allows the user to retrieve and analyze the data. Several experiments were performed to verify the system accuracy and quantify system deficiencies. These tests resulted in recommendations for any future system that might be constructed.

  2. Alert generation and cockpit presentation for an integrated microburst alerting system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wanke, Craig; Hansman, R. John, Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Alert generation and cockpit presentation issues for low level wind shear (microburst) alerts are investigated. Alert generation issues center on the development of a hazard criterion which allows integration of both ground based and airborne wind shear detection systems to form an accurate picture of the aviation hazard posed by a particular wind shear situation. A methodology for the testing of a hazard criteria through flight simulation has been developed, and has been used to examine the effectiveness and feasibility of several possible criteria. Also, an experiment to evaluate candidate graphical cockpit displays for microburst alerts using a piloted simulator has been designed.

  3. Assessing the impact unique NVG filters have on human visual performance under simulated compatible cockpit lighting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixon, Sharon A.; Marasco, Peter L.

    2006-05-01

    The introduction of Night Vision Goggles (NVGs) into the cockpits of aircraft configured with head-up displays (HUDs) and colored cockpit instruments necessitated the addition of special NVG objective lens filters to ensure NVG/cockpit compatibility. Three classifications have been developed: Class A, B and C, all minus blue filters, but with different transmissivity characteristics customized to make NVGs compatible with particular cockpit configurations. Class C filters, designed for aircraft equipped with holographic HUDs, are constructed of applied reflective coatings with a built-in spectral notch for transmitting the correct light wavelength to make the projected HUD symbology readable. New absorptive glass technology was integrated into the design of an RG-665 minus-blue filter identical to a class B filter but with a physical pinhole and varying glass material thickness to fine tune the filter for optimal transmissivity for NVG/HUD compatibility. A study was conducted to examine the impact these two unique classifications of filters have on visual performance using simulated compatible cockpit lighting in a controlled laboratory. Results indicate the Class C filters significantly outperformed the RG-665 filters with the windscreen condition installed. A discussion of the properties of each type of filter and its effect on NVG visual performance are discussed in this paper.

  4. Advanced Image Intensifier: a 60°field-of-view night vision system with integral electroluminescent display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crenshaw, David A.; Branigan, Robert G.

    1996-06-01

    The Advanced Image Intensifier Advanced Technology Demonstrator is an Army program to develop and demonstrate the next generation of night vision goggle using revolutionary new technologies to improve system performance and expand the capability of currently fielded image intensifier devices. The Advanced Image Intensifier is a helmet mounted imaging and display system that exploits recent advances in diffractive optics, miniature flat panel displays, image intensifier tube technology and manufacturing processes. The system will demonstrate significantly enhanced operational performance by increasing low-light resolution by greater than 25 percent; increasing field of view from 40 degrees to 60 degrees; improving high light performance; and integrating a display for viewing thermal imagery, computer graphics, and symbology. The results of these improvements will increase the night fighting capability, operational effectiveness, mobilty, versatility, and survivability of the dismounted soldier and aviator.

  5. Dual redundant display in bubble canopy applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahdi, Ken; Niemczyk, James

    2010-04-01

    Today's cockpit integrator, whether for state of the art military fast jet, or piston powered general aviation, is striving to utilize all available panel space for AMLCD based displays to enhance situational awareness and increase safety. The benefits of a glass cockpit have been well studied and documented. The technology used to create these glass cockpits, however, is driven by commercial AMLCD demand which far outstrips the combined worldwide avionics requirements. In order to satisfy the wide variety of human factors and environmental requirements, large area displays have been developed to maximize the usable display area while also providing necessary redundancy in case of failure. The AMLCD has been optimized for extremely wide viewing angles driven by the flat panel TV market. In some cockpit applications, wide viewing cones are desired. In bubble canopy cockpits, however, narrow viewing cones are desired to reduce canopy reflections. American Panel Corporation has developed AMLCD displays that maximize viewing area, provide redundancy, while also providing a very narrow viewing cone even though commercial AMLCD technology is employed suitable for high performance AMLCD Displays. This paper investigates both the large area display architecture with several available options to solve redundancy as well as beam steering techniques to also limit canopy reflections.

  6. Advanced display object selection methods for enhancing user-computer productivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osga, Glenn A.

    1993-01-01

    The User-Interface Technology Branch at NCCOSC RDT&E Division has been conducting a series of studies to address the suitability of commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) graphic user-interface (GUI) methods for efficiency and performance in critical naval combat systems. This paper presents an advanced selection algorithm and method developed to increase user performance when making selections on tactical displays. The method has also been applied with considerable success to a variety of cursor and pointing tasks. Typical GUI's allow user selection by: (1) moving a cursor with a pointing device such as a mouse, trackball, joystick, touchscreen; and (2) placing the cursor on the object. Examples of GUI objects are the buttons, icons, folders, scroll bars, etc. used in many personal computer and workstation applications. This paper presents an improved method of selection and the theoretical basis for the significant performance gains achieved with various input devices tested. The method is applicable to all GUI styles and display sizes, and is particularly useful for selections on small screens such as notebook computers. Considering the amount of work-hours spent pointing and clicking across all styles of available graphic user-interfaces, the cost/benefit in applying this method to graphic user-interfaces is substantial, with the potential for increasing productivity across thousands of users and applications.

  7. Multi-modal cockpit interface for improved airport surface operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arthur, Jarvis J. (Inventor); Bailey, Randall E. (Inventor); Prinzel, III, Lawrence J. (Inventor); Kramer, Lynda J. (Inventor); Williams, Steven P. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A system for multi-modal cockpit interface during surface operation of an aircraft comprises a head tracking device, a processing element, and a full-color head worn display. The processing element is configured to receive head position information from the head tracking device, to receive current location information of the aircraft, and to render a virtual airport scene corresponding to the head position information and the current aircraft location. The full-color head worn display is configured to receive the virtual airport scene from the processing element and to display the virtual airport scene. The current location information may be received from one of a global positioning system or an inertial navigation system.

  8. A Product Development Decision Model for Cockpit Weather Information System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sireli, Yesim; Kauffmann, Paul; Gupta, Surabhi; Kachroo, Pushkin; Johnson, Edward J., Jr. (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    There is a significant market demand for advanced cockpit weather information products. However, it is unclear how to identify the most promising technological options that provide the desired mix of consumer requirements by employing feasible technical systems at a price that achieves market success. This study develops a unique product development decision model that employs Quality Function Deployment (QFD) and Kano's model of consumer choice. This model is specifically designed for exploration and resolution of this and similar information technology related product development problems.

  9. A Product Development Decision Model for Cockpit Weather Information Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sireli, Yesim; Kauffmann, Paul; Gupta, Surabhi; Kachroo, Pushkin

    2003-01-01

    There is a significant market demand for advanced cockpit weather information products. However, it is unclear how to identify the most promising technological options that provide the desired mix of consumer requirements by employing feasible technical systems at a price that achieves market success. This study develops a unique product development decision model that employs Quality Function Deployment (QFD) and Kano's model of consumer choice. This model is specifically designed for exploration and resolution of this and similar information technology related product development problems.

  10. Advances in display technology III; Proceedings of the Meeting, Los Angeles, CA, January 18, 19, 1983

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlam, E.

    1983-01-01

    Human factors in visible displays are discussed, taking into account an introduction to color vision, a laser optometric assessment of visual display viewability, the quantification of color contrast, human performance evaluations of digital image quality, visual problems of office video display terminals, and contemporary problems in airborne displays. Other topics considered are related to electroluminescent technology, liquid crystal and related technologies, plasma technology, and display terminal and systems. Attention is given to the application of electroluminescent technology to personal computers, electroluminescent driving techniques, thin film electroluminescent devices with memory, the fabrication of very large electroluminescent displays, the operating properties of thermally addressed dye switching liquid crystal display, light field dichroic liquid crystal displays for very large area displays, and hardening military plasma displays for a nuclear environment.

  11. Bridging the gap: adapting advanced display technologies for use in hybrid control rooms

    SciTech Connect

    Jokstad, Håkon; Boring, Ronald

    2015-02-01

    recently assisted INL in establishing the technical infrastructure for implementation of HSI prototypes from HAMMLAB into the HSSL to demonstrate relevant control room replacement systems in support of the LWRS program. In March, 2014, IFE delivered the first HSI prototype utilizing this infrastructure — a large screen overview display for INL's simulator. The co-operation now continues by developing Procedure Support Displays targeted for operators in hybrid control room settings. These prototypes are being validated with U.S. reactor operators in the HSSL and optimized to enhance their performance. This research serves as a crucial stepping stone toward incorporation of advanced display technologies into conventional main control rooms.

  12. Advances in display technology VI; Proceedings of the Meeting, Los Angeles, CA, Jan. 23, 24, 1986

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlam, Elliott

    1986-01-01

    The development and production of flat panel displays and the implementation of displays in systems are examined. Papers are presented on the ergonomic and psychophysical aspects of displays, color selections, and the visual aspects of display use in particular system applications. Particular attention is placed on design considerations for large electroluminescence (EL) displays, energy recovery in EL drive systems, photothermal deflection spectroscopy in ZnS electroluminescent thin films, and the use of a thin film photoconductive-EL system as an optoelectronic logical gate. Consideration is given to a variety of specific system applications for CRT displays, stereoscopic displays, display simulation, and a CRT color projection system. Developments in multicolor approaches to ac plasma panels, the high speed addressing of a 60 cm x 80 cm plasma display, and an analysis of active matrix liquid crystal addressing are discussed.

  13. Applications of AMLCDs in U.S. military cockpits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michaels, Robert A.; Desjardins, Daniel D.; Daniels, Reginald; Hopper, Darrel G.

    1996-05-01

    Active matrix liquid crystal displays have become the flat panel technology of choice for new cockpits as well as for retrofits of existing ones. Systems such as F-22, F-18, F-16, and C-141 have already begun extensive development efforts over the last few years. More recently, JPATS, AH-64, P-3, KC-135, T-45, and T-38 have announced plans to use AMLCDs also. Because of the advantages that AMLCDs have to offer, the list of platforms that will implement them will continue to grow over the next several years. The Displays Branch in Wright Laboratory is continually analyzing current as well as potential programs. An update on this analysis program is presented.

  14. Displaying Composite and Archived Soundings in the Advanced Weather Interactive Processing System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrett, Joe H., III; Volkmer, Matthew R.; Blottman, Peter F.; Sharp, David W.

    2008-01-01

    In a previous task, the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) developed spatial and temporal climatologies of lightning occurrence based on eight atmospheric flow regimes. The AMU created climatological, or composite, soundings of wind speed and direction, temperature, and dew point temperature at four rawinsonde observation stations at Jacksonville, Tampa, Miami, and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, for each of the eight flow regimes. The composite soundings were delivered to the National Weather Service (NWS) Melbourne (MLB) office for display using the National version of the Skew-T Hodograph analysis and Research Program (NSHARP) software program. The NWS MLB requested the AMU make the composite soundings available for display in the Advanced Weather Interactive Processing System (AWIPS), so they could be overlaid on current observed soundings. This will allow the forecasters to compare the current state of the atmosphere with climatology. This presentation describes how the AMU converted the composite soundings from NSHARP Archive format to Network Common Data Form (NetCDF) format, so that the soundings could be displayed in AWl PS. The NetCDF is a set of data formats, programming interfaces, and software libraries used to read and write scientific data files. In AWIPS, each meteorological data type, such as soundings or surface observations, has a unique NetCDF format. Each format is described by a NetCDF template file. Although NetCDF files are in binary format, they can be converted to a text format called network Common data form Description Language (CDL). A software utility called ncgen is used to create a NetCDF file from a CDL file, while the ncdump utility is used to create a CDL file from a NetCDF file. An AWIPS receives soundings in Binary Universal Form for the Representation of Meteorological data (BUFR) format (http://dss.ucar.edu/docs/formats/bufr/), and then decodes them into NetCDF format. Only two sounding files are generated in AWIPS per day. One

  15. 14 CFR 129.24 - Cockpit voice recorders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Cockpit voice recorders. 129.24 Section 129... § 129.24 Cockpit voice recorders. No person may operate an aircraft under this part that is registered in the United States unless it is equipped with an approved cockpit voice recorder that meets...

  16. 3D Navigation and Integrated Hazard Display in Advanced Avionics: Workload, Performance, and Situation Awareness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wickens, Christopher D.; Alexander, Amy L.

    2004-01-01

    We examined the ability for pilots to estimate traffic location in an Integrated Hazard Display, and how such estimations should be measured. Twelve pilots viewed static images of traffic scenarios and then estimated the outside world locations of queried traffic represented in one of three display types (2D coplanar, 3D exocentric, and split-screen) and in one of four conditions (display present/blank crossed with outside world present/blank). Overall, the 2D coplanar display best supported both vertical (compared to 3D) and lateral (compared to split-screen) traffic position estimation performance. Costs of the 3D display were associated with perceptual ambiguity. Costs of the split screen display were inferred to result from inappropriate attention allocation. Furthermore, although pilots were faster in estimating traffic locations when relying on memory, accuracy was greatest when the display was available.

  17. Cockpit System Situational Awareness Modeling Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, John; Lebiere, Christian; Shay, Rick; Latorella, Kara

    2004-01-01

    This project explored the possibility of predicting pilot situational awareness (SA) using human performance modeling techniques for the purpose of evaluating developing cockpit systems. The Improved Performance Research Integration Tool (IMPRINT) was combined with the Adaptive Control of Thought-Rational (ACT-R) cognitive modeling architecture to produce a tool that can model both the discrete tasks of pilots and the cognitive processes associated with SA. The techniques for using this tool to predict SA were demonstrated using the newly developed Aviation Weather Information (AWIN) system. By providing an SA prediction tool to cockpit system designers, cockpit concepts can be assessed early in the design process while providing a cost-effective complement to the traditional pilot-in-the-loop experiments and data collection techniques.

  18. Personalized Intuitive Displays Enhance Pilot Performance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-10-01

    The cockpit of the Multi-Modal Suite (MMS) was equipped with four new interfaces: Voice Interface , Tactile Display, 3D audio display, and Dual...Layer Display. 2.2.2 Voice interface The voice interface consisted of software modules that use speech as an input or generate speech or audio as an...audio display. Five statements concerned the DLD as well as the Voice Interface , and ten more statements dealt with the MMS concept in general. The

  19. A rule-based expert system for generating control displays at the Advanced Photon Source

    SciTech Connect

    Coulter, K.J.

    1993-11-01

    The integration of a rule-based expert system for generating screen displays for controlling and monitoring instrumentation under the Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System (EPICS) is presented. The expert system is implemented using CLIPS, an expert system shell from the Software Technology Branch at Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center. The user selects the hardware input and output to be displayed and the expert system constructs a graphical control screen appropriate for the data. Such a system provides a method for implementing a common look and feel for displays created by several different users and reduces the amount of time required to create displays for new hardware configurations. Users are able to modify the displays as needed using the EPICS display editor tool.

  20. GL Studio Brings Realism to Aircraft Cockpit Simulator Displays

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-06-01

    becoming unsup- portable. A unique CIF simulation execut- ed on a single - board computer (SBC) for each of the seven systems. The SBC code communicated...Implemented Configuration Shared Memory CIF Client Server GUI Server Client Single Board Computer Linux PC (Silicon Graphics Replacement) RPC RPC Quadro FX

  1. Development of advanced direct perception displays for nuclear power plants to enhance monitoring, control and fault management. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, B.; Shaheen, S.; Moray, N.; Sanderson, P.; Reising, D.V.

    1993-05-21

    With recent theoretical and empirical research in basic and applied psychology, human factors, and engineering, it is now sufficient to define an integrated approach to the deign of advanced displays for present and future nuclear power plants. Traditionally, the conventional displays have shown operators the individual variables on gauges, meters, strip charts, etc. This design approach requires the operators to mentally integrate the separately displayed variables and determine the implications for the plant state. This traditional approach has been known as the single-sensor-single-indicator display design and it places an intolerable amount of mental workload on operators during transients and abnormal conditions. This report discusses a new alternative approach which is the use of direct perception interfaces. Direct perception a interfaces display the underlying physical and system constraints of the situation in a directly perceptual way, such that the viewer need not reason about what is seen to identify system states, but can identify the state of the system perceptually. It is expected that displays which show the dynamics of fundamental physical laws should better support operator decisions and diagnoses of plant states. The purpose of this research project is to develop a suite of direct perception displays for PWR nuclear power plant operations.

  2. System status display evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Summers, Leland G.

    1988-01-01

    The System Status Display is an electronic display system which provides the crew with an enhanced capability for monitoring and managing the aircraft systems. A flight simulation in a fixed base cockpit simulator was used to evaluate alternative design concepts for this display system. The alternative concepts included pictorial versus alphanumeric text formats, multifunction versus dedicated controls, and integration of the procedures with the system status information versus paper checklists. Twelve pilots manually flew approach patterns with the different concepts. System malfunctions occurred which required the pilots to respond to the alert by reconfiguring the system. The pictorial display, the multifunction control interfaces collocated with the system display, and the procedures integrated with the status information all had shorter event processing times and lower subjective workloads.

  3. Procedure and information displays in advanced nuclear control rooms: experimental evaluation of an integrated design.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yue; Gao, Qin; Song, Fei; Li, Zhizhong; Wang, Yufan

    2017-02-13

    In the main control rooms of nuclear power plants, operators frequently have to switch between procedure displays and system information displays. In this study, we proposed an operation-unit-based integrated design, which combines the two displays to facilitate the synthesis of information. We grouped actions that complete a single goal into operation units and showed these operation units on the displays of system states. In addition, we used different levels of visual salience to highlight the current unit and provided a list of execution history records. A laboratory experiment, with 42 students performing a simulated procedure to deal with unexpected high pressuriser level, was conducted to compare this design against an action-based integrated design and the existing separated-displays design. The results indicate that our operation-unit-based integrated design yields the best performance in terms of time and completion rate and helped more participants to detect unexpected system failures. Practitioner Summary: In current nuclear control rooms, operators frequently have to switch between procedure and system information displays. We developed an integrated design that incorporates procedure information into system displays. A laboratory study showed that the proposed design significantly improved participants' performance and increased the probability of detecting unexpected system failures.

  4. 14 CFR 27.777 - Cockpit controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Cockpit controls. 27.777 Section 27.777 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction Personnel and Cargo Accommodations §...

  5. 14 CFR 29.777 - Cockpit controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Cockpit controls. 29.777 Section 29.777 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction Personnel and Cargo Accommodations §...

  6. Individual Differences Underlying Pilot Cockpit Error

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-04-01

    achievement motivation, work motivation, and possessing a strong tendency towards interpersonal warmth , combined with low levels of verbal aggression...influence it. RESEARCH FOCUS The focus of this dissertation was an investigation of pilot cockpit error, specifically perception and judgement activities...1970s, the National Transportation Safety Board and the FAA (1988) discovered that poor interpersonal communications among crew members or inadequate

  7. Cockpit Considerations for Inertial-Affect and FTL Propulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millis, M. G.

    Breakthroughs in propulsion physics (control over gravitational or inertial forces, propellant-less space drives, and faster-thanlight travel) may not appear imminent, but enough progress has been made to allow thoughtful speculation about their nature and implications. The implications to cockpit design include added degrees of motion, combination of operational regimes (near ground, orbit, and beyond), greater span of speed (from zero-speed hover to beyond light-speed), the need for new motion displays and navigational tracking methods, and the loss of familiar motion cues (pilot's inertia and visual cues) due to the separation of external and internal environments. The primary reference used to predict these possibilities is the 2009 book, Frontiers of Propulsion Science. These implications are detailed in terms of design requirements.

  8. Head up and head mounted display performance improvements through advanced techniques in the manipulation of light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wisely, Paul L.

    2009-05-01

    Since their introduction a number of years ago, head up and helmet mounted displays have undergone continuous and intensive development in aerospace applications. To date, the designs have been performed using geometric optic design techniques and have progressed to the point where very little further improvement in their characteristics is possible. This paper describes a display realised by the use of new optical design techniques based on wave-guiding principles that have enabled substantial further significant improvements to be made. These improvements are not only in respect of size, weight and volume for a given optical performance, but also in the optical characteristics that currently limit the usability of such displays in many applications. Displays that have been realised and tested through these methods are described and their performance in laboratory and flight trials discussed, together with considerations for further progress in their development.

  9. Advanced Binaural Sonar Display for Collision Avoidance: Applying Spatial Vernier Beamforming to the Wide Aperture Array

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-09-07

    to real-time digital signal extraction for 3-D audio displays that are ideal for enhancing situational awareness. iii ABSTRACT Operating...processes are amenable to real-time digital signal extraction for presentation in 3-D audio displays which are ideal for situational awareness. iv...system design, the poor quality of digitally processed audio stems from the fact that digitization parameters were selected for their influence on

  10. Advances in the Dynallax solid-state dynamic parallax barrier autostereoscopic visualization display system.

    PubMed

    Peterka, Tom; Kooima, Robert L; Sandin, Daniel J; Johnson, Andrew; Leigh, Jason; DeFanti, Thomas A

    2008-01-01

    A solid-state dynamic parallax barrier autostereoscopic display mitigates some of the restrictions present in static barrier systems, such as fixed view-distance range, slow response to head movements, and fixed stereo operating mode. By dynamically varying barrier parameters in real time, viewers may move closer to the display and move faster laterally than with a static barrier system, and the display can switch between 3D and 2D modes by disabling the barrier on a per-pixel basis. Moreover, Dynallax can output four independent eye channels when two viewers are present, and both head-tracked viewers receive an independent pair of left-eye and right-eye perspective views based on their position in 3D space. The display device is constructed by using a dual-stacked LCD monitor where a dynamic barrier is rendered on the front display and a modulated virtual environment composed of two or four channels is rendered on the rear display. Dynallax was recently demonstrated in a small-scale head-tracked prototype system. This paper summarizes the concepts presented earlier, extends the discussion of various topics, and presents recent improvements to the system.

  11. "Head up and eyes out" advances in head mounted displays capabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cameron, Alex

    2013-06-01

    There are a host of helmet and head mounted displays, flooding the market place with displays which provide what is essentially a mobile computer display. What sets aviators HMDs apart is that they provide the user with accurate conformal information embedded in the pilots real world view (see through display) where the information presented is intuitive and easy to use because it overlays the real world (mix of sensor imagery, symbolic information and synthetic imagery) and enables them to stay head up, eyes out, - improving their effectiveness, reducing workload and improving safety. Such systems are an enabling technology in the provision of enhanced Situation Awareness (SA) and reducing user workload in high intensity situations. Safety Is Key; so the addition of these HMD functions cannot detract from the aircrew protection functions of conventional aircrew helmets which also include life support and audio communications. These capabilities are finding much wider application in new types of compact man mounted audio/visual products enabled by the emergence of new families of micro displays, novel optical concepts and ultra-compact low power processing solutions. This papers attempts to capture the key drivers and needs for future head mounted systems for aviation applications.

  12. Situational awareness in the commercial aircraft cockpit - A cognitive perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, Marilyn J.; Pew, Richard W.

    1990-01-01

    A cognitive theory is presented that has relevance for the definition and assessment of situational awareness in the cockpit. The theory asserts that maintenance of situation awareness is a constructive process that demands mental resources in competition with ongoing task performance. Implications of this perspective for assessing and improving situational awareness are discussed. It is concluded that the goal of inserting advanced technology into any system is that it results in an increase in the effectiveness, timeliness, and safety with which the system's activities can be accomplished. The inherent difficulties of the multitask situation are very often compounded by the introduction of automation. To maximize situational awareness, the dynamics and capabilities of such technologies must be designed with thorough respect for the dynamics and capabilities of human information-processing.

  13. Human factors in cockpit automation: A field study of flight crew transition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiener, E. L.

    1985-01-01

    The factors which affected two groups of airline pilots in the transition from traditional airline cockpits to a highly automated version were studied. All pilots were highly experienced in traditional models of the McDonnell-Douglas DC-9 prior to their transition to the more automated DC-9-80. Specific features of the new aircraft, particularly the digital flight guidance system (DFGS) and other automatic features such as the autothrottle system (ATS), autobrake, and digital display were studied. Particular attention was paid to the first 200 hours of line flying experience in the new aircraft, and the difficulties that some pilots found in adapting to the new systems during this initial operating period. Efforts to prevent skill loss from automation, training methods, traditional human factors issues, and general views of the pilots toward cockpit automation are discussed.

  14. Benefits assessment of active control technology and related cockpit technology for rotorcraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hampton, B. J.

    1982-01-01

    Two main-rotor active control concepts, one incorporating multicyclic actuators located just below the swashplate, and the other providing for the actuators and power supplies to be located in the rotating frame are considered. Each design concept is integrated with cockpit controllers and displays appropriate to the actuation concept in each case. The benefits of applying the defined ACT/RCT concepts to rotorcraft are quantified by comparison to the baseline model 412 helicopter. These benefits include, in the case of one active control concept; (1) up to 91% reduction in 4/rev hub shears; (2) a flight safety failure rate of 1.96 x 10 to the 8th power failures per flight-hour; (3) rotating controls/rotor hub drag reduction of 40%; (4) a 9% reduction in control system weight; and (5) vibratory deicing. The related cockpit concept reduces pilot workload for critical mission segments as much as 178% visual and 25% manual.

  15. Cockpit resource management training at People Express

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruce, Keith D.; Jensen, Doug

    1987-01-01

    In January 1986 in a continuing effort to maintain and improve flight safety and solve some Cockpit Resource Management (CRM) problems, People Express implemented a new CRM training program. It is a continuously running program, scheduled over the next three years and includes state-of-the-art full-mission simulation (LOFT), semi-annual seminar workshops and a comprehensive academic program authored by Robert W. Mudge of Cockpit Management Resources Inc. That program is outlined and to maximize its contribution to the workshop's goals, is organized into four topic areas: (1) Program content: the essential elements of resource management training; (2) Training methods: the strengths and weaknesses of current approaches; (3) Implementation: the implementation of CRM training; and (4) Effectiveness: the effectiveness of training. It is confined as much as possible to concise descriptions of the program's basic components. Brief discussions of rationale are included, however no attempt is made to discuss or review popular CRM tenets or the supporting research.

  16. Aeronautical Decision Making - Cockpit Resource Management

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-01-01

    of this effort to establish a universal CRM evaluation methodology useful throughout the 7 Codes icd/or AA industry. The author’s participation in the...on communication) to the decision training and evaluation being offered to the single-person cockpit elsewhere described as ADM. From a historical...risk assessment skills. 5) Learning to consider all resources available. 6) Learning to how evaluate your flight and decision making skills. Recent

  17. General Aviation (FAR 23) Cockpit Standardization Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-03-01

    Cockpit Geu,,ral area was subdivided into: Dimensional Criteria, Seat Belts and Restraintn, Windscreen Visibility, Ventilation and Environment, Doors-Access...helt# and Restraints b. Altimeter b. Indicator C. Windacreen Vslibility a. Attitude Gyro e’ WarnLn d. Ventilation and Environment 4. Directional Gyro d...Cabin Ventilation (CO) 11 Light Selector switches 3 Wanin~g Light. 42h fictrioal qvitlihes 24 Control Lothe 12 KGT Case. 2 Elevator Cuotr,,i 2

  18. The structure of cockpit management attitudes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregorich, S. E.; Helmreich, R. L.; Wilhelm, J. A.

    1990-01-01

    A revised version of the Cockpit Management Attitudes Questionnaire (CMAQ) is introduced. Factor analyses of responses from 3 different samples reveal comparable factor structure (previous attempts to factor analyze this measure had produced equivocal results). Implications for the measurement of attitudes and the assessment of attitude change are discussed. It is argued that the CMAQ will benefit both special training programs and efforts to explore attitude-performance linkages in air-transport operations.

  19. Teaching Cockpit Automation in the Classroom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Casner, Stephen M.

    2003-01-01

    This study explores the idea of teaching fundamental cockpit automation concepts and skills to aspiring professional pilots in a classroom setting, without the use of sophisticated aircraft or equipment simulators. Pilot participants from a local professional pilot academy completed eighteen hours of classroom instruction that placed a strong emphasis on understanding the underlying principles of cockpit automation systems and their use in a multi-crew cockpit. The instructional materials consisted solely of a single textbook. Pilots received no hands-on instruction or practice during their training. At the conclusion of the classroom instruction, pilots completed a written examination testing their mastery of what had been taught during the classroom meetings. Following the written exam, each pilot was given a check flight in a full-mission Level D simulator of a Boeing 747-400 aircraft. Pilots were given the opportunity to fly one practice leg, and were then tested on all concepts and skills covered in the class during a second leg. The results of the written exam and simulator checks strongly suggest that instruction delivered in a traditional classroom setting can lead to high levels of preparation without the need for expensive airplane or equipment simulators.

  20. M2-F1 cockpit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    This photo shows the cockpit configuration of the M2-F1 wingless lifting body. With a top speed of about 120 knots, the M2-F1 had a simple instrument panel. Besides the panel itself, the ribs of the wooden shell (left) and the control stick (center) are also visible. The wingless, lifting body aircraft design was initially conceived as a means of landing an aircraft horizontally after atmospheric reentry. The absence of wings would make the extreme heat of re-entry less damaging to the vehicle. In 1962, Dryden management approved a program to build a lightweight, unpowered lifting body as a prototype to flight test the wingless concept. It would look like a 'flying bathtub,' and was designated the M2-F1, the 'M' referring to 'manned' and 'F' referring to 'flight' version. It featured a plywood shell placed over a tubular steel frame crafted at Dryden. Construction was completed in 1963. The first flight tests of the M2-F1 were over Rogers Dry Lake at the end of a tow rope attached to a hopped-up Pontiac convertible driven at speeds up to about 120 mph. This vehicle needed to be able to tow the M2-F1 on the Rogers Dry Lakebed adjacent to NASA's Flight Research Center (FRC) at a minimum speed of 100 miles per hour. To do that, it had to handle the 400-pound pull of the M2-F1. Walter 'Whitey' Whiteside, who was a retired Air Force maintenance officer working in the FRC's Flight Operations Division, was a dirt-bike rider and hot-rodder. Together with Boyden 'Bud' Bearce in the Procurement and Supply Branch of the FRC, Whitey acquired a Pontiac Catalina convertible with the largest engine available. He took the car to Bill Straup's renowned hot-rod shop near Long Beach for modification. With a special gearbox and racing slicks, the Pontiac could tow the 1,000-pound M2-F1 110 miles per hour in 30 seconds. It proved adequate for the roughly 400 car tows that got the M2-F1 airborne to prove it could fly safely and to train pilots before they were towed behind a C-47

  1. Study of Advanced Electronic Applications to Aeronautical Display and Control Problems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1969-01-01

    0 x 0J 0g" 14 NP4 00, II 77 III A -- HI P4 E-1 4)029 -0 0o -o~ 1-2~ -- 2 bD p. c kD 0 r HbD c 0 t02Co 1-M~ D- r -A ;j CI WN I-H 0 00 - V -r0 jLb 30...Ground Processing Equipment for SSR 94 Q. Independent Reply Path and Tapered Pulse for General Aviation Only 96 R . Conclusions 98 IV. Electronic...National Basis (Low-Cost General Aviation Aircraft Only) 60 V LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS (Cont’d) Page 22. Potential Ground Displays of General Aviation

  2. Three-Dimensional Imaging and Image Displays: Surgical Application of Advanced Technologies.

    PubMed

    Satava

    1996-09-01

    One of the cornerstones of modern technology that was ushered in by laparoscopic surgery is the use of the video image. The importance of this "virtual representation" of the patient goes well beyond the application to laparoscopic surgery, and lies at the very heart of the revolution of surgery into the Information Age. Real objects, organs and patients can be represented as 2 and 3-dimensional computer generated images and viewed upon displays beyond the simple video monitor which permit a level of clinical practice not possible on the actual patients. These fundamental concepts that form the foundation of the revolution in surgery are placed in a framework for the future of surgery, and illustrate how their implementation can dramatically improve patient care.

