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Sample records for advanced colorectal adenoma

  1. Germline Variants and Advanced Colorectal Adenomas: Adenoma Prevention with Celecoxib Trial Genomewide Association Study

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jiping; Carvajal-Carmona, Luis G.; Chu, Jen-Hwa; Zauber, Ann G.; Kubo, Michikai; Matsuda, Koichi; Dunlop, Malcolm; Houlston, Richard S.; Sieber, Oliver; Lipton, Lara; Gibbs, Peter; Martin, Nicholas G.; Montgomery, Grant W.; Young, Joanne; Baird, Paul N.; Ratain, Mark J.; Nakamura, Yusuke; Weiss, Scott T.; Tomlinson, Ian; Bertagnolli, Monica M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Identification of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with development of advanced colorectal adenomas. Experimental Design Discovery Phase: 1,406 Caucasian patients (139 advanced adenoma cases and 1,267 controls) from the Adenoma Prevention with Celecoxib (APC) trial were included in a genome-wide association study (GWAS) to identify variants associated with post-polypectomy disease recurrence. Genome-wide significance was defined as false discovery rate < 0.05, unadjusted p=7.4×10−7. Validation Phase: Results were further evaluated using 4,175 familial colorectal adenoma or CRC cases and 5,036 controls from patients of European ancestry (COloRectal Gene Identification consortium, Scotland, Australia and VQ58). Results Our study identified eight SNPs associated with advanced adenoma risk in the APC trial (rs2837156, rs7278863, rs2837237, rs2837241, rs2837254, rs741864 at 21q22.2, and rs1381392 and rs17651822 at 3p24.1, at p<10–7 level with odds ratio – OR>2). Five variants in strong pairwise linkage disequilbrium (rs7278863, rs2837237, rs741864, rs741864 and rs2837241, r2=0.8–1) are in or near the coding region for the tight junction adhesion protein, IGSF5. An additional variant associated with advanced adenomas, rs1535989 (minor allele frequency 0.11; OR 2.09; 95% confidence interval 1.50–2.91), also predicted CRC development in a validation analysis (p=0.019) using a series of adenoma cases or CRC (CORGI study) and 3 sets of CRC cases and controls (Scotland, VQ58 and Australia, N=9,211). Conclusions Our results suggest that common polymorphisms contribute to the risk of developing advanced adenomas and might also contribute to the risk of developing CRC. The variant at rs1535989 may identify patients whose risk for neoplasia warrants increased colonoscopic surveillance. PMID:24084763

  2. Advanced colorectal adenoma related gene expression signature may predict prognostic for colorectal cancer patients with adenoma-carcinoma sequence

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bing; Shi, Xiao-Yu; Liao, Dai-Xiang; Cao, Bang-Rong; Luo, Cheng-Hua; Cheng, Shu-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Background: There are still no absolute parameters predicting progression of adenoma into cancer. The present study aimed to characterize functional differences on the multistep carcinogenetic process from the adenoma-carcinoma sequence. Methods: All samples were collected and mRNA expression profiling was performed by using Agilent Microarray high-throughput gene-chip technology. Then, the characteristics of mRNA expression profiles of adenoma-carcinoma sequence were described with bioinformatics software, and we analyzed the relationship between gene expression profiles of adenoma-adenocarcinoma sequence and clinical prognosis of colorectal cancer. Results: The mRNA expressions of adenoma-carcinoma sequence were significantly different between high-grade intraepithelial neoplasia group and adenocarcinoma group. The biological process of gene ontology function enrichment analysis on differentially expressed genes between high-grade intraepithelial neoplasia group and adenocarcinoma group showed that genes enriched in the extracellular structure organization, skeletal system development, biological adhesion and itself regulated growth regulation, with the P value after FDR correction of less than 0.05. In addition, IPR-related protein mainly focused on the insulin-like growth factor binding proteins. Conclusion: The variable trends of gene expression profiles for adenoma-carcinoma sequence were mainly concentrated in high-grade intraepithelial neoplasia and adenocarcinoma. The differentially expressed genes are significantly correlated between high-grade intraepithelial neoplasia group and adenocarcinoma group. Bioinformatics analysis is an effective way to study the gene expression profiles in the adenoma-carcinoma sequence, and may provide an effective tool to involve colorectal cancer research strategy into colorectal adenoma or advanced adenoma. PMID:26131062

  3. Serum IGF1, IGF2 and IGFBP3 and risk of advanced colorectal adenoma.

    PubMed

    Gao, Ying; Katki, Hormuzd; Graubard, Barry; Pollak, Michael; Martin, Michael; Tao, Yuzhen; Schoen, Robert E; Church, Timothy; Hayes, Richard B; Greene, Mark H; Berndt, Sonja I

    2012-07-15

    The insulin-like growth factor (IGF) signaling pathway is involved in cell proliferation and differentiation. Elevated serum IGF1 levels have been associated with increased colorectal cancer risk; however, studies of this association with colorectal adenoma are inconclusive. We examined serum IGF1, IGF2 and IGFBP3 levels in relation to risk of advanced colorectal adenoma in a case-control study within the prostate, lung, colorectal and ovarian cancer screening trial. A total of 764 advanced, left-sided colorectal adenoma cases and 775 controls frequency-matched on gender and ethnicity, without evidence of a left-sided polyp on sigmoidoscopy were included in the current study. Serum levels of IGF1, IGF2 and IGFBP3 were measured using an enzyme linked immunosorbent assay in serum samples collected at baseline. Logistic regression was used to estimate the odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for the associations adjusting for age, race, sex, year of blood draw, body mass index, smoking and education. Higher IGF1 levels were associated with increased adenoma risk: ORs = 1.58 (95% CI = 1.16-2.16), 1.42 (95% CI = 1.04-1.93), and 1.80 (95% CI = 1.30-2.47) for the second, third and fourth quartiles, respectively (p(trend) = 0.002). Elevated IGF2 levels were also associated with increased adenoma risk (OR = 1.43, 95% CI = 1.05-1.96 for the fourth vs. first quartile, p(trend) = 0.02), but the association was no longer significant after adjustment for IGF1 (p(trend) = 0.28). IGFBP3 levels were not associated with adenoma risk. Our analysis showed a significant positive association between circulating IGF1 levels and risk of advanced colorectal adenoma, suggesting that IGF1 is associated with the pivotal precursor to colorectal cancer. PMID:21932422

  4. Genetic Variants Associated with Colorectal Adenoma Susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Abulí, Anna; Castells, Antoni; Bujanda, Luis; Lozano, Juan José; Bessa, Xavier; Hernández, Cristina; Álvarez-Urturi, Cristina; Pellisé, Maria; Esteban-Jurado, Clara; Hijona, Elizabeth; Burón, Andrea; Macià, Francesc; Grau, Jaume; Guayta, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Background Common low-penetrance genetic variants have been consistently associated with colorectal cancer risk. Aim To determine if these genetic variants are associated also with adenoma susceptibility and may improve selection of patients with increased risk for advanced adenomas and/or multiplicity (≥ 3 adenomas). Methods We selected 1,326 patients with increased risk for advanced adenomas and/or multiplicity and 1,252 controls with normal colonoscopy from population-based colorectal cancer screening programs. We conducted a case-control association study analyzing 30 colorectal cancer susceptibility variants in order to investigate the contribution of these variants to the development of subsequent advanced neoplasia and/or multiplicity. Results We found that 14 of the analyzed genetic variants showed a statistically significant association with advanced adenomas and/or multiplicity: the probability of developing these lesions increased with the number of risk alleles reaching a 2.3-fold risk increment in individuals with ≥ 17 risk alleles. Conclusions Nearly half of the genetic variants associated with colorectal cancer risk are also related to advanced adenoma and/or multiplicity predisposition. Assessing the number of risk alleles in individuals within colorectal cancer screening programs may help to identify better a subgroup with increased risk for advanced neoplasia and/or multiplicity in the general population. PMID:27078840

  5. AMACR is associated with advanced pathologic risk factors in sporadic colorectal adenomas

    PubMed Central

    Lakis, Sotiris; Papamitsou, Theodora; Panagiotopoulou, Constantina; Kotakidou, Rodoula; Kotoula, Vassiliki

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To analyze α-methylacyl CoA racemase (AMACR) expression in relation to various dysplasia phenotypes and clinicopathological parameters of sporadic colorectal adenomas. METHODS: Fifty-five cases of sporadic colorectal adenomas were categorized according to the Vienna classification for Gastrointestinal Neoplasia. These corresponded to a total of 98 different intra-lesion microscopic fields that were further independently assigned a histological grade based on the old nomenclature (mild, moderate, severe dyplasia and carcinoma in situ). AMACR expression was evaluated by immunohistochemistry and statistical analysis was performed to investigate possible associations with various clinicopathologic parameters of adenomas i.e. gender, age, localization, grade of dysplasia, size and configuration. RESULTS: Patient age ranged from 41 to 84 years (mean 65 ± 13.2 years); 37 patients were males and 18 were females. Adenomas ranged in size between 0.5 and 30 cm (mean 2 ± 1.3 cm), including 18 tubular, 16 villous, 20 mixed or tubulovillous, and 1 giant sessile villous adenoma. AMACR expression was observed in 3 out of 16 (18.8%) of low-grade vs 23 out of 35 (62.8%) of high-grade lesions (P = 0.002). Most adenomas exhibiting high grade dysplasia with in situ carcinoma-like areas stained positive for AMACR (15/17 or 88.2%) as compared to adenomas with high grade dysplasia which contained severe dysplasia-like foci (6/15 or 40%), (P = 0.005). In AMACR positive adenomas featuring severe dysplasia-like or in situ carcinoma-like areas, AMACR staining was not necessarily observed in the in situ component. Positivity in intra-lesion of mild, moderate or severe dysplasia-like foci was more often encountered in adenomas harboring in situ, intramucosal or infiltrative carcinoma [21/33 (63.6%) vs 9/40 (22.5%), P < 0.001]. Strong AMACR expression was found in 11 out of 17 villous adenomas, but in only 1 out of 18 tubular lesions (P = 0.005). Larger lesions, i.e. > 1 cm stained more

  6. Risk Factors of Advanced Adenoma in Small and Diminutive Colorectal Polyp.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Yo Han; Kim, Kyeong Ok; Park, Chan Seo; Kim, Sung Bum; Lee, Si Hyung; Jang, Byung Ik

    2016-09-01

    The aims of this study were to review the clinicopathological characteristics of diminutive (≤ 5 mm) and small polyps (> 5 mm but < 10 mm) and to evaluate the risk factors of advanced adenoma for polyps of diameter < 10 mm in the colon. The medical records of 4,711 patients who underwent first colonoscopy at outpatient clinics or health promotion center were reviewed retrospectively. We analyzed the presence and risk factors of advanced adenoma, which was defined as a villous or tubulovillous polyp, high-grade dysplasia or intramucosal carcinoma histologically. Total 5,058 polyps were detected in the 4,711 patients, and 93.0% (4,704/5,058) polyps were < 10 mm in size. Among them, advanced adenoma was noted in 0.6% (28/4,704) with a villous component in 19, high-grade dysplasia in 3, and adenocarcinoma in 6. Advanced and non-advanced adenomas differed significantly in age group, gender, and polyp size. Multivariate analysis showed that an advanced age (> 65 years), a male gender, and a polyp size of > 5 mm were risk factors of advanced adenoma. The incidence of advanced adenoma in polyps of < 10 mm was 0.6%. Polyp size, male gender, and age of > 65 years are independent risk factors of advanced adenoma. PMID:27510386

  7. Gut Microbiome and Colorectal Adenomas

    PubMed Central

    Dulal, Santosh; Keku, Temitope O.

    2015-01-01

    The trillions of bacteria that naturally reside in the human gut collectively constitute the complex system known the gut microbiome, a vital player for the host’s homeostasis and health. However, there is mounting evidence that dysbiosis, a state of pathological imbalance in the gut microbiome is present in many disease states. In this review, we present recent insights concerning the gut microbiome’s contribution to the development of colorectal adenomas and the subsequent progression to colorectal cancer (CRC). In the United States alone, CRC is the second leading cause of cancer deaths. As a result, there is a high interest in identifying risk factors for adenomas, which are intermediate precursors to CRC. Recent research on CRC and the microbiome suggest that modulation of the gut bacterial composition and structure may be useful in preventing adenomas and CRC. We highlight the known risk factors for colorectal adenomas and the potential mechanisms by which microbial dysbiosis may contribute to the etiology of CRC. We also underscore novel findings from recent studies on the gut microbiota and colorectal adenomas along with current knowledge gaps. Understanding the microbiome may provide promising new directions towards novel diagnostic tools, biomarkers, and therapeutic interventions for CRC. PMID:24855012

  8. Development and validation of a risk score for advanced colorectal adenoma recurrence after endoscopic resection

    PubMed Central

    Facciorusso, Antonio; Di Maso, Marianna; Serviddio, Gaetano; Vendemiale, Gianluigi; Muscatiello, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To develop and validate a risk score for advanced colorectal adenoma (ACA) recurrence after endoscopic polypectomy. METHODS: Out of 3360 patients who underwent colon polypectomy at University of Foggia between 2004 and 2008, data of 843 patients with 1155 ACAs was retrospectively reviewed. Surveillance intervals were scheduled by guidelines at 3 years and primary endpoint was considered 3-year ACA recurrence. Baseline clinical parameters and the main features of ACAs were entered into a Cox regression analysis and variables with P < 0.05 in the univariate analysis were then tested as candidate variables into a stepwise Cox regression model (conditional backward selection). The regression coefficients of the Cox regression model were multiplied by 2 and rounded in order to obtain easy to use point numbers facilitating the calculation of the score. To avoid overoptimistic results due to model fitting and evaluation in the same dataset, we performed an internal 10-fold cross-validation by means of bootstrap sampling. RESULTS: Median lesion size was 16 mm (12-23) while median number of adenomas was 2.5 (1-3), whereof the number of ACAs was 1.5 (1-2). At 3 years after polypectomy, recurrence was observed in 229 ACAs (19.8%), of which 157 (13.5%) were metachronous neoplasms and 72 (6.2%) local recurrences. Multivariate analysis, after exclusion of the variable “type of resection” due to its collinearity with other predictive factors, confirmed lesion size, number of ACAs and grade of dysplasia as significantly associated to the primary outcome. The score was then built by multiplying the regression coefficients times 2 and the cut-off point 5 was selected by means of a Receiver Operating Characteristic curve analysis. In particular, 248 patients with 365 ACAs fell in the higher-risk group (score ≥ 5) where 3-year recurrence was detected in 174 ACAs (47.6%) whereas the remaining 595 patients with 690 ACAs were included in the low-risk group (score < 5) where 3

  9. Is height a risk factor for colorectal adenoma?

    PubMed Central

    Pyo, Jeung Hui; Hong, Sung Noh; Min, Byung-Hoon; Chang, Dong Kyung; Son, Hee Jung; Rhee, Poong-Lyul; Kim, Jae J.; Kim, Young-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims: Although it is generally known that the risk for all types of cancer increases with adult height, combined and for several common site-specific cancers (including colon and rectal), evidence is limited for adenomas, which are precursors to colorectal cancer. We evaluated the association between height and risk of colorectal adenoma at various stages of the adenoma-carcinoma pathway. Methods: We conducted a retrospective study using data from patients who had undergone a complete colonoscopy as part of a health examination at the Health Promotion Center of Samsung Medical Center between October 13, 2009 and December 31, 2011. A total of 1,347 male subjects were included in our study. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to evaluate the association between height and colorectal adenoma. Results: Each 5-cm increase in height was associated with 1.6% and 5.3% higher risks of advanced colorectal adenoma and high-risk colorectal adenoma, respectively, but associations were not significant after adjusting for age, body mass index, metabolic syndrome, alcohol intake, smoking, family history of colorectal cancer, and regular aspirin use (p = 0.840 and p = 0.472, respectively). Conclusions: No clear association was found between colorectal adenoma risk and height. Unlike other site-specific tumors reported to have a consistent relationship with height, the association between colorectal tumor and height remains controversial. PMID:26701232

  10. Genomic Landscape of Colorectal Mucosa and Adenomas.

    PubMed

    Borras, Ester; San Lucas, F Anthony; Chang, Kyle; Zhou, Ruoji; Masand, Gita; Fowler, Jerry; Mork, Maureen E; You, Y Nancy; Taggart, Melissa W; McAllister, Florencia; Jones, David A; Davies, Gareth E; Edelmann, Winfried; Ehli, Erik A; Lynch, Patrick M; Hawk, Ernest T; Capella, Gabriel; Scheet, Paul; Vilar, Eduardo

    2016-06-01

    The molecular basis of the adenoma-to-carcinoma transition has been deduced using comparative analysis of genetic alterations observed through the sequential steps of intestinal carcinogenesis. However, comprehensive genomic analyses of adenomas and at-risk mucosa are still lacking. Therefore, our aim was to characterize the genomic landscape of colonic at-risk mucosa and adenomas. We analyzed the mutation profile and copy number changes of 25 adenomas and adjacent mucosa from 12 familial adenomatous polyposis patients using whole-exome sequencing and validated allelic imbalances (AI) in 37 adenomas using SNP arrays. We assessed for evidence of clonality and performed estimations on the proportions of driver and passenger mutations using a systems biology approach. Adenomas had lower mutational rates than did colorectal cancers and showed recurrent alterations in known cancer driver genes (APC, KRAS, FBXW7, TCF7L2) and AIs in chromosomes 5, 7, and 13. Moreover, 80% of adenomas had somatic alterations in WNT pathway genes. Adenomas displayed evidence of multiclonality similar to stage I carcinomas. Strong correlations between mutational rate and patient age were observed in at-risk mucosa and adenomas. Our data indicate that at least 23% of somatic mutations are present in at-risk mucosa prior to adenoma initiation. The genomic profiles of at-risk mucosa and adenomas illustrate the evolution from normal tissue to carcinoma via greater resolution of molecular changes at the inflection point of premalignant lesions. Furthermore, substantial genomic variation exists in at-risk mucosa before adenoma formation, and deregulation of the WNT pathway is required to foster carcinogenesis. Cancer Prev Res; 9(6); 417-27. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27221540

  11. URINARY MUTAGENICITY AND COLORECTAL ADENOMA RISK

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract

    We investigated urinary mutagenicity and colorectal adenoma risk in a clinic-based, case-control study of currently nonsmoking cases (n = 143) and controls (n = 156). Urinary organics were extracted by C18/methanol from 12-h overnight urine samples, and mutagenici...

  12. Prevalence of colorectal adenomas in asymptomatic young adults: a window to early intervention?

    PubMed

    Kwak, Ji Yeong; Kim, Kwang Min; Yang, Hae Jin; Yu, Kil Jong; Lee, Jae Gon; Jeong, Yeon Oh; Shim, Sang Goon

    2016-06-01

    Objective The prevalence of colorectal adenoma is increasing in the average-risk population. However, little research is available on colorectal adenoma in young adults under age 40. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence and risk factors of colorectal adenoma in 20- to 39-year-old adults. Methods We evaluated 4286 asymptomatic young adults aged 20 to 39 years who underwent first colonoscopy screening as part of an employer-provided health wellness programme at the Health Promotion Centre of Samsung Changwon Hospital, Korea from January 2011 to December 2013. Logistic regression modelling was used to identify risk factors for colorectal adenoma in asymptomatic young adults. Results The prevalence of colorectal adenoma and advanced adenoma was 11.6% (497/4286) and 0.9% (39/4286), respectively. By age group, the prevalence of colorectal adenoma was 5.4% (33/608) in participants aged 20 to 29 years and 12.6% (464/3678) in participants aged 30 to 39. Colorectal adenoma was found in 13.1% (403/3072) of men and 7.7% (94/1214) of women. Increased risk of colorectal adenoma was associated with age over 30 years (OR, 2.37; 95% CI, 1.64-3.42), current smoker status (OR, 1.48; 95% CI, 1.14-1.91), and alcohol consumption (OR, 1.29; 95% CI, 1.03-1.63). Conclusions Our findings indicate that even if the prevalence of colorectal adenoma was low in young adults aged 20 to 39, being over 30, cigarette smoking, and alcohol consumption can affect young adults who have no other CRC risks. PMID:26863602

  13. Advanced endoscopic imaging to improve adenoma detection

    PubMed Central

    Neumann, Helmut; Nägel, Andreas; Buda, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Advanced endoscopic imaging is revolutionizing our way on how to diagnose and treat colorectal lesions. Within recent years a variety of modern endoscopic imaging techniques was introduced to improve adenoma detection rates. Those include high-definition imaging, dye-less chromoendoscopy techniques and novel, highly flexible endoscopes, some of them equipped with balloons or multiple lenses in order to improve adenoma detection rates. In this review we will focus on the newest developments in the field of colonoscopic imaging to improve adenoma detection rates. Described techniques include high-definition imaging, optical chromoendoscopy techniques, virtual chromoendoscopy techniques, the Third Eye Retroscope and other retroviewing devices, the G-EYE endoscope and the Full Spectrum Endoscopy-system. PMID:25789092

  14. Fecal Immunochemical Tests Combined With Other Stool Tests for Colorectal Cancer and Advanced Adenoma Detection: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Niedermaier, Tobias; Weigl, Korbinian; Hoffmeister, Michael; Brenner, Hermann

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Despite moderate to high detection rates of fecal immunochemical tests (FITs) of colorectal cancer (CRC), detection of adenomas remains limited. Further stool tests exist, which are not used in routine practice, such as DNA or RNA markers and protein markers. We aimed at systematically investigating and summarizing evidence for diagnostic performance of combinations of FIT with other stool tests compared with FIT alone in early detection of CRC and its precursors. METHODS: We systematically reviewed studies that evaluated FITs in combination with other stool tests and compared measures of diagnostic accuracy with and without additional stool tests. PubMed and Web of Science were searched from inception to May 2015. Reference lists of eligible studies were also screened. Two reviewers extracted data independently. RESULTS: Some of the reports on DNA, RNA, or tissue tests, including tests based on DNA mutations, methylation, and integrity in selected genes as well as microRNA expression, showed some improvements of diagnostic test accuracy. In contrast, so far assessed stool protein markers did generally not lead to substantial improvements in performance of FIT when added to the latter. Many marker combinations were reported only in one study each, and few studies were conducted in a true screening setting. CONCLUSIONS: Several stool markers show potential to improve performance of FITs. However, the results require confirmation in further studies, which should also evaluate the costs and cost-effectiveness of combined screening strategies. PMID:27253514

  15. Paneth Cell in Adenomas of the Distal Colorectum Is Inversely Associated with Synchronous Advanced Adenoma and Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Mahon, Megan; Xu, Jie; Yi, Xianghua; Liu, Xiuli; Gao, Nan; Zhang, Lanjing

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have linked appearance of Paneth cells in colorectal adenomas to adenoma burden and male gender. However, the clinical importance of Paneth cells’ associations with synchronous advanced adenoma (AA) and colorectal carcinoma (CRC) is currently unclear. We performed a comprehensive case-control study using 1,900 colorectal adenomas including 785 from females, and 1,115 from males. We prospectively reviewed and recorded Paneth cell status in the colorectal adenomas consecutively collected between February 2014 and June 2015. Multivariable logistic regression analyses revealed that, in contrast to the adenomas without Paneth cells, the Paneth cell-containing adenomas at distal colorectum were inversely associated with presence of a synchronous AA or CRC (odds ratio [OR] 0.39, P = 0.046), whereas no statistical significance was reached for Paneth cell-containing proximal colorectal adenomas (P = 0.33). Synchronous AA and CRC were significantly associated with older age (60 + versus <60 years, OR 1.60, P = 0.002), male gender (OR 1.42, P = 0.021), and a history of AA or CRC (OR 2.31, P < 0.001). However, synchronous CRC was not associated with Paneth cell status, or a history of AA or CRC. Paneth cell presence in the adenomas of distal colorectum may be a negative indicator for synchronous AA and CRC, and seems to warrant further studies. PMID:27188450

  16. Paneth Cell in Adenomas of the Distal Colorectum Is Inversely Associated with Synchronous Advanced Adenoma and Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Mahon, Megan; Xu, Jie; Yi, Xianghua; Liu, Xiuli; Gao, Nan; Zhang, Lanjing

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have linked appearance of Paneth cells in colorectal adenomas to adenoma burden and male gender. However, the clinical importance of Paneth cells' associations with synchronous advanced adenoma (AA) and colorectal carcinoma (CRC) is currently unclear. We performed a comprehensive case-control study using 1,900 colorectal adenomas including 785 from females, and 1,115 from males. We prospectively reviewed and recorded Paneth cell status in the colorectal adenomas consecutively collected between February 2014 and June 2015. Multivariable logistic regression analyses revealed that, in contrast to the adenomas without Paneth cells, the Paneth cell-containing adenomas at distal colorectum were inversely associated with presence of a synchronous AA or CRC (odds ratio [OR] 0.39, P = 0.046), whereas no statistical significance was reached for Paneth cell-containing proximal colorectal adenomas (P = 0.33). Synchronous AA and CRC were significantly associated with older age (60 + versus <60 years, OR 1.60, P = 0.002), male gender (OR 1.42, P = 0.021), and a history of AA or CRC (OR 2.31, P < 0.001). However, synchronous CRC was not associated with Paneth cell status, or a history of AA or CRC. Paneth cell presence in the adenomas of distal colorectum may be a negative indicator for synchronous AA and CRC, and seems to warrant further studies. PMID:27188450

  17. Plasma selenium levels and the risk of colorectal adenomas.

    PubMed

    Russo, M W; Murray, S C; Wurzelmann, J I; Woosley, J T; Sandler, R S

    1997-01-01

    Previous research has suggested that selenium may protect against the development of colorectal neoplasia. We examined the potential chemopreventive properties of selenium against colorectal adenomas while controlling for a number of dietary and life-style factors. We conducted a cross-sectional study among patients referred for colonoscopy to University of North Carolina Hospitals. Cases had one or more pathologically confirmed adenomas, and noncases had none. Plasma selenium levels were determined using graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry with Zeeman background correction and platform technique. Odds ratios were calculated using logistic regression analysis adjusting for potential confounders. The mean plasma selenium concentrations for cases (n = 37) and noncases (n = 36) were 107 and 120 micrograms/l, respectively (p = 0.06). Those in the fourth quartile of plasma selenium level had 0.24 times the risk (95% confidence interval = 0.06-1.04) for colorectal adenomas of those in the first quartile. The adjusted odds ratio for colorectal adenomas was 0.58 (95% confidence interval = 0.31-1.08) for a 30 microgram/l increase in plasma selenium level. Lower plasma selenium levels were associated with multiple adenomas but not with adenoma size or location. These data support a protective effect of selenium against colorectal adenomas after adjustment for possible confounders. Selenium might be a potentially useful chemopreventive agent for colorectal neoplasia. PMID:9290116

  18. No association between mitochondrial DNA copy number and colorectal adenomas.

    PubMed

    Thyagarajan, Bharat; Guan, Weihua; Fedirko, Veronika; Barcelo, Helene; Tu, Huakang; Gross, Myron; Goodman, Michael; Bostick, Roberd M

    2016-08-01

    Despite previously reported associations between peripheral blood mtDNA copy number and colorectal cancer, it remains unclear whether altered mtDNA copy number in peripheral blood is a risk factor for colorectal cancer or a biomarker for undiagnosed colorectal cancer. Though colorectal adenomas are well-recognized precursor lesions to colorectal cancer, no study has evaluated an association between mtDNA copy number and colorectal adenoma risk. Hence, we investigated an association between peripheral blood mtDNA copy number and incident, sporadic colorectal adenoma in 412 colorectal adenoma cases and 526 cancer-free controls pooled from three colonoscopy-based case-control studies that used identical methods for case ascertainment, risk factor determination, and biospecimen collection. We also evaluated associations between relative mtDNA copy number and markers of oxidative stress, including circulating F2 -isoprostanes, carotenoids, and fluorescent oxidation products. We measured mtDNA copy number using a quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). We used unconditional logistic regression to analyze the association between mtDNA copy number and colorectal adenoma risk after multivariable adjustment. We found no association between logarithmically transformed relative mtDNA copy number, analyzed as a continuous variable, and colorectal adenoma risk (odds ratio = 1.02, 95%CI: 0.82-1.27; P = 0.86). There were no statistically significant associations between relative mtDNA copy number and other markers of oxidative stress. Our findings, taken together with those from previous studies, suggest that relative mtDNA copy number in peripheral blood may more likely be a marker of early colorectal cancer than of risk for the disease or of in vivo oxidative stress. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26258394

  19. Dietary Intakes of Red Meat, Poultry, and Fish During High School and Risk of Colorectal Adenomas in Women

    PubMed Central

    Nimptsch, Katharina; Bernstein, Adam M.; Giovannucci, Edward; Fuchs, Charles S.; Willett, Walter C.; Wu, Kana

    2013-01-01

    Adolescent diet may be etiologically relevant for colorectal carcinogenesis. We examined the association between meat and fish intakes during adolescence and the risk of colorectal adenomas later in life among 19,771 women participating in the Nurses' Health Study II. Subjects had completed a validated food frequency questionnaire in 1998 (when aged 34–51 years) about their diets during high school and subsequently underwent at least 1 lower-bowel endoscopy during the study period (1998–2007). During this period, 1,494 subjects were diagnosed with colorectal adenomas. Intake of red meat during adolescence was not associated with colorectal adenoma risk when comparing those in the highest versus lowest category of intake (odds ratio (OR) = 1.04, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.81, 1.35). Similarly, intake of fish during adolescence was not associated with colorectal adenoma risk (OR = 0.96, 95% CI: 0.78, 1.17). Intake of poultry during adolescence was associated with a lower risk of total colorectal (OR = 0.80, 95% CI: 0.64, 0.99), distal (OR = 0.71, 95% CI: 0.51, 0.99), rectal (OR = 0.51, 95% CI: 0.29, 0.90), and advanced (OR = 0.60, 95% CI: 0.38, 0.93) adenomas. Replacement of 1 serving per day of red meat with 1 serving per day of poultry or fish was associated with 41% and 35% decreased risks for rectal adenomas and advanced adenomas, respectively. Our findings do not suggest an association between red meat intake during adolescence and colorectal adenomas later in life, but higher poultry intake during this time was associated with a lower risk of colorectal adenomas. PMID:23785116

  20. Circulating levels of inflammatory cytokines and risk of colorectal adenomas

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sangmi; Keku, Temitope O.; Martin, Christopher; Galanko, Joseph; Woosley, John T.; Schroeder, Jane C.; Satia, Jessie A.; Halabi, Susan; Sandler, Robert S.

    2009-01-01

    The association between obesity and colorectal neoplasia may be mediated by inflammation. Circulating levels of C-reactive protein (CRP), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) are elevated in the obese. Adipose tissue can produce and release the inflammatory cytokines that are potentially procarcinogenic. We examined circulating levels of CRP, IL-6, and TNF-α in relation to risk factors and the prevalence of colorectal adenomas. Plasma levels of CRP, IL-6, and TNF-α were quantified in 873 participants (242 colorectal adenoma cases and 631 controls) in a colonoscopy-based cross-sectional study conducted between 1998 and 2002. Multivariable logistic regression was used to estimate associations between levels of inflammatory cytokines, colorectal adenomas, and known risk factors. Several known risk factors for colorectal neoplasia were associated with higher levels of inflammatory cytokines such as older age, current smoking, and increasing adiposity. The prevalence of colorectal adenomas was associated with higher concentrations of IL-6 and TNF-α, and to a lesser degree, with CRP. For IL-6, adjusted odds ratios for colorectal adenomas were 1.78 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.18–2.68) for the second highest plasma level, and 1.84 (95% CI: 1.24– 2.74) for the highest level compared with the reference level. A similar association was found with TNF-α, with adjusted odds ratios of 1.54 (95% CI: 1.02–2.33) and 1.65 (95% CI: 1.09–2.50), respectively. Our findings indicate that inflammation might be involved in the early development of colorectal neoplasia, and suggest that systemic inflammatory cytokines might be an indicator of obesity and other risk factors for colorectal neoplasia. PMID:18172326

  1. Label-free monitoring of colorectal adenoma-carcinoma sequence based on multiphoton microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, J. X.; Li, H. S.; Chen, Z. F.; Feng, C. Y.; Yang, Y. H.; Jiang, W. Z.; Guan, G. X.; Zhu, X. Q.; Zhuo, S. M.; Xu, J.

    2014-06-01

    The monitoring and evaluation of colorectal adenoma-carcinoma sequence during endoscopy are important for endoscopic resection of precursor lesions to disrupt the adenoma-carcinoma sequence and halt progression to invasive neoplastic disease. In this study, multiphoton microscopy (MPM) was used to identify different stages during the development of colorectal adenocarcinoma including adenoma with low-grade and high-grade dysplasia, and adenocarcinoma invading the submucosa. It was found that by combining two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) imaging and second harmonic generation (SHG) imaging, MPM can reveal the morphological changes of the epithelial cells and glands, identify the invasive position and depth of atypical glands and quantitatively describe the change of the cellular nucleus and the nuclear-to-cytoplasmic ratio during the stepwise progression of colorectal adenocarcinoma. These are important pathological findings for pathologists when diagnosing colorectal lesions. With the advancement of a compact and flexible multiphoton endoscope for in vivo imaging and clinical applications, MPM has the potential to provide immediate histological diagnosis for the monitoring and evaluation of the colorectal adenoma-carcinoma sequence during endoscopy.

  2. Characteristics and outcomes of endoscopically resected colorectal cancers that arose from sessile serrated adenomas and traditional serrated adenomas

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Ji Yeon; Choi, Seung Ho; Chun, Jaeyoung; Choi, Ji Min; Jin, Eun Hyo; Hwang, Sung Wook; Im, Jong Pil; Kim, Sang Gyun; Kim, Joo Sung

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims The efficacy and safety of endoscopic resection of colorectal cancer derived from sessile serrated adenomas or traditional serrated adenomas are still unknown. The aims of this study were to verify the characteristics and outcomes of endoscopically resected early colorectal cancers developed from serrated polyps. Methods Among patients who received endoscopic resection of early colorectal cancers from 2008 to 2011, cancers with documented pre-existing lesions were included. They were classified as adenoma, sessile serrated adenoma, or traditional serrated adenoma according to the baseline lesions. Clinical characteristics, pathologic diagnosis, and outcomes were reviewed. Results Overall, 208 colorectal cancers detected from 198 patients were included: 198 with adenoma, five with sessile serrated adenoma, and five with traditional serrated adenoma. The sessile serrated adenoma group had a higher prevalence of high-grade dysplasia (40.0% vs. 25.8%, P<0.001) than the adenoma group. During follow-up, local recurrence did not occur after endoscopic resection of early colorectal cancers developed from serrated polyps. In contrast, two cases of metachronous recurrence were detected within a short follow-up period. Conclusions Cautious observation and early endoscopic resection are recommended when colorectal cancer from serrated polyp is suspected. Colorectal cancers from serrated polyp can be treated successfully with endoscopy. PMID:27433150

  3. Mucosal adherent bacterial dysbiosis in patients with colorectal adenomas.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yingying; Chen, Jing; Zheng, Junyuan; Hu, Guoyong; Wang, Jingjing; Huang, Chunlan; Lou, Lihong; Wang, Xingpeng; Zeng, Yue

    2016-01-01

    Recent reports have suggested that the gut microbiota is involved in the progression of colorectal cancer (CRC). The composition of gut microbiota in CRC precursors has not been adequately described. To characterize the structure of adherent microbiota in this disease, we conducted pyrosequencing-based analysis of 16S rRNA genes to determine the bacterial profile of normal colons (healthy controls) and colorectal adenomas (CRC precursors). Adenoma mucosal biopsy samples and adjacent normal colonic mucosa from 31 patients with adenomas and 20 healthy volunteers were profiled using the Illumina MiSeq platform. Principal coordinate analysis (PCoA) showed structural segregation between colorectal adenomatous tissue and control tissue. Alpha diversity estimations revealed higher microbiota diversity in samples from patients with adenomas. Taxonomic analysis illustrated that abundance of eight phyla (Firmicutes, Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Actinobacteria, Chloroflexi, Cyanobacteria, Candidate-division TM7, and Tenericutes) was significantly different. In addition, Lactococcus and Pseudomonas were enriched in preneoplastic tissue, whereas Enterococcus, Bacillus, and Solibacillus were reduced. However, both PCoA and cluster tree analyses showed similar microbiota structure between adenomatous and adjacent non-adenoma tissues. These present findings provide preliminary experimental evidence supporting that colorectal preneoplastic lesion may be the most important factor leading to alterations in bacterial community composition. PMID:27194068

  4. Mucosal adherent bacterial dysbiosis in patients with colorectal adenomas

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yingying; Chen, Jing; Zheng, Junyuan; Hu, Guoyong; Wang, Jingjing; Huang, Chunlan; Lou, Lihong; Wang, Xingpeng; Zeng, Yue

    2016-01-01

    Recent reports have suggested that the gut microbiota is involved in the progression of colorectal cancer (CRC). The composition of gut microbiota in CRC precursors has not been adequately described. To characterize the structure of adherent microbiota in this disease, we conducted pyrosequencing-based analysis of 16S rRNA genes to determine the bacterial profile of normal colons (healthy controls) and colorectal adenomas (CRC precursors). Adenoma mucosal biopsy samples and adjacent normal colonic mucosa from 31 patients with adenomas and 20 healthy volunteers were profiled using the Illumina MiSeq platform. Principal coordinate analysis (PCoA) showed structural segregation between colorectal adenomatous tissue and control tissue. Alpha diversity estimations revealed higher microbiota diversity in samples from patients with adenomas. Taxonomic analysis illustrated that abundance of eight phyla (Firmicutes, Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Actinobacteria, Chloroflexi, Cyanobacteria, Candidate-division TM7, and Tenericutes) was significantly different. In addition, Lactococcus and Pseudomonas were enriched in preneoplastic tissue, whereas Enterococcus, Bacillus, and Solibacillus were reduced. However, both PCoA and cluster tree analyses showed similar microbiota structure between adenomatous and adjacent non-adenoma tissues. These present findings provide preliminary experimental evidence supporting that colorectal preneoplastic lesion may be the most important factor leading to alterations in bacterial community composition. PMID:27194068

  5. Statin Use and Colorectal Adenoma Risk: Results from the Adenoma Prevention with Celecoxib (APC) Trial

    PubMed Central

    Bertagnolli, Monica M.; Hsu, Meier; Hawk, Ernest T.; Eagle, Craig J.; Zauber, Ann G.

    2010-01-01

    Background Statins are widely prescribed for cardiovascular disease prevention, and also commonly used in patients at high risk for colorectal cancer (CRC). We report the results of a planned secondary analysis of the relationship between statin use and colorectal adenoma risk in a large chemoprevention trial. Methods The Adenoma Prevention with Celecoxib (APC) trial randomized 2035 adenoma patients to receive placebo (679 patients), 200 mg celecoxib twice daily (685 patients), or 400 mg celecoxib twice daily (671 patients). The study collected complete medical history and medication use data, and performed colonoscopic surveillance to 5 years after study enrollment. Effects of statin use on newly detected adenomas and cardiovascular adverse events were analyzed as time-dependent variables by multivariable Cox regression. Results Statins were used by 36% (N=730) of APC trial participants. When adjusted for covariates including cardioprotective aspirin use, age, and sex, participants on the placebo arm who used statins at any time had no benefit over 5 years compared to never users (Risk Ratio (RR) 1.24; 95% confidence interval (CI) (0.99-1.56); p=0.065). Statin use for >3 years increased adenoma risk over 5 years (RR 1.39; 95%CI 1.04-1.86; p=0.024). For all comparisons of patients treated with celecoxib, adenoma detection rates for statin users and non-users were equivalent. Consistent with their use in patients at high risk, cardiovascular serious adverse events were more common among statin users. Conclusions For patients at high risk of CRC, statins do not protect against colorectal neoplasms and may even increase the risk of developing colorectal adenomas. PMID:20403998

  6. Meta-Analysis of the Effect of Bowel Preparation on Adenoma Detection: Early Adenomas Affected Stronger than Advanced Adenomas

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, Meher; Manser, Christine N.; Heinrich, Henriette; Misselwitz, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims Low-quality bowel preparation reduces efficacy of colonoscopy. We aimed to summarize effects of bowel preparation on detection of adenomas, advanced adenomas and colorectal cancer. Methods A systematic literature search was performed regarding detection of colonic lesions after normal and low-quality bowel preparation. Reported bowel preparation quality was transformed to the Aronchick scale with its qualities “excellent”, “good”, “fair”, “poor”, and “insufficient” or “optimal” (good/excellent), “suboptimal” (fair/poor/insufficient), “adequate” (good/excellent/fair) and “inadequate” (poor/insufficient). We identified two types of studies: i) Comparative studies, directly comparing lesion detection according to bowel preparation quality, and ii) repeat colonoscopy studies, reporting results of a second colonoscopy after previous low-quality preparation. Results The detection of early adenomas was reduced with inadequate vs. adequate bowel preparation (Odds Ratio (OR) 0.53, CI: 0.46–0.62, p<0.001). The advanced adenomas were affected less in comparison (0.74, CI: 0.62–0.87, p<0.001). The large number of subjects considered in the present meta-analysis resulted in smaller confidence intervals compared to earlier studies. Classifying the bowel-preparation quality as suboptimal vs. optimal led to the same qualitative conclusion (OR: 0.81, CI: 0.74–0.89, p<0.001 for early adenomas, OR: 0.94, CI: 0.87–1.01, n.s. for advanced adenomas). Bowel preparation was equally important for right-sided/ flat/ serrated vs. other lesions in most observational studies but more relevant in some repeat colonoscopy studies; data regarding carcinoma detection were insufficient. Conclusion Inadequate bowel preparation affects detection of early colonic lesions stronger than advanced lesions. PMID:27257916

  7. Expression of PI3Kp110α and PI3Kp110β in the colorectal conventional adenoma, serrated lesions and adenoma with canceration and their significance

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Shuhua; Li, Tangyue; Mu, Qinghai; Li, Yangyang; Gao, Xiangqian; He, Shuang; Sun, Chenbo

    2015-01-01

    Aims: To evaluate the expression and clinical significance of PI3Kp110α and PI3Kp110β in colorectal conventional adenoma, serrated lesions and adenoma with canceration. Methods and results: Immunohistochemistry and Western blot analysis were conducted to detect the expression of p110α and p110β in normal colorectal tissues, conventional adenoma, serrated lesions and adenoma canceration. Results revealed that the expression of P110α and P110β in the adenoma canceration was significantly higher than that in normal tissues, tubular adenoma (low grade) and tubular-villous adenoma (low grade) of conventional adenoma, hyperplastic polyps of serrated lesions (P<0.05). But there was no significant difference between the adenoma canceration and the high grade adenoma of conventional adenoma, all grade of villous adenoma and serrated adenoma (P>0.05). The expression of p110α and p110β was correlated with different clinicopathologic factors in conventional adenoma, serrated adenoma and adenoma canceration (P<0.05). Conclusions: p110α and p110β were highly expressed in villous adenoma, serrated adenoma and adenoma with canceration. Its high expression may be the risk factor of the progress of adenoma to adenocarcinoma, and may be an important cause of what canceration rate of villous adenoma and serrated adenoma was higher than that of other adenomas. Combined detection of p110α and p110β is helpful to determine the canceration potential of colorectal villous adenoma and serrated adenoma. PMID:26884879

  8. A Trial of Calcium and Vitamin D for the Prevention of Colorectal Adenomas

    PubMed Central

    Baron, John A.; Barry, Elizabeth L.; Mott, Leila A.; Rees, Judy R.; Sandler, Robert S.; Snover, Dale C.; Bostick, Roberd M.; Ivanova, Anastasia; Cole, Bernard F.; Ahnen, Dennis J.; Beck, Gerald J.; Bresalier, Robert S.; Burke, Carol A.; Church, Timothy R.; Cruz-Correa, Marcia; Figueiredo, Jane C.; Goodman, Michael; Kim, Adam S.; Robertson, Douglas J.; Rothstein, Richard; Shaukat, Aasma; Seabrook, March E.; Summers, Robert W.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Epidemiologic and preclinical data suggest that higher intake and serum levels of vitamin D and higher intake of calcium reduce the risk of colorectal neoplasia. To further study the chemopreventive potential of these nutrients, we conducted a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of supplementation with vitamin D, calcium, or both for the prevention of colorectal adenomas. METHODS We recruited patients with recently diagnosed adenomas and no known colorectal polyps remaining after complete colonoscopy. We randomly assigned 2259 participants to receive daily vitamin D3 (1000 IU), calcium as carbonate (1200 mg), both, or neither in a partial 2×2 factorial design. Women could elect to receive calcium plus random assignment to vitamin D or placebo. Follow-up colonoscopy was anticipated to be performed 3 or 5 years after the baseline examinations, according to the endoscopist’s recommendation. The primary end point was adenomas diagnosed in the interval from randomization through the anticipated surveillance colonoscopy. RESULTS Participants who were randomly assigned to receive vitamin D had a mean net increase in serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels of 7.83 ng per milliliter, relative to participants given placebo. Overall, 43% of participants had one or more adenomas diagnosed during follow-up. The adjusted risk ratios for recurrent adenomas were 0.99 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.89 to 1.09) with vitamin D versus no vitamin D, 0.95 (95% CI, 0.85 to 1.06) with calcium versus no calcium, and 0.93 (95% CI, 0.80 to 1.08) with both agents versus neither agent. The findings for advanced adenomas were similar. There were few serious adverse events. CONCLUSIONS Daily supplementation with vitamin D3 (1000 IU), calcium (1200 mg), or both after removal of colorectal adenomas did not significantly reduce the risk of recurrent colorectal adenomas over a period of 3 to 5 years. (Funded by the National Cancer Institute; ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT

  9. Risk factors associated with missed colorectal flat adenoma: A multicenter retrospective tandem colonoscopy study

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Li; Zhan, Qiang; Zhao, Xin-Hua; Wang, Ya-Dong; An, Sheng-Li; Xu, Yang-Zhi; Li, Ai-Min; Gong, Wei; Bai, Yang; Zhi, Fa-Chao; Liu, Si-De

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To determine the miss rate for colorectal flat adenomas during colonoscopy and the risk factors. METHODS: Flat adenomas are frequently missed during colonoscopy. However, the risk factors that influence their miss rates are unclear. This was a multicenter, retrospective study in which patients diagnosed with colorectal adenomas at a diagnostic colonoscopy and followed within 3 mo by a second therapeutic colonoscopy were pooled out from the established database. The “per-patient” and “per-adenoma” adenoma miss rates (AMR) for overall adenomas and flat adenomas, and patient-, adenoma-, and procedure-related risk factors potentially associated with the “per-adenoma” AMR for flat adenomas were determined. RESULTS: Chromoscopy and high-definition colonoscopy were not taken under consideration in the study. Among 2093 patients with colorectal adenomas, 691 (33.0%) were diagnosed with flat adenomas, 514 with concomitant protruding adenomas and 177 without. The “per-patient” AMR for flat adenomas was 43.3% (299/691); the rates were 54.3% and 11.3%, respectively, for those with protruding adenomas and those without (OR = 9.320, 95%CI: 5.672-15.314, χ2 = 99.084, P < 0.001). The “per-adenoma” AMR for flat adenomas was 44.3% (406/916). In multivariate analysis, older age, presence of concomitant protruding adenomas, poor bowel preparation, smaller adenoma size, location at the right colon, insufficient experience of the colonoscopist, and withdrawal time < 6 min were associated with an increased “per-adenoma” AMR for flat adenomas. The AMR for flat adenomas was moderately correlated with that for overall adenomas (r = 0.516, P < 0.0001). The AMR for flat adenomas during colonoscopy was high. CONCLUSION: Patient’s age, concomitant protruding adenomas, bowel preparation, size and location of adenomas, proficiency of the colonoscopist, and withdrawal time are factors affecting the “per-adenoma” AMR for flat adenomas. PMID:25152596

  10. The value of age and medical history for predicting colorectal cancer and adenomas in people referred for colonoscopy

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Colonoscopy is an invasive and costly procedure with a risk of serious complications. It would therefore be useful to prioritise colonoscopies by identifying people at higher risk of either cancer or premalignant adenomas. The aim of this study is to assess a model that identifies people with colorectal cancer, advanced, large and small adenomas. Methods Patients seen by gastroenterologists and colorectal surgeons between April 2004 and December 2006 completed a validated, structured self-administered questionnaire prior to colonoscopy. Information was collected on symptoms, demographics and medical history. Multinomial logistic regression was used to simultaneously assess factors associated with findings on colonoscopy of cancer, advanced adenomas and adenomas sized 6 -9 mm, and ≤ 5 mm. The area under the curve of ROC curve was used to assess the incremental gain of adding demographic variables, medical history and symptoms (in that order) to a base model that included only age. Results Sociodemographic variables, medical history and symptoms (from 8,204 patients) jointly provide good discrimination between colorectal cancer and no abnormality (AUC 0.83), but discriminate less well between adenomas and no abnormality (AUC advanced adenoma 0.70; other adenomas 0.67). Age is the dominant risk factor for cancer and adenomas of all sizes. Having a colonoscopy within the last 10 years confers protection for cancers and advanced adenomas. Conclusions Our models provide guidance about which factors can assist in identifying people at higher risk of disease using easily elicited information. This would allow colonoscopy to be prioritised for those for whom it would be of most benefit. PMID:21899773

  11. Are metaplasias in colorectal adenomas truly metaplasias?

    PubMed Central

    Bansal, M.; Fenoglio, C. M.; Robboy, S. J.; King, D. W.

    1984-01-01

    Five thousand seven hundred seventy-eight adenomas or adenomas containing carcinoma from 3215 patients were examined by routine histologic methods for the presence of epithelial metaplasias. Three forms of epithelial metaplasia were encountered: squamous cell metaplasia (0.44%), Paneth cell metaplasia (0.20%), and melanocytic metaplasia (0.017%). In several instances multiple forms of metaplasia were encountered in the same polyp. In those cases in which the paraffin blocks were available, a Grimelius stain was performed. Grimelius-positive cells were present in 63% of the adenomas containing a metaplastic cell type. All cases with Paneth cell differentiation were immunoreactive for lysozyme; all lesions containing areas of squamous differentiation were immunoreactive for keratin except 2. The histopathologic features of these cases are discussed, and it is concluded that rather than representing a true metaplastic process, Paneth cell, squamous cell, and melanocyte differentiation represent the full range of cellular differentiation that endodermally derived tissues can exhibit, particularly when they undergo neoplastic alterations. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:6202148

  12. A randomized trial on folic acid supplementation and risk of recurrent colorectal adenoma

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Evidence from observational studies suggests that inadequate folate status enhances colorectal carcinogenesis, but results from some randomized trials do not support this hypothesis. Objective: To assess the effect of folic acid supplementation on recurrent colorectal adenoma, we conduc...

  13. Histogenesis of human colorectal adenomas and hyperplastic polyps: the role of cell proliferation and crypt fission

    PubMed Central

    Wong, W-M; Mandir, N; Goodlad, R A; Wong, B C Y; Garcia, S B; Lam, S-K; Wright, N A

    2002-01-01

    Background: The histogenesis of human colorectal hyperplastic polyps and colorectal adenomas is poorly understood even now. Method: Human colorectal adenomas, hyperplastic polyps, and normal colorectal mucosae (patients with familial adenomatous polyposis and hereditary non-polyposis colorectal carcinoma were excluded) were obtained during colonoscopy and microdissected into individual crypts. Morphology, cell proliferation characteristics, and fission indices of crypts isolated from these lesions were then studied. Results: Crypts isolated from colorectal adenomas and colorectal hyperplastic polyps were significantly larger (p<0.001) than crypts from normal colorectal mucosae. Crypt fission was an uncommon event in normal colonic mucosae but common in crypts isolated from adenomas and hyperplastic polyps (p<0.001). Analysis of the distribution of mitoses suggested an upward expansion of the proliferation compartment in adenomas to the surface of the crypt with no reversal of proliferating cell distribution, as has previously been described. Conclusions: Sporadic human colorectal adenomas and hyperplastic polyps grow by the process of crypt fission. Expansion of the proliferative compartment was demonstrated in crypts from adenomas, consistent with deregulation of cell cycle control. PMID:11788562

  14. DNA repair gene polymorphisms and tobacco smoking in the risk for colorectal adenomas.

    PubMed

    Gao, Ying; Hayes, Richard B; Huang, Wen-Yi; Caporaso, Neil E; Burdette, Laurie; Yeager, Meredith; Chanock, Stephen J; Berndt, Sonja I

    2011-06-01

    DNA damage is thought to play a critical role in the development of colorectal adenoma. Variation in DNA repair genes may alter their capacity to correct endogenous and exogenous DNA damage. We explored the association between common single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in DNA repair genes and adenoma risk with a case-control study nested in the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial. A total of 1338 left sided, advanced colorectal adenoma cases and 1503 matched controls free of left-sided polyps were included in the study. Using DNA extracted from blood, 3144 tag SNPs in 149 DNA repair genes were successfully genotyped. Among Caucasians, 30 SNPs were associated with adenoma risk at P < 0.01, with four SNPs remaining significant after gene-based adjustment for multiple testing. The most significant finding was for a non-synonymous SNP (rs9350) in Exonuclease-1 (EXO1) [odds ratio (OR) = 1.30, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.11-1.51, P = 0.001)], which was predicted to be damaging using bioinformatics methods. However, the association was limited to smokers with a strong risk for current smokers (OR = 2.15, 95% CI = 1.27-3.65) and an intermediate risk for former smokers (OR = 1.45, 95% CI = 1.14-1.82) and no association for never smokers (OR = 0.98, 95% CI = 0.76-1.25) (P(interaction) = 0.002). Among the top findings, an SNP (rs17503908) in ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) was inversely related to adenoma risk (OR = 0.75, 95% CI = 0.63-0.91). The association was restricted to never smokers (OR = 0.55, 95% CI = 0.40-0.76) with no increased risk observed among smokers (OR = 0.89, 95% CI = 0.70-1.13) (P(interaction) = 0.006). This large comprehensive study, which evaluated all presently known DNA repair genes, suggests that polymorphisms in EXO1 and ATM may be associated with risk for advanced colorectal adenoma with the associations modified by tobacco-smoking status. PMID:21504893

  15. Mitochondrial D310 mutations in colorectal adenomas: an early but not causative genetic event during colorectal carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Legras, Antoine; Lièvre, Astrid; Bonaiti-Pellié, Catherine; Cottet, Vanessa; Pariente, Alexandre; Nalet, Bernard; Lafon, Jacques; Faivre, Jean; Bonithon-Kopp, Claire; Goasguen, Nicolas; Penna, Christophe; Olschwang, Sylviane; Laurent-Puig, Pierre

    2008-05-15

    Somatic mutations of the D310 sequence of the mitochondrial DNA are reported in human cancers, including colorectal cancers (CRC). The presence of these mutations at early or late steps of colorectal carcinogenesis is unknown. Their prevalence increased significantly with the number of cytosines in the D310 sequence of the matched normal tissue (D310 polymorphism), suggesting that this polymorphism could be a risk factor for CRC. The aim of this study was (i) to investigate the prevalence of D310 mutations in 64 colorectal adenomas and 36 liver metastases from 15 CRC patients, (ii) to assess the relation between D310 polymorphism and the risk of colorectal adenoma in a case-control study including 613 cases with colorectal adenoma and 572 polyp-free (PF) controls. D310 mutations were found in colorectal adenomas and liver metastases from CRC patients in 27 and 33%, respectively and so are an early genetic event in colorectal carcinogenesis. The frequency of the mutations increased significantly with the number of cytosines in the matched normal tissue D310 sequence (p < 0.001) but the distribution of D310 polymorphisms was not significantly different between adenoma cases (large (>9 mm) and small (<5 mm) adenomas) and PF controls (C(4)-C(7)TC(6): 47, 52 and 49%; C(8)TC(6): 44, 39 and 41%; C(9)-C(10)TC(6): 9, 9 and 10%, respectively; p > 0.05), suggesting that germline D310 polymorphism is not a risk factor for colorectal adenomas. Considering their high frequency in colorectal adenomas, mitochondrial D310 mutations could represent a biomarker for early detection of CRC although their causative role in colorectal carcinogenesis remains uncertain. PMID:18224678

  16. Matrix metalloproteinase-13 expression in the progression of colorectal adenoma to carcinoma : Matrix metalloproteinase-13 expression in the colorectal adenoma and carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Foda, Abd Al-Rahman Mohammad; El-Hawary, Amira K; Abdel-Aziz, Azza

    2014-06-01

    Most colorectal carcinomas (CRCs) are considered to arise from conventional adenoma based on the concept of the adenoma-carcinoma sequence. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are known to be overexpressed as normal mucosa progresses to adenomas and carcinomas. There has been little previous investigation about MMP-13 expression in adenoma-carcinoma sequence. In this study, we aimed to investigate the immunohistochemical expression of MMP-13 in colorectal adenoma and CRC specimens using tissue microarray (TMA) technique. A total of 40 cases of CRC associated with adenoma were collected from files of the Pathology laboratory at Mansoura Gastroenterology Center between January 2007 and January 2012. Sections from TMA blocks were prepared and stained for MMP-13. Immunoreactivity to MMP-13 staining was localized to the cytoplasm of mildly, moderately, and severely dysplatic cells of adenomas and CRC tumor cells that were either homogenous or heterogeneous. There was no significant difference in MMP-13 expression between adenomas and CRCs either non-mucinous or mucinous. Adenomas with high MMP-13 expression were significantly associated with moderate to marked degree of inflammatory cellular infiltrate and presence of familial adenomatous polyps. In conclusion, MMP-13 may be a potential biological marker of early tumorigenesis in the adenoma-carcinoma sequence. PMID:24563279

  17. Iron homeostasis and distal colorectal adenoma risk in the prostate, lung, colorectal, and ovarian cancer screening trial.

    PubMed

    Cross, Amanda J; Sinha, Rashmi; Wood, Richard J; Xue, Xiaonan; Huang, Wen-Yi; Yeager, Meredith; Hayes, Richard B; Gunter, Marc J

    2011-09-01

    Red meat consumption has been positively associated with colorectal cancer; however, the biological mechanism underlying this relationship is not understood. Red meat is a major source of iron, which may play a role in colorectal carcinogenesis via increased crypt cell proliferation, cytotoxicity, and endogenous N-nitrosation. In a nested case-control study within the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial, we prospectively evaluated multiple iron exposure parameters, including dietary intake and serum measures of iron, ferritin, transferrin, total iron binding capacity (TIBC), and unsaturated iron binding capacity (UIBC) in relation to incident colorectal adenoma in 356 cases and 396 matched polyp-free controls. We also investigated variation in eight key genes involved in iron homeostasis in relation to colorectal adenoma in an additional series totaling 1,126 cases and 1,173 matched controls. We observed a positive association between red meat intake and colorectal adenoma [OR comparing extreme quartiles (OR(q4-q1)) = 1.59, 95% CI = 1.02-2.49, P(trend) = 0.03]. Serum TIBC and UIBC were inversely associated with colorectal adenoma (OR(q4-q1) = 0.57, 95% CI = 0.37-0.88, P(trend) = 0.03; and OR(q4-q1) = 0.62, 95% CI = 0.40-0.95, P(trend) = 0.04, respectively). Colorectal adenoma was not associated with serum ferritin, iron, or transferrin saturation or with polymorphisms in genes involved in iron homeostasis. Serum TIBC and UIBC, parameters that have a reciprocal relationship with overall iron load, were inversely related to colorectal adenoma, suggesting that individuals with lower iron status have a reduced risk of developing colorectal adenoma. PMID:21685236

  18. Dietary flavonoids and colorectal adenoma recurrence in the Polyp Prevention Trial.

    PubMed

    Bobe, Gerd; Sansbury, Leah B; Albert, Paul S; Cross, Amanda J; Kahle, Lisa; Ashby, Jason; Slattery, Martha L; Caan, Bette; Paskett, Electra; Iber, Frank; Kikendall, James Walter; Lance, Peter; Daston, Cassandra; Marshall, James R; Schatzkin, Arthur; Lanza, Elaine

    2008-06-01

    Two recent case-control studies suggested that some flavonoid subgroups may play a role in preventing colorectal cancer. Previous prospective cohort studies generally reported no association; however, only a small subset of flavonoids was evaluated and partial flavonoid databases were used. We used the newly constructed U.S. Department of Agriculture flavonoid database to examine the association between consumption of total flavonoids, 6 flavonoid subgroups, and 29 individual flavonoids with adenomatous polyp recurrence in the Polyp Prevention Trial. The Polyp Prevention Trial was a randomized dietary intervention trial, which examined the effectiveness of a low-fat, high-fiber, high-fruit, and high-vegetable diet on adenoma recurrence. Intakes of flavonoids were estimated from a food frequency questionnaire. Multivariate logistic regression models (adjusted for age, body mass index, sex, regular non-steroidal anti-inflammatory use, and dietary fiber intake) were used to estimate odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals for both any and advanced adenoma recurrence within quartiles of energy-adjusted flavonoid intake (baseline, during the trial, and change during the trial). Total flavonoid intake was not associated with any or advanced adenoma recurrence. However, high intake of flavonols, which are at greater concentrations in beans, onions, apples, and tea, was associated with decreased risk of advanced adenoma recurrence (4th versus 1st quartile during the trial; odds ratio, 0.24; 95% confidence interval, 0.11, 0.53; P(trend) = 0.0006). Similar inverse associations were observed to a smaller extent for isoflavonoids, the flavonol kaempferol, and the isoflavonoids genistein and formononetin. Our data suggest that a flavonol-rich diet may decrease the risk of advanced adenoma recurrence. PMID:18559549

  19. Differences in Epidemiologic Risk Factors for Colorectal Adenomas and Serrated Polyps by Lesion Severity and Anatomical Site

    PubMed Central

    Burnett-Hartman, Andrea N.; Passarelli, Michael N.; Adams, Scott V.; Upton, Melissa P.; Zhu, Lee-Ching; Potter, John D.; Newcomb, Polly A.

    2013-01-01

    Using a case-control design, we evaluated differences in risk factors for colorectal polyps according to histological type, anatomical site, and severity. Participants were enrollees in the Group Health Cooperative aged 20–79 years who underwent colonoscopy in Seattle, Washington, between 1998 and 2007 and comprised 628 adenoma cases, 594 serrated polyp cases, 247 cases with both types of polyps, and 1,037 polyp-free controls. Participants completed a structured interview, and polyps were evaluated via standardized pathology review. We used multivariable polytomous logistic regression to compare case groups with controls and with the other case groups. Factors for which the strength of the association varied significantly between adenomas and serrated polyps were sex (P < 0.001), use of estrogen-only postmenopausal hormone therapy (P = 0.01), and smoking status (P < 0.001). For lesion severity, prior endoscopy (P < 0.001) and age (P = 0.05) had significantly stronger associations with advanced adenomas than with nonadvanced adenomas; and higher education was positively correlated with sessile serrated polyps but not with other serrated polyps (P = 0.02). Statistically significant, site-specific associations were observed for current cigarette smoking (P = 0.05 among adenomas and P < 0.001 among serrated polyps), postmenopausal estrogen-only therapy (P = 0.01 among adenomas), and obesity (P = 0.01 among serrated polyps). These findings further illustrate the epidemiologic heterogeneity of colorectal neoplasia and may help elucidate carcinogenic mechanisms for distinct pathways. PMID:23459948

  20. Dietary Lignan and Proanthocyanidin Consumption and Colorectal Adenoma Recurrence in the Polyp Prevention Trial

    PubMed Central

    Bobe, Gerd; Murphy, Gwen; Albert, Paul S.; Sansbury, Leah B.; Lanza, Elaine; Schatzkin, Arthur; Cross, Amanda J.

    2011-01-01

    Lignans and proanthocyanidins are plant polyphenols that have shown protective properties against colorectal neoplasms in some human studies. Using logistic regression, we estimated odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) to prospectively evaluate the association between lignan and proanthocyanidin intake, estimated from databases linked to a food frequency questionnaire, and adenoma recurrence in 1,859 participants of the Polyp Prevention Trial. Overall, individual or total lignans or proanthocyanidins were not associated with colorectal adenoma recurrence. However, in sex-specific analyses, total lignan intake was positively associated with any adenoma recurrence in women (highest versus lowest lignan intake quartile OR = 2.07, 95% CI: 1.22-3.52, P trend = 0.004) but not in men (P interaction = 0.04). To conclude, dietary lignan and proanthocyanidin consumption was not generally related to colorectal adenoma recurrence; however, high lignan intake may increase the risk of adenoma recurrence in women. PMID:21618513

  1. Calcium supplementation for the prevention of colorectal adenomas: A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Bonovas, Stefanos; Fiorino, Gionata; Lytras, Theodore; Malesci, Alberto; Danese, Silvio

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To determine the efficacy of calcium supplementation in reducing the recurrence of colorectal adenomas. METHODS: We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of published studies. We searched PubMed, Scopus, the Cochrane Library, the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform, and the ClinicalTrials.gov website, through December 2015. Randomized, placebo-controlled trials assessing supplemental calcium intake for the prevention of recurrence of adenomas were eligible for inclusion. Two reviewers independently selected studies based on predefined criteria, extracted data and outcomes (recurrence of colorectal adenomas, and advanced or “high-risk” adenomas), and rated each trial’s risk-of-bias. Between-study heterogeneity was assessed, and pooled risk ratio (RR) estimates with their 95% confidence intervals (95%CI) were calculated using fixed- and random-effects models. To express the treatment effect in clinical terms, we calculated the number needed to treat (NNT) to prevent one adenoma recurrence. We also assessed the quality of evidence using GRADE. RESULTS: Four randomized, placebo-controlled trials met the eligibility criteria and were included. Daily doses of elemental calcium ranged from 1200 to 2000 mg, while the duration of treatment and follow-up of participants ranged from 36 to 60 mo. Synthesis of intention-to-treat data, for participants who had undergone follow-up colonoscopies, indicated a modest protective effect of calcium in prevention of adenomas (fixed-effects, RR = 0.89, 95%CI: 0.82-0.96; random-effects, RR = 0.87, 95%CI: 0.77-0.98; high quality of evidence). The NNT was 20 (95%CI: 12-61) to prevent one colorectal adenoma recurrence within a period of 3 to 5 years. On the other hand, the association between calcium treatment and advanced adenomas did not reach statistical significance (fixed-effects, RR = 0.92, 95%CI: 0.75-1.13; random-effects, RR = 0.92, 95%CI: 0.71-1.18; moderate quality of evidence). CONCLUSION: Our

  2. Clonal origins and parallel evolution of regionally synchronous colorectal adenoma and carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Rhee, Je-Keun; Jung, Seung-Hyun; Lee, Sung Hak; Baek, In-Pyo; Kim, Min Sung; Lee, Sug Hyung; Chung, Yeun-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Although the colorectal adenoma-to-carcinoma sequence represents a classical cancer progression model, the evolution of the mutational landscape underlying this model is not fully understood. In this study, we analyzed eight synchronous pairs of colorectal high-grade adenomas and carcinomas, four microsatellite-unstable (MSU) and four -stable (MSS) pairs, using whole-exome sequencing. In the MSU adenoma-carcinoma pairs, we observed no subclonal mutations in adenomas that became fixed in paired carcinomas, suggesting a ‘parallel’ evolution of synchronous adenoma-to-carcinoma, rather than a ‘stepwise’ evolution. The abundance of indel (in MSU and MSS pairs) and microsatellite instability (in MSU pairs) was noted in the later adenoma- or carcinoma-specific mutations, indicating that the mutational processes and functional constraints operative in early and late colorectal carcinogenesis are different. All MSU cases exhibited clonal, truncating mutations in ACVR2A, TGFBR2, and DNA mismatch repair genes, but none were present in APC or KRAS. In three MSS pairs, both APC and KRAS mutations were identified as both early and clonal events, often accompanying clonal copy number changes. An MSS case uniquely exhibited clonal ERBB2 amplification, followed by APC and TP53 mutations as carcinoma-specific events. Along with the previously unrecognized clonal origins of synchronous colorectal adenoma-carcinoma pairs, our study revealed that the preferred sequence of mutational events during colorectal carcinogenesis can be context-dependent. PMID:26336987

  3. Clonal origins and parallel evolution of regionally synchronous colorectal adenoma and carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae-Min; An, Chang Hyeok; Rhee, Je-Keun; Jung, Seung-Hyun; Lee, Sung Hak; Baek, In-Pyo; Kim, Min Sung; Lee, Sug Hyung; Chung, Yeun-Jun

    2015-09-29

    Although the colorectal adenoma-to-carcinoma sequence represents a classical cancer progression model, the evolution of the mutational landscape underlying this model is not fully understood. In this study, we analyzed eight synchronous pairs of colorectal high-grade adenomas and carcinomas, four microsatellite-unstable (MSU) and four-stable (MSS) pairs, using whole-exome sequencing. In the MSU adenoma-carcinoma pairs, we observed no subclonal mutations in adenomas that became fixed in paired carcinomas, suggesting a 'parallel' evolution of synchronous adenoma-to-carcinoma, rather than a 'stepwise' evolution. The abundance of indel (in MSU and MSS pairs) and microsatellite instability (in MSU pairs) was noted in the later adenoma- or carcinoma-specific mutations, indicating that the mutational processes and functional constraints operative in early and late colorectal carcinogenesis are different. All MSU cases exhibited clonal, truncating mutations in ACVR2A, TGFBR2, and DNA mismatch repair genes, but none were present in APC or KRAS. In three MSS pairs, both APC and KRAS mutations were identified as both early and clonal events, often accompanying clonal copy number changes. An MSS case uniquely exhibited clonal ERBB2 amplification, followed by APC and TP53 mutations as carcinoma-specific events. Along with the previously unrecognized clonal origins of synchronous colorectal adenoma-carcinoma pairs, our study revealed that the preferred sequence of mutational events during colorectal carcinogenesis can be context-dependent. PMID:26336987

  4. Common colorectal cancer risk alleles contribute to the multiple colorectal adenoma phenotype, but do not influence colonic polyposis in FAP.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Timothy H T; Gorman, Maggie; Martin, Lynn; Barclay, Ella; Casey, Graham; Saunders, Brian; Thomas, Huw; Clark, Sue; Tomlinson, Ian

    2015-02-01

    The presence of multiple (5-100) colorectal adenomas suggests an inherited predisposition, but the genetic aetiology of this phenotype is undetermined if patients test negative for Mendelian polyposis syndromes such as familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) and MUTYH-associated polyposis (MAP). We investigated whether 18 common colorectal cancer (CRC) predisposition single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) could help to explain some cases with multiple adenomas who phenocopied FAP or MAP, but had no pathogenic APC or MUTYH variant. No multiple adenoma case had an outlying number of CRC SNP risk alleles, but multiple adenoma patients did have a significantly higher number of risk alleles than population controls (P=5.7 × 10(-7)). The association was stronger in those with ≥10 adenomas. The CRC SNPs accounted for 4.3% of the variation in multiple adenoma risk, with three SNPs (rs6983267, rs10795668, rs3802842) explaining 3.0% of the variation. In FAP patients, the CRC risk score did not differ significantly from the controls, as we expected given the overwhelming effect of pathogenic germline APC variants on the phenotype of these cases. More unexpectedly, we found no evidence that the CRC SNPs act as modifier genes for the number of colorectal adenomas in FAP patients. In conclusion, common colorectal tumour risk alleles contribute to the development of multiple adenomas in patients without pathogenic germline APC or MUTYH variants. This phenotype may have 'polygenic' or monogenic origins. The risk of CRC in relatives of multiple adenoma cases is probably much lower for cases with polygenic disease, and this should be taken into account when counselling such patients. PMID:24801760

  5. Effect of combined folic acid, Vitamin B6, and Vitamin B12 on colorectal adenoma

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Folic acid, vitamin B(6), and vitamin B(12) act in concert in the one-carbon metabolism and may protect against colorectal neoplasia. We examined the effect of combined B-vitamin treatment on the occurrence of colorectal adenoma. The Women's Antioxidant and Folic Acid Cardiovascular Study was a rand...

  6. Evaluation of pro-inflammatory markers plasma C-reactive protein and urinary prostaglandin-E2 metabolite in colorectal adenoma risk.

    PubMed

    Davenport, James R; Cai, Qiuyin; Ness, Reid M; Milne, Ginger; Zhao, Zhiguo; Smalley, Walter E; Zheng, Wei; Shrubsole, Martha J

    2016-08-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP) is a pro-inflammatory protein with potential as a biomarker in predicting colon cancer risk. However, little is known regarding its association with risk of colorectal adenomas, particularly by subtypes. We conducted a colonoscopy-based matched case-control study to assess whether elevated plasma CRP levels may be associated with colorectal adenoma risk and further whether this association may be modified by urinary prostaglandin E2 metabolite (PGE-M), a biomarker of systemic prostaglandin E2 production. Included in the study were 226 cases with a single small tubular adenoma, 198 cases with multiple small tubular adenomas, 283 cases with at least one advanced adenoma, and 395 polyp-free controls. No apparent association between CRP level and risk of single small tubular adenomas was found (ptrend  = 0.59). A dose-response relationship with CRP level was observed for risk of either multiple small tubular adenomas (OR = 2.01, 95%CI = 1.10-3.68 for the highest versus lowest tertile comparison; ptrend   = 0.03) or advanced adenomas (OR = 1.81, 95%CI = 1.10-2.96 for the highest versus lowest tertile comparison; ptrend  = 0.02). In a joint analysis of CRP level and PGE-M, risk of multiple or advanced adenoma was greatest among those with highest levels of both CRP and PGE-M in comparison to those with low CRP and low PGE-M (OR = 3.72, 95%CI = 1.49-9.72). Our results suggest that elevated CRP, particularly in the context of concurrent elevated PGE-M, may be a biomarker of multiple or advanced adenoma risk in a screening age population. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26333108

  7. MTHFR genotype and colorectal adenoma recurrence: data from a double-blind placebo-controlled clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Levine, A Joan; Wallace, Kristin; Tsang, Shirley; Haile, Robert W; Saibil, Fred; Ahnen, Dennis; Cole, Bernard F; Barry, Elizabeth L; Munroe, David J; Ali, Iqbal U; Ueland, Per; Baron, John A

    2008-09-01

    Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) is a key enzyme in folate metabolism. We assessed the association between two common MTHFR variants, 677C>T and 1298A>C, and adenoma recurrence in the context of a randomized double- blind clinical trial of aspirin use and folate supplementation. We used generalized linear regression to estimate risk ratios and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) for recurrence, adjusting for age, sex, clinical center, follow-up time, and treatment status. Neither MTHFR polymorphism was associated with overall or advanced adenoma recurrence. Compared with those with two wild-type alleles, the relative risk for advanced adenoma was 0.75 (95% CI, 0.36-1.55) for the MTHFR 677 TT genotype and 1.16 (95% CI, 0.58-2.33) for the MTHFR 1298 CC genotype. The effect of folate supplementation on recurrence risk did not differ by genotype. Our findings indicate that the MTHFR genotype does not change adenoma risk in a manner similar to its effect on colorectal cancer, and does not modify the effect of folate supplementation on metachronous adenoma risk. PMID:18768511

  8. c-MET expression in colorectal adenomas and primary carcinomas with its corresponding metastases

    PubMed Central

    Abd El-Maqsoud, Nehad M. R.; El-Hameed El-Heeny, Amr Abd; Mohammed, Mostafa Fuad

    2015-01-01

    Background c-MET plays an important role in tumor proliferation, invasion and metastasis. In this study we examined the expression of c-MET in colorectal adenomas, primary adenocarcinomas and their corresponding lymph node, peritoneal and liver metastases. We correlated our findings with clinicopathological features. Methods Twenty three cases of colorectal adenoma and 102 cases of primary colorectal carcinoma and their corresponding metastases (44 lymph nodes, 21 peritoneal deposits and 16 liver metastases) were studied to evaluate c-MET expression by immunohistochemistry. For comparison, 12 sections of adjacent healthy colorectal mucosa were examined. Results Statistically significant differences were present among normal tissues, colorectal adenomas and primary colorectal carcinomas (P=0.011). Normal tissues showed a negative or weak reaction in 66.67% and 33.33% of cases respectively. Expression of c-MET was positive in 47.8% of adenomas. A significant positive association was identified between c-MET high expression and degree of dysplasia (P=0.024). c-MET was highly expressed in 66.7% of primary colorectal carcinoma. Significant positive correlations were detected between c-MET expression and TNM stage (P=0.036), lymph node metastasis (LNM), peritoneal deposits and liver metastasis (P=0.038, P=0.094 and P=0.045, respectively). c-MET expression in metastatic tissues was significantly higher than that of the primary tumor. Conclusions c-MET expression is gradually up-regulated in the development and progression of colorectal cancer (CRC) from normal epithelium to adenoma to colorectal carcinoma to metastases. PMID:26697193

  9. A comprehensive look at transcription factor gene expression changes in colorectal adenomas

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Biological processes are controlled by transcription networks. Expression changes of transcription factor (TF) genes in precancerous lesions are therefore crucial events in tumorigenesis. Our aim was to obtain a comprehensive picture of these changes in colorectal adenomas. Methods Using a 3-pronged selection procedure, we analyzed transcriptomic data on 34 human tissue samples (17 adenomas and paired samples of normal mucosa, all collected with ethics committee approval and written, informed patient consent) to identify TFs with highly significant tumor-associated gene expression changes whose potential roles in colorectal tumorigenesis have been under-researched. Microarray data were subjected to stringent statistical analysis of TF expression in tumor vs. normal tissues, MetaCore-mediated identification of TF networks displaying enrichment for genes that were differentially expressed in tumors, and a novel quantitative analysis of the publications examining the TF genes’ roles in colorectal tumorigenesis. Results The 261 TF genes identified with this procedure included DACH1, which plays essential roles in the proper proliferation and differentiation of retinal and leg precursor cell populations in Drosophila melanogaster. Its possible roles in colorectal tumorigenesis are completely unknown, but it was found to be markedly overexpressed (mRNA and protein) in all colorectal adenomas and in most colorectal carcinomas. However, DACH1 expression was absent in some carcinomas, most of which were DNA mismatch-repair deficient. When networks were built using the set of TF genes identified by all three selection procedures, as well as the entire set of transcriptomic changes in adenomas, five hub genes (TGFB1, BIRC5, MYB, NR3C1, and TERT) where identified as putatively crucial components of the adenomatous transformation process. Conclusion The transcription-regulating network of colorectal adenomas (compared with that of normal colorectal mucosa) is

  10. Meat, vegetables and genetic polymorphisms and the risk of colorectal carcinomas and adenomas

    PubMed Central

    Skjelbred, Camilla F; Sæbø, Mona; Hjartåker, Anette; Grotmol, Tom; Hansteen, Inger-Lise; Tveit, Kjell M; Hoff, Geir; Kure, Elin H

    2007-01-01

    Background The risk of sporadic colorectal cancer (CRC) is mainly associated with lifestyle factors, particularly dietary factors. Diets high in red meat and fat and low in fruit and vegetables are associated with an increased risk of CRC. The dietary effects may be modulated by genetic polymorphisms in biotransformation genes. In this study we aimed to evaluate the role of dietary factors in combination with genetic factors in the different stages of colorectal carcinogenesis in a Norwegian population. Methods We used a case-control study design (234 carcinomas, 229 high-risk adenomas, 762 low-risk adenomas and 400 controls) to test the association between dietary factors (meat versus fruit, berries and vegetables) genetic polymorphisms in biotransformation genes (GSTM1, GSTT1, GSTP1 Ile105Val, EPHX1 Tyr113His and EPHX1 His139Arg), and risk of colorectal carcinomas and adenomas. Odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (95% CI) were estimated by binary logistic regression. Results A higher ratio of total meat to total fruit, berry and vegetable intake was positively associated with both high and low-risk adenomas, with approximately twice the higher risk in the 2nd quartile compared to the lowest quartile. For the high-risk adenomas this positive association was more obvious for the common allele (Tyr allele) of the EPHX1 codon 113 polymorphism. An association was also observed for the EPHX1 codon 113 polymorphism in the low-risk adenomas, although not as obvious. Conclusion Although, the majority of the comparison groups are not significant, our results suggest an increased risk of colorectal adenomas in individuals for some of the higher ratios of total meat to total fruit, berry and vegetable intake. In addition the study supports the notion that the biotransformation enzymes GSTM1, GSTP1 and EPHX1 may modify the effect of dietary factors on the risk of developing colorectal carcinoma and adenoma. PMID:18093316

  11. ASSOCIATION BETWEEN URINARY MUTAGENICITY AND RISK OF COLORECTAL ADENOMAS IN A CLINIC-BASED CASE-CONTROL STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    ASSOCIATION BETWEEN URINARY MUTAGENICITY AND RISK OF COLORECTAL ADENOMAS IN A CLINIC-BASED CASE-CONTROL STUDY

    Humans are exposed to a variety of mutagens from diet, smoking, or occupation. To explore if exposure to mutagens was related to the risk of colorectal adenomas i...