  3. What Pilots like (and Don't Like) About the New Cockpit Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curry, R. E.

    1984-01-01

    Pilot's perceptions of the new cockpit technology in the B-767 are discussed. Although the data reported were taken from the introductory experience of the B-767, it is felt that similar, if not identical, results would be obtained with any other new cockpit technology aircraft, i.e., the A310. The following conclusions were drawn from the information collected thus far: A large majority of the pilots enjoy flying the B-767 more than the older airplanes. The pilots accept the new cockpit technology, and they choose to use it because they find it useful. The pilots are aware of the possible loss of flying skill with the presence of automation, and they hand fly (usually with flight director) to prevent this loss. There is no evidence of loss of skills from the data collected. The primary points of confusion or surprise were autothrottle/autopilot interactions; the autopilot during the wrong way or not capturing the course; and achieving desired results with the Flight Management System/Control Display Unit (FMS/CDU). The pilots felt training for the FMS/CDU could be improved, and they especially wanted more hands on experience.

  4. Video System for Viewing From a Remote or Windowless Cockpit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banerjee, Amamath

    2009-01-01

    A system of electronic hardware and software synthesizes, in nearly real time, an image of a portion of a scene surveyed by as many as eight video cameras aimed, in different directions, at portions of the scene. This is a prototype of systems that would enable a pilot to view the scene outside a remote or windowless cockpit. The outputs of the cameras are digitized. Direct memory addressing is used to store the data of a few captured images in sequence, and the sequence is repeated in cycles. Cylindrical warping is used in merging adjacent images at their borders to construct a mosaic image of the scene. The mosaic-image data are written to a memory block from which they can be rendered on a head-mounted display (HMD) device. A subsystem in the HMD device tracks the direction of gaze of the wearer, providing data that are used to select, for display, the portion of the mosaic image corresponding to the direction of gaze. The basic functionality of the system has been demonstrated by mounting the cameras on the roof of a van and steering the van by use of the images presented on the HMD device.

  5. F-22 cockpit avionics: a systems integration success story

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greeley, Kevin W.; Schwartz, Richard J.

    2000-08-01

    The F-22 'Raptor' is being developed and manufactured as multi-role fighter aircraft for the 'air dominance' mission. The F-22 team is led by Lockheed Martin, with Boeing and Pratt & Whitney as partners. The F-22 weapons system combines supersonic cruise, maneuverability, stealth, and an extensive suite of tightly integrated sensors to achieve a high level of lethality and invulnerability against current and projected threat systems such as fighter aircraft and surface to air missiles. Despite high automation of the complex systems installed in the F-22, the pilot is heavily tasked for air battle management. Response timelines are compressed due to supersonic cruise velocities. These factors challenge the Pilot Vehicle Interface (PVI) design. This paper discusses the team's response to these challenges, describing the physical cockpit layout, its controls and displays, and the hardware architecture, software tools, and development process used to mature the F-22 'Raptor' weapons system, including a review of Human Factors design considerations for F-22 displays.

  6. Thermal stress analysis of laminated LCDs for aircraft cockpits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Qibin; Hua, Yikui; Lv, Guoqiang; Lu, Xiaosong

    2012-10-01

    Different from common liquid crystal displays (LCDs), LCDs in aircraft cockpits have to satisfy some special requirements, including high luminance, high contrast ration, anti-reflection (AR), and electromagnetic compatibility (EMC). Indium-tin oxide (ITO) glasses are usually attached on the top surface of LC cells by optical adhesive for AR and EMC, forming laminated structure. The characteristics of optical adhesive and lamination processing have direct effects on display. This paper creates a finite-element-analysis model of the laminated LC cell with ITO glass. The simulation results show that the stress concentration happens in the case that there are defects (bubbles, cracks, nonuniform thickness) in the optical adhesive when the operation temperature raises to 70º C. Based on the analysis of the stress on the top surface of the LC cell in Y direction, it is found that the location of the stress concentration is just under where the defects exit. The comparison on the stress of 3 possible defects shows that the concentrated stress caused by the cracks are far more large than the stress by the bubbles and nonuniform thickness of optical adhesives, which should try best to avoid.

  7. Flight evaluation of advanced controls and displays for transition and landing on the NASA V/STOL systems research aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Franklin, James A.; Stortz, Michael W.; Borchers, Paul F.; Moralez, Ernesto, III

    1996-01-01

    Flight experiments were conducted on Ames Research Center's V/STOL Systems Research Aircraft (VSRA) to assess the influence of advanced control modes and head-up displays (HUD's) on flying qualities for precision approach and landing operations. Evaluations were made for decelerating approaches to hover followed by a vertical landing and for slow landings for four control/display mode combinations: the basic YAV-8B stability augmentation system; attitude command for pitch, roll, and yaw; flightpath/acceleration command with translational rate command in the hover; and height-rate damping with translational-rate command. Head-up displays used in conjunction with these control modes provided flightpath tracking/pursuit guidance and deceleration commands for the decelerating approach and a mixed horizontal and vertical presentation for precision hover and landing. Flying qualities were established and control usage and bandwidth were documented for candidate control modes and displays for the approach and vertical landing. Minimally satisfactory bandwidths were determined for the translational-rate command system. Test pilot and engineer teams from the Naval Air Warfare Center, the Boeing Military Airplane Group, Lockheed Martin, McDonnell Douglas Aerospace, Northrop Grumman, Rolls-Royce, and the British Defense Research Agency participated in the program along with NASA research pilots from the Ames and Lewis Research Centers. The results, in conjunction with related ground-based simulation data, indicate that the flightpath/longitudinal acceleration command response type in conjunction with pursuit tracking and deceleration guidance on the HUD would be essential for operation to instrument minimums significantly lower than the minimums for the AV-8B. It would also be a superior mode for performing slow landings where precise control to an austere landing area such as a narrow road is demanded. The translational-rate command system would reduce pilot workload for

  8. Advances in roll-to-roll imprint lithography for display applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeans, Albert; Almanza-Workman, Marcia; Cobene, Robert; Elder, Richard; Garcia, Robert; Gomez-Pancorbo, Fernando; Jackson, Warren; Jam, Mehrban; Kim, Han-Jun; Kwon, Ohseung; Luo, Hao; Maltabes, John; Mei, Ping; Perlov, Craig; Smith, Mark; Taussig, Carl; Jeffrey, Frank; Braymen, Steve; Hauschildt, Jason; Junge, Kelly; Larson, Don; Stieler, Dan

    2010-03-01

    A solution to the problems of roll-to-roll lithography on flexible substrates is presented. We have developed a roll-toroll imprint lithography technique to fabricate active matrix transistor backplanes on flexible webs of polyimide that have a blanket material stack of metals, dielectrics, and semiconductors. Imprint lithography produces a multi-level 3- dimensional mask that is then successively etched to pattern the underlying layers into the desired structures. This process, Self-Aligned Imprint Lithography (SAIL), solves the layer-to-layer alignment problem because all masking levels are created with one imprint step. The processes and equipment required for complete roll-to-roll SAIL fabrication will be described. Emphasis will be placed on the advances in the roll-to-roll imprint process which have enabled us to produce working transistor arrays.

  9. Cognitive network organization and cockpit automation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roske-Hofstrand, R. J.; Paap, K. R.

    1985-01-01

    Attention is given to a technique for the derivation of pilot cognitive networks from empirical data, which has been successfully used to guide the redesign of the Control Display Unit that serves as the primary interface of the complex flight management system being developed by NASA's Advanced Concepts Flight Simulator program. The 'pathfinder' algorithm of Schvaneveldt et al. (1985) is used to obtain the conceptual organization of four pilots by generating a family of link-weighted networks from a set of psychological distance data derived through similarity ratings. The degree of conceptual agreement between pilots is assessed, and the means of translating a cognitive network into a menu structure are noted.

  10. Cockpit Adaptive Automation and Pilot Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parasuraman, Raja

    2001-01-01

    The introduction of high-level automated systems in the aircraft cockpit has provided several benefits, e.g., new capabilities, enhanced operational efficiency, and reduced crew workload. At the same time, conventional 'static' automation has sometimes degraded human operator monitoring performance, increased workload, and reduced situation awareness. Adaptive automation represents an alternative to static automation. In this approach, task allocation between human operators and computer systems is flexible and context-dependent rather than static. Adaptive automation, or adaptive task allocation, is thought to provide for regulation of operator workload and performance, while preserving the benefits of static automation. In previous research we have reported beneficial effects of adaptive automation on the performance of both pilots and non-pilots of flight-related tasks. For adaptive systems to be viable, however, such benefits need to be examined jointly in the context of a single set of tasks. The studies carried out under this project evaluated a systematic method for combining different forms of adaptive automation. A model for effective combination of different forms of adaptive automation, based on matching adaptation to operator workload was proposed and tested. The model was evaluated in studies using IFR-rated pilots flying a general-aviation simulator. Performance, subjective, and physiological (heart rate variability, eye scan-paths) measures of workload were recorded. The studies compared workload-based adaptation to to non-adaptive control conditions and found evidence for systematic benefits of adaptive automation. The research provides an empirical basis for evaluating the effectiveness of adaptive automation in the cockpit. The results contribute to the development of design principles and guidelines for the implementation of adaptive automation in the cockpit, particularly in general aviation, and in other human-machine systems. Project goals

  11. Advanced fighter technology integration (AFTI)/F-16 Automated Maneuvering Attack System final flight test results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dowden, Donald J.; Bessette, Denis E.

    1987-01-01

    The AFTI F-16 Automated Maneuvering Attack System has undergone developmental and demonstration flight testing over a total of 347.3 flying hours in 237 sorties. The emphasis of this phase of the flight test program was on the development of automated guidance and control systems for air-to-air and air-to-ground weapons delivery, using a digital flight control system, dual avionics multiplex buses, an advanced FLIR sensor with laser ranger, integrated flight/fire-control software, advanced cockpit display and controls, and modified core Multinational Stage Improvement Program avionics.

  12. Procedures in complex systems: the airline cockpit.

    PubMed

    Degani, A; Wiener, E L

    1997-05-01

    In complex human-machine systems, successful operations depend on an elaborate set of procedures which are specified by the operational management of the organization. These procedures indicate to the human operator (in this case the pilot) the manner in which operational management intends to have various tasks done. The intent is to provide guidance to the pilots and to ensure a safe, logical, efficient, and predictable (standardized) means of carrying out the objectives of the job. However, procedures can become a hodge-podge. Inconsistent or illogical procedures may lead to noncompliance by operators. Based on a field study with three major airlines, the authors propose a model for procedure development called the "Four P's": philosophy, policies, procedures, and practices. Using this model as a framework, the authors discuss the intricate issue of designing flight-deck procedures, and propose a conceptual approach for designing any set of procedures. The various factors, both external and internal to the cockpit, that must be considered for procedure design are presented. In particular, the paper addresses the development of procedures for automated cockpits--a decade-long, and highly controversial issue in commercial aviation. Although this paper is based on airline operations, we assume that the principles discussed here are also applicable to other high-risk supervisory control systems, such as space flight, manufacturing process control, nuclear power production, and military operations.

  13. [Geometrical dummy used for ergonomic evaluation on early stage cockpit conceptual design].

    PubMed

    Wang, L J; Yuan, X G

    2001-12-01

    Objective. Basing on the need of cockpit ergonomic design, to set up a geometrical dummy. Method. Surface partition of the dummy, source of the curved face data, express of the curved face, degree of freedom of the human joint, coordinate system of the parts, position of the human segment centroid and weight of the human segment were cleared up first, then geometrical dummy was displayed with three-dimensional software. Result. The geometrical dummy could simulate some basic body movements and postures for ergonomic analysis. Conclusion. The geometrical dummy was suitable for present study and engineering design.

  14. VISTA NF-16D programmable display system development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, Randall E.; Landers, Thomas F.

    1998-08-01

    Wright Laboratory's Variable-Stability In-Flight Simulator Test Aircraft (VISTA) NF-16D is the newest in-flight simulator in the USAF inventory. This unique research aircraft will perform a multitude of missions: evaluate flight characteristics of new aircraft that have not yet flown, perform research in the areas of flying qualities, flight control design, pilot-vehicle interface, weapons and avionics integration, and train test pilots and engineers. The VISTA is being upgraded to enhance its simulation fidelity and its research capabilities through the addition of a programmable Helmet-Mounted Display (HMD) and Head-up Display (HUD) in the front cockpit. The programmable HMD system consists of a GEC Marconi Avionics Viper II Helmet- Mounted Optics Module integrate with a modified Helmet Integrated Systems Limited HGU-86/P helmet, the Honeywell Advanced Metal Tolerant tracker, and a GEC-Marconi Avionics Programmable Display Generator. The monocular HMD system is designed for growth to stroke-on-video, binocular capability. Lessons-learned in the VISTA HMD development are reviewed. An outline of the proposed VISTA HMD demonstration flight is given to highlight the VISTA programmable display system capabilities.

  15. Helmet-mounted display technology on the VISTA NF-16D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Underhill, Gregory P.; Bailey, Randall E.; Markman, Steve

    1997-06-01

    Wright Laboratory's Variable-Stability In-Flight Simulator Test Aircraft (VISTA) NF-16D is the newest in-flight simulator in the USAF inventory. A unique research aircraft, it will perform a multitude of missions: to develop and evaluate flight characteristics of new aircraft that have not yet flown, and perform research in the areas of flying qualities, flight control design, pilot-vehicle interface, weapons and avionics integration, and to train new test pilots. The VISTA upgrade will enhance the simulation fidelity and research capabilities by adding a programmable helmet-mounted display (HMD) and head-up display (HUD) in the front cockpit. The programmable HMD consists of a GEC- Marconi Avionics Viper II Helmet-Mounted Optics Module integrated with a modified Helmet Integrated Systems Limited HGU-86/P helmet, the Honeywell Advanced Metal Tolerant tracker, and a GEC-Mounted Tolerant tracker, and a GEC- Marconi Avionics Programmable Display Generator. This system will provide a real-time programmable HUD and monocular stroke capable HMD in the front cockpit. The HMD system is designed for growth to stroke-on-video, binocular capability. This paper examines some of issues associated with current HMD development, and explains the value of rapid prototyping or 'quick-look' flight testing on the VISTA NF-16D. A brief overview of the VISTA NF-16D and the hardware and software modifications made to incorporate the programmable display system is give, as well as a review of several key decisions that were made in the programmable display system implementation. The system's capabilities and what they mean to potential users and designers are presented, particularly for pilot-vehicle interface research.

  16. Cockpit resource management - Exploring the attitude-performance linkage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helmreich, R. L.; Foushee, H. C.; Benson, R.; Russini, W.

    1985-01-01

    Measured attitudes regarding cockpit management were contrasted for pilots whose line flying performance was independently evaluated by check airmen as above or below average. A highly significant discriminant function was obtained indicating that these attitudes are significant predictors of behavior. The performance of 95.7 percent of the pilots was correctly classified by the analysis. Implications of the results for cockpit resource management training and pilot selection are discussed.

  17. Prediction of anthropometric accommodation in aircraft cockpits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zehner, Gregory Franklin

    Designing aircraft cockpits to accommodate the wide range of body sizes existing in the U.S. population has always been a difficult problem for Crewstation Engineers. The approach taken in the design of military aircraft has been to restrict the range of body sizes allowed into flight training, and then to develop standards and specifications to ensure that the majority of the pilots are accommodated. Accommodation in this instance is defined as the ability to: (1) Adequately see, reach, and actuate controls; (2) Have external visual fields so that the pilot can see to land, clear for other aircraft, and perform a wide variety of missions (ground support/attack or air to air combat); and (3) Finally, if problems arise, the pilot has to be able to escape safely. Each of these areas is directly affected by the body size of the pilot. Unfortunately, accommodation problems persist and may get worse. Currently the USAF is considering relaxing body size entrance requirements so that smaller and larger people could become pilots. This will make existing accommodation problems much worse. This dissertation describes a methodology for correcting this problem and demonstrates the method by predicting pilot fit and performance in the USAF T-38A aircraft based on anthropometric data. The methods described can be applied to a variety of design applications where fitting the human operator into a system is a major concern. A systematic approach is described which includes: defining the user population, setting functional requirements that operators must be able to perform, testing the ability of the user population to perform the functional requirements, and developing predictive equations for selecting future users of the system. Also described is a process for the development of new anthropometric design criteria and cockpit design methods that assure body size accommodation is improved in the future.

  18. Cognitive engineering in aerospace application: Pilot interaction with cockpit automation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarter, Nadine R.; Woods, David D.

    1993-01-01

    Because of recent incidents involving glass-cockpit aircraft, there is growing concern with cockpit automation and its potential effects on pilot performance. However, little is known about the nature and causes of problems that arise in pilot-automation interaction. The results of two studies that provide converging, complementary data on pilots' difficulties with understanding and operating one of the core systems of cockpit automation, the Flight Management System (FMS) is reported. A survey asking pilots to describe specific incidents with the FMS and observations of pilots undergoing transition training to a glass cockpit aircraft served as vehicles to gather a corpus on the nature and variety of FMS-related problems. The results of both studies indicate that pilots become proficient in standard FMS operations through ground training and subsequent line experience. But even with considerable line experience, they still have difficulties tracking FMS status and behavior in certain flight contexts, and they show gaps in their understanding of the functional structure of the system. The results suggest that design-related factors such as opaque interfaces contribute to these difficulties which can affect pilots' situation awareness. The results of this research are relevant for both the design of cockpit automation and the development of training curricula specifically tailored to the needs of glass cockpits.

  19. STS-107 Pilot William McCool in the cockpit of Columbia during TCDT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - STS-107 Pilot William 'Willie' McCool checks instructions in the cockpit of Space Shuttle Columbia during a simulated launch countdown, part of Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities. STS-107 is a mission devoted to research and will include more than 80 experiments that will study Earth and space science, advanced technology development, and astronaut health and safety. Launch is planned for Jan. 16, 2003, between 10 a.m. and 2 p.m. EST aboard Space Shuttle Columbia. .

  20. System description and analysis. Part 1: Feasibility study for helicopter/VTOL wide-angle simulation image generation display system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    A preliminary design for a helicopter/VSTOL wide angle simulator image generation display system is studied. The visual system is to become part of a simulator capability to support Army aviation systems research and development within the near term. As required for the Army to simulate a wide range of aircraft characteristics, versatility and ease of changing cockpit configurations were primary considerations of the study. Due to the Army's interest in low altitude flight and descents into and landing in constrained areas, particular emphasis is given to wide field of view, resolution, brightness, contrast, and color. The visual display study includes a preliminary design, demonstrated feasibility of advanced concepts, and a plan for subsequent detail design and development. Analysis and tradeoff considerations for various visual system elements are outlined and discussed.

  1. Advanced Aircrew Display Symposium Proceedings (6th) Held at Patuxent River, Maryland on 15-16 May 1984

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-05-16

    capabilities of available systems to philosophy and applications standards - Predict future trendq and developments A large amount of information has...Evaluation summary and specific recommendations o Subtask 3 - Prediction of future trends and developments in color display technology A survey of...display technology. The following sections focus on a few select issues of interest for color display system design. A FEW INTERESTING ISSUES "" PREDICTIVE

  2. Design developments for advanced general aviation aircraft. [using Fly By Light Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roskam, Jan; Gomer, Charles

    1991-01-01

    Design study results are presented for two advanced general-aviation aircraft incorporating fly-by-light/fly-by-wire controls and digital avionics and cockpit displays. The design exercise proceeded from a database of information derived from a market survey for the 4-10 passenger aircraft range. Pusher and tractor propeller configurations were treated, and attention was given to the maximization of passenger comfort. 'Outside-in' tooling methods were assumed for the primary structures of both configurations, in order to achieve surface tolerances which maximize the rearward extent of laminar flow.

  3. Learning About Cockpit Automation: From Piston Trainer to Jet Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Casner, Stephen M.

    2003-01-01

    Two experiments explored the idea of providing cockpit automation training to airline-bound student pilots using cockpit automation equipment commonly found in small training airplanes. In a first experiment, pilots mastered a set of tasks and maneuvers using a GPS navigation computer, autopilot, and flight director system installed in a small training airplane Students were then tested on their ability to complete a similar set of tasks using the cockpit automation system found in a popular jet transport aircraft. Pilot were able to successfully complete 77% of all tasks in the jet transport on their first attempt. An analysis of a control group suggests that the pilot's success was attributable to the application of automation principles they had learned in the small airplane. A second experiment looked at two different ways of delivering small-aeroplane cockpit automation training: a self-study method, and a dual instruction method. The results showed a slight advantage for the self-study method. Overall, the results of the two studies cast a strong vote for the incorporation of cockpit automation training in curricula designed for pilot who will later transition to the jet fleet.

  4. Cockpit task management: A preliminary, normative theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Funk, Ken

    1991-01-01

    Cockpit task management (CTM) involves the initiation, monitoring, prioritizing, and allocation of resources to concurrent tasks as well as termination of multiple concurrent tasks. As aircrews have more tasks to attend to due to reduced crew sizes and the increased complexity of aircraft and the air transportation system, CTM will become a more critical factor in aviation safety. It is clear that many aviation accidents and incidents can be satisfactorily explained in terms of CTM errors, and it is likely that more accidents induced by poor CTM practice will occur in the future unless the issue is properly addressed. The first step in understanding and facilitating CTM behavior was the development of a preliminary, normative theory of CTM which identifies several important CTM functions. From this theory, some requirements for pilot-vehicle interfaces were developed which are believed to facilitate CTM. A prototype PVI was developed which improves CTM performance and currently, a research program is under way that is aimed at developing a better understanding of CTM and facilitating CTM performance through better equipment and procedures.

  5. Control in the cockpit: crews vs. computers.

    PubMed

    Ropelewski, R

    1996-08-01

    In the no-holds-barred competition between Boeing and Europe's Airbus Industrie for dominance in the world's commercial jet airliner markets, the question of who--or what--is in charge in the cockpit has been a significant selling point. Airbus, which pioneered highly automated flight controls with its A320 narrow-body transport in the late 1980s, likes to emphasize the "protection" features built into the aircraft through those automated systems. Boeing, which employs many of the same concepts in its new 777 twin-engine widebody transport, tends to put more emphasis on crew involvement in the operation of that aircraft. Is there a difference? In fact, the question has broader implications than those involving the marketing battle between Boeing and Airbus. Airlines, aircraft manufacturers, flight training specialists, human factors gurus, and aviation authorities in various countries are struggling with the isse as automation becomes more and more prevalent on passenger and cargo-carrying aircraft around the world.

  6. Investigation of an advanced fault tolerant integrated avionics system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunn, W. R.; Cottrell, D.; Flanders, J.; Javornik, A.; Rusovick, M.

    1986-01-01

    Presented is an advanced, fault-tolerant multiprocessor avionics architecture as could be employed in an advanced rotorcraft such as LHX. The processor structure is designed to interface with existing digital avionics systems and concepts including the Army Digital Avionics System (ADAS) cockpit/display system, navaid and communications suites, integrated sensing suite, and the Advanced Digital Optical Control System (ADOCS). The report defines mission, maintenance and safety-of-flight reliability goals as might be expected for an operational LHX aircraft. Based on use of a modular, compact (16-bit) microprocessor card family, results of a preliminary study examining simplex, dual and standby-sparing architectures is presented. Given the stated constraints, it is shown that the dual architecture is best suited to meet reliability goals with minimum hardware and software overhead. The report presents hardware and software design considerations for realizing the architecture including redundancy management requirements and techniques as well as verification and validation needs and methods.

  7. View of QF-106 aircraft cockpit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    View of the cockpit and instrument panel of the QF-106 airplane used in the Eclipse project. In 1997 and 1998, the Dryden Flight Research Center at Edwards, California, supported and hosted a Kelly Space & Technology, Inc. project called Eclipse, which sought to demonstrate the feasibility of a reusable tow-launch vehicle concept. The project goal was to successfully tow, inflight, a modified QF-106 delta-wing aircraft with an Air Force C-141A transport aircraft. This would demonstrate the possibility of towing and launching an actual launch vehicle from behind a tow plane. Dryden was the responsible test organization and had flight safety responsibility for the Eclipse project. Dryden provided engineering, instrumentation, simulation, modification, maintenance, range support, and research pilots for the test program. The Air Force Flight Test Center (AFFTC), Edwards, California, supplied the C-141A transport aircraft and crew and configured the aircraft as needed for the tests. The AFFTC also provided the concept and detail design and analysis as well as hardware for the tow system and QF-106 modifications. Dryden performed the modifications to convert the QF-106 drone into the piloted EXD-01 (Eclipse eXperimental Demonstrator-01) experimental aircraft. Kelly Space & Technology hoped to use the results gleaned from the tow test in developing a series of low-cost, reusable launch vehicles. These tests demonstrated the validity of towing a delta-wing aircraft having high wing loading, validated the tow simulation model, and demonstrated various operational procedures, such as ground processing of in-flight maneuvers and emergency abort scenarios.

  8. Development of advanced direct perception displays for nuclear power plants to enhance monitoring, control and fault management

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, B.G.; Shaheen, S.; Moray, N.

    1997-08-01

    Traditional Single-Sensor-Single Indicator (SSSI) displays are poorly matched to the cognitive abilities of operators, especially for large and complex systems. It is difficult for operators to monitor very large arrays of displays and controls, and to integrate the information displayed therein. In addition, standard operating procedures (SOPs) are bulky (running to many hundreds of pages) and difficult to use, and operators may become lost. For these reasons, and also because it is becoming increasingly difficult to find replacements for aging hardware components, there is a trend towards computerized graphical interfaces for nuclear power plants (NPPs). There is, however, little rational theory for display design in this domain. This report describes some recent theoretical developments and shows how to develop displays which will greatly reduce the cognitive load on the operator and allow the use of perceptual rather than cognitive mechanisms while using SON and to support state diagnosis and fault management. The report outlines the conceptual framework within which such a new approach could be developed, and provides an example of how the operating procedures for the start-up sequence of a NPP could be realized. A detailed description of a set of displays for a graphical interface for the SON of the feedwater system is provided as an example of how the proposed approach could be realized, and a general account of how it would fit into the overall start-up sequence is given. Examples of {open_quotes}direct perception{close_quotes} or {open_quotes}ecological{close_quotes} configural state space displays to support the use of the proposed direct manipulation SOP interface are provided, and also a critical discussion which identifies some difficulties which may be anticipated should the general approach herein advocated be adopted.

  9. Introducing large color displays in the Gripen fighter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundgren, Mats; Brandtberg, Hans

    1998-09-01

    Cockpit design is about communication between the aircraft system and the pilot. The information available on-board is very large and increases with on-going development of the systems. New functions for integration and fusion will, together with decision support and automation, set requirements on the displays to transfer information to the pilot. Information overload, mental workload and flight safety are always important areas to put efforts in. The present version of the Swedish JAS 39 Gripen aircraft has three monochrome multi-function displays. The displays are fairly large for a small aircraft, 5' X 6', giving a good situation awareness for the pilot. A new version of the Gripen cockpit featuring large color displays is now under development and will be introduced to the Swedish air force and ready for export market in the end of 2001. Display size, resolution, graphics capability and color have great impact on the pilots ability to acquire and understand the presented information. These factors are very important when designing an improved cockpit. By utilizing the most modern flat panel AMLCD techniques we have succeeded in integrating three 6.2' X 8.3' full-color multi-function displays in the Gripen aircraft.

  10. Longitudinal Study of the Market Penetration of Cockpit Weather Information Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stough, Harry Paul, III; Sireli, Yesim; Ozan, Erol; Kauffmann, Paul

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of the longitudinal research of the market penetration of cockpit weather information systems (CWIS) is to contribute to the body of knowledge on modeling advanced technology feasibility in aviation by tracking and analyzing the market adoption of CWIS over a three year period. This research takes advantage of a previous study, conducted by Dr. Paul Kauffmann in 2000, which demonstrated an integrated and cost effective approach to evaluate advanced technology feasibility, examining the feasibility of CWIS in five market segments: transport, commuter, general aviation, business, and rotorcraft. The longitudinal research consists of two consecutive studies and produced two reports. The first report was submitted in August 2003 and included general market analysis about the CWIS products in the market at the time, identified their characteristics and examined developing market dynamics.

  11. The development and implementation of cockpit resource management in UAL recurrent training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shroyer, David H.

    1987-01-01

    Line Oriented Flight Training (LOFT) for United Airlines started in 1976. At that time it was basically no more than a line-simulated training function conducted in a full-mission simulator with no attention or stress on its human factor content. Very soon after the implementation of the LOFT program concerns were voiced about certain crew behavioral situations they were observing in the flight crew's execution of cockpit duties. These duties involved emergency procedures as well as irregular and normal procedures and situations. It was evident that new information was surfacing concerning crew interaction, or its lack thereof, in the cockpit and its effect on satisfactory performance. These observations naturally raised the question of how this information translated into the safety of aircraft operations. A training system had to be repetitive, the crew interactive, and the training had to be conducted under the crew concept. The foundation had to have two other factors: (1) it was necessary to have adequate human factor content, and (2) an advanced state-of-the-art simulator and appropriate electronic devices were required. These concepts are further discussed.

  12. 8. Interior of cockpit showing pilot consoles and flight engineer ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. Interior of cockpit showing pilot consoles and flight engineer seat with instrument panel. View to east. - Offutt Air Force Base, Looking Glass Airborne Command Post, Looking Glass Aircraft, On Operational Apron covering northeast half of Project Looking Glass Historic District, Bellevue, Sarpy County, NE

  13. 6. Detail of forward fuselage showing open cockpit hatch and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. Detail of forward fuselage showing open cockpit hatch and ladder. View to southeast. - Offutt Air Force Base, Looking Glass Airborne Command Post, Looking Glass Aircraft, On Operational Apron covering northeast half of Project Looking Glass Historic District, Bellevue, Sarpy County, NE

  14. 7. Interior of cockpit showing pilot and copilot seats with ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Interior of cockpit showing pilot and co-pilot seats with console and overhead instrument panels. View to northeast. - Offutt Air Force Base, Looking Glass Airborne Command Post, Looking Glass Aircraft, On Operational Apron covering northeast half of Project Looking Glass Historic District, Bellevue, Sarpy County, NE

  15. 14 CFR 121.315 - Cockpit check procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Cockpit check procedure. 121.315 Section 121.315 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED... emergencies. The procedures must be designed so that a flight crewmember will not need to rely upon his...

  16. 14 CFR 121.315 - Cockpit check procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Cockpit check procedure. 121.315 Section 121.315 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED... emergencies. The procedures must be designed so that a flight crewmember will not need to rely upon his...

  17. 14 CFR 121.315 - Cockpit check procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Cockpit check procedure. 121.315 Section 121.315 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED... emergencies. The procedures must be designed so that a flight crewmember will not need to rely upon his...

  18. An Agent-Based Cockpit Task Management System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Funk, Ken

    1997-01-01

    An agent-based program to facilitate Cockpit Task Management (CTM) in commercial transport aircraft is developed and evaluated. The agent-based program called the AgendaManager (AMgr) is described and evaluated in a part-task simulator study using airline pilots.

  19. 14 CFR 121.315 - Cockpit check procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Cockpit check procedure. 121.315 Section 121.315 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED... emergencies. The procedures must be designed so that a flight crewmember will not need to rely upon his...

  20. 14 CFR 121.315 - Cockpit check procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Cockpit check procedure. 121.315 Section 121.315 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED... emergencies. The procedures must be designed so that a flight crewmember will not need to rely upon his...

  1. 46 CFR 178.420 - Drainage of cockpit vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Drainage of cockpit vessels. 178.420 Section 178.420 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS (UNDER 100 GROSS TONS) INTACT STABILITY AND SEAWORTHINESS Drainage of Weather Decks § 178.420 Drainage of...

  2. 46 CFR 178.420 - Drainage of cockpit vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Drainage of cockpit vessels. 178.420 Section 178.420 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS (UNDER 100 GROSS TONS) INTACT STABILITY AND SEAWORTHINESS Drainage of Weather Decks § 178.420 Drainage of...

  3. 46 CFR 178.420 - Drainage of cockpit vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Drainage of cockpit vessels. 178.420 Section 178.420 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS (UNDER 100 GROSS TONS) INTACT STABILITY AND SEAWORTHINESS Drainage of Weather Decks § 178.420 Drainage of...

  4. 46 CFR 178.420 - Drainage of cockpit vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Drainage of cockpit vessels. 178.420 Section 178.420 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS (UNDER 100 GROSS TONS) INTACT STABILITY AND SEAWORTHINESS Drainage of Weather Decks § 178.420 Drainage of...

  5. 46 CFR 178.420 - Drainage of cockpit vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Drainage of cockpit vessels. 178.420 Section 178.420 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS (UNDER 100 GROSS TONS) INTACT STABILITY AND SEAWORTHINESS Drainage of Weather Decks § 178.420 Drainage of...

  6. 14 CFR 27.1457 - Cockpit voice recorders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... paragraph (a)(2) of this section may be met: (1) By installing a cockpit-mounted area microphone located in...; or (2) By installing a continually energized or voice-actuated lip microphone at the first and second pilot stations. The microphone specified in this paragraph must be so located and, if necessary,...

  7. 14 CFR 27.1457 - Cockpit voice recorders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... paragraph (a)(2) of this section may be met: (1) By installing a cockpit-mounted area microphone located in...; or (2) By installing a continually energized or voice-actuated lip microphone at the first and second pilot stations. The microphone specified in this paragraph must be so located and, if necessary,...

  8. 14 CFR 25.1457 - Cockpit voice recorders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... requirements of paragraph (a)(2) of this section must be met by installing a cockpit-mounted area microphone.... The microphone must be so located and, if necessary, the preamplifiers and filters of the recorder... first channel, from each boom, mask, or hand-held microphone, headset, or speaker used at the...

  9. 14 CFR 25.1457 - Cockpit voice recorders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... requirements of paragraph (a)(2) of this section must be met by installing a cockpit-mounted area microphone.... The microphone must be so located and, if necessary, the preamplifiers and filters of the recorder... first channel, from each boom, mask, or hand-held microphone, headset, or speaker used at the...

  10. 14 CFR 23.1457 - Cockpit voice recorders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... cockpit-mounted area microphone, located in the best position for recording voice communications... deck when directed to those stations. The microphone must be so located and, if necessary, the... on a separate channel: (1) For the first channel, from each boom, mask, or handheld...

  11. 14 CFR 27.1457 - Cockpit voice recorders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... paragraph (a)(2) of this section may be met: (1) By installing a cockpit-mounted area microphone located in...; or (2) By installing a continually energized or voice-actuated lip microphone at the first and second pilot stations. The microphone specified in this paragraph must be so located and, if necessary,...

  12. 14 CFR 23.1457 - Cockpit voice recorders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... cockpit-mounted area microphone, located in the best position for recording voice communications... deck when directed to those stations. The microphone must be so located and, if necessary, the... on a separate channel: (1) For the first channel, from each boom, mask, or handheld...

  13. 14 CFR 23.1457 - Cockpit voice recorders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... cockpit-mounted area microphone, located in the best position for recording voice communications... deck when directed to those stations. The microphone must be so located and, if necessary, the... on a separate channel: (1) For the first channel, from each boom, mask, or handheld...

  14. 14 CFR 25.1457 - Cockpit voice recorders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... requirements of paragraph (a)(2) of this section must be met by installing a cockpit-mounted area microphone.... The microphone must be so located and, if necessary, the preamplifiers and filters of the recorder... first channel, from each boom, mask, or hand-held microphone, headset, or speaker used at the...

  15. 14 CFR 23.1457 - Cockpit voice recorders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... cockpit-mounted area microphone, located in the best position for recording voice communications... deck when directed to those stations. The microphone must be so located and, if necessary, the... on a separate channel: (1) For the first channel, from each boom, mask, or handheld...

  16. 14 CFR 25.1457 - Cockpit voice recorders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... requirements of paragraph (a)(2) of this section must be met by installing a cockpit-mounted area microphone.... The microphone must be so located and, if necessary, the preamplifiers and filters of the recorder... first channel, from each boom, mask, or hand-held microphone, headset, or speaker used at the...

  17. 14 CFR 23.1457 - Cockpit voice recorders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... cockpit-mounted area microphone, located in the best position for recording voice communications... deck when directed to those stations. The microphone must be so located and, if necessary, the... on a separate channel: (1) For the first channel, from each boom, mask, or handheld...

  18. 14 CFR 27.1457 - Cockpit voice recorders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... paragraph (a)(2) of this section may be met: (1) By installing a cockpit-mounted area microphone located in...; or (2) By installing a continually energized or voice-actuated lip microphone at the first and second pilot stations. The microphone specified in this paragraph must be so located and, if necessary,...

  19. 14 CFR 27.1457 - Cockpit voice recorders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... paragraph (a)(2) of this section may be met: (1) By installing a cockpit-mounted area microphone located in...; or (2) By installing a continually energized or voice-actuated lip microphone at the first and second pilot stations. The microphone specified in this paragraph must be so located and, if necessary,...

  20. 14 CFR 25.1457 - Cockpit voice recorders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... requirements of paragraph (a)(2) of this section must be met by installing a cockpit-mounted area microphone.... The microphone must be so located and, if necessary, the preamplifiers and filters of the recorder... first channel, from each boom, mask, or hand-held microphone, headset, or speaker used at the...

  1. Management training for cockpit crews at Piedmont flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sifford, J. C.

    1984-01-01

    A brief history of Piedmont Airlines' flight operations is presented. A captain-management seminar conducted regularly by Piedmont is discussed. Piedmont's approach to cockpit resource management (CRM) is reviewed, and the relationship of CRM training to other aspects of flight training is addressed. Future leadership research plans and CRM training is considered along with critical training issues.

  2. Experimental evaluation of a wind shear alert and energy management display

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kraiss, K.-F.; Baty, D. L.

    1978-01-01

    A method is proposed for onboard measurement and display of specific windshear and energy management data derived from an air data computer. An open-loop simulation study is described which was carried out to verify the feasibility of this display concept, and whose results were used as a basis to develop the respective cockpit instrumentation. The task was to fly a three-degree landing approach under various shear conditions with and without specific information on the shear. Improved performance due to augmented cockpit information was observed. Critical shears with increasing tailwinds could be handled more consistently and with less deviation from the glide path.

  3. Cockpit to helmet optical wireless link: prototype hardware demonstration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, M. A.; White, H. J.; Aldridge, N. B.; Lam, J.; Atkinson, R.

    2009-09-01

    This paper describes recent progress in developing a wireless optical link between the fuselage of a cockpit and an aviation helmet. Such a link is desired to replace the physical umbilical cable existing in current cockpit systems, for reasons of potential bandwidth, immunity to EM interference, and freedom from physical constraints within the cockpit. The link concept consists of multiple transmitters embedded in the cockpit fuselage, each sending video (or symbology) data out in a cone of light over free space, which is detected by an array of receivers positioned on the helmet - the data is then sent to the eyepieces or visor of the pilot (after any intermediate processing). The design is such that one of these links is always maintained throughout possible movement of the head. In a recent proof-of-principle demonstration we showed uncompressed, 100 Mbps video data streamed live from the fuselage of a cockpit simulator to an angled cluster of silicon-based receivers mounted on the helmet, via a pair of ~1 Watt free-space lasers operating at 810 nm. Fast Ethernet media converters were used here for convenience and cost. The bespoke optical and electrical link components were developed in close collaboration with suppliers. The system performance arises from: the high dynamic range of the receivers (up to 25 dB), which are equipped with optical antennae to magnify the optical gain; the high power of the lasers; and the switching electronics used to control the signal path on the helmet. Future potential improvements to the technology are discussed, with an indication of wireless link requirements for relevant BAE Systems applications.

  4. 78 FR 68687 - Final Additional Airworthiness Design Standards: Advanced Avionics Under the Special Class (JAR...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-15

    ... analog to electronic glass displays only without changing the kind of operation, is a burden too big for..., safety in relation to lightning effects is not diminished by installing a ``glass cockpit''. An...

  5. A new method of accelerated graph display in primary flight display based on FPGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Quancun; Li, Chenggui; Zhang, Fengqing

    2006-11-01

    With the development of avionic technology, there is the increasing amount of information to be displayed on Primary Flight Display (PFD) of the cockpit. Beside the higher requirement of accuracy, reliability and the real-time property of information should be met in some emergency situations. Therefore, it is rather important to make further improvement on speeding up graph generation and display. This paper, based on hardware acceleration, describes a designated method to satisfy the higher requirement of PFD for graph display. The new method is characterized with graphic layering double frame buffer alternation and graphic synthesis, which to a great extent, reduces the job of a processor and speeds up the graphic generation and display, hence solving the speed bottleneck in PFD graphic display.

  6. B-52B Cockpit Instrument Panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    This photo shows a close-up view of the instrument panel in the cockpit of NASA's B-52 research aircraft. Over the course of more than 40 years, the B-52 launched numerous experimental aircraft, ranging from the X-15 to the HiMAT, and was also used as a flying testbed for a variety of other research projects. NASA B-52, Tail Number 008, is an air launch carrier aircraft, 'mothership,' as well as a research aircraft platform that has been used on a variety of research projects. The aircraft, a 'B' model built in 1952 and first flown on June 11, 1955, is the oldest B-52 in flying status and has been used on some of the most significant research projects in aerospace history. Some of the significant projects supported by B-52 008 include the X-15, the lifting bodies, HiMAT (highly maneuverable aircraft technology), Pegasus, validation of parachute systems developed for the space shuttle program (solid-rocket-booster recovery system and the orbiter drag chute system), and the X-38. The B-52 served as the launch vehicle on 106 X-15 flights and flew a total of 159 captive-carry and launch missions in support of that program from June 1959 to October 1968. Information gained from the highly successful X-15 program contributed to the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo human spaceflight programs as well as space shuttle development. Between 1966 and 1975, the B-52 served as the launch aircraft for 127 of the 144 wingless lifting body flights. In the 1970s and 1980s, the B-52 was the launch aircraft for several aircraft at what is now the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, to study spin-stall, high-angle-of attack, and maneuvering characteristics. These included the 3/8-scale F-15/spin research vehicle (SRV), the HiMAT (Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology) research vehicle, and the DAST (drones for aerodynamic and structural testing). The aircraft supported the development of parachute recovery systems used to recover the space shuttle solid rocket booster

  7. Electronic Checklists on Multi-Purpose Displays: A Better Way For Fighter Pilots to Manage Information and Situational Awareness during Periods of High Workload

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    compartmentalized cockpit design, increasingly complex weapons and sensor suites, digitization , and multi-role missions with high stress levels. Does it not meet the...capability is the electronic displays and digits provide excellent data in excruciating detail, but the problem is they do not present rate of data change...environment. Pilots in a digital cockpit exist in an information-rich environment. The challenge for designers is to organize and present multiple sources

  8. Developing a library of display effects on pilot performance: Methods, meta-analyses, and performance estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salud, Ellen

    The design of NextGen and current-day cockpit displays are critical for efficient pilot performance and situation awareness on the flight deck. Before deployment of a design into the cockpit the costs and benefits that a display design imposes on performance and situation awareness should be considered. In this thesis, a design tool was developed to support the design of NextGen displays for situation awareness and performance. This design tool is a library of pilot performance estimates. Through literature reviews and meta-analyses of empirical data, the library was developed to provide display designers 1) qualitative distinctions of display properties that either support or limit full situation awareness, and 2) quantitative performance time estimates until situation awareness as a function of various display formats. A systematic method was also developed for future augmentation of the library.

  9. Evaluating the effectiveness of cockpit resource management training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helmreich, Robert L.

    1989-01-01

    The concept of providing flight crews with intensive training in crew coordination and interpersonal skills (cockpit resource management training - CRM) is outlined with emphasis on full mission simulator training (line-oriented flight training - LOFT). Findings from several airlines that have instituted CRM and LOFT are summarized. Four types of criteria used for evaluating CRM programs: observer ratings of crew behavior, measures of attitudes regarding cockpit management, self-reports by participants on the value of the training, and case studies of CRM-related incidents and accidents are covered. Attention is focused on ratings of the performance of crews during line flights and during simulator sessions conducted as a part of LOFT. A boomerang effect - the emergence of a subgroup that has changed the attitudes in the opposite direction from that desired is emphasized.

  10. Chemical warfare protection for the cockpit of future aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pickl, William C.

    1988-01-01

    Currently systems are being developed which will filter chemical and biological contaminants from crew station air. In order to maximize the benefits of these systems, a method of keeping the cockpit contaminant free during pilot ingress and egress is needed. One solution is to use a rectangular plastic curtain to seal the four edges of the canopy frame to the canopy sill. The curtain is stored in a tray which is recessed into the canopy sill and unfolds in accordion fashion as the canopy is raised. A two way zipper developed by Calspan could be used as an airlock between the pilot's oversuit and the cockpit. This system eliminates the pilot's need for heavy and restrictive CB gear because he would never be exposed to the chemical warfare environment.

  11. Design and Testing of an Unlimited Field-of-regard Synthetic Vision Head-worn Display for Commercial Aircraft Surface Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arthur, Jarvis J., III; Prinzel, Lawrence J., III; Shelton, Kevin J.; Kramer, Lynda J.; Williams, Steven P.; Bailey, Randall E.; Norman, Robert M.

    2007-01-01

    Experiments and flight tests have shown that a Head-Up Display (HUD) and a head-down, electronic moving map (EMM) can be enhanced with Synthetic Vision for airport surface operations. While great success in ground operations was demonstrated with a HUD, the research noted that two major HUD limitations during ground operations were their monochrome form and limited, fixed field of regard. A potential solution to these limitations found with HUDs may be emerging Head Worn Displays (HWDs). HWDs are small, lightweight full color display devices that may be worn without significant encumbrance to the user. By coupling the HWD with a head tracker, unlimited field-of-regard may be realized for commercial aviation applications. In the proposed paper, the results of two ground simulation experiments conducted at NASA Langley are summarized. The experiments evaluated the efficacy of head-worn display applications of Synthetic Vision and Enhanced Vision technology to enhance transport aircraft surface operations. The two studies tested a combined six display concepts: (1) paper charts with existing cockpit displays, (2) baseline consisting of existing cockpit displays including a Class III electronic flight bag display of the airport surface; (3) an advanced baseline that also included displayed traffic and routing information, (4) a modified version of a HUD and EMM display demonstrated in previous research; (5) an unlimited field-of-regard, full color, head-tracked HWD with a conformal 3-D synthetic vision surface view; and (6) a fully integrated HWD concept. The fully integrated HWD concept is a head-tracked, color, unlimited field-of-regard concept that provides a 3-D conformal synthetic view of the airport surface integrated with advanced taxi route clearance, taxi precision guidance, and data-link capability. The results of the experiments showed that the fully integrated HWD provided greater path performance compared to using paper charts alone. Further, when

  12. F18 Life Support: APECS and EDOX Cockpit Integration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herrick, Paul

    1998-01-01

    Two systems are currently being integrated into the F18 Hornet support aircraft at NASA Dryden Flight Research Center (DFRC). The first system is the Aircrew Personal Environmental Control System (APECS). The system is designed to increase aircrew performance by combating heat stress in the cockpit. The second system is the Extended Duration Oxygen System (EDOX). This system will provide additional redundancy and oxygen system duration to the F18 without extensive modification to the current system.

  13. A COTS-derived NVG compatible 20.1" avionics display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, J.; Cavalcanti, A.

    2007-04-01

    Many avionics displays, particularly for cockpit applications require NVG compatibility. Unusually, the mission definition for a new maritime helicopter has identified a need for NVG compatibility for all of the mission-system displays, including the 20.1" diagonal, SXGA resolution Tactical Workstation Display (TWD) located in the rear cabin. This paper will describe some design tradeoff considerations and describe both some required and measured performance parameters.

  14. Designing Struts for the Low-Fidelity Orion Cockpit Mockup

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lucienne, Runa A.

    2009-01-01

    The objective of the project was to design and construct nine struts to be installed in the low-fidelity Orion cockpit mockup (Rev F; located at NASA s Johnson Space Center in Houston, TX) as simplified representations of the existing flight designed struts designed by engineers at Lockheed Martin (the primary contractor of the Orion). The project design included: researching the existing flight designs, brainstorming design upgrades, developing three unrelated three-dimensional (3D) strut designs using Pro/Engineer Wildfire 3.0, choosing the best fit design, locating materials and their sources, implementing the chosen design, and making design modifications. The project resulted in making simple modifications to the existing struts used in the last Orion cockpit mockup. The project is relevant to NASA, because upgrades to the low-fidelity Orion cockpit mockup progresses NASA s goals of developing and testing a new spacecraft, conducting the spacecraft's first crewed mission by 2015, returning to the moon by 2020, and exploring Mars and other planets in the future.

  15. Development of Improved Graphical Displays for an Advanced Outage Control Center, Employing Human Factors Principles for Outage Schedule Management

    SciTech Connect

    St Germain, Shawn Walter; Farris, Ronald Keith; Thomas, Kenneth David

    2015-09-01

    The long-term viability of existing nuclear power plants in the United States (U.S.) is dependent upon a number of factors, including maintaining high capacity factors, maintaining nuclear safety, and reducing operating costs, particularly those associated with refueling outages. Refueling outages typically take 20-30 days, and for existing light water NPPs in the U.S., the reactor cannot be in operation during the outage. Furthermore, given that many NPPs generate between $1-1.5 million/day in revenue when in operation, there is considerable interest in shortening the length of refueling outages. Yet refueling outages are highly complex operations, involving multiple concurrent and dependent activities that are somewhat challenging to coordinate; therefore, finding ways to improve refueling outage performance, while maintaining nuclear safety has proven to be difficult. The Advanced Outage Control Center (AOCC) project is a research and development (R&D) demonstration activity under the LWRS Program. LWRS is an R&D program that works closely with industry R&D programs to establish technical foundations for the licensing and managing of long-term, safe, and economical operation of current fleet of NPPs. As such, the LWRS Advanced Outage Control Center project has the goal of improving the management of commercial NPP refueling outages. To accomplish this goal, INL is developing an advanced outage control center (OCC) that is specifically designed to maximize the usefulness of communication and collaboration technologies for outage coordination and problem resolution activities. The overall focus is on developing an AOCC with the following capabilities that enables plant and OCC staff to; Collaborate in real-time to address emergent issues; Effectively communicate outage status to all workers involved in the outage; Effectively communicate discovered conditions in the field to the OCC; Provide real-time work status; Provide automatic pending support notifications

  16. Display innovations through glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, Lori L.

    2016-03-01

    Prevailing trends in thin, lightweight, high-resolution, and added functionality, such as touch sensing, continue to drive innovation in the display market. While display volumes grow, so do consumers’ need for portability, enhanced optical performance, and mechanical reliability. Technical advancements in glass design and process have enabled display innovations in these areas while supporting industry growth. Opportunities for further innovation remain open for glass manufacturers to drive new applications, enhanced functionality, and increased demand.

  17. Airborne Intelligent Display (AID) Phase I Software Description,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-10-24

    developing all software on an LSI-1I SDF and downiloading object files to Z80 SDF’s for testing and integration with hardware. This technique has been...of Transportation Project Report Federal Aviation Administration Systems Research and Development Service 14. spiamsuI Asia", tab Washington, D.C...cockpit data terminal in a variety of FAA developmental applications. A prototype of this display was developed by Lincoln Laboratory during 1979-1980 in

  18. Simulator evaluation of takeoff performance monitoring system displays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Middleton, David B.; Person, Lee H., Jr.; Srivatsan, Raghavachari

    1988-01-01

    The development of head-up and head-down cockpit displays to convey symbolic status and advisory information to the pilot to aid him in his decision to continue or abort takeoff is described. It also describes a pilot-in-the-loop evaluation of the displays using the NASA Langley transport systems research vehicle fixed-base simulator. It was found that the head-up display was monitored with little effort and did not obstruct or distract from the runway scene.

  19. Investigation and Development of Control Laws for the NASA Langley Research Center Cockpit Motion Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coon, Craig R.; Cardullo, Frank M.; Zaychik, Kirill B.

    2014-01-01

    The ability to develop highly advanced simulators is a critical need that has the ability to significantly impact the aerospace industry. The aerospace industry is advancing at an ever increasing pace and flight simulators must match this development with ever increasing urgency. In order to address both current problems and potential advancements with flight simulator techniques, several aspects of current control law technology of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Langley Research Center's Cockpit Motion Facility (CMF) motion base simulator were examined. Preliminary investigation of linear models based upon hardware data were examined to ensure that the most accurate models are used. This research identified both system improvements in the bandwidth and more reliable linear models. Advancements in the compensator design were developed and verified through multiple techniques. The position error rate feedback, the acceleration feedback and the force feedback were all analyzed in the heave direction using the nonlinear model of the hardware. Improvements were made using the position error rate feedback technique. The acceleration feedback compensator also provided noteworthy improvement, while attempts at implementing a force feedback compensator proved unsuccessful.

  20. Heat stress in front and rear cockpits of F-4 aircraft

    SciTech Connect

    Nunneley, S.A.; Stribley, R.F.; Allan, J.R.

    1981-05-01

    The thermal stresses encountered in the front and rear cockpits of F-4 aircraft flying low-level missions in warm, moderately humid weather and physiological responses to these stresses are investigated. Measurements of ground and cockpit environmental temperatures and subject skin and core temperatures were acquired for the preflight taxi, low-level flight, ordnance delivery and postflight taxi phases of 36 flights of F-4E aircraft performed to simulate low-level ground attack missions. Cockpit dry-bulb temperatures are found to exceed those on the ground during ground operations, and to decrease in flight in the front, but not the rear, cockpit. A linear relationship between cockpit dry bulb and temperatures is also found in each of the mission phases, along with increases in skin and core temperatures with cockpit temperatures and sweat rates depending both on cockpit temperatures and the amount of clothing worn. Adverse physiological effects related to nausea and acceleration tolerances are also noted. It is concluded that the cockpit cooling system of the F-4 allows the development of operationally significant heat stress, which may be corrected by better design and testing of the cooling system.

  1. 46 CFR 116.1120 - Drainage of cockpit vessels, well deck vessels, and open boats.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... boats. 116.1120 Section 116.1120 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL... Drainage of cockpit vessels, well deck vessels, and open boats. Drainage of cockpit vessels, well deck vessels, and open boats must meet the applicable requirements of §§ 178.420, 178.430, 178.440, 178.450...

  2. 46 CFR 116.1120 - Drainage of cockpit vessels, well deck vessels, and open boats.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... boats. 116.1120 Section 116.1120 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL... Drainage of cockpit vessels, well deck vessels, and open boats. Drainage of cockpit vessels, well deck vessels, and open boats must meet the applicable requirements of §§ 178.420, 178.430, 178.440, 178.450...

  3. 46 CFR 116.1120 - Drainage of cockpit vessels, well deck vessels, and open boats.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... boats. 116.1120 Section 116.1120 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL... Drainage of cockpit vessels, well deck vessels, and open boats. Drainage of cockpit vessels, well deck vessels, and open boats must meet the applicable requirements of §§ 178.420, 178.430, 178.440, 178.450...

  4. 46 CFR 116.1120 - Drainage of cockpit vessels, well deck vessels, and open boats.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... boats. 116.1120 Section 116.1120 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL... Drainage of cockpit vessels, well deck vessels, and open boats. Drainage of cockpit vessels, well deck vessels, and open boats must meet the applicable requirements of §§ 178.420, 178.430, 178.440, 178.450...

  5. 46 CFR 116.1120 - Drainage of cockpit vessels, well deck vessels, and open boats.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... boats. 116.1120 Section 116.1120 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL... Drainage of cockpit vessels, well deck vessels, and open boats. Drainage of cockpit vessels, well deck vessels, and open boats must meet the applicable requirements of §§ 178.420, 178.430, 178.440, 178.450...

  6. 14 CFR 25.779 - Motion and effect of cockpit controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Design and Construction Personnel and Cargo Accommodations § 25.779 Motion and effect of cockpit controls. Cockpit controls must be designed so that they.... Controls Motion and effect Aileron Right (clockwise) for right wing down. Elevator Rearward for nose...

  7. 14 CFR 25.779 - Motion and effect of cockpit controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Design and Construction Personnel and Cargo Accommodations § 25.779 Motion and effect of cockpit controls. Cockpit controls must be designed so that they.... Controls Motion and effect Aileron Right (clockwise) for right wing down. Elevator Rearward for nose...

  8. 14 CFR 25.779 - Motion and effect of cockpit controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Design and Construction Personnel and Cargo Accommodations § 25.779 Motion and effect of cockpit controls. Cockpit controls must be designed so that they.... Controls Motion and effect Aileron Right (clockwise) for right wing down. Elevator Rearward for nose...

  9. 14 CFR 25.779 - Motion and effect of cockpit controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Design and Construction Personnel and Cargo Accommodations § 25.779 Motion and effect of cockpit controls. Cockpit controls must be designed so that they.... Controls Motion and effect Aileron Right (clockwise) for right wing down. Elevator Rearward for nose...

  10. Device-Task Fidelity and Transfer of Training: Aircraft Cockpit Procedures Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prophet, Wallace W.; Boyd, H. Alton

    An evaluation was made of the training effectiveness of two cockpit procedures training devices, differing greatly in physical fidelity and cost, for use on the ground for a twin-engine, turboprop, fixed-wing aircraft. One group of students received training in cockpit procedures in a relatively expensive, sophisticated, computerized trainer,…

  11. Display interface concepts for automated fault diagnosis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, Michael T.

    1989-01-01

    An effort which investigated concepts for displaying dynamic system status and fault history (propagation) information to the flight crew is described. This investigation was performed by developing several candidate display formats and then conducting comprehension tests to determine those characteristics that made one format preferable to another for presenting this type of information. Twelve subjects participated. Flash tests, or limited time exposure tests, were used to determine the subjects' comprehension of the information presented in the display formats. It was concluded from the results of the comprehension tests that pictographs were more comprehensible than both block diagrams and text for presenting dynamic system status and fault history information, and that pictographs were preferred over both block diagrams and text. It was also concluded that the addition of this type of information in the cockpit would help the crew remain aware of the status of their aircraft.

  12. Evaluation of Flying Qualities and Guidance Displays for an Advanced Tilt-Wing STOL Transport Aircraft in Final Approach and Landing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frost, Chad R.; Franklin, James A.; Hardy, Gordon H.

    2002-01-01

    A piloted simulation was performed on the Vertical Motion Simulator at NASA Ames Research Center to evaluate flying qualities of a tilt-wing Short Take-Off and Landing (STOL) transport aircraft during final approach and landing. The experiment was conducted to assess the design s handling qualities, and to evaluate the use of flightpath-centered guidance for the precision approach and landing tasks required to perform STOL operations in instrument meteorological conditions, turbulence, and wind. Pilots rated the handling qualities to be satisfactory for all operations evaluated except those encountering extreme crosswinds and severe windshear; even in these difficult meteorological conditions, adequate handling qualities were maintained. The advanced flight control laws and guidance displays provided consistent performance and precision landings.

  13. [Clarity of flight information in the cockpit of the new aircraft generation].

    PubMed

    Stern, C; Schwartz, R; Groenhoff, S; Draeger, J; Hüttig, G; Bernhard, H

    1994-08-01

    Fundamental changes of cockpit design in recent years, especially the transition from analogue to digital flight information systems and the use of colour-coded displays, lead to new demands on the visual system of the pilot. Twenty experienced pilots each participated in four 15-min sessions with a simulator program in the new Airbus 340 Simulator of the Technical University of Berlin. The pilots were confronted with various flight situations and events. The simulation program was carried out with visual acuity of 1.0 or better, with acuity reduced to 0.5 and with red and green filters. The time between the display of information and the pilot's reaction was determined. The probands were classified into two groups according to their age (< or = 45 years, > or = 45 years). In both age groups a significant difference was found only with green filters. There was no difference with reduced visual acuity or with red filters, and no differences were seen between the two age groups.

  14. Optimization on the Thickness of Organic Insulator Layer for Advanced Super-In-Plane Switching Mode Thin-Film-Transistor Liquid Crystal Displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Jiunn-Shyong; Yang, Kei-Hsiung; Chen, Shu-Hsia

    2005-08-01

    The growth rate of thin-film-transistor liquid crystal display (TFT-LCD) industries is faster than predicted due to the possible replacement of a cathode-ray tube television (CRT-TV) by a liquid crystal display television (LCD-TV). The in-plane switching (IPS) mode has been known as an excellent technology for realizing a wide viewing angle for LCD-TV, but it has the drawback of a low aperture ratio. An advanced super-IPS (AS-IPS) structure with an organic insulator layer was invented to achieve a high aperture ratio with increasing manufacturing cost. In this paper, we proposed a simple method of analyzing the optimum thickness of the organic insulator layer for AS-IPS. We derived the capacitive coupling ratio (CCR) of the IPS cell and analyzed the delay time of the AS-IPS panel to quantify the crosstalk properties. Furthermore, we also analyzed our electrode structure (AS'-IPS), which not only increases substantially the aperture ratio over that of AS-IPS but also reduces the crosstalk using the same optimized thickness of the organic insulator layer.

  15. Assessment of cockpit interface concepts for data link retrofit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccauley, Hugh W.; Miles, William L.; Dwyer, John P.; Erickson, Jeffery B.

    1992-01-01

    The problem is examined of retrofitting older generation aircraft with data link capability. The approach taken analyzes requirements for the cockpit interface, based on review of prior research and opinions obtained from subject matter experts. With this background, essential functions and constraints for a retrofit installation are defined. After an assessment of the technology available to meet the functions and constraints, candidate design concepts are developed. The most promising design concept is described in detail. Finally, needs for further research and development are identified.

  16. Culture in the cockpit: do Hofstede's dimensions replicate?

    PubMed

    Merritt, A

    2000-05-01

    Survey data collected from 9,400 male commercial airline pilots in 19 countries were used in a replication study of Hofstede's indexes of national culture. The analysis that removed the constraint of item equivalence proved superior, both conceptually and empirically, to the analysis using Hofstede's items and formulae as prescribed, and rendered significant replication correlations for all indexes (Individualism-Collectivism .96, Power Distance .87, Masculinity-Femininity .75, and Uncertainty Avoidance .68). The successful replication confirms that national culture exerts an influence on cockpit behavior over and above the professional culture of pilots, and that "one size fits all" training is inappropriate.

  17. Culture in the cockpit: do Hofstede's dimensions replicate?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merritt, A.; Helmreich, R. L. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    Survey data collected from 9,400 male commercial airline pilots in 19 countries were used in a replication study of Hofstede's indexes of national culture. The analysis that removed the constraint of item equivalence proved superior, both conceptually and empirically, to the analysis using Hofstede's items and formulae as prescribed, and rendered significant replication correlations for all indexes (Individualism-Collectivism .96, Power Distance .87, Masculinity-Femininity .75, and Uncertainty Avoidance .68). The successful replication confirms that national culture exerts an influence on cockpit behavior over and above the professional culture of pilots, and that "one size fits all" training is inappropriate.

  18. Handling qualities effects of display latency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, David W.

    1993-01-01

    Display latency is the time delay between aircraft response and the corresponding response of the cockpit displays. Currently, there is no explicit specification for allowable display lags to ensure acceptable aircraft handling qualities in instrument flight conditions. This paper examines the handling qualities effects of display latency between 70 and 400 milliseconds for precision instrument flight tasks of the V-22 Tiltrotor aircraft. Display delay effects on the pilot control loop are analytically predicted through a second order pilot crossover model of the V-22 lateral axis, and handling qualities trends are evaluated through a series of fixed-base piloted simulation tests. The results show that the effects of display latency for flight path tracking tasks are driven by the stability characteristics of the attitude control loop. The data indicate that the loss of control damping due to latency can be simply predicted from knowledge of the aircraft's stability margins, control system lags, and required control bandwidths. Based on the relationship between attitude control damping and handling qualities ratings, latency design guidelines are presented. In addition, this paper presents a design philosophy, supported by simulation data, for using flight director display augmentation to suppress the effects of display latency for delays up to 300 milliseconds.