  12. Piecemeal Versus En Bloc Resection of Large Rectal Adenomas

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-10

    Colorectal Adenoma With Mild Dysplasia; Colorectal Adenoma With Severe Dysplasia; Colorectal Adenomatous Polyp; Colorectal Low Grade Intraepithelial Neoplasia; Colorectal High Grade Intraepithelial Neoplasia

  13. Increased rectal microbial richness is associated with the presence of colorectal adenomas in humans.

    PubMed

    Sanapareddy, Nina; Legge, Ryan M; Jovov, Biljana; McCoy, Amber; Burcal, Lauren; Araujo-Perez, Felix; Randall, Thomas A; Galanko, Joseph; Benson, Andrew; Sandler, Robert S; Rawls, John F; Abdo, Zaid; Fodor, Anthony A; Keku, Temitope O

    2012-10-01

    Differences in the composition of the gut microbial community have been associated with diseases such as obesity, Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis and colorectal cancer (CRC). We used 454 titanium pyrosequencing of the V1-V2 region of the 16S rRNA gene to characterize adherent bacterial communities in mucosal biopsy samples from 33 subjects with adenomas and 38 subjects without adenomas (controls). Biopsy samples from subjects with adenomas had greater numbers of bacteria from 87 taxa than controls; only 5 taxa were more abundant in control samples. The magnitude of the differences in the distal gut microbiota between patients with adenomas and controls was more pronounced than that of any other clinical parameters including obesity, diet or family history of CRC. This suggests that sequence analysis of the microbiota could be used to identify patients at risk for developing adenomas. PMID:22622349

  14. Dynamics of the IL-33/ST2 network in the progression of human colorectal adenoma to sporadic colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Cui, Guanglin; Qi, Haili; Gundersen, Mona D; Yang, Hang; Christiansen, Ingrid; Sørbye, Sveinung W; Goll, Rasmus; Florholmen, Jon

    2015-02-01

    Most sporadic colorectal cancers (CRCs) develop from preformed adenomas. Cytokines are involved in the transition from adenoma to CRC. Interleukin-33 (IL-33) is a newly discovered proinflammatory cytokine belonging to the IL-1 cytokine family and involved in the development of chronic inflammation and cancer. The aim of this study was to evaluate the dynamics of the IL-33/ST2 axis during the sequence of progression from normal colorectum to adenoma to carcinoma and to investigate the association of IL-33 and ST2 expression with clinicopathological parameters and prognosis. The results demonstrated that the levels of IL-33 and ST2 in adenomas (n = 50), determined by real-time PCR, were significantly higher than those of normal controls (n = 30); the levels of both IL-33/ST mRNA in CRCs (n = 50) were higher than in normal controls but lower than in adenomas. Further analysis revealed that the expression level of ST2 in CRCs was associated with tumor/node/metastasis (TNM) stage. The log-rank test showed that neither the IL-33 nor the ST2 expression level was correlated with overall survival in patients with CRC. The increased expression of IL-33/ST2 in adenomas and CRC tissues was confirmed by immunohistochemistry and was observed in both the tumor stromal cells and adenomatous/cancerous cells. Notably, increased densities of IL-33-positive and ST2-positive microvessels were found in the stroma of adenomas and CRCs. In conclusion, increased expression of the IL-33/ST2 axis along the colorectal adenoma-carcinoma sequence might be involved in the neoplastic transformation via the participation of this axis in the regulation of angiogenesis. PMID:25324197

  15. Associations between S-adenosylmethionine, S-adenosylhomocysteine, and colorectal adenoma risk are modified by sex.

    PubMed

    Shrubsole, Martha J; Wagner, Conrad; Zhu, Xiangzhu; Hou, Lifang; Loukachevitch, Lioudmila V; Ness, Reid M; Zheng, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Methionine metabolism is an important component of one-carbon metabolism. S-adenosylmethionine (SAM), the methyl donor for nearly all methylation reactions, is irreversibly converted to S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH), an inhibitor of methyltransferases, some of which are key enzymes for methylation. Changes in DNA methylation are common in colorectal cancers. We evaluated plasma SAM and SAH with colorectal adenoma risk in a matched case-control study conducted among individuals undergoing routine colonoscopy. 216 cases were individually matched to polyp-free controls in a 1:1 ratio on age (± 5 years), sex, race (white/non-white), study site (academic medical center/VA hospital) and date of sample collection (± 60 days). Sex-specific quantiles were evaluated based on the control distribution due to vastly different metabolite levels by sex. Conditional logistic regression models were used to estimate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Among males, both higher SAM (OR = 0.38, 95% CI: 0.18-0.77, p for trend = 0.007) and higher SAH (OR = 0.45, 95% CI: 0.22-0.91, p for trend = 0.02) were associated with statistically significantly decreased risks of colorectal adenoma in comparison to lowest plasma SAM or SAH tertile. Conversely, among females, both higher SAM and higher SAH were associated with increased risk of colorectal adenoma, which was statistically significant for SAH (OR = 5.18, 95% CI: 1.09-24.62, p for trend = 0.04). The difference in these associations between men and women was statistically significant (p < 0.05). The ratio of SAM/SAH was not associated with colorectal adenoma risk among males or females. These findings suggest SAM and SAH may be involved in the development of colorectal adenoma and the association may be modified by sex. PMID:25628954

  16. A systematic comparison of microsimulation models of colorectal cancer: the role of assumptions about adenoma progression

    PubMed Central

    Kuntz, Karen M.; Lansdorp-Vogelaar, Iris; Rutter, Carolyn M.; Knudsen, Amy B.; van Ballegooijen, Marjolein; Savarino, James E.; Feuer, Eric J.; Zauber, Ann G.

    2012-01-01

    Background As the complexity of microsimulation models increases, however, concerns about model transparency are heightened. Methods We conducted model “experiments” to explore the impact of variations in “deep” model parameters using three colorectal cancer (CRC) models. All natural history models were calibrated to match observed data on adenoma prevalence and cancer incidence, but varied in their underlying specification of the adenoma-carcinoma process. We projected CRC incidence among individuals with an underlying adenoma or preclinical cancer vs. those without any underlying condition and examined the impact of removing adenomas. We calculated the percentage of simulated CRC cases arising from adenomas that developed within 10 or 20 years prior to cancer diagnosis, and estimated dwell time – defined as the time from the development of an adenoma to symptom-detected cancer in the absence of screening among individuals with a CRC diagnosis. Results The 20-year CRC incidence among 55-year-old individuals with an adenoma or preclinical cancer was 7 to 75 times greater than in the condition-free group. The removal of all adenomas among the subgroup with an underlying adenoma or cancer resulted in a reduction of 30% to 89% in cumulative incidence. Among CRCs diagnosed at age 65, the proportion arising from adenomas formed within 10 years ranged between 4% and 67%. The mean dwell time varied from 10.6 years to 25.8 years. Conclusions Models that all match observed data on adenoma prevalence and cancer incidence can produce quite different dwell times and very different answers with respect to the effectiveness of interventions. When conducting applied analyses to inform policy, using multiple models provides a sensitivity analysis on key (unobserved) “deep” model parameters and can provide guidance about specific areas in need of additional research and validation. PMID:21673186

  17. URINARY MUTAGENICITY AS A BIOMARKER OF COOKED-MEAT-ASSOCIATED MUTAGENS AND RISK FOR COLORECTAL ADENOMA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Urinary Mutagenicity as a Biomarker of Cooked-Meat-Associated Mutagens and Risk for Colorectal Adenoma

    In a controlled feeding study involving 60 subjects, we have investigated urinary mutagenicity as a biomarker of exposure to cooked-meat-associated mutagens. In a separa...

  18. Frequent PTPRK-RSPO3 fusions and RNF43 mutations in colorectal traditional serrated adenoma.

    PubMed

    Sekine, Shigeki; Yamashita, Satoshi; Tanabe, Taro; Hashimoto, Taiki; Yoshida, Hiroshi; Taniguchi, Hirokazu; Kojima, Motohiro; Shinmura, Kazuya; Saito, Yutaka; Hiraoka, Nobuyoshi; Ushijima, Toshikazu; Ochiai, Atsushi

    2016-06-01

    The molecular mechanisms underlying the serrated pathway of colorectal tumourigenesis, particularly those related to traditional serrated adenomas (TSAs), are still poorly understood. In this study, we analysed genetic alterations in 188 colorectal polyps, including hyperplastic polyps, sessile serrated adenomas/polyps (SSA/Ps), TSAs, tubular adenomas, and tubulovillous adenomas by using targeted next-generation sequencing and reverse transcription-PCR. Our analyses showed that most TSAs (71%) contained genetic alterations in WNT pathway components. In particular, PTPRK-RSPO3 fusions (31%) and RNF43 mutations (24%) were frequently and almost exclusively observed in TSAs. Consistent with the WNT pathway activation, immunohistochemical analysis showed diffuse and focal nuclear accumulation of β-catenin in 53% and 30% of TSAs, respectively. APC mutations were observed in tubular and tubulovillous adenomas and in a subset of TSAs. BRAF mutations were exclusively and frequently encountered in serrated lesions. KRAS mutations were observed in all types of polyps, but were most commonly encountered in tubulovillous adenomas and TSAs. This study has demonstrated that TSAs frequently harbour genetic alterations that lead to WNT pathway activation, in addition to BRAF and KRAS mutations. In particular, PTPRK-RSPO3 fusions and RNF43 mutations were found to be characteristic genetic features of TSAs. Copyright © 2016 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26924569

  19. Coffee prevents proximal colorectal adenomas in Japanese men: a prospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Tomiyo; Ishikawa, Hideki; Mutoh, Michihiro; Wakabayashi, Keiji; Kawano, Atsuko; Sakai, Toshiyuki; Matsuura, Nariaki

    2016-09-01

    This prospective cohort study aimed to show that coffee prevents the recurrence of colorectal tumors (adenomas, precursors of colorectal cancer, and early-stage colorectal cancers) as well as colorectal cancer. The present study included 307 patients who participated in a clinical study that required endoscopy to remove a colorectal tumor. The amount of coffee consumed by the patients at study inclusion and the frequency of colorectal tumors, as detected by colonoscopy over the subsequent 4 years, were assessed. Coffee consumption was determined using a diet survey that included 3-consecutive-day food records. The risk of colorectal tumor recurrence was significantly lower (odds ratio=0.21; 95% confidence interval, 0.06-0.74) in patients who consumed more than three cups of coffee per day compared with those who consumed no coffee. No correlation was observed between the examined factors, including green tea and black tea intake and the amount of caffeine consumed. In subanalysis divided by the tumor location within the colorectum, the odds ratio of colorectal tumor recurrence in the proximal colon showed a tendency toward reduction as coffee consumption increased; however, increased coffee consumption significantly increased colorectal tumor recurrence in the distal colon. We showed that high coffee consumption reduced the overall occurrence of colorectal tumors, affected by the reduction in the proximal colon. PMID:26291025

  20. Associations Between Markers of Colorectal Cancer Stem Cells and Adenomas Among Ethnic Groups

    PubMed Central

    Leavell, Bonita J.; Van Buren, Eric; Antaki, Fadi; Axelrod, Bradley N.; Rambus, Mary Ann; Majumdar, Adhip P. N.

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purposes Most colorectal tumors develop from adenomatous polyps, which are detected by colonoscopy. African Americans (AAs) have higher incidence of colorectal cancer (CRC) and greater mortality from this disease than Caucasian Americans (CAs). We investigated whether differences in predisposition to CRC and its surrogate (colonic adenomas) between these ethnic groups were related to numbers of cancer stem or stem-like cells (CSCs) in colonocytes. Methods We analyzed colonic effluent from 11 AA and 14 CA patients who underwent scheduled colonoscopy examinations at the John D. Dingell Veterans Affairs Medical Center. We determined proportions of cells that expressed the CSC markers CD44 and CD166 by flow cytometry. Results The proportion of colonocytes that were CD44+CD166– in effluent from patients with adenomas was significantly greater than from patients without adenomas (P = 0.01); the proportion of CD44+CD166+ colonocytes was also greater (P = 0.07). Effluent from AAs with adenomas had 60 % more CD44+166– colonocytes than from CAs with adenomas. Using cutoff values of 8 % for AAs and 3 % for CAs, the proportion of CD44+166– colonocytes that had positive predictive value for detection of adenomas was 100 % for AAs and CAs, determined by receiver operator characteristic curve analysis. Conclusion The proportion of CD44+166– colonocytes in colonic effluent can be used to identify patients with adenoma. AAs with adenomas have a higher proportion of CD44+166– colonocytes than CA. The increased proportion of CSCs in colonic tissue from AA might be associated with the increased incidence of CRC in this population. PMID:22562538

  1. Prevalence of serrated polyposis syndrome and its association with synchronous advanced adenoma and lifestyle

    PubMed Central

    TOYOSHIMA, NAOYA; SAKAMOTO, TAKU; MAKAZU, MAKOMO; NAKAJIMA, TAKESHI; MATSUDA, TAKAHISA; KUSHIMA, RYOJI; SHIMODA, TADAKAZU; FUJII, TAKAHIRO; INOUE, HARUHIRO; KUDO, SHIN-EI; SAITO, YUTAKA

    2015-01-01

    We assessed the clinicopathological characteristics of patients with serrated polyposis syndrome (SPS) and the incidence of advanced adenoma/colorectal cancer (CRC). We prospectively enrolled 249 consecutive patients who underwent colonoscopy at the National Cancer Center Hospital over a 6-month period. All the polyps were diagnosed using magnification colonoscopy and resection/biopsy. The enrolled patients were divided into two groups, i) those with ≥5 histologically diagnosed hyperplastic polyps (HPs) proximal to the sigmoid colon, with at least 2 polyps >10 mm in diameter and ii) those with ≥20 HPs distributed throughout the colon. The clinical characteristics of the two groups were compared, including lifestyle, family history of CRC and colonoscopic findings. HPs were identified in 228 patients, of whom 21 (8.4%) had SPS. All 21 patients had ≥20 HPs distributed throughout the colon, with none having >2 HPs ≥1 cm in diameter in the right colon. Synchronous advanced adenoma/CRC was diagnosed in 76/249 (30.5%) patients. The prevalence of advanced adenoma/CRC was higher among patients with compared to those without SPS (P=0.075). SPS was also associated with older age and higher body mass index (BMI). Our results suggested that older age and higher BMI are independent risk factors for SPS. Advanced adenoma/CRC tended to occur more frequently among patients with compared to those without SPS, although the difference was not statistically significant. PMID:25469272

  2. Analysis of Candidate Genes in Occurrence and Growth of Colorectal Adenomas

    PubMed Central

    Olschwang, Sylviane; Vernerey, Déwi; Cottet, Vanessa; Pariente, Alexandre; Nalet, Bernard; Lafon, Jacques; Faivre, Jean; Laurent-Puig, Pierre; Bonithon-Kopp, Claire; Bonaiti-Pellié, Catherine

    2009-01-01

    Predisposition to sporadic colorectal tumours is influenced by genes with minor phenotypic effects. A case-control study was set up on 295 patients treated for a large adenoma matched with polyp-free individuals on gender, age, and geographic origin in a 1 : 2 proportion. A second group of 302 patients treated for a small adenoma was also characterized to distinguish effects on adenoma occurrence and growth. We focussed the study on 38 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) encompassing 14 genes involved in colorectal carcinogenesis. Effect of SNPs was tested using unconditional logistic regression. Comparisons were made for haplotypes within a given gene and for biologically relevant genes combinations using the combination test. The APC p.Glu1317Gly variant appeared to influence the adenoma growth (P = .04, exact test) but not its occurrence. This result needs to be replicated and genome-wide association studies may be necessary to fully identify low-penetrance alleles involved in early stages of colorectal tumorigenesis. PMID:19888426

  3. Fruit and vegetable intakes and risk of colorectal cancer and incident and recurrent adenomas in the PLCO cancer screening trial.

    PubMed

    Kunzmann, Andrew T; Coleman, Helen G; Huang, Wen-Yi; Cantwell, Marie M; Kitahara, Cari M; Berndt, Sonja I

    2016-04-15

    The roles of fruits and vegetables in colorectal cancer development are unclear. Few prospective studies have assessed the association with adenoma, a known precursor to colorectal cancer. Our aim was to evaluate the association between fruit and vegetable intake and colorectal cancer development by evaluating the risk of incident and recurrent colorectal adenoma and colorectal cancer. Study participants were identified from the intervention arm of the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial. Fruit and vegetable intake was measured using a self-reported dietary questionnaire. Total fruit and vegetable intake was not associated with reduced incident or recurrent adenoma risk overall, but a protective association was observed for multiple adenomas (Odds ratio 3rd tertile vs. 1st tertile = 0.61, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.38, 1.00). Higher fruit and vegetable intakes were associated with a borderline reduced risk of colorectal cancer (Hazard ratio (HR) 3rd tertile vs. 1st tertile = 0.82, 95% CI: 0.67, 1.01), which reached significance amongst individuals with high processed meat intakes (HR = 0.74, 95% CI: 0.55, 0.99). Our results suggest that increased fruit and vegetable intake may protect against multiple adenoma development and may reduce the detrimental effects of high processed meat intakes on colorectal cancer risk. PMID:26559156

  4. Evidence of reciprocity of bcl-2 and p53 expression in human colorectal adenomas and carcinomas.

    PubMed Central

    Watson, A. J.; Merritt, A. J.; Jones, L. S.; Askew, J. N.; Anderson, E.; Becciolini, A.; Balzi, M.; Potten, C. S.; Hickman, J. A.

    1996-01-01

    Evidence of accumulating for the failure of apoptosis as an important factor in the evolution of colorectal cancer and its poor response to adjuvant therapy. The proto-oncogene bcl-2 suppresses apoptosis. Its expression could provide an important survival advantage permitting the development of colorectal cancer. The expression of bcl-2 and p53 was determined by immunohistochemistry in 47 samples of histologically normal colonic mucosa, 19 adenomas and 53 adenocarcinomas. Expression of bcl-2 in colonic crypts > 5 cm from the tumours was confined to crypt bases but was more extensive and intense in normal crypts < 5 mm from cancers. A higher proportion of adenomas (63.2%) than carcinomas (36.5%) expressed bcl-2 (P < 0.05). A lower proportion of adenomas (31.6%) than carcinomas (62.3%) expressed p53 (P < 0.02). A total of 26.3% of adenomas and 22% of carcinomas expressed both bcl-2 and p53. To determine whether these samples contained cells which expressed both proteins, a dual staining technique for bcl-2 and p53 was used. Only 1/19 adenomas and 2/53 carcinomas contained cells immunopositive for both bcl-2 and p53. Moreover there was evidence of reciprocity of expression of bcl-2 and p53 in these three double staining neoplasms. We suggest that bcl-2 provides a survival advantage in the proliferative compartment of normal crypts and colorectal neoplasms. However, its expression is lost during the evolution from adenoma to carcinoma, whereas p53 expression is increased, an event generally coincident with the expression of stabilised p53, which we presume to represent the mutant form. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:8611422

  5. Alterations in plasminogen activation correlate with epithelial cell dysplasia grading in colorectal adenomas.

    PubMed Central

    Protiva, P.; Sordat, I.; Chaubert, P.; Saraga, E.; Trân-Thang, C.; Sordat, B.; Blum, A. L.; Dorta, G.

    1998-01-01

    Proteases are important for neoplastic invasion but a specific role for the plasminogen activator system in the progression of colorectal epithelial dysplasia to adenomatous lesions remains unclear. Consecutive tissue cryosections of 51 adenomas, 49 distant mucosa samples and five mucosa samples from control subjects were histopathologically analysed for dysplasia grade and tissue type, urokinase plasminogen activator levels and plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (PAI-1) using immunosorbent methods. Plasminogen activation and urokinase-mediated proteolytic activity levels were assessed using in situ zymography. Plasminogen activation and tissue-type activator levels were lower in adenomas than in mucosae (P < 0.001). PAI-1 concentration and urokinase levels were higher in adenomas than in mucosae (P < 0.001 and P < 0.001 respectively). In adenomas, urokinase concentration increased in parallel with PAI-1, but only the urokinase levels correlated with the dysplasia grade (P < 0.01). Thus, the alterations in plasminogen activation correlated with epithelial cell dysplasia grading. In the mucosa to adenoma transition, a marked decrease in tissue-type plasminogen activator occurred. In adenomas, this decrease was accompanied by a concomitant increase in urokinase and PAI-1. The urokinase level only continued to rise in parallel with the dysplasia grade. Resulting protease-antiprotease imbalance in high-grade dysplasia may represent the phenotypic change associated with malignant transformation and invasive behaviour. Images Figure 2 PMID:9461001

  6. Racial differences in obesity measures and risk of colorectal adenomas in a large screening population.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Caitlin C; Martin, Christopher F; Sandler, Robert S

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is an important risk factor for colorectal neoplasia; however, little research exists on racial differences in obesity measures [body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC), and waist-hip-ratio (WHR)] associated with adenoma. We used data from the Diet and Health Studies, Phases III-V to examine differences in the contribution of obesity measures to adenoma risk by race. The sample consisted of 2184 patients (1806 white, 378 African American) undergoing outpatient colonoscopy for average risk screening. Covariates included demographics, health history, and validated measures of diet and physical activity. Among whites, BMI [overweight: odds ratio (OR) = 1.31, 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.00-1.71; obese: OR = 1.89, 95% CI, 1.41-2.56), WC (OR = 1.47, 95% CI, 1.09-1.99), and WHR (OR = 1.60, 95% CI, 1.24-2.06) were associated with adenomas. BMI was not associated with adenomas in African Americans. Although the CIs were wide, the point estimates for WHR (OR = 1.07, 95% CI, 0.51-2.22) and WC (OR = 1.04, 95% CI, 0.56-1.92) were slightly elevated above the null. BMI was associated with adenomas only among whites, whereas WHR and WC appeared to be important risk factors among both races. Racial differences in adenoma risk may be due to differences in body shape and weight and/or fat distribution. PMID:25425186

  7. Dysbiosis of Fungal Microbiota in the Intestinal Mucosa of Patients with Colorectal Adenomas

    PubMed Central

    Luan, Chunguang; Xie, Lingling; Yang, Xi; Miao, Huifang; Lv, Na; Zhang, Ruifen; Xiao, Xue; Hu, Yongfei; Liu, Yulan; Wu, Na; Zhu, Yuanmin; Zhu, Baoli

    2015-01-01

    The fungal microbiota is an important component of the human gut microbiome and may be linked to gastrointestinal disease. In this study, the fungal microbiota of biopsy samples from adenomas and adjacent tissues was characterized by deep sequencing. Ascomycota, Glomeromycota and Basidiomycota were identified as the dominant phyla in both adenomas and adjacent tissues from all subjects. Among the 60 genera identified, the opportunist pathogens Phoma and Candida represented an average of 45% of the fungal microbiota. When analyzed at the operational taxonomic unit (OTU) level, however, a decreased diversity in adenomas was observed, and three OTUs differed significantly from the adjacent tissues. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) revealed that the core OTUs formed separate clusters for advanced and non-advanced adenomas for which the abundance of four OTUs differed significantly. Moreover, the size of adenomas and the disease stage were closely related to changes in the fungal microbiota in subjects with adenomas. This study characterized the fungal microbiota profile of subjects with adenomas and identified potential diagnostic biomarkers closely related to different stages of adenomas. PMID:25613490

  8. Exome capture sequencing of adenoma reveals genetic alterations in multiple cellular pathways at the early stage of colorectal tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Donger; Yang, Liu; Zheng, Liangtao; Ge, Weiting; Li, Dan; Zhang, Yong; Hu, Xueda; Gao, Zhibo; Xu, Jinghong; Huang, Yanqin; Hu, Hanguang; Zhang, Hang; Zhang, Hao; Liu, Mingming; Yang, Huanming; Zheng, Lei; Zheng, Shu

    2013-01-01

    Most of colorectal adenocarcinomas are believed to arise from adenomas, which are premalignant lesions. Sequencing the whole exome of the adenoma will help identifying molecular biomarkers that can predict the occurrence of adenocarcinoma more precisely and help understanding the molecular pathways underlying the initial stage of colorectal tumorigenesis. We performed the exome capture sequencing of the normal mucosa, adenoma and adenocarcinoma tissues from the same patient and sequenced the identified mutations in additional 73 adenomas and 288 adenocarcinomas. Somatic single nucleotide variations (SNVs) were identified in both the adenoma and adenocarcinoma by comparing with the normal control from the same patient. We identified 12 nonsynonymous somatic SNVs in the adenoma and 42 nonsynonymous somatic SNVs in the adenocarcinoma. Most of these mutations including OR6X1, SLC15A3, KRTHB4, RBFOX1, LAMA3, CDH20, BIRC6, NMBR, GLCCI1, EFR3A, and FTHL17 were newly reported in colorectal adenomas. Functional annotation of these mutated genes showed that multiple cellular pathways including Wnt, cell adhesion and ubiquitin mediated proteolysis pathways were altered genetically in the adenoma and that the genetic alterations in the same pathways persist in the adenocarcinoma. CDH20 and LAMA3 were mutated in the adenoma while NRXN3 and COL4A6 were mutated in the adenocarcinoma from the same patient, suggesting for the first time that genetic alterations in the cell adhesion pathway occur as early as in the adenoma. Thus, the comparison of genomic mutations between adenoma and adenocarcinoma provides us a new insight into the molecular events governing the early step of colorectal tumorigenesis. PMID:23301059

  9. Wnt disruption in colorectal polyps - the traditional serrated adenoma enters the fray.

    PubMed

    Leedham, Simon J; Chetty, Runjan

    2016-08-01

    The adenoma-carcinoma sequence describes the development of colorectal carcinoma (CRC) from benign colorectal precursor lesions. Molecular classification of established CRC has demonstrated considerable disease heterogeneity; however, as an emerging cancer frequently outgrows and destroys the initial precursor lesion, CRC molecular taxonomy can only be partially reconciled with histologically classified polyps. Thus, the molecular pathogenesis of some colorectal polyp types, including the traditional serrated adenoma (TSA), is still unclear. Now, candidate driver gene analysis of a cohort of different polyps reveals characteristic, but highly variable, mutations disrupting the Wnt signalling pathway across different histological polyp subtypes. How and when different precursor lesions acquire Wnt disruption reflects important distinctions in polyp biology, dependent on a combination of the dominant molecular pathway and the cell of origin of individual lesions. TSAs preferentially acquire ligand-dependent Wnt activating mutations, which means that the cancers that arise from these aggressive polyps may be sensitive to targeted Wnt inhibition. This paper demonstrates that applying next-generation sequencing technology to improve our understanding of colorectal precursor lesion molecular pathogenesis could also give important and translationally relevant insights into colorectal cancer biology. Copyright © 2016 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27172330

  10. Circulating 25-Hydroxyvitamin-D and Risk of Colorectal Adenomas and Hyperplastic Polyps

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Scott V.; Newcomb, Polly A.; Burnett-Hartman, Andrea N.; White, Emily; Mandelson, Margaret T.; Potter, John D.

    2011-01-01

    Colorectal adenomas are clear precursors of cancer; hyperplastic polyps may also have malignant potential. An inverse association between circulating vitamin D metabolites and adenoma risk has been reported, but less is known about vitamin D and hyperplastic polyps. We conducted a case-control study of adenomas and hyperplastic polyps among 459 members of an integrated health plan evaluated via colonoscopy. Questionnaires provided information on colorectal polyp risk factors, and plasma samples were assayed for 25-hydroxyvitamin-D (25(OH)D). Polytomous regression was used to estimate odds ratios for adenomas (N=149) and hyperplastic polyps (N=85) compared to polyp-free controls (N=225) by tertile of 25(OH)D. An inverse association between 25(OH)D and adenomas was suggested after adjustment for potential confounding factors (comparing upper to lower tertiles, OR[95%CI]: 0.71 [0.38–1.30]). After restriction of the analyses to study participants with no history of polyps, this OR estimate was reduced further (adjusted OR [95%CI]: 0.52 [0.23–1.20]). In comparison, no inverse association between hyperplastic polyps and 25(OH)D was observed among the full study participants (adjusted OR [95%CI]: 1.17 [0.55–2.51]) or among those without prior polyps (adjusted OR [95%CI]: 1.42 [0.55–3.65]). Our study suggests that the established inverse association between circulating 25(OH)D and adenoma may not apply to hyperplastic polyps. PMID:21432725

  11. Flexible sigmoidoscopy or colonoscopy as a screening modality for colorectal adenomas in older age groups? Findings in a cohort of the normal population aged 63-72 years

    PubMed Central

    Thiis-Evensen, E; Hoff, G; Sauar, J; Majak, B; Vatn, M

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Most cases of colorectal cancer originate from adenomas. Removing adenomas has been shown to reduce the incidence of colorectal cancer. The design of cost effective endoscopic screening programmes requires a knowledge of the distribution of adenomas in different age groups.
AIM—To investigate the distribution of colorectal adenomas in older age groups in the normal population.
METHOD—A total of 356 men and women selected randomly from the population register were offered a colonoscopic screening examination to detect and remove polyps.
RESULTS—In all, 241(68%) subjects, mean age 67.4 years (range 62-73), attended. The caecum was intubated in 193 (80%), and in this group 32 (38%) women and 51 (47%) men had adenomas. One hundred and ten (54%) of the adenomas and 11 (39%) of the "high risk adenomas" (adenomas larger than 10 mm in diameter, adenomas containing villous components, and adenomas with severe dysplasia) were found proximal to the sigmoid colon. In 36 (43%) of the subjects with adenomas, the adenomas were only found proximal to the sigmoid colon. Twenty two (11%) subjects had more than two adenomas. Of 203 adenomas discovered, 189 (93%) were less than 10 mm in diameter.
CONCLUSION—More than half of the adenomas were localised proximal to the sigmoid colon, and, in nearly half of the adenoma bearing subjects examined, the adenoma was proximal to the descending colon. This indicates that a sigmoidoscopic screening examination in this age group would miss a substantial number of adenomas, but this may be acceptable as the vast majority of proximal adenomas do not progress to clinical cancer within the life expectancy of this age group.


Keywords: adenoma; colon; colorectal neoplasms; endoscopy; epidemiology; polyps PMID:10562581

  12. Genetic ancestry is associated with colorectal adenomas and adenocarcinomas in Latino populations.

    PubMed

    Hernandez-Suarez, Gustavo; Sanabria, Maria Carolina; Serrano, Marta; Herran, Oscar F; Perez, Jesus; Plata, Jose L; Zabaleta, Jovanny; Tenesa, Albert

    2014-10-01

    Colorectal cancer rates in Latin American countries are less than half of those observed in the United States. Latin Americans are the resultant of generations of an admixture of Native American, European, and African individuals. The potential role of genetic admixture in colorectal carcinogenesis has not been examined. We evaluate the association of genetic ancestry with colorectal neoplasms in 190 adenocarcinomas, 113 sporadic adenomas and 243 age- and sex-matched controls enrolled in a multicentric case-control study in Colombia. Individual ancestral genetic fractions were estimated using the STRUCTURE software, based on allele frequencies and assuming three distinct population origins. We used the Illumina Cancer Panel to genotype 1,421 sparse single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), and Northern and Western European ancestry, LWJ and Han Chinese in Beijing, China populations from the HapMap project as references. A total of 678 autosomal SNPs overlapped with the HapMap data set SNPs and were used for ancestry estimations. African mean ancestry fraction was higher in adenomas (0.13, 95% confidence interval (95% CI)=0.11-0.15) and cancer cases (0.14, 95% CI=0.12-0.16) compared with controls (0.11, 95% CI=0.10-0.12). Conditional logistic regression analysis, controlling for known risk factors, showed a positive association of African ancestry per 10% increase with both colorectal adenoma (odds ratio (OR)=1.12, 95% CI=0.97-1.30) and adenocarcinoma (OR=1.19, 95% CI=1.05-1.35). In conclusion, increased African ancestry (or variants linked to it) contributes to the increased susceptibility of colorectal cancer in admixed Latin American population. PMID:24518838

  13. Expression profile of mucin-associated sialyl-Tn antigen in Chinese patients with different colorectal lesions (adenomas, carcinomas)

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Feng; Fan, Cuizhen; Fan, Shanshan; Liu, Fuquan; Wen, Tao; An, Guangyu; Feng, Guosheng

    2015-01-01

    Background: The sialyl-Tn (sTn) antigen is a mucin-associated carbohydrate antigen expressed by numerous human carcinomas, and is also claimed to be a prognostic factor in colorectal cancer. But the associations between sTn and colorectal cancer remain elusive and controversial. Here, we investigated the expression profile of sTn antigen in a series of human colorectal tissue samples including normal colon, colorectal adenomas, and colorectal carcinomas (CRCs), with an aim to analyzing whether sTn plays a role in the progression and development of Chinese patients with CRCs. Methods: Immunohistochemical staining of sTn antigen was performed in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded colonic sections from 4 healthy controls, 44 patients with colorectal adenomas, and 186 patients with primary CRCs. Results: No sTn antigen was detected in normal colonic tissues. There were 41 of 44 patients with colorectal adenomas (93.2%), and 141 of 186 patients with CRCs (75.8%) found to express sTn antigen. The patterns of sTn localization were different in adenomas and carcinomas of colonic tissues. Colorectal adenomas showed predominant supranuclear distribution of sTn antigen, while carcinomas revealed apical membrane, mucin droplet and diffuse cytoplasmic localization. Notably, sTn was significantly associated with the degree of differentiation (P = 0.006) and perineural invasion (P = 0.041) of the tumors, but was independent of age, gender, tumor location, depth of penetration, status of lymph nodes, lymphovascular invasion and TNM stage. Conclusions: These results indicate that sTn may play a role in initiating colorectal carcinogenesis and promoting tumor progression. Determination of sTn expression and localization may assist in evaluating malignant status of colorectal lesions. PMID:26617889

  14. Immunohistochemical Expression of Heparanase Isoforms and Syndecan-1 Proteins in Colorectal Adenomas

    PubMed Central

    Waisberg, J.; Theodoro, T.R.; Matos, L.L.; Brasil, F.; Serrano, R.L.; Saba, G.T.; Pinhal, M.A.S.

    2016-01-01

    The proteoglycan syndecan-1 and the endoglucuronidases heparanase-1 and heparanase-2 are involved in molecular pathways that deregulate cell adhesion during carcinogenesis. Few studies have examined the expression of syndecan-1, heparanase-1 and mainly heparanase-2 proteins in non-neoplastic and neoplastic human colorectal adenoma tissues. The aim of this study was to analyze the correlation among the heparanase isoforms and the syndecan-1 proteins through immunohistochemical expression in the tissue of colorectal adenomas. Primary antihuman polyclonal anti-HPSE and anti-HPSE2 antibodies and primary anti-human monoclonal anti-SDC1 antibody were used in the immunohistochemical study. The expressions of heparanase-1 and heparanase-2 proteins were determined in tissue samples from 65 colorectal adenomas; the expression of syndecan-1 protein was obtained from 39 (60%) patients. The histological type of adenoma was tubular in 44 (67.7%) patients and tubular-villous in 21 (32.3%); there were no villous adenomas. The polyps were <1.0 cm in size in 54 (83.1%) patients and ≥1.0 cm in 11 (16.9%). The images were quantified by digital counter with a computer program for this purpose. The expression index represented the relationship between the intensity expression and the percentage of positively stained cells. The results showed that the average of heparanase-1, heparanase-2 and syndecan-1 expression index was 73.29 o.u./µm², 93.34 o.u./µm², and 55.29 o.u./µm², respectively. The correlation between the heparanase-1 and syndecan-1 expression index was positive (R=0.034) and significant (P=0.035). There was a negative (R= -0.384) and significant (P=0.016) correlation between the expression index of heparanase-1 and heparanase-2. A negative (R= -0.421) and significant (P=0.008) correlation between the expression index of heparanase-2 and syndecan-1 was found. We concluded that in colorectal adenomas, the heparanase-1 does not participate in syndecan-1 degradation; the

  15. Urinary PGE-M levels are associated with risk of colorectal adenomas and chemopreventive response to anti-inflammatory drugs.

    PubMed

    Bezawada, Navya; Song, Mingyang; Wu, Kana; Mehta, Raaj S; Milne, Ginger L; Ogino, Shuji; Fuchs, Charles S; Giovannucci, Edward L; Chan, Andrew T

    2014-07-01

    Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) promotes colorectal carcinogenesis. Overall, systemic PGE2 production can be assessed by measuring its major metabolite, PGE-M, in urine. We examined the potential role of PGE-M as a biomarker for colorectal adenoma risk and chemopreventive response to anti-inflammatory drugs. We conducted a prospective case-control study nested within the Nurses' Health Study. Among women who previously provided a urine sample, we identified 420 cases diagnosed with colorectal adenoma during follow-up and matched them to 420 endoscopy-negative controls. We measured urinary PGE-M using an LC/MS assay. Compared with women in the lowest quartile of urinary PGE-M, women in the highest quartile had a multivariate OR of 1.40 (95% confidence interval (CI), 0.92-2.14) for any adenoma; 0.91 (95% CI, 0.48-1.72) for low-risk adenoma (solitary adenoma <1 cm in greatest diameter with tubular/unspecified histology); and 1.66 (95% CI, 1.04-2.67) for high-risk adenoma (adenoma ≥1 cm in greatest diameter and/or tubulovillous, villous or high-grade dysplasia histology or multiple adenomas of any size or histology). Regular use of anti-inflammatory drugs (≥2 standard tablets of aspirin/NSAIDs per week) was associated with a significant reduction in adenoma risk (multivariate OR, 0.61; 95% CI, 0.43-0.87) in women with high baseline PGE-M (quartiles 2-4), but not low PGE-M (quartile 1).Urinary PGE-M is associated with an increased risk of high-risk adenoma. Anti-inflammatory drugs seem to reduce adenoma risk among women with high, but not low PGE-M. Urinary PGE-M may serve as a biomarker to define subsets of the population who may obtain differential chemopreventive benefit from anti-inflammatory drugs. PMID:24824037

  16. Genetic and epigenetic variation in the DNMT3B and MTHFR genes and colorectal adenoma risk.

    PubMed

    Ho, Vikki; Ashbury, Janet E; Taylor, Sherryl; Vanner, Stephen; King, Will D

    2016-05-01

    Polymorphisms in DNMT3B and MTHFR have been implicated in cancer etiology; however, it is increasingly clear that gene-specific DNA methylation also affects gene expression. A cross-sectional study (N = 272) investigated the main and joint effects of polymorphisms and DNA methylation in DNMT3B and MTHFR on colorectal adenoma risk. Polymorphisms examined included DNMT3B c.-6-1045G > T, and MTHFR c.665C > T and c.1286A > C. DNA methylation of 66 and 28 CpG sites in DNMT3B and MTHFR, respectively, was quantified in blood leukocytes using Sequenom EpiTYPER®. DNA methylation was conceptualized using two approaches: (1) average methylation and (2) unsupervised principal component analysis to identify variables that represented methylation around the transcription start site and the gene coding area of both genes. Logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) associated with the main and joint effects of polymorphisms and DNA methylation. DNA methyltransferase 3B (DNMT3B) TT versus GG/GT genotypes was associated with increased colorectal adenoma risk (OR = 2.12; 95% CI: 1.03-4.34). In addition, increasing DNA methylation in the gene-coding area of DNMT3B was associated with higher risk of colorectal adenomas (OR = 1.34; 95% CI: 1.01-1.79 per SD). In joint effect analyses, synergistic effects were observed among those with both the DNMT3B TT genotype and higher DNMT3B methylation levels compared to those with GT/GG genotypes and lower methylation levels (OR = 4.19; 95% CI: 1.45-12.13 for average methylation; OR = 4.26; 95%CI: 1.31-13.87 for methylation in the transcription start site). This research provides novel evidence that genetic and epigenetic variations contribute to colorectal adenoma risk, precursor to the majority of colorectal cancer (CRC). Environ. Mol. Mutagen. 57:261-268, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27062459

  17. Alcohol Consumption-Related Metabolites in Relation to Colorectal Cancer and Adenoma: Two Case-Control Studies Using Serum Biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Troche, Jose Ramon; Mayne, Susan T.; Freedman, Neal D.; Shebl, Fatma M.; Guertin, Kristin A.; Cross, Amanda J.; Abnet, Christian C.

    2016-01-01

    Alcohol is a known carcinogen that may be associated with colorectal cancer. However, most epidemiologic studies assess alcoholic beverage consumption using self-reported data, leading to potential exposure misclassification. Biomarkers of alcohol consumption may provide an alternative, complementary approach that reduces misclassification and incorporates individual differences in alcohol metabolism. Therefore, we evaluated the relationship between previously identified alcohol consumption-related metabolites and colorectal cancer and adenoma using serum metabolomics data from two studies. Data on colorectal cancer were obtained from a nested case-control study of 502 US adults (252 cases, 250 controls) within the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial. Data on colorectal adenoma were obtained from a case-control study of 197 US adults (120 cases, 77 controls) from the Navy Colon Adenoma Study. Unconditional multivariable logistic regression models were fit to calculate odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for eight alcohol consumption-related metabolites identified in a previous analysis: ethyl glucuronide; 4-androstene-3beta,17beta-diol disulfate 1; 5-alpha-androstan-3beta,17beta-diol disulfate; 16-hydroxypalmitate; bilirubin (E,Z or Z,E); cyclo (-leu-pro); dihomo-linoleate (20:2n6); and palmitoleate (16:1n7). We found no clear association between these alcohol consumption-related metabolites and either endpoint. However, we did observe an inverse association between cyclo (-leu-pro) and colorectal adenoma that was only observed in the highest metabolite quantile (OR 4th vs. 1st Quantile = 0.30, 95% CI: 0.12–0.78; P-trend = 0.047), but no association for colorectal cancer. In conclusion, there were no adverse associations between alcohol consumption-related metabolites and colorectal cancer or adenoma. PMID:26967509

  18. Human Neutrophil Peptides 1-3 – Early Markers in Development of Colorectal Adenomas and Carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Mothes, Henning; Melle, Christian; Ernst, Günther; Kaufmann, Roland; von Eggeling, Ferdinand; Settmacher, Utz

    2008-01-01

    Expression of Human Neutrophil Peptides (HNP) 1–3 was recently found to be associated with development of colorectal cancer. Raised defensin-expression in tumours is believed to stem from increased infiltration of neutrophils into tumour environment. To further specify the role of α-defensins in tumourigenesis and progression, HNP1–3 were analyzed in colorectal adenomas and carcinomas of 87 patients and quantified in relation to cancer stage and grading. Using the ProteinChip arrays, HNP1–3 were found upregulated in both colorectal adenomas and carcinomas. By combining the array with Laser capture microscopy we were able to confirm that HNP1–3 are expressed by tumour cells but not by neutrophils or other tumour invading cells. These findings suggest that α-defensins are more likely to contribute to tumour growth than they are to mount an effective host anti-tumour response. However, the amount of HNP-expression was not found to be related to tumour stage, grading, and serological tumour markers. PMID:18957723

  19. Paleolithic and Mediterranean diet pattern scores and risk of incident, sporadic colorectal adenomas.

    PubMed

    Whalen, Kristine A; McCullough, Marji; Flanders, W Dana; Hartman, Terryl J; Judd, Suzanne; Bostick, Roberd M

    2014-12-01

    The Western dietary pattern is associated with higher risk of colorectal neoplasms. Evolutionary discordance could explain this association. We investigated associations of scores for 2 proposed diet patterns, the "Paleolithic" and the Mediterranean, with incident, sporadic colorectal adenomas in a case-control study of colorectal polyps conducted in Minnesota (1991-1994). Persons with no prior history of colorectal neoplasms completed comprehensive questionnaires prior to elective, outpatient endoscopy; of these individuals, 564 were identified as cases and 1,202 as endoscopy-negative controls. An additional group of community controls frequency-matched on age and sex (n = 535) was also recruited. Both diet scores were calculated for each participant and categorized into quintiles, and associations were estimated using unconditional logistic regression. The multivariable-adjusted odds ratios comparing persons in the highest quintiles of the Paleolithic and Mediterranean diet scores relative to the lowest quintiles were, respectively, 0.71 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.50, 1.02; Ptrend = 0.02) and 0.74 (95% CI: 0.54, 1.03; Ptrend = 0.05) when comparing cases with endoscopy-negative controls and 0.84 (95% CI: 0.56, 1.26; Ptrend = 0.14) and 0.77 (95% CI: 0.53, 1.11; Ptrend = 0.13) when comparing cases with community controls. These findings suggest that greater adherence to the Paleolithic diet pattern and greater adherence to the Mediterranean diet pattern may be similarly associated with lower risk of incident, sporadic colorectal adenomas. PMID:25326623

  20. Paleolithic and Mediterranean Diet Pattern Scores and Risk of Incident, Sporadic Colorectal Adenomas

    PubMed Central

    Whalen, Kristine A.; McCullough, Marji; Flanders, W. Dana; Hartman, Terryl J.; Judd, Suzanne; Bostick, Roberd M.

    2014-01-01

    The Western dietary pattern is associated with higher risk of colorectal neoplasms. Evolutionary discordance could explain this association. We investigated associations of scores for 2 proposed diet patterns, the “Paleolithic” and the Mediterranean, with incident, sporadic colorectal adenomas in a case-control study of colorectal polyps conducted in Minnesota (1991–1994). Persons with no prior history of colorectal neoplasms completed comprehensive questionnaires prior to elective, outpatient endoscopy; of these individuals, 564 were identified as cases and 1,202 as endoscopy-negative controls. An additional group of community controls frequency-matched on age and sex (n = 535) was also recruited. Both diet scores were calculated for each participant and categorized into quintiles, and associations were estimated using unconditional logistic regression. The multivariable-adjusted odds ratios comparing persons in the highest quintiles of the Paleolithic and Mediterranean diet scores relative to the lowest quintiles were, respectively, 0.71 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.50, 1.02; Ptrend = 0.02) and 0.74 (95% CI: 0.54, 1.03; Ptrend = 0.05) when comparing cases with endoscopy-negative controls and 0.84 (95% CI: 0.56, 1.26; Ptrend = 0.14) and 0.77 (95% CI: 0.53, 1.11; Ptrend = 0.13) when comparing cases with community controls. These findings suggest that greater adherence to the Paleolithic diet pattern and greater adherence to the Mediterranean diet pattern may be similarly associated with lower risk of incident, sporadic colorectal adenomas. PMID:25326623

  1. Endoscopic mucosal resection of colorectal adenomas > 20 mm: Risk factors for recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Briedigkeit, Alexander; Sultanie, Omar; Sido, Bernd; Dumoulin, Franz Ludwig

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate risk factors for local recurrence after endoscopic mucosal resection of colorectal adenomas > 20 mm. METHODS: Retrospective data analysis of 216 endoscopic mucosal resections for colorectal adenomas > 20 mm in 179 patients (40.3% female; median age 68 years; range 35-91 years). All patients had at least 1 follow-up endoscopy with a minimum control interval of 2 mo (mean follow-up 6 mo/2.0-43.4 mo). Possible factors associated with local recurrence were analyzed by univariate and multivariate analysis. RESULTS: Median size of the lesions was 30 mm (20-70 mm), 69.0% were localized in the right-sided (cecum, ascending and transverse) colon. Most of the lesions (85.6%) showed a non-pedunculated morphology and the majority of resections was in piecemeal technique (78.7%). Histology showed carcinoma or high-grade intraepithelial neoplasia in 51/216 (23.6%) lesions including 4 low risk carcinomas (pT1a, L0, V0, R0 - G1/G2). Histologically proven recurrence was observed in 33/216 patients (15.3%). Patient age > 65 years, polyp size > 30 mm, non-pedunculated morphology, localization in the right-sided colon, piecemeal resection and tubular-villous histology were found as associated factors in univariate analysis. On multivariate analysis, only localization in the right-sided colon (HR = 6.842/95%CI: 1.540-30.394; P = 0.011), tubular-villous histology (HR = 3.713/95%CI: 1.617-8.528; P = 0.002) and polyp size > 30 mm (HR = 2.563/95%CI: 1.179-5.570; P = 0.017) were significantly associated risk factors for adenoma recurrence. CONCLUSION: Meticulous endoscopic follow-up is warranted after endoscopic mucosal resection of adenomas localized in the right-sided colon larger than > 30 mm, with tubular-villous histology. PMID:26981180

  2. Different expression of calgizzarin (S100A11) in normal colonic epithelium, adenoma and colorectal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Melle, Christian; Ernst, Günther; Schimmel, Bettina; Bleul, Annett; Mothes, Henning; Kaufmann, Roland; Settmacher, Utz; Von Eggeling, Ferdinand

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the study was to detect proteomic markers usable to distinguish colorectal carcinoma from colon adenoma for a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms in the process of tumourigenesis. Therefore, we microdissected colon carcinoma tissue, epithelial colon adenoma tissue as well as normal adjacent colon epithelium and determined protein profiles by SELDI-TOF MS. A multitude of significantly different signals was detected. For their identification colon biopsis were lysed and subjected to a two-dimensional gel electrophoresis for separation. Subsequently, we identified nearly 100 proteins by tryptic digestion, peptide fingerprint mapping and database search. Calgizzarin (S100A11; S100C) identified by peptide fingerprint mapping correlated very well with a significantly differentially expressed signal found in prior protein profiling. Using an immunodepletion assay we confirmed the identity of this signal as calgizzarin. To localise calgizzarin in tissues we performed immunohistochemistry. For further confirmation of the identity of calgizzarin we re-analysed IHC-positive as well as IHC-negative tissue sections on ProteinChip arrays. This work demonstrates that biomarkers in colorectal cancer can be detected, identified and assessed by a proteomic approach comprising tissue-microdissection, protein profiling and immunological techniques. PMID:16327996

  3. Efficacy and safety of endoscopic Nd:YAG laser photocoagulation of flat colorectal adenomas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spinelli, Pasquale; Mancini, Andrea; dal Fante, Marco; Cunsolo, Rocco

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of endoscopic Nd:YAG laser photocoagulation for the treatment of flat colorectal adenomas. From January 1982 to December 1994, 222 lesions were treated in 216 patients. Initial eradication was obtained in 96% of lesions with a diameter less than 1 cm, in 89% of lesions with a diameter between 1 and 4 cm, and in 64% of lesions with a diameter greater than 4 cm. According to the histology, a complete disappearance was obtained in 94% of tubular, in 89% of tubulovillous, and in 80% of villous adenomas. Adenomas with severe dysplasia or foci of invasive carcinoma were eradicated in 76% and in 75% of cases, respectively. During a median follow- up of 24 months (3 - 129 months), recurrences developed in 46 of the 186 initially cured lesions (25%). All recurrent lesions were submitted to Nd:YAG laser photocoagulation, obtaining eradication in 37/46 (80%) of the cases. Malignant degeneration occurred in 6% of lesions. Complications related to laser treatments were observed in 5% of patients.

  4. Management of Hepatocellular Adenoma: Recent Advances.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Shefali; Agarwal, Sheela; Arnason, Thomas; Saini, Sanjay; Belghiti, Jacques

    2015-07-01

    Hepatocellular adenoma (HCA) is a rare benign liver cell neoplasm that occurs more frequently in young women with a history of prolonged use of oral contraceptives. Surgical resection is considered because of the risk of hemorrhage in 25% and of malignant transformation in 5% of patients with HCA. HCA is a heterogeneous disease comprising 3 subtypes with distinct molecular and complication profiles. The inflammatory or telangiectatic subtype is at increased risk for hemorrhage, the β-catenin-activated subtype is at increased risk for malignant transformation, and the hepatocyte nuclear factor-1α-inactivated or steatotic subtype is at the least risk for complications. One-third of the patients with HCA have multiple tumors on imaging with no increased risk of complications. Magnetic resonance imaging is the modality of choice for the diagnosis and subtype characterization of HCA. Systematic resection of HCA is recommended in male patients owing to the higher incidence of malignant transformation, and surgical excision in women should be reserved for tumors 5 cm or larger associated with an increased risk of complications. Cessation of hormonal therapy and radiologic surveillance in women with HCA tumors smaller than 5 cm shows that the vast majority of HCA remain stable or undergo spontaneous regression. Percutaneous core needle biopsy is of limited value because the therapeutic strategy is based primarily on patient sex and tumor size. Transarterial embolization is the initial treatment for HCA complicated by hemorrhage. Pregnancy should not be discouraged in the presence of HCA, however, frequent sonographic surveillance is recommended. PMID:24909909

  5. The Frequency and Risk Factors of Colorectal Adenoma in Health-Check-up Subjects in South Korea: Relationship to Abdominal Obesity and Age

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ki-Seong; Moon, Hong Ju; Baek, Eun Kyung; Lee, Seung Young; Cha, Bong Ki; Lee, Hyun Woong; Kim, Hyung Joon; Do, Jae Hyuk; Chang, Sae Kyung

    2010-01-01

    Background/Aims Obesity is associated with the risk of colorectal cancer. However, there is a lack of information about the relationship between obesity and colorectal adenoma. We investigated whether general and abdominal obesity are risk factors for colorectal adenoma. Methods Subjects who received health check-ups, including colonoscopy, from April 2006 to September 2007 in Chung-Ang University Hospital were included (n=1,316). The frequency and characteristics of colorectal adenomas were analyzed according to demographic features, past history, blood tests, body mass index, and components of metabolic syndrome. Abdominal obesity was defined as a waist circumference of ≥80 cm in women and ≥90 cm in men. Results The sex ratio of the subjects was 1.9:1 (male:female) and their age was 47.7±10.0 years (mean±SD). In univariate analysis, abdominal obesity was significantly associated with the frequency of colorectal adenoma (26.5% "yes" vs 16.9% "no"; p<0.001). The frequency of colorectal adenoma was significantly higher among males, older patients, current smokers, and subjects with fasting hyperglycemia (≥100 mg/dL) or fatty liver (p<0.05). Multivariate analysis identified that male sex (odds ratio [OR], 1.5; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.0-2.2), old age (age ≥60 years; OR, 6.7; 95% CI, 3.5-12.5), and abdominal obesity (OR, 1.5; 95% CI, 1.0-2.2) were independent risk factors for colorectal adenoma (p<0.05). The frequency of multiple adenomas (more than two sites) was also significantly higher in subjects with abdominal obesity. However, the effect of abdominal obesity on the development of colorectal adenoma decreased in elderly people. Conclusions Abdominal obesity is an independent risk factor for colorectal adenoma and its multiplicity, especially in younger people in South Korea. PMID:20479911

  6. Identification and validation of highly frequent CpG island hypermethylation in colorectal adenomas and carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Oster, Bodil; Thorsen, Kasper; Lamy, Philippe; Wojdacz, Tomasz K; Hansen, Lise Lotte; Birkenkamp-Demtröder, Karin; Sørensen, Karina D; Laurberg, Søren; Orntoft, Torben F; Andersen, Claus L

    2011-12-15

    In our study, whole-genome methylation arrays were applied to identify novel genes with tumor specific DNA methylation of promoter CpG islands in pre-malignant and malignant colorectal lesions. Using a combination of Illumina HumanMethylation27 beadchips, Methylation-Sensitive High Resolution Melting (MS-HRM) analysis, and Exon arrays (Affymetrix) the DNA methylation pattern of ∼14,000 genes and their transcript levels were investigated in six normal mucosas, six adenomas and 30 MSI and MSS carcinomas. Sixty eight genes with tumor-specific hypermethylation were identified (p < 0.005). Identified hypermethylated sites were validated in an independent sample set of eight normal mucosas, 12 adenomas, 40 MSS and nine MSI cancer samples. The methylation patterns of 15 selected genes, hypermethylated in adenomas and carcinomas (FLI1, ST6GALNAC5, TWIST1, ADHFE1, JAM2, IRF4, CNRIP1, NRG1 and EYA4), in carcinomas only (ABHD9, AOX1 and RERG), or in MSI but not MSS carcinomas (RAMP2, DSC3 and MLH1) were validated using MS-HRM. Four of these genes (MLH1, AOX1, EYA4 and TWIST1) had previously been reported to be hypermethylated in CRC. Eleven genes, not previously known to be affected by CRC specific hypermethylation, were identified and validated. Inverse correlation to gene expression was observed for six of the 15 genes with Spearman correlation coefficients ranging from -0.39 to -0.60. For six of these genes the altered methylation patterns had a profound transcriptional association, indicating that methylation of these genes may play a direct regulatory role. The hypermethylation changes often occurred already in adenomas, indicating that they may be used as biomarkers for early detection of CRC. PMID:21400501

  7. Decay-accelerating factor (DAF, CD55) in normal colorectal mucosa, adenomas and carcinomas.

    PubMed Central

    Koretz, K.; Brüderlein, S.; Henne, C.; Möller, P.

    1992-01-01

    Decay-accelerating-factor (DAF, CD55), a phosphatidyl-inositol anchored glycoprotein, is a member of the cell membrane bound complement regulatory proteins that inhibit autologous complement cascade activation. DAF was found expressed on cells that are in close contact with serum complement proteins, but also on cells outside the vascular space and on tumour cells. Using CD55(BRIC110) and CD55(143-30) we show here that DAF(CD55) is only sporadically expressed on the luminal surface of normal colonic epithelium. However, 5/20 adenomas expressed DAF(CD55) on the cell surface of all tumour cells, 5/20 adenomas were completely negative, 10/20 adenomas expressed DAF(CD55) in various amounts. DAF(CD55) was expressed in various intensities on almost all tumour cells of the colon carcinoma cell line HT29. In 5/88 colorectal carcinomas DAF(CD55) was localised on the apical cell surface of all tumour cells, 31/88 were completely negative, 52/88 expressed DAF(CD55) in parts of their neoplastic populations. There was no correlation between the tumour grading, staging and location and the mode of DAF(CD55) expression, but DAF(CD55) was found more often in mucinous carcinomas (P = 0.007). Although the mode of DAF(CD55) expression is not correlated with tumour prognostic parameters, the upregulation of DAF(CD55) in a subset of adenomas and carcinomas needs further investigation concerning protection of tumour cells against complement cytotoxicity. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:1384641

  8. Genomic Aberrations Occurring in Subsets of Serrated Colorectal Lesions but not Conventional Adenomas

    PubMed Central

    Burnett-Hartman, Andrea N.; Newcomb, Polly A.; Potter, John D.; Passarelli, Michael N.; Phipps, Amanda I.; Wurscher, Michelle A.; Grady, William M.; Zhu, Lee-Ching; Upton, Melissa P.; Makar, Karen W.

    2013-01-01

    A subset of aggressive colorectal cancers exhibit BRAF mutation, MLH1 methylation, and a CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP), but precursors are poorly established. In this study, we determined the status of these markers in colorectal polyps and evaluated associated risk factors. The study included 771 polyp cases and 1,027 controls who were ages 24-80, part of a group health program, received a colonoscopy from 1998-2007, and completed a structured questionnaire assessing risk factors. Following standard pathology review, polyps were assayed for BRAF mutation (V600E) and tested for MLH1 and CIMP methylation, the latter including the genes: CACNA1G, IGF2, NEUROG1, RUNX3, and SOCS1. Polytomous logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals for the association between molecularly-defined subsets of polyps and potential risk factors. There were 580 conventional adenomas and 419 serrated lesions successfully assayed. For adenomas, the prevalence of each marker was ≤1%. In contrast, 55% of serrated lesions harbored mutant BRAF, 26% were CIMP-high, and 5% had methylated MLH1. In these lesions, the highest prevalence of markers was in sessile serrated polyps (SSPs) of ≥10 mm that were in the right-side/cecal regions of the colon. Risk factors for CIMP-high serrated lesions included Caucasian race, current smoking status, and a history of polyps, whereas for serrated lesions with mutant BRAF the significant risk factors were male sex, current smoking status, obesity, and a history of polyps. Our results suggest that SSPs and other large, right-sided serrated lesions have a unique molecular profile that is similar to CIMP-high, BRAF-mutated colorectal cancers. PMID:23539450

  9. Genomic aberrations occurring in subsets of serrated colorectal lesions but not conventional adenomas.

    PubMed

    Burnett-Hartman, Andrea N; Newcomb, Polly A; Potter, John D; Passarelli, Michael N; Phipps, Amanda I; Wurscher, Michelle A; Grady, William M; Zhu, Lee-Ching; Upton, Melissa P; Makar, Karen W

    2013-05-01

    A subset of aggressive colorectal cancers exhibit BRAF mutation, MLH1 methylation, and a CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP), but precursors are poorly established. In this study, we determined the status of these markers in colorectal polyps and evaluated associated risk factors. The study included 771 polyp cases and 1,027 controls who were ages 24 to 80 years, part of a group health program, received a colonoscopy from 1998 to 2007, and completed a structured questionnaire assessing risk factors. Following standard pathology review, polyps were assayed for BRAF mutation (V600E) and tested for MLH1 and CIMP methylation, the latter including the genes, CACNA1G, IGF2, NEUROG1, RUNX3, and SOCS1. Polytomous logistic regression was used to estimate ORs and 95% confidence intervals for the association between molecularly defined subsets of polyps and potential risk factors. There were 580 conventional adenomas and 419 serrated lesions successfully assayed. For adenomas, the prevalence of each marker was ≤1%. In contrast, 55% of serrated lesions harbored mutant BRAF, 26% were CIMP-high, and 5% had methylated MLH1. In these lesions, the highest prevalence of markers was in sessile-serrated polyps (SSP) of ≥10 mm that were in the right-side/cecal regions of the colon. Risk factors for CIMP-high-serrated lesions included Caucasian race, current smoking status, and a history of polyps, whereas for serrated lesions with mutant BRAF, the significant risk factors were male sex, current smoking status, obesity, and a history of polyps. Our results suggest that SSPs and other large, right-sided serrated lesions have a unique molecular profile that is similar to CIMP-high, BRAF-mutated colorectal cancers. PMID:23539450

  10. Development of new non-invasive tests for colorectal cancer screening: The relevance of information on adenoma detection

    PubMed Central

    Haug, Ulrike; Knudsen, Amy B.; Lansdorp-Vogelaar, Iris; Kuntz, Karen M.

    2014-01-01

    Researchers are actively pursuing the development of a new non-invasive test (NIT) for colorectal cancer (CRC) screening as an alternative to fecal occult blood tests (FOBTs). The majority of pilot studies focus on the detection of invasive CRC rather than precursor lesions (i.e., adenomas). We aimed to explore the relevance of adenoma detection for the viability of an NIT for CRC screening by considering a hypothetical test that does not detect adenomas beyond chance. We used the Simulation Model of Colorectal Cancer (SimCRC) to estimate the effectiveness of CRC screening and the lifetime costs (payers’ perspective) for a cohort of US 50-year-olds to whom CRC screening is offered from age 50–75. We compared annual screening with guaiac and immunochemical FOBTs (with sensitivities up to 70% and 24% for CRC and adenomas, respectively) to annual screening with a hypothetical NIT (sensitivity of 90% for CRC, no detection of adenomas beyond chance, specificity and cost similar to FOBTs). Screening with the NIT was not more effective, but was 29–44% more costly than screening with FOBTs. The findings were robust to varying the screening interval, the NIT’s sensitivity for CRC, adherence rates favoring the NIT, and the NIT’s unit cost. A comparative modelling approach using a model that assumes a shorter adenoma dwell time (MISCAN-COLON) confirmed the superiority of the immunochemical FOBT over a NIT with no ability to detect adenomas. Information on adenoma detection is crucial to determine whether a new NIT is a viable alternative to FOBTs for CRC screening. Current evidence thus lacks an important piece of information to identify marker candidates that hold real promise and deserve further (large-scale) evaluation. PMID:25403937

  11. Predicting the Risk of Recurrent Adenoma and Incident Colorectal Cancer Based on Findings of the Baseline Colonoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Fairley, Kimberly J; Li, Jinhong; Komar, Michael; Steigerwalt, Nancy; Erlich, Porat

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The decision tree underlying current practice guidelines for post polypectomy surveillance relies on risk stratification based on predictive attributes gleaned from adenomas removed on screening colonoscopy examination. Our primary aim was to estimate the magnitude of association between baseline adenoma attributes and the risk of adenoma recurrence and invasive colorectal adenocarcinoma (CRC). Our secondary aims were to estimate the adenoma detection rate (ADR) of surveillance compared with screening colonoscopies and describe time trends in preventive colonoscopy utilization. Methods: We used prospective analyses of retrospectively collected clinical data from electronic health records. A cohort of primary care patients eligible for colorectal cancer screening was assembled encompassing 110,452 subjects, of which 3,300 had adenomas removed on screening examination. Of those patients who had a follow-up surveillance colonoscopy (defined as a patient with a documented adenoma on prior colonoscopy) recorded during the study period, 537 had a recurrent adenoma. Results: Of those recurrent adenomas, 354 had a high-risk attributes. High-risk attributes were described at >3 adenomas, at least one adenoma >10 mm in size, high-grade dysplasia, or villous features. The risk of developing invasive CRC among post polypectomy patients was significantly higher if the baseline adenomas displayed any of the following attributes: more numerous than 3 (4.3-fold higher risk, 95% confidence interval (CI) low, high 1.4, 12.9), larger than 10 mm in size (5.2-fold higher risk, 95% CI low, high 1.8, 15.1), high-grade dysplasia (13.2-fold risk, 95% CI low, high 2.8, 62.1), or villous features (7.4-fold higher risk, 95% CI low, high 2.5, 21.5). These attributes combined added a net value of 22.8% to the probability of correctly predicting CRC. There was a threefold increase in surveillance utilization relative to screening from 2005 to 2011. The ADR of surveillance (34

  12. Many private mutations originate from the first few divisions of a human colorectal adenoma.

    PubMed

    Kang, Haeyoun; Salomon, Matthew P; Sottoriva, Andrea; Zhao, Junsong; Toy, Morgan; Press, Michael F; Curtis, Christina; Marjoram, Paul; Siegmund, Kimberly; Shibata, Darryl

    2015-11-01

    Intratumoural mutational heterogeneity (ITH) or the presence of different private mutations in different parts of the same tumour is commonly observed in human tumours. The mechanisms generating such ITH are uncertain. Here we find that ITH can be remarkably well structured by measuring point mutations, chromosome copy numbers, and DNA passenger methylation from opposite sides and individual glands of a 6 cm human colorectal adenoma. ITH was present between tumour sides and individual glands, but the private mutations were side-specific and subdivided the adenoma into two major subclones. Furthermore, ITH disappeared within individual glands because the glands were clonal populations composed of cells with identical mutant genotypes. Despite mutation clonality, the glands were relatively old, diverse populations when their individual cells were compared for passenger methylation and by FISH. These observations can be organized into an expanding star-like ancestral tree with co-clonal expansion, where many private mutations and multiple related clones arise during the first few divisions. As a consequence, most detectable mutational ITH in the final tumour originates from the first few divisions. Much of the early history of a tumour, especially the first few divisions, may be embedded within the detectable ITH of tumour genomes. PMID:26119426

  13. Proteomic and cytokine plasma biomarkers for predicting progression from colorectal adenoma to carcinoma in human patients.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jung-Won; Liu, Hao; Shin, Dong Hoon; Yu, Gyeong Im; Hwang, Jae Seok; Kim, Eun Soo; Yun, Jong Won

    2013-08-01

    In the present study, we screened proteomic and cytokine biomarkers between patients with adenomatous polyps and colorectal cancer (CRC) in order to improve our understanding of the molecular mechanisms behind turmorigenesis and tumor progression in CRC. To this end, we performed comparative proteomic analysis of plasma proteins using a combination of 2DE and MS as well as profiled differentially regulated cytokines and chemokines by multiplex bead analysis. Proteomic analysis identified 11 upregulated and 13 downregulated plasma proteins showing significantly different regulation patterns with diagnostic potential for predicting progression from adenoma to carcinoma. Some of these proteins have not previously been implicated in CRC, including upregulated leucine-rich α-2-glycoprotein, hemoglobin subunit β, Ig α-2 chain C region, and complement factor B as well as downregulated afamin, zinc-α-2-glycoprotein, vitronectin, and α-1-antichymotrypsin. In addition, plasma levels of three cytokines/chemokines, including interleukin-8, interferon gamma-induced protein 10, and tumor necrosis factor α, were remarkably elevated in patients with CRC compared to those with adenomatous polyps. Although further clinical validation is required, these proteins and cytokines can be established as novel biomarkers for CRC and/or its progression from colon adenoma. PMID:23606366

  14. TGFβ signaling directs serrated adenomas to the mesenchymal colorectal cancer subtype.

    PubMed

    Fessler, Evelyn; Drost, Jarno; van Hooff, Sander R; Linnekamp, Janneke F; Wang, Xin; Jansen, Marnix; De Sousa E Melo, Felipe; Prasetyanti, Pramudita R; IJspeert, Joep Eg; Franitza, Marek; Nürnberg, Peter; van Noesel, Carel Jm; Dekker, Evelien; Vermeulen, Louis; Clevers, Hans; Medema, Jan Paul

    2016-01-01

    The heterogeneous nature of colorectal cancer (CRC) complicates prognosis and is suggested to be a determining factor in the efficacy of adjuvant therapy for individual patients. Based on gene expression profiling, CRC is currently classified into four consensus molecular subtypes (CMSs), characterized by specific biological programs, thus suggesting the existence of unifying developmental drivers for each CMS Using human organoid cultures, we investigated the role of such developmental drivers at the premalignant stage of distinct CRC subtypes and found that TGFβ plays an important role in the development of the mesenchymal CMS4, which is of special interest due to its association with dismal prognosis. We show that in tubular adenomas (TAs), which progress to classical CRCs, the dominating response to TGFβ is death by apoptosis. By contrast, induction of a mesenchymal phenotype upon TGFβ treatment prevails in a genetically engineered organoid culture carrying a BRAF(V) (600E) mutation, constituting a model system for sessile serrated adenomas (SSAs). Our data indicate that TGFβ signaling is already active in SSA precursor lesions and that TGFβ is a critical cue for directing SSAs to the mesenchymal, poor-prognosis CMS4 of CRC. PMID:27221051

  15. Genetic polymorphisms of MMP1, MMP3 and MMP7 gene promoter and risk of colorectal adenoma

    PubMed Central

    Lièvre, Astrid; Milet, Jacqueline; Carayol, Jérôme; Le Corre, Delphine; Milan, Chantal; Pariente, Alexandre; Nalet, Bernard; Lafon, Jacques; Faivre, Jean; Bonithon-Kopp, Claire; Olschwang, Sylviane; Bonaiti-Pellié, Catherine; Laurent-Puig, Pierre

    2006-01-01

    Background Matrix metalloproteinases (MMP) have been shown to play a role in colorectal cancer (CRC). More recently, MMP1, MMP3 and MMP7 functional gene promoter polymorphisms have been found to be associated with CRC occurrence and prognosis. To document the role of MMP polymorphisms in the early step of colorectal carcinogenesis, we investigated their association with colorectal adenoma risk in a case-control study comprising 295 patients with large adenomas (LA), 302 patients with small adenomas (SA) and 568 polyp-free (PF) controls. Methods Patients were genotyped using automated fragment analysis for MMP1 -1607 ins/del G and MMP3 -1612 ins/delA (MMP3.1) polymorphisms and allelic discrimination assay for MMP3 -709 A/G (MMP3.2) and MMP7 -181 A/G polymorphisms. Association between MMP genotypes and colorectal adenomas was first tested for each polymorphism separately and then for combined genotypes using the combination test. Adjustment on relevant variables and estimation of odds ratios were performed using unconditional logistic regression. Results No association was observed between the polymorphisms and LA when compared to PF or SA. When comparing SA to PF controls, analysis revealed a significant association between MMP3 -1612 ins/delA polymorphism and SA with an increased risk associated with the 6A/6A genotype (OR = 1.67, 95%CI: 1.20–2.34). Using the combination test, the best association was found for MMP3.1-MMP1 (p = 0.001) with an OR of 1.88 (95%CI: 1.08–3.28) for the combined genotype 2G/2G-6A/6A estimated by logistic regression. Conclusion These data show a relation between MMP1 -1607 ins/del G and MMP3 -1612 ins/delA combined polymorphisms and risk of SA, suggesting their potential role in the early steps of colorectal carcinogenesis. PMID:17125518

  16. Effects of calcium supplementation on biomarkers of inflammation and oxidative stress in colorectal adenoma patients: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Yang, Baiyu; Gross, Myron D; Fedirko, Veronika; McCullough, Marjorie L; Bostick, Roberd M

    2015-11-01

    Inflammation and oxidative stress play important roles in colorectal carcinogenesis. There is strong evidence that calcium reduces risk for colorectal neoplasms, possibly through its ability to bind bile acids and prevent their colonic toxicity (which occurs via an oxidative mechanism and results in an inflammatory response). In a previously reported pilot, randomized, controlled trial among sporadic colorectal adenoma patients we found that those on 2.0 g/day of calcium, relative to those on placebo, had an estimated drop in a combined cytokine z-score of 48% (P = 0.18) over 6 months. To follow-up these promising preliminary findings, we tested the efficacy of two doses of supplemental calcium (1.0 or 2.0 g/day) relative to placebo on modulating circulating biomarkers of inflammation [C-reactive protein (CRP) and 10 cytokines] and oxidative stress (F2-isoprostanes) over a 4-month treatment period among 193 patients with previous sporadic, colorectal adenoma in a randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled clinical trial. The inflammation markers were measured in plasma using electrochemiluminescence detection-based immunoassays, and F2-isoprostanes were measured in plasma using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Over a 4-month treatment period, we found no appreciable effects of calcium on CRP, cytokines, or F2-isoprostanes (P > 0.4), overall or within strata of several major risk factors for colorectal carcinogenesis, such as body mass index and regular use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Overall, our results provide no evidence that calcium supplementation favorably modulates concentrations of circulating biomarkers of inflammation or oxidative stress over 4 months among patients with a previous colorectal adenoma. PMID:26304464

  17. Different risk factors for advanced colorectal neoplasm in young adults

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ji Yeon; Jung, Yoon Suk; Park, Jung Ho; Kim, Hong Joo; Cho, Yong Kyun; Sohn, Chong Il; Jeon, Woo Kyu; Kim, Byung Ik; Choi, Kyu Yong; Park, Dong Il

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To compare the risk of developing advanced colorectal neoplasm (ACRN) according to age in Koreans. METHODS: A total of 70428 Koreans from an occupational cohort who underwent a colonoscopy between 2003 and 2012 at Kangbuk Samsung Hospital were retrospectively selected. We evaluated and compared odds ratios (OR) for ACRN between the young-adults (YA < 50 years) and in the older-adults (OA ≥ 50 years). ACRN was defined as an adenoma ≥ 10 mm in diameter, adenoma with any component of villous histology, high-grade dysplasia, or invasive cancer. RESULTS: In the YA group, age (OR = 1.08, 95%CI: 1.06-1.09), male sex (OR = 1.26, 95%CI: 1.02-1.55), current smoking (OR = 1.37, 95%CI: 1.15-1.63), family history of colorectal cancer (OR = 1.46, 95%CI: 1.01-2.10), diabetes mellitus related factors (OR = 1.27, 95%CI: 1.06-1.54), obesity (OR = 1.23, 95%CI: 1.03-1.47), CEA (OR = 1.04, 95%CI: 1.01-1.09) and low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (OR = 1.01, 95%CI: 1.01-1.02) were related with an increased risk of ACRN. However, age (OR = 1.08, 95%CI: 1.06-1.09), male sex (OR = 2.12, 95%CI: 1.68-2.68), current smoking (OR = 1.38, 95%CI: 1.12-1.71), obesity (OR = 1.34, 95%CI: 1.09-1.65) and CEA (OR = 1.05, 95%CI: 1.01-1.09) also increased the risk of ACRN in the OA group. CONCLUSION: The risks of ACRN differed based on age group. Different colonoscopic screening strategies are appropriate for particular subjects with risk factors for ACRN, even in subjects younger than 50 years. PMID:27053853

  18. Lifestyle and lifestyle-related comorbidities independently associated with colorectal adenoma recurrence in elderly Chinese people

    PubMed Central

    Saiken, Adake; Gu, Fang

    2016-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to determine the lifestyle and lifestyle-related comorbidities independently associated with colorectal adenoma (CRA) recurrence in elderly Chinese people. Methods During the 5-year follow-up after the initial colonoscopy, participants aged >60 years with the diagnosis and removal of CRA underwent a complete surveillance colonoscopy, and 152 participants with CRA recurrence plus 152 participants free of recurrence were included in this analysis. Results Participants with CRA recurrence were more likely to consume less vegetables and fruits, and more red meats compared with the control group (P<0.05 for all). Lifestyle-related comorbidities, including hypertension and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), were more common in participants with CRA recurrence than in the control group (P<0.05 for all). In the multivariate analysis, pack-years of smoking were independently associated with an increased CRA recurrence (odds ratio [OR]: 1.03; P<0.05). Eating less vegetables (OR: 099; P<0.05) and fruits (OR: 0.98; P<0.05) was identified as a statistically independent factor influencing CRA recurrence, as was eating more red meats (OR: 1.01; P<0.05). Hypertension was also found to be a factor independently associated with an increased CRA recurrence (OR: 2.44; P<0.05). NAFLD had an independent association, with an increased CRA recurrence (OR: 3.43; P<0.05). Conclusion Smoking cigarettes, high consumption of red meats, low intake of fruits and vegetables, and the presence of hypertension and NAFLD were independently associated with an increased CRA recurrence in elderly Chinese people. This conclusion helps elderly Chinese people to make effective behavioral changes, such as smoking cessation, substitution of fruits and vegetables for red meats, and timely treatment of hypertension and NAFLD, to reduce CRA recurrence and colorectal cancer risk. PMID:27382263

  19. Urinary metabolites of prostanoids and risk of recurrent colorectal adenomas in the Aspirin/Folate Polyp Prevention Study (AFPPS).

    PubMed

    Fedirko, Veronika; Bradshaw, Patrick T; Figueiredo, Jane C; Sandler, Robert S; Barry, Elizabeth L; Ahnen, Dennis J; Milne, Ginger L; Bresalier, Robert S; Baron, John A

    2015-11-01

    Aspirin has been shown to protect against colorectal neoplasms; however, the optimal chemopreventive dose and underlying mechanisms are unclear. We aimed to study the relationship between prostanoid metabolites and aspirin's effect on adenoma occurrence. We used data from the Aspirin/Folate Polyp Prevention Study, in which 1,121 participants with a recent adenoma were randomized to placebo or two doses of aspirin (81 or 325 mg/d) to be taken until the next surveillance colonoscopy, anticipated about 3 years later. Urinary metabolites of prostanoids (PGE-M, PGI-M, and dTxB2) were measured using liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry or GC/NICI-MS in 876 participants near the end of treatment follow-up. Poisson regression with a robust error variance was used to calculate relative risks and 95% confidence intervals. PGE-M, PGI-M, and dTxB2 levels were 28%, 37%, and 60% proportionately lower, respectively, in individuals who took 325 mg of aspirin compared with individuals who took placebo (all P < 0.001). Similarly, among individuals who took 81 mg of aspirin, PGE-M, PGI-M, and dTxB2 were, respectively, 18%, 30%, and 57% proportionally lower compared with placebo (all P < 0.005). None of the metabolites or their ratios were statistically significantly associated with the risk of adenoma occurrence. The effect of aspirin in reducing adenoma risk was independent of prostanoid levels. Aspirin use is associated with lower levels of urinary prostanoid metabolites. However, our findings do not support the hypothesis that these metabolites are associated with adenoma occurrence, suggesting that COX-dependent mechanisms may not completely explain the chemopreventive effect of aspirin on colorectal neoplasms. PMID:26304466

  20. Immunohistochemical Expression of Estrogen and Progesterone Receptors in Human Colorectal Adenoma and Carcinoma Using Specified Automated Cellular Image Analysis System: A Clinicopathological Study

    PubMed Central

    Qasim, Ban Jumaa; Ali, Hussam Hasson; Hussein, Alaa Ghani

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the immunohistochemical expression of estrogen receptors (ER) and progesterone receptors (PR) in colorectal adenoma and adenocarcinoma and to correlate this immunohistochemical expression with different clinicopathological parameters. Methods The study was retrospectively designed. A total of 86 tissue samples, including 33 paraffin blocks from patients with colorectal adenomas, 33 paraffin blocks from patients with colorectal adenocarcinomas and a control group of 20 samples of non-tumorous colonic tissue, were included in the study. Results The frequency of expression of ER and PR showed a gradual increase from control through adenoma to carcinoma. The frequencies of expression of ER in the control, adenoma and carcinoma were (10%, 15.15% and 42.42% respectively, p<0.001), while the frequency of expression for PR were (10%, 24.24% and 36.36% respectively, p<0.001). Strong ER and PR staining was mainly seen in carcinoma cases (42.42%, 36.36%, respectively) in comparison with adenoma (9.09%, 15.15%, respectively) and control (0%, 0%, respectively). The three digital parameters of ER and PR immunohistochemical expression (Area [A], Number of objects [N], and intensity [I]) were significantly increased in a sequence of normal mucosa-adenoma-carcinoma. There was a significant positive correlation between ER and PR in adenoma (r=0.312, p=0.034) and carcinoma (r=0.321, p=0.0398). Conclusion ER and PR expression increased in a sequence of; normal colonic mucosa-adenoma-carcinoma, and a positive correlation was observed between ER and PR expression in colonic adenoma and carcinoma specimen indicating that ER and PR may play a role in colorectal carcinogenesis. PMID:22125723

  1. Advanced endoscopic technologies for colorectal cancer screening

    PubMed Central

    Obstein, Keith L; Valdastri, Pietro

    2013-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer in men and the second most common cancer in women worldwide. Diagnosing colorectal has been increasingly successful due to advances in technology. Flexible endoscopy is considered to be an effective method for early diagnosis and treatment of gastrointestinal cancer, making it a popular choice for screening programs. However, millions of people who may benefit from endoscopic colorectal cancer screening fail to have the procedure performed. Main reasons include psychological barriers due to the indignity of the procedure, fear of procedure related pain, bowel preparation discomfort, and potential need for sedation. Therefore, an urgent need for new technologies addressing these issues clearly exists. In this review, we discuss a set of advanced endoscopic technologies for colorectal cancer screening that are either already available or close to clinical trial. In particular, we focus on visual-inspection-only advanced flexible colonoscopes, interventional colonoscopes with alternative propulsion mechanisms, wireless capsule colonoscopy, and technologies for intraprocedural bowel cleansing. Many of these devices have the potential to reduce exam related patient discomfort, obviate the need for sedation, increase diagnostic yield, reduce learning curves, improve access to screening, and possibly avert the need for a bowel preparation. PMID:23382621

  2. Colorectal adenomas and diet: a case-control study of subjects participating in the Nottingham faecal occult blood screening programme.

    PubMed Central

    Little, J.; Logan, R. F.; Hawtin, P. G.; Hardcastle, J. D.; Turner, I. D.

    1993-01-01

    Diets high in animal fat and protein and low in fibre and calcium are thought to be factors in the etiology of colorectal cancer. Intakes of these nutrients were determined in three groups participating in a randomised trial of faecal occult blood (FOB) screening. A diet history was obtained by interview from 147 patients with colorectal adenomas, 153 age and sex matched FOB-negative controls (a) and 176 FOB-positive controls without colorectal neoplasia (b). Unconditional logistic regression was used to estimate relative risks (RR) and 95% confidence limits (increases) adjusted for age, sex and social class. After adjustment for total energy intake, no associations were found with total, saturated or mono-unsaturated fat, or calcium intake. For total fibre intake there were non-linear relationships with both control groups with the crude RR for highest quintiles of total fibre intake compared to the lowest being 0.6, although this pattern was no longer apparent after adjustment for energy intake with group (a). In comparison with group (b) cereal fibre intake showed a more consistent inverse relationship with adenoma prevalence with the RR for ascending quintiles of intake being 1.0, 0.7 (0.3-1.6), 0.5 (0.3-1.1), 0.7 (0.4-1.4) and 0.3 (0.1-0.6) (trend chi 2 = 8.80, p = 0.003). In comparison with group (a), the adjusted RR for the highest quintile of cereal fibre intake compared with the lowest was 0.6, but no clear trend was apparent. There was an unexpected positive relationship between adenomas and polyunsaturated fat intake with the RR for having an adenoma being 1.0, 2.8 (1.3-6.1), 1.6 (0.7-3.4), 3.5 (1.6-7.5) and 2.3 (1.1-5.0) for ascending quintiles of polyunsaturated fat intakes (trend chi 2 = 4.8, P = 0.03) in comparison with group (a) only. Our data, while providing no support for the role of dietary animal fat or protein, do support the protective role of dietary cereal fibre in the etiology of colorectal adenomas. PMID:8381298

  3. MicroRNA-320 family is downregulated in colorectal adenoma and affects tumor proliferation by targeting CDK6

    PubMed Central

    Tadano, Toshihiro; Kakuta, Yoichi; Hamada, Shin; Shimodaira, Yosuke; Kuroha, Masatake; Kawakami, Yoko; Kimura, Tomoya; Shiga, Hisashi; Endo, Katsuya; Masamune, Atsushi; Takahashi, Seiichi; Kinouchi, Yoshitaka; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the microRNA (miRNA) expression during histological progression from colorectal normal mucosa through adenoma to carcinoma within a lesion. METHODS: Using microarray, the sequential changes in miRNA expression profiles were compared in colonic lesions from matched samples; histologically, non-neoplastic mucosa, adenoma, and submucosal invasive carcinoma were microdissected from a tissue sample. Cell proliferation assay was performed to observe the effect of miRNA, and its target genes were predicted using bioinformatics approaches and the expression profile of SW480 transfected with the miRNA mimics. mRNA and protein levels of the target gene in colon cancer cell lines with a mimic control or miRNA mimics were measured using qRT-PCR and Western blotting. The expression levels of miRNA and target gene in colorectal tissue samples were also measured. RESULTS: Microarray analysis identified that the miR-320 family, including miR-320a, miR-320b, miR-320c, miR-320d and miR-320e, were differentially expressed in adenoma and submucosal invasive carcinoma. The miR-320 family, which inhibits cell proliferation, is frequently downregulated in colorectal adenoma and submucosal invasive carcinoma tissues. Seven genes including CDK6 were identified to be common in the results of gene expression array and bioinformatics analyses performed to find the target gene of the miR-320 family. We confirmed that mRNA and protein levels of CDK6 were significantly suppressed in colon cancer cell lines with miR-320 family mimics. CDK6 expression was found to increase from non-neoplastic mucosa through adenoma to submucosal invasive carcinoma tissues and showed an inverse correlation with miR-320 family expression. CONCLUSION: MiR-320 family affects colorectal tumor proliferation by targeting CDK6, plays important role in its growth, and is considered to be a biomarker for its early detection. PMID:27559432

  4. Colorectal villous and tubulovillous adenomas equal to or greater than four centimeters.

    PubMed Central

    Stulc, J P; Petrelli, N J; Herrera, L; Mittelman, A

    1988-01-01

    The records of 237 patients treated for benign and malignant villous and tubulovillous adenomas at Roswell Park Memorial Institute from 1963 to 1987 were reviewed. Sixty-five adenomas were greater than or equal to 4 cm and form the basis of this report. Fifteen (23%) were in the cecum, 3 (5%) in the right colon, 1 (1%) in the splenic flexure, 10 (15%) in the sigmoid colon, and 36 (55%) in the rectum. The most common symptoms were rectal bleeding (70%), mucus diarrhea (44%), constipation (22%), and tenesmus (19%). Fifty-five (85%) of these large adenomas contained invasive adenocarcinoma and one in situ carcinoma. Two thirds of invasive carcinomas arose from predominantly villous adenomas and one third from tubulovillous adenomas. Half of all malignant adenomas demonstrated metastases to regional lymph nodes or distant metastases. Seven malignant adenomas (12%) were associated with synchronous adenocarcinomas of the colon, and 29% of malignant adenomas were associated with synchronous adenomatous polyps, principally tubular type. Four of nine benign, large adenomas were associated with synchronous adenomas but with no adenocarcinomas. No relationship was found between the size of the adenoma, location, or Dukes' stage. Though the incidence of in situ and invasive carcinomas is clearly related to the size of the adenoma, a linear relationship could not be demonstrated. PMID:3337563

  5. A Gene Expression and Pre-mRNA Splicing Signature That Marks the Adenoma-Adenocarcinoma Progression in Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Pesson, Marine; Volant, Alain; Uguen, Arnaud; Trillet, Kilian; De La Grange, Pierre; Aubry, Marc; Daoulas, Mélanie; Robaszkiewicz, Michel; Le Gac, Gérald; Morel, Alain; Simon, Brigitte; Corcos, Laurent

    2014-01-01

    It is widely accepted that most colorectal cancers (CRCs) arise from colorectal adenomas (CRAs), but transcriptomic data characterizing the progression from colorectal normal mucosa to adenoma, and then to adenocarcinoma are scarce. These transition steps were investigated using microarrays, both at the level of gene expression and alternative pre-mRNA splicing. Many genes and exons were abnormally expressed in CRAs, even more than in CRCs, as compared to normal mucosae. Known biological pathways involved in CRC were altered in CRA, but several new enriched pathways were also recognized, such as the complement and coagulation cascades. We also identified four intersectional transcriptional signatures that could distinguish CRAs from normal mucosae or CRCs, including a signature of 40 genes differentially deregulated in both CRA and CRC samples. A majority of these genes had been described in different cancers, including FBLN1 or INHBA, but only a few in CRC. Several of these changes were also observed at the protein level. In addition, 20% of these genes (i.e. CFH, CRYAB, DPT, FBLN1, ITIH5, NR3C2, SLIT3 and TIMP1) showed altered pre-mRNA splicing in CRAs. As a global variation occurring since the CRA stage, and maintained in CRC, the expression and splicing changes of this 40-gene set may mark the risk of cancer occurrence from analysis of CRA biopsies. PMID:24516561

  6. Research Advances in Pituitary Adenoma and DNA Methylation.

    PubMed

    Wei, Zhen-Qing; Li, Yang; Li, Wei-Hua; Lou, Jia-Cheng; Zhang, Bo

    2016-08-01

    DNA methylation is closely related to the genesis and development of pituitary adenoma. Studies have shown that high methylation in the promoter region of potassium voltage-gated chanel,shaker related subfamily,beta member 2,O-6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase,echinoderm microtubule associated protein like 2 ,ras homolog family member D ,homeobox B1 ,NNAT, and P16 inhibits the expression of these genes and regulates of the proliferation of pituitary adenoma. DNA methylation is also closely related to invasive pituitary adenoma. Therefore,further study on molecular mechanism of DNA methylation of pituitary adenoma will offer a new strategy for the diagnosis and treatment of pituitary adenoma. PMID:27594164

  7. Prospective Study of Seroreactivity to JC virus T-Antigen and Risk of Colorectal Cancers and Adenomas

    PubMed Central

    Hampras, Shalaka S.; Viscidi, Raphael P.; Helzlsouer, Kathy J.; Lee, Ji-Hyun; Fulp, William J.; Giuliano, Anna R.; Platz, Elizabeth A.; Rollison, Dana E.

    2014-01-01

    John Cunningham virus (JCV) is a common polyomavirus classified as a possible carcinogen by the International Agency for Research on Cancer. JCV may play a role in colorectal carcinogenesis, although we previously reported no association between JCV capsid antibodies and colorectal cancer (CRC). No studies have examined the role of seroreactivity to JCV T-antigen (T-Ag) oncoprotein in CRC. A case-control study nested within a community-based prospective cohort (CLUE II) was conducted. In 1989, 25,080 residents of Washington County, Maryland were enrolled in CLUE II, completing baseline questionnaires and providing blood samples. At follow-up, 257 incident CRC cases were identified by linkage to population-based cancer registries through 2006 and matched to controls on age, sex, race, and date of blood draw. One hundred and twenty three colorectal adenoma cases were identified through self-report during follow-up and matched to controls on age, sex, race, date of blood draw, and CRC screening. Baseline serum samples were tested for seroreactivity to JCV T-Ag. Associations between JCV T-Ag seroreactivity and CRC/adenomas were evaluated using conditional logistic regression models. Overall, seroreactivity to JCV T-Ag was not statistically significantly associated with either the risk of CRC (OR =1.34, 95% CI=0.89-2.01) or adenoma (OR =1.30, 95% CI=0.70-2.42), while a borderline association with CRC was observed among women (OR=1.82, 95% CI=1.00-3.31). Our past evaluation of JCV capsid seropositivity, combined with current findings, do not support a notable etiologic role for JCV infection in CRC. PMID:25128403

  8. MicroRNA profiles in colorectal carcinomas, adenomas and normal colonic mucosa: variations in miRNA expression and disease progression.

    PubMed

    Slattery, Martha L; Herrick, Jennifer S; Pellatt, Daniel F; Stevens, John R; Mullany, Lila E; Wolff, Erica; Hoffman, Michael D; Samowitz, Wade S; Wolff, Roger K

    2016-03-01

    MiRNAs are small, non-protein-coding RNA molecules that regulate gene expression either by post-transcriptionally suppressing mRNA translation or by mRNA degradation. We examine differentially expressed miRNAs in colorectal carcinomas, adenomas and normal colonic mucosa. Data come from population-based studies of colorectal cancer conducted in Utah and the Kaiser Permanente Medical Care Program. A total of 1893 carcinoma/normal-paired samples and 290 adenoma tissue samples were run on the Agilent Human miRNA Microarray V19.0 which contained 2006 miRNAs. We tested for significant differences in miRNA expression between paired carcinoma/adenoma/normal colonic tissue samples. Fewer than 600 miRNAs were expressed in >80% of people for colonic tissue; of these 86.5% were statistically differentially expressed between carcinoma and normal colonic mucosa using a false discovery rate of 0.05. Roughly half of these differentially expressed miRNAs showed a progression in levels of expression from normal to adenoma to carcinoma tissue. Other miRNAs appeared to be altered at the normal to adenoma stage, while others were only altered at the adenoma to carcinoma stage or only at the normal to carcinoma stage. Evaluation of the Agilent platform showed a high degree of repeatability (r = 0.98) and reasonable agreement with the NanoString platform. Our data suggest that miRNAs are highly dysregulated in colorectal tissue among individuals with colorectal cancer; the pattern of disruption varies by miRNA as tissue progresses from normal to adenoma to carcinoma. PMID:26740022

  9. Germline mutations in the proof-reading domains of POLE and POLD1 predispose to colorectal adenomas and carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Palles, Claire; Cazier, Jean-Baptiste; Howarth, Kimberley M; Domingo, Enric; Jones, Angela M.; Broderick, Peter; Kemp, Zoe; Spain, Sarah L; Almeida, Estrella Guarino; Salguero, Israel; Sherborne, Amy; Chubb, Daniel; Carvajal-Carmona, Luis G; Ma, Yusanne; Kaur, Kulvinder; Dobbins, Sara; Barclay, Ella; Gorman, Maggie; Martin, Lynn; Kovac, Michal B; Humphray, Sean; Lucassen, Anneke; Holmes, Christopher; Bentley, David; Donnelly, Peter; Taylor, Jenny; Petridis, Christos; Roylance, Rebecca; Sawyer, Elinor J; Kerr, David J.; Clark, Susan; Grimes, Jonathan; Kearsey, Stephen E; Thomas, Huw JW; McVean, Gilean; Houlston, Richard S; Tomlinson, Ian

    2013-01-01

    Many individuals with multiple or large colorectal adenomas, or early-onset colorectal cancer (CRC), have no detectable germline mutations in the known cancer predisposition genes. Using whole-genome sequencing, supplemented by linkage and association analysis, we identified specific heterozygous POLE or POLD1 germline variants in several multiple adenoma and/or CRC cases, but in no controls. The susceptibility variants appear to have high penetrance. POLD1 is also associated with endometrial cancer predisposition. The mutations map to equivalent sites in the proof-reading (exonuclease) domain of DNA polymerases ε and δ, and are predicted to impair correction of mispaired bases inserted during DNA replication. In agreement with this prediction, mutation carriers’ tumours were microsatellite-stable, but tended to acquire base substitution mutations, as confirmed by yeast functional assays. Further analysis of published data showed that the recently-described group of hypermutant, microsatellite-stable CRCs is likely to be caused by somatic POLE exonuclease domain mutations. PMID:23263490

  10. Advancing Treatment of Pituitary Adenomas through Targeted Molecular Therapies: The Acromegaly and Cushing Disease Paradigms

    PubMed Central

    Mooney, Michael A.; Simon, Elias D.; Little, Andrew S.

    2016-01-01

    The current treatment of pituitary adenomas requires a balance of conservative management, surgical resection, and in select tumor types, molecular therapy. Acromegaly treatment is an evolving field where our understanding of molecular targets and drug therapies has improved treatment options for patients with excess growth hormone levels. We highlight the use of molecular therapies in this disease process and advances in this field, which may represent a paradigm shift for the future of pituitary adenoma treatment. PMID:27517036

  11. Adenoma-Like Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Raul S.; Cates, Justin M.M.; Washington, M. Kay; Beauchamp, R. Daniel; Coffey, Robert J.; Shi, Chanjuan

    2015-01-01

    Aims A subset of colorectal carcinomas (CRCs) architecturally and cytologically resembles adenomatous change, making them difficult to diagnose on biopsy. This subset has not been well-characterized to date. Methods and results For 35 carcinomas with adenomatous-like areas (cytologic and surface architectural appearance that would be insufficient to warrant a diagnosis of adenocarcinoma if evaluated on biopsy), we recorded staging information, molecular data, clinical outcome, whether precursor adenoma was present, and whether prior biopsy had been diagnosed as malignant. Despite advanced T-category in 23 (66%) tumors, only 7 (20%) had nodal metastases, and only 5 patients (15%) developed distant metastases. Fifteen cases (43%) had been diagnosed as adenoma on biopsy. Twenty-one resections (60%) showed no residual associated adenoma, including 9 called adenoma on biopsy. Median follow-up was 44 months. Four patients (12%) died of disease; 22 were alive at last follow-up. KRAS mutation was seen in 14/24 (58%), and 4/17 (24%) were microsatellite-unstable. Patients had significantly improved survival compared to a cohort of patients with conventional well-differentiated CRC after controlling for age and stage (p=0.011). Conclusions Adenoma-like adenocarcinoma is an uncommon variant of CRC with a low rate of metastasis and good prognosis. Biopsy diagnosis of this lesion may be challenging. PMID:25913616

  12. The multidrug resistance 1 (MDR1) gene polymorphism G-rs3789243-A is not associated with disease susceptibility in Norwegian patients with colorectal adenoma and colorectal cancer; a case control study

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Vibeke; Agerstjerne, Lene; Jensen, Dorte; Østergaard, Mette; Sæbø, Mona; Hamfjord, Julian; Kure, Elin; Vogel, Ulla

    2009-01-01

    Background Smoking, dietary factors, and alcohol consumption are known life style factors contributing to gastrointestinal carcinogenesis. Genetic variations in carcinogen handling may affect cancer risk. The multidrug resistance 1(MDR1/ABCB1) gene encodes the transport protein P-glycoprotein (a phase III xenobiotic transporter). P-glycoprotein is present in the intestinal mucosal lining and restricts absorption of certain carcinogens, among these polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Moreover, P-glycoprotein transports various endogenous substrates such as cytokines and chemokines involved in inflammation, and may thereby affect the risk of malignity. Hence, genetic variations that modify the function of P-glycoprotein may be associated with the risk of colorectal cancer (CRC). We have previously found an association between the MDR1 intron 3 G-rs3789243-A polymorphism and the risk of CRC in a Danish study population. The aim of this study was to investigate if this MDR1 polymorphism was associated with risk of colorectal adenoma (CA) and CRC in the Norwegian population. Methods Using a case-control design, the association between the MDR1 intron 3 G-rs3789243-A polymorphism and the risk of colorectal carcinomas and adenomas in the Norwegian population was assessed in 167 carcinomas, 990 adenomas, and 400 controls. Genotypes were determined by allelic discrimination. Odds ratio (OR) and 95 confidence interval (95% CI) were estimated by binary logistic regression. Results No association was found between the MDR1 polymorphism (G-rs3789243-A) and colorectal adenomas or cancer. Carriers of the variant allele of MDR1 intron 3 had odds ratios (95% CI) of 0.97 (0.72–1.29) for developing adenomas, and 0.70 (0.41–1.21) for colorectal cancer, respectively, compared to homozygous wild type carriers. Conclusion The MDR1 intron 3 (G-rs3789243-A) polymorphism was not associated with a risk of colorectal adenomas or carcinomas in the present Norwegian study group. Thus, this

  13. Risk of Advanced Neoplasia in First-Degree Relatives with Colorectal Cancer: A Large Multicenter Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Quintero, Enrique; Gargallo, Carla; Lanas, Angel; Bujanda, Luis; Gimeno-García, Antonio Z.; Hernández-Guerra, Manuel; Nicolás-Pérez, David; Alonso-Abreu, Inmaculada; Morillas, Juan Diego; Balaguer, Francesc; Muriel, Alfonso

    2016-01-01

    Background First-degree relatives (FDR) of patients with colorectal cancer have a higher risk of developing colorectal cancer than the general population. For this reason, screening guidelines recommend colonoscopy every 5 or 10 y, starting at the age of 40, depending on whether colorectal cancer in the index-case is diagnosed at <60 or ≥60 y, respectively. However, studies on the risk of neoplastic lesions are inconclusive. The aim of this study was to determine the risk of advanced neoplasia (three or more non-advanced adenomas, advanced adenoma, or invasive cancer) in FDR of patients with colorectal cancer compared to average-risk individuals (i.e., asymptomatic adults 50 to 69 y of age with no family history of colorectal cancer). Methods and Findings This cross-sectional analysis includes data from 8,498 individuals undergoing their first lifetime screening colonoscopy between 2006 and 2012 at six Spanish tertiary hospitals. Of these individuals, 3,015 were defined as asymptomatic FDR of patients with colorectal cancer (“familial-risk group”) and 3,038 as asymptomatic with average-risk for colorectal cancer (“average-risk group”). The familial-risk group was stratified as one FDR, with one family member diagnosed with colorectal cancer at ≥60 y (n = 1,884) or at <60 y (n = 831), and as two FDR, with two family members diagnosed with colorectal cancer at any age (n = 300). Multiple logistic regression analysis was used for between-group comparisons after adjusting for potential confounders (age, gender, and center). Compared with the average-risk group, advanced neoplasia was significantly more prevalent in individuals having two FDR with colorectal cancer (odds ratio [OR] 1.90; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.36–2.66, p < 0.001), but not in those having one FDR with colorectal cancer diagnosed at ≥60 y (OR 1.03; 95% CI 0.83–1.27, p = 0.77) and <60 y (OR 1.19; 95% CI 0.90–1.58, p = 0.20). After the age of 50 y, men developed advanced

  14. Role of dietary polyamines in a phase III clinical trial of difluoromethylornithine (DFMO) and sulindac for prevention of sporadic colorectal adenomas

    PubMed Central

    Raj, K P; Zell, J A; Rock, C L; McLaren, C E; Zoumas-Morse, C; Gerner, E W; Meyskens, F L

    2013-01-01

    Background: The polyamine-inhibitory regimen difluoromethylornithine (DFMO)+sulindac has marked efficacy in preventing metachronous colorectal adenomas. Polyamines are synthesised endogenously and obtained from dietary sources. Here we investigate dietary polyamine intake and outcomes in the DFMO+sulindac colorectal adenoma prevention trial. Methods: Dietary polyamine data were available for 188 of 267 patients completing the study. Total dietary polyamine content was derived by the sum of dietary putrescine, spermine and spermidine values and categorised into two groups: highest (>75–100%) vs the lower three quartiles (0–25, 25–50 and 50–75%). Baseline tissue polyamine concentration and ODC1 genotype were determined. Logistic regression models were used for risk estimation. Results: A significant interaction was detected between dietary polyamine group and treatment with regard to adenoma recurrence (P=0.012). Significant metachronous adenoma risk reduction was observed after DFMO+sulindac treatment in dietary polyamine quartiles 1–3 (risk ratio (RR) 0.19; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.08–0.42; P<0.0001) but not in quartile 4 (RR 1.51; 95% CI 0.53–4.29; P=0.44). However, a lower number of events in the placebo group within dietary quartile 4 confound the aforementioned risk estimates. Conclusion: These preliminary findings reveal complex relationships between diet and therapeutic prevention, and they support further clinical trial-based investigations where the dietary intervention itself is controlled. PMID:23340449

  15. Colorectal adenomas and energy intake, body size and physical activity: a case-control study of subjects participating in the Nottingham faecal occult blood screening programme.

    PubMed Central

    Little, J.; Logan, R. F.; Hawtin, P. G.; Hardcastle, J. D.; Turner, I. D.

    1993-01-01

    Most case-control studies of colorectal cancer have shown a positive association with energy intake. In contrast studies which have considered physical activity have found the most active to have a lower risk of colonic cancer and obesity appears to be no more than weakly related to colorectal cancer. We therefore compared energy intake determined by a diet history interview, self-reported height and weight, together with measures of lifetime job activity levels and leisure activity in the year prior to interview in 147 cases with colorectal adenomas and two control groups (a) 153 age-sex matched FOB-negative subjects (b) 176 FOB-positive subjects in whom no adenoma or carcinoma was found. Unconditional logistic regression was used to estimate relative risks (RR) and 95% confidence intervals () adjusted for age, sex and social class. No association with weight or body mass index was found. The only association with physical activity found with both control groups was an inverse association with running or cycling for half an hour continuously at least once a week RR 0.46 (0.2-1.3) compared with control group (a), and RR = 0.32 (0.1-0.8) compared with (b), but few subjects engaged in such activity. There was an inverse association with energy intake (trend chi 2 = 5.3, P < 0.025) in the comparison with control group (a) only, a finding which is consistent with those of two previous studies of asymptomatic adenoma. PMID:8427777

  16. Case-control study of the PERIOD3 clock gene length polymorphism and colorectal adenoma formation.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Melannie; Burch, James B; Steck, Susan E; Chen, Chin-Fu; Hurley, Thomas G; Cavicchia, Philip; Ray, Meredith; Shivappa, Nitin; Guess, Jaclyn; Zhang, Hongmei; Youngstedt, Shawn D; Creek, Kim E; Lloyd, Stephen; Yang, Xiaoming; Hébert, James R

    2015-02-01

    Clock genes are expressed in a self-perpetuating, circadian pattern in virtually every tissue including the human gastrointestinal tract. They coordinate cellular processes critical for tumor development, including cell proliferation, DNA damage response and apoptosis. Circadian rhythm disturbances have been associated with an increased risk for colon cancer and other cancers. This mechanism has not been elucidated, yet may involve dysregulation of the 'period' (PER) clock genes, which have tumor suppressor properties. A variable number tandem repeat (VNTR) in the PERIOD3 (PER3) gene has been associated with sleep disorders, differences in diurnal hormone secretion, and increased premenopausal breast cancer risk. Susceptibility related to PER3 has not been examined in conjunction with adenomatous polyps. This exploratory case-control study was the first to test the hypothesis that the 5-repeat PER3 VNTR sequence is associated with increased odds of adenoma formation. Information on demographics, medical history, occupation and lifestyle was collected prior to colonoscopy. Cases (n=49) were individuals with at least one histopathologically confirmed adenoma. Controls (n=97) included patients with normal findings or hyperplastic polyps not requiring enhanced surveillance. Unconditional multiple logistic regression was used to calculate odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs), after adjusting for potential confounding. Adenomas were detected in 34% of participants. Cases were more likely to possess the 5-repeat PER3 genotype relative to controls (4/5 OR, 2.1; 95% CI, 0.9-4.8; 5/5 OR, 5.1; 95% CI, 1.4-18.1; 4/5+5/5 OR, 2.5; 95% CI, 1.7-5.4). Examination of the Oncomine microarray database indicated lower PERIOD gene expression in adenomas relative to adjacent normal tissue. Results suggest a need for follow-up in a larger sample. PMID:25501848

  17. Faecal calprotectin and faecal occult blood tests in the diagnosis of colorectal carcinoma and adenoma

    PubMed Central

    Tibble, J; Sigthorsson, G; Foster, R; Sherwood, R; Fagerhol, M; Bjarnason, I

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS—Testing for faecal occult blood has become an accepted technique of non-invasive screening for colorectal neoplasia but lack of sensitivity remains a problem. The aim of this study was to compare the sensitivity and specificity of faecal calprotectin and faecal occult blood in patients with colorectal cancer and colonic polyps.
METHODS—Faecal calprotectin and occult blood were assessed in 62 patients with colorectal carcinoma and 233 patients referred for colonoscopy. The range of normality for faecal calprotectin (0.5-10.5 mg/l) was determined from 96 healthy subjects.
RESULTS—Median faecal calprotectin concentration in the 62 patients with colorectal carcinoma (101 mg/l, 95% confidence interval (CI) 57-133) differed significantly from normal (2.3 mg/l, 95% CI 1.6-5.0) with 90% of patients having elevated levels (normal <10 mg/l) whereas only 36/62 (58%) had positive faecal occult bloods. There was no significant difference in faecal calprotectin levels when considering location or Dukes' staging of tumour. Percentage positivity of faecal occult bloods was significantly higher for Dukes' stage C and D cancers compared with Dukes' A and B. In the colonoscopy group, 29 patients with adenomatous polyps were detected in whom the median faecal calprotectin was 12 mg/l (95% CI 2.9-32). Sensitivity for detection of adenomatous polyps was 55% using the calprotectin method and 10% using faecal occult blood testing. The overall sensitivity and specificity of calprotectin for colorectal cancer and adenomatous polyps as a combined group was 79% and 72%, respectively, compared with a sensitivity and specificity of faecal occult blood of 43% and 92%.
CONCLUSIONS—Faecal calprotectin is a simple and sensitive non-invasive marker of colorectal cancer and adenomatous polyps. It is more sensitive than faecal occult blood tests for detection of colorectal neoplasia at the cost of a somewhat lower specificity.


Keywords: colorectal

  18. Comprehensive DNA Methylation Analysis Reveals a Common Ten-Gene Methylation Signature in Colorectal Adenomas and Carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Patai, Árpád V.; Valcz, Gábor; Hollósi, Péter; Kalmár, Alexandra; Péterfia, Bálint; Patai, Árpád; Wichmann, Barnabás; Spisák, Sándor; Barták, Barbara Kinga; Leiszter, Katalin; Tóth, Kinga; Sipos, Ferenc; Kovalszky, Ilona; Péter, Zoltán; Miheller, Pál; Tulassay, Zsolt; Molnár, Béla

    2015-01-01

    Microarray analysis of promoter hypermethylation provides insight into the role and extent of DNA methylation in the development of colorectal cancer (CRC) and may be co-monitored with the appearance of driver mutations. Colonic biopsy samples were obtained endoscopically from 10 normal, 23 adenoma (17 low-grade (LGD) and 6 high-grade dysplasia (HGD)), and 8 ulcerative colitis (UC) patients (4 active and 4 inactive). CRC samples were obtained from 24 patients (17 primary, 7 metastatic (MCRC)), 7 of them with synchronous LGD. Field effects were analyzed in tissues 1 cm (n = 5) and 10 cm (n = 5) from the margin of CRC. Tissue materials were studied for DNA methylation status using a 96 gene panel and for KRAS and BRAF mutations. Expression levels were assayed using whole genomic mRNA arrays. SFRP1 was further examined by immunohistochemistry. HT29 cells were treated with 5-aza-2’ deoxycytidine to analyze the reversal possibility of DNA methylation. More than 85% of tumor samples showed hypermethylation in 10 genes (SFRP1, SST, BNC1, MAL, SLIT2, SFRP2, SLIT3, ALDH1A3, TMEFF2, WIF1), whereas the frequency of examined mutations were below 25%. These genes distinguished precancerous and cancerous lesions from inflamed and healthy tissue. The mRNA alterations that might be caused by systematic methylation could be partly reversed by demethylation treatment. Systematic changes in methylation patterns were observed early in CRC carcinogenesis, occuring in precursor lesions and CRC. Thus we conclude that DNA hypermethylation is an early and systematic event in colorectal carcinogenesis, and it could be potentially reversed by systematic demethylation therapy, but it would need more in vitro and in vivo experiments to support this theory. PMID:26291085

  19. CG100649, a novel COX-2 inhibitor, inhibits colorectal adenoma and carcinoma growth in mouse models.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sun-Hee; Margalit, Ofer; Katoh, Hiroshi; Wang, Dingzhi; Wu, Hong; Xia, Dianren; Holla, Vijaykumar R; Yang, Peiying; DuBois, Raymond N

    2014-12-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and selective cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitors (COXIBs) can reduce the risk of developing colorectal cancer (CRC) and are being considered for use as adjuvant therapy for treatment of CRC patients. However, long-term use of most NSAIDs, except aspirin, increases cardiovascular risk, hampering use of these drugs in CRC prevention and possibly for treatment. CG100649 is a new member of the COXIB family, which is proposed to inhibit both COX-2 and carbonic anhydrase-I/-II (CA-I/-II) activity. Using mouse models, we show here that CG100649 inhibits premalignant and malignant colorectal lesions in mouse models, partly through inhibiting tumor cell proliferation. These pre-clinical findings suggest a need for further exploration of CG100649 for CRC prevention and treatment. The long-term safety profile of CG100649, particularly regarding its effect on cardiovascular risk, is yet to be determined. PMID:25085205

  20. Plasminogen activators in experimental colorectal neoplasia: a role in the adenoma-carcinoma sequence?

    PubMed Central

    Gelister, J S; Lewin, M R; Driver, H E; Savage, F; Mahmoud, M; Gaffney, P J; Boulos, P B

    1987-01-01

    An important step in the transition from adenomatous polyp to invasive carcinoma is the degradation of the epithelial basement membrane. By the generation of plasmin, plasminogen activators may play an important role in regulating the extracellular protease activity required for this event to occur. The production of biofunctional urokinase and of tissue plasminogen activator was therefore investigated in the dimethylhydrazine induced rat model of colorectal neoplasia. Both adenomatous polyps (p values less than 0.001) and colorectal carcinomas (p values less than 0.001) were demonstrated to produce a significant excess of both urokinase and tissue plasminogen activator when compared with macroscopically normal colon. There was, however, no increased production of either enzyme by macroscopically normal preneoplastic colon when compared with control colon. This enhanced capacity of colorectal tumours to produce plasminogen activators and generate plasmin is thus a feature of both the premalignant as well as the malignant phenotype. These enzymes may contribute to the malignant potential of adenomatous polyps and to the invasive capacity of established carcinomas. PMID:3115868

  1. Prevalence and features of colorectal lesions among Hispanics: A hospital-based study

    PubMed Central

    Ashktorab, Hassan; Laiyemo, Adeyinka O; Lee, Edward; Cruz-Correa, Marcia; Ghuman, Amita; Nouraie, Mehdi; Brim, Hassan

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the prevalence and characteristics of colorectal adenoma and carcinoma in an inner city Hispanic population. METHODS: We reviewed the reports of 1628 Hispanic patients who underwent colonoscopy at Howard University from 2000 to 2010. Advanced adenoma was defined as adenoma ≥ 1 cm in size, adenomas with villous histology, high grade dysplasia and/or invasive cancer. Statistical analysis was performed using χ2 statistics and t-test. RESULTS: The median age of the patients was 54 years, 64.2% were females. Polyps were observed in 489 (30.0%) of patients. Adenoma prevalence was 16.8% (n = 273), advanced adenoma 2.4% (n = 39), and colorectal cancer 0.4% (n = 7). Hyperplastic polyps were seen in 6.6% of the cohort (n = 107). Adenomas predominantly exhibited a proximal colonic distribution (53.7%, n = 144); while hyperplastic polyps were mostly located in the distal colon (70%, n = 75). Among 11.7% (n = 191) patients who underwent screening colonoscopy, the prevalence of colorectal lesions was 21.4% adenoma, 2.6% advanced adenoma; and 8.3% hyperplastic polyps. CONCLUSION: Our data showed low colorectal cancer prevalence among Hispanics in the Washington DC area. However, the pre-neoplastic pattern of colonic lesions in Hispanics likely points toward a shift in this population that needs to be monitored closely through large epidemiological studies. PMID:26673447

  2. Advances in endoscopic ultrasound imaging of colorectal diseases

    PubMed Central

    Cârțână, Elena Tatiana; Gheonea, Dan Ionuț; Săftoiu, Adrian

    2016-01-01

    malignant subepithelial tumours. Recent reports suggest that EUS elastography enables highly accurate discrimination of colorectal adenocarcinomas from adenomas, while inflammatory bowel disease phenotypes can be distinguished based on the strain ratio calculation. Among EUS-guided therapies, the drainage of abdominal and pelvic collections has been regarded as a safe and effective procedure to be used as an alternative for the transcutaneous route, while the placing of fiducial markers under EUS guidance for targeted radiotherapy in rectal cancer or the use of contrast microbubbles as drug-delivery vehicles represent experimental therapeutic applications that could greatly impact the forthcoming management of patients with colorectal diseases, pending on further investigations. PMID:26855535

  3. Advances in endoscopic ultrasound imaging of colorectal diseases.

    PubMed

    Cârțână, Elena Tatiana; Gheonea, Dan Ionuț; Săftoiu, Adrian

    2016-02-01

    malignant subepithelial tumours. Recent reports suggest that EUS elastography enables highly accurate discrimination of colorectal adenocarcinomas from adenomas, while inflammatory bowel disease phenotypes can be distinguished based on the strain ratio calculation. Among EUS-guided therapies, the drainage of abdominal and pelvic collections has been regarded as a safe and effective procedure to be used as an alternative for the transcutaneous route, while the placing of fiducial markers under EUS guidance for targeted radiotherapy in rectal cancer or the use of contrast microbubbles as drug-delivery vehicles represent experimental therapeutic applications that could greatly impact the forthcoming management of patients with colorectal diseases, pending on further investigations. PMID:26855535

  4. Variation in the Association Between Colorectal Cancer Susceptibility Loci and Colorectal Polyps by Polyp Type

    PubMed Central

    Burnett-Hartman, Andrea N.; Newcomb, Polly A.; Hutter, Carolyn M.; Peters, Ulrike; Passarelli, Michael N.; Schwartz, Malaika R.; Upton, Melissa P.; Zhu, Lee-Ching; Potter, John D.; Makar, Karen W.

    2014-01-01

    We conducted a case-control study of the association between subsets of colorectal polyps, including adenomas and serrated polyps, and single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) related to colorectal cancer through prior genome-wide association studies (GWAS). Participants were enrollees in the Group Health Cooperative (Seattle, Washington) aged 24–79 years who received a colonoscopy from 1998 to 2007, donated a buccal or blood sample, and completed a structured questionnaire. We performed genotyping of 13 colorectal cancer susceptibility SNPs. Polytomous logistic regression models were used to estimate odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals for associations between polyps and the colorectal cancer risk allele for each SNP under a log-additive model. Analyses included 781 controls, 489 cases with adenoma, 401 cases with serrated polyps, and 188 cases with both polyp types. The following SNPs were associated with advanced adenomas: rs10936599, rs10795668, rs16892766, and rs9929218 (P < 0.05). For nonadvanced adenomas and for serrated polyps overall, only rs961253 was statistically significant (P < 0.05). These associations were in the same directions as those in prior colorectal cancer GWAS. No SNP was significantly associated with hyperplastic polyps, and only rs6983267 was significantly associated with sessile serrated polyps, but this association was opposite of that found in colorectal cancer GWAS. Our results suggest that the association between colorectal cancer susceptibility SNPs and colorectal polyps varies by polyp type. PMID:24875374

  5. Association between chronic hepatitis C and hepatitis C/HIV co-infection and the development of colorectal adenomas

    PubMed Central

    Davis-Yadley, Ashley H.; Lipka, Seth; Vardaros, Magdalene; Shen, Huafeng

    2016-01-01

    Background Limited knowledge exists about the effects chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection has in the development of colorectal adenomas (CRA). Data regarding the association between chronic HIV infection and the development of CRA is scarce as well. We aim to determine if there is an association between the development of CRA and chronic infection with HCV and HCV/HIV co-infection. Methods From July 1, 2009 to March 31, 2011 a total of 2,051 patients that underwent colonoscopy were included in our study. The population was divided into 2 study groups: those patients who tested positive for HCV, and HCV/HIC; the control groups consisted of patients whose results were negative. Fisher’s exact χ2 test for categorical variables and t-test for continuous variables was used to analyze data between groups. Logistic regression was performed to obtain odds ratios (OR). Results CRA detection was higher in the HCV than in the control group (26.3% vs. 20.2%; P=1.02); Likewise, the incidence of CRA (25.5% vs. 20.8%; P=0.63) was higher in the co-infection group. However, in both of the study groups this difference was non-statistical. Conclusions A higher detection rate of CRP was seen in the HCV population; however, it failed to reach statistical significance. Whether co-infection with HIV/HCV increases the incidence of CRA and/or has a synergistic effect remains to be determined. The small sample population and the retrospective single institution nature of our study, as well as other confounders may have contributed to our negative results. However, our findings question whether HCV and HIV/HCV co-infected patients will benefit from screening colonoscopy at an earlier age. This issue merits further investigation with a large multi-center prospective study. PMID:27563452

  6. Clonal evolution and tumor progression in 2 human colorectal adenoma-derived cell-lines invitro - the involvement of chromosome-1 abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Hague, A; Hanlon, K; Paraskeva, C

    1992-07-01

    Two human colorectal adenoma cell lines, S/RG and S/AN, have been continuously passaged in vitro to determine whether they would immortalize and if specific cytogenetic changes were involved in immortalization and tumor progression. At passage 7, S/RG was highly aneuploid, but had no abnormalities of chromosome 1 (Paraskeva et al, Cancer Res 49: 1282-1286, 1989). With continued passage under two independent sets of growth conditions an isochromosome Iq and derivatives of this isochromosome occurred as specific abnormalities. S/AN was near-diploid at passage 10, with a deletion in lp and monosomy 18. The karyotype at passage 44 showed no change. The cell lines are stable in that they have remained anchorage-dependent and non-tumorigenic after several years in culture and S/AN has retained a near diploid karyotype. These cell lines are therefore highly valuable for further studies of tumor progression in human colorectal carcinogenesis. PMID:21584532

  7. Characteristics of and risk factors for colorectal neoplasms in young adults in a screening population

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung Eun; Jo, Hee Bum; Kwack, Won Gun; Jeong, Yun Jin; Yoon, Yeo-Jin; Kang, Hyoun Woo

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate prevalence and risk factors for colorectal neoplasms in adults aged < 50 years, for whom screening is not recommended. METHODS: This cross-sectional study compared prevalence and characteristics of colorectal and advanced adenomas in patients aged < 50 years who underwent colonoscopy screening with subjects aged ≥ 50 years. To evaluate risk factors for colorectal and advanced adenoma in young adults, we used multivariable logistic regression models. Colorectal neoplasm characteristics were evaluated and compared with those in older patients. RESULTS: Among 2819 patients included, prevalences of colorectal adenoma and advanced adenoma were 19.7% and 1.5%, respectively. As patient age increased, so did the prevalence of colorectal neoplasm. However, prevalence of advanced adenoma did not differ between age-groups 45-49 years and ≥ 50 years (OR = 0.43, 95%CI: 0.17-1.07, P = 0.070). In younger age-group (< 50 years), colorectal adenoma was significantly associated with older age, waist circumference (OR = 1.72, 95%CI: 1.15-2.55, P = 0.008), and current smoking (OR = 1.60, 95%CI: 1.07-2.41, P = 0.023). Alcohol consumption was an independent risk factor for colorectal advanced adenoma (OR = 3.69, 95%CI: 1.08-12.54, P = 0.037). Multiple neoplasms and large neoplasms (≥ 1 cm) were more prevalent in subjects ≥ 50 years. CONCLUSION: Current screening strategies for colorectal cancer may need to be amended to account for patient age, especially in young subjects with abdominal obesity, current smoking and alcohol consumption. PMID:26973394

  8. Oncogenic Role of miR-15a-3p in 13q Amplicon-Driven Colorectal Adenoma-to-Carcinoma Progression

    PubMed Central

    de Groen, Florence L. M.; Timmer, Lisette M.; Menezes, Renee X.; Diosdado, Begona; Hooijberg, Erik; Meijer, Gerrit A.; Steenbergen, Renske D. M.; Carvalho, Beatriz

    2015-01-01

    Progression from colorectal adenoma to carcinoma is strongly associated with an accumulation of genomic alterations, including gain of chromosome 13. This gain affects the whole q arm and is present in 40%–60% of all colorectal cancers (CRCs). Several genes located at this amplicon are known to be overexpressed in carcinomas due to copy number dosage. A subset of these genes, including the mir-17~92 cluster, are functionally involved in CRC development. The present study set out to explore whether apart from mir-17~92, other miRNAs located at the 13q amplicon show a copy number dependent dosage effect that may contribute to 13q-driven colorectal adenoma-to-carcinoma progression. Integration of publically available miRNA expression, target mRNA expression and DNA copy number data from 125 CRCs yielded three miRNAs, miR-15a, -17, and -20a, of which high expression levels were significantly correlated with a 13q gain and which influenced target mRNA expression. These results could be confirmed by qRT-PCR in a series of 100 colon adenomas and carcinomas.Functional analysis of both mature miRNAs encoded by mir-15a, i.e. miR-15a-5p and miR-15a-3p, showed that silencing of miR-15a-3p significantly inhibited viability of CRC cells. Integration of miR-15a expression levels with mRNA expression data of predicted target genes identified mitochondrial uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2) and COP9 signalosome subunit 2 (COPS2) as candidates with significantly decreased expression in CRCs with 13q gain. Upon silencing of miR-15a-3p, mRNA expression of both genes increased in CRC cells, supporting miR-15a-3p mediated regulation of UPC2 and COPS2 expression. In conclusion, significant overexpression of miR-15a-3p due to gain of 13q is functionally relevant in CRC, with UCP2 and COPS2 as candidate target genes. Taken together our findings suggest that miR-15a-3p may contribute to adenoma-to-carcinoma progression. PMID:26148070

  9. [Treatment outcome of peptide vaccination for advanced colorectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Sugiura, Fumiaki; Inoue, Keisuke; Kogita, Akihiro; Yoshioka, Yasumasa; Hida, Jinichi; Okuno, Kiyotaka; Sukegawa, Yasushi

    2013-11-01

    Complementary DNA( cDNA) microarray technology coupled with laser microdissection has been used to identify human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-A24-restricted epitope peptides as potential targets for cancer vaccination in colorectal cancer patients. These antigenic peptides were derived from 2 different cancer-testis antigens, ring finger protein 43 (RNF43) and translocase of outer mitochondrial membrane 34( TOMM34). We conducted a clinical trial of colorectal cancer-specific peptide( RNF43, TOMM34) vaccines with uracil/tegafur( UFT)+Leucovorin( LV) for the treatment of advanced or recurrent colorectal cancer. The vaccinations were well tolerated without any serious adverse events. There were long-term survivors in the group showing cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) responses against both RNF43 and TOMM34, as well as in the group showing CTL responses against either RNF43 or TOMM34. A new study has been planned to obtain more immunological responses. We started a clinical trial of vaccines against multiple peptides (RNF43, TOMM34, forkhead box protein M1 [FOXM1], maternal embryonic leucine zipper kinase [MELK], holliday junction recognition protein[HJURP], vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 1[VEGFR1], and VEGFR2) for the treatment of advanced or recurrent colorectal cancer. PMID:24393856

  10. Colorectal cancer development and advances in screening.

    PubMed

    Simon, Karen

    2016-01-01

    Most colon tumors develop via a multistep process involving a series of histological, morphological, and genetic changes that accumulate over time. This has allowed for screening and detection of early-stage precancerous polyps before they become cancerous in individuals at average risk for colorectal cancer (CRC), which may lead to substantial decreases in the incidence of CRC. Despite the known benefits of early screening, CRC remains the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the United States. Hence, it is important for health care providers to have an understanding of the risk factors for CRC and various stages of disease development in order to recommend appropriate screening strategies. This article provides an overview of the histological/molecular changes that characterize the development of CRC. It describes the available CRC screening methods and their advantages and limitations and highlights the stages of CRC development in which each screening method is most effective. PMID:27486317

  11. Colorectal cancer development and advances in screening

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Karen

    2016-01-01

    Most colon tumors develop via a multistep process involving a series of histological, morphological, and genetic changes that accumulate over time. This has allowed for screening and detection of early-stage precancerous polyps before they become cancerous in individuals at average risk for colorectal cancer (CRC), which may lead to substantial decreases in the incidence of CRC. Despite the known benefits of early screening, CRC remains the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the United States. Hence, it is important for health care providers to have an understanding of the risk factors for CRC and various stages of disease development in order to recommend appropriate screening strategies. This article provides an overview of the histological/molecular changes that characterize the development of CRC. It describes the available CRC screening methods and their advantages and limitations and highlights the stages of CRC development in which each screening method is most effective. PMID:27486317

  12. Pathology, Pathogenesis and Therapy of Growth Hormone (GH)-producing Pituitary Adenomas: Technical Advances in Histochemistry and Their Contribution

    PubMed Central

    Osamura, Robert Y.; Egashira, Noboru; Kajiya, Hanako; Takei, Mao; Tobita, Maya; Miyakoshi, Takashi; Inomoto, Chie; Takekoshi, Susumu; Teramoto, Akira

    2009-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH)-producing adenomas (GHomas) are one of the most frequently-occurring pituitary adenomas. Differentiation of hormone-producing cells in the pituitary gland is regulated by transcription factors and co-factors. The transcription factors include Pit-1, Prop-1, NeuroD1, Tpit, GATA-2, SF-1. Aberrant expression of transcription factors such as Pit-1 results in translineage expression of GH in adrenocorticotropic hormone-producing adenomas (ACTHomas). This situation has been substantiated by GFP-Pit-1 transfection expression in the AtT20 cell line. Experimentally, GHomas have been induced in GH-releasing hormone (GHRH) or Prop-1 transgenic animals. Immunohistochemical detection of somatostatin receptor (SSTR2a) has recently emphasized their role in the response of GHomas to somatostatin analogue therapy. In this review, the advances in technology and their contribution to cell biology and medical practice are discussed. PMID:19759870

  13. Factors Associated with Adenoma Detection Rate and Diagnosis of Polyps and Colorectal Cancer during Colonoscopy in France: Results of a Prospective, Nationwide Survey

    PubMed Central

    Barret, Maximilien; Boustiere, Christian; Canard, Jean-Marc; Arpurt, Jean-Pierre; Bernardini, David; Bulois, Philippe; Chaussade, Stanislas; Heresbach, Denis; Joly, Isabelle; Lapuelle, Jean; Laugier, René; Lesur, Gilles; Pienkowski, Patrice; Ponchon, Thierry; Pujol, Bertrand; Richard-Molard, Bruno; Robaszkiewicz, Michel; Systchenko, Rémi; Abbas, Fatima; Schott-Pethelaz, Anne-Marie; Cellier, Christophe

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Colonoscopy can prevent deaths due to colorectal cancer (CRC) through early diagnosis or resection of colonic adenomas. We conducted a prospective, nationwide study on colonoscopy practice in France. Methods An online questionnaire was administered to 2,600 French gastroenterologists. Data from all consecutive colonoscopies performed during one week were collected. A statistical extrapolation of the results to a whole year was performed, and factors potentially associated with the adenoma detection rate (ADR) or the diagnosis of polyps or cancer were assessed. Results A total of 342 gastroenterologists, representative of the overall population of French gastroenterologists, provided data on 3,266 colonoscopies, corresponding to 1,200,529 (95% CI: 1,125,936-1,275,122) procedures for the year 2011. The indication for colonoscopy was CRC screening and digestive symptoms in 49.6% and 38.9% of cases, respectively. Polypectomy was performed in 35.5% of cases. The ADR and prevalence of CRC were 17.7% and 2.9%, respectively. The main factors associated with a high ADR were male gender (p=0.0001), age over 50 (p=0.0001), personal or family history of CRC or colorectal polyps (p<0.0001 and p<0.0001, respectively), and positive fecal occult blood test (p=0.0005). The prevalence of CRC was three times higher in patients with their first colonoscopy (4.2% vs. 1.4%; p<0.0001). Conclusions For the first time in France, we report nationwide prospective data on colonoscopy practice, including histological results. We found an average ADR of 17.7%, and observed reduced CRC incidence in patients with previous colonoscopy. PMID:23874822

  14. Grading dysplasia in colorectal adenomas by means of the quantitative binding pattern determination of Arachis hypogaea, Dolichos biflorus, Amaranthus caudatus, Maackia amurensis, and Sambucus nigra agglutinins.

    PubMed

    Bronckart, Y; Nagy, N; Decaestecker, C; Bouckaert, Y; Remmelink, M; Gielen, I; Hittelet, A; Darro, F; Pector, J C; Yeaton, P; Danguy, A; Kiss, R; Salmon, I

    1999-10-01

    The current study deals with the setting up of a new tool that enables the benign versus the malignant nature of colorectal adenomas to be determined accurately. The 2 objectives are to determine (1) whether adenomas should, or should not, be included in a 2- or a 3-tier grading system, and (2) whether severe dysplasias and carcinomas in situ share common or different biological characteristics. The levels of expression of different types of glycoconjugates were characterized in a series of 166 colorectal specimens, including 14 normal, 90 dysplastic, and 62 cancerous cases. The glycoconjugate expressions were demonstrated for 5 lectins, namely, Arachis hypogaea (PNA), Dolichos biflorus (DBA), Amaranthus caudatus (ACA), Maackia amurensis (MAA) and Sambucus nigra (SNA). The glycoconjugates demonstrated by these 5 lectins belong to the family of the Thomsen-Friedenreich antigens. The binding patterns of the 5 lectins were quantitatively determined by means of computer-assisted microscopy. The quantitative data were submitted to discriminant analyses. Our results show that the specific glycochemical staining patterns could be identified unambiguously and without misclassification between benign (normal and low dysplasia) and malignant (ie, either as moderate/severe dysplasia, carcinoma in situ, or cancer) cases. The data also strongly suggested that (1) dysplasias seem to be distinguishable in 2 instead of 3 groups, that is, low versus moderate/severe (high); and (2) moderate/severe dysplasias are biologically distinct from carcinomas in situ. The methodology developed can be applied directly in routine diagnosis to identify moderate/severe dysplasia specimens already exhibiting features common to carcinomas, and which therefore should be treated consistently in view of the fact that our data strongly suggest that most moderate/severe dysplasias are still benign, whereas carcinomas in situ are real carcinomatous lesions. PMID:10534165

  15. Identification and characterization of RET fusions in advanced colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Garrett, Christopher R.; Seery, Tara; Sanford, Eric M.; Balasubramanian, Sohail; Ross, Jeffrey S.; Stephens, Philip J.; Miller, Vincent A.; Ali, Siraj M.; Chiu, Vi K.

    2015-01-01

    There is an unmet clinical need for molecularly directed therapies available for metastatic colorectal cancer. Comprehensive genomic profiling has the potential to identify actionable genomic alterations in colorectal cancer. Through comprehensive genomic profiling we prospectively identified 6 RET fusion kinases, including two novel fusions of CCDC6-RET and NCOA4-RET, in metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC) patients. RET fusion kinases represent a novel class of oncogenic driver in CRC and occurred at a 0.2% frequency without concurrent driver mutations, including KRAS, NRAS, BRAF, PIK3CA or other fusion tyrosine kinases. Multiple RET kinase inhibitors were cytotoxic to RET fusion kinase positive cancer cells and not RET fusion kinase negative CRC cells. The presence of a RET fusion kinase may identify a subset of metastatic CRC patients with a high response rate to RET kinase inhibition. This is the first characterization of RET fusions in CRC patients and highlights the therapeutic significance of prospective comprehensive genomic profiling in advanced CRC. PMID:26078337

  16. Identification and characterization of RET fusions in advanced colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Le Rolle, Anne-France; Klempner, Samuel J; Garrett, Christopher R; Seery, Tara; Sanford, Eric M; Balasubramanian, Sohail; Ross, Jeffrey S; Stephens, Philip J; Miller, Vincent A; Ali, Siraj M; Chiu, Vi K

    2015-10-01

    There is an unmet clinical need for molecularly directed therapies available for metastatic colorectal cancer. Comprehensive genomic profiling has the potential to identify actionable genomic alterations in colorectal cancer. Through comprehensive genomic profiling we prospectively identified 6 RET fusion kinases, including two novel fusions of CCDC6-RET and NCOA4-RET, in metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC) patients. RET fusion kinases represent a novel class of oncogenic driver in CRC and occurred at a 0.2% frequency without concurrent driver mutations, including KRAS, NRAS, BRAF, PIK3CA or other fusion tyrosine kinases. Multiple RET kinase inhibitors were cytotoxic to RET fusion kinase positive cancer cells and not RET fusion kinase negative CRC cells. The presence of a RET fusion kinase may identify a subset of metastatic CRC patients with a high response rate to RET kinase inhibition. This is the first characterization of RET fusions in CRC patients and highlights the therapeutic significance of prospective comprehensive genomic profiling in advanced CRC. PMID:26078337

  17. Incidence of colorectal neoplasms among male pilots

    PubMed Central

    Moshkowitz, Menachem; Toledano, Ohad; Galazan, Lior; Hallak, Aharon; Arber, Nadir; Santo, Erwin

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To assess the prevalence of colorectal neoplasms (adenomas, advanced adenomas and colorectal cancers) among Israeli military and commercial airline pilots. METHODS: Initial screening colonoscopy was performed on average-risk (no symptoms and no family history) airline pilots at the Integrated Cancer Prevention Center (ICPC) in the Tel-Aviv Medical Center. Visualized polyps were excised and sent for pathological examination. Advanced adenoma was defined as a lesion >10 mm in diameter, with high-grade dysplasia or villous histology. The results were compared with those of an age- and gender-matched random sample of healthy adults undergoing routine screening at the ICPC. RESULTS: There were 270 pilots (mean age 55.2 ± 7.4 years) and 1150 controls (mean age 55.7 ± 7.8 years). The prevalence of colorectal neoplasms was 15.9% among the pilots and 20.6% among the controls (P = 0.097, χ2 test). There were significantly more hyperplastic polyps among pilots (15.5% vs 9.4%, P = 0.004) and a trend towards fewer adenomas (14.8% vs 20.3% P = 0.06). The prevalence of advanced lesions among pilots and control groups was 5.9% and 4.7%, respectively (P = 0.49), and the prevalence of cancer was 0.7% and 0.69%, respectively (P = 0.93). CONCLUSION: There tends to be a lower colorectal adenoma, advanced adenoma and cancer prevalence but a higher hyperplastic polyp prevalence among pilots than the general population. PMID:25083084

  18. Advances in epigenetic biomarker research in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xi; Kuang, Ye-Ye; Hu, Xiao-Tong

    2014-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) causes approximately 600000 deaths annually and is the third leading cause of cancer mortality worldwide. Despite significant advancements in treatment options, CRC patient survival is still poor owing to a lack of effective tools for early diagnosis and a limited capacity for optimal therapeutic decision making. Since there exists a need to find new biomarkers to improve diagnosis of CRC, the research on epigenetic biomarkers for molecular diagnostics encourages the translation of this field from the bench to clinical practice. Epigenetic alterations are thought to hold great promise as tumor biomarkers. In this review, we will primarily focus on recent advances in the study of epigenetic biomarkers for colorectal cancer and discuss epigenetic biomarkers, including DNA methylation, microRNA expression and histone modification, in cancer tissue, stool, plasma, serum, cell lines and xenografts. These studies have improved the chances that epigenetic biomarkers will find a place in the clinical practices of screening, early diagnosis, prognosis, therapy choice and recurrence surveillance for CRC patients. However, these studies have typically been small in size, and evaluation at a larger scale of well-controlled randomized clinical trials is the next step that is necessary to increase the quality of epigenetic biomarkers and ensure their widespread clinical use. PMID:24764665

  19. Designing an intervention to help people with colorectal adenomas reduce their intake of red and processed meat and increase their levels of physical activity: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Most cases of colorectal cancer (CRC) arise from adenomatous polyps and malignant potential is greatest in high risk adenomas. There is convincing observational evidence that red and processed meat increase the risk of CRC and that higher levels of physical activity reduce the risk. However, no definitive randomised trial has demonstrated the benefit of behaviour change on reducing polyp recurrence and no consistent advice is currently offered to minimise patient risk. This qualitative study aimed to assess patients’ preferences for dietary and physical activity interventions and ensure their appropriate and acceptable delivery to inform a feasibility trial. Methods Patients aged 60–74 included in the National Health Service Bowel Cancer Screening Programme (NHSBCSP) were selected from a patient tracking database. After a positive faecal occult blood test (FOBt), all had been diagnosed with an intermediate or high risk adenoma (I/HRA) at colonoscopy between April 2008 and April 2010. Interested patients and their partners were invited to attend a focus group or interview in July 2010. A topic guide, informed by the objectives of the study, was used. A thematic analysis was conducted in which transcripts were examined to ensure that all occurrences of each theme had been accounted for and compared. Results Two main themes emerged from the focus groups: a) experiences of having polyps and b) changing behaviour. Participants had not associated polyp removal with colorectal cancer and most did not remember being given any information or advice relating to this at the time. Heterogeneity of existing diet and physical activity levels was noted. There was a lack of readiness to change behaviour in many people in the target population. Conclusions This study has confirmed and amplified recently published factors involved in developing interventions to change dietary and physical activity behaviour in this population. The need to tailor the intervention to

  20. Association Between Exposure to Environmental Tobacco Smoke at the Workplace and Risk for Developing a Colorectal Adenoma: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung-Hwa; Hong, Ji-Yeon; Lee, Jung-Un

    2016-01-01

    Purpose A colorectal adenoma (CRA) is a well-defined precursor to colorectal cancer (CRC). Additionally, smoking is a potent risk factor for developing a CRA, as well as CRC. However, the association between exposure to environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) and the risk for developing a CRA has not yet been fully evaluated in epidemiologic studies. We performed a cross-sectional analysis on the association between exposure to ETS at the workplace and the risk for developing a CRA. Methods The study was conducted on subjects who had undergone a colonoscopy at a health promotion center from January 2012 to December 2012. After descriptive analyses, overall and subgroup analyses by smoking status were performed by using a multivariate logistic regression. Results Among the 1,129 participants, 300 (26.6%) were diagnosed as having CRAs. Exposure to ETS was found to be associated with CRAs in all subjects (fully adjusted odds ratio [OR], 1.95; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.08–2.44; P = 0.001). In the subgroup analysis, exposure to ETS in former smokers increased the risk for developing a CRA (fully adjusted OR, 4.44; 95% CI, 2.07–9.51; P < 0.001). Conclusion Exposure to occupational ETS at the workplace, independent of the other factors, was associated with increased risk for developing a CRA in all subjects and in former smokers. Further retrospective studies with large sample sizes may be necessary to clarify the causal effect of this relationship. PMID:27218095

  1. Statistical methods for assays with limits of detection: Serum bile acid as a differentiator between patients with normal colons, adenomas, and colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    LaFleur, Bonnie; Lee, Wooin; Billhiemer, Dean; Lockhart, Craig; Liu, Junmei; Merchant, Nipun

    2011-01-01

    In analytic chemistry a detection limit (DL) is the lowest measurable amount of an analyte that can be distinguished from a blank; many biomedical measurement technologies exhibit this property. From a statistical perspective, these data present inferential challenges because instead of precise measures, one only has information that the value is somewhere between 0 and the DL (below detection limit, BDL). Substitution of BDL values, with 0 or the DL can lead to biased parameter estimates and a loss of statistical power. Statistical methods that make adjustments when dealing with these types of data, often called left-censored data, are available in many commercial statistical packages. Despite this availability, the use of these methods is still not widespread in biomedical literature. We have reviewed the statistical approaches of dealing with BDL values, and used simulations to examine the performance of the commonly used substitution methods and the most widely available statistical methods. We have illustrated these methods using a study undertaken at the Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, to examine the serum bile acid levels in patients with colorectal cancer and adenoma. We have found that the modern methods for BDL values identify disease-related differences that are often missed, with statistically naive approaches. PMID:21712958

  2. The first year follow-up after colorectal adenoma polypectomy is important: a multiple-center study in symptomatic hospital-based individuals in China.

    PubMed

    Gao, Qin-Yan; Chen, Hui-Min; Sheng, Jian-Qiu; Zheng, Ping; Yu, Cheng-Gong; Jiang, Bo; Fang, Jing-Yuan

    2010-12-01

    The recurrence of colorectal adenoma (CRA) is high. Although there are guidelines for colonoscopy surveillance after polypectomy in other countries, little is known about its recurrence rate and recurrence peak, especially in China. The aim of the present research is to investigate how long after polypectomy follow-up should take and to analyze risk factors of recurrence. 1208 patients who received polypectomies from five clinical research centers in four regions of China (Shanghai, Guangzhou, Nanjing and Beijing) were included. They were divided into 4 groups: group A (follow-up ≤ 1 year after polypectomy), group B (follow-up 2-3 years after polypectomy), group C (follow-up 4-5 years after polypectomy), and group D (follow-up > 5 years after polypectomy). The sex, age, adenoma location, size, number, and pathological characteristics were compared. On the whole, the recurrence rate was 59.46% in group A, 61.09% in group B, 78.07% in group C, and 87.12% in group D, which indicated an increased tendency with a prolonged follow-up duration. There was a significant difference between group A and C or D, and between group B and C or D (P<0.01), but there was no statistical difference between group A and B. Additionally, the recurrent patients in the first year had a recurrence rate of 97.33% in the first three years (59.46/61.09), which means that the peak of recurrence was almost entirely concentrated in the first year. The recurrence rate was higher in males and the elder. The risk factors included multiple numbers, villous feature, high-grade dysplasia of medium or smaller size and location in the distal colon. In conclusion, the peak of recurrence was almost totally concentrated in the first year; meanwhile, the first year follow-up is of critical importance in China. It may not be necessary to do the follow-up examination during the second and third years, but after three years, another colonoscopy should be undertaken. PMID:21128011

  3. Intraoperative and external beam irradiation for locally advanced colorectal cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Gunderson, L L; Martin, J K; Bèart, R W; Nagorney, D M; Fieck, J M; Wieand, H S; Martinez, A; O'Connell, M J; Martenson, J A; McIlrath, D C

    1988-01-01

    In view of poor local control rates obtained with standard treatment, intraoperative radiation (IORT) using electrons was combined with external beam irradiation and surgical resection, with or without 5-fluorouracil (5FU), in 51 patients with locally advanced colorectal cancer (recurrent, 36 patients; primary, 15 patients). Patients received 4500-5500 cGy (rad) of fractionated, multiple field external beam irradiation and an IORT dose of 1000-2000 cGy. Thirty of 51 patients (59%) are alive and 22 patients (43%) are free of disease. In 44 patients at risk greater than or equal to 1 year, local progression within the IORT field has occurred in 1 of 44 (2%) and within the external beam field in 8 of 44 (18%). All local failures have occurred in patients with recurrence or with gross residual after partial resection, and the risk was less in patients who received 5FU during external irradiation (1 of 11, 9% vs. 6 of 31, 19%). The incidence of distant metastases is high in patients with recurrence, but subsequent peritoneal failures are infrequent. Acute and chronic tolerance have been acceptable, but peripheral nerve appears to be a dose-limiting structure. Randomized trials are needed to determine whether potential gains with IORT are real. PMID:3337561

  4. Advances in the care of patients with mucinous colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Hugen, Niek; Brown, Gina; Glynne-Jones, Robert; de Wilt, Johannes H W; Nagtegaal, Iris D

    2016-06-01

    The majority of colorectal cancers (CRCs) are classified as adenocarcinoma not otherwise specified (AC). Mucinous carcinoma (MC) is a distinct form of CRC and is found in 10-15% of patients with CRC. MC differs from AC in terms of both clinical and histopathological characteristics, and has long been associated with an inferior response to treatment compared with AC. The debate concerning the prognostic implications of MC in patients with CRC is ongoing and MC is still considered an unfavourable and unfamiliar subtype of the disease. Nevertheless, in the past few years epidemiological and clinical studies have shed new light on the treatment and management of patients with MC. Use of a multidisciplinary approach, including input from surgeons, pathologists, oncologists and radiologists, is beginning to lead to more-tailored approaches to patient management, on an individualized basis. In this Review, the authors provide insight into advances that have been made in the care of patients with MC. The prognostic implications for patients with colon or rectal MC are described separately; moreover, the predictive implications of MC regarding responses to commonly used therapies for CRC, such as chemotherapy, radiotherapy and chemoradiotherapy, and the potential for, and severity of, metastasis are also described. PMID:26323388

  5. Background Colonic 18F-Fluoro-2-Deoxy-D-Glucose Uptake on Positron Emission Tomography Is Associated with the Presence of Colorectal Adenoma

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ko Eun; Yoon, Hai-Jeon; Chang, Ji Young; Son, Hyo Moon; Ryu, Min Sun; Kim, Seong-Eun; Shim, Ki-Nam; Jung, Hye-Kyung; Jung, Sung-Ae

    2016-01-01

    18F-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) scan is used to evaluate various kinds of tumors. While most studies on PET findings of the colon focus on the colonic uptake pattern, studies regarding background colonic uptake on PET scan are rare. The purpose of this study was to identify the association between the background colonic uptake and the presence of colorectal adenoma (CRA), which is a frequent precancerous lesion. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 241 patients with gynecologic malignancy who had received PET or PET/computed tomography (CT) scan and colonoscopy at the same period as a baseline evaluation. Background colonic 18F-FDG uptake was visually graded and the maximal standardized uptake values (SUVmax) of 7 different bowel segments were averaged. In univariate analysis, older age at diagnosis (≥ 50 years, p = 0.034), overweight (BMI ≥ 23 kg/m², p = 0.010), hypercholesterolemia (≥ 200 mg/dL, p = 0.027), and high grade background colonic uptake (p = 0.009) were positively associated with the prevalence of CRA. By multiple logistic regression, high grade background colonic uptake was independently predictive of CRA (odds ratio = 2.25, p = 0.021). The proportion of CRA patients significantly increased as background colonic uptake grade increased from 1 to 4 (trend p = 0.015). Out of the 138 patients who underwent PET/CT, the proportion of CRA patients in the group with high SUVmax (> 2.25) was significantly higher than in the low SUVmax group (27.5% vs. 11.6%, p = 0.031). In conclusion, high grade of background colonic 18F-FDG uptake is significantly associated with the prevalence of CRA. PMID:27509022

  6. [Progress of endoscopic screening and differentiation of colorectal polyps].

    PubMed

    Gao, Xianchun; Liu, Jun; Ren, Hongyu

    2016-04-25

    The incidence of colorectal cancer is rising year by year, thus screening of neoplastic colorectal polyps is very important for the prevention and treatment of colorectal cancer. In recent years, endoscopic techniques have advanced dramatically, such as high definition endoscopy, magnified endoscopy, conventional or virtual chromoendoscopy. Some of these technologies not only can improve the adenoma detection rate, but also may help to enable real-time endoscopic diagnosis and thereby guide decisions about endoscopic resection. The second generation colon capsule endoscopy provides a new and relative reliable noninvasive tool for colorectal diseases screening and diagnosis. This article aims to provide a comprehensive review of advanced imaging techniques available for the detection and differentiation of colorectal polyps. PMID:27112483

  7. Distribution, size and shape of colorectal adenomas as determined by a colonoscopist with a high lesion detection rate: Influence of age, sex and colonoscopy indication

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Johannes L; Okcu, Murat; Preisegger, Karl H

    2015-01-01

    Background Increasing attention is focused on polyp-related features that may contribute to the operator-dependent nature of colonoscopy. Few data on polyps are available from high-yield colonoscopies, which may serve as a benchmark for quality control. Objectives Describe regional distribution, histology, size and shape of polyps, and the influence of patient age and gender, in colonoscopies performed by a colonoscopist with high lesion detection rate. Methods Analysis of 698 consecutive patients with diagnostic, screening or surveillance colonoscopies. Results In 704 colonoscopies, 1908 polyps were removed (360 were protruded and 1548 flat; 1313 were hyperplastic, 562 adenomas, 5 serrated adenomas and 8 mixed). There were 232 adenomas in female patients and 343 in male patients; 39% of the adenomas were protruded and 61% were flat. The peak adenoma detection rate (ADR) was 51% in patients beyond age 79 years. Men older than 49 years had a higher ADR than women. In men and women, respectively: 40% and 32% of adenomas were in the right colon, 31% and 22% were in the transverse colon, and 30% and 47% were in the left colon. Beyond age 59 years, the majority of adenomas were in the proximal colon. Conclusions An excess of adenomas in the proximal colon started at age 60 and this was more pronounced in men than in women. In all colonic regions, the majority of adenomas had a shape that was flat and smaller than 6 mm. PMID:27403311

  8. Sessile serrated adenoma: from identification to resection.

    PubMed

    Bordaçahar, Benoît; Barret, Maximilien; Terris, Benoît; Dhooge, Marion; Dreanic, Johann; Prat, Frédéric; Coriat, Romain; Chaussade, Stanislas

    2015-02-01

    Until the past two decades, almost all colorectal polyps were divided into two main groups: hyperplastic polyps and adenomas. Sessile serrated adenomas presented endoscopic, pathological and molecular profiles distinct from others polyps. Previously under-diagnosed, physicians now identified sessile serrated adenomas. The serrated neoplastic pathway is accounting for up to one-third of all sporadic colorectal cancers and sessile serrated adenomas have been identified as the main precursor lesions in serrated carcinogenesis. By analogy with the adenoma-adenocarcinoma sequence, the sessile serrated adenomas-adenocarcinoma sequence, has been identified. The development of endoscopic resection techniques permits the consideration of a non-surgical approach as the first option regardless of the size of the lesion. Sessile serrated adenoma warrants the watchfulness of physicians and requires an optimal quality of the colonoscopy procedure, a thorough evaluation of the lesion, an adequate endoscopic resection and follow-up colonoscopies in accordance with sessile serrated adenomas guidelines. We herein present a review on sessile serrated adenomas focusing on their pathological specificities, epidemiology, treatment modalities and follow-up. PMID:25445408

  9. N-glycomic profiling as a tool to separate rectal adenomas from carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Kaprio, Tuomas; Satomaa, Tero; Heiskanen, Annamari; Hokke, Cornelis H; Deelder, André M; Mustonen, Harri; Hagström, Jaana; Carpen, Olli; Saarinen, Juhani; Haglund, Caj

    2015-02-01

    All human cells are covered by glycans, the carbohydrate units of glycoproteins, glycolipids, and proteoglycans. Most glycans are localized to cell surfaces and participate in events essential for cell viability and function. Glycosylation evolves during carcinogenesis, and therefore carcinoma-related glycan structures are potential cancer biomarkers. Colorectal cancer is one of the world's three most common cancers, and its incidence is rising. Novel biomarkers are essential to identify patients for targeted and individualized therapy. We compared the N-glycan profiles of five rectal adenomas and 18 rectal carcinomas of different stages by matrix-assisted laser desorption-ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Paraffin-embedded tumor samples were deparaffinized, and glycans were enzymatically released and purified. We found differences in glycosylation between adenomas and carcinomas: monoantennary, sialylated, pauci-mannose, and small high-mannose N-glycan structures were more common in carcinomas than in adenomas. We also found differences between stage I-II and stage III carcinomas. Based on these findings, we selected two glycan structures: pauci-mannose and sialyl Lewis a, for immunohistochemical analysis of their tissue expression in 220 colorectal cancer patients. In colorectal cancer, poor prognosis correlated with elevated expression of sialyl Lewis a, and in advanced colorectal cancer, poor prognosis correlated with elevated expression of pauci-mannose. In conclusion, by mass spectrometry we found several carcinoma related glycans, and we demonstrate a method of transforming these results into immunohistochemistry, a readily applicable method to study biomarker expression in patient samples. PMID:25452313

  10. N-glycomic Profiling as a Tool to Separate Rectal Adenomas from Carcinomas*

    PubMed Central

    Kaprio, Tuomas; Satomaa, Tero; Heiskanen, Annamari; Hokke, Cornelis H.; Deelder, André M.; Mustonen, Harri; Hagström, Jaana; Carpen, Olli; Saarinen, Juhani; Haglund, Caj

    2015-01-01

    All human cells are covered by glycans, the carbohydrate units of glycoproteins, glycolipids, and proteoglycans. Most glycans are localized to cell surfaces and participate in events essential for cell viability and function. Glycosylation evolves during carcinogenesis, and therefore carcinoma-related glycan structures are potential cancer biomarkers. Colorectal cancer is one of the world's three most common cancers, and its incidence is rising. Novel biomarkers are essential to identify patients for targeted and individualized therapy. We compared the N-glycan profiles of five rectal adenomas and 18 rectal carcinomas of different stages by matrix-assisted laser desorption-ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Paraffin-embedded tumor samples were deparaffinized, and glycans were enzymatically released and purified. We found differences in glycosylation between adenomas and carcinomas: monoantennary, sialylated, pauci-mannose, and small high-mannose N-glycan structures were more common in carcinomas than in adenomas. We also found differences between stage I–II and stage III carcinomas. Based on these findings, we selected two glycan structures: pauci-mannose and sialyl Lewis a, for immunohistochemical analysis of their tissue expression in 220 colorectal cancer patients. In colorectal cancer, poor prognosis correlated with elevated expression of sialyl Lewis a, and in advanced colorectal cancer, poor prognosis correlated with elevated expression of pauci-mannose. In conclusion, by mass spectrometry we found several carcinoma related glycans, and we demonstrate a method of transforming these results into immunohistochemistry, a readily applicable method to study biomarker expression in patient samples. PMID:25452313

  11. (1)H NMR Spectroscopy of Fecal Extracts Enables Detection of Advanced Colorectal Neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Amiot, Aurelien; Dona, Anthony C; Wijeyesekera, Anisha; Tournigand, Christophe; Baumgaertner, Isabelle; Lebaleur, Yann; Sobhani, Iradj; Holmes, Elaine

    2015-09-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a growing cause of mortality in developing countries, warranting investigation into its etiopathogenesis and earlier diagnosis. Here, we investigated the fecal metabolic phenotype of patients with advanced colorectal neoplasia and controls using (1)H-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and multivariate modeling. The fecal microbiota composition was assessed by quantitative real-time PCR as well as Wif-1 methylation levels in stools, serum, and urine and correlated to the metabolic profile of each patient. The predictivity of the model was 0.507 (Q(2)Y), and the explained variance was 0.755 (R(2)Y). Patients with advanced colorectal neoplasia demonstrated increased fecal concentrations of four short-chain fatty acids (valerate, acetate, propionate, and butyrate) and decreased signals relating to β-glucose, glutamine, and glutamate. The predictive accuracy of the multivariate (1)H NMR model was higher than that of the guaiac-fecal occult blood test and the Wif-1 methylation test for predicting advanced colorectal neoplasia. Correlation analysis between fecal metabolites and bacterial profiles revealed strong associations between Faecalibacterium prausnitzii and Clostridium leptum species with short-chain fatty acids concentration and inverse correlation between Faecalibacterium prausnitzii and glucose. These preliminary results suggest that fecal metabonomics may potentially have a future role in a noninvasive colorectal screening program and may contribute to our understanding of the role of these dysregulated molecules in the cross-talk between the host and its bacterial microbiota. PMID:26211820

  12. New technologies and techniques to improve adenoma detection in colonoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Bond, Ashley; Sarkar, Sanchoy

    2015-01-01

    Adenoma detection rate (ADR) is a key component of colonoscopy quality assessment, with a direct link between itself and future mortality from colorectal cancer. There are a number of potential factors, both modifiable and non-modifiable that can impact upon ADR. As methods, understanding and technologies advance, so should our ability to improve ADRs, and thus, reduce colorectal cancer mortality. This article will review new technologies and techniques that improve ADR, both in terms of the endoscopes themselves and adjuncts to current systems. In particular it focuses on effective techniques and behaviours, developments in image enhancement, advancement in endoscope design and developments in accessories that may improve ADR. It also highlights the key role that continued medical education plays in improving the quality of colonoscopy and thus ADR. The review aims to present a balanced summary of the evidence currently available and does not propose to serve as a guideline. PMID:26265990

  13. Prevalence of colorectal neoplasms in young, average risk individuals: A turning tide between East and West

    PubMed Central

    Leshno, Ari; Moshkowitz, Menachem; David, Maayan; Galazan, Lior; Neugut, Alfred I; Arber, Nadir; Santo, Erwin

    2016-01-01

    AIM To determine the prevalence of colorectal neoplasia in average risk persons 40-59 years of age in Israel and to compare the results with other populations. METHODS We reviewed the results of asymptomatic average-risk subjects, aged 40 to 59 years, undergoing their first screening colonoscopy between April 1994 and January 2014. The detection rates of adenoma, advanced adenoma (AA) and colorectal cancer (CRC) were determined in the 40’s and 50’s age groups by gender. The prevalence of lesions was compared between age groups. After meticulous review of the literature, these results were compared to published studies addressing the prevalence of colorectal neoplasia in similar patient groups, in a variety of geographical locations. RESULTS We included first screening colonoscopy results of 1750 individuals. The prevalence of adenomas, AA and CRC was 8.3%, 1.0% and 0.2% in the 40-49 age group and 13.7%, 2.4% and 0.2% in the 50-59 age group, respectively. Age-dependent differences in adenoma and AA rates were significant only among men (P < 0.005). Literature review disclosed 17 relevant studies. As expected, in both Asian and Western populations, the risks for overall adenoma and advanced adenoma was significantly higher in the 50's age group as compared to the 40's age group in a similar fashion. The result of the current study were similar to previous studies on Western populations. A substantially higher rate of adenoma, was observed in studies conducted among Asian populations in both age groups. CONCLUSION The higher rate of colorectal neoplasia in Asian populations requires further investigation and reconsideration as to the starting age of screening in that population. PMID:27621582

  14. Colorectal endoscopic submucosal dissection: Recent technical advances for safe and successful procedures

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Katsumi; Michida, Tomoki; Nishida, Tsutomu; Hayashi, Shiro; Naito, Masafumi; Ito, Toshifumi

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) is very useful in en bloc resection of large superficial colorectal tumors but is a technically difficult procedure because the colonic wall is thin and endoscopic maneuverability is poor because of colonic flexure and extensibility. A high risk of perforation has been reported in colorectal ESD. To prevent complications such as perforation and unexpected bleeding, it is crucial to ensure good visualization of the submucosal layer by creating a mucosal flap, which is an exfoliated mucosa for inserting the tip of the endoscope under it. The creation of a mucosal flap is often technically difficult; however, various types of equipment, appropriate strategy, and novel procedures including our clip-flap method, appear to facilitate mucosal flap creation, improving the safety and success rate of ESD. Favorable treatment outcomes with colorectal ESD have already been reported in many advanced institutions, and appropriate understanding of techniques and development of training systems are required for world-wide standardization of colorectal ESD. Here, we describe recent technical advances for safe and successful colorectal ESD. PMID:26468335

  15. Diagnostic accuracy of 18F-FDG PET/CT for detecting synchronous advanced colorectal neoplasia in patients with gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Choi, Byung Wook; Kim, Hae Won; Won, Kyoung Sook; Song, Bong-Il; Cho, Kwang Bum; Bae, Sung Uk

    2016-09-01

    Preoperative screening for synchronous colorectal neoplasia (CRN) has been recommended in patients with gastric cancer because patients with gastric cancer are at increased risk for synchronous CRN. The aim of this study was to investigate the diagnostic accuracy of F-fluorodeoxyglucose (F-FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) for detecting synchronous advanced CRN in patients with gastric cancer.A total of 256 patients who underwent colonoscopy and F-FDG PET/CT for preoperative staging were enrolled in this study. The diagnosis of focal colonic F-FDG uptake on F-FDG PET/CT image was made based on histopathologic results from the colonoscopic biopsy. The F-FDG PET/CT result was considered as true positive for advanced CRN when focal F-FDG uptake matched colorectal carcinoma or adenoma with high-grade dysplasia in the same location on colonoscopy.Synchronous advanced CRN was detected in 21 of the 256 patients (4.7%). Sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of F-FDG PET/CT were 76.2%, 96.2%, and 94.5%. The size of CRN with a true positive result was significantly larger than that with a false negative result.F-FDG PET/CT demonstrated high diagnostic accuracy for detecting synchronous advanced CRN in patients with gastric cancer. Colonoscopy is recommended as the next diagnostic step for further evaluation of a positive F-FDG PET/CT result in patients with gastric cancer. PMID:27603371

  16. Upregulation of nemo-like kinase is an independent prognostic factor in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wei; He, Jian; Du, Yan; Gao, Xian-Hua; Liu, Yan; Liu, Qi-Zhi; Chang, Wen-Jun; Cao, Guang-Wen; Fu, Chuan-Gang

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the expression and oncogenic role of nemo-like kinase (NLK) in colorectal cancer. METHODS: Expression of NLK protein was assessed by immunohistochemistry in tissue specimens from 56 cases of normal colorectal mucosa, 51 cases of colorectal adenoma, and 712 cases of colorectal cancer. In addition, NLK expression was knocked down using a lentivirus carrying NLK small hairpin RNA in colorectal cancer cells. Cell viability methylthiazoletetrazolium assays, colony formation assays, flow cytometry cell cycle assays, Transwell migration assays, and gene expression assays were performed to explore its role on proliferation and migration of colorectal cancer. RESULTS: Expression of NLK protein progressively increased in tissues from the normal mucosa through adenoma to various stages of colorectal cancer. Overexpression of NLK protein was associated with advanced tumor-lymph node-metastasis stages, poor differentiation, lymph node and distant metastases, and a higher recurrence rate of colorectal cancer (P < 0.05). Multivariate analyses showed that NLK expression was an independent prognostic factor to predict overall survival (hazard ratio 2.57, 95% confidence interval: 1.66-3.98; P < 0.001) and disease-free survival (hazard ratio 1.96, 95% confidence interval: 1.40-2.74: P < 0.001) of colorectal cancer patients. Furthermore, knockdown of NLK expression in colorectal cancer cell lines reduced cell viability, colony formation, and migration, and arrested tumor cells at the G0/G1 phase of the cell cycle. At the gene level, knockdown of NLK expression inhibited matrix metalloproteinase-2 expression in colorectal cancer cells. CONCLUSION: NLK overexpression is an independent prognostic factor in colorectal cancer and knockdown of NLK expression inhibits colorectal cancer progression and metastasis. PMID:26269673

  17. [Recent Advances in Systemic Chemotherapy for Metastatic Colorectal Cancer].