  19. Cooling of organic light-emitting diode display panels with heat pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sure, Anita; Vankayala, Gowtham Kumar; Baranwal, Vaibhav; Paramanandam, Karthikeyan; Sarma, Kalluri R.; Asokan, S.

    2016-05-01

    Organic light-emitting diode half life is a function of temperature and it decreases with increase in operating temperature. Hence thermal management is important for the efficient operation of OLED based displays. High luminance applications like aerospace cockpits require high power densities which lead to increase in their operating temperatures. Passive cooling is the preferred choice in aerospace applications. In this work passive cooling option with heat pipes is studied and implemented to reduce the display temperature rise.

  20. Definition of display/control requirements for assault transport night/adverse weather capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milelli, R. J.; Mowery, G. W.; Pontelandolfo, C.

    1982-01-01

    A Helicopter Night Vision System was developed to improve low-altitude night and/or adverse weather assult transport capabilities. Man-in-the-loop simulation experiments were performed to define the minimum display and control requirements for the assult transport mission and investigate forward looking infrared sensor requirements, along with alternative displays such as panel mounted displays (PMD) helmet mounted displays (HMD), and integrated control display units. Also explored were navigation requirements, pilot/copilot interaction, and overall cockpit arrangement. Pilot use of an HMD and copilot use of a PMD appear as both the preferred and most effective night navigation combination.

  1. Head Worn Display System for Equivalent Visual Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cupero, Frank; Valimont, Brian; Wise, John; Best. Carl; DeMers, Bob

    2009-01-01

    Head-Worn Displays or so-called, near-to-eye displays have potentially significant advantages in terms of cost, overcoming cockpit space constraints, and for the display of spatially-integrated information. However, many technical issues need to be overcome before these technologies can be successfully introduced into commercial aircraft cockpits. The results of three activities are reported. First, the near-to-eye display design, technological, and human factors issues are described and a literature review is presented. Second, the results of a fixed-base piloted simulation, investigating the impact of near to eye displays on both operational and visual performance is reported. Straight-in approaches were flown in simulated visual and instrument conditions while using either a biocular or a monocular display placed on either the dominant or non-dominant eye. The pilot's flight performance, visual acuity, and ability to detect unsafe conditions on the runway were tested. The data generally supports a monocular design with minimal impact due to eye dominance. Finally, a method for head tracker system latency measurement is developed and used to compare two different devices.

  2. The Introduction of New Cockpit Technology: A Human Factors Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curry, R. E.

    1985-01-01

    A joint Airline/NASA field study of B-767 training and operations was conducted during the period this aircraft was being introduced into line service. The objectives of the study were: (1) to identify any adverse reactions to the new technology; (2) to provide a clearing house of information for the airlines and pilots during the introductory period; (3) to provide feedback on airline training programs for the new aircraft; and (4) to provide field data to NASA and other researchers to help them develop principles of human interaction with automated systems. It is concluded that: (1) a large majority of pilots enjoy flying the B-767 more than the older aircraft; (2) pilots accept new cockpit technology and find it useful; (3) pilots are aware of the potential loss of flying skills because of automation, and take steps to prevent this from happening; (4) autopilot/autothrottle interactions and FMS operations were sometimes confusing or surprising to pilots, and they desired more training in this area; and (5) highly automated cockpits can result in a loss of effective monitoring performance.

  3. Advanced helmet mounted display (AHMD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sisodia, Ashok; Bayer, Michael; Townley-Smith, Paul; Nash, Brian; Little, Jay; Cassarly, William; Gupta, Anurag

    2007-04-01

    Due to significantly increased U.S. military involvement in deterrent, observer, security, peacekeeping and combat roles around the world, the military expects significant future growth in the demand for deployable virtual reality trainers with networked simulation capability of the battle space visualization process. The use of HMD technology in simulated virtual environments has been initiated by the demand for more effective training tools. The AHMD overlays computer-generated data (symbology, synthetic imagery, enhanced imagery) augmented with actual and simulated visible environment. The AHMD can be used to support deployable reconfigurable training solutions as well as traditional simulation requirements, UAV augmented reality, air traffic control and Command, Control, Communications, Computers, Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance (C4ISR) applications. This paper will describe the design improvements implemented for production of the AHMD System.

  4. M2-F1 simulator cockpit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    This early simulator of the M2-F1 lifting body was used for pilot training, to test landing techniques before the first ground tow attempts, and to test new control configurations after the first tow attempts and wind-tunnel tests. The M2-F1 simulator was limited in some ways by its analog simulator. It had only limited visual display for the pilot, as well. The wingless, lifting body aircraft design was initially conceived as a means of landing an aircraft horizontally after atmospheric reentry. The absence of wings would make the extreme heat of re-entry less damaging to the vehicle. In 1962, Dryden management approved a program to build a lightweight, unpowered lifting body as a prototype to flight test the wingless concept. It would look like a 'flying bathtub,' and was designated the M2-F1, the 'M' referring to 'manned' and 'F' referring to 'flight' version. It featured a plywood shell placed over a tubular steel frame crafted at Dryden. Construction was completed in 1963. The first flight tests of the M2-F1 were over Rogers Dry Lake at the end of a tow rope attached to a hopped-up Pontiac convertible driven at speeds up to about 120 mph. This vehicle needed to be able to tow the M2-F1 on the Rogers Dry Lakebed adjacent to NASA's Flight Research Center (FRC) at a minimum speed of 100 miles per hour. To do that, it had to handle the 400-pound pull of the M2-F1. Walter 'Whitey' Whiteside, who was a retired Air Force maintenance officer working in the FRC's Flight Operations Division, was a dirt-bike rider and hot-rodder. Together with Boyden 'Bud' Bearce in the Procurement and Supply Branch of the FRC, Whitey acquired a Pontiac Catalina convertible with the largest engine available. He took the car to Bill Straup's renowned hot-rod shop near Long Beach for modification. With a special gearbox and racing slicks, the Pontiac could tow the 1,000-pound M2-F1 110 miles per hour in 30 seconds. It proved adequate for the roughly 400 car tows that got the M2-F1 airborne

  5. The implementation of STOVL task-tailored control modes in a fighter cockpit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whatley, David W.; Virnig, John C.; Bodden, David S.

    1990-01-01

    The implementation of Short Takeoff/Vertical Landing (STOVL) specific task tailored control modes in a supersonic fighter/attack aircraft cockpit is investigated. A detailed linear model exhibiting STOVL Level 1 handling qualities is implemented in a real time engineering workstation environment with an F-16 cockpit mock-up. Conventional F-16 control inceptors are utilized to achieve effective STOVL operation and reduced pilot workload throughout the transition to hover flight region. Favorable pilot comments indicate the existing F-16 cockpit configuration with a force sidestick is adaptable to STOVL operation.

  6. A variable-collimation display system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batchko, Robert; Robinson, Sam; Schmidt, Jack; Graniela, Benito

    2014-03-01

    Two important human depth cues are accommodation and vergence. Normally, the eyes accommodate and converge or diverge in tandem; changes in viewing distance cause the eyes to simultaneously adjust both focus and orientation. However, ambiguity between accommodation and vergence cues is a well-known limitation in many stereoscopic display technologies. This limitation also arises in state-of-the-art full-flight simulator displays. In current full-flight simulators, the out-the-window (OTW) display (i.e., the front cockpit window display) employs a fixed collimated display technology which allows the pilot and copilot to perceive the OTW training scene without angular errors or distortions; however, accommodation and vergence cues are limited to fixed ranges (e.g., ~ 20 m). While this approach works well for long-range, the ambiguity of depth cues at shorter range hinders the pilot's ability to gauge distances in critical maneuvers such as vertical take-off and landing (VTOL). This is the first in a series of papers on a novel, variable-collimation display (VCD) technology that is being developed under NAVY SBIR Topic N121-041 funding. The proposed VCD will integrate with rotary-wing and vertical take-off and landing simulators and provide accurate accommodation and vergence cues for distances ranging from approximately 3 m outside the chin window to ~ 20 m. A display that offers dynamic accommodation and vergence could improve pilot safety and training, and impact other applications presently limited by lack of these depth cues.

  7. Display Tactics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tetlow, Linda

    2009-01-01

    Display took a wide variety of forms ranging from students presenting their initial planning and thought processes, to displays of their finished work, and their suggestions for extending the task should they, or others, have time to return to it in the future. A variety of different media were used from traditional posters in many shapes and…

  8. Stereoscopic layout of a perspective flight guidance display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammer, Matthias; Muecke, Stephan K. M.; Mayer, Udo

    1997-05-01

    Analyses of aviation accidents ascribe about 75% of all incidents to human (pilot) behavior. A strong effort is being made to improve ergonomic cockpit layout, because of dramatic changes in the airspace structure, the increase in air traffic, and larger aircraft. One part of an interdisciplinary research project investigates the potential of stereoscopic flight-guidance displays in order to improve pilots' situation awareness. This experimental approach, which aims to research and apply ergonomic design recommendations for stereoscopic flight displays, is based upon a new type of perspective flight-guidance display. The examination of existing research regarding stereoscopic flight displays reveals a lack of basic knowledge, as well as a need for further systematic research into cockpit application. Thus the project contains experiments on different levels of abstraction, ranging from classic parameter experiments to flight simulator tests. Both current knowledge and recent discoveries are applied to superimposed 2-D flight parameters and to real and synthetic 3-D elements, such as a perspective landscape, other airplanes or flight prediction. The stereoscopic layout takes into consideration specific informational needs within different flight phases and is evaluated by means of pilot performance and pilot strain. Selected symbols of the flight guidance display and actual results are presented as examples of the research approach.

  9. Some inadequacies of the current human factors certification process of advanced aircraft technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paries, Jean

    1994-01-01

    Automation related accidents or serious incidents are not limited to advanced technology aircraft. There is a full history of such accidents with conventional technology aircraft. However, this type of occurrence is far from sparing the newest 'glass cockpit' generation, and it even seems to be a growing contributor to its accident rate. Nevertheless, all these aircraft have been properly certificated according to the relevant airworthiness regulations. Therefore, there is a growing concern that with the technological advancement of air transport aircraft cockpits, the current airworthiness regulations addressing cockpit design and human factors may have reached some level of inadequacy. This paper reviews some aspects of the current airworthiness regulations and certification process related to human factors of cockpit design and focuses on questioning their ability to guarantee the intended safety objectives.

  10. Human factors issues associated with the use of speech technology in the cockpit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kersteen, Z. A.; Damos, D.

    1983-01-01

    The human factors issues associated with the use of voice technology in the cockpit are summarized. The formulation of the LHX avionics suite is described and the allocation of tasks to voice in the cockpit is discussed. State-of-the-art speech recognition technology is reviewed. Finally, a questionnaire designed to tap pilot opinions concerning the allocation of tasks to voice input and output in the cockpit is presented. This questionnaire was designed to be administered to operational AH-1G Cobra gunship pilots. Half of the questionnaire deals specifically with the AH-1G cockpit and the types of tasks pilots would like to have performed by voice in this existing rotorcraft. The remaining portion of the questionnaire deals with an undefined rotorcraft of the future and is aimed at determining what types of tasks these pilots would like to have performed by voice technology if anything was possible, i.e. if there were no technological constraints.

  11. Human factor implications of the Eurocopter AS332L-1 Super Puma cockpit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Padfield, R. Randall

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to identify and describe some of the human factor problems which can occur in the cockpit of a modern civilian helicopter. After examining specific hardware and software problems in the cockpit design of the Eurocopter (Aerospatiale) AS332L-1 Super Puma, the author proposes several principles that can be used to avoid similar human factors problems in the design of future cockpits. These principles relate to the use and function of warning lights, the design of autopilots in two-pilot aircraft, and the labeling of switches and warning lights, specifically with respect to abbreviations and translations from languages other than English. In the final section of the paper, the author describes current trends in society which he suggests should be taken into consideration when designing future aircraft cockpits.

  12. STS-38 Mission Specialist Gemar climbs into T-38A cockpit at Ellington Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    STS-38 Mission Specialist (MS) Charles D. Gemar, smiling, pauses before climbing into T-38A aft cockpit at Ellington Field. The crewmembers are preparing for their departure to the Kennedy Space Center (KSC).

  13. Binocular Camera for cockpit visibility of general aviation aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barile, A. J.

    1981-04-01

    A history of cockpit visibility studies and requirements with regard to aircraft safety, human factors, collision avoidance, and accident investigations is presented. The Federal Aviation Administration's development of the Binocular Camera is reviewed, and the technical details of a new and improved camera are discussed. The Binocular Camera uses two 65 mm wide angle F6.8 lenses and covers an 88 1/2 deg field of vision. The camera produces images, representative of what the human eyes see before the brain integrates them into one, thus making it possible to analyze the effect of obstruction to vision. The improvements, applications, and uses of the camera in the research, development, and operations of general aviation aircraft are discussed.

  14. Military applications of a cockpit integrated electronic flight bag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herman, Robert P.; Seinfeld, Robert D.

    2004-09-01

    Converting the pilot's flight bag information from paper to electronic media is being performed routinely by commercial airlines for use with an on-board PC. This concept is now being further advanced with a new class of electronic flight bags (EFB) recently put into commercial operation which interface directly with major on-board avionics systems and has its own dedicated panel mounted display. This display combines flight bag information with real time aircraft performance and maintenance data. This concept of an integrated EFB which is now being used by the commercial airlines as a level 1 certified system, needs to be explored for military applications. This paper describes a system which contains all the attributes of an Electronic Flight Bag with the addition of interfaces which are linked to military aircraft missions such as those for tankers, cargo haulers, search and rescue and maritime aircraft as well as GATM requirements. The adaptation of the integrated EFB to meet these military requirements is then discussed.

  15. The use of optical waveguides in head up display (HUD) applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Homan, Malcolm

    2013-06-01

    The application of optical waveguides to Head Up Displays (HUD) is an enabling technology which solves the critical issues of volume reduction (including cockpit intrusion) and mass reduction in an affordable product which retains the high performance optical capabilities associated with today's generation of digital display based HUDs. Improved operability and pilot comfort is achieved regardless of the installation by virtue of the intrinsic properties of optical waveguides and this has enabled BAE Systems Electronic Systems to develop two distinct product streams for glareshield and overhead HUD installations respectively. This paper addresses the design drivers behind the development of the next generation of Head Up Displays and their compatibility with evolving cockpit architectures and structures. The implementation of large scale optical waveguide combiners capable of matching and exceeding the display performances normally only associated with current digital display sourced HUDs has enabled BAE Systems Electronic Systems to solve the volume and installation challenges of the latest military and civil cockpits with it's LiteHUD® technology. Glareshield mounted waveguide based HUDs are compatible with the trend towards the addition of Large Area Displays (LAD) in place of the traditional multiple Head Down Displays (HDD) within military fast jet cockpits. They use an "indirect view" variant of the display which allows the amalgamation of high resolution digital display devices with the inherently small volume and low mass of the waveguide optics. This is then viewed using the more traditional technology of a conventional HUD combiner. This successful combination of technologies has resulted in the LPHUD product which is specifically designed by BAE Systems Electronic Systems to provide an ultra-low profile HUD which can be installed behind a LAD; still providing the level of performance that is at least equivalent to that of a conventional large volume

  16. Situation Awareness and Levels of Automation: Empirical Assessment of Levels of Automation in the Commercial Cockpit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaber, David B.; Schutte, Paul C. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    This report has been prepared to closeout a NASA grant to Mississippi State University (MSU) for research into situation awareness (SA) and automation in the advanced commercial aircraft cockpit. The grant was divided into two obligations including $60,000 for the period from May 11, 2000 to December 25, 2000. The information presented in this report summarizes work completed through this obligation. It also details work to be completed with the balance of the current obligation and unobligated funds amounting to $50,043, which are to be granted to North Carolina State University for completion of the research project from July 31, 2000 to May 10, 2001. This research was to involve investigation of a broad spectrum of degrees of automation of complex systems on human-machine performance and SA. The work was to empirically assess the effect of theoretical levels of automation (LOAs) described in a taxonomy developed by Endsley & Kaber (1999) on naive and experienced subject performance and SA in simulated flight tasks. The study was to be conducted in the context of a realistic simulation of aircraft flight control. The objective of this work was to identify LOAs that effectively integrate humans and machines under normal operating conditions and failure modes. In general, the work was to provide insight into the design of automation in the commercial aircraft cockpit. Both laboratory and field investigations were to be conducted. At this point in time, a high-fidelity flight simulator of the McDonald Douglas (MD) 11 aircraft has been completed. The simulator integrates a reconfigurable flight simulator developed by the Georgia Institute of Technology and stand-alone simulations of MD-11 autoflight systems developed at MSU. Use of the simulator has been integrated into a study plan for the laboratory research and it is expected that the simulator will also be used in the field study with actual commercial pilots. In addition to the flight simulator, an electronic

  17. Plasma displays

    SciTech Connect

    Sobel, A.

    1991-12-01

    Plasma displays make use of lightly ionized glow discharges to produce light, perform switching and selection functions, or both. Both the negative glow and the positive column are used. Color can be attained by using UV from the discharge to stimulate phosphors. The adroit use of priming can reduce the number of drive circuits required - an advantage unique in the display art to plasma devices. Short voltage pulses can improve the efficacy of positive-column devices. Short voltage pulses can improve the efficacy of positive-column devices. The gas discharge can be used as a source of electrons, which can then excite cathodoluminescent phosphors in a variety of colors. It can also be used as a selection means for liquid-crystal displays. In this paper a wide variety of device configurations, using both unidirectional and bidirectional pulse excitations, is described.

  18. Operator modeling in commerical aviation: Cognitive models, intelligent displays, and pilot's assistants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Govindaraj, T.; Mitchell, C. M.

    1994-01-01

    One of the goals of the National Aviation Safety/Automation program is to address the issue of human-centered automation in the cockpit. Human-centered automation is automation that, in the cockpit, enhances or assists the crew rather than replacing them. The Georgia Tech research program focused on this general theme, with emphasis on designing a computer-based pilot's assistant, intelligent (i.e, context-sensitive) displays, and an intelligent tutoring system for understanding and operating the autoflight system. In particular, the aids and displays were designed to enhance the crew's situational awareness of the current state of the automated flight systems and to assist the crew's situational awareness of the current state of the automated flight systems and to assist the crew in coordinating the autoflight system resources. The activities of this grant included: (1) an OFMspert to understand pilot navigation activities in a 727 class aircraft; (2) an extension of OFMspert to understand mode control in a glass cockpit, Georgia Tech Crew Activity Tracking System (GT-CATS); (3) the design of a training system to teach pilots about the vertical navigation portion of the flight management system -VNAV Tutor; and (4) a proof-of-concept display, using existing display technology, to facilitate mode awareness, particularly in situations in which controlled flight into terrain (CFIT) is a potential.

  19. A Vision of Displays of the Future

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-01-01

    defined for black/white luminance contrast and ignores color, 3D , and motion as image resolving features of human vision. Human visual acuity is much...ar e s um mar ized b elo w in Tab le V fo r 2 D disp lay s and in Tab le VI f or 3D . Table III. Resolution trends for display devices. * Resolution...for cockpit 0.3 for TV 1989 4.0 for ATC ** 1.3, computer 0.3 for PC 1998 2.1 for HDTV 1.9, computer 0.8 for PC 1999 60 for 3D IMAX 2.1 for HDTV 1.3 for

  20. Color and Luminance Analysis of the Space Shuttle Multifunction Display Units(MDUs)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCandless, Jeffrey W.

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this evaluation is to measure and analyze the colors that can be shown on the Multifunction Display Units (MDUs) of the Space Shuttle cockpit. The evaluation was conducted in the JSC Avionics Engineering Laboratory (JAEL) in building 16A at NASA Johnson Space Center. The JAEL contains a suite of 11 MDUs, each of which can be configured to show colors based on input values of the MDU red, green and blue (RGB) channels. Each of the channels has a range of 0 to 15. For example, bright green is produced by setting RGB to 0,15,0, and orange is produced by setting RGB to 15,4,0. The Cockpit Avionics Upgrade (CAU) program has specified the RGB settings for 14 different colors in the Display Design document (Rev A, 29 June 2001). The analysis in this report may help the CAU program determine better RGB settings for the colors.

  1. Analytical display design for flight tasks conducted under instrument meteorological conditions. [human factors engineering of pilot performance for display device design in instrument landing systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hess, R. A.

    1976-01-01

    Paramount to proper utilization of electronic displays is a method for determining pilot-centered display requirements. Display design should be viewed fundamentally as a guidance and control problem which has interactions with the designer's knowledge of human psychomotor activity. From this standpoint, reliable analytical models of human pilots as information processors and controllers can provide valuable insight into the display design process. A relatively straightforward, nearly algorithmic procedure for deriving model-based, pilot-centered display requirements was developed and is presented. The optimal or control theoretic pilot model serves as the backbone of the design methodology, which is specifically directed toward the synthesis of head-down, electronic, cockpit display formats. Some novel applications of the optimal pilot model are discussed. An analytical design example is offered which defines a format for the electronic display to be used in a UH-1H helicopter in a landing approach task involving longitudinal and lateral degrees of freedom.

  2. Prototyping user displays using CLIPS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kosta, Charles P.; Miller, Ross; Krolak, Patrick; Vesty, Matt

    1990-01-01

    CLIPS is being used as an integral module of a rapid prototyping system. The prototyping system consists of a display manager for object browsing, a graph program for displaying line and bar charts, and a communications server for routing messages between modules. A CLIPS simulation of a physical model provides dynamic control of the user's display. Currently, a project is well underway to prototype the Advanced Automation System (AAS) for the Federal Aviation Administration.

  3. Application of FEM/SEA for prediction of aircraft cockpit noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engelstad, S. P.

    Interior noise restrictions in commercial and military aircraft has led to the need for accurate noise transmission prediction capabilities. Predictions are needed in the later aircraft design stages, so that the structural and acoustic changes and/or active control methods can be optimized with a minimal impact on weight and other considerations. The objective of the proposed paper is to investigate the use of the finite element method (FEM) and statistical energy analysis (SEA) method for the prediction of interior noise in an aircraft cockpit. For the cockpit configuration under study, the internal noise is dominated by low-frequency discrete resonant peaks (less than 500 Hz). After examining the available flight test cockpit internal noise data in conjunction with the canopy vibration data, it was concluded that the principal noise source is due to the external turbulent flow exciting the canopy and radiating into the cockpit. Thus the study focused on the resonant noise transmission of the canopy into the small enclosed cockpit air space. The frequency range of primary interest is well below the critical frequency range.

  4. Evaluation of Helmet Mounted Display Alerting Symbology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeMaio, Joe; Rutkowski, Michael (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Proposed helicopter helmet mounted displays will be used to alert the pilot to a variety of conditions, from threats to equipment problems. The present research was performed under the NASA Safe All-weather Flight Operations Research (SAFOR) program supported by a joint Army/NASA research agreement. The purpose of the research was to examine ways to optimize the alerting effectiveness of helmet display symbology. The research used two approaches to increasing the effectiveness of alerts. One was to increase the ability of the alert to attract attention by using the entire display surface. The other was to include information about the required response in the alert itself. The investigation was conducted using the NASA Ames Research Center's six-degree-of-freedom vertical motion simulator (VMS) with a rotorcraft cockpit. Helmet display symbology was based on the AH-64's pilot night vision system (PNVS), cruise mode symbology. A standardized mission was developed, that consisted of 11 legs. The mission included four tasks, which allowed variation in the frequency of alerts. The general trend in the data points to a small benefit from both the full-screen alert and the partial information alert.

  5. Computer based human-centered display system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Still, David L. (Inventor); Temme, Leonard A. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A human centered informational display is disclosed that can be used with vehicles (e.g. aircraft) and in other operational environments where rapid human centered comprehension of an operational environment is required. The informational display integrates all cockpit information into a single display in such a way that the pilot can clearly understand with a glance, his or her spatial orientation, flight performance, engine status and power management issues, radio aids, and the location of other air traffic, runways, weather, and terrain features. With OZ the information is presented as an integrated whole, the pilot instantaneously recognizes flight path deviations, and is instinctively drawn to the corrective maneuvers. Our laboratory studies indicate that OZ transfers to the pilot all of the integrated display information in less than 200 milliseconds. The reacquisition of scan can be accomplished just as quickly. Thus, the time constants for forming a mental model are near instantaneous. The pilot's ability to keep up with rapidly changing and threatening environments is tremendously enhanced. OZ is most easily compatible with aircraft that has flight path information coded electronically. With the correct sensors (which are currently available) OZ can be installed in essentially all current aircraft.

  6. Traffic Aware Planner for Cockpit-Based Trajectory Optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woods, Sharon E.; Vivona, Robert A.; Henderson, Jeffrey; Wing, David J.; Burke, Kelly A.

    2016-01-01

    The Traffic Aware Planner (TAP) software application is a cockpit-based advisory tool designed to be hosted on an Electronic Flight Bag and to enable and test the NASA concept of Traffic Aware Strategic Aircrew Requests (TASAR). The TASAR concept provides pilots with optimized route changes (including altitude) that reduce fuel burn and/or flight time, avoid interactions with known traffic, weather and restricted airspace, and may be used by the pilots to request a route and/or altitude change from Air Traffic Control. Developed using an iterative process, TAP's latest improvements include human-machine interface design upgrades and added functionality based on the results of human-in-the-loop simulation experiments and flight trials. Architectural improvements have been implemented to prepare the system for operational-use trials with partner commercial airlines. Future iterations will enhance coordination with airline dispatch and add functionality to improve the acceptability of TAP-generated route-change requests to pilots, dispatchers, and air traffic controllers.

  7. Dynamic plasmonic colour display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Xiaoyang; Kamin, Simon; Liu, Na

    2017-02-01

    Plasmonic colour printing based on engineered metasurfaces has revolutionized colour display science due to its unprecedented subwavelength resolution and high-density optical data storage. However, advanced plasmonic displays with novel functionalities including dynamic multicolour printing, animations, and highly secure encryption have remained in their infancy. Here we demonstrate a dynamic plasmonic colour display technique that enables all the aforementioned functionalities using catalytic magnesium metasurfaces. Controlled hydrogenation and dehydrogenation of the constituent magnesium nanoparticles, which serve as dynamic pixels, allow for plasmonic colour printing, tuning, erasing and restoration of colour. Different dynamic pixels feature distinct colour transformation kinetics, enabling plasmonic animations. Through smart material processing, information encoded on selected pixels, which are indiscernible to both optical and scanning electron microscopies, can only be read out using hydrogen as a decoding key, suggesting a new generation of information encryption and anti-counterfeiting applications.

  8. Dynamic plasmonic colour display

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Xiaoyang; Kamin, Simon; Liu, Na

    2017-01-01

    Plasmonic colour printing based on engineered metasurfaces has revolutionized colour display science due to its unprecedented subwavelength resolution and high-density optical data storage. However, advanced plasmonic displays with novel functionalities including dynamic multicolour printing, animations, and highly secure encryption have remained in their infancy. Here we demonstrate a dynamic plasmonic colour display technique that enables all the aforementioned functionalities using catalytic magnesium metasurfaces. Controlled hydrogenation and dehydrogenation of the constituent magnesium nanoparticles, which serve as dynamic pixels, allow for plasmonic colour printing, tuning, erasing and restoration of colour. Different dynamic pixels feature distinct colour transformation kinetics, enabling plasmonic animations. Through smart material processing, information encoded on selected pixels, which are indiscernible to both optical and scanning electron microscopies, can only be read out using hydrogen as a decoding key, suggesting a new generation of information encryption and anti-counterfeiting applications. PMID:28232722

  9. Single Display Groupware

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-01-01

    groupware today. Aircraft cockpits and videogames are excellent examples of the kind of systems we are proposing. However, these systems only touch...by giving one user the mouse and another the keyboard is not likely to result in a good collaborative experience (Papert, 1996 p. 89). We define an...ubiquitous – and we are all very good at picking up on these cues. By supporting people working together shoulder-to-shoulder, SDG systems can take

  10. Liquid crystal displays with high brightness of visualization versus active displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olifierczuk, Marek; Zieliński, Jerzy

    2007-05-01

    Nowadays Liquid Crystal Displays (LCD) takes the very important place among different visualization devices. It's are used in many standard applications such as computer or video screens. In May 2006, 100" LCD TV monitor had been shown by LG. But beside of this main direction of display development, very interesting - because of insignificant electro-magnetic disturbances - is the possibility of it's applications in motorization and aviation. An example of it can be a glass cockpit of U2 , Boeing 777 or many different car dashboards. On this field beside LCD we have now many another display technologies, but interesting for us are 3 of them: FEDs (Field Emission Displays), OLEDs (Organic Light Emitting Diode), PLEDs (Polymer Light Emitting Diode). The leading position of LCD is a result of LCD unique advantages of flat form, weight, power consumption, and reliability, higher (than CRT) luminance, luminance uniformity, sunlight readability, wide dimming range, fault tolerance and a large active display area with a small border. The basis of starting our investigation was the comparison of passive LCD and the other technology, which can be theoretically used on motorization and aviation field. The following parameters are compared: contrast ratio, luminance level, temperature stability, life-time, operating temperature range, color performance, and depth, viewing cone, technology maturity, availability and cost. In our work an analysis of Liquid Crystal Displays used in specific applications is done. The possibilities of the applications such a display under high lighting level are presented. The presented results of this analysis are obtained from computer program worked by authors, which makes it possible to calculate the optical parameters of transmissive and reflective LCD working in quasi-real conditions. The base assumption of this program are shown. This program calculate the transmission and reflection coefficient of a display taking into account the

  11. Crew/Automation Interaction in Space Transportation Systems: Lessons Learned from the Glass Cockpit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rudisill, Marianne

    2000-01-01

    The progressive integration of automation technologies in commercial transport aircraft flight decks - the 'glass cockpit' - has had a major, and generally positive, impact on flight crew operations. Flight deck automation has provided significant benefits, such as economic efficiency, increased precision and safety, and enhanced functionality within the crew interface. These enhancements, however, may have been accrued at a price, such as complexity added to crew/automation interaction that has been implicated in a number of aircraft incidents and accidents. This report briefly describes 'glass cockpit' evolution. Some relevant aircraft accidents and incidents are described, followed by a more detailed description of human/automation issues and problems (e.g., crew error, monitoring, modes, command authority, crew coordination, workload, and training). This paper concludes with example principles and guidelines for considering 'glass cockpit' human/automation integration within space transportation systems.

  12. Peripheral vision horizon display testing in RF-4C aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammond, L. B., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    A test program to assess the capability of the peripheral vision horizon display (PVHD) to provide peripheral attitude cues to the pilot is described. The system was installed in the rear cockpit of a RF-4C aircraft, selected because its poor instrument crosscheck conditions. The PVHD test plan was designed to assess three primary areas: (1) ability of the system to reduce spatial disorientation; (2) ability of the system to aid the pilot in recovering from unusual attitudes; and (3) improvement in pilot performance during instrument landing system (ILS) approaches. Results of preliminary test flights are summarized. The major problem areas concern the distinction of the display itself and the capability of the display to provide pitch motion cues.

  13. Liquid crystal Fresnel lens display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiao-Qian; Abhishek Kumar, Srivastava; Alwin Tam, Ming-Wai; Zheng, Zhi-Gang; Shen, Dong; Vladimir, Chigrinov G.; Kwok, Hoi-Sing

    2016-09-01

    A novel see-through display with a liquid crystal lens array was proposed. A liquid crystal Fresnel lens display (LCFLD) with a holographic screen was demonstrated. The proposed display system has high efficiency, simple fabrication, and low manufacturing cost due to the absence of a polarizer and color filter. Project supported by Partner State Key Laboratory on Advanced Displays and Optoelectronics Technologies HKUST, China, the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61435008 and 61575063), and the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities, China (Grant No. WM1514036).