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Yuji; Oki, Eiji; Saeki, Hiroshi; Maehara, Yoshihiko; Baba, Hideo

    2016-01-01

    The recent development of chemotherapeutic agents and biomarkers have remarkably improved treatment outcomes of metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). However, decision making regarding the choice of therapy for mCRC has been complicated by the availability of many different treatment options. In this review, we will discuss the clinical evidence for current systemic treatment, including the key roles of 3 cytotoxic drugs and oral fluoropyrimidines, the appropriate use of anti-VEGF and anti-EGFR therapy, the significance of RAS mutation status as a predictive marker for anti-EGFR therapy, and new agents for salvage therapy (regorafenib and TAS-102 [TFTD]). PMID:26809522

  18. Advances in glucose metabolism research in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Sitian; Fang, Xiao

    2016-01-01

    Cancer cells uptake glucose at a higher rate and produce lactic acid rather than metabolizing pyruvate through the tricarboxylic acid cycle. This adaptive metabolic shift is termed the Warburg effect. Recently progress had been made regarding the mechanistic understanding of glucose metabolism and associated diagnostic and therapeutic methods, which have been investigated in colorectal cancer. The majority of novel mechanisms involve important glucose metabolism associated genes and miRNA regulation. The present review discusses the contribution of these research results to facilitate with the development of novel diagnosis and anticancer treatment options. PMID:27602209

  19. Colorectal cancer tumour markers and biomarkers: Recent therapeutic advances

    PubMed Central

    Lech, Gustaw; Słotwiński, Robert; Słodkowski, Maciej; Krasnodębski, Ireneusz Wojciech

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second most commonly diagnosed cancer among females and third among males worldwide. It also contributes significantly to cancer-related deaths, despite the continuous progress in diagnostic and therapeutic methods. Biomarkers currently play an important role in the detection and treatment of patients with colorectal cancer. Risk stratification for screening might be augmented by finding new biomarkers which alone or as a complement of existing tests might recognize either the predisposition or early stage of the disease. Biomarkers have also the potential to change diagnostic and treatment algorithms by selecting the proper chemotherapeutic drugs across a broad spectrum of patients. There are attempts to personalise chemotherapy based on presence or absence of specific biomarkers. In this review, we update review published last year and describe our understanding of tumour markers and biomarkers role in CRC screening, diagnosis, treatment and follow-up. Goal of future research is to identify those biomarkers that could allow a non-invasive and cost-effective diagnosis, as well as to recognise the best prognostic panel and define the predictive biomarkers for available treatments. PMID:26855534

  20. [Clinical study of Peptide-cocktail vaccination with tegafur-uracil/leucovorin for advanced colorectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Sugiura, Fumiaki; Inoue, Keisuke; Okuno, Kiyotaka; Sukegawa, Yasushi

    2012-11-01

    cDNA microarray technology coupled with laser microdissection has been used to identify human leukocyte antigen(HLA)-A24-restricted epitope peptides as potential targets for cancer vaccination in colorectal cancer patients. These antigenic peptides were derived from 2 different testis cancer antigens, ring finger protein 43(RNF43) and translocase of outer mitochondrial membrane 34(TOMM34). We conducted a clinical trial of vaccines against colorectal cancer specific peptides(RNF43 and TOMM34) with tegafur-uracil/Leucovorin( UFT/LV) for the treatment of advanced or recurrent colorectal cancer. The vaccinations were well tolerated without any adverse events. The highest long-term survival was observed in the group showing cytolytic T-lymphocyte (CTL) responses against both RNF43 and TOMM34, followed by the group showing CTL responses against only RNF43 or only TOMM34. A new study has been planned in order to obtain more immunological responses, and we have started a clinical trial of vaccines against multiple peptides[RNF43, TOMM34, forkhead box protein M1(FOXM1), maternal embryonic leucine zipper kinase(MELK), holliday junction recognition protein(HJURP), vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR)1, and VEGFR2]by using UFT/LV for the treatment of advanced or recurrent colorectal cancer. PMID:23267878

  1. New active drugs for the treatment of advanced colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zaniboni, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Newer active drugs have been recently added to the pharmacological armamentarium for the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer. Aflibercept, a recombinant fusion protein composed of the extracellular domains of human vascular endothelial growth factor receptors (VEGFR) 1 and 2 and the Fc portion of human immunoglobulin G1 (IgG1), is an attractive second-line option in combination with folfiri for patients who have failed folfox +/- bevacizumab. Ramucirumab, a human IgG1 monoclonal antibody that targets VEGFR-2, provided similar results in the same setting. Tas-102, an oral fluoropyrimidine, and regorafenib, a multi-tyrosine kinase inhibitor, are both able to control the disease in a considerable proportion of patients when all other available treatments have failed. These new therapeutic options along with the emerging concept that previous therapies may also be reitroduced or rechallenged after regorafenib and Tas-102 failure are bringing new hope for thousands of patients and their families. PMID:26730280

  2. New active drugs for the treatment of advanced colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Zaniboni, Alberto

    2015-12-27

    Newer active drugs have been recently added to the pharmacological armamentarium for the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer. Aflibercept, a recombinant fusion protein composed of the extracellular domains of human vascular endothelial growth factor receptors (VEGFR) 1 and 2 and the Fc portion of human immunoglobulin G1 (IgG1), is an attractive second-line option in combination with folfiri for patients who have failed folfox +/- bevacizumab. Ramucirumab, a human IgG1 monoclonal antibody that targets VEGFR-2, provided similar results in the same setting. Tas-102, an oral fluoropyrimidine, and regorafenib, a multi-tyrosine kinase inhibitor, are both able to control the disease in a considerable proportion of patients when all other available treatments have failed. These new therapeutic options along with the emerging concept that previous therapies may also be reitroduced or rechallenged after regorafenib and Tas-102 failure are bringing new hope for thousands of patients and their families. PMID:26730280

  3. Adenoma

    Cancer.gov

    Well circumscribed areas consisting of cuboidal to columnar cells lining alveoli. The size is usually less than 5 mm in diameter. These lesions retain preexisting alveolar structure and tend to be multiple in existing mouse models. Absence of pronounced fibrovascular stroma, as well as more "plump" shape of epithelial cells, may be the reason for different appearance of mouse adenomas, as compared to their human counterparts. Differentiation between a small adenoma and focal hyperplasia can be very difficult. At the same time, no absolute criteria exist for distinguishing a large adenoma from a well-differentiated adenocarcinoma. Among features indicating benign character are a small size, and absence of vascular invasion. Well delineated demarcation and absence of lepidic growth are considered by some as indicators of a benign character. Bland character of nuclei is a main feature of human adenomas. By this criterion many mouse adenomas could be assigned to adenocarcinomas. However, unlike in humans, mouse tumors rarely metastasize during the time of their observation.

  4. Evaluation of serum nucleoside diphosphate kinase A for the detection of colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Otero-Estévez, Olalla; De Chiara, Loretta; Barcia-Castro, Leticia; Páez de la Cadena, María; Rodríguez-Berrocal, Francisco Javier; Cubiella, Joaquín; Hernández, Vicent; Martínez-Zorzano, Vicenta Soledad

    2016-01-01

    We previously described the over-expression of nucleoside diphosphate kinase A (NDKA) in tumours and serum from colorectal cancer (CRC) patients, suggesting its use as biomarker. In this study we evaluated the diagnostic accuracy of serum NDKA to detect advanced neoplasia (CRC or advanced adenomas). Furthermore, the performance of NDKA was compared with the faecal immunochemical test (FIT). The study population included a case-control cohort and a screening cohort (511 asymptomatic first-degree relatives of CRC patients that underwent a colonoscopy and a FIT). Serum NDKA was elevated in CRC patients in the case-control cohort (p = 0.002). In the screening cohort, NDKA levels were higher for advanced adenomas (p = 0.010) and advanced neoplasia (p = 0.006) compared to no neoplasia. Moreover, elevated NDKA was associated with severe characteristics of adenomas (≥3 lesions, size ≥ 1 cm or villous component). Setting specificity to 85%, NDKA showed a sensitivity of 30.19% and 29.82% for advanced adenomas and advanced neoplasia, respectively. NDKA combined with FIT (100 ng/mL cut-off) detected advanced adenomas and advanced neoplasia with 45.28% and 49.12% sensitivity, with specificity close to 90%. The combination of serum NDKA and FIT can improve the detection of advanced neoplasia, mainly for lesions located on the proximal colon, in asymptomatic individuals with CRC family-risk. PMID:27222072

  5. Pair-wise comparison analysis of differential expression of mRNAs in early and advanced stage primary colorectal adenocarcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Tze Pheng; Roslani, April Camilla; Lian, Lay Hoong; Chai, Hwa Chia; Lee, Ping Chin; Hilmi, Ida; Goh, Khean Lee; Chua, Kek Heng

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To characterise the mRNA expression patterns of early and advanced stage colorectal adenocarcinomas of Malaysian patients. Design Comparative expression analysis. Setting and participants We performed a combination of annealing control primer (ACP)-based PCR and reverse transcription-quantitative real-time PCR for the identification of differentially expressed genes (DEGs) associated with early and advanced stage primary colorectal tumours. We recruited four paired samples from patients with colorectal cancer (CRC) of Dukes’ A and B for the preliminary differential expression study, and a total of 27 paired samples, ranging from CRC stages I to IV, for subsequent confirmatory test. The tumouric samples were obtained from the patients with CRC undergoing curative surgical resection without preoperative chemoradiotherapy. The recruited patients with CRC were newly diagnosed with CRC, and were not associated with any hereditary syndromes, previously diagnosed cancer or positive family history of CRC. The paired non-cancerous tissue specimens were excised from macroscopically normal colonic mucosa distally located from the colorectal tumours. Primary and secondary outcome measures The differential mRNA expression patterns of early and advanced stage colorectal adenocarcinomas compared with macroscopically normal colonic mucosa were characterised by ACP-based PCR and reverse transcription-quantitative real-time PCR. Results The RPL35, RPS23 and TIMP1 genes were found to be overexpressed in both early and advanced stage colorectal adenocarcinomas (p<0.05). However, the ARPC2 gene was significantly underexpressed in early colorectal adenocarcinomas, while the advanced stage primary colorectal tumours exhibited an additional overexpression of the C6orf173 gene (p<0.05). Conclusions We characterised two distinctive gene expression patterns to aid in the stratification of primary colorectal neoplasms among Malaysian patients with CRC. Further work can be done to

  6. GNAS gene mutation may be present only transiently during colorectal tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Zauber, Peter; Marotta, Stephen P; Sabbath-Solitare, Marlene

    2016-01-01

    Mutations of the gene GNAS have been shown to activate the adenylate cyclase gene and lead to constitutive cAMP signaling. Several preliminary reports have suggested a role for GNAS gene mutations during colorectal carcinogenesis, particularly mucinous carcinomas. The aim of this study was to clarify the incidence of GNAS mutations in adenomas (tubular, tubulovillous, and villous), carcinomas with residual adenoma, and carcinomas, and to relate these findings to mutations of the KRAS gene and to the mucinous status of the tumors. We used standard PCR techniques and direct gene sequencing to evaluate tumors for gene mutations. No GNAS mutations were identified in 25 tubular adenomas, but were present in 6.4% of tubulovillous adenomas and 11.2% of villous adenomas. A GNAS mutation was found in 9.7% of the benign portion of carcinoma with residual adenoma, but in none of 86 carcinomas. A similar trend was seen for KRAS mutation across the five groups of tumors. GNAS mutations may function as an important driver mutation during certain phases of colorectal carcinogenesis, but may then be lost once the biological advantage gained by the mutated gene is no longer necessary to sustain or advance tumor development. PMID:27186325

  7. Interleukin-6 as a Potential Indicator for Prevention of High Risk Adenoma Recurrence by Dietary Flavonols in the Polyp Prevention Trial

    PubMed Central

    Bobe, Gerd; Albert, Paul S.; Sansbury, Leah B.; Lanza, Elaine; Schatzkin, Arthur; Colburn, Nancy H.; Cross, Amanda J.

    2010-01-01

    Serum interleukin (IL)-6, a pro-inflammatory cytokine, is considered an indicator of inflammation and may be an indicator of colorectal carcinogenesis given that inflammation can promote carcinogenesis. Flavonols, which can be found in fruits and vegetables, may inhibit colorectal carcinogenesis partly by inhibiting inflammation. We estimated odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) to determine whether serum IL-6 was associated with colorectal adenoma recurrence and flavonol intake and, thus may serve as a risk indicator and as a response indicator to dietary flavonols. Serum IL-6 concentrations at baseline, year 1 and 3 were measured in 872 participants from the intervention arm of the Polyp Prevention Trial, a 4-year trial that examined the effectiveness of a low-fat, high-fiber, high-fruit and vegetable diet on adenoma recurrence. Intake of flavonols, especially of isorhamnetin, kaempferol, and quercetin, was inversely associated with serum IL-6 concentrations (highest vs. lowest flavonol intake quartile, 1.80 vs. 2.20 pg/mL) and high risk (OR = 0.51, 95% CI: 0.26–0.98) and advanced adenoma recurrence (OR = 0.17, 95% CI: 0.06–0.50). A decrease in IL-6 concentration during the trial was inversely associated with high risk (OR = 0.44, 95% CI: 0.23–0.84) and advanced adenoma recurrence (OR = 0.47, 95% CI: 0.19–1.18). Individuals with above median flavonol intake and equal or below median IL-6 change after baseline had the lowest risk of recurrence of high risk and advanced adenoma. Our results suggest that serum IL-6 may serve as a risk indicator and as a response indicator to dietary flavonols for colorectal cancer prevention. PMID:20484173

  8. Systematic genomic identification of colorectal cancer genes delineating advanced from early clinical stage and metastasis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Colorectal cancer is the third leading cause of cancer deaths in the United States. The initial assessment of colorectal cancer involves clinical staging that takes into account the extent of primary tumor invasion, determining the number of lymph nodes with metastatic cancer and the identification of metastatic sites in other organs. Advanced clinical stage indicates metastatic cancer, either in regional lymph nodes or in distant organs. While the genomic and genetic basis of colorectal cancer has been elucidated to some degree, less is known about the identity of specific cancer genes that are associated with advanced clinical stage and metastasis. Methods We compiled multiple genomic data types (mutations, copy number alterations, gene expression and methylation status) as well as clinical meta-data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). We used an elastic-net regularized regression method on the combined genomic data to identify genetic aberrations and their associated cancer genes that are indicators of clinical stage. We ranked candidate genes by their regression coefficient and level of support from multiple assay modalities. Results A fit of the elastic-net regularized regression to 197 samples and integrated analysis of four genomic platforms identified the set of top gene predictors of advanced clinical stage, including: WRN, SYK, DDX5 and ADRA2C. These genetic features were identified robustly in bootstrap resampling analysis. Conclusions We conducted an analysis integrating multiple genomic features including mutations, copy number alterations, gene expression and methylation. This integrated approach in which one considers all of these genomic features performs better than any individual genomic assay. We identified multiple genes that robustly delineate advanced clinical stage, suggesting their possible role in colorectal cancer metastatic progression. PMID:24308539

  9. Curative effect of the recent photofrin photodynamic adjuvant treatment on young patients with advanced colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    SUN, BO; LI, WEI; LIU, NING

    2016-01-01

    Advanced colorectal cancer has a high mortality rate and conventional treatments have poor therapeutic effects. The aim of the present study was to analyze the recent curative effect and adverse reaction of photofrin photodynamic adjuvant treatment on young patients with advanced colorectal cancer. A total of 23 patients with advanced colorectal cancer who had accepted semiconductor laser photodynamic adjuvant treatment were selected as the observation group. In addition, 30 patients who had accepted concurrent radiotherapy and chemotherapy during the same period served as the control group. The observation group received photofrin (2 mg/kg) intravenously in 100 ml of 5% glucose, followed by the introduction of the endoscopic optical fiber to deliver laser radiation with an intensity of 630 nm wavelength pulse power. After 2 days, necrotic tissues were removed and irradiation of the original or new tumor lesions was performed and necrotic tissues were removed. The total effective rate and survival time was higher and the length of hospital stay was shorter in the observation group in comparison with the control group. The differences were statistically significant (P<0.05). The number of patients in the control and observation groups with symptoms of hematochezia, change in bowel habit, intestinal stimulation and incomplete intestinal obstruction were reduced. Additionally, the reduced ratio of the observation group was significantly increased in comparison with the control group (P<0.05). The adverse reaction rate of the observation group was lower than that of the control group and this difference was also statistically significant (P<0.05). In conclusion, use of photodynamic treatment for young patients with advanced colorectal cancer can effectively improve the clinical symptoms and reduce complications. PMID:26998124

  10. [Advances of minimally invasive technique in colorectal cancer surgery].

    PubMed

    Wang, Xishan

    2016-06-01

    Colorectal surgery is rapidly developing in the direction of minimally invasive surgery and functional surgery. New technology and ideas are constantly emerging recently. Laparoscopic colon surgery has already been recommended by NCCN guideline. However, laparoscopic rectal cancer surgery still needs to wait for survival and recurrence rates of long-term follow-up data for verification. In recent years, with the rapid progression of imaging equipment of laparoscope, the new 3D laparoscopic system will process image more quickly, and surgeons can get space depth feeling like open surgery only with a pair of glasses. The new 3D laparoscopic system has many advantages, and can also shorten the learning curve of the beginners. But it does not mean the traditional 2D laparoscopy has been out of date. It is admitted that dialectical view on the development of the technology and equipment is still required. New things also need the accumulation of time and validation, and the deficiency of imaging system remains to be improved. At present, the robotic colorectal cancer surgery is still in its infancy, and its application is relatively common in colon surgery. In respect of robotic rectal cancer surgery, it still lacks of long-term follow-up survival results for verification. To reduce physical and psychological trauma for patients is the goal of the surgeon. Surgeons are experiencing the change from minimally invasion to non-invasion. Natural orifice translumenal endoscopic surgery (NOTES) and natural orifice specimen extraction surgery (NOSES) arise at the historic moment. Among them, transanal total mesorectal excision (taTME) incorporates the concepts of NOTES, anal minimally invasive surgery and total mesorectum excision, guaranteeing the radical cure and no scar of abdomen, but it still needs multicenter, large sample and long-term follow-up clinical data to prove its safety, efficacy and indication. Therefore, surgical procedure is transforming from conventional

  11. Korean Guidelines for Colorectal Cancer Screening and Polyp Detection

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Bo-In; Hong, Sung Pil; Kim, Seong-Eun; Kim, Se Hyung; Hong, Sung Noh; Yang, Dong-Hoon; Shin, Sung Jae; Lee, Suck-Ho; Park, Dong Il; Kim, Young-Ho; Kim, Hyun Jung; Yang, Suk-Kyun; Kim, Hyo Jong; Jeon, Hae Jeong

    2012-01-01

    Now colorectal cancer is the second most common cancer in males and the fourth most common cancer in females in Korea. Since most of colorectal cancers occur after the prolonged transformation of adenomas into carcinomas, early detection and removal of colorectal adenomas are one of the most effective methods to prevent colorectal cancer. Considering the increasing incidence of colorectal cancer and polyps in Korea, it is very important to establish Korean guideline for colorectal cancer screening and polyp detection. The guideline was developed by the Korean Multi-Society Take Force and we tried to establish the guideline by evidence-based methods. Parts of the statements were draw by systematic reviews and meta-analyses. Herein we discussed epidemiology of colorectal cancers and adenomas in Korea and optimal methods for screening of colorectal cancer and detection of adenomas including fecal occult blood tests, radiologic tests, and endoscopic examinations. PMID:22741131

  12. Germline variation in NCF4, an innate immunity gene, is associated with an increased risk of colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Bríd M.; Zanetti, Krista A.; Robles, Ana I.; Schetter, Aaron J.; Goodman, Julie; Hayes, Richard B.; Huang, Wen-Yi; Gunter, Marc J.; Yeager, Meredith; Burdette, Laurie; Berndt, Sonja I.; Harris, Curtis C.

    2013-01-01

    Chronic inflammation has been implicated in the etiology of colorectal adenoma and cancer; however, few key inflammatory genes mediating this relationship have been identified. In this study, we investigated the association of germline variation in innate immunity genes in relation to the risk of colorectal neoplasia. Our study was based on the analysis of samples collected from the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal and Ovarian (PLCO) Cancer Screening Trial. We investigated the association between 196 tag single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 20 key innate immunity genes with risk of advanced colorectal adenoma and cancer in 719 adenoma cases, 481 cancer cases and 719 controls. Logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals. After Bonferroni correction, the AG/GG genotype of rs5995355, which is upstream of NCF4, was associated with an increased risk of colorectal cancer (odds ratio [OR] 2.43, 95% confidence interval [95% CI] 1.73 – 3.39; P<0.0001). NCF4 is part of the NAPDH complex, a key factor in biochemical pathways and the innate immune response. While not definitive, our analyses suggest that the variant allele does not affect expression of NCF4, but rather modulates activity of the NADPH complex. Additional studies on the functional consequences of rs5995355 in NCF4 may help to clarify the mechanistic link between inflammation and colorectal cancer. PMID:23982929

  13. Familial pituitary adenomas.

    PubMed

    Vandeva, S; Vasilev, V; Vroonen, L; Naves, L; Jaffrain-Rea, M-L; Daly, A F; Zacharieva, S; Beckers, A

    2010-12-01

    Pituitary adenomas are benign intracranial neoplasms that present a major clinical concern because of hormonal overproduction or compression symptoms of adjacent structures. Most arise in a sporadic setting with a small percentage developing as a part of familial syndromes such as multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1), Carney complex (CNC), and the recently described familial isolated pituitary adenomas (FIPA) and MEN-4. While the genetic alterations responsible for the formation of sporadic adenomas remain largely unknown, considerable advances have been made in defining culprit genes in these familial syndromes. Mutations in MEN1 and PRKAR1A genes are found in the majority of MEN1 and CNC patients, respectively. About 15% of FIPA kindreds present with mutations of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor-interacting protein (AIP) gene. Mutations in the CDKN1B gene, encoding p27(Kip)¹ were identified in MEN4 cases. Familial tumours appear to differ from their sporadic counterparts not only in genetic basis but also in clinical characteristics. Evidence suggests that, especially in MEN1 and FIPA, they are more aggressive and affect patients at younger age, therefore justifying the importance of early diagnosis. In this review, we summarize the genetic and clinical characteristics of these familial pituitary adenomas. PMID:20961530

  14. The analysis of a large Danish family supports the presence of a susceptibility locus for adenoma and colorectal cancer on chromosome 11q24.

    PubMed

    Rudkjøbing, Laura Aviaja; Eiberg, Hans; Mikkelsen, Hanne Birte; Binderup, Marie Louise Mølgaard; Bisgaard, Marie Luise

    2015-09-01

    Hereditary colorectal cancer accounts for approximately 30% of all colorectal cancers, but currently only 5% of these families can be explained by highly penetrant, inherited mutations. In the remaining 25% it is not possible to perform a gene test to identify the family members who would benefit from prophylactic screening. Consequently, all family members are asked to follow a screening program. The purpose of this study was to localize a new gene which causes colorectal cancer. We performed a linkage analysis using data from a SNP6.0 chip in one large family with 12 affected family members. We extended the linkage analysis with microsatellites (STS) and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP's) and looked for the loss of heterozygosity in tumour tissue. Furthermore, we performed the exome sequencing of one family member and we sequenced candidate genes by use of direct sequencing. Major rearrangements were excluded after karyotyping. The linkage analysis with SNP6 data revealed three candidate areas, on chromosome 2, 6 and 11 respectively, with a LOD score close to two and no negative LOD scores. After extended linkage analysis, the area on chromosome 6 was excluded, leaving areas on chromosome 2 and chromosome 11 with the highest possible LOD scores of 2.6. Two other studies have identified 11q24 as a candidate area for colorectal cancer susceptibility and this area is supported by our results. PMID:25724759

  15. [Clinical trial of a seven-peptide vaccine and tegafur-uracil/leucovorin as combination therapy for advanced colorectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Inoue, Keisuke; Sugiura, Fumiaki; Kogita, Akihiro; Yoshioka, Yasumasa; Sukegawa, Yasushi; Hida, Jinichi; Okuno, Kiyotaka

    2014-10-01

    We conducted a clinical trial of a seven-peptide vaccine in combination with tegafur-uracil/Leucovorin for advanced colorectal cancer. These antigenic peptides were derived from 5 proteins identified as cancer-testis antigens(ring finger protein 43 [RNF43], translocase of outer mitochondrial membrane 34[TOMM34], maternal embryonic leucine zipper kinase[MELK], forkhead box M1[FOXM1], and holliday junction recognition protein[HJURP])and 2 vascular endothelial growth factor receptors(VEGFR1 and VEGFR2). Thirty patients with advanced colorectal cancer were enrolled. We found that 25 patients had Grade 1 injection-site redness/induration and 1 patient had Grade 3 anaphylaxis. Tumor imaging revealed that 3 patients had a partial response (PR), 15 had stable disease(SD)and 12 had progressive disease(PD). This trial showed that treatment with the seven-peptide vaccine and UFT/LV was well tolerated and feasible for advanced colorectal cancer. PMID:25335716

  16. Initial analyses of colon cancer-specific antigen (CCSA)-3 and CCSA-4 as colorectal cancer-associated serum markers.

    PubMed

    Leman, Eddy S; Schoen, Robert E; Weissfeld, Joel L; Cannon, Grant W; Sokoll, Lori J; Chan, Daniel W; Getzenberg, Robert H

    2007-06-15

    Colon cancer-specific antigen (CCSA)-3 and CCSA-4 are novel colon cancer markers identified by focused proteomic analysis of nuclear structural proteins. The goal of these studies was to evaluate serum-based CCSA-3 and CCSA-4 in the detection of individuals with preneoplastic and neoplastic lesions using ELISAs. Serum samples from 107 subjects undergoing colonoscopy, 28 subjects with colorectal cancer, and 125 subjects with benign disease or other types of cancer were evaluated. Individuals who underwent colonoscopy were classified into mutually exclusive categories, including normal colon, hyperplastic polyp, nonadvanced adenoma, and advanced adenoma. Sensitivity and specificity for both CCSA-3 and CCSA-4 were evaluated using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves. At a cutoff of 2 microg/mL for CCSA-3 and 0.3 microg/mL for CCSA-4, each marker detected all 28 colorectal cancers, for a sensitivity of 100% (lower 95% confidence bound, 89.8%). The sensitivity for detection of the combined end point of colorectal cancer and advanced adenoma for CCSA-3 was 89.1% [95% confidence interval (95% CI), 76.4-96.4%] and for CCSA-4 was 84.8% (95% CI, 71.1-93.7%) and 91.3% (95% CI, 79.2-97.6%) for either marker positive. The specificity in individuals with normal, hyperplastic polyps, or nonadvanced adenomas was 82.0% (95% CI, 72.4-89.4%) and 91.0% (95% CI, 83.0-96.0%) for CCSA-3 and CCSA-4, respectively. ROC curves for CCSA-3 and CCSA-4 reveal an area under the curve of 0.94 (95% CI, 0.90-0.98%). In these initial analyses, CCSA-3 and CCSA-4 show promise as potential serum markers for detection of colorectal cancer and advanced adenomas. PMID:17575123

  17. Which strategy after first-line therapy in advanced colorectal cancer?

    PubMed Central

    Andrea, Coinu; Fausto, Petrelli; Francesca, Borgonovo Karen; Mary, Cabiddu; Mara, Ghilardi; Veronica, Lonati; Sandro, Barni

    2014-01-01

    Second-line therapy for advanced colorectal cancer is an integral part of the treatment strategy that needs to be set from the beginning for each patient, bearing in mind the expected toxicities of chosen treatments, the patient's clinical condition, comorbidities, preferences, the aims of the treatment and the molecular status. Furthermore, the distinction between lines of therapy is no longer absolute. The perspective of “continuum of care” includes switching chemotherapy prior to disease progression, maintenance therapy, drug "holidays" if needed, surgical resection of metastases in selected patients, and seems to allow a tailored treatment, in which patients are more likely to benefit from exposure to all active agents, which is known to correlate with overall survival. The scenario of second-line treatment has changed dramatically over the years and could currently benefit from several options including chemotherapy with a single agent or in combination and the addition of molecular-targeted agents developed in the last decade, such as epidermal growth factor receptor antibodies (cetuximab, panitumumab) and vascular endothelial growth factor-targeting agents (bevacizumab, aflibercept), with the possibility of bevacizumab use even beyond first progression. The purpose of this review is to summarize the most important scientific data supporting the use of chemotherapy and the new biologic agents in the second-line setting in advanced colorectal cancer. PMID:25083064

  18. Treatment-related gastrointestinal toxicities and advanced colorectal or pancreatic cancer: A critical update

    PubMed Central

    Aprile, Giuseppe; Rihawi, Karim; De Carlo, Elisa; Sonis, Stephen T

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal toxicities (GIT), including oral mucositis, nausea and vomiting, and diarrhea, are common side effects of chemotherapy and targeted agents in patients with advanced colorectal cancer and pancreatic cancer. Being often underreported, it is still difficult to precisely establish their burden in terms of both patient’s quality of life and cancer care costs. Moreover, with the use of more intensive upfront combination regimens, the frequency of these toxicities is rapidly growing with a potential negative effect also on patient’s outcome, as a result of dose reductions, delays or even discontinuation of active treatments. Thus, identifying patients at higher risk of developing GIT as well as an optimal management are paramount in order to improve patient’s compliance and outcome. After the description of the main treatment-induced GIT, we discuss the current knowledge on the pathophysiology of these side effects and comment the scales commonly used to assess and grade them. We then provide a critical update on GIT incidence based on the results of key randomized trials conducted in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer and advanced pancreatic cancer. PMID:26557003

  19. Colonoscopy detects significantly more flat adenomas than 3-tesla magnetic resonance colonography: a pilot trial

    PubMed Central

    Hüneburg, Robert; Kukuk, Guido; Nattermann, Jacob; Endler, Christoph; Penner, Arndt-Hendrik; Wolter, Karsten; Schild, Hans; Strassburg, Christian; Sauerbruch, Tilman; Schmitz, Volker; Willinek, Winfried

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most common cancers worldwide, and several efforts have been made to reduce its occurrence or severity. Although colonoscopy is considered the gold standard in CRC prevention, it has its disadvantages: missed lesions, bleeding, and perforation. Furthermore, a high number of patients undergo this procedure even though no polyps are detected. Therefore, an initial screening examination may be warranted. Our aim was to compare the adenoma detection rate of magnetic resonance colonography (MRC) with that of optical colonoscopy. Patients and methods: A total of 25 patients with an intermediate risk for CRC (17 men, 8 women; mean age 57.6, standard deviation 11) underwent MRC with a 3.0-tesla magnet, followed by colonoscopy. The endoscopist was initially blinded to the results of MRC and unblinded immediately after examining the distal rectum. Following endoscopic excision, the size, anatomical localization, and appearance of all polyps were described according to the Paris classification. Results: A total of 93 lesions were detected during colonoscopy. These included a malignant infiltration of the transverse colon due to gastric cancer in 1 patient, 28 adenomas in 10 patients, 19 hyperplastic polyps in 9 patients, and 45 non-neoplastic lesions. In 5 patients, no lesion was detected. MRC detected significantly fewer lesions: 1 adenoma (P = 0.001) and 1 hyperplastic polyp (P = 0.004). The malignant infiltration was seen with both modalities. Of the 28 adenomas, 23 (82 %) were 5 mm or smaller; only 4 adenomas 10 mm or larger (14 %) were detected. Conclusion: MRC does not detect adenomas sufficiently independently of the location of the lesion. Even advanced lesions were missed. Therefore, colonoscopy should still be considered the current gold standard, even for diagnostic purposes. PMID:26878043

  20. Tests to Detect Colorectal Cancer and Polyps

    MedlinePlus

    ... be acceptable screening tests for colorectal cancer: High-sensitivity fecal occult blood tests (FOBT). Both polyps and ... higher than that of gFOBT or FIT. Test sensitivity for adenomas is low. False-positive test results ...

  1. KRAS Testing for Anti-EGFR Therapy in Advanced Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Executive Summary In February 2010, the Medical Advisory Secretariat (MAS) began work on evidence-based reviews of the literature surrounding three pharmacogenomic tests. This project came about when Cancer Care Ontario (CCO) asked MAS to provide evidence-based analyses on the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of three oncology pharmacogenomic tests currently in use in Ontario. Evidence-based analyses have been prepared for each of these technologies. These have been completed in conjunction with internal and external stakeholders, including a Provincial Expert Panel on Pharmacogenomics (PEPP). Within the PEPP, subgroup committees were developed for each disease area. For each technology, an economic analysis was also completed by the Toronto Health Economics and Technology Assessment Collaborative (THETA) and is summarized within the reports. The following reports can be publicly accessed at the MAS website at: www.health.gov.on.ca/mas or at www.health.gov.on.ca/english/providers/program/mas/mas_about.html Gene Expression Profiling for Guiding Adjuvant Chemotherapy Decisions in Women with Early Breast Cancer: An Evidence-Based and Economic Analysis Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Mutation (EGFR) Testing for Prediction of Response to EGFR-Targeting Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitor (TKI) Drugs in Patients with Advanced Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: an Evidence-Based and Economic Analysis K-RAS testing in Treatment Decisions for Advanced Colorectal Cancer: an Evidence-Based and Economic Analysis. Objective The objective of this systematic review is to determine the predictive value of KRAS testing in the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) with two anti-EGFR agents, cetuximab and panitumumab. Economic analyses are also being conducted to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of KRAS testing. Clinical Need: Condition and Target Population Metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) is usually defined as stage IV disease according to the American Joint Committee on Cancer

  2. Excessive collagen turnover products are released during colorectal cancer progression and elevated in serum from metastatic colorectal cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Kehlet, S N; Sanz-Pamplona, R; Brix, S; Leeming, D J; Karsdal, M A; Moreno, V

    2016-01-01

    During cancer progression, the homeostasis of the extracellular matrix becomes imbalanced with an excessive collagen remodeling by matrix metalloproteinases. As a consequence, small protein fragments of degraded collagens are released into the circulation. We have investigated the potential of protein fragments of collagen type I, III and IV as novel biomarkers for colorectal cancer. Specific fragments of degraded type I, III and IV collagen (C1M, C3M, C4M) and type III collagen formation (Pro-C3) were assessed in serum from colorectal cancer patients, subjects with adenomas and matched healthy controls using well-characterized and validated ELISAs. Serum levels of the biomarkers were significantly elevated in colorectal cancer patients compared to subjects with adenomas (C1M, Pro-C3, C3M) and controls (C1M, Pro-C3). When patients were stratified according to their tumour stage, all four biomarkers were able to differentiate stage IV metastatic patients from all other stages. Combination of all markers with age and gender in a logistic regression model discriminated between metastatic and non-metastatic patients with an AUROC of 0.80. The data suggest that the levels of these collagen remodeling biomarkers may be a measure of tumour activity and invasiveness and may provide new clinical tools for monitoring of patients with advanced stage colorectal cancer. PMID:27465284

  3. Excessive collagen turnover products are released during colorectal cancer progression and elevated in serum from metastatic colorectal cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Kehlet, S. N.; Sanz-Pamplona, R.; Brix, S.; Leeming, D. J.; Karsdal, M. A.; Moreno, V.

    2016-01-01

    During cancer progression, the homeostasis of the extracellular matrix becomes imbalanced with an excessive collagen remodeling by matrix metalloproteinases. As a consequence, small protein fragments of degraded collagens are released into the circulation. We have investigated the potential of protein fragments of collagen type I, III and IV as novel biomarkers for colorectal cancer. Specific fragments of degraded type I, III and IV collagen (C1M, C3M, C4M) and type III collagen formation (Pro-C3) were assessed in serum from colorectal cancer patients, subjects with adenomas and matched healthy controls using well-characterized and validated ELISAs. Serum levels of the biomarkers were significantly elevated in colorectal cancer patients compared to subjects with adenomas (C1M, Pro-C3, C3M) and controls (C1M, Pro-C3). When patients were stratified according to their tumour stage, all four biomarkers were able to differentiate stage IV metastatic patients from all other stages. Combination of all markers with age and gender in a logistic regression model discriminated between metastatic and non-metastatic patients with an AUROC of 0.80. The data suggest that the levels of these collagen remodeling biomarkers may be a measure of tumour activity and invasiveness and may provide new clinical tools for monitoring of patients with advanced stage colorectal cancer. PMID:27465284

  4. Calcium Intake and Ion Transporter Genetic Polymorphisms Interact in Human Colorectal Neoplasia Risk in a 2-Phase Study123

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xiangzhu; Liang, Ji; Shrubsole, Martha J.; Ness, Reid M.; Cai, Qiuyin; Long, Jirong; Chen, Zhi; Li, Guoliang; Wiese, Dawn; Zhang, Bing; Smalley, Walter E.; Edwards, Todd L.; Giovannucci, Edward; Zheng, Wei; Dai, Qi

    2014-01-01

    Background: The kidney-specific sodium-potassium-chloride cotransporter (NKCC2) protein encoded by solute carrier family 12 member 1 (SLC12A1) is the direct downstream effector of the inward-rectifier potassium channel (ROMK) encoded by potassium inwardly-rectifying channel, subfamily J, member 1 (KCNJ1), both of which are critical for calcium reabsorption in the kidney. Objective: We hypothesized that polymorphisms in KCNJ1, SLC12A1, and 7 other genes may modify the association between calcium intake and colorectal neoplasia risk. Methods: We conducted a 2-phase study in 1336 cases and 2891 controls from the Tennessee Colorectal Polyp Study. Results: In phase I, we identified 5 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that significantly interacted with calcium intake in adenoma risk. In phase II, rs2855798 in KCNJ1 was replicated. In combined analysis of phases I and II, the P values for interactions between calcium intake and rs2855798 were 1 × 10−4 for all adenoma and 5 × 10−3 for multiple/advanced adenoma. The highest calcium intake was not associated with risk among those with no variant allele but was significantly associated with a 41% reduced adenoma risk among those who carried at least 1 variant allele in KCNJ1. The corresponding reduction in risk of multiple or advanced adenomas was 52% among those with at least 1 variant allele. The P values for interactions between calcium intake and combined SNPs from the KCNJ1 and SLC12A1 genes were 7.5 × 10−5 for adenoma and 9.9 × 10−5 for multiple/advanced adenoma. The highest calcium intake was not associated with risk among those with nonvariant alleles in 2 genes but was significantly associated with a 34% reduced adenoma risk among those who carried a variant allele in 1 of the genes. The corresponding reduction in risk of multiple or advanced adenomas was 64% among those with variant alleles in both genes. Conclusion: These findings, if confirmed, will be critical for the development of personalized

  5. MicroRNAs in colorectal cancer as markers and targets: Recent advances

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Jing-Jia; Cao, Jiang

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNAs are evolutionarily conserved small non-coding RNA molecules encoded by eukaryotic genomic DNA, and function in post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression via base-pairing with complementary sequences in target mRNAs, resulting in translational repression or degradation of target mRNAs. They represent one of the major types of epigenetic modification and play important roles in all aspects of cellular activities. Altered expression of microRNAs has been found in various human diseases including cancer. Many efforts have been made to discover the characteristic microRNA expression profiles, to understand the roles of aberrantly expressed microRNAs and underlying mechanisms in different cancers. With the application of DNA microarray, real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction and other molecular biology techniques, increasing evidence has been accumulated which reveal that aberrant microRNAs can be detected not only intracellularly within the cancer cells, but also extracellularly in plasma of patients, postulating the potential of aberrant microRNAs as promising diagnostic/prognostic markers and attracting therapeutic targets. This review is intended to provide the most recent advances in microRNA studies in one of the most common cancers, colorectal cancer, especially the identification of those specifically altered microRNAs in colorectal cancer, validation for their relevance to clinical pathological parameters of patients, functional analyses and potential applications of these microRNAs. PMID:24764666

  6. Recent patents and advances in genomic biomarker discovery for colorectal cancers.

    PubMed

    Quyun, Chen; Ye, Zhiyun; Lin, Sheng-Cai; Lin, Biaoyang

    2010-06-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cancer in the world. Early diagnosis of colorectal cancer is the key to reducing the death rate of CRC patients. Predicting the response to current therapeutic modalities of CRC will also have a great impact on patient care. This review summarizes recent advances and patents in biomarker discovery in CRC under five major categories; including genomic changes, expression changes, mutations, epigenetic changes and microRNAs. The interesting patents include: 1) a patent for a method to differentiate normal exfoliated cells from cancer cells based on whether they were subjected to apoptosis and DNA degradation; 2) A model (PM-33 multiple molecular marker model) based on expression changes of up-regulation of the MDM2, DUSP6, and NFl genes down-regulation of the RNF4, MMD and EIF2S3 genes, which achieved an 88% sensitivity, and an 82% specificity for CRC diagnosis; 3) gene mutations in PTEN, KRAS, PIK3CA for predicting the response to anti-EGFR therapies, a common drug used for CRC treatment; 4) patents on epigenetic changes of ITGA4, SEPT9, ALX4, TFAP2E FOXL2, SARM1, ID4 etc. and many key miRNAs. Finally, future directions in the fields were commented on or suggested, including the combination of multiple categories of biomarkers and pathway central or network-based biomarker panels. PMID:20426761

  7. Bevacizumab: a safe and effective treatment in a patient with advanced colorectal cancer and repeated removal of metastases.

    PubMed

    Castro-Carpeño, Javier de; Moyano, María Sereno; Sáenz, Enrique Casado; Belda-Iniesta, Cristóbal; Batlle, Jaime Feliu; Barón, Manuel González

    2009-04-01

    Bevacizumab has been shown to be effective combined with chemotherapy for first-line treatment of advanced colorectal cancer, but little information is available about its efficacy and safety in patients who may be candidates for surgery at any time during the disease. The case history of a female patient with colorectal cancer, undergoing surgery for liver metastases and bilateral surgery for lung metastases at different time-points during her disease, is reported. Perioperative bevacizumab administration caused no complications either associated with surgery, in the early postoperative period, or in the subsequent months. PMID:19352110

  8. Predictive cytogenetic biomarkers for colorectal neoplasia in medium risk patients

    PubMed Central

    Ionescu, EM; Nicolaie, T; Ionescu, MA; Becheanu, G; Andrei, F; Diculescu, M; Ciocirlan, M

    2015-01-01

    Rationale: DNA damage and chromosomal alterations in peripheral lymphocytes parallels DNA mutations in tumor tissues. Objective: The aim of our study was to predict the presence of neoplastic colorectal lesions by specific biomarkers in “medium risk” individuals (age 50 to 75, with no personal or family of any colorectal neoplasia). Methods and Results: We designed a prospective cohort observational study including patients undergoing diagnostic or opportunistic screening colonoscopy. Specific biomarkers were analyzed for each patient in peripheral lymphocytes - presence of micronuclei (MN), nucleoplasmic bridges (NPB) and the Nuclear Division Index (NDI) by the cytokinesis-blocked micronucleus assay (CBMN). Of 98 patients included, 57 were “medium risk” individuals. MN frequency and NPB presence were not significantly different in patients with neoplastic lesions compared to controls. In “medium risk” individuals, mean NDI was significantly lower for patients with any neoplastic lesions (adenomas and adenocarcinomas, AUROC 0.668, p 00.5), for patients with advanced neoplasia (advanced adenoma and adenocarcinoma, AUROC 0.636 p 0.029) as well as for patients with adenocarcinoma (AUROC 0.650, p 0.048), for each comparison with the rest of the population. For a cut-off of 1.8, in “medium risk” individuals, an NDI inferior to that value may predict any neoplastic lesion with a sensitivity of 97.7%, an advanced neoplastic lesion with a sensitivity of 97% and adenocarcinoma with a sensitivity of 94.4%. Discussion: NDI score may have a role as a colorectal cancer-screening test in “medium risk” individuals. Abbreviations: DNA = deoxyribonucleic acid; CRC = colorectal cancer; EU = European Union; WHO = World Health Organization; FOBT = fecal occult blood test; CBMN = cytokinesis-blocked micronucleus assay; MN = micronuclei; NPB = nucleoplasmic bridges; NDI = Nuclear Division Index; FAP = familial adenomatous polyposis; HNPCC = hereditary non

  9. Molecular testing to optimize therapeutic decision making in advanced colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Edward J.

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a leading cause of cancer death in the United States. In recent years, therapeutic advances have prolonged the survival of patients with advanced disease. Along with the addition of new treatments, an increasing body of literature explores the potential benefit of using molecular testing to define tumor, circulating, or host biomarkers of benefit to specific treatment strategies. At present, testing for specific mutations in exons 2, 3, and 4 of KRAS and NRAS has become accepted practice to select patients for treatment with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-targeted agents. Additionally, testing for the BRAF V600E mutation is used to refine decisions based on patient prognosis. The presence of the uridine diphosphate glucuronosyltransferase 1A1 (UGT1A1) *28 polymorphism is associated with toxicity from irinotecan, although it has not been universally applied. Nonetheless, molecular markers to predict response and toxicity of cytotoxic therapy are evolving. While the development of selection biomarkers for anti-angiogenic treatments has not proved fruitful to date, improved development strategies and novel targeted agents are anticipated to revolutionize the approach to treatment of advanced CRC in the near future. This review summarizes currently available data to select treatment strategies in patients with advanced CRC. PMID:27034809

  10. Molecular testing to optimize therapeutic decision making in advanced colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Semrad, Thomas J; Kim, Edward J

    2016-04-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a leading cause of cancer death in the United States. In recent years, therapeutic advances have prolonged the survival of patients with advanced disease. Along with the addition of new treatments, an increasing body of literature explores the potential benefit of using molecular testing to define tumor, circulating, or host biomarkers of benefit to specific treatment strategies. At present, testing for specific mutations in exons 2, 3, and 4 of KRAS and NRAS has become accepted practice to select patients for treatment with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-targeted agents. Additionally, testing for the BRAF V600E mutation is used to refine decisions based on patient prognosis. The presence of the uridine diphosphate glucuronosyltransferase 1A1 (UGT1A1) *28 polymorphism is associated with toxicity from irinotecan, although it has not been universally applied. Nonetheless, molecular markers to predict response and toxicity of cytotoxic therapy are evolving. While the development of selection biomarkers for anti-angiogenic treatments has not proved fruitful to date, improved development strategies and novel targeted agents are anticipated to revolutionize the approach to treatment of advanced CRC in the near future. This review summarizes currently available data to select treatment strategies in patients with advanced CRC. PMID:27034809

  11. The comparative cost-effectiveness of colorectal cancer screening using faecal immunochemical test vs. colonoscopy.

    PubMed

    Wong, Martin C S; Ching, Jessica Y L; Chan, Victor C W; Sung, Joseph J Y

    2015-01-01

    Faecal immunochemical tests (FITs) and colonoscopy are two common screening tools for colorectal cancer(CRC). Most cost-effectiveness studies focused on survival as the outcome, and were based on modeling techniques instead of real world observational data. This study evaluated the cost-effectiveness of these two tests to detect colorectal neoplastic lesions based on data from a 5-year community screening service. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) was assessed based on the detection rates of neoplastic lesions, and costs including screening compliance, polypectomy, colonoscopy complications, and staging of CRC detected. A total of 5,863 patients received yearly FIT and 4,869 received colonoscopy. Compared with FIT, colonoscopy detected notably more adenomas (23.6% vs. 1.6%) and advanced lesions or cancer (4.2% vs. 1.2%). Using FIT as control, the ICER of screening colonoscopy in detecting adenoma, advanced adenoma, CRC and a composite endpoint of either advanced adenoma or stage I CRC was US$3,489, US$27,962, US$922,762 and US$23,981 respectively. The respective ICER was US$3,597, US$439,513, -US$2,765,876 and US$32,297 among lower-risk subjects; whilst the corresponding figure was US$3,153, US$14,852, US$184,162 and US$13,919 among higher-risk subjects. When compared to FIT, colonoscopy is considered cost-effective for screening adenoma, advanced neoplasia, and a composite endpoint of advanced neoplasia or stage I CRC. PMID:26338314

  12. The comparative cost-effectiveness of colorectal cancer screening using faecal immunochemical test vs. colonoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Martin CS; Ching, Jessica YL; Chan, Victor CW; Sung, Joseph JY

    2015-01-01

    Faecal immunochemical tests (FITs) and colonoscopy are two common screening tools for colorectal cancer(CRC). Most cost-effectiveness studies focused on survival as the outcome, and were based on modeling techniques instead of real world observational data. This study evaluated the cost-effectiveness of these two tests to detect colorectal neoplastic lesions based on data from a 5-year community screening service. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) was assessed based on the detection rates of neoplastic lesions, and costs including screening compliance, polypectomy, colonoscopy complications, and staging of CRC detected. A total of 5,863 patients received yearly FIT and 4,869 received colonoscopy. Compared with FIT, colonoscopy detected notably more adenomas (23.6% vs. 1.6%) and advanced lesions or cancer (4.2% vs. 1.2%). Using FIT as control, the ICER of screening colonoscopy in detecting adenoma, advanced adenoma, CRC and a composite endpoint of either advanced adenoma or stage I CRC was US$3,489, US$27,962, US$922,762 and US$23,981 respectively. The respective ICER was US$3,597, US$439,513, -US$2,765,876 and US$32,297 among lower-risk subjects; whilst the corresponding figure was US$3,153, US$14,852, US$184,162 and US$13,919 among higher-risk subjects. When compared to FIT, colonoscopy is considered cost-effective for screening adenoma, advanced neoplasia, and a composite endpoint of advanced neoplasia or stage I CRC. PMID:26338314

  13. Recent advances in active specific cancer vaccine treatment for colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Okuno, Kiyotaka; Sugiura, Fumiaki; Itoh, Kyogo; Yoshida, Koji; Tsunoda, Takuya; Nakamura, Yusuke

    2012-06-01

    Cloning techniques to identify genes and peptides of tumor-associated antigens have created new possibilities for the immunotherapy of patients with advanced cancer. Here, we review recent clinical trials of specific cancer vaccines, mainly HLA-restricted peptides, and epitope-encoding vectors for advanced colorectal cancer (CRC). Many researchers initially focused on carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) as an immunologic target antigen that is overexpressed on virtually all CRCs. A recombinant vaccine containing the CEA gene and dendritic cells (DCs) loaded with CEA peptide was administered to patients with CEA-elevated CRC. Although CEA-specific responses were detected, the clinical responses were limited. Recently, new types of clinical trials--namely, a personalized protocol to take into account the immunological diversity of cytotoxic T cell responses among patients and a novel cancer-testis antigen protocol that uses multiple peptides derived from genes identified by the cDNA array method--have been introduced. The personalized protocol seemed to be better than the classical (non-personalized) protocol in terms of clinical response and survival. Novel cancer-testis antigen protocols that use multiple CRC-derived peptides were recently conducted in patients with advanced CRC. The preliminary study yielded promising results regarding specific T cell responses to peptides and survival benefits. In this review, we summarize these results and discuss future perspectives. PMID:22339221

  14. Discovery of a 29-Gene Panel in Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells for the Detection of Colorectal Cancer and Adenomas Using High Throughput Real-Time PCR

    PubMed Central

    Ciarloni, Laura; Hosseinian, Sahar; Monnier-Benoit, Sylvain; Imaizumi, Natsuko; Dorta, Gian; Ruegg, Curzio

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second leading cause of cancer-related death in developed countries. Early detection of CRC leads to decreased CRC mortality. A blood-based CRC screening test is highly desirable due to limited invasiveness and high acceptance rate among patients compared to currently used fecal occult blood testing and colonoscopy. Here we describe the discovery and validation of a 29-gene panel in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) for the detection of CRC and adenomatous polyps (AP). Blood samples were prospectively collected from a multicenter, case-control clinical study. First, we profiled 93 samples with 667 candidate and 3 reference genes by high throughput real-time PCR (OpenArray system). After analysis, 160 genes were retained and tested again on 51 additional samples. Low expressed and unstable genes were discarded resulting in a final dataset of 144 samples profiled with 140 genes. To define which genes, alone or in combinations had the highest potential to discriminate AP and/or CRC from controls, data were analyzed by a combination of univariate and multivariate methods. A list of 29 potentially discriminant genes was compiled and evaluated for its predictive accuracy by penalized logistic regression and bootstrap. This method discriminated AP >1cm and CRC from controls with a sensitivity of 59% and 75%, respectively, with 91% specificity. The behavior of the 29-gene panel was validated with a LightCycler 480 real-time PCR platform, commonly adopted by clinical laboratories. In this work we identified a 29-gene panel expressed in PBMC that can be used for developing a novel minimally-invasive test for accurate detection of AP and CRC using a standard real-time PCR platform. PMID:25876024

  15. Innate immunity gene polymorphisms and the risk of colorectal neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Chang, Cindy M; Chia, Victoria M; Gunter, Marc J; Zanetti, Krista A; Ryan, Bríd M; Goodman, Julie E; Harris, Curtis C; Weissfeld, Joel; Huang, Wen-Yi; Chanock, Stephen; Yeager, Meredith; Hayes, Richard B; Berndt, Sonja I

    2013-11-01

    Inherited variation in genes that regulate innate immunity and inflammation may contribute to colorectal neoplasia risk. To evaluate this association, we conducted a nested case-control study of 451 colorectal cancer cases, 694 colorectal advanced adenoma cases and 696 controls of European descent within the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial. A total of 935 tag single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 98 genes were evaluated. Logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for the association with colorectal neoplasia. Sixteen SNPs were associated with colorectal neoplasia risk at P < 0.01, but after adjustment for multiple testing, only rs2838732 (ITGB2) remained suggestively associated with colorectal neoplasia (OR(per T allele) = 0.68, 95% CI: 0.57-0.83, P = 7.7 × 10(-5), adjusted P = 0.07). ITGB2 codes for the CD18 protein in the integrin beta chain family. The ITGB2 association was stronger for colorectal cancer (OR(per T allele) = 0.41, 95% CI: 0.30-0.55, P = 2.4 × 10(-) (9)) than for adenoma (OR(per T allele) = 0.84, 95%CI: 0.69-1.03, P = 0.08), but it did not replicate in the validation study. The ITGB2 rs2838732 association was significantly modified by smoking status (P value for interaction = 0.003). Among never and former smokers, it was inversely associated with colorectal neoplasia (OR(per T allele) = 0.5, 95% CI: 0.37-0.69 and OR(per T allele) = 0.72, 95% CI: 0.54-0.95, respectively), but no association was seen among current smokers. Other notable findings were observed for SNPs in BPI/LBP and MYD88. Although the results need to be replicated, our findings suggest that genetic variation in inflammation-related genes may be related to the risk of colorectal neoplasia. PMID:23803696

  16. Innate immunity gene polymorphisms and the risk of colorectal neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Berndt, Sonja I.

    2013-01-01

    Inherited variation in genes that regulate innate immunity and inflammation may contribute to colorectal neoplasia risk. To evaluate this association, we conducted a nested case–control study of 451 colorectal cancer cases, 694 colorectal advanced adenoma cases and 696 controls of European descent within the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial. A total of 935 tag single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 98 genes were evaluated. Logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for the association with colorectal neoplasia. Sixteen SNPs were associated with colorectal neoplasia risk at P < 0.01, but after adjustment for multiple testing, only rs2838732 (ITGB2) remained suggestively associated with colorectal neoplasia (ORper T allele = 0.68, 95% CI: 0.57–0.83, P = 7.7 × 10–5, adjusted P = 0.07). ITGB2 codes for the CD18 protein in the integrin beta chain family. The ITGB2 association was stronger for colorectal cancer (ORper T allele = 0.41, 95% CI: 0.30–0.55, P = 2.4 × 10− 9) than for adenoma (ORper T allele = 0.84, 95%CI: 0.69–1.03, P = 0.08), but it did not replicate in the validation study. The ITGB2 rs2838732 association was significantly modified by smoking status (P value for interaction = 0.003). Among never and former smokers, it was inversely associated with colorectal neoplasia (ORper T allele = 0.5, 95% CI: 0.37–0.69 and ORper T allele = 0.72, 95% CI: 0.54–0.95, respectively), but no association was seen among current smokers. Other notable findings were observed for SNPs in BPI/LBP and MYD88. Although the results need to be replicated, our findings suggest that genetic variation in inflammation-related genes may be related to the risk of colorectal neoplasia. PMID:23803696

  17. Five Year Efficacy and Safety Analysis of the Adenoma Prevention with Celecoxib (APC) Trial

    PubMed Central

    Bertagnolli, Monica M.; Eagle, Craig J.; Zauber, Ann G.; Redston, Mark; Breazna, Aurora; Kim, KyungMann; Tang, Jie; Rosenstein, Rebecca B.; Umar, Asad; Bagheri, Donya; Collins, Neal T.; Burn, John; Chung, Daniel C.; Dewar, Thomas; Foley, T. Raymond; Hoffman, Neville; Macrae, Finlay; Pruitt, Ronald E.; Saltzman, John R.; Salzberg, Bruce; Sylwestrowicz, Thomas; Hawk, Ernest T.

    2010-01-01

    The Adenoma Prevention with Celecoxib (APC) Trial examined the efficacy and safety of the Cox-2 inhibitor, celecoxib, for sporadic colorectal adenoma prevention in patients at high risk for colorectal cancer (CRC). The trial randomized 2035 subjects to receive either placebo, celecoxib 200mg twice daily, or celecoxib 400mg twice daily. The primary study safety and efficacy analyses involved three years of treatment. The results showed significant anti-tumor effect, but also indicated increased cardiovascular adverse events in patients treated with celecoxib compared to placebo. A total of 933 patients participated in an extension of the APC Trial, with a planned total treatment and surveillance duration of 5 years. Study medication was stopped early, resulting in a median treatment duration of 3.1 years. Patients treated on the placebo arm had a cumulative adenoma incidence of 68.4% over 5 years of observation. This figure was 59.0% (p<0.0001) for those receiving low dose celecoxib, and 60.1% (p<0.0001) for those receiving high dose celecoxib. The cumulative incidence of advanced adenomas over 5 years was 21.3% of those taking placebo, 12.5% (p<0.0001) of those taking low dose celecoxib and 15.8% (p<0.0001) of those taking high dose celecoxib. Investigator reported treatment emergent adverse events were similar across all treatment groups for categories including renal and hypertensive events and gastrointestinal ulceration and hemorrhage events. For a category composed of cardiovascular and thrombotic events, the risk relative to placebo was 1.6 (95%CI 1.0, 2.5) for those using 200mg BID celecoxib and 1.9 (95%CI 1.2, 3.1) for those using 400mg BID celecoxib. Secondary analysis showed an interaction between a baseline history of atherosclerotic heart disease and study drug use with respect to cardiovascular and thrombotic adverse events (p=0.004). These results confirm the inhibitory effect of celecoxib on colorectal adenoma formation, and provide additional safety

  18. Hepatocellular adenoma: An update

    PubMed Central

    Vijay, Adarsh; Elaffandi, Ahmed; Khalaf, Hatem

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocellular adenomas (HCA) are rare benign liver tumors. Recent technological advancements have helped in the early identification of such lesions. However, precise diagnosis of hepatocellular incidentalomas remains challenging. Studies at the molecular level have provided new insights into the genetics and pathophysiology of these lesions. These in turn have raised questions over their existing management modalities. However, the rarity of the tumor still restricts the quality of evidence available for current recommendations and guidelines. This article provides a comprehensive review on the etiology, molecular biology, patho-physiology, clinical manifestations, and complications associated with HCA. It also elaborates on the genetic advancements, existing diagnostic tools and current guidelines for management for such lesions. PMID:26557953

  19. Outcomes of pelvic exenteration for recurrent or primary locally advanced colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hwa Yeon; Park, Sung Chan; Hyun, Jong Hee; Seo, Ho Kyung

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The objective of this study was to assess the clinical outcomes of pelvic exenteration for patients with primary locally advanced colorectal cancer (LACRC) or locally recurrent colorectal cancer (LRCRC), and to identify clinically relevant prognostic factors. Methods Between January 2001 and December 2010, 40 consecutive patients with primary LACRC or LRCRC underwent pelvic exenteration at the National Cancer Center, Republic of Korea. We retrospectively reviewed their medical records. Results The median age was 59 years and the median follow-up time was 26 months (range, 1-117 months). The overall complication and in-hospital mortality rates were 70% (28/40) and 7.5% (3/40), respectively. The complication rates were similar between patients with primary LACRC (69.6%) and those with LRCRC (70.6%). The overall recurrence rate was 50% (17/34), and was lower in patients with primary LACRC than in patients with LRCRC (33.3% vs. 76.9%, P = 0.032). The 5-year overall survival was significantly different between primary LACRC and patients with LRCRC (58.7% vs. 11.8%, P = 0.022). Multivariate analysis revealed that radicality (R0 vs. R1/R2) was an independent prognostic factor for overall survival (P = 0.020). Conclusion The complication and operative mortality rates of pelvic exenteration remained high, but pelvic exenteration might provide an opportunity for long-term survival and good local control. Complete (R0) resection was the only independent prognostic factor for overall survival. PMID:26366382

  20. Favorable lifestyle before diagnosis associated with lower risk of screen-detected advanced colorectal neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Knudsen, Markus D; de Lange, Thomas; Botteri, Edoardo; Nguyen, Dung-Hong; Evensen, Helge; Steen, Chloé B; Hoff, Geir; Bernklev, Tomm; Hjartåker, Anette; Berstad, Paula

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the association between adherence to health recommendations and detection of advanced colorectal neoplasia (ACN) in colorectal cancer (CRC) screening. METHODS: A total of 14832 women and men were invited to CRC screening, 6959 in the fecal immunochemical test arm and 7873 in the flexible sigmoidoscopy arm. These were also sent a self-reported lifestyle questionnaire to be completed prior to their first CRC screening. A lifestyle score was created to reflect current adherence to healthy behaviors in regard to smoking, body mass index, physical activity, alcohol consumption and food consumption, and ranged from zero (poorest) to six (best). Odds ratios (ORs) and 95%CIs were calculated using multivariable logistic regression to evaluate the association between the single lifestyle variables and the lifestyle score and the probability of detecting ACN. RESULTS: In all 6315 women and men completed the lifestyle questionnaire, 3323 (53%) in the FIT arm and 2992 (47%) in the FS arm. This was 89% of those who participated in screening. ACN was diagnosed in 311 (5%) participants of which 25 (8%) were diagnosed with CRC. For individuals with a lifestyle score of two, three, four, and five-six, the ORs (95%CI) for the probability of ACN detection were 0.82 (0.45-1.16), 0.43 (0.28-0.73), 0.41 (0.23-0.64), and 0.41 (0.22-0.73), respectively compared to individuals with a lifestyle score of zero-one. Of the single lifestyle factors, adherence to non-smoking and moderate alcohol intake were associated with a decreased probability of ACN detection compared to being a smoker or having a high alcohol intake 0.53 (0.42-0.68) and 0.63 (0.43-0.93) respectively. CONCLUSION: Adopted healthy behaviors were inversely associated with the probability of ACN detection. Lifestyle assessment might be useful for risk stratification in CRC screening. PMID:27468217

  1. The ADENOMA Study. Accuracy of Detection using Endocuff Vision™ Optimization of Mucosal Abnormalities: study protocol for randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Bevan, Roisin; Ngu, Wee Sing; Saunders, Brian P.; Tsiamoulos, Zacharias; Bassett, Paul; Hoare, Zoe; Rees, Colin J.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Colonoscopy is the gold standard investigation for the diagnosis of bowel pathology and colorectal cancer screening. Adenoma detection rate is a marker of high quality colonoscopy and a high adenoma detection rate is associated with a lower incidence of interval cancers. Several technological advancements have been explored to improve adenoma detection rate. A new device called Endocuff Vision™ has been shown to improve adenoma detection rate in pilot studies. Methods/Design: This is a prospective, multicenter, randomized controlled trial comparing the adenoma detection rate in patients undergoing Endocuff Vision™-assisted colonoscopy with standard colonoscopy. All patients above 18 years of age referred for screening, surveillance, or diagnostic colonoscopy who are able to consent are invited to the study. Patients with absolute contraindications to colonoscopy, large bowel obstruction or pseudo-obstruction, colon cancer or polyposis syndromes, colonic strictures, severe diverticular segments, active colitis, anticoagulant therapy, or pregnancy are excluded. Patients are randomized according to site, age, sex, and bowel cancer screening status to receive Endocuff Vision™-assisted colonoscopy or standard colonoscopy on the day of procedure. Baseline data, colonoscopy, and polyp data including histology are collected. Nurse assessment of patient comfort and patient comfort questionnaires are completed post procedure. Patients are followed up at 21 days and complete a patient experience questionnaire. This study will take place across seven NHS Hospital Trusts: one in London and six within the Northern Region Endoscopy Group. A maximum of 10 colonoscopists per site will recruit a total of 1772 patients, with a maximum of four bowel screening colonoscopists permitted per site. Discussion: This is the first trial to evaluate the adenoma detection rate of Endocuff Vision™ in all screening, surveillance, and diagnostic patient groups. This timely

  2. Locoregional surgical and interventional therapies for advanced colorectal cancer liver metastases: expert consensus statements

    PubMed Central

    Abdalla, Eddie K; Bauer, Todd W; Chun, Yun S; D'Angelica, Michael; Kooby, David A; Jarnagin, William R

    2013-01-01

    Selection of the optimal surgical and interventional therapies for advanced colorectal cancer liver metastases (CRLM) requires multidisciplinary discussion of treatment strategies early in the trajectory of the individual patient's care. This paper reports on expert consensus on locoregional and interventional therapies for the treatment of advanced CRLM. Resection remains the reference treatment for patients with bilateral CRLM and synchronous presentation of primary and metastatic cancer. Patients with oligonodular bilateral CRLM may be candidates for one-stage multiple segmentectomies; two-stage resection with or without portal vein embolization may allow complete resection in patients with more advanced disease. After downsizing with preoperative systemic and/or regional therapy, curative-intent hepatectomy requires resection of all initial and currently known sites of disease; debulking procedures are not recommended. Many patients with synchronous primary disease and CRLM can safely undergo simultaneous resection of all disease. Staged resections should be considered for patients in whom the volume of the future liver remnant is anticipated to be marginal or inadequate, who have significant medical comorbid condition(s), or in whom extensive resections are required for the primary cancer and/or CRLM. Priority for liver-first or primary-first resection should depend on primary tumour-related symptoms or concern for the progression of marginally resectable CRLM during treatment of the primary disease. Chemotherapy delivered by hepatic arterial infusion represents a valid option in patients with liver-only disease, although it is best delivered in experienced centres. Ablation strategies are not recommended as first-line treatments for resectable CRLM alone or in combination with resection because of high local failure rates and limitations related to tumour size, multiplicity and intrahepatic location. PMID:23297723

  3. Stromal Expression of MicroRNA-21 in Advanced Colorectal Cancer Patients with Distant Metastases

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kyu Sang; Nam, Soo Kyung; Koh, Jiwon; Kim, Duck-Woo; Kang, Sung-Bum; Choe, Gheeyoung; Kim, Woo Ho; Lee, Hye Seung

    2016-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to determine the regional heterogeneity and clinicopathological significance of microRNA-21 (miR-21) in advanced colorectal cancer (CRC) patients with distant metastasis. Methods: miR-21 expression was investigated by using locked nucleic acid– fluorescence in situ hybridization in the center and periphery of the primary cancer and in distant metastasis from 170 patients with advanced CRC. In addition, α-smooth muscle actin and desmin were evaluated to identify cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) by using immunohistochemistry. Results: The miR-21 signal was observed in the cancer stroma. The expression of miR-21 (a score of 1–4) in the center and periphery of the primary cancer and in distant metastasis was observed in specimens from 133 (78.2%), 105 (61.8%), and 91 (53.5%) patients, respectively. miR-21 expression was heterogeneous in advanced CRC. Discordance between miR-21 expression in the center of the primary cancer and either the periphery of the primary cancer or distant metastasis was 31.7% or 44.7%, respectively. miR-21 stromal expression in the periphery of the primary cancer was significantly associated with a better prognosis (p=.004). miR-21 expression was significantly associated with CAFs in the center of the primary cancer (p=.001) and distant metastases (p=.041). Conclusions: miR-21 expression is observed in cancer stroma related to the CAF quantity and frequently presents regional heterogeneity in CRC. Our findings indicate that the role of miR-21 in predicting prognosis may be controversial but provide a new perspective of miR-21 level measurement in cancer specimens. PMID:27240857

  4. Locoregional surgical and interventional therapies for advanced colorectal cancer liver metastases: expert consensus statements.

    PubMed

    Abdalla, Eddie K; Bauer, Todd W; Chun, Yun S; D'Angelica, Michael; Kooby, David A; Jarnagin, William R

    2013-02-01

    Selection of the optimal surgical and interventional therapies for advanced colorectal cancer liver metastases (CRLM) requires multidisciplinary discussion of treatment strategies early in the trajectory of the individual patient's care. This paper reports on expert consensus on locoregional and interventional therapies for the treatment of advanced CRLM. Resection remains the reference treatment for patients with bilateral CRLM and synchronous presentation of primary and metastatic cancer. Patients with oligonodular bilateral CRLM may be candidates for one-stage multiple segmentectomies; two-stage resection with or without portal vein embolization may allow complete resection in patients with more advanced disease. After downsizing with preoperative systemic and/or regional therapy, curative-intent hepatectomy requires resection of all initial and currently known sites of disease; debulking procedures are not recommended. Many patients with synchronous primary disease and CRLM can safely undergo simultaneous resection of all disease. Staged resections should be considered for patients in whom the volume of the future liver remnant is anticipated to be marginal or inadequate, who have significant medical comorbid condition(s), or in whom extensive resections are required for the primary cancer and/or CRLM. Priority for liver-first or primary-first resection should depend on primary tumour-related symptoms or concern for the progression of marginally resectable CRLM during treatment of the primary disease. Chemotherapy delivered by hepatic arterial infusion represents a valid option in patients with liver-only disease, although it is best delivered in experienced centres. Ablation strategies are not recommended as first-line treatments for resectable CRLM alone or in combination with resection because of high local failure rates and limitations related to tumour size, multiplicity and intrahepatic location. PMID:23297723

  5. Apoptotic pathways as a therapeutic target for colorectal cancer treatment

    PubMed Central

    Abraha, Aman M; Ketema, Ezra B

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is the second leading cause of death from cancer among adults. The disease begins as a benign adenomatous polyp, which develops into an advanced adenoma with high-grade dysplasia and then progresses to an invasive cancer. Appropriate apoptotic signaling is fundamentally important to preserve a healthy balance between cell death and cell survival and in maintaining genome integrity. Evasion of apoptotic pathway has been established as a prominent hallmark of several cancers. During colorectal cancer development, the balance between the rates of cell growth and apoptosis that maintains intestinal epithelial cell homeostasis gets progressively disturbed. Evidences are increasingly available to support the hypothesis that failure of apoptosis may be an important factor in the evolution of colorectal cancer and its poor response to chemotherapy and radiation. The other reason for targeting apoptotic pathway in the treatment of cancer is based on the observation that this process is deregulated in cancer cells but not in normal cells. As a result, colorectal cancer therapies designed to stimulate apoptosis in target cells would play a critical role in controlling its development and progression. A better understanding of the apoptotic signaling pathways, and the mechanisms by which cancer cells evade apoptotic death might lead to effective therapeutic strategies to inhibit cancer cell proliferation with minimal toxicity and high responses to chemotherapy. In this review, we analyzed the current understanding and future promises of apoptotic pathways as a therapeutic target in colorectal cancer treatment. PMID:27574550

  6. Apoptotic pathways as a therapeutic target for colorectal cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Abraha, Aman M; Ketema, Ezra B

    2016-08-15

    Colorectal cancer is the second leading cause of death from cancer among adults. The disease begins as a benign adenomatous polyp, which develops into an advanced adenoma with high-grade dysplasia and then progresses to an invasive cancer. Appropriate apoptotic signaling is fundamentally important to preserve a healthy balance between cell death and cell survival and in maintaining genome integrity. Evasion of apoptotic pathway has been established as a prominent hallmark of several cancers. During colorectal cancer development, the balance between the rates of cell growth and apoptosis that maintains intestinal epithelial cell homeostasis gets progressively disturbed. Evidences are increasingly available to support the hypothesis that failure of apoptosis may be an important factor in the evolution of colorectal cancer and its poor response to chemotherapy and radiation. The other reason for targeting apoptotic pathway in the treatment of cancer is based on the observation that this process is deregulated in cancer cells but not in normal cells. As a result, colorectal cancer therapies designed to stimulate apoptosis in target cells would play a critical role in controlling its development and progression. A better understanding of the apoptotic signaling pathways, and the mechanisms by which cancer cells evade apoptotic death might lead to effective therapeutic strategies to inhibit cancer cell proliferation with minimal toxicity and high responses to chemotherapy. In this review, we analyzed the current understanding and future promises of apoptotic pathways as a therapeutic target in colorectal cancer treatment. PMID:27574550

  7. Adenoma development in familial adenomatous polyposis and MUTYH-associated polyposis: somatic landscape and driver genes.

    PubMed

    Rashid, Mamunur; Fischer, Andrej; Wilson, Cathy H; Tiffen, Jessamy; Rust, Alistair G; Stevens, Philip; Idziaszczyk, Shelley; Maynard, Julie; Williams, Geraint T; Mustonen, Ville; Sampson, Julian R; Adams, David J

    2016-01-01

    Familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) and MUTYH-associated polyposis (MAP) are inherited disorders associated with multiple colorectal adenomas that lead to a very high risk of colorectal cancer. The somatic mutations that drive adenoma development in these conditions have not been investigated comprehensively. In this study we performed analysis of paired colorectal adenoma and normal tissue DNA from individuals with FAP or MAP, sequencing 14 adenoma whole exomes (eight MAP, six FAP), 55 adenoma targeted exomes (33 MAP, 22 FAP) and germline DNA from each patient, and a further 63 adenomas by capillary sequencing (41 FAP, 22 MAP). With these data we examined the profile of mutated genes, the mutational signatures and the somatic mutation rates, observing significant diversity in the constellations of mutated driver genes in different adenomas, and loss-of-function mutations in WTX (9%; p < 9.99e-06), a gene implicated in regulation of the WNT pathway and p53 acetylation. These data extend our understanding of the early events in colorectal tumourigenesis in the polyposis syndromes. PMID:26414517

  8. 89Zr-cetuximab PET imaging in patients with advanced colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Huisman, Marc C.; Vugts, Danielle J.; Roth, Chantal; Luik, Anne Marije; Mulder, Emma R.; Schuit, Robert C.; Boellaard, Ronald; Hoekstra, Otto S.; van Dongen, Guus AMS; Verheul, Henk M.W.

    2015-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) are used in the treatment of advanced colorectal cancer (mCRC). Approximately 50% of patients benefit despite patient selection for RAS wild type (wt) tumors. Based on the hypothesis that tumor targeting is required for clinical benefit of anti-EGFR treatment, biodistribution and tumor uptake of 89Zr-cetuximab by Positron Emission Tomography (PET), combining the sensitivity of PET with the specificity of cetuximab for EGFR was evaluated. Ten patients with wt K-RAS mCRC received 37 ± 1 MBq 89Zr-cetuximab directly (<2 h) after the first therapeutic dose of cetuximab. PET-scans were performed from 1 hour to 10 days post injection (p.i.). Biodistribution was determined for blood and organs. Uptake in tumor lesions was quantified by Standardized Uptake Value (SUV) and related to response. In 6 of 10 patients 89Zr-cetuximab uptake in tumor lesions was detected. Four of 6 patients with 89Zr-cetuximab uptake had clinical benefit, while progressive disease was observed in 3 of 4 patients without 89Zr-cetuximab uptake. Taken together, tumor uptake of 89Zr-cetuximab can be visualized by PET imaging. The strong relation between uptake and response warrants further clinical validation as an innovative selection method for cetuximab treatment in patients with wt RAS mCRC. PMID:26309164

  9. Efficacy of prophylactic anti-diarrhoeal treatment in patients receiving Campto for advanced colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Duffour, J; Gourgou, S; Seitz, J F; Senesse, P; Boutet, O; Castera, D; Kramar, A; Ychou, M

    2002-01-01

    This study assessed the efficacy of combined prophylactic and curative anti-diarrhoeal medication in advanced colorectal patients treated by irinotecan. Thirty-four pre-treated eligible patients were evaluated. There were 44% women, the median age was 65 and 38% of the patients had a 0 performance status. The patients received sucralfate(4g/d) and nifuroxazide(600 mg/d) prophylactic treatment on days 0-7. In the case of severe diarrhoea, preventive treatment was replaced by loperamide(12 mg/d) and diosmectite (9 g/d). Grade 3 delayed diarrhoea occurred in 18% of patients (90% CI: [9.5-28.9]) and 4.6% of cycles. No grade 4 delayed diarrhoea was observed. Twenty-nine patients (85%) received the preventive treatment at cycle 1, while 14% (90% CI: [6.2-25.7]) experienced grade 3 delayed diarrhoea in 3.7% of cycles for a median 4.5 days. The objective response rate was 8% (90% CI [1.4-23.1]) among the 25 assessable patients. Preventive combined treatment is effective in reducing the incidence of severe delayed diarrhoea, and it should be proposed to patients treated with mono-therapy Campto(r) and evaluated in poly-chemotherapy protocols. PMID:12552984

  10. Irreversible electroporation in the treatment of locally advanced pancreas and liver metastases of colorectal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wichtowski, Mateusz; Nowaczyk, Piotr; Kocur, Jacek

    2016-01-01

    Aim of the study Irreversible electroporation is a new, non-thermal ablation technique in the treatment of parenchymal organ tumors which uses short high voltage pulses of electricity in order to induce apoptosis of targeted cells. In this paper the application of this method of treatment in locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC) and liver cancer is analyzed. Material and methods Between 04.2014 and 09.2014 two patients with LAPC and one with colorectal liver metastasis (CRLM) were qualified for treatment with irreversible electroporation. Both patients remained under constant observation and control. PubMed/Medline, Embase and Google Scholar databases were searched and eight original reports on irreversible electroporation of pancreatic and liver tumors based on the biggest groups of patients were found. Results Two patients with LAPC and one with CRLM were qualified for ablation with irreversible electroporation. In all three patients a successful irreversible electroporation (IRE) procedure of the whole tumor was conducted. In the minimum seven-month follow-up 100% local control was achieved – without progression. In the literature review the local response to treatment ranged from 41% to 100%. The event-free survival rate in six-month observation was 94%. Conclusions Ablation with irreversible electroporation is a new non-thermal ablation technique which has been demonstrated, both in the previously published studies and in the cases described in this paper, as a safe and efficient therapeutic method for patients with LAPC and CRLM. PMID:27095938

  11. Retrospective evaluation of 5-fluorouracil-interferon-a aTreatment of advanced colorectal cancer patients.

    PubMed

    András, C; Csiki, Z; Gál, I; Takács, I; Antal, L; Szegedi, G

    2000-01-01

    The authors describe the retrospective analysis of treatment by 5-fluorouracil and interferon-a aof 34 patients with advanced colorectal cancer. An average of 4.6 treatment cycles (3 12) was applied. Complete remission was not observed; partial remission was observed in 8 patients; in 13 patients no change occurred and progression was detected in 14 cases. Remission rate was 22.8%, mean response time was 5.2 (3 12) months, mean progress-free survival 5.6 (0 22) months. Mean survival from the start of treatment was 11.9 (1 42) months and from the establishment of the diagnosis 26.1 (3 60) months. Severe life-threatening side-effects did not occur; other side-effects such as fever, nausea, diarrhea, leucopenia, and anemia responded to drugs. Treatment by 5-FU and interferon, in accordance with other authors findings, improved survival and well-being of patients but no breakthrough has been achieved. PMID:11033456

  12. Depression in older patients with advanced colorectal cancer is closely connected with immunosuppressive acidic protein.