  14. Effect of color on pilot performance and transfer functions using a full-spectrum, calligraphic, color display system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chase, W. D.

    1976-01-01

    The use of blue and red color in out-of-window cockpit displays, in full-spectrum calligraphic computer-generated display systems, is studied with attention given to pilot stereographic depth perception and response to visual cues. Displays for vertical approach, with dynamic and frozen-range landing approach and perspective arrays, are analyzed. Pilot transfer function and the transfer function associated with the contrasted approach and perspective arrays are discussed. Out-of-window blue lights are perceived by pilots as indicating greater distance depth, red lights as indicating proximity. The computer-generated chromatic display was adapted to flight simulators for the tests.

  15. Pilot interaction with cockpit automation - Operational experiences with the Flight Management System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarter, Nadine B.; Woods, David D.

    1992-01-01

    Results are presented of two studies on the potential effect of cockpit automation on the pilot's performance, which provide data on pilots' difficulties with understanding and operating one of the core systems of cockpit automation, the Flight Management System (FMS). The results of both studies indicate that, although pilots do become proficient in standard FMS operations through ground training and subsequent flight experience, they still have difficulties tracking the FMS status and behavior in certain flight contexts and show gaps in the understanding of the functional structure of the system. The results suggest that design-related factors such as opaque interfaces contribute to these difficulties, which can affect the pilot's situation awareness.

  16. Determination of washout performance of various monochrome displays under simulated flight ambient and solar lighting conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batson, Vernon M.; Robertson, James B.; Parrish, Russell V.

    1990-01-01

    The aircraft cockpit ambient lighting simulation system (ACALSS) has been developed to study display readability and associated pilot/vehicle performance effects in a part-task simulator cockpit. In the study reported here, the ACALSS was used to determine the illumination levels at which subjects lose the ability to maintain aircraft states when using three display technologies as display media for primary flight displays: a standard monochrome EL (electroluminescent) flat-panel, a laboratory-class monochrome CRT, and an enhanced-brightness EL flat-panel. The multivariate statistical technique of modified profile analysis was used to test for performance differences between display devices as functions of illumination levels. The standard monochrome EL flat-panel display began to washout after the 2500 foot-candle level of illumination. The monochrome CRT began to washout after the 5500 foot-candle level of illumination. No performance decrements by increased illumination up to the 12,000 foot-candle level were found for the enhanced-brightness EL flat-panel display. What was not anticipated was that half the subjects would subjectively prefer the CRT over the enhanced-brightness EL, even though their performance errors would have indicated the opposite.

  17. Improved display optical performance with notch polarizers and specialized lamps for helmet-mounted display application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinze, Bill

    1996-06-01

    The helmet mounted display (HMD) is an important technology for aircraft cockpit information exchange, and is also of advantage for outdoor field use. For both applications, high display luminance is required to maintain acceptable contrast ratio while competing with environmental forward field scene luminance during bright daylight conditions. For the full color HMD, a broad color gamut is required. Notch Polarizers, made from crosslinked cholesteric liquid crystal silicones and utilized to modulate color with high resolution subtractive color twisted nematic diplay image sources, yield substantial improvements in system luminance efficiency, color gamut, and contrast ratio, compared with conventional color polarizers made with dichroic dyes. A TN subtractive color display system design with notch polarizers is presented, resulting in improved luminance, color gamut, contrast ratio, and contrast ratio in the presence of high ambient luminance. Results are given for backlighting with a broad band Xenon arc lamp, as well as with a trichrominance (primary color) lamp. Very substantial improvements in display system luminance efficiency, color gamut and contrast ratio were achieved.

  18. Cockpit resource management skills enhance combat mission performance in a B-52 simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Povenmire, H. Kingsley; Rockway, Marty R.; Bunecke, Joseph L.; Patton, Mark W.

    1989-01-01

    A cockpit resource management (CRM) program for mission-ready B-52 aircrew is developed. The relationship between CRM performance and combat mission performance is studied. The performances of six crew members flying a simulated high workload mission in a B-52 weapon system trainer are evaluated. The data reveal that CRM performance enhances tactical maneuvers and bombing accuracy.

  19. 46 CFR 171.145 - Drainage of a vessel with a cockpit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Drainage of a vessel with a cockpit. 171.145 Section 171.145 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SUBDIVISION AND STABILITY SPECIAL RULES PERTAINING TO VESSELS CARRYING PASSENGERS Drainage of Weather Decks § 171.145 Drainage of...

  20. 46 CFR 171.145 - Drainage of a vessel with a cockpit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Drainage of a vessel with a cockpit. 171.145 Section 171.145 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SUBDIVISION AND STABILITY SPECIAL RULES PERTAINING TO VESSELS CARRYING PASSENGERS Drainage of Weather Decks § 171.145 Drainage of...

  1. 46 CFR 171.145 - Drainage of a vessel with a cockpit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Drainage of a vessel with a cockpit. 171.145 Section 171.145 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SUBDIVISION AND STABILITY SPECIAL RULES PERTAINING TO VESSELS CARRYING PASSENGERS Drainage of Weather Decks § 171.145 Drainage of...

  2. 46 CFR 171.145 - Drainage of a vessel with a cockpit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Drainage of a vessel with a cockpit. 171.145 Section 171.145 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SUBDIVISION AND STABILITY SPECIAL RULES PERTAINING TO VESSELS CARRYING PASSENGERS Drainage of Weather Decks § 171.145 Drainage of...

  3. 46 CFR 171.145 - Drainage of a vessel with a cockpit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Drainage of a vessel with a cockpit. 171.145 Section 171.145 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SUBDIVISION AND STABILITY SPECIAL RULES PERTAINING TO VESSELS CARRYING PASSENGERS Drainage of Weather Decks § 171.145 Drainage of...

  4. Trans-femoral amputee pilots: criteria for return to the fighter cockpit.

    PubMed

    Grossman, Alon; Goldstein, Liav; Heim, Michael; Barenboim, Erez; Dudkiewicz, Israel

    2005-04-01

    Proximal lower limb amputations (trans-femoral) usually leave amputees with significant functional disturbances. This article contains information regarding three pilots with trans-femoral amputations that returned swiftly to continue their aeronautical careers despite their disabilities. Adaptations are needed in the limb prostheses to enable the amputees to access the minimally spaced cockpit.

  5. Effect of display size on utilization of traffic situation display for self-spacing task. [transport aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbott, T. S.; Moen, G. C.

    1981-01-01

    The weather radar cathode ray tube (CRT) is the prime candidate for presenting cockpit display of traffic information (CDTI) in current, conventionally equipped transport aircraft. Problems may result from this, since the CRT size is not optimized for CDTI applications and the CRT is not in the pilot's primary visual scan area. The impact of display size on the ability of pilots to utilize the traffic information to maintain a specified spacing interval behind a lead aircraft during an approach task was studied. The five display sizes considered are representative of the display hardware configurations of airborne weather radar systems. From a pilot's subjective workload viewpoint, even the smallest display size was usable for performing the self spacing task. From a performane viewpoint, the mean spacing values, which are indicative of how well the pilots were able to perform the task, exhibit the same trends, irrespective of display size; however, the standard deviation of the spacing intervals decreased (performance improves) as the display size increased. Display size, therefore, does have a significant effect on pilot performance.

  6. A flexible flight display research system using a ground-based interactive graphics terminal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hatfield, J. J.; Elkins, H. C.; Batson, V. M.; Poole, W. L.

    1975-01-01

    Requirements and research areas for the air transportation system of the 1980 to 1990's were reviewed briefly to establish the need for a flexible flight display generation research tool. Specific display capabilities required by aeronautical researchers are listed and a conceptual system for providing these capabilities is described. The conceptual system uses a ground-based interactive graphics terminal driven by real-time radar and telemetry data to generate dynamic, experimental flight displays. These displays are scan converted to television format, processed, and transmitted to the cockpits of evaluation aircraft. The attendant advantages of a Flight Display Research System (FDRS) designed to employ this concept are presented. The detailed implementation of an FDRS is described. The basic characteristics of the interactive graphics terminal and supporting display electronic subsystems are presented and the resulting system capability is summarized. Finally, the system status and utilization are reviewed.

  7. Flight Envelope Information-Augmented Display for Enhanced Pilot Situation Awareness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ackerman, Kasey A.; Seefeldt, Benjamin D.; Xargay, Enric; Talleur, Donald A.; Carbonari, Ronald S.; Kirlik, Alex; Hovakimyan, Naira; Trujillo, Anna C.; Belcastro, Christine M.; Gregory, Irene M.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents an interface system display which is conceived to improve pilot situation awareness with respect to a flight envelope protection system developed for a mid-sized transport aircraft. The new display is designed to complement existing cockpit displays, and to augment them with information that relates to both aircraft state and the control automation itself. In particular, the proposed display provides cues about the state of automation directly in terms of pilot control actions, in addition to flight parameters. The paper also describes a forthcoming evaluation test plan that is intended to validate the developed interface by assessing the relevance of the displayed information, as well as the adequacy of the display layout.

  8. Advanced Aircrew Display Symposium Proceedings (5th) Held at the Naval Air Test Center, Patuxent, Maryland on 15-16 September 1981

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-01-01

    2 M s test and Avgr ley$, sle t ts vu ~ ~ ~ ~ n go Warfn u~lr 1.2 Power ’on, 31 79J~f~7 Vig 1 ADANED OCPI 4 32 \\ \\4 hm 33 7$ • i!i*𔃻 -, Jr• Si -- i...8217 trillT9M 13 ANA kAtAM AVA THE NAVALAIR Ir TWA., PATUXeNt. MVIERI’A-AR LAND t 4; U COMPONENT PART NOTICE THiS PAPER IS A COMPONENT PART OF THE FOLLOWING...Aircraft - MR. R. CHORLEY ..................... 198 Helmet Mounted Display for Helicopter Landing on Small Ships’- DR. T . DUKES

  9. Human Factors Engineering in Designing the Passengers' Cockpit of the Malaysian Commercial Suborbital Spaceplane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ridzuan Zakaria, Norul; Mettauer, Adrian; Abu, Jalaluddin; Hassan, Mohd Roshdi; Ismail, Anwar Taufeek; Othman, Jamaluddin; Shaari, Che Zhuhaida; Nasron, Nasri

    2010-09-01

    The design of the passengers’ cabin or cockpit of commercial suborbital spaceplane is a new and exciting frontier in human factors engineering, which emphasizes on comfort and safety. There is a program to develop small piloted 3 seats commercial suborbital spaceplane by a group of Malaysians with their foreign partners, and being relatively small and due to its design philosophy, the spaceplane does not require a cabin, but only a cockpit for its 2 passengers. In designing the cockpit, human factors engineering and safety principles are given priority. The cockpit is designed with the intention to provide comfort and satisfaction to the passengers without compromising the safety, in such a way that there are passenger-view wide angled video camera to observe the passengers at all time in flight, “rear-view”, “under-the-floor-view” and “fuselage-view” video cameras for the passengers, personalized gauges and LCDs on the dashboard to provide vital and useful information during the flight to the passengers, and biomedical engineered products which not only entertain the passengers, but also provide important information on the passengers to the ground crews who are responsible in the comfort and safety of the passengers. The passenger-view video-camera, which record the passengers with Earth visible through the glass canopy as the background, not only provides live visual of the passengers for safety reason, but also provide the most preferred memorable video collection for the passengers, while other video cameras provide the opportunity to view at various angles from unique positions to both the passengers and the ground observers. The gauges and LCDs on the dashboard provide access to the passengers to information such as the gravity, orientation, rate of climb and flight profile of the spaceplane, graphical presentation of the spaceplane in flight, and live video from the onboard video cameras. There is also a control stick for each passenger to

  10. Evolution Of Map Display Optical Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boot, Alan

    1983-06-01

    It is now over 20 years since Ferranti plc introduced optically projected map displays into operational aircraft navigation systems. Then, as now, it was the function of the display to present an image of a topographical map to a pilot or navigator with his present position clearly identified. Then, as now, the map image was projected from a reduced image stored on colour micro film. Then, as now, the fundamental design problems are the same.In the exposed environment of an aircraft cockpit where brightness levels may vary from those associated with direct sunlight on the one hand, to starlight on the other, how does one design an optical system with sufficient luminance, contrast and resolution where in the daytime sunlight may fall on the display or in the pilot's eyes, and at night time the display luminance must not detract from the pilot's ability to pick up external clues? This paper traces the development of Ferranti plc optically projected map displays from the early V Bomber and the ill-fated TSR2 displays to the Harrier and Concorde displays. It then goes on to the development of combined map and electronic displays (COMED), showing how an earlier design, as fitted to Tornado, has been developed into the current COMED design which is fitted to the F-18 and Jaguar aircraft. In each of the above display systems particular features of optical design interest are identified and their impact on the design as a whole are discussed. The use of prisms both for optical rotation and translation, techniques for the maximisation of luminance, the problems associated with contrast enhancement, particularly with polarising filters in the presence of optically active materials, the use of aerial image combining systems and the impact of the pilot interface on the system parameter are all included.Perhaps the most interesting result in considering the evolution of map displays has not been so much the designer's solutions in overcoming the various design problems but

  11. Virtual acoustic displays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wenzel, Elizabeth M.

    1991-01-01

    A 3D auditory display can potentially enhance information transfer by combining directional and iconic information in a quite naturalistic representation of dynamic objects in the interface. Another aspect of auditory spatial clues is that, in conjunction with other modalities, it can act as a potentiator of information in the display. For example, visual and auditory cues together can reinforce the information content of the display and provide a greater sense of presence or realism in a manner not readily achievable by either modality alone. This phenomenon will be particularly useful in telepresence applications, such as advanced teleconferencing environments, shared electronic workspaces, and monitoring telerobotic activities in remote or hazardous situations. Thus, the combination of direct spatial cues with good principles of iconic design could provide an extremely powerful and information-rich display which is also quite easy to use. An alternative approach, recently developed at ARC, generates externalized, 3D sound cues over headphones in realtime using digital signal processing. Here, the synthesis technique involves the digital generation of stimuli using Head-Related Transfer Functions (HRTF's) measured in the two ear-canals of individual subjects. Other similar approaches include an analog system developed by Loomis, et. al., (1990) and digital systems which make use of transforms derived from normative mannikins and simulations of room acoustics. Such an interface also requires the careful psychophysical evaluation of listener's ability to accurately localize the virtual or synthetic sound sources. From an applied standpoint, measurement of each potential listener's HRTF's may not be possible in practice. For experienced listeners, localization performance was only slightly degraded compared to a subject's inherent ability. Alternatively, even inexperienced listeners may be able to adapt to a particular set of HRTF's as long as they provide adequate

  12. Designing displays for severe environment military fighter applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jukes, Malcolm L.

    1997-07-01

    Smiths Industries is a world class supplier of multi-purpose color displays for severe environment fast-jet and rotary wing applications. In this paper we describe the technical issues, design techniques and qualification experience gained through replacing shadow-mask cathode ray tube with active matrix liquid crystal display (AMLCD) devices in our 5 inch and 6 inch display products. The operational needs for primary flight/mission displays are reviewed from which display brightness, dimming range, contrast, viewing angle and resolution requirements are derived. These requirements when combined with the environment conditions found in a jet fighter cockpit challenge the display designer to find novel cost effective solutions. We shall discuss: the development of an AMLCD for severe environment applications; the development of a backlight to achieve long life, wide luminance range and compatibility with night vision imaging systems; mens to manage the local thermal environment of the AMLCD and the backlight. Practical realization of these solutions are demonstrated in our 5 inch and 6 inch multi- purpose color display products which have been qualified for flight in severe military environments. Operator and engineering evaluations have been made in representative lighting environments and through flight trials to compare the performance of AMLCD against our traditional 'de-facto' standard CRT products.

  13. New integrated backup flight data display in Gripen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santesson, Rolf; Kral, Robert

    2000-08-01

    The Saab-BAe multi-role fighter aircraft Gripen has a continuous development program to incorporate new technology. Current important cockpit changes are the replacement of the three 5' X 6' monochrome CRT displays by three 6' X 8' Color Multi-Function Displays (CMFD), and the removal of the traditional and dedicated standby flight instruments. The CMFDs are equipped with built-in graphics generators. The display surfaces are supplied with flight data from two parallel and independent flight data systems, one primary (normal) and one secondary (back-up). All CMFDs have the ability to be switched over to display of back-up flight data. The importance of flight data calls for careful design of functional monitoring. The removal of the old standby instruments and the introduction of the new integrated back-up system also raises a need to define new principles for pilot monitoring of flight data. This is being dealt with in two ways. First, a special display mode is created to make it possible for the pilot to visually perform traditional cross monitoring between independent sources. Second, in order to make maximal tactical use of the CMFDs' surfaces, automated (hidden) integrity cross monitoring is being developed. Flight safety is achieved by designing a system where (a) the primary and the secondary system are totally independent except for the display surfaces which however are triple redundant; (b) the monitoring functionality is distributed both locally and centrally to ensure that no misleading flight data is displayed to the pilot.

  14. Synthetic Vision Systems in GA Cockpit-Evaluation of Basic Maneuvers Performed by Low Time GA Pilots During Transition from VMC to IMC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takallu, M. A.; Wong, D. T.; Uenking, M. D.

    2002-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to study the effectiveness of modern flight displays in general aviation cockpits for mitigating Low Visibility Loss of Control and the Controlled Flight Into Terrain accidents. A total of 18 General Aviation (GA) pilots with private pilot, single engine land rating, with no additional instrument training beyond private pilot license requirements, were recruited to evaluate three different display concepts in a fixed-based flight simulator at the NASA Langley Research Center's General Aviation Work Station. Evaluation pilots were asked to continue flight from Visual Meteorological Conditions (VMC) into Instrument Meteorological Conditions (IMC) while performing a series of 4 basic precision maneuvers. During the experiment, relevant pilot/vehicle performance variables, pilot control inputs and physiological data were recorded. Human factors questionnaires and interviews were administered after each scenario. Qualitative and quantitative data have been analyzed and the results are presented here. Pilot performance deviations from the established target values (errors) were computed and compared with the FAA Practical Test Standards. Results of the quantitative data indicate that evaluation pilots committed substantially fewer errors when using the Synthetic Vision Systems (SVS) displays than when they were using conventional instruments. Results of the qualitative data indicate that evaluation pilots perceived themselves to have a much higher level of situation awareness while using the SVS display concept.

  15. Three-dimensional display technologies.

    PubMed

    Geng, Jason

    2013-01-01

    The physical world around us is three-dimensional (3D), yet traditional display devices can show only two-dimensional (2D) flat images that lack depth (i.e., the third dimension) information. This fundamental restriction greatly limits our ability to perceive and to understand the complexity of real-world objects. Nearly 50% of the capability of the human brain is devoted to processing visual information [Human Anatomy & Physiology (Pearson, 2012)]. Flat images and 2D displays do not harness the brain's power effectively. With rapid advances in the electronics, optics, laser, and photonics fields, true 3D display technologies are making their way into the marketplace. 3D movies, 3D TV, 3D mobile devices, and 3D games have increasingly demanded true 3D display with no eyeglasses (autostereoscopic). Therefore, it would be very beneficial to readers of this journal to have a systematic review of state-of-the-art 3D display technologies.

  16. Augmenting digital displays with computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jing

    rate for traditional displays is not enough for some computational displays that show complex image patterns. The study focuses on displays with hidden channels, and their application to 3D+2D TV. By taking advantage of the fast growing power of computation and sensors, these four novel display setups - in combination with display algorithms - advance the frontier of computational display research.

  17. Application of new GPS aircraft control/display system to topographic mapping of the Greenland ice cap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, C. W.

    1992-01-01

    A new PC-based GPS flight management display system (GFMS) was developed for Greenland ice cap mapping during the NASA Greenland Ice Sheet mapping experiment, when a total of nine flights were made over four different flight tracks, of which two coincided with ground tracks of the ERS altimeter satellite. In this system, the GFMS inputs the GPS position data to a PC, which generates aircraft automatic pilot steering commands and a cockpit display. The display includes (1) the course deviation indicators for cross-track error and altitude, (2) the flight plan and waypoint map overlay oriented to the aircraft, and (3) various other mission-pertinent numerical data.

  18. An integrated control panel utilizing a programmable varistor-multiplexed dichroic liquid crystal display

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitton, I. J.

    1981-01-01

    Due to the conflicting demands of modern aircraft for increased systems/sensors and the decrease in cockpit panel size, weight, volume, and power, conventional discrete/dedicated methods of display and control are fast becoming obsolete. A means is sought to integrate the control and display into multifunctional programmable devices, thus giving the ability to increase system functions and yet conserve panel space. A potential solution to the control portion of the problem has come to be known as the Integrated Control Panel (ICP) approach. Flat panel display technology and controls using programmable flat panel displays with transparent capacitive touch control overlays offer the largest potential advantages. The flat panel display made of varistor-multiplexed dichroic liquid crystal (LCD) developed by GE in recent years appears to offer the ideal monochrome solution.

  19. Vortex beam generation and other advanced optics experiments reproduced with a twisted-nematic liquid-crystal display with limited phase modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cofré, Aaron; García-Martínez, Pascuala; Vargas, Asticio; Moreno, Ignacio

    2017-01-01

    In this work we propose the use of twisted-nematic liquid-crystal spatial light modulators (TN-LC-SLM) as a useful tool for training students in the manipulation of light beams with phase-only masks. In particular, we focus the work on the realization of phase-only gratings and phase-only spiral phases for the generation of vortex beams, beams carrying orbital angular momentum (OAM). Despite the extensive activity in this field, its experimental implementation for educational purposes is limited because it requires the use of very expensive high-resolution liquid-crystal on silicon (LCOS) SLMs. Here, we show that a low-cost experimental implementation can be done with older TNLC technology. However, these devices, intended for display applications, exhibit rather limited optical phase modulation properties in comparison with modern LCOS devices, such as a very low range of phase modulation and a general coupled intensity modulation. However, we show that a precise characterization of their retardance parameters permits their operation in useful modulation configurations. As examples, we include one continuous phase-only configuration useful for reproducing the optimal triplicator phase grating, and a binary π-phase modulation. We include experiments with the realization of different phase diffraction gratings, and their combination with spiral phase patterns and lens functions to generate a variety of vortex beams.

  20. Enhanced spatial-state feedback for night-vision goggle displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachelder, Edward N.; Hansman, R. John, Jr.

    1997-06-01

    A preliminary study was conducted to investigate the use of visual flow cues as an aid to ground and vertical drift awareness during helicopter flight and targeting while using night vision goggles (NVGs). Three displays wee compared: (1) NVG display: simulated NVG image of cockpit and external environment. (2) Overlay display: NVG image with an overlay display but with symbology flow cue field and a surrounding wire-frame globe; (3) Cut-out display: same as the overlay display but with symbology removed from the central region. Three levels of contrast were also compared using each display type. The visual scenery was displayed to subjects using a helmet-mounted virtual reality device that had a 40 by 50 degree field-of-view liquid crystal display. The study involved six pilots. Three tasks were given: (1) Search task: designate enemy targets with a helmet-mounted sight; (2) Hover task: null out all transnational and yaw rates while in a hover; (3) Search/Hover task: perform both Search and Hover tasks simultaneously. These tasks were conducted in a fixed-based helicopter simulator which used the dynamics of a small-scale model helicopter. The following performance measures were collected: (1) Pilot ability to detect and recognize targets; (2) Pilots ability to null transnational and yaw rates; (3) Time scanning the instrument panel. Subjects also rated displays for efficacy in completing the three tasks. Target detection scores conducted during the Search and Search/Hover tasks were highest using the NVG display, followed by the cut-out display. Root-mean-square (RMS) drift rate error was comparable for all display types in the Hover and Hover/Search tasks, however RMS control input activity in all the translational axes was significantly higher in both rate-cueing displays than with the NVG display. From the control input and drift rate time histories it appears that the motion cues were more compelling in the overlay and cut- out displays than those perceived

  1. Frequency encoded auditory display of the critical tracking task

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevenson, J.

    1984-01-01

    The use of auditory displays for selected cockpit instruments was examined. In auditory, visual, and combined auditory-visual compensatory displays of a vertical axis, critical tracking task were studied. The visual display encoded vertical error as the position of a dot on a 17.78 cm, center marked CRT. The auditory display encoded vertical error as log frequency with a six octave range; the center point at 1 kHz was marked by a 20-dB amplitude notch, one-third octave wide. Asymptotic performance on the critical tracking task was significantly better when using combined displays rather than the visual only mode. At asymptote, the combined display was slightly, but significantly, better than the visual only mode. The maximum controllable bandwidth using the auditory mode was only 60% of the maximum controllable bandwidth using the visual mode. Redundant cueing increased the rate of improvement of tracking performance, and the asymptotic performance level. This enhancement increases with the amount of redundant cueing used. This effect appears most prominent when the bandwidth of the forcing function is substantially less than the upper limit of controllability frequency.

  2. Checklists and Monitoring in the Cockpit: Why Crucial Defenses Sometimes Fail

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dismukes, R. Key; Berman, Ben

    2010-01-01

    Checklists and monitoring are two essential defenses against equipment failures and pilot errors. Problems with checklist use and pilots failures to monitor adequately have a long history in aviation accidents. This study was conducted to explore why checklists and monitoring sometimes fail to catch errors and equipment malfunctions as intended. Flight crew procedures were observed from the cockpit jumpseat during normal airline operations in order to: 1) collect data on monitoring and checklist use in cockpit operations in typical flight conditions; 2) provide a plausible cognitive account of why deviations from formal checklist and monitoring procedures sometimes occur; 3) lay a foundation for identifying ways to reduce vulnerability to inadvertent checklist and monitoring errors; 4) compare checklist and monitoring execution in normal flights with performance issues uncovered in accident investigations; and 5) suggest ways to improve the effectiveness of checklists and monitoring. Cognitive explanations for deviations from prescribed procedures are provided, along with suggestions for countermeasures for vulnerability to error.

  3. Group-level issues in the design and training of cockpit crews

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hackman, J. Richard

    1987-01-01

    Cockpit crews always operate in an organizational context, and the transactions between the crew and representatives of that context (e.g., organizational managers, air traffic controllers) are consequential for any crew's performance. For a complete understanding of crew performance a look beyond the traditional focus on individual pilots is provided to see how team- and organization-level factors can enhance (or impede) the ability of even well-trained individuals to work together effectively. This way of thinking about cockpit crews (that is, viewing them as teams that operate in organizations) offers some potentially useful avenues for thinking about next steps in the development of CRM training programs. Those possibilities are explored, emphasizing how they can enrich (not replace) individually-focussed CRM training.

  4. Response time effects of alerting tone and semantic context for synthesized voice cockpit warnings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, C. A.; Williams, D. H.

    1980-01-01

    Some handbooks and human factors design guides have recommended that a voice warning should be preceded by a tone to attract attention to the warning. As far as can be determined from a search of the literature, no experimental evidence supporting this exists. A fixed-base simulator flown by airline pilots was used to test the hypothesis that the total 'system-time' to respond to a synthesized voice cockpit warning would be longer when the message was preceded by a tone because the voice itself was expected to perform both the alerting and the information transfer functions. The simulation included realistic ATC radio voice communications, synthesized engine noise, cockpit conversation, and realistic flight routes. The effect of a tone before a voice warning was to lengthen response time; that is, responses were slower with an alerting tone. Lengthening the voice warning with another work, however, did not increase response time.

  5. Glass-Cockpit Pilot Subjective Ratings of Predictive Information, Collocation, and Mission Status Graphics: An Analysis and Summary of the Future Focus of Flight Deck Research Survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartolone, Anthony; Trujillo, Anna

    2002-01-01

    NASA Langley Research Center has been researching ways to improve flight crew decision aiding for systems management. Our current investigation is how to display a wide variety of aircraft parameters in ways that will improve the flight crew's situation awareness. To accomplish this, new means are being explored that will monitor the overall health of a flight and report the current status of the aircraft and forecast impending problems to the pilots. The initial step in this research was to conduct a survey addressing how current glass-cockpit commercial pilots would value a prediction of the status of critical aircraft systems. We also addressed how this new type of data ought to be conveyed and utilized. Therefore, two other items associated with predictive information were also included in the survey. The first addressed the need for system status, alerts and procedures, and system controls to be more logically grouped together, or collocated, on the flight deck. The second idea called for the survey respondents opinions on the functionality of mission status graphics; a display methodology that groups a variety of parameters onto a single display that can instantaneously convey a complete overview of both an aircraft's system and mission health.

  6. Measurement of visibility from the pilot's cockpit on different airplane types

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurz, Gerhard

    1931-01-01

    A process for the measurement of the visibility of airplanes from the pilot's cockpit is developed. The apparatus necessary for the measurements was suitably constructed and measurements of the fields of vision were made with it. The visibilities of six airplanes of different types of construction and use were measured, as well as the visibility of an automobile for comparison. An attempt was made to establish minimum visibility requirements and to express the excellence of visibility by means of a numerical coefficient.

  7. Investigation of Minimum Sized Low-Profile Cockpits (MSLPC) and Crew Escape System Integration.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-09-17

    GLOSSARY OF TERMINOLOGY ABBREVIATIONS, SYMBOLS, a ACRONYMS AMP Aircraft maneuvering parameter ATS Air-to-surface technology evaluation & integration study ...afterburner, if any Lb FSLGVOL Fuselage volume Cubic feet NOAC Number of operational aircraft Integer i’ xv 1. INTRODUCTION Recent study efforts to define...Profile Cockpit (MSLPC) concept and the integra- tion of crew escape system concepts. This study determined the attendant per- formance and effectiveness

  8. Role of structural noise in aircraft pressure cockpit from vibration action of new-generation engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baklanov, V. S.

    2016-07-01

    The evolution of new-generation aircraft engines is transitioning from a bypass ratio of 4-6 to an increased ratio of 8-12. This is leading to substantial broadening of the vibration spectrum of engines with a shift to the low-frequency range due to decreased rotation speed of the fan rotor, in turn requiring new solutions to decrease structural noise from engine vibrations to ensure comfort in the cockpits and cabins of aircraft.

  9. Implications of Automotive and Trucking On-Board Information Systems for General Aviation Cockpit Weather Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sireli, Yesim; Kauffmann, Paul; Gupta, Surabhi; Kachroo, Pushkin

    2002-01-01

    In this study, current characteristics and future developments of Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS) in the automobile and trucking industry are investigated to identify the possible implications of such systems for General Aviation (GA) cockpit weather systems. First, ITS are explained based on tracing their historical development in various countries. Then, current systems and the enabling communication technologies are discussed. Finally, a market analysis for GA is included.

  10. When training boomerangs - Negative outcomes associated with Cockpit Resource Management programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helmreich, Robert L.; Wilhelm, John A.

    1989-01-01

    Participants' self-reports and measures of attitudes regarding flightdeck management indicate that Cockpit Resource Management training is positively received and causes highly significant changes in attitudes regarding crew coordination and personal capabilities. However, a subset of participants react negatively to the training and show boomerangs (negative change) in attitudes. Explorations into the causes of this effect pinpoint personality factors and group dynamics as critical determinants of reactions to training and the magnitude and direction of attitude change.

  11. A survey of the status of and philosophies relating to cockpit warning systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, G. E.

    1977-01-01

    A survey was taken to study current cockpit caution and warning (c/w) systems, and to examine industry philosophies regarding c/w system design including current efforts to improve them. Guidelines currently in use were outlined and those which appear to have general acceptance, those which are considered ineffective or erroneous, and those with which there is broad disagreement as to validity, were delineated. Major airplane manufacturerd were surveyed and a manufacturer dealing specifically with aircraft instrumentation was consulted.