    PubMed

    Li, Rong; Yang, Jie; Yang, Jihua; Fu, Weijun; Jiang, Hua; Du, Juan; Zhang, Chunyang; Xi, Hao; Hou, Jian

    2014-03-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most common tumors. CRC patients are susceptible to suffering from depression. Whether the immune system of CRC patients with depression is impaired or stimulated is controversial. Possible reasons for this conflict are the involvement of confounding factors, such as the age of the patient, the stage of the CRC and the types of treatment in previous studies. To demonstrate clearly the relationship between depression and the immune system in the context of CRC, the present study included only older patients with advanced CRC who received only chemotherapy, and the study adopted immunosuppressive acidic protein (IAP) as an immune parameter for the first time. A total of 56 older patients with advanced CRC completed the Zung Self-Rating Depression Scale (SDS) and were divided into two groups according to SDS scores. The patients exhibiting depression were treated with fluoxetine until their symptoms remitted. The serum levels of IAP and the percentages of CD3-positive (CD3+), CD4+, CD8+ T lymphocytes and CD56+ natural killer (NK) cells and Neutrophil-lymphocyte ratio (NLR) were calculated at the time of enrollment and once the symptoms remitted. Correlation analyses revealed that the SDS score was positively associated with serum IAP levels but negatively associated with CD3 and CD4 levels. Among the depressed and non-depressed patients, serum IAP levels and the percentages of CD3 and CD4 cells were dramatically different. After the depression symptoms were treated, the IAP levels dramatically decreased, while the levels of CD3, CD4, CD8 and CD56 were unchanged. All of above suggested that IAP was closely correlated with depression and might be a relatively objective parameter for predicting depression. PMID:23975537

  13. Nipple adenoma in infancy.

    PubMed

    Clune, James E; Kozakewich, Harry P; VanBeek, Christine A; Labow, Brian I; Greene, Arin K

    2009-11-01

    We report the first patient with a nipple adenoma presenting in infancy. Nipple adenoma is a benign lesion typically affecting women between 45 and 55 years of age. This lesion can occur in the pediatric population and should be included in the differential diagnosis of an infantile breast lesion. Management of children with nipple adenoma requires consideration for breast development; excision before maturity may cause nipple-areola deformity or injury to the breast bud. PMID:19944237

  14. Application of quantitative estimates of fecal hemoglobin concentration for risk prediction of colorectal neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Chao-Sheng; Lin, Yu-Min; Chang, Hung-Chuen; Chen, Yu-Hung; Chong, Lee-Won; Chen, Chun-Hao; Lin, Yueh-Shih; Yang, Kuo-Ching; Shih, Chia-Hui

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To determine the role of the fecal immunochemical test (FIT), used to evaluate fecal hemoglobin concentration, in the prediction of histological grade and risk of colorectal tumors. METHODS: We enrolled 17881 individuals who attended the two-step colorectal cancer screening program in a single hospital between January 2010 and October 2011. Colonoscopy was recommended to the participants with an FIT of ≥ 12 ngHb/mL buffer. We classified colorectal lesions as cancer (C), advanced adenoma (AA), adenoma (A), and others (O) by their colonoscopic and histological findings. Multiple linear regression analysis adjusted for age and gender was used to determine the association between the FIT results and colorectal tumor grade. The risk of adenomatous neoplasia was estimated by calculating the positive predictive values for different FIT concentrations. RESULTS: The positive rate of the FIT was 10.9% (1948/17881). The attendance rate for colonoscopy was 63.1% (1229/1948). The number of false positive results was 23. Of these 1229 cases, the numbers of O, A, AA, and C were 759, 221, 201, and 48, respectively. Regression analysis revealed a positive association between histological grade and FIT concentration (β = 0.088, P < 0.01). A significant log-linear relationship was found between the concentration and positive predictive value of the FIT for predicting colorectal tumors (R2 > 0.95, P < 0.001). CONCLUSION: Higher FIT concentrations are associated with more advanced histological grades. Risk prediction for colorectal neoplasia based on individual FIT concentrations is significant and may help to improve the performance of screening programs. PMID:24363529

  15. Lectin reactivities as intermediate biomarkers in premalignant colorectal epithelium.

    PubMed

    Boland, C R; Martin, M A; Goldstein, I J

    1992-01-01

    Normal colonic epithelial cells undergo maturation as they traverse the crypt to the lumenal surface. The binding of lectins to goblet cell mucins and other glycoconjugates changes as the cells migrate and differentiate. Additional stepwise modifications in glycoconjugate expression occur in premalignant and malignant neoplasms that may be detected by lectin binding studies. The lectins Dolichos biflorus agglutinin (DBA) and soybean agglutinin (SBA) have been developed as markers of differentiation in normal-appearing colonic epithelium. Using a quantitative biometric system to score tissues, reduced levels of lectin binding have been found in rectal tissue from patients with familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) and hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer. The lectin Amaranthus caudatus agglutinin (ACA) binds to a cytoplasmic glycoconjugate expressed at the base of the colonic crypt and serves as a possible proliferation marker in the distal, but not proximal, colon. ACA binding increases in tandem with increased levels of proliferation (using BrdU incorporation) in neoplastic tissues. Binding by the peanut lectin (PNA) occurs late in the adenoma-to-carcinoma sequence--in larger adenomas and in cancers--and serves as a marker of advancing neoplasia. Lectins identify the stepwise changes that occur during normal differentiation, proliferation and in advancing neoplasia. By selecting the appropriate probe, biomarkers may be developed for early, intermediate, and late events in colorectal cancer. PMID:1469891

  16. Advances in targeted and immunobased therapies for colorectal cancer in the genomic era

    PubMed Central

    Seow, Heng Fong; Yip, Wai Kien; Fifis, Theodora

    2016-01-01

    Targeted therapies require information on specific defective signaling pathways or mutations. Advances in genomic technologies and cell biology have led to identification of new therapeutic targets associated with signal-transduction pathways. Survival times of patients with colorectal cancer (CRC) can be extended with combinations of conventional cytotoxic agents and targeted therapies. Targeting EGFR- and VEGFR-signaling systems has been the major focus for treatment of metastatic CRC. However, there are still limitations in their clinical application, and new and better drug combinations are needed. This review provides information on EGFR and VEGF inhibitors, new therapeutic agents in the pipeline targeting EGFR and VEGFR pathways, and those targeting other signal-transduction pathways, such as MET, IGF1R, MEK, PI3K, Wnt, Notch, Hedgehog, and death-receptor signaling pathways for treatment of metastatic CRC. Additionally, multitargeted approaches in combination therapies targeting negative-feedback loops, compensatory networks, and cross talk between pathways are highlighted. Then, immunobased strategies to enhance antitumor immunity using specific monoclonal antibodies, such as the immune-checkpoint inhibitors anti-CTLA4 and anti-PD1, as well as the challenges that need to be overcome for increased efficacy of targeted therapies, including drug resistance, predictive markers of response, tumor subtypes, and cancer stem cells, are covered. The review concludes with a brief insight into the applications of next-generation sequencing, expression profiling for tumor subtyping, and the exciting progress made in in silico predictive analysis in the development of a prescription strategy for cancer therapy. PMID:27099521

  17. Optimizing Single Agent Panitumumab Therapy in Pre-Treated Advanced Colorectal Cancer12

    PubMed Central

    Gasparini, Giampietro; Buttitta, Fiamma; D'Andrea, Mario Rosario; Tumolo, Salvatore; Buonadonna, Angela; Pavese, Ida; Cordio, Stefano; De Tursi, Michele; Mosconi, Stefania; Stumbo, Luciano; Felicioni, Lara; Marchetti, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: To improve the selection of advanced colorectal cancer patients to panitumumab by optimizing the assessment of RAS (KRAS-NRAS) mutations. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: Using a centralized pyrosequencing RAS assay, we analyzed the tumors of 94 patients, wild-type for KRAS mutations (codons 12 to 13) by Sanger sequencing (SS), treated with panitumumab. RESULTS: By SS analysis, 94 (62%) of 152 patients were wild-type and their objective response rate to panitumumab was 17%. We first optimized the KRAS test, by performing an accurate tissue-dissection step followed by pyrosequencing, a more sensitive method, and found further mutations in 12 (12.8%) cases. Secondly, tumors were subjected to RAS extension analysis (KRAS, exons 3 to 4; NRAS exons 2 to 4) by pyrosequencing that allowed to identify several rare mutations: KRAS codon 61, 5.3%; codon 146, 5.3%; NRAS, 9.5%. Overall, RAS mutation rate was 32.9%. All patients with additional RAS mutations had progressive or stable disease, except 3 patients with mutations at codon 61 of KRAS or NRAS who experienced partial (2 cases) or complete response. By excluding from the analysis 11 cases with mutations at codons 61, no patient was responsive to treatment (P = .021). RAS wild-type versus RAS mutated cases had a significantly better time to progression (P = .044), that resulted improved (p = .004) by excluding codon 61 mutations. CONCLUSION: This study shows that by optimizing the RAS test it is possible to significantly improve the identification of patients who do not gain benefit of panitumumab. Prospective studies are warranted to determine the clinical significance of rare mutations. PMID:25246275

  18. Efficacy and safety analysis of chemotherapy for advanced colitis-associated colorectal cancer in Japan.

    PubMed

    Nio, Kenta; Higashi, Daijiro; Kumagai, Hozumi; Arita, Shuji; Shirakawa, Tsuyoshi; Nakashima, Koji; Shibata, Yoshihiro; Esaki, Motohiro; Manabe, Tatsuya; Nagai, Shuntaro; Ueki, Takashi; Nakano, Michitaka; Ariyama, Hiroshi; Kusaba, Hitoshi; Hirahashi, Minako; Oda, Yoshinao; Esaki, Taito; Mitsugi, Kenji; Futami, Kitaro; Akashi, Koichi; Baba, Eishi

    2016-06-01

    Chemotherapy for advanced colitis-associated colorectal cancer (CAC) has been insufficiently evaluated. The goal of this study was to clarify the efficacy and safety of chemotherapy for CAC in Japan. CAC patients who were treated with chemotherapy between 2005 and 2015 were retrospectively examined. Twenty-nine patients (median age, 48 years; 23 men) were assessed. Eighteen patients had ulcerative colitis, and 11 had Crohn's disease. Three ulcerative colitis and four Crohn's disease patients were in the active disease phase. Primary tumors were located in the rectum/anus (n=16), the left colon (n=9), or the right colon (n=4). Palliative or adjuvant chemotherapy was performed in 13 and 16 patients, respectively. First-line palliative chemotherapy regimens were as follows: fluorouracil, leucovorin, and oxaliplatin (FOLFOX; n=6), FOLFOX+bevacizumab (n=3), and others (n=4). Adjuvant chemotherapy regimens were S-1 (n=7), oxaliplatin-based (n=4) and others (n=5). In palliative chemotherapy, the objective response rate was 15%, and the median progression-free survival and overall survival were 182 and 315 days, respectively. In adjuvant chemotherapy, the 5-year relapse-free survival rate was 78%. Grade 3/4 adverse events (AEs) were observed in 16 patients (55%). Active and remission inflammatory bowel disease patients suffered grade 3/4 nonhematological AEs at an incidence of 71 and 23%, respectively (P<0.01). Dose reduction was required in 11 patients (38%), eight of whom required it for hematological AEs. Adjuvant chemotherapy for CAC exhibited sufficient efficacy, whereas modest efficacy was shown for palliative chemotherapy for CAC. AEs, particularly nonhematological AEs, were closely associated with disease activity of colitis. PMID:26771865

  19. Nonampullary duodenal adenoma: Current understanding of its diagnosis, pathogenesis, and clinical management

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Chul-Hyun; Cho, Young-Seok

    2016-01-01

    Nonampullary duodenal adenomas are relatively common in familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP), but nonampullary sporadic duodenal adenomas (SDAs) are rare. Emerging evidence shows that duodenal adenomas, regardless of their anatomic location and whether they are sporadic or FAP-related, share morphologic and molecular features with colorectal adenomas. The available data suggest that duodenal adenomas develop to duodenal adenocarcinomas via similar mechanisms. The optimal approach for management of duodenal adenomas remains to be determined. The techniques for endoscopic resection of duodenal adenoma include snare polypectomy, endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR), endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD), and argon plasma coagulation ablation. EMR may facilitate removal of large duodenal polyps. Although several studies have reported cases of successful ESD for duodenal adenomas, the procedure is technically difficult to perform safely because of the anatomical properties of the duodenum. Although current clinical practice recommends endoscopic resection of all large duodenal adenomas in patients with FAP, endoscopic treatment is usually insufficient to guarantee a polyp-free duodenum. Surgery is indicated for FAP patients with severe polyposis or nonampullary SDAs or FAP-related polyps not amenable to endoscopic resection. Further studies are needed to develop newer endoscopic techniques to guide diagnostic and therapeutic decisions for future management of nonampullary duodenal adenomas. PMID:26811631

  20. Mutational Profiles Reveal an Aberrant TGF-β-CEA Regulated Pathway in Colon Adenomas

    PubMed Central

    Jogunoori, Wilma; Menon, Vipin; Majumdar, Avijit; Chen, Jiun-Sheng; Gi, Young Jin; Jeong, Yun Seong; Phan, Liem; Belkin, Mitchell; Gu, Shoujun; Kundra, Suchin; Mistry, Nipun A.; Zhang, Jianping; Su, Xiaoping; Li, Shulin; Lin, Sue-Hwa; Javle, Milind; McMurray, John S.; Rahlfs, Thomas F.; Mishra, Bibhuti; White, Jon; Rashid, Asif; Beauchemin, Nicole; Weston, Brian R.; Shafi, Mehnaz A.; Stroehlein, John R.; Davila, Marta; Akbani, Rehan; Weinstein, John N.; Wu, Xifeng; Mishra, Lopa

    2016-01-01

    Mutational processes and signatures that drive early tumorigenesis are centrally important for early cancer prevention. Yet, to date, biomarkers and risk factors for polyps (adenomas) that inordinately and rapidly develop into colon cancer remain poorly defined. Here, we describe surprisingly high mutational profiles through whole-genome sequence (WGS) analysis in 2 of 4 pairs of benign colorectal adenoma tissue samples. Unsupervised hierarchical clustered transcriptomic analysis of a further 7 pairs of adenomas reveals distinct mutational signatures regardless of adenoma size. Transitional single nucleotide substitutions of C:G>T:A predominate in the adenoma mutational spectrum. Strikingly, we observe mutations in the TGF-β pathway and CEA-associated genes in 4 out of 11 adenomas, overlapping with the Wnt pathway. Immunohistochemical labeling reveals a nearly 5-fold increase in CEA levels in 23% of adenoma samples with a concomitant loss of TGF-β signaling. We also define a functional role by which the CEA B3 domain interacts with TGFBR1, potentially inactivating the tumor suppressor function of TGF-β signaling. Our study uncovers diverse mutational processes underlying the transition from early adenoma to cancer. This has broad implications for biomarker-driven targeting of CEA/TGF-β in high-risk adenomas and may lead to early detection of aggressive adenoma to CRC progression. PMID:27100181

  1. Mutational Profiles Reveal an Aberrant TGF-β-CEA Regulated Pathway in Colon Adenomas.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jian; Raju, Gottumukkala S; Jogunoori, Wilma; Menon, Vipin; Majumdar, Avijit; Chen, Jiun-Sheng; Gi, Young Jin; Jeong, Yun Seong; Phan, Liem; Belkin, Mitchell; Gu, Shoujun; Kundra, Suchin; Mistry, Nipun A; Zhang, Jianping; Su, Xiaoping; Li, Shulin; Lin, Sue-Hwa; Javle, Milind; McMurray, John S; Rahlfs, Thomas F; Mishra, Bibhuti; White, Jon; Rashid, Asif; Beauchemin, Nicole; Weston, Brian R; Shafi, Mehnaz A; Stroehlein, John R; Davila, Marta; Akbani, Rehan; Weinstein, John N; Wu, Xifeng; Mishra, Lopa

    2016-01-01

    Mutational processes and signatures that drive early tumorigenesis are centrally important for early cancer prevention. Yet, to date, biomarkers and risk factors for polyps (adenomas) that inordinately and rapidly develop into colon cancer remain poorly defined. Here, we describe surprisingly high mutational profiles through whole-genome sequence (WGS) analysis in 2 of 4 pairs of benign colorectal adenoma tissue samples. Unsupervised hierarchical clustered transcriptomic analysis of a further 7 pairs of adenomas reveals distinct mutational signatures regardless of adenoma size. Transitional single nucleotide substitutions of C:G>T:A predominate in the adenoma mutational spectrum. Strikingly, we observe mutations in the TGF-β pathway and CEA-associated genes in 4 out of 11 adenomas, overlapping with the Wnt pathway. Immunohistochemical labeling reveals a nearly 5-fold increase in CEA levels in 23% of adenoma samples with a concomitant loss of TGF-β signaling. We also define a functional role by which the CEA B3 domain interacts with TGFBR1, potentially inactivating the tumor suppressor function of TGF-β signaling. Our study uncovers diverse mutational processes underlying the transition from early adenoma to cancer. This has broad implications for biomarker-driven targeting of CEA/TGF-β in high-risk adenomas and may lead to early detection of aggressive adenoma to CRC progression. PMID:27100181

  2. Giant Bauhin valve adenoma and laparoscopically assisted colonoscopic polypectomy.

    PubMed

    Mikalauskas, Saulius; Račkauskas, Rokas; Zeromskas, Paulius; Strupas, Kęstutis

    2014-09-01

    Nowadays colonoscopic polypectomy has become a routine procedure, which is performed daily. Almost every colorectal benign tumor can be removed endoscopically, although there are some problematic adenomas which are either large in size or difficult to approach. In the past two decades laparoscopically assisted colonoscopic polypectomy has become established in the endoscopic world, which reduced the need of operations for those patients with lesions that are large or hard to approach. The first laparoscopically monitored colonoscopic polypectomy was performed by Franklin in 1991, and reported publicly in 1993. We present a case report of a patient who was diagnosed with Bauhin valve giant adenoma and underwent laparoscopically assisted polypectomy. PMID:25337179

  3. Regorafenib assessment in refractory advanced colorectal cancer: RegARd-C study protocol

    PubMed Central

    Hendlisz, Alain; Deleporte, Amélie; Vandeputte, Caroline; Charette, Nicolas; Paesmans, Marianne; Guiot, Thomas; Garcia, Camilo; Flamen, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Regorafenib was recently approved for patients with pretreated advanced colorectal cancer (aCRC), despite a moderate improvement of the patients’ outcome, and significant toxicities. Based on previous studies showing that early fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography (FDG-PET)-based metabolic response assessment (MRA) might adequately select patients unlikely to benefit from treatment, the RegARd-C trial uses early MRA to identify likely non-responders to regorafenib in a population of patients with aCRC and guide a comprehensive evaluation of genomic and epigenetic determinants of resistance to treatment. Methods and analysis RegARd-C is a multicentric prospective study. Its primary objective is to identify non-benefitters from regorafenib given at 160 mg/day, 3 weeks out of 4 in a population of patients with pretreated aCRC. Baseline PET is repeated at day 14 of the first treatment course. MRA is blinded for the investigators. Overall survival (OS) is the primary end point and will be correlated with metabolic parameters and (epi)genetic alterations assessed from tumour and serial blood samples. A target sample size of 105 evaluable patients (70 as derivation set and 35 as validation set), is considered as sufficient to validate an expected HR for OS of metabolic responders compared to metabolic non-responders significantly <1 (with 80% power and 1-sided 5% α in case of a true HR≤0.59 and a responders rate of 47%). Ethics and dissemination The study was approved by the Institut Jules Bordet's competent ethics committee and complies with the Helsinki declaration or the Belgian laws and regulations, whichever provides the greatest protection for the patient, and follows the International Conference on Harmonisation E 6 (R1) Guideline for Good Clinical Practice, reference number CPMP/ICH/135/95. The protocol and the trials results, even inconclusive, will be presented at international oncology congresses, and published in peer

  4. [Thyroid Adenomas in Children].

    PubMed

    Morozov, D A; Pimenova, E S; Mirokova, E D

    2015-01-01

    According to the papers thyroid nodules are quite rare in the first two decades of life. However, there are some exceptions, relating to areas with an iodine deficiency or affected by radioactive fallout, where the risk of nodules and carcinomas is increased. Therefore, it is a great challenge for the physician to distinguish between benign and malignant lesions preoperatively, and not only in these areas of greater risk. The authors analyzed current works, which are devoted to diagnostics and treatment of adenomas of thyroid gland in children. This literature review is based on works dedicated to epidemiology, histotypes study, and methods of diagnostics, surgical treatment, prognosis and complications of this pathology. The current tendencies in surgical approaches, intraoperative monitoring of recurrent laryngeal nerve are also discussed. The actuality of this problem is connected with last decade increase of adenomas in structure of thyroid gland nodules, increase of number of patients with multiple adenomas and with polypathias: adenomas with nodular goiter, autoimmune thyroiditis and cancer in children. The difficulties of diagnostic of adenomas are related to the similar clinical symptoms, cytogenetic characteristics of growth of benign and malignant lesions of thyroid gland. Additionally there is no systematic review about thyroid adenomas in children recent years. PMID:26846075

  5. Radioimmunodetection of colorectal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, E.E.; Deland, F.H.; Casper, S.; Corgan, R.L.; Primus, F.J.; Goldenberg, D.M.

    1980-03-15

    This study examines the accuracy of colorectal cancer radioimmunodetection. Twenty-seven patients with a history of histologically-confirmed colonic or rectal carcinoma received a high-titer, purified goat anti-CEA IgG labelled with /sup 131/I at a total dose of at least 1.0 ..mu..Ci. Various body views were scanned at 24 and 48 hours after administration of the radioantibody. Three additional cases were evaluated; one had a villous adenoma in the rectum and received the /sup 131/I-labeled anti-CEA IgG, while two colonic carcinoma patients received normal goat IgG labelled with /sup 131/I. All of the 7 cases with primary colorectal cancer showed true-positive tumor localization, while 20 of 25 sites of metastatic colorectal cancer detected by immune scintigraphy were corroborated by other detection measures. The sensitivity of the radioimmunodetection of colorectal cancers (primary and metastatic) was found to be 90% (true-positive rate), the putative specificity (true-negative rate) was 94%, and the apparent overall accuracy of the technique was 93%. Neither the case of a villous adenoma receiving the anti-CEA IgG nor the two cases of colonic cancer receiving normal goat IgG showed tumor radiolocalization. Very high circulating CEA titers did not appear to hinder successful tumor radiolocalization. These findings suggest that in colorectal cancers the method of CEA radioimmunodetection may be of value in preoperatively determining the location and extent of disease, in assessing possible recurrence or spread postoperatively, and in localizing the source of CEA production in patients with rising or elevated CEA titers. An ancilliary benefit could be a more tumor-specific detection test for confirming the findings of other, more conventional diagnostic measures.

  6. Current targeted therapies in the treatment of advanced colorectal cancer: a review

    PubMed Central

    Moriarity, Andrew; O’Sullivan, Jacintha; Kennedy, John; Mehigan, Brian; McCormick, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Treatment strategies for metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) patients have undergone dramatic changes in the past decade and despite improved patient outcomes, there still exist areas for continued development. The introduction of targeted agents has provided clinicians with additional treatment options in mCRC, however, results have been mixed at best. These novel therapies were designed to interfere with specific molecules involved in the cellular carcinogenesis pathway and ultimately deliver a more focused treatment. Currently, their use in mCRC has been limited primarily as an adjunct to conventional chemotherapy regimens. This review explores the relevant cell-signaling networks in colorectal cancer, provides focus on the current targeted agent armamentarium approved for use in mCRC and explores the usefulness of predictive mCRC biomarkers. PMID:27482287

  7. Contemporary issues in the evaluation and management of pituitary adenomas.

    PubMed

    Pekic, S; Stojanovic, M; Popovic, V

    2015-12-01

    treatment modalities fail to completely control the disease and prevent the associated morbidity and mortality. This article reviews the advances in our understanding of pituitary adenoma, the guidance in evaluation and management of different subtypes of pituitary adenomas and the possibility of new therapeutic approaches. PMID:25900682

  8. Determinants of Bowel Preparation Quality and Its Association With Adenoma Detection: A Prospective Colonoscopy Study.

    PubMed

    Wong, Martin C S; Ching, Jessica Y L; Chan, Victor C W; Lam, Thomas Y T; Luk, Arthur K C; Tang, Raymond S Y; Wong, Sunny H; Ng, Siew C; Ng, Simon S M; Wu, Justin C Y; Chan, Francis K L; Sung, Joseph J Y

    2016-01-01

    The predictors of poor bowel preparation in colorectal cancer screening participants have not been adequately studied, and the association between the quality of bowel preparation and adenoma detection has not been firmly established. This study examined the determinants of poor bowel preparation, and evaluated its relationship with adenoma detection.We included subjects aged between 50 and 70 years who received colonoscopy between 2008 and 2014 in a colorectal cancer screening program in Hong Kong. The quality of the bowel preparation was assessed by colonoscopists, and the factors associated with poor bowel cleansing were evaluated by a binary logistic regression analysis. A multivariate regression model was constructed to evaluate if poor bowel preparation was associated with detection of colorectal neoplasia.From 5470 screening participants (average age 57.7 years, SD 4.9), 1891 (34.6%) had poor or fair bowel preparation. The average cecal intubation time was 7.0 minutes (SD 5.4; range 1.22-36.9 minutes) and the average colonoscopy withdrawal time was 10.8 minutes (SD 6.9; range 6.0-107.0 minutes). Among all, 26.5% had colorectal neoplasia and 5.5% had advanced neoplasia. Older age (≥60 years; adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 1.19-1.38, P = 0.02-0.04), male sex (AOR = 1.38, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.19-1.60, P < 0.001), and current smoking (AOR = 1.41, 95% CI 1.14-1.75, P = 0.002) were significantly associated with poor/fair bowel preparation. Poorer cleansing resulted in significantly lower detection rate of neoplasia (AOR = 0.35-0.62) and advanced neoplasia (AOR = 0.36-0.50) irrespective of polyp size.Steps to improve proper procedures of bowel preparation are warranted, especially among subjects at risk of poor bowel preparation. Strategies should be implemented to improve bowel cleansing, which is now demonstrated as a definite quality indicator. PMID:26765402

  9. Nuclear Division Index may Predict Neoplastic Colorectal Lesions

    PubMed Central

    IONESCU, Mirela E.; CIOCIRLAN, Mihai; BECHEANU, Gabriel; NICOLAIE, Tudor; DITESCU, Cristina; TEIUSANU, Adriana G.; GOLOGAN, Serban I.; ARBANAS, Tudor; DICULESCU, Mircea M.

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Colorectal cancer (CRC) develops by accumulation of multiple genetic damages leading to genetic instability that can be evaluated by cytogenetic methods. In the current study we used Cytokinesis-Blocked Micronucleus Assay (CBMN) technique to assess the behavior of Nuclear Division Index(NDI) in peripheral lymphocytes of patients with CRC and polyps versus patients with normal colonoscopy. Methods: Blood samples were collected from patients after informed consent. By CBMN technique we assessed the proportion of mono-nucleated, bi-nucleated, tri-nucleated and tetra-nucleated cells/500 cells, to calculate NDI. Data were statistically analyzed using the SPSS 11.0 package. Results: 45 patients were available for analysis, 23 men and 22 women, with a mean age of 58.7±13.5. 17 had normal colonoscopy, 17 colonic polyps and 11 CRC. The mean NDI values were significantly smaller for patients with CRC or polyps than in patients with normal colonoscopy (1.57 vs 1.73, p=0.013). The difference persisted for patients with neoplastic lesions (adenomas and carcinomas) when compared with patients with normal colonoscopy or non neoplastic (hyperplastic) polyps (1.56 vs.1.71, p=0.018). The NDI cut-off value to predict the presence of adenomas or carcinomas was equal to 1.55 with a 54.2% sensitivity and 81% specificity of lower values (p=0.019). The NDI cut off value to predict the presence of advanced adenomas or cancer was 1.525 for a sensitivity of 56.3% and a specificity of 82.8% (p=0.048). Conclusion: NDI may be useful in screening strategies for colorectal cancer as simple, noninvasive, inexpensive cytogenetic biomarker. PMID:22368693

  10. Colorectal polyps

    MedlinePlus

    ... Villous adenomas; Serrated polyp; Serrated adenoma; Precancerous polyps; Colon cancer - polyps ... centimeter. Risk factors include: Age Family history of colon cancer or polyps A type of polyp called villous ...

  11. Serum matrix metalloproteinase-9 in colorectal cancer family-risk population screening

    PubMed Central

    Otero-Estévez, Olalla; Chiara, Loretta De; Rodríguez-Girondo, Mar; Rodríguez-Berrocal, Francisco Javier; Cubiella, Joaquín; Castro, Inés; Hernández, Vicent; Martínez-Zorzano, Vicenta Soledad

    2015-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) is related to tumour development and progression in colorectal cancer (CRC) and its utility as biomarker has been suggested. The aim of our study was to measure serum MMP-9 in asymptomatic first-degree relatives of CRC patients, and to analyse its diagnostic accuracy for the detection of advanced neoplasia (AN: advanced adenomas and CRC). Additionally, we compared its diagnostic capability with the most used non-invasive faecal immunochemical test (FIT). Serum MMP-9 was quantified by ELISA in 516 asymptomatic individuals that underwent a colonoscopy and a FIT. MMP-9 levels were significantly related to age and gender and therefore the concentration was corrected by these confounders. Corrected MMP-9 (cMMP-9) levels were higher in individuals with advanced adenomas (AA; p-value = 0.029) and AN (p-value = 0.056) compared to individuals with no neoplasia. Moreover, elevated cMMP-9 concentration was associated with more severe characteristics of adenomas (number of lesions, size and histology). Nevertheless, the diagnostic accuracy of cMMP-9 was considerably lower than that of FIT for identifying AA (22.64% vs. 47.17% sensitivity, 90% specificity) or AN (19.30% vs. 52.63% sensitivity, 90% specificity). According to our results, serum MMP-9 cannot be considered of utility for the diagnosis of AN in CRC family-risk population screening. PMID:26264519

  12. Effect of KRAS codon13 mutations in patients with advanced colorectal cancer (advanced CRC) under oxaliplatin containing chemotherapy. Results from a translational study of the AIO colorectal study group

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background To evaluate the value of KRAS codon 13 mutations in patients with advanced colorectal cancer (advanced CRC) treated with oxaliplatin and fluoropyrimidines. Methods Tumor specimens from 201 patients with advanced CRC from a randomized, phase III trial comparing oxaliplatin/5-FU vs. oxaliplatin/capecitabine were retrospectively analyzed for KRAS mutations. Mutation data were correlated to response data (Overall response rate, ORR), progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS). Results 201 patients were analysed for KRAS mutation (61.2% males; mean age 64.2 ± 8.6 years). KRAS mutations were identified in 36.3% of tumors (28.8% in codon 12, 7.4% in codon 13). The ORR in codon 13 patients compared to codon 12 and wild type patients was significantly lower (p = 0.008). There was a tendency for a better overall survival in KRAS wild type patients compared to mutants (p = 0.085). PFS in all patients was not different in the three KRAS genetic groups (p = 0.72). However, we found a marked difference in PFS between patients with codon 12 and 13 mutant tumors treated with infusional 5-FU versus capecitabine based regimens. Conclusions Our data suggest that the type of KRAS mutation may be of clinical relevance under oxaliplatin combination chemotherapies without the addition of monoclonal antibodies in particular when overall response rates are important. Trial registration number 2002-04-017 PMID:22876876

  13. A Phase I Study of EKB-569 in Combination with Capecitabine in Patients with Advanced Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Laheru, Dan; Croghan, Gary; Bukowski, Ronald; Rudek, Michelle; Messersmith, Wells; Erlichman, Charles; Pelley, Robert; Jimeno, Antonio; Donehower, Ross; Boni, Joseph; Abbas, Richat; Martins, Patricia; Zacharchuk, Charles; Hidalgo, Manuel

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD), characterize the principal toxicities, and assess the pharmacokinetics of EKB-569, an oral selective irreversible inhibitor of the epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase, in combination with capecitabine in patients with advanced colorectal cancer. Experimental Design Patients were treated with EKB-569 daily for 21days and capecitabine twice daily for14 days of a 21-day cycle. The dose levels of EKB-569 (mg/day) and capecitabine (mg/m2 twice daily) assessed were 25/750, 50/750, 50/1,000 and 75/1,000. An expanded cohort was enrolled at the MTD to better study toxicity and efficacy. Samples of plasma were collected to characterize the pharmacokinetics of the agents. Treatment efficacy was assessed every other cycle. Results A total of 37 patients, the majority of whom had prior chemotherapy, received a total of 163 cycles of treatment. Twenty patients were treated at the MTD, 50 mg EKB-569, daily and 1,000 mg/m2 capecitabine twice daily. Dose-limiting toxicities were diarrhea and rash. No patients had complete or partial responses but 48% had stable disease. The conversion of capecitabine to 5-fluorouracil was higher for the combination of EKB-569 and capecitabine (321 ± 151 ng*h/mL) than for capecitabine alone (176 ± 62 ng*hours/mL; P = 0.0037). Conclusion In advanced colorectal cancer, 50 mg EKB-569 daily can be safely combined with 1,000 mg/m2 capecitabine twice a day. A statistically significant increase in plasma levels of 5-fluorouracil for the combination of EKB-569 and capecitabine may be due to the single-dose versus multiple-dose exposure difference, variability in exposure or a potential drug interaction. PMID:18765554

  14. Colorectal neoplasm characterization based on swept-source optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Chih-Wei; Chiu, Han-Mo; Sun, Chia-Wei

    2009-07-01

    Most of the colorectal cancer has grown from the adenomatous polyp. Adenomatous lesions have a well-documented relationship to colorectal cancer in previous studies. Thus, to detect the morphological changes between polyp and tumor can allow early diagnosis of colorectal cancer and simultaneous removal of lesions. In this paper, the various adenoma/carcinoma in-vitro samples are monitored by our swept-source optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT) system. The significant results indicate a great potential for early detection of colorectal adenomas based on the SS-OCT imaging.

  15. Colonoscopy Reduces Risk of Death from Colorectal Cancer in High-Risk Patients

    Cancer.gov

    Long-term results from the National Polyp Study confirm that removing precancerous adenomas not only reduces the risk of colorectal cancer but also reduces the number of deaths from the disease by more than half.

  16. Double pituitary adenomas.

    PubMed

    Iacovazzo, D; Bianchi, A; Lugli, F; Milardi, D; Giampietro, A; Lucci-Cordisco, E; Doglietto, F; Lauriola, L; De Marinis, L

    2013-04-01

    Double pituitary adenomas represent up to 2.6 % of pituitary adenomas in large surgical series and up to 3.3 % of patients with Cushing's disease have been found to have double or multiple pituitary adenomas. We report the case of a 60-year-old male patient whose medical history began in 2002 with erectile dysfunction; hyperprolactinemia was found and MRI showed a 6-mm area of delayed enhancement in the lateral portion of the right pituitary lobe. Treatment with cabergoline was started with normalization of prolactin levels; the following MRI, performed in 2005 and 2008, showed shrinkage of the pituitary lesion. In 2005, the patient began to manifest weight gain, hypertension, and facial plethora, but no further evaluations were done. In January 2010, the patient came to our attention and underwent multiple tests that suggested Cushing's disease. A new MRI was negative. Bilateral inferior petrosal sinus sampling showed significant pituitary-to-peripheral ratio and, in May 2010, the patient underwent exploratory pituitary surgery with evidence of a 1-2-mm white-coloured midline area compatible with pituitary adenoma that was surgically removed. Post-operatively, the patient's clinical conditions improved with onset of secondary hypoadrenalism. The histologic examination confirmed a pituitary adenoma (immunostaining was found to be positive for ACTH and negative for prolactin). We report the case of an ACTH-producing microadenoma metachronous to a prolactin secreting microadenoma although not confirmed histologically, shrunk by medical treatment. A review of data in the literature regarding double or multiple pituitary adenomas has also been done. PMID:23325364

  17. Advances in dynamic modeling of colorectal cancer signaling-network regions, a path toward targeted therapies

    PubMed Central

    Kolch, Walter; Kholodenko, Boris N.; Ambrosi, Cristina De; Barla, Annalisa; Biganzoli, Elia M.; Nencioni, Alessio; Patrone, Franco; Ballestrero, Alberto; Zoppoli, Gabriele; Verri, Alessandro; Parodi, Silvio

    2015-01-01

    The interconnected network of pathways downstream of the TGFβ, WNT and EGF-families of receptor ligands play an important role in colorectal cancer pathogenesis. We studied and implemented dynamic simulations of multiple downstream pathways and described the section of the signaling network considered as a Molecular Interaction Map (MIM). Our simulations used Ordinary Differential Equations (ODEs), which involved 447 reactants and their interactions. Starting from an initial “physiologic condition”, the model can be adapted to simulate individual pathologic cancer conditions implementing alterations/mutations in relevant onco-proteins. We verified some salient model predictions using the mutated colorectal cancer lines HCT116 and HT29. We measured the amount of MYC and CCND1 mRNAs and AKT and ERK phosphorylated proteins, in response to individual or combination onco-protein inhibitor treatments. Experimental and simulation results were well correlated. Recent independently published results were also predicted by our model. Even in the presence of an approximate and incomplete signaling network information, a predictive dynamic modeling seems already possible. An important long term road seems to be open and can be pursued further, by incremental steps, toward even larger and better parameterized MIMs. Personalized treatment strategies with rational associations of signaling-proteins inhibitors, could become a realistic goal. PMID:25671297

  18. Consensus on the Prevention, Screening, Early Diagnosis and Treatment of Colorectal Tumors in China: Chinese Society of Gastroenterology, October 14-15, 2011, Shanghai, China

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Jing-Yuan; Zheng, Shu; Jiang, Bo; Lai, Mao-De; Fang, Dian-Chun; Han, Ying; Sheng, Qian-Jiu; Li, Jing-Nan; Chen, Ying-Xuan; Gao, Qin-Yan

    2014-01-01

    Background Colorectal cancer (CRC) is steadily increasing in China. Colorectal adenoma (CRA) is the most important precancerous disease of CRC. Screening for colorectal tumors can aid early diagnosis. Advances in endoscopic mucosal resection and endoscopic submucosal dissection can aid the early treatment of colorectal tumors. Furthermore, because of high risk of recurrence after removal of adenomas under endoscopy, factors contributing to recurrence, the follow-up mode and the interval established, and the feasibility of application and the time of various chemical preventions should be concerned. However, a relevant consensus on the screening, early diagnosis and treatment, and prevention of colorectal tumors in China is lacking. Summary The consensus recommendations include epidemiology, pathology, screening, early diagnosis, endoscopic treatment, monitoring and follow-up, and chemoprevention of colorectal tumors in China. Key Message This is the first consensus on the prevention, screening, early diagnosis and treatment of CRA and CRC in China based on evidence in the literature and on local data. Practical Implications Through reviewing the literature, regional data and passing the consensus by an anonymous vote, gastroenterology experts from all over China launch the consensus recommendations in Shanghai. The incidence and mortality of CRC in China has increased, and the incidence or detection rate of CRA has increased rapidly. Screening for colorectal tumors should be performed at age 50-74 years. Preliminary screening should be undertaken to find persons at high risk, followed by colonoscopy. A screening cycle of 3 years is recommended for persistent interventions. Opportunistic screening is a mode suitable for the current healthcare system and national situation. Colonoscopy combined with pathological examination is the standard method for the diagnosis of colorectal tumors. CRA removal under endoscopy can prevent CRC to some extent, but CRA has an obvious

  19. Familial Isolated Pituitary Adenomas (FIPA) and the Pituitary Adenoma Predisposition due to Mutations in the Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Interacting Protein (AIP) Gene

    PubMed Central

    Aaltonen, Lauri A.; Daly, Adrian F.

    2013-01-01

    Pituitary adenomas are one of the most frequent intracranial tumors and occur with a prevalence of approximately 1:1000 in the developed world. Pituitary adenomas have a serious disease burden, and their management involves neurosurgery, biological therapies, and radiotherapy. Early diagnosis of pituitary tumors while they are smaller may help increase cure rates. Few genetic predictors of pituitary adenoma development exist. Recent years have seen two separate, complimentary advances in inherited pituitary tumor research. The clinical condition of familial isolated pituitary adenomas (FIPA) has been described, which encompasses the familial occurrence of isolated pituitary adenomas outside of the setting of syndromic conditions like multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 and Carney complex. FIPA families comprise approximately 2% of pituitary adenomas and represent a clinical entity with homogeneous or heterogeneous pituitary adenoma types occurring within the same kindred. The aryl hydrocarbon receptor interacting protein (AIP) gene has been identified as causing a pituitary adenoma predisposition of variable penetrance that accounts for 20% of FIPA families. Germline AIP mutations have been shown to associate with the occurrence of large pituitary adenomas that occur at a young age, predominantly in children/adolescents and young adults. AIP mutations are usually associated with somatotropinomas, but prolactinomas, nonfunctioning pituitary adenomas, Cushing disease, and other infrequent clinical adenoma types can also occur. Gigantism is a particular feature of AIP mutations and occurs in more than one third of affected somatotropinoma patients. Study of pituitary adenoma patients with AIP mutations has demonstrated that these cases raise clinical challenges to successful treatment. Extensive research on the biology of AIP and new advances in mouse Aip knockout models demonstrate multiple pathways by which AIP may contribute to tumorigenesis. This review assesses

  20. Pregnancy and pituitary adenomas.

    PubMed

    Glezer, Andrea; Jallad, Raquel S; Machado, Marcio C; Fragoso, Maria C; Bronstein, Marcello D

    2016-09-01

    Infertility is frequent in patients harboring pituitary adenomas. The mechanisms involved include hypogonadism secondary to hormonal hypersecretion (prolactin, growth hormone and cortisol), stalk disconnection and pituitary damage. With the improvement of clinical and surgical treatment, pregnancy in women harboring pituitary adenomas turned into a reality. Pituitary hormonal hyper- and hyposecretion influences pregnancy outcomes, as well as pregnancy can interfere on pituitary tumors, especially in prolactinomas. We review literature about specific follow-up and management in pregnant women harboring prolactinomas, acromegaly, or Cushings disease and the impact of clinical and surgical treatment on each condition. PMID:26977888

  1. PIK3CA Amplification Is Common in Left Side-Tubular Adenomas but Uncommon Sessile Serrated Adenomas Exclusively with KRAS Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyunsu; Lee, Jae-Ho; Kim, Dae-Kwang; Choi, In-Jang; Hwang, Ilseon; Kang, Yu-Na; Kim, Shin

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is a heterogeneous disorder than arises via multiple distinct pathways, from tubular adenomas (TAs) and sessile serrated adenomas (SSAs), which are clinically, morphologically, and molecularly different. We examined PIK3CA amplification in colorectal precancerous legions, including TAs and SSAs. DNA was isolated from paired normal and tumoral tissues in 64 TAs and 32 SSAs. PIK3CA amplification, KRAS mutation, and BRAF mutation were analyzed by real-time PCR and pyrosequencing. PIK3CA amplification was found in 25% of TAs and 9.4% of SSAs, respectively. KRAS and BRAF mutations were mutually exclusive in both TAs and SSAs. In TAs, PIK3CA amplification was associated with left side and it was mutually exclusive with KRAS mutation. These results suggest that PIK3CA amplification may be early and important event in colorectal carcinogenesis and may drive the development of left-side TAs independently with KRAS mutation. PMID:26019684

  2. EYA4 Acts as a New Tumor Suppressor Gene in Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung-Jin; Tae, Chung Hyun; Hong, Sung Noh; Min, Byung-Hoon; Chang, Dong Kyung; Rhee, Poong-Lyul; Kim, Jae J; Kim, Hee Cheol; Kim, Duk-Hwan; Kim, Young-Ho

    2015-12-01

    A previous genome-wide methylation array for colorectal cancer (CRC) identified aberrant promoter methylation of eyes absent 4 (EYA4). However, the correlations between EYA4 methylation and gene expression, the role played by EYA4 protein in colorectal carcinogenesis, and results of the gene-enrichment and functional annotation analysis have not yet been established. We analyzed the EYA4 methylation status and found EYA4 promoter methylation in CRC cell lines (100%), CRC tissues (93.5%) and advanced adenoma tissues (50.7%), compared with normal mucosa (32.6%). There was a significant inverse correlation between EYA4 methylation and expression. EYA4 transfection led to inhibition of cell proliferation in colony assays and xenograft studies. On performing the gene-enrichment and functional annotation analysis, we observed that the differentially expressed genes have been associated with the Wnt and MAPK signaling pathways. Our results demonstrate that EYA4 is under epigenetic regulation in CRC. It is a candidate tumor suppressor gene that acts by inducing up-regulation of DKK1 and inhibiting the Wnt signaling pathway. In addition, EYA4 methylation may be identified in stool samples and it serves as a potential stool biomarker for detection of advanced adenoma and CRC. PMID:25620232

  3. Paediatric pituitary adenomas: a decade of change.

    PubMed

    Guaraldi, Federica; Storr, Helen L; Ghizzoni, Lucia; Ghigo, Ezio; Savage, Martin O

    2014-01-01

    Pituitary adenomas, although rare in the paediatric age range and mostly benign, represent very challenging disorders for diagnosis and management. The recent identification of genetic alterations in young individuals with pituitary adenomas has broadened the scope of molecular investigations and contributed to the understanding of mechanisms of tumorigenesis. Recent identification of causative mutations of genes such as GNAS, PRKAR1A, MEN1 and AIP has introduced the concept of molecular screening of young apparently healthy family members. Population-based studies have reported a significantly higher number of affected subjects and genetic variations than expected. Radiological techniques have advanced, yet many microadenomas remain undetectable on scanning. However, experience with transsphenoidal and endoscopic pituitary surgery has led to higher rates of cure. Prolactinomas, corticotroph and somatotroph adenomas remain the most prevalent, with each diagnosis presenting its own challenges. As paediatric pituitary adenomas occur very infrequently within the paediatric age range, paediatric endocrine units cannot provide expert management in isolation. Consequently, close co-operation with adult endocrinology colleagues with experience of pituitary disease is strongly recommended. PMID:24525527

  4. Therapeutic targeting of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase signaling pathway: novel targeted therapies and advances in the treatment of colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Ming

    2012-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the leading causes of cancer-related death in the USA, and more effective treatment of CRC is therefore needed. Advances in our understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of this malignancy have led to the development of novel molecule-targeted therapies. Among the most recent classes of targeted therapies being developed are inhibitors targeting the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) signaling pathway. As one of the most frequently deregulated pathways in several human cancers, including CRC, aberrant PI3K signaling plays an important role in the growth, survival, motility and metabolism of cancer cells. Targeting this pathway therefore has considerable potential to lead to novel and more effective treatments for CRC. Preclinical and early clinical studies have revealed the potential efficacy of drugs that target PI3K signaling for the treatment of CRC. However, a major challenge that remains is to study these agents in phase III clinical trials to see whether these early successes translate into better patient outcomes. In this review we focus on providing an up-to-date assessment of our current understanding of PI3K signaling biology and its deregulation in the molecular pathogenesis of CRC. Advances in available agents and challenges in targeting the PI3K signaling pathway in CRC treatment will be discussed and placed in the context of the currently available therapies for CRC. PMID:22973417

  5. The Clinical Significance of MiR-148a as a Predictive Biomarker in Patients with Advanced Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Masanobu; Cuatrecasas, Miriam; Balaguer, Francesc; Hur, Keun; Toiyama, Yuji; Castells, Antoni; Boland, C. Richard; Goel, Ajay

    2012-01-01

    Aim Development of robust prognostic and/or predictive biomarkers in patients with colorectal cancer (CRC) is imperative for advancing treatment strategies for this disease. We aimed to determine whether expression status of certain miRNAs might have prognostic/predictive value in CRC patients treated with conventional cytotoxic chemotherapies. Methods We studied a cohort of 273 CRC specimens from stage II/III patients treated with 5-fluorouracil-based adjuvant chemotherapy and stage IV patients subjected to 5-fluorouracil and oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy. In a screening set (n = 44), 13 of 21 candidate miRNAs were successfully quantified by multiplex quantitative RT-PCR. In the validation set comprising of the entire patient cohort, miR-148a expression status was assessed by quantitative RT-PCR, and its promoter methylation was quantified by bisulfite pyrosequencing. Lastly, we analyzed the associations between miR-148a expression and patient survival. Results Among the candidate miRNAs studied, miR-148a expression was most significantly down-regulated in advanced CRC tissues. In stage III and IV CRC, low miR-148a expression was associated with significantly shorter disease free-survival (DFS), a worse therapeutic response, and poor overall survival (OS). Furthermore, miR-148a methylation status correlated inversely with its expression, and was associated with worse survival in stage IV CRC. In multivariate analysis, miR-148a expression was an independent prognostic/predictive biomarker for advanced CRC patients (DFS in stage III, low vs. high expression, HR 2.11; OS in stage IV, HR 1.93). Discussion MiR-148a status has a prognostic/predictive value in advanced CRC patients treated with conventional chemotherapy, which has important clinical implications in improving therapeutic strategies and personalized management of this malignancy. PMID:23056401

  6. Relationship between duodenal bile acids and colorectal neoplasia.

    PubMed Central

    Moorehead, R J; Campbell, G R; Donaldson, J D; McKelvey, S T

    1987-01-01

    To investigate a possible relationship between bile acids and colorectal neoplasia duodenal bile acids were analysed in 50 patients with colorectal adenomas and 14 with carcinoma. Using gas liquid and high performance liquid chromatography a small, but significant increase in the proportion of chenodeoxycholic acid was found in the bile of adenoma patients compared with controls (mean % +/- SD 31.0 +/- 10.8, 26.4 +/- 8.3, p = 0.01). The difference in the proportions of chenodeoxycholic acid correlated with increasing malignant potential of the adenomas as determined by increasing size, histological type, degree of dysplasia and number present. In carcinoma patients an increase in the proportion of chenodeoxycholic acid was also observed compared with controls (mean % +/- SD, 47.2 +/- 9.6, 28.0 +/- 4.5, p less than 0.01). The proportions of other bile acids in those with adenoma or carcinoma were normal. PMID:3428671

  7. Computer Aided Diagnosis for Confocal Laser Endomicroscopy in Advanced Colorectal Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ştefănescu, Daniela; Streba, Costin; Cârţână, Elena Tatiana; Săftoiu, Adrian; Gruionu, Gabriel; Gruionu, Lucian Gheorghe

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Confocal laser endomicroscopy (CLE) is becoming a popular method for optical biopsy of digestive mucosa for both diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. Computer aided diagnosis of CLE images, using image processing and fractal analysis can be used to quantify the histological structures in the CLE generated images. The aim of this study is to develop an automatic diagnosis algorithm of colorectal cancer (CRC), based on fractal analysis and neural network modeling of the CLE-generated colon mucosa images. Materials and Methods We retrospectively analyzed a series of 1035 artifact-free endomicroscopy images, obtained during CLE examinations from normal mucosa (356 images) and tumor regions (679 images). The images were processed using a computer aided diagnosis (CAD) medical imaging system in order to obtain an automatic diagnosis. The CAD application includes image reading and processing functions, a module for fractal analysis, grey-level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM) computation module, and a feature identification module based on the Marching Squares and linear interpolation methods. A two-layer neural network was trained to automatically interpret the imaging data and diagnose the pathological samples based on the fractal dimension and the characteristic features of the biological tissues. Results Normal colon mucosa is characterized by regular polyhedral crypt structures whereas malignant colon mucosa is characterized by irregular and interrupted crypts, which can be diagnosed by CAD. For this purpose, seven geometric parameters were defined for each image: fractal dimension, lacunarity, contrast correlation, energy, homogeneity, and feature number. Of the seven parameters only contrast, homogeneity and feature number were significantly different between normal and cancer samples. Next, a two-layer feed forward neural network was used to train and automatically diagnose the malignant samples, based on the seven parameters tested. The neural network

  8. A phase II randomised trial of 5-fluorouracil with or without interferon alpha-2a in advanced colorectal cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Piga, A.; Cascinu, S.; Latini, L.; Marcellini, M.; Bavosi, M.; Acito, L.; Bascioni, R.; Giustini, L.; Francini, G.; Pancotti, A.; Rossi, G.; Del Papa, M.; Carle, F.; Cellerino, R.

    1996-01-01

    With the association of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and alpha-interferon (IFN), objective responses as high as 26 63% have been reported in untreated patients with advanced colorectal cancer. However, grade 3-4 toxicity has also been reported. We have conducted a prospective phase II randomised study comparing 5-FU to 5-FU + IFN, to investigate whether the addition of IFN to a weekly 5-FU regimen devoid of significant toxicity used at our institutions could improve the effectiveness of 5-FU while maintaining acceptable toxicity. Patients with histologically proven advanced colorectal carcinoma were randomised to receive 5-FU 500 mg m-2 intravenous (i.v.) bolus on days 1-5 followed by 5-FU 500 mg m-2 i.v. bolus weekly from day 15, with or without IFN alpha-2a intramuscularly (i.m.) 1.5 mU daily on days 6-12 and 3 mU i.m. daily thereafter. The treatment was administered on an outpatient basis. Response was evaluated every 3 months, and treatment continued until progression or after two consecutive judgements of stable disease. Response rate was the main end point of the study. Of 141 patients eligible, 72 were randomised to 5-FU alone (arm A) and 69 to 5-FU + IFN (arm B). Responses were 9/72 (12.5%) in arm A and 6/69 (8.7%) in arm B; complete responses were three in arm A and two in arm B. Progression-free survival (median 4 months) and survival (median 12 months) were identical in the two arms. Toxicity was almost absent in arm A and moderate in arm B, represented mainly by haematological toxicity (usually leucopenia). In conclusion, overall survival was good in both arms of treatment and toxicity was moderate. While the response rate with 5-FU alone was in accord with the literature data, response to 5-FU + IFN was lower than expected. At least at this dosage and schedule, the association of 5-FU and IFN is no better than 5-FU alone and is of no clinical interest. PMID:8826868

  9. Optimal Number of Endoscopic Biopsies in Diagnosis of Advanced Gastric and Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Yeowon; Choi, Hyo Sun; Jeon, Woo Kyu; Kim, Byung Ik; Park, Dong Il; Cho, Yong Kyun; Kim, Hong Joo; Park, Jung Ho

    2012-01-01

    Endoscopic biopsy is necessary to confirm a histopathologic diagnosis. Currently, 6 to 8 biopsies are recommended for diagnosis of a suspected malignant lesion. However, multiple biopsies may result in several problems, such as an increased risk of bleeding, procedure prolongation, and increased workload to pathologists. The aim of this study was to clarify the optimal number of endoscopic biopsy specimens required in diagnosis of advanced gastrointestinal cancer. Patients who were diagnosed with advanced gastrointestinal cancer during endoscopy were included. Five specimens were obtained sequentially from viable tissue of the cancer margin. Experienced pathologists evaluated each specimen and provided diagnoses. A total of 91 patients were enrolled. Fifty-nine subjects had advanced gastric cancer, and 32 had advanced colon cancer. Positive diagnosis rates of the first, second, and third advanced gastric cancer specimens were 81.3%, 94.9%, and 98.3%, respectively, while positive diagnosis rates of advanced colon cancer specimens were 78.1%, 87.5%, and 93.8%. Further biopsies did not increase positive diagnosis cumulative rates. This study demonstrated that three specimens were sufficient to make correct pathologic diagnoses in advanced gastrointestinal cancer. Therefore, we recommend 3 or 4 biopsies from viable tissue in advanced gastrointestinal cancer to make a pathologic diagnosis during endoscopy. PMID:22219611

  10. Advances of Targeted Therapy in Treatment of Unresectable Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Suk-young; Oh, Sang Cheul

    2016-01-01

    Despite being one of the most frequently diagnosed cancers worldwide, prognosis of metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC) was poor. Development and introduction of biologic agents in treatment of patients with metastatic CRC have brought improved outcomes. Monoclonal antibodies directing epidermal growth factor receptors and vascular endothelial growth factor are main biologic agents currently used in treatment of metastatic CRC. Encouraged by results from many clinical trials demonstrating efficacy of those monoclonal antibodies, the combination therapy with those targeted agents and conventional chemotherapeutic agents has been established as the standard therapy for patients with metastatic CRC. However, emergency of resistance to those target agents has limited the efficacy of treatment, and strategies to overcome the resistance are now being investigated by newly developed biological techniques clarifying how to acquire resistance. Here, we introduce mechanisms of action of the biologic agents currently used for treatment of metastatic CRC and several landmark historical clinical studies which have changed the main stream of treatment. The mechanism of resistance to those agents, one of serious problems in treatment metastatic CRC, and ongoing clinical trials to overcome the limitations and improve treatment outcomes will also be presented in this review. PMID:27127793

  11. Continuous infusion of 5-fluorouracil with alpha 2b interferon for advanced colorectal carcinoma.

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, J. E.; Hulse, P.; Lorigan, P.; Jayson, G.; Scarffe, J. H.

    1995-01-01

    Thirty patients with symptomatic colorectal carcinoma were commenced on treatment with 5-fluorouracil (2.5 g week-1) administered by continuous intravenous infusion and alpha 2b interferon (3 x 10(6) U s.c. three times a week). Six out of 30 patients (20%) achieved a partial response. Three patients (10%) had stable disease and 21 patients (70%) progressed on treatment. Twenty patients (67%) completed ten or more weeks of treatment. In nine patients, treatment was withdrawn after 2-9 weeks because of disease progression or death. One patient's treatment was interrupted by emergency surgery. The median survival for all patients was 210 days (7 months). The principal side-effects were oral mucositis (12/30 patients), nausea (8/30 patients) and transient diarrhoea (4/30 patients), and initial constitutional symptoms due to alpha 2b interferon. The combination of low-dose continuous infusional 5-fluorouracil and low-dose alpha 2b interferon is well tolerated but has no obvious advantage over alternative infusional regimens using 5-fluorouracil as a single agent. PMID:7599051

  12. Regorafenib (BAY 73-4506) in advanced colorectal cancer: a phase I study

    PubMed Central

    Strumberg, D; Scheulen, M E; Schultheis, B; Richly, H; Frost, A; Büchert, M; Christensen, O; Jeffers, M; Heinig, R; Boix, O; Mross, K

    2012-01-01

    Background: In a phase I dose-escalation study, regorafenib demonstrated tolerability and antitumour activity in solid tumour patients. The study was expanded to focus on patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC). Methods: Patients received oral regorafenib 60–220 mg daily (160 mg daily in the extension cohort) in cycles of 21 days on, 7 days off treatment. Assessments included toxicity, response, pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics. Results: Thirty-eight patients with heavily pretreated CRC (median 4 prior lines of therapy, range 0–7) were enrolled in the dose-escalation and extension phases; 26 patients received regorafenib 160 mg daily. Median treatment duration was 53 days (range 7–280 days). The most common treatment-related toxicities included hand–foot skin reaction, fatigue, voice change and rash. Twenty-seven patients were evaluable for response: 1 achieved partial response and 19 had stable disease. Median progression-free survival was 107 days (95% CI, 66–161). At steady state, regorafenib and its active metabolites had similar systemic exposure. Pharmacodynamic assessment indicated decreased tumour perfusion in most patients. Conclusion: Regorafenib showed tolerability and antitumour activity in patients with metastatic CRC. This expanded-cohort phase I study provided the foundation for further clinical trials of regorafenib in this patient population. PMID:22568966

  13. Undescended parathyroid adenoma.

    PubMed

    Kanack, Melissa D; Maawy, Ali A; Oh, Deborah K; Bouvet, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Undescended parathyroid adenomas are rare, representing 0.08% of all parathyroid adenomas; however, they make up 7% of the underlying cause of failed cervical exploration in patients with persistent primary hyperparathyroidism. A 43-year-old woman with no significant medical or family history presented with fatigue and was diagnosed with primary hyperparathyroidism; however, preoperative imaging including sestamibi scan and ultrasound was unable to identify the hyperfunctioning gland. She underwent a neck exploration and hemithyroidectomy and partial parathyroidectomy with failure of resolution of her disease. Subsequent work up including a CT of the neck demonstrated a 1.9 cm mass adjacent to the left submandibular gland. This was removed with postoperative normalisation of the patient's serum calcium and parathyroid hormone levels. PMID:25737222

  14. Field cancerisation in colorectal cancer: A new frontier or pastures past?

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Abhilasha; Tripathi, Gyanendra; Gopalakrishnan, Kishore; Williams, Nigel; Arasaradnam, Ramesh P

    2015-01-01

    Despite considerable advances in our understanding of cancer biology, early diagnosis of colorectal cancer remains elusive. Based on the adenoma-carcinoma sequence, cancer develops through the progressive accumulation of mutations in key genes that regulate cell growth. However, recent mathematical modelling suggests that some of these genetic events occur prior to the development of any discernible histological abnormality. Cells acquire pro-tumourigenic mutations that are not able to produce morphological change but predispose to cancer formation. These cells can grow to form large patches of mucosa from which a cancer arises. This process has been termed “field cancerisation”. It has received little attention in the scientific literature until recently. Several studies have now demonstrated cellular, genetic and epigenetic alterations in the macroscopically normal mucosa of colorectal cancer patients. In some reports, these changes were effectively utilised to identify patients with a neoplastic lesion suggesting potential application in the clinical setting. In this article, we present the scientific evidence to support field cancerisation in colorectal cancer and discuss important limitations that require further investigation. Characterisation of the field defect is necessary to enable early diagnosis of colorectal cancer and identify molecular targets for chemoprevention. Field cancerisation offers a promising prospect for experimental cancer research and has potential to improve patient outcomes in the clinical setting. PMID:25852261

  15. Seeing better - Evidence based recommendations on optimizing colonoscopy adenoma detection rate

    PubMed Central

    Aranda-Hernández, Javier; Hwang, Jason; Kandel, Gabor

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of the three most frequent causes of cancer deaths in men and women in Europe and North America. Diagnosis and resection of adenomas has convincingly demonstrated its utility in diminishing colorectal cancer incidence. Therefore, colonoscopy is now the gold standard for colorectal cancer screening. But it is also known that colonoscopy effectiveness varies among endoscopists. Among different quality indicators, the most used is the adenoma detection rate (ADR) which is the percentage of average-risk patients for colorectal cancer who are found to have at least one adenoma or adenocarcinoma during a screening colonoscopy. There is compelling evidence supporting an inverse correlation between ADR and interval colorectal cancer (cancer found after a screening colonoscopy). Many factors such as quality of precolonoscopy preparation, additional observers, manoeuvres with the endoscope (second view, retroflexion, water inflation rather than air), time spent during withdrawal, changes in patient position, fold-flattener devices, new imaging or endoscopic modalities and use of intravenous or through the scope sprayed drugs, have been studied and developed with the aim of increasing the ADR. This reviews discusses these factors, and the current evidence, to “see better” in the colon and optimize ADR. PMID:26855536

  16. Recent Developments in Colorectal Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Pickhardt, Perry J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review The aim of this review is to provide an update on important recent advances in radiologic colorectal imaging, with emphasis on detection, staging, and surveillance of colorectal neoplasia. Recent findings Colorectal imaging advances with magnetic resonance (MR), CT colonography (CTC), and positron emission tomography (PET) over the past year or so have been substantial. Progress in MR imaging for rectal cancer was most notable in terms of assessment of response to neoadjuvant therapy. Continued maturation and clinical validation of CTC was observed for the evaluation of advanced neoplasia, among other areas. Multimodality approaches to colorectal imaging that incorporate functional PET data have also made impressive strides forward. Summary Recent advances in cross-sectional and functional radiologic imaging of the colorectum will positively impact the clinical capabilities for noninvasive evaluation of colorectal neoplasia PMID:25394232

  17. Safety of an oral anticancer agent (trifluridine/tipiracil combination tablet) in patients with advanced and recurrent colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Kimura, M; Go, M; Iwai, M; Ito, D; Asano, H; Usami, E; Teramachi, H; Yoshimura, T

    2016-04-01

    We retrospectively studied the safety of trifluridine/tipiracil combination tablet (TAS-102) monotherapy in patients with advanced and recurrent colorectal cancer. Adverse events to TAS-102 monotherapy were observed in 22 out of 23 cases (95.7%). The most frequent adverse events were neutropenia (69.6%), nausea (53.2%), and malaise (30.4%). Treatment was postponed in 54 (59.3%) out of 91 courses, and in 34 (66.7%) of these 54 courses, the delay in treatment was due to bone marrow suppression. Seven patients with peritoneal metastases suffered from nausea, whilst none of the patients without peritoneal metastases had nausea (p = 0.0139). Nausea and vomiting during a previous chemotherapy cycle was significantly associated with nausea after TAS-102 treatment (p = 0.0007), and the treatment cycles were significantly longer in patients with grade 3 or 4 neutropenia (p = 0.0061). Our results suggest that the incidence of nausea was higher in patients treated with TAS-102. Therefore, it is important to inform patients of the risk of these toxicities and to provide enhanced supportive care. Moreover, we recommend that, for patients with repeated treatment postponement due to neutropenia, the dosage should be fixed based on therapeutic efficacy and prognosis. PMID:27209703

  18. ZD9331 as second- or third-line therapy in patients with advanced colorectal cancer: a phase II multicenter trial.

    PubMed

    Schulz, J; Keller, A; Canfield, V; Parker, G; Douglass, E

    2004-08-01

    This study investigated the efficacy and tolerability of ZD9331 as second- or third-line treatment for patients with advanced colorectal cancer (aCRC). One hundred patients were recruited to the study: 45 in group 1 (failed first-line 5-FU-based regimen) and 55 in group 2 (failed first-line 5-FU-based regimen and second-line irinotecan). Patients received ZD9331 as a 30-minute intravenous infusion on days 1 and 8 of a 3-week cycle, and treatment continued until disease progression (PD) or withdrawal. After a median of 4 cycles of treatment, there were no objective responses in group 1 (N = 37), 25 (67.6%) patients had a best overall response of stable disease (SD), and 12 (32.4%) had PD. After a median of 3 cycles of treatment, there were 2 (4.5%) partial responses in group 2 (N = 44), 21 (47.7%) patients had a best overall response of SD, 20 (45.4%) had PD, and 1 (2.3%) had clinical progression. At data cut-off, 59.5% and 77.3% of patients in groups 1 and 2, respectively, had PD. The main adverse events were neutropenia (69%), fatigue (53%), nausea (46%), and diarrhea (40%), and most (72.3%) were grade I/II. ZD9331 demonstrated minimal antitumor activity, and manageable toxicity, in the second- or third-line treatment of aCRC. PMID:15289725

  19. TAS-102 for Treatment of Advanced Colorectal Cancers That Are No Longer Responding to Other Therapies.

    PubMed

    van der Velden, Daphne L; Opdam, Frans L; Voest, Emile E

    2016-06-15

    TAS-102 is a novel oral formulation of trifluridine (TFT) and tipiracil hydrochloride (TPI), a thymidine phosphorylase inhibitor. TFT was originally synthesized in the 1960s and is a nucleoside analogue that impedes DNA synthesis by inhibition of thymidylate synthase. TFT's main mechanism of action, however, seems to be its incorporation into DNA, which distinguishes TFT from current well-known antimetabolites like 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). The rapid degradation of TFT brought initial clinical development to a halt, but TFT reentered clinical trials when addition of a TPI was found to improve the bioavailability of TFT. The combined TFT-TPI formulation was tested in patients with treatment-refractory metastatic colorectal cancer in the randomized phase III RECOURSE study. Compared with placebo, TAS-102 was associated with an overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) benefit and a 32% reduction in risk of death [median OS, 7.1 (95% CI, 6.5-7.8) vs. 5.3 months (95% CI, 4.6-6.0); median PFS, 2.0 (95% CI, 1.9-2.1) vs. 1.7 months (95% CI, 1.7-1.8); HR for death, 0.68 (95% CI, 0.58-0.81, P < 0.001)]. Based on the results of this pivotal trial and supported by results from an earlier phase II study, TAS-102 recently gained FDA approval. This article reviews the development of TAS-102 and its therapeutic value for the proposed indication. Clin Cancer Res; 22(12); 2835-9. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27126991

  20. Palliative chemotherapy in advanced colorectal cancer patients 80 years of age and older

    PubMed Central

    Lai, P.; Sud, S.; Zhang, T.; Asmis, T.; Wheatley-Price, P.

    2016-01-01

    Background Colorectal cancer (crc) has a median diagnostic age of 68 years. Despite significant progress in chemotherapy (ctx) options, few data on outcomes or toxicity from ctx in patients 80 years of age and older are available. We investigated ctx in such patients with metastatic crc (mcrc), hypothesizing high rates of hospitalization and toxicity. Methods A retrospective chart review identified patients 80 years of age and older with mcrc who initiated ctx between 2005–2010 at our institution. Patient demographics and ctx data were collected. Endpoints included rates of hospitalization, ctx discontinuation because of toxicity, and overall survival. Results In 60 patients, ctx was initiated on 88 occasions. Median age in the cohort was 83 years; 52% were men; 72% lived with family; 53% had a modified Charlson comorbidity index of 2 or greater; and 31% were taking 6 or more prescription medications at baseline. At baseline, 33% of the patients were anemic (hemoglobin < 100 g/L), 36% had leukocytosis (white blood cells > 11×109/L), and 48% had renal impairment (estimated glomerular filtration rate < 60 mL/min/1.73 m2). In 53%, ctx was given as first-line treatment. The initial ctx dose was adjusted in 67%, and capecitabine was the most common chemotherapeutic agent (45%). In 19 instances (22%), the patient was hospitalized during or within 30 days of ctx; in 26 instances (30%), the ctx was discontinued because of toxicity, and in 48 instances (55%), the patient required at least 1 dose reduction, omission, or delay. Median overall survival was 17.8 months (95% confidence interval: 14.3 to 20.8 months). Conclusions In the population 80 years of age and older, ctx for mcrc is feasible; however, most recipients will require dose adjustments, and a significant proportion will be hospitalized or stop ctx because of toxicity. Prospective research incorporating geriatric assessment tools is required to better select these older patients for ctx. PMID:27330342

  1. 5-Fluorouracil, folinic acid and cisplatin in advanced colorectal cancer: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Tsavaris, N; Tentas, K; Bacoyiannis, C; Katsikas, M; Sakelaropoulos, N; Kosmas, C; Daliani, D; Kosmidis, P

    1995-08-01

    The combination of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and folinic acid (FA) has demonstrated activity in colorectal cancer (CC). Cisplatin is reported to have synergistic activity with 5-FU. We examined the combination FA + 5-FU + cisplatin in patients who had previously received chemotherapy with FA + 5-FU and relapsed. Two months after the last dose of FA + 5-FU and documentation of relapse, patients continued with the regimen consisting of cisplatin 20 mg/m2 in 15 min i.v. infusion followed by FA 500 mg/m2 in 1 h i.v. infusion, in the middle of which 5-FU 500 mg/m2 i.v. bolus was administered, with adequate post-hydration. This was repeated weekly for 4 weeks followed by a 2 week rest, for a maximum of six cycles. A total of 30 patients with CC that had relapsed to the combination of FA + 5-FU were treated; 23 had previous surgery and none had radiotherapy. Local recurrence was found in eight patients, metastases in the liver in 21, in lymph nodes in six, lung six and peritoneal metastases in seven. Seven patients responded partially. Toxicity requiring dose reduction or discontinuation of treatment included neutropenia 42% (grade 3:7%), mucositis 28% (grade 1:2), diarrhea 63% (Grade 3:10%), nausea-vomiting 55% (Grade 3:10%), increased creatinine value in three patients and peripheral neuropathy in two patients. We conclude that evaluation of this regimen shows substantial toxicity, with satisfactory response as a second line chemotherapy in these heavily pretreated patients. PMID:7579565

  2. A phase II trial of recombinant tumor necrosis factor in patients with advanced colorectal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kemeny, N; Childs, B; Larchian, W; Rosado, K; Kelsen, D

    1990-08-15

    Sixteen previously treated (with only one prior regimen) patients with histologically proven metastatic or locally recurrent colorectal carcinoma were treated with recombinant tumor necrosis factor (rTNF) administered by 30-minute i.v. infusions twice daily for 5 consecutive days every other week for 8 weeks. Patients received 100 micrograms/m2 twice daily on day 1 of cycle 1 with escalation to 150 micrograms/m2 twice daily thereafter. Patients were concomitantly treated with indomethacin 25 mg every 6 hours and acetaminophen 650 mg every 4 hours to obviate fever and chills. Toxicities included: nausea/vomiting (69%), headache (25%), chills (69%), pain at tumor sites (63%), hypotension (31%), and hypertension (38%). Hematologic toxicity included leukopenia less than 2000 cells/mm3 (38%) and thrombocytopenia less than 100,000 cells/mm3 (13%). Liver function abnormalities occurred independently of the site or extent of metastatic disease and inconsistently in each treatment cycle. Four patients developed bilirubinemia greater than 2.5 x baseline values (range, 2.5 to 10.3 U/L); five patients had greater than 2.5 x elevations in alkaline phosphatase (range, 624 to 1663 U/L). Two patients developed retinal vein thrombosis in the absence of hemostatic abnormalities. In both instances, this complication occurred several weeks after completion of therapy. No objective responses were noted in 14 evaluable patients (95% confidence interval: 0 to 0.23). Three patients had stable disease for a median duration of 4.5 months. In conclusion, i.v. rTNF at this dose and schedule has no demonstrable antitumor efficacy. Twice-daily i.v. administration of this agent is associated with more hepatotoxicity than previously reported in trials using subcutaneous or once daily i.v. administration. Retinal vein thrombosis may be a late complication of i.v. rTNF at this dose and schedule. PMID:2386895

  3. Functional Analysis of SNPs in the ERCC5 Promoter in Advanced Colorectal Cancer Patients Treated With Oxaliplatin-Based Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jianfang; Luo, Xi; Xie, Ganfeng; Chen, Keli; Jiang, Heng; Pan, Feng; Li, Jianjun; Ruan, Zhihua; Pang, Xueli; Liang, Houjie

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The promoter is the center for regulation of gene transcription due to containing numerous transcription factor binding sites. The aim of the study was to determine whether genetic variations at excision repair cross complementation group 5 (ERCC5) promoter could affect transcription factor binding and whether such single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-dependent binding could affect gene expression, drug response, and clinical outcome. A total of 170 patients who were cytologically or histologically confirmed with advanced colorectal cancer (CRC), at least 1 measurable lesion, and underwent oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy were studied. The polymerase chain reaction–ligation detection reaction (PCR-LDR) was used to analyze SNPs. The reporter gene assay system and electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSA) were performed to investigate the effect of SNPs on the ERCC5 promoter activity and DNA-binding activity, respectively. The mRNA and protein expression of ERCC5 in tumor tissues of colorectal cancer patients with different genotypes were detected by real-time PCR and western blot, respectively. Both −763A and −763G allele had nuclear protein-binding ability. +25A allele did not show any nuclear protein-binding ability, whereas +25G allele did. The relative luciferase activity of the −763A/+25G haplotype was significantly higher than other 3 haplotypes (P < 0.05). The expression level of ERCC5 mRNA and protein was significantly higher in tumor tissues with −763AA+25GG genotype combination than that with −763GG+25AA genotype combination (P < 0.05, respectively). Allelic variants (−763AA vs −763AG or –763GG, +25GG versus +25AG or +25AA) were significantly associated with shorter progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) (P < 0.05, respectively). At multivariate analysis, patients with risk genotypes (−763AA or +25GG genotype) demonstrated a significantly increasing risk of progression (P = 0.01) or worse OS

  4. Epidermal growth factor receptor gene copy number in 101 advanced colorectal cancer patients treated with chemotherapy plus cetuximab

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Responsiveness to Cetuximab alone can be mediated by an increase of Epidermal Growth factor Receptor (EGFR) Gene Copy Number (GCN). Aim of this study was to assess the role of EGFR-GCN in advanced colorectal cancer (CRC) patients receiving chemotherapy plus Cetuximab. Methods One hundred and one advanced CRC patients (43 untreated- and 58 pre-treated) were retrospectively studied by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) to assess EGFR-GCN and by immunohistochemistry (IHC) to determine EGFR expression. Sixty-one out of 101 patients were evaluated also for k-ras status by direct sequencing. Clinical end-points were response rate (RR), progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS). Results Increased EGFR-GCN was found in 60/101 (59%) tumor samples. There was no correlation between intensity of EGFR-IHC and EGFR-GCN (p = 0.43). Patients receiving chemotherapy plus Cetuximab as first line treatment had a RR of 70% (30/43) while it was 18% (10/56) in the group with previous lines of therapy (p < 0.0001). RR was observed in 29/60 (48%) of patients with increased EGFR-GCN and in 6/28 (21%) in those without (p = 0.02). At multivariate analyses, number of chemotherapy lines and increased EGFR-GCN were predictive of response; EGFR-IHC score, increased EGFR-GCN and number of chemotherapy lines were significantly associated with a significant better PFS. Response to therapy was the only prognostic predictive factor for OS. In the 60 patients analyzed for k-ras mutations, number of chemotherapy lines, increased EGFR-GCN and k-ras wild type status predicted a better PFS. Conclusion In metastatic CRC patients treated with chemotherapy plus Cetuximab number of chemotherapy lines and increased EGFR-GCN were significantly associated with a better clinical outcome, independent of k-ras status. PMID:20398370

  5. Immune-modulating effects of the newest cetuximab-based chemoimmunotherapy regimen in advanced colorectal cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Botta, Cirino; Bestoso, Elena; Apollinari, Serena; Cusi, Maria Grazia; Pastina, Pierpaolo; Abbruzzese, Alberto; Sperlongano, Pasquale; Misso, Gabriella; Caraglia, Michele; Tassone, Pierfrancesco; Tagliaferri, Pierosandro; Correale, Pierpaolo

    2012-06-01

    Cetuximab is a human-murine chimeric monoclonal antibody to the epidermal growth factor receptor, active for advanced colorectal cancer treatment in combination with chemotherapy. Cetuximab mainly acts by inhibiting epidermal growth factor receptor-mediated pathways in cancer cells; however, in the human host, its IgG1 backbone may offer additional antitumor activity that includes FcγRs-mediated antibody-dependent cell cytotoxicity, phagocytosis, cross priming, and tumor-specific T-cell-mediated immune response. These mechanisms are still under active investigation. At this purpose, we have performed an immunologic investigation in advanced colon cancer patients enrolled in an ongoing phase II trial aimed to test the toxicity and the biological and antitumor activity of a novel biochemotherapy regimen combining polychemotherapy with gemcitabine, irinotecan, levofolinic acid, and fluorouracil with cetuximab and with subcutaneous low-dose metronomic aldesleukin (GILFICet regimen). The peripheral blood mononuclear cells of the first 20 patients enrolled in the GILFICet trial were collected at baseline and after 6 treatment cycles and examined for immune-phenotype change by flow cytometry. Colon cancer-specific T-cell lines were also generated ex vivo from these samples and subsequently characterized for immune phenotype, functional activity, and antigen specificity. We found a treatment-related increase of circulating dendritic cells, natural killer cells, central memory T cells, and activated T cells with a T-helper 1 (Th1)-cytotoxic phenotype. In addition, the ex-vivo characterization of antigen-specific T cells derived from the treated patients revealed a significant increase in proliferating cytotoxic T-lymphocyte precursors specific for carcinoembryonic antigen and thymidylate synthase derivative epitope peptides. On these basis, we concluded that the GILFICet regimen exerts substantial immune-modulating activity that significantly affects tumor antigen

  6. Tumor deposits counted as positive lymph nodes in TNM staging for advanced colorectal cancer: a retrospective multicenter study

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jun; Yang, Shengke; Hu, Junjie; Liu, Hao; Du, Feng; Yin, Jie; Liu, Sai; Li, Ci; Xing, Shasha; Yuan, Jiatian; Lv, Bo; Fan, Jun; Leng, Shusheng; Zhang, Xin; Wang, Bing

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the possibility of counting tumor deposits (TDs) as positive lymph nodes (pLNs) in the pN category and evaluated its prognostic value for colorectal cancer (CRC) patients. A new pN category (npN category) was calculated using the numbers of pLNs plus TDs. The npN category included 4 tiers: npN1a (1 tumor node), npN1b (2-3 tumor nodes), npN2a (4-6 tumor nodes), and npN2b (≥7 tumor nodes). We identified 4,121 locally advanced CRC patients, including 717 (11.02%) cases with TDs. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to evaluate the disease-free and overall survival (DFS and OS) for npN and pN categories. Multivariate analysis showed that the npN and pN categories were both independent prognostic factors for DFS (HR 1.614, 95% CI 1.541 to 1.673; HR 1.604, 95% CI 1.533 to 1.679) and OS (HR 1.633, 95% CI 1.550 to 1.720; HR 1.470, 95% CI 1.410 to 1.532). However, the npN category was superior to the pN category by Harrell's C statistic. We conclude that it is thus feasible to consider TDs as positive lymph nodes in the pN category when evaluating the prognoses of CRC patients, and the npN category is potentially superior to the TNM (7th edition) pN category for predicting DFS and OS among advanced CRC patients. PMID:26934317

  7. A phase I study of the vitamin D analogue EB 1089 in patients with advanced breast and colorectal cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Gulliford, T.; English, J.; Colston, K. W.; Menday, P.; Moller, S.; Coombes, R. C.

    1998-01-01

    Preclinical studies have shown that the vitamin D analogue EB 1089 has significantly less calcaemic activity than its parent compound 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (1,25(OH)2D3) and significant anti-tumour activity. This phase I trial was designed to evaluate the calcaemic effect of the drug in patients with advanced cancer. EB 1089 was given to 36 patients with advanced breast and colorectal cancer in doses of between 0.15 and 17.0 microg m(-2) day(-1). Serial serum and urine calcium, urine creatinine and serum parathyroid hormone (PTH) were monitored. Hypercalcaemia was seen in all patients receiving 17.0 microg m(-2) day(-1). Hypercalcaemia attributable to EB 1089 was reversible by discontinuing or reducing EB 1089 therapy. During the first 5 days of treatment, urine calcium (P = 0.0001) and serum-corrected calcium (P = 0.027) were related to EB 1089 dose, whereas serum parathyroid hormone (P = 0.0001) showed an inverse relationship. Twenty-one patients received compassionate treatment for between 10 and 234 days. No complete or partial responses were seen. Six patients on treatment for more than 90 days showed stabilization of disease. EB 1089 was well tolerated and adverse events considered to be caused by EB 1089 were limited to dose-dependent effects on calcium metabolism. The dose estimated to be tolerable for most patients from this study is around 7 microg m(-2) day(1). These data support previous work that has demonstrated EB 1089 to be significantly less calcaemic than 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3. PMID:9662243

  8. Computational Identification of Novel Stage-Specific Biomarkers in Colorectal Cancer Progression

    PubMed Central

    Palaniappan, Ashok; Ramar, Karthick; Ramalingam, Satish

    2016-01-01

    It is well-known that the conversion of normal colon epithelium to adenoma and then to carcinoma stems from acquired molecular changes in the genome. The genetic basis of colorectal cancer has been elucidated to a certain extent, and much remains to be known about the identity of specific cancer genes that are associated with the advancement of colorectal cancer from one stage to the next. Here in this study we attempted to identify novel cancer genes that could underlie the stage-specific progression and metastasis of colorectal cancer. We conducted a stage-based meta-analysis of the voluminous tumor genome-sequencing data and mined using multiple approaches for novel genes driving the progression to stage-II, stage-III and stage-IV colorectal cancer. The consensus of these driver genes seeded the construction of stage-specific networks, which were then analyzed for the centrality of genes, clustering of subnetworks, and enrichment of gene-ontology processes. Our study identified three novel driver genes as hubs for stage-II progression: DYNC1H1, GRIN2A, GRM1. Four novel driver genes were identified as hubs for stage-III progression: IGF1R, CPS1, SPTA1, DSP. Three novel driver genes were identified as hubs for stage-IV progression: GSK3B, GGT1, EIF2B5. We also identified several non-driver genes that appeared to underscore the progression of colorectal cancer. Our study yielded potential diagnostic biomarkers for colorectal cancer as well as novel stage-specific drug targets for rational intervention. Our methodology is extendable to the analysis of other types of cancer to fill the gaps in our knowledge. PMID:27243824

  9. EGFR methylation and outcome of patients with advanced colorectal cancer treated with cetuximab

    PubMed Central

    CHIADINI, ELISA; SCARPI, EMANUELA; PASSARDI, ALESSANDRO; CALISTRI, DANIELE; VALGIUSTI, MARTINA; SARAGONI, LUCA; ZOLI, WAINER; AMADORI, DINO; ULIVI, PAOLA

    2015-01-01

    Targeted therapy of metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) with monoclonal antibody anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) agents, such as cetuximab (CTX) or panitumumab, is the treatment strategy of choice in patients characterised by a wild-type (wt) RAS gene status. However, despite selection based on RAS status, a high proportion of patients do not respond to therapy. EGFR methylation has been reported to have a role in predicting the response to anti-EGFR agents. The present study aimed to evaluate the role of EGFR methylation in association with the clinical outcome of patients with mCRC treated with CTX. In total, 64 patients with mCRC were assessed in the present study. Genomic DNA was extracted from tumoral tissue and EGFR methylation and mutation of the KRAS, BRAF and PIK3CA genes were analysed by pyrosequencing. EGFR expression was assessed by immunohistochemistry. The various alterations were analysed by assessing the objective response rate (ORR), progression free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) rates. In total, 42 cases (66%) exhibited >10% EGFR methylation and there was no correlation with EGFR expression. Mean EGFR methylation of 41 and 9% was observed in KRAS-mutated and -wt patients, respectively (P=0.05). Conversely, a high EGFR methylation was observed in BRAF-wt patients with compared with patients possessing the mutated gene (18 vs. 3%, respectively; P=0.07). EGFR methylation was significantly correlated with the OS rate [hazard ratio, 0.98; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.96–1.00; P=0.019], but not PFS rate. In patients with a methylation rate <10 and >10%, the median OS rate was 7.5 months (95% CI, 4.4–9.4 months) and 12.0 months (95% CI, 8.7–13.9 months), respectively (P=0.034). In conclusion, the present study revealed a correlation between EGFR methylation and improved OS rate in patients treated with CTX-based chemotherapy. The presence of EGFR methylation is inversely correlated with BRAF and PIK3CA mutations

  10. Biology of colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Arvelo, Francisco; Sojo, Felipe; Cotte, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is a serious health problem, a challenge for research, and a model for studying the molecular mechanisms involved in its development. According to its incidence, this pathology manifests itself in three forms: family, hereditary, and most commonly sporadic, apparently not associated with any hereditary or familial factor. For the types having inheritance patterns and a family predisposition, the tumours develop through defined stages ranging from adenomatous lesions to the manifestation of a malignant tumour. It has been established that environmental and hereditary factors contribute to the development of colorectal cancer, as indicated by the accumulation of mutations in oncogenes, genes which suppress and repair DNA, signaling the existence of various pathways through which the appearance of tumours may occur. In the case of the suppressive and mutating tracks, these are characterised by genetic disorders related to the phenotypical changes of the morphological progression sequence in the adenoma/carcinoma. Moreover, alternate pathways through mutation in BRAF and KRAS genes are associated with the progression of polyps to cancer. This review surveys the research done at the cellular and molecular level aimed at finding specific alternative therapeutic targets for fighting colorectal cancer. PMID:25932044

  11. [Treatment of pituitary adenomas].

    PubMed

    Mezosi, Emese; Nemes, Orsolya

    2009-09-27

    According to epidemiological studies, the prevalence of pituitary adenomas is 16.5% and the majority of them are "incidentalomas". The symptoms of pituitary disorders are often non-specific; disturbances of pituitary function, compression symptoms, hypophysis apoplexy or accidental findings may help the diagnosis. The hormonal evaluation of pituitary adenomas is different from the algorithm used in the disorders of peripheral endocrine organs. The first-line therapy of prolactinomas are the dopamine agonists, and the aims of the treatment are to normalize the prolactin level, restore fertility in child-bearing age, decrease tumor mass, save or improve the residual pituitary function and inhibit the relapse of the disease. The available dopamine agonists in Hungary are bromocriptine and quinagolide. In case of tumors with good therapeutic response, medical therapy can be withdrawn after 3-5 years; hyperprolactinemia will not recur in 2/3 of these patients. Neurosurgery is the primary therapy of GH-, ACTH-, TSH-producing and inactive adenomas. In the last decades, significant improvement has been reached in surgical procedures, resulting in low mortality rates. Acromegalic patients with unresectable tumors have a great benefit from somatostatin analog treatment. The growth hormone receptor antagonist pegvisomant is the newest modality for the treatment of acromegaly. The medical therapy of Cushing's disease is still based on the inhibition of steroid production. A new, promising somatostatin analog, pasireotide is evaluated in clinical trials. The rare TSH-producing tumor can respond to both dopamine agonist and somatostatin analog therapy. The application of conventional radiotherapy has decreased; radiotherapy is mainly used in the treatment of invasive, incurable or malignant tumors. Further studies are needed to elucidate the exact role of radiosurgery and fractionated stereotaxic irradiation in the treatment of pituitary tumors. PMID:19758960

  12. Disparities of conjugating protective enzyme activities in the colon of patients with adenomas and carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Hoensch, Harald P; Roelofs, Hennie MJ; Edler, Lutz; Kirch, Wilhelm; Peters, Wilbert HM

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the metabolic enzymatic capacity of the colon mucosa to detoxify noxious carcinogenic compounds. METHODS: We investigated the activity of 2 conjugating enzymes-the microsomal uridine glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) and the cytosomal glutathione S-transferase (GST) in the uninvolved mucosa of the colon transversum and sigmoideum in patients with adenomatous polyps and colorectal cancer. Biopsies were taken from the mucosa during colonoscopies which were done for clinical (diagnostic) reasons. After storage, the biopsy material was homogenized and after differential centrifugation the enzyme assays were performed with 4-nitrophenol (UGT) and 1-chloro 2,4-dinitrobenzene (GST) as substrates. RESULTS: About 48 patients were included of which 28 had adenomas and 20 had colorectal carcinomas confirmed by histopathology. Enzyme activities were expressed as nmol/mg per minute protein for the GST and as pmol/mg per minute protein for the UGT. Analysis of variance (F-test) indicated that both enzymes were more widely distributed in adenoma than in cancer patients. The means ± SD were smaller for cancer patients: GST for adenomas 268 ± 152 vs 241 ± 69 for carcinomas and UGT for adenomas 197 ± 200 vs 150 ± 86 for carcinomas. CONCLUSION: Compared to patients with adenomatous colon polyps those with colorectal carcinoma exhibited a lower capacity of detoxifying enzyme metabolism and their activities clustered over a smaller range. PMID:24106402

  13. First-line cetuximab-based chemotherapies for patients with advanced or metastatic KRAS wild-type colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Uemura, Mamoru; Kim, Ho Min; Hata, Tsuyoshi; Sakata, Kazuya; Okuyama, Masaki; Takemoto, Hiroyoshi; Fujii, Hitoshi; Fukuzaki, Takayuki; Morita, Tetsushi; Hata, Taishi; Takemasa, Ichiro; Satoh, Taroh; Mizushima, Tsunekazu; Doki, Yuichiro; Mori, Maski

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most commonly occurring cancers worldwide. A burgeoning number of studies have demonstrated that the addition of cetuximab to another standard first-line regimen markedly improves the outcome of CRC treatment. However, at present, the efficacy and safety of cetuximab-based combination chemotherapy has not been well described in Japan. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of first-line chemotherapies that included cetuximab for patients with advanced or metastatic Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (KRAS) wild-type CRC in Japan. This prospective multicenter observational study was conducted at 13 affiliated medical institutions. A total of 64 patients were enrolled between 2010 and 2013. The patients met the following criteria for eligibility: i) histologically confirmed, advanced or metastatic KRAS wild-type CRC; and ii) cetuximab-based chemotherapies administered as a first-line treatment. First-line cetuximab-based treatments were administered as follows: 29 patients (45.3%) received a combination of infusional fluorouracil, leucovorin and oxaliplatin; 14 patients (21.9%) received a combination of capecitabine and oxaliplatin; and 10 patients (15.6%) received a combination of infusional fluorouracil, leucovorin and irinotecan. The overall response rate (including complete plus partial responses) was 50% (32/64 patients). Initially, 48 lesions were diagnosed as unresectable. Among those, 13 lesions (27.1%) were converted to a resectable status following cetuximab-based combination chemotherapy treatments. The median overall survival time and the progression-free survival time were 1,189 and 359 days, respectively. The most frequent grade 3/4 adverse event was neutropenia, which occurred in 20.3% of the patients. The incidence of grade 3/4 skin toxicity was 17.2% (11/64 patients). Cetuximab-based therapies may represent a promising first-line regimen for patients with advanced or

  14. Chemoprevention of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Lang, Michaela; Gasche, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer has become one of the most prevalent malignant diseases for both men and women. Patients with inflammatory bowel diseases or certain inherited cancer syndromes are at high risk of developing colorectal cancer and have naturally the highest need for cancer prevention. In familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) and Lynch syndrome, most of the underlying germline mutations can be detected by DNA sequencing, and medical counselling of affected individuals involves both surveillance tests and chemopreventive measures. However, as the mechanisms leading to colorectal cancer differ in these high-risk groups, the molecular action of chemopreventive drugs needs to be adjusted to the certain pathway of carcinogenesis. In the last decades, a number of drugs have been tested, including sulindac, aspirin, celecoxib, and mesalazine, but some of them are still controversially discussed. This review summarizes the advances and current standards of colorectal cancer prevention in patients with inflammatory bowel disease, FAP and Lynch syndrome. PMID:25531498

  15. Colorectal polyps

    MedlinePlus

    ... SJ, et al. United States Multi-Society Task Force on Colorectal Cancer. Guidelines for colonoscopy surveillance after ... consensus update by the US Multi-Society Task Force on Colorectal Cancer. Gastroenterology . 2012;143:844-857. ...

  16. Colorectal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... rectum are part of the large intestine. Colorectal cancer occurs when tumors form in the lining of ... men and women. The risk of developing colorectal cancer rises after age 50. You're also more ...

  17. Colorectal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... and rectum are part of the large intestine. Colorectal cancer occurs when tumors form in the lining of ... both men and women. The risk of developing colorectal cancer rises after age 50. You're also more ...

  18. Pharmacogenetic prediction of clinical outcome in advanced colorectal cancer patients receiving oxaliplatin/5-fluorouracil as first-line chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Paré, L; Marcuello, E; Altés, A; del Río, E; Sedano, L; Salazar, J; Cortés, A; Barnadas, A; Baiget, M

    2008-10-01

    To determine whether molecular parameters could be partly responsible for resistance or sensitivity to oxaliplatin (OX)-based chemotherapy used as first-line treatment in advanced colorectal cancer (CRC). We studied the usefulness of the excision repair cross-complementing 1 (ERCC1), xeroderma pigmentosum group D (XPD), XRCC1 and GSTP1 polymorphisms as predictors of clinical outcome in these patients. We treated 126 CRC patients with a first-line OX/5-fluorouracil chemotherapeutic regimen. Genetic polymorphisms were determined by real-time PCR on an ABI PRISM 7000, using DNA from peripheral blood. Clinical response (CR), progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were evaluated according to each genotype. In the univariate analysis for CR, ERCC1-118 and XPD 751 polymorphisms were significant (P=0.02 and P=0.05, respectively). After adjustment for the most relevant clinical variables, only ERCC1-118 retained significance (P=0.008). In the univariate analysis for PFS, ERCC1-118 and XPD 751 were significant (P=0.003 and P=0.009, respectively). In the multivariant analysis, only the XPD 751 was significant for PFS (P=0.02). Finally, ERCC1-118 and XPD 751 polymorphisms were significant in the univariate analysis for OS (P=0.006 and P=0.015, respectively). Both genetic variables remained significant in the multivariate Cox survival analysis (P=0.022 and P=0.03). Our data support the hypothesis that enhanced DNA repair diminishes the benefit of platinum-based treatments. PMID:18797464

  19. Pharmacogenetic prediction of clinical outcome in advanced colorectal cancer patients receiving oxaliplatin/5-fluorouracil as first-line chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Paré, L; Marcuello, E; Altés, A; Río, E del; Sedano, L; Salazar, J; Cortés, A; Barnadas, A; Baiget, M

    2008-01-01

    To determine whether molecular parameters could be partly responsible for resistance or sensitivity to oxaliplatin (OX)-based chemotherapy used as first-line treatment in advanced colorectal cancer (CRC). We studied the usefulness of the excision repair cross-complementing 1 (ERCC1), xeroderma pigmentosum group D (XPD), XRCC1 and GSTP1 polymorphisms as predictors of clinical outcome in these patients. We treated 126 CRC patients with a first-line OX/5-fluorouracil chemotherapeutic regimen. Genetic polymorphisms were determined by real-time PCR on an ABI PRISM 7000, using DNA from peripheral blood. Clinical response (CR), progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were evaluated according to each genotype. In the univariate analysis for CR, ERCC1-118 and XPD 751 polymorphisms were significant (P=0.02 and P=0.05, respectively). After adjustment for the most relevant clinical variables, only ERCC1-118 retained significance (P=0.008). In the univariate analysis for PFS, ERCC1-118 and XPD 751 were significant (P=0.003 and P=0.009, respectively). In the multivariant analysis, only the XPD 751 was significant for PFS (P=0.02). Finally, ERCC1-118 and XPD 751 polymorphisms were significant in the univariate analysis for OS (P=0.006 and P=0.015, respectively). Both genetic variables remained significant in the multivariate Cox survival analysis (P=0.022 and P=0.03). Our data support the hypothesis that enhanced DNA repair diminishes the benefit of platinum-based treatments. PMID:18797464

  20. Subsequent Adenomas of Ileal Pouch and Anorectal Segment after Prophylactic Surgery for Familial Adenomatous Polyposis

    PubMed Central

    M'Koma, A.E.; Herline, A.J.; Adunyah, S.E.

    2014-01-01

    Familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) is an autosomally dominant disease characterized by the early development of colorectal adenomas and carcinoma in untreated patients. Patients with FAP may develop rectal cancer at their initial presentation (primary) or after prophylactic surgery (secondary). Controversies exist regarding which surgical procedure represents the best first-line treatment. The options for FAP are ileorectal anastomosis (IRA) or a restorative proctocolectomy (RPC) with either a handsewn or a stapled ileal pouch-anal anastomosis (IPAA), with or without mucosectomy. The purpose of these surgeries is to stop progression to an adenoma-cancer sequence by eradicating the colon, a disease prone organ. Unfortunately, these surgical procedures, which excise the entire colon and rectum while maintaining transanal fecal continence, do not guarantee that patients still won't develop adenomas. Based on the available literature, we therefore reviewed reported incidences of pouch-related adenomas that occurred post prophylactic surgery for FAP. The review consists of a collection of case, descriptive, prospective and retrospective reports. Objectives To provide available data on the natural history of subsequent adenomas after prophylactic surgery (by type) for FAP. Methods A review was conducted of existing case, descriptive, prospective and retrospective reports for patients undergoing prophylactic surgery for FAP (1975 – August, 2013). In each case, the adenomas were clearly diagnosed in one of the following: the ileal pouch mucosa (above the ileorectal anastomosis), within the anorectal segment (ARS) below the ileorectal anastomosis, or in the afferent ileal loop. Results A total of 515 (36%) patients with pouch-related adenomas have been reported. Two hundred and eleven (211) patients had adenomas in the ileal pouch mucosa, 295 had them in the ARS and in 9 were in the afferent ileal loop. Patients with pouch adenomas without dysplasia or cancer were

  1. [Colorectal carcinoma in Cronkhite-Canada syndrome].

    PubMed

    Zügel, N P; Hehl, J A; Jechart, G; Tannapfel, A; Wienbeck, M; Witte, J

    2001-05-01

    We report a 63-year-old lady with Cronkhite-Canada syndrome, who developed colorectal cancer. A hemicolectomy was performed, and the tumor specimen was prepared for DNA-analysis and immunohistochemical screening. We found a mutation of p53 gene without APC- and ras-gene alteration and expression of erbB2-protooncogen. The polyps in non-hereditary Cronkhite-Canada-syndrom are neither adenomatous nor hyperplastic, but patients often develop colorectal cancers. The steps of mutation do not follow the adenoma-carcinoma sequence, first described by Vogelstein 1988. This and previous observations suggest that carcinogenesis in Cronkhite-Canada syndrome follows another independent sequence. PMID:11413916

  2. Capecitabine-induced leukocytoclastic vasculitis under neoadjuvant chemotherapy for locally advanced colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kee, Bryan K.; Tetzlaff, Michael T.; Wolff, Robert A.

    2015-01-01

    We describe a case of capecitabine-induced leukocytoclastic vasculitis in a patient with locally advanced rectal cancer under curative neoadjuvant concurrent chemoradiation using capecitabine. After 5 days of the initiation of capecitabine the patient developed a pruritic maculopapular rash in her extremities consistent with vasculitis which was confirmed on skin biopsy without any signs of systemic involvement. Capecitabine was held and the rash was treated with topical steroids with complete resolution of both rash and pruritus. Due to a lack of other alternative chemotherapeutic options and the cutaneous-only involvement of vasculitis, the capecitabine was re-introduced. Two days later, the patient developed an identical maculopapular rash with a similar distribution. Prednisone was initiated while the capecitabine was continued with complete resolution of the rash. The patient successfully completed her curative neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy treatment without the need to permanently discontinue the capecitabine. PMID:26029464

  3. Assessing patients' needs and preferences in the management of advanced colorectal cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Redmond, K.

    1998-01-01

    Clinical decision-making in advanced cancer is a highly complex process. Many factors are thought to influence this process arguably the most important of these is the patient's own preference. Studies show that most patients want to be fully informed as to their diagnosis and involved in clinical decision-making. However, the attitudes of healthcare workers often preclude patient involvement. Studies have also shown that acceptability of chemotherapy for minimal therapeutic gain differs markedly between patients depending on factors such as age, gender and family status. It is clearly impossible to make decisions about what is best for patients without involving them in the decision-making process. Indeed, it could be argued that active patient participation actually simplifies this process. PMID:9579849

  4. The discriminatory capability of existing scores to predict advanced colorectal neoplasia: a prospective colonoscopy study of 5,899 screening participants

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Martin C. S.; Ching, Jessica Y. L.; Ng, Simpson; Lam, Thomas Y. T.; Luk, Arthur K. C.; Wong, Sunny H.; Ng, Siew C.; Ng, Simon S. M.; Wu, Justin C. Y.; Chan, Francis K. L.; Sung, Joseph J. Y.

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated the performance of seven existing risk scoring systems in predicting advanced colorectal neoplasia in an asymptomatic Chinese cohort. We prospectively recruited 5,899 Chinese subjects aged 50–70 years in a colonoscopy screening programme(2008–2014). Scoring systems under evaluation included two scoring tools from the US; one each from Spain, Germany, and Poland; the Korean Colorectal Screening(KCS) scores; and the modified Asia Pacific Colorectal Screening(APCS) scores. The c-statistics, sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive values(PPVs), and negative predictive values(NPVs) of these systems were evaluated. The resources required were estimated based on the Number Needed to Screen(NNS) and the Number Needed to Refer for colonoscopy(NNR). Advanced neoplasia was detected in 364 (6.2%) subjects. The German system referred the least proportion of subjects (11.2%) for colonoscopy, whilst the KCS scoring system referred the highest (27.4%). The c-statistics of all systems ranged from 0.56–0.65, with sensitivities ranging from 0.04–0.44 and specificities from 0.74–0.99. The modified APCS scoring system had the highest c-statistics (0.65, 95% C.I. 0.58–0.72). The NNS (12–19) and NNR (5-10) were similar among the scoring systems. The existing scoring systems have variable capability to predict advanced neoplasia among asymptomatic Chinese subjects, and further external validation should be performed. PMID:26838178

  5. Potential Targets for Colorectal Cancer Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Temraz, Sally; Mukherji, Deborah; Shamseddine, Ali

    2013-01-01

    The step-wise development of colorectal neoplasia from adenoma to carcinoma suggests that specific interventions could delay or prevent the development of invasive cancer. Several key factors involved in colorectal cancer pathogenesis have already been identified including cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2), nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB), survivin and insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I). Clinical trials of COX-2 inhibitors have provided the “proof of principle” that inhibition of this enzyme can prevent the formation of colonic adenomas and potentially carcinomas, however concerns regarding the potential toxicity of these drugs have limited their use as a chemopreventative strategy. Curcumin, resveratrol and quercetin are chemopreventive agents that are able to suppress multiple signaling pathways involved in carcinogenesis and hence are attractive candidates for further research. PMID:23975167

  6. Ectopic parathyroid adenoma in child.

    PubMed

    Libánský, P; Astl, J; Adámek, S; Nanka, O; Pafko, P; Spacková, J; Foltán, R; Sedý, J

    2008-01-01

    A 10-year old girl presented with fatigue, hypercalcemia, and subperiosteal phalangeal osteolytic lesions. Ultrasonography and MIBI scintigraphy showed a structure near the lower pole of thyroid gland. The structure macroscopically appeared as adenoma, histologically it was thymic tissue. Bilateral neck exploration together with exploration of cervical thymic extensions was performed; adenoma was not found. During next two years, the level of calcium and parathormone raised, bone mineral density decreased. Ultrasonography, MRI, CT and PET/CT were negative. Adenoma was located by MIBI-SPECT/CT near the left border of jugulum. It was found dorsolateral to left common carotid artery and removed. PMID:19548602

  7. Small-area geographic and socioeconomic inequalities in colorectal tumour detection in France.

    PubMed

    Fournel, Isabelle; Bourredjem, Abderrahmane; Sauleau, Erik-André; Cottet, Vanessa; Dejardin, Olivier; Bouvier, Anne-Marie; Launoy, Guy; Bonithon-Kopp, Claire

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the impact of area deprivation and primary care facilities on colorectal adenoma detection and on colorectal cancer (CRC) incidence in a French well-defined population before mass screening implementation. The study population included all patients aged 20 years or more living in Côte d'Or (France) with either colorectal adenoma or invasive CRC first diagnosed between 1995 and 2002 and who were identified from the Burgundy Digestive Cancer Registry and the Côte d'Or Polyp Registry. Area deprivation was assessed using the European deprivation index on the basis of the smallest French area available (Ilots Regroupés pour l'Information Statistique). Healthcare access was assessed using medical density of general practitioners (GPs) and road distance to the nearest GP and gastroenterologist. Bayesian regression analyses were used to estimate influential covariates on adenoma detection and CRC incidence rates. The results were expressed as relative risks (RRs) with their 95% credibility interval. In total, 5399 patients were diagnosed with at least one colorectal adenoma and 2125 with invasive incident CRC during the study period. Remoteness from GP [RR=0.71 (0.61-0.83)] and area deprivation [RR=0.98 (0.96-1.00)] independently reduced the probability of adenoma detection. CRC incidence was only slightly affected by GP medical density [RR=1.05 (1.01-1.08)] without any area deprivation effect [RR=0.99 (0.96-1.02)]. Distance to gastroenterologist had no impact on the rates of adenoma detection or CRC incidence. This study highlighted the prominent role of access to GPs in the detection of both colorectal adenomas and overall cancers. Deprivation had an impact only on adenoma detection. PMID:26067032

  8. Gut mucosal microbiome across stages of colorectal carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Nakatsu, Geicho; Li, Xiangchun; Zhou, Haokui; Sheng, Jianqiu; Wong, Sunny Hei; Wu, William Ka Kai; Ng, Siew Chien; Tsoi, Ho; Dong, Yujuan; Zhang, Ning; He, Yuqi; Kang, Qian; Cao, Lei; Wang, Kunning; Zhang, Jingwan; Liang, Qiaoyi; Yu, Jun; Sung, Joseph J. Y.

    2015-01-01

    Gut microbial dysbiosis contributes to the development of colorectal cancer (CRC). Here we catalogue the microbial communities in human gut mucosae at different stages of colorectal tumorigenesis. We analyse the gut mucosal microbiome of 47 paired samples of adenoma and adenoma-adjacent mucosae, 52 paired samples of carcinoma and carcinoma-adjacent mucosae and 61 healthy controls. Probabilistic partitioning of relative abundance profiles reveals that a metacommunity predominated by members of the oral microbiome is primarily associated with CRC. Analysis of paired samples shows differences in community configurations between lesions and the adjacent mucosae. Correlations of bacterial taxa indicate early signs of dysbiosis in adenoma, and co-exclusive relationships are subsequently more common in cancer. We validate these alterations in CRC-associated microbiome by comparison with two previously published data sets. Our results suggest that a taxonomically defined microbial consortium is implicated in the development of CRC. PMID:26515465

  9. A Phase I Trial to Evaluate Antibody-Dependent Cellular Cytotoxicity of Cetuximab and Lenalidomide in Advanced Colorectal and Head and Neck Cancer.

    PubMed

    Bertino, Erin M; McMichael, Elizabeth L; Mo, Xiaokui; Trikha, Prashant; Davis, Melanie; Paul, Bonnie; Grever, Michael; Carson, William E; Otterson, Gregory A

    2016-09-01

    mAbs can induce antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) via the innate immune system's ability to recognize mAb-coated cancer cells and activate immune effector cells. Lenalidomide is an immunomodulatory agent with the capacity to stimulate immune cell cytokine production and ADCC activity. This phase I trial evaluated the combination of cetuximab with lenalidomide for the treatment of advanced colorectal and head and neck squamous cell cancers (HNSCC). This trial included patients with advanced colorectal cancer or HNSCC. Treatment consisted of cetuximab 500 mg/m(2) i.v. every two weeks with lenalidomide given orally days 1-21 on a 28-day cycle. Three dose levels of lenalidomide were evaluated (15, 20, 25 mg). Correlative studies included measurement of ADCC, FcγRIIIA polymorphism genotyping, measurement of serum cytokine levels, and flow cytometric analysis of immune cell subtypes. Twenty-two patients were enrolled (19 colorectal cancer, 3 HNSCC). Fatigue was the only dose-limiting toxicity. One partial response was observed and 8 patients had stable disease at least 12 weeks. The recommended phase II dose is cetuximab 500 mg/m(2) with lenalidomide 25 mg daily, days 1-21. Correlative studies demonstrated a dose-dependent increase in natural killer cytotoxic activity with increasing doses of lenalidomide. Cetuximab and lenalidomide were well tolerated. There was a lenalidomide dose-dependent increase in ADCC with higher activity in patients enrolled in cohort 3 than those enrolled in cohorts 1/2. Although response was not a primary endpoint, there was evidence of antitumor activity for the combination therapy. Further investigation of lenalidomide as an immunomodulator in solid tumors is warranted. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(9); 2244-50. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27458141

  10. Subnuclear Proteomics in Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Albrethsen, Jakob; Knol, Jaco C.; Piersma, Sander R.; Pham, Thang V.; de Wit, Meike; Mongera, Sandra; Carvalho, Beatriz; Verheul, Henk M. W.; Fijneman, Remond J. A.; Meijer, Gerrit A.; Jimenez, Connie R.

    2010-01-01

    Abnormalities in nuclear phenotype and chromosome structure are key features of cancer cells. Investigation of the protein determinants of nuclear subfractions in cancer may yield molecular insights into aberrant chromosome function and chromatin organization and in addition may yield biomarkers for early cancer detection. Here we evaluate a proteomics work flow for profiling protein constituents in subnuclear domains in colorectal cancer tissues and apply this work flow to a comparative analysis of the nuclear matrix fraction in colorectal adenoma and carcinoma tissue samples. First, we established the reproducibility of the entire work flow. In a reproducibility analysis of three nuclear matrix fractions independently isolated from the same colon tumor homogenate, 889 of 1,047 proteins (85%) were reproducibly identified at high confidence (minimally two peptides per protein at 99% confidence interval at the protein level) with an average coefficient of variance for the number of normalized spectral counts per protein of 30%. This indicates a good reproducibility of the entire work flow from biochemical isolation to nano-LC-MS/MS analysis. Second, using spectral counting combined with statistics, we identified proteins that are significantly enriched in the nuclear matrix fraction relative to two earlier fractions (the chromatin-binding and intermediate filament fractions) isolated from six colorectal tissue samples. The total data set contained 2,059 non-redundant proteins. Gene ontology mining and protein network analysis of nuclear matrix-enriched proteins revealed enrichment for proteins implicated in “RNA processing” and “mRNA metabolic process.” Finally, an explorative comparison of the nuclear matrix proteome in colorectal adenoma and carcinoma tissues revealed many proteins previously implicated in oncogenesis as well as new candidates. A subset of these differentially expressed proteins also exhibited a corresponding change at the mRNA level

  11. Habitual intake of flavonoid subclasses and risk of colorectal cancer in 2 large prospective cohorts12

    PubMed Central

    Nimptsch, Katharina; Zhang, Xuehong; Cassidy, Aedín; Song, Mingyang; O’Reilly, Éilis J; Lin, Jennifer H; Pischon, Tobias; Rimm, Eric B; Willett, Walter C; Fuchs, Charles S; Ogino, Shuji; Chan, Andrew T; Giovannucci, Edward L; Wu, Kana

    2016-01-01

    Background: Flavonoids inhibit the growth of colon cancer cells in vitro. In a secondary analysis of a randomized controlled trial, the Polyp Prevention Trial, a higher intake of one subclass, flavonols, was statistically significantly associated with a reduced risk of recurrent advanced adenoma. Most previous prospective studies on colorectal cancer evaluated only a limited number of flavonoid subclasses and intake ranges, yielding inconsistent results. Objective: In this study, we examined whether higher habitual dietary intakes of flavonoid subclasses (flavonols, flavones, flavanones, flavan-3-ols, and anthocyanins) were associated with a lower risk of colorectal cancer. Design: Using data from validated food-frequency questionnaires administered every 4 y and an updated flavonoid food composition database, we calculated flavonoid intakes for 42,478 male participants from the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study and for 76,364 female participants from the Nurses’ Health Study. Results: During up to 26 y of follow-up, 2519 colorectal cancer cases (1061 in men, 1458 in women) were documented. Intakes of flavonoid subclasses were not associated with risk of colorectal cancer in either cohort. Pooled multivariable adjusted RRs (95% CIs) comparing the highest with the lowest quintiles were 1.04 (0.91, 1.18) for flavonols, 1.01 (0.89, 1.15) for flavones, 0.96 (0.84, 1.10) for flavanones, 1.07 (0.95, 1.21) for flavan-3-ols, and 0.98 (0.81, 1.19) for anthocyanins (all P values for heterogeneity by sex >0.19). In subsite analyses, flavonoid intake was also not associated with colon or rectal cancer risk. Conclusion: Our findings do not support the hypothesis that a higher habitual intake of any flavonoid subclass decreases the risk of colorectal cancer. PMID:26537935

  12. Synchronous pituitary adenoma and pituicytoma.

    PubMed

    Neidert, Marian C; Leske, Henning; Burkhardt, Jan-Karl; Kollias, Spyros S; Capper, David; Schrimpf, Daniel; Regli, Luca; Rushing, Elisabeth J

    2016-01-01

    Pituicytoma is a rare benign neoplasm arising in the sellar region, usually found in the posterior lobe and/or pituitary stalk. Here, we report the case of a 67-year-old woman who presented with bitemporal hemianopsia and visual impairment accompanied by mildly elevated prolactin. Pathologic and molecular examination of the tissue removed transsphenoidally revealed 2 distinct tumors: pituitary adenoma and pituicytoma. To the best of our knowledge, histologically proven pituicytoma and pituitary adenoma have never been reported together. PMID:26476569

  13. Practical opportunities to improve early detection and prevention of colorectal cancer (CRC) in members of high-risk families.

    PubMed

    Patel, S G; Lowery, J T; Gatof, D; Ahnen, D J

    2015-03-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) incidence and mortality are steadily declining and CRC screening rates are increasing in the United States. Although this a very good news, several definable groups still have very low screening rates including younger (under age 50) members of high-risk CRC families. This opinion piece describes five strategies that could be incorporated into routine practice to improve identification and guideline-based screening in members of high-risk families. Routine incorporation of a simple family history screening tool and outreach to high-risk family members could substantially improve guideline-based screening in this population. Identification of CRCs and advanced adenomas in the endoscopy suite defines another group of high-risk families for similar outreach. Lynch syndrome families can be identified by testing CRCs and selected adenomas for microsatellite instability or loss of DNA repair protein expression. Finally, selective addition of aspirin to surveillance endoscopy can decrease the risk of new adenomas and CRCs. The rationale for these strategies as well as mechanisms for their implementation and evaluation in clinical practice is described. PMID:25698379

  14. Aberrant DNA methylation of WNT pathway genes in the development and progression of CIMP-negative colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Galamb, Orsolya; Kalmár, Alexandra; Péterfia, Bálint; Csabai, István; Bodor, András; Ribli, Dezső; Krenács, Tibor; Patai, Árpád V; Wichmann, Barnabás; Barták, Barbara Kinga; Tóth, Kinga; Valcz, Gábor; Spisák, Sándor; Tulassay, Zsolt; Molnár, Béla

    2016-08-01

    The WNT signaling pathway has an essential role in colorectal carcinogenesis and progression, which involves a cascade of genetic and epigenetic changes. We aimed to analyze DNA methylation affecting the WNT pathway genes in colorectal carcinogenesis in promoter and gene body regions using whole methylome analysis in 9 colorectal cancer, 15 adenoma, and 6 normal tumor adjacent tissue (NAT) samples by methyl capture sequencing. Functional methylation was confirmed on 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine-treated colorectal cancer cell line datasets. In parallel with the DNA methylation analysis, mutations of WNT pathway genes (APC, β-catenin/CTNNB1) were analyzed by 454 sequencing on GS Junior platform. Most differentially methylated CpG sites were localized in gene body regions (95% of WNT pathway genes). In the promoter regions, 33 of the 160 analyzed WNT pathway genes were differentially methylated in colorectal cancer vs. normal, including hypermethylated AXIN2, CHP1, PRICKLE1, SFRP1, SFRP2, SOX17, and hypomethylated CACYBP, CTNNB1, MYC; 44 genes in adenoma vs. NAT; and 41 genes in colorectal cancer vs. adenoma comparisons. Hypermethylation of AXIN2, DKK1, VANGL1, and WNT5A gene promoters was higher, while those of SOX17, PRICKLE1, DAAM2, and MYC was lower in colon carcinoma compared to adenoma. Inverse correlation between expression and methylation was confirmed in 23 genes, including APC, CHP1, PRICKLE1, PSEN1, and SFRP1. Differential methylation affected both canonical and noncanonical WNT pathway genes in colorectal normal-adenoma-carcinoma sequence. Aberrant DNA methylation appears already in adenomas as an early event of colorectal carcinogenesis. PMID:27245242

  15. Role of Fusobacteria in the serrated pathway of colorectal carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Park, Chan Hyuk; Han, Dong Soo; Oh, Young-Ha; Lee, A-reum; Lee, Yu-ra; Eun, Chang Soo

    2016-01-01

    Fusobacteria are associated with colorectal cancer (CRC) and are amplified during colorectal carcinogenesis. Compared to the adenoma-carcinoma sequence of carcinogenesis, serrated neoplasm has distinct clinical features and a different molecular background. We aimed to compare the gut microbiome between tubular adenoma (TA) and sessile serrated adenoma/polyp (SSA/P). Patients with TA, SSA/P, or CRC were recruited. Three pieces of colorectal mucosal tissue were obtained from each patient by endoscopic biopsy. 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing and phylogenetic investigation of communities by reconstruction of unobserved states (PICRUSt) were performed. Among 26 enrolled patients, 8, 10, and 8 had TA, SSA/P, and CRC, respectively. The relative abundance of Fusobacteria did not differ significantly between the TA and SSA/P groups (4.3% and 1.9%, P = 0.739) but was higher in the CRC group (33.8%) than in the TA or SSA/P group, respectively (TA vs. CRC, P = 0.002, false discovery rate [FDR] = 0.023; SSA/P vs. CRC, P < 0.001, FDR = 0.001). PICRUSt revealed that most functions in the TA metagenome were similar to those in the SSA/P metagenome. The gut microbiome, including relative abundance of Fusobacteria, did not differ between TA and SSA/P, suggesting that Fusobacteria may contribute to both the serrated pathway and the adenoma-carcinoma sequence. PMID:27125587

  16. Effect of APE1 T2197G (Asp148Glu) Polymorphism on APE1, XRCC1, PARP1 and OGG1 Expression in Patients with Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Juliana C.; Funck, Alexandre; Silva-Fernandes, Isabelle J. L.; Rabenhorst, Silvia H. B.; Martinez, Carlos A. R.; Ribeiro, Marcelo L.

    2014-01-01

    It has been hypothesized that genetic variation in base excision repair (BER) might modify colorectal adenoma risk. Thus, we evaluated the influence of APE1 T2197G (Asp148Glu) polymorphism on APE1, XRCC1, PARP1 and OGG1 expression in normal and tumor samples from patients with colorectal cancer. The results indicate a downregulation of OGG1 and an upregulation of XRCC1 expression in tumor tissue. Regarding the anatomical location of APE1, OGG1 and PARP-1, a decrease in gene expression was observed among patients with cancer in the rectum. In patients with or without some degree of tumor invasion, a significant downregulation in OGG1 was observed in tumor tissue. Interestingly, when taking into account the tumor stage, patients with more advanced grades (III and IV) showed a significant repression for APE1, OGG1 and PARP-1. XRCC1 expression levels were significantly enhanced in tumor samples and were correlated with all clinical and histopathological data. Concerning the polymorphism T2197G, GG genotype carriers exhibited a significantly reduced expression of genes of the BER repair system (APE1, XRCC1 and PARP1). In summary, our data show that patients with colorectal cancer present expression changes in several BER genes, suggesting a role for APE1, XRCC1, PARP1 and OGG1 and APE1 polymorphism in colorectal carcinogenesis. PMID:25268610

  17. Effect of APE1 T2197G (Asp148Glu) polymorphism on APE1, XRCC1, PARP1 and OGG1 expression in patients with colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Santos, Juliana C; Funck, Alexandre; Silva-Fernandes, Isabelle J L; Rabenhorst, Silvia H B; Martinez, Carlos A R; Ribeiro, Marcelo L

    2014-01-01

    It has been hypothesized that genetic variation in base excision repair (BER) might modify colorectal adenoma risk. Thus, we evaluated the influence of APE1 T2197G (Asp148Glu) polymorphism on APE1, XRCC1, PARP1 and OGG1 expression in normal and tumor samples from patients with colorectal cancer. The results indicate a downregulation of OGG1 and an upregulation of XRCC1 expression in tumor tissue. Regarding the anatomical location of APE1, OGG1 and PARP-1, a decrease in gene expression was observed among patients with cancer in the rectum. In patients with or without some degree of tumor invasion, a significant downregulation in OGG1 was observed in tumor tissue. Interestingly, when taking into account the tumor stage, patients with more advanced grades (III and IV) showed a significant repression for APE1, OGG1 and PARP-1. XRCC1 expression levels were significantly enhanced in tumor samples and were correlated with all clinical and histopathological data. Concerning the polymorphism T2197G, GG genotype carriers exhibited a significantly reduced expression of genes of the BER repair system (APE1, XRCC1 and PARP1). In summary, our data show that patients with colorectal cancer present expression changes in several BER genes, suggesting a role for APE1, XRCC1, PARP1 and OGG1 and APE1 polymorphism in colorectal carcinogenesis. PMID:25268610

  18. Increased expression of multidrug resistance related proteins Pgp, MRP1, and LRP/MVP occurs early in colorectal carcinogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Meijer, G A; Schroeijers, A B; Flens, M J; Meuwissen, S G; van der Valk, P; Baak, J P; Scheper, R J

    1999-01-01

    AIM: To analyse the expression of multidrug resistance (MDR) related proteins at different steps in colorectal carcinogenesis. METHODS: The presence of three MDR related proteins (Pgp, MRP1, and LRP/MVP) was studied by means of immunohistochemistry in normal, adenomatous, and malignant colorectal epithelium. Formaldehyde fixed, paraffin embedded tissue sections of 17 samples of colorectal tissue were used (normal mucosa, n = 4; adjacent mucosa, n = 5; adenoma, n = 5; carcinoma, n = 3). RESULTS: For all three proteins, expression was found in the surface epithelium and the upper parts of the crypts in normal colon. In the adenomas, staining was seen along the complete length of the crypts. In the carcinomas analysed, all epithelium showed positive staining. Mucosa adjacent to either carcinoma or adenoma showed staining patterns mostly resembling those of normal mucosa, but sometimes some extension of staining was seen along the crypt. CONCLUSIONS: These proteins already show increased expression in the adenoma stage. In the absence of adequate mucin production in adenomas, MDR related proteins could be an important factor in protecting the epithelium against further environmentally induced genetic damage. This could be one of the reasons why only about 5% of colorectal adenomas will actually progress to carcinomas. Images PMID:10562814

  19. Correlation between Helicobacter pylori-associated gastric diseases and colorectal neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Qing, Ying; Wang, Min; Lin, Ying-Min; Wu, Dong; Zhu, Jing-Yu; Gao, Lang; Liu, Yan-Yan; Yin, Teng-Fei

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To explore the correlation between Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori)-associated gastric diseases and colorectal neoplasia. METHODS: Patients included in this study underwent a colonoscopy and esophago-gastro-duodenoscopy (EGD) along with histopathological measurement between March 2012 and March 2015 at Qi-Lu Hospital of Shandong University, who also had results of H. pylori detection. A total of 233 cases were selected. Demographic data, H. pylori infection status (including results of rapid urease tests and gastric mucosa pathological examinations) and histopathological examination results of gastric and colorectal mucosa were gathered and analyzed. The statistical analysis focused on the prevalence of colorectal neoplasms among patients with various histopathological categories of the stomach. ORs and their 95%CI were calculated to describe the strengths of the associations. RESULTS: The incidence rates of colorectal adenoma without high-grade intraepithelial neoplasia (HGIEN) (OR = 2.400, 95%CI: 0.969-5.941), adenoma with HGIEN (5.333, 1.025-27.758) and adenocarcinoma (1.455, 0.382-5.543) were all higher for patients with H. pylori-associated gastritis than for those in the control group. The incidence rate of colorectal adenoma with HGIEN (3.218, 0.767-13.509) was higher in patients with intestinal metaplasia than in the control group, while the incidence rates of adenoma without HGIEN (0.874, 0.414-1.845) and adenocarcinoma (0.376, 0.096-1.470) were lower in the intestinal metaplasia group than in the control group. The incidence rate of colorectal adenoma without HGIEN (3.111, 1.248-7.753) was significantly higher in the gastric intraepithelial neoplasia group than in the control group, while the rates of adenoma with HGIEN (1.481, 0.138-15.941) and adenocarcinoma (2.020, 0.561-7.272) were higher in the gastric intraepithelial neoplasia group. Incidence rates of colorectal adenoma without HGIEN (1.067, 0.264-4.314), adenoma with HGIEN (2.667, 0

  20. Impact of Young Age on Treatment Efficacy and Safety in Advanced Colorectal Cancer: A Pooled Analysis of Patients From Nine First-Line Phase III Chemotherapy Trials

    PubMed Central

    Blanke, Charles D.; Bot, Brian M.; Thomas, David M.; Bleyer, Archie; Kohne, Claus-Henning; Seymour, Matthew T.; de Gramont, Aimery; Goldberg, Richard M.; Sargent, Daniel J.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Colorectal cancer predominantly occurs in the elderly, but approximately 5% of patients are 50 years old or younger. We sought to determine whether young age is prognostic, or whether it influences efficacy/toxicity of chemotherapy, in patients with advanced disease. Methods We analyzed individual data on 6,284 patients from nine phase III trials of advanced colorectal cancer (aCRC) that used fluorouracil-based single-agent and combination chemotherapy. End points included progression-free survival (PFS), overall survival (OS), response rate (RR), and grade 3 or worse adverse events. Stratified Cox and adjusted logistic-regression models were used to test for age effects and age-treatment interactions. Results A total of 793 patients (13%) were younger than 50 years old; 188 of these patients (3% of total patients) were younger than 40 years old. Grade 3 or worse nausea (10% v 7%; P = .01) was more common, and severe diarrhea (11% v 14%; P = .001) and neutropenia (23% v 26%; P < .001) were less common in young (younger than 50 years) than in older (older than 50 years) patients. Age was prognostic for PFS, with poorer outcomes occurring in those younger than 50 years (median, 6.0 v 7.5 months; hazard ratio, 1.10; P = .02), but it did not affect RR or OS. In the subset of monotherapy versus combination chemotherapy trials, the relative benefits of multiagent chemotherapy were similar for young and older patients. Results were comparable when utilizing an age cut point of 40 years. Conclusion Young age is modestly associated with poorer PFS but not OS or RR in treated patients with aCRC, and young patients have more nausea but less diarrhea and neutropenia with chemotherapy in general. Young versus older patients derive the same benefits from combination chemotherapy. Absent results of a clinical trial, standard combination chemotherapy approaches are appropriate for young patients with aCRC. PMID:21646604

  1. Phase II trial of fluorouracil and recombinant interferon alfa-2a in patients with advanced colorectal carcinoma: an Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group study.

    PubMed

    Wadler, S; Lembersky, B; Atkins, M; Kirkwood, J; Petrelli, N

    1991-10-01

    In a pilot clinical trial, treatment of patients with advanced colorectal carcinoma with the combination of fluorouracil (5FU) and recombinant interferon alfa-2a (IFN) resulted in objective tumor regression in 62% of patients. To confirm these findings in a multiinstitutional setting, a phase II clinical trial was initiated by the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) in 1989. The treatment regimen was identical to that used in the earlier study: 5FU 750 mg/m2/d for 5 days as a continuous infusion followed by weekly outpatient bolus therapy and IFN 9MU subcutaneously beginning day 1 and administered three times per week. Doses were modified for gastrointestinal, hematologic, and neurologic toxicity and for fatigue, similarly to those used in the previous pilot trial. Thirty-eight patients were registered; 36 are evaluable for response (one lost to follow-up and one with nonmeasurable disease). All patients had metastatic or locally recurrent disease beyond the scope of resection; 31 of 38 had liver metastases, and 20 of 38 had two or more sites of involvement. Eight patients had grade 4 toxicities, including sepsis (nonneutropenic) (one), watery diarrhea (two), and granulocytopenia (six). Grade 3 neurologic toxicities were observed in two (5%) patients and included slurred speech and gait disturbance. Objective response was 42% (95% confidence interval [Cl], 27% to 58%), including one clinical complete responder and 14 partial responders. Among the responding patients, the median time to treatment failure was 8 months. Two patients remain on treatment at 10+ and 16+ months: median survival has not been reached. The results of this multiinstitutional trial suggest that the addition of IFN to 5FU enhances the objective response rates achieved in patients with advanced colorectal carcinoma and that the toxicities of this regimen are acceptable. PMID:1919631

  2. Double-blind randomised placebo-controlled phase III study of an E. coli extract plus 5-fluorouracil versus 5-fluorouracil in patients with advanced colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Unger, C; Häring, B; Kruse, A; Thumann, A; Schneider, B; Clemm, C; Weber, B; Clevert, H D; Hockertz, S; Kalousek, M B

    2001-01-01

    The primary aim of this study was to evaluate the toxicity (mucositis, diarrhea and leucopenia) of a therapy with 5-fluorouracil (CAS 51-21-8; 5-FU) plus an E. coli extract (LC-Extract, Laves coli extract, Colibiogen inject, cell-free soluble fraction from lysed E. coli, Laves strain) in comparison with 5-FU plus placebo. Secondary endpoints included general toxicity, response rate according to WHO, survival time and quality of life. 164 patients with advanced colorectal cancer were enrolled in this randomised, placebo-controlled, double-blind, multicenter phase III study. The treatment consisted of 0.167 ml/kg/d LC-Extract or placebo followed by 500-750 mg/m2/d 5-FU on five consecutive days, repeated every three weeks for up to six treatment cycles. 158 (77 verum, 81 placebo) patients were evaluable for toxicity, 144 (72 verum, 72 placebo) evaluable for response. The therapy with LC-Extract was well tolerated. Adverse events that occurred during the study were mainly judged as 5-FU- or tumor-related. Toxicity from treatment with 600 mg/m2/d 5-FU in both treatment groups was very low. After treatment with 750 mg/m2/d 5-FU patients in the placebo-group experienced a higher CTC toxicity than in the LC-Extract groups. Remission rate and survival time showed a slight trend in favour of LC-Extract. These results suggest a positive benefit-risk ratio of the additional application of LC-Extract to 5-FU in the treatment of advanced colorectal cancer especially for administration of high doses of 5-FU. PMID:11367875

  3. A genomic screen for long noncoding RNA genes epigenetically silenced by aberrant DNA methylation in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kumegawa, Kohei; Maruyama, Reo; Yamamoto, Eiichiro; Ashida, Masami; Kitajima, Hiroshi; Tsuyada, Akihiro; Niinuma, Takeshi; Kai, Masahiro; Yamano, Hiro-o; Sugai, Tamotsu; Tokino, Takashi; Shinomura, Yasuhisa; Imai, Kohzoh; Suzuki, Hiromu

    2016-01-01

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) have emerged as key components in multiple cellular processes, although their physiological and pathological functions are not fully understood. To identify cancer-related lncRNAs, we screened for those that are epigenetically silenced in colorectal cancer (CRC). Through a genome-wide analysis of histone modifications in CRC cells, we found that the transcription start sites (TSSs) of 1,027 lncRNA genes acquired trimethylation of histone H3 lysine 4 (H3K4me3) after DNA demethylation. Integrative analysis of chromatin signatures and the DNA methylome revealed that the promoter CpG islands (CGIs) of 66 lncRNA genes contained cancer-specific methylation. By validating the expression and methylation of lncRNA genes in CRC cells, we ultimately identified 20 lncRNAs, including ZNF582-AS1, as targets of epigenetic silencing in CRC. ZNF582-AS1 is frequently methylated in CRC cell lines (87.5%), primary CRCs (77.2%), colorectal adenomas (44.7%) and advanced adenomas (87.8%), suggesting that this methylation is an early event during colorectal tumorigenesis. Methylation of ZNF582-AS1 is associated with poor survival of CRC patients, and ectopic expression of ZNF582-AS1 suppressed colony formation by CRC cells. Our findings offer insight into the association between epigenetic alterations and lncRNA dysregulation in cancer and suggest that ZNF582-AS1 may be a novel tumor-suppressive lncRNA. PMID:27215978

  4. A genomic screen for long noncoding RNA genes epigenetically silenced by aberrant DNA methylation in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Kumegawa, Kohei; Maruyama, Reo; Yamamoto, Eiichiro; Ashida, Masami; Kitajima, Hiroshi; Tsuyada, Akihiro; Niinuma, Takeshi; Kai, Masahiro; Yamano, Hiro-O; Sugai, Tamotsu; Tokino, Takashi; Shinomura, Yasuhisa; Imai, Kohzoh; Suzuki, Hiromu

    2016-01-01

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) have emerged as key components in multiple cellular processes, although their physiological and pathological functions are not fully understood. To identify cancer-related lncRNAs, we screened for those that are epigenetically silenced in colorectal cancer (CRC). Through a genome-wide analysis of histone modifications in CRC cells, we found that the transcription start sites (TSSs) of 1,027 lncRNA genes acquired trimethylation of histone H3 lysine 4 (H3K4me3) after DNA demethylation. Integrative analysis of chromatin signatures and the DNA methylome revealed that the promoter CpG islands (CGIs) of 66 lncRNA genes contained cancer-specific methylation. By validating the expression and methylation of lncRNA genes in CRC cells, we ultimately identified 20 lncRNAs, including ZNF582-AS1, as targets of epigenetic silencing in CRC. ZNF582-AS1 is frequently methylated in CRC cell lines (87.5%), primary CRCs (77.2%), colorectal adenomas (44.7%) and advanced adenomas (87.8%), suggesting that this methylation is an early event during colorectal tumorigenesis. Methylation of ZNF582-AS1 is associated with poor survival of CRC patients, and ectopic expression of ZNF582-AS1 suppressed colony formation by CRC cells. Our findings offer insight into the association between epigenetic alterations and lncRNA dysregulation in cancer and suggest that ZNF582-AS1 may be a novel tumor-suppressive lncRNA. PMID:27215978

  5. Colorectal polyp type and the association with charred meat consumption, smoking, and microsomal epoxide hydrolase polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    Burnett-Hartman, Andrea N; Newcomb, Polly A; Mandelson, Margaret T; Adams, Scott V; Wernli, Karen J; Shadman, Mazyar; Wurscher, Michelle A; Makar, Karen W

    2011-01-01

    We determined the association between charred meat consumption, cigarette smoking, microsomal epoxide hydrolase (mEH) polymorphisms (rs1051740 and rs2234922), and colorectal adenomas and hyperplastic polyps (HPs) and explored gene-environment interactions. Men and women with colorectal adenomas (n = 519), HPs (n = 691), or concurrently with both types of polyps (n = 227) and polyp-free controls (n = 772) receiving a colonoscopy from December 2004 to September 2007 were recruited. Participants completed telephone interviews and provided buccal cell samples; genotyping of mEH was completed using Taqman assays. We conducted polytomous regression and calculated odd ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals. Interactions were evaluated using Wald chi-square tests. Consumption of >3 servings of charred meat per week was associated with distal HPs (OR = 2.0, 1.2-3.4) but not adenomas nor either type of proximal polyp. Heavy cigarette smoking (≥ 22 pack-years) was associated with an increased risk for colorectal adenomas (OR = 1.7, 95% CI: 1.2-2.4), HPs (OR = 2.4, 95% CI: 1.7-3.3), and both types (OR = 2.8, 95% CI: 1.8-4.3) with the strongest association for distal polyps. There was no association between mEH genotype and colorectal polyps, nor were any statistically significant gene-environment interactions identified. Future investigation of BaP exposure and colorectal neoplasia should analyze whether associations are dependent upon anatomic location. PMID:21598178

  6. Feasibility of Unbiased RNA Profiling of Colorectal Tumors: A Proof of Principle

    PubMed Central

    Moshayoff, Vardit; Faktor, Ouriel; Laghi, Luigi; Celesti, Giuseppe; Peretz, Tamar; Keret, Dan

    2016-01-01

    Despite recent advances in molecular profiling of colorectal cancer (CRC), as of yet this has not translated into an unbiased molecular liquid biopsy profile which can accurately screen for early CRC. In this study we depict the profile of early stage CRC as well as for advanced adenomas (AA) by combination of current molecular knowledge with microarray technology, using efficient circulating free plasma RNA purification from blood and RNA amplification technologies. We joined literature search with Affymetrix gene chip experimental procedure to draw the circulating free plasma RNA profile of colorectal cancer disease reflected in blood. The RNA panel was tested by two datasets comparing patients with CRC with healthy subjects and patients with AA to healthy subjects. For the CRC patient cohort (28 CRC cases vs. 41 healthy controls), the ROC analysis of the selected biomarker panel generated a sensitivity of 75% and a specificity of 93% for the detection of CRC using 8-gene classification model. For the AA patient cohort (28 subjects vs. 46 healthy controls), a sensitivity of 60% and a specificity of 87% were calculated using a 2-gene classification model. We have identified a panel of 8 plasma RNA markers as a preliminary panel for CRC detection and subset markers suitable for AA detection. Subjected to extensive clinical validation we suggest that this panel represents a feasible approach and a potential strategy for noninvasive early diagnosis, as a first-line screening test for asymptomatic, average-risk population before colonoscopy. PMID:27441409

  7. Feasibility of Unbiased RNA Profiling of Colorectal Tumors: A Proof of Principle.

    PubMed

    Moshayoff, Vardit; Faktor, Ouriel; Laghi, Luigi; Celesti, Giuseppe; Peretz, Tamar; Keret, Dan; Cohen, Dana; Israeli, Eran

    2016-01-01

    Despite recent advances in molecular profiling of colorectal cancer (CRC), as of yet this has not translated into an unbiased molecular liquid biopsy profile which can accurately screen for early CRC. In this study we depict the profile of early stage CRC as well as for advanced adenomas (AA) by combination of current molecular knowledge with microarray technology, using efficient circulating free plasma RNA purification from blood and RNA amplification technologies. We joined literature search with Affymetrix gene chip experimental procedure to draw the circulating free plasma RNA profile of colorectal cancer disease reflected in blood. The RNA panel was tested by two datasets comparing patients with CRC with healthy subjects and patients with AA to healthy subjects. For the CRC patient cohort (28 CRC cases vs. 41 healthy controls), the ROC analysis of the selected biomarker panel generated a sensitivity of 75% and a specificity of 93% for the detection of CRC using 8-gene classification model. For the AA patient cohort (28 subjects vs. 46 healthy controls), a sensitivity of 60% and a specificity of 87% were calculated using a 2-gene classification model. We have identified a panel of 8 plasma RNA markers as a preliminary panel for CRC detection and subset markers suitable for AA detection. Subjected to extensive clinical validation we suggest that this panel represents a feasible approach and a potential strategy for noninvasive early diagnosis, as a first-line screening test for asymptomatic, average-risk population before colonoscopy. PMID:27441409

  8. Pathologic Features of Colorectal Inflammatory Polyps in Miniature Dachshunds.

    PubMed

    Uchida, E; Chambers, J K; Nakashima, K; Saito, T; Ohno, K; Tsujimoto, H; Nakayama, H; Uchida, K

    2016-07-01

    The histopathologic characteristics of colorectal inflammatory polyps that formed in Miniature Dachshunds were compared with those of other colorectal proliferative lesions, including adenomas and adenocarcinomas. Fifty-three colorectal polypoid lesions were histopathologically classified into inflammatory polyps (26 cases), adenoma (18 cases), and adenocarcinoma (9 cases). All 26 dogs that were diagnosed with inflammatory polyps were Miniature Dachshunds, indicating that colorectal inflammatory polyps exhibit a marked predilection for this breed. The inflammatory polyps had complex histopathologic features and were classified into 3 stages based on their epithelial composition. In early stage (stage 1), the polyps tended to exhibit a thickened mucosa containing hyperplastic goblet cells, dilated crypts filled with a large amount of mucus, and mild lymphocyte and macrophage infiltration. In later stages (stages 2 and 3), more severe neutrophil infiltration, interstitial mucus accumulation, granulation tissue, and occasional osteoid tissue were seen. Also, a few small foci of dysplastic epithelial cells were detected. The hyperplastic goblet cells, which were a major component of the epithelium of the inflammatory polyps, were positive for cytokeratin 20 (CK20), while the dysplastic epithelial cells found in inflammatory polyps (stage 3) and the tumor cells of the adenomas and adenocarcinomas were negative for CK20. These CK20-negative epithelial cells exhibited cytoplasmic and nuclear immunoreactivity for beta-catenin. In addition, the epithelial cells in the inflammatory polyps demonstrated significantly higher cyclooxygenase 2 and fibroblast growth factor 2 expression than did those of the adenomas and adenocarcinomas, suggesting that the arachidonate cascade is involved in the development of colorectal inflammatory polyps in miniature dachshunds. PMID:26792840

  9. Phospholipid Ether Analogs for the Detection of Colorectal Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Deming, Dustin A.; Maher, Molly E.; Leystra, Alyssa A.; Grudzinski, Joseph P.; Clipson, Linda; Albrecht, Dawn M.; Washington, Mary Kay; Matkowskyj, Kristina A.; Hall, Lance T.; Lubner, Sam J.; Weichert, Jamey P.; Halberg, Richard B.

    2014-01-01

    The treatment of localized colorectal cancer (CRC) depends on resection of the primary tumor with adequate margins and sufficient lymph node sampling. A novel imaging agent that accumulates in CRCs and the associated lymph nodes is needed. Cellectar Biosciences has developed a phospholipid ether analog platform that is both diagnostic and therapeutic. CLR1502 is a near-infrared fluorescent molecule, whereas 124/131I-CLR1404 is under clinical investigation as a PET tracer/therapeutic agent imaged by SPECT. We investigated the use of CLR1502 for the detection of intestinal cancers in a murine model and 131I-CLR1404 in a patient with metastatic CRC. Mice that develop multiple intestinal tumors ranging from adenomas to locally advanced adenocarcinomas were utilized. After 96 hours post CLR1502 injection, the intestinal tumors were analyzed using a Spectrum IVIS (Perkin Elmer) and a Fluobeam (Fluoptics). The intensity of the fluorescent signal was correlated with the histological characteristics for each tumor. Colon adenocarcinomas demonstrated increased accumulation of CLR1502 compared to non-invasive lesions (total radiant efficiency: 1.76×1010 vs 3.27×109 respectively, p = 0.006). Metastatic mesenteric tumors and uninvolved lymph nodes were detected with CLR1502. In addition, SPECT imaging with 131I-CLR1404 was performed as part of a clinical trial in patients with advanced solid tumors. 131I-CLR1404 was shown to accumulate in metastatic tumors in a patient with colorectal adenocarcinoma. Together, these compounds might enhance our ability to properly resect CRCs through better localization of the primary tumor and improved lymph node identification as well as detect distant disease. PMID:25286226

  10. Phospholipid ether analogs for the detection of colorectal tumors.

    PubMed

    Deming, Dustin A; Maher, Molly E; Leystra, Alyssa A; Grudzinski, Joseph P; Clipson, Linda; Albrecht, Dawn M; Washington, Mary Kay; Matkowskyj, Kristina A; Hall, Lance T; Lubner, Sam J; Weichert, Jamey P; Halberg, Richard B

    2014-01-01

    The treatment of localized colorectal cancer (CRC) depends on resection of the primary tumor with adequate margins and sufficient lymph node sampling. A novel imaging agent that accumulates in CRCs and the associated lymph nodes is needed. Cellectar Biosciences has developed a phospholipid ether analog platform that is both diagnostic and therapeutic. CLR1502 is a near-infrared fluorescent molecule, whereas 124/131I-CLR1404 is under clinical investigation as a PET tracer/therapeutic agent imaged by SPECT. We investigated the use of CLR1502 for the detection of intestinal cancers in a murine model and 131I-CLR1404 in a patient with metastatic CRC. Mice that develop multiple intestinal tumors ranging from adenomas to locally advanced adenocarcinomas were utilized. After 96 hours post CLR1502 injection, the intestinal tumors were analyzed using a Spectrum IVIS (Perkin Elmer) and a Fluobeam (Fluoptics). The intensity of the fluorescent signal was correlated with the histological characteristics for each tumor. Colon adenocarcinomas demonstrated increased accumulation of CLR1502 compared to non-invasive lesions (total radiant efficiency: 1.76×10(10) vs 3.27×10(9) respectively, p = 0.006). Metastatic mesenteric tumors and uninvolved lymph nodes were detected with CLR1502. In addition, SPECT imaging with 131I-CLR1404 was performed as part of a clinical trial in patients with advanced solid tumors. 131I-CLR1404 was shown to accumulate in metastatic tumors in a patient with colorectal adenocarcinoma. Together, these compounds might enhance our ability to properly resect CRCs through better localization of the primary tumor and improved lymph node identification as well as detect distant disease. PMID:25286226

  11. Clinical and endoscopic-pathological characteristics of colorectal polyps: an analysis of 1,234 cases

    PubMed Central

    Long, Xiaohua; Li, Xiaofeng; Ma, Lin; Lu, Jing; Liao, Suhuan; Gui, Ruohu

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To analyze the correlation of clinical symptom and endoscopic-pathological characteristics of colorectal polyps. Methods: A retrospective study was performed on 1,234 continuous colorectal polyp patients. Their clinical, colonoscopic and pathological data were collected and analyzed. Results: In 1,234 patients, 46.0% cases were asymptomatic, and 54.0% cases were symptomatic, and the female to male ratio was 2.23:1 and 1.74:1, respectively (P = 0.048). The mean polyp size in symptomatic group was significantly larger than asymptomatic group [7.6±5.1 mm (95% CI: 7.2, 8.0) vs. 6.3±3.7 mm (95% CI: 6.0, 6.6), P < 0.001]. Tubu-villous polyp and villous polyp occurred more frequently in symptomatic group, compared with asymptomatic group (P = 0.002). In symptomatic group, 37.4% cases complained of abdominal pain and 62.6% cases complained of bowel habit alteration. The polyp number in abdominal pain group was larger than bowel habit alteration group (P = 0.036). Three major symptoms of bowel habit alteration were diarrhea, constipation and hematochezia, with proportion of 54.2% (278/513), 27.7% (142/513) and 18.1% (93/513), respectively. The hematochezia group had larger polyp size than diarrhea group (P = 0.001) and consisted of more villous component than the constipation patients (P = 0.005). Conclusion: Almost half of colorectal polyp patients do not complain of bowel symptoms, especially the male. Colorectal polyp patients have bowel habit alteration more commonly than abdominal pain. Half of patients with bowel habit alteration demonstrate diarrhea. The hematochezia patients are more susceptible to advanced adenomas than the diarrhea and constipation ones. PMID:26770577

  12. Lactating Adenoma of the Breast.

    PubMed

    Barco Nebreda, Israel; Vidal, M Carmen; Fraile, Manel; Canales, Lydia; González, Clarisa; Giménez, Nuria; García-Fernández, Antonio

    2016-08-01

    Lactating adenoma is an uncommon breast palpable lesion occurring in pregnancy or lactation. Although it is a benign condition, it often requires core biopsy or even surgery to exclude malignancy. As with other solid lesions in pregnancy and lactation, lactating adenoma needs an accurate evaluation in order to ensure its benign nature. Work-up must include both imaging and histologic findings. Ultrasound evaluation remains the first step in assessing the features of the lesion. Some authors consider magnetic resonance imaging as a useful tool in cases of inconclusive evaluation after ultrasound and histologic exam in an attempt to avoid surgery. Most lactating adenomas resolve spontaneously, whereas others persist or even increase in size and must be removed. The authors present a case of a 35-year-old woman at 6 months postpartum with a lactating adenoma in her right breast. After surgical removal, breastfeeding was perfectly continued within the next 24 hours, which highlights the fact that breast surgery is most often compatible with breastfeeding. PMID:27197575

  13. Nephrogenic adenoma of the bladder.

    PubMed

    Vorreuther, R; Nayal, W; Hake, R; Engelmann, U

    1994-01-01

    A nephrogenic adenoma of the bladder in a 4-year-old girl with a past history of urologic surgery for vesicorenal reflux is described. The multifocal tumor was treated by transurethral resection. Relapse occurred 15 months later and was again treated by transurethral resection. Pathological aspects, clinical features and therapeutic considerations of this proliferative lesion are reviewed and discussed. PMID:7855943

  14. Testing ERBB2 p.L755S kinase domain mutation as a druggable target in a patient with advanced colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Aung, Kyaw L.; Stockley, Tracy L.; Serra, Stefano; Kamel-Reid, Suzanne; Bedard, Philippe L.; Siu, Lillian L.

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in molecular profiling technologies allow genetic driver events in individual tumors to be identified. The hypothesis behind this ongoing molecular profiling effort is that improvement in patients’ clinical outcomes will be achieved by inhibiting these discovered genetic driver events with matched targeted drugs. This hypothesis is currently being tested in oncology clinics with variable early results. Herein, we present our experience with a case of advanced colorectal cancer (CRC) with an ERBB2 p.L755S kinase domain mutation, a BRAF p.N581S mutation, and an APC p.Q1429fs mutation, together with a brief review of the literature describing the biological and clinical significance of ERRB2 kinase domain mutations in CRC. The patient was treated with trastuzumab combined with infusional 5-fluorouracil and leucovorin based on the presence of ERBB2 p.L755S kinase mutation in the tumor and based on the available evidence at the time when standard treatment options had been exhausted. However, there was no therapeutic response illustrating the challenges we face in managing patients with potentially targetable mutations where results from functional in vitro and in vivo studies lag behind those of genomic sequencing studies. Also lagging behind are clinical utility data from oncology clinics, hampering rapid therapeutic advances. Our case also highlights the logistical barriers associated with getting the most optimal therapeutic agents to the right patient in this era of personalized therapeutics based on cancer genomics. PMID:27626067

  15. Testing ERBB2 p.L755S kinase domain mutation as a druggable target in a patient with advanced colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Aung, Kyaw L; Stockley, Tracy L; Serra, Stefano; Kamel-Reid, Suzanne; Bedard, Philippe L; Siu, Lillian L

    2016-09-01

    Recent advances in molecular profiling technologies allow genetic driver events in individual tumors to be identified. The hypothesis behind this ongoing molecular profiling effort is that improvement in patients' clinical outcomes will be achieved by inhibiting these discovered genetic driver events with matched targeted drugs. This hypothesis is currently being tested in oncology clinics with variable early results. Herein, we present our experience with a case of advanced colorectal cancer (CRC) with an ERBB2 p.L755S kinase domain mutation, a BRAF p.N581S mutation, and an APC p.Q1429fs mutation, together with a brief review of the literature describing the biological and clinical significance of ERRB2 kinase domain mutations in CRC. The patient was treated with trastuzumab combined with infusional 5-fluorouracil and leucovorin based on the presence of ERBB2 p.L755S kinase mutation in the tumor and based on the available evidence at the time when standard treatment options had been exhausted. However, there was no therapeutic response illustrating the challenges we face in managing patients with potentially targetable mutations where results from functional in vitro and in vivo studies lag behind those of genomic sequencing studies. Also lagging behind are clinical utility data from oncology clinics, hampering rapid therapeutic advances. Our case also highlights the logistical barriers associated with getting the most optimal therapeutic agents to the right patient in this era of personalized therapeutics based on cancer genomics. PMID:27626067

  16. Frequency of coexistent carcinoma in sessile serrated adenoma/polyps and traditional serrated adenomas removed by endoscopic resection

    PubMed Central

    Saiki, Hirotsugu; Nishida, Tsutomu; Yamamoto, Masashi; Hayashi, Shiro; Shimakoshi, Hiromi; Shimoda, Akiyoshi; Amano, Takahiro; Sakamoto, Aisa; Otake, Yuriko; Sugimoto, Aya; Takahashi, Kei; Mukai, Kaori; Matsubara, Tokuhiro; Nakajima, Sachiko; Fukui, Koji; Inada, Masami; Yamamoto, Katsumi; Tokuda, Ryozo; Adachi, Shiro

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: Sessile serrated adenoma/polyps (SSA/Ps) have a different potential than traditional adenomatous polyps for developing into malignant colorectal cancer. However, little is known about the coexistent cancer rate. Here, we evaluate the frequency of carcinoma in serrated polyps removed by endoscopic resection (ER). Patients and methods: This was a retrospective single-center cohort study of consecutive patients with colorectal polyps who underwent ER from March 2003 to October 2014. We determined the frequency of serrated polyps among all resected colorectal polyps and analyzed the clinicopathological findings as well as the frequency and characteristics of coexistent carcinoma in the serrated polyps resected by ER based on pathology reports. Results: A total of 21,048 polyps from 15,326 patients were identified, including 15,984 traditional adenomatous polyps (75.9 %), 621 SSA/Ps (3.0 %), 136 traditional serrated adenomas (TSAs) (0.6 %), 1,121 hyperplastic polyps (5.3 %), and 3,186 polyps of other types (15.1 %). The clinical and endoscopic findings of SSA/Ps revealed a male predominance (68.6 %), with 61.7 % of the polyps located in the proximal colon. Males accounted for 77.2 % of all patients with TSAs, and 77.2 % of these polyps were located in the distal colon. The mean sizes of the SSA/Ps and TSAs were 8.8 and 10.7 mm, respectively. Among the SSA/Ps, 8 (1.3 %) cases had coexistent carcinoma, and 1 (0.7 %) patient with TSA showed coexistent carcinoma. In the patients with SSA/Ps, female sex and a tumor size ≥ 10 mm were predictive factors for coexistent carcinoma. Conclusions: The frequency of SSA/Ps with carcinoma was lower than that for traditional adenoma. Female sex and tumor size ≥ 10 mm were significant predictive factors for coexistent carcinoma. PMID:27092327

  17. Clinical Concerns about Recurrence of Non-Functioning Pituitary Adenoma

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Min Ho; Lee, Ju Hee; Seol, Ho Jun; Lee, Jung-Il; Kim, Jong Hyun; Kong, Doo-Sik

    2016-01-01

    Background Non-functioning pituitary adenomas (NFPA) are clinically challenging because they present at a late stage with local mass effects or hypopituitarism. Surgery for non-functioning pituitary adenoma requires a special strategic approach for both minimal morbidity and radical resection. However, the clinical predictive factors associated with recurrence are limited. Here, we investigated optimal treatment of non-functioning pituitary adenoma. Methods We enrolled 289 patients who presented with non-functioning pituitary adenoma between January 2000 and January 2012 and who had received follow-up for at least one year for this retrospective study. Of these patients, 152 were male and 137 were female, with a median age of 51 years (range 15.79 years) and a median follow-up of four years (range 1.12.6 years). Characteristics of patients and tumors were reviewed with electronic medical records and radiologic images, retrospectively. Results Of the tumors, 193 were gross-totally resected, 53 were near-totally resected, and 43 were sub-totally resected. The extent of resection and adjuvant radiotherapy were both statistically significant prognostic factors of recurrence. Immunohistochemistry of tumor specimens did not yield consistent results. Conclusion With a high rate of recurrence, NFPA should be closely followed-up over a long-term period. Improvement of surgical techniques with advanced surgical equipment and adjuvant radiosurgery would lead to reduce the recurrence rate and improve patients' outcome. PMID:27195254

  18. The genetics of pituitary adenomas.

    PubMed

    Vandeva, Silvia; Jaffrain-Rea, Marie-Lise; Daly, Adrian F; Tichomirowa, Maria; Zacharieva, Sabina; Beckers, Albert

    2010-06-01

    Pituitary adenomas are one of the most frequent intracranial tumors with a prevalence of clinically-apparent tumors close to 1:1000 of the general population. They are clinically significant because of hormone overproduction and/or tumor mass effects in addition to the need for neurosurgery, medical therapies and radiotherapy. The majority of pituitary adenomas have a sporadic origin with recognized genetic mutations seldom being found; somatotropinomas are an exception, presenting frequent somatic GNAS mutations. In this and other phenotypes, tumorigenesis could possibly be explained by altered function of genes implicated in cell cycle regulation, growth factors or their receptors, cell-signaling pathways, specific hormonal factors or other molecules with still unclear mechanisms of action. Genetic changes, such as allelic loss or gene amplification, and epigenetic changes, usually by promoter methylation, have been implicated in abnormal gene expression, but alternative mechanisms may be present. Familial cases of pituitary adenomas represent 5% of all pituitary tumors. MEN1 mutations cause multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1), while the Carney complex (CNC) is characterized by mutations in the protein kinase A regulatory subunit-1alpha (PRKAR1A) gene or changes in a locus at 2p16. Recently, a MEN1-like condition, MEN4, was found to be related to mutations in the CDKN1B gene. The clinical entity of familial isolated pituitary adenomas (FIPA) is characterized by genetic defects in the aryl hydrocarbon receptor interacting protein (AIP) gene in about 15% of all kindreds and 50% of homogenous somatotropinoma families. Identification of familial cases of pituitary adenomas is important as these tumors may be more aggressive than their sporadic counterparts. PMID:20833337

  19. Modeling and Control of Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Song, Li-Peng; Wang, Hao-Yu

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal Cancer (CRC) is becoming a major threat to people’s life in China. Screening methods adopted by many other countries as effective counter-cancer methods have not been explicitly explored for people there. Thus, we present a Markov model with detailed precancerous adenoma states and then evaluate various screening strategies in this paper. Different from current researches, our model considers the population’s heterogeneous risk of developing adenomas and observation-based screening strategies. Furthermore, we also give a new cost-effectiveness metric. After calibrating, the model is simulated using the Monte Carlo method. Numerical results show that there are threshold values of compliance rates below which strategy with every ten-year colonoscopy becomes the most cost-effective method; otherwise, an observation-based screening strategy is the most cost-effective. We also find that strategy with single colonoscopy for adenoma-free individuals and every three-year colonoscopy for those with adenoma is recommended when the observation-based strategy is not considered. Our findings give an explicit and complete instruction in CRC screening protocol in average-risk Chinese. PMID:27536786

  20. Clinicopathological Characteristics of Laterally Spreading Colorectal Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Li; Wang, Yadong; Wang, Xianfei; Li, Aimin; Liu, Side

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims Laterally spreading tumor (LST) is a colorectal pre-cancerous lesion. Previous studies have demonstrated distinct LST clinicopathological characteristics in different populations. This study evaluated clinicopathological characteristics of LST in a Chinese population. Methods A total of 259 Chinese LST patients with 289 lesions were recruited for endoscopic and clinicopathological analyses. Results Among these 289 lesions, 185 were granular type (LST-G), whereas 104 were non-granular type (LST-NG). LST-G lesions were further classified into homogeneous G-type and nodular mixed G-type, while LST-NG lesions were further classified into flat elevated NG-type and pseudo-depressed NG-type. Clinically, these four LST subtypes showed distinct clinicopathological characteristics, e.g., lesion size, location, or histopathological features (high-grade intraepithelial neoplasia and submucosal carcinoma). The nodular mixed G-type showed larger tumor size and higher incidence of high-grade intraepithelial neoplasia compared to the other three subtypes, while pseudo-depressed NG-type lesions showed the highest incidence of submucosal carcinoma. Noticeably, no diffidence was detected between the lesions of homogeneous G-type and flat elevated NG-type with regard to the histopathological features. Histology of the malignancy potential was associated with nodular mixed G-type [OR = 2.41, 95% CI (1.09–5.29); P = 0.029], flat elevated NG-type [OR = 3.49, 95% CI (1.41–8.22); P = 0.007], Diameter ≥30 mm [OR = 2.56, 95% CI (1.20–5.20); P = 0.009], Villous adenoma [OR = 2.76, 95% CI (1.01–7.58); P = 0.048] and serrated adenoma [OR = 6.99, 95% CI (1.81–26.98); P = 0.005]. Conclusion Chinese LSTs can be divided into four different subtypes, which show distinct clinicopathological characteristics. Morphology, size and pathological characteristics are all independent predictors of advanced histology. PMID:24751926

  1. Pituitary adenomas: historical perspective, surgical management and future directions

    PubMed Central

    Theodros, Debebe; Patel, Mira; Ruzevick, Jacob; Lim, Michael; Bettegowda, Chetan

    2016-01-01

    Pituitary adenomas are among the most common central nervous system tumors. They represent a diverse group of neoplasms that may or may not secrete hormones based on their cell of origin. Epidemiologic studies have documented the incidence of pituitary adenomas within the general population to be as high as 16.7%. A growing body of work has helped to elucidate the pathogenesis of these tumors. Each subtype has been shown to demonstrate unique cellular changes potentially leading to tumorigenesis. Surgical advancements over several decades have included microsurgery and the employment of the endoscope for surgical resection. These advancements increase the likelihood of gross-total resection and have resulted in decreased patient morbidity. PMID:26497533

  2. Phase 1 Study of ABT-751 in Combination With CAPIRI (Capecitabine and Irinotecan) and Bevacizumab in Patients With Advanced Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Rudek, Michelle A; Dasari, Arvind; Laheru, Daniel; He, Ping; Jin, Runyan; Walker, Rosalind; Taylor, Gretchen E; Jimeno, Antonio; Donehower, Ross C; Hidalgo, Manuel; Messersmith, Wells A; Purcell, W Thomas

    2016-08-01

    ABT-751 is an orally bioavailable sulfonamide with antimitotic properties. A nonrandomized phase 1 dose-escalation study of ABT-751 in combination with CAPIRI (capecitabine and irinotecan) and bevacizumab was conducted to define the maximum tolerated dose, dose-limiting toxicity (DLT), and pharmacokinetics in patients with advanced colorectal cancer. Patients were treated with ABT-751 daily for 7 days (alone) and then began 21-day cycles of treatment with ABT-751 daily and capecitabine twice daily for 14 days plus irinotecan on day 1 intravenously. Bevacizumab was added as standard of care at 7.5 mg/kg on day 1 after the first 2 dose levels. Because of intolerance to the regimen, a reduced dose of ABT-751 was also explored with reduced-dose and full-dose CAPIRI with bevacizumab. ABT-751 and irinotecan pharmacokinetics, ABT-751 glucuronidation, and protein binding were explored. Twenty-four patients were treated over 5 dose levels. The maximum tolerated dose was ABT-751 125 mg combined with full-dose CAPIRI and bevacizumab 7.5 mg/kg on day 1. DLTs were hypokalemia, elevated liver tests, and febrile neutropenia. ABT-751 is metabolized by UGT1A8 and to a lesser extent UGT1A4 and UGT1A1. Irinotecan and APC exposure were increased, SN-38 exposure was similar, and SN-38 glucuronide exposure was decreased. Clinically relevant alterations in ABT-751 and irinotecan pharmacokinetics were not observed. Despite modest efficacy, the combination of ABT-751, CAPIRI, and bevacizumab will not be studied further in colorectal cancer. PMID:26632033

  3. The role of antiangiogenic agents in the treatment of patients with advanced colorectal cancer according to K-RAS status.