  12. Weapon System Sensor Integration for a Dis-Compatible Virtual Cockpit

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-12-01

    Utilities ........................ 78 6.6.1 Moving The WGS 84 Area of Interest ....... ... 78 6.6.2 Public Methods For Round Earth Utilities . . .. 83 VII...Radar Missile Launched And Tracking 96 41. VC 2.0 Moving Parts Extended ........................... 97 42. F-15E Forward Panel Front Cockpit...operator detection and designation when employing various munition types. Simulated munition types include: radar or IR missiles, free-fall, laser guided

  13. Whither CRM? Future directions in Crew Resource Management training in the cockpit and elsewhere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helmreich, Robert L.

    1993-01-01

    The past decade has shown worldwide adoption of human factors training in civil aviation, now known as Crew Resource Management (CRM). The shift in name from cockpit to crew reflects a growing trend to extend the training to other components of the aviation system including flight attendants, dispatchers, maintenance personnel, and Air Traffic Controllers. The paper reports findings and new directions in research into human factors.

  14. Cockpit Resource Management (CRM) for FAR Parts 91 and 135 operators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwartz, Douglas

    1987-01-01

    The why, what, and how of CRM at Flight Safety International (FSI)--that is, the philosophy behind the program, the content of the program, and some insight regarding how it delivers that to the pilot is presented. A few of the concepts that are part of the program are discussed. This includes a view of statistics called the Safety Window, the concept of situational awareness, and an approach to training that we called the Cockpit Management Concept (CMC).

  15. A Human Factors Evaluation of the Space Shuttle Cockpit Avionics Upgrade

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-01

    cockpit design . This study assesses the CAU design employing human factors principles, evaluates baseline and CAU simulation data, and traces MW and SA...differences back to CAU design modifications. Significant improvements were found in all measures and across all conditions. These improvements were...found to be greater for ascent scenarios than for entry. From the findings, recommendations for the design and evaluation of future spacecraft

  16. Integrated cockpit design for the Army helicopter improvement program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drennen, T.; Bowen, B.

    1984-01-01

    The main Army Helicopter Improvement Program (AHIP) mission is to navigate precisely, locate targets accurately, communicate their position to other battlefield elements, and to designate them for laser guided weapons. The onboard navigation and mast-mounted sight (MMS) avionics enable accurate tracking of current aircraft position and subsequent target location. The AHIP crewstation development was based on extensive mission/task analysis, function allocation, total system design, and test and verification. The avionics requirements to meet the mission was limited by the existing aircraft structural and performance characteristics and resultant space, weight, and power restrictions. These limitations and night operations requirement led to the use of night vision goggles. The combination of these requirements and limitations dictated an integrated control/display approach using multifunction displays and controls.

  17. Pilot Neil Armstrong in the X-15 #1 cockpit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1961-01-01

    NASA pilot Neil Armstrong is seen here in the cockpit of the X-15 ship #1 (56-6670) after a research flight. A U.S. Navy pilot in the Korean War who flew 78 combat missions in F9F-2 jet fighters and who was awarded the Air Medal and two Gold Stars, Armstrong graduated from Purdue University in 1955 with a bachelor degree in aeronautical engineering. That same year, he joined the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics' Lewis Flight Propulsion Laboratory in Cleveland, Ohio (today, the NASA Glenn Research Center). In July 1955, Armstrong transferred to the High-Speed Flight Station (HSFS, as Dryden Flight Research Center was then called) as an aeronautical research engineer. Soon thereafter, he became a research pilot. For the first few years at the HSFS, Armstrong worked on a number of projects. He was a pilot on the Navy P2B-1S used to launch the D-558-2 and also flew the F-100A, F-100C, F-101, F-104A, and X-5. His introduction to rocket flight came on August 15, 1957, with his first flight (of four, total) on the X-1B. He then became one of the first three NASA pilots to fly the X-15, the others being Joe Walker and Jack McKay. (Scott Crossfield, a former NACA pilot, flew the X-15 first but did so as a North American Aviation pilot.) The X-15 was a rocket-powered aircraft. The original three aircraft were about 50 ft long with a wingspan of 22 ft. The modified #2 aircraft (X-15A-2 was longer.) They were a missile-shaped vehicles with unusual wedge-shaped vertical tails, thin stubby wings, and unique side fairings that extended along the side of the fuselage. The X-15 weighed about 14,000 lb empty and approximately 34,000 lb at launch. The XLR-99 rocket engine, manufactured by Thiokol Chemical Corp., was pilot controlled and was rated at 57,000 lb of thrust, although there are indications that it actually achieved up to 60,000 lb. North American Aviation built three X-15 aircraft for the program. The X-15 research aircraft was developed to provide in

  18. The Rendezvous Monitoring Display Capabilities of the Rendezvous and Proximity Operations Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brazzel, Jack; Spehar, Pete; Clark, Fred; Foster, Chris; Eldridge, Erin

    2013-01-01

    The Rendezvous and Proximity Operations Program (RPOP) is a laptop computer- based relative navigation tool and piloting aid that was developed during the Space Shuttle program. RPOP displays a graphical representation of the relative motion between the target and chaser vehicles in a rendezvous, proximity operations and capture scenario. After being used in over 60 Shuttle rendezvous missions, some of the RPOP display concepts have become recognized as a minimum standard for cockpit displays for monitoring the rendezvous task. To support International Space Station (ISS) based crews in monitoring incoming visiting vehicles, RPOP has been modified to allow crews to compare the Cygnus visiting vehicle s onboard navigated state to processed range measurements from an ISS-based, crew-operated Hand Held Lidar sensor. This paper will discuss the display concepts of RPOP that have proven useful in performing and monitoring rendezvous and proximity operations.

  19. Hover training display: rationale and implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Still, David L.; Temme, Leonard A.

    2008-04-01

    Hover is an essential component of rotary wing aviation but learning to hover is extremely difficult. From the viewpoint inside the cockpit, the beginning student neither sees nor understands what needs to be done to control the aircraft. This is because the out-the-window real world visual cues suffer from two primary shortcomings. First, the real world visual cues are ambiguous. For example, the relative motion of the ground moving under the nose may indicate forward flight, pitching upward, vertical ascent, or any combination of these. Second, human ability to judge aircraft pitch by itself is insufficient to stabilize the aircraft; such other clues as relative motion or parallax are needed to augment pitch judgments to set aircraft attitude adequately. We report a training display (TD) designed to assist training rotary wing hover. The TD is specifically constructed to communicate aircraft performance and attitude to the student pilot and to disambiguate the external world's features and motions cues into symbology that allows each cue independently to support sufficient levels of parameter resolution. Our preliminary observations, based on pilot data collected during the design, parameterization, and calibration of the TD indicate that it meets its goals in a fashion that enables beginning flight students to understand and interpret the motion cues of the real world out-the-window view.

  20. Display formats manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Runnels, R. L.

    1973-01-01

    The standards and procedures for the generation of operational display formats to be used in the Mission Control Center (MCC) display control system are presented. The required effort, forms, and fundamentals for the design, specifications, and production of display formats are identified. The principles of display design and system constraints controlling the creation of optimum operational displays for mission control are explained. The basic two types of MCC display systems for presenting information are described.

  1. Using Constraint Satisfaction Networks to Study Aircrew Selection for Advanced Cockpits.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-01-01

    selection [1] has tended to emphasize psychomotor skills , spatial/perceptual skills, and personality traits. The investigation of these skills was...In this situation, superb psychomotor skills could effectively explore the outer fringes of the aircraft’s operating envelope. It is my contention

  2. Cockpit Technology for Prevention of General Aviation Runway Incursions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prinzel, Lawrence J., III; Jones, Denise R.

    2007-01-01

    General aviation accounted for 74 percent of runway incursions but only 57 percent of the operations during the four-year period from fiscal year (FY) 2001 through FY2004. Elements of the NASA Runway Incursion Prevention System were adapted and tested for general aviation aircraft. Sixteen General Aviation pilots, of varying levels of certification and amount of experience, participated in a piloted simulation study to evaluate the system for prevention of general aviation runway incursions compared to existing moving map displays. Pilots flew numerous complex, high workload approaches under varying weather and visibility conditions. A rare-event runway incursion scenario was presented, unbeknownst to the pilots, which represented a typical runway incursion situation. The results validated the efficacy and safety need for a runway incursion prevention system for general aviation aircraft.

  3. Stereoscopic Flat Panel Display

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-12-01

    the display of stereo imagery have been demonstrated. Stereoscopic displays typically require the user to wear special headgear. Autostereoscopic ...components and the resulting changes in the encoding algorithm. Keywords: Stereoscopic display, LCD, 3D , polarization encoding, flat panel 1...panel display when viewing non-stereoscopic imagery or data. Remotely operated vehicles do not represent the only potential application for 3D

  4. Advanced Visualization and Interactive Displays (AVID)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-04-01

    interference to the image from the projector . The IR light passes through the screen and is not visible to the camera until an object comes in contact with...and filters with no illuminators to determine if the DataWall projectors generated adequate ambient IR light for touch interaction. IR reflections...where not detected therefore the projectors did not generate adequate IR light. The next phase Figure 38 Sony HoloWall Touch Screen 47 of testing

  5. Electrochromic display device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicholson, M. M.

    1984-07-01

    This invention relates to electrochromic devices. In one aspect it relates to electrically controllable display devices. In another aspect it relates to electrically tunable optical or light filters. In yet another aspect it relates to a chemical sensor device which employs a color changing film. There are many uses for electrically controllable display devices. A number of such devices have been in commercial use for some time. These display devices include liquid crystal displays, light emitting diode displays, plasma displays, and the like. Light emitting diode displays and plasma display panels both suffer from the fact that they are active. Light emissive devices which require substantial power for their operation, In addition, it is difficult to fabricate light emitting diode displays in a manner which renders them easily distinguishable under bright ambient illumination. Liquid crystal displays suffer from the disadvantage that they are operative only over a limited temperature range and have substantially no memory within the liquid crystal material.

  6. System status display information

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Summers, L. G.; Erickson, J. B.

    1984-01-01

    The system Status Display is an electronic display system which provides the flight crew with enhanced capabilities for monitoring and managing aircraft systems. Guidelines for the design of the electronic system displays were established. The technical approach involved the application of a system engineering approach to the design of candidate displays and the evaluation of a Hernative concepts by part-task simulation. The system engineering and selection of candidate displays are covered.

  7. Reactions of Air Transport Flight Crews to Displays of Weather During Simulated Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bliss, James P.; Fallon, Corey; Bustamante, Ernesto; Bailey, William R., III; Anderson, Brittany

    2005-01-01

    Display of information in the cockpit has long been a challenge for aircraft designers. Given the limited space in which to present information, designers have had to be extremely selective about the types and amount of flight related information to present to pilots. The general goal of cockpit display design and implementation is to ensure that displays present information that is timely, useful, and helpful. This suggests that displays should facilitate the management of perceived workload, and should allow maximal situation awareness. The formatting of current and projected weather displays represents a unique challenge. As technologies have been developed to increase the variety and capabilities of weather information available to flight crews, factors such as conflicting weather representations and increased decision importance have increased the likelihood for errors. However, if formatted optimally, it is possible that next generation weather displays could allow for clearer indications of weather trends such as developing or decaying weather patterns. Important issues to address include the integration of weather information sources, flight crew trust of displayed weather information, and the teamed reactivity of flight crews to displays of weather. Past studies of weather display reactivity and formatting have not adequately addressed these issues; in part because experimental stimuli have not approximated the complexity of modern weather displays, and in part because they have not used realistic experimental tasks or participants. The goal of the research reported here was to investigate the influence of onboard and NEXRAD agreement, range to the simulated potential weather event, and the pilot flying on flight crew deviation decisions, perceived workload, and perceived situation awareness. Fifteen pilot-copilot teams were required to fly a simulated route while reacting to weather events presented in two graphical formats on a separate visual display

  8. Research Pilot C. Gordon Fullerton in Cockpit of TU-144LL SST Flying Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    NASA Research pilot C. Gordon Fullerton sits in cockpit of TU-144LL SST Flying Laboratory. Fullerton was one of two NASA pilots who flew the aircraft as part of a joint high speed research program. NASA teamed with American and Russian aerospace industries for an extended period in a joint international research program featuring the Russian-built Tu-144LL supersonic aircraft. The object of the program was to develop technologies for a proposed future second-generation supersonic airliner to be developed in the 21st Century. The aircraft's initial flight phase began in June 1996 and concluded in February 1998 after 19 research flights. A shorter follow-on program involving seven flights began in September 1998 and concluded in April 1999. All flights were conducted in Russia from Tupolev's facility at the Zhukovsky Air Development Center near Moscow. The centerpiece of the research program was the Tu 144LL, a first-generation Russian supersonic jetliner that was modified by its developer/builder, Tupolev ANTK (aviatsionnyy nauchno-tekhnicheskiy kompleks-roughly, aviation technical complex), into a flying laboratory for supersonic research. Using the Tu-144LL to conduct flight research experiments, researchers compared full-scale supersonic aircraft flight data with results from models in wind tunnels, computer-aided techniques, and other flight tests. The experiments provided unique aerodynamic, structures, acoustics, and operating environment data on supersonic passenger aircraft. Data collected from the research program was being used to develop the technology base for a proposed future American-built supersonic jetliner. Although actual development of such an advanced supersonic transport (SST) is currently on hold, commercial aviation experts estimate that a market for up to 500 such aircraft could develop by the third decade of the 21st Century. The Tu-144LL used in the NASA-sponsored research program was a 'D' model with different engines than were used in

  9. Field study of communication and workload in police helicopters - Implications for AI cockpit design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linde, Charlotte; Shively, Robert J.

    1988-01-01

    This paper reports on the work performed by civilian helicopter crews, using audio and video recordings and a variety of workload measures (heart rate and subjective ratings) obtained in a field study of public service helicopter missions. The number and frequency of communications provided a significant source of workload. This is relevant to the design of automated cockpit systems, since many designs presuppose the use of voice I/O systems. Fluency of communications (including pauses, hesitation markers, repetitions, and false starts) furnished an early indication of the effects of fatigue. Three workload measures were correlated to identify high workload segments of flight, and to suggest alternate task allocations between crew members.

  10. Thin optical display panel

    DOEpatents

    Veligdan, James Thomas

    1997-01-01

    An optical display includes a plurality of optical waveguides each including a cladding bound core for guiding internal display light between first and second opposite ends by total internal reflection. The waveguides are stacked together to define a collective display thickness. Each of the cores includes a heterogeneous portion defining a light scattering site disposed longitudinally between the first and second ends. Adjacent ones of the sites are longitudinally offset from each other for forming a longitudinal internal image display over the display thickness upon scattering of internal display light thereagainst for generating a display image. In a preferred embodiment, the waveguides and scattering sites are transparent for transmitting therethrough an external image in superposition with the display image formed by scattering the internal light off the scattering sites for defining a heads up display.

  11. Seamless tiled display system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dubin, Matthew B. (Inventor); Larson, Brent D. (Inventor); Kolosowsky, Aleksandra (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A modular and scalable seamless tiled display apparatus includes multiple display devices, a screen, and multiple lens assemblies. Each display device is subdivided into multiple sections, and each section is configured to display a sectional image. One of the lens assemblies is optically coupled to each of the sections of each of the display devices to project the sectional image displayed on that section onto the screen. The multiple lens assemblies are configured to merge the projected sectional images to form a single tiled image. The projected sectional images may be merged on the screen by magnifying and shifting the images in an appropriate manner. The magnification and shifting of these images eliminates any visual effect on the tiled display that may result from dead-band regions defined between each pair of adjacent sections on each display device, and due to gaps between multiple display devices.

  12. A method for generating enhanced vision displays using OpenGL video texture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernier, Kenneth L.

    2010-04-01

    Degraded visual conditions can marvel the curious and destroy the unprepared. While navigation instruments are trustworthy companions, true visual reference remains king of the hills. Poor visibility may be overcome via imaging sensors such as low light level charge-coupled-device, infrared, and millimeter wave radar. Enhanced Vision systems combine this imagery into a comprehensive situation awareness display, presented to the pilot as reference imagery on a cockpit display, or as world-conformal imagery on head-up or head-mounted displays. This paper demonstrates that Enhanced Vision imaging can be achieved at video rates using typical CPU / GPU architecture, standard video capture hardware, dynamic non-linear ray tracing algorithms, efficient image transfer methods, and simple OpenGL rendering techniques.

  13. The Effects of Transient Emotional State and Workload on Size Scaling in Perspective Displays

    SciTech Connect

    Tuan Q. Tran; Kimberly R. Raddatz

    2006-10-01

    Previous research has been devoted to the study of perceptual (e.g., number of depth cues) and cognitive (e.g., instructional set) factors that influence veridical size perception in perspective displays. However, considering that perspective displays have utility in high workload environments that often induce high arousal (e.g., aircraft cockpits), the present study sought to examine the effect of observers’ emotional state on the ability to perceive and judge veridical size. Within a dual-task paradigm, observers’ ability to make accurate size judgments was examined under conditions of induced emotional state (positive, negative, neutral) and high and low workload. Results showed that participants in both positive and negative induced emotional states were slower to make accurate size judgments than those not under induced emotional arousal. Results suggest that emotional state is an important factor that influences visual performance on perspective displays and is worthy of further study.

  14. The design and implementation of CRT displays in the TCV real-time simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leavitt, J. B.; Tariq, S. I.; Steinmetz, G. G.

    1975-01-01

    The design and application of computer graphics to the Terminal Configured Vehicle (TCV) program were described. A Boeing 737-100 series aircraft was modified with a second flight deck and several computers installed in the passenger cabin. One of the elements in support of the TCV program is a sophisticated simulation system developed to duplicate the operation of the aft flight deck. This facility consists of an aft flight deck simulator, equipped with realistic flight instrumentation, a CDC 6600 computer, and an Adage graphics terminal; this terminal presents to the simulator pilot displays similar to those used on the aircraft with equivalent man-machine interactions. These two displays form the primary flight instrumentation for the pilot and are dynamic images depicting critical flight information. The graphics terminal is a high speed interactive refresh-type graphics system. To support the cockpit display, two remote CRT's were wired in parallel with two of the Adage scopes.

  15. Three-dimensional display technologies

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Jason

    2014-01-01

    The physical world around us is three-dimensional (3D), yet traditional display devices can show only two-dimensional (2D) flat images that lack depth (i.e., the third dimension) information. This fundamental restriction greatly limits our ability to perceive and to understand the complexity of real-world objects. Nearly 50% of the capability of the human brain is devoted to processing visual information [Human Anatomy & Physiology (Pearson, 2012)]. Flat images and 2D displays do not harness the brain’s power effectively. With rapid advances in the electronics, optics, laser, and photonics fields, true 3D display technologies are making their way into the marketplace. 3D movies, 3D TV, 3D mobile devices, and 3D games have increasingly demanded true 3D display with no eyeglasses (autostereoscopic). Therefore, it would be very beneficial to readers of this journal to have a systematic review of state-of-the-art 3D display technologies. PMID:25530827

  16. An Evaluation of Detect and Avoid Displays for UAS: The Effect of Information Level and Display Location on Pilot Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rorie, Conrad; Fern, Lisa; Pack, Jessica; Shively, Jay; Draper, Mark H.

    2015-01-01

    The pilot-in-the-loop Detect-and-Avoid (DAA) task requires the pilot to carry out three major functions: 1) detect a potential threat, 2) determine an appropriate resolution maneuver, and 3) execute that resolution maneuver via the GCS control and navigation interface(s). The purpose of the present study was to examine two main questions with respect to DAA display considerations that could impact pilots ability to maintain well clear from other aircraft. First, what is the effect of a minimum (or basic) information display compared to an advanced information display on pilot performance? Second, what is the effect of display location on UAS pilot performance? Two levels of information level (basic, advanced) were compared across two levels of display location (standalone, integrated), for a total of four displays. The results indicate that the advanced displays had faster overall response times compared to the basic displays, however, there were no significant differences between the standalone and integrated displays.

  17. Scalability of Robotic Displays: Display Size Investigation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-05-01

    active matrix touch screen display (see figure 1). The screen is a super video graphics array 12.1 inches diagonal with 800x600-pixel resolution...ounces) super- video graphics display, high resolution (800x600) pictures with a 1.425-inch diagonal picture. The device used in this study was a...from a portable operator control unit that provides continuous data and video feedback for precise vehicle positioning. It was developed for the

  18. Refreshable Braille Displays Using EAP Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bar-Cohen, Yoseph

    2010-01-01

    Refreshable Braille can help visually impaired persons benefit from the growing advances in computer technology. The development of such displays in a full screen form is a great challenge due to the need to pack many actuators in small area without interferences. In recent years, various displays using actuators such as piezoelectric stacks have become available in commercial form but most of them are limited to one line Braille code. Researchers in the field of electroactive polymers (EAP) investigated methods of using these materials to form full screen displays. This manuscript reviews the state of the art of producing refreshable Braille displays using EAP-based actuators..

  19. Refreshable Braille displays using EAP actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bar-Cohen, Yoseph

    2010-04-01

    Refreshable Braille can help visually impaired persons benefit from the growing advances in computer technology. The development of such displays in a full screen form is a great challenge due to the need to pack many actuators in small area without interferences. In recent years, various displays using actuators such as piezoelectric stacks have become available in commercial form but most of them are limited to one line Braille code. Researchers in the field of electroactive polymers (EAP) investigated methods of using these materials to form full screen displays. This manuscript reviews the state of the art of producing refreshable Braille displays using EAP-based actuators.

  20. EMU helmet mounted display

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marmolejo, Jose (Inventor); Smith, Stephen (Inventor); Plough, Alan (Inventor); Clarke, Robert (Inventor); Mclean, William (Inventor); Fournier, Joseph (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A helmet mounted display device is disclosed for projecting a display on a flat combiner surface located above the line of sight where the display is produced by two independent optical channels with independent LCD image generators. The display has a fully overlapped field of view on the combiner surface and the focus can be adjusted from a near field of four feet to infinity.

  1. The Traffic-Alert and Collision Avoidance System (TCAS) in the glass cockpit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chappell, Sheryl L.

    1988-01-01

    This volume contains the contributions of the participants in the NASA Ames Research Center workshop on the traffic-alert and collision avoidance system (TCAS) implementation for aircraft with cathode ray tube (CRT) or flat panel displays. To take advantage of the display capability of the advanced-technology aircraft, NASA sponsored this workshop with the intent of bringing together industry personnel, pilots, and researchers so that pertinent issues in the area could be identified. During the 2-day workshop participants addressed a number of issues including: What is the optimum format for TCAS advisories. Where and how should maneuver advisories be presented to the crew. Should the maneuver advisories be presented on the primary flight display. Is it appropriate to have the autopilot perform the avoidance maneuver. Where and how should traffic information be presented to the crew. Should traffic information be combined with weather and navigation information. How much traffic should be shown and what ranges should be used. Contained in the document are the concepts and suggestions produced by the workshop participants.

  2. Status review of field emission displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghrayeb, Joseph; Daniels, Reginald

    2001-09-01

    Cathode ray tube (CRT) technology dominates the direct view display market. Mature CRT technology for many designs is still the preferred choice. CRT manufacturers have greatly improved the size and weight of the CRT displays. High performance CRTs continue to be in great demand, however, supply have to contend with the vanishing CRT vendor syndrome. Therefore, the vanishing CRT vendor syndrome fuels the search for an alternate display technology source. Within the past 10 years, field emission display (FED) technology had gained momentum and, at one time, was considered the most viable electronic display technology candidate [to replace the CRT]. The FED community had advocated and promised many advantages over active matrix liquid crystal displays (AMLCD), electro luminescent (EL) or Plasma displays. Some observers, including potential FED manufacturers and the Department of Defense, (especially the Defense Advanced Research Project Agency (DARPA)), consider the FED entry as having leapfrog potential. Despite major investments by US manufacturers as well as Asian manufacturers, reliability and manufacturing difficulties greatly slowed down the advancement of the technology. The FED manufacturing difficulties have caused many would-be FED manufacturing participants to abandon FED research. This paper will examine the trends, which are leading this nascent technology to its downfall. FED technology was once considered to have the potential to leapfrog over AMLCD's dominance in the display industry. At present the FED has suffered severe setbacks and there are very few [FED] manufacturers still pursuing research in the area. These companies have yet to deliver a display beyond the prototype stage.

  3. Digital video display system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zygielbaum, A. I.; Martin, W. L.; Engle, A.

    1973-01-01

    System displays image data in real time on 120,000-element raster scan with 2, 4, or 8 shades of grey. Designed for displaying planetary range Doppler data, system can be used for X-Y plotting, displaying alphanumerics, and providing image animation.

  4. XVD Image Display Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deen, Robert G.; Andres, Paul M.; Mortensen, Helen B.; Parizher, Vadim; McAuley, Myche; Bartholomew, Paul

    2009-01-01

    The XVD [X-Windows VICAR (video image communication and retrieval) Display] computer program offers an interactive display of VICAR and PDS (planetary data systems) images. It is designed to efficiently display multiple-GB images and runs on Solaris, Linux, or Mac OS X systems using X-Windows.

  5. Screens and Displays.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edstrom, Malin

    1987-01-01

    Discusses the characteristics of different computer screen technologies including the possible harmful effects on health of cathode ray tube (CRT) terminals. CRT's are compared to other technologies including liquid crystal displays, plasma displays, electroluminiscence displays, and light emitting diodes. A chart comparing the different…

  6. Cockpit Resource Management (CRM): A tool for improved flight safety (United Airlines CRM training)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carroll, J. E.; Taggart, William R.

    1987-01-01

    The approach and methodology used in developing cockpit management skills is effective because of the following features: (1) A comparative method of learning is used enabling crewmembers to study different forms of teamwork. (2) The learning comes about as a result of crewmembers learning from one another instead of from an expert instructor. (3) Key elements of cockpit teamwork and effective management are studied so that crewmembers can determine how these elements can improve safety and problem solving. (4) Critique among the crewmembers themselves rather than from outsiders is used as a common focusing point for crews to provide feedback to one another on how each can be a more effective crewmember. (5) The training is continuous in the sense that it becomes part of recurrent, upgrade, and other forms of crewmember training and development. And (6) the training results in sound and genuine insights that come about through solid education as opposed to tutoring, coaching, or telling crewmembers how to behave more effectively.

  7. Mortality Among a Cohort of U.S. Commercial Airline Cockpit Crew

    PubMed Central

    Yong, Lee C.; Pinkerton, Lynne E.; Yiin, James H.; Anderson, Jeri L.; Deddens, James A.

    2015-01-01

    Background We evaluated mortality among 5,964 former U.S. commercial cockpit crew (pilots and flight engineers). The outcomes of a priori interest were non-chronic lymphocytic leukemia, central nervous system (CNS) cancer (including brain), and malignant melanoma. Methods Vital status was ascertained through 2008. Life table and Cox regression analyses were conducted. Cumulative exposure to cosmic radiation was estimated from work history data. Results Compared to the U.S. general population, mortality from all causes, all cancer, and cardiovascular diseases was decreased, but mortality from aircraft accidents was highly elevated. Mortality was elevated for malignant melanoma but not for non-chronic lymphocytic leukemia. CNS cancer mortality increased with an increase in cumulative radiation dose. Conclusions Cockpit crew had a low all-cause, all-cancer, and cardiovascular disease mortality but elevated aircraft accident mortality. Further studies are needed to clarify the risk of CNS and other radiation-associated cancers in relation to cosmic radiation and other workplace exposures. PMID:24700478

  8. Robust recognition of loud and Lombard speech in the fighter cockpit environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanton, Bill J., Jr.

    1988-08-01

    There are a number of challenges associated with incorporating speech recognition technology into the fighter cockpit. One of the major problems is the wide range of variability in the pilot's voice. That can result from changing levels of stress and workload. Increasing the training set to include abnormal speech is not an attractive option because of the innumerable conditions that would have to be represented and the inordinate amount of time to collect such a training set. A more promising approach is to study subsets of abnormal speech that have been produced under controlled cockpit conditions with the purpose of characterizing reliable shifts that occur relative to normal speech. Such was the initiative of this research. Analyses were conducted for 18 features on 17671 phoneme tokens across eight speakers for normal, loud, and Lombard speech. It was discovered that there was a consistent migration of energy in the sonorants. This discovery of reliable energy shifts led to the development of a method to reduce or eliminate these shifts in the Euclidean distances between LPC log magnitude spectra. This combination significantly improved recognition performance of loud and Lombard speech. Discrepancies in recognition error rates between normal and abnormal speech were reduced by approximately 50 percent for all eight speakers combined.

  9. Effects of cockpit lateral stick characteristics on handling qualities and pilot dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, David G.; Aponso, Bimal L.; Klyde, David H.

    1992-01-01

    This report presents the results of analysis of cockpit lateral control feel-system studies. Variations in feel-system natural frequency, damping, and command sensing reference (force and position) were investigated, in combination with variations in the aircraft response characteristics. The primary data for the report were obtained from a flight investigation conducted with a variable-stability airplane, with additional information taken from other flight experiments and ground-based simulations for both airplanes and helicopters . The study consisted of analysis of handling qualities ratings and extraction of open-loop, pilot-vehicle describing functions from sum-of-sines tracking data, including, for a limited subset of these data, the development of pilot models. The study confirms the findings of other investigators that the effects on pilot opinion of cockpit feel-system dynamics are not equivalent to a comparable level of added time delay, and until a more comprehensive set of criteria are developed, it is recommended that feel-system dynamics be considered a delay-inducing element in the aircraft response. The best correlation with time-delay requirements was found when the feel-system dynamics were included in the delay measurements, regardless of the command reference. This is a radical departure from past approaches.

  10. Head-Mounted and Head-Up Display Glossary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, Richard L.; Allen, J. Edwin W. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    One of the problems in head-up and helmet-mounted display (HMD) literature has been a lack of standardization of words and abbreviations. Several different words have been used for the same concept; for example, flight path angle, flight path marker, velocity vector, and total velocity vector all refer to the same thing. In other cases, the same term has been used with two different meanings, such as binocular field-of-view which means the field-of-view visible to both left and right eyes according to some or the field-of-view visible to either the left or right eye or both according to others. Many of the terms used in HMD studies have not been well-defined. We need to have a common language to ensure that system descriptions are communicated. As an example, the term 'stabilized' has been widely used with two meanings. 'Roll-stabilized' has been used to mean a symbol which rotates to indicate the roll or bank of the aircraft. 'World-stabilized' and 'head-stabilized' have both been used to indicate symbols which move to remain fixed with respect to external objects. HMDs present unique symbology problems not found in HUDs. Foremost among these is the issue of maintaining spatial orientation of the symbols. All previous flight displays, round dial instruments, HDDs, and HUDs have been fixed in the cockpit. With the HMD, the flight display can move through a large angle. The coordinates use in transforming from the real-world to the aircraft to the HMD have not been consistently defined. This glossary contains terms relating to optics and vision, displays, and flight information, weapons and aircraft systems. Some definitions, such as Navigation Display, have been added to clarify the definitions for Primary Flight Display and Primary Flight Reference. A list of HUD/HMD related abbreviations is also included.

  11. Comparison of speech intelligibility in cockpit noise using SPH-4 flight helmet with and without active noise reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, Jeffrey W.; Simpson, Carol A.

    1990-01-01

    Active Noise Reduction (ANR) is a new technology which can reduce the level of aircraft cockpit noise that reaches the pilot's ear while simultaneously improving the signal to noise ratio for voice communications and other information bearing sound signals in the cockpit. A miniature, ear-cup mounted ANR system was tested to determine whether speech intelligibility is better for helicopter pilots using ANR compared to a control condition of ANR turned off. Two signal to noise ratios (S/N), representative of actual cockpit conditions, were used for the ratio of the speech to cockpit noise sound pressure levels. Speech intelligibility was significantly better with ANR compared to no ANR for both S/N conditions. Variability of speech intelligibility among pilots was also significantly less with ANR. When the stock helmet was used with ANR turned off, the average PB Word speech intelligibility score was below the Normally Acceptable level. In comparison, it was above that level with ANR on in both S/N levels.

  12. Cytoplasmic bacteriophage display system

    DOEpatents

    Studier, F.W.; Rosenberg, A.H.

    1998-06-16

    Disclosed are display vectors comprising DNA encoding a portion of a structural protein from a cytoplasmic bacteriophage, joined covalently to a protein or peptide of interest. Exemplified are display vectors wherein the structural protein is the T7 bacteriophage capsid protein. More specifically, in the exemplified display vectors the C-terminal amino acid residue of the portion of the capsid protein is joined to the N-terminal residue of the protein or peptide of interest. The portion of the T7 capsid protein exemplified comprises an N-terminal portion corresponding to form 10B of the T7 capsid protein. The display vectors are useful for high copy number display or lower copy number display (with larger fusion). Compositions of the type described herein are useful in connection with methods for producing a virus displaying a protein or peptide of interest. 1 fig.

  13. Cytoplasmic bacteriophage display system

    DOEpatents

    Studier, F. William; Rosenberg, Alan H.

    1998-06-16

    Disclosed are display vectors comprising DNA encoding a portion of a structural protein from a cytoplasmic bacteriophage, joined covalently to a protein or peptide of interest. Exemplified are display vectors wherein the structural protein is the T7 bacteriophage capsid protein. More specifically, in the exemplified display vectors the C-terminal amino acid residue of the portion of the capsid protein is joined to the N-terminal residue of the protein or peptide of interest. The portion of the T7 capsid protein exemplified comprises an N-terminal portion corresponding to form 10B of the T7 capsid protein. The display vectors are useful for high copy number display or lower copy number display (with larger fusion). Compositions of the type described herein are useful in connection with methods for producing a virus displaying a protein or peptide of interest.

  14. Optimization of color LC displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosmowski, Bogdan B.

    1995-08-01

    The advancement of the liquid crystal display (LCD) technology, and improvements of the optical and electro-optical properties, have enabled the broad expansion of LCDs application field. The rapid development of the multimedia techniques, new applications in automotive, office, medical domain, forced the demand for the color displays--for the information presentation with the color code. The necessity to fulfil many contradictory and extreme conditions caused the development of the optimization procedures of the color LC displays to be a big problem. Most of the LCDs used nowadays are the twisted nematic, super twisted nematic, and active matrix thin film transistor LCD. The characterization of the achromatic black/white LCDs is made by means of photometric measuring methods, and quantitative measures are used: luminance, reflectance, contrast, contrast ration; as a function of a driving voltage, viewing angle, temperature, etc. The characterization of the color LCD is based on the spectral distributions of the transmittance or reflectance. Quantitative measures are chromatic coordinates and luminance factors are defined according to the colorimetric systems--CIE 1931, CIE 1976, CIELUV, CIELAB. The color difference (Delta) E in the CIELUV system is applied as a optimization parameter for the color display module. The spectral properties of all optical elements of the display module are analyzed and their influence on the set of the optical factors of LCD is evaluated. The correlation between technological parameters and optical characteristics of the LCD has been investigated. The choice of the optimization criterion is discussed and the optimization algorithm is proposed. Results of the color displays evaluation for some examples with different preconditions are presented.

  15. Improved full-color F-16A/B and F-16C/D multifunction display using a ruggedized COTS active matrix color liquid crystal display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orkis, Randall E.

    1995-06-01

    The Improved F-16 Display Unit (DU) is the first use of a ruggedized COTS LCD in a high performance fighter application and is the first color LCD to fly in an F-16 aircraft. The Display Unit (DU) is one of two LRUs that make up the Improved Radar Electro-Optical (REO) Display Set. The second LRU is called the Electronics Unit (EU). The Improved REO Display Set flew for the first time in August of 1994 and will continue flight testing through 1995. In addition to the improved R&M features of the design, the new system provides the capability for increased performance and growth through an open systems modular architecture. This will be demonstrated during testing this year in which the improved REO Display Set will be a key component in the Air Force Reserves Integrated Electronic Combat Feasibility Assessment Project for the F-16C aircraft, by providing a consolidated color situation awareness display. The current EC LRUs are not integrated, and each EC element has its own controls and displays which are dispersed throughout the cockpit. This puts a significant burden on the pilot and limits his ability to react to various threats. The Improved REO Display Set distributed processing capabilities and color displays allow the EC horizontal situation awareness formats to be generated and consolidated on one of the REO system color LCDs through bezel switch selection of available displays. This paper presents the latest performance characteristics of the Improved Display Unit, testing results, and the design trade-offs that lead to the use of a ruggedized COTS LCD rather than a custom military LCD. Following flight testing and pilot evaluation, a decision will be made to proceed with production refinement of the ruggedized design or to transition to a custom LCD designed specifically for military use.

  16. Aircraft developments that hold promise for increased compatability with an advanced ATC system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodge, K. E.

    1978-01-01

    In terms of an advanced air traffic control environment, consideration is given to a wake vortex advisory system and V/STOL aircraft. The terminal configured vehicle program is described. Procedures for all-weather operations are reviewed and the search and rescue satellite system is described. Predictions are made concerning an advanced national aviation system, digital communications, integrated control technology, and cockpit avionics. Human factors in both general and civil aviation are discussed.

  17. Pilot Designed Aircraft Displays in General Aviation: An Exploratory Study and Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conaway, Cody R.

    From 2001-2011, the General Aviation (GA) fatal accident rate remained unchanged (Duquette & Dorr, 2014) with an overall stagnant accident rate between 2004 and 2013. The leading cause, loss of control in flight (NTSB, 2015b & 2015c) due to pilot inability to recognize approach to stall/spin conditions (NTSB, 2015b & 2016b). In 2013, there were 1,224 GA accidents in the U.S., accounting for 94% of all U.S. aviation accidents and 90% of all U.S. aviation fatalities that year (NTSB, 2015c). Aviation entails multiple challenges for pilots related to task management, procedural errors, perceptual distortions, and cognitive discrepancies. While machine errors in airplanes have continued to decrease over the years, human error still has not (NTSB, 2013). A preliminary analysis of a PC-based, Garmin G1000 flight deck was conducted with 3 professional pilots. Analyses revealed increased task load, opportunities for distraction, confusing perceptual ques, and hindered cognitive performance. Complex usage problems were deeply ingrained in the functionality of the system, forcing pilots to use fallible work arounds, add unnecessary steps, and memorize knob turns or button pushes. Modern computing now has the potential to free GA cockpit designs from knobs, soft keys, or limited display options. Dynamic digital displays might include changes in instrumentation or menu structuring depending on the phase of flight. Airspeed indicators could increase in size to become more salient during landing, simultaneously highlighting pitch angle on Attitude Indicators and automatically decluttering unnecessary information for landing. Likewise, Angle-of-Attack indicators demonstrate a great safety and performance advantage for pilots (Duquette & Dorr, 2014; NTSB, 2015b & 2016b), an instrument typically found in military platforms and now the Icon A5, light-sport aircraft (Icon, 2016). How does the design of pilots' environment---the cockpit---further influence their efficiency and

  18. Virtual acoustics displays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wenzel, Elizabeth M.; Fisher, Scott S.; Stone, Philip K.; Foster, Scott H.

    1991-01-01

    The real time acoustic display capabilities are described which were developed for the Virtual Environment Workstation (VIEW) Project at NASA-Ames. The acoustic display is capable of generating localized acoustic cues in real time over headphones. An auditory symbology, a related collection of representational auditory 'objects' or 'icons', can be designed using ACE (Auditory Cue Editor), which links both discrete and continuously varying acoustic parameters with information or events in the display. During a given display scenario, the symbology can be dynamically coordinated in real time with 3-D visual objects, speech, and gestural displays. The types of displays feasible with the system range from simple warnings and alarms to the acoustic representation of multidimensional data or events.

  19. Polyplanar optic display

    SciTech Connect

    Veligdan, J.; Biscardi, C.; Brewster, C.; DeSanto, L.; Beiser, L.

    1997-07-01

    The Polyplanar Optical Display (POD) is a unique display screen which can be used with any projection source. This display screen is 2 inches thick and has a matte black face which allows for high contrast images. The prototype being developed is a form, fit and functional replacement display for the B-52 aircraft which uses a monochrome ten-inch display. The new display uses a 100 milliwatt green solid state laser (532 nm) as its optical source. In order to produce real-time video, the laser light is being modulated by a Digital Light Processing (DLP{trademark}) chip manufactured by Texas Instruments, Inc. A variable astigmatic focusing system is used to produce a stigmatic image on the viewing face of the POD. In addition to the optical design, the authors discuss the electronic interfacing to the DLP{trademark} chip, the opto-mechanical design and viewing angle characteristics.

  20. Virtual acoustics displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wenzel, Elizabeth M.; Fisher, Scott S.; Stone, Philip K.; Foster, Scott H.

    1991-03-01

    The real time acoustic display capabilities are described which were developed for the Virtual Environment Workstation (VIEW) Project at NASA-Ames. The acoustic display is capable of generating localized acoustic cues in real time over headphones. An auditory symbology, a related collection of representational auditory 'objects' or 'icons', can be designed using ACE (Auditory Cue Editor), which links both discrete and continuously varying acoustic parameters with information or events in the display. During a given display scenario, the symbology can be dynamically coordinated in real time with 3-D visual objects, speech, and gestural displays. The types of displays feasible with the system range from simple warnings and alarms to the acoustic representation of multidimensional data or events.

  1. Paperlike thermochromic display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Liyu; Peng, Suili; Wen, Weijia; Sheng, Ping

    2007-05-01

    The authors report the design and implementation of a paperlike, thermally activated display fabricated from thermochromic composite and embedded conductive wiring patterns, shaped from mixture of metallic nanoparticles in polydimethylsioxane using soft lithography. The display exhibits good image quality and ease of control. Use of electric heating pulses is shown to reduce energy consumption while improving image quality control. The display has excellent mechanical bending flexibility.

  2. Performance specification methodology: introduction and application to displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopper, Darrel G.

    1998-09-01

    Acquisition reform is based on the notion that DoD must rely on the commercial marketplace insofar as possible rather than solely looking inward to a military marketplace to meet its needs. This reform forces a fundamental change in the way DoD conducts business, including a heavy reliance on private sector models of change. The key to more reliance on the commercial marketplace is the performance specifications (PS). This paper introduces some PS concepts and a PS classification principal to help bring some structure to the analysis of risk (cost, schedule, capability) in weapons system development and the management of opportunities for affordable ownership (maintain/increase capability via technology insertion, reduce cost) in this new paradigm. The DoD shift toward commercial components is nowhere better exemplified than in displays. Displays are the quintessential dual-use technology and are used herein to exemplify these PS concepts and principal. The advent of flat panel displays as a successful technology is setting off an epochal shift in cockpits and other military applications. Displays are installed in every DoD weapon system, and are, thus, representative of a range of technologies where issues and concerns throughout industry and government have been raised regarding the increased DoD reliance on the commercial marketplace. Performance specifications require metrics: the overall metrics of 'information-thrust' with units of Mb/s and 'specific info- thrust' with units of Mb/s/kg are introduced to analyze value of a display to the warfighter and affordability to the taxpayer.

  3. JAVA Stereo Display Toolkit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edmonds, Karina

    2008-01-01

    This toolkit provides a common interface for displaying graphical user interface (GUI) components in stereo using either specialized stereo display hardware (e.g., liquid crystal shutter or polarized glasses) or anaglyph display (red/blue glasses) on standard workstation displays. An application using this toolkit will work without modification in either environment, allowing stereo software to reach a wider audience without sacrificing high-quality display on dedicated hardware. The toolkit is written in Java for use with the Swing GUI Toolkit and has cross-platform compatibility. It hooks into the graphics system, allowing any standard Swing component to be displayed in stereo. It uses the OpenGL graphics library to control the stereo hardware and to perform the rendering. It also supports anaglyph and special stereo hardware using the same API (application-program interface), and has the ability to simulate color stereo in anaglyph mode by combining the red band of the left image with the green/blue bands of the right image. This is a low-level toolkit that accomplishes simply the display of components (including the JadeDisplay image display component). It does not include higher-level functions such as disparity adjustment, 3D cursor, or overlays all of which can be built using this toolkit.

  4. Displaying Data As Movies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Judith G.

    1992-01-01

    NMSB Movie computer program displays large sets of data (more than million individual values). Presentation dynamic, rapidly displaying sequential image "frames" in main "movie" window. Any sequence of two-dimensional sets of data scaled between 0 and 255 (1-byte resolution) displayed as movie. Time- or slice-wise progression of data illustrated. Originally written to present data from three-dimensional ultrasonic scans of damaged aerospace composite materials, illustrates data acquired by thermal-analysis systems measuring rates of heating and cooling of various materials. Developed on Macintosh IIx computer with 8-bit color display adapter and 8 megabytes of memory using Symantec Corporation's Think C, version 4.0.

  5. Terrain Portrayal for Head-Down Displays Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, Monica F.; Takallu, M. A.

    2002-01-01

    The General Aviation Element of the Aviation Safety Program's Synthetic Vision Systems (SVS) Project is developing technology to eliminate low visibility induced General Aviation (GA) accidents. SVS displays present computer generated 3-dimensional imagery of the surrounding terrain on the Primary Flight Display (PFD) to greatly enhance pilot's situation awareness (SA), reducing or eliminating Controlled Flight into Terrain, as well as Low-Visibility Loss of Control accidents. SVS-conducted research is facilitating development of display concepts that provide the pilot with an unobstructed view of the outside terrain, regardless of weather conditions and time of day. A critical component of SVS displays is the appropriate presentation of terrain to the pilot. An experimental study has been conducted at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) to explore and quantify the relationship between the realism of the terrain presentation and resulting enhancements of pilot SA and pilot performance. Composed of complementary simulation and flight test efforts, Terrain Portrayal for Head-Down Displays (TP-HDD) experiments will help researchers evaluate critical terrain portrayal concepts. The experimental effort is to provide data to enable design trades that optimize SVS applications, as well as develop requirements and recommendations to facilitate the certification process. This paper focuses on the experimental set-up and preliminary qualitative results of the TP-HDD simulation experiment. In this experiment a fixed based flight simulator was equipped with various types of Head Down flight displays, ranging from conventional round dials (typical of most GA aircraft) to glass cockpit style PFD's. The variations of the PFD included an assortment of texturing and Digital Elevation Model (DEM) resolution combinations. A test matrix of 10 terrain display configurations (in addition to the baseline displays) were evaluated by 27 pilots of various backgrounds and experience levels

  6. Development of an algorithm to model an aircraft equipped with a generic CDTI display

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Driscoll, W. C.; Houck, J. A.

    1986-01-01

    A model of human pilot performance of a tracking task using a generic Cockpit Display of Traffic Information (CDTI) display is developed from experimental data. The tracking task is to use CDTI in tracking a leading aircraft at a nominal separation of three nautical miles over a prescribed trajectory in space. The analysis of the data resulting from a factorial design of experiments reveals that the tracking task performance depends on the pilot and his experience at performing the task. Performance was not strongly affected by the type of control system used (velocity vector control wheel steering versus 3D automatic flight path guidance and control). The model that is developed and verified results in state trajectories whose difference from the experimental state trajectories is small compared to the variation due to the pilot and experience factors.

  7. A simulation evaluation of the engine monitoring and control system display

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbott, Terence S.

    1990-01-01

    The Engine Monitoring and Control System (E-MACS) display is a new concept for an engine instrument display, the purpose of which is to provide an enhanced means for a pilot to control and monitor aircraft engine performance. It provides graphically-presented information about performance capabilities, current performance, and engine component or subsystem operational conditions relative to nominal conditions. The concept was evaluated by sixteen pilot-subjects against a traditional, state-of-the-art electronic engine display format. The results of this evaluation showed a substantial pilot preference for the E-MACS display relative to the traditional display. The results of the failure detection portion of the evaluation showed a 100 percent detection rate for the E-MACS display relative to a 57 percent rate for the traditional display. From these results, it is concluded that by providing this type of information in the cockpit, a reduction in pilot workload and an enhanced ability for detecting degraded or off-nominal conditions is probable, thus leading to an increase in operational safety.

  8. Simulator evaluation of displays for a revised takeoff performance monitoring system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Middleton, David B.; Srivatsan, Raghavachari; Person, Lee H., Jr

    1992-01-01

    Cockpit displays for a Takeoff Performance Monitoring System (TOPMS) to provide pilots with graphic and alphanumeric information pertinent to their decision to continue or abort a takeoff are evaluated. Revised head-down and newly developed head-up displays were implemented on electronic screens in the real-time Transport Systems Research Vehicle (TSRV) Simulator for the Boeing 737 airplane at the Langley Research Center and evaluated by 17 NASA, U.S. Air Force, airline, and industry pilots. Both types of displays were in color, but they were not dependent upon it. The TOPMS head-down display is composed of a runway graphic overlaid with symbolic status and advisory information related to both the expected takeoff point and the predicted stop point (in the event an abort becomes necessary). In addition, an overall Situation Advisory Flag indicates a preferred course of action based on analysis of the various elements of airplane performance and system status. A simpler head-up display conveys most of this same information and relates it to the visual scene. The evaluation pilots found the displays to be credible, easy to monitor, and appropriate for the task. In particular, the pilots said the head-up display was monitored with very little effort and did not obstruct or distract them from monitoring the simulated out-the-window runway scene. This report augments NASA TP-2908, 1989.

  9. Performance Comparison Between a Head-Worn Display System and a Head-Up Display for Low Visibility Commercial Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arthur, Jarvis J., III; Prinzel, Lawrence J., III; Barnes, James R.; Williams, Steven P.; Jones, Denise R.; Harrison, Stephanie J.; Bailey, Randall E.

    2014-01-01

    Research, development, test, and evaluation of flight deck interface technologies is being conducted by NASA to proactively identify, develop, and mature tools, methods, and technologies for improving overall aircraft safety of new and legacy vehicles operating in Next Generation Air Transportation System (NextGen). Under the Vehicle Systems Safety Technologies (VSST) project in the Aviation Safety Program, one specific area of research is the use of small Head-Worn Displays (HWDs) as an equivalent display to a Head-Up Display (HUD). Title 14 of the US Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 91.175 describes a possible operational credit which can be obtained with airplane equipage of a HUD or an "equivalent" display combined with Enhanced Vision (EV). If successful, a HWD may provide the same safety and operational benefits as current HUD-equipped aircraft but for significantly more aircraft in which HUD installation is neither practical nor possible. A simulation experiment was conducted to evaluate if the HWD, coupled with a head-tracker, can provide an equivalent display to a HUD. Comparative testing was performed in the Research Flight Deck (RFD) Cockpit Motion Facility (CMF) full mission, motion-based simulator at NASA Langley. Twelve airline crews conducted approach and landing, taxi, and departure operations during low visibility operations (1000' Runway Visual Range (RVR), 300' RVR) at Memphis International Airport (Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) identifier: KMEM). The results showed that there were no statistical differences in the crews performance in terms of touchdown and takeoff. Further, there were no statistical differences between the HUD and HWD in pilots' responses to questionnaires.

  10. Preliminary results from the evaluation of Cockpit Resource Management training - Performance ratings of flightcrews

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helmreich, Robert L.; Wilhelm, John A.; Gregorich, Steven E.; Chidester, Thomas R.

    1990-01-01

    The first data from the NASA/University of Texas Crew Performance project on the behavior of flightcrews with and without formal training in Cockpit Resource Management (CRM) is reported. Expert observers made detailed ratings of 15 components of crew behavior in both line operations and in full mission simulations. The results indicate that such training in crew coordination concepts increases the percentage of crews rated as above average in performance and decreases the percentage rated as below average. The data also show high and unexpected degrees of variations in rated performance among crews flying different aircraft within the same organization. It was also found that the specific behaviors that triggered observer ratings of above or below average performance differed markedly between organizations. Characteristics of experts' ratings and future research needs are also discussed.

  11. Some human factors issues in the development and evaluation of cockpit alerting and warning systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Randle, R. J., Jr.; Larsen, W. E.; Williams, D. H.

    1980-01-01

    A set of general guidelines for evaluating a newly developed cockpit alerting and warning system in terms of human factors issues are provided. Although the discussion centers around a general methodology, it is made specifically to the issues involved in alerting systems. An overall statement of the current operational problem is presented. Human factors problems with reference to existing alerting and warning systems are described. The methodology for proceeding through system development to system test is discussed. The differences between traditional human factors laboratory evaluations and those required for evaluation of complex man-machine systems under development are emphasized. Performance evaluation in the alerting and warning subsystem using a hypothetical sample system is explained.

  12. Anthropometric Cockpit Compatibility Assessment of US Army Aircraft for Large and Small Personnel Wearing A Cold Weather, Armored Vest, Chemical Defense Protective Clothing Configuration

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-07-01

    identify by block number) Anthropometry, Aircraft, Cockpit-Compatibility, Chemical Defense, Cold Weather Clothing, Helicopters, Fixed- Wing Aircraft...5th percentiles of the Army male population were placed in the cockpits of all current US ArmY helicopters (except AAH-64) and fixed- wing aircraft, and...Fixed Wing Aircraft .... 0........................ 24 References.o........*..e.......o......o............ 29 LIST OF FIGURES FIGURES 1 . Up pe r B o dy

  13. Framework for effective use of multiple displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qiong; Kimber, Don; Zhao, Frank; Huang, Jeffrey

    2005-10-01

    Meeting environments, such as conference rooms, executive briefing centers, and exhibition spaces, are now commonly equipped with multiple displays, and will become increasingly display-rich in the future. Existing authoring/presentation tools such as PowerPoint, however, provide little support for effective utilization of multiple displays. Even using advanced multi-display enabled multimedia presentation tools, the task of assigning material to displays is tedious and distracts presenters from focusing on content. This paper describes a framework for automatically assigning presentation material to displays, based on a model of the quality of views of audience members. The framework is based on a model of visual fidelity which takes into account presentation content, audience members' locations, the limited resolution of human eyes, and display location, orientation, size, resolution, and frame rate. The model can be used to determine presentation material placement based on average or worst case audience member view quality, and to warn about material that would be illegible. By integrating this framework with a previous system for multi-display presentation [PreAuthor, others], we created a tool that accepts PowerPoint and/or other media input files, and automatically generates a layout of material onto displays for each state of the presentation. The tool also provides an interface allowing the presenter to modify the automatically generated layout before or during the actual presentation. This paper discusses the framework, possible application scenarios, examples of the system behavior, and our experience with system use.

  14. Split image optical display

    DOEpatents

    Veligdan, James T.

    2005-05-31

    A video image is displayed from an optical panel by splitting the image into a plurality of image components, and then projecting the image components through corresponding portions of the panel to collectively form the image. Depth of the display is correspondingly reduced.

  15. Split image optical display

    DOEpatents

    Veligdan, James T.

    2007-05-29

    A video image is displayed from an optical panel by splitting the image into a plurality of image components, and then projecting the image components through corresponding portions of the panel to collectively form the image. Depth of the display is correspondingly reduced.

  16. Effective Monitor Display Design.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrell, William

    1999-01-01

    Describes some of the factors that affect computer monitor display design and provides suggestions and insights into how screen displays can be designed more effectively. Topics include color, font choices, organizational structure of text, space outline, and general principles. (Author/LRW)

  17. Displays in space.

    PubMed

    Colford, Nicholas

    2002-04-01

    This chapter describes the human and environmental factors that dictate the way that displays must be designed for, and used in space. A brief history of the evolution of such display systems covers developments from the Mercury rockets to the International Space Station.

  18. Display and Presentation Boards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Midgley, Thomas Keith

    The use of display and presentation boards as tools to help teachers/trainers convey messages more clearly is briefly discussed, and 24 different types of display and presentation boards are described and illustrated; i.e., chalk, paste-up, hook-n-loop, electric, flannel, scroll, communication planning, acetate pocket, slot, pin-tack, preview,…

  19. Polyplanar optical display electronics

    SciTech Connect

    DeSanto, L.; Biscardi, C.

    1997-07-01

    The Polyplanar Optical Display (POD) is a unique display screen which can be used with any projection source. The prototype ten inch display is two inches thick and has a matte black face which allows for high contrast images. The prototype being developed is a form, fit and functional replacement display for the B-52 aircraft which uses a monochrome ten-inch display. In order to achieve a long lifetime, the new display uses a 100 milliwatt green solid-state laser (10,000 hr. life) at 532 nm as its light source. To produce real-time video, the laser light is being modulated by a Digital Light Processing (DLP{trademark}) chip manufactured by Texas Instruments. In order to use the solid-state laser as the light source and also fit within the constraints of the B-52 display, the Digital Micromirror Device (DMD{trademark}) circuit board is removed from the Texas Instruments DLP light engine assembly. Due to the compact architecture of the projection system within the display chassis, the DMD{trademark} chip is operated remotely from the Texas Instruments circuit board. The authors discuss the operation of the DMD{trademark} divorced from the light engine and the interfacing of the DMD{trademark} board with various video formats (CVBS, Y/C or S-video and RGB) including the format specific to the B-52 aircraft. A brief discussion of the electronics required to drive the laser is also presented.

  20. An architecture and model for cognitive engineering simulation analysis - Application to advanced aviation automation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corker, Kevin M.; Smith, Barry R.

    1993-01-01

    The process of designing crew stations for large-scale, complex automated systems is made difficult because of the flexibility of roles that the crew can assume, and by the rapid rate at which system designs become fixed. Modern cockpit automation frequently involves multiple layers of control and display technology in which human operators must exercise equipment in augmented, supervisory, and fully automated control modes. In this context, we maintain that effective human-centered design is dependent on adequate models of human/system performance in which representations of the equipment, the human operator(s), and the mission tasks are available to designers for manipulation and modification. The joint Army-NASA Aircrew/Aircraft Integration (A3I) Program, with its attendant Man-machine Integration Design and Analysis System (MIDAS), was initiated to meet this challenge. MIDAS provides designers with a test bed for analyzing human-system integration in an environment in which both cognitive human function and 'intelligent' machine function are described in similar terms. This distributed object-oriented simulation system, its architecture and assumptions, and our experiences from its application in advanced aviation crew stations are described.

  1. Developing an integrated digitizing and display surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hipple, James D.; Wedding, Daniel K.; Wedding, Donald K., Sr.

    1995-04-01

    The development of an integrated digitizing and display surface, which utilizes touch entry and flat panel display (FPD) technology, is a significant hardware advance in the field of geographic information systems (GIS). Inherent qualities of the FPD, notably the ac gas plasma display, makes such a marriage inevitable. Large diagonal sizes, high resolution color, screen flatness, and monitor thickness are desirable features of an integrated digitizing and display surface. Recently, the GIS literature has addressed a need for such an innovation. The development of graphics displays based on sophisticated technologies include `photorealistic' (or high definition) imaging at resolutions of 2048 X 2048 or greater, palates of 16.7 million colors, formats greater than 30 inches diagonal, and integrated touch entry. In this paper, there is an evaluation of FPDs and data input technologies in the development of such a product.

  2. Extraction and Analysis of Display Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Land, Chris; Moye, Kathryn

    2008-01-01

    The Display Audit Suite is an integrated package of software tools that partly automates the detection of Portable Computer System (PCS) Display errors. [PCS is a lap top computer used onboard the International Space Station (ISS).] The need for automation stems from the large quantity of PCS displays (6,000+, with 1,000,000+ lines of command and telemetry data). The Display Audit Suite includes data-extraction tools, automatic error detection tools, and database tools for generating analysis spread sheets. These spread sheets allow engineers to more easily identify many different kinds of possible errors. The Suite supports over 40 independent analyses, 16 NASA Tech Briefs, November 2008 and complements formal testing by being comprehensive (all displays can be checked) and by revealing errors that are difficult to detect via test. In addition, the Suite can be run early in the development cycle to find and correct errors in advance of testing.

  3. Illusion in reality: visual perception in displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufman, Lloyd; Kaufman, James H.

    2001-06-01

    Research into visual perception ultimately affects display design. Advance in display technology affects, in turn, our study of perception. Although this statement is too general to provide controversy, this paper present a real-life example that may prompt display engineers to make greater use of basic knowledge of visual perception, and encourage those who study perception to track more closely leading edge display technology. Our real-life example deals with an ancient problem, the moon illusion: why does the horizon moon appear so large while the elevated moon look so small. This was a puzzle for many centuries. Physical explanations, such as refraction by the atmosphere, are incorrect. The difference in apparent size may be classified as a misperception, so the answer must lie in the general principles of visual perception. The factors underlying the moon illusion must be the same factors as those that enable us to perceive the sizes of ordinary objects in visual space. Progress toward solving the problem has been irregular, since methods for actually measuring the illusion under a wide range of conditions were lacking. An advance in display technology made possible a serious and methodologically controlled study of the illusion. This technology was the first heads-up display. In this paper we will describe how the heads-up display concept made it possible to test several competing theories of the moon illusion, and how it led to an explanation that stood for nearly 40 years. We also consider the criticisms of that explanation and how the optics of the heads-up display also played a role in providing data for the critics. Finally, we will describe our own advance on the original methodology. This advance was motivated by previously unrelated principles of space perception. We used a stereoscopic heads up display to test alternative hypothesis about the illusion and to discrimate between two classes of mutually contradictory theories. At its core, the

  4. Synthetic Vision Displays for Planetary and Lunar Lander Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arthur, Jarvis J., III; Prinzel, Lawrence J., III; Williams, Steven P.; Shelton, Kevin J.; Kramer, Lynda J.; Bailey, Randall E.; Norman, Robert M.

    2008-01-01

    Aviation research has demonstrated that Synthetic Vision (SV) technology can substantially enhance situation awareness, reduce pilot workload, improve aviation safety, and promote flight path control precision. SV, and related flight deck technologies are currently being extended for application in planetary exploration vehicles. SV, in particular, holds significant potential for many planetary missions since the SV presentation provides a computer-generated view for the flight crew of the terrain and other significant environmental characteristics independent of the outside visibility conditions, window locations, or vehicle attributes. SV allows unconstrained control of the computer-generated scene lighting, terrain coloring, and virtual camera angles which may provide invaluable visual cues to pilots/astronauts, not available from other vision technologies. In addition, important vehicle state information may be conformally displayed on the view such as forward and down velocities, altitude, and fuel remaining to enhance trajectory control and vehicle system status. The paper accompanies a conference demonstration that introduced a prototype NASA Synthetic Vision system for lunar lander spacecraft. The paper will describe technical challenges and potential solutions to SV applications for the lunar landing mission, including the requirements for high-resolution lunar terrain maps, accurate positioning and orientation, and lunar cockpit display concepts to support projected mission challenges.

  5. Defense display market assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desjardins, Daniel D.; Hopper, Darrel G.

    1998-09-01

    This paper addresses the number, function and size of principal military displays and establishes a basis to determine the opportunities for technology insertion in the immediate future and into the next millennium. Principal military displays are defined as those occupying appreciable crewstation real-estate and/or those without which the platform could not carry out its intended mission. DoD 'office' applications are excluded from this study. The military displays market is specified by such parameters as active area and footprint size, and other characteristics such as luminance, gray scale, resolution, angle, color, video capability, and night vision imaging system (NVIS) compatibility. Funded, future acquisitions, planned and predicted crewstation modification kits, and form-fit upgrades are taken into account. This paper provides an overview of the DoD niche market, allowing both government and industry a necessary reference by which to meet DoD requirements for military displays in a timely and cost-effective manner. The aggregate DoD market for direct-view and large-area military displays is presently estimated to be in excess of 242,000. Miniature displays are those which must be magnified to be viewed, involve a significantly different manufacturing paradigm and are used in helmet mounted displays and thermal weapon sight applications. Some 114,000 miniature displays are presently included within Service weapon system acquisition plans. For vendor production planning purposes it is noted that foreign military sales could substantially increase these quantities. The vanishing vendor syndrome (VVS) for older display technologies continues to be a growing, pervasive problem throughout DoD, which consequently must leverage the more modern display technologies being developed for civil- commercial markets.