    PubMed

    García-Alfonso, Pilar; Grande, Enrique; Polo, Eduardo; Afonso, Ruth; Reina, Juan José; Jorge, Mónica; Campos, Juan Manuel; Martínez, Virginia; Angeles, Cristina; Montagut, Clara

    2014-10-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the fourth most commonly diagnosed cancer worldwide. Recently, it has been found that about 40 % of patients with CRC have mutations in the K-RAS gene. Several clinical trials have showed that patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) who present tumour-promoting mutations in signalling pathways involving the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), which includes activating K-RAS mutations, do not respond to anti-EGFR drugs such as panitumumab and cetuximab. Hence, K-RAS status is now considered an important negative predictive factor for response to anti-EGFR drugs. Moreover, K-RAS status seems to have also a prognostic role in CRC, but this fact is somewhat controversial. Activity of antiangiogenic agents seems not to be influenced by K-RAS gene status. Tumour angiogenesis has attracted interest in attempts to improve the management of mCRC. The vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) pathway is fundamental to the regulation of angiogenesis, and research has focused on developing agents that selectively target it. In this way, the anti-VEGF antibody bevacizumab in combination with chemotherapy has provided important clinical benefits in terms of response rate, progression-free survival and overall survival to patients with mCRC. Efficacy data of bevacizumab in K-RAS wild-type patients seem to be comparable with the efficacy data observed with anti-EGFR therapies in a cross-trial comparison. Although there is a lack of prospective and randomized data in this setting, the combination of chemotherapy plus antiangiogenic agents could be considered as an effective alternative for the treatment of mCRC with independence of K-RAS gene status. Here, we review the available data we have in the literature of the use of antiangiogenic strategies in the treatment of mCRC nowadays. PMID:24793846

  4. Sellar gangliocytoma with adrenocorticotropic and prolactin adenoma.

    PubMed

    Kissiedu, Juliana O; Prayson, Richard A

    2016-02-01

    We report a case of a 60-year-old man who presented with weight gain, headaches, dizziness, erectile dysfunction and decreased libido. He was found to have elevated adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and prolactin serum levels. The imaging studies revealed a 1.4 cm sella/suprasellar mass which was compressing the optic chiasm. Histologic slides of the lesion showed a pituitary adenoma, marked by a proliferation of biphenotypic appearing cells, associated with a gangliocytoma, and marked by a proliferation of atypical appearing neuronal cells arranged against a glial-appearing background. Pituitary adenoma-gangliocytomas are benign combination tumors that rarely occur in the sellar region. Adenomas in this setting are sometimes functional, and rare patients with mixed adenomas (adenomas secreting more than one hormone) have been reported. To our knowledge, there has been only one other report of a combined ACTH and prolactin-producing adenoma with gangliocytoma, reported in a patient who also had acromegaly. In our patient, the immunohistochemical stains demonstrated that the bulk of the adenoma cells stained with prolactin antibody, and scattered clusters of cells within the adenoma stained positively for ACTH. The adenoma did not stain with antibodies to any of the other anterior pituitary hormones. Postoperatively, the elevated prolactin and ACTH levels returned to normal levels and there was no evidence of residual tumor. Adequate sampling and immunohistochemistry are important in rendering a correct diagnosis and in identifying the hormone status of mixed adenoma-gangliocytomas. PMID:26314658

  5. Management of Colorectal Trauma

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Although the treatment strategy for colorectal trauma has advanced during the last part of the twentieth century and the result has improved, compared to other injuries, problems, such as high septic complication rates and mortality rates, still exist, so standard management for colorectal trauma is still a controversial issue. For that reason, we designed this article to address current recommendations for management of colorectal injuries based on a review of literature. According to the reviewed data, although sufficient evidence exists for primary repair being the treatment of choice in most cases of nondestructive colon injuries, many surgeons are still concerned about anastomotic leakage or failure, and prefer to perform a diverting colostomy. Recently, some reports have shown that primary repair or resection and anastomosis, is better than a diverting colostomy even in cases of destructive colon injuries, but it has not fully established as the standard treatment. The same guideline as that for colonic injury is applied in cases of intraperitoneal rectal injuries, and, diversion, primary repair, and presacral drainage are regarded as the standards for the management of extraperitoneal rectal injuries. However, some reports state that primary repair without a diverting colostomy has benefit in the treatment of extraperitoneal rectal injury, and presacral drainage is still controversial. In conclusion, ideally an individual management strategy would be developed for each patient suffering from colorectal injury. To do this, an evidence-based treatment plan should be carefully developed. PMID:21980586

  6. Prospective evaluation of 64 serum autoantibodies as biomarkers for early detection of colorectal cancer in a true screening setting

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hongda; Werner, Simone; Butt, Julia; Zörnig, Inka; Knebel, Phillip; Michel, Angelika; Eichmüller, Stefan B.; Jäger, Dirk; Waterboer, Tim; Pawlita, Michael; Brenner, Hermann

    2016-01-01

    Novel blood-based screening tests are strongly desirable for early detection of colorectal cancer (CRC). We aimed to identify and evaluate autoantibodies against tumor-associated antigens as biomarkers for early detection of CRC. 380 clinically identified CRC patients and samples of participants with selected findings from a cohort of screening colonoscopy participants in 2005–2013 (N=6826) were included in this analysis. Sixty-four serum autoantibody markers were measured by multiplex bead-based serological assays. A two-step approach with selection of biomarkers in a training set, and validation of findings in a validation set, the latter exclusively including participants from the screening setting, was applied. Anti-MAGEA4 exhibited the highest sensitivity for detecting early stage CRC and advanced adenoma. Multi-marker combinations substantially increased sensitivity at the price of a moderate loss of specificity. Anti-TP53, anti-IMPDH2, anti-MDM2 and anti-MAGEA4 were consistently included in the best-performing 4-, 5-, and 6-marker combinations. This four-marker panel yielded a sensitivity of 26% (95% CI, 13–45%) for early stage CRC at a specificity of 90% (95% CI, 83–94%) in the validation set. Notably, it also detected 20% (95% CI, 13–29%) of advanced adenomas. Taken together, the identified biomarkers could contribute to the development of a useful multi-marker blood-based test for CRC early detection. PMID:26909861

  7. Prospective evaluation of 64 serum autoantibodies as biomarkers for early detection of colorectal cancer in a true screening setting.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hongda; Werner, Simone; Butt, Julia; Zörnig, Inka; Knebel, Phillip; Michel, Angelika; Eichmüller, Stefan B; Jäger, Dirk; Waterboer, Tim; Pawlita, Michael; Brenner, Hermann

    2016-03-29

    Novel blood-based screening tests are strongly desirable for early detection of colorectal cancer (CRC). We aimed to identify and evaluate autoantibodies against tumor-associated antigens as biomarkers for early detection of CRC. 380 clinically identified CRC patients and samples of participants with selected findings from a cohort of screening colonoscopy participants in 2005-2013 (N=6826) were included in this analysis. Sixty-four serum autoantibody markers were measured by multiplex bead-based serological assays. A two-step approach with selection of biomarkers in a training set, and validation of findings in a validation set, the latter exclusively including participants from the screening setting, was applied. Anti-MAGEA4 exhibited the highest sensitivity for detecting early stage CRC and advanced adenoma. Multi-marker combinations substantially increased sensitivity at the price of a moderate loss of specificity. Anti-TP53, anti-IMPDH2, anti-MDM2 and anti-MAGEA4 were consistently included in the best-performing 4-, 5-, and 6-marker combinations. This four-marker panel yielded a sensitivity of 26% (95% CI, 13-45%) for early stage CRC at a specificity of 90% (95% CI, 83-94%) in the validation set. Notably, it also detected 20% (95% CI, 13-29%) of advanced adenomas. Taken together, the identified biomarkers could contribute to the development of a useful multi-marker blood-based test for CRC early detection. PMID:26909861

  8. Impact of genetic polymorphisms on adenoma recurrence and toxicity in a COX2 inhibitor (celecoxib) trial: results from a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Toriola, Adetunji T.; Poole, Elizabeth M.; Scherer, Dominique; Kotzmann, Jana; Makar, Karen W.; Kazanov, Dina; Galazan, Lior; Naumov, Inna; Coghill, Anna E.; Duggan, David; Gigic, Biljana

    2015-01-01

    Objective Chemoprevention trials have shown that celecoxib reduces adenoma recurrence but can cause cardiovascular toxicity. In this pilot study, we evaluated associations between genetic variation in several candidate pathways (e.g. prostaglandin synthesis) and adenoma recurrence and cardiovascular and gastrointestinal toxicities. Methods Genotyping analysis was carried out on 117 Israeli colorectal adenoma patients who participated in the Prevention of Colorectal Sporadic Adenomatous Polyps trial. Reassessment followed after 3 years on celecoxib and after 2 years from termination of treatment with celecoxib. Efficacy (absence of colorectal adenomas) was measured by colonoscopy at years 1, 3, and 5. Toxicities were assessed by investigators during celecoxib treatment and by self-report post-treatment. A linkage disequilibrium-based selection algorithm (r2 ≥ 0.90, MAF ≥ 4%) identified 255 tagSNPs in 25 analyzed candidate genes. Genotyping was performed by using Illumina GoldenGate technology. Results Multiple genetic variants were associated with adenoma recurrence and toxicity. Genetic variability in COX1, COX2, and ALOX12/15 genes played a role in adenoma recurrence, particularly among patients on placebo. More gene variants (especially variants in PGES, CRP, SRC, and GPX3) were associated with increased risk for cardiovascular toxicity and symptoms, compared with gastrointestinal toxicity and symptoms. The increased risk for cardiovascular toxicity/symptoms associated with the SRC gene variants (rs6017996, rs6018256, rs6018257) ranged from 6.61 (95% confidence interval 1.66–26.36, P < 0.01) to 10.71 (95% confidence interval 1.96–58.60, P < 0.01). Conclusion Genetic polymorphisms in multiple inflammation-related genes appear to interact with celecoxib on adenoma recurrence and its attendant toxicity, particularly cardiovascular toxicity/symptoms. Larger studies validating these pharmacogenetic relationships are needed. PMID:23778325

  9. Regulative Effect of Nampt on Tumor Progression and Cell Viability in Human Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Xiaoqun; Zhang, Lingyun; Zhu, Yanyan; Said, Harun M.; Shi, Jimin; Xu, Guoxiong

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cancer disease. Here we examined Nampt expression in patients with CRC and the effect of Nampt on cell viability in CRC cells. Nampt protein was overexpressed in colorectal adenoma as well as colorectal carcinoma. The immunoreactive staining of Nampt was negative in the adjacent normal colorectal tissue, weak in colorectal adenoma, and strong in colorectal carcinoma, which may represent tumor progression. Further evaluation of clinical data showed that Nampt expression was not correlated with the clinicopathological characteristics of CRC. Additionally, our in vitro studies demonstrated that Nampt promotes CRC cell viability, whereas the Nampt inhibitor FK866 suppressed CRC cell viability, which was in concordance with the previous studies in other cancer cells. Treatment with Nampt-siRNA reduced the Nampt protein expression resulting in the inhibition of the cell viability of HCT116 and Caco2. Thus, the involvement of Nampt in cell growth indicates that Nampt may play an important role in colorectal tumorigenesis. As a consequence, our results suggest that Nampt may be considered as a progression marker of colorectal tumor and a potentially therapeutic target for the treatment of CRC. PMID:26284136

  10. Addition of cetuximab to oxaliplatin-based first-line combination chemotherapy for treatment of advanced colorectal cancer: results of the randomised phase 3 MRC COIN trial

    PubMed Central

    Maughan, Timothy S; Adams, Richard A; Smith, Christopher G; Meade, Angela M; Seymour, Matthew T; Wilson, Richard H; Idziaszczyk, Shelley; Harris, Rebecca; Fisher, David; Kenny, Sarah L; Kay, Edward; Mitchell, Jenna K; Madi, Ayman; Jasani, Bharat; James, Michelle D; Bridgewater, John; Kennedy, M John; Claes, Bart; Lambrechts, Diether; Kaplan, Richard; Cheadle, Jeremy P

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background In the Medical Research Council (MRC) COIN trial, the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-targeted antibody cetuximab was added to standard chemotherapy in first-line treatment of advanced colorectal cancer with the aim of assessing effect on overall survival. Methods In this randomised controlled trial, patients who were fit for but had not received previous chemotherapy for advanced colorectal cancer were randomly assigned to oxaliplatin and fluoropyrimidine chemotherapy (arm A), the same combination plus cetuximab (arm B), or intermittent chemotherapy (arm C). The choice of fluoropyrimidine therapy (capecitabine or infused fluouroracil plus leucovorin) was decided before randomisation. Randomisation was done centrally (via telephone) by the MRC Clinical Trials Unit using minimisation. Treatment allocation was not masked. The comparison of arms A and C is described in a companion paper. Here, we present the comparison of arm A and B, for which the primary outcome was overall survival in patients with KRAS wild-type tumours. Analysis was by intention to treat. Further analyses with respect to NRAS, BRAF, and EGFR status were done. The trial is registered, ISRCTN27286448. Findings 1630 patients were randomly assigned to treatment groups (815 to standard therapy and 815 to addition of cetuximab). Tumour samples from 1316 (81%) patients were used for somatic molecular analyses; 565 (43%) had KRAS mutations. In patients with KRAS wild-type tumours (arm A, n=367; arm B, n=362), overall survival did not differ between treatment groups (median survival 17·9 months [IQR 10·3–29·2] in the control group vs 17·0 months [9·4–30·1] in the cetuximab group; HR 1·04, 95% CI 0·87–1·23, p=0·67). Similarly, there was no effect on progression-free survival (8·6 months [IQR 5·0–12·5] in the control group vs 8·6 months [5·1–13·8] in the cetuximab group; HR 0·96, 0·82–1·12, p=0·60). Overall response rate increased from 57% (n=209

  11. Oncogenic mutations in intestinal adenomas regulate Bim-mediated apoptosis induced by TGF-β

    PubMed Central

    Wiener, Zoltán; Band, Arja M.; Kallio, Pauliina; Högström, Jenny; Hyvönen, Ville; Kaijalainen, Seppo; Ritvos, Olli; Haglund, Caj; Kruuna, Olli; Robine, Sylvie; Louvard, Daniel; Ben-Neriah, Yinon; Alitalo, Kari

    2014-01-01

    In the majority of microsatellite-stable colorectal cancers (CRCs), an initiating mutation occurs in the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) or β-catenin gene, activating the β-catenin/TCF pathway. The progression of resulting adenomas is associated with oncogenic activation of KRas and inactivation of the p53 and TGF-β/Smad functions. Most established CRC cell lines contain mutations in the TGF-β/Smad pathway, but little is known about the function of TGF-β in the early phases of intestinal tumorigenesis. We used mouse and human ex vivo 3D intestinal organoid cultures and in vivo mouse models to study the effect of TGF-β on the Lgr5+ intestinal stem cells and their progeny in intestinal adenomas. We found that the TGF-β–induced apoptosis in Apc-mutant organoids, including the Lgr5+ stem cells, was mediated by up-regulation of the BH3-only proapoptotic protein Bcl-2–like protein 11 (Bim). BH3-mimetic compounds recapitulated the effect of Bim not only in the adenomas but also in human CRC organoids that had lost responsiveness to TGF-β–induced apoptosis. However, wild-type intestinal crypts were markedly less sensitive to TGF-β than Apc-mutant adenomas, whereas the KRas oncogene increased resistance to TGF-β via the activation of the Erk1/2 kinase pathway, leading to Bim down-regulation. Our studies identify Bim as a critical mediator of TGF-β–induced apoptosis in intestinal adenomas and show that the common progression mutations modify Bim levels and sensitivity to TGF-β during intestinal adenoma development. PMID:24825889

  12. A case of tubular adenoma developing after bladder augmentation: Case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Yutaka; Shiyanagi, Satoko; Nagae, Itsuro; Ishizaki, Tetsuo; Kasuya, Kazuhiko; Katsumata, Kenji; Yamataka, Atsuyuki; Tsuchida, Akihiko

    2015-01-01

    Introduction We encountered a rare case of tubular adenoma developing after bladder augmentation. We here report our case as well as summarize reports in the literature on adenomas developing after bladder augmentation. Presentation of case A 23-year-old man came to our hospital for routine surveillance cystoscopy. He was born with a lipomyelomeningocele and neurogenic bladder with low bladder compliance, and hence his bladder was routinely emptied by clean intermittent catheterization. He was also treated with anticholinergic agents. However, because the patient’s neurogenic bladder was unstable, he underwent sigmoidocolocystoplasty when he was 8-years old. After the bladder augmentation, he was examined annually by surveillance cystoscopy. On cystoscopy, a 5-mm pedunculated polyp was found on the front side of the sigmoid colon cap. Therefore, we performed snare polypectomy together with electrocoagulation under cystoscopy. The patient’s final diagnosis was tubular adenoma (mild atypia) with no malignancy, as assessed by histopathology. There has been no evidence of recurrence after the polypectomy on routine surveillance cystoscopy. Discussion To the best of our knowledge, there have been 11 cases of adenoma occurring after bladder augmentation reported in the literature, including our present case. There are several carcinogenic pathways associated with colorectal oncogenesis. Adenomas that are larger than 1.0 cm in diameter with a marked villous component have a high risk of oncogenesis. Conclusion We believe that the early detection of carcinoma or adenoma and their treatment at an early stage is crucial. Therefore, we recommend routine surveillance cystoscopy for patients after bladder augmentation. PMID:26706596

  13. Complete regression of colonic adenomas after treatment with sulindac in Gardner's syndrome: a 4-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Okai, T; Yamaguchi, Y; Sakai, J; Ohtsubo, K; Mouri, H; Sawabu, N

    2001-11-01

    A 22-year-old woman with Gardner's syndrome in whom long-term sulindac therapy, without surgical treatment, was effective in inducing complete regression of colonic adenomas is reported. One hundred milligrams of sulindac was administered twice daily after endoscopic polypectomy. Follow-up colonoscopy 6 months later revealed an encouraging regression of colonic adenomas. The tumors had disappeared after 40 months of sulindac treatment. A sustained effect was identified even after 51 months. Ten milligrams of famotidine was coadministered to prevent side effects of sulindac. Although the effect of sulindac on colorectal adenomas may be transient, this therapy may be useful for postponing prophylactic colectomy, especially for the sparse type of familial adenomatous polyposis. PMID:11757751

  14. Biomarkers in Colorectal Cancer Screening.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Minhhuyen T; Weinberg, David S

    2016-08-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cause of cancer death in men and women in the United States. The main goals of screening are to prevent carcinogenesis (via adenoma detection and removal) and detect cancer at an early, curable stage. CRC mortality is steadily dropping in the United States, partly because of greater screening utilization. However, nearly 1 in 3 average-risk people are not up to date with standard CRC screening recommendations. This review surveys a wide range of CRC biomarkers in various stages of development, which may offer attractive risk stratification tools; a few have reached the commercial stage. If widely accepted, these tools may contribute to shift CRC screening practices away from 1-step colonoscopy to a 2-step risk stratification process of predictive biomarker measurements followed by colonoscopy for lower-risk patients with a positive result. Such strategies could potentially increase the rate of CRC screening. PMID:27496118

  15. Early signet ring cell carcinoma arising from colonic adenoma: the molecular profiling supports the adenoma-carcinoma sequence.

    PubMed

    Bellan, Alberto; Cappellesso, Rocco; Lo Mele, Marcello; Peraro, Laura; Balsamo, Laura; Lanza, Cristiano; Fassan, Matteo; Rugge, Massimo

    2016-04-01

    Among colorectal cancers, the prevalence of signet ring cell carcinoma (SRCC) is lower than 1%; to date, only 6 cases of early SRCCs arising in colonic adenoma have been reported. In spite of the well-established understanding of the phenotypic and genetic changes occurring in conventional colonic carcinogenesis, the molecular landscape of colon SRCC is still far to be elucidated. We describe the histologic and immunohistochemical phenotype and the molecular profile of a case of intramucosal SRCC developed within a 4.5-cm large sigmoid adenoma. The DNA sequencing of the 2 microdissected neoplastic components (adenomatous and SRCC) showed the same G12V KRAS mutation. Interestingly, although the adenomatous epithelium showed unequivocal p53 overexpression, no signet ring cancer cells featured p53 nuclear immunostain. This molecular pattern supports the unique histogenesis of the 2 coexisting neoplastic oncotypes, also suggesting that the signet ring cell component is derived from the molecular de-differentiation (p53 loss) of the preexisting adenomatous lesion. PMID:26997454

  16. Ectopic suprasellar pituitary adenoma. A case report.

    PubMed

    Caranci, F; Cirillo, L; Bartiromo, F; Ferraioli, M; Del Basso De Caro, M L; Esposito, F; Cappabianca, P; Brunetti, A; Elefante, R

    2007-01-31

    The occurrence of a pituitary adenoma located entirely outside the sella turcica, so-called ectopic adenoma, is extremely rare. We report a case of a non secreting-pituitary adenoma located above the diaphragma sellae, with no invasion into the sella turcica, confirmed at surgery. The tumor was initially treated unsuccessfully by operations via the transphenoidal route. After initial negative exploration by the transphenoidal route, the patient was successfully treated by an endoscopic endonasal transphenoidal approach extended to the tuberculum sellae and the posterior planum sphenoidale to access the suprasellar supraglandular region. A brief review of ectopic adenomas and a discussion of the preoperative diagnosis are presented. PMID:24351300

  17. [Nutrition and colorectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Ströhle, Alexander; Maike, Wolters; Hahn, Andreas

    2007-01-01

    Diet plays an important role in the pathogenesis of colorectal cancer. Current prospective cohort studies and metaanalysis enable a reevaluation of how food or nutrients such as fiber and fat influence cancer risk. Based on the evidence criteria of the WHO/FAD, risk reduction by a high intake of fruit is assessed as possible, while a lowered risk by a high vegetable intake is probable. Especially raw vegetables and fruits seem to exert anticancer properties. The evidence of a risk reducing effect of whole grain relating to colorectal cancer is assessed as probable whereas the evidence of an increased risk by high consumption of refined white flour products and sweets is (still) insufficient despite some evidences. There is a probable risk reducing effect of milk and dairy products. e available data on eggs and red meat indicate a possible risk increasing influence. Stronger clues for a risk increasing effect have been shown for meat products leading to an evidence assessed as probable. Owing to varied interpretations of the data on fiber, the evidence of a risk reducing effect relating to colorectal cancer is assessed as possible or insufficient. The available data on alcohol consumption indicate a possible risk increasing effect. In contrast to former evaluations, diets rich in fat seem to increase colorectal cancer risk only indirectly as part of a hypercaloric diet by advancing the obesity risk. Thus, the evidence of obesity, especially visceral obesity, as a risk of colorectal cancer is judged as convincing today. Prospective cohort studies suggest that people who get higher than average amounts of folic acid from multivitamin supplements have lower risks of colorectal cancer. The evidence for a risk reducing effect of calcium, selenium, vitamin D and vitamin E on colorectal cancer is insufficient. As primary prevention, a diet rich in vegetables, fruits, whole grain products, and legumes added by low-fat dairy products, fish, and poultry can be recommended. In

  18. Characterization of the T cell repertoire by deep T cell receptor sequencing in tissues and blood from patients with advanced colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    TAMURA, KENJI; HAZAMA, SHOICHI; YAMAGUCHI, RUI; IMOTO, SEIYA; TAKENOUCHI, HIROKO; INOUE, YUKA; KANEKIYO, SHINSUKE; SHINDO, YOSHITARO; MIYANO, SATORU; NAKAMURA, YUSUKE; KIYOTANI, KAZUMA

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to characterize infiltrated T cell clones that define the tumor immune environment and are important in the response to treatment in patients with advanced colorectal cancer (CRC). In order to explore predictive biomarkers for the efficacy of immunochemotherapies, T cell receptor (TCR) repertoire analysis was performed using blood samples and tumor tissues obtained from patients with advanced CRC that had been treated with a combination of five-cancer peptide vaccines and oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy. The TCR-α/β complementary DNAs (cDNAs), prepared from the messenger RNAs (mRNAs) obtained from 17 tumor tissues and 39 peripheral blood mononuclear cells of 9 CRC patients at various time points, were sequenced. The oligoclonal enrichment of certain TCR sequences was identified in tumor tissues and blood samples; however, only a few TCR sequences with a frequency of >0.1% were commonly detected in pre- and post-treatment tumor tissues, or in post-treatment blood and tissue samples. The average correlation coefficients of the TCR-α and TCR-β clonotype frequencies between the post-treatment tumor tissues and blood samples were 0.023 and 0.035, respectively, and were much lower compared with the correlation coefficients of the TCR-α and TCR-β clonotype frequencies between pre- and post-treatment blood samples (0.430 and 0.370, respectively), suggesting that T cell populations in tumor tissues vary from those in blood. Although the sample size was small, a tendency for the TCR diversity in tumor tissues to drastically decrease during the treatment was indicated in two patients, who exhibited a longer progression-free survival time. The results of the present study suggest that TCR diversity scores in tissues may be a useful predictive biomarker for the therapeutic effect of immunochemotherapy for patients with advanced CRC. PMID:27284367

  19. No evidence for human papillomavirus in the etiology of colorectal polyps

    PubMed Central

    Burnett-Hartman, Andrea N.; Newcomb, Polly A.; Mandelson, Margaret T.; Galloway, Denise A.; Madeleine, Margaret M.; Wurscher, Michelle A.; Carter, Joseph J.; Makar, Karen W.; Potter, John D.; Schwartz, Stephen M.

    2011-01-01

    Background While some studies have reported detection of oncogenic human papillomavirus (HPV) in colorectal tumors, others have not. Methods We examined the association between oncogenic HPV infection and colorectal polyps in a case-control study of individuals with colorectal adenomas (n=167), hyperplastic polyps (n=87), and polyp-free controls (n=250). We performed real-time PCR for HPV-16 /18 DNA, and SPF PCR covering 43 HPV types, on lesional and normal colorectal tissue samples. Plasma antibodies for oncogenic HPV types were assessed via a bead-based multiplex Luminex assay. Results HPV DNA was not found in any of the 609 successfully assayed colorectal tissue samples from adenomas, hyperplastic polyps, normal biopsies adjacent to polyps, or normal biopsies of the rectum of disease-free controls. Also, there was no association between HPV seropositivity for all oncogenic HPV types combined, for either polyp type, and for men or women. When analyses were restricted to participants without a previous history of polyps, among men [adenomas (n=31), hyperplastic polyps (n=28), and controls (n=68)], there was an association between seropositivity and hyperplastic polyps when all oncogenic HPV types were combined (odds ratio=3.0; 95% confidence interval: 1.1–7.9). Conclusions Overall, our findings do not support an etiologic relationship between HPV and colorectal adenomas or hyperplastic polyps; however, our finding suggesting an association between HPV seropositivity and hyperplastic polyps in men may warrant further investigations. Impact After stringent controls for contamination and three methods to assess HPV infection, we report no evidence for HPV in the etiology of colorectal neoplasia for either men or women. PMID:21817125

  20. Clinicopathologic distribution of KRAS and BRAF mutations in a Chinese population with colorectal cancer precursor lesions

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Chenghao; Huang, Yanqing; Yu, Xing; Li, Xiaofen; Zheng, Shu; Ding, Kefeng; Xu, Jinghong

    2016-01-01

    Investigating the clinical features and corresponding histomorphologic and molecular profiles of precursor lesions of colorectal cancer in a natural population provides new insights into the nature of colorectal cancer, uncovers new screening markers and establishes new prevention strategies for colorectal cancer. In this study, 4302 patients with at least one colorectal polyp from a large colorectal cancer screening program were evaluated and genetic mutations in either KRAS or BRAF were detected in 495 patients. The population-based mutation rates of KRAS and BRAF genes in colorectal polyps within this Chinese patient population were 21.8% and 12.1% respectively. Interestingly, considerable variability in the KRAS and BRAF mutations rates were found among different types of polyps. In a multivariate analysis, presence of villous histology and high-grade dysplasia was associated with KRAS mutations (OR, 3.0; 95% CI, 1.7-5.4 and OR, 3.5; 95% CI 1.9-6.5, respectively), while serrated adenomas and hyperplastic polyps were associated with BRAF V600E mutations (OR, 20.6; 95% CI, 8.2–51.8 and OR, 11.9; 95% CI 4.9–29.0, respectively). KRAS mutations may, in part, drive the histologic progression of adenomas toward a villous histology and higher grades of dysplasia. Mutant BRAF may, in part, drive the histologic progression of adenomas toward serrated histology. Dysplasia may arise from hyperplastic polyps, resulting in the formation of serrated adenomas and potentially the development of colorectal carcinoma. PMID:26910894

  1. BRAF, PIK3CA, and HER2 Oncogenic Alterations According to KRAS Mutation Status in Advanced Colorectal Cancers with Distant Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Koh, Jiwon; Kwak, Yoonjin; Seo, An Na; Park, Kyoung Un; Kim, Duck-Woo; Kang, Sung-Bum; Kim, Woo Ho; Lee, Hye Seung

    2016-01-01

    Background Anti-EGFR antibody–based treatment is an important therapeutic strategy for advanced colorectal cancer (CRC); despite this, several mutations—including KRAS, BRAF, and PIK3CA mutations, and HER2 amplification—are associated with the mechanisms underlying the development of resistance to anti-EGFR therapy. The aim of our study was to investigate the frequencies and clinical implications of these genetic alterations in advanced CRC. Methods KRAS, BRAF, and PIK3CA mutations were determined by Cobas real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in 191 advanced CRC patients with distant metastasis. Microsatellite instability (MSI) status was determined by a fragmentation assay and HER2 amplification was assessed by silver in situ hybridization. In addition, KRAS mutations were investigated by the Sanger sequencing method in 97 of 191 CRC cases. Results Mutations in KRAS, BRAF, and PIK3CA were found in 104 (54.5%), 6 (3.1%), and 25 (13.1%) cases of advanced CRC, respectively. MSI-high status and HER2 amplification were observed in 3 (1.6%) and 16 (8.4%) cases, respectively. PIK3CA mutations were more frequently found in KRAS mutant type (18.3%) than KRAS wild type (6.9%) (P = 0.020). In contrast, HER2 amplifications and BRAF mutations were associated with KRAS wild type with borderline significance (P = 0.052 and 0.094, respectively). In combined analyses with KRAS, BRAF and HER2 status, BRAF mutations or HER2 amplifications were associated with the worst prognosis in the wild type KRAS group (P = 0.004). When comparing the efficacy of detection methods, the results of real time PCR analysis revealed 56 of 97 (57.7%) CRC cases with KRAS mutations, whereas Sanger sequencing revealed 49 cases (50.5%). Conclusions KRAS mutations were found in 54.5% of advanced CRC patients. Our results support that subgrouping using PIK3CA and BRAF mutation or HER2 amplification status, in addition to KRAS mutation status, is helpful for managing advanced CRC patients. PMID

  2. Bowel preparation and colonoscopy technique to detect non-polypoid colorectal neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Kim, H N; Raju, G S

    2010-07-01

    Colonoscopy is considered the gold standard for colon cancer screening. In a recent study, however, 0.3% to 0.9% patients developed colorectal cancer within 3 years after removal of adenomas. Some reasons for the development of interval colorectal cancers include missed or incompletely removed lesions during the initial colonoscopy. Non-polypoid colorectal neoplasms are a potential contributor to the pool of missed lesions because they can be easily missed as a result of inadequate colon preparation or examination technique. This article discusses the methods that are useful to improve the quality of bowel preparation and examination technique. PMID:20656242

  3. The human epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene in European patients with advanced colorectal cancer harbors infrequent mutations in its tyrosine kinase domain

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), a member of the ErbB family of receptors, is a transmembrane tyrosine kinase (TK) activated by the binding of extracellular ligands of the EGF-family and involved in triggering the MAPK signaling pathway, which leads to cell proliferation. Mutations in the EGFR tyrosine kinase domain are frequent in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, to date, only very few, mainly non-European, studies have reported rare EGFR mutations in colorectal cancer (CRC). Methods We screened 236 clinical tumor samples from European patients with advanced CRC by direct DNA sequencing to detect potential, as yet unknown mutations, in the EGFR gene exons 18 to 21, mainly covering the EGFR TK catalytic domain. Results EGFR sequences showed somatic missense mutations in exons 18 and 20 at a frequency of 2.1% and 0.4% respectively. Somatic SNPs were also found in exons 20 and 21 at a frequency of about 3.1% and 0.4% respectively. Of these mutations, four have not yet been described elsewhere. Conclusions These mutation frequencies are higher than in a similarly sized population characterized by Barber and colleagues, but still too low to account for a major role played by the EGFR gene in CRC. PMID:22026926

  4. Development of an imaging-guided CEA-pretargeted radionuclide treatment of advanced colorectal cancer: first clinical results

    PubMed Central

    Schoffelen, R; Boerman, O C; Goldenberg, D M; Sharkey, R M; van Herpen, C M L; Franssen, G M; McBride, W J; Chang, C-H; Rossi, E A; van der Graaf, W T A; Oyen, W J G

    2013-01-01

    Background: Radiolabelled antibody targeting of cancer is limited by slow blood clearance. Pretargeting with a non-radiolabelled bispecific monoclonal antibody (bsMAb) followed by a rapidly clearing radiolabelled hapten peptide improves tumour localisation. The primary goals of this first pretargeting study in patients with the anti-CEACAM5 × anti-hapten (HSG) bsMAb, TF2, and the radiolabelled hapten-peptide, IMP288, were to assess optimal pretargeting conditions and safety in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC). Methods: Different dose schedules were studied in four cohorts of five patients: (1) shortening the interval between the bsMAb and peptide administration (5 days vs 1 day), (2) escalating the TF2 dose (from 75 to 150 mg), and (3) reducing the peptide dose (from 100 to 25 μg). After confirmation of tumour targeting by 111In-IMP288, patients were treated with a bsMAb/177Lu-IMP288 cycle. Results: Rapid and selective tumour targeting of the radiolabelled peptide was visualised within 1 h, with high tumour-to-tissue ratios (>20 at 24 h). Improved tumour targeting was achieved with a 1-day interval between the administration of the bsMAb and the peptide and with the 25-μg peptide dose. High 177Lu-IMP288 doses (2.5–7.4 GBq) were well tolerated, with some manageable TF2 infusion reactions, and transient grades 3–4 thrombocytopaenia in 10% of the patients who received 177Lu-IMP288. Conclusion: This phase I study demonstrates for the first time that pretargeting with bsMAb TF2 and radiolabelled IMP288 in patients with CEA-expressing CRC is feasible and safe. With this pretargeting method, tumours are specifically and rapidly targeted. PMID:23860529

  5. Insulin-like growth factor I and the development of colorectal neoplasia in acromegaly.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, P J; Frajese, V; Jones, A M; Camacho-Hubner, C; Lowe, D G; Fairclough, P D; Chew, S L; Grossman, A B; Monson, J P; Besser, G M

    2000-09-01

    Patients with acromegaly are at increased risk of colorectal neoplasia and, by analogy with high-risk nonacromegalic patients, may require regular colonoscopic screening. However, it is unknown whether the risk is equal in all patients or whether some should be regarded as carrying a particularly high risk. The aims of this study were: 1) to establish the natural history of colorectal neoplasia in acromegaly; 2) to establish which patients are at increased risk of developing neoplasia; and 3) to elucidate the influence of insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) in adenoma formation. A prospective colonoscopic evaluation of the development of new premalignant adenomas in the colon was performed in 66 patients with biochemically proven acromegaly who had previously undergone colonoscopic screening and removal of all visible polyps. Twenty-five patients (38%) had a total of 37 polyps detected at the second colonoscopy: nine (14%) had at least one adenoma, and 18 (27%) had one or more hyperplastic polyps (2 patients had both). The development of new adenomas, but not hyperplastic polyps, was associated both with elevated serum IGF-I (P < 0.005) and, to a lesser extent, with a previous adenoma at the original colonoscopy (P < 0.07). In summary, patients with acromegaly and in whom serum IGF-I remains elevated and/or who have had a previous adenoma should be regarded as having an especially high risk for the development of subsequent colorectal neoplasia. Serum IGF-I seems to be implicated in the development of colorectal neoplasia in acromegaly, although the exact mechanisms remain uncertain. PMID:10999811

  6. Use of integrin alpha 6 transcripts in a stool mRNA assay for the detection of colorectal cancers at curable stages

    PubMed Central

    Beaulieu, Jean-François; Herring, Elizabeth; Kanaoka, Shigeru; Tremblay, Éric

    2016-01-01

    Objective An important criterion for colorectal cancer (CRC) screening is the ability to detect lesions at a curable stage. In the present study, we have assessed the integrin α6 subunit transcript (ITGA6) as part of a stool assay for the detection of colorectal lesions. Results In comparison with control samples, ITGA6 levels were found to be significantly increased at all stages (P < 0.01). Receiver operating characteristic analysis revealed areas under the curve of 0.89 for the prediction of CRC with 81% sensitivity and 88% specificity and of 0.90 for the prediction of advanced adenomas (Ad) with 75% sensitivity and 88% specificity. The ITGA6A variant was also found to be increased relative to ITGA6 in stage II and III CRCs. Combining ITGA6 with other selected transcripts and/or immunochemical fecal occult blood test (iFOBT) results further increased sensitivity and specificity for the detection of colorectal lesions. Patients and Methods ITGA6 detection used alone and under various combinations including detection of other mRNA markers and iFOBT was assessed on stool samples obtained from 175 patients (91 CRCs, 24 Ad and 60 healthy controls). Conclusions These data confirm the usefulness and reliability of an mRNA stool assay for the detection of colorectal lesions. The validation of additional candidate genes and their analysis in multiplex qPCR represents a powerful and robust approach that can be combined with iFOBT results to improve the detection of colorectal lesions. PMID:26895101

  7. Chemical and immunological testing for faecal occult blood in screening subjects at risk of familial colorectal cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, L M; Rooney, P S; Bostock, K; Robinson, M H; Hardcastle, J D; Armitage, N C

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: People with a family history of colorectal cancer have an increased risk of the disease themselves. Many centres are advocating family history screening by endoscopy. AIMS: The performance of chemical and immunological faecal occult blood tests (Haemoccult and Hemeselect) in 212 subjects with a family history of colorectal cancer was assessed. RESULTS: Both Hemeselect and Haemoccult were positive in the only patient with colorectal cancer. Hemeselect was more sensitive than Haemoccult for adenomas (40% compared with 20%) (adenomas larger than 1 cm 75% compared with 50%). No additional abnormality was detected by the addition of Haemoccult or Hemeselect to 60 cm flexible sigmoidoscopy in screening people at lower levels of familial risk. A false positive rate of 16% for Hemeselect resulted in a high proportion of additional colonoscopies in this group. CONCLUSIONS: At present faecal occult blood tests are not sufficiently sensitive or specific to replace endoscopy in screening people at risk of familial colorectal cancer. PMID:9155586

  8. Phase II study of necitumumab plus modified FOLFOX6 as first-line treatment in patients with locally advanced or metastatic colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Elez, E; Hendlisz, A; Delaunoit, T; Sastre, J; Cervantes, A; Varea, R; Chao, G; Wallin, J; Tabernero, J

    2016-01-01

    Background: This single-arm phase II study investigated the EGFR monoclonal antibody necitumumab plus modified FOLFOX6 (mFOLFOX6) in first-line treatment of locally advanced or metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). Methods: Patients received 800-mg intravenous necitumumab (day 1; 2-week cycles), followed by oxaliplatin 85 mg m−2, folinic acid 400 mg m−2, and 5-fluorouracil (400 mg m−2 bolus then 2400 mg m−2 over 46 h). Radiographic evaluation was performed every 8 weeks until progression. Primary endpoint was objective response rate. Results: Forty-four patients were enrolled and treated. Objective response rate was 63.6% (95% confidence interval 47.8–77.6); complete response was observed in four patients; median duration of response was 10.0 months (7.0–16.0). Median overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) were 22.5 (11.0–30.0) and 10.0 months (7.0–12.0), respectively. Clinical outcome was better in patients with KRAS exon 2 wild type (median OS 30.0 months (23.0–NA); median PFS 12.0 (8.0–20.0)), compared with KRAS exon 2 mutant tumours (median OS 7.0 months (5.0–37.0); median PFS 7.0 (4.0–18.0)). The most common grade ⩾3 adverse events were neutropenia (29.5%), asthenia (27.3%), and rash (20.5%). Conclusion: First-line necitumumab+mFOLFOX6 was active with manageable toxicity in locally advanced or mCRC; additional evaluation of the impact of tumour RAS mutation status is warranted. PMID:26766738

  9. Colonic and duodenal flat adenomas in children with classical familial adenomatous polyposis.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Marta; Thomson, Mike; Taylor, Chris; Donatone, Jorge; Quijano, Graciela; Drut, Ricardo

    2006-04-01

    Flat adenomas of the colon and duodenum have been described as associating with familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP), its attenuated variant, and the so-called hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer. There seem to be no report on the occurrence of flat adenomas in pediatric patients with family history of FAP. We are reporting 4 children from 2 cancer-prone families in whom colonic and duodenal moderately dysplastic flat adenomas were found. Gastrointestinal endoscopy and biopsies were performed in 3 female siblings (7, 9, and 11 years old) and 1 male (9 years old) when referred for screening owing to familial history of bowel cancer (family 1) or evidence of bilateral congenital hypertrophy of the retinal pigment epithelium (CHRPE), which is known to be associated with FAP (family 2). Endoscopic visualization of the mucosa was improved by use of 0.2% indigo carmine solution spray. Biopsies were routinely processed for H&E and immunohistochemistry staining. Present patients were asymptomatic, with the exception of 2 weeks rectal bleeding in 1 of them. The colonic videoendoscopy showed in 2/3 siblings hundreds of flat or slightly raised plaques less than 1 cm in diameter as well as some classic polyps throughout the colon. The other sibling showed 40 flat-topped lesions with minimal elevation and central umbilication in the cecum. Upper endoscopy demonstrated a few flat lesions in the nonperiampullary area of the duodenum in 2/4 patients. The colonic videoendoscopy performed on the 9-year-old boy revealed multiple small sessile polyps. Microscopic study demonstrated tubular adenomas with a few neoplastic crypts, slight disarray of the overall architecture, and moderate (low-grade) dysplasia of the epithelium. These features were more obvious at the center and superficial areas of the adenomas. The 4 children had multiple flat adenomas of the colon and duodenum (2/4) matching with those described in adult patients. Flat adenomas in the context of FAP probably

  10. Berberine may rescue Fusobacterium nucleatum-induced colorectal tumorigenesis by modulating the tumor microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hui-Jun; Sun, Tian-Tian; Chen, Hui-Min; Chen, Hao-Yan; An, Hui-Fang; Weng, Yu-Rong; Yu, Jun; Li, Min; Qin, Wen-Xin; Ma, Xiong; Shen, Nan; Hong, Jie; Fang, Jing-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Background Accumulating evidence links colorectal cancer (CRC) with the intestinal microbiota. However, the disturbance of intestinal microbiota and the role of Fusobacterium nucleatum during the colorectal adenoma-carcinoma sequence have not yet been evaluated. Methods 454 FLX pyrosequencing was used to evaluate the disturbance of intestinal microbiota during the adenoma-carcinoma sequence pathway of CRC. Intestinal microbiota and mucosa tumor-immune cytokines were detected in mice after introducing 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH), F. nucleatum or Berberine (BBR), using pyrosequencing and Bio-Plex Pro™ cytokine assays, respectively. Protein expressions were detected by western blotting. Results The levels of opportunistic pathogens, such as Fusobacterium, Streptococcus and Enterococcus spp. gradually increased during the colorectal adenoma-carcinoma sequence in human fecal and mucosal samples. F. nucleatum treatment significantly altered lumen microbial structures, with increased Tenericutes and Verrucomicrobia (opportunistic pathogens) (P < 0.05 = in wild-type C57BL/6 and mice with DMH treatment). BBR intervention reversed the F. nucleatum-mediated increase in opportunistic pathogens, and the secretion of IL-21/22/31, CD40L and the expression of p-STAT3, p-STAT5 and p-ERK1/2 in mice, compared with mice fed with F. nucleatum alone. Conclusions F. nucleatum colonization in the intestine may prompt colorectal tumorigenesis. BBR could rescue F. nucleatum-induced colorectal tumorigenesis by modulating the tumor microenvironment and blocking the activation of tumorigenesis-related pathways. PMID:26397137

  11. Longitudinal molecular characterization of endoscopic specimens from colorectal lesions

    PubMed Central

    Minarikova, Petra; Benesova, Lucie; Halkova, Tereza; Belsanova, Barbora; Suchanek, Stepan; Cyrany, Jiri; Tuckova, Inna; Bures, Jan; Zavoral, Miroslav; Minarik, Marek

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To compare molecular profiles of proximal colon, distal colon and rectum in large adenomas, early and late carcinomas. To assess feasibility of testing directed at molecular markers from this study in routine clinical practice. METHODS: A prospective 3-year study has resulted in the acquisition of samples from 159 large adenomas and 138 carcinomas along with associated clinical parameters including localization, grade and histological type for adenomas and localization and stage for carcinomas. A complex molecular phenotyping has been performed using multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification technique for the evaluation of CpG-island methylator phenotype (CIMP), PCR fragment analysis for detection of microsatellite instability and denaturing capillary electrophoresis for sensitive detection of somatic mutations in KRAS, BRAF, TP53 and APC genes. RESULTS: Molecular types according to previously introduced Jass classification have been evaluated for large adenomas and early and late carcinomas. An increase in CIMP+ type, eventually accompanied with KRAS mutations, was notable between large adenomas and early carcinomas. As expected, the longitudinal observations revealed a correlation of the CIMP+/BRAF+ type with proximal location. CONCLUSION: Prospective molecular classification of tissue specimens is feasible in routine endoscopy practice. Increased frequency of some molecular types corresponds to the developmental stages of colorectal tumors. As expected, a clear distinction is notable for tumors located in proximal colon supposedly arising from the serrated (methylation) pathway. PMID:27239120

  12. Phase II trial of panitumumab with irinotecan as salvage therapy for patients with advanced or recurrent colorectal cancer (TOPIC study)

    PubMed Central

    NISHI, TOMOHIRO; HAMAMOTO, YASUO; NAGASE, MICHITAKA; DENDA, TADAMICHI; YAMAGUCHI, KENSEI; AMAGAI, KENJI; MIYATA, YOSHINORI; YAMANAKA, YASUHIRO; YANAI, KAI; ISHIKAWA, TSUTOMU; KUROKI, YOSHIFUMI; FUJII, HIROFUMI

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about the clinical impact of salvage panitumumab with irinotecan for metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) patients. The present study conducted a single-arm, multicenter phase II trial for mCRC with skin toxicity prevention program. The subjects were mCRC patients with wild-type KRAS, who showed resistance to fluoropyrimidine, oxaliplatin and irinotecan. Panitumumab was administered at a dose of 6 mg/kg every 2 weeks by intravenous infusion over 60 min, and irinotecan was administered at a dose of 100–180 mg/m2 every 2 weeks by intravenous infusion over 90 min, depending on the preceding treatment dose. To prevent skin toxicities, a moisturizer was applied and oral antibiotics (100 mg minocycline twice daily) were initiated for 6 weeks. The primary endpoint was the response rate (RR) determined by independent reviewers. Secondary endpoints were the disease control rate (DCR), progression-free survival (PFS) time, overall survival (OS) time and adverse events. A total of 35 patients were enrolled between October 2010 and March 2012. The median age was 61 years (range, 41–76 years), with 25 male and 10 female patients. The initial irinotecan dose was 150 mg/m2 in 19 patients and 180 mg/m2 in 1 patient. The remaining patients were treated with ≤120 mg/m2. A central review indicated a partial response in 8 patients (22.9%) and stable disease in 6 patients (17.1%), with an RR of 22.9% (95% confidence interval, 12.1–39.0) and a DCR of 40%. The RR of the patients with standard-dose irinotecan (150 or 180 mg/m2) was 30%, although that of low-dose irinotecan (100–120 mg/m2) was 13%. The median PFS time was 2.7 months, and the median OS time was 6.3 months. A grade 3 or above acne-like rash developed in 25.7% of patients. In conclusion, panitumumab and irinotecan as salvage therapy for mCRC KRAS wild-type patients with skin toxicity prevention exhibits limited efficacy. In particular, the effect of low-dose irinotecan with panitumumab appears to be

  13. Exosomes in colorectal carcinoma formation: ALIX under the magnifying glass.

    PubMed

    Valcz, Gábor; Galamb, Orsolya; Krenács, Tibor; Spisák, Sándor; Kalmár, Alexandra; Patai, Árpád V; Wichmann, Barna; Dede, Kristóf; Tulassay, Zsolt; Molnár, Béla

    2016-08-01

    Exosomes are small membrane vesicles that have important roles in transporting a great variety of bioactive molecules between epithelial compartment and their microenvironment during tumor formation including colorectal adenoma-carcinoma sequence. We tested the mRNA expression of the top 25 exosome-related markers based on ExoCharta database in healthy (n=49), adenoma (n=49) and colorectal carcinoma (n=49) patients using Affymetrix HGU133 Plus2.0 microarrays. Most related genes showed significantly elevated expression including PGK1, PKM, ANXA5, ENO1, HSP90AB1 and MSN during adenoma-carcinoma sequence. Surprisingly, the expression of ALIX (ALG 2-interacting protein X), involved in multivesicular body (MVB) and exosome formation, was significantly reduced in normal vs adenoma (P=5.02 × 10(-13)) and in normal vs colorectal carcinoma comparisons (P=1.51 × 10(-10)). ALIX also showed significant reduction (P<0.05) at the in situ protein level in the epithelial compartment of adenoma (n=35) and colorectal carcinoma (n=37) patients compared with 27 healthy individuals. Furthermore, significantly reduced ALIX protein levels were accompanied by their gradual transition from diffuse cytoplasmic expression to granular signals, which fell into the 0.6-2 μm diameter size range of MVBs. These ALIX-positive particles were seen in the tumor nests, including tumor-stroma border, which suggest their exosome function. MVB-like structures were also detected in tumor microenvironment including α-smooth muscle actin-positive stromal cells, budding off cancer cells in the tumor front as well as in cancer cells entrapped within lymphoid vessels. In conclusion, we determined the top aberrantly expressed exosome-associated markers and revealed the transition of diffuse ALIX protein signals into a MVB-like pattern during adenoma-carcinoma sequence. These tumor-associated particles seen both in the carcinoma and the surrounding microenvironment can potentially mediate epithelial

  14. Can We Select Patients for Colorectal Cancer Prevention with Aspirin?

    PubMed

    Kraus, Sarah; Sion, Daniel; Arber, Nadir

    2015-01-01

    Aspirin has been extensively investigated in the context of the prevention of cardiovascular disease. It has one of the strongest cumulative evidence supporting its use in colorectal cancer (CRC) chemoprevention. Epidemiological, clinical, and observational studies have demonstrated that aspirin and non-steroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), including COX-2 inhibitors, can protect against CRC and significantly reduce its incidence. Moreover, prospective randomized controlled trials of colorectal polyp recurrence and in patients with hereditary CRC syndromes have shown that aspirin can produce regression of existing colorectal adenomas and prevent the formation of new polyps. However, the lowest effective doses, treatment duration, target populations, and the effects on survival are not entirely clear. Although not common serious side effects and in particular gastrointestinal and intracerebral hemorrhage do occur, better selection of individuals who might benefit the most from aspirin use must be carefully performed in order to maximize their risk/benefit ratio. In the era of precision medicine, genetic information, blood and/or urinary biomarkers, could potentially help in tailoring chemopreventive therapeutic strategies, based on aspirin use, while limiting adverse toxic effects. The current review will cover the use of aspirin for the prevention of colorectal adenomas and CRC, potential markers for chemoprevention, and patient stratification. PMID:26369678

  15. Genetic reconstruction of individual colorectal tumor histories

    PubMed Central

    Tsao, Jen-Lan; Yatabe, Yasushi; Salovaara, Reijo; Järvinen, Heikki J.; Mecklin, Jukka-Pekka; Aaltonen, Lauri A.; Tavaré, Simon; Shibata, Darryl

    2000-01-01

    It is difficult to observe human tumor progression as precursor lesions are systematically removed. Alternatives to direct observations, commonly used to reveal the hidden past of species and populations, are sequence comparisons or molecular clocks. Noncoding microsatellite (MS) loci were employed as molecular tumor clocks in 13 human mutator phenotype (MSI+) colorectal tumors. Quantitative analysis revealed that specific patterns of somatic MS mutations accumulate with division after loss of mismatch repair (MMR). Tumors had unique patterns of MS mutation, and, therefore, based on this model, each tumor had its own unique history. Loss of MMR occurred very early relative to terminal clonal expansion, with an estimated average of 2,300 divisions since loss of MMR and 280 divisions since expansion. Contrary to the classical adenoma-cancer sequence, MSI+ adenomas were nearly as old as cancers (2,000 versus 2,400 divisions since loss of MMR). Negative clinical examinations preceded six tumors, independently documenting an absence of visible precursors during early MSI+ adenoma or cancer progression. These findings further extend a window beyond visible progression since loss of MMR appears to start a genetic phase involving clone sizes or phenotypes below a threshold of clinical detection. This previously occult prologue before visible neoplasia is longer and therefore likely more important than generally appreciated. PMID:10655514

  16. Higher Adenoma Detection Rates with Endocuff-Assisted Colonoscopy – A Randomized Controlled Multicenter Trial

    PubMed Central

    Fitzlaff, Rüdiger; Röming, Hermann; Ameis, Detlev; Heinecke, Achim; Kunsch, Steffen; Ellenrieder, Volker; Ströbel, Philipp; Schepke, Michael; Meister, Tobias

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The Endocuff is a device mounted on the tip of the colonoscope to help flatten the colonic folds during withdrawal. This study aimed to compare the adenoma detection rates between Endocuff-assisted (EC) colonoscopy and standard colonoscopy (SC). Methods This randomized prospective multicenter trial was conducted at four academic endoscopy units in Germany. Participants: 500 patients (235 males, median age 64[IQR 54–73]) for colon adenoma detection purposes were included in the study. All patients were either allocated to EC or SC. The primary outcome measure was the determination of the adenoma detection rates (ADR). Results The ADR significantly increased with the use of the Endocuff compared to standard colonoscopy (35.4%[95% confidence interval{CI} 29–41%] vs. 20.7%[95%CI 15–26%], p<0.0001). Significantly more sessile polyps were detected by EC. Overall procedure time and withdrawal time did not differ. Caecal and ileum intubation rates were similar. No major adverse events occurred in both groups. In multivariate analysis, age (odds ratio [OR] 1.03; 95%[CI] 1.01–1.05), male sex (OR 1.74; 95%CI 1.10–2.73), withdrawal time (OR 1.16; 95%CI 1.05–1.30), procedure time (OR 1.07; 95%CI 1.04–1.10), colon cleanliness (OR 0.60; 95%CI 0.39–0.94) and use of Endocuff (OR 2.09; 95%CI 1.34–3.27) were independent predictors of adenoma detection rates. Conclusions EC increases the adenoma detection rate by 14.7%(95%CI 6.9–22.5%). EC is safe, effective, easy to handle and might reduce colorectal interval carcinomas. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02034929. PMID:25470133

  17. Laparoscopic Colorectal Training Gap in Colorectal and Surgical Residents

    PubMed Central

    Soliman, Mark; Williamson, Paul; Ferrara, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Laparoscopic colorectal surgery is an established safe procedure with demonstrated benefits. Proficiency in this specialty correlates with the volume of cases. We examined training in this surgical field for both general surgery and colon and rectal surgery residents to determine whether the number of cases needed for proficiency is being realized. Methods: We examined the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) and American Board of Colorectal Surgeons (ABCRS) operative statistics for graduating general surgery and colon and rectal surgery residents. Results: Although the number of advanced laparoscopy cases had increased for general surgery residents, there was still a significant gap in case volume between the average number of laparoscopic colorectal operations performed by graduating general surgery residents (21.6) and those performed by graduating colon and rectal surgery residents (81.9) in 2014. Conclusion: There is a gap between general surgery and colon and rectal surgery residency training for laparoscopic colorectal surgery. General surgery residents are not meeting the volume of cases necessary for proficiency in colorectal surgery. This deficit represents a structural difference in training. PMID:27493468

  18. Colorectal hepatic metastasis: Evolving therapies

    PubMed Central

    Macedo, Francisco Igor B; Makarawo, Tafadzwa

    2014-01-01

    The approach for colorectal hepatic metastasis has advanced tremendously over the past decade. Multidrug chemotherapy regimens have been successfully introduced with improved outcomes. Concurrently, adjunct multimodal therapies have improved survival rates, and increased the number of patients eligible for curative liver resection. Herein, we described major advancements of surgical and oncologic management of such lesions, thereby discussing modern chemotherapeutic regimens, adjunct therapies and surgical aspects of liver resection. PMID:25067997

  19. Emerging stool-based and blood-based non-invasive DNA tests for colorectal cancer screening: the importance of cancer prevention in addition to cancer detection.

    PubMed

    Pickhardt, Perry J

    2016-08-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) screening can be undertaken utilizing a variety of distinct approaches, which provides both opportunities and confusion. Traditionally, there has often been a trade-off between the degree of invasiveness of a screening test and its ability to prevent cancer, with fecal occult blood testing (FOBT) and optical colonoscopy (OC) at each end of the spectrum. CT colonography (CTC), although currently underutilized for CRC screening, represents an exception since it is only minimally invasive, yet provides accurate evaluation for advanced adenomas. More recently, the FDA approved a multi-target stool DNA test (Cologuard) and a blood-based test (Epi proColon) for average-risk CRC screening. This commentary will provide an overview of these two new non-invasive tests, including the clinical indications, mechanism of action, and diagnostic performance. Relevance to radiology practice, including a comparison with CTC, will also be discussed. PMID:27259335

  20. Prospective evaluation of methylated SEPT9 in plasma for detection of asymptomatic colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Church, Timothy Robert; Wandell, Michael; Lofton-Day, Catherine; Mongin, Steven J; Burger, Matthias; Payne, Shannon R; Castaños-Vélez, Esmeralda; Blumenstein, Brent A; Rösch, Thomas; Osborn, Neal; Snover, Dale; Day, Robert W; Ransohoff, David F

    2014-01-01

    Background As screening methods for colorectal cancer (CRC) are limited by uptake and adherence, further options are sought. A blood test might increase both, but none has yet been tested in a screening setting. Objective We prospectively assessed the accuracy of circulating methylated SEPT9 DNA (mSEPT9) for detecting CRC in a screening population. Design Asymptomatic individuals ≥50 years old scheduled for screening colonoscopy at 32 US and German clinics voluntarily gave blood plasma samples before colon preparation. Using a commercially available assay, three independent blinded laboratories assayed plasma DNA of all CRC cases and a stratified random sample of other subjects in duplicate real time PCRs. The primary outcomes measures were standardised for overall sensitivity and specificity estimates. Results 7941 men (45%) and women (55%), mean age 60 years, enrolled. Results from 53 CRC cases and from 1457 subjects without CRC yielded a standardised sensitivity of 48.2% (95% CI 32.4% to 63.6%; crude rate 50.9%); for CRC stages I–IV, values were 35.0%, 63.0%, 46.0% and 77.4%, respectively. Specificity was 91.5% (95% CI 89.7% to 93.1%; crude rate 91.4%). Sensitivity for advanced adenomas was low (11.2%). Conclusions Our study using the blood based mSEPT9 test showed that CRC signal in blood can be detected in asymptomatic average risk individuals undergoing screening. However, the utility of the test for population screening for CRC will require improved sensitivity for detection of early cancers and advanced adenomas. Clinical Trial Registration Number: NCT00855348 PMID:23408352

  1. Synchronous occurrence of appendiceal mucinous cystadenoma, with colon adenocarcinoma and tubulovillous rectal adenoma: Management and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Salemis, Nikolaos S.; Nakos, Georgios; Katikaridis, Ilias; Zografidis, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Appendiceal mucocele (AM) is a rare clinical entity comprising 8% of all appendiceal tumors, and it is seen in 0.2-0.3% of all appendectomy specimens. Apart from sporadic cases, there are no enough published data about the incidence of synchronous appendiceal tumors in patients with colorectal cancer. We describe a very rare case of synchronous occurrence of AM, colon adenocarcinoma, and tubulovillous adenoma of the rectum and review the relevant literature. We conclude that thorough preoperative and perioperative evaluations are mandatory in patients undergoing surgery for colorectal cancer to exclude a synchronous colon or an appendiceal primary tumor. Larger prospective studies are necessary to accurately determine the incidence of synchronous appendiceal tumors and colorectal cancer. PMID:27433069

  2. An internally and externally validated nomogram for predicting the risk of irinotecan-induced severe neutropenia in advanced colorectal cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Ichikawa, W; Uehara, K; Minamimura, K; Tanaka, C; Takii, Y; Miyauchi, H; Sadahiro, S; Fujita, K; Moriwaki, T; Nakamura, M; Takahashi, T; Tsuji, A; Shinozaki, K; Morita, S; Ando, Y; Okutani, Y; Sugihara, M; Sugiyama, T; Ohashi, Y; Sakata, Y

    2015-01-01

    Background: In Asians, the risk of irinotecan-induced severe toxicities is related in part to UGT1A1*6 (UGT, UDP glucuronosyltransferase) and UGT1A1*28, variant alleles that reduce the elimination of SN-38, the active metabolite of irinotecan. We prospectively studied the relation between the UGT1A1 genotype and the safety of irinotecan-based regimens in Japanese patients with advanced colorectal cancer, and then constructed a nomogram for predicting the risk of severe neutropenia in the first treatment cycle. Methods: Safety data were obtained from 1312 patients monitored during the first 3 cycles of irinotecan-based regimen in a prospective observational study. In development of the nomogram, multivariable logistic regression analysis was used to test the associations of candidate factors to severe neutropenia in the first cycle. The final nomogram based on the results of multivariable analysis was constructed and validated internally using a bootstrapping technique and externally in an independent data set (n=350). Results: The UGT1A1 genotype was confirmed to be associated with increased risks of irinotecan-induced grade 3 or 4 neutropenia and diarrhoea. The final nomogram included type of regimen, administered dose of irinotecan, gender, age, UGT1A1 genotype, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status, pre-treatment absolute neutrophil count, and total bilirubin level. The model was validated both internally (bootstrap-adjusted concordance index, 0.69) and externally (concordance index, 0.70). Conclusions: Our nomogram can be used before treatment to accurately predict the probability of irinotecan-induced severe neutropenia in the first cycle of therapy. Additional studies should evaluate the effect of nomogram-guided dosing on efficacy in patients receiving irinotecan. PMID:25880011

  3. A phase I study of the chinese herbal medicine PHY906 as a modulator of irinotecan-based chemotherapy in patients with advanced colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Kummar, Shivaani; Copur, M Sitki; Rose, Michal; Wadler, Scott; Stephenson, Joe; O'Rourke, Mark; Brenckman, Wayne; Tilton, Robert; Liu, Shwu-Huey; Jiang, Zaoli; Su, Tahmun; Cheng, Yung-Chi; Chu, Edward

    2011-06-01

    PHY906 is a novel Chinese herbal preparation that has been used in the Orient for over 1800 years to treat a wide range of gastrointestinal side effects including diarrhea, abdominal cramps, vomiting, fever, and headache. Preclinical and clinical studies were conducted to further investigate the biologic and clinical activities of this herbal medicine. To ensure standardization and maintain interbatch reliability of PHY906, high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) was used to establish a "chemical fingerprint" of PHY906. In vivo preclinical studies using the murine Colon 39 tumor model showed that PHY906 protected against the weight loss associated with irinotecan treatment. In the presence of PHY906, mice were able to tolerate otherwise lethal doses of irinotecan. Significantly improved antitumor activity and overall survival were observed in animals treated with the combination of irinotecan and PHY906 versus irinotecan alone. The combination of PHY906 with irinotecan, 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), and leucovorin (LV) also resulted in at least additive antitumor activity with no increased host toxicity. Based on these in vivo studies, a phase I multicenter, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, dose escalation, cross-over study of PHY906 as a modulator of the weekly, bolus regimen of irinotecan, 5-FU, and LV (IFL) in the first-line treatment of patients with advanced colorectal cancer (CRC) was conducted. The specific objectives of this clinical trial were to determine the safety and tolerability of PHY906 when administered concomitantly with the bolus, weekly IFL regimen. Treatment with PHY906 did not alter the pharmacokinetics of 5-FU, irinotecan, or the irinotecan metabolite SN-38. PMID:21859559

  4. Phase IB study of doxorubicin in combination with the multidrug resistance reversing agent S9788 in advanced colorectal and renal cell cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Punt, C. J.; Voest, E. E.; Tueni, E.; Van Oosterom, A. T.; Backx, A.; De Mulder, P. H.; Hecquet, B.; Lucas, C.; Gerard, B.; Bleiberg, H.

    1997-01-01

    S9788 is a new triazineaminopiperidine derivate capable of reversing multidrug resistance (MDR) in cells resistant to chemotherapeutic agents such as doxorubicin. It does not belong to a known class of MDR revertants, but its action involves the binding of P-glycoprotein. Thirty-eight evaluable patients with advanced colorectal or renal cell cancer were treated with doxorubicin alone (16 patients) followed after disease progression with combination treatment of doxorubicin plus S9788 (12 patients) or upfront with the combination of doxorubicin plus S9788 (22 patients). S9788 was given i.v. as a loading dose of 56 mg m-2 over 30 min followed by doxorubicin given at 50 mg m-2 as a bolus infusion. Thereafter, a 2-h infusion of S9788 was administered at escalating doses ranging from 24 to 120 mg m-2 in subsequent cohorts of 4-10 patients. Pharmacokinetic analysis demonstrated that concentrations of S9788 that are known to reverse MDR in vitro were achieved in patients at non-toxic doses. Compared with treatment with doxorubicin alone, treatment with the combination of doxorubicin and S9788 produced a significant increase in the occurrence of WHO grade 3-4 granulocytopenia. Treatment with S9788 was cardiotoxic as it caused a dose-dependent and reversible increase in corrected QT intervals as well as clinically non-significant arrhythmias on 24- or 48-h Holter recordings. Although clinically relevant cardiac toxicities did not occur, the study was terminated as higher doses of S9788 may increase the risk of severe cardiac arrhythmias. Twenty-nine patients treated with S9788 plus doxorubicin were evaluable for response, and one patient, who progressed after treatment with doxorubicin alone, achieved a partial response. We conclude that S9788 administered at the doses and schedule used in this study results in relevant plasma concentrations in humans and can safely be administered in combination with doxorubicin. PMID:9374386

  5. [Tumor markers for colorectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, H; Miyake, Y; Noura, S; Ogawa, M; Yasui, M; Ikenaga, M; Sekimoto, M; Monden, M

    2001-09-01

    CEA and CA19-9 are the two most common tumor markers for colorectal cancer that are currently utilized clinically. The positive rate of CEA is 40-60% and that of CA19-9 is 30-50%. Simultaneous use of the two markers is useful in evaluating the therapeutic effect and monitoring the recurrence of advanced colorectal cancer. Surgical specimens may also provide useful information for the appropriate treatment of patients. Using surgically resected lymph nodes, we examined micrometastasis to assess the spread of the cancer cells and the malignant potential of colorectal cancer. Immunohistochemical analysis using anti-cytokeratin antibody revealed no significant impact of micrometastasis on patient prognosis, while RT-PCR assay using CEA as a genetic marker suggested a positive value in predicting a rapid recurrence. Among various molecular markers, we found that CDC25B phosphatase was a powerful prognostic factor for colorectal cancer. Diagnosis of the existence and malignant potential of cancer cells, together with serum tumor marker levels, may help to construct a more useful system for the better treatment of colorectal cancer. PMID:11579645

  6. Vitamin E deficiency ataxia associated with adenoma.

    PubMed

    Benomar, A; Yahyaoui, M; Marzouki, N; Birouk, N; Bouslam, N; Belaidi, H; Amarti, A; Ouazzani, R; Chkili, T

    1999-01-01

    Vitamin E is one of the most important lipid-soluble antioxidant nutrient. Severe vitamin E deficiency (VED) can have a profound effect on the central nervous system. VED causes ataxia and peripheral neuropathy that resembles Friedreich's ataxia. We report here a patient presenting this syndrome, but also a prolactin and FSH adenoma. Both the neurological syndromes and the adenoma regressed after treatment with alpha-tocopherol. Although, the presence of the prolactinoma in this patient may not be related to his vitamin E deficiency, alpha-tocopherol treatment seems to be beneficial and might usefully be tested in patients with hypophyseal secreting other forms of adenoma. PMID:10064178

  7. Association between atypical parathyroid adenoma and neurofibromatosis.

    PubMed

    Favere, Aline Mesquita Ferreira de; Tsukumo, Daniela Miti; Matos, Patrícia Sabino de; Santos, Sérgio Luiz Marques dos; Lalli, Cristina Alba

    2015-10-01

    Primary hyperparathyroidism is a disease characterized by excessive production of parathyroid hormone (PTH), which is due to a parathyroid adenoma in 85% of cases. An atypical parathyroid adenoma, with some histopathological features of parathyroid carcinoma, may be found in some of the cases, although it may not fulfill all the criteria for this diagnosis. Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is an autosomal dominant systemic disease that may be associated with hyperparathyroidism. We report here the rare combination of a patient with NF1 and clinical manifestations of hyperparathyroidism due to an atypical parathyroid adenoma. PMID:26421674

  8. Adenoma-linked barrier defects and microbial products drive IL-23/IL-17-mediated tumour growth

    PubMed Central

    Grivennikov, Sergei I.; Wang, Kepeng; Mucida, Daniel; Stewart, C. Andrew; Schnabl, Bernd; Jauch, Dominik; Taniguchi, Koji; Yu, Guann-Yi; Osterreicher, Christoph H.; Hung, Kenneth E.; Datz, Christian; Feng, Ying; Fearon, Eric R.; Oukka, Mohamed; Tessarollo, Lino; Coppola, Vincenzo; Yarovinsky, Felix; Cheroutre, Hilde; Eckmann, Lars; Trinchieri, Giorgio; Karin, Michael

    2013-01-01

    colorectal-cancer-initiating genetic lesions results in adenoma invasion by microbial products that trigger tumour-elicited inflammation, which in turn drives tumour growth. PMID:23034650

  9. Colorectal Cancer Screening: Stool DNA and Other Noninvasive Modalities

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, James R.; Aggarwal, Ashish; Imperiale, Thomas F.

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer screening dates to the discovery of pre-cancerous adenomatous tissue. Screening modalities and guidelines directed at prevention and early detection have evolved and resulted in a significant decrease in the prevalence and mortality of colorectal cancer via direct visualization or using specific markers. Despite continued efforts and an overall reduction in deaths attributed to colorectal cancer over the last 25 years, colorectal cancer remains one of the most common causes of malignancy-associated deaths. In attempt to further reduce the prevalence of colorectal cancer and associated deaths, continued improvement in screening quality and adherence remains key. Noninvasive screening modalities are actively being explored. Identification of specific genetic alterations in the adenoma-cancer sequence allow for the study and development of noninvasive screening modalities beyond guaiac-based fecal occult blood testing which target specific alterations or a panel of alterations. The stool DNA test is the first noninvasive screening tool that targets both human hemoglobin and specific genetic alterations. In this review we discuss stool DNA and other commercially available noninvasive colorectal cancer screening modalities in addition to other targets which previously have been or are currently under study. PMID:26934885

  10. Epigenetic silencing of monoallelically methylated miRNA loci in precancerous colorectal lesions

    PubMed Central

    Menigatti, M; Staiano, T; Manser, C N; Bauerfeind, P; Komljenovic, A; Robinson, M; Jiricny, J; Buffoli, F; Marra, G

    2013-01-01

    Epigenetic silencing of protein-encoding genes is common in early-stage colorectal tumorigenesis. Less is known about the methylation-mediated silencing of genes encoding microRNAs (miRNAs), which are also important epigenetic modulators of gene expression. Using quantitative PCR, we identified 56 miRNAs that were expressed in normal colorectal mucosa and in HT29 colorectal cancer cells treated with demethylating agents but not in untreated HT29 cells, suggesting that they probably undergo methylation-induced silencing during colorectal tumorigenesis. One of these, miR-195, had recently been reported to be underexpressed in colorectal cancers and to exert tumor-suppressor effects in colorectal cancer cells. We identified the transcription start site (TSS) for primary miRNA (pri-miR)-497/195, the primary precursor that yields miR-195 and another candidate on our list, miR-497, and a single CpG island upstream to the TSS, which controls expression of both miRNAs. Combined bisulfite restriction analysis and bisulfite genomic sequencing studies revealed monoallelic methylation of this island in normal colorectal mucosa (50/50 samples) and full methylation in most colorectal adenomas (38/50; 76%). The hypermethylated precancerous lesions displayed significantly downregulated expression of both miRNAs. Similar methylation patterns were observed at two known imprinted genes, MEG3 and GNAS-AS1, which encode several of the 56 miRNAs on our list. Imprinting at these loci was lost in over half the adenomas (62% at MEG3 and 52% at GNAS-AS1). Copy-number alterations at MEG3, GNAS-AS1 and pri-miR-497/195, which are frequent in colorectal cancers, were less common in adenomas and confined to tumors displaying differential methylation at the involved locus. Our data show that somatically acquired, epigenetic changes at monoallelically methylated regions encoding miRNAs are relatively frequent in sporadic colorectal adenomas and might contribute to the onset and progression of

  11. Epigenetic silencing of monoallelically methylated miRNA loci in precancerous colorectal lesions.

    PubMed

    Menigatti, M; Staiano, T; Manser, C N; Bauerfeind, P; Komljenovic, A; Robinson, M; Jiricny, J; Buffoli, F; Marra, G

    2013-01-01

    Epigenetic silencing of protein-encoding genes is common in early-stage colorectal tumorigenesis. Less is known about the methylation-mediated silencing of genes encoding microRNAs (miRNAs), which are also important epigenetic modulators of gene expression. Using quantitative PCR, we identified 56 miRNAs that were expressed in normal colorectal mucosa and in HT29 colorectal cancer cells treated with demethylating agents but not in untreated HT29 cells, suggesting that they probably undergo methylation-induced silencing during colorectal tumorigenesis. One of these, miR-195, had recently been reported to be underexpressed in colorectal cancers and to exert tumor-suppressor effects in colorectal cancer cells. We identified the transcription start site (TSS) for primary miRNA (pri-miR)-497/195, the primary precursor that yields miR-195 and another candidate on our list, miR-497, and a single CpG island upstream to the TSS, which controls expression of both miRNAs. Combined bisulfite restriction analysis and bisulfite genomic sequencing studies revealed monoallelic methylation of this island in normal colorectal mucosa (50/50 samples) and full methylation in most colorectal adenomas (38/50; 76%). The hypermethylated precancerous lesions displayed significantly downregulated expression of both miRNAs. Similar methylation patterns were observed at two known imprinted genes, MEG3 and GNAS-AS1, which encode several of the 56 miRNAs on our list. Imprinting at these loci was lost in over half the adenomas (62% at MEG3 and 52% at GNAS-AS1). Copy-number alterations at MEG3, GNAS-AS1 and pri-miR-497/195, which are frequent in colorectal cancers, were less common in adenomas and confined to tumors displaying differential methylation at the involved locus. Our data show that somatically acquired, epigenetic changes at monoallelically methylated regions encoding miRNAs are relatively frequent in sporadic colorectal adenomas and might contribute to the onset and progression of

  12. FIT for the future: a case for risk-based colorectal cancer screening using the faecal immunochemical test.

    PubMed

    Cooper, J A; Moss, S M; Smith, S; Seaman, H E; Taylor-Phillips, S; Parsons, N; Halloran, S P

    2016-07-01

    Worldwide, the guaiac faecal occult blood test (gFOBT) is being replaced with the more accurate faecal immunochemical test (FIT) for colorectal cancer (CRC) screening. From January 2016, the National Screening Committee in the UK has recommended a change from the gFOBT to the FIT following a successful Bowel Cancer Screening Programme pilot study with over 40 000 participants. Although the test has shown improved uptake and the ability to detect significantly more colorectal cancers and advanced adenomas, the higher uptake and test positivity will challenge the capacity of colonoscopy services. One of the main advantages of the FIT is that it provides a quantitative haemoglobin concentration which has been shown to relate to the risk of CRC. Risk scoring systems which combine the FIT concentration with risk factor assessment have been shown to improve the sensitivity of the test. This individualized approach to screening could enable those at greatest risk to be referred for colonoscopy, optimizing resource use and ultimately patient outcomes. PMID:27135192

  13. Effect of rehydration on guaiac-based faecal occult blood testing in colorectal cancer screening.

    PubMed Central

    Castiglione, G.; Biagini, M.; Barchielli, A.; Grazzini, G.; Mazzotta, A.; Salvadori, P.; Scillone, L.; Ciatto, S.

    1993-01-01

    Screening for colorectal cancer by means of unhydrated Hemoccult (HO) is in progress in the Province of Florence since 1982. In 1990 rehydrated HO was introduced in the town of Empoli. Five adjacent municipalities where screening had started in 1987 were selected for comparison. In both areas subjects aged 40-70 were invited by mail to undergo the screening protocol. HO-positive subjects were invited to undergo either pancolonoscopy or a combination of left colonoscopy and double contrast barium enema. HO-negative subjects were invited to repeat screening 2 years later. The positivity rate of HO was significantly higher (P < 0.001) for rehydrated (5%) as compared to unhydrated (3.1%) HO. The positive predictive values for cancer (unhydrated: 5.8%; rehydrated: 8.9%) and for adenomas (unhydrated: 26.7%; rehydrated: 25.5%) did not significantly differ. The detection rates of rehydrated HO were significantly higher as compared to unhydrated HO both for cancer (0.37% vs 0.15%; P < 0.05) and adenomas (1.06% vs 0.72%; P < 0.05%). In the present experience rehydration doesn't produce any decrease in the positive predictive value for cancer or adenomas and the increase in the positivity rate appears quite acceptable when considering the significant increase in the detection rates of cancer and adenomas. We conclude that rehydrated HO should be introduced as the standard test for screening in order to increase sensitivity for colorectal cancer and adenomas. PMID:8494714

  14. Low levels of Caspase-3 predict favourable response to 5FU-based chemotherapy in advanced colorectal cancer: Caspase-3 inhibition as a therapeutic approach

    PubMed Central

    Flanagan, L; Meyer, M; Fay, J; Curry, S; Bacon, O; Duessmann, H; John, K; Boland, K C; McNamara, D A; Kay, E W; Bantel, H; Schulze-Bergkamen, H; Prehn, J H M

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most common cancers in the Western world. 5-Fluorouracil (5FU)-based chemotherapy (CT) remains the mainstay treatment of CRC in the advanced setting, and activates executioner caspases in target cells. Executioner caspases are key proteins involved in cell disassembly during apoptosis. Activation of executioner caspases also has a role in tissue regeneration and repopulation by stimulating signal transduction and cell proliferation in neighbouring, non-apoptotic cells as reported recently. Tissue microarrays (TMAs) consisting of tumour tissue from 93 stage II and III colon cancer patients were analysed by immunohistochemistry. Surprisingly, patients with low levels of active Caspase-3 had an increased disease-free survival time. This was particularly pronounced in patients who received 5FU-based adjuvant CT. In line with this observation, lower serum levels of active Caspase-3 were found in patients with metastasised CRC who revealed stable disease or tumour regression compared with those with disease progression. The role of Caspase-3 in treatment responses was explored further in primary human tumour explant cultures from fresh patient tumour tissue. Exposure of explant cultures to 5FU-based CT increased the percentage of cells positive for active Caspase-3 and Terminal Deoxynucleotidyl Transferase dUTP Nick end Labelling (TUNEL), but also the expression of regeneration and proliferation markers β-Catenin and Ki-67, as well as cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). Of note, selective inhibition of Caspase-3 with Ac-DNLD-CHO, a selective, reversible inhibitor of Caspase-3, significantly reduced the expression of proliferation markers as well as COX-2. Inhibition of COX-2 with aspirin or celecoxib did not affect Caspase-3 levels but also reduced Ki-67 and β-Catenin levels, suggesting that Caspase-3 acted via COX-2 to stimulate cell proliferation and tissue regeneration. This indicates that low levels of active Caspase-3 may represent a

  15. Low levels of Caspase-3 predict favourable response to 5FU-based chemotherapy in advanced colorectal cancer: Caspase-3 inhibition as a therapeutic approach.

    PubMed

    Flanagan, L; Meyer, M; Fay, J; Curry, S; Bacon, O; Duessmann, H; John, K; Boland, K C; McNamara, D A; Kay, E W; Bantel, H; Schulze-Bergkamen, H; Prehn, J H M

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most common cancers in the Western world. 5-Fluorouracil (5FU)-based chemotherapy (CT) remains the mainstay treatment of CRC in the advanced setting, and activates executioner caspases in target cells. Executioner caspases are key proteins involved in cell disassembly during apoptosis. Activation of executioner caspases also has a role in tissue regeneration and repopulation by stimulating signal transduction and cell proliferation in neighbouring, non-apoptotic cells as reported recently. Tissue microarrays (TMAs) consisting of tumour tissue from 93 stage II and III colon cancer patients were analysed by immunohistochemistry. Surprisingly, patients with low levels of active Caspase-3 had an increased disease-free survival time. This was particularly pronounced in patients who received 5FU-based adjuvant CT. In line with this observation, lower serum levels of active Caspase-3 were found in patients with metastasised CRC who revealed stable disease or tumour regression compared with those with disease progression. The role of Caspase-3 in treatment responses was explored further in primary human tumour explant cultures from fresh patient tumour tissue. Exposure of explant cultures to 5FU-based CT increased the percentage of cells positive for active Caspase-3 and Terminal Deoxynucleotidyl Transferase dUTP Nick end Labelling (TUNEL), but also the expression of regeneration and proliferation markers β-Catenin and Ki-67, as well as cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). Of note, selective inhibition of Caspase-3 with Ac-DNLD-CHO, a selective, reversible inhibitor of Caspase-3, significantly reduced the expression of proliferation markers as well as COX-2. Inhibition of COX-2 with aspirin or celecoxib did not affect Caspase-3 levels but also reduced Ki-67 and β-Catenin levels, suggesting that Caspase-3 acted via COX-2 to stimulate cell proliferation and tissue regeneration. This indicates that low levels of active Caspase-3 may represent a

  16. Biochemical modulation of fluorouracil: comparison of methotrexate, folinic acid, and fluorouracil versus folinic acid and fluorouracil in advanced colorectal cancer: a randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Polyzos, A; Tsavaris, N; Giannopoulos, A; Bacoyiannis, C; Papadimas, V; Kalahanis, N; Karatzas, G; Kosmas, C; Sakelaropoulos, N; Archimandritis, A; Papachristodoulou, A; Kosmidis, P

    1996-01-01

    Recent advances in biochemical pharmacology have revealed the basis for the biological modulation of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) by methotrexate (MTX) and folinic acid (FA). Sequential use of MTX given 24 h prior to 5-FU has resulted in enhanced cell kill in vitro and in vivo. In addition, administration of FA prior to 5-FU has led to potentiation of 5-FU action by stabilization of the ternary complex of thymidine synthase. In the present randomized study, two groups of patients with advanced colorectal cancer were treated as follows: 43 patients (pts) in group A received 5-FU + FA, whereas 45 pts in group B received 5-FU + FA + MTX. The dosage was as follows: group A received FA i.v. at 300 mg/m2 per day, prior to i.v. 5-FU at 500 mg/m2 per day on days 1-4; group B was given MTX i.v. at 130 mg/m2 per day on day 0, followed 24 h later by FA at 15 mg q6h x 6, and 5-FU + FA was started on day 1 and given at the same doses and schedule described for group A. Objective responses were achieved by 8/43 pts in group A (1 complete response and 7 partial responses) and by 18/45 pts in group B (3 complete and 15 partial responses), all occurring in the liver. There was no significant difference in the median time to progression (group A 6.1 months, group B 6.8 months) or the median survival (group A 9.2 months, group B 10.3 months). Toxicity was significantly greater in group B [grade 2-3 mucositis 20% versus only 2% in group A (P < 0.0001); grade 3 diarrhea in group B 15% versus 3% in group A (P < 0.001)]. According to our results, double biological modulation of 5-FU with MTX + FA led to an enhanced response rate with increased toxicity as compared with the 5-FU + FA regimen given at less than its maximally tolerated dose. PMID:8646806

  17. Genetics Home Reference: familial isolated pituitary adenoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... 1,000 people. FIPA, though, is quite rare, accounting for approximately 2 percent of pituitary adenomas. More ... be inherited? More about Inheriting Genetic Conditions Diagnosis & Management These resources address the diagnosis or management of ...

  18. Gamma knife radiosurgery for pituitary adenomas.

    PubMed

    Ježková, Jana; Marek, Josef

    2016-09-01

    Pituitary adenomas are frequently occurring intracranial neoplasms. The aim of the treatment of pituitary adenomas is to normalize hormonal hypersecretion, to preserve the normal pituitary function, to reserve or treat impaired pituitary function and to control tumor growth and its mechanical effects on the surrounding structures. Treatment modalities include surgical, medical and radiation therapy. Radiosurgery is mainly used as a secondary line treatment after surgery for residual or recurrent tumors. The antiproliferative effect is achieved by LKG irradiation in more than 90% of patients. Regarding the functioning pituitary adenomas, the manifestation of the treatment effect is slow and depends mainly on the type of adenoma. Gamma knife irradiation is safe when the maximal doses to pituitary and infundibulum are respected. PMID:26899535

  19. Quantitative analysis of colorectal mucosal lesions by autofluorescence endoscopy: discrimination of carcinomas from other lesions.

    PubMed

    Arita, Keiko; Mitsuyama, Keiichi; Kawano, Hiroshi; Hasegawa, Shin; Maeyama, Yasuhiko; Masuda, Junya; Akagi, Yoshito; Watanabe, Yasutomo; Okabe, Yoshinobu; Tsuruta, Osamu; Sata, Michio

    2011-07-01

    A newly developed autofluorescence (AF) imaging technique was applied during colonoscopy in a clinical setting. This pilot study was conducted to evaluate the clinical feasibility of applying AF endoscopy for distinguishing colorectal lesions. A total of 54 colorectal mucosal lesions obtained from 43 patients who underwent both white-light and AF endoscopy and were treated by endoscopy or surgery were assessed. Of the lesions, 11 were hyperplastic polyps, 30 were adenomas and 13 were carcinomas. To quantify the AF intensity, a color-contrast index (CCI) was determined and evaluated in relation to the histology, size and shape of each lesion. CCI was significantly associated with the histology and size of the lesions, but not their shape. CCI increased as the malignant potential increased (in the order of hyperplastic polyps→adenomas→carcinomas), irrespective of the lesion size (r=0.797, p<0.0001 for size>8 mm; r=0.622, p=0.0045 for size>8 mm but >15 mm; r=0.644, p=0.0071 for size>15 mm). In each size group, CCI tended to be higher for carcinomas than for adenomas, and also higher for adenomas than for hyperplastic polyps. CCI allowed discrimination of adenomas/carcinomas from hyperplastic polyps with 95.3% sensitivity and 63.6% specificity (cut-off value, 14.5), and of colorectal carcinomas from adenomas with 84.6% sensitivity and 80.0% specificity (cut-off value, 28.0). These results suggest that the quantitative analysis of AF intensity using CCI is helpful to discriminate among different types of colorectal mucosal lesions, including carcinomas. PMID:21573495

  20. Primary prevention of colorectal cancer. The WHO Collaborating Centre for the Prevention of Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Shike, M.; Winawer, S. J.; Greenwald, P. H.; Bloch, A.; Hill, M. J.; Swaroop, S. V.

    1990-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is the third most common malignant neoplasm worldwide. Epidemiological and laboratory animal studies have established a link between various nutritional factors and the etiology of this cancer. Recent studies in genetic epidemiology and molecular biology have shown that inherited genetic factors also play an important role in colorectal carcinogenesis. Thus, genetic-nutritional interactions may form the basis for the development of this cancer. Nutritional factors that appear to promote or attenuate the carcinogenic process in the colon include fat, excess calories, fibre, calcium, selenium, and various vitamins. Strategies for primary prevention of colorectal cancer should therefore be targeted to all populations who are at risk because of dietary and hereditary predisposition. Based on current knowledge, recommended nutrition guidelines for reducing the risk of colon cancer include decreased fat consumption, adequate amounts of fruits, vegetables, and calcium, and avoidance of overweight. Research to further elucidate the role of diet in colorectal carcinogenesis should include randomized studies in humans, testing of various nutritional regimens, and the use of colonic adenomas and markers of cell proliferation and differentiation as end-points. PMID:2203551

  1. Five Myths about Colorectal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... ACS » Your Local Offices Close + - Text Size Five Myths About Colorectal Cancer In many cases, colorectal cancer ... screening tests you need, when you need them. Myth: Colorectal cancer is a man’s disease. Truth: Colorectal ...

  2. Tubulovillous Adenoma in a Urethral Neobladder Anastomosis

    PubMed Central

    Morganstern, Bradley A.; Greenblatt, Logan B.; Yaskiv, Oksana; Steckel, Joph

    2015-01-01

    We present a case of a tubulovillous adenoma arising in a neobladder that was managed by cystoscopic resection. A 64 year-old male underwent a cystectomy with creation of an ileocolic neobladder urinary diversion for T2 urothelial carcinoma of the bladder. Nine years following his surgery, the patient noted several episodes of gross hematuria. Cystoscopic evaluation revealed the rare occurrence of a 3 cm tubulovillous adenoma with high-grade dysplasia at the neck of the neobladder. PMID:26793555

  3. Intestinal adenomas can develop with a stable karyotype and stable microsatellites

    PubMed Central

    Haigis, Kevin M.; Caya, James G.; Reichelderfer, Mark; Dove, William F.

    2002-01-01

    Loss of function of the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC)/Apc tumor suppressor gene occurs early in the etiology of intestinal cancer in mammals. In human colonic tumors, genomic instability is proposed to be associated with tumor initiation by inducing loss of APC function. We have used a mouse model of inherited intestinal cancer (ApcMin/+, Min/+) to analyze the earliest stages of tumorigenesis in this organ. We find that tumors from C57BL/6 Min/+ mice have a stable karyotype and stable microsatellites. In contrast to previous claims, we find that homozygosity for the Min allele of Apc in tumors can proceed by homologous somatic recombination. Further, our analysis of early, benign human colorectal adenomas failed to reveal any evidence for generalized chromosomal or microsatellite instability. These results cast doubt on the hypothesis that either of these forms of genomic instability is necessary for the initial development of colorectal adenomas. We contrast our analysis of autochthonous primary tumors to other studies involving xenografts or cultured cells. PMID:12060718

  4. Colorectal polyp type and the association with charred meat consumption, smoking, and microsomal epoxide hydrolase polymorphisms

    PubMed Central

    Burnett-Hartman, Andrea N.; Newcomb, Polly A.; Mandelson, Margaret T.; Adams, Scott V.; Wernli, Karen J.; Shadman, Mazyar; Wurscher, Michelle A.; Makar, Karen W.

    2011-01-01

    Objective We determined the association between charred meat consumption, cigarette smoking, microsomal epoxide hydrolase (mEH) polymorphisms [rs1051740 and rs2234922], and colorectal adenomas and hyperplastic polyps (HPs) and explored gene-environment interactions. Methods Men and women with colorectal adenomas (n=519), HPs (n=691), or concurrently with both types of polyps (n=227) and polyp-free controls (n=772) receiving a colonoscopy from 12/04-9/07 were recruited. Participants completed telephone interviews and provided buccal cell samples; genotyping of mEH was completed using Taqman assays. We conducted polytomous regression and calculated odd ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals. Interactions were evaluated using Wald chi-square tests. Results Consumption of >3 servings of charred meat per week was associated with distal HPs (OR=2.0, 1.2–3.4) but not adenomas nor either type of proximal polyp. Heavy cigarette smoking (≥22 pack-years) was associated with an increased risk for colorectal adenomas (OR=1.7, 95% CI 1.2–2.4), HPs (OR=2.4, 95% CI 1.7–3.3), and both types (OR=2.8, 95% CI 1.8–4.3) with the strongest association for distal polyps. There was no association between mEH genotype and colorectal polyps, nor were any statistically significant gene-environment interactions identified. Discussion Future investigation of BaP exposure and colorectal neoplasia should analyze whether associations are dependent upon anatomic location. PMID:21598178

  5. Gene-dosage dependent overexpression at the 13q amplicon identifies DIS3 as candidate oncogene in colorectal cancer progression.

    PubMed

    de Groen, Florence L M; Krijgsman, Oscar; Tijssen, Marianne; Vriend, Lianne E M; Ylstra, Bauke; Hooijberg, Erik; Meijer, Gerrit A; Steenbergen, Renske D M; Carvalho, Beatriz

    2014-04-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) development is in most cases marked by the accumulation of genomic alterations including gain of the entire q-arm of chromosome 13. This aberration occurs in 40%-60% of all CRC and is associated with progression from adenoma to carcinoma. To date, little is known about the effect of the 13q amplicon on the expression of the therein located genes and their functional relevance. We therefore aimed to identify candidate genes at the 13q amplicon that contribute to colorectal adenoma to carcinoma progression in a gene dosage-dependent manner. Integrative analysis of whole genome expression and DNA copy number signatures resulted in the identification of 36 genes on 13q of which significant overexpression in carcinomas compared with adenomas was linked to a copy number gain. Five genes showing high levels of overexpression in carcinomas versus adenomas were further tested by quantitative reverse transcription-PCR in two independent sample sets of colorectal tumors (n = 40 and n = 47). DIS3 and LRCH1 revealed significant overexpression in carcinomas compared with adenomas in a 13q gain dependent manner. Silencing of DIS3 affected important tumorigenic characteristics such as viability, migration, and invasion. In conclusion, significant overexpression of DIS3 and LRCH1 associated with adenoma to carcinoma progression is linked to the CRC specific gain of 13q. The functional relevance of this copy number aberration was corroborated for DIS3, thereby identifying this gene as novel candidate oncogene contributing to the 13q-driven adenoma to carcinoma progression. PMID:24478024

  6. Colorectal cancer screening in the familial risk population: Is colonoscopy still the strategy of choice?

    PubMed

    Gimeno-García, Antonio Z; Hernández-Álvarez-de-Buylla, Noemi; Nicolás-Pérez, David; Carrillo, Marta; Hernández, Goretti; Quintero, Enrique

    2016-05-01

    First-degree relatives of patients with colorectal cancer (CRC) are at high risk of this disease. For this reason, medical organizations and clinical guidelines recommend more intensive screening and surveillance for such first-degree relatives than for the average-risk population. Colonoscopy has been the cornerstone of CRC screening in this setting. Although colonoscopy is the most sensitive technique for the detection of neoplastic lesions (especially non-advanced adenomas), its role is less clear for CRC. In addition, screening colonoscopy has several limitations that may affect the success of a screening campaign, such as poor participant acceptance, the need for skilled endoscopists, participant access to screening colonoscopy, overburdened endoscopy units, potential complications, and procedure-related costs. In addition, recent evidence has cast doubt on the advantage of colonoscopy over other strategies for the detection of advanced neoplastic lesions. Despite being less sensitive in general, other screening methods frequently recommended in the average-risk population may be more acceptable and thus help increase CRC screening uptake. This review discusses recent evidence on the risk of CRC in first-degree relatives, the advantages and disadvantages of each screening technique, participation rates depending on the technique, patient preferences, and barriers to screening. PMID:26547615

  7. Screening for colorectal cancer in Italy: 2011-2012 survey.

    PubMed

    Zorzi, Manuel; Da Re, Filippo; Mantellini, Paola; Naldoni, Carlo; Sassoli De'Bianchi, Priscilla; Senore, Carlo; Turrin, Anna; Visioli, Carmen Beatriz; Zappa, Marco

    2015-01-01

    We present the main results of the 2011-2012 survey of the Italian screening programmes for colorectal cancer carried out by the National centre for screening monitoring (Osservatorio nazionale screening, ONS) on behalf of the Ministry of Health. By the end of 2012, 112 programmes were active, of which 11 had been activated during 2012 and 4 during 2011. The national theoretical extension increased from 66% of Italians aged 50-69 years residing in areas covered by organized screening programmes in 2010 to 73.7% in 2012. The majority of programmes employ the fecal immunochemical test (FIT), while some have adopted flexible sigmoidoscopy (FS) once in a lifetime and FIT for non-responders to FS. Overall, about 7,744,000 subjects were invited to undergo FIT, 53.1% of those to be invited within the two years. The adjusted attendance rate was 47.1%and 3,531,937 subjects were screened. Large differences in the attendance rate were observed among regions. Positivity rate of FIT programmes was 5.2% at first screening (range: 1.0-12.4%) and 4.0% at repeat screening (range: 3.4-6.4%). The average attendance rate to total colonoscopy (TC) was 81.2% and in two regions (Molise and Campania) it was lower than 70%. Completion rate for total colonoscopy (TC) was 91%. Among the 1,316,327 subjects attending screening for the first time, the detection rate (DR) per 1,000 screened subjects was 2.0 for invasive cancer and 9.1 ‰ for advanced adenomas (AA, adenomas with a diameter ≥1 cm, with villous/tubulo-villous type or high-grade dysplasia). As expected, the corresponding figures in the 2,215,610 subjects at repeat screening were lower (1.0‰ and 6.8‰ for invasive cancer and AA, respectively). Many programmes reported some difficulties in guaranteeing TC in the appropriate time frame to FIT+ subjects: in 15% of cases the waiting time was longer than two months. Ten programmes in 2011 and eight in 2012 employed FS as the screening test: 24,549 subjects were screened in the two

  8. The effect of strict adherence to a high-fiber, high-fruit and -vegetable, and low-fat eating pattern on adenoma recurrence.

    PubMed

    Sansbury, Leah B; Wanke, Kay; Albert, Paul S; Kahle, Lisa; Schatzkin, Arthur; Lanza, Elaine

    2009-09-01

    Individual differences in dietary intake are thought to account for substantial variation in cancer incidence. However, there has been a consistent lack of effect for low-fat, high-fiber dietary interventions and risk of colorectal cancer. These inconsistencies may reflect the multistage process of cancer as well as the range and timing of dietary change. Another potential reason for the lack of effect is poor dietary adherence among participants in these trials. The authors examined the effect of strict adherence to a low-fat, high-fiber, high-fruit and -vegetable intervention over 4 years among participants (n = 1,905) in the US Polyp Prevention Trial (1991-1998) on colorectal adenoma recurrence. There was a wide range of individual variation in the level of compliance among intervention participants. The most adherent participants, defined as "super compliers" (n = 210), consistently reported that they met or exceeded each of the 3 dietary goals at all 4 annual visits. Multivariate logistic regression models were used to estimate the association between dietary adherence and adenoma recurrence. The authors observed a 35% reduced odds of adenoma recurrence among super compliers compared with controls (odds ratio = 0.65, 95% confidence interval: 0.47, 0.92). Findings suggest that high compliance with a low-fat, high-fiber diet is associated with reduced risk of adenoma recurrence. PMID:19643809

  9. Colorectal Cancer Epidemiology in the Nurses’ Health Study

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dong Hoon; Giovannucci, Edward L.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. To review the contribution of the Nurses’ Health Study (NHS) to identifying risk and protective factors for colorectal adenomas and colorectal cancer (CRC). Methods. We performed a narrative review of the publications using the NHS between 1976 and 2016. Results. Existing epidemiological studies using the NHS have reported that red and processed meat, alcohol, smoking, and obesity were associated with an increased risk of CRC, whereas folate, calcium, vitamin D, aspirin, and physical activity were associated with decreased risk of CRC. Moreover, modifiable factors, such as physical activity, vitamin D, folate, insulin and insulin-like growth factor binding protein-1, and diet quality, were identified to be associated with survival among CRC patients. In recent years, molecular pathological epidemiological studies have been actively conducted and have shown refined results by molecular subtypes of CRC. Conclusions. The NHS has provided new insights into colorectal adenomas, CRC etiology, and pathogenic mechanisms. With its unique strengths, the NHS should continue to contribute to the field of CRC epidemiology and play a major role in public health. PMID:27459444

  10. Helicobacter pylori and colorectal neoplasia: Is there a causal link?

    PubMed

    Papastergiou, Vasilios; Karatapanis, Stylianos; Georgopoulos, Sotirios D

    2016-01-14

    Ever since Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) was recognized as an infectious cause of gastric cancer, there has been increasing interest in examining its potential role in colorectal carcinogenesis. Data from case-control and cross-sectional studies, mostly relying on hospital-based samples, and several meta-analyses have shown a positive statistical relationship between H. pylori infection and colorectal neoplasia. However, the possibility exists that the results have been influenced by bias, including the improper selection of patients and disparities with respect to potential confounders. While the evidence falls short of a definitive causal link, it appears that infection with H. pylori/H. pylori-related gastritis is associated with an increased, although modest, risk of colorectal adenoma and cancer. The pathogenic mechanisms responsible for this association remain uncertain. H. pylori has been detected in colorectal malignant tissues; however, the possibility that H. pylori is a direct activator of colonic carcinogenesis remains purely hypothetical. On the other hand, experimental data have indicated a series of potential oncogenic interactions between these bacteria and colorectal mucosa, including induction and perpetuation of inflammatory responses, alteration of gut microflora and release of toxins and/or hormonal mediators, such as gastrin, which may contribute to tumor formation. PMID:26811614

  11. Helicobacter pylori and colorectal neoplasia: Is there a causal link?

    PubMed Central

    Papastergiou, Vasilios; Karatapanis, Stylianos; Georgopoulos, Sotirios D

    2016-01-01

    Ever since Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) was recognized as an infectious cause of gastric cancer, there has been increasing interest in examining its potential role in colorectal carcinogenesis. Data from case-control and cross-sectional studies, mostly relying on hospital-based samples, and several meta-analyses have shown a positive statistical relationship between H. pylori infection and colorectal neoplasia. However, the possibility exists that the results have been influenced by bias, including the improper selection of patients and disparities with respect to potential confounders. While the evidence falls short of a definitive causal link, it appears that infection with H. pylori/H. pylori-related gastritis is associated with an increased, although modest, risk of colorectal adenoma and cancer. The pathogenic mechanisms responsible for this association remain uncertain. H. pylori has been detected in colorectal malignant tissues; however, the possibility that H. pylori is a direct activator of colonic carcinogenesis remains purely hypothetical. On the other hand, experimental data have indicated a series of potential oncogenic interactions between these bacteria and colorectal mucosa, including induction and perpetuation of inflammatory responses, alteration of gut microflora and release of toxins and/or hormonal mediators, such as gastrin, which may contribute to tumor formation. PMID:26811614

  12. Colorectal Cancer Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... Genetics of Colorectal Cancer Colorectal cancer is the second leading cause of death from cancer in the ... professional versions have detailed information written in technical language. The patient versions are written in easy-to- ...

  13. [Maintenance therapy for colorectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Shigeo; Kato, Shunsuke

    2014-08-01

    Some trials have demonstrated the benefits of maintenance chemotherapy for advanced colorectal cancer. In chemotherapeutic strategies for advanced colorectal cancer, chemotherapy-related toxicity prevention and quality of life(QOL)maintenance are more important than the introduction of a strong regimen, especially when additional surgery is not possible. In Japan, the combination of a folinic acid/5-fluorouracil/oxaliplatin(FOLFOX)regimen and bevacizumab is a popular first-line chemotherapy regimen. However, despite its effectiveness, neuropathy or hand-foot syndrome after 5 or 6 cycles tends to lead to chemotherapy withdrawal. CAIRO3 trial reported the effectiveness of capecitabine and bevacizumab as a maintenance chemotherapy regimen. Additionally, the ML18147 trial demonstrated that bevacizumab beyond progression(BBP)prolonged overall survival(OS)and progression free survival(PFS)in patients with advanced colorectal cancer. Although those trials demonstrated the effectiveness of continuous or maintenance bevacizumab administration, no trials have compared the effectiveness of cytotoxic drugs with bevacizumab as maintenance therapies. Moreover, controversy exists regarding the selection of drugs as a maintenance therapy and the identification of patients who would benefit from maintenance therapy. PMID:25132024

  14. Mean Polyp per Patient Is an Accurate and Readily Obtainable Surrogate for Adenoma Detection Rate: Results from an Opportunistic Screening Colonoscopy Program

    PubMed Central

    Delavari, Alireza; Salimzadeh, Hamideh; Bishehsari, Faraz; Sobh Rakhshankhah, Elham; Delavari, Farnaz; Moossavi, Shirin; Khosravi, Pejman; Nasseri-Moghaddam, Siavosh; Merat, Shahin; Ansari, Reza; Vahedi, Homayoon; Shahbazkhani, Bijan; Saberifiroozi, Mehdi; Sotoudeh, Masoud; Malekzadeh, Reza

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND The incidence of colorectal cancer is rising in several developing countries. In the absence of integrated endoscopy and pathology databases, adenoma detection rate (ADR), as a validated quality indicator of screening colonoscopy, is generally difficult to obtain in practice. We aimed to measure the correlation of polyp-related indicators with ADR in order to identify the most accurate surrogate(s) of ADR in routine practice. METHODS We retrospectively reviewed the endoscopic and histopathological findings of patients who underwent colonoscopy at a tertiary gastrointestinal clinic. The overall ADR and advanced-ADR were calculated using patient-level data. The Pearson’s correlation coefficient (r) was applied to measure the strength of the correlation between the quality metrics obtained by endoscopists. RESULTS A total of 713 asymptomatic adults aged 50 and older who underwent their first-time screening colonoscopy were included in this study. The ADR and advanced-ADR were 33.00% (95% CI: 29.52-36.54) and 13.18% (95% CI: 10.79-15.90), respectively. We observed good correlations between polyp detection rate (PDR) and ADR (r=0.93), and mean number of polyp per patient (MPP) and ADR (r=0.88) throughout the colon. There was a positive, yet insignificant correlation between advanced ADRs and non-advanced ADRs (r=0.42, p=0.35). CONCLUSION MPP is strongly correlated with ADR, and can be considered as a reliable and readily obtainable proxy for ADR in opportunistic screening colonoscopy programs. PMID:26609349

  15. BCL-3 expression promotes colorectal tumorigenesis through activation of AKT signalling

    PubMed Central

    Urban, Bettina C; Collard, Tracey J; Eagle, Catherine J; Southern, Samantha L; Greenhough, Alexander; Hamdollah-Zadeh, Maryam; Ghosh, Anil; Paraskeva, Christos; Silver, Andrew; Williams, Ann C

    2016-01-01

    Objective Colorectal cancer remains the fourth most common cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide. Here we investigate the role of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) co-factor B-cell CLL/lymphoma 3 (BCL-3) in promoting colorectal tumour cell survival. Design Immunohistochemistry was carried out on 47 tumour samples and normal tissue from resection margins. The role of BCL-3/NF-κB complexes on cell growth was studied in vivo and in vitro using an siRNA approach and exogenous BCL-3 expression in colorectal adenoma and carcinoma cells. The question whether BCL-3 activated the AKT/protein kinase B (PKB) pathway in colorectal tumour cells was addressed by western blotting and confocal microscopy, and the ability of 5-aminosalicylic acid (5-ASA) to suppress BCL-3 expression was also investigated. Results We report increased BCL-3 expression in human colorectal cancers and demonstrate that BCL-3 expression promotes tumour cell survival in vitro and tumour growth in mouse xenografts in vivo, dependent on interaction with NF-κB p50 or p52 homodimers. We show that BCL-3 promotes cell survival under conditions relevant to the tumour microenvironment, protecting both colorectal adenoma and carcinoma cells from apoptosis via activation of the AKT survival pathway: AKT activation is mediated via both PI3K and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathways, leading to phosphorylation of downstream targets GSK-3β and FoxO1/3a. Treatment with 5-ASA suppressed BCL-3 expression in colorectal cancer cells. Conclusions Our study helps to unravel the mechanism by which BCL-3 is linked to poor prognosis in colorectal cancer; we suggest that targeting BCL-3 activity represents an exciting therapeutic opportunity potentially increasing the sensitivity of tumour cells to conventional therapy. PMID:26033966

  16. GIANT PITUITARY ADENOMA WITH NORMAL VISION AND MISLEADING RADIOLOGICAL FINDINGS.

    PubMed

    Khalid, Muhammad; Raina, Umer Farooq; uz Zaman, Khaleeq; Tahir, Muhammad

    2015-01-01

    Giant pituitary adenomas are rare and present with visual loss. Giant pituitary adenoma has rarely been reported presenting with normal vision. We report Giant pituitary adenoma with Normal vision in a 35 years old patient presenting with adult onset epilepsy and headache. PMID:26721053

  17. Preoperative volume determination for pituitary adenoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zukic, Dženan; Egger, Jan; Bauer, Miriam H. A.; Kuhnt, Daniela; Carl, Barbara; Freisleben, Bernd; Kolb, Andreas; Nimsky, Christopher

    2011-03-01

    The most common sellar lesion is the pituitary adenoma, and sellar tumors are approximately 10-15% of all intracranial neoplasms. Manual slice-by-slice segmentation takes quite some time that can be reduced by using the appropriate algorithms. In this contribution, we present a segmentation method for pituitary adenoma. The method is based on an algorithm that we have applied recently to segmenting glioblastoma multiforme. A modification of this scheme is used for adenoma segmentation that is much harder to perform, due to lack of contrast-enhanced boundaries. In our experimental evaluation, neurosurgeons performed manual slice-by-slice segmentation of ten magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) cases. The segmentations were compared to the segmentation results of the proposed method using the Dice Similarity Coefficient (DSC). The average DSC for all datasets was 75.92%+/-7.24%. A manual segmentation took about four minutes and our algorithm required about one second.

  18. Preferences and acceptance of colorectal cancer screening in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Saengow, Udomsak; Chongsuwiwatvong, Virasakdi; Geater, Alan; Birch, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is now common in Thailand with an increase in incidence over time. Health authorities are planning to implement a nationwide CRC screening program using fecal immunochemical test (FIT) as a primary screening tool. This study aimed to estimate preferences and acceptance of FIT and colonoscopy, explore factors influencing the acceptance, and investigate reasons behind choosing and rejecting to screen before the program was implemented. Patients aged 50-69, visiting the primary care unit during the study period, were invited to join this study. Patients with a history of cancer or past CRC screening were excluded. Face-to-face interviews were conducted. Subjects were informed about CRC and the screening tests: FIT and colonoscopy. Then, they were asked for their opinions regarding the screening. The total number of subjects was 437 (86.7% response rate). Fifty-eight percent were females. The median age was 58 years. FIT was accepted by 74.1% of subjects compared to 55.6% for colonoscopy. The acceptance of colonoscopy was associated with perceived susceptibility to CRC and family history of cancer. No symptoms, unwilling to screen, healthy, too busy and anxious about diagnosis were reasons for refusing to screen. FIT was preferred for its simplicity and non-invasiveness compared with colonoscopy. Those rejecting FIT expressed a strong preference for colonoscopy. Subjects chose colonoscopy because of its accuracy; it was refused for the process and complications. If the screening program is implemented for the entire target population in Thailand, we estimate that 106,546 will have a positive FIT, between 8,618 and 12,749 identified with advanced adenoma and between 2,645 and 3,912 identified with CRC in the first round of the program. PMID:25824749

  19. Colonoscopy and chromoscopy in hereditary colorectal cancer syndromes.

    PubMed

    Jenkins Wessling, Erin; Lanspa, Stephen J

    2016-07-01

    With hereditary colorectal cancer prevention studies it is difficult to demonstrate reduced mortality. Large populations are needed with well characterized genetics followed over a long period of time. Those studies do exist for standard white light colonoscopy surveillance in Lynch syndrome, but not for newer technologies including chromoscopy. For these newer technologies adenoma detection rate becomes the stand-in for mortality, and the assumption is made that surveillance efficacy impacts cancer occurrence. Though well-designed and important work exists in this area, the data do not support firm conclusions regarding the use of chromoscopy in Lynch syndrome. PMID:26892866

  20. Randomized phase II trial of sulindac, atorvastatin, and prebiotic dietary fiber for colorectal cancer chemoprevention.

    PubMed

    Limburg, Paul J; Mahoney, Michelle R; Ziegler, Katie L Allen; Sontag, Stephen J; Schoen, Robert E; Benya, Richard; Lawson, Michael J; Weinberg, David S; Stoffel, Elena; Chiorean, Michael; Heigh, Russell; Levine, Joel; Della'Zanna, Gary; Rodriguez, Luz; Richmond, Ellen; Gostout, Christopher; Mandrekar, Sumithra J; Smyrk, Thomas C

    2011-02-01

    Sulindac, atorvastatin, or prebiotic dietary fiber may reduce colorectal cancer (CRC) risk. However, clinical trial data are currently limited. We conducted a randomized, phase II chemoprevention trial involving subjects 40 years or older, with previously resected colon cancer or multiple/advanced colorectal adenomas. Magnification chromoendoscopy (MCE) was performed to identify and characterize rectal aberrant crypt foci (ACF); eligibility criteria required five or more rectal ACFs at baseline. Intervention assignments were as follows: (a) atorvastatin 20 mg qd; (b) sulindac 150 mg bid; (c) oligofructose-enriched inulin (as ORAFTI®Synergy1) 6 gm bid; or (d) control (maltodextrin) 6 gm bid, for 6 months. Percent change in rectal ACF number (%ΔACF) within arm was the primary endpoint. Secondary endpoints included changes in proliferation (Ki67) and apoptosis (caspase-3), as measured from normal mucosa biopsy samples. Among 85 eligible randomized subjects, 76 (86%) completed the trial per protocol. The median (range) of rectal ACF was 9 (5-34) and 8 (0-37) at baseline and postintervention, respectively. The median (SD) for %ΔACF was 5.6 (-69% to 143%), -18.6 (-83% to 160%), -3.6 (-88% to 83%), and -10.0 (-100% to 117%) in the atorvastatin, sulindac, ORAFTI®Synergy1 and control arms, respectively. Neither within-arm (P = 0.12-0.59) nor between-arm (P = 0.30-0.92) comparisons of %ΔACF were statistically significant. The active and control interventions also seemed to have similar effects on mucosal proliferation and apoptosis (P > 0.05 for each comparison). Data from this multicenter, phase II trial do not provide convincing evidence of CRC risk reduction from 6-month interventions with atorvastatin, sulindac, or ORAFTI®Synergy1, although statistical power was limited by the relatively small sample size. PMID:21209397

  1. Colorectal Chemoprevention with Calcium and Vitamin D | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    DESCRIPTION: In this application we propose to complete CA098286, a double-blind, randomized, controlled trial of supplementation with vitamin D and/or calcium for the prevention of colorectal adenomas. The study builds on extensive epidemiological and experimental data indicating that both vitamin D and calcium have anti-neoplastic effects in the large bowel and that these agents interact, each requiring the other for full effect. Despite the strong supporting |

  2. The Impact of Suboptimal Preparation on Adenoma Miss Rates and the Factors Associated with Early Repeat Colonoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Lebwohl, Benjamin; Kastrinos, Fay; Glick, Michael; Rosenbaum, Adam J.; Wang, Timothy; Neugut, Alfred I.

    2011-01-01

    Background There are no guidelines for the recommended interval to the next examination after colonoscopy with suboptimal bowel preparation. Aims To identify factors associated with early repeat colonoscopy after initial examinations with suboptimal preparations, and to measure adenoma miss rates in this context. Methods We analyzed all colonoscopies over 3 years at a single, hospital-based endoscopy unit. We defined early repeat colonoscopies after a suboptimal preparation as those occurring <3 years after the index examination. Adenoma miss rates were calculated by dividing the number of lesions found on the second colonoscopy by the total on both examinations. Results Of 12,787 colonoscopies, preparation quality was suboptimal (poor or fair) in 3,047 (24%) patients. Among these 3,047 patients, repeat examination was performed in <3 years in 505 (17%). Factors associated with early repeat included lack of cecal intubation (OR 3.62, 95%CI 2.50–5.24) and finding a polyp (OR 1.55, 95%CI 1.17–2.07). Among 216 repeat colonoscopies with an optimal preparation, 198 adenomas were identified, of which 83 were only seen on the second examination, an adenoma miss rate of 42% (95%CI 35–49). The advanced adenoma miss rate was 27% (95%CI 17–41). For colonoscopies repeated in <1 year, the adenoma and advanced adenoma miss rates were 35% and 36% respectively. Limitations Single-center, retrospective study. Conclusions While a minority of patients undergo early repeat examination after a suboptimally prepared colonoscopy, the miss rates for suboptimally prepared colonoscopies were high, suggesting that suboptimal bowel preparation substantially decreases colonoscopy effectiveness, and may mandate an early follow-up examination. PMID:21481857

  3. Implication of K-ras and p53 in colorectal cancer carcinogenesis in Tunisian population cohort.

    PubMed

    Ines, Chaar; Donia, Ounissi; Rahma, Boughriba; Ben Ammar, Azza; Sameh, Amara; Khalfallah, Taher; Abdelmajid, Ben Hmida; Sabeh, Mzabi; Saadia, Bouraoui

    2014-07-01

    According to the multistep route of genetic alterations in the colorectal adenoma-carcinoma sequence, the complex K-ras/p53 mutation is one of the first alterations to occur and represent an important genetic event in colorectal cancer (CRC). An evaluation of the mutation spectra in K-ras and p53 gene was effected in 167 Tunisian patients with sporadic CRC to determine whether our populations have similar pattern of genetic alteration as in Maghrebin's population. Mutation patterns of codon 12-13 of K-ras and exon 5-8 of p53 were analyzed by immunohistochemistry and PCR-SSCP and confirmed by sequencing. Mutations in the K-ras gene were detected in 31.13 % and affect the women more than the men (p = 0.008). Immunostaining showed that expression of p21 ras was correlated with the advanced age (p = 0.004), whereas loss of signal was associated with mucinous histotype (p = 0.003). Kaplan-Meier survival curve found that patients with the K-ras mutation had a shorter survival compared with patients without mutation (p = 0.005). Alteration in p53 was seen in 17.4 % of patients and affects three hot spot codons such as 175, 245, and 248. Overexpression of p53 was seen in 34.1 % and correlated with tumor node metastasis (TNM) advanced stage (p = 0.037) and mucinous histotype (p = 0.001). A high concordance between p53 expression and alteration (p<0.005) was shown. Concomitant mutations in K-ras and p53 gene were detected in only 4 % of tumors. K-ras and p53 undergo separate pathways in colorectal tumorogenesis. Interestingly, mutations in the K-ras gene might be considered a valuable prognostic factor correlated to poor outcome. p53 gene alterations were rather low in our set, and methylation pattern of p53 is required to elucidate the molecular basis of this protein in CRC. PMID:24763823

  4. Optical coherence tomography imaging of colonic crypts in a mouse model of colorectal cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welge, Weston A.; Barton, Jennifer K.

    2016-03-01

    Aberrant crypt foci (ACF) are abnormal epithelial lesions that precede development of colonic polyps. As the earliest morphological change in the development of colorectal cancer, ACF is a highly studied phenomenon. The most common method of imaging ACF is chromoendoscopy using methylene blue as a contrast agent. Narrow- band imaging is a contrast-agent-free modality for imaging the colonic crypts. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is an attractive alternative to chromoendoscopy and narrow-band imaging because it can resolve the crypt structure at sufficiently high sampling while simultaneously providing depth-resolved data. We imaged in vivo the distal 15 mm of colon in the azoxymethane (AOM) mouse model of colorectal cancer using a commercial swept-source OCT system and a miniature endoscope designed and built in-house. We present en face images of the colonic crypts and demonstrate that different patterns in healthy and adenoma tissue can be seen. These patterns correspond to those reported in the literature. We have previously demonstrated early detection of colon adenoma using OCT by detecting minute thickening of the mucosa. By combining mucosal thickness measurement with imaging of the crypt structure, OCT can be used to correlate ACF and adenoma development in space and time. These results suggest that OCT may be a superior imaging modality for studying the connection between ACF and colorectal cancer.

  5. The TNF family member APRIL promotes colorectal tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Lascano, V; Zabalegui, L F; Cameron, K; Guadagnoli, M; Jansen, M; Burggraaf, M; Versloot, M; Rodermond, H; van der Loos, C; Carvalho-Pinto, C E; Kalthoff, H; Medema, J P; Hahne, M

    2012-01-01

    The tumor necrosis factor (TNF) family member APRIL (A proliferation inducing ligand) is a disease promoter in B-cell malignancies. APRIL has also been associated with a wide range of solid malignancies, including colorectal cancer (CRC). As evidence for a supportive role of APRIL in solid tumor formation was still lacking, we studied the involvement of APRIL in CRC. We observed that ectopic APRIL expression exacerbates the number and size of adenomas in ApcMin mice and in a mouse model for colitis-associated colon carcinogenesis. Furthermore, knockdown of APRIL in primary spheroid cultures of colon cancer cells and both mouse and human CRC cell lines reduced tumor clonogenicity and in vivo outgrowth. Taken together, our data therefore indicate that both tumor-derived APRIL and APRIL produced by non-tumor cells is supportive in colorectal tumorigenesis. PMID:22705846

  6. Bilateral Adrenal Adenoma Presented As Multiple Metatarsal And Phalangeal Fractures

    PubMed Central

    LiYeung, L L; Lui, T H

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Symptomatic adrenal adenoma usually presents with systemic symptoms. Depending on the function of the adenoma, the patient can present with pheochromocytoma-like symptoms; primary hyperaldosteronism and Cushing syndrome (weight gain, weakness, depression, and bruising). Case report: A 41 year-old lady presented with multiple metatarsal and phalangeal fractures of the both feet without significant injury. DEXA scan showed evidence of osteoporosis. Investigations showed that the picture was compatible with adrenal Cushing syndrome. Computed tomogram showed bilateral adrenal adenoma. Adrenal cortex scintigraphy with NP-59 scan showed hyperfunctioning right adrenal adenoma. Laproscopic R adrenalectomy was performed and histological study confirmed adrenal cortical adenoma with adjacent cortical atrophy suggestive of a functioning adenoma. Post-operatively, she was put on hydrocortisone replacement and recovered well. Conclusion: Adrenal adenoma can present with insufficiency fractures of the feet. PMID:27299107

  7. Parathyroid adenoma upstaging the lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Okuyucu, Kursat; Kavakli, Kuthan; Ozaydın, Sukru; Karahatay, Serdar; Karatas, Okan; Doğan, Deniz

    2015-05-01

    Mediastinal staging of NSCLC with noninvasive methods such as PET/CT can be misleading when a mediastinal disease accompany. Histopathologic confirmation should be made before any treatment plan. Herein, we presented a case of parathyroid adenoma upstaging the lung cancer. PMID:25618011

  8. Thyroid Adenomas After Solid Cancer in Childhood

    SciTech Connect

    Haddy, Nadia; El-Fayech, Chiraz; Guibout, Catherine; Adjadj, Elisabeth; Thomas-Teinturier, Cecile; Oberlin, Odile; Veres, Cristina; Pacquement, Helene; Jackson, Angela; Munzer, Martine; N'Guyen, Tan Dat; Bondiau, Pierre-Yves; Berchery, Delphine; Laprie, Anne; Bridier, Andre; Lefkopoulos, Dimitri; Schlumberger, Martin; Rubino, Carole; Diallo, Ibrahima; Vathaire, Florent de

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: Very few childhood cancer survivor studies have been devoted to thyroid adenomas. We assessed the role of chemotherapy and the radiation dose to the thyroid in the risk of thyroid adenoma after childhood cancer. Methods and Materials: A cohort of 3254 2-year survivors of a solid childhood cancer treated in 5 French centers before 1986 was established. The dose received by the isthmus and the 2 lobes of the thyroid gland during each course of radiation therapy was estimated after reconstruction of the actual radiation therapy conditions in which each child was treated as well as the dose received at other anatomical sites of interest. Results: After a median follow-up of 25 years, 71 patients had developed a thyroid adenoma. The risk strongly increased with the radiation dose to the thyroid up to a few Gray, plateaued, and declined for high doses. Chemotherapy slightly increased the risk when administered alone but also lowered the slope of the dose-response curve for the radiation dose to the thyroid. Overall, for doses up to a few Gray, the excess relative risk of thyroid adenoma per Gray was 2.8 (90% CI: 1.2-6.9), but it was 5.5 (90% CI: 1.9-25.9) in patients who had not received chemotherapy or who had received only 1 drug, and 1.1 (90% CI: 0.4-3.4) in the children who had received more than 1 drug (P=.06, for the difference). The excess relative risk per Gray was also higher for younger children at the time of radiation therapy than for their older counterparts and was higher before attaining 40 years of age than subsequently. Conclusions: The overall pattern of thyroid adenoma after radiation therapy for a childhood cancer appears to be similar to that observed for thyroid carcinoma.

  9. Meat subtypes and their association with colorectal cancer: Systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Carr, Prudence R; Walter, Viola; Brenner, Hermann; Hoffmeister, Michael

    2016-01-15

    Associations between specific red meat subtypes and risk of colorectal cancer (CRC) have been investigated in a number of epidemiological studies. However, no publication to date has summarised the overall epidemiological evidence. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of prospective studies (cohort, nested case-control or case-cohort studies), which reported relative risk (RR) estimates and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for the association between intake of meat subtypes with colorectal, colon or rectal cancer or colorectal adenoma risk. PubMed and ISI Web of Science were searched up until August 1, 2014. Nineteen studies examined meat subtypes (5 beef, 5 pork, 2 lamb, 1 veal and 19 poultry) and associations with colorectal, colon or rectal cancer risk and 4 studies examined associations with adenoma risk (1 beef and 4 poultry). Comparing highest versus lowest intake, beef consumption was associated with an increased risk of CRC (RR = 1.11, 95% CI = 1.01 to 1.22) and colon cancer (RR = 1.24, 95% CI = 1.07 to 1.44), but no association was found with rectal cancer (RR = 0.95, 95% CI = 0.78 to 1.16). Higher consumption of lamb was also associated with increased risk of CRC (RR = 1.24, 95% CI = 1.08 to 1.44). No association was observed for pork (RR = 1.07, 95% CI = 0.90 to 1.27), but some between study heterogeneity was observed. No association was observed for poultry consumption and risk of colorectal adenomas or cancer. This meta-analysis suggests that red meat subtypes differ in their association with CRC and its sub sites. Further analysis of data from prospective cohort studies is warranted, especially regarding the role of pork. PMID:25583132

  10. The Role of Aspirin, Vitamin D, Exercise, Diet, Statins, and Metformin in the Prevention and Treatment of Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Sehdev, Amikar; O'Neil, Bert H

    2015-09-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a worldwide health problem leading to significant morbidity and mortality. Several strategies based on either lifestyle modifications or pharmacological interventions have been developed in an attempt to reduce the risk of CRC. In this review article, we discuss these interventions including aspirin (and other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs), vitamin D, exercise, diet, statins, and metformin. Depending upon the risk of developing CRC, the current evidence supports the beneficial role of aspirin, vitamin D, diet, and exercise especially in high-risk individuals (advanced adenoma or CRC). However, even with these established interventions, there are significant knowledge gaps such as doses of aspirin and 25-hydroxy vitamin D are not well established. Similarly, there is no convincing data from randomized controlled trials that a high fiber diet or a low animal fat diet reduces the risk of CRC. Some potential interventions, such as statins and metformin, do not have convincing data for clinical use even in high-risk individuals. However, these may have emerging roles in the prevention and treatment of CRC. Greater understanding of molecular mechanisms and the application of genomic tools to risk stratify an individual and tailor the interventions based on that individual's risk will help further advance the field. Some of this work is already underway and is a focus of this article. PMID:26187794

  11. Metastatic Colorectal Cancer: Lessons Learned, Future Possibilities.

    PubMed

    Venook, Alan P

    2016-05-01

    Survival of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer has dramatically improved over the past 20 years, primarily because physicians have become adept at using the many regimens approved for this patient population. Future advances may come from understanding molecular subtypes, finding and treating new actionable mutations, and harnessing the immune system. PMID:27226509

  12. Cost benefit of early diagnosis of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Bolin, T D

    1996-01-01

    In most Western countries, colorectal cancer is an important disease in terms of morbidity and mortality. As it has a premalignant asymptomatic stage in the form of benign adenomas that might be detected by screening, and as screening leads to detection of colorectal cancer at an earlier stage, there is potential for improved and better quality survival. Most cost-effective analyses rank the various screening strategies at less than an accepted benchmark value of approximately $40,000 per added year of life. Periodic colorectal screening is therefore a cost-effective intervention and the Office of Technology Assessment of the Congress of the United States has concluded that colorectal cancer screening in average-risk adults beginning at age 50 is a relatively good investment for society. Flexible sigmoidoscopy and double contrast barium enema are the most cost-effective strategies but they both require colonoscopy if a lesion is identified. Colonoscopy at 10-yearly intervals is of comparable cost to flexible sigmoidoscopy every 5 years and less costly than FSIG every 3 years. Combination strategies, using faecal occult blood testing with periodic flexible sigmoidoscopy or double contrast barium enema are as costly as colonoscopy. The choice of screening strategies needs to be tailored to the individual, and a process of community education is an essential prerequisite to the success of any programme. PMID:8898453

  13. Colorectal polyp incidence among polypropylene manufacturing workers.

    PubMed

    Lewis, R J; Lerman, S E; Schnatter, A R; Hughes, J I; Vernon, S W

    1994-02-01

    To follow up earlier findings of increased colorectal cancer and polyp risk among a group of Texas polypropylene manufacturing workers, a second company-sponsored colorectal cancer screening program was conducted. Ninety-four (64%) of the 147 male workers negative for polyps in the first screening were rescreened. Age- and examiner-adjusted incidence rate ratios (IRRs) were modestly elevated for polypropylene manufacturing workers compared with patients screened at the same clinic for total (IRR = 1.31; 90% confidence interval [CI] = 0.84 to 2.03) and adenomatous (IRR = 1.80; 90% CI = 0.68 to 4.78) polyps. However, risk of adenomas among the highest exposed group (early term process/mechanical workers: IRR = 1.77; 90% CI = 0.51 to 6.18) was similar to risk in the least-exposed group (engineer/chemist/administrative workers: IRR = 2.02; 90% CI = 0.56 to 7.31). The modest, nonsignificant excesses and the similarity in risk across job categories does not suggest an occupationally related risk, although small numbers and potential biases preclude making definitive conclusions. PMID:8176517

  14. Cell-surface markers for colon adenoma and adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Sewda, Kamini; Coppola, Domenico; Enkemann, Steven; Yue, Binglin; Kim, Jongphil; Lopez, Alexis S.; Wojtkowiak, Jonathan W.; Stark, Valerie E.; Morse, Brian; Shibata, David; Vignesh, Shivakumar; Morse, David L.

    2016-01-01

    Early detection of colorectal cancer (CRC) is crucial for effective treatment. Among CRC screening techniques, optical colonoscopy is widely considered the gold standard. However, it is a costly and invasive procedure with a low rate of compliance. Our long-term goal is to develop molecular imaging agents for the non-invasive detection of CRC by molecular imaging-based colonoscopy using CT, MRI or fluorescence. To achieve this, cell surface targets must be identified and validated. Here, we report the discovery of cell-surface markers that distinguish CRC from surrounding tissues that could be used as molecular imaging targets. Profiling of mRNA expression microarray data from patient tissues including adenoma, adenocarcinoma, and normal gastrointestinal tissues was used to identify potential CRC specific cell-surface markers. Of the identified markers, six were selected for further validation (CLDN1, GPR56, GRM8, LY6G6D/F, SLCO1B3 and TLR4). Protein expression was confirmed by immunohistochemistry of patient tissues. Except for SLCO1B3, diffuse and low expression was observed for each marker in normal colon tissues. The three markers with the greatest protein overexpression were CLDN1, LY6G6D/F and TLR4, where at least one of these markers was overexpressed in 97% of the CRC samples. GPR56, LY6G6D/F and SLCO1B3 protein expression was significantly correlated with the proximal tumor location and with expression of mismatch repair genes. Marker expression was further validated in CRC cell lines. Hence, three cell-surface markers were discovered that distinguish CRC from surrounding normal tissues. These markers can be used to develop imaging or therapeutic agents targeted to the luminal surface of CRC. PMID:26894861

  15. Notch1 counteracts WNT/β-catenin signaling through chromatin modification in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyun-A; Koo, Bon-Kyoung; Cho, Ji-Hoon; Kim, Yoon-Young; Seong, Jinwoo; Chang, Hee Jin; Oh, Young Min; Stange, Daniel E.; Park, Jae-Gahb; Hwang, Daehee; Kong, Young-Yun

    2012-01-01

    Crosstalk between the Notch and wingless-type MMTV integration site (WNT) signaling pathways has been investigated for many developmental processes. However, this negative correlation between Notch and WNT/β-catenin signaling activity has been studied primarily in normal developmental and physiological processes in which negative feedback loops for both signaling pathways are intact. We found that Notch1 signaling retained the capability of suppressing the expression of WNT target genes in colorectal cancers even when β-catenin destruction by the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) complex was disabled. Activation of Notch1 converted high-grade adenoma into low-grade adenoma in an Apcmin mouse colon cancer model and suppressed the expression of WNT target genes in human colorectal cancer cells through epigenetic modification recruiting histone methyltransferase SET domain bifurcated 1 (SETDB1). Extensive microarray analysis of human colorectal cancers also showed a negative correlation between the Notch1 target gene, Notch-regulated ankyrin repeat protein 1 (NRARP), and WNT target genes. Notch is known to be a strong promoter of tumor initiation, but here we uncovered an unexpected suppressive role of Notch1 on WNT/β-catenin target genes involved in colorectal cancer. PMID:22863622

  16. Microbiota organization is a distinct feature of proximal colorectal cancers.

    PubMed

    Dejea, Christine M; Wick, Elizabeth C; Hechenbleikner, Elizabeth M; White, James R; Mark Welch, Jessica L; Rossetti, Blair J; Peterson, Scott N; Snesrud, Erik C; Borisy, Gary G; Lazarev, Mark; Stein, Ellen; Vadivelu, Jamuna; Roslani, April C; Malik, Ausuma A; Wanyiri, Jane W; Goh, Khean L; Thevambiga, Iyadorai; Fu, Kai; Wan, Fengyi; Llosa, Nicolas; Housseau, Franck; Romans, Katharine; Wu, XinQun; McAllister, Florencia M; Wu, Shaoguang; Vogelstein, Bert; Kinzler, Kenneth W; Pardoll, Drew M; Sears, Cynthia L

    2014-12-23

    Environmental factors clearly affect colorectal cancer (CRC) incidence, but the mechanisms through which these factors function are unknown. One prime candidate is an altered colonic microbiota. Here we show that the mucosal microbiota organization is a critical factor associated with a subset of CRC. We identified invasive polymicrobial bacterial biofilms (bacterial aggregates), structures previously associated with nonmalignant intestinal pathology, nearly universally (89%) on right-sided tumors (13 of 15 CRCs, 4 of 4 adenomas) but on only 12% of left-sided tumors (2 of 15 CRCs, 0 of 2 adenomas). Surprisingly, patients with biofilm-positive tumors, whether cancers or adenomas, all had biofilms on their tumor-free mucosa far distant from their tumors. Bacterial biofilms were associated with diminished colonic epithelial cell E-cadherin and enhanced epithelial cell IL-6 and Stat3 activation, as well as increased crypt epithelial cell proliferation in normal colon mucosa. High-throughput sequencing revealed no consistent bacterial genus associated with tumors, regardless of biofilm status. However, principal coordinates analysis revealed that biofilm communities on paired normal mucosa, distant from the tumor itself, cluster with tumor microbiomes as opposed to biofilm-negative normal mucosa bacterial communities also from the tumor host. Colon mucosal biofilm detection may predict increased risk for development of sporadic CRC. PMID:25489084

  17. Myxoid adrenal adenoma with focal pseudoglandular pattern.

    PubMed

    De Padua, Michelle; Rajagopal, V

    2008-05-01

    Adrenal cortical tumors with myxoid change are rare tumors. To our knowledge, only 22 cases have been described so far in literature, which include 13 carcinomas and 9 adenomas. A pseudoglandular pattern has been described in 9 of these tumors. We report a case of a myxoid adenoma of the left adrenal gland in a 67-year-old woman, with a focal pseudoglandular pattern involving about 20% of the studied tumor. Rest of the tumor was composed of anastomosing cords of tumor cells. Abundant myxoid stroma was present, which stained positively with alcian blue and was weakly focally positive with periodic acid Schiff. Immunophenotype was consistent with an adrenal tumor, i.e., positive for vimentin, inhibin, and melan A. Cytokeratin AE1/AE3 and chromogranin were negative. MIB-1 index was < 0.1%. PMID:18579979

  18. Giant pleomorphic adenoma of the parotid gland.

    PubMed

    Takahama, Ademar; da Cruz Perez, Danyel Elias; Magrin, José; de Almeida, Oslei Paes; Kowalski, Luiz Paulo

    2008-01-01

    Pleomorphic adenoma is the most common type of all benign and malignant salivary gland tumors, involving more frequently the parotid gland. It is a benign tumor with a slow and continuous growth that without treatment can reach an enormous size. We present a case of a giant pleomorphic adenoma in a 78-year-old man with a history of more than 30 years of a growing lesion in the parotid gland. Clinical examination revealed a giant mass on the right side of the face, however without any sign of facial nerve damage. The tumor was completely resected by total parotidectomy and preservation of the facial nerve. Macroscopically, the tumor measured 28 cm and weighed 4.0 Kg. On the histological examination there was a predominance of epithelial and myoepithelial cells in a hyaline and myxoid stroma. It was not found any area of malignant transformation. In the post-operatory the aesthetic and functional results were excellent. PMID:18167483

  19. [One case of laryngeal pleomorphic adenoma].

    PubMed

    An, Huiqin; Bu, Guiqing; Guo, Mingli

    2013-05-01

    A male patient, 55 years old, suffered from intermittent sound,voice depression and shortness of breath for one year,and from dysphagia for 3-4 months. Through fiber laryngoscopy,we could see tumor in the left posterior aryepiglottic fold. The tumor's surface was smooth. A portion of the tumor protruded to the laryngeal cavity and the aryepiglottic fold external,it also covered most of the glottis. Bilateral vocal cord were smooth and had good mobility. Throat CT demonstrated an irregular soft tissue mass on the left side of the aryepiglottic fold in supraglottic area with obscure normal boundary from adjacent structure. The left side of pyriform sinus became shallow without obvious bone destruction. The pathological report showed pleomorphic adenoma. The diagnosis was laryngeal pleomorphic adenoma. PMID:23898619

  20. Bronchial pleomorphic adenoma coexisting with lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Goto, Taichiro; Maeshima, Arafumi; Akanabe, Kumi; Hamaguchi, Reo; Wakaki, Misa; Oyamada, Yoshitaka; Kato, Ryoichi

    2011-01-01

    Pleomorphic adenoma usually occurs in the salivary glands but rarely in the trachea or bronchi. A 71-year-old man had abnormal shadows on a chest X-ray. Chest CT revealed one tumor in the right basal segment of the lung and another, in the left main bronchus. Bronchoscopic biopsy of the right tumor revealed well-differentiated squamous cell carcinoma. Right lower lobectomy and lymph node dissection were performed (pT2N0M0, stage IB). At the orifice of the left main bronchus, bronchoscopy identified a polypoid lesion nearly obstructing the airway. The lesion was resected with hot snare ablation. The histological examination revealed a mixture of epithelial and myxoid mesenchymal elements, characterized by ductal structures, squamous metaplasia, and cartilage tissue. The diagnosis was bronchial pleomorphic adenoma coexisting with squamous cell carcinoma of the lung. PMID:21597416

  1. [Clinicopathological characteristics of colorectal carcinoma in the elderly].

    PubMed

    Tao, Kaixiong; Gao, Jinbo; Wang, Guobin

    2016-05-01

    Elderly patients with colorectal cancer have different clincopathological characteristics from younger patients. Colorectal cancers tend to localize in the proximal colon, from cecum to the splenic flexure in the elderly patients. Changes in the stools, rectal bleeding or black stool, abdominal pain, fatigue, weight loss and anemia are the common symptoms. Analysis showed that age is one of independent risk factors for lower completion rates of colonoscopy. Therefore, the choice of diagnosis methods in elderly patients should be careful. Achieving a clear diagnosis and avoiding complications should be considered at the same time. Most colorectal cancers in elderly are highly and moderately differentiated adenocarcinomas and locally advanced, and have less lymphatic and blood metastasis. The proportion of poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma increases with the increase of age, which should be concerned. Multiple colorectal cancers and colorectal cancer with extra-colorectal malignancy are not rare in the elderly patients. The common extra-colorectal tumors consist of gastric cancer, lung cancer, biliary carcinoma, pancreas cancer and malignancy from blood system. Molecular events, such as mutations of KARS, BRAF, TP53 and deficiency of DNA mismatch repair, are more frequent in elderly colorectal cancer patients. Many factors have impact on treatment decision in elderly patients with colorectal cancer, including age, comorbidities, physiological functions of organs and willingness of patients and their relatives. Although surgery is still the main treatment, the proportion of radical surgery is lower and emergency surgery is higher as compared to younger patients. With the development of minimally invasive surgical techniques and advances in anesthesia and perioperative management, laparoscopic surgery has become widespread in elderly patients with colorectal cancer. In addition, more attention should be paid to adjuvant therapy. Comprehensive individualized

  2. Genetic characterization of large parathyroid adenomas

    PubMed Central

    Sulaiman, Luqman; Nilsson, Inga-Lena; Juhlin, C Christofer; Haglund, Felix; Höög, Anders; Larsson, Catharina; Hashemi, Jamileh

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we genetically characterized parathyroid adenomas with large glandular weights, for which independent observations suggest pronounced clinical manifestations. Large parathyroid adenomas (LPTAs) were defined as the 5% largest sporadic parathyroid adenomas identified among the 590 cases operated in our institution during 2005–2009. The LPTA group showed a higher relative number of male cases and significantly higher levels of total plasma and ionized serum calcium (P<0.001). Further analysis of 21 LPTAs revealed low MIB1 proliferation index (0.1–1.5%), MEN1 mutations in five cases, and one HRPT2 (CDC73) mutation. Total or partial loss of parafibromin expression was observed in ten tumors, two of which also showed loss of APC expression. Using array CGH, we demonstrated recurrent copy number alterations most frequently involving loss in 1p (29%), gain in 5 (38%), and loss in 11q (33%). Totally, 21 minimal overlapping regions were defined for losses in 1p, 7q, 9p, 11, and 15q and gains in 3q, 5, 7p, 8p, 16q, 17p, and 19q. In addition, 12 tumors showed gross alterations of entire or almost entire chromosomes most frequently gain of 5 and loss of chromosome 11. While gain of 5 was the most frequent alteration observed in LPTAs, it was only detected in a small proportion (4/58 cases, 7%) of parathyroid adenomas. A significant positive correlation was observed between parathyroid hormone level and total copy number gain (r=0.48, P=0.031). These results support that LPTAs represent a group of patients with pronounced parathyroid hyperfunction and associated with specific genomic features. PMID:22454399

  3. Treatment of peritoneal metastases from colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    März, Loreen; Piso, Pompiliu

    2015-01-01

    Peritoneal seedings of a colorectal tumor represent the second most frequent site of metastasis (after the liver). In the era of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)-only chemotherapy, the prognosis was poor for colorectal cancer with peritoneal metastases. Within the last few years, new chemotherapeutic and targeted agents have improved the prognosis; however, the response to these treatments seems to be lower than that for liver metastases. The combination of cytoreductive surgery and hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy have further improved both disease-free survival and overall survival. Keeping this in mind, every patient presenting with peritoneal metastases from colorectal cancer should be evaluated and receive adequate treatment, if possible in the above-mentioned combination. This paper reviews recent advancements in the therapy of peritoneal carcinomatosis. PMID:26424828

  4. Tissue Specific Promoters in Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rama, A. R.; Aguilera, A.; Melguizo, C.; Caba, O.; Prados, J.

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal carcinoma is the third most prevalent cancer in the world. In the most advanced stages, the use of chemotherapy induces a poor response and is usually accompanied by other tissue damage. Significant progress based on suicide gene therapy has demonstrated that it may potentiate the classical cytotoxic effects in colorectal cancer. The inconvenience still rests with the targeting and the specificity efficiency. The main target of gene therapy is to achieve an effective vehicle to hand over therapeutic genes safely into specific cells. One possibility is the use of tumor-specific promoters overexpressed in cancers. They could induce a specific expression of therapeutic genes in a given tumor, increasing their localized activity. Several promoters have been assayed into direct suicide genes to cancer cells. This review discusses the current status of specific tumor-promoters and their great potential in colorectal carcinoma treatment. PMID:26648599

  5. Mini-invasive surgery for colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Wei-Gen; Zhou, Zhi-Xiang

    2014-01-01

    Laparoscopic techniques have been extensively used for the surgical management of colorectal cancer during the last two decades. Accumulating data have demonstrated that laparoscopic colectomy is associated with better short-term outcomes and equivalent oncologic outcomes when compared with open surgery. However, some controversies regarding the oncologic quality of mini-invasive surgery for rectal cancer exist. Meanwhile, some progresses in colorectal surgery, such as robotic technology, single-incision laparoscopic surgery, natural orifice specimen extraction, and natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery, have been made in recent years. In this article, we review the published data and mainly focus on the current status and latest advances of mini-invasive surgery for colorectal cancer. PMID:24589210

  6. Laparoscopic ampullectomy for an ampullarian adenoma.

    PubMed

    Borie, Frédéric; Zarzavadjian Le Bian, Alban

    2013-11-01

    Lesions involving the ampulla of Vater are rare entities (0.1-0.2 %) with high malignant potential (90 %) [1]. As a treatment, the surgical procedure known as duodenopancreatectomy was the main option, whatever the tumor's stage or nature. Yet with improvements of endoscopic diagnostic and therapeutic techniques, management of these lesions has been modified, enabling endoscopic removal of adenoma and adenocarcinoma-in situ. Thus, when endoscopic treatment is not possible, surgical ampullectomy is still an alternative option to duodenopancreatectomy [1, 2]. The continuous improvements in surgical techniques and instruments now allow the safe realization of laparoscopic ampullectomy, despite the few cases described in the literature [3, 4]. Here we present a surgical technique in a 52-year-old patient with an ampulloma. The ampulloma was discovered during a gastroscopy for abdominal pain. The endoscopic ultrasound with biopsy revealed a 15-mm adenoma with moderate-grade dysplasia. The thoracoabdominal CT scan was normal. The procedure was performed as shown. The tumor histology showed a R0 resection (5-mm surgical margin) of an adenoma with focal high-grade dysplasia. At 3-year follow-up, outcomes were unremarkable, without any complications. PMID:23836126

  7. Reoperation for parathyroid adenoma: A contemporary experience

    PubMed Central

    Powell, Anathea C.; Alexander, H. Richard; Chang, Richard; Marx, Stephen J.; Skarulis, Monica; Pingpank, James F.; Bartlett, David L.; Hughes, Marybeth; Weinstein, Lee S.; Simonds, William F.; Collins, Michael F.; Shawker, Thomas; Chen, Clara C.; Reynolds, James; Cochran, Craig; Steinberg, Seth M.; Libutti, Steven K.

    2012-01-01

    Background We reviewed reoperations for persistent or recurrent sporadic parathyroid adenoma to evaluate and compare our current results and outcomes to our previous experience. Methods From 1996 to 2008, 237 patients with persistent or recurrent hyperparathyroidism after failed operation underwent reoperation. Patients were re-explored with the assistance of non-invasive and sometimes invasive imaging. Results A missed adenoma was suspected pre-operatively in 163 patients. Reoperation resulted in long-term resolution of hypercalcemia in 92%. Adenomas were in entopic locations in 32%; the most frequent ectopic location was the thymus (20%). Sestamibi scanning and ultrasonography were the most successful non-invasive imaging studies (96% positive predictive value (PPV) and 84% PPV respectively). Forty-four percent of patients had a reoperation based solely on non-invasive imaging. Of the invasive procedures performed, arteriography resulted in the best localization (92% PPV). Permanent recurrent laryngeal nerve injury occurred in 1.8%. Conclusion Compared to our prior experience (1982–1995), outcomes remained similar (92% resolution of hypercalcemia and 1.8% recurrent nerve injury currently versus 96% and 1.3% previously). Fewer patients received invasive studies for pre-operative localization (56% vs 73%, respectively). The decreased use of invasive imaging is due to technical improvements and greater confidence in the combination of ultrasonography and sestamibi scanning. PMID:19958942

  8. Gallium-68 PSMA uptake in adrenal adenoma.

    PubMed

    Law, W Phillip; Fiumara, Frank; Fong, William; Miles, Kenneth A

    2016-08-01

    Gallium-68 (Ga-68) labelled prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) imaging by positron emission tomography (PET) has emerged as a promising tool for staging of prostate cancer and restaging of disease in recurrence or biochemical failure after definitive treatment of prostate cancer. Ga-68 PSMA PET produces high target-to-background images of prostate cancer and its metastases which are reflective of the significant overexpression of PSMA in these cells and greatly facilitates tumour detection. However, relatively little is known about the PSMA expression of benign neoplasms and non-prostate epithelial malignancies. This is a case report of PSMA uptake in an adrenal adenoma incidentally discovered on PET performed for restaging of biochemically suspected prostate cancer recurrence. With the increasing use of PSMA PET in the management of prostate cancer - and the not infrequent occurrence of adrenal adenomas - the appearance of low- to moderate-grade PSMA uptake in adrenal adenomas should be one with which reporting clinicians are familiar. PMID:26394552

  9. Giant mediastinal parathyroid adenoma: a case report.

    PubMed

    Costanzo, Mario; Terminella, Alberto; Marziani, Alessia; Chisari, Antonio; Missiato, Alfredo; Cannizzaro, Matteo Angelo

    2009-01-01

    A 65 year old female patient suffering from multinodular goitre and from hypercalcaemic syndrome which had been and was being treated with drugs for a number of years. The patient undergoes total thyroidectomy. Surgical neck and anterior mediastinum exploration was negative for sick parathyroids. Neck and chest TC and 'TC sestamibi scintigraphy showed the presence of a 7 cm hyperfunctional ectopic parathyroid tissue in the postero-superior mediastinum infiltrating oesophagus. Video bronchoscopy revealed an extrinsic compression of the trachea. The patient underwent surgery. Through right postero-lateral thoracotomy and mediastinal pleura incision, the adenoma excision was carried out. The histological examination revealed a potentially malignant parathyroid adenoma with infiltration, without over-reaching the capsule. The surgical treatment resulted in an immediate resolution of the clinical symptomatology. One year later, the follow up was shown no observable relapse with normal calcium and PTH values. Today, the tendency to minimally invasive surgery, an accurate preoperative localization of the adenoma and the use of techniques such as intra-surgical nuclear mapping through manual gamma probes, selective angiography, venous intraoperative dosage of PTH and intra-surgical ultrasound scan. PMID:19537125

  10. Pituitary Adenoma Volumetry with 3D Slicer

    PubMed Central

    Nimsky, Christopher; Kikinis, Ron

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we present pituitary adenoma volumetry using the free and open source medical image computing platform for biomedical research: (3D) Slicer. Volumetric changes in cerebral pathologies like pituitary adenomas are a critical factor in treatment decisions by physicians and in general the volume is acquired manually. Therefore, manual slice-by-slice segmentations in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data, which have been obtained at regular intervals, are performed. In contrast to this manual time consuming slice-by-slice segmentation process Slicer is an alternative which can be significantly faster and less user intensive. In this contribution, we compare pure manual segmentations of ten pituitary adenomas with semi-automatic segmentations under Slicer. Thus, physicians drew the boundaries completely manually on a slice-by-slice basis and performed a Slicer-enhanced segmentation using the competitive region-growing based module of Slicer named GrowCut. Results showed that the time and user effort required for GrowCut-based segmentations were on average about thirty percent less than the pure manual segmentations. Furthermore, we calculated the Dice Similarity Coefficient (DSC) between the manual and the Slicer-based segmentations to proof that the two are comparable yielding an average DSC of 81.97±3.39%. PMID:23240062

  11. [Colorectal cancer screening programs in the population at average risk in the European Union and Spain].

    PubMed

    Grau, Jaume; Serradesanferm, Anna; Polbach, Sandra; García-Basteiro, Alberto L; Trilla, Antoni; Castells, Antoni

    2010-02-01

    There is broad international consensus on the need for colorectal cancer screening in men and women aged 50 years old or older with no personal or familial history of adenoma or colorectal cancer. The main problem is the disagreement among the various screening guidelines on the best screening method. The European Union (2003) extended the recommendation of implanting colorectal cancer screening using the fecal occult blood test (FOBT) in the population aged between 50 and 74 years. Seventy percent of the member states are introducing a program but there is wide heterogeneity. In Spain, 2-yearly FOBT is recommended in the target population aged 50 to 69 years. Currently, three autonomous communities have developed pilot programs and are extending the program to the entire population. Many other communities have announced they will commence programs shortly. PMID:19523716

  12. The association of Streptococcus bovis/gallolyticus with colorectal tumors: The nature and the underlying mechanisms of its etiological role

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Streptococcus bovis (S. bovis) bacteria are associated with colorectal cancer and adenoma. S. bovis is currently named S. gallolyticus. 25 to 80% of patients with S. bovis/gallolyticus bacteremia have concomitant colorectal tumors. Colonic neoplasia may arise years after the presentation of bacteremia or infectious endocarditis of S. bovis/gallolyticus. The presence of S. bovis/gallolyticus bacteremia and/or endocarditis is also related to the presence of villous or tubular-villous adenomas in the large intestine. In addition, serological relationship of S. gallolyticus with colorectal tumors and direct colonization of S. gallolyticus in tissues of colorectal tumors were found. However, this association is still under controversy and has long been underestimated. Moreover, the etiological versus non-etiological nature of this associationis not settled yet. Therefore, by covering the most of up to date studies, this review attempts to clarify the nature and the core of S. bovis/gallolyicus association with colorectal tumors and analyze the possible underlying mechanisms. PMID:21247505

  13. Oncocytic changes in pleomorphic adenoma: Report of a rare case

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Milanjeet; Bhogal, Jasmine

    2015-01-01

    Pleomorphic adenoma is the most common benign salivary gland tumor, accounting for almost three-fourths of all such tumors. Cells with oncocytic change are a common finding in salivary glands and in salivary gland tumors. When found within pleomorphic adenomas, cells with oncocytic changes may be perceived as evidence of malignancy, and lead to a misdiagnosis of carcinoma ex-pleomorphic adenoma. A case of pleomorphic adenoma arising de novo in the minor salivary glands with oncocytic changes is discussed here. PMID:26392734

  14. Missense Polymorphisms in the Adenomatous Polyposis Coli Gene and Colorectal Cancer Risk

    PubMed Central

    Cleary, Sean P.; Kim, Hyeja; Croitoru, Marina E.; Redston, Mark; Knight, Julia A.; Gallinger, Steven; Gryfe, Robert

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE Whereas truncating germline mutations of the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene give rise to familial adenomatous polyposis, missense polymorphisms of APC may confer a weaker risk for colorectal cancer. METHODS We sequenced the entire open reading frame of the APC gene and tested for two common MYH mutations in a population-based series of patients with colorectal cancer and 5 to 99 adenomas. Missense adenomatous polyposis coli alterations identified in this colorectal cancer multiple-polyp population were analyzed in a population-based series of patients with colorectal cancer and healthy control subjects. RESULTS Germline APC or mutY human homologue (MYH) alterations were identified in 16 of 39 colorectal cancer-multiple polyp patients. Four missense APC gene alterations (S130G, E1317Q, Dl822V, G2502S) were observed in 13 individuals and 3 additional patients carried presumed pathogenic (APC Y94X, biallelic MYH Y165C and heterozygous MYH G382D) mutations. When independently assessed in 971 patients with colorectal cancer and 954 healthy control subjects, none of the identified missense APC alterations conferred a significantly increased risk for colorectal cancer, odds ratio (95 percent confidence intervals): S130G=3.1 (0.29–32.25), E1317Q= 1.08 (0.59–2.74), G2502S= 1 (0.65–1.63), D1822V (heterozygous)=0.79 (0.64–0.98), D1822V (homozygous) =0.82 (0.63–1.27). CONCLUSIONS Germline missense APC alterations observed in 33 percent of patients with multiple colorectal neoplasms seemed to play a limited role in colorectal cancer risk when independently assessed by a population-based, case-control analysis. PMID:18612690

  15. Colorectal cancer risk variants on 11q23 and 15q13 are associated with unexplained adenomatous polyposis

    PubMed Central

    Hes, Frederik J; Ruano, Dina; Nieuwenhuis, Marry; Tops, Carli M; Schrumpf, Melanie; Nielsen, Maartje; Huijts, Petra E A; Wijnen, Juul T; Wagner, Anja; Gómez García, Encarna B; Sijmons, Rolf H; Menko, Fred H; Letteboer, Tom G W; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Harryvan, Jan; Kampman, Ellen; Morreau, Hans; Vasen, Hans F A; van Wezel, Tom

    2013-01-01

    Background Colorectal adenomatous polyposis is associated with a high risk of colorectal cancer (CRC) and is frequently caused by germline mutations in APC or MUTYH. However, in about 20–30% of patients no underlying gene defect can be identified. In this study, we tested if recently identified CRC risk variants play a role in patients with >10 adenomas. Methods We analysed a total of 16 SNPs with a reported association with CRC in a cohort of 252 genetically unexplained index patients with >10 colorectal adenomas and 745 controls. In addition, we collected detailed clinical information from index patients and their first-degree relatives (FDRs). Results We found a statistically significant association with two of the variants tested: rs3802842 (at chromosome 11q23, OR=1.60, 95% CI 1.3 to 2.0) and rs4779584 (at chromosome 15q13, OR=1.50, 95% CI 1.2 to 1.9). The majority of index patients (84%) had between 10 and 100 adenomas and 15% had >100 adenomas. Only two index patients (1%), both with >100 adenomas, had FDRs with polyposis. Forty-one per cent of the index patients had one or more FDRs with CRC. Conclusions These SNPs are the first common, low-penetrant variants reported to be associated with adenomatous polyposis not caused by a defect in the APC, MUTYH, POLD1 and POLE genes. Even though familial occurrence of polyposis was very rare, CRC was over-represented in FDRs of polyposis patients and, if confirmed, these relatives will therefore benefit from surveillance. PMID:24253443

  16. Colorectal clinical trials: what is on the horizon?

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Daniel H; Goldberg, Richard M

    2016-01-01

    Substantial progress has been made in the treatment of colorectal cancer, where more effective therapies have led to improved outcomes in patients with advanced disease. However, the 5-year overall survival rate remains poor. Genomic sequencing has allowed us to understand that colorectal cancer is a heterogeneous disease, where tumor-specific variants affect the prognosis and outcomes in patients. This has shaped the future directions of treatment and the development of clinical trials, including the incorporation of novel targeted therapies and investigations into the role of immunotherapy in colorectal cancer. PMID:26777152

  17. TP53 mutation at early stage of colorectal cancer progression from two types of laterally spreading tumors.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Eiji; Fukuyo, Masaki; Matsusaka, Keisuke; Ohata, Ken; Doi, Noriteru; Takane, Kiyoko; Matsuhashi, Nobuyuki; Fukushima, Junichi; Nakajima, Atsushi; Kaneda, Atsushi

    2016-06-01

    Although most sporadic colorectal cancers (CRC) are thought to develop from protruded adenomas through the adenoma-carcinoma sequence, some CRC develop through flat lesions, so-called laterally spreading tumors (LST). We previously analyzed epigenetic aberrations in LST and found that LST are clearly classified into two molecular subtypes: intermediate-methylation with KRAS mutation and low-methylation with absence of oncogene mutation. Intermediate-methylation LST were mostly granular type LST (LST-G) and low-methylation LST were mostly non-granular LST (LST-NG). In the present study, we conducted a targeted exon sequencing study including 38 candidate CRC driver genes to gain insight into how these genes modulate the development of LST. We identified a mean of 11.5 suspected nonpolymorphic variants per sample, including indels and non-synonymous mutations, although there was no significant difference in the frequency of total mutations between LST-G and LST-NG. Genes associated with RTK/RAS signaling pathway were mutated more frequently in LST-G than LST-NG (P = 0.004), especially KRAS mutation occurring at 70% (30/43) of LST-G but 26% (13/50) of LST-NG (P < 0.0001). Both LST showed high frequency of APC mutation, even at adenoma stage, suggesting its involvement in the initiation stage of LST, as it is involved at early stage of colorectal carcinogenesis via adenoma-carcinoma sequence. TP53 mutation was never observed in adenomas, but was specifically detected in cancer samples. TP53 mutation occurred during development of intramucosal cancer in LST-NG, but during development of cancer with submucosal invasion in LST-G. It is suggested that TP53 mutation occurs in the early stages of cancer development from adenoma in both LST-G and LST-NG, but is involved at an earlier stage in LST-NG. PMID:26991699

  18. Exome sequencing identifies potential novel candidate genes in patients with unexplained colorectal adenomatous polyposis.

    PubMed

    Spier, Isabel; Kerick, Martin; Drichel, Dmitriy; Horpaopan, Sukanya; Altmüller, Janine; Laner, Andreas; Holzapfel, Stefanie; Peters, Sophia; Adam, Ronja; Zhao, Bixiao; Becker, Tim; Lifton, Richard P; Holinski-Feder, Elke; Perner, Sven; Thiele, Holger; Nöthen, Markus M; Hoffmann, Per; Timmermann, Bernd; Schweiger, Michal R; Aretz, Stefan

    2016-04-01

    In up to 30% of patients with colorectal adenomatous polyposis, no germline mutation in the known genes APC, causing familial adenomatous polyposis, MUTYH, causing MUTYH-associated polyposis, and POLE or POLD1, causing Polymerase-Proofreading-associated polyposis can be identified, although a hereditary etiology is likely. To uncover new causative genes, exome sequencing was performed using DNA from leukocytes and a total of 12 colorectal adenomas from seven unrelated patients with unexplained sporadic adenomatous polyposis. For data analysis and variant filtering, an established bioinformatics pipeline including in-house tools was applied. Variants were filtered for rare truncating point mutations and copy-number variants assuming a dominant, recessive, or tumor suppressor model of inheritance. Subsequently, targeted sequence analysis of the most promising candidate genes was performed in a validation cohort of 191 unrelated patients. All relevant variants were validated by Sanger sequencing. The analysis of exome sequencing data resulted in the identification of rare loss-of-function germline mutations in three promising candidate genes (DSC2, PIEZO1, ZSWIM7). In the validation cohort, further variants predicted to be pathogenic were identified in DSC2 and PIEZO1. According to the somatic mutation spectra, the adenomas in this patient cohort follow the classical pathways of colorectal tumorigenesis. The present study identified three candidate genes which might represent rare causes for a predisposition to colorectal adenoma formation. Especially PIEZO1 (FAM38A) and ZSWIM7 (SWS1