  6. A Benefit Analysis of Infusing Wireless into Aircraft and Fleet Operations - Report to Seedling Project Efficient Reconfigurable Cockpit Design and Fleet Operations Using Software Intensive, Network Enabled, Wireless Architecture (ECON)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexandrov, Natalia; Holmes, Bruce J.; Hahn, Andrew S.

    2016-01-01

    We report on an examination of potential benefits of infusing wireless technologies into various areas of aircraft and airspace operations. The analysis is done in support of a NASA seedling project Efficient Reconfigurable Cockpit Design and Fleet Operations Using Software Intensive, Network Enabled Wireless Architecture (ECON). The study has two objectives. First, we investigate one of the main benefit hypotheses of the ECON proposal: that the replacement of wired technologies with wireless would lead to significant weight reductions on an aircraft, among other benefits. Second, we advance a list of wireless technology applications and discuss their system benefits. With regard to the primary hypothesis, we conclude that the promise of weight reduction is premature. Specificity of the system domain and aircraft, criticality of components, reliability of wireless technologies, the weight of replacement or augmentation equipment, and the cost of infusion must all be taken into account among other considerations, to produce a reliable estimate of weight savings or increase.

  7. Current Performance Characteristics of NASA Langley Research Center's Cockpit Motion Base and Standardized Test Procedure for Future Performance Characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cowen, Brandon; Stringer, Mary T.; Hutchinson, Brian K.; Davidson, Paul C.; Gupton, Lawrence E.

    2014-01-01

    This report documents the updated performance characteristics of NASA Langley Research Center's (LaRC) Cockpit Motion Base (CMB) after recent revisions that were made to its inner-loop, feedback control law. The modifications to the control law will be briefly described. The performance of the Cockpit Motion Facility (CMF) will be presented. A short graphical comparison to the previous control law can be found in the appendix of this report. The revised controller will be shown to yield reduced parasitic accelerations with respect to the previous controller. Metrics based on the AGARD Advisory Report No. 144 are used to assess the overall system performance due to its recent control algorithm modification. This report also documents the standardized simulator test procedure which can be used in the future to evaluate potential updates to the control law.

  8. The impact of cockpit automation on crew coordination and communication. Volume 1: Overview, LOFT evaluations, error severity, and questionnaire data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiener, Earl L.; Chidester, Thomas R.; Kanki, Barbara G.; Palmer, Everett A.; Curry, Renwick E.; Gregorich, Steven E.

    1991-01-01

    The purpose was to examine, jointly, cockpit automation and social processes. Automation was varied by the choice of two radically different versions of the DC-9 series aircraft, the traditional DC-9-30, and the glass cockpit derivative, the MD-88. Airline pilot volunteers flew a mission in the simulator for these aircraft. Results show that the performance differences between the crews of the two aircraft were generally small, but where there were differences, they favored the DC-9. There were no criteria on which the MD-88 crews performed better than the DC-9 crews. Furthermore, DC-9 crews rated their own workload as lower than did the MD-88 pilots. There were no significant differences between the two aircraft types with respect to the severity of errors committed during the Line-Oriented Flight Training (LOFT) flight. The attitude questionnaires provided some interesting insights, but failed to distinguish between DC-9 and MD-88 crews.

  9. Integrated Mission Precision Attack Cockpit Technology (IMPACT). Phase 1: Identifying Technologies for Air-to-Ground Fighter Integration.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-10-31

    also used as a "first cut" assessment of thebe oud n hediscussion section. Emphasis technologies. The next set of ratings be found in the presented (see...and control aircraft orbiting a display, giving Jack a real time, accurate,secure update of the enemy ground order of 49 battle . What a quantum leap...CAS aircraft were multiple friendly and enemy forces are intermixed (tanks on battle field), but for long distant deliveries of advanced weapons from

  10. Map display design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aretz, Anthony J.

    1990-01-01

    This paper presents a cognitive model of a pilot's navigation task and describes an experiment comparing a visual momentum map display to the traditional track-up and north-up approaches. The data show the advantage to a track-up map is its congruence with the ego-centered forward view; however, the development of survey knowledge is hindered by the inconsistency of the rotating display. The stable alignment of a north-up map aids the acquisition of survey knowledge, but there is a cost associated with the mental rotation of the display to a track-up alignment for ego-centered tasks. The results also show that visual momentum can be used to reduce the mental rotation costs of a north-up display.

  11. Gardens on Display.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steinheimer, Margaret

    1998-01-01

    Discusses display gardens and their development by students. Presents guidelines for construction and size consideration and describes details of an outdoor garden, volcanic garden, and shoe box dioramas. (DDR)

  12. Factors affecting dwell times on digital displaying

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, A. J.; Harris, R. L., Sr.

    1985-01-01

    A series of exploratory tests were conducted to investigate the effects of advanced display formats and display media on pilot scanning behavior using Langley's oculometer, a desktop flight simulator, a conventional electro-mechanical meter, and various digital displays. The primary task was for the test subject to maintain level flight, on a specific course heading, during moderate turbulence. A secondary task of manually controlling the readout of a display was used to examine the effects of the display format on a subject's scan behavior. Secondary task scan parameters that were evaluated were average dwell time, dwell time histograms, and number of dwells per meter change. The round dial meter demonstrated shorter dwell times and fewer dwells per meter change than the digital displays. The following factors affected digital display scanning behavior: (1) the number of digits; (2) the update rate of the digits; (3) the display media; and (4) the character font. The size of the digits used in these tests (0.28 to 0.50 inches) did not affect scan behavior measures.

  13. Liquid Crystal Airborne Display

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-08-01

    81/2X 11- 10 -9 .8 display using a large advertising alphanimeric ( TCI ) has been added to the front of the optical box used in the F-4 aircraft for HUD...properties over a wide range of tempera - tures, including normal room temperature. What are Liquid Crystals? Liquid crystals have been classified in three...natic fanctions and to present data needed for the semi- automatic and manual control of system functions. Existing aircraft using CRT display

  14. Lasers Aimed at Aircraft Cockpits: Background and Possible Options to Address the Threat to Aviation Safety and Security

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-01-26

    1 Van B. Nakagawara and Ronald W. Montgomery. Laser Pointers : Their Potential Affects on Vision and Aviation Safety. Federal Aviation...powerful at extended viewing distances. Because lasers remain powerful over large distances, a laser pointer can expose pilots to radiation levels above...airliner by aiming a handheld laser pointer into the cockpit is highly unlikely, there is concern that a military laser , such as the Chinese-made ZM-87 laser

  15. Interactive Whole-Class Display Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garofalo, Joe; Bull, Glen; Bell, Randy; van Hover, Stephanie

    2003-01-01

    In several recent studies and surveys, both beginning and experienced teachers ranked access to a projector as one of the actions most likely to facilitate more effective use of technology in their classrooms. Advances in display technologies now make this increasingly feasible. For example, digital light processing (DLP) technology is one of…

  16. Dichroic Liquid Crystal Displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahadur, Birendra

    The following sections are included: * INTRODUCTION * DICHROIC DYES * Chemical Structure * Chemical and Photochemical Stability * THEORETICAL MODELLING * DEFECTS CAUSED BY PROLONGED LIGHT IRRADIATION * CHEMICAL STRUCTURE AND PHOTOSTABILITY * OTHER PARAMETERS AFFECTING PHOTOSTABILITY * CELL PREPARATION * DICHROIC PARAMETERS AND THEIR MEASUREMENTS * Order Parameter and Dichroic Ratio Of Dyes * Absorbance, Order Parameter and Dichroic Ratio Measurements * IMPACT OF DYE STRUCTURE AND LIQUID CRYSTAL HOST ON PHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF A DICHROIC MIXTURE * Order Parameter and Dichroic Ratio * EFFECT OF LENGTH OF DICHROIC DYES ON THE ORDER PARAMETER * EFFECT OF THE BREADTH OF DYE ON THE ORDER PARAMETER * EFFECT OF THE HOST ON THE ORDER PARAMETER * TEMPERATURE VARIATION OF THE ORDER PARAMETER OF DYES IN A LIQUID CRYSTAL HOST * IMPACT OF DYE CONCENTRATION ON THE ORDER PARAMETER * Temperature Range * Viscosity * Dielectric Constant and Anisotropy * Refractive Indices and Birefringence * solubility43,153-156 * Absorption Wavelength and Auxochromic Groups * Molecular Engineering of Dichroic Dyes * OPTICAL, ELECTRO-OPTICAL AND LIFE PARAMETERS * Colour And CIE Colour space120,160-166 * CIE 1931 COLOUR SPACE * CIE 1976 CHROMATICITY DIAGRAM * CIE UNIFORM COLOUR SPACES & COLOUR DIFFERENCE FORMULAE120,160-166 * Electro-Optical Parameters120 * LUMINANCE * CONTRAST AND CONTRAST RATIO * SWITCHING SPEED * Life Parameters and Failure Modes * DICHROIC MIXTURE FORMULATION * Monochrome Mixture * Black Mixture * ACHROMATIC BLACK MIXTURE FOR HEILMEIER DISPLAYS * Effect of Illuminant on Display Colour * Colour of the Field-On State * Effect of Dye Linewidth * Optimum Centroid Wavelengths * Effect of Dye Concentration * Mixture Formulation Using More Than Three Dyes * ACHROMATIC MIXTURE FOR WHITE-TAYLOR TYPE DISPLAYS * HEILMEIER DISPLAYS * Theoretical Modelling * Threshold Characteristic * Effects of Dye Concentration on Electro-optical Parameters * Effect of Cholesteric Doping * Effect of Alignment

  17. Combat vehicle crew helmet-mounted display: next generation high-resolution head-mounted display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Scott A.

    1994-06-01

    The Combat Vehicle Crew Head-Mounted Display (CVC HMD) program is an ARPA-funded, US Army Natick Research, Development, and Engineering Center monitored effort to develop a high resolution, flat panel HMD for the M1 A2 Abrams main battle tank. CVC HMD is part of the ARPA High Definition Systems (HDS) thrust to develop and integrate small (24 micrometers square pels), high resolution (1280 X 1024 X 6-bit grey scale at 60 frame/sec) active matrix electroluminescent (AMEL) and active matrix liquid crystal displays (AMLCD) for head mounted and projection applications. The Honeywell designed CVC HMD is a next generation head-mounted display system that includes advanced flat panel image sources, advanced digital display driver electronics, high speed (> 1 Gbps) digital interconnect electronics, and light weight, high performance optical and mechanical designs. The resulting dramatic improvements in size, weight, power, and cost have already led to program spin offs for both military and commercial applications.

  18. Cockpit Interruptions and Distractions: Effective Management Requires a Careful Balancing Act

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dismukes, R. K.; Young, Grant E.; Sumwalt, Robert L., III; Null, Cynthia H. (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Managing several tasks concurrently is an everyday part of cockpit operations. For the most part, crews handle concurrent task demands efficiently, yet crew preoccupation with one task to the detriment of performing other tasks is one of the more common forms of error in the cockpit. Most pilots are familiar with the December 1972 L1011 crash that occurred when the crew became preoccupied with a landing gear light malfunction and failed to notice that someone had inadvertently bumped off the autopilot. More recently a DC-9 landed gear-up in Houston when the crew, preoccupied with an stabilized approach, failed to recognize that the gear was not down because they had not switched the hydraulic pumps to high. We have recently started a research project to study why crews are vulnerable to these sorts of errors. As part of that project we reviewed NTSB reports of accidents attributed to crew error; we concluded that nearly half of these accidents involved lapses of attention associated with interruptions, distractions, or preoccupation with one task to the exclusion of another task. We have also analyzed 107 ASRS reports involving competing tasks; we present here some of our conclusions from those ASRS reports. These 107 reports involved 21 different types of routine tasks crews neglected at a critical moment while attending to another task. Sixty-nine percent of the neglected tasks involved either failure to monitor the current status or position of the aircraft or failure to monitor the actions of the pilot flying or taxiing. Thirty-four different types of competing activities distracted or preoccupied the pilots. Ninety percent of these competing activities fell into one of four broad categories: communication (e.g., discussion among crew or radio communication), heads-down work (e.g., programming the FMS or reviewing approach plates), responding to abnormals, or searching for VMC traffic. We will discuss examples of each of these four categories and suggest things

  19. Stereo Painting Display Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shafer, David

    1982-06-01

    The Spanish Surrealist artist Salvador Dali has recently perfected the art of producing two paintings which are stereo pairs. Each painting is separately quite remarkable, presenting a subject with the vivid realism and clarity for which Dali is famous. Due to the surrealistic themes of Dali's art, however, the subjects preser.ted with such naturalism only exist in his imagination. Despite this considerable obstacle to producing stereo art, Dali has managed to paint stereo pairs that display subtle differences of coloring and lighting, in addition to the essential perspective differences. These stereo paintings require a display method that will allow the viewer to experience stereo fusion, but which will not degrade the high quality of the art work. This paper gives a review of several display methods that seem promising in terms of economy, size, adjustability, and image quality.

  20. Recent progress in OLED and flexible displays and their potential for application to aerospace and military display systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarma, Kalluri

    2015-05-01

    Organic light emitting diode (OLED) display technology has advanced significantly in recent years and it is increasingly being adapted in consumer electronics products with premium performance, such as high resolution smart phones, Tablet PCs and TVs. Even flexible OLED displays are beginning to be commercialized in consumer electronic devices such as smart phones and smart watches. In addition to the advances in OLED emitters, successful development and adoption of OLED displays for premium performance applications relies on the advances in several enabling technologies including TFT backplanes, pixel drive electronics, pixel patterning technologies, encapsulation technologies and system level engineering. In this paper we will discuss the impact of the recent advances in LTPS and AOS TFTs, R, G, B and White OLED with color filter pixel architectures, and encapsulation, on the success of the OLEDs in consumer electronic devices. We will then discuss potential of these advances in addressing the requirements of OLED and flexible displays for the military and avionics applications.

  1. Viewing angle changeable display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leng, Jinbi; Huang, Ziqiang; Yang, Wenjun; Chen, Xiaoxi

    2010-10-01

    Viewing angle changeable display can change the display viewing angle as needed: In the public place the display could have a narrow viewing angle for privacy, while in the private place the displays could have a wide viewing angle for the convenience of the operation and better viewing experience. This article propose a novel adjustable optical transmission device to realize the viewing angle changes for LCD by using the principle of guest- host effect of liquid crystal. The major technology is to insert a special equipment between the backlight and the LCD, through which the backlight will display either parallel or scattered features to get an either narrow or wide viewing angle. The equipment is an adjustable transmission cell (ATC) which is actually a black G-H LC cell. This ATC is the main focus of our invention. The ATC consists of a polarizer sheet and a special guest-host liquid crystal device filled with the two-phase dye (called as GH-LC in this report), to achieve the viewing angle change in the LCD. When an electrical field charges to the ATC, only the so-called near-axis lights can pass through the ATC within a relatively small angle, while the other scattered lights are absorbed sequentially by GH-LC and the polarizer sheet. On the other hand, when there is no electrical charge to the ATC, the cell behaves like a normal polarizer; and the scattered light can pass through the cell and polarizer in a normal way. This paper describes the principle and structure of the device, applies the electric field on the sample to observe the electro-optical properties, combine the theoretical and experimental research, getting the viewing angle effects of the display.

  2. Diode-pumped microlasers for display applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hargis, David E.; Bergstedt, Robert; Earman, Allen M.; Gullicksen, Paul; Hurtado, Randy; Minich, Arthur P.; Nelte, Sven E.; Ornelas, David P.; Pessot, Maurice A.; Takeuchi, Eric B.; Vivian, Bill D.; Zarrabi, Joseph H.

    1998-05-01

    Laser displays have been investigated by engineers and scientists since shortly after the invention of the laser. The majority of these systems have been based on gas lasers or lamp-pumped solid-state lasers which are expensive, large in size, and require significant cooling systems. Due to these negative attributes, laser displays have been limited to applications which are not sensitive to size or cost. Recent advances in compact, air-cooled, diode-pumped, solid-state, visible microlasers have enabled the development of portable laser displays. Lasers are under development for both 'backlit' displays, where the lasers replace arc-lamps in an LCD/DMD projector, and 'direct-write' displays, where the image is formed by directly modulating and scanning the laser beam. Compact, multi-watt RGB laser modules have been demonstrated for use as 'light engines' in projection displays generating greater than 500 ANSI lumens. Advantages of microlaser-based displays include large color gamut, color accuracy, image uniformity, high resolution, large depth of focus, and low maintenance due to the long lifetime (greater than 10,000 hours) of the lasers. These advantages make them attractive for near term applications such as simulators, command and control centers, high end CAD workstation monitors, and longer term applications such as electronic cinema.

  3. Thin display optical projector

    DOEpatents

    Veligdan, James T.

    1999-01-01

    An optical system (20) projects light into a planar optical display (10). The display includes laminated optical waveguides (12) defining an inlet face (14) at one end and an outlet screen (16) at an opposite end. A first mirror (26) collimates light from a light source (18) along a first axis, and distributes the light along a second axis. A second mirror (28) collimates the light from the first mirror along the second axis to illuminate the inlet face and produce an image on the screen.

  4. Integrated display scanner

    DOEpatents

    Veligdan, James T.

    2004-12-21

    A display scanner includes an optical panel having a plurality of stacked optical waveguides. The waveguides define an inlet face at one end and a screen at an opposite end, with each waveguide having a core laminated between cladding. A projector projects a scan beam of light into the panel inlet face for transmission from the screen as a scan line to scan a barcode. A light sensor at the inlet face detects a return beam reflected from the barcode into the screen. A decoder decodes the return beam detected by the sensor for reading the barcode. In an exemplary embodiment, the optical panel also displays a visual image thereon.

  5. Universal electronic stereoscopic display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipton, Lenny; Halnon, Jeff

    1996-04-01

    SimulEYES VRTM, a new product for mass consumer electro-stereoscopic displays, is described. The system uses a unique indexing approach to allow content providers latitude in choosing the display mode. Board and PC manufacturers may also take advantage of the elegance of the solution by building in the SimulEYES VR capability. Hardware components consist, in part, of two custom chips which may be integrated at the board level, or employed in a VGA port dongle and control box. The liquid crystal shuttering eyewear is of a unique ergonomic design which is comfortable for people of all ages and most facial types, even when wearing eyeglasses.

  6. Symbology display unit: night vision symbology for the AH-64, increasing mission effectiveness and safety

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parise, Michael; McIntire, Dennis

    2006-05-01

    An important capability has been developed for the AH-64 that provides increased mission effectiveness and improved flight safety. First introduced for the Integrated Helmet and Display Sighting Subsystem (IHADSS) on the Agusta A-129, the Symbology Display Unit (SDU) provides IHADSS symbology to the aviator through the Aviator's Night Vision Imaging System (ANVIS) (Night Vision Goggles). Specifically designed for compatibility with the AH-64 and the Legacy IHADSS display and head tracking system, the SDU provides seamless integration of this critical capability into the cockpit. The SDU has been adapted to the IHADSS on the AH-64 and is currently in early fielding within both the US and UK fleets. Although the use of ANVIS on the AH-64 is not a new concept, the ability to display IHADSS symbology integrated with the head tracker is. With the display of IHADSS symbology within the ANVIS field of view, additional capabilities and benefits are realized, including sighting and weapons control, mission performance during poor FLIR conditions, increased target recognition, and improved safety realized by the availability of heads-up pilotage information.

  7. Flight Test Comparison of Synthetic Vision Display Concepts at Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glaab, Louis J.; Kramer, Lynda J.; Arthur, Trey; Parrish, Russell V.; Barry, John S.

    2003-01-01

    Limited visibility is the single most critical factor affecting the safety and capacity of worldwide aviation operations. Synthetic Vision Systems (SVS) technology can solve this visibility problem with a visibility solution. These displays employ computer-generated terrain imagery to present 3D, perspective out-the-window scenes with sufficient information and realism to enable operations equivalent to those of a bright, clear day, regardless of weather conditions. To introduce SVS display technology into as many existing aircraft as possible, a retrofit approach was defined that employs existing HDD display capabilities for glass cockpits and HUD capabilities for the other aircraft. This retrofit approach was evaluated for typical nighttime airline operations at a major international airport. Overall, 6 evaluation pilots performed 75 research approaches, accumulating 18 hours flight time evaluating SVS display concepts that used the NASA LaRC's Boeing B-757-200 aircraft at Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport. Results from this flight test establish the SVS retrofit concept, regardless of display size, as viable for tested conditions. Future assessments need to extend evaluation of the approach to operations in an appropriate, terrain-challenged environment with daytime test conditions.

  8. Virtual Auditory Displays

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-01-01

    timbre , intensity, distance, room modeling, radio communication Virtual Environments Handbook Chapter 4 Virtual Auditory Displays Russell D... musical note “A” as a pure sinusoid, there will be 440 condensations and rarefactions per second. The distance between two adjacent condensations or...and complexity are pitch, loudness, and timbre respectively. This distinction between physical and perceptual measures of sound properties is an

  9. Refreshing Refreshable Braille Displays.

    PubMed

    Russomanno, Alexander; O'Modhrain, Sile; Gillespie, R Brent; Rodger, Matthew W M

    2015-01-01

    The increased access to books afforded to blind people via e-publishing has given them long-sought independence for both recreational and educational reading. In most cases, blind readers access materials using speech output. For some content such as highly technical texts, music, and graphics, speech is not an appropriate access modality as it does not promote deep understanding. Therefore blind braille readers often prefer electronic braille displays. But, these are prohibitively expensive. The search is on, therefore, for a low-cost refreshable display that would go beyond current technologies and deliver graphical content as well as text. And many solutions have been proposed, some of which reduce costs by restricting the number of characters that can be displayed, even down to a single braille cell. In this paper, we demonstrate that restricting tactile cues during braille reading leads to poorer performance in a letter recognition task. In particular, we show that lack of sliding contact between the fingertip and the braille reading surface results in more errors and that the number of errors increases as a function of presentation speed. These findings suggest that single cell displays which do not incorporate sliding contact are likely to be less effective for braille reading.

  10. Ferroelectric liquid crystal display

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    York, Paul K. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A ferroelectric liquid crystal display device employs capacitance spoiling layers to minimize unneeded capacitances created by crossovers of X and Y address lines and to accurately define desired capacitances. The spoiler layers comprise low dielectric constant layers which space electrodes from the ferroelectric at crossover points where capacitance is not needed for device operation.

  11. A Plasma Display Terminal.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stifle, Jack

    A graphics terminal designed for use as a remote computer input/output terminal is described. Although the terminal is intended for use in teaching applications, it has several features which make it useful in many other computer terminal applications. These features include: a 10-inch square plasma display panel, permanent storage of information…

  12. Color Display Design Guide

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-10-01

    22 . 20 - MEAN/ALL COLORS/*. .. %.’ 18 -.-. YELLOW u- 16 . . RED /- ........ WHITE ൖ /- MAGENTA -,f 12 - / / CYAN ’"’- 10 /GREEN BLUE C= Ś S• l I I...Hawaii Laboratory P.O. Box 997 Kailua, Hawaii 96734 Attn: Dr. Ross L. Pepper Department of Psychology Panel Displays Incorporated Vanderbilt University

  13. Environmentally responsive material to address human-system interaction in the automotive cockpit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rehkopf, Jackie D.; Barbat, Saeed D.; Goldman, Neil M.; Samus, Marsha A.; Gold, Harris

    2001-06-01

    There is significant human-system interaction in an automotive cockpit, and for particular components this interaction can be ever-present while being transient in nature. It is envisioned that environmentally responsive materials can be used in some components to accommodate personal and transient differences in the desired human-system interaction. Systems containing responsive gels have been developed to provide user activation and adjustment of the physical properties of a particular interior automotive component. Proprietary reverse viscosification gel formulations were developed that are thermally responsive. Formulations were modified to adjust the dynamic modulus and viscosity in terms of magnitude, amount of change over the viscosification transition, and the temperature over which the transition occurs. Changes in the physical properties of two orders of magnitude and more were achieved over a narrow transition region. Preliminary human factors assessment indicates that this order of magnitude of change is desirable. As the system of responsive gel, encapsulating material and activation mechanism is developed further, additional human factors studies will refine the desired physical properties and thermal activation mechanism. Ultimately, this system will have to perform over the broad range of temperatures imposed on interior automotive components and exhibit long-term durability chemically, physically and mechanically.

  14. Cockpit Window Edge Proximity Effects on Judgements of Horizon Vertical Displacement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haines, R. F.

    1984-01-01

    To quantify the influence of a spatially fixed edge on vertical displacement threshold, twenty-four males (12 pilots, 12 non-pilots) were presented a series of forced choice, paired comparison trials in which a 32 deg arc wide, thin, luminous horizontal stimulus line moved smoothly downward through five angles from a common starting position within a three second-long period. The five angles were 1.4, 1.7, 2, 2.3, and 2.6 deg. Each angle was presented paired with itself and the other four angles in all combinations in random order. For each pair of trials the observer had to choose which trial possessed the largest displacement. A confidence response also was made. The independent variable was the angular separation between the lower edge of a stable 'window' aperture through which the stimulus was seen to move and the lowest position attained by the stimulus. It was found that vertical displacement accuracy is inversely related to the angle separating the stimulus and the fixed window edge (p = .05). In addition, there is a strong tendency for pilot confidence to be lower than that of non-pilots for each of the three angular separations. These results are discussed in erms of selected cockpit features and as they relate to how pilots judge changes in aircraft pitch attitude.

  15. Noise levels in cockpits of aircraft during normal cruise and considerations of auditory risk.

    PubMed

    Gasaway, D C

    1986-02-01

    Noise data, including A-levels and C-minus-A values, are summarized for exposures associated with normal cruise flight in 13 groups of 593 aircraft; means and standard deviations are reported; degrees of auditory risk using OSHA-1983 criterion are presented; and at-the-ear protected and unprotected exposures are revealed. Mean A-levels were 95.0 for 528 fixed-wing; 100.9 for 65 rotary-wing; and 95.7 for all 593 aircraft. Of 13 sub-groups, the lowest mean A-level (85.5) was exhibited in the cockpits of tail-mounted turbojet/fan-powered aircraft, and the highest (105.0) was found in both reciprocating and turbine-powered twin-rotor helicopters. All mean A-levels exceeded the OSHA damage-risk criterion for 8 h.d-1 exposures. At-the-ear exposures while wearing hearing protection are presented. Results clearly illustrate the potential for auditory damage of unprotected aircrews. Hearing protection must be considered to effectively control routinely encountered exposures. The material and illustrations resulting from this study will help health and safety monitors during indoctrination and counseling of aircrews concerning the need to protect their hearing against noise exposures during normal and routine flight operations.

  16. Voice communications in the cockpit noise environment: The role of active noise reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeler, Peter David

    The topic of voice communications in the cockpit noise environment of modern fast-jet aircraft and helicopters is addressed, and in particular, research undertaken in support of the development of a system for reducing the noise level at the operators' ear is described by acoustic cancellation within the ear defender, known as active noise reduction (ANR). The internal noise spectra of today's high performance fast-jet aircraft and military helicopters is described, and the complex interaction of acoustic noise transmission, speech, and microphone noise pick-up, which produces the total acoustic environment at the aircrews' ears, is discussed. Means of mathematically modelling the audio channel, quantifying the components identified above, and identifying areas of shortfall in performance are derived, leading to a procedure for the development of attenuation requirements, described as the communications audit. A model of the electroacoustic characteristics of the ANR ear defender assembly is presented and the sound field distribution within the ear defender/ear cavity, and its effect upon cancellation performance, is discussed. The extensive laboratory and flight testing of the ANR system that was undertaken is reviewed, paying particular attention to the measurement and analysis techniques employed in such testing. Finally, the performance characteristics of ANR are discussed and compared with the requirements previously established. Design limitations placed upon the system by the constraints of its area of application are described, and the scope for future improvements is considered.

  17. Digital Holography Display (2)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Cheok Peng; Asundi, A.; Yu, Yang; Xiao, Zhen Zhong

    This paper describes the extension work from the last Digital Holography Projector System. From the developed works shows that, some unforeseen factors have created the difficulties for the system alignment. Such factors are the DMD frame rate, light source and diffractive zero order. It is really the challenging development works to achieve the virtual 3D model display on the high speed rotation screen. The three most key factors are emphasizing: 1) The display device's frame rate; 2) The light source orientation angle; and 3) The zero order filtering optic. 1) This device's is the digital micro mirror, in short is DMD. It is the high speed switching device has developed by the most recent technology. The switching frame rate can go up as high as 291fps. At first, the 8 bits depth file must be digitalized and stored for DMD onboard Ram. The digitalized data are transmitting from the PC USB to DMD onboard Ram. Instead of the data are downloading directly from the PC to DVI or VGA during display, this downloading method cause slower down the display speed, which is the common frame rate of 30 Hz. Next, the onboard Ram data then transfer to the DMD mirror's for display, at the 8 bits 291 fps speed. At this frame rate, the display 2D image can almost cover for 10 of out of the 360 0 in 1 revolution. 2) This laser light source must be installed such that free for orientated in any arbitrary angle from 220 to 450. Which is normalized to the DMD mirrors and the brief sketch show on figure (a). The purpose of orientated the light source is ensure that multi diffractive order would be reflected straight from the mirrors. (This multi diffractive order is the phenomenon of the digital micro mirror's characteristic). This mean, the reconstruct images would be followed the DMD normalized direction reflected up to fibre conduit. Moreover, this orientated method install of the laser light source is making space for other optical lenses or device driver/controller. Because, all

  18. Quick-disconnect harness system for helmet-mounted displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bapu, P. T.; Aulds, M. J.; Fuchs, Steven P.; McCormick, David M.

    1992-10-01

    We have designed a pilot's harness-mounted, high voltage quick-disconnect connectors with 62 pins, to transmit voltages up to 13.5 kV and video signals with 70 MHz bandwidth, for a binocular helmet-mounted display system. It connects and disconnects with power off, and disconnects 'hot' without pilot intervention and without producing external sparks or exposing hot embers to the explosive cockpit environment. We have implemented a procedure in which the high voltage pins disconnect inside a hermetically-sealed unit before the physical separation of the connector. The 'hot' separation triggers a crowbar circuit in the high voltage power supplies for additional protection. Conductor locations and shields are designed to reduce capacitance in the circuit and avoid crosstalk among adjacent circuits. The quick- disconnect connector and wiring harness are human-engineered to ensure pilot safety and mobility. The connector backshell is equipped with two hybrid video amplifiers to improve the clarity of the video signals. Shielded wires and coaxial cables are molded as a multi-layered ribbon for maximum flexibility between the pilot's harness and helmet. Stiff cabling is provided between the quick-disconnect connector and the aircraft console to control behavior during seat ejection. The components of the system have been successfully tested for safety, performance, ergonomic considerations, and reliability.

  19. A perspective on the FAA approval process: Integrating rotorcraft displays, controls and workload

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, David L.; Hart, Jake; Hwoschinsky, Peter

    1993-01-01

    The FAA is responsible for making the determination that a helicopter is safe for IFR operations in the National Airspace System (NAS). This involves objective and subjective evaluations of cockpit displays, flying qualities, procedures and human factors as they affect performance and workload. After all of the objective evaluations are completed, and all Federal Regulations have been met, FAA pilots make the final subjective judgement as to suitability for use by civil pilots in the NAS. The paper uses the flying qualities and pilot workload characteristics of a small helicopter to help examine the FAA pilot's involvement in this process. The result highlights the strengths of the process and its importance to the approval of new aircraft and equipments for civil IFR helicopter applications. The paper also identifies opportunities for improvement.

  20. Multifunctional aerial display through use of polarization-processing display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchida, Keitaro; Ito, Shusei; Yamamoto, Hirotsugu

    2017-02-01

    We have realized a multifunctional aerial display. An aerial image of a polarization-processing display is formed through aerial imaging by retro-reflection. By changing the polarization modulation patterns, we can switch between a three-layered display and a secure display.